WorldWideScience

Sample records for brominated organic contaminants

  1. Chlorinated and brominated organic contaminants in fish from Shanghai markets: a case study of human exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Yanling; Strid, Anna; Bignert, Anders; Zhu, Zhiliang; Zhao, Jianfu; Athanasiadou, Maria; Athanassiadis, Ioannis; Bergman, Åke

    2012-10-01

    In the present study were two favorite edible fish species for local residents, i.e., mandarin fish and crawfish, collected from the Shanghai market and analyzed for selected organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCDD), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and methoxylated PBDEs (MeO-PBDEs). Efforts were also made to identify the potential sources of these contaminants. Comparable concentrations of hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs), dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethanes (DDTs) and HBCDD were found in muscle tissue of mandarin fish from Guangdong (GDF), the Pearl River Delta and from Taihu Lake (TLF), the Yangtze River Delta. Levels of chlordanes, PCBs and PBDEs were about one magnitude lower in TLF compared to GDF. The concentrations of OCPs in the butter-like gland of the crawfish (CFB) were 2-5 times of those in the crawfish muscle (CFM) while concentrations of PCBs, PBDEs and MeO-PBDEs were comparable. The different patterns and levels of chlorinated and brominated organohalogen contaminants seen in mandarin fish from GDF and TLF indicates that different types of chemicals might be used in the two delta regions. The present study also shows a good correlation between the concentrations of hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and pentachloroanisol (PCA) in fish for the first time. Fish consumption limits based on chemical contaminants with non-carcinogenic effects were calculated. The estimated maximum daily consumption limit for GDF, TLF, CFM and CFB were 1.5, 2.6, 3.7 and 0.08 kg, respectively, indicating no significant risk regarding the persistent organic pollutants measured in the present study. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Abiotic Bromination of Soil Organic Matter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leri, Alessandra C.; Ravel, Bruce

    2015-11-17

    Biogeochemical transformations of plant-derived soil organic matter (SOM) involve complex abiotic and microbially mediated reactions. One such reaction is halogenation, which occurs naturally in the soil environment and has been associated with enzymatic activity of decomposer organisms. Building on a recent finding that naturally produced organobromine is ubiquitous in SOM, we hypothesized that inorganic bromide could be subject to abiotic oxidations resulting in bromination of SOM. Through lab-based degradation treatments of plant material and soil humus, we have shown that abiotic bromination of particulate organic matter occurs in the presence of a range of inorganic oxidants, including hydrogen peroxide and assorted forms of ferric iron, producing both aliphatic and aromatic forms of organobromine. Bromination of oak and pine litter is limited primarily by bromide concentration. Fresh plant material is more susceptible to bromination than decayed litter and soil humus, due to a labile pool of mainly aliphatic compounds that break down during early stages of SOM formation. As the first evidence of abiotic bromination of particulate SOM, this study identifies a mechanistic source of the natural organobromine in humic substances and the soil organic horizon. Formation of organobromine through oxidative treatments of plant material also provides insights into the relative stability of aromatic and aliphatic components of SOM.

  3. Country specific comparison for profile of chlorinated, brominated and phosphate organic contaminants in indoor dust. Case study for Eastern Romania, 2010.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dirtu, Alin C; Ali, Nadeem; Van den Eede, Nele; Neels, Hugo; Covaci, Adrian

    2012-11-15

    We have evaluated the levels and specific profiles of several organohalogenated contaminants, including organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and flame retardants (FRs), such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs), novel brominated FRs (NBFRs), and organophosphate FRs (OPFRs), in 47 indoor dust samples collected in 2010 from urban locations from Iasi, Eastern Romania. The dominant contaminants found in the samples were OPFRs (median sum OPFRs 7890 ng/g). Surprisingly, OCPs were also measured at high levels (median 1300 ng/g). Except for BDE 209 (median 275 ng/g), PBDEs were present in dust samples at relatively low levels (median sum PBDEs 8 ng/g). PCBs were also measured at low levels (median sum PCBs 35 ng/g), while NBFRs were only occasionally detected, showing a low usage in goods present on the Romanian market. The results of the present study evidence the existence of a multitude of chemical formulations in indoor dust. FRs are usually associated to human exposure via ingestion of dust, but other chemicals, such as OCPs, are not commonly reported in such matrix. Although OCPs were found at comparable levels with OPFRs in Romanian dust, OCPs possess a higher risk to human health due to their considerably lower reference dose (RfD) values. Indeed, the OCP exposure calculated for various intake scenarios was only 2-fold lower than the corresponding RfD. Therefore, the inclusion of OCPs as target chemicals in the indoor environment becomes important for countries where elevated levels in other environmental compartments have been previously shown. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Airborne measurements of organic bromine compounds in the Pacific tropical tropopause layer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Maria A; Atlas, Elliot L; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Rodriguez-Lloveras, Xavier; Kinnison, Douglas E; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Tilmes, Simone; Filus, Michal; Harris, Neil R P; Meneguz, Elena; Ashfold, Matthew J; Manning, Alistair J; Cuevas, Carlos A; Schauffler, Sue M; Donets, Valeria

    2015-11-10

    Very short-lived brominated substances (VSLBr) are an important source of stratospheric bromine, an effective ozone destruction catalyst. However, the accurate estimation of the organic and inorganic partitioning of bromine and the input to the stratosphere remains uncertain. Here, we report near-tropopause measurements of organic brominated substances found over the tropical Pacific during the NASA Airborne Tropical Tropopause Experiment campaigns. We combine aircraft observations and a chemistry-climate model to quantify the total bromine loading injected to the stratosphere. Surprisingly, despite differences in vertical transport between the Eastern and Western Pacific, VSLBr (organic + inorganic) contribute approximately similar amounts of bromine [∼6 (4-9) parts per trillion] [corrected] to the stratospheric input at the tropical tropopause. These levels of bromine cause substantial ozone depletion in the lower stratosphere, and any increases in future abundances (e.g., as a result of aquaculture) will lead to larger depletions.

  5. Algae form brominated organic compounds in surface waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huetteroth, A.; Putschew, A.; Jekel, M. [Tech. Univ. Berlin (Germany)

    2004-09-15

    Monitoring of organic halogen compounds, measured as adsorbable organic bromine (AOBr) revealed seasonal high concentrations of organic bromine compounds in a surface water (Lake Tegel, Berlin, Germany). Usually, in late summer, concentrations are up to five times higher than during the rest of the year. The AOBr of the lake inflows (throughout the year less then 6 {mu}g/L) were always lower then those in the lake, which indicates a production of AOBr in the lake. A correlation of the AOBr and chlorophyll-a concentration (1) in the lake provides first evidence for the influence of phototrophic organisms. The knowledge of the natural production of organohalogens is relatively recent. Up to now there are more then 3800 identified natural organohalogen compounds that have been detected in marine plants, animals, and bacteria and also in terrestrial plants, fungi, lichen, bacteria, insects, some higher animals, and humans. Halogenated organic compounds are commonly considered to be of anthropogenic origin; derived from e.g. pharmaceuticals, herbicides, fungicides, insecticides, flame retardants, intermediates in organic synthesis and solvents. Additionally they are also produced as by-products during industrial processes and by waste water and drinking water disinfection. Organohalogen compounds may be toxic, persistent and/or carcinogenic. In order to understand the source and environmental relevance of naturally produced organobromine compounds in surface waters, the mechanism of the formation was investigated using batch tests with lake water and algae cultures.

  6. Preliminary study on the occurrence of brominated organic compounds in Dutch marine organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotterman, Michiel; van der Veen, Ike; van Hesselingen, Judith; Leonards, Pim; Osinga, Ronald; de Boer, Jacob

    2003-07-01

    The extracts of three marine organisms; the ascidian Ciona intestinalis, the brown seaweed Sargassum muticum and the sponge Halichondria panicea, all elicited a number of brominated compounds, some of which were tentatively identified. Tribromophenol was observed in all species. This compound, also industrially produced as flame retardant and fungicide, was likely due to endogenous production.

  7. Chlorine and Bromine Isotope Fractionation of Halogenated Organic Compounds in Electron Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Caiming; Tan, Jianhua; Shi, Zhiqiang; Tang, Caixing; Xiong, Songsong; Liu, Jun; Fan, Yujuan; Peng, Xianzhi

    2017-01-01

    Revelation of chlorine and bromine isotope fractionation of halogenated organic compounds (HOCs) in electron ionization mass spectrometry (EI-MS) is crucial for compound-specific chlorine/bromine isotope analysis (CSIA-Cl/Br) using gas chromatography EI-MS (GC-EI-MS). This study systematically investigated chlorine/bromine isotope fractionation in EI-MS of HOCs including 12 organochlorines and 5 organobromines using GC-double focus magnetic-sector high resolution MS (GC-DFS-HRMS). Chlorine/br...

  8. Chlorine and Bromine Isotope Fractionation of Halogenated Organic Pollutants on Gas Chromatography Columns

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Caiming; Tan, Jianhua; Xiong, Songsong; Liu, Jun; Fan, Yujuan; Peng, Xianzhi

    2017-01-01

    Compound-specific chlorine/bromine isotope analysis (CSIA-Cl/Br) has become a useful approach for degradation pathway investigation and source appointment of halogenated organic pollutants (HOPs). CSIA-Cl/Br is usually conducted by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), which could be negatively impacted by chlorine and bromine isotope fractionation of HOPs on GC columns. In this study, 31 organochlorines and 4 organobromines were systematically investigated in terms of Cl/Br isotope f...

  9. Sea ice-associated diet change increases the levels of chlorinated and brominated contaminants in polar bears.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckinney, Melissa A; Peacock, Elizabeth; Letcher, Robert J

    2009-06-15

    Two global environmental issues, climate change and contamination by persistent organic pollutants, represent major concerns for arctic ecosystems. Yet, it is unclear how these two stressors interact in the Arctic. For instance, the influence of climate-associated changes in food web structure on exposure to pollutants within arctic ecosystems is presently unknown. Here, we report on recent changes in feeding ecology (1991-2007) in polar bears (Ursus maritimus) from the western Hudson Bay subpopulation that have resulted in increases in the tissue concentrations of several chlorinated and brominated contaminants. Differences in timing of the annual sea ice breakup explained a significant proportion of the diet variation among years. As expected from climate change predictions, this diet change was consistent with an increase in the consumed proportions of open water-associated seal species compared to ice-associated seal species in years of earlier sea ice breakup. Our results demonstrate that climate change is a modulating influence on contaminants in this polar bear subpopulation and may pose an additional and previously unidentified threat to northern ecosystems through altered exposures to contaminants.

  10. Halogen-specific total organic halogen analysis: Assessment by recovery of total bromine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langsa, Markus; Allard, Sebastien; Kristiana, Ina; Heitz, Anna; Joll, Cynthia A

    2017-08-01

    Determination of halogen-specific total organic halogen (TOX) is vital for studies of disinfection of waters containing bromide, since total organic bromine (TOBr) is likely to be more problematic than total organic chlorine. Here, we present further halogen-specific TOX method optimisation and validation, focusing on measurement of TOBr. The optimised halogen-specific TOX method was validated based on the recovery of model compounds covering different classes of disinfection by-products (haloacetic acids, haloacetonitriles, halophenols and halogenated benzenes) and the recovery of total bromine (mass balance of TOBr and bromide concentrations) during disinfection of waters containing dissolved organic matter and bromide. The validation of a halogen-specific TOX method based on the mass balance of total bromine has not previously been reported. Very good recoveries of organic halogen from all model compounds were obtained, indicating high or complete conversion of all organic halogen in the model compound solution through to halide in the absorber solution for ion chromatography analysis. The method was also successfully applied to monitor conversion of bromide to TOBr in a groundwater treatment plant. An excellent recovery (101%) of total bromine was observed from the raw water to the post-chlorination stage. Excellent recoveries of total bromine (92%-95%) were also obtained from chlorination of a synthetic water containing dissolved organic matter and bromide, demonstrating the validity of the halogen-specific TOX method for TOBr measurement. The halogen-specific TOX method is an important tool to monitor and better understand the formation of halogenated organic compounds, in particular brominated organic compounds, in drinking water systems. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  11. Soil contamination by brominated flame retardants in open waste dumping sites in Asian developing countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eguchi, Akifimi; Isobe, Tomohiko; Ramu, Karri; Tue, Nguyen Minh; Sudaryanto, Agus; Devanathan, Gnanasekaran; Viet, Pham Hung; Tana, Rouch Seang; Takahashi, Shin; Subramanian, Annamalai; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2013-03-01

    In Asian developing countries, large amounts of municipal wastes are dumped into open dumping sites each day without adequate management. This practice may cause several adverse environmental consequences and increase health risks to local communities. These dumping sites are contaminated with many chemicals including brominated flame retardants (BFRs) such as polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs). BFRs may be released into the environment through production processes and through the disposal of plastics and electronic wastes that contain them. The purpose of this study was to elucidate the status of BFR pollution in municipal waste dumping sites in Asian developing countries. Soil samples were collected from six open waste dumping sites and five reference sites in Cambodia, India, Indonesia, Malaysia, and Vietnam from 1999 to 2007. The results suggest that PBDEs are the dominant contaminants in the dumping sites in Asian developing countries, whereas HBCD contamination remains low. Concentrations of PBDEs and HBCDs ranged from ND to 180 μg/kg dry wt and ND to 1.4 μg/kg dry wt, respectively, in the reference sites and from 0.20 to 430 μg/kg dry wt and ND to 2.5 μg/kg dry wt, respectively, in the dumping sites. Contamination levels of PBDEs in Asian municipal dumping sites were comparable with those reported from electronic waste dismantling areas in Pearl River delta, China. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Formation of brominated disinfection byproducts from natural organic matter isolates and model compounds in a sulfate radical-based oxidation process

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yuru

    2014-12-16

    A sulfate radical-based advanced oxidation process (SR-AOP) has received increasing application interest for the removal of water/wastewater contaminants. However, limited knowledge is available on its side effects. This study investigated the side effects in terms of the production of total organic bromine (TOBr) and brominated disinfection byproducts (Br-DBPs) in the presence of bromide ion and organic matter in water. Sulfate radical was generated by heterogeneous catalytic activation of peroxymonosulfate. Isolated natural organic matter (NOM) fractions as well as low molecular weight (LMW) compounds were used as model organic matter. Considerable amounts of TOBr were produced by SR-AOP, where bromoform (TBM) and dibromoacetic acid (DBAA) were identified as dominant Br-DBPs. In general, SR-AOP favored the formation of DBAA, which is quite distinct from bromination with HOBr/OBr- (more TBM production). SR-AOP experimental results indicate that bromine incorporation is distributed among both hydrophobic and hydrophilic NOM fractions. Studies on model precursors reveal that LMW acids are reactive TBM precursors (citric acid > succinic acid > pyruvic acid > maleic acid). High DBAA formation from citric acid, aspartic acid, and asparagine was observed; meanwhile aspartic acid and asparagine were the major precursors of dibromoacetonitrile and dibromoacetamide, respectively.

  13. Characterization of Three Tetrabromobisphenol-S Derivatives in Mollusks from Chinese Bohai Sea: A Strategy for Novel Brominated Contaminants Identification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ai-feng; Tian, Yong; Yin, Nuo-ya; Yu, Miao; Qu, Guang-bo; Shi, Jian-bo; Du, Yu-guo; Jiang, Gui-bin

    2015-07-01

    Identification of novel brominated contaminants in the environment, especially the derivatives and byproducts of brominated flame retardants (BFRs), has become a wide concern because of their adverse effects on human health. Herein, we qualitatively and quantitatively identified three byproducts of tetrabromobisphenol-S bis(2,3-dibromopropyl ether) (TBBPS-BDBPE), including TBBPS mono(allyl ether) (TBBPS-MAE), TBBPS mono(2-bromoallyl ether) (TBBPS-MBAE) and TBBPS mono(2,3-dibromopropyl ether) (TBBPS-MDBPE) as novel brominated contaminants. Meanwhile, the mass spectra and analytical method for determination of TBBPS-BDBPE byproducts were presented for the first time. The detectable concentrations (dry weight) of TBBPS-MAE, TBBPS-MBAE and TBBPS-MDBPE were in the ranges 28-394 μg/g in technical TBBPS-BDBPE and 0.1-4.1 ng/g in mollusks collected from the Chinese Bohai Sea. The detection frequencies in mollusk samples were 5%, 39%, 95% for TBBPS-MAE, TBBPS-MBAE and TBBPS-MDBPE, respectively, indicating their prevailing in the environment. The results showed that they could be co-produced and leaked into the environment with production process, and might be more bioaccumulative and toxic than TBBPS-BDBPE. Therefore, the production and use of TBBPS derivatives lead to unexpected contamination to the surrounding environment. This study also provided an effective approach for identification of novel contaminants in the environment with synthesized standards and Orbitrap high resolution mass spectrometry.

  14. Levels of brominated flame retardants and other pesistent organic pollutants in breast milk samples from Limpopo province, South Africa

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Darnerud, Per Ola, E-mail: poda@slv.se [Toxicology Division, National Food Administration, P.O. Box 622, SE-751 26 Uppsala (Sweden); Aune, Marie; Larsson, Lotta [Chemistry Division 2, National Food Administration, P.O. Box 622, SE-751 26 Uppsala (Sweden); Lignell, Sanna [Toxicology Division, National Food Administration, P.O. Box 622, SE-751 26 Uppsala (Sweden); Mutshatshi, Tshinanne; Okonkwo, Jonathan; Botha, Ben [Faculty of Science, Tshwane University of Technology, Pretoria (South Africa); Agyei, Nana [Department of Chemistry, Limpopo University, Medunsa (South Africa)

    2011-09-01

    The non-occupational exposure to brominated flame retardants, and other persistent organic pollutants (POPs) was studied by collecting human breast milk samples from mothers residing in Thohoyandou area, a rural district in the Limpopo Province, northern part of South Africa (SA). Of all collected samples to be analysed (n = 28), those with large enough milk volumes, (n = 14) were quantified for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) (9 congeners: BDE-28, 47, 66, 99, 100, 138, 153, 154, and 183) and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) on a GC equipped with dual capillary columns and dual electron-capture detectors (ECD). The levels of PBDE congeners (median sumBDE 1.3 ng/g of lipids) and of HBCD were not far from levels generally found in European studies, and this study may be the first report on the presence of PBDEs and HBCD in SA breast milk. On a congener basis, the finding of comparably high BDE-183 levels suggests a specific PBDE usage, or contamination situation in SA. Apart from BFRs, the high DDT levels found in the breast milk from this area (median and maximum sumDDT levels of about 4 600 and over 20 000 ng/g of lipids, respectively; n = 28) have earlier been reported. In addition, other POPs (PCBs, HCB and HCHs) were found in SA breast milk, at relatively low levels. To conclude, measurable levels of PBDEs and HBCD, and a specific BDE congener pattern, were found in breast milk from the Limpopo province, SA. A number of other POPs, including DDTs in high levels, were also present. - Highlights: {yields} Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) were analysed in South African breast milk. {yields} Focus of interest were brominated flame retardants (BRFs). {yields} Sampling area was the rural Limpopo Province, northern SA. {yields} Probably the first reported African data on BFRs (PBDEs, HBCD) in breast milk. {yields} Reported BFR data similar to European levels.

  15. Transplantation of contaminated organs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Vliet, J. A.; Tidow, G.; van Saene, H. F. K.; Krom, R. A. F.; Slooff, M. J. H.; Weening, J. J.; Tegzess, A. M.; Meijer, S.; van Boven, W. P. L.

    In cadaveric organ transplantation there is a risk of transfer of infectious agents from donor to recipient. The consequences can be fatal for immuosuppressed recipients. This is illustrated by a case history in which an infection with the fungus Monosporium apiospermum was transferred from a donor

  16. Organic contaminates in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osman, M A; Belal, M; Nomrossy, A M; Yousse, A M

    1980-01-01

    The carbon adsorption method was used for separating organic matter from large samples of drainage, river and tap water. The carbon chloroform extract (CCE) was separated into different solubility fractions and the neutral fraction was separated into aliphatic, aromatic and oxy-compounds using column chromatography. The aromatic fraction was subjected to TLC, IR and UV analysis. The pesticide endrin was present in both river and tap water at concentrations of 0.7 and 1.5 ppb, respectively.

  17. Application of ion-selective electrodes for the microdetermination of chlorine and bromine in volatile organic compounds

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Potman, W.; Dahmen, E.A.M.F.

    1972-01-01

    A method is described for the determination of chlorine and bromine in mg samples of highly halogenated volatile organic compounds. The samples are introduced into the combustion system by injection and burnt in a stream of oxygen at 1000° over platinum and quartz. The combustion gases are absorbed

  18. Levels of chlorinated, brominated, and perfluorinated contaminants in birds of prey spanning multiple trophic levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yordy, Jennifer E; Rossman, Sam; Ostrom, Peggy H; Reiner, Jessica L; Bargnesi, Keely; Hughes, Stacy; Elliot, James D

    2013-04-01

    Birds of prey occupy high trophic levels and can consequently bioaccumulate high levels of environmental contaminants. To evaluate exposure to past- and current-use pollutants, we measured legacy contaminants (i.e., polychlorinated biphenyls [PCBs]; organochlorine pesticides, e.g., DDT), contaminants of emerging concern (polybrominated diphenyl ethers [PBDEs]; perfluorinated compounds [PFCs]), and stable isotopes (δ(13)C, δ(15)N) in 26 birds of prey (10 species) from coastal South Carolina (USA) sampled in 2009 and 2010. Nitrogen isotope ratios (δ(15)N) ranged from 5.2% to 13.7%, indicating the birds of prey spanned two to three trophic levels. Legacy contaminant levels were highly variable but generally comparable to levels reported previously for birds of prey in the southeast US, suggesting exposure has not declined substantially over the past 40 yr. Despite their status as newly emerging environmental contaminants, PFC levels were within the same order of magnitude as legacy contaminants. Although PBDEs were less prevalent, levels were among the greatest observed in wildlife to date (∑PBDEs max. 200 μg/g lipid). Relative contaminant profiles also varied between birds of prey utilizing low and high trophic levels; specifically PFCs contributed to a larger proportion of the contaminant burden in birds utilizing high trophic levels, whereas the legacy pesticide mirex was a larger contributor in low-trophic-level birds, indicating that relative exposure is in part dependent on foraging ecology. This study demonstrates that birds of prey continue to face exposure to legacy contaminants as well as newly emerging contaminants at levels of concern.

  19. Reaction of bromine and chlorine with phenolic compounds and natural organic matter extracts--Electrophilic aromatic substitution and oxidation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Criquet, Justine; Rodriguez, Eva M; Allard, Sebastien; Wellauer, Sven; Salhi, Elisabeth; Joll, Cynthia A; von Gunten, Urs

    2015-11-15

    Phenolic compounds are known structural moieties of natural organic matter (NOM), and their reactivity is a key parameter for understanding the reactivity of NOM and the disinfection by-product formation during oxidative water treatment. In this study, species-specific and/or apparent second order rate constants and mechanisms for the reactions of bromine and chlorine have been determined for various phenolic compounds (phenol, resorcinol, catechol, hydroquinone, phloroglucinol, bisphenol A, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, gallic acid, hesperetin and tannic acid) and flavone. The reactivity of bromine with phenolic compounds is very high, with apparent second order rate constants at pH 7 in the range of 10(4) to 10(7) M(-1) s(-1). The highest value was recorded for the reaction between HOBr and the fully deprotonated resorcinol (k = 2.1 × 10(9) M(-1) s(-1)). The reactivity of phenolic compounds is enhanced by the activating character of the phenolic substituents, e.g. further hydroxyl groups. With the data set from this study, the ratio between the species-specific rate constants for the reactions of chlorine versus bromine with phenolic compounds was confirmed to be about 3000. Phenolic compounds react with bromine or chlorine either by oxidation (electron transfer, ET) or electrophilic aromatic substitution (EAS) processes. The dominant process mainly depends on the relative position of the hydroxyl substituents and the possibility of quinone formation. While phenol, p-hydroxybenzoic acid and bisphenol A undergo EAS, hydroquinone, catechol, gallic acid and tannic acid, with hydroxyl substituents in ortho or para positions, react with bromine by ET leading to quantitative formation of the corresponding quinones. Some compounds (e.g. phloroglucinol) show both partial oxidation and partial electrophilic aromatic substitution and the ratio observed for the pathways depends on the pH. For the reaction of six NOM extracts with bromine, electrophilic aromatic substitution

  20. Chlorinated, brominated and fluorinated organic pollutants in African Penguin eggs: 30 years since the previous assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouwman, Hindrik; Govender, Danny; Underhill, Les; Polder, Anuschka

    2015-05-01

    The African Penguin population has drastically declined over the last 100 years. Changes in food availability due to over-fishing and other oceanographic changes seem to be major causes. However, it has also been 30 years since organic pollutants as a potential factor have been assessed. We analysed penguin eggs collected in 2011 and 2012 from two breeding colonies 640 km apart: Robben Island near Cape Town on the Atlantic Ocean coast, and Bird Island near Port Elizabeth on the Indian Ocean coast of South Africa. We quantified organochlorine pesticides, brominated flame retardants, and perfluorinated compounds (PFCs). Compared to 30 years ago, concentrations of ΣDDT have remained about the same or slightly lower, while ΣPCBs declined almost four-fold. The use of DDT in malaria control is unlikely to have contributed. PFCs were detected in all eggs. Indications (non-significant) of eggshell thinning associated with ΣDDT and ΣPCB was found. It seems therefore that the concentrations of measured organic pollutants the African Penguin eggs are not contributing directly to its current demise, but concerns remain about thinner shells and desiccation. Effects of combinations of compounds and newer compounds cannot be excluded, as well as more subtle effects on reproduction, development, and behaviour. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Dissolved organic matter composition drives the marine production of brominated very short-lived substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yina; Thornton, Daniel C O; Bianchi, Thomas S; Arnold, William A; Shields, Michael R; Chen, Jie; Yvon-Lewis, Shari A

    2015-03-17

    Brominated very short-lived substances (BrVSLS), such as bromoform, are important trace gases for stratospheric ozone chemistry. These naturally derived trace gases are formed via bromoperoxidase-mediated halogenation of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in seawater. Information on DOM type in relation to the observed BrVSLS concentrations in seawater, however, is scarce. We examined the sensitivity of BrVSLS production in relation to the presence of specific DOM moieties. A total of 28 model DOM compounds in artificial seawater were treated with vanadium bromoperoxidase (V-BrPO). Our results show a clear dependence of BrVSLS production on DOM type. In general, molecules that comprise a large fraction of the bulk DOM pool did not noticeably affect BrVSLS production. Only specific cell metabolites and humic acid appeared to significantly enhance BrVSLS production. Amino acids and lignin phenols suppressed enzyme-mediated BrVSLS production and may instead have formed halogenated nonvolatile molecules. Dibromomethane production was not observed in any experiments, suggesting it is not produced by the same pathway as the other BrVSLS. Our results suggest that regional differences in DOM composition may explain the observed BrVSLS concentration variability in the global ocean. Ultimately, BrVSLS production and concentrations are likely affected by DOM composition, reactivity, and cycling in the ocean.

  2. Chlorine and bromine isotope fractionation of halogenated organic pollutants on gas chromatography columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Caiming; Tan, Jianhua; Xiong, Songsong; Liu, Jun; Fan, Yujuan; Peng, Xianzhi

    2017-09-08

    Compound-specific chlorine/bromine isotope analysis (CSIA-Cl/Br) has become a powerful approach to investigate degradation pathways and apportion sources of halogenated organic pollutants (HOPs) in the environment. CSIA-Cl/Br is usually conducted by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), which could be negatively impacted by isotope fractionation on GC columns. In this study, on-column Cl/Br isotope fractionation of 31 organochlorines and 4 organobromines was explored using GC-double focus magnetic-sector high resolution MS (GC-DFS-HRMS). Twenty-nine HOPs exhibited inverse Cl/Br isotope fractionation for which the heavier isotopologues eluted faster than the lighter ones on GC columns, and two polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB-138 and PCB-153) showed normal isotope fractionation, whereas the rest four HOPs did not show observable isotope fractionation. The isotope fractionation extents varied from -13.0‰ to 73.1‰. Mechanisms of the on-column Cl/Br isotope fractionation were tentatively elucidated with a modified two-film model. The results demonstrate that integrating peak area as complete as possible for separable chromatographic peaks and integrating the middle retention-time segments for the inseparable peaks are helpful to improve precision and accuracy of the CSIA-Cl/Br data. The findings of this study will shed light on development of CSIA-Cl/Br methods with respect to improving precision and accuracy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Regional contamination versus regional dietary differences: Understanding geographic variation in brominated and chlorinated contaminant levels in polar bears

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKinney, M.A.; Letcher, R.J.; Aars, Jon; Born, E.W.; Branigan, M.; Dietz, R.; Evans, T.J.; Gabrielsen, G.W.; Muir, D.C.G.; Peacock, E.; Sonne, C.

    2011-01-01

    The relative contribution of regional contamination versus dietary differences to geographic variation in polar bear (Ursus maritimus) contaminant levels is unknown. Dietary variation between Alaska Canada, East Greenland, and Svalbard subpopulations was assessed by muscle nitrogen and carbon stable isotope (?? 15N, ?? 13C) and adipose fatty acid (FA) signatures relative to their main prey (ringed seals). Western and southern Hudson Bay signatures were characterized by depleted ?? 15N and ??13C, lower proportions of C20 and C22 monounsaturated FAs and higher proportions of C18 and longer chain polyunsaturated FAs. East Greenland and Svalbard signatures were reversed relative to Hudson Bay. Alaskan ?? 2011 American Chemical Society.

  4. Brominated and fluorinated organic pollutants in the breast milk of first-time Irish mothers: is there a relationship to levels in food?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Pratt, Iona

    2013-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants - polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and others - have been measured in 11 pooled breast milk samples from 109 first-time mothers in Ireland. Additionally, the study has measured levels of polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and furans (PBDD\\/Fs), mixed halogenated dioxins (PXCC\\/Fs) and biphenyls (PXBs), polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs) and perfluoroalkylated substances (PFAS) in these samples. The mean sum of 19 PBDEs including BDE-209 was 4.85 ng g(-1) fat, which is comparable with that found in other European countries. BDE-47, BDE-153, BDE-209, BDE-99 and BDE-100 were found at the highest concentrations. The only PBBs detected consistently were BB-77, BB-126 and BB-153, with highest concentrations being found for BB-153 (mean = 0.13 ng g(-1) fat). The mean sum of HBCD enantiomers was 3.52 ng g(-1) fat, with α-HBCD representing over 70% of the total. Of the other brominated flame retardants - tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBP-A), hexabromobenzene (HBB), decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE) and bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxyethane) (BTBPE) - examined, only TBBP-A was detected above the limit of detection (LOD), in two of the 11 pools analysed. All measured PBDF congeners were observed (at 0.02-0.91 pg g(-1) fat), but 2,3,7,8-tetrabromo-dibenzodioxin (TeBDD) was the only PBDD detected, with a mean concentration of 0.09 pg g(-1) fat. The occurrence of the mixed chlorinated\\/brominated dibenzodioxins, dibenzofurans and biphenyls, 2-B-3,7,8-CDD, 2,3-B-7,8-CDF, 4-B-2,3,7,8-CDF, PXB 105, PXB 118, PXB 126 and PCB 156 in breast milk in the current study may indicate that levels of these contaminants are increasing in the environment. Polychlorinated naphthalenes were detected in all samples, but not perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) and other PFAS. The pattern of occurrence of these brominated and fluorinated persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in Irish breast milk shows a general

  5. Surface Analysis of Stratospheric Particles with TOF-SIMS: Bromine Enrichments Due to Contamination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, T.; Rost, D.; Jessberger, E. K.

    1995-09-01

    Volatile element enrichments compared to CI abundances in stratospheric interplanetary dust particles especially for Br have been interpreted as due to atmospheric contamination processes [1] or, less substantiated, as being indicative for a new type of chondritic material [2, 3]. Although only little is known about the actual Br concentration in the stratosphere, it is well accepted that halogens play an important role in stratospheric chemistry and therefore contamination processes have to be excluded before a Br-rich chondritic parent body can be speculated on. The analysis of the lateral distribution of halogens in IDPs with high-resolution imaging TOF-SIMS (time-of-flight secondary-ion-mass-spectrometry) [4] may help to solve the controversy about the ubiquity of Br in stratospheric IDPs. Besides controversially discussed theoretical models which try to test correlations between Br-content and stratospheric residence time or surface areas [5, 6, 7], first observational hints for halogen contamination of at least two chondritic IDPs were found for W7029E5, where Br- salt nanocrystals of presumably atmospheric origin were observed [5], and for L2006G1, which showed a halogen-rich exterior rim [8]. TOF-SIMS with its extremely high surface sensitivity -- the information depth is in the order of a few atomic monolayers -- seems to be suitable for a systematic search for surface correlated halogens in IDPs. Although, in general, plane surfaces are required for TOF-SIMS measurements, particle analysis is possible with this technique [9], though quantification is highly complicated due to topographic effects on secondary ion production and detection probability. We analyzed five stratospheric particles from small area collector U2071 which were previously investigated with SEM-EDX [10]. Silicone oil on the surfaces of some particles could still be detected with TOF-SIMS, even after extensive hexane rinsing. In three cases (chondritic particles U2071B7a, F3, and H1a

  6. Biomagnification of persistent chlorinated and brominated contaminants in food web components of the Yellow Sea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byun, Gyo-Hyuk; Moon, Hyo-Bang; Choi, Jung-Hwa; Hwang, Jeomshik; Kang, Chang-Keun

    2013-08-15

    Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were measured in 32 species inhabiting the Yellow Sea to assess their bioaccumulation potentials. The concentrations in these samples were lower than those reported for other countries or locations. Relatively high levels of BDE 209 in biota suggest an ongoing source of deca-BDE technical mixing within the Yellow Sea. The accumulation profiles of PCBs were uniform between species, but the concentrations of OCPs and PBDEs varied widely. Pelagic and benthic food-chain components were separated by their δ(13)C values. Significant positive correlations between δ(15)N and PCB 153, PCB 138, p,p'-DDE, oxy-chlordane, and trans-nonachlordane were found only for pelagic consumers, indicating that the pelagic food chain is an important bioaccumulation pathway for selected PCB and OCP compounds. The other compounds did not show any biomagnification through benthic and pelagic food chains, suggesting the lower bioaccumulation potentials of these contaminants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Levels and profiles of chlorinated and brominated contaminants in Southern Hemisphere humpback whales, Megaptera novaeangliae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorneles, Paulo R; Lailson-Brito, José; Secchi, Eduardo R; Dirtu, Alin C; Weijs, Liesbeth; Dalla Rosa, Luciano; Bassoi, Manuela; Cunha, Haydée A; Azevedo, Alexandre F; Covaci, Adrian

    2015-04-01

    The study documents the levels and profiles of selected contaminants [polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and methoxylated PBDEs (MeO-PBDEs)] in blubber biopsy samples collected from humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) in Antarctic Peninsula waters. In addition, we investigated year-to-year and sex-related differences in the bioaccumulation patterns. Except for hexachlorobenzene (HCB), whose concentrations were in the same range as those found in whales from the Northern Hemisphere, levels of all other compounds were lower in Southern Hemisphere whales compared to literature data on animals from the Arctic and subarctic region. The mean contribution to the sum of all anthropogenic organohalogen compounds (ΣOHC) decreased in the following order ΣPCBs (44%)>HCB (31%)>ΣDDXs (13%)>ΣCHLs (4.6%)>ΣHCHs (4.4%)>ΣPBDEs (0.9%). The predominant compounds within each chemical class were: PCBs 153, 149, 101 and 138; p,p'-DDE; γ-HCH; trans-nonachlor; PBDEs 99 and 47. The most dominant MeO-PBDE congener was 6-MeO-BDE 47. As samples were collected during three consecutive summer seasons, year-to-year trends could be assessed indicating a significant decrease from 2000 to 2003 for ΣCHL levels. Higher ΣPBDE concentrations and higher values of the ΣPBDE / ΣMeO-PBDE ratio, as well as higher ratios between the two MeO-BDEs (2'-MeO-BDE 68/6-MeO-BDE 47) were found in females compared to males. Higher ΣMeO-PBDE concentrations and higher values of the ratios between the lower chlorinated and the higher chlorinated PCBs were found in males than in females. In addition, five out of six significant differences found through discriminant function analysis were gender-related. The literature reports both feeding in mid- to low-latitudes and sex-related differences in migration patterns for humpback whales from the Southern Hemisphere, indicating that the hypothesis of dietary differences between males and

  8. The separation of waste printed circuit board by dissolving bromine epoxy resin using organic solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, P; Chen, Y; Wang, L Y; Zhou, M; Zhou, J

    2013-02-01

    Separation of waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs) has been a bottleneck in WPCBs resource processing. In this study, the separation of WPCBs was performed using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as a solvent. Various parameters, which included solid to liquid ratio, temperature, WPCB sizes, and time, were studied to understand the separation of WPCBs by dissolving bromine epoxy resin using DMSO. Experimental results showed that the concentration of dissolving the bromine epoxy resin increased with increasing various parameters. The optimum condition of complete separation of WPCBs was solid to liquid ratio of 1:7 and WPCB sizes of 16 mm(2) at 145°C for 60 min. The used DMSO was vapored under the decompression, which obtained the regenerated DMSO and dissolved bromine epoxy resin. This clean and non-polluting technology offers a new way to separate valuable materials from WPCBs and prevent the environmental pollution of waste printed circuit boards effectively. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Formation of brominated disinfection by-products and bromate in cobalt catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation of phenol.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Kuo; Lu, Junhe; Ji, Yuefei

    2015-11-01

    Formation of halogenated disinfection by-products (DBPs) in sulfate radical [Formula: see text] based oxidation processes attracted considerable attention recently. However, the underlying reaction pathways have not been well explored. This study focused on the transformation of Br(-) in cobalt activated peroxymonosulfate (Co(2+)/PMS) oxidation process. Phenol was added as a model compound to mimic the reactivity of natural organic matter (NOM). It was revealed that Br(-) was efficiently transformed to reactive bromine species (RBS) including free bromine and bromine radicals (Br, [Formula: see text] , etc.) in Co(2+)/PMS system. [Formula: see text] played a principal role during this process. RBS thus generated resulted in the bromination of phenol and formation brominated DBPs (Br-DBPs) including bromoform and bromoacetic acids, during which brominated phenols were detected as the intermediates. Br-DBPs were further degraded by excessive [Formula: see text] and transformed to bromate ultimately. Free bromine was also formed in the absence of Co(2+), suggesting Br(-) could be oxidized by PMS per se. Free bromine was incorporated to phenol sequentially leading to Br-DBPs as well. However, Br-DBPs could not be further transformed in the absence of [Formula: see text] . This is the first study that elucidated the comprehensive transformation map of Br(-) in PMS oxidation systems, which should be taken into consideration when PMS was applied to eliminate contamination in real practice. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Photocatalytic Degradation of Organic Contaminants in Water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Photocatalytic treatment of organics, including regulated and contaminants of emerging concern, has been an important area of this field. Details are provided on the mechanism of degradation, reaction intermediates, kinetics, and nanointerfacial adsorption phenomena. The degradat...

  11. Deriving an atmospheric budget of total organic bromine using airborne in situ measurements from the western Pacific area during SHIVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, S.; Bönisch, H.; Keber, T.; Oram, D. E.; Mills, G.; Engel, A.

    2014-07-01

    During the recent SHIVA (Stratospheric Ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere) project an extensive data set of all halogen species relevant for the atmospheric budget of total organic bromine was collected in the western Pacific region using the Falcon aircraft operated by the German Aerospace agency DLR (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt) covering a vertical range from the planetary boundary layer up to the ceiling altitude of the aircraft of 13 km. In total, more than 700 measurements were performed with the newly developed fully automated in situ instrument GHOST-MS (Gas chromatograph for the Observation of Tracers - coupled with a Mass Spectrometer) by the Goethe University of Frankfurt (GUF) and with the onboard whole-air sampler WASP with subsequent ground-based state-of-the-art GC / MS analysis by the University of East Anglia (UEA). Both instruments yield good agreement for all major (CHBr3 and CH2Br2) and minor (CH2BrCl, CHBrCl2 and CHBr2Cl) VSLS (very short-lived substances), at least at the level of their 2σ measurement uncertainties. In contrast to the suggestion that the western Pacific could be a region of strongly increased atmospheric VSLS abundance (Pyle et al., 2011), we found only in the upper troposphere a slightly enhanced amount of total organic bromine from VSLS relative to the levels reported in Montzka and Reimann et al. (2011) for other tropical regions. From the SHIVA observations in the upper troposphere, a budget for total organic bromine, including four halons (H-1301, H-1211, H-1202, H-2402), CH3Br and the VSLS, is derived for the level of zero radiative heating (LZRH), the input region for the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) and thus also for the stratosphere. With the exception of the two minor VSLS CHBrCl2 and CHBr2Cl, excellent agreement with the values reported in Montzka and Reimann et al. (2011) is found, while being slightly higher than previous studies from our group based on balloon-borne measurements.

  12. Formation of brominated phenolic contaminants from natural manganese oxides-catalyzed oxidation of phenol in the presence of Br(.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kunde; Song, Lianghui; Zhou, Shiyang; Chen, Da; Gan, Jay

    2016-07-01

    Brominated phenolic compounds (BPCs) are a class of persistent and potentially toxic compounds ubiquitously present in the aquatic environment. However, the origin of BPCs is not clearly understood. In this study, we investigated the formation of BPCs from natural manganese oxides (MnOx)-catalyzed oxidation of phenol in the presence of Br(-). Experiments at ambient temperature clearly demonstrated that BPCs were readily produced via the oxidation of phenol by MnOx in the presence of Br(-). In the reaction of MnOx sand with 0.213 μmol/L phenol and 0.34 mmol/L Br(-) for 10 min, more than 60% of phenol and 56% of Br(-) were consumed to form BPCs. The yield of BPCs increased with increasing concentrations of phenol and Br(-). Overall, a total of 14 BPCs including simple bromophenols (4-bromophenol, 2,4-dibromophenol, and 2,4,6-tribromophenol), hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs), and hydroxylated polybrominated biphenyls (OH-PBBs) were identified. The production of BPCs increased with increasing concentrations of Br(-) or phenol. It was deduced that Br(-) was first oxidized to form active bromine, leading to the subsequent bromination of phenol to form bromophenols. The further oxidation of bromophenols by MnOx resulted in the formation of OH-PBDEs and OH-PBBs. In view of the ubiquity of phenol, Br(-), and MnOx in the environment, MnOx-mediated oxidation may play a role on the natural production of BPCs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Brominated Dioxins: Little-Known New Health Hazards - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piskorska-Pliszczyńska Jadwiga

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the present state of the science concerning the polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PBDDs and dibenzofurans (PBDFs. Everywhere in the world people are exposed to anthropogenic origin chemicals. Some of them are long-lived organic compounds, which persist over the years in the environment. Persistent organic pollutants, such as organohalogen compounds, accumulate in environmental and biological compartments and have adverse effects on the health of humans and animals. Little is known about the brominated and mixed chloro/bromo dioxin and furans. Existing literature suggests that brominated dioxins and furans have similar toxicity profiles to their chlorinated analogues. The exposure data are extremely limited, showing a major data gap in estimating the potential environmental and health risk of these chemicals. The rapid increase in the use of brominated flame retardants (the main source of these pollutants has raised the level of concern over environmental and health damage from brominated dioxins and furans. It is likely that human as well as wildlife exposure to these contaminants will increase with their greater use. The findings reported here present strong evidence of the PBDDs and PBDFs as an emerging new class of contaminants.

  14. Critical review of soil contamination by polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs); concentrations, sources and congener profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGrath, Thomas J; Ball, Andrew S; Clarke, Bradley O

    2017-11-01

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) have been used in a broad array of polymeric materials such as plastics, foams, resins and adhesives to inhibit the spread of fires since the 1970s. The widespread environmental contamination and well documented toxic effects of PBDEs have led to bans and voluntary withdrawals in many jurisdictions. Replacement novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) have, however, exhibited many of the same toxic characteristics as PBDEs and appear to share similar environmental fate. This paper presents a critical review of the scientific literature regarding PBDE and NBFR contamination of surface soils internationally, with the secondary objective of identifying probable pollution sources. An evaluation of NBFR distribution in soil was also conducted to assess the suitability of the newer compounds as replacements for PBDEs, with respect to their land contamination potential. Principle production of PBDEs and NBFRs and their consequent use in secondary polymer manufacture appear to be processes with strong potential to contaminate surrounding soils. Evidence suggests that PBDEs and NBFRs are also released from flame retarded products during disposal via landfill, dumping, incineration and recycling. While the land application of sewage sludge represents another major pathway of soil contamination it is not considered in this review as it is extensively covered elsewhere. Both PBDEs and NBFRs were commonly detected at background locations including Antarctica and northern polar regions. PBDE congener profiles in soil were broadly representative of the major constituents in Penta-, Octa- and Deca-BDE commercial mixtures and related to predicted market place demand. BDE-209 dominated soil profiles, followed by BDE-99 and BDE-47. Although further research is required to gain baseline data on NBFRs in soil, the current state of scientific literature suggests that NBFRs pose a similar risk to land contamination as PBDEs. Copyright © 2017

  15. Oxidative treatment of bromide-containing waters: formation of bromine and its reactions with inorganic and organic compounds--a critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeb, Michèle B; Criquet, Justine; Zimmermann-Steffens, Saskia G; von Gunten, Urs

    2014-01-01

    Bromide (Br(-)) is present in all water sources at concentrations ranging from ≈ 10 to >1000 μg L(-1) in fresh waters and about 67 mg L(-1) in seawater. During oxidative water treatment bromide is oxidized to hypobromous acid/hypobromite (HOBr/OBr(-)) and other bromine species. A systematic and critical literature review has been conducted on the reactivity of HOBr/OBr(-) and other bromine species with inorganic and organic compounds, including micropollutants. The speciation of bromine in the absence and presence of chloride and chlorine has been calculated and it could be shown that HOBr/OBr(-) are the dominant species in fresh waters. In ocean waters, other bromine species such as Br2, BrCl, and Br2O gain importance and may have to be considered under certain conditions. HOBr reacts fast with many inorganic compounds such as ammonia, iodide, sulfite, nitrite, cyanide and thiocyanide with apparent second-order rate constants in the order of 10(4)-10(9)M(-1)s(-1) at pH 7. No rate constants for the reactions with Fe(II) and As(III) are available. Mn(II) oxidation by bromine is controlled by a Mn(III,IV) oxide-catalyzed process involving Br2O and BrCl. Bromine shows a very high reactivity toward phenolic groups (apparent second-order rate constants kapp ≈ 10(3)-10(5)M(-1)s(-1) at pH 7), amines and sulfamides (kapp ≈ 10(5)-10(6)M(-1)s(-1) at pH 7) and S-containing compounds (kapp ≈ 10(5)-10(7)M(-1)s(-1) at pH 7). For phenolic moieties, it is possible to derive second-order rate constants with a Hammett-σ-based QSAR approach with [Formula in text]. A negative slope is typical for electrophilic substitution reactions. In general, kapp of bromine reactions at pH 7 are up to three orders of magnitude greater than for chlorine. In the case of amines, these rate constants are even higher than for ozone. Model calculations show that depending on the bromide concentration and the pH, the high reactivity of bromine may outweigh the reactions of chlorine during

  16. Brominated graphitized carbon fibers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, Ching-Cheh (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Low cost, high break elongation graphitized carbon fibers having low degree of graphitization are inert to bromine at room or higher temperatures, but are brominated at -7 to 20 C, and then debrominated at ambient. Repetition of this bromination-debromination process can bring the bromine content to 18 percent. Electrical conductivity of the brominated fibers is three times of the before-bromination value.

  17. Brominated flame retardants and polychlorinated biphenyls in human breast milk from several locations in India: potential contaminant sources in a municipal dumping site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Devanathan, Gnanasekaran; Subramanian, Annamalai; Sudaryanto, Agus; Takahashi, Shin; Isobe, Tomohiko; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2012-02-01

    This study investigated the status of contamination of organohalogen compounds (OCs) such as polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and brominated flame retardant (BFRs), including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs) in human milk samples from several locations in India. The levels of OCs were significantly higher in the milk of mothers living in and near municipal dumping site than other locations indicating that the open dumping sites for municipal wastes act as potential sources of these contaminants in India. The PCB concentrations observed in this study tended to decrease compared to those in the matched locations reported previously, probably due to the restriction of technical PCB usage in India. PBDE levels in human milk were two to three folds lower than those of PCBs in all the sampling locations investigated. Congener profiles of PCBs and PBDEs were different between samples from the dumping site mothers and general populations in other areas suggesting the presence of region-specific sources and pathways. HBCDs were detected in human milk from only two sites, with much lower concentrations and detection frequencies compared to PCBs and PBDEs. When hazard quotients (HQs) of PCBs and PBDEs were estimated for infant health risk, the HQs in some milk samples from the dumping site exceeded the threshold value (HQ>1) of PCBs, indicating the potential risk for infants in the specific site. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Identification of two novel brominated contaminants in water samples by ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-Orbitrap Fusion Tribrid mass spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Aifeng; Qu, Guangbo; Zhang, Chaoli; Gao, Yan; Shi, Jianbo; Du, Yuguo; Jiang, Guibin

    2015-01-16

    Tetrabromobisphenol A mono(2-hydroxyethyl ether) (TBBPA-MHEE) and TBBPA mono(glycidyl ether) (TBBPA-MGE), two impurities of TBBPA derivatives, were hypothesized to be novel brominated contaminants with potential toxicity. However, due to lacking of analytical method and pure standards, their environmental behavior and toxicity have not been studied. Herein we developed a sensitive method based on ultra-high performance liquid chromatography-Orbitrap Fusion Tribrid mass spectrometer (UHPLC-Orbitrap Fusion TMS) for simultaneous detection of TBBPA-MHEE and TBBPA-MGE in water samples. The sample pretreatment method and the experimental conditions of UHPLC and Orbitrap Fusion TMS, were optimized in detail. The instrument detection limits (IDLs) for TBBPA-MHEE and TBBPA-MGE were 0.5pg and 0.6pg, respectively. The method detection limits (MDLs) for TBBPA-MHEE and TBBPA-MGE in river water samples were 0.9 and 0.8ng/L. With the proposed method, we were able to detect TBBPA-MHEE and TBBPA-MGE for the first time in water samples and technical products of TBBPA derivatives. Therefore, UHPLC-Orbitrap Fusion TMS is a simple and effective tool for identification and quantification of novel contaminants in the environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Bromine Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, B

    2001-04-09

    The production and handling in 1999 of about 200 million kilograms of bromine plus substantial derivatives thereof by Great Lakes Chemical Corp. and Albemarle Corporation in their southern Arkansas refineries gave OSHA Occupational Injury/Illness Rates (OIIR) in the range of 0.74 to 1.60 reportable OIIRs per 200,000 man hours. OIIRs for similar industries and a wide selection of other U.S. industries range from 1.6 to 23.9 in the most recent OSHA report. Occupational fatalities for the two companies in 1999 were zero compared to a range in the U.S.of zero for all computer manufacturing to 0.0445 percent for all of agriculture, forestry and fishing in the most recent OSHA report. These results show that bromine and its compounds can be considered as safe chemicals as a result of the bromine safety standards and practices at the two companies. The use of hydrobromic acid as an electrical energy storage medium in reversible PEM fuel cells is discussed. A study in 1979 of 20 megawatt halogen working fluid power plants by Oronzio de Nora Group found such energy to cost 2 to 2.5 times the prevailing base rate at that time. New conditions may reduce this relative cost. The energy storage aspect allows energy delivery at maximum demand times where the energy commands premium rates. The study also found marginal cost and performance advantages for hydrobromic acid over hydrochloric acid working fluid. Separate studies in the late 70s by General Electric also showed marginal performance advantages for hydrobromic acid.

  20. Batch leaching tests of motherboards to assess environmental contamination by bromine, platinum group elements and other selected heavy metals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, César; Grosselli, Melina; González, Patricia; Martínez, Dante; Gil, Raúl

    2016-02-01

    In this study, a batch leaching test was executed to evaluate the toxicity associated with chemicals contained in motherboards. The leaching solutions used were distilled water, nitric acid, acetic acid and synthetic acid rain solution. A total of 21 elements including Ag, As, Au, Br, Cd, Co, Cr, Cu, Hf, Ir, Mn, Ni, Os, Pb, Pd, Pt, Rd, Rh, Se, U and Zn were analyzed. In this study, the pH values of all the leachates fell within the range of 2.33-4.88. The highest concentrations of metals were obtained from the acid rain solution, whilst the maximum value of bromine was achieved with solution of acetic acid. Appreciable concentrations of platinum group elements were detected with concentrations around 3.45, 1.43, 1.21 and 22.19 µg L(-1) for Ir, Pd, Pt and Rh, respectively. The different leaching of the motherboards revealed the predominant presence of the toxic substances in the leached from the e-waste. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Brominated flame retardants and perfluorinated chemicals, two groups of persistent contaminants in Belgian human blood and milk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roosens, Laurence [Toxicological Centre, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); D' Hollander, Wendy; Bervoets, Lieven [Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium); Reynders, Hans; Van Campenhout, Karen [Environment and Health Unit, Department of Environment, Nature and Energy, Flemish Government - Koning Albert II-laan 20, Bus 8, 1000 Brussels (Belgium); Cornelis, Christa; Van Den Heuvel, Rosette; Koppen, Gudrun [Unit Environmental Risk and Health, Flemish Institute of Technological Research (VITO), Boeretang 200, 2400 Mol (Belgium); Covaci, Adrian, E-mail: adrian.covaci@ua.ac.b [Toxicological Centre, Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of Antwerp, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Laboratory for Ecophysiology, Biochemistry and Toxicology, Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Groenenborgerlaan 171, 2020 Antwerp (Belgium)

    2010-08-15

    We assessed the exposure of the Flemish population to brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) by analysis of pooled cord blood, adolescent and adult serum, and human milk. Levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in blood (range 1.6-6.5 ng/g lipid weight, lw) and milk (range 2.0-6.4 ng/g lw) agreed with European data. Hexabromocyclododecane ranged between <2.1-5.7 ng/g lw in milk. Perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS) and perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) dominated in blood and ranged between 1 and 171 ng/mL and <0.9-9.5 ng/mL, respectively. Total PFC levels in milk ranged between <0.5-29 ng/mL. A significant increase in PBDE concentrations was detected from newborns (median 2.1) to the adolescents and adults (medians 3.8 and 4.6 ng/g lw, respectively). An identical trend was observed for PFOS, but not for PFOA. We estimated that newborn exposure to BFRs and PFCs occurs predominantly post-natally, whereas placental transfer has a minor impact on the body burden. - The exposure to BFRs and PFCs of general Flemish population has been assessed throughout several age groups.

  2. Spatial and Temporal Trends of Persistent Organic Chemicals with Emphasis on Brominated Flame Retardants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapid growth in chemical and agrochemical industries during the past century have resulted in the release of large numbers of persistent organic chemicals (POCs) into the environment. Since POCs are prevalent in air, water, soil and tissue of organisms throughout the world and r...

  3. Case studies in organic contaminant hydrogeology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, John A.

    1989-07-01

    The effective management of domestic solid waste and hazardous, toxic, and radioactive waste is a major problem in the area of environmental geology and water sciences over the world. This series of case studies of organic contaminants from both solid and hazardous waste disposal facilities provides examples of these problems. The facilities were investigated to determine risks and liabilities before acquisition, to determine the site hydrogeologic conditions for design of appropriate groundwater monitoring plans, and/or to determine the potential for groundwater contamination. The results of these studies and investigations by Waste Management Inc. (WMI) and its consultants have shown certain relationships in the distribution of organic pollutants to the different geologic and hydrogeologic charac teristics of each facility. In each of the case studies, all 129 priority pollutants were analyzed in private wells and/or monitoring wells at the request of regulatory agencies. The 31 volatile organic compounds (VOCs) of the priority pollutant list were the majority of the organic compounds detected and these data are evaluated in each case study. The case studies are on disposal facilities located in glacial tills, carbonaceous weathered clay soils, weathered shale, limestone bedrock, dolomite bedrock, and alluvial and sedimentary deposits. A brief discussion of groundwater quality impacts and remedial measures also is included.

  4. Contamination of indoor dust and air by polychlorinated biphenyls and brominated flame retardants and relevance of non-dietary exposure in Vietnamese informal e-waste recycling sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tue, Nguyen Minh; Takahashi, Shin; Suzuki, Go; Isobe, Tomohiko; Viet, Pham Hung; Kobara, Yuso; Seike, Nobuyasu; Zhang, Gan; Sudaryanto, Agus; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2013-01-01

    This study investigated the occurrence of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and several additive brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in indoor dust and air from two Vietnamese informal e-waste recycling sites (EWRSs) and an urban site in order to assess the relevance of these media for human exposure. The levels of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), 1,2-bis-(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE) and decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) in settled house dust from the EWRSs (130-12,000, 5.4-400, 5.2-620 and 31-1400 ng g(-1), respectively) were significantly higher than in urban house dust but the levels of PCBs (4.8-320 ng g(-1)) were not higher. The levels of PCBs and PBDEs in air at e-waste recycling houses (1000-1800 and 620-720 pg m(-3), respectively), determined using passive sampling, were also higher compared with non-e-waste houses. The composition of BFRs in EWRS samples suggests the influence from high-temperature processes and occurrence of waste materials containing older BFR formulations. Results of daily intake estimation for e-waste recycling workers are in good agreement with the accumulation patterns previously observed in human milk and indicate that dust ingestion contributes a large portion of the PBDE intake (60%-88%), and air inhalation to the low-chlorinated PCB intake (>80% for triCBs) due to their high levels in dust and air, respectively. Further investigation of both indoor dust and air as the exposure media for other e-waste recycling-related contaminants and assessment of health risk associated with exposure to these contaminant mixtures is necessary. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Numerical simulation of bromine crossover behavior in flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Yaobin; Cheng, Shijian; Chu, Dandan; Li, Xin

    2017-03-01

    Br2 and HBr has its own series of advantages as the positive electrolyte solution, so some batteries select the Br2/Br- as the positive electrolyte solution, such as sodium polysulfide/bromine flow battery, zinc/bromine flow battery, vanadium/ bromine flow batteries and hydrogen/bromine flow batteries. But the crossover benavior of bromine occurs in these batteries too, resulting in cross-contamination, capacity loss and affecting battery's performance. In this work, we build numerical models to study the influence of bromine crossover phenomenon on the three forms of bromine crossover, the concentration of electrolyte on the cathode side and the flow rate of the negative side in the quinone bromine flow battery, to find the main models affecting the bromine crossover and the impact of bromine crossover on battery performance. It was found that the three ways of crossover through the membranes was mainly by diffusion. By reducing the concentration of positive electrolyte solution, the bromine crossover can be reduced and Coulomb Efficiency can be improved. Rising the flow rate of the electrolyte solution on the negative side and reducing the differential between positive side's pressure and negative side's pressure can also reduce the amount of bromine crossover to improve Coulomb efficiency in the battery.

  6. Organic contaminants in soil : desorption kinetics and microbial degradation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlebaum, W.

    1999-01-01

    The availability of organic contaminants in soils or sediments for microbial degradation or removal by physical means (e.g.) soil washing or soil venting) depends on the desorption kinetics of these contaminants from the soil matrix. When the organic contaminants desorb very slow from the

  7. Organics in water contamination analyzer, phase 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-01-01

    The requirements which would result in identifying the components of an automatic analytical system for the analysis of specific organic compounds in the space station potable water supply are defined. The gas chromatographic system for such an analysis is limited to commercially available off-the-shelf hardware and includes the sample inlet, an ionization detector, capillary columns as well as computerized compound identification. The sampling system will be a special variation of the purge and trap Tenax mode using six-port valves and a 500 microliter water sample. Capillary columns used for the separating of contaminants will be bonded phase fused silica with a silicone stationary phase. Two detectors can be used: photoionization and far ultraviolet, since they are sensitive and compatible with capillary columns. A computer system evaluation and program with the principle of compound identification based on the retention index is presented.

  8. Development of leaching tests for non-volatile organic contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roskam, G.D.; Comans, R.N.J. [Energy Research Centre of the Netherlands (ECN), Petten (Netherlands)

    2002-07-01

    The objective of our research was to investigate the processes that control the leaching of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), a group of organic contaminants with an aqueous solubility that varies over more than 5 orders of magnitude. The obtained insight in the leaching processes is used as the basis for an ''availability'' leaching test that is intended to indicate the maximum amount of the organic contaminants that can be leached from soil or waste materials. This presentation is largely based on work performed in the framework of two EU projects on the development of leaching tests for organic contaminants, and on groundwater risk assessment at contaminated sites. (orig.)

  9. Global contamination trends of persistent organic chemicals

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Loganathan, Bommanna G; Lam, Paul K. S

    2012-01-01

    "Composed by a diverse group of experts, this reference covers the history, present status, and projected future trends of environmental contamination from highly toxic synthetic chemical pollutants...

  10. Aqueous adsorption and removal of organic contaminants by carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jin-Gang; Zhao, Xiu-Hui; Yang, Hua; Chen, Xiao-Hong; Yang, Qiaoqin; Yu, Lin-Yan; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Chen, Xiao-Qing

    2014-06-01

    Organic contaminants have become one of the most serious environmental problems, and the removal of organic contaminants (e.g., dyes, pesticides, and pharmaceuticals/drugs) and common industrial organic wastes (e.g., phenols and aromatic amines) from aqueous solutions is of special concern because they are recalcitrant and persistent in the environment. In recent years, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been gradually applied to the removal of organic contaminants from wastewater through adsorption processes. This paper reviews recent progress (145 studies published from 2010 to 2013) in the application of CNTs and their composites for the removal of toxic organic pollutants from contaminated water. The paper discusses removal efficiencies and adsorption mechanisms as well as thermodynamics and reaction kinetics. CNTs are predicted to have considerable prospects for wider application to wastewater treatment in the future. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Organic Contamination Baseline Study on NASA JSC Astromaterial Curation Gloveboxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calaway, Michael J.; Allton, J. H.; Allen, C. C.; Burkett, P. J.

    2013-01-01

    Future planned sample return missions to carbon-rich asteroids and Mars in the next two decades will require strict handling and curation protocols as well as new procedures for reducing organic contamination. After the Apollo program, astromaterial collections have mainly been concerned with inorganic contamination [1-4]. However, future isolation containment systems for astromaterials, possibly nitrogen enriched gloveboxes, must be able to reduce organic and inorganic cross-contamination. In 2012, a baseline study was orchestrated to establish the current state of organic cleanliness in gloveboxes used by NASA JSC astromaterials curation labs that could be used as a benchmark for future mission designs.

  12. 40 CFR 141.50 - Maximum contaminant level goals for organic contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum contaminant level goals for organic contaminants. 141.50 Section 141.50 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY... (27) Glyphosate .7 (28) Hexachlorocyclopentadiene .05 (29) Oxamyl (Vydate) .2 (30) Picloram .5 (31...

  13. A Comprehensive Analysis of Organic Contaminant Adsorption by Clays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macroscopic studies of nonionic organic contaminant (NOC) sorption by clays have revealed many important clues regarding factors that influence sorption affinity, and enabled the development of structural hypotheses for operative adsorption mechanisms. Integrating this understanding with knowledge g...

  14. Microbial Fuel Cells for Organic-Contaminated Soil Remedial Applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Xiaojing; Wang, Xin; Weng, Liping; Zhou, Qixing; Li, Yongtao

    2017-01-01

    Efficient noninvasive techniques are desired for repairing organic-contaminated soils. Bioelectrochemical technology, especially microbial fuel cells (MFCs), has been widely used to promote a polluted environmental remediation approach, and applications include wastewater, sludge, sediment, and

  15. Exposure levels to brominated compounds in seawater swimming pools treated with chlorine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parinet, Julien; Tabaries, Sophie; Coulomb, Bruno; Vassalo, Laurent; Boudenne, Jean-Luc

    2012-03-01

    Despite evidence of formation of brominated compounds in seawater swimming pools treated with chlorine, no data about exposure levels to these compounds have been reported. To address this issue, a survey has been carried out in four establishments (representing 8 pools) fed with seawater and devoted to relaxing and cure treatments (thalassotherapy centres located in Southeast of France). Carcinogenic and mutagenic brominated disinfection byproducts (trihalomethanes -THM- and halogenated acetic acids -HAA-) were quantified at varying levels, statistically related to organic loadings brought by bathers, and not from marine organic matter, and also linked to activities carried out in the pools (watergym vs swimming). Bromoform and dibromoacetic acid, the most abundant THM and HAA detected, were measured at levels up to 18-fold greater than the maximum contaminant levels of 60 and 80 μg/L fixed by US.EPA in drinking waters. The correlations between these disinfection byproducts and other environmental factors such as nitrogen, pH, temperature, free residual chlorine, UV(254), chloride and bromide concentrations, and daily frequentation were examined. Because thalassotherapy and seawater swimming pools (hotels, cruise ships,…) are increasing in use around the world and because carcinogenic and mutagenic brominated byproducts may be produced in chlorinated seawater swimming pools, specific care should be taken to assure cleanliness of users (swimmers and patients taking the waters) and to increase water circulation through media filters to reduce levels of brominated byproducts. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Interactions of organic contaminants with mineral-adsorbed surfactants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, L.; Chen, B.; Tao, S.; Chiou, C.T.

    2003-01-01

    Sorption of organic contaminants (phenol, p-nitrophenol, and naphthalene) to natural solids (soils and bentonite) with and without myristylpyridinium bromide (MPB) cationic surfactant was studied to provide novel insight to interactions of contaminants with the mineral-adsorbed surfactant. Contaminant sorption coefficients with mineral-adsorbed surfactants, Kss, show a strong dependence on surfactant loading in the solid. At low surfactant levels, the Kss values increased with increasing sorbed surfactant mass, reached a maximum, and then decreased with increasing surfactant loading. The Kss values for contaminants were always higher than respective partition coefficients with surfactant micelles (Kmc) and natural organic matter (Koc). At examined MPB concentrations in water the three organic contaminants showed little solubility enhancement by MPB. At low sorbed-surfactant levels, the resulting mineral-adsorbed surfactant via the cation-exchange process appears to form a thin organic film, which effectively "adsorbs" the contaminants, resulting in very high Kss values. At high surfactant levels, the sorbed surfactant on minerals appears to form a bulklike medium that behaves essentially as a partition phase (rather than an adsorptive surface), with the resulting Kss being significantly decreased and less dependent on the MPB loading. The results provide a reference to the use of surfactants for remediation of contaminated soils/sediments or groundwater in engineered surfactant-enhanced washing.

  17. Occurrence of organic wastewater and other contaminants in cave streams in northeastern Oklahoma and northwestern Arkansas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidwell, Joseph R.; Becker, C.; Hensley, S.; Stark, R.; Meyer, M.T.

    2010-01-01

    The prevalence of organic wastewater compounds in surface waters of the United States has been reported in a number of recent studies. In karstic areas, surface contaminants might be transported to groundwater and, ultimately, cave ecosystems, where they might impact resident biota. In this study, polar organic chemical integrative samplers (POCISs) and semipermeable membrane devices (SPMDs) were deployed in six caves and two surface-water sites located within the Ozark Plateau of northeastern Oklahoma and northwestern Arkansas in order to detect potential chemical contaminants in these systems. All caves sampled were known to contain populations of the threatened Ozark cavefish (Amblyopsis rosae). The surface-water site in Oklahoma was downstream from the outfall of a municipal wastewater treatment plant and a previous study indicated a hydrologic link between this stream and one of the caves. A total of 83 chemicals were detected in the POCIS and SPMD extracts from the surface-water and cave sites. Of these, 55 chemicals were detected in the caves. Regardless of the sampler used, more compounds were detected in the Oklahoma surface-water site than in the Arkansas site or the caves. The organic wastewater chemicals with the greatest mass measured in the sampler extracts included sterols (cholesterol and ??-sitosterol), plasticizers [diethylhexylphthalate and tris (2-butoxyethyl) phosphate], the herbicide bromacil, and the fragrance indole. Sampler extracts from most of the cave sites did not contain many wastewater contaminants, although extracts from samplers in the Oklahoma surfacewater site and the cave hydrologically linked to it had similar levels of diethylhexyphthalate and common detections of carbamazapine, sulfamethoxazole, benzophenone, N-diethyl-3-methylbenzamide (DEET), and octophenol monoethoxylate. Further evaluation of this system is warranted due to potential ongoing transport of wastewaterassociated chemicals into the cave. Halogenated organics

  18. Novel approach for removing brominated flame retardant from aquatic environments using Cu/Fe-based metal-organic frameworks: A case of hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiang; Liu, Hongli; Jia, Xiaoshan; Li, Guiying; An, Taicheng; Gao, Yanpeng

    2017-10-17

    Cu and Fe based metal-organic frameworks (Cu-BTC and Fe-BTC) were synthesized via a simple solvothermal method and innovatively utilized to remove a typical nonionic brominated flame retardant, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), from aquatic environment. Results show that over 80% of HBCD was removed by Cu-BTC within 5h, which is 1.3 times higher than removal by Fe-BTC. Thermodynamic analysis confirms spontaneous adsorption of HBCD onto the metal-organic frameworks (MOFs). Furthermore, the Gibbs free energy of Cu-BTC (-9.11kJ/mol) is more negative than that of Fe-BTC (-5.04kJ/mol). Both adsorption isotherms of HBCD onto Cu-BTC and Fe-BTC followed the Langmuir model, indicating a typical monomolecular-layer adsorption mechanism. In addition, the water stability test of these MOFs shows that the collapse of the Cu-BTC crystal structure is significantly hindered in the aquatic environment due to adsorption of the hydrophobic HBCD. The proposed adsorption mechanism includes van der Waals and hydrophobic interactions. These findings demonstrate that Cu/Fe-BTC are promising adsorbents for the removal of hydrophobic organic pollutants from aquatic environments, and may further improve the understanding of MOF materials for environmental applications. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Adsorption and Treatment of Organic Contaminants using Activated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The adsorption and treatment of organic contaminants using activated carbon from waste Nigerian bamboo was investigated. Waste Nigerian bamboo was carbonized at 400oC-500oC and activated with acid at 800oC to produce granular activated carbon (GAC). Adsorption of organics from the refinery waste on the ...

  20. Aqueous adsorption and removal of organic contaminants by carbon nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Jin-Gang, E-mail: yujg@csu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China); Key Laboratory of Resources Chemistry of Nonferrous Metals, Ministry of Education, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Zhao, Xiu-Hui; Yang, Hua [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Key Laboratory of Resources Chemistry of Nonferrous Metals, Ministry of Education, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Chen, Xiao-Hong [Collaborative Innovation Center of Resource-conserving and Environment-friendly Society and Ecological Civilization, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Yang, Qiaoqin [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A9 (Canada); Yu, Lin-Yan [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Key Laboratory of Resources Chemistry of Nonferrous Metals, Ministry of Education, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Jiang, Jian-Hui [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Hunan University, Changsha, Hunan 410082 (China); Chen, Xiao-Qing, E-mail: xqchen@csu.edu.cn [College of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China); Key Laboratory of Resources Chemistry of Nonferrous Metals, Ministry of Education, Central South University, Changsha, Hunan 410083 (China)

    2014-06-01

    Organic contaminants have become one of the most serious environmental problems, and the removal of organic contaminants (e.g., dyes, pesticides, and pharmaceuticals/drugs) and common industrial organic wastes (e.g., phenols and aromatic amines) from aqueous solutions is of special concern because they are recalcitrant and persistent in the environment. In recent years, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been gradually applied to the removal of organic contaminants from wastewater through adsorption processes. This paper reviews recent progress (145 studies published from 2010 to 2013) in the application of CNTs and their composites for the removal of toxic organic pollutants from contaminated water. The paper discusses removal efficiencies and adsorption mechanisms as well as thermodynamics and reaction kinetics. CNTs are predicted to have considerable prospects for wider application to wastewater treatment in the future. - Highlights: • We summarize the most recent research progress of CNTs for removal of organics. • Adsorption mechanisms between CNTs and organics were elucidated in detail. • The developing trends and prospects of CNTs for removal of organics were discussed.

