WorldWideScience

Sample records for bromoform

  1. Bromoform production in tropical open-ocean waters: OTEC chlorination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hartwig, E.O.; Valentine, R.

    1981-09-01

    The bromoform, and other volatile organics produced while chlorinating both the evaporator and condenser seawater during operation of the one megawatt (1 MW) OTEC-1 test facility are reported. Although many halogenated compounds might be produced as a result of chlorination, the quantitative analyses in this study focused on volatile EPA priority pollutants. Bromoform is the compound specifically recognized as a potential pollutant. Its concentration may be indicative of other halogenated species.

  2. Marine sources of bromoform in the global open ocean – global patterns and emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Stemmler

    2014-11-01

    Ziska et al. (2013, because the gas-exchange reverses when less bromoform is produced in non-blooming seasons. This is the case for higher latitudes, i.e. the polar regions and northern North Atlantic. Further model experiments show that future model studies may need to distinguish different bromoform producing phytoplankton species and reveal that the transport of CHBr3 from the coast considerably alters open ocean bromoform concentrations, in particular in the northern sub-polar and polar regions.

  3. Bromoform formation in ozonated groundwater containing bromide and humic substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cooper, W.J.; Amy, G.L.; Moore, C.A.; Zika, R.G.

    1986-01-01

    The effect of bromide ion, organic carbon concentration (natural aquatic humic substances), pH, and solar irradiation on the formation of bromoform in ozonated groundwater has been studied. The studies were conducted on four unique samples of groundwater taken from different regions of the Biscayne Aquifer in southern Florida. All other conditions being equal, increases in bromide ion concentrations resulted in increases in CHBr/sub 3/ formation. In three of the four samples, CHBr/sub 3/ formation decreased as the pH level increased from 5 to 9. The fourth sample exhibited an opposite trend whereby the CHBr/sub 3/ concentration increased with increasing pH. Bromoform concentration increased with increased O/sub 3/ concentration over an ozone dosage range of 3.4 to 6.7 mg/L. Ozonated samples placed in sunlight immediately after ozone addition showed a decrease in the formation of CHBr/sub 3/ presumably due to the photodecomposition of HOBr/OBr.

  4. Bromoform formation in ozonated groundwater containing bromide and humic substances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Copper, W.J. (Florida International Univ., Miami (United States)); Amy, G.L. (Univ. of Arizona, Tucson (United States)); Moore, C.A.; Zika, R.G. (Univ. of Miami, FL (United States))

    The effect of bromide ion, organic carbon concentration (natural aquatic humic substances), pH, and solar irradiation on the formation of bromoform in ozonated groundwater has been studied. The studies were conducted on four unique samples of groundwater taken from different regions of the Biscayne Aquifer in southern Florida. All other conditions being equal, increases in bromide ion concentrations resulted in increases in CHBr{sub 3} formation. In three of the four samples, CHBr{sub 3} formation decreased as the pH level increased from 5 to 9. The fourth sample exhibited an opposite trend whereby the CHBr{sub 3} concentration increased with increasing pH. Bromoform concentration increased with increased O{sub 3} concentration over an ozone dosage range of 3.4 to 6.7 mg/L. Ozonated samples placed in sunlight immediately after ozone addition showed a decrease in the formation of CHBr{sub 3}, presumably due to the photodecomposition of HOBr/OBr.

  5. Marine sources of bromoform in the global open ocean - global patterns and emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemmler, I.; Hense, I.; Quack, B.

    2015-03-01

    Bromoform (CHBr3) is one important precursor of atmospheric reactive bromine species that are involved in ozone depletion in the troposphere and stratosphere. In the open ocean bromoform production is linked to phytoplankton that contains the enzyme bromoperoxidase. Coastal sources of bromoform are higher than open ocean sources. However, open ocean emissions are important because the transfer of tracers into higher altitude in the air, i.e. into the ozone layer, strongly depends on the location of emissions. For example, emissions in the tropics are more rapidly transported into the upper atmosphere than emissions from higher latitudes. Global spatio-temporal features of bromoform emissions are poorly constrained. Here, a global three-dimensional ocean biogeochemistry model (MPIOM-HAMOCC) is used to simulate bromoform cycling in the ocean and emissions into the atmosphere using recently published data of global atmospheric concentrations (Ziska et al., 2013) as upper boundary conditions. Our simulated surface concentrations of CHBr3 match the observations well. Simulated global annual emissions based on monthly mean model output are lower than previous estimates, including the estimate by Ziska et al. (2013), because the gas exchange reverses when less bromoform is produced in non-blooming seasons. This is the case for higher latitudes, i.e. the polar regions and northern North Atlantic. Further model experiments show that future model studies may need to distinguish different bromoform-producing phytoplankton species and reveal that the transport of CHBr3 from the coast considerably alters open ocean bromoform concentrations, in particular in the northern sub-polar and polar regions.

  6. Marine sources of bromoform in the global open ocean – global patterns and emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Stemmler

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Bromoform (CHBr3 is one important precursor of atmospheric reactive bromine species that are involved in ozone depletion in the troposphere and stratosphere. In the open ocean bromoform production is linked to phytoplankton that contains the enzyme bromoperoxidase. Coastal sources of bromoform are higher than open ocean sources. However, open ocean emissions are important because the transfer of tracers into higher altitude in the air, i.e. into the ozone layer, strongly depends on the location of emissions. For example, emissions in the tropics are more rapidly transported into the upper atmosphere than emissions from higher latitudes. Global spatio-temporal features of bromoform emissions are poorly constrained. Here, a global three-dimensional ocean biogeochemistry model (MPIOM-HAMOCC is used to simulate bromoform cycling in the ocean and emissions into the atmosphere using recently published data of global atmospheric concentrations (Ziska et al., 2013 as upper boundary conditions. Our simulated surface concentrations of CHBr3 match the observations well. Simulated global annual emissions based on monthly mean model output are lower than previous estimates, including the estimate by Ziska et al. (2013, because the gas exchange reverses when less bromoform is produced in non-blooming seasons. This is the case for higher latitudes, i.e. the polar regions and northern North Atlantic. Further model experiments show that future model studies may need to distinguish different bromoform-producing phytoplankton species and reveal that the transport of CHBr3 from the coast considerably alters open ocean bromoform concentrations, in particular in the northern sub-polar and polar regions.

  7. Modeling the interaction of ozone with chloroform and bromoform under conditions close to stratospheric

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strokova, N. E.; Yagodovskaya, T. V.; Savilov, S. V.; Lukhovitskaya, E. E.; Vasil'ev, E. S.; Morozov, I. I.; Lunin, V. V.

    2013-02-01

    The reactions of ozone with chloroform and bromoform are studied using a flow gas discharge vacuum unit under conditions close to stratospheric (temperature range, 77-250 K; pressure, 10-3-0.1 Torr in the presence of nitrate ice). It is shown that the reaction with bromoform begins at 160 K; the reaction with chloroform, at 190 K. The reaction products are chlorine and bromine oxides of different composition, identified by low-temperature FTIR spectroscopy. The presence of nitrate ice raises the temperature of reaction onset to 210 K.

  8. On temperate sources of bromoform and other reactive organic bromine gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, L. J.; Liss, P. S.

    2000-08-01

    Current estimates of annual bromoform production by temperate marine algae underestimate, by at least an order of magnitude, the flux required to sustain atmospheric concentrations. In the light of recent evidence of the potential of bromoform to deplete upper-tropospheric/lower-stratospheric ozone, such a substantial discrepancy in global emission rates is of considerable concern. Here we present new information on air and seawater CHBr3, CH2Br2, and CHBr2Cl concentrations in the coastal east Atlantic and review previous data from widespread locations which suggest that concentrations and ratios of reactive organobromines are consistent with marine macroalgal emissions. Detailed reviews of algal halocarbon emissions and biomass estimates imply that macroalgae produce around 70% of the world's bromoform, rather than only ˜20% as previously thought, and that the underestimation was most likely caused by over conservative biomass estimates. Our total global source strength estimate of 2.2×1011 g CHBr3 yr-1 agrees well with recent calculations derived from atmospheric data. Given the dominant role of macroalgae in producing bromoform, the effect of changing climate and environment on seaweed populations and consequent effect on biogenic bromine emissions should be investigated.

  9. Bromoform in the tropical boundary layer of the Maritime Continent during OP3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, J. A.; Ashfold, M. J.; Harris, N. R. P.; Robinson, A. D.; Warwick, N. J.; Carver, G. D.; Gostlow, B.; O'Brien, L. M.; Manning, A. J.; Phang, S. M.; Yong, S. E.; Leong, K. P.; Ung, E. H.; Ong, S.

    2011-01-01

    We report measurements of bromoform made by gas chromatography during the OP3 campaign in 2008. Measurements were made simultaneously for a few days at the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) site in the Danum Valley, a rainforest location in Sabah, Borneo, and at a nearby coastal site at Kunak. Background values at Kunak were higher than those measured in the rainforest (2-5 ppt compared with 1 ppt) and excursions away from the background were very much higher, reaching 10 s of ppt. Measurements of C2Cl4, an industrial tracer, showed no significant difference in background at the two sites. Modelling using two different models can reproduce a number of the observed features. The data are consistent with a strong, local coastal source of bromoform in eastern Sabah and can be used to infer the strength of the source of bromoform in South East Asia. However, they provide only a very weak constraint on global emissions. The global model results highlight the difficulty for short-lived species of extrapolating limited duration, local measurements to a global source.

  10. Contrasting the surface ocean distribution of bromoform and methyl iodide; implications for boundary layer physics, chemistry and climate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromoform and methyl iodide are both methane-like hydrocarbons with a halogen atom replacing one or more of the hydrogen atoms. Both of these compounds occur naturally in the environment as a result of their production from seaweed and kelp. They are of interest to climate science as a result of their catalytic destruction of boundary layer ozone (a potent greenhouse gas) and, specifically for methyl iodide, the proposed role in the formation of new cloud condensation nuclei with implications for climate. In this paper, the currently available data on the distribution of bromoform and methyl iodide are analysed and contrasted to show that the concentrations of bromoform and methyl iodide do not correlate, that, in contrast to bromoform, the parameterization of sea surface methyl iodide concentrations demands only the sea surface temperature, and that the pelagic distribution of methyl iodide appears to follow the solar zenith angle. These three observations together suggest that, while the pelagic source of bromoform is mostly biogenic, the source of methyl iodide is photochemical. This has implications for the understanding of planetary boundary layer chemistry and potential organohalogen mediated feedbacks to climate.

  11. Contrasting the surface ocean distribution of bromoform and methyl iodide; implications for boundary layer physics, chemistry and climate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, C J, E-mail: carl.j.palmer@gmail.co [Department of Oceanography, University of Cape Town, 7701 (South Africa)

    2010-08-15

    Bromoform and methyl iodide are both methane-like hydrocarbons with a halogen atom replacing one or more of the hydrogen atoms. Both of these compounds occur naturally in the environment as a result of their production from seaweed and kelp. They are of interest to climate science as a result of their catalytic destruction of boundary layer ozone (a potent greenhouse gas) and, specifically for methyl iodide, the proposed role in the formation of new cloud condensation nuclei with implications for climate. In this paper, the currently available data on the distribution of bromoform and methyl iodide are analysed and contrasted to show that the concentrations of bromoform and methyl iodide do not correlate, that, in contrast to bromoform, the parameterization of sea surface methyl iodide concentrations demands only the sea surface temperature, and that the pelagic distribution of methyl iodide appears to follow the solar zenith angle. These three observations together suggest that, while the pelagic source of bromoform is mostly biogenic, the source of methyl iodide is photochemical. This has implications for the understanding of planetary boundary layer chemistry and potential organohalogen mediated feedbacks to climate.

  12. Debromination and decomposition of bromoform by contact glow discharge electrolysis in an aqueous solution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromoform (BF) is a stable and carcinogenic contaminant in water. In this study, efficient debromination and decomposition of BF induced by contact glow discharge electrolysis (CGDE) in a sodium sulfate solution were investigated. Intermediate byproducts were determined by ionic chromatography and gas chromatography, respectively. Experimental results showed that alkaline conditions and additions of organic additives to the solution were favorable for both the removal and the debromination of BF. Oxalic acid, formic acid, dibromomethane and bromate ion were determined as the major intermediate byproducts. Final products were inorganic carbon and bromide ion. Hydrated electrons may be the most likely active species responsible for the initiation of the debromination, and hydroxyl radicals may be the ones for the oxidation of the intermediate byproducts

  13. Development of a Simplified, Cost Effective GC-ECD Methodology for the Sensitive Detection of Bromoform in the Troposphere

    OpenAIRE

    Chris Reason; Carl Palmer; Howard Waldron; Nicholas Moyo; Brett Kuyper; Raïssa Philibert; Casper Labuschagne

    2012-01-01

    Wherever measurements have been made bromoform was found to be ubiquitous in the surface ocean in pmolar-nmolar concentrations. These measurements show concentrations in coastal regions orders of magnitude higher than in the pelagic oceans. Its atmospheric presence is primarily due to its release from algae and rapid transport to the marine boundary troposphere where it is known to participate in ozone chemistry via photochemical and catalytic pathways. Until quite recently, a limited number ...

  14. Development of a Simplified, Cost Effective GC-ECD Methodology for the Sensitive Detection of Bromoform in the Troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuyper, Brett; Labuschagne, Casper; Philibert, Raïssa; Moyo, Nicholas; Waldron, Howard; Reason, Chris; Palmer, Carl

    2012-01-01

    Wherever measurements have been made bromoform was found to be ubiquitous in the surface ocean in pmolar-nmolar concentrations. These measurements show concentrations in coastal regions orders of magnitude higher than in the pelagic oceans. Its atmospheric presence is primarily due to its release from algae and rapid transport to the marine boundary troposphere where it is known to participate in ozone chemistry via photochemical and catalytic pathways. Until quite recently, a limited number of studies existed (compared to other marine volatile organic compounds (VOCs)), mainly due to the analytical challenge(s) presented by the low environmental mixing ratios. In this work we detail the development of a simplified, cost effective method to detect and quantify bromoform in environmental air samples. Air samples (1.5 L) were preconcentrated onto a precooled adsorbent (Carbopack X/Carboxen 1016) trap. These samples were injected by means of rapid thermal desorption for separation and detection by GC-ECD. The system was calibrated by means of a custom-built permeation oven. A linear system response was achieved, having a detection limit of 0.73 ± 0.09 ppt. A range of environmental samples was analysed to demonstrate the ability of the technique to separate and identify bromoform from air samples. The results showed that bromoform concentrations typically averaged 24.7 ± 17.3 ppt in marine air samples, 68.5 ± 26.3 ppt in Cape Town urban air samples and 33.9 ± 40.5 ppt in simulated biomass burning plumes (SBBP). PMID:23202011

  15. Development of a Simplified, Cost Effective GC-ECD Methodology for the Sensitive Detection of Bromoform in the Troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chris Reason

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Wherever measurements have been made bromoform was found to be ubiquitous in the surface ocean in pmolar-nmolar concentrations. These measurements show concentrations in coastal regions orders of magnitude higher than in the pelagic oceans. Its atmospheric presence is primarily due to its release from algae and rapid transport to the marine boundary troposphere where it is known to participate in ozone chemistry via photochemical and catalytic pathways. Until quite recently, a limited number of studies existed (compared to other marine volatile organic compounds (VOCs, mainly due to the analytical challenge(s presented by the low environmental mixing ratios. In this work we detail the development of a simplified, cost effective method to detect and quantify bromoform in environmental air samples. Air samples (1.5 L were preconcentrated onto a precooled adsorbent (Carbopack X/Carboxen 1016 trap. These samples were injected by means of rapid thermal desorption for separation and detection by GC-ECD. The system was calibrated by means of a custom-built permeation oven. A linear system response was achieved, having a detection limit of 0.73 ± 0.09 ppt. A range of environmental samples was analysed to demonstrate the ability of the technique to separate and identify bromoform from air samples. The results showed that bromoform concentrations typically averaged 24.7 ± 17.3 ppt in marine air samples, 68.5 ± 26.3 ppt in Cape Town urban air samples and 33.9 ± 40.5 ppt in simulated biomass burning plumes (SBBP.

  16. Bromoform in the tropical boundary layer of the Maritime Continent during OP3: the contrast between coast and rainforest

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, J. A.; Harris, N. R. P.; Robinson, A. D.; Gostlow, B.; O'Brien, L. M.; Ashfold, M. J.; Carver, G. D.; Warwick, N. J.; Manning, A. J.; Yong, S. E.; Peng, L. K.; Ung, H. E.; Ong, S.

    2010-06-01

    We report measurements of bromoform made by gas chromatography during the OP3 campaign in 2008. Measurements were made simultaneously for a few days at the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) Global Atmospheric Watch (GAW) site in the Danum Valley, a rainforest location in Sabah, Borneo, and at a nearby coastal site at Kunak. Background values at Kunak were higher than those measured in the rainforest (2-5 ppt compared with 1 ppt) and excursions away from the background were very much higher, reaching 10s of ppt. Measurements of C2Cl4, an industrial tracer, showed no significant difference in background at the two sites. The data are consistent with a strong, local coastal source of bromoform in eastern Sabah. Modelling using two different models can reproduce many of the observed features. The bromoform data are consistent with a lower global source (190 Gg Br yr-1) than indicated by our recent measurements on Cape Verde (O'Brien et al., 2009) and point to the difficulty for short-lived species of extrapolating local measurements to a global source.

  17. On the emissions and transport of bromoform: sensitivity to model resolution and emission location

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. R. Russo

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Bromoform (CHBr3 is a short-lived species with an important but poorly quantified ocean source. It can be transported to the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL, in part by rapid, deep convective lifting, from where it can influence the global stratospheric ozone budget. In a modelling study, we investigate the importance of the regional distribution of the emissions and of model resolution for the transport of bromoform to the TTL. We use two idealised CHBr3 emission fields (one coastal, one uniformly distributed across the oceans implemented in high and coarse resolution (HR and CR versions of the same global model and focus on February as the period of peak convection in the West Pacific. Using outgoing long-wave radiation and precipitation as metrics, the HR version of the model is found to represent convection better. In the more realistic HR model version, the coastal emission scenario leads to 15–20 % more CHBr3 in the global TTL, and up to three times more CHBr3 in the TTL over the Maritime Continent, than when uniform emissions of the same tropical magnitude are employed. Using the uniform emission scenario in both model versions, the distribution of CHBr3 at 15.7 km (approximately the level of zero net radiative heating is qualitatively consistent with the differing geographic distributions of convection. However, averaged over the whole tropics, the amount of CHBr3 in the TTL in the two model versions is similar. Using the coastal scenario, in which emissions are particularly high in the Maritime Continent because of its long coastlines, the mixing ratio of CHBr3 in the TTL is enhanced over the Maritime Continent in both model versions. The enhancement is larger, and the peak in CHBr3 mixing ratio occurs at a higher altitude, in the HR model version. Our regional-scale results indicate that using aircraft measurements and coarse global models to infer CHBr3 emissions will be very difficult, particularly if (as is possible emissions are

  18. Global sea-to-air flux climatology for bromoform, dibromomethane and methyl iodide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ziska

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Volatile halogenated organic compounds containing bromine and iodine, which are naturally produced in the ocean, are involved in ozone depletion in both the troposphere and stratosphere. Three prominent compounds transporting large amounts of marine halogens into the atmosphere are bromoform (CHBr3, dibromomethane (CH2Br2 and methyl iodide (CH3I. The input of marine halogens to the stratosphere has been estimated from observations and modelling studies using low-resolution oceanic emission scenarios derived from top-down approaches. In order to improve emission inventory estimates, we calculate data-based high resolution global sea-to-air flux estimates of these compounds from surface observations within the HalOcAt (Halocarbons in the Ocean and Atmosphere database (https://halocat.geomar.de/. Global maps of marine and atmospheric surface concentrations are derived from the data which are divided into coastal, shelf and open ocean regions. Considering physical and biogeochemical characteristics of ocean and atmosphere, the open ocean water and atmosphere data are classified into 21 regions. The available data are interpolated onto a 1°×1° grid while missing grid values are interpolated with latitudinal and longitudinal dependent regression techniques reflecting the compounds' distributions. With the generated surface concentration climatologies for the ocean and atmosphere, global sea-to-air concentration gradients and sea-to-air fluxes are calculated. Based on these calculations we estimate a total global flux of 1.5/2.5 Gmol Br yr−1 for CHBr3, 0.78/0.98 Gmol Br yr−1 for CH2Br2 and 1.24/1.45 Gmol Br yr−1 for CH3I (robust fit/ordinary least squares regression techniques. Contrary to recent studies, negative fluxes occur in each sea-to-air flux climatology, mainly in the Arctic and Antarctic regions. "Hot spots" for global polybromomethane emissions are located in the equatorial region, whereas methyl iodide emissions are enhanced in the

  19. Global sea-to-air flux climatology for bromoform, dibromomethane and methyl iodide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Ziska

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Volatile halogenated organic compounds containing bromine and iodine, which are naturally produced in the ocean, are involved in ozone depletion in both the troposphere and stratosphere. Three prominent compounds transporting large amounts of marine halogens into the atmosphere are bromoform (CHBr3, dibromomethane (CH2Br2 and methyl iodide (CH3I. The input of marine halogens to the stratosphere is based on observations and modeling studies using low resolution oceanic emission scenarios derived from top down approaches. In order to improve emission inventory estimates, we calculate data-based high resolution global sea-to-air flux estimates of these compounds from surface observations within the HalOcAt database (https://halocat.geomar.de/. Global maps of marine and atmospheric surface concentrations are derived from the data which are divided into coastal, shelf and open ocean regions. Considering physical and biogeochemical characteristics of ocean and atmosphere, the open ocean water and atmosphere data are classified into 21 regions. The available data are interpolated onto a 1° × 1° grid while missing grid values are interpolated with latitudinal and longitudinal dependent regression techniques reflecting the compounds' distributions. With the generated surface concentration climatologies for the ocean and atmosphere, global concentration gradients and sea-to-air fluxes are calculated. Based on these calculations we estimate a total global flux of 1.5/2.5 Gmol Br yr−1 for CHBr3, 0.78/0.98 Gmol Br yr−1 for CH2Br2 and 1.24/1.45 Gmol I yr−1 for CH3I (Robust Fit/Ordinary Least Square regression technique. Contrary to recent studies, negative fluxes occur in each sea-to-air flux climatology, mainly in the Arctic and Antarctic region. "Hot spots" for global

  20. The alkaline comet assay used in evaluation of genotoxic damage of drinking water disinfection by-products (bromoform and chloroform

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Messaouda Khallef

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The alkaline comet assay (pH 12.3 is a useful method for monitoring genotoxic effects of environmental pollutants in the root nuclei of Allium cepa and various plants; it allows the detection of single- and double-strand breaks, incomplete excision-repair sites and cross-links. It has been introduced to detect even small changes in DNA structure. It is a technically simple, highly sensitive, fast and economic test which detects in vitro and in vivo genotoxicity (DNA integrity and packing mode in any cell types examined, and requires just a few cells for its execution (Liman et al., 2011; Yıldız et al., 2009. Chloroform and bromoform are the most important trihalomethanes found in drinking water. Different concentrations of bromoform (25, 50, 75and 100µg/ml and chloroform (25, 50, 100 and 200 µg/ml were introduced to onion tuber roots. Distilled water was used as a negative control and methyl methansulfonate (MMS-10 µg/ml as positive control. All obtained data were subjected to statistical analyses by using SPSS 15.0 for Windows software. For comparison purposes, Duncan multiple range tests using one-way analysis of variance (ANOVA were employed and p<0.05 was accepted as the test of significance. Comet assay results showed that DNA damage was significant at p <0.05 for the different concentrations of chloroform and bromoform compared to the negative control which has a damage rate equal to 3.5 ± 0.7 and the positive control which has damage rate equal to 13.5 ± 2.12. The exposure of root tip cells to these disinfection by-products increases DNA damage. All concentrations examined in this study of bromoform and chloroform cause significant harm, which could be due to DNA damage induced by oxidative stress. The measurement of DNA damage in the nuclei of higher plant tissues is a new area of study with SCGE. This assay could be incorporated into in situ monitoring of atmosphere, water and soil: the comet assay allows a fast detection without

  1. Fusion curves and thermodynamic properties of carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, bromoform and silicon tetrachloride at pressure up to 3500 Mpa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Rong-Jiao; Xu Wei; Tian Yi-Ling; Hao Ji-Shuang

    2008-01-01

    The fusion temperature as a function of pressure for carbon tetrachloride, chloroform, bromoform and silicon tetrachloride at pressures up to 3500MPa has been determined. The experimental data were fitted by the equation Tfus = T0(1 + Ap/a1)a2 exp(-a3△p) and the changes of the molar enthalpy and molar internal energy on fusion were calculated using the parameters of the fitted equation. Comparisons with the data from the literature show that the experimental data, parameters of fitted equations, changes of the molar enthalpy and molar internal energy are reliable.

