WorldWideScience

Sample records for brominated hydrocarbons

  1. Bromine

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavelka, Stanislav

    2. Weinheim : WileyVCH, 2004 - (Merian, E.; Anke, M.; Ihnat, M.; Stoeppler, M.), s. 1445-1455 ISBN 3-527-30459-2. - (3) Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5011922 Keywords : bromine * analysis * biological relevance Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry

  2. Kinetics of aerobic cometabolic biodegradation of chlorinated and brominated aliphatic hydrocarbons: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jesus, João; Frascari, Dario; Pozdniakova, Tatiana; Danko, Anthony S

    2016-05-15

    This review analyses kinetic studies of aerobic cometabolism (AC) of halogenated aliphatic hydrocarbons (HAHs) from 2001-2015 in order to (i) compare the different kinetic models proposed, (ii) analyse the estimated model parameters with a focus on novel HAHs and the identification of general trends, and (iii) identify further research needs. The results of this analysis show that aerobic cometabolism can degrade a wide range of HAHs, including HAHs that were not previously tested such as chlorinated propanes, highly chlorinated ethanes and brominated methanes and ethanes. The degree of chlorine mineralization was very high for the chlorinated HAHs. Bromine mineralization was not determined for studies with brominated aliphatics. The examined research period led to the identification of novel growth substrates of potentially high interest. Decreasing performance of aerobic cometabolism were found with increasing chlorination, indicating the high potential of aerobic cometabolism in the presence of medium- and low-halogenated HAHs. Further research is needed for the AC of brominated aliphatic hydrocarbons, the potential for biofilm aerobic cometabolism processes, HAH-HAH mutual inhibition and the identification of the enzymes responsible for each aerobic cometabolism process. Lastly, some indications for a possible standardization of future kinetic studies of HAH aerobic cometabolism are provided. PMID:26874310

  3. Chicago's Sanitary and Ship Canal sediment: Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, polychlorinated biphenyls, brominated flame retardants, and organophosphate esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peverly, Angela A; O'Sullivan, Colin; Liu, Liang-Ying; Venier, Marta; Martinez, Andres; Hornbuckle, Keri C; Hites, Ronald A

    2015-09-01

    The Chicago Sanitary and Ship Canal (CSSC) links the Great Lakes to the Mississippi River starting in downtown Chicago. In addition to storm water, the CSSC receives water from Chicago's wastewater treatment plants (WWTP). Such effluents are known to be sources of organic pollutants to water and sediment. Therefore in 2013, we collected 10 sediment samples from the CSSC and measured the concentrations of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), brominated flame retardants, and organophosphate esters (OPEs). Geometric mean concentrations of the summed concentrations of 16 PAHs ranged from 11,000 to 420,000 ng/g dw, with the highest concentrations located at each end of the canal. Total PCB concentrations had a geometric mean of 1,400 ± 500 ng/g dw. Brominated flame retardants were separated into two groups: polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and non-PBDEs. Concentrations of PBDEs and those of the non-PBDE flame retardants had a geometric average of 83 ± 19 and 7.0 ± 5.8 ng/g dw, respectively. The summed concentrations of 8 OPEs ranged from 470 to 2,800 ng/g dw, with the highest concentration detected at a site located downstream of the Stickney water reclamation plant. Using ANOVA results, some hypotheses on sources to the CSSC could be formulated: downtown Chicago is probably a source of PAHs, the Cal-Sag Channel may be a source of PCBs, and neither the WWTP nor the Cal-Sag Channel seem to be significant sources of brominated flame retardants or OPEs. PMID:25981316

  4. Short-lived brominated hydrocarbons – observations in the source regions and the tropical tropopause layer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Brinckmann

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available We conducted measurements of the five important short-lived organic bromine species in the marine boundary layer (MBL. Measurements were made in the Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes (Sylt Island, North Sea in June 2009 and in the tropical Western Pacific during the TransBrom ship campaign in October 2009. For the one-week time series on Sylt Island, mean mixing ratios of CHBr3, CH2Br2, CHBr2Cl and CH2BrCl were 2.0, 1.1, 0.2, 0.1 ppt, respectively. We found maxima of 5.8 and 1.6 ppt for the two main components CHBr3 and CH2Br2. Along the cruise track in the Western Pacific (between 41° N and 13° S we measured mean mixing ratios of 0.9, 0.9, 0.2, 0.1 and 0.1 ppt for CHBr3, CH2Br2, CHBrCl2, CHBr2Cl and CH2BrCl. Air samples with coastal influence showed considerably higher mixing ratios than the samples with open ocean origin. Correlation analyses of the two data sets yielded strong linear relationships between the mixing ratios of four of the five species (except for CH2BrCl. Using a combined data set from the two campaigns and a comparison with the results from two former studies, rough estimates of the molar emission ratios between the correlated substances were: 9/1/0.35/0.35 for CHBr3/CH2Br2/CHBrCl2/CHBr2Cl. Additional measurements were made in the tropical tropopause layer (TTL above Teresina (Brazil, 5° S in June 2008, using balloon-borne cryogenic whole air sampling technique. Near the level of zero clear-sky net radiative heating (LZRH at 14.8 km about 2.25 ppt organic bromine was bound to the five short-lived species, making up 13% of total organic bromine (17.82 ppt. CH2Br2 (1.45 ppt and CHBr3 (0.56 ppt accounted for 90% of the budget of short-lived compounds in that region. Near the

  5. Using airborne in-situ measurements of brominated hydrocarbons in the Western Pacific to improve the understanding of atmospheric halogen loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, S.; Bönisch, H.; Keber, T.; Engel, A.

    2012-04-01

    In this work, we present measurement data from the field campaign "SHIVA - Stratospheric Halogens in a Varying Atmosphere". One part of this campaign was the deployment of the German research aircraft "Falcon" in the Western Pacific at Miri/Malaysia, performing research flights from the boundary layer up to 11km altitude. The dataset we present was obtained by a total amount of sixteen local flights in the area of Borneo in November and December 2011. Onboard the aircraft we used a sophisticated in-situ GC/MS system operated in negative chemical ionization mode for the fast analysis of halogenated hydrocarbons in ambient air. Halogenated hydrocarbons play a major role as precursors for stratospheric ozone depletion. Released from the surface in the troposphere, the halocarbons reach the stratosphere via transport through the Tropical Tropopause Layer (TTL). Measurements of stratospheric BrO indicate an existing gap between the abundance of long lived brominated halocarbons, such as Halons and methyl bromide (CH3Br), and the abundance of inorganic bromine in the stratosphere. Recently, it has been realized that in addition to these long-lived substances so called very short-lived substances (VSLS) can also contribute significantly to the stratospheric halogen loading. The VSLS have lifetimes less than half a year and are predominantly emitted from climate-sensitive natural sources, e.g. marine macro-algae. A main source region for those emissions is the Western Pacific where sea surface temperatures are high and air masses from the surface can be transported rapidly into the TTL by deep convective systems. Our main goal during SHIVA was to improve the understanding of emissions, atmospheric transport and the chemical degradation of halogenated VSLS. Detailed measurements in the boundary layer as well as data from survey flights in the free upper troposphere are used to deflect a local budget bromine species in this tropical region. Measurements in areas of

  6. Bromine Safety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meyers, B

    2001-04-09

    The production and handling in 1999 of about 200 million kilograms of bromine plus substantial derivatives thereof by Great Lakes Chemical Corp. and Albemarle Corporation in their southern Arkansas refineries gave OSHA Occupational Injury/Illness Rates (OIIR) in the range of 0.74 to 1.60 reportable OIIRs per 200,000 man hours. OIIRs for similar industries and a wide selection of other U.S. industries range from 1.6 to 23.9 in the most recent OSHA report. Occupational fatalities for the two companies in 1999 were zero compared to a range in the U.S.of zero for all computer manufacturing to 0.0445 percent for all of agriculture, forestry and fishing in the most recent OSHA report. These results show that bromine and its compounds can be considered as safe chemicals as a result of the bromine safety standards and practices at the two companies. The use of hydrobromic acid as an electrical energy storage medium in reversible PEM fuel cells is discussed. A study in 1979 of 20 megawatt halogen working fluid power plants by Oronzio de Nora Group found such energy to cost 2 to 2.5 times the prevailing base rate at that time. New conditions may reduce this relative cost. The energy storage aspect allows energy delivery at maximum demand times where the energy commands premium rates. The study also found marginal cost and performance advantages for hydrobromic acid over hydrochloric acid working fluid. Separate studies in the late 70s by General Electric also showed marginal performance advantages for hydrobromic acid.

  7. A selected ion flow tube investigation of the positive ion chemistry of a number of bromine containing fully and partially halogenated hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reaction of ions with neutral molecules play a significant, and often dominant, role in the chemistry of many gaseous plasma environments, including the interstellar medium, planetary ionospheres and industrial plasmas. This had led to many publications reporting ion-molecule reaction rate coefficients and reaction pathways (product ion distributions). Such critical data are invaluable in the understanding of the formation and abundance of ions and neutral molecules present in neutral and man-made plasma, and to predict how such plasmas chemically and physically evolve. There have been many studies investigating the positive ion chemistry of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), and a number of studies have explored the positive ion chemistry of their replacements, the perfluorocarbones (PFCs). In part these studies have been undertaken because of their relevance to plasmas, and of more specific interest in terms of their relevance to industrial plasma processing. Halogenated molecules are commonly used in plasma processes. In contrast to fluorinated and/or chlorinated species, little attention has been directed to the reactions of positive ions with bromine containing molecules. Yet a systematic study of these reactions permits useful comparison with the ion chemistry of fully and partially fluorinated/chlorinated compounds. This in turn improves our fundamental understanding of ion-molecule reactions, and ultimately leads, for example, to better models to predict the optimum conditions needed to operate industrial plasma processes. In this paper the thermal biomolecular rate coefficients and product ion branching ratios for the reactions of the positive ions (in order of increasing recombination energy) H2O+, N2O+, O+, CO2+, CO+, N+, and N2+ with the bromine containing molecules CF3Br, CF2Br2, CFBr3, CF2BrCl, CFBr2Cl, CBrCl3, CH3Br, CH2Br2, CH2FBr, CHF2Br, CHFBr2, CH2BrCl, CHBrCl2, CHBr2Cl, CF3CF2Br, and CF2BrCF2Br at 300 K are reported. This represents the most

  8. Hydrocarbon pneumonia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pneumonia - hydrocarbon ... Coughing Fever Shortness of breath Smell of a hydrocarbon product on the breath Stupor (decreased level of ... Most children who drink or inhale hydrocarbon products and develop ... hydrocarbons may lead to rapid respiratory failure and death.

  9. Two new brominated diterpenes from Laurencia decumbens

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Two new brominated diterpenes, namely, laurendecumtriol and 11-deacetylpinnaterpene C, were isolated and identified from the marine red alga Laurencia decumbens. Their structures were established on the basis of various NMR spectroscopic techniques and HR-ESI-MS analyses.

  10. Bromine accumulation in acidic black colluvial soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortizas, Antonio Martínez; Vázquez, Cruz Ferro; Kaal, Joeri; Biester, Harald; Casais, Manuela Costa; Rodríguez, Teresa Taboada; Lado, Luis Rodríguez

    2016-02-01

    Recent investigations showed that bromine is incorporated to soil organic matter (SOM), its content increasing with humification. But few research was done on its long-term accumulation and the role played by pedogenetic processes, as those involved in organic matter stabilization. We investigated bromine content and distribution in four deep, acidic, organic-rich, Holocene soils from an oceanic area of Western Europe. Bromine concentrations (93-778 μg g-1) in the silt + clay (area, and total estimated retention was low (6-16%). The degree of SOM bromination, expressed as the Br/C molar ratio, varied between 0.03 and 1.20 mmol Br/mol C. The ratio was highly correlated (n = 23, r2 0.88, p pool of metal-clay-stabilized organic matter.

  11. 40 CFR 721.3085 - Brominated phthalate ester.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Brominated phthalate ester. 721.3085... Substances § 721.3085 Brominated phthalate ester. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as brominated phthalate ester (PMN P-90-581)...

  12. 40 CFR 721.9740 - Brominated triazine derivative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Brominated triazine derivative. 721... Substances § 721.9740 Brominated triazine derivative. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a brominated triazine...

  13. Hormonal activities of new brominated flame retardants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ezechiáš, Martin; Svobodová, Kateřina; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 87, č. 7 (2012), s. 820-824. ISSN 0045-6535 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/09/0694 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Brominated flame retardants * 2,4,6-Tribromophenol * Endocrine disruptors Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 3.137, year: 2012

  14. Symproportionation versus Disproportionation in Bromine Redox Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: • The disproportionation and symproportionation of bromine in different media is presented. • All the redox systems are elaborated according to the principles of the generalized approach to electrolytic redox systems (GATES/GEB). • All physicochemical knowledge is involved in the algorithm applied for this purpose. • The graphical representation of the systems is the basis of gaining the detailed physicochemical knowledge on the systems in question. -- Abstract: The paper refers to dynamic (titration) redox systems where symproportionation or disproportionation of bromine species occur. The related systems are modeled according to principles assumed in the Generalized Approach to Electrolytic Redox Systems (GATES), with Generalized Electron Balance (GEB) concept involved in the GATES/GEB software. The results obtained from calculations made with use of iterative computer programs prepared according to MATLAB computational software, are presented graphically, as 2D and 3D graphs

  15. Membrane-less hydrogen bromine flow battery

    CERN Document Server

    Braff, W A; Buie, C R

    2014-01-01

    In order for the widely discussed benefits of flow batteries for electrochemical energy storage to be applied at large scale, the cost of the electrochemical stack must come down substantially. One promising avenue for reducing stack cost is to increase the system power density while maintaining efficiency, enabling smaller stacks. Here we report on a membrane-less, hydrogen bromine laminar flow battery as a potential high power density solution. The membrane-less design enables power densities of 0.795 W cm$^{-2}$ at room temperature and atmospheric pressure, with a round-trip voltage efficiency of 92\\% at 25\\% of peak power. Theoretical solutions are also presented to guide the design of future laminar flow batteries. The high power density achieved by the hydrogen bromine laminar flow battery, along with the potential for rechargeable operation, will translate into smaller, inexpensive systems that could revolutionize the fields of large-scale energy storage and portable power systems.

  16. Brominated flame retardants and endocrine disruption

    OpenAIRE

    Vos, J G; Becher, G; Berg, van den, C.A.; Boer; Leonards, P.E.G.

    2003-01-01

    From an environmental point of view, an increasing important group of organohalogen compounds are the brominated flame retardants (BFRs), which are widely used in polymers and textiles and applied in construction materials, furniture, and electronic equipment. BFRs with the highest production volume are the polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBP-A), and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD). Because of their persistence and low biodegradation profile, several of the PBDE ...

  17. Brominated thiophenes as precursors in the preparation of brominated and arylated anthraquinones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiemann, Thies; Tanaka, Yasuko; Iniesta, Jesus

    2009-01-01

    Brominated anthraquinones can be synthesized directly from bromothiophenes when these are reacted with 1,4-naphthoquinones in the presence of meta-chloroperoxybenzoic acid. The bromoanthraquinones are versatile building blocks in the preparation of arylated anthraquinones and of extended pi-systems with interspersed anthraquinone units. PMID:19305356

  18. Brominated Thiophenes as Precursors in the Preparation of Brominated and Arylated Anthraquinones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thies Thiemann

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Brominated anthraquinones can be synthesized directly from bromothiophenes when these are reacted with 1,4-naphthoquinones in the presence of meta-chloroperoxybenzoic acid. The bromoanthraquinones are versatile building blocks in the preparation of arylated anthraquinones and of extended π-systems with interspersed anthraquinone units.

  19. Brominated Thiophenes as Precursors in the Preparation of Brominated and Arylated Anthraquinones

    OpenAIRE

    Thies Thiemann; Jesus Iniesta; Yasuko Tanaka

    2009-01-01

    Brominated anthraquinones can be synthesized directly from bromothiophenes when these are reacted with 1,4-naphthoquinones in the presence of meta-chloroperoxybenzoic acid. The bromoanthraquinones are versatile building blocks in the preparation of arylated anthraquinones and of extended π-systems with interspersed anthraquinone units.

  20. The BRomine, Ozone, and Mercury EXperiment (BROMEX)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, S. V.; Shepson, P. B.; Simpson, W. R.; Perovich, D. K.; Sturm, M.; Douglas, T. A.; Rigor, I. G.; Clemente-Colon, P.; Burrows, J. P.; Richter, A.; Bottenheim, J. W.; Steffen, A.; Barber, D. G.; Kaleschke, L.; Hall, D. K.; Markus, T.; Eicken, H.; Neumann, G.

    2011-12-01

    In the decade of the 2000s, Arctic perennial (multi-year) sea ice has diminished drastically, whereas seasonal (first-year) sea ice has become the dominant ice class. This change effectively increases the overall surface salinity of the sea ice cover and in the overlying snowpack. Satellite results in 2010 and 2011 show the extent of perennial sea ice remains minimal with significant bromine explosions in the springtime. Key science questions still remain to be answered to understand the impact of the Arctic perennial sea ice reduction on low-atmospheric physical and chemical processes. Of the highest priority is to investigate the impact on bromine explosion events that lead to depletion of ozone and gaseous elementary mercury in the atmosphere. With that objective, we present the development of the BRomine, Ozone, and Mercury EXperiment in (BROMEX) in spring 2012 around Barrow, extending out to 200 km offshore and inland. In BROMEX, chemical, sea ice, snow, and ocean measurements will be made across sea ice leads both upwind and downwind areas of newly opened leads. Chemical-measurement buoys and other types of buoys will be deployed with helicopter flights to both sides of the leads. Various flight patterns of aircraft carrying ozone and bromine-measuring sensors will be used to characterize the chemical distribution over sea ice, land, and mountainous regions. Our approach will use data from multiple satellite instruments including MODIS, AMSR-E, QuikSCAT, GOME-2, SCIAMACHY, OMI, RADARSAT-2, Envisat ASAR, TerraSAR-X, TanDEM-X, SMOS, CryoSat-2 altimeter, and Oceansat-2 scatterometer. Moreover, results from recent field campaigns such as the IPY OASIS, INCATPA, CFL, SALT, and IceBridge, from sea ice and snow products generated by the U.S. Naval and National Ice Center, from NASA cryospheric observations, and from surface observation networks such as SIZONet will be utilized together with new measurements from BROMEX. Further collaborations with the international

  1. Formation of THMs and HANs during bromination of Microcystis aeruginosa

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunzhu Pu; Lingzhao Kong; Xin Huang; Guoji Ding; Naiyun Gao

    2013-01-01

    Bromine-contained disinfectants and biocides are widely used in swimming pools,recreational waters and cooling towers.The objective of this study was to evaluate the formation of thrihalomethanes (THMs) and haloacetonitriles (HANs) and their cytotoxicity in algae solutions during free bromine disinfection.Disinfection by-products formation potential experiments were conducted using modelsolutions containing 7mg/L (as total organic carbon) Microcystis aeruginosa cells.Effects of free bromine dosage,pH and ammonia were investigated.The results showed that brominated disinfection by-products were the major products when free bromine was applied.The total THMs formed during bromination was much as that formed during chlorination,whereas HANs were elevated by using bromination instead of chlorination.Dibromoacetonitrice (C2H2NBr2) and bromoform (CHBr3) were the only detected species during free bromine disinfection.The production of C2H2NBr2 and CHBr3 increased with disinfectant dosage but decreased with dosing ammonia.CHBr3 increased with the pH changing from 5 to 9.However,C2H2NBr2 achieved the highest production at neutral pH,which was due to a joint effect of variation in hydrolysis rate and free bromine reactivity.The hydrolysis of C2H2NBr2 was basecatalytic and nearly unaffected by disinfectant.Finally,estimation of cytotoxicity of the disinfected algae solutions showed that HANs formation was responsible for the majority of toxicity.Considering its highest toxicity among the measured disinfection by-products,the elevated C2H2NBr2 should be considered when using bromine-related algaecide.

  2. New infrared spectroscopic database for bromine nitrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Georg; Birk, Manfred

    2016-08-01

    Fourier transform infrared measurements of bromine nitrate have been performed in the spectral region 675-1400 cm-1 at 0.014 cm-1 spectral resolution. Absorption cross sections were derived from 38 spectra covering the temperature range from 203 to 296 K and air pressure range from 0 to 190 mbar. For line-by-line analysis, further spectra were recorded at 0.00094 cm-1 spectral resolution at 223 and 293 K. The sample was synthesized from ClONO2 and Br2. Band strengths of the bands ν3 around 803 cm-1 and ν2 around 1286 cm-1 were determined from three pure BrONO2 measurements at different temperatures and pressures. Number densities in the absorption cell were derived from pressure measurements of the purified sample taking into account small amounts of impurities determined spectroscopically. Resulting band strengths are Sν3 = 2.872(52) × 10-17 cm2 molec-1 cm-1 and Sν2 = 3.63(15) × 10-17 cm2 molec-1 cm-1. Absorption cross sections of all measurements were scaled to these band strengths. Further data reduction was achieved with an interpolation scheme based on two-dimensional polynomials in ln(pressure) and temperature. The database is well-suited for remote-sensing application and should reduce the atmospheric bromine nitrate error budget substantially.

