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Sample records for brookhaven high flux beam reactor

  1. Job and Task Analysis project at Brookhaven National Laboratory's high flux beam reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presenter discussed the Job and Task Analysis (JTA) project conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory's High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). The project's goal was to provide JTA guidelines for use by DOE contractors, then, using the guidelines conduct a JTA for the reactor operator and supervisor positions at the HFBR. Details of the job analysis and job description preparation as well as details of the task selection and task analysis were given. Post JTA improvements to the HFBR training programs were covered. The presentation concluded with a listing of the costs and impacts of the project

  2. Structural biology facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s high flux beam reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korszun, Z.R.; Saxena, A.M.; Schneider, D.K. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The techniques for determining the structure of biological molecules and larger biological assemblies depend on the extent of order in the particular system. At the High Flux Beam Reactor at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Biology Department operates three beam lines dedicated to biological structure studies. These beam lines span the resolution range from approximately 700{Angstrom} to approximately 1.5{Angstrom} and are designed to perform structural studies on a wide range of biological systems. Beam line H3A is dedicated to single crystal diffraction studies of macromolecules, while beam line H3B is designed to study diffraction from partially ordered systems such as biological membranes. Beam line H9B is located on the cold source and is designed for small angle scattering experiments on oligomeric biological systems.

  3. Design of a high-flux epithermal neutron beam using 235U fission plates at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, H B; Brugger, R M; Rorer, D C; Tichler, P R; Hu, J P

    1994-10-01

    Beams of epithermal neutrons are being used in the development of boron neutron capture therapy for cancer. This report describes a design study in which 235U fission plates and moderators are used to produce an epithermal neutron beam with higher intensity and better quality than the beam currently in use at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). Monte Carlo calculations are used to predict the neutron and gamma fluxes and absorbed doses produced by the proposed design. Neutron flux measurements at the present epithermal treatment facility (ETF) were made to verify and compare with the computed results where feasible. The calculations indicate that an epithermal neutron beam produced by a fission-plate converter could have an epithermal neutron intensity of 1.2 x 10(10) n/cm2.s and a fast neutron dose per epithermal neutron of 2.8 x 10(-11) cGy.cm2/nepi plus being forward directed. This beam would be built into the beam shutter of the ETF at the BMRR. The feasibility of remodeling the facility is discussed. PMID:7869995

  4. HFBR handbook, 1992: High flux beam reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welcome to the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), one of the world premier neutron research facilities. This manual is intended primarily to acquaint outside users (and new Brookhaven staff members) with (almost) everything they need to know to work at the HFBR and to help make the stay at Brookhaven pleasant as well as profitable. Safety Training Programs to comply with US Department of Energy (DOE) mandates are in progress at BNL. There are several safety training requirements which must be met before users can obtain unescorted access to the HFBR. The Reactor Division has prepared specific safety training manuals which are to be sent to experimenters well in advance of their expected arrival at BNL to conduct experiments. Please familiarize yourself with this material and carefully pay strict attention to all the safety and security procedures that are in force at the HFBR. Not only your safety, but the continued operation of the facility, depends upon compliance

  5. INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION SURVEY OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT OUTSIDE AREAS BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the verification survey was to obtain evidence by means of measurements and sampling to confirm that the final radiological conditions meet the established cleanup goals. This objective was achieved via multiple verification components including document reviews, instrument scans, and sample analysis to determine the accuracy and adequacy of FSS documentation. During the period between August 18 to 25 and September 24 to 29, 2010, ORISE conducted measurements and sampling of the HFBR 'Outside Areas' at the BNL site. ORISE performed gamma walkover scans in all eight SUs with SUs 2, 4, 6, 7, and 8 receiving high density scans of accessible areas. The remainder of SUs received low density scans. While scanning, ORISE team members observed a significant spike in count rate activity in SU 8. Just as quickly as the count rate increased the count rate decreased. A previous pass in the area did not identify any activity associated with soil contamination. The team determined that both detector instrument electronics functioned normally, and that the increased activity was due to a site activity. All individual sample concentrations and corresponding mean concentrations evaluated were determined to be below the established cleanup goal. A review of the data collected by ORISE has not identified any areas of contamination exceeding cleanup goals.

  6. Final Report Independent Verification Survey of the High Flux Beam Reactor, Building 802 Fan House Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harpeneau, Evan M. [Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Independent Environmental Assessment and Verification Program

    2011-06-24

    On May 9, 2011, ORISE conducted verification survey activities including scans, sampling, and the collection of smears of the remaining soils and off-gas pipe associated with the 802 Fan House within the HFBR (High Flux Beam Reactor) Complex at BNL. ORISE is of the opinion, based on independent scan and sample results obtained during verification activities at the HFBR 802 Fan House, that the FSS (final status survey) unit meets the applicable site cleanup objectives established for as left radiological conditions.

  7. PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 3 TRENCH 5, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has reviewed the project documentation and data for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Underground Utilities removal Phase 3; Trench 5 at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The Brookhaven Survey Group (BSG) has completed removal and performed Final Status Survey (FSS) of the concrete duct from Trench 5 from Building 801 to the Stack. Sample results have been submitted as required to demonstrate that the cleanup goal of (le)15 mrem/yr above background to a resident in 50 years has been met. Four rounds of sampling, from pre-excavation to FSS, were performed as specified in the Field Sampling Plan (FSP) (BNL 2010a). It is the policy of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) to perform independent verifications of decontamination and decommissioning activities conducted at DOE facilities. ORISE has been designated as the organization responsible for this task for the HFBR Underground Utilities. ORISE, together with DOE, determined that a Type A verification of Trench 5 was appropriate based on recent verification results from Trenches 2, 3, and 4, and the minimal potential for residual radioactivity in the area. The removal of underground utilities is being performed in three stages to decommission the HFBR facility and support structures. Phase 3 of this project included the removal of at least 200 feet of 36-inch to 42-inch pipe from the west side to the south side of Building 801, and the 14-inch diameter Acid Waste Line that spanned from 801 to the Stack within Trench 5. Based on the pre-excavation sample results of the soil overburden the potential for contamination of the soil surrounding the pipe is minimal (BNL 2010a). ORISE reviewed the BNL FSP and identified comments for consideration (ORISE 2010). BNL prepared a revised FSP that resolved each ORISE comment adequately (BNL 2010a). ORISE referred to the revised HFBR Underground Utilities FSP FSS data to conduct the Type A verification

  8. LETTER REPORT - INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR DECOMMISSIONING PROJECT FAN HOUSE, BUILDING 704 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) personnel visited the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on August 17 through August 23, 2010 to perform visual inspections and conduct independent measurement and sampling of the 'Outside Areas' at the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) decommissioning project. During this visit, ORISE was also able to evaluate Fan House, Building 704 survey units (SUs) 4 and 5, which are part of the Underground Utilities portion of the HFBR decommissioning project. ORISE performed limited alpha plus beta scans of the remaining Fan House foundation lower walls and remaining pedestals while collecting static measurements. Scans were performed using gas proportional detectors coupled to ratemeter-scalers with audible output and encompassed an area of approximately 1 square meter around the static measurement location. Alpha plus beta scans ranged from 120 to 460 cpm. Twenty smears for gross alpha and beta activity and tritium were collected at judgmentally selected locations on the walls and pedestals of the Fan House foundation. Attention was given to joints, cracks, and penetrations when determining each sample location. Removable concentrations ranged from -0.43 to 1.73 dpm/100 cm2 for alpha and -3.64 to 7.80 dpm/100 cm2 for beta. Tritium results for smears ranged from -1.9 to 9.0 pCi/g. On the concrete pad, 100% of accessible area was scanned using a large area alpha plus beta gas proportional detector coupled to a ratemeter-scaler. Gross scan count rates ranged from 800 to 1500 cpm using the large area detector. Three concrete samples were collected from the pad primarily for tritium analysis. Tritium concentrations in concrete samples ranged from 53.3 to 127.5 pCi/g. Gamma spectroscopy results of radionuclide concentrations in concrete samples ranged from 0.02 to 0.11 pCi/g for Cs-137 and 0.19 to 0.22 pCi/g for Ra-226. High density scans for gamma radiation levels were performed in accessible areas in each SU, Fan House

  9. RADIATION DOSIMETRY AT THE BNL HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR AND MEDICAL RESEARCH REACTOR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOLDEN,N.E.

    1999-09-10

    RADIATION DOSIMETRY MEASUREMENTS HAVE BEEN PERFORMED OVER A PERIOD OF MANY YEARS AT THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR (HFBR) AND THE MEDICAL RESEARCH REACTOR (BMRR) AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY TO PROVIDE INFORMATION ON THE ENERGY DISTRIBUTION OF THE NEUTRON FLUX, NEUTRON DOSE RATES, GAMMA-RAY FLUXES AND GAMMA-RAY DOSE RATES. THE MCNP PARTICLE TRANSPORT CODE PROVIDED MONTE CARLO RESULTS TO COMPARE WITH VARIOUS DOSIMETRY MEASUREMENTS PERFORMED AT THE EXPERIMENTAL PORTS, AT THE TREATMENT ROOMS AND IN THE THIMBLES AT BOTH HFBR AND BMRR.

  10. PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PHASE 2 D/F WASTE LINE REMOVAL, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has reviewed the project documentation and data for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Underground Utilities removal Phase 2; the D/F Waste Line removal at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The Brookhaven Survey Group (BSG) has completed removal and performed the final status survey (FSS) of the D/F Waste Line that provided the conduit for pumping waste from Building 750 to Building 801. Sample results have been submitted as required to demonstrate that the cleanup goals of 15 mrem/yr above background to a resident in 50 years have been met. Four rounds of sampling, from pre-excavation to final status survey (FSS), were performed as specified in the Field Sampling Plan (FSP) (BNL 2010a). It is the policy of the US Departmental of Energy (DOE) to perform independent verifications of decontamination and decomissioning activities conducted at DOE facilities. ORISE has been designated as the organization responsible for this task at the HFBR. ORISE together with DOE determined that a Type A verification of the D/F Waste Line was appropriate based on its method of construction and upon the minimal potential for residual radioactivity in the area. The removal of underground utilities is being performed in three stages in the process to decommission the HFBR facility and support structures. Phase 2 of this project included the grouting and removal of 1100 feet of 2-inch pipe and 640 feet of 4-inch pipe that served as the D/F Waste Line. Based on the pre-excavation sample results of the soil overburden, the potential for contamination of the soil surrounding the pipe is minimal (BNL 2010a). ORISE reviewed the BNL FSP and identified comments for consideration (ORISE 2010). BNL prepared a revised FSP that addressed each ORISE comment adequately (BNL 2010a). ORISE referred to the revised Phase 2 D/F Waste Line removal FSP FSS data to conduct the Type A verification and determine whether the intent odf

  11. SUMMARY AND RESULTS LETTER REPORT - INDEPENDENT VERIFICATION OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR UNDERGROUND UTILITIES REMOVAL PROJECT, PHASE 3: TRENCHES 2, 3, AND 4 BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) personnel visited the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on September 7 through September 10, 2010, and September 20 through Seeptember 24, 2010. ORISE performed visual inspections, conducted independent measurement, and sampling of Trenches 2, 3, and 4, which are part of Phase 3 for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) Underground Utilities Removal Project. Trenches 2 and 3 were addressed during the first visit and Trench 4 during the second visit to BNL. Spatial orientation to Building 801 and minimal survey area inside Trenches 2 and 3 limited satellite reception and the ability to utilize a global positioning system (GPS) as real-time data capture for the gamma scan surveys in these trenches. However, Trench 4 provided suitable conditions in which gamma scan data could be collected using the GPS. ORISE performed high-density gamma scans of accessible surface areas using shielded sodium iodide detectors coupled to ratemeter-scalers with audible output. Scans for Trench 2 ranged from 4,000 to 22,000 gross counts per minute (cpm); Trench 3 from 3,000 to 5,000 gross cpm and Trench 4 from 2,600 to 9,500 gross cpm. ORISE personnel flagged the area where the elevated counts were observed in Trench 2 for further investigation. Additional scane valuations were performed on remaining pipes and associated end-caps in the trenches with no elevated activity detected. Eleven judgemental soil samples (5098M0041 through 5098M0051) were obtained throughout Trenches 2, 3, and 4. The sample locations were selected based on count rates observed during the scan survey or because of contamination potential from pipeline removal activities. ORISE personnel judgmentally selected the location for sample M0043 in response to the 22,000 cpm observed during the scan survey, and to ascertain whether the elevataed counts were a result of soil contamination or radioactive shine from the trench's spatial orientation to the Target Room in

  12. Brookhaven leak reactor to close

    CERN Multimedia

    MacIlwain, C

    1999-01-01

    The DOE has announced that the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven is to close for good. Though the news was not unexpected researchers were angry the decision had been taken before the review to assess the impact of reopening the reactor had been concluded (1 page).

  13. RADIATION DOSIMETRY OF THE PRESSURE VESSEL INTERNALS OF THE HIGH FLUX BEAM REACTOR.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    HOLDEN,N.E.; RECINIELLO,R.N.; HU,J.P.; RORER,D.C.

    2002-08-18

    In preparation for the eventual decommissioning of the High Flux Beam Reactor after the permanent removal of its fuel elements from the Brookhaven National Laboratory, both measurements and calculations of the decay gamma-ray dose rate have been performed for the reactor pressure vessel and vessel internal structures which included the upper and lower thermal shields, the transition plate, and the control rod blades. The measurements were made using Red Perspex{trademark} polymethyl methacrylate high-level film dosimeters, a Radcal ''peanut'' ion chamber, and Eberline's high-range ion chamber. To compare with measured gamma-ray dose rate, the Monte Carlo MCNP code and geometric progressive Microshield code were used to model the gamma transport and dose buildup.

  14. Dhruva reactor -- a high flux facility for neutron beam research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dhruva reactor, the highest flux thermal neutron source in India has been operating at full power of 100 MW over the past two years. Several advanced facilities like the cold source, guides, etc. are being installed for neutron beam research in condensed matter. A large number and variety of neutron spectrometers are operational. This paper deals with the basic advantages that one can derive from neutron scattering investigations and gives a brief description of the instruments that are developed and commissioned at Dhruva for neutron beam research. (author). 3 figs

  15. Tensile and impact testing of an HFBR [High Flux Beam Reactor] control rod follower

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Materials Technology Group of the Department of Nuclear Energy (DNE) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) undertook a program to machine and test specimens from a control rod follower from the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). Tensile and Charpy impact specimens were machined and tested from non-irradiated aluminum alloys in addition to irradiated 6061-T6 from the HFBR. The tensile test results on irradiated material showed a two-fold increase in tensile strength to a maximum of 100.6 ksi. The impact resistance of the irradiated material showed a six-fold decrease in values (3 in-lb average) compared to similar non-irradiated material. Fracture toughness (KI) specimens were tested on an unirradiated compositionally and dimensionally similar (to HFBR follower) 6061 T-6 material with Kmax values of 24.8 ± 1.0 Ksi√in (average) being obtained. The report concludes that the specimens produced during the program yielded reproducible and believable results and that proper quality assurance was provided throughout the program. 9 figs., 6 tabs

  16. Neutron spectrum measurements in the aluminum oxide filtered beam facility at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron spectrum measurements were performed on the aluminum oxide filter installed in the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). For these measurements, activation foils were irradiated at the exit port of the beam facility. A technique based on dominant resonances in selected activation reactions was used to measure the epithermal neutron spectrum. The fast and intermediate-energy ranges of the neutron spectrum were measured by threshold reactions and 10B-shielded 235U fission reactions. Neutron spectral data were derived from the activation data by two approaches: (1) a short analysis which yields neutron flux values at the energies of the dominant or primary resonances in the epithermal activation reactions and integral flux data for neutrons above corresponding threshold or pseudo-threshold energies, and (2) the longer analysis which utilized all the activation data in a full-spectrum, unfolding process using the FERRET spectrum adjustment code. This paper gives a brief description of the measurement techniques, analysis methods, and the results obtained

  17. Spectral characterization of the epithermal-neutron beam at the Brookhaven medical research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The power burst facility boron neutron capture therapy (PBF/BNCT) program schedule required the use of an epithermal-neutron beam before the PBF would be available. The beam was needed to carry out the acute, dose-tolerance study on healthy canines and the treatment protocol on spontaneous tumor canines. Calculations on available U.S. test reactors confirmed that the Brookhaven medical research reactor (BMRR) would be capable of providing an epithermal-neutron beam with sufficient intensity while limiting the fast-neutron and gamma dose contamination to acceptable levels for the canine irradiation studies. A joint Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL)/Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) program was instituted to design, construct, install, and measure the performance of an epithermal-neutron beam filter for the BMRR. Aluminum oxide was selected as the filter material because it provided the desired neutron spectrum characteristics given the physical constraints of the available BMRR irradiation beam port. Neutron spectrum measurements of the exit beam were undertaken by INEL as a means to evaluate the performance of the new filter and the validity of neutron transport calculations. The preliminary data from activation measurements were presented at the Neutron Beam Design Workshop at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in March 1989. The updated activation results and the proton-recoil measurements are presented in this paper and are compared with predictions derived from a two-dimensional transport calculation

  18. High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The HFIR at Oak Ridge National Laboratory is a light-water cooled and moderated reactor that is the United States’ highest flux reactor-based neutron source. HFIR...

  19. RELAP5/MOD2.5 analysis of the HFBR [High Flux Beam Reactor] for a loss of power and coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A set of postulated accidents were evaluated for the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory. A loss of power accident (LOPA) and a loss of coolant accident (LOCA) were analyzed. This work was performed in response to a DOE review that wanted to update the understanding of the thermal hydraulic behavior of the HFBR during these transients. These calculations were used to determine the margins to fuel damage at the 60 MW power level. The LOPA assumes all the backup power systems fail (although this event is highly unlikely). The reactor scrams, the depressurization valve opens, and the pumps coast down. The HFBR has down flow through the core during normal operation. To avoid fuel damage, the core normally goes through an extended period of forced down flow after a scram before natural circulation is allowed. During a LOPA, the core will go into flow reversal once the buoyancy forces are larger than the friction forces produced during the pump coast down. The flow will stagnate, reverse direction, and establish a buoyancy driven (natural circulation) flow around the core. Fuel damage would probably occur if the critical heat flux (CHF) limit is reached during the flow reversal event. The RELAP5/MOD2.5 code, with an option for heavy water, was used to model the HFBR and perform the LOPA calculation. The code was used to predict the time when the buoyancy forces overcome the friction forces and produce upward directed flow in the core. The Monde CHF correlation and experimental data taken for the HFBR during the design verification phase in 1963 were used to determine the fuel damage margin. 20 refs., 40 figs., 11 tabs

  20. Assessment of similarity of HFBR [High Flux Beam Reactor] with separate effects test

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Separate Effects Test (SET) facility was constructed in 1963 to demonstrate the feasibility of the HFBR design and to determine the core power limits for a safe flow reversal event. The objective of the task reported here is to review the capability of the test to scale the dominant phenomena in the HFBR during a flow reversal event and the applicability of the range of the power level obtained from the test to the HFBR. The conclusion of this report was that the flow during the flow reversal event will not be similar in the two facilities. The causes of the dissimilarity are the differences in the core inlet friction, bypass path friction, the absence of the check valve in the test, and the materials used to represent the fuel plates. The impact of these differences is that the HFBR will undergo flow reversal sooner than the test and will have a higher flow rate in the final Natural Circulation Period. The shorter duration of the flow reversal event will allow less time for the plate to heat up and the larger flow in the Natural Circulation Period will lead to higher critical heat flux limits in the HFBR than in the test. Based on these observations, it was concluded that the HFBR can undergo flow reversal safely for heat fluxes up to 46,700 (BTU/hr ft2), the heat flux limit obtained from the 1963 test

  1. Dose measurements and calculations in the epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of the epithermal neutron beam at BMRR were measured, calculated, and reported by R.G. Fairchild. This beam has already been used for animal irradiations. The authors anticipate that it will be used for clinical trials. Thermal and epithermal neutron flux densities distributions, and dose rate distributions, as a function of depth were measured in a lucite dog-head phantom. Monte Carlo calculations were performed and compared with the measured values

  2. The BR2 high-flux reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ponsard, Bernard [Belgian Nuclear Research Center (SCK-CEN), Mol (Belgium). BR2 Reactor

    2012-10-15

    The BR2 reactor is a 100 MW{sub th} High-Flux 'Material Testing Reactor' which first became operational in 1963 and has since been refurbished in 1995 to 1997. It is operated by the Belgian Nuclear Research Centre, SCK CEN, in the framework of programmes related to the development of structural materials and nuclear fuels for fission and fusion reactors. Serious maintenance efforts are currently made by SCK CEN to secure its safe operation until at least 2023. This would guarantee the continuity of the activities in which the BR2 reactor is involved through its replacement by an Accelerator Driven System (ADS), MYRRHA, scheduled to be operated by SCK CEN from 2023. (orig.)

  3. Nuclear structure research at the High Flux Beam Reactor: Progress report for the period February 1, 1988--September 30, 1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Clark University research program in nuclear structure is a collaborative effort involving Clark University personnel, staff members from Brookhaven National Laboratory and from Ames Laboratory (Iowa State University), and an active participation of foreign scientists. The TRISTAN on-line isotope separator and the capture γ-ray facility at the HFBR are the experimental foci of the program which has four principal research themes, three involving nuclear structure physics and one directed towards astrophysics. These themes are: the manifestation of the proton-neutron interaction in the evolution of nuclear structure and its relation to collectivity, the appearance and the role of symmetries and supersymmetries in nuclei, the study of new regions of magic nuclei, and the characterization of nuclei important in r-process stellar nucleosynthesis. The activities involving Clark personnel during the eight month period, February 1, 1988 -- September 30, 1988, are summarized below

  4. Department of Energy's High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), September 15--19, 1980: An independent on-site safety review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intent of this on-site safety review was to make a broad management assessment of HFBR operations, rather than conduct a detailed in-depth audit. The result of the review should only be considered as having identified trends or indications. The Team's observations and recommendations for the most part are based upon licensed reactor facility practices used to meet industry standards. These standards form the basis for many of the comments in this report. The Team believes that a uniform minimum standard of performance should be achieved in the operation of DOE reactors. In order to assure that this is accomplished, clear standards are necessary. Consistent with the past AEC and ERDA policy, the team has used the standards of the commercial nuclear power industry. It is recognized that this approach is conservative in that the HFBR reactor has a significantly greater degree of inherent safety (low pressure, temperature, power, etc.) than a licensed reactor

  5. Neutron diffraction facilities at the high flux reactor, Petten

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohms, C.; Youtsos, A. G.; Bontenbal, A.; Mulder, F. M.

    2000-03-01

    The High Flux Reactor in Petten is equipped with twelve beam tubes for the extraction of thermal neutrons for applications in materials and medical science. Beam tubes HB4 and HB5 are equipped with diffractometers for residual stress and powder investigations. Recently at HB4 the Large Component Neutron Diffraction Facility has been installed. It is a unique facility with respect to its capability of handling heavy components up to 1000 kg in residual stress testing. Its basic features are described and the first applications on thick piping welds are shown. The diffractometer at HB5 can be set up for powder and stress measurements. Recent applications include temperature dependent measurements on phase transitions in intermetallic compounds and on Li ion energy storage materials.

  6. High Flux Isotope Reactor cold neutron source reference design concept

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selby, D.L.; Lucas, A.T.; Hyman, C.R. [and others

    1998-05-01

    In February 1995, Oak Ridge National Laboratory`s (ORNL`s) deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. In May 1995, a team was formed to examine the feasibility of retrofitting a liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) cold source facility into an existing HFIR beam tube. The results of this feasibility study indicated that the most practical location for such a cold source was the HB-4 beam tube. This location provides a potential flux environment higher than the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) vertical cold source and maximizes the space available for a future cold neutron guide hall expansion. It was determined that this cold neutron beam would be comparable, in cold neutron brightness, to the best facilities in the world, and a decision was made to complete a preconceptual design study with the intention of proceeding with an activity to install a working LH{sub 2} cold source in the HFIR HB-4 beam tube. During the development of the reference design the liquid hydrogen concept was changed to a supercritical hydrogen system for a number of reasons. This report documents the reference supercritical hydrogen design and its performance. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and testing, (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the conceptual design phase and establishes the baseline reference concept.

  7. High Flux Isotope Reactor cold neutron source reference design concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In February 1995, Oak Ridge National Laboratory's (ORNL's) deputy director formed a group to examine the need for upgrades to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) system in light of the cancellation of the Advanced neutron Source Project. One of the major findings of this study was that there was an immediate need for the installation of a cold neutron source facility in the HFIR complex. In May 1995, a team was formed to examine the feasibility of retrofitting a liquid hydrogen (LH2) cold source facility into an existing HFIR beam tube. The results of this feasibility study indicated that the most practical location for such a cold source was the HB-4 beam tube. This location provides a potential flux environment higher than the Institut Laue-Langevin (ILL) vertical cold source and maximizes the space available for a future cold neutron guide hall expansion. It was determined that this cold neutron beam would be comparable, in cold neutron brightness, to the best facilities in the world, and a decision was made to complete a preconceptual design study with the intention of proceeding with an activity to install a working LH2 cold source in the HFIR HB-4 beam tube. During the development of the reference design the liquid hydrogen concept was changed to a supercritical hydrogen system for a number of reasons. This report documents the reference supercritical hydrogen design and its performance. The cold source project has been divided into four phases: (1) preconceptual, (2) conceptual design and testing, (3) detailed design and procurement, and (4) installation and operation. This report marks the conclusion of the conceptual design phase and establishes the baseline reference concept

  8. Annual Report 1991. Operation of the high flux reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1991 the operation of the High Flux Reactor was carried out as planned. The availability was more than 100% of scheduled operating time. The average utilization of the reactor was 69% of the practical limit. The reactor was utilized for research programmes in support of nuclear fission reactors and thermonuclear fusion, for fundamental research with neutrons, for radioisotope production, and for various smaller activities. Development activities addressed upgrading of irradiation devices, neutron capture therapy, neutron radiography and neutron transmutation doping of silicon. General activities in support of running irradiation programmes progressed in the normal way

  9. Annual report 1990. Operation of the high flux reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1990 the operation of the High Flux Reactor was carried out as planned. The availability was 96% of scheduled operating time. The average utilization of the reactor was 71% of the practical limit. The reactor was utilized for research programmes in support of nuclear fission reactors and thermonuclear fusion, for fundamental research with neutrons, for radioisotope production, and for various smaller activities. General activities in support of running irradiation programmes progressed in the normal way. Development activities addressed upgrading of irradiation devices, neutron radiography and neutron capture therapy

  10. High flux testing reactor Petten. Replacement of the reactor vessel and connected components. Overall report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project of replacing the HFR originated in 1974 when results of several research programmes confirmed severe neutron embrittlement of aluminium alloys suggesting a limited life of the existing facility. This report contains the detailed chronology of events concerning preparation and execution of the replacement. After a 14 months' outage the reactor resumed routine operation on 14th February, 1985. At the end of several years of planning and preparation the reconstruction proceded in the following steps: unloading of the old core, decay of short-lived radioactivity in December 1983, removal of the old tank and of its peripheral equipment in January-February 1984, segmentation and waste disposal of the removed components in March-April, decontamination of the pools, bottom penetration overhauling in May-June, installation of the new tank and other new components in July-September, testing and commissioning, including minor modifications in October-December, and, trials runs and start-up preparation in January-February 1985. The new HFR Petten features increased and improved experimental facilities. Among others the obsolete thermal columns was replaced by two high flux beam tubes. Moreover the new plant has been designed for future increases of reactor power and neutron fluxes. For the next three to four years the reactor has to cope with a large irradiation programme, claiming its capacity to nearly 100%

  11. Brookhaven highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication provides a broad overview of the research programs and efforts being conducted, built, designed, and planned at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This work covers a broad range of scientific disciplines. Major facilities include the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), with its newly completed booster, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and the RHIC, which is under construction. Departments within the laboratory include the AGS department, accelerator development, physics, chemistry, biology, NSLS, medical, nuclear energy, and interdepartmental research efforts. Research ranges from the pure sciences, in nuclear physics and high energy physics as one example, to environmental work in applied science to study climatic effects, from efforts in biology which are a component of the human genome project to the study, production, and characterization of new materials. The paper provides an overview of the laboratory operations during 1992, including staffing, research, honors, funding, and general laboratory plans for the future

  12. Brookhaven highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L. (eds.)

    1992-01-01

    This publication provides a broad overview of the research programs and efforts being conducted, built, designed, and planned at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This work covers a broad range of scientific disciplines. Major facilities include the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), with its newly completed booster, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and the RHIC, which is under construction. Departments within the laboratory include the AGS department, accelerator development, physics, chemistry, biology, NSLS, medical, nuclear energy, and interdepartmental research efforts. Research ranges from the pure sciences, in nuclear physics and high energy physics as one example, to environmental work in applied science to study climatic effects, from efforts in biology which are a component of the human genome project to the study, production, and characterization of new materials. The paper provides an overview of the laboratory operations during 1992, including staffing, research, honors, funding, and general laboratory plans for the future.

  13. Awareness, Preference, Utilization, and Messaging Research for the Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Rebecca [Bryant Research, LLC; Kszos, Lynn A [ORNL

    2011-03-01

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) offers the scientific community unique access to two types of world-class neutron sources at a single site - the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The 85-MW HFIR provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world, and the SNS is one of the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams. Management of these two resources is the responsibility of the Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD). NScD commissioned this survey research to develop baseline information regarding awareness of and perceptions about neutron science. Specific areas of investigative interest include the following: (1) awareness levels among those in the scientific community about the two neutron sources that ORNL offers; (2) the level of understanding members of various scientific communities have regarding benefits that neutron scattering techniques offer; and (3) any perceptions that negatively impact utilization of the facilities. NScD leadership identified users of two light sources in North America - the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory - as key publics. Given the type of research in which these scientists engage, they would quite likely benefit from including the neutron techniques available at SNS and HFIR among their scientific investigation tools. The objective of the survey of users of APS, NSLS, SNS, and HFIR was to explore awareness of and perceptions regarding SNS and HFIR among those in selected scientific communities. Perceptions of SNS and FHIR will provide a foundation for strategic communication plan development and for developing key educational messages. The survey was conducted in two phases. The first phase included qualitative methods of (1) key stakeholder meetings; (2) online interviews with user administrators of APS and NSLS; and (3) one

  14. Awareness, Preference, Utilization, and Messaging Research for the Spallation Neutron Source and High Flux Isotope Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) offers the scientific community unique access to two types of world-class neutron sources at a single site - the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) and the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The 85-MW HFIR provides one of the highest steady-state neutron fluxes of any research reactor in the world, and the SNS is one of the world's most intense pulsed neutron beams. Management of these two resources is the responsibility of the Neutron Sciences Directorate (NScD). NScD commissioned this survey research to develop baseline information regarding awareness of and perceptions about neutron science. Specific areas of investigative interest include the following: (1) awareness levels among those in the scientific community about the two neutron sources that ORNL offers; (2) the level of understanding members of various scientific communities have regarding benefits that neutron scattering techniques offer; and (3) any perceptions that negatively impact utilization of the facilities. NScD leadership identified users of two light sources in North America - the Advanced Photon Source (APS) at Argonne National Laboratory and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) at Brookhaven National Laboratory - as key publics. Given the type of research in which these scientists engage, they would quite likely benefit from including the neutron techniques available at SNS and HFIR among their scientific investigation tools. The objective of the survey of users of APS, NSLS, SNS, and HFIR was to explore awareness of and perceptions regarding SNS and HFIR among those in selected scientific communities. Perceptions of SNS and FHIR will provide a foundation for strategic communication plan development and for developing key educational messages. The survey was conducted in two phases. The first phase included qualitative methods of (1) key stakeholder meetings; (2) online interviews with user administrators of APS and NSLS; and (3) one-on-one interviews

  15. Annual progress report 1988, operation of the high flux reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1988 the High Flux Reactor Petten was routinely operated without any unforeseen event. The availability was 99% of scheduled operation. Utilization of the irradiation positions amounted to 80% of the practical occupation limit. The exploitation pattern comprised nuclear energy deployment, fundamental research with neutrons, and radioisotope production. General activities in support of running irradiation programmes progressed in the normal way. Development activities addressed upgrading of irradiation devices, neutron radiography and neutron capture therapy

  16. Design of small-animal thermal neutron irradiation facility at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The broad beam facility (BBF) at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) can provide a thermal neutron beam with flux intensity and quality comparable to the beam currently used for research on neutron capture therapy using cell-culture and small-animal irradiations. Monte Carlo computations were made, first, to compare with the dosimetric measurements at the existing BBF and, second, to calculate the neutron and gamma fluxes and doses expected at the proposed BBF. Multiple cell cultures or small animals could be irradiated simultaneously at the so-modified BBF under conditions similar to or better than those individual animals irradiated at the existing thermal neutron irradiation Facility (TNIF) of the BMRR. The flux intensity of the collimated thermal neutron beam at the proposed BBF would be 1.7 x 1010 n/cm2·s at 3-MW reactor power, the same as at the TNIF. However, the proposed collimated beam would have much lower gamma (0.89 x 10-11 cGy·cm2/nth) and fast neutron (0.58 x 10-11 cGy·cm2/nth) contaminations, 64 and 19% of those at the TNIF, respectively. The feasibility of remodeling the facility is discussed

  17. High Flux Metallic Membranes for Hydrogen Recovery and Membrane Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buxbaum, Robert

    2010-06-30

    We made and tested over 250 new alloys for use as lower cost, higher flux hydrogen extraction membrane materials. Most of these were intermetallic, or contained significant intermetallic content, particularly based on B2 alloy compositions with at least one refractory component; B2 intermetallics resemble BCC alloys, in structure, but the atoms have relatively fixed positions, with one atom at the corners of the cube, the other at the centers. The target materals we were looking for would contain little or no expensive elements, no strongly toxic or radioactive elements, would have high flux to hydrogen, while being fabricable, brazable, and relatively immune to hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion in operation. The best combination of properties of the membrane materials we developed was, in my opinion, a Pd-coated membrane consisting of V -9 atomic % Pd. This material was relatively cheap, had 5 times the flux of Pd under the same pressure differential, was reasonably easy to fabricate and braze, and not bad in terms of embrittlement. Based on all these factors we project, about 1/3 the cost of Pd, on an area basis for a membrane designed to last 20 years, or 1/15 the cost on a flux basis. Alternatives to this membrane replaced significant fractions of the Pd with Ni and or Co. The cost for these membranes was lower, but so was the flux. We produced successful brazed products from the membrane materials, and made them into flat sheets. We tested, unsuccessfully, several means of fabricating thematerials into tubes, and eventually built a membrane reactor using a new, flat-plate design: a disc and doughnut arrangement, a design that seems well- suited to clean hydrogen production from coal. The membranes and reactor were tested successfully at Western Research. A larger equipment company (Chart Industries) produced similar results using a different flat-plate reactor design. Cost projections of the membrane are shown to be attractive.

  18. Brookhaven highlights, fiscal year 1985, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    Activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory are briefly discussed. These include work at the National Synchrotron Light Source, the High Flux Beam Reactor, and the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. Areas of research include heavy ion reactions, neutrino oscillations, low-level waste, nuclear data, medicine, biology, chemistry, parallel computing, optics. Also provided are general and administrative news, a financial report. (LEW)

  19. Brookhaven highlights, fiscal year 1985, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory are briefly discussed. These include work at the National Synchrotron Light Source, the High Flux Beam Reactor, and the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. Areas of research include heavy ion reactions, neutrino oscillations, low-level waste, nuclear data, medicine, biology, chemistry, parallel computing, optics. Also provided are general and administrative news, a financial report

  20. Physics design for the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor epithermal neutron source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A collaborative effort by researchers at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory and the Brookhaven National Laboratory has resulted in the design and implementation of an epithermal-neutron source at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). Large aluminum containers, filled with aluminum oxide tiles and aluminum spacers, were tailored to pre-existing compartments on the animal side of the reactor facility. A layer of cadmium was used to minimize the thermal-neutron component. Additional bismuth was added to the pre-existing bismuth shield to minimize the gamma component of the beam. Lead was also added to reduce gamma streaming around the bismuth. The physics design methods are outlined in this paper. Information available to date shows close agreement between calculated and measured beam parameters. The neutron spectrum is predominantly in the intermediate energy range (0.5 eV - 10 keV). The peak flux intensity is 6.4E + 12 n/(m2.s.MW) at the center of the beam on the outer surface of the final gamma shield. The corresponding neutron current is 3.8E + 12 n/(m2.s.MW). Presently, the core operates at a maximum of 3 MW. The fast-neutron KERMA is 3.6E-15 cGy/(n/m2) and the gamma KERMA is 5.0E-16 cGY/(n/m2) for the unperturbed beam. The neutron intensity falls off rapidly with distance from the outer shield and the thermal flux realized in phantom or tissue is strongly dependent on the beam-delimiter and target geometry

  1. Fabrication of control rods for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a research-type nuclear reactor that was designed and built in the early 1960s and has been in continuous operation since its initial criticality in 1965. Under current plans, the HFIR is expected to continue in operation until 2035. This report updates ORNL/TM-9365, Fabrication Procedure for HFIR Control Plates, which was mainly prepared in the early 1970's but was not issued until 1984, and reflects process changes, lessons learned in the latest control rod fabrication campaign, and suggested process improvements to be considered in future campaigns. Most of the personnel involved with the initial development of the processes and in part campaigns have retired or will retire soon. Because their unlikely availability in future campaigns, emphasis has been placed on providing some explanation of why the processes were selected and some discussions about the importance of controlling critical process parameters. Contained in this report is a description of the function of control rods in the reactor, the brief history of the development of control rod fabrication processes, and a description of procedures used in the fabrication of control rods. A listing of the controlled documents and procedures used in the last fabrication campaigns is referenced in Appendix A

  2. Fabrication of control rods for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sease, J.D.

    1998-03-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a research-type nuclear reactor that was designed and built in the early 1960s and has been in continuous operation since its initial criticality in 1965. Under current plans, the HFIR is expected to continue in operation until 2035. This report updates ORNL/TM-9365, Fabrication Procedure for HFIR Control Plates, which was mainly prepared in the early 1970's but was not issued until 1984, and reflects process changes, lessons learned in the latest control rod fabrication campaign, and suggested process improvements to be considered in future campaigns. Most of the personnel involved with the initial development of the processes and in part campaigns have retired or will retire soon. Because their unlikely availability in future campaigns, emphasis has been placed on providing some explanation of why the processes were selected and some discussions about the importance of controlling critical process parameters. Contained in this report is a description of the function of control rods in the reactor, the brief history of the development of control rod fabrication processes, and a description of procedures used in the fabrication of control rods. A listing of the controlled documents and procedures used in the last fabrication campaigns is referenced in Appendix A.

  3. A Compact, High-Flux Cold Atom Beam Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellogg, James R.; Kohel, James M.; Thompson, Robert J.; Aveline, David C.; Yu, Nan; Schlippert, Dennis

    2012-01-01

    The performance of cold atom experiments relying on three-dimensional magneto-optical trap techniques can be greatly enhanced by employing a highflux cold atom beam to obtain high atom loading rates while maintaining low background pressures in the UHV MOT (ultra-high vacuum magneto-optical trap) regions. Several techniques exist for generating slow beams of cold atoms. However, one of the technically simplest approaches is a two-dimensional (2D) MOT. Such an atom source typically employs at least two orthogonal trapping beams, plus an additional longitudinal "push" beam to yield maximum atomic flux. A 2D atom source was created with angled trapping collimators that not only traps atoms in two orthogonal directions, but also provides a longitudinal pushing component that eliminates the need for an additional push beam. This development reduces the overall package size, which in turn, makes the 2D trap simpler, and requires less total optical power. The atom source is more compact than a previously published effort, and has greater than an order of magnitude improved loading performance.

  4. Final Report Independent Verification Survey of the High Flux Beam Reactor, Building 802 Fan House Brookhaven National Laboratory Upton, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evan Harpeneau

    2011-06-24

    The Separations Process Research Unit (SPRU) complex located on the Knolls Atomic Power Laboratory (KAPL) site in Niskayuna, New York, was constructed in the late 1940s to research the chemical separation of plutonium and uranium (Figure A-1). SPRU operated as a laboratory scale research facility between February 1950 and October 1953. The research activities ceased following the successful development of the reduction oxidation and plutonium/uranium extraction processes. The oxidation and extraction processes were subsequently developed for large scale use by the Hanford and Savannah River sites (aRc 2008a). Decommissioning of the SPRU facilities began in October 1953 and continued through the 1990s.

  5. High Flux Isotope Reactor system RELAP5 input model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A thermal-hydraulic computational model of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) has been developed using the RELAP5 program. The purpose of the model is to provide a state-of-the art thermal-hydraulic simulation tool for analyzing selected hypothetical accident scenarios for a revised HFIR Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The model includes (1) a detailed representation of the reactor core and other vessel components, (2) three heat exchanger/pump cells, (3) pressurizing pumps and letdown valves, and (4) secondary coolant system (with less detail than the primary system). Data from HFIR operation, component tests, tests in facility mockups and the HFIR, HFIR specific experiments, and other pertinent experiments performed independent of HFIR were used to construct the model and validate it to the extent permitted by the data. The detailed version of the model has been used to simulate loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs), while the abbreviated version has been developed for the operational transients that allow use of a less detailed nodalization. Analysis of station blackout with core long-term decay heat removal via natural convection has been performed using the core and vessel portions of the detailed model

  6. High Flux Isotope Reactor system RELAP5 input model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, D.G.; Wendel, M.W.

    1993-01-01

    A thermal-hydraulic computational model of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) has been developed using the RELAP5 program. The purpose of the model is to provide a state-of-the art thermal-hydraulic simulation tool for analyzing selected hypothetical accident scenarios for a revised HFIR Safety Analysis Report (SAR). The model includes (1) a detailed representation of the reactor core and other vessel components, (2) three heat exchanger/pump cells, (3) pressurizing pumps and letdown valves, and (4) secondary coolant system (with less detail than the primary system). Data from HFIR operation, component tests, tests in facility mockups and the HFIR, HFIR specific experiments, and other pertinent experiments performed independent of HFIR were used to construct the model and validate it to the extent permitted by the data. The detailed version of the model has been used to simulate loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs), while the abbreviated version has been developed for the operational transients that allow use of a less detailed nodalization. Analysis of station blackout with core long-term decay heat removal via natural convection has been performed using the core and vessel portions of the detailed model.

  7. Department of Energy's High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), September 15--19, 1980: An independent on-site safety review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1981-02-01

    The intent of this on-site safety review was to make a broad management assessment of HFBR operations, rather than conduct a detailed in-depth audit. The result of the review should only be considered as having identified trends or indications. The Team's observations and recommendations for the most part are based upon licensed reactor facility practices used to meet industry standards. These standards form the basis for many of the comments in this report. The Team believes that a uniform minimum standard of performance should be achieved in the operation of DOE reactors. In order to assure that this is accomplished, clear standards are necessary. Consistent with the past AEC and ERDA policy, the team has used the standards of the commercial nuclear power industry. It is recognized that this approach is conservative in that the HFBR reactor has a significantly greater degree of inherent safety (low pressure, temperature, power, etc.) than a licensed reactor.

  8. Evaluation of HFIR [High Flux Isotope Reactor] pressure-vessel integrity considering radiation embrittlement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel has been in service for 20 years, and during this time, radiation damage was monitored with a vessel-material surveillance program. In mid-November 1986, data from this program indicated that the radiation-induced reduction in fracture toughness was greater than expected. As a result, a reevaluation of vessel integrity was undertaken. Updated methods of fracture-mechanics analysis were applied, and an accelerated irradiations program was conducted using the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. Results of these efforts indicate that (1) the vessel life can be extended 10 years if the reactor power level is reduced 15% and if the vessel is subjected to a hydrostatic proof test each year; (2) during the 10-year life extension, significant radiation damage will be limited to a rather small area around the beam tubes; and (3) the greater-than-expected damage rate is the result of the very low neutron flux in the HFIR vessel relative to that in samples of material irradiated in materials-testing reactors (a factor of ∼104 less), that is, a rate effect

  9. Evaluation of HFIR (High Flux Isotope Reactor) pressure-vessel integrity considering radiation embrittlement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheverton, R.D.; Merkle, J.G.; Nanstad, R.K. (eds.)

    1988-04-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel has been in service for 20 years, and during this time, radiation damage was monitored with a vessel-material surveillance program. In mid-November 1986, data from this program indicated that the radiation-induced reduction in fracture toughness was greater than expected. As a result, a reevaluation of vessel integrity was undertaken. Updated methods of fracture-mechanics analysis were applied, and an accelerated irradiations program was conducted using the Oak Ridge Research Reactor. Results of these efforts indicate that (1) the vessel life can be extended 10 years if the reactor power level is reduced 15% and if the vessel is subjected to a hydrostatic proof test each year; (2) during the 10-year life extension, significant radiation damage will be limited to a rather small area around the beam tubes; and (3) the greater-than-expected damage rate is the result of the very low neutron flux in the HFIR vessel relative to that in samples of material irradiated in materials-testing reactors (a factor of approx.10/sup 4/ less), that is, a rate effect.

  10. High-energy tritium beams as current drivers in tokamak reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikkelsen, D.R.; Grisham, L.R.

    1983-04-01

    The effect on neutral-beam design and reactor performance of using high-energy (approx. 3-10 MeV) tritium neutral beams to drive steady-state tokamak reactors is considered. The lower current of such beams leads to several advantages over lower-energy neutral beams. The major disadvantage is the reduction of the reactor output caused by the lower current-drive efficiency of the high-energy beams.

  11. Digital transverse beam dampers from the Brookhaven AGS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wide band, digital damper system has been developed and is in use at the Brookhaven Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). The system consists of vertical and horizontal capacitive pickups, analog and digital processing electronics, four 500 Watt wide band power amplifiers, and two pairs of strip line beam kickers. The system is currently used to damp transverse coherent instabilities and injection errors, in both planes, for protons and all species of heavy ions. This paper discusses the system design and operation, particularly with regard to stabilization of the high intensity proton beam. The analog and digital signal processing techniques used to achieve optimum results are discussed. Operational data showing the effect of the damping are presented

  12. Temperature measurements during high flux ion beam irradiations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespillo, M L; Graham, J T; Zhang, Y; Weber, W J

    2016-02-01

    A systematic study of the ion beam heating effect was performed in a temperature range of -170 to 900 °C using a 10 MeV Au(3+) ion beam and a Yttria stabilized Zirconia (YSZ) sample at a flux of 5.5 × 10(12) cm(-2) s(-1). Different geometric configurations of beam, sample, thermocouple positioning, and sample holder were compared to understand the heat/charge transport mechanisms responsible for the observed temperature increase. The beam heating exhibited a strong dependence on the background (initial) sample temperature with the largest temperature increases occurring at cryogenic temperatures and decreasing with increasing temperature. Comparison with numerical calculations suggests that the observed heating effect is, in reality, a predominantly electronic effect and the true temperature rise is small. A simple model was developed to explain this electronic effect in terms of an electrostatic potential that forms during ion irradiation. Such an artificial beam heating effect is potentially problematic in thermostated ion irradiation and ion beam analysis apparatus, as the operation of temperature feedback systems can be significantly distorted by this effect. PMID:26931879

  13. Dissolution Flowsheet for High Flux Isotope Reactor Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, W. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Rudisill, T. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); O' Rourke, P. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Karay, N. S [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-27

    As part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) processing campaign, H-Canyon is planning to begin dissolving High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel in late FY17 or early FY18. Each HFIR fuel core contains inner and outer fuel elements which were fabricated from uranium oxide (U3O8) dispersed in a continuous Al phase using traditional powder metallurgy techniques. Fuels fabricated in this manner, like other SNF’s processed in H-Canyon, dissolve by the same general mechanisms with similar gas generation rates and the production of H2. The HFIR fuel cores will be dissolved and the recovered U will be down-blended into low-enriched U. HFIR fuel was previously processed in H-Canyon using a unique insert in both the 6.1D and 6.4D dissolvers. Multiple cores will be charged to the same dissolver solution maximizing the concentration of dissolved Al. The objective of this study was to identify flowsheet conditions through literature review and laboratory experimentation to safely and efficiently dissolve the HFIR fuel in H-Canyon. Laboratory-scale experiments were performed to evaluate the dissolution of HFIR fuel using both Al 1100 and Al 6061 T6 alloy coupons. The Al 1100 alloy was considered a representative surrogate which provided an upper bound on the generation of flammable (i.e., H2) gas during the dissolution process. The dissolution of the Al 6061 T6 alloy proceeded at a slower rate than the Al 1100 alloy and was used to verify that the target Al concentration in solution could be achieved for the selected Hg concentration. Mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy were used to provide continuous monitoring of the concentration of H2 and other permanent gases in the dissolution offgas allowing the development of H2 generation rate profiles. The H2 generation rates were subsequently used to evaluate if a full HFIR core could be dissolved in an H-Canyon dissolver without exceeding 60% of the calculated lower

  14. Dissolution Flowsheet for High Flux Isotope Reactor Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, W. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Rudisill, T. S. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); O' Rourke, P. E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Karay, N. S [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-09-27

    As part of the Spent Nuclear Fuel (SNF) processing campaign, H-Canyon is planning to begin dissolving High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel in late FY17 or early FY18. Each HFIR fuel core contains inner and outer fuel elements which were fabricated from uranium oxide (U3O8) dispersed in a continuous Al phase using traditional powder metallurgy techniques. Fuels fabricated in this manner, like other SNF’s processed in H-Canyon, dissolve by the same general mechanisms with similar gas generation rates and the production of H2. The HFIR fuel cores will be dissolved and the recovered U will be down-blended into low-enriched U. HFIR fuel was previously processed in H-Canyon using a unique insert in both the 6.1D and 6.4D dissolvers. Multiple cores will be charged to the same dissolver solution maximizing the concentration of dissolved Al. The objective of this study was to identify flowsheet conditions through literature review and laboratory experimentation to safely and efficiently dissolve the HFIR fuel in H-Canyon. Laboratory-scale experiments were performed to evaluate the dissolution of HFIR fuel using both Al 1100 and Al 6061 T6 alloy coupons. The Al 1100 alloy was considered a representative surrogate which provided an upper bound on the generation of flammable (i.e., H2) gas during the dissolution process. The dissolution of the Al 6061 T6 alloy proceeded at a slower rate than the Al 1100 alloy and was used to verify that the target Al concentration in solution could be achieved for the selected Hg concentration. Mass spectrometry and Raman spectroscopy were used to provide continuous monitoring of the concentration of H2 and other permanent gases in the dissolution offgas allowing the development of H2 generation rate profiles. The H2 generation rates were subsequently used to evaluate if a full HFIR core could be dissolved in an H-Canyon dissolver without exceeding 60% of the calculated lower

  15. Operating manual for the High Flux Isotope Reactor. Volume I. Description of the facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains a comprehensive description of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Facility. Its primary purpose is to supplement the detailed operating procedures, providing the reactor operators with background information on the various HFIR systems. The detailed operating procdures are presented in another report

  16. Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Design with Two-Dimensional Grading for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

    2011-05-01

    An engineering design study of the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel is ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The computational models developed during fiscal year 2010 to search for an LEU fuel design that would meet the requirements for the conversion and the results obtained with these models are documented and discussed in this report. Estimates of relevant reactor performance parameters for the LEU fuel core are presented and compared with the corresponding data for the currently operating HEU fuel core. The results obtained indicate that the LEU fuel design would maintain the current performance of the HFIR with respect to the neutron flux to the central target region, reflector, and beam tube locations under the assumption that the operating power for the reactor fueled with LEU can be increased from the current value of 85 MW to 100 MW.

  17. Operating manual for the High Flux Isotope Reactor: operating procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Procedures are presented for reactor operation; instrumentation and control; reactor components; research facilities; cooling systems; containment heating, venting, and air conditioning; emergency procedures; waste systems; on-site utilities; records and data accumulation; auxiliary equipment; and technical specification requirements

  18. Brookhaven highlights, October 1978-September 1979

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These highlights present an overview of the major research and development achievements at Brookhaven National Laboratory from October 1978 to September 1979. Specific areas covered include: accelerator and high energy physics programs; high energy physics research; the AGS and improvements to the AGS; neutral beam development; heavy ion fusion; superconducting power cables; ISABELLE storage rings; the BNL Tandem accelerator; heavy ion experiments at the Tandem; the High Flux Beam Reactor; medium energy physics; nuclear theory; atomic and applied physics; solid state physics; neutron scattering studies; x-ray scattering studies; solid state theory; defects and disorder in solids; surface physics; the National Synchrotron Light Source ; Chemistry Department; Biology Department; Medical Department; energy sciences; environmental sciences; energy technology programs; National Center for Analysis of Energy Systems; advanced reactor systems; nuclear safety; National Nuclear Data Center; nuclear materials safeguards; Applied Mathematics Department; and support activities

  19. COMPARISON OF COOLING SCHEMES FOR HIGH HEAT FLUX COMPONENTS COOLING IN FUSION REACTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phani Kumar Domalapally

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Some components of the fusion reactor receives high heat fluxes either during the startup and shutdown or during the operation of the machine. This paper analyzes different ways of enhancing heat transfer using helium and water for cooling of these high heat flux components and then conclusions are drawn to decide the best choice of coolant, for usage in near and long term applications.

  20. A neutronic feasibility study for LEU conversion of the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A neutronic feasibility study for converting the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor from HEU to LEU fuel was performed at Argonne National Laboratory in cooperation with Brookhaven National Laboratory. Two possible LEU cores were identified that would provide nearly the same neutron flux and spectrum as the present HEU core at irradiation facilities that are used for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy and for animal research. One core has 17 and the other has 18 LEU MTR-type fuel assemblies with uranium densities of 2.5g U/cm3 or less in the fuel meat. This LEU fuel is fully-qualified for routine use. Thermal hydraulics and safety analyses need to be performed to complete the feasibility study. (author)

  1. High-flux beam source for cold, slow atoms or molecules

    OpenAIRE

    Maxwell, S. E.; Brahms, N.; deCarvalho, R.; Helton, J.; Nguyen, S V; Patterson, D; Doyle, J. M.; Glenn, D. R.; Petricka, J.; DeMille, D.

    2005-01-01

    We demonstrate and characterize a high-flux beam source for cold, slow atoms or molecules. The desired species is vaporized using laser ablation, then cooled by thermalization in a cryogenic cell of buffer gas. The beam is formed by particles exiting a hole in the buffer gas cell. We characterize the properties of the beam (flux, forward velocity, temperature) for both an atom (Na) and a molecule (PbO) under varying buffer gas density, and discuss conditions for optimizing these beam paramete...

  2. The response time analysis of high log neutron flux rate for heavy water reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The heavy water reactor such as Wolssung no. 1 has a protection/safety system named special safety system. The system has four safety systems ; shutdown no. 1, shutdown no. 2, emergency core cooling system and containment system. In this paper, the response time of high log neutron flux rate, one of the reactor trip loops of shutdown no.1/no.2, was analysed based on the description of final safety analysis report and compared to the plant measurement

  3. 1980 Annual status report: operation of the high flux reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HFR Petten has been operated in 1980 in fulfilment of the 1980/83 JRC Programme Decision. Both reactor operation and utilization data have been met within a few percent of the goals set out in the annual working schedule, in support of a large variety of research programmes. Major improvements to experimental facilities have been introduced during the year and future modernization has been prepared

  4. Power Distribution Analysis for the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor Critical Experiment 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mission of the Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors Program is to minimize and, to the extent possible, eliminate the use of highly enriched uranium (HEU) in civilian nuclear applications by working to convert research and test reactors, as well as radioisotope production processes, to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel and targets. Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) is currently reviewing the design bases and key operating criteria including fuel operating parameters, enrichment-related safety analyses, fuel performance, and fuel fabrication in regard to converting the fuel of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from HEU to LEU. The purpose of this study is to validate Monte Carlo methods currently in use for conversion analyses. The methods have been validated for the prediction offlux values in the reactor target, reflector, and beam tubes, but this study focuses on the prediction of the power density profile in the core. Power distributions were calculated in the fuel elements of the HFIR, a research reactor at ORNL, via MCNP and were compared to experimentally obtained data. This study was performed to validate Monte Carlo methods for power density calculations and to observe biases. A current three-dimensional MCNP model was modified to replicate the 1965 HFIR Critical Experiment 3 (HFIRCE-3). In this experiment, the power profile was determined by counting the gamma activity at selected locations in the core. 'Foils' (chunks of fuel meat and clad) were punched out of the fuel elements in HFIRCE-3 following irradiation, and experimental relative power densities were obtained by measuring the activity of these foils and comparing each foil's activity to the activity of a normalizing foil. This analysis consisted of calculating corresponding activities by inserting volume tallies into the modified MCNP model to represent the punchings. The average fission density was calculated for each foil location and then normalized to the reference foil

  5. Specifications for high flux isotope reactor fuel elements HFIR-FE-3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This specification covers requirements for two types of aluminum-base fuel elements which together will be used as the fuel assembly in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Requirements are included for materials of construction, fabrication, assembly, inspection, and quality control to produce fuel elements in accordance with Company drawings

  6. High flux and high resolution VUV beam line for synchrotron radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A beam line has been optimized for high flux and high resolution in the wavelength range from 30 nm to 300 nm. Sample chambers for luminescence spectroscopy on gaseous, liquid and solid samples and for photoelectron spectroscopy have been integrated. The synchrotron radiation from the storage ring DORIS (at DESY, Hamburg) emitted into 50 mrad in horizontal and into 2.2 mrad in vertical direction is focused by a cylindrical and a plane elliptical mirror into the entrance slit of a 2m normal incidence monochromator. The light flux from the exit slit is focused by a rotational elliptic mirror onto the sample yielding a size of the light spot of 4 x 0.15 mm2. The light flux at the sample reaches 7 x 1012 photons nm-1s-1 at 8 eV photon energy for a current of 100 mA in DORIS. A resolution of 0.007 nm has been obtained. (orig.)

  7. Temporal behavior of neutral particle fluxes in TFTR (Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor) neutral beam injectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamperschroer, J.H.; Gammel, G.M.; Roquemore, A.L.; Grisham, L.R.; Kugel, H.W.; Medley, S.S.; O' Connor, T.E.; Stevenson, T.N.; von Halle, A.; Williams, M.D.

    1989-09-01

    Data from an E {parallel} B charge exchange neutral analyzer (CENA), which views down the axis of a neutral beamline through an aperture in the target chamber calorimeter of the TFTR neutral beam test facility, exhibit two curious effects. First, there is a turn-on transient lasting tens of milliseconds having a magnitude up to three times that of the steady-state level. Second, there is a 720 Hz, up to 20% peak-to-peak fluctuation persisting the entire pulse duration. The turn-on transient occurs as the neutralizer/ion source system reaches a new pressure equilibrium following the effective ion source gas throughput reduction by particle removal as ion beam. Widths of the transient are a function of the gas throughput into the ion source, decreasing as the gas supply rate is reduced. Heating of the neutalizer gas by the beam is assumed responsible, with gas temperature increasing as gas supply rate is decreased. At low gas supply rates, the transient is primarliy due to dynamic changes in the neutralizer line density and/or beam species composition. Light emission from the drift duct corroborate the CENA data. At high gas supply rates, dynamic changes in component divergence and/or spatial profiles of the source plasma are necessary to explain the observations. The 720 Hz fluctuation is attributed to a 3% peak-to-peak ripple of 720 Hz on the arc power supply amplified by the quadratic relationship between beam divergence and beam current. Tight collimation by CENA apertures cause it to accept a very small part of the ion source's velocity space, producing a signal linearly proportional to beam divergence. Estimated fluctuations in the peak power density delivered to the plasma under these conditions are a modest 3--8% peak to peak. The efffects of both phenomena on the injected neutral beam can be ameliorated by careful operion of the ion sources. 21 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  8. Progress on the realization of a new GEM based neutron diagnostic concept for high flux neutron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croci, G.; Rebai, M.; Cazzaniga, C.; Palma, M. Dalla; Grosso, G.; Muraro, A.; Murtas, F.; Claps, G.; Pasqualotto, R.; Cippo, E. Perelli; Tardocchi, M.; Tollin, M.; Cavenago, M.; Gorini, G.