  1. Bioavailability of sediment-bound contaminants to marine organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, B. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)]|[Colby Coll., Waterville, ME (United States); Neff, J. [Battelle/Marine Sciences Lab., Sequim, WA (United States)]|[Battelle Ocean Sciences, Duxbury, MA (United States)

    1993-09-01

    The bioavailability of sediment-bound contaminants to marine organisms indicates that there exists a potential for transfer of these contaminants through marine food webs to commercial fisheries products consumed by humans. However, there has been relatively little effort to combine and synthesize data on chemical/biological interactions between benthic animals and seagrasses and the sediments in which they reside on the one hand, and on the chemistry of bioaccumulation on the other. This report provides a conceptual basis for an approach to bioavailability and biomagnification of sediment-bound contaminants that reviews biological and chemical approaches.

  2. 40 CFR 141.61 - Maximum contaminant levels for organic contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Maximum contaminant levels for organic contaminants. 141.61 Section 141.61 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) WATER...-7 Diquat 0.02 (25) 145-73-3 Endothall 0.1 (26) 72-20-8 Endrin 0.002 (27) 1071-53-6 Glyphosate 0.7...

  3. Detecting and Quantifying Organic Contaminants in Sediments with NMR

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fay, E. L.; Knight, R. J.

    2015-12-01

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods have the potential to detect and monitor free-phase organic contaminants in sediments, both in the laboratory and in the field. NMR directly detects signal from hydrogen-bearing fluids; the signal amplitude is proportional to the total amount of hydrogen present, while the signal decay rate provides information about fluid properties and interactions with the surrounding sediments. Contrasting relaxation times (T2) or diffusion coefficients (D) allow the separation of water signal from contaminant signal. In this work, we conduct a laboratory study to assess the use of NMR measurements to detect and quantify diesel, gasoline, crude oil, and tri-chloroethylene in sediments. We compare the T2 distributions for sediments containing only water, only contaminant, and both water and contaminant, confirming that the identification and quantification of contaminants using T2 data alone is limited by overlapping water and contaminant T2 distributions in some sediments. We leverage the contrast between the diffusion coefficient of water and that of diesel and crude oil to separate contaminant signal from water signal in D-T2 maps. D-T2 distributions are measured both using a pulsed gradient method and a static gradient method similar to methods used with logging tools, allowing us to compare the ability of each method to quantify diesel and crude oil when water is also present. There is the potential to apply these methods to characterize and monitor contaminated sites using commercially available NMR logging tools.

  4. Organic contamination of the Birmingham aquifer, U.K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivett, Michael O.; Lerner, David N.; Lloyd, John W.; Clark, Lewis

    1990-02-01

    A survey of the organic-water quality of the Birmingham Triassic Sandstone aquifer was conducted using 59 supply boreholes. Additional shallow-groundwater quality data were obtained from 15 monitoring wells. Chlorinated solvents are widespread, in particular trichloroethylene which is detected in 78% of supply boreholes. Trichloroethylene is frequently observed at high levels with 40% of supply boreholes contaminated above 30 μg/l to a maximum of 5500 μg/l. Occasional high values are also found for 1,1,1-trichloroethane and perchloroethylene. The distribution of solvents is shown to be controlled by land use and hydrogeological factors. Contamination by organic chemicals other than chlorinated solvents is low in the supply boreholes. When high contamination does occur it is usually in the form of a petrogenic hump of unresolved contaminants in the chromatogram. The source of such contamination is probably (degraded) lubricating oils. Greater contamination by general organic chemicals is seen in the shallow groundwater samples, a reverse trend to the chlorinated solvents results.

  5. [Cyanobacteria as indicators of organic contamination].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peinador, M

    1999-09-01

    In two Costa Rican rivers used as receptors for domestic sewage, treated by primary stabilization ponds, were taken a total of 28 samplings located at the pond exit and at three different sites in each river: 100 m before the ponds discharge, at the discharge and 100 m after the discharge. These sampling were done for a five and a half years including dry and rainy seasons. In each sampling site, samples were collected of five different substrates: stones, submerge and semi submerge vegetation, tree trunks or sticks, water and artificial substrates. For each sample were used two types of artificial cultures, WC and BG110. A total of 55 cyanobacteria species isolations were obtained, belonging to a 26 genera, between these the most common were Phormidium with nine species, Microcystis with five species, Leptolyngbya and Pseudanabaena with four species each and Oscillatoria with three species. More cyanobacteria species were isolated in water substrate and less isolations in tree trunks and submerge vegetation. Konvophoron, Cyanarcus and Pilgeria only were isolate from water samples inoculated in culture media WC and in few opportunities, while three Leptolyngbya species and four Phormidium species were isolated very often. At the stabilization ponds Phormidium sp4 was dominant in 25 of 28 sampling while in the last others were the chlorophycea I. In this study were observed an increase in the frequency of cyanobacteria at the higher contamination places, and a species substitution between different sampling points. There were no biomass studies, therefore is not possible to relate between different cyanobacteria species and some specific types of water quality.

  6. Bromine intercalated graphite for lightweight composite conductors

    KAUST Repository

    Amassian, Aram

    2017-07-20

    A method of fabricating a bromine-graphite/metal composite includes intercalating bromine within layers of graphite via liquid-phase bromination to create brominated-graphite and consolidating the brominated-graphite with a metal nanopowder via a mechanical pressing operation to generate a bromine-graphite/metal composite material.

  7. Oxygen Ion Cleaning Of Organic Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deguchi, T. J.; Sasaki, G. R.; Champetier, R. J.

    1987-06-01

    An experiment using low energy oxygen ions to clean organic films from bare aluminum mirrors was performed. Film removal was determined by measuring the reflectance of the mirrors in the ultraviolet region of the spectrum. The results of this study show that complete removal of hydrocarbon films is obtainable. This method may not be fully effective in removing silicon-based polymers. The removal rate for a hydrocarbon oil contami nant was determined to be 2.1 X 10-14 Å/ion.

  8. Remediation of soil contaminated with toxic organic compounds ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioremediation using biological materials viz; whole cells, cell extracts, isolated enzymes etc. is one of the most effective and environmentally friendly approaches currently in use. This paper therefore, reviews the current microbial remediation strategies of soil contaminated with various organic pollutants. Keywords: ...

  9. Biochar: a green sorbent to sequester acidic organic contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigmund, Gabriel; Kah, Melanie; Sun, Huichao; Hofmann, Thilo

    2015-04-01

    Biochar is a carbon rich product of biomass pyrolysis that exhibits a high sorption potential towards a wide variety of inorganic and organic contaminants. Because it is a valuable soil additive and a potential carbon sink that can be produced from renewable resources, biochar has gained growing attention for the development of more sustainable remediation strategies. A lot of research efforts have been dedicated to the sorption of hydrophobic contaminants and metals to biochar. Conversely, the understanding of the sorption of acidic organic contaminants remains limited, and questions remain on the influence of biochar characteristics (e.g. ash content) on the sorption behaviour of acidic organic contaminants. To address this knowledge gap, sorption batch experiments were conducted with a series of structurally similar acidic organic contaminants covering a range of dissociation constant (2,4-D, MCPA, 2,4-DB and triclosan). The sorbents selected for experimentation included a series of 10 biochars covering a range of characteristics, multiwalled carbon nanotubes as model for pure carbonaceous phases, and an activated carbon as benchmark. Overall, sorption coefficient [L/kg] covered six orders of magnitude and generally followed the order 2,4-D < MCPA < 2,4-DB < triclosan. Combining comprehensive characterization of the sorbents with the sorption dataset allowed the discussion of sorption mechanisms and driving factors of sorption. Statistical analysis suggests that (i) partitioning was the main driver for sorption to sorbents with small specific surface area (< 25 m²/g), whereas (ii) specific mechanisms dominated sorption to sorbents with larger specific surface area. Results showed that factors usually not considered for the sorption of neutral contaminants play an important role for the sorption of organic acids. The pH dependent lipophilicity ratio (i.e. D instead of Kow), ash content and ionic strength are key factors influencing the sorption of acidic organic

  10. Uptake of Organic Contaminants from Soil into Vegetables and Fruits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trapp, Stefan; Legind, Charlotte Nielsen

    2011-01-01

    , due to the immense variation in environmental and plant physiological conditions. Uptake of organic contaminants into vegetables and fruits may lead to human health risks, but it may also be used to delineate subsurface plumes and monitor Natural Attenuation. Most models mentioned in this chapter...... particles, or from air. Volatile contaminants have a low potential for accumulation because they quickly escape to air. Experimental data are listed that support these model predictions, but underline also the high variability of accumulation under field conditions. Plant uptake predictions are uncertain...

  11. Reducing Organic Contamination in NASA JSC Astromaterial Curation Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calaway, M. J.; Allen, C. C.; Allton, J. H.

    2013-01-01

    Future robotic and human spaceflight missions to the Moon, Mars, asteroids and comets will require handling and storing astromaterial samples with minimal inorganic and organic contamination to preserve the scientific integrity of each sample. Much was learned from the rigorous attempts to minimize and monitor organic contamination during Apollo, but it was not adequate for current analytical requirements; thus [1]. OSIRIS-REx, Hayabusa-2, and future Mars sample return will require better protocols for reducing organic contamination. Future isolation con-tainment systems for astromaterials, possibly nitrogen enriched gloveboxes, must be able to reduce organic and inorganic cross-contamination. In 2012, a baseline study established the current state of organic cleanliness in gloveboxes used by NASA JSC astromaterials curation labs that could be used as a benchmark for future mission designs [2, 3]. After standard ultra-pure water (UPW) cleaning, the majority of organic contaminates found were hydrocarbons, plasticizers, silicones, and solvents. Hydro-carbons loads (> C7) ranged from 1.9 to 11.8 ng/cm2 for TD-GC-MS wafer exposure analyses and 5.0 to 19.5 ng/L for TD-GC-MS adsorbent tube exposure. Plasticizers included degreased with a pressurized Freon 113 wash. Today, UPW has replaced Freon as the standard cleaning procedure, but does not have the degreasing solvency power of Freon. Future Cleaning Studies: Cleaning experiments are cur-rently being orchestrated to study how to degrease and reduce organics in a JSC curation glovebox lower than the established baseline. Several new chemicals in the industry have replaced traditional degreasing solvents such as Freon and others that are now federally restricted. However, these new suites of chemicals remain untested for lowering organics in curation gloveboxes. 3M's HFE-7100DL and DuPont's Vertrel XF are currently being tested as a replacement for Freon 113 as a degreaser at JSC cura-tion facilities. In addition, the

  12. The zinc bromine battery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonshagen, B. [ZBB (Australia) Ltd., West Perth, WA (Australia)

    1996-12-31

    The Zinc Bromine Battery electrolyte is essentially zinc bromide salt dissolved in water. Unlike the lead acid and most other batteries, the Zinc Bromine Battery uses electrodes that cannot and do not take part in the reactions but merely serve as substrates for the reactions. There is therefore no loss of performance, as in most re-chargeable batteries, from repeated cycling which causes electrode material deterioration. When the Zinc Bromine Battery is completely discharged all the metal zinc plated on the negative electrodes is dissolved in the electrolyte and again produced the next time the batter is charged. In the discharged state the battery can be shorted and left that way indefinitely. This paper presents an overview of large scale Zinc Bromine battery systems that are currently being commercialized as an economically attractive alternative to utility upgrades. Also outlined is how the battery can improve the viability of renewable energy and reduce diesel use in isolated grids and remote power installations. (author). 11 figs., 2 refs.

  13. Degradation of organic contaminants found in organic waste

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angelidaki, Irini; Mogensen, Anders Skibsted; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2000-01-01

    In recent years, great interest has arisen in recycling of the waste created by modern society. A common way of recycling the organic fraction is amendment on farmland. However, these wastes may contain possible hazardous components in small amounts, which may prevent their use in farming....... The objective of our study has been to develop biological methods by which selected organic xenobiotic compounds can be biotransformed by anaerobic or aerobic treatment. Screening tests assessed the capability of various inocula to degrade two phthalates di-n-butylphthalate, and di(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, five...... phenol ethoxylates. The results are promising as they indicate that a great potential for biological degradation is present, though the inoculum containing the microorganisms capable of transforming the recalcitrant xenobiotics has to be chosen carefully....

  14. Contaminants in Liquid Organic Fertilizers Used for Agriculture in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hai, Dao M; Qiu, Xuchun; Xu, Hai; Honda, Masato; Yabe, Mitsuyasu; Kadokami, Kiwao; Shimasaki, Yohei; Oshima, Yuji

    2017-07-01

    To provide an overview of anthropogenic contaminants in liquid organic fertilizers (LOFs), products from four biogas plants in Kyushu, Japan, were analyzed for a wide range of contaminants, including copper, cadmium, tributyltin (TBT), dibutyltin (DBT), perfluorooctane sulfonate, 952 semi-volatile organic compounds, and 89 antibiotics. The highest concentrations of copper (31.1 mg/L) and cadmium (0.08 mg/L) were found in LOFs from the Hita biogas plant. Only ofloxacin and sulfapyridine were detected in total 89 antibiotics screened. TBT, DBT, and perfluorooctane sulfonate were present at low concentrations in the LOFs from all four locations. Among the 952 semi-volatile organic compounds, 78 compounds were detected in at least one sample and were present at concentrations between 1.2 and 139.6 mg/L. On the basis of comparisons with previous studies and quality standards for the use of organic fertilizers, the concentrations of contaminants in the studied LOFs indicate that they might be safe for agricultural purposes.

  15. The influence of donor factors on corneal organ culture contamination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruenert, Anja K; Rosenbaum, Katja; Geerling, Gerd; Fuchsluger, Thomas A

    2017-03-07

    To evaluate the contamination rate and the corresponding spectrum of microbes and to identify donor risk factors for corneal organ culture contaminations. A total of 3306 organ-cultured donor corneas were included in the study. We performed a retrospective database analysis to evaluate donor factors such as gender, age, death-to-explantation interval (DEI), procurement site and cause of death and to determine their influence on donor cornea contaminations. Odds ratios (ORs) were calculated for each factor. The overall contamination rate was 7.8% (n = 259). Younger donor age (OR: 2.2, p = 0.003, chi-squared test), a DEI of more than 24 hr (OR: 1.6, p cultured cornea based on specific donor factors. However, donors with risk factors should not be generally excluded from cornea donation. Further studies including antibiograms might clarify whether a change in the antibiotic composition of the culture medium would be useful to deal with the increasing number of multi-resistant microbes. © 2017 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Radioactive contamination of aquatic media and organisms; La contamination radioactive des milieux et des organismes aquatiques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fontaine, Y. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique, Saclay (France).Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1960-07-01

    After a brief account of the radioactive wastes produced by peaceful or military uses of Atomic Industry, the author first describes a series of observations carried out 'in the field' on the extent of contamination in aquatic organisms with respect to that of the medium. The experimental studies are then analysed, with reference both to the radioisotope metabolism and to the factors and types of contamination of aquatic organisms by wastes from atomic industry. A precise experimental project is presented at the end of the paper, including almost 300 references. (author) [French] Apres une courte etude des dechets radioactifs produits par les utilisations pacifiques ou militaires de l'Industrie Atomique, l'auteur fait etat d'abord des observations effectuees 'sur le terrain' concernant l'extension de la contamination des organismes aquatiques en rapport avec celle du milieu. L'auteur analyse ensuite les etudes experimentales se rapportant aussi bien au metabolisme des radioisotopes qu'aux facteurs et aux modalites de la contamination des organismes aquatiques par les dechets de l'industrie atomique. Un projet de travail experimental precis est presente a la fin de cette revue qui comporte pres de 300 references bibliographiques. (auteur)

  17. Temperature dependence of bromine activation due to reaction of bromide with ozone in a proxy for organic aerosols and its importance for chemistry in surface snow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edebeli, Jacinta; Ammann, Markus; Gilgen, Anina; Trachsel, Jürg; Avak, Sven; Eichler, Anja; Schneebeli, Martin; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten

    2017-04-01

    Tropospheric ozone depletion events (ODEs) via halogen activation are observed in both cold and warm climates [1-3]. Very recently, it was suggested that this multiphase halogen activation chemistry dominates in the tropical and subtropical upper troposphere [4]. These occurrences beg the question of temperature dependence of halogen activation in sea-salt aerosol, which are often mixtures of sea-salt and organic molecules [3, 5]. With the application of flow-tubes, the aim of this study is to investigate the temperature dependence of bromine activation via ozone interaction in a bromide containing film as a proxy for mixed organic - sea-salt aersol. Citric acid is used in this study as a hygroscopically characterized matrix and a proxy for oxidized organics, which is of relevance to atmospheric chemistry. Here, we present reactive ozone uptake measured between 258 and 289 K. The data show high reproducibility. With available knowledge, we have reproduced the measured uptake with modelled bulk uptake while accounting for temperature dependence of the substrate's properties as diffusivity, viscosity, and gas solubility. This work is part of a cross-disciplinary project with the aim to investigate the impact of metamorphism on impurity location in aging snow and its consequences for chemical reactivity. Metamorphism drastically shapes the structure and physical properties of snow, which has impacts on heat transfer, albedo, and avalanche formation. Such changes can be driven by water vapour fluxes in dry metamorphism with a mass turnover of as much as 60% per day - much greater than previously thought [6]. The consequences for atmospheric science are a current question of research [7]. Here, we show first results of a joint experiment to probe the re-distribution of impurities during snow metamorphism in artificial snow combined with an investigation of the samples structural changes. Future work is planned with the goal to investigate to which extend the observed re

  18. A rapid method for the determination of brominated flame retardant concentrations in plastics and textiles entering the waste stream.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Mohamed Abou-Elwafa; Drage, Daniel S; Sharkey, Martin; Berresheim, Harald; Harrad, Stuart

    2017-10-01

    Due to new European legislation, products going to waste are subject to 'low persistent organic pollutant concentration limits'. Concentrations of restricted brominated flame retardants in waste products must be determined. A rapid extraction and clean-up method was developed for determination of brominated flame retardants in various plastics and textiles. The optimised method used vortexing and ultrasonication in dichloromethane followed by sulfuric acid clean-up to determine target compounds. Poly-brominated diphenyl ethers were determined by gas chromatography with mass spectrometry and hexabromocyclododecane by liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Good recoveries of target analytes were obtained after three extraction cycles. The method was validated using poly-propylene and poly-ethylene certified reference materials as well as previously characterised textiles, expanded and extruded poly-styrene samples. Measured concentrations of target compounds showed good agreement with the certified values indicating good accuracy and precision. Clean extracts provided low noise levels resulting in low limits of quantification (0.8-1.5 ng/g for poly-brominated diphenyl ethers and 0.3 ng/g for α-, β- and γ-hexabromocyclododecane). The developed method was applied successfully to real consumer products entering the waste stream and it provided various advantages over traditional methods, including reduced analysis time, solvent consumption, minimal sample contamination and high sample throughput, which is crucial to comply with the implemented legislation. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  19. Very-short-lived brominated substances (VSLBr) and inorganic bromine (Bry) in the Pacific tropical tropopause layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Maria A.; Atlas, Elliot L.; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Cuevas, Carlos A.; Kinnison, Douglas; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Tilmes, Simone; Rodriguez-Lloveras, Xavier; Filus, Michal; Harris, Neil R. P.; Meneguz, Elena; Ashfold, Matthew J.; Manning, Alistair J.; Fernandez, Rafael P.; Schauffler, Sue; Donets, Valeria; Thornberry, Troy; Rollins, Andrew; Elkins, James W.; Hintsa, Eric J.

    2017-04-01

    Organic very-short-lived brominated substances (VSLBr) and inorganic bromine species (Bry) play an important role in the chemistry of upper troposphere/lower stratosphere (UT/LS) region. Their distribution, vertical structure, and variability provide information about sources and transport. In addition, an accurate quantification of the reactive and reservoirs species defines the halogen budget and assists in the assessment of the ozone depletion potential for brominated trace gases. In the last decade, there have been efforts to better understand the chemical and physical processes that occur in the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL), including convection, dehydration, and heterogeneous recycling reactions, which influence the partitioning of the trace gas species that enter the stratosphere. However, uncertainties in the estimation of the organic and inorganic partitioning of bromine and the input to the stratosphere still persist. Based on the measurements of samples collected by the Global Hawk Whole Air Sampler (GWAS) during the NASA-Airborne Tropical Tropopause Experiment (ATTREX), and chemistry climate simulations (using CAM-Chem along ATTREX flight tracks), we will examine the vertical distribution of selected organic species in the UT/LS of the Eastern and Western Pacific. We also will describe the budget and partitioning of bromine at the tropical tropopause and evaluate the contribution of bromine to ozone destruction in the lower stratosphere.

  20. Accumulation of chlorinated and brominated persistent toxic substances (PTS) and their relationship to testosterone suppression in Norway rats from Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takasuga, T.; Senthilkumar, K. [Shimadzu Techno-Research Inc. (Japan); Ishizuka, M.; Fujita, S. [Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido Univ. (Japan); Tanikawa, R. [Inst. of Tech., Ikari Corp. (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    Contamination of chlorinated/brominated persistent toxic substances (PTS) such as polychlorinated, -dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), -dibenzofurans (PCDFs), -biphenyls (PCBs), - organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) {l_brace}e.g., aldrin, dieldrin, endrin, chlordane compounds [cis/transchlordane, cis/trans-nonachlor, oxychlordane, heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide], hexachlorobenzene (HCB), 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (DDTs) and its metabolities [o,p/p,p'-DDD and DDE] and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCHs){r_brace} and -brominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are considered to important class of chemicals due to persistence in nature, bioaccumulation potential and adverse health effects in wildlife and humans. Among South East Asian countries, Japan reported to contaminated with aforesaid chemicals with considerable amounts. There is no document reports contamination of PTS in wild animals, which in-habit near humans. Norway rat (NR) inhabits not only near human environment but also distributed worldwide. Especially, NR feeds on human waste and shelter in and around human environment and thus exposure of toxic contaminants in this animal considered to similar with those in humans. In addition, rats have unique physiology that match with humans (e.g., they have similar pathogens as humans have). Therefore, analysis of toxic contaminants in NR considered as indirect measure in humans. Considering those facts, in this study, we analyzed NR collected from urban area, rural area, waste dumping or land fill site and isolated remote island from Japan. Particularly several chlorinated and brominated organic contaminants such as PCDDs, PCDFs, PCBs, DDTs, HCHs, chlordane compounds, heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide, HCB, aldrin, dieldrin, endrin and PBDEs were analyzed in rat livers by isotope dilution technique using HRGC-HRMS. In addition, laboratory Wistar rats (WR) were used as control.

  1. Passive sampling methods for contaminated sediments: State of the science for organic contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lydy, Michael J; Landrum, Peter F; Oen, Amy MP; Allinson, Mayumi; Smedes, Foppe; Harwood, Amanda D; Li, Huizhen; Maruya, Keith A; Liu, Jingfu

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript surveys the literature on passive sampler methods (PSMs) used in contaminated sediments to assess the chemical activity of organic contaminants. The chemical activity in turn dictates the reactivity and bioavailability of contaminants in sediment. Approaches to measure specific binding of compounds to sediment components, for example, amorphous carbon or specific types of reduced carbon, and the associated partition coefficients are difficult to determine, particularly for native sediment. Thus, the development of PSMs that represent the chemical activity of complex compound–sediment interactions, expressed as the freely dissolved contaminant concentration in porewater (Cfree), offer a better proxy for endpoints of concern, such as reactivity, bioaccumulation, and toxicity. Passive sampling methods have estimated Cfree using both kinetic and equilibrium operating modes and used various polymers as the sorbing phase, for example, polydimethylsiloxane, polyethylene, and polyoxymethylene in various configurations, such as sheets, coated fibers, or vials containing thin films. These PSMs have been applied in laboratory exposures and field deployments covering a variety of spatial and temporal scales. A wide range of calibration conditions exist in the literature to estimate Cfree, but consensus values have not been established. The most critical criteria are the partition coefficient between water and the polymer phase and the equilibrium status of the sampler. In addition, the PSM must not appreciably deplete Cfree in the porewater. Some of the future challenges include establishing a standard approach for PSM measurements, correcting for nonequilibrium conditions, establishing guidance for selection and implementation of PSMs, and translating and applying data collected by PSMs. Integr Environ Assess Manag 2014;10:167–178. © 2014 The Authors. Integrated Environmental Assessment and Management published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of

  2. Biodegradation of organic contaminants from the dairy industry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Prócel

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available One of the environmental aspects of high impact in dairy industries is the discharge of wastewaters, because of contaminating organic matter as well as the substantial generation of effluents. In the present study, a biofiltration of effluents from a dairy industry in San Miguel de Nono (Ecuador with a pollution load of 10.000 mg/L in terms of chemical oxygen demand and turbidity of 799 NTU was implemented. The system with a capacity of 55 L per batch consisted of three biofilters in series and activated zeolite assisted clarification. Organic degradation reached 98,9%; turbidity removal was 95,2%, 94,4% of nitrogen and 89,1% of phosphorus. The presence of milk fat did not decrease the efficiency of the biofiltration but increased the removal of suspended matter and pH neutralisation in the clarification. The optimal operating time was 6 hours under aerobic conditions.

  3. Modelling the fate of oxidisable organic contaminants in groundwater

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barry, D.A.; Prommer, H.; Miller, C.T.

    2002-01-01

    Subsurface contamination by organic chemicals is a pervasive environmental problem, susceptible to remediation by natural or enhanced attenuation approaches or more highly engineered methods such as pump-and-treat, amongst others. Such remediation approaches, along with risk assessment...... such as sorption/desorption, non-aqueous phase liquid dissolution and mineral precipitatation/dissolution, all of which can be in equilibrium or kinetically controlled. This framework is used to simulate microbially mediated transformation/degradation processes and the attendant microbial population growth...... modelling framework is illustrated by pertinent examples, showing the degradation of dissolved organics by microbial activity limited by the availability of nutrients or electron acceptors (i.e., changing redox states), as well as concomitant secondary reactions. Two field-scale modelling examples...

  4. Sorption of Emerging Organic Wastewater Contaminants to Four Soils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Roberts

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Conventional onsite wastewater treatment system design relies on a septic tank and soil treatment unit (STU for treatment of wastewater and integration of the final effluent into the environment. Organic water contaminants (OWCs, chemicals found in pharmaceutical drugs, detergents, surfactants, and other personal care and cleaning products, have been observed in septic tank effluent and the environment. Sorption of OWC mass to soil is a key mechanism in the removal and retardation of many of these chemicals in effluent as it travels through an STU. The primary purpose of this study was to investigate the relationship between the fraction of organic carbon of soil and the equilibrium sorption partitioning coefficient of a selected group of relevant and diverse OWCs. A secondary goal is to evaluate current methods of modeling the sorption of selected OWCs in soil. Five point Freundlich isotherms were constructed from equilibrium sorption batch tests for target OWCs with four different soils. For soils with organic carbon fraction between 0.021 and 0.054, Kd values were calculated between 60 and 185 for 4-nonylphenol, 75 to 260 for triclosan, 115 to 270 for bisphenol-A, 3 to 255 for 17β-estradiol, 40 to 55 for 17α-ethynylestradiol, and 28 to 70 for estrone. An empirically derived, direct relationship between foc and Kd may be a useful approach to estimating sorption for a soil based on organic carbon content.

  5. Hyperspectral characterization of fluorescent organic contaminants on optical payloads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourcier, Frédéric; Pansu, Robert; Faye, Delphine; Le Nouy, Patrice; Spezzigu, Piero

    2017-11-01

    The increase of performance of new optical instruments for science and Earth observation always leads to higher requirements in terms of contamination due to particle sedimentation in cleanrooms and deposition of chemical species in vacuum environment. Specific cleanliness control procedures are implemented in order to mitigate the risks of contamination on optical sensors and sensitive diopters, especially when used for UV applications. Such procedures are commonly carried out in cleanrooms and are described in both European ECSS-Q-ST-70-50C and NASA SN-C-0005D standards. UV light at 365 nm is often used for the inspection of optical sensitive surfaces to localize and to evaluate the amount of fluorescent particles, essentially coming from textile fibers. But other groups of compounds can be observed with a different spectral response and distribution, like adhesives and resins or even organic residues. Therefore, we could take advantage of this spectral information closely linked to specific molecules for partial identification of these materials before further investigation involving wipe on flight model and measurement in a laboratory.

  6. Organic waste compounds as contaminants in Milwaukee-area streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Austin K.; Corsi, Steven R.; Magruder, Christopher; Magruder, Matthew; Bruce, Jennifer L.

    2015-09-22

    Organic waste compounds (OWCs) are ingredients and by-products of common agricultural, industrial, and household substances that can contaminate our streams through sources like urban runoff, sewage overflows, and leaking septic systems. To better understand how OWCs are affecting Milwaukee-area streams, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Milwaukee Metropolitan Sewerage District, conducted a three-year study to investigate the presence and potential toxicity of 69 OWCs in base flow, stormflow, pore water, and sediment at 14 stream sites and 3 Milwaukee harbor locations. This fact sheet summarizes the major findings of this study, including detection frequencies and concentrations, potential toxicity, the prevalence of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and the influence of urbanization.

  7. Characterisation of organic contaminants in the CLOUD chamber at CERN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnitzhofer, R.; Metzger, A.; Breitenlechner, M.; Jud, W.; Heinritzi, M.; de Menezes, L.-P.; Duplissy, J.; Guida, R.; Haider, S.; Kirkby, J.; Mathot, S.; Minginette, P.; Onnela, A.; Walther, H.; Wasem, A.; Hansel, A.; The Cloud Team

    2014-07-01

    The CLOUD experiment (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) investigates the nucleation of new particles and how this process is influenced by galactic cosmic rays in an electropolished, stainless-steel environmental chamber at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research). Since volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can act as precursor gases for nucleation and growth of particles, great efforts have been made to keep their unwanted background levels as low as possible and to quantify them. In order to be able to measure a great set of VOCs simultaneously in the low parts per trillion (pptv) range, proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) was used. Initially the total VOC background concentration strongly correlated with ozone in the chamber and ranged from 0.1 to 7 parts per billion (ppbv). Plastic used as sealing material in the ozone generator was found to be a major VOC source. Especially oxygen-containing VOCs were generated together with ozone. These parts were replaced by stainless steel after CLOUD3, which strongly reduced the total VOC background. An additional ozone-induced VOC source is surface-assisted reactions at the electropolished stainless steel walls. The change in relative humidity (RH) from very dry to humid conditions increases background VOCs released from the chamber walls. This effect is especially pronounced when the RH is increased for the first time in a campaign. Also the dead volume of inlet tubes for trace gases that were not continuously flushed was found to be a short but strong VOC contamination source. For lower ozone levels (below 100 ppbv) the total VOC contamination was usually below 1 ppbv and therewith considerably cleaner than a comparable Teflon chamber. On average about 75% of the total VOCs come from only five exact masses (tentatively assigned as formaldehyde, acetaldehyde, acetone, formic acid, and acetic acid), which have a rather high vapour pressure and are therefore not important for nucleation and growth of

  8. Maternal exposure to brominated flame retardants and infant Apgar scores.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, Metrecia L; Hartnett, Kathleen P; Lim, Hyeyeun; Wirth, Julie; Marcus, Michele

    2015-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and other persistent organic pollutants have been associated with adverse health outcomes in humans and may be particularly toxic to the developing fetus. We investigated the association between in utero polybrominated biphenyl (PBB) and polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) exposures and infant Apgar scores in a cohort of Michigan residents exposed to PBB through contaminated food after an industrial accident. PBB and PCB concentrations were measured in serum at the time the women were enrolled in the cohort. PBB concentrations were also estimated at the time of conception for each pregnancy using a validated elimination model. Apgar scores, a universal measure of infant health at birth, measured at 1 and 5min, were taken from birth certificates for 613 offspring born to 330 women. Maternal PCB concentrations at enrollment were not associated with below-median Apgar scores in this cohort. However, maternal PBB exposure was associated with a dose-related increase in the odds of a below-median Apgar score at 1min and 5min. Among infants whose mothers had an estimated PBB at conception above the limit of detection of 1 part per billion (ppb) to <2.5ppb, the odds ratio=2.32 (95% CI: 1.22-4.40); for those with PBB⩾2.5ppb the OR=2.62 (95% CI: 1.38-4.96; test for trend p<0.01). Likewise, the odds of a below-median 5min Apgar score increased with higher maternal PBB at conception. It remains critical that future studies examine possible relationships between in utero exposures to brominated compounds and adverse health outcomes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Evaluation of a New Disinfection Approach: Efficacy of Chlorine and Bromine Halogenated Contact Disinfection for Reduction of Viruses and Microcystin Toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coulliette, Angela D.; Peterson, Lauren A.; Mosberg, Joshua A. W.; Rose, Joan B.

    2010-01-01

    Contaminated drinking water is responsible for causing diarrheal diseases that kill millions of people a year. Additionally, toxin-producing blue-green algae associated with diarrhea and neurologic effects continues to be an issue for many drinking water supplies. Disinfection has been used to reduce these risks. A novel gravity-fed household drinking water system with canisters containing N-halamine bromine or chlorine media was challenged with MS2 bacteriophage and microcystin. Chlorine and bromine systems were effective against this virus, with an mean ± SE reduction of 2.98 ± 0.26 log10 and 5.02 ± 0.19 log10, respectively. Microcystin toxin was reduced by 27.5% and 88.5% to overall mean ± SE concentrations of 1,600 ± 98 ng/L and 259 ± 50 ng/L for the chlorine and bromine canisters, respectively. Only the bromine units consistently produced microcystin effluent < 1,000 ng/L (the World Health Organization recommended level) when challenged with 2,500 ng/L and consistently surpassed the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency virus reduction goal of 99.99%. PMID:20134006

  10. 9 CFR 310.18 - Contamination of carcasses, organs, or other parts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Contamination of carcasses, organs, or... AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION POST-MORTEM INSPECTION § 310.18 Contamination of carcasses... prevent contamination with fecal material, urine, bile, hair, dirt, or foreign matter; however, if...

  11. Brominated diphenyl ethers in the sediments, porewater, and biota of the Chesapeake Bay, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, K.; Klosterhaus, S.; Liebert, D.; Stapleton, H. [Maryland Univ., Solomons, MD (United States)

    2004-09-15

    Levels of brominated diphenyl ethers (BDEs) are rapidly increasing in the environment, and in a short time these chemicals have evolved from 'emerging contaminants' to globally-distributed organic pollutants. Recent research demonstrates BDEs are sufficiently stable to be transported long distances in the environment and to accumulate in higher trophic levels. Photolysis and metabolism appear to be dominant loss processes for the parent compounds, generating a variety of lower brominated diphenyl ethers, hydroxylated metabolites, and other products. BDEs are hydrophobic, and therefore their transport in aquatic systems is likely controlled by sorption to sediments and perhaps exchange across the air-water interface. To date, few studies have examined the geochemistry of BDEs in natural waters. In this paper, we review our recent measurements of BDEs in the Chesapeake Bay, a shallow, productive estuary in eastern North America. We focus on the distribution of BDE congeners sediment, porewater, and in faunal benthos along a contamination gradient downstream from a wastewater treatment plant and on the spatial distribution of BDEs in bottom-feeding and pelagic fish species.

  12. Organic pollutants in compost and digestate. Part 2. Polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins, and -furans, dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls, brominated flame retardants, perfluorinated alkyl substances, pesticides, and other compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brändli, Rahel C; Kupper, Thomas; Bucheli, Thomas D; Zennegg, Markus; Huber, Sandra; Ortelli, Didier; Müller, Josef; Schaffner, Christian; Iozza, Saverio; Schmid, Peter; Berger, Urs; Edder, Patrick; Oehme, Michael; Stadelmann, Franz X; Tarradellas, Joseph

    2007-05-01

    Compost and digestate are important recycling fertilizers and have beneficial effects on soil parameters. However, they can contain significant amounts of organic pollutants. Here, the first comprehensive data set on dibenzo-p-dioxins and -furans (PCDD/F), dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls (DL-PCB), brominated flame retardants, perfluorinated alkyl substances (PFAS), pesticides, phthalates, nonylphenol and chlorinated paraffins (CP) in source-separated compost and digestate from Switzerland is presented (n = 3-18). The median summation 17PCDD/F and summation 12DL-PCB concentrations were at 3.2 ng I-TEQ kg(-1)dry weight (dw) and 3.0 ng WHO-TEQ kg(-1)dw, respectively. Brominated diphenyl ether 209 (BDE 209) accounted for 72% of the total polyBDE content (10 microg kg(-1)dw). Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) levels were at 100 and 0.51 microg kg(-1)dw, respectively. PFAS were identified for the first time in compost and digestate (median concentration 6.3 microg kg(-1)dw, summation 21compounds). Out of 269 pesticides analysed, 30 fungicides, 14 herbicides, eight insecticides and one acaricide were detected. Di-(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate (DEHP) median concentration accounted for 280 microg kg(-1)dw and nonylphenol was below the detection limit of 1 mg kg(-1)dw. The sum of short and medium chain CP was between 90 and 390 microg kg(-1)dw. The concentrations observed were at or above the levels found in background soils, which are the main recipient of compost and digestate. Where actually applied, compost can contribute considerably to the total input of organic pollutants to the soil. However, on a total Swiss agricultural area base, inputs seem to be limited.

  13. Layer of organic pine forest soil on top of chlorophenol-contaminated mineral soil enhances contaminant degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinkkonen, Aki; Kauppi, Sari; Simpanen, Suvi; Rantalainen, Anna-Lea; Strömmer, Rauni; Romantschuk, Martin

    2013-03-01

    Chlorophenols, like many other synthetic compounds, are persistent problem in industrial areas. These compounds are easily degraded in certain natural environments where the top soil is organic. Some studies suggest that mineral soil contaminated with organic compounds is rapidly remediated if it is mixed with organic soil. We hypothesized that organic soil with a high degradation capacity even on top of the contaminated mineral soil enhances degradation of recalcitrant chlorophenols in the mineral soil below. We first compared chlorophenol degradation in different soils by spiking pristine and pentachlorophenol-contaminated soils with 2,4,6-trichlorophenol in 10-L buckets. In other experiments, we covered contaminated mineral soil with organic pine forest soil. We also monitored in situ degradation on an old sawmill site where mineral soil was either left intact or covered with organic pine forest soil. 2,4,6-Trichlorophenol was rapidly degraded in organic pine forest soil, but the degradation was slower in other soils. If a thin layer of the pine forest humus was added on top of mineral sawmill soil, the original chlorophenol concentrations (high, ca. 70 μg g(-1), or moderate, ca. 20 μg g(-1)) in sawmill soil decreased by >40 % in 24 days. No degradation was noticed if the mineral soil was kept bare or if the covering humus soil layer was sterilized beforehand. Our results suggest that covering mineral soil with an organic soil layer is an efficient way to remediate recalcitrant chlorophenol contamination in mineral soils. The results of the field experiment are promising.

  14. Modeling Organic Contaminant Desorption from Municipal Solid Waste Components

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knappe, D. R.; Wu, B.; Barlaz, M. A.

    2002-12-01

    Approximately 25% of the sites on the National Priority List (NPL) of Superfund are municipal landfills that accepted hazardous waste. Unlined landfills typically result in groundwater contamination, and priority pollutants such as alkylbenzenes are often present. To select cost-effective risk management alternatives, better information on factors controlling the fate of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) in landfills is required. The objectives of this study were (1) to investigate the effects of HOC aging time, anaerobic sorbent decomposition, and leachate composition on HOC desorption rates, and (2) to simulate HOC desorption rates from polymers and biopolymer composites with suitable diffusion models. Experiments were conducted with individual components of municipal solid waste (MSW) including polyvinyl chloride (PVC), high-density polyethylene (HDPE), newsprint, office paper, and model food and yard waste (rabbit food). Each of the biopolymer composites (office paper, newsprint, rabbit food) was tested in both fresh and anaerobically decomposed form. To determine the effects of aging on alkylbenzene desorption rates, batch desorption tests were performed after sorbents were exposed to toluene for 30 and 250 days in flame-sealed ampules. Desorption tests showed that alkylbenzene desorption rates varied greatly among MSW components (PVC slowest, fresh rabbit food and newsprint fastest). Furthermore, desorption rates decreased as aging time increased. A single-parameter polymer diffusion model successfully described PVC and HDPE desorption data, but it failed to simulate desorption rate data for biopolymer composites. For biopolymer composites, a three-parameter biphasic polymer diffusion model was employed, which successfully simulated both the initial rapid and the subsequent slow desorption of toluene. Toluene desorption rates from MSW mixtures were predicted for typical MSW compositions in the years 1960 and 1997. For the older MSW mixture, which had a

  15. Factors influencing the contamination rate of human organ-cultured corneas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Röck, Daniel; Wude, Johanna; Bartz-Schmidt, Karl U; Yoeruek, Efdal; Thaler, Sebastian; Röck, Tobias

    2017-12-01

    To assess the influence of donor, environment and storage factors on the contamination rate of organ-cultured corneas, to consider the microbiological species causing corneal contamination and to investigate the corresponding sensitivities. Data from 1340 consecutive donor corneas were analysed retrospectively. Logistic regression analysis was used to assess the influence of different factors on the contamination rate of organ-cultured corneas for transplantation. The mean annual contamination rate was 1.8 ± 0.4% (range: 1.3-2.1%); 50% contaminations were of fungal origin with exclusively Candida species, and 50% contaminations were of bacterial origin with Staphylococcus species being predominant. The cause of donor death including infection and multiple organ dysfunction syndrome increased the risk of bacterial or fungal contamination during organ culture (p = 0.007 and p = 0.014, respectively). Differentiating between septic and aseptic donors showed an increased risk of contamination for septic donors (p = 0.0020). Mean monthly temperature including warmer months increased the risk of contamination significantly (p = 0.0031). Sex, donor age, death to enucleation, death to corneoscleral disc excision and storage time did not increase the risk of contamination significantly. The genesis of microbial contamination in organ-cultured donor corneas seems to be multifactorial. The main source of fungal or bacterial contamination could be resident species from the skin flora. The rate of microbial contamination in organ-cultured donor corneas seems to be dependent on the cause of donor death and mean monthly temperature. © 2017 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. ORGANIC CONTAMINANT DISTRIBUTION IN SEDIMENTS, POLYCHAETES (NEREIS VIRENS) AND THE AMERICAN LOBSTER, HOMARUS AMERICANUS IN A LABORATORY FOOD CHAIN EXPERIMENT

    Science.gov (United States)

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to investigate the transfer of organic contaminants from an environmentally contaminated marine sediment through a simple marine food chain. The infaunal polychaete, Nereis virens, was exposed to contaminated sediment collected from the Passa...

  17. Nanofiltration vs. reverse osmosis for the removal of emerging organic contaminants in water reuse

    KAUST Repository

    Yangali-Quintanilla, Victor

    2011-10-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) in existing water reuse facilities is a water industry standard. However, that approach may be questioned taking into consideration that "tight" NF can be equal or "better" than RO. NF can achieve the same removals of RO membranes when dealing with emerging organic contaminants (pharmaceuticals, pesticides, endocrine disruptors and others). Experiments using 18 emerging contaminants were performed using membranes NF200 and NF90 at bench-scale units, and for a more complete study, results of NF and RO pilot and full-scale experiments where compared to our experimental results. The removal results showed that NF can remove many emerging contaminants. The average removal by tight NF was 82% for neutral contaminants and 97% for ionic contaminants. The average removal by RO was 85% for neutral contaminants and 99% for ionic contaminants. Aquifer recharge and recovery (ARR) followed by NF can effectively remove emerging contaminants with removals over 90% when loose NF membranes are used.

  18. The role of the global cryosphere in the fate of organic contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Grannas

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available The cryosphere is an important component of global organic contaminant cycles. Snow is an efficient scavenger of atmospheric organic pollutants while a seasonal snowpack, sea ice, glaciers and ice caps are contaminant reservoirs on time scales ranging from days to millennia. Important physical and chemical processes occurring in the various cryospheric compartments impact contaminant cycling and fate. A variety of interactions and feedbacks also occur within the cryospheric system, most of which are susceptible to perturbations due to climate change. In this article, we review the current state of knowledge regarding the transport and processing of organic contaminants in the global cryosphere with an emphasis on the role of a changing climate. Given the complexity of contaminant interactions with the cryosphere and limitations on resources and research capacity, interdisciplinary research and extended collaborations are essential to close identified knowledge gaps and to improve our understanding of contaminant fate under a changing climate.

  19. Thymol bromination: a comparison between enzymatic and chemical catalysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sabuzi, F.; Churakova, E.; Galloni, P.; Wever, R.; Hollmann, F.; Floris, B.; Conte, V.

    2015-01-01

    The catalytic activity of the vanadium-dependent bromoperoxidase isolated from the brown alga Ascophyllum nodosum is compared with the activity of a cheap, commercially available V-catalyst precursor in the bromination of thymol. Organic solvents have been avoided to make the system appealing from a

  20. Transport of organic contaminants in subsoil horizons and effects of dissolved organic matter related to organic waste recycling practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabauty, Florian; Pot, Valérie; Bourdat-Deschamps, Marjolaine; Bernet, Nathalie; Labat, Christophe; Benoit, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Compost amendment on agricultural soil is a current practice to compensate the loss of organic matter. As a consequence, dissolved organic carbon concentration in soil leachates can be increased and potentially modify the transport of other solutes. This study aims to characterize the processes controlling the mobility of dissolved organic matter (DOM) in deep soil layers and their potential impacts on the leaching of organic contaminants (pesticides and pharmaceutical compounds) potentially present in cultivated soils receiving organic waste composts. We sampled undisturbed soil cores in the illuviated horizon (60-90 cm depth) of an Albeluvisol. Percolation experiments were made in presence and absence of DOM with two different pesticides, isoproturon and epoxiconazole, and two pharmaceutical compounds, ibuprofen and sulfamethoxazole. Two types of DOM were extracted from two different soil surface horizons: one sampled in a plot receiving a co-compost of green wastes and sewage sludge applied once every 2 years since 1998 and one sampled in an unamended plot. Results show that DOM behaved as a highly reactive solute, which was continuously generated within the soil columns during flow and increased after flow interruption. DOM significantly increased the mobility of bromide and all pollutants, but the effects differed according the hydrophobic and the ionic character of the molecules. However, no clear effects of the origin of DOM on the mobility of the different contaminants were observed.

  1. Bromine and carbon isotope effects during photolysis of brominated phenols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakon, Yevgeni; Halicz, Ludwik; Gelman, Faina

    2013-12-17

    In the present study, carbon and bromine isotope effects during UV-photodegradation of bromophenols in aqueous and ethanolic solutions were determined. An anomalous relatively high inverse bromine isotope fractionation (εreactive position up to +5.1‰) along with normal carbon isotope effect (εreactive position of -12.6‰ to -23.4‰) observed in our study may be attributed to coexistence of both mass-dependent and mass-independent isotope fractionation of C-Br bond cleavage. Isotope effects of a similar scale were observed for all the studied reactions in ethanol, and for 4-bromophenol in aqueous solution. This may point out related radical mechanism for these processes. The lack of any carbon and bromine isotope effects during photodegradation of 2-bromophenol in aqueous solution possibly indicates that C-Br bond cleavage is not a rate-limiting step in the reaction. The bromine isotope fractionation, without any detectable carbon isotope effect, that was observed for 3-bromophenol photolysis in aqueous solution probably originates from mass-independent fractionation.

  2. Combined effects of microplastics and chemical contaminants on the organ toxicity of zebrafish ( Danio rerio )

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rainieri, Sandra; Conlledo, Nadia; Larsen, Bodil Katrine

    2018-01-01

    Microplastics contamination of the aquatic environment is considered a growing problem. The ingestion of microplastics has been documented for a variety of aquatic animals. Studies have shown the potential of microplastics to affect the bioavailability and uptake route of sorbed co......-contaminants of different nature in living organisms. Persistent organic pollutants and metals have been the co-contaminants majorly investigated in this field. The combined effect of microplastics and sorbed co-contaminants in aquatic organisms still needs to be properly understood. To address this, we have subjected...... zebrafish to four different feeds: A) untreated feed; B) feed supplemented with microplastics (LD-PE 125–250 µm of diameter); C) feed supplemented with 2% microplastics to which a mixture of PCBs, BFRs, PFCs and methylmercury were sorbed; and D) feed supplemented with the mixture of contaminants only. After...

  3. Milk and serum standard reference materials for monitoring organic contaminants in human samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eppe, Gauthier; Focant, Jean-François; Hamilton, Coreen; Heckert, N. Alan; Heltsley, Rebecca M.; Hoover, Dale; Keller, Jennifer M.; Leigh, Stefan D.; Patterson, Donald G.; Pintar, Adam L.; Sharpless, Katherine E.; Sjödin, Andreas; Turner, Wayman E.; Vander Pol, Stacy S.; Wise, Stephen A.

    2016-01-01

    Four new Standard Reference Materials (SRMs) have been developed to assist in the quality assurance of chemical contaminant measurements required for human biomonitoring studies, SRM 1953 Organic Contaminants in Non-Fortified Human Milk, SRM 1954 Organic Contaminants in Fortified Human Milk, SRM 1957 Organic Contaminants in Non-Fortified Human Serum, and SRM 1958 Organic Contaminants in Fortified Human Serum. These materials were developed as part of a collaboration between the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) with both agencies contributing data used in the certification of mass fraction values for a wide range of organic contaminants including polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congeners, chlorinated pesticides, polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners, and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin (PCDD) and dibenzofuran (PCDF) congeners. The certified mass fractions of the organic contaminants in unfortified samples, SRM 1953 and SRM 1957, ranged from 12 ng/kg to 2200 ng/kg with the exception of 4,4′-DDE in SRM 1953 at 7400 ng/kg with expanded uncertainties generally <14 %. This agreement suggests that there were no significant biases existing among the multiple methods used for analysis. PMID:23132544

  4. Interactions between eutrophication and contaminants - partitioning, bioaccumulation and effects on sediment-dwelling organisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hylland, Ketil; Schaanning, Morten; Skei, Jens; Berge, John Arthur; Eriksen, Dag Oe.; Skoeld, Mattias; Gunnarsson, Jonas

    1997-12-31

    This report describes an experiment on the interactions between eutrophication and contaminants in marine sediments. The experiment was performed in 24 continuously flushed glass aquaria within which three sediment-dwelling species were kept in a marine sediment. A filter-feeder, blue mussel, was kept in downstream aquaria. The experiment combined three environmental factors: oxygen availability, the presence or absence of contaminants, the addition of organic matter. The objectives were: (1) to quantify differences in the partitioning of contaminants between sediment, pore water and biota as a result of the treatment, (2) to quantify effects of treatments and interactions between treatments on sediment-dwelling organisms, (3) to identify differences, if any, in the release of contaminants from the sediment as the result of treatments. All three contaminants bio accumulated to higher levels in sediments with increased levels of organic material. Feeding directly or indirectly appeared to be the major route for bioaccumulation of benzo(a)pyrene and mercury. Cadmium was also controlled by the concentration in pore water. Sediment in enriched aquaria released more contaminants than sediment with low organic content. Organic enrichment strongly affected growth in the three sediment-dwelling organisms. Growth was less affected by decreased oxygen availability. The presence of contaminants had little effect on the three sediment-dwelling species at the concentrations used in the experiment. 103 refs., 14 figs., 12 tabs.

  5. Persistence and internalization of Salmonella on/in organic spinach sprout: exploring the contamination route

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purpose: The effects of contamination route, including seed and water, on the persistence and internalization of Salmonella in organic spinach cultivars- Lazio, Space, Emilia and Waitiki were studied. Methods: Seeds (1g) were contaminated with S. Newport using 10 ml of S. Newport-water suspension ov...

  6. Organic Contamination Baseline Study: In NASA JSC Astromaterials Curation Laboratories. Summary Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calaway, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    In preparation for OSIRIS-REx and other future sample return missions concerned with analyzing organics, we conducted an Organic Contamination Baseline Study for JSC Curation Labsoratories in FY12. For FY12 testing, organic baseline study focused only on molecular organic contamination in JSC curation gloveboxes: presumably future collections (i.e. Lunar, Mars, asteroid missions) would use isolation containment systems over only cleanrooms for primary sample storage. This decision was made due to limit historical data on curation gloveboxes, limited IR&D funds and Genesis routinely monitors organics in their ISO class 4 cleanrooms.

  7. Determination of organic contaminants in soil from coking plant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubica, K.; Czaplicka, M.; Kordas, T. [Institute of Chemical Processing of Coal, Zabrze (Poland)

    1998-06-01

    A method is presented which enables the assessment of the level of soil contamination by the compounds particularly noxious for the environment such as: benzol type hydrocarbons, phenols and their alkyl derivatives and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Feasibility of the analytical procedure was assessed using soil samples taken from around a coking plant.

  8. Penguin colonies as secondary sources of contamination with persistent organic pollutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosens, L.; Brink, van den N.W.; Riddle, M.; Blust, R.; Neels, H.; Covaci, A.

    2007-01-01

    Although long-range atmospheric transport has been described as the predominant mechanism for exposing polar regions to persistent organic pollutants (POPs), recent studies have suggested that bird activity can also contribute substantially to contaminant levels in some environments. However,

  9. Spatiotemporal characteristics of organic contaminant concentrations and ecological risk assessment in the Songhua River, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    To control source pollution and improve water quality, an understanding of the spatiotemporal characteristics of organic contaminant concentrations in affected receiving waters is necessary. The Songhua River in northeast China is the country's third-largest domestic river and lo...

  10. Laser induced damage of fused silica polished optics due to a droplet forming organic contaminant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bien-Aime, Karell; Neauport, Jerome; Tovena-Pecault, Isabelle; Fargin, Evelyne; Labrugere, Christine; Belin, Colette; Couzi, Michel

    2009-04-20

    We report on the effect of organic molecular contamination on single shot laser induced damage density at the wavelength of 351 nm, with a 3 ns pulse length. Specific contamination experiments were made with dioctylphthalate (DOP) in liquid or gaseous phase, on the surface of fused silica polished samples, bare or solgel coated. Systematic laser induced damage was observed only in the case of liquid phase contamination. Different chemical and morphological characterization methods were used to identify and understand the damage process. We demonstrate that the contaminant morphology, rather than its physicochemical nature, can be responsible for the decrease of laser induced damage threshold of optics.

  11. Organic contaminant transport and fate in the subsurface: evolution of knowledge and understanding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essaid, Hedeff I.; Bekins, Barbara A.; Cozzarelli, Isabelle M.

    2015-01-01

    Toxic organic contaminants may enter the subsurface as slightly soluble and volatile nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) or as dissolved solutes resulting in contaminant plumes emanating from the source zone. A large body of research published in Water Resources Research has been devoted to characterizing and understanding processes controlling the transport and fate of these organic contaminants and the effectiveness of natural attenuation, bioremediation, and other remedial technologies. These contributions include studies of NAPL flow, entrapment, and interphase mass transfer that have advanced from the analysis of simple systems with uniform properties and equilibrium contaminant phase partitioning to complex systems with pore-scale and macroscale heterogeneity and rate-limited interphase mass transfer. Understanding of the fate of dissolved organic plumes has advanced from when biodegradation was thought to require oxygen to recognition of the importance of anaerobic biodegradation, multiple redox zones, microbial enzyme kinetics, and mixing of organic contaminants and electron acceptors at plume fringes. Challenges remain in understanding the impacts of physical, chemical, biological, and hydrogeological heterogeneity, pore-scale interactions, and mixing on the fate of organic contaminants. Further effort is needed to successfully incorporate these processes into field-scale predictions of transport and fate. Regulations have greatly reduced the frequency of new point-source contamination problems; however, remediation at many legacy plumes remains challenging. A number of fields of current relevance are benefiting from research advances from point-source contaminant research. These include geologic carbon sequestration, nonpoint-source contamination, aquifer storage and recovery, the fate of contaminants from oil and gas development, and enhanced bioremediation.

  12. Potential of zerovalent iron nanoparticles for remediation of environmental organic contaminants in water: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raychoudhury, Trishikhi; Scheytt, Traugott

    2013-01-01

    Zerovalent iron (ZVI) has the potential to degrade different organic contaminants. Nanoscale zerovalent iron (NZVI) can reduce the contaminants even more rapidly due to its small size and large specific surface area (SSA), compared to granular ZVI. The main objective of this paper is to assess and compare the potential of NZVI for degradation of different contaminants in water under specific environmental conditions. As a first step, the potential reactive functional groups/bonds associated with different contaminants are identified and possible reaction mechanisms are discussed. Thereafter, the reaction efficiencies of different organic contaminants with NZVI are compared. Mass of ZVI and reaction time required to transform a certain amount of contaminated water are calculated based on literature data. Sources of contaminants in the environment and their environmental occurrences are discussed to understand the potential locations where NZVI could be applied for removal of different contaminants. Overall it is observed that azo-compounds are readily transformed in the presence of NZVI particles. Reaction efficiencies of ZVI for reduction of nitro-organic compounds are also reasonably high. However, halogenated compounds with high molecular weights or complex structures (i.e., iodinated contrast media, DDT, polychlorinated biphenyls, etc.) show lower reaction rates with NZVI compared to the widely studied chlorinated hydrocarbons (i.e., trichloroethylene).

  13. Electronic properties of bromine-doped carbon nanotubes

    CERN Document Server

    Jhi, S H; Cohen, M L

    2002-01-01

    Intercalation of bromine molecules (Br2) into single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) ropes is studied using the ab initio pseudopotential density functional method. Electronic and vibrational properties of the SWNT and Br2 are studied for various bromine concentrations. A drastic change in the charge transfer, bromine stretching-mode, and bromine bond-length is observed when the bromine-bromine distance decreases. Calculated electronic structures show that, at high bromine concentrations, the bromine ppsigma level broadens due to the interbromine interaction. These states overlap with the electronic bands of the SWNT near the Fermi level which results in a substantial charge transfer from carbon to bromine.

  14. Ecological risk assessment of PCBs and other organic contaminant residues in Laguna de Terminos, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Fernando P; Villeneuve, Jean-Pierre; Cattini, Chantal; Rendón, Jaime; de Oliveira, J Mota

    2009-05-01

    Laguna de Terminos, a wide coastal lagoon system in Campeche, Mexico, was investigated for the contamination by polychlorobiphenyls (PCBs). Distribution of these industrial chemical contaminants along with pesticide residues in the lagoon, as well as their sediment-water partitioning and bioaccumulation by oysters and fish were assessed. Contaminant concentrations in the lagoon were compared with toxicity data for aquatic organisms and the ecotoxicological risks discussed. Current contaminant concentrations generally were several orders of magnitude below acute toxic levels for the most sensitive aquatic species and this seems compatible with the status of nature reserve and functions aimed at Laguna de Terminos. In particular, Penaeidae shrimp species that are the most valuable fisheries resources of Campeche with important populations in the Laguna are not impaired with the current low levels of these contaminants. Nevertheless, due to known environmental persistence, the surveillance of chlorinated contaminant levels in the lagoon ecosystems is recommended.

  15. Endophytes and their Potential to Deal with Co-contamination of Organic Contaminants (Toluene) and Toxic Metals (Nickel) during Phytoremediation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weyens, N.; van der Lelie, D.; Truyens, S.; Saenen, E.; Boulet, J.; Dupae, J.; Taghavi, S.; Carleer, R.; Vangronsveld, J.

    2011-01-15

    The aim was to investigate if engineered endophytes that are capable of degrading organic contaminants, and deal with or ideally improve uptake and translocation of toxic metals, can improve phytoremediation of mixed organic-metal pollution. As a model system, yellow lupine was inoculated with the endophyte Burkholderia cepacia VM1468 possessing (a) the pTOM-Bu61 plasmid, coding for constitutive toluene/TCE degradation, and (b) the chromosomally inserted ncc-nre Ni resistance/sequestration system. As controls, plants were inoculated with B. vietnamiensis BU61 (pTOM-Bu61) and B. cepacia BU72 (containing the ncc-nre Ni resistance/sequestration system). Plants were exposed to mixes of toluene and Ni. Only inoculation with B. cepacia VM1468 resulted in decreased Ni and toluene phytotoxicity, as measured by a protective effect on plant growth and decreased activities of enzymes involved in antioxidative defence (catalase, guaiacol peroxidase, superoxide dismutase) in the roots. Besides, plants inoculated with B. cepacia VM1468 and B. vietnamiensis BU61 released less toluene through the leaves than non-inoculated plants and those inoculated with B. cepacia BU72. Ni-uptake in roots was slightly increased for B. cepacia BU72 inoculated plants. These results indicate that engineered endophytes have the potential to assist their host plant to deal with co-contamination of toxic metals and organic contaminants during phytoremediation.

  16. Anthropogenic organic contaminants in water, sediments and benthic organisms of the mangrove-fringed Segara Anakan Lagoon, Java, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dsikowitzky, Larissa; Nordhaus, Inga; Jennerjahn, Tim C; Khrycheva, Polina; Sivatharshan, Yoganathan; Yuwono, Edy; Schwarzbauer, Jan

    2011-04-01

    Segara Anakan, a mangrove-fringed coastal lagoon in Indonesia, has a high diversity of macrobenthic invertebrates and is increasingly affected by human activities. We found > 50 organic contaminants in water, sediment and macrobenthic invertebrates from the lagoon most of which were polycyclic aromatic compounds (PACs). Composition of PACs pointed to petrogenic contamination in the eastern lagoon. PACs mainly consisted of alkylated PAHs, which are more abundant in crude oil than parent PAHs. Highest total PAC concentration in sediment was above reported toxicity thresholds for aquatic invertebrates. Other identified compounds derived from municipal sewage and also included novel contaminants like triphenylphosphine oxide. Numbers of stored contaminants varied between species which is probably related to differences in microhabitat and feeding mode. Most contaminants were detected in Telescopium telescopium and Polymesoda erosa. Our findings suggest that more attention should be paid to the risk potential of alkylated PAHs, which has hardly been addressed previously. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. A critical review of the reactivity of manganese oxides with organic contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Remucal, Christina K; Ginder-Vogel, Matthew

    2014-05-01

    Naturally occurring manganese (Mn(iii/iv)) oxides are ubiquitous in a wide range of environmental settings and play a key role in numerous biogeochemical cycles. In addition, Mn(iii/iv) oxides are powerful oxidants that are capable of oxidizing a wide range of compounds. This review critically assesses the reactivity of Mn oxides with organic contaminants. Initial work with organic reductants employed high concentrations of model compounds (e.g., substituted phenols and anilines) and emphasized the reductive dissolution of the Mn oxides. Studies with lower concentrations of organic contaminants demonstrate that Mn oxides are capable of oxidizing a wide range of compounds (e.g., antibacterial agents, endocrine disruptors, and pesticides). Both model compounds and organic contaminants undergo similar reaction mechanisms on the oxide surface. The oxidation rates of organic compounds by manganese oxides are dependent upon solution conditions, such as pH and the presence of cations, anions, or dissolved organic matter. Similarly, physicochemical properties of the minerals used affect the rates of organic compound oxidation, which increase with the average oxidation state, redox potential, and specific surface area of the Mn oxides. Due to their reactivity with contaminants under environmentally relevant conditions, Mn oxides may oxidize contaminants in soils and/or be applied in water treatment applications.

  18. Residual hydrophobic organic contaminants in soil: Are they a barrier to risk-based approaches for managing contaminated land?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Umeh, Anthony C; Duan, Luchun; Naidu, Ravi; Semple, Kirk T

    2017-01-01

    Risk-based approaches to managing contaminated land, rather than approaches based on complete contaminant removal, have gained acceptance as they are likely to be more feasible and cost effective. Risk-based approaches aim to minimise risks of exposure of a specified contaminant to humans. However, adopting a risk-based approach over alternative overly-conservative approaches requires that associated uncertainties in decision making are understood and minimised. Irrespective of the nature of contaminants, a critical uncertainty is whether there are potential risks associated with exposure to the residual contaminant fractions in soil to humans and other ecological receptors, and how they should be considered in the risk assessment process. This review focusing on hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs), especially polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), suggests that there is significant uncertainty on the residual fractions of contaminants from risk perspectives. This is because very few studies have focused on understanding the desorption behaviour of HOCs, with few or no studies considering the influence of exposure-specific factors. In particular, it is not clear whether the exposure of soil-associated HOCs to gastrointestinal fluids and enzyme processes release bound residues. Although, in vitro models have been used to predict PAH bioaccessibility, and chemical extractions have been used to determine residual fractions in various soils, there are still doubts about what is actually being measured. Therefore it is not certain which bioaccessibility method currently represents the best choice, or provides the best estimate, of in vivo PAH bioavailability. It is suggested that the fate and behaviour of HOCs in a wide range of soils, and that consider exposure-specific scenarios, be investigated. Exposure-specific scenarios are important for validation purposes, which may be useful for the development of standardised methods and procedures for HOC

  19. Pilot-scale UV/H2O2 study for emerging organic contaminants decomposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Xiaona; Xiao, Yan; Hu, Jiangyong; Quek, Elaine; Xie, Rongjin; Pang, Thomas; Xing, Yongjie

    2016-03-01

    Human behaviors including consumption of drugs and use of personal care products, climate change, increased international travel, and the advent of water reclamation for direct potable use have led to the introduction of significant amounts of emerging organic contaminants into the aqueous environment. In addition, the lower detection limits associated with improved scientific methods of chemical analysis have resulted in a recent increase in documented incidences of these contaminants which previously were not routinely monitored in water. Such contaminants may cause known or suspected adverse ecological and/or human health effects at very low concentrations. Conventional drinking water treatment processes may not effectively remove these organic contaminants. Advanced oxidation process (AOP) is a promising treatment process for the removal of most of these emerging organic contaminants, and has been accepted worldwide as a suitable treatment process. In this study, different groups of emerging contaminants were studied for decomposition efficiency using pilot-scale UV/H2O2 oxidation setup, including EDCs, PPCPs, taste and odor (T&O), and perfluorinated compounds. Results found that MP UV/H2O2 AOP was efficient in removing all the selected contaminants except perfluorinated compounds. Study of the kinetics of the process showed that both light absorption and quantum yield of each compound affected the decomposition performance. Analysis of water quality parameters of the treated water indicated that the outcome of both UV photolysis and UV/H2O2 processes can be affected by changes in the feed water quality.

  20. Global Inorganic Source of Atmospheric Bromine

    OpenAIRE

    Enami, S.; Vecitis, C. D.; Cheng, J.; Hoffmann, M.R.; Colussi, A.J.

    2007-01-01

    A few bromine molecules per trillion (ppt) causes the complete destruction of ozone in the lower troposphere during polar spring and about half of the losses associated with the “ozone hole” in the stratosphere. Recent field and aerial measurements of the proxy BrO in the free troposphere suggest an even more pervasive global role for bromine. Models, which quantify ozone trends by assuming atmospheric inorganic bromine (Br_y) stems exclusively from long-lived bromoalkane gases, significantly...

  1. Contaminants and microorganisms in Dutch organic food products: a comparison with conventional products

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogenboom, L.A.P.; Bokhorst, J.G.; Northolt, M.D.; Vijver, van de L.P.L.; Broex, N.J.G.; Mevius, D.J.

    2008-01-01

    Organic products were analysed for the presence of contaminants, microorganisms and antibiotic resistance and compared with those from conventional products. No differences were observed in the Fusarium toxins deoxynivalenol and zearalenone in organic and conventional wheat, during both a dry period

  2. Characterisation of organic contaminants in the CLOUD chamber at CERN

    OpenAIRE

    Schnitzhofer R.; Metzger A.; Breitenlechner M.; Jud W.; Heinritzi M.; De Menezes L. P.; Duplissy J.; Guida R.; Haider S.; Kirkby J.; Mathot S.; Minginette P.; Onnela A.; Walther H.; Wasem A.

    2014-01-01

    The CLOUD experiment (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) investigates the nucleation of new particles and how this process is influenced by galactic cosmic rays in an electropolished, stainless-steel environmental chamber at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research). Since volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can act as precursor gases for nucleation and growth of particles, great efforts have been made to keep their unwanted background levels as low as possible and to ...

  3. Characterisation of organic contaminants in the CLOUD chamber at CERN

    OpenAIRE

    R. Schnitzhofer; A. Metzger; M. Breitenlechner; W. Jud; M. Heinritzi; L.-P. De Menezes; J. Duplissy; R. Guida; S. Haider; J. Kirkby; S. Mathot; P. Minginette; A. Onnela; H. Walther; A. Wasem

    2013-01-01

    The CLOUD experiment (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) investigates the nucleation of new particles and how this process is influenced by galactic cosmic rays in an electro-polished, stainless-steel environmental chamber at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research). Since volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can act as precursor gases for nucleation and growth of particles, great efforts have been made to keep their unwanted background levels as low as possible and to quantify th...

  4. The delivery of organic contaminants to the Arctic food web: Why sea ice matters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pucko, M.; Stern, Gary; Macdonald, Robie

    2015-01-01

    For decades sea ice has been perceived as a physical barrier for the loading of contaminants to the Arctic Ocean. We show that sea ice, in fact, facilitates the delivery of organic contaminants to the Arctic marine food web through processes that: 1) are independent of contaminant physical......–chemical properties (e.g. 2–3-fold increase in exposure to brine-associated biota), and 2) depend on physical–chemical properties and, therefore, differentiate between contaminants (e.g. atmospheric loading of contaminants to melt ponds over the summer, and their subsequent leakage to the ocean). We estimate...... the concentrations of legacy organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and current-use pesticides (CUPs) in melt pond water in the Beaufort Sea, Canadian High Arctic, in 2008, at near-gas exchange equilibriumbased on Henry's lawconstants (HLCs), air concentrations and exchange dynamics. CUPs currently present the highest...

  5. Inverse modeling of the biodegradation of emerging organic contaminants in the soil-plant system

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurtado, Carlos; Trapp, Stefan; Bayona, Josep M.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the processes involved in the uptake and accumulation of organic contaminants into plants is very important to assess the possible human risk associated with. Biodegradation of emerging contaminants in plants has been observed, but kinetical studies are rare. In this study, we analyse...... experimental data on the uptake of emerging organic contaminants into lettuce derived in a greenhouse experiment. Measured soil, root and leaf concentrations from four contaminants were selected within the applicability domain of a steady-state two-compartment standard plant uptake model: bisphenol A (BPA......), carbamazepine (CBZ), triclosan (TCS) and caffeine (CAF). The model overestimated concentrations in most cases, when no degradation rates in plants were entered. Subsequently, biodegradation rates were fitted so that the measured concentrations were met.Obtained degradation kinetics are in the order, BPA

  6. Combined effects of microplastics and chemical contaminants on the organ toxicity of zebrafish (Danio rerio).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rainieri, Sandra; Conlledo, Nadia; Larsen, Bodil K; Granby, Kit; Barranco, Alejandro

    2018-04-01

    Microplastics contamination of the aquatic environment is considered a growing problem. The ingestion of microplastics has been documented for a variety of aquatic animals. Studies have shown the potential of microplastics to affect the bioavailability and uptake route of sorbed co-contaminants of different nature in living organisms. Persistent organic pollutants and metals have been the co-contaminants majorly investigated in this field. The combined effect of microplastics and sorbed co-contaminants in aquatic organisms still needs to be properly understood. To address this, we have subjected zebrafish to four different feeds: A) untreated feed; B) feed supplemented with microplastics (LD-PE 125-250µm of diameter); C) feed supplemented with 2% microplastics to which a mixture of PCBs, BFRs, PFCs and methylmercury were sorbed; and D) feed supplemented with the mixture of contaminants only. After 3 weeks of exposure fish were dissected and liver, intestine, muscular tissue and brain were extracted. After visual observation, evaluation of differential gene expression of some selected biomarker genes in liver, intestine and brain were carried out. Additionally, quantification of perfluorinated compounds in liver, brain, muscular tissue and intestine of some selected samples were performed. The feed supplemented with microplastics with sorbed contaminants produced the most evident effects especially on the liver. The results indicate that microplastics alone does not produce relevant effects on zebrafish in the experimental conditions tested; on the contrary, the combined effect of microplastics and sorbed contaminants altered significantly their organs homeostasis in a greater manner than the contaminants alone. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A national-scale assessment of micro-organic contaminants in groundwater of England and Wales

    OpenAIRE

    Manamsa, Katya; Crane, Emily; Stuart, Marianne; Talbot, John; Lapworth, Dan; Hart, Alwyn

    2016-01-01

    A large variety of micro-organic (MO) compounds is used in huge quantities for a range of purposes (e.g. manufacturing, food production, healthcare) and is now being frequently detected in the aquatic environment. Interest in the occurrence of MO contaminants in the terrestrial and aquatic environments continues to grow, as well as in their environmental fate and potential toxicity. However, the contamination of groundwater resources by MOs has a limited evidence base compared to other freshw...

