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Sample records for brookhaven cyclotron

  1. Initial experiments with the Nevis Cyclotron, the Brookhaven Cosmotron, the Brookhaven AGS and their effects on high energy physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindenbaum, S.J.

    1988-01-01

    The first experiment at the Nevis Cyclotron by Bernardini, Booth and Lindenbaum demonstrated that nuclear stars are produced by a nucleon-nucleon cascade within the nucleon. This solved a long standing problem in Cosmic rays and made it clear that where they overlap cosmic ray investigation would not be competitive with accelerator investigations. The initial experiments at the Brookhaven Cosmotron by Lindenbaum and Yuan demonstrated that low energy pion nucleon scattering and pion production were unexpectedly mostly due to excitation of the isotopic spin = angular momentum = 3/2 isobaric state of the nucleon. This contradicted the Fermi statistical theory and led to the Isobar model proposed by the author and a collaborator. The initial experiments at the AGS by the author and collaborators demonstrated that the Pomeronchuck Theorem would not come true till at least several hundred GeV. These scattering experiments led to the development of the ''On-line Computer Technique'' by the author and collaborators which is now the almost universal technique in high energy physics. The first accomplishment which flowed from this technique led to contradiction of the Regge pole theory as a dynamical asymptotic theory, by the author and collaborators. The first critical experimental proof of the forward dispersion relation in strong interactions was accomplished by the author and collaborators. They were then used as a crystal ball to predict that ''Asymptopia''---the theoretically promised land where all asymptotic theorems come true---would not be reached till at least 25,000 BeV and probably not before 1,000,000 BeV. 26 refs., 11 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. Brookhaven highlights

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L. (eds.)

    1992-01-01

    This publication provides a broad overview of the research programs and efforts being conducted, built, designed, and planned at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This work covers a broad range of scientific disciplines. Major facilities include the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), with its newly completed booster, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and the RHIC, which is under construction. Departments within the laboratory include the AGS department, accelerator development, physics, chemistry, biology, NSLS, medical, nuclear energy, and interdepartmental research efforts. Research ranges from the pure sciences, in nuclear physics and high energy physics as one example, to environmental work in applied science to study climatic effects, from efforts in biology which are a component of the human genome project to the study, production, and characterization of new materials. The paper provides an overview of the laboratory operations during 1992, including staffing, research, honors, funding, and general laboratory plans for the future.

  3. Brookhaven highlights - Brookhaven National Laboratory 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-09-01

    This report highlights research conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory in the following areas: alternating gradient synchrotron; physics; biology; national synchrotron light source; department of applied science; medical; chemistry; department of advanced technology; reactor; safety and environmental protection; instrumentation; and computing and communications.

  4. Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Brookhaven Linac Isoptope Producer (BLIP)—positioned at the forefront of research into radioisotopes used in cancer treatment and diagnosis—produces commercially...

  5. Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medical Data Analysis for U.S. Veterans Making Glass Invisible: A Nanoscience-Based Disappearing Act Our Mission We ... our diverse portfolio of licensable technologies. | More Outlook Web Access Brookhaven National Lab PO Box 5000 Upton, ...

  6. Brookhaven leak reactor to close

    CERN Multimedia

    MacIlwain, C

    1999-01-01

    The DOE has announced that the High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven is to close for good. Though the news was not unexpected researchers were angry the decision had been taken before the review to assess the impact of reopening the reactor had been concluded (1 page).

  7. Brookhaven Highlights, January 1982-March 1983

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuper, J.B.H.; Rustad, M.C. (eds.)

    1983-01-01

    Research at Brookhaven National Laboratory is summarized. Major headings are high energy physics, physics and chemistry, life sciences, applied energy science, support activities and administration. (GHT)

  8. CLOVERLEAF CYCLOTRON

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMillan, E.M.; Judd, D.L.

    1959-02-01

    A cyclotron is presented embodying a unique magnetic field configuration, which configuration increases in intensity with radius and therefore compensates for the reltivistic mass effect, the field having further convolutions productive of axial stability in the particle beam. By reconciling the seemingly opposed requirements of mass increase compensation on one hand and anial stability on the other, the production of extremely high current particle beams in the relativistie energy range is made feasible. Certain further advantages inhere in the invention, notably an increase in the usable magnet gap, simplified and more efficient extraction of the beam from the accelerator, and ready adaptation to the use of multiply phased excitation as contrasted with the single phased systems herstofore utilized. General

  9. Radiological environmental monitoring report for Brookhaven National Laboratory 1967--1970

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhold, C.B.; Hull, A.P.

    1998-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was established in 1947 on the former Army Camp Upton site located in central Long Island, New York. From the very beginning, BNL has monitored the environment on and around the Laboratory site to assess the effects of its operations on the environment. This document summarizes the environmental data collected for the years 1967, 1968, 1969, and 1970. Thus, it fills a gap in the series of BNL annual environmental reports beginning in 1962. The data in this document reflect measurements for those four years of concentrations and/or amounts of airborne radioactivity, radioactivity in streams and ground water, and external radiation levels in the vicinity of BNL. Also included are estimates, made at that time, of BNL`s contribution to radioactivity in the environment. Among the major scientific facilities operated at BNL are the High Flux Beam Reactor, Medical Research Reactor, Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, and the 60-inch Cyclotron.

  10. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY WILDLIFE MANAGEMENT PLAN.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NAIDU,J.R.

    2002-10-22

    The purpose of the Wildlife Management Plan (WMP) is to promote stewardship of the natural resources found at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), and to integrate their protection with pursuit of the Laboratory's mission.

  11. Cyclotron waves in plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Lominadze, D G

    2013-01-01

    Cyclotron Waves in Plasma is a four-chapter text that covers the basic physical concepts of the theory of cyclotron waves and cyclotron instabilities, brought about by the existence of steady or alternating plasma currents flowing perpendicular to the magnetic field.This book considers first a wide range of questions associated with the linear theory of cyclotron oscillations in equilibrium plasmas and in electron plasmas in metals and semiconductors. The next chapter deals with the parametric excitation of electron cyclotron oscillations in plasma in an alternating electric field. A chapter f

  12. ATLAS Overview Week at Brookhaven

    CERN Multimedia

    Pilcher, J

    Over 200 ATLAS participants gathered at Brookhaven National Laboratory during the first week of June for our annual overview week. Some system communities arrived early and held meetings on Saturday and Sunday, and the detector interface group (DIG) and Technical Coordination also took advantage of the time to discuss issues of interest for all detector systems. Sunday was also marked by a workshop on the possibilities for heavy ion physics with ATLAS. Beginning on Monday, and for the rest of the week, sessions were held in common in the well equipped Berkner Hall auditorium complex. Laptop computers became the norm for presentations and a wireless network kept laptop owners well connected. Most lunches and dinners were held on the lawn outside Berkner Hall. The weather was very cooperative and it was an extremely pleasant setting. This picture shows most of the participants from a view on the roof of Berkner Hall. Technical Coordination and Integration issues started the reports on Monday and became a...

  13. Dr. Praveen Chaudhari named director of Brookhaven National Laboratory

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Brookhaven Science Associates announced today the selection of Dr. Praveen Chaudhari as Director of the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory. Dr. Chaudhari, who will begin his new duties on April 1, joins Brookhaven Lab after 36 years of distinguished service at IBM as a scientist and senior manager of research" (1 page).

  14. ELECTRON CYCLOTRON WAVES

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    2010-01-01

    This lecture gives an overview of heating and current drive with electron cyclotron waves. We present the main theoretical aspects of wave propagation, wave absorption, and non-inductive current drive, as well as important technical aspects for the application of high power electron cyclotron waves,

  15. Electron cyclotron waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    2012-01-01

    This lecture gives an overview of heating and current drive with electron cyclotron waves. We present the main theoretical aspects of wave propagation, wave absorption, and non-inductive current drive, as well as important technical aspects for the application of high power electron cyclotron waves,

  16. Electron cyclotron waves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    2008-01-01

    This lecture gives an overview of heating and current drive with electron cyclotron waves. We present the main theoretical aspects of wave propagation, wave absorption, and non-inductive current drive, as well as important technical aspects for the application of high power electron cyclotron waves,

  17. Brookhaven highlights, October 1979-September 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-01-01

    Highlights are given for the research areas of the Brookhaven National Laboratory. These areas include high energy physics, physics and chemistry, life sciences, applied energy science (energy and environment, and nuclear energy), and support activities (including mathematics, instrumentation, reactors, and safety). (GHT)

  18. Synchro-cyclotron

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1972-01-01

    The electromagnetic coil which forms the first section of the proton extraction channel in the improved synchro-cyclotron. The photograph shows the positioning gear and the current septum. An extraction efficiency above 50% is expected.

  19. Searching for the H dibaryon at Brookhaven

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, A.J. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1994-12-01

    This paper reviews the status of current experiments at Brookhaven, searching for the six-quark H dibaryon postulated by R. Jaffe in 1977. Two experiments, E813 and E888, have recently completed running and two new experiments, E836 and E885, are approved to run. The data recorded so far is under analysis and should have good sensitivity to both short-lived and long-lived Hs.

  20. The Brookhaven electron analogue, 1953--1957

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Plotkin, M.

    1991-12-18

    The following topics are discussed on the Brookhaven electron analogue: L.J. Haworth and E.L. VanHorn letters; Original G.K. Green outline for report; General description; Parameter list; Mechanical Assembly; Alignment; Degaussing; Vacuum System; Injection System; The pulsed inflector; RF System; Ferrite Cavity; Pick-up electrodes and preamplifiers; Radio Frequency power amplifier; Lens supply; Controls and Power; and RF acceleration summary.

  1. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.; Royce, B.A. [eds.

    1995-05-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1994. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at sites adjacent to the Laboratory.

  2. Brookhaven highlights, October 1, 1989--September 30, 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H. (eds.)

    1990-01-01

    This report discusses research being conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Highlights from all the department are illustrated. The main topics are on accelerator development and applications. (LSP)

  3. Production of cyclotron radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Yong Sup; Lim, Sang Moo; Yang, Seung Dae; Chun, Kwon Soo; Ahn, Soon Hyuk; Yun, Yong Kee; Park, Hyun; Lee, Ji Sup; Lee, Jong Doo; Chai, Jong Seo; Kim, Yoo Seok; Hong, Sung Suk; Lee, Min Yong; Beak, Seung Ki [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea)

    1999-12-01

    In the project, 11,492mCi of {sup 201}Tl, 4,384mCi of {sup 67}Ga, 1,245mCi of {sup 123}l, 523mCi of [{sup 123}I]mlBG and 1,283mCi of {sup 18}FDG were supplied, and the revenue were 304,723,000won. In the production of RI, 13 deg for {sup 201}Tl and {sup 67}Ga, 45 deg for {sup 123}l angle solid target have been used, and liquid target system has been used for {sup 18}F production. For the efficient use of the cyclotron, the MC-50 cyclotron was opened to outside user and basic research project was carried out. The technical supports and radionuclides analysis were done during the execution of the research. Then the facilities of safety supervision and handling techniques of radioisotope production were improved. 7 refs., 9 figs., 8 tabs. (Author)

  4. Production of cyclotron radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Kwon Soo; Lim, Sang Moo; Yang, Seung Dae; Suh, Yong Sup; Ahn, Soon Hyuk; Yun, Yong Kee; Park, Hyun; Lee, Ji Sup; Chai, Jong Seo; Kim, Yoo Seok; Hong, Sung Suk; Lee, Min Yong; Beak, Seung Ki; Kim, Jang Hye; Kim, Gi Sup [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-12-01

    In the project, 12,077mCi of {sup 201}Tl, 5,717mCi of {sup 67}Ga, 2,096mCi of {sup 123}l, 482mCi of [{sup 123}I]mlBG and 2,738mCi of {sup 18}FDG were supplied, and the revenue were 387,253,000won. In the production of RI, 13 deg for {sup 201}Tl and {sup 67}Ga, 45 deg for {sup 123}l angle solid target have been used, and liquid target system has been used for {sup 18}F production. For the efficient use of the cyclotron, the MC-50 cyclotron was opened to outside user and basic research project was carried out. The technical supports and radionuclides analysis were done during the execution of the research. Then the facilities of safety supervision and handling techniques of radioisotope production were improved. 7 refs., 8 figs., 9 tabs. (Author)

  5. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1996

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, G.L.; Paquette, D.E.; Naidu, J.R.; Lee, R.J.; Briggs, S.L.K.

    1998-01-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and summarizes information about environmental compliance for 1996. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and of a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in the ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna, and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at adjacent sites. The report also evaluates the Laboratory`s compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and non-radiological emissions and effluents to the environment.

  6. Increased intensity performance of the Brookhaven AGS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raka, E.; Ahrens, L.; Frey, W.; Gill, E.; Glenn, J.W.; Sanders, R.; Weng, W.

    1985-05-01

    With the advent of H/sup -/ injection into the Brookhaven AGS, circulating beams of up to 3 x 10/sup 13/ protons at 200 MeV have been obtained. Rf capture of 2.2 x 10/sup 13/ and acceleration of 1.73 x 10/sup 13/ up to the transition energy (approx. = 8 GeV) and 1.64 x 10/sup 13/ to full energy (approx. = 29 GeV) has been achieved. This represents a 50% increase over the best performance obtained with H/sup +/ injection. The increase in circulation beam current is obtained without filling the horizontal aperture. This allows the rf capture process to utilize a larger longitudinal phase space area (approx. = 1 eV sec/bunch vs less than or equal to 0.6 eV sec with H/sup +/ operation). The resulting reduction in relative longitudinal density partially offsets the increase in space charge effects at higher currents. In order to make the capture process independent of injected beam current, a dynamic beam loading compensation loop was installed on the AGS rf system. This is the only addition to the synchrotron itself that was required to reach the new intensity records. A discussion of injection, the rf capture process, and space charge effects is presented. 9 refs., 5 figs.

  7. Geothermal materials development at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kukacka, L.E. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1997-12-31

    As part of the DOE/OGT response to recommendations and priorities established by industrial review of their overall R&D program, the Geothermal Materials Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is focusing on topics that can reduce O&M costs and increase competitiveness in foreign and domestic markets. Corrosion and scale control, well completion materials, and lost circulation control have high priorities. The first two topics are included in FY 1997 BNL activities, but work on lost circulation materials is constrained by budgetary limitations. The R&D, most of which is performed as cost-shared efforts with U.S. geothermal firms, is rapidly moving into field testing phases. FY 1996 and 1997 accomplishments in the development of lightweight CO{sub 2}-resistant cements for well completions; corrosion resistant, thermally conductive polymer matrix composites for heat exchange applications; and metallic, polymer and ceramic-based corrosion protective coatings are given in this paper. In addition, plans for work that commenced in March 1997 on thermally conductive cementitious grouting materials for use with geothermal heat pumps (GHP), are discussed.

  8. Cyclotrons and positron emitting radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wolf, A.P.; Fowler, J.S.

    1984-01-01

    The state of the art of Positron Emission Tomography (PET) technology as related to cyclotron use and radiopharmaceutical production is reviewed. The paper discusses available small cyclotrons, the positron emitters which can be produced and the yields possible, target design, and radiopharmaceutical development and application. 97 refs., 12 tabs. (ACR)

  9. Ion cyclotron resonance cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weller, R.R.

    1995-02-14

    An ion cyclotron resonance cell is disclosed having two adjacent sections separated by a center trapping plate. The first section is defined by the center trapping plate, a first end trapping plate, and excitation and detector electrodes. The second section includes a second end trapping plate spaced apart from the center plate, a mirror, and an analyzer. The analyzer includes a wavelength-selective light detector, such as a detector incorporating an acousto-optical device (AOD) and a photodetector. One or more ion guides, grounded plates with holes for the ion beam, are positioned within the vacuum chamber of the mass spectrometer between the ion source and the cell. After ions are trapped and analyzed by ion cyclotron resonance techniques in the first section, the ions of interest are selected according to their mass and passed into the second section for optical spectroscopic studies. The trapped ions are excited by light from a laser and caused thereby to fluoresce. The fluorescent light emitted by the excited ions is reflected by the mirror and directed onto the detector. The AOD is scanned, and the photodetector output is recorded and analyzed. The ions remain in the second section for an extended period, enabling multiple studies to be carried out on the same ensemble of ions. 5 figs.

  10. EC-5 fifth international workshop on electron cyclotron emission and electron cyclotron heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prater, R.; Lohr, J. [eds.

    1985-12-31

    This report contains papers on the following topics: electron cyclotron emission measurements; electron cyclotron emission theory; electron cyclotron heating; gyrotron development; and ECH systems and waveguide development. These paper have been indexed separately elsewhere. (LSP).

  11. Ion Cyclotron Resonance Facility (ICR)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — his facility is charged with developing and exploiting the unique capabilities of Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometry, and leads the...

  12. BEST medical radioisotope production cyclotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabaiduc, Vasile; Milton, Bruce; Suthanthiran, Krishnan; Johnson, Richard R. [Best Cyclotron Systems Inc., 7-8765 Ash Street, Vancouver, British Columbia, V6P 6T3 (Canada); Gelbart, W. Z. [Advanced System Designs Inc., 5295 Bear Bay Road, Garden Bay, BC, V0N 1S1 (Canada)

    2013-04-19

    Best Cyclotron Systems Inc (BCSI) is currently developing 14 MeV, 25 MeV, 35MeV and 70MeV cyclotrons for radioisotope production and research applications as well as the entire spectrum of targets and nuclear synthesis modules for the production of Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography (SPECT) and radiation therapy isotopes. The company is a subsidiary of Best Medical International, renowned in the field of medical instrumentation and radiation therapy. All cyclotrons have external negative hydrogen ion sources, four radial sectors with two dees in opposite valleys, cryogenic vacuum system and simultaneous beam extraction on opposite lines. The beam intensity ranges from 400 {mu}A to 1000 {mu}A, depending on the cyclotron energy and application.

  13. Cyclotron for Beam Therapy Application

    CERN Document Server

    Alenitsky, Yu G; Karamysheva, G A; Kostromin, S A; Mitsyn, G V; Molokanov, A G; Onishchenko, L M; Samsonov, E V; Vorozhtsov, S B; Zaplatin, N L

    2005-01-01

    The basic parameters of the proton isochronous cyclotron on the fixed energy are considered. The energy of protons is $E_{p}\\sim $ 220~MeV, intensity of the extracted beam is $I_{p}\\sim $ 0.1~$\\mu$A. The cyclotron is projected on the basis of compact magnet with four sectors and the diameter of poles 300 cm. Two dees of the accelerating system are located in valleys.

  14. Multicavity proton cyclotron accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. L. Hirshfield

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available A mechanism for acceleration of protons is described, in which energy gain occurs near cyclotron resonance as protons drift through a sequence of rotating-mode TE_{111} cylindrical cavities in a strong nearly uniform axial magnetic field. Cavity resonance frequencies decrease in sequence from one another with a fixed frequency interval Δf between cavities, so that synchronism can be maintained between the rf fields and proton bunches injected at intervals of 1/Δf. An example is presented in which a 122 mA, 1 MeV proton beam is accelerated to 961 MeV using a cascade of eight cavities in an 8.1 T magnetic field, with the first cavity resonant at 120 MHz and with Δf=8 MHz. Average acceleration gradient exceeds 40 MV/m, average effective shunt impedance is 223 MΩ/m, but maximum surface field in the cavities does not exceed 7.2 MV/m. These features occur because protons make many orbital turns in each cavity and thus experience acceleration from each cavity field many times. Longitudinal and transverse stability appear to be intrinsic properties of the acceleration mechanism, and an example to illustrate this is presented. This acceleration concept could be developed into a proton accelerator for a high-power neutron spallation source, such as that required for transmutation of nuclear waste or driving a subcritical fission burner, provided a number of significant practical issues can be addressed.

  15. Brookhaven Lab and Argonne Lab scientists invent a plasma valve

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    Scientists from Brookhaven National Laboratory and Argonne National Laboratory have received U.S. patent number 6,528,948 for a device that shuts off airflow into a vacuum about one million times faster than mechanical valves or shutters that are currently in use (1 page).

  16. COMPUTATIONAL SCIENCE AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY: THREE SELECTED TOPICS.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVENPORT,J.W.DENG,Y.GLIMM,J.SAMULYAK,R.

    2003-09-15

    We present an overview of computational science at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), with selections from three areas: fluids, nanoscience, and biology. The work at BNL in each of these areas is itself very broad, and we select a few topics for presentation within each of them.

  17. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.; Paquette, D.E.; Schroeder, G.L. [eds.] [and others

    1996-12-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and summarizes information about environmental compliance for 1995. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and of a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in the ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna, and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at adjacent sites. The report also evaluates the Laboratory`s compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions and effluents to the environment. Areas of known contamination are subject to Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies under the Inter Agency Agreement established by the Department of Energy, Environmental Protection Agency and the New York Department of Environmental Conservation. Except for identified areas of soil and groundwater contamination, the environmental monitoring data has continued to demonstrate that compliance was achieved with the applicable environmental laws and regulations governing emission and discharge of materials to the environment. Also, the data show that the environmental impacts at Brookhaven National Laboratory are minimal and pose no threat to the public nor to the environment. This report meets the requirements of Department of Energy Orders 5484.1, Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Information reporting requirements and 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Programs.

  18. Review of Brookhaven nuclear transparency measurements in (p ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 61; Issue 5. Review of Brookhaven nuclear transparency ... First, we describe the measurements with the newer experiment, E850, which has more complete kinematic definition of quasi-elastic events. E850 covers a larger range of incident momenta, and thus ...

  19. Brookhaven National Laboratory moves to the fast lane

    CERN Multimedia

    2006-01-01

    "The U.S. Department of Energy's energy sciences network (ESnet) continues to roll out its next-generation architecture on schedule with the March 14 completion of the Long Island Metropolitan Area Network, connecting Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) to the ESnet point of presente (PO) 60 miles away in New York City." (1 page)

  20. MC-50 AVF cyclotron operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Jong Seo; Lee, Dong Hoon; Kim, You Seok; Park, Chan Won; Lee, Yong Min; Hong, Sung Seok; Lee, Min Yong

    1995-12-01

    The first cyclotron in Korea, MC-59 cyclotron is used for neutron irradiation, radionuclide development, production and material and biomedical research. 50.5MeV and 35MeV proton beam have been extracted with 20-70 .mu.A. A total of beam extraction time are 1095.7 hours. 206.5 hours are used for the developments and 663.8 hours are for radionuclide production and development and 225.4 hours for application researches. The shutdown days are 23days. Fundamental data for failure decrement and efficient beam extraction were composed and maintenance technologies were developed. (author). 8 tabs., 17 figs., 10 refs.

  1. MC-50 AVF cyclotron operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Yu Seok; Chai, Jong Seo; Bak, Seong Ki; Park, Chan Won; Jo, Young Ho; Hong, Seong Seok; Lee, Min Yong; Jang Ho Ha

    2000-01-01

    The first cyclotron in Korea, MC-50 cyclotron is used for neutron irradiation, radionuclide development, production and material and biomedical research. 50.5MeV and 35MeV proton beam have been extracted with 20-60{mu}A. A total of beam extraction time are 1095.7 hours. 206.5 hours are used for the developments and 663.8 hours are for radionuclide production and development and 225.4 hours for application researches. The shutdown days are 23 days. Fundamental data for failure decrement and efficient beam extraction were composed and maintenance technologies were developed.

  2. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY INSTITUTIONAL PLAN FY2003-2007.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2003-06-10

    This document presents the vision for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for the next five years, and a roadmap for implementing that vision. Brookhaven is a multidisciplinary science-based laboratory operated for the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), supported primarily by programs sponsored by the DOE's Office of Science. As the third-largest funding agency for science in the U.S., one of the DOE's goals is ''to advance basic research and the instruments of science that are the foundations for DOE's applied missions, a base for U.S. technology innovation, and a source of remarkable insights into our physical and biological world, and the nature of matter and energy'' (DOE Office of Science Strategic Plan, 2000 http://www.osti.gov/portfolio/science.htm). BNL shapes its vision according to this plan.

  3. Cyclotron transitions of bound ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezchastnov, Victor G.; Pavlov, George G.

    2017-06-01

    A charged particle in a magnetic field possesses discrete energy levels associated with particle rotation around the field lines. The radiative transitions between these levels are the well-known cyclotron transitions. We show that a bound complex of particles with a nonzero net charge displays analogous transitions between the states of confined motion of the entire complex in the field. The latter bound-ion cyclotron transitions are affected by a coupling between the collective and internal motions of the complex and, as a result, differ from the transitions of a "reference" bare ion with the same mass and charge. We analyze the cyclotron transitions for complex ions by including the coupling within a rigorous quantum approach. Particular attention is paid to comparison of the transition energies and oscillator strengths to those of the bare ion. Selection rules based on integrals of collective motion are derived for the bound-ion cyclotron transitions analytically, and the perturbation and coupled-channel approaches are developed to study the transitions quantitatively. Representative examples are considered and discussed for positive and negative atomic and cluster ions.

  4. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY SITE ENVIRONMENTAL REPORT FOR CALENDAR YEAR 1994.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NAIDU,J.R.; ROYCE,B.A.

    1995-05-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at Brookhaven National Laboratory and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1994. To evaluate the effect of Brookhaven National Laboratory's operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, groundwater, fauna and vegetation were made at the Brookhaven National Laboratory site and at sites adjacent to the Laboratory. Brookhaven National Laboratory's compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions and effluents to the environment were evaluated. Among the permitted facilities, two instances of pH exceedances were observed at recharge basins, possibly related to rain-water run-off to these recharge basins. Also, the discharge from the Sewage Treatment Plant to the Peconic River exceeded. on ten occasions, one each for fecal coliform and 5-day Biochemical Oxygen Demand (avg.) and eight for ammonia nitrogen. The ammonia and Biochemical Oxygen Demand exceedances were attributed to the cold winter and the routine cultivation of the sand filter beds which resulted in the hydraulic overloading of the filter beds and the possible destruction of nitrifying bacteria. The on-set of warm weather and increased aeration of the filter beds via cultivation helped to alleviate this condition. The discharge of fecal coliform may also be linked to this occurrence, in that the increase in fecal coliform coincided with the increased cultivation of the sand filter beds. The environmental monitoring data has identified site-specific contamination of groundwater and soil. These areas are subject to Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies under the Inter Agency Agreement. Except for the above, the environmental monitoring data has continued to demonstrate that compliance was achieved with

  5. Brookhaven highlights for fiscal year 1991, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H.

    1991-12-31

    This report highlights Brookhaven National Laboratory`s activities for fiscal year 1991. Topics from the four research divisions: Computing and Communications, Instrumentation, Reactors, and Safety and Environmental Protection are presented. The research programs at Brookhaven are diverse, as is reflected by the nine different scientific departments: Accelerator Development, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, Applied Science, Biology, Chemistry, Medical, National Synchrotron Light Source, Nuclear Energy, and Physics. Administrative and managerial information about Brookhaven are also disclosed. (GHH)

  6. Brookhaven highlights for fiscal year 1991, October 1, 1990--September 30, 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L.; Kuper, J.B.H.

    1991-01-01

    This report highlights Brookhaven National Laboratory's activities for fiscal year 1991. Topics from the four research divisions: Computing and Communications, Instrumentation, Reactors, and Safety and Environmental Protection are presented. The research programs at Brookhaven are diverse, as is reflected by the nine different scientific departments: Accelerator Development, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, Applied Science, Biology, Chemistry, Medical, National Synchrotron Light Source, Nuclear Energy, and Physics. Administrative and managerial information about Brookhaven are also disclosed. (GHH)

  7. TRIUMF cyclotron vacuum system refurbishing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekachev, I.

    2008-03-01

    The cyclotron at TRIUMF was commissioned to full energy in 1974. The volume of the cyclotron vacuum tank is about 100 m3 and it operates at 5×10-8 Torr pressure during beam production. The pumping is mainly based on a Phillips B-20 cryogenerator (Stirling cycle 4-cylinder engine). The cryogenerator supplies helium gas at 16 K and 70 K to cryopanels in the tank. The decreasing reliability of the B-20 and demanding maintenance requirements triggered the decision to completely overhaul or replace the cryogenerator. Replacement with the LINDE-1630 helium refrigerator was found to be the most attractive (technically and economically) option. The details of the proposal with installation of the helium refrigerator and with a continuous flow liquid nitrogen shield cooling system are presented.

  8. The development of cyclotron radiopharmaceuticals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Seung Dae; Chun, K. W.; Suh, Y. S.; Lee, J. D.; Ahn, S. H. and others

    1999-03-01

    The purpose of this project is to developthe radiopharmaceuticals and automatic synthetic unit for labelled compounds, and to establish mass production system of radiopharmaceuticals. These will contribute to the early diagnosis of the disease hard to cure. The contents of this project are as follows, the development of the radiopharmaceutical for imaging of cancer, the development of automatic synthesizer for the synthesis of radio-pharmaceuticals, the development of hormone derivatives labelled with {sup 12}'3I, the development of the radiopharmaceuticals for therapy of cancer labelled with cyclotron produced radionuclides, the development of radiopharmaceuticals for therapy of cancer labelled with cyclotron produced radionuclides, the development of radiopharmaceuticals for imaging of myocardial metabolism.

  9. Method and apparatus for ion cyclotron spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, David A [Idaho Falls, ID; Scott, Jill R [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-08-17

    An ion cyclotron spectrometer may include a vacuum chamber that extends at least along a z-axis and means for producing a magnetic field within the vacuum chamber so that a magnetic field vector is generally parallel to the z-axis. The ion cyclotron spectrometer may also include means for producing a trapping electric field within the vacuum chamber that includes at least a first section that induces a first magnetron effect that increases a cyclotron frequency of an ion and at least a second section that induces a second magnetron effect that decreases the cyclotron frequency of an ion. The cyclotron frequency changes induced by the first and second magnetron effects substantially cancel one another so that an ion traversing the at least first and second sections will experience no net change in cyclotron frequency.

  10. 1995 Annual epidemiologic surveillance report for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-12-31

    The US Department of Energy`s (DOE) conduct of epidemiologic surveillance provides an early warning system for health problems among workers. This program monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of five or more consecutive workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers. This report summarizes epidemiologic surveillance data collected from Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) from January 1, 1995 through December 31, 1995. The data were collected by a coordinator at BNL and submitted to the Epidemiologic Surveillance Data Center, located at Oak Ridge Institute for Science and Education, where quality control procedures and data analyses were carried out.

  11. Brookhaven National Laboratory site report for calendar year 1988

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miltenberger, R.P.; Royce, B.A.; Naidu, J.R.

    1989-06-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is managed by Associated Universities Inc. (AUI). AUI was formed in 1946 by a group of nine universities whose purpose was to create and manage a laboratory in the Northeast in order to advance scientific research in areas of interest to universities, industry, and government. On January 31, 1947, the contract for BNL was approved by the Manhattan District of the Army Corps of Engineers and BNL was established on the former Camp Upton army camp. 54 refs., 21 figs., 78 tabs.

  12. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.; Royce, B.A.; Miltenberger, R.P.

    1992-09-01

    This publication presents the results of BNL`s environmental monitoring and compliance effort and provides an assessment of the impact of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) operations on the environment. This document is the responsibility of the Environmental Protection Section of the Safety and Envirorunental Protection Division. Within this Section, the Environmental Monitoring Group (EMG) sample the environment, interpreted the results, performed the impact analysis of the emissions from BNL, and compiled the information presented here. In this effort, other groups of the Section: Compliance; Analytical; Ground Water; and Quality played a key role in addressing the regulatory aspects and the analysis and documentation of the data, respectively.

  13. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1991

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.; Royce, B.A.; Miltenberger, R.P.

    1992-09-01

    This publication presents the results of BNL's environmental monitoring and compliance effort and provides an assessment of the impact of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) operations on the environment. This document is the responsibility of the Environmental Protection Section of the Safety and Envirorunental Protection Division. Within this Section, the Environmental Monitoring Group (EMG) sample the environment, interpreted the results, performed the impact analysis of the emissions from BNL, and compiled the information presented here. In this effort, other groups of the Section: Compliance; Analytical; Ground Water; and Quality played a key role in addressing the regulatory aspects and the analysis and documentation of the data, respectively.

  14. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1990

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miltenberger, R.P.; Royce, B.A.; Naidu, J.R.

    1992-01-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) carries out basic and applied research in the following fields: high-energy nuclear and solid state physics; fundamental material and structure properties and the interactions of matter; nuclear medicine, biomedical and environmental sciences; and selected energy technologies. In conducting these research activities, it is Laboratory policy to protect the health and safety of employees and the public, and to minimize the impact of BNL operations on the environment. This document is the BNL environmental report for the calendar year 1990 for the safety and Environmental Protection division and corners topics on effluents, surveillance, regulations, assessments, and compliance.

  15. 76 FR 80982 - International Cyclotron, Inc., Hato Rey, Puerto Rico; Order Suspending Licensed Activities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-27

    ...-0292] International Cyclotron, Inc., Hato Rey, Puerto Rico; Order Suspending Licensed Activities I International Cyclotron, Inc. (International Cyclotron; Licensee) is the holder of Byproduct Materials License... International Cyclotron submitted its NRC license application related to the cyclotron, it requested...

  16. 75 FR 43611 - U S Rail Corporation-Construction and Operation Exemption-Brookhaven Rail Terminal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... TRANSPORTATION Surface Transportation Board U S Rail Corporation--Construction and Operation Exemption-- Brookhaven Rail Terminal On August 7, 2008, U S Rail Corporation (U S Rail), an existing class III short line...) of new rail line at a 28-acre site (the Brookhaven Rail Terminal or BRT) located in the Town of...

  17. Brookhaven National Laboratory Institutional Plan FY2001--FY2005

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, S.

    2000-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multidisciplinary laboratory in the Department of Energy National Laboratory system and plays a lead role in the DOE Science and Technology mission. The Laboratory also contributes to the DOE missions in Energy Resources, Environmental Quality, and National Security. Brookhaven strives for excellence in its science research and in facility operations and manages its activities with particular sensitivity to environmental and community issues. The Laboratory's programs are aligned continuously with the goals and objectives of the DOE through an Integrated Planning Process. This Institutional Plan summarizes the portfolio of research and capabilities that will assure success in the Laboratory's mission in the future. It also sets forth BNL strategies for our programs and for management of the Laboratory. The Department of Energy national laboratory system provides extensive capabilities in both world class research expertise and unique facilities that cannot exist without federal support. Through these national resources, which are available to researchers from industry, universities, other government agencies and other nations, the Department advances the energy, environmental, economic and national security well being of the US, provides for the international advancement of science, and educates future scientists and engineers.

  18. The High Flux Beam Reactor at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shapiro, S.M.

    1994-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory`s High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR) was built because of the need of the scientist to always want `more`. In the mid-50`s the Brookhaven Graphite reactor was churning away producing a number of new results when the current generation of scientists, led by Donald Hughes, realized the need for a high flux reactor and started down the political, scientific and engineering path that led to the BFBR. The effort was joined by a number of engineers and scientists among them, Chemick, Hastings, Kouts, and Hendrie, who came up with the novel design of the HFBR. The two innovative features that have been incorporated in nearly all other research reactors built since are: (i) an under moderated core arrangement which enables the thermal flux to peak outside the core region where beam tubes can be placed, and (ii) beam tubes that are tangential to the core which decrease the fast neutron background without affecting the thermal beam intensity. Construction began in the fall of 1961 and four years later, at a cost of $12 Million, criticality was achieved on Halloween Night, 1965. Thus began 30 years of scientific accomplishments.

  19. Cyclotron Line Measurements with INTEGRAL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottschmidt, K.; Kreykenbohm, I.; Caballero, I.; Fritz, S.; Schoenherr, G.; Kretschmar, P.; Wilms, J.; McBride, V. A.; Suchy, S.; Rothschild, R. E.

    2008-01-01

    Due to its broadband energy coverage, INTEGRAL has made important contributions to observing and interpreting cyclotron lines, which are present in the 10-100 keV range of a sample of accreting pulsars. In these systems photons with energies fulfilling the resonance condition inelastically Compton scatter off electrons quantized in the accretion column above the neutron star's magnetic pole(s). This process gives rise to the broad, absorption-like lines or 'cyclotron resonant scattering features' (CRSF). The observed lines allow to directly measure the B-fields of these sources, resulting in values of a few times 1E12G. In this overview I will present recent highlights regarding CRSF observations as well as discuss current ideas and models for the physical conditions in the accretion column. Among the former are the stability of the spectrum of Vela X-1 during giant flares in 2003, the observation of three cyclotron lines during the 2004 outburst of V0332+53, the confirmation of the fundamental line at approximately 45 keV during a 2005 normal outburst of A0535-26, and the simultaneous detection of the two lines in the dipping source 4U 1907+09 (for which also a torque reversal was detected for the first time). Through these and other observations it has become increasingly apparent that two types of observations can potentially be used to constrain the accretion column geometry: the determination of energy ratios for multiple harmonic lines (only two sources with greater than 2 lines are known), was well as the evolution of the fundamental line centroid, which, for different sources, may or may not be correlated with flux. Furthermore, first steps have been taken away from the usual phenomenological description of the lines, towards a physical approach based on self-consistent CRSF modeling. Initial applications are presented.

  20. Radiation surveillance in and around cyclotron facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Amandeep; Sharma, Sarika; Mittal, BR

    2012-01-01

    The cyclotron is the most widely used particle accelerator for producing medically important radio nuclides. Many medical centers in India have installed compact medical cyclotrons for on-site production of short-lived positron-emitting radio nuclides such as 18F, 13N, and 11C. A mandatory requirement for cyclotron installation is radiation control permit from Atomic Energy Regulatory Board. Cyclotron radiation survey is an integral part of the overall radiation safety in the cyclotron facility. Radiation surveillance in and around a newly installed cyclotron was performed using ionization chamber counter and Geiger Muller counter before, during and after operating the cyclotron. The readings were recorded at various locations where a high radiation field was expected. The results were recorded, tabulated and analyzed. The highest exposure level (0.93 μSv) was found at the back wall of the radiochemistry lab facing the cyclotron vault. Reason for the high exposure of 0.93 μSv/h: Synthesis of 18F-Fluoro-Deoxy-Glucose (18F-FDG) was going in the synthesis module and activity (18F) was present in the synthesis module when reading was taken. All other values were found to be below the recommended levels of exposure. PMID:24019654

  1. Developing the smallest possible medical cyclotron

    CERN Multimedia

    Katarina Anthony

    2011-01-01

    Imagine a portable medical cyclotron operated in a conventional radioactive facility at a hospital. Imagine a nurse or technician switching it on and producing isotopes at the patient’s bedside. Sounds like science fiction? Think again.   CERN has teamed up with Spain’s national scientific research centre (CIEMAT) to develop an avant-garde cyclotron to be used for Positron Emission Tomography (PET). “We plan to make a cyclotron that doesn't need an insulated building or ‘vault’: a cyclotron small enough to fit inside a hospital lift,” explains Jose Manuel Perez, who is leading the CIEMAT/CERN collaboration. “It will be the smallest possible medical cyclotron for single patient dose production and will dramatically reduce costs for hospitals.” While PET technology has transformed imaging techniques, many of its medical benefits have remained confined to highly specialised hospitals. “Studies have foun...

  2. High field magnet program at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    CERN Document Server

    Ghosh, A; Muratore, J; Parker, B; Sampson, W; Wanderer, P J; Willen, E

    2000-01-01

    The magnet program at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is focussed on superconducting magnets for particle accelerators. The effort includes magnet production at the laboratory and in industry, magnet R&D, and test facilities for magnets and superconductors. Nearly 2000 magnets-dipoles, quadrupoles, sextupoles and correctors for the arc and insertion regions-were produced for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC), which is being commissioned. Currently, production of helical dipoles for the polarized proton program at RHIC, insertion region dipoles for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, and an insertion magnet system for the Hadron-Elektron-Ring- Analage (HERA) collider at Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY) is underway. The R&D effort is exploring dipoles with fields above 10 T for use in post-LHC colliders. Brittle superconductors-Nb/sub 3/Sn or HTS-are being used for these magnets. The superconductor test facility measures short-sample currents and other characteristics of sample...

  3. Deriving cleanup guidelines for radionuclides at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Dionne, B.; Moskowitz, P.D.

    1997-01-01

    Past activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. As a result, BNL was designated a Superfund site under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). BNL`s Office of Environmental Restoration (OER) is overseeing environmental restoration activities at the Laboratory. With the exception of radium, there are no regulations or guidelines to establish cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soils at BNL. BNL must derive radionuclide soil cleanup guidelines for a number of Operable Units (OUs) and Areas of Concern (AOCs). These guidelines are required by DOE under a proposed regulation for radiation protection of public health and the environment as well as to satisfy the requirements of CERCLA. The objective of this report is to propose a standard approach to deriving risk-based cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soil at BNL. Implementation of the approach is briefly discussed.

  4. Summary of failure analysis activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cowgill, M.G.; Czajkowski, C.J.; Franz, E.M.

    1996-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory has for many years conducted examinations related to the failures of nuclear materials and components. These examinations included the confirmation of root cause analyses, the determination of the causes of failure, identification of the species that accelerate corrosion, and comparison of the results of nondestructive examinations with those obtained by destructive examination. The results of those examinations, which had previously appeared in various formats (formal and informal reports, journal articles, etc.), have been collected together and summarized in the present report. The report is divided into sections according to the general subject matter (for example, corrosion, fatigue, etc.). Each section presents summaries of the information contained in specific reports and publications, all of which are fully identified as to title, authors, report number or journal reference, date of publication, and FIN number under which the work was performed.

  5. Cyclotrons: From Science to Human Health

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craddock, Michael

    2011-04-01

    Lawrence's invention of the cyclotron, whose 80th anniversary we have just celebrated, not only revolutionized nuclear physics, but proved the starting point for a whole variety of recirculating accelerators, from the smallest microtron to the largest synchrotron, that have had an enormous impact in almost every branch of science and in several areas of medicine and industry. Cyclotrons themselves have proved remarkably adaptable, incorporating a variety of new ideas and technologies over the years: frequency modulation, edge focusing, AG focusing, separate magnet sectors, axial and azimuthal injection, ring geometries, stripping extraction, superconducting magnets and rf...... Even FFAGs, those most complex members of the cyclotron (fixed-magnetic-field) family, are making a comeback. Currently there are more than 50 medium or large cyclotrons around the world devoted to research. These provide intense primary beams of protons or stable ions, and correspondingly intense secondary beams of neutrons, pions, muons and radioactive ions, for experiments in nuclear, particle and condensed-matter physics, and in the materials and life sciences. Far outnumbering these, however, are the 800 or so small and medium cyclotrons used to produce radioisotopes for medical and other purposes. In addition, a rapidly growing number of 230-MeV proton cyclotrons are being built for cancer therapy -12 brought into operation since 1998 and as many more in the works. Altogether, cyclotrons are flourishing!

  6. Method and apparatuses for ion cyclotron spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahl, David A [Idaho Falls, ID; Scott, Jill R [Idaho Falls, ID; McJunkin, Timothy R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2012-03-06

    An ion cyclotron spectrometer may include a vacuum chamber that extends at least along a z-axis and means for producing a magnetic field within the vacuum chamber so that a magnetic field vector is generally parallel to the z-axis. The ion cyclotron spectrometer may also include means for producing a trapping electric field within the vacuum chamber. The trapping electric field may comprise a field potential that, when taken in cross-section along the z-axis, includes at least one section that is concave down and at least one section that is concave up so that ions traversing the field potential experience a net magnetron effect on a cyclotron frequency of the ions that is substantially equal to zero. Other apparatuses and a method for performing ion cyclotron spectrometry are also disclosed herein.

  7. 10 GHz ECRIS for Warsaw Cyclotron

    CERN Document Server

    Sudlitz, K

    1999-01-01

    Cusp type, 10 GHz ECRIS has been built and tested earlier. For obtaining intensive beams, more relevant for cyclotron, cusp geometry has been replaced by hexapole. Discharge chamber (stainless steel, 50 mm diameter, 250 mm long) is an extension of a coaxial line, feeding RF (9,6 GHz, up to 200 W) to the plasma. The NdFeB hexapole (0,52 T on the surface) has been used. The axial magnetic field is created by water cooled coils. The axial injection line dedicated to K160 isochronous heavy ion cyclotron has been constructed. The line consists of Glaser lenses, double focusing magnet, solenoid and mirror type inflector. The system provides sufficient transmission of the beam from ECR ion source to the firsts orbits of the cyclotron for m/q ranging from 7 to 2. After successful initial tests which were done in July 1997 the ECRIS serves as an external source for Warsaw Cyclotron.

  8. Scientists at Brookhaven contribute to the development of a better electron accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    Scientists working at Brookhaven have developed a compact linear accelerator called STELLA (Staged Electron Laser Acceleration). Highly efficient, it may help electron accelerators become practical tools for applications in industry and medicine, such as radiation therapy (1 page)

  9. Proto-2, an ALICE detector prototype, part of the STAR experiment at the Brookhaven National Laboratory

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Proto-2, an LAICE detector prototype, overcame its prototype status to become a real part of the SDTAR, epxeriment at the US Brookhaven National Laboratory. After more than two years across the ocean, it has just arrived back at CERN.

  10. Cyclotron axial ion-beam-buncher system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamm, R.W.; Swenson, D.A.; Wangler, T.P.

    1982-02-11

    Adiabatic ion bunching is achieved in a cyclotron axial ion injection system through the incorporation of a radio frequency quadrupole system, which receives ions from an external ion source via an accelerate-decelerate system and a focusing einzel lens system, and which adiabatically bunches and then injects the ions into the median plane of a cyclotron via an electrostatic quadrupole system and an inflection mirror.

  11. Building 211 cyclotron characterization survey report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-03-30

    The Building 211 Cyclotron Characterization Survey includes an assessment of the radioactive and chemical inventory of materials stored within the facility; an evaluation of the relative distribution of accelerator-produced activation products within various cyclotron components and adjacent structures; measurement of the radiation fields throughout the facility; measurement and assessment of internal and external radioactive surface contamination on various equipment, facility structures, and air-handling systems; and an assessment of lead (Pb) paint and asbestos hazards within the facility.

  12. WILDLAND FIRE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    ENVIRONMENTAL AND WASTE MANAGEMENT SERVICES DIVISION

    2003-09-01

    This Wildland Fire Management Plan (FMP) for Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) and the Upton Ecological and Research Reserve (Upton Reserve) is based on the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service (FWS) fire management planning procedures and was developed in cooperation with the Department of Energy (DOE) by Brookhaven Science Associates. As the Upton Reserve is contained within the BNL 5,265-acre site, it is logical that the plan applies to both the Upton Reserve and BNL. The Department of the Interior policy for managing wildland fires requires that all areas managed by FWS that can sustain fire must have an FMP that details fire management guidelines for operational procedures and specifies values to be protected or enhanced. Fire management plans provide guidance on fire preparedness, fire prevention, wildfire suppression, and the use of controlled, ''prescribed'' fires and mechanical means to control the amount of available combustible material. Values reflected in the BNL/Upton Reserve Wildland FMP include protecting life and public safety; Lab properties, structures and improvements; cultural and historical sites; neighboring private and public properties; and endangered and threatened species and species of concern. Other values supported by the plan include the enhancement of fire-dependent ecosystems at BNL and the Upton Reserve. This FMP will be reviewed periodically to ensure the fire program advances and evolves with the missions of FWS, BNL, and the Upton Reserve. This Fire Management Plan is a modified version of the Long Island National Wildlife Refuge Complex Fire plan (updated in 2000), which contains all FWS fire plan requirements and is presented in the format specified by the national template for fire management plans adopted under the National Fire Plan. The DOE is one of the signatory agencies on the National Fire Plan. FWS shall be, through an Interagency Agreement dated November 2000 (Appendix C), responsible for coordinating and

  13. Brookhaven National Laboratory 2008 Site Environment Report Volume 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brookhaven National Laboratory

    2009-10-01

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) prepares an annual Site Environmental Report (SER) in accordance with DOE Order 231.1A, Environment, Safety and Health Reporting of the U.S. Department of Energy. The report is written to inform the public, regulators, employees, and other stakeholders of the Laboratory's environmental performance during the calendar year in review. Volume I of the SER summarizes environmental data; environmental management performance; compliance with applicable DOE, federal, state, and local regulations; and performance in restoration and surveillance monitoring programs. BNL has prepared annual SERs since 1971 and has documented nearly all of its environmental history since the Laboratory's inception in 1947. Volume II of the SER, the Groundwater Status Report, also is prepared annually to report on the status of and evaluate the performance of groundwater treatment systems at the Laboratory. Volume II includes detailed technical summaries of groundwater data and its interpretation, and is intended for internal BNL users, regulators, and other technically oriented stakeholders. A brief summary of the information contained in Volume II is included in this volume in Chapter 7, Groundwater Protection. Both reports are available in print and as downloadable files on the BNL web page at http://www.bnl.gov/ewms/ser/. An electronic version on compact disc is distributed with each printed report. In addition, a summary of Volume I is prepared each year to provide a general overview of the report, and is distributed with a compact disc containing the full report.

  14. Environmental Survey preliminary report, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1988-06-01

    This report presents the preliminary findings from the first phase of the Environmental Survey of the United States Department of Energy (DOE) Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) conducted April 6 through 17, 1987. The Survey is being conducted by an interdisciplinary team of environmental specialists, led and managed by the Office of Environment, Safety and Health's Office of Environmental Audit. Individual team components are being supplied by a private contractor. The objective of the Survey is to identify environmental problems and areas of environmental risk associated with BNL. The Survey covers all environmental media and all areas of environmental regulation. It is being performed in accordance with the DOE Environmental Survey Manual. This phase of the Survey involves the review of existing site environmental data, observations of the operations carried on at BNL, and interviews with site personnel. The Survey team developed a Sampling and Analysis Plan to assist in further assessing specific environmental problems identified during its on-site activities. The Sampling and Analysis Plan will be executed by Oak Ridge National Laboratory. When completed, the results will be incorporated into the BNL Environmental Survey Interim Report. The Interim Report will reflect the final determinations of the BNL Survey. 80 refs., 24 figs., 48 tabs.

  15. CULTURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DAVIS, M.

    2005-04-01

    The Cultural Resource Management Plan (CRMP) for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) provides an organized guide that describes or references all facets and interrelationships of cultural resources at BNL. This document specifically follows, where applicable, the format of the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Guidelines for Development of Cultural Resource Management Plans, DOE G 450.1-3 (9-22-04[m1]). Management strategies included within this CRMP are designed to adequately identify the cultural resources that BNL and DOE consider significant and to acknowledge associated management actions. A principal objective of the CRMP is to reduce the need for additional regulatory documents and to serve as the basis for a formal agreement between the DOE and the New York State Historic Preservation Officer (NYSHPO). The BNL CRMP is designed to be a ''living document.'' Each section includes identified gaps in the management plan, with proposed goals and actions for addressing each gap. The plan will be periodically revised to incorporate new documentation.

  16. In vivo neutron activation facility at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, R.; Yasumura, Seiichi; Dilmanian, F.A.

    1997-11-01

    Seven important body elements, C, N, Ca, P, K, Na, and Cl, can be measured with great precision and accuracy in the in vivo neutron activation facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The facilities include the delayed-gamma neutron activation, the prompt-gamma neutron activation, and the inelastic neutron scattering systems. In conjunction with measurements of total body water by the tritiated-water dilution method several body compartments can be defined from the contents of these elements, also with high precision. In particular, body fat mass is derived from total body carbon together with total body calcium and nitrogen; body protein mass is derived from total body nitrogen; extracellular fluid volume is derived from total body sodium and chlorine; lean body mass and body cell mass are derived from total body potassium; and, skeletal mass is derived from total body calcium. Thus, we suggest that neutron activation analysis may be valuable for calibrating some of the instruments routinely used in clinical studies of body composition. The instruments that would benefit from absolute calibration against neutron activation analysis are bioelectric impedance analysis, infrared interactance, transmission ultrasound, and dual energy x-ray/photon absorptiometry.

  17. Tiger Team assessment of the Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York, between March 26 and April 27, 1990. The BNL is a multiprogram laboratory operated by the Associated Universities, Inc., (AUI) for DOE. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the status of environment, safety, and health (ES H) programs at the Laboratory. The scope of the assessment included a review of management systems and operating procedures and records; observations of facility operations; and interviews at the facilities. Subteams in four areas performed the review: ES H, Occupational Safety and Health, and Management and Organization. The assessment was comprehensive, covering all areas of ES H activities and waste management operations. Compliance with applicable Federal, State, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; and internal BNL requirements was assessed. In addition, the assessment included an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and the site contractor, Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), management, organization, and administration of the ES H programs at BNL.

  18. HOM identification by bead pulling in the Brookhaven ERL cavity

    CERN Document Server

    Hahn, H; Jain, Puneet; Johnson, Elliott C; Xu, Wencan

    2014-01-01

    Exploratory measurements of the Brookhaven Energy Recovery Linac (ERL) cavity at superconducting temperature produced a long list of high order modes (HOMs). The niobium 5-cell cavity is terminated at each end with HOM ferrite dampers that successfully reduce the Q-factors to levels required to avoid beam break up (BBU) instabilities. However, a number of un-damped resonances with Q≥106 were found at 4 K and their mode identification forms the focus of this paper. The approach taken here consists of bead pulling on a copper (Cu) replica of the ERL cavity with dampers involving various network analyzer measurements. Several different S21 transmission measurements are used, including those taken from the fundamental input coupler to the pick-up probe across the cavity, others between beam-position monitor probes in the beam tubes, and also between probes placed into the cells. The bead pull technique suitable for HOM identification with a metallic needle or dielectric bead is detailed. This paper presents the...

  19. Tiger Team assessment of the Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1990-06-01

    This report documents the results of the Department of Energy's (DOE's) Tiger Team Assessment conducted at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) in Upton, New York, between March 26 and April 27, 1990. The BNL is a multiprogram laboratory operated by the Associated Universities, Inc., (AUI) for DOE. The purpose of the assessment was to provide the status of environment, safety, and health (ES H) programs at the laboratory. The scope of the assessment included a review of management systems and operating procedures and records; observations of facility operations; and interviews at the facilities. Subteams in four areas performed the review: ES H, Occupational Safety and Health, and Management and Organization. The assessment was comprehensive, covering all areas of ES H activities and waste management operations. Compliance with applicable Federal, State, and local regulations; applicable DOE Orders; and internal BNL requirements was assessed. In addition, the assessment included an evaluation of the adequacy and effectiveness of the DOE and the site contractor, Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI), management, organization, and administration of the ES H programs at BNL. This volume contains appendices.