    2014-08-01

    Fusion reactors will need high flux neutron detectors to diagnose the deuterium-deuterium and deuterium-tritium. A candidate detection technique is the Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM). New GEM based detectors are being developed for application to a neutral deuterium beam test facility. The proposed detection system is called Close-contact Neutron Emission Surface Mapping (CNESM). The diagnostic aims at providing the map of the neutron emission due to interaction of the deuterium beam with the deuterons implanted in the beam dump surface. This is done by placing a detector in close contact, right behind the dump. CNESM uses nGEM detectors, i.e. GEM detectors equipped with a cathode that also serves as neutron-proton converter foil. After the realization and test of several small area prototypes, a full size prototype has been realized and tested with laboratory sources. Test on neutron beams are foreseen for the next months.

  9. Next generation fuel irradiation capability in the High Flux Reactor Petten

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuetterer, Michael A., E-mail: michael.fuetterer@jrc.n [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy (JRC-IE), P.O. Box 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); D' Agata, Elio; Laurie, Mathias; Marmier, Alain; Scaffidi-Argentina, Francesco [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Energy (JRC-IE), P.O. Box 2, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands); Raison, Philippe [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Transuranium Elements (JRC-ITU), D-76334 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Bakker, Klaas; Groot, Sander de; Klaassen, Frodo [Nuclear Research and consultancy Group (NRG), P.O. Box 25, NL-1755 ZG Petten (Netherlands)

    2009-07-15

    This paper describes selected equipment and expertise on fuel irradiation testing at the High Flux Reactor (HFR) in Petten, The Netherlands. The reactor went critical in 1961 and holds an operating license up to at least 2015. While HFR has initially focused on Light Water Reactor fuel and materials, it also played a decisive role since the 1970s in the German High Temperature Reactor (HTR) development program. A variety of tests related to fast reactor development in Europe were carried out for next generation fuel and materials, in particular for Very High Temperature Reactor (V/HTR) fuel, fuel for closed fuel cycles (U-Pu and Th-U fuel cycle) and transmutation, as well as for other innovative fuel types. The HFR constitutes a significant European infrastructure tool for the development of next generation reactors. Experimental facilities addressed include V/HTR fuel tests, a coated particle irradiation rig, and tests on fast reactor, transmutation and thorium fuel. The rationales for these tests are given, results are provided and further work is outlined.

  10. Radiation dosimetry for NCT facilities at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holden, N.E.; Hu, J.P.; Greenberg, D.D.; Reciniello, R.N.

    1998-12-31

    Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR) is a 3 mega-watt (MW) heterogeneous, tank-type, light water cooled and moderated, graphite reflected reactor, which was designed for medical and biological studies and became operational in 1959. Over time, the BMRR was modified to provide thermal and epithermal neutron beams suitable for research studies. NCT studies have been performed at both the epithermal neutron irradiation facility (ENIF) on the east side of the BMRR reactor core and the thermal neutron irradiation facility (TNIF) on the west side of the core. Neutron and gamma-ray dosimetry performed from 1994 to the present in both facilities are described and the results are presented and discussed.

  11. Radiological environmental monitoring report for Brookhaven National Laboratory 1967--1970

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhold, C.B.; Hull, A.P.

    1998-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was established in 1947 on the former Army Camp Upton site located in central Long Island, New York. From the very beginning, BNL has monitored the environment on and around the Laboratory site to assess the effects of its operations on the environment. This document summarizes the environmental data collected for the years 1967, 1968, 1969, and 1970. Thus, it fills a gap in the series of BNL annual environmental reports beginning in 1962. The data in this document reflect measurements for those four years of concentrations and/or amounts of airborne radioactivity, radioactivity in streams and ground water, and external radiation levels in the vicinity of BNL. Also included are estimates, made at that time, of BNL`s contribution to radioactivity in the environment. Among the major scientific facilities operated at BNL are the High Flux Beam Reactor, Medical Research Reactor, Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, and the 60-inch Cyclotron.

  12. Neutron spectra at different High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) pressure vessel surveillance locations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Remec, I. [Josef Sefan Inst., Ljubljana (Slovenia); Kam, F.B. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1993-12-01

    This project addresses the potential problem of radiation embrittlement of reactor pressure vessel (RPV) supports. Surveillance specimens irradiated at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at relatively low neutron flux levels (about 1.5E + 8 cm{sup {minus}2}.s{sup {minus}1}) and low temperatures (about 50{degrees}C) showed embrittlement more rapidly than expected. Commercial power reactors have similar flux levels and temperatures at the level vessel support structures. The purposes of this work are to provide the neutron fluence spectra data that are needed to evaluate previously measured mechanical property changes in the HFIR, to explain the discrepancies in neutron flux levels between the nickel dosimeters and two other dosimeters, neptunium and beryllium, and to address any questions or peculiarities of the HFIR reactor environment. The current work consists of neutron and gamma transport calculations, dosimetry measurements, and least-squares logarithmic adjustment to obtain the best estimates for the neutron spectra and the related neutron exposure parameters. The results indicate that the fission rates in neptunium-237 (Np-237) and uranium-238 (U-238) and the helium production rates in beryllium-9 (Be-9) are dominated by photo-induced reactions. The displacements per atom rate for iron (dpa/s) from gamma rays is five times higher than the dpa/s from neutrons. The neutron fluxes in key 7, position 5 do not show any significant gradient in the surveillance capsule, but key 4 and key 2 showed differences in magnitude as well as in the shape of the spectrum. The stainless steel monitor in the V-notch of the Charpy specimens of the surveillance capsules is adequate to determine the neutron flux above 1.0 MeV at the desired V-notch location. Simultaneous adjustment of neutron and gamma fluxes with the measurements has been demonstrated and should avoid future problems with photo-induced reactions.

  13. A conceptual high flux reactor design with scope for use in ADS applications

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Usha Pal; V Jagannathan

    2007-02-01

    A 100 MWt reactor design has been conceived to support flux level of the order of 1015 n/cm2/s in selected flux trap zones. The physics design considers high enriched metallic alloy fuel in the form of annular plates placed in a D2O moderator tank in a hexagonal lattice arrangement. By choosing a tight lattice pitch in the central region and double the lattice pitch in the outer region, it is possible to have both high fast flux and thermal flux trap zones. By design the flux level in the seed fuel has been kept lower than in the high flux trap zones so that the burning rate of the seed is reduced. Another important objective of the design is to maximize the time interval of refueling. As against a typical refueling interval of a few weeks in such high flux reactor cores, it is desired to maximize this period to as much as six months or even one year. This is possible to achieve by eliminating the conventional control absorbers and replacing them with a suitable amount of fertile material loading in the reactor. Requisite number of seedless thorium–aluminum alloy plates are placed at regular lattice locations vacated by seed fuel in alternate fuel layers. It is seen that these thorium plates are capable of acquiring asymptotic fissile content of 14 g/kg in about 100 days of irradiation at a flux level of 8 × 1014 n/cm2 /s. In summary, the core has a relatively higher fast flux in the central region and high thermal flux in the outer region. The present physics design envisages a flat core excess reactivity for the longest possible cycle length of 6 months to one year. It is also possible to modify the design for constant subcriticality for about the same period or longer duration by considering neutron spallation source at the centre and curtailing the power density in the inner core region by shielding it with a layer of thoria fuel loading.

  14. HTGR experiment HRB-15b: particle loadings and irradiation in the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thomas, W.E.; Long, E.L. Jr.; Conlin, J.A.; Johnsen, B.P.

    1979-12-01

    Candidate high-temperature gas-cooled reactor fissile and fertile particles were irradiated in the High Flux Isotope Reactor removable beryllium reflector facility (RB-5) for eight reactor cycles. The experiment contained 18 different ''types'' of fissile particles and five different ''types'' of fertile particles. All uranium was 20% enriched in /sup 235/U. The loose particles were loaded into ''trays'' that resemble flat graphite washers, each having 116 drilled holes in one face. One hundred eighty-four trays were stacked in columns in an alternate fertile particle-fissile particle sequence. The particles were irradiated for 169.4 full power days. The report discusses methods used to specify particle loadings and contains thermal and neutronics results applicable to the irradiation test period.

  15. Advanced Multiphysics Thermal-Hydraulics Models for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, Prashant K [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    Engineering design studies to determine the feasibility of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from using highly enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel are ongoing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). This work is part of an effort sponsored by the US Department of Energy (DOE) Reactor Conversion Program. HFIR is a very high flux pressurized light-water-cooled and moderated flux-trap type research reactor. HFIR s current missions are to support neutron scattering experiments, isotope production, and materials irradiation, including neutron activation analysis. Advanced three-dimensional multiphysics models of HFIR fuel were developed in COMSOL software for safety basis (worst case) operating conditions. Several types of physics including multilayer heat conduction, conjugate heat transfer, turbulent flows (RANS model) and structural mechanics were combined and solved for HFIR s inner and outer fuel elements. Alternate design features of the new LEU fuel were evaluated using these multiphysics models. This work led to a new, preliminary reference LEU design that combines a permanent absorber in the lower unfueled region of all of the fuel plates, a burnable absorber in the inner element side plates, and a relocated and reshaped (but still radially contoured) fuel zone. Preliminary results of estimated thermal safety margins are presented. Fuel design studies and model enhancement continue.

  16. Partial Safety Analysis for a Reduced Uranium Enrichment Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primm, Trent [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL

    2009-04-01

    A computational model of the reactor core of the High Flux Isotope Rector (HFIR) was developed in order to analyze non-destructive accidents caused by transients during reactor operation. The reactor model was built for the latest version of the nuclear analysis software package called Program for the Analysis of Reactor Transients (PARET). Analyses performed with the model constructed were compared with previous data obtained with other tools in order to benchmark the code. Finally, the model was used to analyze the behavior of the reactor under transients using a different nuclear fuel with lower enrichment of uranium (LEU) than the fuel currently used, which has a high enrichment of uranium (HEU). The study shows that the presence of fertile isotopes in LEU fuel, which increases the neutron resonance absorption, reduces the impact of transients on the fuel and enhances the negative reactivity feedback, thus, within the limitations of this study, making LEU fuel appear to be a safe alternative fuel for the reactor core.

  17. Proposed fuel pin irradiation facilities for the high flux isotope reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) is proposing to develop a sodium-cooled fast-spectrum reactor (SFR) to transmute and consume actinides from spent nuclear fuel. The proposed fuels include metal and oxide forms mixed actinides (U-Np-Pu-Am-Cm) as well as target concepts with perhaps both Am-Cm. The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) was built for the purpose of transmuting plutonium to various higher actinides including Am, Cm, and Cf Since a fast-spectrum irradiation facility does not exist in the United States, HFIR can fulfill a first step in the GNEP- mission that being to establish a near-term domestic capability to irradiate materials in a fast neutron spectrum. Modifications to the HFIR central target region to accomplish this goal are described. A second ongoing project for HFIR is to design capsules and installation tools and procedures to irradiate short rods of innovative nuclear fuel types and cladding materials under prototypic light water reactor (LWR) operating conditions at an accelerated rate relative to expected reactor performance. This second proposal would be for a facility representative of thermal reactor conditions rather than the GNEP concept. In order to maintain power densities within the fuel at levels normally seen by LWR reactors, an entirely new experiment and test capsule design will be needed. (authors)

  18. Performance Test of High Heat Flux Test Facility for the Calorimetry and Beam Control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Korea Heat Load Test facility, KoHLT-EB (Electron Beam) has been operating for the plasma facing components to develop fusion engineering in Korea. The ITER Neutral Beam Duct Liner (NBDL) was fabricated and tested to qualify the thermocouple fixation method for the temperature measurement during a direct collision of the high-power neutral beam during ITER operation. The NBDL is CuCrZr panels, which are actively water cooled using deep drilled channels. To perform the profile test, the assessment for the possibility of an electron beam Gaussian power density profile and the result of absorbed power for that profile before the test start is needed. To assess the possibility of Gaussian profile, for the qualification test of a Gaussian heat load profile, small calorimetry was manufactured to simulate a real heat profile in the neutral beam duct liner, and this calorimetry has two cooling channel with five thermocouples, which is the same as NBDL. Preliminary analyses with ANSYSCFX using a 3D model were performed with the calorimetry model. The heating area was modeled to be 60 mm x 250 mm. The simulated heat flux is 0.5 - 1.2 MW/m''2 at 0.75 kg/sec of the water flow rate. A steady heat flux test was performed to measure the surface heat flux, surface temperature profile. With a thermohydraulic analysis and heat load test, the Gaussian heat profile will be confirmed for this calorimetry and NBDL mockup. The Korean heat load test facility will be used to qualify the specifications of various plasma facing components in fusion devices. To conduct a beam profile test, an assessment of the possibility of electron beam Gaussian power density profile and the results of the absorbed power for that profile before the test starts are needed. To assess the possibility of a Gaussian profile, for the qualification test of the Gaussian heat load profile, a calorimeter mockup and large Cu module were manufactured to simulate real heat. For this high-heat flux test

  19. Short-lived radionuclides produced on the ORNL 86-inch cyclotron and High-Flux Isotope Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The production of short-lived radionuclides at ORNL includes the preparation of target materials, irradiation on the 86-in. cyclotron and in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), and chemical processing to recover and purify the product radionuclides. In some cases the target materials are highly enriched stable isotopes separated on the ORNL calutrons. High-purity 123I has been produced on the 86-in. cyclotron by irradiating an enriched target of 123Te in a proton beam. Research on calutron separations has led to a 123Te product with lower concentrations of 124Te and 126Te and, consequently to lower concentrations of the unwanted radionuclides, 124I and 126I, in the 123I product. The 86-in. cyclotron accelerates a beam of protons only but is unique in providing the highest available beam current of 1500 μA at 21 MeV. This beam current produces relatively large quantities of radionuclides such as 123I and 67Ga

  20. A Simulator for Producing of High Flux Atomic Oxygen Beam by Using ECR Plasma Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shuwang DUO; Meishuan LI; Yaming ZHANG

    2004-01-01

    In order to study the atomic oxygen corrosion of spacecraft materials in low earth orbit environment, an atomic oxygen simulator was established. In the simulator, a 2.45 GHz microwave source with maximum power of 600 W was launched into the circular cavity to generate ECR (electron cyclotron resonance) plasma. The oxygen ion beam moved onto a negatively biased Mo plate under the condition of symmetry magnetic mirror field confine, then was neutralized and reflected to form oxygen atom beam. The properties of plasma density, electron temperature, plasma space potential and ion incident energy were characterized. The atomic oxygen beam flux was calibrated by measuring the mass loss rate of Kapton during the atomic 5~30 eV and a cross section of φ80 mm could be obtained under the operating pressure of 10-1~10-3 Pa. Such a high flux source can provide accelerated simulation tests of materials and coatings for space applications.

  1. Proposed Fuel Pin Irradiation Facilities for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) is proposing to develop a sodium-cooled fast-spectrum reactor (SFR) to transmute and consume actinides from spent nuclear fuel. The proposed fuels include metal and oxide mixed actinides (U-Np-Pu-Am-Cm) as well as target concepts with perhaps only Am-Cm. The High Flux Isotope Reactor was built for the purpose of transmuting plutonium to various higher actinides including Am, Cm, and Cf. Since a fast-spectrum irradiation facility does not exist in the United States, HFIR can fulfill a first step in the GNEP mission; that being to establish a near-term capability to irradiate materials in a fast neutron spectrum in addition to efforts to gain access to international facilities through partnering arrangements. Modifications to the HFIR central target region to accomplish this goal are described. A second on-going project for HFIR is to design capsules and installation tools and procedures to irradiate short rods of innovative nuclear fuel types and cladding materials under prototypic LWR operating conditions at an accelerated rate relative to expected reactor performance. This second proposal would be for a facility representative of thermal reactor conditions rather than the GNEP concept. In order to maintain power densities within the fuel at levels normally seen by LWR reactors, an entirely new experiment and test capsule design will be needed than has been available in the past

  2. Establishing Specifications for Low Enriched Uranium Fuel Operations Conducted Outside the High Flux Isotope Reactor Site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinkston, Daniel [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Renfro, David G [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL

    2010-10-01

    The National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) has funded staff at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) to study the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from the current, high enriched uranium fuel to low enriched uranium fuel. The LEU fuel form is a metal alloy that has never been used in HFIR or any HFIR-like reactor. This report provides documentation of a process for the creation of a fuel specification that will meet all applicable regulations and guidelines to which UT-Battelle, LLC (UTB) the operating contractor for ORNL - must adhere. This process will allow UTB to purchase LEU fuel for HFIR and be assured of the quality of the fuel being procured.

  3. Burn-Up Calculations for the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor Fuel Elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel bum-up calculations for the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor involve a distribution of the thermal megawatt days of operations to the fuel elements in proportion to the average thermal neutron flux at their location in the reactor. The megawatt days so assigned can be converted to equivalent uranium-235 consumption when needed. The original fuel loading for the BGRR was neutral uranium and a single calculation was performed on each fuel element upon discharge from the reactor. A subsequent change to a fully enriched uranium-235 fuel element, however, introduced complications. The average loading of enriched uranium involves about 4800 individual elements, each occupying four different reactor positions during its term in the reactor. The total term for a central channel element is about one year as against six to eight years for an element in a peripheral channel. With the large number of individual fuel elements involved and the approximately monthly small changes needed for operation, it was necessary to resort to a computer programme to follow the burn-up of all the elements on the reactor continuously. Both this and other functions of the computer programme are discussed in the paper. To date, uranium has been recovered from two batches of spent fuel. On the first, involving 3674 elements discharged from the reactor over a period of 4.9 years, the recovery figures were 5.5% higher than the calculated total of 32.3 kg uranium-235. On the second batch, involving 1296 elements discharged from the reactor over a period of one year, the recovery figures were 2.3% higher than the calculated figures of 10.8 kg uranium-235. This relatively close agreement seems to indicate that the assumptions made to simplify the programme are acceptable and that the results of the programme are satisfactory for our particular accounting and operating requirements. (author)

  4. Heat Transfer Calculation on Plate-Type Fuel Assembly of High Flux Research Reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daxin Gong

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Heat transfer characteristics of fuel assemblies for a high flux research reactor with a neutron trap are numerically investigated in this study. Single-phase turbulence flow is calculated by a commercial code, FLUENT, where the computational objective covers standard and control fuel assemblies. The simulation is carried out with an inlet coolant velocity varying from 4.5 m/s to 7.5 m/s in hot assemblies. The results indicate that the cladding temperature is always lower than the saturation temperature in the calculated ranges. The temperature rise in the control fuel assembly is smaller than that of the standard fuel assembly. Additionally, the assembly with a hot spot is specially studied, and the safety of the research reactor is also approved.

  5. Calculations for HFIR [High Flux Isotope Reactor] fuel plate non- bonding and fuel segregation uncertainty factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of non-bonds and of fuel segregation on the package factors of the heat flux in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) are examined. The effects of the two defects are examined both separately and together. It is concluded that the peaking factors that are used in the present HFIR thermal analysis code are conservative and thus no changes in the peaking factors are necessary to continue to ensure that HFIR is safe. A study was made of the effect of the non-bond spot diameter on the peaking factor. The conclusion is that the spot can have diameter more than three times the maximum value allowed by the specifications before the peaking factor is greater than the maximum value specified in the present HFIR thermal analysis code. 6 refs., 7 figs., 8 tabs

  6. The wave energy flux of high frequency diffracting beams in complex geometrical optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maj, Omar; Mariani, Alberto; Poli, Emanuele; Farina, Daniela

    2013-04-01

    We consider the construction of asymptotic solutions of Maxwell's equations for a diffracting wave beam in the high frequency limit and address the description of the wave energy flux transported by the beam. With this aim, the complex eikonal method is applied. That is a generalization of the standard geometrical optics method in which the phase function is assumed to be complex valued, with the non-negative imaginary part accounting for the finite width of the beam cross section. In this framework, we propose an argument which simplifies significantly the analysis of the transport equation for the wave field amplitude and allows us to derive the wave energy flux. The theoretical analysis is illustrated numerically for the case of electron cyclotron beams in tokamak plasmas by using the GRAY code [D. Farina, Fusion Sci. Technol. 52, 154 (2007)], which is based upon the complex eikonal theory. The results are compared to those of the paraxial beam tracing code TORBEAM [E. Poli et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 136, 90 (2001)], which provides an independent calculation of the energy flow.

  7. The wave energy flux of high frequency diffracting beams in complex geometrical optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maj, Omar; Poli, Emanuele [Max Planck Institute for Plasma Physics, EURATOM Association, Boltzmannstr. 2, 85748 Garching (Germany); Mariani, Alberto [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma ' P. Caldirola,' Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, via R. Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milano (Italy); Universita degli Studi di Milano, Dipartimento di Fisica, Via Celoria 16, 20133 Milano (Italy); Farina, Daniela [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma ' P. Caldirola,' Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, via R. Cozzi 53, I-20125 Milano (Italy)

    2013-04-15

    We consider the construction of asymptotic solutions of Maxwell's equations for a diffracting wave beam in the high frequency limit and address the description of the wave energy flux transported by the beam. With this aim, the complex eikonal method is applied. That is a generalization of the standard geometrical optics method in which the phase function is assumed to be complex valued, with the non-negative imaginary part accounting for the finite width of the beam cross section. In this framework, we propose an argument which simplifies significantly the analysis of the transport equation for the wave field amplitude and allows us to derive the wave energy flux. The theoretical analysis is illustrated numerically for the case of electron cyclotron beams in tokamak plasmas by using the GRAY code [D. Farina, Fusion Sci. Technol. 52, 154 (2007)], which is based upon the complex eikonal theory. The results are compared to those of the paraxial beam tracing code TORBEAM [E. Poli et al., Comput. Phys. Commun. 136, 90 (2001)], which provides an independent calculation of the energy flow.

  8. Status of FeCrAl ODS Irradiations in the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G [ORNL; Howard, Richard H [ORNL

    2016-08-01

    FeCrAl ODS alloys are an attractive sub-set alloy class of the more global FeCrAl alloys class for nuclear applications due to their high temperature steam oxidation resistance and hypothesized enhanced radiation tolerance. A need currently exists to determine the radiation tolerance of these newly developed alloys. To address this need, a preliminary study was conducted using the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to irradiate an early generation FeCrAl ODS alloy, 125YF. Preliminary PIE on these irradiated specimens have shown good radiation tolerance at elevated temperatures (330 C) but possible radiation-induced hardening and embrittlement at irradiations of 200 C at 1.9 dpa. Building on this experience, a new series of irradiations are currently being conceptualized. This irradiation series called the FCAD irradiation program will irradiate the latest generation FeCrAl ODS and FeCr ODS alloys to significantly higher doses than the preliminary studies final dose level. These experiments will provide the necessary information to determine the mechanical performance of irradiated FeCrAl ODS alloys at light water reactor and fast reactor conditions.

  9. Status of FeCrAl ODS Irradiations in the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD); Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD)

    2016-08-19

    FeCrAl oxide-dispersion strengthened (ODS) alloys are an attractive sub-set alloy class of the more global FeCrAl material class for nuclear applications due to their high temperature steam oxidation resistance and hypothesized enhanced radiation tolerance. A need currently exists to determine the radiation tolerance of these newly developed alloys. To address this need, a preliminary study was conducted using the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) to irradiate an early generation FeCrAl ODS alloy, 125YF. Preliminary post-irradiation examination (PIE) on these irradiated specimens have shown good radiation tolerance at elevated temperatures (≥330°C) but possible radiation-induced hardening and embrittlement at irradiations of 200°C to a damage level of 1.9 displacement per atom (dpa). Building on this experience, a new series of irradiations are currently being conceptualized. This irradiation series called the FCAD irradiation program will irradiate the latest generation FeCrAl ODS and FeCr ODS alloys to significantly higher doses. These experiments will provide the necessary information to determine the mechanical performance of irradiated FeCrAl ODS alloys at light water reactor and fast reactor conditions.

  10. High flux cold Rubidium atomic beam for strongly coupled Cavity QED

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Basudev

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a setup capable of producing a high-flux continuous beam of cold rubidium atoms for cavity QED experiments in the regime of strong coupling. A 2 $D^+$ MOT, loaded by rubidium getters in a dry film coated vapor cell, fed a secondary moving-molasses MOT (MM-MOT) at a rate of 1.5 x $10^{10}$ atoms/sec. The MM-MOT provided a continuous beam with tunable velocity. This beam was then directed through the waist of a 280 $\\mu$m cavity resulting in a Rabi splitting of more than +/- 10 MHz. The presence of sufficient number of atoms in the cavity mode also enabled splitting in the polarization perpendicular to the input. The cavity was in the strong coupling regime, with parameters (g, $\\kappa$, $\\gamma$)/2$\\pi$ equal to (7, 3, 6)/ 2$\\pi$ MHz.

  11. Laser ion source with solenoid for Brookhaven National Laboratory-electron beam ion sourcea)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K.; Yamamoto, T.; Sekine, M.; Okamura, M.

    2012-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a new heavy ion-preinjector for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Laser ion source (LIS) is a primary ion source provider for the BNL-EBIS. LIS with solenoid at the plasma drift section can realize the low peak current (˜100 μA) with high charge (˜10 nC) which is the BNL-EBIS requirement. The gap between two solenoids does not cause serious plasma current decay, which helps us to make up the BNL-EBIS beamline.

  12. Laser ion source with solenoid for Brookhaven National Laboratory-electron beam ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a new heavy ion-preinjector for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Laser ion source (LIS) is a primary ion source provider for the BNL-EBIS. LIS with solenoid at the plasma drift section can realize the low peak current (∼100 μA) with high charge (∼10 nC) which is the BNL-EBIS requirement. The gap between two solenoids does not cause serious plasma current decay, which helps us to make up the BNL-EBIS beamline.

  13. Laser ion source with solenoid for Brookhaven National Laboratory-electron beam ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kondo, K; Yamamoto, T; Sekine, M; Okamura, M

    2012-02-01

    The electron beam ion source (EBIS) preinjector at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is a new heavy ion-preinjector for relativistic heavy ion collider (RHIC) and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL). Laser ion source (LIS) is a primary ion source provider for the BNL-EBIS. LIS with solenoid at the plasma drift section can realize the low peak current (∼100 μA) with high charge (∼10 nC) which is the BNL-EBIS requirement. The gap between two solenoids does not cause serious plasma current decay, which helps us to make up the BNL-EBIS beamline. PMID:22380298

  14. Modeling and Depletion Simulations for a High Flux Isotope Reactor Cycle with a Representative Experiment Loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirtz, Gregory John [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document a high-fidelity VESTA/MCNP High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) core model that features a new, representative experiment loading. This model, which represents the current, high-enriched uranium fuel core, will serve as a reference for low-enriched uranium conversion studies, safety-basis calculations, and other research activities. A new experiment loading model was developed to better represent current, typical experiment loadings, in comparison to the experiment loading included in the model for Cycle 400 (operated in 2004). The new experiment loading model for the flux trap target region includes full length 252Cf production targets, 75Se production capsules, 63Ni production capsules, a 188W production capsule, and various materials irradiation targets. Fully loaded 238Pu production targets are modeled in eleven vertical experiment facilities located in the beryllium reflector. Other changes compared to the Cycle 400 model are the high-fidelity modeling of the fuel element side plates and the material composition of the control elements. Results obtained from the depletion simulations with the new model are presented, with a focus on time-dependent isotopic composition of irradiated fuel and single cycle isotope production metrics.

  15. Modeling and Depletion Simulations for a High Flux Isotope Reactor Cycle with a Representative Experiment Loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division; Betzler, Ben [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division; Hirtz, Gregory John [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division; Ilas, Germina [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division; Sunny, Eva [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this report is to document a high-fidelity VESTA/MCNP High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) core model that features a new, representative experiment loading. This model, which represents the current, high-enriched uranium fuel core, will serve as a reference for low-enriched uranium conversion studies, safety-basis calculations, and other research activities. A new experiment loading model was developed to better represent current, typical experiment loadings, in comparison to the experiment loading included in the model for Cycle 400 (operated in 2004). The new experiment loading model for the flux trap target region includes full length 252Cf production targets, 75Se production capsules, 63Ni production capsules, a 188W production capsule, and various materials irradiation targets. Fully loaded 238Pu production targets are modeled in eleven vertical experiment facilities located in the beryllium reflector. Other changes compared to the Cycle 400 model are the high-fidelity modeling of the fuel element side plates and the material composition of the control elements. Results obtained from the depletion simulations with the new model are presented, with a focus on time-dependent isotopic composition of irradiated fuel and single cycle isotope production metrics.

  16. Reactor Physics Studies of Reduced-Tantaulum-Content Control and Safety Elements for the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some of the unirradiated High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) control elements discharged during the late 1990s were observed to have cladding damage--local swelling or blistering. The cladding damage was limited to the tantalum/europium interface of the element and is thought to result from interaction of hydrogen and europium to form a compound of lower density than europium oxide, thus leading to a ''blistering'' of the control plate cladding. Reducing the tantalum loading in the control plates should help preclude this phenomena. The impact of the change to the control plates on the operation of the reactor was assessed. Regarding nominal, steady-state reactor operation, the impact of the change in the power distribution in the core due to reduced tantalum content was calculated and found to be insignificant. The magnitude and impact of the change in differential control element worth was calculated, and the differential worths of reduced tantalum elements vs the current elements from equivalent-burnup critical configurations were determined to be unchanged within the accuracy of the computational method and relevant experimental measurements. The location of the critical control elements symmetric positions for reduced tantalum elements was found to be 1/3 in. less withdrawn relative to existing control elements regardless of the value of fuel cycle burnup (time in the fuel cycle). The magnitude and impact of the change in the shutdown margin (integral rod worth) was assessed and found to be unchanged. Differential safety element worth values for the reduced-tantalum-content elements were calculated for postulated accident conditions and were found to be greater than values currently assumed in HFIR safety analyses

  17. Development of a high-heat-flux target for multimegawatt, multisecond neutral beams at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combs, S.K.; Milora, S.L.; Bush, C.E.; Foster, C.A.; Haselton, H.H.; Hayes, P.H.; Menon, M.M.; Moeller, J.A.; Sluss, F.; Tsai, C.C.

    1984-01-01

    A high-heat-flux target has been developed for intercepting multimegawatt, multisecond neutral beam power at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). Water-cooled copper swirl tubes are used for the heat transfer medium; these tubes exhibit an enhancement in burnout heat flux over conventional axial-flow tubes. The target consists of 126 swirl tubes (each 0.95 cm in outside diameter with 0.16-cm-thick walls and approx. =1 m long) arranged in a V-shape. Two arrays of parallel tubes inclined at an angle ..cap alpha.. to the beam axis form the V-shape, and this geometry reduces the surface heat flux by a factor of 1/sin ..cap alpha.. (for the present design, ..cap alpha.. =13/sup 0/ and 21/sup 0/). In tests with the ORNL long-pulse ion source (13- by 43-cm grid), the target has handled up to 3-MW, 30-s beam pulses with no deleterious effects. The peak power density was estimated at approx. =15 kW/cm/sup 2/ normal to the beam axis (5.4 kW/cm/sup 2/ maximum on tube surfaces). The water flow rate through the target was 41.6 L/s (660 gpm) or 0.33 L/s (5.2 gpm) per tube (axial flow velocity = 11.6 m/s). The corresponding pressure drop across the target was 1.14 MPa (165 psi) with an inlet pressure of 1.45 MPa (210 psia). Data are also presented from backup experiments in which individual tubes were heated by a small ion source (10-cm-diam grid) to characterize tube performance. These results suggest that the target should handle peak power densities in the range 25 to 30 kW/cm/sup 2/ normal to the beam axis (approx. =10 kW/cm/sup 2/ maximum on tube surfaces) with the present flow parameters. This translates to beam power levels of 5 to 6 MW for equivalent beam optics.

  18. Aging, maintenance and modernization of instrumentation at the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes actions taken at ORNL to upgrade and modernize systems associated with the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Three systems are described. The first is a redesigned resistance temperature device commonly used as a temperature detector at HFIR. The aging of existing devices, and lack of spare devices prompted the redesign of new temperature sensors which used commercial grade sensors in a redesigned assembly which allows easier maintenance. The second is a newly designed neutron detector system to replace existing aging devices. The new design uses commercial ionization chambers, in a cheaper, simpler, and less complicated design which could fit in the previous space, and provide monitoring for control and for protection. The third is the development and implementation of a new test procedure for checking the safety performance of the magnetic safety rod release system. This new procedure allows for electronic testing of the modules with considerably lessened chances that a rod will be dropped during the weekly testing

  19. PROJECT-SPECIFIC TYPE A VERIFICATION FOR THE BROOKHAVEN GRAPHITE RESEARCH REACTOR ENGINEERED CAP, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY UPTON, NEW YORK DCN 5098-SR-07-0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evan Harpenau

    2011-07-15

    The Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education (ORISE) has reviewed the project documentation and data for the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor (BGRR) Engineered Cap at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York. The Brookhaven Science Associates (BSA) have completed removal of affected soils and performed as-left surveys by BSA associated with the BGRR Engineered Cap. Sample results have been submitted, as required, to demonstrate that remediation efforts comply with the cleanup goal of {approx}15 mrem/yr above background to a resident in 50 years (BNL 2011a).

  20. Application of expert systems to heat exchanger control at the 100-megawatt high-flux isotope reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High-Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) is a 100-MW pressurized water reactor at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory. It is used to produce isotopes and as a source of high neutron flux for research. Three heat exchangers are used to remove heat from the reactor to the cooling towers. A fourth heat exchanger is available as a spare in case one of the operating heat exchangers malfunctions. It is desirable to maintain the reactor at full power while replacing the failed heat exchanger with the spare. The existing procedures used by the operators form the initial knowledge base for design of an expert system to perform the switchover. To verify performance of the expert system, a dynamic simulation of the system was developed in the MACLISP programming language. 2 refs., 3 figs

  1. STATUS OF HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR IRRADIATION OF SILICON CARBIDE/SILICON CARBIDE JOINTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Katoh, Yutai [ORNL; Koyanagi, Takaaki [ORNL; Kiggans, Jim [ORNL; Cetiner, Nesrin [ORNL; McDuffee, Joel [ORNL

    2014-09-01

    Development of silicon carbide (SiC) joints that retain adequate structural and functional properties in the anticipated service conditions is a critical milestone toward establishment of advanced SiC composite technology for the accident-tolerant light water reactor (LWR) fuels and core structures. Neutron irradiation is among the most critical factors that define the harsh service condition of LWR fuel during the normal operation. The overarching goal of the present joining and irradiation studies is to establish technologies for joining SiC-based materials for use as the LWR fuel cladding. The purpose of this work is to fabricate SiC joint specimens, characterize those joints in an unirradiated condition, and prepare rabbit capsules for neutron irradiation study on the fabricated specimens in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Torsional shear test specimens of chemically vapor-deposited SiC were prepared by seven different joining methods either at Oak Ridge National Laboratory or by industrial partners. The joint test specimens were characterized for shear strength and microstructures in an unirradiated condition. Rabbit irradiation capsules were designed and fabricated for neutron irradiation of these joint specimens at an LWR-relevant temperature. These rabbit capsules, already started irradiation in HFIR, are scheduled to complete irradiation to an LWR-relevant dose level in early 2015.

  2. A Level 1+ Probabilistic Safety Assessment of the High Flux Australian Reactor. Vol 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    The Department of Industry, Science and Tourism selected PLG, an EQE International Company, to systematically and independently evaluate the safety of the High Flux Australian Reactor (HIFAR), located at Lucas Heights, New South Wales. PLG performed a comprehensive probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) to quantify the risks posed by operation of HIFAR . The PSA identified possible accident scenarios, estimated their likelihood of occurrence, and assigned each scenario to a consequence category; i.e., end state. The accident scenarios developed included the possible release of radioactive material from irradiated nuclear fuel and of tritium releases from reactor coolant. The study team developed a recommended set of safety criteria against which the results of the PSA may be judged. HIFAR was found to exceed one of the two primary safety objectives and two of the five secondary safety objectives. Reactor coolant leaks, earthquakes, and coolant pump trips were the accident initiators that contributed most to scenarios that could result in fuel overheating. Scenarios initiated by earthquakes were the reason the frequency criterion for the one primary safety objective was exceeded. Overall, the plant safety status has been shown to be generally good with no evidence of major safety-related problems from its operation. One design deficiency associated with the emergency core cooling system was identified that should be corrected as soon as possible. Additionally, several analytical issues have been identified that should be investigated further. The results from these additional investigations should be used to determine whether additional plant and procedural changes are required, or if further evaluations of postulated severe accidents are warranted. Supporting information can be found in Appendix A for the seismic analysis and in the Appendix B for selected other external events refs., 139 tabs., 85 figs. Prepared for Department of Industry, Science and Tourism

  3. A Level 1+ Probabilistic Safety Assessment of the High Flux Australian Reactor. Vol 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Department of Industry, Science and Tourism selected PLG, an EQE International Company, to systematically and independently evaluate the safety of the High Flux Australian Reactor (HIFAR), located at Lucas Heights, New South Wales. PLG performed a comprehensive probabilistic safety assessment (PSA) to quantify the risks posed by operation of HIFAR . The PSA identified possible accident scenarios, estimated their likelihood of occurrence, and assigned each scenario to a consequence category; i.e., end state. The accident scenarios developed included the possible release of radioactive material from irradiated nuclear fuel and of tritium releases from reactor coolant. The study team developed a recommended set of safety criteria against which the results of the PSA may be judged. HIFAR was found to exceed one of the two primary safety objectives and two of the five secondary safety objectives. Reactor coolant leaks, earthquakes, and coolant pump trips were the accident initiators that contributed most to scenarios that could result in fuel overheating. Scenarios initiated by earthquakes were the reason the frequency criterion for the one primary safety objective was exceeded. Overall, the plant safety status has been shown to be generally good with no evidence of major safety-related problems from its operation. One design deficiency associated with the emergency core cooling system was identified that should be corrected as soon as possible. Additionally, several analytical issues have been identified that should be investigated further. The results from these additional investigations should be used to determine whether additional plant and procedural changes are required, or if further evaluations of postulated severe accidents are warranted. Supporting information can be found in Appendix A for the seismic analysis and in the Appendix B for selected other external events

  4. Brookhaven highlights, October 1978-September 1979. [October 1978 to September 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    These highlights present an overview of the major research and development achievements at Brookhaven National Laboratory from October 1978 to September 1979. Specific areas covered include: accelerator and high energy physics programs; high energy physics research; the AGS and improvements to the AGS; neutral beam development; heavy ion fusion; superconducting power cables; ISABELLE storage rings; the BNL Tandem accelerator; heavy ion experiments at the Tandem; the High Flux Beam Reactor; medium energy physics; nuclear theory; atomic and applied physics; solid state physics; neutron scattering studies; x-ray scattering studies; solid state theory; defects and disorder in solids; surface physics; the National Synchrotron Light Source ; Chemistry Department; Biology Department; Medical Department; energy sciences; environmental sciences; energy technology programs; National Center for Analysis of Energy Systems; advanced reactor systems; nuclear safety; National Nuclear Data Center; nuclear materials safeguards; Applied Mathematics Department; and support activities. (GHT)

  5. Job/task analysis for I ampersand C [Instrumentation and Controls] instrument technicians at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To comply with Department of Energy Order 5480.XX (Draft), a job/task analysis was initiated by the Maintenance Management Department at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL). The analysis was applicable to instrument technicians working at the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). This document presents the procedures and results of that analysis. 2 refs., 2 figs

  6. Establishing a Cost Basis for Converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor from High Enriched to Low Enriched Uranium Fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Under the auspices of the Global Threat Reduction Initiative Reduced Enrichment for Research and Test Reactors Program, the National Nuclear Security Administration/Department of Energy (NNSA/DOE) has, as a goal, to convert research reactors worldwide from weapons grade to non-weapons grade uranium. The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Lab (ORNL) is one of the candidates for conversion of fuel from high enriched uranium (HEU) to low enriched uranium (LEU). A well documented business model, including tasks, costs, and schedules was developed to plan the conversion of HFIR. Using Microsoft Project, a detailed outline of the conversion program was established and consists of LEU fuel design activities, a fresh fuel shipping cask, improvements to the HFIR reactor building, and spent fuel operations. Current-value costs total $76 million dollars, include over 100 subtasks, and will take over 10 years to complete. The model and schedule follows the path of the fuel from receipt from fuel fabricator to delivery to spent fuel storage and illustrates the duration, start, and completion dates of each subtask to be completed. Assumptions that form the basis of the cost estimate have significant impact on cost and schedule.

  7. Modeling and Simulations for the High Flux Isotope Reactor Cycle 400

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ilas, Germina [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); Chandler, David [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); Ade, Brian J [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); Sunny, Eva E [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); Betzler, Benjamin R [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR); Pinkston, Daniel [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)

    2015-03-01

    A concerted effort over the past few years has been focused on enhancing the core model for the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), as part of a comprehensive study for HFIR conversion from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. At this time, the core model used to perform analyses in support of HFIR operation is an MCNP model for the beginning of Cycle 400, which was documented in detail in a 2005 technical report. A HFIR core depletion model that is based on current state-of-the-art methods and nuclear data was needed to serve as reference for the design of an LEU fuel for HFIR. The recent enhancements in modeling and simulations for HFIR that are discussed in the present report include: (1) revision of the 2005 MCNP model for the beginning of Cycle 400 to improve the modeling data and assumptions as necessary based on appropriate primary reference sources HFIR drawings and reports; (2) improvement of the fuel region model, including an explicit representation for the involute fuel plate geometry that is characteristic to HFIR fuel; and (3) revision of the Monte Carlo-based depletion model for HFIR in use since 2009 but never documented in detail, with the development of a new depletion model for the HFIR explicit fuel plate representation. The new HFIR models for Cycle 400 are used to determine various metrics of relevance to reactor performance and safety assessments. The calculated metrics are compared, where possible, with measurement data from preconstruction critical experiments at HFIR, data included in the current HFIR safety analysis report, and/or data from previous calculations performed with different methods or codes. The results of the analyses show that the models presented in this report provide a robust and reliable basis for HFIR analyses.

  8. Utilization of the High Flux Isotope Reactor at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selby, Douglas L [ORNL; Bilheux, Hassina Z [ORNL; Meilleur, Flora [ORNL; Jones, Amy [ORNL; Bailey, William Barton [ORNL; Vandergriff, David H [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    This paper addresses several aspects of the scientific utilization of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). Topics to be covered will include: 1) HFIR neutron scattering instruments and the formal instrument user program; 2) Recent upgrades to the neutron scattering instrument stations at the reactor, and 3) eMod a new tool for addressing instrument modifications and providing configuration control and design process for scientific instruments at HFIR and the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). There are 15 operating neutron instrument stations at HFIR with 12 of them organized into a formal user program. Since the last presentation on HFIR instruments at IGORR we have installed a Single Crystal Quasi-Laue Diffractometer instrument called IMAGINE; and we have made significant upgrades to HFIR neutron scattering instruments including the Cold Triple Axis Instrument, the Wide Angle Neutron Diffractometer, the Powder Diffractometer, and the Neutron Imaging station. In addition, we have initiated upgrades to the Thermal Triple Axis Instrument and the Bio-SANS cold neutron instrument detector system. All of these upgrades are tied to a continuous effort to maintain a high level neutron scattering user program at the HFIR. For the purpose of tracking modifications such as those mentioned and configuration control we have been developing an electronic system for entering instrument modification requests that follows a modification or instrument project through concept development, design, fabrication, installation, and commissioning. This system, which we call eMod, electronically leads the task leader through a series of questions and checklists that then identifies such things as ES&H and radiological issues and then automatically designates specific individuals for the activity review process. The system has been in use for less than a year and we are still working out some of the inefficiencies, but we believe that this will become a very

  9. Surface modification of molten W exposed to high heat flux helium neutral beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High heat flux tests with central heat flux of 10.5 MW/m2 using helium neutral beams have been carried out on rolled tungsten. The energy of helium particles is 33 keV and the particle flux is 2 × 1021 m−2 s−1. An 80 × 65 × 3 mm3 rolled tungsten plate is firstly exposed to a 4.6 s pulse resulting in partially molten surfaces. Thereafter the tungsten plate is irradiated by several helium pulses with fluences of 1.2–2.5 × 1022/m2 and peak temperatures from 1450 to 2590 °C. The experiments show that: (1) helium-induced surface modification of the resolidified tungsten surface is very different from that of the non-molten surface; (2) the surface morphology of molten surface is closely related to the orientation of the resolidified grain; (3) the evolution of surface modifications, for both of the molten and non-molten tungsten surfaces, indicates a strong dependence on the surface temperature and local helium fluence

  10. High energy physics at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The high energy plans at BNL are centered around the AGS and ISABELLE, or a variant thereof. At present the AGS is maintaining a strong and varied program. This last year a total of 4 x 1019 protons were delivered on target in a period of approximately 20 weeks. Physics interest is very strong, half of the submitted proposals are rejected (thereby maintaining high quality experiments) and the program is full over the next two years. The future colliding beam facility will utilize the AGS as an injector and will be a dedicated facility. It will have six intersection regions, run > 107 sec/year, and explore a new domain of energy and luminosity. Common to all the considered alternatives is a large aperture proton ring. These possible choices involve pp, ep, and heavy ion variants. The long term philosophy is to run the AGS as much as possible, continuously to upgrade it in performance and reliability, and then to phase it down as the new collider begins operation

  11. High-flux cold rubidium atomic beam for strongly-coupled cavity QED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Basudev [Indian Institute of Science Education and Research, Kolkata (India); University of Maryland, MD (United States); Scholten, Michael [University of Maryland, MD (United States)

    2012-08-15

    This paper presents a setup capable of producing a high-flux continuous beam of cold rubidium atoms for cavity quantum electrodynamics experiments in the region of strong coupling. A 2D{sup +} magneto-optical trap (MOT), loaded with rubidium getters in a dry-film-coated vapor cell, fed a secondary moving-molasses MOT (MM-MOT) at a rate greater than 2 x 10{sup 10} atoms/s. The MM-MOT provided a continuous beam with a tunable velocity. This beam was then directed through the waist of a cavity with a length of 280 μm, resulting in a vacuum Rabi splitting of more than ±10 MHz. The presence of a sufficient number of atoms in the cavity mode also enabled splitting in the polarization perpendicular to the input. The cavity was in the strong coupling region, with an atom-photon dipole coupling coefficient g of 7 MHz, a cavity mode decay rate κ of 3 MHz, and a spontaneous emission decay rate γ of 6 MHz.

  12. Simulating High Flux Isotope Reactor Core Thermal-Hydraulics via Interdimensional Model Coupling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Travis, Adam R [ORNL

    2014-05-01

    A coupled interdimensional model is presented for the simulation of the thermal-hydraulic characteristics of the High Flux Isotope Reactor core at Oak Ridge National Laboratory. The model consists of two domains a solid involute fuel plate and the surrounding liquid coolant channel. The fuel plate is modeled explicitly in three-dimensions. The coolant channel is approximated as a twodimensional slice oriented perpendicular to the fuel plate s surface. The two dimensionally-inconsistent domains are linked to one another via interdimensional model coupling mechanisms. The coupled model is presented as a simplified alternative to a fully explicit, fully three-dimensional model. Involute geometries were constructed in SolidWorks. Derivations of the involute construction equations are presented. Geometries were then imported into COMSOL Multiphysics for simulation and modeling. Both models are described in detail so as to highlight their respective attributes in the 3D model, the pursuit of an accurate, reliable, and complete solution; in the coupled model, the intent to simplify the modeling domain as much as possible without affecting significant alterations to the solution. The coupled model was created with the goal of permitting larger portions of the reactor core to be modeled at once without a significant sacrifice to solution integrity. As such, particular care is given to validating incorporated model simplifications. To the greatest extent possible, the decrease in solution time as well as computational cost are quantified versus the effects such gains have on the solution quality. A variant of the coupled model which sufficiently balances these three solution characteristics is presented alongside the more comprehensive 3D model for comparison and validation.

  13. Reactivity Accountability Attributed to Reflector Poisons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, David [ORNL; Maldonado, G Ivan [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL

    2009-12-01

    The objective of this study is to develop a methodology to predict the reactivity impact as a function of outage time between cycles of 3He, 6Li, and other poisons in the High Flux Isotope Reactor s (HFIR) beryllium reflector. The reactivity worth at startup of the HFIR has been incorrectly predicted in the past after the reactor has been shut-down for long periods of time. The incorrect prediction was postulated to be due to the erroneous calculation of 3He buildup in the beryllium reflector. It is necessary to develop a better estimate of the start-of-cycle symmetric critical control element positions since if the estimated and actual symmetrical critical control element positions differ by more than $1.55 in reactivity (approximately one-half inch in control element startup position), HFIR is to be shutdown and a technical evaluation is performed to resolve the discrepancy prior to restart. 3He is generated and depleted during operation, but during an outage, the depletion of 3He ceases because it is a stable isotope. 3He is born from the radioactive decay of tritium, and thus the concentration of 3He increases during shutdown. SCALE, specifically the TRITON and CSAS5 control modules including the KENO V.A, COUPLE, and ORIGEN functional modules were utilized in this study. An equation relating the down time (td) to the change in symmetric control element position was generated and validated against measurements for approximately 40 HFIR operating cycles. The newly-derived correlation was shown to improve accuracy of predictions for long periods of down time.

  14. High Heat Flux Testing of B4C/Cu and SiC/Cu Functionally Graded Materials Simulated by Laser and Electron Beam

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘翔; 谌继明; 张斧; 许增裕; 葛昌纯; 李江涛

    2002-01-01

    B4C, SiC and C, Cu functionally graded-materials (FGMs) have been developed by plasma spraying and hot pressing. Their high-heat flux properties have been investigated by high energy laser and electron beam for the simulation of plasma disruption process of the future fusion reactors, And a study on eroded products of B4C/Cu FGM under transient thermal load of electron beam was performed. In the experiment, SEM and EDS analysis indicated that B4C and SiC were decomposed, carbon was preferentially evaporated under high thermal load, and a part of Si and Cu were melted, in addition, the splash of melted metal and the particle emission of brittle destruction were also found. Different erosive behaviors of carbon-based materials (CBMs) caused by laser and electron beam were also discussed.

  15. High heat flux testing of B4C/Cu and SiC/Cu functionally graded materials simulated by laser and electron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B4C, SiC and C, Cu functionally graded-materials (FGMs) have been developed by plasma spraying and hot pressing. Their high-heat flux properties have been investigated by high energy laser and electron beam for the simulation of plasma disruption process of the future fusion reactors. And a study on eroded products of B4C/Cu FGM under transient thermal load of electron beam was performed. In the experiment, SEM and EDS analysis indicated that B4C and SiC were decomposed, carbon was preferentially evaporated under high thermal load, and a part of Si and Cu were melted, in addition, the splash of melted metal and the particle emission of brittle destruction were also found. Different erosive behaviors of carbon-based materials (CBMs) caused by laser and electron beam were also discussed

  16. Delivery of completed irradiation vehicles and the quality assurance document to the High Flux Isotope Reactor for irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report details the initial fabrication and delivery of two Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) irradiation capsules (ATFSC01 and ATFSC02), with associated quality assurance documentation, to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The capsules and documentation were delivered by September 30, 2015, thus meeting the deadline for milestone M3FT-15OR0202268. These irradiation experiments are testing silicon carbide composite tubes in order to obtain experimental validation of thermo-mechanical models of stress states in SiC cladding irradiated under a prototypic high heat flux. This document contains a copy of the completed capsule fabrication request sheets, which detail all constituent components, pertinent drawings, etc., along with a detailed summary of the capsule assembly process performed by the Thermal Hydraulics and Irradiation Engineering Group (THIEG) in the Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division (RNSD). A complete fabrication package record is maintained by the THIEG and is available upon request.

  17. Delivery of completed irradiation vehicles and the quality assurance document to the High Flux Isotope Reactor for irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petrie, Christian M. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); McDuffee, Joel Lee [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Katoh, Yutai [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Terrani, Kurt A. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    This report details the initial fabrication and delivery of two Fuel Cycle Research and Development (FCRD) irradiation capsules (ATFSC01 and ATFSC02), with associated quality assurance documentation, to the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR). The capsules and documentation were delivered by September 30, 2015, thus meeting the deadline for milestone M3FT-15OR0202268. These irradiation experiments are testing silicon carbide composite tubes in order to obtain experimental validation of thermo-mechanical models of stress states in SiC cladding irradiated under a prototypic high heat flux. This document contains a copy of the completed capsule fabrication request sheets, which detail all constituent components, pertinent drawings, etc., along with a detailed summary of the capsule assembly process performed by the Thermal Hydraulics and Irradiation Engineering Group (THIEG) in the Reactor and Nuclear Systems Division (RNSD). A complete fabrication package record is maintained by the THIEG and is available upon request.

  18. Design Study for a Low-Enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual report for FY 2009

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, David [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Guida, Tracey [University of Pittsburgh; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL

    2010-02-01

    This report documents progress made during FY 2009 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in reactor performance from the current level. Results of selected benchmark studies imply that calculations of LEU performance are accurate. Studies are reported of the application of a silicon coating to surrogates for spheres of uranium-molybdenum alloy. A discussion of difficulties with preparing a fuel specification for the uranium-molybdenum alloy is provided. A description of the progress in developing a finite element thermal hydraulics model of the LEU core is provided.

  19. The study on the stability of the supporting ground on the construction site of High Flux Reactor building in Research Reactor Institute of Kyoto University

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report provides the results of the study on the stability of the supporting gwound which has been carried out as a part of the seismic design of the High Flux Reactor building which is planned to be constructed by Kyoto University, Research Reactor Institute. In this work the finite element method is used. The stresses and displacements of the ground are calculated under the following conditions; (1) Stress-strain relationships for the individual elements are linear. (2) The problem is analyzed on two-dimensional plane strain distributions. (3) No-tension analysis is applied to the calculation for earthquake load. (4) The mechanical properties of the ground are obtained from the soil survey which has been performed at the construction site of High Flux Reactor building. The results are summarized as follows; (1) The settlement of the building is estimated to be about 2 -- 5 cm for long-time loading, including the result from elastic theory, while the relative settlement is about 0.3 cm at both ends of the building. (2) Safety factor is larger than 1.4 for long-time loading. (3) Maximum angle of the deformation of the building due to the earthquake load is estimated to be about 9.2 x 10-3 degree (1.6 x 10-4 rad). (4) Safety factor is larger than 1.2 -- 1.3 for earthquake load. Judging from these results described above, the ground at the construction site of the High Flux Reactor is appropriate for the supporting ground of the reactor building, and the mat foundation can be adopted for the foundation form. (author)

  20. Neutronic flux stability of production uranium graphite reactor conversion core relative to high-frequency oscillations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Preliminary methodical simplified investigation into stability of the neutron field in the conversion load of industrial uranium-graphite reactors with regard to basic characteristics of the load in transient processes was carried out. Analysis was based on the calculated research into the behaviour of simplified single-point and one-dimensional models of the reactor core in transient regimes during the interconnected description of dynamics of neutron-physical and thermal properties of the load. Fundamental assumptions on the reactor characteristics used in the calculated model. In the context of accepted approximations the obtained results preclude the possibility for the occurrence of spontaneous high frequency oscillations resulting from the positive reactivity effect on the fuel temperature in the conversion load

  1. Reactor - and accelerator-based filtered beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutrons produced in high flux nuclear reactors and in accelerator, induced fission and spallation reactions, represent the most intense sources of neutrons available for research. However, the neutrons from these sources are not monoenergetic, covering the broad range extending from 10-3 eV up to 107 eV or so. In order to make quantitative measurements of the effects of neutrons and their dependence on neutron energy it is desirable to have mono-energetic neutron sources. The paper describes briefly methods of obtaining mono-energetic neutrons and different methods of filtration. This is followed by more detailed discussion of neutron window filters and a summary of the filtered beam facilities using this technique. The review concludes with a discussion of the main applications of filtered beams and their present and future importance

  2. DESIGN STUDY FOR A LOW-ENRICHED URANIUM CORE FOR THE HIGH FLUX ISOTOPE REACTOR, ANNUAL REPORT FOR FY 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Jolly, Brian C [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Primm, Trent [ORNL; Renfro, David G [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Pinkston, Daniel [ORNL

    2011-02-01

    This report documents progress made during FY 2010 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. With axial and radial grading of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current level. Studies are reported of support to a thermal hydraulic test loop design, the implementation of finite element, thermal hydraulic analysis capability, and infrastructure tasks at HFIR to upgrade the facility for operation at 100 MW. A discussion of difficulties with preparing a fuel specification for the uranium-molybdenum alloy is provided. Continuing development in the definition of the fuel fabrication process is described.

  3. Burnout experiments on the externally-finned swirl tube for steady-state and high-heat flux beam stops

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental study to develop beam stops for the next generation of neutral beam injectors was started, using an ion source developed for the JT-60 neutral beam injector. A swirl tube is one of the most promising candidates for a beam stop element which can handle steady-state and high-heat flux beams. In the present experiments, a modified swirl tube, namely an externally-finned swirl tube, was tested together with a simple smooth tube, an externally finned tube, and an internally finned tube. The major dimensions of the tubes are 10 mm in outer-diameter, 1.5 mm in wall thickness, 15 mm in external fin width, and 700 mm in length. The burnout heat flux (CHF) normal to the externally finned swirl tube was 4.1±0.1 kW/cm2, where the Gaussian e-folding half-width of the beam intensity distribution was about 90 mm, the flow rate of the cooling water was 30 l/min, inlet and outlet gauge pressures were about 1 MPa and 0.2 MPa, respectively, and the temperature of the inlet water was kept to 200C during a pulse. A burnout heat flux ratio, which is defined by the ratio of the CHF value of the externally-finned swirl tube to that of the externally-finned tube, turned out to be about 1.5. Burnout heat fluxes of the tubes with a swirl tape or internal fins increase linearly with an increase of the flow rate. It was found that the tube with external fins has effects that not only reduce the thermal stress but also improve the characteristics of boiling heat transfer. (orig.)