  8. Compound-specific hydrogen isotope analysis of fluorine-, chlorine-, bromine- and iodine-bearing organics using gas chromatography-chromium-based high-temperature conversion (Cr/HTC) isotope ratio mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Renpenning, Julian; Schimmelmann, Arndt; Gehre, Matthias

    2017-07-15

    The conventional high-temperature conversion (HTC) approach towards hydrogen compound-specific isotope analysis (CSIA) of halogen-bearing (F, Cl, Br, I) organics suffers from incomplete H2 yields and associated hydrogen isotope fractionation due to generation of HF, HCl, HBr, and HI byproducts. Moreover, the traditional off-line combustion of highly halogenated compounds results in incomplete recovery of water as an intermediary compound for hydrogen isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS), and hence also leads to isotope fractionation. This study presents an optimized chromium-based high-temperature conversion (Cr/HTC) approach for hydrogen CSIA of various fluorinated, chlorinated, brominated and iodinated organic compounds. The Cr/HTC approach is fast, economical, and not affected by low H2 yields and associated isotope fractionation. The performance of the modified gas chromatography/chromium-based high-temperature conversion (GC-Cr/HTC) system was monitored and optimized using an ion trap mass spectrometer. Quantitative conversion of organic hydrogen into H2 analyte gas was achieved for all halogen-bearing compounds. The corresponding accuracy of CSIA was validated using (i) manual dual-inlet (DI)-IRMS after off-line conversion into H2 , and (ii) elemental analyzer (EA)-Cr/HTC-IRMS (on-line conversion). The overall hydrogen isotope analysis of F-, Cl-, Br- and I-bearing organics via GC-Cr/HTC-IRMS achieved a precision σ ≤ 3 mUr and an accuracy within ±5 mUr along the VSMOW-SLAP scale compared with the measured isotope compositions resulting from both validation methods, off-line and on-line. The same analytical performance as for single-compound GC-Cr/HTC-IRMS was achieved compound-specifically for mixtures of halogenated organics following GC separation to baseline resolution. GC-Cr/HTC technology can be implemented in existing analytical equipment using commercially available materials to provide a versatile tool for hydrogen CSIA of halogenated and non

  9. Nanofiltration vs. reverse osmosis for the removal of emerging organic contaminants in water reuse

    KAUST Repository

    Yangali-Quintanilla, Victor

    2011-01-01

    Reverse osmosis (RO) in existing water reuse facilities is a water industry standard. However, that approach may be questioned taking into consideration that "tight" NF can be equal or "better" than RO. NF can achieve the same removals of RO membranes when dealing with emerging organic contaminants (pharmaceuticals, pesticides, endocrine disruptors and others). Experiments using 18 emerging contaminants were performed using membranes NF200 and NF90 at bench-scale units, and for a more complete study, results of NF and RO pilot and fullscale experiments where compared to our experimental results. The removal results showed that NF can remove many emerging contaminants. The average removal by tight NF was 82% for neutral contaminants and 97% for ionic contaminants. The average removal by RO was 85% for neutral contaminants and 99% for ionic contaminants. Aquifer recharge and recovery (ARR) followed by NF can effectively remove emerging contaminants with removals over 90% when loose NF membranes are used. © 2011 2011 Desalination Publications. All rights reserved.

  10. Green Photocatalysis for Degradation of Organic Contaminants: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Many organic pesticides that were banned a few decades ago, as well as those that are currently in use in many parts of the world, pose some serious threat to human life and the ecosystem because of their persistent and bioaccumulative nature. In the recent years advanced oxidati...

  11. Toxicity of brominated flame retardants in fish, with emphasis on endocrine effects and reproduction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kuiper, R.V.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The abundant use of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in modern polymers has over the passed decades resulted in contamination of the environment, and BFRs are increasingly found in fish. Laboratory studies have shown that a number of BFRs and BFR-metabolites can interfere with thyroid and

  12. Determination of biological removal of recalcitrant organic contaminants in coal gasification waste water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Qinhong; Tabassum, Salma; Yu, Guangxin; Chu, Chunfeng; Zhang, Zhenjia

    2015-01-01

    Coal gasification waste water treatment needed a sustainable and affordable plan to eliminate the organic contaminants in order to lower the potential environmental and human health risk. In this paper, a laboratory-scale anaerobic-aerobic intermittent system carried out 66 operational cycles together for the treatment of coal gasification waste water and the removal capacity of each organic pollutant. Contaminants included phenols, carboxylic acids, long-chain hydrocarbons, and heterocyclic compounds, wherein the relative content of phenol is up to 57.86%. The long-term removal of 77 organic contaminants was evaluated at different hydraulic retention time (anaerobic24 h + aerobic48 h and anaerobic48 h +aerobic48 h). Contaminant removal ranged from no measurable removal to near-complete removal with effluent concentrations below the detection limit. Contaminant removals followed one of four trends: steady-state removal throughout, increasing removal to steady state (acclimation), decreasing removal, and no removal. Organic degradation and transformation in the reaction were analysed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry technology.

  13. Newly developed standard reference materials for organic contaminant analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poster, D.; Kucklick, J.; Schantz, M.; Porter, B.; Wise, S. [National Inst. of Stand. and Technol., Gaithersburg, MD (USA). Center for Anal. Chem.

    2004-09-15

    The National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) has issued a number of Standard Reference Materials (SRM) for specified analytes. The SRMs are biota and biological related materials, sediments and particle related SRMs. The certified compounds for analysis are polychlorinated biphenyls (PCB), polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) and their nitro-analogues, chlorinated pesticides, methylmercury, organic tin compounds, fatty acids, polybrominated biphenyl ethers (PBDE). The authors report on origin of materials and analytic methods. (uke)

  14. Efficient phytoremediation of organic contaminants in soils using plant-endophyte partnerships.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Nai-Xian; Yu, Jiao; Zhao, Hai-Ming; Cheng, Yu-Ting; Mo, Ce-Hui; Cai, Quan-Ying; Li, Yan-Wen; Li, Hui; Wong, Ming-Hung

    2017-04-01

    Soil pollution with organic contaminants is one of the most intractable environmental problems today, posing serious threats to humans and the environment. Innovative strategies for remediating organic-contaminated soils are critically needed. Phytoremediation, based on the synergistic actions of plants and their associated microorganisms, has been recognized as a powerful in situ approach to soil remediation. Suitable combinations of plants and their associated endophytes can improve plant growth and enhance the biodegradation of organic contaminants in the rhizosphere and/or endosphere, dramatically expediting the removal of organic pollutants from soils. However, for phytoremediation to become a more widely accepted and predictable alternative, a thorough understanding of plant-endophyte interactions is needed. Many studies have recently been conducted on the mechanisms of endophyte-assisted phytoremediation of organic contaminants in soils. In this review, we highlight the superiority of organic pollutant-degrading endophytes for practical applications in phytoremediation, summarize alternative strategies for improving phytoremediation, discuss the fundamental mechanisms of endophyte-assisted phytoremediation, and present updated information regarding the advances, challenges, and new directions in the field of endophyte-assisted phytoremediation technology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Remediation of Groundwater Contaminated with Organics and Radionuclides - An Innovative Approach Eases Traditional Hurdles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scott, J.; Case, N.; Coltman, K.

    2003-02-25

    Traditional approaches to the remediation of contaminated groundwater, such as pump-and-treat, have been used for many years for the treatment of groundwater contaminated with various organics. However the treatment of groundwater contaminated with organics and radionuclides has been considerably more challenging. Safety and Ecology Corporation (SEC) was recently faced with these challenges while designing a remediation system for the remediation of TCE-contaminated groundwater and soil at the RMI Extrusion Plant in Ashtabula, OH. Under contract with RMI Environmental Services (RMIES), SEC teamed with Regenesis, Inc. to design, implement, and execute a bioremediation system to remove TCE and associated organics from groundwater and soil that was also contaminated with uranium and technetium. The SEC-Regenesis system involved the injection of Hydrogen Release Compound (HRC), a natural attenuation accelerant that has been patented, designed, and produced by Regenesis, to stimulate the reductive dechlorination and remediation of chlorinated organics in subsurface environments. The compound was injected using direct-push Geoprobe rods over a specially designed grid system through the zone of contaminated groundwater. The innovative approach eliminated the need to extract contaminated groundwater and bypassed the restrictive limitations listed above. The system has been in operation for roughly six months and has begun to show considerable success at dechlorinating and remediating the TCE plume and in reducing the radionuclides into insoluble precipitants. The paper will provide an overview of the design, installation, and initial operation phase of the project, focusing on how traditional design challenges of remediating radiologically contaminated groundwater were overcome. The following topics will be specifically covered: a description of the mechanics of the HRC technology; an assessment of the applicability of the HRC technology to contaminated groundwater plumes

  16. Bromination of olefins with HBr and DMSO.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karki, Megha; Magolan, Jakob

    2015-04-03

    A simple and inexpensive methodology is reported for the conversion of alkenes to 1,2-dibromo alkanes via oxidative bromination using HBr paired with dimethyl sulfoxide, which serves as the oxidant as well as cosolvent. The substrate scope includes 21 olefins brominated in good to excellent yields. Three of six styrene derivatives yielded bromohydrins under the reaction conditions.

  17. Vitrification of cesium-contaminated organic ion exchange resin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sargent, Jr., Thomas N. [Clemson Univ., SC (United States)

    1994-08-01

    Vitrification has been declared by the Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) as the Best Demonstrated Available Technology (BDAT) for the permanent disposal of high-level radioactive waste. Savannah River Site currently uses a sodium tetraphenylborate (NaTPB) precipitation process to remove Cs-137 from a wastewater solution created from the processing of nuclear fuel. This process has several disadvantages such as the formation of a benzene waste stream. It has been proposed to replace the precipitation process with an ion exchange process using a new resorcinol-formaldehyde resin developed by Savannah River Technical Center (SRTC). Preliminary tests, however, showed that problems such as crust formation and a reduced final glass wasteform exist when the resin is placed in the melter environment. The newly developed stirred melter could be capable of overcoming these problems. This research explored the operational feasibility of using the stirred tank melter to vitrify an organic ion exchange resin. Preliminary tests included crucible studies to determine the reducing potential of the resin and the extent of oxygen consuming reactions and oxygen transfer tests to approximate the extent of oxygen transfer into the molten glass using an impeller and a combination of the impeller and an external oxygen transfer system. These preliminary studies were used as a basis for the final test which was using the stirred tank melter to vitrify nonradioactive cesium loaded organic ion exchange resin. Results from this test included a cesium mass balance, a characterization of the semi-volatile organic compounds present in the off gas as products of incomplete combustion (PIC), a qualitative analysis of other volatile metals, and observations relating to the effect the resin had on the final redox state of the glass.

  18. Unit Process Wetlands for Removal of Trace Organic Contaminants and Pathogens from Municipal Wastewater Effluents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, Justin T.; Nguyen, Mi T.; Jones, Zackary L.; Ismail, Niveen S.; Sedlak, David L.; Sharp, Jonathan O.; Luthy, Richard G.; Horne, Alex J.; Nelson, Kara L.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Treatment wetlands have become an attractive option for the removal of nutrients from municipal wastewater effluents due to their low energy requirements and operational costs, as well as the ancillary benefits they provide, including creating aesthetically appealing spaces and wildlife habitats. Treatment wetlands also hold promise as a means of removing other wastewater-derived contaminants, such as trace organic contaminants and pathogens. However, concerns about variations in treatment efficacy of these pollutants, coupled with an incomplete mechanistic understanding of their removal in wetlands, hinder the widespread adoption of constructed wetlands for these two classes of contaminants. A better understanding is needed so that wetlands as a unit process can be designed for their removal, with individual wetland cells optimized for the removal of specific contaminants, and connected in series or integrated with other engineered or natural treatment processes. In this article, removal mechanisms of trace organic contaminants and pathogens are reviewed, including sorption and sedimentation, biotransformation and predation, photolysis and photoinactivation, and remaining knowledge gaps are identified. In addition, suggestions are provided for how these treatment mechanisms can be enhanced in commonly employed unit process wetland cells or how they might be harnessed in novel unit process cells. It is hoped that application of the unit process concept to a wider range of contaminants will lead to more widespread application of wetland treatment trains as components of urban water infrastructure in the United States and around the globe. PMID:23983451

  19. Unit Process Wetlands for Removal of Trace Organic Contaminants and Pathogens from Municipal Wastewater Effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, Justin T; Nguyen, Mi T; Jones, Zackary L; Ismail, Niveen S; Sedlak, David L; Sharp, Jonathan O; Luthy, Richard G; Horne, Alex J; Nelson, Kara L

    2013-08-01

    Treatment wetlands have become an attractive option for the removal of nutrients from municipal wastewater effluents due to their low energy requirements and operational costs, as well as the ancillary benefits they provide, including creating aesthetically appealing spaces and wildlife habitats. Treatment wetlands also hold promise as a means of removing other wastewater-derived contaminants, such as trace organic contaminants and pathogens. However, concerns about variations in treatment efficacy of these pollutants, coupled with an incomplete mechanistic understanding of their removal in wetlands, hinder the widespread adoption of constructed wetlands for these two classes of contaminants. A better understanding is needed so that wetlands as a unit process can be designed for their removal, with individual wetland cells optimized for the removal of specific contaminants, and connected in series or integrated with other engineered or natural treatment processes. In this article, removal mechanisms of trace organic contaminants and pathogens are reviewed, including sorption and sedimentation, biotransformation and predation, photolysis and photoinactivation, and remaining knowledge gaps are identified. In addition, suggestions are provided for how these treatment mechanisms can be enhanced in commonly employed unit process wetland cells or how they might be harnessed in novel unit process cells. It is hoped that application of the unit process concept to a wider range of contaminants will lead to more widespread application of wetland treatment trains as components of urban water infrastructure in the United States and around the globe.

  20. Characterisation of organic contaminants in the CLOUD chamber at CERN

    CERN Document Server

    Schnitzhofer, R; Breitenlechner, M; Jud, W; Heinritzi, M; Menezes, L-P; Duplissy, J; Guida, R; Haider, S; Kikby, J; Mathot, S; Minginette, P; Onnela, A; Walther, H; Wasem, A; Hansel, A; CLOUD Team

    2014-01-01

    The CLOUD experiment (Cosmics Leaving OUtdoor Droplets) investigates the nucleation of new particles and how this process is influenced by galactic cosmic rays in an electropolished, stainless-steel environmental chamber at CERN (European Organization for Nuclear Research). Since volatile organic compounds (VOCs) can act as precursor gases for nucleation and growth of particles, great efforts have been made to keep their unwanted background levels as low as possible and to quantify them. In order to be able to measure a great set of VOCs simultaneously in the low parts per trillion (pptv) range, proton-transfer-reaction mass spectrometry (PTR-MS) was used. Initially the total VOC background concentration strongly correlated with ozone in the chamber and ranged from 0.1 to 7 parts per billion (ppbv). Plastic used as sealing material in the ozone generator was found to be a major VOC source. Especially oxygen-containing VOCs were generated together with ozone. These parts were replaced by stainless steel after ...

  1. Burrowing and avoidance behaviour in marine organisms exposed to pesticide-contaminated sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohlenberg, F.; Kiorboe, T.

    1983-02-01

    Behavioural effects of marine sediment contaminated with pesticides (6000 ppm parathion, 200 ppm methyl parathion, 200 ppm malathion) were studied in a number of marine organisms in laboratory tests and in situ. The burrowing behaviour in Macoma baltica, Cerastoderma edule, Abra alba, Nereis diversicolor and Scoloplos armiger was impaired in the contaminated sediment compared to control. The impairment was most pronounced in the laboratory tests, where almost no burrowing occured. In a very simple laboratory set-up, highly significant avoidance of the contaminated sediment was demonstrated for Crangon crangon and Solea solea, but not for Carcinus maenas and Pomatoschistus minutus. The validity of both behavioural tests was supported by in situ observations and investigations on the distribution of the species. It is concluded that both tests are useful tools in the assessment of the impact of contaminated sediments.

  2. Organic acid enhanced electrodialytic extraction of lead from contaminated soil fines in suspension

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Pernille Erland; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær; Ottosen, Lisbeth M.

    2007-01-01

    for decontamination of the sludge was investigated. The ability of 11 organic acids to extract Pb from the fine fraction of contaminated soil (grains enhancing reagents during electrodialytic remediation (EDR) of Pb-contaminated soil fines in suspension...... was tested. Five of the acids showed the ability to extract Ph from the soil fines in excess of the effect caused solely by pH changes. Addition of the acids, however, severely impeded EDR, hence promotion of EDR by combination with heterotrophic leaching was rejected. In contrast, enhancement of EDR......The implementation of soil washing technology for the treatment of heavy metal contaminated soils is limited by the toxicity and unwieldiness of the remaining heavy metal contaminated sludge. In this work, the feasibility of combining electrodialytic remediation with heterotrophic leaching...

  3. Process for the restoration of solids contaminated with hydrocarbons and heavy organic compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bala, G.A.; Thomas, C.P.; Jackson, J.D.; McMillin, R.A. [EG and G Idaho, Inc., Idaho Falls, ID (United States). Idaho National Engineering Lab.

    1994-12-31

    Processes have been developed for the restoration of environments contaminated with hydrocarbons and heavy organics. The intended product is a field deployable materials handling system and phase separation process ranging in size from 1 yd{sup 3}/hr to 50 yd{sup 3}/hr for commercial application to environmental problems associated with the exploration, production, refining and transport of petroleum, petroleum products and organic chemicals. Effluents from contaminated sites will be clean solids (classified by size if appropriate), and the concentrated contaminant. The technology is based on biochemical solvation, liquid/liquid and liquid/solid extractions, materials classification, mechanical and hydraulic scrubbing, and phase separation of organic and aqueous phases. Fluid use is minimized through utilization of closed-loop (recycle) systems. Contaminants that are removed from the solid materials may be destroyed, disposed of using existing technologies, or used on-site for cogeneration of /power for plant operations. Additionally, if the contaminant is a valued product, the material may be recovered for application or sale. Clean solid material is not sterilized and may be returned to normal agricultural, commercial, residential or recreational use in most instances.

  4. Contributions of contamination and organic enrichment to sediment toxicity near a sewage outfall

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bay, S.M.; Greenstein, D.J. [Coastal Water Research Project, Westminster, CA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Sediment and interstitial water toxicity and contamination were measured at 12 sites near the Los Angeles County Sanitation Districts sewage outfall on the Palos Verdes (Calif.) shelf, a region contaminated with many metal and organic contaminants. The spatial pattern of biological effects (sea urchin growth and fertilization) was compared with chemical concentrations in sediment, interstitial water, and gonad tissue to identify potentially meaningful relationships. Tissue analyses indicated that sediment metals were not bioavailable and therefore unlikely to be a significant factor in the sediment toxicity test responses. Sediment DDTs, PCBs, and PAHs were bioavailable and showed significant correlations with sea urchin growth effects. Interstitial water toxicity was most strongly correlated with measures of organic enrichment (hydrogen sulfide, ammonia) and hydrocarbon contamination. Subsequent dose response experiments confirmed the important role of hydrogen sulfide in interstitial water toxicity but failed to demonstrate an effect of DDE (the most abundant sediment organic contaminant) on growth. Overall, variations in measured sediment characteristics accounted for a relatively small portion of the biological responses.

  5. A simplified approach for monitoring hydrophobic organic contaminants associated with suspended sediment: methodology and applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahler, B J; Van Metre, P C

    2003-04-01

    Hydrophobic organic contaminants, although frequently detected in bed sediment and in aquatic biota, are rarely detected in whole-water samples, complicating determination of their occurrence, load, and source. A better approach for the investigation of hydrophobic organic contaminants is the direct analysis of sediment in suspension, but procedures for doing so are expensive and cumbersome. We describe a simple, inexpensive methodology for the dewatering of sediment and present the results of two case studies. Isolation of a sufficient mass of sediment for analyses of organochlorine compounds and PAHs is obtained by in-line filtration of large volumes of water. The sediment is removed from the filters and analyzed directly by standard laboratory methods. In the first case study, suspended-sediment sampling was used to determine occurrence, loads, and yields of contaminants in urban runoff affecting biota in Town Lake, Austin, TX. The second case study used suspended-sediment sampling to locate a point source of PCBs in the Donna Canal in south Texas, where fish are contaminated with PCBs. The case studies demonstrate that suspended-sediment sampling can be an effective tool for determining the occurrence, load, and source of hydrophobic organic contaminants in transport.

  6. Screening of inorganic and organic contaminants in floodwater in paddy fields of Hue and Thanh Hoa in Vietnam

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trinh Thu, Ha; Marcussen, Helle; Hansen, Hans Chr. Bruun

    2017-01-01

    In the rainy season, rice growing areas in Vietnam often become flooded by up to 1.5 m water. The floodwater brings contaminants from cultivated areas, farms and villages to the rice fields resulting in widespread contamination. In 2012 and 2013, the inorganic and organic contaminants in floodwater...

  7. Enteropathogenic bacterial contamination of a latosol following application of organic fertilizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Alexandre Escosteguy

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Poultry manure is used as fertilizer in natura, but little is known about whether it contaminates the soil with pathogenic organisms. The aim of this study was to assess the effects of organic, organomineral and mineral fertilizers on soil contamination by enteric pathogens, using poultry manure as the organic fertilizer. Manure was applied in field experiments at rates of 7.0 ton. ha-1 (maize crop, 2008/2009, 8.0 ton. ha-1 (wheat crop, 2009 and 14 ton. ha-1 (maize crop, 2010/2011. Organomineral fertilizer was applied at the same rates but was comprised of 50% manure and 50% mineral fertilizer. At 30 and 70 days after fertilization, the organic fertilizer and the upper 0-5 cm layer of the soil were tested for the presence of helminth eggs and larvae and enteropathogenic bacteria. Fecal and non-fecal coliforms (Escherichia coli and Clostridium perfringes were found in the organic fertilizer, but neither Salmonella spp. nor enteroparasites were detected. The population of enteropathogenic bacteria in the soil was similar among the treatments for all crops at both evaluation times. The population of thermotolerant coliforms in the organic fertilizer was larger than the maximum level allowed in Brazil, but neither the organic or nor the organomineral fertilizer contaminated the soil.

  8. Interactive effects of nanoparticles with other contaminants in aquatic organisms: Friend or foe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canesi, L; Ciacci, C; Balbi, T

    2015-10-01

    The increasing production and use of nanoparticles (NPs) will lead to their release into the aquatic environment, posing a potential threat to the health of aquatic organisms. Both in the water phase and in the sediments NPs could mix and interact with other pollutants, such as organic xenobiotics and heavy metals, leading to possible changes in their bioavailability/bioconcentration/toxicity. However, whether these interactive effects may lead to increased harmful effects in marine organisms is largely unknown. In this work, available data mainly obtained on carbon based NPs and n-TiO2, as examples of widespread NPs, in aquatic organisms are reviewed. Moreover, data are summarized on the interactive effects of n-TiO2 with 2,3,7,8-TCDD and Cd(2+), chosen as examples of common and persistent organic and inorganic contaminants, respectively, in the model marine bivalve Mytilus. The results reveal complex and often unexpected interactive responses of NPs with other pollutants, depending on type of contaminant and the endpoint measured, as well as differences in bioaccumulation. The results are discussed in relation with data obtained in freshwater organisms. Overall, information available so far indicate that interactive effects of NPs with other contaminants do not necessarily lead to increased toxicity or harmful effects in aquatic organisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. The delivery of organic contaminants to the Arctic food web: why sea ice matters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pućko, Monika; Stern, Gary A; Macdonald, Robie W; Jantunen, Liisa M; Bidleman, Terry F; Wong, Fiona; Barber, David G; Rysgaard, Søren

    2015-02-15

    For decades sea ice has been perceived as a physical barrier for the loading of contaminants to the Arctic Ocean. We show that sea ice, in fact, facilitates the delivery of organic contaminants to the Arctic marine food web through processes that: 1) are independent of contaminant physical-chemical properties (e.g. 2-3-fold increase in exposure to brine-associated biota), and 2) depend on physical-chemical properties and, therefore, differentiate between contaminants (e.g. atmospheric loading of contaminants to melt ponds over the summer, and their subsequent leakage to the ocean). We estimate the concentrations of legacy organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and current-use pesticides (CUPs) in melt pond water in the Beaufort Sea, Canadian High Arctic, in 2008, at near-gas exchange equilibrium based on Henry's law constants (HLCs), air concentrations and exchange dynamics. CUPs currently present the highest risk of increased exposures through melt pond loading and drainage due to the high ratio of melt pond water to seawater concentration (Melt pond Enrichment Factor, MEF), which ranges from 2 for dacthal to 10 for endosulfan I. Melt pond contaminant enrichment can be perceived as a hypothetical 'pump' delivering contaminants from the atmosphere to the ocean under ice-covered conditions, with 2-10% of CUPs annually entering the Beaufort Sea via this input route compared to the standing stock in the Polar Mixed Layer of the ocean. The abovementioned processes are strongly favored in first-year ice compared to multi-year ice and, therefore, the dynamic balance between contaminant inventories and contaminant deposition to the surface ocean is being widely affected by the large-scale icescape transition taking place in the Arctic. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of predicted climatic changes on distribution of organic contaminants in brackish water mesocosms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ripszam, M., E-mail: matyas.ripszam@chem.umu.se [Department of Chemistry, Umea University, 901 87 Umeå (Sweden); Gallampois, C.M.J. [Department of Chemistry, Umea University, 901 87 Umeå (Sweden); Berglund, Å. [Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences, Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå (Sweden); Larsson, H. [Umeå Marine Sciences Centre, Umeå University, Norrbyn, 905 71 Hörnefors (Sweden); Andersson, A. [Department of Ecology and Environmental Sciences, Umeå University, 901 87 Umeå (Sweden); Tysklind, M.; Haglund, P. [Department of Chemistry, Umea University, 901 87 Umeå (Sweden)

    2015-06-01

    Predicted consequences of future climate change in the northern Baltic Sea include increases in sea surface temperatures and terrestrial dissolved organic carbon (DOC) runoff. These changes are expected to alter environmental distribution of anthropogenic organic contaminants (OCs). To assess likely shifts in their distributions, outdoor mesocosms were employed to mimic pelagic ecosystems at two temperatures and two DOC concentrations, current: 15 °C and 4 mg DOC L{sup −1} and, within ranges of predicted increases, 18 °C and 6 mg DOC L{sup −1}, respectively. Selected organic contaminants were added to the mesocosms to monitor changes in their distribution induced by the treatments. OC partitioning to particulate matter and sedimentation were enhanced at the higher DOC concentration, at both temperatures, while higher losses and lower partitioning of OCs to DOC were observed at the higher temperature. No combined effects of higher temperature and DOC on partitioning were observed, possibly because of the balancing nature of these processes. Therefore, changes in OCs' fates may largely depend on whether they are most sensitive to temperature or DOC concentration rises. Bromoanilines, phenanthrene, biphenyl and naphthalene were sensitive to the rise in DOC concentration, whereas organophosphates, chlorobenzenes (PCBz) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were more sensitive to temperature. Mitotane and diflufenican were sensitive to both temperature and DOC concentration rises individually, but not in combination. - Highlights: • More contaminants remained in the ecosystem at higher organic carbon levels. • More contaminants were lost in the higher temperature treatments. • The combined effects are competitive with respect to contaminant cycling. • The individual properties of each contaminant determine their respective fate.

  11. Treatment of volatile organic contaminants in a vertical flow filter: Relevance of different removal processes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De Biase, C.; Reger, D.; Schmidt, A.; Jechalke, S.; Reiche, N.; Martínez-Lavanchy, P.M.; Rosell, M.; Van Afferden, M.; Maier, U.; Oswald, S.E.; Thullner, M.

    2011-01-01

    Vertical flow filters and vertical flow constructed wetlands are established wastewater treatment systems and have also been proposed for the treatment of contaminated groundwater. This study investigates the removal processes of volatile organic compounds in a pilot-scale vertical flow filter.

  12. Influence of nonlinear sorption kinetics on the slow-desorbing organic contaminant fraction in soil

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schlebaum, W.; Schraa, G.; Riemsdijk, van W.H.

    1999-01-01

    Release rates of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) from the soil matrix influence the availability of HOCs in soils or sediments for microbial degradation or removal by physical means (e.g., soil washing or soil venting). In this study it was shown that the initial contaminant concentration

  13. Organic Contaminant Levels in Three Fish Species Downchannel from the Los Alamos National Laboratory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzales, G.J.; Fresquez, P.R.; Beveridge, J.W.

    1999-06-01

    The LANL contribution, if any, to organic contaminant levels in the common carp, the channel catfish, and the white sucker in the Rio Grande appear to be small; however, low sample sizes, high variation, and potential interaction of species effect with location treatment effect require additional sampling and analysis.

  14. Thermodynamic analysis of the theoretical energy consumption in the removal of organic contaminants by physical methods

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    The essential requirements for evaluating the sustainable development of a system and the thermodynamic framework of the energy conservation mechanism in the waste-removal process are proposed.A thermodynamic method of analysis based on the first and second laws of thermodynamics is suggested as a means to analyze the theoretical energy consumption for the removal of organic contaminants by physical methods.Moreover,the theoretical energy consumption for the removal by physical methods of different kinds of representative organic contaminants with different initial concentrations and amounts is investigated at 298.15 K and 1.01325 × 105 Pa.The results show that the waste treatment process has a high energy consumption and that the theoretical energy consumption for the removal of organic contaminants increases with the decrease of their initial concentrations in aqueous solutions.The theoretical energy consumption for the removal of different organic contaminants varies dramatically.Furthermore,the theoretical energy consumption increases greatly with the increase in the amount to be removed.

  15. Trends in the identification of organic residues and contaminants : EC regulations under revision

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Andre, F.; Wasch, K.K.G. de; Brabander, H.F. de; Impens, S.R.; Stolker, L.A.M.; Ginkel, L. van; Stephany, R.W.; Schilt, R.; Courtheyn, D.; Bonnaire, Y.; Furst, P.; Gowik, P.; Kennedy, G.; Kuhn, T.; Moretain, J.P.

    2001-01-01

    The use of identification points (IPs) is a new approach to set up quality criteria for the identification of organic residues and contaminants: a laboratory is allowed to use any molecular spectrometric technique or combination of techniques in order to earn a minimum number of points. The system

  16. Burrowing and avoidance behaviour in marine organisms exposed to pesticide-contaminated sediment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møhlenberg, Flemming; Kiørboe, Thomas

    1983-01-01

    Behavioural effects of marine sediment contaminated with pesticides (6000 ppm parathion, 200 ppm methyl parathion, 200 ppm malathion) were studied in a number of marine organisms in laboratory tests and in situ. The burrowing behaviour in Macoma baltica, Cerastoderma edule, Abra alba, Nereis...

  17. Proposing nanofiltration as acceptable barrier for organic contaminants in water reuse

    KAUST Repository

    Yangali-Quintanilla, Victor

    2010-10-01

    For water reuse applications, " tight" nanofiltration (NF) membranes (of polyamide) as an alternative to reverse osmosis (RO) can be an effective barrier against pharmaceuticals, pesticides, endocrine disruptors and other organic contaminants. The use of RO in existing water reuse facilities is addressed and questioned, taking into consideration that tight NF can be a more cost-effective and efficient technology to target the problem of organic contaminants. It was concluded that tight NF is an acceptable barrier for organic contaminants because its removal performance approaches that of RO, and because of reduced operation and maintenance (O&M) costs in long-term project implementation. Average removal of neutral compounds (including 1,4-dioxane) was about 82% and 85% for NF and RO, respectively, and average removal of ionic compounds was about 97% and 99% for NF and RO, respectively. In addition, " loose" NF after aquifer recharge and recovery (ARR) can be an effective barrier against micropollutants with removals over 90%. When there is the presence of difficult to remove organic contaminants such as NDMA and 1,4-dioxane; for 1,4-dioxane, source control or implementation of treatment processes in wastewater treatment plants will be an option; for NDMA, a good strategy is to limit its formation during wastewater treatment, but there is evidence that biodegradation of NDMA can be achieved during ARR. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  18. DETERMINATION OF MINERAL CONTAIN AND BACTERIA CONTAMINANT ON ORGANIC AND NONORGANIC FRESH VEGETABLES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harsojo Harsojo

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The determination of mineral content and bacteria contaminant on fresh vegetable of long bean (Vegan ungulate Wall., white cabbage (Basic tolerance L., and lettuce (Lectuca sativa L. that cultivated by organic and nonorganic system have been done. The mineral content has been analyzed using neutron activation analysis and atomic absorption spectroscopy method, while bacteria contaminant by total plate count number using Nutrient Agar, Mac Conkey Agar, Baird Parker medium, and Salmonella using selective medium. The results showed that there are some essential mineral such as Fe, Zn, Ca, Co, and nonessential mineral Cd. There is tendency that fresh vegetable that cultivated by organic system contained Fe, Zn, Ca, Co and Cd mineral less than nonorganic. The Zn mineral content in nonorganic of fresh vegetable were higher than the limit of threshold number from Health Department, Republic of Indonesia (2004, while Cd mineral in organic or nonorganic of fresh vegetable were greater then threshold number from Codex Alimentarius Commision. The measurement of bacteria contaminant on organic and nonorganic of fresh vegetables contained aerob, coli, and Staphylococcus bacteria in organic of fresh vegetables were less compared to nonorganic of fresh vegetables.   Keywords: mineral, bacteria aerob, coli, Staphylococcus, Salmonella, organic, and nonorganic vegetable, neutron activation

  19. Organic carbon and chemical contaminant relationships in river and lake sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Call, D.J.; Markee, T.P. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Superior, WI (United States). Lake Superior Research Inst.; Lodge, K. [Univ. of Minnesota, Duluth, MN (United States). Natural Resources Research Inst.; Cook, P.D.; Ankley, G.T. [Environmental Protection Agency, Duluth, MN (United States). Mid-Continent Ecology Div.

    1995-12-31

    Sediment collected from 11 sites within the Fox and East Rivers of Brown County, Wisconsin, and two near-shore sites in Green Bay (Lake Michigan) were analyzed for organic carbon content and various pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), chlorodibenzodioxins, chlorodibenzofurans, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), sulfur and heavy metals. Representative chemicals from the organic and inorganic groups were examined for their concentrations at the various sites relative to organic carbon content. Correlations between organic carbon and contaminant concentrations resulted in simple linear regression models with high degrees of predictive capability for most chemicals. For example, chemical concentration relationships with organic carbon (r{sup 2}) were p,p{prime}-DDE (0.85), total PCBs (0.69), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzodioxin (0.76), 1,2,3,6,7,8-hexachlorodibenzodioxin (0.87), 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzofuran (0.71), fluoranthene (0.46), pyrene (0.51), total sulfur (0.75), cadmium (0.76), copper (0.84), lead (0.85), zinc (0.80), chromium (0.04), and nickel (0.39). All correlations were positive with the exception of nickel. This suggests that contaminants within the lower Fox River/Green Bay system are at steady-state with respect to organic carbon. Knowledge of relationships such as this within aquatic systems may be useful in planning and budgeting contaminant mass balance studies within the systems.

  20. New insight into photo-bromination processes in saline surface waters: The case of salicylic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamtam, Fatima; Chiron, Serge, E-mail: serge.chiron@msem.univ-montp2.fr

    2012-10-01

    It was shown, through a combination of field and laboratory observations, that salicylic acid can undergo photo-bromination reactions in sunlit saline surface waters. Laboratory-scale experiments revealed that the photochemical yields of 5-bromosalicylic acid and 3,5-dibromosalicylic acid from salicylic acid were always low (in the 4% range at most). However, this might be of concern since these compounds are potential inhibitors of the 20{alpha}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzyme, with potential implications in endocrine disruption processes. At least two mechanisms were involved simultaneously to account for the photo-generation of brominated substances. The first one might involve the formation of reactive brominated radical species (Br{center_dot}, Br{sub 2}{center_dot}{sup -}) through hydroxyl radical mediated oxidation of bromide ions. These ions reacted more selectively than hydroxyl radicals with electron-rich organic pollutants such as salicylic acid. The second one might involve the formation of hypobromous acid, through a two electron oxidation of bromine ions by peroxynitrite. This reaction was catalyzed by nitrite, since these ions play a crucial role in the formation of nitric oxide upon photolysis. This nitric oxide further reacts with superoxide radical anions to yield peroxynitrite and by ammonium through the formation of N-bromoamines, probably due to the ability of N-bromoamines to promote the aromatic bromination of phenolic compounds. Field measurements revealed the presence of salicylic acid together with 5-bromosalicylic and 3,5-dibromosalicylic acid in a brackish coastal lagoon, thus confirming the environmental significance of the proposed photochemically induced bromination pathways. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Brominated derivatives of salicylic acid were detected in a brackish lagoon. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A photochemical pathway was hypothesized to account for bromination of salicylic acid. Black

  1. Organic Pollutant Contamination of the River Tichá Orlice as Assessed by Biochemical Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Havelková

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available This study used biochemical markers to assess contamination at two contaminated sites (Králíky and Lichkov and one control site (Červená Voda on the River Tichá Orlice, a left-side tributary of the River Elbe. The brown trout (Salmo trutta fario was selected as an indicator species. Enzymes of the first stage of xenobiotic conversion, namely cytochrome P450 (CYP 450 and ethoxyresorufin-O-deethylase (EROD in the liver were selected as biochemical markers. Blood plasma vitellogenin concentrations were used to evaluate xenoestrogenic effects of contamination. Results were compared with the most important inductors of these markers, i.e. with organic pollutants (PCB, HCH, HCB, OCS and DDT and their metabolites in fish muscle and with PAH concentrations in bottom sediments. The highest contamination with organic pollutants was at Králíky, and this was reflected in increased cytochrome P450, EROD activity and vitellogenin concentrations. Significant differences were demonstrated in EROD activity and vitellogenin concentrations between Králíky and Červená Voda (P s = -0.964 between EROD activity and vitellogenin concentrations was demonstrated. This relationship was discussed from the point of view of a possible induction or inhibition of the assessed biomarkers at persistently highly contaminated sites.

  2. Organic contamination and remediation in the agricultural soils of China: A critical review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianteng; Pan, Lili; Tsang, Daniel C W; Zhan, Yu; Zhu, Lizhong; Li, Xiangdong

    2018-02-15

    Soil pollution is a global problem in both developed and developing countries. Countries with rapidly developing economies such as China are faced with significant soil pollution problems due to accelerated industrialization and urbanization over the last decades. This paper provides an overview of published scientific data on soil pollution across China with particular focus on organic contamination in agricultural soils. Based on the related peer-reviewed papers published since 2000 (n=203), we evaluated the priority organic contaminants across China, revealed their spatial and temporal distributions at the national scale, identified their possible sources and fates in soil, assessed their potential environmental risks, and presented the challenges in current remediation technologies regarding the combined organic pollution of agricultural soils. The primary pollutants in Northeast China were polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) due to intensive fossil fuel combustion. The concentrations of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) and phthalic acid esters (PAEs) were higher in North and Central China owing to concentrated agricultural activities. The levels of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were higher in East and South China primarily because of past industrial operations and improper electronic waste processing. The co-existence of organic contaminants was severe in the Yangtze River Delta, Pearl River Delta, and Beijing-Tianjin-Hebei Region, which are the most populated and industrialized regions in China. Integrated biological-chemical remediation technologies, such as surfactant-enhanced bioremediation, have potential uses in the remediation of soil contaminated by multiple contaminants. This critical review highlighted several future research directions including combined pollution, interfacial interactions, food safety, bioavailability, ecological effects, and integrated remediation methods for combined organic pollution in soil. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B

  3. Advances in Dynamic Transport of Organic Contaminants in Karst Groundwater Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Padilla, I. Y.; Vesper, D.; Alshawabkeh, A.; Hellweger, F.

    2011-12-01

    Karst groundwater systems develop in soluble rocks such as limestone, and are characterized by high permeability and well-developed conduit porosity. These systems provide important freshwater resources for human consumption and ecological integrity of streams, wetlands, and coastal zones. The same characteristics that make karst aquifers highly productive make them highly vulnerable to contamination. As a result, karst aquifers serve as an important route for contaminants exposure to humans and wildlife. Transport of organic contaminants in karst ground-water occurs in complex pathways influenced by the flow mechanism predominating in the aquifer: conduit-flow dominated systems tend to convey solutes rapidly through the system to a discharge point without much attenuation; diffuse-flow systems, on the other hand, can cause significant solute retardation and slow movement. These two mechanisms represent end members of a wide spectrum of conditions found in karst areas, and often a combination of conduit- and diffuse-flow mechanisms is encountered, where both flow mechanisms can control the fate and transport of contaminants. This is the case in the carbonate aquifers of northern Puerto Rico. This work addresses advances made on the characterization of fate and transport processes in karst ground-water systems characterized by variable conduit and/or diffusion dominated flow under high- and low-flow conditions. It involves laboratory-scale physical modeling and field-scale sampling and historical analysis of contaminant distribution. Statistical analysis of solute transport in Geo-Hydrobed physical models shows the heterogeneous character of transport dynamics in karstic units, and its variability under different flow regimes. Field-work analysis of chlorinated volatile organic compounds and phthalates indicates a large capacity of the karst systems to store and transmit contaminants. This work is part of the program "Puerto Rico Testsite for Exploring Contamination

  4. Application of dual carbon-bromine isotope analysis for investigating abiotic transformations of tribromoneopentyl alcohol (TBNPA).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozell, Anna; Yecheskel, Yinon; Balaban, Noa; Dror, Ishai; Halicz, Ludwik; Ronen, Zeev; Gelman, Faina

    2015-04-07

    Many of polybrominated organic compounds, used as flame retardant additives, belong to the group of persistent organic pollutants. Compound-specific isotope analysis is one of the potential analytical tools for investigating their fate in the environment. However, the isotope effects associated with transformations of brominated organic compounds are still poorly explored. In the present study, we investigated carbon and bromine isotope fractionation during degradation of tribromoneopentyl alcohol (TBNPA), one of the widely used flame retardant additives, in three different chemical processes: transformation in aqueous alkaline solution (pH 8); reductive dehalogenation by zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) in anoxic conditions; oxidative degradation by H2O2 in the presence of CuO nanoparticles (nCuO). Two-dimensional carbon-bromine isotope plots (δ(13)C/Δ(81)Br) for each reaction gave different process-dependent isotope slopes (Λ(C/Br)): 25.2 ± 2.5 for alkaline hydrolysis (pH 8); 3.8 ± 0.5 for debromination in the presence of nZVI in anoxic conditions; ∞ in the case of catalytic oxidation by H2O2 with nCuO. The obtained isotope effects for both elements were generally in agreement with the values expected for the suggested reaction mechanisms. The results of the present study support further applications of dual carbon-bromine isotope analysis as a tool for identification of reaction pathway during transformations of brominated organic compounds in the environment.

  5. Arsenic uptake by lettuce from As-contaminated soil remediated with Pteris vittata and organic amendment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Letuzia M; Suchismita, Das; Gress, Julia; Rathinasabapathi, Bala; Chen, Yanshan; Ma, Lena Q

    2017-06-01

    Leaching of inorganic arsenic (As) from chromated copper arsenate (CCA)-treated wood may elevate soil As levels. Thus, an environmental concern arises regarding As accumulation in vegetables grown in these soils. In this study, a greenhouse experiment was conducted to investigate the ability of As-hyperaccumulator P. vittata and organic amendments in reducing As uptake by lettuce (Lactuca sativa) from a soil contaminated from CCA-treated wood (63.9 mg kg(-1) As). P. vittata was grown for 150 d in a CCA-contaminated soil amended with biochar, activated carbon or coffee grounds at 1%, followed by lettuce for another 55 d. After harvest, plant biomass and As concentrations in plant and soil were determined. The presence of P. vittata reduced As content in lettuce by 21% from 27.3 to 21.5 mg kg(-1) while amendment further reduced As in lettuce by 5.6-18%, with activated C being most effective. Our data showed that both P. vittata and organic amendments were effective in reducing As concentration in lettuce. Though no health-based standard for As in vegetables exists in USA, care should be taken when growing lettuce in contaminated soils. Our data showed that application of organic amendments with P. vittata reduced As hazards in CCA-contaminated soils. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. [Arbuscular mycorrhizal bioremediation and its mechanisms of organic pollutants-contaminated soils].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiuling; Ling, Wanting; Gao, Yanzheng; Li, Fuchun; Xiong, Wei

    2006-11-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhiza (AM), the symbiont of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) and host plant root, has been proved to be able to improve soil structure and enhance the plant resistance to environmental stress. There are more than 170 kinds of AMF worldwide. Recently, the promoted degradation of organic pollutants in soils in the presence of AM was observed, and AM bioremediation (AMB) is becoming a promising and perspective remediation technique for organic pollutants-contaminated soils. This paper reviewed the research progress on the AMB of soils contaminated by typical organic pollutants such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, PAEs, petroleum, and pesticides. The mechanisms of AMB mainly include the metabolism of organic pollutants by AM fungi, the degradation of these pollutants by the enzymes derived from AM exudation and by the enhanced root exudation and rhizospheric microbial activity in the presence of AM, and the removal of the pollutants by plant uptake and accumulation. As a new approach for the remediation of contaminated soils, some aspects involved in AMB, e.g., the screening of high efficient AM fungi, efficacy of co-existing AM fungi, soil ageing, and plant uptake of organic pollutants from soils in the presence of AM, still need to be further investigated.

  7. The effect of organic contaminants on the spectral induced polarization response of porous media - mechanistic approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, N.; Huisman, J. A.; Furman, A.

    2012-12-01

    In recent years, there is a growing interest in using geophysical methods in general and spectral induced polarization (SIP) in particular as a tool to detect and monitor organic contaminants within the subsurface. The general idea of the SIP method is to inject alternating current through a soil volume and to measure the resultant potential in order to obtain the relevant soil electrical properties (e.g. complex impedance, complex conductivity/resistivity). Currently, a complete mechanistic understanding of the effect of organic contaminants on the SIP response of soil is still absent. In this work, we combine laboratory experiments with modeling to reveal the main processes affecting the SIP signature of soil contaminated with organic pollutant. In a first set of experiments, we investigate the effect of non-aqueous phase liquids (NAPL) on the complex conductivity of unsaturated porous media. Our results show that addition of NAPL to the porous media increases the real component of the soil electrical conductivity and decreases the polarization of the soil (imaginary component of the complex conductivity). Furthermore, addition of NAPL to the soil resulted in an increase of the electrical conductivity of the soil solution. Based on these results, we suggest that adsorption of NAPL to the soil surface, and exchange process between polar organic compounds in the NAPL and inorganic ions in the soil are the main processes affecting the SIP signature of the contaminated soil. To further support our hypothesis, the temporal change of the SIP signature of a soil as function of a single organic cation concentration was measured. In addition to the measurements of the soil electrical properties, we also measured the effect of the organic cation on the chemical composition of both the bulk and the surface of the soil. The results of those experiments again showed that the electrical conductivity of the soil increased with increasing contaminant concentration. In addition

  8. Phototransformation of wastewater-derived trace organic contaminants in open-water unit process treatment wetlands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasper, Justin T; Sedlak, David L

    2013-10-01

    Open-water cells in unit process treatment wetlands can be used to exploit sunlight photolysis to remove trace organic contaminants from municipal wastewater effluent. To assess the performance of these novel systems, a photochemical model was calibrated using measured photolysis rates for atenolol, carbamazepine, propranolol, and sulfamethoxazole in wetland water under representative conditions. Contaminant transformation by hydroxyl radical ((•)OH) and carbonate radical ((•)CO3(-)) were predicted from steady-state radical concentrations measured at pH values between 8 and 10. Direct photolysis rates and the effects of light screening by dissolved organic matter on photolysis rates were estimated using solar irradiance data, contaminant quantum yields, and light screening factors. The model was applied to predict the land area required for 90% removal of a suite of wastewater-derived organic contaminants by sunlight-induced reactions under a variety of conditions. Results suggest that during summer, open-water cells that receive a million gallons of water per day (i.e., about 4.4 × 10(-2) m(3) s(-1)) of nitrified wastewater effluent can achieve 90% removal of most compounds in an area of about 15 ha. Transformation rates were strongly affected by pH, with some compounds exhibiting faster transformation rates under the high pH conditions associated with photosynthetic algae at the sediment-water interface and other contaminants exhibiting faster transformation rates at the circumneutral pH values characteristic of algae-free cells. Lower dissolved organic carbon concentrations typically resulted in increased transformation rates.

  9. First comprehensive screening of lipophilic organic contaminants in surface waters of the megacity Jakarta, Indonesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dsikowitzky, L; Sträter, M; Dwiyitno; Ariyani, F; Irianto, H E; Schwarzbauer, J

    2016-09-30

    Jakarta is an Indonesian coastal megacity with over 10 million inhabitants. The rivers flowing through the city receive enormous amounts of untreated wastewaters and discharge their pollutant loads into Jakarta Bay. We utilized a screening approach to identify those site-specific compounds that represent the major contamination of the cities' water resources, and detected a total number of 71 organic contaminants in Jakarta river water samples. Especially contaminants originating from municipal wastewater discharges were detected in high concentrations, including flame retardants, personal care products and pharmaceutical drugs. A flame retardant, a synthetic fragrance and caffeine were used as marker compounds to trace the riverine transport of municipal wastewaters into Jakarta Bay. These markers are also appropriate to trace municipal wastewater discharges to other tropical coastal ecosystems. This application is in particular useful to evaluate wastewater inputs from land-based sources to habitats which are sensitive to changing water quality, like coral reefs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Role of organic amendments on enhanced bioremediation of heavy metal(loid) contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Hee; Lamb, Dane; Paneerselvam, Periyasamy; Choppala, Girish; Bolan, Nanthi; Chung, Jae-Woo

    2011-01-30

    As land application becomes one of the important waste utilization and disposal practices, soil is increasingly being seen as a major source of metal(loid)s reaching food chain, mainly through plant uptake and animal transfer. With greater public awareness of the implications of contaminated soils on human and animal health there has been increasing interest in developing technologies to remediate contaminated sites. Bioremediation is a natural process which relies on soil microorganisms and higher plants to alter metal(loid) bioavailability and can be enhanced by addition of organic amendments to soils. Large quantities of organic amendments, such as manure compost, biosolid and municipal solid wastes are used as a source of nutrients and also as a conditioner to improve the physical properties and fertility of soils. These organic amendments that are low in metal(loid)s can be used as a sink for reducing the bioavailability of metal(loid)s in contaminated soils and sediments through their effect on the adsorption, complexation, reduction and volatilization of metal(loid)s. This review examines the mechanisms for the enhanced bioremediation of metal(loid)s by organic amendments and discusses the practical implications in relation to sequestration and bioavailability of metal(loid)s in soils. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Monitoring of organic contaminants in sediments using low field proton nuclear magnetic resonance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chi; Rupert, Yuri

    2016-04-01

    The effective monitoring of soils and groundwater contaminated with organic compounds is an important goal of many environmental restoration efforts. Recent geophysical methods such as electrical resistivity, complex conductivity, and ground penetrating radar have been successfully applied to characterize organic contaminants in the subsurface and to monitor remediation process both in laboratory and in field. Low field proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) is a geophysical tool sensitive to the molecular-scale physical and chemical environment of hydrogen-bearing fluids in geological materials and shows promise as a novel method for monitoring contaminant remediation. This laboratory research focuses on measurements on synthetic samples to determine the sensitivity of NMR to the presence of organic contaminants and improve understanding of relationships between NMR observables, hydrological properties of the sediments, and amount and state of contaminants in porous media. Toluene, a light non-aqueous phase liquid (LNAPL) has been selected as a representative organic contaminant. Three types of porous media (pure silica sands, montmorillonite clay, and various sand-clay mixtures with different sand/clay ratios) were prepared as synthetic sediments. NMR relaxation time (T2) and diffusion-relaxation (D - T2) correlation measurements were performed in each sediment saturated with water and toluene mixed fluid at assorted concentrations (0% toluene and 100% water, 1% toluene and 99% water, 5% toluene and 95% water, 25% toluene and 75% water, and 100% toluene and 0% water) to 1) understand the effect of different porous media on the NMR responses in each fluid mixture, 2) investigate the role of clay content on T2 relaxation of each fluid, 3) quantify the amount hydrocarbons in the presence of water in each sediment, and 4) resolve hydrocarbons from water in D - T2 map. Relationships between the compositions of porous media, hydrocarbon concentration, and hydraulic

  12. Brominated Flame Retardants and Perfluorinated Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and perfluorinated chemicals (PFCs) belong to a large class of chemicals known as organohalogens. It is believed that both BFRs and PFCs saved lives by reducing flammability of materials commonly used and bactericidal (biocidal) properties. Thes...

  13. Application of hazard analysis critical control points (HACCP) to organic chemical contaminants in food.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ropkins, K; Beck, A J

    2002-03-01

    Hazard Analysis Critical Control Points (HACCP) is a systematic approach to the identification, assessment, and control of hazards that was developed as an effective alternative to conventional end-point analysis to control food safety. It has been described as the most effective means of controlling foodborne diseases, and its application to the control of microbiological hazards has been accepted internationally. By contrast, relatively little has been reported relating to the potential use of HACCP, or HACCP-like procedures, to control chemical contaminants of food. This article presents an overview of the implementation of HACCP and discusses its application to the control of organic chemical contaminants in the food chain. Although this is likely to result in many of the advantages previously identified for microbiological HACCP, that is, more effective, efficient, and economical hazard management, a number of areas are identified that require further research and development. These include: (1) a need to refine the methods of chemical contaminant identification and risk assessment employed, (2) develop more cost-effective monitoring and control methods for routine chemical contaminant surveillance of food, and (3) improve the effectiveness of process optimization for the control of chemical contaminants in food.

  14. Preliminary evaluation of selected in situ remediation technologies for Volatile Organic Compound contamination at Arid sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenhard, R.J.; Gerber, M.A.; Amonette, J.E.

    1992-10-01

    To support the Volatile Organic Compounds-Arid Site (VOC-Arid) Integrated Demonstration (ID) in its technical, logistical, institutional, and economical testing of emerging environmental management and restoration technologies. Pacific Northwest Laboratory(a) is evaluating several in situ remediation technologies for possible inclusion in the demonstration. The evaluations are made with respect to the initial focus of the VOC-Arid ID: the carbon tetrachloride contamination at the Hanford Site, where it was disposed to the vadose zone along with other volatile and nonvolatile organic wastes. heavy metals, acids. and radionuclides. The purposes of this report are (1) to identify candidate in situ technologies for inclusion in the program, (2) to evaluate the candidate technologies based on their potential applicability to VOC contamination at arid sites and geologic conditions representative of the ID host site (i.e., Hanford Site), and (3) to prioritize those technologies for future US Department of Energy (DOE) support.

  15. Global warming and environmental contaminants in aquatic organisms: the need of the etho-toxicology approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manciocco, Arianna; Calamandrei, Gemma; Alleva, Enrico

    2014-04-01

    Environmental contaminants are associated with a wide spectrum of pathological effects. Temperature increase affects ambient distribution and toxicity of these chemicals in the water environment, representing a potentially emerging problem for aquatic species with short-, medium- and long-term repercussions on human health through the food chain. We assessed peer-reviewed literature, including primary studies, review articles and organizational reports available. We focused on studies concerning toxicity of environmental pollutants within a global warming scenario. Existing knowledge on the effects that the increase of water temperature in a contaminated situation has on physiological mechanisms of aquatic organisms is presented. Altogether we consider the potential consequences for the human beings due to fish and shellfish consumption. Finally, we propose an etho-toxicological approach to study the effects of toxicants in conditions of thermal increase, using aquatic organisms as experimental models under laboratory controlled conditions. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. First evidence of persistent organic contaminants as potential anthropogenic stressors in the Barndoor Skate Dipturus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyons, Kady; Adams, Douglas H

    2017-03-15

    Although exploited populations of elasmobranchs may be able to recover from fishing pressure, there is little information regarding the Barndoor Skate's ability to cope with other anthropogenic stressors such as organic contaminants (OCs). Legacy OCs were measured in liver, muscle and ova from fourteen Barndoor Skates with mature skates having significantly greater mean concentrations of OCs than immature skates, demonstrating bioaccumulation with age. Using Toxic Equivalency Factors, skates were found to have levels of PCBs that have been shown to elicit negative physiological responses in other fishes and these results highlight the need for future studies to investigate the potential impacts that bioaccumulated organic contaminants have on the recovery and conservation of this vulnerable species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Contamination of soils and groundwater with new organic micropollutants: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vodyanitskii, Yu. N.; Yakovlev, A. S.

    2016-05-01

    The input of organic micro- and nanopollutants to the environment has grown in recent years. This vast class of substances is referred to as emerging micropollutants, and includes organic chemicals of industrial, agricultural, and municipal provenance. There are three main sources of emerging pollutants coming to the environment, i.e., (1) upon soil fertilization with sewage and sewage sludge; (2) soil irrigation with reclaimed wastewater and (3) due to filtration from municipal landfills of solid wastes. These pollutants contaminate soil, affect its inhabitants; they are also consumed by plants and penetrate to the groundwater. The pharmaceuticals most strongly affect the biota (microorganisms, earthworms, etc.). The response of microorganisms in the contaminated soil is controlled not only by the composition and the number of emerging pollutants but also by the geochemical environment.

  18. Estrogenic contamination by manure fertilizer in organic farming: a case study with the lizard Podarcis sicula.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verderame, Mariailaria; Limatola, Ermelinda; Scudiero, Rosaria

    2016-01-01

    In the last years, worldwide organic farming has grown exponentially; as a consequence, the use of animal manure as a soil fertility source has become the principal agricultural choice. However, the use of manure as fertilizer can increase the amount of steroid hormone metabolites in the soil. In southern Italy, lacertidae lizards are the most abundant vertebrate group in agroecosystems and have been identified as potential model species for ecotoxicological studies. The aim of this study was to understand if the manure applied in organic farming has estrogen-like effects in the lizard Podarcis sicula. Adult male lizards were captured in two organic agricultural fields (manure-treated sites) and in an uncultivated field (control site). Lizards from the two organic farms displayed hepatic biosynthetic alterations typical of an estrogenic contamination; hepatocytes contained both vitellogenin and estrogen receptor alpha transcripts and proteins, detected by in situ hybridization and immunocytochemistry. The same cells did not show cadmium, lead and metallothionein accumulation, indicative of the lack of inorganic contamination. These findings suggest that exogenous estrogens, arising from the use of manure, could affect the welfare of wild animals and animal breeding, leading to bioaccumulation of estrogens in food chain, with possible risk for human consumers. For this reason, organic farming should implement the use of sustainable practices such as crop rotation to preserve the soil biological activity, rather than organic manure as fertilizer.

  19. Robust Means for Estimating Black Carbon-Water Sorption Coefficients of Organic Contaminants in Sediments

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Objective: Sediment beds at many sites are contaminated by diverse hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) such as PAHs, PCBs, and pesticides . In an...access the same microporous surface areas as done by our sorbate training set. Conclusions and Benefits : Our results showed that one can develop... pesticides are persistent and tend to bioaccumulate. Many are mutagens and/or carcinogens, and all of them contribute to disruption of membrane

  20. Effect of organic matter on determination of reactive mercury in contaminated waters

    OpenAIRE

    Ramalhosa, Elsa; Río-Segade, Susana; Pereira, Eduarda; Vale, Carlos; Duarte, Armando

    2003-01-01

    Dissolved reactive mercury was determined in water samples from Ria da Aveiro, a coastal lagoon contaminated by mercury. Concentrations increased with acid dilution to a maximum of 193% in samples containing organic matter with high aromaticity, as inferred from absorbances at 250, 280 and 365 nm. Laboratory experiments with potassium hydrogenoftalate and humic acids solutions proved the influence of aromaticity in complexing mercury, how acid dilution protonates the aromatic Hg-complexes and...

  1. Remediation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) contaminated soil through composting with fresh organic wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yuan; Zhu, Yong-Guan; Houot, Sabine; Qiao, Min; Nunan, Naoise; Garnier, Patricia

    2011-11-01

    Composting may enhance bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soils by providing organic substrates that stimulate the growth of potential microbial degraders. However, the influence of added organic matter (OM) together with the microbial activities on the dissipation of PAHs has not yet been fully assessed. An in-vessel composting-bioremediation experiment of a contaminated soil amended with fresh wastes was carried out. Four different experimental conditions were tested in triplicate during 60 days using laboratory-scale reactors: treatment S (100% soil), W (100% wastes), SW (soil/waste mixture), and SWB (soil/waste mixture with inoculation of degrading microorganisms). A dry mass loss of 35 ± 5% was observed in treatments with organic wastes during composting in all the treatments except treatment S. The dissipation of the 16 USEPA-listed PAHs was largely enhanced from no significant change to 50.5 ± 14.8% (for SW)/63.7 ± 10.0% (for SWB). More obvious dissipation was observed when fresh wastes were added at the beginning of composting to the contaminated soil, without significant difference between the inoculated and non-inoculated treatments. Phospholipid fatty acid (PLFA) profiling showed that fungi and G-bacteria dominated at the beginning of experiment and were probably involved in PAH dissipation. Subsequently, greater relative abundances of G + bacteria were observed as PAH dissipation slowed down. The results suggest that improving the composting process with optimal organic compositions may be a feasible remediation strategy in PAH-contaminated soils through stimulation of active microbial populations.

  2. New biodegradable organic-soluble chelating agents for simultaneous removal of heavy metals and organic pollutants from contaminated media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ullmann, Amos, E-mail: Ullmann@eng.tau.ac.il [Faculty of Engineering, School of Mechanical Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Brauner, Neima; Vazana, Shlomi; Katz, Zhanna [Faculty of Engineering, School of Mechanical Engineering, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Goikhman, Roman [The Hebrew University of Jerusalem, The Robert H. Smith, Faculty of Agriculture, Food and Environment, Rehovot (Israel); Seemann, Boaz; Marom, Hanit [School of Chemistry, Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel); Gozin, Michael, E-mail: cogozin@gmail.com [School of Chemistry, Faculty of Exact Sciences, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv 69978 (Israel)

    2013-09-15

    Highlights: • New soil remediation process using phase transition of partially miscible solvents. • Design and synthesis of new bio-degradable, organic soluble chelating agents. • Feasibility tests of the process on authentically polluted sediments and sludge. • Simultaneous removal of toxic metals and organic pollutants was demonstrated. -- Abstract: Advanced biodegradable and non-toxic organic chelators, which are soluble in organic media, were synthesized on the basis of the S,S-ethylenediamine-disuccinate (S,S-EDDS) ligand. The modifications suggested in this work include attachment of a lipophilic hydrocarbon chain (“tail”) to one or both nitrogen atoms of the S,S-EDDS. The new ligands were designed and evaluated for application in the Sediments Remediation Phase Transition Extraction (SR-PTE) process. This novel process is being developed for the simultaneous removal of both heavy metals and organic pollutants from contaminated soils, sediments or sludge. The new chelators were designed to bind various target metal ions, to promote extraction of these ions into organic solvents. Several variations of attached tails were synthesized and tested. The results for one of them, N,N′-bis-dodecyl-S,S-EDDS (C24-EDDS), showed that the metal-ligand complexes are concentrated in the organic-rich phase in the Phase Transition Extraction process (more than 80%). Preliminary applications of the SR-PTE process with the C24-EDDS ligand were conducted also on actually contaminated sludge (field samples). The extraction of five toxic metals, namely, Cd, Cu, Ni, Pb and Zn was examined. In general, the extraction performance of the new ligand was not less than that of S,S-EDDS when a sufficient ligand-to-extracted ion ratio (about 4:1 was applied.

  3. Brominated Skeletal Components of the Marine Demosponges, Aplysina cavernicola and Ianthella basta: Analytical and Biochemical Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eike Brunner

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Demosponges possess a skeleton made of a composite material with various organic constituents and/or siliceous spicules. Chitin is an integral part of the skeleton of different sponges of the order Verongida. Moreover, sponges of the order Verongida, such as Aplysina cavernicola or Ianthella basta, are well-known for the biosynthesis of brominated tyrosine derivates, characteristic bioactive natural products. It has been unknown so far whether these compounds are exclusively present in the cellular matrix or whether they may also be incorporated into the chitin-based skeletons. In the present study, we therefore examined the skeletons of A. cavernicola and I. basta with respect to the presence of bromotyrosine metabolites. The chitin-based-skeletons isolated from these sponges indeed contain significant amounts of brominated compounds, which are not easily extractable from the skeletons by common solvents, such as MeOH, as shown by HPLC analyses in combination with NMR and IR spectroscopic measurements. Quantitative potentiometric analyses confirm that the skeleton-associated bromine mainly withstands the MeOH-based extraction. This observation suggests that the respective, but yet unidentified, brominated compounds are strongly bound to the sponge skeletons, possibly by covalent bonding. Moreover, gene fragments of halogenases suggested to be responsible for the incorporation of bromine into organic molecules could be amplified from DNA isolated from sponge samples enriched for sponge-associated bacteria.

  4. Approaches for assessment of terrestrial vertebrate responses to contaminants: moving beyond individual organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albers, P.H.; Heinz, G.H.; Hall, R.J.; Albers, Peter H.; Heinz, Gary H.; Ohlendorf, Harry M.

    2000-01-01

    Conclusions: A need for a broader range ofinformation on effects of contaminants on individuals exists among the 4 classes of terrestrial vertebrates, especially mammals, reptiles, and amphibians. Separation of contaminant effects from other effects and reduction of speculative extrapolation within and among species requires information that can be produced only by combined field and laboratory investigations that incorporate seasonal or annual cycles and important spatial and interaction conditions. Assessments of contaminant effects at the population level and higher are frequently dependent on extrapolations from a lower organizational level. Actual measurements of the effects of contaminants on populations or communities, possibly in conjunction with case studies that establish relations between effects on individuals and effects on populations, are needed to reduce the uncertainty associated with these extrapolations. Associated with these assessment levels is the need for acceptable definitions of what we mean when we refer to a 'meaningful population change' or an 'effect on communities or ecosystems.' At these higher levels of organization we are also confronted with the need for procedures useful for separating contaminant effects from effects caused by other environmental conditions. Although the bulk of literature surveyed was of the focused cause-and-effect type that is necessary for proving relations between contaminants and wildlife, community or ecosystem field assessments, as sometimes performed with reptiles and amphibians, might be a useful alternative for estimating the potential of a contaminant to cause environmental harm. Assumptions about the special usefulness of reptiles and amphibians as environmental indicators ought to be tested with comparisons to mammals and birds. Information on the effects of contaminants above the individual level is needed to generate accurate estimates of the potential consequences of anthropogenic pollution (e

  5. Treatment of Organic-Contaminated Mixed Waste Utilizing the Oak Ridge Broad Spectrum Contracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estes, C. H.; Heacker, F. K.; Cunningham, J.; Westich, B.

    2003-02-25

    To meet the requirements of the State of Tennessee's Department of Environment and Conservation Commissioner's Order for treatment of mixed low level wastes, Oak Ridge has utilized commercial treatment companies to treat and dispose mixed waste. Over the past year, Oak Ridge has shipped organic-contaminated mixed waste for treatment to meet milestones under the Site Treatment Plan. Oak Ridge has established contracts with commercial treatment companies accessible by all DOE sites for treatment of a wide range of mixed wastes. The paper will describe and summarize the activities involved in treating and disposing of organic-contaminated mixed waste utilizing DOE complex-wide contracts and the treatment and disposal activities required. This paper will describe the case history of treatment of several organic-contaminated mixed wastes from the Oak Ridge Reservation requiring treatment prior to disposal. The paper will include waste category information, implementation activities, and contract access. The paper will discuss the specifics of the mixed waste treatment including waste characteristics, treatment process and equipment utilized, and treatment results. Additional information will be provided on task order development, waste profiling, treatment pricing, and the disposal process.

  6. Integrated modelling of conventional pollutants and organic contaminant fate in rivers: a microcosm study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deksissa, T; Vanrolleghem, P A

    2005-01-01

    A new conceptual dynamic integrated model is presented which can be used to describe both conventional pollutants and organic contaminant fate in rivers. The model is designed to assess the short-term fate of organic contaminants in two compartments (bulk water and benthic sediment), taking into account the effect of nutrient dynamics. The biodegradation submodel was refined using a microcosm (artificial river) study and Linear Alkylbenzene Sulphonate (LAS) as an example. Based on data generated during the microcosm study, the model was calibrated and validated in both steady state (continuous constant load) and dynamic (pulse load) conditions. The results show that the simulated data set agrees well with the measured data set. Furthermore, thorough investigation of the model output sensitivity to the model inputs was made, and the results show that the fate of LAS is sensitive to the following model input variables: ammonia nitrogen, dissolved oxygen, microbial biomass and readily biodegradable soluble COD, and the model parameters mainly related to the biodegradation submodel. The model provides good understanding of the interaction between conventional pollutants and organic contaminants fate in rivers.

  7. Importance of organic amendment characteristics on bioremediation of PAH-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukić, B; Huguenot, D; Panico, A; Fabbricino, M; van Hullebusch, E D; Esposito, G

    2016-08-01

    This study investigates the importance of the organic matter characteristics of several organic amendments (i.e., buffalo manure, food and kitchen waste, fruit and vegetables waste, and activated sewage sludge) and their influence in the bioremediation of a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH)-contaminated soil. The removal of low molecular weights (LMW) and high molecular weights (HMW) PAHs was monitored in four bioremediation reactors and used as an indicator of the role of organic amendments in contaminant removal. The total initial concentration of LMW PAHs was 234 mg kg(-1) soil (dry weight), while the amount for HMW PAHs was 422 mg kg(-1) soil (dry weight). Monitoring of operational parameters and chemical analysis was performed during 20 weeks. The concentrations of LMW PAH residues in soil were significantly lower in reactors that displayed a mesophilic phase, i.e., 11 and 15 %, compared to reactors that displayed a thermophilic phase, i.e., 29 and 31 %. Residual HMW PAHs were up to five times higher compared to residual LMW PAHs, depending on the reactor. This demonstrated that the amount of added organic matter and macronutrients such as nitrogen and phosphorus, the biochemical organic compound classes (mostly soluble fraction and proteins), and the operational temperature are important factors affecting the overall efficiency of bioremediation. On that basis, this study shows that characterization of biochemical families could contribute to a better understanding of the effects of organic amendments and clarify their different efficiency during a bioremediation process of PAH-contaminated soil.

