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Sample records for bronchoconstriction

  1. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Conditions & Treatments ▸ Conditions Dictionary ▸ Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Share | Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB) « Back to A to Z Listing Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction, (EIB), often known as exercise-induced ...

  2. Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Quiz

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... use it again if I begin to have exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. True False True: Many people are concerned about the standard prescription: "2 puffs of albuterol before exercise and every ...

  3. Bronchoconstriction in nonhuman primates: a species comparison.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seehase, S; Schlepütz, M; Switalla, S; Mätz-Rensing, K; Kaup, F J; Zöller, M; Schlumbohm, C; Fuchs, E; Lauenstein, H-D; Winkler, C; Kuehl, A R; Uhlig, S; Braun, A; Sewald, K; Martin, C

    2011-09-01

    Bronchoconstriction is a characteristic symptom of various chronic obstructive respiratory diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma. Precision-cut lung slices (PCLS) are a suitable ex vivo model to study physiological mechanisms of bronchoconstriction in different species. In the present study, we established an ex vivo model of bronchoconstriction in nonhuman primates (NHPs). PCLS prepared from common marmosets, cynomolgus macaques, rhesus macaques, and anubis baboons were stimulated with increasing concentrations of representative bronchoconstrictors: methacholine, histamine, serotonin, leukotriene D₄ (LTD₄), U46619, and endothelin-1. Alterations in the airway caliber were measured and compared with previously published data from rodents, guinea pigs, and humans. Methacholine induced maximal airway constriction, varying between 74 and 88% in all NHP species, whereas serotonin was ineffective. Histamine induced maximal bronchoconstriction of 77 to 90% in rhesus macaques, cynomolgus macaques, and baboons and a lesser constriction of 53% in marmosets. LTD₄ was ineffective in marmosets and rhesus macaques but induced a maximum constriction of 44 to 49% in cynomolgus macaques and baboons. U46619 and endothelin-1 caused airway constriction in all NHP species, with maximum constrictions of 65 to 91% and 70 to 81%, respectively. In conclusion, PCLS from NHPs represent a valuable ex vivo model for studying bronchoconstriction. All NHPs respond to mediators relevant to human airway disorders such as methacholine, histamine, U46619, and endothelin-1 and are insensitive to the rodent mast cell product serotonin. Only PCLS from cynomolgus macaques and baboons, however, responded also to leukotrienes, suggesting that among all compared species, these two NHPs resemble the human airway mechanisms best.

  4. Imitators of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weiss Pnina

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB is described by transient narrowing of the airways after exercise. It occurs in approximately 10% of the general population, while athletes may show a higher prevalence, especially in cold weather and ice rink athletes. Diagnosis of EIB is often made on the basis of self-reported symptoms without objective lung function tests, however, the presence of EIB can not be accurately determined on the basis of symptoms and may be under-, over-, or misdiagnosed. The goal of this review is to describe other clinical entities that mimic asthma or EIB symptoms and can be confused with EIB.

  5. Peripheral ventilation heterogeneity determines the extent of bronchoconstriction in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrow, Catherine E; Salome, Cheryl M; Harris, Benjamin E; Bailey, Dale L; Berend, Norbert; King, Gregory G

    2017-11-01

    In asthma, bronchoconstriction causes topographically heterogeneous airway narrowing, as measured by three-dimensional ventilation imaging. Computation modeling suggests that peripheral airway dysfunction is a potential determinant of acute airway narrowing measured by imaging. We hypothesized that the development of low-ventilation regions measured topographically by three-dimensional imaging after bronchoconstriction is predicted by peripheral airway function. Fourteen asthmatic subjects underwent ventilation single-photon-emission computed tomography/computed tomography scan imaging before and after methacholine challenge. One-liter breaths of Technegas were inhaled from functional residual capacity in upright posture before supine scanning. The lung regions with the lowest ventilation (Ventlow) were calculated using a thresholding method and expressed as a percentage of total ventilation (Venttotal). Multiple-breath nitrogen washout was used to measure diffusion-dependent and convection-dependent ventilation heterogeneity (Sacin and Scond, respectively) and lung clearance index (LCI), before and after challenge. Forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) was 87.6 ± 15.8% predicted, and seven subjects had airway hyperresponsiveness. Ventlow at baseline was unrelated to spirometry or multiple-breath nitrogen washout indices. Methacholine challenge decreased FEV1 by 23 ± 5% of baseline while Ventlow increased from 21.5 ± 2.3%Venttotal to 26.3 ± 6.7%Venttotal (P = 0.03). The change in Ventlow was predicted by baseline Sacin (rs  = 0.60, P = 0.03) and by LCI (rs  = 0.70, P = 0.006) but not by Scond (rs  = 0.30, P = 0.30). The development of low-ventilation lung units in three-dimensional ventilation imaging is predicted by ventilation heterogeneity in diffusion-dependent airways. This relationship suggests that acinar ventilation heterogeneity in asthma may be of mechanistic importance in terms of bronchoconstriction and airway narrowing

  6. Vitamin C for asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milan, Stephen J; Hart, Anna; Wilkinson, Mark

    2013-10-23

    Dietary antioxidants, such as vitamin C, in the epithelial lining and lining fluids of the lung may be beneficial in the reduction of oxidative damage (Arab 2002). They may therefore be of benefit in reducing symptoms of inflammatory airway conditions such as asthma, and may also be beneficial in reducing exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, which is a well-recognised feature of asthma and is considered a marker of airways inflammation. However, the association between dietary antioxidants and asthma severity or exercise-induced bronchoconstriction is not fully understood. To examine the effects of vitamin C supplementation on exacerbations and health-related quality of life (HRQL) in adults and children with asthma or exercise-induced bronchoconstriction compared to placebo or no vitamin C. We identified trials from the Cochrane Airways Group's Specialised Register (CAGR). The Register contains trial reports identified through systematic searches of a number of bibliographic databases, and handsearching of journals and meeting abstracts. We also searched trial registry websites. The searches were conducted in December 2012. We included randomised controlled trials (RCTs). We included both adults and children with a diagnosis of asthma. In separate analyses we considered trials with a diagnosis of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (or exercise-induced asthma). We included trials comparing vitamin C supplementation with placebo, or vitamin C supplementation with no supplementation. We included trials where the asthma management of both treatment and control groups provided similar background therapy. The primary focus of the review is on daily vitamin C supplementation to prevent exacerbations and improve HRQL. The short-term use of vitamin C at the time of exacerbations or for cold symptoms in people with asthma are outside the scope of this review. Two review authors independently screened the titles and abstracts of potential studies, and subsequently

  7. Expression of CysLT2 receptors in asthma lung, and their possible role in bronchoconstriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomohiko Sekioka

    2015-10-01

    Conclusions: CysLT2 receptors were expressed in lung specimens isolated from asthma subjects. Activation of CysLT2 receptors may contribute to antigen-induced bronchoconstriction in certain asthma population.

  8. Assessment of Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction in Adolescents and Young Children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Leeuwen, Janneke C.; Driessen, Jean M. M.; Kersten, Elin T. G.; Thio, Bernard J.

    Recent research shows important differences in exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) between children and adults, suggesting a different pathophysiology of EIB in children. Although exercise can trigger classic symptoms of asthma, in children symptoms can be subtle and nonspecific; parents,

  9. A prebiotic galactooligosaccharide mixture reduces severity of hyperpnoea-induced bronchoconstriction and markers of airway inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Williams, Neil C; Johnson, Michael A.; Shaw, Dominick E.; Spendlove, Ian; Vulevic, Jelena; Sharpe, Graham R.; Hunter, Kirsty A.

    2016-01-01

    Gut microbes have a substantial influence on systemic immune function and allergic sensitisation. Manipulation of the gut microbiome through prebiotics may provide a potential strategy to influence the immunopathology of asthma. This study investigated the effects of prebiotic Bimuno-galactooligosaccharide (B-GOS) supplementation on hyperpnoea-induced bronchoconstriction (HIB), a surrogate for exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, and airway inflammation. A total of ten adults with asthma and...

  10. Bronchoconstriction Induces TGF-β Release and Airway Remodelling in Guinea Pig Lung Slices.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tjitske A Oenema

    Full Text Available Airway remodelling, including smooth muscle remodelling, is a primary cause of airflow limitation in asthma. Recent evidence links bronchoconstriction to airway remodelling in asthma. The mechanisms involved are poorly understood. A possible player is the multifunctional cytokine TGF-β, which plays an important role in airway remodelling. Guinea pig lung slices were used as an in vitro model to investigate mechanisms involved in bronchoconstriction-induced airway remodelling. To address this aim, mechanical effects of bronchoconstricting stimuli on contractile protein expression and TGF-β release were investigated. Lung slices were viable for at least 48 h. Both methacholine and TGF-β1 augmented the expression of contractile proteins (sm-α-actin, sm-myosin, calponin after 48 h. Confocal fluorescence microscopy showed that increased sm-myosin expression was enhanced in the peripheral airways and the central airways. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction mediated the release of biologically active TGF-β, which caused the increased contractile protein expression, as inhibition of actin polymerization (latrunculin A or TGF-β receptor kinase (SB431542 prevented the methacholine effects, whereas other bronchoconstricting agents (histamine and KCl mimicked the effects of methacholine. Collectively, bronchoconstriction promotes the release of TGF-β, which induces airway smooth muscle remodelling. This study shows that lung slices are a useful in vitro model to study mechanisms involved in airway remodelling.

  11. Effect of different antiasthmatic treatments on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in children with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelmach, Iwona; Grzelewski, Tomasz; Majak, Pawel; Jerzynska, Joanna; Stelmach, Wlodzimierz; Kuna, Piotr

    2008-02-01

    Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction occurs in a large proportion of children with asthma, limiting everyday activities important for their physical and social development. The purpose of this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study was to compare the ability of different patterns of antiasthmatic treatment, recommended in childhood asthma, to protect patients from exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Children 6 to 18 years of age with atopic asthma were randomized to a 4-week, placebo-controlled, double-blind trial. Patients were randomly allocated to receive daily 200 microg budesonide (twice daily, 100 microg per dose) + 9 microg formoterol (twice daily, 4.5 microg per dose; n = 20); 200 microg budesonide + 5 or 10 mg montelukast (once daily at bedtime; n = 20); 5 or 10 mg montelukast (n = 20); 200 microg budesonide (n = 20); or placebo (n = 20). A standardized treadmill exercise challenge was performed before and after treatment. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, reflected by area under the curve for the FEV1 values from exercise over the 20-minute period and by maximum percent fall in FEV1 after exercise, was significantly diminished after 4 weeks in all active treatment groups, and compared with placebo. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction protection improved more significantly in the budesonide + montelukast and montelukast groups compared with other therapeutic options. These data indicate differences in effects on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction between therapeutic options recommended in childhood asthma. Control of childhood asthma with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction can be obtained by using regular controller treatment.

  12. Air quality and temperature effects on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundell, Kenneth W; Anderson, Sandra D; Sue-Chu, Malcolm; Bougault, Valerie; Boulet, Louis-Philippe

    2015-04-01

    Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) is exaggerated constriction of the airways usually soon after cessation of exercise. This is most often a response to airway dehydration in the presence of airway inflammation in a person with a responsive bronchial smooth muscle. Severity is related to water content of inspired air and level of ventilation achieved and sustained. Repetitive hyperpnea of dry air during training is associated with airway inflammatory changes and remodeling. A response during exercise that is related to pollution or allergen is considered EIB. Ozone and particulate matter are the most widespread pollutants of concern for the exercising population; chronic exposure can lead to new-onset asthma and EIB. Freshly generated emissions particulate matter less than 100 nm is most harmful. Evidence for acute and long-term effects from exercise while inhaling high levels of ozone and/or particulate matter exists. Much evidence supports a relationship between development of airway disorders and exercise in the chlorinated pool. Swimmers typically do not respond in the pool; however, a large percentage responds to a dry air exercise challenge. Studies support oxidative stress mediated pathology for pollutants and a more severe acute response occurs in the asthmatic. Winter sport athletes and swimmers have a higher prevalence of EIB, asthma and airway remodeling than other athletes and the general population. Because of fossil fuel powered ice resurfacers in ice rinks, ice rink athletes have shown high rates of EIB and asthma. For the athlete training in the urban environment, training during low traffic hours and in low traffic areas is suggested. © 2015 American Physiological Society.

  13. Exercise-induced Bronchoconstriction with Firefighting Contained Breathing Apparatus.

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    Seccombe, Leigh M; Buddle, Lachlan; Brannan, John D; Peters, Matthew J; Farah, Claude S

    2017-09-12

    Protective self-contained breathing apparatus (SCBA) used for firefighting delivers decompressed (cold), dehumidified air that may enhance the severity of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) in those susceptible. We investigated the effect of SCBA during exercise on airway caliber in people with asthma and healthy controls. Two exercise challenges (EC) designed to elicit EIB were performed on separate days within one week. The initial challenge was breathing room air (ECRA) with workload titrated to elicit >60% estimated maximum voluntary ventilation. The exercise intensity was repeated for the second challenge using SCBA (ECSCBA). Forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) was measured before and up to 20min after exercise. Bronchial hyperresponsivenss (BHR) to the hyperosmolar mannitol test was measured in the subjects with asthma. Twenty subjects with current asthma (mean[SD] age 27[6] years) and 10 healthy controls (31[5] years, p=0.1) were studied. The % fall in FEV1 following ECSCBA was greater in the mannitol positive asthma subjects (14.4 [15.1]%) compared to mannitol negative asthmatic subjects (1.6 [1.7]%, p=0.02) and controls (2.3 [2.3]%, p=0.04). The FEV1 response was not different between ECRA and ECSCBA (0.49 [5.57] %, p=0.6). No BHR to mannitol (n=7) was highly sensitive for identifying a negative response to ECSCBA (negative predictive value 100%). SCBA does not increase the propensity or severity for EIB in subjects with BHR. Those subjects with asthma but no BHR to inhaled mannitol did not exhibit EIB. BHR to a hyperosmolar stimulus maybe considered a useful screening tool for potential recruits with a history of asthma.

  14. Bronchoconstriction induced by citric acid inhalation in guinea pigs: role of tachykinins, bradykinin, and nitric oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ricciardolo, F L; Rado, V; Fabbri, L M; Sterk, P J; Di Maria, G U; Geppetti, P

    1999-02-01

    Gastroesophageal acid reflux into the airways can trigger asthma attacks. Indeed, citric acid inhalation causes bronchoconstriction in guinea pigs, but the mechanism of this effect has not been fully clarified. We investigated the role of tachykinins, bradykinin, and nitric oxide (NO) on the citric acid- induced bronchoconstriction in anesthetized and artificially ventilated guinea pigs. Citric acid inhalation (2-20 breaths) caused a dose-dependent increase in total pulmonary resistance (RL). RL value obtained after 10 breaths of citric acid inhalation was not significantly different from the value obtained after 20 breaths (p = 0.22). The effect produced by a half-submaximum dose of citric acid (5 breaths) was halved by the bradykinin B2 receptor antagonist HOE 140 (0.1 micromol x kg-1, intravenous) and abolished by the tachykinin NK2 receptor antagonist SR 48968 (0.3 micromol x kg-1, intravenous). Bronchoconstriction induced by a submaximum dose of citric acid (10 breaths) was partially reduced by the administration of HOE 140, SR 48968, or the NK1 receptor antagonist CP-99,994 (8 micromol x kg-1, intravenous) alone and completely abolished by the combination of SR 48968 and CP-99,994. Pretreatment with the NO synthase inhibitor, L-NMMA (1 mM, 10 breaths every 5 min for 30 min) increased in an L-arginine-dependent manner the effect of citric acid inhalation on RL. HOE 140 and CP-99,994 markedly reduced the L-NMMA-potentiated bronchoconstriction to inhaled citric acid. We conclude that citric acid-induced bronchoconstriction is caused by tachykinin release from sensory nerves, which, in part, is mediated by endogenously released bradykinin. Simultaneous release of NO by citric acid inhalation counteracts tachykinin-mediated bronchoconstriction. Our study suggests a possible implication of these mechanisms in asthma associated with gastroesophageal acid reflux and a potential therapeutic role of tachykinin and bradykinin antagonists.

  15. Effect of an intranasal corticosteroid on exercise induced bronchoconstriction in asthmatic children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, Elin T. G.; van Leeuwen, Janneke C.; Brand, Paul L. P.; Duiverman, Eric J.; de Jongh, Frans H. C.; Thio, Bernard J.; Driessen, Jean M. M.

    Rationale Allergic rhinitis and exercise induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) are common in asthmatic children. The aim of this study was to investigate whether treatment of allergic rhinitis with an intranasal corticosteroid protects against EIB in asthmatic children. Methods: This was a double-blind,

  16. Bronchoconstriction induced by inhaled methacholine delays desflurane uptake and elimination in a piglet model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretzschmar, Moritz; Kozian, Alf; Baumgardner, James E; Schreiber, Jens; Hedenstierna, Göran; Larsson, Anders; Hachenberg, Thomas; Schilling, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Bronchoconstriction is a hallmark of asthma and impairs gas exchange. We hypothesized that pharmacokinetics of volatile anesthetics would be affected by bronchoconstriction. Ventilation/perfusion (VA/Q) ratios and pharmacokinetics of desflurane in both healthy state and during inhalational administration of methacholine (MCh) to double peak airway pressure were studied in a piglet model. In piglets, MCh administration by inhalation (100 μg/ml, n=6) increased respiratory resistance, impaired VA/Q distribution, increased shunt, and decreased paO2 in all animals. The uptake and elimination of desflurane in arterial blood was delayed by nebulization of MCh, as determined by Micropore Membrane Inlet Mass Spectrometry (wash-in time to P50, healthy vs. inhalation: 0.5 min vs. 1.1 min, to P90: 4.0 min vs. 14.8 min). Volatile elimination was accordingly delayed. Inhaled methacholine induced severe bronchoconstriction and marked inhomogeneous VA/Q distribution in pigs, which is similar to findings in human asthma exacerbation. Furthermore, MCh-induced bronchoconstriction delayed both uptake and elimination of desflurane. These findings might be considered when administering inhalational anesthesia to asthmatic patients. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Sputum eosinophils and the response of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction to corticosteroid in asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Duong, MyLinh; Subbarao, Padmaja; Adelroth, Ellinor

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The relationship between eosinophilic airway inflammation and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), and the response to inhaled corticosteroid (ICS) therapy was examined. METHODS: Twenty-six steroid-naïve asthmatic patients with EIB were randomized to two parallel, double-blind,...

  18. Can a single dose response predict the effect of montelukast on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, Elin T. G.; Akkerman-Nijland, Anne M.; Driessen, Jean M. M.; Diamant, Zuzana; Thio, Bernard J.

    RationaleExercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) can be prevented by a single dose of montelukast (MLK). The effect is variable, similar to the variable responsiveness observed after daily treatment with MLK. We hypothesized that the effect of a single MLK-dose (5 or 10mg) on EIB could predict

  19. Role of acetylcholine and polyspecific cation transporters in serotonin-induced bronchoconstriction in the mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koepsell Hermann

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background It has been proposed that serotonin (5-HT-mediated constriction of the murine trachea is largely dependent on acetylcholine (ACh released from the epithelium. We recently demonstrated that ACh can be released from non-neuronal cells by corticosteroid-sensitive polyspecific organic cation transporters (OCTs, which are also expressed by airway epithelial cells. Hence, the hypothesis emerged that 5-HT evokes bronchoconstriction by inducing release of ACh from epithelial cells via OCTs. Methods We tested this hypothesis by analysing bronchoconstriction in precision-cut murine lung slices using OCT and muscarinic ACh receptor knockout mouse strains. Epithelial ACh content was measured by HPLC, and the tissue distribution of OCT isoforms was determined by immunohistochemistry. Results Epithelial ACh content was significantly higher in OCT1/2 double-knockout mice (42 ± 10 % of the content of the epithelium-denuded trachea, n = 9 than in wild-type mice (16.8 ± 3.6 %, n = 11. In wild-type mice, 5-HT (1 μM caused a bronchoconstriction that slightly exceeded that evoked by muscarine (1 μM in intact bronchi but amounted to only 66% of the response to muscarine after epithelium removal. 5-HT-induced bronchoconstriction was undiminished in M2/M3 muscarinic ACh receptor double-knockout mice which were entirely unresponsive to muscarine. Corticosterone (1 μM significantly reduced 5-HT-induced bronchoconstriction in wild-type and OCT1/2 double-knockout mice, but not in OCT3 knockout mice. This effect persisted after removal of the bronchial epithelium. Immunohistochemistry localized OCT3 to the bronchial smooth muscle. Conclusion The doubling of airway epithelial ACh content in OCT1/2-/- mice is consistent with the concept that OCT1 and/or 2 mediate ACh release from the respiratory epithelium. This effect, however, does not contribute to 5-HT-induced constriction of murine intrapulmonary bronchi. Instead, this activity involves 1 a non

  20. Differential expression of monocyte CD163 in single- and dual-asthmatic responders during allergen-induced bronchoconstriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kowal, K; Møller, H J; Dubuske, L M

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mononuclear phagocytes play an important role in modulating inflammatory reactions in response to antigen challenge. OBJECTIVE: To investigate the regulation of CD163, a marker of anti-inflammatory macrophages, during Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dp)-induced bronchoconstriction. ME...

  1. Exercise-related respiratory symptoms and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in industrial bakers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minov, Jordan B; Karadzinska-Bislimovska, Jovanka D; Vasilevska, Kristin V; Stoleski, Saso B; Mijakoski, Dragan G

    2013-01-01

    In order to assess prevalence and characteristics of exercise-related respiratory symptoms (ERRS) and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) in industrial bakery, the authors performed a cross-sectional study including 57 bakers and an equal number of office workers studied as a control. Evaluation of examined subjects included completion of a questionnaire, skin prick tests to common inhalant and occupational allergens, spirometry, and exercise and histamine challenge. The authors found a similar prevalence of ERRS and EIB in both bakers and controls. EIB was significantly associated with atopy, asthma, family history of asthma, and positive histamine challenge in either group, whereas in bakers it was closely related to sensitization to occupational allergens (p = .032). Bronchial reaction to exercise was significantly higher in bakers with EIB (25.7% vs 19.2%; p = .021). These findings suggest that occupational exposure in industrial bakery may accentuate bronchoconstrictive response to exercise.

  2. Approach to the diagnosis and management of suspected exercise-induced bronchoconstriction by primary care physicians

    OpenAIRE

    Hull, James H; Hull, Peter J; Parsons, Jonathan P; Dickinson, John W; Ansley, Les

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background Exercise-related respiratory symptoms in the diagnosis of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) have poor predictive value. The aim of this study was to evaluate how athletes presenting with these symptoms are diagnosed and managed in primary care. Methods An electronic survey was distributed to a random selection of family practitioners in England. The survey was designed to assess the frequency with which family practitioners encounter adults with exercise-related r...

  3. Sample size estimation in studies monitoring exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in asthmatic children

    OpenAIRE

    Hofstra, W. B.; Sont, J. K.; Sterk, P. J.; Neijens, H J; Kuethe, M. C.; Duiverman, E. J.

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The repeatability of the response to standardised treadmill exercise testing using dry air and monitoring of heart rate in asthmatic children suffering from exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) has not been well established. METHODS: Twenty seven asthmatic children with known EIB performed standardised exercise testing twice within a period of three weeks. The tests were performed on a treadmill while breathing dry air. During both tests heart rate had to reach 90% of ...

  4. The PDE4 inhibitor CHF-6001 and LAMAs inhibit bronchoconstriction-induced remodeling in lung slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistemaker, Loes E M; Oenema, Tjitske A; Baarsma, Hoeke A; Bos, I Sophie T; Schmidt, Martina; Facchinetti, Fabrizio; Civelli, Maurizio; Villetti, Gino; Gosens, Reinoud

    2017-09-01

    Combination therapy of PDE4 inhibitors and anticholinergics induces bronchoprotection in COPD. Mechanical forces that arise during bronchoconstriction may contribute to airway remodeling. Therefore, we investigated the impact of PDE4 inhibitors and anticholinergics on bronchoconstriction-induced remodeling. Because of the different mechanism of action of PDE4 inhibitors and anticholinergics, we hypothesized functional interactions of these two drug classes. Guinea pig precision-cut lung slices were preincubated with the PDE4 inhibitors CHF-6001 or roflumilast and/or the anticholinergics tiotropium or glycopyorrolate, followed by stimulation with methacholine (10 μM) or TGF-β1 (2 ng/ml) for 48 h. The inhibitory effects on airway smooth muscle remodeling, airway contraction, and TGF-β release were investigated. Methacholine-induced protein expression of smooth muscle-myosin was fully inhibited by CHF-6001 (0.3-100 nM), whereas roflumilast (1 µM) had smaller effects. Tiotropium and glycopyrrolate fully inhibited methacholine-induced airway remodeling (0.1-30 nM). The combination of CHF-6001 and tiotropium or glycopyrrolate, in concentrations partially effective by themselves, fully inhibited methacholine-induced remodeling in combination. CHF-6001 did not affect airway closure and had limited effects on TGF-β1-induced remodeling, but rather, it inhibited methacholine-induced TGF-β release. The PDE4 inhibitor CHF-6001, and to a lesser extent roflumilast, and the LAMAs tiotropium and glycopyrrolate inhibit bronchoconstriction-induced remodeling. The combination of CHF-6001 and anticholinergics was more effective than the individual compounds. This cooperativity might be explained by the distinct mechanisms of action inhibiting TGF-β release and bronchoconstriction. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  5. Montelukast administered in the morning or evening to prevent exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pajaron-Fernandez, Manuel; Garcia-Rubia, Servando; Sanchez-Solis, Manuel; Garcia-Marcos, Luis

    2006-03-01

    Montelukast is recommended to be taken in the evening. The effectiveness of this drug to prevent exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) in children was already evaluated. However, there is no information to determine if this effectiveness could vary depending on dosage time. Children (n = 24) with a documented history of EIB performed an exercise challenge test before starting montelukast treatment. Twelve children were randomly allocated to receive the drug in the morning for 2 weeks, and another 12 to receive it in the evening. After this treatment period and after a week of washout, the children were crossed over. An exercise test was repeated after the first and second periods of treatment. Values obtained after morning or evening dosage were compared with pretreatment values for the whole group of children. There was a significant effect of montelukast for protecting against EIB, measured both as percent of maximum fall in forced expired volume in 1 sec (FEV1) (18.9 +/- 9.7, morning, 18.7 +/- 11.3, evening, vs. 27.5 +/- 9.8, pretreatment; P evening, vs. 294.3 +/- 156.5, pretreatment; P evening. In conclusion, montelukast, taken for 2 weeks, is equally effective in exercise-induced bronchoconstriction when dosing either in the morning or in the evening. (c) 2006 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Lack of paradoxical bronchoconstriction after administration of tiotropium via Respimat® Soft Mist™ Inhaler in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hodder R

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Rick Hodder1, Demetri Pavia2, Angela Lee2, Eric Bateman31Divisions of Pulmonary and Critical Care, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada; 2Boehringer Ingelheim Limited, Bracknell, England, UK; 3Division of Pulmonology, Department of Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South AfricaAbstract: Bronchoconstriction has been reported in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients after administration of some aqueous inhalation solutions. We investigated the incidence of this event during long-term clinical trials of tiotropium delivered via Respimat® Soft Mist™ Inhaler (SMI. We retrospectively analyzed pooled data from two identical Phase III clinical trials, in which 1990 patients with COPD received 48 weeks' treatment with once-daily tiotropium (5 or 10 µg or placebo inhaled via Respimat® SMI. We recorded the incidence of bronchospasm and of a range of respiratory events that could suggest bronchoconstriction during the first 30 minutes after inhalation of study treatment on each of the eight test days. No patients reported bronchospasm. Six patients (0.3% reported a combination of at least two events suggestive of bronchoconstriction, and 21 (1.1% reported either rescue medication use or a respiratory adverse event. Asymptomatic falls in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 of ≥15% were recorded on all test days, with no change in incidence over time, and affected 8.2% of those in the tiotropium groups and 14.5% of those on placebo. In COPD patients receiving long-term treatment with tiotropium 5 or 10 µg via Respimat® SMI, no bronchospasm was recorded, and the number of events possibly indicative of paradoxical bronchoconstriction was very low.Keywords: inhalation device, bronchoconstriction, COPD, tiotropium

  7. Acute relief of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction by inhaled formoterol in children with persistent asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hermansen, Mette Northman; Nielsen, Kim Gjerum; Buchvald, Frederik

    2006-01-01

    -controlled, crossover study of the immediate effect of formoterol, 9 microg, vs terbutaline, 0.5 mg, and placebo administered as dry powder at different study days. Exercise challenge test was used as a model of acute bronchoconstriction. PATIENTS: Twenty-four 7- to 15-year-old children with persistent asthma....... INTERVENTIONS: The children performed standardized treadmill exercise tests, breathing dry air, with a submaximal workload. Study medication was administered 5 min after exercise if FEV1 dropped > or = 15% within 5 min after exercise. FEV1 and forced expiratory flows were measured repeatedly until 60 min after......% of the maximum increase for both. Median times to recovery within 5% of baseline FEV1 were 5.0 min and 7.4 min for formoterol and terbutaline, respectively (p = 0.33). CONCLUSION: Single-dose formoterol, 9 microg, via dry powder inhaler provided an acute bronchodilatory effect similar to terbutaline during EIB...

  8. A Study To Assess The Prevalence Of Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction In Inter-County Hurling.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Hunt, EB

    2017-11-01

    Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction (EIB) is an acute, transient airway narrowing occurring after exercise which may impact athletic performance. Studies report 10% of the general population and up to 90% of asthmatics experience EIB. Ninety-two players from three elite hurling squads underwent a spirometric field-based provocation test with real-time heart rate monitoring and lactate measurements to ensure adequate exertion. Players with a new diagnosis of EIB and those with a negative field-test but with a previous label of EIB or asthma underwent further reversibility testing and if negative, methacholine challenge. Eight (8.7%) of players had EIB, with one further athlete having asthma with a negative field test. Interestingly, only three out of 12 players who had previously been physician-labelled with EIB or asthma had their diagnosis objectively confirmed. Our study highlights the role of objective testing in EIB.

  9. Effects of a thromboxane receptor antagonist on prostaglandin D2 and histamine induced bronchoconstriction in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    al Jarad, N; Hui, K P; Barnes, N

    1994-01-01

    Many prostanoids including are prostaglandin (PG) F2 alpha and PGD2 are potent bronchoconstrictor agents. There is evidence to suggest that airway thromboxane (TP) receptor may act as a common receptor for their bronchoconstrictor actions. We tested the hypothesis that inhaled prostaglandin (PG) D2-induced bronchoconstriction is mediated by interacting with the TP receptor antagonist, ICI 192605, on the bronchoconstrictor response to inhaled PGD2 in a double-blind, placebo-controlled and crossed-over trial in normal subjects. The effect of ICI 192605 on histamine induced bronchoconstriction served as control for non-specific bronchodilatory actions. The study had two phases; the first consisted of two inhaled PGD2 challenge study days, and the second phase was that of inhaled histamine. Each study day was separated by at least a week. On each study day, the challenge tests were carried out 30 min after ingestion of 100 mg ICI 192605 or placebo. Doubling concentrations of agonist were given till more than 35% fall in post-diluent specific airway conductance (sGaw) occurred. The concentration needed to cause a fall in a sGaw of 35% post-diluent value (PC35sGaw) was then determined from linear interpolation of the log dose-response. Eight male subjects (median age 26, range 20-35 years) completed the study. ICI 192605 did not change baseline airway calibre 30 min after ingestion on either PGD2 or histamine study days. ICI 192605 significantly shifted the dose-response curve to inhaled PGD2 to the right by a median of 3.4 fold (Wilcoxon rank sign test, P < 0.05).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  10. Effect of Bronchoconstriction-induced Ventilation-Perfusion Mismatch on Uptake and Elimination of Isoflurane and Desflurane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kretzschmar, Moritz; Kozian, Alf; Baumgardner, James E; Borges, Joao Batista; Hedenstierna, Göran; Larsson, Anders; Hachenberg, Thomas; Schilling, Thomas

    2017-11-01

    Increasing numbers of patients with obstructive lung diseases need anesthesia for surgery. These conditions are associated with pulmonary ventilation/perfusion (VA/Q) mismatch affecting kinetics of volatile anesthetics. Pure shunt might delay uptake of less soluble anesthetic agents but other forms of VA/Q scatter have not yet been examined. Volatile anesthetics with higher blood solubility would be less affected by VA/Q mismatch. We therefore compared uptake and elimination of higher soluble isoflurane and less soluble desflurane in a piglet model. Juvenile piglets (26.7 ± 1.5 kg) received either isoflurane (n = 7) or desflurane (n = 7). Arterial and mixed venous blood samples were obtained during wash-in and wash-out of volatile anesthetics before and during bronchoconstriction by methacholine inhalation (100 μg/ml). Total uptake and elimination were calculated based on partial pressure measurements by micropore membrane inlet mass spectrometry and literature-derived partition coefficients and assumed end-expired to arterial gradients to be negligible. VA/Q distribution was assessed by the multiple inert gas elimination technique. Before methacholine inhalation, isoflurane arterial partial pressures reached 90% of final plateau within 16 min and decreased to 10% after 28 min. By methacholine nebulization, arterial uptake and elimination delayed to 35 and 44 min. Desflurane needed 4 min during wash-in and 6 min during wash-out, but with bronchoconstriction 90% of both uptake and elimination was reached within 15 min. Inhaled methacholine induced bronchoconstriction and inhomogeneous VA/Q distribution. Solubility of inhalational anesthetics significantly influenced pharmacokinetics: higher soluble isoflurane is less affected than fairly insoluble desflurane, indicating different uptake and elimination during bronchoconstriction.

  11. Effects of oral cetirizine, a selective H1 antagonist, on allergen- and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in subjects with asthma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Gong, H

    1990-03-01

    The protective efficacy of oral cetirizine, a selective and potent H1-receptor antagonist, against the immediate bronchoconstrictive response to allergen inhalation and exercise challenge was evaluated in 16 subjects with stable, predominantly mild asthma. The subjects underwent double-blind, crossover pretreatments in randomized order in two separate protocols with (1) three daily oral doses of 20 mg of cetirizine and placebo, followed by allergen inhalation, and (2) single oral doses of cetirizine (5, 10, and 20 mg), albuterol (4 mg), and placebo, followed by exercise with cold-air inhalation. Cetirizine failed to decrease bronchial sensitivity to inhaled allergen in eight of 10 subjects. Neither cetirizine nor albuterol uniformly inhibited exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Serum concentrations of cetirizine were consistent with systemic H1-blocking activity. Modest bronchodilation occurred after administration of cetirizine and albuterol before exercise but not after the third dose of cetirizine in the allergen protocol. One subject developed moderate drowsiness during multiple dosing with cetirizine. Thus, cetirizine, in the doses studied, is not uniformly effective in preventing allergen- or exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Histamine is one of many mediators participating in immediate asthmatic responses, and selective H1 antagonists do not completely block these airway events. However, cetirizine may still clinically benefit some patients with asthma, such as patients with allergic rhinitis or urticaria.

  12. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction: The effects of montelukast, a leukotriene receptor antagonist

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Kemp

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available James P KempClinical Professor of Pediatrics, Division of Immunology and Allergy, University of California School of Medicine, San Diego, CA, USAAbstract: Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB is very common in both patients with asthma and those who are otherwise thought to be normal. The intensity of exercise as well as the type of exercise is important in producing symptoms. This may make some types of exercise such as swimming more suitable and extended running more difficult for patients with this condition. A better understanding of EIB will allow the physician to direct the patient towards a type of exercise and medications that can result in a more active lifestyle without the same concern for resulting symptoms. This is especially important for schoolchildren who are usually enrolled in physical education classes and elite athletes who may desire to participate in competitive sports. Fortunately several medications (short- and long-acting β2-agonists, cromolyn, nedocromil, inhaled corticosteroids, and more recently leukotriene modifiers have been shown to be effective in preventing or attenuating the effects of exercise in many patients. In addition, inhaled β2-agonists have been shown to quickly reverse the airway obstruction that develops in patients and continue to be the reliever medications of choice. Inhaled corticosteroids are increasingly being recommended as regular therapy now that the role of inflammation and airway injury has been identified in EIB. With the discovery that there is a release of mediators such as histamine and leukotrienes from cells in the airway following exercise with resulting airway obstruction in susceptible individuals, interest has turned to attenuating their effects with mediator antagonists especially those that block the effects of leukotrienes. Studies with an oral leukotriene antagonist, montelukast, have shown beneficial effects in adults and children aged as young as 6 years with EIB

  13. A prebiotic galactooligosaccharide mixture reduces severity of hyperpnoea-induced bronchoconstriction and markers of airway inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Neil C; Johnson, Michael A; Shaw, Dominick E; Spendlove, Ian; Vulevic, Jelena; Sharpe, Graham R; Hunter, Kirsty A

    2016-09-01

    Gut microbes have a substantial influence on systemic immune function and allergic sensitisation. Manipulation of the gut microbiome through prebiotics may provide a potential strategy to influence the immunopathology of asthma. This study investigated the effects of prebiotic Bimuno-galactooligosaccharide (B-GOS) supplementation on hyperpnoea-induced bronchoconstriction (HIB), a surrogate for exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, and airway inflammation. A total of ten adults with asthma and HIB and eight controls without asthma were randomised to receive 5·5 g/d of either B-GOS or placebo for 3 weeks separated by a 2-week washout period. The peak fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) following eucapnic voluntary hyperpnoea (EVH) defined HIB severity. Markers of airway inflammation were measured at baseline and after EVH. Pulmonary function remained unchanged in the control group. In the HIB group, the peak post-EVH fall in FEV1 at day 0 (-880 (sd 480) ml) was unchanged after placebo, but was attenuated by 40 % (-940 (sd 460) v. -570 (sd 310) ml, P=0·004) after B-GOS. In the HIB group, B-GOS reduced baseline chemokine CC ligand 17 (399 (sd 140) v. 323 (sd 144) pg/ml, P=0·005) and TNF-α (2·68 (sd 0·98) v. 2·18 (sd 0·59) pg/ml, P=0·040) and abolished the EVH-induced 29 % increase in TNF-α. Baseline C-reactive protein was reduced following B-GOS in HIB (2·46 (sd 1·14) v. 1·44 (sd 0·41) mg/l, P=0·015) and control (2·16 (sd 1·02) v. 1·47 (sd 0·33) mg/l, P=0·050) groups. Chemokine CC ligand 11 and fraction of exhaled nitric oxide remained unchanged. B-GOS supplementation attenuated airway hyper-responsiveness with concomitant reductions in markers of airway inflammation associated with HIB.

  14. Exercice-induced bronchoconstriction among athletes: Assessment of bronchial provocation tests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vakali, S; Vogiatzis, I; Florou, A; Giavi, S; Zakynthinos, S; Papadopoulos, N G; Gratziou, Ch

    2017-01-01

    Diagnosis of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) requires the use of bronchial provocation tests (BPTs). We assessed exercise-induced respiratory symptoms (EIRS), EIB and asthma in athletes and evaluated the validity of BPTs in the diagnosis of EIB. Rhinitis and atopy were also assessed. Athletes with (n=55) and without previous asthma diagnosis (n=145) were tested by skin prick tests, lung function and eNO measurements. EIRS were recorded and EIB was assessed by methacholine (Mch), eucapnic voluntary hyperpnoea (EVH), mannitol and exercise test. EIRS were highly reported and history of asthma was common among athletes. A high prevalence of atopy (48.7%) and allergic rhinitis (30.5%) was found. Athletes with asthma had a higher response rate to Mch and to EVH, as compared with athletes without a previous asthma diagnosis (P=0.012 and P=0.017 respectively). Report of EIRS, rhinitis and atopy were not associated with a positive BPT response. Screening athletes for EIB using BPTs is suggested, irrespective of reported EIRS or a previous asthma diagnosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Hyperpolarized Helium-3 MRI of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction during challenge and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruger, Stanley J; Niles, David J; Dardzinski, Bernard; Harman, Amy; Jarjour, Nizar N; Ruddy, Marcella; Nagle, Scott K; Francois, Christopher J; Sorkness, Ronald L; Burton, Ryan M; Munoz del Rio, Alejandro; Fain, Sean B

    2014-05-01

    To investigate the utility of hyperpolarized He-3 MRI for detecting regional lung ventilated volume (VV) changes in response to exercise challenge and leukotriene inhibitor montelukast, human subjects with exercise induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) were recruited. This condition is described by airway constriction following exercise leading to reduced forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) coinciding with ventilation defects on hyperpolarized He-3 MRI. Thirteen EIB subjects underwent spirometry and He-3 MRI at baseline, postexercise, and postrecovery at multiple visits. On one visit montelukast was given and on two visits placebo was given. Regional VV was calculated in the apical/basilar dimension, in the anterior/posterior dimension, and for the entire lung volume. The whole lung VV was used as an end-point and compared with spirometry. Postchallenge FEV1 dropped with placebo but not with treatment, while postchallenge VV dropped more with placebo than treatment. Sources of variability for VV included region (anterior/posterior), scan, and treatment. VV correlated with FEV1/ forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory flow between 25 and 75% of FVC and showed gravitational dependence after exercise challenge. A paradigm testing the response of ventilation to montelukast revealed both a whole-lung and regional response to exercise challenge and therapy in EIB subjects. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Effects of bronchoconstriction, minute ventilation, and deep inspiration on the composition of exhaled breath condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debley, Jason S; Ohanian, Arpy S; Spiekerman, Charles F; Aitken, Moira L; Hallstrand, Teal S

    2011-01-01

    Exhaled breath condensate (EBC) is composed of droplets of airway surface liquid (ASL) diluted by water vapor. The goal of this study was to determine if the composition of EBC is affected by changes in airway caliber, minute ventilation, or forceful exhalation, factors that may differ among subjects with asthma in cross-sectional studies. In a group of subjects with asthma, we measured the effects of the following: (1) a series of three deep-inspiration and forceful-exhalation maneuvers; (2) a doubling of minute ventilation; and (3) acute bronchoconstriction induced by methacholine on EBC volume, dilution of ASL, and concentration of cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs). With the exception of an increase in EBC volume with increased minute ventilation, there were no significant changes in the volume, dilution, or levels of CysLTs in EBC introduced by each of these factors. The CIs surrounding the differences introduced by each factor showed that the maximum systematic errors due to these factors were modest. These results indicate that changes in airway caliber, minute ventilation, or breathing pattern among subjects with asthma do not significantly alter the measurements of mediator concentrations in EBC.

  17. Breathlessness at High Altitude: First Episode of Bronchoconstriction in an Otherwise Healthy Sojourner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhandari, Sanjeeb Sudarshan; Koirala, Pranawa; Lohani, Sadichhya; Phuyal, Pratibha; Basnyat, Buddha

    2017-06-01

    Bhandari, Sanjeeb Sudarshan, Pranawa Koirala, Sadichhya Lohani, Pratibha Phuyal, and Buddha Basnyat. Breathlessness at high altitude: first episode of bronchoconstriction in an otherwise healthy sojourner. High Alt Med Biol.. 18:179-181, 2017-High-altitude illness is a collective term for less severe acute mountain sickness and more severe high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) and high-altitude cerebral edema, which we can experience while traveling to high altitude. These get better when we get down to the lower altitudes. People with many comorbidities also have been traveling to high altitudes from the dawn of civilization. Obstructive airway diseases can be confused with HAPE at high altitude. Asthma is one of those obstructive pulmonary diseases, but it is shown to get better with travel to the altitudes higher than the residing altitude. We present a case of 55-year-old nonsmoker, athletic, female, a lowland resident who developed difficulty breathing for the first time at high altitude. She did not get better with the descent to lower altitude and timely intake of acetazolamide. Her pulmonary function test showed obstructive airway pattern, which got better with salbutamol/ipratropium nebulization and oxygen.

  18. Eucapnic Voluntary Hyperventilation to Detect Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction in Cystic Fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kirkby, Stephen E; Hayes, Don; Parsons, Jonathan P; Wisely, Clayton E; Kopp, Ben; McCoy, Karen S; Mastronarde, John G

    2015-10-01

    Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) has not been well studied in cystic fibrosis (CF), and eucapnic voluntary hyperventilation (EVH) testing has not been used as an objective assessment of EIB in CF to date. A prospective cohort pilot study was completed where standard EVH testing was completed by 10 CF patients with forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1) ≥70% of predicted. All patients also completed a cardiopulmonary exercise test (CPET) with pre- and post-CPET spirometry as a comparative method of detecting EIB. No adverse events occurred with EVH testing. A total of 20% (2/10) patients were diagnosed with EIB by means of EVH. Both patients had clinical symptoms consistent with EIB. No patient had a CPET-based exercise challenge consistent with EIB. EVH testing was safe and effective in the objective assessment for EIB in patients with CF who had well-preserved lung function. It may be a more sensitive method of detecting EIB then exercise challenge.

  19. Prevalence of Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction Measured by Standardized Testing in Healthy College Athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, David M; Burns, Steve; Merritt, Samantha; Wick, Jo; Sharpe, Matthew

    2016-05-01

    Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) can lead to long-term respiratory illness and even death. EIB prevalence rates are both high and variable in college athletes. Prevalence rates may be underestimated due to ineffective testing and screening. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence of EIB in college athletes by a standardized EIB test that can be used on many college campuses. In addition, we assessed the usefulness of self-reporting EIB/asthma (1) history, (2) symptoms, and (3) respiratory medication obtained from a simple screening questionnaire for predicting an EIB-positive athlete. A standardized EIB test and self-report questionnaire were administered to college athletes on 10 different sports teams. Information collected included pulmonary function (spirometry), expired gas analysis (maximal oxygen uptake), CO2 production, minute ventilation, EIB/asthma history, current symptoms, and medication use. Results showed that 34 of 80 athletes (42.5%) were EIB-positive by standardized exercise testing. The majority (76.5 and 58.8%) of the 34 athletes who tested positive self-reported a negative history or no symptoms, respectively. Also, 79.4% of the athletes who tested positive for EIB reported not using a respiratory medication. There were no significant differences in a positive EIB test when assessing interactions for history (P = .93), current symptoms (P = .12), or respiratory medication use (P = .66). A high proportion of college athletes tested positive for EIB when using a standardized test. Positive history, current symptoms of EIB/asthma, and respiratory medication use were not predictive of a positive test. Many EIB-positive athletes are not using a respiratory medication. More work is needed to develop an effective screening tool and improve education for EIB in college athletes. Copyright © 2016 by Daedalus Enterprises.

  20. Approach to the diagnosis and management of suspected exercise-induced bronchoconstriction by primary care physicians

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hull James H

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exercise-related respiratory symptoms in the diagnosis of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB have poor predictive value. The aim of this study was to evaluate how athletes presenting with these symptoms are diagnosed and managed in primary care. Methods An electronic survey was distributed to a random selection of family practitioners in England. The survey was designed to assess the frequency with which family practitioners encounter adults with exercise-related respiratory symptoms and how they would approach diagnostic work-up and management. The survey also evaluated awareness of and access to diagnostic tests in this setting and general knowledge of prescribing asthma treatments to competitive athletes. Results 257 family practitioners completed the online survey. One-third of respondents indicated they encountered individuals with this problem at a frequency of more than one case per month. Over two-thirds of family practitioners chose investigation as an initial management strategy, while one-quarter would initiate treatment based on clinical information alone. PEFR pre- and post-exercise was the most commonly selected test for investigation (44%, followed by resting spirometry pre- and post-bronchodilator (35%. Short-acting β2-agonists were the most frequently selected choice of treatment indicated by respondents (90%. Conclusion Family practitioners encounter individuals with exercise-related respiratory symptoms commonly and although objective testing is often employed in diagnostic work-up, the tests most frequently utilised are not the most accurate for diagnosis of EIB. This diagnostic approach may be dictated by the reported lack of access to more precise testing methods, or may reflect a lack of dissemination or awareness of current evidence. Overall the findings have implications both for the management and hence welfare of athletes presenting with this problem to family practitioners and also for the

  1. Allergies and Exercise-Induced Bronchoconstriction in a Youth Academy and Reserve Professional Soccer Team.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bougault, Valérie; Drouard, François; Legall, Franck; Dupont, Grégory; Wallaert, Benoit

    2017-09-01

    A high prevalence of respiratory allergies and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) has been reported among endurance athletes. This study was designed to analyze the frequency of sensitization to respiratory allergens and EIB in young soccer players. Prospective cohort design. Youth academy and reserve professional soccer team during the seasons 2012 to 2013 and 2013 to 2014. Eighty-five soccer players (mean age: 20 ± 4 years) participated. Players underwent skin prick tests (SPTs) during the seasons 2012 to 2013 and 2013 to 2014. Spirometry and a eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea test were performed on soccer players during the first season 2012 to 2013 (n = 51) to detect EIB. Two self-administered questionnaires on respiratory history and allergic symptoms (European Community Respiratory Health Survey and Allergy Questionnaire for Athletes) were also distributed during both seasons (n = 59). The number of positive SPTs, exercise-induced respiratory symptoms, presence of asthma, airway obstruction, and EIB. Forty-nine percent of players were sensitized to at least one respiratory allergen, 33% reported an allergic disease, 1 player presented airway obstruction at rest, and 16% presented EIB. Factors predictive of EIB were self-reported exercise-induced symptoms and sensitization to at least 5 allergens. Questioning players about exercise-induced respiratory symptoms and allergies as well as spirometry at the time of the inclusion medical checkup would improve management of respiratory health of soccer players and would constitute inexpensive preliminary screening to select players requiring indirect bronchial provocation test or SPTs. This study showed that despite low frequencies, EIB and allergies are underdiagnosed and undertreated in young soccer players.