  3. Ruthenium-Catalyzed meta-Selective C—H Bromination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teskey, Christopher J; Lui, Andrew Y W; Greaney, Michael F

    2015-01-01

    The first example of a transition-metal-catalyzed, meta-selective C–H bromination procedure is reported. In the presence of catalytic [{Ru(p-cymene)Cl2}2], tetrabutylammonium tribromide can be used to functionalize the meta C–H bond of 2-phenylpyridine derivatives, thus affording difficult to access products which are highly predisposed to further derivatization. We demonstrate this utility with one-pot bromination/arylation and bromination/alkenylation procedures to deliver meta-arylated and meta-alkenylated products, respectively, in a single step. PMID:26288217

  4. Ruthenium-Catalyzed meta-Selective C—H Bromination

    OpenAIRE

    Teskey, Christopher J; Lui, Andrew Y W; Greaney, Michael F.

    2015-01-01

    The first example of a transition-metal-catalyzed, meta-selective C–H bromination procedure is reported. In the presence of catalytic [{Ru(p-cymene)Cl2}2], tetrabutylammonium tribromide can be used to functionalize the meta C–H bond of 2-phenylpyridine derivatives, thus affording difficult to access products which are highly predisposed to further derivatization. We demonstrate this utility with one-pot bromination/arylation and bromination/alkenylation procedures to deliver meta-arylated and...

  5. Magnetic Trapping of Cold Bromine Atoms

    CERN Document Server

    Rennick, C J; Doherty, W G; Softley, T P

    2014-01-01

    Magnetic trapping of bromine atoms at temperatures in the milliKelvin regime is demonstrated for the first time. The atoms are produced by photodissociation of Br$_2$ molecules in a molecular beam. The lab-frame velocity of Br atoms is controlled by the wavelength and polarization of the photodissociation laser. Careful selection of the wavelength results in one of the pair of atoms having sufficient velocity to exactly cancel that of the parent molecule, and it remains stationary in the lab frame. A trap is formed at the null point between two opposing neodymium permanent magnets. Dissociation of molecules at the field minimum results in the slowest fraction of photofragments remaining trapped. After the ballistic escape of the fastest atoms, the trapped slow atoms are only lost by elastic collisions with the chamber background gas. The measured loss rate is consistent with estimates of the total cross section for only those collisions transferring sufficient kinetic energy to overcome the trapping potential...

  6. The metabolism and de-bromination of bromotyrosine in vivo

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.R. Mani (Ali); J.C. Moreno (José C.); T.J. Visser (Theo J.); K.P. Moore (Kevin P.)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractDuring inflammation, leukocyte-derived eosinophil peroxidase catalyses the formation of hypobromous acid, which can brominate tyrosine residues in proteins to form bromotyrosine. Since eosinophils are involved in the pathogenesis of allergic reactions, such as asthma, urinary bromotyrosi

  7. Bromine number should replace FIA in gasoline olefins testing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluorescent indicator adsorption (FIA) analysis, the ASTM test method proposed by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) for monitoring olefins in reformulated gasoline, is subject to significant bias and imprecision. This paper reports on a more accurate, environmentally pertinent measure of olefin content in reformulated gasoline is bromine number another ASTM method. Petroleum chemists should therefore work together with the EPA to select and optimize a bromine number procedure specifically designed for reformulated gasoline to replace FIA

  8. Apparatus for hydrocarbon extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

    2013-03-19

    Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

  9. Probing the tropical tropopause layer for organic and inorganic bromine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werner, Bodo; Pfeilsticker, Klaus; Atlas, Elliot; Cheung, Ross; Chipperfield, Martyn; Colosimo, Fedele; Deutschmann, Tim; Elkins, Jim; Fahey, David; Feng, Wu; Festa, James; Gao, Ru-Shan; Hossaini, Ryan; Navarro, Maria; Raecke, Rasmus; Scalone, Lisa; Spolaor, Max; Thornberry, Troy; Tsai, Catalina; Stutz, Jochen

    2016-04-01

    Bromine chemistry impacts the levels of ozone in the upper troposphere and the stratosphere. An accurate quantitative understanding of the sources, sinks, and chemical transformation of bromine species is thus important to understand the photochemistry and budget of bromine in the tropical upper troposphere, tropopause layer and lowermost stratosphere (UT/TTL/LS). These regions are also known to serve as a gateway for delivery of ozone depleting gases to the stratosphere. CH3Br, halons, short-lived organic bromine precursors (VSLS), such as CHBr3, CH2Br2, and possibly inorganic product gases have been identified as the main bromine gases delivered to the stratosphere. However, many important details of the transport and delivery of VSLS and inorganic bromine compounds through the TTL are still uncertain. Moreover, a number of chemical processes, including the transformation of the source gases and cycling of inorganic bromine species at low ambient temperature and on ice particles are also poorly understood. The presentation reports measurements of CH4, O3, NO2, and BrO performed by different instruments and techniques during the 2013 NASA-ATTREX flights in the TTL and LS. The interpretation of our measurements is supported by chemical transport model (SLIMCAT) simulations. SLIMCAT results, in conjunction with extensive radiative transfer calculations using the Monte Carlo model McArtim, also are used to improve retrieval of O3, NO2, and BrO concentrations from limb scattered sunlight measurements made with the Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) technique during ATTREX. The chemical transport model also allows us to attribute observed concentration variations to transport and to photochemical processes. When properly accounting for the transport-related concentration variations in methane and ozone, we find that measured BrO mostly agrees with model simulations. An exception are regions where the contribution of the short-lived CH2Br2 or the

  10. Bromine pretreated chitosan for adsorption of lead (II) from water

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Rajendra Dongre; Minakshi Thakur; Dinesh Ghugal; Jostna Meshram

    2012-10-01

    Pollution by heavy metals like lead (II) is responsible for health hazards and environmental degradation. Adsorption is a prevalent method applied for removal of heavy metal pollutants from water. This study explored adsorption performances of 30% bromine pretreated chitosan for lead (II) abatement from water. Bromine pretreatment alters porosity and specific surface area of chitosan by means of physicochemical interaction with cationic sites of chitosan skeleton, besides imparting anionic alteration at amino linkages of chitosan, to remove lead (II) by chemical interactions on superfluous active sites as characterized by FTIR, SEM, DTA and elemental analysis. Lead adsorptions were studied in batch mode by varying parameters viz. pH, bromine loading, sorbent dosage, initial lead concentration, contact time and temperature. The adsorption equilibrium data was well fitted to Freundlich isotherm and maximum sorption capacity of 30% bromine pretreated chitosan sorbent was 1.755 g/kg with 85–90% lead removal efficiency. Though cost and applicability of sorbent is unproven, yet contrast to raw chitosan derivatives, activated carbons and some resins, 30% bromine pretreated chitosan endow benign and efficient lead abatement technique.

  11. Levels and trends of brominated flame retardants in the European environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Law, R.J.; Allchin, C.R.; Boer, de J.; Covaci, A.; Herzke, D.; Lepom, P.; Morris, S.; Tronczynski, J.; Wit, de C.A.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we review those data which have recently become available for brominated flame retardants (particularly the brominated diphenyl ethers (BDEs) and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD)) in samples from the European environment. Environmental compartments studied comprise the atmosphere, sedime

  12. An Efficient and Facile Methodology for Bromination of Pyrimidine and Purine Nucleosides with Sodium Monobromoisocyanurate (SMBI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roger Stromberg

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available An efficient and facile strategy has been developed for bromination of nucleosides using sodium monobromoisocyanurate (SMBI. Our methodology demonstrates bromination at the C-5 position of pyrimidine nucleosides and the C-8 position of purine nucleosides. Unprotected and also several protected nucleosides were brominated in moderate to high yields following this procedure.

  13. 40 CFR 180.519 - Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Bromide ion and residual bromine... Tolerances § 180.519 Bromide ion and residual bromine; tolerances for residues. (a) General. The food additives, bromide ion and residual bromine, may be present in water, potable in accordance with...

  14. Brominated Dioxins: Little-Known New Health Hazards - A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piskorska-Pliszczyńska Jadwiga

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the present state of the science concerning the polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins (PBDDs and dibenzofurans (PBDFs. Everywhere in the world people are exposed to anthropogenic origin chemicals. Some of them are long-lived organic compounds, which persist over the years in the environment. Persistent organic pollutants, such as organohalogen compounds, accumulate in environmental and biological compartments and have adverse effects on the health of humans and animals. Little is known about the brominated and mixed chloro/bromo dioxin and furans. Existing literature suggests that brominated dioxins and furans have similar toxicity profiles to their chlorinated analogues. The exposure data are extremely limited, showing a major data gap in estimating the potential environmental and health risk of these chemicals. The rapid increase in the use of brominated flame retardants (the main source of these pollutants has raised the level of concern over environmental and health damage from brominated dioxins and furans. It is likely that human as well as wildlife exposure to these contaminants will increase with their greater use. The findings reported here present strong evidence of the PBDDs and PBDFs as an emerging new class of contaminants.

  15. Ecotoxicity and biodegradability of new brominated flame retardants: A review

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ezechiáš, Martin; Covino, Stefano; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 110, č. 2 (2014), s. 153-167. ISSN 0147-6513 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0003; GA TA ČR TE01020218 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : Ecotoxicity * brominated flame retardants * biodegradation * review Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology Impact factor: 2.762, year: 2014

  16. Discovery of Zinc, Selenium, Bromine, and Neodymium Isotopes

    OpenAIRE

    J.L. Gross; Claes, J.; Kathawa, J.; Thoennessen, M

    2010-01-01

    Currently, thirty-two zinc, thirty-two selenium, twenty-nine bromine and thirty-one neodymium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is discussed here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  17. 21 CFR 180.30 - Brominated vegetable oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... “Food Chemicals Codex,” 3d Ed. (1981), pp. 40-41, which is incorporated by reference, except that free... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Brominated vegetable oil. 180.30 Section 180.30 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED)...

  18. Discovery of zinc, selenium, bromine, and neodymium isotopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, thirty-two zinc, thirty-two selenium, twenty-nine bromine, and thirty-one neodymium isotopes have been observed and the discovery of these isotopes is described here. For each isotope a brief synopsis of the first refereed publication, including the production and identification method, is presented.

  19. Bromine provides new weapons to combat mercury emissions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardtke, W. [Albermarle Europe (Germany)

    2011-04-15

    Brominated powdered activated carbon has been demonstrated to capture over 90% of mercury emissions from coal fired plants, operating at high temperatures and capturing the metal in concrete-friendly, non-leaching forms to help tackle a rising global health threat. 6 refs., 5 figs.

  20. Bromine measurements in ozone depleted air over the Arctic Ocean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. A. Neuman

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available In situ measurements of ozone, photochemically active bromine compounds, and other trace gases over the Arctic Ocean in April 2008 are used to examine the chemistry and geographical extent of ozone depletion in the arctic marine boundary layer (MBL. Data were obtained from the NOAA WP-3D aircraft during the Aerosol, Radiation, and Cloud Processes affecting Arctic Climate (ARCPAC study and the NASA DC-8 aircraft during the Arctic Research of the Composition of the Troposphere from Aircraft and Satellites (ARCTAS study. Fast (1 s and sensitive (detection limits at the low pptv level measurements of BrCl and BrO were obtained from three different chemical ionization mass spectrometer (CIMS instruments, and soluble bromide was measured with a mist chamber. The CIMS instruments also detected Br2. Subsequent laboratory studies showed that HOBr rapidly converts to Br2 on the Teflon instrument inlets. This detected Br2 is identified as active bromine and represents a lower limit of the sum HOBr + Br2. The measured active bromine is shown to likely be HOBr during daytime flights in the arctic. In the MBL over the Arctic Ocean, soluble bromide and active bromine were consistently elevated and ozone was depleted. Ozone depletion and active bromine enhancement were confined to the MBL that was capped by a temperature inversion at 200–500 m altitude. In ozone-depleted air, BrO rarely exceeded 10 pptv and was always substantially lower than soluble bromide that was as high as 40 pptv. BrCl was rarely enhanced above the 2 pptv detection limit, either in the MBL, over Alaska, or in the arctic free troposphere.

  1. Multiple Use of Silica-Alumina Catalyst in Hydrocarbon Resins Production

    OpenAIRE

    Voronchak, Taras; Nykulyshyn, Irena; Rypka, Anna; Gnativ, Zoriana

    2013-01-01

    Hydrocarbon resins synthesis from C9 fraction of liquid products of diesel fuel pyrolysis when using activated bentonite clay as a catalyst at multiple use of the latter has been studied. Process is analysed in terms of the resin yield and its properties including average molecular weight, colour and bromine number. The results obtained are explained considering the catalyst characteristics. The process when using the used catalyst undergone to high temperature regeneration has also been carr...

  2. The hydrocarbon sphere

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandev, P.

    1984-01-01

    The hydrocarbon sphere is understood to be the area in which hydrocarbon compounds are available. It is believed that the lower boundary on the hydrocarbon sphere is most probably located at a depth where the predominant temperatures aid in the destruction of hydrocarbons (300 to 400 degrees centigrade). The upper limit on the hydrocarbon sphere obviously occurs at the earth's surface, where hydrocarbons oxidize to H20 and CO2. Within these ranges, the occurrence of the hydrocarbon sphere may vary from the first few hundred meters to 15 kilometers or more. The hydrocarbon sphere is divided into the external (mantle) sphere in which the primary gas, oil and solid hydrocarbon fields are located, and the internal (metamorphic) sphere containing primarily noncommercial accumulations of hydrocarbon gases and solid carbon containing compounds (anthraxilite, shungite, graphite, etc.) based on the nature and scale of hydrocarbon compound concentrations (natural gas, oil, maltha, asphalt, asphaltite, etc.).

  3. Why does bromine square palladium off? An ab initio study of brominated palladium and its nanomorphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Su-Hyun; Lee, Ji-Hwan; Delley, Bernard; Soon, Aloysius

    2014-09-14

    A first-principles description and prediction of brominated nanocrystals of Pd is presented. In particular, we conducted an extensive study of the adsorption behaviour of Br on various Pd surfaces (including both low and high Miller-index surfaces) as a function of its surface coverage. By coupling our calculated surface energies with ab initio (electrochemical) thermodynamics and the Gibbs-Wulff shape model, we find that the relative stability of the Pd surfaces is strongly modified by Br, allowing high Miller-index surfaces of Pd (namely the (210) surface) to become competitively favourable at moderate concentrations of Br. We also show that Pd nanoparticles assume a cube-like crystal shape at high concentrations of Br, exposing mainly the (100) facets with a Br surface coverage of 0.5 ML. This not only confirms and explains recent solution synthesis results, but also provides a quantitative atomic picture of the exposed surface facets, which is crucial in understanding the local surface chemistry of shape-controlled nanoparticles for better nanocatalyst design. PMID:25075669

  4. Occurrence of bromine in fluidised bed combustion of solid recovered fuel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vainikka, P.

    2011-12-15

    Corrosive ash species are the single most important factor limiting the electric efficiency of steam boiler plants fired with waste or biomass. Chlorine has been found to have a central role in the chemistry involved as it reduces the melting temperature of ash, forms corrosive vapour and gas species in the furnace and halogenated deposits on boiler heat transfer surfaces. In this context chlorine has been extensively researched. At the time of writing this thesis there was hardly any published data available on the occurrence of bromine (Br) in the aforementioned context. The objective of this work was to review the occurrence of bromine in solid fuels and characterise the behaviour of bromine in full-scale fluidised bed combustion. The review on the occurrence of bromine in solid fuels revealed that in anthropogenic wastes bromine is mainly found in connection to flame retarded substances. Several weight percentages of bromine can be found in plastics treated with brominated flame retardants (BFRs). Bromine is typically found some 100-200 mg kg-1 in mixed municipal solid wastes (MSW). Bromine may be enriched in fuels with high share of plastics, such as solid recovered fuel (SRF) or refuse derived fuel (RDF). Up to 2000 mg kg-1 was found as a monthly average in SRF, typical levels being 20-200 mg kg-1. Wastewater sludge from paper mills may contain bromine 20-100 mg kg-1 due the use of bromine based biocides. In other fuels bromine may be found in significant amounts in marine influenced coal deposits and peat as well as in biomass treated with brominated pesticides. In the experimental part SRF, spruce bark and wastewater sludge from a paper mill were co-fired in a full- scale bubbling fluidised bed (BFB) boiler, and the collected fuels, aerosols and waterwall deposits were analysed with the focus on the fate of bromine. Bromine was mainly found to form water soluble high vapour pressure alkali metal halides in the furnace - in the form of KBr(g) and NaBr(g) as

  5. Raman characteristics of hydrocarbon and hydrocarbon inclusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Nai; TIAN ZuoJi; LENG YingYing; WANG HuiTong; SONG FuQing; MENG JianHua

    2007-01-01

    The Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon standard samples show that: (1) the Raman spectrogram of normal paraffin has very strong peaks of methyl and methylene (from 2700 cm-1 to 2970 cm-1); (2)branch methyl has the particular peak of 748 cm-1±; (3) six cyclic has the particular peak of 804 cm-1±; (4)phenyl has two particular peaks of 988 cm-1± and 3058 cm-1± and the 988 cm-1± peak is stronger than the 3058 cm-1± peak; and (5) hexene has three alkenyl spectrum peaks of 1294 cm-1±, 1635 cm-1± and 2996 cm-1±, with the 1635 cm-1± peak being the strongest, showing that the number of carbon in hydrocarbon does not affect its Raman spectrogram, and the hydrocarbon molecular structure and base groups affect its Raman spectrogram, the same hydrocarbons (such as normal paraffin) have the same Raman spectrogram; the types (such as CH4, C2H6, C3H8) and the content of hydrocarbon in oil inclusions are not estimated by their characteristic Raman peaks. According to the Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon compositions, the Raman spectrogram of hydrocarbon inclusion can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon Raman spectrogram, fluoresce Raman spectrogram, saturated hydrocarbon bitumen Raman spectrogram, bitumen Raman spectrogram, and ethane Raman spectrogram.And according to the characteristics of Raman spectrogram, hydrocarbon inclusions can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon inclusion, less saturated hydrocarbon (oil or gas) inclusion,saturated hydrocarbon bitumen inclusion, bitumen inclusion, and methane water inclusion.

  6. Raman characteristics of hydrocarbon and hydrocarbon inclusions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    The Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon standard samples show that: (1) the Raman spectrogram of normal paraffin has very strong peaks of methyl and methylene (from 2700 cm-1 to 2970 cm-1); (2) branch methyl has the particular peak of 748 cm-1±; (3) six cyclic has the particular peak of 804 cm-1±; (4) phenyl has two particular peaks of 988 cm-1± and 3058 cm-1± and the 988 cm-1± peak is stronger than the 3058 cm-1± peak; and (5) hexene has three alkenyl spectrum peaks of 1294 cm-1±, 1635 cm-1± and 2996 cm-1±, with the 1635 cm-1± peak being the strongest, showing that the number of carbon in hy-drocarbon does not affect its Raman spectrogram, and the hydrocarbon molecular structure and base groups affect its Raman spectrogram, the same hydrocarbons (such as normal paraffin) have the same Raman spectrogram; the types (such as CH4, C2H6, C3H8) and the content of hydrocarbon in oil inclu-sions are not estimated by their characteristic Raman peaks. According to the Raman spectrograms of hydrocarbon compositions, the Raman spectrogram of hydrocarbon inclusion can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon Raman spectrogram, fluoresce Raman spectrogram, saturated hydro-carbon bitumen Raman spectrogram, bitumen Raman spectrogram, and ethane Raman spectrogram. And according to the characteristics of Raman spectrogram, hydrocarbon inclusions can be divided into five types: saturated hydrocarbon inclusion, less saturated hydrocarbon (oil or gas) inclusion, saturated hydrocarbon bitumen inclusion, bitumen inclusion, and methane water inclusion.