  8. Comparison of contaminant and residue levels in organic and conventional milk and meat products from northern Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghidini, S; Zanardi, E; Battaglia, A; Varisco, G; Ferretti, E; Campanini, G; Chizzolini, R

    2005-01-01

    Due to the growing interest in organic products, a comparison between the chemical safety of organic and conventional products was undertaken. Milk and meat were the products chosen for study. The parameters evaluated to assess chemical safety were organochlorine pesticides, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), lead, cadmium and mycotoxin contamination. Pesticides and PCBs residues in both organic and conventional milk and meat were lower than legal limits. Lead and cadmium residues were very low and did not differ between organic and conventional products. However, aflatoxin M1 contamination in some but not all samples of organic milk was significantly higher than those of conventional milk, although factors other than organic production might be implicated.

  9. Comparison of ESBL contamination in organic and conventional retail chicken meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen Stuart, James; van den Munckhof, Thijs; Voets, Guido; Scharringa, Jelle; Fluit, Ad; Hall, Maurine Leverstein-Van

    2012-03-15

    Contamination of retail chicken meat by Extended Spectrum Beta-Lactamase (ESBL) producing bacteria likely contributes to the increasing incidence of infections with these bacteria in humans. This study aimed to compare the prevalence and load of ESBL positive isolates between organic and conventional retail chicken meat samples, and to compare the distribution of ESBL genes, strain genotypes and co-resistance. In 2010, 98 raw chicken breasts (n=60 conventional; n=38 organic) were collected from 12 local stores in the Netherlands. Prevalence of ESBL producing micro-organisms was 100% on conventional and 84% on organic samples (porganisms were 80 (range conventional, and organic samples (p=0.001). The distribution of ESBL genes in conventional samples and organic samples was 42% versus 56%, respectively (N.S.), for CTX-M-1, 20% versus 42% (N.S.) for TEM-52, and 23% versus 3% (pconventional samples. Co-resistance rates of ESBL positive isolates were not different between conventional and organic samples (co-trimoxazole 56%, ciprofloxacin 14%, and tobramycin 2%), except for tetracycline, 73% and 46%, respectively, pconventional meat samples harbored 4 MLST types also reported in humans and 5 of 10 organic samples harbored 3 MLST types also reported in humans (2 ST10, 2 ST23, ST354). In conclusion, the majority of organic chicken meat samples were also contaminated with ESBL producing E. coli, and the ESBL genes and strain types were largely the same as in conventional meat samples. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Organic Contamination Baseline Study in NASA Johnson Space Center Astromaterials Curation Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calaway, Michael J.; Allen, Carlton C.; Allton, Judith H.

    2014-01-01

    Future robotic and human spaceflight missions to the Moon, Mars, asteroids, and comets will require curating astromaterial samples with minimal inorganic and organic contamination to preserve the scientific integrity of each sample. 21st century sample return missions will focus on strict protocols for reducing organic contamination that have not been seen since the Apollo manned lunar landing program. To properly curate these materials, the Astromaterials Acquisition and Curation Office under the Astromaterial Research and Exploration Science Directorate at NASA Johnson Space Center houses and protects all extraterrestrial materials brought back to Earth that are controlled by the United States government. During fiscal year 2012, we conducted a year-long project to compile historical documentation and laboratory tests involving organic investigations at these facilities. In addition, we developed a plan to determine the current state of organic cleanliness in curation laboratories housing astromaterials. This was accomplished by focusing on current procedures and protocols for cleaning, sample handling, and storage. While the intention of this report is to give a comprehensive overview of the current state of organic cleanliness in JSC curation laboratories, it also provides a baseline for determining whether our cleaning procedures and sample handling protocols need to be adapted and/or augmented to meet the new requirements for future human spaceflight and robotic sample return missions.

  11. Deposition and accumulation of airborne organic contaminants in Yosemite National Park, Calfornia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mast, Alisa M.; Alvarez, David A.; Zaugg, Steven D.

    2012-01-01

    Deposition and accumulation of airborne organic contaminants in Yosemite National Park were examined by sampling atmospheric deposition, lichen, zooplankton, and lake sediment at different elevations. Passive samplers were deployed in high-elevation lakes to estimate surface-water concentrations. Detected compounds included current-use pesticides chlorpyrifos, dacthal, and endosulfans and legacy compounds chlordane, dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane-related compounds, dieldrin, hexachlorobenzene, and polychlorinated biphenyls. Concentrations in snow were similar among sites and showed little variation with elevation. Endosulfan concentrations in summer rain appeared to coincide with application rates in the San Joaquin Valley. More than 70% of annual pesticide inputs from atmospheric deposition occurred during the winter, largely because most precipitation falls as snow. Endosulfan and chlordane concentrations in lichen increased with elevation, indicating that mountain cold-trapping might be an important control on accumulation of these compounds. By contrast, chlorpyrifos concentrations were inversely correlated with elevation, indicating that distance from source areas was the dominant control. Sediment concentrations were inversely correlated with elevation, possibly because of the organic carbon content of sediments but also perhaps the greater mobility of organic contaminants at lower elevations. Surface-water concentrations inferred from passive samplers were at sub-parts-per-trillion concentrations, indicating minimal exposure to aquatic organisms from the water column. Concentrations in sediment generally were low, except for dichlorodiphenyldichloroethane in Tenaya Lake, which exceeded sediment guidelines for protection of benthic organisms.

  12. Persistence and potential effects of complex organic contaminant mixtures in wastewater-impacted streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barber, Larry B.; Keefe, Steffanie H.; Brown, Greg K.; Furlong, Edward T.; Gray, James L.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Meyer, Michael T.; Sandstrom, Mark W.; Zaugg, Steven D.

    2013-01-01

    Natural and synthetic organic contaminants in municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) effluents can cause ecosystem impacts, raising concerns about their persistence in receiving streams. In this study, Lagrangian sampling, in which the same approximate parcel of water is tracked as it moves downstream, was conducted at Boulder Creek, Colorado and Fourmile Creek, Iowa to determine in-stream transport and attenuation of organic contaminants discharged from two secondary WWTPs. Similar stream reaches were evaluated, and samples were collected at multiple sites during summer and spring hydrologic conditions. Travel times to the most downstream (7.4 km) site in Boulder Creek were 6.2 h during the summer and 9.3 h during the spring, and to the Fourmile Creek 8.4 km downstream site times were 18 and 8.8 h, respectively. Discharge was measured at each site, and integrated composite samples were collected and analyzed for >200 organic contaminants including metal complexing agents, nonionic surfactant degradates, personal care products, pharmaceuticals, steroidal hormones, and pesticides. The highest concentration (>100 μg L–1) compounds detected in both WWTP effluents were ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid and 4-nonylphenolethoxycarboxylate oligomers, both of which persisted for at least 7 km downstream from the WWTPs. Concentrations of pharmaceuticals were lower (<1 μg L–1), and several compounds, including carbamazepine and sulfamethoxazole, were detected throughout the study reaches. After accounting for in-stream dilution, a complex mixture of contaminants showed little attenuation and was persistent in the receiving streams at concentrations with potential ecosystem implications.

  13. Contamination of estuarine water, biota, and sediment by halogenated organic compounds: A field study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, W.E.; Rostad, C.E.; Chiou, C.T.; Brinton, T.I.; Barber, L.B.; Demcheck, D.K.; Demas, C.R.

    1988-01-01

    Studies conducted in the vicinity of an industrial outfall in the Calcasieu River estuary, Louisiana, have shown that water, bottom and suspended sediment, and four different species of biota are contaminated with halogenated organic compounds (HOC) including haloarenes. A "salting-out" effect in the estuary moderately enhanced the partitioning tendency of the contaminants into biota and sediments. Contaminant concentrations in water, suspended sediments, and biota were found to be far below the values predicted on the basis of the assumption of phase equilibria with respect to concentrations in bottom sediment. Relative concentration factors of HOC between biota (catfish) and bottom sediment increased with increasing octanol/estuarine water partition coefficients (Kow*), maximizing at log Kow* of about 5, although these ratios were considerably less than equilibrium values. In contrast, contaminant concentrations in water, biota, and suspended sediments were much closer to equilibrium values. Bioconcentration factors of HOC determined on the basis of lipid content for four different biotic species correlated reasonably well with equilibrium triolein/water partition coefficients (Ktw).

  14. Indoor air condensate as a novel matrix for monitoring inhalable organic contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roll, Isaac B; Halden, Rolf U; Pycke, Benny F G

    2015-05-15

    With the population of developed nations spending nearly 90% of their time indoors, indoor air quality (IAQ) is a critical indicator of human health risks from inhalation of airborne contaminants. We present a novel approach for qualitative monitoring of IAQ through the collection and analysis of indoor air condensate discharged from heat exchangers of heating, ventilation, and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. Condensate samples were collected from six suburban homes and one business in Maricopa County, Arizona, concentrated via solid-phase extraction, analyzed for 10 endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS), and screened for additional organic compounds by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). All 10 EDCs were detected in at least one of the sampled buildings. More than 100 additional compounds were detected by GC-MS, of which 40 were tentatively identified using spectral database searches. Twelve compounds listed as designated chemicals for biomonitoring by the California Environmental Contaminant Biomonitoring Program were detected. Microfiltration of condensate samples prior to extraction had no discernable effect on contaminant concentration, suggesting that contaminants were freely dissolved or associated with inhalable, submicron particles. This study is the first to document the utility of HVAC condensate for the qualitative assessment of indoor air for pollutants. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Organic Contaminant Content and Physico-Chemical Characteristics of Waste Materials Recycled in Agriculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah Rigby

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A range of wastes representative of materials currently applied, or with future potential to be applied, to agricultural land in the UK as fertilisers and soil improvers or used as animal bedding in livestock production, were investigated. In addition to full physico-chemical characterization, the materials were analysed for a suite of priority organic contaminants. In general, contaminants were present at relatively low concentrations. For example, for biosolids and compost-like-output (CLO, concentrations of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs were approximately 1−10 and 5–50 times lower, respectively, than various proposed or implemented European limit values for these contaminants in biosolids or composts applied to agricultural land. However, the technical basis for these limits may require re-evaluation in some cases. Polybrominated, and mixed halogenated, dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans are not currently considered in risk assessments of dioxins and dioxin-like chemicals, but were detected at relatively high concentrations compared with PCDD/Fs in the biosolids and CLOs and their potential contribution to the overall toxic equivalency is assessed. Other ‘emerging’ contaminants, such as organophosphate flame retardants, were detected in several of the waste materials, and their potential significance is discussed. The study is part of a wider research programme that will provide evidence that is expected to improve confidence in the use of waste-derived materials in agriculture and to establish guidelines to protect the food chain where necessary.

  16. Long-term effects of dredging operations program. Effects of sediment organic-matter composition on bioaccumulation of sediment organic contaminants: Interim results. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brannon, J.M.; Price, C.B.; Reilly, F.J.; Pennington, J.C.; McFarland, V.A.

    1991-06-01

    The relationship of sediment-bound polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) 153 and fluoranthene to bioaccumulation by worms and clams and the relationship of sediment-bound PCB 153 and fluoranthene to concentrations in the interstitial water were examined. Bioaccumulation by both worms and clams was observed in all sediments. Apparent preference factor (APF) values showed that steady state was reached between sediment-bound contaminants and organism lipid pools. The APF values of organisms were close to the theoretical value for both contaminants in all sediments. These results showed that sediment total organic carbon (TOC) in conjunction with octanol water partition coefficients of nonpolar organic contaminants is a viable approach for predicting bioaccumulation of such compounds by infaunal organisms. Actual concentrations of contaminants in interstitial water were either overestimated or underestimated by the relationship between TOC and humic + fulvic acid organic matter fractions and sediment contaminant concentrations. Prediction of interstitial water concentrations was not as successful as use of APFs. The lack of agreement between predicted and actual interstitial water results was due to factors such as the presence of interstitial water contaminants bounds to microparticulates and dissolved organic material and the kind of organic material in the sediment.

  17. A, a Brominated Flame Retardant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomomi Takeshita

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA, a brominated flame retardant, has been found to exacerbate pneumonia in respiratory syncytial virus- (RSV- infected mice. We examined the effect of Brazilian propolis (AF-08 on the exacerbation of RSV infection by TBBPA exposure in mice. Mice were fed a powdered diet mixed with 1% TBBPA alone, 0.02% AF-08 alone, or 1% TBBPA and 0.02% AF-08 for four weeks and then intranasally infected with RSV. TBBPA exposure increased the pulmonary virus titer and level of IFN-γ, a representative marker of pneumonia due to RSV infection, in the lungs of infected mice without toxicity. AF-08 was significantly effective in reducing the virus titers and IFN-γ level increased by TBBPA exposure. Also, AF-08 significantly reduced proinflammatory cytokine (TNF-α and IL-6 levels in the lungs of RSV-infected mice with TBBPA exposure, but Th2 cytokine (IL-4 and IL-10 levels were not evidently increased. Neither TBBPA exposure nor AF-08 treatment affected the anti-RSV antibody production in RSV-infected mice. In flow cytometry analysis, AF-08 seemed to be effective in reducing the ratio of pulmonary CD8a+ cells in RSV-infected mice with TBBPA exposure. TBBPA and AF-08 did not exhibit anti-RSV activity in vitro. Thus, AF-08 probably ameliorated pneumonia exacerbated by TBBPA exposure in RSV-infected mice by limiting excess cellular immune responses.

  18. Flow dynamics and potential for Biodegradation of Organic Contaminants in Fractured Rock Vadose Zones

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geller, J.T.; Holman, H.-Y.; Su, T.-S.; Liou, M.S.; Conrad, M.S.; Pruess, K.; Hunter-Devera, J.C.

    1998-12-01

    We present an experimental approach for investigating the potential for bioremediation of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) in fractured-rock vadose zones. This approach is based on the coupling of fluid flow dynamics and biotransformation processes. Fluid flow and distribution within fracture networks may be a significant factor in the ability of microorganisms to degrade VOCs, as they affect the availability of substrate, moisture and nutrients. Biological activity can change liquid surface tension and generate biofilms that may change the nettability of solid surfaces, locally alter fracture permeability and redirect infiltrating liquids. Our approach has four components: (1) establishing a conceptual model for fluid and contaminant distribution in the geologic matrix of interest; (2) physical and numerical experiments of liquid seepage in the fracture plane; (3) non-destructive monitoring of biotransformations on rock surfaces at the micron-scale; and, (4) integration of flow and biological activity in natural rock ''geocosms''. Geocosms are core-scale flow cells that incorporate some aspects of natural conditions, such as liquid seepage in the fracture plane and moisture content. The experimental work was performed with rock samples and indigenous microorganisms from the site of the US Department of Energy's Idaho National Engineering and Environmental Laboratory (INEEL), located in a basalt flow basin where VOC contamination threatens the Snake River Aquifer. The insights gained from this approach should contribute to the design of techniques to monitor and stimulate naturally occurring biological activity and control the spread of organic contaminants.

  19. The design of an environmentally relevant mixture of persistent organic pollutants for use in in vivo and in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berntsen, Hanne Friis; Berg, Vidar; Thomsen, Cathrine; Ropstad, Erik; Zimmer, Karin Elisabeth

    2017-01-01

    Amongst the substances listed as persistent organic pollutants (POP) under the Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants (SCPOP) are chlorinated, brominated, and fluorinated compounds. Most experimental studies investigating effects of POP employ single compounds. Studies focusing on effects of POP mixtures are limited, and often conducted using extracts from collected specimens. Confounding effects of unmeasured substances in such extracts may bias the estimates of presumed causal relationships being examined. The aim of this investigation was to design a model of an environmentally relevant mixture of POP for use in experimental studies, containing 29 different chlorinated, brominated, and perfluorinated compounds. POP listed under the SCPOP and reported to occur at the highest levels in Scandinavian food, blood, or breast milk prior to 2012 were selected, and two different mixtures representing varying exposure scenarios constructed. The in vivo mixture contained POP concentrations based upon human estimated daily intakes (EDIs), whereas the in vitro mixture was based upon levels in human blood. In addition to total in vitro mixture, 6 submixtures containing the same concentration of chlorinated + brominated, chlorinated + perfluorinated, brominated + perfluorinated, or chlorinated, brominated or perfluorinated compounds only were constructed. Using submixtures enables investigating the effect of adding or removing one or more chemical groups. Concentrations of compounds included in feed and in vitro mixtures were verified by chemical analysis. It is suggested that this method may be utilized to construct realistic mixtures of environmental contaminants for toxicity studies based upon the relative levels of POP to which individuals are exposed.

  20. Catalytic degradation of brominated flame retardants by copper oxide nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, I.; Yecheskel, Y.; Berkowitz, B.

    2013-12-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have been added to various products like plastic, textile, electronics and synthetic polymers at growing rates. In spite of the clear advantages of reducing fire damages, many of these BFRs may be released to the environment after their beneficial use which may lead to contamination of water resources. In this work we present the catalytic degradation of two brominated flame retardants (BFRs), tribromoneopentyl alcohol (TBNPA) and 2,4 dibromophenol (2,4-DBP) by copper oxide nanoparticles (nCuO) in aqueous solution. The degradation kinetics, the debromination, and the formation of intermediates by nCuO catalysis are compared to Fenton oxidation and to reduction by nano zero-valent iron (nZVI). The two studied BFRs are shown to degrade fully by the nCuO system within hours to days. Shorter reaction times showed differences in reaction pathways and kinetics for the two compounds. The 2,4-DBP showed faster degradation than TBNPA, by nCuO catalysis. Relatively high resistance to degradation was recorded for 2,4-DBP with nZVI, yielding 20% degradation after 24 h, while the TBNPA was degraded by 85% within 12 hours. A catalytic mechanism for radical generation and BFR degradation by nCuO is proposed. It is further suggested that H2O2 plays an essential role in the activation of the catalyst.

  1. Mitigation of the impact of terrestrial contamination on organic measurements from the Mars Science Laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ten Kate, Inge L; Canham, John S; Conrad, Pamela G; Errigo, Therese; Katz, Ira; Mahaffy, Paul R

    2008-06-01

    The objective of the 2009 Mars Science Laboratory (MSL), which is planned to follow the Mars Exploration Rovers and the Phoenix lander to the surface of Mars, is to explore and assess quantitatively a site on Mars as a potential habitat for present or past life. Specific goals include an assessment of the past or present biological potential of the target environment and a characterization of its geology and geochemistry. Included in the 10 investigations of the MSL rover is the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite, which is designed to obtain trace organic measurements, measure water and other volatiles, and measure several light isotopes with experiment sequences designed for both atmospheric and solid-phase samples. SAM integrates a gas chromatograph, a mass spectrometer, and a tunable laser spectrometer supported by sample manipulation tools both within and external to the suite. The sub-part-per-billion sensitivity of the suite for trace species, particularly organic molecules, along with a mobile platform that will contain many kilograms of organic materials, presents a considerable challenge due to the potential for terrestrial contamination to mask the signal of martian organics. We describe the effort presently underway to understand and mitigate, wherever possible within the resource constraints of the mission, terrestrial contamination in MSL and SAM measurements.

  2. Remediation of Biological Organic Fertilizer and Biochar in Paddy Soil Contaminated by Cd and Pb

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MA Tie-zheng

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The effect of application of biological organic fertilizer and biochar on the immobilized remediation of paddy soil contaminated by Cd and Pb was studied under the field experiment. The results showed that biological organic fertilizer and biochar increased the soil pH and soil nutrient contents, and reduced the soil available Cd and Pb concentrations significantly. The soil pH had significantly negative correla-tion with the soil available Cd and Pb contents. The application of biological organic fertilizer and biochar decreased Cd and Pb concentration in all parts of the rice plant, with Cd concentration in brown rice decrease by 22.00% and 18.34% and Pb decease in brown rice by 33.46% and 12.31%. The concentration of Cd and Pb in brown rice had significant positive correlation with the soil available Cd and Pb concentra-tions. It was observed that both biological organic fertilizer and biochar had a positive effect on the remediation of paddy soil contaminated by Cd and Pb.

  3. Expanded target-chemical analysis reveals extensive mixed-organic-contaminant exposure in USA streams

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Paul M.; Journey, Celeste A.; Romanok, Kristin; Barber, Larry B.; Buxton, Herbert T.; Foreman, William; Furlong, Edward T.; Glassmeyer, Susan T.; Hladik, Michelle L.; Iwanowicz, Luke R.; Jones, Daniel K.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Kuivila, Kathryn M.; Loftin, Keith A.; Mills, Marc A.; Meyer, Michael T.; Orlando, James L.; Reilly, Timothy J.; Smalling, Kelly L.; Villeneuve, Daniel L.

    2017-01-01

    Surface water from 38 streams nationwide was assessed using 14 target-organic methods (719 compounds). Designed-bioactive anthropogenic contaminants (biocides, pharmaceuticals) comprised 57% of 406 organics detected at least once. The 10 most-frequently detected anthropogenic-organics included eight pesticides (desulfinylfipronil, AMPA, chlorpyrifos, dieldrin, metolachlor, atrazine, CIAT, glyphosate) and two pharmaceuticals (caffeine, metformin) with detection frequencies ranging 66–84% of all sites. Detected contaminant concentrations varied from less than 1 ng L–1 to greater than 10 μg L–1, with 77 and 278 having median detected concentrations greater than 100 ng L–1 and 10 ng L–1, respectively. Cumulative detections and concentrations ranged 4–161 compounds (median 70) and 8.5–102 847 ng L–1, respectively, and correlated significantly with wastewater discharge, watershed development, and toxic release inventory metrics. Log10 concentrations of widely monitored HHCB, triclosan, and carbamazepine explained 71–82% of the variability in the total number of compounds detected (linear regression; p-values: environment application (pesticides), designed-bioactive organics (median 41 per site at μg L–1 cumulative concentrations) in developed watersheds present aquatic health concerns, given their acknowledged potential for sublethal effects to sensitive species and lifecycle stages at low ng L–1.

  4. Contaminants and microorganisms in Dutch organic food products: a comparison with conventional products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogenboom, L A P; Bokhorst, J G; Northolt, M D; van de Vijver, L P L; Broex, N J G; Mevius, D J; Meijs, J A C; Van der Roest, J

    2008-10-01

    Organic products were analysed for the presence of contaminants, microorganisms and antibiotic resistance and compared with those from conventional products. No differences were observed in the Fusarium toxins deoxynivalenol and zearalenone in organic and conventional wheat, during both a dry period and a very wet period which promoted the production of these toxins. Nitrate levels in head lettuce produced organically in the open field were much lower than those in conventional products. In iceberg lettuce and head lettuce from the greenhouse, no differences were detected. Organically produced carrots contained higher nitrate levels than conventional products. Both organic and conventional products contained no residues of non-polar pesticides above the legal limits, although some were detected in conventional lettuce. Organic products contained no elevated levels of heavy metals. Salmonella was detected in 30% of pig faeces samples obtained from 30 organic farms, similar to the incidence at conventional farms. At farms that switched to organic production more then 6 years ago no Salmonella was detected, with the exception of one stable with young pigs recently purchased from another farm. No Salmonella was detected in faeces at the nine farms with organic broilers, and at one out of ten farms with laying hens. This is comparable with conventional farms where the incidence for Salmonella lies around 10%. Campylobacter was detected in faeces at all organic broiler farms, being much higher than at conventional farms. One of the most remarkable results was the fact that faeces from organic pigs and broilers showed a much lower incidence of antibiotic resistant bacteria, except for Campylobacter in broilers. It is concluded that the organic products investigated scored as equally well as conventional products with regard to food safety and at the same time show some promising features with respect to antibiotic resistance.

  5. Petroleum refinery secondary effluent polishing using freezing processes--toxicity and organic contaminant removal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, W; Smith, D W; Habib, M

    2008-06-01

    A petroleum refinery secondary effluent was treated using two freezing techniques--spray freezing and unidirectional downward freezing (UDF). The freezing processes were effective to remove toxicity and total organic carbon (TOC)- and chemical oxygen demand (COD)-causing materials in the effluent. Agitation of the liquid during UDF significantly improved the impurity separation efficiency; 85 to 96% removal of TOC and COD was achieved without any pretreatment and freezing only 70% of the feed water. The treatment efficiency of the spray freezing was at the same level as that of UDF without mixing. The spray ice with longer storage time released more contaminants with early meltwater. The initial contaminant concentration of the feed water and the freezing temperatures (-10 degrees C and -25 degrees C) had no significant influence on the treatment efficiency. A small fluctuation in effluent TOC concentration caused a dramatic change in effluent toxicity (Microtox). The effective concentration (EC20) (Microtox) was effective in detecting effluent toxicity.

  6. The ability of biologically based wastewater treatment systems to remove emerging organic contaminants--a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Rodríguez, Aida; Matamoros, Víctor; Fontàs, Clàudia; Salvadó, Victòria

    2014-10-01

    Biologically based wastewater treatment systems are considered a sustainable, cost-effective alternative to conventional wastewater treatment systems. These systems have been used and studied for the treatment of urban sewage from small communities, and recently, it has been reported that they can also effectively remove emerging organic contaminants (EOCs). EOCs are a new group of unregulated contaminants which include pharmaceutical and personal care products, some pesticides, veterinary products, and industrial compounds among others that are thought to have long-term adverse effects on human health and ecosystems. This review is focused on reporting the ability of biologically based wastewater treatment systems to remove EOCs and the main elimination mechanisms and degradation processes (i.e., biodegradation, photodegradation, phytoremediation, and sorption) taking place in constructed wetlands, ponds, and Daphnia and fungal reactors.

  7. A national-scale assessment of micro-organic contaminants in groundwater of England and Wales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manamsa, Katya; Crane, Emily; Stuart, Marianne; Talbot, John; Lapworth, Dan; Hart, Alwyn

    2016-10-15

    A large variety of micro-organic (MO) compounds is used in huge quantities for a range of purposes (e.g. manufacturing, food production, healthcare) and is now being frequently detected in the aquatic environment. Interest in the occurrence of MO contaminants in the terrestrial and aquatic environments continues to grow, as well as in their environmental fate and potential toxicity. However, the contamination of groundwater resources by MOs has a limited evidence base compared to other freshwater resources. Of particular concern are newly 'emerging contaminants' such as pharmaceuticals and lifestyle compounds, particularly those with potential endocrine disrupting properties. While groundwater often has a high degree of protection from pollution due to physical, chemical and biological attenuation processes in the subsurface compared to surface aquatic environments, trace concentrations of a large range of compounds are still detected in groundwater and in some cases may persist for decades due to the long residence times of groundwater systems. This study provides the first national-scale assessment of micro-organic compounds in groundwater in England and Wales. A large set of monitoring data was analysed to determine the relative occurrence and detected concentrations of different groups of compounds and to determine relationships with land-use, aquifer type and groundwater vulnerability. MOs detected including emerging compounds such as caffeine, DEET, bisphenol A, anti-microbial agents and pharmaceuticals as well as a range of legacy contaminants including chlorinated solvents and THMs, petroleum hydrocarbons, pesticides and other industrial compounds. There are clear differences in MOs between land-use types, particularly for urban-industrial and natural land-use. Temporal trends of MO occurrence are assessed but establishing long-term trends is not yet possible. Copyright © 2016 British Geological Survey, NERC. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Constructed Wetlands for Treatment of Organic and Engineered Nanomaterial Contaminants of Emerging Concerns (WaterRF Report 4334)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The goal of this project was to determine hydraulic and carbon loading rates for constructed wetlands required for achieving different levels of organic and nanomaterial contaminants of emerging concern (CECs) removal in constructed wetlands. Specific research objectives included...

  9. EMERGING TECHNOLOGY BULLETIN: PROCESS FOR THE TREATMENT OF VOLATILE ORGANIC CARBON AND HEAVY-METAL- CONTAMINATED SOIL - INTERNATIONAL TECHNOLOGY CORPORATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    The batch steam distillation and metal extraction treatment process is a two-stage system that treats soils contaminated with organics and inorganics. This system uses conventional, readily available process equipment, and does not produce hazardous combustion products. Hazar...

  10. Surfactant-modified zeolites as permeable barriers to organic and inorganic groundwater contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowman, R.S.; Sullivan, E.J. [New Mexico Institute of Mining and Technology, Socorro, NM (United States)

    1995-10-01

    We have shown in laboratory experiments that natural zeolites treated with hexadecyltrimethylammonium (HDTMA) are effective sorbents for nonpolar organics, inorganic cations, and inorganic anions. Due to their low cost ({approximately}$0.75/kg) and granular nature, HDTMA-zeolites appear ideal candidates for reactive, permeable subsurface barriers. The HDTMA-zeolites are stable over a wide range of pH (3-13), ionic strength (1 M Cs{sup +} or Ca{sup 2+}), and in organic solvents. Surfactant-modified zeolites sorb nonpolar organics (benzene, toluene, xylene, chlorinated aliphatics) via a partitioning mechanism, inorganic cations (Pb{sup 2+}) via ion exchange and surface complexation, and inorganic anions (CrO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, SeO{sub 4}{sup 2-}, SO{sub 4}{sup 2-}) via surface precipitation.The goal of this work is to demonstrate the use of surfactant-modified zeolite as a permeable barrier to ground water contaminants.

  11. Role of biochar on composting of organic wastes and remediation of contaminated soils-a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaohua; He, Huijun; Inthapanya, Xayanto; Yang, Chunping; Lu, Li; Zeng, Guangming; Han, Zhenfeng

    2017-07-01

    Biochar is produced by pyrolysis of biomass residues under limited oxygen conditions. In recent years, biochar as an amendment has received increasing attention on composting and soil remediation, due to its unique properties such as chemical recalcitrance, high porosity and sorption capacity, and large surface area. This paper provides an overview on the impact of biochar on the chemical characteristics (greenhouse gas emissions, nitrogen loss, decomposition and humification of organic matter) and microbial community structure during composting of organic wastes. This review also discusses the use of biochar for remediation of soils contaminated with organic pollutants and heavy metals as well as related mechanisms. Besides its aging, the effects of biochar on the environment fate and efficacy of pesticides deserve special attention. Moreover, the combined application of biochar and compost affects synergistically on soil remediation and plant growth. Future research needs are identified to ensure a wide application of biochar in composting and soil remediation. Graphical abstract ᅟ.

  12. Metabolic responses of Eisenia fetida after sub-lethal exposure to organic contaminants with different toxic modes of action

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McKelvie, Jennifer R.; Wolfe, David M.; Celejewski, Magda A. [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail Toronto, ON M1C 1A4 (Canada); Alaee, Mehran [Environment Canada, 867 Lakeshore Rd., P.O. Box 5050, Burlington, ON L7R 4A6 (Canada); Simpson, Andre J. [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail Toronto, ON M1C 1A4 (Canada); Simpson, Myrna J., E-mail: myrna.simpson@utoronto.ca [Department of Physical and Environmental Sciences, University of Toronto, 1265 Military Trail Toronto, ON M1C 1A4 (Canada)

    2011-12-15

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) - based metabolomics has the potential to identify toxic responses of contaminants within a mixture in contaminated soil. This study evaluated the metabolic response of Eisenia fetida after exposure to an array of organic compounds to determine whether contaminant-specific responses could be identified. The compounds investigated in contact tests included: two pesticides (carbaryl and chlorpyrifos), three pharmaceuticals (carbamazephine, estrone and caffeine), two persistent organohalogens (Aroclor 1254 and PBDE 209) and two industrial compounds (nonylphenol and dimethyl phthalate). Control and contaminant-exposed metabolic profiles were distinguished using principal component analysis and potential contaminant-specific biomarkers of exposure were found for several contaminants. These results suggest that NMR-based metabolomics offers considerable promise for differentiating between the different toxic modes of action (MOA) associated with sub-lethal toxicity to earthworms. - Highlights: > NMR-based earthworm metabolomic analysis of the toxic mode of action of various environmental contaminants. > Organic chemicals with different toxic modes of action resulted in varied metabolomic responses for E. fetida. > NMR-based metabolomics differentiates between the different modes of action associated with sub-lethal toxicity. - {sup 1}H NMR metabolomics was used to identify potential biomarkers of organic contaminant exposure in Eisenia fetida earthworms.

  13. Chemical contaminants in the Wadden Sea: Sources, transport, fate and effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laane, R. W. P. M.; Vethaak, A. D.; Gandrass, J.; Vorkamp, K.; Köhler, A.; Larsen, M. M.; Strand, J.

    2013-09-01

    The Wadden Sea receives contaminants from various sources and via various transport routes. The contaminants described in this overview are various metals (Cd, Cu, Hg, Pb and Zn) and various organic contaminants (polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and lindane (hexachlorocyclohexane, γ-HCH)). In addition, information is presented about other and emerging contaminants such as antifouling biocides (e.g. TBT and Irgarol), brominated flame retardants (BFRs), poly- and perfluorinated compounds (PFCs) and pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs). Special attention is given to biogeochemical processes that contribute to the mobilization of contaminants in the surface sediments of the Wadden Sea. Finally, the effects on organisms of contaminants are reviewed and discussed. The main source of contaminants in the Wadden Sea are the rivers Rhine (via de Dutch coastal zone), Elbe and Weser. The Wadden Sea is not a sink for contaminants and adsorbed contaminants are transported from east to west. The surface sediments of the Wadden Sea are an important source for contaminants to the water above. The input and concentration of most contaminants have significantly decreased in water, sediments, organisms (e.g., mussel, flounder and bird eggs) in various parts of the Wadden Sea in the last three decades. Remarkably, the Cd concentration in mussels is increasing the last decades. In recent decades, the effects of contaminants on organisms (e.g., flounder, seal) have fallen markedly. Most of the affected populations have recovered, except for TBT induced effects in snails. Little is known about the concentration and effects of most emerging contaminants and the complex environmental mixtures of contaminants. It is recommended to install an international coordinated monitoring programme for contaminants and their effects in the whole Wadden Sea and to identify the chemical contaminants that really cause the effect.

  14. 21 CFR 180.30 - Brominated vegetable oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Brominated vegetable oil. 180.30 Section 180.30... Brominated vegetable oil. The food additive brominated vegetable oil may be safely used in accordance with... used on an interim basis as a stabilizer for flavoring oils used in fruit-flavored beverages, for which...

  15. 40 CFR 721.3420 - Brominated arylalkyl ether.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Brominated arylalkyl ether. 721.3420... Substances § 721.3420 Brominated arylalkyl ether. (a) Chemical substances and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as brominated arylalkyl ether (P-83-906) is...

  16. Tetrameric DABCO™-Bromine: an Efficient and Versatile Reagent ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Tetrameric DABCO™-bromine is a powerful brominating agent but shows reasonable selectivity with certain substrates. The selective bromination for activated aromatic compounds and alkenes is reported. Synthesis of -bromo ketones and nitriles has also been achieved by using this reagent and the results are also ...

  17. 40 CFR 721.9740 - Brominated triazine derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Brominated triazine derivative. 721... Substances § 721.9740 Brominated triazine derivative. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a brominated triazine derivative...

  18. Electrokinetic-enhanced bioremediation of organic contaminants: a review of processes and environmental applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, R T; Harbottle, M J; Smith, J W N; Thornton, S F

    2014-07-01

    There is current interest in finding sustainable remediation technologies for the removal of contaminants from soil and groundwater. This review focuses on the combination of electrokinetics, the use of an electric potential to move organic and inorganic compounds, or charged particles/organisms in the subsurface independent of hydraulic conductivity; and bioremediation, the destruction of organic contaminants or attenuation of inorganic compounds by the activity of microorganisms in situ or ex situ. The objective of the review is to examine the state of knowledge on electrokinetic bioremediation and critically evaluate factors which affect the up-scaling of laboratory and bench-scale research to field-scale application. It discusses the mechanisms of electrokinetic bioremediation in the subsurface environment at different micro and macroscales, the influence of environmental processes on electrokinetic phenomena and the design options available for application to the field scale. The review also presents results from a modelling exercise to illustrate the effectiveness of electrokinetics on the supply electron acceptors to a plume scale scenario where these are limiting. Current research needs include analysis of electrokinetic bioremediation in more representative environmental settings, such as those in physically heterogeneous systems in order to gain a greater understanding of the controlling mechanisms on both electrokinetics and bioremediation in those scenarios. Copyright © 2014 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  19. Removal of organic wastewater contaminants in septic systems using advanced treatment technologies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilcox, Jeffrey D; Bahr, Jean M; Hedman, Curtis J; Hemming, Jocelyn D C; Barman, Miel A E; Bradbury, Kenneth R

    2009-01-01

    The detection of pharmaceuticals and other organic wastewater contaminants (OWCs) in ground water and surface-water bodies has raised concerns about the possible ecological impacts of these compounds on nontarget organisms. On-site wastewater treatment systems represent a potentially significant route of entry for organic contaminants to the environment. In this study, effluent samples were collected and analyzed from conventional septic systems and from systems using advanced treatment technologies. Six of 13 target compounds were detected in effluent from at least one septic system. Caffeine, paraxanthine, and acetaminophen were the most frequently detected compounds, and estrogenic activity was detected in 14 of 15 systems. The OWC concentrations were significantly lower in effluent after sand filtration (p treatment (p effluent that had not undergone advanced treatment. In general, concentrations in conventional systems were comparable to those measured in previous studies of municipal wastewater treatment plant (WWTP) influent, and concentrations in systems after advanced treatment were comparable to previously measured concentrations in WWTP effluent. These data indicate that septic systems using advanced treatment can reduce OWCs in treated effluent to similar concentrations as municipal WWTPs.

  20. Preparation of Silica/Reduced Graphene Oxide Nanosheet Composites for Removal of Organic Contaminants from Water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen; Liu, Wei; Wang, Haifei; Lu, Wensheng

    2016-06-01

    Graphene-based composites open up new opportunities as effective adsorbents for the removal of organic contaminants from water. In this article, we report a novel and facile process to synthesize well-dispersed silica/reduced graphene oxide (SiO2/RGO) nanosheet composites. The SiO2/RGO nanosheet composites are prepared through a modified sol-gel process with in situ hydrolysis of tetraethoxysilane (TEOS) on graphene oxide (GO) nanosheet, followed by reduction of GO to graphene. In comparison with the RGO nanosheets, the as-prepared SiO2/RGO nanosheet composites have a larger surface area and good aqueous disperse ability. In addition, the application of SiO2/RGO nanosheet composites was demonstrated on removing organic dyes from water. The SiO2/RGO nanosheet composites show rapid and stable adsorption performance on removal of Methylene Blue (MB) and thionine (TH) from water. It is indicated that the resulting SiO2/RGO composites can be utilized as efficient adsorbents for the removal of organic contaminants from water.

  1. Microbial regeneration of spent activated carbon dispersed with organic contaminants: mechanism, efficiency, and kinetic models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Kaushik; Bhakhar, Mathurkumar S

    2011-05-01

    Regeneration of spent activated carbon assumes paramount importance in view of its economic reuse during adsorptive removal of organic contaminants. Classical thermal, chemical, or electrochemical regeneration methods are constrained with several limitations. Microbial regeneration of spent activated carbon provides a synergic combination of adsorption and biodegradation. Microorganisms regenerate the surface of activated carbon using sorbed organic substrate as a source of food and energy. Aromatic hydrocarbons, particularly phenols, including their chlorinated derivatives and industrial waste water containing synthetic organic compounds and explosives-contaminated ground water are the major removal targets in adsorption-bioregeneration process. Popular mechanisms of bioregeneration include exoenzymatic hypothesis and biodegradation following desorption. Efficiency of bioregeneration can be quantified using direct determination of the substrate content on the adsorbent, the indirect measurement of substrate consumption by measuring the carbon dioxide production and the measurement of oxygen uptake. Modeling of bioregeneration involves the kinetics of adsorption/desorption and microbial growth followed by solute degradation. Some modeling aspects based on various simplifying assumptions for mass transport resistance, microbial kinetics and biofilm thickness, are briefly exposed. Kinetic parameters from various representative bioregeneration models and their solution procedure are briefly summarized. The models would be useful in predicting the mass transfer driving forces, microbial growth, substrate degradation as well as the extent of bioregeneration. Intraparticle mass transfer resistance, incomplete regeneration, and microbial fouling are some of the problems needed to be addressed adequately. A detailed techno-economic evaluation is also required to assess the commercial aspects of bioregeneration.

  2. Effects of predicted climatic changes on distribution of organic contaminants in brackish water mesocosms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripszam, M; Gallampois, C M J; Berglund, Å; Larsson, H; Andersson, A; Tysklind, M; Haglund, P

    2015-06-01

    Predicted consequences of future climate change in the northern Baltic Sea include increases in sea surface temperatures and terrestrial dissolved organic carbon (DOC) runoff. These changes are expected to alter environmental distribution of anthropogenic organic contaminants (OCs). To assess likely shifts in their distributions, outdoor mesocosms were employed to mimic pelagic ecosystems at two temperatures and two DOC concentrations, current: 15°C and 4 mg DOCL(-1) and, within ranges of predicted increases, 18°C and 6 mg DOCL(-1), respectively. Selected organic contaminants were added to the mesocosms to monitor changes in their distribution induced by the treatments. OC partitioning to particulate matter and sedimentation were enhanced at the higher DOC concentration, at both temperatures, while higher losses and lower partitioning of OCs to DOC were observed at the higher temperature. No combined effects of higher temperature and DOC on partitioning were observed, possibly because of the balancing nature of these processes. Therefore, changes in OCs' fates may largely depend on whether they are most sensitive to temperature or DOC concentration rises. Bromoanilines, phenanthrene, biphenyl and naphthalene were sensitive to the rise in DOC concentration, whereas organophosphates, chlorobenzenes (PCBz) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were more sensitive to temperature. Mitotane and diflufenican were sensitive to both temperature and DOC concentration rises individually, but not in combination. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Adsorption of ionizable organic contaminants on multi-walled carbon nanotubes with different oxygen contents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li Xiaona; Zhao Huimin [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering (MOE), School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Linggong Road 2, Liaoning Province, Dalian 116024 (China); Quan Xie, E-mail: quanxie@dlut.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering (MOE), School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Linggong Road 2, Liaoning Province, Dalian 116024 (China); Chen Shuo; Zhang Yaobin; Yu Hongtao [Key Laboratory of Industrial Ecology and Environmental Engineering (MOE), School of Environmental Science and Technology, Dalian University of Technology, Linggong Road 2, Liaoning Province, Dalian 116024 (China)

    2011-02-15

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNTs), which are considered to be promising candidates for the adsorption of toxic organics, are released into aqueous environment with their increasing production and application. In this study, the adsorption behaviors of five structurally related ionizable organic contaminants namely perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS), perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA), perfluorooctanesulfonamide (PFOSA), 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) and 4-n-nonylphenol (4-NP) onto MWNTs with different oxygen contents (3.84-22.85%) were investigated. The adsorption kinetics was investigated and simulated with pseudo-second-order model. The adsorption isotherms were found to be fitted with Freundlich model and influenced by both the properties of organic chemicals and the oxygen contents of MWNTs. As adsorption capacity decreases dramatically with the increasing of oxygen contents, the MWNTs with the lowest oxygen contents possess the highest adsorption capacity among four MWNTs. For the MWNTs with the oxygen contents of 3.84%, the adsorption affinity related with hydrophobic interaction and {pi}-electron polarizability decreased in the order of 4-NP > PFOSA > PFOS > 2,4-D > PFOA. Furthermore, the adsorption characters of five contaminants were affected by solution pH and solute pK{sub a} considering electrostatic repulse force and hydrogen bonding, which showed the adsorption of MWNTs with lower oxygen content is much sensitive to solution chemistry.

  4. Impact of plastics on fate and transport of organic contaminants in landfills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saquing, Jovita M; Saquing, Carl D; Knappe, Detlef R U; Barlaz, Morton A

    2010-08-15

    Factors controlling organic contaminant sorption to common plastics in municipal solid waste were identified. Consumer plastics [drinking water container, prescription drug bottle, soda bottle, disposable cold cup, computer casing, furniture foam, carpet, vinyl flooring, formica sheet] and model polymers [high-density polyethylene (HDPE), medium-density polyethylene, low-density polyethylene, poly(vinyl chloride) (PVC)] were characterized by X-ray diffractometry, differential scanning calorimetry, and elemental analysis. The material characterization was used to interpret batch isotherm and kinetic data. K(p) values describing toluene sorption to rubbery or "soft" polymers could be normalized by the amorphous polymer fraction (f(amorphous)) but not by the organic carbon fraction (f(oc)). Diffusion coefficients (D) describing the uptake rate of toluene by rubbery plastics (HDPE, drinking water container, prescription drug bottle) were similar (D approximately 10(-10) cm(2)/s), indicating that pure HDPE can be used as a model for rubbery plastics. Toluene diffusivity was similar among glassy or "hard" plastics (PVC, soda bottle, computer casing, disposable cold cup; D approximately 10(-12) cm(2)/s) but lower than for rubbery plastics. Plastics in landfills are potential sinks of hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) because of their higher affinity for HOCs compared to lignocellulosic materials and the slow desorption of HOCs from glassy plastics.

  5. Bromide oxidation by ferrate(VI): The formation of active bromine and bromate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Yanjun; Goodwill, Joseph E; Tobiason, John E; Reckhow, David A

    2016-06-01

    Ferrate (VI) (abbreviated as Fe(VI)) has long been considered as a green oxidant that does not produce any known hazardous byproducts. However, this work shows that Fe(VI) can slowly oxidize bromide forming active bromine (HOBr/OBr(-)) and bromate, and in natural waters total organic bromine (TOBr) can also be detected. Results showed that the highest levels of active bromine and bromate were formed at lower pHs and in the absence of phosphate. Hydrogen peroxide, which forms from the reaction of Fe(VI) and water, plays an essential role in suppressing bromate formation by reducing active bromine back to bromide. Fe(VI) decomposition products (assumed to be particulate phase Fe(III)) can catalyze the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide by Fe(VI). Phosphate had a substantial inhibiting effect on the formation of active bromine, but less so on bromate formation. The presence of the raw water matrix in natural water suppressed bromate formation. For a natural water spiked with 0.1 mg/L of bromide, the bromate and TOBr concentrations after Fe(VI) oxidation were below 3.0 and 15 μg/L, respectively. No consistent trend regarding the effect of pH or buffer ions on TOBr formation was observed due to the competition between Fe(VI), hydrogen peroxide, and natural organic matter (NOM) for reaction with active bromine. Under environmentally relevant conditions, the formation of bromate and TOBr would not be a problem for Fe(VI) application as their concentration levels are quite low. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Technology of afterpurification of drinking water from organic contaminants in production of foodstuff

    OpenAIRE

    TIMOSHCHUK I.V.

    2016-01-01

    The technology of afterpurification of drinking water is developed for upgrading of foodstuff from organic contaminants periodically present at natural water or formed on a stage of disinfecting by ozonization. The adsorption research of phenol, formaldehyde and acetic aldehyde from individual water solutions and their mixes on active charcoals (AC) marks AG-3, ABG, KsAU, AG-OV-1, SKD-515 and BАU differing in contents, in the way of reception, structure and chemical state of a surface is carr...

  7. ORGANIC AND INORGANIC CONTAMINANT MONITORING IN SOIL: A CASE STUDY IN TREVISO PROVINCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paolo Giandon

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available The present study concerns the environmental monitoring of a site that is close to the industrial area of Pederobba (Treviso  province which is characterized by the presence of a cement factory. Successively 43 soil samples were collected-including 26 surface samples and 17 deep ones. Each soil sample was analyzed and organic (PAHs, PCBs and PCDD/Fs and inorganic (metals and metalloids parameters were measured. Analytical results showed some values above contamination threshold levels in residential districts regarding PCDD/F, copper and cobalt.

  8. Experimental investigation of concentration and stable isotopes signals during organic contaminants back diffusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jin, Biao; Nika, Chrysanthi-Elisabeth; Rolle, Massimo

    2017-01-01

    Back diffusion of organic contaminants is often the cause of groundwater plumes' persistence and can significantly hinder cleanup interventions [1, 2]. In this study we perform a high-resolution investigation of back diffusion in a well-controlled flow-through laboratory setup. We considered cis...... behavior of the plumes originated by back diffusion was investigated by sampling the outlet ports at regular intervals in the experiments, each run for a total time corresponding to 15 pore volumes. The high-resolution sampling allowed us to resolve the spatial and temporal evolution of concentration...

  9. Development of HUMASORB{trademark}, a lignite derived humic acid for removal of metals and organic contaminants from groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanjay, H.G.; Srivastave, K.C.; Walia, D.S. [ARCTECH, Inc., Chantilly, VA (United States)

    1995-10-01

    Heavy metal and organic contamination of surface and groundwater systems is a major environmental concern. The contamination is primarily due to improperly disposed industrial wastes. The presence of toxic heavy metal ions, volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and pesticides in water is of great concern and could affect the safety of drinking water. Decontamination of surface and groundwater can be achieved using a broad spectrum of treatment options such as precipitation, ion-exchange, microbial digestion, membrane separation, activated carbon adsorption, etc. The state of the art technologies for treatment of contaminated water however, can in one pass remediate only one class of contaminants, i.e., either VOCs (activated carbon) or heavy metals (ion exchange). This would require the use of at a minimum, two different stepwise processes to remediate a site. The groundwater contamination at different Department of Energy (DOE) sites (e.g., Hanford) is due to the presence of both VOCs and heavy metals. The two-step approach increases the cost of remediation. To overcome the sequential treatment of contaminated streams to remove both organics and metals, a novel material having properties to remove both classes of contaminants in one step is being developed as part of this project.The objective of this project is to develop a lignite-derived adsorbent, Humasorb{sup TM} to remove heavy metals and organics from ground water and surface water streams.

  10. Prevalence of organic and inorganic contaminants within a rapidly developing catchment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Njumbe, E. S.; Curtis, C. D.; Cooke, D. A.; Polya, D. A.; Wogelius, R. A.; Hughes, C.

    2003-04-01

    Industrialization rates in many developing countries typically outpace investment in water supply, sewage treatment and other waste water facilities. This is futher compounded by the absence of stringent land-use and waste disposal policies. The consequence of this has been contamination of land, surface water, and groundwater in such areas. Efforts to control and remediate these types of systems will rely on a thorough understanding of contaminant levels and mobility. Reliable data, however, is usually not available. Therefore this study was designed to acquire baseline data from a representative developing urban area in tropical west Africa. 43 water and 20 sediment/soil samples from streams, hand-dug wells, springs and deep boreholes within the city and surrounding areas of Douala in Cameroon were characterised. Analyses were aimed at obtaining information on the type and quantity of organic and inorganic contaminants present, and linking them to specific point and non-point sources. Results from gas chromatography (GC/FID) and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry analyses of total organic extracts (TOE) of water samples have revealed the presence of a wide range of organic compounds including phenols, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), volatile organic compounds (VOCs), phthalates, acids and aliphatic derivatives. Concentrations as high as 500 ng ml-1 were detected. These high levels of non-polar compounds measured in drinking water represent a clear health problem. Heavy metal concentrations in bulk alluvial sands and loamy soil have been determined by microwave assisted nitric acid digestion. Concentration ranges (in ppm of dry weight) for the important metals were: Cr, 3.2-84.2 ; Ni, 0.2-57.4 ; Zn, 2.1-92 ; Pb, 0.3-33 ; As, 0.081-9.4 ; Cu, 0.61-17.4 ; and Cd, 0-3.1. Point sources have been identified for several of the organic and inorganic compounds and this spatial information will be integrated with the chemical data to present an overview of

  11. Impact of Biochar on Organic Contaminants in Soil: A Tool for Mitigating Risk?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirk T. Semple

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The presence of biochar in soils through natural processes (forest fires, bush burning or through application to soil (agriculture, carbon storage, remediation, waste management has received a significant amount of scientific and regulatory attention. Biochar alters soil properties, encourages microbial activity and enhances sorption of inorganic and organic compounds, but this strongly depends on the feedstock and production process of biochar. This review considers biochar sources, the production process and result of pyrolysis, interactions of biochar with soil, and associated biota. Furthermore, the paper focuses on the interactions between biochar and common anthropogenic organic contaminants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, pesticides, and dioxins, which are often deposited in the soil environment. It then considers the feasibility of applying biochar in remediation technologies in addition to other perspective areas yet to be explored.

  12. Enhanced degradation of organic contaminants in water by peroxydisulfate coupled with bisulfite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Qi, Chengdu, E-mail: qichengdu@mail.tsinghua.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); State Key Joint Laboratory of Environment Simulation and Pollution Control (SKLESPC), Beijing Key Laboratory for Emerging Organic Contaminants Control, School of Environment, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Liu, Xitao, E-mail: liuxt@bnu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China); Li, Yang; Lin, Chunye; Ma, Jun; Li, Xiaowan; Zhang, Huijuan [State Key Laboratory of Water Environment Simulation, School of Environment, Beijing Normal University, Beijing 100875 (China)

    2017-04-15

    Highlights: • S(IV)/PDS system showed synergistic degradation of BPA than S(IV) and PDS. • BPA degradation involved hydroxyl and oxysulfur radicals in the S(IV)/PDS system. • Based on the identified intermediates, the BPA degradation pathway was proposed. - Abstract: In this study, the bisulfite-peroxydisulfate system (S(IV)/PDS) widely used in polymerization was innovatively applied for organic contaminants degradation in water. The addition of S(IV) into PDS system remarkably enhanced the degradation efficiency of bisphenol A (BPA, a frequently detected endocrine disrupting chemical in the environments) from 17.0% to 84.7% within 360 min. The degradation efficiency of BPA in the S(IV)/PDS system followed pseudo-first-order kinetics, with rate constant values ranging from 0.00005 min{sup −1} to 0.02717 min{sup −1} depending on the operating parameters, such as the initial S(IV) and PDS dosage, solution pH, reaction temperature, chloride and water type. Furthermore, nitrogen purging experiment, radical scavenging experiment and electron spin resonance (ESR) analysis were used to elucidate the possible mechanism. The results revealed that sulfate radical was the dominant reactive species in the S(IV)/PDS system. Finally, based on the results of liquid chromatography–mass spectrometry (LC–MS) and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS), the BPA degradation pathway was proposed to involve β-scission (C−C), hydroxylation, dehydration, oxidative skeletal rearrangement, and ring opening. This study helps to characterize the combination of PDS and inorganic S(IV), a common industrial contaminant, to generate reactive species to enhance organic contaminants degradation in water.

  13. Biomarkers of Organic Contamination in the South-American Fishes Poecilia vivipara and Jenynsia multidentata

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stacke Ferreira, Roger; Monserrat, José Maria; Ribas Ferreira, Josencler Luís; Kalb, Ana Cristina; Stegeman, John; Dias Bainy, Afonso Celso; Zanette, Juliano

    2017-01-01

    South American Cyprinodontiform fishes are potential candidates to be used as model species in environmental toxicology. We sought for molecular and biochemical biomarkers of pollution in Poecilia vivipara (Poecilidae) and Jenynsia multidentata (Anablepidae). Partial nucleotide sequences for the cytochrome P450 1A (cyp1A), a classical biomarker of exposure to organic contaminants in fish, were identified in P. vivipara and J. multidentata (∼ 650 nucleotides) using degenerated primers and PCR. These sequences shared ∼ 90 % identity in the predicted amino acid sequence with the corresponding Cyp1A region of Fundulus heteroclitus. RT-qPCR analysis confirmed that cyp1A transcription was strongly induced in the liver and gills of J. multidentata (∼185-fold and ∼20-fold, respectively) and P. vivipara (122-fold and 739-fold, respectively), after 24-hrs exposure to 1 μM of the synthetic cyp1A inducer β-naphthoflavone (BNF). After 24 hs of injection with 1 μg.g-1 of the environmental carcinogenic contaminant benzo[a]pyrene (BaP), a decreased total antioxidant capacity against peroxyl radicals was observed both in liver of J. multidentata and gills of P. vivipara. BaP injection in both fishes did not cause changes in lipid peroxides (TBARS) levels, suggesting an absence of an oxidative stress situation caused by BaP injection in this study. The newly identified cyp1As would serve as general biomarkers of exposure to organic contaminant in future studies using P. vivipara and J. multidentata. The results also points out to the important species-specific differences in the biomarker responses in those South American cyprinodontiform fishes, which would suggests distinct resistance/susceptibility to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons. PMID:22852852

  14. Bisphenol A sorption by organo-montmorillonite: implications for the removal of organic contaminants from water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yuri; Sun, Zhiming; Ayoko, Godwin A; Frost, Ray L

    2014-07-01

    Remediation of bisphenol A (BPA) from aqueous solutions by adsorption using organoclays synthesized from montmorillonite (MMT) with different types of organic surfactant molecules was demonstrated. High adsorption capacities of the organoclays for the uptake of BPA were observed and these demonstrated their potential application as strong adsorbents for noxious organic water contaminants. The adsorption of BPA was significantly influenced by pH, with increased adsorption of BPA in acidic pH range. However, the organoclays intercalated with highly loaded surfactants and/or large surfactant molecules were less influenced by the pH of the environment and this was thought to be due to the shielding the negative charge from surfactant molecules and the development of more positive charge on the clay surface, which leads to the attraction of anionic BPA even at alkaline pH. The hydrophobic phase created by loaded surfactant molecules contributed to a partitioning phase, interacting with BPA molecules strongly through hydrophobic interaction. Pseudo-second order kinetic model and Langmuir isotherm provided the best fit for the adsorption of BPA onto the organoclays. In addition, the adsorption process was spontaneous and exothermic with lower temperature facilitating the adsorption of BPA onto the organoclays. The described process provides a potential pathway for the removal of BPA from contaminated waters. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. The status of soil contamination by semivolatile organic chemicals (SVOCs) in China: A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai Quanying [College of Resources and Environment, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China)], E-mail: cai_quanying@yahoo.com; Mo Cehui [Department of Environmental Engineering, Jinan University, Guangzhou 510632 (China)], E-mail: tchmo@jnu.edu.cn; Wu Qitang [College of Resources and Environment, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China); Katsoyiannis, Athanasios [European Commission, Joint Research Centre, Institute for Health and Consumer Protection (IHCP), Physical and Chemical Exposure Unit, Ispra (Vatican City State, Holy See,), TP-281, Via E. Fermi 1, I-21020 (Italy)], E-mail: athanasios.katsogiannis@jrc.it; Zeng Qiaoyun [College of Resources and Environment, South China Agricultural University, Guangzhou 510642 (China)

    2008-01-25

    This paper summarizes the published scientific data on the soil contamination by semivolatile organic chemicals (SVOCs) in China. Data has been found for more than 150 organic compounds which were grouped into six classes, namely, polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and phthalic acid esters (PAEs). An overview of data collected from the literature is presented in this paper. The Chinese regulation and/or other maximum acceptable values for SVOCs were used for the characterization of soils. In general, the compounds that are mostly studied in Chinese soils are OCPs, PAHs and PCBs. According to the studies reviewed here, the most abundant compounds were PAEs and PAHs (up to 46 and 28 mg kg{sup -1} dry weight, respectively); PCBs and OCPs occurred generally at concentrations lower than 100 {mu}g kg{sup -1} dry weight. Nevertheless, quite high concentrations of PCDD/Fs, PCBs and PBDEs were observed in contaminated sites (e.g., the sites affected by electronic waste activities). The average concentrations of PAHs and OCPs in soils of North China were higher than those in South China. The principal component analysis demonstrated different distribution patterns for PAH, PCB and PCDD/F congeners and for the various sites/regions examined. The isomer ratios of DDTs and hexachlorocyclohexanes (HCHs) indicated different sources and residue levels in soils. Finally, this review has highlighted several areas where further research is considered necessary.

  16. Occurrence of Organic Contaminants in Lower Reaches of River Ganges, India

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta Gupta, S.; Bhattacharya, A.; Mukherjee, A.; Bhattacharya, J.

    2016-12-01

    The Gangetic plain of eastern India has been long known as the "bread basket" of the Indian subcontinent. However, indiscriminate use of pesticides in the agricultural fields is to increase crop production. These resulted to increased vulnerability of pesticide pollution of the hydrological systems of the area, potentially exposing to significant human health consequences. Our present study delineate pesticides occurrence in lower Ganges in West Bengal. The major organic contaminants regularly detected in the studied reaches of the Ganges belong to wide range of herbicides and insecticides, which especially include organochlorides and organophosphates such as Aldrin, Alachlor, Lindane, Malathion, Chlorpyrifos and Methyl parathion. Results show Alachlor and Malathion were the most abundant organic contaminant in the river. Among the other pesticides, one of the most venomous substances, Malathion has been noticed from the last year insecticide screening study. The mean concentration of river water Malathion was found to be 5 times higher than the maximum concentration limit (MCL). Presence of Malathion or its derivative Malaoxon in river water is suspected to be caused by agricultural run-off and it showed a good correlation with river water chlorine concentrations.

  17. Biodegradation of brominated and organophosphorus flame retardants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Waaijers, S.L.; Parsons, J.R.

    2016-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants account for about 21% of the total production of flame retardants and many of these have been identified as persistent, bioaccumulative and toxic. Nevertheless, debromination of these chemicals under anaerobic conditions is well established, although this can increase

  18. Bromination of selected pharmaceuticals in water matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benitez, F Javier; Acero, Juan L; Real, Francisco J; Roldan, Gloria; Casas, Francisco

    2011-11-01

    The bromination of five selected pharmaceuticals (metoprolol, naproxen, amoxicillin, phenacetin, and hydrochlorothiazide) was studied with these compounds individually dissolved in ultra-pure water. The apparent rate constants for the bromination reaction were determined as a function of the pH, obtaining the sequence amoxicillin>naproxen>hydrochlorothiazide≈phenacetin≈metoprolol. A kinetic mechanism specifying the dissociation reactions and the species formed for each compound according to its pK(a) value and the pH allowed the intrinsic rate constants to be determined for each elementary reaction. There was fairly good agreement between the experimental and calculated values of the apparent rate constants, confirming the goodness of the proposed reaction mechanism. In a second stage, the bromination of the selected pharmaceuticals simultaneously dissolved in three water matrices (a groundwater, a surface water from a public reservoir, and a secondary effluent from a WWTP) was investigated. The pharmaceutical elimination trend agreed with the previously determined rate constants. The influence of the main operating conditions (pH, initial bromine dose, and characteristics of the water matrix) on the degradation of the pharmaceuticals was established. An elimination concentration profile for each pharmaceutical in the water matrices was proposed based on the use of the previously evaluated apparent rate constants, and the theoretical results agreed satisfactorily with experiment. Finally, chlorination experiments performed in the presence of bromide showed that low bromide concentrations slightly accelerate the oxidation of the selected pharmaceuticals during chlorine disinfection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Bromocontryphan: post-translational bromination of tryptophan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jimenez, E C; Craig, A G; Watkins, M; Hillyard, D R; Gray, W R; Gulyas, J; Rivier, J E; Cruz, L J; Olivera, B M

    1997-02-04

    We demonstrate that post-translational bromination of a tryptophan residue occurs in the biologically active octapeptide bromocontryphan, purified and characterized from Conus radiatus venom. Clones encoding bromocontryphan were identified from a cDNA library made from C. radiatus venom ducts. The mRNA sequence obtained predicts a prepropeptide which has the mature peptide sequence at the C-terminal end, with the L-6-bromotryptophan residue encoded by UGG, the Trp codon. These data provide the first direct evidence for post-translational bromination of a polypeptide which is translated through the normal cellular machinery. In addition to bromination, the peptide, which induces a "stiff tail" syndrome in mice, has several other modifications as shown by the sequence [Formula: See Text] in which Hyp = hydroxyproline. Asterisks indicate post-translational modifications (left to right): proteolytic cleavage at the N-terminus; hydroxylation of Pro3; epimerization of Trp4; bromination of Trp7, and C-terminal amidation. Bromocontryphan appears to have the highest density of post-translational modifications known among gene-encoded polypeptides. The overall result is a molecule which closely resembles marine natural products produced through specialized biosynthetic pathways comprising many enzyme-catalyzed steps.

  20. Structure and functionality of bromine doped graphite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamdan, Rashid; Kemper, A F; Cao, Chao; Cheng, H P

    2013-04-28

    First-principles calculations are used to study the enhanced in-plane conductivity observed experimentally in Br-doped graphite, and to study the effect of external stress on the structure and functionality of such systems. The model used in the numerical calculations is that of stage two doped graphite. The band structure near the Fermi surface of the doped systems with different bromine concentrations is compared to that of pure graphite, and the charge transfer between carbon and bromine atoms is analyzed to understand the conductivity change along different high symmetry directions. Our calculations show that, for large interlayer separation between doped graphite layers, bromine is stable in the molecular form (Br2). However, with increased compression (decreased layer-layer separation) Br2 molecules tend to dissociate. While in both forms, bromine is an electron acceptor. The charge exchange between the graphite layers and Br atoms is higher than that with Br2 molecules. Electron transfer to the Br atoms increases the number of hole carriers in the graphite sheets, resulting in an increase of conductivity.

  1. Application of compost for effective bioremediation of organic contaminants and pollutants in soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kästner, Matthias; Miltner, Anja

    2016-04-01

    Soils contaminated with hazardous chemicals worldwide are awaiting remediation activities; bioremediation is often considered as a cost-effective remediation approach. Potential bioapproaches are biostimulation, e.g. by addition of nutrients, fertiliser and organic substrates, and bioaugmentation by addition of compound-degrading microbes or of organic amendments containing active microorganisms, e.g. activated sludge or compost. In most contaminated soils, the abundance of the intrinsic metabolic potential is too low to be improved by biostimulation alone, since the physical and chemical conditions in these soils are not conducive to biodegradation. In the last few decades, compost or farmyard manure addition as well as composting with various organic supplements have been found to be very efficient for soil bioremediation. In the present minireview, we provide an overview of the composting and compost addition approaches as 'stimulants' of natural attenuation. Laboratory degradation experiments are often biased either by not considering the abiotic factors or by focusing solely on the elimination of the chemicals without taking the biotic factors and processes into account. Therefore, we first systemise the concepts of composting and compost addition, then summarise the relevant physical, chemical and biotic factors and mechanisms for improved contaminant degradation triggered by compost addition. These factors and mechanisms are of particular interest, since they are more relevant and easier to determine than the composition of the degrading community, which is also addressed in this review. Due to the mostly empirical knowledge and the nonstandardised biowaste or compost materials, the field use of these approaches is highly challenging, but also promising. Based on the huge metabolic diversity of microorganisms developing during the composting processes, a highly complex metabolic diversity is established as a 'metabolic memory' within developing and mature

  2. Environmental contamination and transmission of Ascaris suum in Danish organic pig farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katakam, Kiran K; Thamsborg, Stig M; Dalsgaard, Anders; Kyvsgaard, Niels C; Mejer, Helena

    2016-02-09

    Although Ascaris suum is the most common pig nematode, the on-farm transmission dynamics are not well described. We performed a 1-year field study on five organic pig farms, mapping egg contamination levels in pens and pasture soil as well as faecal egg counts in starter pigs, finisher pigs, dry and lactating sows. The uppermost bedding material was sampled from three pen areas (resting, intermediate and latrine) of shallow and deep litter pens. Ascaris suum was found on all farms. Averaged across farm and season, the prevalence of A. suum was 48, 64, 28 and 15% in starters, finishers, dry and lactating sows, respectively. For starters and finishers, the prevalence varied with season increasing towards the end of the year when 83-96% of finishing pigs from each farm had fresh liver white spots. Farrowing pastures were contaminated with a mean of 78-171 larvated eggs/kg dry soil depending on farm, while pastures for starter pigs contained 290-5397 larvated eggs/kg dry soil. The concentration of eggs in soil was highest in the autumn. Indoors, all pen areas were contaminated with A. suum eggs at comparable levels for shallow and deep litter. Overall there were 106, 445 and 1331 eggs/g dry straw in the resting, intermediate and latrine areas, respectively. However, more eggs were undergoing development in resting areas (44%) compared to intermediate (33%) and latrine areas (13%). Irrespective of area, more eggs were undergoing development in the autumn, but overall there were very few fully developed (i.e., infective) eggs in the bedding material. Laboratory embryonation of eggs from the bedding material nevertheless revealed that an overall mean of 79% of the eggs were viable. The organic pigs of all ages were continuously exposed to A. suum, but mainly younger animals were infected. Deep litter appeared to be a less important source of A. suum eggs than previously believed compared to shallow litter. Long-term pasture rotation to eliminate pasture contamination was

  3. Campylobacter contamination and the relative risk of illness from organic broiler meat in comparison with conventional broiler meat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rosenquist, Hanne; Boysen, Louise; Krogh, Anne Louise

    2013-01-01

    Danish organic broiler meat, represented by carcasses sampled at the end of processing after chilling, was more frequently contaminated with thermotolerant Campylobacter spp. than conventional broiler carcasses; the yearly mean prevalence being 54.2% (CI: 40.9-67.5) for organic and 19.7% (CI: 14....

  4. Organic Contaminants and Treatment Chemicals in Steam-Water Cycles : Thermal stability, decomposition products and flow-accelerated corrosion

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moed, D.H.

    2015-01-01

    Boiler feedwater and steam have to be of high purity, because of the susceptibility of the steam-water cycle to corrosion. Organic contaminants break down in boilers by hydrothermolysis, leading to the formation of organic acid anions, which are suspected to cause corrosion of steam-water cycle

  5. Plant-microbe interactions as drivers of ecosystem functions relevant for the biodegradation of organic contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fester, Thomas; Giebler, Julia; Wick, Lukas Y; Schlosser, Dietmar; Kästner, Matthias

    2014-06-01

    The plant organism and associated microbial communities can be seen as a sunlight driven hotspot for the turnover of organic chemicals. In such environments the fate of a chemical will not only depend on its intrinsic structural stability toward (bio-)chemical reactions and its bioavailability but also on the functional effectiveness and stability of natural microbial communities as main drivers of natural attenuation of chemicals. Recent research demonstrates that interactions between plants and microorganisms are crucial for the biotransformation of organic chemicals, for various processes affecting the bioavailability of such compounds, and for the stability of the affected ecosystem. Practical bioremediation approaches, therefore, should encompass integrated measures targeting functional vegetation as well as functional microbial communities. Good examples for a successful practical approach are constructed wetlands, where an artificial, simplified ecosystem is used for the detoxification of organic contaminants. While such systems have considerable practical success, they are often treated as a black box and a sound mechanistic understanding of functional resilience and of the 'reactive power' of such plant-microbe ecosystems is poor. This situation has to change, if progress in the application of bioremediation is to be made. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Influence of dissimilatory metal reduction on fate of organic and metal contaminants in the subsurface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovley, Derek R.; Anderson, Robert T.

