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Sample records for brooke army medical

  1. An Examination of Referral Physician Attitudes Toward Brooke Army Medical Center as a Tertiary Care Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-01

    as a referral center as the basis for developing a marketing strategy . D MTRIPUO =1 ~ ’ 0 N Approved Z.r =uzic :eI’,.~e: I, Dj rzut.:n Un. ::ed 20...have become the principal constituency group that holds the key to meeting this goal. In this regard, a marketing strategy must be developed...Brooke Army Medical Center’s Health Service Region towards BAMC as a referral center as the basis 9 for developing a marketing strategy . Objectives The

  2. Market Assessment of Brooke Army Medical Center - A Strategy for Today and the Future

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-08-01

    ticipation and representation in communitywide social or sports activi- ties are invited and strongly supported by the BAMC leadership. The purpose of...or individuals with supervisory responsibility in the outpatient setting (e.g., chief of podiatry , chief of occupational therapy, chief of physical... Sports events and activities (e.g., nutrition care run and wellness fair). c. Television and newspaper health spots. II. Increase Brooke Army

  3. Quantitative Analysis of Contributing Factors Affecting Patient Satisfaction in Family Medicine Service Clinics at Brooke Army Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-06

    physicians, Doctors of Medicine (M.D.) or Doctors of Osteopathy (D.O.); physician assistants; or clinical nurse practitioners. Physicians, physician...treatment methods including spinal manipulation and the whole body concept and confer the Doctor of Osteopathy (D.O.) degree. After completion of...medical school, both Doctors of Medicine and Doctors of Osteopathy are licensed by their state boards and may become board certified in any medical

  4. U.S. Army Medical Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Excerpt-3 Building partnerships through military medicine Tripler Army Medical Center assists in medical missions. Read more ... their age, height, and weight. Healthy Living Videos Army Medicine Health Minute View More Videos

  5. US Army Medical Department Journal, January - March 2008. Warriors in Transition; Healing with Dignity and Determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-01

    reported witnessing the use and sale medication-related risk. In response, Brooke Army of cocaine, marijuana , and mushrooms within the Medical Center...Pain. chronic non- cancer pain. Pain. 2007:129:355-362. 1997;72:245-25 1. 28. Daniell H. Hypogonadism in men consuming 16. Bryant R, Harvey A...ability of modem medicine to effect a " cure " for severely brain-injured patients is limited. The initial Hyperventilation and extreme hypocarbia are

  6. U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and thank you for your interest in the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID). ... This Web site provides an introduction to the U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases (USAMRIID) ...

  7. United States Army Medical Department Journal. Leadership in the Army Medical Department, October - December 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-12-01

    work, The Origin of Species,’ is that the key to survival in biological evolution is the ability of a species to adapt. A species that does not adapt...attorneys, military paralegals , and civilian paralegals providing legal support throughout the AMEDD at the 8 medical centers and numerous hospitals...Army Medical Command (MEDCOM), mobilized 18 Judge Advocates and paralegals in 2007 and has continued a cycle of mobilizations of legal personnel to

  8. US Army Medical Department Journal, April-June 2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    793. AUTHOR: 12. Bailit M, Dyer MB. Beyond bankable dollars: Establishing a business tMedical Corps, U.S. Army. Lieutenant Colonel Rice is an...Available at http://www.emwf.org/usr _ d o / Care Administration and is assigned to Headquarters, U.S. Army Medical Bailitbeyond bankable

  9. Professionalism and Leadership in the Army Medical Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    Colonel Daniel F . Perugini U. S. Army Faculty Research Advisor Dr. John E. Bokel Dut&~Unaz~i :.4l The Industrial College of the Armed Forces National...profession, from patient care to command. Daniel F . Perugini 1992 Executive Research Project RS 3f Professionalism and Leadership in the Army Medical...Department Colonel Daniel F . Perugini U. S. Army Faculty Research Advisor Dr. John E. Bokel 4- I-orce 4Ls • ..... ’ /or The Industrial College of the Armed

  10. The United States Army Medical Department Journal, April - June 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    Certification exam. Additionally, they are offered the opportunity to take the ServSafe ® certification examination.† The Navy trains Preventive Medicine...the ServSafe Exam.5(p5) Navy  Scope of practice – a concern because Navy PMTs operate clinically, unlike Army preventive medicine personnel...with other programs relocating and integrating into the Medical Education and Training Campus concept. *Army Training Course 322-68S10 †The ServSafe

  11. [Medical research in the US Armed Forces (Report 3). The US Army].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agapitov, A A; Aleĭnikov, S I; Bolekhan, V I; Ivchenko, I V; Krassiĭ, A B; Nagibovich, O A; Petrov, S V; Rezvantsev, M V; Soldatov, E A; Shalakhin, R A; Sheppli, E V

    2012-12-01

    The US Army. The present article is the third part of the review dedicated to organization and management of medical research in the US Armed Forces. The first and the second parts have been published in the previous issuses of the journal. Specifically this article is dedicated to organization and management of medical research in the US Army. It is shown that in the US Army the medical and biological research is conducted and coordinated by the special US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command. The following units are successively presented: US Army Institute of Surgical Research, US Army Medical Research Institute of Chemical Defense, US Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious Diseases, US Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine, Walter Reed Army Institute of Research, US Army Aeromedical Research Laboratory, Armed Forces Institute of Regenerative Medicine. The particular research programs conducting in the above mentioned institutions are presented.

  12. Delinquent Medical Service Accounts at Brooke Army Medical Center Need Additional Management Oversight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-08-13

    project focused on capture of the DD Form 2569 within BAMC to assist the working group. Also, according to the Chief of Staff, a Lean Six Sigma ... six claims were valued at $3.1 million. BAMC UBO management noted that SAMMC is not a registered TMHP provider, and these patients had to receive... six denied claims, only two account files contained evidence that BAMC personnel sent a letter to TMHP officials disputing the denial; however, each

  13. US Army Medical Research and Development Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-10-01

    findings in this report are not to be construed as an official Department of the Army position unless so designated by other authorized documents...characteristics. ACHIEVEMENTS: A commercial dental X-ray film processor unit devel- oped and marketed by the Air Techniques Inc. Company of New Hyde Park, NY, was...has been designed which will increase the usefulness of the standard r. ubered containers. Prototypes will be procured during 2nd Quarter FY80. 83 D

  14. Is the British Army medical grading functional assessment tool effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackie, Isobel

    2015-12-01

    Decision Support Aids (DSAs) have been widely used throughout industry and one (known as Table 7) is available to support British Army Medical Officers (MOs) grade soldiers against the Joint Medical Employment Standards. It is unknown how useful this DSA is in practice. An electronic questionnaire was distributed to British Army MOs working within Defence Primary Care facilities enquiring about MOs views on the usefulness of the DSA. Although the response rate was low, informative data were obtained. Between a half and a third of respondents felt that their judgement was affected in the application of the grading system when there were career implications to the grading MOs felt that the DSA allowed subjectivity in the grading. The results of this research suggest that although minor changes to Table 7 may improve service provision, an improvement in training in the application of Table 7 would be of greater benefit to the quality of occupational health service provision in the British Army.

  15. The United States Army Medical Department Journal. October - December 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    Hall et al14 compared the success rate of endotracheal intubation among paramedic students trained on a human patient simulator group or on human...Kang J, Hall CA. Human patient simulation is effective for teaching paramedic students endotracheal intubation . Acad Emerg Med. 2005;12(9):850-855...published in The Army Medical Department Journal are listed and indexed in MEDLINE, the National Library of Medicine’s premier bibliographic database of life

  16. The United States Army Medical Department Journal. October - December 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-01

    THIS PAGE unclassified Standard Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 October – December 2012 The Army Medical Department Center...health benefits increase as you spend more time being active. Children and adolescents : get 60 minutes or more a day. Adults: get 2 hours and 30...AFB, Delaware ; and Fort Sam Houston, Texas.7 In addition, the Joint Pa- thology Center, the federal govern- ment’s pathology resource center, was

  17. Physician Retention in the Army Medical Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-16

    Fifteen years ago, these jobs were filled by General Medical Officers ( GMO ) -- graduates of internships who spent some time “muddying their boots” in the...field while waiting a year or two for the residency position of their choice. Today, the GMO is an endangered species. In an effort to provide the best

  18. Medically Documented Suicide Ideation Among U.S. Army Soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursano, Robert J; Kessler, Ronald C; Stein, Murray B; Naifeh, James A; Nock, Matthew K; Aliaga, Pablo A; Fullerton, Carol S; Wynn, Gary H; Ng, Tsz Hin Hinz; Dinh, Hieu M; Sampson, Nancy A; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Schoenbaum, Michael; McCarroll, James E; Cox, Kenneth L; Heeringa, Steven G

    2016-11-29

    We used administrative data to examine predictors of medically documented suicide ideation (SI) among Regular Army soldiers from 2006 through 2009 (N = 10,466 ideators, 124,959 control person-months). Enlisted ideators (97.8% of all cases) were more likely than controls to be female, younger, older when entering service, less educated, never or previously deployed, and have a recent mental health diagnosis. Officer ideators were more likely than controls to be female, younger, younger when entering service, never married, and have a recent mental health diagnosis. Risk among enlisted soldiers peaked in the second month of service and declined steadily, whereas risk among officers remained relatively stable over time. Risk of SI is highest among enlisted soldiers early in Army service, females, and those with a recent mental health diagnosis.

  19. Annual Research Progress Report, Fiscal Year 1988. Volume 2. (Brooke Army Medical Center)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-10-01

    cura ~le treatment. Patients with a cumulative dose of Adriamycin > 250 mq/m are not eligible for this study. allowable prior chemotherapy depends on...obtain estimates of mortality at five years. 2) To determine whether histologic criteria or pattern of spread can be used to distinguish subsets of

  20. Recommendation Analysis for an Ambulatory Surgical Center at Brooke Army Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-10

    provided at this time. Operating Rooms There would be seven operating rooms configured in the most optimum way with ergonomic considerations addressed...each $5,000.00 $350.00 N/A $5,350.00 4 $21,400.00 Computer for X-Ray visualization each $5,000.00 $350.00 N/A $5,350.00 4 $21,400.00 Stools ...sitting each $200.00 $14.00 N/A $214.00 4 $856.00 Stools - rolling each $300.00 $21.00 N/A $321.00 4 $1,284.00 Step stools each $100.00 $7.00 N/A $107.00 4

  1. Annual Research Progress Report, Fiscal Year 1988. Volume 1. (Brooke Army Medical Center)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-10-01

    Quantification. (0) 279 C-68-88 Non-Thermal Pulsed High Peak Power Electromagnetic Energy 280 (DiapulseTM ) in the Treatment of Ankle Sprains. (0) C-70-88...Ministry and Pastoral Care Hn.;enauer, H., Anderson, L. The magical power of pets. Soldiers, (in press). (C) Department of Nursing Maloney, J.P...Symptomatic Cholelithiasis . Residents Symposium, Fort Sam Houston, TX, 26 Mar 88. Olsen, S.B. Appendicitis in the Over 50 Population. Residents Symposium

  2. Suicide attempts in U.S. Army combat arms, special forces and combat medics

    OpenAIRE

    Ursano, Robert J.; Kessler, Ronald C.; Naifeh, James A.; Mash, Holly Herberman; Fullerton, Carol S.; Ng, Tsz Hin Hinz; Aliaga, Pablo A.; Wynn, Gary H; Dinh, Hieu M.; McCarroll, James E.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Schoenbaum, Michael; Heeringa, Steven G; Stein, Murray B.

    2017-01-01

    Background: The U.S. Army suicide attempt rate increased sharply during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Risk may vary according to occupation, which significantly influences the stressors that soldiers experience. Methods: Using administrative data from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS), we identified person-month records for all active duty Regular Army enlisted soldiers who had a medically documented suicide attempt from 2004 through 2009 (n = 96...

  3. U.S. Army Medical Department Journal (October-December 2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-12-01

    headaches, migraines, concussions, seizures , syncope, epilepsy , nonsurgical neck or back pain, chronic pain syndromes, and vague neuropsychiatric...Medical Information Program 65 During Operation Iraqi Freedom IV MAJ Mark L. Higdon, MC, USA Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188...US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, Fort Detrick, Maryland. 20 Army Medical Department Journal INTRODUCTION Operation Iraqi Freedom has

  4. Civilian primary care prescribing psychologist in an army medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shearer, David S

    2012-12-01

    The present article discusses the integration of a civilian prescribing psychologist into a primary care clinic at Madigan Army Medical Center. A description of the role of the prescribing psychologist in this setting is provided. The author asserts that integrating prescribing psychology into primary care can improve patient access to skilled behavioral health services including psychotherapeutic and psychopharmacologic treatment. Potential benefits to the primary care providers (PCPs) working in primary care clinics are discussed. The importance of collaboration between the prescribing psychologist and PCP is emphasized. Initial feedback indicates that integration of a prescribing psychologist into primary care has been well received in this setting.

  5. Cost-Benefit Analysis of Radiation Therapy Services at Tripler Army Medical Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Diehl, Diane S

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this analysis was to examine the costs and benefits associated with continuance of "in-house" radiation therapy services to eligible beneficiaries at Tripler Army Medical Center (TAMC...

  6. Unjustly accused? Medical authorities and army recruitment in Australia 1914-1918

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Tyquin

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Throughout World One, army recruiting in Australia was subject to wartime demands, demographic constraints and political interference. Australia’s small medical establishment became better in dealing with these issues, helped by the greater combat experience of the Australian Army Medical Corps. Within the political and military constraints of the day it generally responded well to changing Government and military policies at home and abroad. This was despite serious differences in opinion within the senior command of the Corps.

  7. The Department of Defense and Veteran Affairs Health Care Joint Venture at Tripler Army Medical Center Needs More Management Oversight

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-18

    E M B E R 1 8 , 2 0 1 3 The Department of Defense and Veteran Affairs Health Care Joint Venture at Tripler Army Medical Center Needs More...Department of Defense and Veteran Affairs Health Care Joint Venture at Tripler Army Medical Center Needs More Management Oversight 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER...Health Care Joint Venture at Tripler Army Medical Center Needs More Management Oversight Objective Our audit objective was to determine whether the

  8. General Duties Medical Officer Role 1 remote supervision in the era of Army Contingency Operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin-Bates, Alexander James; Jefferys, S E

    2016-08-01

    The return to contingency after Operation HERRICK (2002-2014 Afghanistan conflict) has seen an emerging trend for small-scale rapidly developing expeditionary operations. The associated small, remote medical footprint for such operations, often within a coalition construct, reliant on host nation support is in direct conflict with the General Medical Council (GMC) guidelines for junior doctor supervision in an 'approved practice setting'. If a General Duties Medical Officer (GDMO) is nominated to support future operations, the provision of assured patient care and supervision within GMC guidelines, while ensuring career progression and ongoing education, may prove a challenge. Recently published British Army Policy aims to provide a framework to meet these challenges. The authors' first-hand experience in implementing this policy is explored further. The deployment of a remotely supervised GDMO, in line with British Army Policy, is both suitable and safe. This should assure quality medical care delivery during the era of Army Contingency Operations.

  9. Army Medical Support for Peace Operations and Humanitarian Assistance,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    gum infection. The Army’s maxillofacial surgeon ended up having to pull a number of the soldier’s teeth and treat him with massive doses of...extensive postinjury physiotherapy and follow-up orthopedic care; (g) radiol- ogy capability;44 (h) one two-tent section (four bunks) for psychiatric

  10. Nuclear Medical Science Officers: Army Health Physicists Serving and Defending Their Country Around the Globe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melanson, Mark; Bosley, William; Santiago, Jodi; Hamilton, Daniel

    2010-02-01

    Tracing their distinguished history back to the Manhattan Project that developed the world's first atomic bomb, the Nuclear Medical Science Officers are the Army's experts on radiation and its health effects. Serving around the globe, these commissioned Army officers serve as military health physicists that ensure the protection of Soldiers and those they defend against all sources of radiation, military and civilian. This poster will highlight the various roles and responsibilities that Nuclear Medical Science Officers fill in defense of the Nation. Areas where these officers serve include medical health physics, deployment health physics, homeland defense, emergency response, radiation dosimetry, radiation research and training, along with support to the Army's corporate radiation safety program and international collaborations. The poster will also share some of the unique military sources of radiation such as depleted uranium, which is used as an anti-armor munition and in armor plating because of its unique metallurgic properties. )

  11. U.S. Army Medical Department Journal (April-June 2006)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-06-01

    have asthma .9 Diabetes now affects 20.8 million Americans, 7% of our population and a 6.3% increase since 2002.10 Like the military, the US as a whole...Sciences, Bangkok, Thailand; US Army Medical Research Unit- Kenya , Nairobi; Naval Medical Research Center Detachment, Lima, Peru; Naval Medical Research...Philippines, Cuba, Ethiopia, Kenya , Kyrgyzstan, Pakistan, Saudi Arabia, Uganda, Uzbekistan (air, water, soil, industrial hygiene) Iraqi Freedom 2003–2006 5,503

  12. Medical students' unique experience of army leadership training: a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Earis, John; Garner, J; Haddock, D; Jenkins, J; Jha, V

    2017-02-13

    To assess the interactive experience of first year medical students attending the leadership and management course hosted by a British Army Reserve Field Hospital developed in partnership with Liverpool University. 244 students submitted a 1000-word structured reflective learning assignment about their reaction to, learning from and any behaviour and attitude changes as a result of, the training. The assignments were thematically analysed to identify how aspects of the training had impacted upon the students' understanding of leadership and teamwork. Their comments relating to the army were analysed to gain insight into their views and experience of the training. Students were surprised at how enjoyable and useful they found the course. Initially they expressed scepticism about what they could learn in an army-based environment. However, the training, particularly command and planning tasks, helped them appreciate and understand the different skills individuals can bring to a team environment, and the importance of everyone contributing. While some students were challenged by aspects of the course, with support and encouragement from team-mates and the army personnel, they learned they could achieve more together. Teaching leadership and management skills to medical students is a challenge which can be effectively addressed by adapting and developing army training resources. Students overcame initial scepticism about participating, and learned a lot about themselves and each other. In addition, the army developed a better understanding of the doctors of the future. The expertise of the army in delivering this training was crucial to its success as the medical school could not have provided this experience unsupported. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/.

  13. Radiology in World War II (Medical Department, United States Army)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1966-01-01

    of opinion as the war progressed. They included: 102 RADIOLOGY FJiuG-z 33.-Moderately advanced pulmon - ary tuberculosis detected in routine roent...therapy of cancer , like its surgical management, had become so complex that, unless the disease was treated with skill far above the average, therapeutic...efforts directed toward it could be wasted. To control cancer with X-rays produced by the equipment available to Army hospitals, except the equipment

  14. AMEDD Clinical Psychology Short Course, 10 - 15 May 1992, Eisenhower Army Medical Center, Augusta, Georgia

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-01-01

    program, the other having occurred at William Beaumont Army Medical Center in 1990. Since 1971, the Fort Ord program has recruited and trained some of our...Press. Tait, R., & Silver, R. C. (1989). Coming to terms with major negative life events. In J. S. Uleman and J. A. Bargh (Eds.). Unintended thought

  15. Computer Simulation of an Anesthesia Service at a U.S. Army Medical Treatment Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    1999-08-01

    Anesthesia Simulation Study 1 Running head : ANESTHESIA SIMULATION Computer Simulation of an Anesthesia Service at a U.S. Army Medical Treatment...bettering marketing efforts). There are several articles that address staffing from the perspective of what type of provider is the most cost

  16. Annual Research Progress Report Fiscal Year 1990. Volume 1. Department of Clinical Investigation (Brooke Army Medical Center)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-10-01

    encephalopathy and hydrophosphatemia. Critical Care Medicine, 4:_, 1990. Lamiell, J. H. Physiologica monitoring of combat casualties. Milit. Med., 154:186...to the uremic syndrome in such patients. 88 Detail Summary Sheet Date: 18 Sep 90 Proj No: C-23-89 Status: Ongoing Title: Rvtrospective Analysis of

  17. A Business Case Analysis to Determine the Feasibility of a Scrub Management System at Brooke Army Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-07

    MRDOs), which include Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) and gram - negative bacilli (GNB...142.8) (289.0) (139.6) (428.6) (136.5) (565.1) (133.4) (698.5) The implementation of scenario two would result in a negative net cash flow in

  18. AMEDD Clinical Psychology Short Course Held at Brooke Army Medical Center, San Antonio, Texas, 5-9 June 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-01

    it appeared to be a much more healthy coping response than closing buildings, packing up bags, and "going home to mama ." Prehostilities Although the...conditions ( tumors , cerebral vascular malformations, etc.) or illnesses in which the headache is a symptom of the underlying disease process. (Figure 1...Brain Injury 15 Vascular 8 Tumor 6 Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) 22 Epilepsy 3 Other 8 Total 62 79 TABLE 2 CORRELATION MATRIX OF MFQ WITH

  19. Annual Research Progress Report Fiscal Year 1990. Volume 2. Department of Clinical Investigation (Brooke Army Medical Center)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-10-01

    W7-r5 CON AdI -f-O AT NUMBEf’l(’q CHARLES P. KINGSLEY Major, MC i 9. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NlAME ANO ADDRESS 10 PROGRAM rLEmN . PROJECT. TASK...efficacy, toxicity and feasibility of administration of PEG -L-asparaginase versus native L-asparaginase as part of a standard combination chemotherapy...describe the pharmacokinetics and cytotoxic effect within the cerebrospi- nal fluid (CSF) of intravenous 6-mercaptopurine (6-MP) given -as a single agent

  20. Annual Research Progress Report Fiscal Year 1992. Volume 2. Department of Clinical Investigation (Brooke Army Medical Center)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-01-01

    Treatment of Dysphagia Following Head and Neck Surgery. (0) SWOG 8896 Phase III Protocol for Surgical Adjuvant Therapy of Rectal 403 Carcinoma: A Controlled...1 Oct 92 Proj No: SWOG 8895 Status: Ongoing Title: Phase III Study of the role of Cricopharyngeal Myotomy in the Treatment of Dysphagia following...associated with each of the above courses. 3) To determine other systemic toxicities (infections, nutritional , etc.) associated with this intensive one

  1. A Study to Determine the Feasibility of Implementing Same-Day Surgery at Brooke Army Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    This number will steadily rise as additional changes in technology, such as improved anesthesia methods and new procedures (e.g., with lasers ) are...Q LASER LARYNGOSCOPY VOCAL CORD INJECTION z ESOPHAGOSCOPY-DIAGNOSTIC ESOPHAGOSCOPY WITH FOREIGH BODY REMOVAL z -4ESOPHAGOSCOPY WITH STRICTURE DILATION...PROCEDURES) ADENOIDECTOMY TONSILLECTOMY T & A UVULOPALATOPHARYNGOPLASTY NASAL POLYPECTOMY SUBMUCOUS RESECTION OF SEPTUM NASAL SEPTOPLASTY TURBINECTOMY

  2. Technology complementing military behavioral health efforts at tripler army medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stetz, Melba C; Folen, Raymond A; Yamanuha, Bronson K

    2011-06-01

    The purpose of this article is to provide a short narrative on the ways that behavioral health professionals and their patients are currently benefitting from the use of technology. Examples stem from applications of technology to patients/research participants at the Tripler Army Medical Center. The paper also discusses how current use of this technology has made it possible to serve individuals in their own cultural environment, providing a cost-effective means of providing mental health services.

  3. Annual Research Progress Report (William Beaumont Army Medical Center) FY 1983

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-03-23

    101 Napolitano, P: 92/69 (C) (PR) Pregnancy After Failed Tubal Ligations : A Review of William Beaumont Army Medical Center’s Experience...Failed Tubal Ligation : A Review of WBAMCs Deparbent of Pedi•ics Experience. Armed Forces District Atkinson AW Attention Deficit Meeting of the American...carcinoma, post -venography infarction, etc.; (4) to detect functioning adrenal remnant after adrenalectomy for Cushing’s syndrome ; (5) to aid In

  4. A Study of Civilian Registered Nurse Recruitment at Madigan Army Medical Center, Tacoma, Washington.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-06-01

    127 H. A MARKETING MIX FOR CIVILIAN REGISTERED NURSE *RECRUITMENT AT MADIGAN ARMY MEDICAL CENTER ... ... 131 SELECTED BIBLIOGRAPHY...employement should be promoted to this market. RN Recruitment Marketing Mix for Madigan The major finding in the market analysis of civilian RN...should be targeted; all gain their impetus from MAMC nursing management. A sumimary of the marketing mix is tabulated at Appendix H. This brief listing of

  5. The United States Army Medical Department Journal. July-September 2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    virus antigens were detected in hair follicles of nuchal skin biopsy specimens by direct immunofl uorescence, and rabies viral RNA was found in...be reprinted if credit is given to the author(s). OFFICIAL DISTRIBUTION: This publication is targeted to US Army Medical Department units and...Louis, MO: Saunders/Elsevier; 2006:676- 681. Godfrey MER. Non- target and secondary poison-24. ing hazards of “second generation” anticoagulants

  6. Leadership and the Army Medical Specialist Corps Officer

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-04-06

    George Patton, and Martin Luther King were inspiring, at least to those they led. Many people feel that inspiration requires eloquence, an ability to...skills. Therefore, medical professionals need to pay particular attention to leadership and management competencies. Visionary Leadership implies...behaviors. LEADERSHIP BEHAVIORS Clarifies Roles Closely related to the visionary and forward-looking characteristic previously discussed is role

  7. United States Army Medical Department Journal, January-March 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-01

    kidney dialysis treatment, and artificial nutrition and hydration. The term does not include the administration of pain management medication or the...person the right to refuse lifesaving hydration and nutrition . The Court noted that "most state courts have based a right to refuse treatment on...and Cosmetic Act (FFDCA) defines substantial evidence as ...evidence consisting of adequate and well-controlled investigations, including clinical

  8. The Tripler Army Medical Center LEAN Program: a healthy lifestyle model for the treatment of obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    James, L C; Folen, R A; Garland, F N; Edwards, C; Noce, M; Gohdes, D; Williams, D; Bowles, S; Kellar, M A; Supplee, E

    1997-05-01

    This paper provides an overview of the Tripler Army Medical Center LEAN Program for the treatment of obesity, hypercholesterolemia, and essential hypertension. The LEAN Program, a multi-disciplinary prevention program, emphasizes healthy Lifestyles, Exercise and Emotions, Attitudes, and Nutrition for active duty service members. The treatment model offers a medically healthy, emotionally safe, and reasonable, low-intensity exercise program to facilitate weight loss. We will discuss the philosophy behind the LEAN Program and the major components. Thereafter, we will briefly discuss the preliminary results.

  9. Quality of Care Indicators in the AMEDD (Army Medical Department)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    Evaluation, Indicators 6 7rACT (Ceate - re,,vee sfr ,f d ideif y bio\\onb,) Ihis study looked at the feasibility of thev(MEDD)constructing a list of...affect the final list chosen. 7. The list of indicators should not be limited to " failures " or "errors" in medical practice. 6.p, 8. The list of...PATIENTS TRANSFUSED . TH WEIGHT RECORDED 100 1 PIN RNU3 1ED WITH ELECTROLYTE DETERMINATION 00 1 1 WITH INDICATION FOR TRANSFLS ON 100 I 2 2 WiTH ANEMIA EX

  10. Suicide attempts in U.S. Army combat arms, special forces and combat medics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ursano, Robert J; Kessler, Ronald C; Naifeh, James A; Mash, Holly Herberman; Fullerton, Carol S; Ng, Tsz Hin Hinz; Aliaga, Pablo A; Wynn, Gary H; Dinh, Hieu M; McCarroll, James E; Sampson, Nancy A; Kao, Tzu-Cheg; Schoenbaum, Michael; Heeringa, Steven G; Stein, Murray B

    2017-05-25

    The U.S. Army suicide attempt rate increased sharply during the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Risk may vary according to occupation, which significantly influences the stressors that soldiers experience. Using administrative data from the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS), we identified person-month records for all active duty Regular Army enlisted soldiers who had a medically documented suicide attempt from 2004 through 2009 (n = 9650) and an equal-probability sample of control person-months (n = 153,528). Logistic regression analyses examined the association of combat occupation (combat arms [CA], special forces [SF], combat medic [CM]) with suicide attempt, adjusting for socio-demographics, service-related characteristics, and prior mental health diagnosis. In adjusted models, the odds of attempting suicide were higher in CA (OR = 1.2 [95% CI: 1.1-1.2]) and CM (OR = 1.4 [95% CI: 1.3-1.5]), but lower in SF (OR = 0.3 [95% CI: 0.2-0.5]) compared to all other occupations. CA and CM had higher odds of suicide attempt than other occupations if never deployed (ORs = 1.1-1.5) or previously deployed (ORs = 1.2-1.3), but not when currently deployed. Occupation was associated with suicide attempt in the first ten years of service, but not beyond. In the first year of service, primarily a time of training, CM had higher odds of suicide attempt than both CA (OR = 1.4 [95% CI: 1.2-1.6]) and other occupations (OR = 1.5 [95% CI: 1.3-1.7]). Discrete-time hazard functions revealed that these occupations had distinct patterns of monthly risk during the first year of service. Military occupation can inform the understanding suicide attempt risk among soldiers.

  11. Triage Decision Trees and Triage Protocols: Changing Strategies for Medical Rescue in Civilian Mass Casualty Situations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-02-06

    o . .. ° . - . . - • . . . . state of fruition by Gtnerall Basil Pruitt of Brooke Army Medical Center. A simple calculation based on the depth...A.S., Berstein R.S. and Johnson D.S., Ocular effects following the volcanic eruptions of Mount St. Helens, Arch Ophthalmol 101 Mar 83 p. 376 79

  12. Brooke-Spiegler syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szepietowski, J C; Wasik, F; Szybejko-Machaj, G; Bieniek, A; Schwartz, R A

    2001-07-01

    The Brooke-Spiegler syndrome is an autosomal dominant one characterized by cylindromas, trichoepitheliomas and occasionally spiradenomas. Within a given family, some members may have cylindromas whereas others may have trichoepitheliomas or both. We describe the coexistence of trichoepithelioma papulosum multiplex (also known as epithelioma adenoides cysticum of Brooke) and cylindromas in a 30-year-old man, and discuss the relationship between these two autosomal dominant syndromes.

  13. Dealing with drug-seeking patients: the Tripler Army Medical Center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, P; Gaule, D

    1999-12-01

    Patients who exhibit drug-seeking behavior are a chronic problem in most health care delivery settings. In June 1996, Tripler Army Medical Center, a tertiary care hospital serving approximately 300,000 beneficiaries, implemented a sole provider program to identify and help such patients. A multidisciplinary sole provider team assigns a sole provider to identified drug seekers. Twice a year, the team scans a printout of all prescriptions for controlled substances to identify suspicious drug usage patterns. The team also accepts referrals from health care providers. This article describes the program and reports on results, problems encountered, and steps taken to improve its efficacy.

  14. What is the value of graduate education? An economic analysis of Army Medical Department Graduate Programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewley, Lee W; Broom, Kevin D; Bonica, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Current and forward-looking resource constraints within the federal health system and general health market are generating questions of fiscal or economic viability of a number of programs including graduate education. This article establishes a framework for assessing economic value among graduate health-related programs within the Army Medical Department. The findings of this analysis indicated that the programs evaluated in the study generate positive economic value based on a market-based valuation of extrinsic benefits compared to extrinsic costs for conducting graduate education within each of the programs. Suggestions for future research and policy application are also discussed.

  15. The health of the American slave examined by means of Union Army medical statistics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freemon, F R

    1985-01-01

    The health status of the American slave in the 19th century remains unclear despite extensive historical research. Better knowledge of slave health would provide a clearer picture of the life of the slave, a better understanding of the 19th-century medicine, and possibly even clues to the health problems of modern blacks. This article hopes to contribute to the literature by examining another source of data. Slaves entering the Union Army joined an organization with standardized medical care that generated extensive statistical information. Review of these statistics answers questions about the health of young male blacks at the time American slavery ended.

  16. Graphical user interface for a remote medical monitoring system: U.S. Army medic recommendations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushik, Sangeeta; Tharion, William J

    2009-11-01

    We obtained recommendations for a graphical user interface (GUI) design for a new medical monitoring system. Data were obtained from 26 combat-experienced medics. Volunteers were briefed on the medical monitoring system. They then completed a questionnaire on background medical treatment experience, provided drawings on how and what information should be displayed on the GUI screens for use on a personal digital assistant, and participated in focus group sessions with four to seven medics per group to obtain group consensus on what information the GUI screens should contain. Detailed displays on seven screens provide the medical and situational awareness information medics need for triage decisions and for early processing of a casualty. The created GUI screens are a combination of object-based and text-based information using a color-coded system. Medics believed the information displayed with these GUI designs would improve treatment of casualties on the battlefield.

  17. Department of the Army Supply Bulletin, Army Medical Department Supply Information, SB8-75-S7

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    operations. In that light, key SCMD personnel have traveled to various Major Army Command (MACOM) locations, marketing our strategic capabilities and...4) One (1) 1x1 Brigade Set on various ships. b. These sets do not contain exclusionary items such as controlled drugs, refrigerated, or P&D

  18. A Study to Determine the Impact of Medical Readiness Programs on Fiscal Year 1987 Resource Utilization at Tripler Army Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-10-01

    Requirements..48 McAdam III Ligt of Tables (Continued) Table Number Title Pale Nomber 1 Opportunity Cost of Exercise Support .... 50 19 Total Manpower...Advanced Trauma Life Support Materials Costo Medical Supplies Item Required Unit Price Unit of Measure Unit Cost Quantity Cost Catheter, 16 gauge S 48.22 50...McAdam 56 Chapter III - Summary Medical readiness programs are a vital part of the Army Medical Department mission. They are an integral part of

  19. Conserving the Future Force Fighting Strength: Findings from the Army Medical Department Transformation Workshops, 2002

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-01-01

    TRADOC, AAN Overview Briefing: Army After Next-Knowledge, Speed and Power, Fort Monroe : U.S. Army TRADOC, 1999. 6 Conserving the Future Force Fighting...to Army if AMEDO hseof Pr Issue Not Resolved in Another Reovd Control mation Conditional Issue 1AN:, What doctrina mdchange mconsiderations of MOUn T

  20. An Analysis of a VA/DoD High-Tech Joint Venture at Womack Army Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-07-01

    interest groups to expand the ’ joint venture ’ concept have intensified with the expectation that cost savings will be realized by participating...organizations (Tokarski, 1989). Using a specific example of a local Magnetic Resonance Imager (MRI) joint venture between the Fayetteville Veterans...Administration Medical Center (FVAMC) and Womack Army Medical Center (WAMC), the management problem was to determine how effective this joint venture has been at improving patient access to MRI technology.

  1. U.S. Army Medical Command Injury Summary, Active Duty Personnel, 2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    ABSTRACT Injuries pose a major public health problem for the U.S. Army, impacting almost 300,000 active duty Army Soldiers annually leading to over 1.4...outpatient visits) were obtained from the Armed Forces Health Surveillance Center in May 2015 for active duty Army personnel assigned to MEDCOM. Trends in...11 Tables 1 Frequency of Acute Injuries by Location and Diagnosis (Barell Matrix), Active Duty

  2. Lessons from the Army’s Future Combat Systems Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Combat Team),” January 11, 2007. 20 Will Brooks, Phil Beavers, and Robert Miele , FCS Platform Capabilities for AoA (Block 1 Unconstrained vs. Increment 1...October 19, 2011: https://www.bliss.army.mil/BMC/History/History.html Brooks, Will, Phil Beavers, and Robert Miele , FCS Platform Capabilities for AoA (Block

  3. Increasing Department of Surgery Productivity: A Study on the Effects of Adding an Ambulatory Surgery Room to Tripler Army Medical Center

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Vaseliades, Aristotle A

    2006-01-01

    ...) to increase productivity in terms of relative value units (RVUs). Tripler Army Medical Center submitted 12 initiatives, one of which was the implementation of an ambulatory surgery room within the Department of Surgery...

  4. An experimental predeployment training program improves self-reported patient treatment confidence and preparedness of Army combat medics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhardt, Robert T; Hermstad, Erik L; Oakes, Michael; Wiegert, Richard S; Oliver, Jeffrey

    2008-01-01

    To develop and assess impact of a focused review of International Trauma Life Support (ITLS) and combat casualty care with hands-on procedure training for U.S. Army medics deploying to Iraq. The setting was a U.S. Army Medical Department Center and School and Camp Eagle, Iraq. Investigators developed and implemented a command-approved prospective educational intervention with a post hoc survey. Subjects completed a three-day course with simulator and live-tissue procedure laboratories. At deployment's end, medics were surveyed for experience, confidence, and preparedness in treating various casualty severity levels. Investigators used two-tailed t-test with unequal variance for continuous data and chi-square for categorical data. Twenty-nine medics deployed. Eight completed the experimental program. Twenty-one of 25 (84%) available medics completed the survey including six of the eight (75%) experimental medics. The experimental group reported significantly greater levels of preparedness and confidence treating "minimal," "delayed," and "immediate" casualties at arrival in Iraq. These differences dissipated progressively over the time course of the deployment. This experimental program increased combat medic confidence and perceived level of preparedness in treating several patient severity levels. Further research is warranted to determine if the experimental intervention objectively improves patient care quality and translates into lives saved early in deployment.

  5. The ultrasound detection of simulated long bone fractures by U.S. Army Special Forces Medics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiner, Jason D; Baker, Benjamin L; McArthur, Todd J

    2010-01-01

    U.S. Army Special Forces Medics (18Ds) operate in austere environments where decisions regarding patient management may be limited by available resources. Portable ultrasound may allow for the detection of fractures in environments where other imaging modalities such as radiography are not readily available or practical. We used a simulation training model for the ultrasound diagnosis of long bone fractures to study the ability of 18Ds to detect the presence or absence of a fracture using a portable ultrasound. The fracture simulation model is composed of a bare turkey leg bone that is mechanically fractured and housed in a shallow plastic container within an opaque gelatin base solution. Five fracture patterns were created: transverse, segmental, oblique, comminuted, and no fracture. After a brief orientation session, twenty 18Ds evaluated the models in a blinded fashion with a SonoSite M-Turbo portable ultrasound device for the presence or absence of a fracture. 18Ds demonstrated 100% sensitivity (95% CI: 94.2% to 100%) in fracture detection and an overall specificity of 90% (95% CI: 66.8-98.2%) due to two false positive assessments of the no fracture model. Using a portable ultrasound device, 18Ds were able to correctly detect the presence or absence of a simulated long bone fracture with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity. Future studies are needed to investigate the clinical impact of this diagnostic ability. 2010.

  6. Aerospace medicine at Brooks AFB, TX: hail and farewell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunneley, Sarah A; Webb, James T

    2011-05-01

    With the impending termination of USAF operations at Brooks Air Force Base (AFB) in San Antonio, TX, it is time to consider its historic role in Aerospace Medicine. The base was established in 1917 as a flight training center for the U.S. Army Air Service and in 1926 became home to its School of Aviation Medicine. The school moved to San Antonio's Randolph Field in 1931, but in 1959 it returned to Brooks where it occupied new facilities to support its role as a national center for U.S. Air Force aerospace medicine, including teaching, clinical medicine, and research. The mission was then expanded to encompass support of U.S. military and civilian space programs. With the abrupt termination of the military space program in 1969, research at Brooks focused on clinical aviation medicine and support of advanced military aircraft while continuing close cooperation with NASA in support of orbital spaceflight and the journey to the Moon. Reorganization in the 1990s assigned all research functions at Brooks to the Human Systems Division and its successors, leaving to USAFSAM the missions related to clinical work and teaching. In 2002 the USAF and the city of San Antonio implemented shared operation of Brooks as a "City-Base" in the hope of deflecting threatened closure. Nevertheless, under continuing pressure to consolidate military facilities in the United States, the 2005 Base Closure and Realignment Commission ordered Brooks closed by 2011, with its aerospace medicine functions relocated to new facilities at Wright-Patterson AFB in Dayton, OH.

  7. Clinical prediction of musculoskeletal-related "medically not ready" for combat duty statuses among active duty U.S. army soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, D Alan; Kurina, Lianne M

    2013-12-01

    No evidence-based mechanism currently exists to inform U.S. Army clinicians of soldiers at risk of being found "Medically Not Ready" for combat duty. Historically, musculoskeletal conditions represent high-frequency medical problems among Army soldiers. We explored the feasibility of using centrally archived medical and administrative data on Army soldiers in the automated prediction of musculoskeletal-related Medically Not Ready soldiers who did not deploy. We examined 56,443 active duty U.S. Army soldiers who underwent precombat medical screening during March through December 2009 and in March 2010. Musculoskeletal problems were associated with 23.0% of nonreadiness cases in the study population. We used multivariable logistic regression in derivation cohorts to compute risk coefficients and cut points. We then applied these coefficients to covariates in validation cohorts, simulating predictions 2 to 3 months before their medical screenings. The analysis yielded c statistics ranging from 83 to 90%. The predictions identified 45 to 73% and 50 to 82% of the individual male and female outcome-positive soldiers, respectively, while obtaining 83 to 95% specificity. Our findings demonstrate the potential of Army data to create evidence-based estimates of nonreadiness risk. These methods could enable earlier patient referrals and improved management, and potentially reduce medically related nondeployment.

  8. Evaluation of the Army Physical Training and Weight Control Programs. Part 2. The Army Medical Department Advanced NCOES Course

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-09-01

    Inspecion Specialist 91S - Environmental Specialist 91T - Animal Care Specialist 91W - Nuclear Lab Specialist 92B - Medical Lab Specialist 94F... Corporations have achieved excellent success with individual programs when they are supervised and receive adequate institutional backirg (Health and Fitness...The Corporate View, 1980). A safe and effective physical fitness program which is supported by the organization is an integral part of successful stress

  9. The United States Army Medical Department Journal. October-December 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-01

    flowsheet with documentation of continuous fluid resuscitation decreased morbidity and mortality from burn wounds.6 Compartment syndrome ALARACT (all...Army action) memo mandated a high index of suspicion for compartment syndrome and a standardized approach to guide providers in the evaluation and...supervisors and staff concerning scheduling in order to foster a positive work environment, avoid burnout , increase morale, lower absenteeism, and

  10. Injuries and injury risk factors among men and women in U.S. Army Combat Medic Advanced individual training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henderson, N E; Knapik, J J; Shaffer, S W; McKenzie, T H; Schneider, G M

    2000-09-01

    No previous reports have evaluated injuries or injury risk factors during the advanced individual training (AIT) that follows the Army's initial or basic combat training (BCT). This study examined injuries and injury risk factors among 439 men and 287 women participating in combat medic AIT. A questionnaire addressing demographic and lifestyle characteristics (age, race, tobacco and alcohol use, physical activity, etc.) was administered to all subjects. Stature and body mass were obtained from battalion records. Injuries occurring during both BCT and AIT were transcribed from subject medical records. Results indicated that cumulative injury incidence (subjects with one or more injuries) in BCT was 26% for men and 52% for women (p 25 years), split option (a break in service between BCT and AIT), and higher body mass were independent risk factors for AIT injuries among women. None of the examined variables were independent risk factors for AIT injuries among men.

  11. Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC Annual Progress Report FY-89. Volume 2. Part 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-02

    levels dropped quite remarkably during the study. The third patient who will start the study in February 1989 is a patient who has had anorexia nervosa in... anorexia nervosa which she had in the past should not interfere with the scientific aspects or interpretation of this study. CONCLUSIONS None yet as...with respect to gender , rank and unit would not differ with respect to health risk (scores in the US Army’s Wellness Check, version 2.0); self

  12. Pathology and Laboratory Medicine Support for the American Expeditionary Forces by the US Army Medical Corps During World War I.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, James R; Baskin, Leland B

    2015-09-01

    Historical research on pathology and laboratory medicine services in World War I has been limited. In the Spanish American War, these efforts were primarily focused on tropical diseases. World War I problems that could be addressed by pathology and laboratory medicine were strikingly different because of the new field of clinical pathology. Geographic differences, changing war tactics, and trench warfare created new issues. To describe the scope of pathology and laboratory medicine services in World War I and the value these services brought to the war effort. Available primary and secondary sources related to American Expeditionary Forces' laboratory services were analyzed and contrasted with the British and German approaches. The United States entered the war in April 1917. Colonel Joseph Siler, MD, a career medical officer, was the director, and Colonel Louis B. Wilson, MD, head of pathology at the Mayo Clinic, was appointed assistant director of the US Army Medical Corps Division of Laboratories and Infectious Disease, based in Dijon, France. During the next year, they organized 300 efficient laboratories to support the American Expeditionary Forces. Autopsies were performed to better understand treatment of battlefield injuries, effects of chemical warfare agents, and the influenza pandemic; autopsies also generated teaching specimens for the US Army Medical Museum. Bacteriology services focused on communicable diseases. Laboratory testing for social diseases was very aggressive. Significant advances in blood transfusion techniques, which allowed brief blood storage, occurred during the war but were not primarily overseen by laboratory services. Both Siler and Wilson received Distinguished Service Medals. Wilson's vision for military pathology services helped transform American civilian laboratory services in the 1920s.