  4. A new deflection technique applied to an existing scheme of electrostatic accelerator for high energy neutral beam injection in fusion reactor devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pilan, N., E-mail: nicola.pilan@igi.cnr.it; Antoni, V.; De Lorenzi, A.; Chitarin, G.; Veltri, P.; Sartori, E. [Consorzio RFX—Associazione EURATOM-ENEA per la Fusione, Corso Stati Uniti 4, 35127 Padova (Italy)

    2016-02-15

    A scheme of a neutral beam injector (NBI), based on electrostatic acceleration and magneto-static deflection of negative ions, is proposed and analyzed in terms of feasibility and performance. The scheme is based on the deflection of a high energy (2 MeV) and high current (some tens of amperes) negative ion beam by a large magnetic deflector placed between the Beam Source (BS) and the neutralizer. This scheme has the potential of solving two key issues, which at present limit the applicability of a NBI to a fusion reactor: the maximum achievable acceleration voltage and the direct exposure of the BS to the flux of neutrons and radiation coming from the fusion reactor. In order to solve these two issues, a magnetic deflector is proposed to screen the BS from direct exposure to radiation and neutrons so that the voltage insulation between the electrostatic accelerator and the grounded vessel can be enhanced by using compressed SF{sub 6} instead of vacuum so that the negative ions can be accelerated at energies higher than 1 MeV. By solving the beam transport with different magnetic deflector properties, an optimum scheme has been found which is shown to be effective to guarantee both the steering effect and the beam aiming.

  5. Optimization of a partially non-magnetic primary radiation shielding for the triple-axis spectrometer PANDA at the Munich high-flux reactor FRM-II

    CERN Document Server

    Pyka, N M; Rogov, A

    2002-01-01

    Monte Carlo simulations have been used to optimize the monochromator shielding of the polarized cold-neutron triple-axis spectrometer PANDA at the Munich high-flux reactor FRM-II. By using the Monte Carlo program MCNP-4B, the density of the total spectrum of incoming neutrons and gamma radiation from the beam tube SR-2 has been determined during the three-dimensional diffusion process in different types of heavy concrete and other absorbing material. Special attention has been paid to build a compact and highly efficient shielding, partially non-magnetic, with a total biological radiation dose of less than 10 mu Sv/h at its outsides. Especially considered was the construction of an albedo reducer, which serves to reduce the background in the experiment outside the shielding. (orig.)

  6. Design Study for a Low-enriched Uranium Core for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primm, Trent [ORNL; Ellis, Ronald James [ORNL; Gehin, Jess C [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Miller, James Henry [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL

    2007-11-01

    This report documents progress made during fiscal year 2007 in studies of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from highly enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium fuel (LEU). Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum alloy. A high volume fraction U/Mo-in-Al fuel could attain the same neutron flux performance as with the current, HEU fuel but materials considerations appear to preclude production and irradiation of such a fuel. A diffusion barrier would be required if Al is to be retained as the interstitial medium and the additional volume required for this barrier would degrade performance. Attaining the high volume fraction (55 wt. %) of U/Mo assumed in the computational study while maintaining the current fuel plate acceptance level at the fuel manufacturer is unlikely, i.e. no increase in the percentage of plates rejected for non-compliance with the fuel specification. Substitution of a zirconium alloy for Al would significantly increase the weight of the fuel element, the cost of the fuel element, and introduce an as-yet untried manufacturing process. A monolithic U-10Mo foil is the choice of LEU fuel for HFIR. Preliminary calculations indicate that with a modest increase in reactor power, the flux performance of the reactor can be maintained at the current level. A linearly-graded, radial fuel thickness profile is preferred to the arched profile currently used in HEU fuel because the LEU fuel media is a metal alloy foil rather than a powder. Developments in analysis capability and nuclear data processing techniques are underway with the goal of verifying the preliminary calculations of LEU flux performance. A conceptual study of the operational cost of an LEU fuel fabrication facility yielded the conclusion that the annual fuel cost to the HFIR would increase significantly from the current, HEU fuel cycle. Though manufacturing can be accomplished with existing technology

  7. Experimental and analytical studies of high heat flux components for fusion experimental reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this report, the experimental and analytical results concerning the development of plasma facing components of ITER are described. With respect to developing high heat removal structures for the divertor plates, an externally-finned swirl tube was developed based on the results of critical heat flux (CHF) experiments on various tube structures. As the result, the burnout heat flux, which also indicates incident CHF, of 41 ± 1 MW/m2 was achieved in the externally-finned swirl tube. The applicability of existing CHF correlations based on uniform heating conditions was evaluated by comparing the CHF experimental data with the smooth and the externally-finned tubes under one-sided heating condition. As the results, experimentally determined CHF data for straight tube show good agreement, for the externally-finned tube, no existing correlations are available for prediction of the CHF. With respect to the evaluation of the bonds between carbon-based material and heat sink metal, results of brazing tests were compared with the analytical results by three dimensional model with temperature-dependent thermal and mechanical properties. Analytical results showed that residual stresses from brazing can be estimated by the analytical three directional stress values instead of the equivalent stress value applied. In the analytical study on the separatrix sweeping for effectively reducing surface heat fluxes on the divertor plate, thermal response of the divertor plate has been analyzed under ITER relevant heat flux conditions and has been tested. As the result, it has been demonstrated that application of the sweeping technique is very effective for improvement in the power handling capability of the divertor plate and that the divertor mock-up has withstood a large number of additional cyclic heat loads. (J.P.N.) 62 refs

  8. High-Speed Neutron and Gamma Flux Sensor for Monitoring Surface Nuclear Reactors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA needs compact nuclear reactors to power future bases on the moon and/or Mars. These reactors require robust automatic control systems using low mass, rapid...

  9. High-Speed Neutron and Gamma Flux Sensor for Monitoring Surface Nuclear Reactors Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — NASA needs compact nuclear reactors to power future bases on the moon and Mars. These reactors require robust automatic control systems using low mass, rapid...

  10. High-flux low-divergence positron beam generation from ultra-intense laser irradiated a tapered hollow target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Jian-Xun [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); College of Electronic Engineering, Wuhan 430019 (China); Ma, Yan-Yun, E-mail: yanyunma@126.com [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); IFSA Collaborative Innovation Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Laser Fusion Research Center, China Academy of Engineering Physics, Mianyang 621000 (China); Zhao, Jun; Yu, Tong-Pu, E-mail: tongpu@nudt.edu.cn; Yang, Xiao-Hu; Gan, Long-Fei; Zhang, Guo-Bo; Yan, Jian-Feng; Zhuo, Hong-Bin; Liu, Jin-Jin; Zhao, Yuan [College of Science, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China); Kawata, Shigeo [Center for Optical Research and Education, Graduate School of Engineering, Utsunomiya University, 7-1-2 Yohtoh, Utsunomiya 321-8585 (Japan)

    2015-10-15

    By using two-dimensional particle-in-cell simulations, we demonstrate high-flux dense positrons generation by irradiating an ultra-intense laser pulse onto a tapered hollow target. By using a laser with an intensity of 4 × 10{sup 23 }W/cm{sup 2}, it is shown that the Breit-Wheeler process dominates the positron production during the laser-target interaction and a positron beam with a total number >10{sup 15} is obtained, which is increased by five orders of magnitude than in the previous work at the same laser intensity. Due to the focusing effect of the transverse electric fields formed in the hollow cone wall, the divergence angle of the positron beam effectively decreases to ∼15° with an effective temperature of ∼674 MeV. When the laser intensity is doubled, both the positron flux (>10{sup 16}) and temperature (963 MeV) increase, while the divergence angle gets smaller (∼13°). The obtained high-flux low-divergence positron beam may have diverse applications in science, medicine, and engineering.

  11. BR2 reactor neutron beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of reactor neutron beams is becoming increasingly more widespread for the study of some properties of condensed matter. It is mainly due to the unique properties of the ''thermal'' neutrons as regards wavelength, energy, magnetic moment and overall favorable ratio of scattering to absorption cross-sections. Besides these fundamental reasons, the impetus for using neutrons is also due to the existence of powerful research reactors (such as BR2) built mainly for nuclear engineering programs, but where a number of intense neutron beams are available at marginal cost. A brief introduction to the production of suitable neutron beams from a reactor is given. (author)

  12. Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel Conversion Activities for the High Flux Isotope Reactor, Annual Report for FY 2011

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Renfro, David G [ORNL; Cook, David Howard [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL; Griffin, Frederick P [ORNL; Ilas, Germina [ORNL; Sease, John D [ORNL; Chandler, David [ORNL

    2012-03-01

    This report describes progress made during FY11 in ORNL activities to support converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) from high-enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low-enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. Conversion from HEU to LEU will require a change in fuel form from uranium oxide to a uranium-molybdenum (UMo) alloy. With both radial and axial contouring of the fuel foil and an increase in reactor power to 100 MW, calculations indicate that the HFIR can be operated with LEU fuel with no degradation in performance to users from the current levels achieved with HEU fuel. Studies are continuing to demonstrate that the fuel thermal safety margins can be preserved following conversion. Studies are also continuing to update other aspects of the reactor steady state operation and accident response for the effects of fuel conversion. Technical input has been provided to Oregon State University in support of their hydraulic testing program. The HFIR conversion schedule was revised and provided to the GTRI program. In addition to HFIR conversion activities, technical support was provided directly to the Fuel Fabrication Capability program manager.

  13. Beam characterization at the Neutron Radiography Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The project characterized the beam at the Neutron Radiography Reactor. • Experiments indicate that the neutron energy spectrum model may not be accurate. • The facility is a category I radiography facility. • The beam divergence and effective collimation ratio are 0.3 ± 0.1° and >125. • The predicted total neutron flux at the image plane is 5.54 × 106 n/cm2 s. -- Abstract: The quality of a neutron-imaging beam directly impacts the quality of radiographic images produced using that beam. Fully characterizing a neutron beam, including determination of the beam's effective length-to-diameter ratio, neutron flux profile, energy spectrum, potential image quality, and beam divergence, is vital for producing quality radiographic images. This paper provides a characterization of the east neutron imaging beamline at the Idaho National Laboratory Neutron Radiography Reactor (NRAD). The experiments which measured the beam's effective length-to-diameter ratio and potential image quality are based on American Society for Testing and Materials (ASTM) standards. An analysis of the image produced by a calibrated phantom measured the beam divergence. The energy spectrum measurements consist of a series of foil irradiations using a selection of activation foils, compared to the results produced by a Monte Carlo n-Particle (MCNP) model of the beamline. The NRAD has an effective collimation ratio greater than 125, a beam divergence of 0.3 ± 0.1°, and a gold foil cadmium ratio of 2.7. The flux profile has been quantified and the facility is an ASTM Category 1 radiographic facility. Based on bare and cadmium covered foil activation results, the neutron energy spectrum used in the current MCNP model of the radiography beamline over-samples the thermal region of the neutron energy spectrum

  14. Core management, operational limits and conditions and safety aspects of the Australian High Flux Reactor (HIFAR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Town, S.L. [ANSTO, Nuclear Technology Div., Menai (Australia)

    1997-07-01

    HIFAR is a DIDO class reactor which commenced routine operation at approximately 10 MW in 1960. It is principally used for production of medical radio-isotopes, scientific research using neutron scattering facilities and irradiation of silicon ingots for the electronics industry. A detailed description of the core, including fuel types, is presented. Details are given of the current fuel management program HIFUEL and the experimental measurements associated with reactor physics analysis of HIFAR are discussed. (author)

  15. Neutron spectra at two beam ports of a TRIGA Mark III reactor loaded with HEU fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron spectra have been measured in two beam ports, one radial and another tangential, of the TRIGA Mark III nuclear reactor from the National Institute of Nuclear Research in Mexico. Measurements were carried out with the reactor core loaded with high enriched uranium fuel. Two reactor powers, 5 and 10 W, were used during neutron spectra measurements using a Bonner sphere spectrometer with a 6LiI(Eu) scintillator and 2, 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12 in.-diameter high-density polyethylene spheres. The neutron spectra were unfolded using the NSDUAZ unfolding code. For each spectrum total flux, mean energy and ambient dose equivalent were determined. Measured spectra show fission, epithermal and thermal neutrons, being harder in the radial beam port. - Highlights: • Neutron spectra of a TRIGA reactor were measured. • The reactor core is loaded with HEU. • The spectra were measured at two reactor beam ports. • Measurements were carried out at 5 and 10 W

  16. Development of a high temperature, high sensitivity fission counter for liquid metal reactor in-vessel flux monitoring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced liquid metal reactor concepts such as the Sodium Advanced Fast Reactor (SAFR) and the Power Reactor Inherently Safe Module (PRISM) have relatively large pressure vessels that necessitate in-vessel placement of the neutron detectors to achieve adequate count rates during source range operations. It is estimated that detector sensitivities of 5 to 10 counts/center dot/s/center dot//sup /minus/1//center dot/[neutron/(cm2/center dot/s)]/sup /minus/1/ will be required for the initial core loading. The Instrumentation and Controls Division of Oak Ridge National Laboratory has designed and fabricated a fission counter to meet this requirement which is also capable of operating in uncooled instrument thimbles at primary coolant temperatures of 500 to 600/degree/C. Components are fabricated from Inconel-600, and high temperature alumina insulators are employed. The transmission line electrode configuration is utilized to minimize capacitive loading effects

  17. Positron beam facility at Kyoto University Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Q.; Sato, K.; Yoshiie, T.; Sano, T.; Kawabe, H.; Nagai, Y.; Nagumo, K.; Inoue, K.; Toyama, T.; Oshima, N.; Kinomura, A.; Shirai, Y.

    2014-04-01

    A positron beam facility is presently under construction at the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR), which is a light-water moderated tank-type reactor operated at a rated thermal power of 5 MW. A cadmium (Cd) - tungsten (W) source similar to that used in NEPOMUC was chosen in the KUR because Cd is very efficient at producing γ-rays when exposed to thermal neutron flux, and W is a widely used in converter and moderator materials. High-energy positrons are moderated by a W moderator with a mesh structure. Electrical lenses and a solenoid magnetic field are used to extract the moderated positrons and guide them to a platform outside of the reactor, respectively. Since Japan is an earthquake-prone country, a special attention is paid for the design of the in-pile positron source so as not to damage the reactor in the severe earthquake.

  18. Brookhaven highlights. [Fiscal year 1992, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L. [eds.

    1992-12-31

    This publication provides a broad overview of the research programs and efforts being conducted, built, designed, and planned at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This work covers a broad range of scientific disciplines. Major facilities include the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), with its newly completed booster, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and the RHIC, which is under construction. Departments within the laboratory include the AGS department, accelerator development, physics, chemistry, biology, NSLS, medical, nuclear energy, and interdepartmental research efforts. Research ranges from the pure sciences, in nuclear physics and high energy physics as one example, to environmental work in applied science to study climatic effects, from efforts in biology which are a component of the human genome project to the study, production, and characterization of new materials. The paper provides an overview of the laboratory operations during 1992, including staffing, research, honors, funding, and general laboratory plans for the future.

  19. Chronology of the beryllium replacement shutdown at the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR), 1983

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In addition to the permanent beryllium reflector, several other components were replaced. The outer shroud and lower tracks were replaced. The new control rod access plugs and the upper tracks were installed. Replacement of collimator tubes for HB-1 and -2 are tentatively slated for the next permanent beryllium changeout. Inspection of the reactor vessel, the vessel-to-nozzle welds, core support structure, and vessel internal cladding showed them to be in acceptable condition. The highest, accumulative radiation doses received by Reactor Operations personnel during the shutdown, in mrem, were 665, 606, and 560; the highest for P and E personnel were 520, 505, and 475

  20. Preliminary Assessment of the Impact on Reactor Vessel dpa Rates Due to Installation of a Proposed Low Enriched Uranium (LEU) Core in the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daily, Charles R. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-10-01

    An assessment of the impact on the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) reactor vessel (RV) displacements-per-atom (dpa) rates due to operations with the proposed low enriched uranium (LEU) core described by Ilas and Primm has been performed and is presented herein. The analyses documented herein support the conclusion that conversion of HFIR to low-enriched uranium (LEU) core operations using the LEU core design of Ilas and Primm will have no negative impact on HFIR RV dpa rates. Since its inception, HFIR has been operated with highly enriched uranium (HEU) cores. As part of an effort sponsored by the National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA), conversion to LEU cores is being considered for future HFIR operations. The HFIR LEU configurations analyzed are consistent with the LEU core models used by Ilas and Primm and the HEU balance-of-plant models used by Risner and Blakeman in the latest analyses performed to support the HFIR materials surveillance program. The Risner and Blakeman analyses, as well as the studies documented herein, are the first to apply the hybrid transport methods available in the Automated Variance reduction Generator (ADVANTG) code to HFIR RV dpa rate calculations. These calculations have been performed on the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) Institutional Cluster (OIC) with version 1.60 of the Monte Carlo N-Particle 5 (MCNP5) computer code.

  1. High flux materials testing reactor HFR Petten. Characteristics of facilities and standard irradiation devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the materials testing reactor HFR some characteristic information is presented. Besides the nuclear data for the experiment positions short descriptions are given of the most important standard facilities for material irradiation and radionuclide production. One paragraph deals with the experimental set-ups for solid state and nuclear structure investigations. The information in this report refers to a core type, which is operational since March 1977. The numerical data compiled have been up-dated to June 1978

  2. Numerical Simulation of Subcooled Boiling Inside High-Heat-Flux Component with Swirl Tube in Neutral Beam Injection System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to realize steady-state operation of the neutral beam injection (NBI) system with high beam energy, an accurate thermal analysis and a prediction about working conditions of heat-removal structures inside high-heat-flux (HHF) components in the system are key issues. In this paper, taking the HHF ion dump with swirl tubes in NBI system as an example, an accurate thermal dynamic simulation method based on computational fluid dynamics (CFD) and the finite volume method is presented to predict performance of the HHF component. In this simulation method, the Eulerian multiphase method together with some empirical corrections about the inter-phase transfer model and the wall heat flux partitioning model are considered to describe the subcooled boiling. The reliability of the proposed method is validated by an experimental example with subcooled boiling inside swirl tube. The proposed method provides an important tool for the refined thermal and flow dynamic analysis of HHF components, and can be extended to study the thermal design of other complex HHF engineering structures in a straightforward way. The simulation results also verify that the swirl tube is a promising heat removing structure for the HHF components of the NBI system. (fusion engineering)

  3. Compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam probe system for measurement of two-dimensional electron density profile.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Y; Manabe, T; Kajita, S; Ohno, N; Takagi, M; Tsuchiya, H; Morisaki, T

    2014-09-01

    A compact and high-particle-flux thermal-lithium-beam source for two-dimensional measurement of electron density profiles has been developed. The thermal-lithium-beam oven is heated by a carbon heater. In this system, the maximum particle flux of the thermal lithium beam was ~4 × 10(19) m(-2) s(-1) when the temperature of the thermal-lithium-beam oven was 900 K. The electron density profile was evaluated in the small tokamak device HYBTOK-II. The electron density profile was reconstructed using the thermal-lithium-beam probe data and this profile was consistent with the electron density profile measured with a Langmuir electrostatic probe. We confirm that the developed thermal-lithium-beam probe can be used to measure the two-dimensional electron density profile with high time and spatial resolutions.

  4. Fabrication procedures for manufacturing High Flux Isotope Reactor fuel elements - 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knight, R.W.; Morin, R.A.

    1999-12-01

    The original fabrication procedures written in 1968 delineated the manufacturing procedures at that time. Since 1968, there have been a number of procedural changes. This rewrite of the fabrication procedures incorporates these changes. The entire fuel core of this reactor is made up of two fuel elements. Each element consists of one annular array of fuel plates. These annuli are identified as the inner and outer fuel elements, since one fits inside the other. The inner element consists of 171 identical fuel plates, and the outer element contains 369 identical fuel plates differing slightly from those in the inner element. Both sets of fuel plates contain U{sub 3}O{sub 8} powder as the fuel, dispersed in an aluminum powder matrix and clad with aluminum. Procedures for manufacturing and inspection of the fuel elements are described and illustrated.

  5. Fabrication procedures for manufacturing High Flux Isotope Reactor fuel elements - 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The original fabrication procedures written in 1968 delineated the manufacturing procedures at that time. Since 1968, there have been a number of procedural changes. This rewrite of the fabrication procedures incorporates these changes. The entire fuel core of this reactor is made up of two fuel elements. Each element consists of one annular array of fuel plates. These annuli are identified as the inner and outer fuel elements, since one fits inside the other. The inner element consists of 171 identical fuel plates, and the outer element contains 369 identical fuel plates differing slightly from those in the inner element. Both sets of fuel plates contain U3O8 powder as the fuel, dispersed in an aluminum powder matrix and clad with aluminum. Procedures for manufacturing and inspection of the fuel elements are described and illustrated

  6. Reliable operation of the Brookhaven EBIS for highly charged ion production for RHIC and NSRL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beebe, E., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Alessi, J., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Binello, S., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Kanesue, T., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; McCafferty, D., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Morris, J., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Okamura, M., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Pikin, A., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Ritter, J., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Schoepfer, R., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2015-01-09

    An Electron Beam Ion Source for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC EBIS) was commissioned at Brookhaven in September 2010 and since then it routinely supplies ions for RHIC and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) as the main source of highly charged ions from Helium to Uranium. Using three external primary ion sources for 1+ injection into the EBIS and an electrostatic injection beam line, ion species at the EBIS exit can be switched in 0.2 s. A total of 16 different ion species have been produced to date. The length and the capacity of the ion trap have been increased by 20% by extending the trap by two more drift tubes, compared with the original design. The fraction of Au{sup 32+} in the EBIS Au spectrum is approximately 12% for 70-80% electron beam neutralization and 8 pulses operation in a 5 Hertz train and 4-5 s super cycle. For single pulse per super cycle operation and 25% electron beam neutralization, the EBIS achieves the theoretical Au{sup 32+} fractional output of 18%. Long term stability has been very good with availability of the beam from RHIC EBIS during 2012 and 2014 RHIC runs approximately 99.8%.

  7. Reliable operation of the Brookhaven EBIS for highly charged ion production for RHIC and NSRL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Electron Beam Ion Source for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC EBIS) was commissioned at Brookhaven in September 2010 and since then it routinely supplies ions for RHIC and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) as the main source of highly charged ions from Helium to Uranium. Using three external primary ion sources for 1+ injection into the EBIS and an electrostatic injection beam line, ion species at the EBIS exit can be switched in 0.2 s. A total of 16 different ion species have been produced to date. The length and the capacity of the ion trap have been increased by 20% by extending the trap by two more drift tubes, compared with the original design. The fraction of Au32+ in the EBIS Au spectrum is approximately 12% for 70-80% electron beam neutralization and 8 pulses operation in a 5 Hertz train and 4-5 s super cycle. For single pulse per super cycle operation and 25% electron beam neutralization, the EBIS achieves the theoretical Au32+ fractional output of 18%. Long term stability has been very good with availability of the beam from RHIC EBIS during 2012 and 2014 RHIC runs approximately 99.8%

  8. Neutronics Conversion Analyses of the Laue-Langevin Institute (ILL) High Flux Reactor (RHF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergeron, A. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Dionne, B. [Argonne National Lab. (ANL), Argonne, IL (United States); Calzavara, Y. [Inst. Laue-Langevin (ILL), Grenoble (France)

    2014-09-30

    The following report describes the neutronics results obtained with the MCNP model of the RHF U7Mo LEU reference design that has been established in 2010 during the feasibility analysis. This work constitutes a complete and detailed neutronics analysis of that LEU design using models that have been significantly improved since 2010 and the release of the feasibility report. When possible, the credibility of the neutronics model is tested by comparing the HEU model results with experimental data or other codes calculations results. The results obtained with the LEU model are systematically compared to the HEU model. The changes applied to the neutronics model lead to better comparisons with experimental data or improved the calculation efficiency but do not challenge the conclusion of the feasibility analysis. If the U7Mo fuel is commercially available, not cost prohibitive, a back-end solution is established and if it is possible to manufacture the proposed element, neutronics analyses show that the performance of the reactor would not be challenged by the conversion to LEU fuel.

  9. Radiation Dosimetry in the BNCT Patient Treatment Room at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The BMRR was a 3 MW light water reactor that had an epithermal neutron beam that was used to perform clinical trials on patients with malignant brain tumors. A series of measurements and calculations had been performed in the treatment room both prior to the trials and during the trials. The details of the measurements and the Monte Carlo calculations are presented and compared.

  10. Impact of the High Flux Isotope Reactor HEU to LEU Fuel Conversion on Cold Source Nuclear Heat Generation Rates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandler, David [ORNL

    2014-03-01

    Under the sponsorship of the US Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration, staff members at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory have been conducting studies to determine whether the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) can be converted from high enriched uranium (HEU) fuel to low enriched uranium (LEU) fuel. As part of these ongoing studies, an assessment of the impact that the HEU to LEU fuel conversion has on the nuclear heat generation rates in regions of the HFIR cold source system and its moderator vessel was performed and is documented in this report. Silicon production rates in the cold source aluminum regions and few-group neutron fluxes in the cold source moderator were also estimated. Neutronics calculations were performed with the Monte Carlo N-Particle code to determine the nuclear heat generation rates in regions of the HFIR cold source and its vessel for the HEU core operating at a full reactor power (FP) of 85 MW(t) and the reference LEU core operating at an FP of 100 MW(t). Calculations were performed with beginning-of-cycle (BOC) and end-of-cycle (EOC) conditions to bound typical irradiation conditions. Average specific BOC heat generation rates of 12.76 and 12.92 W/g, respectively, were calculated for the hemispherical region of the cold source liquid hydrogen (LH2) for the HEU and LEU cores, and EOC heat generation rates of 13.25 and 12.86 W/g, respectively, were calculated for the HEU and LEU cores. Thus, the greatest heat generation rates were calculated for the EOC HEU core, and it is concluded that the conversion from HEU to LEU fuel and the resulting increase of FP from 85 MW to 100 MW will not impact the ability of the heat removal equipment to remove the heat deposited in the cold source system. Silicon production rates in the cold source aluminum regions are estimated to be about 12.0% greater at BOC and 2.7% greater at EOC for the LEU core in comparison to the HEU core. Silicon is aluminum s major transmutation product and

  11. Brookhaven highlights

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report highlights the research activities of Brookhaven National Laboratory during the period dating from October 1, 1992 through September 30, 1993. There are contributions to the report from different programs and departments within the laboratory. These include technology transfer, RHIC, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, physics, biology, national synchrotron light source, applied science, medical science, advanced technology, chemistry, reactor physics, safety and environmental protection, instrumentation, and computing and communications

  12. Intermediate energy neutron beams from the MURR [University of Missouri Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several reactors in the US are potential candidates to deliver beams of intermediate energy neutrons for NCT. At this time, moderators, as compared to filters, appear to be the more effective means of tailoring the flux of these reactors. The objective is to sufficiently reduce the flux of fast neutrons while producing enough intermediate energy neutrons for treatments. At the University of Missouri Research Reactor (MURR), the code MCNP has recently been used to calculate doses in a phantom. First, ideal beams of 1, 35, and 1,000 eV neutrons were analyzed to determine doses and advantage depths in the phantom. Second, a high quality beam that had been designed to fit in the thermal column of the MURR, was reanalyzed. MCNP calculations of the dose in phantom in this beam confirmed previous calculations and showed that this beam would be a nearly ideal one with neutrons of the desired energy and also a high neutron current. However, installation of this beam will require a significant modification of the thermal column of the MURR. Therefore, a second beam that is less difficult to build and install, but of lower neutron current, has been designed to fit in MURR port F. This beam is designed using inexpensive Al, S, and Pb. The doses calculated in the phantom placed in this beam show that it will be satisfactory for sample tests, animal tests, and possible initial patient trials. Producing this beam will require only modest modifications of the existing tube

  13. Transmutation of /sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs in a high-flux fast reactor with a thermalized central region

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taube, M.

    1976-10-01

    The fission products /sup 90/Sr and /sup 137/Cs produced by fission reactors of 30 GW(th) can be transmutated into stable nuclides by neutron irradiation with a thermal flux of 2 x 10/sup 16/ n cm/sup -2/ s/sup -1/. The rates of transmutation are 15 and 3.3 times greater, respectively, than that of spontaneous beta decay. The transmutation would take place in a central thermalized region of a high-flux fast burner reactor of 7 GW(th). In the case where the power reactors of 23 GW(th) are breeders with a high breeding gain of G = 0.38, the total system, inclusive of the high-flux burner, remains a breeding system, with G/sub total/ = 0.09. Details of the neutronics calculations and simplified thermohydraulics are given. The high-flux burner is fueled with a molten salt of chlorides of plutonium and sodium with a power density of 10 kW cm/sup -3/. The ''self-liquidation'' of such a system is discussed.

  14. Status of high current R&D Energy Recovery LINAC at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kayran, D.; Altinbas Z.; Beavis D.; Ben-Zvi I.; Calaga R.; Gassner D.M.; Hahn H.; Hammons L.; Jain A.; Jamilkowski J.; Lambiase R.; Lederle D.; Litvinenko V.N.; Laloudakis N.; Mahler G.; McIntyre G.; Meng W.; Oerter B.; Pate D.; Phillips D.; Reich J.; Roser T.; Schultheiss C.; Seda T.; Sheehy B.; Srinivasan-Rao T.; Than R.; Tuozzolo J.; Weiss D.; Xu W.; Zaltsman A.

    2011-03-28

    An ampere class 20 MeV superconducting Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) is under construction at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for testing of concepts relevant for high-energy coherent electron cooling and electron-ion colliders. One of the goals is to demonstrate an electron beam with high charge per bunch ({approx} 5 nC) and low normalized emittance ({approx} 5 mm-mrad) at an energy of 20 MeV. Flexible lattice of ERL loop provides a test-bed for investigating issues of transverse and longitudinal instabilities, and diagnostics for intense CW e-beam. The superconducting 703 MHz RF photoinjector is considered as an electron source for such a facility. We will start with a straight pass (gun - 5 cell cavity - beam stop) test for the SRF Gun performance studies. Later, we will install and test a novel injection line concept for emittance preservation in a lower energy merger. In this paper we present the status and our plans for construction and commissioning of this facility.

  15. Use of neutron beams for low and medium flux research reactors: Radiography and materials characterization. Report of a technical committee held in Vienna, 4-7 May 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present report is the result of the Technical Committee meeting held during 4-7 May 1993 in Vienna, Austria, and includes contributions from the participants. The Physics Section of the Department of Research and Isotopes was responsible for the co-ordination and compilation of the report. The report is intended to provide guidelines to research reactor owners and operators for promoting and developing their research programmes and industrial applications for neutron radiology, related neutron inspection and analytical techniques and neutron beam irradiation. Refs, figs and tabs

  16. Design, fabrication, and testing of gadolinium-shielded metal fuel samples in the hydraulic tube of the high flux isotope reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of hydraulic rabbit capsules inserted into and ejected from the core of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) during full power operation allows for precise control of the neutron fluence in fueled experiments. Rabbit capsules with strong thermal neutron absorbers must be used to screen out thermal neutrons, thereby reducing the heat generation rate while maintaining the fast neutron flux that produces displacement damage similar to fast reactor type conditions. However, rapid insertion and ejection of rabbit capsules containing a strong neutron absorber causes a reactivity response in the reactor that has the potential to engage the HFIR safety response system which could result in an unplanned shutdown. Therefore, a set of tests were performed to provide the data needed to establish limits on the reactivity worth that can be ejected from the hydraulic facility without causing a reactor shutdown. This paper will describe the design, operation, and results of the reactivity measurements undertaken to understand the reactor response to insertion of the gadolinium-lined rabbit capsules. (author)

  17. Assumptions and Criteria for Performing a Feasability Study of the Conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor Core to Use Low-Enriched Uranium Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Primm, R.T., III; Ellis, R.J.; Gehin, J.C.; Moses, D.L.; Binder, J.L.; Xoubi, N. (U. of Cincinnati)

    2006-02-01

    A computational study will be initiated during fiscal year 2006 to examine the feasibility of converting the High Flux Isotope Reactor from highly enriched uranium fuel to low-enriched uranium. The study will be limited to steady-state, nominal operation, reactor physics and thermal-hydraulic analyses of a uranium-molybdenum alloy that would be substituted for the current fuel powder--U{sub 3}O{sub 8} mixed with aluminum. The purposes of this document are to (1) define the scope of studies to be conducted, (2) define the methodologies to be used to conduct the studies, (3) define the assumptions that serve as input to the methodologies, (4) provide an efficient means for communication with the Department of Energy and American research reactor operators, and (5) expedite review and commentary by those parties.

  18. Production of Medical Radioisotopes in the ORNL High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) for Cancer Treatment and Arterial Restenosis Therapy after PTCA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knapp, F. F. Jr.; Beets, A. L.; Mirzadeh, S.; Alexander, C. W.; Hobbs, R. L.

    1998-06-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) represents an important resource for the production of a wide variety of medical radioisotopes. In addition to serving as a key production site for californium-252 and other transuranic elements, important examples of therapeutic radioisotopes which are currently routinely produced in the HFIR for distribution include dysprosium-166 (parent of holmium-166), rhenium-186, tin-117m and tungsten-188 (parent of rhenium-188). The nine hydraulic tube (HT) positions in the central high flux region permit the insertion and removal of targets at any time during the operating cycle and have traditionally represented a major site for production of medical radioisotopes. To increase the irradiation capabilities of the HFIR, special target holders have recently been designed and fabricated which will be installed in the six Peripheral Target Positions (PTP), which are also located in the high flux region. These positions are only accessible during reactor refueling and will be used for long-term irradiations, such as required for the production of tin-117m and tungsten-188. Each of the PTP tubes will be capable of housing a maximum of eight HT targets, thus increasing the total maximum number of HT targets from the current nine, to a total of 57. In this paper the therapeutic use of reactor-produced radioisotopes for bone pain palliation and vascular brachytherapy and the therapeutic medical radioisotope production capabilities of the ORNL HFIR are briefly discussed.

  19. Spheromak reactor with poloidal flux-amplifying transformer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furth, Harold P.; Janos, Alan C.; Uyama, Tadao; Yamada, Masaaki

    1987-01-01

    An inductive transformer in the form of a solenoidal coils aligned along the major axis of a flux core induces poloidal flux along the flux core's axis. The current in the solenoidal coil is then reversed resulting in a poloidal flux swing and the conversion of a portion of the poloidal flux to a toroidal flux in generating a spheromak plasma wherein equilibrium approaches a force-free, minimum Taylor state during plasma formation, independent of the initial conditions or details of the formation. The spheromak plasma is sustained with the Taylor state maintained by oscillating the currents in the poloidal and toroidal field coils within the plasma-forming flux core. The poloidal flux transformer may be used either as an amplifier stage in a moving plasma reactor scenario for initial production of a spheromak plasma or as a method for sustaining a stationary plasma and further heating it. The solenoidal coil embodiment of the poloidal flux transformer can alternately be used in combination with a center conductive cylinder aligned along the length and outside of the solenoidal coil. This poloidal flux-amplifying inductive transformer approach allows for a relaxation of demanding current carrying requirements on the spheromak reactor's flux core, reduces plasma contamination arising from high voltage electrode discharge, and improves the efficiency of poloidal flux injection.

  20. Determination flux in the Reactor JEN-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarized several irradiations that have been made to determine the neutron flux distributions in the core of the JEN-1 reactor. Gold foils of 380 μ gr and Mn-Ni (12% de Ni) of 30 mg have been employed. the epithermal flux has been determined by mean of the Cd radio. The resonance integral values given by Macklin and Pomerance have been used. (Author) 9 refs

  1. High field magnet program at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, A; Muratore, J; Parker, B; Sampson, W; Wanderer, P J; Willen, E

    2000-01-01

    The magnet program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is focussed on superconducting magnets for particle accelerators. The effort includes magnet production at the laboratory and in industry, magnet R&D, and test facilities for magnets and superconductors. Nearly 2000 magnets-dipoles, quadrupoles, sextupoles and correctors for the arc and insertion regions-were produced for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), which is being commissioned. Currently, production of helical dipoles for the polarized proton program at RHIC, insertion region dipoles for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, and an insertion magnet system for the Hadron-Elektron-Ring- Analage (HERA) collider at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) is underway. The R&D effort is exploring dipoles with fields above 10 T for use in post-LHC colliders. Brittle superconductors-Nb/sub 3/Sn or HTS-are being used for these magnets. The superconductor test facility measures short-sample currents and other characteristics of sample...

  2. Reactor antineutrino fluxes - status and challenges

    CERN Document Server

    Huber, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    In this contribution we describe the current understanding of reactor antineutrino fluxes and point out some recent developments. This is not intended to be a complete review of this vast topic but merely a selection of observations and remarks, which despite their incompleteness, will highlight the status and the challenges of this field.

  3. Type B investigation of the iridium contamination event at the High Flux Isotope Reactor on September 7, 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the title date, at ORNL, area radiation alarms sounded during a routine transfer of a shielding cask (containing 60 Ci192Ir) from the HFIR pool side to a transport truck. Small amounts of Ir were released from the cask onto the reactor bay floor. The floor was cleaned, and the cask was shipped to a hot cell at Building 3047 on Oct. 3, 1993. The event was caused by rupture of one of the Ir target rods after it was loaded into the cask for normal transport operations; the rupture was the result of steam generation in the target rod soon after it was placed in the cask (water had entered the target rod through a tiny defect in a weld while it was in the reactor under pressure). While the target rods were in the reactor and reactor pool, there was sufficient cooling to prevent steam generation; when the target rod was loaded into the dry transport cask, the temperature increased enough to result in boiling of the trapped water and produced high enough pressure to result in rupture. The escaping steam ejected some of the Ir pellets. The event was reported as Occurrence Report Number ORO--MMES-X10HFIR-1993-0030, dated Sept. 8, 1993. Analysis indicated that the following conditions were probable causes: less than adequate welding procedures, practices, or techniques, material controls, or inspection methods, or combination thereof, could have led to weld defects, affecting the integrity of target rod IR-75; less than adequate secondary containment in the cask allowed Ir pellets to escape

  4. Dose calculation and treatment planning for the Brookhaven NCT Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H.B.; Brugger, R.M.

    1992-01-01

    Consistency of the calculated to measured fluxes and doses in phantoms is important for confidence in treatment planning for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). Two phantoms have been used to measure the thermal and epithermal flux and gamma dose distributions for irradiations at the BMRR and these are compared to MCNP calculations. Since MCNP calculations in phantoms or models would be lengthy if the calculations started each time with fission neutrons from the reactor core, a neutron source plane, which was verified by spectrum and flux measurements at the irradiation port, was designed. Measured doses in phantoms are especially important to verify the simulated neutron source plane. Good agreement between the calculated and measured values has been achieved and this neutron source plane is now used to predict flux and dose information for oncologists to form treatment plans as well as designing collimator and room shielding. In addition, a program using MCNP calculated results as input has been developed to predict reliable flux and dose distributions in the central coronal section of a head model for irradiation by the BMRR beam. Dosimetric comparisons and treatment examples are presented.

  5. Dose calculation and treatment planning for the Brookhaven NCT Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, H.B.; Brugger, R.M.

    1992-12-31

    Consistency of the calculated to measured fluxes and doses in phantoms is important for confidence in treatment planning for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor (BMRR). Two phantoms have been used to measure the thermal and epithermal flux and gamma dose distributions for irradiations at the BMRR and these are compared to MCNP calculations. Since MCNP calculations in phantoms or models would be lengthy if the calculations started each time with fission neutrons from the reactor core, a neutron source plane, which was verified by spectrum and flux measurements at the irradiation port, was designed. Measured doses in phantoms are especially important to verify the simulated neutron source plane. Good agreement between the calculated and measured values has been achieved and this neutron source plane is now used to predict flux and dose information for oncologists to form treatment plans as well as designing collimator and room shielding. In addition, a program using MCNP calculated results as input has been developed to predict reliable flux and dose distributions in the central coronal section of a head model for irradiation by the BMRR beam. Dosimetric comparisons and treatment examples are presented.

  6. Experimental Plan and Irradiation Target Design for FeCrAl Embrittlement Screening Tests Conducted Using the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Field, Kevin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Howard, Richard H. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Yamamoto, Yukinori [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-06-26

    The objective of the FeCrAl embrittlement screening tests being conducted through the use of Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor is to provide data on the radiation-induced changes in the mechanical properties including radiation-induced hardening and embrittlement through systematic testing and analysis. Data developed on the mechanical properties will be supported by extensive microstructural evaluations to assist in the development of structure-property relationships and provide a sound, fundamental understanding of the performance of FeCrAl alloys in intense neutron radiation fields. Data and analysis developed as part of this effort will be used to assist in the determination of FeCrAl alloys as a viable material for commercial light water reactor (LWR) applications with a primary focus as an accident tolerant cladding.

  7. Experimental Plan and Irradiation Target Design for FeCrAl Embrittlement Screening Tests Conducted Using the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the FeCrAl embrittlement screening tests being conducted through the use of Oak Ridge National Laboratories (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor is to provide data on the radiation-induced changes in the mechanical properties including radiation-induced hardening and embrittlement through systematic testing and analysis. Data developed on the mechanical properties will be supported by extensive microstructural evaluations to assist in the development of structure-property relationships and provide a sound, fundamental understanding of the performance of FeCrAl alloys in intense neutron radiation fields. Data and analysis developed as part of this effort will be used to assist in the determination of FeCrAl alloys as a viable material for commercial light water reactor (LWR) applications with a primary focus as an accident tolerant cladding.

  8. Feasibility of a laser or charged-particle-beam fusion-reactor concept with direct electric generation by magnetic-flux compression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new concept for an inertial-confinement fusion reactor is described which, because of its fundamentally different approach to blanket geometry and energy conversion, makes possible a unique combination of high efficiency, high power density, and low radioactivity. The conventional blanket is replaced with a liquid-density mass of lithium contiguously surrounding the fusion yield. This compact blanket configuration produces the maximum shock-induced kinetic energy in liquid metal and the maximum neutron absorption per unit mass. The shock-induced kinetic energy of the liquid lithium is converted directly to electricity with high efficiency by work done against a pulsed normal-conducting magnetic field applied to the exterior of the lithium

  9. Determining Reactor Flux from Xenon-136 and Cesium-135 in Spent Fuel

    CERN Document Server

    Hayes, A C

    2012-01-01

    The ability to infer the reactor flux from spent fuel or seized fissile material would enhance the tools of nuclear forensics and nuclear nonproliferation significantly. We show that reactor flux can be inferred from the ratios of xenon-136 to xenon-134 and cesium-135 to cesium-137. If the average flux of a reactor is known, the flux inferred from measurements of spent fuel could help determine whether that spent fuel was loaded as a blanket or close to the mid-plane of the reactor. The cesium ratio also provides information on reactor shutdowns during the irradiation of fuel, which could prove valuable for identifying the reactor in question through comparisons with satellite reactor heat monitoring data. We derive analytic expressions for these correlations and compare them to experimental data and to detailed reactor burn simulations. The enrichment of the original uranium fuel affects the correlations by up to 3 percent, but only at high flux.

  10. High flux source of cold rubidium atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the production of a continuous, slow, and cold beam of 87Rb atoms with an extremely high flux of 3.2x1012 atoms/s, a transverse temperature of 3 mK, and a longitudinal temperature of 90 mK. We describe the apparatus created to generate the atom beam. Hot atoms are emitted from a rubidium candlestick atomic beam source and transversely cooled and collimated by a 20 cm long atomic collimator section, boosting overall beam flux by a factor of 50. The Rb atomic beam is then decelerated and longitudinally cooled by a 1 m long Zeeman slower

  11. High flux source of cold rubidium atoms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slowe, Christopher; Vernac, Laurent; Hau, Lene Vestergaard

    2005-10-01

    We report on the production of a continuous, slow, and cold beam of Rb87 atoms with an extremely high flux of 3.2×1012atoms/s, a transverse temperature of 3mK, and a longitudinal temperature of 90mK. We describe the apparatus created to generate the atom beam. Hot atoms are emitted from a rubidium candlestick atomic beam source and transversely cooled and collimated by a 20cm long atomic collimator section, boosting overall beam flux by a factor of 50. The Rb atomic beam is then decelerated and longitudinally cooled by a 1m long Zeeman slower.

  12. Boron neutron capture therapy of malignant brain tumors at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joel, D.D.; Coderre, J.A.; Chanana, A.D. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Medical Dept.

    1996-12-31

    Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) is a bimodal form of radiation therapy for cancer. The first component of this treatment is the preferential localization of the stable isotope {sup 10}B in tumor cells by targeting with boronated compounds. The tumor and surrounding tissue is then irradiated with a neutron beam resulting in thermal neutron/{sup 10}B reactions ({sup 10}B(n,{alpha}){sup 7}Li) resulting in the production of localized high LET radiation from alpha and {sup 7}Li particles. These products of the neutron capture reaction are very damaging to cells, but of short range so that the majority of the ionizing energy released is microscopically confined to the vicinity of the boron-containing compound. In principal it should be possible with BNCT to selectively destroy small nests or even single cancer cells located within normal tissue. It follows that the major improvements in this form of radiation therapy are going to come largely from the development of boron compounds with greater tumor selectivity, although there will certainly be advances made in neutron beam quality as well as the possible development of alternative sources of neutron beams, particularly accelerator-based epithermal neutron beams.

  13. Neutron spectra at two beam ports of a TRIGA Mark III reactor loaded with HEU fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Carrillo, H R; Hernández-Dávila, V M; Aguilar, F; Paredes, L; Rivera, T

    2014-01-01

    The neutron spectra have been measured in two beam ports, one radial and another tangential, of the TRIGA Mark III nuclear reactor from the National Institute of Nuclear Research in Mexico. Measurements were carried out with the reactor core loaded with high enriched uranium fuel. Two reactor powers, 5 and 10 W, were used during neutron spectra measurements using a Bonner sphere spectrometer with a (6)LiI(Eu) scintillator and 2, 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12 in.-diameter high-density polyethylene spheres. The neutron spectra were unfolded using the NSDUAZ unfolding code. For each spectrum total flux, mean energy and ambient dose equivalent were determined. Measured spectra show fission, epithermal and thermal neutrons, being harder in the radial beam port. PMID:23746708

  14. Neutron spectra at two beam ports of a TRIGA Mark III reactor loaded with HEU fuel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vega-Carrillo, H R; Hernández-Dávila, V M; Aguilar, F; Paredes, L; Rivera, T

    2014-01-01

    The neutron spectra have been measured in two beam ports, one radial and another tangential, of the TRIGA Mark III nuclear reactor from the National Institute of Nuclear Research in Mexico. Measurements were carried out with the reactor core loaded with high enriched uranium fuel. Two reactor powers, 5 and 10 W, were used during neutron spectra measurements using a Bonner sphere spectrometer with a (6)LiI(Eu) scintillator and 2, 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12 in.-diameter high-density polyethylene spheres. The neutron spectra were unfolded using the NSDUAZ unfolding code. For each spectrum total flux, mean energy and ambient dose equivalent were determined. Measured spectra show fission, epithermal and thermal neutrons, being harder in the radial beam port.

  15. Brookhaven highlights - Brookhaven National Laboratory 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This report highlights research conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the following areas: alternating gradient synchrotron; physics; biology; national synchrotron light source; department of applied science; medical; chemistry; department of advanced technology; reactor; safety and environmental protection; instrumentation; and computing and communications.

  16. Production capabilities in US nuclear reactors for medical radioisotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mirzadeh, S.; Callahan, A.P.; Knapp, F.F. Jr. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Schenter, R.E. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States)

    1992-11-01

    The availability of reactor-produced radioisotopes in the United States for use in medical research and nuclear medicine has traditionally depended on facilities which are an integral part of the US national laboratories and a few reactors at universities. One exception is the reactor in Sterling Forest, New York, originally operated as part of the Cintichem (Union Carbide) system, which is currently in the process of permanent shutdown. Since there are no industry-run reactors in the US, the national laboratories and universities thus play a critical role in providing reactor-produced radioisotopes for medical research and clinical use. The goal of this survey is to provide a comprehensive summary of these production capabilities. With the temporary shutdown of the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in November 1986, the radioisotopes required for DOE-supported radionuclide generators were made available at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR). In March 1988, however, the HFBR was temporarily shut down which forced investigators to look at other reactors for production of the radioisotopes. During this period the Missouri University Research Reactor (MURR) played an important role in providing these services. The HFIR resumed routine operation in July 1990 at 85 MW power, and the HFBR resumed operation in June 1991, at 30 MW power. At the time of the HFBR shutdown, there was no available comprehensive overview which could provide information on status of the reactors operating in the US and their capabilities for radioisotope production. The obvious need for a useful overview was thus the impetus for preparing this survey, which would provide an up-to-date summary of those reactors available in the US at both the DOE-funded national laboratories and at US universities where service irradiations are currently or expected to be conducted.

  17. High-Flux Femtosecond X-Ray Emission from Controlled Generation of Annular Electron Beams in a Laser Wakefield Accelerator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, T Z; Behm, K; Dong, C F; Davoine, X; Kalmykov, S Y; Petrov, V; Chvykov, V; Cummings, P; Hou, B; Maksimchuk, A; Nees, J A; Yanovsky, V; Thomas, A G R; Krushelnick, K

    2016-08-26

    Annular quasimonoenergetic electron beams with a mean energy in the range 200-400 MeV and charge on the order of several picocoulombs were generated in a laser wakefield accelerator and subsequently accelerated using a plasma afterburner in a two-stage gas cell. Generation of these beams is associated with injection occurring on the density down ramp between the stages. This well-localized injection produces a bunch of electrons performing coherent betatron oscillations in the wakefield, resulting in a significant increase in the x-ray yield. Annular electron distributions are detected in 40% of shots under optimal conditions. Simultaneous control of the pulse duration and frequency chirp enables optimization of both the energy and the energy spread of the annular beam and boosts the radiant energy per unit charge by almost an order of magnitude. These well-defined annular distributions of electrons are a promising source of high-brightness laser plasma-based x rays. PMID:27610860

  18. Brookhaven highlights, October 1979-September 1980

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights are given for the research areas of the Brookhaven National Laboratory. These areas include high energy physics, physics and chemistry, life sciences, applied energy science (energy and environment, and nuclear energy), and support activities (including mathematics, instrumentation, reactors, and safety)

  19. Brookhaven highlights, October 1979-September 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Highlights are given for the research areas of the Brookhaven National Laboratory. These areas include high energy physics, physics and chemistry, life sciences, applied energy science (energy and environment, and nuclear energy), and support activities (including mathematics, instrumentation, reactors, and safety). (GHT)

  20. The Phase I/II BNCT Trials at the Brookhaven medical research reactor: Critical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A phase I/II clinical trial of boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-F) mediated boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) was initiated at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in 1994. Many critical issues were considered during the design of the first of many sequential dose escalation protocols. These critical issues included patient selection criteria, boron delivery agent, dose limits to the normal brain, dose escalation schemes for both neutron exposure and boron dose, and fractionation. As the clinical protocols progressed and evaluation of the tolerance of the central nervous system (CNS) to BPA-mediated BNCT at the BMRR continued new specifications were adopted. Clinical data reflecting the progression of the protocols will be presented to illustrate the steps taken and the reasons behind their adoption. (author)

  1. High power 1 MeV neutral beam system and its application plan for the international tokamak experimental reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemsworth, R.S. [ITER Joint Central Team, Naka, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1997-03-01

    This paper describes the Neutral Beam Injection system which is presently being designed for the International Tokamak Experimental Reactor, ITER, in Europe Japan and Russia, with co-ordination by the Joint Central Team of ITER at Naka, Japan. The proposed system consists of three negative ion based neutral injectors, delivering a total of 50 MW of 1 MeV D{sup 0} to the ITER plasma for a pulse length of >1000 s. Each injectors uses a single caesiated volume arc discharge negative ion source, and a multi-grid, multi-aperture accelerator, to produce about 40 A of 1 MeV D{sup -}. This will be neutralized by collisions with D{sub 2} in a sub-divided gas neutralizer, which has a conversion efficiency of about 60%. The charged fraction of the beam emerging from the neutralizer is dumped in an electrostatic residual ion dump. A water cooled calorimeter can be moved into the beam path to intercept the neutral beam, allowing commissioning of the injector independent of ITER. ITER is scheduled to produce its first plasma at the beginning of 2008, and the planning of the R and D, construction and installation foresees the neutral injection system being available from the start of ITER operations. (author)

  2. Investigation of the delay in pressure vessel embrittlement specimen analysis for the Oak Ridge National Laboratory High Flux Isotope Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of the investigative data pertaining to this incident reveals the following conditions as key findings and probable causes: (1) The contractor failed to properly implement the surveillance program for monitoring reactor pressure vessel embrittlement. (2) Contractor and DOE organizations provided less than adequate oversight and independent overview, especially by not requiring operating organizations to provide documented evidence to substantiate claims that there was ''no problem'' with respect to embrittlement. (3) Although the temperature limitation for reactor pressurization identified in the Technical Specifications was never violated, the basis of this safety limitation was violated. (4) The basis for concluding that there would be no embrittlement of the pressure vessel steel over the expected life of the reactor is questionable. (5) The contractor and DOE failed to make the surveillance program visible by incorporating it in the Technical Specifications. (6) The Accident Analysis/Final Safety Analysis Report was never adequately reviewed and updated subsequent to its initial issuance. (7) Surveillance specimen analysis was incomplete and never transmitted to reactor operating personnel in a usable format prior to November 1986. (8) There was extensive delays (many years) in the testing, analysis, and reporting of surveillance program results

  3. Modification of the radial beam port of ITU TRIGA Mark II research reactor for BNCT applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper aims to describe the modification of the radial beam port of ITU (İstanbul Technical University) TRIGA Mark II research reactor for BNCT applications. Radial beam port is modified with Polyethylene and Cerrobend collimators. Neutron flux values are measured by neutron activation analysis (Au–Cd foils). Experimental results are verified with Monte Carlo results. The results of neutron/photon spectrum, thermal/epithermal neutron flux, fast group photon fluence and change of the neutron fluxes with the beam port length are presented. - Highlights: • Using MCNP5, radial beam port of ITU TRIGA Mark II research reactor is modified. • Polyethylene and Cerrobend collimators are used to modify the beam port. • Results of two-group neutron/photon flux are presented. • Monte Carlo results are compared with experimental results

  4. Charge neutralized low energy beam transport at Brookhaven 200 MeV linac.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raparia, D; Alessi, J; Atoian, G; Zelenski, A

    2016-02-01

    The H(-) magnetron source provides about 100 mA H(-) beam to be match into the radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator. As H(-) beam traverses through low energy transport, it ionizes the residual gas and electrons are repelled and positive ions are trapped in the beam, due to negative potential of the beam, providing charge neutralization for the H(-) beam. The neutralization time for the critical density depends upon the background gas and its pressure. Critical density for xenon gas at 35 keV is about 43 times smaller than that of hydrogen and stripping cross section is only 5 times than that of hydrogen gas. We are using xenon gas to reduce neutralization time and to improve transmission through the 200 MeV linac. We are also using pulse nitrogen gas to improve transmission and stability of polarized H(-) beam from optically pumped polarized ion source. PMID:26932107

  5. Charge neutralized low energy beam transport at Brookhaven 200 MeV linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The H− magnetron source provides about 100 mA H− beam to be match into the radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator. As H− beam traverses through low energy transport, it ionizes the residual gas and electrons are repelled and positive ions are trapped in the beam, due to negative potential of the beam, providing charge neutralization for the H− beam. The neutralization time for the critical density depends upon the background gas and its pressure. Critical density for xenon gas at 35 keV is about 43 times smaller than that of hydrogen and stripping cross section is only 5 times than that of hydrogen gas. We are using xenon gas to reduce neutralization time and to improve transmission through the 200 MeV linac. We are also using pulse nitrogen gas to improve transmission and stability of polarized H− beam from optically pumped polarized ion source

  6. Study of the Potential Impact of Gamma-Induced Radiolytic Gases on Loading of Cesium Onto Crystalline Silicotitanate Sorbent at ORNL's High Flux Isotope Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mattus, A.J.

    2001-02-12

    The use of an engineered form of crystalline silicotitanate as a potential sorbent for the removal and concentration of cesium from the high-level waste at the Savannah River Site was investigated. Results conclusively showed this sorbent to be unaffected by gamma-induced radiolytic gas formation during column loading. Closely controlled column-loading experiments were performed at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory's High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) in a gamma field with a conservative dose rate expected to exceed that in a full-scale column by a factor of nearly 16. Operation of column loading under expected nominal full-scale field conditions in the HFIR pool showed that radiolytic gases were formed at a previously calculated generation rate of 0.4 mL per liter of feed solution. When the resulting cesium-loading curve in the gamma field was compared with that of a control experiment in the absence of a gamma field, no discernable difference in the curves (within analytical error) was detected. Both curves were in good agreement with the VERSE computer-generated curve. Results conclusively indicate that the production of radiolytic gases within a full-scale column is not expected to result in reduced capacity or associated gas generation problems during operation at the Savannah River Site.

  7. Neutron flux determination at the IPR-R1 Triga Mark I neutron beam extractor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The IPR-R1 Triga Mark I Reactor located at the CDTN/CNEN, Belo Horizonte, Brazil, has been operating since November of 1960. In this work, measurements of thermal and epithermal neutron flux along the IPR-R1 neutron beam extractor were performed by neutron activation of reference materials using the two foils method. The obtained results were compared with results from two previous works: an experimental measurement done in a previous reactor core configuration and a numerical work made by Monte Carlo simulation using the actual reactor core configuration. The main purpose of this work is to update the measured data to the actual reactor core configuration. (author)

  8. Charge neutralized low energy beam transport at Brookhaven 200 MeV linac

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raparia, D., E-mail: raparia@bnl.gov; Alessi, J.; Atoian, G.; Zelenski, A. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11786 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    The H{sup −} magnetron source provides about 100 mA H{sup −} beam to be match into the radio-frequency quadrupole accelerator. As H{sup −} beam traverses through low energy transport, it ionizes the residual gas and electrons are repelled and positive ions are trapped in the beam, due to negative potential of the beam, providing charge neutralization for the H{sup −} beam. The neutralization time for the critical density depends upon the background gas and its pressure. Critical density for xenon gas at 35 keV is about 43 times smaller than that of hydrogen and stripping cross section is only 5 times than that of hydrogen gas. We are using xenon gas to reduce neutralization time and to improve transmission through the 200 MeV linac. We are also using pulse nitrogen gas to improve transmission and stability of polarized H{sup −} beam from optically pumped polarized ion source.

  9. The Atmospheric Response to High Nonthermal Electron Beam Fluxes in Solar Flares I: Modeling the Brightest NUV Footpoints in the X1 Solar Flare of 2014 March 29

    CERN Document Server

    Kowalski, Adam F; Daw, Adrian N; Cauzzi, Gianna; Carlsson, Mats

    2016-01-01

    The 2014 March 29 X1 solar flare (SOL20140329T17:48) produced bright continuum emission in the far- and near-ultraviolet (NUV) and highly asymmetric chromospheric emission lines, providing long-sought constraints on the heating mechanisms of the lower atmosphere in solar flares. We analyze the continuum and emission line data from the Interface Region Imaging Spectrograph (IRIS) of the brightest flaring magnetic footpoints in this flare. We compare the NUV spectra of the brightest pixels to new radiative-hydrodynamic predictions calculated with the RADYN code using constraints on a nonthermal electron beam inferred from the collisional thick-target modeling of hard X-ray data from RHESSI. We show that the atmospheric response to a high beam flux density satisfactorily achieves the observed continuum brightness in the NUV. The NUV continuum emission in this flare is consistent with hydrogen (Balmer) recombination radiation that originates from low optical depth in a dense chromospheric condensation and from th...