    Dissimilatory Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms have the ability to destroy organic contaminants under anaerobic conditions by oxidizing them to carbon dioxide. Some Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can also reductively dechlorinate chlorinated contaminants. Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can reduce a variety of contaminant metals and convert them from soluble forms to forms that are likely to be immobilized in the subsurface. Studies in petroleum-contaminated aquifers have demonstrated that Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can be effective agents in removing aromatic hydrocarbons from groundwater under anaerobic conditions. Laboratory studies have demonstrated the potential for Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms to remove uranium from contaminated groundwaters. The activity of Fe(III)-reducing microorganisms can be stimulated in several ways to enhance organic contaminant oxidation and metal reduction. Molecular analyses in both field and laboratory studies have demonstrated that microorganisms of the genus Geobacter become dominant members of the microbial community when Fe(III)-reducing conditions develop as the result of organic contamination, or when Fe(III) reduction is artificially stimulated. These results suggest that further understanding of the ecophysiology of Geobacter species would aid in better prediction of the natural attenuation of organic contaminants under anaerobic conditions and in the design of strategies for the bioremediation of subsurface metal contamination. Des micro-organismes simulant la réduction du fer ont la capacité de détruire des polluants organiques dans des conditions anérobies en les oxydant en dioxyde de carbone. Certains micro-organismes réducteurs de fer peuvent aussi dé-chlorer par réduction des polluants chlorés. Des micro-organismes réducteurs de fer peuvent réduire tout un ensemble de métaux polluants et les faire passer de formes solubles à des formes qui sont susceptibles d'être immobilisées dans le milieu

  7. Contaminant immobilization and nutrient release by biochar soil amendment: roles of natural organic matter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchimiya, Minori; Lima, Isabel M; Klasson, K Thomas; Wartelle, Lynda H

    2010-08-01

    Contamination of soil interstitial waters by labile heavy metals such as Cu(II), Cd(II), and Ni(II) is of worldwide concern. Carbonaceous materials such as char and activated carbon have received considerable attention in recent years as soil amendment for both sequestering heavy metal contaminants and releasing essential nutrients like sulfur. Information is currently lacking in how aging impacts the integrity of biochars as soil amendment for both agricultural and environmental remediation purposes. Major contributors to biochar aging in soils are: sorption of environmental constituents, especially natural organic matter (NOM), and oxidation. To investigate the impact of NOM and organic fractions of chars, we employed broiler litter-derived chars and steam-activated carbons that underwent varying degrees of carbonization, in the presence and absence of NOM having known carboxyl contents. For aging by oxidation, we employed phosphoric acid activated carbons that underwent varying degrees of oxidation during activation. The results suggest that the organic fractions of biochars, and NOM having high carboxyl contents can mobilize Cu(II) retained by alkaline soil. Base treatment of broiler litter-derived char formed at low pyrolysis temperature (350 degrees C) improved the immobilization of all heavy metals investigated, and the extent of immobilization was similar to, or slightly greater than pecan shell-derived phosphoric acid activated carbons. Portions of total sulfur were released in soluble form in soil amended with broiler litter-derived carbons, but not pecan shell-derived phosphoric acid activated carbons. (c) 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Application of isotope dilution method for measuring bioavailability of organic contaminants sorbed to dissolved organic matter (DOM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Delgado-Moreno, Laura, E-mail: laura.delgado@eez.csic.es; Wu, Laosheng; Gan, Jay

    2015-08-15

    Natural waters such as surface water and sediment porewater invariably contain dissolved organic matter (DOM). Association of strongly hydrophobic contaminants (HOCs) with DOM leads to decreased toxicity and bioavailability, but bioavailability of DOM-sorbed HOCs is difficult to measure. Current methods to estimate bioavailability of HOCs in water are based on only the freely dissolved concentration (C{sub free}). The ignorance of the exchangeable fraction of HOCs sorbed on DOM may result in an underestimation of the toxicity potential of HOCs to aquatic organisms. Here we explore the applicability of an isotope dilution method (IDM) to measuring the desorption fraction of DOM-sorbed pyrene and bifenthrin and determining their exchangeable pool (E) as an approximation of bioavailability. E values, expressed as percentage of the total concentration, ranged between 0.80 and 0.92% for pyrene and 0.74 and 0.85% for bifenthrin, depending primarily on the amount of chemical in the freely dissolved form. However, between 34 and 78% of the DOM-sorbed pyrene was exchangeable. This fraction ranged between 23% and 82% for bifenthrin. The ability of IDM to predict bioavailability was further shown from a significant relationship (r{sup 2} > 0.72, P < 0.0001) between E and bioaccumulation into Daphnia magna. Therefore, IDM may be used to improve the bioavailability measurement and risk assessment of HOCs in aquatic systems.

  9. The aquatic vascular plant Ruppia maritima as an indicator organism for contaminated sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tagliabue, M.D.; Thursby, G.B.; Walker, H.A. [Environmental Protection Agency, Narragansett, RI (United States); Johnston, R.K.

    1995-12-31

    An ongoing estuarine ecological risk assessment case study for the Portsmouth Naval Shipyard in the Great Bay Estuary (New Hampshire, Maine) was the catalyst to continue development a rooted aquatic plant sediment toxicity test. Laboratory studies were conducted to evaluate effects of lead, the primary site contaminant on R. maritima in the Great Bay. Although the aquatic vascular plant Zostra marina comprises up to 46% of the Great Bay subtidal habitat, R. maritima`s much smaller size makes it a more practical laboratory organism. Effects on Ruppia may offer useful insights into potential effects on Zostra or other aquatic vascular plants. Presently rooted vascular plants are not found in Clark Cove located adjacent to a landfill disposal site on the shipyard. The absence of rooted vegetation can be contributed to, physical parameters of the site (turbidity, grain size, texture) or chemical parameters (heavy metal/Pb contamination, redox potential). Exposure of bedded and nonbedded plants occurred over a four day and ten day period using lead sulfate. Concentrations for bedded exposures were as follows, 0.3, 0.5, 0.8, 1.0 simultaneously extracted metal/acid volatile sulfide (SEM/AVS) molar ratios, and 0.1, 1.0, 10.0 and 100.0mg/l Pb for water only exposures. Reduction in cumulative leaf growth was observed for the Clark Cove sediments as well as the spiked sediments as compared to reference sediments.

  10. Effects of metal-contaminated forest soils from the Canadian shield to terrestrial organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feisthauer, Natalie C; Stephenson, Gladys L; Princz, Juliska I; Scroggins, Richard P

    2006-03-01

    The effects of elevated metal concentrations in forest soils on terrestrial organisms were investigated by determining the toxicity of six site soils from northern Ontario and Quebec, Canada, using a battery of terrestrial toxicity tests. Soils were collected from three sites on each of two transects established downwind of nickel (Sudbury, ON, Canada) and copper (Rouyn-Noranda, PQ, Canada) smelting operations. Site soils were diluted to determine if toxicity estimates for the most-contaminated site soils could be quantified as a percent of site soil. Rouyn-Noranda soils were toxic following acute exposure (14 d) to plants, but not to invertebrates (7 d for collembola and 14 d for earthworms). However, Rouyn-Noranda soils were toxic to all species following chronic exposure (21, 35, and 63 d for plants, collembola, and earthworms, respectively). The toxicity of the Rouyn-Noranda site soils did not correspond to the gradient of metal concentrations in soil. Metal-contaminated Sudbury soils were toxic to plants but not to invertebrates, following acute exposure. Chronic exposure to Sudbury soils caused adverse effects to plant growth and invertebrate survival and reproduction. The toxicity of Sudbury soils corresponded to the metal concentration gradient, with one exception: The reference soil collected in October was toxic to collembola following acute and chronic exposure. This study evaluated the applicability of the new Environment Canada terrestrial toxicity test methods, developed using agricultural soils, to forest soils and also provided useful data to assess the ecological risk associated with mixtures of metals in soil.

  11. Effects of organic carbon supply rates on mobility of previously bioreduced uranium in a contaminated sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wan, J.; Tokunaga, T.K.; Kim, Y.; Brodie, E.; Daly, R.; Hazen, T.C.; Firestone, M.K.

    2008-05-15

    Bioreduction-based strategies for remediating uranium (U)-contaminated sediments face the challenge of maintaining the reduced status of U for long times. Because groundwater influxes continuously bring in oxidizing terminal electron acceptors (O{sub 2}, NO{sub 3}{sup -}), it is necessary to continue supplying organic carbon (OC) to maintain the reducing environment after U bioreduction is achieved. We tested the influence of OC supply rates on mobility of previously microbial reduced uranium U(IV) in contaminated sediments. We found that high degrees of U mobilization occurred when OC supply rates were high, and when the sediment still contained abundant Fe(III). Although 900 days with low levels of OC supply minimized U mobilization, the sediment redox potential increased with time as did extractable U(VI) fractions. Molecular analyses of total microbial activity demonstrated a positive correlation with OC supply and analyses of Geobacteraceae activity (RT-qPCR of 16S rRNA) indicated continued activity even when the effluent Fe(II) became undetectable. These data support our earlier hypothesis on the mechanism responsible for re-oxidation of microbial reduced U(IV) under reducing conditions; that microbial respiration caused increased (bi)carbonate concentrations and formation of stable uranyl carbonate complexes, thereby shifted U(IV)/U(VI) equilibrium to more reducing potentials. The data also suggested that low OC concentrations could not sustain the reducing condition of the sediment for much longer time.

  12. Simulation of nonlinear sorption of N-heterocyclic organic contaminates in soil columns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Erping; Zhang, Lunliang; Schmidt, Torsten C; Haderlein, Stefan B

    2009-06-26

    The transport of organic contaminants in porous media is frequently influenced by nonequilibrium sorption and/or nonlinear sorption. In this study, sorption of coal tar related contaminants with different sorption properties, i.e., toluene, quinoline, quinaldine, and benzotriazole, was studied in column experiments using a European reference soil and compared with batch sorption results in order to quantify the governing sorption features. The breakthrough curves (BTCs) were simulated with a versatile 1-D reactive transport model using a one-site first-order sorption approach. Some differences in fitted parameters from batch and column experiments were found and discussed in terms of different sorption mechanisms in different aqueous concentration ranges, effects of solution properties (e.g., pH) and differences in solid-to-solution ratio and accessible sorption sites. The modeling results show that the fitting results were not sensitive to mass transfer coefficients and that a local equilibrium assumption provides excellent agreement with BTCs in our designed column when Damkohler numbers were greater than 20. Nonequilibrium sorption resulting from intraparticle diffusion thus was negligible in the column experiments. Tailing of BTCs nevertheless occurred and was primarily attributed to nonlinear sorption due to specific interactions in the sorption processes rather than to sorption nonequilibrium. Our study demonstrates how column experiments with different concentrations and flow velocities can be designed to obtain reliable sorption parameters for polar solutes with nonlinear sorption isotherms from modeling.

  13. Medical costs and lost productivity from health conditions at volatile organic compound-contaminated Superfund sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lybarger, J.A.; Spengler, R.F.; Brown, D.R. [Agency for Toxic Substances and Disease Registry, Atlanta, GA (United States). Div. of Health Studies; Lee, R.; Vogt, D.P. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)]|[Joint Inst. for Energy and Environment, Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Perhac, R.M. Jr. [Univ. of Tennessee, Knoxville, TN (United States)]|[Joint Inst. for Energy and Environment, Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    1998-10-01

    This paper estimates the health costs at Superfund sites for conditions associated with volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in drinking water. Health conditions were identified from published literature and registry information as occurring at excess rates in VOC-exposed populations. These health conditions were: (1) some categories of birth defects, (2) urinary tract disorders, (3) diabetes, (4) eczema and skin conditions, (5) anemia, (6) speech and hearing impairments in children under 10 years of age, and (7) stroke. Excess rates were used to estimate the excess number of cases occurring among the total population living within one-half mile of 258 Superfund sites. These sites had evidence of completed human exposure pathways for VOCs in drinking water. For each type of medical condition, an individual`s expected medical costs, long-term care costs, and lost work time due to illness or premature mortality were estimated. Costs were calculated to be approximately $330 million per year, in the absence of any remediation or public health intervention programs. The results indicate the general magnitude of the economic burden associated with a limited number of contaminants at a portion of all Superfund sites, thus suggesting that the burden would be greater than that estimated in this study if all contaminants at all Superfund sites could be taken into account.

  14. Effects of dissolved organic matter on the co-transport of mineral colloids and sorptive contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Tao; Saiers, James E

    2015-01-01

    Colloid-facilitated transport of contaminants in the vadose zone has important implications to groundwater quality, and has received considerable attention. Natural organic matter (NOM) is ubiquitous in subsurface environments, and its influence on mineral colloids and solute transport has been well documented. However, research on the influence of NOM on colloid-facilitated transport is limited. The objective of this paper is to elucidate the effects of NOM on colloid-facilitated transport of a radioactive contaminant (Cs-137) within partially-saturated sediments. Measurements made with re-packed columns reveal that Cs-137 mobility was low when mineral colloids were absent and was unaffected by the presence of NOM. The addition of mineral colloids to influent increased Cs-137 mobility, and effluent Cs-137 was dominated by the colloid-associated form. When NOM was added to systems that contained mineral colloids and Cs-137, the mobility of Cs-137 further increased. A mathematical model simulating colloid-facilitated transport showed that NOM increases Cs-137 transport by increasing colloid mobility and reducing the rate of Cs-137 adsorption to the porous medium. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. A national reconnaissance of pharmaceuticals and other organic wastewater contaminants in the United States - I) Groundwater

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, K.K.; Kolpin, D.W.; Furlong, E.T.; Zaugg, S.D.; Meyer, M.T.; Barber, L.B.

    2008-01-01

    As part of the continuing effort to collect baseline information on the environmental occurrence of pharmaceuticals, and other organic wastewater contaminants (OWCs) in the Nation's water resources, water samples were collected from a network of 47 groundwater sites across 18 states in 2000. All samples collected were analyzed for 65 OWCs representing a wide variety of uses and origins. Site selection focused on areas suspected to be susceptible to contamination from either animal or human wastewaters (i.e. down gradient of a landfill, unsewered residential development, or animal feedlot). Thus, sites sampled were not necessarily used as a source of drinking water but provide a variety of geohydrologic environments with potential sources of OWCs. OWCs were detected in 81% of the sites sampled, with 35 of the 65 OWCs being found at least once. The most frequently detected compounds include N,N-diethyltoluamide (35%, insect repellant), bisphenol A (30%, plasticizer), tri(2-chloroethyl) phosphate (30%, fire retardant), sulfamethoxazole (23%, veterinary and human antibiotic), and 4-octylphenol monoethoxylate (19%, detergent metabolite). Although sampling procedures were intended to ensure that all groundwater samples analyzed were indicative of aquifer conditions it is possible that detections of some OWCs could have resulted from leaching of well-construction materials and/or other site-specific conditions related to well construction and materials. Future research will be needed to identify those factors that are most important in determining the occurrence and concentrations of OWCs in groundwater.

  16. Stabilization of Rocky Flats combustible residues contaminated with plutonium metal and organic solvents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bowen, S.M.; Cisneros, M.R.; Jacobson, L.L.; Schroeder, N.C.; Ames, R.L.

    1998-09-30

    This report describes tests on a proposed flowsheet designed to stabilize combustible residues that were generated at the Rocky Flats Environmental Technology Site (RFETS) during the machining of plutonium metal. Combustible residues are essentially laboratory trash contaminated with halogenated organic solvents and plutonium metal. The proposed flowsheet, designed by RFETS, follows a glovebox procedure that includes (1) the sorting and shredding of materials, (2) a low temperature thermal desorption of solvents from the combustible materials, (3) an oxidation of plutonium metal with steam, and (4) packaging of the stabilized residues. The role of Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) in this study was to determine parameters for the low temperature thermal desorption and steam oxidation steps. Thermal desorption of carbon tetrachloride (CCl{sub 4}) was examined using a heated air stream on a Rocky Flats combustible residue surrogate contaminated with CCl{sub 4}. Three types of plutonium metal were oxidized with steam in a LANL glovebox to determine the effectiveness of this procedure for residue stabilization. The results from these LANL experiments are used to recommend parameters for the proposed RFETS stabilization flowsheet.

  17. Distribution of organic contamination of sediments from Ichkeul Lake and Bizerte Lagoon, Tunisia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Salem, Fida; Ben Said, Olfa; Mahmoudi, Ezzeddine; Duran, Robert; Monperrus, Mathilde

    2017-09-14

    Analyses of organochlorine pesticides (OCPs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and butyl tins (BuSn) were conducted on sediments from Ichkeul Lake-Bizerte Lagoon watershed (Tunisia). A total of 59 compounds (16 PAHs, 12 PCBs, 22 OCPs and 9 BuSn) were measured in 40 surface sediment samples collected during two campaigns. High concentrations of total PAHs were identified in the lagoon ranging from 122 to 19600ng·g(-1). Several OCPs, including endrin, dieldrin, and lindane (Hexachlorocyclohexane or HCH or BHC) were found in high concentrations in Ichkeul Lake, ranging from 28 to 2012ngg(-1). PAHs and OCPs varied seasonally, in response to the complex hydrology of the watershed. The concentrations of total PCBs ranged between 0.04 and 10.653ngg(-1) and suggests low total PCBs sediment contamination, when compared to most international criteria. Total BuSn concentrations range between 67 and 526ng·g(-1), which are relatively low when compared to most international criteria and ecological risk assessments. This is the first study of organic contamination in Ichkeul Lake (RAMSAR and UNESCO World Heritage site). Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  18. Airborne fungal volatile organic compounds in rural and urban dwellings: detection of mould contamination in 94 homes determined by visual inspection and airborne fungal volatile organic compounds method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moularat, Stéphane; Hulin, Marion; Robine, Enric; Annesi-Maesano, Isabella; Caillaud, Denis

    2011-05-01

    Moulds can both degrade the materials and structures they colonise and contribute to the appearance of symptoms and diseases in the inhabitants of contaminated dwellings. Only few data have compared the levels of contamination in urban and rural environments and the results are not consistent. The aim of this study was to use a fungal contamination index, based on the detection of specific Microbial Volatile Organic Compounds (MVOC), to determine the exposure to moulds of individuals living in urban and rural dwellings. For this purpose, 94 dwellings (47 in an urban setting in Clermont-Ferrand and 47 in rural areas of the Auvergne region, France) were studied. By demonstrating marked disparities between the proportion of visible contamination (19%) and that of active, visible and/or hidden contamination (59%) and the fact that almost all visible contamination was identified by MVOC, we were able to show that use of the index seemed relevant to confirm the actual presence of fungal contamination in a dwelling. Furthermore, it was possible to demonstrate a relationship between moulds and the presence of water on surfaces (condensation, infiltrations, water damage, etc.). A higher proportion of positive fungal contamination index in rural homes was observed compared to the proportion in urban ones (68% versus 49%; p<0.05). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Critical review of the analysis of brominated flame retardants and their environmental levels in Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brits, Martin; de Vos, Jayne; Weiss, Jana M; Rohwer, Egmont R; de Boer, Jacob

    2016-12-01

    World-wide, the prevalence of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) is well documented for routine analysis of environmental and biological matrices. There is, however, limited information on these compounds in the African environment and insufficient information on the analytical approaches used to obtain data. This paper presents a review on BFR levels in the African environment and the various analytical methodologies specifically applied in Africa for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polybrominated biphenyls and alternative-BFRs. The analyses include liquid sample preparation using liquid-liquid and solid phase extraction and solid sample preparation involving Soxhlet extraction, with ultrasound-assisted extraction increasingly being applied. Instrumental detection techniques were limited to gas chromatography coupled with electron capture detector and electron impact ionisation with single quadrupole mass spectrometers. Information on congener profile prevalence in indoor dust, soil, aquatic environment (water, sediment, and aquatic organisms), eggs, wastewater treatment plant compartments, landfills (leachate and sediment) and breast milk are presented. Although PBDEs were inconsistently detected, contamination was reported for all investigated matrices in the African environment. The manifestation in remote regions indicates the ubiquitous prevalence and long-range transport of these compounds. Levels in sediment, and breast milk from some African countries were higher than reported for Asia and Europe. Due to limited data or non-detection of alternative-BFRs, it is unclear whether banned formulations were replaced in Africa. Most of the data reported for BFR levels in Africa were obtained in non-African laboratories or in South Africa and formed the basis for our discussion of reported contamination levels and related methodologies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Contribution of very short-lived substances to stratospheric bromine loading: uncertainties and constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Aschmann

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Very short-lived substances (VSLS still represent a major factor of uncertainty in the quantification of stratospheric bromine loading. One of the major obstacles for short-lived source gases in contributing to the stratosphere is generally thought to be loss of inorganic bromine (Bry in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL due to dehydration. We use sensitivity calculations with a three-dimensional chemistry transport model comprising a consistent parametrization of convective transport and a comprehensive chemistry scheme to investigate the associated processes. The model considers the two most important bromine VSLS, bromoform (CHBr3 and dibromomethane (CH2Br2. The organic bromine source gases as well as the resulting profile of inorganic bromine in the model are consistent with available observations. In contrast to its organic precursors, Bry is assumed to have a significant sorption capacity regarding sedimenting liquid or frozen particles thus the fraction of intact source gases during their ascent through the TTL is a critical factor. We find that source gas injection is the dominant pathway into the stratosphere, about 50% of CHBr3 and 94% of CH2Br2 is able to overcome the cold point tropopause at approximately 17 km altitude, modulated by the interannual variability of the vertical transport efficiency. In fact, our sensitivity calculations indicate that the extent of source gas injection of CHBr3 is highly sensitive to the strength of convection and large-scale ascent; in contrast, modifying the photolysis or the destruction via OH yields a significantly smaller response. In principle, the same applies as well to CH2Br2, though it is considerably less responsive due to its longer lifetime. The next important aspect we identified is that the partitioning of available Bry from short-lived sources is clearly

  1. Reclamation of a mine contaminated soil using biologically reactive organic matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarenga, Paula; Gonçalves, Ana Paula; Fernandes, Rosa Maria; de Varennes, Amarillas; Duarte, Elizabeth; Cunha-Queda, Ana Cristina; Vallini, Giovanni

    2009-03-01

    Organic residues such as sewage sludge, biowastes and composts are increasingly used in land rehabilitation because they can improve the physical, chemical and biochemical properties of soil, and reduce the need for inorganic fertilization. Furthermore, their use contributes to an integrated approach to waste management by promoting recycling of nutrients and minimizing final disposal, especially of organic residues that, due to their composition, can pose problems to agricultural soils. In the present study, three different types of organic residues were considered as amendments to be used in the reclamation of a metal-contaminated mine soil from the Aljustrel mining area (a pyrite mine located in the SW Portugal in the Iberian Pyrite Belt), with high Cu, Pb and Zn total contents: sewage sludge from a municipal wastewater treatment plant (SS), compost from the organic fraction of unsorted municipal solid waste (MSWC), and garden waste compost (GWC), applied at 100 and 200 Mg ha(-1) . The soil and mixtures of soil and amendments were adjusted to 70% of the maximum water-holding capacity determined for each type of sample and incubated in a controlled-temperature room at 20 +/- 1 degrees C. Sub-samples were taken prior to wetting (time zero), and after 7, 14, 21 and 28 days of incubation, and analysed for pH, electrical conductivity, organic matter content, effectively bioavailable Cu, Zn and Pb (extracted with 0.01 mol L(- 1) calcium chloride) and potentially bioavailable metals (extracted with 0.5 mol L(-1) ammonium acetate, 0.5 mol L( -1) acetic acid and 0.01 mol L(- 1) EDTA, pH 4.7). In general, organic residues corrected soil acidity, and increased the total organic matter content of the soil. The SS and the MSWC amendments were roughly equivalent in their ability to correct soil acidity whereas the GWC had the smallest liming capacity and only with 200 Mg ha(-1) GWC did the soil pH reach acceptable values. As expected, all the tested organic residues, at both

  2. Permeable sorptive walls for treatment of hydrophobic organic contaminant plumes in groundwater

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grathwohl, P.; Peschik, G. [Univ. of Tuebingen (Germany)

    1997-12-31

    Highly hydrophobic contaminants are easily adsorbed from aqueous solutions. Since for many of these compounds sorption increases with increasing organic carbon content natural materials such as bituminous shales and coals may be used in permeable sorptive walls. This, however, only applies if sorption is at equilibrium, which may not always be the case in groundwater treatment using a funnel-and-gate system. In contrast to the natural solids, granular activated carbons (GACs) have very high sorption capacities and reasonably fast sorption kinetics. The laboratory results show that application of GACs (e.g. F100) is economically feasible for in situ removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) from groundwater at a former manufactured gas plant site (MGP). For less sorbing compounds (such as benzene, toluene, xylenes) a combination of adsorption and biodegradation is necessary (i.e. sorptive + reactive treatment).

  3. Preliminary assessment of contaminants in the sediment and organisms of the Swartkops Estuary, South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nel, L; Strydom, N A; Bouwman, H

    2015-12-30

    Urban estuaries are susceptible to metal and organic pollution, yet most remain understudied in South Africa with respect to the presence, concentrations and distribution of contaminants. Metal and organic chemical concentrations were assessed in sediment and organisms from different trophic levels in the lower reaches of the Swartkops Estuary. Species sampled included Upogebia africana (Malacostraca: Upogebiidae), Gilchristella aestuaria (Clupeidae), Psammogobius knysnaensis (Gobiidae), Mugil cephalus (Mugilidae), Lichia amia (Carangidae), Argyrosomus japonicus (Sciaenidae), Pomadasys commersonnii (Haemulidae) and Larus dominicanus (Avis: Laridae). This study is one of the most comprehensive studies to date assessing pollution levels in a food web in estuaries in South Africa. Due to biomagnification, higher concentrations of Arsenic, Lead, Mercury and Cadmium were found in the juveniles stages of popular angling fishes. High concentrations of Cadmium and Arsenic were recorded in the liver of L. amia, A. japonicus and P. commersonnii which exceed international quality food guidelines. Eggs from the gull, L. dominicanus, showed detectable concentrations of PCBs. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The influence of biomass on the toxicity of hydrophobic organic contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, A D; Nipper, M

    2008-02-01

    Hydrophobic organic contaminants (HOCs) enter the marine environment through several means, including industrial, urban, and agricultural runoff, and accumulate in sediments. Methods for measurement of sediment toxicity include porewater tests using sea urchin (Arbacia punctulata) fertilization and embryological development assessments. Previous studies investigating sediments from Boston Harbor determined that significant binding of contaminants to organic matter led to insufficient evidence of the bioavailability of HOCs in porewater toxicity tests. It was hypothesized that excessive biomass in testing systems prevents a critical body residue of HOCs from forming, thus curbing toxic effects. In this study, the effect of biomass on the toxicity of phenanthrene (a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon) and lindane (an organochlorine pesticide) were assessed individually and combined in a mixture. The fertilization toxicity test for phenanthrene and mixture solutions containing both compounds revealed less biomass in the test vial caused higher toxicity levels, the fact of which was enhanced with increased hydrophobicity. The 50% inhibition concentration (IC(50)) of phenanthrene to sea urchin fertilization success in test vials with 50 eggs/mL (lowest biomass concentration tested) was 3.72 micromol/L, but in vials with 100 to 400 eggs/mL, the IC(50) was >4.12 micromol/L. Toxicity of several concentrations of the phenanthrene and lindane mixture to sea urchin fertilization success and embryological development was significantly higher at lower biomasses (50 and 100 eggs or embryos/mL) than with biomasses > or =200 eggs or embryos/mL. The results suggest that when testing environmental samples that may contain HOCs, lowering the biomass can help better estimate sediment toxicity using porewater tests.

  5. A contribution to reduce sampling variability in the evaluation of deoxynivalenol contamination of organic wheat grain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallier, Arnaud; Celette, Florian; Coutarel, Julie; David, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Fusarium head blight caused by different varieties of Fusarium species is one of the major serious worldwide diseases found in wheat production. It is therefore important to be able to quantify the deoxynivalenol concentration in wheat. Unfortunately, in mycotoxin quantification, due to the uneven distribution of mycotoxins within the initial lot, it is difficult, or even impossible, to obtain a truly representative analytical sample. In previous work we showed that the sampling step most responsible for variability was grain sampling. In this paper, it is more particularly the step scaling down from a laboratory sample of some kilograms to an analytical sample of a few grams that is investigated. The naturally contaminated wheat lot was obtained from an organic field located in the southeast of France (Rhône-Alpes) from the year 2008-2009 cropping season. The deoxynivalenol level was found to be 50.6 ± 2.3 ng g⁻¹. Deoxynivalenol was extracted with a acetonitrile-water mix and quantified by gas chromatography-electron capture detection (GC-ECD). Three different grain sampling techniques were tested to obtain analytical samples: a technique based on manually homogenisation and division, a second technique based on the use of a rotating shaker and a third on the use of compressed air. Both the rotating shaker and the compressed air techniques enabled a homogeneous laboratory sample to be obtained, from which representative analytical samples could be taken. Moreover, the techniques did away with many repetitions and grinding. This study, therefore, contributes to sampling variability reduction in the evaluation of deoxynivalenol contamination of organic wheat grain, and then, at a reasonable cost.

  6. 3D resistivity method to monitor degradation of an organic contaminant in sand boxes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, P. M.; Bloem, E.; Philippe, R.; French, H. K.

    2015-12-01

    Degradation of organic chemicals under various saturation conditions is a process highly relevant to protect groundwater. The redox potential drives the degradation of organic compounds. Its variation affects the water chemistry, gas release and responses of the geo-electrical signature. This study explores how non-invasive measurements sensitive to geo-electrical properties provides quantitative information about the in-situ redox situation. During this presentation, the preliminary results of a laboratory experiment to study the degradation of deicing chemicals with 3D resistivity and self-potential techniques, water samples will be shown. The experiment consists of sand boxes (1.0x0.5x0.4 m) to which both sides of each box is contaminated with propylene glycol, an aircraft deicing fluid, commonly used in Norwegian airports. Each source is placed near the water table with static conditions. At one side a conductor is placed, linking the contamination zone at the water table and the unsaturated zone with a low water content, to improve the degradation by facilitating the electron exchange. At the other side, degradation occurs under natural conditions. Each box is equipped with 288 electrodes, distributed on six faces to perform 3D resistivity measurements. In addition to the resistivity, self-potential measurements are taken from the sand surface. Six water wells are installed above and below the water table to provide more information on the degradation processes. Moreover, measurements of carbon dioxide on the surface are performed as higher concentrations are expected where the pollutant is degraded.

  7. Non-invasive monitoring of the degradation of organic contaminants: A laboratory investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Perrine M.; Bloem, Esther; Philippe, Romain; Binley, Andrew; French, Helen K.

    2016-04-01

    Degradation of organic chemicals under various fluid saturation conditions is a process highly relevant to the protection of groundwater quality. Redox potential drives the degradation of organic compounds; its variation affects the water chemistry, gas release and also the geo-electrical signature. This study explores how non-invasive measurements sensitive to geo-electrical properties provides quantitative information about the in-situ redox conditions. Our laboratory experiment focuses on the degradation of de-icing chemicals commonly used, for example, in Norwegian airports. The experiment was conducted in a number of (1.0x0.5x0.4 m) sand boxes. Two ends of each box was contaminated with propylene glycol, an aircraft deicing fluid. Each source was placed near the water table under static hydraulic conditions. At one side of the tank, a conductor linking the contamination zone, near the water table and the unsaturated zone with a low water content, was placed to improve the degradation by facilitating the electron exchange. At the other side, degradation occurred under natural conditions. Each box was equipped with 288 electrodes, distributed on six faces to perform 3D resistivity measurements. In addition, self-potential measurements were taken from electrodes on the sand surface. Four observation wells were installed above and below the water table to provide more information on the degradation processes. Moreover, measurements of carbon dioxide on the surface were performed as higher concentrations were expected where the pollutant degraded. We would like to present and discuss a selection of the preliminary results of 3D electrical resistivity and self-potential techniques from our laboratory setup.

  8. Monitoring priority substances, other organic contaminants and heavy metals in a volcanic aquifer from different sources and hydrological processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estevez, Esmeralda; Cabrera, María del Carmen; Fernández-Vera, Juan Ramón; Molina-Díaz, Antonio; Robles-Molina, José; Palacios-Díaz, María del Pino

    2016-05-01

    Irrigation with reclaimed water (R) is necessary to guarantee the sustainability of semi-arid areas. Results obtained during a two years monitoring network (2009-2011) in Gran Canaria are presented, including the analysis of chemical parameters, N and S isotopes, priority substances (2008/105/EC, 2013/39/EU), other organic contaminants and heavy metals in groundwater and R used to irrigate a golf course. The aims of this work are to evaluate the contamination in a volcanic aquifer, relate the presence of organic contaminants and heavy metals with the hydrogeochemistry and identify pollution sources in the area. No priority substance exceeded the EU thresholds for surface water, although seventeen were detected in R. The most frequent compounds were hexachlorobenzene, chlorpyrifos ethyl, fluorene, phenanthrene and pyrene. These compounds were detected at low concentration, except chlorpyrifos. Chlorpyrifos ethyl, terbuthylazine, diuron, terbutryn, procymidone, atrazine and propazine exceeded the European threshold concentration for pesticides in groundwater (100ngL(-1)). Therefore, the priority substances chlorpyrifos ethyl and diuron must be included in monitoring studies. The priority pesticides chlorfenvinphos and diazinon were always detected in R but rarely in groundwater. Besides, the existence of contaminants not related to the current R irrigation has been identified. Absence of environmental problems related to heavy metals can be expected. The relationship among contaminant presence, hydrogeochemistry, including the stable isotopic prints of δ(18)O, δ(15)N and δ(34)S and preferential recharge paths has been described. The coastal well shows high values of EC, nitrate, a variable chemistry, and 50% of organic contaminants detected above 100ngL(-1). The well located in the recharge area presents a stable hydrochemistry, the lowest value of δ(15)N and the lowest contaminants occurrence. The area is an example of a complex volcanic media with several

  9. Recycling of plastic waste: Screening for brominated flame retardants (BFRs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivnenko, K; Granby, K; Eriksson, E; Astrup, T F

    2017-11-01

    Flame retardants are chemicals vital for reducing risks of fire and preventing human casualties and property losses. Due to the abundance, low cost and high performance of bromine, brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have had a significant share of the market for years. Physical stability on the other hand, has resulted in dispersion and accumulation of selected BFRs in the environment and receiving biota. A wide range of plastic products may contain BFRs. This affects the quality of waste plastics as secondary resource: material recycling may potentially reintroduce the BFRs into new plastic product cycles and lead to increased exposure levels, e.g. through use of plastic packaging materials. To provide quantitative and qualitative data on presence of BFRs in plastics, we analysed bromophenols (tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), dibromophenols (2,4- and 2,6-DBP) and 2,4,6-tribromophenol (2,4,6-TBP)), hexabromocyclododecane stereoisomers (α-, β-, and γ-HBCD), as well as selected polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in samples of household waste plastics, virgin and recycled plastics. A considerable number of samples contained BFRs, with highest concentrations associated with acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS, up to 26,000,000ngTBBPA/g) and polystyrene (PS, up to 330,000ng∑HBCD/g). Abundancy in low concentrations of some BFRs in plastic samples suggested either unintended addition in plastic products or degradation of higher molecular weight BFRs. The presence of currently restricted flame retardants (PBDEs and HBCD) identified in the plastic samples illustrates that circular material flows may be contaminated for extended periods. The screening clearly showed a need for improved documentation and monitoring of the presence of BFRs in plastic waste routed to recycling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. High Occurrence Rate and Contamination Level of Bacillus cereus in Organic Vegetables on Sale in Retail Markets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Young-Ji; Kim, Hong-Seok; Kim, Kwang-Yeop; Chon, Jung-Whan; Kim, Dong-Hyeon; Seo, Kun-Ho

    2016-12-01

    Organic foods have risen in popularity recently. However, the increased risk of bacterial contamination of organic foods has not been fully evaluated. In this study, 100 samples each of organic and conventional fresh vegetables (55 lettuce samples and 45 sprout samples) sold in South Korea were analyzed for aerobic bacteria, coliforms, Escherichia coli, and Bacillus cereus. Although the aerobic bacteria and coliform counts were not significantly different between the two farming types (p > 0.05), the occurrence rate of B. cereus was higher in organically cultivated vegetables compared with those grown conventionally (70% vs. 30%, respectively). The mean contamination level of B. cereus-positive organic samples was also significantly higher (1.86 log colony-forming unit [CFU]/g vs. 0.69 log CFU/g, respectively) (p < 0.05). In addition, six samples of organic vegetables were found to be contaminated with B. cereus at over 4 log CFU/g categorized as unsatisfactory according to Health Protection Agency guideline. The relatively higher occurrence rate of B. cereus in organic vegetables emphasizes the importance of implementing control measures in organic vegetable production and postharvest processing to reduce the risk of food poisoning.

  11. Campylobacter contamination and the relative risk of illness from organic broiler meat in comparison with conventional broiler meat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenquist, Hanne; Boysen, Louise; Krogh, Anne Louise; Jensen, Annette Nygaard; Nauta, Maarten

    2013-04-01

    Danish organic broiler meat, represented by carcasses sampled at the end of processing after chilling, was more frequently contaminated with thermotolerant Campylobacter spp. than conventional broiler carcasses; the yearly mean prevalence being 54.2% (CI: 40.9-67.5) for organic and 19.7% (CI: 14.8-24.7) for conventional carcasses. Campylobacter jejuni was the most frequently isolated species. The difference in prevalence was obvious in all quarters of the year. Contamination of organic and conventional broiler carcasses was more likely to occur in the warmer summer months, in this case in the third quarter, as also documented for conventional broiler flocks. When contaminated, the mean concentration of Campylobacter on neck skin samples of organic and conventional carcasses was not significantly different (P=0.428); 2.0±0.65 log 10 cfu/g and 2.1±0.93 log 10 cfu/g, respectively. Assessing the relative risk of becoming ill following exposure to Campylobacter on conventional or organic broiler meat indicated that the risk per serving from organic carcasses was 1.7 times higher than that of conventional carcasses. The higher risk of illness from organic broiler carcasses compared with conventional broiler carcasses emphasizes the importance of implementing control measures in organic broiler production. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Comparison of the removal of hydrophobic trace organic contaminants by forward osmosis and reverse osmosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ming; Nghiem, Long D; Price, William E; Elimelech, Menachem

    2012-05-15

    We compared the rejection behaviours of three hydrophobic trace organic contaminants, bisphenol A, triclosan and diclofenac, in forward osmosis (FO) and reverse osmosis (RO). Using erythritol, xylose and glucose as inert reference organic solutes and the membrane pore transport model, the mean effective pore size of a commercial cellulose-based FO membrane was estimated to be 0.74 nm. When NaCl was used as the draw solute, at the same water permeate flux of 5.4 L/m(2) h (or 1.5 μm/s), the adsorption of all three compounds to the membrane in the FO mode was consistently lower than that in the RO mode. Rejection of bisphenol A and diclofenac were higher in the FO mode compared to that in the RO mode. Because the molecular width of triclosan was larger than the estimated mean effective membrane pore size, triclosan was completely rejected by the membrane and negligent difference between the FO and RO modes could be observed. The difference in the separation behaviour of these hydrophobic trace organics in the FO (using NaCl the draw solute) and RO modes could be explained by the phenomenon of retarded forward diffusion of solutes. The reverse salt flux of NaCl hinders the pore diffusion and subsequent adsorption of the trace organic compounds within the membrane. The retarded forward diffusion effect was not observed when MgSO(4) and glucose were used as the draw solutes. The reverse flux of both MgSO(4) and glucose was negligible and thus both adsorption and rejection of BPA in the FO mode were identical to those in the RO mode. Crown Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The role of vanadium haloperoxidases in the formation of volatile brominated compounds and their impact on the environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wever, Ron; van der Horst, Michael A

    2013-09-07

    Vanadium haloperoxidases differ strongly from heme peroxidases in substrate specificity and stability and in contrast to a heme group they contain the bare metal oxide vanadate as a prosthetic group. These enzymes specifically oxidize halides in the presence of hydrogen peroxide into hypohalous acids. These reactive halogen intermediates will react rapidly and aspecifically with many organic molecules. Marine algae and diatoms containing these iodo- and bromoperoxidases produce short-lived brominated methanes (bromoform, CHBr3 and dibromomethane CH2Br2) or iodinated compounds. Some seas and oceans are supersaturated with these compounds and they form an important source of bromine to the troposphere and lower stratosphere and contribute significantly to the global budget of halogenated hydrocarbons. This perspective focuses, in particular, on the biosynthesis of these volatile compounds and the direct or indirect involvement of vanadium haloperoxidases in the production of huge amounts of bromoform and dibromomethane. Some of the global sources are discussed and from the literature a picture emerges in which oxidized brominated species generated by phytoplankton, seaweeds and cyanobacteria react with dissolved organic matter in seawater, resulting in the formation of intermediate brominated compounds. These compounds are unstable and decay via a haloform reaction to form an array of volatile brominated compounds of which bromoform is the major component followed by dibromomethane.

  14. Pathogens Contamination Level Reduction on Beef Using Organic Acids Decontamination Methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sorin Daniel DAN

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available In this study we aimed to assess the efficiency of organic acids in different concentrations regarding pathogens as Salmonella, Listeria and Escherichia on beef, which can cause food borne illness in humans. The samples were sterilized using UV radiation for 30 minutes, afterwards being contaminated with 1 ml of microbial suspension (0.5 MacFarland. We used reference bacterial strains for Salmonella Enteritidis, Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes. The samples were subjected to decontamination procedure by introducing 25mL of solution of lactic, acetic or citric acid in concentration of 1%, 2% and 3%. The results showed a reduction of initial pathogen load, ranging from 0.32 to 7.78 log CFU/g, depending on the type of acid, concentration and pathogen sensitivity. After decontamination, standardized methods have been used for the isolation of pathogenic germs. Based on statistical analysis we conclude that pathogens have a different sensitivity to the action of acid solutions, their sensitivity in ascending order being: Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella Enteritidis and Escherichia coli. Among the organic acids, the most efficient was lactic acid, followed by acetic acid and less efficient citric acid. The greatest reduction of germs was determined by the concentration of 3%.

  15. Activated carbon prepared from coffee pulp: potential adsorbent of organic contaminants in aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonçalves, Maraisa; Guerreiro, Mário César; Ramos, Paulize Honorato; de Oliveira, Luiz Carlos Alves; Sapag, Karim

    2013-01-01

    The processing of coffee beans generates large amounts of solid and liquid residues. The solid residues (pulp, husk and parchment) represent a serious environmental problem and do not have an adequate disposal mechanism. In this work, activated carbons (ACs) for adsorption of organic compounds were prepared from coffee pulp by controlled temperature at different pulp/Na2HPO4 ratios (4:1, 2:1, 5:4 and 1:1). The N2 adsorption/desorption isotherms showed ACs with high quantities of mesopores and micropores and specific surface areas of 140, 150, 450 and 440 m(2)g(-1) for AC 4:1, AC 2:1, AC 5:4 and AC 1:1, respectively. The prepared material AC 5:4 showed a higher removal capacity of the organic contaminants methylene blue (MB), direct red (DR) and phenol than did a Merck AC. The maximum capacities for this AC are approximately 150, 120 and 120 mg g(-1) for MB, DR and phenol, respectively. Thus, a good adsorbent was obtained from coffee pulp, an abundant Brazilian residue.

  16. Effect of colloids on the occurrence, distribution and photolysis of emerging organic contaminants in wastewaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Caixia; Nie, Minghua; Yang, Yi; Zhou, Junliang; Liu, Min; Baalousha, Mohammed; Lead, Jamie R

    2015-12-15

    The effect of colloids on the occurrence, phase distribution and photolysis of twenty-seven emerging organic contaminants (EOCs) was studied in domestic and livestock wastewaters (DW and LW), respectively. Filtered water (colloids was 13.5% and 14.4% in DW and LW. Most of the EOCs exhibited pseudo-first-order degradation kinetics in all water samples. Control experiments using glass and quartz reactors showed that UV light was more effective on the photolysis of most EOCs. The EOCs photolysis in the three fractions of DW and LW could be accelerated or inhibited compared to ultrapure water with the enhancement factor ranging from -0.94 to 7.33. The impact of colloids on the photolysis of EOCs depended on the compound and the source of water. The photolysis of most EOCs in permeates and filtrates was generally accelerated, while inhibited in the retentates, which could be attributed to the relatively high dissolved organic carbon contents in retentates. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Selective Extraction of Organic Contaminants from Soil Using Pressurised Liquid Extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rozita Osman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study focuses on the application of sorbents in pressurised liquid extraction (PLE cell to establish a selective extraction of a variety of organic contaminants (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs, chlorpyrifos, phenol, pentachlorophenol, and sterols from soil. The selectivity and efficiency of each sorbent depend on the properties of the material, extracting solvent, capacity factor, organic compounds of interest, and PLE operating parameters (temperature, pressure, and extraction time. Several sorbents (silica, alumina, and Florisil were evaluated and with the proper choice of solvents, polar and nonpolar compounds were successfully separated in two fractions. Nonpolar compounds (PAHs, chlorpyrifos, and pentachlorophenol were recovered in the first fraction using a polar sorbent such as Florisil or alumina, and n-hexane as eluting solvent, while more polar compounds (phenol and sterols were recovered in the second fraction using methanol. Silica (5 g was found to be effective for selective extraction with the satisfactory recoveries for all compounds (PAHs from 87.1–96.2%, chlorpyrifos 102.9%, sterols from 93.7–100.5%, phenol 91.9%, and pentachlorophenol 106.2%. The efficiency and precision of this extraction approach and the existing EPA Method 3545 were compared.

  18. Emerging organic contaminants in coastal waters: anthropogenic impact, environmental release and ecological risk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jheng-Jie; Lee, Chon-Lin; Fang, Meng-Der

    2014-08-30

    This study provides a first estimate of the sources, distribution, and risk presented by emerging organic contaminants (EOCs) in coastal waters off southwestern Taiwan. Ten illicit drugs, seven nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs), five antibiotics, two blood lipid regulators, two antiepileptic drugs, two UV filters, caffeine, atenolol, and omeprazole were analyzed by solid-phase extraction and liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-MS/MS). Thirteen EOCs were detected in coastal waters, including four NSAIDs (acetaminophen, ibuprofen, ketoprofen, and codeine), three antibiotics (ampicillin, erythromycin, and cefalexin), three illicit drugs (ketamine, pseudoephedrine, and MDMA), caffeine, carbamazepine, and gemfibrozil. The median concentrations for the 13 EOCs ranged from 1.47 ng/L to 156 ng/L. Spatial variation in concentration of the 13 EOCs suggests discharge into coastal waters via ocean outfall pipes and rivers. Codeine and ampicillin have significant pollution risk quotients (RQ>1), indicating potentially high risk to aquatic organisms in coastal waters. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Experimental investigation of concentration and stable isotopes signals during organic contaminants back diffusion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Biao; Nika, Chrysanthi-Elisabeth; Rolle, Massimo

    2017-04-01

    Back diffusion of organic contaminants is often the cause of groundwater plumes' persistence and can significantly hinder cleanup interventions [1, 2]. In this study we perform a high-resolution investigation of back diffusion in a well-controlled flow-through laboratory setup. We considered cis-dichloroethene (cis-DCE) as model contaminant and we investigated its back diffusion from an impermeable source into a permeable saturated layer, in which advection-dominated flow conditions were established. We used concentration and stable chlorine isotope measurements to investigate the plumes originated by cis-DCE back diffusion in a series of flow-through experiments, performed in porous media with different hydraulic conductivity and at different seepage velocities (i.e., 0.4, 0.8 and 1.2 m/day). A two-centimeter thick agarose gel layer was placed at the bottom of the setup to simulate the source of cis-DCE back diffusion from an impervious layer. Intensive sampling (>1000 measurements) was carried out, including the withdrawal of aqueous samples at closely spaced (1 cm) outlet ports, as well as the high-resolution sampling of the source zone (agarose gel) at the end of each experiment. The transient behavior of the plumes originated by back diffusion was investigated by sampling the outlet ports at regular intervals in the experiments, each run for a total time corresponding to 15 pore volumes. The high-resolution sampling allowed us to resolve the spatial and temporal evolution of concentration and stable isotope gradients in the flow-through setup. In particular, steep concentration and stable isotope gradients were observed at the outlet. Lateral isotope gradients corresponding to chlorine isotope fractionation up to 20‰ were induced by cis-DCE back diffusion and subsequent advection-dominated transport in all flow-through experiments. A numerical modeling approach, tracking individually all chlorine isotopologues, based on the accurate parameterization of local

  20. Hydrogen-bromine fuel cell advance component development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charleston, Joann; Reed, James

    1988-01-01

    Advanced cell component development is performed by NASA Lewis to achieve improved performance and longer life for the hydrogen-bromine fuel cells system. The state-of-the-art hydrogen-bromine system utilizes the solid polymer electrolyte (SPE) technology, similar to the SPE technology developed for the hydrogen-oxygen fuel cell system. These studies are directed at exploring the potential for this system by assessing and evaluating various types of materials for cell parts and electrode materials for Bromine-hydrogen bromine environment and fabricating experimental membrane/electrode-catalysts by chemical deposition.

  1. Occurrence of brominated disinfection byproducts in the air and water of chlorinated seawater swimming pools.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manasfi, Tarek; Temime-Roussel, Brice; Coulomb, Bruno; Vassalo, Laurent; Boudenne, Jean-Luc

    2017-05-01

    An undesirable consequence of disinfection is the formation of chemical contaminants known as disinfection byproducts (DBPs). Chronic exposure to DBPs has been linked to adverse health effects. The occurrence of DBPs in chlorinated pools filled with seawater (such as thalassotherapy pools and pools in spas) has received little attention so far. The present study evaluated the speciation and levels of disinfection byproducts in indoor swimming pools filled with seawater and treated with chlorine. Water and air samples were collected from three indoor swimming pools located in Southern France. Several classes of DBPs including trihalomethanes, haloacetic acids, haloacetonitriles, and trihaloacetaldehydes were analyzed in water. Halogenated volatile organic compounds were analyzed in air. Extractable organic halides (EOX) contents were determined using combustion/micro-coulometry system. The speciation of DBPs identified in the three pools was predominantly brominated. The mean (arithmetic) concentration of bromoform, dibromoacetic acid, tribromoacetic acid, dibromoacetonitrile and bromal hydrate in the three pools was 79.2, 72.9, 59.9, 26.9 and 10.0μg/L, respectively. By weight, HAAs represented the most abundant chemical class followed by THMs. In air, bromoform was the most abundant THM occurring at a mean concentration of 133.2μg/m(3) in the three pools. The mean EOX level was 706μgCl(-)/L for the three pools. In average, the quantified DBPs accounted for only 14% of EOX, thus 86% of EOX remained unknown. Further research is warranted to identify the unknown DBPs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  2. Horizontal and vertical structure of reactive bromine events probed by bromine monoxide MAX-DOAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. R. Simpson

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Heterogeneous photochemistry converts bromide (Br− to reactive bromine species (Br atoms and bromine monoxide, BrO that dominate Arctic springtime chemistry. This phenomenon has many impacts such as boundary-layer ozone depletion, mercury oxidation and deposition, and modification of the fate of hydrocarbon species. To study environmental controls on reactive bromine events, the BRomine, Ozone, and Mercury EXperiment (BROMEX was carried out from early March to mid-April 2012 near Barrow (Utqiaġvik, Alaska. We measured horizontal and vertical gradients in BrO with multiple-axis differential optical absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS instrumentation at three sites, two mobile and one fixed. During the campaign, a large crack in the sea ice (an open lead formed pushing one instrument package ∼ 250 km downwind from Barrow (Utqiaġvik. Convection associated with the open lead converted the BrO vertical structure from a surface-based event to a lofted event downwind of the lead influence. The column abundance of BrO downwind of the re-freezing lead was comparable to upwind amounts, indicating direct reactions on frost flowers or open seawater was not a major reactive bromine source. When these three sites were separated by ∼ 30 km length scales of unbroken sea ice, the BrO amount and vertical distributions were highly correlated for most of the time, indicating the horizontal length scales of BrO events were typically larger than ∼ 30 km in the absence of sea ice features. Although BrO amount and vertical distribution were similar between sites most of the time, rapid changes in BrO with edges significantly smaller than this ∼ 30 km length scale episodically transported between the sites, indicating BrO events were large but with sharp edge contrasts. BrO was often found in shallow layers that recycled reactive bromine via heterogeneous reactions on snowpack. Episodically, these surface-based events propagated aloft when

  3. Effect of anaerobic digestion at 35, 55 and 60°C on pharmaceuticals and organic contaminants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsson, Åsa; Kjerstadius, H.; Haghighatafshar, S.

    2014-01-01

    pharmaceuticals and organic contaminants are mentioned as emerging threats since wastewater treatment plants are not designed to degrade these substances. The aim of this study was to screen and evaluate the presence, and reduction, of pharmaceuticals and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) during anaerobic...

  4. Transfer of hydrophobic contaminants in urban runoff particles to benthic organisms estimated by an in vitro bioaccessibility test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nakajima, F.; Saito, K.; Isozaki, Y.

    2006-01-01

    An in vitro bioaccessibility test was applied for assessing the transfer of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) present in road dust, into benthic organisms living in a receiving water body. The road dust is supposed to be urban runoff particles under wet weather conditions. Sodium dodecyl su...... the exposed contaminants than the traditional organic solvent extraction method and the SDS extracted fraction is applicable to toxicity tests reflecting the digestive process....

  5. Influence of Exposure and Toxicokinetics on Measures of Aquatic Toxicity for Organic Contaminants: A Case Study Review

    OpenAIRE

    Landrum, Peter F.; Chapman, Peter M.; Neff, Jerry; Page, David S

    2012-01-01

    This theoretical and case study review of dynamic exposures of aquatic organisms to organic contaminants examines variables important for interpreting exposure and therefore toxicity. The timing and magnitude of the absorbed dose change when the dynamics of exposure change. Thus, the dose metric for interpreting toxic responses observed during such exposure conditions is generally limited to the specific experiment and cannot be extrapolated to either other experiments with different exposure...

  6. Characterization of organochlorine pesticides, brominated flame retardants and dioxin-like compounds in shellfish and eel from Fiji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lal, Vincent; Bridgen, Phil; Votadroka, Waisea; Raju, Rupantri; Aalbersberg, William

    2014-09-01

    This article gives an overview of a range of persistent organic pollutant chemical levels in shellfish (Batissa violacea and Anadara antiquata) species and eel (Gymnothorax flavimarginatus) from Fiji. As there is limited data in published literature to date, this paper reports first data on a range of persistent organic pollutants and highlights the more prominent POP chemicals present in marine biota in Fiji. A significant number of POP chemicals were detected (e.g. 17 PCDD/PCDF, 12dl-PCBs, organochlorine pesticides and brominated flame retardants), the concentrations found were generally low (e.g. parts per billion level). The low levels of contamination are indicative of a low input from long range and short-range transport as well as few local point sources. Also concentrations of POPs in eel and shellfish from Fiji are low in comparison to wild species in other regions and are within acceptable limits for POP chemicals in fish and fishery products set by the European Union. It describes also results of early studies on basic POPs levels in shellfish in several Pacific Island Countries, which generally show relatively low levels. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Boiling of simulated tap water: effect on polar brominated disinfection byproducts, halogen speciation, and cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Yang; Zhang, Xiangru; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Osiol, Jennifer; Plewa, Michael J

    2014-01-01

    Tap water typically contains numerous halogenated disinfection byproducts (DBPs) as a result of disinfection, especially of chlorination. Among halogenated DBPs, brominated ones are generally significantly more toxic than their chlorinated analogues. In this study, with the aid of ultra performance liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization-triple quadrupole mass spectrometry by setting precursor ion scans of m/z 79/81, whole spectra of polar brominated DBPs in simulated tap water samples without and with boiling were revealed. Most polar brominated DBPs were thermally unstable and their levels were substantially reduced after boiling via decarboxylation or hydrolysis; the levels of a few aromatic brominated DBPs increased after boiling through decarboxylation of their precursors. A novel adsorption unit for volatile total organic halogen was designed, which enabled the evaluation of halogen speciation and mass balances in the simulated tap water samples during boiling. After boiling for 5 min, the overall level of brominated DBPs was reduced by 62.8%, of which 39.8% was volatilized and 23.0% was converted to bromide; the overall level of chlorinated DBPs was reduced by 61.1%, of which 44.4% was volatilized and 16.7% was converted to chloride; the overall level of halogenated DBPs was reduced by 62.3%. The simulated tap water sample without boiling was cytotoxic in a chronic (72 h) exposure to mammalian cells; this cytotoxicity was reduced by 76.9% after boiling for 5 min. The reduction in cytotoxicity corresponded with the reduction in overall halogenated DBPs. Thus, boiling of tap water can be regarded as a "detoxification" process and may reduce human exposure to halogenated DBPs through tap water ingestion.

  8. Brominated flame retardants and the formation of dioxins and furans in fires and combustion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Mengmei [State key laboratory of clean energy utilisation, Institute for Thermal Power Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Buekens, Alfons [State key laboratory of clean energy utilisation, Institute for Thermal Power Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); Formerly with Chemical Engineering department, Vrije Universiteit Brussel, Brussels (Belgium); Li, Xiaodong, E-mail: lixd@zju.edu.cn [State key laboratory of clean energy utilisation, Institute for Thermal Power Engineering, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China)

    2016-03-05

    Highlights: • BFRs (PBDEs, HBCD and TBBP-A) are the main sources of PBDD/Fs in combustion process. • Precursor formation is the most relevant pathway for PBDD/Fs formation. • Adding bromine into combustion system can enhance the formation of PCDD/Fs. • Primitive recycling of e-waste produces the largest amounts of PBDD/Fs. - Abstract: The widespread use and increasing inventory of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) have caused considerable concern, as a result of BFRs emissions to the environment and of the formation of both polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PBDD/Fs) and mixed polybromochloro-dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PBCDD/Fs or PXDD/Fs). Structural similarities between PBDD/Fs and polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) suggest the existence of comparable formation pathways of both PBDD/Fs and PCDD/Fs, yet BFRs also act as specific precursors to form additional PBDD/Fs. Moreover, elementary bromine (Br{sub 2}) seems to facilitate chlorination by bromination of organics, followed by Br/Cl-exchange based on displacement through the more reactive halogen. Overall, PBDD/Fs form through three possible pathways: precursor formation, de novo formation, and dispersion of parts containing BFRs as impurities and surviving a fire or other events. The present review summarises the formation mechanisms of both brominated (PBDD/Fs) and mixed dioxins (PXDD/Fs with X = Br or Cl) from BFRs, recaps available emissions data of PBDD/Fs and mixed PXDD/Fs from controlled waste incineration, uncontrolled combustion sources and accidental fires, and identifies and analyses the effects of several local factors of influence, affecting the formation of PBDD/Fs and mixed PXDD/Fs during BFRs combustion.

  9. Further characterization of membrane proteins involved in the transport of organic anions in hepatocytes. Comparison of two different affinity labels: 4,4'-diisothiocyano-1,2-diphenylethane-2,2'-disulfonic acid and brominated taurodehydrocholic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziegler, K; Frimmer, M; Fasold, H

    1984-01-11

    4,4'-Diisothiocyano-1,2-diphenylethane-2,2'-disulfonic acid (H2DIDS) known as an irreversible inhibitor of the anion transport in red blood cells (Cabantchik, Z.I. and Rothstein, A. (1972) J. Membrane Biol. 10, 311-330) blocks also the uptake of bile acids and of some foreign substrates in isolated hepatocytes (Petzinger, E. and Frimmer, M. (1980) Arch. Toxicol. 44, 127-135). [3H]H2DIDS was used for labeling of membrane proteins probably involved in anion transport of rat liver cells. The membrane proteins modified in vitro by [3H]H2DIDS were compared with those labeled by brominated taurodehydrocholic acid. The latter is one of a series of suitable taurocholate derivatives, all able to bind to defined membrane proteins of hepatocytes and also known to block the uptake of bile acids as well as of phallotoxins and of cholecystographic agents (Ziegler, K., Frimmer, M., Möller, W. and Fasold, H. (1982) Naunyn-Schmiedeberg's Arch. Pharmacol. 319, 254-261). The radiolabeled proteins were compared after SDS-electrophoresis with and without reducing agent present, solubilization by detergents, two-dimensional electrophoresis and after separation of integral and peripheral proteins. Our results suggest that the anion transport system of liver cells cannot distinguish between bile acids and the anionic stilbene derivative (DIDS). The labeling pattern for both kinds of affinity labels was very similar. Various combinations of separation techniques gave evidence that the radiolabeled membrane proteins are not subunits of a single native channel protein.

  10. Selected trace-element and organic contaminants in the streambed sediments of the Potomac River Basin, August 1992

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerhart, James M.; Blomquist, Joel D.

    1995-01-01

    This report describes the occurrence and distribution of five selected contaminants in streambed sediments at 22 stream sites in the Potomac River Basin. Lead, mercury, and total DDT (dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane) were detected at all sites, and chlordane and total PCB's (polychlorinated biphenyls) were detected at most sites. At six sites, streambed-sediment concentrations of contaminants were detected at levels with the potential to cause frequent adverse effects on aquatic organisms that live in the sediments. Chlordane was detected at these high levels at sampling sites on the Anacostia River, the North Branch Potomac River, Bull Run, and Accotink Creek; mercury was detected at these levels at sites on the South River and the South Fork Shenandoah River; and total PCB's were detected at these levels at the site on the South Fork Shenandoah River. The highest concentrations of all five contaminants generally occurred at sampling sites downstream from areas with industrial plants, urban centers, or orchard and agricultural activity. The occurrence of these contaminants in streambed sediments of the Potomac River Basin is of concern because the contaminants (1) are environmentally persistent, (2) are available for downstream transport during high streamflow periods, and (3) have the potential to cause adverse effects on the health of aquatic organisms and humans through bioaccumulation.

  11. Contamination of an arctic terrestrial food web with marine-derived persistent organic pollutants transported by breeding seabirds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choy, Emily S., E-mail: echoy087@uottawa.c [Program for Chemical and Environmental Toxicology, Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Kimpe, Linda E., E-mail: linda.kimpe@uottawa.c [Program for Chemical and Environmental Toxicology, Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada); Mallory, Mark L., E-mail: mark.mallory@ec.gc.c [Canadian Wildlife Service, Environment Canada, Iqaluit, NU, X0A 0H0 (Canada); Smol, John P., E-mail: smolj@queensu.c [Paleoecological Environmental Assessment and Research Lab (PEARL), Department of Biology, Queen' s University, Kingston, ON, K7L 3N6 (Canada); Blais, Jules M., E-mail: jules.blais@uottawa.c [Program for Chemical and Environmental Toxicology, Department of Biology, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, K1N 6N5 (Canada)

    2010-11-15

    At Cape Vera, Devon Island (Nunavut, Canada), a colony of northern fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis) concentrates and releases contaminants through their guano to the environment. We determined whether persistent organic pollutants (POPs) from seabirds were transferred to coastal food webs. Snow buntings (Plectrophenax nivalis) were the most contaminated species, with {Sigma}PCB and {Sigma}DDT (mean: 168, 106 ng/g ww) concentrations surpassing environmental guidelines for protecting wildlife. When examined collectively, PCB congeners and DDT in jewel lichen (Xanthoria elegans) were lower in samples taken farther from the seabird colony, and increased with increasing {delta}{sup 15}N values. However, only concentrations of p'p-DDE:{Sigma}DDT and PCB-95 were significantly correlated inversely with distance from the seabird cliffs. Linkages between marine-derived POPs and their concentrations in terrestrial mammals were less clear. Our study provides novel contaminant data for these species and supports biovector transport as a source of organic contaminants to certain components of the terrestrial food web. - This study provides evidence of contaminant transport by seabirds to a coastal Arctic food web.

  12. The use of passive membrane samplers to assess organic contaminant inputs at five coastal sites in west Maui, Hawaii

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Pamela L.; Prouty, Nancy G.; Storlazzi, Curt; D'antonio, Nicole

    2017-07-26

    Five passive membrane samplers were deployed for 28 continuous days at select sites along and near the west Maui coastline to assess organic compounds and contaminant inputs to diverse, shallow coral reef ecosystems. Daily and weekly fluctuations in such inputs were captured on the membranes using integrative sampling. The distribution of organic compounds observed at these five coastal sites showed considerable variation; with high concentrations of terrestrially sourced organic compounds such as C29 sterols and high molecular weight n-alkanes at the strongly groundwater-influenced Kahekili vent site. In comparison, the coastal sites were presumably influenced more by seasonal surface and stream water runoff and therefore had marine-sourced organic compounds and fewer pharmaceuticals and personal care products. The direct correlation to upstream land-use practices was not obvious and may require additional wet-season sampling. Pharmaceuticals and personal care products as well as flame retardants were detected at all sites, and the Kahekili vent site had the highest number of detections. Planned future work must also determine the organic compound and contaminant concentrations adsorbed onto water column particulate matter, because it may also be an important vector for contaminant transport to coral reef ecosystems. The impact of contaminants per individual (such as fecundity and metabolism) as well as per community (such as species abundance and diversity) is necessary for an accurate assessment of environmental stress. Results presented herein provide current contaminant inputs to select nearshore environments along the west Maui coastline captured during the dry season, and they can be useful to aid potential future evaluations and (or) comparisons.

  13. Persistence of Trace Organic Contaminants from a Commercial Biosolids-Based Fertilizer in Aerobic Soils

    OpenAIRE

    Banet, Travis A; Kim, Jihyun R.; Mashtare, Michael L

    2016-01-01

    Municipal biosolids are recycled as agricultural fertilizers. Recent studies have raised concerns due to the presence of emerging contaminants in municipal biosolids. Previous research suggests that these contaminants have the potential to reside in biosolids-based fertilizers that are commercially distributed. Use of these products in urban/suburban areas may provide a pathway for these contaminants to enter ecosystems and impact human and environmental health. Soils from Purdue University’s...

  14. Addition of organic amendments contributes to C sequestration in trace element contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Mar Montiel Rozas, María; Panettier, Marco; Madejón Rodríguez, Paula; Madejón Rodríguez, Engracia

    2015-04-01

    Nowadays, the study of global C cycle and the different natural sinks of C have become especially important in a climate change context. Fluxes of C have been modified by anthropogenic activities and, presently, the global objective is the decrease of net CO2 emission. For this purpose, many studies are being conducted at local level for evaluate different C sequestration strategies. These techniques must be, in addition to safe in the long term, environmentally friendly. Restoration of contaminated and degraded areas is considered as a strategy for SOC sequestration. Our study has been carried out in the Guadiamar Green Corridor (Seville, Spain) affected by the Aznalcóllar mining accident. This accident occurred 16 years ago, due to the failure of the tailing dam which contained 4-5 million m3 of toxic tailings (slurry and acid water).The affected soils had a layer of toxic sludge containing heavy metals as As, Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn. Restoration techniques began to be applied just after the accident, including the removal of the toxic sludge and a variable layer of topsoil (10-30 cm) from the surface. In a second phase, in a specific area (experimental area) of the Green Corridor the addition of organic amendments (Biosolid compost (BC) and Leonardite (LE), a low grade coal rich in humic acids) was carried out to increase pH, organic matter and fertility in a soil which lost its richest layer during the clean-up operation. In our experimental area, half of the plots (A) received amendments for four years (2002, 2003, 2006 and 2007) whereas the other half (B) received amendments only for two years (2002-2003). To compare, plots without amendments were also established. Net balance of C was carried out using values of Water Soluble Carbon (WSC) and Total Organic Carbon (TOC) for three years (2012, 2013 and 2015). To eliminate artificial changes carried out in the plots, amendment addition and withdrawal of biomass were taken into account to calculate balance of kg TOC

  15. Factors Affecting Indoor Air Concentrations of Volatile Organic Compounds at a Site of Subsurface Gasoline Contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, M.L.; Bentley, A.J.; Dunkin, K.A.; Hodgson, A.T.; Nazaroff, W.W.; Sextro, R.G.; Daisey, J.M.

    1995-11-01

    We report a field study of soil gas transport of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into a slab-on-grade building found at a site contaminated with gasoline. Although the high VOC concentrations (30-60 g m{sup -3}) measured in the soil gas at depths of 0.7 m below the building suggest a potential for high levels of indoor VOC, the measured indoor air concentrations were lower than those in the soil gas by approximately six orders of magnitude ({approx} 0.03 mg m{sup -3}). This large ratio is explained by (1) the expected dilution of soil gas entering the building via ambient building ventilation (a factor of {approx}1000), and (2) an unexpectedly sharp gradient in soil gas VOC concentration between the depths of 0.1 and 0.7 m (a factor of {approx}1000). Measurements of the soil physical and biological characteristics indicate that a partial physical barrier to vertical transport in combination with microbial degradation provides a likely explanation for this gradient. These factors are likely to be important to varying degrees at other sites.

  16. Enhanced activation of periodate by iodine-doped granular activated carbon for organic contaminant degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaowan; Liu, Xitao; Lin, Chunye; Qi, Chengdu; Zhang, Huijuan; Ma, Jun

    2017-08-01

    In this study, iodine-doped granular activated carbon (I-GAC) was prepared and subsequently applied to activate periodate (IO4(-)) to degrade organic contaminants at ambient temperature. The physicochemical properties of GAC and I-GAC were examined using scanning electron microscopy, N2 adsorption/desorption, Raman spectroscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. No significant difference was observed between the two except for the existence of triiodide (I3(-)) and pentaiodide (I5(-)) on I-GAC. The catalytic activity of I-GAC towards IO4(-) was evaluated by the degradation of acid orange 7 (AO7), and superior catalytic performance was achieved compared with GAC. The effects of some influential parameters (preparation conditions, initial solution pH, and coexisting anions) on the catalytic ability were also investigated. Based on radical scavenging experiments, it appeared that IO3 was the predominant reactive species in the I-GAC/IO4(-) system. The mechanism underlying the enhanced catalytic performance of I-GAC could be explained by the introduction of negatively charged I3(-) and I5(-) into I-GAC, which induced positive charge density on the surface of I-GAC. This accelerated the interaction between I-GAC and IO4(-), and subsequently mediated the increasing generation of iodyl radicals (IO3). Furthermore, a possible degradation pathway of AO7 was proposed according to the intermediate products identified by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Concentrations of environmental organic contaminants in meat and meat products and human dietary exposure: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domingo, José L

    2017-09-01

    Meat and meat products is one of the most relevant food groups in an important number of human diets. Recently, the IARC, based on results of a number of epidemiological studies, classified the consumptions of red meat and processed meat as "probably carcinogenic to humans" and as "carcinogenic to humans", respectively. It was suggested that the substances responsible of the potential carcinogenicity would be mainly generated during meat processing, such as curing and smoking, or when meat is heated at high temperatures. However, the exposure to environmental pollutants through meat consumption was not discussed. The purpose of the present paper was to review recent studies reporting the concentrations of PCDD/Fs, DL-PCBs and PAHs in meat and meat products, as well as the human exposure to these pollutants through the diet. It is concluded that the health risks derived from exposure to carcinogenic environmental contaminants must be considered in the context of each specific diet, which besides meat and meat products, includes other foodstuffs containing also chemical pollutants, some of them with carcinogenic potential. Anyhow, meat and meat products are not the main food group responsible of the dietary exposure to carcinogenic (or probably carcinogenic) environmental organic pollutants. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Quantitative Structure--Activity Relationship (QSAR) for the Oxidation of Trace Organic Contaminants by Sulfate Radical.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Ruiyang; Ye, Tiantian; Wei, Zongsu; Luo, Shuang; Yang, Zhihui; Spinney, Richard

    2015-11-17

    The sulfate radical anion (SO4•–) based oxidation of trace organic contaminants (TrOCs) has recently received great attention due to its high reactivity and low selectivity. In this study, a meta-analysis was conducted to better understand the role of functional groups on the reactivity between SO4•– and TrOCs. The results indicate that compounds in which electron transfer and addition channels dominate tend to exhibit a faster second-order rate constants (kSO4•–) than that of H–atom abstraction, corroborating the SO4•– reactivity and mechanisms observed in the individual studies. Then, a quantitative structure activity relationship (QSAR) model was developed using a sequential approach with constitutional, geometrical, electrostatic, and quantum chemical descriptors. Two descriptors, ELUMO and EHOMO energy gap (ELUMO–EHOMO) and the ratio of oxygen atoms to carbon atoms (#O:C), were found to mechanistically and statistically affect kSO4•– to a great extent with the standardized QSAR model: ln kSO4•– = 26.8–3.97 × #O:C – 0.746 × (ELUMO–EHOMO). In addition, the correlation analysis indicates that there is no dominant reaction channel for SO4•– reactions with various structurally diverse compounds. Our QSAR model provides a robust predictive tool for estimating emerging micropollutants removal using SO4•– during wastewater treatment processes.