  2. Atmospheric bromoform at Mace Head, Ireland: seasonality and evidence for a peatland source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. J. Carpenter

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available In situ atmospheric observations of bromoform (CHBr3 made over a 2.5 year period at Mace Head, Ireland from May 2001- Dec 2003, including during the NAMBLEX (North Atlantic Marine Boundary Layer Experiment campaign, show broad maxima from spring until autumn and winter minima, with mixing ratios of 5.3+1.0 pptv (mid March - mid October and 1.8+0.8 pptv (December-February. This indicates that, unlike CHCl3, which has a summer minimum and winter maximum at Mace Head, local biological sources of CHBr3 have a greater influence on the atmospheric data than photochemical decay during long-range transport. The emission sources are predominantly macroalgal, but we find evidence for a small terrestrial flux from peatland ecosystems, which so far has not been accounted for in the CHBr3 budget. Sharp increases in CHCl3 and CHBr3 concentrations and decreases in O3 concentrations occurred at night when the wind direction switched from an ocean- to a land-based sector (land breeze and the wind speed dropped to below 5 ms-1. These observations infer a shallow atmospheric boundary layer with increased O3 deposition and concentration of local emissions of both CHCl3 and CHBr3. The ratio of ΔCHCl3/ΔCHBr3 varied strongly according to the prevailing wind direction; from 0.60+0.15 in south-easterly (100-170° and northerly (340-20° air to 2.5+0.4 in north-easterly (40-70° air. Of these land-sectors, the south-easterly air masses are likely to be strongly influenced by macroalgal beds along the coast and the emission ratios probably reflect those from seaweeds in addition to land sources. The north-easterly airmasses however had an immediate fetch inland, which locally is comprised of coastal peatland ecosystems (peat bogs and coastal conifer plantations, previously identified as being strong sources of atmospheric CHCl3 under these conditions. Although we cannot entirely rule out other local land or coastal sources, our observations also suggest peatland

  3. Spectroscopic and computational studies of matrix-isolated iso-CHBr3: Structure, properties, and photochemistry of iso-bromoform

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Iso-polyhalomethanes are known reactive intermediates that play a pivotal role in the photochemistry of halomethanes in condensed phases. In this work, iso-bromoform (iso-CHBr3) and its deuterated isotopomer were characterized by matrix isolation infrared and UV/visible spectroscopy, supported by ab initio and density functional theory calculations, to further probe the structure, spectroscopy, and photochemistry of this important intermediate. Selected wavelength laser irradiation of CHBr3 isolated in Ar or Ne matrices at ∼5 K yielded iso-CHBr3; the observed infrared and UV/visible absorptions are in excellent agreement with computational predictions, and the energies of various stationary points on the CHBr3 potential energy surface were characterized computationally using high-level methods in combination with correlation consistent basis sets. These calculations show that, while the corresponding minima lie ∼200 kJ/mol above the global CHBr3 minimum, the isomer is bound by some 60 kJ/mol in the gas phase with respect to the CHBr2+ Br asymptote. The photochemistry of iso-CHBr3 was investigated by selected wavelength laser irradiation into the intense S0→ S3 transition, which resulted in back photoisomerization to CHBr3. Intrinsic reaction coordinate calculations confirmed the existence of a first-order saddle point connecting the two isomers, which lies energetically below the threshold of the radical channel. Subsequently, natural bond orbital analysis and natural resonance theory were used to characterize the important resonance structures of the isomer and related stationary points, which demonstrate that the isomerization transition state represents a crossover from dominantly covalent to dominantly ionic bonding. In condensed phases, the ion-pair dominated isomerization transition state structure is preferentially stabilized, so that the barrier to isomerization is lowered.

  4. Global sampling of the photochemical reaction paths of bromoform by ultrafast deep-UV through near-IR transient absorption and ab initio multiconfigurational calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pal, S K; Mereshchenko, A S; Butaeva, E V; El-Khoury, P Z; Tarnovsky, A N

    2013-03-28

    Ultrafast deep-ultraviolet through near infrared (210-950 nm) transient absorption spectroscopy complemented by ab initio multiconfigurational calculations offers a global description of the photochemical reaction pathways of bromoform following 255-nm excitation in methylcyclohexane and acetonitrile solutions. Photoexcitation of CHBr3 leads to the ground-state iso-CHBr3 product in a large quantum yield (∼35%), formed through two different mechanisms: concerted excited-state isomerization and cage-induced isomerization through the recombination of the nascent radical pair. These two processes take place on different time scales of tens of femtoseconds and several picoseconds, respectively. The novel ultrafast direct isomerization pathway proposed herein is consistent with the occurrence of a conical intersection between the first excited singlet state of CHBr3 and the ground electronic state of iso-CHBr3. Complete active space self-consistent field calculations characterize this singularity in the vicinity of a second order saddle point on the ground state which connects the two isomer forms. For cage-induced isomerization, both the formation of the nascent radical pair and its subsequent collapse into ground-state iso-CHBr3 are directly monitored through the deep-ultraviolet absorption signatures of the radical species. In both mechanisms, the optically active (i.e., those with largest Franck-Condon factors) C-Br-Br bending and Br-Br stretching modes of ground-state iso-CHBr3 have the largest projection on the reaction coordinate, enabling us to trace the structural changes accompanying vibrational relaxation of the non-equilibrated isomers through transient absorption dynamics. The iso-CHBr3 photoproduct is stable in methylcyclohexane, but undergoes either facile thermal isomerization to the parent CHBr3 structure through a cyclic transition state stabilized by the polar acetonitrile medium (∼300-ps lifetime), and hydrolysis in the presence of water. PMID

  5. Distributions and sea-to-air fluxes of chloroform, trichloroethylene, tetrachloroethylene, chlorodibromomethane and bromoform in the Yellow Sea and the East China Sea during spring

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halocarbons including chloroform (CHCl3), trichloroethylene (C2HCl3), tetrachloroethylene (C2Cl4), chlorodibromomethane (CHBr2Cl) and bromoform (CHBr3) were measured in the Yellow Sea (YS) and the East China Sea (ECS) during spring 2011. The influences of chlorophyll a, salinity and nutrients on the distributions of these gases were examined. Elevated levels of these gases in the coastal waters were attributed to anthropogenic inputs and biological release by phytoplankton. The vertical distributions of these gases in the water column were controlled by different source strengths and water masses. Using atmospheric concentrations measured in spring 2012 and seawater concentrations obtained from this study, the sea-to-air fluxes of these gases were estimated. Our results showed that the emissions of C2HCl3, C2Cl4, CHBr2Cl, and CHBr3 from the study area could account for 16.5%, 10.5%, 14.6%, and 3.5% of global oceanic emissions, respectively, indicating that the coastal shelf may contribute significantly to the global oceanic emissions of these gases. -- Highlights: ► Distributions of the VHCs were studied in the YS and the ECS. ► Elevated levels of VHCs were related to terrestrial input from the Yangtze River. ► Biogenic production from diatoms was an important source of the VHCs. ► Shelf seas could significantly contribute to the global oceanic VHCs emission. -- The elevated levels of the volatile halocarbons in the coastal waters were attributed to anthropogenic inputs and biological release by phytoplankton (e.g., diatoms)

  6. Oceanic bromoform emissions weighted by their ozone depletion potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tegtmeier, S.; Ziska, F.; Pisso, I.; Quack, B.; Velders, G. J. M.; Yang, X.; Krüger, K.

    2015-12-01

    At present, anthropogenic halogens and oceanic emissions of very short-lived substances (VSLSs) both contribute to the observed stratospheric ozone depletion. Emissions of the long-lived anthropogenic halogens have been reduced and are currently declining, whereas emissions of the biogenic VSLSs are expected to increase in future climate due to anthropogenic activities affecting oceanic production and emissions. Here, we introduce a new approach for assessing the impact of oceanic halocarbons on stratospheric ozone by calculating their ozone depletion potential (ODP)-weighted emissions. Seasonally and spatially dependent, global distributions are derived within a case-study framework for CHBr3 for the period 1999-2006. At present, ODP-weighted emissions of CHBr3 amount up to 50 % of ODP-weighted anthropogenic emissions of CFC-11 and to 9 % of all long-lived ozone depleting halogens. The ODP-weighted emissions are large where strong oceanic emissions coincide with high-reaching convective activity and show pronounced peaks at the Equator and the coasts with largest contributions from the Maritime Continent and western Pacific Ocean. Variations of tropical convective activity lead to seasonal shifts in the spatial distribution of the trajectory-derived ODP with the updraught mass flux, used as a proxy for trajectory-derived ODP, explaining 71 % of the variance of the ODP distribution. Future climate projections based on the RCP 8.5 scenario suggest a 31 % increase of the ODP-weighted CHBr3 emissions by 2100 compared to present values. This increase is related to a larger convective updraught mass flux in the upper troposphere and increasing emissions in a future climate. However, at the same time, it is reduced by less effective bromine-related ozone depletion due to declining stratospheric chlorine concentrations. The comparison of the ODP-weighted emissions of short- and long-lived halocarbons provides a new concept for assessing the overall impact of oceanic halocarbon emissions on stratospheric ozone depletion for current conditions and future projections.

  7. The measurement of dangerous organic materials in water by gas chromatographic methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measurements were confined only to drinking water in order to investigate the effect of disinfection by chloronation. The results obtained revealed that all the values for carbon tetrachlorides and bromoform in drinking water are much less than the acceptable values

  8. Trihalomethanes as initiators and promoters of carcinogenesis.

    OpenAIRE

    M. A. PEREIRA; Lin, L. H.; Lippitt, J M; Herren, S L

    1982-01-01

    Chloroform and other trihalomethanes are contaminants of drinking water that have been demonstrated to be carcinogenic in laboratory animals. Determination of the mechanism of carcinogenicity of chloroform is required so that the animal data can be extrapolated to estimate the human health hazard. The extent of the binding of chloroform to rat liver and kidney DNA was approximately 0.1% the level of binding found for dimethylnitrosamine. Neither chloroform nor bromoform, in contrast to diethy...

  9. 40 CFR Appendix Viii to Part 261 - Hazardous Constituents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ...-butynyl ester 101-27-9 U280 Barium Same 7440-39-3 Barium compounds, N.O.S. 1 Barium cyanide Same 542-62-1...′-(tetrathiodicarbonothioyl)-bis- 120-54-7 Bromoacetone 2-Propanone, 1-bromo- 598-31-2 P017 Bromoform Methane, tribromo- 75-25...-methylbenzenamine 120-71-8 Cresol (Cresylic acid) Phenol, methyl- 1319-77-3 U052 Crotonaldehyde 2-Butenal...

  10. Exposure assessment and the risk associated with trihalomethanes compounds in drinking water - doi: 10.5020/18061230.2012.p5

    OpenAIRE

    Aldo Pacheco Ferreira; Cynara de Lourdes Nóbrega da Cunha

    2012-01-01

    To measure the concentrations of trihalomethanes (THMs) in marshland of Jacarepaguá drinking water, Rio de Janeiro-RJ, Brazil, and their associated risks. Methods: Two hundred houses were visited and samples were collected from consumer taps water. Risks estimates based on exposures were projected by employing deterministic and probabilistic approaches. Results: The THMs (dibromochloromethane, bromoform, chloroform, and bromodichloromethane) ranged from 3.08 μg/l to 129.31...

  11. Exposure assessment and the risk associated with trihalomethanes compounds in drinking water

    OpenAIRE

    Aldo Pacheco Ferreira; Cynara de Lourdes Nóbrega da Cunha

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To measure the concentrations of trihalomethanes (THMs) in marshland of Jacarepaguá drinking water, Rio de Janeiro-RJ, Brazil, and their associated risks. Methods: Two hundred houses were visited and samples were collected from consumer taps water. Risksestimates based on exposures were projected by employing deterministic and probabilistic approaches. Results: The THMs (dibromochloromethane, bromoform, chloroform, and bromodichloromethane) ranged from 3.08 μg/l to 129.31 μg/l. Non...

  12. The Evaluation of Spatial Fluctuations and Temporal Variability in Estimated Levels of THMs in Drinking Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ristoiu, D.; Haiduc, I.; Culea, M.; Mocan, A.; Chira, R.; Vancea, S.

    2007-04-01

    Chlorine, used by municipal water treatment facilities to disinfect water, reacts with naturally occurring organic matter to produce a host of compounds known as disinfection by-products. In addition to chloroform, brominated species such as bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, and bromoform may also be formed if bromide is present in the source water. Together, these volatile compounds comprise the trihalomethanes (THMs). The results presented in this paper shown that the THM levels were higher in the summer relative to other seasons.

  13. 40 CFR Table 34 to Subpart G of... - Fraction Measured (Fm) and Fraction Emitted (Fe) For HAP Compounds in Wastewater Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ....37 Methyl tert-butyl ether 1634044 1.00 0.57 Methylene chloride (Dichloromethane) 75092 1.00 0.77... Acrolein 107028 1.00 0.43 Acrylonitrile 107131 1.00 0.43 Allyl chloride 107051 1.00 0.89 Benzene 71432 1.00 0.80 Benzyl chloride 100447 1.00 0.47 Biphenyl 92524 0.86 0.45 Bromoform 75252 1.00 0.49...

  14. 40 CFR Table 8 to Subpart Ggg of... - Fraction Measured (Fm) for HAP Compounds in Wastewater Streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Methyl tert-butyl ether 1634044 1.00 Methylene chloride (Dichloromethane) 75092 1.00 Naphthalene 91203 0... Acrolein 107028 1.00 Acrylonitrile 107131 1.00 Allyl chloride 107051 1.00 Benzene 71432 1.00 Benzyl chloride 100447 1.00 Biphenyl 92524 0.86 Bromoform 75252 1.00 Butadiene (1,3-) 106990 1.00 Carbon...

  15. Detailed modeling of the atmospheric degradation mechanism of very-short lived brominated species

    OpenAIRE

    G. Krysztofiak; Catoire, Valéry; Poulet, G.; Marécal, V.; Pirre, Michel; Louis, F.; Canneaux, S.; B. Josse

    2012-01-01

    International audience Detailed chemical reaction schemes for the atmospheric degradations of the very short-lived species (VSLS) bromoform (CHBr3) and dibromomethane (CH2Br2) have been established. These degradation schemes have been implemented in the meteorological/tracer transport model CATT-BRAMS used in the present case as pseudo one-dimensional model with chemistry of CH4, CO, HOx, NOx, NOy and Ox. They include the main possible reactions of the intermediate brominated peroxy radica...

  16. Hoch selektive Polyolefin-Oberflächenfunktionalisierung in bromenthaltenden Niederdruckplasmen

    OpenAIRE

    Wettmarshausen, Sascha

    2010-01-01

    Selectively functionalized polyolefine surfaces are essential for many applications in adhesion, chemistry, medicine and biotechnology. To provide polymer surfaces with special functionalities it is necessary to treat them with according precursors in plasma. In this work polypropylene (PP) and polyethylene (PE) were exposed to bromine containing (bromoform, allylbromide, tert-butylbromide) plasmas. Surpisingly, the bromination appeared as high selective and formed high dense C-Br groups a...

  17. Modeling the transport of very short-lived substances into the tropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Aschmann

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The transport of very short-lived substances into the tropical upper troposphere and lower stratosphere is investigated by a three-dimensional chemical transport model using archived convective updraft mass fluxes (or detrainment rates from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecast's ERA-Interim reanalysis. Large-scale vertical velocities are calculated from diabatic heating rates. With this approach we explicitly model the large scale subsidence in the tropical troposphere with convection taking place in fast and isolated updraft events. The model calculations agree generally well with observations of bromoform and methyl iodide from aircraft campaigns and with ozone and water vapor from sonde and satellite observations. Using a simplified treatment of dehydration and bromine product gas washout we give a range of 1.6 to 3 ppt for the contribution of bromoform to stratospheric bromine, assuming a uniform source in the boundary layer of 1 ppt. We show that the most effective region for VSLS transport into the stratosphere is the West Pacific, accounting for about 55% of the bromine from bromoform transported into the stratosphere under the supposition of a uniformly distributed source.

  18. A rapid sample decomposition procedure for bromo-heavies containing ferruginous material: determination of REEs and thorium by ICP-AES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A rapid method of sample decomposition and dissolution for bromoform heavies is described for the determination of REEs and thorium by inductively coupled plasma- optical emission spectrometry. For application to geochemical exploration to achieve the high sample throughput; a simple and rapid analytical procedure is a prerequisite. In order to speed-up the existing methodology, phosphate fusion was introduced for decomposition of samples. In the proposed method, bromoform-heavies material are fused with 1:1 mixture of sodium dihydrogen orthophosphate and tetra-sodium pyrophosphate and dissolved in distilled water. After disintegration of melt, the solution was subjected to oxalate precipitation followed by R2O3 separation for separating the REEs from major matrix interfering elements. The rare earth elements and thorium in the resultant solution were determined by ICP-OES. The results are compared with the results obtained by well-established existing dissolution procedures involving HF-HCl-HClO4 acid treatment and NaF/KHF2 fusion followed by H2SO4 acid fuming. The accuracy of the method was evaluated by doping the phosphate blank with known amount of REEs and comparing the recoveries obtained using the present method. The method is simple, rapid and is suitable for the routine determination of REEs and Th in bromoform-heavies. The RSD of the method was found to be within 1-3% for Th and REEs by ICP-AES. (author)

  19. Boundary Layer Concentrations of Halocarbons at Coastal and Forest Sites during the OP3 campaign, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyle, John

    2010-05-01

    As part of the OP3 project, halocarbon measurements were made in 2008 at two sites in Sabah, Borneo, by gas chromatography using the µ-Dirac instrument. In this second field deployment of µ-Dirac the measurements confirmed the potential of the instrument for longterm observations at a range of sites for studies of halocarbon trends and emissions. Observations with two identical instruments at Bukit Atur, Danum Valley, produced identical measurements of two different halocarbons, bromomform and C2Cl4. When one instrument was then deployed at a nearby coastal site, higher concentrations of both species were measured. The bromoform background at the coast was higher than inland and the variability was also greater, with occasional peaks of many 10s pptv. The background of C2Cl4 was the same at both sites but, again, the coastal measurements showed occasional very high values. In each case, the explanation appears to lie with coastal sources. In the case of bromoform, these are likely to be related to macroalgae; for C2Cl4 industrial emissions from the populated coastal strip are the probable explanation. Two different numerical models were used to aid data interpretation. The Lagrangian air parcel dispersion model, NAME, confirms that the air parcels during this period had crossed potentially rich oceanic and, especially, coastal regions prior to measurement in Sabah. Both models show that, despite a lifetime of about two weeks, substantial gradients between the coast and inland can be expected for bromoform. For the very short period of measurements undertaken, the coastal background was always higher than that measured inland. The modelling suggests that this need not always be the case, a results confirmed by a longer measurement series. The chemical transport model, p-TOMCAT is able to reproduce the magnitude of the bromoform measurements but only if the emission strengths used by Warwick et al. (JGR, 2006) are reduced. Here we used global bromoform emissions of

  20. Chlorine by-products in sea water at the Penly nuclear power plant. Measurement survey in May 1993

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the measurement survey conducted at the Penly nuclear power plant on May 27 and 28, 1993, was to determine the distribution of residual oxidants and volatile organo-halogenated compounds (THM) concentrations in the discharge plume when both units of the plants are carrying out chlorination. The data collected provide a mapping of the chemical types analyzed and will serve in calibration of a numerical model to simulate the evolution of these compounds in the discharge plume. During the two days of measurements, quantitative analyses were performed on samples taken by helicopter, once at high tide and twice at low tide with mean tidal coefficients. The chlorine injection level ranged from 0.84 to 0.92 mg/l (ppm) in unit 1 and from 0.64 to 0.70 mg/l in unit 2. Residual oxidants were measured as Total Chlorine equivalents using the colorimetric DPD method. Bromoform accounted for 97.8 % of the THM generated by chlorination. Three minutes after injection of hypochlorite, in the discharge basin, bromoform reached 60 % of its maximum concentration (29.23 μg/l). The maximum reaction yield of bromoform formation is 2,9 %. Three zones were defined according to their proximity to releases. In each zone, given the lake of precision in measurements, the concentration of residual oxidants found did not reach significant levels (≤0.03 mg/l). The bromoform concentration, on the contrary, reached measurable levels in each of the samples. Its distribution differs significantly from one zone to another: -release zone : 1.66±0.40μg/l -nearby zone: 0.44±0.13μg/l - distant zone : 0.26±0.10μg/l. Our analysis, which indicates a background level of the order of 0.1 μg/l for the entire studied area, raises the question of possible other sources of bromoform, independent of discharge from Penly. (authors). 15 refs., 11 figs., 5 tabs., 4 annexes

  1. Production and distribution of chlorination by-products in the cooling water system of a coastal power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Employing chlorination as antifouling agent in cooling water circuits of coastal power plants can lead to the production of chlorination by-products (CBP), mainly due to chlorine's reactions with the organic compounds present in natural seawater. Important among the by products are trihalomethane, haloacetonitriles, halo acetic acids, halo phenols etc., with trihalomethanes (THM) generally being the predominant compounds. The THM species that are commonly observed are chloroform, mono bromodichloromethane, dibromochloro-methane and bromoform. The present work was carried out to understand the production and distribution of chlorination by products (mainly trihalomethanes) in the cooling water systems of Madras Atomic Power Station (MAPS). Field studies were carried out in which samples collected from the intake, forebay pump house, out fall point and mixing point were analysed for THM using gas chromatograph with electron capture detector. The results showed that bromoform was the dominant THM formed as a result of chlorination, followed by dibromochloromethane. Mono bromodichloromethane and chloroform were not observed in seawater throughout the study period. Moreover, no THM could be detected at the intake point. The total THM values at other stations ranged between 25-250 μgL-1, the highest values were observed at the process seawater pump outlet and the lowest at the mixing point. The concentrations of CBP's formed were found to be related to the chlorine residuals measured. In addition, laboratory experiments were carried out to understand CBP formation as a function of chlorine dose and contact time. Chlorine doses ranging from 1 to 10 mgL-1 were added to unfiltered seawater and the various THMs formed were analysed after different time intervals. The results confirmed that bromoform was the dominant THM species, followed by dibromochloromethane, as observed in the field studies. As the chlorine doses increased, the other THMs, namely, mono

  2. Sensitivity and variability of Presage dosimeter formulations in sheet form with application to SBRT and SRS QA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumas, Michael, E-mail: mdumas1127@gmail.com [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine and Karmanos Cancer Institute Detroit, Detroit, Michigan 48201 and Department of Radiation Oncology, Henry Ford Hospital, Detroit, Michigan 48202 (United States); Rakowski, Joseph T. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Wayne State University School of Medicine and Karmanos Cancer Institute Detroit, Detroit, Michigan 48201 (United States)