  20. The Founding of the Brookhaven National Laboratory - Associated Universities, Inc.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY

    1948-01-15

    At the end of the war it became apparent that the teamwork of government and scientific institutions, which had been so effective in wartime work, must somehow be perpetuated in order to insure the continued progress of nuclear science in peace time. The enormous expense of the tools needed to pursue the next steps in this research -- nuclear reactors and high energy accelerators -- and the shortage of scientifically trained personnel pointed towards the establishment of a cooperative laboratory. Such a laboratory, using government funds, could carry out a comprehensive research program that would benefit the many interested research groups throughout the country. As a result of the wartime programs under the Manhattan District, centers of research in nuclear science were already active at the Radiation Laboratory in Berkeley, California, at Los Alamos in New Mexico, at the Clinton Laboratories in Oak Ridge, Tennessee and at the Argonne Laboratory in Chicago. No analogous nuclear research laboratories, however, had developed in the Northeast, and since so much of the nation's scientific talent and industrial activities are concentrated in the northeastern states, it was proposed that a new laboratory be established near New York City. As a result of this plan, the Brookhaven National Laboratory is now in operation at Upton, Long Island. The work of this Laboratory is performed under a contract between the Atomic Energy Commission (AEC) and a corporation, Associated Universities, Inc. (AUI) , formed by representatives of nine of the larger private universities in the northeast: Columbia, Cornell, Harvard, Johns Hopkins, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the University of Pennsylvania, Princeton, the University of Rochester, and Yale. The purpose of this laboratory is the advancement of knowledge in the fundamentals of nuclear science, the extension of its application to other fields, and the training of young scientists in these new subjects. This

  1. NATURAL RESOURCE MANAGEMENT PLAN FOR BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREEN,T.ET AL.

    2003-12-31

    Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) is located near the geographic center of Long Island, New York. The Laboratory is situated on 5,265 acres of land composed of Pine Barrens habitat with a central area developed for Laboratory work. In the mid-1990s BNL began developing a wildlife management program. This program was guided by the Wildlife Management Plan (WMP), which was reviewed and approved by various state and federal agencies in September 1999. The WMP primarily addressed concerns with the protection of New York State threatened, endangered, or species of concern, as well as deer populations, invasive species management, and the revegetation of the area surrounding the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The WMP provided a strong and sound basis for wildlife management and established a basis for forward motion and the development of this document, the Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP), which will guide the natural resource management program for BNL. The body of this plan establishes the management goals and actions necessary for managing the natural resources at BNL. The appendices provide specific management requirements for threatened and endangered amphibians and fish (Appendices A and B respectively), lists of actions in tabular format (Appendix C), and regulatory drivers for the Natural Resource Program (Appendix D). The purpose of the Natural Resource Management Plan is to provide management guidance, promote stewardship of the natural resources found at BNL, and to integrate their protection with pursuit of the Laboratory's mission. The philosophy or guiding principles of the NRMP are stewardship, adaptive ecosystem management, compliance, integration with other plans and requirements, and incorporation of community involvement, where applicable.

  2. Brookhaven National Laboratory site environmental report for calendar year 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Naidu, J.R.; Royce, B.A. [eds.

    1994-05-01

    This report documents the results of the Environmental Monitoring Program at BNL and presents summary information about environmental compliance for 1993. To evaluate the effect of BNL operations on the local environment, measurements of direct radiation, and a variety of radionuclides and chemical compounds in ambient air, soil, sewage effluent, surface water, ground water and vegetation were made at the BNL site and at sites adjacent to the Laboratory. Brookhaven National Laboratory`s compliance with all applicable guides, standards, and limits for radiological and nonradiological emissions to the environment were evaluated. Among the permitted facilities, two instances, of pH exceedances were observed at recharge basins, possible related to rain-water run-off to these recharge basins. Also, the discharge from the Sewage Treatment Plant (STP) to the Peconic River exceeded on five occasions, three for residual chlorine and one each for iron and ammonia nitrogen. The chlorine exceedances were related to a malfunctioning hypochlorite dosing pump and ceased when the pump was repaired. While the iron and ammonia-nitrogen could be the result of disturbances to the sand filter beds during maintenance. The environmental monitoring data has identified site-specific contamination of ground water and soil. These areas are subject to Remedial Investigation/Feasibility Studies (RI/FS) under the Inter Agency Agreement (IAG). Except for the above, the environmental monitoring data has continued to demonstrate that compliance was achieved with applicable environmental laws and regulations governing emission and discharge of materials to the environment, and that the environmental impacts at BNL are minimal and pose no threat to the public or to the environment. This report meets the requirements of DOE Orders 5484. 1, Environmental Protection, Safety, and Health Protection Information reporting requirements and 5400.1, General Environmental Protection Programs.

  3. The Brookhaven National Laboratory electron beam ion source for RHIC.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessi, J G; Barton, D; Beebe, E; Bellavia, S; Gould, O; Kponou, A; Lambiase, R; Lockey, R; McNerney, A; Mapes, M; Marneris, Y; Okamura, M; Phillips, D; Pikin, A I; Raparia, D; Ritter, J; Snydstrup, L; Theisen, C; Wilinski, M

    2010-02-01

    As part of a new heavy ion preinjector that will supply beams for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration Space Radiation Laboratory, construction of a new electron beam ion source (EBIS) is now being completed. This source, based on the successful prototype Brookhaven National Laboratory Test EBIS, is designed to produce milliampere level currents of all ion species, with q/m=(1/6)-(1/2). Among the major components of this source are a 5 T, 2-m-long, 204 mm diameter warm bore superconducting solenoid, an electron gun designed to operate at a nominal current of 10 A, and an electron collector designed to dissipate approximately 300 kW of peak power. Careful attention has been paid to the design of the vacuum system, since a pressure of 10(-10) Torr is required in the trap region. The source includes several differential pumping stages, the trap can be baked to 400 C, and there are non-evaporable getter strips in the trap region. Power supplies include a 15 A, 15 kV electron collector power supply, and fast switchable power supplies for most of the 16 electrodes used for varying the trap potential distribution for ion injection, confinement, and extraction. The EBIS source and all EBIS power supplies sit on an isolated platform, which is pulsed up to a maximum of 100 kV during ion extraction. The EBIS is now fully assembled, and operation will be beginning following final vacuum and power supply tests. Details of the EBIS components are presented.

  4. Residual radioactivity at the Milan AVF cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birattari, C.; Cantone, M. C.; Ferrari, A.; Silari, M.

    1989-08-01

    γ-ray spectrometry measurements have been carried out at the Cyclotron Laboratory at the Department of Physics of the University of Milan, to evaluate the levels of residual radioactivity after about one year from shut down. Measurements were performed inside the cyclotron and at several points in the accelerator vault and target room, as well as on specific components removed from the beam transport system, on samples of the concrete shields and on residues taken from the cyclotron vacuum chamber. The radionuclides identified and the values of specific activity and dose rate are reported. The results indicate that no particular hazard and waste disposal problems should be encountered at the time of the decommissioning of the facility.

  5. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, S.M. Finn, R.D.

    1992-08-04

    This report describes the author's continuing long term goal of promoting nuclear medicine applications by improving the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The program has 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry /Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. An essential strategy is as follows: novel radionuclides and radiotracers developed in the Radiochemistry/Cyclotron section under the DOE grant during the 1989--1992 grant period, will be employed in the Pharmacology and Immunology sections of the DOE grant during the 1992--1995 grant period. The development of novel radionuclides and tracers is of course useful in and of itself, but their utility is greatly enhanced by the interaction with the immunology and pharmacology components of the program.

  6. A line-of-sight electron cyclotron emission receiver for electron cyclotron resonance heating feedback control of tearing modes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Oosterbeek, J.W.; Bürger, A.; Westerhof, E.

    2008-01-01

    An electron cyclotron emission (ECE) receiver inside the electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) transmission line has been brought into operation. The ECE is extracted by placing a quartz plate acting as a Fabry-Perot interferometer under an angle inside the electron cyclotron wave (ECW) beam...

  7. A woman like you: Women scientists and engineers at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benkovitz, Carmen; Bernholc, Nicole; Cohen, Anita; Eng, Susan; Enriquez-Leder, Rosario; Franz, Barbara; Gorden, Patricia; Hanson, Louise; Lamble, Geraldine; Martin, Harriet; Mastrangelo, Iris; McLane, Victoria; Villela, Maria-Alicia; Vivirito, Katherine; Woodhead, Avril

    1991-01-01

    This publication by the women in Science and Engineering introduces career possibilities in science and engineering. It introduces what work and home life are like for women who have already entered these fields. Women at Brookhaven National Laboratory work in a variety of challenging research roles -- from biologist and environmental scientist to safety engineer, from patent lawyer to technician. Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi-program laboratory which carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences and in selected energy technologies. The Laboratory is managed by Associated University, Inc., under contract with the US Department of Energy. Brookhaven and the other national laboratories, because of their enormous research resources, can play a critical role in a education and training of the workforce.

  8. A woman like you: Women scientists and engineers at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Careers in action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1991-12-31

    This publication by the women in Science and Engineering introduces career possibilities in science and engineering. It introduces what work and home life are like for women who have already entered these fields. Women at Brookhaven National Laboratory work in a variety of challenging research roles -- from biologist and environmental scientist to safety engineer, from patent lawyer to technician. Brookhaven National Laboratory is a multi-program laboratory which carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences and in selected energy technologies. The Laboratory is managed by Associated University, Inc., under contract with the US Department of Energy. Brookhaven and the other national laboratories, because of their enormous research resources, can play a critical role in a education and training of the workforce.

  9. Natural Resource Management Plan for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    green, T.

    2011-08-15

    This comprehensive Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP) for Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was built on the successful foundation of the Wildlife Management Plan for BNL, which it replaces. This update to the 2003 plan continues to build on successes and efforts to better understand the ecosystems and natural resources found on the BNL site. The plan establishes the basis for managing the varied natural resources located on the 5,265 acre BNL site, setting goals and actions to achieve those goals. The planning of this document is based on the knowledge and expertise gained over the past 10 years by the Natural Resources management staff at BNL in concert with local natural resource agencies including the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, Long Island Pine Barrens Joint Planning and Policy Commission, The Nature Conservancy, and others. The development of this plan is an attempt at sound ecological management that not only benefits BNL's ecosystems but also benefits the greater Pine Barrens habitats in which BNL is situated. This plan applies equally to the Upton Ecological and Research Reserve (Upton Reserve). Any difference in management between the larger BNL area and the Upton Reserve are noted in the text. The purpose of the Natural Resource Management Plan (NRMP) is to provide management guidance, promote stewardship of the natural resources found at BNL, and to sustainably integrate their protection with pursuit of the Laboratory's mission. The philosophy or guiding principles of the NRMP are stewardship, sustainability, adaptive ecosystem management, compliance, integration with other plans and requirements, and the incorporation of community involvement, where applicable. The NRMP is periodically reviewed and updated, typically every five years. This review and update was delayed to develop documents associated with a new third party facility, the Long Island Solar Farm. This two hundred acre facility will result in

  10. Wildland Fire Management Plan for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green,T.

    2009-10-23

    This Wildland Fire Management Plan (FMP) for Brookhaven National Lab (BNL) updates the 2003 plan incorporating changes necessary to comply with DOE Order 450.1 and DOE P 450.4, Federal Wildland Fire Management Policy and Program Review; Wildland and Prescribed Fire Management Policy and implementation Procedures Reference Guide. This current plan incorporates changes since the original draft of the FMP that result from new policies on the national level. This update also removes references and dependence on the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service and Department of the Interior, fully transitioning Wildland Fire Management responsibilities to BNL. The Department of Energy policy for managing wildland fires requires that all areas, managed by the DOE and/or its various contractors, that can sustain fire must have a FMP that details fire management guidelines for operational procedures associated with wild fire, operational, and prescribed fires. Fire management plans provide guidance on fire preparedness, fire prevention, wildfire suppression, and the use of controlled, 'prescribed' fires and mechanical means to control the amount of available combustible material. Values reflected in the BNL Wildland FMP include protecting life and public safety; Lab properties, structures and improvements; cultural and historical sites; neighboring private and public properties; and endangered, threatened, and species of concern. Other values supported by the plan include the enhancement of fire-dependent ecosystems at BNL. This FMP will be reviewed periodically to ensure the fire program advances and evolves with the missions of the DOE and BNL. This Fire Management Plan is presented in a format that coverers all aspects specified by DOE guidance documents which are based on the national template for fire management plans adopted under the National Fire Plan. The DOE is one of the signatory agencies on the National Fire Plan. This FMP is to be used and implemented for the

  11. Electron cyclotron resonance heating on TEXTOR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.; Hoekzema, J. A.; Hogeweij, G. M. D.; Jaspers, R. J. E.; Schüller, F. C.; Barth, C. J.; Bongers, W. A.; Donne, A. J. H.; Dumortier, P.; van der Grift, A. F.; van Gorkom, J. C.; Kalupin, D.; Koslowski, H. R.; Kramer-Flecken, A.; Kruijt, O. G.; Cardozo, N. J. L.; Mantica, P.; van der Meiden, H. J.; Merkulov, A.; Messiaen, A.; Oosterbeek, J. W.; Oyevaar, T.; Poelman, A. J.; Polman, R. W.; Prins, P. R.; Scholten, J.; Sterk, A. B.; Tito, C. J.; Udintsev, V.S.; Unterberg, B.; Vervier, M.; van Wassenhove, G.

    2003-01-01

    The 110 GHz and the new 140 GHz gyrotron systems for electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) and ECCD on TEXTOR are described and results of ECRH experiments with the 110 GHz system are reported. Central ECRH on Ohmic plasmas shows the presence of an internal electron transport barrier near q =

  12. Microwave power coupling with electron cyclotron resonance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma was produced at 2.45 GHz using 200 – 750 W microwave power. The plasma was produced from argon gas at a pressure of 2 × 10−4 mbar. Three water-cooled solenoid coils were used to satisfy the ECR resonant conditions inside the plasma chamber. The basic parameters of ...

  13. The Data Cyclotron query processing scheme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Goncalves, R.; Kersten, M.

    2011-01-01

    A grand challenge of distributed query processing is to devise a self-organizing architecture which exploits all hardware resources optimally to manage the database hot set, minimize query response time, and maximize throughput without single point global coordination. The Data Cyclotron

  14. The Data Cyclotron query processing scheme.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Goncalves (Romulo); M.L. Kersten (Martin)

    2011-01-01

    htmlabstractA grand challenge of distributed query processing is to devise a self-organizing architecture which exploits all hardware resources optimally to manage the database hot set, minimize query response time, and maximize throughput without single point global coordination. The Data Cyclotron

  15. Electron-cyclotron-resonance ion sources (review)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovanivskii, K.S.; Dougar-Jabon, V.D. [People`s Friendship Univ., Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1992-01-01

    The physical principles are described and a brief survey of the present state is given of ion sources based on electron-cyclotron heating of plasma in a mirror trap. The characteristics of ECR sources of positive and negative ions used chiefly in accelerator technology are presented. 20 refs., 10 figs., 3 tabs.

  16. <600> MeV synchro-cyclotron

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN PhotoLab

    1971-01-01

    One of the 14 pancakes of the new magnet coils for the 600 MeV synchro-cyclotron which were wound and coated with epoxy resin on the CERN site. These new coils will replace the present ones which have been in use for more than 14 years but are now showing signs of deteriorations.

  17. Development of the cyclotron radioisotope production technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Suh, Yong Sup; Chun, K.S.; Yang, S.D.; Lee, J.D.; Ahn, S.H.; Yun, Y.K.; Park, H.; Lee, J.S.; Chai, J.S.; Kim, U.S.; Hong, S.S.; Lee, M.Y.; Park, C.W.; Baik, S. K.; Kim, E. H.; Kim, T. K.; Kim, K. S.; Kim, J. H

    1999-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to contribute the advance of nuclear medicine and to the improvement of human health through the development of various accelerator radionuclides and mass production with automization of production. The results obtained from this study are following: 1) In order to introduce 30 MeV high current cyclotron, the specification of cyclotron has been made, the building site was selected and we drew the draw-up of cyclotron. The cyclotron installation contract was postponed until the financial resources could be secured. 2) For a development high purity 1-123 producing system, a Xe-124 target system, a temperature measurement system of the inner part of the target and a target window were fabricated. A Xe-124 gas target recovery system and a full production system of 1-123 was drew up. 3) For a development of a therapeutic nuclide At-211, a target for the production of At-211 via {sup 209}Bi(alpha, 2n) reaction was fabricated. Produced At-211 was separated by distillation method. 4) For development of beta-emitting nuclides, Ti-45, C-11, F{sub 2}-18, beam irradiation system suitable for each target were fabricated. 5) For automatic production of Ga-67, automated module and PLC program was made 6) For the quality control of radiopharmaceuticals, analytical method of thallium and copper by polarography was investigated and established.

  18. Resonant cyclotron scattering in magnetars' emission

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rea, N.; Zane, S.; Turolla, R.; Lyutikov, M.; Götz, D.

    2008-01-01

    We present a systematic fit of a model of resonant cyclotron scattering (RCS) to the X-ray data of 10 magnetars, including canonical and transient anomalous X-ray pulsars (AXPs) and soft gamma repeaters (SGRs). In this scenario, nonthermal magnetar spectra in the soft X-rays (i.e., below ~10 keV)

  19. Ion cyclotron resonance heating system on Aditya

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    R. Narasimhan (Krishtel eMaging) 1461 1996 Oct 15 13:05:22

    1Institute for Plasma Research, Bhat, Gandhinagar 382 428, India. 2Variable Electron Cyclotron .... Requirements for RF generators for fusion research include high power, long pulse duration and reliability. ... Output of pre-driver (triode 3CX5000A7) grounded grid amplifier is made tunable within. 20 to 47 MHz by using a ...

  20. Program Complex For Cyclotron Beam Dynamic Simulations

    CERN Document Server

    Glazov, A A; Karamysheva, G A; Lisenkova, O E

    2004-01-01

    The program complex in MATLAB intended for particle dynamic simulations is described. Programming in an easy-to-use environment permits creation of models in a short space of time. Advanced graphical tools of MATLAB give good visualization features to created models. The beam dynamic modelling results by the example of two different cyclotron designs are presented.

  1. SC Cyclotron and RIB Facilities in Kolkata

    CERN Document Server

    Sinha, Bikash; Chakrabarti, Alok

    2005-01-01

    The superconducting cyclotron under construction at this Centre has bending limit (K-bend) of 520 and focusing limit (K-foc) of 160. It is being constructed, primarily, for nuclear physics experiments with heavy ion beams at intermediate energies. The 100-ton main magnet is currently in the commissioning phase with the main coil already at 4.2K temperature. Magnetic field measurements will be carried out over the next several months. All other systems of the cyclotron are in an advanced stage of fabrication or development. We plan to start assembly of the complete cyclotron around the end of 2005. In the phase-I of the project one beam line has been provided. Construction of three more beam lines and various experimental facilities for nuclear physics as well as irradiation experiments has also been funded and the work is well on its way. An ISOL type Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) facility is being built with the existing K=130 room temperature cyclotron, VEC, as the primary beam source. In-beam RIB production a...

  2. Tokamak startup with electron cyclotron heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holly, D J; Prager, S C; Shepard, D A; Sprott, J C

    1980-04-01

    Experiments are described in which the startup voltage in a tokamak is reduced by approx. 60% by the use of a modest amount of electron cyclotron resonance heating power for preionization. A 50% reduction in volt-second requirement and impurity reflux are also observed.

  3. Cyclotron-based neutron source for BNCT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsumoto, T.; Yajima, S.; Tsutsui, H.; Ogasawara, T.; Fujita, K.; Tanaka, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Maruhashi, A.

    2013-04-01

    Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) and Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) have developed a cyclotron-based neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). It was installed at KURRI in Osaka prefecture. The neutron source consists of a proton cyclotron named HM-30, a beam transport system and an irradiation & treatment system. In the cyclotron, H- ions are accelerated and extracted as 30 MeV proton beams of 1 mA. The proton beams is transported to the neutron production target made by a beryllium plate. Emitted neutrons are moderated by lead, iron, aluminum and calcium fluoride. The aperture diameter of neutron collimator is in the range from 100 mm to 250 mm. The peak neutron flux in the water phantom is 1.8×109 neutrons/cm2/sec at 20 mm from the surface at 1 mA proton beam. The neutron source have been stably operated for 3 years with 30 kW proton beam. Various pre-clinical tests including animal tests have been done by using the cyclotron-based neutron source with 10B-p-Borono-phenylalanine. Clinical trials of malignant brain tumors will be started in this year.

  4. Cyclotron-based neutron source for BNCT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitsumoto, T.; Yajima, S.; Tsutsui, H.; Ogasawara, T.; Fujita, K. [Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd (Japan); Tanaka, H.; Sakurai, Y.; Maruhashi, A. [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (Japan)

    2013-04-19

    Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute (KURRI) and Sumitomo Heavy Industries, Ltd. (SHI) have developed a cyclotron-based neutron source for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT). It was installed at KURRI in Osaka prefecture. The neutron source consists of a proton cyclotron named HM-30, a beam transport system and an irradiation and treatment system. In the cyclotron, H- ions are accelerated and extracted as 30 MeV proton beams of 1 mA. The proton beams is transported to the neutron production target made by a beryllium plate. Emitted neutrons are moderated by lead, iron, aluminum and calcium fluoride. The aperture diameter of neutron collimator is in the range from 100 mm to 250 mm. The peak neutron flux in the water phantom is 1.8 Multiplication-Sign 109 neutrons/cm{sup 2}/sec at 20 mm from the surface at 1 mA proton beam. The neutron source have been stably operated for 3 years with 30 kW proton beam. Various pre-clinical tests including animal tests have been done by using the cyclotron-based neutron source with {sup 10}B-p-Borono-phenylalanine. Clinical trials of malignant brain tumors will be started in this year.

  5. EBCO Technologies TR Cyclotrons, Dynamics, Equipment, and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. R.; Erdman, K. L.; Gyles, Wm.; Burbee, J.; VanLier, E.; Kovacs, M.; Perron, F.

    2003-08-01

    The Ebco Technologies TR cyclotrons have a common parent in the 500 MeV negative ion cyclotron at TRIUMF in Vancouver. As such, the TR cyclotrons have features that can be adapted for specific application. The cyclotron design is modularized into ion source and injection system, central region and then extraction. The cyclotron ion source is configured for cyclotron beam currents ranging from 50 microAmps to 2 milliAmps. The injection line can be operated in either continuous (CW) or in pulsed mode. The center region of the cyclotron is configured to match the ion source configuration. The extracted beams are directed either to a local target station or to beam lines and thence to target stations. There has been development both in solid, liquid and gas targets. There has been development in radioisotope handling techniques, target material recovery and radiochemical synthesis.

  6. Aberration-Coreected Electron Microscopy at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhu,Y.; Wall, J.

    2008-04-01

    The last decade witnessed the rapid development and implementation of aberration correction in electron optics, realizing a more-than-70-year-old dream of aberration-free electron microscopy with a spatial resolution below one angstrom [1-9]. With sophisticated aberration correctors, modern electron microscopes now can reveal local structural information unavailable with neutrons and x-rays, such as the local arrangement of atoms, order/disorder, electronic inhomogeneity, bonding states, spin configuration, quantum confinement, and symmetry breaking [10-17]. Aberration correction through multipole-based correctors, as well as the associated improved stability in accelerating voltage, lens supplies, and goniometers in electron microscopes now enables medium-voltage (200-300kV) microscopes to achieve image resolution at or below 0.1nm. Aberration correction not only improves the instrument's spatial resolution but, equally importantly, allows larger objective lens pole-piece gaps to be employed thus realizing the potential of the instrument as a nanoscale property-measurement tool. That is, while retaining high spatial resolution, we can use various sample stages to observe the materials response under various temperature, electric- and magnetic- fields, and atmospheric environments. Such capabilities afford tremendous opportunities to tackle challenging science and technology issues in physics, chemistry, materials science, and biology. The research goal of the electron microscopy group at the Dept. of Condensed Matter Physics and Materials Science and the Center for Functional Nanomaterials, as well as the Institute for Advanced Electron Microscopy, Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), is to elucidate the microscopic origin of the physical- and chemical-behavior of materials, and the role of individual, or groups of atoms, especially in their native functional environments. We plan to accomplish this by developing and implementing various quantitative

  7. 75 FR 55631 - U. S. Rail Corporation-Construction and Operation Exemption-Brookhaven Rail Terminal

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-13

    ... Surface Transportation Board U. S. Rail Corporation--Construction and Operation Exemption-- Brookhaven Rail Terminal AGENCY: Surface Transportation Board. ACTION: Notice of Board Action. SUMMARY: Subject to... approval requirements of 49 U.S.C. 10901 for U. S. Rail Corporation (U. S. Rail) to construct and operate a...

  8. Brookhaven Lab physicist William Willis wins the 2003 W.K.H. Panofsky prize

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    William Willis, a senior physicist Brookhaven National Laboratory, has won the American Physical Society's 2003 W.K.H. Panofsky Prize in Experimental Particle Physics. He received the prize, which consists of $5,000 and a certificate citing his contributions to physics, at the APS meeting in Philadelphia on April 6 (1 page).

  9. Brookhaven highlights, fiscal year 1985, October 1, 1984-September 30, 1985

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1985-01-01

    Activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory are briefly discussed. These include work at the National Synchrotron Light Source, the High Flux Beam Reactor, and the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron. Areas of research include heavy ion reactions, neutrino oscillations, low-level waste, nuclear data, medicine, biology, chemistry, parallel computing, optics. Also provided are general and administrative news, a financial report. (LEW)

  10. T.D. LEE: RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLISIONS AND THE RIKEN BROOKHAVEN CENTER.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MCLERRAN,L.; SAMIOS, N.

    2006-11-24

    This paper presents the history of Professor T. D. Lee's seminal work on the theory of relativistic heavy ion collisions, and the founding and development of the Riken Brookhaven Center. A number of anecdotes are given about Prof. Lee, and his strong positive effect on his colleagues, particularly young physicists.

  11. Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry at the Cyclotron Frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagornov, Konstantin O; Kozhinov, Anton N; Tsybin, Yury O

    2017-04-01

    The phenomenon of ion cyclotron resonance allows for determining mass-to-charge ratio, m/z, of an ensemble of ions by means of measurements of their cyclotron frequency, ω c . In Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS), the ω c quantity is usually unavailable for direct measurements: the resonant state is located close to the reduced cyclotron frequency (ω+), whereas the ω c and the corresponding m/z values may be calculated via theoretical derivation from an experimental estimate of the ω+ quantity. Here, we describe an experimental observation of a new resonant state, which is located close to the ω c frequency and is established because of azimuthally-dependent trapping electric fields of the recently developed ICR cells with narrow aperture detection electrodes. We show that in mass spectra, peaks close to ω+ frequencies can be reduced to negligible levels relative to peaks close to ω c frequencies. Due to reduced errors with which the ω c quantity is obtained, the new resonance provides a means of cyclotron frequency measurements with precision greater than that achieved when ω+ frequency peaks are employed. The described phenomenon may be considered for a development into an FT-ICR MS technology with increased mass accuracy for applications in basic research, life, and environmental sciences. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  12. Operation of a quasioptical electron cyclotron maser

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morse, E.C.; Pyle, R.V.

    1984-12-01

    The electron cyclotron maser or gyrotron concept has been developed to produce sources producing 200 kW at 28 GHz continuously, and higher power outputs and frequencies in pulsed mode. These sources have been useful in electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) in magnetically confined fusion devices. However, higher frequencies and higher power levels will be required in reactor-grade fusion plasmas, with likely requirements of 1.0 MW or more per source at 140 GHz. Conventional gyrotrons follow a trend of decreasing power for increasing frequency. In order to circumvent this problem, the quasioptical electron cyclotron maser was proposed. In this device, the closed resonator of the conventional gyrotron is replaced with an open, Fabry-Perot type resonator. The cavity modes are then the TEM-type modes of an optical laser. The advantage of this configuration is that the cavity size is not a function of frequency, since the length can be any half-integer number of wavelengths. Furthermore, the beam traverses across the cavity transverse to the direction of radiation output, and thus the rf window design is less complicated than in conventional tubes. The rf output, if obtained by diffraction coupling around one of the mirrors, could be in a TEM mode, which would allow for quasioptical transmission of the microwaves into the plasma in fusion devices. 4 references, 1 figure.

  13. Beam stripping extraction from the VINCY cyclotron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ristić-Đurović Jasna L.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The extraction system of a cyclotron guides an ion beam from a spiral acceleration orbit, through an extraction trajectory, into a high energy transport line. The two methods commonly used to direct an ion into the extraction path are deflection, by the electric field of an electrostatic deflector, and ion stripping, by a thin carbon foil. Compared to the electrostatic deflector system, the stripping extraction provides a fast and easy change of the extracted ion energy and is easier to manufacture operate, and maintain. However, the extraction trajectory and dynamics of an ion beam after stripping are highly dependant on the ion energy and specific charge. Thus, when a multipurpose machine such as the VINCY Cyclotron is concerned, it is far from easy to deliver a variety of ion beams into the same high energy transport line and at the same time preserve a reasonable compactness of the extraction system. The front side stripping extraction system of the VINCY Cyclotron provides high (~70 MeV and mid (~30 MeV energy protons, as well as a number of heavy ions in broad energy ranges. The back side stripping extraction system extracts low energy protons (~18 MeV and enables their simultaneous use with high energy protons at the front side of the machine.

  14. Benchmarking of codes for electron cyclotron heating and electron cyclotron current drive under ITER conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prater, R.; Farina, D.; Gribov, Y.; Harvey, R. W.; Ram, A. K.; Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Poli, E.; Smirnov, A. P.; Volpe, F.; Westerhof, E.; Zvonkovo, A.

    2008-01-01

    Optimal design and use of electron cyclotron heating requires that accurate and relatively quick computer codes be available for prediction of wave coupling, propagation, damping and current drive at realistic levels of EC power. To this end, a number of codes have been developed in laboratories

  15. First magnet constructed for the LHC by Brookhaven National Laboratory, USA

    CERN Document Server

    Maximilien Brice

    2003-01-01

    CERN has taken delivery of the first US-built contribution to the LHC. The 25-tonne interaction-region dipole magnet, which will guide the LHC´s two counter-rotating beams of protons into collision, was built at the US Brookhaven National Laboratory. It is the first of 20 that the laboratory will ultimately provide and took nine months for more than 100 scientists, engineers and technicians to construct. Brookhaven´s Superconducting Magnet Division is now building the remaining 19 magnets, which will be shipped to CERN later this year. They are provided for the LHC under the terms of a 1998 agreement between CERN and the US Department of Energy and National Science Foundation.

  16. Qualitative risk evaluation of environmental restoration programs at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, S.C.

    1996-05-01

    This report documents the evaluation of risks associated with environmental restoration activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory using two tools supplied by DOE to provide a consistent set of risk estimates across the DOE complex: Risk Data Sheets (RDS) and Relative Risk Ranking. The tools are described, the process taken characterized, results provided and discussed. The two approaches are compared and recommendations provided for continuing improvement of the process.

  17. Brookhaven experience with handling and shipping of, and cask design for, reactor spent-fuel elements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dugan, Francis A.

    1965-12-01

    The general problems in the area are presented. Solutions to the specific problems at Brookhaven are discussed in relation to the general problem. Presentation covers (a) fuel removal tools and equipment, and canal storage facilities; (b) methods of shipment; (c) brief review of the AEC and ICC regulatory requirements; and (d) optimized design of the shipping container. Specific solutions used by BNL over a six -year period are described. The need for complete and early analysis of the specific problem is indicated.

  18. The first picosecond terawatt CO{sub 2} laser at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pogorelsky, I.V.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Babzien, M. [and others

    1998-02-01

    The first terawatt picosecond CO{sub 2} laser will be brought to operation at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility in 1998. System consists of a single-mode TEA oscillator, picosecond semiconductor optical switch, multi-atmosphere. The authors report on design, simulation, and performance tests of the 10 atm final amplifier that allows for direct multi-joule energy extraction in a picosecond laser pulse.

  19. Strong interactions of hyperons. [Summaries of research activities of Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemethy, P.; Hungerbuehler, V.; Majka, R.

    1975-01-01

    A summary of the strong interaction results obtained with the Yale--FNAL--BNL hyperon beam at the Brookhaven AGS is presented. Differential cross sections are reported for hyperon-proton elastic scattering with samples of 6200 ..sigma../sup -/p events and 67 ..xi../sup -/p events. Also a report is made on a search for hyperon resonances in inelastic scattering. Finally, the prospects for new results on hyperon interactions are reviewed.

  20. Brookhaven highlights. Report on research, October 1, 1992--September 30, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Belford, M.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L. [eds.

    1993-12-31

    This report highlights the research activities of Brookhaven National Laboratory during the period dating from October 1, 1992 through September 30, 1993. There are contributions to the report from different programs and departments within the laboratory. These include technology transfer, RHIC, Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, physics, biology, national synchrotron light source, applied science, medical science, advanced technology, chemistry, reactor physics, safety and environmental protection, instrumentation, and computing and communications.

  1. 2003 Brookhaven National Laboratory Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Report, Revised September 2007

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    U.S. Department of Energy, Office of Health, Safety and Security, Office of Illness and Injury Prevention Programs

    2007-10-02

    Annual Illness and Injury Surveillance Program report for 2003 for Brookhaven National Lab. The U.S. Department of Energy’s (DOE) commitment to assuring the health and safety of its workers includes the conduct of epidemiologic surveillance activities that provide an early warning system for health problems among workers. The IISP monitors illnesses and health conditions that result in an absence of workdays, occupational injuries and illnesses, and disabilities and deaths among current workers.

  2. Electron cyclotron emission diagnostics on KSTAR tokamak.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, S H; Lee, K D; Kogi, Y; Kawahata, K; Nagayama, Y; Mase, A; Kwon, M

    2010-10-01

    A new electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics system was installed for the Second Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) campaign. The new ECE system consists of an ECE collecting optics system, an overmode circular corrugated waveguide system, and 48 channel heterodyne radiometer with the frequency range of 110-162 GHz. During the 2 T operation of the KSTAR tokamak, the electron temperatures as well as its radial profiles at the high field side were measured and sawtooth phenomena were also observed. We also discuss the effect of a window on in situ calibration.

  3. Electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic system for Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deng, B.H.; Hsia, R. P.; Domier, C.W.; Burns, S. R.; Hillyer, T. R.; N C Luhmann Jr.,; Oyevaar, T.; Donne, A. J. H.; R. T. P. Team,

    1999-01-01

    A 16-channel electron cyclotron emission (ECE) imaging diagnostic system has been developed and installed on the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project for measuring plasma electron cyclotron emission with a temporal resolution of 2 mu s. The high spatial resolution of the system is achieved by utilizing a low

  4. Cyclotron Lines: From Magnetic Field Strength Estimators to ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Chandreyee Maitra

    2017-09-12

    Sep 12, 2017 ... With forty years since the discovery of the first cyclotron line in Her X-1, there have been remarkable ... the important results related to cyclotron lines since its discovery and reviews their significance. ... context can provide, to build a complete picture for the physics of accretion and hence X-ray emission in.

  5. Ion–Cyclotron Resonance Frequency Interval Dependence on the O ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Solar corona—ion–cyclotron waves—coronal heating—. Vlasov equation. 1. Introduction. Heating of solar corona is still an active research area. It has recently been suggested that the ion–cyclotron resonance could play a key role in the problem of coronal heating. It is generally argued that various electromagnetic plasma ...

  6. Unstable plasma characteristics in mirror field electron cyclotron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electron cyclotron plasma reactor are prone to instabilities in specific input power [3–. 7] region (150–450 watts). ... Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma technology has become very important for fabrication of very large scale ... left hand polarized (LHP) wave. Shufflbotham and Thomson [4] observed several distinct.

  7. Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating of a High-Density Plasma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, F. Ramskov

    1986-01-01

    Various schemes for electron cyclotron resonance heating of tokamak plasmas with the ratio of electron plasma frequency to electron cyclotron frequency, "»pe/^ce* larger than 1 on axis, are investigated. In particular, a mode conversion scheme is investigated using ordinary waves at the fundamental...

  8. High-current cyclotron to drive an electronuclear assembly

    CERN Document Server

    Alenitsky, Yu G

    2002-01-01

    The proposal on creation of a high-current cyclotron complex for driving an electronuclear assembly reported at the 17th Meeting on Accelerators of Charged Particles is discussed. Some changes in the basic design parameters of the accelerator are considered in view of new results obtained in the recent works. It is shown that the cyclotron complex is now the most real and cheapest accelerator for production of proton beams with a power of up to 10 MW. Projects on design of a high-current cyclotron complex for driving an electronuclear subcritical assembly are presented.

  9. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, S.M.; Finn, R.D.

    1993-11-01

    This report describes our continuing long term goal of promoting nuclear medicine applications by improving the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis, treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The program includes 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry/Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. An essential strategy is as follows: novel radionuclides and radiotracers developed in the Radiochemistry/Cyclotron section will be employed in the Pharmacology and Immunology sections during the next year. The development of novel radionuclides and tracers is of course useful in and of itself, but their utility is greatly enhanced by the interaction with the immunology and pharmacology components of the program.

  10. Shielding design of the Mayo Clinic Scottsdale cyclotron vault

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riper Kenneth A. Van

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Mayo Clinic Scottsdale (Scottsdale, Arizona is building a cyclotron vault containing a cyclotron with adjacent targets and a beam line leading to an external target. The targets are irradiated by high energy (15 to 16.5 MeV protons for the production of radioisotopes. We performed Monte Carlo radiation transport simulations to calculate the radiation dose outside of the vault during irradiation of the cyclotron and external targets. We present the Monte Carlo model including the geometry, sources, and variance reduction methods. Mesh tallies surrounding the vault show the external dose rate is within acceptable limits.

  11. Radiation Monitoring System of 30 MeV Cyclotron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Jin-Woo

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A state-of-the-art radiation monitoring system was implemented at KAERI for a 30-MeV cyclotron. This system consists of several types of radiation measuring systems for ambient dose equivalent rate measurements of outside photon and neutron areas as well as inside the cyclotron, and monitors the alpha and beta particulates released from a stack, as well as the results of worker contamination at the portal of the cyclotron. In addition, an automatic alarm system is also mounted if there are alarms in the measuring systems.

  12. High-Resolution Ion Cyclotron Mobility Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merenbloom, Samuel I.; Glaskin, Rebecca S.; Henson, Zachary B.; Clemmer, David E.

    2009-01-01

    A novel ion mobility spectrometry instrument incorporating a cyclotron geometry drift tube is presented. The drift tube consists of eight regions, four curved drift tubes and four ion funnels. Packets of ions are propagated around the drift tube by changing the drift field at a frequency that is resonant with the ion’s drift time through each region. The approach trims each packet of ions as it leaves and enters each new region. An electrostatic gate allows ions to be kept in the drift tube for numerous cycles, increasing the ability to resolve specified ions. We demonstrate the approach by isolating the [M+2H]2+ or [M+3H]3+ charge state of substance P as well as individual trisaccharide isomers from a mixture of melezitose and raffinose. Resolving powers in excess of 300 are obtainable with this approach. PMID:19143495

  13. Simulation of cyclotron resonant scattering features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarm Fritz-Walter

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available X-ray binary systems consisting of a mass donating optical star and a highly magnetized neutron star, under the right circumstances, show quantum mechanical absorption features in the observed spectra called cyclotron resonant scattering features (CRSFs. We have developed a simulation to model CRSFs using Monte Carlo methods. We calculate Green’s tables which can be used to imprint CRSFs to arbitrary X-ray continua. Our simulation keeps track of scattering parameters of individual photons, extends the number of variable parameters of previous works, and allows for more flexible geometries. Here we focus on the influence of bulk velocity of the accreted matter on the CRSF line shapes and positions.

  14. Ion cyclotron emission by spontaneous emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Da Costa, O. [Commission of the European Communities, Abingdon (United Kingdom). JET Joint Undertaking; Gresillon, D. [Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). Lab. de Physique des Milieux Ionises

    1994-07-01

    The goal of the study is to examine whether the spontaneous emission can account for ICE (ion cyclotron emission) experimental results, or part of them. A straightforward approach to plasma emission is chosen, investigating the near equilibrium wave radiation by gyrating ions, and thus building from the majority and fast fusion ions the plasma fluctuations and emission on the fast magnetoacoustic or compressional Alfven wave mode in the IC frequency range. Similarities with the ICE experiments are shown: the emission temperature in the presence of fast ions (even in a very small amount), the strong fast ion emission increase with the harmonic, the fine double-line splitting of each peak, the linear but not proportional increase of the peak width with the harmonic. 3 refs., 2 figs.

  15. Risk-based priority scoring for Brookhaven National Laboratory environmental restoration programs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morris, S.C.; Meinhold, A.F.

    1995-05-01

    This report describes the process of estimating the risk associated with environmental restoration programs under the Brookhaven National Laboratory Office of Environmental Restoration. The process was part of an effort across all Department of Energy facilities to provide a consistent framework to communicate risk information about the facilities to senior managers in the DOE Office of Environmental Management to foster understanding of risk activities across programs. the risk evaluation was a qualitative exercise. Categories considered included: Public health and safety; site personnel safety and health; compliance; mission impact; cost-effective risk management; environmental protection; inherent worker risk; environmental effects of clean-up; and social, cultural, political, and economic impacts.

  16. Assessment of Energy Efficiency Project Financing Alternatives for Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, W. D.; Hail, John C.; Sullivan, Gregory P.

    2000-02-14

    This document provides findings and recommendations that resulted from an assessment of the Brookhaven National Laboratory by a team from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to assess the site's potential for various alternative financing options as a means to implement energy-efficiency improvements. The assessment looked for life-cycle cost-effective energy-efficiency improvement opportunities, and through a series of staff interviews, evaluated the various methods by which these opportunities may be financed, while considering availability of funds, staff, and available financing options. This report summarizes the findings of the visit and the resulting recommendations.

  17. X-ray holographic microscopy experiments at the Brookhaven synchrotron light source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howells, M.R.; Iarocci, M.; Kenney, J.; Kirz, J.; Rarback, H.

    1983-01-01

    Soft x-ray holographic microscopy is discussed from an experimental point of view. Three series of measurements have been carried out using the Brookhaven 750 MeV storage ring as an x-ray source. Young slits fringes, Gabor (in line) holograms and various data pertaining to the soft x-ray performance of photographic plates are reported. The measurements are discussed in terms of the technique for recording them and the experimental limitations in effect. Some discussion is also given of the issues involved in reconstruction using visible light.

  18. Determination of floor response spectra for the Brookhaven HFBR reactor building structure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subudhi, M.; Goradia, H.

    1978-11-01

    In order to perform the dynamic analysis of various structural components of the HFBR reactor building at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) subjected to seismic disturbances, it is necessary to obtain the floor response spectra of the primary structure. The mathematical model includes the four floor levels of the internal structure, the dome, and soil spring effects. The standard time history analysis is adopted to obtain the response spectrum for each floor of the internal structure. This report summarizes the results both in tabular and graphical form for various damping values.

  19. Applications of nuclear techniques for in vivo body composition studies at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cohn, S.H.; Ellis, K.J.; Vartsky, D.; Vaswani, A.N.; Wielopolski, L.

    1981-01-01

    A series of technical developments and their clinical applications in various nuclear technologies at Brookhaven National Laboratory is described. These include the development of a portable neutron activation facility for measuring cadmium in vivo in kidney and liver, a technique for the measurement of body iron utilizing nuclear resonant scattering of gamma rays, a non-invasive measure of the skeletal levels of lead by an x-ray fluorescence technique, and the development of a pulsed Van de Graaff generator as a source of pulsed neutrons for the measurement of lung silicon. (ACR)

  20. Summary of proposed approach for deriving cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soil at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhold, A.F.; Morris, S.C.; Dionne, B.; Moskowitz, P.D.

    1996-11-01

    Past activities at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) resulted in soil and groundwater contamination. As a result, BNL was designated a Superfund site under the Comprehensive Environmental Response Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA). BNL`s Office of Environmental Restoration (OER) is overseeing environmental restoration activities at the Laboratory, carried out under an Interagency Agreement (IAG) with the United States Department of Energy (DOE), the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) and the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC). The objective of this paper is to propose a standard approach to deriving risk-based cleanup guidelines for radionuclides in soil at BNL.

  1. Proceedings of Brookhaven National Laboratory's fusion/synfuel workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fillo, J.A.; Powell, J.R. (eds.)

    1979-01-01

    The fusion synfuels workshop held at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on August 27-29, 1979 examined the current status of candidate synfuel processes and the R and D required to develop the capability for fusion synfuel production. Participants divided into five working groups, covering the following areas: (1) economics and applications; (2) high-temperature electrolysis; (3) thermochemical processes (including hybrid thermo-electrochemical); (4) blanket and materials; and (5) high-efficiency power cycles. Each working group presented a summary of their conclusions and recommendations to all participants during the third day of the Workshop. These summaries are given.

  2. Single-electron detection and spectroscopy via relativistic cyclotron radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asner, David M.; Bradley, Rich; De Viveiros Souza Filho, Luiz A.; Doe, Peter J.; Fernandes, Justin L.; Fertl, M.; Finn, Erin C.; Formaggio, Joseph; Furse, Daniel L.; Jones, Anthony M.; Kofron, Jared N.; LaRoque, Benjamin; Leber, Michelle; MCBride, Lisa; Miller, M. L.; Mohanmurthy, Prajwal T.; Monreal, Ben; Oblath, Noah S.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rosenberg, Leslie; Rybka, Gray; Rysewyk, Devyn M.; Sternberg, Michael G.; Tedeschi, Jonathan R.; Thummler, Thomas; VanDevender, Brent A.; Woods, N. L.

    2015-04-01

    It has been understood since 1897 that accelerating charges should emit electromagnetic radiation. Cyclotron radiation, the particular form of radiation emitted by an electron orbiting in a magnetic field, was first derived in 1904. Despite the simplicity of this concept, and the enormous utility of electron spectroscopy in nuclear and particle physics, single-electron cyclotron radiation has never been observed directly. Here we demonstrate single-electron detection in a novel radiofrequency spectrometer. We observe the cyclotron radiation emitted by individual electrons that are produced with mildly-relativistic energies by a gaseous radioactive source and are magnetically trapped. The relativistic shift in the cyclotron frequency permits a precise electron energy measurement. Precise beta electron spectroscopy from gaseous radiation sources is a key technique in modern efforts to measure the neutrino mass via the tritium decay endpoint, and this work is a proof-of-concept for future neutrino mass experiments using this technique.

  3. Neutron field inside a PET Cyclotron vault room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vega C, H.R. [UAZ, C. Cipres 10, 98068 Zacatecas (Mexico); Mendez, R. [CIEMAT, Ave. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Iniguez, M.P. [Universidad de Valladolid, Po Prado de la Magdalena s/n, 47011 Valladolid (Spain); Climent, J.M.; Penuelas, I. [Servicio de Medicina Nuclear de la Clinica Universitaria de Navarra, Pamplona (Spain); Barquero, R. [Hospital Universitario Rio Hortega, Valladolid (Spain)]. e-mail: fermineutron@yahoo.com

    2006-07-01

    The neutron field around a Positron Emission Tomography cyclotron was investigated during {sup 18} F radioisotope production with an 18 MeV proton beam. In this study the Ion Beam Application cyclotron, model Cyclone 18/9, was utilized. Measurements were carried out with a Bonner sphere neutron spectrometer with pairs of thermoluminescent dosemeters (TLD600 and TLD700) as thermal neutron detector. The TLDs readouts were utilized to unfold the neutron spectra at three different positions inside the cyclotron's vault room. With the spectra the Ambient dose equivalent was calculated. Neutron spectra unfolding were performed with the BUNKIUT code and the UTA4 response matrix. Neutron spectra were also determined by Monte Carlo calculations using a detailed model of cyclotron and vault room. (Author)

  4. Vacuum Control Systems of the Cyclotrons in VECC, Kolkata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Anindya; Akhtar, Javed; Yadav, R. C.; Bhole, R. B.; Pal, Sarbajit; Sarkar, D.; Bhandari, R. K.

    2012-11-01

    VECC has undertaken the modernization of the K-130 Room Temperature Cyclotron (RTC) (operational since 1978) and commissioning of K-500 Superconducting Cyclotron (SCC) at present. The control system of RTC vacuum system has been upgraded to Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) based automated system from relay based manual system. A distributed PLC based system is under installation for SCC vacuum system. The requirement of high vacuum in both the cyclotrons (1×10-6 mbar for RTC and 5 × 10-8 mbar SCC) imposes the reliable local and remote operation of all vacuum components and instrumentation. The design and development of the vacuum control system of two cyclotrons using the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) distributed real-time software tools are presented.

  5. Maryland University sectored isochronous cyclotron (MUSIC): Progress report No. 23

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1967-10-09

    Progress is reported in the design, installation of various components of the cyclotron, including coils, magnets, rf system, and vacuum system. Also reported are measurements on magnets and rf components. (LEW)

  6. Maryland University sectored isochronous cyclotron (MUSIC): Progress report No. 20

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1967-06-30

    Progress is reported in the fabrication and testing of cyclotron components, including magnet system and rf system components. Work on vacuum components and instrumentation and control equipment is also reported. (LEW)

  7. Maryland University sectored isochronous cyclotron (MUSIC): Progress report No. 32

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1968-06-28

    Completion of magnet tests, followed by completion of installation of major cyclotron components, are reported. Intermediate level power tests of the rf system are also reported. Design and fabrication of the control system are reported to be under way. (LEW)

  8. Maryland University sectored isochronous cyclotron (MUSIC): Progress report No. 26

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1968-01-17

    Progress is reported in the fabrication, installation, and testing of cyclotron components, including magnets and coils, rf components, vacuum and control equipment. Also reported are magnet and rf component measurements. (LEW)

  9. Relativistic Cyclotron Resonance Shape in Magnetic Bottle Geonium

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Hans Dehmelt; Richard Mittleman; Yuan Liu

    1988-01-01

    The thermally excited axial oscillation of the electron through the weak magnetic bottle needed for the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect modulates the cyclotron frequency and produces a characteristic...

  10. Cryogenic system for VECC K500 superconducting cyclotron

    CERN Document Server

    Pal, G; Bhattacharyya, T K; Bhandari, R K

    2009-01-01

    VEC Centre, Kolkata in India is at an advanced stage of commissioning a K500 superconducting cyclotron. The superconducting coil of the magnet for cyclotron is cooled by liquid helium. Three liquid helium cooled cryopanels, placed inside the Dees of the radiofrequency system, maintain the vacuum in the acceleration region of the superconducting cyclotron. The cryogenic system for magnet for cyclotron has been tested by cooling the coil and energizing the magnet. The cryogenic system for cryopanels has also been tested. Heater and temperature sensor were placed on the liquid helium cold head for cryopanel. The temperature of the cold head was observed to be below 20 K upto a heat load of 11.7 watt.

  11. Design of 10 MeV cyclotron accelerator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Solhju

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Design and construction of 10MeV cyclotron has been started at Amirkabir University of Technology since 2012. So far, the conceptual and detail engineering design phases have been finalized. The main purpose of this baby cyclotron is to generate proton beam for the production of PET radioisotopes. The cyclotron consists of magnet, cavity, ion source, RF and LLRF system, vacuum system, cooling system, power amplifiers and power supplies system. In this paper, a brief of design principles for all the parts of cyclotron and their final simulation results is presented. It should be noted that these simulations have been performed and optimized by the most accurate softwares such as TOSCA, ANSYS, HFSS, SolidWorks and CST. Also, the manufacturing feasibility of all the parts is performed and their dimensions and parameters are synchronized with manufacturing standards

  12. A new way to measure the electron cyclotron frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmer, F. L.

    1993-03-01

    A method is described for using spin flips to measure the 0 to 1 cyclotron transition frequency of a single electron in a Penning trap. Detection can be accomplished with magnetic bottles of 10 T/m2 or less, thereby greatly reducing the thermal broadening of the cyclotron line. This method complements a recently published technique for measuring the anomaly frequency, making a more precise measurement of the electron anomaly ratio possible.

  13. Ion-Beam-Excited Electrostatic Ion Cyclotron Waves

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1976-01-01

    Self-excited electrostatic ion cyclotron waves were observed in an ion-beam-plasma system produced in a DP-operated Q-machine. The frequency of the waves showed the theoretically predicted variation with the magnetic field.......Self-excited electrostatic ion cyclotron waves were observed in an ion-beam-plasma system produced in a DP-operated Q-machine. The frequency of the waves showed the theoretically predicted variation with the magnetic field....

  14. PET computer programs for use with the 88-inch cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gough, R.A.; Chlosta, L.

    1981-06-01

    This report describes in detail several offline programs written for the PET computer which provide an efficient data management system to assist with the operation of the 88-Inch Cyclotron. This function includes the capability to predict settings for all cyclotron and beam line parameters for all beams within the present operating domain of the facility. The establishment of a data base for operational records is also described from which various aspects of the operating history can be projected.

  15. Ion source and injection line for high intensity medical cyclotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, XianLu; Guan, Fengping; Yao, Hongjuan; Zhang, TianJue; Yang, Jianjun; Song, Guofang; Ge, Tao; Qin, Jiuchang

    2014-02-01

    A 14 MeV high intensity compact cyclotron, CYCIAE-14, was built at China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE). An injection system based on the external H- ion source was used on CYCIAE-14 so as to provide high intensity beam, while most positron emission tomography cyclotrons adopt internal ion source. A beam intensity of 100 μA/14 MeV was extracted from the cyclotron with a small multi-cusp H- ion source (CIAE-CH-I type) and a short injection line, which the H- ion source of 3 mA/25 keV H- beam with emittance of 0.3π mm mrad and the injection line of with only 1.2 m from the extraction of ion source to the medial plane of the cyclotron. To increase the extracted beam intensity of the cyclotron, a new ion source (CIAE-CH-II type) of 9.1 mA was used, with maximum of 500 μA was achieved from the cyclotron. The design and test results of the ion source and injection line optimized for high intensity acceleration will be given in this paper.

  16. Doing More with Less: Cost-effective, Compact Particle Accelerators (489th Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trbojevic, Dejan [BNL Collider-Accelerator Department

    2013-10-22

    Replace a 135-ton magnet used for cancer-fighting particle therapies with a magnet that weighs only two tons? Such a swap is becoming possible thanks to new particle accelerator advances being developed by researchers at Brookhaven Lab. With an approach that combines techniques used by synchrotron accelerators with the ability to accept more energy, these new technologies could be used for more than fighting cancer. They could also decrease the lifecycle of byproducts from nuclear power plants and reduce costs for eRHIC—a proposed electron-ion collider for Brookhaven Lab that researchers from around the world would use to explore the glue that holds together the universe’s most basic building blocks and explore the proton-spin puzzle. During this lecture, Dr. Trbojevic provides an overview of accelerator technologies and techniques—particularly a non-scaling, fixed-focused alternating gradient—to focus particle beams using fewer, smaller magnets. He discusses how these technologies will benefit eRHIC and other applications, including particle therapies being developed to combat cancer.

  17. Magic Lenses for RHIC: Compensating Beam-beam Interaction (488th Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luo, Yun [BNL Collider-Accelerator Department

    2013-07-17

    Scientists at Brookhaven Lab’s Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) smash atomic particles together to understand more about why the physical world works the way it does. Increasing rates of particle collisions, or luminosity, at RHIC is no small challenge, but the results—more data for better clues—are crucial for scientists trying answer big questions about the origins of matter and mass. When scientists at RHIC collide protons, they don’t hope for a head-on crash by focusing only two particles roaring toward each other from opposite directions. For all intents and purposes, that would be impossible. The scientists can smash protons because they significantly increase the likelihood of collisions by steering hundreds of billions clumped into bunches, which at RHIC are about 3.5 meters long and less than 1 millimeter tall. The particles of these bunches are all positively charged, so when they interact, they repel outwardly—think how magnets repel when their same poles are pushed together. Although this decreases the density of each bunch, reducing luminosity, scientists in Brookhaven Lab’s Collider-Accelerator Department (C-AD) have a solution. After more than seven years of development, the scientists have designed an electron-lens system that uses electrons’ negative charges to attract positively charged proton bunches and minimize their repelling tendencies. Combined with other upgrades to the RHIC accelerator complex, these lenses are important components in efforts towards the major task of doubling the luminosity for proton-proton collisions.