  10. Detailed flux calculations for the conceptual design of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed MCNP model of the Advanced Neutron Source Reactor has been developed. All reactor components inside the reflector tank were included, and all components were highly segmented. Neutron and photon multigroup flux spectra have been calculated for each segment in the model, and thermal-to-fast neutron flux ratios were determined for each component segment. Axial profiles of the spectra are provided for all components of the reactor. Individual segment statistical uncertainties were limited wherever possible, and the group fluxes for all important reflector components have a standard deviation below 10%

  11. Modification of the radial beam port of ITU TRIGA Mark II research reactor for BNCT applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akan, Zafer; Türkmen, Mehmet; Çakir, Tahir; Reyhancan, İskender A; Çolak, Üner; Okka, Muhittin; Kiziltaş, Sahip

    2015-05-01

    This paper aims to describe the modification of the radial beam port of ITU (İstanbul Technical University) TRIGA Mark II research reactor for BNCT applications. Radial beam port is modified with Polyethylene and Cerrobend collimators. Neutron flux values are measured by neutron activation analysis (Au-Cd foils). Experimental results are verified with Monte Carlo results. The results of neutron/photon spectrum, thermal/epithermal neutron flux, fast group photon fluence and change of the neutron fluxes with the beam port length are presented. PMID:25746919

  12. A high-speed beam of lithium droplets for collecting diverted energy and particles in ITER [International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A high-speed (160m/s) beam (0.14 x 0.86m) of liquid-lithium droplets passing through the divertor region(s) below (and above) the main plasma has the potential to replace and out-perform ''conventional'' solid divertor plates in both heat and particle removal. In addition to superior heat-collection properties, the lithium beam would: remove impurities; require low power to circulate the lithium; exhibit low-recycle divertor operation compatible with lower-hybrid current drive, H-mode plasma confinement, and no flow reversal in the edge plasma; be insensitive to plasma shifts; and finally protect solid structures from the plasma thermal energy for those disruptions that deposit energy preferentially into the divertor while simultaneously being rapidly re-established after a major disruption. Scoping calculations identifying the beam configuration and the droplet dynamics, including formation, MHD effects, gravitational effects, thermal response and hydrodynamics, are presented. Limitations and uncertainties are also discussed. 20 refs., 6 figs., 3 tabs

  13. Research and Development of Multiphysics Models in Support of the Conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor to Low Enriched Uranium Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodey, Isaac T [ORNL; Curtis, Franklin G [ORNL; Arimilli, Rao V [ORNL; Ekici, Kivanc [ORNL; Freels, James D [ORNL

    2015-12-01

    ABSTRACT The findings presented in this report are results of a five year effort lead by the RRD Division of the ORNL, which is focused on research and development toward the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). This report focuses on the tasks accomplished by the University of Tennessee Knoxville (UTK) team from the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Biomedical Engineering (MABE) that provided expert support in multiphysics modeling of complex problems associated with the LEU conversion of the HFIR reactor. The COMSOL software was used as the main computational modeling tool, whereas Solidworks was also used in support of computer-aided-design (CAD) modeling of the proposed LEU fuel design. The UTK research has been governed by a statement of work (SOW), which was updated annually to clearly define the specific tasks reported herein. Ph.D. student Isaac T. Bodey has focused on heat transfer and fluid flow modeling issues and has been aided by his major professor Dr. Rao V. Arimilli. Ph.D. student Franklin G. Curtis has been focusing on modeling the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) phenomena caused by the mechanical forces acting on the fuel plates, which in turn affect the fluid flow in between the fuel plates, and ultimately the heat transfer, is also affected by the FSI changes. Franklin Curtis has been aided by his major professor Dr. Kivanc Ekici. M.Sc. student Adam R. Travis has focused two major areas of research: (1) on accurate CAD modeling of the proposed LEU plate design, and (2) reduction of the model complexity and dimensionality through interdimensional coupling of the fluid flow and heat transfer for the HFIR plate geometry. Adam Travis is also aided by his major professor, Dr. Kivanc Ekici. We must note that the UTK team, and particularly the graduate students, have been in very close collaboration with Dr. James D. Freels (ORNL technical monitor and mentor

  14. Research and Development of Multiphysics Models in Support of the Conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor to Low Enriched Uranium Fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bodey, Isaac T. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Curtis, Franklin G. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Arimilli, Rao V. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Ekici, Kivanc [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Freels, James D. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-11-01

    ABSTRACT The findings presented in this report are results of a five year effort lead by the RRD Division of the ORNL, which is focused on research and development toward the conversion of the High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) fuel from high-enriched uranium (HEU) to low-enriched uranium (LEU). This report focuses on the tasks accomplished by the University of Tennessee Knoxville (UTK) team from the Department of Mechanical, Aerospace, and Biomedical Engineering (MABE) that provided expert support in multiphysics modeling of complex problems associated with the LEU conversion of the HFIR reactor. The COMSOL software was used as the main computational modeling tool, whereas Solidworks was also used in support of computer-aided-design (CAD) modeling of the proposed LEU fuel design. The UTK research has been governed by a statement of work (SOW), which was updated annually to clearly define the specific tasks reported herein. Ph.D. student Isaac T. Bodey has focused on heat transfer and fluid flow modeling issues and has been aided by his major professor Dr. Rao V. Arimilli. Ph.D. student Franklin G. Curtis has been focusing on modeling the fluid-structure interaction (FSI) phenomena caused by the mechanical forces acting on the fuel plates, which in turn affect the fluid flow in between the fuel plates, and ultimately the heat transfer, is also affected by the FSI changes. Franklin Curtis has been aided by his major professor Dr. Kivanc Ekici. M.Sc. student Adam R. Travis has focused two major areas of research: (1) on accurate CAD modeling of the proposed LEU plate design, and (2) reduction of the model complexity and dimensionality through interdimensional coupling of the fluid flow and heat transfer for the HFIR plate geometry. Adam Travis is also aided by his major professor, Dr. Kivanc Ekici. We must note that the UTK team, and particularly the graduate students, have been in very close collaboration with Dr. James D. Freels (ORNL technical monitor and mentor

  15. Excitation of neutron flux waves in reactor core transients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An analysis of the excitation of neutron flux waves in reactor core transients has been performed. A perturbation theory solution has been developed for the time-dependent thermal diffusion equation in which the absorption cross section undergoes a rapid change, as in a PWR rod ejection accident (REA). In this analysis the unperturbed reactor flux states provide the basis for the spatial representation of the flux solution. Using a simplified space-time representation for the cross section change, the temporal integrations have been carried out and analytic expressions for the modal flux amplitudes determined. The first order modal excitation strength is determined by the spatial overlap between the initial and final flux states, and the cross section perturbation. The flux wave amplitudes are found to be largest for rapid transients involving large reactivity perturbations

  16. High energy beam lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marchetto, M.; Laxdal, R. E.

    2014-01-01

    The ISAC post accelerator comprises an RFQ, DTL and SC-linac. The high energy beam lines connect the linear accelerators as well as deliver the accelerated beams to two different experimental areas. The medium energy beam transport (MEBT) line connects the RFQ to the DTL. The high energy beam transport (HEBT) line connects the DTL to the ISAC-I experimental stations (DRAGON, TUDA-I, GPS). The DTL to superconducting beam (DSB) transport line connects the ISAC-I and ISAC-II linacs. The superconducting energy beam transport (SEBT) line connects the SC linac to the ISAC-II experimental station (TUDA-II, HERACLES, TIGRESS, EMMA and GPS). All these lines have the function of transporting and matching the beams to the downstream sections by manipulating the transverse and longitudinal phase space. They also contain diagnostic devices to measure the beam properties.

  17. Use of neutron beams for low and medium flux research reactors: R and D programmes in materials science. Report of an advisory group meeting held in Vienna, 29 March - 1 April 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report is intended to provide guidelines to research reactor owners and operators for promoting and developing neutron beam based research programmes for solid state studies using neutron scattering techniques. It is expected to benefit ongoing facilities and programmes by encouraging use of improved techniques for detection, signal acquisition, signal processing, etc. and new programmes by assisting in the selection of appropriate equipment, instrument design and research plans. Refs, figs and tabs

  18. Reactor Neutrino Flux Uncertainty Suppression on Multiple Detector Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Cucoanes, Andi; Cabrera, Anatael; Fallot, Muriel; Onillon, Anthony; Obolensky, Michel; Yermia, Frederic

    2015-01-01

    This publication provides a coherent treatment for the reactor neutrino flux uncertainties suppression, specially focussed on the latest $\\theta_{13}$ measurement. The treatment starts with single detector in single reactor site, most relevant for all reactor experiments beyond $\\theta_{13}$. We demonstrate there is no trivial error cancellation, thus the flux systematic error can remain dominant even after the adoption of multi-detector configurations. However, three mechanisms for flux error suppression have been identified and calculated in the context of Double Chooz, Daya Bay and RENO sites. Our analysis computes the error {\\it suppression fraction} using simplified scenarios to maximise relative comparison among experiments. We have validated the only mechanism exploited so far by experiments to improve the precision of the published $\\theta_{13}$. The other two newly identified mechanisms could lead to total error flux cancellation under specific conditions and are expected to have major implications o...

  19. Neutron spectra in two beam ports of the TRIGA Mark III reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H. R.; Hernandez D, V. M. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98060 Zacatecas (Mexico); Aguilar, F.; Paredes, L. [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, 52750 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Rivera M, T., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Unidad Legaria, Av. Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2013-10-15

    The neutron spectra have been measured in two beam ports, radial and tangential, of the TRIGA Mark III nuclear reactor from the National Institute of Nuclear Research. Measurements were carried out with the core with mixed fuel (Leu 8.5/20 and Flip Heu 8.5/70). Two reactor powers, 5 and 10 W, were used during neutron spectra measurements using a Bonner sphere spectrometer with a {sup 6}Lil(Eu) scintillator and 2, 3, 5, 8, 10 and 12 inches-diameter high density polyethylene spheres. The neutron spectra were unfolded using the NSDUAZ unfolding code; from each spectrum the total neutron flux, the neutron mean energy and the neutron ambient dose equivalent dose were determined. Measured spectra show fission (E≥ 0.1 MeV), epithermal (from 0.4 eV up to 0.1 MeV) and thermal neutrons (E≤ 0.4 eV). For both reactor powers the spectra in the radial beam port have similar features which are different to the neutron spectrum characteristics in the tangential beam port. (Author)

  20. Final beam transport in the reactor chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The beam transport in heavy ion fusion (HIF) accelerators is discussed. The qualitative features of transport effects are presented. The basic transport effects associated with HIF beam are space charge effects, atomic physics effects, zero-order plasma effects, and plasma instabilities. In the case of HIF, very high intensity of HIF beam is required, and its own electric repulsion does not keep the beam converging. The number of beams required for supplying the demand power at a target can be estimated. The beam charge deposited on a target pellet produces electrostatic potential, and the electrostatic repulsion prevents the beam to reach on the target. The upper limit of the gas pressure is determined by small angle Coulomb scattering. Since unneutralized beam has the pinching force, the electrostatic kink mode (wiggle mode) should be considered in the pressure region where beam neutralization does not occur. Two-stream instability, filamentation instability and self-pinched transport are considered. As a conclusion of this paper, the new first choice for HIF transport is to use ballistic transport in moderate vacuum. (Kato, T.)

  1. Experiments on critical heat flux for CAREM reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The prediction of critical heat flux (CHF) in rod bundles of light water reactors is basically performed with the aid of empirical correlations derived from experimental data. Many CHF correlations have been proposed and are widely used in the analysis of the thermal margin during normal operation, transient, and accident conditions. Correlations found in the open literature are not sufficiently verified for the thermal-hydraulic conditions that appear in the CAREM core under normal operation: high pressure, low flow, and low qualities. To compensate this deficiency, an experimental investigation on CHF in such thermal-hydraulic conditions is being carried out. The experiments have been performed in the Institute of Physics and Power Engineering of Russian Federation. A short description of facilities, details of the experimental program and some trends in the preliminary results obtained are presented in this work. (author)

  2. Laser ion source for high brightness heavy ion beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamura, M.

    2016-09-01

    A laser ion source is known as a high current high charge state heavy ion source. However we place great emphasis on the capability to realize a high brightness ion source. A laser ion source has a pinpoint small volume where materials are ionized and can achieve quite uniform low temperature ion beam. Those features may enable us to realize very small emittance beams. In 2014, a low charge state high brightness laser ion source was successfully commissioned in Brookhaven National Laboratory. Now most of all the solid based heavy ions are being provided from the laser ion source for regular operation.

  3. AGS Resonant Extraction with High Intensity Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Brookhaven AGS third integer resonant extraction system allows the AGS to provide high quality, high intensity 25.5 GeV/c proton beams simultaneously to four target stations and as many as 8 experiments. With the increasing intensities (over 7 x 1013 protons/pulse) and associated longer spill periods (2.4 to 3 seconds long), they continue to run with low losses and high quality low modulation continuous current beams. Learning to extract and transport these higher intensity beams has required a process of careful modeling and experimentation. They have had to learn how to correct for various instabilities and how to better match extraction and the transport lines to the higher emittance beams being accelerated in the AGS. Techniques employed include ''RF'' methods to smooth out momentum distributions and fine structure. They will present results of detailed multi-particle tracking modeling studies which enabled them to develop a clear understanding of beam loss mechanisms in the transport and extraction process. They report on their status, experiences, and the present understanding of the intensity limitations imposed by resonant extraction and transport to fixed target stations

  4. AGS RESONANT EXTRACTION WITH HIGH INTENSITY BEAMS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    AHRENS,L.; BROWN,K.; GLENN,J.W.; ROSER,T.; TSOUPAS,N.; VANASSELT,W.

    1999-03-29

    The Brookhaven AGS third integer resonant extraction system allows the AGS to provide high quality, high intensity 25.5 GeV/c proton beams simultaneously to four target stations and as many as 8 experiments. With the increasing intensities (over 7 x 10{sup 13} protons/pulse) and associated longer spill periods (2.4 to 3 seconds long), we continue to run with low losses and high quality low modulation continuous current beams.[1] Learning to extract and transport these higher intensity beams has required a process of careful modeling and experimentation. We have had to learn how to correct for various instabilities and how to better match extraction and the transport lines to the higher emittance beams being accelerated in the AGS. Techniques employed include ''RF'' methods to smooth out momentum distributions and fine structure. We will present results of detailed multi-particle tracking modeling studies which enabled us to develop a clear understanding of beam loss mechanisms in the transport and extraction process. We will report on our status, experiences, and the present understanding of the intensity limitations imposed by resonant extraction and transport to fixed target stations.

  5. Monitoring Akkuyu Nuclear Reactor Using Anti-Neutrino Flux Measurement

    CERN Document Server

    Ozturk, Sertac; Ozcan, V Erkcan; Unel, Gokhan

    2016-01-01

    We present a simulation based study for monitoring Akkuyu Nuclear Power Plant's activity using anti-neutrino flux originating from the reactor core. A water Cherenkov detector has been designed and optimization studies have been performed using Geant4 simulation toolkit. A first study for the design of a monitoring detector facility for Akkuyu Nuclear Power Plant has been discussed in this paper.

  6. Which reactor antineutrino flux may be responsible for the anomaly?

    CERN Document Server

    Giunti, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    We investigate which among the reactor antineutrino fluxes from the decays of the fission products of $^{235}\\text{U}$, $^{238}\\text{U}$, $^{239}\\text{Pu}$, and $^{241}\\text{Pu}$ may be responsible for the reactor antineutrino anomaly. We find that it is the $^{235}\\text{U}$ flux, which contributes to the rates of all reactor neutrino experiments. From the fit of the data we obtain the precise determination $ \\sigma_{^{235}\\text{U}} = ( 6.34 \\pm 0.10 ) \\times 10^{-43} \\, \\text{cm}^2 / \\text{fission} $ of the $^{235}\\text{U}$ cross section per fission, which is more precise than the calculated value and differs from it by $2.0\\sigma$.

  7. High temperature gas reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present invention provides a reflector block structure of a high temperature gas reactor in which graphite blocks are not failed even a containing cylinder loaded to a fuel exchanger collides against to secured reflectors upon loading and withdrawing fuel constitutional elements. Namely, a protection plate made of a metal material such as stainless steel is covered on the secured reflector blocks disposed to the upper most step among secured graphite reflector blocks constituting the reactor core. In addition, positioning guide grooves are formed on the protection plate for guiding the containing cylinder loaded to the fuel exchanger to the column of the reactor core constitutional elements. With such a constitution, even if the containing cylinder of fuel exchanger is hoisted down and collided against the inner circumferential edge of the secured reflector blocks due to deviation of the position and the direction upon exchange of fuels, the reflector blocks are not failed since the above-mentioned portion is covered with the metal protection plate. In addition, the positioning guide grooves lead the fuel exchanger to a predetermined column correctly. (I.S.)

  8. Beam halo in high-intensity beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In space-charge dominated beams the nonlinear space-charge forces produce a filamentation pattern, which in projection to the 2-D phase spaces results in a 2-component beam consisting of an inner core and a diffuse outer halo. The beam-halo is of concern for a next generation of cw, high-power proton linacs that could be applied to intense neutron generators for nuclear materials processing. The author describes what has been learned about beam halo and the evolution of space-charge dominated beams using numerical simulations of initial laminar beams in uniform linear focusing channels. Initial results are presented from a study of beam entropy for an intense space-charge dominated beam

  9. High power beam analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aharon, Oren

    2014-02-01

    In various modern scientific and industrial laser applications, beam-shaping optics manipulates the laser spot size and its intensity distribution. However the designed laser spot frequently deviates from the design goal due to real life imperfections and effects, such as: input laser distortions, optical distortion, heating, overall instabilities, and non-linear effects. Lasers provide the ability to accurately deliver large amounts of energy to a target area with very high accuracy. Thus monitoring beam size power and beam location is of high importance for high quality results and repeatability. Depending on the combination of wavelength, beam size and pulse duration , laser energy is absorbed by the material surface, yielding into processes such as cutting, welding, surface treatment, brazing and many other applications. This article will cover the aspect of laser beam measurements, especially at the focal point where it matters the most. A brief introduction to the material processing interactions will be covered, followed by fundamentals of laser beam propagation, novel measurement techniques, actual measurement and brief conclusions.

  10. Modelling collimator of radial beam port Kartini reactor for boron neutron capture therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the cancer therapy methods is BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy). BNCT utilizes neutron nature by 10B deposited on cancer cells. The superiority of BNCT compared to the radiation therapy is the high level of selectivity since its level is within cell. This study was carried out on collimator modelling in radial beam port of reactor Kartini for BNCT. The modelling was conducted by simulation using software of Monte Carlo N-Particle version 5 (MCNP 5). MCNP5 is a package of the programs for both simulating and calculating the problem of particle transport by following the life cycle of a neutron since its birth from fission reaction, transport on materials, until eventually lost due to the absorption reaction or out from the system. The collimator modelling used materials which varied in size in order to generate the value of each of the parameters in accordance with the recommendation of the IAEA, the epithermal neutron flux (ϕepi) > 1.0 x 109n.cm-2s-1, the ratio between the neutron dose rate fast and epithermal neutron flux (Df/ϕepi) < 2.0 x 10-13 Gy.cm2.n-1, the ratio of gamma dose rate and epithermal neutron flux (Dγ/ϕepi) < 2.0 X10-13 Gy.cm2.n-1, the ratio between the thermal and epithermal neutron flux (ϕTh/ϕepi)< 0.05 and the ratio between the current and flux of the epithermal neutron (J/ϕepi) > 0.7. Based on the results of the optimization of the modeling, the materials and sizes of the collimator construction obtained were 0.75 cm Ni as collimator wall, 22 cm Al as a moderator and 4.5 cm Bi as a gamma shield. The outputs of the radiation beam generated from collimator modeling of the radial beam port were ϕepi = 5.25 x 106 n.cm-2.s-1, Df/ϕepi = 1.17 x 10-13Gy.cm2.n-1, Dγ/ϕepi = 1.70 x 10-12 Gy.cm2.n-1, ϕTh/ϕepi = 1.51 and J/ϕepi = 0.731. Based on this study, the result of the beam radiation coming out of the radial beam port dis not fully meet the criteria recommended by IAEA so need to continue this study to get the criteria of IAEA

  11. PODESY program for flux mapping of CNA II reactor:

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The PODESY program, developed by KWU, calculates the spatial flux distribution of CNA II reactor through a three-dimensional expansion of 90 incore detector measurements. The calculation is made in three steps: a) short-term calculation which considers the control rod positions and it has to be done each time the flux mapping is calculated; b) medium-term calculation which includes local burn-up dependent calculation made by diffusion methods in macro-cell configurations (seven channels in hexagonal distribution), and c) long-term calculation, or macroscopic flux determination, that is a fitting and expansion of measured fluxes, previously corrected by local effects, using the eigen functions of the modified diffusion equation. The paper outlines development of step (c) of the calculation. The incore detectors have been located in the central zone of the core. In order to obtain low errors in the expansion procedure it is necessary to include additional points, whose flux values are assumed to be equivalent to detector measurements. These flux values are calculated with detector measurements and a spatial flux distribution calculated by a PUMA code. This PUMA calculation employs a smooth burn-up distribution (local burn-up variations are considered in step (b) of the whole calculation) representing the state of core evolution at the calculation time. The core evolution referred to ends when the equilibrium core condition is reached. Additionally, a calculation method to be employed in the plant in case of incore detector failures, is proposed. (Author)

  12. Charge exchange recombination spectroscopy measurements in the extreme ultraviolet region of central carbon concentrations during high power neutral beam heating in TFTR [Tokamak Fusion Test Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The carbon concentration in the central region of TFTR discharges with high power neutral beam heating has been measured by charge-extracted recombination spectroscopy (CXRS) of the C+5 n = 3--4 transition in the extreme ultraviolet region. The carbon concentrations were deduced from absolute measurements of the line brightness using a calculation of the beam attenuation and the appropriate cascade-corrected line excitation rates. As a result of the high ion temperatures in most of the discharges, the contribution of beam halo neutrals to the line brightness was significant and therefore had to be included in the modeling of the data. Carbon concentrations have been measured in discharges with Ip = 1.0-1.6 MA and beam power in the range of 2.6-30 MW, including a number of supershots. The results are in good agreement with carbon concentrations deduced from the visible bremsstrahlung Zeff and metallic impurity concentrations measured by x-ray pulse-height analysis, demonstrating the reliability of the atomic rates used in the beam attenuation and line excitation calculations. Carbon is the dominant impurity species in these discharges; the oxygen concentration measured via CXRS in a high beam power case was 0.0006 of ne, compard to 0.04 for carbon. Trends with Ip and beam power in the carbon concentration and the inferred deuteron concentration are presented. The carbon concentration is independent of Ip and decreases from 0.13 at 2.6 MW beam power to 0.04 at 30 MW, while the deuteron concentration increases from 0.25 to 0.75 over the same range of beam power. These changes are primarily the result of beam particle fueling, as the carbon density did not vary significantly with beam power. The time evolutions of the carbon and deuteron concentrations during two high power beam pulses, one which exhibited a carbon bloom and one which did not, are compared. 30 refs., 12 figs., 2 tabs

  13. Neutrino Flux Predictions for the NuMI Beam

    CERN Document Server

    Aliaga, L; Golan, T; Altinok, O; Bellantoni, L; Bercellie, A; Betancourt, M; Bravar, A; Budd, H; Carneiro, M F; Diaz, G A; Endress, E; Felix, J; Fields, L; Fine, R; Gago, A M; Galindo, R; Gallagher, H; Gran, R; Harris, D A; Higuera, A; Hurtado, K; Kiveni, M; Kleykamp, J; Le, T; Maher, E; Mann, W A; Marshall, C M; Caicedo, D A Martinez; McFarland, K S; McGivern, C L; McGowan, A M; Messerly, B; Miller, J; Mislivec, A; Morfin, J G; Mousseau, J; Naples, D; Nelson, J K; Norrick, A; Nuruzzaman,; Paolone, V; Park, J; Patrick, C E; Perdue, G N; Ransome, R D; Ray, H; Ren, L; Rimal, D; Rodrigues, P A; Ruterbories, D; Schellman, H; Salinas, C J Solano; Falero, S Sanchez; Tice, B G; Valencia, E; Walton, T; Wolcott, J; Wospakrik, M; Zhang, D

    2016-01-01

    Knowledge of the neutrino flux produced by the Neutrinos at the Main Injector (NuMI) beamline is essential to the neutrino oscillation and neutrino interaction measurements of the MINERvA, MINOS+, NOvA and MicroBooNE experiments at Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory. We have produced a flux prediction which uses all available and relevant hadron production data, incorporating measurements of particle production off of thin targets as well as measurements of particle yields from a spare NuMI target exposed to a 120 GeV proton beam. The result is the most precise flux prediction achieved for a neutrino beam in the one to tens of GeV energy region. We have also compared the prediction to in situ measurements of the neutrino flux and find good agreement.

  14. High-flux, extended-pulse accelerators: Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the program was to investigate physical phenomena associated with high flux ion beam generation and to develop technology for intense ion beam accelerators with pulselengths in the ms range. At the time the work was initiated, the chief area of application for the technology was ion implantation and materials modification

  15. Modeling space–time evolution of flux in a traveling wave reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Monte-Carlo MCNPX was used to analyze flux profile in a traveling wave reactor. • Results show steady propagation of flux (2 cm/year) over life of the reactor. • High discharge burn-up of 394 GWd/MTU was observed for the prototype compact model. - Abstract: Simulations have been carried out using Monte Carlo code MCNPX to evaluate the space and time evolution of flux in a prototype traveling wave reactor under constant thermal power condition. A 3-D box-shaped model of the reactor is developed. The reactor core is divided into two primary regions: the smaller, enriched region with fissile material; and the larger non-enriched region with fertile material. This enrichment strategy is aimed to allow breed-and-burn in the core. The core, on the outside, is surrounded by shielding material of uniform thickness. To facilitate the study, these two primary regions in the core are further divided into thin slab-like regions referred to as cells. Results show propagation of flux profile from the enriched region to the non-enriched region at a near constant speed. Analyses of time evolution of local power density (power fraction) at specified locations in the core are presented. Space and time evolution of the overall core burn-up and localized burn-up are discussed

  16. Neutron Beam Characterization for Neutron Radiography Facility at the Thai Research Reactor TRR-1/M1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this research is to characterize the present status of neutron beam coming out from the reactor core of Thai Research Reactor TRR-1/M1 through neutron radiography facility. In this study, the neutron beam profiles at different positions along the beam exit were recorded using digital imaging devices. In addition, thin foil activation technique, with and without cadmium cover, was employed to determine thermal neutron flux and Cd ratio. An acrylic step wedge was exposed to neutron at different time. In parallel to image construction, neutron detection was carried out using a BF3 gas-filled detector. Then, the image intensities at particular thicknesses were normalized by neutron counts from the BF3 detector to determine relative neutron intensity. The obtained information of neutron beam characterization will be useful not only for monitoring the present status of neutron radiography facility but also for determining the optimum exposure conditions for particular samples in the future.

  17. γ-ray fluxes in Oklo natural reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, C. R.; Sharapov, E. I.; Sonzogni, A. A.

    2012-11-01

    Background: Uncertainty in the operating temperatures of Oklo reactor zones impacts the precision of bounds derived for time variation of the fine structure constant α. Improved 176Lu/175Lu thermometry has been discussed but its usefulness may be complicated by photoexcitation of the isomeric state 176mLu by 176Lu(γ,γ') fluorescence.Purpose: We calculate prompt, delayed, and equilibrium γ-ray fluxes due to fission of 235U in pulsed mode operation of Oklo zone RZ10.Methods: We use Monte Carlo modeling to calculate the prompt flux. We use improved data libraries to estimate delayed and equilibrium spectra and fluxes.Results: We find γ-ray fluxes as a function of energy and derive values for the coefficients λγ,γ' that describe burn-up of 176Lu through the isomeric 176mLu state.Conclusion: The contribution of the (γ,γ') channel to the 176Lu/175Lu isotopic ratio is negligible in comparison to the neutron burn-up channels. Lutetium thermometry is fully applicable to analyses of Oklo reactor data.

  18. RHIC: The World's First High-Energy, Polarized-Proton Collider (423rd Brookhaven Lecture)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at BNL has been colliding polarized proton at a beam energy of 100 billion electron volts (GeV) since 2001. In addition to reporting upon the progress of RHIC polarized-proton program, this talk will focus upon the mechanisms that cause the beam to depolarize and the strategies developed to overcome this. As the world first polarized-proton collider, RHIC is designed to collide polarized protons up to an energy of 250 GeV, thereby providing an unique opportunity to measure the contribution made by the gluon to a proton's spin and to study the spin structure of proton. Unlike other high-energy proton colliders, however, the challenge for RHIC is to overcome the mechanisms that cause partial or total loss of beam polarization, which is due to the interaction of the spin vector with the magnetic fields. In RHIC, two Siberian snakes have been used to avoid these spin depolarizing resonances, which are driven by vertical closed-orbit distortion and vertical betatron oscillations. As a result, polarized-proton beams have been accelerated to 100 GeV without polarization loss, although depolarization has been observed during acceleration from 100 GeV to 205 GeV.

  19. Calculation with MCNP of capture photon flux in VVER-1000 experimental reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Töre, Candan; Ortego, Pedro

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study is to obtain by Monte Carlo method the high energy photon flux due to neutron capture in the internals and vessel layers of the experimental reactor LR-0 located in REZ, Czech Republic, and loaded with VVER-1000 fuel. The calclated neutron, photon and photon to neutron flux ratio are compared with experimental measurements performed with a multi-parameter stilbene detector. The results show clear underestimation of photon flux in downcomer and some overestimation at vessel surface and 1/4 thickness but a good fitting for deeper points in vessel.

  20. Future management of hazardous wastes generated at Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York. Environmental assessment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document assesses the potential environmental impacts of a variety of alternatives which could provide a Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) permitted waste packaging and storage facility that would handle all hazardous, radioactive, and mixed wastes generated at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) and would operate in full compliance with all federal, state, and local laws and regulations. Location of the existing Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) with respect to ground water and the site boundary, technical and capacity limitations, inadequate utilities, and required remediation of the area make the existing facility environmentally unacceptable for long term continued use. This Environmental Assessment (EA) describes the need for action by the Department of Energy (DOE). It evaluates the alternatives for fulfilling that need, including the alternative preferred by DOE, a no-action alternative, and other reasonable alternatives. The EA provides a general description of BNL and the existing environment at the current HWMF and alternative locations considered for a new Waste Management Facility (WMF). Finally, the EA describes the potential environmental impacts of the alternatives considered. The preferred alternative, also identified as Alternative D, would be to construct and operate a new WMF on land formerly occupied by barracks during Camp Upton operations, in an area north of Building 830 and the High Flux Beam Reactor/Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS) recharge basins, east of North Railroad Street, and south of East Fifth Avenue. The purpose of this new facility would be to move all storage and transfer activities inside buildings and on paved and curbed areas, consolidate facilities to improve operations management, and provide improved protection of the environment

  1. A wide range in-core neutron monitoring system for high powered TRIGA reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High power movable core TRIGA reactors present unique problems of determining power levels from a neutron flux measurement because of (1) difficulty of locating detectors; (2) water thermal effects and (3) effect of experimental facilities. A solution, along with experimental results, will be described that uses a beam tube to effectively make in-core flux measurements with an out-of-core detector. The application of this new type of detector assembly to wide range linear and log power measurement will also be discussed. (author)

  2. A High Flux Source of Cold Rubidium

    CERN Document Server

    Slowe, C; Hau, L V; Slowe, Christopher; Vernac, Laurent; Hau, Lene Vestergaard

    2004-01-01

    We report the production of a continuous, slow, and cold beam of 87-Rb atoms with an unprecedented flux of 3.2 x 10^12 atoms/s and a temperature of a few milliKelvin. Hot atoms are emitted from a Rb candlestick atomic beam source and transversely cooled and collimated by a 20 cm long atomic collimator section, augmenting overall beam flux by a factor of 50. The atomic beam is then decelerated and longitudinally cooled by Zeeman slowing.

  3. Jules Horowitz Reactor: a high performance material testing reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iracane, Daniel; Chaix, Pascal; Alamo, Ana

    2008-04-01

    The physical modelling of materials' behaviour under severe conditions is an indispensable element for developing future fission and fusion systems: screening, design, optimisation, processing, licensing, and lifetime assessment of a new generation of structure materials and fuels, which will withstand high fast neutron flux at high in-service temperatures with the production of elements like helium and hydrogen. JANNUS and other analytical experimental tools are developed for this objective. However, a purely analytical approach is not sufficient: there is a need for flexible experiments integrating higher scales and coupled phenomena and offering high quality measurements; these experiments are performed in material testing reactors (MTR). Moreover, complementary representative experiments are usually performed in prototypes or dedicated facilities such as IFMIF for fusion. Only such a consistent set of tools operating on a wide range of scales, can provide an actual prediction capability. A program such as the development of silicon carbide composites (600-1200 °C) illustrates this multiscale strategy. Facing the long term needs of experimental irradiations and the ageing of present MTRs, it was thought necessary to implement a new generation high performance MTR in Europe for supporting existing and future nuclear reactors. The Jules Horowitz Reactor (JHR) project copes with this context. It is funded by an international consortium and will start operation in 2014. JHR will provide improved performances such as high neutron flux ( 10 n/cm/s above 0.1 MeV) in representative environments (coolant, pressure, temperature) with online monitoring of experimental parameters (including stress and strain control). Experimental devices designing, such as high dpa and small thermal gradients experiments, is now a key objective requiring a broad collaboration to put together present scientific state of art, end-users requirements and advanced instrumentation. To cite this

  4. Heat transfer phenomena in gas protected particle beam fusion reactor cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The behavior of the fireball produced in particle beam fusion reactor cavities as the cavity gas near the target absorbs the X-rays and ionic debris emanating from the microexplosion is examined. Thermal response of the first wall to the radiative heat flux from the gas is examined parametrically. Criteria for the suitability of different cavity fill gases based on their ability to protect the first wall from excessive surface heating and ablation are discussed. 9 refs

  5. H particle searches at Brookhaven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chrien, R.E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Physics Dept.

    1997-09-01

    Following the suggestion by R.L. Jaffe twenty years ago, researchers have been trying to establish the existence of a six-quark object, termed the H dibaryon, predicted by the phenomenological quark bag model. This object quickly became the focus of experimental searches at several locations, including the AGS. This search still continues, with perhaps the most active program being carried out at the 2.0 GeV/c beam line at the BNL-AGS. The research was considerably enhanced by the writing of two notable papers at BNL by Aerts and Dover, which gave quantitative predictions for H-production cross sections in two very different reaction mechanisms. One of these, the formation of cascade atomic deuterium to form the H by fusion, had been first suggested by P.D. Barnes. The 2.0 GeV/c line at the AGS was specifically designed to provide an adequate kaon flux for double strangeness and charge exchange reactions. It has been used for two H searches, E813 and E836, as well as for several {Lambda}{Lambda} searches, E885 and E906. These four experiments are setting significant limits on H-production. The results of these experiments are discussed, and descriptions of related H searches at Brookhaven are given.

  6. Gamma-ray fluxes in Oklo natural reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Gould, C R; Sonzogni, A A; 10.1103/PhysRevC.86.054602

    2012-01-01

    Uncertainty in the operating temperatures of Oklo reactor zones impacts the precision of bounds derived for time variation of the fine structure constant $\\alpha$. Improved $^{176}$Lu/$^{175}$Lu thermometry has been discussed but its usefulness may be complicated by photo excitation of the isomeric state $^{176m}$Lu by $^{176}$Lu($\\gamma,\\gamma^\\prime $) fluorescence. We calculate prompt, delayed and equilibrium $\\gamma$-ray fluxes due to fission of $^{235}$U in pulsed mode operation of Oklo zone RZ10. We use Monte Carlo modeling to calculate the prompt flux. We use improved data libraries to estimate delayed and equilibrium spectra and fluxes. We find $\\gamma$-ray fluxes as a function of energy and derive values for the coefficients $\\lambda_{\\gamma,\\gamma^\\prime}$ that describe burn-up of $^{176}$Lu through the isomeric $^{176m}$Lu state. The contribution of the ($\\gamma,\\gamma^\\prime $) channel to the $^{176}$Lu/$^{175}$Lu isotopic ratio is negligible in comparison to the neutron burn-up channels. Lutetium...

  7. Brookhaven Highlights, January 1982-March 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuper, J.B.H.; Rustad, M.C. (eds.)

    1983-01-01

    Research at Brookhaven National Laboratory is summarized. Major headings are high energy physics, physics and chemistry, life sciences, applied energy science, support activities and administration. (GHT)

  8. Study of the RP-10 reactor neutron beam applied to the neutron radiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have studied the RP-10 reactor radial neutron beam No. 3, which is used for neutron radiographies, by comparing radiograph's with and without the inner duct, and neutron flux determination with in flakes along the external duct, being the presence of photons creating signals at comparable levels of neutron effects, which reduce the quality of the analysis, values around 106 and 104 n/cm2s for thermal and epithermal flux were obtained respectively. It is recommended evaluate the design of the internal duct which presents strong photon emission. (authors).

  9. Materials research with neutron beams from a research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Root, J.; Banks, D. [Canadian Neutron Beam Centre, Chalk River Laboratories, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada)

    2015-03-15

    Because of the unique ways that neutrons interact with matter, neutron beams from a research reactor can reveal knowledge about materials that cannot be obtained as easily with other scientific methods. Neutron beams are suitable for imaging methods (radiography or tomography), for scattering methods (diffraction, spectroscopy, and reflectometry) and for other possibilities. Neutron-beam methods are applied by students and researchers from academia, industry and government to support their materials research programs in several disciplines: physics, chemistry, materials science and life science. The arising knowledge about materials has been applied to advance technologies that appear in everyday life: transportation, communication, energy, environment and health. This paper illustrates the broad spectrum of materials research with neutron beams, by presenting examples from the Canadian Neutron Beam Centre at the NRU research reactor in Chalk River. (author)

  10. Neutron spectrum measurements at a radial beam port of the NUR research reactor using a Bonner spheres spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazrou, H; Nedjar, A; Seguini, T

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes the measurement campaign held around the neutron radiography (NR) facility of the Algerian 1MW NUR research reactor. The main objective of this work is to characterize accurately the neutron beam provided at one of the radial channels of the NUR research reactor taking benefit of the acquired CRNA Bonner spheres spectrometer (BSS). The specific objective was to improve the image quality of the NR facility. The spectrometric system in use is based on a central spherical (3)He thermal neutron proportional counter combined with high density polyethylene spheres of different diameters ranging from 3 to 12in. This counting system has good gamma ray discrimination and is able to cover an energy range from thermal to 20MeV. The measurements were performed at the sample distance of 0.6m from the beam port and at a height of 1.2m from the facility floor. During the BSS measurements, the reactor was operating at low power (100W) to avoid large dead times, pulse pileup and high level radiation exposures, in particular, during spheres handling. Thereafter, the neutron spectrum at the sample position was unfolded by means of GRAVEL and MAXED computer codes. The thermal, epithermal and fast neutron fluxes, the total neutron flux, the mean energy and the Cadmium ratio (RCd) were provided. A sensitivity analysis was performed taking into account various defaults spectra and ultimately a different response functions in the unfolding procedure. Overall, from the obtained results it reveals, unexpectedly, that the measured neutron spectrum at the sample position of the neutron radiography of the NUR reactor is being harder with a predominance of fast neutrons (>100keV) by about 60%. Finally, those results were compared to previous and more recent measurements obtained by activation foils detectors. The agreement was fairly good highlighting thereby the consistency of our findings. PMID:27203706

  11. Neutron spectrum measurements at a radial beam port of the NUR research reactor using a Bonner spheres spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazrou, H; Nedjar, A; Seguini, T

    2016-08-01

    This paper describes the measurement campaign held around the neutron radiography (NR) facility of the Algerian 1MW NUR research reactor. The main objective of this work is to characterize accurately the neutron beam provided at one of the radial channels of the NUR research reactor taking benefit of the acquired CRNA Bonner spheres spectrometer (BSS). The specific objective was to improve the image quality of the NR facility. The spectrometric system in use is based on a central spherical (3)He thermal neutron proportional counter combined with high density polyethylene spheres of different diameters ranging from 3 to 12in. This counting system has good gamma ray discrimination and is able to cover an energy range from thermal to 20MeV. The measurements were performed at the sample distance of 0.6m from the beam port and at a height of 1.2m from the facility floor. During the BSS measurements, the reactor was operating at low power (100W) to avoid large dead times, pulse pileup and high level radiation exposures, in particular, during spheres handling. Thereafter, the neutron spectrum at the sample position was unfolded by means of GRAVEL and MAXED computer codes. The thermal, epithermal and fast neutron fluxes, the total neutron flux, the mean energy and the Cadmium ratio (RCd) were provided. A sensitivity analysis was performed taking into account various defaults spectra and ultimately a different response functions in the unfolding procedure. Overall, from the obtained results it reveals, unexpectedly, that the measured neutron spectrum at the sample position of the neutron radiography of the NUR reactor is being harder with a predominance of fast neutrons (>100keV) by about 60%. Finally, those results were compared to previous and more recent measurements obtained by activation foils detectors. The agreement was fairly good highlighting thereby the consistency of our findings.

  12. Axial flux distribution in a lattice position in the NRX reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The axial thermal flux distribution in a lattice position in the NRX reactor has been measured at a number of moderator levels. The results have been fitted to sine functions and values are given for the positions of the flux maxima and the extrapolated flux lengths. Results of measurements of the axial fast flux distribution are also given. (author)

  13. Analysis of calculated neutron flux response at detectors of G.A. Siwabessy multipurpose reactor (RSG-GAS Reactor)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multi Purpose Reactor G.A. Siwabessy (RSG-GAS) reactor core possesses 4 fission-chamber detectors to measure intermediate power level of RSG-GAS reactor. Another detector, also fission-chamber detector, is intended to measure power level of RSG-GAS reactor. To investigate influence of space to the neutron flux values for each detector measuring intermediate and power levels has been carried out. The calculation was carried out using combination of WIMS/D4 and CITATION-3D code and focused on calculation of neutron flux at different detector location of RSG-GAS typical working core various scenarios. For different scenarios, all calculation results showed that each detector, located at different location in the RSG-GAS reactor core, causes different neutron flux occurred in the reactor core due to spatial time effect

  14. UCN sources at external beams of thermal neutrons. An example of PIK reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lychagin, E. V.; Mityukhlyaev, V. A.; Muzychka, A. Yu.; Nekhaev, G. V.; Nesvizhevsky, V. V.; Onegin, M. S.; Sharapov, E. I.; Strelkov, A. V.

    2016-07-01

    We consider ultracold neutron (UCN) sources based on a new method of UCN production in superfluid helium (4He). The PIK reactor is chosen as a perspective example of application of this idea, which consists of installing 4He UCN source in the beam of thermal or cold neutrons and surrounding the source with moderator-reflector, which plays the role of cold neutron (CN) source feeding the UCN source. CN flux in the source can be several times larger than the incident flux, due to multiple neutron reflections from the moderator-reflector. We show that such a source at the PIK reactor would provide an order of magnitude larger density and production rate than an analogous source at the ILL reactor. We estimate parameters of 4He source with solid methane (CH4) or/and liquid deuterium (D2) moderator-reflector. We show that such a source with CH4 moderator-reflector at the PIK reactor would provide the UCN density of ~1·105 cm-3, and the UCN production rate of ~2·107 s-1. These values are respectively 1000 and 20 times larger than those for the most intense UCN user source. The UCN density in a source with D2 moderator-reflector would reach the value of ~2·105 cm-3, and the UCN production rate would be equal ~8·107 s-1. Installation of such a source in a beam of CNs would slightly increase the density and production rate.

  15. Advanced high temperature heat flux sensors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, W.; Hobart, H. F.; Strange, R. R.

    1983-01-01

    To fully characterize advanced high temperature heat flux sensors, calibration and testing is required at full engine temperature. This required the development of unique high temperature heat flux test facilities. These facilities were developed, are in place, and are being used for advanced heat flux sensor development.

  16. Microdosimetry of high LET therapeutic beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental microdosimetry of high LET therapeutic beams were presented. The cyclotron produced fast neutron beams at IMS, TAMVEC and NRL, a reactor fast neutron at YAYOI, a proctor beam at Harvard and a pion beam at TRIUMF are included. Measurements were performed with a conventional tissue equivalent spherical proportional counter with a logarithmic amplifier which made the recording and analysis quite simple. All the energy deposition spectra were analysed in the conventional manner and anti y F, anti y D as well as anti y D* were calculated. The spectra and their mean lineal energies showed wide variations, depending on the particle type, energy, position in phantom. Fractional contribution of elemental particles ( electron, muon, pion, proton, alpha and so on) to the total dose were analysed. For fast neutron beams, the y spectra stayed almost constant at any depth along the central axis in the phantom. The y spectra of proton beam changed slightly along the depth. On the other side, the y spectra of pion beam change drastically in the phantom between plateau and dose peak region. A novel technique of time-of-flight microdosimetry was employed, which made it possible to separate the fractional contribution of contaminant electrons and muons out of pions. Finally, a map of the radiation quality for all the beams is presented and its significances are discussed. (author)

  17. Muon flux measurement with silicon detectors in the CERN neutrino beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work mainly describes the 'Neutrino Flux Monitoring' system (NFM), which has been built for the 400-GeV Super Proton Synchrotron (SPS) neutrino beams. A treatment is given of some general subjects related to the utilization of silicon detectors and the properties of high-energy muons. Energy loss of minimal-ionizing particles, which has to be distinguished from energy deposition in the detector, is considered. Secondary radiation, also called 'spray', consisting of 'delta rays' and other cascade products, is shown to play an important role in the muon flux measurement inside a shield, especially for muons of high energy (> 100 GeV). Radiation induced damage in the detectors, which determines the long term performance, is discussed. The relation between the detector response and the real muon flux is determined. The use of NFM system for on-line beam monitoring is described. (Auth.)

  18. Planned reactor and beam experiments on Neutrino Oscillations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodman, Maury [Argonne National Lab, Argonne IL 60439 (United States)

    2009-08-15

    Current and future neutrino oscillation experiments are discussed with an emphasis on those that will measure or further limit the neutrino oscillation parameter {theta}{sub 13}. Some {nu}{sub e} disappearance experiments are being planned at nuclear reactors, and more ambitious {nu}{sub {mu}}{yields}{nu}{sub e} appearance experiments are being planned using accelerator beams.

  19. Hydrogen production from fusion reactors coupled with high temperature electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The decreasing availability of fossil fuels emphasizes the need to develop systems which will produce synthetic fuel to substitute for and complement the natural supply. An important first step in the synthesis of liquid and gaseous fuels is the production of hydrogen. Thermonuclear fusion offers an inexhaustible source of energy for the production of hydrogen from water. Processes which may be considered for this purpose include electrolysis, thermochemical decomposition or thermochemical-electrochemical hybrid cycles. Preliminary studies at Brookhaven indicate that high temperature electrolysis has the highest potential efficiency for production of hydrogen from fusion. Depending on design electric generation efficiencies of approximately 40 to 60 percent and hydrogen production efficiencies of approximately 50 to 70 percent are projected for fusion reactors using high temperature blankets

  20. Calculations of tangential neutral beam injection current drive efficiency for present moderate flux FRCs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifschitz, A. F.; Farengo, R.; Hoffman, A. L.

    2004-09-01

    A Monte Carlo code is employed to study tangential neutral beam injection into moderate flux field reversed configurations (FRCs) sustained by rotating magnetic fields (RMFs). The dimensions of the FRC are similar to those obtained in the Translation, Confinement and Sustainment (TCS) experiment. Two injection geometries are considered. In one case the beam is injected through the ends, at a small angle to the FRC axis while in the other the beam is injected almost perpendicularly, at some point along the separatrix. The current drive efficiency and the deposited power are calculated employing plasma parameters that can be expected in future experiments on TCS. It is shown that, although the RMF degrades beam confinement, relatively high efficiencies can be obtained provided the RMF does not penetrate too deeply into the plasma. Since the torque deposited by the neutral beam can balance the torque deposited by the RMF, the simultaneous use of both methods appears to be a very attractive option.

  1. A Level 1+ Probabilistic Safety Assessment of the high flux Australian reactor. Vol. 2. Appendix C: System analysis models and results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-01-01

    This section contains the results of the quantitative system/top event analysis. Section C. 1 gives the basic event coding scheme. Section C.2 shows the master frequency file (MFF), which contains the split fraction names, the top events they belong to, the mean values of the uncertainty distribution that is generated by the Monte Carlo quantification in the System Analysis module of RISKMAN, and a brief description of each split fraction. The MFF is organized by the systems modeled, and within each system, the top events associated with the system. Section C.3 contains the fault trees developed for the system/top event models and the RISKMAN reports for each of the system/top event models. The reports are organized under the following system headings: Compressed/Service Air Supply (AIR); Containment Isolation System (CIS); Heavy Water Cooling System (D20); Emergency Core Cooling System (ECCS); Electric Power System (EPS); Light Water Cooling system (H20); Helium Gas System (HE); Mains Water System (MW); Miscellaneous Top Events (MISC); Operator Actions (OPER) Reactor Protection System (RPS); Space Conditioner System (SCS); Condition/Status Switch (SWITCH); RCB Ventilation System (VENT); No. 1 Storage Block Cooling System (SB)

  2. Momentum Flux Determination Using the Multi-beam Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolls, M. J.; Fritts, D. C.; Janches, Diego; Heinselman, C. J.

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, we develop an estimator for the vertical flux of horizontal momentum with arbitrary beam pointing, applicable to the case of arbitrary but fixed beam pointing with systems such as the Poker Flat Incoherent Scatter Radar (PFISR). This method uses information from all available beams to resolve the variances of the wind field in addition to the vertical flux of both meridional and zonal momentum, targeted for high-frequency wave motions. The estimator utilises the full covariance of the distributed measurements, which provides a significant reduction in errors over the direct extension of previously developed techniques and allows for the calculation of an error covariance matrix of the estimated quantities. We find that for the PFISR experiment, we can construct an unbiased and robust estimator of the momentum flux if sufficient and proper beam orientations are chosen, which can in the future be optimized for the expected frequency distribution of momentum-containing scales. However, there is a potential trade-off between biases and standard errors introduced with the new approach, which must be taken into account when assessing the momentum fluxes. We apply the estimator to PFISR measurements on 23 April 2008 and 21 December 2007, from 60-85 km altitude, and show expected results as compared to mean winds and in relation to the measured vertical velocity variances.

  3. Triga Mark III Reactor Operating Power and Neutron Flux Study by Nuclear Track Methodology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, G.; Golzarri, J. I.; Raya-Arredondo, R.; Cruz-Galindo, S.; Sajo-Bohus, L.

    The operating power of a TRIGA Mark III reactor was studied using Nuclear Track Methodology (NTM). The facility has a Highly Enriched Uranium core that provides a neutron flux of around 2 x 1012 n cm-2 s-1 in the TO-2 irradiation channel. The detectors consisted of a Landauer® CR-39 (allyl diglycol polycarbonate) chip covered with a 3 mm Plexiglas® converter. After irradiation, the detectors were chemically etched in a 6.25M-KOH solution at 60±1 °C for 6 h. Track density was determined by a custom-made Digital Image Analysis System. The results show a direct proportionality between reactor power and average nuclear track density for powers in the range 0.1-7 kW. Data reproducibility and relatively low uncertainty (±3%) were achieved. NTM is a simple, fast and reliable technique that can serve as a complementary procedure to measure reactor operating power. It offers the possibility of calibrating the neutron flux density in any low power reactor.

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of the thermal column and beam tube of the TRIGA Mark II research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → Neutronics parameters of the reactor shielding. → Biological shielding of the TRIGA reactor. → Thermal flux measurement in the thermal column and BT-A. → MCNP model validation. - Abstract: The Monet Carlo simulation of the TRIGA Mark II research reactor core has been performed employing the radiation transport computer code MCNP5. The model has been confirmed experimentally in the PhD research work at the Atominstitute (ATI) of the Vienna University of Technology. The MCNP model has been extended to complete biological shielding of the reactor including the thermal column, radiographic collimator and four beam tubes. This paper presents the MCNP simulated results in the thermal column and one of the beam tubes (beam tube A) of the reactor. To validate these theoretical results, thermal neutron flux density measurements using the gold foil activation method have been performed in the thermal column and beam tube A (BT-A). In the thermal column, the theoretical and experimental results are in fairly good agreement i.e. maximum thermal flux density in the centre decreases in radial direction. Further, it is also agreed that thermal flux densities in the lower part is greater than the upper part of the thermal column. In the BT-A experiment, the thermal flux density distribution is measured using gold foil. The experimental and theoretical diffusion lengths have been determined as 10.77 cm and 9.36 cm respectively with only 13% difference, reflecting good agreement between the experimental and simulated results. To save the computational cost and to incorporate the accurate and complete information of each individual Monte Carlo MC particle tracks, the surface source writing capability of MCNP has been utilized to the TRIGA shielding model. The variance reduction techniques have been applied to improve the statistics of the problem and to save computational efforts.

  5. Ion Flux Measurements in Electron Beam Produced Plasmas in Atomic and Molecular Gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, S. G.; Leonhardt, D.; Blackwell, D. D.; Murphy, D. P.; Fernsler, R. F.; Meger, R. A.

    2001-10-01

    In this presentation, mass- and time-resolved measurements of ion fluxes sampled from pulsed, electron beam-generated plasmas will be discussed. Previous works have shown that energetic electron beams are efficient at producing high-density plasmas (10^10-10^12 cm-3) with low electron temperatures (Te < 1.0 eV) over the volume of the beam. Outside the beam, the plasma density and electron temperature vary due, in part, to ion-neutral and electron-ion interactions. In molecular gases, electron-ion recombination plays a significant role while in atomic gases, ion-neutral interactions are important. These interactions also determine the temporal variations in the electron temperature and plasma density when the electron beam is pulsed. Temporally resolved ion flux and energy distributions at a grounded electrode surface located adjacent to pulsed plasmas in pure Ar, N_2, O_2, and their mixtures are discussed. Measurements are presented as a function of operating pressure, mixture ratio, and electron beam-electrode separation. The differences in the results for atomic and molecular gases will also be discussed and related to their respective gas-phase kinetics.

  6. Dissolution of low burnup Fast Flux Test reactor fuel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first Fast-Flux Test Facility reactor fuel [mixed (U,Pu)O2 composition] has been used in dissolution tests for fuel reprocessing. The fuel tested here had a peak burnup of 0.22 at. %, with peak centerline temperatures of 19970C. Linear dissolution rates of 0.99 to 1.57 mm/h were determined for dissolver solution and fresh acid, respectively. Insoluble residues from dissolution at 950C ranged from 0.18 to 0.28% of the original fuel. From 2 to 37 wt % of the residue was recoverable plutonium. Dissolution at 290C yielded residues of 0.56 to 0.64% of the original fuel. The major elements present in the HF leached residue included Ru, Mo, and Rh. The recovered cladding from the 950C dissolution contained the equivalent of 198 mg of 239Pu per 100 g of hulls, while the cladding from the 290c experiments contained only 0.21 mg of 239Pu per 100 g of hulls. 9 references, 5 figures

  7. Poloidal flux linkage requirements for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jardin, S.C.; Kessel, C.; Pomphrey, N.

    1994-01-01

    We have applied two computational models to calculate the poloidal flux linkage requirements for the current ramp-up and for the flattop phase of the proposed International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER). For the current ramp-up phase, we have used the TSC code to simulate the entire current ramp-up period as described in the TAC-3 Physics Report. We have extended the time of the simulation to cover the full current penetration time, that is, until the loop voltage is a constant throughout the plasma. Sensitivity studies have been performed with respect to current ramp-up time, impurity concentration, and to the time of onset of auxiliary heating. We have also used a steady state plasma equilibrium code that has the constant loop voltage constraint built in to survey the dependence of the steady state loop-voltage on the density and temperature profiles. This calculation takes into account the plasma bootstrap current contribution, including non-circular and collisional corrections. The results can be displayed as contours of the loop-voltage on a POPCON like diagram.

  8. Validation of neutron flux redistribution factors in JSI TRIGA reactor due to control rod movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiba, Tanja; Žerovnik, Gašper; Jazbec, Anže; Štancar, Žiga; Barbot, Loïc; Fourmentel, Damien; Snoj, Luka

    2015-10-01

    For efficient utilization of research reactors, such as TRIGA Mark II reactor in Ljubljana, it is important to know neutron flux distribution in the reactor as accurately as possible. The focus of this study is on the neutron flux redistributions due to control rod movements. For analyzing neutron flux redistributions, Monte Carlo calculations of fission rate distributions with the JSI TRIGA reactor model at different control rod configurations have been performed. Sensitivity of the detector response due to control rod movement have been studied. Optimal radial and axial positions of the detector have been determined. Measurements of the axial neutron flux distribution using the CEA manufactured fission chambers have been performed. The experiments at different control rod positions were conducted and compared with the MCNP calculations for a fixed detector axial position. In the future, simultaneous on-line measurements with multiple fission chambers will be performed inside the reactor core for a more accurate on-line power monitoring system. PMID:26141293

  9. UCN sources at external beams of thermal neutrons. An example of PIK reactor

    CERN Document Server

    Lychagin, E V; Muzychka, A Yu; Nekhaev, G V; Nesvizhevsky, V V; Onegin, M S; Sharapov, E I; Strelkov, A V

    2015-01-01

    We consider ultracold neutron (UCN) sources based on a new method of UCN production in superfluid helium (4He). The PIK reactor is chosen as a perspective example of the application of this idea, which consists of installing a 4He UCN source in a beam of thermal or cold neutrons and surrounding the source with a moderator-reflector, which plays the role of a source of cold neutrons (CNs) feeding the UCN source. The CN flux in the source can be several times larger than the incident flux, due to multiple neutron reflections from the moderator-reflector. We show that such a source at the PIK reactor would provide an order of magnitude larger density and production rate than an analogous source at the ILL reactor. We estimate parameters of a 4He source with solid methane (CH4) or/and liquid deuterium (D2) moderator-reflector. We show that such a source with CH4 moderator-reflector at the PIK reactor would provide the UCN density of ~1x10^5 1/cm^3, and the UCN production rate of ~2x10^7 1/s. These values are resp...

  10. Study of a multi-beam accelerator driven thorium reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary advantages that accelerator driven systems have over critical reactors are: (1) Greater flexibility regarding the composition and placement of fissile, fertile, or fission product waste within the blanket surrounding the target, and (2) Potentially enhanced safety brought about by operating at a sufficiently low value of the multiplication factor to preclude reactivity induced events. The control of the power production can be achieved by vary the accelerator beam current. Furthermore, once the beam is shut off the system shuts down. The primary difference between the operation of an accelerator driven system and a critical system is the issue of beam interruptions of the accelerator. These beam interruptions impose thermo-mechanical loads on the fuel and mechanical components not found in critical systems. Studies have been performed to estimate an acceptable number of trips, and the value is significantly less stringent than had been previously estimated. The number of acceptable beam interruptions is a function of the length of the interruption and the mission of the system. Thus, for demonstration type systems and interruption durations of 1sec 5mins 2500/yr and 50/yr are deemed acceptable. However, for industrial scale power generation without energy storage type systems and interruption durations of t 5mins, the acceptable number of interruptions are 25000, 2500, 250, and 3 respectively. However, it has also been concluded that further development is required to reduce the number of trips. It is with this in mind that the following study was undertaken. The primary focus of this study will be the merit of a multi-beam target system, which allows for multiple spallation sources within the target/blanket assembly. In this manner it is possible to ameliorate the effects of sudden accelerator beam interruption on the surrounding reactor, since the remaining beams will still be supplying source neutrons. The proton beam will be assumed to have an

  11. Muon flux measurement with silicon detectors in the CERN neutrino beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutrino beam installations at the CERN SPS accelerator are described, with emphasis on the beam monitoring systems. Especially the muon flux measurement system is considered in detail, and the calibration procedure and systematic aspects of the measurements are discussed. An introduction is given to the use of silicon semiconductor detectors and their related electronics. Other special chapters concern non-linear phenomena in the silicon detectors, radiation damage in silicon detectors, energy loss and energy deposition in silicon and a review of energy loss phenomena for high energy muons in matter. (orig.)