  2. Randomized controlled trial of fish oil and montelukast and their combination on airway inflammation and hyperpnea-induced bronchoconstriction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Tecklenburg-Lund

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Both fish oil and montelukast have been shown to reduce the severity of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of fish oil and montelukast, alone and in combination, on airway inflammation and bronchoconstriction induced by eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea (EVH in asthmatics.In this model of EIB, twenty asthmatic subjects with documented hyperpnea-induced bronchoconstriction (HIB entered a randomized double-blind trial. All subjects entered on their usual diet (pre-treatment, n = 20 and then were randomly assigned to receive either one active 10 mg montelukast tablet and 10 placebo fish oil capsules (n = 10 or one placebo montelukast tablet and 10 active fish oil capsules totaling 3.2 g EPA and 2.0 g DHA (n = 10 taken daily for 3-wk. Thereafter, all subjects (combination treatment; n = 20 underwent another 3-wk treatment period consisting of a 10 mg active montelukast tablet or 10 active fish oil capsules taken daily.While HIB was significantly inhibited (p0.017 between treatment groups; percent fall in forced expiratory volume in 1-sec was -18.4 ± 2.1%, -9.3±2.8%, -11.6 ± 2.8% and -10.8 ± 1.7% on usual diet (pre-treatment, fish oil, montelukast and combination treatment respectively. All three treatments were associated with a significant reduction (p0.017 in these biomarkers between treatments.While fish oil and montelukast are both effective in attenuating airway inflammation and HIB, combining fish oil with montelukast did not confer a greater protective effect than either intervention alone. Fish oil supplementation should be considered as an alternative treatment for EIB.ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00676468.

  3. Randomized Controlled Trial of Fish Oil and Montelukast and Their Combination on Airway Inflammation and Hyperpnea-Induced Bronchoconstriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecklenburg-Lund, Sandra; Mickleborough, Timothy D.; Turner, Louise A.; Fly, Alyce D.; Stager, Joel M.; Montgomery, Gregory S.

    2010-01-01

    Background Both fish oil and montelukast have been shown to reduce the severity of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB). The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of fish oil and montelukast, alone and in combination, on airway inflammation and bronchoconstriction induced by eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea (EVH) in asthmatics. Methods In this model of EIB, twenty asthmatic subjects with documented hyperpnea-induced bronchoconstriction (HIB) entered a randomized double-blind trial. All subjects entered on their usual diet (pre-treatment, n = 20) and then were randomly assigned to receive either one active 10 mg montelukast tablet and 10 placebo fish oil capsules (n = 10) or one placebo montelukast tablet and 10 active fish oil capsules totaling 3.2 g EPA and 2.0 g DHA (n = 10) taken daily for 3-wk. Thereafter, all subjects (combination treatment; n = 20) underwent another 3-wk treatment period consisting of a 10 mg active montelukast tablet or 10 active fish oil capsules taken daily. Results While HIB was significantly inhibited (pmontelukast, fish oil and combination treatment compared to pre-treatment, there was no significant difference (p>0.017) between treatment groups; percent fall in forced expiratory volume in 1-sec was −18.4±2.1%, −9.3±2.8%, −11.6±2.8% and −10.8±1.7% on usual diet (pre-treatment), fish oil, montelukast and combination treatment respectively. All three treatments were associated with a significant reduction (p0.017) in these biomarkers between treatments. Conclusion While fish oil and montelukast are both effective in attenuating airway inflammation and HIB, combining fish oil with montelukast did not confer a greater protective effect than either intervention alone. Fish oil supplementation should be considered as an alternative treatment for EIB. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00676468 PMID:20976161

  4. Exertional-induced bronchoconstriction: Comparison between cardiopulmonary exercise test and methacholine challenging test

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mostafa Ghanei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Exertional-induced bronchoconstriction is a condition in which the physical activity causes constriction of airways in patients with airway hyper- responsiveness. In this study, we tried to study and evaluate any relationship between the findings of cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET and the response to methacholine challenge test (MCT in patients with dyspnea after activity. Materials and Methods: Thirty patients with complaints of dyspnea following activity referred to "Lung Clinic" of Baqiyatallah Hospital but not suffering from asthma were entered into the study. The subjects were excluded from the study if: Suffering from any other pulmonary diseases, smoking more than 1 cigarette a week in the last year, having a history of smoking more than 10 packets of cigarettes/year, having respiratory infection in the past 4 weeks, having abnormal chest X-ray or electrocardiogram, and cannot discontinue the use of medicines interfering with bronchial provocation. Baseline spirometry was performed for all the patients, and the values of forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1, forced vital capacity (FVC, and FEV/FVC were recorded. The MCT and then the CPET were performed on all patients. Results: The mean VO 2 (volume oxygen in patients with positive methacholine test (20.45 mL/kg/min was significantly lower than patients with negative MCT (28.69 mL/kg/min (P = 0.000. Respiratory rates per minute (RR and minute ventilation in the group with positive MCT (38.85 and 1.636 L were significantly lower than the group with negative methacholine test (46.78 and 2.114 L (P < 0.05. Also, the O 2 pulse rate in the group with negative methacholine test (116.27 mL/beat was significantly higher than the group with positive methacholine test (84.26 mL/beat (P < 0.001. Conclusion: Pulmonary response to exercise in patients with positive methacholine test is insufficient. The dead space ventilation in these patients has increased. Also, dynamic

  5. Effects of montelukast and salmeterol on physical performance and exercise economy in adult asthmatics with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinshamn, Sigurd; Sandsund, Mariann; Sue-Chu, Malcolm; Bjermer, Leif

    2004-10-01

    To compare the effect of montelukast and the long-acting beta(2)-agonist salmeterol on cardiopulmonary exercise economy and physical performance in adult patients with asthma during exercise. Asthmatic patients (n = 18), aged 18 to 35 years with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), using a double-blind, double-dummy cross-over design. Montelukast, 10 mg/d, was compared to inhaled salmeterol, 50 microg bid. The study medication was administered for at least 5 days prior to testing, with a washout period of at least 5 days. Treadmill exercise tests (5.3% inclination, -15 degrees C ambient temperature) were performed at work loads of 80% of maximal oxygen uptake (Vo(2)max) [6 min], rest (4 min), 60% of Vo(2)max (6 min), and finally step increments until exhaustion. We investigated parameters of gas exchange, physical performance, and lung function. After montelukast, the oxygen pulse was higher than after salmeterol, at 80% of Vo(2)max (p = 0.035), and 6 min at 60% of Vo(2)max (p = 0.011). Lung function during exercise, running time to exhaustion, Borg score, lactate levels, Vo(2)max, carbon dioxide elimination, minute ventilation, ventilatory equivalents, respiratory exchange ratio, and heart rate were not significantly different between the two treatments. The maximal postexercise fall in FEV(1) from baseline occurred 2 min after run to exhaustion, and was greater after salmeterol than after montelukast: mean, 16.2% (SD, 11.0) vs 10.0% (SD, 12.2) [p effect on the oxygen pulse, thus suggesting improved gas exchange during exercise.

  6. The effect of allergen-induced bronchoconstriction on concentration of 5-oxo-ETE in exhaled breath condensate of house dust mite-allergic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowal, K; Gielicz, A; Sanak, M

    2017-10-01

    Arachidonic acid metabolites regulate several aspects of airway function including inflammation, muscle contraction and mucous secretion. The aim of this study was to evaluate concentration of selected 5-lipoxygenase- and cyclooxygenase-derived eicosanoids in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) during allergen-induced bronchoconstriction. The study was performed on 24 allergic rhinitis/asthma patients sensitized to a house dust mite (HDM) Dermatophagoides pteronyssinus (Dp) and 13 healthy controls (HCs). Bronchial challenge with Dp extract was performed only in the allergic patients. EBC samples were collected before (T0 ) and during Dp-induced bronchoconstriction (TEAR ). Eicosanoid concentration was measured using HPLC-tandem mass spectrometry. Significant bronchoconstriction after Dp challenge was demonstrated in 15 patients (Rs), while in 9 patients (NRs) no asthmatic response could be detected. At T0 the most abundant eicosanoids in EBC of HDM-allergic patients were LTB4 and 5-oxo-ETE, while in HCs EBC concentration of LTB4 was significantly greater than that of 5-oxo-ETE. Allergen challenge resulted in significant increase in EBC concentration of 5-oxo-ETE, LTD4 and 8-iso-PGE2 only in Rs. At TEAR , the relative change of 5-oxo-ETE concentration in EBC correlated with decrease of peripheral blood eosinophilia (R = -0.774; P = .0012). Moreover, the relative increase of 5-oxo-ETE in EBC at TEAR significantly correlated with the severity of the subsequent late asthmatic response (R = 0.683, P = .007). Our study demonstrates significant up-regulation of 5-oxo-ETE synthesis in HDM-allergic patients and indicates possible involvement of that mediator in the pathogenesis of allergic asthma. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Non-genomic action of beclomethasone dipropionate on bronchoconstriction caused by leukotriene C4 in precision cut lung slices in the horse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fugazzola Maria

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucocorticoids have been proven to be effective in the therapy of recurrent airway obstruction (RAO in horses via systemic as well as local (inhalative administration. Elective analysis of the effects of this drug on bronchoconstriction in viable lung tissue offers an insight into the mechanism of action of the inflammatory cascade occurring during RAO which is still unclear. The mechanism of action of steroids in treatment of RAO is thought to be induced through classical genomic pathways. We aimed at electively studying the effects of the glucocorticoid beclomethasone dipropionate on equine precision-cut lung slices (PCLS. PCLS were used to analyze ex-vivo effects of beclomethasone on inhibiting bronchoconstriction in the horse. The inhibiting effect was measured through instillation of a known mediator of inflammation and bronchoconstriction, leukotriene C4. For this, the accessory lobes of 13 horses subjected to euthanasia for reasons unrelated to the respiratory apparatus were used to obtain viable lung slices. Results After 30 minutes of PCLS incubation, beclomethasone showed to significantly inhibit the contraction of the bronchioles after instillation with leukotriene C4. The EC50 values of the two contraction curves (LTC4 with and without BDP differed significantly from each other (p = 0.002. The possibility of a non-genomic rapid mechanism of action seems likely since transcriptional activities require a longer lag period. Conclusions In human neuroendocrinology, high levels of glucocorticoids have been proven to function via a non-genomic mechanism of membrane receptors. The concentration of beclomethasone used on the lung slices in our study can be considered as high. This allows speculation about similar rapid non-genomic mechanisms of high-dosage inhaled glucocorticoids in the lower airways of horses. However, further assessment on a molecular basis is needed to confirm this.

  8. The effect of nebulized salbutamol or isotonic saline on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in elite skaters following a 1,500-meter race : study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Jean M. M.; Gerritsma, Margryt; Westbroek, Jaap; ten Hacken, Nick H. T.; de Jongh, Frans H. C.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Prevalence of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) is high in elite athletes, especially after many years training in cold and dry air conditions. The primary treatment of EIB is inhaling a short-acting beta-2-agonist such as salbutamol. However, professional speed skaters also

  9. The effect of nebulized salbutamol or isotonic saline on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in elite skaters following a 1,500-meter race: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, Jean M. M.; Gerritsma, Margryt; Westbroek, Jaap; ten Hacken, Nick H. T.; de Jongh, Frans H. C.

    2013-01-01

    Prevalence of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) is high in elite athletes, especially after many years training in cold and dry air conditions. The primary treatment of EIB is inhaling a short-acting beta-2-agonist such as salbutamol. However, professional speed skaters also inhale

  10. Eficácia do formoterol na reversão imediata do broncoespasmo Efficacy of inhaled formoterol in reversing bronchoconstriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalberto Sperb Rubin

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Avaliar efetividade e rapidez de ação do formoterol liberado através de inalador para pó seco na reversão de broncoespasmo induzido pela metacolina. MÉTODOS: Avaliaram-se prospectivamente 84 pacientes com queda do volume expiratório forçado no primeiro segundo 20% após inalação de metacolina. Todos estavam sob investigação de sintomas respiratórios de etiologia não definida. Foram randomizados 41 pacientes para receber 200 mcg de fenoterol spray e 43 para receber 12 mcg de formoterol sob a forma de inalador de pó seco para reversão imediata do broncoespasmo. Avaliaram-se a queda no volume expiratório forçado no primeiro segundo inicial, dose provocadora de queda de 20% do volume expiratório forçado no primeiro segundo inicial, e volume expiratório forçado no primeiro segundo após cinco e dez minutos da administração dos fármacos. RESULTADOS: Não houve diferença significativa entre os grupos em relação ao sexo, idade, peso, altura, dose provocadora de queda de 20% do volume expiratório forçado no primeiro segundo, volume expiratório forçado no primeiro segundo inicial e pós-metacolina. A melhora do volume expiratório forçado no primeiro segundo após uso do broncodilatador foi de 34% (cinco minutos e 50,1% (dez minutos no primeiro grupo, e 46,5% (cinco minutos e 53,2% (dez minutos no segundo. CONCLUSÃO: O efeito broncodilatador do formoterol após cinco e dez minutos da indução de broncoespasmo pela metacolina foi similar ao do fenoterol. O formoterol, além de ser um broncodilatador de longa duração, tem também rápido início de ação, sugerindo que possa ser empregado como medicação de resgate nas crises de broncoespasmo.OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness and onset of action of formoterol delivered by dry-powder inhaler in reversing methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction. METHODS: Patients presenting a drop in forced expiratory volume in one second > 20% after methacholine

  11. Efeito do salbutamol liberado através de inalador de pó seco sobre o broncoespasmo induzido por metacolina Effects of salbutamol delivered by dry-powder inhaler on methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalberto Sperb Rubin

    2004-06-01

    (MDIs are the drugs usually used for the reversal of methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction. The b2 agonists that are delivered by dry-powder inhaler (DPI can be an efficacious option. OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the effectiveness and speed of action of salbutamol delivered by DPI (Pulvinal; Butovent®, in comparison to salbutamol delivered by MDI, in reversing methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction. METHOD: Sixty successive methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction patients who presented a decrease of at least 20% in forced expiratory volume (FEV1 were evaluated prospectively. Of these 60 patients, we randomized 30 (first group to receive 200 mcg of salbutamol by MDI and 30 (second group to receive 200 mcg of salbutamol by DPI (Pulvinal. Both drugs were administered with the objective of reversing bronchoconstriction during the final phase of a bronchoprovocation test. The FEV1 values obtained at 1 and 5 minutes after bronchodilator administration were evaluated. RESULTS: The groups were comparable in gender distribution, age, weight, dose level provoking a 20% drop in FEV1 (first group: 1.3 mg; second group: 1.19 mg; p = 0.79 and post-methacholine FEV1 (first group: 2.03 l; second group: 1.99 l; p = 0.87, with no statistically significant differences between the two groups. In the first group (MDI, the mean increase in FEV1 was 16.2% (at 1 minute and 22.2% (at 5 minutes, and in the second group (DPI it was 17% (at 1 minute and 23.6% (at 5 minutes. There was no statistically significant difference between the groups (p = 0.8. CONCLUSION: The beta2-agonists delivered by DPI (Pulvinal present the same bronchodilator efficacy and speed of action as do those delivered by the more traditional MDI method.

  12. Treatment of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Backer, Vibeke; Sverrild, Asger; Porsbjerg, Celeste

    2013-01-01

    impairment of performance to severe bronchospasm and a large reduction in FEV1. Treatment of EIB varies from daily to less frequent therapy, depending on the level of activity. In this article, the authors evaluate the treatment possibilities before, during, and after exercise. They also review medications...

  13. A deep breath bronchoconstricts obese asthmatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holguin, Fernando; Cribbs, Sushma; Fitzpatrick, Anne M; Ingram, Roland H; Jackson, Andrew C

    2010-02-01

    Asthma is characterized by the loss of a deep breath (DB)-induced bronchodilation and bronchoprotection. Obesity causes lung restriction and increases airway resistance, which may further worsen the capacity of a DB to induce bronchodilation; however, whether increasing BMI impairs the bronchodilatory response to a DB in asthmatics is unknown. The population consisted of 99 subjects, 87 with moderate to severe persistent asthma and 12 obese control subjects. Using transfer impedance we derived airway resistance (Raw). Participants breathed for 1 minute and took a slow DB followed by passive exhalation to functional residual capacity (FRC) and tidal breathing for another minute. After a DB, obese asthmatics had the largest percent increase in Raw (median 9.8% interquartile range [IQR] 3.1-15.1), compared with overweight (6.5% IQR -1.3, 12.1) and lean (0.7% IQR -3, 7.9) asthmatics and obese controls (2.5% IQR -.6, 11) (p for trend = 0.008). The association between the percent increase in Raw after a DB and BMI as a continuous variable was significant (p = 0.02). In obese, moderate to severe and poorly controlled asthmatics, a DB results in increased Raw. This phenomenon was not observed in leaner asthmatics of similar severity or in obese control subjects.

  14. Air quality and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rundell, Kenneth W; Sue-Chu, Malcolm

    2013-08-01

    A higher prevalence of airway hyperresponsiveness, airway remodeling, and asthma has been identified among athletes who compete and train in environmental conditions of cold dry air and/or high air pollution. Repeated long-duration exposure to cold/dry air at high minute ventilation rates can cause airway damage. Competition or training at venues close to busy roadways, or in indoor ice arenas or chlorinated swimming pools, harbors a risk for acute and chronic airway disorders from high pollutant exposure. This article discusses the effects of these harsh environments on the airways, and summarizes potential mechanisms and prevalence of airway disorders in elite athletes. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. The impact of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction on athletic performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Price, Oliver J; Hull, James H; Backer, Vibeke

    2014-01-01

    of this review is to provide a systematic appraisal of the current status of knowledge regarding EIB and exercise performance and to highlight potential mechanisms by which performance may be compromised by EIB. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SELECTION: PubMed/Medline and EBSCO databases were searched up to May 2014...

  16. Limited bronchoconstriction to methacholine using partial flow-volume curves in nonasthmatic subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterk, P. J.; Daniel, E. E.; Zamel, N.; Hargreave, F. E.

    1985-01-01

    We investigated whether the plateau of the dose-response to nonsensitizing stimuli, such as methacholine, could be explained by the airway dilation that follows lung inflation in nonasthmatics. We used maximal expiratory partial flow-volume curves to measure the response of the airways to doubling

  17. Exhaled nitric oxide predicts exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in asthmatic school children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buchvald, Frederik; Hermansen, Mette N; Nielsen, Kim G

    2005-01-01

    to a standardized submaximal exercise test on the treadmill were measured in 111 school children with asthma. EIB could be excluded with a probability of 90% in asthmatic children with FeNO levels ... reducing the need for exercise testing. OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to estimate the value of FeNO as a predictor of EIB in asthmatic children. METHODS: Stable outpatient asthmatic school children performed standard exercise challenge tests and measurement of FeNO. RESULTS: FeNO and response...

  18. Asthma symptoms, mannitol reactivity and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in adolescent swimmers versus tennis players

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Romberg K

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Kerstin Romberg,1,2 Ellen Tufvesson,1 Leif Bjermer1 1Respiratory Medicine and Allergology, Department of Clinical Sciences, Lund, Lund University, Lund, 2Health Care Center, Näsets Läkargrupp, Höllviken, Sweden Background: Strenuous physical activity at an elite level is associated with an increased risk for asthma and, in some sports, also prevalence of allergies. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of asthma and allergy among elite swimmers and tennis players and compare airway hyperreactivity to mannitol and exercise.Materials and methods: One hundred and one adolescent swimmers and 86 tennis players answered a questionnaire about respiratory symptoms and allergy and performed mannitol challenge and sport-specific exercise challenge. Atopy was assessed and fractional exhaled nitric oxide was measured. Mannitol positivity was defined as drop in FEV1 ≥15% (ordinary criteria and/or β2-reversibility (≥15% after provocation (extended criteria. A positive exercise test was defined as a drop in FEV1 ≥10% (ordinary criteria and/or β2-reversibility (≥15% after provocation (extended criteria. Club cell protein (CC16 was measured in urine before and after the challenges.Results: Asthma symptoms were common in both groups. More swimmers had exercise-induced symptoms (77% versus 50% and current asthma symptoms (56% versus 38%, compared to the tennis players. More swimmers also had a positive mannitol challenge test both using ordinary (26% versus 6% and extended criteria (43% versus 17%, while the number of positive exercise tests did not differ. After exercise (but not mannitol challenge, CC16 level was increased in both groups, but to a higher extent in tennis players. There were no differences in atopy, rhinitis or fractional exhaled nitric oxide.Conclusion: We found a high prevalence of asthma among elite swimmers and tennis players and a higher frequency of current asthma and positive mannitol challenge tests among the swimmers. This indicates an unfavorable exercise environment. Keywords: asthma, sport, swimming, tennis, mannitol, exercise, CC16 bronchial hyperreactivity, bronchial hyperreactivity test 

  19. Asthma symptoms, mannitol reactivity and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in adolescent swimmers versus tennis players.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romberg, Kerstin; Tufvesson, Ellen; Bjermer, Leif

    2017-01-01

    Strenuous physical activity at an elite level is associated with an increased risk for asthma and, in some sports, also prevalence of allergies. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of asthma and allergy among elite swimmers and tennis players and compare airway hyperreactivity to mannitol and exercise. One hundred and one adolescent swimmers and 86 tennis players answered a questionnaire about respiratory symptoms and allergy and performed mannitol challenge and sport-specific exercise challenge. Atopy was assessed and fractional exhaled nitric oxide was measured. Mannitol positivity was defined as drop in FEV1 ≥15% (ordinary criteria) and/or β2-reversibility (≥15%) after provocation (extended criteria). A positive exercise test was defined as a drop in FEV1 ≥10% (ordinary criteria) and/or β2-reversibility (≥15%) after provocation (extended criteria). Club cell protein (CC16) was measured in urine before and after the challenges. Asthma symptoms were common in both groups. More swimmers had exercise-induced symptoms (77% versus 50%) and current asthma symptoms (56% versus 38%), compared to the tennis players. More swimmers also had a positive mannitol challenge test both using ordinary (26% versus 6%) and extended criteria (43% versus 17%), while the number of positive exercise tests did not differ. After exercise (but not mannitol) challenge, CC16 level was increased in both groups, but to a higher extent in tennis players. There were no differences in atopy, rhinitis or fractional exhaled nitric oxide. We found a high prevalence of asthma among elite swimmers and tennis players and a higher frequency of current asthma and positive mannitol challenge tests among the swimmers. This indicates an unfavorable exercise environment.

  20. Response of the adrenergic system after provoked bronchoconstriction in patients with bronchial asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islami, Hilmi; Ilazi, Ali; Gashi, Nijazi; Mustafa, Lirim; Maloku, Halit; Jashanica, Adelina

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, effect of the Tolazoline as antagonist of the alpha-2 adrenergic receptors in patients with bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive bronchitis was studied, and also the effect of stimulation with Hexoprenaline of beta-2 adrenergic receptor after bronchi-constriction caused with Propranolol, and Acetylcholine. Lung function parameters are determined with Body plethysmography. In patients with bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive bronchitis was registered resistance (Raw), was determined the amount of intrathoracic gas volume (ITGV), and specific resistance was calculated as well (SRaw). Aerosolization was done with standard aerosolizing machine-Asema. The study included a total of 21 patients. Two hours after the inhalation of Propranolol, in experimental group, it was applied the blocker of alpha-2 adrenergic receptors (Tolazoline 20 mg / ml with inhalator ways), which did not cause changes in bronchomotor tonus of tracheobronchial system (p > 1.0). Meanwhile, at the same patient, stimulation of beta-2 adrenergic receptor with Hexoprenaline (2 inh x 0.2 mg) is associated with a significant decrease of the specific resistance of airways (SRaw, p < 0.01). Control group results show that after bronchi-constriction caused by Propranolol-aerosol (20 mg / ml) in patients with bronchial asthma and chronic obstructive bronchitis, an increase of specific resistance in airways was caused (SRaw, p < 0.01), which confirms the presence of hyper-reactive bronco-constrictor effects intermediated by vagal ways. Two hours after Propranolol, inhaled Hexorenaline has blocked the action of Propranolol, but not entirely. Furthermore, two hours after acetylcholine-aerosol (1 mg /ml) was applied, inhaled Ipratropium (2 inh x 1 mg) has fully blocked the action of chemical bronchoconstrictor mediators, causing a decline of specific resistance in the airways (SRaw; p < 0.01). This suggests that primary mechanism, which would cause reaction in patients with increased bronchial reactibility, is prevalence of the cholinergic system over adrenergic one, and not the relationship in between alpha-2 and beta-2 adrenergic receptors.

  1. Evaluation of Effect of Taxus baccata Leaves Extract on Bronchoconstriction and Bronchial Hyperreactivity in Experimental Animals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, PK; Patel, KV; Gandhi, TR

    2011-01-01

    The present investigation was undertaken to evaluate the bronchodilating effect and bronchial hyperreactivity of alcoholic extract of Taxus baccata Linn. (AET) leaves in experimental animals. Bronchodilator activity of AET was studied on the histamine and acetylcholine aerosol induced bronchospasm in guinea pigs and bronchial hyperreactivity was studied on bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) in the egg albumin sensitized guinea pigs and by histopathological studies. In vitro mast cell stabilizing activity was studied using compound 48/80 as a degranulating agent. Treatment with AET (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o., for 7 days) showed significant protection against histamine and acetylcholine aerosol induced bronchospasm in guinea pigs. Significant decrease in the total leukocyte and differential leukocyte count in the BALF of the egg albumin sensitized guinea pigs was observed by administration of AET (200 and 400 mg/kg, p.o., for 15 days). AET dose dependently protected the mast cell disruption induced by compound 48/80. These results suggest that AET not only has bronchodilating activity but also decreases bronchial hyperreactivity by decreasing the infiltration of inflammatory cells in the airway and inhibiting the release of histamine like mediators from the mast cell by stabilizing it. PMID:21607053

  2. Simulation of Forced Expiration in a Biophysical Model, With Homogeneous and Clustered Bronchoconstriction

    OpenAIRE

    Hedges, Kerry L.; Tawhai, Merryn H.

    2016-01-01

    One limitation of forced spirometry is that it integrates the contribution of the complex and dynamic behavior of all of the airways and tissue of the lung into a single exhaling unit, hence, it is not clear how spirometric measures are affected by local changes to the airways or tissue such as the presence of ���ventilation defects.��� Here, we adapt a wave-speed limitation model to a spatially distributed and anatomically based airway tree that is embedded within a deformable parenchyma, to...

  3. The effect of body posture during medication inhalation on exercise induced bronchoconstriction in asthmatic children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, R.; Wind, M.; de Graaf, B.J.; de Jong, F.H.; van der Palen, Jacobus Adrianus Maria; Thio, B.J.

    2015-01-01

    RATIONALE: Inhaling medication in a standard body posture leads to impaction of particles in the sharp angle of the upper airway. Stretching the upper airway by extending the neck in a forward leaning body posture may improve pulmonary deposition. A single dose of inhaled corticosteroids (ICS)

  4. Dysfunctional muscarinic M(2) autoreceptors in vagally induced bronchoconstriction of conscious guinea pigs after the early allergic reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    TenBerge, REJ; Krikke, M; Teisman, ACH; Roffel, AF; Zaagsma, J

    1996-01-01

    We studied the function of autoinhibitory muscarinic M(2) receptors on vagal nerve endings in the airways of conscious, unrestrained, ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs after the early and late allergic reaction. For this purpose, the effects of the selective muscarinic M(2) receptor antagonist

  5. Field versus race pace conditions to provoke exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in elite swimmers: Influence of training background

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael D. Kennedy

    2017-06-01

    Conclusion: All conditions have poor sensitivity to diagnose EIB and total accumulated ventilation (distance swum did not influence AHR. These results also indicate that elite swimmers, despite many risk factors, are not limited by respiratory function in race conditions. It is proposed that the swim field test not be used for AHR assessment in swimmers due to too high relative humidity.

  6. Optimizing inhalation therapy in childhood asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, Reina

    2016-01-01

    Childhood asthma is a common chronic disease, featured by inflammation of the airways and episodic bronchoconstriction. Exercise is an important trigger for bronchoconstriction in asthmatic children. They experience this symptom, limiting participation in play and sports, as the most bothersome

  7. Up-regulation of airway smooth muscle histamine H1 receptor mRNA, protein and function by ß2-adrenoceptor activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mak, J.CW; Roffel, A.F; Katsunuma, T; Elzinga, C.R S; Zaagsma, Hans; Barnes, P.J

    Histamine, released from activated mast cells, causes bronchoconstriction mediated by H-1 receptors, whereas beta(2)-agonists are widely used for the relief of bronchoconstriction. In this study, we examined the effects of the beta(2)-adrenoceptor agonist, fenoterol, on the expression of H-1

  8. Airway smooth muscle cells : regulators of airway inflammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zuyderduyn, Suzanne

    2007-01-01

    Airways from asthmatic subjects are more responsive to bronchoconstrictive stimuli than airways from healthy subjects. Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells mediate contraction of the airways by responding to the bronchoconstrictive stimuli, which was thought to be the primary role of ASM cells. In this

  9. Effect of an intranasal conrticosteroid on exercide induced bronchocostriction in asthmatic children

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kersten, E.T.; Leeuwen, J.C. van; Brand, P.L.; Duiverman, E.J.; de Jongh, Franciscus H.C.; Thio, B.J.; Driessen, J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: Allergic rhinitis and exercise induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) are common in asthmatic children. The aim of this study was to investigate whether treatment of allergic rhinitis with an intranasal corticosteroid protects against EIB in asthmatic children. Methods: This was a

  10. Investigation of in vitro and in vivo anti-asthmatic properties of Siphonochilus aethiopicus

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Fouché, Gerda

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic inflammatory disease of the lungs, characterized by increased sensitivity to bronchoconstriction associated with infiltration of immune cells, mucus hypersecretion and structural remodelling of the airways. In South Africa...

  11. A new perspective on muscarinic receptor antagonism in obstructive airways diseases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meurs, Herman; Oenema, Tjitske A.; Kistemaker, Loes E. M.; Gosens, Reinoud

    Acetylcholine has traditionally only been regarded as a neurotransmitter of the parasympathetic nervous system, causing bronchoconstriction and mucus secretion in asthma and COPD by muscarinic receptor activation on airway smooth muscle and mucus-producing cells. Recent studies in experimental

  12. Pro-inflammatory mechanisms of muscarinic receptor stimulation in airway smooth muscle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Oenema, Tjitske A.; Kolahian, Saeed; Nanninga, Janke E.; Rieks, Danielle; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Zuyderduyn, Suzanne; Halayko, Andrew J.; Meurs, Herman; Gosens, Reinoud

    2010-01-01

    Background: Acetylcholine, the primary parasympathetic neurotransmitter in the airways, plays an important role in bronchoconstriction and mucus production. Recently, it has been shown that acetylcholine, by acting on muscarinic receptors, is also involved in airway inflammation and remodelling. The

  13. Mometasone furoate nasal spray for the treatment of asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meteran, Howraman; Backer, Vibeke

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Asthma is a common respiratory disease characterized by airway inflammation, bronchoconstriction and airway hyperresponsiveness and symptoms such as coughing, wheezing, shortness of breath and chest tightness. Allergic rhinitis is a common comorbidity in asthma and glucocorticoids...

  14. Anticholinergic treatment in airways diseases.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Flynn, Robert A

    2009-10-01

    The prevalence of chronic airways diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma is increasing. They lead to symptoms such as a cough and shortness of breath, partially through bronchoconstriction. Inhaled anticholinergics are one of a number of treatments designed to treat bronchoconstriction in airways disease. Both short-acting and long-acting agents are now available and this review highlights their efficacy and adverse event profile in chronic airways diseases.

  15. Failure of enhancement by labetalol of bronchopulmonary effects of histamine in guinea-pigs: independence of alpha-adrenoceptor antagonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clerici, C.; Harf, A.; Macquin-Mavier, I.

    1987-01-01

    The effect of labetalol on histamine-induced bronchoconstriction was studied in anaesthetized guinea-pigs. Unlike propranolol (1 mg kg-1), the same dose of labetalol did not enhance histamine-induced bronchoconstriction. To determine whether the absence of enhancement of the respiratory effects of histamine by labetalol was due to its alpha 1-blocking properties or to its partial agonist activity at beta 2-adrenoceptors, the effects of propranolol plus prazosin and of propranolol plus labetalol on histamine-induced bronchoconstriction were examined. In both cases, the bronchoconstrictor effects of histamine were enhanced to the same extent as with propranolol alone. These data support the hypothesis that the non impairment of respiratory mechanics by labetalol is not due to antagonism at alpha-adrenoceptors and may be mediated by its partial agonist activity at beta 2-adrenoceptors. PMID:2886173

  16. Effect of Inhaled Prostaglandin E2 on Methacholine and Leukotriene D4 Airway Responsiveness in Asthmatic Subjects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wil Hm Stevens

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies in asthmatics have demonstrated that the endogenous release of inhibitory prostaglandins limits the bronchoconstrictor response to repeated challenges with exercise and histamine, and that inhaled prostaglandin (PG E2 attenuates allergen-induced asthmatic responses and exercise bronchoconstriction in asthmatics. Inhaled PGE2 does not significantly attenuate methacholine airway responsiveness. These results, taken together, indicate that inhaled PGE2 attenuates the bronchoconstriction caused by stimuli, such as allergen and exercise, that result in bronchoconstriction through cysteinyl leukotriene (LT release. The purpose of this study was to determine whether inhaled PGE2 could selectively attenuate LTD4-induced bronchoconstriction in seven stable asthmatic subjects. Each subject was studied on four different study days. On two occasions the subjects inhaled 100 mg PGE2, 30 mins before a methacholine, or LTD4 challenge test. On the other two study days, the subjects were pretreated with its diluent. Results were expressed as the provocation concentration causing a 20% fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 (PC20. PGE2 pretreatment significantly increased the LTD4 PC20, but not the methacholine PC20. The mean LTD4 PC20 increased from 2.00 mg/mL (%SEM 1.65 after diluent pretreatment to 3.01 mg/mL (%SEM 1.64 after PGE2 pretreatment (P=0.008. The mean methacholine PC20 was 1.28 mg/mL (%SEM 1.68 after diluent pretreatment and 1.62 mg/mL (%SEM 1.46 after PGE2 pretreatment (P=0.28. These results suggest that PGE2 partially attenuates LTD4-induced bronchoconstriction; however, the magnitude of the effect is unlikely to account for its attenuation of exercise and allergen-induced bronchoconstriction.

  17. Nitrogen Dioxide Exposure and Airway Responsiveness in Individuals with Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Controlled human exposure studies evaluating the effect of inhaled NO2 on the inherent responsiveness of the airways to challenge by bronchoconstricting agents have had mixed results. In general, existing meta-analyses show statistically significant effects of NO2 on the airway r...

  18. 76 FR 56644 - Sulfur Dioxide; Pesticide Tolerances for Emergency Exemptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-14

    ... through the food supply. However, since sulfur does not cause any relevant toxic effects, no quantitative... selected by the Agency for the bystander inhalation risk assessment is 0.25 ppm sulfur dioxide, with one..., as it is based on effects of concern for bystanders (such as bronchoconstriction, shortness of breath...

  19. The correlation between increased reactivity of the bronchi and of mediator releasing cells in asthma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    H.J. Neijenst (H.); H.J. Degenhart (Herman); R.H. Raatgeep (Rolien); K.F. Kerrebijn

    1980-01-01

    textabstractThe hypothesis that increased reactivity in asthma is not always limited to the bronchi but also exists in the mediator releasing system was investigated in forty‐five asthmatic children, approximately half of whom had exercise‐induced bronchoconstriction (EIB). The bronchial threshold

  20. Relationship between airway narrowing, patchy ventilation and lung mechanics in asthmatics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tgavalekos, N T; Musch, G; Harris, R S; Vidal Melo, M F; Winkler, T; Schroeder, T; Callahan, R; Lutchen, K R; Venegas, J G

    2007-06-01

    Bronchoconstriction in asthma results in patchy ventilation forming ventilation defects (VDefs). Patchy ventilation is clinically important because it affects obstructive symptoms and impairs both gas exchange and the distribution of inhaled medications. The current study combined functional imaging, oscillatory mechanics and theoretical modelling to test whether the degrees of constriction of airways feeding those units outside VDefs were related to the extent of VDefs in bronchoconstricted asthmatic subjects. Positron emission tomography was used to quantify the regional distribution of ventilation and oscillatory mechanics were measured in asthmatic subjects before and after bronchoconstriction. For each subject, ventilation data was mapped into an anatomically based lung model that was used to evaluate whether airway constriction patterns, consistent with the imaging data, were capable of matching the measured changes in airflow obstruction. The degree and heterogeneity of constriction of the airways feeding alveolar units outside VDefs was similar among the subjects studied despite large inter-subject variability in airflow obstruction and the extent of the ventilation defects. Analysis of the data amongst the subjects showed an inverse relationship between the reduction in mean airway conductance, measured in the breathing frequency range during bronchoconstriction, and the fraction of lung involved in ventilation defects. The current data supports the concept that patchy ventilation is an expression of the integrated system and not just the sum of independent responses of individual airways.

  1. Effect of an inhaled neutral endopeptidase inhibitor, thiorphan, on airway responsiveness to leukotriene D4 in normal and asthmatic subjects

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Diamant, Z.; Timmers, M. C.; van der Veen, H.; Booms, P.; Sont, J. K.; Sterk, P. J.

    1994-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes are potent inflammatory mediators that are considered to play a role in the pathophysiology of asthma. It can be postulated that leukotrienes exert their bronchoconstricting effects, in part, through secondary release of endogenous neuropeptides. We examined the effect of

  2. Asthma control during the year after bronchial thermoplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cox, Gerard; Thomson, Neil C.; Rubin, Adalberto S.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Bronchial thermoplasty is a bronchoscopic procedure to reduce the mass of airway smooth muscle and attenuate bronchoconstriction. We examined the effect of bronchial thermoplasty on the control of moderate or severe persistent asthma. METHODS: We randomly assigned 112 subjects who had...

  3. β2-Agonist induced cAMP is decreased in asthmatic airway smooth muscle due to increased PDE4D

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Trian, Thomas; Burgess, Janette K; Niimi, Kyoko; Moir, Lyn M; Ge, Qi; Berger, Patrick; Liggett, Stephen B; Black, Judith L; Oliver, Brian G

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Asthma is associated with airway narrowing in response to bronchoconstricting stimuli and increased airway smooth muscle (ASM) mass. In addition, some studies have suggested impaired β-agonist induced ASM relaxation in asthmatics, but the mechanism is not known. OBJECTIVE:

  4. Biodegradation of Organophosphate Chemical Warfare Agents by Activated Sludge

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-01

    bronchoconstriction Bladder (M) Urinary frequency, incontinence Cardiovascular system (M) Bradycardia, hypotension Cardiovascular system (N...15  II. Scholarly Article ..........................................................................................................16  Abstract...is written in the scholarly article format. Chapter 2 is a journal article produced from this research which is planned to be submitted to Water

  5. Effects of airway tree asymmetry on the emergence and spatial persistence of ventilation defects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leary, D; Winkler, T; Braune, A; Maksym, G N

    2014-08-15

    Asymmetry and heterogeneity in the branching of the human bronchial tree are well documented, but their effects on bronchoconstriction and ventilation distribution in asthma are unclear. In a series of seminal studies, Venegas et al. have shown that bronchoconstriction may lead to self-organized patterns of patchy ventilation in a computational model that could explain areas of poor ventilation [ventilation defects (VDefs)] observed in positron emission tomography images during induced bronchoconstriction. To investigate effects of anatomic asymmetry on the emergence of VDefs we used the symmetric tree computational model that Venegas and Winkler developed using different trees, including an anatomic human airway tree provided by M. Tawhai (University of Auckland), a symmetric tree, and three trees with intermediate asymmetry (Venegas JG, Winkler T, Musch G, Vidal Melo MF, Layfield D, Tgavalekos N, Fischman AJ, Callahan RJ, Bellani G, Harris RS. Nature 434: 777-782, 2005 and Winkler T, Venegas JG. J Appl Physiol 103: 655-663, 2007). Ventilation patterns, lung resistance (RL), lung elastance (EL), and the entropy of the ventilation distribution were compared at different levels of airway smooth muscle activation. We found VDefs emerging in both symmetric and asymmetric trees, but VDef locations were largely persistent in asymmetric trees, and bronchoconstriction reached steady state sooner than in a symmetric tree. Interestingly, bronchoconstriction in the asymmetric tree resulted in lower RL (∼%50) and greater EL (∼%25). We found that VDefs were universally caused by airway instability, but asymmetry in airway branching led to local triggers for the self-organized patchiness in ventilation and resulted in persistent locations of VDefs. These findings help to explain the emergence and the persistence in location of VDefs found in imaging studies. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  6. Relationship between airway pathophysiology and airway inflammation in older asthmatics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Porsbjerg, Celeste M; Gibson, Peter G; Pretto, Jeffrey J

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVE: Asthma-related morbidity is greater in older compared with younger asthmatics. Airway closure is also greater in older asthmatics, an observation that may be explained by differences in airway inflammation. We hypothesized that in older adult patients with asthma......, neutrophil airway inflammation increases airway closure during bronchoconstriction, while eosinophil airway inflammation increases airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). METHODS: Asthmatic subjects (n = 26), aged ≥55 years (68% female), were studied, and AHR to 4.5% saline challenge was measured by the response......-dose ratio (%fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 )/mg saline). Airway closure was assessed during bronchoconstriction percent change in forced vital capacity (FVC)/percent change in FEV1 (i.e. Closing Index). Airway inflammation was assessed by induced sputum and exhaled nitric oxide (eNO). RESULTS...

  7. Asthma in elite athletes: pathogenesis, diagnosis, differential diagnoses, and treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lars; Elers, Jimmi; Backer, Vibeke

    2011-01-01

    is essential when treating elite athletes. This article is aimed at physicians who diagnose and treat athletes with respiratory symptoms. It focuses on the pathogenesis of asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in elite athletes and how the diagnosis can be made. Furthermore, treatment of elite......Elite athletes have a high prevalence of asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Although respiratory symptoms can be suggestive of asthma, the diagnosis of asthma in elite athletes cannot be based solely on the presence or absence of symptoms; diagnosis should be based on objective...... measurements, such as the eucapnic voluntary hyperpnea test or exercise test. When considering that not all respiratory symptoms are due to asthma, other diagnoses should be considered. Certain regulations apply to elite athletes who require asthma medication for asthma. Knowledge of these regulations...

  8. A fungal protease allergen provokes airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balenga, Nariman A.; Klichinsky, Michael; Xie, Zhihui; Chan, Eunice C.; Zhao, Ming; Jude, Joseph; Laviolette, Michel; Panettieri, Reynold A.; Druey, Kirk M.

    2015-01-01

    Asthma, a common disorder that affects more than 250 million people worldwide, is defined by exaggerated bronchoconstriction to inflammatory mediators including acetylcholine, bradykinin, and histamine—also termed airway hyper-responsiveness Nearly 10% of people with asthma have severe, treatment-resistant disease, which is frequently associated with IgE sensitization to ubiquitous fungi, typically Aspergillus fumigatus. Here we show that a major Aspergillus fumigatus allergen, Asp f13, which is a serine protease, alkaline protease 1 (Alp 1), promotes airway hyper-responsiveness by infiltrating the bronchial submucosa and disrupting airway smooth muscle cell-extracellular matrix interactions. Alp 1-mediated extracellular matrix degradation evokes pathophysiological RhoA-dependent Ca2+ sensitivity and bronchoconstriction. These findings support a pathogenic mechanism in asthma and other lung diseases associated with epithelial barrier impairment, whereby airway smooth muscle cells respond directly to inhaled environmental allergens to generate airway hyper-responsiveness. PMID:25865874

  9. Genome-Wide and Follow-Up Studies Identify CEP68 Gene Variants Associated with Risk of Aspirin-Intolerant Asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Park, Byung-Lae; Cheong, Hyun Sub; Bae, Joon Seol; Park, Jong Sook; Jang, An Soo; Uh, Soo-Taek; Choi, Jae-Sung; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Choi, Inseon S.; Cho, Sang Heon; Choi, Byoung Whui; Park, Choon-Sik; Shin, Hyoung Doo

    2010-01-01

    Aspirin-intolerant asthma (AIA) is a rare condition that is characterized by the development of bronchoconstriction in asthmatic patients after ingestion of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including aspirin. However, the underlying mechanisms of AIA occurrence are still not fully understood. To identify the genetic variations associated with aspirin intolerance in asthmatics, the first stage of genome-wide association study with 109,365 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was underta...

  10. Cough in Exercise and Athletes

    OpenAIRE

    Hull, James; Jackson, Anna; Dickinson, John W.

    2017-01-01

    Cough is the most common respiratory symptom reported by athletes and can significantly impact on health status, ability to train and athletic performance. The presence of cough in an athlete is typically taken to indicate exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), yet in many athletes with chronic cough there is no objective evidence of airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) or heightened airway inflammation. Moreover, cough in athletes often fails to respond to a therapeutic asthma strategy, th...

  11. Pathophysiology of the cysteinyl leukotrienes and effects of leukotriene receptor antagonists in asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H

    2001-01-01

    and pranlukast inhibit bronchoconstriction in asthmatic patients undergoing allergen, exercise, cold air or aspirin challenge. They attenuate the hallmarks of asthmatic inflammation, including eosinophilia in the airway mucosa and peripheral blood. Moreover, exhaled nitric oxide concentrations, another correlate...... of airway inflammation, are decreased during montelukast treatment in children. Cysteinyl leukotriene synthesis is not blocked by corticosteroid therapy. This important observation suggests that the leukotriene receptor antagonists represent a novel therapeutic approach, one that may provide benefits...

  12. Levodropropizine (LD) activity in allergic asthmatic patients, challenged with ultrasonically nebulized distilled water, metacholine and allergen-induced bronchospasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossi, R; Banfi, P; Filipazzi, V; Castelli, C; Braga, P C

    1994-04-01

    The antitussive compound Levodropropizine (LD) is active in animal bronchoconstriction induced by histamine and capsaicin and in man protects from bronchoconstriction induced by capsaicin. The primary objective of this study was to evaluate the mechanism of action of LD given at 60 mg t.i.d. as oral drops, for 8 days by means of specific bronchial challenges (allergens) and of aspecific challenges acting via different receptors and fibers (i.e. metacholine via cholinergic receptors and ultrasonically nebulized distilled water (UNDW) via histamine and neuropeptide release). The study design is randomized, double-blind, cross-over versus placebo in 30 allergic asthmatic patients. Baseline bronchial tone and bronchoconstrictor response to metacholine (MCh) were not modified by active treatment nor by placebo. On the contrary, in airway responsiveness to UNDW, the active treatment showed an antagonist effect against induced bronchoconstriction of 59% [activity ratio (AR) as antilog = 0.41; 95% confidence interval 0.35-0.54; p < or = 0.05] in comparison to no effect for placebo. Similarly, in airway responsiveness to specific allergen, active treatment antagonized the bronchoconstrictor effect of grass pollen by 83% and of various allergens (dermatophagoides and grass pollen) by 72%, i.e. AR of 0.17 (95% confidence interval 0.045-0.65; p < 0.01) and of 0.28 (95% confidence interval 0.07-1.04; p < 0.05), respectively. No antagonist effect was evident with placebo at all times. Besides inhibiting cough, LD is also partially effective in inhibiting bronchial hyperreactive response against specific allergen and UNDW bronchoconstriction. Hence, LD might act by partly inhibiting histamine and neuropeptide release.

  13. Platelet activating factor: effects on bronchomotor tone and bronchial responsiveness in human beings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, K F; Cuss, F M; Barnes, P J

    1989-01-01

    Platelet-activating factor (PAF) is a newly discovered lipid mediator of inflammation. When inhaled by normal volunteers, it induces bronchoconstriction associated with facial flushing and with a transient fall in circulating neutrophils. Of greater interest is its ability to induce prolonged increases in bronchial responsiveness to methacholine. These observations support an important role for PAF in asthama; the availability of specific PAF antagonists will allow us to test this hypothesis.

  14. The correlation between increased reactivity of the bronchi and of mediator releasing cells in asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Neijenst, H.; Degenhart, Herman; Raatgeep, Rolien; Kerrebijn, K.F.

    1980-01-01

    textabstractThe hypothesis that increased reactivity in asthma is not always limited to the bronchi but also exists in the mediator releasing system was investigated in forty‐five asthmatic children, approximately half of whom had exercise‐induced bronchoconstriction (EIB). The bronchial threshold to histamine was measured as an indicator of the reactivity of the bronchi and the histamine release from leucocytes without adding allergen (spontaneous histamine release) was considered as an indi...

  15. Genetic Mechanisms in Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha Palikhe, Nami; Kim, Seung-Hyun; Jin, Hyun Jung; Hwang, Eui-Kyung; Nam, Young Hee; Park, Hae-Sim

    2012-01-01

    Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD) refers to the development of bronchoconstriction in asthmatics following the exposure to aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The key pathogenic mechanisms associated with AERD are the overproduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs) and increased CysLTR1 expression in the airway mucosa and decreased lipoxin and PGE2 synthesis. Genetic studies have suggested a role for variability of genes in disease susceptibility and the resp...

  16. Impact of a 12weeks supervised exercise training program on pulmonary functions of patients with exercise induced asthma

    OpenAIRE

    Heba, Helmy A.; Ashraf, Kotb A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Exercise induced bronchoconstriction typically develops within 5–15 min after completing exercise. Patients develop typical asthma symptoms or sometimes troublesome cough, which usually resolve spontaneously within 30–45 min. Previous studies tried to find the best way for these subjects aiming to improve exercise performance, respiratory symptoms and quality of life without provoking this type of asthma. Objective: To investigate the effect of supervised exercise training on s...