  7. Endocrine effects of some new brominated flame retardants

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ezechiáš, Martin; Svobodová, Kateřina; Cajthaml, Tomáš

    Praha : VŠCHT, 2012. s. 77-78. ISBN 978-80-7080-811-5. [Průmyslová ekologie /3./. 20.03.2012-23.03.2012, Hustopeče u Brna] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA104/09/0694 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Brominated flame retardants * Endocrine disruptors Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology

  8. Measurement-based modeling of bromine chemistry in the boundary layer: 1. Bromine chemistry at the Dead Sea

    OpenAIRE

    Tas, E.; Peleg, M.; D. U. Pedersen; Matveev, V; Pour Biazar, A.; Luria, M.

    2006-01-01

    International audience The Dead Sea is an excellent natural laboratory for the investigation of Reactive Bromine Species (RBS) chemistry, due to the high RBS levels observed in this area, combined with anthropogenic air pollutants up to several ppb. The present study investigated the basic chemical mechanism of RBS at the Dead Sea using a numerical one-dimensional chemical model. Simulations were based on data obtained from comprehensive measurements performed at sites along the Dead Sea. ...

  9. High selectively oxidative bromination of toluene derivatives by the H2O2-HBr system

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jie Ju; Yu Jin Li; Jian Rong Gao; Jian Hong Jia; Liang Han; Wei Jian Sheng; Yi Xia Jia

    2011-01-01

    An aqueous solution of hydrogen peroxide and hydrogen bromide illuminated by a 60 W incandescent light bulb serves as a source of bromine radicals. Various substituted toluenes (NO2,Cl, Br, H, CH3) were high selectively brominated at the benzyl position for monobromination in CH2C12 at ice water with catalyst free. This simple but effective bromination of toluene derivatives with an aqueous H2O2-HBr system is characterized with the use of inexpensive reagents and a lower impact on the environment, which make it a good alternative to the existing bromination methods.

  10. New insight into photo-bromination processes in saline surface waters: The case of salicylic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was shown, through a combination of field and laboratory observations, that salicylic acid can undergo photo-bromination reactions in sunlit saline surface waters. Laboratory-scale experiments revealed that the photochemical yields of 5-bromosalicylic acid and 3,5-dibromosalicylic acid from salicylic acid were always low (in the 4% range at most). However, this might be of concern since these compounds are potential inhibitors of the 20α-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzyme, with potential implications in endocrine disruption processes. At least two mechanisms were involved simultaneously to account for the photo-generation of brominated substances. The first one might involve the formation of reactive brominated radical species (Br·, Br2·−) through hydroxyl radical mediated oxidation of bromide ions. These ions reacted more selectively than hydroxyl radicals with electron-rich organic pollutants such as salicylic acid. The second one might involve the formation of hypobromous acid, through a two electron oxidation of bromine ions by peroxynitrite. This reaction was catalyzed by nitrite, since these ions play a crucial role in the formation of nitric oxide upon photolysis. This nitric oxide further reacts with superoxide radical anions to yield peroxynitrite and by ammonium through the formation of N-bromoamines, probably due to the ability of N-bromoamines to promote the aromatic bromination of phenolic compounds. Field measurements revealed the presence of salicylic acid together with 5-bromosalicylic and 3,5-dibromosalicylic acid in a brackish coastal lagoon, thus confirming the environmental significance of the proposed photochemically induced bromination pathways. -- Highlights: ► Brominated derivatives of salicylic acid were detected in a brackish lagoon. ► A photochemical pathway was hypothesized to account for bromination of salicylic acid. ► Radical bromine species are partly responsible for the bromination process. ► Hypobromous acid might

  11. Bayesian statistical modeling of disinfection byproduct (DBP) bromine incorporation in the ICR database.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, Royce A; Vanbriesen, Jeanne M; Small, Mitchell J

    2010-02-15

    Statistical models are developed for bromine incorporation in the trihalomethane (THM), trihaloacetic acids (THAA), dihaloacetic acid (DHAA), and dihaloacetonitrile (DHAN) subclasses of disinfection byproducts (DBPs) using distribution system samples from plants applying only free chlorine as a primary or residual disinfectant in the Information Collection Rule (ICR) database. The objective of this study is to characterize the effect of water quality conditions before, during, and post-treatment on distribution system bromine incorporation into DBP mixtures. Bayesian Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) methods are used to model individual DBP concentrations and estimate the coefficients of the linear models used to predict the bromine incorporation fraction for distribution system DBP mixtures in each of the four priority DBP classes. The bromine incorporation models achieve good agreement with the data. The most important predictors of bromine incorporation fraction across DBP classes are alkalinity, specific UV absorption (SUVA), and the bromide to total organic carbon ratio (Br:TOC) at the first point of chlorine addition. Free chlorine residual in the distribution system, distribution system residence time, distribution system pH, turbidity, and temperature only slightly influence bromine incorporation. The bromide to applied chlorine (Br:Cl) ratio is not a significant predictor of the bromine incorporation fraction (BIF) in any of the four classes studied. These results indicate that removal of natural organic matter and the location of chlorine addition are important treatment decisions that have substantial implications for bromine incorporation into disinfection byproduct in drinking waters. PMID:20095529

  12. Accurate measurement of bromine contents in plastic samples by instrumental neutron activation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, I J; Lee, K S; Hwang, E; Min, H S; Yim, Y H

    2013-03-26

    Accurate measurements of bromine contents in plastic samples were made by the direct comparator instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA). Individual factors affecting the measurements were comprehensively evaluated and compensated, including the volatility loss of bromine from standard comparators, the background bromine level in the filter papers used for preparation of the standard comparators, nuclear interference, γ-ray spectral interference and the variance among replicates of the samples. Uncertainty contributions from those factors were thoroughly evaluated and included in the uncertainty budgeting of the INAA measurement. (81)Br was chosen as the target isotope, and the INAA measurements for bromine were experimentally confirmed to exhibit good linearity within a bromine content range of 10-170 μg. The established method has been applied to the analysis of eight plastic samples: four commercially available certified reference materials (CRMs) of polyethylene and polystyrene and four acrylonitrile butadiene styrene (ABS) samples prepared as the candidate reference materials (KRISS CRM 113-01-012, -013, -014 and -015). The bromine contents of the samples were calculated at three different γ-ray energies and compared, showing good agreement. The results of the four CRMs also showed good consistency with their certified values within the stated uncertainties. Finally, the bromine contents of the ABS samples were determined with expanded uncertainties (at a 95% level of confidence) between 2.5% and 5% in a bromine content range of 25-900 mg kg(-1). PMID:23498117

  13. The Evolution of a Green Chemistry Laboratory Experiment: Greener Brominations of Stilbene

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenzie, Lallie C.; Huffman, Lauren M.; Hutchison, James E.

    2005-01-01

    The use of green metrics to compare three bromination laboratory procedures demonstrates the effectiveness of an incremental greening process for chemistry curricula. Due to this process, the bromination of alkenes can be introduced to students through the use of a safe, effective, modern practice.

  14. 40 CFR 721.775 - Brominated aromatic com-pound (generic name).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Brominated aromatic com-pound (generic name). 721.775 Section 721.775 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.775 Brominated aromatic com-pound (generic name). (a)...

  15. Biosynthesis of brominated tyrosine metabolites by Aplysina fistularis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carney, J R; Rinehart, K L

    1995-07-01

    The biosynthesis of brominated tyrosine metabolites by the marine sponge Aplysina fistularis was investigated. [U-14C]-L-Tyrosine, [U-14C]-L-3-bromotyrosine, and [U-14C]-L-3,5-dibromotyrosine were incorporated into both dibromoverongiaquinol [1] and aeroplysinin-1 [2], and [methyl-14C]methionine was specifically incorporated into the O-methyl group group of 2. [Methyl-14C]-L-O-methyltyrosine, [methyl-14C]-L-3,5-dibromo-O-methyltyrosine, and several putative nitrile precursors were not incorporated into 1 or 2. PMID:7561906

  16. Future chlorine-bromine loading and ozone depletion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Michael J.; Ibrahim, Abdel Moneim; Sasaki, Toru; Stordal, Frode; Visconti, Guido

    1991-01-01

    The prediction of future ozone requires three elements: (1) a scenario for the net emissions of chemically and radiatively active trace gases from the land and oceans; (2) a global atmospheric model that projects the accumulation of these gases; and (3) a chemical transport model that describes the distribution of ozone for a prescribed atmospheric composition and climate. This chapter, of necessity, presents models for all three elements and focuses on the following: (1) atmospheric abundance of chlorine and bromine in the form of halocarbons; and (2) the associated perturbations to stratospheric ozone.

  17. Process for producing hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doi, K.; Komatsu, A.; Moroe, M.; Moroe, T.

    1980-07-22

    A process is described for producing a hydrocarbon product consisting essentially of hydrocarbons having about 10 to 50 carbon atoms with 60% or more of said product consisting of hydrocarbons containing 25 to 32 carbon atoms which comprises subjecting a synthetic polyisoprene rubber having 92 to 97% cis-type double bods to a thermally destructive distillation at about 300 to 400/sup 0/ C for about 30 minutes under a reduced pressure of about 0.1 to 5 mm. Hg to obtain said hydrocarbon product consisting essentially of hydrocarbons having about 10 to 50 carbon atoms with 60% or more of said product consisting of hydrocarbons containing 25 to 35 carbon atoms, said hydrocarbon product not having a bad odor and containing scarcely any resinous material.

  18. Research on the phenomenon of graphitization. Crystallographic study - Study of bromine sorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This research thesis reports the study of the mechanism of graphitization of carbon by using X-ray diffraction analysis and the physical and chemical study of lamellar reactions between carbon and bromine. The author first presents generalities and results of preliminary studies (meaning of graphitization, presentation of the various carbon groups and classes), and then reports the study of the graphitization of compact carbons (soft carbons). More precisely, he reports the crystallographic study of partially graphitized carbons: methods and principles, experimental results and their analysis, discussion of the graphitization mechanism. In the next part, the author reports the study of bromine sorption on carbons: experimental method, isotherms of a natural graphite and of a graphitized carbon, structure of carbon-bromine complexes, isotherms of graphitizable carbons and of all other carbons, distribution of bromine layers in partially graphitized carbons, bromine sorption and Fermi level

  19. Labeling of receptor ligands with bromine radionuclides. Progress report, March 1, 1981-February 28, 1982

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years there has been an interest in the use of various radioisotopes of bromine as labels for radiopharmaceuticals. Although radioisotopes of iodine have been used extensively as radiopharmaceutical labels, there are several advantages associated with the use of radiobromine as a label, due primarily to increased stability of bonds to the radiohalide and smaller steric perturbation resulting from substitution of the radiohalide. Methods of attaching radiobromine to receptor ligands with the potential of mapping estrogen receptors in mammary tumors and uteri were studied. Two ligands were studied extensively in vitro and in animal models; preliminary studies were also carried out in humans. To date, the only radioisotope of bromine used was bromine-77. In addition, a series of model compounds were labeled with bromine-77 using a recently described method for rapid bromination; the scope and limitations of this new rapid radiobromination technique were evaluated

  20. Algae form brominated organic compounds in surface waters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huetteroth, A.; Putschew, A.; Jekel, M. [Tech. Univ. Berlin (Germany)

    2004-09-15

    Monitoring of organic halogen compounds, measured as adsorbable organic bromine (AOBr) revealed seasonal high concentrations of organic bromine compounds in a surface water (Lake Tegel, Berlin, Germany). Usually, in late summer, concentrations are up to five times higher than during the rest of the year. The AOBr of the lake inflows (throughout the year less then 6 {mu}g/L) were always lower then those in the lake, which indicates a production of AOBr in the lake. A correlation of the AOBr and chlorophyll-a concentration (1) in the lake provides first evidence for the influence of phototrophic organisms. The knowledge of the natural production of organohalogens is relatively recent. Up to now there are more then 3800 identified natural organohalogen compounds that have been detected in marine plants, animals, and bacteria and also in terrestrial plants, fungi, lichen, bacteria, insects, some higher animals, and humans. Halogenated organic compounds are commonly considered to be of anthropogenic origin; derived from e.g. pharmaceuticals, herbicides, fungicides, insecticides, flame retardants, intermediates in organic synthesis and solvents. Additionally they are also produced as by-products during industrial processes and by waste water and drinking water disinfection. Organohalogen compounds may be toxic, persistent and/or carcinogenic. In order to understand the source and environmental relevance of naturally produced organobromine compounds in surface waters, the mechanism of the formation was investigated using batch tests with lake water and algae cultures.

  1. Brominated dioxins and dibenzofurans in human adipose tissue. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cramer, P.H.; Stanley, J.S.; Bauer, K.; Ayling, R.E.; Thornburg, K.R.

    1990-04-11

    The report describes the analytical efforts for the determination of polybrominated dioxins (PBDDs) and furans (PBDFs) in human adipose tissues. Data on the precision and accuracy of the method for three tetra- through hexabrominated dioxins and three tetra- through hexabrominated furans (specific 2,3,7,8-substituted isomers) were generated from the analysis of 5 unspiked and 10 spiked (5 replicates at 2 spike levels) adipose tissue samples that were included with the analysis of the FY 1987 samples. In addition, data are presented on the results of the analysis of 48 composite samples for the six specific PBDD and PBDF compounds. The targeted 2,3,7,8-substituted PBDDs and PBDFs were not detected in any of the samples except those prepared as spiked QC materials. The detection limits calculated for the tetrabromo congeners in the samples ranged from 0.46 to 8.9 pg/g (lipid basis). The detection limits for the higher brominated congeners were typically greater than that observed for the tetrabrominated compounds. There is some evidence for the presence of other brominated compounds in the adipose tissue samples. Specifically, responses were noted that correspond to the qualitative criteria for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (hexa through octabromo).

  2. Comparative environmental analysis of waste brominated plastic thermal treatments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this research activity is to investigate the environmental impact of different thermal treatments of waste electric and electronic equipment (WEEE), applying a life cycle assessment methodology. Two scenarios were assessed, which both allow the recovery of bromine: (A) the co-combustion of WEEE and green waste in a municipal solid waste combustion plant, and (B) the staged-gasification of WEEE and combustion of produced syngas in gas turbines. Mass and energy balances on the two scenarios were set and the analysis of the life cycle inventory and the life cycle impact assessment were conducted. Two impact assessment methods (Ecoindicator 99 and Impact 2002+) were slightly modified and then used with both scenarios. The results showed that scenario B (staged-gasification) had a potentially smaller environmental impact than scenario A (co-combustion). In particular, the thermal treatment of staged-gasification was more energy efficient than co-combustion, and therefore scenario B performed better than scenario A, mainly in the impact categories of 'fossil fuels' and 'climate change'. Moreover, the results showed that scenario B allows a higher recovery of bromine than scenario A; however, Br recovery leads to environmental benefits for both the scenarios. Finally the study demonstrates that WEEE thermal treatment for energy and matter recovery is an eco-efficient way to dispose of this kind of waste

  3. Pulse radiolysis studies of the reactions of bromine atoms and dimethyl sulfoxide-bromine atom complexes with alcohols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO)-Br complexes were generated by pulse radiolysis of DMSO/bromomethane mixtures and the formation mechanism and spectral characteristics of the formed complexes were investigated in detail. The rate constant for the reaction of bromine atoms with DMSO and the extinction coefficient of the complex were obtained to be 4.6x109 M-1 s-1 and 6300 M-1 cm-1 at the absorption maximum of 430 nm. Rate constants for the reaction of bromine atoms with a series of alcohols were determined in CBrCl3 solutions applying a competitive kinetic method using the DMSO-Br complex as the reference system. The obtained rate constants were ∼108 M-1 s-1, one or two orders larger than those reported for highly polar solvents. Rate constants of DMSO-Br complexes with alcohols were determined to be ∼ 107 M-1 s-1. A comparison of the reactivities of Br atoms and DMSO-Br complexes with those of chlorine atoms and chlorine atom complexes which are ascribed to hydrogen abstracting reactants strongly indicates that hydrogen abstraction from alcohols is not the rate determining step in the case of Br atoms and DMSO-Br complexes

  4. Effects of bromination on the viscoelastic response of vinyl ester nanocomposites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Fire, smoke and toxicity are of significant concern for composite materials used in marine applications. Bromination of vinyl ester resin imparts fire retardancy as manifested by a reduction in the amount of smoke, carbon monoxide, and corrosive combustion products. In this research, the viscoelastic properties, modulus (stiffness and damping (energy dissipation, of 1.25 and 2.5 wt. percent nanoclay and exfoliated graphite nanoplatelet (xGnP reinforced non-brominated and brominated vinyl ester have been studied over a range of temperature and frequency. Effects of frequency on the viscoelastic behavior were investigated using a Dynamic Mechanical Analyzer (DMA by sweeping the frequency over three decades: 0.01, 0.1, 1 and 10 Hz, and temperature range from 30–150°C at a step rate of 4°C per minute. Master curves were generated by time-temperature superposing the experimental data at a reference temperature. The nano reinforced composites showed a drop in initial storage modulus with bromination. Nanocomposites with 1.25 and 2.5 wt. percent graphite had the highest storage modulus among brominated specimens. Bromination was also found to significantly increase the glass transition temperature (Tg and damping for all nanocomposites. Among the brominated specimens, 1.25 wt. Percent graphite platelet reinforced vinyl ester exhibited the best viscoelastic response with high damping and glass transition temperature, along with superior storage modulus over a longer time period.

  5. The contribution of anthropogenic bromine emissions to past stratospheric ozone trends: a modelling study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B.-M. Sinnhuber

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Bromine compounds play an important role in the depletion of stratospheric ozone. We have calculated the changes in stratospheric ozone in response to changes in the halogen loading over the past decades, using a two-dimensional (latitude/height model constrained by source gas mixing ratios at the surface. Model calculations of the decrease of total column ozone since 1980 agree reasonably well with observed ozone trends, in particular when the contribution from very short-lived bromine compounds is included. Model calculations with bromine source gas mixing ratios fixed at 1959 levels, corresponding approximately to a situation with no anthropogenic bromine emissions, show an ozone column reduction between 1980 and 2005 at Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes of only ≈55% compared to a model run including all halogen source gases. In this sense anthropogenic bromine emissions are responsible for ≈45% of the model estimated column ozone loss at Northern Hemisphere mid-latitudes. However, since a large fraction of the bromine induced ozone loss is due to the combined BrO/ClO catalytic cycle, the effect of bromine would have been smaller in the absence of anthropogenic chlorine emissions. The chemical efficiency of bromine relative to chlorine for global total ozone depletion from our model calculations, expressed by the so called α-factor, is 64 on an annual average. This value is much higher than previously published results. Updates in reaction rate constants can explain only part of the differences in α. The inclusion of bromine from very short-lived source gases has only a minor effect on the global mean α-factor.

  6. Enhancement of the carbon electrode capacitance by brominated hydroquinones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gastol, Dominika; Walkowiak, Jedrzej; Fic, Krzysztof; Frackowiak, Elzbieta

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents supercapacitors utilizing new redox-active electrolytes with bromine species. Two sources of Br specimen were investigated, i.e. dibromodihydroxybenzene dissolved in KOH and potassium bromide dissolved in KOH with hydroxybenzene additive. KOH-activated carbon, exhibiting a well-developed porosity, was incorporated as an electrode material. The tested systems revealed a capacitance enhancement explained by Br- and partial BrO3- redox activity. The optimisation of the electrolyte concentration resulted in a capacitance value of 314 F g-1 achieved at 1.1 V voltage range. Good cyclability performance (11% capacitance loss) combined with a high capacitance value (244 F g-1) were obtained for the system operating in 0.2 mol L- 1 C6H4Br2O2 in 2 mol L-1 KOH electrolytic solution.

  7. Hydrocarbon Spectral Database

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 115 Hydrocarbon Spectral Database (Web, free access)   All of the rotational spectral lines observed and reported in the open literature for 91 hydrocarbon molecules have been tabulated. The isotopic molecular species, assigned quantum numbers, observed frequency, estimated measurement uncertainty and reference are given for each transition reported.

  8. Oxygenated Derivatives of Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    For the book entitled “Insect Hydrocarbons: Biology, Biochemistry and Chemical Ecology”, this chapter presents a comprehensive review of the occurrence, structure and function of oxygenated derivatives of hydrocarbons. The book chapter focuses on the occurrence, structural identification and functi...

  9. Preparation and evaluation of composite membranes for zinc/bromine storage batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Charles, Jr.; Assink, Roger A.

    Low coulombic efficiencies of zinc/bromine redox batteries were attributed to migration of bromine and negatively charged bromine moieties through the microporous separator used to separate the catholyte from the anolyte. While it was demonstrated that improvements in coulombic efficiency can be achieved by replacing the microporous separator with a cationic ion exchange membrane, these membranes are expensive and/or not sufficiently conductive to be practicable. It was found that the rate of bromine permeation can be reduced by two orders of magnitude with minimal decreases in conductivity by impregnating commercial microporous polyethylene type separators with sulfonated polysulfone, a cationic polyelectrolyte that was developed in earlier work for other redox storage batteries.