  12. Heavy ion beam transport through liquid lithium first wall ICF reactor cavities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This analysis addresses the critical issue of the final transport of a heavy ion beam in an inertial confinement fusion reactor. The beam must traverse the reaction chamber from the final focusing lens to the target without being disrupted. This requirement has a strong impact on the reactor design. It is essential to the development of ICF fusion reactor technology, that the restrictions placed on the reactor engineering parameters by final beam transport consideration be understood early on

  13. Absolute beam flux measurement at NDCX-I using gold-melting calorimetry technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on an alternative way to measure the absolute beam flux at the NDCX-I, LBNL linear accelerator. Up to date, the beam flux is determined from the analysis of the beam-induced optical emission from a ceramic scintilator (Al-Si). The new approach is based on calorimetric technique, where energy flux is deduced from the melting dynamics of a gold foil. We estimate an average 260 kW/cm2 beam flux over 5 (micro)s, which is consistent with values provided by the other methods. Described technique can be applied to various ion species and energies.

  14. Flux attenuation at NREL's High-Flux Solar Furnace

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bingham, Carl E.; Scholl, Kent L.; Lewandowski, Allan A.

    1994-10-01

    The High-Flux Solar Furnace (HFSF) at the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) has a faceted primary concentrator and a long focal-length-to-diameter ratio (due to its off-axis design). Each primary facet can be aimed individually to produce different flux distributions at the target plane. Two different types of attenuators are used depending on the flux distribution. A sliding-plate attenuator is used primarily when the facets are aimed at the same target point. The alternate attenuator resembles a venetian blind. Both attenuators are located between the concentrator and the focal point. The venetian-blind attenuator is primarily used to control the levels of sunlight failing on a target when the primary concentrators are not focused to a single point. This paper will demonstrate the problem of using the sliding-plate attenuator with a faceted concentrator when the facets are not aimed at the same target point. We will show that although the alternate attenuator necessarily blocks a certain amount of incoming sunlight, even when fully open, it provides a more even attenuation of the flux for alternate aiming strategies.

  15. High power, high beam quality regenerative amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hackel, L.A.; Dane, C.B.

    1993-08-24

    A regenerative laser amplifier system generates high peak power and high energy per pulse output beams enabling generation of X-rays used in X-ray lithography for manufacturing integrated circuits. The laser amplifier includes a ring shaped optical path with a limited number of components including a polarizer, a passive 90 degree phase rotator, a plurality of mirrors, a relay telescope, and a gain medium, the components being placed close to the image plane of the relay telescope to reduce diffraction or phase perturbations in order to limit high peak intensity spiking. In the ring, the beam makes two passes through the gain medium for each transit of the optical path to increase the amplifier gain to loss ratio. A beam input into the ring makes two passes around the ring, is diverted into an SBS phase conjugator and proceeds out of the SBS phase conjugator back through the ring in an equal but opposite direction for two passes, further reducing phase perturbations. A master oscillator inputs the beam through an isolation cell (Faraday or Pockels) which transmits the beam into the ring without polarization rotation. The isolation cell rotates polarization only in beams proceeding out of the ring to direct the beams out of the amplifier. The diffraction limited quality of the input beam is preserved in the amplifier so that a high power output beam having nearly the same diffraction limited quality is produced.

  16. LIBRA - a light ion beam fusion conceptual reactor design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LIBRA light ion beam fusion commercial reactor study is a self-consistent conceptual design of a 330 MWe power plant with an accompanying economic analysis. Fusion targets are imploded by 4 MJ shaped pulses of 30 MeV Li ions at a rate of 3 Hz. The target gain is 80, leading to a yield of 320 MJ. The high intensity part of the ion pulse is delivered by 16 diodes through 16 separate z-pinch plasma channels formed in 100 torr of helium with trace amounts of lithium. The blanket is an array of porous flexible silicon carbind tubes with Li17Pb83 flowing downward through them. These tubes (INPORT units) shield the target chamber wall from both neutron damage and the shock overpressure of the target explosion. The target chamber is 'self-pumped' by the target explosion generated overpressure into a surge tank partially filled with Li17Pb83 that surrounds the target chamber. This scheme refreshes the chamber at the desired 3 Hz frequently without excessive pumping demands. The blanket multiplication is 1.2 and the tritium breeding ratio is 1.4. The direct capital cost of a 331 MWe LIBRA design is estimated to be 2843 Dollar/kWe while a 1200 MWe LIBRA design will cost approximately 1300 Dollar/kWe. (orig.)

  17. Solid-State Neutron Flux Monitoring Instruments for Nuclear Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes solid-state picoammeters, log-N amplifiers and period meters which have been developed for the flux monitoring and control system of the material testing reactor (JMTR). Recent developments and improvements of insulated-gate field-effect transistors (MOS FET's) have enabled us to realize a perfectly transistorized direct coupled electrometer. The examination of the behaviour of the MOS FET for the ambient temperature variation shows that the voltage drift referred to the gate is higher than that of the ordinary FET, but low enough for picoammeter application. For log-N amplifier applications, selection of the first stage FET or adjustment of the drain current for the individual FET is necessary. The paper also describes the method of compensating the temperature dependence of the log-diode. Balancing out the variation due to the temperature dependent saturation current with an identical diode and compensating the slope by the use of an amplifier having a temperature-dependent gain, a variation of less than 0.1 decades is attained in the range of 3 x 10-12 to 3 x 10-4 A for an ambient temperature variation of 25°C. The authors discuss the non-linear representation of the period-indication to compromise requirements of the expanded scale for the convenience of operation and of compressed scale necessary for period trip. Finally, a description is given of complete picoammeter circuits covering the ranges of 10-10 to 10-4A, the 8-decade log-N amplifier covering 3 x 10-12 to 3 x 10-4 A, and the period meter. (author)

  18. High flux isotope reactor technical specifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technical specifications are presented concerning safety limits and limiting safety system settings; limiting conditions for operation; surveillance requirements; design features; administrative controls; and accidents and anticipated transients

  19. Development of a fuel-rod simulator and small-diameter thermocouples for high-temperature, high-heat-flux tests in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Flow Test Loop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McCulloch, R.W.; MacPherson, R.E.

    1983-03-01

    The Core Flow Test Loop was constructed to perform many of the safety, core design, and mechanical interaction tests in support of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) using electrically heated fuel rod simulators (FRSs). Operation includes many off-normal or postulated accident sequences including transient, high-power, and high-temperature operation. The FRS was developed to survive: (1) hundreds of hours of operation at 200 W/cm/sup 2/, 1000/sup 0/C cladding temperature, and (2) 40 h at 40 W/cm/sup 2/, 1200/sup 0/C cladding temperature. Six 0.5-mm type K sheathed thermocouples were placed inside the FRS cladding to measure steady-state and transient temperatures through clad melting at 1370/sup 0/C.

  20. Development of a fuel-rod simulator and small-diameter thermocouples for high-temperature, high-heat-flux tests in the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor Core Flow Test Loop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Core Flow Test Loop was constructed to perform many of the safety, core design, and mechanical interaction tests in support of the Gas-Cooled Fast Reactor (GCFR) using electrically heated fuel rod simulators (FRSs). Operation includes many off-normal or postulated accident sequences including transient, high-power, and high-temperature operation. The FRS was developed to survive: (1) hundreds of hours of operation at 200 W/cm2, 10000C cladding temperature, and (2) 40 h at 40 W/cm2, 12000C cladding temperature. Six 0.5-mm type K sheathed thermocouples were placed inside the FRS cladding to measure steady-state and transient temperatures through clad melting at 13700C

  1. Gamma and Neutron Flux of a Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis Collimator at the PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A Prompt Gamma Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) facility is being studied for installation at PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor (RTP) under the Thorium Flagship programme. This work presents the preliminary design of a PGNAA collimator at the RTP. The result of calculations for gamma and neutron flux at various positions of the PGNAA collimator in the RTP beam port 1 by using the computer code MCNPX are presented and discussed. The results indicate the technical feasibility of the installation of PGNAA facility at the RTP and the possibility of enhancing the utilization of the RTP. (author)

  2. Discussion about modeling the effects of neutron flux exposure for nuclear reactor core analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods used to calculate the effects of exposure to a neutron flux are described. The modeling of the nuclear-reactor core history presents an analysis challenge. The nuclide chain equations must be solved, and some of the methods in use for this are described. Techniques for treating reactor-core histories are discussed and evaluated

  3. Beam removal block and shielding resign for the MARS neutron therapy reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The beam removal block and shielding design for the MARS neutron therapy reactor are described. The requirements to the beams' characteristics, filters, collimator and reactor shielding are formulated. Radiation field levels in medical box are analyzed for beams' different operation conditions. It is stated that the removal block and shutter compositions meet necessary conditions in radiation treatment and emergency evacuation

  4. The conceptual calculation for the neutron beam device at Mark 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thermal neutron beam device, epithermal neutron beam device and test duct experiment device are designed by using Monte Carlo method at 30 kW Mark 1(-1). The compared calculation for transverse cross section dimension, moderator, reflector and others of neutron filter device are studied in this paper. The three optimized neutron beams including thermal neutron beam, epithermal neutron beam and the beam for measuring blood boron density, whose neutron flux density per reactor power are rather high, are also introduced. The results show that the BNCT neutron beam can be designed by using 30kW -1 reactor. (author)

  5. Plasma–Surface Interactions Under High Heat and Particle Fluxes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory De Temmerman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The plasma-surface interactions expected in the divertor of a future fusion reactor are characterized by extreme heat and particle fluxes interacting with the plasma-facing surfaces. Powerful linear plasma generators are used to reproduce the expected plasma conditions and allow plasma-surface interactions studies under those very harsh conditions. While the ion energies on the divertor surfaces of a fusion device are comparable to those used in various plasma-assited deposition and etching techniques, the ion (and energy fluxes are up to four orders of magnitude higher. This large upscale in particle flux maintains the surface under highly non-equilibrium conditions and bring new effects to light, some of which will be described in this paper.

  6. Brookhaven fastbus/unibus interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benenson, G.; Bauernfeind, J.; Larsen, R.C.; Leipuner, L.B.; Morse, W.M.; Adair, R.K.; Black, J.K.; Campbell, S.R.; Kasha, H.; Schmidt, M.P.

    1983-01-01

    A typical high energy physics experiment requires both a high speed data acquisition and processing system, for data collection and reduction; and a general purpose computer to handle further reduction, bookkeeping and mass storage. Broad differences in architecture, format or technology, will often exist between these two systems, and interface design can become a formidable task. The PDP-11 series minicomputer is widely used in physics research, and the Brookhaven FASTBUS is the only standard high speed data acquisition system which is fully implemented in a current high energy physics experiment. This paper will describe the design and operation of an interface between these two systems. The major issues are elucidated by a preliminary discussion on the basic principles of Bus Systems, and their application to Brookhaven FASTBUS and UNIBUS.

  7. High flux expansion divertor studies in NSTX

    CERN Document Server

    Soukhanovskii, V A; Bell, R E; Gates, D A; Kaita, R; Kugel, H W; LeBlanc, B P; Maqueda, R; Menard, J E; Mueller, D; Paul, S F; Raman, R; Roquemore, A L

    2009-01-01

    High flux expansion divertor studies have been carried out in the National Spherical Torus Experiment using steady-state X-point height variations from 22 to 5-6 cm. Small-ELM H-mode confinement was maintained at all X-point heights. Divertor flux expansions from 6 to 26-28 were obtained, with associated reduction in X-point connection length from 5-6 m to 2 m. Peak divertor heat flux was reduced from 7-8 MW/m$^2$ to 1-2 MW/m$^2$. In low X-point configuration, outer strike point became nearly detached. Among factors affecting deposition of parallel heat flux in the divertor, the flux expansion factor appeared to be dominant

  8. Slow neutron flux extrapolation distances in R-5 and CIRUS reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to calculate the core reactivity, fuel channel power outputs and neutron flux levels in the R-5 reactor at Trombay, axial flux extrapolation distances are required. For this, an analysis is carried out considering the reactor core as a two region neutron multiplying system in axial direction. The slow neutron diffusion equations for both the regions are solved analytically by applying suitable boundary conditions. Application of this method for the estimation of top extrapolation distances in CIRUS, has given results which agree well with accepted values for the reactor. (author)

  9. Simulation of Particle Fluxes at the DESY-II Test Beam Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the course of this Master's thesis ''Simulation of Particle Fluxes at the DESY-II Test Beam Facility'' the test beam generation for the DESY test beam line was studied in detail and simulated with the simulation software SLIC. SLIC uses the Geant4 toolkit for realistic Monte Carlo simulations of particles passing through detector material.After discussing the physics processes relevant for the test beam generation and the principles of the beam generation itself, the software used is introduced together with a description of the functionality of the Geant4 Monte Carlo simulation. The simulation of the test beam line follows the sequence of the test beam generation. Therefore, it starts with the simulation of the beam bunch of the synchrotron accelerator DESY-II, and proceeds step by step with the single test beam line components. An additional benefit of this thesis is the provision of particle flux and trajectory maps, which make fluxes directly visible by following the particle tracks through the simulated beam line. These maps allow us to see each of the test beam line components, because flux rates and directions change rapidly at these points. They will also guide the decision for placements of future test beam line components and measurement equipment.In the end, the beam energy and its spread, and the beam rate of the final test beam in the test beam area were studied in the simulation, so that the results can be compared to the measured beam parameters. The test beam simulation of this Master's thesis will serve as a key input for future test beam line improvements.

  10. In situ spatial-profile monitoring of beam flux of neutral free radicals produced by photo-deionization of negative ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion-current difference measurement by light intensity modulation (ICD) is introduced as a convenient method to characterize a purified beam of momentum-controlled neutral free radicals produced by photo-deionization of a negative ion beam for the purpose of surface-reaction-selective device processing. The ICD setup developed in this study to estimate the number flux of the photo-deionized neutral particles exhibited the high precision, sensitivity, and spatial resolution.

  11. Multipurpose Utilisation of a Medium Flux Research Reactor. Benefit for the Society

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Budapest Research Reactor (BRR) was restarted after a major refurbishment and increase in power to 10 MW in 1992. Basically, the experience gained with the utilization of this multipurpose facility during the past 20 years is described here. The utilization aims for 3 major activities: i) Research and development base for the energy sector: scientific and safety support for the Paks NPP; research in energy saving and production. ii) A complex source of irradiations for materials testing and modification, diagnostics in nanotechnologies, engineering, healthcare etc. iii) Neutron beams from the horizontal channels of the reactor serve for exploratory as well as for applied research in a very wide range of disciplines. Graduate and professional training is also in the scope of our activity. The reactor went critical first in 1959. It served nearly 3 decades as a home base for learning nuclear sciences and technologies, to development nuclear energetics, which resulted in launching four power plant blocks in the eighties, as well as to establish neutron beam research in our country. Nearly 20 years passed now that the decision was made - after the falling of the Iron Curtain'' - the practically brand new 10 megawatt reactor should be commissioned and opened for the international user community. The reactor reached its nominal power in May 1993 and neutron beam experiments were available on 4 instruments at that time. Thanks to a continuous development the number of experimental stations now is 15, the research staffs has grown from 10 to nearly 50 scientists and research facilities have been improved considerably. A few important milestones should be mentioned: a liquid hydrogen cold source was installed and the neutron guide system was replaced by a supermirror guide configuration, yielding a factor of 50-80 gain in neutron intensity; a second guide hall was constructed to house a new time-of-flight instrument; BRR became a member of the European neutron

  12. Design of the experimental apparatus to obtain a thermal neutron beam, intermediate-energy neutrons (2-144 keV) and high-energy photons (6 MeV) by means of the TRIGA reactor at the ENEA Casaccia center

    CERN Document Server

    Laitano, R F

    1987-01-01

    Design of the experimental apparatus to obtain a thermal neutron beam, intermediate-energy neutrons (2-144 keV) and high-energy photons (6 MeV) by means of the TRIGA reactor at the ENEA Casaccia center

  13. Particles fluidized bed receiver/reactor with a beam-down solar concentrating optics: 30-kWth performance test using a big sun-simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Tatsuya; Gokon, Nobuyuki; Cho, Hyun Seok; Matsubara, Koji; Etori, Tetsuro; Takeuchi, Akane; Yokota, Shin-nosuke; Ito, Sumie

    2016-05-01

    A novel concept of particles fluidized bed receiver/reactor with a beam-down solar concentrating optics was performed using a 30-kWth window type receiver by a big sun-simulator. A fluidized bed of quartz sand particles was created by passing air from the bottom distributor of the receiver, and about 30 kWth of high flux visible light from 19 xenon-arc lamps of the sun-simulator was directly irradiated on the top of the fluidized bed in the receiver through a quartz window. The particle bed temperature at the center position of the fluidized bed went up to a temperature range from 1050 to 1200°C by the visible light irradiation with the average heat flux of about 950 kW/m2, depending on the air flow rate. The output air temperature from the receiver reached 1000 - 1060°C.

  14. Simulation of the SONGS Reactor Antineutrino Flux Using DRAGON

    CERN Document Server

    Jones, C L

    2011-01-01

    For reactor antineutrino experiments, a thorough understanding of the fuel composition and isotopic evolution is of paramount importance for the extraction of $\\theta_{13}$. To accomplish these goals, we employ the deterministic lattice code DRAGON, and analyze the instantaneous antineutrino rate from the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) Unit 2 reactor in California. DRAGON's ability to predict the rate for two consecutive fuel cycles is examined.

  15. Measurement and calculation of the neutron flux distribution in the RP-10 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work implementing experimental methods are implemented for easy reproduction for measuring the spatial distribution or thermal neutron flux in the RP-10 reactor core. Using two measuring methods: the passive and the active ones. In the passive method was used the activation technique using foils such as gold, manganese, and indium. These were irradiated in the reactor core and treated through the Westcott's formalism. In the active method was used the Self Powered Neutron Detectors (SPNs) for which was necessary to condition the detectors response for the data acquisition. The knowledge of the spatial distribution of RP-10 reactor neutrons flux will contribute in the understanding of other interesting parameters of reactor physics such as power density, reactivity, buckling, etc.. Wish knowledge is important for reactor operation. Fuel burnup calculations as well as others related to safety. (author)

  16. Second annual progress report on United States-Japan collaborative testing in the High Flux Isotope Reactor and the Oak Ridge Research Reactor for the period ending September 30, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, J.L.; Grossbeck, M.L.; Mansur, L.K.; Rowcliffe, A.F.; Siman-Tov, I.I.; Thoms, K.R.; Tanaka, M.P.; Hamada, S.; Kendo, T.; Hishinuma, A.

    1986-08-01

    The second year of the program of US-Japan collaborative testing in the HFIR and ORR has been successfully completed. Two of eight phase-I target capsules were irradiated, and postirradiation testing was begun. Two spectral-tailoring capsules, MFE-6J and -7J, were fabricated and installed in the ORR. The JEOL JEM 2000FX microscope was installed at ORNL and is now being operated routinely. Microstructural data of the JPCA in the SA, 10%, and 20% cold-worked conditions and type J316 in the SA and 20% cold-worked conditions reveal that all specimens examined clearly show a high concentration of fine helium bubbles after irradiation to about 30 dpa at 300/sup 0/C (in HFIR). Precipitation of MC was observed in 20% cold-worked JPCA. Swelling of all specimens was less than 1%.

  17. Second annual progress report on United States-Japan collaborative testing in the High Flux Isotope Reactor and the Oak Ridge Research Reactor for the period ending September 30, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The second year of the program of US-Japan collaborative testing in the HFIR and ORR has been successfully completed. Two of eight phase-I target capsules were irradiated, and postirradiation testing was begun. Two spectral-tailoring capsules, MFE-6J and -7J, were fabricated and installed in the ORR. The JEOL JEM 2000FX microscope was installed at ORNL and is now being operated routinely. Microstructural data of the JPCA in the SA, 10%, and 20% cold-worked conditions and type J316 in the SA and 20% cold-worked conditions reveal that all specimens examined clearly show a high concentration of fine helium bubbles after irradiation to about 30 dpa at 3000C (in HFIR). Precipitation of MC was observed in 20% cold-worked JPCA. Swelling of all specimens was less than 1%

  18. Comparison of depth-dose distributions between reactor and accelerator neutron beams proposed by design studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accelerator epithermal neutron beams produced by 7Li(p,n)7Be reactions were compared with reactor neutron beams using a fission converter (20% enriched 235U 5mm-thick plate) from view points of neutron spectrum and depth-dose distributions in a phantom. It is possible to design accelerator epithermal neutron beams having better depth-dose distributions than reactor neutron beams. (author)

  19. Focal spot size predictions for beam transport through a gas-filled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results from calculations of focal spot size for beam transport through a gas-filled reactor are summarized. In the converging beam mode, we find an enlargement of the focal spot due to multiple scattering and zeroth order self-field effects. This enlargement can be minimized by maintaining small reactors together with a careful choice of the gaseous medium. The self-focused mode, on the other hand, is relatively insensitive to the reactor environment, but is critically dependent upon initial beam quality. This requirement on beam quality can be significantly eased by the injection of an electron beam of modest current from the opposite wall

  20. Flux measurements in a nuclear research reactor by using an aluminum nitride detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A small polycrystalline aluminium nitride detector with a thickness of 381 μm was used to measure a 200,000 Ci Co60 source and to measure the flux in a research reactor where the neutron flux is about 1014/cm2 s, which is nearly the same order as in the commercial power plant. If the applied voltage is greater than or equal to 2000 V and if the measurements are done in a short period of time so that the heat energy does not build up in the aluminium nitride, then the measured electric current is linearly proportional to the input flux. It is assumed of course that the energy spectrum of the input flux remains constant. This linearity relation is illustrated by the results of a measurement in which the reactor power has been controlled so that the flux becomes a step function

  1. Conceptual design of light ion beam inertia nuclear fusion reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Light ion beam, inertia nuclear fusion system drew attention recently as one of the nuclear fusion systems for power reactors in the history of the research on nuclear fusion. Its beginning seemed to be the judgement that the implosion of fusion fuel pellets with light ions can be realized with the light ions which can be obtained in view of accelerator techniques. Of course, in order to generate practically usable nuclear fusion reaction by this system and maintain it, many technical difficulties must be overcome. This research was carried out for the purpose of discovering such technical problems and searching for their solution. At the time of doing the works, the following policy was adopted. Though their is the difference of fine and rough, the design of a whole reactor system is performed conformably. In order to make comparison with other reactor types and nuclear fusion systems, the design is carried out as the power plant of about one million kWe output. As the extent of the design, the works at conceptual design stage are performed to present the concept of design which satisfies the required function. Basically, the design is made from conservative standpoint. This research of design was started in 1981, and in fiscal 1982, the mutual adjustment among the design of respective parts was performed on the basis of the results in 1981, and the possible revision and new proposal were investigated. (Kako, I.)

  2. Applicability of copper alloys for DEMO high heat flux components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zinkle, Steven J.

    2016-02-01

    The current state of knowledge of the mechanical and thermal properties of high-strength, high conductivity Cu alloys relevant for fusion energy high heat flux applications is reviewed, including effects of thermomechanical and joining processes and neutron irradiation on precipitation- or dispersion-strengthened CuCrZr, Cu-Al2O3, CuNiBe, CuNiSiCr and CuCrNb (GRCop-84). The prospects for designing improved versions of wrought copper alloys and for utilizing advanced fabrication processes such as additive manufacturing based on electron beam and laser consolidation methods are discussed. The importance of developing improved structural materials design criteria is also noted.

  3. Validation of neutron flux redistribution factors in JSI TRIGA reactor due to control rod movements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For efficient utilization of research reactors, such as TRIGA Mark II reactor in Ljubljana, it is important to know neutron flux distribution in the reactor as accurately as possible. The focus of this study is on the neutron flux redistributions due to control rod movements. For analyzing neutron flux redistributions, Monte Carlo calculations of fission rate distributions with the JSI TRIGA reactor model at different control rod configurations have been performed. Sensitivity of the detector response due to control rod movement have been studied. Optimal radial and axial positions of the detector have been determined. Measurements of the axial neutron flux distribution using the CEA manufactured fission chambers have been performed. The experiments at different control rod positions were conducted and compared with the MCNP calculations for a fixed detector axial position. In the future, simultaneous on-line measurements with multiple fission chambers will be performed inside the reactor core for a more accurate on-line power monitoring system. - Highlights: • Neutron flux redistribution due to control rod movement in JSI TRIGA has been studied. • Detector response sensitivity to the control rod position has been minimized. • Optimal radial and axial detector positions have been determined

  4. High density operation for reactor-relevant power exhaust

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wischmeier, M.

    2015-08-01

    With increasing size of a tokamak device and associated fusion power gain an increasing power flux density towards the divertor needs to be handled. A solution for handling this power flux is crucial for a safe and economic operation. Using purely geometric arguments in an ITER-like divertor this power flux can be reduced by approximately a factor 100. Based on a conservative extrapolation of current technology for an integrated engineering approach to remove power deposited on plasma facing components a further reduction of the power flux density via volumetric processes in the plasma by up to a factor of 50 is required. Our current ability to interpret existing power exhaust scenarios using numerical transport codes is analyzed and an operational scenario as a potential solution for ITER like divertors under high density and highly radiating reactor-relevant conditions is presented. Alternative concepts for risk mitigation as well as strategies for moving forward are outlined.

  5. Background Radiation Measurements at High Power Research Reactors

    CERN Document Server

    Ashenfelter, J; Baldenegro, C X; Band, H R; Barclay, G; Bass, C D; Berish, D; Bowden, N S; Bryan, C D; Cherwinka, J J; Chu, R; Classen, T; Davee, D; Dean, D; Deichert, G; Dolinski, M J; Dolph, J; Dwyer, D A; Fan, S; Gaison, J K; Galindo-Uribarri, A; Gilje, K; Glenn, A; Green, M; Han, K; Hans, S; Heeger, K M; Heffron, B; Jaffe, D E; Kettell, S; Langford, T J; Littlejohn, B R; Martinez, D; McKeown, R D; Morrell, S; Mueller, P E; Mumm, H P; Napolitano, J; Norcini, D; Pushin, D; Romero, E; Rosero, R; Saldana, L; Seilhan, B S; Sharma, R; Stemen, N T; Surukuchi, P T; Thompson, S J; Varner, R L; Wang, W; Watson, S M; White, B; White, C; Wilhelmi, J; Williams, C; Wise, T; Yao, H; Yeh, M; Yen, Y -R; Zhang, C; Zhang, X

    2016-01-01

    Research reactors host a wide range of activities that make use of the intense neutron fluxes generated at these facilities. Recent interest in performing measurements with relatively low event rates, e.g. reactor antineutrino detection, at these facilities necessitates a detailed understanding of background radiation fields. Both reactor-correlated and naturally occurring background sources are potentially important, even at levels well below those of importance for typical activities. Here we describe a comprehensive series of background assessments at three high-power research reactors, including $\\gamma$-ray, neutron, and muon measurements. For each facility we describe the characteristics and identify the sources of the background fields encountered. The general understanding gained of background production mechanisms and their relationship to facility features will prove valuable for the planning of any sensitive measurement conducted therein.

  6. Fission reactor flux monitors based on single-crystal CVD diamond films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Almaviva, S.; Marinelli, M.; Prestopino, G.; Tucciarone, A.; Verona, C.; Verona-Rinati, G. [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Meccanica, Universita di Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' , Via del Politecnico 1, 00133 Roma (Italy); INFN - Sezione Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' (Italy); Milani, E. [INFN - Sezione Roma ' ' Tor Vergata' ' (Italy); Angelone, M.; Lattanzi, D.; Pillon, M. [Associazione EURATOM-ENEA sulla Fusione, Via E. Fermi 45, 00144 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Rosa, R. [Dipartimento Fusione e Presidio Nucleare ENEA C.R. Casaccia, Via Anguillarese 301, 00123 Roma (Italy)

    2007-09-15

    Diamond based thermal neutron flux monitors have been fabricated using single crystal diamond films, grown by chemical vapour deposition. A 3 {mu}m thick {sup 6}LiF layer was thermally evaporated on the detector surface as a converting material for thermal neutron monitoring via the {sup 6}Li(n, {alpha}) T nuclear reaction. The detectors were tested in a fission nuclear reactor. One of them was positioned 80 cm above the core mid-plane, where the neutron flux is 2.2 x 10{sup 9} neutrons/cm{sup 2}s at 1 MW resulting in a device count rate of about 150000 cps. Good stability and reproducibility of the device output were proved over the whole reactor power range (up to 1 MW). During the irradiation, several pulse height spectra were recorded, in which both products of the {sup 6}Li(n,{alpha})T reaction, e.g. 2.73 MeV tritium and the 2.06 MeV {alpha}, were clearly identified, thus excluding a degradation of the detector response. A comparison with a reference fission chamber monitor pointed out a limitation of the adopted readout electronics at high count rates, due to multiple pile-up processes. However, once this effect is properly accounted for, a good linearity of the diamond flux monitor response is observed as a function of the fission chamber one, as well as an excellent agreement between the temporal behaviour of the two detector response. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  7. Beam tube experiments and correlated research projects at the TRIGA reactor Vienna

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The four beam tubes and the thermal column at the TRIGA reactor Vienna were used intensively during the reporting period. Three of the beam tubes are mainly used for neutron spectroscopy such as small angle scattering, neutron interferometry and polarized neutrons where now investigations of magnetic structures in pulsed high magnetic fields (25 T) synchronized with the pulsed mode of the reactor have been started. The thermalizing column will be modified from the present cold neutron source to a comfortable neutron radiography installation which allows investigations of objects of a size up to 30 cm diameters. The thermal column is also used for neutron radiography and as a strong gamma source to investigate gamma irradiation effects on various materials such as glass fiber cables. In view of flexible utilization of the thermal column a movable shielding construction has been designed which is simple rolled away on the rails of the thermal column doors when access to the thermal column in necessary. (orig.)

  8. Process for servicing a jet pump hold down beam in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes a process for remotely removing a jet pump hold down beam mounted between opposed members in a nuclear reactor, the hold down beam having a beam body, a pair of opposed beam tabs extending outwardly from the beam body, a pair of positioning trunnions, and a threaded beam bolt received within a correspondingly-threaded channel extending through the beam body, a lower end of the beam bolt extending through an aperture formed in a beam bolt retainer plate, the retainer plate being coupled by a connecting member to the jet pump, the beam bolt being rotatably adjusted within the beam channel so as to urge the beam tabs against the opposed reactor members. It comprises grasping the beam trunnions; depressing the beam tabs; rotating the beam approximately 90 about the beam bolt so as to remove the beam tabs from the opposed reactor members; removing the retainer plate connecting member in its entirety from the jet pump; and removing the entire hold down beam, retainer plate, and retainer plate connecting member from the jet pump

  9. Boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for glioblastoma multiforme using the epithermal neutron beam at the Brookhaven Medical Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Capala, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Diaz, A.Z.; Chadha, M. [Univ. Hospital, State Univ. of New York, NY (United States)] [and others

    1997-12-31

    The abstract describes evaluation of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for two groups of glioblastoma multiforme patients. From September 1994 to February 1996 15 patients have been treated. In September 1997 another 34 patients were examined. Authors determined a safe starting dose for BNCT using epithermal neutrons and BPA-F. They have also evaluated adverse effects of BNCT at this starting dose. Therapeutic effectiveness of this starting dose has been evaluated. No significant side effects from BPA-F infusion or BNCT treatment were observed in normal brains.

  10. HIBALL - a conceptual heavy ion beam driven fusion reactor study. Vol. 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary concept for a heavy-ion beam driven inertial confinement fusion power plant is presented. The high repetition rate of the RF accelerator driver is utilized to serve four reactor chambers alternatingly. In the chambers a novel first-wall protection scheme is used. At a target gain of 83 the total net electrical output is 3.8 GW. The recirculating power fraction is below 15%. The main goal of the comprehensive HIBALL study (which is continuing) is to demonstrate the compatibility of the design of the driver, the target and the reactor chambers. Though preliminary, the present design is essentially self-consistent. Tentative cost estimates are given. The costs compare well with those found in similar studies on other types of fusion reactors. (orig.)

  11. HIBALL - a conceptual heavy ion beam driven fusion reactor study. Vol. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A preliminary concept for a heavy-ion beam driven inertial confinement fusion power plant is presented. The high repetition rate of the RF accelerator driver is utilized to serve four reactor chambers alternatingly. In the chambers a novel first-wall protection scheme is used. At a target gain of 83 the total net electrical output is 3.8 GW. The recirculating power fraction is below 15%. The main goal of the comprehensive HIBALL study (which is continuing) is to demonstrate the compatibility of the design of the driver, the target and the reactor chambers. Though preliminary, the present dessign is essentially self-consistent. Tentative cost estimates are given. The costs compare well with those found in similar studies on other types of fusion reactors. (orig.)

  12. Measurement of photon flux with a miniature gas ionization chamber in a Material Testing Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fourmentel, D.; Filliatre, P.; Villard, J. F.; Lyoussi, A.; Reynard-Carette, C.; Carcreff, H.

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear heating measurements in Material Testing Reactors (MTR) are crucial for the design of the experimental devices and the prediction of the temperature of the hosted samples. Nuclear heating in MTR materials (except fuel) is mainly due to the energy deposition by the photon flux. Therefore, the photon flux is a key input parameter for the computer codes which simulate nuclear heating and temperature reached by samples/devices under irradiation. In the Jules Horowitz MTR under construction at the CEA Cadarache, the maximal expected nuclear heating levels will be about 15 to 18 W g-1 and it will be necessary to assess this parameter with the best accuracy. An experiment was performed at the OSIRIS reactor to combine neutron flux, photon flux and nuclear heating measurements to improve the knowledge of the nuclear heating in MTR. There are few appropriate sensors for selective measurement of the photon flux in MTR even if studies and developments are ongoing. An experiment, called CARMEN-1, was conducted at the OSIRIS MTR and we used in particular a gas ionization chamber based on miniature fission chamber design to measure the photon flux. In this paper, we detail Monte-Carlo simulations to analyze the photon fluxes with ionization chamber measurements and we compare the photon flux calculations to the nuclear heating measurements. These results show a good accordance between photon flux measurements and nuclear heating measurement and allow improving the knowledge of these parameters.

  13. Measurement of photon flux with a miniature gas ionization chamber in a Material Testing Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fourmentel, D., E-mail: damien.fourmentel@cea.fr [CEA, DEN, DER, Instrumentation Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory, Cadarache, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Filliatre, P.; Villard, J.F.; Lyoussi, A. [CEA, DEN, DER, Instrumentation Sensors and Dosimetry Laboratory, Cadarache, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Reynard-Carette, C. [Aix-Marseille Université, LISA EA 4672, cedex 20, Marseille 13397 (France); Carcreff, H. [CEA, DEN, DRSN, Saclay, F-91191 Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2013-10-01

    Nuclear heating measurements in Material Testing Reactors (MTR) are crucial for the design of the experimental devices and the prediction of the temperature of the hosted samples. Nuclear heating in MTR materials (except fuel) is mainly due to the energy deposition by the photon flux. Therefore, the photon flux is a key input parameter for the computer codes which simulate nuclear heating and temperature reached by samples/devices under irradiation. In the Jules Horowitz MTR under construction at the CEA Cadarache, the maximal expected nuclear heating levels will be about 15 to 18 W g{sup −1} and it will be necessary to assess this parameter with the best accuracy. An experiment was performed at the OSIRIS reactor to combine neutron flux, photon flux and nuclear heating measurements to improve the knowledge of the nuclear heating in MTR. There are few appropriate sensors for selective measurement of the photon flux in MTR even if studies and developments are ongoing. An experiment, called CARMEN-1, was conducted at the OSIRIS MTR and we used in particular a gas ionization chamber based on miniature fission chamber design to measure the photon flux. In this paper, we detail Monte-Carlo simulations to analyze the photon fluxes with ionization chamber measurements and we compare the photon flux calculations to the nuclear heating measurements. These results show a good accordance between photon flux measurements and nuclear heating measurement and allow improving the knowledge of these parameters.

  14. High current beam transport with multiple beam arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights of recent experimental and theoretical research progress on the high current beam transport of single and multiple beams by the Heavy Ion Fusion Accelerator Research (HIFAR) group at the Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) are presented. In the single beam transport experiment (SBTE), stability boundaries and the emittance growth of a space charge dominated beam in a long quadrupole transport channel were measured and compared with theory and computer simulations. Also, a multiple beam ion induction linac (MBE-4) is being constructed at LBL which will permit study of multiple beam transport arrays, and acceleration and bunch length compression of individually focused beamlets. Various design considerations of MBE-4 regarding scaling laws, nonlinear effects, misalignments, and transverse and longitudinal space charge effects are summarized. Some aspects of longitudinal beam dynamics including schemes to generate the accelerating voltage waveforms and to amplify beam current are also discussed

  15. High flux lithium antineutrino source with variable hard spectrum

    CERN Document Server

    Lyashuk, V I

    2016-01-01

    The high flux antineutrino source with hard antineutrino spectrum based on neutron activation of 7Li and subsequent fast beta-decay (T 1/2 = 0.84 s) of the 8Li isotope with emission of antineutrino with energy up to 13 MeV - is discussed. Creation of the intensive isotope neutrino source of hard spectrum will allow to increase the detection statistics of neutrino interaction and it is especially urgent for oscillation experiments. The scheme of the proposed neutrino source is based on the continuous transport of the created 8Li to the neutrino detector, which moved away from the place of neutron activation. Analytical expressions for lithium antineutrino flux is obtained. The discussed source will ensure to increase the cross section for reactions with deuteron from several times to tens compare to the reactor antineutrino spectrum. An another unique feature of the installation is the possibility to vary smoothly the hardness of the antineutrino spectrum.

  16. Silicon detectors for the neutron flux and beam profile measurements of the n_TOF facility at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musumarra, Agatino; Cosentino, Luigi; Barbagallo, Massimo; Colonna, Nicola; Damone, Lucia; Pappalardo, Alfio; Piscopo, Massimo; Finocchiaro, Paolo

    2016-09-01

    The demand of new and high precision cross section data for neutron-induced reactions is continuously growing, driven by the requirements from several fields of fundamental physics, as well as from nuclear technology, medicine, etc. Several neutron facilities are operational worldwide, and new ones are being built. In the coming years, neutron beam intensities never reached up to now will be available, thus opening new scientific and technological frontiers. Among existing facilities, n_TOF at CERN provides a high intensity pulsed neutron beam in a wide energy range (thermal to GeV) and with an extremely competitive energy resolution that also allows spectroscopy studies. In order to ensure high quality measurements, the neutron beams must be fully characterized as a function of the neutron energy, in particular by measuring the neutron flux and the beam transverse profile with high accuracy. In 2014 a new experimental area (EAR2), with a much higher neutron flux, has been completed and commissioned at n_TOF. In order to characterize the neutron beam in the newly built experimental area at n_TOF, two suitable diagnostics devices have been built by the INFN-LNS group. Both are based on silicon detectors coupled with 6Li converter foils, in particular Single Pad for the flux measurement and Position Sensitive (strips and others) for the beam profile. The devices have been completely characterized with radioactive sources and with the n_TOF neutron beam, fulfilling all the specifications and hence becoming immediately operational. The performances of these devices and their high versatility, in terms of neutron beam intensity, make them suitable to be used in both n_TOF experimental areas. A description of the devices and the main results obtained so far will be presented.

  17. High heat flux loop heat pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Mark T.; Sarraf, David B.; Rosenfeld, John H.; Maidanik, Yuri F.; Vershinin, Sergey

    1997-01-01

    Loop heat pipes (LHPs) can transport very large thermal power loads over long distances, through flexible, small diameter tubes against gravitational heads. In order to overcome the evaporator limit of LHPs, which is of about 0.07 MW/sq m, work was carried out to improve the efficiency by threefold to tenfold. The vapor passage geometry for the high heat flux conditions is shown. A bidisperse wick material within the circumferential vapor passages was used. Along with heat flux enhancement, several underlying issues were demonstrated, including the fabrication of bidisperse powder with controlled properties and the fabrication of a device geometry capable of replacing vapor passages with bidisperse powder.

  18. Design, construction and characterization of a new neutron beam for neutron radiography at the Tehran Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choopan Dastjerdi, M. H.; Khalafi, H.; Kasesaz, Y.; Mirvakili, S. M.; Emami, J.; Ghods, H.; Ezzati, A.

    2016-05-01

    To obtain a thermal neutron beam for neutron radiography applications, a neutron collimator has been designed and implemented at the Tehran Research Reactor (TRR). TRR is a 5 MW open pool light water moderated reactor with seven beam tubes. The neutron collimator is implemented in the E beam tube of the TRR. The design of the neutron collimator was performed using MCNPX Monte Carlo code. In this work, polycrystalline bismuth and graphite have been used as a gamma filter and an illuminator, respectively. The L/D parameter of the facility was chosen in the range of 150-250. The thermal neutron flux at the image plane can be varied from 2.26×106 to 6.5×106 n cm-2 s-1. Characterization of the beam was performed by ASTM standard IQI and foil activation technique to determine the quality of neutron beam. The results show that the obtained neutron beam has a good quality for neutron radiography applications.

  19. The behavior of reactor power and flux resulting from changes in core-coolant temperature for a miniature neutron source reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, measurements were performed to verify the theoretical predictions of reactor power and flux parameters that result from changes in core inlet temperature (Tin) and the temperature difference between the coolant inlet and outlet (ΔT) in the Nigeria Research Reactor-1 (NIRR-1), which is a Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR). The measured data shows that there is a strong dependence of the reactor power on coolant temperature in agreement with the design of MNSR. The experimental parameters were found to be in good agreement with data obtained using a semi-empirical relationship between the reactor power, flux parameters, core inlet temperature, and the coolant temperature rise. The relationship was therefore used to predict the power level of NIRR-1 from its neutron flux parameters to which it has been found to be proportional. The variation of Tin and ΔT with the reactor power and flux was also investigated and the results obtained are hereby discussed

  20. Source Terms for HFIR Beam Tube Shielding Analyses, and a Complete Shielding Analysis of the HB-3 Tube

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bucholz, J.A.

    2000-07-01

    The High Flux Isotope Reactor (HFIR) at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory is in the midst of a massive upgrade program to enhance experimental facilities. The reactor presently has four horizontal experimental beam tubes, all of which will be replaced or redesigned. The HB-2 beam tube will be enlarged to support more guide tubes, while the HB-4 beam tube will soon include a cold neutron source.

  1. Applications of electron lenses: scraping of high-power beams, beam-beam compensation, and nonlinear optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stancari, Giulio

    2014-09-11

    Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beams whose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for bunch-by-bunch compensation of long-range beam-beam tune shifts, for removal of uncaptured particles in the abort gap, for preliminary experiments on head-on beam-beam compensation, and for the demonstration of halo scraping with hollow electron beams. Electron lenses for beam-beam compensation are being commissioned in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Hollow electron beam collimation and halo control were studied as an option to complement the collimation system for the upgrades of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN; a conceptual design was recently completed. Because of their electric charge and the absence of materials close to the proton beam, electron lenses may also provide an alternative to wires for long-range beam-beam compensation in LHC luminosity upgrade scenarios with small crossing angles. At Fermilab, we are planning to install an electron lens in the Integrable Optics Test Accelerator (IOTA, a 40-m ring for 150-MeV electrons) as one of the proof-of-principle implementations of nonlinear integrable optics to achieve large tune spreads and more stable beams without loss of dynamic aperture.

  2. High Energy Electron Reconstruction in the BeamCal

    CERN Document Server

    Sailer, Andre

    2016-01-01

    This note discusses methods of particle reconstruction in the forward region detectors of future e+ e− linear colliders such as ILC or CLIC. At the nominal luminosity the innermost electromagnetic calorimeters undergo high particle fluxes from the beam-induced background. In this prospect, different methods of the background simulation and signal electron reconstruction are described.

  3. Beam plug replacement and alignment under high radiation conditions for cold neutron facilities at Hanaro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text : The HANARO, an open-tank-in-pool type research reactor of a 30 MWth power in Korea, has been operating for 15 years since its initial criticality in February 1995. The beam port assigned for the cold neutron at HANARO had been used for an 8-m SANS without neutron guides until it was replaced by a cold neutron guide system in 2008. It was developed a cold neutron guide system for the delivery of cold neutrons from the cold neutron source in the reactor to the neutron scattering instruments in the guide hall. Since the HANARO has been operated from 1995, it was a big challenge to replace the existing plug and shutter with the new facilities under high radiation conditions. When the old plug was removed from the beam port in 2008, the radiation level was 230 mSv/hr at the end of beam port. In addition to that, there were more difficult situations such as the poor as-built dimensions of the beam port, limited work space and time constraint due to other constructions in parallel in the reactor hall. Before the removal of the old plug the level of the radiation was measured coming out through a small hole of the plug to estimate the radiation level during the removal of the old plug and installation of a new plug. Based on the measurement and analysis results, special tools and various shielding facilities were developed for the removal of old in-pile plug and the installation of the new in-pile plug assembly safely. In 2008, the old plug and shutter were successfully replaced by the new plug and shutter as shown in this article with a minimum exposure to the workers. A laser tracker system was also one of the main factors in our successful installation and alignment under high radiation conditions and limited work space. The laser tracker was used to measure and align all the mechanical facilities and the neutron guides with a minimum radiation exposure to workers. The alignment of all the guides and accessories were possible during reactor operation because

  4. Uniaxial in-reactor creep of Zircaloy-2: Stress, flux, and temperature dependence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tinti, F.

    1983-01-01

    Results of several uniaxial in-reactor creep tests, carried out in a temperature range of 553 to 623 K on Zircaloy-2 cold-worked specimens in fast flux (E > 1 MeV) from 1.2 X 10/sup 17/ to 1.1 X 10/sup 18/ n X m/sup -2/ X s and in a stress range from 98 to 157 MPa, are presented. The effects of instantaneous flux and applied tensile stress are investigated, and the available data correlated by functional relationship. The effect of the temperature on the creep rate in the presence and absence of flux is also investigated and discussed.

  5. Present and future beam tube experiments at the 250 kW TRIGA Mark II reactor Wien

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The four beam tubes and the thermal column at the TRIGA reactor Wien were well used in the reporting period. Since the thermal column is used as a gamma source for different irradiation experiments and as a neutron source for radiography, the other facilities are mainly used for neutron spectroscopy experiments: polarized neutrons, neutron interferometry, small angle scattering and neutron choppers, In the piercing beam tube a fast rabbit system is installed which is mainly used for high precision activation analysis. (author)

  6. Applications of electron lenses: scraping of high-power beams, beam-beam compensation, and nonlinear optics

    CERN Document Server

    Stancari, Giulio

    2014-01-01

    Electron lenses are pulsed, magnetically confined electron beams whose current-density profile is shaped to obtain the desired effect on the circulating beam. Electron lenses were used in the Fermilab Tevatron collider for bunch-by-bunch compensation of long-range beam-beam tune shifts, for removal of uncaptured particles in the abort gap, for preliminary experiments on head-on beam-beam compensation, and for the demonstration of halo scraping with hollow electron beams. Electron lenses for beam-beam compensation are being commissioned in the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). Hollow electron beam collimation and halo control were studied as an option to complement the collimation system for the upgrades of the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN; a conceptual design was recently completed. Because of their electric charge and the absence of materials close to the proton beam, electron lenses may also provide an alternative to wires for long-range beam-beam compens...

  7. Visualization of neutron flux and power distributions in TRIGA Mark II reactor as an educational tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Snoj, Luka; Ravnik, Matjaz; Lengar, Igor [Jozef Stefan Institute, Reactor Physics Division, Jamova 39, SI-1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia)

    2008-10-29

    Modern Monte Carlo computer codes (e.g. MCNP) for neutron transport allow calculation of detailed neutron flux and power distribution in complex geometries with resolution of {approx}1 mm. Moreover they enable the calculation of individual particle tracks, scattering and absorption events. With the use of advanced software for 3D visualization (e.g. Amira, Voxler, etc.) one can create and present neutron flux and power distribution in a 'user friendly' way convenient for educational purposes. One can view axial, radial or any other spatial distribution of the neutron flux and power distribution in a nuclear reactor from various perspectives and in various modalities of presentation. By visualizing the distribution of scattering and absorption events and individual particle tracks one can visualize neutron transport parameters (mean free path, diffusion length, macroscopic cross section, up-scattering, thermalization, etc.) from elementary point of view. Most of the people remember better, if they visualize the processes. Therefore the representation of the reactor and neutron transport parameters is a convenient modern educational tool for the (nuclear power plant) operators, nuclear engineers, students and specialists involved in reactor operation and design. The visualization of neutron flux and power distributions in Jozef Stefan Institute TRIGA Mark II research reactor is treated in the paper. The distributions are calculated with MCNP computer code and presented using Amira and Voxler software. The results in the form of figures are presented in the paper together with comments qualitatively explaining the figures. (authors)

  8. Improved Measurement of the Reactor Antineutrino Flux and Spectrum at Daya Bay

    CERN Document Server

    An, F P; Band, H R; Bishai, M; Blyth, S; Cao, D; Cao, G F; Cao, J; Cen, W R; Chan, Y L; Chang, J F; Chang, L C; Chang, Y; Chen, H S; Chen, Q Y; Chen, S M; Chen, Y X; Chen, Y; Cheng, J -H; Cheng, J; Cheng, Y P; Cheng, Z K; Cherwinka, J J; Chu, M C; Chukanov, A; Cummings, J P; de Arcos, J; Deng, Z Y; Ding, X F; Ding, Y Y; Diwan, M V; Dolgareva, M; Dove, J; Dwyer, D A; Edwards, W R; Gill, R; Gonchar, M; Gong, G H; Gong, H; Grassi, M; Gu, W Q; Guan, M Y; Guo, L; Guo, R P; Guo, X H; Guo, Z; Hackenburg, R W; Han, R; Hans, S; He, M; Heeger, K M; Heng, Y K; Higuera, A; Hor, Y K; Hsiung, Y B; Hu, B Z; Hu, T; Hu, W; Huang, E C; Huang, H X; Huang, X T; Huber, P; Huo, W; Hussain, G; Jaffe, D E; Jaffke, P; Jen, K L; Jetter, S; Ji, X P; Ji, X L; Jiao, J B; Johnson, R A; Joshi, J; Kang, L; Kettell, S H; Kohn, S; Kramer, M; Kwan, K K; Kwok, M W; Kwok, T; Langford, T J; Lau, K; Lebanowski, L; Lee, J; Lee, J H C; Lei, R T; Leitner, R; Li, C; Li, D J; Li, F; Li, G S; Li, Q J; Li, S; Li, S C; Li, W D; Li, X N; Li, Y F; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Lin, C J; Lin, G L; Lin, S; Lin, S K; Lin, Y -C; Ling, J J; Link, J M; Littenberg, L; Littlejohn, B R; Liu, D W; Liu, J L; Liu, J C; Loh, C W; Lu, C; Lu, H Q; Lu, J S; Luk, K B; Lv, Z; Ma, Q M; Ma, X Y; Ma, X B; Ma, Y Q; Malyshkin, Y; Caicedo, D A Martinez; McDonald, K T; McKeown, R D; Mitchell, I; Mooney, M; Nakajima, Y; Napolitano, J; Naumov, D; Naumova, E; Ngai, H Y; Ning, Z; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Olshevskiy, A; Pan, H -R; Park, J; Patton, S; Pec, V; Peng, J C; Pinsky, L; Pun, C S J; Qi, F Z; Qi, M; Qian, X; Raper, N; Ren, J; Rosero, R; Roskovec, B; Ruan, X C; Steiner, H; Sun, G X; Sun, J L; Tang, W; Taychenachev, D; Treskov, K; Tsang, K V; Tull, C E; Viaux, N; Viren, B; Vorobel, V; Wang, C H; Wang, M; Wang, N Y; Wang, R G; Wang, W; Wang, X; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z; Wang, Z M; Wei, H Y; Wen, L J; Whisnant, K; White, C G; Whitehead, L; Wise, T; Wong, H L H; Wong, S C F; Worcester, E; Wu, C -H; Wu, Q; Wu, W J; Xia, D M; Xia, J K; Xing, Z Z; Xu, J Y; Xu, J L; Xu, Y; Xue, T; Yang, C G; Yang, H; Yang, L; Yang, M S; Yang, M T; Ye, M; Ye, Z; Yeh, M; Young, B L; Yu, Z Y; Zeng, S; Zhan, L; Zhang, C; Zhang, H H; Zhang, J W; Zhang, Q M; Zhang, X T; Zhang, Y M; Zhang, Y X; Zhang, Y M; Zhang, Z J; Zhang, Z Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, Y B; Zhong, W L; Zhou, L; Zhou, N; Zhuang, H L; Zou, J H

    2016-01-01

    A new measurement of the reactor antineutrino flux and energy spectrum by the Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment is reported. The antineutrinos were generated by six 2.9 GW$_{\\mathrm{th}}$ nuclear reactors and detected by eight antineutrino detectors deployed in two near (510~m and 560~m flux-weighted baselines) and one far (1580~m flux-weighted baseline) underground experimental halls. With 621 days of data, more than 1.2 million inverse beta decay (IBD) candidates were detected. The IBD yield in the eight detectors was measured, and the ratio of measured to predicted flux was found to be $0.946\\pm0.020$ ($0.992\\pm0.021$) for the Huber+Mueller (ILL+Vogel) model. A 2.9 $\\sigma$ deviation was found in the measured IBD positron energy spectrum compared to the predictions. In particular, an excess of events in the region of 4-6~MeV was found in the measured spectrum, with a local significance of 4.4 $\\sigma$. A reactor antineutrino spectrum weighted by the IBD cross section is extracted for model-independent p...

  9. Two-field and drift-flux models with applications to nuclear reactor safety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ideas of the two-field (6 equation model) and drift-flux (4 equation model) description of two-phase flows are presented. Several example calculations relating to reactor safety are discussed and comparisons of the numerical results and experimental data are shown to be in good agreement

  10. Flux perturbation factor in cobalt samples for the reactor production of Co-60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Total flux perturbation factor (F) is experimentally determined for hollow cylinder cobalt samples irradiated in the RA-3 reactor. F factor is studied for different thicknesses of the material and the values are compared with those theoretically estimated by Dwork for a similar. (author)

  11. High flux film and transition boiling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witte, L. C.

    1993-02-01

    An investigation was conducted on the potential for altering the boiling curve through effects of high velocity and high subcooling. Experiments using water and Freon-113 flowing over cylindrical electrical heaters in crossflow were made to see how velocity and subcooling affect the boiling curve, especially the film and transition boiling regions. We sought subcooling levels down to near the freezing points of these two liquids to prove the concept that the critical heat flux and the minimum heat flux could be brought together, thereby averting the transition region altogether. Another emphasis was to gain insight into how the various boiling regions could be represented mathematically on various parts of the heating surface. Motivation for the research grew out of a realization that the effects of very high subcooling and velocity might be to avert the transition boiling altogether so that the unstable part of the boiling curve would not limit the application of high flux devices to temperatures less than the burnout temperatures. Summaries of results from the study are described. It shows that the potential for averting the transition region is good and points the way to further research that is needed to demonstrate the potential.

  12. Dynamics of neutralizing electrons during the focusing of intense heavy ions beams inside a HIF reactor chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lifschitz, A. F.; Maynard, G.; Vay, J.-L.; Lenglet, A.

    2006-06-01

    The efficiency of a Heavy Ion Fusion reactor heavily depends on the maximum value for the density of energy (DoE) that can be deposited by the ion beams. In order to reduce the final radius, and thus to increase the DoE inside the target, the beam spatial charge has to be neutralized. Therefore the dynamics of the neutralizing electrons (DNE) play a central role in optimizing the DoE deposited in solid targets by high current of high energy heavy ion beams. We present results on some aspects of the DNE, which was performed using the Monte-Carlo 2D1/2 PIC code BPIC.

  13. High flux, narrow bandwidth compton light sources via extended laser-electron interactions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barty, V P

    2015-01-13

    New configurations of lasers and electron beams efficiently and robustly produce high flux beams of bright, tunable, polarized quasi-monoenergetic x-rays and gamma-rays via laser-Compton scattering. Specifically, the use of long-duration, pulsed lasers and closely-spaced, low-charge and low emittance bunches of electron beams increase the spectral flux of the Compton-scattered x-rays and gamma rays, increase efficiency of the laser-electron interaction and significantly reduce the overall complexity of Compton based light sources.

  14. Use of CMOS imagers to measure high fluxes of charged particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Servoli, L.; Tucceri, P.

    2016-03-01

    The measurement of high flux charged particle beams, specifically at medical accelerators and with small fields, poses several challenges. In this work we propose a single particle counting method based on CMOS imagers optimized for visible light collection, exploiting their very high spatial segmentation (> 3 106 pixels/cm2) and almost full efficiency detection capability. An algorithm to measure the charged particle flux with a precision of ~ 1% for fluxes up to 40 MHz/cm2 has been developed, using a non-linear calibration algorithm, and several CMOS imagers with different characteristics have been compared to find their limits on flux measurement.