  17. Sleep apnea, respiratory cooling and thermoregulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reser, Jared Edward

    2009-12-01

    This article will suggest that moderate sleep apnea may have an adaptive benefit, the reduction of nocturnal, respiratory heat loss, that may have caused it to be selected for despite the associated disadvantages. Sleep apnea is caused by the collapse of the throat, specifically the pharyngeal airway, during sleep and can result in discomfort and hypoxia. The large size of the fleshy structures in the pharynx and hypotonicity of the pharyngeal musculature are what cause humans, and many other species of mammals, to be susceptible to apnea. There are many functional and anatomical parallels between sleep apnea and a well known, thermoregulatory response that minimizes respiratory cooling in the lower airways known as reflex bronchoconstriction. Bronchoconstriction involves the constriction of the inner airways, the bronchioles, in response to cold air, a reaction that acts to warm inspired air before it makes contact with the more sensitive lower airways and alveoli. Because air is colder at night and body temperature drops severely during sleep, sleep apnea may represent a similar protective, thermoregulatory adaptation. When the pharynx is collapsed, the diameter of the pharyngeal airway decreases, allowing increased intermolecular collisions between inspired air and the epithelial walls of the upper airway. An increase in the number of collisions facilitates the transference of both warmth and humidity to inspired air before it reaches the more sensitive lower airway resulting in the maintenance of internal, core temperature and alveolar heat retention. In fact, sleep apnea can be conceptualized as a functional reversal of the thermoregulatory process of panting, where the pharynx is highly dilated instead of collapsed. Given the disorder associated with sleep apnea, the absence of a disease state secondary to surgical correction, the fact that the disorder is exclusive to warm-blooded animals, the high proclivity for collapse documented in pregnant mothers, and

  18. Newly divided eosinophils limit ozone-induced airway hyperreactivity in nonsensitized guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wicher, Sarah A; Jacoby, David B; Fryer, Allison D

    2017-06-01

    Ozone causes vagally mediated airway hyperreactivity and recruits inflammatory cells, including eosinophils, to lungs, where they mediate ozone-induced hyperreactivity 1 day after exposure but are paradoxically protective 3 days later. We aimed to test the role of newly divided eosinophils in ozone-induced airway hyperreactivity in sensitized and nonsensitized guinea pigs. Nonsensitized and sensitized guinea pigs were treated with 5-bromo-2-deoxyuridine (BrdU) to label newly divided cells and were exposed to air or ozone for 4 h. Later (1 or 3 days later), vagally induced bronchoconstriction was measured, and inflammatory cells were harvested from bone marrow, blood, and bronchoalveolar lavage. Ozone induced eosinophil hematopoiesis. One day after ozone, mature eosinophils dominate the inflammatory response and potentiate vagally induced bronchoconstriction. However, by 3 days, newly divided eosinophils have reached the lungs, where they inhibit ozone-induced airway hyperreactivity because depleting them with antibody to IL-5 or a TNF-α antagonist worsened vagally induced bronchoconstriction. In sensitized guinea pigs, both ozone-induced eosinophil hematopoiesis and subsequent recruitment of newly divided eosinophils to lungs 3 days later failed to occur. Thus mature eosinophils dominated the ozone-induced inflammatory response in sensitized guinea pigs. Depleting these mature eosinophils prevented ozone-induced airway hyperreactivity in sensitized animals. Ozone induces eosinophil hematopoiesis and recruitment to lungs, where 3 days later, newly divided eosinophils attenuate vagally mediated hyperreactivity. Ozone-induced hematopoiesis of beneficial eosinophils is blocked by a TNF-α antagonist or by prior sensitization. In these animals, mature eosinophils are associated with hyperreactivity. Thus interventions targeting eosinophils, although beneficial in atopic individuals, may delay resolution of airway hyperreactivity in nonatopic individuals. Copyright

  19. [Agreement in asthmatics' perception of dyspnea during acute and chronic obstruction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez-Moragón, E; Perpiñá, M; Belloch, A; de Diego, A; Martínez-Francés, M E

    2005-07-01

    Three types of asthmatic patients can be identified during periods of clinical stability: "poor perceivers," "normal perceivers," and "over perceivers." When asthmatics undergo bronchial challenge in the laboratory, the same distinctions in type of perception can be observed. The aim of the present study was to determine the level of agreement between the 2 situations. A total of 93 patients with persistent moderate asthma (36 men and 57 women; mean age 40 years) were studied. We asked them to assess their dyspnea on a modified Borg scale when stable and after each histamine dose in a bronchial provocation test. When a patient's Borg scale assessment in stable situation was below the 25th percentile, that patient was classified as a poor perceiver. Patients were considered over perceivers if their score in stable situation was in the 75th percentile. Others were labeled normal perceivers. Type of perception during acute bronchoconstriction was defined in function of the change in Borg assessment once forced expiratory volume in the first second had decreased 20%: poor perceivers were those whose change in Borg assessment was in the 25th percentile, over perceivers were in the 75th percentile, and normal perceivers in the middle percentiles. In stable situation, 23 patients were poor perceivers, 58 were normal perceivers, and 12 were over perceivers. During bronchoconstriction, there were 23 poor perceivers, 47 normal perceivers, and 23 over perceivers. Agreement was estimated by a kappa index of 0.0574 for poor perception, 0.1521 for over perception, and 0.3980 for normal perception. Asthmatics' perception of dyspnea during periods of stability and during acute bronchoconstriction are independent phenomena. It is therefore not possible to infer how a patient will perceive an asthmatic attack by evaluating only how he or she perceives breathlessness during stable periods.

  20. A Novel in vivo System to Test Bronchodilators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addison, Kenneth J; Morse, John; Robichaud, Annette; Daines, Michael O; Ledford, Julie G

    2017-03-01

    The incidence and severity of asthma continue to rise worldwide. β-agonists are the most commonly prescribed therapeutic for asthma management but have less efficacy for some subsets of asthmatic patients and there are concerns surrounding the side effects from their long-term persistent use. The demand to develop novel asthma therapeutics highlights the need for a standardized approach to effectively screen and test potential bronchoprotective compounds using relevant in vivo animal models. Here we describe a validated method of testing potential therapeutic compounds for their fast-acting efficacy during the midst of an induced bronchoconstriction in a house dust mite challenged animal model.

  1. Effects of methacholine infusion on desflurane pharmacokinetics in piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozian, Alf; Kretzschmar, Moritz; Baumgardner, James E; Schreiber, Jens; Hedenstierna, Göran; Larsson, Anders; Hachenberg, Thomas; Schilling, Thomas

    2015-12-01

    The data of a corresponding animal experiment demonstrates that nebulized methacholine (MCh) induced severe bronchoconstriction and significant inhomogeneous ventilation and pulmonary perfusion (V̇A/Q̇) distribution in pigs, which is similar to findings in human asthma. The inhalation of MCh induced bronchoconstriction and delayed both uptake and elimination of desflurane (Kretzschmar et al., 2015) [1]. The objective of the present data is to determine V̇A/Q̇ matching by Multiple Inert Gas Elimination Technique (MIGET) in piglets before and during methacholine- (MCh-) induced bronchoconstriction, induced by MCh infusion, and to assess the blood concentration profiles for desflurane (DES) by Micropore Membrane Inlet Mass Spectrometry (MMIMS). Healthy piglets (n=4) under general anesthesia were instrumented with arterial, central venous, and pulmonary artery lines. The airway was secured via median tracheostomy with an endotracheal tube, and animals were mechanically ventilated with intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) with a FiO2 of 0.4, tidal volume (V T)=10 ml/kg and PEEP of 5cmH2O using an open system. The determination of V.A/Q. was done by MIGET: before desflurane application and at plateau in both healthy state and during MCh infusion. Arterial blood was sampled at 0, 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 30 min during wash-in and washout, respectively. Bronchoconstriction was established by MCH infusion aiming at doubling the peak airway pressure, after which wash-in and washout of the anesthetic gas was repeated. Anesthesia gas concentrations were measured by MMIMS. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, paired t-test, and by nonparametric Friedman׳s test and Wilcoxon׳s matched pairs test. We measured airway pressures, pulmonary resistance, and mean paO2 as well as hemodynamic variables in all pigs before desflurane application and at plateau in both healthy state and during methacholine administration by infusion. By MIGET, fractional alveolar ventilation and

  2. Effects of methacholine infusion on desflurane pharmacokinetics in piglets☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozian, Alf; Kretzschmar, Moritz; Baumgardner, James E.; Schreiber, Jens; Hedenstierna, Göran; Larsson, Anders; Hachenberg, Thomas; Schilling, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    The data of a corresponding animal experiment demonstrates that nebulized methacholine (MCh) induced severe bronchoconstriction and significant inhomogeneous ventilation and pulmonary perfusion (V̇A/Q̇) distribution in pigs, which is similar to findings in human asthma. The inhalation of MCh induced bronchoconstriction and delayed both uptake and elimination of desflurane (Kretzschmar et al., 2015) [1]. The objective of the present data is to determine V̇A/Q̇ matching by Multiple Inert Gas Elimination Technique (MIGET) in piglets before and during methacholine- (MCh-) induced bronchoconstriction, induced by MCh infusion, and to assess the blood concentration profiles for desflurane (DES) by Micropore Membrane Inlet Mass Spectrometry (MMIMS). Healthy piglets (n=4) under general anesthesia were instrumented with arterial, central venous, and pulmonary artery lines. The airway was secured via median tracheostomy with an endotracheal tube, and animals were mechanically ventilated with intermittent positive pressure ventilation (IPPV) with a FiO2 of 0.4, tidal volume (VT)=10 ml/kg and PEEP of 5cmH2O using an open system. The determination of V.A/Q. was done by MIGET: before desflurane application and at plateau in both healthy state and during MCh infusion. Arterial blood was sampled at 0, 1, 2, 5, 10, 20, and 30 min during wash-in and washout, respectively. Bronchoconstriction was established by MCH infusion aiming at doubling the peak airway pressure, after which wash-in and washout of the anesthetic gas was repeated. Anesthesia gas concentrations were measured by MMIMS. Data were analyzed by ANOVA, paired t-test, and by nonparametric Friedman׳s test and Wilcoxon׳s matched pairs test. We measured airway pressures, pulmonary resistance, and mean paO2 as well as hemodynamic variables in all pigs before desflurane application and at plateau in both healthy state and during methacholine administration by infusion. By MIGET, fractional alveolar ventilation and

  3. Terbutaline: level the playing field for inhaled β2-agonists by introducing a dosing and urine threshold

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobson, Glenn A; Hostrup, Morten

    2017-01-01

    Terbutaline, a short-acting β2-agonist similar to salbutamol, is widely used in Europe in the treatment of asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Unlike salbutamol, terbutaline requires therapeutic use exemption (TUE) for therapeutic inhaled use in competitive sport. There is now...... limits for other common β2-agonists. This allows athletes to use these drugs for therapeutic purposes while minimising the potential for doping and administrative burden of TUEs. However, no such threshold limits currently exist for terbutaline. For terbutaline, athletes can be granted a TUE...

  4. Can resistive breathing injure the lung? Implications for COPD exacerbations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vassilakopoulos T

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Theodoros Vassilakopoulos, Dimitrios Toumpanakis Pulmonary and Critical Care Medicine, Medical School, National and Kapodistrian University of Athens, Greece Abstract: In obstructive lung diseases, airway inflammation leads to bronchospasm and thus resistive breathing, especially during exacerbations. This commentary discusses experimental evidence that resistive breathing per se (the mechanical stimulus in the absence of underlying airway inflammation leads to lung injury and inflammation (mechanotransduction. The potential implications of resistive breathing-induced mechanotrasduction in COPD exacerbations are presented along with the available clinical evidence. Keywords: resistive breathing, COPD, mechanotransduction, bronchoconstriction, inflammation

  5. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Agents in the Treatment of Asthma in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Gaudreault

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available The increasing scientific information clearly demonstrates the important role of inflammation in asthma. This evidence has led physicians to focus their treatment on the elimination of inflammation instead of working solely against bronchoconstriction. Steroids and nonsteroidal agents are currently used to prevent this inflammatory component. This paper focuses only on nonstcroidal anti-inflammatory agents such as sodium cromoglycate, nedocromil sodium and ketotifen and their use in pediatric asthma. The discussion on each medication addresses its mechanism of action, the evidence concerning its efficacy in pediatrics (ie, clinical pharmacology, acute bronchial challenge, late asthmatic response, bronchial hyperrcactivity, clinical efficacy and the pediatric dose.

  6. Diffuse idiopathic pulmonary neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia in a patient with multiple pulmonary nodules: case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamin HS

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Diffuse idiopathic pulmonary neuroendocrine cell hyperplasia (DIPNECH is a rare pulmonary disease, where carcinoid tumorlets invade the pulmonary parenchyma and bronchioles. These nests of cells release a variety of mediators including bombesin and gastrin releasing peptide that cause heterogeneous bronchoconstriction, creating a mosaic appearance on chest imaging studies, especially on expiratory scans. Clinically patients usually have long standing symptoms of shortness of breath (SOB and cough that are difficult to distinguish from asthma. In this article we describe a case of DIPNECH in a patient with several years’ history of SOB and cough, and review 179 cases of DIPNECH reported in the literature since 1992.

  7. Use of Mannitol Inhalation Challenge in Assessment of Cough

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    Bronchial provocation testing uses a variety of direct and indirect inhalational challenges to evaluate airway hyperreactivity. Mannitol, a simple, easy-to-administer hypertonic stimulus available in many countries, is currently under review by the FDA in the US. Healthy subjects show no airway response to inhaled mannitol; asthmatic patients respond with airway narrowing similar to challenges with hypertonic saline and exercise. Mannitol challenge also has a tussive effect that is independent of bronchoconstriction, suggesting different physiologic pathways. Patients with chronic cough show increased sensitivity to mannitol, and mannitol testing may be useful for evaluating heterogeneity in the cough response. PMID:19756864

  8. Cholinergic Regulation of Airway Inflammation and Remodelling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saeed Kolahian

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acetylcholine is the predominant parasympathetic neurotransmitter in the airways that regulates bronchoconstriction and mucus secretion. Recent findings suggest that acetylcholine regulates additional functions in the airways, including inflammation and remodelling during inflammatory airway diseases. Moreover, it has become apparent that acetylcholine is synthesized by nonneuronal cells and tissues, including inflammatory cells and structural cells. In this paper, we will discuss the regulatory role of acetylcholine in inflammation and remodelling in which we will focus on the role of the airway smooth muscle cell as a target cell for acetylcholine that modulates inflammation and remodelling during respiratory diseases such as asthma and COPD.

  9. Inhibitory effect of n-butanol fraction of Moringa oleifera Lam. seeds on ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation in a guinea pig model of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Shailaja G; Banerjee, Aryamitra; Chauhan, Bhupendrasinh F; Padh, Harish; Nivsarkar, Manish; Mehta, Anita A

    2009-01-01

    Moringaceae, which belongs to the Moringa oleifera Lam. family, is a well-known herb used in Asian medicine as an antiallergic drug. In the present study, the efficacy of the n-butanol extract of the seeds of the plant (MONB) is examined against ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation in guinea pigs. The test drugs (MONB or dexamethasone) are administered orally prior to challenge with aerosolized 0.5% ovalbumin. During the experimental period, bronchoconstriction tests are performed, and lung function parameters are measured. The blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid are collected to assess cellular content, and serum is used for cytokine (tumor necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-4, and interleukin-6) assays. Histamine assays of lung tissue are performed using lung tissue homogenate. The results suggest that in ovalbumin-sensitized model control animals, tidal volume is decreased, respiration rate is increased, and both the total and differential cell counts in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid are increased significantly compared with nonsensitized controls. MONB treatment shows improvement in all parameters except bronchoalveolar lavage tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-4. Moreover, MONB treatment demonstrates protection against acetylcholine-induced bronchoconstriction and airway inflammation. These results indicate that MONB has an inhibitory effect on airway inflammation. Thus, MONB possesses an antiasthmatic property through modulation of the relationship between Th1/Th2 cytokine imbalances.

  10. Physiological Changes at Altitude in Nonasthmatic and Asthmatic Subjects

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    Dianna Louie

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Exercised-induced asthma is not due to exercise itself per se, but rather is due to cooling and/or drying of the airway because of the increased ventilation that accompanies exercise. Travel to high altitudes is accompanied by increased ventilation of cool, often dry, air, irrespective of the level of exertion, and by itself, this could represent an 'exercise' challenge for asthmatic subjects. Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction was measured at sea level and at various altitudes during a two-week trek through the Himalayas in a group of nonasthmatic and asthmatic subjects. The results of this study showed that in mild asthmatics, there was a significant reduction in peak expiratory flow at very high altitudes. Contrary to the authors' hypothesis, there was not a significant additional decrease in peak expiratory flow after exercise in the asthmatic subjects at high altitude. However, there was a significant fall in arterial oxygen saturation postexercise in the asthmatic subjects, a change that was not seen in the nonasthmatic subjects. These data suggest that asthmatic subjects develop bronchoconstriction when they go to very high altitudes, possibly via the same mechanism that causes exercise-induced asthma.

  11. Formaldehyde inhalation reduces respiratory mechanics in a rat model with allergic lung inflammation by altering the nitric oxide/cyclooxygenase-derived products relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lino-dos-Santos-Franco, Adriana; Gimenes-Júnior, João Antonio; Ligeiro-de-Oliveira, Ana Paula; Breithaupt-Faloppa, Ana Cristina; Acceturi, Beatriz Golegã; Vitoretti, Luana Beatriz; Machado, Isabel Daufenback; Oliveira-Filho, Ricardo Martins; Farsky, Sandra Helena Poliselli; Moriya, Henrique Takachi; Tavares-de-Lima, Wothan

    2013-09-01

    Bronchial hyperresponsiveness is a hallmark of asthma and many factors modulate bronchoconstriction episodes. A potential correlation of formaldehyde (FA) inhalation and asthma has been observed; however, the exact role of FA remains controversial. We investigated the effects of FA inhalation on Ovalbumin (OVA) sensitisation using a parameter of respiratory mechanics. The involvement of nitric oxide (NO) and cyclooxygenase-derived products were also evaluated. The rats were submitted, or not, to FA inhalation (1%, 90 min/day, 3 days) and were OVA-sensitised and challenged 14 days later. Our data showed that previous FA exposure in allergic rats reduced bronchial responsiveness, respiratory resistance (Rrs) and elastance (Ers) to methacholine. FA exposure in allergic rats also increased the iNOS gene expression and reduced COX-1. L-NAME treatment exacerbated the bronchial hyporesponsiveness and did not modify the Ers and Rrs, while Indomethacin partially reversed all of the parameters studied. The L-NAME and Indomethacin treatments reduced leukotriene B₄ levels while they increased thromboxane B₂ and prostaglandin E₂. In conclusion, FA exposure prior to OVA sensitisation reduces the respiratory mechanics and the interaction of NO and PGE₂ may be representing a compensatory mechanism in order to protect the lung from bronchoconstriction effects. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Eicosanoids in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Kong-Sang; Wu, Wei-Fong

    2007-01-01

    Eicosanoids belong to a diverse family of bioactive fatty acids that play important roles in regulating airway inflammation and reactivity. They are the key mediators of the pathobiology of asthma. Among the eicosanoids, lipoxins (LXs) were the first agents to be identified and recognized as potential anti-inflammatory endogenous lipid mediators. Lipoxins are biosynthesized in vivo at inflammation sites. They result mainly from the interaction between 5 and 15-lipoxygenases (LOs), which are distinct from leukotrienes (LTs) and prostaglandins (PGs) in structure and function. Leukotrienes are potent proinflammatory mediators and directly and indirectly stimulate fibroblast chemotaxis, proliferation, and collagen synthesis. Prostaglandins have both bronchoconstrictive and bronchoprotective effects and the bronchoconstriction mediated by PGD2 and PGF2alpha is only occurred in asthmatic patients but not in healthy subjects. Lipoxins counter-regulate the proinflammatory actions of LTs and activate resolution of the inflammatory response. At least two classes of receptors, CysLT1 receptors and Asprin-triggered lipoxin A4 (ALX) receptors, can interact with lipoxin A4 (LXA4) and LXA4 analogs to mediate their biologic actions. Allergen challenge initiates airway biosynthesis of LXA4 and increases expression of its receptor. In addition, LXA4 affects the release of interleukin-8 by blood mononuclear cells, and ALX affects calcium influx into epithelial cells. Therefore, the pivotal role of LXs is mediating airway homeostasis, and LXs may be part of a novel, multipronged approach for treating human asthma.

  13. A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled study assessing the safety and tolerability of regadenoson in subjects with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prenner, Bruce M; Bukofzer, Stan; Behm, Sarah; Feaheny, Kathleen; McNutt, Bruce E

    2012-08-01

    Adenosine receptor stress agents for myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) may cause A(2B) and/or A(3) receptor-mediated bronchoconstriction, of particular concern to physicians testing patients with asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). A Phase 4, randomized, double-blind study (NCT00862641) assessed the safety of the selective A(2A) receptor agonist, regadenoson, compared with placebo in subjects with asthma or COPD who represented likely candidates for MPI. Overall, 356 and 176 subjects with asthma and 316 and 151 subjects with COPD received regadenoson and placebo, respectively. The percentage of subjects experiencing a >15% decrease in FEV(1) from baseline to any assessment up to 24 hours post-baseline was not statistically significantly different between the regadenoson and the placebo groups in the asthma or COPD stratum. Dyspnea, the most frequent respiratory adverse event, occurred with higher incidence (P regadenoson group than the placebo group in the asthma (10.7% vs 1.1%) and COPD (18.0% vs 2.6%) strata. No subjects experienced severe bronchoconstriction, although the occurrence of such reactions with adenosine receptor agonists cannot be ruled out, such that caution is advised. This information may be helpful to physicians selecting a pharmacologic stress agent for MPI in patients with asthma or COPD.

  14. Ionotropic and Metabotropic Proton-Sensing Receptors Involved in Airway Inflammation in Allergic Asthma

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    Haruka Aoki

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An acidic microenvironment has been shown to evoke a variety of airway responses, including cough, bronchoconstriction, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR, infiltration of inflammatory cells in the lung, and stimulation of mucus hyperproduction. Except for the participation of transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1 and acid-sensing ion channels (ASICs in severe acidic pH (of less than 6.0-induced cough and bronchoconstriction through sensory neurons, the molecular mechanisms underlying extracellular acidic pH-induced actions in the airways have not been fully understood. Recent studies have revealed that ovarian cancer G protein-coupled receptor 1 (OGR1-family G protein-coupled receptors, which sense pH of more than 6.0, are expressed in structural cells, such as airway smooth muscle cells and epithelial cells, and in inflammatory and immune cells, such as eosinophils and dendritic cells. They function in a variety of airway responses related to the pathophysiology of inflammatory diseases, including allergic asthma. In the present review, we discuss the roles of ionotropic TRPV1 and ASICs and metabotropic OGR1-family G protein-coupled receptors in the airway inflammation and AHR in asthma and respiratory diseases.

  15. Effect of N-acetylcysteine on gas exchange after methacholine challenge and isoprenaline inhalation in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueno, O; Lee, L N; Wagner, P D

    1989-03-01

    N-acetylcysteine (NAC) has antioxidant and possibly mucolytic properties. To determine whether NAC could be of benefit in acute bronchoconstriction induced by methacholine, 12 of 24 anaesthetized dogs (group 1) received NAC i.v. (loading dose 150 mg.kg-1, then 20 mg.kg-1.hr-1). The other 12 (group 2) received diluent. Nebulized methacholine (1%) was then inhaled until arterial oxygen tension (PaO2) fell to a mean of 5.5 kPa, after which isoprenaline 0.5% was inhaled in six dogs of each group to reverse bronchoconstriction. Over the next 3 h we measured total lung resistance, functional residual capacity (FRC), haemodynamic variables, and pulmonary gas exchange for respiratory and inert gases. After methacholine challenge, lung resistance increased and then fell similarly for both groups, but PaO2 was higher in the NAC group (by 0.6-1.9 kPa) throughout the observation period. The ventilation-perfusion distribution measured by inert gas elimination also showed less abnormality in the NAC treated dogs over this time. Mucus was visible during post-mortem in the large airways in about half of the dogs in both groups, with no significant differences between them. These results show that NAC produces a measurable improvement in gas exchange following methacholine challenge (both with and without subsequent isoprenaline therapy) by mechanisms that remain to be determined.

  16. Dynamic model of eicosanoid production with special reference to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug-triggered hypersensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fajmut, Aleš; Emeršič, Tadej; Dobovišek, Andrej; Antić, Nataša; Schäfer, Dirk; Brumen, Milan

    2015-10-01

    The authors developed a mathematical model of arachidonic acid (AA) degradation to prostaglandins (PGs) and leukotrienes (LTs), which are implicated in the processes of inflammation and hypersensitivity to non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). The model focuses on two PGs (PGE2 and PGD2) and one LT (LTC4), their % increases and their ratios. Results are compared with experimental studies obtained from non-asthmatics (NAs), and asthmatics tolerant (ATA) or intolerant (AIA) to aspirin. Simulations are carried out for predefined model populations NA, ATA and three AIA, based on the differences of two enzymes, PG E synthase and/or LTC4-synthase in two states, that is, no-inflammation and inflammation. Their model reveals that the model population with concomitant malfunctions in both enzymes is the most sensitive to NSAIDs, since the duration and the capacity for bronchoconstriction risk are highest after simulated oral dosing of indomethacin. Furthermore, inflammation prolongs the duration of the bronchoconstriction risk in all AIA model populations, and the sensitivity analysis reveals multiple possible scenarios leading to hypersensitivity, especially if inflammatory processes affect the expression of multiple enzymes of the AA metabolic pathway. Their model estimates the expected fold-changes in enzyme activities and gives valuable information for further targeted transcriptomic/proteomic and metabolomic studies.

  17. Inhaled corticosteroids and HPA axis suppression: how important is it and how should it be managed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao Bondugulapati, L N; Rees, D A

    2016-08-01

    Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are established as a cornerstone of management for patients with bronchoconstrictive lung disease. However, systemic absorption may lead to suppression of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis in a significant minority of patients. This is more likely in 'higher risk' patients exposed to high cumulative ICS doses, and in those treated with frequent oral corticosteroids or drugs which inhibit cytochrome p450 3A4. Hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis suppression is frequently unrecognized, such that some patients, notably children, only come to light when an adrenal crisis is precipitated by physical stress. To minimize this risk, 'higher risk' patients and those with previously identified suppressed cortisol responses to Synacthen testing should undergo an education programme to inform them about sick day rules. A review of ICS therapy should also be undertaken to ensure that the dose administered is the minimum required to control symptoms. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. BL-5255. I. Activity in animal models of immediate hypersensitivity reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siminoff, P; Reed, F C; Schurig, J E

    1982-01-01

    BL-5255 exhibited potent activity in several models of antigen-induced immediate hypersensitivity reactions in rats and guinea pigs. The compound was effective whether administered by oral or parenteral routes and in passively and actively sensitized animals. It appeared to be readily absorbed when given orally. Localized skin and bronchoconstriction reactions in rats were inhibited by the compound by oral doses at 0.014 and 1 mg/kg, respectively. BL-5255 was protective against both IgE- and IgG-mediated reactions in the rat and guinea pig. Its effectiveness versus the systemic anaphylaxis reaction in the guinea pig appears to be due to BL-5255's ability to inhibit both the IgE and IgG1 components of the reaction.

  19. Metastatic Carcinoid Tumor Presenting As Right Sided Heart Failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Quintana, Efren; Avila-Gonzalez, Maria Del Mar; Suarez-Castellano, Laura; Rodriguez-Gonzalez, Fayna

    2013-01-01

    Carcinoid tumor is a slow-growing type of neuroendocrine tumor, originating in the enterochromaffin cells and secreting mainly serotonin. The diagnosis is based on clinical symptoms, hormone levels, radiological and nuclear imaging, and histological confirmation. The clinical symptoms are characterized by flushing, diarrhea, abdominal pain, telangiectasia and/or bronchoconstriction. However, most patients have metastatic disease at diagnosis because the clinic goes unnoticed or are ascribed to other abdominal conditions. We report the clinical symptoms, hormone levels, radiological and nuclear imaging, histological diagnosis, treatment and evaluation of a 44-year-old female patient with congestive heart failure secondary to carcinoid heart disease in the context of liver metastases of an ileum carcinoid tumor. PMID:23825984

  20. MONTELUKAST IN TREATING ALLERGIC DISEASES

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    T.V. Kulichenko

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Anti inflammatory medications are the basis for pathogenetic treatment of allergic diseases. The review covers description of the most studied and efficient medication of leukotriene receptors' antagonist category montelukast. Specific and reversible antagonism to leukotriene receptors sets two most important effects of this medication: treatment of inflammatory process and influence tu muscular cells of bronchi. The article reviews in detail the possibility of applying montelukast in allergology as a basis therapy, peculiarities of its pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and safety. Its advantages and disadvantages for monotherapy of bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis are discussed, as well as the role of this category of medications in combined therapy of bronchial asthma and allergic rhinitis, and its influence to exercise induced bronchoconstriction.Key words: antagonists of leukotriene receptors, montelukast, bronchial asthma, allergic rhinitis, treatment, children.

  1. Regadenoson use in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the state of current knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golzar, Yasmeen; Doukky, Rami

    2014-01-01

    Stress testing is challenging in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Functional capacity is generally decreased in this patient population, limiting patients' ability to achieve physiologic stress through exercise. Additionally, due to emphysematous changes, COPD patients tend to have poor acoustic windows that impair the quality and therefore diagnostic accuracy of stress echocardiography techniques. Pharmacologic stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI) testing is also problematic, particularly due to the concern for adenosine-induced bronchoconstriction with conventional vasodilator stress agents. Regadenoson, a selective A2A adenosine receptor agonist, has gained popularity due to its ease of administration and improved patient experience in the general population. The literature describing the experience with regadenoson in COPD patients, though limited, is rapidly growing and reassuring. This review summarizes the pharmacology and clinical application of this novel stress agent and presents the available data on the safety and tolerability of its use in COPD patients.

  2. Hyperventilation in Panic Disorder and Asthma: Empirical Evidence and Clinical Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meuret, Alicia E.; Ritz, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Sustained or spontaneous hyperventilation has been associated with a variety of physical symptoms and has been linked to a number of organic illnesses and mental disorders. Theories of panic disorder hold that hyperventilation either produces feared symptoms of hypocapnia or protects against feared suffocation symptoms of hypercapnia. Although the evidence for both theories is inconclusive, findings from observational, experimental, and therapeutic studies suggest an important role of low carbon dioxide (CO2) levels in this disorder. Similarly, hypocapnia and associated hyperpnia are linked to bronchoconstriction, symptom exacerbation, and lower quality of life in patients with asthma. Raising CO2 levels by means of therapeutic capnometry has proven beneficial effects in both disorders, and the reversing of hyperventilation has emerged as a potent mediator for reductions in panic symptom severity and treatment success. PMID:20685222

  3. Should antihistamines be re-considered as antiasthmatic drugs as adjuvants to anti-leukotrienes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartho, Lorand; Benko, Rita

    2013-02-15

    In spite of histamine mimicking the symptoms of allergic bronchoconstriction and severe anaphylaxis, histamine antagonists most probably represent no effective treatment for these conditions. Anti-leukotrienes proved effective for preventing attacks of allergic asthma. In vitro evidence supports a supra-additive effect of histamine H1 receptor antagonists and anti-leukotrienes in vitro, in asthma models utilizing human bronchi. The same seems to hold true for human allergen provocation tests in vivo. We conclude that combinations of second-generation antihistamines and anti-leukotrienes deserve a large-scale clinical trial for preventing and/or treating attacks of allergic asthma. If useful, these drugs could provide a cost-effective alternative to some recent antiasthmatics. Given that redundant mechanisms may be included in asthma pathophysiology, other combinations (including thromboxane or platelet activating factor antagonists) could also be considered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Airway dysfunction in elite swimmers: prevalence, impact, and challenges

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    Lomax M

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Mitch Lomax Department of Sport and Exercise Science, University of Portsmouth, Portsmouth, UK Abstract: The prevalence of airway dysfunction in elite swimmers is among the highest in elite athletes. The traditional view that swimmers naturally gravitate toward swimming because of preexisting respiratory disorders has been challenged. There is now sufficient evidence that the higher prevalence of bronchial tone disorders in elite swimmers is not the result of a natural selection bias. Rather, the combined effects of repeated chlorine by-product exposure and chronic endurance training can lead to airway dysfunction and atopy. This review will detail the underpinning causes of airway dysfunction observed in elite swimmers. It will also show that airway dysfunction does not prevent success in elite level swimming. Neither does it inhibit lung growth and might be partially reversible when elite swimmers retire from competition. Keywords: exercise, aquatic athletes, bronchoconstriction

  5. Common causes of dyspnoea in athletes: a practical approach for diagnosis and management

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    James M. Smoliga

    2016-06-01

    Dyspnoea during exercise is a common chief complaint in athletes and active individuals. It is not uncommon for dyspnoeic athletes to be diagnosed with asthma, “exercise-induced asthma” or exercise-induced bronchoconstriction based on their symptoms, but this strategy regularly leads to misdiagnosis and improper patient management. Dyspnoea during exercise can ultimately be caused by numerous respiratory and nonrespiratory conditions, ranging from nonpathological to potentially fatal in severity. As, such it is important for healthcare providers to be familiar with the many factors that can cause dyspnoea during exercise in seemingly otherwise-healthy individuals and have a general understanding of the clinical approach to this patient population. This article reviews common conditions that ultimately cause athletes to report dyspnoea and associated symptoms, and provides insight for developing an efficient diagnostic plan.

  6. Metabolic effects of beta2-agonists in relation to exercise performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalsen, Anders

    2015-01-01

    Beta2-agonists are frequently used in the treatment of asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in elite athletes. However, aside from a bronchodilatory effect, beta2-agonists have also been shown to improve exercise performance, which makes these substances subjected to misuse by elite...... athletes. The present PhD thesis is based on four manuscripts in which the acute effects of beta2-agonists on exercise performance were investigated. The aims were 1) to investigate whether supratherapeutic inhalation of beta2-agonists enhances muscle strength, anaerobic performance and aerobic performance......, 2) to uncover the mechanisms behind potential beta2-adrenergic improvements in anaerobic performance, 3) to investigate whether inhalation of beta2-agonists is ergogenic in elite athletes with or without airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Results from the studies of the thesis show...

  7. Pathophysiology of the cysteinyl leukotrienes and effects of leukotriene receptor antagonists in asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bisgaard, H

    2001-01-01

    Cysteinyl leukotrienes, synthesized de novo from cell membrane phospholipids, are proinflammatory mediators that play an important role in the pathophysiology of asthma. These mediators are among the most potent of bronchoconstrictors and cause vasodilation, increased microvascular permeability......, exudation of macromolecules and edema. The cysteinyl leukotrienes also have potent chemoattractant properties for eosinophils, causing an influx of eosinophils into the airway mucosa, which further fuels the inflammatory process. In addition, the cysteinyl leukotrienes are potent secretagogues and reduce...... and pranlukast inhibit bronchoconstriction in asthmatic patients undergoing allergen, exercise, cold air or aspirin challenge. They attenuate the hallmarks of asthmatic inflammation, including eosinophilia in the airway mucosa and peripheral blood. Moreover, exhaled nitric oxide concentrations, another correlate...

  8. Exhaled nitric oxide dynamics in asthmatic reactions induced by diisocyanates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, P; Scarpa, M C; Guarnieri, G; Giordano, G; Baraldi, E; Maestrelli, P

    2016-12-01

    Isocyanate-induced asthmatic reactions are associated with delayed increase in fractional exhaled nitric oxide measured at expiratory flow of 50 mL/s (FeNO50), a biomarker of airway inflammation. The time course of FeNO increase is compatible with the activation of NO synthase, but the origin of NO production in the lung is undetermined. The aim of this study was to define the dynamics of airway and alveolar NO during specific inhalation challenge (SIC) with isocyanates and the role of asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), an endogenous inhibitor of NO synthase. Spirometry, exhaled NO parameters (FeNO50, bronchial wall NO concentration, NO airway diffusing capacity, NO flux to luminal space, alveolar NO) and ADMA levels in exhaled breath condensate were measured before and at intervals up to 24 h after exposure to isocyanates. The results were compared between 17 SIC-positive and eight SIC-negative subjects. A significant FeNO50 increase in SIC-positive subjects was detected 24 h after exposure and was associated with the augmented NO flux from airway wall to the lumen, whereas airway NO diffusion and alveolar NO were not affected. The changes in NO dynamics were specific for the subjects who developed an asthmatic reaction, but were independent from the pattern and magnitude of bronchoconstriction. There was no evidence that exhaled NO is modulated by the changes in ADMA concentration. Because isocyanate-induced increase in FeNO50 was almost exclusively determined by the increase in NO flux, the use of FeNO50 appears adequate to monitor the exhaled NO dynamics during SIC. FeNO50 measurement may provide additional information to spirometry, because bronchoconstriction and airway inflammatory responses are dissociated. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Effect of Moringa oleifera Lam. seed extract on ovalbumin-induced airway inflammation in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Shailaja G; Mehta, Anita A

    2008-08-01

    To determine the therapeutic potential of herbal medicine Moringa oleifera Lam. family: Moringaceae in the control of allergic diseases, the efficacy of the ethanolic extract of the seeds of the plant (MOEE) against ovalbumin (OVA)-induced airway inflammation in guinea pigs was examined. During the experimental period, the test drugs (MOEE or dexamethasone) were administered by oral route prior to challenge with aerosolized 0.5% OVA. Bronchoconstriction tests were performed and respiratory parameters (i.e., tidal volume and respiratory rate) were measured. At the end of experiment, blood was collected from each animal to perform total and differential counts and serum was used for assay of IL-4, IL-6, and TNFalpha. Lung lavage fluid (BAL) was collected for estimation of cellular content and cytokine levels. Lung tissue histamine assays were performed using the homogenate of one lobe from each animal; a separate lobe and the trachea were subjected to histopathology to measure the degree of any airway inflammation. The results suggest that in OVA-sensitized control animals that did not receive either drug, tidal volume (V(t)) was decreased, respiration rate (f) was increased, and both the total and differential cell counts in blood and BAL fluid were increased significantly. MOEE-treatment of sensitized hosts resulted in improvement in all parameters except BAL TNFalpha and IL-4. Moreover, MOEE-treatment also showed protection against acetylcholine-induced broncho-constriction and airway inflammation which was confirmed by histological observations. The results of these studies confirm the traditional claim for the usefulness of this herb in the treatment of allergic disorders like asthma.

  10. Dyspnea assessment and adverse events during sputum induction in COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moschandreas Joanna

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The inhalation of normal or hypertonic saline during sputum induction (SI may act as an indirect bronchoconstrictive stimulus leading to dyspnea and lung function deterioration. Our aim was to assess dyspnea and adverse events in COPD patients who undergo SI following a safety protocol. Methods Sputum was induced by normal and hypertonic (4.5% saline solution in 65 patients with COPD of varying severity. In order to minimize saline-induced bronchoconstriction a protocol based on the European Respiratory Society sputum induction Task group report was followed. Dyspnea change was scored using the Borg scale and lung function was assessed by spirometry and oximetry. Results Borg score changes [median(IQR 1.5(0–2] were observed during SI in 40 subjects; 16 patients required temporary discontinuation of the procedure due to dyspnea-general discomfort and 2 did not complete the session due to dyspnea-wheezing. The change in Borg dyspnea score was significantly correlated with oxygen saturation and heart rate changes and with discontinuation of the procedure due to undesired symptoms. 19 subjects presented an hyperresponsive reaction (decline>20% from baseline FEV1. No significant correlation between Borg changes and FEV1decline was found. Patients with advanced COPD presented significantly greater Borg and oxygen saturation changes than patients with less severe disease (p = 0.02 and p = 0.001, respectively. Baseline FEV1, oxygen saturation and 6MWT demonstrated significant diagnostic values in distinguishing subjects who develop an adverse physiologic reaction during the procedure. Conclusion COPD patients undergoing SI following a safety protocol do not experience major adverse events. Dyspnea and oxygen desaturation is more likely to occur in patients with disease in advanced stages, leading to short discontinuation or less frequently to termination of the procedure. Baseline FEV1, oxygen saturation and 6MWT may have a

  11. Incidence of aspirin hypersensitivity in patients with chronic rhinosinusitis and diagnostic value of urinary leukotriene E4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celejewska-Wójcik, Natalia; Mastalerz, Lucyna; Wójcik, Krzysztof; Nieckarz, Rafał; Januszek, Rafał; Hartwich, Patryk; Szaleniec, Joanna; Hydzik-Sobocińska, Karolina; Oleś, Krzysztof; Cybulska, Agnieszka; Stręk, Paweł; Sanak, Marek

    2012-01-01

    Chronic rhinosinusitis (CRS) with nasal polyposis (NP) may be associated with hypersensitivity to nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs, representing a syndrome of aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD). The aim of the study was to validate a simple measurement of urinary leukotriene E4 (uLTE4) excretion for the diagnosis of AERD in patients with CRS and indication for surgery. Subjects requiring functional endoscopic sinus surgery (FESS) were recruited from the Department of Otolaryngology (n = 24). Before surgery, a standard oral placebo-controlled aspirin challenge was performed to diagnose aspirin hypersensitivity. Urine samples were collected on the placebo day and both before and within 2 to 4 hours after aspirin challenge for uLTE4 measurement. All patients with CRS had sinusitis confirmed by computed tomography. Previous ear, nose, and throat surgery was performed in 70% of the patients, NP was present in 86%, and asthma was diagnosed in 62.5%. AERD was diagnosed in 8 subjects (7 women and 1 man). Five of those patients had bronchoconstriction. At baseline, median uLTE4 was 7.5-times higher in AERD subjects than in the remaining patients. It increased almost 6-fold following the challenge, while remained unchanged in patients without aspirin hypersensitivity. Pretest uLTE4 had a sensitivity of 87.5% and specificity of 93.75% to diagnose aspirin hypersensitivity in patients with CRS. After the challenge, the values improved to 100% sensitivity and 93% specificity. Among CRS subjects requiring FESS, as many as 33.3% may have AERD and respond to a small provocative dose of aspirin with bronchoconstriction and/or mucosal and skin edema. A simple and inexpensive measurement of uLTE4 can help diagnose AERD in patients with CRS with sensitivity of 87.5%, but its specificity is limited and depends on the arbitrary threshold of uLTE4.

  12. Protective effect of bronchial challenge with hypertonic saline on nocturnal asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Borges

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Inhalation of hypertonic saline (HS causes bronchoconstriction in asthmatic subjects. Repeated inhalation of HS leads to substantially reduced bronchoconstriction, known as the refractory period. Refractoriness due to different stimuli has also been described (cross-refractoriness. Nocturnal asthma is defined as an increase in symptoms, need for medication, airway responsiveness, and/or worsening of lung function that usually occurs from 4 to 6 am. Our objective was to determine the effect of refractoriness on nocturnal asthma. The challenge test consisted of inhalations of 4.5% saline with increasing durations until a reduction of 20% in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1 (PD20HS or total time of 15.5 min. Twelve subjects with nocturnal asthma were challenged with HS at 16:00 and 18:00 h and FEV1 was measured at 4:00 h. One to 2 weeks later, FEV1 was determined at 16:00 and 4:00 h. LogPD20HS at 18:00 h was significantly greater than logPD20HS at 16:00 h, 0.51 ± 0.50 and 0.69 ± 0.60 mg, respectively (P = 0.0033. When subjects underwent two HS challenges in the afternoon, mean (± SD FEV1 reduction was 206 ± 414 mL or 9.81 ± 17.42%. On the control day (without challenge in the afternoon FEV1 reduction was 523 ± 308 mL or 22.75 ± 15.40% (P = 0.021. Baseline FEV1 values did not differ significantly between the control and study days, 2.48 ± 0.62 and 2.36 ± 0.46 L, respectively. The refractory period following HS challenges reduces the nocturnal worsening of asthma. This new concept may provide beneficial applications to asthmatic patients.

  13. Protective effects of phosphodiesterase inhibitors on lung function and remodeling in a murine model of chronic asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Campos H.S.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the present study was to compare the efficacy of a novel phosphodiesterase 4 and 5 inhibitor, LASSBio596, with that of dexamethasone in a murine model of chronic asthma. Lung mechanics (airway resistance, viscoelastic pressure, and static elastance, histology, and airway and lung parenchyma remodeling (quantitative analysis of collagen and elastic fiber were analyzed. Thirty-three BALB/c mice were randomly assigned to four groups. In the asthma group (N = 9, mice were immunized with 10 µg ovalbumin (OVA, ip on 7 alternate days, and after day 40 they were challenged with three intratracheal instillations of 20 µg OVA at 3-day intervals. Control mice (N = 8 received saline under the same protocol. In the dexamethasone (N = 8 and LASSBio596 (N = 8 groups, the animals of the asthma group were treated with 1 mg/kg dexamethasone disodium phosphate (0.1 mL, ip or 10 mg/kg LASSBio596 dissolved in dimethyl sulfoxide (0.2 mL, ip 24 h before the first intratracheal instillation of OVA, for 8 days. Airway resistance, viscoelastic pressure and static elastance increased significantly in the asthma group (77, 56, and 76%, respectively compared to the control group. The asthma group presented more intense alveolar collapse, bronchoconstriction, and eosinophil and neutrophil infiltration than the control group. Both LASSBio596 and dexamethasone inhibited the changes in lung mechanics, tissue cellularity, bronchoconstriction, as well as airway and lung parenchyma remodeling. In conclusion, LASSBio596 at a dose of 10 mg/kg effectively prevented lung mechanical and morphometrical changes and had the potential to block fibroproliferation in a BALB/c mouse model of asthma.

  14. A Halotyrosine Antibody that Detects Increased Protein Modifications in Asthma Patients

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    Jin, Hongjun; Hallstrand, Teal S.; Daly, Don S.; Matzke, Melissa M.; Nair, Parameswaran; Bigelow, Diana J.; Pounds, Joel G.; Zangar, Richard C.

    2014-01-31

    Background-Airway inflammation plays an important pathophysiological role in asthma. Eosinophils produce hypobromite and bromotyrosine while neutrophils produce hypochlorite and chlorotyrosine. Objective-To evaluate halotyrosine modifications of individual airway proteins as a marker of inflammation in asthma using an antibody-based assay. Methods-We developed a novel monoclonal antibody (BTK-94C) that binds halogenated tyrosine residues, and used this antibody in a custom enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) microarray platform to examine halotyrosine levels in 23 proteins in three independent sets of sputum samples (52 samples total). Results-In 15 subjects with either no asthma, or with asthma characterized by high or low sputum eosinophil counts, we found associations between increased halotyrosine levels of at least three proteins and severity of airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). Treatment with mepolizumab in 17 patients with sputum eosinophilia markedly reduced the sputum eosinophilia and significantly reduced halotyrosine levels in one sputum protein. Further analysis of 10 subjects with neutrophilic asthma and 10 health controls demonstrated a broad increase in halotyrosine in the patients with airway neutrophilia. Conclusions-Significantly higher levels of halotyrosine are associated with asthma in the asthma phenotypes we examined. The halotyrosine levels correlated with indirect AHR in the form of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Clinical Implication-An antibody-based assay for tyrosine halogenation in specific proteins may prove useful for assessing airway inflammation in asthma. Capsule Summary-An antibody to measure protein monobrominated tyrosine and other halotyrosine modifications was developed and used to evaluate halogenation in specific proteins in the airways for the first time. Associations were found between levels of halotyrosine and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, and eosinophil and neutrophil inflammation in sputum from

  15. In vitro and in vivo preclinical profile of abediterol (LAS100977), an inhaled long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonist, compared with indacaterol, olodaterol and vilanterol.

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    Aparici, Mònica; Gavaldà, Amadeu; Ramos, Israel; Carcasona, Carla; Otal, Raquel; Fernández-Blanco, Joan Antoni; Montero, Jose Luís; García, Vicente Marco; López, Rosa; De Alba, Jorge; Doe, Christopher; Puig, Carlos; Vilella, Dolors; Miralpeix, Montserrat

    2016-01-05

    Abediterol is a novel long-acting β2-adrenoceptor agonist (LABA) currently in development for once-daily combination maintenance therapy of asthma and COPD. This study investigated the preclinical profile of abediterol in terms of affinity, potency, selectivity, duration of action and cardiac effects in comparison to the marketed once-daily LABAs indacaterol, olodaterol and vilanterol. Abediterol was the compound with the highest in vitro potency for dog, guinea pig and human β2-adrenoceptors. In electrical field stimulated guinea pig trachea, abediterol demonstrated 5-, 44- and 77-fold greater potency than olodaterol, indacaterol and vilanterol, respectively. In anaesthetised guinea pigs, inhaled abediterol was also the most potent compound, with 5-20 times higher bronchoprotective potency than other once-daily LABAs against acetylcholine. The bronchoprotective half-life of abediterol in guinea pigs was 36h compared with 51h for indacaterol, 47h for olodaterol, and 18h for vilanterol. In anaesthetised dogs, abediterol also inhibited acetylcholine-induced bronchoconstriction, with higher potency than olodaterol and vilanterol [ID40 (dose inhibiting bronchoconstriction by 40%) of 0.059µg/kg, 0.180µg/kg and 2.870µg/kg, respectively]. In parallel, effects on heart rate in dogs were also measured. Abediterol showed greater safety index (defined as the ratio of the maximal dose without effect on heart rate and the ID40) than olodaterol and vilanterol (10.5 versus 4.9 and 2.4, respectively). Taken together, these data suggest that abediterol offers potent bronchodilation and a sustained duration of action suited to once-daily dosing, plus a reduced potential for class-related cardiac side effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Aspirin provocation increases 8-iso-PGE2 in exhaled breath condensate of aspirin-hypersensitive asthmatics.