  18. Manipulating Light to Understand and Improve Solar Cells (494th Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eisaman, Matthew [BNL, Sustainable Energy Technologies Department

    2014-04-16

    Energy consumption around the world is projected to approximately triple by the end of the century, according to the 2005 Report from the U.S. Department of Energy's Basic Energy Sciences Workshop on Solar Energy Utilization. Much will change in those next 86 years, but for all the power the world needs—for everything from manufacturing and transportation to air conditioning and charging cell phone batteries—improved solar cells will be crucial to meet this future energy demand with renewable energy sources. At Brookhaven Lab, scientists are probing solar cells and exploring variations within the cells—variations that are so small they are measured in billionths of a meter—in order to make increasingly efficient solar cells and ultimately help reduce the overall costs of deploying solar power plants. Dr. Eisaman will discuss DOE's Sunshot Initiative, which aims to reduce the cost of solar cell-generated electricity by 2020. He will also discuss how he and collaborators at Brookhaven Lab are probing different material compositions within solar cells, measuring how efficiently they collect electrical charge, helping to develop a new class of solar cells, and improving solar-cell manufacturing processes.

  19. Is Overeating Behavior Similar to Drug Addiction? (427th Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Gene-Jack

    2007-09-27

    The increasing number of obese individuals in the U.S. and other countries world-wide adds urgency to the need to understand the mechanisms underlying pathological overeating. Research by the speaker and others at Brookhaven National Laboratory and elsewhere is compiling evidence that the brain circuits disrupted in obesity are similar to those involved in drug addiction. Using positron emission tomography (PET), the speaker and his colleagues have implicated brain dopamine in the normal and the pathological intake of food by humans. During the 427th Brookhaven Lecture, speaker will review the findings and implications of PET studies of obese subjects and then compare them to PET research involving drug-addicted individuals. For example, in pathologically obese subjects, it was found that reductions in striatal dopamine D2 receptors are similar to those observed in drug-addicted subjects. The speaker and his colleagues have postulated that decreased levels of dopamine receptors predisposed subjects to search for strongly rewarding reinforcers, be it drugs for the drug-addicted or food for the obese, as a means to compensate for decreased sensitivity of their dopamine-regulated reward circuits. As the speaker will summarize, multiple but similar brain circuits involved in reward, motivation, learning and inhibitory control are disrupted both in drug addiction and obesity, resulting in the need for a multimodal approach to the treatment of obesity.

  20. Electromagnetic cyclotron waves near the proton cyclotron frequency in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, Lan K.; Boardsen, Scott; Moya, Pablo; Stevens, Michael; Alexander, Robert; Vinas, Adolfo

    2015-04-01

    Strong narrow-band electromagnetic waves around the proton cyclotron frequency (fpc) have been found sporadically in the solar wind from 0.3 to 0.7 AU during MESSENGER spacecraft’s cruise phase. These waves are transverse and circularly polarized, and they propagate in directions quasi-parallel to the magnetic field. The wave power decreases quadratically with heliocentric distance, faster than the trend if assuming the conservation of Poynting flux for wave packets, suggesting there is energy dissipation from the waves, which could contribute to the heating and acceleration of solar wind plasma. Although the wave frequency is a few times of fpc in the spacecraft frame, it is a fraction of fpc in the solar wind plasma frame after removing the Doppler shift effect. In this frequency range, the waves can be left-hand (LH) polarized ion cyclotron waves or right-hand (RH) polarized magnetosonic waves. Because the waves are LH or RH polarized in the spacecraft frame with otherwise nearly identical characteristics, they could be due to Doppler shift of a same type of waves or a mixture of waves with intrinsically different polarizations. Through the assistance of audification, we have studied the long-lasting wave events in 2005 using high-cadence magnetic field data from the Wind mission. Statistically, in contrast with general solar wind, the protons at these waves are distributed closer to the proton instability thresholds, while the alpha particles at these waves are distributed further away from the alpha instability thresholds. For selected events of extensive waves, the ion distribution is analyzed in detail. A mixture of temperature anisotropies for core protons, beam protons, and alpha particles, as well as proton beam drift are often found in such events. We conduct linear wave dispersion analysis using these ion moments to examine whether these waves can be explained by the local generation of kinetic instabilities such as the LH ion cyclotron, the RH

  1. Correlation electron cyclotron emission diagnostic in TCV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontana, M.; Porte, L.; Molina Cabrera, P.

    2017-08-01

    The correlation electron cyclotron emission diagnostic of tokamak à configuration variable has recently been upgraded. It now has the choice of three lines of sight: two horizontal lines placed on the low field side of the vessel, perpendicular to the magnetic field, and a dual-axis steerable antenna. The polarization of the radiation collected by the latter can be rotated using a universal polarizer situated in the transmission line. This line is also shared with a reflectometry system, allowing simultaneous measurements of temperature and density fluctuations in the same plasma volumes. When using this line, it is possible to choose between two dedicated front ends characterized by different local oscillator frequencies, adding flexibility in the choice of the plasma region to be studied. The intermediate frequency section is now equipped with six frequency tunable YIG filters allowing the study of turbulence properties in a wide range of radial positions. When studying fluctuations over the whole video bandwidth, the minimum detectable fluctuation level is δ Te/Te˜0.5 % . The new system has been used to measure electron temperature fluctuations over a large fraction of the plasma profiles in a series of plasmas with triangularity varying from 0.6 to -0.6 but comparable collisionality profiles.

  2. Brookhaven Lab physicists Edward Beebe and Alexander Pikin win 'Brightness Award' for achievement in ion source physics and technology

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    "Edward Beebe and Alexander Pikin, physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory, have been awarded the Ion Source Prize, known as the "Brightness Award," which recognizes and encourages innovative and significant recent achievements in the fields of ion source physics and technology" (1 page).

  3. Inverse ion-cyclotron damping and excitation of multiharmonic ion-cyclotron waves in the northern magnetospheric cusp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slapak, Rikard; Gunell, Herbert; Hamrin, Maria

    2017-04-01

    We have investigated a case of inverse ion-cyclotron damping taking place in the northern terrestrial magnetospheric cusp, exciting waves at the ion-cyclotron frequency and its harmonics. Magnetosheath influx in the cusps and the effect of convection and magnetic mirroring give rise to parallel velocity shears, dvallel/dx\\perp, often associated with instabilities in the plasma and corresponding ion-cyclotron waves, whose evolution is described by a damping factor. This damping factor depends on, for example, the wave numbers and the velocity shear itself and can under certain conditions be negative, hence describing inverse damping (or wave growth). However, an additional required condition for inverse ion-cyclotron damping is a velocity shear in the magnetic field-aligned ion-bulk flow, and this condition is only met for magnetosheath influx in the northern cusp, as oppose to the southern cusp. The ion-cyclotron waves are primarily seen as peaks in the magnetic-field spectral densities, as presented by Slapak et al., [GRL (2016), doi:10.1002/2016GL071680]. The corresponding peaks in the electric-field spectral densities are not as profound, suggesting a background electric field noise or other processes of wave generation causing the electric spectral densities to smoothen out more compared to the magnetic counterpart. We note that some ion-cyclotron wave activity is present in a few similar shear events in the southern cusp, which indicates that other mechanisms generating ion-cyclotron waves may also be present during such conditions.

  4. Design of RF system for CYCIAE-230 superconducting cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin, Zhiguo, E-mail: bitbearAT@hotmail.com; Ji, Bin; Fu, Xiaoliang; Cao, Xuelong; Zhao, Zhenlu; Zhang, Tinajue

    2017-05-11

    The CYCIAE230 is a low-current, compact superconducting cyclotron designed for proton therapy. The Radio Frequency system consists of four RF cavities and applies second harmonic to accelerate beams. The driving power for the cavity system is estimated to be approximately 150 kW. The LLRF controller is a self-made device developed and tested at low power using a small-scale cavity model. In this paper, the resonator systems of an S.C. cyclotron in history are reviewed. Contrary to those RF systems, the cavities of the CYCIAE230 cyclotron connect two opposite dees. Two high-power RF windows are included in the system. Each window carries approximately 75 kW RF power from the driver to the cavities. Thus, the RF system for the CY-CIAE230 cyclotron is operated in driven push–pull mode. The two-way amplifier-coupler-cavity systems are operated with approximately the same amount of RF power but 180° out of phase compared with each other. The design, as well as the technical advantage and limitations of this operating mode, of the CYCIAE230 cyclotron RF system is analyzed.

  5. Relativistic Cyclotron Resonance Shape in Magnetic Bottle Geonium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehmelt, Hans; Mittleman, Richard; Liu, Yuan

    1988-10-01

    The thermally excited axial oscillation of the electron through the weak magnetic bottle needed for the continuous Stern-Gerlach effect modulates the cyclotron frequency and produces a characteristic ≈ 12-kHz-wide vertical rise-exponential decline line shape of the cyclotron resonance. At the same time the relativistic mass shift decreases the frequency by ≈ 200 Hz per cyclotron motion quantum level n. Nevertheless, our analysis of the complex line shape shows that it should be possible to produce an abrupt rise in the cyclotron quantum number n from 0 to ≈ 20 over a small fraction of 200 Hz, when the 160-GHz microwave drive approaches the n = 0 → 1 transition, and a jump of 14 levels over a frequency increment of 200 Hz has already been observed in preliminary work. This realizes an earlier proposal to generate a very sharp cyclotron resonance feature by quasithermal excitation with a square noise band and should provide a way to detect spin flips when a weak bottle is used to reduce the broadening of the g - 2 resonance by a factor of 20.

  6. Design of RF system for CYCIAE-230 superconducting cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zhiguo; Ji, Bin; Fu, Xiaoliang; Cao, Xuelong; Zhao, Zhenlu; Zhang, Tinajue

    2017-05-01

    The CYCIAE230 is a low-current, compact superconducting cyclotron designed for proton therapy. The Radio Frequency system consists of four RF cavities and applies second harmonic to accelerate beams. The driving power for the cavity system is estimated to be approximately 150 kW. The LLRF controller is a self-made device developed and tested at low power using a small-scale cavity model. In this paper, the resonator systems of an S.C. cyclotron in history are reviewed. Contrary to those RF systems, the cavities of the CYCIAE230 cyclotron connect two opposite dees. Two high-power RF windows are included in the system. Each window carries approximately 75 kW RF power from the driver to the cavities. Thus, the RF system for the CY-CIAE230 cyclotron is operated in driven push-pull mode. The two-way amplifier-coupler-cavity systems are operated with approximately the same amount of RF power but 180° out of phase compared with each other. The design, as well as the technical advantage and limitations of this operating mode, of the CYCIAE230 cyclotron RF system is analyzed.

  7. Risk assessment of 30 MeV cyclotron facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Gyo Seong; Lee, Jin Woo [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Chong Yeal [Dept. of Radiation Science and Technology, Chonbuk National University, Jeonju (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-03-15

    A cyclotron is a kind of particle accelerator that produces a beam of charged particles for the production of medical, industrial, and research radioisotopes. More than 30 cyclotrons are operated in Korea to produce 18F, an FDG synthesis at hospitals. A 30-MeV cyclotron was installed at ARTI (Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, KAERI) mainly for research regarding isotope production. In this study, we analyze and estimate the items of risk such as the problems in the main components of the cyclotron, the loss of radioactive materials, the leakage of coolant, and the malfunction of utilities, fres and earthquakes. To estimate the occurrence frequency in an accident risk assessment, five levels, i.e., Almost certain, Likely, Possible, Unlikely, and Rare, are applied. The accident consequence level is classified under four grades based on the annual permissible dose for radiation workers and the public in the nuclear safety law. The analysis of the accident effect is focused on the radioactive contamination caused by radioisotope leakage and radioactive material leakage of a ventilation filter due to a free. To analyze the risks, Occupation Safety and Health Acts is applied. In addition, action plans against an accident were prepared after a deep discussion among relevant researchers. In this acts, we will search for hazard and introduce the risk assessment for the research 30-MeV cyclotron facilities of ARTI.

  8. Structural biology facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s high flux beam reactor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korszun, Z.R.; Saxena, A.M.; Schneider, D.K. [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The techniques for determining the structure of biological molecules and larger biological assemblies depend on the extent of order in the particular system. At the High Flux Beam Reactor at the Brookhaven National Laboratory, the Biology Department operates three beam lines dedicated to biological structure studies. These beam lines span the resolution range from approximately 700{Angstrom} to approximately 1.5{Angstrom} and are designed to perform structural studies on a wide range of biological systems. Beam line H3A is dedicated to single crystal diffraction studies of macromolecules, while beam line H3B is designed to study diffraction from partially ordered systems such as biological membranes. Beam line H9B is located on the cold source and is designed for small angle scattering experiments on oligomeric biological systems.

  9. Brookhaven highlights. [Fiscal year 1992, October 1, 1991--September 30, 1992

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowe, M.S.; Cohen, A.; Greenberg, D.; Seubert, L. [eds.

    1992-12-31

    This publication provides a broad overview of the research programs and efforts being conducted, built, designed, and planned at Brookhaven National Laboratory. This work covers a broad range of scientific disciplines. Major facilities include the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron (AGS), with its newly completed booster, the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS), the High Flux Beam Reactor (HFBR), and the RHIC, which is under construction. Departments within the laboratory include the AGS department, accelerator development, physics, chemistry, biology, NSLS, medical, nuclear energy, and interdepartmental research efforts. Research ranges from the pure sciences, in nuclear physics and high energy physics as one example, to environmental work in applied science to study climatic effects, from efforts in biology which are a component of the human genome project to the study, production, and characterization of new materials. The paper provides an overview of the laboratory operations during 1992, including staffing, research, honors, funding, and general laboratory plans for the future.

  10. Brookhaven highlights, October 1978-September 1979. [October 1978 to September 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1979-01-01

    These highlights present an overview of the major research and development achievements at Brookhaven National Laboratory from October 1978 to September 1979. Specific areas covered include: accelerator and high energy physics programs; high energy physics research; the AGS and improvements to the AGS; neutral beam development; heavy ion fusion; superconducting power cables; ISABELLE storage rings; the BNL Tandem accelerator; heavy ion experiments at the Tandem; the High Flux Beam Reactor; medium energy physics; nuclear theory; atomic and applied physics; solid state physics; neutron scattering studies; x-ray scattering studies; solid state theory; defects and disorder in solids; surface physics; the National Synchrotron Light Source ; Chemistry Department; Biology Department; Medical Department; energy sciences; environmental sciences; energy technology programs; National Center for Analysis of Energy Systems; advanced reactor systems; nuclear safety; National Nuclear Data Center; nuclear materials safeguards; Applied Mathematics Department; and support activities. (GHT)

  11. 75 FR 48939 - National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory of Michigan State University; Notice of Decision on...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-12

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE International Trade Administration National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory of Michigan State University...., NW., Washington, DC. Docket Number: 10-043. Applicant: National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory...

  12. Development of a fast scintillator based beam phase measurement system for compact superconducting cyclotrons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhattacharjee, Tanushyam; Kanti Dey, Malay; Dhara, Partha; Roy, Suvodeep; Debnath, Jayanta; Balakrishna Bhole, Rajendra; Dutta, Atanu; Pradhan, Jedidiah; Pal, Sarbajit; Pal, Gautam; Roy, Amitava; Chakrabarti, Alok [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2013-05-15

    In an isochronous cyclotron, measurements of central phase of the ion beam with respect to rf and the phase width provide a way to tune the cyclotron for maximum energy gain per turn and efficient extraction. We report here the development of a phase measurement system and the measurements carried out at the Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre's (VECC's) K= 500 superconducting cyclotron. The technique comprises detecting prompt {gamma}-rays resulting from the interaction of cyclotron ion beam with an aluminium target mounted on a radial probe in coincidence with cyclotron rf. An assembly comprising a fast scintillator and a liquid light-guide inserted inside the cyclotron was used to detect the {gamma}-rays and to transfer the light signal outside the cyclotron where a matching photo-multiplier tube was used for light to electrical signal conversion. The typical beam intensity for this measurement was a few times 10{sup 11} pps.

  13. Calibration of the simulation model of the VINCY cyclotron magnet

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ćirković Saša

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available The MERMAID program will be used to isochronise the nominal magnetic field of the VINCY Cyclotron. This program simulates the response, i. e. calculates the magnetic field, of a previously defined model of a magnet. The accuracy of 3D field calculation depends on the density of the grid points in the simulation model grid. The size of the VINCY Cyclotron and the maximum number of grid points in the XY plane limited by MERMAID define the maximumobtainable accuracy of field calculations. Comparisons of the field simulated with maximum obtainable accuracy with the magnetic field measured in the first phase of the VINCY Cyclotron magnetic field measurements campaign has shown that the difference between these two fields is not as small as required. Further decrease of the difference between these fields is obtained by the simulation model calibration, i. e. by adjusting the current through the main coils in the simulation model.

  14. Cyclotron instabilities driven by temperature anisotropy in the solar wind

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noreen, N.; Yoon, P. H.; Zaheer, S.

    2017-10-01

    Kinetic plasma instabilities are important for regulating the temperature anisotropies of electrons and ions in solar wind. For the low beta regime, it is known that electromagnetic ion/electron cyclotron instabilities are important, but in the literature these unstable modes are discussed under the assumption of parallel propagation. The present paper extends the analysis to two (or with cylindrical symmetry, three) dimensions. The analysis is further extended to include quasilinear description with the assumption of the bi-Maxwellian velocity distribution function. Such an analysis lays the foundation for an eventual study in which cyclotron instabilities as well as obliquely propagating unstable modes such as the mirror instability are simultaneously taken into account. The present paper first lays down the basis for such future efforts in which the two- or three dimensional linear and quasilinear theories of cyclotron instabilities in the low beta regime are formulated.

  15. Calibration of the simulation model of the Vincy cyclotron magnet

    CERN Document Server

    Cirkovic, S; Vorozhtsov, A S; Vorozhtsov, S B

    2002-01-01

    The MERMAID program will be used to isochronise the nominal magnetic field of the VINCY Cyclotron. This program simulates the response, i. e. calculates the magnetic field, of a previously defined model of a magnet. The accuracy of 3D field calculation depends on the density of the grid points in the simulation model grid. The size of the VINCY Cyclotron and the maximum number of grid points in the XY plane limited by MERMAID define the maximum obtainable accuracy of field calculations. Comparisons of the field simulated with maximum obtainable accuracy with the magnetic field measured in the first phase of the VINCY Cyclotron magnetic field measurements campaign has shown that the difference between these two fields is not as small as required. Further decrease of the difference between these fields is obtained by the simulation model calibration, i. e. by adjusting the current through the main coils in the simulation model.

  16. Distribution of thermal neutron flux around a PET cyclotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogata, Yoshimune; Ishigure, Nobuhito; Mochizuki, Shingo; Ito, Kengo; Hatano, Kentaro; Abe, Junichiro; Miyahara, Hiroshi; Masumoto, Kazuyoshi; Nakamura, Hajime

    2011-05-01

    The number of positron emission tomography (PET) examinations has greatly increased world-wide. Since positron emission nuclides for the PET examinations have short half-lives, they are mainly produced using on-site cyclotrons. During the production of the nuclides, significant quantities of neutrons are generated from the cyclotrons. Neutrons have potential to activate the materials around the cyclotrons and cause exposure to the staff. To investigate quantities and distribution of the thermal neutrons, thermal neutron fluxes were measured around a PET cyclotron in a laboratory associating with a hospital. The cyclotron accelerates protons up to 18 MeV, and the mean particle current is 20 μA. The neutron fluxes were measured during both 18F production and C production. Gold foils and thermoluminescent dosimeter (TLD) badges were used to measure the neutron fluxes. The neutron fluxes in the target box averaged 9.3 × 10(6) cm(-2) s(-1) and 1.7 × 10(6) cm(-2) s(-1) during 18F and 11C production, respectively. Those in the cyclotron room averaged 4.1 × 10(5) cm(-2) s(-1) and 1.2 × 10(5) cm(-2) s(-1), respectively. Those outside the concrete wall shielding were estimated as being equal to or less than ∼3 cm s, which corresponded to 0.1 μSv h(-1) in effective dose. The neutron fluxes outside the concrete shielding were confirmed to be quite low compared to the legal limit.

  17. A new RF system for a rejuvenated Synchro-cyclotron

    CERN Multimedia

    1975-01-01

    The Synchro-cyclotron is shown here shortly after the completion of the improvement programme, which left the steel magnet yoke as almost the only remaining component of the original machine. On the left can be seen the rotary condenser which produces the frequency modulation required for the acceleration (one of a pair available -in this instance ROTCO II). (see photo 7506015)

  18. Study of microwave components for an electron cyclotron resonance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Microwave system; microwave studio software; network analyser; electron cyclotron resonance ion source. ... of ∼13 eV was obtained. This article describes various aspects of the microwave system including design, fabrication, characterization and performance studies of the microwave components.

  19. Development of beam instruments at JAERI cyclotron facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okumura, Susumu; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Ishibori, Ikuo; Agematsu, Takashi; Yokota, Watalu; Nara, Takayuki; Nakamura, Yoshiteru; Arakawa, Kazuo [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    A beam phase monitor and two kinds of fluence distribution monitors have been developed for measuring characteristics of cyclotron beams. The beam phase monitor provides a beam phase signal for tuning a beam chopping system and a beam phase selection system. A two-dimensional fluence distribution on a large area is measured with fluence distribution monitors. (author)

  20. The electron cyclotron absorption diagnostic at the Rijnhuizen tokamak project

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gelder, J. F. M.; Miedema, H. S.; Donne, A. J. H.; Oomens, A. A. M.; Schüller, F. C.

    1997-01-01

    A new 20-channel electron cyclotron absorption diagnostic has been developed at the Rijnhuizen tokamak project. It is the first time the electron pressure profile in a tokamak plasma can be measured directly with a time resolution of 1 ms. The diagnostic measures simultaneously the emission and

  1. Electron cyclotron resonance heating in a short cylindrical plasma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma is produced and studied in a small cylindrical system. Microwave power is delivered by a CW magnetron at 2.45 GHz in TE10 mode and launched radially to have extraordinary (X) wave in plasma. The axial magnetic field required for ECR in the system is such that the first two ...

  2. Unstable Electrostatic Ion Cyclotron Waves Exited by an Ion Beam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1976-01-01

    Electrostatic ion cyclotron waves were observed in a quiescent cesium plasma into which a low‐energy beam of sodium ions was injected. The instability appeared when the beam velocity was above 12 times the ion thermal velocity. The waves propagated along the magnetic field with a velocity somewhat...

  3. Cyclotron Resonance of Electrons Trapped in a Microwave Cavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elmore, W. C.

    1975-01-01

    Describes an experiment in which the free-electron cyclotron resonance of electrons trapped in a microwave cavity by a Penning trap is observed. The experiment constitutes an attractive alternative to one of the Gardner-Purcell variety. (Author/GS)

  4. Ion-Beam-Excited, Electrostatic, Ion Cyclotron Instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1977-01-01

    The stability limits of the ion‐beam‐excited, electrostatic, ion cyclotron instability were investigated in a Q‐machine plasma where the electrons could be heated by microwaves. In agreement with theory, the beam energy necessary for excitation decreased with increasing electron temperature....

  5. Ion-Beam-Excited Electrostatic Ion Cyclotron Instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Michelsen, Poul; Pécseli, Hans; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1977-01-01

    The stability limits of the ion‐beam‐excited, electrostatic, ion cyclotron instability were investigated in a Q‐machine plasma where the electrons could be heated by microwaves. In agreement with theory, the beam energy necessary for excitation decreased with increasing electron temperature....

  6. Maryland University sectored isochronous cyclotron (MUSIC): Progress report No. 35

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-10-29

    Efforts are reported on the installation and checkout of cyclotron components which had been previously fabricated. Final integration of subsystems and major systems leading to internal beam tests is reported near completion. Progress is reported in relation to control system components, focus and steering magnet design, and rf system testing. (LEW)

  7. Wave propagation through an electron cyclotron resonance layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.

    1997-01-01

    The propagation of a wave beam through an electron cyclotron resonance layer is analysed in two-dimensional slab geometry in order to assess the deviation from cold plasma propagation due to resonant, warm plasma changes in wave dispersion. For quasi-perpendicular propagation, N-parallel to x

  8. Radiation safety aspects of the AGOR superconducting cyclotron facility

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijers, JPM; de Meijer, RJ

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes shielding calculations and skyshine estimates for the new AGOR K=600 superconducting cyclotron facility. Both simple, semi-empirical models and Monte-Carlo simulations were used. The calculations are based on a 200 MeV proton beam incident on a trick aluminum target. Also the

  9. Electron cyclotron resonance breakdown studies in a linear plasma ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma breakdown is studied in a small linear cylindrical system with four different gases – hydrogen, helium, argon and nitrogen. Microwave power in the experimental system is delivered by a magnetron at 2.45 ± 0.02. GHz in TE10 mode and launched radially to have ...

  10. A micropulse monitor for control of cyclotron beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lind, D. A.; Peterson, R. J.; Da Silva, A. G.; Auler, L. T.; de Barros, S.

    1990-07-01

    A system using wall current monitors to observe the time structure of the individual beam current pulses of the Cyclotron Corp. CV28 cyclotron installed at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear of CNEN in Rio de Janeiro is described. The monitors are designed to give a faithful representation of the actual beam pulse, so the effects on the longitudinal phase space could be seen as the cyclotron parameters were changed. Beam pulses of width in the range of 1 to 4 ns and with a charge of 7 × 10-16 C or greater can be observed. With two units in the line transit times permit beam energy determination as well as charge distribution. For timing purposes a unit placed in front of a target is used to generate a start signal for time-of-flight measurements, and to monitor the effects of all parameters of the cyclotron tune. By measuring flight times in the beamlines of this machine, the energy for 28 MeV protons can be determined to about 50 keV and for the other available particles to about 30 keV.

  11. Study of microwave components for an electron cyclotron resonance ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    rious aspects of the microwave system including design, fabrication, characterization and performance studies of the microwave components. Keywords. Microwave system; microwave studio software; network analyser; electron cyclotron resonance ion source. 1. Introduction. Microwave systems at 2.45 GHz have been ...

  12. The development of technology for the improvement of cyclotron performance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, Jong Seo; Kim, Y. S.; Ha, J. H.; Lee, M. Y.; Lee, H. S

    1999-05-01

    We show the first-order beam optics theory which is a simplified theory that can be used to carry out the initial design of a cyclotron. Based on this, a computer program has been developed to determine main cyclotron parameters such as number of magnet sectors, sector angle, hill and valley fields, and overall size of the cyclotron etc. We then show the result of two-dimensional magnetic field calculation using POISSON program. By using this program, one can determine magnet yoke geometry and the average magnetic fields etc. Finally, the three-dimensional computer program OPERA-3D had been invoked to determine magnet pole tips (i.e. sector). Validity of the design can be seen by investigating magnetic fields, radial and vertical focusing frequencies as a function of the beam energy. In this report, we show the results of cyclotron magnet design. And we designed 72 MHz RF system and ion source system. We tested RF resonance each coupling methods. We show the result of RF design and prototype operation. Our developed ion source is PIG type. We described our design methods and implementation. We report the result of getting negative hydrogen ion.

  13. Second-harmonic ion cyclotron resonance heating scenarios of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    ... Refresher Courses · Symposia · Live Streaming. Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 85; Issue 4. Second-harmonic ion cyclotron resonance heating scenarios of Aditya tokamak plasma. Asim Kumar Chattopadhyay S V Kulkarni R Srinivasan Aditya Team. Volume 85 Issue 4 October 2015 pp 713-721 ...

  14. Nuclear physics with superconducting cyclotron at Kolkata: Scopes ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    At the same time, the nuclear physics programme and related experimental facility development activities are taking shape. A general review of the nuclear physics research opportunities with the superconducting cyclotron and the present status of the development of different detector arrays and other experimental facilities ...

  15. Unstable plasma characteristics in mirror field electron cyclotron ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Electron cyclotron plasma reactor are prone to instabilities in specific input power [3–7] region (150–450 watts). In this region power absorption by gas molecules in the cavity is very poor and enhanced input power gets reflected substantially without increasing ion density. There are abrupt changes in plasma characteristics ...

  16. Application of compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Iwata, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Hojo, S.; Kubo, T.; Kato, Y.; Biri, S.; Fekete, E.; Yoshida, Y.; Drentje, A. G.

    The compact electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source with a permanent magnet configuration (Kei2 source) has been developed at National Institute of Radiological Sciences for a new carbon therapy facility. The Kei2 source was designed for production of C(4+) ions; its performance such as beam

  17. Interactive radiopharmaceutical facility between Yale Medical Center and Brookhaven National Laboratory. Progress report, October 1976-June 1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottschalk, A.

    1979-01-01

    DOE Contract No. EY-76-S-02-4078 was started in October 1976 to set up an investigative radiochemical facility at the Yale Medical Center which would bridge the gap between current investigation with radionuclides at the Yale School of Medicine and the facilities in the Chemistry Department at the Brookhaven National Laboratory. To facilitate these goals, Dr. Mathew L. Thakur was recruited who joined the Yale University faculty in March of 1977. This report briefly summarizes our research accomplishments through the end of June 1979. These can be broadly classified into three categories: (1) research using indium-111 labelled cellular blood components; (2) development of new radiopharmaceuticals; and (3) interaction with Dr. Alfred Wolf and colleagues in the Chemistry Department of Brookhaven National Laboratory.

  18. Department of Energy’s ARM Climate Research Facility External Data Center Operations Plan Located At Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cialella, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Gregory, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Lazar, K. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Liang, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Ma, L. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Tilp, A. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Wagener, R. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2015-05-01

    The External Data Center (XDC) Operations Plan describes the activities performed to manage the XDC, located at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), for the Department of Energy’s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Climate Research Facility. It includes all ARM infrastructure activities performed by the Data Management and Software Engineering Group (DMSE) at BNL. This plan establishes a baseline of expectation within the ARM Operations Management for the group managing the XDC.

  19. Cyclotron Phase-Coherent Ion Spatial Dispersion in a Non-Quadratic Trapping Potential is Responsible for FT-ICR MS at the Cyclotron Frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagornov, Konstantin O.; Kozhinov, Anton N.; Tsybin, Yury O.

    2017-11-01

    Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR MS) at the cyclotron frequency instead of the reduced cyclotron frequency has been experimentally demonstrated using narrow aperture detection electrode (NADEL) ICR cells. Here, based on the results of SIMION simulations, we provide the initial mechanistic insights into the cyclotron frequency regime generation in FT-ICR MS. The reason for cyclotron frequency regime is found to be a new type of a collective motion of ions with a certain dispersion in the initial characteristics, such as pre-excitation ion velocities, in a highly non-quadratic trapping potential as realized in NADEL ICR cells. During ion detection, ions of the same m/z move in phase for cyclotron ion motion but out of phase for magnetron (drift) ion motion destroying signals at the fundamental and high order harmonics that comprise reduced cyclotron frequency components. After an initial magnetron motion period, ion clouds distribute into a novel type of structures - ion slabs, elliptical cylinders, or star-like structures. These structures rotate at the Larmor (half-cyclotron) frequency on a plane orthogonal to the magnetic field, inducing signals at the true cyclotron frequency on each of the narrow aperture detection electrodes. To eliminate the reduced cyclotron frequency peak upon dipolar ion detection, a number of slabs or elliptical cylinders organizing a star-like configuration are formed. In a NADEL ICR cell with quadrupolar ion detection, a single slab or an elliptical cylinder is sufficient to minimize the intensity of the reduced cyclotron frequency components, particularly the second harmonic. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  20. RHIC and quark matter: proposal for a relativistic heavy ion collider at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1984-08-01

    This document describes the Brookhaven National Laboratory Proposal for the construction of a Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The construction of this facility represents the natural continuation of the laboratory's role as a center for nuclear and high-energy physics research and extends and uses the existing AGS, Tandem Van de Graaff and CBA facilities at BNL in a very cost effective manner. The Administration and Congress have approved a project which will provide a link between the Tandem Van de Graaf and the AGS. Completion of this project in 1986 will provide fixed target capabilities at the AGS for heavy ions of about 14 GeV/amu with masses up to approx. 30 (sulfur). The addition of an AGS booster would extend the mass range to the heaviest ions (A approx. 200, e.g., gold); its construction could start in 1986 and be completed in three years. These two new AGS experimental facilities can be combined with the proposed Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider to extend the energy range to 100 x 100 GeV/amu for the heaviest ions. BNL proposes to start construction of RHIC in FY 86 with completion in FY 90 at a total cost of 134 M$.

  1. The Shape and Flow of Heavy Ion Collisions (490th Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schenke, Bjoern [BNL Physics Department

    2014-12-18

    The sun can’t do it, but colossal machines like the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven Lab and Large Hadron Collider (LHC) in Europe sure can. Quarks and gluons make up protons and neutrons found in the nucleus of every atom in the universe. At heavy ion colliders like RHIC and the LHC, scientists can create matter more than 100,000 times hotter than the center of the sun—so hot that protons and neutrons melt into a plasma of quarks and gluons. The particle collisions and emerging quark-gluon plasma hold keys to understanding how these fundamental particles interact with each other, which helps explain how everything is held together—from atomic nuclei to human beings to the biggest stars—how all matter has mass, and what the universe looked like microseconds after the Big Bang. Dr. Schenke discusses theory that details the shape and structure of heavy ion collisions. He will also explain how this theory and data from experiments at RHIC and the LHC are being used to determine properties of the quark-gluon plasma.

  2. What Goes Up Must Come Down: The Lifecycle of Convective Clouds (492nd Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, Michael [BNL Environmental Sciences

    2014-02-19

    Some clouds look like cotton balls and others like anvils. Some bring rain, some snow and sleet, and others, just shade. But, whether big and billowy or dark and stormy, clouds affect far more than the weather each day. Armed with measurements of clouds’ updrafts and downdrafts—which resemble airflow in a convection oven—and many other atmospheric interactions, scientists from Brookhaven Lab and other institutions around the world are developing models that are crucial for understanding Earth’s climate and forecasting future climate change. During his lecture, Dr. Jensen provides an overview of the importance of clouds in the Earth’s climate system before explaining how convective clouds form, grow, and dissipate. His discussion includes findings from the Midlatitude Continental Convective Clouds Experiment (MC3E), a major collaborative experiment between U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and NASA scientists to document precipitation, clouds, winds, and moisture in 3-D for a holistic view of convective clouds and their environment.

  3. A Really Good Hammer: Quantification of Mass Transfer Using Perfluorocarbon Tracers (475th Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, Tom [BNL Environmental Sciences, Tracer Technology Group

    2012-02-15

    Brookhaven Lab’s perfluorocarbon tracer (PFT) technology can be viewed as a hammer looking for nails. But, according to Tom Watson, leader of the Lab’s Tracer Technology Group in the Environmental Research and Technology Division (ERTD), “It’s a really good hammer!” The colorless, odorless and safe gases have a number of research uses, from modeling how airborne contaminants might move through urban canyons to help first responders plan their response to potential terrorist attacks and accidents to locating leaks in underground gas pipes. Their extremely low background level — detectable at one part per quadrillion — allows their transport to be easily tracked. Lab researchers used PFTs during the 2005 Urban Dispersion Program field studies in New York City, gathering data to help improve models of how a gas or chemical release might move around Manhattan’s tall buildings and canyons. Closer to home, scientists also used PFTs to make ventilation measurements in Bldg. 400 on the Lab site to provide data to test air flow models used in determining the effects of passive and active air exchange on the levels of indoor and outdoor air pollution, and to determine the effects of an accidental or intentional release of hazardous substances in or around buildings.

  4. Reliable operation of the Brookhaven EBIS for highly charged ion production for RHIC and NSRL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beebe, E., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Alessi, J., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Binello, S., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Kanesue, T., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; McCafferty, D., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Morris, J., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Okamura, M., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Pikin, A., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Ritter, J., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov; Schoepfer, R., E-mail: beebe@bnl.gov [Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, NY 11973 (United States)

    2015-01-09

    An Electron Beam Ion Source for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC EBIS) was commissioned at Brookhaven in September 2010 and since then it routinely supplies ions for RHIC and NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) as the main source of highly charged ions from Helium to Uranium. Using three external primary ion sources for 1+ injection into the EBIS and an electrostatic injection beam line, ion species at the EBIS exit can be switched in 0.2 s. A total of 16 different ion species have been produced to date. The length and the capacity of the ion trap have been increased by 20% by extending the trap by two more drift tubes, compared with the original design. The fraction of Au{sup 32+} in the EBIS Au spectrum is approximately 12% for 70-80% electron beam neutralization and 8 pulses operation in a 5 Hertz train and 4-5 s super cycle. For single pulse per super cycle operation and 25% electron beam neutralization, the EBIS achieves the theoretical Au{sup 32+} fractional output of 18%. Long term stability has been very good with availability of the beam from RHIC EBIS during 2012 and 2014 RHIC runs approximately 99.8%.

  5. In-situ containment of buried waste at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dwyer, B.P. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Heiser, J. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Stewart, W.; Phillips, S. [Applied Geotechnical Engineering and Construction, Inc., Richland, WA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    The primary objective of this project was to further develop close-coupled barrier technology for the containment of subsurface waste or contaminant migration. A close-coupled barrier is produced by first installing a conventional cement grout curtain followed by a thin inner lining of a polymer grout. The resultant barrier is a cement polymer composite that has economic benefits derived from the cement and performance benefits from the durable and chemically resistant polymer layer. The technology has matured from a regulatory investigation of issues concerning barriers and barrier materials to a pilot-scale, multiple individual column injections at Sandia National Labs (SNL) to full scale demonstration. The feasibility of this barrier concept was successfully proven in a full scale {open_quotes}cold test{close_quotes} demonstration at Hanford, WA. Consequently, a full scale deployment of the technology was conducted at an actual environmental restoration site at Brookhaven National Lab (BNL), Long Island, NY. This paper discusses the installation and performance of a technology deployment implemented at OU-1 an Environmental Restoration Site located at BNL.

  6. BESTIA (Brookhaven Experimental Supra-Terawatt Infrared at ATF) laser: A status report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyanskiy, Mikhail N.; Babzien, Marcus; Pogorelsky, Igor V.

    2017-03-01

    Development of a next-generation CO2 laser aiming at 100 TW peak power at a wavelength of 10 µm ts underway at the Brookhaven Accelerator Test Facility (ATF). A new laser facility is being deployed as part of the ATF-II upgrade. New high-pressure power amplifiers are being fabricated and assembled, while R&D continues with ATF's present 2 TW CO2 laser system. Our plan for increasing the peak laser power envisions several discrete steps in the upgrade. First will be demonstration of a 10 TW capability utilizing chirped pulse amplification, with an extended power amplifier chain filled with high-pressure isotopic gas. Further development aimed at a demonstration of 25 TW operation will require the addition of a nonlinear compressor system to shrink the pulse width below the nominal gain-bandwidth limit. These upgrades will then enable a longer-term R&D effort to achieve the 100 TW goal. Over the last two years, significant R&D effort has been focused on the development of chirped-pulse amplification, the study of the behavior of optical materials under the action of high-peak-power mid-IR pulses, and the optimization of the beam quality, which is required for nonlinear pulse compression. The results of this R&D have been implemented into the ongoing operation of the ATF's CO2 laser and have already benefited our users in their experimental programs.

  7. Higher-order-mode absorbers for energy recovery linac cryomodules at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hahn

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Several future accelerator projects at Brookhaven for the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC are based on energy recovery linacs (ERLs with high-charge high-current electron beams. Their stable operation mandates effective higher-order-mode (HOM damping. The development of HOM dampers for these projects is pursued actively at this laboratory. Strong HOM damping was experimentally demonstrated both at room and at superconducting (SC temperatures in a prototype research and development (R&D five-cell niobium superconducting rf (SRF cavity with ferrite dampers. Two room-temperature mock-up five-cell copper cavities were used to study various damper configurations with emphasis on capacitive antenna dampers. An innovative type of ferrite damper over a ceramic break for an R&D SRF electron gun also was developed. For future SRF linacs longer cryomodules comprised of multiple superconducting cavities with reasonably short intercavity transitions are planned. In such a configuration, the dampers, located closer to the cavities, will be at cryogenic temperatures; this will impose additional constraints and complications. This paper presents the results of simulations and measurements of several damper configurations.

  8. Summary of EC-17: the 17th Joint Workshop on Electron Cyclotron Emission and Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (Deurne, The Netherlands, 7-10 May 2012)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.; Austin, M. E.; Kubo, S.; Lin-Liu, Y. R.; Plaum, B.

    2013-01-01

    An overview is given of the papers presented at the 17th Joint Workshop on Electron Cyclotron Emission (ECE) and Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH). The meeting covered all aspects of the research field ranging from theory to enabling technologies. From the workshop, advanced control by

  9. Electron cyclotron emission imaging diagnostic system for Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deng, B.H.; Hsia, R.P.; Domier, C.W.; Burns, S.R.; Hillyer, T.R.; Luhmann, N.C. Jr. [University of California at Davis, 228 Walker Hall, Davis, California 95616 (United States); Oyevaar, T.; Donne, A.J. [FOM-Inst. voor Plasmafysica Rijnhuizen, Association Euratom-FOM (International organizations without location); RTP team

    1999-01-01

    A 16-channel electron cyclotron emission (ECE) imaging diagnostic system has been developed and installed on the Rijnhuizen Tokamak Project for measuring plasma electron cyclotron emission with a temporal resolution of 2 {mu}s. The high spatial resolution of the system is achieved by utilizing a low cost linear mixer/receiver array. Unlike conventional ECE diagnostics, the sample volumes of the ECE imaging system are aligned vertically, and can be shifted across the plasma cross-section by varying the local oscillator frequency, making possible 2D measurements of electron temperature profiles and fluctuations. The poloidal/radial wavenumber spectra and correlation lengths of T{sub e} fluctuations in the plasma core can also be obtained by properly positioning the focal plane of the imaging system. Due to these unique features, ECE imaging is an ideal tool for plasma transport study. Technical details of the system are described, together with preliminary experimental results. {copyright} {ital 1999 American Institute of Physics.}

  10. Studies of radioisotope production with an AVF cyclotron in TIARA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sekine, Toshiaki [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment

    1997-03-01

    The production of radioisotopes to be used mainly for nuclear medicine and biology is studied with an AVF cyclotron in TIARA. A production method of no-carrier-added {sup 186}Re with the {sup 186}W(p,n){sup 186}Re reaction has been developed; this product may be used as a therapeutic agent in radioimmunotherapy due to the adequate nuclear and chemical properties. For the study of the function of plants using a positron-emitter two-dimensional imaging system, a simple method of producing the positron emitter {sup 18}F in water was developed by taking advantage of a highly-energetic {alpha} beam from the AVF cyclotron. (author)

  11. Target development for diversified irradiations at a medical cyclotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spellerberg, S; Scholten, B; Spahn, I; Bolten, W; Holzgreve, M; Coenen, H H; Qaim, S M

    2015-10-01

    The irradiation facility at an old medical cyclotron (Ep=17 MeV; Ed=10 MeV) was upgraded by extending the beam line and incorporation of solid state targetry. Tests performed to check the quality of the available beam are outlined. Results on nuclear data measurements and improvement of radiochemical separations are described. Using solid targets, with the proton beam falling at a slanting angle of 20°, a few radionuclides, e.g. (75)Se, (120)I, (124)I, etc. were produced with medium currents (up to 20 µA) in no-carrier-added form in quantities sufficient for local use. The extended irradiation facility has considerably enhanced the utility of the medical cyclotron. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Neutron spectra due (13)N production in a PET cyclotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavente, J A; Vega-Carrillo, H R; Lacerda, M A S; Fonseca, T C F; Faria, F P; da Silva, T A

    2015-05-01

    Monte Carlo and experimental methods have been used to characterize the neutron radiation field around PET (Positron Emission Tomography) cyclotrons. In this work, the Monte Carlo code MCNPX was used to estimate the neutron spectra, the neutron fluence rates and the ambient dose equivalent (H*(10)) in seven locations around a PET cyclotron during (13)N production. In order to validate these calculations, H*(10) was measured in three sites and were compared with the calculated doses. All the spectra have two peaks, one above 0.1MeV due to the evaporation neutrons and another in the thermal region due to the room-return effects. Despite the relatively large difference between the measured and calculated H*(10) for one point, the agreement was considered good, compared with that obtained for (18)F production in a previous work. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Physics of electron cyclotron current drive on DIII-D

    CERN Document Server

    Petty, C C; Harvey, R W; Kinsey, J E; Lao, L L; Lohr, J; Luce, T C; Makowski, M A; Prater, R

    2002-01-01

    OAK A271 PHYSICS OF ELECTRON CYCLOTRON CURRENT DRIVE ON DIII-D. Recent experiments on the DIII-D tokamak have focused on determining the effect of trapped particles on the electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) efficiency. The measured ECCD efficiency increases as the deposition location is moved towards the inboard midplane or towards smaller minor radius for both co and counter injection. The measured ECCD efficiency also increases with increasing electron density and/or temperature. The experimental ECCD is compared to both the linear theory (Toray-GA) as well as a quasilinear Fokker-Planck model (CQL3D). The experimental ECCD is found to be in better agreement with the more complete Fokker-Planck calculation, especially for cases of high rf power density and/or loop voltage. The narrow width of the measured ECCD profile is consistent with only low levels of radial transport for the current carrying electrons.

  14. Ernest Orlando Lawrence (1901-1958), Cyclotron and Medicine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chu, William T.

    2005-09-01

    On August 8, 2001, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory celebrated the centennial of the birth of its founder (and namesake), Ernest Orlando Lawrence. For the occasion, many speeches were given and old speeches were remembered. We recall the words of the late Luis Alvarez, a Nobel Laureate and one of the Lawrence's closest colleagues: ''Lawrence will always be remembered as the inventor of the cyclotron, but more importantly, he should be remembered as the inventor of the modern way of doing science''. J. L. Heilbron and R. W. Seidel, in the introduction of their book, ''Lawrence and His Laboratory'' stated, ''The motives and mechanisms that shaped the growth of the Laboratory helped to force deep changes in the scientific estate and in the wider society. In the entrepreneurship of its founder, Ernest Orlando Lawrence, these motives, mechanisms, and changes came together in a tight focus. He mobilized great and small philanthropists, state and local governments, corporations, and plutocrats, volunteers and virtuosos. The work they supported, from astrophysics and atomic bombs, from radiochemistry to nuclear medicine, shaped the way we observe, control, and manipulate our environment.'' Indeed, all over the civilized world, the ways we do science changed forever after Lawrence built his famed Radiation Laboratory. In this editorial, we epitomize his legacy of changing the way we do medicine, thereby affecting the health and well being of all humanity. This year marks the 75th anniversary of the invention of the cyclotron by Ernest Orlando Lawrence at the University of California at Berkeley. Lawrence conceived the idea of the cyclotron early in 1929 after reading an article by Rolf Wideroe on high-energy accelerators. In the spring of 1930 one of his students, Nels Edlefsen, constructed two crude models of a cyclotron. Later in the fall of the same year, another student, M. Stanley Livingston

  15. Converting an AEG Cyclotron to H- Acceleration and Extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramsey, Fred; Carroll, Lewis; Rathmann, Tom; Huenges, Ernst; Bechtold, Matthias Mentler Volker

    2009-03-01

    Clinical Trials are under way to evaluate agents labeled with the nuclide 225Ac and its decay product 213Bi, in targeted alpha-immuno-therapy [1]. 225Ac can be produced on a medium-energy cyclotron via the nuclear reaction 226Ra(p,n)225Ac. To demonstrate proof-of-principle, a vintage AEG cyclotron, Model E33 [2], with an internal target, had been employed in a pilot production program at the Technical University of Munich (TUM). To enhance production capability and further support the clinical studies, the TUM facility has recently been refurbished and upgraded, adding a new external beam-line, automated target irradiation and transport systems, new laboratories, hot cells, etc. [3]. An improved high-power rotating target has been built and installed [4]. The AEG cyclotron itself has also been modified and upgraded to accelerate and extract H- ions. We have designed, built, and tested a new axial Penning-type ion source which is optimized for the production of H- ions. The ion source has continued to evolve through experiment and experience. Steady improvements in materials and mechanics have led to enhanced source stability, life-time, and H- production. We have also designed and built a precision H- charge-exchange beam-extraction system which is equipped with a vacuum lock. To fit within the tight mechanical constraint imposed by the narrow magnet gap, the system incorporates a novel chain-drive foil holder and foil-changer mechanism. The reconfigured cyclotron system has now been in operation for more than 1 year. Three long-duration target irradiations have been conducted. The most recent bombardment ran 160 continuous hours at a beam on target of ˜80 microamperes for a total yield of ˜70 milli-curies of 225Ac.

  16. Shielding simulation of the CDTN cyclotron bunker using MCNP

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalle, Hugo M.; Campolina, Daniel de A.M., E-mail: dallehm@cdtn.b, E-mail: campolina@cdtn.b [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Div. de Reatores e Radiacoes

    2011-07-01

    The Nuclear Technology Development Centre (CDTN/CNEN) has contracted services from General Electric in order to install a cyclotron for radioisotopes production and PET radiopharmaceutical synthesis. The Monte Carlo code MCNP5 was used to determine the TVL (tenth value layer) of the concrete and verify shielding calculations performed by GE. The simulations results show values of equivalent dose rates in agreement with those calculated using the methodology adopted by GE, the NCRP-144 and the NCRP-51. (author)

  17. Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Accelerator for environmental applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yong; Shchelkunov, Sergey V.; Hirshfield, Jay L.

    2017-03-01

    A MW-level CW electron beam source for environmental remediation based on extensions of the scientifically-proven Cyclotron Auto-Resonance Accelerator, dubbed CARA, is described here. CARA is distinguished by its exceptionally high RF-to-beam efficiency, by its production of a self-scanning beam, and by its proportionately lower specific power loading on a beam output window. Its environmental applications include sterilization, flue gas and waste water treatment.

  18. Electron Cyclotron Waves Polarization in the TJII Stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cappa, A.; Martinez-Fernandez, J.; Wagner, D.

    2013-05-01

    This report describes the theoretical calculations related with the electron cyclotron (EC) waves polarization control in the TJII stellarator. Two main aspects will be distinguished: the determination of the vacuum polarization that the wave must exhibit if a given propagation mode in a cold plasma is desired and the calculation of the behavior of the grooved polarizers and other transmission systems used to launch the vacuum wave with the required polarization. (Author) 13 refs.

  19. Ion–Cyclotron Resonance Frequency Interval Dependence on the O ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The frequency intervals in which O VI ions get in resonance with ion–cyclotron waves are calculated using the kinetic model, for the latest six values found in literature on O VI ion number densities in the 1.5–3 region of the NPCH. It is found that the common resonance interval is 1.5 kHz to 3 kHz. The -variations of wave ...

  20. Modern compact accelerators of cyclotron type for medical applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smirnov, V.; Vorozhtsov, S.

    2016-09-01

    Ion beam therapy and hadron therapy are types of external beam radiotherapy. Recently, the vast majority of patients have been treated with protons and carbon ions. Typically, the types of accelerators used for therapy were cyclotrons and synchrocyclotrons. It is intuitively clear that a compact facility fits best to a hospital environment intended for particle therapy and medical diagnostics. Another criterion for selection of accelerators to be mentioned in this article is application of superconducting technology to the magnetic system design of the facility. Compact isochronous cyclotrons, which accelerate protons in the energy range 9-30 MeV, have been widely used for production of radionuclides. Energy of 230 MeV has become canonical for all proton therapy accelerators. Similar application of a carbon beam requires ion energy of 430 MeV/u. Due to application of superconducting coils the magnetic field in these machines can reach 4-5 T and even 9 T in some cases. Medical cyclotrons with an ironless or nearly ironless magnetic system that have a number of advantages over the classical accelerators are in the development stage. In this work an attempt is made to describe some conceptual and technical features of modern accelerators under consideration. The emphasis is placed on the magnetic and acceleration systems along with the beam extraction unit, which are very important from the point of view of the facility compactness and compliance with the strict medical requirements.

  1. Quench analysis of a novel compact superconducting cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghosh, Sundeep; Dutta Gupta, Anjan; Kanti Dey, Malay; Pal, Gautam

    2017-02-01

    Design and analysis of a compact superconducting cyclotron dedicated for medical applications in the fields of nuclear medicine and therapy is presently being pursued in our organization. The novelty of this cyclotron lies in the fact that it does not consist of any iron-pole. The cyclotron magnet will be made of a set of NbTi coils comprising of solenoid and sector coils which are housed in two halves on either sides of the median plane. The average magnetic field is 1.74 T and the maximum extraction energy is 25 MeV, which is sufficient for production of 99mTc from Mo. In this paper, quench analyses of the coils have been discussed in details considering adiabatic condition. The entire cryostat magnet along with coils, formers and support links were modelled for the quench simulation. Self and mutual inductances of all the coils were obtained from a separate magnetic analysis and used in the simulation. Parametric analyses were carried out with different quench initiation energy at various critical locations on the coil surface. The corresponding quench behaviour, i.e. maximum temperature rise, maximum voltage and current decay in each of the coils have been studied.

  2. A Suzaku View of Cyclotron Line Sources and Candidates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pottschmidt, K.; Suchy, S.; Rivers, E.; Rothschild, R. E.; Marcu, D. M.; Barragan, L.; Kuehnel, M.; Fuerst, F.; Schwarm, F.; Kreykenbohm, I.; hide

    2012-01-01

    Seventeen accreting neutron star pulsars, mostly high mass X-ray binaries with half of them Be-type transients, are known to exhibit Cyclotron Resonance Scattering Features (CRSFs) in their X-ray spectra, with characteristic line energies from 10 to 60 keY. To date about two thirds of them, plus a few similar systems without known CRSFs, have been observed with Suzaku. We present an overview of results from these observations, including the discovery of a CRSF in the transient IA1118-61 and pulse phase resolved spectroscopy of OX 301-2. These observations allow for the determination of cyclotron line parameters to an unprecedented degree of accuracy within a moderate amount of observing time. This is important since these parameters vary - e.g., with orbital phase, pulse phase, or luminosity - depending on the geometry of the magnetic field of the pulsar and the properties of the accretion column at the magnetic poles. We briefly introduce a spectral model for CRSFs that is currently being developed and that for the first time is based on these physical properties. In addition to cyclotron line measurements, selected highlights from the Suzaku analyses include dip and flare studies, e.g., of 4U 1907+09 and Vela X-I, which show clumpy wind effects (like partial absorption and/or a decrease in the mass accretion rate supplied by the wind) and may also display magnetospheric gating effects.