    2015-12-15

    Purpose: To measure sensitivity and stability of the Presage dosimeter in sheet form for various chemical concentrations over a range of clinical photon energies and examine its use for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) QA. Methods: Presage polymer dosimeters were formulated to investigate and optimize their sensitivity and stability. The dosimeter is composed of clear polyurethane base, leucomalachite green (LMG) reporting dye, and bromoform radical initiator in 0.9–1.0 mm thick sheets. The chemicals are mixed together for 2 min, cast in an aluminum mold, and left to cure at 60 psi for a minimum of two days. Dosimeter response was characterized at energies Co-60, 6 MV, 10 MV flattening-filter free, 15 MV, 50 kVp (mean 19.2 keV), and Ir-192. The dosimeters were scanned by a Microtek Scanmaker i800 at 300 dpi, 2{sup 16} bit depth per color channel. Red component images were analyzed with ImageJ and RIT. SBRT QA was done with gamma analysis tolerances of 2% and 2 mm DTA. Results: The sensitivity of the Presage dosimeter increased with increasing concentration of bromoform. Addition of tin catalyst decreased curing time and had negligible effect on sensitivity. LMG concentration should be at least as high as the bromoform, with ideal concentration being 2% wt. Gamma Knife SRS QA measurements of relative output and profile widths were within 2% of manufacturer’s values validated at commissioning, except the 4 mm collimator relative output which was within 3%. The gamma pass rate of Presage with SBRT was 73.7%, compared to 93.1% for EBT2 Gafchromic film. Conclusions: The Presage dosimeter in sheet form was capable of detecting radiation over all tested photon energies and chemical concentrations. The best sensitivity and photostability of the dosimeter were achieved with 2.5% wt. LMG and 8.2% wt. bromoform. Scanner used should not emit any UV radiation as it will expose the dosimeter, as with the Epson 10000 XL scanner

  3. Sensitivity and variability of Presage dosimeter formulations in sheet form with application to SBRT and SRS QA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To measure sensitivity and stability of the Presage dosimeter in sheet form for various chemical concentrations over a range of clinical photon energies and examine its use for stereotactic body radiation therapy (SBRT) and stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) QA. Methods: Presage polymer dosimeters were formulated to investigate and optimize their sensitivity and stability. The dosimeter is composed of clear polyurethane base, leucomalachite green (LMG) reporting dye, and bromoform radical initiator in 0.9–1.0 mm thick sheets. The chemicals are mixed together for 2 min, cast in an aluminum mold, and left to cure at 60 psi for a minimum of two days. Dosimeter response was characterized at energies Co-60, 6 MV, 10 MV flattening-filter free, 15 MV, 50 kVp (mean 19.2 keV), and Ir-192. The dosimeters were scanned by a Microtek Scanmaker i800 at 300 dpi, 216 bit depth per color channel. Red component images were analyzed with ImageJ and RIT. SBRT QA was done with gamma analysis tolerances of 2% and 2 mm DTA. Results: The sensitivity of the Presage dosimeter increased with increasing concentration of bromoform. Addition of tin catalyst decreased curing time and had negligible effect on sensitivity. LMG concentration should be at least as high as the bromoform, with ideal concentration being 2% wt. Gamma Knife SRS QA measurements of relative output and profile widths were within 2% of manufacturer’s values validated at commissioning, except the 4 mm collimator relative output which was within 3%. The gamma pass rate of Presage with SBRT was 73.7%, compared to 93.1% for EBT2 Gafchromic film. Conclusions: The Presage dosimeter in sheet form was capable of detecting radiation over all tested photon energies and chemical concentrations. The best sensitivity and photostability of the dosimeter were achieved with 2.5% wt. LMG and 8.2% wt. bromoform. Scanner used should not emit any UV radiation as it will expose the dosimeter, as with the Epson 10000 XL scanner. Presage

  4. Occurrence of Selected Pharmaceutical and Organic Wastewater Compounds in Effluent and Water Samples from Municipal Wastewater and Drinking-Water Treatment Facilities in the Tar and Cape Fear River Basins, North Carolina, 2003-2005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrell, G.M.

    2009-01-01

    Samples of treated effluent and treated and untreated water were collected at 20 municipal wastewater and drinkingwater treatment facilities in the Tar and Cape Fear River basins of North Carolina during 2003 and 2005. The samples were analyzed for a variety of prescription and nonprescription pharmaceutical compounds and a suite of organic compounds considered indicative of wastewater. Concentrations of these compounds generally were less than or near the detection limits of the analytical methods used during this investigation. None of these compounds were detected at concentrations that exceeded drinking-water standards established by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Bromoform, a disinfection byproduct, was the only compound detected at a concentration that exceeded regulatory guidelines. The concentration of bromoform in one finished drinking-water sample, 26 micrograms per liter, exceeded North Carolina water-quality criteria. Drinking-water treatment practices were effective at removing many of the compounds detected in untreated water. Disinfection processes used in wastewater treatment - chlorination or irradiation with ultraviolet light - did not seem to substantially degrade the organic compounds evaluated during this study.

  5. Prediction of RO/NF membrane rejections of PhACs and organic compounds: a statistical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Amy

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Rejections of pharmaceutical compounds (Ibuprofen, Diclofenac, Clofibric acid, Naproxen, Primidone, Phenacetin and organic compounds (Dichloroacetic acid, Trichloroacetic acid, Chloroform, Bromoform, Trichloroethene, Perchloroethene, Carbontetrachloride, Carbontetrabromide by NF (Filmtec, Saehan and RO (Filmtec, Saehan, Toray, Koch membranes were studied. Chloroform presented the lowest rejection due to small molar volume, equivalent width and length. Diclofenac and Primidone showed high rejections related to high molar volume and length. Dichloroacetic acid and Trichloroacetic acid presented good rejections caused by charge exclusion instead of steric hindrance mechanism influencing rejection. Bromoform and Trichloroethene showed low rejections due to small length and equivalent width. Carbontetrabromide, Perchloroethene and Carbontetrachloride with higher equivalent width than BF and TCE presented better rejections. A qualitative analysis of variables using Principal Component Analysis was successfully implemented for reduction of physical-chemical compound properties that influence membrane rejection of PhACs and organic compounds. Properties such as dipole moment, molar volume, hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity, molecular length and equivalent width were found to be important descriptors for prediction of membrane rejection. Ionic and neutral compounds were successfully separated before analysis. For membranes used in the experiments, we may conclude that charge repulsion was an important mechanism of rejection for ionic compounds. Molecular weight was a poor variable for rejection prediction. Membrane rejection of neutral compounds was well predicted by dipole moment, molar volume, length, equivalent width and hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity of compounds after analysis with Multiple Linear Regression.

  6. Factorial analysis of the trihalomethanes formation in water disinfection using chlorine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The factors that affect trihalomethane (THM) (chloroform, bromodichloromethane, chlorodibromomethane and bromoform) formation from the chlorination of aqueous solutions of hydrophobic fulvic acids (FA) were investigated in a prototype laboratorial simulation using factorial analysis. This strategy involved a fractional factorial design (16 plus 5 center experiments) of five factors (fulvic acids concentration, chlorine dose, temperature, pH and bromide concentration) and a Box Behnken design (12 plus 3 center experiments) for the detailed analysis of three factors (FA concentration, chlorine dose and temperature). The concentration of THM was determined by headspace analysis by GC-ECD. The most significant factors that affect the four THM productions were the following: chloroform-FA concentration and temperature; bromodichloromethane-FA concentration and chlorine dose; chlorodibromomethane-chlorine dose; and, bromoform-chlorine dose and bromide concentration. Moreover, linear models were obtained for the four THM concentrations in the disinfection solution as function of the FA concentration, chlorine dose and temperature, and it was observed that the complexity of the models (number of significant factors and interactions) increased with increasing bromine atoms in the THM. Also, this study shows that reducing the FA concentration the relative amount of bromated THM increases

  7. Modeling of RO/NF membrane rejections of PhACs and organic compounds: a statistical analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Amy

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Rejections of pharmaceutical compounds (Ibuprofen, Diclofenac, Clofibric acid, Naproxen, Primidone, Phenacetin and organic compounds (Dichloroacetic acid, Trichloroacetic acid, Chloroform, Bromoform, Trichloroethene, Perchloroethene, Carbontetrachloride, Carbontetrabromide by NF (Filmtec, Saehan and RO (Filmtec, Saehan, Toray, Koch membranes were studied. Chloroform presented the lowest rejection due to small molar volume, equivalent width and length. Diclofenac and Primidone showed high rejections related to high molar volume and length. Dichloroacetic acid and Trichloroacetic acid presented good rejections caused by charge exclusion instead of steric hindrance mechanism influencing rejection. Bromoform and Trichloroethene showed low rejections due to small length and equivalent width. Carbontetrabromide, Perchloroethene and Carbontetrachloride with higher equivalent width than BF and TCE presented better rejections. A qualitative analysis of variables using Principal Component Analysis was successfully implemented for reduction of physical-chemical compound properties that influence membrane rejection of PhACs and organic compounds. Properties such as dipole moment, molar volume, hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity, molecular length and equivalent width were found to be important descriptors for simulation of membrane rejection. For membranes used in the experiments, we may conclude that charge repulsion was an important mechanism of rejection for ionic compounds. After analysis with Multiple Linear Regression, we also may conclude that membrane rejection of neutral compounds was well predicted by molar volume, length, equivalent width, hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity and dipole moment. Molecular weight was a poor descriptor variable for rejection modelling. We were able to provide acceptable statistical significance for important results.

  8. SU-E-T-265: Presage Thin Sheet Dosimeter Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dumas, M; Rakowski, J [Wayne State University/Karmanos Cancer Institute, Detroit, MI (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To quantify the sensitivity and stability of the Presage dosimeter in sheet form for different concentrations of chemicals and for a diverse range of clinical photon energies. Methods: Presage polymer dosimeters are formulated to investigate and optimize their sensitivity and stability. The dosimeter is composed of clear polyurethane base, leucomalachite green reporting dye, and bromoform radical initiator in 1mm thick sheets. The chemicals are well mixed together, cast in an aluminum mold, and left to cure at 60 psi for a minimum of 2 days. Dosimeter response will be characterized at multiple energies including Co-60, 6 MV, 15 MV, 50 kVp, and 250 kVp. The dosimeters are read by an Epson 10000 XL scanner at 800 dpi, 2{sup 16} bit depth. Red component images are analyzed with ImageJ. Results: Analysis of optical density verse dose for Co-60 energies indicates that the bromoform containing Presage was able to quantify dose from 0 to 300 Gy, with saturation beyond 300 Gy. Initial results show two regions of linear response, 0–100 Gy and 150–300 Gy. The 150–300 Gy region has a sensitivity of 0.0024 net OD/Gy. Further results on other energies are still in progress. Conclusions: This work shows the potential for use of thin sheets of Presage dosimeter as a dosimeter capable of being analyzed with a flatbed scanner.

  9. Reaction products from the chlorination of seawater. Final report 15 Jul 75-14 Jul 80

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carpenter, J.H.; Smith, C.A.; Zika, R.G.

    1981-03-01

    Chemical treatment of natural waters, in particular the use of chlorine as a biocide, modifies the chemistry of these waters in ways that are not fully understood. The research described in this report examined both inorganic and organic reaction products from the chlorination of seawater using a variety of analytical approaches. Some analytical methods in widespread current use underestimate the residual oxidants in chlorinated seawater by as much as 70% depending upon the detail of the procedures. The chlorination of seawater in the presence of light produces substantial quantities of bromate ions which can influence standard analytical procedures and represents an unknown factor in estuarine and coastal waters. The copper complexing capacity of Biscayne Bay, Florida water was found to be substantially reduced with the addition of chlorine. Analysis was made by anodic stripping voltammetry on water samples after successive additions of copper sulfate solution. Laboratory chlorination of water from the intake of the Port Everglades, Florida power plant produces bromoform levels comparable to that found in the plant discharge. These results are in contrast to results reported in the literature for a power plant on the Patuxent estuary in Maryland, so that bromoform production appears to be site-specific. Chloroform extracts of chlorinated Biscayne Bay water are found to contain halogenated compounds which are new and different, and which pose unusual analytical problems. Studies using GC/ECD, GC/MS, HPLC, H NMR, differential pulsed polarography and other techniques on natural extracts and synthesized compounds are reported.

  10. Influence of Natural Organic Matter (NOM) Character on the Distribution of Chlorinated and Chloraminated Disinfection By-Products (DBPs) at Rand Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marais, Savia S.; Ncube, Esper J.; Haarhoff, Johannes; Msagati, Titus AM; Mamba, Bhekie B.; Nkambule, Thabo I.

    2016-04-01

    Certain disinfection by-products (DBPs) are likely human carcinogens or present mutagenic effects while many DBPs are unidentified. Considering the possibility of DBPs being harmful to human health and the fact that trihalomethanes (THMs) are the only regulated DBP in the South African National Standard (SANS:241) for drinking water, special interest in the precursors to these DBPs' formation is created. It is essential to understand the reactivity and character of the precursors responsible for the formation of DBPs in order to enhance precursor removal strategies during the treatment of drinking water. In this study the character of NOM within surface water and the subsequent distribution of THMs formed in the drinking water from Rand Waters' full scale treatment plant were investigated. Molecular size distribution (MSD) of NOM within the surface water was determined by high performance size exclusion chromatography (HPSEC). Specific ultraviolet absorbance (SUVA) and UV254 measurements formed part of the NOM character study as they provide an indication of the aromaticity of organic matter. The four THMs; bromoform, chloroform, dibromochloromethane (DBCM) and bromodichloromethane (BDCM)were measured by gas chromatography. The sum of these four THMs was expressed as total trihalomethane (TTHM). On average the chloroform constituted 76.2% of the total TTHM, BDCM 22.5% while DBCM and bromoform measured below the detection limit. THM speciation after chlorination and chloramination concentrations increased in the sequence bromoform < DBCM < BDCM < chloroform. Results of the MSD showed a significant correlation between NOM of high molecular size (peak I) and TTHM formation specifically during the summer months (R2= 0.971, p < 0.05). High molecular weight (HMW) NOM also related well to chloroform formation (R2 = 0.963, p < 0.05) however, the formation of BDCM was not due to HWM fraction as indicated by weak regression coefficient. A positive correlation existed between

  11. Exposure assessment and the risk associated with trihalomethanes compounds in drinking water - doi: 10.5020/18061230.2012.p5

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aldo Pacheco Ferreira

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available To measure the concentrations of trihalomethanes (THMs in marshland of Jacarepaguá drinking water, Rio de Janeiro-RJ, Brazil, and their associated risks. Methods: Two hundred houses were visited and samples were collected from consumer taps water. Risks estimates based on exposures were projected by employing deterministic and probabilistic approaches. Results: The THMs (dibromochloromethane, bromoform, chloroform, and bromodichloromethane ranged from 3.08 μg/l to 129.31 μg/l. Non-carcinogenic risks induced by ingestion of THMs were below the tolerable level (10 -6 . Conclusion: Data obtained in this research demonstrate that exposure to drinking water contaminants and associated risks were higher than the acceptable level.

  12. Laser-sheet imaging of HE-driven interfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The authors made substantial progress in developing the MILSI (Multiple Imaging of Laser-Sheet Illumination) technique for high explosive (HE)-driven fluid interfaces. They observed the instability, but have not yet measured the instability growth rate. They developed suitable sample containers and optical systems for studying the Rightmyer-Meshkov instability of perturbed water/bromoform interfaces and they successfully fielded the new MILSI diagnostic at two firing-site facilities. The problem continues to be of central importance to the inertial confinement fusion (ICF) and weapons physics communities

  13. Covalent Carbene Functionalization of Graphene: Toward Chemical Band-Gap Manipulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sainsbury, Toby; Passarelli, Melissa; Naftaly, Mira; Gnaniah, Sam; Spencer, Steve J; Pollard, Andrew J

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we employ dibromocarbene (DBC) radicals to covalently functionalize solution exfoliated graphene via the formation of dibromocyclopropyl adducts. This is achieved using a basic aqueous/organic biphasic reaction mixture to decompose the DBC precursor, bromoform, in conjunction with a phase-transfer catalyst to facilitate ylide formation and carbene migration to graphene substrates. DBC-functionalized graphene (DBC-graphene) was characterized using a range of spectroscopic and analytical techniques to confirm the covalent nature of functionalization. Modified optical and electronic properties of DBC-graphene were investigated using UV-vis spectroscopy, analysis of electrical I-V transport properties, and noncontact terahertz time-domain spectroscopy. The implications of carbene functionalization of graphene are considered in the context of scalable radical functionalization methodologies for bulk-scale graphene processing and controlled band-gap manipulation of graphene. PMID:26824127

  14. Long term puzzles of the CH and CD energetics and related phenomena revisited; solutions sought through REMPI-photofragmentations of bromomethanes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafliðason, Arnar; Wang, Huasheng; Kvaran, Ágúst

    2016-01-21

    Ever since the pioneering work by Herzberg and Johns in 1969 (The Astrophysical Journal, 1969, 158, 399) the spectral assignment and the energetics of the fundamental molecular fragment CH, in the region of 63 000-65 000 cm(-1) (7.81-8.06 eV), have remained a puzzle to a large extent. The dissociation of bromoform and deuterated bromoform following two-photon resonance excitations to molecular Rydberg states forms the fragment species CH* and CD* in the excited state A(2)Δ(v' =0) as well as carbon and bromine atoms in the ground and first excited states, C/C* and Br/Br*. Further (1r + 1i)REMPI of CH* and CD* resonance excites the fragments to the energy region of concern, whereas the atom fragments were identified by further (2r + 1i)REMPI. Analysis based on spectral simulations, isotope shifts and comparison with other data allowed spectral identifications, assignments and partial characterization of four highly excited bound states for each of the molecular fragments (CH**/CD**); including the (3)(2)Π valence state and the (4)(2)Π Rydberg state, for the first time. Perturbations, shown as line-shifts, line-intensity and/or line-width alterations, due to the level-to-level state interactions between the bound states and predissociations by a repulsive state are recognized. Recording of C(+) signals in REMPI of several bromomethanes for a one-photon energy of about 40 333 cm(-1) allows the clarification of a mystery concerning a broad C(+) band frequently observed. This work, presented, demonstrates the usefulness of molecular REMPI for fragment analysis. PMID:26674135

  15. Radiolytic removal of trihalomethane in chlorinated seawater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biofouling is one of the major operational problems in seawater cooling systems. It is controlled by application of chlorine based biocides in the range of 0.5-2.0 mg L-1. The bromide in seawater reacts with the added chlorine and forms hypobromous acid. The brominated residual biocides react with natural organic matter present in the seawater, resulting in the formation of trihalomethanes (THM) such as bromoform (CHBr3), dibromochloromethane (CHBr2Cl) bromodichloromethane (CHBrCl2). Though THMs represent a small fraction of the added chlorine, they are relatively more persistent than residual chlorine, and hence pose a potential hazard to marine life because of their reported mutagenicity. There have been few reports on removal of THMs from chlorinated seawater. In this work, the efficacy of gamma irradiation technique for the removal of THMs from chlorine-dosed seawater was investigated. Experiments were carried out using seawater collected from Kalpakkam. Irradiation study was conducted in chlorinated (1, 3, and 5 mg L-1 of Cl2) seawater by applying various dosages (0.4-5.0 kGy) of gamma radiation using a 60Co Gamma Chamber 5000. Bromoform showed a faster rate of degradation as compared to other halocarbons like bromodichloromethane and dibromochloromethane. This shows the change in total THM concentration with variation in the radiation dose and initial Cl2 dosing. When the percentage degradation of all the three trihalomethane species was compared with applied doses, it was found that the maximum reduction occurred at a dose of 2.5 kGy. The reduction was almost similar for all the three doses (1, 3, 5 ppm of Cl2) used for chlorination. With a further increase in radiation dose to 5.0 kGy, a slight increase in reduction was observed

  16. Correlated physiochemical and age changes in embryonic bovine enamel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, W J; Navarro, M

    1983-01-01

    Whole enamel scrapings from unerupted teeth of embryonic calves have been separated into fractions of varying density by stepwise centrifugation in bromoform-toluene mixtures of increasing specific gravity. Partition of enamel in this manner yields individual fractions of increasing mineral phase age and maturation. Whole scrapings and isolated fractions of the fetal bovine enamel were examined by X-ray powder diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and atomic absorption and infrared spectroscopy to determine time-related changes in the physiochemical nature of the constituent mineral phase particles. These analyses showed poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite (HA) as the only detectable solid phase of calcium phosphate present in all fractions, its degree of crystallinity increasing with increasing density. Molar Ca/P ratios and magnesium content were highest in lowest density fractions. Carbonate vibration bands at 875 and 1420-1450 cm-1, common to mineralized tissue, were observed in intermediate and higher density fractions and in whole unfractionated enamel. Another carbonate band at approximately 705 cm-1, unusual to vertebrate calcified tissue, was detected in low density fractions and disappeared rapidly with increasing enamel maturation. Its precise relation with the enamel mineral phase has not been determined. PMID:6839190

  17. Occurrence of Organic Compounds in Source and Finished Samples from Seven Drinking-Water Treatment Facilities in Miami-Dade County, Florida, 2008

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foster, Adam L.; Katz, Brian G.

    2010-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Miami-Dade Water and Sewer Department, conducted a reconnaissance study in 2008 to determine the occurrence of 228 organic compounds in raw, source (untreated) and finished (treated) drinking water at seven municipal water-treatment facilities in Miami-Dade County. Results of this sampling study showed that 25 (about 11 percent) of the 228 organic compounds were detected in at least one source water sample and 22 (about 10 percent) were detected in at least one finished water sample. The concentrations of organic compounds in source water samples were less than or equal to 0.2 (u or mu)g/L (micrograms per liter). The concentrations of organic compounds in finished water samples were generally less than or equal to 0.5 (u or mu)g/L, with the exception of bromoform (a possible disinfection byproduct) at estimated concentrations ranging from 0.7 to 2.8 (u or mu)g/L and diethyl phthalate (a plasticizer compound) at 2 (u or mu)g/L.

  18. A new rapid decomposition procedure for bromo-heavies containing ferruginous material: determination of REEs and Th by ICP-AES

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For application to geochemical exploration to achieve the high sample throughput; a simple and rapid analytical procedure is a prerequisite. In order to speed-up the existing methodology, phosphate fusion was introduced for decomposition of samples. In the proposed method, bromoform-heavies containing ferruginous material are fused with 1:1 mixture of sodium di-hydrogen orthophosphate and tetra-sodium pyrophosphate, and dissolved in distilled water. The fusion requires on the average 15-20 minutes and about 1-1 1/2 hours for leaching of the melt. In this procedures, no hazardous acids are involved, so the method is eco-friendly and very rapid. The solution was subjected to oxalate precipitation to separate the REEs and Th from the major matrix constituents using Ca as carrier. The systematic investigations were carried out on the amount of flux; varying amount of HCI concentration if any, required before the oxalate precipitation. Among chemical methods, ion exchange, solvent extraction, precipitation and adsorption are he most commonly used methods for the chemical separation of REEs from the major matrix elements

  19. Trihalomethanes and associated potential cancer risks in the water supply in Ankara, Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The occurrence of trihalomethanes (THMs) in the water supply in the Ankara, Turkey was investigated. Total THMs and total organic carbon measurements were carried seasonally in the samples collected form 22 different districts along with the samples taken from the Ivedik Water Treatment Plant serving 90% of the city. The average summer nonpurgeable organic carbon (NPOC) concentration in the raw water was 4.2 mg/L, and the NPOC removal achieved in the treatment plant was 31%. The concentration of total THMs ranged from 25 to 74 μg/L, from 28 to 73 μg/L, and from 25 to 110 μg/L in winter, spring, and summer, respectively. In all of the samples chloroform existed at the highest concentrations, while bromoform was almost absent. The total THM concentrations were highest in summer for all districts. However, none of the concentrations detected exceeded the USEPA's Stage I limit of 80 μg/L and the EU's limit of 100 μg/L. However, the total THM level in 64% of the districts exceeded the USEPA's Stage II limit of 40 μg/L. The risk estimations carried out indicated that each year 1 of the 5 million Ankara residents could get cancer from the daily intake of water, mainly because of exposure to chloroform through oral ingestion

  20. Springtime surface ozone fluctuations at high Arctic latitudes and their possible relationship to atmospheric bromine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltmans, Samuel J.; Sheridan, Patrick J.; Schnell, Russell C.; Winchester, John W.