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    Mastalerz, Lucyna; Januszek, Rafał; Kaszuba, Marek; Wójcik, Krzysztof; Celejewska-Wójcik, Natalia; Gielicz, Anna; Plutecka, Hanna; Oleś, Krzysztof; Stręk, Paweł; Sanak, Marek

    2015-09-01

    Isoprostanes are bioactive compounds formed by non-enzymatic oxidation of polyunsaturated fatty acids, mostly arachidonic, and markers of free radical generation during inflammation. In aspirin exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD), asthmatic symptoms are precipitated by ingestion of non-steroid anti-inflammatory drugs capable for pharmacologic inhibition of cyclooxygenase-1 isoenzyme. We investigated whether aspirin-provoked bronchoconstriction is accompanied by changes of isoprostanes in exhaled breath condensate (EBC). EBC was collected from 28 AERD subjects and 25 aspirin-tolerant asthmatics before and after inhalatory aspirin challenge. Concentrations of 8-iso-PGF2α, 8-iso-PGE2, and prostaglandin E2 were measured using gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Leukotriene E4 was measured by immunoassay in urine samples collected before and after the challenge. Before the challenge, exhaled 8-iso-PGF2α, 8-iso-PGE2, and PGE2 levels did not differ between the study groups. 8-iso-PGE2 level increased in AERD group only (p=0.014) as a result of the aspirin challenge. Urinary LTE4 was elevated in AERD, both in baseline and post-challenge samples. Post-challenge airways 8-iso-PGE2 correlated positively with urinary LTE4 level (p=0.046), whereas it correlated negatively with the provocative dose of aspirin (p=0.027). A significant increase of exhaled 8-iso-PGE2 after inhalatory challenge with aspirin was selective and not present for the other isoprostane measured. This is a novel finding in AERD, suggesting that inhibition of cyclooxygenase may elicit 8-iso-PGE2 production in a specific mechanism, contributing to bronchoconstriction and systemic overproduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The effectiveness of the treatment of severe exercise-induced asthma in schoolchildren

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    M.N. Garas

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Bronchial asthma is one of the most common chronic multifactorial diseases of the lungs. At least 10–12 % of patients with bronchial asthma are suffering from a severe form of the disease. One aspect of inadequate severe asthma control is its phenotypic heterogeneity, interest of experts increases to the problem of exercise-induced asthma. The purpose of the study was to increase efficiency of treatment for severe exercise-induced asthma in schoolchildren based on the analysis of the attack dynamics and to achieve disease control according to main inflammatometric and spirometric indices. Materials and methods. We examined 46 children with severe persistent bronchial asthma, in particular, 15 schoolchildren suffering from severe exercise-induced asthma, the second clinical group (comparison one consisted of 31 children suffering from severe type of the disease, with no signs of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Basic therapy effectiveness was determined prospectively by assessing the disease control using AST-test with an interval of 3 months. The severity of bronchial obstruction syndrome in patients on admission to hospital during exacerbation was assessed by score scale. Airway hyperresponsiveness was evaluated according to the results of bronchoprovocation with histamine. Results. Children of I clinical group had more significant manifestations of bronchial obstruction during the week of inpatient treatment than the comparison group of patients, including significantly more severe manifestations of bronchial obstruction were verified on 1st and 7th day of hospitalization. Due to the analysis of basic therapy effectiveness, only a quarter of I clinical group patients and a larger part of schoolchildren in comparison group achieved the partial control after a 3-month course of anti-inflammatory treatment. Eosinophilic inflammation was observed in most children with severe exercise-induced asthma (60.1 % and in 47.2 % of

  18. CysLT2 receptor activation is involved in LTC4-induced lung air-trapping in guinea pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekioka, Tomohiko; Kadode, Michiaki; Yonetomi, Yasuo; Kamiya, Akihiro; Fujita, Manabu; Nabe, Takeshi; Kawabata, Kazuhito

    2017-01-05

    CysLT1 receptors are known to be involved in the pathogenesis of asthma. However, the functional roles of CysLT2 receptors in this condition have not been determined. The purpose of this study is to develop an experimental model of CysLT2 receptor-mediated LTC4-induced lung air-trapping in guinea pigs and use this model to clarify the mechanism underlying response to such trapping. Because LTC4 is rapidly converted to LTD4 by γ-glutamyltranspeptidase (γ-GTP) under physiological conditions, S-hexyl GSH was used as a γ-GTP inhibitor. In anesthetized artificially ventilated guinea pigs with no S-hexyl GSH treatment, i.v. LTC4-induced bronchoconstriction was almost completely inhibited by montelukast, a CysLT1 receptor antagonist, but not by BayCysLT2RA, a CysLT2 receptor antagonist. The inhibitory effect of montelukast was diminished by treatment with S-hexyl GSH, whereas the effect of BayCysLT2RA was enhanced with increasing dose of S-hexyl GSH. Macroscopic and histological examination of lung tissue isolated from LTC4-/S-hexyl-GSH-treated guinea pigs revealed air-trapping expansion, particularly at the alveolar site. Inhaled LTC4 in conscious guinea pigs treated with S-hexyl GSH increased both airway resistance and airway hyperinflation. On the other hand, LTC4-induced air-trapping was only partially suppressed by treatment with the bronchodilator salmeterol. Although montelukast inhibition of LTC4-induced air-trapping was weak, treatment with BayCysLT2RA resulted in complete suppression of this air-trapping. Furthermore, BayCysLT2RA completely suppressed LTC4-induced airway vascular hyperpermeability. In conclusion, we found in this study that CysLT2 receptors mediate LTC4-induced bronchoconstriction and air-trapping in S-hexyl GSH-treated guinea pigs. It is therefore believed that CysLT2 receptors contribute to asthmatic response involving air-trapping. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Beta-blockers: friend or foe in asthma?

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    Arboe B

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Bente Arboe, Charlotte Suppli UlrikDepartment of Pulmonary Medicine, Hvidovre Hospital and University of Copenhagen, Hvidovre, DenmarkBackground and aim: Recently, β-blockers have been suggested as a potential maintenance treatment option for asthma. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of the current knowledge of the potential benefits and risks of β-blocker therapy for asthma.Method: Systematic literature review.Results: No significant increase in the number of patients requiring rescue oral corticosteroid for an exacerbation of asthma has been observed after initiation of β-blocker treatment. Patients with mild to moderate reactive airway disease, probably both asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, may have a limited fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1 following single-dose administration of β-blocker, whereas no change in FEV1 has been reported following long-term administration. In a murine model of asthma, long-term administration of β-blockers resulted in a decrease in airway hyperresponsiveness, suggesting an anti-inflammatory effect. In keeping with this, long-term administration of a nonselective β-blocker to steroid-naïve asthma patients has shown a dose-dependent improvement in airway hyperresponsiveness, and either an asymptomatic fall in FEV1 or no significant change in FEV1. Furthermore, available studies show that bronchoconstriction induced by inhaled methacholine is reversed by salbutamol in patients on regular therapy with a β-blocker. On the other hand, a recent placebo-controlled trial of propranolol and tiotropium bromide added to inhaled corticosteroids revealed no effect on airway hyperresponsiveness and a small, not statistically significant, fall in FEV1 in patients classified as having mild to moderate asthma.Conclusion: The available, although limited, evidence suggests that a dose-escalating model of β-blocker therapy to patients with asthma is well tolerated, does not

  20. Cortactin mediates elevated shear stress-induced mucin hypersecretion via actin polymerization in human airway epithelial cells.

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    Liu, Chunyi; Li, Qi; Zhou, Xiangdong; Kolosov, Victor P; Perelman, Juliy M

    2013-12-01

    Mucus hypersecretion is a remarkable pathophysiological manifestation in airway obstructive diseases. These diseases are usually accompanied with elevated shear stress due to bronchoconstriction. Previous studies have reported that shear stress induces mucin5AC (MUC5AC) secretion via actin polymerization in cultured nasal epithelial cells. Furthermore, it is well known that cortactin, an actin binding protein, is a central mediator of actin polymerization. Therefore, we hypothesized that cortactin participates in MUC5AC hypersecretion induced by elevated shear stress via actin polymerization in cultured human airway epithelial cells. Compared with the relevant control groups, Src phosphorylation, cortactin phosphorylation, actin polymerization and MUC5AC secretion were significantly increased after exposure to elevated shear stress. Similar effects were found when pretreating the cells with jasplakinolide, and transfecting with wild-type cortactin. However, these effects were significantly attenuated by pretreating with Src inhibitor, cytochalasin D or transfecting cells with the specific small interfering RNA of cortactin. Collectively, these results suggest that elevated shear stress induces MUC5AC hypersecretion via tyrosine-phosphorylated cortactin-associated actin polymerization in cultured human airway epithelial cells. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. [Bilateral proximal pulmonary embolism without associated hypoxemia. Case report].

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    Bahloul, M; Chtara, K; Turki, O; Kammoun, M M; Bouaziz, W; Bouaziz, M

    2017-10-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a classic complication in intensive care. It is characterized by hypoxemia secondary to perturbed ventilation/perfusion ratios. We report a case of proximal and bilateral pulmonary embolism that occurred without associated hypoxemia. A spiral computed tomography (CT) scan was performed to explore unexplained fever in a patient with a negative infectious investigation. We discuss the mechanisms underlying the absence of hypoxemia in this patient. A 43-year-old patient with no significant pathological history was admitted to intensive care for the management of multiple injuries following a road accident. During resuscitation, the patient developed a proximal and bilateral pulmonary embolism without signs of hypertension of the pulmonary artery or associated hypoxemia. The patient improved under treatment. This case shows that bilateral proximal pulmonary embolism may be associated with normal gas exchange. The absence of hypoxemia could be explained by the bilateral nature of the pulmonary embolism that led to balanced ventilation/perfusion ratios on both sides. Furthermore, bronchoconstriction was bilateral, explaining the maintenance of a stable ventilation/perfusion ratio on both sides. The presence of unexplained fever in a victim of multiple trauma, despite the absence of hypoxemia, suggests the diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  2. Exercise and airway injury in athletes.

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    Couto, Mariana; Silva, Diana; Delgado, Luis; Moreira, André

    2013-01-01

    Olympic level athletes present an increased risk for asthma and allergy, especially those who take part in endurance sports, such as swimming or running, and in winter sports. Classical postulated mechanisms behind EIA include the osmotic, or airway-drying, hypothesis. Hyperventilation leads to evaporation of water and the airway surface liquid becomes hyperosmolar, providing a stimulus for water to move from any cell nearby, which results in the shrinkage of cells and the consequent release of inflammatory mediators that cause airway smooth muscle contraction. But the exercise-induced asthma/bronchoconstriction explanatory model in athletes probably comprises the interaction between environmental training factors, including allergens and ambient conditions such as temperature, humidity and air quality; and athlete's personal risk factors, such as genetic and neuroimmuneendocrine determinants. After the stress of training and competitions athletes experience higher rate of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI), compared with lesser active individuals. Increasing physical activity in non-athletes is associated with a decreased risk of URTI. Heavy exercise induces marked immunodepression which is multifactorial in origin. Prolonged, high intensity exercise temporarily impairs the immune competence while moderate activity may enhance immune function. The relationship between URTI and exercise is affected by poorly known individual determinants such genetic susceptibility, neurogenic mediated immune inflammation and epithelial barrier dysfunction. Further studies should better define the aetiologic factors and mechanisms involved in the development of asthma in athletes, and propose relevant preventive and therapeutic measures.

  3. Mechanisms of endothelin-1 elevation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients with nocturnal oxyhemoglobin desaturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trakada, G; Marangos, M; Spiropoulos, K

    2001-01-01

    Nonapneic, oxyhemoglobin desaturation associated with sleep has been described in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Hypoxemia stimulates endothelin-1 (ET-1) secretion. Once released, ET-1 can act locally to elicit sustained pulmonary artery vasoconstriction, bronchoconstriction and activation of alveolar macrophages. The aim of this study was to examine a possible correlation between ET-1 levels and nocturnal, nonapneic, oxyhemoglobin desaturation during sleep, in patients with COPD. We examined 48 COPD patients with formal polysomnography (EEG, ECG, airflow, respiratory muscle movement, oximeter) to detect the presence of nocturnal, nonapneic, oxyhemoglobin desaturation. Twelve of them were disqualified because of inadequate sleep or sleep apnea syndrome. Nineteen of them desaturated below a baseline sleep saturation of 90% for 5 min or more, reaching a nadir saturation of at least 85%. We collected arterial samples to measure ET-1 levels, after 5 min of the first period of desaturation, in each of the 19 patients. We also collected arterial samples in the morning, before the study, to measure baseline ET-1 levels in all patients. Baseline arterial ET-1 levels during the day were very significantly higher in 'desaturator' COPD patients (2.058 +/- 0.252 pg/ml) compared to 'non-desaturator' COPD patients (1.382 +/- 0.159 pg/ml; p oxyhemoglobin desaturation. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that ET-1 plays a very important role in the pathophysiological manifestations of COPD patients. Copyright 2001 S. Karger AG, Basel

  4. IL-4 amplifies the pro-inflammatory effect of adenosine in human mast cells by changing expression levels of adenosine receptors.

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    Xiaoyang Hua

    Full Text Available Adenosine inhalation produces immediate bronchoconstriction in asthmatics but not in normal subjects. The bronchospastic effect of adenosine is largely mediated through adenosine-induced mast cell activation, the mechanism of which is poorly understood due to limitations in culturing human primary mast cells. Here, we show that human umbilical cord blood -derived mast cells incubated with the Th2 cytokine IL-4 develop increased sensitivity to adenosine. Potentiation of anti-IgE- induced and calcium ionophore/PMA-induced degranulation was augmented in mast cells cultured with IL-4, and this effect was reduced or abolished by pre-treatment with A(2BsiRNA and selective A(2B receptor antagonists, respectively. IL-4 incubation resulted in the increased expression of A(2B and reduced expression of A(2A adenosine receptors on human mast cells. These results suggest that Th2 cytokines in the asthmatic lung may alter adenosine receptor expression on airway mast cells to promote increased responsiveness to adenosine.

  5. Effects of nitric acid on carbachol reactivity of the airways in normal and allergic sheep

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    Abraham, W.M.; Kim, C.S.; King, M.M.; Oliver, W. Jr.; Yerger, L.

    1982-01-01

    The airway effects of a 4-hr exposure (via a Plexiglas hood) to 1.6 ppm nitric acid vapor were evaluated in seven normal and seven allergic sheep, i.e., animals that have a history of reacting with bronchospasm to inhalation challenge with Ascaris suum antigen. The nitric acid vapor was generated by ultrasonic nebulization of a 2% nitric acid solution. Airway effects were assessed by measuring the change in specific pulmonary flow resistance before and after a standard inhalation challenge with 2.5% carbachol aerosol. Nitric acid exposure did not produce bronchoconstriction in either group. Pre-exposure increases in specific pulmonary flow resistance after carbachol inhalation were 68% (SD+/- 13%) and 82% (SD+/- 35%) for the normal and allergic sheep, respectively. Within 24 hr, the largest post-exposure increases in specific pulmonary flow resistance for the normal and allergic sheep were 108% (SD+/- 51%(P<.06)) and 175% (SD+/- 87% (p<.02)), respectively. We conclude that a short-term exposure to nitric acid vapor at levels below the industrial threshold limit (2 ppm), produces airway hyperreactivity to aerosolized carbachol in allergic sheep.

  6. IL-4 Amplifies the Pro-Inflammatory Effect of Adenosine in Human Mast Cells by Changing Expression Levels of Adenosine Receptors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Xiaoyang; Chason, Kelly D.; Patel, Janki Y.; Naselsky, Warren C.; Tilley, Stephen L.

    2011-01-01

    Adenosine inhalation produces immediate bronchoconstriction in asthmatics but not in normal subjects. The bronchospastic effect of adenosine is largely mediated through adenosine-induced mast cell activation, the mechanism of which is poorly understood due to limitations in culturing human primary mast cells. Here, we show that human umbilical cord blood -derived mast cells incubated with the Th2 cytokine IL-4 develop increased sensitivity to adenosine. Potentiation of anti-IgE- induced and calcium ionophore/PMA-induced degranulation was augmented in mast cells cultured with IL-4, and this effect was reduced or abolished by pre-treatment with A2BsiRNA and selective A2B receptor antagonists, respectively. IL-4 incubation resulted in the increased expression of A2B and reduced expression of A2A adenosine receptors on human mast cells. These results suggest that Th2 cytokines in the asthmatic lung may alter adenosine receptor expression on airway mast cells to promote increased responsiveness to adenosine. PMID:21966389

  7. The Pathophysiology of Nitrogen Dioxide During Inhaled Nitric Oxide Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petit, Priscilla C; Fine, David H; Vásquez, Gregory B; Gamero, Lucas; Slaughter, Mark S; Dasse, Kurt A

    Administration of inhaled nitric oxide (NO) with the existing compressed gas delivery systems is associated with unavoidable codelivery of nitrogen dioxide (NO2), an unwanted toxic contaminant that forms when mixed with oxygen. The NO2 is generated when NO is diluted with O2-enriched air before delivery to the patient. When NO2 is inhaled by the patient, it oxidizes protective antioxidants within the epithelial lining fluid (ELF) and triggers extracellular damage in the airways. The reaction of NO2 within the ELF triggers oxidative stress (OS), possibly leading to edema, bronchoconstriction, and a reduced forced expiratory volume in 1 second. Nitrogen dioxide has been shown to have deleterious effects on the airways of high-risk patients including neonates, patients with respiratory and heart failure, and the elderly. Minimizing co-delivery of NO2 for the next generation delivery systems will be a necessity to fully optimize the pulmonary perfusion of NO because of vasodilation, whereas minimizing the negative ventilatory and histopathological effects of NO2 exposure during inhaled NO therapy.

  8. The Quintiles Prize Lecture 2004. The identification of the adenosine A2B receptor as a novel therapeutic target in asthma.

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    Holgate, Stephen T

    2005-08-01

    Adenosine is a powerful bronchoconstrictor of asthmatic, but not normal, airways. In vitro studies on isolated human mast cells and basophils revealed that adenosine and selective analogues augmented inflammatory mediator release from mast cells by stimulating A(2) receptors. Pharmacological blockade of mast cell mediator release in vivo also attenuated adenosine-induced bronchoconstriction, as did theophylline, by adenosine A(2) receptor antagonism. Further in vitro studies revealed that the asthmatic response to adenosine is likely to be mediated via the A(2B) subtype which is selectively antagonised by enprofylline. Studies in animal models, especially mice, have shown a close synergistic interaction between adenosine, Th2 and airway remodelling responses. The recent description of A(2B) receptors on human airway smooth muscle cells that mediate cytokine and chemokine release and induce differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts strengthens the view that adenosine maybe more than an inflammatory mediator in asthma but also participates in airway wall remodelling in this disease. These data have provided a firm basis for developing adenosine A(2B) receptor antagonists as a new therapeutic approach to this disease.

  9. The Quintiles Prize Lecture 2004: The identification of the adenosine A2B receptor as a novel therapeutic target in asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holgate, Stephen T

    2005-01-01

    Adenosine is a powerful bronchoconstrictor of asthmatic, but not normal, airways. In vitro studies on isolated human mast cells and basophils revealed that adenosine and selective analogues augmented inflammatory mediator release from mast cells by stimulating A2 receptors. Pharmacological blockade of mast cell mediator release in vivo also attenuated adenosine-induced bronchoconstriction, as did theophylline, by adenosine A2 receptor antagonism. Further in vitro studies revealed that the asthmatic response to adenosine is likely to be mediated via the A2B subtype which is selectively antagonised by enprofylline. Studies in animal models, especially mice, have shown a close synergistic interaction between adenosine, Th2 and airway remodelling responses. The recent description of A2B receptors on human airway smooth muscle cells that mediate cytokine and chemokine release and induce differentiation of fibroblasts into myofibroblasts strengthens the view that adenosine maybe more than an inflammatory mediator in asthma but also participates in airway wall remodelling in this disease. These data have provided a firm basis for developing adenosine A2B receptor antagonists as a new therapeutic approach to this disease. PMID:15980878

  10. Purification of a novel aminopeptidase from the pollen of Parietaria judaica that alters epithelial integrity and degrades neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortes, Luísa; Carvalho, Ana Luísa; Todo-Bom, Ana; Faro, Carlos; Pires, Euclides; Veríssimo, Paula

    2006-10-01

    Parietaria judaica pollen is a common cause of pollinosis in the Mediterranean area. This study sought to purify and characterize the peptidase responsible for the majority of proteolytic activity present in the pollen extract of P judaica, and to investigate its contribution to the allergic response. A serial of chromatographic steps was applied to isolate the peptidase from P judaica's pollen, and its biochemical properties were determined. Bioactive peptides present in the airways were incubated with the peptidase, and their degradation was visualized by direct protein sequencing. In addition, we measured the cellular detachment, by methylene blue binding assay, of an airway-derived epithelial cell line (A549) in the presence of the peptidase, and visualized, by Western blot, the degradation of proteins from intercellular junctions. We purified a 98-kDa peptidase from the pollen of P judaica that was classified as an aminopeptidase on the basis of its biochemical properties and internal amino acid sequence. The aminopeptidase was able to degrade bioactive peptides. Moreover, the aminopeptidase caused cellular detachment of A549 cell line and degradation of occludin and E-cadherin. Our results suggest that the P judaica aminopeptidase can alter the integrity of the epithelium barrier by degrading occludin as well as E-cadherin. In addition, P judaica aminopeptidase can degrade bioactive peptides, which can exacerbate the overall bronchoconstrictive effect detected in asthmatic lungs. The novel aminopeptidase described here could constitute a relevant therapeutic target in the treatment of allergic disorders induced by the pollen of P judaica.

  11. Drug treatment of asthma in the 1990s: achievements and new strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavakkoli, A; Rees, P J

    1999-01-01

    Asthma is an inflammatory condition of the airways. First-line therapy involves the use of inhaled corticosteroids as anti-inflammatory agents to control the underlying process. Bronchodilators are used for symptom relief. Short-acting beta-agonists provide rapid relief of bronchoconstriction, whereas long-acting beta-agonists control the symptoms and reduce the frequency of exacerbations when combined with inhaled corticosteroids. Anticholinergic bronchodilators have a minor role in acute exacerbations and in patients troubled by adverse effects from beta-agonists. Theophylline has a bronchodilator action in asthma, but its role as an anti-inflammatory agent needs to be examined further. Because of their toxicity, corticosteroid-sparing agents have a limited role, being restricted to patients with severe uncontrolled asthma. New selective phosphodiesterase IV inhibitors show both anti-inflammatory and bronchodilator characteristics with fewer adverse effects. Other new approaches to the control of inflammation come from the antileukotriene drugs, which improve pulmonary function in patients with chronic asthma. The antileukotrienes have shown promising results, especially in the treatment of asthma caused by aspirin (acetylsalicylic acid), exercise and cold air. Other new therapies being studied include anti-immunoglobulin E, antitryptase and anti-CD4 agents. These newer possibilities suggest that the range of available treatment options will expand significantly over the next decade.

  12. ReCOMmendations for management of Preschool ASthma for General Practitioners – COMPAS GP

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    Zbigniew Doniec

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic, inflammatory, heterogenic disease of the bronchi. It is characterised by bronchial obstruction in the form of wheezing, coughing, shortness of breath and breathing difficulty, showing variable intensity and resolving after medication, or sometimes spontaneously. Making the diagnosis of asthma in children under 5 years of age is based on clinical criteria – the presence of symptoms of bronchial constriction, confirmation of its reversibility and lack of symptoms suggestive of other clinical diagnosis. The criterion for diagnosis are usually three episodes of bronchial obstruction, or a single episode of severe intensity. A detailed history and physical examination allows in most cases to rule out other diseases with similar clinical course. Frequent recurrence of symptoms is an indication for the initial differential diagnosis in primary health care, including a chest X-ray, blood count, often an ENT and/or allergological consultation. However severe, frequent and not responding to treatment episodes of bronchoconstriction indicate the need for diagnostics in specialist hospital wards. Chronic treatment of asthma is based on the administration of anti-inflammatory drugs, inhaled therapy is the treatment of choice in most patients. The assessment of the severity of asthma exacerbation determines the range of treatment, on an outpatient basis consisting of bronchodilators, corticosteroids and oxygen therapy. An important element of treatment is appropriate patient education, with particular attention to the exacerbation risk factors and correct inhalation technique. Children suffering from asthma should be vaccinated against pneumococcal disease and against influenza annually.

  13. Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drug Hypersensitivity in Preschool Children

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    Kidon Mona

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Although extensively studied in adults, nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID hypersensitivity in children, especially in young children, remains poorly defined. Pediatricians, prescribing antipyretics for children, rarely encounter significant problems, but the few epidemiologic studies performed show conflicting results. Although it is clear that some patients with acetylsalicylic acid (ASA-sensitive asthma have their clinical onset of disease in childhood and bronchoconstriction after ASA challenge is seen in 0 to 22% of asthmatic children so challenged, ibuprofen at antipyretic doses may cause acute respiratory problems only in a very small number of mild to moderate asthmatics. The recently elucidated mechanism of action of acetaminophen may explain some occurrences of adverse reactions in patients with cross-reactive NSAID hypersensitivity on the basis of its inhibitory activity on the newly described enzyme, cyclooxygenase (COX-3. This nonspecific sensitivity to inhibition of COX is most likely genetically determined and shows a remarkable association with atopic disease even in the very young age group and possibly an increased predilection in specific ethnic groups. This review summarizes state-of-the-art published data on NSAID hypersensitivity in preschool children.

  14. LUNG FUNCTION TESTING IN CHILDREN

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    Matjaž Fležar

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Background. Lung function testing in children above five years old is standardised similarly as is in adult population (1. Nevertheless bronchial provocation testing can be more hazardous since the calibre and reactivity of childhood airway is different. We analysed the frequency of different lung function testing procedures and addressed the safety issues of bronchial provocation testing in children.Methods. We analysed lung function testing results in 517 children, older than 5 years, tested in our laboratory in threeyear period. Spirometry was done in every patient, metacholine provocation test was used as a part of diagnostic work-up in suspected asthma. In case of airway obstruction, bronchodilator test with salbutamol was used instead of a metacholine provocation test.Results. The most common procedure in children was spirometry with bronchial provocation test as a part of diagnostic work-up of obstructive syndrome (mostly asthma. 291 children required metacholine test and 153 tests were interpreted as positive. The decline in expiratory flows (forced expiratory flow in first second – FEV1 in positive tests was greater than in adult population as was the dose of metacholine, needed to induce bronchoconstriction. The compliance of children was better than in adults.Conclusions. Lung function testing in children is reliable and safe and can be done in a well-standardised laboratory that follows the regulations of such testing in adults.

  15. Genetic Mechanisms in Aspirin-Exacerbated Respiratory Disease

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    Nami Shrestha Palikhe

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aspirin-exacerbated respiratory disease (AERD refers to the development of bronchoconstriction in asthmatics following the exposure to aspirin or other nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs. The key pathogenic mechanisms associated with AERD are the overproduction of cysteinyl leukotrienes (CysLTs and increased CysLTR1 expression in the airway mucosa and decreased lipoxin and PGE2 synthesis. Genetic studies have suggested a role for variability of genes in disease susceptibility and the response to medication. Potential genetic biomarkers contributing to the AERD phenotype include HLA-DPB1, LTC4S, ALOX5, CYSLT, PGE2, TBXA2R, TBX21, MS4A2, IL10, ACE, IL13, KIF3A, SLC22A2, CEP68, PTGER, and CRTH2 and a four-locus SNP set composed of B2ADR, CCR3, CysLTR1, and FCER1B. Future areas of investigation need to focus on comprehensive approaches to identifying biomarkers for early diagnosis.

  16. The mechanisms of intractable asthma

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    Stephen T Holgate

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Overwhelming evidence now points to asthma as a chronic inflammatory disease involving the airways. The T lymphocyte takes primacy in driving the inflammatory response through upregulation of cytokines, specifically those encoded in the IL-4 gene cluster: IL-4 and IL-13 (IgE isotype switching; IL-3, IL-5 and GM-CSF (eosinophil and basophil recruitment; and IL-9 (mast cell maturation. Additional cytokines of importance include TNFa and a range of related C-x-C and C-C cytokines. Although allergens are involved in initiating the Th-2 T-cell response, other factors are likely to operate that expand and maintain the inflammatory reaction. These include a potential role for superantigens and autoimmune mechanisms as well as the recruitment of accessory cytokine producing cells, especially mast cells and eosinophils. Leucocytes recruited from the microvasculature through interactions with specific adhesion molecules release an array of mediators, which in addition to causing bronchoconstriction also lead to damage to the epithelium and underlying structures. Neutral proteases from mast cells, metalloproteases from eosinophils and an array of mediators from the formed elements of the airway all contribute to the tissue destruction remodelling process. It was concluded that asthma is a dynamic disease process involving an interplay between inflammation and repair processes and that the differing proportions of these could account for the various disease phenotypes associated with severity and progression.

  17. Effectiveness of levodropropizine against cigarette smoke-induced airway hyperreactivity: possible mechanism.

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    Daffonchio, L; Hernandez, A; Melillo, G; Clavenna, G; Omini, C

    1993-04-01

    We verified the possible effect of the new antitussive drug levodropropizine on airway hyperreactivity and lung inflammation induced by cigarette smoke exposure in anaesthetized guinea-pigs. Levodropropizine, administered by aerosol at 25 mg/ml for 30 s completely prevented smoke induced airway hyperreactivity. The protective effect was early in onset (3 min) and lasted up to 30 min. The same dose of codeine, administered in the form of an aerosol, decreased the increase in airway responsiveness induced by smoke inhalation slightly but not significantly. In parallel with the functional results, levodropropizine also inhibited the recruitment of inflammatory cells triggered by smoke exposure within the airway lumen. When levodropropizine was administered i.v. to anaesthetized guinea-pigs, it reduced the bronchocontractile effect of capsaicin dose-dependently, whereas it was without effect against substance P-induced bronchoconstriction. These data demonstrate the ability of levodropropizine to counteract the hyperreactive phenomenon and the associated inflammatory event induced by cigarette smoke exposure, an effect which might depend on its capacity to modulate the activation of the peptidergic system.

  18. Does unrestrained single-chamber plethysmography provide a valid assessment of airway responsiveness in allergic BALB/c mice?

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    Chen Guoqin

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Unrestrained plethysmography has been used to monitor bronchoconstriction because of its ease of use and ability to measure airway responsiveness in conscious animals. However, its reliability remains controversial. Objective To investigate if unrestrained plethysmography could provide a valid interpretation of airway responsiveness in allergic BALB/c mice. Methods Ovalbumin sensitized BALB/c mice were randomized to receive either a single-dose Ovalbumin challenge (OVA-1D group or a three-dose Ovalbumin challenge (OVA-3D group. The OVA-1D group was further divided into OVA-1D-I (measured invasively, using lung resistance as the index of responsiveness and OVA-1D-N group (measured non-invasively, using Penh as the index of responsiveness. Similarly the OVA-3D group was divided into OVA-3D-I and OVA-3D-N groups based on the above methods. The control groups were sensitized and challenged with normal saline. Bronchial alveolar lavage fluid was taken and airway histopathology was evaluated for airway inflammation. Nasal responsiveness was tested with histamine challenge. Results Compared with controls, a significant increase in airway responsiveness was shown in the OVA-1D-N group (P Conclusion Penh can not be used as a surrogate for airway resistance. The invasive measurement is specific to lower airway. Penh measurement (done as a screening procedure, must be confirmed by a direct invasive measurement specific to lower airway in evaluating lower airway responsiveness.

  19. Localization of quantitative changes in pulmonary beta-receptors in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs

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    Gatto, C.; Green, T.P.; Johnson, M.G.; Marchessault, R.P.; Seybold, V.; Johnson, D.E.

    1987-07-01

    Impaired beta-receptor function has been postulated as one factor contributing to airway hyperreactivity in asthmatic patients. Although numerous indirect studies have cast doubt on this theory, none of these previous investigations has been able to directly measure changes in beta-receptor number on intrapulmonary structures capable of affecting the physiologic changes seen in this disease state. To help clarify the intrapulmonary location of such changes, a model of allergic bronchoconstriction was prepared by sensitizing guinea pigs to ovalbumin intraperitoneally (ip) 2 wk prior to testing (Group S). A second group of animals was sensitized to ovalbumin, then 2 wk later partially desensitized (Group D) during a 4- to 6-wk period by repeated exposure to increasing doses of nebulized ovalbumin with epinephrine rescue. Control animals received ip administered and nebulized normal saline alone. Pulmonary function assessed by plethysmography revealed an increase in airway resistance to 294 +/- 42% (SE) of control in Group S (p less than 0.005) and a decrease in dynamic compliance to 76 +/- 8% of control in Group D and 39 +/- 10% of control in Group S (p less than 0.002) after exposure to nebulized ovalbumin. Using L-(/sup 3/H) dihydroalprenolol ((/sup 3/H) DHA), beta-receptors were autoradiographically localized and quantitated in lung sections from all 3 groups. Significant decreases (p less than 0.02) in /sup 3/H-DHA binding were noted in alveolar and conducting airway epithelium, and bronchiolar and vascular smooth muscle in ovalbumin-exposed animals.

  20. Bronchodilator effects of exercise hyperpnea and albuterol in mild-to-moderate asthma.

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    Milanese, Manlio; Saporiti, Riccardo; Bartolini, Stefano; Pellegrino, Riccardo; Baroffio, Michele; Brusasco, Vito; Crimi, Emanuele

    2009-08-01

    In asthmatic patients, either bronchodilatation or bronchoconstriction may develop during exercise. In 18 patients with mild-to-moderate asthma, we conducted two studies with the aims to 1) quantify the bronchodilator effect of hyperpnea induced by incremental-load maximum exercise compared with effects of inhaled albuterol (study 1, n=10) and 2) determine the time course of changes in airway caliber during prolonged constant-load exercise (study 2, n=8). In both studies, it was also investigated whether the bronchodilator effects of exercise hyperpnea and albuterol are additive. Changes in airway caliber were measured by changes in partial forced expiratory flow. In study 1, incremental-load exercise was associated with a bronchodilatation that was approximately 60% of the maximal bronchodilatation obtainable with 1,500 microg of albuterol. In study 2, constant-load exercise was associated with an initial moderate bronchodilatation and a late airway renarrowing. In both studies, premedication with inhaled albuterol (400 microg) promoted sustained bronchodilatation during exercise, which was additive to that caused by exercise hyperpnea. In conclusion, in mild-to-moderate asthmatic individuals, hyperpnea at peak exercise was associated with a potent yet not complete bronchodilatation. During constant-load exercise, a transient bronchodilatation was followed by airway renarrowing, suggesting prevalence of constrictor over dilator effects of hyperpnea. Finally, the bronchodilator effect of hyperpnea was additive to that of albuterol.

  1. Respiratory complications of gastroesophageal reflux associated with paraesophageal hiatal hernia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greub, Gilbert; Liaudet, Lucas; Wiesel, Paul; Bettschart, Vincent; Schaller, Marie-Denise

    2003-08-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) may be associated with episodes of bronchoaspiration, sometimes leading to life-threatening respiratory complications. GERD is frequently observed in the setting of type 1 (sliding type) hiatal hernia, but only infrequently complicates the course of type 2 (paraesophageal) hernia. We performed a retrospective analysis of 50 patients operated for type 2 hiatal hernia in our hospital, to determine the prevalence of respiratory complaints related to GERD in this setting. We found 7 cases (14%) of type 2 hiatal hernia complicated by pulmonary manifestations as the only symptoms of GERD. These ranged from dyspnea to severe bronchoconstriction and acute respiratory failure. The series is illustrated by the report of 1 patient who experienced acute bronchospasm and cardiopulmonary arrest as a complication of GERD. In all patients, surgical repair of the hiatal hernia, together with an antireflux procedure, resulted in complete resolution of the respiratory complaints for follow-up periods up to 160 months. Our data emphasize the particular prevalence of respiratory involvement in the case of GERD complicating type 2 hiatal hernia, and also the excellent symptomatic results obtained by surgical therapy for this condition.

  2. Ozone-induced loss of neuronal M{sub 2} muscarinic receptor function is prevented by cyclophosphamide

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    Gambone, L.M.; Elbon, C.L.; Fryer, A.D. [Johns Hopkins Univ., Baltimore, MD (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The authors tested the hypothesis that inflammatory cells mediate the loss of neuronal M{sub 2} muscarinic receptors in the lung after ozone exposure. Pathogen-free guinea pigs treated with cyclophosphamide (30 mg {center_dot} kg{sup {minus}1} {center_dot} day{sup {minus}1} ip for 7 days) before exposure to ozone were compared with untreated ozone-exposed animals. This dose of cyclophosphamide significantly reduced leukocytes in peripheral blood and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Twenty-four hours after ozone, muscarinic receptor function was tested in anesthetized animals. In air-exposed guinea pigs, vagally induced bronchoconstriction was attenuated by the muscarinic agonist pilocarpine (0.1-100 {mu}g/kg iv) and potentiated by the selective M{sub 2} antagonist gallamine (0.1-10 mg/kg iv), indicating that the neuronal M{sub 2} muscarinic receptors were functioning. These responses were significantly reduced after ozone, indicating loss of neuronal M{sub 2} muscarinic receptor function. However, in those animals treated with cyclophosphamide, M{sub 2} muscarinic receptor function was not altered by ozone. These data suggest that ozone-induced loss of neuronal muscarinic receptor function is mediated via inflammatory cells and that the link between ozone-induced hyperresponsiveness and inflammation may be the neuronal M{sub 2} muscarinic receptor. 27 refs., 9 figs.

  3. Respiratory Effects of Sarafotoxins from the Venom of Different Atractaspis Genus Snake Species

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    Stéphanie Malaquin

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Sarafotoxins (SRTX are endothelin-like peptides extracted from the venom of snakes belonging to the Atractaspididae family. A recent in vivo study on anesthetized and ventilated animals showed that sarafotoxin-b (SRTX-b, extracted from the venom of Atractaspis engaddensis, decreases cardiac output by inducing left ventricular dysfunction while sarafotoxin-m (SRTX-m, extracted from the venom of Atractaspis microlepidota microlepidota, induces right ventricular dysfunction with increased airway pressure. The aim of the present experimental study was to compare the respiratory effects of SRTX-m and SRTX-b. Male Wistar rats were anesthetized, tracheotomized and mechanically ventilated. They received either a 1 LD50 IV bolus of SRTX-b (n = 5 or 1 LD50 of SRTX-m (n = 5. The low-frequency forced oscillation technique was used to measure respiratory impedance. Airway resistance (Raw, parenchymal damping (G and elastance (H were determined from impedance data, before and 5 min after SRTX injection. SRTX-m and SRTX-b injections induced acute hypoxia and metabolic acidosis with an increased anion gap. Both toxins markedly increased Raw, G and H, but with a much greater effect of SRTX-b on H, which may have been due to pulmonary edema in addition to bronchoconstriction. Therefore, despite their structural analogy, these two toxins exert different effects on respiratory function. These results emphasize the role of the C-terminal extension in the in vivo effect of these toxins.

  4. Effects of Flavin7 on allergen induced hyperreactivity of airways

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    Franova S

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Some studies have suggested that the polyphenolic compounds might reduce the occurrence of asthma symptoms. The aim of our experiments was to evaluate the effects of 21 days of the flavonoid Flavin7 administration on experimentally induced airway inflammation in ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs. We assessed tracheal smooth muscle reactivity by an in vitro muscle-strip method; changes in airway resistance by an in vivo plethysmographic method; histological picture of tracheal tissue; and the levels of interleukin 4 (IL-4, and interleukin 5 (IL-5 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF. Histological investigation of tracheal tissue and the concentrations of the inflammatory cytokines IL-4 and IL-5 in BALF were used as indices of airway inflammation. Administration of Flavin7 caused a significant decrease of specific airway resistance after histamine nebulization and a decline in tracheal smooth muscle contraction amplitude in response to bronchoconstricting mediators. Flavin7 minimized the degree of inflammation estimated on the basis of eosinophil calculation and IL-4 and IL-5 concentrations. In conclusion, administration of Flavin7 showed bronchodilating and anti-inflammatory effects on allergen-induced airway inflammation.

  5. Effect of montelukast on platelet activating factor- and tachykinin induced mucus secretion in the rat

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    Groneberg David A

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Platelet activating factor and tachykinins (substance P, neurokinin A, neurokinin B are important mediators contributing to increased airway secretion in the context of different types of respiratory diseases including acute and chronic asthma. Leukotriene receptor antagonists are recommended as add-on therapy for this disease. The cys-leukotriene-1 receptor antagonist montelukast has been used in clinical asthma therapy during the last years. Besides its inhibitory action on bronchoconstriction, only little is known about its effects on airway secretions. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of montelukast on platelet activating factor- and tachykinin induced tracheal secretory activity. Methods The effects of montelukast on platelet activating factor- and tachykinin induced tracheal secretory activity in the rat were assessed by quantification of secreted 35SO4 labelled mucus macromolecules using the modified Ussing chamber technique. Results Platelet activating factor potently stimulated airway secretion, which was completely inhibited by the platelet activating factor receptor antagonist WEB 2086 and montelukast. In contrast, montelukast had no effect on tachykinin induced tracheal secretory activity. Conclusion Cys-leukotriene-1 receptor antagonism by montelukast reverses the secretagogue properties of platelet activating factor to the same degree as the specific platelet activating factor antagonist WEB 2086 but has no influence on treacheal secretion elicited by tachykinins. These results suggest a role of montelukast in the signal transduction pathway of platelet activating factor induced secretory activity of the airways and may further explain the beneficial properties of cys-leukotriene-1 receptor antagonists.

  6. Do children with stable asthma benefit from addition of montelukast to inhaled corticosteroids: randomized, placebo controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stelmach, Iwona; Ożarek-Hanc, Agata; Zaczeniuk, Magdalena; Stelmach, Wlodzimierz; Smejda, Katarzyna; Majak, Pawel; Jerzynska, Joanna; Anna, Janas

    2015-04-01

    To determine the effects of montelukast added to maintenance inhaled steroids (ICS) therapy during the school year in children with stable asthma on the ICS use, frequency of exacerbations, lung function, asthma symptoms, fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) level and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB). Seventy six asthmatic children aged 6-14 years, allergic to house dust mites were randomized to a double-blinded trial comparing montelukast therapy to a matching placebo. We studied following end-points: the reduction in the ICS dose, the frequency of exacerbations, lung function, asthma control test score, and the change from baseline in FEV1 during a standardized exercise treadmill challenge. ICS dose was adjusted in a stepwise fashion to determine the lowest dose necessary to control asthma symptoms. We showed that children with baseline value of FeNO above 31 ppb and well controlled asthma symptoms on low doses of ICS, benefit the most from additive therapy with montelukast; their cumulative ICS dose is lower than in children treated with ICS only. Also, the addition of montelukast to regular treatment in asthmatic children resulted in a significant reduction in the frequency of exacerbations and EIB protection. It is reasonable to add montelukast to ICS therapy in asthmatic children during the school year, to lower cumulative ICS dose in children with well controlled asthma symptoms, as well as to reduce number of exacerbations, and to achieve better control of EIB. NCT01266772. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Respiratory toxicity of repeated exposure to particles produced by traffic and sugar cane burning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazzoli-Rocha, Flavia; Carvalho, Giovanna M C; Lanzetti, Manuella; Valença, Samuel S; Silva, Luiz F F; Saldiva, Paulo H N; Zin, Walter A; Faffe, Débora S

    2014-01-15

    We compared the toxicity of subchronic exposure to equivalent masses of particles from sugar cane burning and traffic. BALB/c mice received 3 intranasal instillations/week during 1, 2 or 4 weeks of either distilled water (C1, C2, C4) or particles (15μg) from traffic (UP1, UP2, UP4) or biomass burning (BP1, BP2, BP4). Lung mechanics, histology and oxidative stress were analyzed 24h after the last instillation. In all instances UP and BP groups presented worse pulmonary elastance, airway and tissue resistance, alveolar collapse, bronchoconstriction and macrophage influx into the lungs than controls. UP4, BP2 and BP4 presented more alveolar collapse than UP1 and BP1, respectively. UP and BP had worse bronchial and alveolar lesion scores than their controls; BP4 had greater bronchial lesion scores than UP4. Catalase was higher in UP4 and BP4 than in C4. In conclusion, biomass particles were more toxic than those from traffic after repeated exposures. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Life-threatening asthma attack during prolonged fingolimod treatment: case report

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    Zecca C

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Chiara Zecca,1,* Matteo Caporro,1,* Sandor Györik,2 Claudio Gobbi11Neurocenter of Southern Switzerland, Department of Neurology, Ospedale Regionale di Lugano, Lugano, Switzerland; 2Department of Internal Medicine, Ospedale Regionale di Bellinzona, Bellinzona, Switzerland*These authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Fingolimod (FTY mediates bronchoconstriction by interacting with sphingosine-1-phosphate receptors. The majority of the reported adverse respiratory events occur during the first weeks of treatment.Case presentation: A 49-year-old woman developed a life-threatening asthma attack after 6 months of continuous FTY treatment. The adverse event required prolonged hospitalization, and the patient recovered without sequelae after FTY interruption. A history of previous airway hyperreactivity and a concurrent viral respiratory infection possibly acted as predisposing factors.Conclusion: This first description of a severe, life-threatening asthma attack during prolonged FTY treatment suggests the need for long-term clinical surveillance, especially in patients with known predisposing factors.Keywords: multiple sclerosis, bronchial hyper-reactivity

  9. Breathing hot humid air induces airway irritation and cough in patients with allergic rhinitis.

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    Khosravi, Mehdi; Collins, Paul B; Lin, Ruei-Lung; Hayes, Don; Smith, Jaclyn A; Lee, Lu-Yuan

    2014-07-01

    We studied the respiratory responses to an increase in airway temperature in patients with allergic rhinitis (AR). Responses to isocapnic hyperventilation (40% of maximal voluntary ventilation) for 4min of humidified hot air (HA; 49°C) and room air (RA; 21°C) were compared between AR patients (n=7) and healthy subjects (n=6). In AR patients, cough frequency increased pronouncedly from 0.10±0.07 before to 2.37±0.73 during, and 1.80±0.79coughs/min for the first 8min after the HA challenge, but not during the RA challenge. In contrast, neither HA nor RA had any significant tussive effect in healthy subjects. The HA challenge also caused respiratory discomfort (mainly throat irritation) measured by the handgrip dynamometry in AR patients, but not in healthy subjects. Bronchoconstriction was not detected after the HA challenge in either group of subjects. In conclusion, hyperventilation of HA triggered vigorous cough response and throat irritation in AR patients, indicating the involvement of sensory nerves innervating upper airways. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Pharmacological preclinical characterization of LAS190792, a novel inhaled bifunctional muscarinic receptor antagonist /β2-adrenoceptor agonist (MABA) molecule.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparici, Mònica; Carcasona, Carla; Ramos, Israel; Montero, José Luís; Ortiz, José Luís; Cortijo, Julio; Puig, Carlos; Vilella, Dolors; Doe, Chris; Gavaldà, Amadeu; Miralpeix, Montserrat

    2017-10-01

    LAS190792 is a novel muscarinic antagonist and β2-adrenoceptor agonist in development for chronic respiratory diseases. This study investigated the pharmacological profile of LAS190792 in comparison to batefenterol, tiotropium, indacaterol and olodaterol. LAS190792 is potent at the human M3 receptor (pIC50: 8.8 in binding assays). It is selective for the β2-adrenoceptor over the β1-and β3-adrenoceptor, and shows a functional potency in a similar range to batefenterol and LABA compounds (pEC50 in spontaneous tone isolated trachea: 9.6). The relaxant potency of LAS190792 in electrically stimulated tissue is similar to batefenterol, with an antimuscarinic activity in presence of propranolol slightly higher than batefenterol (pIC50 of 8.3 versus 7.9 in human tissue). LAS190792 exhibits a sustained duration of action in isolated tissue longer than that of batefenterol. Nebulized LAS190792 inhibits acetylcholine-induced bronchoconstriction in dog with minimal cardiac effects and sustained bronchodilation (t1/2: 13.3 h). In conclusion, these studies suggest that LAS190792 is a dual-acting muscarinic antagonist β2-adrenoceptor agonist that has the potential to be a next generation bronchodilator with long-lasting effects and wide safety margin in humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Variability of breath condensate pH may contribute to the better understanding of non-allergic seasonal respiratory diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kullmann, Tamás; Szipőcs, Annamária

    2017-09-01

    The seasonal variability of certain non-allergic respiratory diseases is not clearly understood. Analysis of the breath condensate, the liquid that can be collected by breathing into a cold tube, has been proposed to bring closer to the understanding of airway pathologies. It has been assumed, that (1) airway lining fluid was a stable body liquid and (2) the breath condensate samples were representative of the airway lining fluid. Research was focussed on the identification of biomarkers indicative of respiratory pathologies. Despite 30 years of extended investigations breath condensate analysis has not gained any clinical implementation so far. The pH of the condensate is the characteristic that can be determined with the highest reproducibility. The present paper shows, that contrary to the initial assumptions, breath condensate is not a representative of the airway lining fluid, and the airway lining fluid is not a stable body liquid. Condensate pH shows baseline variability and it is influenced by drinking and by the ambient temperature. The changes in condensate pH are linked to changes in airway lining fluid pH. The variability of airway lining fluid pH may explain seasonal incidence of certain non-allergic respiratory diseases such as the catching of a common cold and the increased incidence of COPD exacerbations and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in cold periods.

  12. Regadenoson use in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: the state of current knowledge

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    Golzar Y

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Yasmeen Golzar,1,2 Rami Doukky1,21Division of Adult Cardiology, John H Stroger Jr, Hospital of Cook County, 2Division of Cardiology, Rush University Medical Center, Chicago, IL, USAAbstract: Stress testing is challenging in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD. Functional capacity is generally decreased in this patient population, limiting patients' ability to achieve physiologic stress through exercise. Additionally, due to emphysematous changes, COPD patients tend to have poor acoustic windows that impair the quality and therefore diagnostic accuracy of stress echocardiography techniques. Pharmacologic stress myocardial perfusion imaging (MPI testing is also problematic, particularly due to the concern for adenosine-induced bronchoconstriction with conventional vasodilator stress agents. Regadenoson, a selective A2A adenosine receptor agonist, has gained popularity due to its ease of administration and improved patient experience in the general population. The literature describing the experience with regadenoson in COPD patients, though limited, is rapidly growing and reassuring. This review summarizes the pharmacology and clinical application of this novel stress agent and presents the available data on the safety and tolerability of its use in COPD patients.Keywords: chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, COPD, regadenoson, myocardial perfusion imaging, safety, tolerability, asthma, emphysema

  13. Safety of regadenoson, a selective adenosine A2A agonist, in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: A randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial (RegCOPD trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Gregory S; Tammelin, Bruce R; Schiffman, George L; Marquez, Rudy; Rice, Deborah L; Milikien, Douglas; Mathur, Vandana

    2008-01-01

    Patients with reactive airways are at risk for adenosine-induced bronchoconstriction, mediated via A(2B) and/or A(3) adenosine receptors. In this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial, we examined the safety of regadenoson, a selective adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist, in patients with moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (n = 38) and patients with severe COPD (n = 11) with a baseline mean forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)) of 1.74 +/- 0.50 L and 1.0 +/- 0.35 L, respectively, 37% of whom had dyspnea during activities of daily living. Patients receiving glucocorticoids or oxygen and those with pretreatment wheezing were included. Short-acting bronchodilators were withheld for at least 8 hours before treatment. No differences emerged between regadenoson and placebo on multiple lung function parameters, including repeated FEV(1) and forced vital capacity, respiratory rate, pulmonary examinations, and oxygen saturation. The mean maximum decline in FEV(1) was 0.11 +/- 0.02 L and 0.12 +/- 0.02 L (P = .55) in patients after regadenoson and placebo, respectively, and new-onset wheezing was observed in 6% and 12%, respectively (P = .33). No patient required acute treatment with bronchodilators or oxygen. This pilot study showed the overall safety of regadenoson in 49 compromised outpatients with clinically stable moderate and severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  14. Safety of regadenoson, an adenosine A2A receptor agonist for myocardial perfusion imaging, in mild asthma and moderate asthma patients: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leaker, Brian R; O'Connor, B; Hansel, Trevor T; Barnes, Peter J; Meng, Lixen; Mathur, Vandana S; Lieu, Hsiao D

    2008-01-01

    Patients with reactive airways are at risk for adenosine-induced bronchoconstriction, mediated via A(2B) and/or A(3) adenosine receptors. To examine the effects of regadenoson, a selective adenosine A(2A) receptor agonist, on airway resistance, we conducted a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled crossover trial in asthmatic patients with a positive adenosine monophosphate challenge test. The mean ratio of the forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV(1)) at each tested time point relative to the baseline FEV(1) was significantly higher after treatment with regadenoson compared with placebo from 10 to 60 minutes after treatment. One patient had a substantial but asymptomatic FEV(1) reduction (-36.2%) after regadenoson that reversed spontaneously. The most common adverse events with regadenoson were tachycardia (66%), dizziness (53%), headache (45%), and dyspnea (34%). The mean heart rate significantly increased with regadenoson (maximum of +10.4 beats/min) versus placebo. In this pilot safety study of 48 patients with mild or moderate asthma who had bronchial reactivity to adenosine monophosphate, regadenoson was safe and well tolerated.