  3. Emittance Measurement for Beamline Extension at the PET Cyclotron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sae-Hoon Park

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Particle-induced X-ray emission is used for determining the elemental composition of materials. This method uses low-energy protons (of several MeV, which can be obtained from high-energy (of tens MeV accelerators. Instead of manufacturing an accelerator for generating the MeV protons, the use of a PET cyclotron has been suggested for designing the beamline for multipurpose applications, especially for the PIXE experiment, which has a dedicated high-energy (of tens MeV accelerator. The beam properties of the cyclotron were determined at this experimental facility by using an external beamline before transferring the ion beam to the experimental chamber. We measured the beam profile and calculated the emittance using the pepper-pot method. The beam profile was measured as the beam current using a wire scanner, and the emittance was measured as the beam distribution at the beam dump using a radiochromic film. We analyzed the measurement results and are planning to use the results obtained in the simulations of external beamline and aligned beamline components. We will consider energy degradation after computing the beamline simulation. The experimental study focused on measuring the emittance from the cyclotron, and the results of this study are presented in this paper.

  4. The cyclotron laboratory and the RFQ accelerator in Bern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braccini, S.; Ereditato, A.; Kreslo, I.; Nirkko, M.; Scampoli, P.; von Bremen, K.; Weber, M.

    2013-07-01

    Two proton accelerators have been recently put in operation in Bern: an 18 MeV cyclotron and a 2 MeV RFQ linac. The commercial IBA 18/18 cyclotron, equipped with a specifically conceived 6 m long external beam line ending in a separate bunker, will provide beams for routine 18-F and other PET radioisotope production as well as for novel detector, radiation biophysics, radioprotection, radiochemistry and radiopharmacy developments. The accelerator is embedded into a complex building hosting two physics laboratories and four Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) laboratories. This project is the result of a successful collaboration between the Inselspital, the University of Bern and private investors, aiming at the constitution of a combined medical and research centre able to provide the most cutting-edge technologies in medical imaging and cancer radiation therapy. The cyclotron is complemented by the RFQ with the primary goals of elemental analysis via Particle Induced Gamma Emission (PIGE), and the detection of potentially dangerous materials with high nitrogen content using the Gamma-Resonant Nuclear Absorption (GRNA) technique. In this context, beam instrumentation devices have been developed, in particular an innovative beam profile monitor based on doped silica fibres and a setup for emittance measurements using the pepper-pot technique. On this basis, the establishment of a proton therapy centre on the campus of the Inselspital is in the phase of advanced study.

  5. The cyclotron laboratory and the RFQ accelerator in Bern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Braccini, S.; Ereditato, A.; Kreslo, I.; Nirkko, M.; Weber, M. [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Laboratory for High Energy Physics (LHEP), University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern (Switzerland); Scampoli, P. [Albert Einstein Center for Fundamental Physics, Laboratory for High Energy Physics (LHEP), University of Bern, Sidlerstrasse 5, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland and Department of Physical Sciences, University Federico II, Via Cintia, I-60126 Napoli (Italy); Bremen, K. von [SWAN Isotopen AG, Inselspital, CH-3010 Bern (Switzerland)

    2013-07-18

    Two proton accelerators have been recently put in operation in Bern: an 18 MeV cyclotron and a 2 MeV RFQ linac. The commercial IBA 18/18 cyclotron, equipped with a specifically conceived 6 m long external beam line ending in a separate bunker, will provide beams for routine 18-F and other PET radioisotope production as well as for novel detector, radiation biophysics, radioprotection, radiochemistry and radiopharmacy developments. The accelerator is embedded into a complex building hosting two physics laboratories and four Good Manufacturing Practice (GMP) laboratories. This project is the result of a successful collaboration between the Inselspital, the University of Bern and private investors, aiming at the constitution of a combined medical and research centre able to provide the most cutting-edge technologies in medical imaging and cancer radiation therapy. The cyclotron is complemented by the RFQ with the primary goals of elemental analysis via Particle Induced Gamma Emission (PIGE), and the detection of potentially dangerous materials with high nitrogen content using the Gamma-Resonant Nuclear Absorption (GRNA) technique. In this context, beam instrumentation devices have been developed, in particular an innovative beam profile monitor based on doped silica fibres and a setup for emittance measurements using the pepper-pot technique. On this basis, the establishment of a proton therapy centre on the campus of the Inselspital is in the phase of advanced study.

  6. PRODUCTION OF 11 C-METHIONINE BY CYCLOTRON AVF JAERI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Hastini

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available At the Takasaki-site of JAERI, an AVF cyclotron has been constructed for advanced radiation technology research. The cyclotron produces extracted beams particularly light and heavy ions of proton as well as deutron. Target chamber is available for production of 11CO2 a positron emitter radioisotope, by bombardment of proton from nitrogen gas as a target, by 14 N (p,a 11C reaction. The use of incident energy on target was estimated to be 11 MeV for primary proton energy of 20 MeV and the beam current was 0,1 m A and the irradiation time was 10 minutes for production of 11CO2 and the yield was about 30 MBq (EOBand for irradiation time 15 minutes and the beam current was 1 mA for production of 11C-Methionine, the yield was about 70 MBq (EOB. Remotely operated automatic and semiautomatic processing systems are used for the production of the 11 C-Methionine agent and the radiochemical purity of the product obtained was determined by High Performance Liquid Chromatography (HPLC with cation exchange column was LC 10 AD MERCK LICHROSPHER 100 RP-18 and the mobile phase was 10 mM ammonium phormmate, the mean of retention time was 1,815 minutes and the radiochemical purity to be more than 90 %. The product was used for plant studies and visualized by PETIS (Positron Emission Tracer Imaging System   Keywords: cyclotron, Positron emitter, 11C-Methionine.

  7. EURAC: A liquid target neutron spallation source using cyclotron technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perlado, J. M.; Mínguez, E.; Sanz, J.; Piera, M.

    1995-09-01

    Euratom/JRC Ispra led some years ago the design of an accelerator based neutron spallation source EURAC, with special emphasis as a fusion material testing device. DENIM was involved in the development of the last version of this source. EURAC proposes to use a beam of 600 MeV or 1.5 GeV protons, produced by an effective and low cost ring cyclotron with a current of 6 mA impinging in a liquid lead, or lead-bismuth, target. It will use an advanced cyclotron technology which can be implemented in the next future, in the line of the actual technology of the upgraded SIN-type cyclotron. The adjacent rows to the target correspond to the lead, or Li17Pb83, cooled channels where the samples will be located. The available volumes there were shown enough for material testing purposes. Here, proposal of using those experimental areas to introduce small masses of radioactive wastes for testing of transmutation in spallation source is made. In addition, extrapolation of present conceptual design to make available larger volumes under flexible conditions seems to be possible. Neutrons leaking from the test zone drive a subcritical booster (hidrogen moderator in the center.

  8. 915-MHz Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bartholomew, M. J. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Giangrande, S. [Brookhaven National Lab. (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-03-01

    When considering the amount of shortwave radiation incident on a photovoltaic solar array and, therefore, the amount and stability of the energy output from the system, clouds represent the greatest source of short-term (i.e., scale of minutes to hours) variability through scattering and reflection of incoming solar radiation. Providing estimates of this short-term variability is important for determining and regulating the output from large solar arrays as they connect with the larger power infrastructure. In support of the installation of a 37-MW solar array on the grounds of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a study of the impacts of clouds on the output of the solar array has been undertaken. The study emphasis is on predicting the change in surface solar radiation resulting from the observed/forecast cloud field on a 5-minute time scale. At these time scales, advection of cloud elements over the solar array is of particular importance. As part of the BNL Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive Operational Period (IOP), a 915-MHz Radar Wind Profiler (RWP) was deployed to determine the profile of low-level horizontal winds and the depth of the planetary boundary layer. The initial deployment mission of the 915-MHz RWP for cloud forecasting has been expanded the deployment to provide horizontal wind measurements for estimating and constraining cloud advection speeds. A secondary focus is on the observation of dynamics and microphysics of precipitation during cold season/winter storms on Long Island. In total, the profiler was deployed at BNL for 1 year from May 2011 through May 2012.

  9. 915-Mhz Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bartholomew, M. J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Giangrande, S. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-03-01

    When considering the amount of shortwave radiation incident on a photovoltaic solar array and, therefore, the amount and stability of the energy output from the system, clouds represent the greatest source of short-term (i.e., scale of minutes to hours) variability through scattering and reflection of incoming solar radiation. Providing estimates of this short-term variability is important for determining and regulating the output from large solar arrays as they connect with the larger power infrastructure. In support of the installation of a 37-MW solar array on the grounds of Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), a study of the impacts of clouds on the output of the solar array has been undertaken. The study emphasis is on predicting the change in surface solar radiation resulting from the observed/forecast cloud field on a 5-minute time scale. At these time scales, advection of cloud elements over the solar array is of particular importance. As part of the BNL Aerosol Life Cycle Intensive Operational Period (IOP), a 915-MHz Radar Wind Profiler (RWP) was deployed to determine the profile of low-level horizontal winds and the depth of the planetary boundary layer. The initial deployment mission of the 915-MHz RWP for cloud forecasting has been expanded the deployment to provide horizontal wind measurements for estimating and constraining cloud advection speeds. A secondary focus is on the observation of dynamics and microphysics of precipitation during cold season/winter storms on Long Island. In total, the profiler was deployed at BNL for 1 year from May 2011 through May 2012.

  10. Radar Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) Field Campaign Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jensen, M. P. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Giangrande, S. E. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States); Bartholomew, M. J. [Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Upton, NY (United States)

    2016-04-01

    The Radar Wind Profiler for Cloud Forecasting at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) [http://www.arm.gov/campaigns/osc2013rwpcf] campaign was scheduled to take place from 15 July 2013 through 15 July 2015 (or until shipped for the next U.S. Department of Energy Atmospheric Radiation Measurement [ARM] Climate Research Facility first Mobile Facility [AMF1] deployment). The campaign involved the deployment of the AMF1 Scintec 915 MHz Radar Wind Profiler (RWP) at BNL, in conjunction with several other ARM, BNL and National Weather Service (NWS) instruments. The two main scientific foci of the campaign were: 1) To provide profiles of the horizontal wind to be used to test and validate short-term cloud advection forecasts for solar-energy applications and 2) to provide vertical profiling capabilities for the study of dynamics (i.e., vertical velocity) and hydrometeors in winter storms. This campaign was a serendipitous opportunity that arose following the deployment of the RWP at the Two-Column Aerosol Project (TCAP) campaign in Cape Cod, Massachusetts and restriction from participation in the Green Ocean Amazon 2014/15 (GoAmazon 2014/15) campaign due to radio-frequency allocation restriction for international deployments. The RWP arrived at BNL in the fall of 2013, but deployment was delayed until fall of 2014 as work/safety planning and site preparation were completed. The RWP further encountered multiple electrical failures, which eventually required several shipments of instrument power supplies and the final amplifier to the vendor to complete repairs. Data collection began in late January 2015. The operational modes of the RWP were changed such that in addition to collecting traditional profiles of the horizontal wind, a vertically pointing mode was also included for the purpose of precipitation sensing and estimation of vertical velocities. The RWP operated well until the end of the campaign in July 2015 and collected observations for more than 20 precipitation

  11. TWENTY-YEAR PLANNING STUDY FOR THE RELATIVISTIC HEAVY ION COLLIDER FACILITY AT BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    LUDLAM,T.ET AL.

    2003-12-31

    At the request of DOE's Office of Nuclear Physics (ONP), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) has created this planning document to assemble and summarize a planning exercise that addresses the core scientific thrust of the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) for the next twenty years and the facilities operation plan that will support this program. The planning work was carried out by BNL in close collaboration with the RHIC user community and within budgetary guidelines for the next five years supplied by the ONP. The resulting plans were reviewed by the BNL High Energy and Nuclear Physics Program Advisory Committee (PAC) at a special RHIC planning meeting held in December 2003. Planning input from each of the four RHIC experimental collaborations was absolutely central to the preparation of this overall Laboratory plan. Each collaboration supplied two key documents, a five-year ''Beam Use Proposal'' and a ten-year ''Decadal Plan''. These plans are posted on the BNL website http://www.bnl.gov/henp/, along with other planning documents germane to this paper, such as the complete written reports from the August and December 2003 PAC meetings that considered the five-year and decadal planning documents of the four RHIC collaborations and offered advice and commentary on these plans. Only in these collaboration documents can the full physics impact of the RHIC program be seen and the full scope of the efforts put into this planning process be appreciated. For this reason, the maximum value of the present planning paper can only be realized by making frequent reference to the collaboration documents.

  12. Status of a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source for National Institute of Radiological Sciences-930 cyclotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojo, S; Katagiri, K; Nakao, M; Sugiura, A; Muramatsu, M; Noda, A; Okada, T; Takahashi, Y; Komiyama, A; Honma, T; Noda, K

    2014-02-01

    The Kei-source is a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source using only permanent magnets and a frequency of 10 GHz. It was developed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) for producing C(4+) ions oriented for high-energy carbon therapy. It has also been used as an ion source for the NIRS-930 cyclotron. Its microwave band region for the traveling-wave-tube amplifier and maximum output power are 8-10 GHz and 350 W, respectively. Since 2006, it has provided various ion beams such as proton, deuteron, carbon, oxygen, and neon with sufficient intensity (200 μA for proton and deuteron, 50 μA for C(4+), for example) and good stability for radioisotope production, tests of radiation damage, and basic research experiments. Its horizontal and vertical emittances were measured using a screen monitor and waist-scan. The present paper reports the current status of the Kei-source.

  13. Status of a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source for National Institute of Radiological Sciences-930 cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hojo, S.; Katagiri, K.; Nakao, M.; Sugiura, A.; Muramatsu, M.; Noda, A.; Okada, T.; Takahashi, Y.; Komiyama, A.; Honma, T.; Noda, K.

    2014-02-01

    The Kei-source is a compact electron cyclotron resonance ion source using only permanent magnets and a frequency of 10 GHz. It was developed at the National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS) for producing C4+ ions oriented for high-energy carbon therapy. It has also been used as an ion source for the NIRS-930 cyclotron. Its microwave band region for the traveling-wave-tube amplifier and maximum output power are 8-10 GHz and 350 W, respectively. Since 2006, it has provided various ion beams such as proton, deuteron, carbon, oxygen, and neon with sufficient intensity (200 μA for proton and deuteron, 50 μA for C4+, for example) and good stability for radioisotope production, tests of radiation damage, and basic research experiments. Its horizontal and vertical emittances were measured using a screen monitor and waist-scan. The present paper reports the current status of the Kei-source.

  14. Static harmonization of dynamically harmonized Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhdanova, Ekaterina; Kostyukevich, Yury; Nikolaev, Eugene

    2017-08-01

    Static harmonization in the Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance cell improves the resolving power of the cell and prevents dephasing of the ion cloud in the case of any trajectory of the charged particle, not necessarily axisymmetric cyclotron (as opposed to dynamic harmonization). We reveal that the Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance cell with dynamic harmonization (paracell) is proved to be statically harmonized. The volume of the statically harmonized potential distribution increases with an increase in the number of trap segments.

  15. Magnetic Cyclotron Waves near the Proton Cyclotron Frequency in the Solar Wind: Wind and ACE Observations in 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broiles, T. W.; Jian, L.; Stevens, M. L.; Gary, S. P.; Lepri, S. T.; Vinas, A. F.; Moya, P. S.; Alexander, R.

    2016-12-01

    Strong narrow-band electromagnetic waves near the proton cyclotron frequency (fpc) have been observed extensively in the solar wind throughout the inner heliosphere. They are transverse and near-circularly polarized, and propagate in directions quasi-parallel or anti-parallel to the magnetic field. Their frequency is a few times of fpc in the spacecraft frame and a fraction of fpc in the plasma frame after removing the Doppler shift effect. These waves are left-hand (LH) or right-hand (RH) polarized in the spacecraft frame with otherwise similar characteristics except LH ones appear more often and have higher wave power. Intrinsically they can be LH polarized Alfven-cyclotron waves or RH polarized magnetosonic waves. Through the assistance of audification, we have studied the long-lasting wave events near fpc in 2005 using the high-cadence magnetic field data and well-calibrated plasma data from the Wind mission. A mixture of temperature anisotropies for core protons, beam protons, and alpha particles, as well as proton beam drift are often found for selected events of extensive waves. The wave dispersion analysis using these ion moments indicate these waves are likely to be associated with unstable Alfven-cyclotron anisotropy instability or ion beam instability, and suggest there is a mixture of Alfven-cyclotron waves and magnetosonic waves in the solar wind. Using the conjunction of Wind and ACE spacecraft when they were within 50 Earth radii of each other, we study how often the two spacecraft observe the same waves and whether there is noticeable heating for heavy ions associated with these waves.

  16. Monte Carlo simulation of cyclotron resonant scattering features

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarm, Fritz-Walter; Schönherr, Gabriele; Wilms, Joern

    In the regime of very high magnetic fields on the order of 10(12} mathrm{G) the electron momenta perpendicular to the field are quantized due to the discrete Landau levels populated by the electrons. Parallel to the magnetic field the electrons form a continuous momentum distribution. The seed photon continuum is generated for example by bremsstrahlung or blackbody radiation. Resonant scattering of a seed photon by an electron may excite the electron to a higher Landau level. The subsequent de-excitation of the excited electron produces additional photons close to the resonance energy. This way complex cyclotron resonant scattering features (CRSFs) are imprinted on the continuum radiation. Due to the continuous electron momentum distribution parallel to the magnetic field the scattering photon's energy and angle are mixed by Lorentz transformation to the electron rest frame in which the resonant scattering process is being carried out. Therefore synthetic spectra of cyclotron lines can not be accurately calculated analytically. CRSFs have been observed in more than a dozen accreting X-ray binaries. They provide much information about the accretion structure in the observed systems since the exact line shape is sensitive to many parameters in the column. Typical parameters are for example the geometry and the spectral properties of seed photon sources, the geometry of the column, or the magnetic field and temperature within the column. We present an overview over the Monte-Carlo approach to cyclotron line simulation and show results from our texttt{cyclosim} code. Furthermore we investigate the influence of the accretion geometry on the cyclotron line shape. Our code enables us to perform fully relativistic simulations including the correct cyclotron scattering cross sections and the possibility to cope with parameter gradients such as magnetic field, temperature, or velocity gradients within the accretion column. Using a Green's function approach these simulations

  17. Electromagnetic Cyclotron Waves in the Solar Wind: Wind Observation and Wave Dispersion Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jian, L. K.; Moya, P. S.; Vinas, A. F.; Stevens, M.

    2016-01-01

    Wind observed long-lasting electromagnetic cyclotron waves near the proton cyclotron frequency on 11 March 2005, in the descending part of a fast wind stream. Bi-Maxwellian velocity distributions are fitted for core protons, beam protons, and alpha-particles. Using the fitted plasma parameters we conduct kinetic linear dispersion analysis and find ion cyclotron and/or firehose instabilities grow in six of 10 wave intervals. After Doppler shift, some of the waves have frequency and polarization consistent with observation, thus may be correspondence to the cyclotron waves observed.

  18. Comparison of neutron fluxes in an 18-MeV unshielded cyclotron room and a 16.5-MeV self-shielded cyclotron room.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Horitsugi, Genki; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Eto, Akihisa; Iwamoto, Yasuo; Obara, Satoshi; Iimori, Takashi; Masuda, Yoshitada; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Hatazawa, Jun

    2012-07-01

    Some medical compact cyclotrons have self-shielding to reduce neutron fluxes. Thermal neutron fluxes in an 18-MeV unshielded cyclotron room and in a 16.5-MeV self-shielded cyclotron room were evaluated. In addition, the radioactivities in concrete and metals due to thermal neutrons in the cyclotron rooms for 30 years were calculated of operation such that the sum of the ratio of the nuclide concentration to the nuclide clearance level was equal to 1. The thermal neutron flux from the unshielded cyclotron was approximately 10(2) cm(-2) s(-1), whereas that from the self-shielded cyclotron was approximately 10(2) cm(-2) s(-1). The thermal neutron fluxes for concrete, stainless steel, vessel steel, and aluminum that reached their clearance levels were 9.80 × 10(4), 2.17 × 10(3), 1.87 × 10(4), and 2.41 × 10(5) cm(-2) s(-1), respectively. The specific activities in the cyclotron room were found to be sufficiently below the clearance level when the self-shield was employed.

  19. BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY SOURCE WATER ASSESSMENT FOR DRINKING WATER SUPPLY WELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    BENNETT,D.B.; PAQUETTE,D.E.; KLAUS,K.; DORSCH,W.R.

    2000-12-18

    The BNL water supply system meets all water quality standards and has sufficient pumping and storage capacity to meet current and anticipated future operational demands. Because BNL's water supply is drawn from the shallow Upper Glacial aquifer, BNL's source water is susceptible to contamination. The quality of the water supply is being protected through (1) a comprehensive program of engineered and operational controls of existing aquifer contamination and potential sources of new contamination, (2) groundwater monitoring, and (3) potable water treatment. The BNL Source Water Assessment found that the source water for BNL's Western Well Field (comprised of Supply Wells 4, 6, and 7) has relatively few threats of contamination and identified potential sources are already being carefully managed. The source water for BNL's Eastern Well Field (comprised of Supply Wells 10, 11, and 12) has a moderate number of threats to water quality, primarily from several existing volatile organic compound and tritium plumes. The g-2 Tritium Plume and portions of the Operable Unit III VOC plume fall within the delineated source water area for the Eastern Well Field. In addition, portions of the much slower migrating strontium-90 plumes associated with the Brookhaven Graphite Research Reactor, Waste Concentration Facility and Building 650 lie within the Eastern source water area. However, the rate of travel in the aquifer for strontium-90 is about one-twentieth of that for tritium and volatile organic compounds. The Laboratory has been carefully monitoring plume migration, and has made adjustments to water supply operations. Although a number of BNL's water supply wells were impacted by VOC contamination in the late 1980s, recent routine analysis of water samples from BNL's supply wells indicate that no drinking water standards have been reached or exceeded. The high quality of the water supply strongly indicates that the operational and engineered

  20. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Nucleon Spin Physics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aschenauer, A.; Qiu, Jianwei; Vogelsang, W.; Yuan, F.

    2011-08-02

    Understanding the structure of the nucleon is of fundamental importance in sub-atomic physics. Already the experimental studies on the electro-magnetic form factors in the 1950s showed that the nucleon has a nontrivial internal structure, and the deep inelastic scattering experiments in the 1970s revealed the partonic substructure of the nucleon. Modern research focuses in particular on the spin and the gluonic structure of the nucleon. Experiments using deep inelastic scattering or polarized p-p collisions are carried out in the US at the CEBAF and RHIC facilities, respectively, and there are other experimental facilities around the world. More than twenty years ago, the European Muon Collaboration published their first experimental results on the proton spin structure as revealed in polarized deep inelastic lepton-nucleon scattering, and concluded that quarks contribute very little to the proton's spin. With additional experimental and theoretical investigations and progress in the following years, it is now established that, contrary to naive quark model expectations, quarks and anti-quarks carry only about 30% of the total spin of the proton. Twenty years later, the discovery from the polarized hadron collider at RHIC was equally surprising. For the phase space probed by existing RHIC experiments, gluons do not seem to contribute any to the proton's spin. To find out what carries the remaining part of proton's spin is a key focus in current hadronic physics and also a major driving force for the new generation of spin experiments at RHIC and Jefferson Lab and at a future Electron Ion Collider. It is therefore very important and timely to organize a series of annual spin physics meetings to summarize the status of proton spin physics, to focus the effort, and to layout the future perspectives. This summer program on 'Nucleon Spin Physics' held at Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) on July 14-27, 2010 [http://www.bnl.gov/spnsp/] is the

  1. Practical experience and challenges in the operation of medical cyclotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Rajeev; Sonkawade, Rajendra G; Pandey, Anil K; Tripathi, Madhavi; Damle, Nishikant A; Kumar, Praveen; Bal, Chandra S

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this article was to share 10 years of operational experience of medical cyclotron and to provide working knowledge on the same. This experience has helped us gain working knowledge on cyclotron operation with practical points, which may help in improving F yield, minimizing the breakdown time, and help in the prevention of the occurrence of unusual events. Our facility has a self-shielded radioisotope delivery system eclipse 111 medical cyclotron with an 11 MeV proton beam in use for the past 10 years to produce positron emitters - namely, F, N, and F-2 gas - for PET imaging. During F production, we have followed a set protocol comprising the following: monitoring target pressure, rinsing the target with O water just immediately after bombardment, ion source feedback, radiofrequency (RF) feedback, and recording any unusual events that occurred during the operation. Besides this, enrichment of O water, target volume, target current, energy of the beam, variation in argon pressure on the target, bombardment duration, target status (new or old target or total number of previous bombardments on the same target), status of the delivery lines from target to the radiochemistry module (old or new) were also recorded. Rinsing with O water immediately after bombardment increases the life of the target and delivery line. The frequent problems encountered were with the ion source, RF, and target foil rupture. These problems were solved by rebuilding the ion source, changing the fuse of RF, and rebuilding the target. F yield can be increased by rinsing with O water immediately after bombardment. The effect of target leak - that is, rupture of vacuum window - can be avoided by immediate stoppage of bombardment.

  2. Electromagnetic waves near the proton cyclotron frequency: Stereo observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jian, L. K. [Department of Astronomy, University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742 (United States); Wei, H. Y.; Russell, C. T. [Institute of Geophysics and Planetary Physics, University of California, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Luhmann, J. G. [Space Science Laboratory, University of California, Berkeley, CA 94720 (United States); Klecker, B. [Max-Planck-Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik, D-85741 Garching (Germany); Omidi, N. [Solana Scientific Inc., Solana Beach, CA 92075 (United States); Isenberg, P. A. [Institute for the Study of Earth, Oceans, and Space, University of New Hampshire, Durham, NH 03824 (United States); Goldstein, M. L.; Figueroa-Viñas, A. [Heliophysics Science Division, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, MD 20771 (United States); Blanco-Cano, X., E-mail: lan.jian@nasa.gov [Instituto de Geofisica, Universidad Nacional Autónoma de México, Coyoacán D.F. (Mexico)

    2014-05-10

    Transverse, near-circularly polarized, parallel-propagating electromagnetic waves around the proton cyclotron frequency were found sporadically in the solar wind throughout the inner heliosphere. They could play an important role in heating and accelerating the solar wind. These low-frequency waves (LFWs) are intermittent but often occur in prolonged bursts lasting over 10 minutes, named 'LFW storms'. Through a comprehensive survey of them from Solar Terrestrial Relations Observatory A using dynamic spectral wave analysis, we have identified 241 LFW storms in 2008, present 0.9% of the time. They are left-hand (LH) or right-hand (RH) polarized in the spacecraft frame with similar characteristics, probably due to Doppler shift of the same type of waves or waves of intrinsically different polarities. In rare cases, the opposite polarities are observed closely in time or even simultaneously. Having ruled out interplanetary coronal mass ejections, shocks, energetic particles, comets, planets, and interstellar ions as LFW sources, we discuss the remaining generation scenarios: LH ion cyclotron instability driven by greater perpendicular temperature than parallel temperature or by ring-beam distribution, and RH ion fire hose instability driven by inverse temperature anisotropy or by cool ion beams. The investigation of solar wind conditions is compromised by the bias of the one-dimensional Maxwellian fit used for plasma data calibration. However, the LFW storms are preferentially detected in rarefaction regions following fast winds and when the magnetic field is radial. This preference may be related to the ion cyclotron anisotropy instability in fast wind and the minimum in damping along the radial field.

  3. Cyclotron facilities in Brazil: Current status and licensing aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Facure, A.; Carvalho, S.M.; Di Prinzio, R.; Silveira, C.S.; Gasparian, P.B.R.; Franca, W.F., E-mail: facure@cnen.gov.br [Comissao Nacional de Energia Nuclear (CNEN), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2017-09-01

    Positron Emission Tomography (PET) is a highly sensitive and accurate nuclear medicine imaging technology but the major problem of this technique is the use of radioisotopes with short half-life, less than two hours. The production and selling of short half-life radioisotopes used to be monopoly of the Brazilian Government. In 2006, a Constitutional Amendment revoked the state monopoly due to the need for the use of short half-life radioisotopes in nuclear medicine centers very far from the government production facilities. The aim of this study is to describe the current status of short half-life radioisotopes production in Brazil and discuss some licensing process. In Brazil, as has been occurring worldwide, the number of nuclear medicine centers is increasing. Currently there are 123 services performing PET scans in Brazil. There are 14 cyclotrons operating in Brazil. The type of licensing process conducted in Brazil does not take into account the population density of each state, with a free competition model being adopted. Because of this there is a lot of equipment concentrated in the Southeast and no cyclotrons operating in the Northern part of the country. One of the biggest obstacles during the licensing process is the designation of qualified personnel as operation workers and radiation safety officers. The number of cyclotron accelerators and PET/CT equipment increased in recent years. However, a number of external factors such as the distance from the nuclear medicine centers, and qualified personnel have proved crucial for the economic viability of this type of facility. (author)

  4. Glow plasma trigger for electron cyclotron resonance ion sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodopianov, A V; Golubev, S V; Izotov, I V; Nikolaev, A G; Oks, E M; Savkin, K P; Yushkov, G Yu

    2010-02-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources (ECRISs) are particularly useful for nuclear, atomic, and high energy physics, as unique high current generators of multicharged ion beams. Plasmas of gas discharges in an open magnetic trap heated by pulsed (100 micros and longer) high power (100 kW and higher) high-frequency (greater than 37.5 GHz) microwaves of gyrotrons is promising in the field of research in the development of electron cyclotron resonance sources for high charge state ion beams. Reaching high ion charge states requires a decrease in gas pressure in the magnetic trap, but this method leads to increases in time, in which the microwave discharge develops. The gas breakdown and microwave discharge duration becomes greater than or equal to the microwave pulse duration when the pressure is decreased. This makes reaching the critical plasma density initiate an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) discharge during pulse of microwave gyrotron radiation with gas pressure lower than a certain threshold. In order to reduce losses of microwave power, it is necessary to shorten the time of development of the ECR discharge. For fast triggering of ECR discharge under low pressure in an ECRIS, we initially propose to fill the magnetic trap with the plasmas of auxiliary pulsed discharges in crossed ExB fields. The glow plasma trigger of ECR based on a Penning or magnetron discharge has made it possible not only to fill the trap with plasma with density of 10(12) cm(-3), required for a rapid increase in plasma density and finally for ECR discharge ignition, but also to initially heat the plasma electrons to T(e) approximately = 20 eV.

  5. Experimental monitoring of ozone production in a PET cyclotron facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zanibellato, L. [Department of Energetic, Nuclear and Environmental Control, University of Bologna (Italy); Cicoria, G.; Pancaldi, D. [Department of Medical Physics, University Hospital ' S.Orsola-Malpighi' , Bologna (Italy); Boschi, S. [PET Radiopharmacy Unit, Department of Nuclear Medicine, University Hospital ' S.Orsola-Malpighi' , Bologna (Italy); Mostacci, D. [Department of Energetic, Nuclear and Environmental Control, University of Bologna (Italy); Marengo, M., E-mail: marengo@med.unibo.i [Department of Medical Physics, University Hospital ' S.Orsola-Malpighi' , Bologna (Italy)

    2010-10-15

    Ozone produced from radiolytic processes was investigated as a possible health hazard in the working environment at the University Hospital 'S.Orsola-Malpighi' PET facility. Intense radiation fields can generate ozone, known to be the most toxic gas produced by ionizing radiation around a particle accelerator. To evaluate ozone concentration in air, two different measurement campaigns were conducted with passive diffusion detectors. Comparison of the results with the concentration limits recommended by American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH) demonstrated that ozone poses no health hazard to workers around a biomedical cyclotron.

  6. A new EMIS facility at the Tohoku University cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujioka, M.; Shinozuka, T.; Tanaka, E.; Arai, Y.; Hayashibe, S.; Ishimatsu, T.

    1981-07-01

    An EMIS facility has begun operation at one of the beam lines of a multipurpose cyclotron of K = 50 MeV. The separator is of a Scandinavian type of 55° deflection and 1500 mm dispersion, and is equipped with three beam-transport lines to which are connected a tape-transport system for ISOL study, a retardation system for implantation work and an optical spectrometer for surface analysis. The status and developments of this facility are reported here for the first time.

  7. Coaxial ring cyclotron as a perspective nuclear power engineering machine

    CERN Document Server

    Tumanyan, A R; Mkrtchyan, R L; Amatuni, T A; Avakian, R O; Khudaverdian, A G

    1995-01-01

    Coaxial Ring Cyclotron (CRC) is described, and its main advantages, such as simple injection technique, several injected beams summation option, high efficiency, are considered. The proposed proton accelerator is a perspective machine for the solution of the main problems of the present day nuclear power engineering as well as for the next-generation nuclear power plants, representing a combination of subcritical reactors and particle accelerators. The possibility of installation of CRCs into ring accelerators with an average diameter from 60 to 100m, e.g., the Yerevan electron synchrotron, is considered.

  8. Spot-welding solid targets for high current cyclotron irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellison, Paul A.; Valdovinos, Hector F.; Graves, Stephen A.; Barnhart, Todd E.; Nickles, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    Zirconium-89 finds broad application for use in positron emission tomography. Its cyclotron production has been limited by the heat transfer from yttrium targets at high beam currents. A spot welding technique allows a three-fold increase in beam current, without affecting 89Zr quality. An yttrium foil, welded to a jet-cooled tantalum support base accommodates a 50 μA proton beam degraded to 14 MeV. The resulting activity yield of 48 ± 4 MBq/(μA·hr) now extends the outreach of 89Zr for a broader distribution. PMID:27771445

  9. Calibration of electron cyclotron emission radiometer for KSTAR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogi, Y; Jeong, S H; Lee, K D; Akaki, K; Mase, A; Kuwahara, D; Yoshinaga, T; Nagayama, Y; Kwon, M; Kawahata, K

    2010-10-01

    We developed and installed an electron cyclotron emission radiometer for taking measurements of Korea Superconducting Tokamak Advanced Research (KSTAR) plasma. In order to precisely measure the absolute value of electron temperatures, a calibration measurement of the whole radiometer system was performed, which confirmed that the radiometer has an acceptably linear output signal for changes in input temperature. It was also found that the output power level predicted by a theoretical calculation agrees with that obtained by the calibration measurement. We also showed that the system displays acceptable noise-temperature performance around 0.23 eV.

  10. Ion cyclotron resonance heating system in the RT-1 magnetospheric plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiura, M.; Kawazura, Y.; Yoshida, Z.; Kenmochi, N.; Yano, Y.; Saitoh, H.; Yamasaki, M.; Mushiake, T.; Kashyap, A.; Takahashi, N.; Nakatsuka, M.; Fukuyama, A.

    2017-08-01

    We have developed an ion cyclotron resonance frequency (ICRF) heating system for the Ring Trap 1 (RT-1) magnetospheric device. We excite slow waves from the polar region of the dipole magnetic field. The target helium plasma is produced by electron cyclotron heating. The electrons comprise high-temperature (>10 keV) and low-temperature (wave electric field in the plasma.

  11. Quantum oscillation of the cyclotron mass in two-dimensional electron systems in silicon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaesen, K.F.; Huber, A; Lorenz, H.; Kotthaus, J.P.; Bakker, S.; Klapwijk, T.M

    1996-01-01

    The cyclotron resonance of two-dimensional electron systems in silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor devices is investigated for high electron densities in high magnetic fields. The cyclotron mass, extracted from the resonance frequency, shows an oscillatory behavior. The periodicity of this oscillation

  12. Periodic Beam Current Oscillations Driven by Electron Cyclotron Instabilities in ECRIS Plasmas

    OpenAIRE

    Tarvainen, Olli; Kalvas, Taneli; Koivisto, Hannu; Komppula, Jani; Kronholm, Risto; Laulainen, Janne; Izotov, I.; Mansfeld, D.; Skalyga, V.; Toivanen, V.

    2014-01-01

    Experimental observation of cyclotron instabilities in electron cyclotron resonance ion source plasma operated in cwmode is reported. The instabilities are associated with strong microwave emission and a burst of energetic electrons escaping the plasma, and explain the periodic oscillations of the extracted beam currents. The instabilities are shown to restrict the parameter space available for the optimization of high charge state ion currents.

  13. Effect of ion clouds micromotion on measured signal in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance: Computer simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vladimirov, Gleb; Kostyukevich, Yury; Kharybin, Oleg; Nikolaev, Eugene

    2017-08-01

    Particle-in-cell-based realistic simulation of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance experiments could be used to generate ion trajectories and a signal induced on the detection electrodes. It has been shown recently that there is a modulation of "reduced" cyclotron frequencies in ion cyclotron resonance signal caused by Coulomb interaction of ion clouds. In this work it was proposed to use this modulation in order to determine frequency difference between an ion of known m/z and all other ions generating signal in ion cyclotron resonance cell. It is shown that with an increase of number of ions in ion cyclotron resonance trap, the modulation index increases, which lead to a decrease in the accuracy of determination of peak intensities by super Fourier transform resolution methods such as filter diagonalization method.

  14. Reduction of axial kinetic energy induced perturbations on observed cyclotron frequency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Nathan K; Weisbrod, Chad R; Webb, Brian N; Bruce, James E

    2008-04-01

    With Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry one determines the mass-to-charge ratio of an ion by measuring its cyclotron frequency. However, the need to confine ions to the trapping region of the ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) cell with electric fields induces deviations from the unperturbed cyclotron frequency. Additional perturbations to the observed cyclotron frequency are often attributed to changes in space charge conditions. This study presents a detailed investigation of the observed ion cyclotron frequency as a function of ion z-axis kinetic energy. In a perfect three-dimensional quadrupolar field, cyclotron frequency is independent of position within the trap. However, in most ICR cell designs, this ideality is approximated only near the trap center and deviations arise from this ideal quadrupolar field as the ion moves both radially and axially from the center of the trap. To allow differentiation between deviations in observed cyclotron frequency caused from changes in space charge conditions or differences in oscillation amplitude, ions with identical molecular weights but different axial kinetic energy, and thus amplitude of z-axis motion, were simultaneously trapped within the ICR cell. This allows one to attribute deviations in observed cyclotron frequency to differences in the average force from the radial electric field experienced by ions of different axial amplitude. Experimentally derived magnetron frequency is compared with the magnetron frequency calculated using SIMION 7.0 for ions of different axial amplitude. Electron promoted ion coherence, or EPIC, is used to reduce the differences in radial electric fields at different axial positions. Thus with the application of EPIC, the differences in observed cyclotron frequencies are minimized for ions of different axial oscillation amplitudes.

  15. Survey of Saturn electrostatic cyclotron harmonic wave intensity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menietti, J. D.; Averkamp, T. F.; Kurth, W. S.; Ye, S.-Y.; Gurnett, D. A.; Cecconi, B.

    2017-08-01

    We conduct a survey of electrostatic electron cyclotron harmonic (ECH) emissions observed at Saturn by the radio and plasma wave science investigation on board the Cassini spacecraft. These emissions are known to be effective at interacting with electrons in the terrestrial inner magnetosphere, producing electron scattering into the loss cone and acceleration (cf. Horne and Thorne, 2000; Thorne et al., 2010). At Saturn ECH emission occurs with high probability and at strong intensity near the magnetic equator, outside the Enceladus torus in the range 5 < L < 10. Inside the inner boundary of the torus, ECH emissions are also observed near the equator and at higher latitude. Intensity levels of ECH emission are comparable to those observed at Earth, higher than Saturn chorus and Z-mode emission, and are likely to scatter electrons into the loss cone as at Earth. ECH waves are particularly intense and extend to higher harmonics within some plasma injection regions. We present results for a survey of over 8 years of Saturn data for fundamental and up to three harmonics of fce, the electron cyclotron frequency.

  16. New radionuclides production on the isochronous cyclotron U-120M

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stursa, J.; Cihak, M.; Krivanek, M.; Kucera, J.; Lacman, J. [Nuclear Physics Institute, Prague (Czech Republic)

    1999-07-01

    The production of {sup 18}F for positron emission tomography (PET) applications and manufacturing of the {sup 81}Rb for the {sup 81}Rb/{sup 81m}Kr radionuclidic generator (used in lung ventilation studies) have been introduced as a new program of the twenty year old cyclotron U-120M(K=40, A/Z=1-2.8). The cyclotron conversion from positive to H/{sup -}D{sup -} accelerating regimes and the extraction by means of stripping were necessary for obtaining sufficiently high beam intensities. Two possible solutions of H{sup -} gain - either from the external high intensive (1 mA DC) old TRIUMF CUSP ion source or from the internal ion source with a cold cathode developed in our laboratory - are described. Axial injector characteristics for H{sup -} currents up to 1 mA together with optimizing the central region, the ion extraction system and upgrade of the vacuum system are presented. The realization of the enriched H{sub 2}O{sup 18} target, its setting into operation and the first results of {sup 18}F production (average yields {approx} 2 GBq/{mu}A. hour at EOB) are briefly discussed. (authors)

  17. Cyclotrons with fast variable and/or multiple energy extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Baumgarten

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available We discuss the possibility in principle of stripping extraction in combination with reverse bends in isochronous separate-sector cyclotrons (and/or fixed field alternating gradient accelerators. If one uses reverse bends between the sectors (instead of or in combination with drifts and places stripper foils at the sector exit edges, the stripped beam has a reduced bending radius and it should be able to leave the cyclotron within the range of the valley—even if the beam is stripped at less than full energy. We are especially interested in stripping of H_{2}^{+}, as it doubles the charge to mass ratio of the ions. However the method could be applied to other ions or ionized molecules as well. For the production of proton beams by stripping extraction of an H_{2}^{+} beam, we discuss possible designs for three types of machines: First, a low-energy cyclotron for the simultaneous production of several beams at multiple energies—for instance 15, 30, and 70 MeV—thus allowing beam delivery on several isotope production targets. In this case it can be an advantage to have a strong energy dependence of the direction of the extracted beam. Second, we consider a fast variable-energy proton machine for cancer therapy that should allow extraction (of the complete beam at all energies in the range of about 70 MeV to about 250 MeV into the same beam line. Third, we consider a high-intensity high-energy machine, where the main design goals are extraction with low losses, low activation of components, and high reliability. Especially if such a machine is considered for an accelerator driven system (ADS, this extraction mechanism has advantages: Beam trips by the failure of electrostatic elements could be avoided and the turn separation would be less critical, which allows operation at lower main cavity voltages. This would in turn reduce the number of rf trips. The price that has to be paid for these advantages is an increase in size and/or field

  18. Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S.C. III; Baum, J.W. [and others

    1998-01-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique. This document contains the Appendices for the report.

  19. Risk assessment and optimization (ALARA) analysis for the environmental remediation of Brookhaven National Laboratory`s hazardous waste management facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dionne, B.J.; Morris, S. III; Baum, J.W. [and others

    1998-03-01

    The Department of Energy`s (DOE) Office of Environment, Safety, and Health (EH) sought examples of risk-based approaches to environmental restoration to include in their guidance for DOE nuclear facilities. Extensive measurements of radiological contamination in soil and ground water have been made at Brookhaven National Laboratory`s Hazardous Waste Management Facility (HWMF) as part of a Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act (CERCLA) remediation process. This provided an ideal opportunity for a case study. This report provides a risk assessment and an {open_quotes}As Low as Reasonably Achievable{close_quotes} (ALARA) analysis for use at other DOE nuclear facilities as an example of a risk-based decision technique.

  20. Technical note: building a combined cyclotron and MRI facility: implications for interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofman, Mark B M; Kuijer, Joost P A; de Ridder, Jan Willem; Perk, Lars R; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M

    2013-01-01

    With the introduction of hybrid PET∕MRI systems, it has become more likely that the cyclotron and MRI systems will be located close to each other. This study considered the interference between a cyclotron and a superconducting MRI system. Interactions between cyclotrons and MRIs are theoretically considered. The main interference is expected to be the perturbation of the magnetic field in the MRI due to switching on or off the magnetic field of the cyclotron. MR imaging is distorted by a dynamic spatial gradient of an external inplane magnetic field larger than 0.5-0.04 μT∕m, depending on the specific MR application. From the design of a cyclotron, it is expected that the magnetic fringe field at large distances behaves as a magnetic dipolar field. This allows estimation of the full dipolar field and its spatial gradients from a single measurement. Around an 18 MeV cyclotron (Cyclone, IBA), magnetic field measurements were performed on 5 locations and compared with calculations based upon a dipolar field model. At the measurement locations the estimated and measured values of the magnetic field component and its spatial gradients of the inplane component were compared, and found to agree within a factor 1.1 for the magnetic field and within a factor of 1.5 for the spatial gradients of the field. In the specific case of the 18 MeV cyclotron with a vertical magnetic field and a 3T superconducting whole body MR system, a minimum distance of 20 m has to be considered to prevent interference. This study showed that a dipole model is sufficiently accurate to predict the interference of a cyclotron on a MRI scanner, for site planning purposes. The cyclotron and a whole body MRI system considered in this study need to be placed more than 20 m apart, or magnetic shielding should be utilized.

  1. Technical Note: Building a combined cyclotron and MRI facility: Implications for interference

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofman, Mark B. M.; Kuijer, Joost P. A.; Ridder, Jan Willem de; Perk, Lars R.; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M. [Physics and Medical Technology, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam 1007 MB (Netherlands) and BV Cyclotron VU, Amsterdam 1081HV (Netherlands)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: With the introduction of hybrid PET/MRI systems, it has become more likely that the cyclotron and MRI systems will be located close to each other. This study considered the interference between a cyclotron and a superconducting MRI system. Methods: Interactions between cyclotrons and MRIs are theoretically considered. The main interference is expected to be the perturbation of the magnetic field in the MRI due to switching on or off the magnetic field of the cyclotron. MR imaging is distorted by a dynamic spatial gradient of an external inplane magnetic field larger than 0.5-0.04 {mu}T/m, depending on the specific MR application. From the design of a cyclotron, it is expected that the magnetic fringe field at large distances behaves as a magnetic dipolar field. This allows estimation of the full dipolar field and its spatial gradients from a single measurement. Around an 18 MeV cyclotron (Cyclone, IBA), magnetic field measurements were performed on 5 locations and compared with calculations based upon a dipolar field model. Results: At the measurement locations the estimated and measured values of the magnetic field component and its spatial gradients of the inplane component were compared, and found to agree within a factor 1.1 for the magnetic field and within a factor of 1.5 for the spatial gradients of the field. In the specific case of the 18 MeV cyclotron with a vertical magnetic field and a 3T superconducting whole body MR system, a minimum distance of 20 m has to be considered to prevent interference. Conclusions: This study showed that a dipole model is sufficiently accurate to predict the interference of a cyclotron on a MRI scanner, for site planning purposes. The cyclotron and a whole body MRI system considered in this study need to be placed more than 20 m apart, or magnetic shielding should be utilized.

  2. Experiments on ion cyclotron damping at the deuterium fourth harmonic in DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinsker, R.I.; Petty, C.C. [General Atomics, San Diego, CA (United States); Baity, F.W. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Bernabei, S.; Greenough, N. [Princeton Plasma Physics Lab., NJ (United States); Heidbrink, W.W. [Univ. of California, Irvine, CA (United States); Mau, T.K. [Univ. of California, San Diego, CA (United States); Porkolab, M. [Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge, MA (United States)

    1999-05-01

    Absorption of fast Alfven waves by the energetic ions of an injected beam is evaluated in the DIII-D tokamak. Ion cyclotron resonance absorption at the fourth harmonic of the deuteron cyclotron frequency is observed with deuterium neutral beam injection (f = 60 MHz, B{sub T} = 1.9 T). Enhanced D-D neutron rates are evidence of absorption at the Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance. Characteristics of global energy confinement provide further proof of substantial beam acceleration by the rf. In many cases, the accelerated deuterons cause temporary stabilization of the sawtooth (monster sawteeth), at relatively low rf power levels of {approximately}1 MW.

  3. Analysis for liquid cryogen spillage in the superconducting cyclotron building at VECC

    CERN Document Server

    Roy S ,; Pal, G; Bhandari, R K

    2009-01-01

    The cryogenic system uses liquid helium and liquid nitrogen to cool the superconducting cyclotron magnet and its cryopanels. In order to assess safety scenarios subsequent to an unusual leakage of cryogens from the system, a deterministic analysis has been carried out to estimate the variation of oxygen concentration with time at several locations of superconducting cyclotron building. The entire process is simulated assuming evaporated cryogens mixes instantaneously with air in the confined space, the ventilation system of the cyclotron building is operational, fresh air continuously enters the confined volume and mixes instantaneously with air in the confined space.

  4. Numerical model of electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Mironov

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Important features of the electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS operation are accurately reproduced with a numerical code. The code uses the particle-in-cell technique to model the dynamics of ions in ECRIS plasma. It is shown that a gas dynamical ion confinement mechanism is sufficient to provide the ion production rates in ECRIS close to the experimentally observed values. Extracted ion currents are calculated and compared to the experiment for a few sources. Changes in the simulated extracted ion currents are obtained with varying the gas flow into the source chamber and the microwave power. Empirical scaling laws for ECRIS design are studied and the underlying physical effects are discussed.

  5. The Electron Cyclotron Resonance Light Source Assembly of PTB - ELISA

    CERN Document Server

    Gruebling, P; Ulm, G

    1999-01-01

    In the radiometry laboratory of the Physikalisch-Technische,Bundesanstalt at the Berlin electron storage ring BESSY I, radiation sources for radiometric applications in industry and basic research in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) spectral range are developed, characterized and calibrated. Established sources such as deuterium lamps, Penning and hollow cathode discharge sources have limited spectral ranges and in particular their stability and life time suffers from the erosion of the cathode material. To overcome these limitations we have developed a radiation source based on the principle of the electron cyclotron resonance ion source. ELISA is a 10 GHz monomode source with a compact design featuring a tunable cavity and axially positionable permanent magnets. The radiation emission of the source can be detected simultaneously in the VUV and X-ray spectral range via a toroidal grating monochromator and a Si(Li)-detector. The special design of the source allows spectroscopic investigations of the plasma in dep...

  6. One-electron quantum cyclotron (and implications for cold antihydrogen)

    CERN Document Server

    Gabrielse, G; Odom, B; D'Urso, B

    2001-01-01

    Quantum jumps between Fock states of a one-electron oscillator reveal the quantum limit of a cyclotron accelerator. The states live for seconds when spontaneous emission is inhibited by a factor of 140 within a cylindrical Penning trap cavity. Averaged over hours the oscillator is in thermal equilibrium with black-body photons in the cavity. At 80 mK, quantum jumps occur only when resonant microwave photons are introduced into the cavity, opening a route to improved measurements of the magnetic moments of the electron and positron. The temperature demonstrated is about 60 times lower than the 4.2 K temperature at which charged elementary particles were previously stored. Implications for the production of cold antihydrogen are discussed. (21 refs).

  7. Electromagnetic ion/ion cyclotron instability - Theory and simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winske, D.; Omidi, N.

    1992-01-01

    Linear theory and 1D and 2D hybrid simulations are employed to study electromagnetic ion/ion cyclotron (EMIIC) instability driven by the relative streaming of two field-aligned ion beams. The characteristics of the instability are studied as a function of beam density, propagation angle, electron-ion temperature ratios, and ion beta. When the propagation angle is near 90 deg the EMIIC instability has the characteristics of an electrostatic instability, while at smaller angles electromagnetic effects play a significant role as does strong beam coupling. The 2D simulations point to a narrowing of the wave spectrum and accompanying coherent effects during the linear growth stage of development. The EMIIC instability is an important effect where ion beta is low such as in the plasma-sheet boundary layer and upstream of slow shocks in the magnetotail.

  8. Why NASA and the Space Electronics Community Cares About Cyclotrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    LaBel, Kenneth A.

    2017-01-01

    NASA and the space community are faced with the harsh reality of operating electronic systems in the space radiation environment. Systems need to work reliably (as expected for as long as expected) and be available during critical operations such as docking or firing a thruster. This talk will provide a snapshot of the import of ground-based research on the radiation performance of electronics. Discussion topics include: 1) The space radiation environment hazard, 2) Radiation effects on electronics, 3) Simulation of effects with cyclotrons (and other sources), 4) Risk prediction for space missions, and, 5) Real-life examples of both ground-based testing and space-based anomalies and electronics performance. The talk will conclude with a discussion of the current state of radiation facilities in North America for ground-based electronics testing.

  9. A LabVIEW based cyclotron magnetic field mapping system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marti, F.; Johnson, P. [NSCL, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States)

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes the application of National Instruments LabVIEW to the NSCL K500 magnet mapping, as part of the Coupled Cyclotron Upgrade. LabVIEW provides a fast development environment for hardware control from a PC running Windows NT. The PC and LabVIEW environment allow non-professional computer programmers to obtain a reliable and flexible system where modifications can be quickly implemented. This program supports the use of motor controllers, data acquisition cards, digital I/O modules and GPIB instruments. A complete map of 360 degrees is obtained in approximately 90 minutes, measuring 185000 field values with a spacing of 1.6 mm in radius every degree. (author)

  10. Mechanism for electron cyclotron heating of collisionless plasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golovanivskii, K.S.; Dugard-Jabon, V.D.; Milant' ev, V.P.

    1975-01-01

    The electron distribution with respect to transverse energy is derived for electron cyclotron resonance in a constant, homogeneous magnetic field; weak relativistic effects are taken into account. After the establishment of a steady-state distribution with groups of hot and cold electrons, no energy is pumped from the rf field to the plasma. The rf electrostatic perturbations are studied on the basis of the distribution function found; it is shown that waves of two types are unstable eigenmodes of the plasma at rest and drift waves. The growth rates for the corresponding instabilities are derived. A study is also made of the stability of right-handed circularly polarized electromagnetic wave propagating along the magnetic field. Instabilities occur at frequencies which depend on the degree of anisotropy, analogous to the case of a plasma with a temperature anisotropy.

  11. Recent developments of cyclotron produced radionuclides for nuclear cardiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, P. V.; Jansen, D. E.; Corbett, J. R.

    1987-04-01

    For over a decade myocardial perfusion imaging with thallium-201, a cyclotron product, has been routinely used in clinical medicine. Recent advances have allowed the efficient production of very high purity (> 99.8%) iodine-123. New metabolically active 123I labeled radiopharmaceuticals, including alkyl and phenyl fatty acids, and norepinephrine analogs, have been developed and are undergoing clinical trials. Fab' fragments of monoclonal antibodies to cardiac myosin have been labeled with indium-111 ( 111In) and are undergoing clinical evaluation for imaging myocardial infarcts. Monoclonal antibodies to platelets, fibrin, and the thrombolytic agent, tissue plasminogen activator (TPA), have recently been labeled with 111In. Together these developments in radiotracers and instrumentation should have a significant impact on the future of cardiovascular nuclear medicine. This manuscript will discuss developments in single photon emitting radiotracers for myocardial imaging.

  12. Alternative optical concept for electron cyclotron emission imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J X; Milbourne, T; Bitter, M; Delgado-Aparicio, L; Dominguez, A; Efthimion, P C; Hill, K W; Kramer, G J; Kung, C; Kubota, S; Kasparek, W; Lu, J; Pablant, N A; Park, H; Tobias, B

    2014-11-01

    The implementation of advanced electron cyclotron emission imaging (ECEI) systems on tokamak experiments has revolutionized the diagnosis of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) activities and improved our understanding of instabilities, which lead to disruptions. It is therefore desirable to have an ECEI system on the ITER tokamak. However, the large size of optical components in presently used ECEI systems have, up to now, precluded the implementation of an ECEI system on ITER. This paper describes a new optical ECEI concept that employs a single spherical mirror as the only optical component and exploits the astigmatism of such a mirror to produce an image with one-dimensional spatial resolution on the detector. Since this alternative approach would only require a thin slit as the viewing port to the plasma, it would make the implementation of an ECEI system on ITER feasible. The results obtained from proof-of-principle experiments with a 125 GHz microwave system are presented.