  13. Enhancing the effectiveness of the U.S. Army's participation in medical diplomacy: implications from a case study in Trinidad.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haims, Marla C; Duber, Herbert C; Chang, Lie-Ping

    2014-06-01

    Medical diplomacy is a complex, yet increasingly important strategy of the U.S. government. In this article, we present a unique program that was jointly developed by the U.S. Army Reserves 807 th Medical Deployment Support Command and the Trinidad Ministry of Health to address the large backlog of untreated cataracts in Trinidad and Tobago. This partnership evolved over time, but began with a commitment to help address a critical public health issue as determined by the host country, with investment in both local capacity and attention towards sustainability. The 807 th Medical Deployment Support Command utilized its connection to the military and civilian worlds, bringing in outside expertise and a long-term university partner allowing for sustainability without protracted U.S. government support. This program resulted in multiple positive outcomes, including building a strong partnership with a key U.S. interest; enhancing the legitimacy of the Trinidadian government through the development of a sustainable cataract program; and providing a platform for the United States to be seen by the Trinidadian public in a very positive light. This new model for medical diplomacy may have significant benefit for both the host country and U.S. government, and deserves further evaluation in other contexts. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  14. Disqualifying Medical Conditions of Flying Personnel in Chinese Army and Air Force

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chun-wei Wang; Shu-xuan Xu; Xian-rong Xu; Tong-xin Chen

    2008-01-01

    @@ After inpatient aircrews of Chinese Army and Air Force are treated at local hospitals,their health status will be evaluated.If it is aeronantieally adaptable,the conclusion would be flying qualification;if it may impact the flight safety or the flight environment may aggravate the illness,the conclusion would be flight suspension,and then the patient should be forwarded from local hospital to our hospital.After detailed examination,if the conditions of flying personnel are considered not qualified for flight,the conclusion of flying disqualification should be made finally.

  15. A Call for Innovation: Reflective Practices and Clinical Curricula of US Army Special Operations Forces Medics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rocklein, Kate

    2014-01-01

    Special Operations Forces (SOF) medics have written and published numerous practice reflections that intricately describe their practice environments, clinical dilemmas, and suggestions for teaching and practice. The lack of translation of SOF medics experiential evidence to their curriculum has created a gap in evidence-based curriculum development. This study analyzed SOF medics learning and practice patterns and compared it to the evidence in the interdisciplinary clinical literature. After framing the problem, the literature was reviewed to determine appropriate tools by which perceptions and attitudes toward reflection-centered curricula could be measured. A recognizable practice reflection was extracted from the published SOF clinical literature and presented in writing to self-identified SOF medics and medic instructors via a descriptive crossover design, to ensure possible biases were mitigated. To measure SOF medics perceptions of reflection-based curricula, the Dundee Ready Education Environment Measure survey instrument was used, as it has validated psychometric properties and is used worldwide. SOF medics averaged scores of perceptions of their medic education indicated positive but not completely statistically significant preferences toward reflection-based curricula over traditional curriculum. Special Operations, medics, reflective practice, curricula BACKGROUND Special Operations Forces (SOF) medics practice in environments that are violent, austere, clandestine, and far removed from definitive hospital facilities. What was true almost 20 years ago?". . . academic demands of [Special Forces medic training] are roughly equivalent to those of an upper-level undergraduate curriculum in science or perhaps to those of first year medical school"?is even more challenging today. During this study, medics, physicians, and educators within the SOF medical community publicly and privately (ergo, names were redacted) expressed the need for curricular changes to

  16. Analysis of publications in Medical Journal of Chinese People’s Liberation Army during 2006 to 2010

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong-ping ZHU

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective To analyze the characteristics of articles published in the Medical Journal of Chinese People’s Liberation Army(MJCPLA from year 2006 to 2010,so as to provide some beneficial references for further advance of the journal.Methods Each bibliometrics index of MJCPLA during 2006 to 2010 was analyzed with literature metrology.Results A total of 2442 articles were published in 60 issues over 5 years characterizing reasonable column setting,a high proportion,accounting for 43.5%,of fund-supported researches,with coauthor paper accounting for 95.6% and coauthor degree at 5.20.The articles were provided by authors widely distributed from 31 provinces,autonomous regions,mulicipality,and Macao Special Administrative Region,America,Ukraine,German and other overseas areas,implying the author ranks are of tremendous strength,and the readers group is of steady.Conclusion For the high quality of materials being published,the MJCPLA has a claim to one of the most important military medical information sources and an important core journal in medical field.

  17. A remembrance of Victoria and the Canadian Army Medical Corps in the Great War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Preston L

    2008-05-01

    The North Pacific Surgical Association first met in Victoria in December, 1917, in the midst of World War I, or as it was known then, the Great War. On all sides, the toll in human life was staggering. Canada alone lost more than 60,000 men in the war. Our Association now returns to Victoria as the very last survivors of that generation pass into history. We honor the great sacrifice of the Canadian Army, recall the horrific conditions they endured, and honor the doctors and nurses who attended the countless wounded through the experiences of a Canadian surgeon from Calgary, Dr. Harold McGill, who served for 3 years in the thick of action on the Western Front.

  18. Pilot study to determine the feasibility of training Army National Guard medics to perform focused cardiac ultrasonography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Backlund, Brandon H; Bonnett, Carl J; Faragher, Jeffrey P; Haukoos, Jason S; Kendall, John L

    2010-01-01

    To assess the ability of Army National Guard combat medics to perform a limited bedside echocardiography (BE) to determine cardiac activity after a brief training module. Twelve Army National Guard health care specialists trained to the level of emergency medical technician-basic (EMT-B) underwent an educational session consisting of a 5-minute lecture on BE followed by hands-on practical training. After the training session, each medic performed BEs, in either the subxiphoid (SX) or parasternal (PS) location at his or her discretion, on four healthy volunteers. The time required to complete the BE and the anatomic location of the examination (SX vs. PS) was documented. A 3-second video clip representing the best image was recorded for each BE. These clips were subsequently reviewed independently by two of the investigators with experience performing and interpreting BE; each BE was graded on a six-point scale designed for the study, the Cardiac Ultrasound Structural Assessment Scale (CUSAS). A score of 3 or greater was considered to be adequate to assess for the presence of cardiac activity. Where there was disagreement on the CUSAS score, the reviewers viewed the clip together and agreed on a consensus CUSAS score. We calculated the median time to completion and interquartile range (IQR) for each BE, the median CUSAS scores and IQR for examinations performed in the SX and PS locations, and kappa for agreement between the two reviewers on the CUSAS. A total of 48 BEs were recorded and reviewed. Thirty-seven of 48 (77%) were obtained in the SX location, and 11 of 48 (23%) were obtained in the PS location. Forty-four of 48 (92%) were scored as a 3 or higher on the CUSAS. Median time to completion of a BE was 5.5 seconds (IQR: 3.7-10.9 seconds). The median CUSAS score in the SX location was 4 (IQR: 4-5), and the median CUSAS score in the PS location was 4 (IQR: 4-4). Weighted kappa for the CUSAS was 0.6. With minimal training, the vast majority of the medics in our

  19. Summary of Injury Prevention Activities Supporting the Army Soldier Medical Readiness Campaign, 2011-2014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-10-30

    Continuing Medical Education (CME) and Continuing Nursing Education (CNE) credits were offered to participants starting in 2013 and 2014 (respectively...Human Performance Optimization Programs, LOE 4.0 Measurements of Effectiveness, and LOE 5.0 STRATCOM. Injury Prevention Activities in the Soldier...increase Soldier medical readiness by optimizing medical readiness systems, enhancing Soldier care , and improving Soldier health and fitness (U.S

  20. Primary trauma care experience of army reserve combat medics: is a new approach needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Abraham, R; Paret, G; Kluger, Y; Shemer, J; Stein, M

    1999-01-01

    Combat medics play a significant role in any fighting unit. In recent years, during times of peace and low-intensity military conflicts, as well as in operations other than war, reserve combat medics have been challenged to treat major casualties in the field. Although this work requires important manual skills, the medics perform basic treatment maneuvers that are not necessarily for saving of lives. A sample survey of reserve combat medics revealed that most (70%) were engaged in medical care for trauma victims during their regular and reserve service. Many (32.5%) were involved in incidents with multiple casualties. These incidents included seriously injured victims, with 39.2% of the medics being involved with air evacuation and 44.4% with fatalities. Not all medics are exposed to major trauma, but for those who are, the numbers of patients per medic is not large. Therefore, the need to educate the medics in cognitive, and more importantly, in manual skills, is obvious. Suggestions for the means to do so are provided.

  1. U.S. Army Medical Materiel Development Activity 1991 Annual Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-01-31

    Molecular Sieve O9yMe Generating System (HOOGS) willprovide medical grade oxygen on Medical Evacuation aircraft for I trauma and chemical agent patient...these toxoids within this new facility. e Pentavalent Botulinal Toxoid ( ABCDE ) was fielded for use as an Investigational New Drug in Saudi Arabia, and

  2. Using the Army Medical Cost Avoidance Model to prioritize preventive medicine initiatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Cindy; McCoskey, Kelsey; Clasing, Jay; Kluchinsky, Timothy A

    2014-01-01

    The MCAM's ICD-9 Analysis Tool provides preventive medicine program developers with a powerful tool to demonstrate ROI. Previously disjointed cost components have been brought together in the MCAM to calculate the total medical cost avoided. Users are required to make 4 data entries. In response, the user receives the highly coveted medical cost avoidance that should be realized. The SPHMP example demonstrates how simple it is to use the MCAM to determine the expected ROI.

  3. Physician-to-physician consultation via electronic mail: the Walter Reed Army Medical Center Ask a Doc system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbott, Kevin C; Mann, Scott; DeWitt, Daisy; Sales, Linda Youngblood; Kennedy, Sean; Poropatich, Ron K

    2002-03-01

    Physician-to-physician consultation and discussion have traditionally been conducted by telephone, paper, and "curbside" (face to face meetings). The implementation and use of physician-to-physician consultation via electronic mail in a military health care system has not been reported previously. The group mail function of the Composite Health Care System, the main outpatient medical automation system for the Department of Defense, was modified to create mailgroups for every specialty of the Walter Reed Army Medical Center to facilitate ease of physician-to-physician consultation. This modification was called the "Ask a Doc" system. The system was deployed to a 21-state health care network among triservice participants. There were 3,121 consultations logged from April 22, 1998, to December 31, 2000. Growth in use expanded initially and was sustained during a 3-year period. Average response time to consultations was less than 1 day (11.93 hours). Additional training and maintenance requirements were minimal. In general, the use of electronic consultation mirrored that of clinical practice. Most specialty consultations involved the disciplines of internal medicine. Use of the Ask a Doc system was representative of total clinical workload and increased access to specialty medical care over a wide geographic area. The distribution of use indicated that user statistics were legitimate, and quality improvement programs could easily troubleshoot the system. Ask a Doc was inserted into a regional health care network with minimal cost to support and implement and was sustained with very little effort for 3 years. Barriers to even wider use currently include lack of secure communications and the difficulty in assigning workload credit for electronic consultations.

  4. Mental health, help seeking, and stigma and barriers to care among 3- and 12-month postdeployed and never deployed U.S. Army Combat Medics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Paula L; Elnitsky, Christine; Pitts, Barbara; Figley, Charles; Thurman, Ryan M; Unwin, Brian

    2014-08-01

    U.S. Army Combat Medic serves as both Soldier and provider of combat casualty care, often in the heat of battle and with limited resources. Yet little is known about their help-seeking behavior and perceived stigma and barriers to care. Participants were three groups of U.S. Army Combat Medics surveyed at 3- and 12-months postdeployment from assignment with line units vs. those Medics who had never deployed to combat. The primary data source was surveys of mental health service utilization, perceived stigma and barriers to care, and depression and post-traumatic stress disorder screens. Medics who received help in the past year from a mental health professional ranged from 18% to 30%, with 18% to 30% seeking mental health assistance from other sources. Previously deployed Medics were more likely to obtain assistance than those who never deployed. Those meeting a mental health screening criteria were more likely to report associated stigma and barriers to care. Findings indicate that Medics in need of assistance report greater perceived barriers to mental health care, as well as stigma from seeking treatment, and that depression may be a salient issue for Medics. The longitudinal nature of the ongoing study will help determine the actual trajectory and onset of depression and post-traumatic stress disorder. Reprint & Copyright © 2014 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  5. Military Personnel. Army Needs to Better Enforce Requirements and Improve Record Keeping for Soldiers Whose Medical Conditions May Call for Significant Duty Limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    about 19 percent, from 216,000 to 256,000 servicemembers, in support of Operation Iraqi Freedom and the Global War on Terrorism. The Army has been...ability to perform his or her duties, such as heart disease, cirrhosis of the liver, chronic asthma, and epilepsy . Page 11 GAO-08-546 Medical...such as work on scaffolding, vehicle driving, or near moving machinery. Seizure disorders; other disorders producing syncopal attacks of severe

  6. A Study of Meeting the Emotional Needs of Dying Patients and their Families at Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-08-01

    for the creation of a special thanatology team called "The Care Team". This interdisciplinary team consisting of volunteer physicians, nurses, social...the status quo, (2) establish a fully operational hospice, or (3) establish a thanatology team that is specifically designed to help dying patients... Thanatology Team To some the status quo is not acceptable, yet at the same time establishing a fully operational hospice at Walter Reed Army Medical Center

  7. Dominique-Jean Larrey, chief surgeon of the French Army with Napoleon in Egypt: notes and observations on Larrey's medical memoirs based on the Egyptian campaign.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Mary Mendenhall

    2008-01-01

    Dr. Dominique-Jean Larrey wrote memoirs of 12 diseases he encountered while serving as chief surgeon of the French army during Napoleon's Egyptian campaign. He describes symptoms and treatments, evaluates remedies used by the Egyptians, and the effects of the climate. Of interest are his original though misguided explanations of causes of sickness or complications from wounds as well as descriptions of medications--now known to be dangerous--but all balanced by his common sense and efforts to ameliorate suffering.

  8. A Study to Develop a Methodology for Establishing Medical Clerk Requirements within the Outpatient Clinics at Blanchfield Army Community Hospital Fort Campbell, Kentucky

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-01-01

    No. 6 (November-December 1983): 20-23, 29. Genovese, Dolores . "Workload and Staffing in the Medical Records Department at Church Hospital." Topics in...Health Record Management 5, No. 1 (September 1984): 1-17. Lang, Kathryn A. "A Part-Time Clerk May Solve Busy Office Problems." Dental Economics 72, No...Army Standard, Dental Activities and Area Dental Laboratories. San Antonio: Health Services Command, May 1985. U.S. Department of Labor. Job

  9. A Problem Solving Project to Determine if the Central Appointment System Adequately Supports the Outpatient Workload Reporting Requirements at Tripler Army Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-04-21

    34Information Systems: The Process of Development." Journal of Nursing Administration Vol. 9, No. 1 (January 1979): pp. 53-58. Weisbord , Marvin R. "Why...with the overall responsibility for this system. In May 1980, Tripler Army Medical Center (TAMC) will receive a new Burroughs Model 1800 computer to...and the workload gathering methods, the steps involved in reporting on outpatient clinic visit were documented and modelled . This model captured the

  10. Establishment of a Separate Psychology Service at Walter Reed Army Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-07-01

    Sheila Forsythe, Barbara J. Morgan); the Department of Psychology at the National Naval Medical Center, Bethesda, Maryland (CAPT Frank Mullins and...Services w2 1l have to be configured to specific staffs, available resources, and missions. To enhance leadership opportunities and carper rr𔄁-0ssion fe

  11. U.S. Army Medical Bioengineering Research and Development Laboratory. Volume 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-10-01

    chemical warfare agents and trIchothecene mycotoxlns In field water supplies. Identified methods for detection, Identification, quantitation and...activities burdened with problems In the broad areas of combat casualty care, human health effects of environmental pollution, preventive medicine, and...utilization of human resources. The functional realignment resulted in major changes for the Field Medical Materiel Development Division which now has

  12. Medical Diplomacy in the United States Army: A Concept Whose Time Has Come

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-13

    medical diplomacy, comparing the five million dollars spent refurbishing the Rabia Balkhi hospital in Kabul Afghanistan with the eight billion dollars...tat once saw nearly one in five children die at birth”, Mr. Thompson pointed out. Those patients being born and treated today in the Rabia Balkhi

  13. MEDBASE: Strategic Planning and Implementation of an Army Medical Department Software Application

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-31

    developing the plan: stakeholder analysis , SWOT analysis , a list of competitors ’ strengths and weaknesses, the development of a big, hairy, audacious goal...was created along with the following products: SWOT (strengths, weaknesses, opportunities, and threats) analysis , vision statement, strategy map, and...Implementation, AMEDD Architecture, Strategy Map, Balanced Scorecard, Life Cycle Model, SWOT Analysis , Interim Systems, Injury Tracking, Medical Readiness

  14. The United States Army Medical Department Journal. April-June 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    deep breathing, journaling, tai chi, meditation , guided imagery, and biofeedback, just to name a few. These are techniques that most medical...doubled as a classroom . The clinic could accommodate instruction of up to 6 hearing technician students who not only used the training systems

  15. U.S. Army Medical Department Journal, January-March 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    Officer COL Barry Moore, DC Chief, Department of Dental Science AMEDD Center & School COL Patricia Patrician, AN Chief, Department of Nursing Science AMEDD...confusing to diagnose and treat, especially if the patient has multiple potential sources of hypoxia and/ or hypotension. Inadequate Sedation/ Analgesia ...Intravenous sedation and analgesia , a continuous process, includes observation and timely administration of sedative/pain medications which, if not

  16. A Study of Alternate Approaches to Utilization Review of Laboratory Services within an Army Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-06

    not known 5. Outplacement 6. Administrative discharge delay 7. Other (EKG, EEG, etc.) OTHER 1. Patient/family pressure 2. Teaching 3. Research 23...return as ordered or next weekday a. Routine lab tests and X-ray: same 4. Outplacement : delay, if any, is count- day if ordered in a.m. or next ed from...medical complica- tion) interferes 5. Outplacement : delay, if any, is counted from the day after disposi- tion request is noted except where unusual

  17. Essential Medical Capabilities and Medical Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    15-001098 Copy Essential Medical Capabilities and Medical Readiness John E. Whitley Joseph F. Adams Joseph J. Angello Jennifer T. Brooks Sarah K...other national challenges. Essential Medical Capabilities and Medical Readiness John E. Whitley Joseph F. Adams Joseph J. Angello Jennifer T. Brooks...noted that the ability of the Military Health System to provide operational healthcare is measured by the readiness of its medical personnel and

  18. US Army Medical Bioengineering Research and Development Laboratory Annual Progress Report FY1981.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-10-01

    MUMNIP E T ASSOC.AVE ANPYSTICATOPS NAME O’CONNOR, R..J. 21A. DB. C. . E. NAME FROMMER , F (U) MOSQUITO LIGHT TRAP ;(U) DISEASE VECTORS ;(U) PEST...DETRICK MD 21701 Amus’FT DETRICK Nd 21701 *CWWA WIVESTIGATO FU~ SM ,f US ACIM10,€ llt- l) NAME FROMMER , R L *.j HAMES, W. H., LTC Tp"’ow 3016637237 0E... Frommer , Dr. R. L., Hembree, S. C., Nelson, Dr. J. H., Remington, M. P., ARD, and Paul H. Gibbs, EPRD. For publication in Journal of Medical Entomology

  19. Blood Program in World War II. Medical Department, United States Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    1964-01-01

    fowl malaria at the Naval Medical School had indicated that this variety of Pl43modium does not survive in dried plasma. Recent observations in Puerto ...1)4 )11 Ivs prm Idell shill)III1,111 . I I V \\1 VP A :14 I’ll I )FIFF It \\1 I N \\’III( JINS :opper SidlIkalle Falling- I )rojo Tesi A .1111...Pacific airlift, 602-603 in fractionation of plasma, 343 Puerperal hemorrhage, transfusion for, I in gelatin, 375, 376 Puerto Rico, 143 in intravenous

  20. Operations of and Challenges to the Army Medical Department during the US-Mexican War, 1846-1848

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    Falling Before Honor: Corpus Christi, New Orleans, and the Gulf of Mexico ............ 45 Taylor’s Army: Palo Alto to Buena Vista ...was patronizing, as if he was attempting to placate a small child by employing simple mathematical equations to prove his point. Lawson claimed...own and the enemy’s. Taylor’s Army: Palo Alto to Buena Vista Figure 9. Map of Matamoros, Mexico to Point Isabel (now Port Isabel, TX

  1. 36 CFR 13.1226 - Brooks Falls area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 36 Parks, Forests, and Public Property 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Brooks Falls area. 13.1226... Developed Area § 13.1226 Brooks Falls area. The area within 50 yards of the ordinary high water marks of the Brooks River from the Riffles Bear Viewing Platform to a point 100 yards above Brooks Falls is closed...

  2. Brigadier General James Stevens Simmons (1890-1954), Medical Corps, United States Army: a career in preventive medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marble, Sanders

    2012-02-01

    James Simmons began his career in the US Army as a laboratory officer and his assignments progressed into tropical medicine research. His interests and work evolved into preventive medicine (PM, as the Army termed public health), and he took both a PhD and a Doctorate in Public Health. As the Army's leading PM officer he was appointed head of PM in 1940 and guided the Army's PM effort through World War II. His responsibility ran from gas masks through healthy nutrition and occupational health to an enormous variety of diseases; by the war's end, the breadth and importance of PM was reflected in the Preventive Medicine Division, having fully one-sixth of all military personnel at the Surgeon General's Office. Simmons used his strong professional credentials to tap into civilian medicine for expertise the Army lacked and he established organizations that survive to this day. After retirement, he sought to expand the field of public health and raise another generation of public health physicians.

  3. 2012 USGS Lidar: Brooks Camp (AK)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) had a requirement for high resolution Lidar needed for mapping the Brooks Camp region of Katmai National Park in Alaska....

  4. Katherine Brooke'ist / Tiina Lepiste

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lepiste, Tiina

    2007-01-01

    Ameerika teleseriaali "Vaprad ja ilusad" ("The Bold and the Beautiful") osatäitja Katherine Kelly Lang (Brooke). Artikli aluseks on Soap Opera Weekly ajakirjaniku Linda Susmani vestlus näitlejannaga

  5. Katherine Brooke'ist / Tiina Lepiste

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Lepiste, Tiina

    2007-01-01

    Ameerika teleseriaali "Vaprad ja ilusad" ("The Bold and the Beautiful") osatäitja Katherine Kelly Lang (Brooke). Artikli aluseks on Soap Opera Weekly ajakirjaniku Linda Susmani vestlus näitlejannaga

  6. Genetics Home Reference: Brooke-Spiegler syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... gene (CYLD) mutations in Brooke-Spiegler syndrome: novel insights into the role of deubiquitination in cell signaling. ... healthcare professional . About Genetics Home Reference Site Map Customer Support Selection Criteria for Links USA.gov Copyright ...

  7. The Tripler Army Medical Center's LE3AN program: a six-month retrospective analysis of program effectiveness for African-American and European-American females.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Mark; Earles, Jay; Folen, Raymond; Trammel, Rick; James, Larry

    2004-10-01

    This is a retrospective study that examines the effectiveness of the Tripler Army Medical Center (TAMC) LE3AN Program for weight management among African-American and European American women. African-American and European-American active-duty females who enrolled in the TAMC LE3AN Program between July 1998 and December 2001, and completed six months of follow-up were included in the analysis. The results indicate that the program is associated with significant weight loss for participants, and that it is equally effective for African-American and European-American women. Weekly follow-up visits were correlated with greater weight loss.

  8. Case ascertainment of heat illness in the British Army: evidence of under-reporting from analysis of Medical and Command notifications, 2009–2013

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacey, Michael J; Brett, S; Woods, D; Jackson, S; Ross, D

    2016-01-01

    Background Heat illness in the Armed Forces is considered preventable. The UK military relies upon dual Command and Medical reporting for case ascertainment, investigation of serious incidents and improvement of preventive practices and policy. This process could be vulnerable to under-reporting. Objectives To establish whether heat illness in the British Army has been under-reported, by reviewing concordance of reporting to the Army Incident Notification Cell (AINC) and the Army Health Unit (AHU) and to characterise the burden of heat illness reported by these means. Methods Analysis of anonymised reporting databases held by the AHU and AINC, for the period 2009–2013. Results 565 unique cases of heat illness were identified. Annual concordance of reporting ranged from 9.6% to 16.5%. The overall rate was 13.3%. July was the month with the greatest number of heat illness reports (24.4% of total reporting) and the highest concordance rate (30%). Reports of heat illness from the UK (n=343) exceeded overseas notifications (n=221) and showed better concordance (17.1% vs 12.8%). The annual rate of reported heat illness varied widely, being greater in full-time than reservist personnel (87 vs 23 per100 000) and highest in full-time untrained personnel (223 per100 000). Conclusions The risk of heat illness was global, year-round and showed dynamic local variation. Failure to dual-report casualties impaired case ascertainment of heat illness across Command and Medical chains. Current preventive guidance, as applied in training and on operations, should be critically evaluated to ensure that risk of heat illness is reduced as low as possible. Clear procedures for casualty notification and surveillance are required in support of this and should incorporate communication within and between the two reporting chains. PMID:25717054

  9. Gynecologic evaluation of the first female soldiers enrolled in the Gulf War Comprehensive Clinical Evaluation Program at Tripler Army Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wittich, A C

    1996-11-01

    Tripler Army Medical Center initiated the Department of Defense's Persian Gulf Illness Comprehensive Clinical Evaluation Program (CCEP) on June 15, 1994. In the first 5 months, 100 patients enrolled in this program. Sixteen (16%) were women who served in the Persian Gulf during Desert Shield/ Desert Storm, and 1 (1%) was the dependent wife of a Gulf War veteran who is experiencing illness that may be related to the Persian Gulf War. All 17 women enrolled in the CCEP were evaluated in the Tripler Army Medical Center Obstetrics and Gynecology Clinic between June 17 and November 10, 1994. Each patient underwent gynecologic history, pelvic exam, Pap smear, and screen for fecal occult blood. Ten patients underwent baseline mammograms and 13 patients underwent urogenital and cervical cultures for aerobic bacteria, chlamydia and herpes simplex. The 1 patient with an abnormal Pap smear underwent cervical and endocervical biopsies and colposcopy (histology demonstrated no dysplasia or neoplasia). Half of the 16 Gulf War veterans experienced gynecologic problems while serving in the Gulf and 43% admitted gynecologic problems since returning in 1991. Of 6 patients who became pregnant after returning, 5 had normal pregnancies and 1 suffered four miscarriages.

  10. [Analysis of the use of field medical units in the armies of NATO and Russian Armed Forces].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korniushko, I G; Iakovlev, S V; Murashev, I V; Sidorov, V A; Medvedev, V R; Matveev, A G

    2011-12-01

    An analysis of medical services of NATO and the Medical Service of the Armed Forces of the Russian Federation of modern technology deployment stages of medical evacuation (tents, inflatable structures, shelters, containers, medical armored vehicles, cars, etc.) is presented. Examples of their usage in isolated employment, usage in the group as a mobile medical stations and field hospitals in various conditions, the prospects and directions of development of technical means deployment of medical service are given.

  11. Historical Review: The U.S. Army Medical Belt for Front Line First Aid: A Well-Considered Design That Failed the Medical Department During the First World War.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wever, Peter C; Korst, Mike B J M; Otte, Maarten

    2016-10-01

    In December 1913, a board of medical officers was appointed to adapt new U.S. Army equipment to the needs of the Hospital Corps. One of the improvements concerned substitution of the satchel-like Hospital Corps pouch used to carry first aid equipment. A waist belt with 10 pockets, known as the medical belt, was devised, and supplied with a tourniquet, adhesive plaster, safety pins, iodine swabs, sublimated gauze, individual dressing packets, gauze bandages, aromatic spirit of ammonia, and common pins. In addition, an ax carrier accommodating a hand ax, a canteen hanger, and a pouch to carry diagnosis tags and instruments were attached to the medical belt. In 1916, the medical belt was incorporated in the field supply tables in the Manual for the Medical Department. The next year, on April 6, 1917, the U.S. Congress declared war on Germany in reaction to sinking of American ships by German submarines. Although the medical belt had given satisfaction in preliminary trials, it did not withstand the test of war. In practice, the medical belt proved a source of dissatisfaction both as to the methods of packing and its contents, which were considered useless in modern warfare. Subsequently, discontinuance of the medical belt was recommended.

  12. Peter Brook y el pensamiento tradicional

    OpenAIRE

    Nicolescu, Basarab

    2014-01-01

    La trayectoria creativa de Peter Brook tiene su fuente en la investigación sobre la tradición. En este ensayo se hace un recorrido por su concepción teatral y se revisan los diversos sentidos del concepto “tradición”. Desde la perspectiva transdiciplinaria se analizan los componentes centrales del teatro de Brook: energía, movimiento e interrelación, así como la estructura ternaria del espacio, la relación entre determinismo y espontaneidad y la imposibilidad de un lenguaje universal. El pens...

  13. Reform of the Army Physical Disability Evaluation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-24

    that USAPDA currently falls under the Army Human Resources Command and not the Army Medical Command in that the medical department only provides...confusing to Soldiers, and leaves the impression that the Army ‘ underrates ’ disability in order to achieve fiscal savings.33 While that may not be the...Adapted from the PDES Review for the Commanding General, Human Resources Command as presented by the U.S. Army Physical Disability Agency, 3 July 2008

  14. Clarification to Brook and Willoughby (2016).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Reports an error in "Social anxiety and alcohol use across the university years: Adaptive and maladaptive groups" by Christina A. Brook and Teena Willoughby (Developmental Psychology, 2016[May], Vol 52[5], 835-845). In the article, Figures 1 and 2 and Tables 1, 2, 3, and 4 were inadvertently designated as supplemental material. The figures and tables are present in the erratum. (The following abstract of the original article appeared in record 2016-13161-001.) University/college can be a challenging time as students face developmental tasks such as building new social networks and achieving academically. Social anxiety may be disadvantageous in this setting given that social situations often include drinking and individuals with social anxiety tend to self-medicate through alcohol use. However, findings are mixed as to whether the association between social anxiety and alcohol use is positive or negative. To clarify the nature of this association, we used a person-centered longitudinal analysis to identify student groups based on levels of social anxiety symptoms and alcohol consumption. Undergraduates (N = 1132, 70.5% female, Mage = 19.06 at Time 1) enrolled in university completed a survey assessing social anxiety and alcohol use over 3 years, and psychosocial functioning and emotion coping behaviors at Time 1. Two out of 5 groups were identified with higher levels of social anxiety, 1 with moderately low alcohol use, and the other with moderately high alcohol use. Both groups reported higher levels of general anxiety, depressive symptoms, behavioral inhibition, emotional reactivity, daily hassles, and lower levels of social ties at Time 1 than the 3 groups with lower levels of social anxiety. Furthermore, the social anxiety-alcohol use group reported significantly lower academic grades and was more likely to endorse problematic emotion coping behaviors (e.g., self-injury) than the social anxiety-low alcohol use group. These results not only help explain the

  15. Assessing the Assignment Policy for Army Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    General surgeon 61K Thoracic surgeon 61L Plastic surgeon 61M Orthopedic surgeon 61N Flight surgeon 61P Physiatrist 61Q Radiation oncologist 61R Diagnostic... veterinarian (immaterial) Branch 65, Army Medical Specialist Corps 65A Occupational therapy Table C.3—Continued 100 Assessing the Assignment Policy for Army

  16. Case Study: Organizational Realignment at Tripler Army Medical Center to Reflect "Best Business Practice." Facilitate Coordinated Care, and Maximize the Use of Resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    miles away. Tripler AMC also provides administrative and logistical support to the U.S. Army Dental Activity – Hawaii, the U.S. Army Forensic Toxicology...and general dentistry . In addition Tripler has programs in hospital administration, nurse anesthesia, and obstetrics and gynecology nursing

  17. A Case Study of the Implementation of Radio Frequency Identification Asset Visibility Tracking at Walter Reed Army Medical Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-10-23

    Chapa , Director of Logistics at WAMC, the "biomedical maintenance efficiency jumped to 98-99 percent in performance of scheduled services, because you... Chapa , Director of Logistics at WAMC, recalls an instance where a particular pump was recalled due to a bad gasket. Using the RFID system, medical

  18. Graphical User Interface (GUI) for the Warfighter Physiological Status Monitoring (WPSM) System - U.S. Army Medic Recommendations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-11-01

    Friedl), while cognitive state assesses one’s cognitive capability based on past sleep history determined through actigraphy from the wrist -worn sleep ...button when activated be represented? • How will time be tracked? • How will location of troops be represented? • How will changes in various measures ...preventive medication measures 1 Information on eyesight 1 Work/ rest cycles 1 47 TRIAGE INFORMATION In situations with multiple

  19. Annual Research Progress Report for Department of Clinical Investigation (Madigan Army Medical Center), October 1990 - September 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-09-01

    Study Objective: To determine the incidence of antiphospholipid antibodies in pregnancies complicated by intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR), to...Spontaneous Vaginal Delive2ry in Term Pregnancies Other nominees were: Richard A. Beck Cardiovascular Effects of Pseudoephedrine in MAd, MC Medically...Sex Hormone Matt DW, Steingold KA, Binding Globulin Levels in Obese Women with the Polycystic Plymate SR, Ovary Syndrome . JCEM 72(1): 83-89, 1991

  20. The United States Army Medical Department Journal, April - June 2011. Prehospital combat casualty care; The starting point of battlefield survival

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    advanced since 1831. Highlighting the technologic advances in combat arms to the individual medic level, one only need look at the medic’s semiautomatic ...splenic laceration) in normal and coagulopathic pigs,31,32 but was ineffective against severe arterial (aortotomy injury22), venous ( grade V liver...swine model with a grade V liver injury. The results demonstrated the superior efficacy of this dressing over regular gauze for controlling venous

  1. AMEDD Clinical Psychology Short Course Held at Madigan Army Medical Center, in Tacoma, Washington on 13-17 June 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-06-01

    contrast, Weiss in 1981 reported that Ritalin was not even available in France, Italy, Sweden , Spain, or Portugal at the time of his article. 224 SHORT...of time, medications seem to be indicated in children and adolescents as follows: a. Stimulants for hyperactivity and attention in ADDH/ ADHD . b. Anti...walking and night terrors. 3. ADDH/ ADHD children who fail to respond to stimulants. 4. Separation anxiety disorder. h. Lithium for bona-fide mania

  2. US Army blood program: 2025 and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Richard; Taylor, Audra L; Atkinson, Andrew J; Malloy, Wilbur W; Macdonald, Victor W; Cap, Andrew P

    2016-03-01

    In preparing to support the Army in 2025 and beyond, the Army Blood Program remains actively engaged with the research and advanced development of blood products and medical technology to improve blood safety and efficacy in conjunction with the US Army Medical Research and Materiel Command. National and International Blood Bank authorities have noted that the US Army research and development efforts in providing new blood products and improving blood safety operate on the cutting edge of technology and are transformational for the global blood industry. Over the past 14 years, the Army has transformed how blood support is provided and improved the survival rate of casualties. Almost every product or process developed by or for the military has found an application in treating civilian patients. Conflicts have many unwanted consequences; however, in times of conflict, one positive aspect is the identification of novel solutions to improve the safety and efficacy of the blood supply.

  3. Army Robotics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-10-07

    Army Robotics 07 October 2009 Dr. Grant Gerhart, Senior Research Scientist Bernard Theisen, Joint Center for Robotics DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A... Robots 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Grant Gerhart; Bernard Theisen 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK...CBRNE • IED Defeat Systems • Disarm / Disrupt • Reconnaissance • Investigation • Explosive Sniffer • Common Robotic Kit • EOD • Convoy • Log

  4. Brook trout passage performance through culverts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goerig, Elsa; Castro-Santos, Theodore R.; Bergeron, Normand

    2016-01-01

    Culverts can restrict access to habitat for stream-dwelling fishes. We used passive integrated transponder telemetry to quantify passage performance of >1000 wild brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) attempting to pass 13 culverts in Quebec under a range of hydraulic and environmental conditions. Several variables influenced passage success, including complex interactions between physiology and behavior, hydraulics, and structural characteristics. The probability of successful passage was greater through corrugated metal culverts than through smooth ones, particularly among smaller fish. Trout were also more likely to pass at warmer temperatures, but this effect diminished above 15 °C. Passage was impeded at higher flows, through culverts with steep slopes, and those with deep downstream pools. This study provides insight on factors influencing brook trout capacity to pass culverts as well as a model to estimate passage success under various conditions, with an improved resolution and accuracy over existing approaches. It also presents methods that could be used to investigate passage success of other species, with implications for connectivity of the riverscape.

  5. Daniel John Cunningham (1850-1909): anatomist and textbook author, whose sons achieved distinction in the Army, Navy and Indian Medical Service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaufman, Matthew H

    2008-02-01

    Daniel John Cunningham was a son of the manse. His father John (1819-93) was the parish priest at Crieff, Perthshire from 1845 and was to remain there for 41 years. In 1886 he was appointed Principal of St Mary's College of the University of St Andrews and Moderator of the Church of Scotland. Daniel was educated at Crieff Academy before he progressed to the University of Edinburgh. He graduated MB CM with First-class Honours in 1874 and then proceeded MD in 1876 when he was awarded a Gold Medal for his thesis. He acted as Demonstrator to Professor Turner (1832-1916) in Edinburgh for eight years until 1882 and was then appointed to the Chair of Anatomy at the Royal College of Surgeons of Ireland, in Dublin. After only one year there, he transferred to Trinity College, Dublin, where he occupied a similar position for 20 years. In 1903, on the appointment of Sir William Turner to the post of Principal and Vice-Chancellor of the University of Edinburgh, Daniel was invited to succeed him as Professor of Anatomy in Edinburgh. Daniel held this post until his premature death in 1909. He had three sons and two daughters. Each of his three sons achieved distinction in different fields - one in the Army, another in the Navy and the third in the Indian Medical Service. One of Daniel's daughters married Dr Edwin Bramwell (1873-1952), who was later to occupy the Moncrieff Arnott Chair of Clinical Medicine in the University of Edinburgh.

  6. An internet-based referral/consultation system for the U.S.-associated Pacific Islands: its contribution to orthopedic graduate medical education at Tripler Army Medical Center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hensel, Kurt S; Person, Donald A; Schaefer, Richard A; Burkhalter, William E

    2005-03-01

    To evaluate the benefit of the Pacific Island Health Care Project (PIHCP) to our orthopedic graduate medical education program, we performed a retrospective review of our 8-year operative experience with patients referred through this program. Between July 1994 and June 2002, 69 patients underwent 79 orthopedic operative procedures. Patients were categorized by primary diagnosis, anatomic site involved, and surgical treatment rendered. Because many of the patients referred from the PIHCP with tumors were noted to have either unusually large lesions or advanced-stage disease, further analyses of tumor stage and pathologic grade were made. Seven of the 14 oncologic cases surgically treated in our department in the past 8 years were referrals from the PIHCP. Unique operative procedures performed for these tumor patients included one forequarter amputation, one hip disarticulation, one hemipelvectomy, two partial scapulectomies, and one distal ulna excision. We conclude that the PIHCP referrals provide an important and relatively unique contribution to the clinical and operative experience of our orthopedic residents. These patients from the Pacific basin also enhance our orthopedic graduate medical education program by exposing our residents to the special socioeconomic and cultural issues related to caring for people from developing insular countries.

  7. Army Airships

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-04-01

    contains some type of internal support structure such as a keel. A rigid airship has a full skeleton, such as the Zeppelin model from the mid 1900‟s...the World War One, the Germans used zeppelins with limited success to attack the United Kingdom (UK) in a “strategic bomber” role. The US used...similar objectives.21 The Army initiated CPR‟s on every acquisition program to identify redundancies and create efficiencies. CPR‟s have led to more

  8. La Sanidad en la Base Antártica del E.T. "Gabriel de Castilla" The Medical Service in the Army's Antarctic Base "Gabriel de Castilla"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. De Diego Lousa

    2011-06-01

    the First International Polar Year (1887-1888, the 75th Anniversary of the Second International Polar Year (1932-1933 and the 50th Anniversary of the International Geophysical Year (1957-1958 which led to the establishment of the SCAR and the Antarctic Treaty. The IPY 2007-2009 is promoted by the International Council for Science (ICSU and the World Meteorological Organization (WMO. Spain has actively participated, for the first time, in this event with the first Arctic Campaign of the BIO "Hespérides" and the two operational Antarctic bases. For the Army's Antarctic base "Gabriel de Castilla" the year 2008 is special as it combines the celebration of the IPY with the commemoration of the 20th anniversary of the Spanish presence in Deception Island. It was in 1988 when the first shelter was established, although it was not considered an Antarctic Base until 1998. The aim of this article is to present the Environment and Health fields, as they are called in the structure of the Army Antarctic Campaign and which are the responsibility of Medical Service officers, as well as commemorate this significant date and remember the participants in the different Antarctic Campaigns.

  9. Army Modernization Strategy 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    hazard. The SUGV modular design allows multiple payloads to be integrated in a plug-and- play fashion . Weighing less than 30 pounds, it is capable...the Army will: Continue to field LMP (to include Army Installations) Plan for and field GCSS-Army (F/T) Plan for and field GCSS-Army ( PLM +) Define

  10. Army Sustainment. Volume 42, Issue 6, November-December 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-01

    Joseph L. Bass Commanding General Army Expeditionary Contracting Command Major General James K. Gilman Commanding General Army Medical Research and...administration, optical fabrication, laboratory services, preventive medicine, dentistry , medical operations and planning, evacuation, and practical nursing...advantage of a lot of lessons learned from previous deployments,” said Brigadier General Joseph L. Bass, commanding general of the ECC. “We

  11. Environmental contaminants in brook trout from Aroostook National Wildlife Refuge

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — In June 2012, four brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) were collected by angling from Chapman Pond and East Loring Lake at Aroostook NWR in northeast Maine. Two...

  12. Foote Brook Macroinvertebrate Biomonitoring - Phase 2 in Johnson, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — In 2000, Foote Brook was identified as a high priority site for restoration after the extensive countywide stream stability study, Stream Stability Assessment of...

  13. Great Smoky Mountains National Park Brook Trout Genetics

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Park Service, Department of the Interior — Great Smoky Mountains National Park (GRSM) is committed to monitoring ecological and evolutionary functions and processes of park ecosystems. Brook trout (Salvelinus...

  14. VT Foote Brook Natural Channel Design Restoration 2001-2002

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The Foote Brook, located in Johnson, Vermont, is known to biologists and anglers as a high quality stream with significant natural reproduction of...

  15. Foote Brook Macroinvertebrate Biomonitoring-Phase I in Johnson, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Foote Brook Biomonitoring Project, Phase I geospatial dataset consists of data from the biomonitoring of benthic macroinvertebrates at three sites located along...

  16. VT Foote Brook Natural Channel Design Restoration 2003

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — (Link to Metadata) The Foote Brook, located in Johnson, Vermont, is known to biologists and anglers as a high quality stream with significant natural reproduction of...

  17. Mitochondrial dysfunction in Brooks-Wisniewski-Brown syndrome.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morava, E.; Rodenburg, R.J.T.; Hol, F.A.; Meirleir, L. de; Seneca, S.; Busch, R.; Heuvel, L.P.W.J. van den; Smeitink, J.A.M.

    2006-01-01

    Brooks, Wisniewski, and Brown described a familial presentation of severe developmental retardation, speech delay, static encephalopathy with atrophic hydrocephalus, microcephaly, progressive spastic diplegia, a characteristic facial appearance, optic atrophy, and growth retardation associated with

  18. Brook Trout Distribution, Pacific Northwest (updated March, 2006)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Pacific States Marine Fisheries Commission — This dataset is a record of fish distribution and activity for BROOK TROUT contained in the StreamNet database. This feature class was created based on linear event...