  10. A Novel Protocol for the Regioselective Bromination of Primary Alcohols in Unprotected Carbohydrates or Glycosides

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    薛伟华; 张立芬

    2012-01-01

    The regioselective and efficient bromination of primary hydroxyl groups in unprotected carbohydrates or glycosides is successfully achieved by using (chloro-phenylthio-methylene)dimethylammoniumchloride (CPMA) in the presence of tetrabutylammonium bromide (TBAB) in dry DMF.

  11. Evaluation of carbon cryogels used as cathodes for non-flowing zinc-bromine storage cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayme-Perrot, David; Walter, Serge; Gabelica, Zelimir [Groupe Securite et Ecologie Chimiques (GSEC), ENSCMu, 3 rue Alfred Werner, F-68093 Mulhouse Cedex (France); Valange, Sabine [Laboratoire de Catalyse en Chimie Organique (LACCO), ESIP, 40 Avenue du Recteur Pineau, F-86022 Poitiers Cedex (France)

    2008-01-03

    Monolithic megaloporous carbon cryogels were examined for their potential applications as cathodic electrodes in secondary zinc-bromine cells. This work investigates the possibility of using their particular macroporous texture as microscopic bromine tanks in a zinc/bromine battery. The electrochemical behaviour of a cell based upon such a Br{sub 2} electrode was studied and discussed in terms of energy yields, energy storage capability and cycle life. Good storages (over 20 Wh kg{sup -1}) could be obtained during the first 2 h of cell charging for currents between 10 and 20 mA g{sup -1}. The energy yield remains almost constant during a fairly large number of cycles, basically for weak charges (e.g. 25 C g{sup -1}). Our findings show that the good cyclability of the cathodic electrode is a consequence of the liquid state of the active bromine phase. (author)

  12. Dynamic dielectric properties and the γ transition of bromine doped polyacrylonitrile

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Based on monitoring the γ process (the lowest temperature-relaxation in polyacrylonitrile (PAN by dynamic dielectric spectroscopy, new evidence for the formation of a charge transfer complex between bromine dopants and nitrile groups is presented. The experimental work is carried out on PAN and nitrile polymerized PAN with and without bromine doping and the effects of these factors on the γ process are measured. Nitrile polymerization results in diminishing of the γ process and in a 15% increase in its activation energy, whereas bromine doping produces splitting of the original γ process in PAN – coupled with a significant activation energy increase – and its complete disappearance in nitrile polymerized PAN. Both the splitting of the γ process and the higher activation energy reflect bromine-nitrile adduct formation..

  13. Strand breaks in plasmid DNA, natural and brominated, by low-energy X-rays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Single- and double-strand breaks were measured in Col E1 plasmid DNA, natural and partially brominated, irradiated with monoenergetic X-rays (from a synchrotron radiation source) on both sides of the K-absorption edge for Br. The fraction of the undamaged supercoiled form decreased exponentially with the photon dose; its yield in the brominated DNA did not exhibit any energy-dependence. This result is consistent with the calculated relative contributions of photoelectric interactions with individual component atoms which show that an electron flux originating in light atoms outweighs that from bromine. However, X-rays of energy above the Br K-edge appear slightly more efficient in producing double-strand breaks. This result seems to suggest that the positive charge and submolecular effects associated with the photo-absorption in bromine play some role in damaging processes, besides the initial distribution of deposited electron energy. (author)

  14. Bromine determination by neutron activation analysis and its distribution in the atmosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromine, one of the main participants in ozone layer destruction, is 10 to 100 times more effective than chlorine. There are two principal sources of methyl bromide emissions: the oceans and some pesticides that are used in farming. Bromine was detected in 'premium' and 'magna sin' gasolines (2.86±0.96 and 1.54±0.38 ppm, respectively) as well as in condensed water found in exhaust pipes of vehicles. In addition, samples of rainwater were also analyzed to determine atmospheric bromine concentration. In water samples Br concentrations ranging from 2.09 to 0.06 ppm were found. The techniques utilised were neutron activation analysis and high voltage electrophoresis, the latter to determine the chemical form of bromine in condensed water samples. Finally, suspended particles from rainwater were also analysed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). (author)

  15. New insight into photo-bromination processes in saline surface waters: The case of salicylic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamtam, Fatima; Chiron, Serge, E-mail: serge.chiron@msem.univ-montp2.fr

    2012-10-01

    It was shown, through a combination of field and laboratory observations, that salicylic acid can undergo photo-bromination reactions in sunlit saline surface waters. Laboratory-scale experiments revealed that the photochemical yields of 5-bromosalicylic acid and 3,5-dibromosalicylic acid from salicylic acid were always low (in the 4% range at most). However, this might be of concern since these compounds are potential inhibitors of the 20{alpha}-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzyme, with potential implications in endocrine disruption processes. At least two mechanisms were involved simultaneously to account for the photo-generation of brominated substances. The first one might involve the formation of reactive brominated radical species (Br{center_dot}, Br{sub 2}{center_dot}{sup -}) through hydroxyl radical mediated oxidation of bromide ions. These ions reacted more selectively than hydroxyl radicals with electron-rich organic pollutants such as salicylic acid. The second one might involve the formation of hypobromous acid, through a two electron oxidation of bromine ions by peroxynitrite. This reaction was catalyzed by nitrite, since these ions play a crucial role in the formation of nitric oxide upon photolysis. This nitric oxide further reacts with superoxide radical anions to yield peroxynitrite and by ammonium through the formation of N-bromoamines, probably due to the ability of N-bromoamines to promote the aromatic bromination of phenolic compounds. Field measurements revealed the presence of salicylic acid together with 5-bromosalicylic and 3,5-dibromosalicylic acid in a brackish coastal lagoon, thus confirming the environmental significance of the proposed photochemically induced bromination pathways. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Brominated derivatives of salicylic acid were detected in a brackish lagoon. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A photochemical pathway was hypothesized to account for bromination of salicylic acid. Black

  16. A three-step process to facilitate the annulation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Sara E; Streeter, Matthew D; Jones, Laurel L; Klepfer, Matthew S; Atmatzidis, Kyriakos; Wille, Kristen D; Harrison, Sean A; Hoegg, Edward D; Sheridan, Heather M; Kramer, Stephanie; Parrish, Damon A; Amick, Aaron W

    2014-09-01

    A new efficient three-step process to annulate polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has been developed, providing access to PAHs with saturated rings that under current chemical methods would be difficult to produce in an efficient manner. This method relies on a palladium-catalyzed cross-coupling reaction of various brominated PAHs with cyclohexanone to yield α-arylated ketones, which are converted to regiospecific vinyl triflates and cyclized by a palladium-catalyzed intramolecular arene-vinyl triflate coupling to produce PAHs with incorporated saturated rings or "tetrahydroindeno-annulated" PAHs. PMID:25137354

  17. Bromine as a Potential Threat to the Aquatic Environment in Areas of Mining Operations

    OpenAIRE

    Winid Bogumiła

    2013-01-01

    Fresh water normally contains limited quantities of bromine. The average content of bromine in the surface and groundwater active exchange zone generally does not exceed 200 μg/dm3 (0.2 mg/dm3). Mineralized waters, including some specific therapeutic waters, thermal waters, and brines, may contain bromides in amounts greater than in ordinary groundwater. Bromides will penetrate into groundwater and surface water due to salty groundwater inflow. In areas of mining operations, the management of...

  18. Complete Reductive Dehalogenation of Brominated Biphenyls by Anaerobic Microorganisms in Sediment

    OpenAIRE

    Bedard, Donna L.; Van Dort, Heidi M.

    1998-01-01

    We sought to determine whether microorganisms from the polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-contaminated sediment in Woods Pond (Lenox, Mass.) could dehalogenate brominated biphenyls. The PCB dechlorination specificities for the microorganisms in this sediment have been well characterized. This allowed us to compare the dehalogenation specificities for brominated biphenyls and chlorinated biphenyls within a single sediment. Anaerobic sediment microcosms were incubated separately at 25°C with 16 dif...

  19. Characterization and cyclic performance of membranes in hydrogen-bromine battery

    OpenAIRE

    Hugo, Yohanes

    2015-01-01

    A large renewable energy integration needs to be coupled with a low cost energy storage technology. One of the promising energy storage alternatives for the commercial market segment is the hydrogen bromine flow battery. Although the technology has been explored since 1980, the development of the hydrogen bromine flow battery system is still in the research phase due to the system complexity, the safety aspect, and technical problems. The literature review revealed that costs of the system an...

  20. Performance and Degradation of A Lithium-Bromine Rechargeable Fuel Cell Using Highly Concentrated Catholytes

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Peng; Bazant, Martin Z.

    2016-01-01

    Lithium-air batteries have been considered as ultimate solutions for the power source of long-range electrified transportation, but state-of-the-art prototypes still suffer from short cycle life, low efficiency and poor power output. Here, a lithium-bromine rechargeable fuel cell using highly concentrated bromine catholytes is demonstrated with comparable specific energy, improved power density, and higher efficiency. The cell is similar in structure to a hybrid-electrolyte Li-air battery, wh...

  1. Bromine atom production and chain propagation during springtime Arctic ozone depletion events in Barrow, Alaska

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, Chelsea R.; Shepson, Paul B.; Liao, Jin; Huey, L. Greg; Cantrell, Chris; Flocke, Frank; Orlando, John

    2016-01-01

    Ozone depletion events (ODEs) in the Arctic are primarily controlled by a bromine radical-catalyzed destruction mechanism that depends on the efficient production and recycling of Br atoms. Numerous laboratory and modeling studies have suggested the importance of heterogeneous recycling of Br through HOBr reaction with bromide on saline surfaces. However, the gas-phase regeneration of bromine atoms through BrO-BrO radical reactions has been assumed to be an efficient, if not dominant, pa...

  2. Gaia Paradigm: A Biotic Origin Of The Polar Sunrise Arctic Bromine Explosion

    OpenAIRE

    Iudin, M.

    2008-01-01

    The main attention is given to discussion of the natural causes and regularities of the Arctic bromine pollution. We make notice of marine microbial organisms and their metabolism as a prime driving force for the elemental biogeochemical cycles. One of the important conclusions of this study is on similarity between ocean bromine concentrating as by-product of the marine microbial activities and nitrogen fixation by soil bacteria. In both cases, microbial organisms and their food webs maintai...

  3. Springtime surface ozone fluctuations at high Arctic latitudes and their possible relationship to atmospheric bromine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oltmans, Samuel J.; Sheridan, Patrick J.; Schnell, Russell C.; Winchester, John W.

    1988-01-01

    At high Arctic stations such as Barrow, Alaska, springtime near-surface ozone amounts fluctuate between the highest and lowest values seen during the course of the year. Episodes when the surface ozone concentration is essentially zero last up to several days during this time of year. In the Arctic Gas and Aerosol Sampling Program (AGASP-I and AGASP-II) in 1983 and 1986, it was found that ozone concentrations often showed a very steep gradient in altitude with very low values near the surface. The cold temperatures, and snow-covered ground make it unlikely that the surface itself would rapidly destroy significant amounts of ozone. The AGASP aircraft measurements that found low ozone concentrations in the lowest layers of the troposphere also found that filterable excess bromine (the amount of bromine in excess of the sea salt component) in samples collected wholly or partially beneath the temperature inversion had higher bromine concentrations than other tropospheric samples. Of the four lowest ozone minimum concentrations, three of them were associated with the highest bromine enrichments. Surface measurements of excess filterable bromine at Barrow show a strong seasonal dependence with values rising dramatically early in March, then declining in May. The concentration of organic bromine gases such as bromoform rise sharply during the winter and then begin to decline after March with winter and early spring values at least three times greater than the summer minimum.

  4. Addition of bromine as a diagnostic gas to inertial confinement fusion target microspheres

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently, direct fuel rho r measurements on Inertial Confinement Fusion (ICF) targets by neutron activation of the argon tracer gas mixed with the DT fuel would require a 100 fold increase in neutron yield. Bromine, on the other hand, has excellent properties for neutron activation analysis at neutron yields of 10two' to 108, when present at an internal pressure of from 0.1 to 0.2 atmospheres. Bromine addition is accomplished in a 2 furnace system using the dried-gel method of microsphere production. An upper furnace operated at 15000C is separated from a lower furnace by a cooled zone. The lower furnace is filled with bromine gas and operated at approximately 12500C. The upper furnace is the glass production furnace. The cooled zone in between the upper and lower furnace is to prevent the hot bromine gas from rising into the upper furnace. The microspheres pass through the cooled zone and immediately into the 12500C bromine furnace where the bromine permeates into the spheres

  5. Photothermally induced bromination of carbon/polymer bipolar plate materials for fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schade, Martin; Franzka, Steffen [Fakultät für Chemie, Universität Duisburg-Essen, 45117 Essen (Germany); Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CENIDE), University of Duisburg-Essen, Carl-Benz-Straße 199, 47057 Duisburg (Germany); Cappuccio, Franco; Peinecke, Volker; Heinzel, Angelika [Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CENIDE), University of Duisburg-Essen, Carl-Benz-Straße 199, 47057 Duisburg (Germany); Zentrum für BrennstoffzellenTechnik (ZBT), Carl-Benz-Straße 201, 47057 Duisburg (Germany); Hartmann, Nils, E-mail: nils.hartmann@uni-due.de [Fakultät für Chemie, Universität Duisburg-Essen, 45117 Essen (Germany); Center for Nanointegration Duisburg-Essen (CENIDE), University of Duisburg-Essen, Carl-Benz-Straße 199, 47057 Duisburg (Germany)

    2015-05-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Photothermal laser bromination of carbon/polymer materials is demonstrated. • Using a microfocused laser functionalized domains with diameters of 5 μm and 100 μm and more can be fabricated. • Bromine groups can be transformed in a variety of other chemical functionalities, i.e. amine groups. • Depending on the chemical functionality, the local chemical affinity and wettability is changed. • The routine can be applied to standard bipolar plate materials used for fuel cell applications. - Abstract: A facile photothermal procedure for direct functionalization of carbon/polymer bipolar plate materials is demonstrated. Through irradiation with a microfocused beam of an Ar{sup +}-laser at λ = 514 nm in gaseous bromine and distinct laser powers and pulse lengths local bromination of the carbon/polymer material takes place. At a 1/e spot diameter of 2.1 μm, functionalized surface areas with diameters down to 5 μm are fabricated. In complementary experiments large-area bromination is investigated using an ordinary tungsten lamp. For characterization contact angle goniometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and electron microscopy in conjunction with labeling techniques are employed. After irradiation bromine groups can easily be substituted by other chemical functionalities, e.g. azide and amine groups. This provides a facile approach in order to fabricate surface patterns and gradient structures with varying wetting characteristics. Mechanistic aspects and prospects of photothermal routines in micropatterning of carbon/polymer materials are discussed.

  6. Photothermally induced bromination of carbon/polymer bipolar plate materials for fuel cell applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Photothermal laser bromination of carbon/polymer materials is demonstrated. • Using a microfocused laser functionalized domains with diameters of 5 μm and 100 μm and more can be fabricated. • Bromine groups can be transformed in a variety of other chemical functionalities, i.e. amine groups. • Depending on the chemical functionality, the local chemical affinity and wettability is changed. • The routine can be applied to standard bipolar plate materials used for fuel cell applications. - Abstract: A facile photothermal procedure for direct functionalization of carbon/polymer bipolar plate materials is demonstrated. Through irradiation with a microfocused beam of an Ar+-laser at λ = 514 nm in gaseous bromine and distinct laser powers and pulse lengths local bromination of the carbon/polymer material takes place. At a 1/e spot diameter of 2.1 μm, functionalized surface areas with diameters down to 5 μm are fabricated. In complementary experiments large-area bromination is investigated using an ordinary tungsten lamp. For characterization contact angle goniometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and electron microscopy in conjunction with labeling techniques are employed. After irradiation bromine groups can easily be substituted by other chemical functionalities, e.g. azide and amine groups. This provides a facile approach in order to fabricate surface patterns and gradient structures with varying wetting characteristics. Mechanistic aspects and prospects of photothermal routines in micropatterning of carbon/polymer materials are discussed

  7. Utilization of a Green Brominating Agent for the Spectrophotometric Determination of Pipazethate HCl in Pure Form and Pharmaceutical Preparations

    OpenAIRE

    Ayman A. Gouda

    2013-01-01

    Five simple, accurate, and sensitive spectrophotometric methods (A–E) have been described for the indirect assay of pipazethate HCl (PZT) either in pure form or in pharmaceutical preparations. The proposed methods are based on the bromination of pipazethate HCl with a solution of excess bromate-bromide mixture in hydrochloric acid medium and subsequent estimation of the residual bromine by different reaction schemes. In the first three methods (A–C), the determination of the residual bromine ...

  8. Thraustochytrid protists degrade hydrocarbons

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Raikar, M.T.; Raghukumar, S.; Vani, V.; David, J.J.; Chandramohan, D.

    isolation tubes with crude oil. Three isolates tested showed positive hydrophobicity of cell walls as judged by the Microbial Adhesion to Hydrocarbons (MATH) assay. Addition of Bombay High crude oil to nutrient broth slightly enhanced growth of the protists...

  9. Immunoassay for petroleum hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petroleum hydrocarbon contamination of soil and ground water has become a serious environmental problem. Since the 1940s, it has been a common practice to bury fuel tanks underground to guard against fire and explosions. The leakage of petroleum fuel from these aging tanks creates a long term threat to human health. In order to location and identify these sources of contamination, an on-site screening test is very desirable. A simple, inexpensive petroleum hydrocarbon immunoassay has been developed for this purpose. The EnviroGard Petroleum Hydrocarbon test kit is designed for qualitative or semiquantitative analysis of petroleum hydrocarbon fuel in soil and ground water. The assay can be easily used on-site and takes 15 minutes to perform. Following a 2 minute methanol extraction, the test is performed in polystyrene tubes and can detect gasoline, diesel fuel, kerosene, home heating oil and other major fuels at ppm levels in soil and sub-ppm levels in water samples

  10. Antimycobacterial brominated metabolites from two species of marine sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Maria Fernanda; de Oliveira, Jaine Honorata; Galetti, Fabio C; de Souza, Ana Olívia; Silva, Célio Lopes; Hajdu, Eduardo; Peixinho, Solange; Berlinck, Roberto G

    2006-04-01

    A screening of 500 crude extracts of marine invertebrates against the growth of Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv yielded MeOH extracts of the sponges Aplysina cauliformis and Pachychalina sp. with significant activity. Further bioassay-guided fractionation of both crude extracts led to the isolation of four bromine-containing metabolites. The known (+)-fistularin-3 (1) and 11-deoxyfistularin-3 (2), and the new compound 2-(3-amino-2,4-dibromo-6-hydroxyphenyl)acetic acid (3) were isolated from the sponge A. cauliformis, while the new bromotyrosine-derived 3-(3,5-dibromo-4-methoxyphenyl)-2-methoxy- N-methylpropan-1-ammonium (4) was isolated from Pachychalina sp. Compound 4 exhibited weak antimycobacterial activity while compounds 1-3 displayed activity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis H37Rv, with MICs of 7.1, 7.3 and 49 microM, respectively. Compounds 1 and 2 also exhibited low cytotoxicity against J744 macrophages, indicating that both 1 and 2 are interesting leads for the development of new anti-tuberculosis agents. PMID:16557458

  11. Excited atomic bromine energy transfer and quenching mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Ray O.

    1993-08-01

    Pulsed and steady-state photolysis experiments have been conducted to determine the rate coefficients for collisional deactivation of the spin-orbit excited state of atomic bromine, Br((sup 2)P(sub 1/2)). Pulsed lifetime studies for quenching by Br2 and CO2 established absolute rate coefficients at room temperature of k(sub Br2) = 1.2 +/- 0.1 x 10(exp-12) and k(sub CO2) = 1.5 +/0.2 x 10(exp-11) cu cm/molecule-s. Steady-state photolysis methods were used to determine the quenching rates for the rare gases, N2, 02, H2, D2, NO, NO2, N2O, SF6, CF4, CH4, CO, CO2, COS, SO2, H2S, HBr, HC1, and HI relative to that for Br2. Quenching rate temperature dependence was examined for Br2, CO2, N2O, HCl, COS, NO, and NO2 for temperatures from 300 to 420 K. Diffusion and three body effects were examined in order to determine the slowest relative quenching rate measurable by this experimental technique.