  13. Data processing in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Yulin; O'Connor, Peter B

    2014-01-01

    The Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FT-ICR) mass spectrometer intricately couples advanced physics, instrumentation, and electronics with chemical and particularly biochemical research. However, general understanding of the data processing methodologies used lags instrumentation, and most data processing algorithms we are familiar with in FT-ICR are not well studied; thus, professional skill and training in FT-ICR operation and data analysis is still the key to achieve high performance in FT-ICR. This review article is focused on FT-ICR data processing, and explains the procedures step-by-step for users with the goal of maximizing spectral features, such as mass accuracy, resolving power, dynamic range, and detection limits. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Cyclotron Resonance Gain for FIR and THz Radiation in Graphene

    CERN Document Server

    Cole, Nightvid

    2016-01-01

    A cyclotron resonance maser source using low-effective-mass conduction electrons in graphene, if successful, would allow for generation of Far Infrared (FIR) and Terahertz (THz) radiation without requiring magnetic fields running into the tens of Tesla. In order to investigate this possibility, we consider a device in which electrons are effectively injected via pumping from the valence band to the conduction band using an infrared (IR) laser source, subsequently gyrate in a magnetic field applied perpendicular to the plane of the graphene, and give rise to gain for a FIR/THz wave crossing the plane of the graphene. A set of integral expressions is derived by assuming that the non-radiative energy loss processes of the electrons can be adequately represented by a damping force proportional and antiparallel to their momentum. Minimal gain may occur at very short electron damping times of hundreds of femtoseconds.

  15. The NSCL cyclotron gas stopper – Entering commissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, S. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Bollen, G. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI (United States); Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, East Lansing, MI (United States); Chouhan, S. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, East Lansing, MI (United States); Das, J.J. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Green, M. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, East Lansing, MI (United States); Magsig, C. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Morrissey, D.J. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Department of Chemistry, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Ottarson, J.; Sumithrarachchi, C. [National Superconducting Cyclotron Laboratory, East Lansing, MI (United States); Villari, A.C.C.; Zeller, A. [Facility for Rare Isotope Beams, East Lansing, MI (United States)

    2016-06-01

    Linear gas stopping cells have been used successfully at NSCL to slow down ions produced by projectile fragmentation from the 100 MeV/u to the keV energy range. These ‘stopped beams’ have first been used for low-energy high precision experiments and more recently for NSCLs re-accelerator ReA. A gas-filled reverse cyclotron is currently under construction by the NSCL to complement the existing stopping cells: Due to its extended stopping length, efficient stopping and fast extraction is expected even for light and medium-mass ions, which are difficult to thermalize in linear gas cells. The device is based on a 2.6 T maximum-field cyclotron-type magnet to confine the injected beam while it is slowed down in ≈100 mbar of LN{sub 2}-temperature helium gas. Once thermalized, the beam will be transported to the center of the device by a traveling-wave RF-carpet system, extracted along the symmetry axis with an ion conveyor and miniature RF-carpets, and accelerated to a few tens of keV of energy for delivery to the users. The superconducting magnet has been constructed on a 60 kV platform and energized to its nominal field strength. The magnet’s two cryostats use 3 cryo-refrigerators each and liquid-nitrogen cooled thermal shields to cool the coil pair to superconductivity. This concept, chosen not to have to rely on external liquid helium, has been working well. Measurements of axial and radial field profiles confirm the field calculations. The individual RF-ion guiding components for low-energy ion transport through the device have been tested successfully. The beam stopping chamber with its 0.9 m-diameter RF carpet system and the ion extraction system are being prepared for installation inside the magnet for low-energy ion transport tests.

  16. A Tuning Method for Electrically Compensated Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometer Traps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brustkern, Adam M.; Rempel, Don L.; Gross, Michael L.

    2010-01-01

    We describe a method for tuning electrically compensated ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) traps by tracking the observed cyclotron frequency of an ion cloud at different oscillation mode amplitudes. Although we have used this method to tune the compensation voltages of a custom-built electrically compensated trap, the approach is applicable to other designs that incorporate electrical compensation. To evaluate the effectiveness of tuning, we examined the frequency shift as a function of cyclotron orbit size at different z-mode oscillation amplitudes. The cyclotron frequencies varied by ~ 12 ppm for ions with low z-mode oscillation amplitudes compared to those with high z-mode amplitudes. This frequency difference decreased to ~1 ppm by one iteration of trap tuning. PMID:20060743

  17. Realistic simulations of a cyclotron spiral inflector within a particle-in-cell framework

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winklehner, Daniel; Adelmann, Andreas; Gsell, Achim; Kaman, Tulin; Campo, Daniela

    2017-12-01

    We present an upgrade to the particle-in-cell ion beam simulation code opal that enables us to run highly realistic simulations of the spiral inflector system of a compact cyclotron. This upgrade includes a new geometry class and field solver that can handle the complicated boundary conditions posed by the electrode system in the central region of the cyclotron both in terms of particle termination, and calculation of self-fields. Results are benchmarked against the analytical solution of a coasting beam. As a practical example, the spiral inflector and the first revolution in a 1 MeV /amu test cyclotron, located at Best Cyclotron Systems, Inc., are modeled and compared to the simulation results. We find that opal can now handle arbitrary boundary geometries with relative ease. Simulated injection efficiencies and beam shape compare well with measured efficiencies and a preliminary measurement of the beam distribution after injection.

  18. Cyclotron-based nuclear science. Progress report, April 1, 1979-March 31, 1980

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-06-01

    Research at the cyclotron institute is summarized. These major areas are covered: nuclear structure; nuclear reactions and scattering; polarization studies; interdisciplinary nuclear science; instrumentation and systems development; and publications. (GHT)

  19. Magnetic Alfvén‐cyclotron fluctuations of anisotropic nonthermal plasmas

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Navarro, Roberto E; Muñoz, Víctor; Araneda, Jaime; Viñas, Adolfo F.‐; Moya, Pablo S; Valdivia, Juan A

    2015-01-01

    .... Here we study magnetic Alfvén‐cyclotron fluctuations propagating along a background magnetic field in a plasma composed of thermal and suprathermal protons and electrons via the fluctuation...

  20. Research of the Electron Cyclotron Emission with Vortex Property excited by high power high frequency Gyrotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goto, Yuki; Kubo, Shin; Tsujimura, Tohru; Takubo, Hidenori

    2017-10-01

    Recently, it has been shown that the radiation from a single electron in cyclotron motion has vortex property. Although the cyclotron emission exists universally in nature, the vortex property has not been featured because this property is normally cancelled out due to the randomness in gyro-phase of electrons and the development of detection of the vortex property has not been well motivated. In this research, we are developing a method to generate the vortex radiation from electrons in cyclotron motion with controlled gyro-phase. Electron that rotates around the uniform static magnetic field is accelerated by right-hand circular polarized (RHCP) radiation resonantly when the cyclotron frequency coincides with the applied RHCP radiation frequency. A large number of electrons can be coherently accelerated in gyro-phase by a RHCP high power radiation so that these electrons can radiate coherent emission with vortex feature. We will show that vortex radiation created by purely rotating electrons for the first time.

  1. Measurement of ion cyclotron emissions by use of ICRF heating antennas in LHD

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, K. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)], E-mail: saito@nifs.ac.jp; Kasahara, H.; Seki, T.; Kumazawa, R.; Mutoh, T.; Watanabe, T.; Shimpo, F.; Nomura, G.; Osakabe, M. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan); Ichimura, M. [Tsukuba University, Plasma Research Center, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8577 (Japan); Higaki, H. [Hiroshima University, Higashi-Hiroshima, Hiroshima 739-8530 (Japan); Komori, A. [National Institute for Fusion Science, Toki, Gifu 509-5292 (Japan)

    2009-06-15

    Ion cyclotron emissions (ICEs) were clearly detected in the Large Helical Device (LHD) during perpendicular neutral beam (NB) injection. Antennas for the ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) heating were used as probes. The frequencies of ICEs were proportional to magnetic field strength. The location of ICE excitation was a peripheral region of plasma and the source particles were lost-ions injected by the perpendicular NB.

  2. Simulation, design, and testing of a high power collimator for the RDS-112 cyclotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peeples, Johanna L; Stokely, Matthew H; Poorman, Michael C; Bida, Gerald T; Wieland, Bruce W

    2015-03-01

    A high power [F-18] fluoride target package for the RDS-112 cyclotron has been designed, tested, and commercially deployed. The upgrade includes the CF-1000 target, a 1.3kW water target with an established commercial history on RDS-111/Eclipse cyclotrons, and a redesigned collimator with improved heat rejection capabilities. Conjugate heat transfer analyses were employed to both evaluate the existing collimator capabilities and design a suitable high current replacement. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Optically detected cyclotron resonance in a single GaAs/AlGaAs heterojunction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bartsch, Gregor

    2011-09-23

    Optically detected far-infrared cyclotron resonance (FIR-ODCR) in GaAs/AlGaAs HJs is interpreted in the frame of an exciton-dissociation mechanism. It is possible to explain the ODR mechanism by an exciton drag, mediated by ballistically propagating phonons. Furthermore, very narrow resonances are presented and realistic electron mobility values can be calculated. The exceptionally narrow ODCRs allow to measure conduction-band nonparabolicity effects and resolve satellite resonances, close to the main cyclotron resonance line.

  4. Symmetry Properties of Proton Velocity Distributions: a Vlasov Simulation Study of the Ion Cyclotron Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Araneda, J. A.; López, R. A.; Vinas, A. F.

    2014-12-01

    The ion cyclotron instability is driven by a sufficiently large proton temperature anisotropy, generating a spectrum of counterpropagating field-aligned ion cyclotron fluctuations. In this work, we use low-noise one-dimensional electromagnetic Vlasov simulations in a magnetized and collisionless plasma of fluid electrons and one ion species to study the evolution of proton velocity distributions during the thermal relaxation process. Special attention is given to deviations from initial bi-Maxwellian shapes.

  5. Determination of Magnet Specification of 13 MeV Proton Cyclotron Based on Opera 3D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taufik

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The magnet is one of the main components of a cyclotron, used to form a circular particle beam trajectories and to provide focusing of the beam. To support the mastery of 13-MeV proton cyclotron technologies, cyclotron magnet design must be done to satisfy cyclotron magnet requirements. This research was conducted by studying important parameters in designing the cyclotron magnet which is then used to determine the design requirements. The magnet design was based on the results of a 3D simulation using Opera 3D software. Opera 3D is a software developed by Cobham plc to solve physical problems in 3D such as magnetostatic using finite element methods. The simulation started by drawing a 3D model of the magnet using a modeler, followed by magnetic field calculations by Tosca module in the Opera 3D software. Simulation results were analyzed with the Genspeo software to determine whether the parameters of the cyclotron magnet have met design requirements. The results indicate that the magnet design satisfied the cyclotron magnet design requirement, that B in the median plane of the magnetic pole approached the isochronous curve, providing axial and radial focusing beam, crossing the resonance line at vr = 1 when the particle energy is low and the particle energy is more than 13 MeV, and lead to small enough phase shift of about 13°. The dimension of the cyclotron magnet is 1.96 m × 1.30 m × 1.21 m; its weight is 17.3 ton; its coil current is 88,024 ampere-turn; its center magnetic field is 1.27479 T; its maximum magnetic field is 1.942116 T; its minimum magnetic field is 0.7689 T; its valley gap is 120 mm; its hill gaps are 40 to 50.78 mm; and its hill angles are 35° to 44°.to 44°

  6. Bi-directional Alfv\\'en Cyclotron Instabilities in the Mega-Amp Spherical Tokamak

    CERN Document Server

    Sharapov, S E; Akers, R; Ayed, N Ben; Cecconello, M; Cook, J W C; Cunningham, G; Verwichte, E; Tea, the MAST

    2014-01-01

    Alfv\\'en cyclotron instabilities excited by velocity gradients of energetic beam ions were investigated in MAST experiments with super-Alfv\\'enic NBI over a wide range of toroidal magnetic fields from ~0.34 T to ~0.585 T. In MAST discharges with high magnetic field, a discrete spectrum of modes in the sub-cyclotron frequency range is excited toroidally propagating counter to the beam and plasma current (toroidal mode numbers n < 0).

  7. Coupling of electrostatic ion cyclotron and ion acoustic waves in the solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sreeraj, T., E-mail: sreerajt13@iigs.iigm.res.in [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Navi Mumbai (India); Singh, S. V., E-mail: satyavir@iigs.iigm.res.in; Lakhina, G. S., E-mail: gslakhina@gmail.com [Indian Institute of Geomagnetism, Navi Mumbai (India); University of the Western Cape, Bellville 7535, Capetown (South Africa)

    2016-08-15

    The coupling of electrostatic ion cyclotron and ion acoustic waves is examined in three component magnetized plasma consisting of electrons, protons, and alpha particles. In the theoretical model relevant to solar wind plasma, electrons are assumed to be superthermal with kappa distribution and protons as well as alpha particles follow the fluid dynamical equations. A general linear dispersion relation is derived for such a plasma system which is analyzed both analytically and numerically. For parallel propagation, electrostatic ion cyclotron (proton and helium cyclotron) and ion acoustic (slow and fast) modes are decoupled. For oblique propagation, coupling between the cyclotron and acoustic modes occurs. Furthermore, when the angle of propagation is increased, the separation between acoustic and cyclotron modes increases which is an indication of weaker coupling at large angle of propagation. For perpendicular propagation, only cyclotron modes are observed. The effect of various parameters such as number density and temperature of alpha particles and superthermality on dispersion characteristics is examined in details. The coupling between various modes occurs for small values of wavenumber.

  8. Influence of injection beam emittance on beam transmission efficiency in a cyclotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurashima, Satoshi; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Yoshida, Ken-Ichi; Okumura, Susumu

    2014-02-01

    The JAEA AVF cyclotron accelerates various kinds of high-energy ion beams for research in biotechnology and materials science. Beam intensities of an ion species of the order of 10(-9)-10(-6) ampere are often required for various experiments performed sequentially over a day. To provide ion beams with sufficient intensity and stability, an operator has to retune an ion source in a short time. However, the beam intensity downstream of the cyclotron rarely increases in proportion to the intensity at the ion source. To understand the cause of this beam behavior, transmission efficiencies of a (12)C(5+) beam from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source to the cyclotron were measured for various conditions of the ion source. Moreover, a feasible region for acceleration in the emittance of the injection beam was clarified using a transverse-acceptance measuring system. We confirmed that the beam emittance and profile were changed depending on the condition of the ion source and that matching between the beam emittance and the acceptance of the cyclotron was degraded. However, after fine-tuning to improve the matching, beam intensity downstream of the cyclotron increased.

  9. Towards quantitative simulations of high power proton cyclotrons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y. J. Bi

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available We describe a large scale simulation effort using Object Oriented Parallel Accelerator Library, that leads to a better quantitative understanding of the existing Paul Scherrer Institut high power proton cyclotron facility. The 1.3 MW of beam power on target poses stringent constraints on the controlled and uncontrolled beam losses. We present initial conditions for the Ring simulation, obtained from the new time-structure measurement and the many profile monitors of the 72 MeV transfer line. A trim coil model is developed, including trim coil TC15, which is needed to avoid the dangerous ν_{r}=2ν_{z} resonance. By properly selecting the injection position and angle (eccentric injection, the flattop voltage, and phase, very good agreement between simulations and measurements at the radial probe RRE4 is obtained. We report on 3–4 orders of magnitude in dynamic range when comparing simulations with measurements. The relation between beam intensity, rms beam size, and accelerating voltage is studied and compared with measurement. The demonstrated capabilities are mandatory in the design and operation of the next generation high power proton drivers. In an outlook we discuss our future plans to include more physics into the model, which eventually leads to an even larger dynamic range in the simulation.

  10. Electron-cyclotron plasma startup in the GDT experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Yakovlev, D V; Gospodchikov, E D; Solomakhin, A L; Savkin, V Ya; Bagryansky, P A

    2016-01-01

    The paper reports on a new plasma startup scenario in the Gas Dynamic Trap (GDT) magnetic mirror device. The primary 5 MW neutral beam injection (NBI) plasma heating system fires into a sufficiently dense plasma target ("seed plasma"), which is commonly supplied by an arc plasma generator. In the reported experiments, a different approach to seed plasma generation is explored. One of the channels of the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating system is used to ionize the neutral gas and build up the density of plasma to a level suitable for NBI capture. After a short transition (about 1 ms) the discharge becomes essentially similar to a standard one initiated by the plasma gun. The paper presents the discharge scenario and experimental data on the seed plasma evolution during ECR heating, along with the dependencies on incident microwave power, magnetic configuration and pressure of a neutral gas. The characteristics of consequent high-power NBI discharge are studied and differences to the conventional sce...

  11. Simulating Electron Cyclotron Maser Emission for Low Mass Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llama, Joe; Jardine, Moira

    2018-01-01

    Zeeman-Doppler Imaging (ZDI) is a powerful technique that enables us to map the large-scale magnetic fields of stars spanning the pre- and main-sequence. Coupling these magnetic maps with field extrapolation methods allow us to investigate the topology of the closed, X-ray bright corona, and the cooler, open stellar wind.Using ZDI maps of young M dwarfs with simultaneous radio light curves obtained from the VLA, we present the results of modeling the Electron-Cyclotron Maser (ECM) emission from these systems. We determine the X-ray luminosity and ECM emission that is produced using the ZDI maps and our field extrapolation model. We compare these findings with the observed radio light curves of these stars. This allows us to predict the relative phasing and amplitude of the stellar X-ray and radio light curves.This benchmarking of our model using these systems allows us to predict the ECM emission for all stars that have a ZDI map and an observed X-ray luminosity. Our model allows us to understand the origin of transient radio emission observations and is crucial for disentangling stellar and exoplanetary radio signals.

  12. Parallel Spectral Acquisition with an Ion Cyclotron Resonance Cell Array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sung-Gun; Anderson, Gordon A; Navare, Arti T; Bruce, James E

    2016-01-19

    Mass measurement accuracy is a critical analytical figure-of-merit in most areas of mass spectrometry application. However, the time required for acquisition of high-resolution, high mass accuracy data limits many applications and is an aspect under continual pressure for development. Current efforts target implementation of higher electrostatic and magnetic fields because ion oscillatory frequencies increase linearly with field strength. As such, the time required for spectral acquisition of a given resolving power and mass accuracy decreases linearly with increasing fields. Mass spectrometer developments to include multiple high-resolution detectors that can be operated in parallel could further decrease the acquisition time by a factor of n, the number of detectors. Efforts described here resulted in development of an instrument with a set of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) cells as detectors that constitute the first MS array capable of parallel high-resolution spectral acquisition. ICR cell array systems consisting of three or five cells were constructed with printed circuit boards and installed within a single superconducting magnet and vacuum system. Independent ion populations were injected and trapped within each cell in the array. Upon filling the array, all ions in all cells were simultaneously excited and ICR signals from each cell were independently amplified and recorded in parallel. Presented here are the initial results of successful parallel spectral acquisition, parallel mass spectrometry (MS) and MS/MS measurements, and parallel high-resolution acquisition with the MS array system.

  13. Development of helium electron cyclotron wall conditioning on TCV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douai, D.; Goodman, T.; Isayama, A.; Fukumoto, M.; Wauters, T.; Sozzi, C.; Coda, S.; Blanchard, P.; Figini, L.; Garavaglia, S.; Miyata, Y.; Moro, A.; Ricci, D.; Silva, M.; Theiler, C.; Vartanian, S.; Verhaegh, K.; the EUROfusion MST1 Team; the TCV Team

    2018-02-01

    JT-60SA envisions electron cyclotron wall conditioning (ECWC), as wall conditioning method in the presence of the toroidal field to control fuel and impurity recycling and to improve plasma performance and reproducibility. This paper reports on Helium ECWC experiments on TCV in support of JT-60SA operation. Nearly sixty Helium conditioning discharges have been successfully produced in TCV, at a toroidal field B T  =  1.3 or 1.54 T, with gyrotrons at 82.7 GHz in X2 mode, mimicking ECWC operation in JT-60SA at the second harmonic of the EC wave. Discharge parameters were tuned in order to (i) minimize the time for the onset of ECWC plasmas, thus minimizing absorption of stray radiation by in-vessel components, (ii) improve discharge homogeneity by extending the discharge vertically and radially, and wall coverage, in particular of inboard surfaces where JT-60SA plasmas will be initiated, (iii) assess the efficiency of He-ECWC to deplete carbon walls from fuel. An optimized combination of vertical and radial magnetic fields, with amplitudes typically 0.1 to 0.6% of that of B T, has been determined, which resulted in lowest breakdown time, improved wall coverage and enhanced fuel removal. A standard ohmic D 2-plasma could be then sustained, whereas it would not have been possible without He-ECWC.

  14. High current DC negative ion source for cyclotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etoh, H; Onai, M; Aoki, Y; Mitsubori, H; Arakawa, Y; Sakuraba, J; Kato, T; Mitsumoto, T; Hiasa, T; Yajima, S; Shibata, T; Hatayama, A; Okumura, Y

    2016-02-01

    A filament driven multi-cusp negative ion source has been developed for proton cyclotrons in medical applications. In Cs-free operation, continuous H(-) beam of 10 mA and D(-) beam of 3.3 mA were obtained stably at an arc-discharge power of 3 kW and 2.4 kW, respectively. In Cs-seeded operation, H(-) beam current reached 22 mA at a lower arc power of 2.6 kW with less co-extracted electron current. The optimum gas flow rate, which gives the highest H(-) current, was 15 sccm in the Cs-free operation, while it decreased to 4 sccm in the Cs-seeded operation. The relationship between H(-) production and the design/operating parameters has been also investigated by a numerical study with KEIO-MARC code, which gives a reasonable explanation to the experimental results of the H(-) current dependence on the arc power.

  15. Maryland University sectored isochronous cyclotron (MUSIC): Progress report No. 14

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1967-01-10

    The past quarter has seen further progress in the solution of the problem of achieving a cyclotron which meets or exceeds the performance requirements. The magnet system, with the exception of the trim coils and their supplies, is all on order or about to be ordered, and a high confidence level exists that the system will meet all requirements. The rf system studies, nearly complete, have indicated that the solution chosen will meet the frequency requirements and will be within the power expected. The center studies, complete in the first phase, have resulted in a preliminary center design of the electrostatic focusing system and a design of the magnetic center which provides the required axial focusing. A high degree of cooperation on the center study programs between the U of M and CSF has efficiently yielded these results. The overall schedule continues to be maintained, and the program is expected to be completed on the 37-month schedule. For better control and greater visibility on schedule progress, two reference points have been selected as more immediate objectives. These are 17 July 1967 for the start of the magnet testing program and 2 October 1967 as the start of the rf high power tests. Each task involved is being analyzed with these dates in mind, and they appear to be reasonable.

  16. Characteristic Experimentations of Degrader and Scatterer at MC-50 Cyclotron

    CERN Document Server

    Lee Seok Ki; Kim, Kye-Ryung; Lee, Hwa-Ryun; Park, Bum-Sik

    2005-01-01

    Building proton beam user facilities, especially deciding beam energy level, depends on the attached proton accelerator and users' needs. To adjust beam energy level, two methods are generally used. One is to directly adjust the beam in the accelerator. The other is to adjust beam energy after extracting from the accelerator. Degrader/Scatterer System has been installed in the MC-50 Cyclotron to adjust energy level of the beam used for various application fields. Its degrader and scatterer are made of Al foils and Au foils, respectively. Al thickness are 2, 1, 0.5, 0.3, 0.2, 0.1, 0.05, 0.03, 0.02, 0.01mm and Au thickness are 0.2, 0.1, 0.05, 0.03, 0.02, 0.01mm, respectively. In this study, suitable beam condition was adjusted through overlapping Al/Au foils of various thickness through simulation results. After that, LET(Linear Energy Transfer) value was indirectly acquired by measuring the bragg peak of the external beam through PMMA plastic Phantom and profile was measured by film dosimetry.

  17. Isotope exchange by Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning on JET

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wauters, T., E-mail: t.wauters@fz-juelich.de [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, ERM/KMS, TEC Partner, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Douai, D.; Kogut, D. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Lyssoivan, A. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, ERM/KMS, TEC Partner, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Brezinsek, S. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung Plasmaphysik, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Belonohy, E. [Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Blackman, T. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Bobkov, V. [Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Crombé, K. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, ERM/KMS, TEC Partner, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Drenik, A. [Jožef Stefan Institute, 1000 Ljubljana (Slovenia); Graham, M. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Joffrin, E. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Lerche, E. [Laboratory for Plasma Physics, ERM/KMS, TEC Partner, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Loarer, T. [CEA, IRFM, F-13108 St-Paul-Lez-Durance (France); Lomas, P.L.; Mayoral, M.-L.; Monakhov, I. [JET-EFDA, Culham Science Centre, Abingdon OX14 3DB (United Kingdom); Oberkofler, M. [Max-Planck Institut für Plasmaphysik, 85748 Garching (Germany); Philipps, V. [Forschungszentrum Jülich, Institut für Energie- und Klimaforschung Plasmaphysik, 52425 Jülich (Germany); Plyusnin, V. [IST, Instituto de Plasmas e Fusão Nuclear, 1049-001 Lisboa (Portugal); and others

    2015-08-15

    The isotopic exchange efficiencies of JET Ion Cyclotron Wall Conditioning (ICWC) discharges produced at ITER half and full field conditions are compared for JET carbon (C) and ITER like wall (ILW). Besides an improved isotope exchange rate on the ILW providing cleaner plasma faster, the main advantage compared to C-wall is a reduction of the ratio of retained discharge gas to removed fuel. Complementing experimental data with discharge modeling shows that long pulses with high (∼240 kW coupled) ICRF power maximizes the wall isotope removal per ICWC pulse. In the pressure range 1–7.5 × 10{sup −3} Pa, this removal reduces with increasing discharge pressure. As most of the wall-released isotopes are evacuated by vacuum pumps in the post discharge phase, duty cycle optimization studies for ICWC on JET-ILW need further consideration. The accessible reservoir by H{sub 2}-ICWC at ITER half field conditions on the JET-ILW preloaded by D{sub 2} tokamak operation is estimated to be 7.3 × 10{sup 22} hydrogenic atoms, and may be exchanged within 400 s of cumulated ICWC discharge time.

  18. Electron cyclotron wave sources and applications for fusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomassen, K. I.

    1990-03-01

    Advances in magnetic fusion research have come as often from the use of new technologies as from the invention of ideas and discovery of phenomena that are then applied to new experiments. The technologies needed for plasma production, heating, confinement, and control have largely been developed and are a major factor in the success of our current experiments. These include high vacuum techniques, normal and superconducting magnets, particle beams, pellet fueling devices, and rf sources in the ion cylotron and lower hybrid range of frequencies. One area where development is especially required, and where the potential impact on fusion research is large, is that of electron cyclotron wave (ECW) sources in the 100-600 GHz range. This journal issue is devoted to methods for ECW generation and transmission, and to applications including heating, current drive, profile shaping, and instability control. To help focus these articles the requirements(1) for a system to heat the Compact Ignition Tokamak (CIT) were used to define the necessary technology. Somewhat lower frequencies, but similar power, is anticipated(2) for the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER), and for future large devices of that class, should they use ECW sources in them.

  19. Applied research with cyclotron beams at FLNR JINR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oganessian, Yu.Ts.; Apel, P.Yu.; Didyk, A.Yu.; Dmitriev, S.N.; Gulbekian, G.G. [Joint Inst. for Nuclear Research, Dubna, Moscow (Russian Federation). Flerov Lab. of Nuclear Reactions

    1997-03-01

    The Center of Applied Physics at the Flerov Laboratory carries out an R and D program comprising development of track membrane technology, materials research with heavy ion beams and production of radioisotopes. Experiments are performed on three cyclotrons: U-400, U-200 and IC-100 providing a wide variety of ion beams with the energies of 1 to 10 MeV/u. The activity on track membranes (TMs) includes studies of track formation in polymers and latent track structure, track sensitization and etching, methods of membrane testing, development of track membranes on the basis of new materials, surface modification of TMs, design and construction of facilities for track membrane production. Recent experiments on heavy ion-induced radiation damage in non-polymeric substances have been devoted to defect creation in semiconductor and dielectric single crystals. TEM, SEM, STM and `in situ` luminescent spectroscopy are used to investigate heavy ion effects. Methods for producing several isotopes of high radiochemical and isotopic purity for medical, biomedical and environmental protection applications have been developed. (author)

  20. Electron cyclotron plasma startup in the GDT experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakovlev, D. V.; Shalashov, A. G.; Gospodchikov, E. D.; Solomakhin, A. L.; Savkin, V. Ya.; Bagryansky, P. A.

    2017-01-01

    We report on a new plasma startup scenario in the gas dynamic trap (GDT) magnetic mirror device. The primary 5 MW neutral beam injection (NBI) plasma heating system fires into a sufficiently dense plasma target (‘seed plasma’), which is commonly supplied by an arc plasma generator. In the reported experiments, a different approach to seed plasma generation is explored. One of the channels of the electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) heating system is used to ionize the neutral gas and build up the density of plasma to a level suitable for NBI capture. After a short transition of approximately 1 ms the discharge becomes essentially similar to a standard one initiated by the plasma gun. This paper presents the discharge scenario and experimental data on the seed plasma evolution during ECRH, along with the dependencies on incident microwave power, magnetic configuration and pressure of a neutral gas. The characteristics of the consequent high-power NBI discharge are studied and differences from the conventional scenario are discussed. A theoretical model describing the ECR breakdown and the seed plasma accumulation in a large-scale mirror trap is developed on the basis of the GDT experiment.

  1. Electron cyclotron emission measurements at the stellarator TJ-K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sichardt, Gabriel; Ramisch, Mirko [Institut fuer Grenzflaechenverfahrenstechnik und Plasmatechnologie, Universitaet Stuttgart (Germany); Koehn, Alf [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany)

    2016-07-01

    Electron temperature (T{sub e}) measurements in the magnetised plasmas of the stellarator TJ-K are currently performed by means of Langmuir probes. The use of these probes is restricted to relatively low temperatures and the measurement of temperature profiles requires the acquisition of the local current-voltage characteristics which limits strongly the sampling rate. As an alternative, T{sub e} can be measured using the electron cyclotron emission (ECE) that is generated by the gyration of electrons in magnetised plasmas. Magnetic field gradients in the plasma lead to a spatial distribution of emission frequencies and thus the measured intensity at a given frequency can be related to its point of origin. The T{sub e} dependence of the intensity then leads to a temperature profile along the line of sight for Maxwellian velocity distributions. A diagnostic system for T{sub e} measurements using ECE is currently being set up at TJ-K. When non-thermal electrons are present the emission spectrum changes dramatically. Therefore, the ECE can also be used to investigate the contribution of fast electrons to previously observed toroidal net currents in TJ-K. Simulations are used to examine the role of electron drift orbits in generating these currents.

  2. Evaluation of alternative designs for an injectable subsurface barrier at the Brookhaven National Laboratory Site, Long Island, New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moridis, George J.; Finsterle, Stefan; Heiser, John

    1999-10-01

    Two alternative designs for the demonstration emplacement of a viscous liquid barrier (VLB) at the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), Long Island, New York, are investigated by means of numerical simulation. The application of the VLB technology at the BNL site involved a surface-modified colloidal silica (CS), which gels upon addition of an appropriate electrolyte. Lance injection was used for the CS barrier emplacement. The lance injections occur in three stages: primary, secondary, and tertiary. The geometry of the barrier is based on the wedge model. The first design is based on optimization principles and determines the parameters that maximize uniformity and minimize permeability by minimizing an appropriate objective function while meeting the design criteria. These include a maximum hydraulic conductivity of 10-7 cm/s and a minimum thickness of 1 m. The second design aims to meet the same criteria and reflects standard chemical grouting practices. The combined effects of the key design parameters (i.e., lance spacing, injection location and spacing, gel time, injection rate, and volume) on the barrier permeability are studied. The optimization-based design is shown to have a significantly better performance than the standard engineering design. The interpenetration of adjacent CS bulbs appears to be of critical importance in meeting the barrier specifications. The three-dimensional simulations show that the barrier performance depends heavily on the path by which the final state is achieved. The in situ field measurements of the barrier permeability are consistent with, and appear to validate, the model predictions.

  3. The RaDIATE High-Energy Proton Materials Irradiation Experiment at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ammigan, Kavin; et al.

    2017-05-01

    The RaDIATE collaboration (Radiation Damage In Accelerator Target Environments) was founded in 2012 to bring together the high-energy accelerator target and nuclear materials communities to address the challenging issue of radiation damage effects in beam-intercepting materials. Success of current and future high intensity accelerator target facilities requires a fundamental understanding of these effects including measurement of materials property data. Toward this goal, the RaDIATE collaboration organized and carried out a materials irradiation run at the Brookhaven Linac Isotope Producer facility (BLIP). The experiment utilized a 181 MeV proton beam to irradiate several capsules, each containing many candidate material samples for various accelerator components. Materials included various grades/alloys of beryllium, graphite, silicon, iridium, titanium, TZM, CuCrZr, and aluminum. Attainable peak damage from an 8-week irradiation run ranges from 0.03 DPA (Be) to 7 DPA (Ir). Helium production is expected to range from 5 appm/DPA (Ir) to 3,000 appm/DPA (Be). The motivation, experimental parameters, as well as the post-irradiation examination plans of this experiment are described.

  4. Magnet design for the splitter/combiner regions of CBETA, the Cornell-Brookhaven Energy-Recovery-Linac Test Accelerator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crittendon, J. A. [Cornell Lab. for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, NY (United States); Burke, D. C. [Cornell Lab. for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, NY (United States); Fuentes, Y. L.P. [Cornell Lab. for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, NY (United States); Mayes, C. E. [Cornell Lab. for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, NY (United States); Smolenski, K. W. [Cornell Lab. for Accelerator-Based Sciences and Education, Ithaca, NY (United States)

    2017-01-06

    The Cornell-Brookhaven Energy-Recovery-Linac Test Accelerator (CBETA) will provide a 150-MeV electron beam using four acceleration and four deceleration passes through the Cornell Main Linac Cryomodule housing six 1.3-GHz superconducting RF cavities. The return path of this 76-m-circumference accelerator will be provided by 106 fixed-field alternating-gradient (FFAG) cells which carry the four beams of 42, 78, 114 and 150 MeV. Here we describe magnet designs for the splitter and combiner regions which serve to match the on-axis linac beam to the off-axis beams in the FFAG cells, providing the path-length adjustment necessary to energy recovery for each of the four beams. The path lengths of the four beamlines in each of the splitter and combiner regions are designed to be adapted to 1-, 2-, 3-, and 4-pass staged operations. Design specifi- cations and modeling for the 24 dipole and 32 quadrupole electromagnets in each region are presented. The CBETA project will serve as the first demonstration of multi-pass energy recovery using superconducting RF cavities with FFAG cell optics for the return loop.

  5. RADIATION MEASUREMENTS BY BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY DURING THE WOODS HOLE OCEANOGRAPHIC INSTITUTION INTERCOMPARISON STUDY, MAY-JUNE 2000.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    REYNOLDS, R.M.; BARTHOLOMEW, M.J.; MILLER, M.A.; SMITH, S.; EDWARDS, R.

    2000-12-01

    The WHOI buoy radiometer intercomparison took place during May and June, 2000 at the WHOI facility. The WHOI IMET, JAMSTEC Triton, and NOAA TAO buoy systems were operated from a beach site and the Brookhaven National Laboratory set up two Portable Radiation Package systems (P01 and P02) alongside the WHOI instrumentation on the roof of the Clark Building, about 300 m away. The BNL instruments were named ''P01'' and ''P02'' and were identical. Buoy instruments were all leveled to {+-}1{degree} to horizontal. The purpose of the project was to compare the buoy systems with precision measurements so that any differences in data collection or processing would be evaluated. BNL was pleased to participate so the PRP system could be evaluated as a calibration tool. The Portable Radiation Package is an integral component of the BNL Shipboard Oceanographic and Atmospheric Radiation (SOAR) system. It is designed to make accurate downwelling radiation measurements, including the three solar irradiance components (direct normal, diffuse and global) at six narrowband channels, aerosol optical depth measurements, and broadband longwave and shortwave irradiance measurements.

  6. On the origin of cyclotron lines in the spectra of X-ray pulsars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mushtukov A. A.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cyclotron resonance scattering features are observed in the spectra of some X-ray pulsars and show significant changes in the line energy with the pulsar luminosity. In a case of bright sources, the line centroid energy is anti-correlated with the luminosity. Such a behaviour is often associated with the onset and growth of the accretion column, which is believed to be the origin of the observed emission and the cyclotron lines. However, this scenario inevitably implies large gradient of the magnetic field strength within the line-forming region, and it makes the formation of the observed line-like features problematic. Moreover, the observed variation of the cyclotron line energy is much smaller than could be anticipated for the corresponding luminosity changes. We argue that a more physically realistic situation is that the cyclotron line forms when the radiation emitted by the accretion column is reflected from the neutron star surface. The idea is based on the facts that a substantial part of column luminosity is intercepted by the neutron star surface and the reflected radiation should contain absorption features. The reflection model is developed and applied to explain the observed variations of the cyclotron line energy in a bright X-ray pulsar V 0332+53 over a wide range of luminosities.

  7. Support vector machine based fault detection approach for RFT-30 cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Young Bae, E-mail: ybkong@kaeri.re.kr; Lee, Eun Je; Hur, Min Goo; Park, Jeong Hoon; Park, Yong Dae; Yang, Seung Dae

    2016-10-21

    An RFT-30 is a 30 MeV cyclotron used for radioisotope applications and radiopharmaceutical researches. The RFT-30 cyclotron is highly complex and includes many signals for control and monitoring of the system. It is quite difficult to detect and monitor the system failure in real time. Moreover, continuous monitoring of the system is hard and time-consuming work for human operators. In this paper, we propose a support vector machine (SVM) based fault detection approach for the RFT-30 cyclotron. The proposed approach performs SVM learning with training samples to construct the classification model. To compensate the system complexity due to the large-scale accelerator, we utilize the principal component analysis (PCA) for transformation of the original data. After training procedure, the proposed approach detects the system faults in real time. We analyzed the performance of the proposed approach utilizing the experimental data of the RFT-30 cyclotron. The performance results show that the proposed SVM approach can provide an efficient way to control the cyclotron system.

  8. mA beam acceleration efforts on 100 MeV H- cyclotron at CIAE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tianjue; An, Shizhong; Lv, Yinlong; Ge, Tao; Jia, Xianlu; Ji, Bin; Yin, Zhiguo; Pan, Gaofeng; Cao, Lei; Guan, Fengping; Yang, Jianjun; Li, Zhenguo; Zhao, Zhenlu; Wu, Longcheng; Zhang, He; Wang, Jingfeng; Zhang, Yiwang; Liu, Jingyuan; Li, Shiqiang; Lu, Xiaotong; Liu, Zhenwei; Li, Yaoqian; Guo, Juanjuan; Cao, Xuelong; Guan, Leilei; Wang, Fei; Wang, Yang; Yang, Guang; Zhang, Suping; Hou, Shigang; Wang, Feng

    2017-09-01

    Various technologies for high current compact H- cyclotron have been developed at CIAE since 1990s. A 375 μA proton beam was extracted from a 30 MeV compact H- cyclotron CYCIAE-30 at the end of 1994. A central region model cyclotron CYCIAE-CRM was developed for the design verification of a 100 MeV high current compact H- cyclotron CYCIAE-100. It is also a 10 MeV proton machine as a prototype for PET application. A 430 μA beam was achieved in 2009. The first beam was extracted from the CYCIAE-100 cyclotron on July 4, 2014, the operation stability has been improved and beam current has been increased gradually. A 1.1 mA proton beam was measured on the internal target in July 2016. The effort for an increasing of proton beam has continued till now. In this paper, the effort on several aspects for mA beam development will be presented, including the multi-cusp source, buncher, matching from the energy of the injected beam, vertical beam line and central region, beam loading of the RF system and instrumentation for beam diagnostics etc.

  9. Modeling whistler wave generation regimes in magnetospheric cyclotron maser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Pasmanik

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Numerical analysis of the model for cyclotron instability in the Earth's magnetosphere is performed. This model, based on the self-consistent set of equations of quasi-linear plasma theory, describes different regimes of wave generation and related energetic particle precipitation. As the source of free energy the injection of energetic electrons with transverse anisotropic distribution function to the interaction region is considered. A parametric study of the model is performed. The main attention is paid to the analysis of generation regimes for different characteristics of energetic electron source, such as the shape of pitch angle distributions and its intensity. Two mechanisms of removal of energetic electrons from a generation region are considered, one is due to the particle precipitation through the loss cone and another one is related to the magnetic drift of energetic particles.

    It was confirmed that two main regimes occur in this system in the presence of a constant particle source, in the case of precipitation losses. At small source intensity relaxation oscillations were found, whose parameters are in good agreement with simplified analytical theory developed earlier. At a larger source intensity, transition to a periodic generation occurs. In the case of drift losses the regime of self-sustained periodic generation regime is realized for source intensity higher than some threshold. The dependencies of repetition period and dynamic spectrum shape on the source parameters were studied in detail. In addition to simple periodic regimes, those with more complex spectral forms were found. In particular, alteration of spikes with different spectral shape can take place. It was also shown that quasi-stationary generation at the low-frequency band can coexist with periodic modulation at higher frequencies.

    On the basis of the results obtained, the model for explanation of

  10. Electron-cyclotron heating in the Constance 2 mirror experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mauel, Michael E.

    1982-09-01

    Electron cyclotron heating of a highly-ionized plasma in mirror geometry is investigated. The experimental diagnosis of the electron energy distribution and the comparison of the results of this diagnosis with a two dimensional, time-dependent Fokker-Planck simulation are accomplished in four steps. (1) First, the power balance of the heated and unheated Constance 2 plasma is analyzed experimentally. It is concluded that the heated electrons escape the mirror at a rate dominated by a combination of the influx of cool electrons from outside the mirror and the increased loss rate of the ions. (2) The microwave parameters at the resonance zones are then calculated by cold-plasma ray tracing. High N/sub parallel/ waves are launched and for these waves, strong first-pass absorption is predicted. The absorption strength is qualitatively checked in the experiment by surrounding the plasma with non-reflecting liners. (3) A simplified quasilinear theory including the effect of N/sub parallel/ is developed to model the electrons. An analytic expression is derived for the RF-induced pump-out of the magnetically-confined warm electrons. Results of the Fokker-Planck simulations show the development of the electron energy distribution for several plasma conditions and verify the scaling of the analytic expression for RF-induced diffusion into the loss cone. (4) Sample x-ray and endloss data are presented, and the overall comparison between the simulation and experiment is discussed. The x-ray signals indicate that, for greater RF power, the hot electrondensity increases more rapidly than its temperature. The time history of the endloss data, illustrating RF-enhancement, suggests the predicted scaling for warm-electron pump-out. Finally, a comparison between the measured and predicted energy distribution shows that the bulk, warm and hot components of the heated Constance 2 electrons are indeed reproduced by the simulation.

  11. Electron cyclotron resonance heating in the microwave tokamak experiment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, S.L.; Casper, T.A.; Fenstermacher, M.E. [and others

    1992-09-01

    This paper presents the results from a series of Electron Cyclotron Resonance Heating (ECRH) experiments on the Microwave Tokamak Experiment (MTX). On-axis heating at B{sub T} = 5T (f{sub ce} = 140 GHz) has been performed at electron densities up to cutoff. We have used both a long-pulse gryotron ({approximately}200 kW, {approximately}0.1s) and a pulsed Free Electron Laser (FEL) as microwave sources. Gyrotron experiments with power densities corresponding to 4 MW m{sup {minus}3}. A far infrared (FIR) polarimeter measured peaking of plasma current profiles in some discharges during the ECRH pulse. During high-power single-pulse FEL experiments, single-pass microwave !transmission measurements show nonlinear effects; i.e., higher transmission than predicted by linear theory. A corrugated-wall duct was used in the tokamak port to increase the gradient of the parallel refractive index n{sub parallel} of the incident wave, and increased absorption was observed. Evidence of electron tail heating during FEL pulses was observed on soft x-ray and ECE diagnostics. These results are in agreement with predictions of nonlinear theory; extrapolation of this theory to reactor-like conditions indicates efficient absorption and heating. A Laser Assisted Particle Probe Spectroscopy (LAPPS) diagnostic provided estimates of the vacuum electric field of the FEL which were consistent with the measured power. Multiple pulse operation of the ETA-II accelerator for the FEL has also been demonstrated, indicating the feasibility of high-average power FEL operation.

  12. The study of acceptance and the transmission efficiency of separated sector cyclotron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Xiaoni

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper we present the study of the transversal and longitudinal acceptance and the transmission efficiency in the injection, acceleration, and extraction systems in the separated sector cyclotron of the heavy ion research facility in Lanzhou, China. The study of cyclotron acceptance is done for 238U36+ with energy of 97 MeV/u and for 70Zn10+ with energy of 5.62 MeV/u under the theoretical isochronous and real magnetic field distribution. From the simulation results it can be seen that the transmission efficiency and the acceptances of separated sector cyclotron can be improved by redesign the curvature of MSI3 deflector or by introducing the magnet shim in MSI3 deflector region to change the distribution of the inner magnetic field. [Projekat Ministarstva nauke Republike Srbije, br. OI-171018

  13. Results from the Project 8 phase-1 cyclotron radiation emission spectroscopy detector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashtari Esfahani, A.; Böser, S.; Claessens, C.; de Viveiros, L.; Doe, P. J.; Doeleman, S.; Fertl, M.; Finn, E. C.; Formaggio, J. A.; Guigue, M.; Heeger, K. M.; Jones, A. M.; Kazkaz, K.; LaRoque, B. H.; Machado, E.; Monreal, B.; Nikkel, J. A.; Oblath, N. S.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Rosenberg, L. J.; Rybka, G.; Saldaña, L.; Slocum, P. L.; Tedeschi, J. R.; Thümmler, T.; Vandevender, B. A.; Wachtendonk, M.; Weintroub, J.; Young, A.; Zayas, E.

    2017-09-01

    The Project 8 collaboration seeks to measure the absolute neutrino mass scale by means of precision spectroscopy of the beta decay of tritium. Our technique, cyclotron radiation emission spectroscopy, measures the frequency of the radiation emitted by electrons produced by decays in an ambient magnetic field. Because the cyclotron frequency is inversely proportional to the electron’s Lorentz factor, this is also a measurement of the electron’s energy. In order to demonstrate the viability of this technique, we have assembled and successfully operated a prototype system, which uses a rectangular waveguide to collect the cyclotron radiation from internal conversion electrons emitted from a gaseous 83m Kr source. Here we present the main design aspects of the first phase prototype, which was operated during parts of 2014 and 2015. We will also discuss the procedures used to analyze these data, along with the features which have been observed and the performance achieved to date.

  14. Optimized feed-forward neural-network algorithm trained for cyclotron-cavity modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamadian, Masoumeh; Afarideh, Hossein; Ghergherehchi, Mitra

    2017-01-01

    The cyclotron cavity presented in this paper is modeled by a feed-forward neural network trained by the authors’ optimized back-propagation (BP) algorithm. The training samples were obtained from simulation results that are for a number of defined situations and parameters and were achieved parametrically using MWS CST software; furthermore, the conventional BP algorithm with different hidden-neuron numbers, structures, and other optimal parameters such as learning rate that are applied for our purpose was also used here. The present study shows that an optimized FFN can be used to estimate the cyclotron-model parameters with an acceptable error function. A neural network trained by an optimized algorithm therefore shows a proper approximation and an acceptable ability regarding the modeling of the proposed structure. The cyclotron-cavity parameter-modeling results demonstrate that an FNN that is trained by the optimized algorithm could be a suitable method for the estimation of the design parameters in this case.

  15. Absorption and emission of extraordinary-mode electromagnetic waves near cyclotron frequency in nonequilibrium plasmas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, C. S.; Lin, C. S.; Wong, H. K.; Tsai, S. T.; Zhou, R. L.

    1981-01-01

    An investigation is presented of two cases: (1) weakly relativistic electrons with a loss-cone type distribution, and (2) electrons with a drift velocity parallel to the ambient magnetic field. Numerical computations are given for physical parameters close to those in the polar region of the earth magnetosphere and laboratory experiments, with attention to the fast extraordinary-mode radiation whose frequency is near that of the electron cyclotron frequency. The fast extraordinary mode can escape from a strong field region to the weaker field region and may therefore be measured outside the plasma. It is found that the X mode radiation can be amplified by means of a cyclotron maser effect when the electrons have a loss-cone distribution, and it is concluded that, when the electron energy is sufficiently high, the X mode cutoff frequency may be lower than the cyclotron frequency.

  16. Differentiating Fragmentation Pathways of Cholesterol by Two-Dimensional Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Agthoven, Maria A; Barrow, Mark P; Chiron, Lionel; Coutouly, Marie-Aude; Kilgour, David; Wootton, Christopher A; Wei, Juan; Soulby, Andrew; Delsuc, Marc-André; Rolando, Christian; O'Connor, Peter B

    2015-12-01

    Two-dimensional Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry is a data-independent analytical method that records the fragmentation patterns of all the compounds in a sample. This study shows the implementation of atmospheric pressure photoionization with two-dimensional (2D) Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. In the resulting 2D mass spectrum, the fragmentation patterns of the radical and protonated species from cholesterol are differentiated. This study shows the use of fragment ion lines, precursor ion lines, and neutral loss lines in the 2D mass spectrum to determine fragmentation mechanisms of known compounds and to gain information on unknown ion species in the spectrum. In concert with high resolution mass spectrometry, 2D Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry can be a useful tool for the structural analysis of small molecules. Graphical Abstract ᅟ.

  17. Magnetic field calculation for a 13 MeV PET cyclotron

    CERN Document Server

    Yang, W Y; Oh, S; Chai, J S; Ha, J H

    1999-01-01

    A design study of the main magnet for a 13 MeV cyclotron has been carried out in a joint collaboration between the Korea Cancer Center Hospital (KCCH) and POSTECH. A maximum energy of 13 MeV has been chosen to produce radioisotopes such as /sup 18/F. There are four magnet sectors, each with radial-ridged shape. Maximum magnetic fields are 1.85 T and 0.48 T at hill and valley centers, respectively. The total size of the cyclotron is less than 2 m in diameter. The program TOSCA has been utilized for the field calculation and optimization. In this paper, we describe design parameters of the 13 MeV PET cyclotron, with emphasis on the magnetic field shape and the beam optics calculation. (3 refs).

  18. Experiments on ion cyclotron damping at the deuterium fourth harmonic in DIII-D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pinsker, R. I. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Baity, F. W. [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee (United States); Bernabei, S. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey (United States); Greenough, N. [Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory, Princeton, New Jersey (United States); Heidbrink, W. W. [University of California, Irvine, California (United States); Mau, T. K. [University of California, San Diego, California (United States); Petty, C. C. [General Atomics, P.O. Box 85608, San Diego, California 92186-5608 (United States); Porkolab, M. [Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States)

    1999-09-20

    Absorption of fast Alfven waves by the energetic ions of an injected beam is evaluated in the DIII-D tokamak. Ion cyclotron resonance absorption at the fourth harmonic of the deuteron cyclotron frequency is observed with deuterium neutral beam injection (f=60 MHz, B{sub T}=1.9 T). Enhanced D-D neutron rates are evidence of absorption at the Doppler-shifted cyclotron resonance. Characteristics of global energy confinement provide further proof of substantial beam acceleration by the rf. In many cases, the accelerated deuterons cause temporary stabilization of the sawtooth (''monster sawteeth''), at relatively low rf power levels of {approx}1 MW. (c) 1999 American Institute of Physics.

  19. Topological model of composite fermions in the cyclotron band generator picture: New insights

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staśkiewicz, Beata

    2018-03-01

    A combinatorial group theory in the braid groups is correlated with the unusual "anyon" statistic of particles in 2D Hall system in the fractional quantum regime well. On this background has been derived cyclotron band generator as a modification and generalization band generator, first established to solve the word and conjugacy problems in the braid group terms. Topological commensurability condition has been embraced by canonical factors - like, based on the concept of parallel descending cycles. Owing to this we can mathematically capture the general hierarchy of correlated states in the lowest Landau level, describing the fractional quantum Hall effect hierarchy, in terms of cyclotron band generators, especially for those being beyond conventional composite fermions model. It has been also shown that cyclotron braid subgroups, developed for interpretation of Laughlin correlations, are a special case of the right-angled Artin groups.

  20. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides. Comprehensive progress report, February 1, 1990--January 31, 1993

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, S.M. Finn, R.D.

    1992-08-04

    This report describes the author`s continuing long term goal of promoting nuclear medicine applications by improving the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. The program has 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry /Cyclotron; Pharmacology; and Immunology. An essential strategy is as follows: novel radionuclides and radiotracers developed in the Radiochemistry/Cyclotron section under the DOE grant during the 1989--1992 grant period, will be employed in the Pharmacology and Immunology sections of the DOE grant during the 1992--1995 grant period. The development of novel radionuclides and tracers is of course useful in and of itself, but their utility is greatly enhanced by the interaction with the immunology and pharmacology components of the program.

  1. A cyclotron isotope production facility designed to maximize production and minimize radiation dose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dickie, W. J.; Stevenson, N. R.; Szlavik, F. F.

    1993-06-01

    Continuing increases in requirements from the nuclear medicine industry for cyclotron isotopes is increasing the demands being put on an aging stock of machines. In addition, with the 1990 recommendations of the ICRP publication in place, strict dose limits will be required and this will have an effect on the way these machines are being operated. Recent advances in cyclotron design combined with lessons learned from two decades of commercial production mean that new facilities can result in a substantial charge on target, low personnel dose, and minimal residual activation. An optimal facility would utilize a well engineered variable energy/high current H - cyclotron design, multiple beam extraction, and individual target caves. Materials would be selected to minimize activation and absorb neutrons. Equipment would be designed to minimize maintenance activities performed in high radiation fields.

  2. Comment on the determination of Fermi-liquid parameters from cyclotron-wave measurements using empirical procedures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gordon, R A; Frandsen, J.B.

    1978-01-01

    The application of empirical procedures is shown to lead to a number of ambiguities or errors in the determination of cyclotron-wave dispersion curves. As a result of such ambiguities or errors, it is pointed out that the presently quoted values of the Fermi-liquid parameters {Ai}, i≥2, obtained...... from cyclotron-wave dispersion curves, can not be considered reliable....

  3. CSEWG SYMPOSIUM, A CSWEG RETROSPECTIVE. 35TH ANNIVERSARY CROSS SECTION EVALUATION WORKING GROUP, NOV. 5, 2001, BROOKHAVEN NATIONAL LABORATORY.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DUNFORD, C.; HOLDEN, N.; PEARLSTEIN, S.