    1988-01-01

    At high Arctic stations such as Barrow, Alaska, springtime near-surface ozone amounts fluctuate between the highest and lowest values seen during the course of the year. Episodes when the surface ozone concentration is essentially zero last up to several days during this time of year. In the Arctic Gas and Aerosol Sampling Program (AGASP-I and AGASP-II) in 1983 and 1986, it was found that ozone concentrations often showed a very steep gradient in altitude with very low values near the surface. The cold temperatures, and snow-covered ground make it unlikely that the surface itself would rapidly destroy significant amounts of ozone. The AGASP aircraft measurements that found low ozone concentrations in the lowest layers of the troposphere also found that filterable excess bromine (the amount of bromine in excess of the sea salt component) in samples collected wholly or partially beneath the temperature inversion had higher bromine concentrations than other tropospheric samples. Of the four lowest ozone minimum concentrations, three of them were associated with the highest bromine enrichments. Surface measurements of excess filterable bromine at Barrow show a strong seasonal dependence with values rising dramatically early in March, then declining in May. The concentration of organic bromine gases such as bromoform rise sharply during the winter and then begin to decline after March with winter and early spring values at least three times greater than the summer minimum.

  1. Occurrence and potential crop uptake of emerging contaminants and related compounds in an agricultural irrigation network

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calderon-Preciado, Diana [IDAEA-CSIC, Jordi Girona, 18, E-08034 Barcelona (Spain); Matamoros, Victor, E-mail: victor.matamoros@udg.edu [Department of Chemistry, University of Girona, Campus Montilivi, 17071 Girona (Spain); Bayona, Josep M. [IDAEA-CSIC, Jordi Girona, 18, E-08034 Barcelona (Spain)

    2011-12-15

    Emerging contaminants have received much attention in recent years due to their presence in surface waters, but little attention has been paid to their occurrence in agricultural irrigation waters. This study investigated the occurrence of these compounds in an agricultural irrigation network in northeastern Spain and, for the first time, using two plant uptake models, estimated the concentration of selected micropollutants in crops. The concentration of micropollutants in agricultural irrigation waters ranged from 10 to 5130 ng L{sup -1} and exhibited some attenuation over the course of the irrigation network. Bromoform, chloroform, diclofenac, caffeine, ibuprofen, naproxen, methyl dihydrojasmonate, galaxolide, butylated hydroxytoluene, and butylated hydroxyanisole were the most abundant contaminants (> 200 ng L{sup -1}, on average). The estimated concentration of micropollutants in crops ranged from < 1 to 7677 ng kg{sup -1}, with the neutral compounds being the most abundant. Moreover, the predicted data obtained by fate models generally agreed with experimental data. Finally, human exposure to micropollutants through fruit and vegetable consumption was estimated to be 9.8 {mu}g per person and week ({Sigma} 27 contaminants detected). Further studies are needed to determine the health implications that the presence of these compounds in fruit and vegetables may have for consumers.

  2. Removal and transformation of organic matter during soil-aquifer treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Qing-liang; XUE Shuang; YOU Shi-jie; WANG Li-na

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated the removal and transformation of organic matter through laboratory-scale soil-aquifer treatment (SAT) soil columns over a 110-day period. Reductions in total organic carbon (TOC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC),biodegradable dissolved organic carbon (BDOC), nonbiodegradable dissolved organic carbon (NBDOC) and absorbance of ultraviolet light at 254 mn (UV-254) averaged 71.46%, 68.05% , 99.31%, 33.27% and 38.96% across the soil columns, respectively.DOC/TOC ratios increased slightly with depth while BDOC/DOC ratios showed a converse trend. DOC exiting the soil-column system contained only a very small biodegradable fraction. SAT decreased the concentration of DOC present in feed water but increased its aromaticity, as indicated by specific ultraviolet light absorbance (SUVA), which increased by 50%~115% across the soil columns, indicating preferential removal of non-aromatic DOC during SAT. Overall, laboratory-scale SAT reduced trihalomethane formation potential (THMFP), although specific THMFP increased. THMFP reduction was dominated by removal in chloroform. All samples exhibited a common general relationship with respect to weight: chloroform>dichlorobromomethane >dibromochloromethane>bromoform.

  3. Measurement of unscheduled DNA synthesis and S-phase synthesis in rodent hepatocytes following in vivo treatment: Testing of 24 compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The in vivo-in vitro hepatocyte DNA repair assay has been shown to be useful for studying genotoxic hepatocarcinogens. In addition, measurement of S-phase synthesis (SPS) provides an indirect indicator of hepatocellular proliferation, which may be an important mechanism in rodent carcinogenesis. This assay was used to examine 24 chemicals for their ability to induce unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) or SPS in Fischer-344 rats or B6C3F1 mice following in vivo treatment. Hepatocytes were isolated by liver perfusion and incubated with 3H-thymidine following in vivo treatment by gavage. Chemicals chosen for testing were from the National Toxicology Program (NTP) genetic toxicology testing program and most were also evaluated in long-term animal studies conducted by the NTP. Dinitrotoluene and Michler's Ketone induced positive UDS response in rat, while N-nitrosodiethanolamine and selenium sulfide induced equivocal UDS results in mouse and rat, respectively. BCMEE, bromoform, chloroform, PBB, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, and trichloroethylene were all potent inducers of SPS in mouse liver, while C.I. Solvent Yellow 14, and 1,1,2,2-tetrachloroethane yielded equivocal SPS results in rat and mouse, respectively. These results indicate that most of the test compounds do not induced UDS in the liver; however, the significant S-phase response induced by many of these compounds, especially the halogenated solvents, may be an important mechanism in their hepatocarinogenicity

  4. Separation of trivalent actinides and lanthanides from simulated high-level waste using cobalt bis(dicarbollide) (1{sup -}) ion derivate substituted with diphenyl-N-tert.octyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selucky, P.; Lucanikova, M. [Nuclear Research Institute, Rez near Prague (Czech Republic); Gruener, B. [Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Rez near Prague (Czech Republic). Inst. of Inorganic Chemistry

    2012-07-01

    A derivative with cobalt bis(dicarbollide)(1{sup -}) ion covalently bonded with diphenyl-N-tert.octyl-carbamoylmethylphosphine oxide with a formula [(8-Ph{sub 2}P(O))-CH{sub 2}C(O)N-t-C{sub 8}H{sub 17}-(CH{sub 2}-CH{sub 2}O){sub 2}-(1,2-C{sub 2}B{sub 9}H{sub 10})(1',2'-C{sub 2}B{sub 9}H{sub 11})-3,3'-Co]{sup -} (CMPO-COSAN) has been evaluated for actinides(III)/lanthanides(III) separation from high level liquid waste (HLLW) from PUREX reprocessing. The procedures for HLLW treatment by CMPO-COSAN dissolved in low polar mixture of hexylmethylketone and hydrogenated tetrapropylene (HMK/TPH, 1:1) or polar mixture of nitrobenzene/bromoform (NB/BF, 9:1) were proposed. The good separation of Am(III)/Ln(III) from bulk of fission products was achieved. The trivalent radionuclides were effectively stripped from the loaded organic phase by using ammonium citrate or mixture of ammonium citrate and ammonium diethylenetriamine pentaacetate (DTPA). The co-extraction of some undesirable elements as Zr, Mo, Pd was suppressed using oxalic acid and HEDTA in extraction and a scrub steps. However, co-extraction of Ag has to be solved, yet. (orig.)

  5. Heavy mineral distribution in stream sediment of Tapah area, Perak, Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sibon, Mahat Hj; Jamil, Habibah; Umor, Mohd Rozi; Hassan, Wan Fuad Wan

    2013-11-01

    This paper aims to provide the overview of occurrence, distribution and origin of the heavy minerals in the study area. A total of 45 selected stream sediment heavy mineral concentrate samples were panned using standard dulangs, dried and separated from other light minerals using bromoform. The heavy minerals were separated into different fractions at different amperes using Frantz Isodynamic magnetic separator. Mineral identification was done using binocular microscope augmented by X-ray diffraction analyses. Mineral abundance data were analysed graphically using triangular diagrams to show their origin. Dominant minerals present in the heavy mineral samples collected are ilmenite, cassiterite, tourmaline, zircon, topaz, and magnetite. The less common minerals, present in trace amounts are hematite, xenotime, allanite, monazite, rutile, anatase, leucoxene, chromite, garnet and olivine. Examination of the heavy mineral assemblage shows that they originated from granite batholiths of the Main Range, Changkat Rembian as well as from the metasedimentary rock in the area. The gold flakes present are found together with cassiterite and topaz indicating that gold originates from the mineralized veins contact-metamorphosed metasedimentary rocks. Almost all samples collected contain cassiterite grains in various amounts. From the mineral assemblage, the source of cassiterite originates from the mineralized quartz veins that cut granitic rocks of Main Range, Changkat Rembian as well as the metasedimentary rock in the area. Greisenized veins containing quartz, mica and tourmaline with the presence of wolframite and arsenopyrite also contribute to the presence of cassiterite in this study area.

  6. Fibre selection based on an overall analytical feature comparison for the solid-phase microextraction of trihalomethanes from drinking water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Juan, Pedro Manuel; Carrillo, José David; Tena, María Teresa

    2007-01-12

    This paper describes the optimization of solid-phase microextraction (SPME) conditions for three different fibres (Carboxen-polydimethylsiloxane (CAR-PDMS), divinylbenzene-Carboxen-polydimethylsiloxane (DVB-CAR-PDMS) and polydimethylsiloxane-divinylbenzene (PDMS-DVB)) used to determine trihalomethanes (THMs) in water by headspace solid-phase microextraction and gas chromatography (HS-SPME-GC). The influence of temperature and salting-out effect was examined using a central composite design for each fibre. Extraction time was studied separately at the optimum values found for temperature and sodium chloride concentration (40 degrees C and 0.36g mL-1). The HS-SPME-GC-MS method for each fibre was characterised in terms of linearity, detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) limits and repeatability. The fibre PDMS-DVB was selected as it provided a broader linear range, better repeatability and lower detection and quantification limits than the others, particularly CAR-PDMS fibre. The accuracy of the proposed method using the PDMS-DVB fibre was checked by a recovery study in both ultrapure and tap water. A blank analysis study showed the absence of memory effects for this fibre. The reproducibility (expressed as a percentage of relative standard deviation) was 6-11% and the detection limits were between 0.078 and 0.52microgL-1 for bromoform and chloroform, respectively. Finally, the method was applied to determine THM concentration in two drinking water samples. PMID:17109874

  7. Behaviour of zirconium in the weathering of granulites from Salvador-BA/Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The weathering related to mineralogy with chemical analysis of Zr in granulites and their weathered equivalents in Salvador - Brazil, is studied. The mineralogical and petrographical characteristics were correlated with analyses for K,Al and Zr. The fresh rocks are quartz-rich pyroxene granulites, the weathered samples were submitted to bromoform and electromagnetic separations to recovery nearly pure zircon from the fraction coarser than 50 micros. These zircons were classified by color, size and shape. Proportions between different colors of zircon were correlated with petrography of fresh granulites. Studies of zircons resistent to acid attack indicated, that the darker colors were due to iron oxide staining. Chemical analyses for Zr in fresh rocks presented values higher than the values corresponding to zircon observed in thin sections, sugesting the presence of Zr as a trace element in ferromagnesian silicates. In the weathered rocks, Zr values are much higher than those corresponding to recovered zircon. Comparisons of K2O, Al2O3 and Zr values in fresh and weathered rocks indicated a loss of K2O, and a gain of Zr by weathering. However, maximum losses of K2O do not coincide with maximum gains of Zr. (author)

  8. Occurrence and potential crop uptake of emerging contaminants and related compounds in an agricultural irrigation network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emerging contaminants have received much attention in recent years due to their presence in surface waters, but little attention has been paid to their occurrence in agricultural irrigation waters. This study investigated the occurrence of these compounds in an agricultural irrigation network in northeastern Spain and, for the first time, using two plant uptake models, estimated the concentration of selected micropollutants in crops. The concentration of micropollutants in agricultural irrigation waters ranged from 10 to 5130 ng L−1 and exhibited some attenuation over the course of the irrigation network. Bromoform, chloroform, diclofenac, caffeine, ibuprofen, naproxen, methyl dihydrojasmonate, galaxolide, butylated hydroxytoluene, and butylated hydroxyanisole were the most abundant contaminants (> 200 ng L−1, on average). The estimated concentration of micropollutants in crops ranged from −1, with the neutral compounds being the most abundant. Moreover, the predicted data obtained by fate models generally agreed with experimental data. Finally, human exposure to micropollutants through fruit and vegetable consumption was estimated to be 9.8 μg per person and week (Σ 27 contaminants detected). Further studies are needed to determine the health implications that the presence of these compounds in fruit and vegetables may have for consumers.

  9. A novel process for preparation of ultra-clean micronized coal by high pressure water jet comminution technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Longlian Cui; Liqian An; Weili Gong; Hejin Jiang [China University of Mining and Technology, Beijing (China). School of Mechanics, Architecture and Civil Engineering

    2007-03-15

    A novel process for the preparation of ultra-clean micronized coal is presented in this paper. High pressure water jet mill replacing the ball mill is employed for coal comminution in the new preparation process, which is the essential difference from the traditional one. To compare the new preparation process with the traditional one, the comparison experiments were performed, with froth flotation tests of the fine particles ground by both mills using diesel oil and n-dodecane as collector, 2-octanol as frother, and sink-float separation tests using mixtures of carbon tetrachloride-benzene and carbon tetrachloride-bromoform as dense liquid. Different parameters including combustible recovery, ash content of the clean coal, separation efficiency, and energy consumption were investigated based on the two different preparation processes. The results show that the new preparation process has high combustible recovery, low ash content of the product, high separation efficiency, and low energy consumption compared with the traditional one. The comminution mechanism of high pressure water jet mill is introduced in this paper. The high pressure water jet comminution technique has great potential in coal pulverization, having the advantages of low energy consumption, low iron content, and low equipment wear. 35 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  10. A metagenomic-based survey of microbial (de)halogenation potential in a German forest soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigold, Pascal; El-Hadidi, Mohamed; Ruecker, Alexander; Huson, Daniel H.; Scholten, Thomas; Jochmann, Maik; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    In soils halogens (fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine) are cycled through the transformation of inorganic halides into organohalogen compounds and vice versa. There is evidence that these reactions are microbially driven but the key enzymes and groups of microorganisms involved are largely unknown. Our aim was to uncover the diversity, abundance and distribution of genes encoding for halogenating and dehalogenating enzymes in a German forest soil by shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Metagenomic libraries of three soil horizons revealed the presence of genera known to be involved in halogenation and dehalogenation processes such as Bradyrhizobium or Pseudomonas. We detected a so far unknown diversity of genes encoding for (de)halogenating enzymes in the soil metagenome including specific and unspecific halogenases as well as metabolic and cometabolic dehalogenases. Genes for non-heme, no-metal chloroperoxidases and haloalkane dehalogenases were the most abundant halogenase and dehalogenase genes, respectively. The high diversity and abundance of (de)halogenating enzymes suggests a strong microbial contribution to natural halogen cycling. This was also confirmed in microcosm experiments in which we quantified the biotic formation of chloroform and bromoform. Knowledge on microorganisms and genes that catalyze (de)halogenation reactions is critical because they are highly relevant to industrial biotechnologies and bioremediation applications. PMID:27353292

  11. A metagenomic-based survey of microbial (de)halogenation potential in a German forest soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weigold, Pascal; El-Hadidi, Mohamed; Ruecker, Alexander; Huson, Daniel H; Scholten, Thomas; Jochmann, Maik; Kappler, Andreas; Behrens, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    In soils halogens (fluorine, chlorine, bromine, iodine) are cycled through the transformation of inorganic halides into organohalogen compounds and vice versa. There is evidence that these reactions are microbially driven but the key enzymes and groups of microorganisms involved are largely unknown. Our aim was to uncover the diversity, abundance and distribution of genes encoding for halogenating and dehalogenating enzymes in a German forest soil by shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Metagenomic libraries of three soil horizons revealed the presence of genera known to be involved in halogenation and dehalogenation processes such as Bradyrhizobium or Pseudomonas. We detected a so far unknown diversity of genes encoding for (de)halogenating enzymes in the soil metagenome including specific and unspecific halogenases as well as metabolic and cometabolic dehalogenases. Genes for non-heme, no-metal chloroperoxidases and haloalkane dehalogenases were the most abundant halogenase and dehalogenase genes, respectively. The high diversity and abundance of (de)halogenating enzymes suggests a strong microbial contribution to natural halogen cycling. This was also confirmed in microcosm experiments in which we quantified the biotic formation of chloroform and bromoform. Knowledge on microorganisms and genes that catalyze (de)halogenation reactions is critical because they are highly relevant to industrial biotechnologies and bioremediation applications. PMID:27353292

  12. Predictors of Third Trimester Blood Trihalomethanes and Urinary Trichloroacetic Acid Concentrations among Pregnant Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qiang; Cao, Wen-Cheng; Zhou, Bin; Yang, Pan; Wang, Yi-Xin; Huang, Zhen; Li, Jin; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2016-05-17

    Prenatal exposure to disinfection byproducts (DBPs) has been associated with a variety of adverse birth outcomes. However, little is known about predictors of prenatal biomarkers of exposure to DBPs among pregnant women. We aimed to identify predictors of third trimester blood trihalomethanes (THMs) and urinary trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) concentrations, two biomarkers of exposure to DBPs, among pregnant women. Blood samples, urine samples, and questionnaires on individual characteristics and water-use activities were collected from 893 pregnant women in a Chinese cohort study. Maternal blood THM [chloroform (TCM), bromodichloromethane (BDCM), dibromochloromethane (DBCM), and bromoform (TBM)] and urinary TCAA concentrations were measured. We used multivariable linear regression to identify the predictors of third trimester blood THM and creatinine-adjusted urinary TCAA concentrations. The geometric mean of blood TTHM (sum of TCM, BDCM, DBCM, and TBM) and creatinine-adjusted urinary TCAA concentrations were 51.90 ng/L and 9.66 μg/g creatinine, respectively. Study city was the strongest significant predictors of blood THM and creatinine-adjusted urinary TCAA concentrations. Prenatal body mass index (BMI) was associated with decreased blood THM and decreased creatinine-adjusted urinary TCAA concentrations. Age was associated with increased blood Br-THM (sum of BDCM, DBCM, and TBM) concentrations. Intake of boiled water and passive smoking were associated with lower blood THM concentrations. The predictors of blood THM and urinary TCAA concentrations identified in this study provide potential health implications on how to reduce DBP exposure during pregnancy. PMID:27095243

  13. The Effect of Different Boiling and Filtering Devices on the Concentration of Disinfection By-Products in Tap Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glòria Carrasco-Turigas

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Disinfection by-products (DBPs are ubiquitous contaminants in tap drinking water with the potential to produce adverse health effects. Filtering and boiling tap water can lead to changes in the DBP concentrations and modify the exposure through ingestion. Changes in the concentration of 4 individual trihalomethanes (THM4 (chloroform (TCM, bromodichloromethane (BDCM, dibromochloromethane (DBCM, and bromoform (TBM, MX, and bromate were tested when boiling and filtering high bromine-containing tap water from Barcelona. For filtering, we used a pitcher-type filter and a household reverse osmosis filter; for boiling, an electric kettle, a saucepan, and a microwave were used. Samples were taken before and after each treatment to determine the change in the DBP concentration. pH, conductivity, and free/total chlorine were also measured. A large decrease of THM4 (from 48% to 97% and MX concentrations was observed for all experiments. Bromine-containing trihalomethanes were mostly eliminated when filtering while chloroform when boiling. There was a large decrease in the concentration of bromate with reverse osmosis, but there was a little effect in the other experiments. These findings suggest that the exposure to THM4 and MX through ingestion is reduced when using these household appliances, while the decrease of bromate is device dependent. This needs to be considered in the exposure assessment of the epidemiological studies.

  14. Development of resonance-enhanced multiphoton ionization system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation and Photochemistry Division has developed a Molecular Beam-Resonance Enhanced Multiphoton Ionization-Time-of-Flight spectrometer, a highly sensitive and selective analytical detection system, for investigation of photodissociation dynamics of isolated molecules. In this system, the molecular beam is intersected in the extraction region of a Wiley-McLaren type Time-of-Flight mass spectrometer by the photolysis laser beam, propagating perpendicular to both the molecular beams and the Time-of-Flight tube. The probe (ionization) laser beam counter propagating to the photolysis beam, ionizes the stable products and the radicals produced on photodissociation. The important features of the system, namely, the resolution and the detection limit, have been determined from the studies of aniline molecular beam, generated by seeding 1% aniline in helium. For the present configuration, using one metre long flight tube, the resolution has been found to be about 400, and detection limit is better than 106 species per cm3. The integrity of the set-up is obtained from the photodissociation dynamics studies of bromoform. (author)

  15. Cometabolism of trihalomethanes by mixed culture nitrifiers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahman, David G; Henry, Andrea E; Katz, Lynn E; Speitel, Gerald E

    2006-10-01

    Three mixed-culture nitrifier sources degraded low concentrations (25-450 microg/L) of four trihalomethanes (THMs) (trichloromethane (TCM) or chloroform, bromodichloromethane (BDCM), dibromochloromethane (DBCM), tribromomethane (TBM) or bromoform) commonly found in treated drinking water. Individual THM rate constants (k1THM) increased with increasing THM bromine-substitution with TBM>DBCM>BDCM>TCM and were comparable to previous studies with the pure culture nitrifier, Nitrosomonas europaea. A decrease in temperature resulted in a decrease in both ammonia and THM degradation rates with ammonia rates affected to a greater extent than THM degradation rates. The significant effect of temperature indicates that seasonal variations in water temperature should be a consideration for technology implementation. Product toxicity, measured by transformation capacity (T(c)), was similar to that observed with N. europaea. Because both rate constants and product toxicities increase with increasing THM bromine-substitution, a water's THM speciation is an important consideration for process implementation during drinking water treatment. Even though a given water is kinetically favored, the resulting THM product toxicity may not allow stable treatment process performance. PMID:16970971

  16. The effect of desiccation on the emission of volatile bromocarbons from two common temperate macroalgae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. C. Leedham Elvidge

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Exposure of intertidal macroalgae during low tide has been linked to the emission of a variety of atmospherically-important trace gases into the coastal atmosphere. In recent years, several studies have investigated the role of inorganic iodine and organoiodides as antioxidants and their emission during exposure to combat oxidative stress, yet the role of organic bromine species during desiccation is less well understood. In this study the emission of dibromomethane (CH2Br2 and bromoform (CHBr3 during exposure and desiccation of two common temperate macroalgae, Fucus vesiculosus and Ulva intestinalis, is reported. Determination of the impact exposure may have on algal physiological processes is difficult as intertidal species are adapted to desiccation and may undergo varying degrees of desiccation before their physiology is affected. For this reason we include comparisons between photosynthetic capacity (Fv / Fm and halocarbon emissions during a desiccation time series. In addition, the role of rewetting with freshwater to simulate exposure to rain was also investigated. Our results show that an immediate flux of bromocarbons occurs upon exposure, followed by a decline in bromocarbon emissions. We suggest that this immediate bromocarbon pulse may be linked to volatilisation or emissions of existing bromocarbon stores from the algal surface rather than the production of bromocarbons as an antioxidant response.