  15. Comments on the implications for health of the physical and chemical characteristics of airborne particles

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    Nelson, N. (New York Univ., NY (USA). Medical Center)

    1982-05-01

    The inhalation of toxic particles, whether chemical or radioactive, is a major source of health concern in respect to occupational exposures, general community air pollution and the natural environment. The respiratory tract may be both a target for injury and a route of entry for toxic agents. The handling of airborne particles in the lung is a complex process in which size and shape critically influence deposition and clearance. As a target organ, the lung has a variety of responses. These can be temporary and reversible (respiratory depth, frequency, bronchoconstriction, alterations in mucus secretion, rate of movement of the cilia, irritation) or with slowly responding changes (fibrosis, diffusing capacity), or, more gravely, with malignant changes leading to cancer. As a portal of entry, the lung permits the movement of soluble particles with great rapidity into systemic circulation and provides only a limited barrier to less soluble materials. The net biological outcome, whether lasting or temporary, depends on the chemical characteristics of the inhaled particles, their physical dimensions and the anatomy and histology of the respiratory tract. The interplay of these factors will be discussed using as illustrative material, research from the Institute of Environmental Medicine of New York University Medical Center.

  16. Exercise-Induced Bronchospasm and Allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serena Caggiano

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Sport is an essential part of childhood, with precious and acknowledged positive health effects but the impact of exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB significantly reduces participation in physical activity. It is important to recognize EIB, differentiating EIB with or without asthma if the transient narrowing of the airways after exercise is associated with asthmatic symptoms or not, in the way to select the most appropriate treatment among the many treatment options available today. Therapy is prescribed based on symptoms severity but diagnosis of EIB is established by changes in lung function provoked by exercise evaluating by direct and indirect tests. Sometimes, in younger children it is difficult to obtain the registration of difference between the preexercise forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1 value and the lowest FEV1 value recorded within 30 min after exercise, defined as the gold standard, but interrupter resistance, in association with spirometry, has been showed to be a valid alternative in preschool age. Atopy is the main risk factor, as demonstrated by epidemiologic data showing that among the estimated pediatric population with EIB up to 40% of them have allergic rhinitis and 30% of these patients may develop adult asthma, according with atopic march. Adopting the right treatment and prevention, selecting sports with no marked hyperventilation and excessive cooling of the airways, children with EIB can be able to take part in physical activity like all others.

  17. Integrating the overlap of obstructive lung disease and obstructive sleep apnoea: OLDOSA syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ioachimescu, Octavian C; Teodorescu, Mihaela

    2013-04-01

    Obstructive lung diseases (OLD) such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are very prevalent conditions. Disease phenotypes (e.g. chronic bronchitis, emphysema, etc.) often overlap, and significant confusion exists about their optimal nosologic characterization. Obstructive sleep apnoea (OSA) is also a common condition that features bidirectional interactions with OLD. OSA appears to be more commonly seen in patients with OLD, perhaps as a result of shared risk factors, for example obesity, smoking, increased airway resistance, local and systemic inflammation, anti-inflammatory therapy. Conversely, OSA is associated with worse clinical outcomes in patients with OLD, and continuous positive airway pressure therapy has potential beneficial effects on this vicious pathophysiological interaction. Possible shared mechanistic links include increased parasympathetic tone, hypoxaemia-related reflex bronchoconstriction/vasoconstriction, irritation of upper airway neural receptors, altered nocturnal neurohormonal secretion, pro-inflammatory mediators, within and inter-breath interactions between upper and lower airways, lung volume-airway dependence, etc. While the term overlap syndrome has been defined as the comorbid association of COPD and OSA, the interaction between asthma and OSA has not been integrated yet nosologically; in this review, the latter will be called alternative overlap syndrome. In an effort to bolster further investigations in this area, an integrated, lumping nomenclature for OSA in the setting of OLD is proposed here--OLDOSA (obstructive lung disease and obstructive sleep apnoea) syndrome. © 2013 The Authors. Respirology © 2013 Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  18. Alterations in minute ventilation, maximum voluntary ventilation and dyspneic index in different trimesters of pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tell, Anita; Bagali, Shrilaxmi; Aithala, Manjunatha; Khodnapur, Jyoti; Dhanakshirur, Gopal B

    2014-01-01

    Respiratory function in pregnancy is of special importance since the life of fetus depends primarily upon its oxygen supply. Thus this study was designed to evaluate the Minute ventilation (MV), Maximum Voluntary Ventilation (MVV) & Dyspneic Index (DI) in different trimesters of pregnancy & compare the results with non- pregnant control group. A cross-sectional study was carried out in 200 healthy women in the age range of 19-35 years with 50 subjects each in 1st, 2nd, 3rd trimesters of pregnancy and non-pregnant control group. We recorded respiratory parameters in study and control groups. Statistical analysis was done by ANOVA and Tukey Krammer post Hoc tests. It was observed that there was a significant decrease in MVV and dyspneic index in all trimesters of pregnancy and an insignificant variation in MV when compared to the control group. The changes in pulmonary function are influenced by the mechanical pressure of enlarging gravid uterus, elevating the diaphragm and restricting the movements of lungs thus hampering forceful expiration. The decrease seen in MVV in 1st trimester might be due to bronchoconstriction effect of decreased alveolar Pco2 on the bronchial smooth muscles.

  19. Umeclidinium for the treatment of uncontrolled asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrando, Matteo; Bagnasco, Diego; Braido, Fulvio; Baiardini, Ilaria; Passalacqua, Giovanni; Puggioni, Francesca; Varricchi, Gilda; Canonica, Giorgio Walter

    2017-06-01

    Smooth muscle cell contraction in the airways is the principal therapeutic target in asthmatic subjects and its insufficient treatment is often a cause of uncontrolled disease. For this reason, research has focused on targeting smooth muscle activity with anticholinergic agents, including umeclidinium. Areas covered: This review highlights the potential application of umeclidinium, a long acting muscarinic antagonist, as a novel therapeutic approach for patients with severe uncontrolled asthma, despite maximal therapy. Expert opinion: Umeclidinium, similarly to tiotropium, which has been recently included in guidelines, may act by contrasting cholinergic activation in airways, preventing or at least reducing smooth muscle cells contraction and the consequent bronchoconstriction. This is similar to what occurs in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, for which umeclidinium has been regularly approved. However, available data is not sufficient and further studies are needed before regulatory approval can be sought, since only phase II clinical trials have been conducted at present. Both quality of life and objectifiable clinical data and parameters must be assessed, including lung function improvements, reduction of exacerbations and reduction of as required medications.

  20. Autonomic nervous system control of the cardiovascular and respiratory systems in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, M J; Short, A L; Lewis, K E

    2006-10-01

    Patients with asthma have exaggerated bronchoconstriction of their airways in response to certain indirect (e.g. cold air, allergens, dust, exercise) or direct (e.g. inhaled methacholine) stimuli. This 'hyper-reactivity' usually co-exists with airway inflammation, although the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying these changes are not fully understood. It is likely that this hyper-reactivity is associated with abnormal autonomic nervous system (ANS) control. In particular, the parasympathetic (vagal) component of the ANS appears to be implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma. In addition, several studies have suggested the existence of differential alteration in ANS function following exercise in asthmatics compared with non-asthmatic individuals. Several early studies suggested that the altered autonomic control of airway calibre in asthma might be reflected by a parallel change in heart rate. Cardiac vagal reactivity does indeed appear to be increased in asthma, as demonstrated by the cardiac response to various autonomic functions tests. However, other studies have reported a lack of association between bronchial and cardiac vagal tone, and this is in accord with the concept of system-independent ANS control. This review provides a discussion of cardiovascular-autonomic changes associated with either the pathophysiology of asthma per se or with asthma pharmacotherapy treatment. Previous investigations are summarised suggesting an apparent association between altered autonomic-cardiovascular control and bronchial asthma. The full extent of autonomic dysfunction, and its clinical implications, has yet to be fully determined and should be the subject of future investigation.

  1. Purinergic Signaling in Mast Cell Degranulation and Asthma

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    Zhan-Guo Gao

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are responsible for the majority of allergic conditions. It was originally thought that almost all allergic events were mediated directly only via the high-affinity immunoglobulin E receptors. However, recent evidence showed that many other receptors, such as G protein-coupled receptors and ligand-gated ion channels, are also directly involved in mast cell degranulation, the release of inflammatory mediators such as histamine, serine proteases, leukotrienes, heparin, and serotonin. These mediators are responsible for the symptoms in allergic conditions such as allergic asthma. In recent years, it has been realized that purinergic signaling, induced via the activation of G protein-coupled adenosine receptors and P2Y nucleotide receptors, as well as by ATP-gated P2X receptors, plays a significant role in mast cell degranulation. Both adenosine and ATP can induce degranulation and bronchoconstriction on their own and synergistically with allergens. All three classes of receptors, adenosine, P2X and P2Y are involved in tracheal mucus secretion. This review will summarize the currently available knowledge on the role of purinergic signaling in mast cell degranulation and its most relevant disease, asthma.

  2. Mast cell adenosine receptors function: a focus on the A3 adenosine receptor and inflammation

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    Noam eRudich

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Adenosine is a metabolite, which has long been implicated in a variety of inflammatory processes. Inhaled adenosine provokes bronchoconstriction in asthmatics or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD patients, but not in non-asthmatics. This hyper responsiveness to adenosine appears to be mediated by mast cell activation. These observations have marked the receptor that mediates the bronchoconstrictor effect of adenosine on mast cells, as an attractive drug candidate. Four subtypes (A1, A2a, A2b and A3 of adenosine receptors have been cloned and shown to display distinct tissue distributions and functions. Animal models have firmly established the ultimate role of the A3 adenosine receptor (A3R in mediating hyper responsiveness to adenosine in mast cells, although the influence of the A2b adenosine receptor was confirmed as well. In contrast, studies of the A3R in humans have been controversial. In this review, we summarize data on the role of different adenosine receptors in mast cell regulation of inflammation and pathology, with a focus on the common and distinct functions of the A3R in rodent and human mast cells. The relevance of mouse studies to the human is discussed.

  3. Influence of nutritional status on asthma condition in the population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Elena; Rodríguez-Rodríguez, Paula; González Rodríguez, Liliana Guadalupe; López Sobaler, Ana María

    2016-07-12

    Asthma is a chronic disease characterized by airway inflammation and bronchoconstriction. There are different factors that can favor this process, but the role of diet is especially important. Thus, inadequate nutritional status in some nutrients causes alterations in immune function and antioxidant defense mechanisms that may facilitate the onset of inflammatory processes in the pulmonary system. Thus, intervention studies with antioxidant vitamins have shown mixed results. Nevertheless, having in mind the low consumption of fruits and vegetables and the low intake of antioxidant nutrients of the population, a first step could be to approximate the diet to the theoretical ideal to reach the recommended intakes. Furthermore, it is important follow an adequate diet during the pregnancy because during this period the diet affects fetal development, which can be related to the suffering of asthma in childhood, and even in adulthood. In addition, in relation with other less studied nutrients, such as vitamin D and those nutrients methyl donors, would be interesting to conduct randomized controlled trials in people with risk of asthma or with established asthma to test their effect.

  4. Exhaled nitric oxide and other exhaled biomarkers in bronchial challenge with exercise in asthmatic children: current knowledge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barreto, Mario; Zambardi, Rosanna; Villa, Maria Pia

    2015-01-01

    The fractional concentration of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO), a known marker of atopic-eosinophilic inflammation, may be used as a surrogate to assess exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) in asthmatic children. The predictive value of baseline FENO for EIB appears to be influenced by several factors, including age, atopy, current therapy with corticosteroids and measurement technique. Nonetheless, FENO cut-off values appear to be able to rule out EIB. FENO levels decrease during EIB, apparently through neural mechanisms rather than by decreased airway-epithelial surface. Partition of FENO into proximal and peripheral contributions of the respiratory tract may improve our understanding on NO exchange during exercise and help to screen subjects prone to EIB. Other biomarkers of inflammation and oxidative stress contained in exhaled gases and exhaled breath condensate (EBC) may shed light on the pathophysiology of EIB. Exhaled breath temperature is a promising real-time measurement whose routine use for assessing EIB warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. A mechanism for masking receptors with particular application to asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hills, B A

    1996-01-01

    This study ensconces the concept currently popular in neurophysiology that nerve terminals can be sensitized by 'unmasking' more receptors, but goes on to propose that the unknown substance masking the remainder is surface-active phospholipid. These molecules are considered to bind reversibly by adsorption to receptor surfaces just as they are known to do at a variety of tissue surfaces at which they impart 'barrier' properties very similar to those much exploited in the physical sciences. This model of nonspecific adsorption is further extended to a wide variety of receptors in lung airways including those on smooth muscle, to explain the normal control of sensitivity of reflex bronchoconstriction indicated by many physiological features. In the corollary hypothesis, asthma is attributed to a basic deficiency in surfactant causing undue unmasking of receptors exposed to the next noxious stimulus to enter the lungs. This model is shown to be compatible with the actions of a very wide variety of sensitizing agents which are physical, chemical and biological in nature; while the inflammation arising from the more biological routes can be correlated according to whether they release surfactant or disrupt it. Special attention is focused upon the diverse actions of nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs versus steroids widely prescribed for asthma which promote the secretion of surfactant, as do the popular beta-agonists.

  6. S-Nitrosoglutathione Attenuates Airway Hyperresponsiveness in Murine Bronchopulmonary Dysplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raffay, Thomas M; Dylag, Andrew M; Di Fiore, Juliann M; Smith, Laura A; Einisman, Helly J; Li, Yuejin; Lakner, Mitchell M; Khalil, Ahmad M; MacFarlane, Peter M; Martin, Richard J; Gaston, Benjamin

    2016-10-01

    Bronchopulmonary dysplasia (BPD) is characterized by lifelong obstructive lung disease and profound, refractory bronchospasm. It is observed among survivors of premature birth who have been treated with prolonged supplemental oxygen. Therapeutic options are limited. Using a neonatal mouse model of BPD, we show that hyperoxia increases activity and expression of a mediator of endogenous bronchoconstriction, S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) reductase. MicroRNA-342-3p, predicted in silico and shown in this study in vitro to suppress expression of GSNO reductase, was decreased in hyperoxia-exposed pups. Both pretreatment with aerosolized GSNO and inhibition of GSNO reductase attenuated airway hyperresponsiveness in vivo among juvenile and adult mice exposed to neonatal hyperoxia. Our data suggest that neonatal hyperoxia exposure causes detrimental effects on airway hyperreactivity through microRNA-342-3p-mediated upregulation of GSNO reductase expression. Furthermore, our data demonstrate that this adverse effect can be overcome by supplementing its substrate, GSNO, or by inhibiting the enzyme itself. Rates of BPD have not improved over the past two decades; nor have new therapies been developed. GSNO-based therapies are a novel treatment of the respiratory problems that patients with BPD experience. Copyright © 2016 by The Author(s).

  7. Acute inhalation of ozone stimulates bronchial C-fibers and rapidly adapting receptors in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Coleridge, J.C.G.; Coleridge, H.M.; Schelegle, E.S.; Green, J.F. (Univ. of California, Davis (United States) Univ. of California, San Francisco (United States))

    1993-05-01

    To identify the afferents responsible for initiating the vagally mediated respiratory changes evoked by acute exposure to ozone, the authors recorded vagal impulses in anesthetized, open-chest, artificially ventilated dogs and examined the pulmonary afferent response to ozone (2--3 ppM in air) delivered to the lower trachea for 20--60 min. Bronchial C-fibers (BrCs) were the lung afferents most susceptible to ozone, the activity of 10 of 11 BrCs increasing from 0.2 [+-] 0.2 to 4.6 [+-] 1.3 impulses/s within 1--7 min of ozone exposure. Ten of 15 rapidly adapting receptors (RARs) were stimulated by ozone, their activity increasing from 1.5 [+-] 0.4 to 4.7 [+-] 0.7 impulses/s. Stimulation of RARs (but not of BrCs) appeared secondary to the ozone-induced reduction of lung compliance because it was abolished by hyperinflation of the lungs. Ozone had little effect on pulmonary C-fibers or slowly adapting pulmonary stretch receptors. The authors' results suggest that both BrCs and RARs contribute to the tachypnea and bronchoconstriction evoked by acute exposure to ozone when vagal conduction is intact and that BrCs alone are responsible for the vagally mediated tachypnea that survives vagal cooling to 7[degrees]C. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  8. Mechanisms, measurement and management of exertional dyspnoea in asthma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jason Weatherald

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a heterogeneous condition, with dyspnoea during exercise affecting individuals to a variable degree. This narrative review explores the mechanisms and measurement of exertional dyspnoea in asthma and summarises the available evidence for the efficacy of various interventions on exertional dyspnoea. Studies on the mechanisms of dyspnoea in asthma have largely utilised direct bronchoprovocation challenges, rather than exercise, which may invoke different physiological mechanisms. Thus, the description of dyspnoea during methacholine challenge can differ from what is experienced during daily activities, including exercise. Dyspnoea perception during exercise is influenced by many interacting variables, such as asthma severity and phenotype, bronchoconstriction, dynamic hyperinflation, respiratory drive and psychological factors. In addition to the intensity of dyspnoea, the qualitative description of dyspnoea may give important clues as to the underlying mechanism and may be an important endpoint for future interventional studies. There is currently little evidence demonstrating whether pharmacological or non-pharmacological interventions specifically improve exertional dyspnoea, which is an important area for future research.

  9. Respiratory response of guinea pigs to sulfuric acid mist

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amdur, M.O.

    1958-01-01

    Guinea pigs were exposed to 23 to 42 mg/m/sup 3/ acid mist with a mass median diameter of 0.8, 2.5, or 7 ..mu..m for 1-h periods. Significant increase in resistance at all levels and sizes was observed. There was a concurrent decrease in compliance for 2.5- and 7-..mu..m sizes with exception of lowest level of exposure. Dose-effect with resistance vs concentration shows smaller sizes were more deleterious. The 2.5 ..mu..m were more harmful at higher concentrations (above approx. 15 mg/m/sup 3/). The 0.8-..mu..m particles produced a rapid response suggesting bronchoconstriction as the mechanism (change in resistance proportionately greater than change in compliance). This was similar to irritant gases. Conversely, 2.5- and 7-..mu..m particles acted slower and change in resistance paralleled the drop in compliance. High concentrations evoked edema and atelectasis. This was interpreted as closure of main bronchi rather than general constriction. Response was consistent with expected penetration.

  10. Application of the Virtual Bronchoscopy in Children with Suspected Aspiration of the Foreign Body - Case Report

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    Kostic Gordana

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available In diagnosing the aspiration of the foreign body (AFB in children most important are: medical history, clinical signs and positive radiography of the lungs. Common dilemmas in the diff erential diagnosis are life-threatening asthma attacks or difficult pneumonia. Conventional rigid bronchoscopy (RB is not recommended as a routine method. Virtual bronchoscopy (VB can be a diagnostic tool for solving dilemmas. Fiber-optic bronchoscopy (FOB has a therapeutic stake in severe cases. Herein, we describe a girl, at the age of 6, who was hospitalized due to rapid bronchoconstriction and based on the anamnesis, clinical symptoms and physical fi ndings the suspicion was that she aspirated the foreign body. Due to the poor general condition and possible sequel, the idea of RB was dropped out. Multidetector computed tomography of the chest and VB was performed and AFB was not found. Due to positive epidemiological situation, virus H1N1 was excluded. FOB established that the foreign body does not exist in the airways. During bronchoscopy numerous castings are aspirated from the peripheral airways which lead to faster final recovery. With additional procedures, the diagnosis of asthma was confirmed and for girl that was the first attack. Along with inhaled corticosteroids as prevention she feels well.

  11. Antiasthmatic Effects of Hesperidin, a Potential Th2 Cytokine Antagonist, in a Mouse Model of Allergic Asthma

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    Seung-Hyung Kim

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objective. The features of asthma are airway inflammation, reversible airflow obstruction, and an increased sensitivity to bronchoconstricting agents, termed airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR, excess production of Th2 cytokines, and eosinophil accumulation in the lungs. To investigate the antiasthmatic potential of hesperidin as well as the underlying mechanism involved, we studied the inhibitory effect and anti-inflammatory effect of hesperidin (HPN on the production of Th2 cytokines, eotaxin, IL-17, -OVA-specific IgE in vivo asthma model mice. Methods. In this paper, BALB/c mice were systemically sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA followed intratracheally, intraperitoneally, and by aerosol allergen challenges. We investigated the effect of HPN on airway hyperresponsiveness, pulmonary eosinophilic infiltration, various immune cell phenotypes, Th2 cytokine production and OVA-specific IgE production in a mouse model of asthma. Results. In BALB/c mice, we found that HPN-treated groups had suppressed eosinophil infiltration, allergic airway inflammation, and AHR, and these occurred by suppressing the production of IL-5, IL-17, and OVA-specific IgE. Conclusions. Our data suggest that the therapeutic mechanism by which HPN effectively treats asthma is based on reductions of Th2 cytokines (IL-5, eotaxin, OVA-specific IgE production, and eosinophil infiltration via inhibition of GATA-3 transcription factor.

  12. Antiasthmatic Effects of Hesperidin, a Potential Th2 Cytokine Antagonist, in a Mouse Model of Allergic Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seung-Hyung; Kim, Bok-Kyu; Lee, Young-Cheol

    2011-01-01

    Background and Objective. The features of asthma are airway inflammation, reversible airflow obstruction, and an increased sensitivity to bronchoconstricting agents, termed airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), excess production of Th2 cytokines, and eosinophil accumulation in the lungs. To investigate the antiasthmatic potential of hesperidin as well as the underlying mechanism involved, we studied the inhibitory effect and anti-inflammatory effect of hesperidin (HPN) on the production of Th2 cytokines, eotaxin, IL-17, -OVA-specific IgE in vivo asthma model mice. Methods. In this paper, BALB/c mice were systemically sensitized to ovalbumin (OVA) followed intratracheally, intraperitoneally, and by aerosol allergen challenges. We investigated the effect of HPN on airway hyperresponsiveness, pulmonary eosinophilic infiltration, various immune cell phenotypes, Th2 cytokine production and OVA-specific IgE production in a mouse model of asthma. Results. In BALB/c mice, we found that HPN-treated groups had suppressed eosinophil infiltration, allergic airway inflammation, and AHR, and these occurred by suppressing the production of IL-5, IL-17, and OVA-specific IgE. Conclusions. Our data suggest that the therapeutic mechanism by which HPN effectively treats asthma is based on reductions of Th2 cytokines (IL-5), eotaxin, OVA-specific IgE production, and eosinophil infiltration via inhibition of GATA-3 transcription factor. PMID:21772663

  13. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol reverses TNFα-induced increase in airway epithelial cell permeability through CB2 receptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shang, Valerie C M; Kendall, David A; Roberts, Richard E

    2016-11-15

    Despite pharmacological treatment, bronchial hyperresponsiveness continues to deteriorate as airway remodelling persists in airway inflammation. Previous studies have demonstrated that the phytocannabinoid Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) reverses bronchoconstriction with an anti-inflammatory action. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of THC on bronchial epithelial cell permeability after exposure to the pro-inflammatory cytokine, TNFα. Calu-3 bronchial epithelial cells were cultured at air-liquid interface. Changes in epithelial permeability were measured using Transepithelial Electrical Resistance (TEER), then confirmed with a paracellular permeability assay and expression of tight junction proteins by Western blotting. Treatment with THC prevented the TNFα-induced decrease in TEER and increase in paracellular permeability. Cannabinoid CB1 and CB2 receptor-like immunoreactivity was found in Calu-3 cells. Subsequent experiments revealed that pharmacological blockade of CB2, but not CB1 receptor inhibited the THC effect. Selective stimulation of CB2 receptors displayed a similar effect to that of THC. TNFα decreased expression of the tight junction proteins occludin and ZO-1, which was prevented by pre-incubation with THC. These data indicate that THC prevents cytokine-induced increase in airway epithelial permeability through CB2 receptor activation. This highlights that THC, or other cannabinoid receptor ligands, could be beneficial in the prevention of inflammation-induced changes in airway epithelial cell permeability, an important feature of airways diseases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Cigarette Smoking and Dyspnea Perception

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    Scano Giorgio

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cigarette smoking has been implicated as an important risk factor for the development of respiratory symptoms in adults. The relationship of dyspnea with cigarette smoking has been examined in smokers and ex-smokers and the beneficial effects of smoking cessation have been demonstrated. Recent studies reported that in subjects who smoke cigarettes the risk of developing respiratory symptoms is higher in a dose-dependent way. Environmental tobacco smoke heavily influences the incidence of respiratory symptoms in both adults and in children. Up to the present time, the mechanisms whereby cigarette smoking causes dyspnea perception remain to be defined. Abnormalities in sensory nerves might diminish the perception of bronchoconstriction in smokers. In this regard, it has been postulated that prolonged exposure to cigarette smoke may lead to chronic depletion of sensory nerve neurotransmitters. Eosinophil airway inflammation has been proposed as a determinant of breathlessness via mechanisms affecting either the mechanical pathways that control breathlessness or the afferent nerves involved in perception of dyspnea. An increased number of eosinophils in some smokers implies the possibility that smoking may trigger immunological or other reactions associated with eosinophilia. In conclusion, cigarette smoking is by far one of the greatest risk factors for most respiratory symptoms, including dyspnea. Smoking is associated with the development of symptoms in a dose-dependent way and eosinophilia and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR increase the risk of developing dyspnea.

  15. Nonspecific airway reactivity in a mouse model of asthma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Collie, D.D.; Wilder, J.A.; Bice, D.E.

    1995-12-01

    Animal models are indispensable for studies requiring an intact immune system, especially for studying the pathogenic mechanisms in atopic diseases, regulation of IgE production, and related biologic effects. Mice are particularly suitable and have been used extensively for such studies because their immune system is well characterized. Further, large numbers of mutants or inbred strains of mice are available that express deficiencies of individual immunologic processes, inflammatory cells, or mediator systems. By comparing reactions in such mice with appropriate control animals, the unique roles of individual cells or mediators may be characterized more precisely in the pathogenesis of atopic respiratory diseases including asthma. However, given that asthma in humans is characterized by the presence of airway hyperresponsiveness to specific and nonspecific stimuli, it is important that animal models of this disease exhibit similar physiologic abnormalities. In the past, the size of the mouse has limited its versatility in this regard. However, recent studies indicate the feasibility of measuring pulmonary responses in living mice, thus facilitating the physiologic evaluation of putative mouse models of human asthma that have been well charcterized at the immunologic and patholigic level. Future work will provide details of the morphometry of the methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction and will further seek to determine the relationship between cigarette smoke exposure and the development of NS-AHR in the transgenic mouse model.

  16. Airway hypersensitivity induced by Ascaris suum extract in New Zealand Romney sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W; Pack, R J; Alley, M R; Carr, D H; Manktelow, B W

    1990-06-01

    Sheep from local farms with and without previous exposure to pigs were tested for their skin and airway responses to a commercial Ascaris suum antigen. There was an immediate reaction to intradermal injection of the antigen in 90% of 101 sheep. A bronchial provocation test by aerosol of the same antigen was undertaken on 43 of the sheep with a positive skin reaction. About 70% of sheep showed an immediate airway response to the antigen as an aerosol, reflected as a significant increase in airway resistance and/or decrease of dynamic lung compliance. The mean peak airway resistance and mean lowest dynamic lung compliance were 165% above and 61% below their baselines, respectively. No significant changes were recorded when the same animals were given an aerosol of phosphate buffered saline. Similarly, no correlation was found between the degree of skin reaction and the magnitude of bronchoconstriction (p>0.05). The sheep with previous exposure to pigs showed no significant differences in airway responses to antigen challenge, although they showed significantly greater skin reactions than those without exposure to pigs. These results indicate that the majority of Romney sheep in the Manawatu have a natural skin and airway sensitivity to A. suum antigen and may therefore be used as an animal model to study human airway hypersensitivity. The origin of this sensitivity has yet to be determined.

  17. β2 agonists in athletes. An ergogenic aid? = β2 agonistas en deportistas. ¿Una ayuda ergogénica?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ospina Uribe, Carlos Fernando

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Asthma is a chronic disorder of the airways with bronchial hyperresponsiveness and bronchoconstriction. Exercise can trigger asthma symptoms; this condition is known as exerciseinduced bronchospasm (EIB. Asthma is common in Olympic athletes who therefore use β2 agonists to prevent and treat its episodes. These drugs are preferably supplied by inhalation. In sports, the use of β2 agonists is restricted by anti-doping regulation, arguing that these drugs have the potential to improve physical performance, which can result in a competitive advantage. β2 agonists are prohibited by the WADA (World Anti-Doping Agency, except salbutamol (maximum dose: 1.600 μg over 24 hours and salmeterol. Oral administration of salbutamol can induce ergogenic effects in athletes. It has been documented that when given orally β2 agonists can improve performance in endurance disciplines, increase muscle strength and improve anaerobic power. However, according to scientific evidence, inhaled β2 agonists do not have a relevant performance-enhancing effect in nonasthmatic athletes.

  18. Fibromyalgia as a cause of uncontrolled asthma: a case-control multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Moragon, Eva; Plaza, Vicente; Torres, Isabel; Rosado, Ana; Urrutia, Isabel; Casas, Xavier; Hinojosa, Belen; Blanco-Aparicio, Marina; Delgado, Julio; Quirce, Santiago; Sabadell, Carles; Cebollero, Pilar; Muñoz-Fernández, Ana

    2017-12-01

    Fibromyalgia can affect the control of asthma when both diseases are present in a single patient. To characterize asthma in patients with concomitant fibromyalgia to assess whether fibromyalgia is an independent factor of asthma severity that influences poor asthma control. We also evaluated how dyspnea is perceived by patients in order to demonstrate that alterations in the perception of airway obstruction may be responsible for poor asthma control. This was a cross-sectional case-control multicenter study, in which 56 patients in the asthma and fibromyalgia group were matched to 36 asthmatics by sex, approximate age, and asthma severity level. All patients were women. Study variables included the Asthma Control Test (ACT), the Mini Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (MiniAQLQ), the Nijmegen hyperventilation syndrome questionnaire, the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale, and perception of dyspnea after acute bronchoconstriction. Although patients in both study groups showed similar asthma severity and use of anti-asthmatic drugs, patients in the asthma and fibromyalgia group showed lower scores on the ACT and MiniAQLQ questionnaires, and higher scores of anxiety and depression as well as hyperventilation compared to asthma patients without fibromyalgia. All these differences were statistically significant. Fibromyalgia in patients with asthma influences poor control of the respiratory disease and is associated with altered perception of dyspnea, hyperventilation syndrome, high prevalence of depression and anxiety, and impaired quality of life. Fibromyalgia may be considered a risk factor for uncontrolled asthma in patients suffering from asthma and fibromyalgia concomitantly.

  19. Efficacy of acupuncture in children with asthma: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chi Feng; Chien, Li Wei

    2015-07-07

    We performed a systematic review of the efficacy of various types of acupuncture in the treatment of asthma in children. We searched the MEDLINE, Embase, and Cochrane Library databases up to October 20, 2014. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) of children and adolescents (acupuncture (traditional and laser) vs. control, with one showing significant improvement in asthma-specific anxiety level, but no significant differences in other lung function parameters or quality of life. Another RCT reported significant benefits of laser acupuncture on lung function parameters but did not describe or report statistical analyses. One crossover RCT showed significant improvements in response to both acupuncture and placebo acupuncture, with better improvements with acupuncture compared to placebo acupuncture (forced exhaled volume in 1 s [FEV1], PEF). Two additional crossover RCTs showed no significant differences between single sessions of laser acupuncture and placebo acupuncture on baseline, postacupuncture, and postinduced bronchoconstriction values (% predicted FEV1, maximum expiratory flow). A recent study showed a significant effect of acupuncture paired with acupressure on medication use and symptoms in preschool-age children. Methodologic and reporting variability remains an issue. However, the results suggest that acupuncture may have a beneficial effect on PEF or PEF variability in children with asthma. The efficacy of acupuncture on other outcome measures is unclear. Large-scale RCTs are needed to further assess the efficacy of acupuncture in the treatment of asthma in children.

  20. Contribution of vagal afferents to respiratory reflexes evoked by acute inhalation of ozone in dogs

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    Schelegle, E.S.; Carl, M.L.; Coleridge, H.M.; Coleridge, J.C.; Green, J.F. (Univ. of California, Davis (United States))

    1993-05-01

    Acute inhalation of ozone induces vagally mediated rapid shallow breathing and bronchoconstriction. In spontaneously breathing anesthetized dogs, we attempted to determine whether afferent vagal C-fibers in the lower airways contributed to these responses. Dogs inhaled 3 ppm ozone for 40-70 min into the lower trachea while cervical vagal temperature was maintained successively at 37, 7, and 0 degrees C. At 37 degrees C, addition of ozone to the inspired air decreased tidal volume and dynamic lung compliance and increased breathing frequency, total lung resistance, and tracheal smooth muscle tension. Ozone still evoked significant effects when conduction in myelinated vagal axons was blocked selectively by cooling the nerves to 7 degrees C. Ozone-induced effects were largely abolished when nonmyelinated vagal axons were blocked by cooling to 0 degree C, breathing during ozone inhalation at 0 degree C being generally similar to that during air breathing at 0 degree C, except that minute volume and inspiratory flow were higher. We conclude that afferent vagal C-fibers in the lower airways make a major contribution to the acute respiratory effects of ozone and that nonvagal afferents contribute to the effects that survive vagal blockade.

  1. Airway smooth muscle dysfunction in Pompe (Gaa-/- ) mice.

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    Keeler, Allison M; Liu, Donghai; Zieger, Marina; Xiong, Lang; Salemi, Jeffrey; Bellvé, Karl; Byrne, Barry J; Fuller, David D; ZhuGe, Ronghua; ElMallah, Mai K

    2017-06-01

    Pompe disease is an autosomal recessive disorder caused by a deficiency of acid α-glucosidase (GAA), an enzyme responsible for hydrolyzing lysosomal glycogen. Deficiency of GAA leads to systemic glycogen accumulation in the lysosomes of skeletal muscle, motor neurons, and smooth muscle. Skeletal muscle and motor neuron pathology are known to contribute to respiratory insufficiency in Pompe disease, but the role of airway pathology has not been evaluated. Here we propose that GAA enzyme deficiency disrupts the function of the trachea and bronchi and this lower airway pathology contributes to respiratory insufficiency in Pompe disease. Using an established mouse model of Pompe disease, the Gaa-/- mouse, we compared histology, pulmonary mechanics, airway smooth muscle (ASM) function, and calcium signaling between Gaa-/- and age-matched wild-type (WT) mice. Lysosomal glycogen accumulation was observed in the smooth muscle of both the bronchi and the trachea in Gaa-/- but not WT mice. Furthermore, Gaa-/- mice had hyporesponsive airway resistance and bronchial ring contraction to the bronchoconstrictive agents methacholine (MCh) and potassium chloride (KCl) and to a bronchodilator (albuterol). Finally, calcium signaling during bronchiolar smooth muscle contraction was impaired in Gaa-/- mice indicating impaired extracellular calcium influx. We conclude that GAA enzyme deficiency leads to glycogen accumulation in the trachea and bronchi and impairs the ability of lower ASM to regulate calcium and respond appropriately to bronchodilator or constrictors. Accordingly, ASM dysfunction may contribute to respiratory impairments in Pompe disease. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  2. Effects of inspiratory resistance, inhaled beta-agonists and histamine on canine tracheal blood flow

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    Kelly, W.T.; Baile, E.M.; Brancatisano, A.; Pare, P.D.; Engel, L.A. (Dept. of Respiratory Medicine, Westmead Hospital, Westmead, NSW (Australia))

    1992-01-01

    Tracheobronchial blood flow is potentially important in asthma as it could either influence the clearance of mediators form the airways, thus affecting the duration and severity of bronchoispasm, or enhance oedema formation with a resultant increase in airflow obstruction. In anaesthetized dogs, spontaneously breathing via a tracheostomy, we investigated the effects of three interventions which are relevant to acute asthma attacks and could potentially influence blood flow and its distribution to the mucosa and remaining tissues of the trachea: (1) increased negative intrathoracic pressure swings (-25[+-]1 cmH[sub 2]O) induced by an inspiratory resistance; (2) variable inhaled doses of a beta-adrenoceptor-agonist (terbutaline); and (3) aerosolized histamine sufficient to produce a threefold increase in pulmonary resistance. Microspheres labelled with different radioisotopes were used to measure blood flow. Resistive breathing did not influence tracheobronchial blood flow. Following a large dose of terbutaline, mucosal blood flow (Qmb) increased by 50%. After inhaled histamine, Qmb reached 265% of the baseline value. We conclude that, whereas increased negative pressure swings do not influence tracheobronchial blood flow or its distribution, inhalation of aerosolized terbutaline, corresponding to a conventionally nebulized dose, increases mucosal blood flow. Our results also confirm that inhaled histamine, in a dose sufficient to produce moderate bronchoconstriction, increases tracheal mucosal blood flow in the area of deposition. (au).

  3. Dynamic 3He imaging for quantification of regional lung ventilation parameters.

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    Dupuich, David; Berthezène, Yves; Clouet, Pierre-Louis; Stupar, Vasile; Canet, Emmanuelle; Crémillieux, Yannick

    2003-10-01

    Dynamic ventilation imaging using laser-polarized (3)He has a promising potential for elucidating the physiology and physiopathology of the lungs. In this study, a methodological approach is proposed for the assessment and quantification of local ventilation parameters. High-temporal-resolution coronal ventilation image series were obtained with a projection-reconstruction (PR) sequence combined with the sliding-window technique. After image series were processed, parametric pixel-by-pixel maps of the gas arrival time, filling time constant, inflation rate, and gas volume were generated. The acquisition technique and the signal processing procedure, which are referred to collectively as sliding pulmonary imaging for respiratory overview (SPIRO), were tested in vivo in healthy rat lungs using a contrast media injector for controlled (3)He flow and volume injection in the animal lungs. The same protocol was applied to broncho-constriction animal models using intravenous injection of methacholine solution. Inflation rate values measured in the lungs were found to decrease with increasing doses of injected methacholine solution. This study demonstrates that it is possible to obtain quantitative regional gas dynamic information using the SPIRO technique in a single polarized gas inspiration. Copyright 2003 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. Beta₂-agonists for exercise-induced asthma.

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    Bonini, Matteo; Di Mambro, Corrado; Calderon, Moises A; Compalati, Enrico; Schünemann, Holger; Durham, Stephen; Canonica, Giorgio W

    2013-10-02

    It is well known that physical exercise can trigger asthma symptoms and can induce bronchial obstruction in people without clinical asthma. International guidelines on asthma management recommend the use of beta2-agonists at any stage of the disease. At present, however, no consensus has been reached about the efficacy and safety of beta2-agonists in the pretreatment of exercise-induced asthma and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. For the purpose of the present review, both of these conditions are referred to by the acronymous EIA, independently from the presence of an underlying chronic clinical disease. To assess the effects of inhaled short- and long-acting beta2-agonists, compared with placebo, in the pretreatment of children and adults with exercise-induced asthma (or exercise-induced bronchoconstriction). Trials were identified by electronic searching of the Cochrane Airways Group Specialised Register of Trials and by handsearching of respiratory journals and meetings. Searches are current as of August 2013. We included randomised, double-blind, placebo-controlled trials of any study design, published in full text, that assessed the effects of inhaled beta2-agonists on EIA in adults and children. We excluded studies that did not clearly state diagnostic criteria for EIA. We used standard methodological procedures as expected by The Cochrane Collaboration. We included 53 trials consisting of 1139 participants. Forty-eight studies used a cross-over design, and five were performed in accordance with a parallel-group design. Forty-five studies addressed the effect of a single beta2-agonist administration, and eight focused on long-term treatment. We addressed these two different intervention regimens as different comparisons.Among primary outcomes for short-term administration, data on maximum fall in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) showed a significant protective effect for both short-acting beta-agonists (SABA) and long-acting beta

  5. Detrimental effects of albuterol on airway responsiveness requires airway inflammation and is independent of β-receptor affinity in murine models of asthma

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    Aimi Steven

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Inhaled short acting β2-agonists (SABA, e.g. albuterol, are used for quick reversal of bronchoconstriction in asthmatics. While SABA are not recommended for maintenance therapy, it is not uncommon to find patients who frequently use SABA over a long period of time and there is a suspicion that long term exposure to SABA could be detrimental to lung function. To test this hypothesis we studied the effect of long-term inhaled albuterol stereoisomers on immediate allergic response (IAR and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR in mouse models of asthma. Methods Balb/C mice were sensitized and challenged with ovalbumin (OVA and then we studied the IAR to inhaled allergen and the AHR to inhaled methacholine. The mice were pretreated with nebulizations of either racemic (RS-albuterol or the single isomers (S- and (R-albuterol twice daily over 7 days prior to harvest. Results We found that all forms of albuterol produced a significant increase of IAR measured as respiratory elastance. Similarly, we found that AHR was elevated by albuterol. At the same time a mouse strain that is intrinsically hyperresponsive (A/J mouse was not affected by the albuterol isomers nor was AHR induced by epithelial disruption with Poly-L-lysine affected by albuterol. Conclusions We conclude that long term inhalation treatment with either isomer of albuterol is capable of precipitating IAR and AHR in allergically inflamed airways but not in intrinsically hyperresponsive mice or immunologically naïve mice. Because (S-albuterol, which lacks affinity for the β2-receptor, did not differ from (R-albuterol, we speculate that isomer-independent properties of the albuterol molecule, other than β2-agonism, are responsible for the effect on AHR.

  6. Receptor-mediated enhancement of beta adrenergic drug activity by ascorbate in vitro and in vivo.

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    Patrick F Dillon

    Full Text Available RATIONALE: Previous in vitro research demonstrated that ascorbate enhances potency and duration of activity of agonists binding to alpha 1 adrenergic and histamine receptors. OBJECTIVES: Extending this work to beta 2 adrenergic systems in vitro and in vivo. METHODS: Ultraviolet spectroscopy was used to study ascorbate binding to adrenergic receptor preparations and peptides. Force transduction studies on acetylcholine-contracted trachealis preparations from pigs and guinea pigs measured the effect of ascorbate on relaxation due to submaximal doses of beta adrenergic agonists. The effect of inhaled albuterol with and without ascorbate was tested on horses with heaves and sheep with carbachol-induced bronchoconstriction. MEASUREMENTS: Binding constants for ascorbate binding to beta adrenergic receptor were derived from concentration-dependent spectral shifts. Dose- dependence curves were obtained for the relaxation of pre-contracted trachealis preparations due to beta agonists in the presence and absence of varied ascorbate. Tachyphylaxis and fade were also measured. Dose response curves were determined for the effect of albuterol plus-and-minus ascorbate on airway resistance in horses and sheep. MAIN RESULTS: Ascorbate binds to the beta 2 adrenergic receptor at physiological concentrations. The receptor recycles dehydroascorbate. Physiological and supra-physiological concentrations of ascorbate enhance submaximal epinephrine and isoproterenol relaxation of trachealis, producing a 3-10-fold increase in sensitivity, preventing tachyphylaxis, and reversing fade. In vivo, ascorbate improves albuterol's effect on heaves and produces a 10-fold enhancement of albuterol activity in "asthmatic" sheep. CONCLUSIONS: Ascorbate enhances beta-adrenergic activity via a novel receptor-mediated mechanism; increases potency and duration of beta adrenergic agonists effective in asthma and COPD; prevents tachyphylaxis; and reverses fade. These novel effects are

  7. Pitfalls in the diagnosis of carcinoid syndrome

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    Dorota Kaczmarska-Turek

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Background . Carcinoid syndrome (CS is a rare syndrome, most commonly associated with neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN s of the small intestine. Carcinoid syndrome consists of diarrhea, vomiting, abdominal pain, cutaneous flushing, teleangiectasias, bronchoconstriction and increased perspiration. Diagnosis of carcinoid syndrome remains a challenge and it is often delayed. Objectives . The aim of this study was to characterize patients with CS and define the most sensitive, primary diagnostic tools for CS . Material and methods. 26 consecutive patients admitted to the Department because of carcinoid-like symptoms. Diagnosis of CS was based on clinical findings and laboratory data (levels of 5-hydroxyindoloacetic acid. Diagnosis of NEN was based on laboratory findings, imaging studies (US , CT , Gallium-68-DOTA TATE PET -CT and histopathological analysis. CS due to NEN was diagnosed in 16 subjects (NEN –CS . Results . The most common symptoms in non-NEN were increased perspiration, flushes and diarrhea. CgA was elevated (40%; n = 4 in this group. However, elevated levels of 5-HIAA and liver lesions were not presented. In the NEN –CS symptoms were reported more often: flush (93.7%; n = 15, diarrhea (87.5%; n = 14, abdominal pain and teleangiectasis (81.2%; n = 13. Elevated CgA and 5-HIAA were noted in 87.5% (n = 14 and 81.2% (n = 13 respectively. US and CT revealed liver metastases in all patients. The mean duration of symptoms before diagnosis was 28.6 months. Conclusions . The combination of several symptoms of carcinoid syndrome and liver lesion in easily available abdominal imaging (US and/or CT should prompt physicians to quick referral to centres specialized in the diagnosis and treatment of NEN.

  8. The potential role of omega-3 fatty acids supplements in increasing athletic performance

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    Șerban GLIGOR

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Polyunsaturated omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids are essential fatty acids that cannot be produced by the body itself and therefore must be provided through nutrition. Omega-6 and particularly omega-3 fatty acids have important roles in the organism, contributing to the maintenance and promotion of health. The optimal proportion of omega-6/omega-3 fatty acids is 2:1, or even better 1:1. They are involved in normal growth and development, play a role in the prevention of coronary and cardiovascular diseases, of diabetes mellitus, of arterial hypertension, arthritis and cancer. Omega-3 fatty acids mainly have an anti-inflammatory effect, but also act as hypolipidemic and antithrombotic agents. A potential role of omega-3 fatty acids is that of increasing physical performance. Their role in the physical activity refers on one side to the global health of athletes and on the other side to their anti-inflammatory effect, as high intensity physical exercise induces increased free-radical production and microtraumas, with the induction of an inflammatory status. The anti-inflammatory effect of these fatty acids manifests through an increased production of endogenous antioxidant enzymes, through decreasing the production of prostaglandins metabolites, decreasing the production of leukotriene B4, etc. They are also effective on reducing muscle pain post eccentric exercise and on decreasing the severity of bronchoconstriction induced by exercise, as well as improving pulmonary function variables. In conclusion it seems that supplementing diets with omega-3 fatty acids, apart from having benefic effects on health and on the prevention and management of certain affections, proves to be a beneficial for physical activity and athletic performance.

  9. Ginger (Zingiber officinale) as an Analgesic and Ergogenic Aid in Sport: A Systemic Review.

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    Wilson, Patrick B

    2015-10-01

    Ginger is a popular spice used to treat a variety of maladies, including pain. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are frequently used by athletes to manage and prevent pain; unfortunately, NSAIDs contribute to substantial adverse effects, including gastrointestinal (GI) dysfunction, exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, hyponatremia, impairment of connective tissue remodeling, endurance competition withdrawal, and cardiovascular disease. Ginger, however, may act as a promoter of GI integrity and as a bronchodilator. Given these potentially positive effects of ginger, a systematic review of randomized trials was performed to assess the evidence for ginger as an analgesic and ergogenic aid for exercise training and sport. Among 7 studies examining ginger as an analgesic, the evidence indicates that roughly 2 g·d(-1) of ginger may modestly reduce muscle pain stemming from eccentric resistance exercise and prolonged running, particularly if taken for a minimum of 5 days. Among 9 studies examining ginger as an ergogenic aid, no discernable effects on body composition, metabolic rate, oxygen consumption, isometric force generation, or perceived exertion were observed. Limited data suggest that ginger may accelerate recovery of maximal strength after eccentric resistance exercise and reduce the inflammatory response to cardiorespiratory exercise. Major limitations to the research include the use of untrained individuals, insufficient reporting on adverse events, and no direct comparisons with NSAID ingestion. While ginger taken over 1-2 weeks may reduce pain from eccentric resistance exercise and prolonged running, more research is needed to evaluate its safety and efficacy as an analgesic for a wide range of athletic endeavors.