    2001-11-05

    This publication has been prepared to record some of the history of the Cross Section Evaluation Working Group (CSEWG). CSEWG is responsible for creating the evaluated nuclear data file (ENDF/B) which is widely used by scientists and engineers who are involved in the development and maintenance of applied nuclear technologies. This organization has become the model for the development of nuclear data libraries throughout the world. The data format (ENDF) has been adopted as the international standard. On November 5, 2001, a symposium was held at Brookhaven National Laboratory to celebrate the 50 th meeting of the CSEWG organization and the 35 th anniversary of its first meeting in November 1966. The papers presented in this volume were prepared by present and former CSEWG members for presentation at the November 2001 symposium. All but two of the presentations are included. I have included an appendix to list all of the CSEWG members and their affiliations, which has been compiled from the minutes of each of the CSEWG meetings. Minutes exist for all meetings except the 4 th meeting held in January 1968. The list includes 348 individuals from 71 organizations. The dates for each of the 50 CSEWG meetings are listed. The committee structure and chairmen of all committees and subcommittees are also included in the appendix. This volume is dedicated to three individuals whose foresight and talents made CSEWG possible and successful. They are Henry Honeck who lead the effort to develop the ENDF format and the CSEWG system, Ira Zartman, the Atomic Energy Commission program manager who provided the programmatic direction and support, and Sol Pearlstein who led the development of the CESWG organization and the ENDF/B evaluated nuclear data library.

  4. Striving Toward Energy Sustainability: How Plants Will Play a Role in Our Future (453rd Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrieri, Richard A. (Ph.D., Medical Department)

    2009-10-28

    Edible biomass includes sugars from sugar cane or sugar beets, starches from corn kernels or other grains, and vegetable oils. The fibrous, woody and generally inedible portions of plants contain cellulose, hemicellulose and lignin, three key cell-wall components that make up roughly 70 percent of total plant biomass. At present, starch can readily be degraded from corn grain into glucose sugar, which is then fermented into ethanol, and an acre of corn can yield roughly 400 gallons of ethanol. In tapping into the food supply to solve the energy crisis, however, corn and other crops have become more expensive as food. One solution lies in breaking down other structural tissues of plants, including the stalks and leaves of corn, grasses and trees. However, the complex carbohydrates in cellulose-containing biomass are more difficult to break down and convert to ethanol. So researchers are trying to engineer plants having optimal sugars for maximizing fuel yield. This is a challenge because only a handful of enzymes associated with the more than 1,000 genes responsible for cell-wall synthesis have had their roles in controlling plant metabolism defined. As Richard Ferrieri, Ph.D., a leader of a biofuel research initiative within the Medical Department, will discuss during the 453rd Brookhaven Lecture, he and his colleagues use short-lived radioisotopes, positron emission tomography and biomarkers that they have developed to perform non-invasive, real time imaging of whole plants. He will explain how the resulting metabolic flux analysis gives insight into engineering plant metabolism further.

  5. [Decommissioning of the medical cyclotron in National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kimiteru; Nakata, Yasuhiro; Matsuda, Hiroshi; Sato, Noriko

    2011-05-01

    In Japan, positron emission tomography has prevailed as a useful procedure for detecting malignancy, myocardial viability, and epileptic foci. Consequently, compact medical cyclotrons have been installed in many hospitals. However, reports about the dismantling or decommissioning of compact medical cyclotrons are rare. This report describes the series of steps involved in the decommissioning of a compact medical cyclotron that had been used to produce radioactively tagged substances over a period of fifteen years at the National Center of Neurology and Psychiatry in Japan. Additionally, this report describes the manner in which the radioactive waste was disposed. The plan to decommission the cyclotron was comprised of three phases: a preliminary survey, the dismantling work, and a reports after the dismantling. We complied with the guidelines for the disposal of radioactive waste published by the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology. The most radioactive material was the vacuuming foil used in the window of the target chamber, with a dose rate of 17 microSv/h (gamma rays) and 20 x 10(3) cpm (beta rays). The detected radionuclides were mainly 22Na, 57Co, 60Co and 65Zn. The total numbers of radioactive waste containers were thirteen 200 l containers and one 50 l container. We suspect that the long shutdown period of the cyclotron (more than one year) contributed to the decay of the radioactive waste because the amount of containers was smaller than the initial estimation. The shutdown period of a cyclotron may play a significant role in reducing the amount of radioactive waste.

  6. Biomedical research with cyclotron produced radionuclides. Progress report, October 1, 1977--September 30, 1978

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laughlin, J.S.; Benua, R.S.; Tilbury, R.S.; Bigler, R.E.

    1978-09-30

    Progress is reported on biomedical studies using cyclotron-produced /sup 18/F, /sup 15/O, /sup 11/C, /sup 13/N, /sup 52/Fe, /sup 38/K, /sup 206/Bi, /sup 73/Se, /sup 53/Co, and /sup 43/K. The following research projects are described: tumor detection and diagnosis; neurological studies; radiopharmaceutical development; /sup 38/K as an indicator of blood flow to the myocardium; dosimetry for internally deposited isotopes in animals and man; cyclotron development; positron tomographic imaging with the TOKIM System; and review of positron emission transaxial tomograph instruments. (HLW)

  7. First results of electron cyclotron emission measurements at the GDT magnetic mirror

    CERN Document Server

    Shalashov, A G; Gospodchikov, E D; Lubyako, L V; Yakovlev, D V; Bagryansky, P A

    2016-01-01

    This paper summarizes the results of experiments on electron cyclotron emission (ECE) measurements at the fundamental harmonic recently performed at the axially symmetric magnetic mirror device GDT (Budker Institute, Novosibirsk). New ECE diagnostics is installed to facilitate the successful electron cyclotron resonance heating experiment and operates in the vicinity of the heating frequency of 54.5 GHz. Besides expected emission of thermal electrons, a clearly resolved non-thermal ECE is observed indicating the presence of suprathermal electrons driven by high-power microwave heating. The particulars of plasma emission are studied experimentally in a broad range of discharge scenarios.

  8. Neutron transport calculation for Activation Evaluation for Decommissioning of PET cyclotron Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobuhara, Fumiyoshi; Kuroyanagi, Makoto; Masumoto, Kazuyoshi; Nakamura, Hajime; Toyoda, Akihiro; Takahashi, Katsuhiko

    2017-09-01

    In order to evaluate the state of activation in a cyclotron facility used for the radioisotope production of PET diagnostics, we measured the neutron flux by using gold foils and TLDs. Then, the spatial distribution of neutrons and induced activity inside the cyclotron vault were simulated with the Monte Calro calculation code for neutron transport and DCHAIN-SP for activation calculation. The calculated results are in good agreement with measured values within factor 3. Therefore, the adaption of the advanced evaluation procedure for activation level is proved to be important for the planning of decommissioning of these facilities.

  9. Cyclotron resonance in InAs/GaSb heterostructure in inclined magnetic field

    CERN Document Server

    Greshnov, A A; Vasilev, Yu B; Suchalkin, S D; Meltser, B Y; Ivanov, S V; Kopev, P S

    2002-01-01

    The mechanism of splitting the cyclotron resonance line in the InAs/GaSb heterostructure in the inclined magnetic field is experimentally and theoretically studied. It is shown that the electrons and holes mixing in leads to the anticrossing Landau levels and consequently to the cyclotron resonance line splitting. Splitting in the case of the inclined magnetic field was not observed which is explained by damping the electrons and holes states mixing in on the account of originating the additional barrier for the electrons and holes by availability of the magnetic field longitudinal constituent

  10. The 88-Inch Cyclotron: A One-Stop Facility for Electronics Radiation and Detector Testing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kireeff Covo, M.; Albright, R. A.; Ninemire, B. F.; Johnson, M. B.; Hodgkinson, A.; Loew, T.; Benitez, J. Y.; Todd, D. S.; Xie, D. Z.; Perry, T.; Phair, L.; Bernsteiny, L. A.; Bevins, J.; Brown, J. A.; Goldblum, B. L.; Harasty, M.; Harrig, K. P.; Laplace, T. A.; Matthews, E. F.; Bushmaker, A.; Walker, D.; Oklejas, V.; Hopkins, A. R.; Bleuel, D. L.; Chen, J.; Cronin, S. B.

    2017-10-01

    In outer space down to the altitudes routinely flown by larger aircrafts, radiation can pose serious issues for microelectronics circuits. The 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory is a sector-focused cyclotron and home of the Berkeley Accelerator Space Effects Facility, where the effects of energetic particles on sensitive microelectronics are studied with the goal of designing electronic systems for the space community. This paper describes the flexibility of the facility and its capabilities for testing the bombardment of electronics by heavy ions, light ions, and neutrons. Experimental capabilities for the generation of neutron beams from deuteron breakups and radiation testing of carbon nanotube field effect transistor will be discussed.

  11. Solid targets for production of radioisotopes with cyclotron; Blancos solidos para produccion de radioisotopos con ciclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paredes G, L.; Balcazar G, M. [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Direccion de Investigacion Tecnologica, A.P. 18-1027, 11801 Mexico D.F. (Mexico)

    1999-07-01

    The design of targets for production of radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals of cyclotron to medical applications requires a detailed analysis of several variables such as: cyclotron operation conditions, choice of used materials as target and their physicochemical characteristics, activity calculation, the yielding of each radioisotope by irradiation, the competition of nuclear reactions in function of the projectiles energy and the collision processes amongst others. The objective of this work is to determine the equations for the calculation for yielding of solid targets at the end of the proton irradiation. (Author)

  12. Unidirectional stripping extraction from a cyclotron which accelerates light as well as heavy ions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasna L. Ristić-Djurović

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available The VINCY Cyclotron (VINča CYclotron is a multipurpose machine intended to accelerate light as well as heavy ions. To extract heavy ions with low energy and light ions an extraction system with stripping foil is used. Heavy ions with high energy will be extracted by means of an electrostatic deflector. The former extraction system will be manufactured and used first. The proposed unidirectional stripping extraction system is the optimal balance between the placement of the extraction line and the required diversity and quality of the extracted beam. The available range of extraction directions is set by geometry limitations.

  13. A simple thick target for production of 89Zr using an 11 MeV cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Link, Jeanne M.; Krohn, Kenneth A.; O’Hara, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    The growing interest but limited availability of 89Zr for PET led us to test targets for the 89Y(p,n) reaction. The goal was an easily constructed target for an 11 MeV Siemens cyclotron. Yttrium foils were tested at different thicknesses, angles and currents. A 90° foil tolerated 41 μA without damage and produced ~800 MBq/h, > 20 mCi, an amount adequate for radiochemistry research and human doses in a widely available accelerator. This method should translate to higher energy cyclotrons. PMID:28187357

  14. The electrostatic ion-cyclotron instability-a two-dimensional potential relaxation instability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popa, G.; Schrittwieser, R.; Juul Rasmussen, Jens

    1985-01-01

    An experimental investigation shows that the electrostatic ion-cyclotron instability, driven by an electron current to a positively biased collector, is accompanied by strong coherent two-dimensional fluctuations of the plasma potential in front of the collector. These results suggest that this i......An experimental investigation shows that the electrostatic ion-cyclotron instability, driven by an electron current to a positively biased collector, is accompanied by strong coherent two-dimensional fluctuations of the plasma potential in front of the collector. These results suggest...

  15. The influence of the edge density fluctuations on electron cyclotron wave beam propagation in tokamaks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bertelli, N.; Balakin, A.A.; Westerhof, E.

    2010-01-01

    A numerical analysis of the electron cyclotron (EC) wave beam propagation in the presence of edge density fluctuations by means of a quasi-optical code [Balakin A. A. et al, Nucl. Fusion 48 (2008) 065003] is presented. The effects of the density fluctuations on the wave beam propagation are estim......A numerical analysis of the electron cyclotron (EC) wave beam propagation in the presence of edge density fluctuations by means of a quasi-optical code [Balakin A. A. et al, Nucl. Fusion 48 (2008) 065003] is presented. The effects of the density fluctuations on the wave beam propagation...

  16. Medium to large scale radioisotope production for targeted radiotherapy using a small PET cyclotron

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thisgaard, Helge; Jensen, Mikael; Elema, Dennis Ringkjøbing

    2011-01-01

    In recent years the use of radionuclides in targeted cancer therapy has increased. In this study we have developed a high-current solid target system and demonstrated that by the use of a typical low-energy medical cyclotron, it is possible to produce tens of GBq's of many unconventional radionuc......In recent years the use of radionuclides in targeted cancer therapy has increased. In this study we have developed a high-current solid target system and demonstrated that by the use of a typical low-energy medical cyclotron, it is possible to produce tens of GBq's of many unconventional...

  17. ROKCY-12 (KCCH PET-dedicated cyclotron): main features and improvements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chai, J. S.; Kim, Y. S.; Yang, Y. T.; Jung, I. S.; Hong, S. S.; Lee, M. Y.; Jang, H. S.; Kim, J. H. [Korea Cancer Center Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2002-07-01

    In this paper, we describe the development of 13 MeV cyclotron (ROKCY-12) that can be used for a Position Emission Tomography(PET) purpose. This cyclotron with a maximum beam energy of 13 MeV can produce radio isotopes especially {sup 18}F which has a relatively short half lifetime of 110 minutes. First, we show the beam characteristics can be used to carry out the operation of ROCKY-12. Based on this, a computer program has been developed to determine main cyclotron parameters such as cyclotron magnet, RF system, ion source, vacuum system and other cyclotron operation parameters. And then we show the result of design and manufacturing feature of ROKCY-12. By using this design program, one can determines magnet yoke geometry and the average magnetic fields etc. And then the three-dimensional computer program OPERA-3D has been invoked to determine magnet pole tips. Validity of the design can be seen by investigating magnetic fields, radial and vertical focusing frequencies as a function of the beam energy. In this paper, we show the results of cyclotron beam by ROCKY-12. We designed 77.3 MHz RF system and ion source system. We tested RF resonance each coupling methods. We show the result of RF design and prototype operation. Developed ion source is PIG type. We described our design methods and implementation. We report the result of getting negative hydrogen ion. Cyclotron controller asks inputs of every sensor and output of every instrument for notifying current condition to operator. It has independent controllers, for example DC power supply, vacuum system, beam profile system, beam extraction system, RF system, ion source, cooling unit and so on. Basically, each control system uses RS-485 for communication to main control computer. Consumers reward products and services that feature quality, originality, a distinct personality and charm. The International Standardization Organization (ISO) requires, as its mission, that we achieve competitive superiority by

  18. Neutron transport calculation for Activation Evaluation for Decommissioning of PET cyclotron Facility

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobuhara Fumiyoshi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the state of activation in a cyclotron facility used for the radioisotope production of PET diagnostics, we measured the neutron flux by using gold foils and TLDs. Then, the spatial distribution of neutrons and induced activity inside the cyclotron vault were simulated with the Monte Calro calculation code for neutron transport and DCHAIN-SP for activation calculation. The calculated results are in good agreement with measured values within factor 3. Therefore, the adaption of the advanced evaluation procedure for activation level is proved to be important for the planning of decommissioning of these facilities.

  19. Purification of cyclotron-produced {sup 203}Pb for labeling Herceptin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garmestani, Kayhan [Radioimmune and Inorganic Chemistry Section, Radiation Oncology Branch, NCI, Bethesda, MD 20892-1002 (United States); Milenic, Diane E. [Radioimmune and Inorganic Chemistry Section, Radiation Oncology Branch, NCI, Bethesda, MD 20892-1002 (United States); Brady, Erik D. [Radioimmune and Inorganic Chemistry Section, Radiation Oncology Branch, NCI, Bethesda, MD 20892-1002 (United States); Plascjak, Paul S. [PET Department, Clinical Center, NIH, Bethesda, MD 20892-1002 (United States); Brechbiel, Martin W. [Radioimmune and Inorganic Chemistry Section, Radiation Oncology Branch, NCI, Bethesda, MD 20892-1002 (United States)]. E-mail: martinwb@mail.nih.gov

    2005-04-01

    A simple and rapid procedure was developed for the purification of cyclotron-produced {sup 203}Pb via the {sup 203}Tl(d,2n) {sup 203}Pb reaction. A Pb(II) selective ion-exchange resin, with commercial name Pb Resin from Eichrom Technologies, Inc., was used to purify {sup 203}Pb from the cyclotron-irradiated Tl target with excellent recovery of the enriched Tl target material. The purified {sup 203}Pb was used to radiolabel the monoclonal antibody Herceptin. The in vitro and in vivo properties of the {sup 203}Pb radioimmunoconjugate were evaluated.

  20. Development of an 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source at RCNP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yorita, Tetsuhiko; Hatanaka, Kichiji; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro; Kibayashi, Mitsuru; Morinobu, Shunpei; Okamura, Hiroyuki; Tamii, Atsushi

    2008-02-01

    An 18 GHz superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source has recently been developed and installed in order to extend the variety and the intensity of ions at the RCNP coupled cyclotron facility. Production of several ions such as O, N, Ar, Kr, etc., is now under development and some of them have already been used for user experiments. For example, highly charged heavy ion beams like (86)Kr(21+,23+) and intense (16)O(5+,6+) and (15)N(6+) ion beams have been provided for experiments. The metal ion from volatile compounds method for boron ions has been developed as well.

  1. Effects of energetic heavy ions on electromagnetic ion cyclotron wave generation in the plasmapause region

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozyra, J. U.; Cravens, T. E.; Nagy, A. F.; Fontheim, E. G.; Ong, R. S. B.

    1984-01-01

    An expression for electromagnetic ion cyclotron convective growth rates is derived. The derivation of the dispersion relation and convective growth rates in the presence of a multicomponent energetic and cold plasma is presented. The effects that multiple heavy ions in the ring current and cold plasma produce in the growth and propagation characteristics of ion cyclotron waves are explored. Results of growth rate calculations using parameters consistent with conditions in the plasmapause region during the early recovery phase of geomagnetic storms are presented and compared with ground-based and satellite observations of waves in this region. The geophysical implications of the results are discussed.

  2. New Cyclotron Targetry to Enhance F-18 clinical Position Emission Tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Michael Doster

    2008-12-19

    This project proposes to develop cyclotron targets that produce F-18 for clinical Positron Emission Tomography (PET) at significantly higher rates than that available from current targetry. This production rate of 18F is directly proportional to the beam current. Higher beam currents would result in increased 18F production but would be accompanied by higher heat loads to the target. The beam power available in most commercial cyclotrons exceeds the heat removal capacity of current target technology by a factor of two to four, significantly limiting the production rate of Fluorine-18.

  3. Electron cyclotron emission at the fundamental harmonic in GDT magnetic mirror

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalashov, A. G.; Solomakhin, A. L.; Gospodchikov, E. D.; Lubyako, L. V.; Yakovlev, D. V.; Bagryansky, P. A.

    2017-08-01

    New electron cyclotron emission (ECE) diagnostics has been installed to facilitate the successful experiment of electron cyclotron plasma heating (ECRH) in a large open magnetic trap GDT at Budker Institute. The particularities of ECE in the vicinity of the ECRH frequency were studied experimentally for a broad range of discharge scenarios. The measured thermal emission has partly validated the existing physical conceptions about microwave plasma heating in the machine. Besides the expected emission of thermal electrons, a clearly resolved non-thermal ECE was observed which unambiguously confirmed the presence of suprathermal electrons driven by high-power microwave heating.

  4. Energy-related perturbations of the northeast coastal zone: five years (1974-1979) of oceanographic research at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, J.J.

    1980-03-01

    Since inception of oceanographic research at Brookhaven National Laboratory in 1974, over 75 cruises and 150 papers and reports have been completed. In comparison of shelf ecosystems at high, mid, and low latitudes, an understanding of the natural variability of US coastal waters has been derived. Annual carbon and nitrogen budgets suggest that the energy flow is diverted to a pelagic food web in summer-fall and a demersal food web in winter-spring within the Mid-Atlantic Bight. The impact of energy-related perturbations can now be assessed within the context of natural oscillation of the coastal food web.

  5. Status report of the multipurpose superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ciavola, G.; Gammino, S.; Barbarino, S.; Celona, L.; Consoli, F.; Gallo, G.; Maimone, F.; Mascali, D.; Passarello, S.; Galata, A.; Tinschert, K.; Spaedtke, P.; Lang, R.; Maeder, J.; Rossbach, J.; Koivisto, H.; Savonen, M.; Koponen, T.; Suominen, P.; Ropponen, T.; Barue, C.; Lechartier, M.; Beijers, J. P. M.; Brandenburg, S.; Kremers, H. R.; Vanrooyen, D.; Kuchler, D.; Scrivens, R.; Schachter, L.; Dobrescu, S.; Stiebing, K.

    Intense heavy ion beam production with electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion sources is a common requirement for many of the accelerators under construction in Europe and elsewhere. An average increase of about one order of magnitude per decade in the performance of ECR ion sources was obtained up

  6. LIBO - boosting medical cyclotron facilities for cancer therapy Exhibition LEPFest 2000

    CERN Multimedia

    2000-01-01

    Length : Energy boost : From 62 to 200 MeVAccelerating gradient : 10 MeV/metreAccelerating frequency : 3 GHz Collaboration : CERN, INFN and University of Milan, INFN and University of Naples and TERA foundation Prototype test in 2001 : SC cyclotron Catania

  7. Modelling third harmonic ion cyclotron acceleration of deuterium beams for JET fusion product studies experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, M.; Johnson, T.; Dumont, R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent JET experiments have been dedicated to the studies of fusion reactions between deuterium (D) and Helium-3 (3He) ions using neutral beam injection (NBI) in synergy with third harmonic ion cyclotron radio-frequency heating (ICRH) of the beam. This scenario generates a fast ion deuterium tail...

  8. Analysis of Chaperone Complexes by Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Geels, R.B.J.

    2008-01-01

    Investigation of methodologies for analyses of noncovalently bound protein assemblies using Fourier transformation ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FT-ICR-MS) and quadrupole Time-of-Flight (qToF) mass spectrometry. Specifically, the co-chaperonins GroEL and gp31 are used to perform

  9. Study of the Polarization Strategy for Electron Cyclotron Heating Systems on HL-2M

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, F.; Huang, M.; Xia, D. H.; Song, S. D.; Wang, J. Q.; Huang, B.; Wang, H.

    2016-06-01

    As important components integrated in transmission lines of electron cyclotron heating systems, polarizers are mainly used to obtain the desired polarization for highly efficient coupling between electron cyclotron waves and plasma. The polarization strategy for 105-GHz electron cyclotron heating systems of HL-2M tokamak is studied in this paper. Considering the polarizers need high efficiency, stability, and low loss to realize any polarization states, two sinusoidal-grooved polarizers, which include a linear polarizer and an elliptical polarizer, are designed with the coordinate transformation method. The parameters, the period p and the depth d, of two sinusoidal-grooved polarizers are optimized by a phase difference analysis method to achieve an almost arbitrary polarization. Finally, the optimized polarizers are manufactured and their polarization characteristics are tested with a low-power test platform. The experimental results agree well with the numerical calculations, indicating that the designed polarizers can meet the polarization requirements of the electron cyclotron heating systems of HL-2M tokamak.

  10. Destabilization of fast particle stabilized sawteeth in ASDEX Upgrade with electron cyclotron current drive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Igochine, V.; Chapman, I.T.; Bobkov, V.

    2011-01-01

    Upgrade for destabilization of fast particle stabilized sawteeth with electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD). It is shown that moderate ECCD from a single gyrotron is able to destabilize the fast particle stabilized sawteeth. A reduction in sawtooth period by about 40% was achieved in first experiments...

  11. The smooth cyclotron line in Her X-1 as seen with NuSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuerst, Felix; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Staubert, Ruediger

    2013-01-01

    Her X-1, one of the brightest and best studied X-ray binaries, shows a cyclotron resonant scattering feature (CRSF) near 37 keV. This makes it an ideal target for detailed study with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), taking advantage of its excellent hard X-ray spectral resolution...

  12. Graphical user interface for yield and dose estimations for cyclotron-produced technetium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, X; Vuckovic, M; Buckley, K; Bénard, F; Schaffer, P; Ruth, T; Celler, A

    2014-07-07

    The cyclotron-based (100)Mo(p,2n)(99m)Tc reaction has been proposed as an alternative method for solving the shortage of (99m)Tc. With this production method, however, even if highly enriched molybdenum is used, various radioactive and stable isotopes will be produced simultaneously with (99m)Tc. In order to optimize reaction parameters and estimate potential patient doses from radiotracers labeled with cyclotron produced (99m)Tc, the yields for all reaction products must be estimated. Such calculations, however, are extremely complex and time consuming. Therefore, the objective of this study was to design a graphical user interface (GUI) that would automate these calculations, facilitate analysis of the experimental data, and predict dosimetry. The resulting GUI, named Cyclotron production Yields and Dosimetry (CYD), is based on Matlab®. It has three parts providing (a) reaction yield calculations, (b) predictions of gamma emissions and (c) dosimetry estimations. The paper presents the outline of the GUI, lists the parameters that must be provided by the user, discusses the details of calculations and provides examples of the results. Our initial experience shows that the proposed GUI allows the user to very efficiently calculate the yields of reaction products and analyze gamma spectroscopy data. However, it is expected that the main advantage of this GUI will be at the later clinical stage when entering reaction parameters will allow the user to predict production yields and estimate radiation doses to patients for each particular cyclotron run.

  13. The smooth cyclotron line in her x-1 as seen with nuclear spectroscopic telescope array

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fuerst, Felix; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Staubert, Ruediger

    2013-01-01

    Her X-1, one of the brightest and best studied X-ray binaries, shows a cyclotron resonant scattering feature (CRSF) near 37 keV. This makes it an ideal target for detailed study with the Nuclear Spectroscopic Telescope Array (NuSTAR), taking advantage of its excellent hard X-ray spectral resolution...

  14. Dispersion equations for field-aligned cyclotron waves in axisymmetric magnetospheric plasmas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. I. Grishanov

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we derive the dispersion equations for field-aligned cyclotron waves in two-dimensional (2-D magnetospheric plasmas with anisotropic temperature. Two magnetic field configurations are considered with dipole and circular magnetic field lines. The main contribution of the trapped particles to the transverse dielectric permittivity is estimated by solving the linearized Vlasov equation for their perturbed distribution functions, accounting for the cyclotron and bounce resonances, neglecting the drift effects, and assuming the weak connection of the left-hand and right-hand polarized waves. Both the bi-Maxwellian and bi-Lorentzian distribution functions are considered to model the ring current ions and electrons in the dipole magnetosphere. A numerical code has been developed to analyze the dispersion characteristics of electromagnetic ion-cyclotron waves in an electron-proton magnetospheric plasma with circular magnetic field lines, assuming that the steady-state distribution function of the energetic protons is bi-Maxwellian. As in the uniform magnetic field case, the growth rate of the proton-cyclotron instability (PCI in the 2-D magnetospheric plasmas is defined by the contribution of the energetic ions/protons to the imaginary part of the transverse permittivity elements. We demonstrate that the PCI growth rate in the 2-D axisymmetric plasmasphere can be significantly smaller than that for the straight magnetic field case with the same macroscopic bulk parameters.

  15. Tomsk Polytechnic University cyclotron as a source for neutron based cancer treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisin, V A; Bogdanov, A V; Golovkov, V M; Musabaeva, L I; Sukhikh, L G; Verigin, D A

    2014-02-01

    In this paper we present our cyclotron based neutron source with average energy 6.3 MeV generated during the 13.6 MeV deuterons interactions with beryllium target, neutron field dosimetry, and dosimetry of attendant gamma fields. We also present application of our neutron source for cancer treatment.

  16. Three-wave interaction during electron cyclotron resonance heating and current drive

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Stefan Kragh; Jacobsen, Asger Schou; Hansen, Søren Kjer

    2016-01-01

    Non-linear wave-wave interactions in fusion plasmas, such as the parametric decay instability (PDI) of gyrotron radiation, can potentially hamper the use of microwave diagnostics. Here we report on anomalous scattering in the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak during electron cyclotron resonance heating...

  17. The electrostatic ion-cyclotron instability excited by a current to a strip collector

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul Rasmussen, Jens; Schrittwieser, R.; Skøelv, Å.

    1986-01-01

    The electrostatic ion-cyclotron instability is excited in a single-ended Q-machine by drawing an electron current to a strip collector crossing the entire plasma column. The instability is most easily excited when the widths of the strip is a few ion Larmor radii. The instability is confined within...

  18. Estimation of activity of air in the cyclotron bunker for PET diagnostics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Voskanjan Karen Varuzhanovich

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of the estimation of air activation by argon-41 induced by accelerated protons in 18 MeV Cyclotron. It has been demonstrated that activity of air is below significant minimum at proton current of 150 microamps.

  19. Discrete-Spectrum Waves in the Vicinity of Cyclotron Resonance in Silver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, J. O.

    1970-01-01

    Cyclotron-resonance studies of silver have revealed two additional series of oscillations, one between the fundamental and the second harmonic, the other above the fundamental resonance. These series are caused by the excitation of weakly damped discrete-spectrum waves propagating perpendicular...

  20. Stability of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in a multi-ion plasma

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A detailed numerical study, for parameters relevant to comet Halley, shows that the growth rate is dependent on the magnitude of the frequency. The ion cyclotron waves are driven by the electron drift parallel to the magnetic field; the temperature anisotropy of the oxygen ions only slightly enhance the growth rates for small ...

  1. On-line microseparations with Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wahl, J.H.; Hofstadler, S.A.; Zhao, Zhongxi; Gale, D.C.; Smith, R.D. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    The combination of capillary electrophoresis (CE) with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI/MS) is a powerful bioanalytical tool. Accurate charge states are readily obtained through high resolution MS techniques such as Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance (FTICR) mass spectrometry. In this study, the authors examine the practical considerations that were necessary for successful on-line CE-ESI/FTICR MS.

  2. Theory of the Current-Driven Ion Cyclotron Instability in the Bottomside Ionosphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-11-11

    Davidson, 1972; Aamodt , 1970]. Recent nonlinear numerical simulations [Pritchett et al., 1981; Okuda and Ashour-Abdalla, 1981] of the collisionless ion...Y -.- d-. .-. .--. W REFERENCES Aamodt , R.E., Particle motion in the presence of three dimensional finite amplitude harmonic cyclotron

  3. Simulation on the electronic wave packet cyclotron motion in a Weyl semimetal slab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Haibo; Zhu, Mingfeng; Jiang, Liwei; Zheng, Yisong

    2017-04-20

    We perform a numerical simulation on the time evolution of an electronic wave packet in a Weyl semimetal (WSM) slab driven by a magnetic field. We find that the evolution trajectory of the wave packet depends sensitively on its initial spin state. Only with initial spin state identical to that of the Fermi arc state at the surface it localized, does the wave packet evolution demonstrate the characteristic cyclotron orbit of WSM previously predicted from a semiclassical viewpoint. By analyzing the eigen-expansion of the electronic wave packet, we find the chiral Landau levels (LLs) of the WSM slab, as ingredients of the wave packet, to be responsible for establishing the characteristic WSM cyclotron orbit. In contrast, the nonchiral LLs contribute irregular oscillations to the wave packet evolution, going against the formation of a well-defined cyclotron orbit. In addition, the tilted magnetic field does not affect the motion of the electronic wave packet along the Fermi arcs in the momentum space. It does, however, alter the evolution trajectory of the electronic wave packet in real space and spin space. Finally, the energy disalignment of the Weyl nodes results in a 3D cyclotron orbit in real space.

  4. Closure of the single fluid magnetohydrodynamic equations in presence of electron cyclotron current drive

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westerhof, E.; Pratt, J.

    2014-01-01

    In the presence of electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD), the Ohm's law of single fluid magnetohydrodynamics is modified as E + v × B = η(J – J EC). This paper presents a new closure relation for the EC driven current density appearing in this modified Ohm's law. The new relation

  5. Advanced launcher design options for electron cyclotron current drive on ITER based on remote steering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Graswinckel, M. R.; Bongers, W. A.; M.R. de Baar,; van den Berg, M. A.; Denisov, G.; Donne, A. J. H.; Elzendoorn, B. S. Q.; Goede, A. P. H.; Heidinger, R.; Kuzikov, S.; Kruijt, O. G.; Kruizinga, B.; Moro, A.; Poli, E.; Ronden, D. M. S.; Saibene, G.; Thoen, D. J.; Verhoeven, A. G. A.

    2008-01-01

    Electron cyclotron current drive will become the main scheme on ITER for the stabilization of neoclassical tearing modes (NTMs) and the control of sawtooth oscillations. The effectiveness of this scheme forms the basis for the requirements of the ITER Upper Port Launcher. These requirements include

  6. Cyclotron laboratory of the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonev, D.; Goutev, N.; Georgiev, L. S.

    2016-06-01

    An accelerator laboratory is presently under construction in Sofia at the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences. The laboratory will use a TR24 type of cyclotron, which provides a possibility to accelerate a proton beam with an energy of 15 to 24 MeV and current of up to 0.4 mA. An accelerator with such parameters allows to produce a large variety of radioisotopes for development of radiopharmaceuticals. The most common radioisotopes that could be produced with such a cyclotron are PET isotopes like: 11C, 13N, 15O, 18F, 124I, 64Cu, 68Ge/68Ga, and SPECT isotopes like: 123I, 111In, 67Ga, 57Co, 99m Tc. Our aim is to use the cyclotron facility for research in the fields of radiopharmacy, radiochemistry, radiobiology, nuclear physics, solid state physics, applied research, new materials and for education in all these fields including nuclear energy. The building of the laboratory will be constructed nearby the Institute for Nuclear Research and Nuclear Energy and the cyclotron together with all the equipment needed will be installed there.

  7. Neutron Beams from Deuteron Breakup at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMahan, M.A.; Ahle, L.; Bleuel, D.L.; Bernstein, L.; Braquest, B.R.; Cerny, J.; Heilbronn, L.H.; Jewett, C.C.; Thompson, I.; Wilson, B.

    2007-07-31

    Accelerator-based neutron sources offer many advantages, in particular tunability of the neutron beam in energy and width to match the needs of the application. Using a recently constructed neutron beam line at the 88-Inch Cyclotron at LBNL, tunable high-intensity sources of quasi-monoenergetic and broad spectrum neutrons from deuteron breakup are under development for a variety of applications.

  8. Ultralow Frequency Waves In Saturn's Magnetosphere: More Than Ion Cyclotron Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crary, Frank; Dols, Vincent; Usanova, Maria; Meeks, Zachary; Simon, Sven

    2017-04-01

    Electromagnetic waves near the oxygen/water group cyclotron frequency are an ubiquitous feature of Saturn's inner magnetosphere. These left-circularly polarized, transverse waves are generated by the anisotropic velocity distribution of recently produced ions, and reflect the ion production rate. The properties and distribution of these emissions have been previous studies and related to the distribution of neutrals in the system (Leisner et al., 2006; Crary et al., 2013; Meeks et al., 2016.) In addition to these waves, other, related mode have been observed by the Cassini spacecraft. The waves near the W+ (water group) cyclotron frequency sometimes have a compressional component and/or accompanying emission the first (2f) harmonic (implying the waves are oblique rather than parallel propagating. Neither of these properties is predicted by the classic theory of wave growth from a ring-beam distribution. In addition, ion cyclotron waves are also observed near the gyrofrequency of a 32 AMU ion, suggesting production of O2+. While observed, O2+ is a very low abundance species outside of 4 Saturn radii, and in the regions where these waves are present. Finally, strong but linearly polarized waves are sometimes observed near the orbit of Enceladus. The association between these waves and W+ ion cyclotron waves is unclear. We will present the measurements of these ULF waves, their frequency of occurrence with respect to position and time, and discuss their implications for plasma production in Saturn's magnetosphere.

  9. Techniques and mechanisms applied in electron cyclotron resonance sources for highly charged ions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drentje, AG

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources are delivering beams of highly charged ions for a wide range of applications in many laboratories. For more than two decades, the development of these ion sources has been to a large extent an intuitive and experimental enterprise. Much effort has been spent

  10. Electron cyclotron emission measurements on JET: Michelson interferometer, new absolute calibration, and determination of electron temperature

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schmuck, S.; Fessey, J.; Gerbaud, T.; Alper, B.; Beurskens, M. N. A.; de la Luna, E.; Sirinelli, A.; Zerbini, M.

    2012-01-01

    At the fusion experiment JET, a Michelson interferometer is used to measure the spectrum of the electron cyclotron emission in the spectral range 70-500 GHz. The interferometer is absolutely calibrated using the hot/cold technique and, in consequence, the spatial profile of the plasma electron

  11. Three-dimensional simulations of ion dynamics in an Electron Cyclotron Resonance Ion Source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Beijers, J. P. M.; Mironov, V.

    We present a three-dimensional simulation of the ion dynamics in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source. Ion trajectories in the min-B field of the source are calculated taking ion-ion and electron-ion collisions into account. The electrons are not tracked but considered as a neutralizing

  12. Abrupt variation in ion current with biased disk voltage in the electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Taki, GS; Sarma, PR; Chakraborty, DK; Lhandari, RK; Ray, PK; Drentje, AG; Bhandari, R.K.

    The performance of the biased disk in the 6.4 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source at VECC, Kolkata was studied at a pressure of similar to 1 X 10(-7) Torr. We observed an abrupt variation of beam current with bias voltage. For low negative bias voltages (from 0 to -5 V) the beam current

  13. Experiments with biased cylinder in electron cyclotron resonance ion source (plenary)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drentje, AG; Kitagawa, A; Muramatsu, M; Ogawa, H; Sakamoto, Y

    The shape of the magnetic field of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) gives rise to different particle fluxes (losses) from the plasma to the end plates (mainly diffusion of electrons), and to the side walls (mainly ions). The electron fluxes to the injection end plate can be reduced

  14. Selective minority-ion heating in the afterglow of an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nadzeyka, A; Meyer, D; Barzangy, F; Drentje, AG; Wiesemann, K

    We report first experimental results on selective minority-ion heating in the afterglow mode of electron cyclotron resonance ion sources in Bochum and at the KVI (Groningen) in mixtures of Ar/O/He and in pure nitrogen. In addition we measured time resolved vacuum ultraviolet-line intensities of

  15. Isotopic anomaly for carbon ions in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Drentje, A. G.; Kitagawa, A.; Muramatsu, M.

    In many experiments methods were applied to increase the highly charged ion output from an electron cyclotron resonance ion source; the gas-mixing method is still generally being applied. The dominant role of the masses of the ions in the gas-mixture was apparent. Two basically differing mechanisms

  16. An overview of control system for the ITER electron cyclotron system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Purohit, D.; Bigelow, T.; Billava, D.; Bonicelli, T.; Caughman, J.; Darbos, C.; Denisov, G.; Gandini, F.; Gassmann, T.; Henderson, M.; Journeux, J. Y.; Kajiwara, K.; Kobayashi, N.; Nazare, C.; Oda, Y.; Omori, T.; Rao, S. L.; Rasmussen, D.; Ronden, D.; Saibene, G.; Sakamoto, K.; Sartori, F.; Takahashi, K.; Temkin, R.

    2011-01-01

    The ITER electron cyclotron (EC) system having capability of up to 26 MW generated power at 170 GHz is being procured by 5 domestic agencies via 10 procurement arrangements. This implies diverse types of equipment and complex interface management. It also places a challenge on control system

  17. Stability of electrostatic ion cyclotron waves in a multi-ion plasma†

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We have studied the stability of the electrostatic ion cyclotron wave in a plasma consisting of isotropic hydrogen ions (H+) and temperature-anisotropic positively. (O+) and negatively (O−) charged oxygen ions, with the electrons drifting parallel to the magnetic field. Analytical expressions have been derived for the ...

  18. Ion cyclotron waves during the Rosetta approach phase: a magnetic estimate of cometary outgassing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Volwerk

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available A theoretical model for the ion cyclotron wave generation during the approach phase of Rosetta to 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko is presented. For various activity levels of the comet, the crossing of the observational threshold is determined, whose level is derived from the wave power in the undisturbed solar wind near the comet's location during the approach phase at the appropriate frequency. The Giotto flyby at 27P/Grigg–Skjellerup is used to obtain an estimate of how often water-group ion cyclotron waves are observed, and to get insight into the wave forms. At 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko one can expect to observe water-group ion cyclotron waves already at a distance of 600 000 km from the nucleus for a nominal outgassing rate of Q = 350 × 1023 molecules per second. The observed first location of cyclotron waves during the Rosetta approach phase will give an indication of the actual outgassing rate of the comet.

  19. Graphical user interface for yield and dose estimations for cyclotron-produced technetium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, X.; Vuckovic, M.; Buckley, K.; Bénard, F.; Schaffer, P.; Ruth, T.; Celler, A.

    2014-07-01

    The cyclotron-based 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc reaction has been proposed as an alternative method for solving the shortage of 99mTc. With this production method, however, even if highly enriched molybdenum is used, various radioactive and stable isotopes will be produced simultaneously with 99mTc. In order to optimize reaction parameters and estimate potential patient doses from radiotracers labeled with cyclotron produced 99mTc, the yields for all reaction products must be estimated. Such calculations, however, are extremely complex and time consuming. Therefore, the objective of this study was to design a graphical user interface (GUI) that would automate these calculations, facilitate analysis of the experimental data, and predict dosimetry. The resulting GUI, named Cyclotron production Yields and Dosimetry (CYD), is based on Matlab®. It has three parts providing (a) reaction yield calculations, (b) predictions of gamma emissions and (c) dosimetry estimations. The paper presents the outline of the GUI, lists the parameters that must be provided by the user, discusses the details of calculations and provides examples of the results. Our initial experience shows that the proposed GUI allows the user to very efficiently calculate the yields of reaction products and analyze gamma spectroscopy data. However, it is expected that the main advantage of this GUI will be at the later clinical stage when entering reaction parameters will allow the user to predict production yields and estimate radiation doses to patients for each particular cyclotron run.

  20. Wide-aperture Nonintercepting Ionization Sensor For Cyclotron Beam Cross-section Control

    CERN Document Server

    Latushkin, S T; Unezhev, V N; Yudin, L

    2004-01-01

    A new construction of beam cross-section ionization sensor (BCSIS) for use with intense beams is proposed. The aperture of the sensor was increased up to 120×120 mm, and its field of vision - up to 60×60 mm. The sensor is functioning at cyclotron with proton beam energy 32 MeV and current 20 mcA.

  1. Low current performance of the Bern medical cyclotron down to the pA range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auger, M.; Braccini, S.; Ereditato, A.; Nesteruk, K. P.; Scampoli, P.

    2015-09-01

    A medical cyclotron accelerating H- ions to 18 MeV is in operation at the Bern University Hospital (Inselspital). It is the commercial IBA 18/18 cyclotron equipped with a specifically conceived 6 m long external beam line ending in a separate bunker. This feature is unique for a hospital-based facility and makes it possible to conduct routine radioisotope production for PET diagnostics in parallel with multidisciplinary research activities, among which are novel particle detectors, radiation biophysics, radioprotection, radiochemistry and radiopharmacy developments. Several of these activities, such as radiobiology experiments for example, require low current beams down to the pA range, while medical cyclotrons are designed for high current operation above 10 μA. In this paper, we present the first results on the low current performance of a PET medical cyclotron obtained by ion source, radio-frequency and main coil tuning. With this method, stable beam currents down to (1.5+/- 0.5 ) pA were obtained and measured with a high-sensitivity Faraday cup located at the end of the beam transport line.

  2. A remotely steered millimetre wave launcher for electron cyclotron heating and current drive on ITER

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bongers, W. A.; M. F. Graswinckel,; Goede, A. P. H.; Kasparek, W.; Danilov, I.; Curto, A. F.; M.R. de Baar,; van den Berg, M. A.; Donne, A. J. H.; Elzendoorn, B. S. Q.; Heidinger, R.; Ivanov, P.; Kruijt, O. G.; Lamers, B.; Meier, A.; Piosczyk, B.; Plaum, B.; Ronden, D. M. S.; Thoen, D. J.; Schmid, M.; Verhoeven, A. G. A.

    2010-01-01

    High-power millimetre wave beams employed on ITER for heating and Current drive at the 170 GHz electron cyclotron resonance frequency require agile steering and tight focusing of the beams to suppress neoclassical tearing modes. This paper presents experimental validation of the remote steering (RS)

  3. Self-Assembly by Instruction: Designing Nanoscale Systems Using DNA-Based Approaches (474th Brookhaven Lecture)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gang, Oleg [Center for Functional Nanomaterials

    2012-01-18

    In the field of nanoscience, if you can control how nanoparticles self-assemble in particular structures — joining each other, for example, as molecules can form, atom-by-atom — you can design new materials that have unique properties that industry needs. Nature already uses the DNA genetic code to instruct the building of specific proteins and whole organisms in both plants and people. Taking a cue from nature, scientists at BNL devised a way of using strands of synthetic DNA attached to the surface of nanoparticles to instruct them to self-assemble into specific nanoscale structures, clusters, and three-dimensional organizations. Novel materials designed and fabricated this way promise use in photovoltaics, energy storage, catalysis, cell-targeted systems for more effective medical treatments, and biomolecular sensing for environmental monitoring and medical applications. To find out more about the rapid evolution of this nanoassembly method and its applications, join Physicist Oleg Gang of the Center for Functional Nanomaterials (CFN) as he gives the 474th Brookhaven Lecture, titled “Self-Assembly by Instruction: Designing Nanoscale Systems Using DNA-Based Approaches." Gang, who has led this work at the CFN, will explain the rapid evolution of this nanoassembly method, and discuss its present and future applications in highly specific biosensors, optically active nano-materials, and new ways to fabricate complex architectures in a rational manner via self-assembly. Gang and his colleagues used the CFN and the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) facilities to perform their groundbreaking research. At the CFN, the scientists used electron microscopes and optical methods to visualize the clusters that they fabricated. At the NSLS, they applied x-rays to study a particles-assembly process in solution, DNA’s natural environment. Gang earned a Ph.D. in soft matter physics from Bar-Ilan University in 2000, and he was a Rothschild Fellow at Harvard

  4. Application of the SmartSampling Methodology to the Evaluation of Contaminated Landscape Soils at Brookhaven National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    RAUTMAN,CHRISTOPHER A.

    2000-08-01

    Portions of the SmartSampling{trademark} analysis methodology have been applied to the evaluation of radioactive contaminated landscape soils at Brookhaven National Laboratory. Specifically, the spatial, volumetric distribution of cesium-137 ({sup 137}Cs) contamination within Area of Concern 16E-1 has been modeled probabilistically using a geostatistical methodology, with the purpose of identifying the likelihood of successfully reducing, with respect to a pre-existing, baseline remediation plan, the volume of soil that must be disposed of offsite during clean-up. The principal objective of the analysis was to evaluate the likelihood of successful deployment of the Segmented Gate System (SGS), a novel remediation approach that emphasizes real-time separation of clean from contaminated materials during remediation operations. One primary requirement for successful application of the segmented gate technology investigated is that a variety of contaminant levels exist at the deployment site, which would enable to the SGS to discriminate material above and below a specified remediation threshold value. The results of this analysis indicate that there is potential for significant volume reduction with respect to the baseline remediation plan at a threshold excavation level of 23 pCi/g {sup 137}Cs. A reduction of approximately 50%, from a baseline volume of approximately 1,064.7 yd{sup 3} to less than 550 yd{sup 3}, is possible with acceptance of only a very small level of engineering risk. The vast majority of this volume reduction is obtained by not excavating almost all of levels 3 and 4 (from 12 to 24 inches in depth), which appear to be virtually uncontaminated, based on the available data. Additional volume reductions related to soil materials on levels 1 (depths of 0--6 inches) and 2 (6--12 inches) may be possible, specifically through use of the SGS technology. Level-by-level evaluation of simulation results suggests that as much as 26 percent of level 1 and as

  5. Proceedings of RIKEN BNL Research Center Workshop: Brookhaven Summer Program on Quarkonium Production in Elementary and Heavy Ion Collisions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumitru, A.; Lourenco, C.; Petreczky, P.; Qiu, J., Ruan, L.

    2011-08-03

    Understanding the structure of the hadron is of fundamental importance in subatomic physics. Production of heavy quarkonia is arguably one of the most fascinating subjects in strong interaction physics. It offers unique perspectives into the formation of QCD bound states. Heavy quarkonia are among the most studied particles both theoretically and experimentally. They have been, and continue to be, the focus of measurements in all high energy colliders around the world. Because of their distinct multiple mass scales, heavy quarkonia were suggested as a probe of the hot quark-gluon matter produced in heavy-ion collisions; and their production has been one of the main subjects of the experimental heavy-ion programs at the SPS and RHIC. However, since the discovery of J/psi at Brookhaven National Laboratory and SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory over 36 years ago, theorists still have not been able to fully understand the production mechanism of heavy quarkonia, although major progresses have been made in recent years. With this in mind, a two-week program on quarkonium production was organized at BNL on June 6-17, 2011. Many new experimental data from LHC and from RHIC were presented during the program, including results from the LHC heavy ion run. To analyze and correctly interpret these measurements, and in order to quantify properties of the hot matter produced in heavy-ion collisions, it is necessary to improve our theoretical understanding of quarkonium production. Therefore, a wide range of theoretical aspects on the production mechanism in the vacuum as well as in cold nuclear and hot quark-gluon medium were discussed during the program from the controlled calculations in QCD and its effective theories such as NRQCD to various models, and to the first principle lattice calculation. The scientific program was divided into three major scientific parts: basic production mechanism for heavy quarkonium in vacuum or in high energy elementary collisions; the

  6. Radiologic assessment of a self-shield with boron-containing water for a compact medical cyclotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horitsugi, Genki; Fujibuchi, Toshioh; Yamaguchi, Ichiro; Eto, Akihisa; Iwamoto, Yasuo; Hashimoto, Hiromi; Hamada, Seiki; Obara, Satoshi; Watanabe, Hiroshi; Hatazawa, Jun

    2012-07-01

    The cyclotron at our hospital has a self-shield of boron-containing water. The amount of induced radioactivity in the boron-containing water shield of a compact medical cyclotron has not yet been reported. In this study, we measured the photon and neutron dose rates outside the self-shield during cyclotron operation. We estimated the induced radioactivities of the boron-containing water used for the self-shield and then measured them. We estimated the activation of concrete outside the self-shield in the cyclotron laboratory. The thermal neutron flux during cyclotron operation was estimated to be 4.72 × 10(2) cm(-2) s(-1), and the activation of concrete in a cyclotron laboratory was about three orders of magnitude lower than the clearance level of RS-G-1.7 (IAEA). The activity concentration of the boron-containing water did not exceed the concentration limit for radioactive isotopes in drainage in Japan and the exemption level for Basic Safety Standards. Consequently, the boron-containing water is treatable as non-radioactive waste. Neutrons were effectively shielded by the self-shield during cyclotron operation.

  7. A Kinetic Model of Solar Wind Generation by Oblique Ion-cyclotron Waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isenberg, Philip A.; Vasquez, Bernard J.

    2011-04-01

    The fast solar wind is generated by extended perpendicular ion heating in coronal holes, but the kinetic mechanism responsible for this heating has not been determined. One long-standing possibility is the resonant-cyclotron dissipation of ion-cyclotron waves, replenished from a turbulent cascade of interacting counter-propagating Alfvén waves. We present results of a kinetic model for proton heating by the quasilinear resonant-cyclotron wave-particle interaction in a coronal hole. The resonant wave spectrum is taken as a power law in wavenumber, uniformly distributed in propagation direction between 0° and 60° with respect to the large-scale radial magnetic field. We obtain the steady-state solution of the kinetic guiding-center equation for the proton distribution in an expanding coronal hole, including the effects of large-scale forces of gravity, charge-separation electric field, Alfvén wave ponderomotive force, and mirror force, along with the small-scale scattering from the wave dissipation. We find that plausible wave intensities can yield reasonable flow speeds and temperatures in the heliocentric radial range between 2 and 6 solar radii. We address the claim in earlier work that dissipation of parallel-propagating ion-cyclotron waves cannot provide enough acceleration and show that claim to be incorrect. We find that the combined action of the large-scale forces and the resonant-cyclotron scattering produces proton distribution functions with a characteristic structure: compressed in the sunward half of velocity space with a high-density shell separate from the origin, and relatively expanded in the anti-sunward half of velocity space. We suggest that qualitatively similar proton distributions would result from the kinetic evolution of any sufficiently effective perpendicular heating mechanism operating in an expanding coronal hole.

  8. Experimental measurement and Monte Carlo assessment of Argon-41 production in a PET cyclotron facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Infantino, Angelo; Valtieri, Lorenzo; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Pancaldi, Davide; Mostacci, Domiziano; Marengo, Mario

    2015-12-01

    In a medical cyclotron facility, (41)Ar (t1/2 = 109.34 m) is produced by the activation of air due to the neutron flux during irradiation, according to the (40)Ar(n,γ)(41)Ar reaction; this is particularly relevant in widely diffused high beam current cyclotrons for the production of PET radionuclides. While theoretical estimations of the (41)Ar production have been published, no data are available on direct experimental measurements for a biomedical cyclotron. In this work, we describe a sampling methodology and report the results of an extensive measurement campaign. Furthermore, the experimental results are compared with Monte Carlo simulations performed with the FLUKA code. To measure (41)Ar activity, air samples were taken inside the cyclotron bunker in sealed Marinelli beakers, during the routine production of (18)F with a 16.5 MeV GE-PETtrace cyclotron; this sampling thus reproduces a situation of absence of air changes. Samples analysis was performed in a gamma-ray spectrometry system equipped with HPGe detector. Monte Carlo assessment of the (41)Ar saturation yield was performed directly using the standard FLUKA score RESNUCLE, and off-line by the convolution of neutron fluence with cross section data. The average (41)Ar saturation yield per one liter of air of (41)Ar, measured in gamma-ray spectrometry, resulted to be 3.0 ± 0.6 Bq/µA*dm(3) while simulations gave a result of 6.9 ± 0.3 Bq/µA*dm(3) in the direct assessment and 6.92 ± 0.22 Bq/µA*dm(3) by the convolution neutron fluence-to-cross section. Copyright © 2015 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Production of high intensity 48Ca for the 88-Inch Cyclotron and other updates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, J Y; Franzen, K Y; Hodgkinson, A; Lyneis, C M; Strohmeier, M; Thullier, T; Todd, D; Xie, D

    2014-02-01

    Recently the Versatile ECR for NUclear Science (VENUS) ion source was engaged in a 60-day long campaign to deliver high intensity (48)Ca(11+) beam to the 88-Inch Cyclotron. As the first long term use of VENUS for multi-week heavy-element research, new methods were developed to maximize oven to target efficiency. First, the tuning parameters of VENUS for injection into the cyclotron proved to be very different than those used to tune VENUS for maximum beam output of the desired charge state immediately following its bending magnet. Second, helium with no oxygen support gas was used to maximize the efficiency. The performance of VENUS and its low temperature oven used to produce the stable requested 75 eμA of (48)Ca(11+) beam current was impressive. The consumption of (48)Ca in VENUS using the low temperature oven was checked roughly weekly, and was found to be on average 0.27 mg/h with an ionization efficiency into the 11+ charge state of 5.0%. No degradation in performance was noted over time. In addition, with the successful operation of VENUS the 88-Inch cyclotron was able to extract a record 2 pμA of (48)Ca(11+), with a VENUS output beam current of 219 eμA. The paper describes the characteristics of the VENUS tune used for maximum transport efficiency into the cyclotron as well as ongoing efforts to improve the transport efficiency from VENUS into the cyclotron. In addition, we briefly present details regarding the recent successful repair of the cryostat vacuum system.