  12. Untypical bromine corrosion in boilers co-firing biomass

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Hernas

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study was to determine the untypical corrosion resistance of rotary air preheaters in a biomass co-fired power plant.Design/methodology/approach: The selected results of some components of regenerative rotary air preheaters in a biomass co-fired power plant are presented. The macro and microstructure of corroded components of a LUVO preheater after 3 years of service are presented. The chemical composition of corrosion products was determined by X-ray microanalysis.Findings: Data concerning toxicity and identification of PBDEs (Polibrominated diphenyl ethers in the biomass is very limited. The presented research provides information and the proposed corrosion reaction mechanism in environments containing biomass with aggressive compounds like Cl, Si, H and Br.Research limitations/implications: An extended research on PBDEs in power plant fuels is necessary to give a full assessment of the corrosion mechanism in the presented environment; obligatory classification of the co-fired biomass.Originality/value: Firstly, an assessment of the danger for boiler materials co-firing biomass containing brominated organic flame and presentation of the reaction during the corrosion process and degradation of power boiler components in the presented environment. Secondly, the highlighting of the problem that there is a need to properly select and determine the chemical composition of the biomass used.

  13. Hydrogen cycle employing calcium-bromine and electrolysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Secure Transportable Autonomous Reactor (STAR) project is part of the U.S. Department of Energy's (DOE's) Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) to develop Generation IV nuclear reactors that will supply high-temperature heat at over 800 C. The NERI project goal is to develop an economical, proliferation-resistant, sustainable, nuclear-based energy supply system based on a modular-sized fast reactor that is passively safe and cooled with heavy liquid metal. STAR consists of: (1) A combined thermochemical water-splitting cycle to generate hydrogen, (2) A steam turbine cycle to generate electricity, and (3) An optional capability to produce potable water from brackish or salt water. However, there has been limited reporting on critical elements of the thermochemical cycle: (1) establishing chemical reaction kinetics and operating pressures and (2) addressing materials issues for hydrogen production. This paper reviews the thermodynamic basis for a three-stage Calcium-Bromine water-splitting cycle based on the University of Tokyo Cycle No.3 [UT-3] and discusses the further chemistry work that is required to develop an economical process including modifying UT-3 to incorporate HBr dissociation

  14. Modelling chemistry over the Dead Sea: bromine and ozone chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Smoydzin

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of O3 and BrO concentrations over the Dead Sea indicate that Ozone Depletion Events (ODEs, widely known to happen in polar regions, are also likely to occur over the Dead Sea due to the very high bromine content of the Dead Sea water. However, we show that BrO and O3 levels as they are detected cannot solely be explained by high Br levels in the Dead Sea water and the release of gas phase halogen species out of sea borne aerosol particles and their conversion to reactive halogen species. It is likely that other sources for reactive halogen compounds are needed to explain the observed concentrations for BrO and O3. To explain the chemical mechanism taking place over the Dead Sea leading to BrO levels of several pmol/mol we used the single column model MISTRA which calculates microphysics, meteorology, gas and aerosol phase chemistry. We performed pseudo Lagrangian studies by letting the model column first move over the desert which surrounds the Dead Sea region and then let it move over the Dead Sea itself. To include an additional source for gas phase halogen compounds, gas exchange between the Dead Sea water and the atmosphere is treated explicitly. Model calculations indicate that this process has to be included to explain the measurements.

  15. Modelling chemistry over the Dead Sea: bromine and ozone chemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. von Glasow

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Measurements of O3 and BrO concentrations over the Dead Sea indicate that Ozone Depletion Events (ODEs, widely known to happen in polar regions, are also occuring over the Dead Sea due to the very high bromine content of the Dead Sea water. However, we show that BrO and O3 levels as they are detected cannot solely be explained by high Br levels in the Dead Sea water and the release of gas phase halogen species out of sea borne aerosol particles and their conversion to reactive halogen species. It is likely that other sources for reactive halogen compounds are needed to explain the observed concentrations for BrO and O3. To explain the chemical mechanism taking place over the Dead Sea leading to BrO levels of several pmol/mol we used the one-dimensional model MISTRA which calculates microphysics, meteorology, gas and aerosol phase chemistry. We performed pseudo Lagrangian studies by letting the model column first move over the desert which surrounds the Dead Sea region and then let it move over the Dead Sea itself. To include an additional source for gas phase halogen compounds, gas exchange between the Dead Sea water and the atmosphere is treated explicitly. Model calculations indicate that this process has to be included to explain the measurements.

  16. Non-polar halogenated natural products bioaccumulated in marine samples. II. Brominated and mixed halogenated compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vetter, Walter; Jun, Wu

    2003-07-01

    Several identified and potential natural brominated bioaccumulative compounds were studied in this work. 4,6-dibromo-2-(2('),4(')-dibromo)phenoxyanisole (BC-2) previously detected in Australian marine mammals and isolated from sponges, was synthesized. Two byproducts (a tetrabromo isomer and a tribromo congener) were investigated as well. The byproducts of the synthesis were not identified in the environmental samples investigated. Previously described natural brominated compounds (BC-1, BC-2, BC-3, BC-10, BC-11, MHC-1) and anthropogenic brominated diphenyl ethers (BDE-47, BDE-99, BDE-100, BDE-154) were detected in a sample of human milk. The sample was from a woman from the Faeroe Islands who frequently consumed fish as well as whale blubber and meat. The most abundant compound originated from the natural tetrabromo phenoxyanisole BC-3 which may have a 3:1 distribution of bromine on the two phenyl units. This sample also accumulated a dibromochloroanisole, as well as a previously unknown mixed halogenated compound (MHC-X) and an unknown, most likely aromatic brominated compound. Co-elutions on a DB-5 column were found for BDE-99 and BC-11 as well as BDE-154 and the unknown brominated compound. This suggests that quantification of these two compounds has to be carried out carefully.Two samples of lower trophic level, namely Baltic cod liver and Mexican mussel tissue, were investigated as well. The cod liver samples contained BDE congeners but also abundant signals for the natural 2,3,3('),4,4('),5,5(')-heptachloro-1(')-methyl-1,2(')-bipyrrole Q1 and tribromoanisole (TBA). The mussel sample contained Q1, TBA, another halogenated anisole, BC-1, BC-2, and BC-3, as well as additional, potential natural brominated compounds in the elution range of tribromophenoxyanisoles. PMID:12738265

  17. Impact of deep convection and dehydration on bromine loading in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Aschmann

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Stratospheric bromine loading due to very short-lived substances is investigated with a three-dimensional chemical transport model over a period of 21 years using meteorological input data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts ERA-Interim reanalysis from 1989 to the end of 2009. Within this framework we analyze the impact of dehydration and deep convection on the amount of stratospheric bromine using an idealized and a detailed full chemistry approach. We model the two most important brominated short-lived substances, bromoform (CHBr3 and dibromomethane (CH2Br2, assuming a uniform convective detrainment mixing ratio of 1 part per trillion by volume (pptv for both species. The contribution of very short-lived substances to stratospheric bromine varies drastically with the applied dehydration mechanism and the associated scavenging of soluble species ranging from 3.4 pptv in the idealized setup up to 5 pptv using the full chemistry scheme. In the latter case virtually the entire amount of bromine originating from very short-lived source gases is able to reach the stratosphere thus rendering the impact of dehydration and scavenging on inorganic bromine in the tropopause insignificant. Furthermore, our long-term calculations show that the mixing ratios of very short-lived substances are strongly correlated to convective activity, i.e. intensified convection leads to higher amounts of very short-lived substances in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere especially under extreme conditions like El Niño seasons. However, this does not apply to the inorganic brominated product gases whose concentrations are anti-correlated to convective activity mainly due to convective dilution and possible scavenging, depending on the applied approach.

  18. Impact of deep convection and dehydration on bromine loading in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Aschmann

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Stratospheric bromine loading due to very short-lived substances is investigated with a three-dimensional chemical transport model over a period of 21 years using meteorological input data from the European Centre for Medium-Range Weather Forecasts ERA-Interim reanalysis from 1989 to the end of 2009. Within this framework we analyze the impact of dehydration and deep convection on the amount of stratospheric bromine using an idealized and a detailed full chemistry approach. We model the two most important brominated short-lived substances, bromoform (CHBr3 and dibromomethane (CH2Br2, assuming a uniform detrainment mixing ratio of 1 part per trillion by volume (pptv for both species. The contribution of very short-lived substances to stratospheric bromine varies drastically with the applied dehydration mechanism and the associated scavenging of soluble species ranging from 3.4 pptv in the idealized setup up to 5 pptv using the full chemistry scheme. In the latter case virtually the entire amount of bromine originating from very short-lived source gases is able to reach the stratosphere thus rendering the impact of dehydration and scavenging on inorganic bromine in the tropopause insignificant. Furthermore, our long-term calculations show that the mixing ratios of very short-lived substances are strongly correlated to convective activity, i.e. intensified convection leads to higher amounts of very short-lived substances in the upper troposphere/lower stratosphere especially under extreme conditions like El Niño seasons. However, this does not apply to the inorganic brominated product gases whose concentrations are anti-correlated to convective activity mainly due to convective dilution and possible scavenging, depending on the applied approach.

  19. An exemplary case of a bromine explosion event linked to cyclone development in the Arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blechschmidt, A.-M.; Richter, A.; Burrows, J. P.; Kaleschke, L.; Strong, K.; Theys, N.; Weber, M.; Zhao, X.; Zien, A.

    2016-02-01

    Intense, cyclone-like shaped plumes of tropospheric bromine monoxide (BrO) are regularly observed by GOME-2 on board the MetOp-A satellite over Arctic sea ice in polar spring. These plumes are often transported by high-latitude cyclones, sometimes over several days despite the short atmospheric lifetime of BrO. However, only few studies have focused on the role of polar weather systems in the development, duration and transport of tropospheric BrO plumes during bromine explosion events. The latter are caused by an autocatalytic chemical chain reaction associated with tropospheric ozone depletion and initiated by the release of bromine from cold brine-covered ice or snow to the atmosphere. In this manuscript, a case study investigating a comma-shaped BrO plume which developed over the Beaufort Sea and was observed by GOME-2 for several days is presented. By making combined use of satellite data and numerical models, it is shown that the occurrence of the plume was closely linked to frontal lifting in a polar cyclone and that it most likely resided in the lowest 3 km of the troposphere. In contrast to previous case studies, we demonstrate that the dry conveyor belt, a potentially bromine-rich stratospheric air stream which can complicate interpretation of satellite retrieved tropospheric BrO, is spatially separated from the observed BrO plume. It is concluded that weather conditions associated with the polar cyclone favoured the bromine activation cycle and blowing snow production, which may have acted as a bromine source during the bromine explosion event.

  20. Measurement-based modeling of bromine chemistry in the boundary layer: 1. Bromine chemistry at the Dead Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pour Biazar

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available The Dead Sea is an excellent natural laboratory for the investigation of Reactive Bromine Species (RBS chemistry, due to the high RBS levels observed in this area, combined with anthropogenic air pollutants up to several ppb. The present study investigated the chemical mechanism of RBS at the Dead Sea using a numerical one-dimensional chemical model. Simulations were based on data obtained from comprehensive measurements performed at sites along the Dead Sea. The simulations showed that the high BrO levels measured frequently at the Dead Sea could only partially be attributed to the highly concentrated Br− present in the Dead Sea water. Further, the RBS activity at the Dead Sea cannot solely be explained by a pure gas phase mechanism. This paper presents a chemical mechanism which can account for the observed chemical activity at the Dead Sea, with the addition of only two heterogeneous processes: the "Bromine Explosion" mechanism and the heterogeneous decomposition of BrONO2. Ozone frequently dropped below a threshold value of ~1 to 2 ppbv at the Dead Sea evaporation ponds, and in such cases, O3 became a limiting factor for the production of BrOx (BrO+Br. The entrainment of O3 fluxes into the evaporation ponds was found to be essential for the continuation of RBS activity, and to be the main reason for the positive correlation observed between BrO and O3 at low O3 concentrations, and for the jagged diurnal pattern of BrO observed in the Dead Sea area. The present study has shown that the heterogeneous decomposition of BrONO2 has the potential to greatly affect the RBS activity in areas under anthropogenic influence, mainly due to the positive correlation between the rate of this process and the levels of NO2. Further investigation of the influence of the decomposition of BrONO2 may be especially important in understanding the RBS activity at mid-latitudes.

  1. Measurement-based modeling of bromine chemistry in the boundary layer: 1. Bromine chemistry at the Dead Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Tas

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The Dead Sea is an excellent natural laboratory for the investigation of Reactive Bromine Species (RBS chemistry, due to the high RBS levels observed in this area, combined with anthropogenic air pollutants up to several ppb. The present study investigated the basic chemical mechanism of RBS at the Dead Sea using a numerical one-dimensional chemical model. Simulations were based on data obtained from comprehensive measurements performed at sites along the Dead Sea. The simulations showed that the high BrO levels measured frequently at the Dead Sea could only partially be attributed to the highly concentrated Br− present in the Dead Sea water. Furthermore, the RBS activity at the Dead Sea cannot solely be explained by a pure gas phase mechanism. This paper presents a chemical mechanism which can account for the observed chemical activity at the Dead Sea, with the addition of only two heterogeneous processes: the "Bromine Explosion" mechanism and the heterogeneous decomposition of BrONO2. Ozone frequently dropped below a threshold value of ~1 to 2 ppbv at the Dead Sea evaporation ponds, and in such cases, O3 became a limiting factor for the production of BrOx (BrO+Br. The entrainment of O3 fluxes into the evaporation ponds was found to be essential for the continuation of RBS activity, and to be the main reason for the jagged diurnal pattern of BrO observed in the Dead Sea area, and for the positive correlation observed between BrO and O3 at low O3 concentrations. The present study has shown that the heterogeneous decomposition of BrONO2 has a great potential to affect the RBS activity in areas influenced by anthropogenic emissions, mainly due to the positive correlation between the rate of this process and the levels of NO2. Further investigation of the influence of the decomposition of BrONO2 may be especially important in understanding the RBS activity at mid-latitudes.

  2. Brominated skeletal components of the marine demosponges, Aplysina cavernicola and Ianthella basta: analytical and biochemical investigations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunze, Kurt; Niemann, Hendrik; Ueberlein, Susanne; Schulze, Renate; Ehrlich, Hermann; Brunner, Eike; Proksch, Peter; van Pée, Karl-Heinz

    2013-04-01

    Demosponges possess a skeleton made of a composite material with various organic constituents and/or siliceous spicules. Chitin is an integral part of the skeleton of different sponges of the order Verongida. Moreover, sponges of the order Verongida, such as Aplysina cavernicola or Ianthella basta, are well-known for the biosynthesis of brominated tyrosine derivates, characteristic bioactive natural products. It has been unknown so far whether these compounds are exclusively present in the cellular matrix or whether they may also be incorporated into the chitin-based skeletons. In the present study, we therefore examined the skeletons of A. cavernicola and I. basta with respect to the presence of bromotyrosine metabolites. The chitin-based-skeletons isolated from these sponges indeed contain significant amounts of brominated compounds, which are not easily extractable from the skeletons by common solvents, such as MeOH, as shown by HPLC analyses in combination with NMR and IR spectroscopic measurements. Quantitative potentiometric analyses confirm that the skeleton-associated bromine mainly withstands the MeOH-based extraction. This observation suggests that the respective, but yet unidentified, brominated compounds are strongly bound to the sponge skeletons, possibly by covalent bonding. Moreover, gene fragments of halogenases suggested to be responsible for the incorporation of bromine into organic molecules could be amplified from DNA isolated from sponge samples enriched for sponge-associated bacteria. PMID:23595055

  3. Removal of brominated flame retardant from electrical and electronic waste plastic by solvothermal technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► A process for brominated flame retardants (BFRs) removal in plastic was established. ► The plastic became bromine-free with the structure maintained after this treatment. ► BFRs transferred into alcohol solvent were easily debrominated by metallic copper. - Abstract: Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in electrical and electronic (E and E) waste plastic are toxic, bioaccumulative and recalcitrant. In the present study, tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) contained in this type of plastic was tentatively subjected to solvothermal treatment so as to obtain bromine-free plastic. Methanol, ethanol and isopropanol were examined as solvents for solvothermal treatment and it was found that methanol was the optimal solvent for TBBPA removal. The optimum temperature, time and liquid to solid ratio for solvothermal treatment to remove TBBPA were 90 °C, 2 h and 15:1, respectively. After the treatment with various alcohol solvents, it was found that TBBPA was finally transferred into the solvents and bromine in the extract was debrominated catalyzed by metallic copper. Bisphenol A and cuprous bromide were the main products after debromination. The morphology and FTIR properties of the plastic were generally unchanged after the solvothermal treatment indicating that the structure of the plastic maintained after the process. This work provides a clean and applicable process for BFRs-containing plastic disposal.

  4. Electrochemical performance and transport properties of a Nafion membrane in a hydrogen-bromine cell environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldwin, Richard S.

    1987-01-01

    The overall energy conversion efficiency of a hydrogen-bromine energy storage system is highly dependent upon the characteristics and performance of the ion-exchange membrane utilized as a half-cell separator. The electrochemical performance and transport properties of a duPont Nafion membrane in an aqueous HBr-Br2 environment were investigated. Membrane conductivity data are presented as a function of HBr concentration and temperature for the determination of ohmic voltage losses across the membrane in an operational cell. Diffusion-controlled bromine permeation rates and permeabilities are presented as functions of solution composition and temperature. Relationships between the degree of membrane hydration and the membrane transport characteristics are discussed. The solution chemistry of an operational hydrogen-bromine cell undergoing charge from 45% HBr to 5% HBr is discussed, and, based upon the experimentally observed bromine permeation behavior, predicted cell coulombic losses due to bromine diffusion through the membrane are presented as a function of the cell state-of-charge.

  5. The bromine enhancement ratio in mammalian cells in vitro and experimental mouse tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human kidney cells in culture and cells of mouse sarcoma-180 were allowed to incorporate bromine into their DNA. Cultured cells with and without incorporated BUdR were irradiated with electromagnetic radiations ranging in energy from 12 keV X-rays to 60Co γ-rays to find out whether or not there exists any energy dependence of the bromine dose enhancement ratio BER. Such a dependence should show in the immediate neighbourhood of the K-absorption edge of bromine (13.5 keV). Any influence of the Auger effect triggered in bromine by external irradiation should show by a significant increase of the BER for energies rising from slightly below to slight above the bromine K-edge. Values of D37, D0 and the extrapolation numbers of the cell survival curves served as biological endpoints. Measured values of BER ranged from 1.12-2.00 without any significant dependence on energy. A weakly pronounced peak was found for 50 kV X-rays of 26 keV mean energy. Sarcoma-180 were irradiated with 14 keV X-rays and 60C γ-rays. BUdR was administered i.v., i.p. and directly into the tumours in quantities of up to 1 ml of a 10-3M solution. (Auth.)

  6. Bromine and bromide content in soils: Analytical approach from total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallardo, Helena; Queralt, Ignasi; Tapias, Josefina; Candela, Lucila; Margui, Eva

    2016-08-01

    Monitoring total bromine and bromide concentrations in soils is significant in many environmental studies. Thus fast analytical methodologies that entail simple sample preparation and low-cost analyses are desired. In the present work, the possibilities and drawbacks of low-power total reflection X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (TXRF) for the determination of total bromine and bromide contents in soils were evaluated. The direct analysis of a solid suspension using 20 mg of fine ground soil (water soil extracts. In this case, the TXRF analysis can be directly performed by depositing 10 μL of the internal standardized soil extract sample on a quartz glass reflector in a measuring time of 1500 s. The bromide limit of detection by this approach was 10 μg L(-1). Good agreement was obtained between the TXRF results for the total bromine and bromide determinations in soils and those obtained by other popular analytical techniques, e.g. energy dispersive X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (total bromine) and ionic chromatography (bromide). As a study case, the TXRF method was applied to study bromine accumulation in two agricultural soils fumigated with a methyl bromide pesticide and irrigated with regenerated waste water. PMID:27179429

  7. Brominated Skeletal Components of the Marine Demosponges, Aplysina cavernicola and Ianthella basta: Analytical and Biochemical Investigations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eike Brunner

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Demosponges possess a skeleton made of a composite material with various organic constituents and/or siliceous spicules. Chitin is an integral part of the skeleton of different sponges of the order Verongida. Moreover, sponges of the order Verongida, such as Aplysina cavernicola or Ianthella basta, are well-known for the biosynthesis of brominated tyrosine derivates, characteristic bioactive natural products. It has been unknown so far whether these compounds are exclusively present in the cellular matrix or whether they may also be incorporated into the chitin-based skeletons. In the present study, we therefore examined the skeletons of A. cavernicola and I. basta with respect to the presence of bromotyrosine metabolites. The chitin-based-skeletons isolated from these sponges indeed contain significant amounts of brominated compounds, which are not easily extractable from the skeletons by common solvents, such as MeOH, as shown by HPLC analyses in combination with NMR and IR spectroscopic measurements. Quantitative potentiometric analyses confirm that the skeleton-associated bromine mainly withstands the MeOH-based extraction. This observation suggests that the respective, but yet unidentified, brominated compounds are strongly bound to the sponge skeletons, possibly by covalent bonding. Moreover, gene fragments of halogenases suggested to be responsible for the incorporation of bromine into organic molecules could be amplified from DNA isolated from sponge samples enriched for sponge-associated bacteria.