  15. Neutronic designs and analyses of a new core-moderator assembly and neutron beam ports for the Penn State Breazeale Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new core-moderator assembly and five new neutron beam ports are modeled and designed for the Penn State Breazeale Reactor (PSBR). The PSBR is an open pool, light water cooled, and moderated 1-MW research reactor with seven neutron beam ports. The existing core-moderator assembly design does not allow simultaneous utilization of all the available beam ports; only two beam ports, namely no.4 and no.7, are currently in use for research and education in the facility. Moreover, the prompt gamma-rays produced at the back side of the heavy water moderator tank shine into neutron beam tube no.4. Subsequently that is hampering the quality of the experimental data at the existing beam port facilities. The proposed design eliminates all the limitations of the existing design and provides multiple high-intensity and clean neutron beams to a new and expanded beam hall utilizing various instruments and techniques. The new design features a crescent-shaped moderator tank, which couples the reactor core to four thermal ports and one cold neutron beam port with three curved guide tubes for various cold neutron beam techniques. The modeling of the new PSBR design was achieved with highly detailed neutronics simulations using several stochastic simulation tools developed for the PSBR. The simulation results revealed the optimal design parameters and neutronics performance of the new beam ports, such that the thermal neutron beam intensity was significantly increased and the total prompt gamma dose was drastically decreased in the new beam port facilities. (author)

  16. Improving flux tilt control while adjuster control rods are removed from the Pickering NGS A reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Removal of adjuster control rods from the Pickering NGS A reactor core results in flux peaking and higher fuel powers in the centre region of the core. The present flux tilt control algorithm increases the level of the light water neutron absorber in the centre liquid zone controllers in an attempt to nullify flux peaking. However, due to the limited depth of the neutron absorption capability of the liquid zone controllers, the pre-removal zone powers can not be achieved. This results in saturation of liquid zone controller levels and reduced flux tilt control. Recent operating experience as shown that in certain situations the reduced flux tilt control capability with adjusters removed results in uncorrected side to side azimuthal flux tilts. To increase tilt control in these situations an improved flux tilt control algorithm has been developed which switches the zone power flux tilt control targets to more realistic obtainable values as adjusters are removed. In this paper the computer simulations and analysis performed to develop and test the improved flux tilt algorithm is described. Also the improved performance of the new algorithm in one event will be demonstrated. 2 refs., 9 figs

  17. BLIP. [Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stang, Jr, L G

    1976-01-01

    The operation of the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP) is discussed. Topics covered include targets, target holders, linac specifications, beam transport, and current production performance. The use of the BLIP is confined exclusively to the development of radionuclides that are, or should be, of medical interest, and the facility is moving rapidly into a self-supporting state from the income of the products. (PMA)

  18. Neutron Beam Analysis on Materials for Nuclear Applications, Being Irradiated in Fission Reactors and Having Radioactivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extensive supports are given from the public sectors to the neutron beam analysis on advanced materials developed mainly in the framework of fundamental solid state physics, through the Japan Atomic Energy Agency and the Institute for Solid State physics in University of Tokyo. However, the related activities are mainly on non-radioactive materials with some limited exceptions, though the facilities for the neutron beam analysis are installed in the radiation controlled areas. Research activities in the field of nuclear related materials have concentrated their efforts for nano structural analysis into the other techniques of the post irradiation examinations, such as the high resolution transmission microscopy, the three dimensional atom probe tomography, and the positron annihilation techniques, than the neutron beam analysis. In the meantime, more detailed analysis on the radiation induced nanostructures are becoming more and more essential for the further understanding of the radiation effects in the materials which will be used in the advanced nuclear systems, such as the nuclear fusion reactors and the generation-IV nuclear fission reactors. Utilizing of the cutting edge techniques for the nanostructural analysis on materials irradiated by neutrons, all of which cannot be installed in the limited area of available hot laboratories, is urgently demanded, of course, satisfying the related legal restrictions and the safety demands. The present study was focused on as the realization of the neutron beam analysis on the nanostructural evolutions of the superconductive materials, which will be used in the ITER, the international thermonuclear experimental reactor, being under construction in Cadarache, France, and the glassy metals, which have some unique and advantageous features for the nuclear applications. (author)

  19. Resonance integral calculations for high temperature reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods of calculation of resonance integrals of finite dilution and temperature are given for both, homogeneous and heterogeneous geometries, together with results obtained from these methods as applied to the design of high temperature reactors. (author)

  20. Ionization Chambers for Monitoring in High-Intensity Neutrino Beams

    CERN Document Server

    McDonald, J; Velissaris, C; Erwin, A R; Ping, H; Viren, B M; Diwan, M V

    2002-01-01

    Radiation-hard ionization chambers were tested using an intense electron beam from the accelerator test facility (ATF) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL). The detectors were designed to be used as the basic element for monitoring muons in the Main Injector Neutrino beamline (NuMI) at the Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory (FNAL). Measurements of linearity of response, voltage dependence, and the onset of ionization saturation as a function of gap voltage were performed.

  1. High heat flux loop heat pipes

    Science.gov (United States)

    North, Mark T.; Sarraf, David B.; Rosenfeld, John H.; Maidanik, Yuri F.; Vershinin, Sergey

    1997-01-01

    Loop Heat Pipes (LHPs) can transport very large thermal power loads, over long distances, through flexible, small diameter tubes and against high gravitational heads. While recent LHPs have transported as much as 1500 W, the peak heat flux through a LHP's evaporator has been limited to about 0.07 MW/m2. This limitation is due to the arrangement of vapor passages next to the heat load which is one of the conditions necessary to ensure self priming of the device. This paper describes work aimed at raising this limit by threefold to tenfold. Two approaches were pursued. One optimized the vapor passage geometry for the high heat flux conditions. The geometry improved the heat flow into the wick and working fluid. This approach also employed a finer pored wick to support higher vapor flow losses. The second approach used a bidisperse wick material within the circumferential vapor passages. The bidisperse material increased the thermal conductivity and the evaporative surface area in the region of highest heat flux, while providing a flow path for the vapor. Proof-of-concept devices were fabricated and tested for each approach. Both devices operated as designed and both demonstrated operation at a heat flux of 0.70 MW/m2. This performance exceeded the known state of the art by a factor of more than six for both conventional heat pipes and for loop heat pipes using ammonia. In addition, the bidisperse-wick device demonstrated boiling heat transfer coefficients up to 100,000 W/m2.K, and the fine pored device demonstrated an orientation independence with its performance essentially unaffected by whether its evaporator was positioned above, below or level with the condenser.

  2. Studies of the behavior of a reactor neutron beam at the sample position of a diffractometer using silicon monochromators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, F. U.; Ahsan, M. H.; Khan, Aysha A.; Kamal, I.; Awal, M. A.; Ahmad, A. A. Z.

    1992-02-01

    A computer program TISTA has been developed for calculation of different aspects of designing a double axis neutron spectrometer at the TRIGA Mark II research reactor of the Atomic Energy Research Establishment, Dhaka, Bangladesh. The mathematical algorithms used in this program are based on the formalisms used by Fischer, Sabine and Bacon. Angle and energy resolutions and flux density as functions of neutron wave length, beam collimation, crystal asymmetry and deviation from zero-Bragg-angle position for different silicon crystal planes (111, 220, 311) have been calculated.

  3. High-intensity power-resolved radiation imaging of an operational nuclear reactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Jonathan S; Mellor, Matthew P; Villa, Mario; Joyce, Malcolm J

    2015-01-01

    Knowledge of the neutron distribution in a nuclear reactor is necessary to ensure the safe and efficient burnup of reactor fuel. Currently these measurements are performed by in-core systems in what are extremely hostile environments and in most reactor accident scenarios it is likely that these systems would be damaged. Here we present a compact and portable radiation imaging system with the ability to image high-intensity fast-neutron and gamma-ray fields simultaneously. This system has been deployed to image radiation fields emitted during the operation of a TRIGA test reactor allowing a spatial visualization of the internal reactor conditions to be obtained. The imaged flux in each case is found to scale linearly with reactor power indicating that this method may be used for power-resolved reactor monitoring and for the assay of ongoing nuclear criticalities in damaged nuclear reactors. PMID:26450669

  4. High-intensity power-resolved radiation imaging of an operational nuclear reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumont, Jonathan S.; Mellor, Matthew P.; Villa, Mario; Joyce, Malcolm J.

    2015-10-01

    Knowledge of the neutron distribution in a nuclear reactor is necessary to ensure the safe and efficient burnup of reactor fuel. Currently these measurements are performed by in-core systems in what are extremely hostile environments and in most reactor accident scenarios it is likely that these systems would be damaged. Here we present a compact and portable radiation imaging system with the ability to image high-intensity fast-neutron and gamma-ray fields simultaneously. This system has been deployed to image radiation fields emitted during the operation of a TRIGA test reactor allowing a spatial visualization of the internal reactor conditions to be obtained. The imaged flux in each case is found to scale linearly with reactor power indicating that this method may be used for power-resolved reactor monitoring and for the assay of ongoing nuclear criticalities in damaged nuclear reactors.

  5. Preliminary Design of LEU MNSR for BNCT with Excellent Epithermal Neutron Flux Treatment Beam%高额超热中子束流治疗孔道低浓化BNCT堆初步设计方案

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于涛; 钱金栋; 谢金森

    2012-01-01

    Based on the Miniature Neutron Source Reactor (MNSR) with high enrichment uranium (HEU) fuel and accordance with the requirements of BNCT, the 19.5% of enriched fuel UO2 fuel core for BNCT with epithermal neutron treatment beam was primary designed, the reactor core parameters such as epithermal neutron flux density,epithermal neutron flux unit of fast neutron dose rate,epithermal neutron flux unit photon dose rate of γ,epithermal neutron flux ratio of thermal neutron flux, neutron spectrum were calculated and analyzed. The results show that the design program was an excellent epithermal neutron treatment beam.%根据硼中子俘获治疗( BNCT)中子源的要求,在高浓铀为燃料的微型反应堆(MNSR)的基础上,以富集度19.5%的UO2为燃料,将其堆芯低浓化并且添加水平超热中子束流治疗孔道,开展超热中子束流BNCT堆堆芯低浓化初步设计.计算BNCT堆的超热中子注量率、单位超热中子注量的快中子剂量率、单位超热中子注量的γ光子剂量率、超热中子注量与热中子的注量之比、中子束流能谱等关键参数.结果表明,该设计可以得到优良的超热中子束流.

  6. Calculation of the inventory and near-field release rates of radioactivity from neutron-activated metal parts discharged from the high flux isotope reactor and emplaced in solid waste storage area 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emplacement of contaminated reactor components involves disposal in lined and unlined auger holes in soil above the water table. The radionuclide inventory of disposed components was calculated. Information on the composition and weight of the components, as well as reasonable assumptions for the neutron flux fueling use, the time of neutron exposure, and radioactive decay after discharge, were employed in the inventory calculation. Near-field release rates of 152Eu, 154Eu, and 155Eu from control plates and cylinders were calculated for 50 years after emplacement. Release rates of the europium isotopes were uncertain. Two release-rate-limiting models were considered and a range of reasonable values were assumed for the time-to-failure of the auger-hole linear and aluminum cladding and europium solubility in SWSA-6 groundwater. The bounding europium radionuclide near-field release rates peaked at about 1.3 Ci/year total for /sup 152,154,155/Eu in 1987 for the lower bound, and at about 420 Ci/year in 1992 for the upper bound. The near-field release rates of 55Fe, 59Ni, 60Co, and 63Ni from stainless steel and cobalt alloy components, as well as of 10Be, 41Ca, and 55Fe from beryllium reflectors, were calculated for the next 100 years, assuming bulk waste corrosion was the release-rate-limiting step. Under the most conservative assumptions for the reflectors, the current (1986) total radionuclide release rate was calculated to be about 1.2 x 10-4 Ci/year, decreasing by 1992 to a steady release of about 1.5 x 10-5 Ci/year due primarily to 41Ca. 50 refs., 13 figs., 8 tabs

  7. Calculation of the inventory and near-field release rates of radioactivity from neutron-activated metal parts discharged from the high flux isotope reactor and emplaced in solid waste storage area 6 at Oak Ridge National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelmers, A.D.; Hightower, J.R.

    1987-05-01

    Emplacement of contaminated reactor components involves disposal in lined and unlined auger holes in soil above the water table. The radionuclide inventory of disposed components was calculated. Information on the composition and weight of the components, as well as reasonable assumptions for the neutron flux fueling use, the time of neutron exposure, and radioactive decay after discharge, were employed in the inventory calculation. Near-field release rates of /sup 152/Eu, /sup 154/Eu, and /sup 155/Eu from control plates and cylinders were calculated for 50 years after emplacement. Release rates of the europium isotopes were uncertain. Two release-rate-limiting models were considered and a range of reasonable values were assumed for the time-to-failure of the auger-hole linear and aluminum cladding and europium solubility in SWSA-6 groundwater. The bounding europium radionuclide near-field release rates peaked at about 1.3 Ci/year total for /sup 152,154,155/Eu in 1987 for the lower bound, and at about 420 Ci/year in 1992 for the upper bound. The near-field release rates of /sup 55/Fe, /sup 59/Ni, /sup 60/Co, and /sup 63/Ni from stainless steel and cobalt alloy components, as well as of /sup 10/Be, /sup 41/Ca, and /sup 55/Fe from beryllium reflectors, were calculated for the next 100 years, assuming bulk waste corrosion was the release-rate-limiting step. Under the most conservative assumptions for the reflectors, the current (1986) total radionuclide release rate was calculated to be about 1.2 x 10/sup -4/ Ci/year, decreasing by 1992 to a steady release of about 1.5 x 10/sup -5/ Ci/year due primarily to /sup 41/Ca. 50 refs., 13 figs., 8 tabs.

  8. Brookhaven highlights for fiscal year 1991, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report highlights Brookhaven National Laboratory's activities for fiscal year 1991. Topics from the four research divisions: Computing and Communications, Instrumentation, Reactors, and Safety and Environmental Protection are presented. The research programs at Brookhaven are diverse, as is reflected by the nine different scientific departments: Accelerator Development, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, Applied Science, Biology, Chemistry, Medical, National Synchrotron Light Source, Nuclear Energy, and Physics. Administrative and managerial information about Brookhaven are also disclosed

  9. Brookhaven highlights for fiscal year 1991, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H.

    1991-01-01

    This report highlights Brookhaven National Laboratory's activities for fiscal year 1991. Topics from the four research divisions: Computing and Communications, Instrumentation, Reactors, and Safety and Environmental Protection are presented. The research programs at Brookhaven are diverse, as is reflected by the nine different scientific departments: Accelerator Development, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, Applied Science, Biology, Chemistry, Medical, National Synchrotron Light Source, Nuclear Energy, and Physics. Administrative and managerial information about Brookhaven are also disclosed. (GHH)

  10. Brookhaven highlights for fiscal year 1991, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H.

    1991-12-31

    This report highlights Brookhaven National Laboratory`s activities for fiscal year 1991. Topics from the four research divisions: Computing and Communications, Instrumentation, Reactors, and Safety and Environmental Protection are presented. The research programs at Brookhaven are diverse, as is reflected by the nine different scientific departments: Accelerator Development, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, Applied Science, Biology, Chemistry, Medical, National Synchrotron Light Source, Nuclear Energy, and Physics. Administrative and managerial information about Brookhaven are also disclosed. (GHH)

  11. Development and modelling of fission chambers designed for high neutron fluxes: applications at the HFR reactor (ILL) and the MEGAPIE target (PSI); Developpement et modelisation de chambres a fission pour les hauts flux, mise en application au RHF (ILL) et a MEGAPIE (PSI)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chabod, S

    2006-11-15

    The international project MEGAPIE (MEGAwatt PIlot Experiment) at the Paul Scherrer Institute aims to build and operate the first 1 MW liquid lead-bismuth spallation target. This work is dedicated to the characterization of the neutron flux and the actinide incineration potential of the target. This mission has required the development of an innovating neutron detector (DNM) made of 8 micro fission chambers, installed inside the central rod of the MEGAPIE target. The combination of uranium chambers with chambers without deposit allows an efficient compensation of the gamma radiation background. The optimisation and development work on the MEGAPIE chambers have enabled us to measure the {sigma}{sub f} * {phi} product at each level of the DNM with an uncertainty of less than 3 per cent. We have inferred from these data the value of the epithermal neutron flux (E > 1 eV) at 37 cm away from the window: 3.4*10{sup 13} n.cm{sup -2}.s{sup -1}, and the values of the neutron flux at 50, 60 and 74 cm: 1.2*10{sup 13}, 7.9*10{sup 12} and 3.9*10{sup 12} n.cm{sup -2}.s{sup -1} respectively. All these values are notably less important than those obtained from MCNPX simulations. Thermocouples installed in DMN have enabled us to know the temperature distribution inside the target. For a beam intensity of 1.2 mA, the temperature ranges from 360 to 420 Celsius degrees in the low part of the central rod. The thermal inertia of the system composed of the central rod and DNM has been assessed for brutal changes of the beam intensity and is worth about 60 s. (A.C.)

  12. Calculation of self-shielding coefficients, flux depression and cadmium factor for thermal neutron flux measurement of the IPEN/MB-01 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A calculation methodology of Flux Depression, Self-Shielding and Cadmium Factors is presented, using the ANISN code, for experiments conducted at the IPEN/MB-01 Research Reactor. The correction factors were determined considering thermal neutron flux and 0.125 e 0.250 mm diameter of 197 Au wires. (author)

  13. Development of a mono-energetic positron beam line at the Kyoto University Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sato, K. [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Xu, Q., E-mail: xu@rri.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Yoshiie, T.; Sano, T.; Kawabe, H. [Research Reactor Institute, Kyoto University, Kumatori-cho, Osaka 590-0494 (Japan); Nagai, Y.; Nagumo, K.; Inoue, K.; Toyama, T. [The Oarai Branch, Institute for Materials Research, Tohoku University, Ibaraki 311-1313 (Japan); Oshima, N.; Kinomura, A. [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan); Shirai, Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Graduate School of Engineering, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan)

    2015-01-01

    Positron beam facilities are widely used for solid state physics and material science studies. A positron beam facility has been constructed at the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) in order to expand its application range. The KUR is a light-water-moderated tank-type reactor operated at a rated thermal power of 5 MW. A positron beam has been transported successfully from the reactor to the irradiation chamber. The total moderated positron rate was greater than 1.4 × 10{sup 6}/s while the reactor operated at a reduced power of 1 MW. Special attention was paid for the design of the in-pile position source to prevent possible damage of the reactor in case of severe earthquakes.

  14. Development of a mono-energetic positron beam line at the Kyoto University Research Reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, K.; Xu, Q.; Yoshiie, T.; Sano, T.; Kawabe, H.; Nagai, Y.; Nagumo, K.; Inoue, K.; Toyama, T.; Oshima, N.; Kinomura, A.; Shirai, Y.

    2015-01-01

    Positron beam facilities are widely used for solid state physics and material science studies. A positron beam facility has been constructed at the Kyoto University Research Reactor (KUR) in order to expand its application range. The KUR is a light-water-moderated tank-type reactor operated at a rated thermal power of 5 MW. A positron beam has been transported successfully from the reactor to the irradiation chamber. The total moderated positron rate was greater than 1.4 × 106/s while the reactor operated at a reduced power of 1 MW. Special attention was paid for the design of the in-pile position source to prevent possible damage of the reactor in case of severe earthquakes.

  15. Epithermal neutron flux characterization of the TRIGA MARK II reactor, Ljubljana, Yugoslavia, for use in NAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nonideality of the epithermal neutron flux distribution at a reactor site can be described by a 1/E1+α spectrum representation, with parameter α as a measure of nonideality. α-values were determined in 3 typical irradiation positions of the TRIGA MARK II reactor, Ljubljana, Yugoslavia, using the 'Cd-ratio for multi-monitor' method. The simpler 'Cd-ratio for dual monitor' method also yielded reliable results. This characterization is useful in the ko-method of NAA. (author) 18 refs.; 3 figs

  16. Quantitative high dynamic range beam profiling for fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, T. J., E-mail: t.j.mitchell@dur.ac.uk; Saunter, C. D.; O’Nions, W.; Girkin, J. M.; Love, G. D. [Centre for Advanced Instrumentation and Biophysical Sciences Institute, Department of Physics, Durham University, Durham DH1 3LE (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-15

    Modern developmental biology relies on optically sectioning fluorescence microscope techniques to produce non-destructive in vivo images of developing specimens at high resolution in three dimensions. As optimal performance of these techniques is reliant on the three-dimensional (3D) intensity profile of the illumination employed, the ability to directly record and analyze these profiles is of great use to the fluorescence microscopist or instrument builder. Though excitation beam profiles can be measured indirectly using a sample of fluorescent beads and recording the emission along the microscope detection path, we demonstrate an alternative approach where a miniature camera sensor is used directly within the illumination beam. Measurements taken using our approach are solely concerned with the illumination optics as the detection optics are not involved. We present a miniature beam profiling device and high dynamic range flux reconstruction algorithm that together are capable of accurately reproducing quantitative 3D flux maps over a large focal volume. Performance of this beam profiling system is verified within an optical test bench and demonstrated for fluorescence microscopy by profiling the low NA illumination beam of a single plane illumination microscope. The generality and success of this approach showcases a widely flexible beam amplitude diagnostic tool for use within the life sciences.

  17. Apparatus for servicing a jet pump hold down beam in a nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This patent describes an apparatus for replacing the hold down beam of a fluid circulating jet pump mounted in a nuclear reactor, the hold down beam having a beam body, a pair of opposed beam tabs and a pair of opposed beam positioning trunnions extending outwardly from the beam body. It comprises a housing having a lower surface configured to be positionable over the body of the hold down beam; means coupled to the housing for engaging the beam trunnions and securing the beam body against the lower surface of the housing; means coupled to the housing for depressing the beam tabs while the beam body is secured against the lower surface of the housing; means coupled to the trunnion engaging means and the beam tab depressing means for selectively actuating the trunnion engaging means and the beam tab depressing means from a position remote from the nuclear reactor; and means connectable to the housing for selectively changing the directional orientation of the beam

  18. The high-energy dual-beam facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This proposal presents a new experimental facility at the Kernforschungszentrum Karlsruhe (KfK) to study the effects of irradiation on the first wall and blanket materials of a fusion reactor. A special effort is made to demonstrate the advantages of the Dual Beam Technique (DBT) as a future research tool for materials development within the European Fusion Technology Programme. The Dual-Beam-Technique allows the production both of helium and of damage in thick metal and ceramic specimens by simultaneous irradiation with high energy alpha particles and protons produced by the two KfK cyclotrons. The proposal describes the Dual Beam Technique the planned experimental activities and the design features of the Dual Beam Facility presently under construction. (orig.)

  19. NEUTRONIC REACTOR HAVING LOCALIZED AREAS OF HIGH THERMAL NEUTRON DENSITIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newson, H.W.

    1958-06-01

    A nuclear reactor for the irradiation of materials designed to provide a localized area of high thermal neutron flux density in which the materials to be irradiated are inserted is described. The active portion of the reactor is comprised of a cubicle graphite moderator of about 25 feet in length along each axis which has a plurality of cylindrical channels for accommodatirg elongated tubular-shaped fuel elements. The fuel elements have radial fins for spacing the fuel elements from the channel walls, thereby providing spaces through which a coolant may be passed, and also to serve as a heatconductirg means. Ducts for accommnodating the sample material to be irradiated extend through the moderator material perpendicular to and between parallel rows of fuel channels. The improvement is in the provision of additional fuel element channels spaced midway between 2 rows of the regular fuel channels in the localized area surrounding the duct where the high thermal neutron flux density is desired. The fuel elements normally disposed in the channels directly adjacent the duct are placed in the additional channels, and the channels directly adjacent the duct are plugged with moderator material. This design provides localized areas of high thermal neutron flux density without the necessity of providing additional fuel material.

  20. Determination of fast neutron flux distribution in irradiation sites of the Malaysian Nuclear Agency research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Determination of thermal to fast neutron flux ratio (ffast) and fast neutron flux (φfast) is required for fast neutron reactions, fast neutron activation analysis, and for correcting interference reactions. The ffast and subsequently φfast were determined using the absolute method. The ffast ranged from 48 to 155, and the φfast was found in the range 1.03x1010-4.89x1010 n cm-2 s-1. These values indicate an acceptable conformity and applicable for installation of the fast neutron facility at the MNA research reactor.

  1. Fast flux measurements by means of threshold detectors on the reactor 'Melusine'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using existing data on the (n,p) and (n,α) threshold reactions we have carried out fast flux measurements on the swimming pool type reactor 'Melusine'. Four common elements: P, S, Mg, Al were chosen because from the point of view of fast spectrum analysis they represent a fairly good energy range from 2.4 MeV to 8 MeV. The fission flux value found in the central element at a power of 1 MW is 1.4 x 1013 n/cm2/s ± 0.14. (author)

  2. Steel slag carbonation in a flow-through reactor system:The role of fluid-flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Eleanor J.Berryman; Anthony E.Williams-Jones; Artashes A.Migdisov

    2015-01-01

    Steel production is currently the largest industrial source of atmospheric CO2.As annual steel production continues to grow,the need for effective methods of reducing its carbon footprint increases correspondingly.The carbonation of the calcium-bearing phases in steel slag generated during basic oxygen furnace (BOF) steel production,in particular its major constituent,lamite {Ca2SiO4},which is a structural analogue of olivine {(MgFe)2SiO4},the main mineral subjected to natural carbonation in peridotites,offers the potential to offset some of these emissions.However,the controls on the nature and efficiency of steel slag carbonation are yet to be completely understood.Experiments were conducted exposing steel slag grains to a CO2-H2O mixture in both batch and flow-through reactors to investigate the impact of temperature,fluid flux,and reaction gradient on the dissolution and carbonation of steel slag.The results of these experiments show that dissolution and carbonation of BOF steel slag are more efficient in a flow-through reactor than in the batch reactors used in most previous studies.Moreover,they show that fluid flux needs to be optimized in addition to grain size,pressure,and temperature,in order to maximize the efficiency of carbonation.Based on these results,a two-stage reactor consisting of a high and a low fluid-flux chamber is proposed for CO2 sequestration by steel slag carbonation,allowing dissolution of the slag and precipitation of calcium carbonate to occur within a single flow-through system.

  3. Status of the IDTF high-heat-flux test facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuznetsov, V.; Gorbenko, A.; Davydov, V.; Kokoulin, A.; Komarov, A.; Mazul, I.; Mudyugin, B.; Ovchinnikov, I.; Stepanov, N.; Rulev, R.; Volodin, A., E-mail: volodin@sintez.niiefa.spb.su

    2014-10-15

    Highlights: • In the Efremov Institute the IDTF (ITER Divertor Test Facility) was created for the high heat flux tests (HHFT) of the PFUs of the ITER divertor. • In summer 2012, the IDTF had been qualified for the testing of the outer vertical full-scale prototypes. • The HHFT of the test assembly of the outer vertical target full-scale prototype – was completed at the end of 2012. - Abstract: The ITER Divertor Test Facility (IDTF) was designed for the high heat flux tests of outer vertical targets, inner vertical targets and domes of the ITER divertor. This facility was created in the Efremov Institute under the Procurement Arrangement 1.7.P2D.RF (high heat flux tests of the plasma facing units of the ITER divertor). The heat flux is generated by an electron-beam system (EBS), 800 kW power and 60 kV maximum accelerating voltage. The component to be tested is mounted on a manipulator in the vacuum chamber capable of testing objects up to 2.5 m long and 1.5 m wide. The pressure in the vacuum chamber is about 3*10{sup −3} Pa. The parameters of the cooling system and the water quality (deionized water) are similar to the cooling conditions of the ITER divertor. The integrated control system regulates all IDTF subsystems and data acquisition from all diagnostic devices, such as pyrometers, IR-cameras, video cameras, flow, pressure and temperature sensors. Started in 2008, the IDTF was commissioned in 2012 with the testing the outer vertical full-scale prototypes and the completion of the PA 1.7.P2D.RF task. This paper details the main characteristics of the IDTF.

  4. Development of high current electron beam generator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Byeong Cheol; Lee, Jong Min; Kim, Sun Kook [and others

    1997-05-01

    A high-current electron beam generator has been developed. The energy and the average current of the electron beam are 2 MeV and 50 mA, respectively. The electron beam generator is composed of an electron gun, RF acceleration cavities, a 260-kW RF generator, electron beam optics components, and control system, etc. The electron beam generator will be used for the development of a millimeter-wave free-electron laser and a high average power infrared free-electron laser. The machine will also be used as a user facility in nuclear industry, environment industry, semiconductor industry, chemical industry, etc. (author). 15 tabs., 85 figs.

  5. High Temperature reactors status 1977

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this report is to summarize the current state-of-the-art of HTR technology as part of follow-up studies of the development of advanced fission reactor systems. These studies have been performed at AB Atomenergi since fiscal year 1975/76 and are financed by governmental funds for energy R and D. In this report emphasis is given to the following main aspects of the HTR development: - a survey of the major HTR - R and D programmes; - the description of HTR technology including remaining development problems and uncertainties; - the analysis of the safety and environmental characteristics of the HTR systems; - the analysis of the incentives for the introduction of various HTR types. The report contains also information kindly provided directly by experts from several organisations developing the HTR-systems

  6. Beam Dynamics Studies for High-Intensity Beams in the CERN Proton Synchrotron

    CERN Document Server

    AUTHOR|(CDS)2082016; Benedikt, Michael

    With the discovery of the Higgs boson, the existence of the last missing piece of the Standard Model of particle physics (SM) was confirmed. However, even though very elegant, this theory is unable to explain, for example, the generation of neutrino masses, nor does it account for dark energy or dark matter. To shed light on some of these open questions, research in fundamental particle physics pursues two complimentary approaches. On the one hand, particle colliders working at the high-energy frontier, such as the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), located in Geneva, Switzerland, are utilized to investigate the fundamental laws of nature. Alternatively, fixed target facilities require high-intensity beams to create a large flux of secondary particles to investigate, for example, rare particle decay processes, or to create neutrino beams. This thesis investigates limitations arising during the acceleration of high-intensity beams at the CERN Proton Synchrotro...

  7. Recent activities on neutron beam utilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Japan, the utilization of neutron beam brought out in research reactors had mainly been carried out in KUR of Kyoto University and JRR-2 of Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) in the fields of neutron scattering experiment, neutron radiography, neutron induced prompt-gamma ray analysis, medical and biological irradiation and so on. After the completion of upgrading work of JRR-3 in JAERI in 1990 (JRR-3M), the quality and quantity for the neutron beam experiments are extremely improved by means of its high intensity of neutron flux and high signal-to-noise ratio of cold and thermal neutron beams at more than twenty neutron beam ports. Especially, the cold neutron beam has brought the field of the utilization expanded and the neutron guide tubes have increased the number of neutron beam facilities as if there are three research reactors. These facilities induced to more active use of research reactors and increased the researchers in the many fields. At present, research reactors are utilized widely in various fields of not only nuclear researches but also non-nuclear researches and industrial uses. The JRR-3M has been operated only for about three years, however, interesting results have already been obtained using cold and thermal neutron beams. The current status of the neutron beam utilization using the research reactors in JAERI is reported and also several research topics obtained at JRR-3M are introduced in this presentation. (author)

  8. Flux profile scanners for scattered high-energy electrons

    CERN Document Server

    Hicks, R S; Arroyo, C; Breuer, M; Celli, J; Chudakov, E; Kumar, K S; Olson, M; Peterson, G A; Pope, K; Ricci, J; Savage, J; Souder, P A

    2005-01-01

    The paper describes the design and performance of flux integrating Cherenkov scanners with air-core reflecting light guides used in a high-energy, high-flux electron scattering experiment at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center. The scanners were highly radiation resistant and provided a good signal to background ratio leading to very good spatial resolution of the scattered electron flux profile scans.

  9. Laser diagnostic for high current H- beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the last 5 years, significant technology advances have been made in the performance, size, and cost of solid-state diode-pumped lasers. These developments enable the use of compact Q-switched Nd:YAG lasers as a beam diagnostic for high current H- beams. Because the threshold for photodetachment is only 0.75 eV, and the maximum detachment cross section is 4x10-17cm2 at 1.5 eV, A 50 mJ/pulse Q-switched Nd:YAG laser can neutralize a significant fraction of the beam in a single 10 ns wide pulse. The neutral beam maintains nearly identical parameters as the parent H- beam, including size, divergence, energy, energy spread, and phase spread. A dipole magnet can separate the neutral beam from the H- beam to allow diagnostics on the neutral beam without intercepting the high-current H- beam. Such a laser system can also be used to extract a low current proton beam, or to induce fluorescence in partially stripped heavy ion beams. Possible beamline diagnostic systems will be reviewed, and the neutral beam yields will be calculated. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  10. Angular momentum flux of nonparaxial acoustic vortex beams and torques on axisymmetric objects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Likun; Marston, Philip L

    2011-12-01

    An acoustic vortex in an inviscid fluid and its radiation torque on an axisymmetric absorbing object are analyzed beyond the paraxial approximation to clarify an analogy with an optical vortex. The angular momentum flux density tensor from the conservation of angular momentum is used as an efficient description of the transport of angular momentum. Analysis of a monochromatic nonparaxial acoustic vortex beam indicates that the local ratio of the axial (or radial) flux density of axial angular momentum to the axial (or radial) flux density of energy is exactly equal to the ratio of the beam's topological charge l to the acoustic frequency ω. The axial radiation torque exerted by the beam on an axisymmetric object centered on the beam's axis due to the transfer of angular momentum is proportional to the power absorbed by the object with a factor l/ω, which can be understood as a result of phonon absorption from the beam. Depending on the vortex's helicity, the torque is parallel or antiparallel to the beam's axis.

  11. Measurement of the Reactor Antineutrino Flux and Spectrum at Daya Bay

    CERN Document Server

    An, F P; Band, H R; Bishai, M; Blyth, S; Butorov, I; Cao, D; Cao, G F; Cao, J; Cen, W R; Chan, Y L; Chang, J F; Chang, L C; Chang, Y; Chen, H S; Chen, Q Y; Chen, S M; Chen, Y X; Chen, Y; Cheng, J H; Cheng, J; Cheng, Y P; Cherwinka, J J; Chu, M C; Cummings, J P; de Arcos, J; Deng, Z Y; Ding, X F; Ding, Y Y; Diwan, M V; Dove, J; Draeger, E; Dwyer, D A; Edwards, W R; Ely, S R; Gill, R; Gonchar, M; Gong, G H; Gong, H; Grassi, M; Gu, W Q; Guan, M Y; Guo, L; Guo, X H; Hackenburg, R W; Han, R; Hans, S; He, M; Heeger, K M; Heng, Y K; Higuera, A; Hor, Y K; Hsiung, Y B; Hu, B Z; Hu, L M; Hu, L J; Hu, T; Hu, W; Huang, E C; Huang, H X; Huang, X T; Huber, P; Hussain, G; Jaffe, D E; Jaffke, P; Jen, K L; Jetter, S; Ji, X P; Ji, X L; Jiao, J B; Johnson, R A; Kang, L; Kettell, S H; Kohn, S; Kramer, M; Kwan, K K; Kwok, M W; Kwok, T; Langford, T J; Lau, K; Lebanowski, L; Lee, J; Lei, R T; Leitner, R; Leung, K Y; Leung, J K C; Lewis, C A; Li, D J; Li, F; Li, G S; Li, Q J; Li, S C; Li, W D; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Y F; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Lin, C J; Lin, G L; Lin, P Y; Lin, S K; Ling, J J; Link, J M; Littenberg, L; Littlejohn, B R; Liu, D W; Liu, H; Liu, J L; Liu, J C; Liu, S S; Lu, C; Lu, H Q; Lu, J S; Luk, K B; Ma, Q M; Ma, X Y; Ma, X B; Ma, Y Q; Caicedo, D A Martinez; McDonald, K T; McKeown, R D; Meng, Y; Mitchell, I; Kebwaro, J Monari; Nakajima, Y; Napolitano, J; Naumov, D; Naumova, E; Ngai, H Y; Ning, Z; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Olshevski, A; Pan, H -R; Park, J; Patton, S; Pec, V; Peng, J C; Piilonen, L E; Pinsky, L; Pun, C S J; Qi, F Z; Qi, M; Qian, X; Raper, N; Ren, B; Ren, J; Rosero, R; Roskovec, B; Ruan, X C; Shao, B B; Steiner, H; Sun, G X; Sun, J L; Tang, W; Taychenachev, D; Tsang, K V; Tull, C E; Tung, Y C; Viaux, N; Viren, B; Vorobel, V; Wang, C H; Wang, M; Wang, N Y; Wang, R G; Wang, W; Wang, W W; Wang, X; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z M; Wei, H Y; Wen, L J; Whisnant, K; White, C G; Whitehead, L; Wise, T; Wong, H L H; Wong, S C F; Worcester, E; Wu, Q; Xia, D M; Xia, J K; Xia, X; Xing, Z Z; Xu, J Y; Xu, J L; Xu, J; Xu, Y; Xue, T; Yan, J; Yang, C G; Yang, L; Yang, M S; Yang, M T; Ye, M; Yeh, M; Young, B L; Yu, G Y; Yu, Z Y; Zang, S L; Zhan, L; Zhang, C; Zhang, H H; Zhang, J W; Zhang, Q M; Zhang, Y M; Zhang, Y X; Zhang, Z J; Zhang, Z Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, Y F; Zhao, Y B; Zheng, L; Zhong, W L; Zhou, L; Zhou, N; Zhuang, H L; Zou, J H

    2015-01-01

    This Letter reports a measurement of the flux and energy spectrum of electron antineutrinos from six 2.9~GW$_{th}$ nuclear reactors with six detectors deployed in two near (effective baselines 512~m and 561~m) and one far (1,579~m) underground experimental halls in the Daya Bay experiment. Using 217 days of data, 296,721 and 41,589 inverse beta decay (IBD) candidates were detected in the near and far halls, respectively. The measured IBD yield is (1.55 $\\pm$ 0.04) $\\times$ 10$^{-18}$~cm$^2$/GW/day or (5.92 $\\pm$ 0.14) $\\times$ 10$^{-43}$~cm$^2$/fission. This flux measurement is consistent with previous short-baseline reactor antineutrino experiments and is $0.946\\pm0.022$ ($0.991\\pm0.023$) relative to the flux predicted with the Huber+Mueller (ILL+Vogel) fissile antineutrino model. The measured IBD positron energy spectrum deviates from both spectral predictions by more than 2$\\sigma$ over the full energy range with a local significance of up to $\\sim$4$\\sigma$ between 4-6 MeV. A reactor antineutrino spectrum...

  12. Measurement of the Reactor Antineutrino Flux and Spectrum at Daya Bay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, F P; Balantekin, A B; Band, H R; Bishai, M; Blyth, S; Butorov, I; Cao, D; Cao, G F; Cao, J; Cen, W R; Chan, Y L; Chang, J F; Chang, L C; Chang, Y; Chen, H S; Chen, Q Y; Chen, S M; Chen, Y X; Chen, Y; Cheng, J H; Cheng, J; Cheng, Y P; Cherwinka, J J; Chu, M C; Cummings, J P; de Arcos, J; Deng, Z Y; Ding, X F; Ding, Y Y; Diwan, M V; Dove, J; Draeger, E; Dwyer, D A; Edwards, W R; Ely, S R; Gill, R; Gonchar, M; Gong, G H; Gong, H; Grassi, M; Gu, W Q; Guan, M Y; Guo, L; Guo, X H; Hackenburg, R W; Han, R; Hans, S; He, M; Heeger, K M; Heng, Y K; Higuera, A; Hor, Y K; Hsiung, Y B; Hu, B Z; Hu, L M; Hu, L J; Hu, T; Hu, W; Huang, E C; Huang, H X; Huang, X T; Huber, P; Hussain, G; Jaffe, D E; Jaffke, P; Jen, K L; Jetter, S; Ji, X P; Ji, X L; Jiao, J B; Johnson, R A; Kang, L; Kettell, S H; Kohn, S; Kramer, M; Kwan, K K; Kwok, M W; Kwok, T; Langford, T J; Lau, K; Lebanowski, L; Lee, J; Lei, R T; Leitner, R; Leung, K Y; Leung, J K C; Lewis, C A; Li, D J; Li, F; Li, G S; Li, Q J; Li, S C; Li, W D; Li, X N; Li, X Q; Li, Y F; Li, Z B; Liang, H; Lin, C J; Lin, G L; Lin, P Y; Lin, S K; Ling, J J; Link, J M; Littenberg, L; Littlejohn, B R; Liu, D W; Liu, H; Liu, J L; Liu, J C; Liu, S S; Lu, C; Lu, H Q; Lu, J S; Luk, K B; Ma, Q M; Ma, X Y; Ma, X B; Ma, Y Q; Martinez Caicedo, D A; McDonald, K T; McKeown, R D; Meng, Y; Mitchell, I; Monari Kebwaro, J; Nakajima, Y; Napolitano, J; Naumov, D; Naumova, E; Ngai, H Y; Ning, Z; Ochoa-Ricoux, J P; Olshevski, A; Pan, H-R; Park, J; Patton, S; Pec, V; Peng, J C; Piilonen, L E; Pinsky, L; Pun, C S J; Qi, F Z; Qi, M; Qian, X; Raper, N; Ren, B; Ren, J; Rosero, R; Roskovec, B; Ruan, X C; Shao, B B; Steiner, H; Sun, G X; Sun, J L; Tang, W; Taychenachev, D; Tsang, K V; Tull, C E; Tung, Y C; Viaux, N; Viren, B; Vorobel, V; Wang, C H; Wang, M; Wang, N Y; Wang, R G; Wang, W; Wang, W W; Wang, X; Wang, Y F; Wang, Z; Wang, Z; Wang, Z M; Wei, H Y; Wen, L J; Whisnant, K; White, C G; Whitehead, L; Wise, T; Wong, H L H; Wong, S C F; Worcester, E; Wu, Q; Xia, D M; Xia, J K; Xia, X; Xing, Z Z; Xu, J Y; Xu, J L; Xu, J; Xu, Y; Xue, T; Yan, J; Yang, C G; Yang, L; Yang, M S; Yang, M T; Ye, M; Yeh, M; Young, B L; Yu, G Y; Yu, Z Y; Zang, S L; Zhan, L; Zhang, C; Zhang, H H; Zhang, J W; Zhang, Q M; Zhang, Y M; Zhang, Y X; Zhang, Y M; Zhang, Z J; Zhang, Z Y; Zhang, Z P; Zhao, J; Zhao, Q W; Zhao, Y F; Zhao, Y B; Zheng, L; Zhong, W L; Zhou, L; Zhou, N; Zhuang, H L; Zou, J H

    2016-02-12

    This Letter reports a measurement of the flux and energy spectrum of electron antineutrinos from six 2.9 GWth nuclear reactors with six detectors deployed in two near (effective baselines 512 and 561 m) and one far (1579 m) underground experimental halls in the Daya Bay experiment. Using 217 days of data, 296 721 and 41 589 inverse β decay (IBD) candidates were detected in the near and far halls, respectively. The measured IBD yield is (1.55±0.04) ×10(-18)  cm(2) GW(-1) day(-1) or (5.92±0.14) ×10(-43)  cm(2) fission(-1). This flux measurement is consistent with previous short-baseline reactor antineutrino experiments and is 0.946±0.022 (0.991±0.023) relative to the flux predicted with the Huber-Mueller (ILL-Vogel) fissile antineutrino model. The measured IBD positron energy spectrum deviates from both spectral predictions by more than 2σ over the full energy range with a local significance of up to ∼4σ between 4-6 MeV. A reactor antineutrino spectrum of IBD reactions is extracted from the measured positron energy spectrum for model-independent predictions.

  13. Measurement of thermal, epithermal and fast neutron flux in the IEA-R1 reactor by the foil activation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental and theoretical details of the foil activation method applied to neutrons flux measurements at the IEA-R1 reactor are presented. The thermal - and epithermal - neutron flux were determined form activation measurements of gold, cobalt and manganese foils; and for the fast neutron flux determination, aluminum, iron and nickel foils were used. The measurements of the activity induced in the metal foils were performed using a Ge-Li gamma spectrometry system. In each energy range of the reactor neutron spectrum, the agreement among the experimental flux values obtained using the three kind of materials, indicates the consistency of the theoretical approach and of the nuclear parameters selected. (Author)

  14. Conceptual design of epithermal neutron beam for BNCT in the thermalizing column of TRIGA reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Monte Carlo feasibility study of development of the epithermal neutron beam for BNCT clinical trials in thermalising column (TC) of TRIGA reactor is presented. The investigation of the possible use of fission converter as well as the set-up of TRIGA reactor core is performed. The optimization of the irradiation facility components is carried out and the configuration with the most favorable cost/performance ratio is proposed. The results prove, that a BNCT irradiation facility with performances, comparable to existing beams throughout the world, could be installed in TC/DC of the TRIGA reactor, quite suitable for the clinical treatments of human patients.(author)

  15. Production of Medical Radioisotopes with High Specific Activity in Photonuclear Reactions with $\\gamma$ Beams of High Intensity and Large Brilliance

    CERN Document Server

    Habs, D

    2010-01-01

    We study the production of radioisotopes for nuclear medicine in $(\\gamma,x{\\rm n}+y{\\rm p})$ photonuclear reactions or ($\\gamma,\\gamma'$) photoexcitation reactions with high flux [($10^{13}-10^{15}$)$\\gamma$/s], small diameter $\\sim (100 \\, \\mu$m$)^2$ and small band width ($\\Delta E/E \\approx 10^{-3}-10^{-4}$) $\\gamma$ beams produced by Compton back-scattering of laser light from relativistic brilliant electron beams. We compare them to (ion,$x$n$ + y$p) reactions with (ion=p,d,$\\alpha$) from particle accelerators like cyclotrons and (n,$\\gamma$) or (n,f) reactions from nuclear reactors. For photonuclear reactions with a narrow $\\gamma$ beam the energy deposition in the target can be managed by using a stack of thin target foils or wires, hence avoiding direct stopping of the Compton and pair electrons (positrons). $(\\gamma,\\gamma')$ isomer production via specially selected $\\gamma$ cascades allows to produce high specific activity in multiple excitations, where no back-pumping of the isomer to the ground st...

  16. Sr flux stability against oxidation in oxide-molecular-beam-epitaxy environment: Flux, geometry, and pressure dependence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maintaining stable fluxes for multiple source elements is a challenging task when the source materials have significantly different oxygen affinities in a complex-oxide molecular-beam-epitaxy (MBE) environment. Considering that Sr is one of the most easily oxidized and widely used elements in various complex oxides, we took Sr as a probe to investigate the flux-stability problem in a number of different conditions. Source oxidation was less for higher flux, extended port geometry, and unmelted source shape. The extended port geometry also eliminated the flux transient after opening a source shutter as observed in the standard port. We also found that the source oxidation occurred more easily on the crucible wall than on the surface of the source material. Atomic oxygen, in spite of its stronger oxidation effectiveness, did not make any difference in source oxidation as compared to molecular oxygen in this geometry. Our results may provide a guide for solutions to the source oxidation problem in oxide-MBE system.

  17. Development of a 10-decade single-mode reactor flux monitoring system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentine, K.H.; Shepard, R.L.; Falter, K.G.; Reese, W.B.

    1988-03-31

    Conventional wide-range neutron channels employ three optional modes to monitor the required flux range from source levels to full power (typically 10 or more decades). Difficult calibrations are necessary to provide a continuous output signal when such a system switches from counting mode in the source range to mean-square voltage mode in the midrange to dc current mode in the power range. In an ORNL proof-of-principle test, a method of extended range counting was implemented with a fission counter and conventional wide-band pulse processing electronics to provide a single-mode, monotonically increasing signal that spanned /approximately 10/ decades of neutron flux. Ongoing work includes design, fabrication, and testing of a comlpete neutron flux monitoring system suitable for advanced liquid metal reactor designs. 6 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Transverse Laser Beam Shaping in High Brightness Electron Gun at ATF

    CERN Document Server

    Roychowdhury, S

    2005-01-01

    The brightness of electron beams from a photo injector is influenced by the transverse and longitudinal distribution of the laser beam illuminating the cathode. Previous studies at Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility have shown that formation of an ideal e-beam with lowest transverse emittance requires uniform circular distribution of the emitted electrons. The use of the uniformly distributed power of the laser beam may not lead to that of the emitted electrons because of the non-uniform quantum efficiency. A proper shaping of the laser beam can compensate for this non-uniformity. In this paper we describe the use of digital light processing (DLP) technique based on digital mirror device (DMD) for spatial modulation of the laser beam, for measurements of the quantum efficiency map, and for creating the desirable e-beam density profiles. A DMD is aμelectronic mechanical system (MEMS) comprising of millions of highly reflectiveμmirrors controlled by underlying electronics. We present exper...

  19. Influence of high flux hydrogen-plasma exposure on the thermal shock induced crack formation in tungsten

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wirtz, M.; Linke, J.; Pintsuk, G.; Rapp, J.; Wright, G. M.

    2012-01-01

    The influence of high flux hydrogen-plasma on the thermal shock behaviour of tungsten was investigated in a combined experiment using the linear plasma device Pilot-PSI and the electron beam facility JUDITH 1. Tungsten targets were exposed to high flux hydrogen plasma, cyclic thermal shock tests and

  20. Wake-field and space charge effects on high brightness beams calculations and measured results for the laser driven photoelectrons at BNL-ATF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We discuss the formalism used to study the effects of the interactions between the highly charged particles and the fields in the accelerating structure, including space charge and wake fields. Some of our calculations and numerical simulation results obtained for the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) high-brightness photoelectron beam at the Accelerator Test Facility (ATF) and the measured data at ATF are also included

  1. Beyond ITER: neutral beams for a demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) (invited).

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAdams, R

    2014-02-01

    In the development of magnetically confined fusion as an economically sustainable power source, International Tokamak Experimental Reactor (ITER) is currently under construction. Beyond ITER is the demonstration fusion reactor (DEMO) programme in which the physics and engineering aspects of a future fusion power plant will be demonstrated. DEMO will produce net electrical power. The DEMO programme will be outlined and the role of neutral beams for heating and current drive will be described. In particular, the importance of the efficiency of neutral beam systems in terms of injected neutral beam power compared to wallplug power will be discussed. Options for improving this efficiency including advanced neutralisers and energy recovery are discussed.

  2. Neutron flux measurement in the thermal column of the Malaysian TRIGA mark II reactor with MCNP verification

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the thermal column of the Malaysian TRIGA Mark II reactor, forming part of a feasibility study for BNCT was proposed in 2001. In the current study, pure metals were used to measure the neutron flux at selected points in the thermal column and the neutron flux determined using SAND-II. Monte Carlo simulation of the thermal column was also carried out. The reactor core was homogenized and calculations of the neutron flux through the graphite stringers performed using MCNP5. The results show good agreement between the measured flux and the MCNP calculated flux. An obvious extension from this is that the MCNP neutron flux output can be utilized as an input spectrum for SAND-II for the flux iteration. (author)

  3. Electron beam induced oxidation of Ni3Al surfaces : electron flux effects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koch, S.A.; Palasantzas, G.; Agterveld, D.T.L. van; Hosson, J.Th.M. De

    2002-01-01

    Electron beam irradiation of polycrystalline boron doped Ni3Al (at 300 K and under ultrahigh vacuum conditions) induces fast oxidation. The rate and depth of oxidation initially increase with increasing electron flux as indicated by results from Auger electron spectroscopy. Curves of oxygen developm

  4. Localized fast neutron flux enhancement for damage experiments in a research reactor; Accroissement local du flux rapide pour des experiences de dommages dans un reacteur de recherche

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malouch, F

    2003-06-01

    In irradiation experiments on materials in the core of the Osiris reactor (CEA-Saclay) we seek to increase damage in irradiated samples and to reduce the duration of their stay in the core. Damage is essentially caused by fast neutrons (E {>=} 1 MeV); we have therefore pursued the possibility of a localized increase of their level in an irradiation experiment by using a flux converter device made up of fissile material arranged according to a suitable geometry that allows the converter to receive experiments. We have studied several parameters that are influential in the increase of fast neutron flux within the converter. We have also considered the problem of the converter's cooling in the core and its effect on the operation of the reactor. We have carried out a specific neutron calculation scheme based on the modular 2D-transport code APOLLO2 using a two-level transport method. Experimental validation of the flux calculation scheme was carried out in the ISIS reactor, the mock-up of OSIRIS, by optimizing the loading of fuel elements in the core. The experimental results show that the neutron calculation scheme computes the fluxes in close agreement with the measurements especially the fast flux. This study allows us to master the essential physical parameters needed for the design of a flux converter in an MTR reactor. (author)

  5. Splitting of high power, cw proton beams

    CERN Document Server

    Facco, Alberto; Berkovits, Dan; Yamane, Isao

    2007-01-01

    A simple method for splitting a high power, continuous wave (cw) proton beam in two or more branches with low losses has been developed in the framework of the EURISOL (European Isotope Separation On-Line adioactive Ion Beam Facility) design study. The aim of the system is to deliver up to 4 MW of H beam to the main radioactive ion beam production target, and up to 100 kWof proton beams to three more targets, simultaneously. A three-step method is used, which includes magnetic neutralization of a fractionof the main H- beam, magnetic splitting of H- and H0, and stripping of H0 to H+. The method allowsslow raising and individual fine adjustment of the beam intensity in each branch.

  6. Filtration behavior of casein glycomacropeptide (CGMP) in an enzymatic membrane reactor: fouling control by membrane selection and threshold flux operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Luo, Jianquan; Morthensen, Sofie Thage; Meyer, Anne S.;

    2014-01-01

    to be the most suitable membrane for this application. Low pH increased CGMP retention but produced more fouling. Higher agitation and lower CGMP concentration induced larger permeate flux and higher CGMP retention. Adsorption fouling and pore blocking by CGMP in/on membranes could be controlled by selecting......Sialylated human milk oligosaccharides (HMOs) can be produced by enzymatic trans-sialidation using casein glycomacropeptide (CGMP) as the substrate. By performing the reaction in an enzymatic membrane reactor (EMR), simultaneous separation of the HMOs from CGMP and enzyme reuse can be achieved...... a highly hydrophilic membrane with appropriate pore size. Operating under threshold flux could minimize the concentration polarization and cake/gel/scaling layers, but might not avoid irreversible fouling caused by adsorption and pore blocking. The effects of membrane properties, pH, agitation and CGMP...

  7. Scaleable, High Efficiency Microchannel Sabatier Reactor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — A Microchannel Sabatier Reactor System (MSRS) consisting of cross connected arrays of isothermal or graded temperature reactors is proposed. The reactor array...

  8. SPring-8 BL41XU, a high-flux macromolecular crystallography beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hasegawa, Kazuya [SPring-8/JASRI, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Shimizu, Nobutaka [SPring-8/JASRI, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); KEK-PF, 1-1 Oho, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Okumura, Hideo; Mizuno, Nobuhiro; Baba, Seiki [SPring-8/JASRI, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Hirata, Kunio [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Takeuchi, Tomoyuki; Yamazaki, Hiroshi; Senba, Yasunori; Ohashi, Haruhiko [SPring-8/JASRI, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan); Yamamoto, Masaki [RIKEN SPring-8 Center, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5148 (Japan); Kumasaka, Takashi, E-mail: kumasaka@spring8.or.jp [SPring-8/JASRI, 1-1-1 Kouto, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2013-11-01

    SPring-8 BL41XU provides a high-flux X-ray beam of size 10–50 µm, and enables high-quality diffraction data to be obtained from various types of protein crystals. Details of this beamline and an upgrade project are described. SPring-8 BL41XU is a high-flux macromolecular crystallography beamline using an in-vacuum undulator as a light source. The X-rays are monochromated by a liquid-nitrogen-cooling Si double-crystal monochromator, and focused by Kirkpatrick–Baez mirror optics. The focused beam size at the sample is 80 µm (H) × 22 µm (V) with a photon flux of 1.1 × 10{sup 13} photons s{sup −1}. A pinhole aperture is used to collimate the beam in the range 10–50 µm. This high-flux beam with variable size provides opportunities not only for micro-crystallography but also for data collection effectively making use of crystal volume. The beamline also provides high-energy X-rays covering 20.6–35.4 keV which allows ultra-high-resolution data to be obtained and anomalous diffraction using the K-edge of Xe and I. Upgrade of BL41XU for more rapid and accurate data collection is proceeding. Here, details of BL41XU are given and an outline of the upgrade project is documented.

  9. Electron beam diagnostic for profiling high power beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmer, John W.; Palmer, Todd A.; Teruya, Alan T.

    2008-03-25

    A system for characterizing high power electron beams at power levels of 10 kW and above is described. This system is comprised of a slit disk assembly having a multitude of radial slits, a conducting disk with the same number of radial slits located below the slit disk assembly, a Faraday cup assembly located below the conducting disk, and a start-stop target located proximate the slit disk assembly. In order to keep the system from over-heating during use, a heat sink is placed in close proximity to the components discussed above, and an active cooling system, using water, for example, can be integrated into the heat sink. During use, the high power beam is initially directed onto a start-stop target and after reaching its full power is translated around the slit disk assembly, wherein the beam enters the radial slits and the conducting disk radial slits and is detected at the Faraday cup assembly. A trigger probe assembly can also be integrated into the system in order to aid in the determination of the proper orientation of the beam during reconstruction. After passing over each of the slits, the beam is then rapidly translated back to the start-stop target to minimize the amount of time that the high power beam comes in contact with the slit disk assembly. The data obtained by the system is then transferred into a computer system, where a computer tomography algorithm is used to reconstruct the power density distribution of the beam.

  10. Beam dynamics in high energy particle accelerators

    CERN Document Server

    Wolski, Andrzej

    2014-01-01

    Particle accelerators are essential tools for scientific research in fields as diverse as high energy physics, materials science and structural biology. They are also widely used in industry and medicine. Producing the optimum design and achieving the best performance for an accelerator depends on a detailed understanding of many (often complex and sometimes subtle) effects that determine the properties and behavior of the particle beam. Beam Dynamics in High Energy Particle Accelerators provides an introduction to the concepts underlying accelerator beam line design and analysis, taking an approach that emphasizes the elegance of the subject and leads into the development of a range of powerful techniques for understanding and modeling charged particle beams.

  11. High-energy fluxes of atmospheric neutrinos

    CERN Document Server

    Sinegovskaya, T S; Sinegovsky, S I

    2013-01-01

    High-energy neutrinos from decays of mesons, produced in collisions of cosmic ray particles with air nuclei, form unavoidable background for detection of astrophysical neutrinos. More precise calculations of the high-energy neutrino spectrum are required since measurements in the IceCube experiment reach the intriguing energy region where a contribution of the prompt neutrinos and/or astrophysical ones should be discovered. Basing on the referent hadronic models QGSJET II-03, SIBYLL 2.1, we calculate high-energy spectra, both of the muon and electron atmospheric neutrinos, averaged over zenith-angles. The computation is made using three parameterizations of cosmic ray spectra which include the knee region. All calculations are compared with the atmospheric neutrino measurements by Frejus and IceCube. The prompt neutrino flux predictions obtained with thequark-gluon string model (QGSM) for the charm production by Kaidalov & Piskunova do not contradict to the IceCube measurements and upper limit on the astr...

  12. Burnout experiment in subcooled forced-convection boiling of water for beam dumps of a high power neutral beam injector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies were made on burnout heat flux in highly subcooled forced-convection boiling of water for the design of beam dumps of a high power neutral beam injector for Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute Tokamak-60. These dumps are composed of many circular tubes with two longitudinal fins. The tube was irradiated with nonuniformly distributed hydrogen ion beams of 120 to 200 kW for as long as 10 s. The coolant water was circulated at flow velocities of 3 to 7.5 m/s at exit pressures of 0.4 to 0.9 MPa. The burnout and film-boiling data were obtained at local heat fluxes of 8 to 15 MW/m2. These values were as high as 2.5 times larger than those for the circumferentially uniform heat flux case with the same parameters. These data showed insensitivity to local subcooling as well as to pressure, and simple burnout correlations were derived. From these results, the beam dumps have been designed to receive energetic beam fluxes of as high as 5 MW/m2 with a margin of a factor of 2 for burnout

  13. Theoretical analysis of nuclear reactors (Phase I), I-V, Part V, Determining the fine flux distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mono energetic neutron transport equation was solved by Carlson numerical method in cylindrical geometry. Sn code was developed for the digital computer ZUSE Z23. Neutron flux distribution was determined for the RA reactor cell by applying S4 approximation. Reactor cell was treated as D2O-U-D2O system. Time of iteration was 185 s

  14. Electron beam treatment of exhaust gas with high NOx concentration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simulated exhaust gases with a high NOx concentration, ranging from 200 to 1700 ppmv, were irradiated by an electron beam from an accelerator. In the first part of this study, only exhaust gases were treated. Low NOx removal efficiencies were obtained for high NOx concentrations, even with high irradiation doses applied. In the second part of study, gaseous ammonia or/and vapor ethanol were added to the exhaust gas before its inlet to the plasma reactor. These additions significantly enhanced the NOx removal efficiency. The synergistic effect of high SO2 concentration on NOx removal was observed. The combination of electron beam treatment with the introduction of the above additions and with the performance of irradiation under optimal parameters ensured high NOx removal efficiency without the application of a solid-state catalyst. (paper)

  15. Hybrid high temperature gas-cooled reactor, thermonuclear fusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The project of a multi-purpose high temperature gas-cooled reactor started in 1969. The Atomic Energy Commission, Japan, approved in 1980 the budget for the design study of the experimental reactor. The conceptual design is in progress. The manufacturing of coated fuel pellets and the test method have been developed. The study of graphite structure is carried out. Corrosion and creep tests are made to obtain the knowledge concerning the metals in high temperature helium gas. The engineering study of various machines and structures operating at high temperature is performed. International cooperative works are considered. The experimental reactor will be critical in 1987. A critical plasma test facility, JT-60, has been constructed at the Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute. As the theoretical work on plasma confinement, the evaluation of the critical beta value of JT-60 was made. By high temperature neutral beam injection, the slowing down and heating processes of high energy particles are studied. The development of a non-circular cross-section tokamak is in progress. The construction of JT-60 will be completed in 1984. Study concerning superconducting magnets is considered. Japan is one of the members of INTOR project. (Kato, T.)