  10. Brookhaven highlights 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1994-12-31

    Established in 1947 on Long Island, New York, on the site of the former army Camp Upton, BNL is a multidisciplinary laboratory that carries out basic and applied research in the physical, biomedical and environmental sciences and in selected energy technologies. The Laboratory is managed by Associated Universities, Inc., under contract to the US Department of Energy. BNL`s annual budget is about $400 million, and the Laboratory`s facilities are valued at replacements cost in excess of over $2.8 billion. Employees number around 3,300,and over 4,000 guests, collaborators and students come each year to use the Laboratory`s facilities and work with the staff. Scientific and technical achievements at BNL have made their way into daily life in areas as varied as health care, construction materials and video games. The backbone of these developments is fundamental research, which is and always will be an investment in the future.

  11. Cyclotron resonance in InAs/AlSb quantum wells in magnetic fields up to 45 T

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spirin, K. E., E-mail: spirink@ipmras.ru; Krishtopenko, S. S. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation); Sadofyev, Yu. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Lebedev Physical Institute (Russian Federation); Drachenko, O. [Laboratoire National des Champs Magn’etiques Intenses (France); Helm, M. [Forschungszentrum Dresden–Rossendorf, Dresden High-Magnetic-Field Laboratory and Institute of Ion-Beam Physics and Materials Research (Germany); Teppe, F.; Knap, W. [GIS-TERALAB Universite Montpellier II, Laboratoire Charles Coulomb UMR CNRS 5221 (L2C) (France); Gavrilenko, V. I. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Institute for Physics of Microstructures (Russian Federation)

    2015-12-15

    Electron cyclotron resonance in InAs/AlSb heterostructures with quantum wells of various widths in pulsed magnetic fields up to 45 T are investigated. Our experimental cyclotron energies are in satisfactory agreement with the results of theoretical calculations performed using the eight-band kp Hamiltonian. The shift of the cyclotron resonance (CR) line, which corresponds to the transition from the lowest Landau level to the low magnetic-field region, is found upon varying the electron concentration due to the negative persistent photoconductivity effect. It is shown that the observed shift of the CR lines is associated with the finite width of the density of states at the Landau levels.

  12. Ion cyclotron waves at unmagnetized bodies: a comparison of Mars, Venus and Titan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, H.; Russell, C. T.; Cowee, M.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Zhang, T.; Dougherty, M. K.

    2009-12-01

    Mars, Venus and Titan do not have appreciable global magnetic fields. Their high-altitude neutral atmospheres are not shielded from being lost to the solar wind and the Saturnian magnetosphere. When the atmospheric hydrogen atoms of Mars and Venus are ionized and picked up by the solar wind, proton cyclotron waves are created from the free energy of the ring-beam distribution of the pick-up ions. At Mars, proton cyclotron waves observed by Mars Global Surveyor extend from the magnetosheath to over 12 Mars radii, with intermittent occurrence and amplitudes slowly varying with distance. The wave occurrence pattern indicates a disk-shaped hydrogen exosphere of Mars with asymmetry in the direction of the interplanetary electric field. Fast neutrals produced by neutralization of the pickup ions can travel across fieldlines to distant regions where they get re-ionized and produce waves far downstream. Thus the top of Mars exosphere extends in a disk to high altitude, with its orientation controlled by the interplanetary magnetic field. At Venus, plasma waves having properties similar to ion cyclotron waves are observed in the solar wind around the planet by Venus Express, with wave frequencies that range from 0.2 to 5.9 times of the proton gyrofrequency. Statistical study shows that the waves with frequency higher than 1.5 times the proton gyrofrequency are not generated locally and are similar to the waves observed at 0.3 AU and 1 AU which appear to be created near the Sun and convected outward with the solar wind. The rest of the waves are mostly magnetically connected to the bow shock, so they are probably generated by particles backstreaming from the shock and propagate out further from the foreshock. At Titan, ion cyclotron waves are not observed although wave generation is expected due to the large pickup rate of hydrocarbon ions at high altitude of Titan. We attempt to understand the lack of ion cyclotron waves at Titan using hybrid simulations. Studying and

  13. The ion cyclotron turbulence generated by a low frequency kinetic Alfvén wave and turbulent heating of ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikhailenko, V. S.; Mikhailenko, V. V.; Lee, Hae June

    2018-01-01

    The ion cyclotron instability driven by a strong kinetic Alfvén wave is investigated as a possible source of anisotropic heating of ions in the sun's corona. We present a novel model of a plasma with coupled inhomogeneous current and shearing flow, which results from the particle's motion in the electric field of the kinetic Alfvén wave of finite wavelength. The investigation is performed employing the non-modal kinetic theory grounded on the shearing mode approach. The solution of the governing linear integral equation for the perturbed potential displays that the flow velocity shear, which for the corona conditions may be above the growth rate of the ion cyclotron instability in the plasma with steady current, changes the exponential growth of the ion cyclotron potential on the power function of time, that impedes the growth of the unstable ion cyclotron wave and reduces the turbulent heating rate of ions across the magnetic field.

  14. A simple and powerful XY-Type current monitor for 30 MeV IPEN/CNEN-SP cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barcellos, Henrique; Matsuda, Hylton; Sumyia, Luiz Carlos do A.; Junqueira, Fernando de C.; Costa, Osvaldo L. da, E-mail: hbolivei@ipen.br [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN/CNEN-SP), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)

    2017-11-01

    A water-cooled XY-type current monitor was designed and built in the Cyclotrons Laboratory of the Nuclear and Energy Research Institute (IPEN). It is a very simple design and easily adaptable to the cyclotron beam lines. Tests were done demonstrating to be an instrument of great assistance in proton beam position along beam transport line and target port. Nowadays the XY-type current monitor has been widely used in {sup 18}F-FDG routine productions, employing irradiation system which were originally designed for productions on 18 MeV cyclotron accelerator only, however, applying the XY-type current monitor the target port may be exchanged between the 30 MeV and 18 MeV cyclotrons and the observed results are in perfect agreement with expected. (author)

  15. Observation of quasi-periodic frequency sweeping in electron cyclotron emission of nonequilibrium mirror-confined plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Viktorov, M E; Mansfeld, D A; Golubev, S V

    2016-01-01

    Chirping frequency patterns have been observed in the electron cyclotron emission from strongly nonequilibrium plasma confined in a table-top mirror magnetic trap. Such patterns are typical for the formation of nonlinear phase space structures in a proximity of the wave-particle resonances of a kinetically unstable plasma, also known as the "holes and clumps" mechanism. Our data provides the first experimental evidence for acting of this mechanism in the electron cyclotron frequency domain.

  16. The high-order cyclotron modes in Fermi liquid of Q2D layered conductors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.V.Kirichenko

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The propagation of electromagnetic waves in layered conductors at the presence of an external magnetic field is investigated theoretically. At certain orientations of a magnetic field concerning the layers of the conductor the collisionless absorption is absent and weakly damping collective modes can propagate even under the strong spatial dispersion. In a short-wave limit the existence of electromagnetic waves with frequencies near the cyclotron resonances is possible at an arbitrary orientation of the wave vector with respect to an external magnetic field. We have obtained the spectrum of waves with the frequencies near the cyclotron resonances of high order with regard to the Fermi-liquid interaction of the electrons.

  17. The design of a correlation electron cyclotron emission system on J-TEXT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Z. J.; Xiao, Y.; Ma, X. D.; Pan, X. M.; Xiao, J. S. [State Key Laboratory of Advanced Electromagnetic Engineering and Technology, School of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China)

    2015-04-15

    To study the anomalous transport, a correlation electron cyclotron emission (CECE) was planned to be developed on J-TEXT for electron temperature fluctuation measurement. The spectral decorrelation method was employed for the CECE system. It was developed based on the previous 16-channel electron cyclotron emission system. They shared the optical transmission line and mixer. The CECE part consists of 4 channels. Two fixed frequency narrow band filters were used for two channels and two yttrium iron garnet (YIG) filters for the other two channels. To meet the measuring requirement, some tests have been taken for the YIG filters. The results show good performance of the filters. Gaussian optics is used to produce a good poloidal resolution. Wavenumbers resolved by the CECE diagnostic are k{sub θ} ≤ 1.5 rad/cm and k{sub r} ≤ 12 rad/cm. Some preliminary experiment results are also presented in this paper.

  18. Electrostatic Electron Cyclotron Waves Observed by the Plasma Wave Instrument on Board Polar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menietti, J. D.; Pickett, J. S.; Gurnett, D. A.; Scudder, J. D.

    2001-01-01

    We report the results of an investigation of waves observed by the Polar spacecraft at high altitudes and latitudes and at frequencies just above the cyclotron frequency. These observations are made frequently when the spacecraft is over the polar cap as well as near the dayside cusp and near the nightside auroral region, and observations are made for ratios of plasma frequency to cyclotron frequency, f(sub p)/f(sub c) = 1. Using the six-channel high-frequency waveform receiver (HFWR) on board the spacecraft, which can provide three-axis electric and three-axis magnetic field measurements, we attempt to identify the wavemode of these emissions and investigate possible source mechanisms including low-energy electron beams. We further observe electromagnetic emission associated with upper hybrid waves near and within the plasmasphere. This emission is consistent with both Z and O modes.

  19. Lorentz force in water: evidence that hydronium cyclotron resonance enhances polymorphism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Emilia, E; Giuliani, L; Lisi, A; Ledda, M; Grimaldi, S; Montagnier, L; Liboff, A R

    2015-01-01

    There is an ongoing question regarding the structure forming capabilities of water at ambient temperatures. To probe for different structures, we studied effects in pure water following magnetic field exposures corresponding to the ion cyclotron resonance of H3O(+). Included were measurements of conductivity and pH. We find that under ion cyclotron resonance (ICR) stimulation, water undergoes a transition to a form that is hydroxonium-like, with the subsequent emission of a transient 48.5 Hz magnetic signal, in the absence of any other measurable field. Our results indicate that hydronium resonance stimulation alters the structure of water, enhancing the concentration of EZ-water. These results are not only consistent with Del Giudice's model of electromagnetically coherent domains, but they can also be interpreted to show that these domains exist in quantized spin states.

  20. Cyclotron-produced radioisotopes and their clinical use at the Austin PET Centre

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tochon-Danguy, H.J. [Centre for PET, Melbourne, VIC (Australia). Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre

    1997-12-31

    A Centre for Positron Emission Tomography (PET) has been established within the Department of Nuclear Medicine at the Austin and Repatriation Medical Centre in Melbourne. PET is a non-invasive technique based on the use of biologically relevant compounds labelled with short-lived positron-emitting radionuclides such as carbon-11, nitrogen-13, oxygen-15 and fluorine-18. The basic equipment consists of a medical cyclotron (10 MeV proton and 5 MeV deuteron), six lead-shielded hot cells with associated radiochemistry facilities and a whole body PET scanner. During its first five years of operation, the Melbourne PET Centre, has pursued a strong radiolabelling development program, leading to an ambitious clinical program in neurology, oncology and cardiology. This presentation will describe the basic principles of the PET technique and review the cyclotron-produced radioisotopes and radiopharmaceuticals. Radiolabelling development programs and clinical applications are also addressed. 30 refs., 1 tab., 1 fig.

  1. Sensitive test for ion-cyclotron resonant heating in the solar wind.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasper, Justin C; Maruca, Bennett A; Stevens, Michael L; Zaslavsky, Arnaud

    2013-03-01

    Plasma carrying a spectrum of counterpropagating field-aligned ion-cyclotron waves can strongly and preferentially heat ions through a stochastic Fermi mechanism. Such a process has been proposed to explain the extreme temperatures, temperature anisotropies, and speeds of ions in the solar corona and solar wind. We quantify how differential flow between ion species results in a Doppler shift in the wave spectrum that can prevent this strong heating. Two critical values of differential flow are derived for strong heating of the core and tail of a given ion distribution function. Our comparison of these predictions to observations from the Wind spacecraft reveals excellent agreement. Solar wind helium that meets the condition for strong core heating is nearly 7 times hotter than hydrogen on average. Ion-cyclotron resonance contributes to heating in the solar wind, and there is a close link between heating, differential flow, and temperature anisotropy.

  2. Initial operation of the Sherbrooke EBCO 19 MeV cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdman, K.L.; Cackette, M.; Dehnel, M.P.; Gyles, W.; Johnson, R.R.; Kovac, B.; Popa, I.; Sabaiduc, V.; Watt, R.; Sliwinski, A. [EBCO Technologies Inc., Richmond BC (Canada); Van Lier, J.E. [Sherbrooke Univ., PQ (Canada). Faculte de Medicine

    1999-07-01

    A variable energy TR19 cyclotron built by EBCO Technologies was installed and commissioned at the Centre Hospitalier Universite de Sherbrooke at the end of 1997. This negative ion cyclotron is capable of accelerating a 150 {mu}Amp of protons to over 19 MeV energy and two simultaneous beams of protons of energies between 13 and 19 MeV can be extracted on opposite sides of the magnet. A novel target changer permits the positioning of the variable energy beams, which leave the magnet at different angles, into long gaseous targets. Properties of the beams used for the production of both PET and SPECT isotopes, made possible by the variable energy feature, are discussed. (authors)

  3. Studies on a Q/A selector for the SECRAL electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Y; Sun, L T; Feng, Y C; Fang, X; Lu, W; Zhang, W H; Cao, Y; Zhang, X Z; Zhao, H W

    2014-08-01

    Electron cyclotron resonance ion sources are widely used in heavy ion accelerators in the world because they are capable of producing high current beams of highly charged ions. However, the design of the Q/A selector system for these devices is challenging, because it must have a sufficient ion resolution while controlling the beam emittance growth. Moreover, this system has to be matched for a wide range of ion beam species with different intensities. In this paper, research on the Q/A selector system at the SECRAL (Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou) platform both in experiment and simulation is presented. Based on this study, a new Q/A selector system has been designed for SECRAL II. The features of the new design including beam simulations are also presented.

  4. Results of RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with 28 GHz.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higurashi, Y; Ohnishi, J; Nakagawa, T; Haba, H; Tamura, M; Aihara, T; Fujimaki, M; Komiyama, M; Uchiyama, A; Kamigaito, O

    2012-02-01

    We measured the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions and x-ray heat load for RIKEN superconducting electron cyclotron resonance ion source with 28 GHz microwaves under the various conditions. The beam intensity of Xe(20+) became maximum at B(min) ∼ 0.65 T, which was ∼65% of the magnetic field strength of electron cyclotron resonance (B(ECR)) for 28 GHz microwaves. We observed that the heat load of x-ray increased with decreasing gas pressure and field gradient at resonance zone. It seems that the beam intensity of highly charged heavy ions with 28 GHz is higher than that with 18 GHz at same RF power.

  5. Observation of ion-cyclotron-frequency mode-conversion flow drive in tokamak plasmas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Y; Rice, J E; Wukitch, S J; Greenwald, M J; Hubbard, A E; Ince-Cushman, A; Lin, L; Porkolab, M; Reinke, M L; Tsujii, N

    2008-12-05

    Strong toroidal flow (Vphi) and poloidal flow (Vtheta) have been observed in D-3He plasmas with ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) mode-conversion (MC) heating on the Alcator C-Mod tokamak. The toroidal flow scales with the rf power Prf (up to 30 km/s per MW), and is significantly larger than that in ICRF minority heated plasmas at the same rf power or stored energy. The central Vphi responds to Prf faster than the outer regions, and the Vphi(r) profile is broadly peaked for r/a or =1.5 MW and increases with power (up to 0.7 km/s per MW). The experimental evidence together with numerical wave modeling suggests a local flow drive source due to the interaction between the MC ion cyclotron wave and 3He ions.

  6. Cyclotron production of Ga-68 for human use from liquid targets: From theory to practice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, F.; Alves, V. H.; Neves, A. C. B.; do Carmo, S. J. C.; Nactergal, B.; Hellas, V.; Kral, E.; Gonçalves-Gameiro, C.; Abrunhosa, A. J.

    2017-05-01

    A fully automated system for the production of 68Ga based on commercially available cyclotron liquid target and synthesis modules is described. A solution containing enriched 68Zn dissolved in a nitric solution is irradiated in a Cyclone 18/9 IBA cyclotron leading to the production of up to about 25 GBq of 68Ga. The irradiated solution is transferred to a Synthera synthesis module in which 68Ga is separated and purified with a yield superior to 85 % and where further labelling is achieved with yields no inferior to 70 %. The developed and implemented method presents an improved approach for the production of 68Ga-radiopharmaceuticals suitable for human use, in a process that takes less than 2 hours. This technique represents an economically viable alternative to 68Ge/68Ga generators with improved characteristics.

  7. Van Allen Probes observations of oxygen cyclotron harmonic waves in the inner magnetosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usanova, M.; Malaspina, D.; Jaynes, A. N.; Bruder, R.; Mann, I. R.; Wygant, J. R.; Ergun, R.

    2016-12-01

    Waves with frequencies in the vicinity of the oxygen cyclotron frequency and its harmonics have been regularly observed on the Van Allen Probes satellites during geomagnetic storms. We focus on properties of these waves and present events from the main phase of two storms on November 1, 2012 and March 17, 2013 and associated dropouts of few MeV electron fluxes. They are electromagnetic, in the frequency range 0.5 - several Hz, and amplitude 0.1- a few nT in magnetic and 0.1- a few mV/m in electric field, with both the wave velocity and the Poynting vector directed almost parallel to the background magnetic field. These properties are very similar to those of electromagnetic ion cyclotron (EMIC) waves, which are believed to contribute to loss of ring current ions and radiation belt electrons and therefore can be also important for inner magnetosphere dynamics.

  8. Gamma ray facilities at the University of Maryland cyclotron. [data acquisition and radiation measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hornyak, W. F.

    1978-01-01

    A special beam line was set up in a separate shielded experimental room to provide a low background station for gamma-ray measurements at the University of Maryland cyclotron. The transmitted beam leaving the target is gathered in by a magnetic quadrupole lens located 1.8 m further downstream and focused on a Faraday cup located on the far side of the 2.5 m thick concrete shielding wall of the experimental room. A software computer program permits timing information ot be obtained using the cyclotron beam fine structure as a time reference for the observed gamma-ray events. Measurements indicate a beam fine structure width of less than 1.2 nanoseconds repeated, for example, in the case of 140 MeV alpha particles every 90 nanoseconds. Twelve contiguous time channels of adjustable width may be set as desired with reference to the RF signal. This allows the creation of 12 separate 8192 channel analyzers.

  9. Understanding the bursty electron cyclotron emission during a sawtooth crash in the HT-7 tokamak

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Erzhong, E-mail: rzhonglee@ipp.ac.cn; Hu, Liqun; Chen, Kaiyun [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Science, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2014-01-15

    Bursts in electron cyclotron emission (ECE) were observed during sawtooth crashes in HT-7 in discharges with ion cyclotron resonance heating injected near the q = 1 rational surface (q is the safety factor). The local ECE measurement indicated that the bursty radiation is only observed on channels near but a little away outward from the q = 1 magnetic surface. In conjunction with the soft x-ray tomography analysis, it was determined that, for the first time, only a compression process survives in the later stage of fast magnetic reconnection but before prompt heat transport. The compression enhanced the electron radiation temperature, the increased amplitude of which agreed well with the estimation according to a kinetic compression theory model [R. J. Hastie and T. C. Hender, Nucl. Fusion 28, 585 (1988)]. This paper presents the experimental evidence that there indeed exists a transient compression phase which results in the bursty ECE radiation during a sawtooth crash.

  10. Understanding the bursty electron cyclotron emission during a sawtooth crash in the HT-7 tokamak

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Erzhong; Hu, Liqun; Chen, Kaiyun

    2014-01-01

    Bursts in electron cyclotron emission (ECE) were observed during sawtooth crashes in HT-7 in discharges with ion cyclotron resonance heating injected near the q = 1 rational surface (q is the safety factor). The local ECE measurement indicated that the bursty radiation is only observed on channels near but a little away outward from the q = 1 magnetic surface. In conjunction with the soft x-ray tomography analysis, it was determined that, for the first time, only a compression process survives in the later stage of fast magnetic reconnection but before prompt heat transport. The compression enhanced the electron radiation temperature, the increased amplitude of which agreed well with the estimation according to a kinetic compression theory model [R. J. Hastie and T. C. Hender, Nucl. Fusion 28, 585 (1988)]. This paper presents the experimental evidence that there indeed exists a transient compression phase which results in the bursty ECE radiation during a sawtooth crash.

  11. Spin-orbit splitting of the cyclotron resonance in GaAs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tonello, P.; Lipparini, E.

    2004-08-01

    We have studied the relevance of spin-orbit coupling to the splitting of the cyclotron resonance of electron space-charge layers in GaAs recently observed by Manger [Phys. Rev. B 63, 121203R (2001)]. We show that the spin-orbit interaction couples density and spin-density excitations in the long-wavelength limit and is able to explain all the features observed in the experiment.

  12. SPES: A new cyclotron-based facility for research and applications with high-intensity beams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggiore, M.; Campo, D.; Antonini, P.; Lombardi, A.; Manzolaro, M.; Andrighetto, A.; Monetti, A.; Scarpa, D.; Esposito, J.; Silvestrin, L.

    2017-06-01

    In 2016, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (Italy) started the commissioning of a new accelerator facility based on a high-power cyclotron able to deliver proton beams up to 70 MeV of energy and 700 μA current. Such a machine is the core of the Selective Production of Exotic Species (SPES) project whose main goal is to provide exotics beam for nuclear and astrophysics research and to deliver high-intensity proton beams for medical applications and neutrons generator.

  13. Cyclotron production of no-carrier-added palladium-103 by bombardment of rhodium-103 target.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chunfu, Z; Yongxian, W; Yongping, Z; Xiuli, Z

    2001-10-01

    Electroplated rhodium foil was employed as the target for cyclotron production of palladium-103. An electrodissolution apparatus was found better than other dissolution methods in terms of personnel shielding and palladium-103 yield. The ion-exchange column chromatography method was simple and effective for the purification of palladium-103 and the final stripping agent of NH4Cl + NH3(1:1) was more efficient than other agents.

  14. A real-time intercepting beam-profile monitor for a medical cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, C.; Uittenbosch, T.; Cameron, D.; Kellogg, S.; Gray, D.; Buckley, K.; Schaffer, P.; Verzilov, V.; Hoehr, C.

    2013-11-01

    There is a lack of real-time continuous beam-diagnostic tools for medical cyclotrons due to high power deposition during proton irradiation. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a profile monitor that is capable of providing continuous feedback about beam shape and current in real time while it is inserted in the beam path. This enables users to optimize the beam profile and observe fluctuations in the beam over time with periodic insertion of the monitor.

  15. Preliminary production of 211At at the Texas A&M University Cyclotron Institute.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Thomas Michael; Bhakta, Vihar; Al-Harbi, Abeer; Hackemack, Michael; Tabacaru, Gabriel; Tribble, Robert; Shankar, Sriram; Akabani, Gamal

    2014-07-01

    A feasibility study for the production of the alpha particle-emitting radionuclide At was performed at the Texas A&M University Cyclotron Institute as part of the Interdisciplinary Radioisotope Production and Radiochemistry Program. The mission of this program centers upon the production of radionuclides for use in diagnostic and therapeutic nuclear medicine with the primary focus on development of novel therapeutic strategies. As a first step in establishing this program, two goals were outlined: (i) verify production of At and compare results to published data, and (ii) evaluate shielding and radiological safety issues for large-scale implementation using an external target. The radionuclide At was produced via the Bi (α, 2n) At reaction using the K500 cyclotron. Two experiments were conducted, using beam energies of 27.8 MeV and 25.3 MeV, respectively. The resulting yields for At were found to be 36.0 MBq μA h and 12.4 MBq μA h, respectively, which fall within the range of published yield data. Strategies for increasing absolute yield and production efficiency were also evaluated, which focused chiefly on using a new target designed for use with the K150 cyclotron, which will enable the use of a higher beam current. Finally, neutron and gamma dose rates during production were evaluated by using the Monte Carlo code MCNPX. It was determined that a simple structure consisting of 4-in thick borated polyethylene will reduce the neutron dose rate within the cyclotron production vault by approximately a factor of 2, thereby decreasing activation of equipment.

  16. Parametric decay instability of an obliquely propagating ordinary wave in the electron cyclotron frequency range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gusakov, E. Z.; Popov, A. Yu.

    2018-01-01

    The possibility of the low-power-threshold parametric decay of an obliquely propagating ordinary wave to an upper hybrid wave and a low-hybrid wave is analysed under conditions of nonmonotonic plasma density profile in a magnetic trap. The instability threshold and growth rate are derived explicitly. The analytical results are illustrated under the conditions typical of the ordinary mode fundamental electron cyclotron resonance heating harmonic experiments at the FTU tokamak.

  17. A real-time intercepting beam-profile monitor for a medical cyclotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, C; Uittenbosch, T; Cameron, D; Kellogg, S; Gray, D; Buckley, K; Schaffer, P; Verzilov, V; Hoehr, C

    2013-11-01

    There is a lack of real-time continuous beam-diagnostic tools for medical cyclotrons due to high power deposition during proton irradiation. To overcome this limitation, we have developed a profile monitor that is capable of providing continuous feedback about beam shape and current in real time while it is inserted in the beam path. This enables users to optimize the beam profile and observe fluctuations in the beam over time with periodic insertion of the monitor.

  18. submitter Development of a Superconducting Magnet for a Compact Cyclotron for Radioisotope Production

    CERN Document Server

    Garcia-Tabares, Luis; Calero, Jesus; Gutierrez, Jose L; Munilla, Javier; Obradors, Diego; Perez, Jose M; Toral, Fernando; Iturbe, Rafael; Minguez, Leire; Gomez, Jose; Rodilla, Elena; Bajko, Marta; Michels, Matthias; Berkowitz, Daniel; Haug, Friedrich

    2016-01-01

    The present paper describes the development process of a low critical temperature superconducting magnet to be installed in a compact cyclotron producing single-dose radioisotopes for clinical and preclinical applications. After a brief description of the accelerator, the magnet development process is described, starting from the magnetic, mechanical, quench, and thermal calculations, continuing with the designing process, particularly the support structure of the magnet and the cryogenic supply system, to finish with the fabrication and the first tests than have been performed.

  19. The hydraulic lifting system for the main magnets of CYCIAE-30 cyclotron

    CERN Document Server

    Zhao Zhen Lu; Chen Rong Fan; Chu Cheng Jie

    2002-01-01

    The oil-line structure, control system and their working principles of the hydraulic lifting system for the main magnets of CYCIAE-30 cyclotron are introduced. The six years practice proves that the specification of the system matches the requirements: the oil cylinder maximum stroke of 850 mm, the eight slot positioning dowels repositioning accuracy of +-0.01 mm, the two oil cylinders moving in step accuracy of 5-10 mm. The system is safe, reliable and easy to be operated

  20. Use of maze in cyclotron hoppers; Utilizacao de labirinto em bunker de ciclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandes, Fernando A.; Alves, Juliano S.; Fochesatto, Cintia; Cerioli, Luciane; Borges, Joao Alfredo; Gonzalez, Delfin; Silva, Daniel C., E-mail: fernandofernandes@biofarmaco.com.br [Delfin Farmacos e Derivados (Biofarmaco Marcadores Moleculares), Lauro de Freitas, BA (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    Introduction: the increasing number of cyclotrons in Brazil due to constitutional amendment 49 /06 that enabled the production of radiopharmaceuticals with a short half - life by private companies. The radionuclides used for PET - CT require production centers near or within the diagnostic centers. In order to minimize maintenance and operating risks, gaining efficiency, our facility was the first in Brazil to use the access to a cyclotron bunker via maze, rather than armored door stopper type. Materials: the design calculations were based on the Monte Carlo method (MCNP5 - Monte Carlo N-Particletransportcode version 5). At the ends of the labyrinth are installed a door of polyethylene, for thermalization of neutrons, and other of wood for limiting access. Both legs of the maze have wall thickness of 100cm. In inspection Brazilian CNEN realize measures of dose rate for neutrons and gamma 9 points: 7 around the bunker, 1 over the bunker and 1 in the exhaust with the cyclotron operating with maximum load, double beam of 50uA for 2 hours. After commissioning were carried out around the bunker, the following measures: cumulative dose in three months with dosimeters for neutron rate dose with a gas proportional detector type filled with {sup 3}He and polyethylene neutron moderator and dose rate with a Geiger - Mueller detector for gamma radiation. Readings with neutron detectors were classified as background radiation and dose rates were always below the limits established in standard EN 3.01, and the calculation of the predicted regardless of the intensity of irradiation inside the bunker. Conclusion: the use of labyrinths as a way to access the bunkers cyclotron has been shown to be effective as the radiation shielding and efficient by allowing quick and easy access, virtually eliminating the maintenance.

  1. Comparison of Dispersion Model of Magneto-Acoustic Cyclotron Instability with Experimental Observation of 3He Ion Cyclotron Emission on JT-60U

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumida, Shuhei; Shinohara, Kouji; Ikezoe, Ryuya; Ichimura, Makoto; Sakamoto, Mizuki; Hirata, Mafumi; Ide, Shunsuke

    2017-12-01

    The Magneto-acoustic Cyclotron Instability (MCI) is a possible emission mechanism for Ion Cyclotron Emissions (ICEs). A dispersion model of the MCI driven by a drifting-ring-type ion velocity distribution has been proposed. In this study, the model was compared with the experimental observations of 3He ICEs [ICEs(3He)] on JT-60U. For this purpose, at first, velocity distributions of deuterium-deuterium fusion produced fast 3He ions at the time of an appearance of the ICE(3He) were evaluated by using a fast ion orbit following code under a realistic condition. The calculated distribution at the edge of the plasma on the midplane on the low field side is shown to have an inverted population and strong anisotropy. This distribution can be reasonably approximated by the drifting-ring-type distribution. Next, dispersions of the MCIs driven by the drifting-ring-type distribution were compared with those of observed ICEs(3He). The comparison shows that toroidal wavenumbers and frequencies of the calculated MCIs agree with those of the observed ICEs(3He).

  2. Electron Cloud Cyclotron Resonances in the Presence of a Short-bunch-length Relativistic Beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Celata, C.M.; Furman, Miguel A.; Vay, J.-L.; Yu, Jennifer W.

    2008-09-02

    Computer simulations using the 2D code"POSINST" were used to study the formation of the electron cloud in the wiggler section of the positron damping ring of the International Linear Collider. In order to simulate an x-y slice of the wiggler (i.e., a slice perpendicular to the beam velocity), each simulation assumed a constant vertical magnetic field. At values of the magnetic field where the cyclotron frequency was an integral multiple of the bunch frequency, and where the field strength was less than approximately 0.6 T, equilibrium average electron densities were up to three times the density found at other neighboring field values. Effects of this resonance between the bunch and cyclotron frequency are expected to be non-negligible when the beam bunch length is much less than the product of the electron cyclotron period and the beam velocity, for a beam moving at v~;;c. Details of the dynamics of the resonance are described.

  3. Cherenkov-cyclotron instability in a metamaterial loaded waveguide for high power generation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Xueying; Shapiro, Michael; Temkin, Richard

    2017-10-01

    This work presents the analytical theory for an S-band high power microwave experiment at MIT utilizing a metamaterial (MTM) structure. A 490 kV, 84 A electron beam travels through a rectangular waveguide loaded with two MTM plates in a DC magnetic field B0. The excited waveguide mode is deflecting with a transverse E field on beam axis. Microsecond long megawatt level microwave pulses were generated under a low B0 in the Cherenkov-cyclotron type of interaction. A linear theory has been developed to explain the high power generation due to the Cherenkov-cyclotron instability. The simplified model is a planar waveguide filled with a double negative dispersive medium, and in the mode being studied, the longitudinal E field has an antisymmetric pattern in the direction perpendicular to the MTM plates. We have proved that the Cherenkov-cyclotron instability can happen with a zero initial transverse beam velocity when B0 is below a threshold. Also this instability is a unique feature of the left-handed MTM, since it requires a propagating mode below the cut-off frequency. The minimum beam current to start the instability is calculated, and the scaling law different from that of the traditional backward wave oscillators operated by longitudinal bunching will be discussed. This research was supported by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research within the Multidisciplinary University Research Initiative under Grant No. FA9550-12-1-0489 through the University of New Mexico.

  4. Review on production of 89Zr in a medical cyclotron for PET radiopharmaceuticals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasbollah, Azahari; Eu, Peter; Cowell, Simon; Deb, Pradip

    2013-03-01

    This article is intended to provide an overview of the production and application of (89)Zr for the professional development of nuclear medicine technologists. It outlines the cyclotron targeting, separation and labeling options, and techniques for the preparation of the radionuclide (89)Zr (half-life, 78.4 h [3.3 d]) used in PET. Unlike the commonly used (18)F-FDG, with a 109.7-min half-life, the longer half-life of (89)Zr makes it possible to use high-resolution PET/CT to localize and image tumors with monoclonal antibody radiopharmaceuticals and thus potentially expand the use of PET. This paper briefly reviews the cyclotron technique of (89)Zr production and outlines the range and preparation techniques available for making (89)Y targets as a starting material. It then discusses how cyclotron-produced (89)Zr can be separated, purified, and labeled to monoclonal antibodies for PET/CT of specific tumors. We argue that knowledge and understanding of this long-lived PET radionuclide should be part of the professional development of nuclear medicine technologists because it will lead to better patient outcomes and potentially increase the pool of collaborators in this field of research.

  5. Ion cyclotron and spin-flip emissions from fusion products in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arunasalam, V.; Greene, G.J.; Young, K.M.

    1993-02-01

    Power emission by fusion products of tokamak plasmas in their ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) and at their spin-flip resonance frequency is calculated for some specific model fusion product velocity-space distribution functions. The background plasma of say deuterium (D) is assumed to be in equilibrium with a Maxwellian distribution both for the electrons and ions. The fusion product velocity distributions analyzed here are: (1) A monoenergetic velocity space ring distribution. (2) A monoenergetic velocity space spherical shell distribution. (3) An anisotropic Maxwellian distribution with T {perpendicular} {ne} T{parallel}and with appreciable drift velocity along the confining magnetic field. Single ``dressed`` test particle spontaneous emission calculations are presented first and the radiation temperature for ion cyclotron emission (ICE) is analyzed both for black-body emission and nonequilibrium conditions. Thresholds for instability and overstability conditions are then examined and quasilinear and nonlinear theories of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron modes are discussed. Distinctions between ``kinetic or causal instabilities`` and ``hydrodynamic instabilities`` are drawn and some numerical estimates are presented for typical tokamak parameters. Semiquantitative remarks are offered on wave accessibility, mode conversion, and parametric decay instabilities as possible for spatially localized ICE. Calculations are carried out both for k{parallel} = 0 for k{parallel} {ne} 0. The effects of the temperature anisotropy and large drift velocities in the parallel direction are also examined. Finally, proton spin-flip resonance emission and absorption calculations are also presented both for thermal equilibrium conditions and for an ``inverted`` population of states.

  6. Overview of the future upgrade of the INFN-LNS superconducting cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabretta, Luciano; Calanna, Alessandra; Cuttone, Giacomo; D'Agostino, Grazia; Rifuggiato, Danilo; Domenico Russo, Antonio

    2017-06-01

    The LNS Superconducting Cyclotron, named “Ciclotrone Superconduttore” (CS), has been in operation for more than 20 years. A wide range of ion species from hydrogen to lead, with energy in the range 10 to 80 AMeV, have been delivered to users. The maximum beam power is limited to 100 W due to the beam dissipation on the electrostatic deflectors. To fulfil the demand of users aiming at studying rare processes in nuclear physics, an upgrade of the cyclotron is necessarily intended to increase the intensity of ion beams with mass lower than 40 a.m.u. up to a power 10 kW. This will be achieved by means of extraction by stripping. This solution needs to replace the cryostat including the superconducting coils. The present capability of the cyclotron will be maintained, i.e. all the ion species allowed by the operating diagram will be available, being extracted by electrostatic extraction. In addition to the high power beams for nuclear physics, it will be possible to produce medical radioisotopes like 211At using an internal target.

  7. Advances in intense beams, beam delivery, targetry, and radiochemistry at advanced cyclotron systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, R. R.; Watt, R.; Kovac, B.; Zyuzin, A.; Van Lier, E.; Erdman, K. L.; Gyles, Wm.; Sabaiduc, V.; McQuarrie, S. A.; Wilson, J.; Backhouse, C.; Gelbart, Wm.; Kuo, T.

    2007-08-01

    The increasing demand for radionuclides for PET and SPECT has resulted in ACSI system improvements starting from the cyclotron and proceeding to the Radiochemistry Modules. With more TR30 cyclotrons installed and operating at full capacity, emphasis has been placed on improving the operational components to reduce both the incidence of failure and subsequent maintenance time. A cyclotron system has been developed that meets the needs of a regional radiopharmacy that supplies both positron and single photon emitters that would not otherwise be available. This new system has been named the TR24. In order to deal with some of the challenges of high currents, a method has been developed for passivating the entrance window foil during high current irradiation of a water target used to produce F-18. A method has been developed for passivating the entrance window foil to reduce unwanted chemical species that interfere with radiopharmaceutical production. Preliminary results for novel radioiodine production technique using the TR19/9 are also discussed.

  8. Analytical study of effects of positron density and temperature anisotropy on electrostatic ion cyclotron instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barati Moqadam Niyat, M.; Khorashadizadeh, S. M.; Niknam, A. R.

    2017-03-01

    The effects of the positron concentration and ion temperature anisotropy on the electrostatic ion cyclotron instability are studied analytically, in a magnetized electron-positron-ion plasma with temperature anisotropy, using the linear kinetic theory. Positrons and electrons are supposed to drift either in the same direction or in opposite directions relative to singly ionized stationary ions and parallel to the magnetic field. The dispersion relation of the electrostatic ion cyclotron waves is derived, and then the conditions for exciting the instability of the waves are investigated. Moreover, the condition for the marginally stable state is also studied. It is found that as the positron concentration and perpendicular ion temperature increase, the growth rate of the electrostatic ion cyclotron instability decreases, whereas the critical drift velocity increases. It is also found that for the chosen set of parameters, with electrons and positrons drifting in the same direction, the instability in the plasma is stronger than when the electrons and positrons drift in opposite directions. In addition, a comparison is made to the normal electron-ion plasma.

  9. Cyclotron Lines: From Magnetic Field Strength Estimators to Geometry Tracers in Neutron Stars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maitra, Chandreyee

    2017-09-01

    With forty years since the discovery of the first cyclotron line in Her X-1, there have been remarkable advancements in the field related to the study of the physics of accreting neutron stars - cyclotron lines have been a major torchbearer in this regard, from being the only direct estimator of the magnetic field strength, a tracer of accretion geometry and an indicator of the emission beam in these systems. The main flurry of activities have centred around studying the harmonic separations, luminosity dependence, pulse phase dependence and more recently, the shapes of the line and the trend for long-term evolution in the line energy. This article visits the important results related to cyclotron lines since its discovery and reviews their significance. An emphasis is laid on pulse phase resolved spectroscopy and the important clues a joint timing and spectral study in this context can provide, to build a complete picture for the physics of accretion and hence X-ray emission in accreting neutron stars.

  10. Optical imaging of irradiated cyclotron target window foils using Cerenkov and radioluminescence imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spinelli, A. E.; Boschi, F.; Calandrino, R.

    2017-05-01

    Radioisotopes production for PET radiopharmaceuticals is performed using cyclotrons resulting in radio activation of different cyclotron components. It is thus necessary to measure the level of radiation exposure and, if possible, to image the areas where most of the radiations are emitted in particular during maintenance or decommissioning procedures. In this work we present a novel optical imaging approach using Cerenkov luminescence imaging (CLI) and radioluminescence imaging (RLI). CLI was performed by placing a glass Cerenkov radiator on a target window (Havar foils) and RLI data were obtained by covering the Havar foils with an intensifying screen. CLI or RLI were acquired using a small animal optical imaging system used in bioluminescence mode without the use of any optical filters. The analysis of the normalized radiance line profiles of both CLI and RLI images showed a similar pattern, however the absolute radiance of the RLI signal is several order of magnitude higher with respect to CLI. We conclude that optical imaging with CLI and RLI can be considered a novel method to detect and image activation areas in irradiated samples from a medical cyclotron.

  11. Calibration and use cases of the electron cyclotron emission diagnostic at Wendelstein 7-X

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoefel, Udo; Hirsch, Matthias; Ewert, Karsten; Hartfuss, Hans-Juergen; Laqua, Heinrich Peter; Stange, Torsten; Wolf, Robert [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Plasmaphysik, Greifswald (Germany); Collaboration: the W7-X Team

    2016-07-01

    The world's largest stellarator, Wendelstein 7-X (W7-X), is equipped with a 140 GHz electron cyclotron resonance heating (ECRH) system providing up to 5 MW absorbed power in the first operation phase OP1.1. The foreseen X2-heating scenario uses the high absorption of the second harmonic extraordinary electron cyclotron waves, which leads on the other hand to a black body electron cyclotron emission (ECE) being proportional to the local electron temperature. ECE is one of the fundamental operating diagnostics and is planned to yield the electron temperature profile from the very first discharges onwards. Unlike most other ECE diagnostics, the 32 channel ECE radiometer diagnostic (with additional 16 channels with higher radial resolution) at W7-X is absolutely calibrated. It is planned to use this diagnostic for intensive studies on electron heat transport in the upcoming operational phases of W7-X. Simple switch-off experiments for the determination of the energy confinement time should already be possible within the first plasma shots. Due to the high temporal and radial resolution the ECE will be used also to determine the power deposition by modulation of the heating gyrotron. or the localization of a power modulated ECRH to optimize the power deposition. If reasonably equilibrated plasma conditions could be generated in the first operational phase (OP 1.1), first studies on electron thermal diffusivity could also be possible.

  12. Experimental observation of acoustic emissions generated by a pulsed proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Kevin C; Vander Stappen, François; Bawiec, Christopher R; Janssens, Guillaume; Lewin, Peter A; Prieels, Damien; Solberg, Timothy D; Sehgal, Chandra M; Avery, Stephen

    2015-12-01

    To measure the acoustic signal generated by a pulsed proton spill from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. An electronic function generator modulated the IBA C230 isochronous cyclotron to create a pulsed proton beam. The acoustic emissions generated by the proton beam were measured in water using a hydrophone. The acoustic measurements were repeated with increasing proton current and increasing distance between detector and beam. The cyclotron generated proton spills with rise times of 18 μs and a maximum measured instantaneous proton current of 790 nA. Acoustic emissions generated by the proton energy deposition were measured to be on the order of mPa. The origin of the acoustic wave was identified as the proton beam based on the correlation between acoustic emission arrival time and distance between the hydrophone and proton beam. The acoustic frequency spectrum peaked at 10 kHz, and the acoustic pressure amplitude increased monotonically with increasing proton current. The authors report the first observation of acoustic emissions generated by a proton beam from a hospital-based clinical cyclotron. When modulated by an electronic function generator, the cyclotron is capable of creating proton spills with fast rise times (18 μs) and high instantaneous currents (790 nA). Measurements of the proton-generated acoustic emissions in a clinical setting may provide a method for in vivo proton range verification and patient monitoring.

  13. Cyclotron resonant scattering feature simulations. II. Description of the CRSF simulation process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarm, F.-W.; Ballhausen, R.; Falkner, S.; Schönherr, G.; Pottschmidt, K.; Wolff, M. T.; Becker, P. A.; Fürst, F.; Marcu-Cheatham, D. M.; Hemphill, P. B.; Sokolova-Lapa, E.; Dauser, T.; Klochkov, D.; Ferrigno, C.; Wilms, J.

    2017-05-01

    Context. Cyclotron resonant scattering features (CRSFs) are formed by scattering of X-ray photons off quantized plasma electrons in the strong magnetic field (of the order 1012 G) close to the surface of an accreting X-ray pulsar. Due to the complex scattering cross-sections, the line profiles of CRSFs cannot be described by an analytic expression. Numerical methods, such as Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the scattering processes, are required in order to predict precise line shapes for a given physical setup, which can be compared to observations to gain information about the underlying physics in these systems. Aims: A versatile simulation code is needed for the generation of synthetic cyclotron lines. Sophisticated geometries should be investigatable by making their simulation possible for the first time. Methods: The simulation utilizes the mean free path tables described in the first paper of this series for the fast interpolation of propagation lengths. The code is parallelized to make the very time-consuming simulations possible on convenient time scales. Furthermore, it can generate responses to monoenergetic photon injections, producing Green's functions, which can be used later to generate spectra for arbitrary continua. Results: We develop a new simulation code to generate synthetic cyclotron lines for complex scenarios, allowing for unprecedented physical interpretation of the observed data. An associated XSPEC model implementation is used to fit synthetic line profiles to NuSTAR data of Cep X-4. The code has been developed with the main goal of overcoming previous geometrical constraints in MC simulations of CRSFs. By applying this code also to more simple, classic geometries used in previous works, we furthermore address issues of code verification and cross-comparison of various models. The XSPEC model and the Green's function tables are available online (see link in footnote, page 1).

  14. Effective production of ⁶⁵Zn with a PET cyclotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucconi, G; Cicoria, G; Pancaldi, D; Malizia, C; Marengo, M

    2012-08-01

    Cyclotrons dedicated to the production of PET radiopharmaceuticals for clinical use can be a resource also for research in other fields of science. In the present study we assessed the feasibility of (65)Zn production via the (65)Cu(p,n)(65)Zn reaction using a 16.5 MeV GE-PETtrace biomedical cyclotron. The radioisotope (65)Zn (t(1/2)=244.26 zd; decay mode: EC 98.3%, β(+) 1.7%) has a wide range of applications, especially in botany and agriculture; its long half life allows storage and delivery to research centers without a cyclotron on site. Natural copper foils (thickness: 100 μm; purity: >99.9%) were irradiated in a solid target station developed in our institution. The EXFOR and IAEA cross sections databases were carefully studied to optimize the irradiation setup in order to maximize the yield of the radionuclide of interest and minimize the production of isotopic impurities. We performed production runs at 20 μA for 30 min. Activity was measured using a calibrated HPGe gamma ray detector and an ionization chamber radionuclide activity meter. These measures showed the presence of two main contaminants: (63)Zn (t(1/2)=38.47 min) and (64)Cu (t(1/2)=12.7h); we produced (65)Zn with a saturation yield of (1.06 ± 0.07) GBq/μA (E(p)=12.65→10.48 MeV). The irradiated target was dissolved in 1 ml of 6N HNO(3) at the temperature of 90°C and then purified through anion exchange chromatography with BIO RAD AG 1×8 resin. The radionuclidic purity of the final solution of (65)Zn in HCl 0.005 N, expressed in activity, resulted superior to (99.921 ± 0.003) %. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Recent achievements in Tc-99m radiopharmaceutical direct production by medical cyclotrons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boschi, Alessandra; Martini, Petra; Pasquali, Micol; Uccelli, Licia

    2017-09-01

    99mTc is the most commonly used radionuclide in the field of diagnostic imaging, a noninvasive method intended to diagnose a disease, assess the disease state and monitor the effects of treatments. Annually, the use of 99mTc, covers about 85% of nuclear medicine applications. This isotope releases gamma rays at about the same wavelength as conventional X-ray diagnostic equipment, and owing to its short half-life (t½ = 6 h) is ideal for diagnostic nuclear imaging. A patient can be injected with a small amount of 99mTc and within 24 h almost 94% of the injected radionuclide would have decayed and left the body, limiting the patient's radiation exposure. 99mTc is usually supplied to hospitals through a 99Mo/99mTc radionuclide generator system where it is produced from the β decay of the parent nuclide 99Mo (t½ = 66 h), which is produced in nuclear reactors via neutron fission. Recently, the interruption of the global supply chain of reactor-produced 99Mo, has forced the scientific community to investigate alternative production routes for 99mTc. One solution was to consider cyclotron-based methods as potential replacement of reactor-based technology and the nuclear reaction 100Mo(p,2n)99mTc emerged as the most worthwhile approach. This review reports some achievements about 99mTc produced by medical cyclotrons. In particular, the available technologies for target design, the most efficient extraction and separation procedure developed for the purification of 99mTc from the irradiated targets, the preparation of high purity 99mTc radiopharmaceuticals and the first clinical studies carried out with cyclotron produced 99mTc are described.

  16. Ion cyclotron and spin-flip emissions from fusion products in tokamaks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arunasalam, V.; Greene, G.J.; Young, K.M.

    1993-02-01

    Power emission by fusion products of tokamak plasmas in their ion cyclotron range of frequencies (ICRF) and at their spin-flip resonance frequency is calculated for some specific model fusion product velocity-space distribution functions. The background plasma of say deuterium (D) is assumed to be in equilibrium with a Maxwellian distribution both for the electrons and ions. The fusion product velocity distributions analyzed here are: (1) A monoenergetic velocity space ring distribution. (2) A monoenergetic velocity space spherical shell distribution. (3) An anisotropic Maxwellian distribution with T [perpendicular] [ne] T[parallel]and with appreciable drift velocity along the confining magnetic field. Single dressed'' test particle spontaneous emission calculations are presented first and the radiation temperature for ion cyclotron emission (ICE) is analyzed both for black-body emission and nonequilibrium conditions. Thresholds for instability and overstability conditions are then examined and quasilinear and nonlinear theories of the electromagnetic ion cyclotron modes are discussed. Distinctions between kinetic or causal instabilities'' and hydrodynamic instabilities'' are drawn and some numerical estimates are presented for typical tokamak parameters. Semiquantitative remarks are offered on wave accessibility, mode conversion, and parametric decay instabilities as possible for spatially localized ICE. Calculations are carried out both for k[parallel] = 0 for k[parallel] [ne] 0. The effects of the temperature anisotropy and large drift velocities in the parallel direction are also examined. Finally, proton spin-flip resonance emission and absorption calculations are also presented both for thermal equilibrium conditions and for an inverted'' population of states.

  17. Electron cyclotron resonance near the axis of the gas-dynamic trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagulov, D. S.; Kotelnikov, I. A.

    2012-08-01

    Propagation of an extraordinary electromagnetic wave in the vicinity of electron cyclotron resonance surface in an open linear trap is studied analytically, taking into account inhomogeneity of the magnetic field in paraxial approximation. Ray trajectories are derived from a reduced dispersion equation that makes it possible to avoid the difficulty associated with a transition from large propagation angles to the case of strictly longitudinal propagation. Our approach is based on the theory, originally developed by Zvonkov and Timofeev [Sov. J. Plasma Phys. 14, 743 (1988)], who used the paraxial approximation for the magnetic field strength, but did not consider the slope of the magnetic field lines, which led to considerable error, as has been recently noted by Gospodchikov and Smolyakova [Plasma Phys. Rep. 37, 768-774 (2011)]. We have found ray trajectories in analytic form and demonstrated that the inhomogeneity of both the magnetic field strength and the field direction can qualitatively change the picture of wave propagation and significantly affect the efficiency of electron cyclotron heating of a plasma in a linear magnetic trap. Analysis of the ray trajectories has revealed a criterion for the resonance point on the axis of the trap to be an attractor for the ray trajectories. It is also shown that a family of ray trajectories can still reach the resonance point on the axis if the latter generally repels the ray trajectories. As an example, results of general theory are applied to the electron cyclotron resonance heating experiment which is under preparation on the gas dynamic trap in the Budker Institute of Nuclear Physics [Shalashov et al., Phys. Plasmas 19, 052503 (2012)].

  18. Electron acceleration at Jupiter: input from cyclotron-resonant interaction with whistler-mode chorus waves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. E. Woodfield

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Jupiter has the most intense radiation belts of all the outer planets. It is not yet known how electrons can be accelerated to energies of 10 MeV or more. It has been suggested that cyclotron-resonant wave-particle interactions by chorus waves could accelerate electrons to a few MeV near the orbit of Io. Here we use the chorus wave intensities observed by the Galileo spacecraft to calculate the changes in electron flux as a result of pitch angle and energy diffusion. We show that, when the bandwidth of the waves and its variation with L are taken into account, pitch angle and energy diffusion due to chorus waves is a factor of 8 larger at L-shells greater than 10 than previously shown. We have used the latitudinal wave intensity profile from Galileo data to model the time evolution of the electron flux using the British Antarctic Survey Radiation Belt (BAS model. This profile confines intense chorus waves near the magnetic equator with a peak intensity at ∼5° latitude. Electron fluxes in the BAS model increase by an order of magnitude for energies around 3 MeV. Extending our results to L = 14 shows that cyclotron-resonant interactions with chorus waves are equally important for electron acceleration beyond L = 10. These results suggest that there is significant electron acceleration by cyclotron-resonant interactions at Jupiter contributing to the creation of Jupiter's radiation belts and also increasing the range of L-shells over which this mechanism should be considered.

  19. Direct production of 99mTc using a small medical cyclotron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lapi, Suzanne [Washington Univ., St. Louis, MO (United States)

    2017-10-03

    This project describes an investigation towards the production of 99mTc with a small medical cyclotron. This endeavor addresses the current urgent problem of availability of 99mTc due to the ongoing production reactor failures and the upcoming Canadian reactor shut down. Currently, 99mTc is produced via nuclear fission using highly enriched uranium which is a concern due to nuclear proliferation risks. In addition to this, the United States is dependent solely on currently unreliable foreign sources of this important medical isotope. Clearly, a need exists to probe alternative production routes of 99mTc. In the first year, this project measured cross-sections and production yields of potential pathways to 99mTc and associated radionuclidic impurities produced via these pathways using a small 15 MeV medical cyclotron. During the second and third years target systems for the production of 99mTc via the most promising reaction routes were developed and separation techniques for the isolation of 99mTc from the irradiated target material will be investigated. Systems for the recycling of the enriched target isotopes as well as automated target processing systems were examined in years four and five. This project has the potential to alleviate some of the current crisis in the medical community by developing a technique to produce 99mTc on location at a university hospital. This technology will be applicable at many other sites in the United States as many other similar, low energy (<20 MeV) cyclotrons (currently used for a few hours per day for the production of [18F]fluorodeoxyglucose) are available for production of 99mTc though this method, thus leading to job creation and preservation.

  20. Effective dose to immuno-PET patients due to metastable impurities in cyclotron produced zirconium-89

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfuraih, Abdulrahman; Alzimami, Khalid; Ma, Andy K.; Alghamdi, Ali; Al Jammaz, Ibrahim

    2014-11-01

    Immuno-PET is a nuclear medicine technique that combines positron emission tommography (PET) with radio-labeled monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for tumor characterization and therapy. Zirconium-89 (89Zr) is an emerging radionuclide for immuno-PET imaging. Its long half-life (78.4 h) gives ample time for the production, the administering and the patient uptake of the tagged radiopharmaceutical. Furthermore, the nuclides will remain in the tumor cells after the mAbs are catabolized so that time series studies are possible without incurring further administration of radiopharmarceuticals. 89Zr can be produced in medical cyclotrons by bombarding an yttrium-89 (89Y) target with a proton beam through the 89Y(p,n)89Zr reaction. In this study, we estimated the effective dose to the head and neck cancer patients undergoing 89Zr-based immune-PET procedures. The production of 89Zr and the impurities from proton irradiation of the 89Y target in a cyclotron was calculated with the Monte Carlo code MCNPX and the nuclear reaction code TALYS. The cumulated activities of the Zr isotopes were derived from real patient data in literature and the effective doses were estimated using the MIRD specific absorbed fraction formalism. The estimated effective dose from 89Zr is 0.5±0.2 mSv/MBq. The highest organ dose is 1.8±0.2 mSv/MBq in the liver. These values are in agreement with those reported in literature. The effective dose from 89mZr is about 0.2-0.3% of the 89Zr dose in the worst case. Since the ratio of 89mZr to 89Zr depends on the cooling time as well as the irradiation details, contaminant dose estimation is an important aspect in optimizing the cyclotron irradiation geometry, energy and time.