  10. A novel method for chronic measurement of respiratory function in the conscious monkey.

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    Murphy, D J; Renninger, J P; Coatney, R W

    2001-01-01

    Chronic measurement of respiratory function in the conscious monkey has been limited by the ability to monitor pleural pressure. Previous attempts to measure pleural pressure chronically in conscious animals have involved surgical implantation of pressure-sensitive catheters directly into the pleural cavity. The success of these techniques has been limited by lung damage and/or tissue growth and encapsulation of the pressure-sensitive catheter with damping or loss of the signal. These problems have been eliminated by developing a novel surgical procedure for placement of a pressure-sensitive catheter beneath the pleural surface. A pressure-sensitive catheter (attached to a radiotelemetry transmitter) was surgically implanted beneath the serosal layer of the esophagus within the thoracic cavity. This was accomplished by performing a midline laparotomy, making a small incision in the serosal layer of the esophagus caudal to the diaphragm, and advancing the catheter cranially along the esophagus and beneath the serosal layer into the thoracic cavity. The catheter was secured to the esophageal wall and the telemetry transmitter was sutured to the inner abdominal wall. Respiratory airflow measurements were obtained using a restraint chair equipped with a clear plastic helmet (plethysmograph chamber) that seals around the neck and encloses the head. The decreases in pleural pressure during inspiration ranged from -5 to -15 mmHg and remained constant for at least 36 weeks following surgery. Intravenous administration of the respiratory depressant morphine, exposure to the respiratory stimulant 8% CO2, and intravenous administration of the bronchoconstrictive agent methacholine verified that this technique was able to detect and quantify ventilatory changes and an increase in airway resistance. This novel method for chronic measurement of pleural pressure will facilitate evaluation of the effects of drugs, environmental agents, or disease on respiratory function by

  11. Airway hyperresponsiveness induced by repeated esophageal infusion of HCl in guinea pigs.

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    Cheng, Yan-Mei; Cao, Ai-Li; Zheng, Jian-Pu; Wang, Hong-Wei; Sun, Yong-Shun; Liu, Chun-Fang; Zhang, Bei-Bei; Wang, Yi; Zhu, Sheng-Liang; Wu, Da-Zheng

    2014-11-01

    Gastroesophageal reflux is a common disorder closely related to chronic airway diseases, such as chronic cough, asthma, chronic bronchitis, and chronic obstructive disease. Indeed, gastroesophageal acid reflux into the respiratory tract causes bronchoconstriction, but the underlying mechanisms have still not been clarified. This study aimed to elucidate functional changes of bronchial smooth muscles (BSMs) isolated from guinea pigs in an animal model of gastroesophageal reflux. The marked airway inflammation, hyperresponsiveness and remodeling were observed after guinea pigs were exposed to intraesophageal HCl infusion for 14 days. In addition, contractile responses to acetylcholine (ACh), KCl, electrical field stimulation, and extracellular Ca(2+) were greater in guinea pigs infused with HCl compared with control groups. The L-type voltage-dependent Ca(2+) channels (L-VDCC) blocker, nicardipine, significantly inhibited ACh- and Ca(2+)-enhanced BSM contractions in guinea pigs infused with HCl. The Rho-kinase inhibitor, Y27632, attenuated ACh-enhanced BSM contractions in guinea pigs infused with HCl. Moreover, mRNA and protein expressions for muscarinic M2 and M3 receptors, RhoA, and L-VDCC in BSM were detected by real-time PCR and Western blot. Expressions of mRNA and protein for muscarinic M3 receptors, RhoA, and L-VDCC were greater than in BSM of HCl-infused guinea pigs, whereas levels of muscarinic M2 receptors were unchanged. We demonstrate that acid infusion to the lower esophagus and, subsequently, microaspiration into the respiratory tract in guinea pigs leads to airway hyperresponsiveness and overactive BSM. Functional and molecular results indicate that overactive BSM is the reason for enhancement of extracellular Ca(2+) influx via L-VDCC and Ca(2+) sensitization through Rho-kinase signaling.

  12. Deterioration of epithelium mediated mechanisms in diabetic-antigen sensitized airways of guinea pigs.

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    Bano, Saidullah; Swati, Omanwar; Kambadur, Muralidhar; Mohammad, Fahim

    2016-01-01

    The onset of diabetes causes disruption of respiratory epithelial mediators. The present study investigates whether diabetes modifies the epithelium mediated bronchial responses in hyper-reactive airway smooth muscle (ASM) primarily through nitric oxide (NO), cyclooxygenase (COX), and epithelium derived hyperpolarizing factor (EpDHF) pathways. Experimental model of guinea pigs having hyper-reactive airways with or without diabetes were developed. The responses of tracheal rings to cumulative concentrations of acetylcholine (ACh) and isoproterenol (IP) in the presence and absence of epithelium and before and after incubation with NO, K+ATP and COX inhibitors, N-(ω)-Nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME; 100 μM), glybenclamide (10 μM) and indomethacin (100 μM) were assessed. In diabetic guinea pigs with hyper-reactive airways, a decrease in ACh induced bronchoconstriction was observed after epithelium removal and after incubation with L-NAME/indomethacin, suggesting damage to NO/COX pathways. Hyper-reactivity did not alter the response of trachea to ACh but affected the response to IP which was further reduced in hyper-reactive animals with diabetes. The ASM response to IP after glybenclamide treatment did not alter in hyper-reactive guinea pigs and diabetic guinea pigs with hyper-reactive airways, suggesting damage to the EpDHF pathway. Treatment with indomethacin reduced IP response in the hyper-reactive model, and did not produce any change in diabetic model with hyper-reactive airways, indicating further disruption of the COX pathway. EpDHF pathway is damaged in hyper-reactive guinea pigs and in diabetic guinea pigs with hyper-reactive airways. Diabetes further aggravates the NO and COX mediated pathways in diabetic guinea pigs with hyper-reactive airways.

  13. Antagonist profile of ibodutant at the tachykinin NK(2) receptor in guinea pig isolated bronchi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santicioli, Paolo; Meini, Stefania; Giuliani, Sandro; Lecci, Alessandro; Maggi, Carlo Alberto

    2013-11-15

    In this study we have characterized the pharmacological profile of the non-peptide tachykinin NK(2) receptor antagonist ibodutant (MEN15596) in guinea pig isolated main bronchi contractility. The antagonist potency of ibodutant was evaluated using the selective NK(2) receptor agonist [βAla8]NKA(4-10)-mediated contractions of guinea pig isolated main bronchi. In this assay ibodutant (30, 100 and 300 nM) induced a concentration-dependent rightward shift of the [βAla8]NKA(4-10) concentration-response curves without affecting the maximal contractile effect. The analysis of the results yielded a Schild-plot linear regression with a slope not different from unity (0.95, 95% c.l. 0.65-1.25), thus, indicating a surmountable behavior. The calculated apparent antagonist potency as pK(B) value was 8.31 ± 0.05. Ibodutant (0.3-100 nM) produced a concentration-dependent inhibition of the nonadrenergic-noncholinergic (NANC) contractile response induced by electrical field stimulation (EFS) of intrinsic airway nerves in guinea pig isolated main bronchi. At the highest concentration tested (100 nM) ibodutant almost abolished the EFS-induced bronchoconstriction (95 ± 4% inhibition), the calculated IC(50) value was 2.98 nM (95% c.l. 1.73-5.16 nM). In bronchi from ovalbumin (OVA) sensitized guinea pigs ibodutant (100 nM) did not affect the maximal contractile response to OVA, but completely prevented the slowing in the fading of the motor response induced by phosphoramidon pretreatment linked to the endogenous neurokinin A release. Altogether, the present study demonstrates that ibodutant is a potent NK(2) receptor antagonist in guinea pig airways.

  14. Impaired Bronchoprotection Is Not Induced by Increased Smooth Muscle Mass in Chronic Treatment In Vivo with Formoterol in Asthmatic Mouse Model

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    W Luo

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Objective: Inhaling β2-adrenoceptor agonist is first-line asthma treatment, which is used for both acute relief and prevention of bronchoconstriction. However, chronic use of β-agonists results in impaired bronchoprotection and increasing occurrences of severe asthma exacerbation, even death in clinical practice. The mechanism of β-adrenoceptor hyposensitivity has not been thoroughly elucidated thus far. Bronchial smooth muscle contraction induces airway narrowing and also mediates airway inflammation. Moreover, bronchial smooth muscle mass significantly increases in asthmatics. We aimed to establish an asthmatic model that demonstrated that formoterol induced impaired bronchoprotection and to see whether increased smooth muscle mass played a role in it. Methods: We combined routine allergen challenging (seven weeks with repeated application of formoterol, formoterol plus budesonide or physiological saline in allergen-sensitized BALB/c mouse. The bronchoprotection mediated by β-agonist was measured in five consecutive weeks. Smooth muscle mass was shown by morphometric analysis, and α-actin expression was detected by western blot. Results: The trend of bronchoprotection was wavy in drug interventional groups, which initially increased and then decreased. Chronic treatment with formoterol significantly impaired bronchoprotection. According to the morphometric analysis and α-actin expression, no significant difference was detected in smooth muscle mass in all groups. Conclusion: This experiment successfully established that a chronic asthmatic mouse model, which manifested typical features of asthmatic patients, with chronic use of formoterol, results in a loss of bronchoprotection. No significant difference was detected in smooth muscle mass in all groups, which implied some subcellular signalling changes may be the key points.

  15. Genome-wide and follow-up studies identify CEP68 gene variants associated with risk of aspirin-intolerant asthma.

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    Jeong-Hyun Kim

    Full Text Available Aspirin-intolerant asthma (AIA is a rare condition that is characterized by the development of bronchoconstriction in asthmatic patients after ingestion of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including aspirin. However, the underlying mechanisms of AIA occurrence are still not fully understood. To identify the genetic variations associated with aspirin intolerance in asthmatics, the first stage of genome-wide association study with 109,365 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs was undertaken in a Korean AIA (n = 80 cohort and aspirin-tolerant asthma (ATA, n = 100 subjects as controls. For the second stage of follow-up study, 150 common SNPs from 11 candidate genes were genotyped in 163 AIA patients including intermediate AIA (AIA-I subjects and 429 ATA controls. Among 11 candidate genes, multivariate logistic analyses showed that SNPs of CEP68 gene showed the most significant association with aspirin intolerance (P values of co-dominant for CEP68, 6.0×10(-5 to 4.0×10(-5. All seven SNPs of the CEP68 gene showed linkage disequilibrium (LD, and the haplotype of CEP68_ht4 (T-G-A-A-A-C-G showed a highly significant association with aspirin intolerance (OR= 2.63; 95% CI= 1.64-4.21; P = 6.0×10(-5. Moreover, the nonsynonymous CEP68 rs7572857G>A variant that replaces glycine with serine showed a higher decline of forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV(1 by aspirin provocation than other variants (P = 3.0×10(-5. Our findings imply that CEP68 could be a susceptible gene for aspirin intolerance in asthmatics, suggesting that the nonsynonymous Gly74Ser could affect the polarity of the protein structure.

  16. Genome-wide and follow-up studies identify CEP68 gene variants associated with risk of aspirin-intolerant asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jeong-Hyun; Park, Byung-Lae; Cheong, Hyun Sub; Bae, Joon Seol; Park, Jong Sook; Jang, An Soo; Uh, Soo-Taek; Choi, Jae-Sung; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Kim, Mi-Kyeong; Choi, Inseon S; Cho, Sang Heon; Choi, Byoung Whui; Park, Choon-Sik; Shin, Hyoung Doo

    2010-11-03

    Aspirin-intolerant asthma (AIA) is a rare condition that is characterized by the development of bronchoconstriction in asthmatic patients after ingestion of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs including aspirin. However, the underlying mechanisms of AIA occurrence are still not fully understood. To identify the genetic variations associated with aspirin intolerance in asthmatics, the first stage of genome-wide association study with 109,365 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was undertaken in a Korean AIA (n = 80) cohort and aspirin-tolerant asthma (ATA, n = 100) subjects as controls. For the second stage of follow-up study, 150 common SNPs from 11 candidate genes were genotyped in 163 AIA patients including intermediate AIA (AIA-I) subjects and 429 ATA controls. Among 11 candidate genes, multivariate logistic analyses showed that SNPs of CEP68 gene showed the most significant association with aspirin intolerance (P values of co-dominant for CEP68, 6.0×10(-5) to 4.0×10(-5)). All seven SNPs of the CEP68 gene showed linkage disequilibrium (LD), and the haplotype of CEP68_ht4 (T-G-A-A-A-C-G) showed a highly significant association with aspirin intolerance (OR= 2.63; 95% CI= 1.64-4.21; P = 6.0×10(-5)). Moreover, the nonsynonymous CEP68 rs7572857G>A variant that replaces glycine with serine showed a higher decline of forced expiratory volume in 1s (FEV(1)) by aspirin provocation than other variants (P = 3.0×10(-5)). Our findings imply that CEP68 could be a susceptible gene for aspirin intolerance in asthmatics, suggesting that the nonsynonymous Gly74Ser could affect the polarity of the protein structure.

  17. [Anaphylaxis by atracurium. One case report].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez-Sansores, Luis; González-Díaz, Sandra; Arias-Cruz, Alfredo; Palacios-Rìos, Dionisio; López-Cabrera, Norma Guadalupe

    2013-01-01

    The incidence of severe intraoperative anesthetic reactions varies among countries from 1:10,000 to 1:13 000 patients submitted to surgery. A 13 year old male, with family history of atopy, who underwent 5 surgeries for hydrocephalus, using general anesthesia. He was on lamotrigine for seizures. He also suffers from chronic rhinitis, and oral allergy syndrome related to bananas since the age of 6 months. He had a posterior fossa tumor resection. During anesthesia induction with atracurium he developed a local rash in one arm, being the intubation without difficulty. Twenty minutes later he presented bipalpebral edema, accompanied by generalized rash, severe bronchoconstriction and hypotension, not reversing with the use of bronchodilators and corticosteroids. With the use of antihistamines, epinephrine and controlled ventilation the reaction subsides. One month later a skin prick test with atracurium besylate (50 mg/mL) diluted 1:10,000, negative and positive controls was performed. The result with atracurium was negative. After the application of intradermal tests with 0.02 mL of atracurium at dilutions of 1:10,000 and 1:1000, we found a positive skin response to atracurium (wheal diameter >8 mm and >9 mm with dilutions 1:10,000 and 1:1000, respectively and erythema). The response to atracurium intradermal test could be related to the ability of histamine release by a nonimmunological mechanism. But the magnitude of the skin response in this case, do not rule out the possibility of an IgE-mediated reaction. Atracurium is a known potent histamine releaser from mast cells, but rarely can it cause IgE-mediated reactions.

  18. The effects of aminophylline infusion in the treatment of children with acute asthma exacerbation. Evaluation with {sup 81m}Kr ventilation scintigraphy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsubara, Yasuko; Shimada, Takao [Jikei Univ., Tokyo (Japan). School of Medicine

    1998-09-01

    The use of intravenous aminophylline in the treatment of children with acute asthma remains controversial. Most authors suggest that aminophylline be used with caution because of its poor efficacy with adverse reactions and instead recommend other drugs, such as {beta}{sub 2}-adrenergic agonists and glucocorticoids. However other studies have reported the benefits of aminophylline, and current Japanese guidelines for the management of asthma recommend its use. Here, we have evaluated the efficacy of aminophylline infusion in children with acute asthma exacerbations. Twenty children with acute asthma exacerbations were given an infusion of 5 mg/kg of aminophylline over 5 minutes, 30 minutes after the same volume of normal saline had been infused as a control. {sup 81m}Kr ventilation scintigraphy was done sequentially, and lung function was measured with spirometry before and after each infusion. Side effects were also evaluated with a questionnaire. Ventilation images obtained with {sup 81m}Kr scintigraphy, which initially showed widespread ventilatory defects caused by bronchoconstriction, decreased 54.9% after aminophylline infusion (p<0.0001). Ventilatory defects, caused by both central and peripheral airway disturbances and confirmed with the {sup 81m}Kr bolus inhalation procedure, also showed significant improvement (p<0.0001). These improvement were accompanied by improvements in lung function as assessed with forced expiratory volume in 1 second (p<0.01) and maximum expiratory flow rates at 25% (p<0.001) and 50% (p<0.001). No serious adverse reactions were recognized in any subjects. Our results show that aminophylline is a useful bronchodilator which decreased ventilatory imbalance and improves lung function in both central and peripheral airways. (author)

  19. Technetium-99m DTPA inhalation scintigraphy in patients treated with fluoxetine and maprotiline: preliminary results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaya, G.C.; Durak, H.; Oezdogan, Oe.; Sayit, E.; Degirmenci, B.; Derebek, E. [Dokuz Eyluel Univ., Izmir (Turkey). School of Medicine; Yemez, B.; Turhal, Ue. [Dept. of Psychiatry, Dokuz Eylul Univ. School of Medicine, Izmir (Turkey)

    2000-09-01

    Drug-metabolising enzymatic activities have been detected in tracheobronchiolar, bronchiolar and alveolar regions in the lungs. Induction of phospholipidosis by amine drugs such as clorphentermine has also been shown. This study aimed to investigate the effect of fluoxetine and maprotiline, which contain amine groups in their structure, on pulmonary epithelial membrane permeability. Twenty-seven patients (mean age 36{+-}12 years) with various psychiatric problems, of whom 17 were treated with fluoxetine and 10 with maprotiline, were included in this study. Technetium-99m diethylene triamine penta-acetic acid (DTPA) aerosol inhalation scintigraphy was performed before and after 4-6 weeks of therapy. Following the inhalation of 1480 MBq {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA for 3 min, lung images in a 64 x 64 matrix were obtained every minute for 30 min. Regions of interest were drawn around the periphery of the lungs and on the major airways. Clearance half-times (T{sub 1/2}) were calculated by placing a mono-exponential fit on the curves. Penetration index (PI) was calculated on the first-minute image. There was no difference between the clearance rates of {sup 99m}Tc-DTPA before and after therapy for either the fluoxetine or the maprotiline group. After therapy, a significant decrease in PI was found in patients treated with fluoxetine (PI values before and after therapy: 0.53{+-}0.03 and 0.49{+-}0.05 respectively, P{<=}0.05). This finding might have been due to the induction of increased synaptic serotonin (5-HT) by fluoxetine, which acts by inhibiting the re-uptake of 5-HT on presynaptic membranes. Bronchoconstriction of small and medium airways may be caused by direct and indirect effects of 5-HT on smooth muscle contraction. (orig.)

  20. Could the gene coding for human uteroglobin (clara cell 10 kDa protein) be a candidate gene for atopy?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukherjee, A.B.; Peri, A.; Miele, L. [SDG, Bethesda, MD (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    It has been proposed that human immune response to allergens is genetically determined. Most of these allergic responses are directed to environmental proteins and are mediated by immunoglobulin E (IgE). These allergic disorders (eg. allergic asthma) are commonly known as atopy. IgE activates phospholipase A{sub 2} (PLA{sub 2}) which hydrolyzes cell membrane phospholipids generating free fatty acids, such as arachidonic acid (AA). AA is utilized as the substrate for the generation of pro-inflammatory eicosanoids and platelet activating factor (PAF). These agents can cause inflammation as well as bronchoconstriction, hallmarks of asthma. IgE-induced mast cell degranulation and accumulation of basophils and eosinophils in the lung are also characteristic immunological processes commonly found in atopic asthma. Recent investigations suggest that a group I PLA{sub 2} may be associated with the secretory granules of these cells. An inverse relationship between the levels of eicosanoids and hUG has been found in the nasopharyngeal lavage fluid of children with viral infections of the upper respiratory tract, often a precipitating factor in asthma. Results of genetic linkage studies mapped a putative atopy gene in human chromosome 11q{sup 13}, the same region in which we localized the hUG gene. Moreover, a genetic linkage between atopic IgE responses and chromosome 11q{sup 13} has been reported. In addition, hUG is: (i) a potent inhibitor of PLA{sub 2} activity, (ii) a potent antiinflammatory/immunomodulatory and antichemotactic protein and has a hitherto undetermined receptor-mediated activity. Taken together, these findings suggest that a mutation either in the hUG or its receptor genes may manifest symptoms characteristic of atopy. Hence, we raise the question whether hUG is a candidate gene for this disease.

  1. Disconnect between standardized field-based testing and mannitol challenge in Scottish elite swimmers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clearie, K L; Williamson, P A; Vaidyanathan, S; Short, P; Goudie, A; Burns, P; Hopkinson, P; Meldrum, K; Howaniec, L; Lipworth, B J

    2010-05-01

    Elite swimmers have high rates of rhinoconjunctivitis and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Moreover, exposure to chlorine and chlorine metabolites is known to induce bronchial hyper-reactivity. To assess the early and late effects of chlorine and exercise on the unified airway of elite swimmers, and to compare the response to mannitol and field-based exercise challenge. The Scottish national squad underwent exhaled tidal (FE(NO)) and nasal (N(NO)) nitric oxide measurement, peak nasal inspiratory flow (PNIF), and forced expiratory volume in 1 s before, immediately after, and 4-6 h post-swimming. A sport-specific exercise test was carried out during an intensive lactate set (8 min at >/=80% maximum hear rate). All swimmers underwent mannitol challenge, and completed a health questionnaire. N=61 swimmers were assessed: 8/59 (14%) of swimmers had a positive mannitol challenge. Nine out of 57 (16%) of swimmers had a positive exercise test. Only one swimmer was positive to both. Swimmers with a positive mannitol had a significantly higher baseline FE(NO) (37.3 vs. 18.0 p.p.b., P=0.03) than those with a positive exercise challenge. A significant decrease in FE(NO) was observed pre vs. immediate and delayed post-chlorine exposure: mean (95% CI) 18.7 (15.9-22.0) p.p.b. vs. 15.9 (13.3-19.1) p.p.b. (Pchlorine challenge was not. Thus, mannitol may identify swimmers with a 'traditional' inflammatory asthmatic phenotype, while field-based exercise/chlorine challenge may identify a swimmer-specific bronchoconstrictor response. A sustained fall in FE(NO) following chlorine exposure suggests that a non-cellular, perhaps neurogenic, response may be involved in this group of athletes.

  2. Ozone-Induced Hypertussive Responses in Rabbits and Guinea Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clay, Emlyn; Patacchini, Riccardo; Trevisani, Marcello; Preti, Delia; Branà, Maria Pia; Spina, Domenico; Page, Clive

    2016-04-01

    Cough remains a major unmet clinical need, and preclinical animal models are not predictive for new antitussive agents. We have investigated the mechanisms and pharmacological sensitivity of ozone-induced hypertussive responses in rabbits and guinea pigs. Ozone induced a significant increase in cough frequency and a decrease in time to first cough to inhaled citric acid in both conscious guinea pigs and rabbits. This response was inhibited by the established antitussive drugs codeine and levodropropizine. In contrast to the guinea pig, hypertussive responses in the rabbit were not inhibited by bronchodilator drugs (β2 agonists or muscarinic receptor antagonists), suggesting that the observed hypertussive state was not secondary to bronchoconstriction in this species. The ozone-induced hypertussive response in the rabbit was inhibited by chronic pretreatment with capsaicin, suggestive of a sensitization of airway sensory nerve fibers. However, we could find no evidence for a role of TRPA1 in this response, suggesting that ozone was not sensitizing airway sensory nerves via activation of this receptor. Whereas the ozone-induced hypertussive response was accompanied by a significant influx of neutrophils into the airway, the hypertussive response was not inhibited by the anti-inflammatory phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitor roflumilast at a dose that clearly exhibited anti-inflammatory activity. In summary, our results suggest that ozone-induced hypertussive responses to citric acid may provide a useful model for the investigation of novel drugs for the treatment of cough, but some important differences were noted between the two species with respect to sensitivity to bronchodilator drugs. Copyright © 2016 by The American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics.

  3. Protective effect of levodropropizine against cough induced by inhalation of nebulized distilled water in patients with obstructive lung disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bariffi, F; Tranfa, C; Vatrella, A; Ponticiello, A

    1992-01-01

    Levodropropizine is a recently developed, peripherally active antitussive agent which is widely used in clinical practice. In order to obtain further information on the spectrum of activity of this compound in experimental clinical models, a double-blind controlled study was carried out to evaluate the potential effect of the drug against cough and bronchoconstriction induced by inhalation of an ultrasonically nebulized solution of distilled water in patients with obstructive lung disease. Twenty patients were randomly divided into two groups, which received levodropropizine (60 mg t.i.d.) or placebo respectively for 7 consecutive days. Parameters evaluated at baseline and on the last day of treatment included (i) results of respiratory function tests (FEV1, IVC, FVC, TIFF, PEF, MEF75, MEF50, MEF25) performed before the stimulation test with nebulized water; (ii) total number of coughs during a 2-hour period after the stimulation test; (iii) bronchial responsiveness, quantified by calculating the volume of nebulized water required to induce a 20% reduction of FEV1 below the basal level. At pretreatment, the tussive response was very similar in the two groups. A significant decrease in number of coughs (from 34.4 +/- 8.4 at baseline to 15.6 +/- 4.9 post-treatment, p less than 0.01) was observed after administration of levodropropizine, whereas placebo treatment produced no significant effect (number of coughs: 29.6 +/- 4.9 at baseline vs 24.8 +/- 9.6 post-treatment, N.S.). Bronchial responsiveness decreased significantly (compared to baseline) in both treatment groups, without any significant difference between drug and placebo. Respiratory function tests were not significantly affected by either treatment.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Transglutaminase 2, a novel regulator of eicosanoid production in asthma revealed by genome-wide expression profiling of distinct asthma phenotypes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teal S Hallstrand

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A frequent manifestation of asthma, exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB, occurs in 30-50% of asthmatics and is characterized by increased release of inflammatory eicosanoids. The objective of this study was to identify genes differentially expressed in EIB and to understand the function of these genes in the biology of asthma.Genome-wide expression profiling of airway leukocytes and epithelial cells obtained by induced sputum was conducted in two groups of subjects with asthma with and without EIB (n = 7 per group, at baseline and following exercise challenge. Based on the results of the gene expression study, additional comparisons were made with a normal control group (n = 10. Localization studies were conducted on epithelial brushings and biopsies from an additional group of asthmatics with EIB (n = 3. Genes related to epithelial repair and mast cell infiltration including beta-tryptase and carboxypeptidase A3 were upregulated by exercise challenge in the asthma group with EIB. A gene novel to asthma pathogenesis, transglutaminase 2 (TGM2, was the most differentially expressed at baseline between the groups. In vivo studies confirmed the increased expression of TGM2 in airway cells and airway lining fluid, and demonstrate that TGM2 is avidly expressed in the asthmatic airway epithelium. In vitro studies using recombinant human enzymes reveal that TGM2 augments the enzymatic activity of secreted phospholipase A(2 (PLA(2 group X (sPLA(2-X, an enzyme recently implicated in asthma pathogenesis.This study found that TGM2, a mediator that is novel to asthma pathogenesis, is overexpressed in asthmatic airways and functions to increase sPLA(2-X enzymatic activity. Since PLA(2 serves as the first rate-limiting step leading to eicosanoid formation, these results suggest that TGM2 may be a key initiator of the airway inflammatory cascade in asthma.

  5. Lung function measurements in rodents in safety pharmacology studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoymann, Heinz Gerd

    2012-01-01

    The ICH guideline S7A requires safety pharmacology tests including measurements of pulmonary function. In the first step - as part of the "core battery" - lung function tests in conscious animals are requested. If potential adverse effects raise concern for human safety, these should be explored in a second step as a "follow-up study." For these two stages of safety pharmacology testing, both non-invasive and invasive techniques are needed which should be as precise and reliable as possible. A short overview of typical in vivo measurement techniques is given, their advantages and disadvantages are discussed and out of these the non-invasive head-out body plethysmography and the invasive but repeatable body plethysmography in orotracheally intubated rodents are presented in detail. For validation purposes the changes in the respective parameters such as tidal midexpiratory flow (EF(50)) or lung resistance have been recorded in the same animals in typical bronchoconstriction models and compared. In addition, the technique of head-out body plethysmography has been shown to be useful to measure lung function in juvenile rats starting from day two of age. This allows safety pharmacology testing and toxicological studies in juvenile animals as a model for the young developing organism as requested by the regulatory authorities (e.g., EMEA Guideline 1/2008). It is concluded that both invasive and non-invasive pulmonary function tests are capable of detecting effects and alterations on the respiratory system with different selectivity and area of operation. The use of both techniques in a large number of studies in mice and rats in the last years have demonstrated that they provide useful and reliable information on pulmonary mechanics in safety pharmacology and toxicology testing, in investigations of respiratory disorders, and in pharmacological efficacy studies.

  6. Lung function measurements in rodents in safety pharmacology studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heinz Gerd Hoymann

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available The ICH guideline S7A requires safety pharmacology tests including measurements of pulmonary function. In the first step – as part of the core battery - lung function tests in conscious animals are requested. If potential adverse effects raise concern for human safety, these should be explored in a second step as a follow-up study. For these two stages of safety pharmacology testing, both noninvasive and invasive techniques are needed which should be as precise and reliable as possible. A short overview of typical in-vivo measurement techniques is given, their advantages and disadvantages are discussed and out of these the noninvasive head-out body plethysmography and the invasive but repeatable body-plethysmography in orotracheally intubated rodents are presented in detail. For validation purposes the changes in the respective parameters such as tidal midexpiratory flow (EF50 or lung resistance have been recorded in the same animals in typical bronchoconstriction models and compared. In addition, the technique of head-out body plethysmography has been shown to be useful to measure lung function in juvenile rats starting from day two of age. This allows safety pharmacology testing and toxicological studies in juvenile animals as a model for the young developing organism as requested by the regulatory authorities (e.g. EMEA Guideline 1/2008.It is concluded that both invasive and noninvasive pulmonary function tests are capable of detecting effects and alterations on the respiratory system with different selectivity and area of operation. The use of both techniques in a large number of studies in mice and rats in the last years have demonstrated that they provide useful and reliable information on pulmonary mechanics in safety pharmacology and toxicology testing, in investigations of respiratory disorders, and in pharmacological efficacy studies.

  7. Respiratory mechanics: comparison of Beagle dogs, Göttingen minipigs and Cynomolgus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Truchetti, Geoffrey; Troncy, Eric; Robichaud, Annette; Gold, Leslie; Schuessler, Thomas; Maghezzi, Said; Bassett, Leanne; Authier, Simon

    2014-01-01

    When the no observed adverse effect level (NOAEL) is determined by respiratory safety pharmacology, follow-up studies are warranted and may include airway resistance and compliance. Respiratory mechanics in commonly used large animal species (Beagle dogs, Cynomolgus monkeys, and Göttingen minipigs) were compared. Eighteen animals were used (3/sex/species) in an anesthetized model (propofol infusion) with pancuronium as a neuromuscular blocker. Parameters of respiratory mechanics were evaluated at baseline and at peak drug effect. Resistance (Rrs) and elastance (Ers) were measured by applying a single frequency forced oscillation (0.5 Hz) to the subject's airway opening and fitting the flow, volume and pressure data to the single compartment model of the lung. Increasing doses of intravenous (IV) methacholine were administered in all three species, as well as doubling aerosolized concentrations of the same bronchoconstrictor agent before and after inhaled albuterol. The slope of the IV methacholine dose-response curve for Rrs was similar in dogs and monkeys and both species differed from minipigs, which showed greater reactivity. At the highest IV dose tested, minipigs also reached higher levels of bronchoconstriction than the other two species. They were followed, in decreasing order, by dogs and monkeys. Albuterol induced a significant decrease in the slope of the dose-response curve only in dogs and monkeys. Scientific literature is available on respiratory mechanics in monkeys and dogs but not in minipigs. Our results suggest that minipigs were more reactive than dogs and monkeys to IV methacholine while less sensitive to inhaled albuterol. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. A multi-scale approach to airway hyperresponsiveness: from molecule to organ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne-Marie eLauzon

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR, a characteristic of asthma that involves an excessive reduction in airway caliber, is a complex mechanism reflecting multiple processes that manifest over a large range of length and time scales. At one extreme, molecular interactions determine the force generated by airway smooth muscle (ASM. At the other, the spatially distributed constriction of the branching airways leads to breathing difficulties. Similarly, asthma therapies act at the molecular scale while clinical outcomes are determined by lung function. These extremes are linked by events operating over intermediate scales of length and time. Thus, AHR is an emergent phenomenon that limits our understanding of asthma and confounds the interpretation of studies that address physiological mechanisms over a limited range of scales. A solution is a modular computational model that integrates experimental and mathematical data from multiple scales. This includes, at the molecular scale, kinetics and force production of actin-myosin contractile proteins during cross-bridge and latch-state cycling; at the cellular scale, Ca2+ signaling mechanisms that regulate ASM force production; at the tissue scale, forces acting between contracting ASM and opposing viscoelastic tissue that determine airway narrowing; at the organ scale, the topographic distribution of ASM contraction dynamics that determine mechanical impedance of the lung. At each scale, models are constructed with iterations between theory and experimentation to identify the parameters that link adjacent scales. This modular model establishes algorithms for modeling over a wide range of scales and provides a frame-work for the inclusion of other responses such as inflammation or therapeutic regimes. The goal is to develop this lung model so that it can make predictions about bronchoconstriction and identify the pathophysiologic mechanisms having the greatest impact on AHR and its therapy.

  9. Role of Inflammatory Reponse in Experimental Decompression Sickness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, B. D.; Little, T.

    1999-01-01

    Decompression to altitude can result in gas bubble formation both in tissues and in the systemic veins. The venous gas emboli (VGE) are often monitored during decompression exposures to assess risk for decompression sickness (DCS). Astronauts are at risk for DCS during extravehicular activities (EVA), where decompression occurs from the Space Shuttle or Space Station atmospheric pressure of 14.7 pounds per square inch (PSI) to that of the space suit pressure of 4.3 PSI. DCS symptoms include diffuse pain, especially around joints, inflammation and edema. Pathophysiological effects include interstitial inflammatory responses and recurring injury to the vascular endothelium. Such responses can result in vasoconstriction and associated hemodynamic changes.The granulocyte cell activation and chemotaxin release results in the formation of vasoactive and microvascular permeability altering mediators, especially from the lungs which are the principal target organ for the venous bubbles, and from activated cells (neutrophils, platelets, macrophages). Such mediators include free arachidonic acid and the byproducts of its metabolism via the cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase pathways (see figure). The cyclooxygenase pathway results in formation of prostacyclin and other prostaglandins and thromboxanes that cause vasoconstriction, bronchoconstriction and platelet aggregation. Leukotrienes produced by the alternate pathway cause pulmonary and bronchial smooth muscle contraction and edema. Substances directly affecting vascular tone such as nitric oxide may also play a role in the respose to DCS. We are studying the role and consequent effects of the release inflammatory bioactive mediators as a result of DCS and VGE. More recent efforts are focused on identifying the effects of the body's circadian rhythm on these physiological consequences to decompression stress. al

  10. Exercise-induced bronchospasm among healthy elite cross country skiers and non-athletic students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohjantähti, H; Laitinen, J; Parkkari, J

    2005-10-01

    Regular exercise in cold, dry air is believed to be a predisposing factor for exercise-induced bronchospasm (EIB). The aim of this study was to compare the occurrence of EIB among previously healthy elite cross country skiers and their non-athletic control subjects. Twenty healthy elite cross country skiers and 18 non-asthmatic controls were challenged by a standardized free exercise test. Thereafter, subjects' respiratory function was followed by flow-volume spirometry up to 30 min. EIB was defined in the post-exercise spirometry as at least one of the following: a >or=10% decrease in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), a >or=20% decrease in mean maximal expiratory flow (MMEF) or a >or=25% decrease in peak expiratory flow rate (PEF). EIB was found in two skiers and one control according to FEV1, for seven skiers and two controls according to MMEF. Two skiers and one control had exercise-induced asthma (EIA) according to both parameters. The largest decrease in PEF was 13%, that did not result in additional diagnoses. All nine of the subjects with a positive test result reported asthma-like symptoms (dyspnea, cough or increased mucus excretion) after the exercise challenge. Accordingly, seven previously healthy skiers (35%) and two controls (11%) were diagnosed as having EIB. In addition, three skiers of the original cohort were excluded because of an earlier asthma diagnosis, making the total asthma prevalence 10/23 (42%) among the elite skiers. It was concluded that EIB is more common in elite cross country skiers than in non-athletic controls. The bronchoconstriction induced by exercise is usually mild or moderate, and flow-volume spirometry with sensitive flow parameters is needed for it to be diagnosed. Even a mild asthma decreases minute ventilation and maximal performance of winter sport athletes. Therefore, skiers with long-term respiratory symptoms or decreased performance should be studied for EIA and treated adequately.

  11. ASP4058, a novel agonist for sphingosine 1-phosphate receptors 1 and 5, ameliorates rodent experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis with a favorable safety profile.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rie Yamamoto

    Full Text Available Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P is a biologically active sphingolipid that acts through the members of a family of five G protein-coupled receptors (S1P1-S1P5. S1P1 is a major regulator of lymphocyte trafficking, and fingolimod, whose active metabolite fingolimod phosphate acts as a nonselective S1P receptor agonist, exerts its immunomodulatory effect, at least in part, by regulating the lymphocyte trafficking by inducing down regulation of lymphocyte S1P1. Here, we detail the pharmacological profile of 5-{5-[3-(trifluoromethyl-4-{[(2S-1,1,1-trifluoropropan-2-yl]oxy}phenyl]-1,2,4-oxadiazol-3-yl}-1H-benzimidazole (ASP4058, a novel next-generation S1P receptor agonist selective for S1P1 and S1P5. ASP4058 preferentially activates S1P1 and S1P5 compared with S1P2, 3, 4 in GTPγS binding assays in vitro. Oral administration of ASP4058 reduced the number of peripheral lymphocytes and inhibited the development of experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE in Lewis rats. Further, ASP4058 prevented relapse of disease in a mouse model of relapsing-remitting EAE. Although these immunomodulatory effects were comparable to those of fingolimod, ASP4058 showed a wider safety margin than fingolimod for bradycardia and bronchoconstriction in rodents. These observations suggest that ASP4058 represents a new therapeutic option for treating multiple sclerosis that is safer than nonselective S1P receptor agonists such as fingolimod.

  12. Aerosolized red-tide toxins (brevetoxins) and asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Lora E; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Backer, Lorraine C; Bean, Judy A; Wanner, Adam; Reich, Andrew; Zaias, Julia; Cheng, Yung Sung; Pierce, Richard; Naar, Jerome; Abraham, William M; Baden, Daniel G

    2007-01-01

    With the increasing incidence of asthma, there is increasing concern over environmental exposures that may trigger asthma exacerbations. Blooms of the marine microalgae, Karenia brevis, cause red tides (or harmful algal blooms) annually throughout the Gulf of Mexico. K brevis produces highly potent natural polyether toxins, called brevetoxins, which are sodium channel blockers, and possibly histamine activators. In experimental animals, brevetoxins cause significant bronchoconstriction. In humans, a significant increase in self-reported respiratory symptoms has been described after recreational and occupational exposures to Florida red-tide aerosols, particularly among individuals with asthma. Before and after 1 h spent on beaches with and without an active K brevis red-tide exposure, 97 persons >or= 12 years of age with physician-diagnosed asthma were evaluated by questionnaire and spirometry. Concomitant environmental monitoring, water and air sampling, and personal monitoring for brevetoxins were performed. Participants were significantly more likely to report respiratory symptoms after K brevis red-tide aerosol exposure than before exposure. Participants demonstrated small, but statistically significant, decreases in FEV(1), midexpiratory phase of forced expiratory flow, and peak expiratory flow after exposure, particularly among those participants regularly using asthma medications. No significant differences were detected when there was no Florida red tide (ie, during nonexposure periods). This study demonstrated objectively measurable adverse changes in lung function from exposure to aerosolized Florida red-tide toxins in asthmatic subjects, particularly among those requiring regular therapy with asthma medications. Future studies will assess these susceptible subpopulations in more depth, as well as the possible long-term effects of these toxins.

  13. Initial evaluation of the effects of aerosolized Florida red tide toxins (brevetoxins) in persons with asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fleming, Lora E; Kirkpatrick, Barbara; Backer, Lorraine C; Bean, Judy A; Wanner, Adam; Dalpra, Dana; Tamer, Robert; Zaias, Julia; Cheng, Yung Sung; Pierce, Richard; Naar, Jerome; Abraham, William; Clark, Richard; Zhou, Yue; Henry, Michael S; Johnson, David; Van De Bogart, Gayl; Bossart, Gregory D; Harrington, Mark; Baden, Daniel G

    2005-05-01

    Florida red tides annually occur in the Gulf of Mexico, resulting from blooms of the marine dinoflagellate Karenia brevis. K. brevis produces highly potent natural polyether toxins, known as brevetoxins, that activate voltage-sensitive sodium channels. In experimental animals, brevetoxins cause significant bronchoconstriction. A study of persons who visited the beach recreationally found a significant increase in self-reported respiratory symptoms after exposure to aerosolized Florida red tides. Anecdotal reports indicate that persons with underlying respiratory diseases may be particularly susceptible to adverse health effects from these aerosolized toxins. Fifty-nine persons with physician-diagnosed asthma were evaluated for 1 hr before and after going to the beach on days with and without Florida red tide. Study participants were evaluated with a brief symptom questionnaire, nose and throat swabs, and spirometry approved by the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health. Environmental monitoring, water and air sampling (i.e., K. brevis, brevetoxins, and particulate size distribution), and personal monitoring (for toxins) were performed. Brevetoxin concentrations were measured by liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, high-performance liquid chromatography, and a newly developed brevetoxin enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Participants were significantly more likely to report respiratory symptoms after Florida red tide exposure. Participants demonstrated small but statistically significant decreases in forced expiratory volume in 1 sec, forced expiratory flow between 25 and 75%, and peak expiratory flow after exposure, particularly those regularly using asthma medications. Similar evaluation during nonexposure periods did not significantly differ. This is the first study to show objectively measurable adverse health effects from exposure to aerosolized Florida red tide toxins in persons with asthma. Future studies will examine the possible chronic

  14. Pharmacological characterization of abediterol, a novel inhaled β(2)-adrenoceptor agonist with long duration of action and a favorable safety profile in preclinical models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aparici, Mònica; Gómez-Angelats, Mireia; Vilella, Dolors; Otal, Raquel; Carcasona, Carla; Viñals, Marisa; Ramos, Israel; Gavaldà, Amadeu; De Alba, Jorge; Gras, Jordi; Cortijo, Julio; Morcillo, Esteban; Puig, Carlos; Ryder, Hamish; Beleta, Jorge; Miralpeix, Montserrat

    2012-08-01

    Abediterol is a novel potent, long-acting inhaled β(2)-adrenoceptor agonist in development for the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Abediterol shows subnanomolar affinity for the human β(2)-adrenoceptor and a functional selectivity over β(1)-adrenoceptors higher than that of formoterol and indacaterol in both a cellular model with overexpressed human receptors and isolated guinea pig tissue. Abediterol is a full agonist at the human β(2)-adrenoceptor (E(max) = 91 ± 5% of the maximal effect of isoprenaline). The potency and onset of action that abediterol shows in isolated human bronchi (EC(50) = 1.9 ± 0.4 nM; t½ onset = 7-10 min) is not significantly different from that of formoterol, but its duration of action (t½ ∼ 690 min) is similar to that of indacaterol. Nebulized abediterol inhibits acetylcholine-induced bronchoconstriction in guinea pigs in a concentration-dependent manner, with higher potency and longer duration of action (t½ = 36 h) than salmeterol (t½ = 6 h) and formoterol (t½ = 4 h) and similar duration of action to indacaterol up to 48 h. In dogs, the bronchoprotective effect of abediterol is more sustained than that of salmeterol and indacaterol at doses without effects on heart rate, thus showing a greater safety margin (defined as the ratio of dose increasing heart rate by 5% and dose inhibiting bronchospasm by 50%) than salmeterol, formoterol, and indacaterol (5.6 versus 3.3, 2.2, and 0.3, respectively). In conclusion, our results suggest that abediterol has a preclinical profile for once-daily dosing in humans together with a fast onset of action and a favorable cardiovascular safety profile.

  15. Subcutaneous epinephrine versus nebulized terbutaline in the emergency treatment of asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pancorbo, S; Fifield, G; Davies, S; Fraser, G; Helmink, R; Heissler, J

    1983-01-01

    The efficacy of aerosolized terbutaline compared with subcutaneous epinephrine in the treatment of acute asthma was studied. The study population consisted of 30 men and women, 17 to 35 years old, who were diagnosed at a hospital emergency department as having acute asthmatic attacks. Heart rate, blood pressure, and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR) were measured on admission and 5, 15, and 30 minutes after initial drug treatment. One group received an initial dose of epinephrine hydrochloride (1:1000) 0.3 ml subcutaneously and a second, identical dose 15 minutes later. The other group received terbutaline sulfate 1 mg (for patients weighing less than or equal to 40 kg) or 2 mg (for patients weighing greater than 40 kg) by nebulizer over a five-minute period. Treatment was considered successful in patients whose PEFR was both greater than 60 liters/min and more than 16% greater than the individual's baseline PEFR. Improvements in the PEFR and in the ratio of the measured PEFR to the expected PEFR were compared for the two test groups. Five minutes after the initial drug administration, the mean improvement in PEFR was significantly greater in the terbutaline group (40% improvement) than in the epinephrine group (17% improvement). At 15 and 30 minutes, there were no significant differences in mean improvement in PEFR, but a trend favoring epinephrine was observed. The numbers of patients showing greater than or equal to 16% improvement in PEFR over baseline were not significantly different between the two groups. For patients in both drug groups with initial PEFR less than 60 liters/min, PEFR did not exceed 100 liters/min after treatment. No significant effect on heart rate was observed after administration of either drug. Aerosolized terbutaline is as effective as subcutaneous epinephrine in management of patients with acute bronchoconstricting episodes.

  16. Feasibility to apply eucapnic voluntary hyperventilation in young elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van der Eycken, S; Schelpe, A; Marijsse, G; Dilissen, E; Troosters, T; Vanbelle, V; Aertgeerts, S; Dupont, L J; Peers, K; Bullens, D M; Seys, S F

    2016-02-01

    Exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB) is more common in athletes compared to the general population. The eucapnic voluntary hyperventilation test is used to detect EIB in adult athletes. It is however unclear whether this technique is also applicable to young athletes. Young athletes (basketball (n = 13), football (n = 19), swimming (n = 12)) were recruited at the start of their elite sports career (12-14 years). Eight age-matched controls were also recruited. Eucapnic voluntary hyperventilation test was performed according to ATS guidelines in all subjects. A second (after 1 year, n = 32) and third (after 2 years, n = 39) measurement was performed in a subgroup of athletes and controls. At time of first evaluation, 3/13 basketball players, 4/19 football players, 5/11 swimmers and 1/8 controls met criteria for EIB (fall in FEV1≥10% after EVH). A ventilation rate of >85% of the maximal voluntary ventilation (MVV) is recommended by current guidelines (for adults) but was only achieved by a low number of individuals (first occasion: 27%, third occasion: 45%) However, MVV in young athletes corresponds to 30 times FEV1, which is equivalent to 85% of MVV in adults. A threshold of 70% of MVV (21 times FEV1) is feasible in the majority of young athletes. EIB is present in a substantial number of individuals at the age of 12-14 years, especially in swimmers. This underscores the importance of screening for EIB at this age. EVH is feasible in young elite athletes, however target ventilation needs to be adjusted accordingly. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Tracheal epithelium cell volume responses to hyperosmolar, isosmolar and hypoosmolar solutions: relation to epithelium-derived relaxing factor (EpDRF effects

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    Jeffrey S. Fedan

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available In asthmatic patients, inhalation of hyperosmolar saline or D-mannitol (D-M elicits bronchoconstriction, but in healthy subjects exercise causes bronchodilation. Hyperventilation causes drying of airway surface liquid (ASL and increases its osmolarity. Hyperosmolar challenge of airway epithelium releases epithelium-derived relaxing factor (EpDRF, which relaxes the airway smooth muscle. This pathway could be involved in exercise-induced bronchodilation. Little is known of ASL hyperosmolarity effects on epithelial function. We investigated the effects of osmolar challenge maneuvers on dispersed and adherent guinea-pig tracheal epithelial cells to examine the hypothesis that EpDRF-mediated relaxation is associated with epithelial cell shrinkage. Enzymatically-dispersed cells shrank when challenged with ≥10 mOsM added D M, urea or NaCl with a concentration-dependence that mimics relaxation of the of isolated, perfused tracheas (IPT. Cells shrank when incubated in isosmolar N-methyl-D-glucamine (NMDG chloride, Na gluconate (Glu, NMDG-Glu, K-Glu and K2SO4, and swelled in isosmolar KBr and KCl. However, isosmolar challenge is not a strong stimulus of relaxation in IPTs. In previous studies amiloride and 4,4' diisothiocyano 2,2' stilbenedisulfonic acid (DIDS inhibited relaxation of IPT to hyperosmolar challenge, but had little effect on shrinkage of dispersed cells. Confocal microscopy in tracheal segments showed that adherent epithelium is refractory to low hyperosmolar concentrations that induce dispersed cell shrinkage and relaxation of IPT. Except for gadolinium and erythro 9 (2 hydroxy 3 nonyladenine (EHNA, actin and microtubule inhibitors and membrane permeabilizing agents did not affect on ion transport by adherent epithelium or shrinkage responses of dispersed cells. Our studies dissociate relaxation of IPT from cell shrinkage after hyperosmolar challenge of airway epithelium .

  18. Increased group IV cytosolic phospholipase A2 activity in lungs of sheep after smoke inhalation injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, T; Kim, D K; Chin, M R; Hales, C A; Bonventre, J V

    1999-09-01

    Increased phospholipase A2 (PLA2) activity was measured in cytosolic fractions of lungs from sheep exposed to smoke from burning cotton or to synthetic smoke consisting of carbon and acrolein, a cotton smoke toxin. Three peaks of PLA2 activity were identified by heparin-Sepharose chromatography. The heparin-nonbinding PLA2 activity was twofold higher in the extracts from lungs exposed to smoke than in normal lungs. This activity was identified as the group IV 85-kDa cytosolic PLA2 (cPLA2). The activities of the forms of PLA2 that bound to heparin did not change after smoke exposure. Those activities showed a pH optimum of 9.0, required a millimolar Ca2+ concentration for full activity, and were inhibited by 5 mM dithiothreitol. One activity eluted at an NaCl concentration typical for group Ib and V PLA2 and had the expected substrate specificity. The other form of lung PLA2 that bound heparin was a group II PLA2. Lung myeloperoxidase activity increased progressively with increased exposure to smoke. cPLA2 was identified in sheep neutrophils. With 30 breaths of smoke exposure, there was an increase in cPLA2 activity without a difference in immunoreactivity on Western blot, indicating that the increased activity was not due to increased amounts of protein. In conclusion, smoke induces increases in resident lung cell cPLA2 activity that is likely responsible for eicosanoid production, leading to lung inflammation and bronchoconstriction.