  17. Distributions and sources of volatile chlorocarbons and bromocarbons in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Concentrations of the six VHOC were determined in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea. • VHOC distributions were affected by anthropogenic, biologic and hydrographic factors. • Diurnal variations of the six VHOC were observed. • Relationships between VHOC and related parameters were discussed. • Sources of the six VHOC were identified by principal component analysis. - Abstract: Six volatile halogenated organic compounds (VHOC), namely, chloroform, carbon tetrachloride, trichloroethylene, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, and bromoform, were studied in the Yellow Sea and East China Sea from April to May, 2009. The spatial variability of these VHOC was influenced by various factors, including anthropogenic inputs, biogenic production and complicated hydrographic features such as Changjiang Diluted Water, Yellow Sea Cold Water Mass, and Kuroshio Current. Diurnal study results showed that factors such as solar irradiation, biological activity, and tide affected the abundance of these VHOC. Correlation analyses revealed that bromodichloromethane was positively correlated with chlorophyll a in surface seawater. Principal component analysis suggested that chlorinated compounds like carbon tetrachloride originated from anthropogenic sources whereas brominated compounds such as bromodichloromethane originated from biogenic sources. Sources of other chlorinated and brominated compounds may not be governed by biological processes in the marine environment

  18. Formation of brominated disinfection byproducts from natural organic matter isolates and model compounds in a sulfate radical-based oxidation process

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yuru

    2014-12-16

    A sulfate radical-based advanced oxidation process (SR-AOP) has received increasing application interest for the removal of water/wastewater contaminants. However, limited knowledge is available on its side effects. This study investigated the side effects in terms of the production of total organic bromine (TOBr) and brominated disinfection byproducts (Br-DBPs) in the presence of bromide ion and organic matter in water. Sulfate radical was generated by heterogeneous catalytic activation of peroxymonosulfate. Isolated natural organic matter (NOM) fractions as well as low molecular weight (LMW) compounds were used as model organic matter. Considerable amounts of TOBr were produced by SR-AOP, where bromoform (TBM) and dibromoacetic acid (DBAA) were identified as dominant Br-DBPs. In general, SR-AOP favored the formation of DBAA, which is quite distinct from bromination with HOBr/OBr- (more TBM production). SR-AOP experimental results indicate that bromine incorporation is distributed among both hydrophobic and hydrophilic NOM fractions. Studies on model precursors reveal that LMW acids are reactive TBM precursors (citric acid > succinic acid > pyruvic acid > maleic acid). High DBAA formation from citric acid, aspartic acid, and asparagine was observed; meanwhile aspartic acid and asparagine were the major precursors of dibromoacetonitrile and dibromoacetamide, respectively.

  19. Study of the texture of porous solids using a technique of γ ray absorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A technique, which enables us to measure locally total porosity, open porosity and pore size distribution is developed. The total porosity is calculated from the bulk density. A gamma absorption gauge is set up fitted with a Cs137 source. This enables the determination of the density by layers of carbonaceous samples in a practically automatic way. By taking adequate precautions it is possible to obtain the density with a maximum error Δρ ≤ 0,005 g/cm3. The open porosity is evaluated by the absorption method after impregnation with bromoform. A new mercury porosimeter is developed using the absorption probe for the measurement of mercury infiltrated into the porous sample. Due to the localized character of exploration by this technique, the variations of porous texture in a heterogeneous sample can be studied. Used as a classical porosimeter, in the case of homogeneous samples, this apparatus is capable of exploring the equivalent diameters of pores between 500 μ and 0.14 μ with a maximum error ΔP ≤ 0.002. The possibility of exploration of heterogeneous samples, with the facility of determination of porosities due to macro-pores combined with the non-limiting character of the method in the field of high pressures differentiates this apparatus from all the porosimeters of former conception. Examples of utilization of this technique in the case of graphite-gas reactions are presented. (author)

  20. New method for determination of trihalomethanes in exhaled breath: Applications to swimming pool and bath environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the estimation of the human intake of trihalomethanes (THMs), namely chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane and bromoform, during showering and bathing is reported. The method is based on the determination of these compounds in exhaled breath that is collected by solid adsorption on Tenax using a device specifically designed for this purpose. Instrumental measurements were performed by automatic thermal desorption coupled to gas chromatography with electron capture detection. THMs in exhaled breath samples were determined during showering and swimming pool attendance. The levels of these compounds in indoor air and water were also determined as reference for interpretation of the exhaled breath results. The THM concentrations in exhaled breath of the volunteers measured before the exposure experiments showed a close correspondence with the THMs levels in indoor air where the sampler was located. Limits of detection in exhaled breath were dependent on THM analytes and experimental sites. They ranged between 170 and 710 ng m-3 in the swimming pool studies and between 97 and 460 ng m-3 in the showering studies. Application of this method to THMs determination during showering and swimming pool activities revealed statistically significant increases in THMs concentrations when comparing exhaled breath before and after exposure.

  1. Cobalt catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation of tetrabromobisphenol A: Kinetics, reaction pathways, and formation of brominated by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yuefei; Kong, Deyang; Lu, Junhe; Jin, Hao; Kang, Fuxing; Yin, Xiaoming; Zhou, Quansuo

    2016-08-01

    Degradation of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), a flame retardant widely spread in the environment, in Co(II) catalyzed peroxymonosulfate (PMS) oxidation process was systematically explored. The second-order-rate constant for reaction of sulfate radical (SO4(-)) with TBBPA was determined to be 5.27×10(10)M(-1)s(-1). Apparently, degradation of TBBPA showed first-order kinetics to the concentrations of both Co(II) and PMS. The presence of humic acid (HA) and bicarbonate inhibited TBBPA degradation, most likely due to their competition for SO4(-). Degradation of TBBPA was initiated by an electron abstraction from one of the phenolic rings. Detailed transformation pathways were proposed, including β-scission of isopropyl bridge, phenolic ring oxidation, debromination and coupling reactions. Further oxidative degradation of intermediates in Co(II)/PMS process yielded brominated disinfection by-products (Br-DBPs) such as bromoform and brominated acetic acids. Evolution profile of Br-DBPs showed an initially increasing and then decreasing pattern with maximum concentrations occurring around 6-10h. The presence of HA enhanced the formation of Br-DBPs significantly. These findings reveal potentially important, but previously unrecognized, formation of Br-DBPs during sulfate radical-based oxidation of bromide-containing organic compounds that may pose toxicological risks to human health. PMID:27107323

  2. Occurrence and potential crop uptake of emerging contaminants and related compounds in an agricultural irrigation network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calderón-Preciado, Diana; Matamoros, Víctor; Bayona, Josep M

    2011-12-15

    Emerging contaminants have received much attention in recent years due to their presence in surface waters, but little attention has been paid to their occurrence in agricultural irrigation waters. This study investigated the occurrence of these compounds in an agricultural irrigation network in northeastern Spain and, for the first time, using two plant uptake models, estimated the concentration of selected micropollutants in crops. The concentration of micropollutants in agricultural irrigation waters ranged from 10 to 5130 ng L(-1) and exhibited some attenuation over the course of the irrigation network. Bromoform, chloroform, diclofenac, caffeine, ibuprofen, naproxen, methyl dihydrojasmonate, galaxolide, butylated hydroxytoluene, and butylated hydroxyanisole were the most abundant contaminants (>200 ng L(-1), on average). The estimated concentration of micropollutants in crops ranged from micropollutants through fruit and vegetable consumption was estimated to be 9.8 μg per person and week (Σ 27 contaminants detected). Further studies are needed to determine the health implications that the presence of these compounds in fruit and vegetables may have for consumers. PMID:22030249

  3. In-situ BrO measurements in the upper troposphere / lower stratosphere. Validation of the ENVISAT satellite measurements and photochemical model studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hrechanyy, S.

    2007-04-15

    and SCOUT-O3 in the 15-20 km altitude regime are at the low side of comparable DOAS measurements a CLaMS study of the evolution of Bry from the source gases has been carried out. For this purpose an ensemble of trajectories rising from the lower troposphere to the TTL within 6 to more than 90 days were initialized with observed mixing ratios in the boundary layer of all important organic bromine source gases and the free-up of Bry by chemical and photochemical reactions was simulated. Bromoform, CHBr3, was found to be the main source of inorganic bromine at the tropopause. The derived tropospheric lifetime of bromoform is 33 days. The modelled BrO mixing ratio at the tropopause (less than 2.5 pptv) is consistent with HALOX measurements which do not detect significant amounts of BrO there (<1-2 pptv). Therefore measurements of more than 4 pptv (as retrieved from SCIAMACHY) can only be explained trough processes not included in the model. (orig.)

  4. Study of the texture of porous solids using a technique of {gamma} ray absorption; Application de l'absorption du rayonnement {gamma} a l'etude de la texture des solides poreux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortega, M. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Grenoble (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1967-01-01

    A technique, which enables us to measure locally total porosity, open porosity and pore size distribution is developed. The total porosity is calculated from the bulk density. A gamma absorption gauge is set up fitted with a Cs137 source. This enables the determination of the density by layers of carbonaceous samples in a practically automatic way. By taking adequate precautions it is possible to obtain the density with a maximum error {delta}{rho} {<=} 0,005 g/cm{sup 3}. The open porosity is evaluated by the absorption method after impregnation with bromoform. A new mercury porosimeter is developed using the absorption probe for the measurement of mercury infiltrated into the porous sample. Due to the localized character of exploration by this technique, the variations of porous texture in a heterogeneous sample can be studied. Used as a classical porosimeter, in the case of homogeneous samples, this apparatus is capable of exploring the equivalent diameters of pores between 500 {mu} and 0.14 {mu} with a maximum error {delta}P {<=} 0.002. The possibility of exploration of heterogeneous samples, with the facility of determination of porosities due to macro-pores combined with the non-limiting character of the method in the field of high pressures differentiates this apparatus from all the porosimeters of former conception. Examples of utilization of this technique in the case of graphite-gas reactions are presented. (author) [French] On a developpe une technique permettant la mesure localisee de la porosite totale, de la porosite ouverte et de la repartition de la taille de pores. La porosite totale est calculee a partir de la densite apparente. On a mis au point une jauge d'absorption du rayonnement gamma munie d'une source de Cs137. Celle-ci nous a permis de determiner la densite par couches d'echantillons cylindriques carbones d'une facon pratiquement automatique. En prenant les precautions adequates, il est possible d'obtenir la densite

  5. Experimental cancer studies of chlorinated by-products

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chlorinated drinking water contains a number of different by-products formed during the chlorination process from organic matter. The carcinogenicity of only a fraction of them have been evaluated in experimental animals. The focus has been on compounds and groups of compounds that are most abundant in chlorinated drinking water or the in vitro toxicity data have suggested genotoxic potential. From trihalomethanes, chloroform causes liver tumors in mice and female rats and renal tumors in male mice and rats. Tumor formation by chloroform is strongly associated with cytotoxicity and regenerative cell proliferation in tissues and that has been considered to be one determinant of its carcinogenicity. From halogenic acetic acids, dichloroacetic acid (DCA) and trichlotoacetic acid (TCA) are hepatocarcinogenic in mice and DCA in male rats. Their genotoxicity is equivocal and nongenotoxic mechanisms, such as peroxisome proliferation and hypomethylation of DNA in the liver, likely contribute to tumor development. From chlorinated furanones (CHFs), 3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-2(5H)-furanone (MX) is a multisite carcinogen in rats (e.g. in thyroid glands and liver) and it has caused DNA damage in vivo. MX may be a complete carcinogen because it also has promoter properties in vitro. Chlorinated drinking water may also contain brominated by-products providing the raw water contains bromide. At least some of them (bromodichloromethane, bromoform) have been shown to be carcinogenic in laboratory animals. Altogether, although several by-products have been shown to have carcinogenic potential in laboratory animals, it not yet possible to state which compounds or groups of by-products cause the cancer risk in chlorinated drinking water. The cellular mechanisms of their effects and these effects at low concentrations are still poorly understood. The few studies with mixtures of these by-products suggest that the mixture effects may be complex and unpredictable (inhibitory

  6. Comparison of Spot and Time Weighted Averaging (TWA Sampling with SPME-GC/MS Methods for Trihalomethane (THM Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Don-Roger Parkinson

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Water samples were collected and analyzed for conductivity, pH, temperature and trihalomethanes (THMs during the fall of 2014 at two monitored municipal drinking water source ponds. Both spot (or grab and time weighted average (TWA sampling methods were assessed over the same two day sampling time period. For spot sampling, replicate samples were taken at each site and analyzed within 12 h of sampling by both Headspace (HS- and direct (DI- solid phase microextraction (SPME sampling/extraction methods followed by Gas Chromatography/Mass Spectrometry (GC/MS. For TWA, a two day passive on-site TWA sampling was carried out at the same sampling points in the ponds. All SPME sampling methods undertaken used a 65-µm PDMS/DVB SPME fiber, which was found optimal for THM sampling. Sampling conditions were optimized in the laboratory using calibration standards of chloroform, bromoform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, 1,2-dibromoethane and 1,2-dichloroethane, prepared in aqueous solutions from analytical grade samples. Calibration curves for all methods with R2 values ranging from 0.985–0.998 (N = 5 over the quantitation linear range of 3–800 ppb were achieved. The different sampling methods were compared for quantification of the water samples, and results showed that DI- and TWA- sampling methods gave better data and analytical metrics. Addition of 10% wt./vol. of (NH42SO4 salt to the sampling vial was found to aid extraction of THMs by increasing GC peaks areas by about 10%, which resulted in lower detection limits for all techniques studied. However, for on-site TWA analysis of THMs in natural waters, the calibration standard(s ionic strength conditions, must be carefully matched to natural water conditions to properly quantitate THM concentrations. The data obtained from the TWA method may better reflect actual natural water conditions.

  7. Optical properties of flyash. Quarterly report, 1 April--30 June 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Self, S.A.

    1989-07-01

    The purpose of this task is to validate the whole approach adopted in this program. Specifically, this bench-scale experiment is intended to compare the measured optical/radiative properties of a dispersion of well characterized ash with those calculated on the basis of the known size/composition distribution using the correlation formulae relating the composition and complex refractive index resulting from measurements on bulk samples of synthetic slag. Considerable thought has been given to the various possible approaches to satisfying the objectives of this task. Several experiments were done to guide our design of an apparatus for measuring the scattering and absorption properties of dispersions of flyash. As a result of these experiments, and from extensive prior experience in connection with research on electrostatic precipitation, it has been determined that there is no satisfactory way to satisfy the aims of this task using a gaseous dispersion of flyash because it is not possible to adequately disperse and deagglomerate flyash into a gas stream. Unless the ash is adequately dispersed, as it exists in the radiant boiler of a pulverized coal-fired combustion system, one cannot expect calculations, based on Mie calculations for a dispersion of spheres to properly agree with laboratory measurements. For these reasons, our design efforts are based on making measurements on a dispersion of flyash in liquid, for which our experience shows we can obtain stable, well-deagglomerated dispersions of ash. Because there is not single liquid which is adequately transparent over the wavelength range 1--12 {mu}m, we plan to use a combination of three liquids, C Cl{sub 4}, C S{sub 2} and bromoform to cover the full range. Windows of BaF{sub 2} will be used to contain the liquid suspension in an absorption/scattering cell.

  8. Optical properties of flyash

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Self, S.A.

    1989-07-01

    The purpose of this task is to validate the whole approach adopted in this program. Specifically, this bench-scale experiment is intended to compare the measured optical/radiative properties of a dispersion of well characterized ash with those calculated on the basis of the known size/composition distribution using the correlation formulae relating the composition and complex refractive index resulting from measurements on bulk samples of synthetic slag. Considerable thought has been given to the various possible approaches to satisfying the objectives of this task. Several experiments were done to guide our design of an apparatus for measuring the scattering and absorption properties of dispersions of flyash. As a result of these experiments, and from extensive prior experience in connection with research on electrostatic precipitation, it has been determined that there is no satisfactory way to satisfy the aims of this task using a gaseous dispersion of flyash because it is not possible to adequately disperse and deagglomerate flyash into a gas stream. Unless the ash is adequately dispersed, as it exists in the radiant boiler of a pulverized coal-fired combustion system, one cannot expect calculations, based on Mie calculations for a dispersion of spheres to properly agree with laboratory measurements. For these reasons, our design efforts are based on making measurements on a dispersion of flyash in liquid, for which our experience shows we can obtain stable, well-deagglomerated dispersions of ash. Because there is not single liquid which is adequately transparent over the wavelength range 1--12 {mu}m, we plan to use a combination of three liquids, C Cl{sub 4}, C S{sub 2} and bromoform to cover the full range. Windows of BaF{sub 2} will be used to contain the liquid suspension in an absorption/scattering cell.

  9. AN EVALUATION OF THMs IN DRINKING WATER AND A METHOD OF ITS REMOVAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Torabian

    1998-03-01

    Full Text Available Chlorination of natural water containing humic compounds, produce significant amount of disinfectant by - products. The most important of such compounds are THlvIs and halo acetic acids, suspected to cause cancer in animals and human. Studies showed that under usual processes of water treatment plants, THMs can not be removed effectively. Since chlorination is the final process of treatment, it is necessary to suggest a method for removing such compounds. The primary goal of this research was to study the possibility of the presence of THMs in the drinking water and the procedures for its removal. In the first phase of this study which was done in 1996, the quality of raw and fmished water in the case of total THMs were studied for Ahwaz, Isfahan, Bandar- Abbas, Shiraz, Mashhad and Tehran. The THMs determination was done for three months in all cities, but for Tehran, fulfilled ten months for raw and seven months for the tap waters. Total THM concentrations were determined by liquid-liquid extraction and gas chromatography. Results varied from less than 5µgr/lit (the lowest concentration detectable by the method to 732 µgr/lit (THM.F.P. In for BandarAbbass tap water. Four samples out of 185, showed that total THM concentrations were above the 100 µgr/lit (MCL. In the second phase of the study, Granular Activated Carbon was used to determine its ability to remove the THM, from the water. Tap water was spiked to 500 µgr/lit using bromoform and chloroform, and then passed through the activated carbon filter. The effluent and influent of the filter were analyzed periodically to determine the concentration of THMs. After 1360 liter of spiked water was passed through, breakthrough was measured. GAC absorption follows Frendlich isotherm. K and n parameters were determined.

  10. Finding the missing stratospheric Bry: a global modeling study of CHBr3 and CH2Br2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Ott

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Recent in situ and satellite measurements suggest a contribution of ~5 pptv to stratospheric inorganic bromine from short-lived bromocarbons. We conduct a modeling study of the two most important short-lived bromocarbons, bromoform (CHBr3 and dibromomethane (CH2Br2, with the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry Climate Model (GEOS CCM to account for this missing stratospheric bromine. We derive a "top-down" emission estimate of CHBr3 and CH2Br2 using airborne measurements in the Pacific and North American troposphere and lower stratosphere (LS obtained during previous NASA aircraft campaigns. Our emission estimate suggests that to reproduce the observed concentrations in the free troposphere, a global oceanic emission of 425 Gg Br yr−1 for CHBr3 and 57 Gg Br yr−1 for CH2Br2 is needed, with 60% of emissions from open ocean and 40% from coastal regions. Although our simple emission scheme assumes no seasonal variations, the model reproduces the observed seasonal variations of the short-lived bromocarbons with high concentrations in winter and low concentrations in summer. This indicates that the seasonality of short-lived bromocarbons is largely due to seasonality in their chemical loss and transport. The inclusion of CHBr3 and CH2Br2 contributes ~5 pptv bromine throughout the stratosphere. Both the source gases and inorganic bromine produced from the source gas degradation (BryVSLS in the troposphere are transported into the stratosphere, and are equally important. Inorganic bromine accounts for half (2.5 pptv of the bromine from the inclusion of CHBr3 and CH2Br2 near the tropical tropopause and its contribution rapidly increases to ~100% as altitude increases. More than 85% of the wet scavenging of BryVSLS occurs in large-scale precipitation below 500 hPa and BryVSLS in the stratosphere is not sensitive to convection.

  11. Application of liquid-phase microextraction to the analysis of trihalomethanes in water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A liquid-phase microextraction method for the determination of trihalomethanes (THMs) including chloroform (CHCl3), bromodichloromethane (CHBrCl2), dibromochloromethane (CHBr2Cl) and bromoform (CHBr3) in water samples was developed, with analysis by gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD). After the determination of the most suitable solvent and stirring rate for the extraction, several other parameters (solvent drop volume, extraction time and ionic strength of the sample) were optimized using a factorial design to obtain the most relevant variables. The optimized extraction conditions for 5 mL of sample volume in a 10 mL vial were as follows: n-hexane an organic solvent; a solvent drop volume of 2 μL; an extraction time of 5.0 min; a stirring rate of 600 rpm at 25 deg. C; sample ionic strength of 3 M sodium chloride. The linear range was 1-75 μg L-1 for the studied THMs. The limits of detection (LODs) ranged from 0.23 μg L-1 (for CHBr2Cl) to 0.45 μg L-1 (for CHCl3). Recoveries of THMs from fortified distilled water were over 70% for a fortification level of 15 μg L-1, and relative standard deviations of the recoveries were below 5%. Real samples collected from tap water and well water were successfully analyzed using the proposed method. The recovery of spiked water samples was from 73% to 78% with relative standard deviations below 7%

  12. Convective Transport of Very-short-lived Bromocarbons to the Stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Qing; Atlas, Elliot Leonard; Blake, Donald Ray; Dorf, Marcel; Pfeilsticker, Klaus August; Schauffler, Sue Myhre

    2014-01-01

    We use the NASA GEOS Chemistry Climate Model (GEOSCCM) to quantify the contribution of two most important brominated very short-lived substances (VSLS), bromoform (CHBr3) and dibromomethane (CH2Br2), to stratospheric bromine and its sensitivity to convection strength. Model simulations suggest that the most active transport of VSLS from the marine boundary layer through the tropopause occurs over the tropical Indian Ocean, the Western Pacific warm pool, and off the Pacific coast of Mexico. Together, convective lofting of CHBr3 and CH2Br2 and their degradation products supplies 8 ppt total bromine to the base of the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL, 150 hPa), similar to the amount of VSLS organic bromine available in the marine boundary layer (7.8-8.4 ppt) in the above active convective lofting regions. Of the total 8 ppt VSLS-originated bromine that enters the base of TTL at 150 hPa, half is in the form of source gas injection (SGI) and half as product gas injection (PGI). Only a small portion (< 10%) the VSLS-originated bromine is removed via wet scavenging in the TTL before reaching the lower stratosphere. On global and annual average, CHBr3 and CH2Br2, together, contribute 7.7 pptv to the present-day inorganic bromine in the stratosphere. However, varying model deep convection strength between maximum and minimum convection conditions can introduce a 2.6 pptv uncertainty in the contribution of VSLS to inorganic bromine in the stratosphere (BryVSLS). Contrary to the conventional wisdom, minimum convection condition leads to a larger BryVSLS as the reduced scavenging in soluble product gases, thus a significant increase in PGI (2-3 ppt), greatly exceeds the relative minor decrease in SGI (a few 10ths ppt.

  13. Direct detection of pyridine formation by the reaction of CH (CD) with pyrrole: a ring expansion reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soorkia, Satchin; Taatjes, Craig A.; Osborn, David L.; Selby, Talitha M.; Trevitt, Adam J.; Wilson, Kevin R.; Leone, Stephen R.

    2010-03-16

    The reaction of the ground state methylidyne radical CH (X2Pi) with pyrrole (C4H5N) has been studied in a slow flow tube reactor using Multiplexed Photoionization Mass Spectrometry coupled to quasi-continuous tunable VUV synchrotron radiation at room temperature (295 K) and 90 oC (363 K), at 4 Torr (533 Pa). Laser photolysis of bromoform (CHBr3) at 248 nm (KrF excimer laser) is used to produce CH radicals that are free to react with pyrrole molecules in the gaseous mixture. A signal at m/z = 79 (C5H5N) is identified as the product of the reaction and resolved from 79Br atoms, and the result is consistent with CH addition to pyrrole followed by Helimination. The Photoionization Efficiency curve unambiguously identifies m/z = 79 as pyridine. With deuterated methylidyne radicals (CD), the product mass peak is shifted by +1 mass unit, consistent with the formation of C5H4DN and identified as deuterated pyridine (dpyridine). Within detection limits, there is no evidence that the addition intermediate complex undergoes hydrogen scrambling. The results are consistent with a reaction mechanism that proceeds via the direct CH (CD) cycloaddition or insertion into the five-member pyrrole ring, giving rise to ring expansion, followed by H atom elimination from the nitrogen atom in the intermediate to form the resonance stabilized pyridine (d-pyridine) molecule. Implications to interstellar chemistry and planetary atmospheres, in particular Titan, as well as in gas-phase combustion processes, are discussed.