  19. Learning to Communicate Science: Stony Brook University's Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, E.

    2012-12-01

    Stony Brook University offers an unusual series of short courses to help science graduate students learn to communicate more effectively about science with people outside their disciplines, including the public, public officials, potential funders and employers, students, the press, and colleagues in other fields. The courses include six 1-credit (14-hour) modules in oral and written communication that rely on practice and interactive feedback. More than 120 master's and PhD students, from more than 16 departments, have taken at least one of the courses since spring 2011. Most students who try one module end up taking two or three. An additional course for medical and nursing students was added in fall 2012. The courses are offered in the School of Journalism and were developed by the Center for Communicating Science (CCS). CCS was founded in 2009, with the participation of Alan Alda, the actor, writer, and longtime advocate for science, who is a Visiting Professor at Stony Brook. The Communicating Science courses have received strong institutional support and enthusiastic reviews. They are required by two programs, an MA in Marine Conservation and Policy and an Advanced Certificate in Health Communications. Two successive Provosts have subsidized course costs for PhD students, and Graduate School leaders are working to establish a steady funding stream to allow expansion of the program. Our aspiration at CCS is for every science graduate student to receive some training in communicating about science to the public. Several factors have helped in establishing the program: --CCS' multidisciplinary nature helped build support, with participation by faculty from across the campus, including not only the natural sciences, engineering, and medicine, but journalism, theatre arts, and the Writing Program, as well as nearby Brookhaven National Laboratory and Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory. --Before offering courses, CCS conducted all-day workshops and high

  20. 为军服务模式的创新与效果评价%Innovation and Effect Evaluation on Medical Service Mode for the Army

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    谢明璐

    2015-01-01

    The article summarized the basic methods of innovating the mode of serving the army.Through the mode innovation, the quality of service the army was getting better and better, the sanatorium was functioning adequate-ly, the general mood of sanatorium was purified,the management of sanatorium became more scientific and standardized.%总结为军服务模式持续创新的基本做法。通过模式创新,为军服务质量越来越好、疗养院的功能作用得到充分发挥、疗养院内部风气得到净化、疗养院管理更加科学规范。

  1. Accession Medical Standards Analysis and Research Activity (AMSARA) 2014, Annual Report, and four Supplemental Applicants and Accessions Tables for: Army, Air Force, Marine, and Navy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-02

    subcutaneous tissue. In the second year of service, the frequency of hospitalizations for complications of pregnancy increased dramatically when compared to...the first year of service, with pregnancy the most common reason for hospital admission in the second year. The Army and Marine Corps enlistees who... osteoporosis , pathologic fractures, bone cysts, and aseptic necrosis. Please note, when a majority of codes examined out to the fourth digit do not

  2. Thoughts on the army-civilian Integrated rapid delivery system of mobile medical service units%机动卫勤分队军民融合式快速投送体系思考

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    任芳宁; 夏梦; 鱼敏

    2014-01-01

    军队应急机动卫勤分队是我军卫勤保障体系的重要组成部分,本文在对其性质、特点和要求进行分析的基础上,针对其所面临的多样化军事任务卫勤保障需要,指出了构建军民融合式快速投送体系的必要性与可行性;结合我军机动卫勤分队投送现状以及我国信息化交通运输事业发展所取得的巨大成就,借鉴了国内外军民融合式发展的先进经验,对军民融合式快速投送体系在机动卫勤分队中构建的重要内容进行了深刻的思考。%As the integrative part of military medical security system, the emergency mobile medical units carry out responsibilities for both multi-military and non-military tasks. Based on its own nature and characteristics, this paper focused on necessity and feasibility of establishing the army-civilian Integrative rapid delivery system. A deeper thought on that is given based current situation of the mobile medical service units, the development of Chinese transportation, as well as advanced experiences of the army-civilian Integrative development obtained at home and abroad.

  3. Cleanth Brooks at the United States Air Force Academy April 11-12, 1978,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    April 1966. The Writer and His Community. Glasgow: Jackson , 1968. The Twenty-First W. P. Fer Memorial Lecture delivered in the University of Glasgow...Brooks & Warren. N. Y.: Crofts 119431. The Correspondence of Thomas Percy . General Editors, David Nichol Smith & Brooks. 5 vols. Baton Rouge: LSU Press...1944-57. Brooks edited vol. 11, The Correspondence of Thomas Percy and Richard Farmer [19461. Understanding Drama. By Brooks & Robert B. Heilman. N

  4. Endoparasites of plethodontid salamanders from Paradise Brook, New Hampshire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muzzall, P M; Peebles, C R; Burton, T M

    1997-12-01

    Totals of 52 dusky salamanders Desmognathus fuscus, 51 two-lined salamanders Eurycea bislineata, 54 red-backed salamanders Plethodon cinereus, and 3 spring salamanders Gyrinophilus porphyriticus (Plethodontidae) collected in June and August 1995 from Paradise Brook, a tributary to Hubbard Brook, New Hampshire, were examined for parasites. Parasites found were Brachycoelium storeriae, Brachycoelium sp., Bothriocephalus rarus, Falcaustra sp., Omeia sp., Batracholandros magnavulvaris, and Cepedietta michiganensis. Eighty-six percent of the red-backed salamanders, a terrestrial species, harbored 1 or more parasites. Among the aquatic and semiaquatic species, 27% of the dusky and 45% of the two-lined salamanders were infected with 1 or more parasites.

  5. Mujeres malditas pintadas de gris : el arte de Romaine Brooks

    OpenAIRE

    Serrano de Haro, Amparo

    1994-01-01

    A pesar de su morbosa elegancia y fatídica sensualidad, los retratos de Romaine Brooks, grises como la nostalgia, son aceptados y considerados dignos de atención crítica desde hace muy poco tiempo. Romaine Brooks,norteamericana nacida en Roma en 1874, cuyas pinturas gozaron de una gran popularidad en el París de principios de siglo XX, fue prácticamente olvidada a partir de los años treinta. La donación de buena parte de su obra al Museo Nacional de Washington a fines de los...

  6. US Army Order of Battle 1919-1941. Volume 4. The Services: Quartermaster, Medical, Military Police, Signal Corps, Chemical Warfare, and Miscellaneous Organizations, 1919-41

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    was organized at Bristow, OK, in May 1923. The unit in Bristow was disbanded in May 1924. A new 120th Ammunition Train was organized at Sperry , OK...Quartermaster Train Unknown ao Dec 24-Sep 27 Capt. John K. Rogers 1 May 30-11 May 31 Inactive Sep 27-1 May 30 Unknown 11 May 31-1 Jul 36 Third Army... Roger G. Maus (OK) 1 May 37-7 Aug 41 Lt. Col. Hugh Askew (OK) 7 Aug 41-11 Feb 42 121st Quartermaster Squadron (21st Cavalry Division) Massachusetts

  7. 2010 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Volume 2, Main Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-01

    address uncertainty to face the challenges in Full Spectrum Operations (Nicely, Bryson, Aude, Keller-Glaze, & Vowels , in preparation). 21 3...Affective commitment is an emotional or attachment to the Army. Those strongly committed leaders identify with and enjoy working for the Army...Medical Command. Nicely, K., Bryson, J., Aude, S., Keller-Glaze, H., & Vowels , C. (in preparation). Preparatory Skillsets for Brigade Combat Teams

  8. Clonal distribution and associated characteristics of Escherichia coli clinical and surveillance isolates from a military medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manges, Amee R; Mende, Katrin; Murray, Clinton K; Johnston, Brian D; Sokurenko, Evgeni V; Tchesnokova, Veronika; Johnson, James R

    2017-04-01

    Antimicrobial-resistant Escherichia coli are a concern for military health services. We studied 100 extended-spectrum beta-lactamase (ESBL)-producing and non-producing E. coli clinical and surveillance isolates from military personnel and civilians at Brooke Army Medical Center (2007-2011). Major E. coli lineages, most prominently ST10 (24%), ST131 (16%), and ST648 (8%), were distributed much as reported for other North American populations. ST131, represented mainly by its resistance-associated ST131-H30 clonal subset, was uniquely associated with a clinical origin, regardless of ESBL status. Thus, clonal background predicted resistance phenotype and clinical versus surveillance origin, and these findings could assist military clinicians and epidemiologists.

  9. Feasibility of target communities in a Dutch brook valley system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, AH; Bekker, RM

    As a reaction to the ongoing deterioration of nature conservation interest in The Netherlands, an offensive nature strategy was formulated in the 1990 Nature Policy Plan. In this Plan, target communities and target plant species are mentioned. For the 'Drentse A brook valley system', target

  10. Feasibility of target communities in a Dutch brook valley system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, AH; Bekker, RM

    1998-01-01

    As a reaction to the ongoing deterioration of nature conservation interest in The Netherlands, an offensive nature strategy was formulated in the 1990 Nature Policy Plan. In this Plan, target communities and target plant species are mentioned. For the 'Drentse A brook valley system', target communit

  11. Induction and viability of tetraploids in brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) populations are threatened by introduction of invasive species, habitat loss, and habitat degradation in their native range; and are a problem invasive species in western Unites States and Canada, and in Europe. Stocking sterile triploids has been promoted as an ...

  12. Patterns of streamwater acidity in Lye Brook Wilderness, Vermont, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    John L. Campbell; Christopher Eagar; William H. McDowell

    2002-01-01

    Under the United States Clean Air Act Amendments of 1977, a class I designation safeguards wilderness areas from the negative effects of new sources of air pollution. We monitored streamwater chemistry in the class I Lye Brook Wilderness in southwestern Vermont from May 1994 through August 1995. Stream samples were collected biweekly at nine sampling locations...

  13. Documentary Linguistics and Computational Linguistics: A Response to Brooks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bird, Steven; Chiang, David; Frowein, Friedel; Hanke, Florian; Vaswani, Ashish

    2015-01-01

    In mid-2012, the authors organized a two-week workshop in Papua New Guinea to provide training in basic techniques and technologies for language documentation, and to gain understanding of how these technologies might be improved in the future. An assessment of the workshop was conducted by Brooks with the central idea that the workshop's…

  14. Army Sociocultural Performance Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-06-01

    L., Crafts, J. L., & Brooks, J. E. (July 1995). Intercultural communication requirements for Special Forces teams. (Study Report 1683). Arlington... Communication Uses alternative, sometimes novel, methods to communicate when verbal language is not shared; conveys information about mood, intent...status, and demeanor via gestures, tone of voice, and facial expressions; improvises communication techniques as necessary. WI Works with Interpreters

  15. Experience of prevention and control of Ebola of medical team formed by People's Liberation Army in Liberia%解放军援助利比里亚医疗队埃博拉防控工作体会

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓云川; 刘秋倩

    2015-01-01

    目的 探讨解放军援助利比里亚抗击埃博拉医疗队在感染控制方面的做法和经验.方法 总结埃博拉治疗中心建设、个人防护用品穿脱、手卫生、病区环境消毒、医疗废物处置的实际做法,提出工作实践中的建议和观点.结果 按照规范的制度和流程,中国埃博拉治疗中心未发生医院感染事件.结论 合理的建筑设计和严格的感染防控流程执行是确保医务人员零感染的关键.%Objective To explore the methods and experience of infection control by anti-Ebola medical team of People's Liberation Army to Liberia.Methods The actual practices of Ebola treatment unit construction, personal protective equipment using, hand hygiene, wards environment disinfection and medical waste handling were summarized, some suggestions and opinions were offered.Results According to the standard regulation and process, no nosocomial infection affair occurred in China Ebola treatment unit.Conclusion Reasonable construction design and strict execution of infection control process are the key of ensuring zero-infection to medical personnel.

  16. Complexity and Army Transformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calhoun, Mark T.

    On 12 Octther 1999, the U.S. Army began a journey down a new path to innovation, when General Eric Shinseki presented his vision of Army Transformation at the 45th annual meeting of the Association of the United States Army. In this speech, General Shinseki described the Army as an organization consisting of heavy forces with excellent staying power but poor strategic responsiveness, light forces with excellent responsiveness but poor staying power, and a logistics system with an excessively large footprint. His proposed solution, a comprehensive change of the Army resulting in full-spectrum dominance and strategic responsiveness, would occur so quickly as to "be unnerving to some." [Shinseki. 1999] While this prediction has turned out in some ways to be true, it is not necessarily the speed of change that is unnerving to many of the people studying Army Transformation.

  17. 2010 Army Modernization Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Capability Release ( JCR ) software upgrades with BFT2 and KGV-72s provides Type-1 security and enhanced (10X) L-band bandwidth to current FBCB2 terminals...Additionally, JCR will include the co-host of the TiGR and the Army will leverage to support HBCT to SBCT conversions starting in FY11. By FY13...Army Human Intelligence 89 2010 ARMY MODERNIZATION STRATEGY WWW.G8.ARMY.MIL IBCT: IED: IED: IFPC: IPADS: IRB: ISR: IT: JAB: JBC-P: JCR : JETS

  18. Evaluation of an Unsuccessful Brook Trout Electrofishing Removal Project in a Small Rocky Mountain Stream.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyer, Kevin A.; Lamansky, Jr., James A.; Schill, Daniel J.

    2006-01-26

    In the western United States, exotic brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis frequently have a deleterious effect on native salmonids, and biologists often attempt to remove brook trout from streams by means of electrofishing. Although the success of such projects typically is low, few studies have assessed the underlying mechanisms of failure, especially in terms of compensatory responses. A multiagency watershed advisory group (WAG) conducted a 3-year removal project to reduce brook trout and enhance native salmonids in 7.8 km of a southwestern Idaho stream. We evaluated the costs and success of their project in suppressing brook trout and looked for brook trout compensatory responses, such as decreased natural mortality, increased growth, increased fecundity at length, and earlier maturation. The total number of brook trout removed was 1,401 in 1998, 1,241 in 1999, and 890 in 2000; removal constituted an estimated 88% of the total number of brook trout in the stream in 1999 and 79% in 2000. Although abundance of age-1 and older brook trout declined slightly during and after the removals, abundance of age-0 brook trout increased 789% in the entire stream 2 years after the removals ceased. Total annual survival rate for age-2 and older brook trout did not decrease during the removals, and the removals failed to produce an increase in the abundance of native redband trout Oncorhynchus mykiss gairdneri. Lack of a meaningful decline and unchanged total mortality for older brook trout during the removals suggest that a compensatory response occurred in the brook trout population via reduced natural mortality, which offset the removal of large numbers of brook trout. Although we applaud WAG personnel for their goal of enhancing native salmonids by suppressing brook trout via electrofishing removal, we conclude that their efforts were unsuccessful and suggest that similar future projects elsewhere over such large stream lengths would be costly, quixotic enterprises.

  19. 远程医学在军队非战争军事行动卫勤保障中的应用%Application of Telemedicine in Medical Service Support of Non-war Military Action in Armies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘运成; 葛毅; 吴豪; 翟新海

    2012-01-01

    近年来,随着我军非战争军事行动的增多,远程医学系统在各类非战争军事行动中的卫勤指挥、伤员救治、普及医学知识等方面发挥了重要作用.从军队远程医学建设历程、具有的主要功能、在各类非战争军事行动中的应用以及建设的相关经验等方面进行了论述.%In recent years, as the increasing of non-war military actions in China, telemedicine system plays an important role in medical service command, treating the wounded and popularizing medical knowledge in various non-war military actions. The paper discussed the construction progress, main functions, applications and relevant construction experiences of telemedicine in armies.

  20. Army Overdependency on Contractors

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-02-20

    Army Overdependency on Contrators EWS 2005 Subject Area Topical Issues Contemporary Issues Paper Submitted by Captain HL Morris...aspect of this collection of information, including suggestions for reducing this burden, to Washington Headquarters Services , Directorate for Information... service would not be interrupted if the contractor failed to perform. The guidelines also mandated that the Army had to be capable of providing

  1. 某部医院船赴马尔代夫外岛礁巡诊经验体会%Experience of our army hospital ship to Maldives island for mobile medical service

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    安丰妹; 田玉芹; 郭红霞

    2016-01-01

    通过对执行“和谐使命-2013”任务,巡诊医疗分队首次赴马尔代夫南岛礁的福阿穆拉库岛(Fua Mulaku)和阿杜岛(Addu Atoll)2岛住岛连续开展医疗巡诊2 d进行总结,探讨医院船国外岛礁驻岛连续巡诊医疗服务模式。本次巡诊456例次,皮肤、消化系统、口腔溃疡疾病多见。实践证明我军医院船达到了医院船赴国外岛礁住岛连续巡诊,为国外外岛礁官兵、居民提供高水平医疗服务的目的,完全有能力承担赴海外医疗条件差的外岛礁住岛连续巡诊、展开医疗服务,任务获得圆满成功;这一做法节省了人力物力和时间,增进了两国友谊,值得借鉴和推广。%This paper was to study mobile medical service pattern of our army hospital ship perfoming on foreign island reefs,through summarizing the data of the harmony mission-2013 mobile medical practiced for two days firstly at Maldives Addu Atoll and Fua Mulaku l. In this mobile medical practice of 456 (case/time) skin disease,digestive system disease and dental ulcer are common ones. This practice achived the aim to provide high level medical service for foreign islands officers and residents,to promote friendship of both countries. Results show that hospital ship suffice for succession mobile medical service contraposing foreign island poor medical condition, its medical services are successful and fulfill,as well as save manpower material resources,at same time the mission enhanced friendship of both countries. It’s worth taking as example and popularizing.

  2. Mujeres malditas pintadas de gris : el arte de Romaine Brooks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amparo Serrano de Haro

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available A pesar de su morbosa elegancia y fatídica sensualidad, los retratos de Romaine Brooks, grises como la nostalgia, son aceptados y considerados dignos de atención crítica desde hace muy poco tiempo. Romaine Brooks,norteamericana nacida en Roma en 1874, cuyas pinturas gozaron de una gran popularidad en el París de principios de siglo XX, fue prácticamente olvidada a partir de los años treinta. La donación de buena parte de su obra al Museo Nacional de Washington a fines de los años 60 y la exposición antológica de su obra en 1971 (un año después de su muerte, iniciaron lo que sería un proceso de recuperación de su figura y su pintura.

  3. BROOKS GLYCERINE 10缓震基因

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    中底为王

    2012-01-01

    在跑鞋品牌里要论谁最具专业科技性,身为“四大跑鞋品牌”之一的BROOKS 相信是很多跑步迷心中的首选。2011年BROOKS推出了极具创新精神的中底缓震技术DNA,为整个跑步界投下了重磅炸弹,

  4. A geologic framework for mineralization in the western Brooks Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lorne E.

    2004-01-01

    The Brooks Range is a 950-km-long north-vergent fold and thrust belt, which was formed during Mesozoic convergence of the continental Arctic Alaska terrane and the oceanic Angayucham terrane and was further shortened and uplifted in Tertiary time. The Arctic Alaska terrane consists of parautochthonous rocks and the Endicott Mountains and De Long Mountains subterranes. The Endicott Mountains allochthon of the western Brooks Range is the setting for many sulfide and barite occurrences, such as the supergiant Red Dog zinc-lead mine. Mineralization is sediment hosted and most commonly is present in black shale and carbonate turbidites of the Mississippian Kuna Formation. The reconstructed Kuna basin is a 200 by +600 km feature that represents the culmination of a remarkable chain of events that includes three fluvial-deltaic and two or more orogenic cycles, Middle Devonian to Mississippian episodes of extension and igneous activity, and the emergence of a seaward Lower Proterozoic landmass that may have constituted a barrier to marine circulation. Mississippian extension and related horst-and-graben architecture in the western Brooks Range is manifested in part by strong facies variability between coeval units of allochthons and structural plates. Shallow marine to possibly nonmarine arkose, platform to shelf carbonate, slope-to-basin shale, chert and carbonate turbidites, and submarine volcanic rocks are all represented in Mississippian time. The structural setting of Mississippian sedimentation, volcanism, and mineralization in the Kuna basin may be comparable to documented Devono-Mississippian extensional sags or half-grabens in the subsurface north of the Brooks Range. Climate, terrestrial ecosystems, multiple fluvial-deltaic aquifers, and structural architecture affected the liberation, movement, and redeposition of metals in ways that are incompletely understood.

  5. Strategic Sealift Supporting Army Deployments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-10

    STRATEGIC SEALIFT SUPPORTING ARMY DEPLOYMENTS A thesis presented to the Faculty of the U.S. Army Command and General Staff...THOMPSON, MAJ, US ARMY BFA, Louisiana Tech University, Ruston, Louisiana, 1994 Fort Leavenworth, Kansas 2016 Approved for...Strategic Sealift Supporting Army Deployments 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Matthew

  6. Broad-scale patterns of Brook Trout responses to introduced Brown Trout in New York

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, James E.; Slattery, Michael T.; Kean M. Clifford,

    2013-01-01

    Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis and Brown Trout Salmo trutta are valuable sport fish that coexist in many parts of the world due to stocking introductions. Causes for the decline of Brook Trout within their native range are not clear but include competition with Brown Trout, habitat alteration, and repetitive stocking practices. New York State contains a large portion of the Brook Trout's native range, where both species are maintained by stocking and other management actions. We used artificial neural network models, regression, principal components analysis, and simulation to evaluate the effects of Brown Trout, environmental conditions, and stocking on the distribution of Brook Trout in the center of their native range. We found evidence for the decline of Brook Trout in the presence of Brown Trout across many watersheds; 22% of sampled reaches where both species were expected to occur contained only Brown Trout. However, a model of the direct relationship between Brook Trout and Brown Trout abundance explained less than 1% of data variation. Ordination showed extensive overlap of Brook Trout and Brown Trout habitat conditions, with only small components of the hypervolume (multidimensional space) being distinctive. Subsequent analysis indicated higher abundances of Brook Trout in highly forested areas, while Brown Trout were more abundant in areas with relatively high proportions of agriculture. Simulation results indicated that direct interactions and habitat conditions were relatively minor factors compared with the effects of repeated stocking of Brown Trout into Brook Trout habitat. Intensive annual stocking of Brown Trout could eliminate resident Brook Trout in less than a decade. Ecological differences, harvest behavior, and other habitat changes can exacerbate Brook Trout losses. Custom stocking scenarios with Brown Trout introductions at relatively low proportions of resident Brook Trout populations may be able to sustain healthy populations of both

  7. A Study to Determine the Best Approach for Conducting a Formal Ambulatory Surgery Program at William Beaumont Army Medical Center, El Paso, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-05-01

    that first class surgical therapy could only be carried on in the confines of the hospitai. 1 As medical knowledge and technology. expanued, the...Excision Gynecomasta, Male Mastectomy (Bilateral) Gynecomasta, Male Mastectomy (Unilateral) Hemangioma, Excision Hemorrhoidectomy Hydrocelectomy Inguinal...Implants Bilateral Removal/Exchange - Breast Implants Unilateral Rhinoplasty Rhydidectomy Scar Revision - Single Multiple Septoplasty- Nasal Septal

  8. 国际化背景下军队医学院校研究生培养的挑战与探索%Challenge and exploration of army medical college graduate education in the context of internationalization

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁树辉; 王莉; 张永国; 封斌; 王新; 王飙落; 郭学刚; 吴开春; 丁杰

    2011-01-01

    在教育国际化大背景下,军校研究生教育理念、模式亦随之转变,并存着机遇和挑战.试指出国际化背景下军队医学院校研究生教育面临的挑战,分析军队医学院校现行研究生教育存在的问题,并总结了研究生培养国际化进程中的探索和尝试.%In the context of internationalization of education,the military graduate education concepts and models also come to change,and opportunities and challenges coexist.In this article,the challenges and problems of army medical college graduate education were mentioned and analyzed,and the exploration and attempt of graduate education in the process of international were summarized.

  9. Advanced Capabilities for Combat Medics

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Convertino, Victor A; Cooke, William H; Salinas, Jose; Holcomb, John B

    2004-01-01

    The US Army Institute of Surgical Research (USAISR) has the lead for directing the Research Program Area for Advanced Triage Capabilities for Combat Medics in the Medical Research and Materiel Command (MRMC...

  10. Accession Medical Standards Analysis and Research Activity (AMSARA) 2014, Annual Report, and four Supplemental Applicants and Accessions Tables for: Army, Air Force, Marine, and Navy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-02-02

    education were 1.39 times, more likely to have a disability discharge compared to individuals with a high school diploma. Personnel with a Bachelor...a high school education at accession, recruits who scored in the lower AFQT percentile score groups, and recruits with a medical disqualification...subsections titled “Hospitalizations,” “Attrition,” “EPTS Discharges,” and “ Disability Discharges with an Accession Record,” age, education level, and Armed

  11. The United States Army Operating Concept, 2016-2028

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-19

    retrograde operations. f. Theater armies may also include a medical command for deployment support that provides health services to Army and other...tenets of jus in bello ,120 discrimination (between combatants and noncombatants), and proportionality in the use of force,121 measured against the...Barracks, PA, 19. (Used with permission.) 119 Biddle, 9. 120 Jus in bello , translated as justice in war, are agreements defining limits on acceptable

  12. Index to Army Times 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    task force told. Army Times; Mar. 14, 1988; 48(31): p. 52. DENTAL RECORDS Army behind in dental record effort. Army Times; Nov. 21, 1988; 49(15): p. 27...p. 17. MILITARY DEPENDENTS-- DENTAL CARE Dental insurance for military families may be expanded. Army Times; Aug. 22, 1988; 49(2): p. 24. MILITARY...compensation bill. Army Times; May 2, 1988; 48(38): p. 38. PENTAGON MEDITATION CLUB Meditators, Soviets munch pasta , push peace. Army Times; May 23, 1988; 48

  13. Brooks Range and eastern Alps: a tectonic comparison

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helwig, J.A.

    1985-04-01

    A comparison of the tectonic evolution of the Brooks Range (BR) and the Eastern Alps (EA) reveals a remarkable parallelism. Both of these Mesozoic-Cenozoic orogenic belts are underlain by sialic crust formed in an earlier Paleozoic orogenic cycle. The old basement is revealed in major tectonic windows: the Tauern Fenster (EA) and the Doonerak Window-Schwatka Mountains (BR) - which are unconformably overlapped by transgressive, neritic marine clastic to carbonate successions - the Permo-Triassic through Hochstegenkalk sequence (EA), and the Kekiktuk-Kayak-Lisburne sequence (BR). These successions are passive-margin sequences that pass southward, in palinspastically restored cross sections, to synchronous deep-water facies deposited on ophiolitic basement - Bunderschiefer on Triassic-Jurassic ophiolites (EA) and Kuna facies or Etivluk sequence on upper Paleozoic ophiolites (BR). Onset of subduction-collision is marked by olistostromal facies - Cretaceous wildflysch (EA) and Jura-Cretaceous Okpikruak Formation (BR) - and the development of major flysch-molasse successions in the foreland basins of the collisional fold and thrust belts. Important major contrasts between these two mountain ranges reside in their colliding blocks and their post-orogenic histories. Alpine orogenesis was driven by continent-continent collision, closing out a young, narrow ocean, whereas Brooks Range deformation appears to have originated by arc-continent collision, closing out an older, broad (.)ocean. Younger Cenozoic deformation is extensional and strike-slip in the Eastern Alps, producing disjunctive basins, but Cenozoic deformation in the Brooks Range is diverse and includes compression in the east and extension in the far west.

  14. Standardized early medical care of Lushan earthquake victims in army hospitals%芦山地震伤员震区驻军医院内的早期规范救治

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱灏; 周继红; 杨人懿; 肖伟; 毛志有; 覃先云

    2013-01-01

    Objective To summarize the experiences with early treatment of the wounded associated with 4 · 20 Lushan earthquake in army hospitals.Methods Emergency response programs were started and tent hospitals were set up.According to the basic principle of wartime wound treatment regulation,emergency triage,emergency medical care,transferring,specialized treatment and evacuation were performed for the wounded in this earthquake.Results After the earthquake,the emergency rescue programs were started in the hospital.Twenty minutes later,emergence medical team with full equipment were set out for the epicenter and the tent hospitals were set up.A total of 181 earthquake cases were admitted within two weeks,of which 68 (37.6%) were transferred from the scene of earthquake and 113 (62.4%) were transferred after the primary treatment (including cases evacuating from other hospitals).Forty-nine surgeries had been done,including 30 emergence ones.Thirty-four cases (including 14 severe wounded) were evacuated to superior hospitals as their vital signs turned stable.There was no death or surgical wound infection.Conclusions Peacetime complete emergence programs and materials reserves,unified and well-organized command as well as normative grading treatment system in army hospitals assure the standardized medical care with high efficiency and high quality for earthquake victims.However,more researches are needed over diagnosis methods and standards for wound severity,equipment improvement and standards for casualty evacuation.%目的 总结震区驻军医院在雅安芦山“4·20”地震伤员早期救治经验. 方法 启动应急预案,建立帐蓬医院,依据《战伤救治规则》基本原则,针对本次地震伤员特点对伤员展开急救拣伤分类、紧急救治、分流、专科处理和后送等. 结果 地震后医院迅速启动重大灾害紧急救援预案,20min后向震心重灾区派出了装备齐全的应急医疗队;在医院展开了帐篷医院.2

  15. Sexual Assault: Better Resource Management Needed to Improve Prevention and Response in the Army National Guard and Army Reserve

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-01

    ensure it has the staff needed to complete investigations within 3 weeks, as required by OCI guidance. Eligibility for follow-up or long-term health ...long-term mental and medical health -care services. DOD’s sexual assault prevention and response instruction requires the commander of the Army...correct or mitigate the challenges of funding behavioral health care for Army Reserve soldiers, particularly those who require coverage for trauma

  16. Histopathology of fish. IV. A granuloma of brook trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, E.M.; Yasutake, W.T.

    1956-01-01

    In the summer of 1952, Snieszko and Griffin (1955) diagnosed kidney disease in brook trout from the Fish and Wildlife Service's station at Berlin, New Hampshire. During the examination of these fish, a peculiar lesion was observed in the vicinity of the gastric caeca. In very advanced cases, hard, glistening, white masses of tissue bearing a striking resemblance to mature testes often filled the abdominal cavity. In the initial examinations, the material was actually mistaken for normal testicular tissue. Subsequently, it was recognized as an entirely aberrant, proliferating tumor-like mass.

  17. The Why, What, and Impact of GPA at Oxford Brookes University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrews, Matthew

    2016-01-01

    This paper examines the introduction at Oxford Brookes University of a Grade Point Average (GPA) scheme alongside the traditional honours degree classification. It considers the reasons for the introduction of GPA, the way in which the scheme was implemented, and offers an insight into the impact of GPA at Brookes. Finally, the paper considers…

  18. Aviation medicine and the Army.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vyrnwy-Jones, P; Thornton, R

    1984-10-01

    The purpose of this short series of articles is not to present the reader with a vast amount of technical data, soon to be forgotten, but to provide some items of general interest from the past, present, and future of Army aviation. Obviously there will be a concentration on medical matters, but the aim is to give the reader a feel for the rapid progress being made in helicopter design and the likely problems we may face in the future. The first article serves as an introduction to the series and three further articles will cover various aspects of the speciality. The second will be concerned with AAC helicopter accidents and will include accident investigation, crashworthiness and the contribution made by pilot error. The third article will cover major environmental problems of helicopters, particularly noise, vibration and thermal stress. The fourth article will examine ways in which microprocessors and modern technology will affect future helicopter and ancillary equipment development; for instance, a helicopter with no external windows has been suggested, 'The Iron Cockpit'. The fifth article will be concerned with the clinical aspects of Army Aviation medicine.

  19. Analysis of floods, including the tropical storm Irene inundation, of the Ottauquechee River in Woodstock, Bridgewater, and Killington and of Reservoir Brook in Bridgewater and Plymouth, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flynn, Robert H.

    2014-01-01

    Digital flood-inundation maps were created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) in cooperation with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District for a 25-mile reach of the Ottauquechee River and a 2-mile reach of Reservoir Brook in Vermont. The reach of the Ottauquechee River that was studied extends from River Road Bridge in Killington, Vt., to the Taftsville Dam in the village of Taftsville, in the town of Woodstock, Vt., and the reach of Reservoir Brook extends from a location downstream from the Woodward Reservoir in Plymouth, Vt., to its confluence with the Ottauquechee River in Bridgewater, Vt. The inundation maps depict estimates of the areal extent of flooding corresponding to the 1-percent annual exceedance probability (AEP) flood (also referred to as the 100-year flood) and the peak of the tropical storm Irene flood of August 28, 2011, which was greater than the 0.2-percent AEP flood (also referred to as the 500-year flood), as referenced to the USGS Ottauquechee River near West Bridgewater, Vt. streamgage (station 01150900).

  20. Designing and implementing the Army Nursing Leader Academy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunemn, Kathleen; Hopkins-Chadwick, Denise L; Connally, Tina; Bramley, Kelly

    2011-01-01

    In 2008, the Chief of the Army Nurse Corps directed a thorough review of existing training programs available to and provided for Army Nursing personnel for the development of full-spectrum leaders for Army Nursing. The review provided the gap analysis necessary to restructure courses provided by the Department of Nursing Science at the Army Medical Department Center and School. This new grouping of courses is referred to as the Army Nursing Leader Academy. The Army Nursing Leader Academy is the first of its kind in that it addresses career-long learning of all Army Nursing by focusing on building skills, knowledge, and behaviors to produce sustainable, full-spectrum leaders. The Nursing Leader Academy consists of a series of sequential nurse leader development courses combined with a web based resource center. Grounded in the Patient CaringTouch System, guided by nurse competencies, and gauged by the Leader Capabilities Map, the Nursing Leader Academy provides learning that is relevant and timely designed to reinforce enterprise values and culture to ensure readiness for successive roles and positions. Full implementation of the Nursing Leader Academy will include the evidence-based elements of formal schooling, coaching, self-development, functional/technical (competency attainment), and professional experiences.

  1. Branding the Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-25

    the specific segment of the population that the marketer or retailer identifies as the most likely consumer of their product or service.14 While the...Target+ Market . 15 Linda Clingan, “US Army Custom Segmentation System” (Fort Knox, KY: June 1, 2007). 16 “Common Language Marketing Dictionary.” 17...Linda Clingan, “US Army Custom Segmentation System.” 11 marketing teams face the harder-to-measure goal of “building awareness,” whereas the sales

  2. How the Army Runs: A Senior Leader Reference Handbook, 2015-2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-28

    Army Corrections Command (USACC); Defense Forensics and Biometrics Agency (DFBA). (n) The Judge Advocate General (TJAG): U.S. Army Legal Services...BMDR Ballistic Missile Defense Review BMIS-T Battlefield Medical Information-Theater BOD Board of Directors BOD Broadcast Operations

  3. Women in the Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-06-06

    undoubtedly be included in the ultimate AFEES test package for future enlistees. The significance of this study effort, and ultimate value to the Army...FY. 2 2 PART 4 PROXOTIONS AND SELECTIONS Selection by. grade for promocion , command and advanced schooling are presented in this part. o Selections

  4. Army Strong, Superintendent Savvy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, Ericka

    2011-01-01

    Brigadier General Anthony "Tony" Tata of the U.S. Army had one of those "ah-ha" moments in April 2006 when, on the eve of an operation he was heading in Afghanistan, an Al Qaeda rocket shattered a nearby school. The attack killed a teacher and seven students and wounded dozens more. The rocket incident eventually nudged Tata…

  5. Stony Brook's Graduate Courses in Clear, Vivid, Conversational Communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, E.

    2011-12-01

    Graduate students in the sciences at Stony Brook University are taking for-credit courses to learn to communicate more effectively about science with people outside their disciplines, including public officials, the press, students, potential funders and employers, colleagues in other fields, and the general public. Five Communicating Science courses are offered; two more will be added in January, 2012. The courses are offered by the School of Journalism and developed by the Center for Communicating Science (CCS). This interdisciplinary center was founded in 2009, with the participation of Alan Alda, the actor, writer, director and longtime advocate for science, who is a Visiting Professor at Stony Brook. At the core of the program are three 1-credit (14-hour) modules that rely on experiential learning, repeated practice and immediate, interactive feedback. In Distilling Your Message, students practice speaking clearly, vividly and conversationally about their work at different levels of complexity and formality to different audiences, using storytelling techniques where appropriate. In Writing for the Public, they extend these skills into writing. In Improvisation for Scientists, the most unconventional of the courses, students play improvisational theater games to help themselves connect more directly, personally and responsively with their audiences. In their first two semesters, the courses are expected to serve about 90 students, taking a total of about 180 credits. Most of the courses have filled quickly, mixing master's and doctoral students from more than a dozen fields, including marine and atmospheric sciences. Three to six credits of Communicating Science courses are required for students in two programs, an MA in Marine Conservation and Policy and an Advanced Certificate in Health Communications. The content and methods of the courses are based largely on lessons learned from evaluations of all-day workshops that CCS has conducted for more than 250

  6. Schubert in Stony Brook and Kinks in Vienna

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nieuwenhuizen, P.

    Wolfgang Kummer became my friend during the many years I have been visiting Vienna in January. He created a marvellous Institute for Theoretical Physics with an enthusiastic group of students, postdocs and colleagues. Great Institutes need a central person to grow around. Two such Institutes I have been attached to are Utrecht where M. Veltman created a school of field theorists, and Stony Brook where C.N. Yang was the natural leader. In Vienna Wolfgang played a similar role. His mere presence during seminars gave a sense of enthusiasm and direction, and his active participation was an example for younger physicists not to be shy and also ask further clarifications when needed. In particular I was impressed by his collaboration with students. Almost every afternoon I would find him sitting with one or two students at his desk or in the conference room, trying to understand new problems in dilaton gravity, and discussing and calculating with them on equal footing. I invited Wolfgang to visit Stony Brook, but he was noncommittal, and I soon found out that he was seriously ill. Yet, he would come in everyday, and be the life of the Institute. Every year with his wife Lore we would go out one evening in Vienna, either to a play or a concert. These were great evenings as I will describe below. Near the end, I would phone him at his home, and we would talk physics. He remained optimistic about his chances, but then suddenly all went wrong and he died. I miss a dear friend. Below is the story of how we became friends…

  7. 75 FR 7255 - Army Educational Advisory Committee

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-18

    ... Department of the Army Army Educational Advisory Committee AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... CFR 102-3.150, the following meeting notice is announced: Name of Committee: U.S. Army War College Subcommittee of the Army Education Advisory Committee. Date of Meeting: March 11, 2010. Place of Meeting:...

  8. Flume length and post-exercise impingement affect anaerobic metabolism in brook charr Salvelinus fontinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudorache, C; O'Keefe, R A; Benfey, T J

    2010-02-01

    The effect of flume length and impingement time on post-exercise lactate concentrations in brook charr Salvelinus fontinalis were examined. Swimming in longer flumes increased lactate concentrations, as does impingement after swimming in short flumes.

  9. 75 FR 38716 - Safety Zone; Vietnam Veterans of America Fireworks Display, Brookings, OR

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-06

    ...-9319, e-mail D13-SG-SecPortlandWWM@uscg.mil . If you have questions on viewing the docket, call Renee V... America are holding a fireworks display near Brookings, Oregon on July 4, 2010. Due to the...

  10. Environmental contaminants in fish from Mere Brook - U.S. Naval Air Station, Brunswick, Maine

    Data.gov (United States)

    US Fish and Wildlife Service, Department of the Interior — Mere Brook bisects three former landfills at the U.S. Naval Air Station in Brunswick, Maine (NASB). Leachate, soil, and sediment analyzed during Superfund remedial...

  11. Olemuse teater. Kantor ja Brook / Jan Kott ; tõlk. Eva-Liisa Linder

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kott, Jan

    2004-01-01

    T. Kantori lavastustest "Surnud klass" ja "Wielopole Wielopole" ning P. Brooki "Carmeni" lavastusest. Tõlgitud raamatust : Jan Kott. The Theatre of Essence: Kantor and Brook.- The Theatre of Essence and other Essays. Evanston, Northwestern University Press, 1984, lk. 159-165

  12. Olemuse teater. Kantor ja Brook / Jan Kott ; tõlk. Eva-Liisa Linder

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Kott, Jan

    2004-01-01

    T. Kantori lavastustest "Surnud klass" ja "Wielopole Wielopole" ning P. Brooki "Carmeni" lavastusest. Tõlgitud raamatust : Jan Kott. The Theatre of Essence: Kantor and Brook.- The Theatre of Essence and other Essays. Evanston, Northwestern University Press, 1984, lk. 159-165

  13. The Foote Brook Natural Channel Design Restoration Project (2001) and Post Monitoring Project (2002)--Johnson, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Foote Brook, located in Johnson, Vermont, is known to biologists and anglers as a high quality stream with significant natural reproduction of rainbow, brown,...

  14. Post Monitoring (2003) of the Foote Brook Natural Channel Design Restoration Project--Johnson, Vermont

    Data.gov (United States)

    Vermont Center for Geographic Information — The Foote Brook, located in Johnson, Vermont, is known to biologists and anglers as a high quality stream with significant natural reproduction of rainbow, brown,...

  15. CRED 5 m Gridded bathymetry of Brooks Banks, Hawaii, USA (Arc ASCII format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry (5m) of the shelf and slope environments of Brooks Banks, Hawaii, USA. The ASCII includes multibeam bathymetry from the Simrad EM300, Simrad...

  16. Nostalgia in the Army (17th-19th Centuries).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battesti, Michèle

    2016-01-01

    People died from nostalgia in the army in the 17th-19th centuries. The term 'nostalgia', created by the doctor Johannes Hofer (1669-1752), from Mulhouse, came from the Germanic Heimweh, or 'homesickness'. It affected the young people enrolled in the army, such as Swiss mercenaries. Longing for their native land, they were consumed by an ongoing desire to return home. If it was impossible to do so, they sank into 'a sadness accompanied with insomnia, anorexia and other unpleasant symptoms' that could lead to death. Nostalgia became classified as a disease during the last quarter of the 18th century and ravaged the French army during the Revolution and the Napoleonic wars. However, as soon as the wars ended, it ceased to exist in the army (except the colonial army). It was removed from the nosology in the first half of the 19th century. Rapidly explained as an example of a misdiagnosis or a confusion between 'connection and cause', nostalgia needs to be assessed in regard to the medical debate between 'alienists' and 'organicists'. Creating much concern, nostalgia needs to be considered in the historical context of a society destabilized by modernity, with some individuals uprooted by the sudden transition from civil society to military life. It raises questions about the role that the army played in the creation of the French national union. Nostalgia may have also covered psychic traumatisms later designated as combat fatigue, war neurosis, or post-traumatic stress disorder.