  19. Airway Responsiveness to Psychological Processes in Asthma and Health

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    Thomas eRitz

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Psychosocial factors have been found to impact airway pathophysiology in respiratory disease with considerable consistency. Influences on airway mechanics have been studied particularly well. The goal of this article is to review the literature on airway responses to psychological stimulation, discuss potential pathways of influence, and present a well-established emotion-induction paradigm to study airway obstruction elicited by unpleasant stimuli. Observational studies have found systematic associations between lung function and daily mood changes. The laboratory –based paradigm of bronchoconstrictive suggestion has been used successfully to elicit airway obstruction in a substantial proportion of asthmatic individuals. Other studies have demonstrated an enhancement of airway responses to standard airway challenges with exercise, allergens, or methacholine. Standardized emotion-induction techniques have consistently shown airway constriction during unpleasant stimulation, with surgery, blood and injury stimuli being particularly powerful. Findings with various forms of stress induction have been more mixed. A number of methodological factors may account for variability across studies, such as choice of measurement technique, temporal association between stimulation and measurement, and the specific quality and intensity of the stimulus material, in particular the extent of implied action-orientation. Research has also begun to elucidate physiological processes associated with psychologically induced airway responses, with vagal excitation and ventilatory influences being the most likely candidate pathways, whereas the role of specific central nervous system pathways and inflammatory processes has been less studied. The technique of emotion-induction using films has the potential to become a standardized challenge paradigm for the further exploration of airway hyperresponsiveness mediated by central nervous system processes.

  20. Propranolol treatment for infantile hemangioma does not increase risk of childhood wheezing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mei-Zahav, Meir; Blau, Hannah; Hoshen, Moshe; Zvulunov, Alex; Mussaffi, Huda; Prais, Dario; Stafler, Patrick; Steuer, Guy; Lapidoth, Moshe; Amitai, Dan Ben

    2017-08-01

    Propranolol is the treatment of choice for infantile hemangiomas requiring medical intervention. Although contraindicated in asthma, its bronchoconstrictive effect in infants and children has not been extensively studied. We aimed to assess the incidence of wheezing episodes in infants and children treated with propranolol for infantile hemangiomas. A retrospective case-control study. a tertiary pediatric hospital. All Children followed for infantile hemangioma between 2009 and 2014. Children followed conservatively served as control group and were matched 1:1 for gender and month of birth by random matching to children treated with propranolol. All respiratory episodes (asthma, wheezing, stridor, and pneumonia) and respiratory associated hospitalizations were recorded from hospital records, from the primary care physician visits records and pharmacy prescriptions. The main outcome measure was the incidence of respiratory episodes in the treatment and the control groups. A total of 1828 clinic visits were reviewed for 683 children. In addition, primary care physician visits records were available in 80% of them. Two hundred and sixteen children were treated with propranolol. Incidence of respiratory episodes and recurrent respiratory episodes was similar in the propranolol and control groups (8.3% vs 12%, P = 0.265; 3.7% vs 6.5%, P = 0.274, respectively). Time to first episode was similar in the treatment and control groups (5.03 ± 3.32 vs 4.45 ± 3.21 months, respectively, P = 0.09). Respiratory hospital admission rate was similar in both groups. Propranolol treatment does not exacerbate wheezing episodes in infants and children. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Study of pH Stability of R-Salbutamol Sulfate Aerosol Solution and Its Antiasthmatic Effects in Guinea Pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Qing; Li, Qingrui; Han, Ting; Hu, Tingting; Zhang, Xuemei; Hu, Junhua; Hu, Hui; Tan, Wen

    2017-09-01

    Currently, all commercial available nebulized salbutamol in China is in its racemic form. It is known that only R-salbutamol (eutomer) has therapeutic effects, while S-salbutamol (distomer) may exacerbate asthma after chronic use. Therefore, it is an unmet clinical need to develop R-salbutamol as a nebulized product that is more convenient for young and old patients. In our study, a stable aerosol solution of R-salbutamol sulfate was established, and its antiasthmatic effects were confirmed. The decomposition rate and racemization effect of the R-salbutamol sulfate solution were evaluated over a pH range from 1 to 10 (except pH=7, 8) at 60°C. The aerodynamic particle size of the R-salbutamol sulfate solution and commercial RS-salbutamol sulfate solution were both tested in vitro by Next-Generation Impactor (NGI) in 5°C. Laser diffractometer was used to characterize the droplet-size distribution (DSD) of both solutions. We next conducted an in vivo animal study to document the antiasthmatic effect of R-salbutamol aerosol sulfate solution and determine the relationship to RS-salbutamol. The results showed that the R-salbutamol sulfate solution was more stable at pH 6. In vitro comparison studies indicated that there was no distribution difference between R-salbutamol sulfate solution and the commercial RS-salbutamol solution. The animal results showed that R-salbutamol was more potent than RS-salbutamol against the same dose of histamine challenge. Unlike commercial RS-salbutamol, which was acidified to a pH of 3.5 to extend bench life but may cause bronchoconstriction in asthmatic patients, the neutralized R-salbutamol solution was more suitable for clinic use.

  2. Low magnesium concentration in erythrocytes of children with acute asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sedighi, Mostafa; Pourpak, Zahra; Bavarian, Behrouz; Safaralizadeh, Reza; Zare, Ahad; Moin, Mostafa

    2006-12-01

    Magnesium (Mg) is the second most abundant intracellular cation and is involved in numerous physiological functions, including protein folding, intracellular signaling and enzyme catalysis. It has been shown that magnesium deficiency exacerbates pulmonary airways hyper reactivity. Several studies suggest that magnesium level has no effect on asthma but others had shown a contributory effect. Because of its intracellular abundance the aim of this study was to determine if there was any difference in plasma and intracellular Mg concentrations of children with acute asthma compared to non asthmatic children. Twenty nine patients with acute asthma aged 2 to11 years admitted to the emergency department of hospital and 37 non asthmatic children with the same age were included in our study. 0.5 mL of heparinized whole blood samples of patients who were meeting inclusion criteria at the onset of admission with bronchoconstriction and before using any medication was drawn and it was immediately sent to the laboratory. Plasma and erythrocytes were separated and stored at -20C and later their Mg levels were quantified with atomic absorption spectrophotometry method. The average plasma and intracellular magnesium levels in patients were (0.79 +/- 0.098 mmol/L) and (1.17 +/- 0.27 mmol/L) respectively. Results of 37 non asthmatic persons [plasma (0.85 +/- 0.1 mmol/L ) and erythrocytes (1.33 +/- 0.21 mmol/L)] showed that there was no significant difference between plasma Mg levels in two groups (p 0.06) but intracellular magnesium level was significantly lower (p 0.03) in patients group. These results indicate that intracellular Mg level may be a more accurate method to assess Mg level in patients with asthma. Hence, determination of Mg concentration in erythrocytes may be used in evaluation of asthma pathophysiology. There are recommendations for using intravenous Mg sulfate in acute asthma, and this study supports the rational for using it in emergency departments for acute

  3. Effect of Inhaled β2-Agonist on Exhaled Nitric Oxide in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

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    Mostafa Amer

    Full Text Available The fractional exhaled nitric oxide measured at an expiratory flow of 50mL/s (FENO50 is a marker of airway inflammation, and high levels are associated with greater response to steroid treatment. In asthma, FENO50 increases with bronchodilation and decreases with bronchoconstriction, the latter potentially causing an underestimate of the degree of airway inflammation when asthma worsens. It is unknown whether the same effect occurs in chronic obstructive lung disease (COPD. Likewise, it is not known whether changes in airway calibre in COPD patients alter flow-independent parameters describing pulmonary nitric oxide exchange, such as the maximal flux of nitric oxide (NO from the proximal airway compartment (J'awNO and the distal airway/alveolar concentration of NO (CANO. We recruited 24 patients with COPD and performed FENO analysis at multiple expiratory flows before and after treatment with inhaled β2-agonist bronchodilator therapy. For the 21 patients analysed, FENO50 rose from 17.1 (1.4 ppb (geometric mean (geometric SD at baseline, to 19.3 (1.3 ppb after bronchodilator therapy, an increase of 2.2 ppb (95% CI, 0.7-3.6; P = 0.005. There were non-significant changes in flow-independent NO parameters. The change in FENO50 correlated positively with the change in J'awNO (rs = 0.67, P < 0.001; rs = 0.62, P = 0.002 before and after correction for axial back-diffusion respectively following bronchodilation. Inhaled bronchodilator therapy can increase exhaled nitric oxide measurements in COPD. The standardisation of inhaled bronchodilator therapy before FENO analysis in COPD patients should therefore be considered in both research and clinical settings.

  4. Effects of aclidinium on determinants of COPD severity: symptoms and quality of life

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    Contoli M

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Marco Contoli,1 Paolo Solidoro,2 Fabiano Di Marco,3,4 Nicola Scichilone,5 Angelo Corsico,6 Fulvio Braido,7 Pierachille Santus4,8 1Research Centre on Asthma and COPD, Department of Medical Sciences, University of Ferrara, Ferrara, Italy; 2Cardiovascular and Thoracic Department, Città della Salute, Turin, Italy; 3Department of Health Sciences, University of Milan, Milan, Italy; 4Respiratory Unit, San Paolo Hospital, Milan, Italy; 5Department of Internal Medicine, Section of Pulmonology (DIBIMIS, University of Palermo, Palermo, Italy; 6Department of Molecular Medicine, Fondazione IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo, Pavia, Italy; 7Allergy and Respiratory Diseases Clinic, DIMI, University of Genoa, IRCS AOU San Martino-IST, Genoa, Italy; 8Pulmonary Rehabilitation Unit, Fondazione Salvatore Maugeri, Scientific Institute of Milan-IRCCS, Milan, Italy Abstract: The pathophysiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD includes persistent airflow limitation, altered gas exchange, and enhanced chronic inflammatory response. According to disease severity in individual patients, exacerbations and comorbidities frequently occur. The overall nocturnal and daily symptoms have a strong impact on patient quality of life and clinical outcomes. Bronchodilators, by targeting two important aspects of COPD pathophysiology, ie, bronchoconstriction and lung hyperinflation, are the mainstay of therapy for COPD. Aclidinium bromide in particular is an anticholinergic molecule, approved for maintenance bronchodilator treatment of stable COPD, that combines high antimuscarinic activity with strong kinetic selectivity for the M3 receptor subtype. Moreover, the elevated plasma clearance of aclidinium has been related to low systemic bioavailability and low incidence of anticholinergic adverse events, whereas the reduced residence time at M2 receptors provides good cardiovascular safety. Altogether, these characteristics result in a high safety and tolerability profile

  5. Novel Thioester Prodrug of N-acetylcysteine for Odor Masking and Bioavailability Enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhilare, Neha V; Dhaneshwar, Suneela S; Sinha, Akanksha J; Kandhare, Amit D; Bodhankar, Subhash L

    2016-01-01

    The mucolytic N-acetylcysteine (NAC) is used to control the excessive mucus secretion if mucus is the underlying cause of broncho-constriction. Its major drawbacks are poor bioavailability due to extensive first pass effect, poor lipophilicity, high protein binding and offensive odor. For minimizing above shortcomings of NAC, in present study thioester (A1) prodrug of NAC was synthesized by conventional as well as microwave-assisted methods. Release studies of A-1 were carried out using HPLC and pharmacological evaluation was performed in ovalbumin-induced model of pulmonary inflammation in Sprague dawley rats. A-1 was found to be stable in HCl buffer, phosphate buffer, stomach homogenates but furnished 30% NAC in 6h and 1.7% of NAC in 4h when incubated with small intestinal and liver homogenates respectively. Upon oral administration of A-1 to rats, 4.85% NAC was detected in blood at 8h. Urine samples pooled over a period of 24h exhibited 0.75% NAC while negligible concentration was found in 24 h pooled samples of feces. The findings of this preliminary investigation demonstrated significant effects of thioester prodrug A-1 as compared to NAC through reduction of lung inflammation, airway eosinophilia and reversal of lung function parameters in ovalbumin- challenged rats at half the equimolar dose of NAC. Interestingly masking thiol group through thioester formation resulted in odorless prodrug. We propose that thioester prodrug using palmitic acid as a carrier is a promising strategy to enhance bioavailability of NAC by increasing its lipophilicity/ absorption and minimizing its first pass metabolism.

  6. Activation of Transient Receptor Potential Ankyrin-1 by Insoluble Particulate Material and Association with Asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deering-Rice, Cassandra E; Shapiro, Darien; Romero, Erin G; Stockmann, Chris; Bevans, Tatjana S; Phan, Quang M; Stone, Bryan L; Fassl, Bernhard; Nkoy, Flory; Uchida, Derek A; Ward, Robert M; Veranth, John M; Reilly, Christopher A

    2015-12-01

    Inhaled irritants activate transient receptor potential ankyrin-1 (TRPA1), resulting in cough, bronchoconstriction, and inflammation/edema. TRPA1 is also implicated in the pathogenesis of asthma. Our hypothesis was that particulate materials activate TRPA1 via a mechanism distinct from chemical agonists and that, in a cohort of children with asthma living in a location prone to high levels of air pollution, expression of uniquely sensitive forms of TRPA1 may correlate with reduced asthma control. Variant forms of TRPA1 were constructed by mutating residues in known functional elements and corresponding to single-nucleotide polymorphisms in functional domains. TRPA1 activity was studied in transfected HEK-293 cells using allyl-isothiocynate, a model soluble electrophilic agonist; 3,5-ditert butylphenol, a soluble nonelectrophilic agonist and a component of diesel exhaust particles; and insoluble coal fly ash (CFA) particles. The N-terminal variants R3C and R58T exhibited greater, but not additive, activity with all three agonists. The ankyrin repeat domain-4 single nucleotide polymorphisms E179K and K186N exhibited decreased response to CFA. The predicted N-linked glycosylation site residues N747A and N753A exhibited decreased responses to CFA, which were not attributable to differences in cellular localization. The pore-loop residue R919Q was comparable to wild-type, whereas N954T was inactive to soluble agonists but not CFA. These data identify roles for ankyrin domain-4, cell surface N-linked glycans, and selected pore-loop domain residues in the activation of TRPA1 by insoluble particles. Furthermore, the R3C and R58T polymorphisms correlated with reduced asthma control for some children, which suggest that TRPA1 activity may modulate asthma, particularly among individuals living in locations prone to high levels of air pollution.

  7. Concordance between bronchial hyperresponsiveness, fractional exhaled nitric oxide, and asthma control in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Biju; Chay, Oh Moh; Allen, John C; Chiang, Andrea Shu Xian; Pugalenthi, Arun; Goh, Anne; Wong, Petrina; Teo, Ai Huay; Tan, Soh Gin; Teoh, Oon Hoe

    2016-10-01

    Previous studies on association between level of asthma control, markers of airway inflammation and the degree of bronchial hyperresponsiveness (BHR) have yielded conflicting results. Our aim was to determine the presence and severity of BHR and the concordance between BHR, asthma control, and fractional exhaled nitric oxide (FeNO) in children with asthma on therapy. In this cross-sectional observational study, children (aged 6-18 years) with asthma on British Thoracic Society (BTS) treatment steps 2 or 3, underwent comprehensive assessment of their asthma control (clinical assessment, spirometry, asthma control test [ACT], Pediatric Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire [PAQLQ]), measurement of FeNO and BHR (using mannitol dry powder bronchial challenge test [MCT], Aridol™, Pharmaxis, Australia). Fifty-seven children (63% male) were studied. Twenty-seven children were on BTS treatment step 2 and 30 were on step 3. Overall, 25 out of 57 (43.8%) children had positive MCT. Of note, 9 out of 27 (33.3%) children with clinically controlled asthma had positive MCT. Analyses of pair-wise agreement between MCT (positive or negative), FeNO (>25 or ≤25 ppb) and clinical assessment of asthma control (controlled or partially controlled/uncontrolled) showed poor agreement between these measures. A substantial proportion of children with asthma have persistent BHR despite good clinical control. The concordance between clinical assessment of asthma control, BHR and FeNO was observed to be poor. Our findings raise concerns in the context of emerging evidence for the role of bronchoconstriction in inducing epithelial stress that may drive airway remodeling in asthma. Pediatr Pulmonol. 2016;51:1004-1009. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Integrin αVβ5 Mediated TGF-β Activation by Airway Smooth Muscle Cells in Asthma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatler, Amanda L; John, Alison E; Jolly, Lisa; Habgood, Anthony; Porte, Jo; Brightling, Chris; Knox, Alan J; Pang, Linhua; Sheppard, Dean; Huang, Xiaozhu; Jenkins, Gisli

    2011-01-01

    Severe asthma is associated with airway remodelling, characterised by structural changes including increased smooth muscle mass and matrix deposition in the airway, leading to deteriorating lung function. Transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) is a pleiotropic cytokine leading to increased synthesis of matrix molecules by human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMs) and is implicated in asthmatic airway remodelling. TGF-β is synthesised as a latent complex, sequestered in the extracellular matrix, and requires activation for functionality. Activation of latent TGF-β is the rate-limiting step in its bioavailability. This study investigated the effect of the contraction agonists LPA and methacholine on TGF-β activation by HASMs and its role in the development of asthmatic airway remodelling. The data presented show that LPA and methacholine induced TGF-β activation by HASMs via the integrin αVβ5. Our findings highlight the importance of the β5 cytoplasmic domain since a polymorphism in the β5 subunit rendered the integrin unable to activate TGF-β. This is the first description of a biologically relevant integrin that is unable to activate TGF-β. These data demonstrate for the first time that murine airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells express αVβ5 integrins and activate TGF-β. Finally, these data show that inhibition, or genetic loss, of αVβ5 reduces allergen-induced increases in airway smooth muscle thickness in two models of asthma. These data highlight a hitherto un-described mechanism of TGF-β activation in asthma and support the hypothesis that bronchoconstriction may promote airway remodelling via integrin mediated TGF-β activation. PMID:22025551

  9. Integrin αvβ5-mediated TGF-β activation by airway smooth muscle cells in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatler, Amanda L; John, Alison E; Jolly, Lisa; Habgood, Anthony; Porte, Jo; Brightling, Chris; Knox, Alan J; Pang, Linhua; Sheppard, Dean; Huang, Xiaozhu; Jenkins, Gisli

    2011-12-01

    Severe asthma is associated with airway remodeling, characterized by structural changes including increased smooth muscle mass and matrix deposition in the airway, leading to deteriorating lung function. TGF-β is a pleiotropic cytokine leading to increased synthesis of matrix molecules by human airway smooth muscle (HASM) cells and is implicated in asthmatic airway remodeling. TGF-β is synthesized as a latent complex, sequestered in the extracellular matrix, and requires activation for functionality. Activation of latent TGF-β is the rate-limiting step in its bioavailability. This study investigated the effect of the contraction agonists LPA and methacholine on TGF-β activation by HASM cells and its role in the development of asthmatic airway remodeling. The data presented show that LPA and methacholine induced TGF-β activation by HASM cells via the integrin αvβ5. Our findings highlight the importance of the β5 cytoplasmic domain because a polymorphism in the β5 subunit rendered the integrin unable to activate TGF-β. To our knowledge, this is the first description of a biologically relevant integrin that is unable to activate TGF-β. These data demonstrate that murine airway smooth muscle cells express αvβ5 integrins and activate TGF-β. Finally, these data show that inhibition, or genetic loss, of αvβ5 reduces allergen-induced increases in airway smooth muscle thickness in two models of asthma. These data highlight a mechanism of TGF-β activation in asthma and support the hypothesis that bronchoconstriction promotes airway remodeling via integrin mediated TGF-β activation.

  10. Pro-inflammatory mechanisms of muscarinic receptor stimulation in airway smooth muscle

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    Zuyderduyn Suzanne

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acetylcholine, the primary parasympathetic neurotransmitter in the airways, plays an important role in bronchoconstriction and mucus production. Recently, it has been shown that acetylcholine, by acting on muscarinic receptors, is also involved in airway inflammation and remodelling. The mechanism(s by which muscarinic receptors regulate inflammatory responses are, however, still unknown. Methods The present study was aimed at characterizing the effect of muscarinic receptor stimulation on cytokine secretion by human airway smooth muscle cells (hASMc and to dissect the intracellular signalling mechanisms involved. hASMc expressing functional muscarinic M2 and M3 receptors were stimulated with the muscarinic receptor agonist methacholine, alone, and in combination with cigarette smoke extract (CSE, TNF-α, PDGF-AB or IL-1β. Results Muscarinic receptor stimulation induced modest IL-8 secretion by itself, yet augmented IL-8 secretion in combination with CSE, TNF-α or PDGF-AB, but not with IL-1β. Pretreatment with GF109203X, a protein kinase C (PKC inhibitor, completely normalized the effect of methacholine on CSE-induced IL-8 secretion, whereas PMA, a PKC activator, mimicked the effects of methacholine, inducing IL-8 secretion and augmenting the effects of CSE. Similar inhibition was observed using inhibitors of IκB-kinase-2 (SC514 and MEK1/2 (U0126, both downstream effectors of PKC. Accordingly, western blot analysis revealed that methacholine augmented the degradation of IκBα and the phosphorylation of ERK1/2 in combination with CSE, but not with IL-1β in hASMc. Conclusions We conclude that muscarinic receptors facilitate CSE-induced IL-8 secretion by hASMc via PKC dependent activation of IκBα and ERK1/2. This mechanism could be of importance for COPD patients using anticholinergics.

  11. Development of bronchial sensitization to inhalant allergens in occupational asthma patients

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    Hae-sim Park

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available In cases of occupational asthma due to reactive chemicals, an appreciable number of patients have persistent asthmatic symptoms and airway inflammation even after several years' avoidance of the cause agents. A case of late respiratory systemic syndrome (LRSS caused by phthalic anhydride is reported. The patient showed a progression of bronchial asthma due to house dust mite and developed a new bronchial sensitization to horse hair during the 5 year follow-up period. The patient was diagnosed in September 1990 as having LRSS due to phthalic anhydride. He was atopic and had worked in a factory preparing materials for paints for 8 years. After leaving his workplace and commencing treatment with anti-asthmatic medications, his asthmatic symptoms and airway hyper-responsiveness were much improved for 1year (PC20 methacholine level was increased from 0.44 to 4.4 mg/mL. For several months before the second admission (October 1992 his asthmatic symptoms were again aggravated and methacholine PC20 decreased to 1.1mg/mL without improvement in the following 3 years. The level of serum specific IgE antibody to phthalic anhydride has been gradually decreasing, while specific IgE to two types of house dust mite and horse hair has been increasing year by year during the last 3 years' follow-up period. These findings suggest that chronic exposure to inhalant allergens can induce the progression of allergen-induced airway inflammation, and result in new bronchial sensitization to inhalant allergens. Careful follow-up study is needed to detect new developments of allergen-induced bronchoconstriction in occupational asthma patients with persistent asthmatic symptoms.

  12. An Apparatus to Deliver Mannitol Powder for Bronchial Provocation in Children Under Six Years Old.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Patricia; Leung, Sharon S Y; Hor, Eleanor; Ruzycki, Conor A; Carrigy, Nicholas B; Finlay, Warren H; Brannan, John D; Devadason, Sunalene; Anderson, Sandra D; Sly, Peter D; Samnick, Kevin; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2015-12-01

    Currently bronchial provocation testing (BPT) using mannitol powder cannot be performed in children under 6 years. A primary reason is it is challenging for children at this age to generate a consistent inspiratory effort to inhale mannitol efficiently from a dry powder inhaler. A prototype system, which does not require any inhalation training from the pediatric subject, is reported here. It uses an external source of compressed air to disperse mannitol powder into a commercial holding chamber. Then the subject uses tidal breathing to inhale the aerosol. The setup consists of a commercially available powder disperser and Volumatic™ holding chamber. Taguchi experimental design was used to identify the effect of dispersion parameters (flow rate of compressed air, time compressed air is applied, mass of powder, and the time between dispersion and inhalation) on the fine particle dose (FPD). The prototype was tested in vitro using a USP throat connected to a next generation impactor. The aerosols from the holding chamber were drawn at 10 L/min. A scaling factor for estimating the provoking dose to induce a 15% reduction in forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) (PD15) was calculated using anatomical dimensions of the human respiratory tract at various ages combined with known dosing values from the adult BPT. Consistent and doubling FPDs were successfully generated based on the Taguchi experimental design. The FPD was reliable over a range of 0.8 (±0.09) mg to 14 (±0.94) mg. The calculated PD15 for children aged 1-6 years ranged from 7.1-30 mg. The FPDs generated from the proposed set up are lower than the calculated PD15 and therefore are not expected to cause sudden bronchoconstriction. A prototype aerosol delivery system has been developed that is consistently able to deliver doubling doses suitable for bronchial provocation testing in young children.

  13. Low levels of fractional exhaled nitric oxide and deep inhalation bronchoprotection are associated with mannitol non-responsiveness in asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Beth E; Stewart, Sarah L; Martin, Alexandra L; Cockcroft, Donald W

    2014-06-01

    Airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) to indirect agents like mannitol is thought to be dependent on concurrent airway inflammation as these stimuli exert their effects via the release of bronchoconstricting mediators from inflammatory cells. Airway inflammation correlates negatively with deep inhalation bronchoprotection against direct stimuli like methacholine. We hypothesised that deep inhalation bronchoprotection to methacholine would be absent and airway inflammation would be present in individuals with AHR to inhaled mannitol. Twenty asthmatic, otherwise healthy individuals, either gender, aged 18-65 years, with a Visit 1 (screening) methacholine two-minute tidal breathing PC20 of 16 mg/mL or less completed the study. Visits 2 and 3 consisted of either mannitol or deep inhalation methacholine challenge in random order, at least 24 h apart. All visits were completed within a period of two weeks. Eleven of the twenty participants had AHR to mannitol (PD15 ≤ 635 mg, the "responders") and nine did not (the "non-responders"). Responders did not bronchoprotect to methacholine via deep inhalation (doubling dose shift = 0.7; p = 0.13) and had high levels of exhaled nitric oxide (geometric mean 49 ppb; range 16-109 ppb). Conversely, significant deep inhalation bronchoprotection to methacholine occurred in the non-responder group (doubling dose shift = 1.6; p = 0.013). This group also had significantly lower levels of exhaled nitric oxide (geometric mean 23 ppb (range 16-45 ppb; p = 0.015). Deep inhalation bronchoprotection to methacholine and low levels of exhaled nitric oxide coincide with mannitol non-responsiveness in an asthmatic population. Clinical Trials Registration #NCT01642745 (clinicaltrials.gov). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Dysfunctional breathing and reaching one's physiological limit as causes of exercise-induced dyspnoea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Depiazzi, Julie; Everard, Mark L

    2016-06-01

    Excessive exercise-induced shortness of breath is a common complaint. For some, exercise-induced bronchoconstriction is the primary cause and for a small minority there may be an alternative organic pathology. However for many, the cause will be simply reaching their physiological limit or be due to a functional form of dysfunctional breathing, neither of which require drug therapy.The physiological limit category includes deconditioned individuals, such as those who have been through intensive care and require rehabilitation, as well as the unfit and the fit competitive athlete who has reached their limit with both of these latter groups requiring explanation and advice.Dysfunctional breathing is an umbrella term for an alteration in the normal biomechanical patterns of breathing that result in intermittent or chronic symptoms, which may be respiratory and/or nonrespiratory. This alteration may be due to structural causes or, much more commonly, be functional as exemplified by thoracic pattern disordered breathing (PDB) and extrathoracic paradoxical vocal fold motion disorder (pVFMD).Careful history and examination together with spirometry may identify those likely to have PDB and/or pVFMD. Where there is doubt about aetiology, cardiopulmonary exercise testing may be required to identify the deconditioned, unfit or fit individual reaching their physiological limit and PDB, while continuous laryngoscopy during exercise is increasingly becoming the benchmark for assessing extrathoracic causes.Accurate assessment and diagnosis can prevent excessive use of drug therapy and result in effective management of the cause of the individual's complaint through cost-effective approaches such as reassurance, advice, breathing retraining and vocal exercises. This review provides an overview of the spectrum of conditions that can present as exercise--induced breathlessness experienced by young subjects participating in sport and aims to promote understanding of the need for

  15. Preexposure to ozone blocks the antigen-induced late asthmatic response of the canine peripheral airways

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, C.R.; Kleeberger, S.R.; Spannhake, E.W. (Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions, Baltimore, MD (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The influence of exposure of the airways to ozone on acute allergic responsiveness has been investigated in several species. Little is known, however, about the effect of this environmental pollutant on the late asthmatic response (LAR) in animals in which it is exhibited. The purpose of this study was to evaluate this effect in the canine peripheral airways and to assess the potential role of mast cells in modulating the effect. A series of experiments on seven mongrel dogs demonstrated that the numbers of mast cells at the base of the epithelial region of small subsegmental airways exposed to 1 ppm ozone for 5 min were significantly (p less than .01) increased 3 h following exposure compared to air exposed or nonexposed control airways. In a second series of experiments performed on eight additional mongrel dogs with inherent sensitivity to Ascaris suum antigen, antigen aerosol was administered to the sublobar segment 3 h following ozone preexposure when mast cell numbers were presumed to be increased. These experiments were performed to determine whether ozone preexposure could enhance the late-phase response to antigen by virtue of acutely increasing the number of mast cells available to bind the antigen. Four of the eight dogs tested displayed a late-phase response to antigen following air-sham preexposure. In these four dogs, simultaneous ozone preexposure of a contralateral lobe completely blocked the late-phase response to antigen. These results indicate that the consequences of a single exposure to ozone persist beyond its effects on acute antigen-induced bronchoconstriction and extend to the complex processes involved with the late response. This attenuating effect of ozone is seen under conditions where mast-cell numbers in the airways are increased above baseline levels.

  16. [Update on treatment of asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battistini, A

    1996-01-01

    Treatment of asthma, in particular long-term therapy, has continued to evolve both for the perfectioning of single classes of drugs and for a better addressed long-term treatment, although physicians have not disposed of new drugs for over 30 years. Only with regard to chromones expectations have been disappointing, as the new nedocromil showed substantially the same efficacy as the old chromoglycate. The recent availability, in paediatrics, of long-acting beta 2 agonists, especially salmeterol, represents a big advantage with regard to compliance in therapies which last months, while the most recent corticosteroid, available in Italy as a spray, fluticasone, would have very few side effects. Principally this is due to the scarce intestinal absorption which is nearly non-existent. An old drug, such as theophylline, has been rediscovered because of the recent evidence of an antiinflammatory action. This is confirmed by the good results obtained when it is used for very long periods instead of inhaled corticosteroids. The therapeutical schemes of asthma have been modified since asthma has been demonstrated to be characterized more by phlogosis of the bronchial mucosa which persists after an acute episode rather than by broncho-constriction. This necessarily requires long-term therapies with antiinflammatory drugs which must be stepwise. In fact, the absence of an ideal drug determines the use of the drug with the fewest side effects in the less severe forms, i.e. chromones although less active, and of inhaled corticosteroids at increasing doses up to steroids per os in the more severe forms. Classical protocols suggest the combination with a beta 2-agonist (when necessary up to 3-4 times per day) to use corticosteroids as little as possible. However, recently short beta 2 agonists are being substituted by long-acting preparation which must be regularly administrated in the morning and evening.

  17. Phenol-containing saline solution as a diluent for adenosine 5'-monophosphate in bronchial challenge testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prieto, Luis; Badiola, Carlos; Cortijo, Julio; Pérez-Francés, Carmen; Gutiérrez, Valentina; Lanuza, Amparo

    2005-01-01

    To investigate the effect of dissolving adenosine 5'-monophosphate (AMP) with phenol-containing saline solution on the stability and the bronchoconstrictive properties of this indirect agonist. Eleven subjects with asthma well controlled with short-acting inhaled beta2-agonists as required or with inhaled corticosteroids were studied. Bronchial challenge tests with AMP dissolved with either normal saline solution or saline solution containing 0.4% phenol were performed on separate days. Furthermore, to assess the potential influence of the phenol-containing saline solution on the stability of the bronchoconstrictor agent, AMP solutions in concentrations of 40 microg/mL and 400 microg/mL were prepared in saline solution and phenol-containing saline solution and, after 30 min, the AMP levels were determined by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) assay. The geometric mean AMP provocative concentration causing a 20% fall in FEV1 (PC20) was 13.49 mg/mL (95% confidence interval [CI], 6.76 to 26.91) for the saline solution method, and AMP PC20 for the saline solution with phenol method was 8.91 mg/mL (95% CI, 3.39 to 23.44) [p = 0.18]. No significant differences were found between the concentrations of AMP made in saline solution compared to those made in phenol-containing saline solution measured by HPLC. These observations indicate that normal saline solution with or without phenol can be used as the diluent for AMP. However, since a potential risk with AMP of industrial sources is the bacterial contamination, adding a preservative such as phenol to a saline solution diluent might be recommended.

  18. Attenuation of nociceptive pain and inflammatory disorders by total steroid and terpenoid fraction of Euphorbia tirucalli Linn root in experimental in vitro and in vivo model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palit, Partha; Mukherjee, Dhrubojyoti; Mahanta, Poulami; Shadab, Md; Ali, Nahid; Roychoudhury, Shubhadeep; Asad, Md; Mandal, Subhash C

    2017-10-23

    The plant Euphorbia tirucalli Linn has been successfully used as a tribal folk medicine in India and Africa for the management of acute inflammatory, arthritic, nociceptive pain and asthmatic symptoms. The present study was conducted to assess the anti-inflammatory, analgesic, anti-asthmatic and anti-arthritic role of the total steroid and terpenoid rich fractions of the hydro-alcoholic extract of E. tirucalli root (STF-HAETR). STF-HAETR fraction demonstrated 71.25 ± 2.5 and 74.25 ± 5.1% protection against acetic acid-induced pain and central neuropathic pain at 75 and 100 mg/kg doses, respectively. It showed 96.97% protection against acute inflammation at 100 mg/kg with 1.6-fold better activity than the standard drug. The fraction exhibited such efficacy via inhibition of proinflammatory cytokines TNF-α, IFN-γ, by 61.12 and 65.18%, respectively, at 100 μg/mL. Inhibition of cyclooxygenase and Nitric oxide synthase in a dose-dependent manner affirms its analgesic and anti-inflammatory activity. The spectrophotometric analysis reveals that STF-HAETR induces ameliorative effect against heat-induced denaturation of Bovine serum albumin (BSA) and exhibits significant anti-proteinase activity. The plant fraction also demonstrated anti-asthmatic activity by displaying 62.45% protection against histamine induced bronchoconstriction or dyspnoea. Our findings suggest that STF-HAETR could be an effective safe therapeutic agent to treat nociceptive pain, acute inflammation, asthma, and arthritis which may authenticate its traditional use.

  19. Respiratory allergy to the indoor ant (Monomorium pharaonis) not related to sting allergy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Cheol-Woo; Choi, Soo-Young; Park, Jung-Won; Hong, Chein-Soo

    2005-02-01

    Many studies are available on systemic reactions to ant sting, but few have described the direct role of ants in respiratory allergy. The nonstinging house ant, Monomorium pharaonis (pharaoh ant), is a highly infesting species in indoor environments. To determine whether the pharaoh ant is an indoor source of aeroallergens. Two patients with asthma who lived in homes with ant infestation were enrolled. Pharaoh ants were collected at the patients' homes, and crude extracts were prepared. Skin prick tests with ant extracts were performed. Specific IgE to pharaoh ant was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the allergenic components were determined by using immunoblot analysis. Cross-reactivity among pharaoh ant, imported fire ant, Pachycondyla chinensis ant, and other indoor allergens was evaluated by ELISA inhibition tests. Specific bronchial challenge testing was performed using pharaoh ant extracts. Both patients had positive skin test reactions to pharaoh ant extract and high levels of specific IgE antibodies to pharaoh ant. The ELISA inhibition test results demonstrated significant inhibition by pharaoh ant; however, P. chinensis, cockroach, and house dust mite showed no inhibition of the IgE binding to pharaoh ant. Two important IgE-binding components, 9.4 and 34 kDa, were identified by using immunoblot analysis. Pharaoh ant bronchial challenge test results showed typical early asthmatic reactions in 1 patient and dual asthmatic reactions in the other patient. Ants can induce IgE-mediated bronchoconstriction regardless of sting in sensitized patients. Ants should be taken into consideration as a cause of respiratory allergy in patients living in homes with visual evidence of infestation.

  20. Effects of dexmedetomidine on oxygenation and lung mechanics in patients with moderate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease undergoing lung cancer surgery: A randomised double-blinded trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Su Hyun; Kim, Namo; Lee, Chang Yeong; Ban, Min Gi; Oh, Young Jun

    2016-04-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a risk factor that increases the incidence of postoperative cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality after lung resection. Dexmedetomidine, a selective α2-adrenoreceptor agonist, has been reported previously to attenuate intrapulmonary shunt during one-lung ventilation (OLV) and to alleviate bronchoconstriction. The objective is to determine whether dexmedetomidine improves oxygenation and lung mechanics in patients with moderate COPD during lung cancer surgery. A randomised, double-blinded, placebo-controlled study. Single university hospital. Fifty patients scheduled for video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery who had moderate COPD. Patients were randomly allocated to a control group or a Dex group (n = 25 each). In the Dex group, dexmedetomidine was given as an initial loading dose of 1.0  μg  kg(-1) over 10  min followed by a maintenance dose of 0.5  μg  kg(-1)  h(-1) during OLV while the control group was administered a comparable volume of 0.9% saline. Data were measured at 30  min (DEX-30) and 60  min (DEX-60) after dexmedetomidine or saline administration during OLV. The primary outcome was the effect of dexmedetomidine on oxygenation. The secondary outcome was the effect of dexmedetomidine administration on postoperative pulmonary complications. Patients in the Dex group had a significantly higher PaO2/FIO2 ratio (27.9 ± 5.8 vs. 22.5 ± 8.4 and 28.6 ± 5.9 vs. 21.0 ± 9.9 kPa, P ventilation (19.2 ± 8.5 vs. 24.1 ± 8.1 and 19.6 ± 6.7 vs. 25.3 ± 7.8%, P lung mechanics in patients with moderate COPD undergoing lung cancer surgery. ClinicalTrial.gov identifier: NCT 02185430.

  1. The significance of excursions above the ADI. Case study: monosodium glutamate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, R

    1999-10-01

    relationship between Chinese Restaurant Syndrome and ingestion of MSG, even in individuals reportedly sensitive to Chinese meals, and MSG did not provoke bronchoconstriction in asthmatics. Thus, high usage of MSG in ethnic cuisines does not represent a situation in which intakes might achieve unsafe levels, even among individuals claiming idiosyncratic intolerance of such foods. In the light of the toxicological studies, the human metabolic studies in neonates and adults, and the physiological and nutritional role of glutamic acid and the fact that food additive use does not markedly increase the total dietary burden, no foreseeable circumstances arise in which intakes would be such as to invalidate the appropriateness of allocating an ADI not specified to MSG.

  2. Association of serum Clara cell protein CC16 with respiratory infections and immune response to respiratory pathogens in elite athletes

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background Respiratory epithelium integrity impairment caused by intensive exercise may lead to exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. Clara cell protein (CC16) has anti-inflammatory properties and its serum level reflects changes in epithelium integrity and airway inflammation. This study aimed to investigate serum CC16 in elite athletes and to seek associations of CC16 with asthma or allergy, respiratory tract infections (RTIs) and immune response to respiratory pathogens. Methods The study was performed in 203 Olympic athletes. Control groups comprised 53 healthy subjects and 49 mild allergic asthmatics. Serum levels of CC16 and IgG against respiratory viruses and Mycoplasma pneumoniae were assessed. Allergy questionnaire for athletes was used to determine symptoms and exercise pattern. Current versions of ARIA and GINA guidelines were used when diagnosing allergic rhinitis and asthma, respectively. Results Asthma was diagnosed in 13.3% athletes, of whom 55.6% had concomitant allergic rhinitis. Allergic rhinitis without asthma was diagnosed in 14.8% of athletes. Mean CC16 concentration was significantly lower in athletes versus healthy controls and mild asthmatics. Athletes reporting frequent RTIs had significantly lower serum CC16 and the risk of frequent RTIs was more than 2-fold higher in athletes with low serum CC16 (defined as equal to or less than 4.99 ng/ml). Athletes had significantly higher anti-adenovirus IgG than healthy controls while only non-atopic athletes had anti-parainfluenza virus IgG significantly lower than controls. In all athletes weak correlation of serum CC16 and anti-parainfluenza virus IgG was present (R = 0.20, p athletes a weak positive correlations of CC16 with IgG specific for respiratory syncytial virus (R = 0.29, p = 0.009), parainfluenza virus (R = 0.31, p = 0.01) and adenovirus (R = 0.27, p = 0.02) were seen as well. Conclusions Regular high-load exercise is associated with decrease in serum CC16

  3. Chronic beta2 -adrenoceptor agonist treatment alters muscle proteome and functional adaptations induced by high intensity training in young men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hostrup, Morten; Onslev, Johan; Jacobson, Glenn; Wilson, Richard; Bangsbo, Jens

    2017-10-05

    Although the effects of training have been studied for decades, data on muscle proteome signature remodelling induced by high intensity training in relation to functional changes in humans remains incomplete. Likewise, β2 -agonists are frequently used to counteract exercise-induced bronchoconstriction, but the effects β2 -agonist treatment on muscle remodelling and adaptations to training are unknown. In a placebo-controlled parallel study, we randomized 21 trained men to four weeks of high intensity training with (HIT + β2 A) or without (HIT) daily inhalation of β2 -agonist (terbutaline, 4 mg d(-1) ). Of 486 proteins identified by mass-spectrometry proteomics of muscle biopsies sampled before and after the intervention, 32 and 85 were changing (FDR ≤ 5%) with the intervention in HIT and HIT + β2 A. Proteome signature changes were different in HIT and HIT + β2 A (P = 0.005), wherein β2 -agonist caused a repression of 25 proteins in HIT + β2 A compared to HIT, and an upregulation of 7 proteins compared to HIT. β2 -agonist repressed or even downregulated training-induced enrichment of pathways related to oxidative phosphorylation and glycogen metabolism, but upregulated pathways related to histone trimethylation and the nucleosome. Muscle contractile phenotype changed differently in HIT and HIT + β2 A (P ≤ 0.001), with a fast-to-slow twitch transition in HIT and a slow-to-fast twitch transition in HIT + β2 A. β2 -agonist attenuated training-induced enhancements in maximal oxygen consumption (P ≤ 0.01) and exercise performance (11.6 vs. 6.1%, P ≤ 0.05) in HIT + β2 A compared to HIT. These findings indicate that daily β2 -agonist treatment attenuates the beneficial effects of high intensity training on exercise performance and oxidative capacity, and causes remodelling of muscle proteome signature towards a fast-twitch phenotype. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by

  4. Comparing the cardiovascular therapeutic indices of glycopyrronium and tiotropium in an integrated rat pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and safety model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trifilieff, Alexandre; Ethell, Brian T. [Respiratory Disease Area, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Wimblehurst Road, Horsham, West Sussex RH12 5AB (United Kingdom); Sykes, David A. [Respiratory Disease Area, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Wimblehurst Road, Horsham, West Sussex RH12 5AB (United Kingdom); School of Life Sciences, Queen' s Medical Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2UH (United Kingdom); Watson, Kenny J.; Collingwood, Steve [Respiratory Disease Area, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Wimblehurst Road, Horsham, West Sussex RH12 5AB (United Kingdom); Charlton, Steven J. [Respiratory Disease Area, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Wimblehurst Road, Horsham, West Sussex RH12 5AB (United Kingdom); School of Life Sciences, Queen' s Medical Centre, University of Nottingham, Nottingham, NG7 2UH (United Kingdom); Kent, Toby C., E-mail: tobykent@me.com [Respiratory Disease Area, Novartis Institutes for Biomedical Research, Wimblehurst Road, Horsham, West Sussex RH12 5AB (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-15

    Long acting inhaled muscarinic receptor antagonists, such as tiotropium, are widely used as bronchodilator therapy for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although this class of compounds is generally considered to be safe and well tolerated in COPD patients the cardiovascular safety of tiotropium has recently been questioned. We describe a rat in vivo model that allows the concurrent assessment of muscarinic antagonist potency, bronchodilator efficacy and a potential for side effects, and we use this model to compare tiotropium with NVA237 (glycopyrronium bromide), a recently approved inhaled muscarinic antagonist for COPD. Anaesthetized Brown Norway rats were dosed intratracheally at 1 or 6 h prior to receiving increasing doses of intravenous methacholine. Changes in airway resistance and cardiovascular function were recorded and therapeutic indices were calculated against the ED{sub 50} values for the inhibition of methacholine-induced bronchoconstriction. At both time points studied, greater therapeutic indices for hypotension and bradycardia were observed with glycopyrronium (19.5 and 28.5 fold at 1 h; > 200 fold at 6 h) than with tiotropium (1.5 and 4.2 fold at 1 h; 4.6 and 5.5 fold at 6 h). Pharmacokinetic, protein plasma binding and rat muscarinic receptor binding properties for both compounds were determined and used to generate an integrated model of systemic M{sub 2} muscarinic receptor occupancy, which predicted significantly higher M{sub 2} receptor blockade at ED{sub 50} doses with tiotropium than with glycopyrronium. In our preclinical model there was an improved safety profile for glycopyrronium when compared with tiotropium. - Highlights: • We use an in vivo rat model to study CV safety of inhaled muscarinic antagonists. • We integrate protein and receptor binding and PK of tiotropium and glycopyrrolate. • At ED{sub 50} doses for bronchoprotection we model systemic M{sub 2} receptor occupancy. • Glycopyrrolate demonstrates lower M

  5. β₂ long-acting and anticholinergic drugs control TGF-β1-mediated neutrophilic inflammation in COPD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Profita, Mirella; Bonanno, Anna; Montalbano, Angela Marina; Albano, Giusy Daniela; Riccobono, Loredana; Siena, Liboria; Ferraro, Maria; Casarosa, Paola; Pieper, Michael Paul; Gjomarkaj, Mark

    2012-07-01

    We quantified TGF-β1 and acetylcholine (ACh) concentrations in induced sputum supernatants (ISSs) from 18 healthy controls (HC), 22 healthy smokers (HS) and 21 COPDs. ISSs from HC, HS and COPD as well as rhTGF-β1 were also tested in neutrophil adhesion and in mAChR2, mAChR3 and ChAT expression experiments in human bronchial epithelial cells (16-HBE). Finally, we evaluated the effects of Olodaterol (a novel inhaled β(2)-adrenoceptor agonist) and Tiotropium Spiriva®, alone or in combination, on neutrophil adhesion and mAChRs and ChAT expression in stimulated 16-HBE. The results showed that 1) TGF-β1 and ACh concentrations are increased in ISSs from COPD in comparison to HC and HS, and TGF-β1 in HS is higher than in HC; 2) ISSs from COPD and HS caused increased neutrophil adhesion to 16-HBE when compared to ISSs from HC. The effect of ISSs from COPD was significantly reduced by TGF-β1 depletion or by the pretreatment with Olodaterol or Tiotropium alone or in combination, while the effect of ISSs from HS was significantly reduced by the pretreatment with Olodaterol alone; 3) mAChR2, mAChR3 and ChAT expression was increased in 16-HBE stimulated with ISSs from COPD and TGF-β1 depletion significantly reduced this effect on mAChR3 and ChAT expression; 4) rhTGF-β1 increased mAChR2, mAChR3 and ChAT expression in 16-HBE; 5) Olodaterol did not affect the expression of mAChRs and ChAT in 16-HBE. Our findings support the use of β₂ long-acting and anticholinergic drugs to control the bronchoconstriction and TGF-β1-mediated neutrophilic inflammation in COPD. © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Pulmonary function responses to ozone in smokers with a limited smoking history

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bates, Melissa L., E-mail: mlbates@pediatrics.wisc.edu [Interdisciplinary Graduate Degree Program in Physiology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Department of Pediatrics, Critical Care Division, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI 53792 (United States); John Rankin Laboratory of Pulmonary Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI 53792 (United States); Brenza, Timothy M. [Department of Chemical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Ben-Jebria, Abdellaziz [Interdisciplinary Graduate Degree Program in Physiology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Bascom, Rebecca [Division of Pulmonary, Allergy and Critical Care Medicine, Penn State College of Medicine, Hershey, PA 17033 (United States); Eldridge, Marlowe W. [Department of Pediatrics, Critical Care Division, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI 53792 (United States); John Rankin Laboratory of Pulmonary Medicine, University of Wisconsin School of Medicine and Public Health, Madison, WI 53792 (United States); Department of Kinesiology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53792 (United States); Department of Bioengineering, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison, WI 53792 (United States); Ultman, James S. [Interdisciplinary Graduate Degree Program in Physiology, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States); Department of Chemical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, PA 16802 (United States)

    2014-07-01

    In non-smokers, ozone (O{sub 3}) inhalation causes decreases in forced expiratory volume (FEV{sub 1}) and dead space (V{sub D}) and increases the slope of the alveolar plateau (S{sub N}). We previously described a population of smokers with a limited smoking history that had enhanced responsiveness to brief O{sub 3} boluses and aimed to determine if responsiveness to continuous exposure was also enhanced. Thirty smokers (19 M, 11 F, 24 ± 4 years, 6 ± 4 total years smoking,4 ± 2 packs/week) and 30 non-smokers (17 M, 13 F, 25 ± 6 years) exercised for 1 h on a cycle ergometer while breathing 0.30 ppm O{sub 3}. Smokers and non-smokers were equally responsive in terms of FEV{sub 1} (− 9.5 ± 1.8% vs − 8.7 ± 1.9%). Smokers alone were responsive in terms of V{sub D} (− 6.1 ± 1.2%) and S{sub N} (9.1 ± 3.4%). There was no difference in total delivered dose. Dead space ventilation (V{sub D}/V{sub T}) was not initially different between the two groups, but increased in the non-smokers (16.4 ± 2.8%) during the exposure, suggesting that the inhaled dose may be distributed more peripherally in smokers. We also conclude that these cigarette smokers retain their airway responsiveness to O{sub 3} and, uniquely, experience changes in V{sub D} that lead to heterogeneity in airway morphometry and an increase in S{sub N}. - Highlights: • We previously found lung function responses to O{sub 3} bolus exposure in smokers. • Here, we describe their responsiveness to continuous O{sub 3} exposure with exercise. • Spirometry and capnography were used to assess pulmonary function changes. • Enhanced bronchoconstriction in smokers increases parenchymal delivery of O{sub 3}.