  14. Formation of THMs and HANs during bromination of Microcystis aeruginosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunzhu Pu; Lingzhao Kong; Xin Huang; Guoji Ding; Naiyun Gao

    2013-01-01

    Bromine-contained disinfectants and biocides are widely used in swimming pools,recreational waters and cooling towers.The objective of this study was to evaluate the formation of thrihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetonitriles (HANs) and their cytotoxicity in algae solutions during free bromine disinfection.Disinfection by-products formation potential experiments were conducted using modelsolutions containing 7mg/L (as total organic carbon) Microcystis aeruginosa cells.Effects of free bromine dosage,pH and ammonia were investigated.The results showed that brominated disinfection by-products were the major products when free bromine was applied.The total THMs formed during bromination was much as that formed during chlorination,whereas HANs were elevated by using bromination instead of chlorination.Dibromoacetonitrice (C2H2NBr2) and bromoform (CHBr3) were the only detected species during free bromine disinfection.The production of C2H2NBr2 and CHBr3 increased with disinfectant dosage but decreased with dosing ammonia.CHBr3 increased with the pH changing from 5 to 9.However,C2H2NBr2 achieved the highest production at neutral pH,which was due to a joint effect of variation in hydrolysis rate and free bromine reactivity.The hydrolysis of C2H2NBr2 was basecatalytic and nearly unaffected by disinfectant.Finally,estimation of cytotoxicity of the disinfected algae solutions showed that HANs formation was responsible for the majority of toxicity.Considering its highest toxicity among the measured disinfection by-products,the elevated C2H2NBr2 should be considered when using bromine-related algaecide.

  15. Formation of bromate and halogenated disinfection byproducts during chlorination of bromide-containing waters in the presence of dissolved organic matter and CuO

    KAUST Repository

    Liu, Chao

    2015-12-02

    Previous studies showed that significant bromate (BrO3-) can be formed via the CuO-catalyzed disproportionation of hypobromous acid (HOBr) pathway. In this study, the influence of CuO on the formation of BrO3- and halogenated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) (e.g., trihalomethanes, THMs and haloacetic acids, HAAs) during chlorination of six dissolved organic matter (DOM) isolates was investigated. Only in the presence of slow reacting DOM (from treated Colorado River water, i.e., CRW-BF-HPO), significant BrO3- formation is observed, which competes with bromination of DOM (i.e., THM and HAA formation). Reactions between HOBr and 12 model compounds in the presence of CuO indicates that CuO-catalyzed HOBr disproportionation is completely inhibited by fast reacting phenols, while it predominates in the presence of practically unreactive compounds (acetone, butanol, propionic, and butyric acids). In the presence of slow reacting di- and tri-carboxylic acids (oxalic, malonic, succinic, and citric acids), BrO3- formation varies, depending on its competition with bromoform and dibromoacetic acid formation (i.e., bromination pathway). The latter pathway can be enhanced by CuO due to the activation of HOBr. Therefore, increasing CuO dose (0-0.2 g L-1) in a reaction system containing chlorine, bromide, and CRW-BF-HPO enhances the formation of BrO3-, total THMs and HAAs. Factors including pH and initial reactant concentrations influence the DBP formation. These novel findings have implications for elevated DBP formation during transportation of chlorinated waters in copper-containing distribution systems.

  16. Chlorination by-product concentration levels in seawater and fish of an industrialised bay (Gulf of Fos, France) exposed to multiple chlorinated effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boudjellaba, D; Dron, J; Revenko, G; Démelas, C; Boudenne, J-L

    2016-01-15

    Chlorination is one of the most widely used techniques for biofouling control in large industrial units, leading to the formation of halogenated chlorination by-products (CBPs). This study was carried out to evaluate the distribution and the dispersion of these compounds within an industrialised bay hosting multiple chlorination discharges issued from various industrial processes. The water column was sampled at the surface and at 7 m depth (or bottom) in 24 stations for the analysis of CBPs, and muscle samples from 15 conger eel (Conger conger) were also investigated. Temperature and salinity profiles supported the identification of the chlorination releases, with potentially complex patterns. Chemical analyses showed that bromoform was the most abundant CBP, ranging from 0.5 to 2.2 μg L(-1) away from outlets (up to 10 km distance), and up to 18.6 μg L(-1) in a liquefied natural gas (LNG) regasification plume. However, CBP distributions were not homogeneous, halophenols being prominent in a power station outlet and dibromoacetonitrile in more remote stations. A seasonal effect was identified as fewer stations revealed CBPs in summer, probably due to the air and water temperatures increases favouring volatilisation and reactivity. A simple risk assessment of the 11 identified CBPs showed that 7 compounds concentrations were above the potential risk levels to the local marine environment. Finally, conger eel muscles presented relatively high levels of 2,4,6-tribromophenol, traducing a generalised impregnation of the Gulf of Fos to CBPs and a global bioconcentration factor of 25 was determined for this compound. PMID:26410714

  17. Representation of tropical deep convection in atmospheric models – Part 2: Tracer transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Hoyle

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The tropical transport processes of 14 different models or model versions were compared, within the framework of the SCOUT-O3 (Stratospheric-Climate Links with Emphasis on the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere project. The tested models range from the regional to the global scale, and include numerical weather prediction (NWP, chemical transport, and chemistry-climate models. Idealised tracers were used in order to prevent the model's chemistry schemes from influencing the results substantially, so that the effects of modelled transport could be isolated. We find large differences in the vertical transport of very short-lived tracers (with a lifetime of 6 h within the tropical troposphere. Peak convective outflow altitudes range from around 300 hPa to almost 100 hPa among the different models, and the upper tropospheric tracer mixing ratios differ by up to an order of magnitude. The timing of convective events is found to be different between the models, even among those which source their forcing data from the same NWP model (ECMWF. The differences are less pronounced for longer lived tracers, however they could have implications for modelling the halogen burden of the lowermost stratosphere through transport of species such as bromoform, or short-lived hydrocarbons into the lowermost stratosphere. The modelled tracer profiles are strongly influenced by the convective transport parameterisations, and different boundary layer mixing parameterisations also have a large impact on the modelled tracer profiles. Preferential locations for rapid transport from the surface into the upper troposphere are similar in all models, and are mostly concentrated over the western Pacific, the Maritime Continent and the Indian Ocean. In contrast, models do not indicate that upward transport is highest over western Africa.

  18. Joint effects of trihalomethanes and trichloroacetic acid on semen quality: A population-based cross-sectional study in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Qiang; Zhou, Bin; He, Dong-Liang; Wang, Yi-Xin; Wang, Mu; Yang, Pan; Huang, Zhen; Li, Jin; Lu, Wen-Qing

    2016-05-01

    Exposure to trihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetic acids (HAAs) has been individually associated with adverse male reproductive effects; however, their joint male reproductive toxicity is largely unknown. This study aimed to explore the joint effects of THMs and trichloroacetic acid (TCAA) on semen quality in a Chinese population. A total of 337 men presenting to the Reproductive Center of Tongjing Hospital, in Wuhan, China to seek semen analysis were included this study. Baseline blood THMs [chloroform (TCM), bromodichloromethane (BDCM), dibromochloromethane (DBCM), and bromoform (TBM)] and urinary TCAA were analyzed and dichotomized at their median levels. The joint effects of THMs and TCAA on below-reference semen quality parameters were evaluated by calculating the relative excess risk due to interaction (RERI). After adjusting for potential confounders, we found a suggestive synergistic effect between Br-THMs (sum of BDCM, DBCM, and TBM) and TCAA for below-reference sperm count (RERI = 2.14, 95% CI: -0.37, 4.91) (P = 0.076); men with high Br-THMs and TCAA levels (above the median) had 3.31 times (95% CI: 1.21, 9.07) elevated risk of having below-reference sperm count than men with low Br-THMs and TCAA levels (below the median). No apparent joint effects were observed between THMs and TCAA for other semen quality parameters. Our results suggest that co-exposure to Br-THMs and TCAA is associated with additive effects on decreased semen quality. However, further studies in a larger sample size and mechanistic studies are needed to confirm the findings. PMID:26975004

  19. Impact of deep convection and dehydration on bromine loading in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Aschmann

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Stratospheric bromine loading due to very short-lived substances is investigated with a three-dimensional chemical transport model over a period of 21 years using meteorological input data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts ERA-Interim reanalysis from 1989 to the end of 2009. Within this framework we analyze the impact of dehydration and deep convection on the amount of stratospheric bromine using an idealized and a detailed full chemistry approach. We model the two most important brominated short-lived substances, bromoform (CHBr3 and dibromomethane (CH2Br2, assuming a uniform convective detrainment mixing ratio of 1 part per trillion by volume (pptv for both species. The contribution of very short-lived substances to stratospheric bromine varies drastically with the applied dehydration mechanism and the associated scavenging of soluble species ranging from 3.4 pptv in the idealized setup up to 5 pptv using the full chemistry scheme. In the latter case virtually the entire amount of bromine originating from very short-lived source gases is able to reach the stratosphere thus rendering the impact of dehydration and scavenging on inorganic bromine in the tropopause insignificant. Furthermore, our long-term calculations show that the mixing ratios of very short-lived substances are strongly correlated to convective activity, i.e. intensified convection leads to higher amounts of very short-lived substances in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere especially under extreme conditions like El Niño seasons. However, this does not apply to the inorganic brominated product gases whose concentrations are anti-correlated to convective activity mainly due to convective dilution and possible scavenging, depending on the applied approach.

  20. Impact of deep convection and dehydration on bromine loading in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Aschmann

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stratospheric bromine loading due to very short-lived substances is investigated with a three-dimensional chemical transport model over a period of 21 years using meteorological input data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts ERA-Interim reanalysis from 1989 to the end of 2009. Within this framework we analyze the impact of dehydration and deep convection on the amount of stratospheric bromine using an idealized and a detailed full chemistry approach. We model the two most important brominated short-lived substances, bromoform (CHBr3 and dibromomethane (CH2Br2, assuming a uniform detrainment mixing ratio of 1 part per trillion by volume (pptv for both species. The contribution of very short-lived substances to stratospheric bromine varies drastically with the applied dehydration mechanism and the associated scavenging of soluble species ranging from 3.4 pptv in the idealized setup up to 5 pptv using the full chemistry scheme. In the latter case virtually the entire amount of bromine originating from very short-lived source gases is able to reach the stratosphere thus rendering the impact of dehydration and scavenging on inorganic bromine in the tropopause insignificant. Furthermore, our long-term calculations show that the mixing ratios of very short-lived substances are strongly correlated to convective activity, i.e. intensified convection leads to higher amounts of very short-lived substances in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere especially under extreme conditions like El Niño seasons. However, this does not apply to the inorganic brominated product gases whose concentrations are anti-correlated to convective activity mainly due to convective dilution and possible scavenging, depending on the applied approach.

  1. Exhaust constituent emission factors of printed circuit board pyrolysis processes and its exhaust control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiang, Hung-Lung, E-mail: hlchiang@mail.cmu.edu.tw [Department of Health Risk Management, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Kuo-Hsiung [Department of Environmental Engineering and Science, Fooyin University, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China)

    2014-01-15

    Highlights: • Recycling of waste printed circuit boards is an important issue. • Pyrolysis is an emerging technology for PCB treatment. • Emission factors of VOCs are determined for PCB pyrolysis exhaust. • Iron-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} catalyst was employed for the exhaust control. -- Abstract: The printed circuit board (PCB) is an important part of electrical and electronic equipment, and its disposal and the recovery of useful materials from waste PCBs (WPCBs) are key issues for waste electrical and electronic equipment. Waste PCB compositions and their pyrolysis characteristics were analyzed in this study. In addition, the volatile organic compound (VOC) exhaust was controlled by an iron-impregnated alumina oxide catalyst. Results indicated that carbon and oxygen were the dominant components (hundreds mg/g) of the raw materials, and other elements such as nitrogen, bromine, and copper were several decades mg/g. Exhaust constituents of CO, H{sub 2}, CH{sub 4}, CO{sub 2}, and NOx, were 60–115, 0.4–4.0, 1.1–10, 30–95, and 0–0.7 mg/g, corresponding to temperatures ranging from 200 to 500 °C. When the pyrolysis temperature was lower than 300 °C, aromatics and paraffins were the major species, contributing 90% of ozone precursor VOCs, and an increase in the pyrolysis temperature corresponded to a decrease in the fraction of aromatic emission factors. Methanol, ethylacetate, acetone, dichloromethane, tetrachloromethane and acrylonitrile were the main species of oxygenated and chlorinated VOCs. The emission factors of some brominated compounds, i.e., bromoform, bromophenol, and dibromophenol, were higher at temperatures over 400 °C. When VOC exhaust was flowed through the bed of Fe-impregnated Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}, the emission of ozone precursor VOCs could be reduced by 70–80%.

  2. CONCENTRATION OF TRIHALOMETHANES (THM AND PRECURSORS IN DRINKING WATER WITHIN DISTRIBUTION NETWORKS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CORNELIA DIANA ROMAN

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Concentration of trihalomethanes (THM and precursors in drinking water within distribution networks. Water chlorination is the disinfection method most widely used, having however the disadvantage of producing trihalomethanes (THM as secondary compounds, which are included in the list of priority hazardous substances in water. THM formation is influenced by the raw water composition and chlorine from the disinfection process. This paper intends to highlight the individual values of the chemical compounds precursors of THM in the water network in order to correlate them with the evolution of THM concentration. The cities of Targu Mures and Zalau were chosen as the study area having surface waters with different degrees of contamination as the water source. Pre-treatment with potassium permanganate is used at the water treatment plant in Targu Mures, while pre-chlorination is used at the water treatment plant in Zalau. Water sampling was performed weekly between March-May, 2011 in three sampling points of each city, maintained during the period of study. Total THM and their compounds as well as THM precursors (oxidability, ammonium content, nitrites and nitrates were measured. The water supplied in the distribution network corresponded integrally to the quality standards in terms of the analyzed indicators, including THM concentrations. The higher average THM concentrations in Zalau (52.01±14 μg/L compared to Targu Mures (36.43±9.14 μg/L were expected as a result of precursors concentration. In terms of THM compounds, they had similar proportions in the two localities, chloroform being clearly predominant, followed by dichlorobromoform and dibromochloroform, while bromoform was not identified. Statistical data analysis showed that the presence of THM precursors is correlated with the THM levels but not sufficient for their generation, even if they can be considered in general the basis of a valid prediction.

  3. ICON-ART 1.0 - a new online-coupled model system from the global to regional scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieger, D.; Bangert, M.; Bischoff-Gauss, I.; Förstner, J.; Lundgren, K.; Reinert, D.; Schröter, J.; Vogel, H.; Zängl, G.; Ruhnke, R.; Vogel, B.

    2015-06-01

    We present the first stage of a new online-coupled global to regional-scale modeling framework for the simulation of the spatiotemporal evolution of aerosols and trace gases. The underlying meteorological model is the new nonhydrostatic model system ICON (ICOsahedral Nonhydrostatic) which allows a local grid refinement with two-way interactions between the grids. We develop the extension ART (Aerosol and Reactive Trace gases) with the goal of simulating interactions between trace substances and the state of the atmosphere. Within this paper, we present the basic equations and give an overview of the physical parameterizations as well as numerical methods we use. First applications of the new model system for trace gases, monodisperse particles and polydisperse particles are shown. The simulated distribution of two very short-lived substances (VSLS), bromoform (CHBr3) and dibromomethane (CH2Br2) reflecting the fast upward transport shows a good agreement with observations and previous model studies. Also, the shape of the simulated tropical profiles is well reproduced. As an example for the treatment of monodisperse particles we present the simulated ash plume of the Eyjafjallajökull eruption in April 2010. Here, a novel approach for the source function is applied. The pattern of the simulated distribution of volcanic ash particles shows a good agreement with previous studies. As an example for the treatment of a polydisperse aerosol, where number densities and mass concentrations are accounted for, we simulated the annual emissions of sea salt. We obtain a total emission flux of 26.0 Pg yr-1 and an emission flux of particles with diameter less than 10 μm of 7.36 Pg yr-1.

  4. Photolytic removal of DBPs by medium pressure UV in swimming pool water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medium pressure UV is used for controlling the concentration of combined chlorine (chloramines) in many public swimming pools. Little is known about the fate of other disinfection by-products (DBPs) in UV treatment. Photolysis by medium pressure UV treatment was investigated for 12 DBPs reported to be found in swimming pool water: chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, bromoform, dichloroacetonitrile, bromochloroacetonitrile, dibromoacetronitrile, trichloroacetonitrile, trichloronitromethane, dichloropropanone, trichloropropanone, and chloral hydrate. First order photolysis constants ranged 26-fold from 0.020 min−1 for chloroform to 0.523 min−1 for trichloronitromethane. The rate constants generally increased with bromine substitution. Using the UV removal of combined chlorine as an actinometer, the rate constants were recalculated to actual treatment doses of UV applied in a swimming pool. In an investigated public pool the UV dose was equivalent to an applied electrical energy of 1.34 kWh m−3 d−1 and the UV dose required to removed 90% of trichloronitromethane was 0.4 kWh m−3 d−1, while 2.6 kWh m−3 d−1 was required for chloral hydrate and the bromine containing haloacetonitriles and trihalomethanes ranged from 0.6 to 3.1 kWh m−3 d−1. It was predicted thus that a beneficial side-effect of applying UV for removing combined chlorine from the pool water could be a significant removal of trichloronitromethane, chloral hydrate and the bromine containing haloacetonitriles and trihalomethanes. - Highlights: ► UV irradiation is able to degrade all 12 investigated disinfection by-products. ► Bromine species are easier to remove than their chlorinated analogues. ► UV dose used for combined chlorine was comparable with doses required for DBP removal. ► Significant removal of some disinfection by-products in swimming pools is indicated

  5. Exhaust constituent emission factors of printed circuit board pyrolysis processes and its exhaust control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Recycling of waste printed circuit boards is an important issue. • Pyrolysis is an emerging technology for PCB treatment. • Emission factors of VOCs are determined for PCB pyrolysis exhaust. • Iron-Al2O3 catalyst was employed for the exhaust control. -- Abstract: The printed circuit board (PCB) is an important part of electrical and electronic equipment, and its disposal and the recovery of useful materials from waste PCBs (WPCBs) are key issues for waste electrical and electronic equipment. Waste PCB compositions and their pyrolysis characteristics were analyzed in this study. In addition, the volatile organic compound (VOC) exhaust was controlled by an iron-impregnated alumina oxide catalyst. Results indicated that carbon and oxygen were the dominant components (hundreds mg/g) of the raw materials, and other elements such as nitrogen, bromine, and copper were several decades mg/g. Exhaust constituents of CO, H2, CH4, CO2, and NOx, were 60–115, 0.4–4.0, 1.1–10, 30–95, and 0–0.7 mg/g, corresponding to temperatures ranging from 200 to 500 °C. When the pyrolysis temperature was lower than 300 °C, aromatics and paraffins were the major species, contributing 90% of ozone precursor VOCs, and an increase in the pyrolysis temperature corresponded to a decrease in the fraction of aromatic emission factors. Methanol, ethylacetate, acetone, dichloromethane, tetrachloromethane and acrylonitrile were the main species of oxygenated and chlorinated VOCs. The emission factors of some brominated compounds, i.e., bromoform, bromophenol, and dibromophenol, were higher at temperatures over 400 °C. When VOC exhaust was flowed through the bed of Fe-impregnated Al2O3, the emission of ozone precursor VOCs could be reduced by 70–80%

  6. Formation and chemical reactivity of carbon fibers prepared by defluorination of graphite fluoride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh

    1994-01-01

    Defluorination of graphite fluoride (CFX) by heating to temperatures of 250 to 450 C in chemically reactive environments was studied. This is a new and possibly inexpensive process to produce new carbon-based materials. For example, CF 0.68 fibers, made from P-100 carbon fibers, can be defluorinated in BrH2C-CH = CH-CH2Br (1,4-dibromo-2butene) heated to 370 C, and graphitized to produce fibers with an unusually high modulus and a graphite layer structure that is healed and cross-linked. Conversely, a sulfur-doped, visibly soft carbon fiber was produced by defluorinating CF 0.9 fibers, made from P-25, in sulfur (S) vapor at 370 C and then heating to 660 C in nitrogen (N2). Furthermore, defluorination of the CF 0.68 fibers in bromine (Br2) produced fragile, structurally damaged carbon fibers. Heating these fragile fibers to 1100 C in N2 caused further structural damage, whereas heating to 150 C in bromoform (CHBr3) and then to 1100 C in N2 healed the structural defects. The defluorination product of CFX, tentatively called activated graphite, has the composition and molecular structure of graphite, but is chemically more reactive. Activated graphite is a scavenger of manganese (Mn), and can be intercalated with magnesium (Mg). Also, it can easily collect large amounts of an alloy made from copper (Cu) and type 304 stainless steel to form a composite. Finally, there are indications that activated graphite can wet metals or ceramics, thereby forming stronger composites with them than the pristine carbon fibers can form.

  7. 4-氨基苯甲酸的合成工艺研究%Synthesis techniques of 4-amino benzoic acid

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周石洋; 陈玲; 冯豫川

    2013-01-01

    以苯胺为原料,经酰基化、溴仿两步反应合成得到了目标产物,并采用IR、1HNMR和13CNMR对产物结构进行了表征.探讨了酰基化反应时催化剂AlCl3用量、反应温度及反应时间对4-氨基苯乙酮产率的影响,以及溴仿反应中反应温度、反应时间和滴加4-氨基苯乙酮速率对产物产率的影响.在最佳合成条件下,标题化合物的产率可达94.0%.本合成方法降低了工艺要求,减少合成步骤,提高了产率.%With aniline as raw material,through acylation,bromoform reactions,the target compound 4-amino benzoic acid was synthesized and confirmed by IR,1HNMR and 13CNMR.In the acylation reaction,the influence of dosage of catalyst AlCl3,reaction temperature and reaction time on the yield of intermediate 4-amino acetophenone was investigated.In the iodoformation reaction,the influence of reaction temperature,reaction time and adding rate of 4-amino acetophenone on the yield of 4-amino benzoic acid was investigated.Under the optimal conditions,the yield of 4-amino benzoic acid was 94.0%.This synthetic method has reduced process requirement and synthetic steps to improve the yield.

  8. Transport of NMHCs and halocarbons observed by CARIBIC: A case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, A. K.; Brenninkmeijer, C. A. M.; Oram, D. E.; O'Sullivan, D. A.; Schuck, T. J.; Slemr, F.