  19. Kinetic controls on the complexation between mercury and dissolved organic matter in a contaminated environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Carrie L; Southworth, George; Brooks, Scott; Liang, Liyuan; Gu, Baohua

    2009-11-15

    The interaction of mercury (Hg) with dissolved natural organic matter (NOM) under equilibrium conditions is the focus of many studies but the kinetic controls on Hg-NOM complexation in aquatic systems have often been overlooked. We examined the rates of Hg-NOM complexation both in a contaminated Upper East Fork Poplar Creek (UEFPC) in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, and in controlled laboratory experiments using reducible Hg (Hg(R)) measurements and C(18) solid phase extraction techniques. Of the filterable Hg at the headwaters of UEFPC, >90% was present as Hg(R) and this fraction decreased downstream but remained >29% of the filterable Hg at all sites. The presence of higher Hg(R) concentrations than would be predicted under equilibrium conditions in UEFPC and in experiments with a NOM isolate suggests that kinetic reactions are controlling the complexation between Hg and NOM. The slow formation of Hg-NOM complexes is attributed to competitive ligand exchange among various moieties and functional groups in NOM with a range of binding strengths and configurations. This study demonstrates the need to consider the effects of Hg-NOM complexation kinetics on processes such as Hg methylation and solid phase partitioning.

  20. Monitoring priority substances, other organic contaminants and heavy metals in a volcanic aquifer from different sources and hydrological processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Estevez, Esmeralda, E-mail: eestevez@proyinves.ulpgc.es [Dpt. Física (GEOVOL), Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35017 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Canary Islands (Spain); Agrifood and Phytopathological Laboratory (Cabildo de Gran Canaria), 35413 Arucas, Canary Islands (Spain); Cabrera, María del Carmen, E-mail: mcarmen.cabrera@ulpgc.es [Dpt. Física (GEOVOL), Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35017 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Canary Islands (Spain); IMDEA Water Institute, Alcalá de Henares, Madrid (Spain); Fernández-Vera, Juan Ramón, E-mail: jrfernandezv@grancanaria.com [Agrifood and Phytopathological Laboratory (Cabildo de Gran Canaria), 35413 Arucas, Canary Islands (Spain); Molina-Díaz, Antonio, E-mail: amolina@ujaen.es [Analytical Chemistry Research Group, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, University of Jaen, 23071 Jaen (Spain); Robles-Molina, José, E-mail: jroblesmol@gmail.com [Analytical Chemistry Research Group, Department of Physical and Analytical Chemistry, University of Jaen, 23071 Jaen (Spain); Palacios-Díaz, María del Pino, E-mail: mp.palaciosdiaz@ulpgc.es [Dpt. de Patología Animal, Producción Animal, Bromatología y Tecnología de los Alimentos (GEOVOL), Universidad de Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, 35413 Arucas, Canary Islands (Spain)

    2016-05-01

    Irrigation with reclaimed water (R) is necessary to guarantee the sustainability of semi-arid areas. Results obtained during a two years monitoring network (2009–2011) in Gran Canaria are presented, including the analysis of chemical parameters, N and S isotopes, priority substances (2008/105/EC, 2013/39/EU), other organic contaminants and heavy metals in groundwater and R used to irrigate a golf course. The aims of this work are to evaluate the contamination in a volcanic aquifer, relate the presence of organic contaminants and heavy metals with the hydrogeochemistry and identify pollution sources in the area. No priority substance exceeded the EU thresholds for surface water, although seventeen were detected in R. The most frequent compounds were hexachlorobenzene, chlorpyrifos ethyl, fluorene, phenanthrene and pyrene. These compounds were detected at low concentration, except chlorpyrifos. Chlorpyrifos ethyl, terbuthylazine, diuron, terbutryn, procymidone, atrazine and propazine exceeded the European threshold concentration for pesticides in groundwater (100 ng L{sup −1}). Therefore, the priority substances chlorpyrifos ethyl and diuron must be included in monitoring studies. The priority pesticides chlorfenvinphos and diazinon were always detected in R but rarely in groundwater. Besides, the existence of contaminants not related to the current R irrigation has been identified. Absence of environmental problems related to heavy metals can be expected. The relationship among contaminant presence, hydrogeochemistry, including the stable isotopic prints of δ{sup 18}O, δ{sup 15}N and δ{sup 34}S and preferential recharge paths has been described. The coastal well shows high values of EC, nitrate, a variable chemistry, and 50% of organic contaminants detected above 100 ng L{sup −1}. The well located in the recharge area presents a stable hydrochemistry, the lowest value of δ{sup 15}N and the lowest contaminants occurrence. The area is an example of a complex

  1. Fate of aerobic bacterial granules with fungal contamination under different organic loading conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, An-jie; Zhang, Tong; Li, Xiao-yan

    2010-01-01

    Aerobic sludge granulation is an attractive new technology for biological wastewater treatment. However, the instability of aerobic granules caused by fungal growth is still one of the main problems encountered in granular bioreactors. In this study, laboratory experiments were conducted to investigate the fate and transformation of aerobic granules under different organic loading conditions. Bacterial granules (2-3mm) in a poor condition with fungi-like black filamentous growth were seeded into two 1L batch reactors. After more than 100d of cultivation, the small seed granules in the two reactors had grown into two different types of large granules (>20mm) with different and unique morphological features. In reactor R1 with a high organic loading rate of 2.0g COD L(-1)d(-1), the black filaments mostly disappeared from the granules, and the dominance of rod-shaped bacteria was recovered. In contrast, at a low loading of 0.5g COD L(-1)d(-1) in reactor R2, the filaments eventually became dominant in the black fungal granules. The bacteria in R1 granules had a unique web-like structure with large pores of a few hundred microm in size, which would allow for effective substrate and oxygen transport into the interior of the granules. DNA-based molecular analysis indicated the evolution of the bacterial population in R1 and that of the eukaryal community in R2. The experimental results suggest that a high loading rate can be an effective means of helping to control fungal bloom, recover bacterial domination and restore the stability of aerobic granules that suffer from fungal contamination. 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. EU-wide monitoring survey on emerging polar organic contaminants in wastewater treatment plant effluents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loos, Robert; Carvalho, Raquel; António, Diana C; Comero, Sara; Locoro, Giovanni; Tavazzi, Simona; Paracchini, Bruno; Ghiani, Michela; Lettieri, Teresa; Blaha, Ludek; Jarosova, Barbora; Voorspoels, Stefan; Servaes, Kelly; Haglund, Peter; Fick, Jerker; Lindberg, Richard H; Schwesig, David; Gawlik, Bernd M

    2013-11-01

    In the year 2010, effluents from 90 European wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) were analyzed for 156 polar organic chemical contaminants. The analyses were complemented by effect-based monitoring approaches aiming at estrogenicity and dioxin-like toxicity analyzed by in vitro reporter gene bioassays, and yeast and diatom culture acute toxicity optical bioassays. Analyses of organic substances were performed by solid-phase extraction (SPE) or liquid-liquid extraction (LLE) followed by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS) or gas chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry (GC-HRMS). Target microcontaminants were pharmaceuticals and personal care products (PPCPs), veterinary (antibiotic) drugs, perfluoroalkyl substances (PFASs), organophosphate ester flame retardants, pesticides (and some metabolites), industrial chemicals such as benzotriazoles (corrosion inhibitors), iodinated x-ray contrast agents, and gadolinium magnetic resonance imaging agents; in addition biological endpoints were measured. The obtained results show the presence of 125 substances (80% of the target compounds) in European wastewater effluents, in concentrations ranging from low nanograms to milligrams per liter. These results allow for an estimation to be made of a European median level for the chemicals investigated in WWTP effluents. The most relevant compounds in the effluent waters with the highest median concentration levels were the artificial sweeteners acesulfame and sucralose, benzotriazoles (corrosion inhibitors), several organophosphate ester flame retardants and plasticizers (e.g. tris(2-chloroisopropyl)phosphate; TCPP), pharmaceutical compounds such as carbamazepine, tramadol, telmisartan, venlafaxine, irbesartan, fluconazole, oxazepam, fexofenadine, diclofenac, citalopram, codeine, bisoprolol, eprosartan, the antibiotics trimethoprim, ciprofloxacine, sulfamethoxazole, and clindamycine, the insect repellent N,N'-diethyltoluamide (DEET), the pesticides

  3. Graphene nanosheets and graphite oxide as promising adsorbents for removal of organic contaminants from aqueous solution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Liangliang; Chen, Wei; Xu, Zhaoyi; Zheng, Shourong; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2013-01-01

    Graphenes are an emerging class of carbon nanomaterials whose adsorption properties toward organic compounds have not been well understood. In the present study, graphene nanosheets were prepared by reoxidation and abrupt heating of graphite oxide, which was prepared by sequential chemical oxidation of commercial nonporous graphite powder. Adsorption properties of three aromatic compounds (naphthalene, 2-naphthol, and 1-naphthylamine) and one pharmaceutical compound (tylosin) on graphene nanosheets and graphite oxide were examined to explore the potential of these two adsorbents for the removal of organic contaminants from aqueous solutions. Compared with the literature data of adsorption on carbon nanotubes, adsorption of bulky, flexible tylosin on graphene nanosheets exhibited markedly faster adsorption kinetics, which can be attributed to their opened-up layer structure. Graphene nanosheets and graphite oxide showed similar sequences of adsorption affinity: 1-naphthylamine > 2-naphthol > tylosin > naphthalene (with much larger differences observed on graphite oxide). It was proposed that the strong adsorption of the three aromatic compounds was mainly due to π-π electron donor-acceptor interactions with the graphitic surfaces of adsorbents. Additionally, Lewis acid-base interaction was likely an important factor contributing to the strong adsorption of 1-naphthylamine and tylosin, especially for the O-functionality-abundant graphite oxide. After being normalized on the basis of adsorbent surface area, adsorption affinities of all four tested adsorbates on graphene nanosheets were very close to those on nonporous graphite powder, reflecting complete accessibility of the adsorbent surface area in adsorption. Copyright © by the American Society of Agronomy, Crop Science Society of America, and Soil Science Society of America, Inc.

  4. Alkaline hydrothermal treatment of brominated high impact polystyrene (HIPS-Br) for bromine and bromine-free plastic recovery

    OpenAIRE

    Brebu, Mihai; Bhaskar, Thallada; Muto, Akinori; Sakata, Yusaku

    2006-01-01

    A method to recover both Br and Br-free plastic from brominated flame retardant high impact polystyrene (HIPS-Br) was proposed. HIPS-Br containing 15% Br was treated in autoclave at 280℃ using water or KOH solution of various amounts and concentrations. Hydrothermal treatment (30 ml water) leads to 90% debromination of 1 g HIPS-Br but plastic is strongly degraded and could not be recovered. previous termAlkalinenext term hydrothermal treatment (45 ml or 60 ml KOH 1 M) showed similar debromina...

  5. Characteristics of a solid coal tar sampled from a contaminated soil and of the organics transferred into water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karim Benhabib; Pierre Faure; Michel Sardin; Marie-Odile Simonnot [Nancy Universite INPL-CNRS, Nancy (France). Laboratoire des Sciences du Genie Chimique

    2010-02-15

    Most often, only TOC and the concentrations of the 16 PAHs of the US EPA list are monitored in contaminated soils of former coking plants or MGPs. The objective of the present study was to provide a detailed characterization of the organic extracts of (i) coal tar particles sampled from a contaminated soil and (ii) of water at equilibrium with these particles. Chromatographic techniques were used (HPLC, GC-MS) as well as Fourier Transform Infrared Microscopy. An accurate description was obtained, showing the predominance of aromatic compounds in the coal tar and the preferential transfer of polar compounds and aliphatic hydrocarbons into water. 28 refs., 7 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Remediation approach for organic compounds and arsenic co-contaminated soil using the pressurized hot water extraction process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad Nazrul; Jo, Young-Tae; Jeong, Yeon-Jae; Park, Jeong-Hun

    2017-09-26

    Successful remediation of soil with co-existing organics contaminants and arsenic (As) is a challenge as the chemical and remediation technologies are different for each group of pollutants. In this study, the treatment effectiveness of the pressurized hot water (PHW) extraction process was investigated for remediation of soil co-contaminated with phenol, crude oil, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), and As. An elimination percentage of about 99% was achieved for phenol, and in the range of 63-100% was observed for the PAHs at 260°C for 90 min operation. The performance of PHW extraction in the removal of total petroleum hydrocarbons was found to be 86%. Of the 87 mg/kg of As in untreated soil, 67% of which was eliminated after treatment. The removal of organic contaminants was mainly via desorption, dissolution and degradation in subcritical water, while As was eliminated probably by oxidation and dissolution of arsenic-bearing minerals. According to the experimental results, the PHW extraction process can be suggested as an alternative cleaning technology, instead of using any organic solvents for remediation of such co-contaminated soil.

  7. Arsenic contamination in sesame and possible mitigation through organic interventions in the lower Gangetic Plain of West Bengal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Bishwajit; Bhattacharyya, Kallol; Giri, Pradip K; Sarkar, Supradip

    2011-12-01

    The widespread geogenic arsenic contamination of groundwater in the Gangetic Delta of West Bengal, leading to toxicities through the food chain-principally through irrigated rice-drew due attention from researchers. Oilseeds such as sesame might be a remunerative alternative to rice and can be grown with small quantities of contaminated groundwater. The present study was conducted to explore the efficiency of organic matter in reducing arsenic accumulation in sesame. Accumulation of total arsenic in sesame seed and available arsenic in post-harvest soils varied from 0.08 to 0.58 mg kg(-1) and from 3.87 to 8.89 kg ha(-1) , respectively. The organic manures added as soil amendment significantly reduced the accumulation (concentration) of arsenic in sesame seed to a maximum extent of 65.5% (vermicompost), 50% (phosphocompost), 42% (mustard cake) and 40% (farmyard manure (FYM)) compared with the control counterpart. The risk associated with dietary exposure to arsenic-contaminated sesame oil reached a value of 15.55% of provisional tolerable weekly intake for arsenic at the maximum accumulation of arsenic in sesame oil. Substantial accumulation of arsenic in the soil-plant system was found. Risks of exposure to arsenic-contaminated oil remained considerably high. Irrigation through surface water and organic amendments both significantly reduced arsenic accumulation in sesame. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  8. Covalent organic polymer functionalized activated carbon: A novel material for water contaminant removal and CO2 capture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mines, Paul D.; Thirion, Damien; Uthuppu, Basil

    Covalent organic polymers (COPs) have emerged as one of the leading advanced materials for environmental applications, such as the capture and recovery of carbon dioxide and the removal of contaminants from polluted water. COPs exhibit many remarkable properties that other leading advanced...... materials do not all-encompassing possess. Moreover, COPs have proven to be extremely stable in a wide variety of conditions, i.e. extremely high temperatures and boiling water for weeks at a time, which make them ideal for environmental applications; ranging from CO2 capture and recovery to organic solvent...... uptake in concentrated streams to metal and organic pollutant adsorption in contaminated waters. However, given the nanoscale structure of these COPs, real-world application has yet remained elusive for these materials. Herein, we report the functionalization of COPs onto the surface of activated carbon...

  9. Study of the trace metal ion influence on the turnover of soil organic matter in cultivated contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumat, C; Quenea, K; Bermond, A; Toinen, S; Benedetti, M F

    2006-08-01

    The role of metals in the behaviour of soil organic matter (SOM) is not well documented. Therefore, we investigated the influence of metals (Pb, Zn, Cu and Cd) on the dynamic of SOM in contaminated soils where maize (C4 plant) replaced C3 cultures. Three pseudogley brown leached soil profiles under maize with a decreasing gradient in metals concentrations were sampled. On size fractions, stable carbon isotopic ratio (delta13C), metals, organic carbon and nitrogen concentrations were measured in function of depth. The determined sequence for the amount of C4 organic matter in the bulk fractions: M3 (0.9)>M2 (0.4)>M1 (0.3) is in agreement with a significant influence of metals on the SOM turnover. New C4 SOM, mainly present in the labile coarser fractions and less contaminated by metals than the stabilised C3 SOM of the clay fraction, is more easily degraded by microorganisms.

  10. Condition of copper and organic matter in the soil contaminated with metal remediation of humic substances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolchanova, Kseniia; Barsova, Natalia; Motuzova, Galina; Stepanov, Andrey; Karpukhin, Mikhail

    2017-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the forms of copper and transformation of organic matter in the soil under the influence of humic substances (potassium humate, which was obtained from coal). The object of research was the top layer of soil model field experience. Field experiments were carried out in 10-liter plastic containers.The upper layers were constructed artificially as mixture of loam, sand and peat. Below it was a layer of loam, then gravel and under it we installed lysimeters. The experiment was conducted in 3 settings: 1) control, 2) control + Cu, and 3) control + Cu + potassium humate . Copper was deposited into upper layer at soil column construction as dry powder (CuSO4*5H2O), which is 1000mg per kg. Humic substance was introduced on surface as liquid form. The focus was the state of the copper and organic matter of solid and liquid phase. In the solid phase pH, carbon content, the molecular-mass distributions for the organic matter, total (HNO3 conc.+ H2O2; decomposition in a microwave oven) and acid-soluble (1H HNO3) copper content, sequential extraction of copper (1 M MgCl2, acetate buffer pH 4,8 (AAB), 1% EDTA) were determined. For liquid phase characteristics aqueous extract was obtained and identified therein: pH, total activity and copper content and water-soluble organic matter(WOM) amphiphilic properties. The introduction of copper is accompanied by a decrease in pH in soils from 7 to 6,3. The introduction of the humic substance softens this effect. Introducing humic preparation gives an increase in carbon at 0.5%. HS and copper has no significant effect on the molecular-mass distribution of solid organic matter. Only about 4% introduced copper accounted for the exchangeable form (MgCl2) for the variant only copper contaminated. Copper, mainly precipitated as hydroxides, moved in an AAB extract. And compared with the exchangeable forms its quantity increases by 10 times. Still more copper goes into an extract of EDTA, about half of

  11. Temporal development of brominated flame retardants in peregrine falcon (Falco peregrinus) eggs from South Greenland (1986-2003)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vorkamp, Katrin; Thomsen, Marianne; Falk, Knud

    2005-01-01

    A time trend between 1986 and 2003 was found for brominated flame retardants in peregrine falcon eggs from South Greenland, with significantly increasing concentrations of the polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) 99, 100, 153, 154, and 209. For BDE-99 and -100, the concentration increased appro...... with increasing time trends exist for the BDEs 99, 100, 153, 154, and 209, while a decreasing contamination with the BDEs 183, 49, 47, 66 and 153 was indicated in a subset of eggs....

  12. Influences of Organic Carbon Supply Rate on Uranium Bioreduction in Initially Oxidizing, Contaminated Sediment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokunaga, Tetsu K.; Wan, Jiamin; Kim, Yongman; Daly, Rebecca A.; Brodie, Eoin L.; Hazen, Terry C.; Herman, Don; Firestone, Mary K.

    2008-06-10

    Remediation of uranium (U) contaminated sediments through in-situ stimulation of bioreduction to insoluble UO{sub 2} is a potential treatment strategy under active investigation. Previously, we found that newly reduced U(IV) can be reoxidized under reducing conditions sustained by a continuous supply of organic carbon (OC) because of residual reactive Fe(III) and enhanced U(VI) solubility through complexation with carbonate generated through OC oxidation. That finding motivated this investigation directed at identifying a range of OC supply rates that is optimal for establishing U bioreduction and immobilization in initially oxidizing sediments. The effects of OC supply rate, from 0 to 580 mmol OC (kg sediment){sup -1} year{sup -1}, and OC form (lactate and acetate) on U bioreduction were tested in flow-through columns containing U-contaminated sediments. An intermediate supply rate on the order of 150 mmol OC (kg sediment){sup -1} year{sup -1} was determined to be most effective at immobilizing U. At lower OC supply rates, U bioreduction was not achieved, and U(VI) solubility was enhanced by complexation with carbonate (from OC oxidation). At the highest OC supply rate, resulting highly carbonate-enriched solutions also supported elevated levels of U(VI), even though strongly reducing conditions were established. Lactate and acetate were found to have very similar geochemical impacts on effluent U concentrations (and other measured chemical species), when compared at equivalent OC supply rates. While the catalysts of U(VI) reduction to U(IV) are presumably bacteria, the composition of the bacterial community, the Fe reducing community, and the sulfate reducing community had no direct relationship with effluent U concentrations. The OC supply rate has competing effects of driving reduction of U(VI) to low solubility U(IV) solids, as well as causing formation of highly soluble U(VI)-carbonato complexes. These offsetting influences will require careful control of OC

  13. Brominated flame retardants: occurrence, dietary intake and risk assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winter-Sorkina R de; Bakker MI; Wolterink G; Zeijlmaker MJ; SIR

    2006-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants have entered the human food chain. For the time being the occurrence of these chemicals in Dutch food does not pose a human health risk. However, this might easily change at increasing contents of flame retardants in Dutch food. The monitoring of brominated flame

  14. Bromine pretreated chitosan for adsorption of lead (II) from water

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Pollution by heavy metals like lead (II) is responsible for health hazards and environmental degradation. Adsorption is a prevalent method applied for removal of heavy metal pollutants from water. This study explored adsorption performances of 30% bromine pretreated chitosan for lead (II) abatement from water. Bromine ...

  15. Kinetics of hydrophobic organic contaminant extraction from sediment by granular activated carbon

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rakowska, M.I.; Kupryianchyk, D.; Smit, M.; Koelmans, A.A.; Meent, van de D.

    2014-01-01

    Ex situ solid phase extraction with granular activated carbon (GAC) is a promising technique to remediate contaminated sediments. The methods' efficiency depends on the rate by which contaminants are transferred from the sediment to the surface of GAC. Here, we derive kinetic parameters for

  16. Subsurface Organics in Aseptic Cores From the MARTE Robotic Drilling Experiment: Ground truth and Contamination Issues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonaccorsi, R.; Stoker, C. R.

    2006-12-01

    The subsurface is the key environment for searching for life on planets lacking surface life. This includes the search for past/present life on Mars where possible subsurface life could exist [1]. The Mars-Analog-Rio-Tinto-Experiment (MARTE) performed a simulation of a Mars robotic drilling at the RT Borehole#7 Site ~6.07m, atop a massive-pyrite deposit from the Iberian Pyritic Belt. The RT site is considered an important analog of Sinus Meridiani on Mars, an ideal model analog for a subsurface Martian setting [2], and a relevant example of deep subsurface microbial community including aerobic and anaerobic chemoautotrophs [4-5]. Searching for microbes or bulk organics of biological origin in a subsurface sample from a planet is a key scientific objective of Robotic drilling missions. During the 2005 Field experiment 28 minicores were robotically handled and subsampled for life detection experiments under anti-contamination protocols. Ground truth included visual observation of cores and lab based Elemental and Isotope Ratios Mass Spectrometry analysis (EA-IRMS) of bulk organics in Hematite and Gohetite-rich gossanized tuffs, gossan and clay layers within 0-6m-depth. C-org and N-tot vary up to four orders of magnitude among the litter (~11Wt%, 0-1cm) and the mineralized (~3Wt%, 1-3cm) layers, and the first 6 m-depth (C-org=0.02-0.38Wt%). Overall, the distribution/ preservation of plant and soil-derived organics (d13C-org = 26 per mil to 24 per mil) is ten times higher (C-org=0.33Wt%) that in hematite-poor clays, or where rootlets are present, than in hematite- rich samples (C-org=handling and environmental dust loadings on cleaned/sterilized control surfaces (e.g., 6,782-36,243RLU/cm2). Cleanliness/sterility can be maintained by applying a simple sterile protocol under field conditions. Science results from this research will support future Astrobiology driven drilling mission planned on Mars. Specifically, ground truth offers relevant insights to assess strengths

  17. Adsorption of Estrogen Contaminants by Graphene Nanomaterials under Natural Organic Matter Preloading: Comparison to Carbon Nanotube, Biochar, and Activated Carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Luhua; Liu, Yunguo; Liu, Shaobo; Zeng, Guangming; Hu, Xinjiang; Hu, Xi; Guo, Zhi; Tan, Xiaofei; Wang, Lele; Wu, Zhibin

    2017-06-06

    Adsorption of two estrogen contaminants (17β-estradiol and 17α-ethynyl estradiol) by graphene nanomaterials was investigated and compared to those of a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT), a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWCNT), two biochars, a powdered activated carbon (PAC), and a granular activate carbon (GAC) in ultrapure water and in the competition of natural organic matter (NOM). Graphene nanomaterials showed comparable or better adsorption ability than carbon nanotubes (CNTs), biochars (BCs), and activated carbon (ACs) under NOM preloading. The competition of NOM decreased the estrogen adsorption by all adsorbents. However, the impact of NOM on the estrogen adsorption was smaller on graphenes than CNTs, BCs, and ACs. Moreover, the hydrophobicity of estrogens also affected the uptake of estrogens. These results suggested that graphene nanomaterials could be used to removal estrogen contaminants from water as an alternative adsorbent. Nevertheless, if transferred to the environment, they would also adsorb estrogen contaminants, leading to great environmental hazards.

  18. Subacute effects of the brominated flame retardants hexabromocyclododecane and tetrabromobisphenol A on hepatic cytochrome P450 levels in rats.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Germer, Silke; Piersma, Aldert H; Ven, Leo T M van der; Kamyschnikow, Andreas; Fery, Yvonne; Schmitz, Hans-Joachim; Schrenk, Dieter

    2006-01-01

    The brominated flame retardants tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) are found in the environment, e.g., in sediments and organisms, in food items, human blood samples and mother's milk. In this study, the effects of both compounds on rat hepatic cytochrome P450 (CYP)

  19. Dynamics And Remediation Of Fine Textured Soils And Ground Water Contaminated With Salts And Chlorinated Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murata, Alison; Naeth, M. Anne

    2017-04-01

    Soil and ground water are frequently contaminated by industrial activities, posing a potential risk to human and environmental health and limiting land use. Proper site management and remediation treatments can return contaminated areas to safe and useful states. Most remediation research focuses on single contaminants in coarse and medium textured soils. Contaminant mixtures are common and make remediation efforts complex due to differing chemical properties. Remediation in fine textured soils is difficult since their low hydraulic conductivities hinder addition of amendments into and removal of contaminated media out of the impacted zone. The objective of this research is to assess contaminant dynamics and potential remediation techniques for fine textured soil and ground water impacted by multiple contaminants in Edmonton, Alberta, Canada. The University of Alberta's Ellerslie Waste Management Facility was used to process liquid laboratory waste from 1972 to 2007. A waste water pond leak prior to 1984 resulted in salt and chlorinated organic compound contamination. An extensive annual ground water monitoring data set for the site is available since 1988. Analytical parameters include pH, electrical conductivity, major ions, volatile organic compounds, and metals. Data have been compared to Alberta Tier 1 Soil and Groundwater Remediation Guidelines to identify exceedances. The parameters of greatest concern, based on magnitude and frequency of detection, are electrical conductivity, sodium, chloride, chloroform, and dichloromethane. Spatial analyses of the data show that the contamination is focused in and down gradient of the former waste water pond. Temporal analyses show different trends depending on monitoring well location. Laboratory column experiments were used to assess leaching as a potential treatment for salt contamination in fine textured soils. Saturated hydraulic conductivity was measured for seven soils from two depth intervals with or without

  20. [Correlation between microbial growth in conjunctival swabs of corneal donors and contamination of organ culture media].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, S; Bischoff, M; Schirra, F; Langenbucher, A; Ong, M; Halfmann, A; Herrmann, M; Seitz, B

    2014-06-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the rate of contamination in conjunctival swabs from corneal donors by microbiological investigations and to correlate this with microbial contamination of the culture medium. Contamination of conjunctival swabs and culture media was analyzed retrospectively for the years 2009, 2010 and 2011 at the LIONS corneal bank of Saar-Lor-Lux Trier/Westpfalz at the Saarland University Medical Center. The total annual number of conjunctival swabs was 316 in 2009, 341 in 2010 and 381 in 2011. Conjunctival swabs were taken prior to 1.25% povidone-iodine application. After disinfection donor corneas were harvested by in situ corneoscleral disc excision in all cases. The correlation between positive conjunctival swabs and microbial contamination of the culture medium was analyzed. In every year examined the contamination rate of the culture medium was significantly higher in cases of contaminated conjunctival swabs (p culture medium was contaminated in 16.5%, 11.5% and 7.6% of the donated corneas with positive conjunctival swabs and in 7.2%, 1.9% and 0.6% in donated corneas with negative conjunctival swabs, respectively. A positive correlation was found between contamination of the culture medium and microbial colonization of the conjunctival swabs, Nevertheless, microbial colonization of the conjunctiva was high and contamination of the culture medium was relatively low. For the microbial contamination rate of the donated corneas in the medium, conjunctival disinfection time with iodine solution before explantation of the corneoscleral disc and the addition of antibiotics to the culture medium seem to play a protective role.

  1. A novel modeling tool with multi-stressor functionality for organic contaminant transport and fate in the Baltic Sea

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Undeman, E., E-mail: emma.undeman@itm.su.se [Baltic Nest Institute, Baltic Sea Centre, Stockholm University, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Department of Applied Environmental Science, Stockholm University, 11418 Stockholm (Sweden); Gustafsson, E., E-mail: erik.gustafsson@su.se [Baltic Nest Institute, Baltic Sea Centre, Stockholm University, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden); Gustafsson, B.G., E-mail: bo.gustafsson@su.se [Baltic Nest Institute, Baltic Sea Centre, Stockholm University, 10691 Stockholm (Sweden)

    2014-11-01

    The coupled physical–biogeochemical model BALTSEM, previously used to assess nutrient/carbon cycles and eutrophication in the Baltic Sea, has been expanded to include algorithms for calculations of organic contaminant environmental transport and fate. This novel model version (BALTSEM-POP) is evaluated for polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins/dibenzofurans (PCDD/Fs) and hexachlorobenzene (HCB) in Baltic Sea surface water and sediment. Modeled dissolved concentrations are usually within a factor of 2–4 of observed concentrations, however with larger deviations for furans. Calculated concentrations in particulate organic matter are less accurate (within factors of 1–700), likely due to errors in estimated pelagic biomass, particulate matter–water partitioning, and large natural variability in field data. Concentrations in sediments are usually predicted within a factor of 6. The good performance of the model illustrates its usefulness for exploration of contaminant fate in response to variations in nutrient input and climatic conditions in the Baltic Sea marine environment. - Highlights: • A new model for organic chemical transport and fate in the Baltic Sea is presented. • Physical and biogeochemical processes are linked to organic contaminant transport. • The model is evaluated for PCBs, HCB and PCDD/Fs. • The model can predict dissolved concentrations within a factor of ca 2–4. • Predictions for concentrations in particulate matter and sediment are less accurate.

  2. Removal of organic contaminants from secondary effluent by anodic oxidation with a boron-doped diamond anode as tertiary treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Segura, Sergi; Keller, Jürg; Brillas, Enric; Radjenovic, Jelena

    2015-01-01

    Electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOPs) have been widely investigated as promising technologies to remove trace organic contaminants from water, but have rarely been used for the treatment of real waste streams. Anodic oxidation with a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode was applied for the treatment of secondary effluent from a municipal sewage treatment plant containing 29 target pharmaceuticals and pesticides. The effectiveness of the treatment was assessed from the contaminants decay, dissolved organic carbon and chemical oxygen demand removal. The effect of applied current and pH was evaluated. Almost complete mineralization of effluent organic matter and trace contaminants can be obtained by this EAOP primarily due to the action of hydroxyl radicals formed at the BDD surface. The oxidation of Cl(-) ions present in the wastewater at the BDD anode gave rise to active chlorine species (Cl2/HClO/ClO(-)), which are competitive oxidizing agents yielding chloramines and organohalogen byproducts, quantified as adsorbable organic halogen. However, further anodic oxidation of HClO/ClO(-) species led to the production of ClO3(-) and ClO4(-) ions. The formation of these species hampers the application as a single-stage tertiary treatment, but posterior cathodic reduction of chlorate and perchlorate species may reduce the risks associated to their presence in the environment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Solid-phase microextraction to predict bioavailability and accumulation of organic micropollutants in terrestrial organisms after exposure to a field-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Wal, Leon; Jager, Tjalling; Fleuren, Roel H L J; Barendregt, Arjan; Sinnige, Theo L; Van Gestel, Cornelis A M; Hermens, Joop L M

    2004-09-15

    The risk posed by soil contaminants strongly depends on their bioavailability. In this study, a partition-based sampling method was applied as a tool to estimate bioavailability in soil. The accumulation of organic micropollutants was measured in two earthworm species (Eisenia andrei and Aporrectodea caliginosa) and in 30-microm poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS)-coated solid-phase micro extraction (SPME) fibers after exposure to two field-contaminated soils. Within 10 days, steady state in earthworms was reached, and within 20 days in the SPME fibers. Steady-state concentrations in both earthworm species were linearly related to concentrations in fibers over a 10,000-fold range of concentrations. Measured concentrations in earthworms were compared to levels calculated via equilibrium partitioning theory and total concentrations of contaminants in soil. In addition, freely dissolved concentrations of contaminants in pore water, derived from SPME measurements, were used to calculate concentrations in earthworms. Measured concentrations in earthworms were close to estimated concentrations from the SPME fiber measurements. Freely dissolved concentrations of contaminants in pore water, derived from SPME measurements, were used to calculate bioconcentration factors (BCF) in earthworms. A plot of log BCFs against the octanol-water partition coefficient (log Kow) was linear up to a log Kow of 8. These results show that measuring concentrations of hydrophobic chemicals in a PDMS-coated fiber represents a simple tool to estimate internal concentrations of chemicals in biota exposed to soil.

  4. Solid-phase Microextraction (SPME) with Stable Isotope Calibration for Measuring Bioavailability of Hydrophobic Organic Contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Xinyi; Bao, Lianjun; Gan, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Solid-phase microextraction (SPME) is a biomimetic tool ideally suited for measuring bioavailability of hydrophobic organic compounds (HOCs) in sediment and soil matrices. However, conventional SPME sampling requires the attainment of equilibrium between the fiber and sample matrix, which may take weeks or months, greatly limiting its applicability. In this study, we explored the preloading of polydimethylsiloxane fiber with stable isotope labeled analogs (SI-SPME) to circumvent the need for long sampling time, and evaluated the performance of SI-SPME against the conventional equilibrium SPME (Eq-SPME) using a range of sediments and conditions. Desorption of stable isotope-labeled analogs and absorption of PCB-52, PCB-153, bifenthrin and cis-permethrin were isotropic, validating the assumption for SI-SPME. Highly reproducible preloading was achieved using acetone-water (1:4, v/v) as the carrier. Compared to Eq-SPME that required weeks or even months, the fiber concentrations (Cf) under equilibrium could be reliably estimated by SI-SPME in 1 d under agitated conditions or 20 d under static conditions in spiked sediments. The Cf values predicted by SI-SPME were statistically identical to those determined by Eq-SPME. The SI-SPME method was further applied successfully to field sediments contaminated with PCB 52, PCB 153, and bifenthrin. The increasing availability of stable isotope labeled standards and mass spectrometry nowadays makes SI-SPME highly feasible, allowing the use of SPME under non-equilibrium conditions with much shorter or flexible sampling time. PMID:23930601

  5. Trace organic contaminant rejection by aquaporin forward osmosis membrane: Transport mechanisms and membrane stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ming; Luo, Wenhai; Guo, Hao; Nghiem, Long D; Tang, Chuyang Y; Gray, Stephen R

    2017-12-28

    We investigated transport mechanisms of trace organic contaminants (TrOCs) through aquaporin thin-film composite forward osmosis (FO) membrane, and membrane stability under extreme conditions with respect to TrOC rejections. Morphology and surface chemistry of the aquaporin membrane were characterised to identify the incorporation of aquaporin vesicles into membrane active layer. Pore hindrance model was used to estimate aquaporin membrane pore size as well as to describe TrOC transport. TrOC transport mechanisms were revealed by varying concentration and type of draw solutions. Experimental results showed that mechanism of TrOC transport through aquaporin-embedded FO membrane was dominated by solution-diffusion mechanism. Non-ionic TrOC rejections were molecular-weight dependent, suggesting steric hindrance mechanisms. On the other hand, ionic TrOC rejections were less sensitive to molecular size, indicating electrostatic interaction. TrOC transport through aquaporin membrane was also subjected to retarded forward diffusion where reverse draw solute flux could hinder the forward diffusion of feed TrOC solutes, reducing their permeation through the FO membrane. Aquaporin membrane stability was demonstrated by either heat treatment or ethanol solvent challenges. Thermal stability of the aquaporin membrane was manifested as a relatively unchanged TrOC rejection before and after the heat treatment challenge test. By contrast, ethanol solvent challenge resulted in a decrease in TrOC rejection, which was evident by the disappearance of the lipid tail of the aquaporin vesicles from infrared spectrum and a notable decrease in the membrane pore size. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Effect of oxidation and catalytic reduction of trace organic contaminants on their activated carbon adsorption.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoutteten, Klaas V K M; Hennebel, Tom; Dheere, Ellen; Bertelkamp, Cheryl; De Ridder, David J; Maes, Synthia; Chys, Michael; Van Hulle, Stijn W H; Vanden Bussche, Julie; Vanhaecke, Lynn; Verliefde, Arne R D

    2016-12-01

    The combination of ozonation and activated carbon (AC) adsorption is an established technology for removal of trace organic contaminants (TrOCs). In contrast to oxidation, reduction of TrOCs has recently gained attention as well, however less attention has gone to the combination of reduction with AC adsorption. In addition, no literature has compared the removal behavior of reduction vs. ozonation by-products by AC. In this study, the effect of pre-ozonation vs pre-catalytic reduction on the AC adsorption efficiency of five TrOCs and their by-products was compared. All compounds were susceptible to oxidation and reduction, however the catalytic reductive treatment proved to be a slower reaction than ozonation. New oxidation products were identified for dinoseb and new reduction products were identified for carbamazepine, bromoxynil and dinoseb. In terms of compatibility with AC adsorption, the influence of the oxidative and reductive pretreatments proved to be compound dependent. Oxidation products of bromoxynil and diatrizoic acid adsorbed better than their parent TrOCs, but oxidation products of atrazine, carbamazepine and dinoseb showed a decreased adsorption. The reductive pre-treatment showed an enhanced AC adsorption for dinoseb and a major enhancement for diatrizoic acid. For atrazine and bromoxynil, no clear influence on adsorption was noted, while for carbamazepine, the reductive pretreatment resulted in a decreased AC affinity. It may thus be concluded that when targeting mixtures of TrOCs, a trade-off will undoubtedly have to be made towards overall reactivity and removal of the different constituents, since no single treatment proves to be superior to the other. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Contamination of an arctic terrestrial food web with marine-derived persistent organic pollutants transported by breeding seabirds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choy, Emily S; Kimpe, Linda E; Mallory, Mark L; Smol, John P; Blais, Jules M

    2010-11-01

    At Cape Vera, Devon Island (Nunavut, Canada), a colony of northern fulmars (Fulmarus glacialis) concentrates and releases contaminants through their guano to the environment. We determined whether persistent organic pollutants (POPs) from seabirds were transferred to coastal food webs. Snow buntings (Plectrophenax nivalis) were the most contaminated species, with ∑PCB and ∑DDT (mean: 168, 106 ng/g ww) concentrations surpassing environmental guidelines for protecting wildlife. When examined collectively, PCB congeners and DDT in jewel lichen (Xanthoria elegans) were lower in samples taken farther from the seabird colony, and increased with increasing δ(15)N values. However, only concentrations of p'p-DDE:∑DDT and PCB-95 were significantly correlated inversely with distance from the seabird cliffs. Linkages between marine-derived POPs and their concentrations in terrestrial mammals were less clear. Our study provides novel contaminant data for these species and supports biovector transport as a source of organic contaminants to certain components of the terrestrial food web. Crown Copyright © 2010. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Remediation and desorption kinetics of pyrene from kaolinite co-contaminated with heavy metals at various organic matter contents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeedi, Mohsen; Li, Loretta Y.; Grace, John R.

    2017-04-01

    Soils co-contaminated with polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and heavy metals are challenging for remediation. In the present study desorption of pyrene in kaolinite, co-contaminated by Ni, Pb and Zn, was examined by combinations of surfactants and chelating agents such as Triton X-100, Tween 80, Ethylene diamine tetra acetic acid (EDTA) and citric acid. Results showed that a combination of Triton X-100 (7.5 % w/w) + EDTA (0.01 M) and Tween 80 (7.5 % w/w) + EDTA (0.01 M) were effective in simultaneously desorbing both types of contaminants. Batch desorption tests were conducted using single and combined enhancing agents containing Triton X-100 and Tween 80 as non-ionic surfactants, EDTA as a chelating agent, and citric acid as an organic acid. The solution with the highest removal efficiency was the combined solution containing Triton X-100 (7.5 % w/w) + EDTA (0.01M). Triton X-100 (7.5% w/w) + EDTA (0.01M) led to removal efficiencies of 88% for pyrene in base kaolinite. Batch desorption kinetic experiments were performed using Triton X-100 (7.5% w/w) + EDTA (0.01M). During the first 24 h, desorption was rapid. Organic matter content in the kaolinite led to a reduction in the desorption rate of the contaminants. The desorption kinetic data were well fitted by a pseudo-second-order kinetic model.

  9. Distribution and remineralization of organic carbon in sediments of a mangrove stand partly contaminated with sewage waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machiwa, J.F. [Dar es Salaam Univ. (Tanzania, United Republic of). Dept. of Zoology and Marine Biology

    1998-12-01

    The distribution of soil organic carbon in a mangrove forest partly contaminated with raw sewage shows that a high proportion of the carbon in the landward zones of the forest was organic. Relative content of inorganic carbon increased seawards. Carbonate from the shells of gastropods, oysters, and corals contribute to the inorganic carbon pool. The vertical profiles of organic carbon showed a general surface enrichment and subsurface depletion. An extremely high organic carbon content up to 19% of sediment (dry weight) was found at the sewage dump site. Peat formation was not evident and the organic carbon content decreased with depth of burial in the sediment. The interstitial water at the terrestrial mangrove fringe with sewage waste was relatively more acidic (pH 4-5) and strongly reducing (Eh - 300 mV). The pH in the terrestrial fringe that had no sewage influence was close to neutral values (pH > 6). There was no significant difference between the rates of organic matter remineralization in the forest zones. Relative values, however, indicate that mineralization was slowest in sewage-contaminated areas compared to areas without exposure to sewage. The rate of remineralization was high in the frequently inundated mangrove areas Special issue. Building capacity for coastal management. 27 refs, 2 figs, 4 tabs

  10. Zebra Mussels as Biomonitoring for Organic Contaminants in the Lower Great Lakes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Comba, Michael E; Metcalfe-Smith, J. L; Kaiser, Klaus L. E

    1996-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to contribute to the growing data base on the distributions and levels of orgnaic contaminants in zebra mussels throughout the Great Lakes and to address several issues...

  11. Solidification-stabilization of organic and inorganic contaminants using portland cement: a literature review

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Yuet, Pak K; Paria, Santanu

    2006-01-01

    ... (S-S) is of increasing importance as an option for remediating contaminated sites. Indeed, among the various treatment techniques, S-S is one of the most widely used methods for treating inorganic wastes...

  12. Strategies to reduce mycotoxin and fungal alkaloid contamination in organic and conventional cereal production systems

    OpenAIRE

    Köpke, U.; Thiel, B.; Elmholt, S.

    2007-01-01

    Mycotoxins are toxic metabolites formed by specific fungi that grow on living plants and their residues under favourable conditions. They are undesirable ingredients of food and feed. Risks are also posed by the spores and toxin-contaminated raised dusts. Contamination by mycotoxins is a severe problem in food security. More than 300 species of fungi with the ability to form mycotoxins have been identified. More than 400 metabolites are assigned to the group of mycotoxins. Fortunately, only a...

  13. Complex interplay between formation routes and natural organic matter modification controls capabilities of C60 nanoparticles (nC60) to accumulate organic contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Lei; Fortner, John D; Wang, Ximeng; Zhang, Chengdong; Wang, Lilin; Chen, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Accumulation of organic contaminants on fullerene nanoparticles (nC60) may significantly affect the risks of C60 in the environment. The objective of this study was to further understand how the interplay of nC60 formation routes and humic acid modification affects contaminant adsorption of nC60. Specifically, adsorption of 1,2,4,5-tetrachlorobenzene (a model nonionic, hydrophobic organic contaminant) on nC60 was greatly affected by nC60 formation route - the formation route significantly affected the aggregation properties of nC60, thus affecting the available surface area and the extent of adsorption via the pore-filling mechanism. Depending on whether nC60 was formed via the "top-down" route (i.e., sonicating C60 powder in aqueous solution) or "bottom-up" route (i.e., phase transfer from an organic solvent) and the type of solvent involved (toluene versus tetrahydrofuran), modification of nC60 with Suwannee River humic acid (SRHA) could either enhance or inhibit the adsorption affinity of nC60. The net effect depended on the specific way in which SRHA interacted with C60 monomers and/or C60 aggregates of different sizes and morphology, which determined the relative importance of enhanced adsorption from SRHA modification via preventing C60 aggregation and inhibited adsorption through blocking available adsorption sites. The findings further demonstrate the complex mechanisms controlling interactions between nC60 and organic contaminants, and may have significant implications for the life-cycle analysis and risk assessment of C60. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Modeling the inorganic bromine partitioning in the tropical tropopause layer over the eastern and western Pacific Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Navarro

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The stratospheric inorganic bromine (Bry burden arising from the degradation of brominated very short-lived organic substances (VSLorg and its partitioning between reactive and reservoir species is needed for a comprehensive assessment of the ozone depletion potential of brominated trace gases. Here we present modeled inorganic bromine abundances over the Pacific tropical tropopause based on aircraft observations of VSLorg from two campaigns of the Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX 2013, carried out over the eastern Pacific, and ATTREX 2014, carried out over the western Pacific and chemistry-climate simulations (along ATTREX flight tracks using the specific meteorology prevailing. Using the Community Atmosphere Model with Chemistry (CAM-Chem we model that BrO and Br are the daytime dominant species. Integrated across all ATTREX flights, BrO represents ∼ 43 and 48 % of daytime Bry abundance at 17 km over the western and eastern Pacific, respectively. The results also show zones where Br / BrO > 1 depending on the solar zenith angle (SZA, ozone concentration, and temperature. On the other hand, BrCl and BrONO2 were found to be the dominant nighttime species with ∼  61 and 56 % of abundance at 17 km over the western and eastern Pacific, respectively. The western-to-eastern differences in the partitioning of inorganic bromine are explained by different abundances of ozone (O3, nitrogen dioxide (NO2, total inorganic chlorine (Cly, and the efficiency of heterogeneous reactions of bromine reservoirs (mostly BrONO2 and HBr occurring on ice crystals.

  15. Modeling the inorganic bromine partitioning in the tropical tropopause layer over the eastern and western Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro, Maria A.; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Cuevas, Carlos A.; Fernandez, Rafael P.; Atlas, Elliot; Rodriguez-Lloveras, Xavier; Kinnison, Douglas; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Tilmes, Simone; Thornberry, Troy; Rollins, Andrew; Elkins, James W.; Hintsa, Eric J.; Moore, Fred L.

    2017-08-01

    The stratospheric inorganic bromine (Bry) burden arising from the degradation of brominated very short-lived organic substances (VSLorg) and its partitioning between reactive and reservoir species is needed for a comprehensive assessment of the ozone depletion potential of brominated trace gases. Here we present modeled inorganic bromine abundances over the Pacific tropical tropopause based on aircraft observations of VSLorg from two campaigns of the Airborne Tropical TRopopause EXperiment (ATTREX 2013, carried out over the eastern Pacific, and ATTREX 2014, carried out over the western Pacific) and chemistry-climate simulations (along ATTREX flight tracks) using the specific meteorology prevailing. Using the Community Atmosphere Model with Chemistry (CAM-Chem) we model that BrO and Br are the daytime dominant species. Integrated across all ATTREX flights, BrO represents ˜ 43 and 48 % of daytime Bry abundance at 17 km over the western and eastern Pacific, respectively. The results also show zones where Br / BrO > 1 depending on the solar zenith angle (SZA), ozone concentration, and temperature. On the other hand, BrCl and BrONO2 were found to be the dominant nighttime species with ˜ 61 and 56 % of abundance at 17 km over the western and eastern Pacific, respectively. The western-to-eastern differences in the partitioning of inorganic bromine are explained by different abundances of ozone (O3), nitrogen dioxide (NO2), total inorganic chlorine (Cly), and the efficiency of heterogeneous reactions of bromine reservoirs (mostly BrONO2 and HBr) occurring on ice crystals.

  16. Successful field tests of a multi-process phytoremediation system for decontamination of persistent petroleum and organic contaminants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberg, B.M.; Huang, X.D.; Gurska, Y.; Gerhardt, K.E.; Wang, W.; Lampi, M.A.; Zhang, C.; Khalid, A.; Isherwood, D.; Chang, P.; Wang, H.; Dixon, D.G.; Glick, B.R. [Waterloo Univ., ON (Canada)

    2006-07-01

    A large number of aquatic and terrestrial environments are polluted with various levels of toxicants. Metals, organics and total petroleum hydrocarbons from anthropogenic sources pose a risk to both human health and the health of ecosystems. Although these persistent contaminants are difficult to remediate, several industrial sites throughout North America are being remediated as part of land reclamation and restoration programs. This paper addressed the issue of phytoremediation for removing contaminants from soils. Phytoremediation is considered to be a viable remediation strategy because the increased biomass of plants, relative to the biomass of soil microbes in the absence of plants, allows for higher throughput. Extensive root systems can infiltrate large volumes of soil, thus promoting degradation of contaminants over a wide area. This paper described a newly developed multi-process phytoremediation system with accelerated remediation kinetics to effectively remove polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH), total petroleum hydrocarbons (TPH) and chlorinated hydrocarbons (CHC) from soils. The system combines land farming/sunlight exposure; inoculation of contaminant degrading bacteria; and, plant growth with plant growth promoting rhizobacteria which mitigates the effects of stress ethylene in plants. The primary factor for success was the interaction between the plant and the plant growth promoting rhizobacteria. Several field tests were conducted following successful greenhouse tests. Results at a TPH contaminated site in Sarnia, Ontario showed that over a 2 year period, 60 to 70 per cent remediation of 15 per cent TPH was achieved. At a site in Turner Valley, Alberta, 35 per cent remediation of 1 per cent recalcitrant TPH was achieved, while a DDT contaminated site near Simcoe, Ontario had nearly 30 per cent of CHC removed in a 3 month period. 34 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  17. Modeling the potential influence of particle deposition on the accumulation of organic contaminants by submerged aquatic vegetation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armitage, James M; Franco, Amaya; Gomez, Sonia; Cousins, Ian T

    2008-06-01

    Submerged aquatic vegetation can act as both a mitigating factor(e.g., reducing downstream impacts of pesticides following runoff/spray drift) and mobilizing factor (e.g., remobilization of contaminants from sediments) influencing the fate and distribution of organic contaminants in the environment. Consequently, there has been wide scientific and regulatory interest in assessing the role of these plants in different contamination scenarios. Mechanistic models describing the environmental fate of contaminants in submerged aquatic vegetation are useful tools for interpreting laboratory and field measurements in addition to providing valuable information to risk assessors. In this study, we developed a fugacity-based model to investigate the influence of particle deposition to plant surfaces on the fate and distribution of two substances in small ponds. The main motivation for conducting this study was to address the fact that the potential contribution of this process is not typically considered by many types of models describing contaminant dynamics in submerged aquatic vegetation. For the hydrophobic substance included in this evaluation (lambda-cyhalothrin), model performance was greatly improved by including this process. The model was also applied in a generic context to compare the importance of particle deposition versus directwater uptake as a function of chemical properties (log Kow) and concentration of suspended solids in the water column. The generic application demonstrated that contaminant mass transfer is dominated by particle deposition for chemicals with log Kow greater than approximately 5.5--6 across a wide range of suspended solid concentrations and can be important even for low log Kow substances in some circumstances. Further empirical and modeling studies are recommended to explore this process more comprehensively.

  18. Vanadium haloperoxidase-catalyzed bromination and cyclization of terpenes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter-Franklin, Jayme N; Parrish, Jon D; Tschirret-Guth, Richard A; Little, R Daniel; Butler, Alison

    2003-04-02

    Marine red algae (Rhodophyta) are a rich source of bioactive halogenated natural products, including cyclic terpenes. The biogenesis of certain cyclic halogenated marine natural products is thought to involve marine haloperoxidase enzymes. Evidence is presented that vanadium bromoperoxidase (V-BrPO) isolated and cloned from marine red algae that produce halogenated compounds (e.g., Plocamium cartilagineum, Laurencia pacifica, Corallina officinalis) can catalyze the bromination and cyclization of terpenes and terpene analogues. The V-BrPO-catalyzed reaction with the monoterpene nerol in the presence of bromide ion and hydrogen peroxide produces a monobromo eight-membered cyclic ether similar to laurencin, a brominated C15 acetogenin, from Laurencia glandulifera, along with noncyclic bromohydrin, epoxide, and dibromoproducts; however, reaction of aqueous bromine with nerol produced only noncyclic bromohydrin, epoxide, and dibromoproducts. The V-BrPO-catalyzed reaction with geraniol in the presence of bromide ion and hydrogen peroxide produces two singly brominated six-membered cyclic products, analogous to the ring structures of alpha and beta snyderols, brominated sesquiterpenes from Laurencia, spp., along with noncyclic bromohydrin, epoxide, and dibromoproducts; again, reaction of geraniol with aqueous bromine produces only noncyclic bromohydrin, epoxide, and dibromoproducts. Thus, V-BrPO can direct the electrophilic bromination and cyclization of terpenes.

  19. Bromine-Chlorine Coupling in the Antarctic Ozone Hole

    Science.gov (United States)

    Danilin, Michael Y.; Sze, Nien-Dak; Ko, Malcolm K. W.; Rodriquez, Jose M.; Prather, Michael J.

    1996-01-01

    The contribution from the chlorine and bromine species in the formation of the Antarctic ozone hole is evaluated. Since chlorine and bromine compounds are of different industrial origin, it is desirable, from a policy point of view, to be able to attribute chlorine-catalyzed loss of ozone with those reactions directly involving chlorine species, and likewise for bromine-catalyzed loss. In the stratosphere, however, most of the chemical families are highly coupled, and, for example, changes in the chlorine abundance will alter the partitioninig in other families and thus the rate of ozone loss. This modeling study examines formation of the Antarctic ozone hole for a wide range of bromine concentrations (5 - 25 pptv) and for chlorine concentrations typical of the last two decades (1.5, 2.5 and 3.5 ppbv). We follow the photochemical evolution of a single parcel of air, typical of the inner Antarctic vortex (50 mbar, 70 deg. S, NO(sub y) = 2 ppbv, with Polar Stratospheric Clouds(PSC)) from August 1 to November 1. For all of these ranges of chlorine and bromine loading, we would predict a substantial ozone hole (local depletion greater than 90%) within the de-nitrified, PSC- perturbed vortex. The contributions of the different catalytic cycles responsible for ozone loss are tabulated. The deep minimum in ozone is driven primarily by the chlorine abundance. As bromine levels decrease, the magnitude of the chlorine-catalyzed ozone loss increases to take up the slack. This is because bromine suppresses ClO by accelerating the conversion of ClO an Cl2O2 back to HCI. For this range of conditions, the local relative efficiency of ozone destruction per bromine atom to that per chlorine atom (alpha-factor) ranges from 33 to 55, decreasing with increase of bromine.

  20. Brominated flame retardants and organochlorine pollutants in eggs of little owls (Athene noctua) from Belgium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaspers, Veerle [Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Campus Drie Eiken, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Covaci, Adrian [Toxicological Centre, University of Antwerp, Campus Drie Eiken, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)]. E-mail: adrian.covaci@ua.ac.be; Maervoet, Johan [Toxicological Centre, University of Antwerp, Campus Drie Eiken, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Dauwe, Tom [Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Campus Drie Eiken, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Voorspoels, Stefan [Toxicological Centre, University of Antwerp, Campus Drie Eiken, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Schepens, Paul [Toxicological Centre, University of Antwerp, Campus Drie Eiken, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium); Eens, Marcel [Department of Biology, University of Antwerp, Campus Drie Eiken, Universiteitsplein 1, 2610 Wilrijk (Belgium)

    2005-07-15

    Residues of brominated diphenylethers (PBDEs), organochlorinated pesticides (OCPs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were measured in 40 eggs of little owls (Athene noctua), a terrestrial top predator from Belgium. The major organohalogens detected were PCBs (median 2,600 ng/g lipid, range 790-23000 ng/g lipid). PCB 153,138/163, 170, 180 and 187 were the predominant congeners and constituted 71% of total sum PCBs. PBDEs were measurable in all samples, but their concentrations were much lower than for PCBs, with a range from 29-572 ng/g lipid (median 108 ng/g lipid). The most prevalent PBDE congeners in little owl egg samples were BDE 47, 99 and 153. This profile differs from the profile in marine bird species, for which BDE 47 was the dominant congener, indicating that terrestrial birds may be more exposed to higher brominated BDE congeners than marine birds. The fully brominated BDE 209 could be detected in one egg sample (17 ng/g lipid), suggesting that higher brominated BDEs may accumulate in terrestrial food chains. Brominated biphenyl (BB) 153 was determined in all egg samples, with levels ranging from 0.6 to 5.6 ng/g lipid (median 1.3 ng/g lipid). Additionally, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) could be identified and quantified in only two eggs at levels of 20 and 50 ng/g lipid. OCPs were present at low concentrations, suggesting a rather low contamination of the sampled environment with OCPs (median concentrations of sum DDTs: 826 ng/g lipid, sum chlordanes: 1,016 ng/g lipid, sum HCHs: 273 ng/g lipid). Hexachlorobenzene (HCB) and octachlorostyrene (OCS) were also found at low median levels of 134 and 3.4 ng/g lipid, respectively. Concentrations of most analytes were significantly higher in eggs collected from deserted nests in comparison to addled (unhatched) eggs, while eggshell thickness did not differ between deserted and addled eggs. No significant correlations were found between eggshell thickness and the analysed organohalogens. - PBDEs are measurable

  1. Snowmelt onset hinders bromine monoxide heterogeneous recycling in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burd, Justine A.; Peterson, Peter K.; Nghiem, Son V.; Perovich, Don K.; Simpson, William R.

    2017-08-01

    Reactive bromine radicals (bromine atoms, Br, and bromine monoxide, BrO) deplete ozone and alter tropospheric oxidation chemistry during the Arctic springtime (February-June). As spring transitions to summer (May-June) and snow begins to melt, reactive bromine events cease and BrO becomes low in summer. In this study, we explore the relationship between the end of the reactive bromine season and snowmelt timing. BrO was measured by Multi-AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectrometer at Utqiaġvik (Barrow), AK, from 2012 to 2016 and on drifting buoys deployed in Arctic sea ice from 2011 to 2016, a total of 13 site and year combinations. The BrO seasonal end date (SED) was objectively determined and was compared to surface-air-temperature-derived melt onset date (MOD). The SED was highly correlated with the MOD (N = 13, R2 = 0.983, RMS = 1.9 days), and BrO is only observed at subfreezing temperatures. In subsets of these sites and years where ancillary data were available, we observed that snowpack depth reduced and rain precipitation occurred within a few days of the SED. These data are consistent with snowpack melting hindering BrO recycling, which is necessary to maintain enhanced BrO concentrations. With a projected warmer Arctic, a shift to earlier snowmelt seasons could alter the timing and role of halogen chemical reactions in the Arctic with impacts on ozone depletion and mercury deposition.Plain Language SummaryReactive bromine events in the Arctic are common in spring and deplete ozone and cause mercury deposition. These events are affected by snow and ice, which are changing in the Arctic; therefore, we need to understand how environmental conditions affect reactive bromine chemistry. We find that the reactive bromine season ends when snowpack begins to melt. Through these full seasonal observations, we find that reactive bromine events occur to warmer temperatures than previously reported, with 0°C being the observed threshold above which reactive

  2. Feasibility of biochar manufactured from organic wastes on the stabilization of heavy metals in a metal smelter contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelhafez, Ahmed A; Li, Jianhua; Abbas, Mohamed H H

    2014-12-01

    The main objectives of the current study were to evaluate the potential effects of biochar derived from sugar cane bagasse (SC-BC) and orange peel (OP-BC) on improving the physicochemical properties of a metal smelter contaminated soil, and determining its potentiality for stabilizing Pb and As in soil. To achieve these goals, biochar was produced in a small-scale biochar producing plant, and an incubation experiment was conducted using a silt loam metal-contaminated soil treated with different application rates of biochar (0-10% w/w). The obtained results showed that, the addition of SC-BC and OP-BC increased significantly the soil aggregate stability, water-holding capacity, cation exchange capacity, organic matter and N-status in soil. SC-BC considerably decreased the solubility of Pb to values lower than the toxic regulatory level of the toxicity characteristics leaching procedure extraction (5 mg L(-1)). The rise in soil pH caused by biochar application, and the increase of soil organic matter transformed the labile Pb into less available fractions i.e. "Fe-Mn oxides" and "organic" bound fractions. On the other hand, As was desorbed from Fe-Mn oxides, which resulted in greater mobility of As in the treated soil. We concluded that SC-BC and OP-BC could be used successfully for remediating soils highly contaminated with Pb. However, considerable attention should be paid when using it in soil contaminated with As. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. The relationship between body organ doses and surface dosemeter readings resulting from an infinite area of contamination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eleftherakis, A. [Aeronautical and Maritime Research Laboratory, Melbourne, VIC (Australia); Rosen, R. [University of New South Wales, Kensington, NSW (Australia). School of Safety Science

    1999-03-01

    Complementary experimental and theoretical techniques were employed to investigate the relationship between radiation doses measured on the surface of the body with those received by internal body organs, for a person standing on an infinite surface uniformly contaminated with gamma emitting radioactive material. This relationship for the critical organs (bone marrow, gastro-intestinal tract and brain) can be used to assess the likely biological response of persons receiving acute or chronic whole body doses of radiation. The experimental technique involved the use of a rotating RANDO phantom which was irradiated with discrete {sup 137}Cs and {sup 60}Co sources placed at successive distances up to 20 m. The experimental dose rates were then extrapolated to derive the equivalent dose rates from an infinite area of contamination. Doses were measured by TLD detectors placed on and inside the phantom. A commercially available Monte Carlo dosimetric computer code, DISDOS-INHOPHO, which incorporated a mathematical phantom, was selected for the theoretical treatment. Extensive modifications were made to the computer code to simulate ground contamination; to account for the transport of photons through air and soil; and to calculate doses delivered to surface dosemeters. The results from the experimental and theoretical work were expressed as organ-to-surface dose ratios and as organ-to-air dose ratios to permit their direct intercomparison. The average of the dose ratio relating the critical organ dose to a surface dosemeter reading had a value of 0.81. Similarly, the dose ratio value for the effective dose had a value of 0.83 7 refs., 1 tab.

  4. Investigation the foam dynamics capacity of SDS in foam generator by affecting the presence of organic and inorganic contaminant

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haryanto, Bode; Siswarni, M. Z.; Sianipar, Yosef C. H.; Sinaga, Tongam M. A.; Bestari, Imam

    2017-05-01

    The effect of negative charge SDS monomer on its foam capacity with the presence of contaminants was investigated in foam generator. Generally, surfactant with higher concentration has higher foam capacity. The higher concentration will increase the number of monomer then increase the micelles in liquid phase. Increasing the number of monomer with the negative charge is a potential to increase interaction with metal ion with positive charge in solution. The presence of inorganic compound as metal ion with positive charge and organic compound (colloid) as particle of coffee impacting to generate the foam lamella with monomer is evaluated. Foam dynamic capacity of only SDS with variation of CMC, 1 x; 2 x; 3 x have the height 7.5, 8.0 and 8.3 cm respectively with the different range time were investigated. The Height of foam dynamic capacity with the presence of 20 ppm Cd2+ ion contaminant was 8.0, 8.3 and 8.4 cm at the same CMC variation of SDS. The presence of metal ion contaminant within the foam was confirmed by AAS. The black coffee particles and oil as contaminant decreased the foam capacity significantly in comparing to metal ions.

  5. Micropore clogging by leachable pyrogenic organic carbon: A new perspective on sorption irreversibility and kinetics of hydrophobic organic contaminants to black carbon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bingyu; Zhang, Wei; Li, Hui; Fu, Heyun; Qu, Xiaolei; Zhu, Dongqiang

    2017-01-01

    Black carbon (BC) plays a crucial role in sequestering hydrophobic organic contaminants in the environment. This study investigated key factors and mechanisms controlling nonideal sorption (e.g., sorption irreversibility and slow kinetics) of model hydrophobic organic contaminants (nitrobenzene, naphthalene, and atrazine) by rice-straw-derived BC. After removing the fraction of leachable pyrogenic organic carbon (LPyOC) (referring to composites of dissoluble non-condensed organic carbon and associated mineral components) with deionized water or 0.5 M NaOH, sorption of these sorbates to BC was enhanced. The sorption enhancement was positively correlated with sorbate molecular size in the order of atrazine > naphthalene > nitrobenzene. The removal of LPyOC also accelerated sorption kinetics and reduced sorption irreversibility. These observations were attributed to increased accessibility of BC micropores initially clogged by the LPyOC. Comparison of BC pore size distributions before and after atrazine sorption further suggested that the sorbate molecules preferred to access the micropores that were more open, and the micropore accessibility was enhanced by the removal of LPyOC. Consistently, the sorption of nitrobenzene and atrazine to template-synthesized mesoporous carbon (CMK3), a model sorbent with homogeneous pore structures, showed decreased kinetics, but increased irreversibility by impregnating sorbent pores with surface-grafted alkylamino groups and by subsequent loading of humic acid. These findings indicated an important and previously unrecognized role of LPyOC (i.e., micropore clogging) in the nonideal sorption of organic contaminants to BC. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. WEEE plastic sorting for bromine essential to enforce EU regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennebert, Pierre; Filella, Montserrat

    2018-01-01

    The plastics of waste of electric and electronic equipment (WEEE) are improved for fire safety by flame retardants, and particularly brominated flame retardants (BFR). As waste, the management of these plastic fractions must comply with the update of the regulation of waste hazard classification (2014, 2017), the publication of a technical standard on management of WEEE (2015), and a restriction of use for decabromodiphenylether in the product regulation (2017). Data of bromine (n=4283) and BFR concentrations (n=98) in plastics from electric and electronic equipment (EEE), and from WEEE processing facilities before and after sorting for bromine in four sites in France have been studied for chemical composition and for regulatory classification. The WEEE was analysed by handheld X-ray fluorescence, and the waste was sorted after shredding, by on-line X-ray transmission for total bromine content ( 2000 mg/kg) in small household appliances (SHA), cathode ray tubes (CRT) and flat screens plastics. In equipment (n=347), 15% of the equipment items have no bromine, while 46% have at least one part with bromine, and 39% have all parts brominated. The bromine concentration in plastics is very heterogeneous, found in high concentrations in large household appliance (LHA) plastics, and also found in unexpected product categories, as observed by other authors. Clearly, an unwanted global loop of brominated substances occurs via the international recycling of plastic scrap. In waste (n=65), polybromobiphenyls, polybromodiphenylethers (PBDE), tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) and hexabromocyclododecane were analysed. The most concentrated BFRs are decaBDE (3000 mg/kg) and TBBPA (8000 mg/kg). The bromine concentration of regulated brominated substances was identified in 2014 and 2015 to be up to 86% of total bromine in "old" waste (SHA, CRT), 30-50% in "younger" waste (Flat screens), and a mean of only 8% in recent products (2009-2013). Regulated substances are a minority of

  7. Organic and metal contamination in marine surface sediments of Guánica Bay, Puerto Rico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitall, David; Mason, Andrew; Pait, Anthony; Brune, Lia; Fulton, Michael; Wirth, Ed; Vandiver, Lisa

    2014-03-15

    Land based sources of pollution have the potential to adversely impact valuable coral reef ecosystems. In Guánica Bay (Puerto Rico) sediment samples collected and analyzed in 2009 demonstrate unusually high concentrations of total chlordane, total PCBs, nickel and chromium. A variety of other contaminants (total DDT, total PAHs, As, Cu, Hg, and Zn) were also at levels which may indicate sediment toxicity. With the exception of chromium, all of these contaminants were detected in coral tissues (Porites astreoides), although it is unclear at what level these contaminants affect coral health. PCBs and chlordane are environmentally persistent and likely represent legacy pollution from historical uses in close geographic proximity to the Bay. We hypothesize that the high nickel and chromium levels are due to a combination of naturally high Ni and Cr in rock and soils in the watershed, and enhanced (human driven) erosional rates. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  8. A model compound study: The ecotoxicological evaluation of five organic contaminants employing a battery of marine bioassays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Macken, Ailbhe [Radiation and Environmental Science Centre, Focas Institute, DIT, Kevin Street, Dublin 8 (Ireland)], E-mail: ailbhe.macken@dit.ie; Giltrap, Michelle [Radiation and Environmental Science Centre, Focas Institute, DIT, Kevin Street, Dublin 8 (Ireland); Marine Institute, Rinville, Oranmore, Co. Galway (Ireland)], E-mail: michelle.giltrap@marine.ie; Foley, Barry [School of Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences, DIT, Kevin Street, Dublin 8 (Ireland)], E-mail: barry.foley@dit.ie; McGovern, Evin [Marine Institute, Rinville, Oranmore, Co. Galway (Ireland)], E-mail: evin.mcgovern@marine.ie; McHugh, Brendan [Marine Institute, Rinville, Oranmore, Co. Galway (Ireland)], E-mail: brendan.mchugh@marine.ie; Davoren, Maria [Radiation and Environmental Science Centre, Focas Institute, DIT, Kevin Street, Dublin 8 (Ireland)], E-mail: maria.davoren@dit.ie

    2008-06-15

    This paper describes the ecotoxicological evaluation of five organic contaminants frequently detected in marine sediments (tributyltin, triphenyltin, benzo[a]pyrene, fluoranthene, and PCB 153) using three marine species (Vibrio fischeri, Tetraselmis suecica, and Tisbe battagliai). The sensitivity of each species varied for all compounds. The triorganotins were consistently the most toxic to all species. The applicability of each test system to assess the acute toxicity of environmental contaminants and their use in Toxicity Identification Evaluation (TIE) is discussed. Suitability of the Microtox and T. battagliai tests for employment in TIE studies were further assessed through spiking experiments with tributyltin. Results demonstrated that the most effective treatment to remove organotin toxicity from the sample was the C{sub 18} resin. The results of this study have important implications for risk assessment in estuarine and coastal waters in Ireland, where, at present the monitoring of sediment and water quality is predominantly reliant on chemical analysis alone. - Ecotoxicological evaluation of five organic marine sediment contaminants was conducted and the suitability of the test species for marine porewater TIE discussed.

  9. On-line orientation of bromine isotopes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barham, C.G.; Alghamdi, S.S.; Grant, I.S. (Schuster Lab., Manchester Univ. (United Kingdom)); Bhagwat, A.; Singleton, B.D.D.; Walker, P.M. (Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom)); Booth, M.; Lindroos, M.; Rikovska, J.; Stone, N.J. (Clarendon Lab., Oxford Univ. (United Kingdom))

    1992-11-01

    Assignments for the principal Nilsson configuration in light [beta][sup +]-decaying bromine isotopes were proposed in a contribution to the OLNO-1 conference. These assignments were made on the basis of magnetic moments derived from the temperature dependence of anisotropies in daughter Se isotopes observed in the DOLIS-COLD facility at Daresbury. Anisotropy measurements have since been extended to a lower base temperature in [sup 74m]Br and [sup 72g]Br decay, leading to more stringent limits on the ground state moment of [sup 72]Br. The proposed [pi][312]3/2 configuration for [sup 75]Br has also now been confirmed by a measurement of the sign of its magnetic moment. This was done by observing the [beta]-asymmetry in [sup 75]Br decay using high purity Si detectors mounted within the dilution refrigerator. (orig.).