  8. Human health risk associated with brominated flame-retardants (BFRs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyche, Jan L; Rosseland, Carola; Berge, Gunnar; Polder, Anuschka

    2015-01-01

    The purposes of this review are to assess the human exposure and human and experimental evidence for adverse effects of brominated flame-retardants (BFRs) with specific focus on intake from seafood. The leakage of BFRs from consumer products leads to exposure of humans from fetal life to adulthood. Fish and fish products contain the highest levels of BFRs and dominate the dietary intake of frequent fish eaters in Europe, while meat, followed by seafood and dairy products accounted for the highest US dietary intake. House dust is also reported as an important source of exposure for children as well as adults. The levels of BFRs in the general North American populations are higher than those in Europe and Japan and the highest levels are detected in infants and toddlers. The daily intake via breast milk exceeds the RfD in 10% of US infants. BFRs including PBDEs, HBCDs and TBBP-A have induced endocrine-, reproductive- and behavior effects in laboratory animals. Furthermore, recent human epidemiological data demonstrated association between exposure to BFRs and similar adverse effects as observed in animal studies. Fish including farmed fish and crude fish oil for human consumption may contain substantial levels of BFRs and infants and toddlers consuming these products on a daily basis may exceed the tolerable daily intake suggesting that fish and fish oil alone represent a risk to human health. This intake comes in addition to exposure from other sources (breast milk, other food, house dust). Because potential harmful concentrations of BFRs and other toxicants occur in fish and fish products, research on a wider range of products is warranted, to assess health hazard related to the contamination of fish and fish products for human consumption. PMID:25454234

  9. Superconductivity in aromatic hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Aromatic superconductor is one of core research subjects in superconductivity. Superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons. Some serious problems to be solved exist for future advancement of the research. This article shows the present status of aromatic superconductors. - Abstract: ‘Aromatic hydrocarbon’ implies an organic molecule that satisfies the (4n + 2) π-electron rule and consists of benzene rings. Doping solid aromatic hydrocarbons with metals provides the superconductivity. The first discovery of such superconductivity was made for K-doped picene (Kxpicene, five benzene rings). Its superconducting transition temperatures (Tc’s) were 7 and 18 K. Recently, we found a new superconducting Kxpicene phase with a Tc as high as 14 K, so we now know that Kxpicene possesses multiple superconducting phases. Besides Kxpicene, we discovered new superconductors such as Rbxpicene and Caxpicene. A most serious problem is that the shielding fraction is ⩽15% for Kxpicene and Rbxpicene, and it is often ∼1% for other superconductors. Such low shielding fractions have made it difficult to determine the crystal structures of superconducting phases. Nevertheless, many research groups have expended a great deal of effort to make high quality hydrocarbon superconductors in the five years since the discovery of hydrocarbon superconductivity. At the present stage, superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons (picene, phenanthrene and dibenzopentacene), but the shielding fraction remains stubbornly low. The highest priority research area is to prepare aromatic superconductors with a high superconducting volume-fraction. Despite these difficulties, aromatic superconductivity is still a core research target and presents interesting and potentially breakthrough challenges, such as the positive pressure dependence of Tc that is clearly observed in some phases of aromatic hydrocarbon superconductors

  10. Determination of bromine contents in blood and hair of workers exposed to methyl by radioactivation analysis method bromide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bromine contained in blood and hair samples obtained from workers exposed to methyl bromide was analyzed by nondestructive activation analysis. The samples were irradiated for 1 min in pneumatic irradiation facility of Kyoto University research reactor with an estimated thermal neutron flux density at 2 x 1013 n.cm-2.sec-1. The irradiation was counted with Ge(Li) detector. The duration of measurement of radionuclide bromine in blood and hair was 200 sec within 2 - 10 min after irradiation. The bromine content of serum sample obtained from a worker suspected of methyl bromide poisoning was found to be 412 μg/g on 13 days apart from exposure to methyl bromide. The biological half-life of bromine in this case was found to be about 16 days. Then bromine contents in serum and hair samples obtained from workers exposed to methyl bromide were found to be 1.7 and 2.6 times higher respectively than those of nonexposed workers. Any correlations of bromine contents were not observed between serum and hair samples obtained from workers exposed to methyl bromide, nor between bromine amount in the serum of workers exposed to methyl bromide and the terms exposed to it, but statistically significant positive correlation was observed between bromine amount in the hair of workers exposed to methyl bromide and the terms exposed to it. (author)

  11. Bromine-77-labeled estrogen receptor-binding radiopharmaceuticals for breast tumor imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two derivatives of 16α-bromoestradiol, both with and without an 11β-methoxy substituent, have been labeled with bromine-77 and evaluated as potential breast tumor imaging agents. Extensive characterization of these radiotracers in animal models has demonstrated their effective concentration in estrogen target tissues. Preliminary clinical studies have demonstrated the potential of radiolabeled estrogens for breast tumor imaging; however, the suboptimal decay properties of bromine-77 limit the utility of these agents in imaging studies. These results with 77-Br-labeled estrogens suggest that estrogen derivatives labeled with other radionuclides should provide enhanced image resolution with various imaging devices. Although the decay characteristics of bromine-77 are such that it is not ideally suited to imaging with conventional gamma cameras, it may be a useful radionuclide for therapeutic applications

  12. Determination by neutron activation analysis of loss of arsenic, antimony, bromine and mercury during lyophilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neutron activation analysis has been used to monitor the loss of arsenic, as dimethylarsinic acid, (CH3)2AsOOH, or as sodium arsenate (Na2HAsO4.7H2O), antimony (as potassium antimony, tartrate, KSbC4O7.1/2H2O) and bromine (as bromide ion) during lyophilization of acidified and neutral aqueous synthetic and environmental samples. Losses of Sb and As ranged from zero to 60%, while losses of bromine were constant (at 91%) in acidic solutions. The variable losses of As and Sb were due solely to the presence of and partial decomposition of the (CH3)2AsOOH. Electrochemical oxidation of Br- to Br2 is responsible for the high losses of bromine. In addition losses of mercury (as methylmercuric chloride) were 1O0% in both acidic and neutral aqueous synthetic samples during lyophilization. (author)

  13. Regional variation and possible sources of brominated contaminants in breast milk from Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study focuses on the regional trends and possible sources of brominated organic contaminants accumulated in breast milk from mothers in southeastern (Okinawa) and northwestern (Hokkaido) areas of Japan. For persistent brominated flame retardants, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs; major components, BDE-47 and BDE-153) were distributed at higher levels in mothers from Okinawa (mean, 2.1 ng/g lipid), while hexabromobenzene (HeBB) and its metabolite 1,2,4,5-tetrabromobenzene were more abundantly detected in mothers from Hokkaido (0.86 and 2.6 ng/g lipid), suggesting that there are regional differences in their exposure in Japan. We also detected naturally produced brominated compounds, one of which was identified as 2′-methoxy-2,3′,4,5′-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (2′-MeO-BDE68) at higher levels in mothers from Okinawa (0.39 ng/g lipid), while the other was identified as 3,3′,4,4′-tetrabromo-5,5′-dichloro-2,2′-dimethyl-1,1′-bipyrrole in mothers from Hokkaido (0.45 ng/g lipid). The regional variation may be caused by source differences, i.e. southern seafood for MeO-PBDEs and northern biota for halogenated bipyrroles in the Japanese coastal water. - Highlights: ► In this study, we detected brominated organic contaminants in Japanese breast milk. ► Naturally produced brominated organic contaminants were also detected. ► Northern and southern Japan showed regional differences in these contaminants. ► Exposure to the contaminants is suggested to arise from different specific sources. - Brominated organic contaminants were detected in Japanese breast milk.

  14. HYDROCARBONS DIAGNOSTIC OF POLLUTED SOILS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Arad

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Petroleum hydrocarbons are known as carcinogenic and may contaminate the environment (water, air and soil. In this study, a diagnostic of polluted soils by petroleum hydrocarbons is carried out in order to know the effect of their accumulation as well as their behavior in time. The aging factor, a source of significant changing in hydrocarbon behavior, is integrated on two sites of an industrial refinery as experimental samples. The first site is recently polluted by hydrocarbons while the second is a previously polluted site.The results indicate that the concentration of hydrocarbons on the surface of the first site is greater and remains stable in time, as for the second site, hydrocarbons concentration on the surface is also important and undergoes a weak reduction. At a depth of one meter hydrocarbons exist at a greater concentration. This shows that obstinate hydrocarbons are an environmental danger for fauna and flora.

  15. Dichlorinated and Brominated Rugulovasines, Ergot Alkaloids Produced by Talaromyces wortmannii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Soman De Medeiros, Lívia; da Silva, José Vinícius; Abreu, Lucas Magalhães;

    2015-01-01

    . Brominated rugulovasines were also detected when the microbial incubation medium was supplemented with bromine sources. Studies from 1D/2D NMR and HRMS spectroscopy data allowed the structural elucidation of the dichlorinated compounds, while tandem MS/HRMS data analysis supported the rationalization of......UHPLC-DAD-HRMS based dereplication guided the detection of new halogenated alkaloids co-produced by Talaromyces wortmannii. From the fungal growth in large scale, the epimers 2,8-dichlororugulovasines A and B were purified and further identified by means of a HPLC-SPE/NMR hyphenated system...

  16. Photochemical bromination of substituted indan-1-one derivatives: synthesis of new polybromoindan-1-one derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    KUŞ, Nermin Şimşek

    2009-01-01

    The photobromination of substituted indan derivatives was studied. Four products, 2,3-dibromo-inden-1-one (5), trans-2,3-dibromoindan-1-one (6), 2,2-dibromoindan-1,3-dione (7) and 2,2-dibromoindan-1-one (8), were obtained by the bromination of indan-1-one (4). The bromination of 2-methyl indanone (9) and 3-methyl-indanone (13) gave the corresponding monobromo, dibromo, and tribromo compounds in high yield. 4-Nitro indan (16) was tribrominated under same condition reaction. The stru...

  17. Effect of Brominated Furanones on the Formation of Biofilm by Escherichia coli on Polyvinyl Chloride Materials

    OpenAIRE

    Lianhua, Ye; Yunchao, Huang; Geng, Xu; Youquang, Zhou; Guangqiang, Zhao; Yujie, Lei

    2013-01-01

    To study the influence of brominated furanones on the biofilm (BF) formation by Escherichia coli (E. coli) on polyvinyl chloride (PVC) material, and to provide new ways of surface modification of materials to clinically prevent biomaterial centered infection. Three brominated furanones, dissolved in ethanol, furanone-1(3,4-dibromo-5-hydroxyl-furanone), furanone-2(4-bromo-5-(4-methoxypheny)-3-(methylamino)-furanone), and furanone-3(3,4-dibromo-5,5-dimethoxypheny-2(5H)-furanone) with representa...

  18. Selecting hydrocarbon rocket propulsion technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, J. A.

    1986-01-01

    Past studies have shown that the dry weight of future earth-to-orbit vehicles can be reduced by the combined use of hydrogen and hydrocarbon propulsion compared to all-hydrogen propulsion. This paper shows that the use of certain hydrocarbon engines with hydrogen engines produces the lowest vehicle dry mass. These hydrocarbon engines use propane or RP-1 fuel, hydrogen cooling, and hydrogen-rich gas generators. Integration of the hydrogen and hydrocarbon nozzles is also beneficial.

  19. HYDROCARBONS DIAGNOSTIC OF POLLUTED SOILS

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Arad; Abdelkader Anouzla; Mohamed Safi; Salah Souabi; Hicham Rhbal

    2010-01-01

    Petroleum hydrocarbons are known as carcinogenic and may contaminate the environment (water, air and soil). In this study, a diagnostic of polluted soils by petroleum hydrocarbons is carried out in order to know the effect of their accumulation as well as their behavior in time. The aging factor, a source of significant changing in hydrocarbon behavior, is integrated on two sites of an industrial refinery as experimental samples. The first site is recently polluted by hydrocarbons while the s...

  20. Optrode for sensing hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Holly; Milanovich, Fred P.; Hirschfeld, Tomas B.; Miller, Fred S.

    1987-01-01

    A two-phase system employing the Fujiwara reaction is provided for the fluorometric detection of halogenated hydrocarbons. A fiber optic is utilized to illuminate a column of pyridine trapped in a capillary tube coaxially attached at one end to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A strongly alkaline condition necessary for the reaction is maintained by providing a reservoir of alkali in contact with the column of pyridine, the surface of contact being adjacent to the illuminating end of the fiber optic. A semipermeable membrane caps the other end of the capillary tube, the membrane being preferentially permeable to the halogenated hydrocarbon and but preferentially impermeable to water and pyridine. As the halogenated hydrocarbon diffuses through the membrane and into the column of pyridine, fluorescent reaction products are formed. Light propagated by the fiber optic from a light source, excites the fluorescent products. Light from the fluorescence emission is also collected by the same fiber optic and transmitted to a detector. The intensity of the fluorescence gives a measure of the concentration of the halogenated hydrocarbons.

  1. Method and apparatus for pyrolytically cracking hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skraba, F.W.

    1992-06-09

    This patent describes a method for pyrolytically cracking a hydrocarbon vapor feedstock in a hydrocarbon pyrolysis unit to produce an olefinic hydrocarbon product. It comprises contacting a hydrocarbon vapor feedstock, then, cracking the hydrocarbon vapor feedstock in the presence of the vaporized water in a pyrolysis furnace to produce a furnace effluent stream comprised of an olefinic hydrocarbon product gas and the vaporized water.

  2. Apparatus and methods for hydrocarbon extraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bohnert, George W.; Verhulst, Galen G.

    2016-04-26

    Systems and methods for hydrocarbon extraction from hydrocarbon-containing material. Such systems and methods relate to extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material employing a non-aqueous extractant. Additionally, such systems and methods relate to recovering and reusing non-aqueous extractant employed for extracting hydrocarbon from hydrocarbon-containing material.

  3. Superconductivity in aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubozono, Yoshihiro, E-mail: kubozono@cc.okayama-u.ac.jp [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, ACT-C, Kawaguchi 332-0012 (Japan); Goto, Hidenori; Jabuchi, Taihei [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Yokoya, Takayoshi [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Research Center of New Functional Materials for Energy Production, Storage and Transport, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Kambe, Takashi [Department of Physics, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakai, Yusuke; Izumi, Masanari; Zheng, Lu; Hamao, Shino; Nguyen, Huyen L.T. [Research Laboratory for Surface Science, Okayama University, Okayama 700-8530 (Japan); Sakata, Masafumi; Kagayama, Tomoko; Shimizu, Katsuya [Center of Science and Technology under Extreme Conditions, Osaka University, Osaka 560-8531 (Japan)

    2015-07-15

    Highlights: • Aromatic superconductor is one of core research subjects in superconductivity. Superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons. Some serious problems to be solved exist for future advancement of the research. This article shows the present status of aromatic superconductors. - Abstract: ‘Aromatic hydrocarbon’ implies an organic molecule that satisfies the (4n + 2) π-electron rule and consists of benzene rings. Doping solid aromatic hydrocarbons with metals provides the superconductivity. The first discovery of such superconductivity was made for K-doped picene (K{sub x}picene, five benzene rings). Its superconducting transition temperatures (T{sub c}’s) were 7 and 18 K. Recently, we found a new superconducting K{sub x}picene phase with a T{sub c} as high as 14 K, so we now know that K{sub x}picene possesses multiple superconducting phases. Besides K{sub x}picene, we discovered new superconductors such as Rb{sub x}picene and Ca{sub x}picene. A most serious problem is that the shielding fraction is ⩽15% for K{sub x}picene and Rb{sub x}picene, and it is often ∼1% for other superconductors. Such low shielding fractions have made it difficult to determine the crystal structures of superconducting phases. Nevertheless, many research groups have expended a great deal of effort to make high quality hydrocarbon superconductors in the five years since the discovery of hydrocarbon superconductivity. At the present stage, superconductivity is observed in certain metal-doped aromatic hydrocarbons (picene, phenanthrene and dibenzopentacene), but the shielding fraction remains stubbornly low. The highest priority research area is to prepare aromatic superconductors with a high superconducting volume-fraction. Despite these difficulties, aromatic superconductivity is still a core research target and presents interesting and potentially breakthrough challenges, such as the positive pressure dependence of T{sub c} that is clearly

  4. Regioselective chlorination and bromination of unprotected anilines under mild conditions using copper halides in ionic liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Han Wang; Kun Wen; Nurbiya Nurahmat; Yan Shao; He Zhang; Chao Wei; Ya Li; Yongjia Shen; Zhihua Sun

    2012-01-01

    By using ionic liquids as solvents, the chlorination or bromination of unprotected anilines at the para-position can be achieved in high yields with copper halides under mild conditions, without the need for potentially hazardous operations such as supplementing oxygen or gaseous HCl.

  5. Regioselective chlorination and bromination of unprotected anilines under mild conditions using copper halides in ionic liquids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Han Wang

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available By using ionic liquids as solvents, the chlorination or bromination of unprotected anilines at the para-position can be achieved in high yields with copper halides under mild conditions, without the need for potentially hazardous operations such as supplementing oxygen or gaseous HCl.

  6. Performance and Degradation of A Lithium-Bromine Rechargeable Fuel Cell Using Highly Concentrated Catholytes

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Lithium-air batteries have been considered as ultimate solutions for the power source of long-range electrified transportation, but state-of-the-art prototypes still suffer from short cycle life, low efficiency and poor power output. Here, a lithium-bromine rechargeable fuel cell using highly concentrated bromine catholytes is demonstrated with comparable specific energy, improved power density, and higher efficiency. The cell is similar in structure to a hybrid-electrolyte Li-air battery, where a lithium metal anode in nonaqueous electrolyte is separated from aqueous bromine catholytes by a lithium-ion conducting ceramic plate. The cell with a flat graphite electrode can discharge at a peak power density around 9mW cm-2 and in principle could provide a specific energy of 791.8 Wh kg-1, superior to most existing cathode materials and catholytes. It can also run in regenerative mode to recover the lithium metal anode and free bromine with 80-90% voltage efficiency, without any catalysts. Degradation of the sol...

  7. On the bromination of the dihydroazulene/vinylheptafulvene photo-/thermoswitch

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mazzanti, Virginia; Cacciarini, Martina; Broman, Søren Lindbæk;

    2012-01-01

    Background: The dihydroazulene (DHA)/vinylheptafulvene (VHF) system (with two cyano groups at C1) functions as a photo-/thermoswitch. Direct ionic bromination of DHA has previously furnished a regioselective route to a 7,8-dibromide, which by elimination was converted to a 7-bromo-substituted DHA...

  8. Photothermally induced bromination of carbon/polymer bipolar plate materials for fuel cell applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schade, Martin; Franzka, Steffen; Cappuccio, Franco; Peinecke, Volker; Heinzel, Angelika; Hartmann, Nils

    2015-05-01

    A facile photothermal procedure for direct functionalization of carbon/polymer bipolar plate materials is demonstrated. Through irradiation with a microfocused beam of an Ar+-laser at λ = 514 nm in gaseous bromine and distinct laser powers and pulse lengths local bromination of the carbon/polymer material takes place. At a 1/e spot diameter of 2.1 μm, functionalized surface areas with diameters down to 5 μm are fabricated. In complementary experiments large-area bromination is investigated using an ordinary tungsten lamp. For characterization contact angle goniometry, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and electron microscopy in conjunction with labeling techniques are employed. After irradiation bromine groups can easily be substituted by other chemical functionalities, e.g. azide and amine groups. This provides a facile approach in order to fabricate surface patterns and gradient structures with varying wetting characteristics. Mechanistic aspects and prospects of photothermal routines in micropatterning of carbon/polymer materials are discussed.