  17. Army Medical Department Support to Stability Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-02-28

    25 million dead and another 40 million infected , continues to spread at an alarming rate and nervous eyes are turned toward an anticipated influenza...million men , women, and children suffer from chronic malnutrition that often comes in the aftermath of natural and man-made disasters.10 According to...included cholera, diphtheria, leishmaniasis, malaria, measles, pertussis, poliomyelitis, schistosomiasis , typhoid fever, and the chronic malnutrition

  18. Modified Diet Recipes for Army Medical Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-10-20

    Starch, edible, modified Milk non-fat, dry Water , cold 1 oz 3 oz 1 lb 15 oz l/4 cup 3/4 cup 1 quart 33 Ö9 881 3. 4. 5. 6...Milk| nonfat dry - Water Starch, edible, mQdified Pepper, ground lemon Juice Ghicken, Puree, canned WEIGHTS 4 oz 1 oz 2 oz 11/2 oz 30 oz...simmer 10 minutes or until fish and potatoes are tender. 3. Add salt, garlic, thyme, parsley and tarragon. Milk, nonfat, dry Water , warm Starch

  19. Army Medical Research and Development Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-10-01

    sporozoite neutralizing activity (SNA), destroying sporozoite infectivity and produce a circumsporozoite precipitate (CSP) reaction. Passive transfer...fact that passive transfer of immune serum does not protect recipient animals and that, under certain experimental conditions, mice are protected in...non-immune control, immune unfractionated, inmune -T cells or immune-B cells, and in varying quantities were transferred to recipient mice

  20. Clinical Investigation Program (Tripler Army Medical Center)

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-10-01

    been leucopenia and, given the intensity of these programs, fatal toxicities have ranged from 2-3% with CHOP and ProMACE-CytaBOM to 6% with m-BACOD...toxicity has been very tolerable with the only serious toxicity being transient leucopenia . 220 q Detail Summary Sheet Prot No: SWOG 8711(89) Status

  1. Modeling Exposure to Electromagnetic Fields with Realistic Anatomical Models: The Brooks Finite Difference Time Domain (FDTD)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-02-01

    Both versions of Brooks FDTD are parallelized for Beowulf clusters and have run on more than one hundred processors. In addition to code, a number of...rewritten in C. Both versions of Brooks FDTD are parallelized for Beowulf clusters and have run on more than one hundred processors. In addition to...have made significant contributions include: Aldon Lyssy, who volunteered to scavenge and build the first Beowulf : Peter Gajsek who lead the first

  2. Simulated effects of YY-male stocking and manual suppression for eradicating nonnative Brook Trout populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schill, Daniel J.; Meyer, Kevin A.; Hansen, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Eradication of nonnative Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis populations is difficult to achieve with standard techniques, such as electrofishing removal or piscicides; new approaches are needed. A novel concept is to stock “supermale” hatchery fish with wild conspecifics. Supermales (MYY) have two Y-chromosomes, resulting in offspring that are all males; over time, successful supermale reproduction could eradicate the wild population. We constructed an age-structured stochastic model to investigate the effects of manually suppressing wild fish and stocking MYY fingerlings on the long-term viability of hypothetical nonnative Brook Trout populations. In streams, an annual stocking rate of supermales equivalent to 50% of wild age-0 Brook Trout density combined with an annual selective suppression rate equivalent to 50% of wild Brook Trout density resulted in a time to extirpation of only 2–4 years if supermale fitness was equivalent to wild male fitness. However, time to extirpation in streams was 5–15 years if supermale fitness was 80% lower than wild male fitness. In alpine lakes, higher supermale stocking rates and nonselective gillnetting were required to eradicate Brook Trout populations. If supermales were assumed to be as fit as wild males, however, any supermale stocking rate greater than 49% in alpine lakes or 60% in streams achieved eradication in 10 years or less, regardless of the suppression rate. Because manual suppression and the stocking of MYY fingerlings can readily be conducted at the levels assumed in our simulations, use of such an integrated pest management (IPM) approach could extirpate undesirable Brook Trout populations within reasonably short periods of time. Given the recent successful development of an MYY Brook Trout broodstock capable of producing large numbers of MYY fingerlings and given the positive results of the present simulations for both streams and alpine lakes, field testing of MYY stocking is warranted within an

  3. Landscape models of brook trout abundance and distribution in lotic habitat with field validation

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenna, James E.; Johnson, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis are native fish in decline owing to environmental changes. Predictions of their potential distribution and a better understanding of their relationship to habitat conditions would enhance the management and conservation of this valuable species. We used over 7,800 brook trout observations throughout New York State and georeferenced, multiscale landscape condition data to develop four regionally specific artificial neural network models to predict brook trout abundance in rivers and streams. Land cover data provided a general signature of human activity, but other habitat variables were resistant to anthropogenic changes (i.e., changing on a geological time scale). The resulting models predict the potential for any stream to support brook trout. The models were validated by holding 20% of the data out as a test set and by comparison with additional field collections from a variety of habitat types. The models performed well, explaining more than 90% of data variability. Errors were often associated with small spatial displacements of predicted values. When compared with the additional field collections (39 sites), 92% of the predictions were off by only a single class from the field-observed abundances. Among “least-disturbed” field collection sites, all predictions were correct or off by a single abundance class, except for one where brown trout Salmo trutta were present. Other degrading factors were evident at most sites where brook trout were absent or less abundant than predicted. The most important habitat variables included landscape slope, stream and drainage network sizes, water temperature, and extent of forest cover. Predicted brook trout abundances were applied to all New York streams, providing a synoptic map of the distribution of brook trout habitat potential. These fish models set benchmarks of best potential for streams to support brook trout under broad-scale human influences and can assist with planning and

  4. Charles Lewis Brook: third Director of the BAA Variable Star Section

    CERN Document Server

    Shears, Jeremy

    2011-01-01

    Charles Lewis Brook, MA, FRAS, FRMetS (1855 - 1939) served as Director of the BAA Variable Star Section from 1910 to 1921. During this time he was not merely interested in collecting the observations of the members (to which he also contributed), but he also spent considerable amounts of time analysing the data and preparing numerous publications on the findings. This paper discusses Brook's life and work, with a particular focus on his contribution to variable star astronomy.

  5. TRICARE: the Civilian Health and Medical Program of the Uniformed Services (CHAMPUS); specialized treatment services (STS) program--DoD. Notice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-11-16

    This notice is to advise interested parties that Brooke Army Medical Center (BAMC) and Wilford Hall Medical Center (WHMC), hereinafter referred to as Destination San Antonio, have been designated the Regional Specialized Treatment Service facilities (STSFs) for DRGs 1, 3, 4, 49, 104-107, 110-111, 191, 209, 491, 286, and 357. The application for the STSF designation was submitted by the Lead Agency for TRICARE Region 6 and approved by the Assistant Secretary of Defense (Health Affairs). The Lead Agent will oversee that the STSFs maintain the quality and standards required for specialized treatment services. DoD beneficiaries residing within a 200-mile radius of Destination San Antonio facilities falling into the above patient category must be evaluated by Destination San Antonio staff before receiving care for these DRGs under direct military care or TRICARE/CHAMPUS cost sharing. Travel and lodging for the patient and, if stated to be medically necessary by a referring physician, for a nonmedical attendant, will be reimbursed by Destination San Antonio facility in accordance with the provisions of the Joint Federal Travel Regulation. Although evaluation in person is preferred, it is possible to conduct the evaluation telephonically if the patient is unable to travel to a Destination San Antonio facility. If the care for these DRGs cannot be performed at the Destination San Antonio facilities, the TRICARE Managed Care Support Contractor for Region 6 will provide a medical necessity review prior to issuance of an Inpatient Care Authorization or Non-availability Statement.

  6. Army Strong, Superintendent Savvy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mellon, Ericka

    2011-01-01

    Brigadier General Anthony "Tony" Tata of the U.S. Army had one of those "ah-ha" moments in April 2006 when, on the eve of an operation he was heading in Afghanistan, an Al Qaeda rocket shattered a nearby school. The attack killed a teacher and seven students and wounded dozens more. The rocket incident eventually nudged Tata toward a new mission:…

  7. 1998 Army Modernization Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    Biological (CB) Protective Duty Uniform (STO) • Biometrics (SRO) • Nanoscience (SRO) • Millimeter Wave Material and Dissemination Technology... Biometrics and Nanoscience SROs will enable the development of advanced NBC detection and characterization systems, including the exploitation of biologically...Requirements Trailers • Procure HEMAT Trailers Figure K-23 K-19 //;<?. U.S. Army 1997Modernization Plan This final fleet assessment, made against the

  8. Army Leader Transitions Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    to improving the organization. The following are some effective methods and a compilation of techniques and considerations which have been used... improve your understanding of the environment. Outgoing Leader’s Assessment An important item to obtain from the current leader is a list of key contacts...The courseware allows users to tailor training materials to specific needs. Users access this at the CAL AKO website or Army eLearning https

  9. Army Equipment Modernization Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Intrusion System (BAIS) (14.6 percent of the Army Acquisition Objective (AAO) of 8,933). Provides early seismic /acoustic warning, intrusion detection...The advanced affordable Turbine engine (aaTe), S&T Program developed and demon- strated two new helicopter turbine engines that provide significant...improvements in engine power and operating efficiencies. In FY12, the program transitioned to the Army’s Improved Turbine Engine Program (ITEP) to

  10. 2007 Army Modernization Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-01

    Presidential Decision Memorandum (PDM) II OSA Study, the PDM III FCA/ LCA Study and the Joint JCA Analysis of Alternatives. Army senior leadership...control package and a new rocket motor . The M30 Dual Purpose Improved Conventional Munition (DPICM) version of the GMLRS contains 404 sub-munitions...lbs, HE unitary warhead, a multimode (point detonating, delay and proximity) fuze capability; and insensitive munitions (IM) rocket motor , further

  11. The Army Lawyer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-01

    Fired at Fleeing Cars, Soldiers Say, WASH. POST, Oct. 12, 2007, at A1 (quoting Major General (MG) Joseph Fil , Commander of 1st Cavalry Division, as...saying, “It’s yet another challenge, another setback.”). 32 See generally id. (quoting MG Joseph Fil as saying in reference to the incidents of PSC...Prosecutors Research Institute 99 Canal Center Plaza, Suite 510 Alexandria, VA 22313 (703) 549-9222 JULY 2008 • THE ARMY LAWYER

  12. The Army Profession: A Narrative

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-23

    profile cases of alleged misconduct” were symptomatic of “a much larger issue affecting the armed forces.”9 In the Associated Press, Lolita Baldor ...of-misconduct-among-high-level-military-leaders?lite (accessed January 02, 2013). 10Lolita C. Baldor , "US Army Brigadier General Jeffrey Sinclair to...Science: An Academic Discipline." Army Magazine, no. 5 (May 2005): 14-15. Baldor , Lolita C. and Michael Biesecker. "US Army Brigadier General

  13. Movement patterns of Brook Trout in a restored coastal stream system in southern Massachusetts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snook, Erin L.; Letcher, Benjamin H.; Dubreuil, Todd L.; Zydlewski, Joseph; O'Donnell, Matthew J.; Whiteley, Andrew R.; Hurley, Stephen T.; Danylchuk, Andy J.

    2016-01-01

    Coastal Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) populations are found from northern Canada to New England. The extent of anadromy generally decreases with latitude, but the ecology and movements of more southern populations are poorly understood. We conducted a 33-month acoustic telemetry study of Brook Trout in Red Brook, MA, and adjacent Buttermilk Bay (marine system) using 16 fixed acoustic receivers and surgically implanting acoustic transmitters in 84 individuals. Tagged Brook Trout used the stream, estuary (50% of individuals) and bay (10% of individuals). Movements into full sea water were brief when occurring. GAMM models revealed that transitions between habitat areas occurred most often in spring and fall. Environmental data suggest that use of the saline environment is limited by summer temperatures in the bay. Movements may also be related to moon phase. Compared to more northern coastal populations of Brook Trout, the Red Brook population appears to be less anadromous overall, yet the estuarine segment of the system may have considerable ecological importance as a food resource.

  14. 76 FR 70710 - Army National Cemeteries Advisory Commission (ANCAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-15

    ... Department of the Army Army National Cemeteries Advisory Commission (ANCAC) AGENCY: Department of the Army... the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army National Cemeteries... first-come basis. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: Lieutenant Colonel Renea Yates;...

  15. Enterococcus rivorum sp. nov., from water of pristine brooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemi, R Maarit; Ollinkangas, Tuula; Paulin, Lars; Svec, Pavel; Vandamme, Peter; Karkman, Antti; Kosina, Marcel; Lindström, Kristina

    2012-09-01

    A significant number of Enterococcus strains from pristine waters of two brooks in Finland formed a distinct cluster on the basis of whole-cell protein fingerprinting by one-dimensional SDS-PAGE. The strains shared the following characteristics. Cells were ovoid, Gram-positive-staining and non-spore-forming, appearing singly or in pairs or chains. They were facultatively anaerobic and catalase-negative. Growth in broth containing 6.5 % NaCl or at 45 °C was weak or absent. Production of D antigen was variable. The strains tolerated 60 °C for 30 min, 40 % bile and tellurite, hydrolysed aesculin strongly and gelatin weakly, produced no acid from hippurate and did not reduce it, grew weakly at 10 °C, showed a strong reaction for the Voges-Proskauer test and produced acid from methyl α-d-glucoside, mannitol, sorbitol and sucrose, with weak or no production of acid from methyl α-d-mannoside, l-arabinose, gluconate and l-xylose. Several of the strains were selected for identification on the basis of sequencing of almost the whole 16S rRNA gene and partial atpA and pheS genes and of (GTG)(5)-PCR fingerprints. Partial atpA and pheS gene sequencing was also performed for those type strains of Enterococcus species without available sequences in the database. The pristine brook isolates formed a novel species, for which the name Enterococcus rivorum sp. nov. (type strain S299(T) = HAMBI 3055(T) = LMG 25899(T) = CCM 7986(T)) is proposed. On the basis of 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity, E. rivorum sp. nov. is related to the Enterococcus faecalis genogoup. It is distinguished from described Enterococcus species on the basis of 16S rRNA, atpA and pheS gene sequences and whole-cell protein and (GTG)(5)-PCR fingerprints. It is most closely related to E. faecalis, but DNA-DNA hybridization confirms it to represent a novel species.

  16. The Strategic Direction for Army Science and Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    The Strategic Direction for Army Science and Technology: Final Report 83 MCWL USMC Warfighting Laboratory MEDEVAC Medical Evacuation MEP Mobile ...Environment Findings: The technology playing field is changing, important t echnology breakthroughs are principa lly driven by commercial and...control charge localization and mobility in the film; initial results have demonstrated substantial improvements in dielectric performance. The

  17. Superfund Record of Decision (EPA Region 5): Fields Brook sediment operable unit, Ashtabula, Ohio, September 1986. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1986-09-30

    Fields Brook is located in the City of Ashtabula, Ohio and drains a 5.6-square mile watershed (defined as the 'site'). The 3.5 mile main channel of Fields Brook flows through an industrial area that is one of the largest and most diversified concentrations of chemical plants in Ohio. Industrial sources have contaminated the sediment in Fields Brook with a variety of organic and heavy metal pollutants, including TCE, PCE, chlorobenzene, vinyl chloride, arsenic, zinc, mercury and chromium. Base-neutral compounds including hexachloroethane, toluenediamine and toluene diisocyanate also were detected in Fields Brook sediments. Sediments taken from the Ashtabula River in the vicinity of Fields Brook are contaminated with PCBs. The U.S. EPA believes that the amount of contamination entering the brook at this time has been substantially reduced due to the recent development of pollution control laws and discharge-permitting requirements.

  18. Army Training Study: Concepts of the Army Training System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-08-08

    Combat Units. 1 March 1971. Harher, Robert A. and Coleman, Charlie C. Application of Simulation Training Exercises to Crisis Relocation Planning...product or outpit of the Army’s helth -. Ssinn. 0 ro)gram qM is a go example of hw pr hugra-. udgetinc’ is intro-. to work. The Army’s health care

  19. Army Contract Writing System (ACWS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    the integration with Army Enterprise Resource Planning systems. As a financial feeder system, ACWS will meet the compliance requirements of the...Federal Financial Management Improvement Act of 1996. The system will meet the full scope of Army Contracting requirements, including those in secure and...business process efficiencies, support compliance with the Federal Financial Management Improvement Act of 1996, integrate with existing Enterprise

  20. Personnel-General: Army Substance Abuse Program (ASAP)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-10-01

    services in the area of addiction medicine. e. Designate a civilian Clinical Director (CD), who generally will be rated by the CC, with intermediate rating...services to subordinate commands. i. Report positive tests, which do not require medical review (that is, THC, Cocaine, LSD , and PCP), to an appropriate...Installation Prevention Team IPTT Installation Prevention Team Training LSD Lysergic Acid Diethylamide MACOM Major Army Command MEDCEN Medical Center MEDDAC

  1. Army Energy Plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-08-08

    ultimate goal. Additionally, electric vehicles, scooters , and bicycles are being widely used for on-post courier, patrol and maintenance operations. Table 4...characteristics. b. Suspension systems. The Army has a new suspension system under develop- ment called the Loopwheel. This new experimental suspension will...200 200 COMPOSITE STRUCTURAL VEH COMPS AMM 2 6.2 AH84 100 0 0 LIGHTWEIGHT SUSPENSION COMPS AMM 0 6.2 AH84 300 350 250 SAMARIUM-COBALT GEN TECH HOL 3 6.2

  2. The French Army and British Army Crimean War Reforms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Dawson

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available French army logistics of the Crimean War are generally considered to have been better organized than their British counterpart. This sometimes erroneous belief was fuelled by letters home (from officers and men as well as by the reporting of various ‘special correspondents’ in the Crimea, and created an emotional response favourable to the ordinary soldier and, in particular, towards the French. This then became the basis for arguments for reform of the British army in the military and domestic press and in Parliament. Clamour for reform on French lines led to official studies being made of the French army, especially of logistics, officer education, and even uniforms. The French army, however, was little understood and the resulting ephemeral corps-style units (such as Land Transport Corps, Army Work Corps, and Mounted Staff Corps were quickly found faulty. In fact, official study of the French army often had little or no effect on the major reforms of the war. Emulation of the French was ultimately short-lived and of little effect; the favourable perception of the French was based on short-term emotional response and, indeed, the desire for army reform had its sting drawn with the establishment of the Roebuck Committee. Post-war retrenchment and success in the Indian Mutiny would stifle what was left of the reform debate.

  3. 75 FR 19302 - Radiation Sources on Army Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-14

    ... Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 655 RIN 0702-AA58 Radiation Sources on Army Land AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Proposed rule; request for comments. SUMMARY: The Department of the Army proposes to revise its regulations concerning radiation sources on Army land. The Army requires Non-Army...

  4. 76 FR 6692 - Radiation Sources on Army Land

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-02-08

    ... Department of the Army 32 CFR Part 655 RIN 0702-AA58 Radiation Sources on Army Land AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION: Final rule. SUMMARY: The Department of the Army is finalizing revisions to its regulation concerning radiation sources on Army land. The Army requires non-Army agencies (including...

  5. Conservation genetics of Lake Superior brook trout: Issues, questions, and directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, C.C.; Stott, W.; Miller, L.; D'Amelio, S.; Jennings, Martin J.; Cooper, A.M.

    2008-01-01

    Parallel efforts by several genetic research groups have tackled common themes relating to management concerns about and recent rehabilitation opportunities for coaster brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis in Lake Superior. The questions that have been addressed include the evolutionary and genetic status of coaster brook trout, the degree of relatedness among coaster populations and their relationship to riverine tributary brook trout populations, and the role and effectiveness of stocking in maintaining and restoring coasters to Lake Superior. Congruent genetic results indicate that coasters are an ecotype (life history variant) rather than an evolutionarily significant unit or genetically distinct strain. Regional structure exists among brook trout stocks, coasters being produced from local populations. Introgression of hatchery genes into wild populations appears to vary regionally and may relate to local population size, habitat integrity, and anthropogenic pressures. Tracking the genetic diversity and integrity associated with captive breeding programs is helping to ensure that the fish used for stocking are representative of their source populations and appropriate for rehabilitation efforts. Comparative analysis of shared samples among collaborating laboratories is enabling standardization of genotype scoring and interpretation as well as the development of a common toolkit for assessing genetic structure and diversity. Incorporation of genetic data into rehabilitation projects will facilitate monitoring efforts and subsequent adaptive management. Together, these multifaceted efforts provide comprehensive insights into the biology of coaster brook trout and enhance restoration options. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  6. Science in Flux: NASA's Nuclear Program at Plum Brook Station 1955-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowles, Mark D.

    2006-01-01

    Science in Flux traces the history of one of the most powerful nuclear test reactors in the United States and the only nuclear facility ever built by NASA. In the late 1950's NASA constructed Plum Brook Station on a vast tract of undeveloped land near Sandusky, Ohio. Once fully operational in 1963, it supported basic research for NASA's nuclear rocket program (NERVA). Plum Brook represents a significant, if largely forgotten, story of nuclear research, political change, and the professional culture of the scientists and engineers who devoted their lives to construct and operate the facility. In 1973, after only a decade of research, the government shut Plum Brook down before many of its experiments could be completed. Even the valiant attempt to redefine the reactor as an environmental analysis tool failed, and the facility went silent. The reactors lay in costly, but quiet standby for nearly a quarter-century before the Nuclear Regulatory Commission decided to decommission the reactors and clean up the site. The history of Plum Brook reveals the perils and potentials of that nuclear technology. As NASA, Congress, and space enthusiasts all begin looking once again at the nuclear option for sending humans to Mars, the echoes of Plum Brook's past will resonate with current policy and space initiatives.

  7. Brook trout use of thermal refugia and foraging habitat influenced by brown trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hitt, Nathaniel P.; Snook, Erin; Massie, Danielle L.

    2017-01-01

    The distribution of native brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) in eastern North America is often limited by temperature and introduced brown trout (Salmo trutta), the relative importance of which is poorly understood but critical for conservation and restoration planning. We evaluated effects of brown trout on brook trout behavior and habitat use in experimental streams across increasing temperatures (14–23 °C) with simulated groundwater upwelling zones providing thermal refugia (6–9 °C below ambient temperatures). Allopatric and sympatric trout populations increased their use of upwelling zones as ambient temperatures increased, demonstrating the importance of groundwater as thermal refugia in warming streams. Allopatric brook trout showed greater movement rates and more even spatial distributions within streams than sympatric brook trout, suggesting interference competition by brown trout for access to forage habitats located outside thermal refugia. Our results indicate that removal of introduced brown trout may facilitate native brook trout expansion and population viability in downstream reaches depending in part on the spatial configuration of groundwater upwelling zones.

  8. HPLC and ELISA analyses of larval bile acids from Pacific and western brook lampreys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yun, S.-S.; Scott, A.P.; Bayer, J.M.; Seelye, J.G.; Close, D.A.; Li, W.

    2003-01-01

    Comparative studies were performed on two native lamprey species, Pacific lamprey (Lampetra tridentata) and western brook lamprey (Lampetra richardsoni) from the Pacific coast along with sea lamprey (Petromyzon marinus) from the Great Lakes, to investigate their bile acid production and release. HPLC and ELISA analyses of the gall bladders and liver extract revealed that the major bile acid compound from Pacific and western brook larval lampreys was petromyzonol sulfate (PZS), previously identified as a migratory pheromone in larval sea lamprey. An ELISA for PZS has been developed in a working range of 20pg-10ng per well. The tissue concentrations of PZS in gall bladder were 127.40, 145.86, and 276.96??g/g body mass in sea lamprey, Pacific lamprey, and western brook lamprey, respectively. Releasing rates for PZS in the three species were measured using ELISA to find that western brook and sea lamprey released PZS 20 times higher than Pacific lamprey did. Further studies are required to determine whether PZS is a chemical cue in Pacific and western brook lampreys. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Army Programs: The Army Radiation Safety Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    area or very high radiation area. (For example, medical and dental diagnostic x-ray systems do not require an ARA.) However, commanders will...the testing of nuclear explosive devices or from past nuclear accidents such as Chernobyl that contribute to background radiation. Background radiation

  10. Diagenesis of the Lisburne Group, northeastern Brooks Range, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, R.C.; Goldstein, R.H.; Enos, P. [and others

    1995-05-01

    Petrographic cathodoluminescence studies of the cement stratigraphy of the Lisburne Group yield insights on its diagenetic history. Crosscutting relationships between features of subaerial exposure and calcite cements show that early generations of nonferroan, nonluminescent and multibanded-luminescent calcites are synchronous with or postdated by subaerial exposure surfaces within the Lisburne. Surfaces of subaerial exposure occur at 18 horizons within the Lisburne and are distinguished by features as laminated crusts, rhizoliths, autoclastic breccia, fissure fills, mud cracks, and erosional surfaces. Crosscutting relationships also occur between calcite cements and clasts in karst breccias and conglomerates that formed along the sub-Permian unconformity at the top of the Lisburne. The sub-Permian unconformity postdates later generations of calcite cement. These cements formed in the following sequence: nonferroan to low-ferroan, dully luminescent calcite; ferroan, very-dully luminescent calcite; and second generation of nonferroan, multibanded calcite. The crosscutting relationships not only constrain the timing of cement precipitation, but also suggest that the cements probably were precipitated from meteoric groundwaters introduced during subaerial exposure of the Lisburne platform. Late cements in the Lisburne postdate the Permian Echooka Formation. These cements are low-ferroan, moderately-bright to dully luminescent calcite, followed by a second generation of ferroan, very-dully luminescent calcite. Features of compaction and pressure solution are coincident with the precipitation of the late ferroan calcite and further constrain its timing to deep burial of the Lisburne. The youngest phase of calcite cement precipitated in the Lisburne Group is nonferroan, very-dully luminescent calcite. It commonly fills tectonically-induced shear fractures, indicating precipitation after the onset of Cretaceous (and/or Cenozoic) tectonism in the northeastern Brooks Range.

  11. LopheliaII2012: Coral Research on Oil Rigs in the Gulf of Mexico on TDI-Brooks Vessel Brooks McCall between 2012-07-12 and 2012-07-24

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — The final year of a multi-year effort to study Lophelia coral communities in the Gulf of Mexico is occurring on the TDI-Brooks research vessel, Brooks McCall,...

  12. Field report: Exploring the Doonerak fenster of the central Brooks Range, Alaska, USA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin V. Strauss

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Arctic Alaska is a ‘suspect’ terrane that encompasses approximately 20% of Alaska, stretching from the southern Brooks Range all the way to the continental shelves of the Chukchi and Beaufort Seas. Although the origin and subsequent travels of this large crustal fragment are debated among geologists, most researchers agree upon its composite nature and exotic origin. To constrain the early geological history of this terrane, we describe a recent expedition to the Doonerak fenster of the central Brooks Range. This area has long been regarded as a key locality for understanding the structural evolution of the Mesozoic–Cenozoic Brooks Range orogen; however, our target was different: a unique sequence of volcanic and siliciclastic rocks (Apoon assemblage exposed beneath a profound pre-Mississippian unconformity, which we argue is of key importance to understanding the early Paleozoic tectonic history of northern Alaska and the greater Arctic.

  13. Genome evolution in the fish family salmonidae: generation of a brook charr genetic map and comparisons among charrs (Arctic charr and brook charr with rainbow trout

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moghadam Hooman K

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Salmonids are regarded as 4R derivative species, having experienced 4 whole genome duplication events in their ancestry. Many duplicated chromosome regions still share extensive homology with one another which is maintained primarily through male-based homeologous chromosome pairings during meiosis. The formation of quadrivalents during meiosis leads to pseudolinkage. This phenomenon is more prevalent within 5 of the 12 ancestral teleost linkage groups in salmonids. Results We constructed a genetic linkage map for brook charr and used this in combination with the genetic map from Arctic charr, to make comparisons with the genetic map of rainbow trout. Although not all chromosome arms are currently mapped, some homologous chromosome rearrangements were evident between Arctic charr and brook charr. Notably, 10 chromosome arms in brook charr representing 5 metacentric chromosomes in Arctic charr have undergone rearrangements. Three metacentrics have one arm translocated and fused with another chromosome arm in brook charr to a make a new metacentrics while two metacentrics are represented by 4 acrocentric pairs in brook charr. In two cases (i.e., BC-4 and BC-16, an apparent polymorphism was observed with the identification of both a putative metacentric structure (similar to metacentric AC-4 = BC-4 and a joining of acrocentric AC-16 + one arm of AC-28 = BC-16, as well as two separate acrocentric linkage groups evident in the mapping parents. Forty-six of the expected 50 karyotypic arms could be inter-generically assigned. SEX in brook charr (BC-4 was localized to the same homologous linkage group region as in Arctic charr (AC-4. The homeologous affinities detected in the two charr species facilitated the identification of 20 (expected number = 25 shared syntenic regions with rainbow trout, although it is likely that some of these regions were partial or overlapping arm regions. Conclusions Inter-generic comparisons among 2

  14. William Keith Brooks and the naturalist's defense of Darwinism in the late-nineteenth century.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nash, Richard

    2015-06-01

    William Keith Brooks was an American zoologist at Johns Hopkins University from 1876 until his death in 1908. Over the course of his career, Brooks staunchly defended Darwinism, arguing for the centrality of natural selection in evolutionary theory at a time when alternative theories, such as neo-Lamarckism, grew prominent in American biology. In his book The Law of Heredity (1883), Brooks addressed problems raised by Darwin's theory of pangenesis. In modifying and developing Darwin's pangenesis, Brooks proposed a new theory of heredity that sought to avoid the pitfalls of Darwin's hypothesis. In so doing he strengthened Darwin's theory of natural selection by undermining arguments for the inheritance of acquired characteristics. In later attacks on neo-Lamarckism, Brooks consistently defended Darwin's theory of natural selection on logical grounds, continued to challenge the idea of the inheritance of acquired characteristics, and argued that natural selection best explained a wide range of adaptations. Finally, he critiqued Galton's statistical view of heredity and argued that Galton had resurrected an outmoded typological concept of species, one which Darwin and other naturalists had shown to be incorrect. Brooks's ideas resemble the "biological species concept" of the twentieth century, as developed by evolutionary biologist Ernst Mayr and others. The late-nineteenth century was not a period of total "eclipse" of Darwinism, as biologists and historians have hitherto seen it. Although the "Modern Synthesis" refers to the reconciliation of post-Mendelian genetics with evolution by natural selection, we might adjust our understanding of how the synthesis developed by seeing it as the culmination of a longer discussion that extends back to the late-nineteenth century.

  15. Brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis extinction in small boreal lakes revealed by ephippia pigmentation: a preliminary analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Bérubé Tellier

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Ephippium pigmentation is a plastic trait which can be related to a trade-off between visual predation pressure and better protection of cladoceran eggs against different types of stress. Experimental studies showed that planktivorous fish exert a greater predation pressure on individuals carrying darker ephippia, but little is known about the variation of ephippium pigmentation along gradients of fish predation pressure in natural conditions. For this study, our experimental design included four small boreal lakes with known fish assemblages. Two of the lakes have viable brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis populations, whereas the other two lakes experienced brook trout extinctions during the 20th century. Cladoceran ephippia were extracted from sediment cores at layers corresponding to the documented post- extinction phase (1990's and from an older layer (1950's for which the brook trout population status is not known precisely. Our first objective was to determine whether brook trout extinction has a direct effect on both ephippium pigmentation and size. Our second objective was to give a preliminary assessment of the status of brook trout populations in the 1950's by comparing the variation in ephippia traits measured from this layer to those measured in the 1990's, for which the extinction patterns are well known. Cost-effective image analysis was used to assess variation in pigmentation levels in ephippia. This approach provided a proxy for the amount of melanin invested in each ephippium analysed. Our study clearly shows that ephippium pigmentation may represent a better indicator of the presence of fish predators than ephippium size, a trait that showed a less clear pattern of variation between lakes with and without fish. For the 1990's period, ephippia from fishless lakes were darker and showed a slight tendency to be larger than ephippia from lakes with brook trout. However, no clear differences in either ephippium size or pigmentation

  16. Salamander populations and biomass in the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, T.M.; Likens, G.E.

    1975-01-01

    There were about 2950 salamanders per ha (1770 g/ha wet wt) in the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire. The terrestrial species, Plethodon cinereus, accounted for about 93.5% of the total biomass while the streamside species, Desmognathus fuscus, Eurycea bislineata and Gyrinophilus porphyriticus, accounted for the remaining 6.5%. Notophthalmus viridescens was present, but was rare and insignificant in the biomass calculations. The population size of salamanders at Hubbard Brook appears to be stable. The biomass of salamanders is about twice that of birds during the bird's peak (breeding) season and is about equal to the biomass of small mammals.

  17. US Army TARDEC: Robotics Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-25

    unclassified US ARMY TARDEC Robotics Overview Bernard Theisen, Joint Center for Robotics 25 March 2010 Reference herein to any specific commercial...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE US ARMY TARDEC Robotics Overview 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Bernard... Robotics Industry Partnerships Academia PartnershipsGovernment Partnerships TRADOC Community Outreach • S&T Support to the RS-JPO • Develops and Fosters

  18. Structure of the Red Dog District, western Brooks Range, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vera, Jean-Pierre P.; McClay, K. R.

    2004-01-01

    The Red Dog district of the western Brooks Range of northern Alaska, which includes the sediment-hosted Zn-Pb-Ag ± Ba deposits at Red Dog, Su-Lik, and Anarraaq, contains one of the world's largest reserves of zinc. This paper presents a new model for the structural development of the area and shows that understanding the structure is crucial for future exploration efforts and new mineral discoveries in the district. In the Red Dog district, a telescoped Late Devonian through Jurassic continental passive margin is exposed in a series of subhorizontally stacked, internally imbricated, and regionally folded thrust sheets. These sheets were emplaced during the Middle Jurassic to Late Cretaceous Brookian orogeny and subsequently were uplifted by late tectonic activity in the Tertiary. The thrust sheet stack comprises seven tectonostratigraphically distinct allochthonous sheets, three of which have been subject to regional and detailed structural analysis. The lowermost of these is the Endicott Mountains allochthon, which is overlain by the structurally higher Picnic Creek and Kelly River allochthons. Each individual allochthon is itself internally imbricated into a series of tectonostratigraphically coherent and distinct thrust plates and subplates. This structural style gives rise to duplex development and imbrication at a range of scales, from a few meters to tens of kilometers. The variable mechanical properties of the lithologic units of the ancient passive margin resulted in changes in structural styles and scales of structures across allochthon boundaries. Structural mapping and analysis of the district indicate a dominant northwest to west-northwest direction of regional tectonic transport. Local north to north-northeast transport of thrust sheets is interpreted to reflect the influence of underlying lateral and/or oblique ramps, which may have been controlled by inherited basin margin structures. Some thrust-sheet stacking patterns suggest out

  19. 2014 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Army Civilian Leader Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    feedback to learners . The level of rigor or challenge posed by all ix courses shows room for improvement, particularly courses offered entirely...The attributes represent the values and identity of Army leaders (character), how leaders are perceived by followers and others (presence), and...degree. Less than 10% attended a resident Army course, completed structured self-development, learned a foreign language , or engaged in other types of

  20. 1986 AMEDD (Army Medical Department) Clinical Psychology Short Course: Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, Hawaii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-09-01

    understand) the system (the langue part we mentioned before) within which the language operates. To this end the students of Saussure (and later of Roman ... Jakobson and his Prague School of Linguistics) looked to other disciplines for help in describing language structure and language system. It was

  1. Linking water age and solute dynamics in streamflow at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, NH, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paolo Benettin; Scott W. Bailey; John L. Campbell; Mark B. Green; Andrea Rinaldo; Gene E. Likens; Kevin J. McGuire; Gianluca Botter

    2015-01-01

    We combine experimental and modeling results from a headwater catchment at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF), New Hampshire, USA, to explore the link between stream solute dynamics and water age. A theoretical framework based on water age dynamics, which represents a general basis for characterizing solute transport at the catchment scale, is here applied to...

  2. Chemical and morphological distinctions between vertical and lateral podzolization at Hubbard Brook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rebecca R. Bourgault; Donald S. Ross; Scott W. Bailey

    2015-01-01

    Classical podzolization studies assumed vertical percolation and pedon-scale horizon development. However, hillslope-scale lateral podzolization also occurs where lateral subsurface water flux predominates. In this hydropedologic study, 99 podzols were observed in Watershed 3, Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire. Soil horizon samples were extracted with...

  3. SOIL ALUMINUM DISTRIBUTION IN THE NEAR-STREAM ZONE AT THE BEAR BROOK WATERSHED IN MAINE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Near-stream and upslope soil chemical properties were analyzed to infer linkages between soil and surface water chemistry at the Bear Brook Watershed in Maine [BBWM]. Organic and mineral soil samples were collected along six 20 m transects perpendicular to the stream and one 200 ...

  4. The Spine of Literature: A Conversation between Eudora Welty and Cleanth Brooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Caroline

    1988-01-01

    Describes a discussion between Cleanth Brooks and Eudora Welty about the state of the story in today's fiction. Characterizes the narrative form as the spine of literature. Points out that, too often, contemporary writers neglect this form of writing and instead emphasize a type of prose poetry. Notes that authors today overemphasize the present…

  5. Elevation dependent sensitivity of northern hardwoods to Ca addition at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, NH USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakesh Minocha; Stephanie Long; Palaniswamy Thangavel; Subhash C. Minocha; Christopher Eagar; Charles T. Driscoll

    2010-01-01

    Acidic deposition has caused a depletion of calcium (Ca) in the northeastern forest soils. Wollastonite (Ca silicate) was added to watershed 1 (WS1) at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) in 1999 to evaluate its effects on various functions of the HBEF ecosystem. The effects of Ca addition on foliar soluble (extractable in 5% HClO4) ions...

  6. The Spine of Literature: A Conversation between Eudora Welty and Cleanth Brooks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Caroline

    1988-01-01

    Describes a discussion between Cleanth Brooks and Eudora Welty about the state of the story in today's fiction. Characterizes the narrative form as the spine of literature. Points out that, too often, contemporary writers neglect this form of writing and instead emphasize a type of prose poetry. Notes that authors today overemphasize the present…

  7. On the identity of Cervus nigricans Brooke, 1877, with remarks upon other deer from the Philippines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dobroruka, L.J.

    1971-01-01

    A great number of papers deal with the deer of the Philippine Islands but in spite of this fact the taxonomy and the nomenclature are still not clear. The first author who recapitulated all known facts about the Philippine deer was Brooke (1877), who also described a new species, Cervus nigricans.

  8. IMPACTS OF MARINE AEROSOLS ON SURFACE WATER CHEMISTRY AT BEAR BROOK WATERSHED, MAINE USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The East Bear catchment at Bear Brook Watershed, Maine receives moderate (for the eastern U.S.) amounts of Cl- in wet and dry deposition. In 1989, Cl- in precipitation ranged from 2 to 55 eq/L. Dry, occult, and wet deposition plus evapotranspiration resulted in stream Cl- averagi...

  9. Long-term trends from ecosystem research at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest

    Science.gov (United States)

    John L. Campbell; Charles T. Driscoll; Christopher Eagar; Gene E. Likens; Thomas G. Siccama; Chris E. Johnson; Timothy J. Fahey; Steven P. Hamburg; Richard T. Holmes; Amey S. Bailey; Donald C. Buso

    2007-01-01

    Summarizes 52 years of collaborative, long-term research conducted at the Hubbard Brook (NH) Experimental Forest on ecosystem response to disturbances such as air pollution, climate change, forest disturbance, and forest management practices. Also provides explanations of some of the trends and lists references from scientific literature for further reading.

  10. Endocrine disruption in brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) exposed to leachate from a public refuse dump

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noaksson, E.; Linderoth, M.; Bosveld, A.T.C.; Norrgren, L.; Zebühr, Y.; Balk, L.

    2003-01-01

    Lake Molnbyggen was previously found to harbour a large number of sexually immature female perch (Perca fluviatilis) suffering from endocrine disruption. In an attempt to pin-point the source of the endocrine-disrupting substance(s) (EDSs), brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) from Vadbacken, a strea

  11. 77 FR 9633 - Army National Cemeteries Advisory Commission (ANCAC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... Department of the Army Army National Cemeteries Advisory Commission (ANCAC) AGENCY: Department of the Army... Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army National Cemeteries Advisory...: Lieutenant Colonel Renea Yates; renea-yates@us.army.mil or 571.256.4325. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION:...

  12. Musculoskeletal injuries sustained in modern army combatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Possley, Daniel R; Johnson, Anthony E

    2012-01-01

    Participation in martial arts has grown over the past 15 years with an estimated 8 million participants. In 2004, the Chief of Staff of the Army directed that all Initial Military Training soldiers receive Modern Army Combatives (MAC) training. The mechanical differences between the various martial arts styles incorporated into mixed martial arts/MAC pose challenges to the medical professional. We report the incidence of musculoskeletal injuries by Level 1 and 2 trained active duty soldiers participating in MAC over a 3-year period. From June 1, 2005 to January 1, 2009, the Orthopaedic Surgery service treated and tracked all injuries in MAC. Data was analyzed using the Chi(2) method of analysis. (p < 0.05). 155 of 1,025 soldiers presenting with MAC injuries reported inability to perform their military occupation specialty duties. The knee was most frequently injured followed by shoulder. Surgical intervention was warranted 24% of the time. Participants in MAC reported injuries severe enough to impact occupational duties at 15.5%. Surgical intervention was warranted only 24% of the time. The knee and shoulder are the most frequently injured body parts. Labral repair was the most frequent surgical procedure.

  13. The Center for the Army Profession and Ethic (CAPE) Annual Survey of the Army Profession (CASAP FY16)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-30

    Colonel, U.S. Army Director , Center for the Army Profession and Ethic NOTICES DISTRIBUTION: Primary distribution of this...Army leaders regarding the effectiveness of policies and practices intended to inspire and motivate Army professionals to “live by and uphold the Army...FY17/18 AA – OP theme, One Army, Indivisible. Assessment of the State of the Army Profession assists Senor Army leaders in understanding the effects

  14. An Analysis of Collaborative Research Opportunities for the Army. Volume I

    Science.gov (United States)

    1998-01-01

    technologyy Ltechnology Medical advanced technology utility LOSAT Missile and rocket Night vision advanced technology Weapons and munitions advanced...Medical systems Engineer mobility equipment Tactical electronic surveillance system Landmine warfare and barrier Army NBC defense system utility N-LOS Night

  15. Reliability of the Suchey-Brooks method for a French contemporary population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savall, Frédéric; Rérolle, Camille; Hérin, Fabrice; Dédouit, Fabrice; Rougé, Daniel; Telmon, Norbert; Saint-Martin, Pauline

    2016-09-01

    The Suchey-Brooks method is commonly used for pubic symphyseal aging in forensic cases. However, inter-population variability is a problem affected by several factors such as geographical location and secular trends. The aim of our study was to test the reliability of the Suchey-Brooks method on a virtual sample of contemporary French males. We carried out a retrospective study of 680 pubic symphysis from adult males undergoing clinical Multislice Computed Tomography in two hospitals between January 2013 and July 2014 (Toulouse and Tours, France). The reliability of the Suchey-Brooks method was tested by the calculation of inaccuracy and bias between real and estimated ages, and the mean age for each stage and the mean stage for each 10-years age interval were compared. The degree of inaccuracy and bias increased with age and inaccuracy exceeded 20 years for individuals over 65 years of age. The results are consistent with an overestimation of the real age for stages I and II and an underestimation of the real age for stages IV, V and VI. Furthermore, the mean stages of the reference sample were significantly lower for the 14-25 age group and significantly higher for individuals over 35 years old. Age estimation is potentially limited by differential inter-population error rates between geographical locations. Furthermore, the effects of secular trends are also supported by research in European countries showing a reduction in the age of attainment of indicators of biological maturity during the past few decades. The results suggest that the Suchey-Brooks method should be used with caution in France. Our study supports previous findings and in the future, the Suchey-Brooks method could benefit from re-evaluation of the aging standards by the establishment of new virtual reference samples.

  16. A comparative and experimental evaluation of performance of stocked diploid and triploid brook trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budy, Phaedra E.; Thiede, G.P.; Dean, A.; Olsen, D.; Rowley, G.

    2012-01-01

    Despite numerous negative impacts, nonnative trout are still being stocked to provide economically and socially valuable sport fisheries in western mountain lakes. We evaluated relative performance and potential differences in feeding strategy and competitive ability of triploid versus diploid brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis in alpine lakes, as well as behavioral and performance differences of diploid and triploid brook trout in two controlled experimental settings: behavioral experiments in the laboratory and performance evaluations in ponds. Across lakes, catch per unit effort (CPUE) and relative weight (Wr ) were not significantly different between ploidy levels. Mean sizes were also similar between ploidy levels except in two of the larger lakes where diploids attained slightly larger sizes (approximately 20 mm longer). We observed no significant differences between diploids and triploids in diet, diet preference, or trophic structure. Similarly, growth and condition did not differ between ploidy levels in smaller-scale pond experiments, and aggressive behavior did not differ between ploidy levels (fed or unfed fish trials) in the laboratory. Independent of ploidy level, the relative performance of brook trout varied widely among lakes, a pattern that appeared to be a function of lake size or a factor that covaries with lake size such as temperature regime or carrying capacity. In summary, we observed no significant differences in the relative performance of brook trout from either ploidy level across a number of indices, systems, and environmental conditions, nor any indication that one group is more aggressive or a superior competitor than the other. Collectively, these results suggest that triploid brook trout will offer a more risk-averse and promising management opportunity when they are stocked to these lakes and elsewhere to simultaneously meet the needs for the sport fishery and conservation objectives.

  17. Give us back our field army! The Dutch army leadership and the operational planning during the interwar years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amersfoort, H.; Amersfoort, H.; Klinkert, W.

    2011-01-01

    The 1922 Army Reform Bill reduced the Dutch army to a militia. During the period between the two World Wars Dutch army leadership sought to rebuild an army that in several repects (organization, armement, doctrine) could be compared to the armies of great powers like France and Germany. The army lea

  18. Give us back our field army! The Dutch army leadership and the operational planning during the interwar years

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amersfoort, H.; Amersfoort, H.; Klinkert, W.

    2011-01-01

    The 1922 Army Reform Bill reduced the Dutch army to a militia. During the period between the two World Wars Dutch army leadership sought to rebuild an army that in several repects (organization, armement, doctrine) could be compared to the armies of great powers like France and Germany. The army lea

  19. TOPMODEL simulations of streamflow and depth to water table in Fishing Brook Watershed, New York, 2007-09

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nystrom, Elizabeth A.; Burns, Douglas A.

    2011-01-01

    TOPMODEL, a physically based, variable-source area rainfall-runoff model, was used to simulate streamflow and depth to water table for the period January 2007-September 2009 in the 65.6 square kilometers of Fishing Brook Watershed in northern New York. The Fishing Brook Watershed is located in the headwaters of the Hudson River and is predominantly forested with a humid, cool continental climate. The motivation for applying this model at Fishing Brook was to provide a simulation that would be effective later at this site in modeling the interaction of hydrologic processes with mercury dynamics.