  1. Modelling third harmonic ion cyclotron acceleration of deuterium beams for JET fusion product studies experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schneider, M.; Johnson, T.; Dumont, R.

    2016-01-01

    Recent JET experiments have been dedicated to the studies of fusion reactions between deuterium (D) and Helium-3 (3He) ions using neutral beam injection (NBI) in synergy with third harmonic ion cyclotron radio-frequency heating (ICRH) of the beam. This scenario generates a fast ion deuterium tail...... ion diagnostics, showing an overall good agreement. Finally, a sawtooth activity for these experiments has been observed and interpreted using SPOT/RFOF simulations in the framework of Porcelli’s theoretical model, where NBI+ICRH accelerated ions are found to have a strong stabilizing effect, leading...

  2. A real-time beam-profile monitor for a PET cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoehr, C.; Uittenbosch, T.; Verzilov, V.; English, W.; Buckley, K.; Gray, D.; Kellog, S.; Cameron, D.; Schaffer, P.

    2012-12-01

    Beam profiles in medical cyclotrons are traditionally measured using techniques that do not provide any information about short-term fluctuations of the beam shape or beam intensity. To overcome this, we have developed a real-time harp beam profile monitor which can withstand beam power in excess of 300 W. The monitor and electronics were constructed and applied toward a 13 MeV proton beam with current of up to 25 μA. Herein are reported preliminary beam-profile measurement results.

  3. Status of the Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Toyo University

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Uchida, T., E-mail: uchida-t@toyo.jp [Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo University, Kawagoe 350-8585 (Japan); Minezaki, H.; Ishihara, S. [Graduate School of Engineering, Toyo University, Kawagoe 350-8585 (Japan); Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A.; Drentje, A. G. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Rácz, R.; Biri, S. [Institute for Nuclear Research (ATOMKI), H-4026 Debrecen (Hungary); Asaji, T. [Oshima National College of Maritime Technology, Yamaguchi 742-2193 (Japan); Kato, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, Suita 565-0871 (Japan); Yoshida, Y. [Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo University, Kawagoe 350-8585 (Japan); Graduate School of Engineering, Toyo University, Kawagoe 350-8585 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    In the paper, the material science experiments, carried out recently using the Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source (ECRIS) at Toyo University, are reported. We have investigated several methods to synthesize endohedral C{sub 60} using ion-ion and ion-molecule collision reaction in the ECRIS. Because of the simplicity of the configuration, we can install a large choice of additional equipment in the ECRIS. The Bio-Nano ECRIS is suitable not only to test the materials production but also to test technical developments to improve or understand the performance of an ECRIS.

  4. Fullerene-rare gas mixed plasmas in an electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Asaji, T., E-mail: asaji@oshima-k.ac.jp; Ohba, T. [Oshima National College of Maritime Technology, 1091-1 Komatsu, Suo-oshima, Oshima, Yamaguchi 742-2193 (Japan); Uchida, T.; Yoshida, Y. [Bio-Nano Electronics Research Centre, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe, Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Minezaki, H.; Ishihara, S. [Graduate School of Engineering, Toyo University, 2100 Kujirai, Kawagoe, Saitama 350-8585 (Japan); Racz, R.; Biri, S. [Institute of Nuclear Research (ATOMKI), H-4026 Debrecen, Bem Tér 18/c (Hungary); Muramatsu, M.; Kitagawa, A. [National Institute of Radiological Sciences (NIRS), 4-9-1 Anagawa, Inage-ku, Chiba 263-8555 (Japan); Kato, Y. [Graduate School of Engineering, Osaka University, 2-1 Yamada-oka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    A synthesis technology of endohedral fullerenes such as Fe@C{sub 60} has developed with an electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source. The production of N@C{sub 60} was reported. However, the yield was quite low, since most fullerene molecules were broken in the ECR plasma. We have adopted gas-mixing techniques in order to cool the plasma and then reduce fullerene dissociation. Mass spectra of ion beams extracted from fullerene-He, Ar or Xe mixed plasmas were observed with a Faraday cup. From the results, the He gas mixing technique is effective against fullerene destruction.

  5. Wave intensifications near the electron cyclotron frequency within the polar cusp

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, W. M.; Gurnett, D. A.; Menietti, J. D.; Wong, H. K.; Lin, C. S.

    1990-01-01

    As DE 1 flew through the polar cusp, enhanced narrowband electrostatic waves were sometimes observed just above the electron cyclotron frequency. Here, wave and particle measurements from three representative cusp transits are presented in order to characterize these signals and understand the conditions that favor their generation. It was found that the form of the local cusp electron velocity distribution had a direct influence on the wave spectral character. A preliminary study indicates that electron beams in the cusp can generate the enhanced signals, although generation by an anisotropic warm component cannot be ruled out.

  6. Development of a prototype T-shaped fast switching device for electron cyclotron current drive systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekiguchi, Kenji; Nagashima, Koji; Honzu, Toshihiko; Saigusa, Mikio; Oda, Yasuhisa; Takahashi, Koji; Sakamoto, Keishi

    2016-09-01

    A T-shaped high-power switching device composed of circular corrugated waveguides with three ports and double dielectric disks made of sapphire was proposed as a fast switching device based on a new principle in electron cyclotron current drive systems. This switching device has the advantages of operating at a fixed frequency and being compact. The design of the prototype switch was obtained by numerical simulations using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The size of these components was optimized for the frequency band of 170 GHz. Low-power tests were carried out in a cross-shaped model.

  7. Interaction of the electron density fluctuations with electron cyclotron waves from the equatorial launcher in ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snicker, A.; Poli, E.; Maj, O.; Guidi, L.; Köhn, A.; Weber, H.; Conway, G. D.; Henderson, M.; Saibene, G.

    2018-01-01

    We present a numerical investigation of electron cyclotron beams interacting with electron density fluctuations in the ITER 15 MA H-mode scenario. In particular, here we study how the beam from the equatorial launcher, which shall be utilized to influence the sawtooth instability, is affected by the fluctuations. Moreover, we present the theory and first estimates of the power that is scattered from the injected O-mode to a secondary X-mode in the presence of the fluctuations. It is shown that for ITER parameters the scattered power stays within acceptable limits and broadening of the equatorial beams is less than those from the upper launcher.

  8. An analytical approach of thermodynamic behavior in a gas target system on a medical cyclotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahangiri, Pouyan; Zacchia, Nicholas A; Buckley, Ken; Bénard, François; Schaffer, Paul; Martinez, D Mark; Hoehr, Cornelia

    2016-01-01

    An analytical model has been developed to study the thermo-mechanical behavior of gas targets used to produce medical isotopes, assuming that the system reaches steady-state. It is based on an integral analysis of the mass and energy balance of the gas-target system, the ideal gas law, and the deformation of the foil. The heat transfer coefficients for different target bodies and gases have been calculated. Excellent agreement is observed between experiments performed at TRIUMF's 13 MeV cyclotron and the model. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Nonlocal weakly relativistic permittivity tensor of magnetized plasma near electron cyclotron resonances

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakharov, A. S.

    2017-11-01

    Compact expressions are derived for the nonlocal permittivity tensor of weakly relativistic plasma in a 2D nonuniform magnetic field near the resonances at the second harmonic of the electron cyclotron frequency for an extraordinary wave and at the first harmonic for an ordinary wave. It is shown that the wave equation with allowance for the obtained thermal correction to the permittivity tensor in the form of a differential operator in transverse (with respect to the external magnetic field) coordinates possesses an integral in the form of the energy conservation law.

  10. The Spontaneous Loss of Coherence Catastrophe in Fourier Transform Ion Cyclotron Resonance Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aizikov, Konstantin; Mathur, Raman; O’Connor, Peter B.

    2009-01-01

    The spontaneous loss of coherence catastrophe (SLCC) is a frequently observed, yet poorly studied, space-charge related effect in Fourier-transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR-MS). This manuscript presents an application of the filter diagonalization method (FDM) in the analysis of this phenomenon. The temporal frequency behavior reproduced by frequency shift analysis using the FDM shows the complex nature of the SLCC, which can be explained by a combination of factors occurring concurrently, governed by electrostatics and ion packet trajectories inside the ICR cell. PMID:19013078

  11. Spectra of KeV Protons Related to Ion-Cyclotron Wave Packets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, G. V.; Sibeck, D. G.; Tel'Nikhin, A. A.; Kronberg, T. K.

    2017-01-01

    We use the Fokker-Planck-Kolmogorov equation to study the statistical aspects of stochastic dynamics of the radiation belt (RB) protons driven by nonlinear electromagnetic ion-cyclotron (EMIC) wave packets. We obtain the spectra of keV protons scattered by these waves that showsteeping near the gyroresonance, the signature of resonant wave-particle interaction that cannot be described by a simple power law. The most likely mechanism for proton precipitation events in RBs is shown to be nonlinear wave-particle interaction, namely, the scattering of RB protons into the loss cone by EMIC waves.

  12. Design of the central region in the Gustaf Werner cyclotron at the Uppsala university

    CERN Document Server

    Toprek, D; Lundstrom, B; Wessman, D

    2002-01-01

    This paper describes the design of the central region in the Gustaf Werner cyclotron for h=1, 2 and 3 modes of acceleration. The electric field distribution in the inflector and in the four acceleration gaps has been numerically calculated from an electric potential map produced by the program RELAX3D. The geometry of the central region has been tested with the computations of orbits carried out by means of the computer code CYCLONE. The optical properties of the spiral inflector and the central region were studied by using the programs CASINO and CYCLONE, respectively.

  13. Multiply charged ion dissociation in Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Qinyuan; Bakhtair, R.; Sherman, M.G.; Hofstadler, S.A.; Smith, R.D. [Pacific Northwest Laboratory, Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Bimolecular ions of up to MDa size with thousands of charges have recently been trapped and studied in this laboratory using electrospray ionization (ESI) and Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometer (FTICRMS). For structural analysis, multiply charged ions generated by ESI can be dissociated at the interface, by collision induced dissociation (CID) or Surface induced dissociation (SID). However, charge exchange with the surface and charge partition among the fragments significantly complicate the SID and CID spectra of multiply charged large ions. High resolution FTICR is an ideal solution to this problem.

  14. Computer modeling of beam space charge effects in cyclotron injector into JINR phasotron

    CERN Document Server

    Kalinichenko, V V

    2002-01-01

    Charge particle beam dynamics including space charge by direct Coulomb particle-to-particle method was simulated. For this purpose in MATLAB a new code KASKADS was developed. Numerical simulations of the particle motion confirm that it is possible to achieve separated orbits in a 5 MeV, 30 mA separated sector cyclotron (accelerating voltage varies depending on radius from 150 kV in the centre to 240 kV in the extraction region). The aperture of the accelerator must be greater than 3 cm.

  15. New approach in design of efficient low level RF circuit for 10 MeV cyclotron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M S Sharifi Asadi Malafeh

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The electric field in cavity accelerates charged particles and magnetic field of magnets changes the direction of these particles in cyclotrons. In order to establish the electric field inside the cavity, a noiseless radio frequency (RF signal should be generated, amplified and sent to cavity. The resonant frequency of the cavity could be changed by temperature variation. Variation of resonant frequency will cause reflected power from the cavity. in this work the low level RF circuits with task of signal generation, phase and frequency Adjustment, cavity resonant frequency Adjustment, protection of the RF set from the reflected power and stability of RF system was designed

  16. Theory of electromagnetic cyclotron wave growth in a time-varying magnetoplasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gail, William B.

    1990-01-01

    The effect of a time-dependent perturbation in the magnetoplasma on the wave and particle populations is investigated using the Kennel-Petchek (1966) approach. Perturbations in the cold plasma density, energetic particle distribution, and resonance condition are calculated on the basis of the ideal MHD assumption given an arbitrary compressional magnetic field perturbation. An equation is derived describing the time-dependent growth rate for parallel propagating electromagnetic cyclotron waves in a time-varying magnetoplasma with perturbations superimposed on an equilibrium configuration.

  17. Calculating method for confinement time and charge distribution of ions in electron cyclotron resonance sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dougar-Jabon, V.D. [Escuela de Fisica, Universidad Industrial de Santander, A.A. 678, Bucaramanga (Colombia); Umnov, A.M. [Russian Friendship University, 117198 Moscow (Russia); Kutner, V.B. [Joint Institute for Nuclear Research, Dubna (Russia)

    1996-03-01

    It is common knowledge that the electrostatic pit in a core plasma of electron cyclotron resonance sources exerts strict control over generation of ions in high charge states. This work is aimed at finding a dependence of the lifetime of ions on their charge states in the core region and to elaborate a numerical model of ion charge dispersion not only for the core plasmas but for extracted beams as well. The calculated data are in good agreement with the experimental results on charge distributions and magnitudes for currents of beams extracted from the 14 GHz DECRIS source. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. Coupled operation of the Oak Ridge isochronous cyclotron and the 25 MV tandem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lord, R.S.; Ball, J.B.; Beckers, R.M.; Cleary, T.P.; Hudson, E.D.; Ludemann, C.A.; Martin, J.A.; Milner, W.T.; Mosko, S.W.; Ziegler, N.F.

    1981-01-01

    Coupled operation of the 25 MV tandem and the Oak Ridge Isochronous Cyclotron (ORIC) was achieved on January 27, 1981. A beam of 38 MeV /sup 16/O/sup 2 +/ was injected into ORIC, stripped to 8/sup +/ and accelerated to 324 MeV. Shortly afterwards, the energy was increased to the maximum design value of 25 MeV/amu (400 MeV). A spectrum taken of the scattering of this beam from a thin /sup 208/Pb target in the broad range spectrograh exhibited a resolution of 115 keV (FWHM). Performance of the system was in close agreement with that predicted from calculations.

  19. Preliminary results of ion trajectory tracking in the acceleration region of the VINCY cyclotron

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilić Anđelija Ž.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In an accelerating region of a cyclotron, an ion makes a large number of turns; thus, its n the Runge-Kutta method of the fourth order with the adaptive time step has been developed. The accuracy requirement is simultaneously set on position and momentum calculation. Magnetic fields used as inputs, have been evaluated in terms of the radial fluctuations of the orbital frequency, i.e. their isochronisms. Ion trajectory tracking has been performed for the following four test beams: H-, H+3, 4He+, He+, and 40Ar6+.

  20. Photovoltaic infrared photoresponse of the high-mobility graphene quantum Hall system due to cyclotron resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masubuchi, Satoru; Onuki, Masahiro; Arai, Miho; Yamaguchi, Takehiro; Watanabe, Kenji; Taniguchi, Takashi; Machida, Tomoki

    2013-09-01

    We report on the infrared photoresponse of high-mobility graphene in high magnetic fields. Two types of photoresponse signals were observed that were due to photovoltaic and bolometric effects. The photovoltaic signal was observed in the quantum Hall regime, whereas the bolometric signal was dominant in the quantum Hall transition regime. The photovoltaic effect, which was induced by cyclotron resonance, was observable up to 180 K. The polarity of the photovoltaic photoresponse was shown to be systematically reversed on reversal of the applied magnetic field direction and measurement geometry, suggesting that the photovoltage signals were generated along the quantum Hall edge channel.

  1. Distorted cyclotron line profile in Cep X-4 as observed by NuSTAR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fürst, F.; Pottschmidt, K.; Miyasaka, H.

    2015-01-01

    deviations at the red side of the line. We characterize this asymmetry with a second absorption feature around 19 keV. The line energy of the CRSF, which is not influenced by the addition of this feature, shows a small but significant positive luminosity dependence. With luminosities between (1-6)e36 erg...... a powerlaw with a Fermi-Dirac cutoff at high energies. Cep X-4 has a very strong cyclotron resonant scattering feature (CRSF) around 30 keV. A simple absorption-like line with a Gaussian optical depth or a pseudo-Lorentzian profile both fail to describe the shape of the CRSF accurately, leaving significant...

  2. Filling and Recycling Apparatus of a Cyclotron Target with Enriched Krypton for Production of Radiopharmaceuticals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Vognar

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available An apparatus for multiple filling of a cyclotron target with enriched Kr gas is described. The system is based on recycling pressurized gas by cryogenic pumping between the target tube and storage containers. The design and construction makes use of previous experience in the construction and operation of two analogue apparatuses for Xe124 high pressure gas targets, but major modifications have been incorporated, evoked by the different physical properties of Kr, by the character of the nuclear reaction, and by the demand for automation from the side of the end user.

  3. Development of DRAGON electron cyclotron resonance ion source at Institute of Modern Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, W; Xie, D Z; Zhang, X Z; Xiong, B; Ruan, L; Sha, S; Zhang, W H; Cao, Y; Lin, S H; Guo, J W; Fang, X; Guo, X H; Li, X X; Ma, H Y; Yang, Y; Wu, Q; Zhao, H Y; Ma, B H; Wang, H; Zhu, Y H; Feng, Y C; Li, J Y; Li, J Q; Sun, L T; Zhao, H W

    2012-02-01

    A new room temperature electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source, DRAGON, is under construction at IMP. DRAGON is designed to operate at microwaves of frequencies of 14.5-18 GHz. Its axial solenoid coils are cooled with evaporative medium to provide an axial magnetic mirror field of 2.5 T at the injection and 1.4 T at the extraction, respectively. In comparison to other conventional room temperature ECR ion sources, DRAGON has so far the largest bore plasma chamber of inner diameter of 126 mm with maximum radial fields of 1.4-1.5 T produced by a non-Halbach permanent sextupole magnet.

  4. Effect of pulse-modulated microwaves on fullerene ion production with electron cyclotron resonance ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asaji, T; Uchida, T; Minezaki, H; Oshima, K; Racz, R; Muramatsu, M; Biri, S; Kitagawa, A; Kato, Y; Yoshida, Y

    2012-02-01

    Fullerene plasmas generated by pulse-modulated microwaves have been investigated under typical conditions at the Bio-Nano electron cyclotron resonance ion source. The effect of the pulse modulation is distinct from that of simply structured gases, and then the density of the fullerene plasmas increased as decreasing the duty ratio. The density for a pulse width of 10 μs at the period of 100 μs is 1.34 times higher than that for CW mode. We have studied the responses of fullerene and argon plasmas to pulsed microwaves. After the turnoff of microwave power, fullerene plasmas lasted ∼30 times longer than argon plasmas.

  5. Preparation of Bismuth Titanate Films by Electron Cyclotron Resonance Plasma Sputtering-Chemical Vapor Deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Masumoto, H.; Hirai, T.

    1995-01-01

    Bismuth titanate (Bi4Ti3O12 : BIT) thin films were prepared on the Pt courted MgO(100) substrate by electron cyclotron resonance plasma sputtering-chemical vapor deposition (ECR plasma sputtering-CVD). Bi2O3 was used as a sputtering target and tetra-isopropoxy-titanium [Ti(i-C3H7O)4] as a CVD source. The composition of films was controlled by changing RF power (PRF) of Bi2O3 target and Ti source temperature (TTi). The stoichiometric BIT film was prepared under the condition of PRF=500W, TTi=6...

  6. Phase-resolved optical emission spectroscopy for an electron cyclotron resonance etcher

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milosavljevic, Vladimir [BioPlasma Research Group, Dublin Institute of Technology, Sackville Place, Dublin 1 (Ireland); Biosystems Engineering, University College Dublin, Dublin 4, Ireland and Faculty of Physics, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); MacGearailt, Niall; Daniels, Stephen; Turner, Miles M. [NCPST, Dublin City University, Dublin (Ireland); Cullen, P. J. [BioPlasma Research Group, Dublin Institute of Technology, Sackville Place, Dublin 1 (Ireland)

    2013-04-28

    Phase-resolved optical emission spectroscopy (PROES) is used for the measurement of plasma products in a typical industrial electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) plasma etcher. In this paper, the PROES of oxygen and argon atoms spectral lines are investigated over a wide range of process parameters. The PROES shows a discrimination between the plasma species from gas phase and those which come from the solid phase due to surface etching. The relationship between the micro-wave and radio-frequency generators for plasma creation in the ECR can be better understood by the use of PROES.

  7. Remote-Steering Antennas for 140 GHz Electron Cyclotron Heating of the Stellarator W7-X

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lechte C.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available For electron cyclotron resonance heating of the stellarator W7-X at IPP Greifswald, a 140 GHz/10 MW cw millimeter wave system has been built. Two out of 12 launchers will employ a remote-steering design. This paper describes the overall design of the two launchers, and design issues like input coupling structures, manufacturing of corrugated waveguides, optimization of the steering range, integration of vacuum windows, mitrebends and vacuum valves into the launchers, as well as low power tests of the finished waveguides.

  8. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides. Progress report, February 1987--September 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, S.M.

    1989-12-31

    This report is divided into six sections, each section dealing with a separate aspect of the program. The six sections are entitled (1) In Vivo Measurement of Amino Acid Transport and Protein Synthesis, (2) Angiogenesis in Human Gliomas: Correlations with Blood Flow and Transport of C-11 AIB, (3) Use of F-18 Fluoropyrimidines for Design and Evaluation of Regional and Systemic Chemotherapeutic Strategies in Human Adenocarcinomas of the Gastrointestinal Tract, (4) Enzymatic Synthesis of Metabolites Labeled with N-13 or C-11, (5) Synthesis of Amino Acids Labeled with C-11, and (6) Instrumentation: Cyclotron and Imaging Systems.

  9. The third generation superconducting 28 GHz electron cyclotron resonance ion source VENUS (invited)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lyneis, C.; Leitner, D.; Leitner, M.; Taylor, C.; Abbott, S. [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, One Cyclotron Road, Berkeley, California 94720 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    VENUS is a third generation electron cyclotron resonance (ECR) ion source, which incorporates a high field superconducting NbTi magnet structure, a 28 GHz gryotron microwave source and a state of the art closed cycle cryosystem. During the decade from initial concept to regular operation, it has demonstrated both the feasibility and the performance levels of this new generation of ECR ion sources and required innovation on magnet construction, plasma chamber design, and beam transport. In this paper, the development, performance, and major innovations are described as well as a look to the potential to construct a fourth generation ECR ion source.

  10. Remote-Steering Antennas for 140 GHz Electron Cyclotron Heating of the Stellarator W7-X

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lechte, C.; Kasparek, W.; Plaum, B.; Zeitler, A.; Erckmann, V.; Laqua, H.; Schneider, N.; Weissgerber, M.; Bechtold, A.; Busch, M.; Szepaniak, B.

    2017-07-01

    For electron cyclotron resonance heating of the stellarator W7-X at IPP Greifswald, a 140 GHz/10 MW cw millimeter wave system has been built. Two out of 12 launchers will employ a remote-steering design. This paper describes the overall design of the two launchers, and design issues like input coupling structures, manufacturing of corrugated waveguides, optimization of the steering range, integration of vacuum windows, mitrebends and vacuum valves into the launchers, as well as low power tests of the finished waveguides.

  11. The accuracy of heavy-ion mass measurements using time of flight-ion cyclotron resonance in a Penning trap

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bollen, G.; Moore, R. B.; Savard, G.; Stolzenberg, H.

    1990-11-01

    Ion motion in a Penning trap and the electrical signals it can produce have been analyzed for the purpose of identifying the important causes of uncertainty in high-accuracy mass measurements of heavy ions. The role of the azimuthal quadrupole electric field in signal pickup, and its effects on ion motion at the sum frequency of the cyclotron and magnetron motions, have been identified. A useful scheme for calculating the signal strength and strength of the interaction between an applied field and the ion motion has been developed. The important sources of uncertainty in using the sum frequency of the cyclotron and magnetron motions for determining the ion mass are discussed. Particular application is made to the case of cyclotron resonance detection by observation of the time of flight of ejected ions.

  12. Ion cyclotron waves in the Earth’s magnetotail during CASSINI’s Earth swing-by

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. T. Bogdanov

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available The properties of low frequency magnetotail waves observed during CASSINI’s Earth swing-by are examined. A maximum in the distribution of the waves about half the proton cyclotron frequency and a peak at linear polarisation are found and their implications are analysed in detail. Data on the fluid plasma velocity for the observation interval are not available and thus no unique conclusions about Doppler shift influence on the properties of the waves can be made. This determines the need to analyse different hypotheses in order to understand the origin of the waves. The plausibility of competing interpretations, such as off-resonance proton cyclotron waves and bi-ion cyclotron waves at the gyrofrequency of a heavy ion component of the magneto-tail plasma in the form of He ++ ions of solar wind origin is questioned.Key words. Space plasma physics (waves and instabilities – Magnetospheric physics (plasma waves and instabilities; magnetotail

  13. Collision cross section measurements for biomolecules within a high-resolution Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Lu; Chen, Yu; Xin, Yi; Chen, Yu; Zheng, Li; Kaiser, Nathan K; Marshall, Alan G; Xu, Wei

    2015-04-21

    To understand the role and function of a biomolecule in a biosystem, it is important to know both its composition and structure. Here, a mass spectrometric based approach has been proposed and applied to demonstrate that collision cross sections and high-resolution mass spectra of biomolecule ions may be obtained simultaneously by Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry. With this method, the unfolding phenomena for ubiquitin ions that possess different number of charges have been investigated, and results agree well with ion mobility measurements. In the present approach, we extend ion collision cross-section measurements to lower pressures than in prior ion cyclotron resonance (ICR)-based experiments, thereby maintaining the potentially high resolution of Fourier transform ion cyclotron resonance mass spectrometry (FTICR MS), and enabling collision cross section (CCS) measurements for high-mass biomolecules.

  14. Numerical Simulation Of The Beam Transmission Efficiency For Design Of Vacuum System Of The Dc-72 Cyclotron

    CERN Document Server

    Tikhomirov, A V; Gulbekyan, G G; Oganesyan, R T

    2004-01-01

    The results of a numerical modelling of the transmission efficiency of ion beams in conditions of ion recharge on the residual gas in the channel of the axial injection, in the cyclotron vacuum chamber, as well as in transport lines of accelerated beams are presented. The computer simulation programs GENAP and VACLOS have been developed and tested on the basis of experiments on four cyclotrons of heavy ions of the Flerov Laboratory of Nuclear Reactions. They estimate beam losses on the basis of calculations of pressure distributions in vacuum chambers of any arbitrary geometry and cross sections of a recharge of ions in exchange reactions by electrons with molecules of residual gas in a wide range of energies and masses of ions. The outcomes of simulation have provided determination of main parameters and technical requirements for the vacuum system of the DC-72 cyclotron.

  15. High intensity proton beam transportation through fringe field of 70 MeV compact cyclotron to beam line targets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Li, Ming; Wei, Sumin; Xing, Jiansheng; Hu, Yueming; Johnson, Richard R.; Piazza, Leandro; Ryjkov, Vladimir

    2016-06-01

    From the stripping points, the high intensity proton beam of a compact cyclotron travels through the fringe field area of the machine to the combination magnet. Starting from there the beams with various energy is transferred to the switching magnet for distribution to the beam line targets. In the design of the extraction and transport system for the compact proton cyclotron facilities, such as the 70 MeV in France and the 100 MeV in China, the space charge effect as the beam crosses the fringe field has not been previously considered; neither has the impact on transverse beam envelope coupled from the longitudinal direction. Those have been concerned much more with the higher beam-power because of the beam loss problem. In this paper, based on the mapping data of 70 MeV cyclotron including the fringe field by BEST Cyclotron Inc (BEST) and combination magnet field by China Institute of Atomic Energy (CIAE), the beam extraction and transport are investigated for the 70 MeV cyclotron used on the SPES project at Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro (INFN-LNL). The study includes the space charge effect and longitudinal and transverse coupling mentioned above, as well as the matching of beam optics using the beam line for medical isotope production as an example. In addition, the designs of the ±45° switching magnets and the 60° bending magnet for the extracted beam with the energy from 35 MeV to 70 MeV have been made. Parts of the construction and field measurements of those magnets have been done as well. The current result shows that, the design considers the complexity of the compact cyclotron extraction area and fits the requirements of the extraction and transport for high intensity proton beam, especially at mA intensity levels.

  16. Theoretical and experimental study of cyclotronic waves in a fusion plasma; Etude theorique et experimentale des ondes cyclotroniques electroniques dans un plasma de fusion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vezard, D.

    1994-12-20

    This thesis presents a study concerning cyclotronic waves in a plasma. It starts with an illustration of the elementary interaction between electromagnetic waves and matter.It shows that electrons from tokamak absorbs waves at cyclotronic frequency. Cyclotronic waves are studied by solving the dispersion relation in plasma; it concerns polarisation, absorption, dispersion, extinction. Then, classical theories are reminded in order to speak about decoupled electrons and their interactions. Absorption and emission properties of cyclotronic waves by electrons from a queue are described. After that, cyclotronic waves propagation is studied taking into account resonance. The last part of this thesis is dedicated to the electronic distribution function that is made by a wave spectra at a inferior hybrid frequency. (TEC). 129 refs., 75 figs.

  17. Phase-space resolved measurement of 2nd harmonic ion cyclotron heating using FIDA tomography at the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weiland, M.; Bilato, R.; Geiger, B.

    2017-01-01

    Recent upgrades to the FIDA (fast-ion D-alpha) diagnostic at ASDEX Upgrade allow to reconstruct the fast-ion phase space at several radial positions with decent energy and pitch resolution. These new diagnostic capabilities are applied to study the physics of 2nd harmonic ion cyclotron heating......, which is a foreseen heating scenario for ITER. In particular, the acceleration of deuterium beam ions above the injection energy by absorption of ion cyclotron waves at the 2nd harmonic is investigated and compared to theoretical predictions by the TORIC-SSFPQL and TORIC-NUBEAM code packages...

  18. Diagnostic assessment to estimate and minimize neutron dose rates received by occupationally exposed individuals at cyclotron facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reina, L C; Silva, A X; Suita, J C; Souza, M I S; Facure, A; Silva, J C P; Furlanetto, J A D; Rebello, W

    2010-03-01

    Since 2003, radiopharmaceuticals for medical diagnostic purposes have been produced at the Instituto de Engenharia Nuclear, in Brazil, using two cyclotron accelerators - CV-28 and RDS111. As a result of the ever increasing production, a diagnostic assessment to reduce neutron dose rates received by occupationally exposed individuals during irradiation processes has been developed. The purpose of this work is to present this assessment, which is currently being applied to both the Fluorine and Iodine targets of CV-28 and RDS111 cyclotron accelerators. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Experimental observations of mode-converted ion cyclotron waves in a tokamak plasma by phase contrast imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson-Melby, E; Porkolab, M; Bonoli, P T; Lin, Y; Mazurenko, A; Wukitch, S J

    2003-04-18

    The process of mode conversion, whereby an externally launched electromagnetic wave converts into a shorter wavelength mode(s) in a thermal plasma near a resonance in the index of refraction, is particularly important in a multi-ion species plasma near the ion cyclotron frequency. Using phase contrast imaging techniques (PCI), mode-converted electromagnetic ion cyclotron waves have been detected for the first time in the Alcator C-Mod tokamak near the H-3He ion-ion hybrid resonance region during high power rf heating experiments. The results agree with theoretical predictions.

  20. Study of ion beam transport from the SECRAL electron cyclotron resonance ion source at the Institute of Modern Physics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Y; Lu, W; Zhang, W H; Sha, S; Yang, Y; Ma, B H; Wang, H; Zhu, Y H; Guo, J W; Fang, X; Lin, S H; Li, X X; Feng, Y C; Li, J Y; Zhao, H Y; Ma, H Y; Zhang, X Z; Guo, X H; Wu, Q; Sun, L T; Zhao, H W; Xie, D Z

    2012-02-01

    Ion beam transport from the Superconducting Electron Cyclotron Resonance ion source with Advanced design in Lanzhou (SECRAL) electron cyclotron resonance ion source was studied at the Institute of Modern Physics during 2010. Particle-in-cell simulations and experimental results have shown that both space charge and magnetic aberrations lead to a larger beam envelope and emittance growth. In the existing SECRAL extraction beam line, it has been shown that raising the solenoid lens magnetic field reduces aberrations in the subsequent dipole and results in lower emittance. Detailed beam emittance measurements are presented in this paper.

  1. An intrinsically safe facility for forefront research and training on nuclear technologies — An example of accelerator: the SPES cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggiore, M.; Lombardi, A.; Piazza, L. A. C.; Prete, G.

    2014-04-01

    The SPES project, under construction at INFN, Laboratori Nazionali di Legnaro, is a research facility for nuclear and applied physics, based on a high-current H- cyclotron with two exits. One exit will be devoted to supply an ISOL facility for the production of radioactive beams, the second one can be used as driver for the ADS system. The main characteristics of the cyclotron are described together with the main building designed to operate high-current proton beams according to radioprotection rules.

  2. Progress in research, April 1, 1992--March 31, 1993, Texas A and M University Cyclotron Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1993-07-01

    This Institute annual report for the period 1 April 1992--31 March 1993 covers a period which has seen the initial runs of three new spectrometers which constitute a major portion of the new detection capabilities developed for this facility. These devices are the Proton Spectrometer (PSP), the Mass Achromat Recoil Mass Spectrometer (MARS), and the Multipole dipole Multipole (MDM) Particle Spectrometer. These devices are now available to pursue the studies of Gamow Teller states, reactions of astrophysical interest, and giant resonance studies for which they were constructed, as well as for other experiments. A beam analysis system which will deliver high resolution beams to the MDM spectrometer is currently under construction. With the completion of these spectrometer projects, the facility emphasis is now focused on the development of the full capabilities of the K500 cyclotron and on the research program. During the report period, the ECR-K500 cyclotron combination operated 5,849 hours. Theoretical work reported in this document ranges from nuclear structure calculations using the IBM-2 model to calculations of kaon production and the in-medium properties of the rho and phi mesons, the latter as a probe of the QCD phase transition. Nuclear dynamics and exotic shapes and fragmentation modes of hot nuclei are also addressed. In atomic physics, new measurements of x-ray emission from highly ionized ions, of molecular dissociation and of surface interactions are reported.

  3. Development of a miniature microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma ion thruster for exospheric micro-propulsion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dey, Indranuj; Toyoda, Yuji; Yamamoto, Naoji; Nakashima, Hideki

    2015-12-01

    A miniature microwave electron cyclotron resonance plasma source [(discharge diameter)/(microwave cutoff diameter) micro-propulsion applications in the exosphere. The discharge source uses both radial and axial magnetostatic field confinement to facilitate electron cyclotron resonance and increase the electron dwell time in the volume, thereby enhancing plasma production efficiency. Performance of the ion thruster is studied at 3 microwave frequencies (1.2 GHz, 1.6 GHz, and 2.45 GHz), for low input powers (<15 W) and small xenon mass flow rates (<40 μg/s), by experimentally measuring the extracted ion beam current through a potential difference of ≅1200 V. The discharge geometry is found to operate most efficiently at an input microwave frequency of 1.6 GHz. At this frequency, for an input power of 8 W, and propellant (xenon) mass flow rate of 21 μg/s, 13.7 mA of ion beam current is obtained, equivalent to an calculated thrust of 0.74 mN.

  4. A solvent-extraction module for cyclotron production of high-purity technetium-99m.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martini, Petra; Boschi, Alessandra; Cicoria, Gianfranco; Uccelli, Licia; Pasquali, Micòl; Duatti, Adriano; Pupillo, Gaia; Marengo, Mario; Loriggiola, Massimo; Esposito, Juan

    2016-12-01

    The design and fabrication of a fully-automated, remotely controlled module for the extraction and purification of technetium-99m (Tc-99m), produced by proton bombardment of enriched Mo-100 molybdenum metallic targets in a low-energy medical cyclotron, is here described. After dissolution of the irradiated solid target in hydrogen peroxide, Tc-99m was obtained under the chemical form of 99mTcO4-, in high radionuclidic and radiochemical purity, by solvent extraction with methyl ethyl ketone (MEK). The extraction process was accomplished inside a glass column-shaped vial especially designed to allow for an easy automation of the whole procedure. Recovery yields were always >90% of the loaded activity. The final pertechnetate saline solution Na99mTcO4, purified using the automated module here described, is within the Pharmacopoeia quality control parameters and is therefore a valid alternative to generator-produced 99mTc. The resulting automated module is cost-effective and easily replicable for in-house production of high-purity Tc-99m by cyclotrons. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Improving cancer treatment with cyclotron produced radionuclides. Comprehensive progress report, February 1, 1992--July 15, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Larson, S.M.; Finn, R.D.

    1995-07-17

    This research continues the long term goals of promoting nuclear medicine applications by improving the scientific basis for tumor diagnosis, treatment and treatment follow-up based on the use of cyclotron produced radiotracers in oncology. This program fits into the nuclear medicine component of DOE`s mission, which is aimed at enhancing the beneficial applications of radiation, radionuclides, and stable isotopes in the diagnosis, study and treatment of human diseases. The grant includes 3 interactive components: Radiochemistry/Cyclotron; Pharmacology/Immunology; and Imaging Physics. An essential strategy is as follows: novel radionuclides and radiotracers developed in the Radiochemistry/Section under the DOE grant during the 1992--1995 will be employed in the Pharmacology/Immunology component in the period 1996--1999. Imaging Physics resolves relevant imaging related physics issues that arise during the experimentation that results. In addition to the basic research mission, this project also provides a basis for training of research scientists in radiochemistry, immunology, bioengineering and imaging physics.

  6. Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves in the High-Altitude Cusp: Polar Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, G.; Blanco-Cano, X.; Russell, C. T.; Zhou, X.-W.; Mozer, F.; Trattner, K. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Anderson, B. J.

    2005-01-01

    High-resolution magnetic field data from the Polar Magnetic Field Experiment (MFE) show that narrow-band waves at frequencies approx. 0.2-3 Hz are a permanent feature in the vicinity of the polar cusp. The waves have been found in the magnetosphere adjacent to the cusp (both poleward and equatorward of the cusp) and in the cusp itself. The occurrence of waves is coincident with depression of magnetic field strength associated with enhanced plasma density, indicating the entry of magnetosheath plasma into the cusp region. The wave frequencies are generally scaled by the local proton cyclotron frequency and vary between 0.2 and 1.7 times local proton cyclotron frequency. This suggests that the waves are generated in the cusp region by the precipitating magnetosheath plasma. The properties of the waves are highly variable. The waves exhibit both left-handed and right-handed polarization in the spacecraft frame. The propagation angles vary from nearly parallel to nearly perpendicular to the magnetic field. We find no correlation among wave frequency, propagation angle, and polarization. Combined magnetic field and electric field data for the waves indicate that the energy flux of the waves is guided by the background magnetic field and points downward toward the ionosphere.

  7. Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron Waves in the High Altitude Cusp: Polar Observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Guan; Blanco-Cano, X.; Russell, C. T.; Zhou, X.-W.; Mozer, F.; Trattner, K. J.; Fuselier, S. A.; Anderson, B. J.; Vondrak, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    High-resolution magnetic field data from the Polar Magnetic Field Experiment (MFE) show that narrow band waves at frequencies approximately 0.2 to 3 Hz are a permanent feature in the vicinity of the polar cusp. The waves have been found in the magnetosphere adjacent to the cusp (both poleward and equatorward of the cusp) and in the cusp itself. The occurrence of waves is coincident with depression of magnetic field strength associated with enhanced plasma density, indicating the entry of magnetosheath plasma into the cusp region. The wave frequencies are generally scaled by the local proton cyclotron frequency, and vary between 0.2 and 1.7 times local proton cyclotron frequency. This suggests that the waves are generated in the cusp region by the precipitating magnetosheath plasma. The properties of the waves are highly variable. The waves exhibit both lefthanded and right-handed polarization in the spacecraft frame. The propagation angles vary from nearly parallel to nearly perpendicular to the magnetic field. We find no correlation among wave frequency, propagation angle and polarization. Combined magnetic field and electric field data for the waves indicate that the energy flux of the waves is guided by the background magnetic field and points downward toward the ionosphere.

  8. Precision mass measurements using the Phase-Imaging Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance detection technique

    CERN Document Server

    Karthein, Jonas

    This thesis presents the implementation and improvement of the Phase-Imaging Ion-Cyclotron-Resonance (PI-ICR) detection technique at the ISOLTRAP experiment, located at the ISOLDE / CERN, with the purpose of on-line high-precision and high-resolution mass spectrometry. Extensive simulation studies were performed with the aim of improving the phase-imaging resolution and finding the optimal position for detector placement. Following the outcome of these simulations, the detector was moved out of a region of electric-field distortion and closer to the center of the Penning trap, showing a dramatic improvement in the quality and reproducibility of the phase-imaging measurements. A new image reconstitution and analysis software for the MCP-PS detector was written in Python and ROOT and introduced in the framework of PI-ICR mass measurements. The state of the art in the field of time-of-flight ion-cyclotron-resonance measurements is illustrated through an analysis of on-line measurements of the mirror nuclei $...

  9. NuSTAR Discovery of a Cyclotron Line in KS 1947+300

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furst, Felix; Pottschmidt, Katja; Wilms, Jorn; Kennea, Jamie; Bachetti, Matteo; Bellm, Eric; Boggs, Steven E.; Chakrabarty, Deepto; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; hide

    2014-01-01

    We present a spectral analysis of three simultaneous Nuclear Spectroscopy Telescope Array and Swift/XRT observations of the transient Be-neutron star binary KS 1947+300 taken during its outburst in 2013/2014. These broadband observations were supported by Swift/XRTmonitoring snapshots every three days, which we use to study the evolution of the spectrum over the outburst.We find strong changes of the power-law photon index, which shows a weak trend of softening with increasing X-ray flux. The neutron star shows very strong pulsations with a period of P ˜ [almost equal to] 18.8 s. The 0.8-79 keV broadband spectrum can be described by a power law with an exponential cutoff and a blackbody component at low energies. During the second observation we detect a cyclotron resonant scattering feature at 12.5 keV, which is absent in the phase-averaged spectra of observations 1 and 3. Pulse phase-resolved spectroscopy reveals that the strength of the feature changes strongly with pulse phase and is most prominent during the broad minimum of the pulse profile. At the same phases the line also becomes visible in the first and third observation at the same energy. This discovery implies that KS 1947+300 has a magnetic field strength of B ˜ [almost equal to] 1.1 × 1012(1 + z) G, which is at the lower end of known cyclotron line sources.

  10. Ion cyclotron range of frequencies heating of plasma with small impurity production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohkawa, Tihiro

    1987-01-01

    Plasma including plasma ions is magnetically confined by a magnetic field. The plasma has a defined outer surface and is intersected by resonance surfaces of respective common ion cyclotron frequency of a predetermined species of plasma ions moving in the magnetic field. A radio frequency source provides radio frequency power at a radio frequency corresponding to the ion cyclotron frequency of the predetermined species of plasma ions moving in the field at a respective said resonance surface. RF launchers coupled to the radio frequency source radiate radio frequency energy at the resonance frequency onto the respective resonance surface within the plasma from a plurality of locations located outside the plasma at such respective distances from the intersections of the respective resonance surface and the defined outer surface and at such relative phases that the resulting interference pattern provides substantially null net radio frequency energy over regions near and including substantial portions of the intersections relative to the radio frequency energy provided thereby at other portions of the respective resonance surface within the plasma.

  11. Enhancement of beam pulse controllability for a single-pulse formation system of a cyclotron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurashima, Satoshi; Miyawaki, Nobumasa; Kashiwagi, Hirotsugu; Okumura, Susumu; Taguchi, Mitsumasa; Fukuda, Mitsuhiro

    2015-07-01

    The single-pulse formation technique using a beam chopping system consisting of two types of high-voltage beam kickers was improved to enhance the quality and intensity of the single-pulse beam with a pulse interval over 1 μs at the Japan Atomic Energy Agency cyclotron facility. A contamination rate of neighboring beam bunches in the single-pulse beam was reduced to less than 0.1%. Long-term purification of the single pulse beam was guaranteed by the well-controlled magnetic field stabilization system for the cyclotron magnet. Reduction of the multi-turn extraction number for suppressing the neighboring beam bunch contamination was achieved by restriction of a beam phase width and precise optimization of a particle acceleration phase. In addition, the single-pulse beam intensity was increased by a factor of two or more by a combination of two types of beam bunchers using sinusoidal and saw-tooth voltage waveforms. Provision of the high quality intense single-pulse beam contributed to improve the accuracy of experiments for investigation of scintillation light time-profile and for neutron energy measurement by a time-of-flight method.

  12. Low magnetic field cooling of lepton plasmas via cyclotron-cavity resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, E. D.; Evetts, N.; Fajans, J.; Hardy, W. N.; Landsberger, H.; Mcpeters, R.; Wurtele, J. S.

    2018-01-01

    Pure electron or pure positron plasmas held in magnetic fields B radiate energy because of the cyclotron motion of the plasma particles; nominally, the plasmas should cool to the often cryogenic temperatures of the trap in which they are confined. However, the cyclotron cooling rate for leptons is (1/4 s)(B/1 T)2, and significant cooling is not normally observed unless B ≳ 1 T . Cooling to the trap temperatures of ˜10 K is particularly difficult to attain. Here, we show that dramatically higher cooling rates (×100) and lower temperatures (÷1000) can be obtained if the plasmas are held in electromagnetic cavities rather than in effectively free space conditions. We find that plasmas with up to 107 particles can be cooled in fields close to 0.15 T, much lower than 1 T commonly thought to be necessary to obtain plasma cooling. Appropriate cavities can be constructed with only minor modifications to the standard Penning-Malmberg trap structures.

  13. Direct Technetium radiopharmaceuticals production using a 30MeV Cyclotron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jalilian, AR.; Targholizadeh, H.; Raisali, GR.; Zandi, H.; Kamali Dehgan, M.

    2011-01-01

    Background and the purpose of the study Technetium-99m is the major radionuclide used in the world and mainly is provided by fission product. However extensive research has been conducted on the use of accelerators for production of 99mTc. This investigation reports the production of 99mTc radioisotope using cyclotrons and the preparation, quality control and biodistribution studies of four major Tc-radiopharmaceuticals. Methods The high purity molybdenum natural target (130 mg/cm2) was irradiated in a Cyclone 30 accelerator using 160 µA of 25 MeV proton beam energy for 1000 µA-h. After dissolution, the technetium radionuclides were extracted using methyl ethyl ketone (MEK) followed by preparation of Tc-MIBI, Tc-DTPA, Tc-DMSA and Tc-phytate as radiopharmaceutical samples. Results The results of quality controls and animal biodistribution studies showed successful production of Tc radionuclides (including 99mTc) in the bombarded target and subsequent labelling of the kit with Tc. Conclusion The developed high power Mo target if constructed using enriched 100Mo, could be a practical method for large-scale production of 99mTc and promising as an alternative to fission product 99Mo-99mTc generators for local applications near cyclotron facilities. PMID:22615656

  14. Cyclotron Production of (99m)Tc using (100)Mo2C targets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Vernal N; Mebrahtu, Efrem; Lapi, Suzanne E

    2013-10-01

    An investigative study of the (100)Mo (p,2n)(99m)Tc reaction on a medical cyclotron using (100)Mo2C is reported. This is the first report of this compound being used as a target for this reaction. (100)Mo2C, a refractory carbide with high thermal conductivity, properties which underscore its use on a cyclotron, was synthesized using (100)MoO3. Its ease of oxidation back to (100)MoO3 under air at elevated temperatures facilitates the use of thermo-chromatography, a high temperature gas phase separation technique for the separation and isolation of (99m)Tc. Activity yields for (99m)Tc averaged 84% of the calculated theoretical yields. Additionally, the percent recovery of MoO3, the precursor for Mo2C, was consistently high at 85% ensuring a good life cycle for this target material. The produced (99m)Tc was radio-chemically pure and easily labeled MDP for imaging purposes. © 2013.

  15. Consequences of the Ion Cyclotron Instability in the Inner Magnetospheric Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazanov, George V.

    2011-01-01

    The inner magnetospheric plasma is a very unique composition of different plasma particles and waves. Among these plasma particles and waves are Ring Current (RC) particles and Electromagnetic Ion Cyclotron (EMIC) waves. The RC is the source of free energy for the EMIC wave excitation provided by a temperature anisotropy of RC ions, which develops naturally during inward E x B convection from the plasma sheet. The cold plasmasphere, which is under the strong influence of the magnetospheric electric field, strongly mediates the RC-EMIC waves-coupling process, and ultimately becomes part of the particle and energy interplay, generated by the ion cyclotron instability of the inner magnetosphere. On the other hand, there is a strong influence of the RC on the inner magnetospheric electric and magnetic field configurations and these configurations, in turn, are important to RC dynamics. Therefore, one of the biggest needs for inner magnetospheric plasma physics research is the continued progression toward a coupled, interconnected system, with the inclusion of nonlinear feedback mechanisms between the plasma populations, the electric and magnetic fields, and plasma waves.

  16. On nonlinear Alfvén-cyclotron waves in multi-species plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsch, Eckart; Verscharen, Daniel

    2011-06-01

    Large-amplitude Alfvén waves are ubiquitous in space plasmas and a main component of magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) turbulence in the heliosphere. As pump waves, they are prone to parametric instability by which they can generate cyclotron and acoustic daughter waves. Here, we revisit a related process within the framework of the multi-fluid equations for a plasma consisting of many species. The nonlinear coupling of the Alfvén wave to acoustic waves is studied, and a set of compressive and coupled-wave equations for the transverse magnetic field and longitudinal electric field is derived for waves propagating along the mean-field direction. It turns out that slightly compressive Alfvén waves exert, through induced gyro-radius and kinetic-energy modulations, an electromotive force on the particles in association with a longitudinal electric field, which has a potential that is given by the gradient of the transverse kinetic energy of the particles gyrating about the mean field. This in turn drives electric fluctuations (sound and ion-acoustic waves) along the mean magnetic field, which can nonlinearly react back on the transverse magnetic field. Mutually coupled Alfvén-cyclotron-acoustic waves are thus excited, a nonlinear process that can drive a cascade of wave energy in the plasma, and may generate compressive microturbulence. These driven electric fluctuations might have consequences for the dissipation of an MHD turbulence and, thus, for the heating and acceleration of particles in the solar wind.

  17. Implementation of EPICS based vacuum control system for variable energy cyclotron centre, Kolkata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roy, Anindya, E-mail: r-ani@vecc.gov.in; Bhole, R. B.; Nandy, Partha P.; Yadav, R. C.; Pal, Sarbajit; Roy, Amitava [Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2015-03-15

    The vacuum system of the Room Temperature (K = 130) Cyclotron of Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre is comprised of vacuum systems of main machine and Beam Transport System. The vacuum control system is upgraded to a PLC based Automated system from the initial relay based Manual system. The supervisory control of the vacuum system is implemented in Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). An EPICS embedded ARM based vacuum gauge controller is developed to mitigate the requirement of vendor specific gauge controller for gauges and also for seamless integration of the gauge controllers with the control system. A set of MS-Windows ActiveX components with embedded EPICS Channel Access interface are developed to build operator interfaces with less complex programming and to incorporate typical Windows feature, e.g., user authentication, file handling, better fonts, colors, mouse actions etc. into the operator interfaces. The control parameters, monitoring parameters, and system interlocks of the system are archived in MySQL based EPICS MySQL Archiver developed indigenously. In this paper, we describe the architecture, the implementation details, and the performance of the system.

  18. Implementation of EPICS based vacuum control system for variable energy cyclotron centre, Kolkata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Anindya; Bhole, R. B.; Nandy, Partha P.; Yadav, R. C.; Pal, Sarbajit; Roy, Amitava

    2015-03-01

    The vacuum system of the Room Temperature (K = 130) Cyclotron of Variable Energy Cyclotron Centre is comprised of vacuum systems of main machine and Beam Transport System. The vacuum control system is upgraded to a PLC based Automated system from the initial relay based Manual system. The supervisory control of the vacuum system is implemented in Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS). An EPICS embedded ARM based vacuum gauge controller is developed to mitigate the requirement of vendor specific gauge controller for gauges and also for seamless integration of the gauge controllers with the control system. A set of MS-Windows ActiveX components with embedded EPICS Channel Access interface are developed to build operator interfaces with less complex programming and to incorporate typical Windows feature, e.g., user authentication, file handling, better fonts, colors, mouse actions etc. into the operator interfaces. The control parameters, monitoring parameters, and system interlocks of the system are archived in MySQL based EPICS MySQL Archiver developed indigenously. In this paper, we describe the architecture, the implementation details, and the performance of the system.

  19. The electron-cyclotron maser instability as a source of plasma radiation. [Solar radio bursts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winglee, R. M.; Dulk, G. A.

    1986-01-01

    The generation of continuum bursts from the sun at dm and m wavelengths (in particular, type IV bursts) via the electron-cyclotron-maser instability is examined. The maser instability can be driven by an electron distribution with either a loss-cone anisotropy or a peak at large pitch angles. For omega(p)/Omega(e) much greater than 1, the maser emission is produced by electrons interacting through a harmonic (cyclotron) resonance and is electrostatic, being in the upper hybrid mode at frequencies approximately equal to omega(p). Coalescence processes are required to convert the electrostatic waves into transverse radiation which can escape from the source region. Whether the resultant spectrum is nearly a smooth continuum or has a zebra-stripe pattern (both of which occur in type IV bursts) depends on the form of the electron distribution, inhomogeneities in the density and magnetic field, and whether the maser reaches saturation. For at least the case of some type IV dm bursts with fine structure, comparison with observations seems to indicate that the electrons producing the emission are more likely to have a loss-cone distribution, and that the maser instability is not at saturation.

  20. Conceptual design studies of the Electron Cyclotron launcher for DEMO reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moro, Alessandro; Bruschi, Alex; Franke, Thomas; Garavaglia, Saul; Granucci, Gustavo; Grossetti, Giovanni; Hizanidis, Kyriakos; Tigelis, Ioannis; Tran, Minh-Quang; Tsironis, Christos

    2017-10-01

    A demonstration fusion power plant (DEMO) producing electricity for the grid at the level of a few hundred megawatts is included in the European Roadmap [1]. The engineering design and R&D for the electron cyclotron (EC), ion cyclotron and neutral beam systems for the DEMO reactor is being performed by Work Package Heating and Current Drive (WPHCD) in the framework of EUROfusion Consortium activities. The EC target power to the plasma is about 50 MW, in which the required power for NTM control and burn control is included. EC launcher conceptual design studies are here presented, showing how the main design drivers of the system have been taken into account (physics requirements, reactor relevant operations, issues related to its integration as in-vessel components). Different options for the antenna are studied in a parameters space including a selection of frequencies, injection angles and launch points to get the best performances for the antenna configuration, using beam tracing calculations to evaluate plasma accessibility and deposited power. This conceptual design studies comes up with the identification of possible limits, constraints and critical issues, essential in the selection process of launcher setup solution.