  9. Bromine-82 Labelling of Human Serum Albumin, Insulin and Fibrinogen by Electrochemical Means

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors describe results obtained with a method using bromine-82 to label human serum albumin, fibrinogen and insulin, three organic substances of special importance in diagnostics and biological research. The method involves electrolytic bromination in an aqueous solution; this is performed in an electrolysis cell, whose anodic zone containing the substance to be labelled is partitioned from the cathodic zone by a dialysis membrane. For each of the three substances mentioned, the degree of bromination produced by a direct current (200, 200, 300 x 10-6 Å) was studied as a function of anode potential in 10-3 and 10-4 M solutions of NH4Br, the amount of bromine-labelled substance formed being checked by radio electrophoresis for various anodic potential values differing from each other by 50 mV. By immuno- electrophoresis it was ascertained that denaturation of albumin and fibrinogen only starts at anodic potential values for which the degree of labelling is already very high as compared with that yielded by chemical methods of labelling. The method here described has the advantage of rapid execution and is well suited to remote handling in a shielded zone. (author)

  10. Microbial degradation of the brominated flame retardant TBNPA by groundwater bacteria: laboratory and field study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaban, Noa; Bernstein, Anat; Gelman, Faina; Ronen, Zeev

    2016-08-01

    In the present study, the biodegradation of the brominated flame retardant tribromoneopentylalcohol (TBNPA) by a groundwater enrichment culture was investigated using a dual carbon ((13)C/(12)C)- bromine ((81)Br/(79)Br) stable isotope analysis. An indigenous aerobic bacterial consortium was enriched from the polluted groundwater underlying an industrial site in the northern Negev Desert, Israel, where TBNPA is an abundant pollutant. Aerobic biodegradation was shown to be rapid, with complete debromination within a few days, whereas anaerobic biodegradation was not observed. Biodegradation under aerobic conditions was accompanied by a significant carbon isotope effect with an isotopic enrichment factor of ɛCbulk = -8.8‰ ± 1.5‰, without any detectable bromine isotope fractionation. It was found that molecular oxygen is necessary for biodegradation to occur, suggesting an initial oxidative step. Based on these results, it was proposed that H abstraction from the C-H bond is the first step of TBNPA biodegradation under aerobic conditions, and that the C-H bond cleavage results in the formation of unstable intermediates, which are rapidly debrominated. A preliminary isotopic analysis of TBNPA in the groundwater underlying the industrial area revealed that there are no changes in the carbon and bromine isotope ratio values downstream of the contamination source. Considering that anoxic conditions prevail in the groundwater of the contaminated site, the lack of isotope shifts in TBNPA indicates the lack of TBNPA biodegradation in the groundwater, in accordance with our findings. PMID:27183339

  11. Electron stimulated desorption of anions from native and brominated single stranded oligonucleotide trimers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polska, Katarzyna; Rak, Janusz [Department of Chemistry, University of Gdansk, Sobieskiego 18, 80-952 Gdansk (Poland); Bass, Andrew D.; Cloutier, Pierre; Sanche, Leon [Research Group in the Radiation Sciences, Faculty of Medicine, Universite de Sherbrooke, Sherbrooke, Quebec J1H 5N4 (Canada)

    2012-02-21

    We measured the low energy electron stimulated desorption (ESD) of anions from thin films of native (TXT) and bromine monosubstituted (TBrXT) oligonucleotide trimers deposited on a gold surface (T = thymidine, X = T, deoxycytidine (C), deoxyadenosine (A) or deoxyguanosine (G), Br = bromine). The desorption of H{sup -}, CH{sub 3}{sup -}/NH{sup -}, O{sup -}/NH{sub 2}{sup -}, OH{sup -}, CN{sup -}, and Br{sup -} was induced by 0 to 20 eV electrons. Dissociative electron attachment, below 12 eV, and dipolar dissociation, above 12 eV, are responsible for the formation of these anions. The comparison of the results obtained for the native and brominated trimers suggests that the main pathways of TBrXT degradation correspond to the release of the hydride and bromide anions. Significantly, the presence of bromine in oligonucleotide trimers blocks the electron-induced degradation of nuclobases as evidenced by a dramatic decrease in CN{sup -} desorption. An increase in the yields of OH{sup -} is also observed. The debromination yield of particular oligonucleotides diminishes in the following order: BrdU > BrdA > BrdG > BrdC. Based on these results, 5-bromo-2{sup '}-deoxyuridine appears to be the best radiosensitizer among the studied bromonucleosides.

  12. Assessment of the zinc-bromine battery for utility load leveling. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Will, F. G.; Iacovangelo, C. D.; Jackowski, J. S.; Secor, F. W.

    1978-03-15

    The technical and economic prospects of zinc-bromine batteries employing Nafion/sup R*/ fluorinated ion exchange membranes was evaluated. The applicability and performance limits of a variety of materials and concepts were explored, noval all-carbon electrode structures developed and tested in cells of up to 36 w-hr size, and a system design and cost analysis was performed.

  13. Biodegradation of brominated aromatics by cultures and laccase of Trametes versicolor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Uhnáková, Bronislava; Petříčková, Alena; Biedermann, David; Homolka, Ladislav; Vejvoda, Vojtěch; Bednář, P.; Papoušková, B.; Šulc, Miroslav; Martínková, Ludmila

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 76, č. 6 (2009), s. 826-832. ISSN 0045-6535 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 2B06151 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50200510 Keywords : Brominated phenols * Tetrabromobisphenol A * Laccase Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.253, year: 2009

  14. Thermoelectric properties of bromine filled CoSb3 skutterudite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, Brenden R.; Crawford, Caitlin M.; McKinney, Robert W.; Parilla, Philip A.; Toberer, Eric S.

    2016-01-01

    Historically, the improved thermoelectric performance of skutterudite compounds has largely been driven by the incorporation of electropositive donors on interstitial sites. These 'rattlers' serve to optimize both electronic and thermal properties by tuning the carrier concentration and scattering phonons. In this work, we show that interstitial bromine can be incorporated into CoSb3 and assess the impact on electronic and thermal transport. In contrast to prior high pressure syntheses with iodine, interstitial bromine incorporation is achieved at ambient pressure. Transport properties are stable up to at least 375 degrees C. Bromine serves as an electronegative acceptor and can induce degenerate (>5 x 1019 cm-3) hole densities. In contrast to other p-type skutterudite compositions, bromine preserves the intrinsically high hole mobility of CoSb3 while significantly reducing the lattice thermal conductivity. The development of a stable p-type dopant for the interstitial filler site enables the development of skutterudites with both donor and acceptor interstitials to maximize phonon scattering while maintaining the high mobility of CoSb3.

  15. XAS AND XPS CHARACTERIZATION OF MERCURY BINDING ON BROMINATED ACTIVATED CARBON

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brominated powdered activated carbon sorbents have been shown to e quite effective for mercury capture when injected into the flue gas duct at coal-fired power plants and are especially useful when buring Western low-chlorine subbituminous coals. X-ray absorption spectroscopy (X...

  16. Ullmann-type coupling of brominated tetrathienoanthracene on copper and silver

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Gutzler, R.; Cardenas, L.; Lipton-Duffin, J.; El Garah, M.; Dinca, L.E.; Szakacs, C.E.; Fu, Ch.; Gallagher, M.; Vondráček, Martin; Rybachuk, M.; Perepichka, D.F.; Rosei, F.

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 5 (2014), 2660-2668. ISSN 2040-3364 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LM2011029 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : Ullmann reaction * brominated tetrathienoanthracene * high resolution photoemission * STM Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism Impact factor: 7.394, year: 2014

  17. Surface characteristics of photoaligned polyimide film interfacial reacted with bromine or ethanethiol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The surface characteristics of polyimide films containing cinnamate groups which promote the uniform alignment in adjacent liquid crystal (LC) upon photodimerization by linearly polarized ultraviolet (LPUV) lights were studied [M. Schadt, K. Schmitt, V. Koznikov, V. Chignirov, Jpn. J. Appl. Phys. 31 (1992) 2155. ]. But photoalignment methods have an image sticking problem by un-reacted photosensitive functional groups, which can be a severe defect to achieve high reliability of liquid crystal display (LCD) panels. So the un-reacted photosensitive functional groups were deactivated using bromine or ethanethiol. Bromine and ethanethiol lead to the formation of carbon-bromine or carbon-sulfur bonds from carbon-carbon double bonds. The interfacial reaction of bromine or ethanethiol on the polyimide surface has been studied using in situ X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The change of surface tension was observed by using a contact angle analyzer. The photoelastic modulator (PEM) was used to analyze the optical anisotropy on the polyimide surface. Also, the atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used to observe the morphology of polyimide surface [K. Rajesh, M.K. Ram, S.C. Jain, S.B. Samanta, A.V. Narliker, Thin Solid Films 325 (1998) 251.

  18. METABOLISM OF BROMINATED FLAME RETARDANTS IN HUMAN ASTROCYTES AND EFFECTS ON THYROID HORMONE HOMEOSTASIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this proposed study, hydroxylated PBDEs and brominated phenols likely will be formed in astrocytes as a result of cytochrome p450-mediated metabolism. Previous studies have shown that polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) affect the regulation of thyroid hormones at the bloo...

  19. Bromine release from blowing snow and its impact on tropospheric chemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffiths, Paul; Yang, Xin; Abraham, N. Luke; Archibald, Alexander; Pyle, John

    2016-04-01

    In the last two decades, significant depletion of boundary layer ozone (ozone depletion events, ODEs) has been observed in both Arctic and Antarctic spring. ODEs are attributed to catalytic destruction by bromine radicals (Br plus BrO), especially during bromine explosion events (BEs), when high concentrations of BrO periodically occur. The source of bromine and the mechanism that sustains the high BrO levels are still the subject of study. Recent work by Pratt et al. (2013) posits Br2 production within saline snow and sea ice which leads to sudden ODEs. Previously, Yang et al. (2008) suggested snow could provide a source of (depleted) sea-salt aerosol if wicked from the surface of ice. They suggest that rapid depletion of bromide from the aerosol will constitute a source of photochemical Bry. Given the large sea ice extent in polar regions, this may constitute a significant source of sea salt and bromine in the polar lower atmosphere. While bromine release from blowing snow is perhaps less likely to trigger sudden ODEs, it may make a contribution to regional scale processes affecting ozone levels. Currently, the model parameterisations of Yang et al. assumes that rapid release of bromine occurs from fresh snow on sea ice during periods of strong wind. The parameterisation depends on an assumed sea-salt aerosol distribution generated via sublimation of the snow above the boundary layer, as well as taking into account the salinity of the snow. In this work, we draw on recent measurements by scientists from the British Antarctic Survey during a cruise aboard the Polarstern in the southern oceans. This has provided an extensive set of measurements of the chemical and physical characteristics of blowing snow over sea ice, and of the aerosol associated with it. Based on the observations, we have developed an improved parameterisation of the release of bromine from blowing snow. The paper presents results from the simulation performed using the United Kingdom Chemistry

  20. Membrane separation of hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Y. Alice; Kulkarni, Sudhir S.; Funk, Edward W.

    1986-01-01

    Mixtures of heavy oils and light hydrocarbons may be separated by passing the mixture through a polymeric membrane. The membrane which is utilized to effect the separation comprises a polymer which is capable of maintaining its integrity in the presence of hydrocarbon compounds and which has been modified by being subjected to the action of a sulfonating agent. Sulfonating agents which may be employed will include fuming sulfuric acid, chlorosulfonic acid, sulfur trioxide, etc., the surface or bulk modified polymer will contain a degree of sulfonation ranging from about 15 to about 50%. The separation process is effected at temperatures ranging from about ambient to about 100.degree. C. and pressures ranging from about 50 to about 1000 psig.

  1. Direct hydrocarbon fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnett, Scott A.; Lai, Tammy; Liu, Jiang

    2010-05-04

    The direct electrochemical oxidation of hydrocarbons in solid oxide fuel cells, to generate greater power densities at lower temperatures without carbon deposition. The performance obtained is comparable to that of fuel cells used for hydrogen, and is achieved by using novel anode composites at low operating temperatures. Such solid oxide fuel cells, regardless of fuel source or operation, can be configured advantageously using the structural geometries of this invention.

  2. Biogeochemistry of Halogenated Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adriaens, P.; Gruden, C.; McCormick, M. L.

    2003-12-01

    Halogenated hydrocarbons originate from both natural and industrial sources. Whereas direct anthropogenic emissions to the atmosphere and biosphere are often easy to assess, particularly when they are tied to major industrial activities, the attribution of emissions to other human activities (e.g., biomass burning), diffuse sources (e.g., atmospheric discharge, run off), and natural production (e.g., soils, fungi, algae, microorganisms) are difficult to quantify. The widespread occurrence of both alkyl and aryl halides in groundwater, surface water, soils, and various trophic food chains, even those not affected by known point sources, suggests a substantial biogeochemical cycling of these compounds (Wania and Mackay, 1996; Adriaens et al., 1999; Gruden et al., 2003). The transport and reactive fate mechanisms controlling their reactivity are compounded by the differences in sources of alkyl-, aryl-, and complex organic halides, and the largely unknown impact of biogenic processes, such as enzymatically mediated halogenation of organic matter, fungal production of halogenated hydrocarbons, and microbial or abiotic transformation reactions (e.g., Asplund and Grimvall, 1991; Gribble, 1996; Watling and Harper, 1998; Oberg, 2002). The largest source may be the natural halogenation processes in the terrestrial environment, as the quantities detected often exceed the amount that can be explained by human activities in the surrounding areas ( Oberg, 1998). Since biogeochemical processes result in the distribution of a wide range of halogenated hydrocarbon profiles, altered chemical structures, and isomer distributions in natural systems, source apportionment (or environmental forensics) can often only be resolved using multivariate statistical methods (e.g., Goovaerts, 1998; Barabas et al., 2003; Murphy and Morrison, 2002).This chapter will describe the widespread occurrence of halogenated hydrocarbons, interpret their distribution and biogeochemical cycling in light of

  3. Monitoring of WEEE plastics in regards to brominated flame retardants using handheld XRF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Specification of an empirical factor for conversion from bromine to PBB and PBDE. • The handheld XRF device was validated for this particular application. • A very large number of over 4600 pieces of monitor housings was analysed. • The recyclable fraction mounts up to 85% for TV but only 53% of PC waste plastics. • A high percentage of pieces with bromine contents of over 50,000 ppm was obtained. - Abstract: This contribution is focused on the on-site determination of the bromine content in waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), in particular waste plastics from television sets (TV) and personal computer monitors (PC) using a handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) device. The described approach allows the examination of samples in regards to the compliance with legal specifications for polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) directly after disassembling and facilitates the sorting out of plastics with high contents of brominated flame retardants (BFRs). In all, over 3000 pieces of black (TV) and 1600 pieces of grey (PC) plastic waste were analysed with handheld XRF technique for this study. Especially noticeable was the high percentage of pieces with a bromine content of over 50,000 ppm for TV (7%) and PC (39%) waste plastics. The applied method was validated by comparing the data of handheld XRF with results obtained by GC–MS. The results showed the expected and sufficiently accurate correlation between these two methods. It is shown that handheld XRF technique is an effective tool for fast monitoring of large volumes of WEEE plastics in regards to BFRs for on-site measurements

  4. Monitoring of WEEE plastics in regards to brominated flame retardants using handheld XRF

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aldrian, Alexia, E-mail: alexia.aldrian@unileoben.ac.at [Chair of Waste Processing Technology and Waste Management, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Ledersteger, Alfred, E-mail: a.ledersteger@saubermacher.at [Saubermacher Dienstleistungs AG, Hans-Roth-Straße 1, 8073 Feldkirchen bei Graz (Austria); Pomberger, Roland, E-mail: roland.pomberger@unileoben.ac.at [Chair of Waste Processing Technology and Waste Management, Montanuniversitaet Leoben, Franz-Josef-Straße 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria)

    2015-02-15

    Highlights: • Specification of an empirical factor for conversion from bromine to PBB and PBDE. • The handheld XRF device was validated for this particular application. • A very large number of over 4600 pieces of monitor housings was analysed. • The recyclable fraction mounts up to 85% for TV but only 53% of PC waste plastics. • A high percentage of pieces with bromine contents of over 50,000 ppm was obtained. - Abstract: This contribution is focused on the on-site determination of the bromine content in waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), in particular waste plastics from television sets (TV) and personal computer monitors (PC) using a handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) device. The described approach allows the examination of samples in regards to the compliance with legal specifications for polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) directly after disassembling and facilitates the sorting out of plastics with high contents of brominated flame retardants (BFRs). In all, over 3000 pieces of black (TV) and 1600 pieces of grey (PC) plastic waste were analysed with handheld XRF technique for this study. Especially noticeable was the high percentage of pieces with a bromine content of over 50,000 ppm for TV (7%) and PC (39%) waste plastics. The applied method was validated by comparing the data of handheld XRF with results obtained by GC–MS. The results showed the expected and sufficiently accurate correlation between these two methods. It is shown that handheld XRF technique is an effective tool for fast monitoring of large volumes of WEEE plastics in regards to BFRs for on-site measurements.

  5. Interactions of bromine, chlorine, and iodine photochemistry during ozone depletions in Barrow, Alaska

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. R. Thompson

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The springtime depletion of tropospheric ozone in the Arctic is known to be caused by active halogen photochemistry resulting from halogen atom precursors emitted from snow, ice, or aerosol surfaces. The role of bromine in driving ozone depletion events (ODEs has been generally accepted, but much less is known about the role of chlorine radicals in ozone depletion chemistry. While the potential impact of iodine in the High Arctic is more uncertain, there have been indications of active iodine chemistry through observed enhancements in filterable iodide, probable detection of tropospheric IO, and recently, detection of atmospheric I2. Despite decades of research, significant uncertainty remains regarding the chemical mechanisms associated with the bromine-catalyzed depletion of ozone, as well as the complex interactions that occur in the polar boundary layer due to halogen chemistry. To investigate this, we developed a zero-dimensional photochemical model, constrained with measurements from the 2009 OASIS field campaign in Barrow, Alaska. We simulated a 7 day period during late March that included a full ozone depletion event lasting 3 days and subsequent ozone recovery to study the interactions of halogen radicals under these different conditions. In addition, the effects of iodine added to our base model were investigated. While bromine atoms were primarily responsible for ODEs, chlorine and iodine were found to enhance the depletion rates and iodine was found to be more efficient per atom at depleting ozone than Br. The interaction between chlorine and bromine is complex, as the presence of chlorine can increase the recycling and production of Br atoms, while also increasing reactive bromine sinks under certain conditions. Chlorine chemistry was also found to have significant impacts on both HO2 and RO2. The results of this work highlight the need for future studies on the production mechanisms of Br2 and Cl2, as well as on the potential

  6. Interactions of bromine, chlorine, and iodine photochemistry during ozone depletions in Barrow, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, C. R.; Shepson, P. B.; Liao, J.; Huey, L. G.; Apel, E. C.; Cantrell, C. A.; Flocke, F.; Orlando, J.; Fried, A.; Hall, S. R.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Knapp, D. J.; Mauldin, R. L., III; Montzka, D. D.; Sive, B. C.; Ullmann, K.; Weibring, P.; Weinheimer, A.

    2015-08-01

    The springtime depletion of tropospheric ozone in the Arctic is known to be caused by active halogen photochemistry resulting from halogen atom precursors emitted from snow, ice, or aerosol surfaces. The role of bromine in driving ozone depletion events (ODEs) has been generally accepted, but much less is known about the role of chlorine radicals in ozone depletion chemistry. While the potential impact of iodine in the High Arctic is more uncertain, there have been indications of active iodine chemistry through observed enhancements in filterable iodide, probable detection of tropospheric IO, and recently, observation of snowpack photochemical production of I2. Despite decades of research, significant uncertainty remains regarding the chemical mechanisms associated with the bromine-catalyzed depletion of ozone, as well as the complex interactions that occur in the polar boundary layer due to halogen chemistry. To investigate this, we developed a zero-dimensional photochemical model, constrained with measurements from the 2009 OASIS field campaign in Barrow, Alaska. We simulated a 7-day period during late March that included a full ozone depletion event lasting 3 days and subsequent ozone recovery to study the interactions of halogen radicals under these different conditions. In addition, the effects of iodine added to our Base Model were investigated. While bromine atoms were primarily responsible for ODEs, chlorine and iodine were found to enhance the depletion rates and iodine was found to be more efficient per atom at depleting ozone than Br. The interaction between chlorine and bromine is complex, as the presence of chlorine can increase the recycling and production of Br atoms, while also increasing reactive bromine sinks under certain conditions. Chlorine chemistry was also found to have significant impacts on both HO2 and RO2, with organic compounds serving as the primary reaction partner for Cl atoms. The results of this work highlight the need for future

  7. A case study of a transported bromine explosion event in the Canadian high arctic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, X.; Strong, K.; Adams, C.; Schofield, R.; Yang, X.; Richter, A.; Friess, U.; Blechschmidt, A.-M.; Koo, J.-H.