  20. Green Remediation: Army Policy and Implementation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    treated on-site within a contained asphalt- lined former pH control pond and treated in 300 yard increments – Caustic soda was evenly spread on soil...Army installations and FUDS.  The examples presented are not representative of all Army efforts 11 Energy Example Former Nebraska Ordnance Plant ...Daugherty, mark.e.daugherty@us.army.mil 15 Land and Ecosystems Example #2 Volunteer Army Ammunition Plant (Excess) Cleanup Objective: Treat soil

  1. Enhancing Army Joint Force Headquarters Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Ad hoc (Army) 2004–2005 MNSTC-I SSTR CENTCOM Ad hoc (Army) 2004-2005 JTF-G8/ DNC /RNC HD/CS NORTHCOM Ad hoc (Army) x 3 2004 JTF-515 SSTR PACOM 2004...AFIC = Armed Forces Inaugural Committee; CENTCOM = Central Command; DNC = Democratic National Committee; EUCOM = European Command; FSSG = Fleet

  2. The Evolution of Army Leader Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    Colarusso , Towards a U.S. Army Officer Corps Strategy for Success: Developing Talent, (Carlisle Barracks, PA: U.S. Army War College, March 2010), 4-6...16 Casey Wardynski, David S. Lyle, Michael J. Colarusso , Towards a U.S. Army Officer Corps Strategy for Success: Employing Talent, (Carlisle

  3. Army Science Board 1991 Summer Study - Army Simulation Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-12-01

    May 91, Mr. C. Hatfield, Lawrence Livermore Labor atory JANUS-Technology, 29 May 91, Mr. Paul Herman , Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Aviation...Development, 30 May 91, Mr. Mansur , US Army, Aviation Systems Command Crew Station Research and Development Facility Briefing and Demonstration, 30 May

  4. Army Sustainability Report 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    Iraq continue. The burn pit at Camp Anaconda, like many others, was collecting everything from engines and plastic to medical waste, risking the health...acquisition of weapon systems, are energy-efficient … water-efficient, biobased , environmentally preferable … non-ozone depleting, contain recycled

  5. CRED 20 m Gridded bathymetry of Brooks Banks and St.Rogatien Bank, Hawaii, USA (NetCDF format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry (20m) of the shelf and slope environments of Brooks Banks and St. Rogatien, Hawaii, USA. The netCDF grid includes multibeam bathymetry from the...

  6. 2006 Reson 8101ER Multibeam Sonar Data from Cruise AHI-06-12 - Brooks Bank, Northwestern Hawaiian Islands

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Reson 8101ER multibeam Data were collected between 13-15 October 2006 aboard NOAA Survey Launch Acoustic Habitat Investigator (AHI) Brooks Banks in the Northwestern...

  7. CRED 20 m Gridded bathymetry of Brooks Banks and St. Rogatien Bank, Hawaii, USA (Arc ASCII format)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — Gridded bathymetry (20m) of the shelf and slope environments of Brooks Banks and St. Rogatien, Hawaii, USA. The ASCII includes multibeam bathymetry from the Simrad...

  8. A Comparison of Some Aspects of Two Extinct Mammals, Mammuthus Brookes, 1828 (Proboscidea: Elephantidae) and Mammut Blumenbach, 1799 (Proboscidea: Mammutidae)

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Pankaj S. Bhatnagar

    2013-01-01

    The present study aims at extracting the fossil database www.paleodb.org to compare extinct megafauna genera, Mammuthus Brookes, 1828 and Mammut Blumenbach, 1799 along with its close reletive, Zygolophodon (Vacek, 1877...

  9. Influence of species, size and relative abundance on the outcomes of competitive interactions between brook trout and juvenile coho salmon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Emily J; Duda, Jeff; Quinn, Thomas P

    2016-01-01

    Resource competition between animals is influenced by a number of factors including the species, size and relative abundance of competing individuals. Stream-dwelling animals often experience variably available food resources, and some employ territorial behaviors to increase their access to food. We investigated the factors that affect dominance between resident, non-native brook trout and recolonizing juvenile coho salmon in the Elwha River, WA, USA, to see if brook trout are likely to disrupt coho salmon recolonization via interference competition. During dyadic laboratory feeding trials, we hypothesized that fish size, not species, would determine which individuals consumed the most food items, and that species would have no effect. We found that species, not size, played a significant role in dominance; coho salmon won 95% of trials, even when only 52% the length of their brook trout competitors. As the pairs of competing fish spent more time together during a trial sequence, coho salmon began to consume more food, and brook trout began to lose more, suggesting that the results of early trials influenced fish performance later. In group trials, we hypothesized that group composition and species would not influence fish foraging success. In single species groups, coho salmon consumed more than brook trout, but the ranges overlapped. Brook trout consumption remained constant through all treatments, but coho salmon consumed more food in treatments with fewer coho salmon, suggesting that coho salmon experienced more intra- than inter-specific competition and that brook trout do not pose a substantial challenge. Based on our results, we think it is unlikely that competition from brook trout will disrupt Elwha River recolonization by coho salmon.

  10. Improving the Army Hospital Satisfaction and Reducing the Defects of Non-medical Factors%减少非医疗因素缺陷,提高部队医院满意度

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王国芳

    2013-01-01

    本文从医患沟通、医疗费用、医德医风、医院的安全保障、医院形象、医护人员素质等六方面论述了非医疗因素缺陷其对医院整体满意度的影响,并提出具体整改措施。%This article discuss the factors of affecting the overall hospital satisfaction from some aspect of non-medical reasons,such as the communication between doctors and patients,medical expenses,medical ethics,the hospital security,the image of the hospital,the medical care personnel quality,and puts forward some concrete measures of increasing overall hospital satisfaction.

  11. Full Spectrum Army Officer Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-22

    ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) AND ADDRESS(ES) 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER Colonel Ronda G. Urey Department of Military...Lieutenant Colonel Thomas J. Edwards, Jr. United States Army Colonel Ronda G. Urey Project Adviser This SRP is submitted in

  12. A Mobile Army of Ontologies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Juul, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    their cultural position(s). The following scholars have agreed to participate the event: Pawel Grabarczyk (“Games Within Games: How to Properly Individuate Game Modes?”), Stefano Gualeni (“Augmented Ontologies and Games”), Jesper Juul: (“A Mobile Army of Ontologies”), Veli-Matti Karhulahti (“Videogame...

  13. Male parentage in army ants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kronauer, Daniel J C; Schöning, Caspar; Boomsma, Jacobus J

    2006-01-01

    of active research in insect sociobiology. Here we present microsatellite data for 176 males from eight colonies of the African army ant Dorylus (Anomma) molestus. Comparison with worker genotypes and inferred queen genotypes from the same colonies show that workers do not or at best very rarely reproduce...

  14. The Army Needs More Patriots

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    the 10th AAMDC by at least 48% to account for requirements to perform Brigade headquarters functions, maintaining AAMDC TAC forward deployed and...Program (MCTP), US Army Combined Arms Center ( CAC ), Ft. Leavenworth, Kansas, can coordinate with AAMDCs to send a senior AMD officer to attend unit

  15. Index to Army Times 1991

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-08-01

    Times; Jan. 28, 1991; 51(26): p. 10. DEFENSE OUTPLACEMENT REFERRAL SYSTEM (DORS) Service to find the right desk for your resume. Army Times; Oct. 28...DEPENDENT SCHOOLS (DODDS) DORS SEE DEFENSE OUTPLACEMENT REFERRAL SYSTEM (DORS) DOUBLE DIPPING SEE RETIRED MILITARY PERSONNEL--DUAL COMPENSATION 0 38 DRAGON

  16. Exploring the potential of life-history key innovation: brook breeding in the radiation of the Malagasy treefrog genus Boophis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vences, M; Andreone, F; Glaw, F; Kosuch, J; Meyer, A; Schaefer, H-C; Veith, M

    2002-08-01

    The treefrog genus Boophis is one of the most species-rich endemic amphibian groups of Madagascar. It consists of species specialized to breeding in brooks (48 species) and ponds (10 species). We reconstructed the phylogeny of Boophis using 16S ribosomal DNA sequences (558 bp) from 27 species. Brook-breeders were monophyletic and probably derived from an ancestral pond-breeding lineage. Pond-breeders were paraphyletic. The disparity in diversification among pond-breeders and brook-breeders was notable among endemic Malagasy frogs, although it was not significant when considering Boophis alone. Sibling species which have different advertisement calls but are virtually indistinguishable by morphology were common among brook-breeders; genetic divergence between these species was high (modal 8% total pairwise divergence). Substitution rates in brook-breeding species were significantly higher than in pond-breeders. Speciation of pond-breeders may be hindered by their usually more synchronous reproduction and a higher vagility which enhances gene flow, while a higher potential of spatial segregation and speciation may exist along brooks.

  17. Army Back Complaint Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-05-13

    pain as there are doctors, 4 from chiropractic approaches through hypnotism and acupuncture . In the vast majority of cases, low back pain will disappear...initiatives to dispel fears and amc .!ticns about back pain , prmpt recognition and medical zwvaemet of affected aployees, and reduclM back complaints through...installation of ABC Programs. It is designed to be an educational tool to prevent injuries to the back, shoulder, or neck areas primarily as a result of

  18. Dynamics and regulation of the southern brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) population in an Appalachian stream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gary D. Grossman; Robert E. Ratajczak; C. Michael Wagner; J. Todd Petty

    2010-01-01

    1. We used information theoretic statistics [Akaike’s Information Criterion (AIC)] and regression analysis in a multiple hypothesis testing approach to assess the processes capable of explaining long-term demographic variation in a lightly exploited brook trout population in Ball Creek, NC. We sampled a 100-m-long second-order site during both spring and autumn 1991–...

  19. 77 FR 66823 - Army Education Advisory Committee Study Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-11-07

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Study Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD... the Federal Regulations (41 CFR 102-3. 140 through 160, the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date(s) of...

  20. 78 FR 69077 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-18

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do... Army Education Advisory Committee for deliberation by the Committee under the open-meeting rules...@us.army.mil , (831) 242-5828. SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: Pursuant to 41 CFR 102-3.105(j) and 102-...

  1. 77 FR 50089 - Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... the Federal Regulations (CFR 102-3. 140 through 160, the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date of...

  2. 78 FR 23759 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-22

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do... advisory committee meeting will take place: Name of Committee: Board of Visitors, U.S. Army War College Subcommittee. Dates of Meeting: May 16, 2013. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes...

  3. 77 FR 11084 - Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Committee Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... the Federal Regulations (CFR 102-3. 140 through 160, the Department of the Army announces the following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Education Advisory Committee (AEAC). Date of...

  4. 77 FR 4026 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-26

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do... advisory committee meeting will take place: Name of Committee: Board of Visitors, U.S. Army War College Subcommittee. Date of Meeting: February 23, 2012. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122 Forbes...

  5. 77 FR 27209 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-09

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army, Do... ] Federal advisory committee meeting will take place: Name of Committee: Board of Visitors, U.S. Army War College Subcommittee. Date of Meeting: May 31, 2012. Place of Meeting: U.S. Army War College, 122...

  6. 78 FR 38956 - Army Education Advisory Subcommittee; Meeting Notice

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-28

    ... Department of the Army Army Education Advisory Subcommittee; Meeting Notice AGENCY: Department of the Army... Army Education Advisory Committee for deliberation by the Committee under the open- meeting rules. FOR... Designated Federal Officer: ATFL- APO, Monterey, CA, 93944, Robert.Savukinas@us.army.mil , (831)...

  7. A Study to Determine if Ethics Committees Should be a Decision-Making and Review Mechanism for Matters Relating to No-Code Orders in the Continental United States Army Medical Department Hospitals with over One Hundred Total Operating Beds

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-08-01

    Mexico Air Force hospitals on DNR procedures with inclosures of the Air Force’s general policy and Wilford Hall USAF Medical Center’s DNR guidelines are at...with a request for "assisted suicide" or voluntary euthanasia . "Do Not .:Lsuscitate" does not mean that the medical staff will take any affirmative steps...practice in responding to issues raised in the management of terminally ill patients. 4. The New Mexico Right to Die Act (the "Act", 24-7-1 to 24-7-11

  8. Army Net Zero Prove Out. Army Net Zero Training Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-20

    reclaim system does not enable Fort Carson to achieve its net zero water goal, which is to reclaim water through the WWTP equal to or greater than the...Class A Recycled Water Plant WWTP rapid infiltration basin #1 (of 4) 426,000 gal water supply storage reservoir Primary Lagoon for WWTP 6 7...cost of water = Longer time to payback  Double charged for incoming and outgoing  Army owned WWTP – true cost of water = water/sewer rates It

  9. Exploring the Complexities of Army Civilians and the Army Profession

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    as the province of practitioners of a profession. For a fiduciary relationship , a profession manifests when the nature of the services provided...9. 94 “5 CFR 2636.305 - Compensation and Other Restrictions Relating to Professions Involving a Fiduciary Relationship ,” linked from The Legal...operations.9 The symbiotic relationship and necessity for Army civilians is apparent in generating land combat power and providing support for

  10. US Army Physical Therapist Roles and Contributions in Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaffer, Scott W; Moore, Josef H

    2016-01-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries are a leading cause of health care utilization, medical evacuation, and disability. US Army physical therapists (PTs) have served as physician extenders for the management of nonsurgical neuromusculoskeletal injuries since the Vietnam conflict. The roles and evidence supporting US Army physical therapy continue to evolve. This article discusses the different levels of care and roles of US Army PTs, the contributions and evidence regarding US Army physical therapy, and physical therapy lessons learned during Operations Enduring Freedom and Iraqi Freedom. Since 2001, US Army PTs and enlisted physical therapy technicians have provided care from Levels 1 to 5 and assignments have expanded to special operations and brigade combat teams. Evidence suggests US Army PTs serving both in referral and direct access roles provided safe and definitive care that maximized readiness while reducing evacuation. Key physical therapy lessons learned include: (1) a continued focus on a Soldier sports medicine forward care model, (2) a need for injury risk assessment, physical performance screenings, and reconditioning programs that optimize readiness, and (3) continued support for physical therapy structure, training, and research that maximizes Soldier readiness and health.

  11. Army Planning: Comprehensive Risk Assessment Needed for Planned Changes to the Armys Force Structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    focus on retaining combat units, and senior Army leaders ’ assessment that shortfalls in combat units are more challenging to resolve than shortfalls in...According to the Army, this reduction will require reductions of both combat and supporting units. Army leaders reported that reducing the Army to...such levels creates significant but manageable risk to executing the U.S. military strategy and that further reductions would result in unacceptable

  12. Online Spatial Database of US Army Public Health Command Region-West Mosquito Surveillance Records: 1947-2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    geocoding errors. Output addresses were checked against input to identify discrepancies, and results that had a low precision level (to street or city...jwww.gpsvisuallzer.com/ geocoder / 30 http://www.cs.amedd.army.mil/dasqaDocuments.aspx?type=l THE ARMY MEDICAL DEPARTMENT JOURNAL combination of internet searches...calculated area. Data were filtered in Excel for unique locations, and these point data were converted to shape files for mapping in DIVA- GIS 5.2

  13. Army Independent Risk Assessment Guidebook

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    AMSAA Kadry Rizk, TARDEC Lisa Graf, TARDEC Klaus Sanford, TRAC Elyse Krezmien, TRAC Jerry Scriven, ALU Igor Linkov, ERDC Alison Tichenor...Engineering ATEC - Army Test and Evaluation Command BCA - Business Case Analysis C - Consequence Level C- BA - Cost Benefit Analysis CDD...the AMSAA Risk Team has completed 12 technical and schedule risk assessments to support AoAs and Cost-Benefit Analyses (C- BAs ). AMSAA also developed

  14. 2011 Army Strategic Planning Guidance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-25

    TESI ) of 22,000 Soldiers, the Army’s total force by the end of the mid-term period is programmed to be 520K (AC). We will achieve a more...dwell ratios, extending TESI authority to adequately man deploying units and sustain the All-Volunteer Force, right-sizing the generating force, and... TESI Temporary End-Strength Increase WMD Weapons of Mass Destruction 2011 ARMY STRATEGIC PLANNING GUIDANCE Page 19 2011

  15. Plain English for Army Lawyers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-05-01

    TELEPHONE (Include Arta Code) 22c. OFFICE SYMBOL Judy CI irk 207-475.1Ull I FA-AR 0D FRM 1473, 84 MAR 83 APR edition may be used until exhausted SE CURITY...instructions during courts- martial . Contractors and contracting officers outdo each other in blaming lawyers for problems that crop up in Government...of legal practice -- from courts- martial to client services and from business transac- tions to administrative regulations. Although Army clients may

  16. Information Management: Army Information Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    commander is the franchising authority. When appropriate, the installation commander may designate a non-appropriated fund instrumentality (NAFI) to be...the franchising authority. Overall staff management of CATV is the responsibility of the DISC4 at the Army level and will be executed at the local level...installations are cable television franchising authorities for the purpose of the applicable cable televisions laws. As a result, installations may

  17. Management: Total Army Quality Management

    Science.gov (United States)

    2002-03-15

    meet current and future customer needs . 3–2. Strategic planning a. Strategic planning is the process by which managers at higher levels envision their...framework for all Army organizations to measure how well they are meeting their stated goals and customer needs . It provides a systematic review that...business. (2) Customer-Driven – The organization’s focus is on its customers – ensuring its operations meet customer needs in the most efficient manner

  18. Considering a Cadre Augmented Army

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-01-01

    division equivalents (HDEs) of Abrams tanks in the first year of ____________ 101 Dewar et al (2000), p. 59 102 Dewar et al (2000), p. 61 -200- An...Reserves and the Abrams Doctrine: Unfulfilled Promise, Uncertain Future,” Heritage Foundation Lecture, April 18, 2005. Carey, Benedict, “Stress on Troops... Floyd H., The Standby Reserve Training Corps: An Alternative Mobilization Manpower Policy, Army War College, Carlisle Barracks, PA, 1985. Dupuy

  19. Army Environmental Cleanup Strategic Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-05-01

    New success indicators are all definable, measurable, and achievable MAY 200918 of 29 Emerging Issues  Emerging contaminants  MMRP progress  NCP...programmatic expectations  NDNODS  Operational range program  Vapor Intrusion MAY 200919 of 29 Emerging Contaminants – Hexavalent Chromium...regulatory standards  Several emerging contaminants have been assessed and judged to have a significant potential impact to Army cleanup programs

  20. Army Training Study: Survey Data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-08-08

    training: dis- tractors, turbulence, and availabilty of training support material. Results from a detailed breakdown of the respondents by rank, type of...report lower usage of Army regulations in training than do respondents in CONUS. Unit differences are noted only insofar as air defense artillery...specialities. Differences by rank are noted on each iteir with junior officers, senior NCOs and junior NCOs reporting higher usage in all areas than

  1. Controls Over Army Real Property Financial Reporting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-03-28

    Assistant Secretary of the Army (Financial Management and Comptroller) AWCF Army Working Capital Fund CIP Construction-in-Progress DCD/ DCW DFAS...Warehouse (DCD/ DCW ). The Assistant Secretary of the Army (Financial Management and Comptroller) (ASA[FM&C]) is responsible for the policies, procedures...entity’s information to automatically populate that indicator. As a result, IFS did not send DCD/ DCW correct information for determining the

  2. The US Army Learning Concept for 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-18

    Pedagogy is still the right answer… • Learning on demand The US Army Learning Concept for 2015 Mobile Learning enabled by technology • Problem...The US Army Learning Concept for 2015 18 October 2012 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the...SUBTITLE The US Army Learning Concept for 2015 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e

  3. Army Prisoner Population Prediction Study (AP3).

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    Probability that a prisoner , serving his sentence, will benefit from clemency/ parole board actions. The probabilities that offenders will be...5-9 6-1 Non-Army Prisoners in Army Facilities ............... 6-3 D-1 Generation/Arrival of Offenders ..................... D-2 D-2...8 CHAPTER2 THE ARMY CRIMINAL JUSTICE SYSTEM 2-1. INTRODUCTION a. In order to understand the flow of offenders into and out of the Amy’s prison system

  4. 76 FR 56406 - Science and Technology Reinvention Laboratory Demonstration Project; Department of the Army; Army...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-13

    .... SUMMARY: On March 7, 2011 (76 FR 12508-12548), DoD published notice of approval of a personnel management... the Army; Army Research, Development and Engineering Command; Tank Automotive Research, Development... 9, 2010. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: TARDEC: Mr. Gregory Berry, U. S. Army Tank...

  5. Unraveling the Timing of Fluid Migration and Trap Formation in the Brooks Range Foothills: A Key to Discovering Hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catherine L. Hanks

    2008-12-31

    Naturally occurring fractures can play a key role in the evolution and producibility of a hydrocarbon accumulation. Understanding the evolution of fractures in the Brooks Range/Colville basin system of northern Alaska is critical to developing a better working model of the hydrocarbon potential of the region. This study addressed this problem by collecting detailed and regional data on fracture distribution and character, structural geometry, temperature, the timing of deformation along the Brooks Range rangefront and adjacent parts of the Colville basin, and the in situ stress distribution within the Colville basin. This new and existing data then were used to develop a model of how fractures evolved in northern Alaska, both spatially and temporally. The results of the study indicate that fractures formed episodically throughout the evolution of northern Alaska, due to a variety of mechanisms. Four distinct fracture sets were observed. The earliest fractures formed in deep parts of the Colville basin and in the underlying Ellesmerian sequence rocks as these rocks experienced compression associated with the growing Brooks Range fold-and-thrust belt. The orientation of these deep basin fractures was controlled by the maximum in situ horizontal stress in the basin at the time of their formation, which was perpendicular to the active Brooks Range thrust front. This orientation stayed consistently NS-striking for most of the early history of the Brooks Range and Colville basin, but changed to NW-striking with the development of the northeastern Brooks Range during the early Tertiary. Subsequent incorporation of these rocks into the fold-and-thrust belt resulted in overprinting of these deep basin fractures by fractures caused by thrusting and related folding. The youngest fractures developed as rocks were uplifted and exposed. While this general order of fracturing remains consistent across the Brooks Range and adjacent Colville basin, the absolute age at any one

  6. Effect of postthaw storage time and sperm-to-egg ratio on fertility of cryopreserved brook trout sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nynca, J; Dietrich, G J; Dobosz, S; Zalewski, T; Ciereszko, A

    2015-01-15

    The aim of this study was to test the influence of postthaw storage time on sperm motility parameters of brook trout (n = 9). Furthermore, we examined the effect of sperm-to-egg ratios of 300,000:1 and 600,000:1 on fertility of postthaw, cryopreserved, brook trout sperm. The application of a cryopreservation procedure produced very high postthaw sperm motility (56.8 ± 4.0%). The cryopreserved sperm of brook trout could be stored up to 60 minutes without loss of the percentage of sperm motility (52.0 ± 9.0%). The fertilization capacity of brook trout postthaw sperm was comparable with the fertilization rate of fresh semen at a sperm-to-egg ratio as low as 300,000:1 (42.4 ± 14.0% and 36.5 ± 11.0% for eyed and hatched stages, respectively). The possibility of postthaw semen storage for the prolonged time and the obtainment of high fertilization rate at low sperm-to-egg ratio can lead to the significant improvement of brook trout semen cryopreservation procedure.

  7. Military Health Care: Army Needs to Improve Oversight of Warrior Transition Units

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    their needs, undergo physical rehabilitation, meet with behavioral health therapists, participate in adaptive sports and reconditioning programs...soldiers at the former Walter Reed Army Medical Center. The program is to coordinate care for soldiers recovering from serious physical and...2) established processes to oversee the selection of WTU personnel, assess their training , and adjust staff levels; and (3) assessed adherence

  8. Implementation of Prolonged Exposure in the Army: Is Consultation Necessary for Effective Dissemination

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-10-01

    MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command Fort Detrick, Maryland...leadership, including COL Lang (Chief of Behavioral Health), to present the study and gain local support. Dr. Alan Peterson, Director of the STRONG STAR

  9. A Study to Determine the Ambulatory Quality Assurance Impact of a Computer-Stored Medical Records System Upon the Family Practice Clinic, Silas B. Hays Army Community Hospital, Fort Ord, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-01

    thoroughly familiar with the capabilities and the limitations of the computer-stored medical record information system. 16 2. Validate vendor claims...TOTAL DKN5NAME 22 QHA2NANE 22 PHAlNAME 22 PALPITATIONS 21 IRRIT BOWEL SYNDR OR INTE 21 HX OF ALLERGY TO MEDICINA 20 MALIG NEOPL OASTROrNTESTI 20 ACNE...FOR ACCURACY OF DATA INPUT TO THE COSTAR SYSTEM Method: The data entry clerks have been familiar with the system and have used the system since 12

  10. Predicting U.S. Army suicides after hospitalizations with psychiatric diagnoses in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Ronald C.; Warner, LTC Christopher H.; Ivany, LTC Christopher; Petukhova, Maria V.; Rose, Sherri; Bromet, Evelyn J.; Brown, LTC Millard; Cai, Tianxi; Colpe, Lisa J.; Cox, Kenneth L.; Fullerton, Carol S.; Gilman, Stephen E.; Gruber, Michael J.; Heeringa, Steven G.; Lewandowski-Romps, Lisa; Li, Junlong; Millikan-Bell, Amy M.; Naifeh, James A.; Nock, Matthew K.; Rosellini, Anthony J.; Sampson, Nancy A.; Schoenbaum, Michael; Stein, Murray B.; Wessely, Simon; Zaslavsky, Alan M.; Ursano, Robert J.

    2014-01-01

    IMPORTANCE The U.S. Army experienced a sharp rise in suicides beginning in 2004. Administrative data show that among those at highest risk are soldiers in the 12 months after inpatient treatment of a psychiatric disorder. OBJECTIVE To develop an actuarial risk algorithm predicting suicide in the 12 months after US Army soldier inpatient treatment of a psychiatric disorder to target expanded post-hospital care. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS There were 53,769 hospitalizations of active duty soldiers in 2004–2009 with ICD-9-CM psychiatric admission diagnoses. Administrative data available prior to hospital discharge abstracted from a wide range of data systems (socio81 demographic, Army career, criminal justice, medical/pharmacy) were used to predict suicides in the subsequent 12 months using machine learning methods (regression trees, penalized regressions) designed to evaluate cross-validated linear, nonlinear, and interactive predictive associations. MAIN OUTCOME Suicides of soldiers hospitalized with psychiatric disorders in the 12 months after hospital discharge. RESULTS 68 soldiers died by suicide within 12 months of hospital discharge (12.0% of all Army suicides), equivalent to 263.9 suicides/100,000 person-years compared to 18.5 suicides/100,000 person-years in the total Army. Strongest predictors included socio-demographics (male, late age of enlistment), criminal offenses (verbal violence, weapons possession), prior suicidality, aspects of prior psychiatric inpatient and outpatient treatment, and disorders diagnosed during the focal hospitalizations. 52.9% of post-hospital suicides occurred after the 5% of hospitalizations with highest predicted suicide risk (3,824.1 suicides/100,000 person years). These highest-risk hospitalizations also accounted for significantly elevated proportions of several other adverse post-hospital outcomes (unintentional injury deaths, suicide attempts, re-hospitalizations). CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE The high concentration

  11. Predicting suicides after psychiatric hospitalization in US Army soldiers: the Army Study To Assess Risk and rEsilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Ronald C; Warner, Christopher H; Ivany, Christopher; Petukhova, Maria V; Rose, Sherri; Bromet, Evelyn J; Brown, Millard; Cai, Tianxi; Colpe, Lisa J; Cox, Kenneth L; Fullerton, Carol S; Gilman, Stephen E; Gruber, Michael J; Heeringa, Steven G; Lewandowski-Romps, Lisa; Li, Junlong; Millikan-Bell, Amy M; Naifeh, James A; Nock, Matthew K; Rosellini, Anthony J; Sampson, Nancy A; Schoenbaum, Michael; Stein, Murray B; Wessely, Simon; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Ursano, Robert J

    2015-01-01

    The US Army experienced a sharp increase in soldier suicides beginning in 2004. Administrative data reveal that among those at highest risk are soldiers in the 12 months after inpatient treatment of a psychiatric disorder. To develop an actuarial risk algorithm predicting suicide in the 12 months after US Army soldier inpatient treatment of a psychiatric disorder to target expanded posthospitalization care. There were 53,769 hospitalizations of active duty soldiers from January 1, 2004, through December 31, 2009, with International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification psychiatric admission diagnoses. Administrative data available before hospital discharge abstracted from a wide range of data systems (sociodemographic, US Army career, criminal justice, and medical or pharmacy) were used to predict suicides in the subsequent 12 months using machine learning methods (regression trees and penalized regressions) designed to evaluate cross-validated linear, nonlinear, and interactive predictive associations. Suicides of soldiers hospitalized with psychiatric disorders in the 12 months after hospital discharge. Sixty-eight soldiers died by suicide within 12 months of hospital discharge (12.0% of all US Army suicides), equivalent to 263.9 suicides per 100,000 person-years compared with 18.5 suicides per 100,000 person-years in the total US Army. The strongest predictors included sociodemographics (male sex [odds ratio (OR), 7.9; 95% CI, 1.9-32.6] and late age of enlistment [OR, 1.9; 95% CI, 1.0-3.5]), criminal offenses (verbal violence [OR, 2.2; 95% CI, 1.2-4.0] and weapons possession [OR, 5.6; 95% CI, 1.7-18.3]), prior suicidality [OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.7-4.9], aspects of prior psychiatric inpatient and outpatient treatment (eg, number of antidepressant prescriptions filled in the past 12 months [OR, 1.3; 95% CI, 1.1-1.7]), and disorders diagnosed during the focal hospitalizations (eg, nonaffective psychosis [OR, 2.9; 95% CI, 1.2-7.0]). A total

  12. Army Science Board Ad Hoc Subgroup Report, Manning Army Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-09-01

    VA 22314 (703) 751-2745 Major Brad Taylor, DCSP Military Staff Assistant Dr. Dan Risser , ARI Army Staff Assistant Dr. K.C. Emerson 560 Boulder...SINCGARS Meeting with DCSPER Mr. BradshawCAPL) Mr. Bennett(AMSAA) Dr. Risser (ARI) LtCol Abney LtGen Thurman 10 December, 1981 - The Pentagon...ASVAB Update Maintenance Data PM Trade BOIP/QQPRI/Div 86 Dr. Eaton(ARI) Dr. Risser (ARI) Dr. Hofer Col. Bettinger(SSC) 11 December, 1981

  13. Spatial structure of morphological and neutral genetic variation in Brook Trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazyak, David C.; Hilderbrand, Robert H.; Keller, Stephen R.; Colaw, Mark C.; Holloway, Amanda E.; Morgan, Raymond P.; King, Timothy L.

    2015-01-01

    Brook Trout Salvelinus fontinalis exhibit exceptional levels of life history variation, remarkable genetic variability, and fine-scale population structure. In many cases, neighboring populations may be highly differentiated from one another to an extent that is comparable with species-level distinctions in other taxa. Although genetic samples have been collected from hundreds of populations and tens of thousands of individuals, little is known about whether differentiation at neutral markers reflects phenotypic differences among Brook Trout populations. We compared differentiation in morphology and neutral molecular markers among populations from four geographically proximate locations (all within 24 km) to examine how genetic diversity covaries with morphology. We found significant differences among and/or within streams for all three morphological axes examined and identified the source stream of many individuals based on morphology (52.3% classification efficiency). Although molecular and morphological differentiation among streams ranged considerably (mean pairwise FST: 0.023–0.264; pairwise PST: 0.000–0.339), the two measures were not significantly correlated. While in some cases morphological characters appear to have diverged to a greater extent than expected by neutral genetic drift, many traits were conserved to a greater extent than were neutral genetic markers. Thus, while Brook Trout exhibit fine-scale spatial patterns in both morphology and neutral genetic diversity, these types of biological variabilities are being structured by different ecological and evolutionary processes. The relative influences of genetic drift versus selection and phenotypic plasticity in shaping morphology appear to vary among populations occupying nearby streams.

  14. New orbit recalculations of comet C/1890 F1 Brooks and its dynamical evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Królikowska, Małgorzata; Dybczyński, Piotr A.

    2016-08-01

    C/1890 F1 Brooks belongs to a group of 19 comets used by Jan Oort to support his famous hypothesis on the existence of a spherical cloud containing hundreds of billions of comets with orbits of semi-major axes between 50 000 and 150 000 au. Comet Brooks stands out from this group because of a long series of astrometric observations as well as a nearly 2-yr-long observational arc. Rich observational material makes this comet an ideal target for testing the rationality of an effort to recalculate astrometric positions on the basis of original (comet-star) measurements using modern star catalogues. This paper presents the results of such a new analysis based on two different methods: (i) automatic re-reduction based on cometary positions and the (comet-star) measurements and (ii) partially automatic re-reduction based on the contemporary data for the reference stars originally used. We show that both methods offer a significant reduction in the uncertainty of orbital elements. Based on the most preferred orbital solution, the dynamical evolution of comet Brooks during three consecutive perihelion passages is discussed. We conclude that C/1890 F1 is a dynamically old comet that passed the Sun at a distance below 5 au during its previous perihelion passage. Furthermore, its next perihelion passage will be a little closer than during the 1890-1892 apparition. C/1890 F1 is interesting also because it suffered extremely small planetary perturbations when it travelled through the planetary zone. Therefore, in the next passage through perihelion, it will once again be a comet from the Oort spike.

  15. Potential Environmental Impacts of Army Laser Operations: An Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    1983-06-01

    exemplifies the thermal nature of the dam - considerably with wavelength. It was necessary to consider age. In the IR-C region, as in the ultraviolet... Retroreflector during Irradiation by Searchlights and Lasers, April 1977 42-0335-77 Reevaluation of the SIMFIRE Tank Gunnery ADB020377L Simulator Lasers, Fort...OFFICE OCF TH SURGEON GKENAL AWN: DRSMC-CLB-R(S) (A) 1 ATmE: IRSMC-CLB-T (A) 1 Cinander ATm: Dam -C-•-TE (A) I US Army Medical Research and AmTT: DRSMC

  16. Army Logistician. Volume 41, Issue 1, January-February 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-02-01

    operations Chief for the 3D sustainment BrigaDe, WhiCh reCentLy reDe - pLoyeD from operation iraqi freeDom. he has a master’s Degree in LogistiCs management...conducting medical engagements. • Pamphlet-targeting and counter- propaganda efforts to build support for the Iraqi Security Forces and increase interactions...with the Iraqi Army and Iraqi Police. • Social and leadership engagements, including dinners with local sheiks and school visits. • Adopt-a-village

  17. medical recipients of the victoria cross during the anglo-boer war ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Major-General Henry Edward Manning Douglas, Vc, CMG, DSo. (Photograph: Courtesy of the Army Medical Services Museum,. Aldershot.) Medical Corps ... persistent heavy fire he continued to attend to the wounded until a general retire was ...

  18. Familial multiple eccrine spiradenomas with cylindromatous features associated with epithelioma adenoides cysticum of Brooke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berberian, B J; Sulica, V I; Kao, G F

    1990-07-01

    Four cases of rare familial multiple eccrine spiradenomas showing features of dermal cylindromas and associated with epithelioma adenoides cysticum of Brooke are reported. Skin biopsy specimens were obtained from three generations of this family and routine histochemical and immunoperoxidase stains were used. The eldest affected family member had multiple disfiguring facial and scalp tumors, which precipitated episodes of depression. Unlike other cutaneous genetic disorders, such as neurofibromatosis and tuberous sclerosis, the cutaneous adnexal tumors occurring in these patients continue to erupt and grow during their lifetimes.

  19. Retrieving an archive: Brook Andrew and William Blandowski’s Australien in 142 Photographischen Abbildungen

    OpenAIRE

    Kerry Heckenberg

    2014-01-01

    Much of the critical response to Brook Andrew’s reinterpretation of images from a colonial archive in his 2008 series The Island situated the work in a tradition of post-colonial critique of documentary images. But is this an adequate account of either Andrew’s work or the archive in question, William Blandowski’s Australien in 142 Photographischen Abbildungen (1862)? This essay looks at practices involving copying and their impact on understandings of authenticity, the role of art in science...

  20. Thermal Vacuum Testing of ICPTA RCS at Plum Brook B-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atwell, M. J.; Hurlbert, E. A.; Melcher, J. C.; Morehead, R. L.

    2017-01-01

    Vacuum and thermal vacuum testing of the Integrated Cryogenic Propulsion Test Article (ICPTA) was performed at the Plum Brook B-2 facility as a part of a system checkout and facility characterization effort. Multiple test objectives included: integrated Reaction Control System (RCS) characterization, cold helium pressurization system characterization, modal propellant gaging experiment (Orion), CFM propellant loading experiments, main engine characterization. The ICPTA is a test bed for LOX/LCH4 technologies built in 2016 using new components and hardware from the former Morpheus vehicle and other projects.

  1. DETECTION OF RENIBACTERIUM SALMONINARUM IN TISSUE OF BROOK TROUT (SALVELINUS FONTINALIS BY NESTED RT–PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irena Vardić

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Pathogenic bacterium Renibacterium salmoninarum causes kidney disease with high mortality rate and considerable economic losses in salmonid farming. Thus, application of fast and sensitive method for R. salmoninarum diagnosis is of great importance. This paper describes detection of R. salmoninarum in brook trout tissue with gross clinical signs of disease by nested RT–PCR. Determination of partial sequence of bacterial msa gene was done prior to comparison with similar sequences from different R. salmoninarum isolates. Nested RT–PCR proved to be a rapid and valuable diagnostic tool for R. salmoninarum detection, and sequence analysis confirmed previously reported genetic uniformity of this bacteria

  2. Evaluation of a Videotape Technique for Measuring Clinical Psychiatric Skills of Medical Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tardiff, Kenneth; And Others

    1978-01-01

    A technique developed at SUNY at Stony Brook measures changes in second-year medical students' ability to recognize psychopathology following an educational program in psychobiology. It compares ratings of videotaped interviews by the students to the ratings of the interviews made by the faculty preceptors participating in the teaching program.…

  3. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 21 (WALDTH00450021) on Town HIghway 45, crossing Joes Brook, Walden, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanoff, Michael A.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WALDTH00450021 on Town Highway 45 crossing Joes Brook, Walden, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The VTAOT files state that the stream is Coles Brook, both the USGS and the VTAOT maps state that it is Joes Brook.

  4. Survey of Army Personnel Interested in Teaching

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-11-01

    Demographic prof’de CurrentActive Army Personnel rent Teachers Actie - ifl~ = -Employment Active Actve Active Outside Army Officers Enlted Educaion Base: 607...Base: 607 345 206 301 1144 2380 0^ PA Desire to work with young people 71 69 70 64 70 78 Value or significance of education in society 69 68 68 75

  5. After the Spring: Reforming Arab Armies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-09-01

    Arab region, and intercultural communication . She was previously assigned to the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) Defence College and the...and provides solutions to strategic Army issues affecting the national security community . The Peacekeeping and Stability Operations Institute...concern topics having strategic implications for the Army, the Department of Defense, and the larger national security community . In addition to its

  6. Army Industrial, Landscaping, and Agricultural Water Use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McMordie Stoughton, Kate; Loper, Susan A.; Boyd, Brian K.

    2014-09-18

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a task for the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army to quantify the Army’s ILA water use and to help improve the data quality and installation water reporting in the Army Energy and Water Reporting System.

  7. Army industrial, landscaping, and agricultural water use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stoughton, Kate McMordie [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Loper, Susan A. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Boyd, Brian K. [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States)

    2014-09-18

    The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory conducted a task for the Deputy Assistant Secretary of the Army to quantify the Army’s ILA water use and to help improve the data quality and installation water reporting in the Army Energy and Water Reporting System.

  8. Past and future effects of atmospheric deposition on the forest ecosystem at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest: simulations with the dynamic model ForSAFE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim Belyazid; Scott Bailey; Harald. Sverdrup

    2010-01-01

    The Hubbard Brook Ecosystem Study presents a unique opportunity for studying long-term ecosystem responses to changes in anthropogenic factors. Following industrialisation and the intensification of agriculture, the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF) has been subject to increased loads of atmospheric deposition, particularly sulfur and nitrogen. The deposition of...

  9. 75 FR 3217 - J&T Hydro Company; H. Dean Brooks and W. Bruce Cox; Notice of Application for Transfer of License...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY Federal Energy Regulatory Commission J&T Hydro Company; H. Dean Brooks and W. Bruce Cox; Notice of Application... 30, 2009, J&T Hydro Company (transferor) and W. Dean Brooks, and H. Bruce Cox (transferees) filed...

  10. Preliminary Classification of Army and Navy Entry-Level Occupations by the Holland Coding System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-12-01

    96) Realistic =55% Realistic z56% RIS 3 RIS 3 RIE 22 RIE 21 RSE 5 RIC I RSC I RSE 4 RSI I REI I I REI 15 RES 10 RES 15 REC1 REC 2 RCE 3 RCI 1 54 RCS...HOLLAND-CODED ARMY ENTRY-LEVEL OCCUPATIONS PdB-0 dM.Mill UI Holland-Coded Army Entry-Level Occupations 1. Still Photographer RSE 2. Motion Picture...9. Practical Nurse SAI 10. Medical Lab Technician ISA 11. Orthotist RSE 12. Electrocardiograph Technician RCI 13. Optometric Assistant SCI 14

  11. Within-year Exertional Heat Illness Incidence in U.S. Army Soldiers, 2008-2012

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-01

    2008-2012 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) MAJ David DeGroot Robyn Martin 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e...criteria and associated codes for the continuum of heat illnesses. 9 Point of Contact The point of contact is MAJ David DeGroot and the US Army...Medical Fitness. Washington, DC: Department of the Army, 2011. 11. Ely, B.R., M.R. Ely, S.N. Cheuvront, R.W. Kenefick, D.W. DeGroot , and S.J. Montain

  12. Observation on the Joint Service Military Medical Facility What Does the Future Hold

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-03-30

    base hospitals at Mather and McClellan , Sacramento , CA; March AFB hospital, CA; Fitzsimmons Medical Center, Aurora, CO, among others.20 Unlike...Medical Center, San Diego, CA and David Grant Medical Center, Travis AFB , CA for Army RC units, such as the 921st Field Hospital (FH) from Sacramento ...with Malcolm Grow Medical Center at Andrews AFB , Dewitt Army Community Hospital at Ft. Belvoir, and associated area clinics.14 But the Office of

  13. Comparison of CO2 trapping in highly heterogeneous reservoirs with Brooks-Corey and van Genuchten type capillary pressure curves

    CERN Document Server

    Gershenzon, Naum I; Dominic, David F; Mehnert, Edward; Okwen, Roland T

    2015-01-01

    Geological heterogeneities essentially affect the dynamics of a CO2 plume in subsurface environments. Previously we showed how the dynamics of a CO2 plume is influenced by the multi-scale stratal architecture in deep saline reservoirs. The results strongly suggest that representing small-scale features is critical to understanding capillary trapping processes. Here we present the result of simulation of CO2 trapping using two different conventional approaches, i.e. Brooks-Corey and van Genuchten, for the capillary pressure curves. We showed that capillary trapping and dissolution rates are very different for the Brooks-Corey and van Genuchten approaches when heterogeneity and hysteresis are both represented.

  14. Free-Energy Profiles of Membrane Insertion of the M2 Transmembrane Peptide from Influenza A Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    U.S. Army Medical Research and Materiel Command, yDepartment of Cell Biology and Biochemistry , U.S. Army Medical Research Institute of Infectious...straints: molecular dynamics of n- alkanes . J. Comput. Phys. 23:327– 341. 36. Feig, M., J. Karanicolas, and C. L. Brooks. 2004. MMTSB Tool Set: enhanced

  15. High-resolution geophysical data collected within Red Brook Harbor, Buzzards Bay, Massachusetts, in 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turecek, Aaron M.; Danforth, William W.; Baldwin, Wayne E.; Barnhardt, Walter A.

    2012-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey conducted a high-resolution geophysical survey within Red Brook Harbor, Massachusetts, from September 28 through November 17, 2009. Red Brook Harbor is located on the eastern edge of Buzzards Bay, south of the Cape Cod Canal. The survey area was approximately 7 square kilometers, with depths ranging from 0 to approximately 10 meters. Data were collected aboard the U.S. Geological Survey Research Vessel Rafael. The research vessel was equipped with a 234-kilohertz interferometric sonar system to collect bathymetry and backscatter data, a dual frequency (3.5- and 200-kilohertz) compression high-intensity radar pulse seismic reflection profiler to collect subbottom data, a sound velocity profiler to acquire speed of sound within the water column, and a sea floor sampling device to collect sediment samples, video, and photographs. The survey was part of an ongoing cooperative effort between the U.S. Geological Survey and the Massachusetts Office of Coastal Zone Management to map the geology of the Massachusetts inner continental shelf. In addition to inclusion within the cooperative geologic mapping effort, these data will be used to assess the shallow-water mapping capability of the geophysical systems deployed for this project, with an emphasis on identifying resolution benchmarks for the interferometric sonar system.