  10. Magnetic trapping of cold bromine atoms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rennick, C J; Lam, J; Doherty, W G; Softley, T P

    2014-01-17

    Magnetic trapping of bromine atoms at temperatures in the millikelvin regime is demonstrated for the first time. The atoms are produced by photodissociation of Br2 molecules in a molecular beam. The lab-frame velocity of Br atoms is controlled by the wavelength and polarization of the photodissociation laser. Careful selection of the wavelength results in one of the pair of atoms having sufficient velocity to exactly cancel that of the parent molecule, and it remains stationary in the lab frame. A trap is formed at the null point between two opposing neodymium permanent magnets. Dissociation of molecules at the field minimum results in the slowest fraction of photofragments remaining trapped. After the ballistic escape of the fastest atoms, the trapped slow atoms are lost only by elastic collisions with the chamber background gas. The measured loss rate is consistent with estimates of the total cross section for only those collisions transferring sufficient kinetic energy to overcome the trapping potential.

  11. Dioxins, chlorophenols and other chlorinated organic pollutants in colloidal and water fractions of groundwater from a contaminated sawmill site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Ylva; Shchukarev, Andrei; Oberg, Lars; Tysklind, Mats

    2008-09-01

    The distribution of chlorinated organic contaminants in groundwater and the importance of colloids were studied in groundwater from a sawmill site contaminated by chlorophenol preservatives. The groundwater was fractionated into three different size ranges: (1) >0.7 microm, (2) 0.4-0.7 microm and (3) 0.2-0.4 microm and the filtered water phase. The concentrations of chlorophenols (CP), chlorinated phenoxy phenols (PCPP), chlorinated diphenyl ethers (PCDE), chlorinated dibenzofurans (PCDF) and chlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDD) were determined in each fraction. The colloids were characterised regarding the chemical composition using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). Chlorophenols were mostly found in the water fraction and PCDD/Fs were found almost exclusively in the particulate fractions. For example, the filtered water phase contained 2,100 microg l(-1) and 0.72 ng l(-1) for CPs and PCDD/Fs, respectively, and the particulate fractions contained 27 microg l(-1) and 32 ng l(-1) for CPs and PCDD/Fs, respectively. XPS evaluation of the particulate phases showed no correlation between the surface chemistry of the particle properties and the distribution of chlorinated compounds. The results suggest that groundwater transport of CPs, PCPPs, PCDEs and PCDD/Fs may occur from contaminated sawmill sites and that the colloid-facilitated transport, especially of PCDD/Fs, is substantial. The results correlated well with previous studies of compounds sorbed to dissolved organic carbon, which indicate that dissolved and colloidal organic carbon facilitated the transport of PCDEs, PCDFs and PCDDs particularly. Several classes of chlorinated compounds were readily detected in the groundwater samples. Due to the differences in their physicochemical properties, CPs, PCPPs, PCDEs and PCDD/Fs vary in their partitioning between colloidal fractions and the filtered groundwater. The proportion of the bound fraction increased with an increasing hydrophobicity of the chlorinated

  12. Cadmium, lead and bromine in beached microplastics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massos, Angelo; Turner, Andrew

    2017-08-01

    Samples of microplastic (n = 924) from two beaches in south west England have been analysed by field-portable-x-ray fluorescence (FP-XRF) spectrometry, configured in a low-density mode and with a small-spot facility, for the heavy metals, Cd and Pb, and the halogen, Br. Primary plastics in the form of pre-production pellets were the principal type of microplastic (>70%) on both beaches, with secondary, irregularly-shaped fragments representing the remainder of samples. Cadmium and Pb were detected in 6.9% and 7.5% of all microplastics, respectively, with concentrations of either metal that exceeded 103 μg g-1 usually encountered in red and yellow pellets or fragments. Respective correlations of Cd and Pb with Se and Cr were attributed to the presence of the coloured, inorganic pigments, cadmium sulphoselenide and lead chromate. Bromine, detected in 10.4% of microplastics and up to concentrations of about 13,000 μg g-1, was mainly encountered in neutrally-coloured pellets. Its strong correlation with Sb, whose oxides are effective fire suppressant synergists, suggests the presence of a variety of brominated flame retardants arising from the recycling of plastics originally used in casings for heat-generating electrical equipment. The maximum bioaccessible concentrations of Cd and Pb, evaluated using a physiological extraction based on the chemical characteristics of the proventriculus-gizzard of the northern fulmar, were about 50 μg g-1 and 8 μg g-1, respectively. These concentrations exceed those estimated for the diet of local seabirds by factors of about 50 and 4, respectively. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Genetically Engineering Bacillus subtilis with a Heat-Resistant Arsenite Methyltransferase for Bioremediation of Arsenic-Contaminated Organic Waste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ke; Chen, Chuan; Shen, Qirong; Rosen, Barry P.

    2015-01-01

    Organic manures may contain high levels of arsenic (As) due to the use of As-containing growth-promoting substances in animal feed. To develop a bioremediation strategy to remove As from organic waste, Bacillus subtilis 168, a bacterial strain which can grow at high temperature but is unable to methylate and volatilize As, was genetically engineered to express the arsenite S-adenosylmethionine methyltransferase gene (CmarsM) from the thermophilic alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae. The genetically engineered B. subtilis 168 converted most of the inorganic As in the medium into dimethylarsenate and trimethylarsine oxide within 48 h and volatized substantial amounts of dimethylarsine and trimethylarsine. The rate of As methylation and volatilization increased with temperature from 37 to 50°C. When inoculated into an As-contaminated organic manure composted at 50°C, the modified strain significantly enhanced As volatilization. This study provides a proof of concept of using genetically engineered microorganisms for bioremediation of As-contaminated organic waste during composting. PMID:26187966

  14. INVESTIGATION OF THE NON THERMAL PLASMA-BASED ADVANCED OXIDATION PROCESS FOR REMOVAL OF ORGANIC CONTAMINANTS IN AZO DYES SOLUTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tota Pirdo Kasih

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study deals with the development of non thermal plasma-based AOPs for removal of organic contaminants in wastewater treatment. The plasma itself is generated based on point-to-point geometry under organic solution and can generate hydroxyl radicals, ozone, peroxide and other radicals as the basic species to destruct organic contaminants. Electrical diagnostic in the form of voltage and current waveform was investigated through the variation of time during the formation of plasma channeling. The evolutions of plasma channeling with its physical phenomena were also discussed. The relationship between the electrodes distance towards applied voltage to sustain the plasma were also studied. It was found that the mineralization have occurred during plasma treatment to transform the harmful functional group in organic dye solution into harmless species. Simultaneously, the decoloration process by using this submerged plasma treatment system is able to change the orange color of methyl orange solution into clearly transparent water in 30 minutes. The present findings may provide the plasma-based advanced oxidation process as a promising chemical-free and cost competitive AOP process application on specially the waste water treatment in textile industry.

  15. Removal of organic contaminants from secondary effluent by anodic oxidation with a boron-doped diamond anode as tertiary treatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia-Segura, Sergi, E-mail: sergigarcia@ub.edu [Advanced Water Management Centre, The University of Queensland, Level 4, Gehrmann Bld. (60), St Lucia, QLD 072 (Australia); Laboratori d’Electroquímica dels Materials i del Medi Ambient, Departament de Química Física, Facultat de Química, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Keller, Jürg [Advanced Water Management Centre, The University of Queensland, Level 4, Gehrmann Bld. (60), St Lucia, QLD 072 (Australia); Brillas, Enric [Laboratori d’Electroquímica dels Materials i del Medi Ambient, Departament de Química Física, Facultat de Química, Universitat de Barcelona, Martí i Franquès 1-11, 08028 Barcelona (Spain); Radjenovic, Jelena, E-mail: j.radjenovic@awmc.uq.edu.au [Advanced Water Management Centre, The University of Queensland, Level 4, Gehrmann Bld. (60), St Lucia, QLD 072 (Australia)

    2015-02-11

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Mineralization of secondary effluent by anodic oxidation with BDD anode. • Complete removal of 29 pharmaceuticals and pesticides at trace level concentrations. • Organochlorine and organobromine byproducts were formed at low μM concentrations. • Chlorine species evolution assessed to evaluate the anodic oxidation applicability. - Abstract: Electrochemical advanced oxidation processes (EAOPs) have been widely investigated as promising technologies to remove trace organic contaminants from water, but have rarely been used for the treatment of real waste streams. Anodic oxidation with a boron-doped diamond (BDD) anode was applied for the treatment of secondary effluent from a municipal sewage treatment plant containing 29 target pharmaceuticals and pesticides. The effectiveness of the treatment was assessed from the contaminants decay, dissolved organic carbon and chemical oxygen demand removal. The effect of applied current and pH was evaluated. Almost complete mineralization of effluent organic matter and trace contaminants can be obtained by this EAOP primarily due to the action of hydroxyl radicals formed at the BDD surface. The oxidation of Cl{sup −} ions present in the wastewater at the BDD anode gave rise to active chlorine species (Cl{sub 2}/HClO/ClO{sup −}), which are competitive oxidizing agents yielding chloramines and organohalogen byproducts, quantified as adsorbable organic halogen. However, further anodic oxidation of HClO/ClO{sup −} species led to the production of ClO{sub 3}{sup −} and ClO{sub 4}{sup −} ions. The formation of these species hampers the application as a single-stage tertiary treatment, but posterior cathodic reduction of chlorate and perchlorate species may reduce the risks associated to their presence in the environment.

  16. Steroid markers to assess sewage and other sources of organic contaminants in surface sediments of Cienfuegos Bay, Cuba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolosa, I; Mesa, M; Alonso-Hernandez, C M

    2014-09-15

    Analyses of faecal steroids in coastal sediments from Cienfuegos Bay Cuba indicate chronic sewage contamination at the main outfalls from the city, where concentrations of coprostanol up to 5400ngg(-)(1) (dry wt) were measured. In contrast, steroid concentrations and compositions from sites from the south part of the Bay are characteristic of uncontaminated sewage environments. The levels of coprostanol in the Cienfuegos sediments compares to the lower to mid-range of concentrations reported for coastal sediments on a world-wide basis, with sedimentary levels markedly below those previously reported for heavily impacted sites. This study delivers baseline data for further investigation of the effectiveness of the proposed sewerage plan promoted by the GEF project in Cienfuegos. Investigations on the correlations between faecal steroids and other organic contaminants confirmed that the major source of petroleum hydrocarbons within the bay was associated with the sewage effluents from the Cienfuegos city. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Western Canadian Arctic ringed seal organic contaminant trends in relation to sea ice break-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaden, A; Ferguson, Steve H; Harwood, L; Melling, H; Alikamik, J; Stern, G A

    2012-04-17

    The association between changing sea ice conditions and contaminant exposure to Arctic animals interests Inuvialuit harvesters, communities, and researchers. We examined organochlorine contaminant (OC) concentrations in the blubber of 90 male adult ringed seals (Phoca hispida) sampled from the subsistence harvest in Ulukhaktok (formerly Holman), NT, Canada, just prior to break-up of the sea ice (1993-2008). OC blubber concentrations were assessed with respect to year and sea ice break-up date. HCB and age- and blubber-adjusted concentrations of p,p'-DDT and ΣCHB (chlorobornane) significantly decreased over the study period. With respect to the timing of the spring break-up, highly lipophlic OCs, such as p,p'-DDE and PCB 153, were higher during years of early ice clearing (at least 12 days earlier than the mean annual break-up date), whereas no trends were observed for α, β, and γ isomers of HCH, trans- and cis-chlordane, oxychlordane, or ΣCHB. The higher contaminant concentrations found in earlier break-up years is likely due to earlier and/or increased foraging opportunities. This situation also has potential for enhancing bioaccumulation and biomagnification of contaminants over the long-term if projected changes continue to result in lighter and earlier ice conditions.

  18. REMOVAL OF ORGANIC CCL CONTAMINANTS FROM DRINKING WATERS BY GAC, AIR STRIPPING, AND MEMBRANE PROCESSES

    Science.gov (United States)

    The 1996 amendments to the Safe Drinking Water Act (SWDA) require the US Environmental Protection Agency (USEPA) to establish a list of unregulated microbiological and chemical contaminants to aid in priority-setting for the Agency's drinking water program. This list, known as t...

  19. Reactions Between Contaminants and Functionalized Organic Self-Assembled Monolayers in Aqueous Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-16

    Introduction The subject of microbiological contamination in water has long been a major public concern, where microorganisms such as coliform bacteria...15597 B-1) were prepared in suspension (DPBS) using their host cells E. coli (ATCC 15597). Active cultures of the E. coli host were first cultivated

  20. REMOVAL OF ORGANIC DYES FROM CONTAMINATED WATER USING COFE2O4 /REDUCED GRAPHENE OXIDE NANOCOMPOSITE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Sakhaei

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Up to now, lots of materials such as active carbon, iron, manganese, zirconium, and metal oxides have been widely used for removal of dyes from contaminated water. Among these, ferrite nanoparticle is an interesting magnetic material due to its moderate saturation magnetization, excellent chemical stability and mechanical hardness. Graphene, a new class of 2D carbonaceous material with atom thick layer features, has attracted much attention recently due to its high specific surface area. Reduced graphene oxide (rGO has also been of great interest because of its unique properties, which are similar to those of graphene, such as specific surface area, making it an ideal candidate for dye removal. Thus far, few works have been carried out on the preparation of CoFe2O4-rGO composite and its applications in removal of contaminants from water. In this paper, CoFe2O4 reduced graphene oxide nanocomposite was fabricated using hydrothermal process. During the hydrothermal process, the reduction of graphene oxide and growth of CoFe2O4 simultaneously occurred on the carbon basal planes under the conditions generated in the hydrothermal system. The samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy contaminant and UV-Vis spectroscopy as the analytical method. The experimental results suggest that this material has great potential for treating Congo red contaminated water.

  1. The metabolism and de-bromination of bromotyrosine in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Mani (Ali); J.C. Moreno (José C.); T.J. Visser (Theo); K.P. Moore (Kevin P.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractDuring inflammation, leukocyte-derived eosinophil peroxidase catalyses the formation of hypobromous acid, which can brominate tyrosine residues in proteins to form bromotyrosine. Since eosinophils are involved in the pathogenesis of allergic reactions, such as asthma, urinary

  2. C-6 regioselective bromination of methyl indolyl-3-acetate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suárez-Castillo, Oscar R; Meléndez-Rodríguez, Myriam; Beiza-Granados, Lidia; Cano-Escudero, Indira C; Morales-Ríos, Martha S; Joseph-Nathan, Pedro

    2011-04-01

    An efficient route to natural occurring methyl 6-bromoindolyl-3-acetate 1c from methyl indolyl-3-acetate 3 was achieved in 3 steps and 68% overall yield. Thus, in order to regioselectively brominate 3 at the C6-position, introduction of electron withdrawing substituents at N1 and C8 was affected to give intermediate 4 in 82% yield. Bromination of 4 with 8 equiv of bromine in CCl4 and washings with aqueous Na2SO3 gave 5 in 86% yield, which was N- and C-decarbomethoxylated by treatment with NaCN in DMSO, affording 1c in 97% yield. The regioselectivity of bromination was evidenced by NMR spectroscopy and X- ray diffraction analysis.

  3. Organization A Comprehensive System Of Insurance Coverage In The Potential Chemical And Biological Contamination Zone In Regions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nina Vladimirovna Zaytseva

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The article provides a scientific rationale for an integrated approach to the provision of insurance coverage in the potential chemical and biological contamination zone. The following modern forms of chemical safety in the Russian Federation were considered: state reserve’s system, target program financing, state social insurance. The separate issue tackles the obligatory civil liability insurance for owners of dangerous objects. For improvement of the existing insurance protection system against emergency situations, risks were analyzed (shared on exogenous and endogenous. Among the exogenous risks including natural and climatic conditions of a region, its geographical arrangement, economic specialization, the seismic and terrorist risks were chosen and approaches to its solution were suggested. In endogenous risks’ group, the special focus is on wear and tear and obsolescence of hazardous chemical and biological object’s fixed assets. In case of high risk of an incident, it is suggested to increase in extent of insurance protection through self-insurance, a mutual insurance in the form of the organization of societies of a mutual insurance or the self-regulating organizations, and also development of voluntary insurance of a civil liability, both the owner of hazardous object, and regions of the Russian Federation and municipalities. The model of insurance coverage in the potential chemical and biological contamination zone is based on a differentiated approach to the danger level of the area. A matrix of adequate forms and types of insurance (required for insurance coverage of the population in the potential chemical and biological contamination zone was constructed. Proposed health risk management toolkit in the potential chemical and biological contamination zone will allow to use financial resources for chemical and biological safety in the regions more efficiently.

  4. Application of passive sampling for measuring dissolved concentrations of organic contaminants in the water column at three marine superfund sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, Robert M; Lohmann, Rainer; Schubauer-Berigan, Joseph P; Reitsma, Pamela; Perron, Monique M; Lefkovitz, Lisa; Cantwell, Mark G

    2015-08-01

    Currently, there is an effort under way to encourage remedial project managers at contaminated sites to use passive sampling to collect freely dissolved concentrations (Cfree ) of hydrophobic organic contaminants to improve site assessments. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the use of passive sampling for measuring water column Cfree for several hydrophobic organic contaminants at 3 US Environmental Protection Agency Superfund sites. Sites investigated included New Bedford Harbor (New Bedford, MA, USA), Palos Verdes Shelf (Los Angeles, CA, USA), and Naval Station Newport (Newport, RI, USA); and the passive samplers evaluated were polyethylene, polydimethylsiloxane-coated solid-phase microextraction fibers, semipermeable membrane devices, and polyoxymethylene. In general, the different passive samplers demonstrated good agreement, with Cfree values varying by a factor of 2 to 3. Further, at New Bedford Harbor, where conventional water sample concentrations were also measured (i.e., grab samples), passive sampler-based Cfree values agreed within a factor of 2. These findings suggest that all of the samplers were experiencing and measuring similar Cfree during their respective deployments. Also, at New Bedford Harbor, a strong log-linear, correlative, and predictive relationship was found between polyethylene passive sampler accumulation and lipid-normalized blue mussel bioaccumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls (r(2)  = 0.92, p < 0.05). The present study demonstrates the utility of passive sampling for generating scientifically accurate water column Cfree values, which is critical for making informed environmental management decisions at contaminated sediment sites. Published 2015 SETAC. This article is a US Government work and is in the public domain in the USA.

  5. Identification of selected organic contaminants in streams associated with agricultural activities and comparison between autosampling and silicone rubber passive sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emelogu, Emmanuel S; Pollard, Pat; Robinson, Craig D; Webster, Lynda; McKenzie, Craig; Napier, Fiona; Steven, Lucy; Moffat, Colin F

    2013-02-15

    This study evaluates the potential of silicone rubber passive sampling devices (SR-PSDs) as a suitable alternative to automatic water samplers (autosamplers) for the preliminary identification of a wide range of organic contaminants in freshwater systems. The field performance of SR-PSDs deployed at three sites on two streams of an agricultural catchment area in North East (NE) Scotland, United Kingdom (UK) was assessed concurrently with composite water samples collected from two of the sites using autosamplers. The analytical suite consisted of selected plant protection products (PPPs; commonly referred to collectively as 'pesticides'), including 47 pesticides and a separate sub-category of 22 acid/urea herbicides. Of these, a total of 54 substances, comprising 46 pesticides and 8 urea herbicides were detected in at least one of the SR samplers. All but 6 of these SR-PSD detected substances were quantifiable. By comparison, a total of 25 substances comprising 3 pesticides and 22 acid/urea herbicides were detected in the composite water samples, of which only 8 acid/urea herbicides were quantifiable. The larger number and chemical classes of compounds detected and quantified via passive sampling reflect the lower limits of detection achieved by this device when compared to autosamplers. The determination of dissolved concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) added to the information on contaminant pressures at each site, allowing assessment of the reliability of SR-PSDs in freshwater systems and the identification of possible contaminant sources. The study demonstrated the utility of SR-PSDs for detecting and semi-quantifying low concentrations of analytes, including those which hitherto have not been measured in the catchment area and also some pesticides that are no longer approved for agricultural use in the UK and EU. The SR-PSD approach can thus provide a better understanding and clearer picture of the use

  6. 1H NMR Metabolomics: A New Molecular Level Tool for Assessment of Organic Contaminant Bioavailability to Earthworms in Soil

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKelvie, J. R.; Wolfe, D. M.; Celejewski, M. A.; Simpson, A. J.; Simpson, M. J.

    2009-05-01

    At contaminated field sites, the complete removal of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) is rarely achieved since a portion of these compounds remain tightly bound to the soil matrix. The concentration of PAHs in soil typically decreases until a plateau is reached, at which point the remaining contaminant is considered non- bioavailable. Numerous soil extraction techniques, including cyclodextrin extraction, have been developed to estimate contaminant bioavailability. However, these are indirect methods that do not directly measure the response of organisms to chemical exposure in soil. Earthworm metabolomics offers a promising new way to directly evaluate the bioavailability and toxicity of contaminants in soil. Metabolomics involves the measurement of changes in small-molecule metabolites, including sugars and amino acids, in living organisms due to an external stress, such as contaminant exposure. The objective of this study was to compare cyclodextrin extraction of soil (a bioavailability proxy) and 1H NMR metabolomic analysis of aqueous earthworm tissue extracts as indicators of contaminant bioavailability. A 30 day laboratory experiment was conducted using phenanthrene-spiked sphagnum peat soil and the OECD recommended earthworm species for toxicity testing, Eisenia fetida. The initial phenanthrene concentration in the soil was 320 mg/kg. Rapid biodegradation of phenanthrene occurred and concentrations decreased to 16 mg/kg within 15 days. After 15 days, phenanthrene biodegradation slowed and cyclodextrin extraction of the soil suggested that phenanthrene was no longer bioavailable. Multivariate statistical analysis of the 1H NMR spectra for E. fetida tissue extracts indicated that the metabolic profile of phenanthrene exposed earthworms differed from control earthworms throughout the 30 day experiment. This suggests that the residual phenanthrene remaining in the soil after 15 days continued to elicit a metabolic response, even though it was not

  7. New Methods for Labeling RGD Peptides with Bromine-76

    OpenAIRE

    Lixin Lang, Weihua Li, Hong-Mei Jia, De-Cai Fang, Shushu Zhang, Xilin Sun, Lei Zhu, Ying Ma, Baozhong Shen, Dale O. Kiesewetter, Gang Niu, Xiaoyuan Chen

    2011-01-01

    Direct bromination of the tyrosine residues of peptides and antibodies with bromine-76, to create probes for PET imaging, has been reported. For peptides that do not contain tyrosine residues, however, a prosthetic group is required to achieve labeling via conjugation to other functional groups such as terminal α-amines or lysine ε-amines. The goal of this study was to develop new strategies for labeling small peptides with Br-76 using either a direct labeling method or a prosthetic...

  8. Development of Bromine-77 from the LAMPF facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mettler, F.A. Jr.

    1982-01-01

    The objective of the work is to conduct the necessary studies required to evaluate the efficacy, potential benefit and role of bromine-77 labelled steroids in the detection and evaluation of treatment for hormone-dependent tumors. The synthetic goals of the project are to prepose estradiol derivatives which are labelled with bromine-77 at specific positions in the steroid nucleus. In addition, animal studies imaging studies, and cooperative studies are being conducted. (KJD)

  9. Detection of novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs in the urban soils of Melbourne, Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas J. McGrath

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available A range of brominated flame retardants (BFRs have been incorporated into polymeric materials like plastics, electronic equipment, foams and textiles to prevent fires. The most common of these, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs, have been subject to legislated bans and voluntary withdrawal by manufacturers in North America, Europe and Australia over the past decade due to long-range atmospheric transport, persistence in the environment, and toxicity. Evidence has shown that replacement novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs are released to the environment by the same mechanisms as PBDEs and share similar hazardous properties. The objective of the current research was to characterize soil contamination by NBFRs in the urban soils of Melbourne, Australia. A variety of industrial and non-industrial land-uses were investigated with the secondary objective of determining likely point sources of pollution. Six NBFRs; pentabromotoluene (PBT, pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB, hexabromobenzene (HBB, 2-ethylhexyl-2,3,4,5-tetrabromobenzoate (EH-TBB, 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxyethane (BTBPE and decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE were measured in 30 soil samples using selective pressurized liquid extraction (S-PLE and gas chromatography coupled to triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-MS/MS. NBFRs were detected in 24/30 soil samples with Σ5NBFR concentrations ranging from nd-385 ng/g dw. HBB was the most frequently detected compound (14/30, while the highest concentrations were observed for DBDPE, followed by BTBPE. Electronic waste recycling and polymer manufacturing appear to be key contributors to NBFR soil contamination in the city of Melbourne. A significant positive correlation between Σ8PBDEs and Σ5NBFR soil concentrations was observed at waste disposal sites to suggest that both BFR classes are present in Melbourne's waste streams, while no association was determined among manufacturing sites. This research provides the first account of NBFRs

  10. A comparison of the in vitro cyto- and neurotoxicity of brominated and halogen-free flame retardants : prioritization in search for safe(r) alternatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Hester S; Meijer, Marieke; Muilwijk, Mirthe; van den Berg, Martin; Westerink, Remco H S

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are abundant persistent organic pollutants with well-studied toxicity. The toxicological and ecological concerns associated with BFRs argue for replacement by safe(r) alternatives. Though previous research identified the nervous system as a sensitive target organ

  11. Terminal elimination half-lives of the brominated flame retardants TBBPA, HBCD, and lower brominated PBDEs in humans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geyer, H.J.; Schramm, K.W.; Feicht, E.A.; Fried, K.W.; Henkelmann, B.; Lenoir, D. [GSF-National Research Center, Institute of Ecological Chemistry, Neuherberg (Germany); Darnerud, P.O.; Aune, M. [Swedish National Food Administration, Uppsala (Sweden); Schmid, P. [Swiss Federal Laboratories for Materials Testing and Research, Laboratory of Organic Chemistry, EMPA Duebendorf (Switzerland); McDonald, T.A. [Office of Environmental Health Assessment, California EPA, Oakland, CA (United States)

    2004-09-15

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are widely used in polymers and textiles and applied in electronic equipment, construction materials, and furniture for the purpose of fire prevention. BFRs with the highest production volume are tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), 1,2,5,6,9,10- hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDs: {alpha}-HBCD + {beta}-HBCD + {gamma}-HBCD), and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs). Several BFRs are highly lipophilic persistent organic pollutants (POPs) which have been identified in the aquatic and terrestrial environment including wildlife and humans. In exposed organisms including humans toxic effects, bioaccumulation, metabolism, and pharmacokinetics (especially half-life t{sub 1/2}) are important criterions in the hazard assessment. The aim of the present study was to estimate the terminal elimination half-lives (t{sub 1/2H}) of the main BFRs from the whole body (also named body-burden half-life) and/or from the adipose tissue (fat) of adult humans. The t{sub 1/2H} data for the following BFRs were evaluated: TBBPA, HBCD, 2,2',4,4'- tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47), 2,2',4,4',5-pentaBDE (BDE-99), 2,2',4,4',6-pentaBDE (BDE- 100), 2,2',4,4',5,5'-hexaBDE (BDE-153), and 2,2',4,4',5,6-hexaBDE (BDE-154).

  12. Signaling in a polluted world: oxidative stress as an overlooked mechanism linking contaminants to animal communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Marasco

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The capacity to communicate effectively with other individuals plays a critical role in the daily life of an individual and can have important fitness consequences. Animals rely on a number of visual and non-visual signals, whose production brings costs to the individual. The theory of honest signaling states that these costs are higher for low than for high-quality individuals, which prevents cheating and makes signals, such as skin and plumage colouration, indicators of individual’s quality or condition. The condition-dependent nature of signals makes them ideally suited as indicators of environmental quality, implying that signal production might be affected by contaminants. In this mini-review article, we have made the point that oxidative stress (OS is one overlooked mechanism linking exposure to contaminants to signaling because (i many contaminants can influence the individual’s oxidative balance, and (ii generation of both visual and non-visual signals is sensitive to oxidative stress. To this end, we have provided the first comprehensive review on the way both non-organic (heavy metals, especially mercury and organic (persistent organic pollutants contaminants may influence either OS or sexual signaling. We have also paid special attention to emerging classes of pollutants like brominated flame-retardants and perfluoroalkoxy alkanes in order to stimulate research in this area. We have finally provided suggestions and warnings for future work on the links among OS, sexual signaling and contaminant exposure.

  13. Expanded Target-Chemical Analysis Reveals Extensive Mixed-Organic-Contaminant Exposure in U.S. Streams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, Paul M; Journey, Celeste A; Romanok, Kristin M; Barber, Larry B; Buxton, Herbert T; Foreman, William T; Furlong, Edward T; Glassmeyer, Susan T; Hladik, Michelle L; Iwanowicz, Luke R; Jones, Daniel K; Kolpin, Dana W; Kuivila, Kathryn M; Loftin, Keith A; Mills, Marc A; Meyer, Michael T; Orlando, James L; Reilly, Timothy J; Smalling, Kelly L; Villeneuve, Daniel L

    2017-05-02

    Surface water from 38 streams nationwide was assessed using 14 target-organic methods (719 compounds). Designed-bioactive anthropogenic contaminants (biocides, pharmaceuticals) comprised 57% of 406 organics detected at least once. The 10 most-frequently detected anthropogenic-organics included eight pesticides (desulfinylfipronil, AMPA, chlorpyrifos, dieldrin, metolachlor, atrazine, CIAT, glyphosate) and two pharmaceuticals (caffeine, metformin) with detection frequencies ranging 66-84% of all sites. Detected contaminant concentrations varied from less than 1 ng L -1 to greater than 10 μg L -1 , with 77 and 278 having median detected concentrations greater than 100 ng L -1 and 10 ng L -1 , respectively. Cumulative detections and concentrations ranged 4-161 compounds (median 70) and 8.5-102 847 ng L -1 , respectively, and correlated significantly with wastewater discharge, watershed development, and toxic release inventory metrics. Log 10 concentrations of widely monitored HHCB, triclosan, and carbamazepine explained 71-82% of the variability in the total number of compounds detected (linear regression; p-values: aquatic health concerns, given their acknowledged potential for sublethal effects to sensitive species and lifecycle stages at low ng L -1 .

  14. INTERACTION’S EFFECT OF ORGANIC MATERIAL AND AGGREGATION ON EXTRACTION EFFICIENCY OF TPHS FROM PETROLEUM CONTAMINATED SOILS WITH MAE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. Ganjidoust and Gh. Naghizadeh

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Microwave-Assisted Extraction (MAE is a type of low-temperature thermal desorption process that its numerous advantages have caused a wide spread use of it. Microwave heating is a potentially attractive technique as it provides volumetric heating process to improve heating efficiencies as compared with conventional techniques. The ability to rapidly heat the sample solvent mixture is inherent to MAE and the main advantage of this technique. Presently MAE has been shown to be one of the best technologies for removing environmental pollutants specially PAHs, phenols and PCBs from soils and sediments. Five different mixtures and types of aggregation (Sand, Top soil, Kaolinite besides three concentrations of crude oil as a contaminant (1000, 5000 and 10000 mg/L were considered. The results indicated that regardless of aggregation, the presence of humus component in soil reduces the efficiency. Minimum and maximum efficiencies were for sandy soil (containing organic components and kaolinite (without any organic content, respectively. According to the results of this research when some amount of humus and organic materials are available in the matrix, it causes the extraction efficiency to perform as a function of just humus materials but not aggregation. Increasing the concentration of crude oil reduced the efficiency with a sharp steep for higher concentration (5000-10000 mg/L and less steeper for lower concentration (1000-5000 mg/L. The concentration of the contaminant, works just as an independent function with extraction time and aggregation factors. The extraction period of 10 min. can be suggested as an optimum extraction time in FMAE for PAHs contaminated soils.

  15. Interactions of carbon nanotubes with aqueous/aquatic media containing organic/inorganic contaminants and selected organisms of aquatic ecosystems--A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boncel, Sławomir; Kyzioł-Komosińska, Joanna; Krzyżewska, Iwona; Czupioł, Justyna

    2015-10-01

    Due to their unique molecular architecture translating into numerous every-day applications, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) will be ultimately an increasingly significant environmental contaminant. This work reviews qualitative/quantitative analyses of interactions of various types of CNTs and their chemically modified analogues with aqueous/aquatic media containing organic and inorganic contaminants and selected organisms of aquatic ecosystems. A special emphasis was placed on physicochemical interactions between CNTs as adsorbents of heavy metal cations and aromatic compounds (dyes) with its environmental consequences. The studies revealed CNTs as more powerful adsorbents of aromatic compounds (an order of magnitude higher adsorption capacity) than metal cations. Depending on the presence of natural organic matter (NOM) and/or co-contaminants, CNTs may act as Trojan horse while passing through biological membranes (in the absence of NOM coordinating metal ions). Nanotubes, depending on flow conditions and their morphology/surface chemistry, may travel with natural waters or sediment with immobilized PAHs or metals and/or increase cyto- and ecotoxicity of PAHs/metal ions by their release via competitive complexation, or cause synergic ecotoxicity while adsorbing nutrients. Additionally, toxicity of CNTs against exemplary aquatic microorganisms was reviewed. It was found for Daphnia magna that longer exposures to CNTs led to higher ecotoxicity with a prolonged CNTs excretion. SWCNTs were more toxic than MWCNTs, while hydrophilization of CNTs via oxidation or anchoring thereto polar/positively charged polymer chains enhanced stability of nanotubes dispersion in aqueous media. On the other hand, bioavailability of functionalized CNTs was improved leading to more complex both mechanisms of uptake and cytotoxic effects. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. ATP bioluminescence method: tool for rapid screening of organic and microbial contaminants on deteriorated mural paintings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Unković, Nikola; Ljaljević Grbić, Milica; Stupar, Miloš; Vukojević, Jelena; Subakov-Simić, Gordana; Jelikić, Aleksa; Stanojević, Dragan

    2015-11-24

    The extent of the microbial contamination of the seventeenth-century wall paintings in the nave of the old Church of the Holy Ascension (Veliki Krčimir, Serbia) was evaluated via newly implemented ATP bioluminescence method, and traditional cultivation-based method, utilising commercially available dip slides. To assess the validity of ATP, as a biomarker for rapid detection of mural surface contamination, obtained zones of cleanliness values, in range from 1.0 to 5.3, were compared to documented total microbial counts, ranging between seven and 247 CFU/cm 2 . Small coefficients of determination, 0.0106-0.0385, suggest poor correlation between microbial counts and surface ATP levels; however, zones of cleanliness values are of great help in determining the high points of contamination, aka 'hotspots', which should be given special attention during sampling and investigation using other methods. In addition, various aspects of the possible implementation of the ATP bioluminescence method in an integrated system of wall painting conservation are discussed.

  17. Biological treatment of soils contaminated with hydrophobic organics using slurry and solid phase techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cassidy, D.P.; Irvine, R.L. [Univ. of Notre Dame, IN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    Both slurry-phase and solid-phase bioremediation are effective ex situ soil decontamination methods. Slurry is energy intensive relative to solid-phase treatment, but provides homogenization and uniform nutrient distribution. Limited contaminant bioavailability at concentrations above the required cleanup level reduces biodegradation rates and renders solid phase bioremediation more cost effective than complete treatment in a bioslurry reactor. Slurrying followed by solid-phase bioremediation combines the advantages and minimizes the weaknesses of each treatment method when used alone. A biological treatment system consisting of slurrying followed by aeration in solid phase bioreactors was developed and tested in the laboratory using a silty clay load contaminated with diesel fuel. The first set of experiments was designed to determine the impact of the water content and mixing time during slurrying on the ate and extent of contaminant removal in continuously aerated solid phase bioreactors. The second set of experiments compared the volatile and total diesel fuel removal in solid phase bioreactors using periodic and continuous aeration strategies.

  18. Spatiotemporal reconstruction of lead contamination using tree rings and organic soil layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aznar, J-C; Richer-Laflèche, M; Bégin, C; Rodrigue, R

    2008-12-15

    An atmospheric dispersion model predicting ground-level concentrations from a point source of metal emissions (Murdochville smelter) was calibrated on tree rings in black spruce (Picea mariana Mill. B.S.P.) in order to reconstruct the spatial and temporal Pb-contamination pattern in the Gaspé Peninsula (Canada). Model predictions were validated with forest-floor Pb concentrations that resulted from accumulation of this element over the years and that provide a robust spatial-deposition pattern. Atmospheric emission records were also used to verify the good agreement between the smelter emissions and the temporal-information pattern present in tree rings. Tree rings that formed during the period of smelter emissions exhibited Pb concentrations that correlated with those measured in humus. Temporal variability in tree-ring concentrations was closely associated with the smelter emissions, suggesting that black spruce trees were able to record Pb pollution from a point source. However, a time gap of at least 15years must be considered between the emissions and the actual uptake and incorporation of Pb in the tree rings. A decrease in the level of contamination in the area was associated with the decrease in smelting activities, suggesting a natural resilience of the forest ecosystems to the contamination. This study highlights the strong potential for combining dendrochemical, soil, and modeling approaches in environmental research.

  19. Emerging organic contaminants in vertical subsurface flow constructed wetlands: influence of media size, loading frequency and use of active aeration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avila, Cristina; Nivala, Jaime; Olsson, Linda; Kassa, Kinfe; Headley, Tom; Mueller, Roland A; Bayona, Josep Maria; García, Joan

    2014-10-01

    Four side-by-side pilot-scale vertical flow (VF) constructed wetlands of different designs were evaluated for the removal of eight widely used emerging organic contaminants from municipal wastewater (i.e. ibuprofen, acetaminophen, diclofenac, tonalide, oxybenzone, triclosan, ethinylestradiol, bisphenol A). Three of the systems were free-draining, with one containing a gravel substrate (VGp), while the other two contained sand substrate (VS1p and VS2p). The fourth system had a saturated gravel substrate and active aeration supplied across the bottom of the bed (VAp). All beds were pulse-loaded on an hourly basis, except VS2p, which was pulse-loaded every 2h. Each system had a surface area of 6.2m(2), received a hydraulic loading rate of 95 mm/day and was planted with Phragmites australis. The beds received an organic loading rate of 7-16 gTOC/m(2)d. The sand-based VF (VS1p) performed significantly better (pwetland (VGp) both in the removal of conventional water quality parameters (TSS, TOC, NH4-N) and studied emerging organic contaminants except for diclofenac (85 ± 17% vs. 74 ± 15% average emerging organic contaminant removal for VS1p and VGp, respectively). Although loading frequency (hourly vs. bi-hourly) was not observed to affect the removal efficiency of the cited conventional water quality parameters, significantly lower removal efficiencies were found for tonalide and bisphenol A for the VF wetland that received bi-hourly dosing (VS2p) (higher volume per pulse), probably due to the more reducing conditions observed in that system. However, diclofenac was the only contaminant showing an opposite trend to the rest of the compounds, achieving higher elimination rates in the wetlands that exhibited less-oxidizing conditions (VS2p and VGp). The use of active aeration in the saturated gravel bed (VAp) generally improved the treatment performance compared to the free-draining gravel bed (VGp) and achieved a similar performance to the free-draining sand-based VF

  20. Alkaline hydrothermal treatment of brominated high impact polystyrene (HIPS-Br) for bromine and bromine-free plastic recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brebu, Mihai; Bhaskar, Thallada; Muto, Akinori; Sakata, Yusaku

    2006-08-01

    A method to recover both Br and Br-free plastic from brominated flame retardant high impact polystyrene (HIPS-Br) was proposed. HIPS-Br containing 15% Br was treated in autoclave at 280 degrees C using water or KOH solution of various amounts and concentrations. Hydrothermal treatment (30 ml water) leads to 90% debromination of 1g HIPS-Br but plastic is strongly degraded and could not be recovered. Alkaline hydrothermal treatment (45 ml or 60 ml KOH 1M) showed similar debromination for up to 12 g HIPS-Br and plastic was recovered as pellets with molecular weight distribution close to that of the initial material. Debromination occurs at melt plastic/KOH solution interface when liquid/vapour equilibrium is attained inside autoclave (280 degrees C and 7 MPa in our experimental conditions) and depends on the plastic amount/KOH volume ratio. The antimony oxide synergist from HIPS-Br remains in recovered plastic during treatment. A pictorial imagination of the proposed debromination process is presented.

  1. Redox potential distribution of an organic-rich contaminated site obtained by the inversion of self-potential data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abbas, M.; Jardani, A.; Soueid Ahmed, A.; Revil, A.; Brigaud, L.; Bégassat, Ph.; Dupont, J. P.

    2017-11-01

    Mapping the redox potential of shallow aquifers impacted by hydrocarbon contaminant plumes is important for the characterization and remediation of such contaminated sites. The redox potential of groundwater is indicative of the biodegradation of hydrocarbons and is important in delineating the shapes of contaminant plumes. The self-potential method was used to reconstruct the redox potential of groundwater associated with an organic-rich contaminant plume in northern France. The self-potential technique is a passive technique consisting in recording the electrical potential distribution at the surface of the Earth. A self-potential map is essentially the sum of two contributions, one associated with groundwater flow referred to as the electrokinetic component, and one associated with redox potential anomalies referred to as the electroredox component (thermoelectric and diffusion potentials are generally negligible). A groundwater flow model was first used to remove the electrokinetic component from the observed self-potential data. Then, a residual self-potential map was obtained. The source current density generating the residual self-potential signals is assumed to be associated with the position of the water table, an interface characterized by a change in both the electrical conductivity and the redox potential. The source current density was obtained through an inverse problem by minimizing a cost function including a data misfit contribution and a regularizer. This inversion algorithm allows the determination of the vertical and horizontal components of the source current density taking into account the electrical conductivity distribution of the saturated and non-saturated zones obtained independently by electrical resistivity tomography. The redox potential distribution was finally determined from the inverted residual source current density. A redox map was successfully built and the estimated redox potential values correlated well with in

  2. Selected emerging organic contaminants in the Yangtze Estuary, China: a comprehensive treatment of their association with aquatic colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Caixia; Yang, Yi; Zhou, Junliang; Nie, Minghua; Liu, Min; Hochella, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    Contaminants that are becoming detected in the environment but are not yet generally regulated or monitored are known collectively as emerging contaminants. In the present study, the occurrence and distribution of 42 emerging organic compounds (EOCs) were investigated in the Yangtze River Estuary and adjacent East China Sea coastal areas. Study compounds were mainly pharmaceuticals, including antibiotics, hormones and sterols, and also included two industrial endocrine disruptors. Samples were analyzed using cross-flow ultrafiltration (CFUF) and ultra-performance liquid chromatograph-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS). Results revealed that chloramphenicols, sulfonamides and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs were the dominant compounds in filtered samples with relatively high concentrations and detection frequencies. EOC levels varied with location, with the highest concentrations being observed around rivers discharging into the estuary, and near sewage outfalls. Colloids that were separated by CFUF tended to be a sink for EOCs with up to 60% being colloid-associated in the water phase. In addition, colloidal properties, including hydrodynamic size, zeta-potential and organic carbon composition, were found to be the main factors controlling the association of EOCs with aquatic colloids. Moreover, these colloidal properties were all significantly related to salinity, indicating the critical role played by increasing salinity in EOCs-colloids interaction in an estuarine system. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. New Insights on the Influence of Organic Co-Contaminants on the Aquatic Toxicology of Carbon Nanomaterials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanchís, Josep; Olmos, Mar; Vincent, Phil; Farré, Marinella; Barceló, Damià

    2016-01-19

    At present, there is a lack of understanding of the combined ecotoxicity of carbon-based nanomaterials and co-contaminants. In this paper, we report on the toxicity of three carbon nanomaterials (fullerene-soot, multiwall carbon nanotubes, and graphene). Two standardized toxicity bioassays, the immobilization of the invertebrate Daphnia magna and the bioluminescence inhibition of the marine bacteria Vibrio fischeri, have been used. Synergistic and antagonistic effects of binary mixtures composed of fullerene soot and organic co-contaminants as malathion, glyphosate, diuron, triclosan, and nonylphenol were assessed. The isobologram method was used to evaluate the concentrations producing an effect, in comparison to those effects expected by a simple additive approach. In this study, antagonism was the predominant effect. However, synergism was also observed as in the case of D. magna exposed to mixtures of malathion and fullerene soot. D. magna was shown to be the most sensitive assay when carbon nanomaterials were present. Toxicity to D. magna was as follows: fullerene soot > multiwall carbon nanotubes > graphene. These results were proportional to the size of aggregates, smaller aggregates being the most toxic. The vector function of nanomaterials aggregates and the unexpected release inside living organisms was proven for malathion. These results highlight new insights on the risks associated with the release of carbon nanomaterials into the environment.

  4. Efficiency of soil organic and inorganic amendments on the remediation of a contaminated mine soil: II. Biological and ecotoxicological evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardo, T; Clemente, R; Alvarenga, P; Bernal, M P

    2014-07-01

    The feasibility of two organic materials (pig slurry and compost) in combination with hydrated lime for the remediation of a highly acidic trace elements (TEs) contaminated mine soil was assessed in a mesocosm experiment. The effects of the amendments on soil biochemical and ecotoxicological properties were evaluated and related with the main physicochemical characteristics of soil and soil solution. The original soil showed impaired basic ecological functions due to the high availability of TEs, its acidic pH and high salinity. The three amendments slightly reduced the direct and indirect soil toxicity to plants, invertebrates and microorganisms as a consequence of the TEs' mobility decrease in topsoil, reducing therefore the soil associated risks. The organic amendments, especially compost, thanks to the supply of essential nutrients, were able to improve soil health, as they stimulated plant growth and significantly increased enzyme activities related with the key nutrients in soil. Therefore, the use of compost or pig slurry, in combination with hydrated lime, decreased soil ecotoxicity and seems to be a suitable management strategy for the remediation of highly acidic TEs contaminated soils. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Removal of organic contaminant toxicity from sediments - Early work toward development of a toxicity identification evaluation (TIE) method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lebo, J.A.; Huckins, J.N.; Petty, J.D.; Ho, K.T.

    1999-01-01

    Work was performed to determine the feasibility of selectively detoxifying organic contaminants in sediments. The results of this research will be used to aid in the development of a scheme for whole-sediment toxicity identification evaluations (TIEs). The context in which the method will be used inherently restricts the treatments to which the sediments can be subjected: Sediments cannot be significantly altered physically or chemically and the presence and bioavailabilities of other toxicants must not be changed. The methodological problem is daunting because of the requirement that the detoxification method be relatively fast and convenient together with the stipulation that only innocuous and minimally invasive treatments be used. Some of the experiments described here dealt with degrees of decontamination (i.e., detoxification as predicted from instrumental measurements) of spiked sediments rather than with degrees of detoxification as gauged by toxicity tests (e.g., 48-h toxicity tests with amphipods). Although the larger TIE scheme itself is mostly outside the scope of this paper, theoretical aspects of bioavailability and of the desorption of organic contaminants from sediments are discussed.

  6. Time trend of butyl- and phenyl-tin contamination in organisms of the Lagoon of Venice (1999-2003).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zanon, F; Rado, N; Centanni, E; Zharova, N; Pavoni, B

    2009-05-01

    In the period 1999-2003 a monitoring study on the accumulation of organotin compounds in edible organisms in the Lagoon of Venice was conducted. Butyl and Phenyl derivatives were determined in pooled samples of Mytilus galloprovincialis and Tapes spp. with the aims of assessing organotin contamination in the Lagoon of Venice in the period just preceding their ban in Europe, monitoring the concentrations in organisms with a high commercial use, evaluating a potential hazard for human health due to seafood and identifying the possible contamination sources. Sampling stations (up to 20) were distributed around the Lagoon and particularly concentrated in the area close to the town of Chioggia. Significantly higher (analysis of variance (ANOVA), p 0.05) in either species. Furthermore, by analyzing the entire data set, it is evident that most stations show analogous concentrations in the 3 years for both species, whereas few have anomalously higher concentrations. If organotin concentrations in specimens from some sites are compared with the Tolerable Average Residue Level, a possible risk for human health must be considered.

  7. Metal inhibition on the reactivity of manganese dioxide toward organic contaminant oxidation in relation to metal adsorption and ionic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jing; Wang, Zhuopu; Chen, Yang; He, Anfei; Li, Jianliang; Sheng, G Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Coexisting metal ions may significantly inhibit the oxidative reactivity of manganese oxides toward organic contaminants in metal-organic multi-pollutant waters. While the metal inhibition on the oxidation of organic contaminants by manganese oxides has previously been reported, the extent of the inhibition in relation to metal properties has not been established. Six alkali, alkaline, and transition metals, as well as two testing metals were evaluated for their abilities to inhibit the reactivity of birnessite. Regardless of the pathways of phenol and diuron oxidation (polymerization vs. breakdown), the extent of metal inhibition depended mainly on the metal itself and its concentration. The observed metal inhibition efficiency followed the order of Mn2+ > Co2+ > Cu2+ > Al3+ > Mg2+ > K+, consistent with metal adsorption on birnessite. The first-order organic oxidation rate constant (kobs) was linearly negatively correlated with metal adsorption (qe) on birnessite. These observations demonstrated that the metal inhibition efficiency was determined by metal adsorption on birnessite. The slopes of the kobs-qe varied among metals and followed the order of K+ > Ca2+ > Mg2+ > Mn2+ > Cd2+ > Co2+ > Cu2+ > Al3+. These slopes defined intrinsic inhibitory abilities of metals. As metals were adsorbed hydrated on birnessite, the intrinsic inhibitory ability was significantly linearly correlated with ionic potentials of metals, leading to a single straight line. Metals with multiple d electrons in the outermost orbit with polarizing energy that promotes hydrolysis sat slightly below the line, and vice versa. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Quantification of fossil organic matter in contaminated sediments from an industrial watershed: validation of the quantitative multimolecular approach by radiocarbon analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeanneau, Laurent; Faure, Pierre

    2010-09-01

    The quantitative multimolecular approach (QMA) based on an exhaustive identification and quantification of molecules from the extractable organic matter (EOM) has been recently developed in order to investigate organic contamination in sediments by a more complete method than the restrictive quantification of target contaminants. Such an approach allows (i) the comparison between natural and anthropogenic inputs, (ii) between modern and fossil organic matter and (iii) the differentiation between several anthropogenic sources. However QMA is based on the quantification of molecules recovered by organic solvent and then analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry, which represent a small fraction of sedimentary organic matter (SOM). In order to extend the conclusions of QMA to SOM, radiocarbon analyses have been performed on organic extracts and decarbonated sediments. This analysis allows (i) the differentiation between modern biomass (contemporary (14)C) and fossil organic matter ((14)C-free) and (ii) the calculation of the modern carbon percentage (PMC). At the confluence between Fensch and Moselle Rivers, a catchment highly contaminated by both industrial activities and urbanization, PMC values in decarbonated sediments are well correlated with the percentage of natural molecular markers determined by QMA. It highlights that, for this type of contamination by fossil organic matter inputs, the conclusions of QMA can be scaled up to SOM. QMA is an efficient environmental diagnostic tool that leads to a more realistic quantification of fossil organic matter in sediments. Copyright 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. TSCA Work Plan Chemical Technical Supplement – Physicochemical Properties and Environmental Fate of the Brominated Phthalates Cluster (BPC) Chemicals

    Science.gov (United States)

    TSCA Work Plan Chemical Technical Supplement – Physicochemical Properties and Environmental Fate of the Brominated Phthalates Cluster (BPC) Chemicals -- Brominated Phthalates Cluster Flame Retardants.

  10. Effect of halide ions and carbonates on organic contaminant degradation by hydroxyl radical-based advanced oxidation processes in saline waters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebel, Janel E; Pignatello, Joseph J; Mitch, William A

    2010-09-01

    Advanced oxidation processes (AOPs) generating nonselective hydroxyl radicals (HO*) provide a broad-spectrum contaminant destruction option for the decontamination of waters. Halide ions are scavengers of HO* during AOP treatment, such that treatment of saline waters would be anticipated to be ineffective. However, HO* scavenging by halides converts HO* to radical reactive halogen species (RHS) that participate in contaminant destruction but react more selectively with electron-rich organic compounds. The effects of Cl-, Br-, and carbonates (H2CO3+HCO3-+CO3(2-)) on the UV/H2O2 treatment of model compounds in saline waters were evaluated. For single target organic contaminants, the impact of these constituents on contaminant destruction rate suppression at circumneutral pH followed the order Br->carbonates>Cl-. Traces of Br- in the NaCl stock had a greater effect than Cl- itself. Kinetic modeling of phenol destruction demonstrated that RHS contributed significantly to phenol destruction, mitigating the impact of HO* scavenging. The extent of treatment efficiency reduction in the presence of halides varied dramatically among different target organic compounds. Destruction of contaminants containing electron-poor reaction centers in seawater was nearly halted, while 17beta-estradiol removal declined by only 3%. Treatment of mixtures of contaminants with each other and with natural organic matter (NOM) was evaluated. Although NOM served as an oxidant scavenger, conversion of nonselective HO* to selective radicals due to the presence of anions enhanced the efficiency of electron-rich contaminant removal in saline waters by focusing the oxidizing power of the system away from the NOM toward the target contaminant. Despite the importance of contaminant oxidation by halogen radicals, the formation of halogenated byproducts was minimal.

  11. Bromine in plastic consumer products - Evidence for the widespread recycling of electronic waste.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Andrew; Filella, Montserrat

    2017-12-01

    A range of plastic consumer products and components thereof have been analysed by x-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry in a low density mode for Br as a surrogate for brominated flame retardant (BFR) content. Bromine was detected in about 42% of 267 analyses performed on electronic (and electrical) samples and 18% of 789 analyses performed on non-electronic samples, with respective concentrations ranging from 1.8 to 171,000μgg-1 and 2.6 to 28,500μgg-1. Amongst the electronic items, the highest concentrations of Br were encountered in relatively small appliances, many of which predated 2005 (e.g. a fan heater, boiler thermostat and smoke detector, and various rechargers, light bulb collars and printed circuit boards), and usually in association with Sb, a component of antimony oxide flame retardant synergists, and Pb, a heavy metal additive and contaminant. Amongst the non-electronic samples, Br concentrations were highest in items of jewellery, a coffee stirrer, a child's puzzle, a picture frame, and various clothes hangers, Christmas decorations and thermos cup lids, and were often associated with the presence of Sb and Pb. These observations, coupled with the presence of Br at concentrations below those required for flame-retardancy in a wider range of electronic and non-electronic items, are consistent with the widespread recycling of electronic plastic waste. That most Br-contaminated items were black suggests the current and recent demand for black plastics in particular is met, at least partially, through this route. Given many Br-contaminated items would evade the attention of the end-user and recycler, their disposal by conventional municipal means affords a course of BFR entry into the environment and, for food-contact items, a means of exposure to humans. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Optimized removal of dissolved organic carbon and trace organic contaminants during combined ozonation and artificial groundwater recharge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hübner, U; Miehe, U; Jekel, M

    2012-11-15

    Pilot scale experiments using an 8 g/h ozonation unit and a 1.4 m(2) slow sand filter have demonstrated that the combination of ozonation and artificial groundwater recharge is suitable for efficient reduction of bulk and trace organics. The biodegradation of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in the slow sand filter was enhanced from 22% without pre-treatment to 34% by pre-ozonation. In addition, realistic surface water concentrations of most investigated trace organic compounds (TrOCs) including carbamazepine, sulfamethoxazole, phenazone and metoprolol were reduced below the limits of quantification. Only a few TrOCs, e.g. primidone and benzotriazole, were not efficiently removed in both treatment steps and could be detected regularly in the filter effluent. For these compounds, enhanced treatment, such as advanced oxidation processes, needs to be considered. Testing for genotoxicity and cytotoxicity did not reveal any systematic adverse effects for human health. The formation of the by-product bromate from bromide was below the limit of the German drinking water directive of 10 μg/L. No removal of bromate was observed in the aerobic slow sand filter. Additional experiments with sand columns showed that operating a preceding bank filtration step to reduce DOC can reduce oxidant demand by approximately 20%. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. HMSRP Hawaiian Monk Seal Contaminants (Blubber, serum, and whole blood persistent organic pollutants) Data

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains information on persistent organic pollutant analysis of Hawaiian monk seal whole blood and blubber samples from the northwestern Hawaiian...

  14. Levels and trends of brominated flame retardants in the European environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Law, R.J.; Allchin, C.R.; Boer, de J.; Covaci, A.; Herzke, D.; Lepom, P.; Morris, S.; Tronczynski, J.; Wit, de C.A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we review those data which have recently become available for brominated flame retardants (particularly the brominated diphenyl ethers (BDEs) and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD)) in samples from the European environment. Environmental compartments studied comprise the atmosphere,

  15. Review of polyoxymethylene passive sampling methods for quantifying freely dissolved porewater concentrations of hydrophobic organic contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arp, Hans Peter H; Hale, Sarah E; Elmquist Kruså, Marie; Cornelissen, Gerard; Grabanski, Carol B; Miller, David J; Hawthorne, Steven B

    2015-04-01

    Meth ods involving polyoxymethylene (POM) as a passive sampler are increasing in popularity to assess contaminant freely dissolved porewater concentrations in soils and sediments. These methods require contaminant-specific POM-water partition coefficients, KPOM . Certain methods for determining KPOM perform reproducibly (within 0.2 log units). However, other methods can give highly varying KPOM values (up to 2 log units), especially for polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). To account for this variation, the authors tested the influence of key methodological components in KPOM determinations, including POM thickness, extraction procedures, and environmental temperature and salinity, as well as uptake kinetics in mixed and static systems. All inconsistencies in the peer-reviewed literature can be accounted for by the likelihood that thick POM materials (500 μm or thicker) do not achieve equilibrium (causing negative biases up to 1 log unit), or that certain POM extraction procedures do not ensure quantitative extraction (causing negative biases up to 2 log units). Temperature can also influence KPOM , although all previous literature studies were carried out at room temperature. The present study found that KPOM values at room temperature are independent (within 0.2 log units) of POM manufacture method, of thickness between 17 μm and 80 μm, and of salinity between 0% and 10%. Regarding kinetics, monochloro- to hexachloro-polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) were within 0.2 log units of equilibrium after 28 d in the mixed system, but only dichloro-PCBs achieved near equilibrium after 126 d in the static system. Based on these insights, recommended methods and KPOM values to facilitate interlaboratory reproducibility are presented. © 2015 SETAC.

  16. Modeling PAH mass transfer in a slurry of contaminated soil or sediment amended with organic sorbents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sungwoo; Werner, David; Luthy, Richard G

    2008-06-01

    A three-compartment kinetic partitioning model was employed to assess contaminant mass transfer and intraparticle diffusion in systems comprising dense slurries of polluted soil or aquifer sediment with or without sorbent amendments to sequester polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The model was applied to simulate temporal changes in aqueous and particle-bound PAH concentrations comparing different pollution sources (heavy oil or tar sludge) and various sorbent amendments (polyoxymethylene (POM), coke breeze, and activated carbon). For the model evaluation, all the parameters needed were directly measured from a series of experiments, allowing full calibration and verification of model predictions without parameter fitting. The numerical model reproduced two separate laboratory-scale experiments reasonably: PAH uptake in POM beads and PAH uptake by semipermeable membrane devices. PAH mass transfer was then simulated for various scenarios, considering different sorbent doses and mass transfer rates as well as biodegradation. Such model predictions provide a quick assessment tool for identifying mass transfer limitations during washing, stabilization, or bioslurry treatments of polluted soil or sediment in mixed systems. It appears that PAHs would be readily released from materials contaminated by small oil droplets, but not tar decanter sludge. Released PAHs would be sequestered rapidly by activated carbon amendment but to a much lesser extent by coke breeze. If sorbing black carbon is present in the slurries, POM pellets would not be effective as a sequestration amendment. High first-order biodegradation rates in the free aqueous phase, e.g., in the order of 0.001 s(-1) for phenanthrene, would be required to compete effectively with adsorption and mass transfer for strong sorbents.

  17. Modeling PAH mass transfer in a slurry of contaminated soil or sediment amended with organic sorbents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, S.; Werner, D.; Luthy, R.G. [Stanford University, Stanford, CA (United States). Dept. for Civil & Environmental Engineering

    2008-06-15

    A three-compartment kinetic partitioning model was employed to assess contaminant mass transfer and intraparticle diffusion in systems comprising dense slurries of polluted soil or aquifer sediment with or without sorbent amendments to sequester polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). The model was applied to simulate temporal changes in aqueous and particle-bound PAH concentrations comparing different pollution sources (heavy oil or tar sludge) and various sorbent amendments (polyoxymethylene (POM), coke breeze, and activated carbon). For the model evaluation, all the parameters needed were directly measured from a series of experiments, allowing full calibration and verification of model predictions without parameter fitting. The numerical model reproduced two separate laboratory-scale experiments reasonably: PAH uptake in POM beads and PAH uptake by semipermeable membrane devices. PAH mass transfer was then simulated for various scenarios, considering different sorbent doses and mass transfer rates as well as biodegradation. Such model predictions provide a quick assessment tool for identifying mass transfer limitations during washing, stabilization, or bioslurry treatments of polluted soil or sediment in mixed systems. It appears that PAHs would be readily released from materials contaminated by small oil droplets, but not tar decanter sludge. Released PAHs would be sequestered rapidly by activated carbon amendment but to a much lesser extent by coke breeze. If sorbing black carbon is present in the slurries, POM pellets would not be effective as a sequestration amendment. High first-order biodegradation rates in the free aqueous phase, e.g., in the order of 0.001 s{sup -1} for phenanthrene, would be required to compete effectively with adsorption and mass transfer for strong sorbents.

  18. Microbial sulfolane degradation by environmental organisms isolated from contaminated sour gas plant sediments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, E.A.

    1999-08-01

    The removal of hydrogen sulfide from oil and natural gas is critical for the petroleum industry because it causes corrosion of oil recovery equipment, pipelines, and storage tanks. It can also lead to the corrosion of concrete and is highly toxic. Depending on the concentration of hydrogen sulfide, carbon dioxide and other gas souring compounds such as mercaptans, different sweetening processes are used for gas treatment, including chemical processes or physical solvents. Chemical processes involve a chemical interaction between the sour components in oil or natural gas and the sweetening compound. In physical gas sweetening processes, the sour components in a physical solvent are dissolved to separate them from the gas. The Sulfinol gas sweetening technique, which is used worldwide, involves a combination of both physical and chemical processes. The chemical solvent used in the Sulfinol gas sweetening process is diisopropanolamine (DIPA). The physical solvent used in the Sulfinol process in Sulfolane which makes it possible to absorb more carbon dioxide in an amine and water mixture. Sulfolane is stable at high temperatures and has entered groundwaters and aquifers through spills, landfills and unlined surface storage ponds. It poses a risk for off-site contamination because of its high water solubility. This thesis presented a laboratory study that examined the sulfolane degradation potential in contaminated aquifer sediments from three sites. Sulfolane-degrading populations were detected in microcosms inoculated with site materials and their nutrient requirements were assessed. The second part of the study focused on better understanding sulfolane biodegradation, particularly the extent of mineralization of the compound by microbial populations and the types of bacteria that can degrade sulfolane. All samples degraded sulfolane aerobically. Anaerobic sulfolane biodegradation occurred in some NO{sub 3} and Mn(IV)-reducing microcosms. Future work will focus on

  19. Wastewater contamination in Antarctic melt-water streams evidenced by virological and organic molecular markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tort, L F L; Iglesias, K; Bueno, C; Lizasoain, A; Salvo, M; Cristina, J; Kandratavicius, N; Pérez, L; Figueira, R; Bícego, M C; Taniguchi, S; Venturini, N; Brugnoli, E; Colina, R; Victoria, M

    2017-12-31

    Human activities in the Antarctica including tourism and scientific research have been raised substantially in the last century with the concomitant impact on the Antarctic ecosystems through the release of wastewater mainly from different scientific stations activities. The aim of this study was to assess the wastewater contamination of surface waters and sediments of three melt-water streams (11 sites) by leaking septic tanks located in the vicinity of the Uruguayan Scientific Station in the Fildes Peninsula, King George Island, Antarctica, during summer 2015. For this purpose, we combined the analysis of fecal steroids in sediments by using gas chromatography and six enteric viruses in surface waters by quantitative and qualitative PCR. Coprostanol concentrations (from 0.03 to 3.31μgg-1) and fecal steroids diagnostic ratios indicated that stations C7 and C8 located in the kitchen stream presented sewage contamination. Rotavirus was the only enteric virus detected in five sites with concentration ranging from 1.2×105gcL-1 to 5.1×105gcL-1 being three of them located downstream from the leaking AINA and Kitchen septic tanks. This study shows for the first time the presence of both virological and molecular biomarkers of wastewater pollution in surface waters and sediments of three melt-water streams in the vicinity of a scientific station in the Antarctica. These results highlight the importance of the complementation of these biomarkers in two different matrices (surface waters and sediments) to assess wastewater pollution in an Antarctic environment related to anthropogenic activities in the area. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  20. Adsorption and coadsorption mechanisms of Cr(VI) and organic contaminants on H3PO4 treated biochar.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Nan; Zhao, Chuanfang; Lv, Yizhong; Zhang, Weifang; Du, Yuguo; Hao, Zhengping; Zhang, Jing

    2017-11-01

    The study of simultaneous removal of heavy metals and organic contaminants has practical applications due to the coexistence of complex pollutants in the wastewater or soil. In this work, biochar was prepared to study the removal efficiencies of Cr(VI), naphthalene (NAP) and bisphenol A (BPA) in the single or mixed systems. H3PO4-treated biochar presented a much higher adsorption capacity of the pollutants than the untreated biochar and also showed a high resistance to coexisting salts. The maximum adsorption capacities for Cr(VI) and BPA were 116.28 mg g(-1) and 476.19 mg g(-1), respectively. Coadsorption experiments revealed that the presence of organic pollutants caused a limited decrease (∼10%) of removal efficiency of Cr(VI) and no further decrease was observed with higher concentrations of organic pollutants, while the presence of Cr(VI) had little impact on the removal of NAP. Infrared spectra and molecular simulation demonstrated that Cr(VI) was mainly adsorbed on the biochar via chemical complexation, while the organic pollutants through π-π interaction. Unexpectedly, the addition of Cr(VI) increased the removal efficiency of BPA, probably due to the increased H-bond interactions between BPA and the biochar through bridge bonds of oxygenic groups from CrO4(2-). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of alfalfa and organic fertilizer on benzo[a]pyrene dissipation in an aged contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Dengqiang; Teng, Ying; Luo, Yongming; Tu, Chen; Li, Shixing; Li, Zhengao; Christie, Peter

    2012-06-01

    A climate-controlled pot experiment was conducted to investigate the effects of planting alfalfa and applying organic fertilizer on the dissipation of benzo[a]pyrene from an aged contaminated agricultural soil. Short-term planting of alfalfa inhibited the dissipation of benzo[a]pyrene from the soil by 8.9%, and organic fertilizer enhanced benzo[a]pyrene removal from the soil by 11.6% compared with the unplanted and unfertilized treatments, respectively. No significant interaction was observed between alfalfa and organic fertilizer on benzo[a]pyrene dissipation. Sterilization completely inhibited the removal of benzo[a]pyrene from the soil indicating that its degradation by indigenous microorganisms may have been the main mechanism of dissipation. Furthermore, significant positive relationships were observed between benzo[a]pyrene removal and the contents of soil ammonium nitrogen, nitrate nitrogen, and total mineral nitrogen at the end of the experiment, suggesting that competition between plants and microorganisms for nitrogen may have inhibited benzo[a]pyrene dissipation in the rhizosphere of alfalfa and the addition of organic fertilizer may facilitate microbial degradation of benzo[a]pyrene in the soil.

  2. Impact of organic carbon and nutrients mobilized during chemical oxidation on subsequent bioremediation of a diesel-contaminated soil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Nora B; Grotenhuis, Tim; Rijnaarts, Huub H M

    2014-02-01

    Remediation with in situ chemical oxidation (ISCO) impacts soil organic matter (SOM) and the microbial community, with deleterious effects on the latter being a major hurdle to coupling ISCO with in situ bioremediation (ISB). We investigate treatment of a diesel-contaminated soil with Fenton's reagent and modified Fenton's reagent coupled with a subsequent bioremediation phase of 187d, both with and without nutrient amendment. Chemical oxidation mobilized SOM into the liquid phase, producing dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations 8-16 times higher than the untreated field sample. Higher aqueous concentrations of nitrogen and phosphorous species were also observed following oxidation; NH4(+) increased 14-172 times. During the bioremediation phase, dissolved carbon and nutrient species were utilized for microbial growth-yielding DOC concentrations similar to field sample levels within 56d of incubation. In the absence of nutrient amendment, the highest microbial respiration rates were correlated with higher availability of nitrogen and phosphorus species mobilized by oxidation. Significant diesel degradation was only observed following nutrient amendment, implying that nutrients mobilized by chemical oxidation can increase microbial activity but are insufficient for bioremediation. While all bioremediation occurred in the first 28d of incubation in the biotic control microcosm with nutrient amendment, biodegradation continued throughout 187d of incubation following chemical oxidation, suggesting that chemical treatment also affects the desorption of organic contaminants from SOM. Overall, results indicate that biodegradation of DOC, as an alternative substrate to diesel, and biological utilization of mobilized nutrients have implications for the success of coupled ISCO and ISB treatments. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Screening evaluation of the ecotoxicity and genotoxicity of soils contaminated with organic and inorganic nanoparticles: The role of ageing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, R., E-mail: ruthp@ua.pt [Departamento de Biologia and CESAM, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal); Rocha-Santos, T.A.P. [ISEIT/Viseu, Instituto Piaget, Estrada do Alto do Gaio, Galifonge, 3515-776 Lordosa, Viseu (Portugal); Antunes, F.E.; Rasteiro, M.G. [CIEPQPF - Departamento de Engenharia Quimica, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia, Polo II, Universidade de, 3030-290 Coimbra (Portugal); Ribeiro, R. [IMAR - CMA, Departamento de Ciencias da Vida da Universidade de Coimbra, Largo Marques de Pombal, P-3004 517 Coimbra (Portugal); Goncalves, F.; Soares, A.M.V.M.; Lopes, I. [Departamento de Biologia and CESAM, Universidade de Aveiro, Campus de Santiago, 3810-193 Aveiro (Portugal)

    2011-10-30

    Highlights: {yields} In general ageing decreases toxicity/genotoxicity of soil spiked with aqueous suspensions of NMs. {yields} Ageing may promote degradation of organic shells of metallic NPs increasing toxicity. {yields} Toxicity was recorded despite aggregation of NPs in the aqueous suspensions. {yields} Soils spiked with Au nanorods, quantum dots, TiSiO{sub 4} induced mutations in Salmonella typhimurium. - Abstract: This study aimed to evaluate the toxicity and genotoxicity of soils, and corresponding elutriates, contaminated with aqueous suspensions of two organic (vesicles of sodium dodecyl sulphate/didodecyl dimethylammonium bromide and of monoolein and sodium oleate) and five inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) (TiO{sub 2}, TiSiO{sub 4}, CdSe/ZnS quantum dots, Fe/Co magnetic fluid and gold nanorods) to Vibrio fischeri and Salmonella typhimurium (TA98 and TA100 strains). Soil samples were tested 2 h and 30 days after contamination. Suspensions of NPs were characterized by Dynamic Light Scattering. Soils were highly toxic to V. fischeri, especially after 2 h. After 30 days toxicity was maintained only for soils spiked with suspensions of more stable NPs (zeta potential > 30 mV or <-30 mV). Elutriates were particularly toxic after 2 h, except for soil spiked with Fe/Co magnetic fluid, suggesting that ageing may have contributed for degrading the organic shell of these NPs, increasing the mobility of core elements and the toxicity of elutriates. TA98 was the most sensitive strain to the mutagenic potential of soil elutriates. Only elutriates from soils spiked with gold nanorods, quantum dots (QDs) and TiSiO{sub 4} induced mutations in both strains of S. typhimurium, suggesting more diversified mechanisms of genotoxicity.