  16. Observations and diagnostics in high brightness beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianchi, A.; Anania, M. P.; Bisesto, F.; Castellano, M.; Chiadroni, E.; Pompili, R.; Shpakov, V.

    2016-09-01

    The brightness is a figure of merit largely used in the light sources, like FEL (Free Electron Lasers), but it is also fundamental in several other applications, as for instance Compton backscattering sources, beam driven plasma accelerators and THz sources. Advanced diagnostics are essential tools in the development of high brightness beams. 6D electron beam diagnostics will be reviewed with emphasis on emittance measurement.

  17. Technical aspects of high converter reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The meeting provided an opportunity to review and discuss national R and D programs, various technical aspects of and worldwide progress in the implementation of high conversion reactors. The meeting was attended by 66 participants from 18 countries and 2 international organizations. 33 papers were presented. A separate abstract was prepared for each of these papers. Refs, figs, tabs, slides and diagram

  18. High brightness beams and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the present research on attaining intense bright electron beams. Thermionic systems are briefly covered. Recent and past results from the photoinjector programs are given. The performance advantages and difficulties presently faced by researchers using photoinjectors is discussed. The progress that has been made in photocathode materials, both in lifetime and quantum efficiency, is covered. Finally, a discussion of emittance measurements of photoinjector systems and how the measurement is complicated by the non-thermal nature of the electron beam is presented

  19. Ultra high temperature particle bed reactor design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazareth, Otto; Ludewig, Hans; Perkins, K.; Powell, J.

    1990-01-01

    A direct nuclear propulsion engine which could be used for a mission to Mars is designed. The main features of this reactor design are high values for I(sub sp) and very efficient cooling. This particle bed reactor consists of 37 cylindrical fuel elements embedded in a cylinder of beryllium which acts as a moderator and reflector. The fuel consists of a packed bed of spherical fissionable fuel particles. Gaseous H2 passes over the fuel bed, removes the heat, and is exhausted out of the rocket. The design was found to be neutronically critical and to have tolerable heating rates. Therefore, this particle bed reactor design is suitable as a propulsion unit for this mission.

  20. Verification of Monte Carlo calculations of the neutron flux in typical irradiation channels of the TRIGA reactor, Ljubljana

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jacimovic, R; Maucec, M; Trkov, A

    2003-01-01

    An experimental verification of Monte Carlo neutron flux calculations in typical irradiation channels in the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the Jozef Stefan Institute is presented. It was found that the flux, as well as its spectral characteristics, depends rather strongly on the position of the irradiati

  1. High heat flux engineering in solar energy applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cameron, C.P.

    1993-07-01

    Solar thermal energy systems can produce heat fluxes in excess of 10,000 kW/m{sup 2}. This paper provides an introduction to the solar concentrators that produce high heat flux, the receivers that convert the flux into usable thermal energy, and the instrumentation systems used to measure flux in the solar environment. References are incorporated to direct the reader to detailed technical information.

  2. Evaluation of the Initial Isothermal Physics Measurements at the Fast Flux Test Facility, a Prototypic Liquid Metal Fast Breeder Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    John D. Bess

    2010-03-01

    The Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) was a 400-MWt, sodium-cooled, low-pressure, high-temperature, fast-neutron flux, nuclear fission reactor plant designed for the irradiation testing of nuclear reactor fuels and materials for the development of liquid metal fast breeder reactors (LMFBRs). The FFTF was fueled with plutonium-uranium mixed oxide (MOX) and reflected by Inconel-600. Westinghouse Hanford Company operated the FFTF as part of the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) for the U.S. Department of Energy on the Hanford Site near Richland, Washington. Although the FFTF was a testing facility not specifically designed to breed fuel or produce electricity, it did provide valuable information for LMFBR projects and base technology programs in the areas of plant system and component design, component fabrication, prototype testing, and site construction. The major objectives of the FFTF were to provide a strong, disciplined engineering base for the LMFBR program, provide fast flux testing for other U.S. programs, and contribute to the development of a viable self-sustaining competitive U.S. LMFBR industry. During its ten years of operation, the FFTF acted as a national research facility to test advanced nuclear fuels, materials, components, systems, nuclear power plant operating and maintenance procedures, and active and passive reactor safety technologies; it also produced a large number of isotopes for medical and industrial users, generated tritium for the U.S. fusion research program, and participated in cooperative, international research work. Prior to the implementation of the reactor characterization program, a series of isothermal physics measurements were performed; this acceptance testing program consisted of a series of control rod worths, critical rod positions, subcriticality measurements, maximum reactivity addition rates, shutdown margins, excess reactivity, and isothermal temperature coefficient reactivity. The results of these

  3. Neutron spectra in two beam ports of a TRIGA Mark III reactor with HEU fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H. R.; Hernandez D, V. M. [Universidad Autonoma de Zacatecas, Unidad Academica de Estudios Nucleares, Cipres No. 10, Fracc. La Penuela, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Paredes G, L.; Aguilar, F., E-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com [ININ, Carretera Mexico-Toluca s/n, Ocoyoacac 52750, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2012-10-15

    Before to change the HEU for Leu fuel of the ININ's TRIGA Mark III nuclear reactor the neutron spectra were measured in two beam ports using 5 and 10 W. Measurements were carried out in a tangential and a radial beam port using a Bonner sphere spectrometer. It was found that neutron spectra are different in the beam ports, in radial beam port the amplitude of thermal and fast neutrons are approximately the same while, in the tangential beam port thermal neutron peak is dominant. In the radial beam port the fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent factors are 131{+-}11 and 124{+-}10 p Sv-cm{sup 2} for 5 and 10 W respectively while in the tangential beam port the fluence-to-ambient dose equivalent factor is 55{+-}4 p Sv-cm{sup 2} for 10 W. (Author)

  4. Critical Heat Flux Phenomena at HighPressure & Low Mass Fluxes: NEUP Final Report Part I: Experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Corradini, Michael [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Wu, Qiao [Oregon State Univ., Corvallis, OR (United States)

    2015-04-30

    This report is a preliminary document presenting an overview of the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) phenomenon, the High Pressure Critical Heat Flux facility (HPCHF), preliminary CHF data acquired, and the future direction of the research. The HPCHF facility has been designed and built to study CHF at high pressure and low mass flux ranges in a rod bundle prototypical of conceptual Small Modular Reactor (SMR) designs. The rod bundle is comprised of four electrically heated rods in a 2x2 square rod bundle with a prototypic chopped-cosine axial power profile and equipped with thermocouples at various axial and circumferential positions embedded in each rod for CHF detection. Experimental test parameters for CHF detection range from pressures of ~80 – 160 bar, mass fluxes of ~400 – 1500 kg/m2s, and inlet water subcooling from ~30 – 70°C. The preliminary data base established will be further extended in the future along with comparisons to existing CHF correlations, models, etc. whose application ranges may be applicable to the conditions of SMRs.

  5. Development of a neutron tomography system using a low flux reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A neutron tomography instrument was designed and developed at the Royal Military College (RMC) of Canada with Queen's University to enhance these institutions' non-destructive evaluation capabilities. The neutron imaging system was built around a Safe Low-Power C(K)ritical Experiment (SLOWPOKE-2) nuclear research reactor. The low power and physical geometry of the reactor required that a novel design be developed to facilitate tomography. A unique rotisserie style rotary stage and clamping apparatus was developed. Furthermore, the low flux at the image plane (3x104 n cm-2 s-1), necessitated that the image acquisition and reconstruction processes be optimized. Tomographs of numerous samples were obtained using the new tomography instrument at RMC.

  6. Power and neutron flux calculation for the PUSPATI TRIGA Reactor using MCNP

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Malaysian 1 MW TRIGA MARK II research reactor at Malaysian Nuclear Agency is designed to effectively implement the various fields of basic nuclear research, manpower training, and production of radioisotopes for their use in agriculture, industry, and medicine. This study deals with the calculation of neutron flux and power distribution in PUSPATI TRIGA REACTOR (RTP) 14th core configuration. The 3-D continuous energy Monte Carlo code MCNP was used to develop a versatile and accurate full model of the TRIGA core and fuels. The model represents in detailed all components of the core with literally no physical approximation. Continuous energy cross-section data from the more recent nuclear data as well as S (α, β) thermal neutron scattering functions distributed with the MCNP code were used. Results of calculations are analyzed and discussed. (author)

  7. Two-beam type IH-RFQ linear accelerator for low-energy and high intensity heavy ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a two-beam type IH-RFQ (Interdigital H type Radio Frequency Quadrupole) linac system to proof the principle of a multi-beam type IH-RFQ linac in Research Laboratory for Nuclear Reactors of Tokyo Institute of Technology. The multi-beam type RFQ linac has several beam channels in a cavity for accelerating high intensity and low energy heavy ion beams. The developed system consists of a two-beam type IH-RFQ cavity as a prototype of the multi-beam type cavity, a two-beam type laser ion source with DPIS (Direct Plasma Injection Scheme) and beam analyzers mainly. A a result of the beam acceleration test, the linac system accelerates carbon ions from 5 keV/u to 60 keV/u and generates about 108 mA (2x54 mA/channel) in the total output current. In this paper, we describe the development of the linac system and some results of the beam acceleration test. (author)

  8. Anisotropic flux pinning in high Tc superconductors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koleśnik, S.; Igalson, J.; Skośkiewicz, T.; Szymczak, R.; Baran, M.; Pytel, K.; Pytel, B.

    1995-02-01

    In this paper we present a comparison of the results of FC magnetization measurements on several PbSr(Y,Ca)CuO crystals representing various levels of flux pinning. The pinning centers in our crystals have been set up during the crystal growth process or introduced by neutron irradiation. Some possible explanations of the observed effects, including surface barrier, flux-center distribution and sample-shape effects, are discussed.

  9. Experimental results of angular neutron flux spectra leaking from slabs of fusion reactor candidate materials, (1)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes experimental data of angular neutron flux spectra measured on the slab assemblies of fusion reactor candidate materials using the neutron time-of-flight (TOF) method. These experiments have been performed for graphite (carbon), beryllium and lithium-oxide. The obtained data are very suitable for the benchmark tests to check the nuclear data and calculational code systems. For use of that purpose, the experimental conditions, definitions of key terms and results obtained are compiled in figures and numerical tables. (author)

  10. Design of epithermal neutron beam for clinical BNCT treatment at Slovenian TRIGA research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maucec, Marko [Jozef Stefan Institute, Reactor Physics Division, Lubljana (Slovenia). E-mail: marko.mauce@ijs.si

    1999-07-01

    The Monte Carlo feasibility study of development of epithermal neutron beam for BNCT clinical trials on Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI) TRIGA reactor is presented. The investigation of the possible use of fission converter for the purpose of enhancement of neutron beam, as well as the set-up of TRIGA reactor core is performed. The optimization of the irradiation facility components is carried out and the configuration with the most favorable cost/performance ratio is proposed. The simulation results prove that a BNCT irradiation facility with performances, comparable to existing beams throughout the world, could be installed in the thermalizing column of the TRIGA reactor, quite suitable for the clinical treatments of human patients. (author)

  11. Design of epithermal neutron beam for clinical BNCT treatment at Slovenian TRIGA research reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Monte Carlo feasibility study of development of epithermal neutron beam for BNCT clinical trials on Jozef Stefan Institute (JSI) TRIGA reactor is presented. The investigation of the possible use of fission converter for the purpose of enhancement of neutron beam, as well as the set-up of TRIGA reactor core is performed. The optimization of the irradiation facility components is carried out and the configuration with the most favorable cost/performance ratio is proposed. The simulation results prove that a BNCT irradiation facility with performances, comparable to existing beams throughout the world, could be installed in the thermalizing column of the TRIGA reactor, quite suitable for the clinical treatments of human patients. (author)

  12. Demonstration of the importance of a dedicated neutron beam monitoring system for BNCT facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Der-Sheng; Liu, Yuan-Hao; Jiang, Shiang-Huei

    2016-01-01

    The neutron beam monitoring system is indispensable to BNCT facility in order to achieve an accurate patient dose delivery. The neutron beam monitoring of a reactor-based BNCT (RB-BNCT) facility can be implemented through the instrumentation and control system of a reactor provided that the reactor power level remains constant during reactor operation. However, since the neutron flux in reactor core is highly correlative to complicated reactor kinetics resulting from such as fuel depletion, poison production, and control blade movement, some extent of variation may occur in the spatial distribution of neutron flux in reactor core. Therefore, a dedicated neutron beam monitoring system is needed to be installed in the vicinity of the beam path close to the beam exit of the RB-BNCT facility, where it can measure the BNCT beam intensity as closely as possible and be free from the influence of the objects present around the beam exit. In this study, in order to demonstrate the importance of a dedicated BNCT neutron beam monitoring system, the signals originating from the two in-core neutron detectors installed at THOR were extracted and compared with the three dedicated neutron beam monitors of the THOR BNCT facility. The correlation of the readings between the in-core neutron detectors and the BNCT neutron beam monitors was established to evaluate the improvable quality of the beam intensity measurement inferred by the in-core neutron detectors. In 29 sampled intervals within 16 days of measurement, the fluctuations in the mean value of the normalized ratios between readings of the three BNCT neutron beam monitors lay within 0.2%. However, the normalized ratios of readings of the two in-core neutron detectors to one of the BNCT neutron beam monitors show great fluctuations of 5.9% and 17.5%, respectively. PMID:26595774

  13. Determination of fast neutron flux distribution in irradiation sites of the Malaysian Nuclear Agency research reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavar, A.R. [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, National University of Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Sarmani, S.B. [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, National University of Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Wood, A.K. [Analytical Chemistry Application Group, Industrial Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (MNA), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Fadzil, S.M. [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, National University of Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Radir, M.H. [Analytical Chemistry Application Group, Industrial Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (MNA), Bangi, 43000 Kajang, Selangor (Malaysia); Khoo, K.S., E-mail: khoo@ukm.m [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, National University of Malaysia (UKM), 43600 Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2011-05-15

    Determination of thermal to fast neutron flux ratio (f{sub fast}) and fast neutron flux ({phi}{sub fast}) is required for fast neutron reactions, fast neutron activation analysis, and for correcting interference reactions. The f{sub fast} and subsequently {phi}{sub fast} were determined using the absolute method. The f{sub fast} ranged from 48 to 155, and the {phi}{sub fast} was found in the range 1.03x10{sup 10}-4.89x10{sup 10} n cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}. These values indicate an acceptable conformity and applicable for installation of the fast neutron facility at the MNA research reactor.

  14. Characterization of the neutron flux gradients in typical irradiation channels of a TRIGA Mark II reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The neutron distribution in a defined volume (gradient) for different matrices (air, water, cellulose, biological material and silicon dioxide) in two typical irradiation channels (pneumatic tube (PT) and IC40-channel in the carousel facility) in the TRIGA Mark II reactor at the Jozef Stefan Institute (IJS) was studied. Experiment was based on inserting Fe wires (flux monitors) into the chosen matrices. The wires were cut into small pieces after irradiation and the induced activities of 59Fe measured. The results showed that for the studied geometry the average spatial thermal neutron flux inhomogeneities (for five studied matrices) are about 2.3% in the PT-channel and about 2.9% in the IC40-channel. (author)

  15. Improved Gamma-Ray Flux Monitoring at the High Intensity Gamma-Ray Source (HIGS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, Robert

    2002-10-01

    An improved gamma-ray beam flux monitor has been built for use at the High Intensity Gamma-Ray Source at the Duke University Free Electron Laser Laboratories. It is important to know precisely the gamma-ray flux of this beam. It is also important to limit beam attenuation to a minimum while making an accurate flux measurement. The improvements from a more accurate gamma-ray intensity monitor will allow for more precise cross-section measurements and will be valuable to many of the experiments conducted at HIGS. The detector consists of a thin scintillator optically coupled to two photomultiplier tubes, a thin foil, and then another thin scintillator attached to two photomultiplier tubes. The front scintillator is used to veto counts from charged particles emitted upstream in the beam-line. The preliminary tests of the monitor show very promising results and after slight adjustments and calibrations, the detector will be ready to acquire accurate beam intensity measurements while contributing very little to beam attenuation.

  16. High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of internally and externally cooled annular fuel rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and economic assessment. The investigation was conducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperature. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasibility issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density

  17. High Performance Fuel Desing for Next Generation Pressurized Water Reactors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mujid S. Kazimi; Pavel Hejzlar

    2006-01-31

    The use of internally and externally cooled annular fule rods for high power density Pressurized Water Reactors is assessed. The assessment included steady state and transient thermal conditions, neutronic and fuel management requirements, mechanical vibration issues, fuel performance issues, fuel fabrication methods and econmic assessment. The investigation was donducted by a team from MIT, Westinghouse, Gamma Engineering, Framatome ANP, and AECL. The analyses led to the conclusion that raising the power density by 50% may be possible with this advanced fuel. Even at the 150% power level, the fuel temperature would be a few hundred degrees lower than the current fuel temperatre. Significant economic and safety advantages can be obtained by using this fuel in new reactors. Switching to this type of fuel for existing reactors would yield safety advantages, but the economic return is dependent on the duration of plant shutdown to accommodate higher power production. The main feasiblity issue for the high power performance appears to be the potential for uneven splitting of heat flux between the inner and outer fuel surfaces due to premature closure of the outer fuel-cladding gap. This could be overcome by using a very narrow gap for the inner fuel surface and/or the spraying of a crushable zirconium oxide film at the fuel pellet outer surface. An alternative fuel manufacturing approach using vobropacking was also investigated but appears to yield lower than desirable fuel density.

  18. Developing a High-Flux Isolated Attosecond Pulse Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamalov, Andrei; Ware, Matthew; Bucksbaum, Philip; Cryan, James

    2016-05-01

    High harmonic based light sources have proven to be valuable experimental tools that facilitate studies of electron dynamics at their natural timescale, the attosecond regime. The nature of driving laser sources used in high harmonic generation make it difficult to attain attosecond pulses that are both isolated in time and of a high intensity. We present our progress in commissioning a beamline designed to produce high-flux isolated attosecond pulses. A multistep amplification process provides us with 30 mJ, 25 fs pulses centered around 800 nm with 100 Hz repetition rate. These pulses are spatially split and focused into a gas cell. A non-collinear optical gating scheme is used to produce a lighthouse source of high harmonic radiation wherein each beamlet is an isolated attosecond pulse. A variable-depth grazing-incidence stepped mirror is fabricated to extend the optical path length of the older beamlets and thus overlap the beamlets in time. The combined beam is tightly focused and ensuing mechanics will be studied with an electron spectrometer as well as a xuv photon spectrometer. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Science, Basic Energy Sciences, Chemical Sciences, Geosciences, and Biosciences Division.

  19. Achromatic beam transport of High Current Injector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sarvesh; Mandal, A.

    2016-02-01

    The high current injector (HCI) provides intense ion beams of high charge state using a high temperature superconducting ECR ion source. The ion beam is accelerated upto a final energy of 1.8 MeV/u due to an electrostatic potential, a radio frequency quadrupole (RFQ) and a drift tube linac (DTL). The ion beam has to be transported to superconducting LINAC which is around 50 m away from DTL. This section is termed as high energy beam transport section (HEBT) and is used to match the beam both in transverse and longitudinal phase space to the entrance of LINAC. The HEBT section is made up of four 90 deg. achromatic bends and interconnecting magnetic quadrupole triplets. Two RF bunchers have been used for longitudinal phase matching to the LINAC. The ion optical design of HEBT section has been simulated using different beam dynamics codes like TRACEWIN, GICOSY and TRACE 3D. The field computation code OPERA 3D has been utilized for hardware design of all the magnets. All the dipole and quadrupole magnets have been field mapped and their test results such as edge angles measurements, homogeneity and harmonic analysis etc. are reported. The whole design of HEBT section has been performed such that the most of the beam optical components share same hardware design and there is ample space for beam diagnostics as per geometry of the building. Many combination of achromatic bends have been simulated to transport the beam in HEBT section but finally the four 90 deg. achromatic bend configuration is found to be the best satisfying all the geometrical constraints with simplified beam tuning process in real time.

  20. Development of neutron beam projects at the University of Texas TRIGA Mark II Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the UT-TRIGA research reactor was licensed and has become fully operational. This reactor, the first new US university reactor in 17 years, is the focus of a new reactor laboratory facility which is located on the Balcones Research Center at The University of Texas at Austin. The TRIGA Mark II reactor is licensed for 1.1 MW steady power operation, 3 dollar pulsing, and includes five beam ports. Various neutron beam-line projects have been assigned to each beam port. Neutron Depth Profiling (NDP) and the Texas Cold Neutron Source (TCNS) are close to completion and will be operational in the near future. The design of the NDP instrument has been completed, a target chamber has been built, and the thermal neutron collimator, detectors, data acquisition electronics, and data processing computers have been acquired. The target chamber accommodates wafers up to 12'' in diameter and provides remote positioning of these wafers. The design and construction of the TCNS has been completed. The TCNS consists of a moderator (mesitylene), a neon heat pipe, a cryogenic refrigerator, and neutron guide tubes. In addition, fission-fragment research (HIAWATHA), Neutron Capture Therapy, and Neutron Radiography are being pursued as projects for the other three beam ports. (author)

  1. High-Order Homogenization Method in Diffusion Theory for Reactor Core Simulation and Design Calculation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most modern nodal methods in use by the reactor vendors and utilities are based on the generalized equivalence theory (GET) that uses homogenized cross sections and flux discontinuity factors. These homogenized parameters, referred to as infinite medium parameters, are precomputed by performing single bundle fine-mesh calculations with zero current boundary conditions. It is known that for configurations in which the node-to-node leakage (e.g., surface current-to-flux ratio) is large the use of the infinite medium parameters could lead to large errors in the nodal solution. This would be the case for highly heterogeneous core configurations, typical of modern reactor core designs

  2. High-Order Homogenization Method in Diffusion Theory for Reactor Core Simulation and Design Calculation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farzad Rahnema

    2003-09-30

    Most modern nodal methods in use by the reactor vendors and utilities are based on the generalized equivalence theory (GET) that uses homogenized cross sections and flux discontinuity factors. These homogenized parameters, referred to as infinite medium parameters, are precomputed by performing single bundle fine-mesh calculations with zero current boundary conditions. It is known that for configurations in which the node-to-node leakage (e.g., surface current-to-flux ratio) is large the use of the infinite medium parameters could lead to large errors in the nodal solution. This would be the case for highly heterogeneous core configurations, typical of modern reactor core designs.

  3. Influence of MeV H+ ion beam flux on cross-linking and blister formation in PMMA resist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somrit Unai

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In soft lithography, a pattern is produced in poly(dimethylsiloxane (PDMS elastomer by casting from a master mould. The mould can be made of poly(methylmethacrylate (PMMA resist by utilising either its positive or negative tone induced by an ion beam. Here we have investigated the irradiation conditions for achieving complete cross-linking and absence of blister formation in PMMA so that its negative characteristic can be used in making master moulds. PMMA thin films approximately 9 µm thick on Si were deposited by spin coating. The 2-MeV H+ ion beam was generated using a 1.7-MV tandem Tandetron accelerator. The beam was collimated to a 500×500 µm2 cross section using programmable proximity aperture lithography system with a real-time ion beam monitoring system and a high precision current integrator. The irradiated areas were investigated by a standard scanning electron microscope and a profilometer. It was found that both the ion beam flux and the stopping power of the ions in the polymer have a critical influence on the blister formation.

  4. Possibility of measuring gravity-wave momentum flux by single beam observation of MST radar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, C. H.

    1986-01-01

    Vincent and Reid (1983) proposed a technique to measure gravity-wave momentum fluxes in the atmosphere by mesosphere-stratosphere-troposphere (MST) radars using two or more radar beams. Since the vertical momentum fluxes are assumed to be due to gravity waves, it appears possible to make use of the dispersion and polarization relations for gravity waves in extracting useful information from the radar data. In particular, for an oblique radar beam, information about both the vertical and the horizontal velocities associated with the waves are contained in the measured Doppler data. Therefore, it should be possible to extract both V sub Z and V sub h from a single beam observational configuration. A procedure is proposed to perform such an analysis. The basic assumptions are: the measured velocity fluctuations are due to gravity waves and a separable model gravity-wave spectrum of the Garrett-Munk type that is statistically homogeneous in the horizontal plane. Analytical expressions can be derived that relate the observed velocity fluctuations to the wave momentum flux at each range gate. In practice, the uncertainties related to the model parameters and measurement accuracy will affect the results. A MST radar configuration is considered.

  5. Neutron flux characterisation of the Pavia TRIGA Mark II research reactor for radiobiological and microdosimetric applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alloni, D; Prata, M; Salvini, A; Ottolenghi, A

    2015-09-01

    Nowadays the Pavia TRIGA reactor is available for national and international collaboration in various research fields. The TRIGA Mark II nuclear research reactor of the Pavia University offers different in- and out-core neutron irradiation channels, each characterised by different neutron spectra. In the last two years a campaign of measurements and simulations has been performed in order to guarantee a better characterisation of these different fluxes and to meet the demands of irradiations that require precise information on these spectra in particular for radiobiological and microdosimetric studies. Experimental data on neutron fluxes have been collected analysing and measuring the gamma activity induced in thin target foils of different materials irradiated in different TRIGA experimental channels. The data on the induced gamma activities have been processed with the SAND II deconvolution code and finally compared with the spectra obtained with Monte Carlo simulations. The comparison between simulated and measured spectra showed a good agreement allowing a more precise characterisation of the neutron spectra and a validation of the adopted method. PMID:25958412

  6. Neutron flux characterisation of the Pavia Triga Mark II research reactor for radiobiological and microdosimetric applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nowadays the Pavia TRIGA reactor is available for national and international collaboration in various research fields. The TRIGA Mark II nuclear research reactor of the Pavia University offers different in- and out-core neutron irradiation channels, each characterised by different neutron spectra. In the last two years a campaign of measurements and simulations has been performed in order to guarantee a better characterisation of these different fluxes and to meet the demands of irradiations that require precise information on these spectra in particular for radiobiological and microdosimetric studies. Experimental data on neutron fluxes have been collected analysing and measuring the gamma activity induced in thin target foils of different materials irradiated in different TRIGA experimental channels. The data on the induced gamma activities have been processed with the SAND II deconvolution code and finally compared with the spectra obtained with Monte Carlo simulations. The comparison between simulated and measured spectra showed a good agreement allowing a more precise characterisation of the neutron spectra and a validation of the adopted method. (authors)

  7. Neutron flux parameters for k{sub 0}-NAA method at the Malaysian nuclear agency research reactor after core reconfiguration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yavar, A.R. [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bangi, Selangor 43600 (Malaysia); Sarmani, S. [School of Chemical Sciences and Food Technology, Faculty of Science and Technology, University Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bangi, Selangor 43600 (Malaysia); Wood, A.K. [Analytical Chemistry Application Group, Industrial Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (MNA), Bangi, Kajang, Selangor 43000 (Malaysia); Fadzil, S.M. [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bangi, Selangor 43600 (Malaysia); Masood, Z. [Analytical Chemistry Application Group, Industrial Technology Division, Malaysian Nuclear Agency (MNA), Bangi, Kajang, Selangor 43000 (Malaysia); Khoo, K.S., E-mail: khoo@ukm.m [School of Applied Physics, Faculty of Science and Technology, University Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM), Bangi, Selangor 43600 (Malaysia)

    2011-02-15

    The Malaysian Nuclear Agency (MNA) research reactor, commissioned in 1982, is a TRIGA Mark II swimming pool type reactor. When the core configuration changed in June 2009, it became essential to re-determine such neutron flux parameters as thermal to epithermal neutron flux ratio (f), epithermal neutron flux shape factor ({alpha}), thermal neutron flux ({phi}{sub th}) and epithermal neutron flux ({phi}{sub epi}) in the irradiation positions of MNA research reactor in order to guarantee accuracy in the application of k{sub 0}-neutron activation analysis (k{sub 0}-NAA).The f and {alpha} were determined using the bare bi-isotopic monitor and bare triple monitor methods, respectively; Au and Zr monitors were utilized in present study. The results for four irradiation positions are presented and discussed in the present work. The calculated values of f and {alpha} ranged from 33.49 to 47.33 and -0.07 to -0.14, respectively. The {phi}{sub th} and the {phi}{sub epi} were measured as 2.03 x 10{sup 12} (cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) and 6.05 x 10{sup 10} (cm{sup -2} s{sup -1}) respectively. These results were compared to those of previous studies at this reactor as well as to those of reactors in other countries. The results indicate a good conformity with other findings.

  8. Effect of Gamma-Ray Beaming on the Fluxes of Gamma-Ray Pulsars

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ze-Jun; ZHANG Li

    2005-01-01

    @@ We study the effect ofγ-ray beaming on γ-ray emission of the pulsars in a self-sustained outer gap model. In this model, averaged γ-ray flux is a function of period, magnetic field, magnetic inclination angle and solid angle of γ-ray beaming for a γ-ray pulsar. We generate a sample of γ-ray pulsars with their ages less than 106 years by using the Monte Carlo method, and then study the γ-ray beaming effect. The comparison of distributions of periods, magnetic fields, distances, γ-ray energy fluxes and period derivatives of the simulated γ-ray pulsars with those of observed γ-ray pulsars by the detector EGRET shows that γ-ray beaming has an important role on the detection ofγ-ray pulsars. Furthermore, possible γ-ray pulsars observed by the detector GLAST are predicted.PACS: 97. 60. Gb, 95. 85. Pw, 97. 10. Yp

  9. Evaluation of ultra-fine grained tungsten under transient high heat flux by high-intensity pulsed ion beam%强流脉冲离子束作用下超细晶钨的抗瞬态热负荷性能评价

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谈军; 周张健; 朱小鹏; 郭双全; 屈丹丹; 雷明凯; 葛昌纯

    2012-01-01

    采用高能球磨和放电等离子体烧结技术制备纯钨、氧化物弥散强化钨和碳化物弥散强化钨.为了评价钨在瞬态热冲击下的性能,采用强流脉冲离子束,在热流密度高达160 MW/(m2·s-1/2)的条件下对4种不同晶粒尺寸的钨进行抗热冲击试验.与商品钨相比,弥散强化钨在瞬态高热流作用下显现出不同的行为.氧化物弥散强化钨显现出较差的抗热冲击性能,这主要是由于低熔点的第二相Ti和Y2O3的引入,从而使得钨的表面发生熔融、起泡和开裂.而碳化物弥散强化钨合金则显现出较好的抗热冲击性能.%Pure tungsten,oxide dispersion strengthened tungsten and carbide dispersion strengthened tungsten were fabricated by high-energy ball milling and spark plasma sintering process.In order to evaluate the properties of the tungsten alloys under transient high heat flues,four tungsten samples with different grain sizes were tested by high-intensity pulsed ion beam with a heat flux as high as 160 MW/(m2·s-1/2).Compared with the commercial tungsten,the surface modification of the oxide dispersion strengthened tungsten by high-intensity pulsed ion beam is completely different.The oxide dispersion strengthened tungsten shows inferior thermal shock response due to the low melting point second phase of Ti and Y2O3,which results in the surface melting,boiling bubbles and cracking.While the carbide dispersion strengthened tungsten shows better thermal shock response than the commercial tungsten.

  10. High spin isomer beam line at RIKEN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kishida, T.; Ideguchi, E.; Wu, H.Y. [Institute of Physical and Chemical Research, Saitama (Japan)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Nuclear high spin states have been the subject of extensive experimental and theoretical studies. For the production of high spin states, fusion reactions are usually used. The orbital angular momentum brought in the reaction is changed into the nuclear spin of the compound nucleus. However, the maximum induced angular momentum is limited in this mechanism by the maximum impact parameter of the fusion reaction and by the competition with fission reactions. It is, therefore, difficult to populate very high spin states, and as a result, large {gamma}-detector arrays have been developed in order to detect subtle signals from such very high spin states. The use of high spin isomers in the fusion reactions can break this limitation because the high spin isomers have their intrinsic angular momentum, which can bring the additional angular momentum without increasing the excitation energy. There are two methods to use the high spin isomers for secondary reactions: the use of the high spin isomers as a target and that as a beam. A high spin isomer target has already been developed and used for several experiments. But this method has an inevitable shortcoming that only {open_quotes}long-lived{close_quotes} isomers can be used for a target: {sup 178}Hf{sup m2} (16{sup +}) with a half-life of 31 years in the present case. By developing a high spin isomer beam, the authors can utilize various short-lived isomers with a short half-life around 1 {mu}s. The high spin isomer beam line of RIKEN Accelerator Facility is a unique apparatus in the world which provides a high spin isomer as a secondary beam. The combination of fusion-evaporation reaction and inverse kinematics are used to produce high spin isomer beams; in particular, the adoption of `inverse kinematics` is essential to use short-lived isomers as a beam.

  11. Workshop on high heat flux materials for TFCX

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The workshop reviewed the performance requirements for high-heat-flux material in TFCX, summarized existing materials and materials technologies for meeting these requirements, identified critical near-term materials R and D for high-heat flux components, and reviewed the status of materials test facilities for performing the necessary R and D

  12. Critical heat flux predictions for the Sandia Annular Core Research Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study provides best estimate predictions of the Critical Heat Flux (CHF) and the Critical Heat Flux Ratio (CHFR) to support the proposed upgrade of the Annual Core Research Reactor (ACRR) at Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) from its present value of 2 MWt to 4 MWt. These predictions are based on the University of New Mexico (UNM) - CHF correlation, originally developed for uniformly heated vertical annuli. The UNM-CHF correlation is applicable to low-flow and low-pressure conditions, which are typical of those in the ACRR. The three hypotheses that examined the effect of the nonuniform axial heat flux distribution in the ACRR core are (1) the local conditions hypotheses, (2) the total power hypothesis, and (3) the global conditions hypothesis. These hypotheses, in conjunction with the UNM-CHF correlation, are used to estimate the CHF and CHFR in the ACRR. Because the total power hypothesis predictions of power per rod at CHF are approximately 15%-20% lower than those corresponding to saturation exit conditions, it can be concluded that the total power hypothesis considerably underestimates the CHF for nonuniformly heated geometries. This conclusion is in agreement with previous experimental results. The global conditions hypothesis, which is more conservative and more accurate of the other two, provides the most reliable predictions of CHF/CHFR for the ACRR. The global conditions hypothesis predictions of CHFR varied between 2.1 and 3.9, with the higher value corresponding to the lower water inlet temperature of 20 degrees C

  13. How Big Science Came to Long Island: the Birth of Brookhaven Lab (429th Brookhaven Lecture)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robert P. Crease, historian for the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory and Chair of the Philosophy Department at Stony Brook University, will give two talks on the Laboratory's history on October 31 and December 12. Crease's October 31 talk, titled 'How Big Science Came to Long Island: The Birth of Brookhaven Lab,' will cover the founding of the Laboratory soon after World War II as a peacetime facility to construct and maintain basic research facilities, such as nuclear reactors and particle accelerators, that were too large for single institutions to build and operate. He will discuss the key figures involved in starting the Laboratory, including Nobel laureates I.I. Rabi and Norman Ramsey, as well as Donald Dexter Van Slyke, one of the most renowned medical researchers in American history. Crease also will focus on the many problems that had to be overcome in creating the Laboratory and designing its first big machines, as well as the evolving relations of the Laboratory with the surrounding Long Island community and news media. Throughout his talk, Crease will tell fascinating stories about Brookhaven's scientists and their research.

  14. High Resolution Muon Computed Tomography at Neutrino Beam Facilities

    CERN Document Server

    Suerfu, Burkhant

    2015-01-01

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has an indispensable role in constructing 3D images of objects made from light materials. However, limited by absorption coefficients, X-rays cannot deeply penetrate materials such as copper and lead. Here we show via simulation that muon beams can provide high resolution tomographic images of dense objects and of structures within the interior of dense objects. The effects of resolution broadening from multiple scattering diminish with increasing muon momentum. As the momentum of the muon increases, the contrast of the image goes down and therefore requires higher resolution in the muon spectrometer to resolve the image. The variance of the measured muon momentum reaches a minimum and then increases with increasing muon momentum. The impact of the increase in variance is to require a higher integrated muon flux to reduce fluctuations. The flux requirements and level of contrast needed for high resolution muon computed tomography are well matched to the muons produced in the pio...

  15. Biological Effects of Particles with Very High Energy Deposition on Mammalian Cells Utilizing the Brookhaven Tandem Van de Graaff Accelerator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saha, Janapriya; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Wang, Minli

    2013-01-01

    High LET radiation from GCR (Galactic Cosmic Rays) consisting mainly of high charge and energy (HZE) nuclei and secondary protons and neutrons, and secondaries from protons in SPE (Solar Particle Event) pose a major health risk to astronauts due to induction of DNA damage and oxidative stress. Experiments with high energy particles mimicking the space environment for estimation of radiation risk are being performed at NASA Space Radiation Laboratory at BNL. Experiments with low energy particles comparing to high energy particles of similar LET are of interest for investigation of the role of track structure on biological effects. For this purpose, we report results utilizing the Tandem Van de Graaff accelerator at BNL. The primary objective of our studies is to elucidate the influence of high vs low energy deposition on track structure, delta ray contribution and resulting biological responses. These low energy ions are of special relevance as these energies may occur following absorption through the spacecraft and shielding materials in human tissues and nuclear fragments produced in tissues by high energy protons and neutrons. This study will help to verify the efficiency of these low energy particles and better understand how various cell types respond to them.

  16. Low Energy High Brilliance Beam Characterization

    CERN Document Server

    Bähr, J

    2005-01-01

    Low energy high brilliance beam characterization plays an important role for electron sources and injectors of Free Electron Lasers (FELs) and electron linear accelerators as for example the future ILC project. The topic is discussed basing on solutions of the PITZ facility (PhotoInjector Test facility Zeuthen) which are compared with methods applied at other facilities. The properties of an electron beam produced at a laser-driven rf-gun is mainly influenced also by characteristics of the laser beam and the electron gun itself. Therefore aspects of diagnostics will be also discussed for the laser, laser beam line and gun as well. The main properties of the electron beam are transverse and longitudinal phase space and charge as well. The measurement of transverse beam size and position, transverse emittance, charge, beam current, and longitudinal phase space will be discussed in detail. The measurements of the transverse emittance at PITZ is based on a single slit method. The measurement of the longitudinal p...

  17. Thermal Energetic Reactor with High Reproduction of Fission Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir M. Kotov

    2012-01-01

    On the base of thermal reactors with high fission materials reproduction world atomic power engineering development supplying higher power and requiring smaller speed of raw uranium mining, than in the variant with fast reactors, is possible.

  18. Beam-beam studies for the High-Energy LHC

    CERN Document Server

    Ohmi, K; Zimmermann, F

    2011-01-01

    LHC upgrades are being considered both towards higher luminosity (HL-LHC) and towards higher energy (HE-LHC). In this paper we report initial studies of the beam-beam effects in the HE-LHC [1]. The HE-LHC aims at beam energies of 16.5 TeV, where the transverse emittance decreases due to synchrotron radiation with a 2-hour damping time. As a result of this emittance, shrinkage the beam-beam parameter increases with time, during a physics store. The beam-beam limit in the HE-LHC is explored using computer simulations.

  19. Neutron flux measurements at the TRIGA reactor in Vienna for the prediction of the activation of the biological shield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merz, Stefan; Djuricic, Mile; Villa, Mario; Böck, Helmuth; Steinhauser, Georg

    2011-11-01

    The activation of the biological shield is an important process for waste management considerations of nuclear facilities. The final activity can be estimated by modeling using the neutron flux density rather than the radiometric approach of activity measurements. Measurement series at the TRIGA reactor Vienna reveal that the flux density next to the biological shield is in the order of 10(9)cm(-2)s(-1) at maximum power; but it is strongly influenced by reactor installations. The data allow the estimation of the final waste categorization of the concrete according to the Austrian legislation. PMID:21646026

  20. Design of the beryllium window for Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nayak, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Mapes, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Raparia, D. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-11-01

    In the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer (BLIP) beam line, there were two Beryllium (Be) windows with an air gap to separate the high vacuum upstream side from low vacuum downstream side. There had been frequent window failures in the past which affected the machine productivity and increased the radiation dose received by workers due to unplanned maintenance. To improve the window life, design of Be window is reexamined. Detailed structural and thermal simulations are carried out on Be window for different design parameters and loading conditions to come up with better design to improve the window life. The new design removed the air gap and connect the both beam lines with a Be window in-between. The new design has multiple advantages such as 1) reduces the beam energy loss (because of one window with no air gap), 2) reduces air activation due to nuclear radiation and 3) increased the machine reliability as there is no direct pressure load during operation. For quick replacement of this window, an aluminum bellow coupled with load binder was designed. There hasn’t been a single window failure since the new design was implemented in 2012.

  1. HOM identification by bead pulling in the Brookhaven ERL cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn, H; Jain, Puneet; Johnson, Elliott C; Xu, Wencan

    2014-01-01

    Exploratory measurements of the Brookhaven Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) cavity at superconducting temperature produced a long list of high order modes (HOMs). The niobium 5-cell cavity is terminated at each end with HOM ferrite dampers that successfully reduce the Q-factors to levels required to avoid beam break up (BBU) instabilities. However, a number of un-damped resonances with Q≥106 were found at 4 K and their mode identification forms the focus of this paper. The approach taken here consists of bead pulling on a copper (Cu) replica of the ERL cavity with dampers involving various network analyzer measurements. Several different S21 transmission measurements are used, including those taken from the fundamental input coupler to the pick-up probe across the cavity, others between beam-position monitor probes in the beam tubes, and also between probes placed into the cells. The bead pull technique suitable for HOM identification with a metallic needle or dielectric bead is detailed. This paper presents the...

  2. Ageing Management and Preventice Measures for Reactor Pool Liners, Beam Tubes and Spent Fuel Storage Tank at the Dalat Research Reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dien, Nguyen Nhi; Dien, Nguyen Minh; Su, Trang Cao [Nuclear Research Institute, Henoi (Viet Nam)

    2013-07-01

    The 500-kw Dalat Nuclear Research Reactor (DNRR) was reconstructed from the original 250-kW TRIGA Mark II as named of VN-001. In the framework of the reconstruction project during the 1982-1984 period, some structures of the TRIGA reactor constructed in the early sixties, such as the aluminum tank, graphite reflector, thermal column, four horizontal beam tubes, etc. have been remained. It means, such components are more than 50 years old and are facing with ageing issues. The structural materials of the pool liner and other components of TRIGA were made of aluminum alloy 6061 and aluminum cladding fuel assemblies. Some other parts, such as reactor core, irradiation rotary rack around the core, vertical irradiation facilities, etc. were replaced by the former Soviet Union's design with structural materials of aluminum alloy CAV-1. The reactor core has been loaded with HEU VVR-M2 fuel assemblies of 36% enrichment alloy CAV-1. The reactor core has been loaded with HEU VVR-M2 fuel assemblies of U-Al alloy 36% and of UO{sub 2} 19.75% enrichment used aluminum as fuel cladding. For ageing management and preventive measures of corrosion, an underwater high-resolution video camera system had been designed for visual inspections. A home-made cleaning system was also designed for cleaning the pool and other components. Water chemistry of the reactor pool and spent fuel storage was monitored regularly. In September-November 2011, all four horizontal channels were cleaned inside and visual inspection was done using special camera system. It was the first time from 1963 such activity could be done. Based on results obtained we could convince that inside all horizontal channels are in good condition and leakage could not be occurred. All 106 HEU spent fuel assemblies stored in the spent fuel pool in good condition. The visual inspection was done using under water camera too. The results obtained show that the surface of all HEU SFA is good and leakage was not occurred. The

  3. Theoretical and experimental study of collectrons for epithermal neutron flux in reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A theoretical study of nuclear reactions and electric charge displacements arising in sensitivity to thermal and epithermal neutrons in collectrons allowed a computer code conception. Collectrons in Rhodium, Silver, Cobalt, Hafnium, Erbium, Gadolinium and Holmium have been tested in different radiation fields given by neutron or gamma filters irradiated in different places of Melusine and Siloe reactors. Some emitters were covered with different steel, nickel or zircaloy thicknesses. Theoretical and experimental results are consistent; that validate the computer code and show possibilities and necessity of covering collectron emitters to reduce or cancel the gamma sensitivity and to improve response instantaneity. A selective measurement of epithermal neutron flux can by this way, made by associating two types of collectrons

  4. Verification of MCNP simulation of neutron flux parameters at TRIGA MK II reactor of Malaysia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yavar, A R; Khalafi, H; Kasesaz, Y; Sarmani, S; Yahaya, R; Wood, A K; Khoo, K S

    2012-10-01

    A 3-D model for 1 MW TRIGA Mark II research reactor was simulated. Neutron flux parameters were calculated using MCNP-4C code and were compared with experimental results obtained by k(0)-INAA and absolute method. The average values of φ(th),φ(epi), and φ(fast) by MCNP code were (2.19±0.03)×10(12) cm(-2)s(-1), (1.26±0.02)×10(11) cm(-2)s(-1) and (3.33±0.02)×10(10) cm(-2)s(-1), respectively. These average values were consistent with the experimental results obtained by k(0)-INAA. The findings show a good agreement between MCNP code results and experimental results. PMID:22885391

  5. Report of the Working Group on Electron Linac Guns at the ICFA Workshop on Low Emittance Beams Brookhaven National Laboratory, March 20-25, 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The group addressed the topic of high brightness injectors for electron linacs. Parameters for a target injector were adopted which were consistent with the criteria established for the workshop as a whole and possible issues involved with meeting the target parameters were examined. These included: electron guns, space charge, RF dynamics, wake fields and bunching. An approach for building the injector is outlined

  6. Request for Naval Reactors Comment on Proposed Prometheus Space Flight Nuclear Reactor High Tier Reactor Safety Requirements and for Naval Reactors Approval to Transmit These Requirements to JPL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D. Kokkinos

    2005-04-28

    The purpose of this letter is to request Naval Reactors comments on the nuclear reactor high tier requirements for the PROMETHEUS space flight reactor design, pre-launch operations, launch, ascent, operation, and disposal, and to request Naval Reactors approval to transmit these requirements to Jet Propulsion Laboratory to ensure consistency between the reactor safety requirements and the spacecraft safety requirements. The proposed PROMETHEUS nuclear reactor high tier safety requirements are consistent with the long standing safety culture of the Naval Reactors Program and its commitment to protecting the health and safety of the public and the environment. In addition, the philosophy on which these requirements are based is consistent with the Nuclear Safety Policy Working Group recommendations on space nuclear propulsion safety (Reference 1), DOE Nuclear Safety Criteria and Specifications for Space Nuclear Reactors (Reference 2), the Nuclear Space Power Safety and Facility Guidelines Study of the Applied Physics Laboratory.

  7. Holographic generation of highly twisted electron beams

    CERN Document Server

    Grillo, Vincenzo; Mafakheri, Erfan; Frabboni, Stefano; Karimi, Ebrahim; Boyd, Robert W

    2014-01-01

    Free electrons can possess an intrinsic orbital angular momentum, similar to those in an electron cloud, upon free-space propagation. The wavefront corresponding to the electron's wavefunction forms a helical structure with a number of twists given by the \\emph{angular speed}. Beams with a high number of twists are of particular interest because they carry a high magnetic moment about the propagation axis. Among several different techniques, electron holography seems to be a promising approach to shape a \\emph{conventional} electron beam into a helical form with large values of angular momentum. Here, we propose and manufacture a nano-fabricated phase hologram for generating a beam of this kind with an orbital angular momentum up to 200$\\hbar$. Based on a novel technique the value of orbital angular momentum of the generated beam are measured, then compared with simulations. Our work, apart from the technological achievements, may lead to a way of generating electron beams with a high quanta of magnetic momen...

  8. Response of actinides to flux changes in high-flux systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When discussing the transmutation of actinides in accelerator-based transmutation of waste (ATW) systems, there has been some concern about the dynamics of the actinides under high transient fluxes. For a pure neptunium feed, it has been estimated that the 238Np/237Np ratio increase due to an increasing flux may lead to an unstable, positive reactivity growth. In this analysis, a perturbation method is used to calculate the response of the entire set of actinides in a general way that allows for more species than just neptunium. The time response of the system can be calculated; i.e., a plot of fuel composition and reactivity versus time after a change in flux can be made. The effects of fission products can also be included. The procedure is extremely accurate on short time scales (∼ 1000 s) for the flux levels we contemplate. Calculational results indicate that the reactivity insertions are always smaller than previously estimated

  9. Effect of the solenoid in various conditions of the laser ion source at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the laser ion source (LIS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a solenoid is used to guide the laser ablation plasma and modulate the extracted beam current. Many types of ion species are guided. In some cases, the plasma plume is injected into the solenoid away from the solenoidal axis. To investigate the effects of the solenoid on the beam extracted from the plasma that has different properties, the beam current was measured in the setup of the LIS at the BNL. The beam current of Li, Al, Si, Fe, and Au increased when the magnetic field was applied. For most of the species the peak current and the total charge within a single beam pulse increased around 10 times with a magnetic field less than 100 G. In addition, for some species the rate of increase of the peak currents became smaller when the magnetic flux densities were larger than certain values depending on the species. In this case, the current waveforms were distorted. At the same magnetic field value, the field was more effective on lighter species than on heavier ones. When plasma was injected offset from the axis of the solenoid, peak current and total charge became half of those without offset. The experimental data are useful for the operation of the LIS at the BNL

  10. Effect of the solenoid in various conditions of the laser ion source at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ikeda, S.; Kumaki, M.; Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M.

    2016-02-01

    In the laser ion source (LIS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a solenoid is used to guide the laser ablation plasma and modulate the extracted beam current. Many types of ion species are guided. In some cases, the plasma plume is injected into the solenoid away from the solenoidal axis. To investigate the effects of the solenoid on the beam extracted from the plasma that has different properties, the beam current was measured in the setup of the LIS at the BNL. The beam current of Li, Al, Si, Fe, and Au increased when the magnetic field was applied. For most of the species the peak current and the total charge within a single beam pulse increased around 10 times with a magnetic field less than 100 G. In addition, for some species the rate of increase of the peak currents became smaller when the magnetic flux densities were larger than certain values depending on the species. In this case, the current waveforms were distorted. At the same magnetic field value, the field was more effective on lighter species than on heavier ones. When plasma was injected offset from the axis of the solenoid, peak current and total charge became half of those without offset. The experimental data are useful for the operation of the LIS at the BNL.

  11. Effect of the solenoid in various conditions of the laser ion source at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ikeda, S., E-mail: ikeda.s.ae@m.titech.ac.jp [Interdisciplinary Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Yokohama, Kanagawa 216-8502 (Japan); Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0108 (Japan); Kumaki, M. [Nishina Center for Accelerator-Based Science, RIKEN, Wako, Saitama 351-0108 (Japan); Kanesue, T.; Okamura, M. [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973-5000 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    In the laser ion source (LIS) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a solenoid is used to guide the laser ablation plasma and modulate the extracted beam current. Many types of ion species are guided. In some cases, the plasma plume is injected into the solenoid away from the solenoidal axis. To investigate the effects of the solenoid on the beam extracted from the plasma that has different properties, the beam current was measured in the setup of the LIS at the BNL. The beam current of Li, Al, Si, Fe, and Au increased when the magnetic field was applied. For most of the species the peak current and the total charge within a single beam pulse increased around 10 times with a magnetic field less than 100 G. In addition, for some species the rate of increase of the peak currents became smaller when the magnetic flux densities were larger than certain values depending on the species. In this case, the current waveforms were distorted. At the same magnetic field value, the field was more effective on lighter species than on heavier ones. When plasma was injected offset from the axis of the solenoid, peak current and total charge became half of those without offset. The experimental data are useful for the operation of the LIS at the BNL.

  12. The applications of research reactors. Report of an advisory group meeting

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Owners and operators of many research reactors are finding that their facilities are not being utilized as fully as they might wish. Perhaps the original mission of the reactor has been accomplished or a particular analysis is now performed better in other ways. In addition, the fact that a research reactor exists and is available does not guarantee that users will come seeking to take advantage of the facility. Therefore, many research reactor owners and operators recognize that there is a need to develop a strategic plan for long term sustainability, including the 'marketing' of their facilities. An important first element in writing a strategic plan is to evaluate the current and potential capabilities of the reactor. The purpose of this document is to assist in such an evaluation by providing some factual and advisory information with respect to all of the current applications of research reactors. By reference to this text, each facility owner and operator will be able to assess whether or not a new application is feasible with the reactor, and what will be required to develop capability in that application. Applications fall into four broad categories: human resource development, irradiations, extracted beam work and testing. The human resource category includes public information, training and education and can be accomplished by any reactor. Irradiation applications involves inserting material into the reactor to induce radioactivity for analytical purposes, to produce radioisotopes or to induce radiation damage effects. Almost all reactors can be utilized for some irradiation applications, but as the reactor flux gets higher the range of potential uses gets larger. Beam work usually includes using neutron beams outside of the reactor for a variety of analytical purposes. Because of the magnitude of the fluxes needed at some distance from the core, most beam work can only be performed by the intermediate and higher powered research reactors. Testing nuclear

  13. Magnetic Flux Compression Reactor Concepts for Spacecraft Propulsion and Power (MSFC Center Director's Discretionary Fund; Project No. 99-24). Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litchford, R. J.; Robertson, G. A.; Hawk, C. W.; Turner, M. W.; Koelfgen, S.; Litchford, Ron J. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This technical publication (TP) examines performance and design issues associated with magnetic flux compression reactor concepts for nuclear/chemical pulse propulsion and power. Assuming that low-yield microfusion detonations or chemical detonations using high-energy density matter can eventually be realized in practice, various magnetic flux compression concepts are conceivable. In particular, reactors in which a magnetic field would be compressed between an expanding detonation-driven plasma cloud and a stationary structure formed from a high-temperature superconductor are envisioned. Primary interest is accomplishing two important functions: (1) Collimation and reflection of a hot diamagnetic plasma for direct thrust production, and (2) electric power generation for fusion standoff drivers and/or dense plasma formation. In this TP, performance potential is examined, major technical uncertainties related to this concept accessed, and a simple performance model for a radial-mode reactor developed. Flux trapping effectiveness is analyzed using a skin layer methodology, which accounts for magnetic diffusion losses into the plasma armature and the stationary stator. The results of laboratory-scale experiments on magnetic diffusion in bulk-processed type II superconductors are also presented.

  14. Charged particle's flux measurement from PMMA irradiated by 80 MeV/u carbon ion beam

    CERN Document Server

    Agodi, C; Bellini, F; Cirrone, G A P; Collamati, F; Cuttone, G; De Lucia, E; De Napoli, M; Di Domenico, A; Faccini, R; Ferroni, F; Fiore, S; Gauzzi, P; Iarocci, E; Marafini, M; Mattei, I; Muraro, S; Paoloni, A; Patera, V; Piersanti, L; Romano, F; Sarti, A; Sciubba, A; Vitale, E; Voena, C

    2012-01-01

    Hadrontherapy is an emerging technique in cancer therapy that uses beams of charged particles. To meet the improved capability of hadrontherapy in matching the dose release with the cancer position, new dose monitoring techniques need to be developed and introduced into clinical use. The measurement of the fluxes of the secondary particles produced by the hadron beam is of fundamental importance in the design of any dose monitoring device and is eagerly needed to tune Monte Carlo simulations. We report the measurements done with charged secondary particles produced from the interaction of a 80 MeV/u fully stripped carbon ion beam at the INFN Laboratori Nazionali del Sud, Catania, with a Poly-methyl methacrylate target. Charged secondary particles, produced at 90$\\degree$ with respect to the beam axis, have been tracked with a drift chamber, while their energy and time of flight has been measured by means of a LYSO scintillator. Secondary protons have been identified exploiting the energy and time of flight in...

  15. 3D AGENT methodology validation for prismatic high-temperature gas-cooled reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Generation IV of nuclear reactors includes as highly competitive the design of a Very High Temperature Reactor (VHTR). This type of reactors can be of a prismatic block, or pebble-bed type. An example of a prismatic block nuclear reactor is the High Temperature Test Reactor (HTTR) operated by Japan Atomic Energy Agency; the reactor reached its full power of 30 MWth for the first time in 1999. The primary coolant is helium at the pressure of ∼4 MPa, with inlet-outlet temperatures of 395°C and 850 – 950°C, respectively. The fuel is 6% enriched uranium, and the moderator is made of graphite. Using the literature available data, a comprehensive validation study is performed to benchmark and assess the AGENT (Arbitrary GEometry Neutron Transport) methodology capabilities in predicting and capturing reactor physics details affected by double heterogeneity of the fuel. Using AGENT with explicit modeling of the fuel double heterogeneity, the HTTR neutronics parameters are compared to NEWT and KENO VI, as well as to experimental data as found in literature. Detailed analysis of spatial steady-state reaction rates and flux spatial maps are provided. The AGENT methodology is based on the method of characteristics and the only one in the world as applied to reactor systems, the R-function based reactor solid modeler, in providing an accurate deterministic solution for 3D steady-state reactor physics. The R-functions modeler presents no limits to reactor geometry and materials types with their distributions. (author)

  16. Research Reactor Application for Materials under High Neutron Fluence. Proceedings of an IAEA Technical Meeting (TM-34779)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research reactors (RRs) have played, and continue to play, a key role in the development of the peaceful uses of nuclear energy and technology. The role of the IAEA is to assist Member States in the effective utilization of these technologies in various domains of research such as fundamental and applied science, industry, human health care and environmental studies, as well as nuclear energy applications. In particular, material testing reactors (MTRs), serve as unique tools in scientific and technological development and they have quite a wide variety of applications. Today, a large range of different RR designs exist when compared with power reactors and they also have different operating modes, producing high neutron fluxes, which may be steady or pulsed. Recently, an urgent need has arisen for the development of new advanced materials, for example in the nuclear industry, where RRs offer capacities for irradiation programmes. Besides the scientific and research activities and commercial applications, RRs are also used extensively for educational training activities for scientists and engineers. This report is a compilation of outputs of an IAEA Technical Meeting (TM-34779) held on Research Reactor Application for Materials under High Neutron Fluence. The overall objective of the meeting was to review typical applications of small and medium size RRs, such as material characterization and testing, neutron physics and beam research, neutron radiography and imaging as well as isotope production and other types of non-nuclear applications. Several issues were discussed during the meeting, in particular: (1) recent development of irradiation facilities, specific irradiation programmes and their implementation; (2) effective and optimal RR operation regimes for irradiation purposes; (3) sharing of best practices and existing technical knowledge; and (4) fostering of advanced or innovative technologies, e.g. information exchange and effective collaboration. This

  17. Design characteristics and requirements of irradiation holes for research reactor experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to be helpful for the design of a new research reactor with high performance, are summarized the applications of research reactors in various fields and the design characteristics of experimental facility such as vertical irradiation holes and beam tubes. Basic requirements of such experimental facilities are also described. Research reactor has been widely utilized in various fields such as industry, engineering, medicine, life science, environment etc., and now the application fields are gradually being expanded together with the development of technology. Looking into the research reactors which are recently constructed or in plan, it seems that to develop a multi-purpose research reactor with intensive neutron beam research capability has become tendency. In the layout of the experimental facilities, the number and configuration of irradiation and beam holes should be optimized to meet required test conditions such as neutron flux at the early design stage. But, basically high neutron flux is required to perform experiments efficiently. In this aspect, neutron flux is regarded as one of important parameters to judge the degree of research reactor performance. One of main information for a new research reactor design is utilization demands and requirements of experimental holes. So basic requirements which should be considered in a new research reactor design were summarized from the survey of experimental facilities characteristics of various research reactors with around 20 MW thermal power and the experiences of HANARO utilization. Also is suggested an example of the requirements of experimental holes such as size, number and neutron flux, which are thought as minimum, in a new research reactor for exporting to developing countries such as Vietnam

  18. GEANT4 used for neutron beam design of a neutron imaging facility at TRIGA reactor in Morocco

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouardi, A.; Machmach, A.; Alami, R.; Bensitel, A.; Hommada, A.