    2009-04-01

    The CARIBIC project (Civil Aircraft for the Regular Investigation of the Atmosphere Based on an Instrument Container) involves the monthly deployment of an instrument container equipped to make atmospheric measurements from onboard a long-range commercial airliner. Since December 2004, flights for the second phase of CARIBIC have been aboard a Lufthansa Airbus A340-600 traveling between Frankfurt, Germany and destinations in Asia, North America and South America. The instrument package housed in the container is fully automated and during each flight carries out a variety of real-time trace gas and aerosol measurements, and also collects 28 air samples, which are analyzed upon return to the laboratory. Routine measurements made from the sampling flasks include greenhouse gases, nonmethane hydrocarbons (NMHCs), and halocarbons; results of air sample analysis form the basis for the data discussed here. While the majority of CARIBIC samples represent background free tropospheric air and air representative of the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere, the aircraft also, less frequently, encounters air parcels influenced by more recent emissions. Here we present a case study of a round-trip flight between Frankfurt and Toronto, Canada during September 2007. During this flight, different air masses of unique origin were encountered; a number of samples were influenced by transport from the Gulf of Mexico, while others had source regions in Central and Southeast Asia. Samples from the Gulf of Mexico exhibited enhancements in C3-C6 alkanes, as well as a number of halogenated compounds with oceanic sources, such as methyl iodide and bromoform, while Asian samples had enhanced levels of combustion products (CO, acetylene, benzene) and anthropogenic halocarbons (methlyene chloride, chloroform, perchloroethylene). Additionally, a number of samples also showed stratospheric influence, and these samples were characterized by relatively depleted levels of many of the compounds

  9. Finding the missing stratospheric Bry: a global modeling study of CHBr3 and CH2Br2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. R. Blake

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent in situ and satellite measurements suggest a contribution of ~5 pptv to stratospheric inorganic bromine from short-lived bromocarbons. We conduct a modeling study of the two most important short-lived bromocarbons, bromoform (CHBr3 and dibromomethane (CH2Br2, with the Goddard Earth Observing System Chemistry Climate Model (GEOS CCM to account for this missing stratospheric bromine. We derive a "top-down" emission estimate of CHBr3 and CH2Br2 using airborne measurements in the Pacific and North American troposphere and lower stratosphere obtained during previous NASA aircraft campaigns. Our emission estimate suggests that to reproduce the observed concentrations in the free troposphere, a global oceanic emission of 425 Gg Br yr−1 for CHBr3 and 57 Gg Br yr−1 for CH2Br2 is needed, with 60% of emissions from open ocean and 40% from coastal regions. Although our simple emission scheme assumes no seasonal variations, the model reproduces the observed seasonal variations of the short-lived bromocarbons with high concentrations in winter and low concentrations in summer. This indicates that the seasonality of short-lived bromocarbons is largely due to seasonality in their chemical loss and transport. The inclusion of CHBr3 and CH2Br2 contributes ~5 pptv bromine throughout the stratosphere. Both the source gases and inorganic bromine produced from source gas degradation (BryVSLS in the troposphere are transported into the stratosphere, and are equally important. Inorganic bromine accounts for half (2.5 pptv of the bromine from the inclusion of CHBr3 and CH2Br2 near the tropical tropopause and its contribution rapidly increases to ~100% as altitude increases. More than 85% of the wet scavenging of BryVSLS occurs in large-scale precipitation below 500 hPa. Our sensitivity study with wet scavenging in convective updrafts switched off suggests that BryVSLS in the stratosphere is not sensitive to convection. Convective scavenging only accounts for

  10. Evaluating Global Emission Inventories of Biogenic Bromocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossaini, Ryan; Mantle, H.; Chipperfield, M. P.; Montzka, S. A.; Hamer, P.; Ziska, F.; Quack, B.; Kruger, K.; Tegtmeier, S.; Atlas, E.; Sala, S.; Engel, A.; Bonisch, H.; Keber, T.; Oram, D.; Mills, G.; Ordonez, C.; Saiz-Lopez, A.; Warwick, N.; Liang, Q.; Feng, W.; Moore, F.; Miller, F.; Marecal, V.; Richards, N. A. D.; Dorf, M.; Pfeilsticker, K.

    2013-01-01

    Emissions of halogenated very short-lived substances (VSLS) are poorly constrained. However, their inclusion in global models is required to simulate a realistic inorganic bromine (Bry) loading in both the troposphere, where bromine chemistry perturbs global oxidizing capacity, and in the stratosphere, where it is a major sink for ozone (O3). We have performed simulations using a 3-D chemical transport model (CTM) including three top-down and a single bottom-up derived emission inventory of the major brominated VSLS bromoform (CHBr3) and dibromomethane (CH2Br2). We perform the first concerted evaluation of these inventories, comparing both the magnitude and spatial distribution of emissions. For a quantitative evaluation of each inventory, model output is compared with independent long-term observations at National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) ground-based stations and with aircraft observations made during the NSF (National Science Foundation) HIAPER Pole-to-Pole Observations (HIPPO) project. For CHBr3, the mean absolute deviation between model and surface observation ranges from 0.22 (38 %) to 0.78 (115 %) parts per trillion (ppt) in the tropics, depending on emission inventory. For CH2Br2, the range is 0.17 (24 %) to 1.25 (167 %) ppt. We also use aircraft observations made during the 2011 Stratospheric Ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere (SHIVA) campaign, in the tropical western Pacific. Here, the performance of the various inventories also varies significantly, but overall the CTM is able to reproduce observed CHBr3 well in the free troposphere using an inventory based on observed sea-to-air fluxes. Finally, we identify the range of uncertainty associated with these VSLS emission inventories on stratospheric bromine loading due to VSLS (Br(VSLS/y)). Our simulations show Br(VSLS/y) ranges from approximately 4.0 to 8.0 ppt depending on the inventory. We report an optimized estimate at the lower end of this range (approximately 4 ppt

  11. Investigation of Amount and Effective Factors on Trihalomethane Production in PotableWater of Yazd

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andalib A.H.

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Background and Objectives:Yazd province is located in the central desert part of Iran in which water scarcity was one of the most important problems. This has been recently solved to some extent, due to the approved channel project of water transferring from Isfahan to Yazd. Chlorination is usually used in the last stage of water treatment for disinfection in the networks, treatment plants, storages and channel stations. The possibility of carcinogen lateral composites formation is expected by tri-halo-methanes (THMs due to the reactions occurs between the natural organic materials and free chlorine available in water. Based on the established standard by the country, the permissible limit of THMs in water is 200 mg/L. In this research, in addition to the amount of THMs and their distribution in Yazd water transferring channel and the city water network system, the important parameters and their correlations with THMs formation were discussed.Materials and Methods: In a year of sampling period, the concentrations of THMs including the four major components of chloroform, bromoform, bromo di-chloro methane and di-bromo chloro methane during all seasons were measured using gas chromatograph and analyzed. This was done for 11 stations including Zayande-rood Basin River and Isfahan water treatment plant up to Yazd Shehneh storage, stations and inline equalization tanks and also five regions of Yazd city network.Results: According to the results, the maximum rate of THMs (51.14 mg/L during the sampling period in summer for Yazd city network and in ancient context of Jamea Mosque district was found. In addition, the minimum concentration of THMs was 1.60 mg/L in winter for the domestic network of the city which was related to Azad Shahr district. The Average total amount of THMs during sampling periods in all stations was 12.26 mg/L. Conclusion: SPSS and Excel softwares were used to analyze the research data in the descriptive and inferential manner

  12. Modelling marine emissions and atmospheric distributions of halocarbons and dimethyl sulfide: the influence of prescribed water concentration vs. prescribed emissions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartz, S. T.; Krysztofiak, G.; Marandino, C. A.; Sinnhuber, B.-M.; Tegtmeier, S.; Ziska, F.; Hossaini, R.; Krüger, K.; Montzka, S. A.; Atlas, E.; Oram, D. E.; Keber, T.; Bönisch, H.; Quack, B.

    2015-10-01

    Marine-produced short-lived trace gases such as dibromomethane (CH2Br2), bromoform (CHBr3), methyliodide (CH3I) and dimethyl sulfide (DMS) significantly impact tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry. Describing their marine emissions in atmospheric chemistry models as accurately as possible is necessary to quantify their impact on ozone depletion and Earth's radiative budget. So far, marine emissions of trace gases have mainly been prescribed from emission climatologies, thus lacking the interaction between the actual state of the atmosphere and the ocean. Here we present simulations with the chemistry climate model EMAC (ECHAM5/MESSy Atmospheric Chemistry) with online calculation of emissions based on surface water concentrations, in contrast to directly prescribed emissions. Considering the actual state of the model atmosphere results in a concentration gradient consistent with model real-time conditions at the ocean surface and in the atmosphere, which determine the direction and magnitude of the computed flux. This method has a number of conceptual and practical benefits, as the modelled emission can respond consistently to changes in sea surface temperature, surface wind speed, sea ice cover and especially atmospheric mixing ratio. This online calculation could enhance, dampen or even invert the fluxes (i.e. deposition instead of emissions) of very short-lived substances (VSLS). We show that differences between prescribing emissions and prescribing concentrations (-28 % for CH2Br2 to +11 % for CHBr3) result mainly from consideration of the actual, time-varying state of the atmosphere. The absolute magnitude of the differences depends mainly on the surface ocean saturation of each particular gas. Comparison to observations from aircraft, ships and ground stations reveals that computing the air-sea flux interactively leads in most of the cases to more accurate atmospheric mixing ratios in the model compared to the computation from prescribed emissions

  13. Modelling marine emissions and atmospheric distributions of halocarbons and DMS: the influence of prescribed water concentration vs. prescribed emissions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. T. Lennartz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Marine produced short-lived trace gases such as dibromomethane (CH2Br2, bromoform (CHBr3, methyliodide (CH3I and dimethylsulfide (DMS significantly impact tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry. Describing their marine emissions in atmospheric chemistry models as accurately as possible is necessary to quantify their impact on ozone depletion and the Earth's radiative budget. So far, marine emissions of trace gases have mainly been prescribed from emission climatologies, thus lacking the interaction between the actual state of the atmosphere and the ocean. Here we present simulations with the chemistry climate model EMAC with online calculation of emissions based on surface water concentrations, in contrast to directly prescribed emissions. Considering the actual state of the model atmosphere results in a concentration gradient consistent with model real-time conditions at ocean surface and atmosphere, which determine the direction and magnitude of the computed flux. This method has a number of conceptual and practical benefits, as the modelled emission can respond consistently to changes in sea surface temperature, surface wind speed, sea ice cover and especially atmospheric mixing ratio. This online calculation could enhance, dampen or even invert the fluxes (i.e. deposition instead of emissions of VSLS. We show that differences between prescribing emissions and prescribing concentrations (−28 % for CH2Br2 to +11 % for CHBr3 result mainly from consideration of the actual, time-varying state of the atmosphere. The absolute magnitude of the differences depends mainly on the surface ocean saturation of each particular gas. Comparison to observations from aircraft, ships and ground stations reveals that computing the air–sea flux interactively leads in most of the cases to more accurate atmospheric mixing ratios in the model compared to the computation from prescribed emissions. Calculating emissions online also enables effective testing of

  14. Dating of zircons by the fission track method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work describes the methodology to date zircons by the Fission Track Method. A brief discussion is made of the physical principles of the method, physical properties of zircons and the geochemical properties of uranium. When starting with a hand sample, a mineral separation is required; to do this the following steps are needed: crushing and sieving of the sample, washing and drying, magnetic separation, heavy liquid separation (Bromoform 2.89 g/cm3, Diyodomethane = 3.31 g/cm3), and manual separation on a stereoscopic microscope. Once the zircon concentrate is obtained, these are mounted on a FEP teflon mount, then polished and etched on an eutectic mix of 10 g. of KOH + 7.2 g. of NaOH, heated to 210 Centigrade degrees. Afterwards the mounts are prepared for irradiation, sterilizing and putting on top of them an external detector (a thin sheet of muscovite poor in uranium content). The package is then wrapped in plastic and sent to the reactor together with standard zircons of known age (Fish Canyon Tuff: Naeser et.al., 1981), mounted in the same way, plus standard glasses of known uranium content. The package was irradiated in a site known as SIRCA (Rotatory Capsules Irradiation System). Then the package is left to decay for several days, and then the external detectors are etched in a 48% concentrated hydrofluoric acid for 5 minutes. Once the samples are processed through the mentioned steps, spontaneous tracks appear in the zircons and induced tracks appear in the external detectors. On counting the tracks one obtains ρs (spontaneous track density) and ρ1 (induced track density). These two parameters together with another one called '#zeta #' (obtained from the standard zircons and glasses), are used to obtain the age of the sample. Zircons from Cerro de Mercado, Durango were dated and the age obtained was 30 ±5 Ma. This date is in agreement with similar results obtained by Fleisher and Naeser (1975) for zircons of the same locality and dated by the same

  15. Photolytic removal of DBPs by medium pressure UV in swimming pool water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hansen, Kamilla M.S. [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (Denmark); Zortea, Raissa [Department of Land, Environment and Geotechnology Engineering, Polytechnic University of Turin (Italy); Piketty, Aurelia [Institute of Chemistry, Industrial and Chemical Engineering and Technology (INP-ENCIACET), National Polytechnic Institute of Toulouse (France); Vega, Sergio Rodriguez [Chemical Engineering, Complutense University of Madrid (Spain); Andersen, Henrik Rasmus, E-mail: Henrik@ndersen.net [Department of Environmental Engineering, Technical University of Denmark (Denmark)

    2013-01-15

    Medium pressure UV is used for controlling the concentration of combined chlorine (chloramines) in many public swimming pools. Little is known about the fate of other disinfection by-products (DBPs) in UV treatment. Photolysis by medium pressure UV treatment was investigated for 12 DBPs reported to be found in swimming pool water: chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, bromoform, dichloroacetonitrile, bromochloroacetonitrile, dibromoacetronitrile, trichloroacetonitrile, trichloronitromethane, dichloropropanone, trichloropropanone, and chloral hydrate. First order photolysis constants ranged 26-fold from 0.020 min{sup −1} for chloroform to 0.523 min{sup −1} for trichloronitromethane. The rate constants generally increased with bromine substitution. Using the UV removal of combined chlorine as an actinometer, the rate constants were recalculated to actual treatment doses of UV applied in a swimming pool. In an investigated public pool the UV dose was equivalent to an applied electrical energy of 1.34 kWh m{sup −3} d{sup −1} and the UV dose required to removed 90% of trichloronitromethane was 0.4 kWh m{sup −3} d{sup −1}, while 2.6 kWh m{sup −3} d{sup −1} was required for chloral hydrate and the bromine containing haloacetonitriles and trihalomethanes ranged from 0.6 to 3.1 kWh m{sup −3} d{sup −1}. It was predicted thus that a beneficial side-effect of applying UV for removing combined chlorine from the pool water could be a significant removal of trichloronitromethane, chloral hydrate and the bromine containing haloacetonitriles and trihalomethanes. - Highlights: ► UV irradiation is able to degrade all 12 investigated disinfection by-products. ► Bromine species are easier to remove than their chlorinated analogues. ► UV dose used for combined chlorine was comparable with doses required for DBP removal. ► Significant removal of some disinfection by-products in swimming pools is indicated.

  16. Determination of volatile organic compounds in water by headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry with triple quadrupole analyzer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    ) lower than 20%. The developed method was applied to surface water and wastewater from a wastewater treatment plant and from a municipal solid-waste treatment plant. Several compounds, like chloroform, benzene, trichloroethylene, toluene, tetrachloroethylene, dibromochloromethane, xylenes and bromoform were detected and confirmed in all the samples analyzed.

  17. Determination of volatile organic compounds in water by headspace solid-phase microextraction gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry with triple quadrupole analyzer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cervera, M.I. [Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, Avda. Sos Baynat, E-12071 Castellon (Spain); Beltran, J., E-mail: joaquim.beltran@uji.es [Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, Avda. Sos Baynat, E-12071 Castellon (Spain); Lopez, F.J.; Hernandez, F. [Research Institute for Pesticides and Water, University Jaume I, Avda. Sos Baynat, E-12071 Castellon (Spain)

    2011-10-17

    relative standard deviations (RSDs) lower than 20%. The developed method was applied to surface water and wastewater from a wastewater treatment plant and from a municipal solid-waste treatment plant. Several compounds, like chloroform, benzene, trichloroethylene, toluene, tetrachloroethylene, dibromochloromethane, xylenes and bromoform were detected and confirmed in all the samples analyzed.

  18. Molecular symmetry and isostructural relations in crystal phases of trihalomethanes CHCl3, CHBrCl2, CHBr2Cl, and CHBr3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dziubek, Kamil; Podsiadło, Marcin; Katrusiak, Andrzej

    2009-10-01

    Bromodichloromethane (CHBrCl(2)), dibromochloromethane (CHBr(2)Cl), and their parent trihalomethanes, chloroform (CHCl(3)) and bromoform (CHBr(3)), form an intriguing series of isostructural crystal phases, the sequence of which depends on the Br/Cl substitution and thermodynamic conditions. The phase behavior of these compounds has been studied by isobaric calorimetry and isothermal compression, and the crystal structure of CHBrCl(2) has been determined at 0.10 MPa/200 K, 0.73, 1.26, 2.53 GPa (all at 295 K), and that of CHBr(2)Cl at 0.43, 1.24 GPa (all at 295 K). CHBrCl(2) frozen by isobaric cooling at 0.10 MPa crystallizes in space group P1 with Z = 2, while its high-pressure polymorph in space group Pnma (Z = 4) is stable at 295 K from its freezing pressure at 0.48 to at least 2.53 GPa. At the freezing pressure of 0.29 GPa, CHBr(2)Cl crystallizes in space group P6(3), with Z = 2, and at 1.27 GPa, it transforms to the orthorhombic structure, space group Pnma (Z = 4); CHCl(3) has the identical symmetries, but their reverse sequence was observed. A subtle isostructural phase transition has been observed at 0.10 MPa and 214.9 K in CHBr(2)Cl. The relations between isostructural phases, their symmetry, and site occupation factors of halogen atoms observed in the low-temperature and high-pressure phases of trihalomethanes (CHCl(3), CHBrCl(2), CHBr(2)Cl, and CHBr(3)) have been explained by the directional character of electrostatic interactions between the molecules. A gradual ordering of the disordered Br and Cl atoms has been achieved in the compressed crystals, where the narrower volume of the atomic sites correlates with the increased occupancy of the smaller atom (chlorine). The molecular symmetry has been shown to control the molecular aggregation in the crystalline state, consistent with the crystal site-symmetry and the balance of electrostatic matching and dispersion forces between molecules. PMID:19743834

  19. Tropical deep convection and its impact on composition in global and mesoscale models – Part 2: Tracer transport

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Hoyle

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The tropical transport processes of 14 different models or model versions were compared, within the framework of the SCOUT-O3 (Stratospheric-Climate Links with Emphasis on the Upper Troposphere and Lower Stratosphere project. The tested models range from the regional to the global scale, and include numerical weather prediction (NWP, chemistry transport, and climate chemistry models. Idealised tracers were used in order to prevent the model's chemistry schemes from influencing the results substantially, so that the effects of modelled transport could be isolated. We find large differences in the vertical transport of very short lived tracers (with a lifetime of 6 hours within the tropical troposphere. Peak convective outflow altitudes range from around 300 hPa to almost 100 hPa among the different models, and the upper tropospheric tracer mixing ratios differ by up to an order of magnitude. The timing of convective events is found to differ between the models, even among those which source their forcing data from the same NWP model (ECMWF. The differences are less pronounced for longer lived tracers, however they could have implications for the modelling of the halogen burden of the lowermost stratosphere through species such as bromoform, or for the transport of short lived hydrocarbons into the lowermost stratosphere. The modelled tracer profiles are found to be strongly influenced by the convective transport parameterisations, and boundary layer mixing parameterisations of the models. The location of rapid transport into the upper troposphere is similar among the models, and is mostly concentrated over the western Pacific, the Maritime Continent and the Indian Ocean. In contrast, none of the models indicates significant enhancement in upward transport over western Africa. The mean mixing ratios of an idealised CO like tracer in the upper tropical troposphere are found to be sensitive to the surface CO mixing ratios in the regions with the

  20. Cancer risk assessment from exposure to trihalomethanes in tap water and swimming pool water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANYAKAPO Mallika; SOONTORNCHAI Sarisak; PAOPUREE Pongsri

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the concentration of trihalomethanes (THMs) in tap water and swimming pool water in the area of the Nakhon Path-om Municipality during the period April 2005-March 2006.The concentrations of total THMs,chloroform,bromodichloromethane,dibromochloromethane and bromoform in tap water were 12.70-41.74,6.72-29.19,1.12-11.75,0.63-3.55 and 0.08-3.40 μg/L,respectively,whereas those in swimming pool water were 26.15-65.09,9.50-36.97,8.90-18.01,5.19-22.78 and ND-6.56 μg/L,respectively.It implied that the concentration of THMs in swimming pool water was higher than those in tap water,particularly,brominated-THMs.Both tap water and swimming pool water contained concentrations of total THMs below the standards of the World Health Organization (WHO),European Union (EU) and the United States Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) phase Ⅰ,but 1 out of 60 tap water samples and 60 out of 72 swimming pool water samples contained those over the Standard of the USEPA phase Ⅱ.From the two cases of cancer risk assessment including Case Ⅰ Non-Swimmer and Case Ⅱ Swimmer,assessment of cancer risk of non-swimmers from exposure to THMs at the highest and the average concentrations was 4.43×10-5 and 2.19×10-5,respectively,which can be classified as acceptable risk according to the Standard of USEPA.Assessment of cancer risk of swimmers from exposure to THMs at the highest and the average concentrations was 1.47×10-3 and 7.99×10-4,respectively,which can be classified as unacceptable risk and needs to be improved.Risk of THMs exposure from swimming was 93.9%-94.2% of the total risk.Cancer risk of THMs concluded from various routes in descending order was:skin exposure while swimming,gastro-intestinal exposure from tap water intake,and skin exposure to tap water and gastro-intestinal exposure while swimming.Cancer risk from skin exposure while swimming was 94.18% of the total cancer risk.