  4. Partitioning Behavior of Organic Contaminants in Carbon Storage Environments: A Critical Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burant, Aniela; Lowry, Gregory V; Karamalidis, Athanasios K

    2012-12-04

    Carbon capture and storage is a promising strategy for mitigating the CO{sub 2} contribution to global climate change. The large scale implementation of the technology mandates better understanding of the risks associated with CO{sub 2} injection into geologic formations and the subsequent interactions with groundwater resources. The injected supercritical CO{sub 2} (sc-CO{sub 2}) is a nonpolar solvent that can potentially mobilize organic compounds that exist at residual saturation in the formation. Here, we review the partitioning behavior of selected organic compounds typically found in depleted oil reservoirs in the residual oil–brine–sc-CO{sub 2} system under carbon storage conditions. The solubility of pure phase organic compounds in sc-CO{sub 2} and partitioning of organic compounds between water and sc-CO{sub 2} follow trends predicted based on thermodynamics. Compounds with high volatility and low aqueous solubility have the highest potential to partition to sc-CO{sub 2}. The partitioning of low volatility compounds to sc-CO{sub 2} can be enhanced by co-solvency due to the presence of higher volatility compounds in the sc-CO{sub 2}. The effect of temperature, pressure, salinity, pH, and dissolution of water molecules into sc-CO{sub 2} on the partitioning behavior of organic compounds in the residual oil-brine-sc-CO{sub 2} system is discussed. Data gaps and research needs for models to predict the partitioning of organic compounds in brines and from complex mixtures of oils are presented. Models need to be able to better incorporate the effect of salinity and co-solvency, which will require more experimental data from key classes of organic compounds.

  5. The individual and cumulative effect of brominated flame retardant and polyvinylchloride (PVC) on thermal degradation of acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) copolymer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brebu, Mihai; Bhaskar, Thallada; Murai, Kazuya; Muto, Akinori; Sakata, Yusaku; Uddin, Md Azhar

    2004-08-01

    Acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) copolymers without and with a polybrominated epoxy type flame retardant were thermally degraded at 450 degrees C alone (10 g) and mixed with polyvinylchloride (PVC) (8 g/2 g). Gaseous and liquid products of degradation were analysed by various gas chromatographic methods (GC with TCD, FID, AED, MSD) in order to determine the individual and cumulative effect of bromine and chlorine on the quality and quantity of degradation compounds. It was found that nitrogen, chlorine, bromine and oxygen are present as organic compounds in liquid products, their quantity depends on the pyrolysed polymer or polymer mixture. Bromophenol and dibromophenols were the main brominated compounds that come from the flame retardant. 1-Chloroethylbenzene was the main chlorine compound observed in liquid products. It was also determined that interactions appear at high temperatures during decomposition between the flame retardant, PVC and the ABS copolymer.

  6. A study of organic contamination control on photomask surface for 65nm tech node

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Min; Kang, Han-Byul; Kim, Yong-Dae; Cho, Hyun-Joon; Choi, Sang-Soo

    2005-11-01

    In recent years, organic compounds have been clarified as one of major root causes of the haze, and carbon and amine components are major of them to organize. Therefore, both two should be controlled simultaneously for preventing haze defects on photomask. It is well known that UV/O3 treatment has a strong efficiency of removing organic matters1. For that reason, we have inserted it into our cleaning process, especially for EA.PSMS. And the surface variation of mask, after UV/O3 treatment, has been confirmed by the change of surface free energy on it. And organic matters remaining on mask surface have been identified by Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GC MS) with two different sample preparation methods: Thermal Desorption (TD) and direct extraction. As a result of UV/O3 treatment, we confirmed that it has an excellent removing efficiency of aromatic compounds and semi-volatile organics on mask surface. Finally, through the haze accelerating tests, we have known that conventional SPM/SC-1 cleaning with UV/ O3 treatment has been having a much higher threshold energy value in terms of causing haze defects on masks about 20 times higher than that of the cleaning with just SPM/SC-1.

  7. Contamination of commercial cane sugars by some organic acids and some inorganic anions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtczak, Maciej; Antczak, Aneta; Lisik, Krystyna

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the paper was the identification and the quantitative evaluation of the following inorganic anions: chloride, phosphate, nitrate, nitrite, sulphate and the following organic acids: lactic, acetic, formic, malic and citric in commercial "unrefined" brown cane sugars and in cane raw sugars. The determination was carried out by high performance anion exchange chromatography with conductivity detector HPAEC-CD. The conducted analyses have shown that the content of some inorganic anions and organic acids in cane sugars may be an important criterion of the quality of commercial "unrefined" brown cane sugars. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Fate of organic contaminants in the redox zones of a landfill leachate pollution plume (Vejen, Denmark)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lyngkilde, John; Christensen, Thomas Højlund

    1992-01-01

    Samples from 75 sample locations in a landfill leachate pollution plume reveal a significant disappearance of specific organic compounds (SOC's) within the first 100 m of the plume. Only the herbicide Mecoprop® (MCPP) migrates further. Since sorption and dilution cannot account for the decreasing...... by a significant ferrogenic zone exhibiting a substantial capacity to degrade the SOC's. The presence of intermediary products (here an oxidized camphor compound) supports the concept of degradation within the ferrogenic zone. This investigation draws the attention to the significant natural attenuation of organic...

  9. Brominated flame retardant: environmental and exposed individuals' health impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dufour, Patrice; Charlier, Corinne

    2017-04-01

    Since Antiquity, men have used chemicals to protect their goods against fire. Effective and easy to use, brominated flame retardants are used since decades massively in plastic industry. Such like other organohalogenated compounds, brominated flame retardants are very persistent in the environment and able to accumulate along the food chain. Many authors highlight their presence in the environment, in many animal species and in the human serum. Worryingly, man is exposed as soon as the pregnancy and then by the breastfeeding. This exposition may have consequence on our health. Many studies (in vitro, in vivo or epidemiologic) highlight brominated flame retardant negative effects on the endocrine system, mainly on the thyroid function but also on the reproduction, the neurodevelopment in the children and on the metabolism with increasing diabetes risk. If authorities and some big enterprises are aware about the problematic, new studies are needed to confirm previous results, elucidate endocrine disrupting mechanisms and highlight hypothetical synergies with other pollutants such like PCBs.

  10. A rotating disk study of gold dissolution by bromine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesic, Batric; Sergent, Rodney H.

    1991-12-01

    Gold dissolution with bromine was studied using the rotating disk technique with Geobrom™ 3400 as a source of bromine. The parameters studied were speed of rotation, lixiviant concentration, pH, temperature, sulfuric acid and hydrochloric acid concentrations, and the concentrations of various cations (i.e., copper, iron, zinc, aluminum, manganese, potassium, and sodium) and anions (i.e., chloride, bromide, sulfate, nitrate, and iodide). According to the Lavich plot and activation energy, gold dissolution is controlled by a chemical reaction rate. Copper, iron, and manganese in their highest oxidation states, as well as aluminum, zinc, sodium, and potassium, have no effect on the rate of gold dissolution. The presence of manganous ion substantially decreases the gold dissolution rate. The kinetic performance of bromine was found to be dramatically better than the performance of cyanide and thiourea.

  11. Dichlorinated and Brominated Rugulovasines, Ergot Alkaloids Produced by Talaromyces wortmannii

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lívia Soman de Medeiros

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available UHPLC-DAD-HRMS based dereplication guided the detection of new halogenated alkaloids co-produced by Talaromyces wortmannii. From the fungal growth in large scale, the epimers 2,8-dichlororugulovasines A and B were purified and further identified by means of a HPLC-SPE/NMR hyphenated system. Brominated rugulovasines were also detected when the microbial incubation medium was supplemented with bromine sources. Studies from 1D/2D NMR and HRMS spectroscopy data allowed the structural elucidation of the dichlorinated compounds, while tandem MS/HRMS data analysis supported the rationalization of brominated congeners. Preliminary genetic studies revealed evidence that FADH2 dependent halogenase can be involved in the biosynthesis of the produced halocompounds.

  12. Screening evaluation of the ecotoxicity and genotoxicity of soils contaminated with organic and inorganic nanoparticles: the role of ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, R; Rocha-Santos, T A P; Antunes, F E; Rasteiro, M G; Ribeiro, R; Gonçalves, F; Soares, A M V M; Lopes, I

    2011-10-30

    This study aimed to evaluate the toxicity and genotoxicity of soils, and corresponding elutriates, contaminated with aqueous suspensions of two organic (vesicles of sodium dodecyl sulphate/didodecyl dimethylammonium bromide and of monoolein and sodium oleate) and five inorganic nanoparticles (NPs) (TiO(2), TiSiO(4), CdSe/ZnS quantum dots, Fe/Co magnetic fluid and gold nanorods) to Vibrio fischeri and Salmonella typhimurium (TA98 and TA100 strains). Soil samples were tested 2h and 30 days after contamination. Suspensions of NPs were characterized by Dynamic Light Scattering. Soils were highly toxic to V. fischeri, especially after 2h. After 30 days toxicity was maintained only for soils spiked with suspensions of more stable NPs (zeta potential>30 mV or mobility of core elements and the toxicity of elutriates. TA98 was the most sensitive strain to the mutagenic potential of soil elutriates. Only elutriates from soils spiked with gold nanorods, quantum dots (QDs) and TiSiO(4) induced mutations in both strains of S. typhimurium, suggesting more diversified mechanisms of genotoxicity. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of ozone and ozone/peroxide on trace organic contaminants and NDMA in drinking water and water reuse applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pisarenko, Aleksey N; Stanford, Benjamin D; Yan, Dongxu; Gerrity, Daniel; Snyder, Shane A

    2012-02-01

    An ozone and ozone/peroxide oxidation process was evaluated at pilot scale for trace organic contaminant (TOrC) mitigation and NDMA formation in both drinking water and water reuse applications. A reverse osmosis (RO) pilot was also evaluated as part of the water reuse treatment train. Ozone/peroxide showed lower electrical energy per order of removal (EEO) values for TOrCs in surface water treatment, but the addition of hydrogen peroxide increased EEO values during wastewater treatment. TOrC oxidation was correlated to changes in UV(254) absorbance and fluorescence offering a surrogate model for predicting contaminant removal. A decrease in N-nitrosodimethylamine (NDMA) formation potential (after chloramination) was observed after treatment with ozone and ozone/peroxide. However, during spiking experiments with surface water, ozone/peroxide achieved limited destruction of NDMA, while in wastewaters net direct formation of NDMA of 6-33 ng/L was observed after either ozone or ozone/peroxide treatment. Once formed during ozonation, NDMA passed through the subsequent RO membranes, which highlights the significance of the potential for direct NDMA formation during oxidation in reuse applications. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Sensor array for the detection of organic and inorganic contaminants in post-consumer recycled plastics for food contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Nathan; Danes, Jeffrey E; Vorst, Keith

    2017-10-01

    Post-consumer recycled (PCR) plastic material is made by collecting used plastic products (e.g., bottles and other plastic packaging materials) and reprocessing them into solid-state pellets or flakes. Plastic recycling has positive environmental benefits, but may also carry potential drawbacks due to unwanted organic and inorganic contaminants. These contaminants can migrate into food packaging made from these recycled plastic materials. The purpose of this research was to identify economically viable real-time monitoring technologies that can be used during the conversion of virgin and recycled resin feedstocks (i.e., various blends of virgin pellets and recycled solid-state pellet or mechanically ground flake) to final articles to ensure the safety, quality and sustainability of packaging feedstocks. Baseline analysis (validation) of real-time technologies was conducted using industry-standard practices for polymer analysis. The data yielded supervised predictive models developed by training sessions completed in a controlled laboratory setting. This technology can be employed to evaluate compliance and aid converters in commodity sourcing of resin without exceeding regulatory thresholds. Furthermore, this technology allowed for real-time decision and diversion strategies during the conversion of resin and flake to final articles or products to minimise the negative impact on human health and environmental exposure.

  15. Validation of an automated screening method for persistent organic contaminants in fats and oils by GC×GC-ToFMS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, Patricia; Tienstra, Marc; Lommen, Arjen; Mol, Hans G J

    2016-11-15

    An screening method, comprised of straightforward sample treatment based on silica clean-up, GC×GC-ToFMS detection and automated data processing with the non-proprietary free downloadable software MetAlignID, has been successfully validated with respect to false negatives for the sum PCB 28, 52, 101, 138, 153 and 180), for the sum of BDE 28, 47, 99, 100, 153, 154 and 183, for the four markers of PAHs and for a number of emerging brominated flame retardants. A screening detection limit (SDL) equal to or lower than the maximum regulatory level was always achieved. MetAlignID considerably decreased the time needed for data treatment from 20 to 5min/file. Automated identification of the signature mass spectral patterns was applied to identify chlorinated- and brominated-containing substances with more than two halogen atoms, and PAH derivates. Although the success rate was variable and needs to be further improved, the tool was considered to be of added value. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Comparison of direct injection nebulizer and desolvating microconcentric nebulizer for analysis of chlorine-, bromine- and iodine-containing compounds by reversed phase HPLC with ICP-MS detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B.P.; Gammelgaard, Bente; Hansen, S.H.

    2003-01-01

    the direct injection nebulizer at flow rates of 25 and 50 mul min(-1), the influence of 0-50% methanol and 0-25% acetonitrile on the sensitivity was studied. For chlorine and bromine, the relative sensitivity decreased with increasing amounts of organic solvent. For iodine, the relative sensitivity reached...

  17. Bottom Sediment as a Source of Organic Contaminants in Lake Mead, Nevada, USA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treated wastewater effluent from Las Vegas, Nevada and surrounding communities’ flow through Las Vegas Wash (LVW) into the Lake Mead National Recreational Area at Las Vegas Bay (LVB). Lake sediment is a likely sink for many hydrophobic synthetic organic compounds (SOCs); however,...

  18. Partitioning of hydrophobic organic contaminants between polymer and lipids for two silicones and low density polyethylene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smedes, F.; Rusina, T.P.; Beeltje, H.; Mayer, P.

    2017-01-01

    Polymers are increasingly used for passive sampling of neutral hydrophobic organic substances (HOC) in environmental media including water, air, soil, sediment and even biological tissue. The equilibrium concentration of HOC in the polymer can be measured and then converted into equilibrium

  19. Partitioning of hydrophobic organic contaminants between polymer and lipids for two silicones and low density polyethylene

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smedes, Foppe; Rusina, Tatsiana P.; Beeltje, Henry

    2017-01-01

    Polymers are increasingly used for passive sampling of neutral hydrophobic organic substances (HOC) in environmental media including water, air, soil, sediment and even biological tissue. The equilibrium concentration of HOC in the polymer can be measured and then converted into equilibrium...... for a thermodynamically sound risk assessment of HOC contained in microplastics....

  20. Concentration and Distribution of Hydrophobic Organic Contaminants and Metals in the Estuaries of Ukraine

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this baseline study of Ukrainian estuaries, sediments and organisms from the Dnieper and Boh estuaries and Danube Delta on the mainland, Sevastopol and Balaklava Bays on the Crimean Peninsula, and coastal Black Sea along the Crimean Peninsula were collected in 2006. Contamina...

  1. Characterization of trace organic contaminants in marine sediment from Yeongil Bay, Korea: 1. Instrumental analyses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Chul-Hwan [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences (Oceanography), College of Natural Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Khim, Jong Seong [School of Earth and Environmental Sciences (Oceanography), College of Natural Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)]. E-mail: jskocean@snu.ac.kr; Villeneuve, Daniel L. [U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, Mid-Continent Ecology Division, 6201 Congdon Blvd., Duluth, MN 55804-2595 (United States); Kannan, Kurunthachalam [Wadsworth Center, New York State Department of Health and Department of Environmental Health and Toxicology, State University of New York at Albany, Empire State Plaza, PO Box 509, Albany, NY 12201-0509 (United States); Giesy, John P. [National Food Safety and Toxicology Center, Department of Zoology, and Institute for Environmental Toxicology, Michigan State University, East Lansing, MI 48824 (United States); Department of Biology and Chemistry, City University of Hong Kong, Tat Chee Avenue, Kowloon, Hong Kong (China)

    2006-07-15

    Concentrations of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), organochlorine (OC) pesticides (HCB, HCHs, CHLs, and DDTs), polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), alkylphenols (APs), and bisphenol A (BPA) were measured in 26 marine sediments collected from Yeongil Bay, Korea, in order to characterize their spatial distribution and sources. PCBs (2.85-26.5 ng/g, dry wt.) were detected mainly in the inner bay locations. Mean OC pesticide ranged from 1.16 ng/g dry wt. for HCH to 0.05 ng/g dry wt. for HCB. PAH concentrations ranged from <10.0 to 1870 (mean: 309) ng/g dry wt., and were predominated 3- and 4-ring congeners. Concentrations of APs, such as nonylphenol, octylphenol, butylphenol (means 89.1, 4.61, 11.0 ng/g dry wt., respectively), were greater at locations proximal to municipal wastewater discharges. Concentrations of PCBs and PAHs were great near shipyards and industrial complexes. Vertical profiles of PAHs and APs indicated that they have been associated with sediments since the 1950s. - Among various sediment contaminant classes measured, nonylphenol and PAHs are responsible for the variability among sampling sites, suggesting the existence of multiple sources in Yeongil Bay sediment.

  2. Development of a method for assessing the toxicity of volatile organic contaminants (VOCs) to soil biota

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cureton, P.M. [Environment Canada, Ottawa, Ontario (Canada). Evaluation and Interpretation Branch; Lintott, D.; Balch, G.; Goudey, S. [HydroQual Labs. Ltd., Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    1994-12-31

    A method was developed to assess the toxicity of VOCs to plants and earthworms (survival of Eisenia foetida). The procedures followed were based on Greene et al. Gas samples for head space analyses were removed, at test initiation a termination, through a bulkhead fitting in the lid equipped with septa. Treatment levels were prepared, at low temperature to minimize volatilization, by spiking a soil sample with the compound of interest and then serially diluting it with clean soil. Root elongation tests were conducted on filter paper supported by 70 mesh silica sand spiked with the volatile of interest. Soils were then inundated with water, shaken with heating, and the headspace reanalyzed for the total contaminant concentration in the test system (total equals headspace plus adsorbed). Enclosing the seeds and worms in containers did not appear to have detrimental effects. VOCs tested included benzene, xylene, toluene, ethylbenzene, tetrachloroethylene, and 1,1,2-trichloroethylene. Each test was repeated three times with different batches of soil, seed lots and worms from different colonies. Endpoints derived based on nominal and measured concentrations included: NOEC, LOEC, LC{sub 50} and LC{sub 25} for earthworm mortality and EC{sub 50} and EC{sub 25} for emergence and root elongation.

  3. Hybrid composites of nano-sized zero valent iron and covalent organic polymers for groundwater contaminant degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mines, Paul D.; Byun, J.; Hwang, Yuhoon

    of chemicals such as azo dyes and trichloroethylene (TCE). However, stabilization and immobilization of nZVI is a key parameter in its effectiveness as a chemical degradation agent for both in-situ and ex-situ applications. Most importantly, this inhibits unwanted iron oxidation from the environment...... and prevents particle agglomeration; but also still allows for contaminant diffusion into the composite matrix, leading to degradation. In this study, the effect of various covalent organic polymers (COPs) as effective supporting materials for nZVI for optimal pollutant degradation was assessed. These COPs...... were on average approximately 6nm, with extremes at 2.5nm and 24nm. Composite lengths exhibited much more variance, and although the average was approximately 110nm, many lengths were observed as low as 50-70nm and as high as 260-280nm ranges. BET surface areas of the polymers were as small as 1.8m2/g...

  4. Unique and hierarchically structured novel Co3O4/NiO nanosponges with superior photocatalytic activity against organic contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Vahini; Puvaneswaran, Senthil Kumar; Swaminathan, Karuthapandian

    2017-12-01

    In the present study, novel Co3O4/NiO nanosponges designed for the photocatalytic degradation of organic contaminants were synthesized by a simple precipitation technique. The formation of sponge-like nanostructures was clearly evident through the TEM analysis. The photocatalytic efficiency was tested against rhodamine B (RhB) and congo red (CR) dye solutions. Co3O4/NiO nanosponges showed excellent and enhanced photocatalytic efficacy compared to those of Co3O4, NiO nanoparticles, and standards like TiO2 and ZnO. The influence of paramount important operational parameters was explored and the conditions for the best photocatalytic efficiency were optimized. The trapping experiment revealed that the reactive oxygen species (ROS) identified was OH radical. These findings certainly open up a new way for synthesizing a morphology dependent photocatalyst.

  5. Combined effects of low-molecular-weight organic acids on mobilization of arsenic and lead from multi-contaminated soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onireti, Olaronke O; Lin, Chuxia; Qin, Junhao

    2017-03-01

    A batch experiment was conducted to examine the combined effects of three common low-molecular-weight organic acids (LMWOAs) on the mobilization of arsenic and lead in different types of multi-contaminated soils. The capacity of individual LMWOAs (at a same molar concentration) to mobilize soil-borne As and Pb varied significantly. The combination of the organic acids did not make a marked "additive" effect on the mobilization of the investigated three elements. An "antagonistic" effect on element mobilization was clear in the treatments involving oxalic acid for some soils. The acid strength of a LMWOA did not play an important role in controlling the mobilization of elements. While the mobilization of As and Pb was closely associated with the dissolution of soil-borne Fe, soil properties such as original soil pH, organic matter contents and the total amount of the element relative to the total Fe markedly complicated the mobility of that element. Aging led to continual consumption of proton introduced from addition of LMWOAs and consequently caused dramatic changes in solution-borne Fe, which in turn resulted in change in As and Pb in the soil solution though different elements behaved differently. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Reproductive health of bass in the potomac, USA, drainage: part 2. Seasonal occurrence of persistent and emerging organic contaminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarez, D.A.; Cranor, W.L.; Perkins, S.D.; Schroeder, V.L.; Iwanowicz, L.R.; Clark, R.C.; Guy, C.P.; Pinkney, A.E.; Blazer, V.S.; Mullican, J.E.

    2009-01-01

    The seasonal occurrence of organic contaminants, many of which are potential endocrine disruptors, entering the Potomac River, USA, watershed was investigated using a two-pronged approach during the fall of 2005 and spring of 2006. Passive samplers (semipermeable membrane device and polar organic chemical integrative sampler [POCIS]) were deployed in tandem at sites above and below wastewater treatment plant discharges within the watershed. Analysis of the samplers resulted in detection of 84 of 138 targeted chemicals. The agricultural pesticides atrazine and metolachlor had the greatest seasonal changes in water concentrations, with a 3.1 - to 91 -fold increase in the spring compared with the level in the previous fall. Coinciding with the elevated concentrations of atrazine in the spring were increasing concentrations of the atrazine degradation products desethylatrazine and desisopropylatrazine in the fall following spring and summer application of the parent compound. Other targeted chemicals (organochlorine pesticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, and organic wastewater chemicals) did not indicate seasonal changes in occurrence or concentration; however, the overall concentrations and number of chemicals present were greater at the sites downstream of wastewater treatment plant discharges. Several fragrances and flame retardants were identified in these downstream sites, which are characteristic of wastewater effluent and human activities. The bioluminescent yeast estrogen screen in vitro assay of the POCIS extracts indicated the presence of chemicals that were capable of producing an estrogenic response at all sampling sites. ?? 2009 SETA.

  7. New Methods for Labeling RGD Peptides with Bromine-76

    OpenAIRE

    Lang, Lixin; Li, Weihua; Jia, Hong-Mei; Fang, De-Cai; Zhang, Shushu; Sun, Xilin; Zhu, Lei; Ma, Ying; Shen, Baozhong; Kiesewetter, Dale O.; Niu, Gang; Chen, Xiaoyuan

    2011-01-01

    Direct bromination of the tyrosine residues of peptides and antibodies with bromine-76, to create probes for PET imaging, has been reported. For peptides that do not contain tyrosine residues, however, a prosthetic group is required to achieve labeling via conjugation to other functional groups such as terminal α-amines or lysine ε-amines. The goal of this study was to develop new strategies for labeling small peptides with Br-76 using either a direct labeling method or a prosthetic group, de...

  8. Pyrolysis of brominated feedstock plastic in a fluidised bed reactor

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, W.J.; Williams, P.T.

    2006-01-01

    Fire retarded high impact polystyrene has been pyrolysed using a fluidised bed reactor with a sand bed. The yield and composition of the products have been investigated in relation to fluidised bed temperature. The bromine distribution between the products and a detailed analysis of the oils using GC-FID/ECD, GC-MS, FT-ir, and size exclusion chromatography has been carried out. It was found that the majority of the bromine transfers to the pyrolysis oil and the antimony was detected in both t...

  9. Microbial Activities and Dissolved Organic Matter Dynamics in Oil-Contaminated Surface Seawater from the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziervogel, Kai; McKay, Luke; Rhodes, Benjamin; Osburn, Christopher L.; Dickson-Brown, Jennifer; Arnosti, Carol; Teske, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    The Deepwater Horizon oil spill triggered a complex cascade of microbial responses that reshaped the dynamics of heterotrophic carbon degradation and the turnover of dissolved organic carbon (DOC) in oil contaminated waters. Our results from 21-day laboratory incubations in rotating glass bottles (roller bottles) demonstrate that microbial dynamics and carbon flux in oil-contaminated surface water sampled near the spill site two weeks after the onset of the blowout were greatly affected by activities of microbes associated with macroscopic oil aggregates. Roller bottles with oil-amended water showed rapid formation of oil aggregates that were similar in size and appearance compared to oil aggregates observed in surface waters near the spill site. Oil aggregates that formed in roller bottles were densely colonized by heterotrophic bacteria, exhibiting high rates of enzymatic activity (lipase hydrolysis) indicative of oil degradation. Ambient waters surrounding aggregates also showed enhanced microbial activities not directly associated with primary oil-degradation (β-glucosidase; peptidase), as well as a twofold increase in DOC. Concurrent changes in fluorescence properties of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM) suggest an increase in oil-derived, aromatic hydrocarbons in the DOC pool. Thus our data indicate that oil aggregates mediate, by two distinct mechanisms, the transfer of hydrocarbons to the deep sea: a microbially-derived flux of oil-derived DOC from sinking oil aggregates into the ambient water column, and rapid sedimentation of the oil aggregates themselves, serving as vehicles for oily particulate matter as well as oil aggregate-associated microbial communities. PMID:22509359

  10. Distribution of heavy metals and hydrocarbon contents in an alfisol contaminated with waste-lubricating oil amended with organic wastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adesodun, J K; Mbagwu, J S C

    2008-05-01

    Contamination of soil and groundwater with mineral oil-based products is among the most common sources of pollution in Nigeria. This study evaluated the distribution of some heavy metals and hydrocarbon content in soil contaminated with waste-lubricating oil (spent oil), and the effectiveness of some abundantly available organic wastes from animal source as remediation alternative to the expensive chemical and physical methods. The main-plot treatments include control (C), cow dung (CD), poultry manure (PM) and pig waste (PW) applied at 10Mg/ha each; while the sub-plot treatments were control (0%), 0.5%, 2.5% and 5% spent oil (SP) applied at 10, 50 and 100 Mg/ha, respectively arranged in a split-plot in Randomized Complete Block Design (RCBD) with four replications. These treatments were applied once each year for two consecutive years. Soil samples (0-20 cm) were collected at 3, 6 and 12 months each year and analyzed for Cr, Ni, Pb and Zn, while the residual total hydrocarbon content (THC) was determined at the end of the 2 years study. Results show significant (poil pollution following the sequence 5%SP>2.5%SP>0.5%SP, indicating higher metal pollution with increase in oil pollution. General distribution of Cr, Ni, Pb and Zn, relative to sampling periods, followed 3 months>6 months>12 months in the 1st year indicating reduction in metal levels with time. The trend for 2nd year indicated higher accumulation of Cr and Ni in 12 months, while Pb and Zn decreased with time of sampling. The results further showed higher accumulation of Cr followed by Zn, relative to other metals, with oil pollution. However, addition of organic wastes to the oil polluted soils significantly (pPW>CD.

  11. Determining equilibrium partition coefficients between lipid/protein and polydimethylsiloxane for highly hydrophobic organic contaminants using preloaded disks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Yuanyuan; Li, Huizhen; You, Jing

    2017-11-15

    Bioaccumulation of hydrophobic organic contaminants is of great concern and understanding their partitioning to biological phases is crucial for estimating their bioaccumulation potential. The estimation, however, was of large uncertainty for highly hydrophobic organic contaminants (HHOCs) with log KOW>9 due to the challenge of quantifying their water concentrations. In the present study, partition coefficients between polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and storage lipid (KSL,PDMS), membrane lipid (KML,PDMS) and protein (Kpro,PDMS) were measured for 21 polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), 14 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), dechlorane plus (DP) and decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE), covering log KOW from 5.07 to 11.6, using a preloaded PDMS depletion method. The values of KSL,PDMS, KML,PDMS and Kpro,PDMS were in the ranges of 5.36-52.5, 0.286-11.8 and 0.067-2.62g/g, respectively, being relatively constant although their KOW values extend more than six orders of magnitude. The relative sorption capacity of the biological phases showed storage lipid was the dominant sorption phase in biota, followed by membrane lipid and protein was the lowest. The KPDMS,pro values of the compounds with log KOW<9 were similar (0.382-14.9g/g) regardless of the thickness of preloaded PDMS disks (58-209μm). For HHOCs, however, KPDMS,pro values dropped when thinner PDMS disks were used, as a result of slow diffusion of HHOCs in PDMS. The KPDMS,pro values of HHOCs measured by 58-μm PDMS disks ranged from 1.78 to 6.85g/g, which was consistent with compounds with log KOW<9. This validated that partition coefficients between PDMS and biological phases were independent of chemical hydrophobicity, showing the advantage of using PDMS-based methods to directly estimate bioaccumulation potential of HHOCs. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Microbial activities and dissolved organic matter dynamics in oil-contaminated surface seawater from the Deepwater Horizon oil spill site.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Ziervogel

    Full Text Available The Deepwater Horizon oil spill triggered a complex cascade of microbial responses that reshaped the dynamics of heterotrophic carbon degradation and the turnover of dissolved organic carbon (DOC in oil contaminated waters. Our results from 21-day laboratory incubations in rotating glass bottles (roller bottles demonstrate that microbial dynamics and carbon flux in oil-contaminated surface water sampled near the spill site two weeks after the onset of the blowout were greatly affected by activities of microbes associated with macroscopic oil aggregates. Roller bottles with oil-amended water showed rapid formation of oil aggregates that were similar in size and appearance compared to oil aggregates observed in surface waters near the spill site. Oil aggregates that formed in roller bottles were densely colonized by heterotrophic bacteria, exhibiting high rates of enzymatic activity (lipase hydrolysis indicative of oil degradation. Ambient waters surrounding aggregates also showed enhanced microbial activities not directly associated with primary oil-degradation (β-glucosidase; peptidase, as well as a twofold increase in DOC. Concurrent changes in fluorescence properties of colored dissolved organic matter (CDOM suggest an increase in oil-derived, aromatic hydrocarbons in the DOC pool. Thus our data indicate that oil aggregates mediate, by two distinct mechanisms, the transfer of hydrocarbons to the deep sea: a microbially-derived flux of oil-derived DOC from sinking oil aggregates into the ambient water column, and rapid sedimentation of the oil aggregates themselves, serving as vehicles for oily particulate matter as well as oil aggregate-associated microbial communities.

  13. Aided phytostabilisation of As- and Cu-contaminated soils using white lupin and combined iron and organic amendments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fresno, Teresa; Moreno-Jiménez, Eduardo; Zornoza, Pilar; Peñalosa, Jesús M

    2018-01-01

    An aided phytostabilisation strategy consisting of several composite amendments of iron sulphate and organic materials combined with Lupinus albus L. (white lupin) was evaluated for remediation of an As- and Cu-contaminated soil. Iron sulphate was combined with lime, paper mill sludge (PS), olive mill waste compost (OMWC) or holm oak biochar (BC) and applied to a slightly acidic soil with high concentration of As (∼2200 mg kg-1) and Cu (∼150 mg kg-1). White lupin was grown for 48 days in pots containing amended and non-amended soils and the effect of soil treatments on soluble and extractable trace elements, soil fertility and plant growth and composition was evaluated. The addition of the amendments raised soil pH and reduced soluble As (50-93%) and extractable As and Cu (50-89%). Despite the reduction of As- and Cu-extractable fractions, plant As and Cu uptake was not greatly affected by the amendments. Variations in soil pH and P-Olsen seemed to have influenced As dynamics in the treated soils, although they did not provoke its mobilisation with respect to the non-amended soil. Our results suggest that the freshly formed iron oxides resulting from addition of iron sulphate controlled As dynamics in the treated soils, avoiding its mobilisation due to application of organic materials. The combination of iron sulphate with OMWC and BC is shown as appropriate for aided phytostabilisation of metal(loid)s contaminated soils, as it improved soil fertility and plant nutrition while reduced As and Cu mobility. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Evaluation of an Innovative Technology for Treatment of Water Contaminated with Perchlorate and Organic Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-03-26

    109  Figure 4-5: Relationship between Influent Concentrations [µg/L] for 2- Nitrotoluene ...diverse group of organics: benzene, toluene , n-hexane, n-heptane, 1-hexanol, 1-heptanol, diethyl ether, methy tert-butyl ether, diisopropyl ether, 3...chloride (VC) 8800 9,442.24 0.4916 TCE 1100 47,720.62 0.4442 PCE 150 74,344.71 0.3814 Nitrobenzene 2000 85,497.49 0.0938 2- Nitrotoluene 650

  15. Use of admixtures in organic-contaminated cement-clay pastes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gallo Stampino, Paola [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica ' G. Natta' , R.U. INSTM, p.zza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)], E-mail: pgallo@chem.polimi.it; Zampori, Luca; Dotelli, Giovanni [Politecnico di Milano, Dipartimento di Chimica, Materiali e Ingegneria Chimica ' G. Natta' , R.U. INSTM, p.zza L. da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Meloni, Paola [Department of Chemical Engineering and Materials, University of Cagliari, p.zza D' Armi 19, 09100 Cagliari (Italy); Sora, Isabella Natali; Pelosato, Renato [Department of Industrial Engineering, University of Bergamo, INSTM R.U. - Unibg, viale Marconi 5, 24044 Dalmine (Italy)

    2009-01-30

    In this work microstructure, porosity and hydration degree of cement-based solidified/stabilized wasteforms were studied before assessing their leaching behaviour. 2-Chloroaniline was chosen as a model liquid organic pollutant and included into cement pastes, which were also modified with different admixtures for concrete: a superplasticizer based on acrylic-modified polymer, a synthetic rubber latex and a waterproofing agent. An organoclay, modified with an ammonium quaternary salt (benzyl-dimethyl-tallowammonium, BDMTA), was added to the pastes as pre-sorbent agent of the organic matter. All the samples were dried up to constant weight in order to stop the hydration process at different times during the first 28 days of curing, typically, after 1 day (1 d), 7 days (7 d) and 28 days. Then, the microstructure of the hardened cement-clay pastes was investigated by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). The hydration degree and porosity were studied by thermal analysis (TG/DTA) and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), respectively. For samples cured for 28 days a short-term leach test set by Italian regulation for industrial waste recycling (D.M. 5 February 1998) was performed. The best results showed a 5% release of the total initial amount of organic pollutant.

  16. Use of admixtures in organic-contaminated cement-clay pastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo Stampino, Paola; Zampori, Luca; Dotelli, Giovanni; Meloni, Paola; Sora, Isabella Natali; Pelosato, Renato

    2009-01-30

    In this work microstructure, porosity and hydration degree of cement-based solidified/stabilized wasteforms were studied before assessing their leaching behaviour. 2-Chloroaniline was chosen as a model liquid organic pollutant and included into cement pastes, which were also modified with different admixtures for concrete: a superplasticizer based on acrylic-modified polymer, a synthetic rubber latex and a waterproofing agent. An organoclay, modified with an ammonium quaternary salt (benzyl-dimethyl-tallowammonium, BDMTA), was added to the pastes as pre-sorbent agent of the organic matter. All the samples were dried up to constant weight in order to stop the hydration process at different times during the first 28 days of curing, typically, after 1 day (1d), 7 days (7d) and 28 days. Then, the microstructure of the hardened cement-clay pastes was investigated by powder X-ray diffraction (XRD). The hydration degree and porosity were studied by thermal analysis (TG/DTA) and mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), respectively. For samples cured for 28 days a short-term leach test set by Italian regulation for industrial waste recycling (D.M. 5 February 1998) was performed. The best results showed a 5% release of the total initial amount of organic pollutant.

  17. Introducing saccharic acid as an efficient iron chelate to enhance photo-Fenton degradation of organic contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subramanian, Gokulakrishnan; Madras, Giridhar

    2016-11-01

    The identification of iron chelates that can enhance photo-Fenton degradation is of great interest in the field of advanced oxidation process. Saccharic acid (SA) is a polyhydroxy carboxylic acid and completely non-toxic. Importantly, it can effectively bind Fe(III) as well as induce photoreduction of Fe(III). Despite having these interesting properties, the effect of SA on photo-Fenton degradation has not been studied. Herein, we demonstrate the first assessment of SA as an iron chelate in photo-Fenton process using methylene blue (MB) as a model organic contaminant. Our results demonstrate that SA has the ability to (i) enhance the photo-Fenton degradation of MB by about 11 times at pH 4.5 (ii) intensify photochemical reduction of Fe(III) to Fe(II) by about 17 times and (iii) accelerate the rate of consumption of H2O2 in photo-Fenton process by about 5 times (iv) increase the TOC reduction by about 2 times and (v) improve the photo-Fenton degradation of MB in the presence of a variety of common inorganic ions and organic matter. The influential properties of SA on photo-Fenton degradation is attributed to the efficient photochemical reduction of Fe(III) via LMCT (ligand to metal charge transfer reaction) to Fe(II), which then activated H2O2 to generate OH and accelerated photo-Fenton degradation efficiency. Moreover, the effect of operational parameters such as oxidant: contaminant (H2O2: MB) ratio, catalyst: contaminant (Fe(III)SA: MB) ratio, Fe(III): SA stoichiometry and pH on the degradation of MB by photo-Fenton in the presence of SA is demonstrated. Importantly, SA assisted photo-Fenton caused effective degradation of MB and 4-Chlorophenol under natural sunlight irradiation in natural water matrix. The findings strongly support SA as a deserving iron chelate to enhance photo-Fenton degradation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Neurotoxicity and risk assessment of brominated and alternative flame retardants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendriks, Hester S; Westerink, Remco H S

    2015-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are widely used chemicals that prevent or slow the onset and spreading of fire. Unfortunately, many of these compounds pose serious threats for human health and the environment, indicating an urgent need for safe(r) and less persistent alternative flame retardants (AFRs). As previous research identified the nervous system as a sensitive target organ, the neurotoxicity of past and present flame retardants is reviewed. First, an overview of the neurotoxicity of BFRs in humans and experimental animals is provided, and some common in vitro neurotoxic mechanisms of action are discussed. The combined epidemiological and toxicological studies clearly underline the need for replacing BFRs. Many potentially suitable AFRs are already in use, despite the absence of a full profile of their environmental behavior and toxicological properties. To prioritize the suitability of some selected halogenated and non-halogenated organophosphorous flame retardants and inorganic halogen-free flame retardants, the available neurotoxic data of these AFRs are discussed. The suitability of the AFRs is rank-ordered and combined with human exposure data (serum concentrations, breast milk concentrations and house dust concentrations) and physicochemical properties (useful to predict e.g. bioavailability and persistence in the environment) for a first semi-quantitative risk assessment of the AFRs. As can be concluded from the reviewed data, several BFRs and AFRs share some neurotoxic effects and modes of action. Moreover, the available neurotoxicity data indicate that some AFRs may be suitable substitutes for BFRs. However, proper risk assessment is hampered by an overall scarcity of data, particularly regarding environmental persistence, human exposure levels, and the formation of breakdown products and possible metabolites as well as their toxicity. Until these data gaps in environmental behavioral and toxicological profiles are filled, large scale use of

  19. Trophic transfer of naturally produced brominated aromatic compounds in a Baltic Sea food chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlgren, Elin; Lindqvist, Dennis; Dahlgren, Henrik; Asplund, Lillemor; Lehtilä, Kari

    2016-02-01

    Brominated aromatic compounds (BACs) are widely distributed in the marine environment. Some of these compounds are highly toxic, such as certain hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs). In addition to anthropogenic emissions through use of BACs as e.g. flame retardants, BACs are natural products formed by marine organisms such as algae, sponges, and cyanobacteria. Little is known of the transfer of BACs from natural producers and further up in the trophic food chain. In this study it was observed that total sum of methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (MeO-PBDEs) and OH-PBDEs increased in concentration from the filamentous red alga Ceramium tenuicorne, via Gammarus sp. and three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) to perch (Perca fluviatilis). The MeO-PBDEs, which were expected to bioaccumulate, increased in concentration accordingly up to perch, where the levels suddenly dropped dramatically. The opposite pattern was observed for OH-PBDEs, where the concentration exhibited a general trend of decline up the food web, but increased in perch, indicating metabolic demethylation of MeO-PBDEs. Debromination was also indicated to occur when progressing through the food chain resulting in high levels of tetra-brominated MeO-PBDE and OH-PBDE congeners in fish, while some penta- and hexa-brominated congeners were observed to be the dominant products in the alga. As it has been shown that OH-PBDEs are potent disruptors of oxidative phosphorylation and that mixtures of different congener may act synergistically in terms of this toxic mode of action, the high levels of OH-PBDEs detected in perch in this study warrants further investigation into potential effects of these compounds on Baltic wildlife, and monitoring of their levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Organic contaminants in Great Lakes tributaries: Prevalence and potential aquatic toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Austin K.; Corsi, Steven R.; De Cicco, Laura A.; Lenaker, Peter L.; Lutz, Michelle A; Sullivan, Daniel J.; Richards, Kevin D.

    2016-01-01

    Organic compounds used in agriculture, industry, and households make their way into surface waters through runoff, leaking septic-conveyance systems, regulated and unregulated discharges, and combined sewer overflows, among other sources. Concentrations of these organic waste compounds (OWCs) in some Great Lakes tributaries indicate a high potential for adverse impacts on aquatic organisms. During 2010–13, 709 water samples were collected at 57 tributaries, together representing approximately 41% of the total inflow to the lakes. Samples were collected during runoff and low-flow conditions and analyzed for 69 OWCs, including herbicides, insecticides, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, plasticizers, antioxidants, detergent metabolites, fire retardants, non-prescription human drugs, flavors/fragrances, and dyes. Urban-related land cover characteristics were the most important explanatory variables of concentrations of many OWCs. Compared to samples from nonurban watersheds ( 15% urban land cover) had nearly four times the number of detected compounds and four times the total sample concentration, on average. Concentration differences between runoff and low-flow conditions were not observed, but seasonal differences were observed in atrazine, metolachlor, DEET, and HHCB concentrations. Water quality benchmarks for individual OWCs were exceeded at 20 sites, and at 7 sites benchmarks were exceeded by a factor of 10 or more. The compounds with the most frequent water quality benchmark exceedances were the PAHs benzo[a]pyrene, pyrene, fluoranthene, and anthracene, the detergent metabolite 4-nonylphenol, and the herbicide atrazine. Computed estradiol equivalency quotients (EEQs) using only nonsteroidal endocrine-active compounds indicated medium to high risk of estrogenic effects (intersex or vitellogenin induction) at 10 sites. EEQs at 3 sites were comparable to values reported in effluent. This multifaceted study is the largest, most comprehensive assessment of the

  1. Metal-catalysed organic transformations in water: From bromination ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Reaction of ,-unsaturated aromatic carboxylic acids with KBr and H2O2 in the presence of Na2MoO4 ⋅ H2O in aqueous medium affords -bromo alkenes in high yields. Metallocene dichlorides, Cp2MCl2 (M = Ti, Zr, or V) catalyse polymerisation of olefins in aqueous medium to afford high molecular weight polymers ...

  2. Metal-catalysed organic transformations in water: From bromination ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    that obtained from radical polymerisation of MMA. It has been found that the conversion is both tem- perature and time dependent. In the case of Cp2TiCl2 catalysed polymerisation of MMA, up to 40°C we could not detect any product. The conversion is negli- gible at 50°C. The highest conversion was observed at 70°C, and ...

  3. Biomonitoring of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) in child populations living near contaminated sites in Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flores-Ramírez, R; Pérez-Vázquez, F J; Rodríguez-Aguilar, M; Medellín-Garibay, S E; Van Brussel, E; Cubillas-Tejeda, A C; Carrizales-Yáñez, L; Díaz-Barriga, F

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to conduct a POP biomonitoring programme for children in high-risk areas. We evaluated 247 serum samples from children between the ages of 6 and 12years old from two zones in Mexico: (1) indigenous zones, which included Cuatlamayan (CUA), Tocoy (TOC), and Santa Maria Picula (SAM); and (2) industrial zones, which included Tercera Chica (TC), Industrial San Luis (IND) and Rincon de San Jose (SJR); Mundo Nuevo (MN); and Alpuyeca (ALP). Our results showed that α-endosulfan was similar to CUA, TOC, SAM, TC and MN (178.6-306.9ng/g lipid). β-Endosulfan levels were higher in ALP (901.5ng/g lipid), followed by CUA (139.9ng/g lipid) and TOC, SAM, TC and MN, which had similar levels (55.4-64.5ng/g lipid). For endosulfan sulfate, the ALP community had the highest concentration levels (1096.4ng/g lipid), whereas CUA and TOC (212.3 and 289ng/g lipid, respectively) had concentrations similar to those found in SAM and TC (99.5 and 119.1ng/g lipid, respectively). DDE levels were found in malaria-endemic areas of SAM, CUA and TOC (1782.2, 1358.3 and 57.0ng/g lipid), followed by MN (35.1ng/g lipid). HCB concentration levels were found to be higher in MN and SJR (691.8 and 575.4ng/g lipid, respectively), followed by CUA and TC (363.9 and 269.1ng/g lipid, respectively), with levels similar to those found in TOC and SAM (191.8 and 181.9ng/g lipid, respectively). Finally, PCB 101 concentration levels were found to be the highest in ALP (1032.7ng/g lipid), followed by similar levels of SJR and IND (567.5 and 327.3ng/g lipid, respectively) and TC and MN, with 109.1 and 144.5ng/g lipid, respectively. The evidence provided by this exploratory study indicates that the evaluation of the health risks posed to children living in contaminated areas is a high priority health issue. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Maternal transfer of emerging brominated and chlorinated flame retardants in European eels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sühring, Roxana, E-mail: roxana.suehring@hzg.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Institute of Coastal Research, Department for Environmental Chemistry, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Leuphana University Lüneburg, Institute of Sustainable and Environmental Chemistry, Scharnhorststraße 1, 21335 Lüneburg (Germany); Freese, Marko [Thünen Institute of Fisheries Ecology, Palmaille 9, 22767 Hamburg (Germany); Schneider, Mandy [Leuphana University Lüneburg, Institute of Sustainable and Environmental Chemistry, Scharnhorststraße 1, 21335 Lüneburg (Germany); Schubert, Sophia; Pohlmann, Jan-Dag [Thünen Institute of Fisheries Ecology, Palmaille 9, 22767 Hamburg (Germany); Alaee, Mehran [Water Science and Technology Directorate, Environment Canada, Burlington, Ontario, L7R4A6 Canada (Canada); Wolschke, Hendrik [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Institute of Coastal Research, Department for Environmental Chemistry, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Leuphana University Lüneburg, Institute of Sustainable and Environmental Chemistry, Scharnhorststraße 1, 21335 Lüneburg (Germany); Hanel, Reinhold [Thünen Institute of Fisheries Ecology, Palmaille 9, 22767 Hamburg (Germany); Ebinghaus, Ralf [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Institute of Coastal Research, Department for Environmental Chemistry, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Marohn, Lasse [Thünen Institute of Fisheries Ecology, Palmaille 9, 22767 Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    The European eel (Anguilla anguilla) is regarded as a critically endangered species. Scientists are in agreement that the “quality of spawners” is a vital factor for the survival of the species. This quality can be impaired by parasites, disease and pollution. Especially endocrine disrupting organic chemicals pose a potential threat to reproduction and development of offspring. To our knowledge, the findings in this publication for the first time describe maternal transfer of contaminants in eels. We analysed the concentrations of in total 53 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and their halogenated substitutes in muscle, gonads and eggs of artificially matured European eels and in muscle and gonads of untreated European eels that were used for comparison. We found evidence that persistent organic pollutants such as PBDEs, as well as their brominated and chlorinated substitutes are redistributed from muscle tissue to gonads and eggs. Concentrations ranged from 0.001 ng g{sup −1} ww for sum Dechlorane metabolites (DPMA, aCL{sub 10}DP, aCl{sub 11}DP) to 2.1 ng g{sup −1} ww for TBA in eggs, 0.001 ng g{sup −1} ww for Dechlorane metabolites to 9.4 ng g{sup −1} ww for TBA in gonads and 0.002 ng g{sup −1} ww for Dechlorane metabolites to 54 ng g{sup −1} ww for TBA in muscle tissue. Average egg muscle ratios (EMRs) for compounds detectable in artificially matured eels from both Schlei Fjord and Ems River ranged from 0.01 for Dechlorane 602 (DDC-DBF) to 10.4 for PBEB. Strong correlations were found between flame retardant concentrations and lipid content in the analysed tissue types, as well as transfer rates and octanol–water partitioning coefficient, indicating that these parameters were the driving factors for the observed maternal transfer. Furthermore, indications were found, that TBP-DBPE, TBP-AE, BATE and TBA have a significant uptake from the surrounding water, rather than just food and might additionally be formed by metabolism or

  5. Degradation of Polymeric Brominated Flame Retardants: Development of an Analytical Approach Using PolyFR and UV Irradiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Christoph; Dundua, Alexander; Aragon-Gomez, Jackelyn; Nachev, Milen; Stephan, Susanne; Willach, Sarah; Ulbricht, Mathias; Schmitz, Oliver J; Schmidt, Torsten C; Sures, Bernd

    2016-12-06

    Many well-established methods for studying the degradation of brominated flame retardants are not useful when working with polymeric and water insoluble species. An example for this specific class of flame retardants is PolyFR (polymeric flame retardant; CAS No 1195978-93-8), which is used as a substituent for hexabromocyclododecane. Although it has been on the market for two years now, almost no information is available about its long time behavior in the environment. Within this study, we focus on how to determine a possible degradation of both pure PolyFR as well as PolyFR in the final insulation product, expanded polystyrene foam. Therefore, we chose UV radiation followed by analyses of the total bromine content at different time points via ICP-MS and identified possible degradation products such as 2,4,6-tribromophenol through LC-MS. These results were then linked with measurements of the adsorbable organically bound bromine and total organic carbon in order to estimate their concentrations. With respect to the obtained (1)H NMR, GPC, and contact angle results, the possibility for further degradation was discussed, as UV irradiation can influence the decomposition of molecules in combination with other environmental factors like biodegradation.

  6. Spatial Patterns of Atmospherically Deposited Organic Contaminants at High Elevation in the Southern Sierra Nevada Mountains, California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atmospherically deposited contaminants in the Sierra Nevada mountains of California have been implicated as a factor adversely affecting biological resources such as amphibians and fish, yet the distributions of contaminants within the mountains are poorly known, particularly at...

  7. Survey of 218 organic contaminants in groundwater derived from the world's largest untreated wastewater irrigation system: Mezquital Valley, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesser, Luis E; Mora, Abrahan; Moreau, Cristina; Mahlknecht, Jürgen; Hernández-Antonio, Arturo; Ramírez, Aldo I; Barrios-Piña, Héctor

    2018-05-01

    The Mezquital Valley system is the world's oldest and largest example with regard to use of untreated wastewater for agricultural irrigation. Because of the artificial high recharge associated with the Mezquital Valley aquifers, groundwater is extracted for human consumption, and there are plans to use this groundwater as a water resource for Mexico City. Thus, this study analyzed 218 organic micro-contaminants in wastewater, springs, and groundwater from Mezquital Valley. Five volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and nine semi-volatile organic compounds (SVOCs) were detected in the wastewater used for irrigation. Only two SVOCs [bis-2-(ethylhexyl) phthalate and dibutyl phthalate] were detected in all the wastewater canals and groundwater sources, whereas no VOCs were detected in groundwater and springs. Of the 118 pharmaceutically active compounds (PhACs) and 7 reproductive hormones measured, 65 PhACs and 3 hormones were detected in the wastewater. Of these, metformin, caffeine, and acetaminophen account for almost sixty percent of the total PhACs in wastewater. Nevertheless, 23 PhACs were detected in groundwater sources, where the majority of these compounds have low detection frequencies. The PhACs sulfamethoxazole, N,N-diethyl-meta-toluamide, carbamazepine, and benzoylecgonine (primary cocaine metabolite) were frequently detected in groundwater, suggesting that although the soils act as a filter adsorbing and degrading the majority of the organic pollutant content in wastewater, these PhACs still reach the aquifer. Therefore, the presence of these PhACs, together with the high levels of the endocrine disruptor bis-2-(ethylhexyl) phthalate, indicate that water sources derived from the recharge of the studied aquifers may pose a risk to consumer health. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  8. Synergistic role of different soil components in slow sorption kinetics of polar organic contaminants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Dongmei; Hou, Lei; Zhu, Dongqiang; Chen, Wei

    2014-01-01

    We observed that the sorption kinetics of nitrobenzene and 2,4-dinitrotoluene (two model polar compounds) was significantly slower than that of 1,4-dichlorobenzene and phenanthrene (two model apolar compounds). The difference was attributable to the strong non-hydrophobic interactions between the polar molecules and soil. Interestingly, sorption kinetics of the polar sorbates to the soil organic matter-free soil, humic/fulvic acid-free soil, and extracted humic acids was very fast, indicating that different soil components played a synergetic role in the observed slow kinetics. We propose that slow sorption kinetics of highly polar sorbates stems mainly from the strong specific interactions (H-bonding, electron donor-acceptor interactions, etc.) with humic/fulvic acids; such specific interactions occur when sorbate molecules diffuse through humic/fulvic acids coiled, in relatively compressed confirmations, within the complex, tortuous, and porous soil matrices formed by mineral grains/particles and soil organic matter. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Bioaccumulation of organic contaminants in humans: a multimedia perspective and the importance of biotransformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLachlan, Michael S; Czub, Gertje; MacLeod, Matthew; Arnot, Jon A

    2011-01-01

    Bioaccumulation is an important component of the exposure hazard assessment and risk assessment of organic chemicals. Screening criteria for chemical hazard used in national and international regulations are based on the paradigm that partitioning properties are the primary chemical determinants of bioaccumulation. We use a holistic multimedia perspective to evaluate the partitioning property paradigm with respect to assessing human bioaccumulation. Multimedia bioaccumulation factors (mmBAFs) for humans were modeled for hypothetical chemicals with a wide range of physical-chemical properties. Varying partitioning properties over 12 orders of magnitude (a plausible range for nonionizing organics) resulted in only modest changes in mmBAFs (a factor of ∼ 10) for all but very volatile or hydrophilic chemicals. In contrast, varying biotransformation rate constants over 6 orders of magnitude resulted in substantial differences in mmBAFs (greater than a factor of 10(9)). Our model results are supported by empirical observations of well characterized pollutants, which demonstrate that chemicals with similar partitioning properties can have very different bioaccumulation behavior. Susceptibility to biotransformation clearly determines bioaccumulation in humans for many chemicals. We conclude that a holistic multimedia perspective for bioaccumulation assessment is necessary to develop regulations, criteria, and policies that are protective of human health and the environment.

  10. The influence of soil organic carbon on interactions between microbial parameters and metal concentrations at a long-term contaminated site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Muhlbachova, G. [Crop Research Institute, Drnovska 507, 161 06 Prague 6, Ruzyne (Czech Republic); Sagova-Mareckova, M., E-mail: sagova@vurv.cz [Crop Research Institute, Drnovska 507, 161 06 Prague 6, Ruzyne (Czech Republic); Omelka, M. [Charles University, Faculty of Mathematics and Physics, Dept. of Probability and Mathematical Statistics, Prague 8, Karlin (Czech Republic); Szakova, J.; Tlustos, P. [Czech University of Life Sciences, Department of Agroenvironmental Chemistry and Plant Nutrition, Prague 6, Suchdol (Czech Republic)

    2015-01-01

    The effects of lead, zinc, cadmium, arsenic and copper deposits on soil microbial parameters were investigated at a site exposed to contamination for over 200 years. Soil samples were collected in triplicates at 121 sites differing in contamination and soil organic carbon (SOC). Microbial biomass, respiration, dehydrogenase activity and metabolic quotient were determined and correlated with total and extractable metal concentrations in soil. The goal was to analyze complex interactions between toxic metals and microbial parameters by assessing the effect of soil organic carbon in the relationships. The effect of SOC was significant in all interactions and changed the correlations between microbial parameters and metal fractions from negative to positive. In some cases, the effect of SOC was combined with that of clay and soil pH. In the final analysis, dehydrogenase activity was negatively correlated to total metal concentrations and acetic acid extractable metals, respiration and metabolic quotient were to ammonium nitrate extractable metals. Dehydrogenase activity was the most sensitive microbial parameter correlating most frequently with contamination. Total and extractable zinc was most often correlated with microbial parameters. The large data set enabled robust explanation of discrepancies in organic matter functioning occurring frequently in analyzing of contaminated soil processes. - Highlights: • Soil organic carbon affected all interactions between metals and microorganisms. • Soil organic carbon adjustment changed correlations from positive to negative. • Ammonium nitrate extractable metals were the most influencing fraction. • Dehydrogenase activity was the most affected soil parameter. • Zinc was the most toxic metal among studied metals.

  11. Assessment and Control of Organic and other Contaminants Associated with the Stardust Sample Return from Comet 81P/Wild 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandford, S.; Bajt, S; Clemett, S; Cody, G; Cooper, G; Degregorio, B; de Vera, V; Dworkin, J; Flynn, G; et al.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous potential sources of organic contaminants could have greatly complicated the interpretation of the organic portions of the samples returned from comet 81P/Wild 2 by the Stardust spacecraft. Measures were taken to control and assess potential organic (and other) contaminants during the design, construction, and flight of the spacecraft, and during and after recovery of the sample return capsule. Studies of controls and the returned samples suggest that many of these potential sources did not contribute any significant material to the collectors. In particular, contamination from soils at the recovery site and materials associated with the ablation of the heatshield do not appear to be significant problems. The largest source of concern is associated with the C present in the original aerogel. The relative abundance of this carbon can vary between aerogel tiles and even within individual tiles. This C was fortunately not distributed among a complex mixture of organics, but was instead largely present in a few simple forms (mostly as Si-CH{sub 3} groups). In most cases, the signature of returned cometary organics can be readily distinguished from contaminants through their different compositions, nonterrestrial isotopic ratios, and/or association with other cometary materials. However, some conversion of the carbon indigenous to the flight aerogel appears to have happened during particle impact, and some open issues remain regarding how this C may be processed into new forms during the hypervelocity impact collection of the comet dust.

  12. Assessment and Control of Organic and Other Contaminants Associated with the Stardust Sample Return from Comet 81P/Wild 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanford, S.; Bajt, S; Clemett, S; Cody, G; Cooper, G; Degregorio, B; DeVera, V; Dworkin, J; Elsila, J; et al.

    2010-01-01

    Numerous potential sources of organic contaminants could have greatly complicated the interpretation of the organic portions of the samples returned from comet 81P/Wild 2 by the Stardust spacecraft. Measures were taken to control and assess potential organic (and other) contaminants during the design, construction, and flight of the spacecraft, and during and after recovery of the sample return capsule. Studies of controls and the returned samples suggest that many of these potential sources did not contribute any significant material to the collectors. In particular, contamination from soils at the recovery site and materials associated with the ablation of the heatshield do not appear to be significant problems. The largest source of concern is associated with the C present in the original aerogel. The relative abundance of this carbon can vary between aerogel tiles and even within individual tiles. This C was fortunately not distributed among a complex mixture of organics, but was instead largely present in a few simple forms (mostly as Si-CH{sub 3} groups). In most cases, the signature of returned cometary organics can be readily distinguished from contaminants through their different compositions, nonterrestrial isotopic ratios, and/or association with other cometary materials. However, some conversion of the carbon indigenous to the flight aerogel appears to have happened during particle impact, and some open issues remain regarding how this C may be processed into new forms during the hypervelocity impact collection of the comet dust.

  13. Characterization of black carbon and organic contaminants in wood ash from different feedstocks and types of furnaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, Agustin; Rey-Salgueiro, Ledicia; Omil, Beatriz; Martinez-Carballo, Elena; Simal-Gandara, Jesus

    2015-04-01

    Due to their important concentration of nutrient and charcoal, wood ash from biomass power plants (WA) can be used as a fertilizer and organic amendment in intensively managed soils. Unlike biochar produced in under anoxic conditions, the nature of the organic compounds present in wood ash has been scarcely studied. Due to the incomplete combustion, wood ash may contain a wide range of organic compounds, from charred to highly condensed refractory biomass, which determines the possibilities of WA as an organic amendment. In addition, the possible environmental risk of this practice must be assessed by determining the content of water-soluble and insoluble organic contaminants. due to the incomplete combustion of organic matter, organic pollutants, such as Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs), can be formed and can remain in the combustion residue. Also, the four alkyl benzene volatile organic compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and the ortho, para, and meta xylenes) can be formed, depending on certain conditions during combustion. For this study 15 biomass power stations in Spain were selected. In all of them the feedstock is pine or eucalyptus branches and bark. Nine of them were bottom wood ash generated from wood fires furnaces, obtained from grate-fired or water-tube boilers. Whereas four of them were fly ash, obtained in cyclone separators. The samples were collected following a common procedure to ensure the representiveness of the sampling. Bottom ash samples were fraccionated in three fractions: 5mm. Each fraction was characterized for organic matter and BTEX, styrene and total petroleum hydrocarbons Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons. For each analyzes, three replicates were analyzed per sample. Mixes wood ash shows higher amounts of charred material than fly ash. The 13 C CPMAS NMR, DSC/TG and FTIR analysis showed the loss of carbohydrates and aliphatic constituents and revealed the formation of aromatic compounds. The atomic H/C ratios, NMR

  14. Sorption study of organic contaminant on raw and modified clay materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dammak N.

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption of volatile organic compound VOC (o-xylene was studied by a static headspace coupled to gas chromatography in natural and intercalated clay. Vapor–solid adsorption isotherms of o-xylene were measured at 20 °C, 30 °C and 40 °C. Clay was modified with hexadecyl trimetyl ammonium bromide (HDTMA. Absolute values of the amounts of o- xylene adsorbed in intercalated clay were about eighteen times higher than natural clay. The adsorption isotherm were analysed with Langmuir, Freundlich, Langmuir–Freundlich and Toth models. Langmuir–Freundlich model describes well the equilibrium adsorption data. The evaluation of thermodynamic parameters presents an exothermic and spontaneous adsorption process.

  15. Occurrence of organic wastewater contaminants, pharmaceuticals, and personal care products in selected water supplies, Cape Cod, Massachusetts, June 2004

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Marc J.

    2005-01-01

    In June 2004, the U.S. Geological Survey, in cooperation with the Barnstable County Department of Health and Environment, sampled water from 14 wastewater sources and drinking-water supplies on Cape Cod, Massachusetts, for the presence of organic wastewater contaminants, pharmaceuticals, and personal care products. The geographic distribution of sampling locations does not represent the distribution of drinking-water supplies on Cape Cod. The environmental presence of the analyte compounds is mostly unregulated; many of the compounds are suspected of having adverse ecological and human health effects. Of the 85 different organic analyte compounds, 43 were detected, with 13 detected in low concentrations (less than 1 microgram per liter) from drinking-water supplies thought to be affected by wastewater because of previously detected high nitrate concentrations. (Phenol and d-limonene, detected in equipment blanks at unacceptably high concentrations, are not included in counts of detections in this report.) Compounds detected in the drinking-water supplies included the solvent, tetrachloroethylene; the analgesic, acetaminophen; the antibiotic, sulfamethoxazole; and the antidepressant, carbamazapine. Nitrate nitrogen, an indicator of wastewater, was detected in water supplies in concentrations ranging from 0.2 to 8.8 milligrams per liter.

  16. The role of condensed carbonaceous materials on the sorption of hydrophobic organic contaminants in subsurface sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Sangjo; Wander, Michelle M; Kleineidam, Sybille; Grathwohl, Peter; Ligouis, Bertrand S; Werth, Charles J

    2008-03-01

    The identification and characterization of carbonaceous materials (CMs) that control hydrophobic organic chemical (HOC) sorption is essential to predict the fate and transport of HOCs in soils and sediments. The objectives of this paper are to determine the types of CMs that control HOC sorption in the oxidized and reduced zones of a glacially deposited groundwater sediment in central Illinois, with a special emphasis on the roles of kerogen and black carbon. After collection, the sediments were treated to obtain fractions of the sediment samples enriched in different types of CMs (e.g., humic acid, kerogen, black carbon), and selected fractions were subject to quantitative petrographic analysis. The original sediments and their enrichment fractions were evaluated for their ability to sorb trichloroethene (TCE), a common groundwater pollutant. Isotherm results and mass fractions of CM enrichments were used to calculate sorption contributions of different CMs. The results indicate that CMs in the heavy fractions dominate sorption because of their greater mass. Black carbon mass fractions of total CMs in the reduced sediments were calculated and used to estimate the sorption contribution of these materials. Results indicate that in the reduced sediments, black carbon may sequester as much as 32% of the sorbed TCE mass, butthat kerogen and humin are the dominant sorption environments. Organic carbon normalized sorption coefficients (K(oc)) were compared to literature values. Values for the central Illinois sediments are relatively large and in the range of values determined for materials high in kerogen and humin. This work demonstrates the advantage of using both sequential chemical treatment and petrographic analysis to analyze the sorption contributions of different CMs in natural soils and sediments, and the importance of sorption to natural geopolymers in groundwater sediments not impacted by anthropogenic sources of black carbon.

  17. Application of groundwater residence time tracers and broad screening for micro-organic contaminants in the Indo-Gangetic aquifer system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lapworth, Dan; Das, Prerona; Mukherjee, Abhijit; Petersen, Jade; Gooddy, Daren; Krishan, Gopal

    2017-04-01

    Groundwater abstracted from aquifers underlying urban centres across India provide a vital source of domestic water. Abstraction from municipal and private supplies is considerable and growing rapidly with ever increasing demand for water from expanding urban populations. This trend is set to continue. The vulnerability of deeper aquifers (typically >100 m below ground) used for domestic water to contamination migration from often heavily contaminated shallow aquifer systems has not been studies in detail in India. This paper focusses on the occurrence of micro-organic contaminants within sedimentary aquifers beneath urban centres which are intensively pumped for drinking water and domestic use. New preliminary results from a detailed case study undertaken across Varanasi, a city with an estimated population of ca. 1.5 million in Uttar Pradesh. Micro -organic groundwater quality status and evolution with depth is investigated through selection of paired shallow and deep sites across the city. These results are considered within the context of paired groundwater residence time tracers within the top 150m within the sedimentary aquifer system. Groundwater emerging contaminant results are compared with surface water quality from the Ganges which is also used for drinking water supply. Broad screening for >800 micro-organic compounds was undertaken. Age dating tools were employed to constrain and inform a conceptual model of groundwater recharge and contaminant evolution within the sedimentary aquifer system.

  18. Brominated flame retardants in Dutch North Sea surface sediments

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klamers, H.J.C.; Villerius, L.A.; Leonards, P.E.G.; Bakker, J.F.

    2001-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFR) concentrations were determined in the fine fraction (<63?m) of 10 surface sediments located in the southern part of the Dutch section of the North Sea Continental Shelf. Concentrations generally decreased with increasing distance from the Dutch shore. Highest

  19. Bromine pretreated chitosan for adsorption of lead (II) from water

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. Pollution by heavy metals like lead (II) is responsible for health hazards and environmental degradation. Adsorption is a prevalent method applied for removal of heavy metal pollutants from water. This study explored adsorption performances of 30% bromine pretreated chitosan for lead (II) abatement from water.

  20. Complex Kinetics in the Reaction of Taurine with Aqueous Bromine ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Complex Kinetics in the Reaction of Taurine with Aqueous. Bromine and Acidic Bromate: A Possible Cytoprotective. Role against Hypobromous Acid. Reuben H. Simoyi1*, Kevin Streete2, Claudius Mundoma2 and Rotimi Olojo2. 1Department of Chemistry, University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, 7700 South Africa.

  1. Pharmaceuticals, hormones, and other organic wastewater contaminants in U.S. streams, 1999-2000: A national reconnaissance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolpin, D.W.; Furlong, E.T.; Meyer, M.T.; Thurman, E.M.; Zaugg, S.D.; Barber, L.B.; Buxton, H.T.

    2002-01-01

    To provide the first nationwide reconnaissance of the occurrence of pharmaceuticals, hormones, and other organic wastewater contaminants (OWCs) in water resources, the U.S. Geological Survey used five newly developed analytical methods to measure concentrations of 95 OWCs in water samples from a network of 139 streams across 30 states during 1999 and 2000. The selection of sampling sites was biased toward streams susceptible to contamination (i.e. downstream of intense urbanization and livestock production). OWCs were prevalent during this study, being found in 80% of the streams sampled. The compounds detected represent a wide range of residential, industrial, and agricultural origins and uses with 82 of the 95 OWCs being found during this study. The most frequently detected compounds were coprostanol (fecal steroid), cholesterol (plant and animal steroid), N,N-diethyltoluamide (insect repellant), caffeine (stimulant), triclosan (antimicrobial disinfectant), tri(2-chloroethyl)phosphate (fire retardant), and 4-nonylphenol (nonionic detergent metabolite). Measured concentrations for this study were generally low and rarely exceeded drinking-water guidelines, drinking-water health advisories, or aquatic-life criteria. Many compounds, however, do not have such guidelines established. The detection of multiple OWCs was common for this study, with a median of seven and as many as 38 OWCs being found in a given water sample. Little is known about the potential interactive effects (such as synergistic or antagonistic toxicity) that may occur from complex mixtures of OWCs in the environment. In addition, results of this study demonstrate the importance of obtaining data on metabolites to fully understand not only the fate and transport of OWCs in the hydrologic system but also their ultimate overall effect on human health and the environment.

  2. Reducing organic contamination of shallow areas in brackish lagoons during rearing fish in cages in polyculture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Shekk

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. The development of the technology of the controlled rearing of marine fish remains one of the priority strategic trends of development of national mariculture. A study of the possibility of using polyculture for cage culture has a particular interest. Joint cultivation of several species of fish in the same cage, as practice of fish farming has demonstrated, does not have a tangible positive effect. At the same time, the use of cages of special design can provide significant additional fish products through the use of additional aquaculture objects. The ecological state of water areas, where the cages are located, is of great importance. High fish stocking density and the use of artificial feeds can serve as a source of powerful biogenic and organic pollution, which is especially important for shallow water areas with weak water exchange. The purpose of the study is to develop the methods for joint fish production in cage mariculture capable to provide high fish production and to weaken organic pollution of shallow water areas where cage farms are located. Methodology. The studies were conducted in 1999 and 2004. Cages of special design (internal 10 m3 and external 18.75 m3 installed in the brackish Shabolat Lagoon were used for rearing, steelhead trout, haarder, grass goby and round goby in polyculture. The standard aquaculture research methods were used. For express-analysis of environment hydrochemical parameters in cage location area the following devices were used: "ECOTEST-2000 T" (О2, NO2, NO3, NH4, CO2, phosphates, pH; termooksimetr "АJА-101М" (Т; О2; "pH meter-150 M; Refractometer "ATAGO-100" (salinity and water density. Findings. The results of marine fish cultivation in cages in polyculture in the shallow Shabolat lagoon are presented. It has been shown that joint cultivation of salmon, mullet and gobies in specially designed ca