    2011-09-01

    Neutron imaging has a broad scope of applications and has played a pivotal role in visualizing and quantifying hydrogenous masses in metallic matrices. The field continues to expand into new applications with the installation of new neutron imaging facilities. In this scope, a neutron imaging facility for computed tomography and real-time neutron radiography is currently being developed around 2.0MW TRIGA MARK-II reactor at Maamora Nuclear Research Center in Morocco (Reuscher et al., 1990 [1]; de Menezes et al., 2003 [2]; Deinert et al., 2005 [3]). The neutron imaging facility consists of neutron collimator, real-time neutron imaging system and imaging process systems. In order to reduce the gamma-ray content in the neutron beam, the tangential channel was selected. For power of 250 kW, the corresponding thermal neutron flux measured at the inlet of the tangential channel is around 3×10 11 ncm 2/s. This facility will be based on a conical neutron collimator with two circular diaphragms with diameters of 4 and 2 cm corresponding to L/D-ratio of 165 and 325, respectively. These diaphragms' sizes allow reaching a compromise between good flux and efficient L/D-ratio. Convergent-divergent collimator geometry has been adopted. The beam line consists of a gamma filter, fast neutrons filter, neutron moderator, neutron and gamma shutters, biological shielding around the collimator and several stages of neutron collimator. Monte Carlo calculations by a fully 3D numerical code GEANT4 were used to design the neutron beam line ( http://www.info.cern.ch/asd/geant4/geant4.html[4]). To enhance the neutron thermal beam in terms of quality, several materials, mainly bismuth (Bi) and sapphire (Al 2O 3) were examined as gamma and neutron filters respectively. The GEANT4 simulations showed that the gamma and epithermal and fast neutron could be filtered using the bismuth (Bi) and sapphire (Al 2O 3) filters, respectively. To get a good cadmium ratio, GEANT 4 simulations were used to

  19. High-temperature and breeder reactors - economic nuclear reactors of the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The thesis begins with a review of the theory of nuclear fission and sections on the basic technology of nuclear reactors and the development of the first generation of gas-cooled reactors applied to electricity generation. It then deals in some detail with currently available and suggested types of high temperature reactor and with some related subsidiary issues such as the coupling of different reactor systems and various schemes for combining nuclear reactors with chemical processes (hydrogenation, hydrogen production, etc.), going on to discuss breeder reactors and their application. Further sections deal with questions of cost, comparison of nuclear with coal- and oil-fired stations, system analysis of reactor systems and the effect of nuclear generation on electricity supply. (C.J.O.G.)

  20. Experimental and MCNP5 based evaluation of neutron and gamma flux in the irradiation ports of the University of Utah research reactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noble Brooklyn

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neutron and gamma flux environment of various irradiation ports in the University of Utah training, research, isotope production, general atomics reactor were experimentally assessed and fully modeled using the MCNP5 code. The experimental measurements were based on the cadmium ratio in the irradiation ports of the reactor, flux profiling using nickel wire, and gamma dose measurements using thermo luminescence dosimeter. Full 3-D MCNP5 reactor model was developed to obtain the neutron flux distributions of the entire reactor core and to compare it with the measured flux focusing at the irradiation ports. Integration of all these analysis provided the updated comprehensive neutron-gamma flux maps of the existing irradiation facilities of the University of Utah TRIGA reactor.

  1. High repetition rate intense ion beam diode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A magnetically insulated ion beam diode with a gas-breakdown plasma anode has been successfully developed recently. In this paper, the authors report the experiment results of operating a version of this diode at a 1-Hz repetition rate. Intense ion beams (100ns, 200Kv and 20kA per pulse) are generated by using an inductive voltage to breakdown an annular hydrogen gas puff (8.5cm mean radius, and 160cm2 in area), and magnetically driving the resulting plasma toward a magnetically insulated accelerating gap. The high voltage pulses on the accelerating gap are supplied using two thyratron switch chassises which are connected to the diode through a series of capacitors coupled with saturable inductors. To understand the operation of the diode, the anode plasma source and the extracted ion beams are characterized by using various diagnostics

  2. Neutralized transport of high intensity beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The NTX experiment at the Heavy Ion Fusion Virtual National Laboratory is exploring the performance of neutralized final focus systems for high perveance heavy ion beams. A converging ion beam at the exit of the final focus magnetic system is injected into a neutralized drift section. The neutralization is provided by a metal arc source and an RF plasma source. Effects of a ''plasma plug'', where electrons are extracted from a localized plasma in the upstream end of the drift section, and are then dragged along by the ion potential, as well as the ''volumetric plasma'', where neutralization is provided by the plasma laid down along the ion path, are both studied and their relative effects on the beam spot size are compared. Comparisons with 3-D PIC code predictions will also be presented

  3. Miniaturized heat flux sensor for high enthalpy plasma flow characterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved miniaturized heat flux sensor is presented aiming at measuring extreme heat fluxes of plasma wind tunnel flows. The sensor concept is based on an in-depth thermocouple measurement with a miniaturized design and an advanced calibration approach. Moreover, a better spatial estimation of the heat flux profile along the flow cross section is realized with this improved small sensor design. Based on the linearity assumption, the heat flux is determined using the impulse response of the sensor relating the heat flux to the temperature of the embedded thermocouple. The non-integer system identification (NISI) procedure is applied that allows a calculation of the impulse response from transient calibration measurements with a known heat flux of a laser source. The results show that the new sensor leads to radially highly resolved heat flux measurement for a flow with only a few centimetres in diameter, the so far not understood non-symmetric heat flux profiles do not occur with the new sensor design. It is shown that this former effect is not a physical effect of the flow, but a drawback of the classical sensor design. (authors)

  4. Brookhaven highlights, 1986-1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The highlights of research conducted between October 1985 and September 1987 at Brookhaven National Laboratory are reviewed in this publication. Also covered are the administrative and financial status of the laboratory and a brief mention of meetings held and honors received. (FI)

  5. Relation of middle molecules levels and oxidative stress to erythropoietin requirements in high-flux versus low-flux hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hala S El-Wakil

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to investigate the serum beta-2-microglobulin (B2MG and advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP as middle molecule uremic toxins and protein carbonyl (PCO as oxidative stress marker in uremic patients undergoing high-flux versus low-flux hemodialysis (HD and to correlate their levels to the erythropoietin requirements for those patients. Twenty patients on chronic low-flux HD were recruited in the study. At the start of the study, all patients underwent high-flux HD for eight weeks, followed by low-flux HD for two weeks as a washout period. The patients were then subjected to another eight weeks of low-flux HD. Blood samples were obtained at the beginning and at the end of the high-flux period and the low-flux period. The mean erythropoietin dose for patients using high-flux HD was significantly lower than that for low-flux HD (P = 0.0062. Post-high flux, the B2MG and PCO levels were significantly lower than the pre-high-flux levels (P = 0.026 and 0.0005, respectively, but no significant change was observed in AOPP (P = 0.68. Post-low flux, the B2MG, AOPP and PCO were significantly higher than the pre-low-flux levels (P = 0.0002, 0.021 and <0.0001, respectively. Post-low flux, the B2MG and PCO were significantly higher than the post-high-flux levels (P <0.0001, but no significant difference was observed in AOPP (P = 0.11. High-flux HD results in reduction of some of the middle molecule toxins and PCO levels better than low-flux HD, and is associated with a better response to erythropoietin.

  6. High resolution muon computed tomography at neutrino beam facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray computed tomography (CT) has an indispensable role in constructing 3D images of objects made from light materials. However, limited by absorption coefficients, X-rays cannot deeply penetrate materials such as copper and lead. Here we show via simulation that muon beams can provide high resolution tomographic images of dense objects and of structures within the interior of dense objects. The effects of resolution broadening from multiple scattering diminish with increasing muon momentum. As the momentum of the muon increases, the contrast of the image goes down and therefore requires higher resolution in the muon spectrometer to resolve the image. The variance of the measured muon momentum reaches a minimum and then increases with increasing muon momentum. The impact of the increase in variance is to require a higher integrated muon flux to reduce fluctuations. The flux requirements and level of contrast needed for high resolution muon computed tomography are well matched to the muons produced in the pion decay pipe at a neutrino beam facility and what can be achieved for momentum resolution in a muon spectrometer. Such an imaging system can be applied in archaeology, art history, engineering, material identification and whenever there is a need to image inside a transportable object constructed of dense materials

  7. High Torque Density Transverse Flux Machine without the Need to Use SMC Material for 3D Flux Paths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lu, Kaiyuan; Wu, Weimin

    2015-01-01

    machine topology proposed in this paper, by advantageously utilizing the magnetic flux path provided by an additional rotor, use of laminations that allow 2-D flux paths only will be sufficient to accomplish the required 3-D flux paths. The machine also has a high torque density and is therefore......This paper presents a new transverse flux permanent magnet machine. In a normal transverse flux machine, complicated 3-D flux paths often exist. Such 3-D flux paths would require the use of soft magnetic composites material instead of laminations for construction of the machine stator. In the new...

  8. Use of different programs for calculating the flux density of neutrons activating sodium in the secondary circuit of a NPP with the BN-600 reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Possibilities of application of the RADAR, TVK-2D and MMKFK program complexes to calculate the BN-600 type reactor shields are analyzed. TVK-2D program (ALGOL-DDR, BESM-6 computer) is designed for two-dimensional calculations of reactors in diffusion multigroup finite-difference approximation using classical and unified perturbation theory. The RADAR system (FORTRAN-4, BESM-6 computer) realizes Boltzmann equation solution by iterative synthesis method in multigroup diffusion approximation. The MMKFK complex (FORTRAN, BESM-6 computer) is used to calculate radiation transport in reactors and cells. The complex is improved: at large ratioes of neutron flux attenuation the methods of splitting and roulette are realized. Calculational results of the integral by energy and mean by zones values of neutron flux density in radial shield and sodium activity in the secondary coolant circuits are presented. Good conformity of the data obtained is pointed out. Conclusion is made about the applicability of the program systems investigated to calculate fast reactor shields at different stages of design. The RADAR system due to its quick operation will be more efficient at the initial stages, while the MMKFK system - at final ones, when high accuracy of calculation is required

  9. Experimental and MCNP5 based evaluation of neutron and gamma flux in the irradiation ports of the University of Utah research reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Noble Brooklyn; Choe Dong-Ok; Jevremovic Tatjana

    2012-01-01

    Neutron and gamma flux environment of various irradiation ports in the University of Utah training, research, isotope production, general atomics reactor were experimentally assessed and fully modeled using the MCNP5 code. The experimental measurements were based on the cadmium ratio in the irradiation ports of the reactor, flux profiling using nickel wire, and gamma dose measurements using thermo luminescence dosimeter. Full 3-D MCNP5 reactor model was developed to obtain the neutron f...

  10. The fast neutron facility at the research reactor Munich. Determination of the beam quality and medical applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At the research reactor FRM, fast and epithermal neutron beams are generated by a thermal-to-fast neutron converter and/or near core scatterers. The dosimetry and spectroscopy of the resulting intense mixed beams of neutron and gamma radiation with a wide range of energies set spetial tasks for neutron dosimetry and spectroscopy. The twin chamber method and some others are briefly described. Neutron spectroscopy is performed by a Li-6 sandwich spectrometer covering the full neutron spectrum of a well-collimated mixed beam from about 20 keV to 8 MeV. The data registration is assisted by a microcomputer which generates sum and triton spectra on-line. Sum analysis is applied to neutron energies greater than 0.3 MeV; the intermediate neutron spectrum is evaluated by unfolding of the triton spectrum. Moreover, a brief overview of the reactor neutron therapy (RENT) at the FRM is given. After a number of animal experiments for the determination of the biological effectiveness relative to X-rays, clinical irradiations have been started in 1985. The most important indications for RENT are listed. 140 patients with bad prognoses have been treated since. The average tumour control rate of 60% is surprisingly high. Possibilities for an assisting Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) are shown. 8 figs., 23 refs

  11. Reverse propagation and negative angular momentum density flux of an optical nondiffracting nonparaxial fractional Bessel vortex beam of progressive waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F G

    2016-09-01

    Energy and angular momentum flux density characteristics of an optical nondiffracting nonparaxial vector Bessel vortex beam of fractional order are examined based on the dual-field method for the generation of symmetric electric and magnetic fields. Should some conditions determined by the polarization state, the half-cone angle as well as the beam-order (or topological charge) be met, the axial energy and angular momentum flux densities vanish (representing Poynting singularities), before they become negative. These negative counterintuitive properties suggest retrograde (negative) propagation as well as a rotation reversal of the angular momentum with respect to the beam handedness. These characteristics of nondiffracting nonparaxial Bessel fractional vortex beams of progressive waves open new capabilities in optical tractor beam tweezers, optical spanners, invisibility cloaks, optically engineered metamaterials, and other applications.

  12. Sensitivity of Displaced-Beam Scintillometer Measurements of Area-Average Heat Fluxes to Uncertainties in Topographic Heights

    CERN Document Server

    Gruber, Matthew; Hartogensis, Oscar

    2014-01-01

    Displaced-beam scintillometer measurements of the turbulence inner-scale length $l_o$ and refractive index structure function $C_n^2$ resolve area-average turbulent fluxes of heat and momentum through the Monin-Obukhov similarity equations. Sensitivity studies have been produced for the use of displaced-beam scintillometers over flat terrain. Many real field sites feature variable topography. We develop here an analysis of the sensitivity of displaced-beam scintillometer derived sensible heat fluxes to uncertainties in spacially distributed topographic measurements. Sensitivity is shown to be concentrated in areas near the center of the beam and where the underlying topography is closest to the beam height. Uncertainty may be decreased by taking precise topographic measurements in these areas.

  13. Reverse propagation and negative angular momentum density flux of an optical nondiffracting nonparaxial fractional Bessel vortex beam of progressive waves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitri, F G

    2016-09-01

    Energy and angular momentum flux density characteristics of an optical nondiffracting nonparaxial vector Bessel vortex beam of fractional order are examined based on the dual-field method for the generation of symmetric electric and magnetic fields. Should some conditions determined by the polarization state, the half-cone angle as well as the beam-order (or topological charge) be met, the axial energy and angular momentum flux densities vanish (representing Poynting singularities), before they become negative. These negative counterintuitive properties suggest retrograde (negative) propagation as well as a rotation reversal of the angular momentum with respect to the beam handedness. These characteristics of nondiffracting nonparaxial Bessel fractional vortex beams of progressive waves open new capabilities in optical tractor beam tweezers, optical spanners, invisibility cloaks, optically engineered metamaterials, and other applications. PMID:27607486

  14. Fusion reactors-high temperature electrolysis (HTE)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillo, J.A. (ed.)

    1978-01-01

    Results of a study to identify and develop a reference design for synfuel production based on fusion reactors are given. The most promising option for hydrogen production was high-temperature electrolysis (HTE). The main findings of this study are: 1. HTE has the highest potential efficiency for production of synfuels from fusion; a fusion to hydrogen energy efficiency of about 70% appears possible with 1800/sup 0/C HTE units and 60% power cycle efficiency; an efficiency of about 50% possible with 1400/sup 0/C HTE units and 40% power cycle efficiency. 2. Relative to thermochemical or direct decomposition methods HTE technology is in a more advanced state of development, 3. Thermochemical or direct decomposition methods must have lower unit process or capital costs if they are to be more attractive than HTE. 4. While design efforts are required, HTE units offer the potential to be quickly run in reverse as fuel cells to produce electricity for restart of Tokamaks and/or provide spinning reserve for a grid system. 5. Because of the short timescale of the study, no detailed economic evaluation could be carried out.A comparison of costs could be made by employing certain assumptions. For example, if the fusion reactor-electrolyzer capital installation is $400/(KW(T) ($1000/KW(E) equivalent), the H/sub 2/ energy production cost for a high efficiency (about 70 %) fusion-HTE system is on the same order of magnitude as a coal based SNG plant based on 1976 dollars. 6. The present reference design indicates that a 2000 MW(th) fusion reactor could produce as much at 364 x 10/sup 6/ scf/day of hydrogen which is equivalent in heating value to 20,000 barrels/day of gasoline. This would fuel about 500,000 autos based on average driving patterns. 7. A factor of three reduction in coal feed (tons/day) could be achieved for syngas production if hydrogen from a fusion-HTE system were used to gasify coal, as compared to a conventional syngas plant using coal-derived hydrogen.

  15. Fusion reactors-high temperature electrolysis (HTE)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Results of a study to identify and develop a reference design for synfuel production based on fusion reactors are given. The most promising option for hydrogen production was high-temperature electrolysis (HTE). The main findings of this study are: 1. HTE has the highest potential efficiency for production of synfuels from fusion; a fusion to hydrogen energy efficiency of about 70% appears possible with 18000C HTE units and 60% power cycle efficiency; an efficiency of about 50% possible with 14000C HTE units and 40% power cycle efficiency. 2. Relative to thermochemical or direct decomposition methods HTE technology is in a more advanced state of development, 3. Thermochemical or direct decomposition methods must have lower unit process or capital costs if they are to be more attractive than HTE. 4. While design efforts are required, HTE units offer the potential to be quickly run in reverse as fuel cells to produce electricity for restart of Tokamaks and/or provide spinning reserve for a grid system. 5. Because of the short timescale of the study, no detailed economic evaluation could be carried out.A comparison of costs could be made by employing certain assumptions. For example, if the fusion reactor-electrolyzer capital installation is $400/(KW(T) [$1000/KW(E) equivalent], the H2 energy production cost for a high efficiency (about 70 %) fusion-HTE system is on the same order of magnitude as a coal based SNG plant based on 1976 dollars. 6. The present reference design indicates that a 2000 MW(th) fusion reactor could produce as much at 364 x 106 scf/day of hydrogen which is equivalent in heating value to 20,000 barrels/day of gasoline. This would fuel about 500,000 autos based on average driving patterns. 7. A factor of three reduction in coal feed (tons/day) could be achieved for syngas production if hydrogen from a fusion-HTE system were used to gasify coal, as compared to a conventional syngas plant using coal-derived hydrogen

  16. High temperature reactors and their use in the FRG

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Various aspects of the strategy of building high temperature reactors in the FRG are discussed. The development of these reactors has a long tradition in the FRG and great sums of money are being invested in the research programme. In 1988 the AVR-15 experimental reactor is expected to be shut down in which the helium output temperature had been maintained at 950 degC for a long period of time. The THTR-300 demonstration power plant which is expected to be available at that time represents a link to further application of high temperature reactors in the FRG. A detailed description is presented of projects of further high temperature reactors with a wide range of power output. The BBC/HRB association with Swiss participation is now specifying the project of the HTR-500 reactor with a steam cycle and the delivery of technological steam. This reactor should be followed up by the construction of a reactor with an HHT gas turbine and of an HTR-PNP reactor for coal gasification. Alternatively developed are small HTR-100 universal reactors. Prospective projects also include the 80 MW modular system by KWU following up on the AVR-15 reactor. (Z.M.)

  17. Determination and validation of prompt k0-factors with a monochromatic neutron beam at the Dhruva reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, A. G. C.; Acharya, R.; Sudarshan, K.; Tripathi, R.; Reddy, A. V. R.; Goswami, A.

    2006-08-01

    Prompt Gamma-ray Neutron Activation Analysis (PGNAA) was carried out using a reflected neutron beam of 0.018 eV energy at the Dhruva research reactor, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai, India. The neutron beam characteristics, such as dimension, homogeneity and thermal equivalent flux were evaluated. The prompt k0-factors of about 15 elements were determined versus the 1951.1 keV gamma-ray of the 35Cl(n,γ) reaction. These prompt k0-factors are compared with the recommended k0-values for thermal neutrons and were found to be in good agreement, except for Gd, Cd and Hg. The internal mono-standard method was applied to analyze a meteorite and a stainless steel alloy (SS 316 M) using the recommended k0-values from the literature. As to the alloy, the measured concentrations were in good agreement with the nominal composition. For the meteorite sample, the concentrations of the major elements were in good agreement with the values determined using conventional neutron activation analysis.

  18. Design and construction of an automatic measurement electronic system and graphical neutron flux for the subcritical reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) has in its installations with a nuclear subcritical reactor which was designed and constructed with the main purpose to be used in the nuclear sciences education in the Physics areas and Reactors engineering. Within the nuclear experiments that can be realized in this reactor are very interesting those about determinations of neutron and gamma fluxes spectra, since starting from these some interesting nuclear parameters can be obtained. In order to carry out this type of experiments different radioactive sources are used which exceed the permissible doses by far to human beings. Therefore it is necessary the remote handling as of the source as of detectors used in different experiments. In this work it is presented the design of an electronic system which allows the different positions inside of the tank of subcritical reactor at ININ over the radial and axial axes in manual or automatic ways. (Author)

  19. Early and delayed reproductive death in human cells exposed to high energy iron-ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettega, D.; Calzolari, P.; Doneda, L.; Durante, M.; Tallone, L.

    For radiation protection of the astronauts it is important to know both the acute and the late effects of charged particles. Iron is the most abundant high charge and energy (HZE) specie in galactic cosmic radiation. (HZE) ions are considered to be the major contributors to equivalent dose in space, but the Relative Biological Effectiveness of HZE particles has large uncertainties, expecially for late effects. We have determined early and delayed reproductive death in human fibroblast cells (AG1522) exposed to iron ion beams of energies between 0.2 and 1 GeV/n. The cells were irradiated at the HIMAC accelerator in Chiba (0.2 and 0.5 GeV/n) and at the AGS accelerator at the NASA Space Radiation Laboratory in Brookhaven (1 GeV/n). For each beam the dose--effect curves were measured at least twice in the dose range between 0.5 and 2 Gy. 60 Co gamma rays were used as reference radiation. The following results were obtained: 1) the 1 GeV/n beam effectiveness for inactivation of the AG1522 cells is higher than that of any other beam. 2) the progeny of the irradiated cells show the presence of delayed damage in the form of reproductive death for all the beams with the 1 GeV/n being the most effective. 3) the relative biological effectiveness of the iron beams is higher for delayed compared to early reproductive death. A comparison with preliminary results obtained with 970 MeV/n Ti and 490 MeV/n Si ions will be also reported .

  20. High Performance Photocatalytic Oxidation Reactor System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Pioneer Astronautics proposes a technology program for the development of an innovative photocatalytic oxidation reactor for the removal and mineralization of...

  1. Comparing changes in plasma and skin autofluorescence in low-flux versus high-flux hemodialysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ramsauer, Bernd; Engels, Gerwin; Arsov, Stefan; Hadimeri, Henrik; Sikole, Aleksandar; Graaff, Reindert; Stegmayr, Bernd

    2015-01-01

    Background: Tissue advanced glycation end products (AGE) are increased in hemodialysis (HD) patients, especially those with cardiovascular complications. Skin autofluorescence (skin-AF) can noninvasively estimate the accumulation of AGE in tissue. The aim was to clarify whether HD using a high-flux

  2. Neutron flux distribution inside the cylindrical core of minor excess of reactivity in the IPEN/MB-01 reactor and comparison with citation code and MCNP- 5 code

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study aims to determine the distribution of thermal neutron flux in the IPEN/MB-01 nuclear reactor core assembled with cylindrical core configuration of minor excess of reactivity with 568 fuel rods (28 fuel rods in diameter). The thermal neutron flux at the positions of irradiation derive from the method of reaction rate using gold foils. The experiment consists in inserting gold activations foils with and without cadmium coverage (cadmium boxes with 0.0502 cm thickness) in several positions throughout the active core. After irradiation, activity induced by nuclear reaction rates over gold foils is assessed by gamma ray spectrometry using a high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector. Experimental results are compared to those derived from calculations performed using a three dimensional CITATION diffusion code and MCNP-5 code and a proper nuclear data library. While calculated neutron flux data shows good agreement with experimental values in regions with little disturbance in the neutron flux, also showing that in the region of the reflectors of neutrons and near the control rods, the diffusion theory is not very precise. The average value of thermal neutron flux obtained experimentally compared to the calculated value by CITATION code and MCNP-5 code respectively show a difference of 1.18% and 0.84% at a nuclear power level of 74.65 ± 3.28 % watts. The average measured value of thermal neutron flux is 4.10 108 ± 5.25% n/cm2s. (author)

  3. High-field superconducting window-frame beam-transport magnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The window-frame design for high-field superconducting beam-transport magnets was first applied to two, 2-m-long, 4-T modules of an 80 bending magent which has operated for nine years in the primary proton beam line at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS). The design of two 1.5-m long, 7.6-cm cold-bore superconducting windowframe magnets, described in this paper, intended for the external proton beam transport system at the AGS incorporated evolutionary changes. These magnets generated a maximum aperture field of 6.8 T with a peak field in the dipole coil of 7.1 T. Measured fields are very accurate and are compared to values calculated using the computer programs LINDA and POISSON. Results of quench-propagation studies demonstrate the excellent thermal stability of the magnets. The magnets quench safely without energy extraction at a maximum current density, J = 130 kA/cm2 in the superconductor, corresponding to J = 57.6 kA/cm2 overall the conductor at B = 6.7 T

  4. Coherent beam combining of high powerfiber lasers: Progress and prospect

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU; ZeJin; ZHOU; Pu; XU; XiaoJun; WANG; XiaoLin; MA; YanXing

    2013-01-01

    The recent research progress of coherent beam combining of high power fiber lasers is reviewed. Key technologies like coherently combinable fiber laser, phase control of multiple beams and beam tilling are specially analyzed. Prospects for single coherently combinable high power fiber amplifier, beam tilling and target-in-the-loop control for propagation in real atmosphere are presented.

  5. Parallel beam dynamics calculations on high performance computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faced with a backlog of nuclear waste and weapons plutonium, as well as an ever-increasing public concern about safety and environmental issues associated with conventional nuclear reactors, many countries are studying new, accelerator-driven technologies that hold the promise of providing safe and effective solutions to these problems. Proposed projects include accelerator transmutation of waste (ATW), accelerator-based conversion of plutonium (ABC), accelerator-driven energy production (ADEP), and accelerator production of tritium (APT). Also, next-generation spallation neutron sources based on similar technology will play a major role in materials science and biological science research. The design of accelerators for these projects will require a major advance in numerical modeling capability. For example, beam dynamics simulations with approximately 100 million particles will be needed to ensure that extremely stringent beam loss requirements (less than a nanoampere per meter) can be met. Compared with typical present-day modeling using 10,000-100,000 particles, this represents an increase of 3-4 orders of magnitude. High performance computing (HPC) platforms make it possible to perform such large scale simulations, which require 10's of GBytes of memory. They also make it possible to perform smaller simulations in a matter of hours that would require months to run on a single processor workstation. This paper will describe how HPC platforms can be used to perform the numerically intensive beam dynamics simulations required for development of these new accelerator-driven technologies

  6. High-Energy Electron Beam Application to Air Pollutants Removal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantage of electron beam (EB) process in pollutants removal is connected to its high efficiency to transfer high amount of energy directly into the matter under treatment. Disadvantage which is mostly related to high investment cost of accelerator may be effectively overcome in future as the result of use accelerator new developments. The potential use of medium to high-energy high power EB accelerators for air pollutants removal is demonstrated in [1]. The lower electrical efficiencies of accelerators with higher energies are partially compensated by the lower electron energy losses in the beam windows. In addition, accelerators with higher electron energies can provide higher beam powers with lower beam currents [1]. The total EB energy losses (backscattering, windows and in the intervening air space) are substantially lower with higher EB incident energy. The useful EB energy is under 50% for 0.5 MeV and about 95% above 3 MeV. In view of these arguments we decided to study the application of high energy EB for air pollutants removal. Two electron beam accelerators are available for our studies: electron linear accelerators ALIN-10 and ALID-7, built in the Electron Accelerator Laboratory, INFLPR, Bucharest, Romania. Both accelerators are of traveling-wave type, operating at a wavelength of 10 cm. They utilize tunable S-band magnetrons, EEV M 5125 type, delivering 2 MW of power in 4 μ pulses. The accelerating structure is a disk-loaded tube operating in the 2 mode. The optimum values of the EB peak current IEB and EB energy EEB to produce maximum output power PEB for a fixed pulse duration EB and repetition frequency fEB are as follows: for ALIN-10: EEB = 6.23 MeV; IEB =75 mA; PEB 164 W (fEB = 100 Hz, EB = 3.5 s) and for ALID-7: EEB 5.5 MeV; IEB = 130 mA; PEB = 670 W (fEB = 250 Hz, EB = 3.75 s). This paper presents a special designed installation, named SDI-1, and several representative results obtained by high energy EB application to SO2, NOx and VOCs

  7. Visualization Study on High Heat Flux Boiling and Critical Heat Flux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, Satbyoul; Kim, Hyungdae [Kyung Hee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    In this study, an integrated visible and infrared-based experimental method is introduced to simultaneously measure the details of high-resolution liquid-vapor phase and heat transfer distributions on a heated wall. The dynamics and heat transfer at high heat flux boiling and critical heat flux were observed. The experiment was conducted in pool of saturated water under atmospheric pressure. There have been many studies to examine the physical mechanisms of nucleation boiling and critical heat flux over several decades. Several visible and infrared-based optical techniques for time-resolved high resolution measurements for liquid-vapor phase and heater surface temperature during boiling have been introduced to understand the characteristics and mechanisms of them. Liquid-vapor phase, temperature, and heat flux distributions on the heated surface were measured during pool boiling of water using the integrated total reflection and infrared thermometry technique. Qualitative examination of the data for high heat flux boiling and CHF was performed. The main contributions of this work are summarized below. The existence and behavior of dry patches lead the way toward CHF condition. Therefore, the mechanistic modeling of the CHF phenomenon necessarily needs to include the physical parameters related to dynamics of the large dry patch such as life time and size. In addition to the dynamic behavior of the dry patch, the thermal behavior of the hot patch is also important. Even though the dry area was rewetted, the stored thermal energy in the hot patch can be remained if the rewetting time is short and the subsequent dry patch is regenerated quickly.

  8. Spatial distributions of the energy and energy flux density of partially coherent electromagnetic beams in atmospheric turbulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jianlong; Lü, Baida; Zhu, Shifu

    2009-07-01

    The formulas of the energy and energy flux density of partially coherent electromagnetic beams in atmospheric turbulence are derived by using Maxwell's equations. Expressions expressed by elements of electric cross spectral density matrixes of the magnetic and the mutual cross spectral density matrix are obtained for the partially coherent electromagnetic beams. Taken the partially coherent Cosh-Gaussian (ChG) electromagnetic beam as a typical example, the spatial distributions of the energy and energy flux density in atmospheric turbulence are numerically calculated. It is found that the turbulence shows a broadening effect on the spatial distributions of the energy and energy flux density. Some interesting results are obtained and explained with regard to their physical nature.

  9. Maintenance management at the High Flux Isotope Reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maintenance procedures are described for mechanical and electrical equipment; nuclear and process instrumentation; operational maintenance; equipment and systems inspections; and HFIR quality assurance

  10. Determination of nitrogen in wheat flour through Activation analysis using Fast neutron flux of a Thermal nuclear reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work is done a technical study for determining Nitrogen (protein) and other elements in wheat flour Activation analysis, with Fast neutrons from a Thermal nuclear reactor. Initially it is given an introduction about the basic principles of the methods of analysis. Equipment used in Activation analysis and a brief description of the neutron source (Thermal nuclear reactor). The realized experiments for determining the flux form in the irradiation site, the half life of N-13 and the interferences due to the sample composition are included too. Finally, the obtained results by Activation and the Kjeldahl method are tabulated. (Author)

  11. Irradiation embrittlement mechanism of reactor pressure vessel steels of light water reactors. Effect of neutron flux on the embrittlement of low copper steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the effects of neutron flux on the mechanical properties of low copper reactor pressure vessel steels, we carried out neutron irradiation of Japanese plate and forging steels. We then tested subsize tensile and Charpy impact specimens in the joint research program between the Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry and the University of California, Santa Barbara. The results showed that shifts in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature obtained from Charpy impact tests have no dependence on neutron flux through the neutron fluence levels although there are slight changes of shift in ductile-to-brittle transition temperature as neutron flux changes. Changes in yield stress and ultimate tensile stress obtained from tensile tests are independent of neutron flux but increase with increasing neutron fluence. Based on the mechanical property test results, we conclude that irradiation embrittlement of low copper steels has no detectable dependence on neutron flux in the neutron flux range of 7 x 1010-5 x 1012 n/cm2-s. (author)

  12. Reliability Analysis of High Temperature Reactor Fuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of reliability analysis of the TRISO -coated fuel particles for the High Temperature Test Reactor (HTTR), Japan. The reliability of fuel particle was evaluated based on the failure probability of each coating layer, and only the failure due to internal gas pressure and shrinkage of pyrolytic carbon (PyC) layer was considered The analysis results show that, no significant failure occurs up to about 45 MWd/kgU for the first core fuel particle and up to about 75 MWd/kgU for the reload core fuel particle. The fuel particle is predicted to fail completely at about 50 MWd/kgU for the first core fuel particle and at about 85 MWd/kgU for the reload core fuel particle. This results show that the TRISO -coated fuel particle for the HTTR to have high reliability. No failure occurs up to the maximum burnup design level, i.e. 33 MWd/kgU for the first core fuel particle and 60 MWd/kgU for the reload core fuel particle. The analysis results show also that the fuel particle reliability (coating layers) depends on the irradiation temperature. The failure occurs at lower burnup if the irradiation temperature increases. (author)

  13. Atomic collision experiments utilizing low-velocity, highly-charged ion beams

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, B.M.; Jones, K.W.; Meron, M.

    1982-01-01

    Intense beams of highly-stripped ions are now routinely produced at low velocities using the Brookhaven dual MP-tandens in a unique four-stage accel/decel mode. This mode of operation combines three stages of acceleration, stripping at high energy, and one stage of deceleration to near-zero velocity. To date, experiments have used 10-100 nA beams of bare and few-electron heavy ions at energies as low as 0.2 MeV/amu, and upgrades of the facility should push the lower limit below 0.1 MeV/amu. Recent experiments, such as measurements of charge transfer and x-ray production for S/sup 6-16+/ on He and Ar at 6 to 20 MeV and P(b) measurements for MO x-rays produced in Cl/sup 16 +/ + Ar collisions at 20, 10, and 5 MeV have demonstrated the usefulness of highly-stripped, low-velocity projectiles. These experiments and a few possibilities for future experiments are discussed.

  14. Atomic collision experiments utilizing low-velocity, highly-charged ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intense beams of highly-stripped ions are now routinely produced at low velocities using the Brookhaven dual MP-tandems in a unique four-stage accel/decel mode. This mode of operation combines three stages of acceleration, stripping at high energy, and one stage of deceleration to near-zero velocity. To date, experiments have used 10-100 nA beams of bare and few-electron heavy ions at energies as low as 0.2 MeV/amu, and upgrades of the facility should push the lower limit below 0.1 MeV/amu. Recent experiments, such as measurements of charge transfer and x-ray production for S6-16+ on He and Ar at 6-20 MeV and P(b) measurements for MO x-rays produced in Cl16+ + Ar collisions at 20, 10 and 5 MeV have demonstrated the usefulness of highly-stripped, low-velocity projectiles. These experiments and a few possibilities for future experiments are discussed

  15. Neutron dosimetry and radiation damage calculations for HFBR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenwood, L.R.; Ratner, R.T. [Pacific Northwest National Lab., TN (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Neutron dosimetry measurements have been conducted for various positions of the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in order to measure the neutron flux and energy spectra. Neutron dosimetry results and radiation damage calculations are presented for positions V10, V14, and V15.

  16. High Field Seeking State Atom Laser and Properties of Flux

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Lin; XIONG Wei; YANG Fan; YI Lin; ZHOU Xiao-Ji; CHEN Xu-Zong

    2008-01-01

    We present an experimental study on the continuous atom laser. The experiments show that a high field seeking state atom laser with stable flux can be formed by increasing the strength of outcoupling before large density fluctuations appear. It is easy to obtain a long length or high speed output with this kind of atom laser.

  17. Spatial distribution of the neutron flux in the IEA-R1 reactor core obtained by means of foil activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A three-dimensional distribution of the neutron flux in IEA-R1 reactor, obtained by activating gold foils, is presented. The foils of diameter 8mm and thickness 0,013mm were mounted on lucite plates and located between the fuel element plates. Foil activities were measured using a 3x3 inches Nal(Tl) scintilation detector calibrated against a 4πβγ coincidence detector. Foil positions were chosen to minimize the errors of measurement; the overall estimated error on the measured flux is 5%. (Author)

  18. Neutron flux calculation and fluence in the encircling of the core and vessel of a reactor BWR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the main objectives related to the safety of any nuclear power plant, including the nuclear power plant of Laguna Verde is to ensure the structural integrity of reactor pressure vessel. To identify and quantify the damage caused by neutron irradiation in the vessel of any nuclear reactor, it is necessary to know both the neutron flux and the neutron fluence that the vessel has been receiving during its operation lifetime, and that the damage observed by mechanical testing are products of microstructural effects induced by neutron irradiation; therefore, it is important the study and prediction of the neutron flux in order to have a better understanding of the damage that these materials are receiving. The calculation here described uses the DORT code, which solves the neutron transport equation in discrete ordinates in two dimensions (x-y, r-θ and r-z), according to a regulatory guide, it should make an approximation of the neutron flux in three dimensions by the so called synthesis method. It is called in that way because it achieves a representation of 3 Dimensional neutron flux combining or summarizing the fluxes calculated by DORT r-θ, r-z and r. This work presents the application of synthesis method, according to Regulatory Guide 1190, to determine the 3 Dimensional fluxes in internal BWR reactor using three different spatial meshes. The results of the neutron flux and fluence, using three different meshes in the directions r, θ and z were compared with results reported in the literature obtaining a difference not larger than 9.61%, neutron flux reached its maximum, 1.58 E + 12 n/cm2s, at a height H 4 (239.07 cm) and angle 32.236o in the core shroud and 4.00 E + 09 n/cm2s at a height H 4 and angle 35.27o in the inner wall of the reactor vessel, positions that are consistent to within ±10% over the ones reported in the literature. (Author)

  19. Microscopic Deformation of Tungsten Surfaces by High Energy and High Flux Helium/Hydrogen Particle Bombardment with Short Pulses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokitani, Masayuki; Yoshida, Naoaki; Tokunaga, Kazutoshi; Sakakita, Hajime; Kiyama, Satoru; Koguchi, Haruhisa; Hirano, Yoichi; Masuzaki, Suguru

    The neutral beam injection facility in the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology was used to irradiate a polycrystalline tungsten specimen with high energy and high flux helium and hydrogen particles. The incidence energy and flux of the beam shot were 25 keV and 8.8 × 1022 particles/m2 s, respectively. The duration of each shot was approximately 30 ms, with 6 min intervals between each shot. Surface temperatures over 1800 K were attained. In the two cases of helium irradiation, total fluence of either 1.5 × 1022 He/m2 or 4.0 × 1022 He/m2 was selected. In the former case, large sized blisters with diameter of 500 nm were densely observed. While, the latter case, the blisters were disappeared and fine nanobranch structures appeared instead. Cross-sectional observations using a transmission electron microscope (TEM) with the focused ion beam (FIB) technique were performed. According to the TEM image, after irradiation with a beam shot of total fluence 4.0 × 1022 He/m2 , there were very dense fine helium bubbles in the tungsten of sizes 1-50 nm. As the helium bubbles grew the density of the tungsten matrix drastically decreased as a result of void swelling. These effects were not seen in hydrogen irradiation case.

  20. Study of the beam-induced neutron flux and required shielding for DIANA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Best, Andreas, E-mail: abest1@nd.edu [Department of Physics and The Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Couder, Manoel [Department of Physics and The Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Famiano, Michael [Department of Physics, Western Michigan University, Kalamazoo, MI 49008 (United States); Lemut, Alberto [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Wiescher, Michael [Department of Physics and The Joint Institute for Nuclear Astrophysics, University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Low energy accelerators in underground locations have emerged as a powerful tool for the measurement of critical nuclear reactions for the study of energy production and element synthesis in astrophysics. While cosmic ray induced background is substantially reduced, beam induced background on target impurities and depositions on target and collimator materials remain a matter of serious concern. The Dual Ion Accelerator for Nuclear Astrophysics (DIANA) is proposed to operate as a low-level background facility in an underground location. One of the main goals of DIANA is the study of neutron sources in stellar helium burning. For these experiments DIANA is a neutron radiation source which may affect other nearby low background level experiments. We therefore investigated the required laboratory layout to attenuate the neutron flux generated in a worst-case scenario to a level below the natural background in the underground environment. Detailed Monte Carlo calculations of the neutron propagation in the laboratory show that a neutron flux many orders of magnitude above expected values gets attenuated below the natural background rate using a 1 m thick water-shielded door as well as an emergency access/egress maze.

  1. BOTHER: a steady-state code that predicts margin to burnout heat flux for N-Reactor fuel elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to operate a nuclear reactor safely, some method must be available which can adequately describe the thermal-hydraulics of the reactor core. Further, some method must be available which can be used to predict the effects of changes in system operation. For example it is often necessary to know or be able to predict the effects of reduced coolant flow, front or rear peaked power distribution, etc., on the overall safe operation of the reactor. Because of the uniqueness of the N Reactor (horizontal pressure tubes with no crossflow between tubes or annular subchannels) the commonly available thermal-hydraulics codes are generally not directly applicable. For these reasons the BOTHER (BurnOut THErmal Ratio) computer code has been developed at UNI. Using experimental results for N Reactor flow splits and heat splits as well as enthalpy imbalance and critical heat flux data, BOTHER computes the steady state margin to burnout for N Reactor fuel elements. The equations used by BOTHER to perform the burnout calculations are described. A sample problem for MARK-IV fuel with input and output listings is also included

  2. Investigating the use of nanofluids to improve high heat flux cooling systems

    CERN Document Server

    Barrett, T R; Flinders, K; Sergis, A; Hardalupas, Y

    2013-01-01

    The thermal performance of high heat flux components in a fusion reactor could be enhanced significantly by the use of nanofluid coolants, suspensions of a liquid with low concentrations of solid nanoparticles. However, before they are considered viable for fusion, the long-term behaviour of nanofluids must be investigated. This paper reports an experiment which is being prepared to provide data on nanofluid stability, settling and erosion in a HyperVapotron device. Procedures are demonstrated for nanofluid synthesis and quality assessment, and the fluid sample analysis methods are described. The end results from this long-running experiment are expected to allow an initial assessment of the suitability of nanofluids as coolants in a fusion reactor.

  3. Characterization and Application of the Thermal Neutron Radiography Beam in the Egyptian Second Experimental and Training Research Reactor (ETRR-2)

    OpenAIRE

    M. A. Abou Mandour; R. M. Megahid; Hassan, M.H.; T. M. Abd El Salam

    2007-01-01

    The Experimental, Training, Research Reactor (ETRR-2) is an open-pool multipurpose reactor (MPR) with a core power of 22 MWth cooled and moderated by light water and reflected with beryllium. It has four neutron beams and a thermal column as the main experimental devices. The neutron radiography facility unit utilizes one of the radial beam tubes. The track-etch technique using nitrocellulose films and converter screen is applied. In this work, the radial neutron beam for the thermal neutron ...

  4. Modeling and design of a new core-moderator assembly and neutron beam ports for the Penn State Breazeale Nuclear Reactor (PSBR)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ucar, Dundar

    modeling, the amount of heat generated by the fuel is assumed to be transferred totally into the coolant. Therefore, the surface heat flux is applied to the fuel cladding outer surface by considering the depleted fuel composition of each individual fuel rod under a reference core loading condition defined as; 53H at 1MW full power. In order to model the entire PSBR reactor, fine mesh discretization was achieved with 22 millions structured and unstructured computational meshes. The conductive heat transfer inside the fuel rods was ignored in order to decrease the computational mesh requirement. Since the PSBR core operates in the subcooled nucleate boiling region, the CFD simulation of new PSBR design was completed utilizing an Eulerian-Eulerian multiphase flow formulation and RPI wall boiling model. The simulation results showed that the new moderator tank geometry results in secondary flow entering into the core due to decrease in the cross-flow area. Notably, the radial flow improves the local heat transfer conditions by providing radial-mixing in the core. Bubble nucleation occurs on the heated fuel rods but bubbles are collapsing in the subcooled fluid. Furthermore, the bulk fluid properties are not affected by the bubble formation. Yet, subcooled boiling enhances the heat transfer on the fuel rods. Five neutron beam ports are designed for the new reactor. The geometrical configuration, filter and collimator system designs of each neutron beam ports are selected based on the requirements of the experimental facilities. A cold neutron beam port which utilizes cold neutrons from three curved guide tubes is considered. Therefore, there will be seven neutron beams available in the new facility. The neutronic analyses of the new beam port designs were achieved by using MCNP5 code and Burned Coupled Simulation Tool for the PSBR. The MCNP simulation results showed that thermal neutron flux was increased by a factor of minimum 1.23 times and maximum 2.68 times in the new beam

  5. Compendium of Neutron Beam Facilities for High Precision Nuclear Data Measurements. Annex: Individual Reports

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent advances in the development of nuclear science and technology, demonstrating the globally growing economy, require highly accurate, powerful simulations and precise analysis of the experimental results. Confidence in these results is still determined by the accuracy of the atomic and nuclear input data. For studying material response, neutron beams produced from accelerators and research reactors in broad energy spectra are reliable and indispensable tools to obtain high accuracy experimental results for neutron induced reactions. The IAEA supports the accomplishment of high precision nuclear data using nuclear facilities in particular, based on particle accelerators and research reactors around the world. Such data are essential for numerous applications in various industries and research institutions, including the safety and economical operation of nuclear power plants, future fusion reactors, nuclear medicine and non-destructive testing technologies. The IAEA organized and coordinated the technical meeting Use of Neutron Beams for High Precision Nuclear Data Measurements, in Budapest, Hungary, 10–14 December 2012. The meeting was attended by participants from 25 Member States and three international organizations — the European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), the Joint Research Centre (JRC) and the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) Nuclear Energy Agency (OECD/NEA). The objectives of the meeting were to provide a forum to exchange existing know-how and to share the practical experiences of neutron beam facilities and associated instrumentation, with regard to the measurement of high precision nuclear data using both accelerators and research reactors. Furthermore, the present status and future developments of worldwide accelerator and research reactor based neutron beam facilities were discussed. This publication is a summary of the technical meeting and additional materials supplied by the international

  6. Brookhaven: Spin result underlined

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recent experiment looking at violent proton-proton elastic scattering confirms, with high precision, earlier data which puzzled many theorists. Most pictures of strong interactions based on perturbative quark-gluon field theory (Quantum Chromodynamics, QCD) suggested that spin effects should disappear with energy and as the collisions become more violent

  7. Beam manipulation techniques, nonlinear beam dynamics, and space charge effect in high energy high power accelerators

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, S. Y.

    2014-04-07

    We had carried out a design of an ultimate storage ring with beam emittance less than 10 picometer for the feasibility of coherent light source at X-ray wavelength. The accelerator has an inherent small dynamic aperture. We study method to improve the dynamic aperture and collective instability for an ultimate storage ring. Beam measurement and accelerator modeling are an integral part of accelerator physics. We develop the independent component analysis (ICA) and the orbit response matrix method for improving accelerator reliability and performance. In collaboration with scientists in National Laboratories, we also carry out experimental and theoretical studies on beam dynamics. Our proposed research topics are relevant to nuclear and particle physics using high brightness particle and photon beams.

  8. Complementary system for monitoring and control of neutron flux during a fuel outage and during reactor start up stage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present work is an example for that, how with modern technical instruments is possible to compensate disadvantage and to increase technical resources of the old systems, without a change of given system totally with new one. The system detail design and implementation was possible mostly, due to the international conferences and courses organised by IAEA and technical information provided by the agency. The designed system plays a role of complementary system to the in-situ operational systems for monitoring and control of the reactor core neutron flux, allowing its measurement and control during a fuel outage and during reactor start up stage. Additionally, the system recalculates the reactivity in beta units and according to its value the reactor criticality fixed up reactivity is defined. (author)

  9. Cascade: a high-efficiency ICF power reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cascade attains a net power-plant efficiency of 49% and its cost is competitive with high-temperature gas-cooled reactor, pressurized-water reactor, and coal-fired power plants. The Cascade reactor and blanket are made of ceramic materials and activation is 6 times less than that of the MARS Tandem Mirror Reactor operating at comparable power. Hands-on maintenance of the heat exchangers is possible one day after shutdown. Essentially all tritium is recovered in the vacuum system, with the remainder recovered from the helium power conversion loop. Tritium leakage external to the vacuum system and power conversion loop is only 0.03 Ci/d

  10. RHTF 2, a 1200 MWe high temperature reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After having adapted to French conditions the 1160 MWe G.A.C. reactor, Commissariat a l'Energie Atomique and French Industry have decided to design an High Temperature Reactor 1200 MWe based on the G.A.C. technology and taking into account the point of view of Electricite de France and the experience of C.E.A. and industry on the gas cooled reactor technology. The main objective of this work is to produce a reactor design having a low technical risk, good operability, with an emphasis on the safety aspects easing the licensing problems

  11. Design of a high-flux instrument for ultrafast electron diffraction and microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippetto, D.; Qian, H.

    2016-05-01

    We present the design and optimization of a new instrument for ultrafast electron diffraction and imaging. The proposed instrument merges the high peak current and relativistic electron energies of radio-frequency guns, with the high average electron flux of static electron microscopes, extending the beam parameter space achievable with relativistic electrons by many orders of magnitude. An immediate consequence of this work is a broader range of accessible science by using electron probes, enabling techniques as femtosecond nano-diffraction and coherent diffraction imaging, and paving the way to direct observation of ultrafast dynamics in complex and isolated samples, from nanocrystals, to nano/micro droplets and organic molecules.

  12. Neutron flux variability at the TRIGA MARK II reactor, Ljubljana, as a parameter with applying the k0-method of NAA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron flux behaviour during irradiation should be known when applying the k0 method of neutron activation analysis. During two 100-hour operating periods of the TRIGA MARK II reactor, Ljubljana, the flux was measured by means of a 197Au(n,γ)198Au monitor (Eγ=411.8 keV). Cadmium-covered irradiations were also performed to obtain the epithermal flux and thermal-to-epithermal flux ratio variations. Consistency was found between these results and the reactor operators' logbook record. (author) 5 refs.; 3 figs

  13. Nuclear analysis of the heavy-ion-beam-driven fusion reactor HIBALL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A detailed three-dimensional Monte Carlo nuclear analysis is presented for the heavy-ion-beam-driven reactor HIBALL. Neutron target interactions leading to neutron multiplication, spectrum softening, and gamma production are included in the model. A 0.66m-thick blanket cooleb by Pb83 Li 17 reduces the radiation damage in the HT-9 ferritic steel first wall to 2.7 dpa/full power year, allowing it to last the whole life of the plant. The overall tritium breeding ratio and the overall energy multiplication are 1.25 and 1.27, respectively. The four reactor cavities in the HIBALL power plant yield a total thermal power of 10 200 MW(thermal)

  14. High temperature reactor development in the Netherlands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This year, some clear design choices have been made in the WHITE Reactor development programme. The activities will be concentrated at the development of a small size pebble bed HTR for combined heat and power production with a closed cycle gas turbine. Objective of the development is threefold: 1. restoring social support; 2. establishing commercial viability after market introduction; and 3. making the market introduction itself feasible, i.e. limited development and first-of-a-kind costs. This design is based on the peu-a-peu design of KFA Juelich and will be optimized. The computer codes necessary for this are being prepared for this work. The dynamic neutronics code PANTHER is being coupled to the thermal hydraulics code THERMIX-DIREKT. For this reactor type, fuel temperatures are maximal in the scenario of depressurization with recriticality. Even for this scenario, fuel temperatures of the 20MWth PAP-GT do not exceed 1300 deg. C, so there should be room for upscaling for economic reasons. On the other hand, it would be convenient to fuel the reactor batchwise instead of continuously, and the use of thorium could be required. These two features may lead to a larger temperature margin. The optimal design must unite these features in the best acceptable way. To gain expertise in calculations on gas cooled graphite moderate reactors, benchmark calculations are being performed in parallel with international partners. Parallel to this, special expertise is being built up on HTR fuel and HTR reactor vessels. (author). 3 refs

  15. Core Physics of Pebble Bed High Temperature Nuclear Reactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Auwerda, G.J.

    2014-01-01

    To more accurately predict the temperature distribution inside the reactor core of pebble bed type high temperature reactors, in this thesis we investigated the stochastic properties of randomly stacked beds and the effects of the non-homogeneity of these beds on the neutronics and thermal-hydraulic

  16. Electrogravitational Resonance of a Gaussian Beam to a High-Frequency Relic Gravitational Wave

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李芳昱; 唐孟希

    2001-01-01

    We consider the resonant response of a Gaussian beam passing through a static magnetic field to a high-frequency relic gravitational wave (GW). It is found that under the synchroresonance condition, the first-order perturbative electromagnetic energy fluxes will contain a "left circular wave" and a "right circular wave" around the symmetrical axis of the Gaussian beam, but the perturbative effects produced by the + and × polarization of the GW have a different physical behaviour. For the high-frequency relic GW with vg = 1010 Hz, h = l0-30, recently expected by the quintessential inflationary models, the corresponding perturbative photon flux passing through the region 10-2 m2 would be expected to be 104 s-1. This is the largest perturbative photon flux we have recently analysed and estimated using the typical laboratory parameters.

  17. The dynamics of flux tubes in a high beta plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Vishniac, E T

    1994-01-01

    We suggest a new model for the structure of a magnetic field embedded high \\beta turbulent plasma, based on the popular notion that the magnetic field will tend to separate into individual flux tubes. We point out that interactions between the flux tubes will be dominated by coherent effects stemming from the turbulent wakes created as the fluid streams by the flux tubes. Balancing the attraction caused by shielding effects with turbulent diffusion we find that flux tubes have typical radii comparable to the local Mach number squared times the large scale eddy length, are arranged in a one dimensional fractal pattern, have a radius of curvature comparable to the largest scale eddies in the turbulence, and have an internal magnetic pressure comparable to the ambient pressure. When the average magnetic energy density is much less than the turbulent energy density the radius, internal magnetic field and curvature scale of the flux tubes will be smaller than these estimates. Realistic resistivity does not alter t...

  18. HIBALL-II - an improved conceptual heavy ion beam driven fusion reactor study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved design of the HIBALL inertial-confinement fusion power station is presented. The new RF-linac based heavy ion driver has improved concepts for beam stacking, bunching and final focusing. The new target design takes into account radiation transport effects in a coarse approximation. The system of four reactors with a net total output of 3.8 GW electric is essentially the same as described earlier, however, progress in the analysis has enhanced its credibility and self-consistency. Considerations of environmental and safety aspects and cost estimates are given. (orig.)

  19. Gravity waves and momentum fluxes in the MLT using the 430 MHz Dual-Beam Measurements at Arecibo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janches, D.; Fritts, D. C.; Riggin, D. M.; Stockwell, R. G.; Sulzer, M. P.; Gonzalez, S.

    We report on a new use of the UHF radar at the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico We have employed the 430 MHz radar for incoherent scatter measurements of radial wind spectra at altitudes from sim 71 to 95 km using the Gregorian and line-feed antennas to define two beams inclined 15 o to the east and west of zenith We find that the two beams define radial velocities with sufficient accuracy to characterize both the gravity waves GWs and the momentum fluxes due to these waves over the majority of the observed altitude range during daylight hours The characteristics of the GWs inferred from these measurements include 1 vertical scales ranging from sim 2 to 20 km 2 downward phase progression of the dominant GWs up to sim 5 ms -1 and 3 vertical wavenumber spectra having slopes near the value expected for saturated GWs The coplanar dual-beam experiment was specifically designed to test the ability to measure GW momentum fluxes and their frequency distributions Radial velocity variances reveal preferential eastward propagation for most intervals and altitudes The momentum fluxes observed during this experiment had sim 1-hr averages that were often near zero occasionally achieved amplitudes of sim 20 to 50 m 2 s -2 displayed significant consistency in altitude and exhibited an approximate anti-correlation with the zonal wind field in cases with significant momentum fluxes Frequency spectra defined the major contributions to the momentum fluxes while S transforms were employed to examine the temporal variability

  20. Evaluation of risk from space radiation with high-energy heavy ion beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimmerling, W.; Wilson, J. W.; Cucinotta, F.; Kim, M. H.

    1998-01-01

    The most challenging radiation in space consists of fully ionized atomic elements with high energy for which only the few lowest energy ions can be stopped in shielding materials. The health risk from exposure to these ions and their secondary radiations generated in shield materials is poorly understood since there are few human data and a systematic study in relevant animal model systems has not been made. The accuracy of risk prediction is described as the major limiting factor in the management of space radiation risk. The expected impact of systematic studies is examined using the limited available biological data and models. Given the limitations of current predictions, models must be developed that are able to incorporate the required fundamental scientific data into accurate risk estimates. The important radiation components that can be provided for laboratory testing are identified. The use of ground-based accelerator beams to simulate space radiation is explained and quantitative scientific constraints on such facilities are derived. Three facilities, one each in the United States, in Germany and in Japan, currently have the partial capability to satisfy these constraints. A facility has been proposed using the Brookhaven National Laboratory Booster Synchrotron in the United States; in conjuction with other on-site accelerators, it will be able to provide the full range of heavy ion beams and energies required.