  1. Subproductos halogenados de la cloración en el agua de consumo público Halogenated by-products of chlorination in tap water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Calderón

    2002-06-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: La presencia de trihalometanos en el agua de diversas ciudades españolas está demostrada. Este estudio pretende analizar sus concentraciones en el agua de la ciudad de Barcelona. Métodos: Se analizan 151 muestras de agua recogidas durante el año 1998. Los análisis se realizaron en el laboratorio municipal mediante purge and trap y posterior determinación por cromatografía de gases acoplada a espectrofotometría de masas. Los resultados se presentan según el origen del agua: ríos Llobregat, Ter o mezcla. Resultados: En aguas del Ter los valores son relativamente bajos y predominan cloroformo y bromodiclorometano, mientras que en las del Llobregat son más elevados y predominan bromoformo y dibromoclorometano. Las aguas de mezcla presentan valores intermedios. Los valores totales alcanzados en las muestras procedentes del Llobregat superan los 100 µg/l. Conclusiones: Estos resultados muestran la necesidad de seguir corrigiendo la contaminación orgánica y los compuestos halogenados en el agua captada para el consumo humano en Barcelona.Objective: The presence of trihalomethanes in the water systems of several Spanish cities has been demonstrated. The aim of this study was to analyze trihalomethane concentrations in the water provided for human consumption in the city of Barcelona. Methods: We analyzed 151 water samples collected in 1998. The analyses were performed in the Public Health Laboratory of Barcelona using the purge-and-trap method and subsequent determination by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry. The results are presented according to the source of the water: the rivers of Llobregat or Ter, or a mixture of these. Results: Thrihalomethane concentrations in the water from Ter were relatively low, with a predominance of chloroform and bromodichloromethane, while concentrations in the water from Llobregat were much higher, with a predominance of bromoform and dibromochloromethane. Mixed water showed intermediate

  2. Response of halocarbons to ocean acidification in the Arctic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. E. Hopkins

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The potential effect of ocean acidification (OA on seawater halocarbons in the Arctic was investigated during a~mesocosm experiment in Spitsbergen in June–July 2010. Over a period of 5 weeks, natural phytoplankton communities in nine ~50 m3 mesocosms were studied under a range of pCO2 treatments from ~185 μatm to ~1420 μatm. In general, the response of halocarbons to pCO2 was subtle, or undetectable. A large number of significant correlations with a range of biological parameters (chlorophyll a, microbial plankton community, phytoplankton pigments were identified, indicating a biological control on the concentrations of halocarbons within the mesocosms. The temporal dynamics of iodomethane (CH3I alluded to active turnover of this halocarbon in the mesocosms and strong significant correlations with biological parameters suggested a biological source. However, despite a pCO2 effect on various components of the plankton community, and a strong association between CH3I and biological parameters, no effect of pCO2 was seen in CH3I. Diiodomethane (CH2I2 displayed a number of strong relationships with biological parameters. Furthermore, the concentrations, the rate of net production and the sea-to-air flux of CH2I2 showed a significant positive response to pCO2. There was no clear effect of pCO2 on bromocarbon concentrations or dynamics. However, periods of significant net loss of bromoform (CHBr3 were found to be concentration-dependent, and closely correlated with total bacteria, suggesting a degree of biological consumption of this halocarbon in Arctic waters. Although the effects of OA on halocarbon concentrations were marginal, this study provides invaluable information on the production and cycling of halocarbons in a region of the world

  3. Contamination of sediments and water of a wet dune slack (SW Portugal)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conceição Freitas, Maria; Rosário Carvalho, Maria; Andrade, César; Cruces, Aanabela; Moreira, Sandra

    2015-04-01

    Lagoa da Sancha (LS), located in the Portuguese SW coast, is a small (0.12km2) wet dune slack with a shallow (<1m) open-water body, which occasionally dries out in summer. This environment is part of a Natural Reserve since 2000. It collects inputs from a 35km2 watershed essentially draining Cenozoic sandy materials. The main anthropogenic activities in the catchment area are related to agriculture and hog raising; however, an industrial waste disposal located proximal to LS, infilling an abandoned quarry, has been recently discovered. Field surveys have been conducted in March 2014 in order to collect sediment and water samples in LS as well as in the industrial waste disposal (TW3); riverine water and sediments and underground water have also been collected. Sedimentological (texture, pH, calcium carbonate and organic matter content) and geochemical (major elements, metals and organic compounds) analysis have been performed. Results show that riverine and groundwater have neutral pH and low to medium mineralization of NaCl to CaHCO3 types. The only metal found in high concentrations is iron, with a maximum value of 1200 ug/L. The texture and composition of alluvial sediments are compatible with the geologic background. LS bottom sediments areCaCO3-free organic muds, hyperacid and low organic; they present high contents of heavy metals, organic compounds (101 to 102 mg/kg) and S (2700 mg/kg). Also, the LS hydrosome presents pH values < 3, electric conductivity up to ≈ 8 mS/cm and very high concentrations of dissolved metals (iron attains 20000 ug/L and the heavy metals content is up to 3 orders of magnitude higher than in both the surface and groundwater). Dissolved hydrocarbon species (fraction C4-C10) reach 11 ug/L and bromoform 17 ug/L. Chemical analysis to TW3 revealed the presence of a large diversity of organic compounds in concentrations of up to 105 mg/kg. Hydrocarbon species and very high S content were only found in the soil and water of the waste

  4. The recovery of rare earth elements (REE) from beach sands

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This preliminary study describes a metallurgical process that will extract, recover and produce REE oxides from beach sands obtained from Ombo, San Vicente, northern Palawan. The beach sands contain REE minerals of allanite and small amounts of monazite. Allanite is a sorosilicate mineral containing rare earths, thorium and uranium. Monazite is the anhydrous phosphate of cerium and the lanthanum group of rare earths with thorium commonly present in replacement for cerium and lanthanum. Collected beach sand were first pan-concentrated in-situ to produce heavy mineral concentrates. Screening using a 32 mesh (0.500 mm) sieve was done at the Nuclear Materials Research Laboratory to remove oversize sand particles. The -32 mesh fraction was treated with bromoform (sp. gr. 2.89) to separate the heavy minerals from siliceous gangue. Grinding to -325 mesh size (0.044mm) followed to liberate the minerals prior to leaching. Two acids leachants were used - concentrated HCl for the first trial and a mixture of concentrated HCl and HNO3 (10:1 volume ratio) for the second trial. Both leaching trials were carried out at 180oC for 7 hours or until dry. The resulting leached residues were re-dissolved in concentrated HCl and filtered. IonquestR 801, an organophosphorous extractant, was added to the filtrate to separate the radioactive thorium from REE. Sodium hydroxide was added to the aqueous phase to precipitate the REE. After filtering the precipitate, it was dissolved in HCl. The acid solution was repeatedly extracted three (3) times with IonquestR 801 to remove iron and other contaminants. Ammonium hydroxide was added to the final solution to precipitate the REE, which was then dried in the oven. The precipitate was calcined/roasted in the furnace at two different temperatures for different periods of time to burn off the organic matter and to form oxides. Results of the XRD analysis showed peaks of the calcined precipitate matching with the peaks of lanthanum oxide standard

  5. Online calculation of global marine halocarbon emissions in the chemistry climate model EMAC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lennartz, Sinikka T.; Krysztofiak-Tong, Gisèle; Sinnhuber, Björn-Martin; Marandino, Christa A.; Tegtmeier, Susann; Krüger, Kirstin; Ziska, Franziska; Quack, Birgit

    2015-04-01

    Marine produced trace gases such as dibromomethane (CH2Br2), bromoform (CHBr3) and methyl iodide (CH3I) significantly impact tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry. Marine emissions are the dominant source of halocarbons to the atmosphere, and therefore, it is crucial to represent them accurately in order to model their impact on atmospheric chemistry. Chemistry climate models are a frequently used tool for quantifying the influence of halocarbons on ozone depletion. In these model simulations, marine emissions of halocarbons have mainly been prescribed from established emission climatologies, thus neglecting the interaction with the actual state of the atmosphere in the model. Here, we calculate halocarbon marine emissions for the first time online by coupling the submodel AIRSEA to the chemical climate model EMAC. Our method combines prescribed water concentrations and varying atmospheric concentrations derived from the model instead of using fixed emission climatologies. This method has a number of conceptual and practical advantages, as the modelled emissions can respond consistently to changes in temperature, wind speed, possible sea ice cover and atmospheric concentration in the model. Differences between the climatology-based and the new approach (2-18%) result from consideration of the actual, time-varying state of the atmosphere and the consideration of air-side transfer velocities. Extensive comparison to observations from aircraft, ships and ground stations reveal that interactively computing the air-sea flux from prescribed water concentrations leads to equally or more accurate atmospheric concentrations in the model compared to using constant emission climatologies. The effect of considering the actual state of the atmosphere is largest for gases with concentrations close to equilibrium in the surface ocean, such as CH2Br2. Halocarbons with comparably long atmospheric lifetimes, e.g. CH2Br2, are reflected more accurately in EMAC when compared to time

  6. Formation of emerging DBPs from the chlorination and chloramination of seawater algal organic matter and related model compounds

    KAUST Repository

    Nihemaiti, Maolida

    2014-05-01

    Limited studies focused on reactions occurring during disinfection and oxidation processes of seawater. The aim of this work was to investigate disinfection by-products (DBPs) formation from the chlorination and chloramination of seawater algal organic matter and related model compounds. Simulated algal blooms directly growing in Red Sea, red tide samples collected during an algal bloom event and Hymenomonas sp. monoculture were studied as algal organic matter sources. Experiments were conducted in synthetic seawater containing bromide ion. A variety of DBPs was formed from the chlorination and chloramination of algal organic matter. Brominated DBPs (bromoform, DBAA, DBAN and DBAcAm) were the dominant species. Iodinated DBPs (CIAcAm and iodinated THMs) were detected, which are known to be highly toxic compared to their chlorinated or brominated analogues. Algal organic matter was found to incorporate important precursors of nitrogenous DBPs (N-DBPs), which have been reported to be more toxic than regulated THMs and HAAs. Isotopically-labeled monochloramine (15N- NH2Cl) was used in order to investigate the nitrogen source in N-DBPs. High formation of N-DBPs was found from Hymenomonas sp. sample in exponential growth phase, which was enriched in nitrogen-containing organic compounds. High inorganic nitrogen incorporation was found from the algal samples enriched in humic-like compounds. HAcAms formation was studied from chlorination and chloramination of amino acids. Asparagine, aspartic acid and other amino acids with an aromatic structure were found to be important precursors of HAcAms and DCAN. Factors affecting HAcAms formation (Cl2/ amino acid molar ratio and pH) were evaluated. Studies on the formation kinetics of DCAcAm and DCAN from asparagine suggested a rapid formation of DCAcAm from organic nitrogen (amide group) and a slower incorporation of inorganic nitrogen coming from monochloramine to form DCAN. High amounts of DCAN and DCAcAm were detected from the

  7. Halocarbon emissions and sources in the equatorial Atlantic Cold Tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Hepach

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Halocarbons from oceanic sources contribute to halogens in the troposphere, and can be transported into the stratosphere where they take part in ozone depletion. This paper presents distribution and sources in the equatorial Atlantic from June and July 2011 of the four compounds bromoform (CHBr3, dibromomethane (CH2Br2, methyl iodide (CH3I and diiodomethane (CH2I2. Enhanced biological production during the Atlantic Cold Tongue (ACT season, indicated by phytoplankton pigment concentrations, led to elevated concentrations of CHBr3 of up to 44.7 pmol L−1 and up to 9.2 pmol L−1 for CH2Br2 in surface water, which is comparable to other tropical upwelling systems. While both compounds correlated very well with each other in the surface water,CH2Br2 was often more elevated in greater depth than CHBr3, which showed maxima in the vicinity of the deep chlorophyll maximum. The deeper maximum of CH2Br2 indicates an additional source in comparison to CHBr3 or a slower degradation of CH2Br2. Concentrations of CH3I of up to 12.8 pmol L−1 in the surface water were measured. In contrary to expectations of a predominantly photochemical source in the tropical ocean, its distribution was mostly in agreement with biological parameters, indicating a~biological source. CH2I2 was very low in the near surface water with maximum concentrations of only 3.7 pmol L−1, and the observed anticorrelation with global radiation was likely due to its strong photolysis. CH2I2 showed distinct maxima in deeper waters similar to CH2Br2. For the first time, diapycnal fluxes of the four halocarbons from the upper thermocline into and out of the mixed layer were determined. These fluxes were low in comparison to the halocarbon sea-to-air fluxes. This indicates that despite the observed maximum concentrations at depth, production in the surface mixed layer is the main oceanic source for all four compounds and has an influence on emissions into the atmosphere. The calculated

  8. Valores de trihalometanos en agua de consumo de la provincia de Granada, España Trihalomethane levels in drinking water in the province of Granada (Spain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Freire

    2008-12-01

    -two tap water samples were collected in two campaigns during the winter and summer of 2006. An optimized procedure based on gas chromatography and mass spectrometry was used to determine concentrations of chloroform, bromodichloromethane, dibromochloromethane, and bromoform in the samples. Results: Total trihalomethane concentrations ranged from 0.14 to 18.75 μg/l in winter samples and from 0.01 to 31.87 μg/l in summer samples. The most abundant compound was chloroform. Mean trihalomethane concentrations were 10.13 in surface waters and 1.41 μg/l in ground waters. Conclusions: The trihalomethane levels found were considerably below the maximum permitted level of 100 μg/l in the European Union. The values obtained varied widely according to the type of water source: the highest concentrations were found in urban and sub-urban areas, where the water is largely of surface origin. The presence of trihalomethanes was lower than that reported in other Spanish regions.

  9. A multi-model intercomparison of halogenated very short-lived substances (TransCom-VSLS): linking oceanic emissions and tropospheric transport for a reconciled estimate of the stratospheric source gas injection of bromine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossaini, R.; Patra, P. K.; Leeson, A. A.; Krysztofiak, G.; Abraham, N. L.; Andrews, S. J.; Archibald, A. T.; Aschmann, J.; Atlas, E. L.; Belikov, D. A.; Bönisch, H.; Carpenter, L. J.; Dhomse, S.; Dorf, M.; Engel, A.; Feng, W.; Fuhlbrügge, S.; Griffiths, P. T.; Harris, N. R. P.; Hommel, R.; Keber, T.; Krüger, K.; Lennartz, S. T.; Maksyutov, S.; Mantle, H.; Mills, G. P.; Miller, B.; Montzka, S. A.; Moore, F.; Navarro, M. A.; Oram, D. E.; Pfeilsticker, K.; Pyle, J. A.; Quack, B.; Robinson, A. D.; Saikawa, E.; Saiz-Lopez, A.; Sala, S.; Sinnhuber, B.-M.; Taguchi, S.; Tegtmeier, S.; Lidster, R. T.; Wilson, C.; Ziska, F.

    2016-07-01

    The first concerted multi-model intercomparison of halogenated very short-lived substances (VSLS) has been performed, within the framework of the ongoing Atmospheric Tracer Transport Model Intercomparison Project (TransCom). Eleven global models or model variants participated (nine chemical transport models and two chemistry-climate models) by simulating the major natural bromine VSLS, bromoform (CHBr3) and dibromomethane (CH2Br2), over a 20-year period (1993-2012). Except for three model simulations, all others were driven offline by (or nudged to) reanalysed meteorology. The overarching goal of TransCom-VSLS was to provide a reconciled model estimate of the stratospheric source gas injection (SGI) of bromine from these gases, to constrain the current measurement-derived range, and to investigate inter-model differences due to emissions and transport processes. Models ran with standardised idealised chemistry, to isolate differences due to transport, and we investigated the sensitivity of results to a range of VSLS emission inventories. Models were tested in their ability to reproduce the observed seasonal and spatial distribution of VSLS at the surface, using measurements from NOAA's long-term global monitoring network, and in the tropical troposphere, using recent aircraft measurements - including high-altitude observations from the NASA Global Hawk platform. The models generally capture the observed seasonal cycle of surface CHBr3 and CH2Br2 well, with a strong model-measurement correlation (r ≥ 0.7) at most sites. In a given model, the absolute model-measurement agreement at the surface is highly sensitive to the choice of emissions. Large inter-model differences are apparent when using the same emission inventory, highlighting the challenges faced in evaluating such inventories at the global scale. Across the ensemble, most consistency is found within the tropics where most of the models (8 out of 11) achieve best agreement to surface CHBr3 observations

  10. Investigación de trihalometanos en agua potable del Estado Carabobo, Venezuela Trihalomethanes in the drinking water of Carabobo State, Venezuela

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Sarmiento

    2003-04-01

    and 2001. THM concentrations were determined by gas chromatography using the headspace technique. The concentrations of the following THMs were measured: chloroform (CHCl3, bromoform (CHBr3, chlorodibromomethane (CHBr2Cl and bromodichloromethane (CHCl2Br. Results: The concentration of total THMs was between 47.84 µg/l and 94.23 µg/l. CHCl3 was the most commonly formed compound representing 83% of all THMs in the CRS I and 82% in the CRS II. The concentrations of total THMs in the CRS I, specifically in the Baja and San Diego networks, were significantly higher (p < 0.05 than permissible levels set by the American Environmental Protection Agency (80 µg/l for the sum of all four THMs. Conclusions: The results show that in the area studied there is a risk of adverse health effects due to THMs in drinking water, especially in the Baja and San Diego networks.

  11. Development of an analytical technique for the detection of alteration minerals formed in bentonite by reaction with alkaline solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, H.; Shibata, M.; Owada, H.; Kaneko, M.; Kuno, Y.; Asano, H.

    A multibarrier system consisting of cement-based backfill, structures and support materials, and a bentonite-based buffer material has been studied for the TRU waste disposal concept being developed in Japan, the aim being to restrict the migration of radionuclides. Concern regarding bentonite-based materials in this disposal environment relates to long-term alteration under hyper-alkaline conditions due to the presence of cementitious materials. In tests simulating the interaction between bentonite and cement, formation of secondary minerals due to alteration reactions under the conditions expected for geological disposal of TRU waste (equilibrated water with cement at low liquid/solid ratio) has not been observed, although alteration was observed under extremely hyper-alkaline conditions with high temperatures. This was considered to be due to the fact that analysis of C-S-H gel formed at the interface as a secondary mineral was difficult using XRD, because of its low crystallinity and low content. This paper describes an analytical technique for the characterization of C-S-H gel using a heavy liquid separation method which separates C-S-H gel from Kunigel V1 bentonite (bentonite produced in Japan) based on the difference in specific gravity between the crystalline minerals constituting Kunigel V1 and the secondary C-S-H gel. For development of C-S-H gel separation methods, simulated alteration samples were prepared by mixing 990 mg of unaltered Kunigel V1 and 10 mg of C-S-H gel synthesized using pure chemicals at a ratio of Ca/Si = 1.2. The simulated alteration samples were dispersed in bromoform-methanol mixtures with specific gravities ranging from 2.00 to 2.57 g/cm 3 and subjected to centrifuge separation to recover the light density fraction. Subsequent XRD analysis to identify the minerals was complemented by dissolution in 0.6 N hydrochloric acid to measure the Ca and Si contents. The primary peak (2 θ = 29.4°, Cu Kα) and secondary peaks (2 θ = 32.1

  12. Effect of ocean acidification and elevated fCO2 on trace gas production by a Baltic Sea summer phytoplankton community

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Alison L.; Leedham-Elvidge, Emma; Hughes, Claire; Hopkins, Frances E.; Malin, Gill; Bach, Lennart T.; Schulz, Kai; Crawfurd, Kate; Brussaard, Corina P. D.; Stuhr, Annegret; Riebesell, Ulf; Liss, Peter S.

    2016-08-01

    The Baltic Sea is a unique environment as the largest body of brackish water in the world. Acidification of the surface oceans due to absorption of anthropogenic CO2 emissions is an additional stressor facing the pelagic community of the already challenging Baltic Sea. To investigate its impact on trace gas biogeochemistry, a large-scale mesocosm experiment was performed off Tvärminne Research Station, Finland, in summer 2012. During the second half of the experiment, dimethylsulfide (DMS) concentrations in the highest-fCO2 mesocosms (1075-1333 µatm) were 34 % lower than at ambient CO2 (350 µatm). However, the net production (as measured by concentration change) of seven halocarbons analysed was not significantly affected by even the highest CO2 levels after 5 weeks' exposure. Methyl iodide (CH3I) and diiodomethane (CH2I2) showed 15 and 57 % increases in mean mesocosm concentration (3.8 ± 0.6 increasing to 4.3 ± 0.4 pmol L-1 and 87.4 ± 14.9 increasing to 134.4 ± 24.1 pmol L-1 respectively) during Phase II of the experiment, which were unrelated to CO2 and corresponded to 30 % lower Chl a concentrations compared to Phase I. No other iodocarbons increased or showed a peak, with mean chloroiodomethane (CH2ClI) concentrations measured at 5.3 (±0.9) pmol L-1 and iodoethane (C2H5I) at 0.5 (±0.1) pmol L-1. Of the concentrations of bromoform (CHBr3; mean 88.1 ± 13.2 pmol L-1), dibromomethane (CH2Br2; mean 5.3 ± 0.8 pmol L-1), and dibromochloromethane (CHBr2Cl, mean 3.0 ± 0.5 pmol L-1), only CH2Br2 showed a decrease of 17 % between Phases I and II, with CHBr3 and CHBr2Cl showing similar mean concentrations in both phases. Outside the mesocosms, an upwelling event was responsible for bringing colder, high-CO2, low-pH water to the surface starting on day t16 of the experiment; this variable CO2 system with frequent upwelling events implies that the community of the Baltic Sea is acclimated to regular significant declines in pH caused by up to 800 µatm fCO2. After

  13. Occurrence of Selected Organic Compounds in Groundwater Used for Public Supply in the Plio-Pleistocene Deposits in East-Central Nebraska and the Dawson and Denver Aquifers near Denver, Colorado, 2002-2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bails, Jeffrey B.; Dietsch, Benjamin J.; Landon, Matthew K.; Paschke, Suzanne S.

    2009-01-01

    ), which were detected in 9 of the 15 wells (60 percent of the samples). The second most frequently detected organic compound was tetrachloroethylene, detected in 4 of the 15 wells (27 percent of the samples), followed by chloroform, trichloroethylene, and 2-hydroxyatrazine (2-hydroxy-4-isopropylamino-6-ethylamino-s-triazine, or OIET), present in 3 of the 15 wells (20 percent of the samples). The pesticide compounds deisopropylatrazine (2-chloro-6-ethylamino-4-amino-s-triazine, or CEAT), metolachlor, and simazine and the volatile organic compound cis-1,2-dichloroethylene were detected in 2 of the 15 wells, and the compounds diuron and 1,2-dichloroethane were detected in only 1 of the 15 wells during the first-year sampling. Most detections of these compounds were at or near the minimum reporting levels, and none were greater than their regulatory maximum contaminant level. There were few detections of organic compounds during the first year of sampling groundwater wells in the South Platte study area. The compounds atrazine, deethylatrazine, picloram, tetrachloroethylene, methyl-tert-butyl-ether (MTBE), tris(2-butoxyethyl)phosphate, and bromoform were detected only once in all the samples from the 12 wells. Most detections of these compounds were at or near the minimum reporting levels, and none were greater than their regulatory maximum contaminant level. Second-year sampling, which included the addition of paired source- and finished-water samples, was completed at two sites in the High Plains study area. Source-water samples from the second-year sampling had detections of atrazine and deethylatrazine; at one site deisopropylatrazine and chloroform also were detected. The finished-water samples, which represent the source water after blending with water from other wells and treatment, indicated a decrease in the concentrations of the pesticides at one site, whereas concentrations remained nearly constant at a second site. The trihalomethanes (THMs or disinfec

  14. Cáncer gástrico en Costa Rica: ¿existe o no relación con la cloración del agua para consumo humano?

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    Darner A Mora Alvarado

    2007-07-01

    que no existe relación entre la incidencia de CG y la cloración del ACH, incluida la antigüedad de la misma y el tipo de fuente de agua usada (subterránea y superficial. Por último se recomienda realizar una campaña de divulgación por parte del Instituto Costarricense de Acueductos y Alcantarillados como entidad rectora en el suministro de agua potable, con el propósito de eliminar la desconfianza de los usuarios en el consumo de ACH sometida a la cloración. Además, se debe promover la elaboración de estudios semejantes a éste con otro tipo de cánceres como el de vejiga y el colorrectal.Gastric cancer (GC is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality in Costa Rican males. After breast cancer, it is the second highest cause of cancer mortality in women in Costa Rica. From a histological point-of-view, GC is divided into two types: the first is the "diffuse" type and it has been related etiologically to genetic factors; the second type is the "intestinal" type and it has been linked to such environmental carcinogenic factors as: toxic chemical substances, geographic altitude and age. Along these lines, some researchers have studied possible relationships bet-tween epidemiological and ecological factors such as, for example, physico-chemical traits of water for human consumption (ACH, soils, pesticide use as well as carcinogen intake in milk such as Pteridium aquilinum (the so-called male fern. Regarding ACH, since 1974, water chlorination has been causally linked to formation of byproducts of disinfection like chloroform and bromoform, so-called trihalomethanes, which have a propensity for causing a higher incidence of GC in the population. These facts, along with media hype, have provoked uncertainty and doubts regarding the safety of chlorinated water among the public. With this background in mind, an exploratory-ecological epidemiological study was carried out with the explicit purpose of analyzing if there is or if there isn´t a statistically

  15. Assessing the vulnerability of public-supply wells to contamination—Edwards aquifer near San Antonio, Texas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jagucki, Martha L.; Musgrove, MaryLynn; Lindgren, Richard J.; Fahlquist, Lynne; Eberts, Sandra M.

    2011-01-01

    This fact sheet highlights findings from the vulnerability study of a public-supply well field in San Antonio, Texas. The well field consists of six production wells that tap the Edwards aquifer. Typically, one or two wells are pumped at a time, yielding an average total of 20-21 million gallons per day. Water samples were collected from public-supply wells in the well field and from monitoring wells installed along general directions of flow to the well field. Samples from the well field contained some constituents of concern for drinking-water quality, including nitrate; the pesticide compounds atrazine, deethylatrazine, and simazine; and the volatile organic compounds tetrachloroethene (also called perchloroethene, or PCE), chloroform, bromoform, and dibromochloromethane. These constituents were detected in untreated water at concentrations much less than established drinking-water standards, where such standards exist. Overall, the study findings point to four primary factors that affect the movement and fate of contaminants and the vulnerability of the public-supply well field in San Antonio, Texas: (1) groundwater age (how long ago water entered, or recharged, the aquifer), (2) fast pathways for flow of groundwater through features formed or enlarged by dissolution of bedrock, (3) recharge characteristics of the aquifer, and (4) natural geochemical processes within the aquifer. A computer-model simulation of groundwater flow and transport was used to estimate the traveltime (or age) of water particles entering public-supply well W4 in the well field. Modeled findings show that almost half of the water reaching the public-supply well is less than 2 years old. Such a large percentage of very young water indicates that (1) contaminants entering the aquifer may be transported rapidly to the well, (2) there is limited time for chemical reactions to occur in the aquifer that may attenuate contaminants, and (3) should recharge water become contaminated with