  7. Biochemical regulation of airway smooth muscle tone: current knowledge and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torphy, T J

    1987-01-01

    Evidence collected during the last decade indicates that the molecular processes responsible for smooth muscle contraction are fundamentally different from those responsible for skeletal muscle contraction. Furthermore, because of the diverse functional roles of various smooth muscles, it would not be surprising if significant differences in regulatory processes also exist among different smooth muscles. Such diversity may already be exemplified by differences in cross-bridge kinetics and sources of activator Ca2+. Additional unique regulatory features of various smooth muscle types will undoubtedly be uncovered by further research. A convincing body of data suggests that activation of the adenylate cyclase/protein kinase cascade is responsible for the bronchodilation produced by beta-adrenoceptor agonists. Although the exact mechanism by which the activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase induces relaxation is not clear, the phosphorylation of multiple substrates may be involved. Phosphorylation of these substrates can promote relaxation by decreasing the myoplasmic Ca2+ concentration, decreasing the Ca2+ sensitivity of the contractile apparatus, or both. Thus, because beta-adrenoceptor agonists act as physiologic antagonists of broncho-constriction, they should relax airway smooth muscle regardless of the mediator(s) responsible for the bronchospasm. Perhaps this is the major reason that the beta-adrenoceptor agonists have become the premier class of drugs used in the treatment of bronchial asthma. As useful as the sympathomimetic bronchodilators have been, they are not without liabilities. These liabilities include: cardiovascular and skeletal muscle side effects, an inherent subsensitivity of the asthmatic patient population to beta-adrenoceptor agonists, the development of tolerance and a loss of efficacy during severe asthmatic episodes. The fact that these drawbacks are probably shared by all sympathomimetic bronchodilators suggests that little therapeutic

  8. Investigation of the bioequivalence of montelukast chewable tablets after a single oral administration using a validated LC-MS/MS method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaid, Abdel Naser; Abualhasan, Murad N; Watson, David G; Mousa, Ayman; Ghazal, Nadia; Bustami, Rana

    2015-01-01

    Background Montelukast (MT) is a leukotriene D4 antagonist. It is an effective and safe medicine for the prophylaxis and treatment of chronic asthma. It is also used to prevent acute exercise-induced bronchoconstriction and as a symptomatic relief of seasonal allergic rhinitis and perennial allergic rhinitis. Objective The aim of this study was to evaluate the bioequivalence (BE) of two drug products: generic MT 5 mg chewable tablets versus the branded drug Singulair® pediatric 5 mg chewable tablets among Mediterranean volunteers. Methods An open-label, randomized two-period crossover BE design was conducted in 32 healthy male volunteers with a 9-day washout period between doses and under fasting conditions. The drug concentrations in plasma were quantified by using a newly developed and fully validated liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method, and the pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using a non-compartmental model. The ratio for generic/branded tablets using geometric least squares means was calculated for both the MT products. Results The relationship between concentration and peak area ratio was found to be linear within the range 6.098–365.855 ng/mL. The correlation coefficient (R2) was always greater than 0.99 during the course of the validation. Statistical comparison of the main pharmacokinetic parameters showed no significant difference between the generic and branded products. The point estimates (ratios of geometric means) were 101.2%, 101.6%, and 98.11% for area under the curve (AUC)0→last, AUC0→inf, and Cmax, respectively. The 90% confidence intervals were within the predefined limits of 80.00%–125.00% as specified by the US Food and Drug Administration and European Medicines Agency for BE studies. Conclusion Broncast® pediatric chewable tablets (5 mg/tablet) are bioequivalent to Singulair® pediatric chewable tablets (5 mg/tablet), with a similar safety profile. This suggests that these two formulations can be

  9. Rupatadine, a new potent, orally active dual antagonist of histamine and platelet-activating factor (PAF).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlos, M; Giral, M; Balsa, D; Ferrando, R; Queralt, M; Puigdemont, A; García-Rafanell, J; Forn, J

    1997-01-01

    Rupatadine (UR-12592, 8-chloro-6, 11-dihydro-11-[1-[(5-methyl3-pyridinyl) methyl]-4-piperidinylidene]-5H-benzo[5,6]-cyclohepta[1,2b]pyridine ) is a novel compound that inhibits both platelet-activating factor (PAF) and histamine (H1) effects through its interaction with specific receptors (Ki(app) values against [3H]WEB-2086 binding to rabbit platelet membranes and [3H]-pyrilamine binding to guinea pig cerebellum membranes were 0.55 and 0.10 microM, respectively). Rupatadine competitively inhibited histamine-induced guinea pig ileum contraction (pA2 = 9.29 +/- 0.06) without affecting contraction induced by ACh, serotonin or leukotriene D4 (LTD4). It also competitively inhibited PAF-induced platelet aggregation in washed rabbit platelets (WRP) (pA2 = 6.68 +/- 0.08) and in human platelet-rich plasma (HPRP) (IC50 = 0.68 microM), while not affecting ADP- or arachidonic acid-induced platelet aggregation. Rupatadine blocked histamine- and PAF-induced effects in vivo, such as hypotension in rats (ID50 = 1.4 and 0.44 mg/kg i.v., respectively) and bronchoconstriction in guinea pigs (ID50 = 113 and 9.6 micrograms/kg i.v.). Moreover, it potently inhibited PAF-induced mortality in mice (ID50 = 0.31 and 3.0 mg/kg i.v. and p.o., respectively) and endotoxin-induced mortality in mice and rats (ID50 = 1.6 and 0.66 mg/kg i.v.). Rupatadine's duration of action was long, as assessed by the histamine- and PAF-induced increase in vascular permeability test in dogs (42 and 34% inhibition at 26 h after 1 mg/kg p.o.). Rupatadine at a dose of 100 mg/kg p.o. neither modified spontaneous motor activity nor prolonged barbiturate-sleeping time in mice, which indicates a lack of sedative effects. Overall, rupatadine combines histamine and PAF antagonist activities in vivo with high potency, the antihistamine properties being similar to or higher than those of loratadine, whereas rupatadine's PAF antagonist effects were near those of WEB-2066. Rupatadine is therefore a good candidate for further

  10. The in vitro and in vivo profile of aclidinium bromide in comparison with glycopyrronium bromide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavaldà, Amadeu; Ramos, Israel; Carcasona, Carla; Calama, Elena; Otal, Raquel; Montero, José Luis; Sentellas, Sonia; Aparici, Monica; Vilella, Dolors; Alberti, Joan; Beleta, Jorge; Miralpeix, Montserrat

    2014-08-01

    This study characterised the in vitro and in vivo profiles of two novel long-acting muscarinic antagonists, aclidinium bromide and glycopyrronium bromide, using tiotropium bromide and ipratropium bromide as comparators. All four antagonists had high affinity for the five muscarinic receptor sub-types (M1-M5); aclidinium had comparable affinity to tiotropium but higher affinity than glycopyrronium and ipratropium for all receptors. Glycopyrronium dissociated faster from recombinant M3 receptors than aclidinium and tiotropium but more slowly than ipratropium; all four compounds dissociated more rapidly from M2 receptors than from M3 receptors. In vitro, aclidinium, glycopyrronium and tiotropium had a long duration of action at native M3 receptors (>8 h versus 42 min for ipratropium). In vivo, all compounds were equi-potent at reversing acetylcholine-induced bronchoconstriction. Aclidinium, glycopyrronium and ipratropium had a faster onset of bronchodilator action than tiotropium. Aclidinium had a longer duration of action than glycopyronnium (time to 50% recovery of effect [t½ offset] = 29 h and 13 h, respectively); these compare with a t½ offset of 64 h and 8 h for tiotropium and ipratropium, respectively. Aclidinium was less potent than glycopyrronium and tiotropium at inhibiting salivation in conscious rats (dose required to produce half-maximal effect [ED50] = 38, 0.74 and 0.88 μg/kg, respectively) and was more rapidly hydrolysed in rat, guinea pig and human plasma compared with glycopyrronium or tiotropium. These results indicate that while aclidinium and glycopyrronium are both potent antagonists at muscarinic receptors with similar kinetic selectivity for M3 receptors versus M2, aclidinium has a longer dissociation half-life at M3 receptors and a longer duration of bronchodilator action in vivo than glycopyrronium. The rapid plasma hydrolysis of aclidinium, coupled to its kinetic selectivity, may confer a reduced propensity for systemic

  11. Salmeterol attenuates chemotactic responses in rhinovirus-induced exacerbation of allergic airways disease by modulating protein phosphatase 2A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatchwell, Luke; Girkin, Jason; Dun, Matthew D; Morten, Matthew; Verrills, Nicole; Toop, Hamish D; Morris, Jonathan C; Johnston, Sebastian L; Foster, Paul S; Collison, Adam; Mattes, Joerg

    2014-06-01

    β-Agonists are used for relief and control of asthma symptoms by reversing bronchoconstriction. They might also have anti-inflammatory properties, but the underpinning mechanisms remain poorly understood. Recently, a direct interaction between formoterol and protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) has been described in vitro. We sought to elucidate the molecular mechanisms by which β-agonists exert anti-inflammatory effects in allergen-driven and rhinovirus 1B-exacerbated allergic airways disease (AAD). Mice were sensitized and then challenged with house dust mite to induce AAD while receiving treatment with salmeterol, formoterol, or salbutamol. Mice were also infected with rhinovirus 1B to exacerbate lung inflammation and therapeutically administered salmeterol, dexamethasone, or the PP2A-activating drug (S)-2-amino-4-(4-[heptyloxy]phenyl)-2-methylbutan-1-ol (AAL[S]). Systemic or intranasal administration of salmeterol protected against the development of allergen- and rhinovirus-induced airway hyperreactivity and decreased eosinophil recruitment to the lungs as effectively as dexamethasone. Formoterol and salbutamol also showed anti-inflammatory properties. Salmeterol, but not dexamethasone, increased PP2A activity, which reduced CCL11, CCL20, and CXCL2 expression and reduced levels of phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and active nuclear factor κB subunits in the lungs. The anti-inflammatory effect of salmeterol was blocked by targeting the catalytic subunit of PP2A with small RNA interference. Conversely, increasing PP2A activity with AAL(S) abolished rhinovirus-induced airway hyperreactivity, eosinophil influx, and CCL11, CCL20, and CXCL2 expression. Salmeterol also directly activated immunoprecipitated PP2A in vitro isolated from human airway epithelial cells. Salmeterol exerts anti-inflammatory effects by increasing PP2A activity in AAD and rhinovirus-induced lung inflammation, which might potentially account for some of its clinical benefits

  12. Pantoea agglomerans: a marvelous bacterium of evil and good.Part I. Deleterious effects: Dust-borne endotoxins and allergens - focus on cotton dust.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutkiewicz, Jacek; Mackiewicz, Barbara; Lemieszek, Marta Kinga; Golec, Marcin; Milanowski, Janusz

    2015-01-01

    accumulation of platelets in pulmonary capillaries initiating an acute and chronic inflammation resulting in endothelial cell damage and extravasation of cells and fluids into the lung interstitium. These changes cause bronchoconstriction, the decrement of lung function expressed as reduction of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) and/or diffusion capacity, increase in the airway hyperreactivity and subjective symptoms such as fever, airway irritation and chest tightness. The conclusions from these experiments, performed mostly 2-3 decades ago, did not loose their actuality until recently as so far no other cotton dust component was identified as a more important work-related hazard than bacterial endotoxin. Though also other microbial and plant constituents are considered as potential causative agents of byssinosis, the endotoxin produced by Pantoea agglomerans and other Gram-negative bacteria present in cotton dust is still regarded as a major cause of this mysterious disease.

  13. Asthma, allergy and the Olympics: a 12-year survey in elite athletes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonini, Matteo; Gramiccioni, Claudia; Fioretti, Daniela; Ruckert, Beate; Rinaldi, Monica; Akdis, Cezmi; Todaro, Antonio; Palange, Paolo; Carlsen, Kai-Hakon; Pelliccia, Antonio; Rasi, Guido; Bonini, Sergio

    2015-04-01

    There are no comprehensive surveys relating the reported high prevalence of asthma and allergic diseases in athletes to comorbidities and immune changes associated with intense chronic exercise. This 12-year survey aims to evaluate several clinical, functional and immunological parameters in order to assess features, trend and burden of asthma, allergy, infections and autoimmune diseases, in a large homogeneous population of Olympic athletes. Six hundred and fifty-nine Italian Olympic athletes were studied through four cross-sectional surveys performed between 2000 and 2012 before the Summer and Winter Olympics. Clinical diagnosis of allergic, autoimmune and infectious diseases was complemented by: skin-prick tests (n = 569); pulmonary function tests (n = 415); total (n = 158) and specific (n = 72) serum IgE; serum autoantibodies (n = 30), cytokines and growth factors (n = 92); flow cytometry (n = 135). The prevalence of asthma and/or exercise-induced bronchoconstriction was 14.7%, with a significant increase (P = 0.04) from 2000 (11.3%) to 2008 (17.2%). The prevalence of rhinitis, conjunctivitis, skin allergic diseases and anaphylaxis was 26.2%, 20.0%, 14.8% and 1.1%, respectively. Sensitization to inhalant allergens was documented in 49.0% of athletes, being 32.7% in 2000 and 56.5% in 2008 (P < 0.0001). Food, drug and venom allergy was present in 7.1%, 5.0% and 2.1% of athletes, respectively. The high prevalence of asthma and allergy was associated with recurrent upper respiratory tract (10.3%) and herpes (18.2%) infections, an abnormal T cell subset profile and a general down-regulation of serum cytokines with a significantly lower IFN-γ/IL-4 ratio. A chronic and intense physical exercise may cause a transient immunodepression with a preferential shift to a Th2 response, associated with abnormalities of the respiratory tract.

  14. Analysis of the method for ventilation heterogeneity assessment using the Otis model and forced oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glapiński, Jarosław; Mroczka, Janusz; Polak, Adam G

    2015-12-01

    Increased heterogeneity of the lung disturbs pulmonary gas exchange. During bronchoconstriction, inflammation of lung parenchyma or acute respiratory distress syndrome, inhomogeneous lung ventilation can become bimodal and increase the risk of ventilator-induced lung injury during mechanical ventilation. A simple index sensitive to ventilation heterogeneity would be very useful in clinical practice. In the case of bimodal ventilation, the index (H) can be defined as the ratio between the longer and shorter time constant characterising regions of contrary mechanical properties. These time constants can be derived from the Otis model fitted to input impedance (Zin) measured using forced oscillations. In this paper we systematically investigated properties of the aforementioned approach. The research included both numerical simulations and real experiments with a dual-lung simulator. Firstly, a computational model mimicking the physical simulator was derived and then used as a forward model to generate synthetic flow and pressure signals. These data were used to calculate the input impedance and then the Otis inverse model was fitted to Zin by means of the Levenberg-Marquardt (LM) algorithm. Finally, the obtained estimates of model parameters were used to compute H. The analysis of the above procedure was performed in the frame of Monte Carlo simulations. For each selected value of H, forward simulations with randomly chosen lung parameters were repeated 1000 times. Resulting signals were superimposed by additive Gaussian noise. The estimated values of H properly indicated the increasing level of simulated inhomogeneity, however with underestimation and variation increasing with H. The main factor responsible for the growing estimation bias was the fixed starting vector required by the LM algorithm. Introduction of a correction formula perfectly reduced this systematic error. The experimental results with the dual-lung simulator confirmed potential of the proposed

  15. Pharmacological characterization of GSK573719 (umeclidinium): a novel, long-acting, inhaled antagonist of the muscarinic cholinergic receptors for treatment of pulmonary diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Michael; Luttmann, Mark A; Foley, James J; Buckley, Peter T; Schmidt, Dulcie B; Burman, Miriam; Webb, Edward F; DeHaas, Christopher J; Kotzer, Charles J; Barrett, Victoria J; Slack, Robert J; Sarau, Henry M; Palovich, Michael R; Lainé, Dramane I; Hay, Douglas W P; Rumsey, William L

    2013-05-01

    Activation of muscarinic subtype 3 (M3) muscarinic cholinergic receptors (mAChRs) increases airway tone, whereas its blockade improves lung function and quality of life in patients with pulmonary diseases. The present study evaluated the pharmacological properties of a novel mAChR antagonist, GSK573719 (4-[hydroxy(diphenyl)methyl]-1-{2-[(phenylmethyl)oxy]ethyl}-1-azoniabicyclo[2.2.2]octane; umeclidinium). The affinity (Ki) of GSK573719 for the cloned human M1-M5 mAChRs ranged from 0.05 to 0.16 nM. Dissociation of [(3)H]GSK573719 from the M3 mAChR was slower than that for the M2 mAChR [half-life (t1/2) values: 82 and 9 minutes, respectively]. In Chinese hamster ovary cells transfected with recombinant human M3 mAChRs, GSK573719 demonstrated picomolar potency (-log pA2 = 23.9 pM) in an acetylcholine (Ach)-mediated Ca(2+) mobilization assay. Concentration-response curves indicate competitive antagonism with partial reversibility after drug washout. Using isolated human bronchial strips, GSK573719 was also potent and showed competitive antagonism (-log pA2 = 316 pM) versus carbachol, and was slowly reversible in a concentration-dependent manner (1-100 nM). The time to 50% restoration of contraction at 10 nM was about 381 minutes (versus 413 minutes for tiotropium bromide). In mice, the ED50 value was 0.02 μg/mouse intranasally. In conscious guinea pigs, intratracheal administration of GSK573719 dose dependently blocked Ach-induced bronchoconstriction with long duration of action, and was comparable to tiotropium; 2.5 μg elicited 50% bronchoprotection for >24 hours. Thus, GSK573719 is a potent anticholinergic agent that demonstrates slow functional reversibility at the human M3 mAChR and long duration of action in animal models. This pharmacological profile translated into a 24-hour duration of bronchodilation in vivo, which suggested umeclidinium will be a once-daily inhaled treatment of pulmonary diseases.

  16. The effects of particle size on measurement of airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naji, Nizar; Keung, Elaine; Beaudin, Suzanne; Kane, James; Killian, Kieran J; Gauvreau, Gail M

    2013-05-01

    The effect of particle size on methacholine provocation concentration causing a decrease in forced expiratory volume of 1 second (FEV1) of 20% (PC20) is debatable. To evaluate the functional effects of 3 different particle size nebulizers on methacholine PC20. Participants were randomly assigned to have 3 methacholine challenges on 3 separate days. Nebulizer mass median aerodynamic diameter (MMAD) was provided by manufacturers. The Wright nebulizer (MMAD, 1.0 μm), Aeroneb (MMAD, 3 μm), and Aeroneb (MMAD, 5 μm) were calibrated, and the nebulizer outputs were calculated to administer 0.26 mL of methacholine over 120, 112, and 83 seconds, respectively. After each inhalation, spirometry was performed and the test was terminated when the PC20 was achieved. Eight nonsmoking patients with mild asthma (4 male and 4 female) completed the study. The mean (SD) age was 25 (13.9) years, and the mean (SD) baseline FEV1 was 88% (11.3%). Patients using the Aeroneb (MMAD, 5 μm) nebulizer had the lowest PC20 (bronchoconstricted at lowest methacholine concentration), with a PC20 geometric mean of 0.62 mg/mL compared with patients using the Aeroneb (MMAD, 3.0 μm), who had a PC20 of 1.76 mg/mL, and patients using the Wright nebulizer (MMAD, 1.0 μm), who had a PC20 of 6.32 mg/mL. There was a significant difference in PC20 across all particle sizes (P < .001). The pairwise differences revealed a P < .001 between 3 μm and 1 μm and between 5 μm and 1 μm and a P = .008 between 5 μm and 3 μm. Our results reveal a variability in methacholine PC20 using 3 different nebulizers, despite adjusting the nebulizers' outputs. Our results are consistent with the previous reports, which recommended using larger particle size nebulizers in the assessment of airway hyperresponsiveness in asthma. clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00529477. Copyright © 2013 American College of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Exploratory study comparing dysautonomia between asthmatic and non-asthmatic elite swimmers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Couto

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Dysautonomia has been independently associated with training and exercise-induced bronchoconstriction. In addition, neurogenic airway inflammation was recently associated with swimmers-asthma. We aimed to assess the relation between autonomic nervous system and airway responsiveness of asthmatic elite swimmers. Methods: Twenty-seven elite swimmers, 11 of whom had asthma, were enrolled in this exploratory cross-sectional study. All performed spirometry with bronchodilation, skin prick tests and methacholine challenge according to the guidelines. Pupillometry was performed using PLR-200™ Pupillometer. One pupil light response curve for each eye was recorded and the mean values of pupil's maximal and minimal diameters, percentage of constriction, average and maximum constriction velocities (parasympathetic parameters, dilation velocity, and total time to recover 75% of the initial size (sympathetic parameters were used for analysis. Asthma was defined using IOC-MC criteria; subjects were divided into airway hyperesponsiveness (AHR severity according to methacholine PD20 in: no AHR, borderline, mild, moderate and severe AHR. Differences for pupillary parameters between groups and after categorization by AHR severity were assessed using SPSS 20.0 (p ≤ 0.05. In individuals with clinically relevant AHR, correlation between PD20 and pupillary parameters was investigated with Spearman's correlation test. Results: No statistically significant differences were observed between asthmatic and non-asthmatic swimmers regarding parasympathetic parameters. When stratified by AHR, maximal and minimal diameters and percentage of constriction were significantly lower among those with severe AHR. Among swimmers with clinically relevant AHR (n = 18, PD20 correlated with parasympathetic activity: maximal (r = 0.67, p = 0.002 and minimal diameters (r = 0.75, p < 0.001, percentage of constriction (r

  18. IL-1β induces murine airway 5-HT2A receptor hyperresponsiveness via a non-transcriptional MAPK-dependent mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adner Mikael

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Interleukin 1 beta (IL-1β is found in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids from asthmatic patients and plays an important role in normal immunoregulatory processes but also in pathophysiological inflammatory responses. The present study was designed to investigate if IL-1β could be involved in the development of airway hyperresponsiveness and if transcriptional mechanisms, epithelium contractile factors and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK pathways are involved in IL-1β effect. Methods The effect of IL-1β on 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT induced bronchoconstriction was evaluated in an in-vitro model for assessment of long-term effects of inflammatory mediators on the airway smooth muscle. Murine tracheal segments were cultured up to 8 days in the absence or presence of IL-1β with subsequent evaluation in a myograph system, along with mRNA quantification, focusing on the role of the epithelium, acetylcholine release, transcriptional mechanisms and MAPK activity. Results During control conditions, 5-HT induced a relatively weak contraction. Presence of IL-1β increased this response in a time- and concentration-dependent way. The increased concentration-effect curves could be shifted rightwards in a parallel manner by ketanserin, a selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, indicating that the responses are mediated by 5-HT2A receptors. The mRNA levels of 5-HT2A receptors were not changed as a consequence of the IL-1β treatment and actinomycin D, a general transcriptional inhibitor, failed to affect the contractile response, suggesting a non-transcriptional mechanism behind this phenomenon. Neither the removal of the epithelium nor the addition of atropine affected the IL-1β induced enhancement of 5-HT2A receptor-mediated contractile response. Application of inhibitors for c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK, p38 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/2 showed that the signaling pathways for JNK and ERK1/2 dominated only

  19. [Airway hyperreactivity in patients with allergic and non-allergic rhinitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    González Hernández, Jessica; Gómez Vera, Javier; Orea Solano, Modesto; Flores Sandoval, Graciela; Ríos Nava, Roberto; de la Torre, Fernando

    2003-01-01

    Epidemiologically there is an association between allergic rhinitis and asthma due to a common inflammatory process. Asthma can affect 40% of the patients with rhinitis and 80% of asthmatics present rhinitis. The relationship between the two diseases is explained by the term of "a united airway". Some patients with allergic rhinitis have nonspecific bronchial hyper-responsiveness, specially during the exacerbation stage. These patients have a unique physiologic characteristic that differs from the asthmatic and healthy subjects developing bronchoconstriction not related to clinical bronchospasm, therefore, allergic rhinitis is considered a risk factor for the asthma development. To determine if there is bronchial hyper-responsiveness in patients with allergic and not allergic rhinitis, by correlating with the eosinophilia in nasal mucosa. We studied a total of 32 patients with an age range from 18 to 38 years, of both sexes (11 men and 17 women) of the Hospital Regional Lic. Adolfo Lopez Mateos, ISSSTE. They were submitted to clinical history, laboratory studies (blood count cell, serum IgE levels, eosinophils of nasal mucosa), roentgenograms (paranasal sinus and esophagus-gastroduodenal series) and allergy skin tests with 32 allergens. It was taken biopsy of nasal mucosa for the search of eosinophils and it was carried out bronchial challenge with distilled water. Twenty-eight patients concluded the study, they were divided in two groups: a group of 15 patients with diagnosis of allergic rhinitis and another group of 13 patients with diagnosis of non allergic rhinitis. Fifty-six spirometry studies were performed and only 4 patients (26.6%) with diagnosis of allergic rhinitis presented fall of the FEV1 in the bronchial challenge in comparison with the group of non allergic rhinitis in which there were no changes in the FEV1 later to the bronchial challenge. This difference was statistically significant (-4.3 and 0.15, respectively with a p < 0.0370, CI 95

  20. Different patterns of exhaled nitric oxide response to β2-agonists in asthmatic patients according to the site of bronchodilation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michils, Alain; Malinovschi, Andrei; Haccuria, Amaryllis; Michiels, Sebastien; Van Muylem, Alain

    2016-03-01

    In asthmatic patients undergoing airway challenge, fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (FENO) levels decrease after bronchoconstriction. In contrast, model simulations have predicted both decreased and increased FENO levels after bronchodilation, depending on the site of airway obstruction relief. We sought to investigate whether β2-agonists might induce divergent effects on FENO values in asthmatic patients as a result of airway obstruction relief occurring at different lung depths. FENO, FEV1, and the slope of phase III of the single-breath washout test (S) of He (S(He)) and sulfur hexafluoride (S(SF6)) were measured in 68 asthmatic patients before and after salbutamol inhalation. S(He) and S(SF6) decreases reflected preacinar and intra-acinar obstruction relief, respectively. Changes (Δ) were expressed as a percentage from the baseline. No FENO change (|ΔFENO| ≤ 10%) was found in 16 patients (mean [SD]: 2.5% [5.2%]; ie, FENO= group); a ΔFENO value of greater than 10% was found in 23 patients (31.7% [20.3%]; ie, the FENO+ group); and a ΔFENO value of less than -10% was found in 29 patients (-31.5% [17.3%]; ie, the FENO- group). All groups had similar ΔFEV1 values. In the FENO= group neither S(He) nor S(SF6) changed, in the FENO+ group only S(He) decreased significantly (-21.8% [SD 28.5%], P = .03), and in the FENO- group both S(He) (-29.8% [24.0%], P response to β2-agonists: a decrease likely caused by relief of an intra-acinar airway obstruction that we propose reflects amplification of nitric oxide back-diffusion, an increase likely associated with a predominant dilation up to the preacinar airways, and FENO stability when obstruction relief involved predominantly the central airways. In combination, these results suggest a new role for FENO in identifying the site of airway obstruction in asthmatic patients. Copyright © 2015 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. House dust mite major allergens Der p 1 and Der p 5 activate human airway-derived epithelial cells by protease-dependent and protease-independent mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timmerman J André B

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract House dust mite allergens (HDM cause bronchoconstriction in asthma patients and induce an inflammatory response in the lungs due to the release of cytokines, chemokines and additional mediators. The mechanism how HDM components achieve this is largely unknown. The objective of this study was to assess whether HDM components of Dermatophagoides pteronissinus with protease activity (Der p 1 and unknown enzymatic activity (Der p 2, Der p 5 induce biological responses in a human airway-derived epithelial cell line (A549, and if so, to elucidate the underlying mechanism(s of action. A549 cells were incubated with HDM extract, Der p 1, recombinant Der p 2 and recombinant Der p 5. Cell desquamation was assessed by microscopy. The proinflammatory cytokines, IL-6 and IL-8, were measured by ELISA. Intracellular Ca2+ levels were assessed in A549 cells and in mouse fibroblasts expressing the human protease activated receptor (PAR1, PAR2 or PAR4. HDM extract, Der p 1 and Der p 5 dose-dependently increased the production of IL-6 and IL-8. Added simultaneously, Der p 1 and Der p 5 further increased the production of IL-6 and IL-8. The action of Der p 1 was blocked by cysteine-protease inhibitors, while that of Der p 5 couldn't be blocked by either serine- or cysteine protease inhibitors. Der p 5 only induced cell shrinking, whereas HDM extract and Der p1 also induced cell desquamation. Der p 2 had no effect on A549 cells. Der p 1's protease activity causes desquamation and induced the release of IL6 and IL-8 by a mechanism independent of Ca2+ mobilisation and PAR activation. Der p 5 exerts a protease-independent activation of A549 that involves Ca2+ mobilisation and also leads to the production of these cytokines. Together, our data indicate that allergens present in HDM extracts can trigger protease-dependent and protease-independent signalling pathways in A549 cells.

  2. The Effects of Short-Term Propofol and Dexmedetomidine on Lung Mechanics, Histology, and Biological Markers in Experimental Obesity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heil, Luciana Boavista Barros; Santos, Cíntia L; Santos, Raquel S; Samary, Cynthia S; Cavalcanti, Vinicius C M; Araújo, Mariana M P N; Poggio, Hananda; Maia, Lígia de A; Trevenzoli, Isis Hara; Pelosi, Paolo; Fernandes, Fatima C; Villela, Nivaldo R; Silva, Pedro L; Rocco, Patricia R M

    2016-04-01

    Administering anesthetics to the obese population requires caution because of a variety of reasons including possible interactions with the inflammatory process observed in obese patients. Propofol and dexmedetomidine have protective effects on pulmonary function and are widely used in short- and long-term sedation, particularly in intensive care unit settings in lean and obese subjects. However, the functional and biological effects of these drugs in obesity require further elucidation. In a model of diet-induced obesity, we compared the short-term effects of dexmedetomidine versus propofol on lung mechanics and histology, as well as biological markers of inflammation and oxidative stress modulation in obesity. Wistar rats (n = 56) were randomly fed a standard diet (lean) or experimental diet (obese) for 12 weeks. After this period, obese animals received sodium thiopental intraperitoneally and were randomly allocated into 4 subgroups: (1) nonventilated (n = 4) for molecular biology analysis only (control); (2) sodium thiopental (n = 8); (3) propofol (n = 8); and (4) dexmedetomidine (n = 8), which received continuous IV administration of the corresponding agents and were mechanically ventilated (tidal volume = 6 mL/kg body weight, fraction of inspired oxygen = 0.4, positive end-expiratory pressure = 3 cm H2O) for 1 hour. Compared with lean animals, obese rats did not present increased body weight but had higher total body and trunk fat percentages, airway resistance, and interleukin-6 levels in the lung tissue (P = 0.02, P = 0.0027, and P = 0.01, respectively). In obese rats, propofol, but not dexmedetomidine, yielded increased airway resistance, bronchoconstriction index (P = 0.016, P = 0.02, respectively), tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-6 levels, as well as lower levels of nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor-2 and glutathione peroxidase (P = 0.001, Bonferroni-corrected t test). In this model of diet-induced obesity, a 1-hour propofol infusion

  3. Mechanisms underlying gas exchange alterations in an experimental model of pulmonary embolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.H.T. Ferreira

    2006-09-01

    induced by hypocapnic bronchoconstriction.

  4. Pulmonary embolism. Clinical relevance, requirements for diagnostic and therapeutic strategies; Lungenembolie. Klinische Bedeutung, Anforderung an die Diagnostik und Behandlungsoptionen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nowak, F.G.; Halbfass, P.; Hoffmann, E. [Herzzentrum Muenchen-Bogenhausen, Staedtisches Klinikum Muenchen GmbH, Klinik fuer Kardiologie und Internistische Intensivmedizin, Muenchen (Germany)

    2007-08-15

    In the population the annual incidence of pulmonary embolism amounts to 1.3-2.8 per 1000 at the age of 65-89 years. Mortality reaches about 17% within the first 3 months. Acute pulmonary embolism is characterized by an increase in pulmonary arterial pressure and an impairment of the pulmonary gas exchange. Elevation of the right cardiac pressure up to right heart decompensation may follow. In addition, hypoxemia, hyperventilation, dead space ventilation, right to left shunting, bronchoconstriction, and vasoconstriction may occur. Clinical examination, ECG, laboratory findings such as elevated D-dimer, blood gas analysis, ultrasound examination of the veins of the lower extremities, and transthoracic echocardiography are acutely available diagnostic methods of an emergency department. In addition, extensive diagnostic procedures like pulmonary scintigraphy and pulmonary angiography may be required. The aim is to get a definite diagnosis as quickly as possible to direct therapy. In acute pulmonary embolism with cardiac shock, monitoring and stabilization of the circulatory function as well as an appropriate anticoagulant therapy are essential. In some cases surgery or a local fibrinolytic intervention is indicated. (orig.) [German] Die Lungenembolie stellt eine potenziell lebensbedrohliche akute Erkrankung dar, deren Prognose durch die fruehzeitige Diagnostik und effektive gerinnungshemmende Therapie bestimmt wird. Die jaehrliche Inzidenz der Lungenembolie liegt zwischen 1,3-2,8/1000 Einwohner im Alter zwischen 65 und 89 Jahren. Die Mortalitaet einer akuten Lungenembolie erreicht etwa 17% innerhalb der ersten 3 Monate. Die akute Lungenembolie ist durch Erhoehung des pulmonalarteriellen Drucks mit Stoerung des Gasaustauschs und Anstieg des Drucks im rechten Herzen bis hin zur Rechtsherzdekompensation gekennzeichnet. Weitere Folgen sind Hypoxaemie, Hyperventilation, Totraumventilation, Rechts-links-Shunt und Broncho- sowie auch Vasokonstriktion. Anamnese und klinische

  5. Dysfunctional breathing and reaching one’s physiological limit as causes of exercise-induced dyspnoea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Everard, Mark L.

    2016-01-01

    Key points Excessive exercise-induced shortness of breath is a common complaint. For some, exercise-induced bronchoconstriction is the primary cause and for a small minority there may be an alternative organic pathology. However for many, the cause will be simply reaching their physiological limit or be due to a functional form of dysfunctional breathing, neither of which require drug therapy. The physiological limit category includes deconditioned individuals, such as those who have been through intensive care and require rehabilitation, as well as the unfit and the fit competitive athlete who has reached their limit with both of these latter groups requiring explanation and advice. Dysfunctional breathing is an umbrella term for an alteration in the normal biomechanical patterns of breathing that result in intermittent or chronic symptoms, which may be respiratory and/or nonrespiratory. This alteration may be due to structural causes or, much more commonly, be functional as exemplified by thoracic pattern disordered breathing (PDB) and extrathoracic paradoxical vocal fold motion disorder (pVFMD). Careful history and examination together with spirometry may identify those likely to have PDB and/or pVFMD. Where there is doubt about aetiology, cardiopulmonary exercise testing may be required to identify the deconditioned, unfit or fit individual reaching their physiological limit and PDB, while continuous laryngoscopy during exercise is increasingly becoming the benchmark for assessing extrathoracic causes. Accurate assessment and diagnosis can prevent excessive use of drug therapy and result in effective management of the cause of the individual’s complaint through cost-effective approaches such as reassurance, advice, breathing retraining and vocal exercises. This review provides an overview of the spectrum of conditions that can present as exercise-­induced breathlessness experienced by young subjects participating in sport and aims to promote understanding of

  6. Pantoea agglomerans: a marvelous bacterium of evil and good.Part I. Deleterious effects: Dust-borne endotoxins and allergens – focus on cotton dust

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacek Dutkiewicz

    2015-12-01

    that cause accumulation of platelets in pulmonary capillaries initiating an acute and chronic inflammation resulting in endothelial cell damage and extravasation of cells and fluids into the lung interstitium. These changes cause bronchoconstriction, the decrement of lung function expressed as reduction of forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1 and/or diffusion capacity, increase in the airway hyperreactivity and subjective symptoms such as fever, airway irritation and chest tightness. The conclusions from these experiments, performed mostly 2-3 decades ago, did not loose their actuality until recently as so far no other cotton dust component was identified as a more important work-related hazard than bacterial endotoxin. Though also other microbial and plant constituents are considered as potential causative agents of byssinosis, the endotoxin produced by Pantoea agglomerans and other Gram-negative bacteria present in cotton dust is still regarded as a major cause of this mysterious disease.

  7. Investigation of the bioequivalence of montelukast chewable tablets after a single oral administration using a validated LC-MS/MS method

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    Zaid AN

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Abdel Naser Zaid,1 Murad N Abualhasan,1 David G Watson,2 Ayman Mousa,3 Nadia Ghazal,4 Rana Bustami5 1Department of Pharmacy, Faculty of Medicine and Health Sciences, An-Najah National University, Nablus, Palestine; 2Strathclyde Institute of Pharmacy and Biomedical Sciences, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, UK; 3R&D Department, Avalon Pharma (Middle East Pharmaceutical Industries Co. Ltd., Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia; 4Naratech Pharmaceutical Consultancy, 5Pharmaceutical Research Unit, Amman, Jordan Background: Montelukast (MT is a leukotriene D4 antagonist. It is an effective and safe medicine for the prophylaxis and treatment of chronic asthma. It is also used to prevent acute exercise-induced bronchoconstriction and as a symptomatic relief of seasonal allergic rhinitis and perennial allergic rhinitis.Objective: The aim of this study was to evaluate the bioequivalence (BE of two drug products: generic MT 5 mg chewable tablets versus the branded drug Singulair® pediatric 5 mg chewable tablets among Mediterranean volunteers.Methods: An open-label, randomized two-period crossover BE design was conducted in 32 healthy male volunteers with a 9-day washout period between doses and under fasting conditions. The drug concentrations in plasma were quantified by using a newly developed and fully validated liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method, and the pharmacokinetic parameters were calculated using a non-compartmental model. The ratio for generic/branded tablets using geometric least squares means was calculated for both the MT products.Results: The relationship between concentration and peak area ratio was found to be linear within the range 6.098–365.855 ng/mL. The correlation coefficient (R2 was always greater than 0.99 during the course of the validation. Statistical comparison of the main pharmacokinetic parameters showed no significant difference between the generic and branded products. The point estimates (ratios of

  8. Rapid shallow breathing evoked by selective stimulation of airway C fibres in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleridge, H M; Coleridge, J C; Roberts, A M

    1983-07-01

    rate were complex and appeared to result from the interplay of several reflexes. Marked cardiac slowing was evoked by bradykinin aerosol.6. Bradykinin injected into a bronchial artery is known to stimulate bronchial (intrapulmonary) C fibres. Results of recording afferent vagal impulses in the present study indicated that bradykinin administered as an aerosol stimulated bronchial C fibres and also C fibres with endings in the lower trachea and extrapulmonary bronchi. Irritant and pulmonary stretch receptors were not stimulated unless aerosols were administered repeatedly and in higher concentration. Hence airway C fibres appeared to be responsible for the reflex effects of bradykinin aerosol.7. Bronchial C fibres are stimulated by substances (bradykinin, prostaglandins and histamine) known to be released by the lungs and airways in a variety of pathophysiological circumstances. Results of this and previous studies are compatible with the hypothesis that stimulation of bronchial C fibres plays a major role in evoking the rapid shallow breathing, bronchoconstriction and increased secretion by airway submucosal glands that are part of the pulmonary defence response.

  9. [True and presumed contraindications of beta blockers. Peripheral vascular disease, diabetes mellitus, chronic bronchopneumopathy].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pozzi, R

    2000-08-01

    Traditional contraindications to beta-blockers are peripheral vascular diseases, diabetes mellitus, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma. Recent data seem to show that rigorous application of these rules are not completely justified and indicate that many patients would be inappropriately excluded from the beneficial effects of this therapy. Appraisal of clear guidelines for a safe use of beta-blockers is thus mandatory for the clinician. A brief review of the effects of beta-adrenergic receptor blockade is offered. The therapy is aimed at blocking beta 1-receptors. On the other hand, the block of beta 2-receptors causes the well known side effects, i.e. vasoconstriction, delayed response to hypoglycemia in diabetic patients, bronchoconstriction. From the first compound, propranolol, with uniform action on beta 1 and beta 2-receptors, further generation of beta-blockers were subsequently developed: beta 1-selective, with intrinsic sympathomimetic activity, and with associated vasodilating "ancillary" property. Some favorable reduction in collateral effects has thus been obtained with new compounds, without reaching complete safety. Examination of exclusion criteria applied in clinical trials offers no useful indications because of their imprecise definition. Examination of the literature and a more accurate understanding of the diseases, traditionally considered contraindications, may help setting up a uniform and clear path: peripheral vascular disease: beta-blockers should be avoided only in those patients with vasospastic disorders, rest pain with severe peripheral vascular disease or nonhealing lesions. In patients with mild to moderate disease, beta-blockers can be prescribed, but careful surveillance for any changes in symptoms related to intermittent claudicatio should be achieved; diabetes mellitus: previous apprehension for the lessening reaction to hypoglycemia in patients treated with insulin has been retracted. Beta-blockers are not

  10. Inhaled nebulised unfractionated heparin improves lung function in moderate to very severe COPD: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shute, Janis K; Calzetta, Luigino; Cardaci, Vittorio; di Toro, Stefania; Page, Clive P; Cazzola, Mario

    2018-02-01

    COPD is an inflammatory airway disease characterised by progressive airflow limitation and air trapping, leading to lung hyperinflation and exercise limitation. Acute worsening of symptoms, including dyspnea, cough and sputum production, occurs during exacerbations which are associated with significantly reduced health related quality of life, and increased morbidity and mortality. Chronic bronchial mucus production and productive cough are risk factors for exacerbations. Medicines targeting bronchoconstriction and airway inflammation are the current mainstays of COPD therapy. However, there is growing concern with an increased risk of pneumonia in patients with COPD receiving regular inhaled corticosteroids and there is therefore a need to find safer alternative treatments. Previous studies have indicated that inhalation of unfractionated heparin (UFH) treats local inflammation, mucus hypersecretion and lung injury, without systemic anticoagulation, and is safe. Therefore, our primary objective was to demonstrate that inhaled UFH significantly improves lung function (FEV1) over 21 days of treatment in patients with COPD receiving pulmonary rehabilitation and that UFH provides a novel, safe and effective way of treating this complex disease. Forty patients with moderate to very severe COPD admitted to the IRCCS San Raffaele Pisana Hospital for 21 days pulmonary rehabilitation were randomised to receive nebulised inhaled UFH (75,000 or 150,000 IU BID) or placebo for 21 days. All patients also received nebulised salbutamol (1 mg) and beclomethasone dipropionate (400 μg) BID over the same period. Lung function was measured at day 0, 7, 14 and 21 of treatment and at a follow-up visit 7 days post-treatment. Exercise capacity (6MWT) and dyspnoea (Borg score) were measured before and after treatment. In pre-clinical studies, the ability of basic proteins found in COPD sputum to neutralise the anticoagulant activity of heparin was determined using the AMAX heparin assay

  11. The efficacy of a comprehensive lifestyle modification programme based on yoga in the management of bronchial asthma: a randomized controlled trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bijlani Ramesh

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is a substantial body of evidence on the efficacy of yoga in the management of bronchial asthma. Many studies have reported, as the effects of yoga on bronchial asthma, significant improvements in pulmonary functions, quality of life and reduction in airway hyper-reactivity, frequency of attacks and medication use. In addition, a few studies have attempted to understand the effects of yoga on exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB or exercise tolerance capacity. However, none of these studies has investigated any immunological mechanisms by which yoga improves these variables in bronchial asthma. Methods The present randomized controlled trial (RCT was conducted on 57 adult subjects with mild or moderate bronchial asthma who were allocated randomly to either the yoga (intervention group (n = 29 or the wait-listed control group (n = 28. The control group received only conventional care and the yoga group received an intervention based on yoga, in addition to the conventional care. The intervention consisted of 2-wk supervised training in lifestyle modification and stress management based on yoga followed by closely monitored continuation of the practices at home for 6-wk. The outcome measures were assessed in both the groups at 0 wk (baseline, 2, 4 and 8 wk by using Generalized Linear Model (GLM repeated measures followed by post-hoc analysis. Results In the yoga group, there was a steady and progressive improvement in pulmonary function, the change being statistically significant in case of the first second of forced expiratory volume (FEV1 at 8 wk, and peak expiratory flow rate (PEFR at 2, 4 and 8 wk as compared to the corresponding baseline values. There was a significant reduction in EIB in the yoga group. However, there was no corresponding reduction in the urinary prostaglandin D2 metabolite (11β prostaglandin F2α levels in response to the exercise challenge. There was also no significant change in serum

  12. Home telemonitoring and remote feedback between clinic visits for asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kew, Kayleigh M; Cates, Christopher J

    2016-08-03

    Asthma is a chronic disease that causes reversible narrowing of the airways due to bronchoconstriction, inflammation and mucus production. Asthma continues to be associated with significant avoidable morbidity and mortality. Self management facilitated by a healthcare professional is important to keep symptoms controlled and to prevent exacerbations.Telephone and Internet technologies can now be used by patients to measure lung function and asthma symptoms at home. Patients can then share this information electronically with their healthcare provider, who can provide feedback between clinic visits. Technology can be used in this manner to improve health outcomes and prevent the need for emergency treatment for people with asthma and other long-term health conditions. To assess the efficacy and safety of home telemonitoring with healthcare professional feedback between clinic visits, compared with usual care. We identified trials from the Cochrane Airways Review Group Specialised Register (CAGR) up to May 2016. We also searched www.clinicaltrials.gov, the World Health Organization (WHO) trials portal and reference lists of other reviews, and we contacted trial authors to ask for additional information. We included parallel randomised controlled trials (RCTs) of adults or children with asthma in which any form of technology was used to measure and share asthma monitoring data with a healthcare provider between clinic visits, compared with other monitoring or usual care. We excluded trials in which technologies were used for monitoring with no input from a doctor or nurse. We included studies reported as full-text articles, those published as abstracts only and unpublished data. Two review authors screened the search and independently extracted risk of bias and numerical data, resolving disagreements by consensus.We analysed dichotomous data as odds ratios (ORs) while using study participants as the unit of analysis, and continuous data as mean differences (MDs) while

  13. Phosphodiesterase 4 inhibitors for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Jimmy; Leung, Bonnie; Poole, Phillippa

    2017-09-19

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is associated with cough, sputum production or dyspnoea and a reduction in lung function, quality of life and life expectancy. Apart from smoking cessation, there are no other treatments that slow lung function decline. Roflumilast and cilomilast are oral phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE 4 ) inhibitors proposed to reduce the airway inflammation and bronchoconstriction seen in COPD. This is an update of a Cochrane review first published in 2011 and updated in 2013. To evaluate the efficacy and safety of oral PDE 4 inhibitors in the management of stable COPD. We identified randomised controlled trials (RCTs) from the Cochrane Airways Trials Register (date of last search October 2016). We found other trials from web-based clinical trials registers. We included RCTs if they compared oral PDE 4 inhibitors with placebo in people with COPD. We allowed co-administration of standard COPD therapy. One review author extracted data and a second review author checked the data. We reported pooled data in Review Manager as mean differences (MD), standardised mean differences (SMD) or odds ratios (OR). We converted the odds ratios into absolute treatment effects in a 'Summary of findings' table. Thirty-four separate RCTs studying roflumilast (20 trials with 17,627 participants) or cilomilast (14 trials with 6457 participants) met the inclusion criteria, with a duration of between six weeks and one year. These included people across international study centres with moderate to very severe COPD (Global Initiative for Chronic Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD) grades II-IV), with a mean age of 64 years.We considered that the methodological quality of the 34 published and unpublished trials was acceptable overall. Treatment with a PDE 4 inhibitor was associated with a significant improvement in forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV 1 ) over the trial period compared with placebo (MD 51.53 mL, 95% confidence interval (CI) 43.17 to 59.90, 27

  14. Bronchial thermoplasty for moderate or severe persistent asthma in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torrego, Alfons; Solà, Ivan; Munoz, Ana Maria; Roqué I Figuls, Marta; Yepes-Nuñez, Juan Jose; Alonso-Coello, Pablo; Plaza, Vicente

    2014-03-03

    Bronchial thermoplasty is a procedure that consists of the delivery of controlled radiofrequency-generated heat via a catheter inserted into the bronchial tree of the lungs through a flexible bronchoscope. It has been suggested that bronchial thermoplasty works by reducing airway smooth muscle, thereby reducing the ability of the smooth muscle to bronchoconstrict. This treatment could then reduce asthma symptoms and exacerbations, resulting in improved asthma control and quality of life. To determine the efficacy and safety of bronchial thermoplasty in adults with bronchial asthma. We searched the Cochrane Airways Group Specialised Register of Trials (CAGR) up to January 2014. We included randomised controlled clinical trials that compared bronchial thermoplasty versus any active control in adults with moderate or severe persistent asthma. Our primary outcomes were quality of life, asthma exacerbations and adverse events. Two review authors independently extracted data and assessed risk of bias. We included three trials (429 participants) with differences regarding their design (two trials compared bronchial thermoplasty vs medical management and the other compared bronchial thermoplasty vs a sham intervention) and participant characteristics; one of the studies included participants with more symptomatic asthma compared with the others.The pooled analysis showed improvement in quality of life at 12 months in participants who received bronchial thermoplasty that did not reach the threshold for clinical significance (3 trials, 429 participants; mean difference (MD) in Asthma Quality of Life Questionnaire (AQLQ) scores 0.28, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.07 to 0.50; moderate-quality evidence). Measures of symptom control showed no significant differences (3 trials, 429 participants; MD in Asthma Control Questionnaire (ACQ) scores -0.15, 95% CI -0.40 to 0.10; moderate-quality evidence). The risk of bias for these outcomes was high because two of the studies did not