  16. Water age and stream solute dynamics at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (US)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botter, Gianluca; Benettin, Paolo; McGuire, Kevin; Rinaldo, Andrea

    2016-04-01

    The contribution discusses experimental and modeling results from a headwater catchment at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (New Hampshire, USA) to explore the link between stream solute dynamics and water age. A theoretical framework based on water age dynamics, which represents a general basis for characterizing solute transport at the catchment scale, is used to model both conservative and weathering-derived solutes. Based on the available information about the hydrology of the site, an integrated transport model was developed and used to estimate the relevant hydrochemical fluxes. The model was designed to reproduce the deuterium content of streamflow and allowed for the estimate of catchment water storage and dynamic travel time distributions (TTDs). Within this framework, dissolved silicon and sodium concentration in streamflow were simulated by implementing first-order chemical kinetics based explicitly on dynamic TTD, thus upscaling local geochemical processes to catchment scale. Our results highlight the key role of water stored within the subsoil glacial material in both the short-term and long-term solute circulation at Hubbard Brook. The analysis of the results provided by the calibrated model allowed a robust estimate of the emerging concentration-discharge relationship, streamflow age distributions (including the fraction of event water) and storage size, and their evolution in time due to hydrologic variability.

  17. Plant communities as indicators of salt marsh hydrology A study at Goose Fare Brook, Saco, Maine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Millette, P.M. (Univ. of Maine, Orono, ME (United States). Dept. of Geological Sciences)

    1993-03-01

    Salt marsh stratigraphy often relies on vegetation fragment distribution as an indicator of paleo-sea level. This study is attempting to validate the use of Spartina alterniflora and Spartina patens at Goose Fare Brook in Saco, Maine as paleo-sea level indicators. Plant zones were mapped and each zone boundary was surveyed to describe the relationship between sea level and plant species zonation. Data showing the contact elevations between S. patens and S. alterniflora were examined, and contacts from different environments in the marsh were compared. Differences in contact elevations ranged from only a few centimeters to more than eighty centimeters. Three series of groundwater monitoring wells were installed along transects. Within a single transect, one well was placed in the creek bottom, measuring the free water surface, and one was placed at each of several plant zone boundaries. Strip chart recordings from one series of monitoring wells show the flood dominated patterns of tidally influenced groundwater fluctuations in the wells. Root depths of 100 plugs each of S. alterniflora and S. patens were also measured. A comparison of these measurements and those from monitoring wells will assist in the determination of the average length of submergence time for each species. Preliminary findings suggest that sea level is not the only force affecting the modern zonation of these two indicator plants in Goose Fare Brook.

  18. Structural provinces of the northeastern Brooks Range, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, W.K.; Hanks, C.L. (Univ. of Alaska, Fairbanks (USA))

    1990-07-01

    The dominant Cenozoic structures of the northeastern Brooks Range are anticlinoria with cores of sub-Mississippian rocks, reflecting a regional north-vergent duplex with a floor thrust in the sub-Mississippian sequence and a roof thrust in the Mississippian Kayak Shale. The number of horses forming each anticlinorium and the structural style of the overlying Mississippian and younger cover sequence varies regionally, providing a basis for dividing the northeastern Brooks Range into structural provinces. In the western province, each anticlinorium contains a single horse, and shortening above the Kayak Shale was accommodated mainly by detachment folds. To the north in the Sadlerochit Mountains, the Kayak Shale is depositionally discontinuous and rocks elsewhere separated by this detachment deformed together. In the eastern province, each anticlinorium contains multiple horses, and shortening above the Kayak Shale was accommodated largely by thrust duplication of Mississippian through Triassic rocks. In the narrow central province, the Devonian Okpilak batholith was detached from its roots, internally shortened along shear zones and by penetrative strain, and transported northward. Because the Kayak Shale is locally absent, the Mississippian and younger cover sequence deformed in part penetratively along with the batholith. 13 figs.

  19. New orbit recalculations of comet C/1890 F1 Brooks and its dynamical evolution

    CERN Document Server

    Królikowska, Małgorzata

    2016-01-01

    C/1890 F1 Brooks belongs to a group of nineteen comets used by Jan Oort to support his famous hypothesis on the existence of a spherical cloud containing hundreds of billions of comets with orbits of semimajor axes between 50 and 150 thousand au. Comet Brooks stands out from this group because of a long series of astrometric observations as well as nearly two-year long observational arc. Rich observational material makes this comet an ideal target for testing the rationality of an effort to recalculate astrometric positions on the basis of original (comet-star)-measurements using modern star catalogues. This paper presents the results of such new analysis based on two different methods: (i) automatic re-reduction based on cometary positions and the (comet-star)-measurements, and (ii) partially automatic re-reduction based on the contemporary data for originally used reference stars. We show that both methods offer a significant reduction of orbital elements uncertainties. Based on the most preferred orbital s...

  20. 32 CFR 651.14 - Integration with Army planning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Integration with Army planning. 651.14 Section... the Decision Process § 651.14 Integration with Army planning. (a) Early integration. The Army goal is to concurrently integrate environmental reviews with other Army planning and decision-making actions...

  1. Army Basic Skills Provision: Whole Organisation Approach/Lessons Learnt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basic Skills Agency, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Army began working in partnership with the Basic Skills Agency in 2000. This was formalised with the establishment of the Basic Skills Agency's National Support Project for the Army (2001) that contributes to the raising of basic skills standards in the Army by advising on, and assisting with, the development of the Army's basic skills policy…

  2. 76 FR 43993 - Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-22

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Summer Study Meeting AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ACTION... following committee meeting: Name of Committee: Army Science Board (ASB). Date(s) of Meeting: August 10, 2011. Time(s) of Meeting: 0800-1200. Location: Newport News Marriott at City Center, 740 Town Center...

  3. Managing workers' compensation costs in the military setting: the Army's story.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloeren, Marianne; Mallon, Timothy M

    2004-05-01

    Direct and indirect costs for the Army's workers' compensation payments have increased to more than 2 billion US dollars. Increasing attention is putting the spotlight on the problems at all levels, and a promising cooperative approach to injury prevention and case management is emerging. This article addresses the system within which the Army's workers' compensation program operates, provides some organizational history, gives an update on current status,and describes what is needed for sustained improvement. The onus is on the Army to develop and implement strategies that use available data to target high-risk occupations and employees to prevent accidents, injuries, and illnesses. Front-line managers bear the responsibility for educating the workforce and providing safe workplaces. Employees become the beneficiaries, not of medical and compensation benefits but of safe and healthy work environments.

  4. NASA's Hydrogen Outpost: The Rocket Systems Area at Plum Brook Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrighi, Robert S.

    2016-01-01

    "There was pretty much a general knowledge about hydrogen and its capabilities," recalled former researcher Robert Graham. "The question was, could you use it in a rocket engine? Do we have the technology to handle it? How will it cool? Will it produce so much heat release that we can't cool the engine? These were the questions that we had to address." The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's (NASA) Glenn Research Center, referred to historically as the Lewis Research Center, made a concerted effort to answer these and related questions in the 1950s and 1960s. The center played a critical role transforming hydrogen's theoretical potential into a flight-ready propellant. Since then NASA has utilized liquid hydrogen to send humans and robots to the Moon, propel dozens of spacecraft across the universe, orbit scores of satellite systems, and power 135 space shuttle flights. Rocket pioneers had recognized hydrogen's potential early on, but its extremely low boiling temperature and low density made it impracticable as a fuel. The Lewis laboratory first demonstrated that liquid hydrogen could be safely utilized in rocket and aircraft propulsion systems, then perfected techniques to store, pump, and cleanly burn the fuel, as well as use it to cool the engine. The Rocket Systems Area at Lewis's remote testing area, Plum Brook Station, played a little known, but important role in the center's hydrogen research efforts. This publication focuses on the activities at the Rocket Systems Area, but it also discusses hydrogen's role in NASA's space program and Lewis's overall hydrogen work. The Rocket Systems Area included nine physically modest test sites and three test stands dedicated to liquid-hydrogen-related research. In 1962 Cleveland Plain Dealer reporter Karl Abram claimed, "The rocket facility looks more like a petroleum refinery. Its test rigs sprout pipes, valves and tanks. During the night test runs, excess hydrogen is burned from special stacks in the best

  5. Mortality Surveillance in the U.S. Army 20052014

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-07-01

    Army Publ ic Heal th Center (Provis ional Public Health Report Army Public Health Center (Provisional) Army Public Health Center (Provisional...Public Health Report Mortality Surveillance in the U.S. Army 2005-2014 PHR No. S.0034370-14 Approved for public release, distribution unlimited...Disease Surveillance Portfolio Behavioral and Social Health Outcomes Program Mortality Surveillance in the U.S. Army 2005–2014 Brent E

  6. Army Hearing Program Status Report Quarter 2 Fiscal Year 2017

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-07-01

    U.S. Army Publ ic Heal th Center Army Hearing Program Status Report Q2 FY17 Clinical Public Health and Epidemiology Directorate Army...56               INTRODUCTION The Army Hearing Program Status Report (AHPSR) is a component of the Public Health ... required by Department of Defense Instruction (DoDI) 6055.12, Department of the Army Pamphlet (DA Pam) 40-501, and the Chief of Staff of the Army’s

  7. [The army of the East and health services].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guivarc'h, Marcel

    2007-01-01

    A medical disaster due to the failure of a plan intended to free Belfort by an army of 90 000 men, formed by Bourbaki in Nevers, joined in Besancon by 40 000 men from Lyon and from Dijon. Envisaged in three days, the regrouping lasts three weeks. A gigantic railway blocking, by an icy cold, leaves in the trains of the soldiers without food, of the horses without irons nor fodder. A third of manpower is from the start inapt for the fights. The utter exhaustion of the men don't make possible to exploit the success of Villersexel's battle (January 9), nor to cross Lizaine. The medical army officers joined those of the civil ambulances formed in South-east, and that of Pamard. The care given with delay on the covered with snow ground, in precarious shelters or encumbered hospitals, is summary. Cold, gelures, walk feet, infection, associated variola, are the cause of a high mortality: 8 500 died, and much of casualties. Ordered by Bourbaki, the dramatic routed to Switzerland by Pontarlier and the Cluse collar, under the Prussian shells will add 15 000 killed. The Swiss ones collect sick and wounded in 200 ambulances along the border, and on 87 000 men to be disarmed in 9 000 hospitalize. Pamard will remain until March 18 at the Pontarlier' hospital.

  8. Joseph Lovell, MD (1788-1836): First US army surgeon general.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Craig, Stephen C

    2016-08-01

    Joseph Lovell, trained in medicine at Harvard and in military medicine/surgery by the War of 1812, became the first Surgeon General to sit on the reorganised army staff at the tender age of 29 in 1818. With a keen intellect, medical acumen, and wartime experiences for his tools and a close supporting relationship with Commanding General Jacob Jennings Brown and Secretary of War John C Calhoun (1728-1850), Lovell constructed an efficient and effective organisational and administrative framework for the new Medical Department of the US Army. Moreover, he not only redefined the role of the American military physician but also established the professional dignity, respectability and value of the medical officer among line officers and staff. Lovell's 18-year tenure came to an abrupt end, but the operational framework he created became both foundation and legacy for his successors.

  9. Getting it right: revamping Army talent management

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Brian S.

    2015-01-01

    Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited U.S. Army officers face countless opportunity costs, especially at the mid-grade level, when deciding to stay in the Army past the ten-year mark of service. The scarcity of skilled labor in today’s economy makes it important that organizations, especially the Army, retain their human capital investment. This thesis suggests techniques to acquire, manage, and retain talent to ensure that the Army’s officer talent pool is not depleted. S...

  10. SEX-LINKED CHANGES IN PHASE 1 BIOTRANSFORMATION OF PHENOL IN BROOK TROUT OVER AN ANNUAL REPRODUCTIVE CYCLE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The microsomal metabolism of phenol (11 degrees C) over an annual reproductive cycle from June to December has been studied using fall spawning adult brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis). Incubations were optimized for time, cofactor connection, pH, and microsomal protein concentr...

  11. Past and projected future changes in snowpack and soil frost at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, New Hampshire, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    John L. Campbell; Scott V. Ollinger; Gerald N. Flerchinger; Haley Wicklein; Katharine Hayhoe; Amey S. Bailey

    2010-01-01

    Long-term data from the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire show that air temperature has increased by about 1 °C over the last half century. The warmer climate has caused significant declines in snow depth, snow water equivalent and snow cover duration. Paradoxically, it has been suggested that warmer air temperatures may result in colder soils...

  12. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 7 (WALDTH00020007) on Town Highway 2, crossing Coles Brook, Walden, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striker, Lora K.; Medalie, Laura

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WALDTH00020007 on Town Highway 2 crossing Coles Brook, Walden, Vermont (figures 1–8). Coles Brook is also referred to as Joes Brook. A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D. The site is in the New England Upland section of the New England physiographic province in north-eastern Vermont. The 12.8-mi2 drainage area is in a predominantly rural and forested basin. In the vicinity of the study site, the surface cover is predominantly shrub and brushland. In the study area, Coles Brook has a sinuous channel with a slope of approximately 0.005 ft/

  13. Growth of a Science Center: The Center for Science and Mathematics Education (CESAME) at Stony Brook University

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafney, Leo; Bynum, R. David; Sheppard, Keith

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the origin and development of CESAME (The Center for Science and Mathematics Education) at Stony Brook University. The analysis identifies key ingredients in areas of personnel, funding, organizational structures, educational priorities, collaboration, and institutionalization. After a discussion of relevant issues in…

  14. 75 FR 52374 - National Environmental Policy Act; NASA Glenn Research Center Plum Brook Station Wind Farm Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-25

    ... Environmental Policy Act; NASA Glenn Research Center Plum Brook Station Wind Farm Project AGENCY: National... and to conduct scoping for the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC). SUMMARY: NASA intends to conduct... Project located near Sandusky, Ohio, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969, as...

  15. Examining Scientific and Technical Writing Strategies in the 11th Century Chinese Science Book "Brush Talks from Dream Brook"

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuejiao

    2013-01-01

    This article examines the influential Chinese science book "Brush Talks from Dream Brook," written by Shen Kuo in the 11th century. I suggest that "Brush Talks" reveals a tension between institutionalized science and science in the public, and a gap between the making of scientific knowledge and the communication of such…

  16. Maintenance of phenotypic variation: repeatibility, heritability, and size-dependent processes in a wild brook trout population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjamin H. Letcher; Jason A Coombs; Keith H. Nislow

    2011-01-01

    Phenotypic variation in body size can result from within-cohort variation in birth dates, among-individual growth variation and size-selective processes. We explore the relative effects of these processes on the maintenance of wide observed body size variation in stream-dwelling brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis). Based on the analyses of multiple...

  17. On Conceptual Metaphor and the Flora and Fauna of Mind: Commentary on Brookes and Etkina; and Jeppsson, Haglund, and Amin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherin, Bruce

    2015-01-01

    In this commentary, the author presents his thoughts on two papers appearing in this special issue. The first, "The Importance of Language in Students' Reasoning about Heat in Thermodynamic Processes," by David T. Brookes and Eugenia Etkina (See: EJ1060728), and the second, "Varying Use of Conceptual Metaphors Across Levels of…

  18. Genetic identity of brook trout in Lake Superior south shore streams: Potential for genetic monitoring of stocking and rehabilitation efforts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sloss, Brian L.; Jennings, Martin J.; Franckowiak, R.; Pratt, D.M.

    2008-01-01

    Rehabilitation of migratory ('coaster') brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis along Lake Superior's south shore is a topic of high interest among resource stakeholders and management agencies. Proposed strategies for rehabilitation of this brook trout life history variant in Wisconsin include supplemental stocking, watershed management, habitat rehabilitation, harvest regulations, or a combination thereof. In an effort to evaluate the success of coaster brook trout rehabilitation efforts, we collected genetic data from four populations of interest (Whittlesey Creek, Bois Brule River, Bark River, and Graveyard Creek) and the hatchery sources used in the Whittlesey Creek supplementation experiment. We characterized the genetic diversity of 30 individuals from each of four populations using 13 microsatellite DNA loci. Levels of genetic variation were consistent with those in similar studies conducted throughout the basin. Significant genetic variation among the populations was observed, enabling adequate population delineation through assignment tests. Overall, 208 of the 211 sampled fish (98.6%) were correctly assigned to their population of origin. Simulated F1 hybrids between two hatchery strains and the Whittlesey Creek population were identifiable in the majority of attempts (90.5-100% accuracy with 0-2.5% error). The genetic markers and analytical techniques described provide the ability to monitor the concurrent coaster brook trout rehabilitation efforts along Wisconsin's Lake Superior south shore, including the detection of hybridization between hatchery and native populations. ?? Copyright by the American Fisheries Society 2008.

  19. Feeding habits of the alien brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis and the native brown trout Salmo trutta in Czech mountain streams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horká Petra

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying patterns of prey resource use is fundamental to identify mechanisms enabling the coexistence of related fish species. Trophic interactions between the native brown trout, Salmo trutta, and the introduced brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis, were studied monthly from May to October in three mountain streams in Central Europe (Czech Republic. To evaluate whether the feeding habits differ between separated and coexisting populations of these species, one locality where both species coexist, and two allopatric populations of either species were studied. Across the study period, the mean stomach fullness of fish varied, being highest in spring and declining through autumn. The diet overlap (Schoener's overlap index between the species increased through the studied season (from 54.5% in July to 81.5% in October. In allopatry, both species had nearly the same feeding habits. However, in sympatry, brook trout consumed higher proportion of terrestrial invertebrates, while brown trout showed no changes either in the proportions of aquatic and terrestrial prey utilized or in the selectivity for prey categories in comparison to allopatric conditions. The dietary shift observed for brook trout, but not for brown trout, suggests that brown trout is a stronger competitor in the studied sympatric locality, leading the brook trout to change its feeding habits to reduce interspecific competition.

  20. The Battalion Surgeon: A Background Study and Analysis of His Military Training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1985-06-07

    is comprised of six corps or branches of service within the Army. They include the Medical Corps (MC), the Dental Corps (DC), the Veterinary Corps (VC...1952. Brooke, Paul P. "The Impact of the All-Volunteer Force on Physician Procurement and Retension in the Army Medical Department, 1973-1978." Student...Factors Involved In Retension of Medical Officers In The Military Service." Student Thesis, U.S. Army Command and General Staff College, 1966. 4

  1. [Norman Bethune and field surgery of the Eighth Route Army].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yong; Luo, Chang-Kun; Wang, Lin; Chen, Hong; Zhu, Jian-Wu

    2013-05-01

    With long-term war experience abroad, combined with the actual situation of health work in China, Bethune put forward a series of strategy and theory used in battlefield conditions of rescuing the wounded in China, such as "fire rescue, early debridement", "emergency blood transfusion in battlefield" and "the crowd blood bank", which effectively improved the rate of saving the battlefield wounded rate in the actual war. Combining with his own practice, he invented a variety of surgical instruments and equipment, such as "lugou bridge" medicine cabinet, "Bipp ointment", which have been widely used in the battlefield. He paid more attention to the construction of battlefield hospital, proposed the establishment of "Model Hospital" and "Special Surgery Hospital" in the rear of Anti-Japanese War, founded the health school, and wrote many battlefield medical books and skills data. Bethune trained a large number of medical personnel for the war front, laid the foundation for the field surgery education of the Eighth Route Army.

  2. Drought-induced stomatal closure probably cannot explain divergent white spruce growth in the Brooks Range, Alaska, USA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brownlee, Annalis H; Sullivan, Patrick F; Csank, Adam Z; Sveinbjörnsson, Bjartmar; Ellison, Sarah B Z

    2016-01-01

    Increment cores from the boreal forest have long been used to reconstruct past climates. However, in recent years, numerous studies have revealed a deterioration of the correlation between temperature and tree growth that is commonly referred to as divergence. In the Brooks Range of northern Alaska, USA, studies of white spruce (Picea glauca) revealed that trees in the west generally showed positive growth trends, while trees in the central and eastern Brooks Range showed mixed and negative trends during late 20th century warming. The growing season climate of the eastern Brooks Range is thought to be drier than the west. On this basis, divergent tree growth in the eastern Brooks Range has been attributed to drought stress. To investigate the hypothesis that drought-induced stomatal closure can explain divergence in the Brooks Range, we synthesized all of the Brooks Range white spruce data available in the International Tree Ring Data Bank (ITRDB) and collected increment cores from our primary sites in each of four watersheds along a west-to-east gradient near the Arctic treeline. For cores from our sites, we measured ring widths and calculated carbon isotope discrimination (δ13C), intrinsic water-use efficiency (iWUE), and needle intercellular CO2 concentration (C(i)) from δ13C in tree-ring alpha-cellulose. We hypothesized that trees exhibiting divergence would show a corresponding decline in δ13C, a decline in C(i), and a strong increase in iWUE. Consistent with the ITRDB data, trees at our western and central sites generally showed an increase in the strength of the temperature-growth correlation during late 20th century warming, while trees at our eastern site showed strong divergence. Divergent tree growth was not, however, associated with declining δ13C. Meanwhile, estimates of C(i) showed a strong increase at all of our study sites, indicating that more substrate was available for photosynthesis in the early 21st than in the early 20th century. Our

  3. Army Business Transformation: The Utility of Using Corporate Business Models within the Institutional Army

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bailer, Jr., John J

    2007-01-01

    .... Through a survey of the literature of published corporate business plans and models, military reports, Army depot case studies, and comparative analysis of emerging computer software technology...

  4. Pillow basalts of the Angayucham terrane: Oceanic plateau and island crust accreted to the Brooks Range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pallister, John S.; Budahn, James R.; Murchey, Benita L.

    1989-11-01

    The Angayucham Mountains (north margin of the Yukon-Koyukuk province) are made up of an imbricate stack of four to eight east-west trending, steeply dipping, fault slabs composed of Paleozoic (Devonian to Mississippean), Middle to Late Triassic, and Early Jurassic oceanic upper crustal rocks (pillow basalt, subordinate diabase, basaltic tuff, and radiolarian chert). Field relations and geochemical characteristics of the basaltic rocks suggest that the fault slabs were derived from an oceanic plateau or island setting and were emplaced onto the Brooks Range continental margin. The basalts are variably metamorphosed to prehnite-pumpellyite and low-greenschist facies. Major element analyses suggest that many are hypersthene-normative olivine tholeiites. Classification based on immobile trace elements confirms the tholeiitic character of most of the basalts but suggests that some had primary compositions transitional to alkali basalt. Although field and petrographic features of the basalts are similar, trace element characteristics allow definition of geographically distinct suites. A central outcrop belt along the crest of the mountains is made up of basalt with relatively flat rare earth element (REE) patterns. This belt is flanked to the north and south by LREE (light rare earth element)-enriched basalts. Radiolarian and conodont ages from interpillow and interlayered chert and limestone indicate that the central belt of basalts is Triassic in age, the southern belt is Jurassic in age, and the northern belt contains a mixture of Paleozoic and Mesozoic ages. Data for most of the basalts cluster in the "within-plate basalt" fields of trace element discriminant diagrams; none have trace-element characteristics of island arc basalt. The Triassic and Jurassic basalts are geochemically most akin to modern oceanic plateau and island basalts. Field evidence also favors an oceanic plateau or island setting. The great composite thickness of pillow basalt probably resulted

  5. [The General Military Medical Department during the Great Patriotic War].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryuchkov, O A; Kulnev, S V; Taranov, S P

    2015-08-01

    The article is devoted to the contribution of the General Military Medical Department of the Red Army (GMMD) to organisation of health care support during the Great Patriotic War of 1941-1945. In the summary you may follow the main ways of activity of the central governing body of medical (health) services of the Red. Army. The main focus of the article is made on conditions under which GMMD had to organize medical support of the Red. Army at the beginning of the war, the most difficult period of the Great Patriotic War. The authors payed attention to the forms and methods of the work of the head of GMMD and its subordinate departments under the conditions of rapidly changing environment of combat and rear situation, as well as interaction with GMMD People Commissariat of Health. The authors tried to highlight not well known but not less important moments in the activities of the Red Army GMMD.

  6. Army Response Letter - signed April 27, 1988

    Science.gov (United States)

    Army response letter regarding a request to elevate the decision of the New England Division Engineer (DE) to issue a permit to the Maine Department of Transportation to construct a marine terminal at Sears Island.

  7. [Disease control in the Red Army during the final stages of the Great Patriotic War].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butakov, S S; Berskii, O V; Zetkin, A Yu; Zobov, A E

    2015-05-01

    Forms and methods of disease, control in troops were fully developed during the Great Patriotic War 1941-1945 years. An improvement of anti-epidemic organization in the Red Army was based on military medical doctrine, which demanded united views on methods of disease prevention and in accordance with the 'main tasks of medical support of the army, including prevention of epidemic outbreaks in the army. Disease control system in the Red Army during the war was a series of targeted, science-based and proved by military practice measures .aimed at both the prevention and the immediate elimination of epidemic diseases. when they occur. The questions of disease control forces in the final stage of the Great Patriotic War (January 1944 - May 1945). Depending on the progress of the war and the conditions of the fighting, given the period laid down in the principles of disease control of military operations, discussed aspects of the organization of sanitary-epidemiological (preventive) measures in the armed forces.

  8. Current and Future Army Resiliency Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    organizational learning, Peter Senge , illustrates this point very well: “Organizations learn only through individuals who learn. Individual learning does not...downloads/CSF2Newsletter- Issue3.pdf, (accessed March 3, 2013). 11 Griffith, “Army Suicides,” 496. 12 Casey, “Comprehensive Soldier Fitness,” 2. 13 Peter ... Senge , The Fifth Discipline: The Art & Practice of the Learning Organization (New York, NY: Doubleday, 2006), 129. 14 Griffith, “Army Suicides,” 505

  9. Army Cyber Mission Force - Ambitions and Realities

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-05-21

    as part of the CyMF. This represents a departure from previous Army recruiting paradigms. Equally important as branding is the significance of...readdress branding , compensation, professional development and organization in order to increase the likelihood of success for the Cyber Mission Force...unique character traits that differ from the typical traits of Army enlistees. The research has further shown that compensation, branding

  10. Strategic Planning and Army Installation Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1996-01-01

    program. The U.S. Army has adopted the Malcolm Baldrige National Quality Award criteria for use in the ACOE program. Strategic planning is one of the...seven pillars of the Baldrige criteria. The Army has recognized that strategic planning is the key to the future. Strategic planning is the key to...and utilization of strategic planning . This paper examines through case study analysis several civilian communities and lessons learned through their

  11. Army JTIDS: A C3 Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-03-01

    Guerra , Director of Combat Developments, United States Army Signal Center, Fort Gordon for his sponsorship. Professor Donald A. Lacer and Professor...radio frequency band. This insures compatibility with civil Distance Measuring Equipment (DME), Military Tactical Air Navigation equipment (TACAN...LEBMNN~JORDAN ,AFGHNISTrAN ISRAEL, EGYPT SAD SUDAN SOUT)H YEMEN YEMEN ETHIOPIA Figure 22 The JSTARS Radar Platform data to Army fire support

  12. The Utility of Ada for Army Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-04-10

    34 Ada " for Ada Lovelace (1815-1851), a mathematician who worked with Charles Babbage on his difference and analytic engines.9 Later in 1979, the HOLWG...OF ADA FOR ARMY MODELING BY COLONEL MICHAEL L. YOCOM DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT A: Approved for publie releases distribution is unlimited. 1% LF-, EC TE...TITLE (ad Subtitle) a. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED The Utility of Ada for Army Modeling Individual Study Project 6 PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER

  13. The physiological response of diploid and triploid brook trout to exhaustive exercise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyndman, C A; Kieffer, J D; Benfey, T J

    2003-01-01

    Using triploidy as an experimental model, we examined whether cell size limits the post-exercise recovery process in fish. Because triploids generally possess larger cells, which could affect many physiological and biochemical processes, we hypothesized that triploids would take longer to recover from exhaustive exercise compared to diploids. To test this, we measured plasma lactate, glucose and osmolality, and white muscle energy stores (glycogen, phosphocreatine and ATP) and lactate before and immediately following exhaustive exercise and during recovery at 2 and 4 h post-exercise. In addition, oxygen consumption and ammonia excretion rates were determined before and after exhaustive exercise. Overall, diploid and triploid brook trout showed similar metabolic responses exercise, but plasma osmolality, white muscle lactate, white muscle ATP and post-exercise oxygen consumption rates recovered earlier in triploids compared to diploids. The results of this study suggest that the characteristic larger cell size of triploidy does not limit the physiological response to, or recovery from, exhaustive exercise.

  14. Total mitochondrial genome of mantis shrimp, Squilloides leptosquilla (Brooks, 1886) (Crustacea: Stomatopoda: Squillidae) in Korean waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hye-Eun; Kim, Jung Nyun; Yoon, Tae-Ho; Park, Kyeong Dong; Park, Won Gyu; Park, Hyun; Kim, Hyun Woo

    2016-07-01

    We characterized the complete mitochondrial genome of Squilloides leptosquilla (Brooks, 1886) collected from the southern waters of Korea, which is newly recorded into the Korean carcinological fauna. The total mitochondrial genome length of S. leptosquilla was 16,376 bp. This circular DNA encodes 13 proteins, two ribosomal RNAs, and 22 transfer RNAs, as well as a putative control region. Compared with other decapod crustacean mitochondrial genomes, the overall A + T content was relatively high (71.1%) as those among other stomatopod species. Nine and four protein-coding genes are encoded on the H-strand and on the L-strand, respectively. The short non-coding region (210 bp) between tRNA(Glu) and tRNA(Phe) may be the good candidate as the molecular marker to discriminate S. leptosequilla from other stomatopods.

  15. Concomitant Antibiotic and Mercury Resistance Among Gastrointestinal Microflora of Feral Brook Trout, Salvelinus fontinalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meredith, Matthew M.; Parry, Erin M.; Guay, Justin A.; Markham, Nicholas O.; Danner, G. Russell; Johnson, Keith A.; Barkay, Tamar; Fekete, Frank A.

    2013-01-01

    Twenty-nine bacterial isolates representing eight genera from the gastrointestinal tracts of feral brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis (Mitchell) demonstrated multiple maximal antibiotic resistances and concomitant broad-spectrum mercury (Hg) resistance. Equivalent viable plate counts on tryptic soy agar supplemented with either 0 or 25 μM HgCl2 verified the ubiquity of mercury resistance in this microbial environment. Mercury levels in lake water samples measured 1.5 ng L−1; mercury concentrations in fish filets ranged from 81.8 to 1,080 ng g−1 and correlated with fish length. The presence of similar antibiotic and Hg resistance patterns in multiple genera of gastrointestinal microflora supports a growing body of research that multiple selective genes can be transferred horizontally in the presence of an unrelated individual selective pressure. We present data that bioaccumulation of non-point source Hg pollution could be a selective pressure to accumulate both antibiotic and Hg resistant bacteria. PMID:22850694

  16. Incidence of pigmented skin tumors in a population of wild Montseny brook newt (Calotriton arnoldi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Silvestre, Albert; Amat, Fèlix; Bargalló, Ferran; Carranza, Salvador

    2011-04-01

    We report the presence of pigmented skin tumors in three populations of the endangered amphibian Montseny brook newt, Calotriton arnoldi, one of the European amphibian species with the smallest distribution range (40 km(2) in the Montseny Natural Park, Catalonia, Spain). Examination of one of the tumors by light microscopy was consistent with chromatophoroma and was most suggestive of a melanophoroma. Tumors were not found in juveniles. In adults, only two of three populations were affected. The proportions of males and females affected were not significantly different, but there was a positive correlation between body size and presence of tumors in both sexes. The etiology of chromatophoromas remains unknown but, in our study, they do not appear to have been caused by water quality or Ultraviolet B.

  17. Retrieving an archive: Brook Andrew and William Blandowski’s Australien in 142 Photographischen Abbildungen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kerry Heckenberg

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Much of the critical response to Brook Andrew’s reinterpretation of images from a colonial archive in his 2008 series The Island situated the work in a tradition of post-colonial critique of documentary images. But is this an adequate account of either Andrew’s work or the archive in question, William Blandowski’s Australien in 142 Photographischen Abbildungen (1862? This essay looks at practices involving copying and their impact on understandings of authenticity, the role of art in science, the nature of the observer and visual communication in relation to the broad scope of Blandowski’s archive, but particularly with regard to Andrew’s intervention in it. By examining the way that the past is brought into the present in the Island series, this essay seeks to facilitate a more richly nuanced understanding of these works that is cognizant of the historical issues involved.

  18. Pseudolinkage of the duplicate loci for supernatant aspartate aminotransferase in brook trout, Salvelinus fontinalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, J E; May, B; Stoneking, M; Lee, G M

    1980-01-01

    Electrophoretic variation involving three alleles is described for the duplicated loci for supernatant aspartate aminotransferase (AAT-1,2), from muscle extracts of brook trout. Both loci exhibit largely disomic inheritance. Exceptional progeny types are proposed to be the result of a form of tetrasomic inheritance. Nonrandom segregation was found among the progeny of males doubly heterozygous for AAT markers; where so-called linkage phase was known, this nonrandom assortment was shown to be pseudolinkage (78.9 percent recombination). Analyses of joint segregation of triply heterozygous males for the AAT-(1,2) loci and for the single alpha glycerophosphate dehydrogenase locus (AGP-1) revealed true linkage of AGP-1 with one AAT locus (mean r = 11 percent), but pseudolinkage with the other AAT locus (r = 74 percent). Intraindividual variation for homoeologous multivalent pairing of two acrocentric with two metacentric chromosomes in males, but with bivalent pairing in females, is proposed to account for pseudolinkage and for the tetrasomically inherited types.

  19. Aeromonas cavernicola sp. nov., isolated from fresh water of a brook in a cavern.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Murcia, Antonio; Beaz-Hidalgo, Roxana; Svec, Pavel; Saavedra, Ma José; Figueras, Ma José; Sedlacek, Ivo

    2013-02-01

    Aeromonas P2973 was isolated from the water of a brook in a cavern in the Czech Republic. This isolate could not be biochemically identified at the species level, considering all updated species descriptions. Subsequent extensive phenotypic characterisation, DNA-DNA hybridisation, 16S rRNA gene sequencing and a Multi-Locus Phylogenetic Analysis (MLPA) of the concatenated sequence of 7 housekeeping genes (gyrB, rpoD, recA, dnaJ, gyrA, dnaX and atpD; 4705 bp) was employed in an attempt to ascertain the taxonomy of this isolate. Based on this polyphasic approach, we describe a novel species of the genus Aeromonas, for which the name Aeromonas cavernicola sp. nov. is proposed, with strain CCM7641(T) (DSM24474(T), CECT7862(T)) as the type strain.

  20. Thrust-breakthrough of asymmetric anticlines: Observational constraints from surveys in the Brooks Range, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadamec, Margarete A.; Wallace, Wesley K.

    2014-05-01

    To gain insights into the processes governing the thrust-truncation of anticlines, we conducted a field study of the thrust-truncated folds in the remote Brooks Range of northern Alaska, where there is a transition in fold style from symmetric detachment folds to thrust-truncated asymmetric folds. In order to document the detailed geometry of the km-scale folds exposed in cliff-forming, largely inaccessible outcrops, a new surveying technique was developed that combines data from a theodolite and laser range finder. The field observations, survey profiles, and cross section reconstructions, indicate that late-stage thrust breakthrough of the anticlines within the mechanically competent Lisburne Group carbonates accommodated continued shortening when other mechanisms became unfeasible, including fold tightening, forelimb rotation, and parasitic folding in the anticline forelimbs. These results provide constraints on the processes that govern the transition from buckle folding to thrust truncation in fold-and-thrust belts worldwide.

  1. Department of the Army Supply Bulletin, Army Medical Department Supply Information, SB8-75-11

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    21702-5001 Telephone DSN 343-2045 or 301-619-2045 Telefax extension 2938 c. The Shelf Life Extension Program (SLEP) Project number is given for...136-7000 NOM: POTASSIUM IODIDE USP 1 LB (453.6 GRAM) BOTTLE MFR: MALLINCKRODT LOT/SER NO: CVD CVE KHLP G KMAG KMBZ G A-5 SB 8-75-11...continued) APPENDIX A. 2001 OPEN POTENCY PROJECTS LISTING NSN: 6505-01-116-8198 NOM: POTASSIUM IODIDE TABLETS 130MG 14 TABLETS PER BOTTLE MFR

  2. Utilization Management of Orthopedic Services by Fitzsimons Army Medical Center and Evans Army Community Hospital

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-08-01

    Nerve & Other Nerve System Proc w CC 1 2.72 2.0 -10.0 -10 209 Major Joint & Limb reattachment Procedures, lower Extremity 18 2.37 13.6 3.6 65 216...106 3.0 1.0 108 209 Major Joint & Limb Reattachment Procedures Lower Extremity 101 20.9 10.9 1105 243 Medica. Back Problems 65 9.0 4.0 261 231 Local...231 Local Excision & Removal of Int. Fix Devices exc Hip & Femur 74 4.6 0.6 41 209 Major Joint & Limb Reattachment Procedures Lower Extremity 70 22.3

  3. Stream Carbon Dioxide Dynamics and Evasion in Temperate Forest Catchments at Hubbard Brook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, S. F.; Driscoll, C. T.; Cole, J. J.

    2010-12-01

    Degassing of carbon dioxide (CO2) from small streams draining forest landscapes have come under close scrutiny as potentially significant sources of CO2 relative to the net ecosystem exchange (NEE) of carbon. Quantifying such losses is essential to our understanding of how temperate forest ecosystems function as carbon sinks. The concentration of CO2 in stream water is not only a product of in-stream metabolism but also terrestrial respiration, thereby functioning as integrative measure of whole catchment respiration. Longitudinal surveys and in situ monitoring (4 hour intervals) of dissolved pCO2 were conducted to examine the spatial and temporal variability in headwater streams at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, NH, USA. A valley wide survey of contrasting headwaters revealed that CO2 was rapidly lost and approached atmospheric equilibrium within the first 400 m of first flowing water. Catchment geomorphology (soil depth, slope, aspect) did not appear to significantly influence pCO2 variation between streams. Stream flow exhibited a strong control over pCO2, approaching atmospheric levels under high flows and increasing to upwards of 15,000 µatm during low flow periods. Two distinct phases of diurnal fluctuations in pCO2 were observed from early May to mid June, and again in mid August until late October. These diurnal patterns were largely absent during the height of the growing season (mid June through July). The role of small streams draining northern temperate forest ecosystems relative to the NEE of CO2 will be discussed. The Hubbard Brook pCO2 time-series are among the first reported for northern temperate forest headwaters and represent a potential advancement towards assessing whole catchment soil respiration.

  4. Comparative transcriptomics of anadromous and resident brook charr Salvelinus fontinalis before their first salt water transition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marylène BOULET, Éric NORMANDEAU, Bérénice BOUGAS, Céline AUDET,Louis BERNATCHEZ

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Most salmonid taxa have an anadromous life history strategy, whereby fish migrate to saltwater habitats for a growth period before returning to freshwater habitats for spawning. Moreover, several species are characterized by different life history tactics whereby resident and anadromous forms may occur in genetically differentiated populations within a same species, as well as polymorphism within a population. The molecular mechanisms underlying the physiological differences between anadromous and resident forms during the first transition from freshwater to saltwater environments are only partially understood. Insofar research has typically focused on species of the genus Salmo. Here, using a 16,000 cDNA array, we tested the hypothesis that anadromous brook charr Salvelinus fontinalis are characterized by differences in their transcriptome relative to resident brook charr before the anadromous fish migration. Families originating from parapatric populations of anadromous and resident charr were reared in controlled environments mimicking natural temperature and photoperiod, and sampled in spring, while still in fresh water. While anadromous and resident charr showed similar transcriptome profiles in white muscle, they were characterized by striking differences in their gill transcriptome profiles. Genes that were upregulated in the gills of anadromous charr were principally involved in metabolism (mitochondrial electron transport chain, glucose metabolism, and protein synthesis, development (tissue differentiation and innate immunity. We discuss the nature of these transcriptomic differences in relation to molecular mechanisms underlying the expression of anadromous and resident life history tactics and suggest that the anadromous charr express some of the molecular processes present in other migratory salmonids [Current Zoology 58 (1: 158–170, 2012].

  5. Comparative transcriptomics of anadromous and resident brook charr Salvelinus fontinalis before their first salt water transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Marylène BOULET; (E)ric NORMANDEAU; Bérénice BOUGAS; Cé1ine AUDET; Louis BERNATCHEZ

    2012-01-01

    Most salmonid taxa have an anadromous life history strategy,whereby fish migrate to saltwater habitats for a growth period before returning to freshwater habitats for spawning.Moreover,several species are characterized by different life history tactics whereby resident and anadromous forms may occur in genetically differentiated populations within a same species,as well as polymorphism within a population.The molecular mechanisms underlying the physiological differences between anadromous and resident forms during the first transition from freshwater to saltwater environments are only partially understood.Insofar research has typically focused on species of the genus Salmo.Here,using a 16,000 cDNA array,we tested the hypothesis that anadromous brook charr Salvelinus fontinalis are characterized by differences in their transcriptome relative to resident brook charr before the anadromous fish migration.Families originating from parapatric populations of anadromous and resident charr were reared in controlled environments mimicking natural temperature and photoperiod,and sampled in spring,while still in fresh water.While anadromous and resident charr showed similar transcriptome profdes in white muscle,they were characterized by striking differences in their gill transcriptome profiles.Genes that were upregulated in the gills of anadromous charr were principally involved in metabolism (mitochondrial electron transport chain,glucose metabolism,and protein synthesis),development (tissue differentiation) and innate immunity.We discuss the nature of these transcriptomic differences in relation to molecular mechanisms underlying the expression of anadromous and resident life history tactics and suggest that the anadromous chart express some of the molecular processes present in other migratory salmonids [Current Zoology 58 (1):158-170,2012].

  6. Effects of coal pile leachate on Taylor Brook in western Massachusetts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, B.; Coler, R.A.

    1986-01-01

    The metals in Taylor Brook, a second-order stream that receives the runoff and leachate from a coal pile, were analyzed and evaluated for toxicity. Al, Fe and Mn levels were highest immediately downstream from the coal pile at site 4, where the pH was 4.9. The water at this site was soft (41 ppm). Ca and Mg were predominantly unbound, yet maximum binding with organic acids occurred. The increase in SO/sub 4/ concentrations (fourfold) and HCO/sub 3/:SO/sub 4/ ratios indicated little or no buffer capacity but the SO/sub 4/:NO/sub 3/:Cl ratios showed that the effect was local rather than a consequence of acid precipitation alone. The 96-h LC50 values for guppies in water from sites 4 and 3 were 26 and 100%, respectively. The increase of Al (80-fold) was inversely proportional to pH, but this proportionality was more pronounced at site 4 than at site 3. The 36-h LC50 values obtained on the addition of Al and acidity to water from site 3 at the levels measured in water from site 4 were 24% and greater than 100%, respectively. When compared with the values (17% and 49%) derived for site 4 water, the data indicate that the toxicity was principally exerted by aluminium. Residual oxygen data also suggest that fish mortality was primarily a function of Al. Additions of Al (0.3 ppm) to Taylor Brook control site water resulted in increased toxicity to guppies, while added acidity (pH 4.5) has no marked effect. 18 references.

  7. The Wageningen Lowland Runoff Simulator (WALRUS: application to the Hupsel Brook catchment and Cabauw polder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. C. Brauer

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The Wageningen Lowland Runoff Simulator (WALRUS is a new parametric (conceptual rainfall-runoff model which accounts explicitly for processes that are important in lowland areas, such as groundwater-unsaturated zone coupling, wetness-dependent flowroutes, groundwater–surface water feedbacks, and seepage and surface water supply (see companion paper by Brauer et al., 2014. Lowland catchments can be divided into slightly sloping, freely draining catchments and flat polders with controlled water levels. Here, we apply WALRUS to two contrasting Dutch catchments: the Hupsel Brook catchment and Cabauw polder. In both catchments, WALRUS performs well: Nash–Sutcliffe efficiencies obtained after calibration on one year of discharge observations are 0.87 for the Hupsel Brook catchment and 0.83 for the Cabauw polder, with values of 0.74 and 0.76 for validation. The model also performs well during floods and droughts and can forecast the effect of control operations. Through the dynamic division between quick and slow flowroutes controlled by a wetness index, temporal and spatial variability in groundwater depths can be accounted for, which results in adequate simulation of discharge peaks as well as low flows. The performance of WALRUS is most sensitive to the parameter controlling the wetness index and the groundwater reservoir constant, and to a lesser extent to the quickflow reservoir constant. The effects of these three parameters can be identified in the discharge time series, which indicates that the model is not overparameterised (parsimonious. Forcing uncertainty was found to have a larger effect on modelled discharge than parameter uncertainty and uncertainty in initial conditions.

  8. Changes in seasonal climate outpace compensatory density-dependence in eastern brook trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassar, Ronald D.; Letcher, Benjamin H.; Nislow, Keith H.; Whiteley, Andrew R.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding how multiple extrinsic (density-independent) factors and intrinsic (density-dependent) mechanisms influence population dynamics has become increasingly urgent in the face of rapidly changing climates. It is particularly unclear how multiple extrinsic factors with contrasting effects among seasons are related to declines in population numbers and changes in mean body size and whether there is a strong role for density-dependence. The primary goal of this study was to identify the roles of seasonal variation in climate driven environmental direct effects (mean stream flow and temperature) versus density-dependence on population size and mean body size in eastern brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis). We use data from a 10-year capture-mark-recapture study of eastern brook trout in four streams in Western Massachusetts, USA to parameterize a discrete-time population projection model. The model integrates matrix modeling techniques used to characterize discrete population structures (age, habitat type and season) with integral projection models (IPMs) that characterize demographic rates as continuous functions of organismal traits (in this case body size). Using both stochastic and deterministic analyses we show that decreases in population size are due to changes in stream flow and temperature and that these changes are larger than what can be compensated for through density-dependent responses. We also show that the declines are due mostly to increasing mean stream temperatures decreasing the survival of the youngest age class. In contrast, increases in mean body size over the same period are the result of indirect changes in density with a lesser direct role of climate-driven environmental change.

  9. The Wageningen Lowland Runoff Simulator (WALRUS): application to the Hupsel Brook catchment and the Cabauw polder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, C. C.; Torfs, P. J. J. F.; Teuling, A. J.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2014-10-01

    The Wageningen Lowland Runoff Simulator (WALRUS) is a new parametric (conceptual) rainfall-runoff model which accounts explicitly for processes that are important in lowland areas, such as groundwater-unsaturated zone coupling, wetness-dependent flowroutes, groundwater-surface water feedbacks, and seepage and surface water supply (see companion paper by Brauer et al., 2014). Lowland catchments can be divided into slightly sloping, freely draining catchments and flat polders with controlled water levels. Here, we apply WALRUS to two contrasting Dutch catchments: the Hupsel Brook catchment and the Cabauw polder. In both catchments, WALRUS performs well: Nash-Sutcliffe efficiencies obtained after calibration on 1 year of discharge observations are 0.87 for the Hupsel Brook catchment and 0.83 for the Cabauw polder, with values of 0.74 and 0.76 for validation. The model also performs well during floods and droughts and can forecast the effect of control operations. Through the dynamic division between quick and slow flowroutes controlled by a wetness index, temporal and spatial variability in groundwater depths can be accounted for, which results in adequate simulation of discharge peaks as well as low flows. The performance of WALRUS is most sensitive to the parameter controlling the wetness index and the groundwater reservoir constant, and to a lesser extent to the quickflow reservoir constant. The effects of these three parameters can be identified in the discharge time series, which indicates that the model is not overparameterised (parsimonious). Forcing uncertainty was found to have a larger effect on modelled discharge than parameter uncertainty and uncertainty in initial conditions.

  10. The Wageningen Lowland Runoff Simulator (WALRUS): application to the Hupsel Brook catchment and Cabauw polder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brauer, C. C.; Torfs, P. J. J. F.; Teuling, A. J.; Uijlenhoet, R.

    2014-02-01

    The Wageningen Lowland Runoff Simulator (WALRUS) is a new parametric (conceptual) rainfall-runoff model which accounts explicitly for processes that are important in lowland areas, such as groundwater-unsaturated zone coupling, wetness-dependent flowroutes, groundwater-surface water feedbacks, and seepage and surface water supply (see companion paper by Brauer et al., 2014). Lowland catchments can be divided into slightly sloping, freely draining catchments and flat polders with controlled water levels. Here, we apply WALRUS to two contrasting Dutch catchments: the Hupsel Brook catchment and Cabauw polder. In both catchments, WALRUS performs well: Nash-Sutcliffe efficiencies obtained after calibration on one year of discharge observations are 0.87 for the Hupsel Brook catchment and 0.83 for the Cabauw polder, with values of 0.74 and 0.76 for validation. The model also performs well during floods and droughts and can forecast the effect of control operations. Through the dynamic division between quick and slow flowroutes controlled by a wetness index, temporal and spatial variability in groundwater depths can be accounted for, which results in adequate simulation of discharge peaks as well as low flows. The performance of WALRUS is most sensitive to the parameter controlling the wetness index and the groundwater reservoir constant, and to a lesser extent to the quickflow reservoir constant. The effects of these three parameters can be identified in the discharge time series, which indicates that the model is not overparameterised (parsimonious). Forcing uncertainty was found to have a larger effect on modelled discharge than parameter uncertainty and uncertainty in initial conditions.

  11. [Military physician Colonel Robert Yout. Twenty years as a paratrooper medical officer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yout, Guillaume

    2014-01-01

    Robert Yout was born on June 15th, 1930. A rugby player and a member of the French Volleyball team, he was already an outstanding sportsman when he began his studies at the Health Services School in Lyons. His career as an army medical officer among the paratroopers was atypical. He spent many years among the most prestigious elite paratroopers of the French army: the 2nd REP, the 1st CHOC and the CINC (The Army Training School for Combat Swimmers) . When he retired, he was Head Doctor of the Paratroopers parent company: The Airborne School of Pau. For the army medical historian, Robert Yout is the perfect example of a man with an outstanding and remarkable career: A crack soldier, a brave army medical officer, a parachuting and diving pioneer and a sportsman of international class.

  12. Army Transformaton: A View from the U.S. Army War College

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-07-01

    71 4. THE ARMY THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS William F. Grimsley . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 91 5...THE ARMY THROUGH THE LOOKING GLASS William F. Grimsley “Who are you?" said the caterpillar. “I-I hardly know, Sir, just at present—at least I know...

  13. Army Working Capital Fund: Army Industrial Operations Could Improve Budgeting and Management of Carryover

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-06-01

    throughs of four Army depot maintenance operations to observe the work being performed and discussed with officials the causes for workload carrying...the preponderance of the Industrial Operations workload . Army Materiel Command (AMC) serves as the management command for Industrial Operations... automotive and Armaments Command LCMC mission of developing, acquiring, fielding, and sustaining ground systems, such as the Mine Resistant Ambush

  14. 2009 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Main Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    Effective/Very Effective (AC, 2007-2009) Army Values Empathy Warrior Ethos Military Bearing/Physical Fitness Composure/ Resilence Mental Agility Sound...dependents ( children ) does not appear to have as much of an impact on morale, as 21% of Army leaders who indicate having no dependents report low or

  15. The United States Army Medical Department Journal, January - March 2009

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-01

    hyperesthesia, paresthesia, diplopia . ataxia, confusion, urinary retention, convulsions, dysphagia, and an ascending flaccid paralysis.7 > Some...confusion, diplopia , dysphagia, dizziness, dysarthria, cranial nerve palsies, and ataxia. Seizures, hemiplegia, hemiparesis, ascending paralysis

  16. A Study to Develop an Army Medical Department Wellness Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-08-01

    slice Thick Crust Pizza 400 ’R FOODS"--These foods are almost totally free of calories. bv mlion mstard fat free broth soy sauce ater spices -nd herbs...watch TV, or talk on the telephone while eating. When you avoid these distractions, you can enjoy your food by noticing the taste, texture, and aroma of

  17. Compendium of U.S. Army Visual Medical Fitness Standards

    Science.gov (United States)

    1987-08-01

    service. Table 15 Visual standards for retention -- Category Standard Aniseikonia Correctable with iseikonic lenses Dipiopia, Intermittent and in zone...Table 16 Visual standards for mobilization Category Standard Aniseikonia Correctable with iseikonic lenses Diplopia, Intermittent and in zone

  18. Army Medical Command Handbook for the Government Purchase Card Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-09-01

    Mellon Bank, Citibank , JPMorgan Chase and USBank). These banks are contracted to provide federal employees with purchase cards. Such purchase card...Policy in the Office of the Under Secretary of Defense (Acquisition, Technology & Logistics) and is responsible for Program Management for the DoD...principal advisor to the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and Logistics (AT&L), Deputy Under Secretary of Defense for

  19. Equal Opportunity Program Management for the Army Medical Department

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-04-09

    applies to someone who has the physical, cultural, or linguistic characteristics of a national group. Personal Racism, Sexism , or Bigotry: The... Sexism : Any attitude or action, personal or institutional, which subordinates a person or group because of gender (sex). Sexual Harassment: A form of

  20. Water Purification Unit Development for Field Army Medical Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-04-01

    designed to operate in one of several process configurations , i.e., semibatch , once-through continuous , recycle-and-bleed continuous , stages in... Reactor Module ,” Memorandum to W. P. Lambert , May 17 , 1977. 9. See , C. C. and Yang, P. Y . , “Water Processing Element Operation Manual , ” Contract

  1. The United States Army Medical Department Journal. July - September 2011

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    disease ( arthritis , rheumatism , fibromyalgia, or fibrositis), musculoskeletal disease (lumbago and any disease of the muscles or tendons), chronic...outcomes (respiratory and cardiovascular conditions, chronic multisystem illness, lupus erythemetosus, rheumatoid arthritis , and birth outcomes for...busy, 2 out of town, 2 pregnancies ) 1 dropout (pedometer not working) 10 additional dropouts (1 too busy, 1 wants more intense program, 4 loss

  2. Job Satisfaction of Dietitians in the Army Medical Specialists Corps

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-01-01

    teacher satisfaction. Educational Administration Quarterly. 8 (Winter): 44-57. Blum, M. L. and Russ, J. 1942. A study of employee attitudes towards...decision making, job related tension, job involvement, and job satisfaction. Educational Administration Quarterly. 12:1 (Winter): 80-93. Hoppock, R. 1935

  3. A Health Facility Planning Methodology for Army Troop Medical Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-04-01

    Herbert H. Hyman, Basic Health Planning Methods, (Germantown, Md: Aspen Systems Corp., 1978), p.14 . 16 17 1 3James A. Rice, " Interinstitutional Planning...another for collaboration throughout the developmental process in order for that project to come to fruition. In the final analysis, the planning...Space Needs." Hospitals 54 (December 16, 1980): 109-112. Rice, James A. " Interinstitutional Planning Process, Part 1. Free Standing Hospitals." Hospitals

  4. US Army Medical Department Journal, April - June 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    approximately 1 ml of 100% ethyl alcohol. Female mosquitoes from a single trap catch were sorted to genus (ie, Anopheles, Culex , Aedes) and placed in 2 ml...various individual water purification systems, and the an area with considerably less infrastructure than Iraq. results. An important offshoot of the study ...the late 19th century, many schemes emerged for Africa develop in weedy, sunlit pools as aquatic disease prevention based on detailed studies of the

  5. US Army Medical Department Journal, October-December 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-12-01

    conditions. Diabetic detainees have more favorable management of their conditions, as measured by hemoglobin A1C, than other diabetics in similar disease ...teeth, large caries burdens, and unrelenting periodontal disease are endemic. The overwhelming need for comprehensive dental care makes the... disease -nonbattle injury rate in the history of land warfare. This is largely a result of the preventive medicine and veterinary medicine teams

  6. US Army Medical Research and Development Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-07-01

    jytotoxic Reactions Produced by MUST-Water Constituents • — ^ &,-FT—Bahr, M.D. J. A. Boccia , Ljet MC, USA R. K. Shoemaker, CPT, MSC, USA...Bahr, M.D. Joseph A. Boccia , LTC, MC, USA Robert H. Shoemaker, CPT, MSC, USA Report Control Symbol: RCS-MEDDH-288(R1) Security Classification...Performing 90 Gunter F. Bahr, M.D., Chairman; Joseph A. Boccia , M.D., LTC, MC, USA: Robert H. Shoe- maker, Ph.D., CPT, MSC, USA I Technical

  7. United States Army Medical Materiel Development Activity: 1997 Annual Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    CY97. • In a double-blind, placebo controlled Phase l/2a laboratory mosquito challenge study, the Malaria Recombinant Vaccine (RTS,S) with Adjuvant...month Carcinogenicity Study of WR 238605 in the transgenic mouse. • It is anticipated that the ELA/PLA for Clostridium botulinum Toxoid, Pentavalent

  8. U. S. Army Medical Research and Development Technical Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-09-30

    Caroroo-a*, and otier countrir’, of I-er-t and ra’tt .PfricA (SOVOIia it is sAas f,?un4 ocs’al"In rantern rurore. It hs not case~d any apidemics as of...fiorphot’etric ;-,,ttorn of axon reo.’thi &Cro09s At sna.jis ar .eirves of (6 rheoint ton~.evA -. erp severed, tral:ed, and theu bi~psaed At either 3 . 4. 5, cr 6

  9. Army National Guard Medical Readiness Training Exercises in Southern Command

    Science.gov (United States)

    1994-06-03

    Canine: Feline : Other: TYPE OF VETERINARY FACILITIES AVAILABLE (corral, posts, shoot, etc: SKETCH OF VILLAGE: SECURITY REQUIREMENTS: # U.S.: # Host...h) Meningococcal meningitis. (i) Acute respiratory diseases. (2) Diseases with long incubation periods. (a) Viral hepatitis. 121 (b) Leishmaniasis

  10. The Origins of the Golden Hour of Medical Care and Its Applicability to Combat Medicine

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-12

    anesthesia (pain and consciousness suppression), as opposed to pure analgesia (pain suppression only), for major surgery. 15 It was during this period...fmsweb.army.mil/unprotected/splash/. ———. 2013a. Army Regulation (AR) 40-3, Medical, Dental , and Veterinary Care. Washington, DC: Government Printing Office

  11. The effects of varied densities on the growth and emigration of adult cutthroat trout and brook trout in fenced stream enclosures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buys, D.J.; Hilderbrand, R.H.; Kershner, J.L.

    2009-01-01

    We evaluated the effects of various density treatments on adult fish growth and emigration rates between Bonneville cutthroat trout Oncorhynchus clarki utah and brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis in stream enclosures in Beaver Creek, Idaho, We used 3 density treatments (low, ambient, and high fish densities) to evaluate density-related effects and to ensure a response. Intraspecific ambient-density tests using cutthroat trout only were also performed. Results indicated an absence of cage effects in the stream enclosures and no differences in fish growth between ambient-density stream-enclosure fish and free-range fish. Brook trout outgrew and moved less than cutthroat trout in the stream enclosures, especially as density increased, In all 3 density treatments, brook trout gained more weight than cutthroat trout, with brook trout gaining weight in each density treatment and cutthroat trout losing weight at the highest density. At high densities, cutthroat trout attempted to emigrate more frequently than brook trout in sympatry and allopatry. We observed a negative correlation between growth and emigration for interspecific cutthroat trout, indicating a possible competitive response due to the presence of brook trout. We observed similar responses for weight and emigration in trials of allopatric cutthroat trout, indicating strong intraspecific effects as density increased. While cutthroat trout showed a response to experimental manipulation with brook trout at different densities, there has been long-term coexistence between these species in Beaver Creek, This system presents a unique opportunity to study the mechanisms that lead cutthroat trout to coexist with rather than be replaced by nonnative brook trout.

  12. Correlation of job burnout with emotional labor and role of job characteristics in medical staff from army hospital%军队医院医务人员职业倦怠与情绪劳动、工作角色特征相关研究

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    瞿伟; 谷珊珊

    2013-01-01

    目的 探讨军队医务人员职业倦怠与情绪劳动3种表现策略、工作角色特征的相关性及情绪劳动和工作角色特征对职业倦怠的预测作用.方法 采用CMBI问卷、工作角色特征量表和情绪劳动量表,其中CMBI问卷包含情感衰竭、去个性化及个人成就感减低3个维度,工作角色特征量表包含角色冲突和角色混淆2个维度,情绪劳动量表包含表面表现、自然表现和深层表现3个维度,采用整群抽样方法,对某军队三甲综合医院511名医务人员进行调查.结果 情感衰竭与情绪的表面表现、深层表现、角色冲突呈显著正相关(r分别为0.260、0.074、0.285,P<0.05,P <0.01).去个性化与表面表现呈显著正相关(r =0.240,P<0.01),而与深层表现、自然表现呈显著性负相关(r分别为-0.153、-0.181,P<0.01).成就感减低与情绪的深层表现、自然表现呈显著负相关(r分别为-0.247、-0.183,P<0.01),而与角色冲突和角色混淆呈显著性正相关(r分别为0.094、0.247,P<0.05,P<0.01).角色冲突、表面表现及深层表现3个维度能联合预测情感衰竭12.6%的变异.表面表现、深层表现及自然表现3个维度能联合预测去个性化8%的变异.深层表现、角色混淆及角色冲突3个维度能预测个人成就感减低10.2%的变异.结论 职业倦怠与情绪劳动3种表现策略和工作角色特征相关,情绪劳动3种表现策略和工作角色特征对职业倦怠有预测作用.%Objective To investigate the relationship of job burnout with emotional labor and role of job characteristics in medical staffs from army hospital, and the role of emotional labor and the role of job characteristics in prediction of job burnout. Methods By cluster sampling, 580 medical staffs from a Class-AAA army hospital were enrolled in this study. They were given a survey including general survey and Chinese Maslach Burnout Inventory ( CMBI) questionnaire, emotional labor

  13. [Medical science during the Great Patriotic War].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knopov, M Sh; Taranukha, V K

    2015-04-01

    Forms of organization of scientific work in the interests of the front were different: for example, united efforts of physicians to organize a proper work at Scientific Medical Boards directed by the Head of the Main Army Medical Department of the Red Army and the Head of the Health and Sanitary Department of the Navy, as well as Scientific and Hospital boards of the People's Commissariat of Health of the USSR. At the plenary sessions the heads of these boards considered the most important medical problems of evacuation, treatment, sanitary and disease control and also new methods of treatments of wounded, results of medical services during particular period of war, new tasks and etc. The most prominent scientists and presenters of all leading sectors of healthcare worked at these boards, that allowed developing, testing and implementing of the latest achievements of medical science.

  14. Patient Safety Concerns as a Result of Nursing Shortage Trends

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-10

    Hospital, Fort Sam Houston, Brooke Army Medical Center, Fort Sill, Reynolds Army Community Hospital. The GCOD division collects the data from of all its...M2 Systems Data Dictionary (2005). M2 data dictionary, PA&E website. Dragoo, Jessie (1998). Mentoring a Novice Chief Nurse Executive. Journal of

  15. Psychiatry in the U.S. Army: Lessons for Community Psychiatry

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-01-01

    Considerations. Springfield, IL: Charles C. Thomas; 1952. 29. Jones FD. Psychiatric lessons of low-intensity wars. Annales Medicinae Militaris Fenniae...Review of the Army, Navy, and Air Force Medical Services. 1982;55:247-254. 21. Jones FD. Psychiatric lessons of low-intensity wars. Annales Medicinae ...McGraw Hill; 1969: 76. 41. Froede, RC, Stahl CJ. Fatal narcotism in military personnel. J Forensic Sciences. 1971;16(2):199-218. 42. Baker SL. Drug

  16. Army Response Letter & Analysis - signed February 5, 2001

    Science.gov (United States)

    A reply to a letter from Mr. J. Charles Fox, former Administrator for Water requesting to review the proposed decision of the Army Corps of Engineers Sacramento District Department of the Army (DA) permit to Vail Associates.

  17. Bot armies as threats to network security

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banks, Sheila B.; Stytz, Martin R.

    2007-04-01

    "Botnets", or "bot armies", are large groups of remotely controlled malicious software. Bot armies pose one of the most serious security threats to all networks. Botnets, remotely controlled and operated by botmasters or botherders, can launch massive denial of service attacks, multiple penetration attacks, or any other malicious network activity on a massive scale. While bot army activity has, in the past, been limited to fraud, blackmail, and other forms of criminal activity, their potential for causing large-scale damage to the entire internet; for launching large-scale, coordinated attacks on government computers and networks; and for large-scale, coordinated data gathering from thousands of users and computers on any network has been underestimated. This paper will not discuss how to build bots but the threats they pose. In a "botnet" or "bot army", computers can be used to spread spam, launch denial-of-service attacks against Web sites, conduct fraudulent activities, and prevent authorized network traffic from traversing the network. In this paper we discuss botnets and the technologies that underlie this threat to network and computer security. The first section motivates the need for improved protection against botnets, their technologies, and for further research about botnets. The second contains background information about bot armies and their key underlying technologies. The third section presents a discussion of the types of attacks that botnets can conduct and potential defenses against them. The fourth section contains a summary and suggestions for future research and development.

  18. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 22 (WALDTH00180022) on Town Highway 18, crossing Coles Brook, Walden, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Striker, Lora K.; Ivanoff, Michael A.

    1997-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WALDTH00180022 on Town Highway 18 crossing Coles Brook also known as Joes Brook, Walden, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (U.S. Department of Transportation, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in Appendix D.

  19. Nitrile anion cyclization with epoxysilanes followed by Brook rearrangement/ring-opening of cyclopropane nitriles/alkylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okugawa, Seigo; Masu, Hyuma; Yamaguchi, Kentaro; Takeda, Kei

    2005-12-09

    [reactions: see text] The reaction of delta-silyl-gamma,delta-epoxypentanenitrile derivatives 9-12 with a base and an alkylating agent affords (Z)-delta-siloxy-gamma,delta-unsaturated pentanenitrile derivatives via a tandem process that involves the formation of a cyclopropane derivative by epoxy nitrile cyclization followed by Brook rearrangement and an anion-induced cleavage of the cyclopropane ring. Exclusive formation of a (Z)-derivative from trans-epoxides is explained by the reaction pathway that involves a backside displacement of the epoxide by the alpha-nitrile carbanion and the O-Si bond formation followed by concerted processes involving Brook rearrangement and the anti-mode of eliminative ring fission of the cyclopropane from the rotamer 19. The fact that (E)-isomers are exclusively obtained from cis-epoxides and alpha-cyclopropyl-alpha-silylcarbinol derivative 26 provides experimental support for the proposed pathway.

  20. Annual layers in river-bed sediment of a stagnant river-mouth area of the Kitagawa Brook, Central Japan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurashige, Y.; Nakano, T.; Kasubuchi, E.; Maruo, M.; Domitsu, H.

    2015-03-01

    The river mouth of Kitagawa Brook is normally stagnant because it is easily closed by sand and gravel transported by littoral currents of Biwa Lake, Japan. A new urban area exists in the basin and sewerage works were constructed in the early 1990s, so contaminated water with a bad odour had flowed into the brook before the sewerage works. To reduce the smell, the river mouth was excavated to narrow the channel in the early 1980s. Thus, river-bed sediment after this excavation only occurs at the river mouth. From the upper 24 cm of a sediment core, we found 19 strata of leaves which were supplied from deciduous trees in autumn. We also found several gravel layers which were supplied from the lake during severe storms. The combination of veins and gravel layers were reconstructed for about 20 years of sediment records with an error of two to three years.

  1. Optimizing the Sustainment of U.S. Army Weapon Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-17

    64 OPTIMIZING SUSTAINMENT OF ARMY SYSTEMS 6 Chapter 1 - Optimizing the Sustainment of U.S. Army Weapon Systems In a paradigm shift from...past 13 years. The result has been the erosion of perishable maintenance skills. The Army must develop the most effective plan to sustain these...communities to study and effectively manage Army sustainment . One effort is the development of Maintenance Steering Groups (MSG) to perform extensive

  2. Army Communicator. Volume 32, Number 2, Spring 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-01-01

    Engineering requires skilled leaders LTC Tony Roper 14 Update Telecommunications Systems Engineering Course MAJ Mark Thomson 16 The Paradigm shift in enabling...to 200 locations. Each TLA stack includes, at a minimum, an Army Security Router and an Intrusion Detection System or Intrusion Protection System...Security Center APC – Area Processing Center ARNET – Army Reserve Network ARSTRAT – Army Strategic Com- mand ASR – Army Security Router CIF – Central Issue

  3. Retaining Talent for Army 2020: Overcoming Institutional Barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-19

    Assignments for Leaders, RETAL, 8. 18 Casey Wardynski, David S. Lyle, and Michael J. Colarusso , Towards a U.S. Army Officer Corps Strategy for...Opportunities (Boston: Harvard University, 2011), 17. 22 32 Wardynski, Lyle, and Colarusso , Towards a U.S. Army Officer Corps Strategy for...www.hrc.army.mil/milper/11-282 (accessed March 14, 2012). 34 Wardynski, Lyle, and Colarusso , Towards a U.S. Army Officer Corps Strategy for

  4. Army Hearing Program Talking Points Calendar Year 2016

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-09-12

    National Guard 7% Army Reserve 2% of Soldiers have a hearing loss that requires a Fit-for-Duty (Readiness) evaluation: 1% Active Duty 2% Army...Reserve ARMY HEARING PROGRAM TALKING POINTS CALENDAR YEAR 2016 TIP No. 51-065-0817 2 BACKGROUND Hearing health in the Army has improved...over time, largely due to the dedicated work of hearing health experts. However, noise-induced hearing loss and associated problems have not been

  5. Differential Child Maltreatment Risk Across Deployment Periods of US Army Soldiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Christine M; Ross, Michelle E; Wood, Joanne N; Griffis, Heather M; Harb, Gerlinde C; Mi, Lanyu; Song, Lihai; Strane, Douglas; Lynch, Kevin G; Rubin, David M

    2016-01-01

    We described the risk for maltreatment among toddlers of US Army soldiers over different deployment cycles to develop a systematic response within the US Army to provide families appropriate supports. We conducted a person-time analysis of substantiated maltreatment reports and medical diagnoses among children of 112,325 deployed US Army soldiers between 2001 and 2007. Risk of maltreatment was elevated after deployment for children of soldiers deployed once but not for children of soldiers deployed twice. During the 6 months after deployment, children of soldiers deployed once had 4.43 substantiated maltreatment reports and 4.96 medical diagnoses per 10,000 child-months. The highest maltreatment rate among children of soldiers deployed twice occurred during the second deployment for substantiated maltreatment (4.83 episodes per 10,000 child-months) and before the first deployment for medical diagnoses of maltreatment (3.78 episodes per 10,000 child-months). We confirmed an elevated risk for child maltreatment during deployment but also found a previously unidentified high-risk period during the 6 months following deployment, indicating elevated stress within families of deployed and returning soldiers. These findings can inform efforts by the military to initiate and standardize support and preparation to families during periods of elevated risk.

  6. Sibship reconstruction for inferring mating systems, dispersal and effective population size in headwater brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanno, Yoichiro; Vokoun, Jason C.; Letcher, Benjamin H.

    2011-01-01

    Brook trout Salvelinus fontinalis populations have declined in much of the native range in eastern North America and populations are typically relegated to small headwater streams in Connecticut, USA. We used sibship reconstruction to infer mating systems, dispersal and effective population size of resident (non-anadromous) brook trout in two headwater stream channel networks in Connecticut. Brook trout were captured via backpack electrofishing using spatially continuous sampling in the two headwaters (channel network lengths of 4.4 and 7.7 km). Eight microsatellite loci were genotyped in a total of 740 individuals (80–140 mm) subsampled in a stratified random design from all 50 m-reaches in which trout were captured. Sibship reconstruction indicated that males and females were both mostly polygamous although single pair matings were also inferred. Breeder sex ratio was inferred to be nearly 1:1. Few large-sized fullsib families (>3 individuals) were inferred and the majority of individuals were inferred to have no fullsibs among those fish genotyped (family size = 1). The median stream channel distance between pairs of individuals belonging to the same large-sized fullsib families (>3 individuals) was 100 m (range: 0–1,850 m) and 250 m (range: 0–2,350 m) in the two study sites, indicating limited dispersal at least for the size class of individuals analyzed. Using a sibship assignment method, the effective population size for the two streams was estimated at 91 (95%CI: 67–123) and 210 (95%CI: 172–259), corresponding to the ratio of effective-to-census population size of 0.06 and 0.12, respectively. Both-sex polygamy, low variation in reproductive success, and a balanced sex ratio may help maintain genetic diversity of brook trout populations with small breeder sizes persisting in headwater channel networks.

  7. Spatial heterogeneity of mobilization processes and input pathways of herbicides into a brook in a small agricultural catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doppler, Tobias; Lück, Alfred; Popow, Gabriel; Strahm, Ivo; Winiger, Luca; Gaj, Marcel; Singer, Heinz; Stamm, Christian

    2010-05-01

    Soil applied herbicides can be transported from their point of application (agricultural field) to surface waters during rain events. There they can have harmful effects on aquatic species. Since the spatial distribution of mobilization and transport processes is very heterogeneous, the contributions of different fields to the total load in a surface water body may differ considerably. The localization of especially critical areas (contributing areas) can help to efficiently minimize herbicide inputs to surface waters. An agricultural field becomes a contributing area when three conditions are met: 1) herbicides are applied, 2) herbicides are mobilized on the field and 3) the mobilized herbicides are transported rapidly to the surface water. In spring 2009, a controlled herbicide application was performed on corn fields in a small (ca 1 km2) catchment with intensive crop production in the Swiss plateau. Subsequently water samples were taken at different locations in the catchment with a high temporal resolution during rain events. We observed both saturation excess and hortonian overland flow during the field campaign. Both can be important mobilization processes depending on the intensity and quantity of the rain. This can lead to different contributing areas during different types of rain events. We will show data on the spatial distribution of herbicide loads during different types of rain events. Also the connectivity of the fields with the brook is spatially heterogeneous. Most of the fields are disconnected from the brook by internal sinks in the catchment, which prevents surface runoff from entering the brook directly. Surface runoff from these disconnected areas can only enter the brook rapidly via macropore-flow into tile drains beneath the internal sinks or via direct shortcuts to the drainage system (maintenance manholes, farmyard or road drains). We will show spatially distributed data on herbicide concentration in purely subsurface systems which shows

  8. Irrigation Alternatives to Meet Army Net Zero Water Goals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-01

    Up to 100 Rain Barrel Catchment Up to...US Army Corps of Engineers BUILDING STRONG® Irrigation Alternatives to Meet Army Net Zero Water Goals Richard J. Scholze Dick L. Gebhart H...TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2012 to 00-00-2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Irrigation Alternatives to Meet Army Net Zero Water Goals 5a. CONTRACT

  9. The Women’s Army Corps: 1945-1978

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-01-01

    floor-length wool skirt, white silk blouse , blue tiara with gold thread embroidery, blue suede pumps, white kid gloves, and a finger-tip length blue...24, 33, 267 Army Uniform Board, 162, 260 chief, 64, 94, 162, 212. See also Blanch - Army Uniform Branch, 394 field, Col. Florence A.; Bryant, Col. Army

  10. 32 CFR 508.1 - Utilization of Army bands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 3 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Utilization of Army bands. 508.1 Section 508.1 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY AID OF CIVIL AUTHORITIES AND PUBLIC RELATIONS COMPETITION WITH CIVILIAN BANDS § 508.1 Utilization of Army bands. (a)...

  11. 32 CFR 644.517 - Clearance of Army lands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Clearance of Army lands. 644.517 Section 644.517 National Defense Department of Defense (Continued) DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY (CONTINUED) REAL PROPERTY REAL... and Improvements § 644.517 Clearance of Army lands. The responsibility for performing clearance...

  12. Certification Report: Army Aviation Alternative Fuels Certification Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-08-01

    SPECIAL REPORT RDMR-AE-16-02 CERTIFICATION REPORT: ARMY AVIATION ALTERNATIVE FUELS CERTIFICATION PROGRAM Dale Cox...NOT TO BE CONSTRUED AS AN OFFICIAL DEPARTMENT OF THE ARMY POSITION UNLESS SO DESIGNATED BY OTHER AUTHORIZED DOCUMENTS. TRADE NAMES USE...COVERED Final 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Certification Report: Army Aviation Alternative Fuels Certification Program 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6

  13. APPLYING PRACTICAL NEUTRON RADIOGRAPHIC INSPECTION TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ARMY

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-11-15

    INSPECTION TO THE DEPARTMENT OF ARMY Stephan C. Zuber November 2016 Approved for public...release; distribution is unlimited. AD U.S. ARMY ARMAMENT RESEARCH, DEVELOPMENT AND ENGINEERING CENTER Enterprise and Systems Integration Center...are those of the author(s) and should not be construed as an official Department of the Army position, policy, or decision, unless so designated by

  14. Training America’s Army for the Next Millennium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    Corte Madera , California: Waite Group Press, 1994), 28. 9 William W. Hartzog and Susan Canedy, "TRADOC: Moving the Army Into the Future," Army...Future. Corte Madera , California: Waite Group Press, 1994. Romjue, John, L. American Army Doctrine for the Post-Cold War. Washington, D.C.: U.S

  15. An Organizational Climate Assessment of the Army Contracting Workforce

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA MBA PROFESSIONAL REPORT AN ORGANIZATIONAL CLIMATE ASSESSMENT OF THE ARMY CONTRACTING WORKFORCE...professional report 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE AN ORGANIZATIONAL CLIMATE ASSESSMENT OF THE ARMY CONTRACTING WORKFORCE 5. FUNDING NUMBERS 6. AUTHOR(S...13 dimensions within the area of organizational climate . This research analyzes the responses from active Army civilian and military workforce

  16. ARMY DOCTRINE AND THE PHYSICAL DOMAIN REQUIREMENTS OF STRATEGIC LEADERS

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-06

    agencies and organizations outside of the Army for the physical domain concept design and research commitments in developing strategic leaders... organizations outside the Army offer an abundance of potential contributions to human performance capability development . Notes 1 Department of the...components of the human dimension for Army leader development as individuals move through a career from direct to strategic leadership. Using a qualitative

  17. 32 CFR 636.10 - Hunter Army Airfield vehicle registration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Hunter Army Airfield vehicle registration. 636.10... Stewart, Georgia § 636.10 Hunter Army Airfield vehicle registration. Personnel assigned or employed at Hunter Army Airfield are required to register their privately owned vehicles within five days...

  18. Army Sustainment. Volume 42, Issue 5, September-October 2010

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    consumption during flight. During the colder seasons, sustainment packs included ther- moses of coffee or hot chocolate . During night opera- tions, they...divisions, he added the 89th Division and the 90th Division. [The National Army was a volunteer Army (almost analogous to today’s Army Reserve) that was

  19. Installation Management Command: Preparing Civilians for the Army of 2020

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    resist change.55 “Walt Disney is credited with saying that “change is inevitable, growth is optional.”56 If we are to execute the best plan to...Management Command Regulation 350-1 (Washington, DC, U.S. Department of the Army, June 1 2010). 11 U.S. Department of the Army, The Army, A-3. 12

  20. Can brook trout survive climate change in large rivers? If it rains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merriam, Eric R; Fernandez, Rodrigo; Petty, J Todd; Zegre, Nicolas

    2017-12-31

    We provide an assessment of thermal characteristics and climate change vulnerability for brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) habitats in the upper Shavers Fork sub-watershed, West Virginia. Spatial and temporal (2001-2015) variability in observed summer (6/1-8/31) stream temperatures was quantified in 23 (9 tributary, 14 main-stem) reaches. We developed a mixed effects model to predict site-specific mean daily stream temperature from air temperature and discharge and coupled this model with a hydrologic model to predict future (2016-2100) changes in stream temperature under low (RCP 4.5) and high (RCP 8.5) emissions scenarios. Observed mean daily stream temperature exceeded the 21°C brook trout physiological threshold in all but one main-stem site, and 3 sites exceeded proposed thermal limits for either 63- and 7-day mean stream temperature. We modeled mean daily stream temperature with a high degree of certainty (R(2)=0.93; RMSE=0.76°C). Predicted increases in mean daily stream temperature in main-stem and tributary reaches ranged from 0.2°C (RCP 4.5) to 1.2°C (RCP 8.5). Between 2091 and 2100, the average number of days with mean daily stream temperature>21°C increased within main-stem sites under the RCP 4.5 (0-1.2days) and 8.5 (0-13) scenarios; however, no site is expected to exceed 63- or 7-day thermal limits. During the warmest 10years, ≥5 main-stem sites exceeded the 63- or 7-day thermal tolerance limits under both climate emissions scenarios. Years with the greatest increases in stream temperature were characterized by low mean daily discharge. Main-stem reaches below major tributaries never exceed thermal limits, despite neighboring reaches having among the highest observed and predicted stream temperatures. Persistence of thermal refugia within upper Shavers Fork would enable persistence of metapopulation structure and life history processes. However, this will only be possible if projected increases in discharge are realized and offset expected

  1. Stratigraphic controls on lateral variations in the structural style of northeastern Brooks Range, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, W.K.; Hanks, C.L.

    1988-01-01

    The structural style of the range-front region of the northeastern Brooks Range in Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) is strongly controlled by (1) the existence of detachment horizons in both pre-Mississippian rocks and the unconformably overlying Mississippian to Lower Cretaceous cover sequence, and (2) lithology and structural competency of the pre-Mississippian rocks. These variables strongly influence lateral changes in structural style. The Brooks Range of northwestern ANWR is dominated by a series of narrow linear anticlinoria, whereas in northeastern ANWR the Brooks Range is characterized by only two broad and strongly arcuate anticlinoria. In both areas, the anticlinoria are controlled by the geometry of a duplex bounded by a floor thrust in pre-Mississippian rocks and a roof thrust in the Kayak Shale, near the base of the cover sequence. In the west, where the pre-Mississippian partially consists of structurally competent carbonates, each anticlinorium marks a single horse in the duplex. However, in the east, pre-Mississippian rocks are relatively incompetent and each anticlinorium is cored by multiple horses. In the west, shortening above the roof thrust is by detachment folding, except where the shale detachment horizon is depositionally absent. In contrast, in eastern ANWR shortening above the roof thrust is by major thrust duplication of the entire cover sequence, perhaps due to lithology and thickness changes within the detachment horizon.

  2. [Alcohol abuse in soldiers of the Herzegovina Corps of the Republic of Serbia Army during the 1992-1994 war].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plavljanić, R; Mijić, R

    1997-01-01

    The frequency of alcohol abuse in the soldiers of Herzegovinian corps of the Republic of Srpska Army during the 1992-1994 war, who took part in combat action was investigated by retrospective analysis of medical documentation. The same procedure was performed in the members of Yugoslav Army for the same period who did not take part in combat actions. By comparing the obtained results, it was concluded that the alcohol abuse was 3.7 times more frequent in participants of combat actions compared to those who did not have such assignment.

  3. Army Energy and Water Reporting System Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deprez, Peggy C.; Giardinelli, Michael J.; Burke, John S.; Connell, Linda M.

    2011-09-01

    There are many areas of desired improvement for the Army Energy and Water Reporting System. The purpose of system is to serve as a data repository for collecting information from energy managers, which is then compiled into an annual energy report. This document summarizes reported shortcomings of the system and provides several alternative approaches for improving application usability and adding functionality. The U.S. Army has been using Army Energy and Water Reporting System (AEWRS) for many years to collect and compile energy data from installations for facilitating compliance with Federal and Department of Defense energy management program reporting requirements. In this analysis, staff from Pacific Northwest National Laboratory found that substantial opportunities exist to expand AEWRS functions to better assist the Army to effectively manage energy programs. Army leadership must decide if it wants to invest in expanding AEWRS capabilities as a web-based, enterprise-wide tool for improving the Army Energy and Water Management Program or simply maintaining a bottom-up reporting tool. This report looks at both improving system functionality from an operational perspective and increasing user-friendliness, but also as a tool for potential improvements to increase program effectiveness. The authors of this report recommend focusing on making the system easier for energy managers to input accurate data as the top priority for improving AEWRS. The next major focus of improvement would be improved reporting. The AEWRS user interface is dated and not user friendly, and a new system is recommended. While there are relatively minor improvements that could be made to the existing system to make it easier to use, significant improvements will be achieved with a user-friendly interface, new architecture, and a design that permits scalability and reliability. An expanded data set would naturally have need of additional requirements gathering and a focus on integrating

  4. US Army primary radiation standards complex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rogers, S.C. [Radiation Standards and Dosimetry Laboratory, Redstone Arsenal, AL (United States)

    1993-12-31

    This paper describes the U.S. Army Primary Radiation Standards Complex (PRSC) to be constructed at Redstone Arsenal, Alabama. The missions of the organizations to be located in the PRSC are described. The health physics review of the facility design is discussed. The radiation sources to be available in the PRSC and the resulting measurement capabilities of the Army Primary Standards Laboratory Nucleonics section are specified. Influence of the National Voluntary Laboratory Accrediation Program (NVLAP) accreditation criteria on facility design and source selection is illustrated.

  5. Streambed-material characteristics and surface-water quality, Green Pond Brook and tributaries, Picatinny Arsenal, New Jersey, 1983-90

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storck, D.A.; Lacombe, Pierre

    1996-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study designed to determine whether Green Pond Brook and its tributaries contain contaminated streambed sediments and to characterize the quaity of water in the brook. Results of previous investigations at Picatinny Arsenal, Morris County, New Jersey, indicate that significant contamination of ground water, surface water, and soil is present at the arsenal. Forty-five streambed-material samples were collected for analysis to determine whether contaminants have migrated to the brook from the surrounding area. Samples were analyzed for trace elements, base/neutral- and acid-etractable compounds, insecticides, and other constituents. Results of an electromagnetic-conductivity and natural-gamma-ray survey were used to describe the distribution of particle sizes in streambed and substreambed sediments. Historical results of analyses of streambed-material and surface-water samples also are presented. Samples of streambed material from three areas in Green Pond Brook and its tributaries contained organic and (or) inorganic constituents in concentrations greater than those typically found at the arsenal. These areas are Green Pond Brook, from the area near the outflow of Picatinny Lake downstream to Farley Avenue; Bear Swamp Brook, from the area near building 241 downstream to the confluence with Green Pond Brook; and Green Pond Brook, from the open burning area downstream to the dam near building 1178. Contaminants identified include trace elements, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, and organochlorine insecticides. Surface water in Green Pond Brook contained several volatile organic compounds, including trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, and 1,2-dichloroethylene, at maximum concen- trations of 3.8, 4.6, and 11 micrograms per liter, respectively. Volatilization is expected to remove volatile organic compounds in the steep, fast- flowing reaches of the brook. No organic or inorganic constituents were

  6. Ototoxic Medications (Medication Effects)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Information for the Public / Hearing and Balance Ototoxic Medications (Medication Effects) By Barbara Cone, Patricia Dorn, Dawn Konrad- ... Audiology Information Series [PDF]. What Is Ototoxicity? Certain medications can damage the ear, resulting in hearing loss, ...

  7. Modern Volunteer Army Experiment - 1971

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-07-26

    medical and dental care. The scheduling of classes on the day following night problems. The opportunities for unmarried enlisted men to attend co...fom.d signiJiCiint in the previous acU ;■. is becuuso a; mu tn r.h change had occurred at th« compari^Oj» pastas at. l’i t t Mcm^ln^,, indica that...ami appointments ayatem for medical and dental care. FiVa+ Tour E,Kf«*>«l*^ Toor ..■■ -..:.- 76. The PX closing time. i ^h FiVs^ Tour Ofr

  8. Reconstructing the demographic history of divergence between European river and brook lampreys using approximate Bayesian computations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quentin Rougemont

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Inferring the history of isolation and gene flow during species divergence is a central question in evolutionary biology. The European river lamprey (Lampetra fluviatilis and brook lamprey (L. planeri show a low reproductive isolation but have highly distinct life histories, the former being parasitic-anadromous and the latter non-parasitic and freshwater resident. Here we used microsatellite data from six replicated population pairs to reconstruct their history of divergence using an approximate Bayesian computation framework combined with a random forest model. In most population pairs, scenarios of divergence with recent isolation were outcompeted by scenarios proposing ongoing gene flow, namely the Secondary Contact (SC and Isolation with Migration (IM models. The estimation of demographic parameters under the SC model indicated a time of secondary contact close to the time of speciation, explaining why SC and IM models could not be discriminated. In case of an ancient secondary contact, the historical signal of divergence is lost and neutral markers converge to the same equilibrium as under the less parameterized model allowing ongoing gene flow. Our results imply that models of secondary contacts should be systematically compared to models of divergence with gene flow; given the difficulty to discriminate among these models, we suggest that genome-wide data are needed to adequately reconstruct divergence history.

  9. Are brook trout streams in Western Virginia and Shenandoah National Park recovering from acidification?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    James R. Webb; Bernard J. Cosby; Frank A. Deviney, Jr.; James N. Galloway; Suzanne W. Maben; Arthur J. Bulger [University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA (United States). Department of Environmental Sciences

    2004-08-01

    Streamwater composition data obtained through periodic sampling of streams that support brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) in the mountains of western Virginia were examined for evidence of recovery from acidification during the 1988-2001 period. Measurements of sulfate deposition in precipitation indicate that sulfate deposition in the region declined approximately 40% between 1985 and 2000. While no significant regional trends in acid-base constituents were observed for the set (n = 65) of western Virginia study streams, significant regional trends were observed for a subset (n = 14) of streams in Shenandoah National Park (SNP). For the subset of SNP streams, the median increase in acid-neutralizing capacity (ANC) was 0.168 {mu} equiv L{sup -1} year{sup -1} and the median decrease in sulfate concentration was -0.229 {mu}equiv L{sup -1} year{sup -1}. Although these trends are consistent with recovery from acidification, the degree of apparent recovery is small compared to estimates of historic acidification in SNP streams and much less than observed in other, more northern regions in the United States. Correlation between sulfate concentration trends and current sulfate concentrations in streamwater suggests that recovery from stream acidification in the western Virginia region is determined by sulfur retention processes in watershed soils. A transient increase in nitrate concentrations that occurred among some western Virginia streams following forest defoliation by the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar) complicates interpretation of the observed patterns of change in acid-base status. 28 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  10. Can personality predict individual differences in brook trout spatial learning ability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, S L; Wagner, T; Gowan, C; Braithwaite, V A

    2017-08-01

    While differences in individual personality are common in animal populations, understanding the ecological significance of variation has not yet been resolved. Evidence suggests that personality may influence learning and memory; a finding that could improve our understanding of the evolutionary processes that produce and maintain intraspecific behavioural heterogeneity. Here, we tested whether boldness, the most studied personality trait in fish, could predict learning ability in brook trout. After quantifying boldness, fish were trained to find a hidden food patch in a maze environment. Stable landmark cues were provided to indicate the location of food and, at the conclusion of training, cues were rearranged to test for learning. There was a negative relationship between boldness and learning as shy fish were increasingly more successful at navigating the maze and locating food during training trials compared to bold fish. In the altered testing environment, only shy fish continued using cues to search for food. Overall, the learning rate of bold fish was found to be lower than that of shy fish for several metrics suggesting that personality could have widespread effects on behaviour. Because learning can increase plasticity to environmental change, these results have significant implications for fish conservation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Experimental test of genetic rescue in isolated populations of brook trout

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Zachary L.; Coombs, Jason A.; Hudy, Mark; Nislow, Keith H.; Letcher, Benjamin H.; Whiteley, Andrew R.

    2017-01-01

    Genetic rescue is an increasingly considered conservation measure to address genetic erosion associated with habitat loss and fragmentation. The resulting gene flow from facilitating migration may improve fitness and adaptive potential, but is not without risks (e.g., outbreeding depression). Here, we conducted a test of genetic rescue by translocating ten (five of each sex) brook trout (Salvelinus fontinalis) from a single source to four nearby and isolated stream populations. To control for the demographic contribution of translocated individuals, ten resident individuals (five of each sex) were removed from each recipient population. Prior to the introduction of translocated individuals, the two smallest above-barrier populations had substantially lower genetic diversity, and all populations had reduced effective number of breeders relative to adjacent below-barrier populations. In the first reproductive bout following translocation, 31 of 40 (78%) translocated individuals reproduced successfully. Translocated individuals contributed to more families than expected under random mating and generally produced larger full-sibling families. We observed relatively high (>20%) introgression in three of the four recipient populations. The translocations increased genetic diversity of recipient populations by 45% in allelic richness and 25% in expected heterozygosity. Additionally, strong evidence of hybrid vigour was observed through significantly larger body sizes of hybrid offspring relative to resident offspring in all recipient populations. Continued monitoring of these populations will test for negative fitness effects beyond the first generation. However, these results provide much-needed experimental data to inform the potential effectiveness of genetic rescue-motivated translocations.

  12. Hiding in Plain Sight: A Case for Cryptic Metapopulations in Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David C Kazyak

    Full Text Available A fundamental issue in the management and conservation of biodiversity is how to define a population. Spatially contiguous fish occupying a stream network have often been considered to represent a single, homogenous population. However, they may also represent multiple discrete populations, a single population with genetic isolation-by-distance, or a metapopulation. We used microsatellite DNA and a large-scale mark-recapture study to assess population structure in a spatially contiguous sample of Brook Trout (Salvelinus fontinalis, a species of conservation concern. We found evidence for limited genetic exchange across small spatial scales and in the absence of barriers to physical movement. Mark-recapture and stationary passive integrated transponder antenna records demonstrated that fish from two tributaries very seldom moved into the opposite tributary, but movements between the tributaries and mainstem were more common. Using Bayesian genetic clustering, we identified two genetic groups that exhibited significantly different growth rates over three years of study, yet survival rates were very similar. Our study highlights the importance of considering the possibility of multiple genetically distinct populations occurring within spatially contiguous habitats, and suggests the existence of a cryptic metapopulation: a spatially continuous distribution of organisms exhibiting metapopulation-like behaviors.

  13. Data Acquisition System Architecture and Capabilities at NASA GRC Plum Brook Station's Space Environment Test Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Richard K.; Hill, Gerald M.

    2014-01-01

    Very large space environment test facilities present unique engineering challenges in the design of facility data systems. Data systems of this scale must be versatile enough to meet the wide range of data acquisition and measurement requirements from a diverse set of customers and test programs, but also must minimize design changes to maintain reliability and serviceability. This paper presents an overview of the common architecture and capabilities of the facility data acquisition systems available at two of the world's largest space environment test facilities located at the NASA Glenn Research Center's Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio; namely, the Space Propulsion Research Facility (commonly known as the B-2 facility) and the Space Power Facility (SPF). The common architecture of the data systems is presented along with details on system scalability and efficient measurement systems analysis and verification. The architecture highlights a modular design, which utilizes fully-remotely managed components, enabling the data systems to be highly configurable and support multiple test locations with a wide-range of measurement types and very large system channel counts.

  14. NASA Plum Brook's B-2 test facility-Thermal vacuum and propellant test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudlac, Maureen; Weaver, Harold; Cmar, Mark

    2012-06-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) Plum Brook Station (PBS) Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility, commonly referred to as B-2, is NASA's third largest thermal vacuum facility. It is the largest designed to store and transfer large quantities of liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, and is perfectly suited to support developmental testing of upper stage chemical propulsion systems as well as fully integrated stages. The facility is also capable of providing thermal-vacuum simulation services to support testing of large lightweight structures, Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) systems, electric propulsion test programs, and other In-Space propulsion programs. A recently completed integrated system test demonstrated the refurbished thermal vacuum capabilities of the facility. The test used the modernized data acquisition and control system to monitor the facility. The heat sink provided a uniform temperature environment of approximately 77K. The modernized infrared lamp array produced a nominal heat flux of 1.4 kW/m2. With the lamp array and heat sink operating simultaneously, the thermal systems produced a heat flux pattern simulating radiation to space on one surface and solar exposure on the other surface.

  15. NASA Plum Brook's B-2 Test Facility: Thermal Vacuum and Propellant Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudlac, Maureen T.; Weaver, Harold F.; Cmar, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Glenn Research Center (GRC) Plum Brook Station (PBS) Spacecraft Propulsion Research Facility, commonly referred to as B-2, is NASA's third largest thermal vacuum facility. It is the largest designed to store and transfer large quantities of liquid hydrogen and liquid oxygen, and is perfectly suited to support developmental testing of upper stage chemical propulsion systems as well as fully integrated stages. The facility is also capable of providing thermal-vacuum simulation services to support testing of large lightweight structures, Cryogenic Fluid Management (CFM) systems, electric propulsion test programs, and other In-Space propulsion programs. A recently completed integrated system test demonstrated the refurbished thermal vacuum capabilities of the facility. The test used the modernized data acquisition and control system to monitor the facility. The heat sink provided a uniform temperature environment of approximately 77 K. The modernized infrared lamp array produced a nominal heat flux of 1.4 kW/sq m. With the lamp array and heat sink operating simultaneously, the thermal systems produced a heat flux pattern simulating radiation to space on one surface and solar exposure on the other surface.

  16. Lateral continuity of the Blarney Creek Thrust, Doonerak Windown, Central Brooks Range, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seidensticker, C.M.; Julian, F.E.; Phelps, J.C.; Oldow, J.S.; Avellemant, H.G.

    1985-04-01

    The contact between Carboniferous and lower Paleozoic rocks, exposed along the northern margin of the Doonerak window in the central Brooks Range, is a major thrust fault called the Blarney Creek thrust (BCT). The BCT has been traced over a distance of 25 km, from Falsoola Mountain to Wien Mountain. The tectonic nature of this contact is demonstrated by: (1) omission of stratigraphic units above and below the BCT; (2) large angular discordance in orientation of first-generation cleavage at the BCT; (3) numerous thrust imbricates developed in the upper-plate Carboniferous section that sole into the BCT; and (4) truncation of an upper-plate graben structure at the BCT. Lack of evidence for pre-Carboniferous deformation in the lower plate casts doubt on the interpretation of the contact as an angular unconformity. However, the localized presence below the BCT of Mississippian Kekiktuk Conglomerate and Kayak Shale, in apparent depositional contact with lower Paleozoic rocks, suggests that the BCT follows an originally disconformable contact between the Carboniferous and lower Paleozoic rocks. The juxtaposition of younger over older rocks at the BCT is explained by calling upon the BCT to act as the upper detachment surface of a duplex structure. Duplex development involves initial imbrication of the Carboniferous section using the BCT as a basal decollement, followed by formation of deeper thrusts in the lower Paleozoic section, which ramp up and merge into the BCT.

  17. Flow path studies in forested watersheds of heatwater tributaries of Brush Brook, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Donald S.; Bartlett, Richmond J.; Magdoff, Frederick R.; Walsh, Gregory J.

    1994-09-01

    An investigation was undertaken into how headwater tributaries of Brush Brook, Vermont, could have average pH differences of almost two units (4.75 and 6.7). Sampling along four tributaries revealed that most of one tributary, below an area of seeps, had consistently higher pH, Ca2+, Mg2+, and K+, and lower Al than other sites. Bedrock mapping showed numerous fractures in vicinity of the seeps. A portion of this tributary's watershed and a portion of an acid tributary's watershed were intensively mapped for soil depth. Sampling showed the widespread existence of dense basal till in the watershed of the acid tributary but none in that of the near-neutral stream. Lateral flow, found above the dense till, was chemically similar to that of the acid tributary and to solutions sampled from soil B horizons. There were no differences in the average pH of nonseep soils sampled from either watershed. Flow paths are hypothesized to be through the B horizons in the acid tributaries and from below the soil profile in the near-neutral tributary. The acid catchment should be more sensitive to environmental change.

  18. Analysis of reinjection problems at the Stony Brook ATES field test site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supkow, D. J.; Shultz, J. A.

    1982-12-01

    Aquifer Thermal Energy Storage (ATES) is one of several energy storage technologies being investigated by the DOE to determine the feasibility of reducing energy consumption by means of energy management systems. The State University of New York, (SUNY) Stony Brook, Long Island, New York site was selected by Battelle PNL for a Phase 1 investigation to determine the feasibility of an ATES demonstration to seasonally store chill energy by injecting chilled water in the winter and recovering it at a maximum rate of 100 MBTU/hr (30 MW) in the summer. The Phase 1 study was performed during 1981 by Dames & Moore under subcontract to Batelle PLN. The pumping and injection tests were performed using two wells in a doublet configuration. Well PI-1 is a previously existing well and PI-2 was installed specifically for this investigation. Both wells are screened in the Upper Magothy aquifer from approximately 300 to 350 feet below ground surface. Nine observation wells were also installed as a portion of the investigation to monitor water level and aquifer temperature changes during the test.

  19. Army Hearing Program Talking Points Calendar Year 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-14

    clinically significant hearing loss: 4% Active Duty 8% Army National Guard 7% Army Reserve 2% of Soldiers have a hearing loss that requires a...Guard (ARNG) Data % Require Fit-for-Duty Evaluation 2.5% 6,000 / 241,256 Army Reserve (USAR) Data % Require Fit-for-Duty Evaluation 2.4% 3,117...STATISTICS FOR CY15 25% of Soldiers have some degree of hearing loss: 21% Active Duty 27% Army National Guard 28% Army Reserve 6% of Soldiers have a

  20. 2013 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Main Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-04-01

    the Leadership Requirements Model and Leader Effectiveness Implicit leadership theory (Eden & Leviatan , 1975; Yukl, 2002) indicates followers...D.C.: Headquarters, Department of the Army. Eden, D. & Leviatan , U. (1975). Implicit leadership theory as a determinant of the factor structure

  1. Factors predicting health behaviors among Army Reserve, active duty Army, and civilian hospital employees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wynd, Christine A; Ryan-Wenger, Nancy A

    2004-12-01

    This study identified health-risk and health-promoting behaviors in military and civilian personnel employed in hospitals. Intrinsic self-motivation and extrinsic organizational workplace factors were examined as predictors of health behaviors. Because reservists represent a blend of military and civilian lifestyles, descriptive analyses focused on comparing Army Reserve personnel (n = 199) with active duty Army (n = 218) and civilian employees (n = 193), for a total sample of 610. Self-motivation and social support were significant factors contributing to the adoption of health-promoting behaviors; however, organizational workplace cultures were inconsistent predictors of health among the three groups. Only the active Army subgroup identified a hierarchical culture as having an influence on health promotion, possibly because of the Army's mandatory physical fitness and weight control standards. Social support and self-motivation are essential to promoting health among employees, thus hospital commanders and chief executive officers should encourage strategies that enhance and reward these behaviors.

  2. Behavioral Sciences in a Changing Army: Proceedings of Army Medical Department (AMEDD) Behavioral Sciences Seminar, 19-23 March 1979 held at Fitzsimons Army Medical Center, Aurora, Colorado,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1979-01-01

    Groups who were already struggling with identity problems were abso- lutely paranoid about the potential for identity diffusion and perceived loss of...La icir ot’( rosy- .,tl ( b) ’I ht Pr- . IW at r’ 1 : CII:iPatsn-.I t o fV I ccI iiIE-d,".’al 1 I i W b.,I . +(2d ao I-vi IvI. I ind o -e] i Cah b...respect to deploy- ability.Itswthttraens e. It is more euitable with respect to gender treatments. 2. Provide abortion on demand for all personnel

  3. The Economics of Air Force Medical Service Readiness

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Andi Vinyard Col Arnyce Pock Denise Comfort Air Force Medical Operating Agency, Arlington, Virginia Col JoAnne McPherson Lt Col Brenda Hanes Maj Shawn...Patrick Wesley (and staff) Office of the Army Surgeon General Col Daryl Spencer Herb Coley Ramona Bacon 59th Medical Wing, Lackland AFB, Texas Maj Gen

  4. Building A Better Force: Regular Army / Reserve Components Integration In The Army Chemical Corps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-26

    capabilities. Today, these changes detract from the Army Chemical Corps’ ability to provide the required capabilities to the joint force commander to execute...structural changes , including the creation of the US Army Reserve Command (USARC) and elevation of the Chief of the National Guard Bureau (NGB) to a...will enhance the CBRN force’s capabilities, evolving threats, changes in operational requirements , and equipment modernization continue to energize

  5. Evaluating Mobile Device Ownership and Usage in the U.S. Army: Implications for Army Training

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-07-01

    Mercado University of Central Florida Randall D. Spain U.S. Army Research Institute July 2014 United States Army...NUMBER 633007 6. AUTHOR(S) Joseph E. Mercado ; Randall D. Spain 5c. PROJECT NUMBER A792 5d. TASK NUMBER 5e...13. SUPPLEMENTARY NOTES Subject Matter POC and Subject Matter Expert: Joseph E. Mercado 14. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 words): As the U.S

  6. The Army’s Institutional Values: Current Doctrine and the Army’s Values Training Strategy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2001-06-01

    called Generation X, and the generation after that is being referred to as the Millennials . The current demographic makeup of the Army includes members...Fraternization, Code of Conduct Training, Character Development, Law of War, Military Ethics, Suicide Prevention, Army Family Advocacy, Alcohol and Drug...explains that by introducing height and weight 112 standards, raising PT standards, emphasizing training and education, and deglamorizing alcohol

  7. Army Strong: Equipped, Trained and Ready. Final Report of the 2010 Army Acquisition Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Disadvantaged Business Utilization, Department of the Army Price, Lee, Brigadier General, U.S. Army, PEO, Command Control Communications-Tactical...based on QDRs or future forecasts. Task Force ODIN was a successful rapid acquisition. It delivered a counter-Improvised Explosive Device (CIED...new build • Deliver 6 Lots of 250 a/c • IOTE using five AB3 aircraft in Mar 2012 • FRP decision planned for Jul 2012 • Development will continue

  8. Typology of Army Families. Coping Styles of Successful, Career Army Families

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-06-01

    22% Individuals ( Trainees , holdees, etc.) 101,000 13% The Army has approximately 100 different job titles, called Military Occupational Specialties...management trainee program. He received his draft notice, and he enlisted in the Army under the College/Officer C-ndidate School (OCS) program. His...not really like it there. TPhe neighbor s were, not very friendly, bu~t Betty has been trying to organize a block Clb I h U elt that she as gained o

  9. Army Science Board Ad Hoc Sub-Group Report on Energy Needs of the Army,

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-10-01

    and solar. The goal for the year 2000 is to reduce the use of natural petroleum by 75 percent and to replace natural gas with synthetic gas ( syngas ...example, one * goal states that (by 2000) syngas will replace natural gas. The Army has therefore programed efforts to Implement syngas tech- nologies at...the reactor would run at full capacity to make up for shortages and to allow the Army to meet expanded needs. The AHSG notes that such systems resolve

  10. Estimating active Army and Army Reserve competition for high quality recruits with other military services

    OpenAIRE

    Demyanovich, James M.

    1995-01-01

    The analysis concentrated primarily on the recruiting of high quality recruits for the period FY 1987 through 2d Quarter FY 1995. The U.S. Military Entrance Processing Command (USMEPCOM) data used contained sufficiently accurate figures on Active Army and Army Reserve accessions. The data appears to represent a relatively accurate historical record of the number of non prior service enlistments into the Military Services, with the exception of the Air National Guard and Ai...

  11. 2014 Center for Army Leadership Annual Survey of Army Leadership (CASAL): Military Leader Findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-22

    of representativeness across the Army. The respondent sample closely approximated the population of the Army in distribution of component and gender ...be Europe 25 (56%), while the smallest percentages of high morale are reported in Korea (48%). Low morale is reported by 19% and 21% of...standards are types of behaviors that hinder trust by creating climates of perceived inequality . As expected, the display of favoritism is negatively

  12. Geochronology of the western and central Brooks Range, Alaska: Implications for the geologic evolution of the Anarraaq and Red Dog Zn-Pb-Ag deposits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rombach, C.S.; Layer, P.W.

    2004-01-01

    A compilation of published geochronology of rocks and minerals from the western and central Brooks Range provides a framework for understanding the complex history of the Brooks Range and northern Alaska. A simplified timeline of events comprises (1) Devonian extension, (2) Mississippian extension and Zn-Pb-Ag mineralization, (3) a passive interval, (4) pre-Brooks Range orogeny rock-formation and thermal event, (5) inception of Brooks Range orogeny, (6) exhumation and the end of main-stage deformation, and (7) subsequent episodic deformation. This compilation is supplemented by new 40Ar/39Ar dates of white mica from the Anarraaq and Red Dog Zn-Pb-Ag (+ barite) deposits from the western Brooks Range. The deposits are hosted in black shale and carbonate rocks of the Late Mississippian-Early Pennsylvanian Kuna Formation. Quartz-pyrite-white mica grains in sedimentary rocks above the Anarraaq deposit yield an age of 195.0 ?? 2.0 Ma, and paragenetically late quartz-pyrite-white mica from the Main orebody at the Red Dog deposit has an age of 126.1 ?? 0.7 Ma. These white micas are much younger than the age of Zn-Pb-Ag mineralization at Red Dog (338 ?? 5.8 Ma Re-Os age of pyrite). The date for white mica from Anarraaq (???195 Ma) appears to be related to a large-scale thermal event in the region immediately before the inception of the Brooks Range orogeny. The white mica from the Red Dog deposit (???126 Ma) correlates with the later stages of the orogeny, a period of blueschist metamorphism, extension, and rapid exhumation, which varied with geographic location. These dates suggest that the Red Dog deposits underwent significant hydrothermal overprinting during multiple episodes of the Brooks Range orogeny. ?? 2004 by Economic Geology.

  13. Design of the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kessler, Ronald C; Colpe, Lisa J; Fullerton, Carol S; Gebler, Nancy; Naifeh, James A; Nock, Matthew K; Sampson, Nancy A; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Stein, Murray B; Ursano, Robert J; Heeringa, Steven G

    2013-12-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce US Army suicides and increase basic knowledge about the determinants of suicidality. This report presents an overview of the designs of the six components of the Army STARRS. These include: an integrated analysis of the Historical Administrative Data Study (HADS) designed to provide data on significant administrative predictors of suicides among the more than 1.6 million soldiers on active duty in 2004-2009; retrospective case-control studies of suicide attempts and fatalities; separate large-scale cross-sectional studies of new soldiers (i.e. those just beginning Basic Combat Training [BCT], who completed self-administered questionnaires [SAQs] and neurocognitive tests and provided blood samples) and soldiers exclusive of those in BCT (who completed SAQs); a pre-post deployment study of soldiers in three Brigade Combat Teams about to deploy to Afghanistan (who completed SAQs and provided blood samples) followed multiple times after returning from deployment; and a platform for following up Army STARRS participants who have returned to civilian life. Department of Defense/Army administrative data records are linked with SAQ data to examine prospective associations between self-reports and subsequent suicidality. The presentation closes with a discussion of the methodological advantages of cross-component coordination.

  14. Field procedures in the Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeringa, Steven G; Gebler, Nancy; Colpe, Lisa J; Fullerton, Carol S; Hwang, Irving; Kessler, Ronald C; Naifeh, James A; Nock, Matthew K; Sampson, Nancy A; Schoenbaum, Michael; Zaslavsky, Alan M; Stein, Murray B; Ursano, Robert J

    2013-12-01

    The Army Study to Assess Risk and Resilience in Servicemembers (Army STARRS) is a multi-component epidemiological and neurobiological study of unprecedented size and complexity designed to generate actionable evidence-based recommendations to reduce US Army suicides and increase basic knowledge about determinants of suicidality by carrying out coordinated component studies. A number of major logistical challenges were faced in implementing these studies. The current report presents an overview of the approaches taken to meet these challenges, with a special focus on the field procedures used to implement the component studies. As detailed in the paper, these challenges were addressed at the onset of the initiative by establishing an Executive Committee, a Data Coordination Center (the Survey Research Center [SRC] at the University of Michigan), and study-specific design and analysis teams that worked with staff on instrumentation and field procedures. SRC staff, in turn, worked with the Office of the Deputy Under Secretary of the Army (ODUSA) and local Army Points of Contact (POCs) to address logistical issues and facilitate data collection. These structures, coupled with careful fieldworker training, supervision, and piloting, contributed to the major Army STARRS data collection efforts having higher response rates than previous large-scale studies of comparable military samples.

  15. Distance Education Findings for Army Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    1992-04-01

    operated by the U.S. Army Logistics Management College at Ft. Lee, VA was studied. The SEN student examination scores did not significantly differ...Baccalaureate Nursing Program Bollinger, M., Danon , N., Maddox, K., University of Wisconsin- Eau Claire School of Nursing Teaching approaches incorporated

  16. 32 CFR 651.5 - Army policies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... statements specifying that they have no financial or other interest in the outcome of the project. The..., or any protected natural or ecological resources of global importance. (g) Army NEPA documentation.../statement and also avoid extensive, time-consuming, and costly analyses or revisions. Project proponents...

  17. The Army’s Local Economic Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-01-01

    available to the general public. 6 U.S. Army Environmental Command, 2014. 7 James Hosek, Aviva Litovitz, and Adam C. Resnick , How Much Does Military Spending...Hosek, James, Aviva Litovitz, and Adam C. Resnick , How Much Does Military Spending Add to Hawaii’s Economy? Santa Monica, Calif.: RAND Corporation, TR

  18. Dental Therapy Assistant: Attitudes of Army Dentists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heid, Theodore H.; Bair, Jeffrey H.

    The U. S. Army Dental Corps has implemented a formal program based on the concept that dental care can be more efficiently and effectively provided with treatment teams composed of one dental officer, two dental therapy assistants, one basic assistant, and the shared support of other auxiliary personnel. Such a team will use three dental treatment…

  19. Army Information Operations Officer Needs Analysis Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-01

    helping with formatting the final report iv ARMY INFORMATION OPERATIONS OFFICER NEEDS ANALYSIS REPORT EXECUTIVE SUMMARY Research...time.” One IO officer suggested the IPO try to get a access the database that has all the old APA reports archived as a way to look at assessment

  20. Army Reserve (AR) Educational Assistance (EA) Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) US Army TRADOC Analysis Center Ft. Lee, VA 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/ MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S...Programs REAP: Reserve Education Assistance Program; MGIB-SR: Montgomery GI Bill – Selected Reserve; SRK: Selected Reserve Kicker ; OFF: Officer; EM

  1. Army Reserve Accessions and Retention Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-06-01

    S) AND ADDRESS(ES) US Army TRADOC Analysis Center Ft. Lee, VA 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/ MONITORING AGENCY NAME(S) AND...incentives, TRICARE, and TSP matching funds as opposed to large bonuses. – Provide small kickers to critical MOSs. 10 June 2008 29ARARA Brief to MORSS

  2. ‘Giving the dope’: Australian Army Nurse Anaesthetists during World War I

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Kirsty Harris

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available More than 2500 trained Australian army nurses served overseas during World War I. Many were called upon to act outside their normal nursing practice and one new area was that of anaesthetics. Due to a lack of medical officers in the latter part of the war, a number of Australian theatre sisters trained and worked as nurse anaesthetists in Casualty Clearing Stations in France. The British Army provided three months’ training for Australian, British and New Zealand nurses in the use of chloroform and ether. Australian nurses were enthusiastic volunteers as trained nurses at home had already carved out a small but unofficial place for the profession in this role. In addition, Canadian and American army and civil nurses were already trained and used as nurse anaesthetists. While nurses were successfully used without recorded incident, at the end of the first training course, the Director General of Medical Services, Australian Imperial Force, decreed that the nurses would not be further trained or used. This was out of step with the other countries participating, and this paper examines some possible reasons for the change of heart.

  3. 78 FR 22527 - Army Science Board Request for Information on Technology and Core Competencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-16

    ... Department of the Army Army Science Board Request for Information on Technology and Core Competencies AGENCY: Department of the Army, DoD. ] ACTION: Request for information regarding support to Army Core Competencies... 102-3.140 through 160, the Department of the Army requests information on science and technology...

  4. The Army Family Team Building Program: Facilitating a Transformative Learning Process--An Intrinsic Case Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gall, Joseph A.

    2009-01-01

    This study sought to understand how the Army Family Team Building program influences self-reliance and self-sufficiency in Army spouses as they integrate into the Army community. The purpose of the Army Family Team Building program is to empower Army spouses with knowledge and skills, which foster well-being and improve quality of life. The…

  5. Sex Chromosome Evolution, Heterochiasmy, and Physiological QTL in the Salmonid Brook Charr Salvelinus fontinalis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutherland, Ben J.G.; Rico, Ciro; Audet, Céline; Bernatchez, Louis

    2017-01-01

    Whole-genome duplication (WGD) can have large impacts on genome evolution, and much remains unknown about these impacts. This includes the mechanisms of coping with a duplicated sex determination system and whether this has an impact on increasing the diversity of sex determination mechanisms. Other impacts include sexual conflict, where alleles having different optimums in each sex can result in sequestration of genes into nonrecombining sex chromosomes. Sex chromosome development itself may involve sex-specific recombination rate (i.e., heterochiasmy), which is also poorly understood. The family Salmonidae is a model system for these phenomena, having undergone autotetraploidization and subsequent rediploidization in most of the genome at the base of the lineage. The salmonid master sex determining gene is known, and many species have nonhomologous sex chromosomes, putatively due to transposition of this gene. In this study, we identify the sex chromosome of Brook Charr Salvelinus fontinalis and compare sex chromosome identities across the lineage (eight species and four genera). Although nonhomology is frequent, homologous sex chromosomes and other consistencies are present in distantly related species, indicating probable convergence on specific sex and neo-sex chromosomes. We also characterize strong heterochiasmy with 2.7-fold more crossovers in maternal than paternal haplotypes with paternal crossovers biased to chromosome ends. When considering only rediploidized chromosomes, the overall heterochiasmy trend remains, although with only 1.9-fold more recombination in the female than the male. Y chromosome crossovers are restricted to a single end of the chromosome, and this chromosome contains a large interspecific inversion, although its status between males and females remains unknown. Finally, we identify quantitative trait loci (QTL) for 21 unique growth, reproductive, and stress-related phenotypes to improve knowledge of the genetic architecture of these

  6. Linking water age and solute dynamics in streamflow at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest, NH, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benettin, Paolo; Bailey, Scott W.; Campbell, John L.; Green, Mark B.; Rinaldo, Andrea; Likens, Gene E.; McGuire, Kevin J.; Botter, Gianluca

    2015-11-01

    We combine experimental and modeling results from a headwater catchment at the Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest (HBEF), New Hampshire, USA, to explore the link between stream solute dynamics and water age. A theoretical framework based on water age dynamics, which represents a general basis for characterizing solute transport at the catchment scale, is here applied to conservative and weathering-derived solutes. Based on the available information about the hydrology of the site, an integrated transport model was developed and used to compute hydrochemical fluxes. The model was designed to reproduce the deuterium content of streamflow and allowed for the estimate of catchment water storage and dynamic travel time distributions (TTDs). The innovative contribution of this paper is the simulation of dissolved silicon and sodium concentration in streamflow, achieved by implementing first-order chemical kinetics based explicitly on dynamic TTD, thus upscaling local geochemical processes to catchment scale. Our results highlight the key role of water stored within the subsoil glacial material in both the short-term and long-term solute circulation. The travel time analysis provided an estimate of streamflow age distributions and their evolution in time related to catchment wetness conditions. The use of age information to reproduce a 14 year data set of silicon and sodium stream concentration shows that, at catchment scales, the dynamics of such geogenic solutes are mostly controlled by hydrologic drivers, which determine the contact times between the water and mineral interfaces. Justifications and limitations toward a general theory of reactive solute circulation at catchment scales are discussed.

  7. Caledonian Deformation in Polydeformed Pre-Mississippian Rocks of the Northeast Brooks Range, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, B. G.; Toro, J.; Benowitz, J.

    2013-12-01

    In the northeastern Brooks Range of Alaska there are polydeformed metasedimentary and metavolcanic rocks exposed below a major pre-Mississippian unconformity. Elsewhere in northern Alaska it has been challenging to correlate the tectonic fabrics of these early Paleozoic to Neoproterozoic rocks to the different orogenic events of the Arctic because of the strong overprint of Mesozoic and Tertiary Brookian deformation. However, our recent field investigations along the Kongakut and Aichiklik rivers of ANWR have identified an older (pre-Brookian) structural event based on the orientation of penetrative cleavage planes and a contrast in folding style to Brookian structures. Many of the cleavage planes are north dipping and orientated parallel to the axial planes of south-vergent folds. Although metamorphic grade is generally low, in localized areas the cleavage planes contain white micas, whose petrologic and isotopic characteristics indicate that they crystallized during fabric formation. 40Ar/39Ar dating of the white micas yield a metamorphic age of ~400 Ma (Early Devonian). This is evidence for a south-directed structural event which is contemporaneous with Caledonian deformation in East Greenland and Svalbard. Stratigraphicaly, the basement consists of a diverse package of highly deformed marine clastic sediments, and a thick section of basaltic to andesitic flows and volcaniclastic rocks, the Whale Mountain volcanics, which have a sharp southern contact but grade northward and upwards into the clastic rocks. All units are metamorphosed to lower greenschist facies. We are currently investigating the age and geochemical characteristics of the Whale Mountain volcanics to determine their tectonic affinity and role in the assemblage of the North Slope block of Northern Alaska.

  8. Measuring ecosystem capacity to provide regulating services: forest removal and recovery at Hubbard Brook (USA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beier, Colin M; Caputo, Jesse; Groffman, Peter M

    2015-10-01

    In this study, by coupling long-term ecological data with empirical proxies of societal demand for benefits, we measured the capacity of forest watersheds to provide ecosystem services over variable time periods, to different beneficiaries, and in response to discrete perturbations and drivers of change. We revisited one of the earliest ecosystem experiments in North America: the 1963 de-vegetation of a forested catchment at Hubbard Brook Experimental Forest in New Hampshire, USA. Potential benefits of the regulation of water flow, water quality, greenhouse gases, and forest growth were compared between experimental (WS 2) and reference (WS 6) watersheds over a 30-year period. Both watersheds exhibited similarly high capacity for flow regulation, in part because functional loads remained low (i.e., few major storm events) during the de-vegetation period. Drought mitigation capacity, or the maintenance of flows sufficient to satisfy municipal water consumption, was higher in WS 2 due to reduced evapotranspiration associated with loss of plant cover. We also assessed watershed capacity to regulate flows to satisfy different beneficiaries, including hypothetical flood averse and drought averse types. Capacity to regulate water quality was severely degraded during de-vegetation, as nitrate concentrations exceeded drinking water standards on 40% of measurement days. Once forest regeneration began, WS 2 rapidly recovered the capacity to provide safe drinking water, and subsequently mitigated the eutrophication potential of rainwater at a marginally higher level than WS 6. We estimated this additional pollution removal benefit would have to accrue for approximately 65-70 years to offset the net eutrophication cost incurred during forest removal. Overall, our results affirmed the critical role of forest vegetation in water regulation, but also indicated trade-offs associated with forest removal and recovery that partially depend on larger-scale exogenous changes in climate

  9. Population structure of Phalloceros caudimaculatus (Hensel, 1868 (Cyprinodontiformes, Poeciliidae collected in a brook in Guarapuava, PR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciano Lazzarini Wolff

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available The population structure of Phalloceros caudimaculatus was studied in a brook (sites A and B existing in the CEDETEG - Guarapuava/PR. Fourteen length classes of 3 mm amplitude were defined for P. caudimaculatus. The widest length amplitude and the average and maximum sizes were observed in females. Females were significantly more predominant in the whole sample and more frequent in all length classes. The sexual proportion data, showed that the number of females was superior to that of males throughout most of the year. Young occurrence peaks were registered in November and March. Pregnant females were present from March to April, from July to August and in January, characterizing the reproductive season. At sampling site A, a higher occurrence of pregnant females and young was observed.A estrutura populacional de Phalloceros caudimaculatus foi estudada em um riacho (pontos A e B existente no CEDETEG - Guarapuava/PR. Para P. caudimaculatus foram encontradas 14 classes de comprimento com amplitude de 3,0mm. A maior amplitude de comprimento e os maiores tamanhos médios e máximos foram observados nas fêmeas. As fêmeas foram significativamente predominantes na amostra total e mais abundantes em todas as classes de comprimento. Pela proporção sexual pode-se detectar que o número de fêmeas é superior ao de machos a maior parte do ano. Os picos de ocorrência de jovens foram registrados nos meses de novembro e março. As fêmeas grávidas estiveram presentes nos bimestres de março-abril, julho-agosto e no mês de janeiro, caracterizando a época reprodutiva. No ponto de coleta A foi observado uma maior ocorrência de fêmeas grávidas e de jovens.

  10. Frozen debris lobe morphology and movement: an overview of eight dynamic features, southern Brooks Range, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Margaret M.; Gyswyt, Nora L.; Simpson, Jocelyn M.; Daanen, Ronald P.; Hubbard, Trent D.

    2016-05-01

    Frozen debris lobes (FDLs) are elongated, lobate permafrost features that mostly move through shear in zones near their bases. We present a comprehensive overview of eight FDLs within the Dalton Highway corridor (southern Brooks Range, Alaska), including their catchment geology and rock strengths, lobe soil characteristics, surface movement measurements collected between 2012 and 2015, and analysis of historic and modern imagery from 1955 to 2014. Field mapping and rock strength data indicate that the metasedimentary and metavolcanic bedrock forming the majority of the lobe catchments has very low to medium strength and is heavily fractured, thus easily contributing to FDL formation. The eight investigated FDLs consist of platy rocks typical of their catchments, organic debris, and an ice-poor soil matrix; massive ice, however, is present within FDLs as infiltration ice, concentrated within cracks open to the surface. Exposure of infiltration ice in retrogressive thaw slumps (RTSs) and associated debris flows leads to increased movement and various stages of destabilization, resulting in morphological differences among the lobes. Analysis of historic imagery indicates that movement of the eight investigated FDLs has been asynchronous over the study period, and since 1955, there has been an overall increase in movement rates of the investigated FDLs. The formation of surface features, such as cracks, scarps, and RTSs, suggests that the increased movement rates correlate to general instability, and even at their current distances, FDLs are impacting infrastructure through increased sediment mobilization. FDL-A is the largest of the investigated FDLs. As of August 2015, FDL-A was 39.2 m from the toe of the Dalton Highway embankment. Based on its current distance and rate of movement, we predict that FDL-A will reach the Dalton Highway alignment by 2023.

  11. Stratigraphic controls on lateral variations in the structural style of northeastern Brooks range, Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, Alaska

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wallace, W.K.; Hanks, C.L.

    1988-02-01

    The structural style of the range-front region of the northeastern Brooks Range in Arctic National Wildlife Refuge (ANWR) is strongly controlled by (1) the existence of detachment horizons in both pre-Mississippian rocks and the unconformably overlying Mississippian to Lower Cretaceous cover sequence, and (2) lithology and structural competency of the pre-Mississippian rocks. These variables strongly influence lateral changes in structural style. The Brooks Range of northwestern ANWR is dominated by a series of narrow linear anticlinoria, whereas in northeastern ANWR the Brooks Range is characterized by only two broad and strongly arcuate anticlinoria. In both areas, the anticlinoria are controlled by the geometry of a duplex bounded by a floor thrust in pre-Mississippian rocks and a roof thrust in the Kayak Shale, near the base of the cover sequence. In the west, where the pre-Mississippian partially consists of structurally competent carbonates, each anticlinorium marks a single horse in the duplex. However, in the east, pre-Mississippian rocks are relatively incompetent and each anticlinorium is cored by multiple horses. In the west, shortening above the roof thrust is by detachment folding, except where the shale detachment horizon is depositionally absent. In contrast, in eastern ANWR shortening above the roof thrust is by major thrust duplication of the entire cover sequence, perhaps due to lithology and thickness changes within the detachment horizon. A Devonian batholith marks the boundary between the eastern and western structural provinces. The thrust-controlled range front of eastern ANWR extends north of the batholith, suggesting that the batholith itself may be underlain by a thrust fault.

  12. The Mothball, Sustainment, and Proposed Reactivation of the Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) at NASA Glenn Research Center Plum Brook Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Scott R.; Lee, Jinho; Stephens, John W.; Hostler, Robert W., Jr.; VonKamp, William D.

    2010-01-01

    The Hypersonic Tunnel Facility (HTF) located at the NASA Glenn Research Center s Plum Brook Station in Sandusky, Ohio, is the nation s only large-scale, non-vitiated, hypersonic propulsion test facility. The HTF, with its 4-story graphite induction heater, is capable of duplicating Mach 5, 6, and 7 flight conditions. This unique propulsion system test facility has experienced several standby and reactivation cycles. The intent of the paper is to overview the HTF capabilities to the propulsion community, present the current status of HTF, and share the lessons learned from putting a large-scale facility into mothball status for a later restart

  13. Level II scour analysis for Bridge 37 (TOWNTH00290037) on Town Highway 29, crossing Mill Brook, Townshend, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, R.L.; Medalie, Laura

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure TOWNTH00290037 on Town Highway 29 crossing Mill Brook, Townshend, Vermont (figures 1–8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in Appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D.

  14. Level II scour analysis for bridge 2 (WODFTH00010002) on Town Highway 1, crossing Hell Hollow Brook, Woodford, Vermont

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Ronda L.; Degnan, James R.

    1998-01-01

    This report provides the results of a detailed Level II analysis of scour potential at structure WODFTH00010002 on Town Highway 1 crossing Hell Hollow Brook, Woodford, Vermont (figures 1-8). A Level II study is a basic engineering analysis of the site, including a quantitative analysis of stream stability and scour (FHWA, 1993). Results of a Level I scour investigation also are included in appendix E of this report. A Level I investigation provides a qualitative geomorphic characterization of the study site. Information on the bridge, gleaned from Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTAOT) files, was compiled prior to conducting Level I and Level II analyses and is found in appendix D.

  15. A Comparison of Some Aspects of Two Extinct Mammals, Mammuthus Brookes, 1828 (Proboscidea: Elephantidae and Mammut Blumenbach, 1799 (Proboscidea: Mammutidae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj S. Bhatnagar

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study aims at extracting the fossil database www.paleodb.org to compare extinct megafauna genera, Mammuthus Brookes, 1828 and Mammut Blumenbach, 1799 along with its close reletive, Zygolophodon (Vacek, 1877. Taxon count indicated 9 species for the former genus, and a dozen species for the latter two genera taken together. Mammuthus scored higher than Mammut and Zygolophodon in occurrences. They were found in North America, Europe, Asia and Africa but additionally, Mammuthus was found in South America as well. As two families diverged about 27 m years ago, these differences are important.

  16. Analysis of brook trout spatial behavior during passage attempts in corrugated culverts using near-infrared illumination video imagery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergeron, Normand E.; Constantin, Pierre-Marc; Goerig, Elsa; Castro-Santos, Theodore R.

    2016-01-01

    We used video recording and near-infrared illumination to document the spatial behavior of brook trout of various sizes attempting to pass corrugated culverts under different hydraulic conditions. Semi-automated image analysis was used to digitize fish position at high temporal resolution inside the culvert, which allowed calculation of various spatial behavior metrics, including instantaneous ground and swimming speed, path complexity, distance from side walls, velocity preference ratio (mean velocity at fish lateral position/mean crosssectional velocity) as well as number and duration of stops in forward progression. The presentation summarizes the main results and discusses how they could be used to improve fish passage performance in culverts.

  17. Selection and preference of benthic habitat by small and large ammocoetes of the least brook lamprey (Lampetra aepyptera)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, D.M.; Welsh, S.A.; Turk, P.J.

    2011-01-01

    In this laboratory study, we quantified substrate selection by small (large (100-150 mm) ammocoetes of the least brook lamprey (Lampetra aepyptera). In aquaria, ammocoetes were given a choice to burrow into six equally-available substrate types: small gravel (2.360-4.750 mm), coarse sand (0.500-1.400 mm), fine sand (0.125-0.500 mm), organic substrate (approximately 70% decomposing leaves/stems and organic sediment particles, and 30% silt and fine sand), an even mixture of silt, clay, and fine sand, and silt/clay (population sizes. ?? 2011 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  18. Geomorphic, flood, and groundwater-flow characteristics of Bayfield Peninsula streams, Wisconsin, and implications for brook-trout habitat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzpatrick, Faith A.; Peppler, Marie C.; Saad, David A.; Pratt, Dennis M.; Lenz, Bernard N.

    2015-01-01

    In 2002–03, the U.S. Geological Survey conducted a study of the geomorphic, flood, and groundwater-flow characteristics of five Bayfield Peninsula streams, Wisconsin (Cranberry River, Bark River, Raspberry River, Sioux River, and Whittlesey Creek) to determine the physical limitations for brook-trout habitat. The goals of the study were threefold: (1) to describe geomorphic characteristics and processes, (2) to determine how land-cover characteristics affect flood peaks, and (3) to determine how regional groundwater flow patterns affect base flow.

  19. Nature of hydrothermal fluids at the shale-hosted Red Dog Zn-Pb-Ag deposits, Brooks Range, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leach, David L.; Marsh, Erin E.; Emsbo, Poul; Rombach, Cameron; Kelley, Karen D.; Anthony, Michael W.

    2004-01-01

    The Red Dog Zn-Pb-Ag district in the western Brooks Range, northern Alaska, contains numerous shale-hosted Zn-Pb sulfide and barite deposits in organic-rich siliceous mudstone and shale, chert, and carbonate rocks of the Carboniferous Kuna Formation. The giant Red Dog shale-hosted deposits consist of a cluster of four orebodies (Main, Qanaiyaq, Aqqaluk, and Paalaaq) that lie within distinct thrust panels that offset a single ore deposit during the Mesozoic Brookian orogeny. These Zn-Pb-Ag-barite orebodies contain one of the world's largest reserves and resources of zinc.

  20. INDEPENDENT CONFIRMATORY SURVEY REPORT FOR THE REACTOR BUILDING, HOT LABORATORY, PRIMARY PUMP HOUSE, AND LAND AREAS AT THE PLUM BROOK REACTOR FACILITY, SANDUSKY, OHIO

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erika N. Bailey

    2011-10-10

    In 1941, the War Department acquired approximately 9,000 acres of land near Sandusky, Ohio and constructed a munitions plant. The Plum Brook Ordnance Works Plant produced munitions, such as TNT, until the end of World War II. Following the war, the land remained idle until the National Advisory Committee for Aeronautics later called the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) obtained 500 acres to construct a nuclear research reactor designed to study the effects of radiation on materials used in space flight. The research reactor was put into operation in 1961 and was the first of fifteen test facilities eventually built by NASA at the Plum Brook Station. By 1963, NASA had acquired the remaining land at Plum Brook for these additional test facilities