    2016-01-01

    Ozone depletion events in the polar troposphere have been linked to extremely high concentrations of bromine, known as bromine explosion events (BEE). However, the optimum meteorological conditions for the occurrence of these events remain uncertain. On 4-5 April 2011, a combination of both blowing snow and a stable shallow boundary layer was observed during a BEE at Eureka, Canada (86.4°W, 80.1°N). Measurements made by a Multi-Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy spectrometer were used to retrieve BrO profiles and partial columns. During this event, the near-surface BrO volume mixing ratio increased to ~20 parts per trillion by volume, while ozone was depleted to ~1 ppbv from the surface to 700 m. Back trajectories and Global Ozone Monitoring Experiment-2 satellite tropospheric BrO columns confirmed that this event originated from a bromine explosion over the Beaufort Sea. From 30 to 31 March, meteorological data showed high wind speeds (24 m/s) and elevated boundary layer heights (~800 m) over the Beaufort Sea. Long-distance transportation (~1800 km over 5 days) to Eureka indicated strong recycling of BrO within the bromine plume. This event was generally captured by a global chemistry-climate model when a sea-salt bromine source from blowing snow was included. A model sensitivity study indicated that the surface BrO at Eureka was controlled by both local photochemistry and boundary layer dynamics. Comparison of the model results with both ground-based and satellite measurements confirmed that the BEE observed at Eureka was triggered by transport of enhanced BrO from the Beaufort Sea followed by local production/recycling under stable atmospheric shallow boundary layer conditions.

  8. Global atmospheric model for mercury including oxidation by bromine atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. D. Holmes

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Global models of atmospheric mercury generally assume that gas-phase OH and ozone are the main oxidants converting Hg0 to HgII and thus driving mercury deposition to ecosystems. However, thermodynamic considerations argue against the importance of these reactions. We demonstrate here the viability of atomic bromine (Br as an alternative Hg0 oxidant. We conduct a global 3-D simulation with the GEOS-Chem model assuming gas-phase Br to be the sole Hg0 oxidant (Hg + Br model and compare to the previous version of the model with OH and ozone as the sole oxidants (Hg + OH/O3 model. We specify global 3-D Br concentration fields based on our best understanding of tropospheric and stratospheric Br chemistry. In both the Hg + Br and Hg + OH/O3 models, we add an aqueous photochemical reduction of HgII in cloud to impose a tropospheric lifetime for mercury of 6.5 months against deposition, as needed to reconcile observed total gaseous mercury (TGM concentrations with current estimates of anthropogenic emissions. This added reduction would not be necessary in the Hg + Br model if we adjusted the Br oxidation kinetics downward within their range of uncertainty. We find that the Hg + Br and Hg + OH/O3 models are equally capable of reproducing the spatial distribution of TGM and its seasonal cycle at northern mid-latitudes. The Hg + Br model shows a steeper decline of TGM concentrations from the tropics to southern mid-latitudes. Only the Hg + Br model can reproduce the springtime depletion and summer rebound of TGM observed at polar sites; the snowpack component of GEOS-Chem suggests that 40% of HgII deposited to snow in the Arctic is transferred to the ocean and land reservoirs, amounting to a net deposition flux to the Arctic of 60 Mg a−1. Summertime events of depleted Hg0 at Antarctic sites due to subsidence are much better simulated by

  9. The effect of bromination of carbon fibers on the coefficient of thermal expansion of graphite fiber-epoxy composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Maciag, C.

    1987-01-01

    To examine the effect of bromination of carbon fibers on the coefficient of thermal expansion (CTE) of carbon fiber epoxy composites, several pristine and brominated carbon fiber-epoxy composite samples were subjected to thermomechanical analysis. The CTE's of these samples were measured in the uniaxial and transverse directions. The CTE was dominated by the fibers in the uniaxial direction, while it was dominated by the matrix in the transverse directions. Bromination had no effect on the CTE of any of the composites. In addition, the CTE of fiber tow was measured in the absence of a polymer matrix, using an extension probe. The results from this technique were inconclusive.

  10. Combustion and inorganic bromine emission of waste printed circuit boards in a high temperature furnace

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The combustion efficiency of waste printed circuit boards (PCBs) depends on temperature, excess air factor, and high temperature zone residence time. Temperature has the most significant impact. Under the proposed condition, combustion of waste PCBs alone is quite complete within the furnace. ► High temperature prompts a more complete bromine release and conversion. When temperature is high enough, 99.9% organobrominated compounds, the potential precursors for brominated dixoins formation, are destroyed efficiently and convert to inorganic bromine in flue gas, as HBr and Br2. ► Temperature has crucial influence over the inhibition of HBr conversion to Br2, while the oxygen partial pressure plays a reverse role in the conversion to a very small extent. Increasing temperature will decrease the volume percentage ratio of Br2/HBr in flue gas greatly. ► The thermodynamic equilibrium approach of bromine conversion was investigated. The two forms of inorganic bromine in flue gas substantially reach thermodynamic equilibrium within 0.25 s. Under the proposed operating condition, the reaction of Br transfer and conversion finish. - Abstract: High temperature combustion experiments of waste printed circuit boards (PCBs) were conducted using a lab-scale system featuring a continuously-fed drop tube furnace. Combustion efficiency and the occurrence of inorganic bromine (HBr and Br2) were systematically studied by monitoring the main combustion products continuously. The influence of furnace temperature (T) was studied from 800 to 1400 °C, the excess air factor (EAF) was varied from 1.2 to 1.9 and the residence time in the high temperature zone (RTHT) was set at 0.25, 0.5, or 0.75 s. Combustion efficiency depends on temperature, EAF and RTHT; temperature has the most significant effect. Conversion of organic bromine from flame retardants into HBr and Br2 depends on temperature and EAF. Temperature has crucial influence over the ratio of HBr to Br2

  11. Distribution of brominated compounds within the sponge Aplysina aerophoba: coupling of X-ray microanalysis with cryofixation techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turon, X; Becerro, M A; Uriz, M J

    2000-08-01

    The major secondary metabolites of the sponge Aplysina aerophoba are brominated compounds. X-ray energy dispersive microanalysis was therefore used to locate secondary metabolites via the Br signal in energy emission spectra from sponge sections. To test the reliability of this method in the face of the loss or redistribution of metabolites during processing, we compared the results obtained by conventional aldehyde fixation with those obtained by cryofixation and cryosubstitution with and without cryoembedding. Bromine appeared to be concentrated in two sponge structures, viz. fibres and spherulous cells, when cryofixed material was examined. However, X-ray microanalysis failed to demonstrate the presence of bromine in spherulous cells in chemically fixed samples, showing the need for cryotechniques to avoid the loss of compounds. Cryofixation plus cryosubstitution methods performed best regarding structural preservation and the immobilization of metabolites. The presence of bromine in the spherulous cells suggests that this cell type is the producer of the secondary metabolites, as described for other sponge species. Nevertheless, the presence of bromine in sponge fibres indicates that they can accumulate metabolic substances, although we have been unable to assess whether the chemicals are in their original form or in a modified state within the fibres. A. aerophoba has both bacterial and cyanobacterial symbionts in its mesohyl; the absence of brominated compounds in them contrasts with previous findings in other sponges with prokaryote symbionts. PMID:10955726

  12. Molten-Phase Hydrolysis Stage Analysis and Experiments for the Calcium Bromine Thermochemical Cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of the United States Department of Energy Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative as linked with the Generation IV Nuclear Energy Systems Initiative for Gas Reactor Deployment is to develop a cost-effective, proliferation-resistant, low-greenhouse-gas emissions, and sustainable, nuclear-based energy supply system. The calcium-bromine cycle under development at Argonne National Laboratory combines both experimental and modeling studies of a novel continuous 'hybrid' cycle for hydrogen production, where 'hybrid' means that both nuclear heat and electricity are employed. Engineering the calcium-bromine cycle for continuous operation should facilitate its practical development since there will be an inherent advantage to using components and materials which will operate in a constant, non-cycling chemical and thermal environment. This paper focuses on the first and important calcium bromide hydrolysis stage to generate hydrogen bromide, which when split by electrolysis, produces hydrogen. (authors)

  13. Co-doping of Potassium and Bromine in Carbon Nanotubes: A Density Functional Theory Study

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Yong; YAN xiao-Hong; DING Jian-Wen

    2007-01-01

    We investigate the co-doping of potassium and bromine in singlewalled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs)and doublewalled carbon nanotubes(DWCNTs)based on density functional theory.In the co-doped(6,O)SWCNTs,the 4s electron of potassium is transferred to nanotube and Br,leading to the n-type feature of SWCNTs.When potassium is intercalated into inner tube and bromine is put on outer tube,the positive and negative charges reside on the outer and inner tubes of the(7.0)@(16,0)DWCNT,respectively.It is expected that DWCNTs would be an ideal candidate for p-n junction and diode applications.

  14. Stratospheric ozone depletion and future levels of atmospheric chlorine and bromine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prather, Michael J.; Watson, Robert T.

    1990-01-01

    The rise in atmospheric chlorine levels caused by the emission of chlorofluorocarbons and other halocarbons is thought to be the main cause of the appearance of the Antarctic ozone 'hole' in the late 1970s, and the more modest ozone depletion observed over parts of the Northern Hemisphere. Atmospheric bromine, also associated with halocarbon emissions, is believed to contribute to ozone depletion. Over the next decade, further increases in these compounds are inevitable. Model calculations show that by the end of the next century, atmospheric chlorine and bromine levels may return to those prevalent before the onset of the ozone hole, but only if more stringent regulations are applied to halocarbon production than those currently proposed.

  15. First measurements of total chlorine and bromine in the lower stratosphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A total halogen collection system employing ultra-pure activated charcoal traps has been developed for use in the stratosphere aboard aircraft and balloon sampling platforms. Neutron activation techniques for low-level chlorine, bromine, and iodine analysis within the activated charcoal sampling matrix were developed. Initial results from six aircraft flights and one balloon mission in the lower stratosphere are presented for latitudes ranging from 160N to 670N. Little variability was observed in twelve total, gaseous and particulate chlorine (Cl/sub tot/) determinations as a function of latitude at 20 km with values ranging between 2.7 +- 9 ppbV and 3.2 +- .7 ppbV. Five total bromine (Br/sub tot/) values showed substantial variability ranging from 7 +- 4 pptV to 40 +- 11 pptV. No iodine was observed in any samples but a calculated I/sub tot/ upper limit of < 3 pptV was determined

  16. Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    SRD 4 NIST Thermophysical Properties of Hydrocarbon Mixtures (PC database for purchase)   Interactive computer program for predicting thermodynamic and transport properties of pure fluids and fluid mixtures containing up to 20 components. The components are selected from a database of 196 components, mostly hydrocarbons.

  17. Volatile Hydrocarbon Pheromones from Beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    This chapter reviews literature about hydrocarbons from beetles that serve as long-range pheromones. The most thoroughly studied beetles that use volatile hydrocarbon pheromones belong to the family Nitidulidae in the genera Carpophilus and Colopterus. Published pheromone research deals with behav...

  18. Occupational exposure to brominated flame retardants : With emphasis on polybrominated diphenyl ethers

    OpenAIRE

    Thuresson, Kaj

    2004-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are a diverse group of chemicals, which are used to slow down or inhibit the development of fires. BFRs are incorporated into a wide range of consumer products that are considered as potential fire hazards, such as TV-sets, household appliances, computers, and textiles. The production and use of BFRs is extensive and consists of mainly tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecan (HBCD). BFRs in general, but...

  19. Assessing oestrogenic effects of brominated flame retardants Hexabromocyclododecane and Tetrabromobisphenol A on MCF-7 cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dorosh, Andriy; Děd, Lukáš; Elzeinová, Fatima; Pěknicová, Jana

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 56, - (2010), s. 35-39. ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M06011; GA MŠk(CZ) 2B06151 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520701 Keywords : endocrine disruptors * BRF - brominated flame retardant * MCF-7 cells * TFF1 - trefoil factor Subject RIV: DN - Health Impact of the Environment Quality Impact factor: 0.729, year: 2010

  20. Brominated Skeletal Components of the Marine Demosponges, Aplysina cavernicola and Ianthella basta: Analytical and Biochemical Investigations

    OpenAIRE

    Eike Brunner; Peter Proksch; Hermann Ehrlich; Renate Schulze; Susanne Ueberlein; Hendrik Niemann; Kurt Kunze; Karl-Heinz van Pée

    2013-01-01

    Demosponges possess a skeleton made of a composite material with various organic constituents and/or siliceous spicules. Chitin is an integral part of the skeleton of different sponges of the order Verongida. Moreover, sponges of the order Verongida, such as Aplysina cavernicola or Ianthella basta, are well-known for the biosynthesis of brominated tyrosine derivates, characteristic bioactive natural products. It has been unknown so far whether these compounds are exclusively present in the ce...

  1. Reductive Dehalogenation of Brominated Phenolic Compounds by Microorganisms Associated with the Marine Sponge Aplysina aerophoba

    OpenAIRE

    Ahn, Young-Beom; Rhee, Sung-Keun; Fennell, Donna E.; Kerkhof, Lee J.; Hentschel, Ute; Häggblom, Max M.

    2003-01-01

    Marine sponges are natural sources of brominated organic compounds, including bromoindoles, bromophenols, and bromopyrroles, that may comprise up to 12% of the sponge dry weight. Aplysina aerophoba sponges harbor large numbers of bacteria that can amount to 40% of the biomass of the animal. We postulated that there might be mechanisms for microbially mediated degradation of these halogenated chemicals within the sponges. The capability of anaerobic microorganisms associated with the marine sp...

  2. Ship-source pollution by polychlorinated biphenyls and brominated flame retardants

    OpenAIRE

    ČULIN, Jelena; Bielić, Toni

    2015-01-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) and brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are groups of anthropogenic contaminants that have been routinely used in many applications for several decades. Prior to the discovery of their detrimental health effects and subsequent implementation of regulatory measures they were widely applied in shipbuilding. They are still found onboard active and inactive ships and pose a risk to human and environment. Therefore, it is important to continue to carry out preven...

  3. Tropospheric bromine chemistry: implications for present and pre-industrial ozone and mercury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Parrella

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available We present a new model for the global tropospheric chemistry of inorganic bromine (Bry coupled to oxidant-aerosol chemistry in the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model (CTM. Sources of tropospheric Bry include debromination of sea-salt aerosol, photolysis and oxidation of short-lived bromocarbons, and transport from the stratosphere. Comparison to a GOME-2 satellite climatology of tropospheric BrO columns shows that the model can reproduce the observed increase of BrO with latitude, the northern mid-latitudes maximum in winter, and the Arctic maximum in spring. This successful simulation is contingent on the HOBr + HBr reaction taking place in aqueous aerosols and ice clouds. Bromine chemistry in the model decreases tropospheric ozone concentrations by <1−8 nmol mol−1 (6.5% globally, with the largest effects in the northern extratropics in spring. The global mean tropospheric OH concentration decreases by 4%. Inclusion of bromine chemistry improves the ability of global models (GEOS-Chem and p-TOMCAT to simulate observed 19th-century ozone and its seasonality. Bromine effects on tropospheric ozone are comparable in the present-day and pre-industrial atmospheres so that estimates of anthropogenic radiative forcing are minimally affected. Br atom concentrations are 40% higher in the pre-industrial atmosphere due to lower ozone, which would decrease by a factor of 2 the atmospheric lifetime of elemental mercury against oxidation by Br. This suggests that historical anthropogenic mercury emissions may have mostly deposited to northern mid-latitudes, enriching the corresponding surface reservoirs. The persistent rise in background surface ozone at northern mid-latitudes during the past decades could possibly contribute to the observations of elevated mercury in subsurface waters of the North Atlantic.

  4. Tropospheric bromine chemistry: implications for present and pre-industrial ozone and mercury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. P. Parrella

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available We present a new model for the global tropospheric chemistry of inorganic bromine (Bry coupled to oxidant-aerosol chemistry in the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model (CTM. Sources of tropospheric Bry include debromination of sea-salt aerosol, photolysis and oxidation of short-lived bromocarbons, and transport from the stratosphere. Comparison to a GOME-2 satellite climatology of tropospheric BrO columns shows that the model can reproduce the observed increase of BrO with latitude, the northern mid-latitudes maximum in winter, and the Arctic maximum in spring. This successful simulation is contingent on the HOBr + HBr reaction taking place in aqueous aerosols and ice clouds. Bromine chemistry in the model decreases tropospheric ozone mixing ratios by <1–8 nmol mol−1 (6.5% globally, with the largest effects in the northern extratropics in spring. The global mean tropospheric OH concentration decreases by 4%. Inclusion of bromine chemistry improves the ability of global models (GEOS-Chem and p-TOMCAT to simulate observed 19th-century ozone and its seasonality. Bromine effects on tropospheric ozone are comparable in the present-day and pre-industrial atmospheres so that estimates of anthropogenic radiative forcing are minimally affected. Br atom concentrations are 40% higher in the pre-industrial atmosphere due to lower ozone, which would decrease by a factor of 2 the atmospheric lifetime of elemental mercury against oxidation by Br. This suggests that historical anthropogenic mercury emissions may have mostly deposited to northern mid-latitudes, enriching the corresponding surface reservoirs. The persistent rise in background surface ozone at northern mid-latitudes during the past decades could possibly contribute to the observations of elevated mercury in subsurface waters of the North Atlantic.

  5. A comparison of the virucidal properties of chlorine, chlorine dioxide, bromine chloride and iodine.

    OpenAIRE

    Taylor, G R; Butler, M

    1982-01-01

    Chlorine dioxide, bromine chloride and iodine were compared with chlorine as virucidal agents. Under optimal conditions all disinfectants were effective at low concentrations, but each disinfectant responded differently to acidity and alkalinity. Disinfection by chlorine was impaired by the presence of ammonia, but the other disinfectants retained much of their potency. Disinfection of poliovirus by iodine resulted in structural changes in the virions as seen by electron micrroscopy, but the ...

  6. Bromine monoxide / sulphur dioxide ratios in relation to volcanological observations at Mt. Etna 2006–2009

    OpenAIRE

    N. Bobrowski; Giuffrida, G

    2012-01-01

    Over a 3-yr period, from 2006 to 2009, frequent scattered sunlight DOAS measurements were conducted at Mt. Etna at a distance of around 6 km downwind from the summit craters. During the same period and in addition to these measurements, volcanic observations were made by regularly visiting various parts of Mt. Etna. Here, results from these measurements and observations are presented and their relation is discussed. The focus of the investigation is the bromine monoxide/sulphur dioxide (BrO ...

  7. Mercury oxidation from bromine chemistry in the free troposphere over the southeastern US

    OpenAIRE

    S. Coburn; Dix, B.; Edgerton, E.; Holmes, C. D; Kinnison, D.; Liang, Q; A. ter Schure; Wang, S.; R. Volkamer

    2015-01-01

    The elevated deposition of atmospheric mercury over the Southeastern United States is currently not well understood. Here we measure partial columns and vertical profiles of bromine monoxide (BrO) radicals, a key component of mercury oxidation chemistry, to better understand the processes and altitudes at which mercury is being oxidized in the atmosphere. We use the data from a ground-based MAX-DOAS instrument located at a coastal site ~ 1 km from the Gulf o...

  8. Toxicity of brominated flame retardants with focus on retinoid system disturbances

    OpenAIRE

    Litens Karlsson, Sabina

    2015-01-01

    Background: Brominated flame retardants (BFR) are detected in the environment and biota all over the world. They contribute to the human body burden of industrial chemicals and exposure is mainly via food. Indoor dust contributes substantially in some exposure situations, which involve small children. Regulatory restrictions and bans have been introduced as some BFRs can impact proper development, potentially via the endocrine system. Objectives: The study aim was to clarify the role of...

  9. Volcanic plumes: Evaluation of spectroscopic measurements, early detection, and bromine chemistry

    OpenAIRE

    Vogel, Leif

    2011-01-01

    Volcanos emit inter alia highly reactive chemical compounds, which influence the atmosphere on a local, regional and global scale. Subject of this study are measurements of volcanic plumes via differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS). A new tool for analysis and optimisation of evaluation schemes was developed, which is applicable to any DOAS measurement. Measurements of bromine monoxide (BrO) and sulphur dioxide (SO2 ) are presented, which were gathered at Mt. Etna (Italy) and Pac...

  10. Thermal Recycling of Brominated Flame Retardants with Fe2O3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altarawneh, Mohammednoor; Ahmed, Oday H; Jiang, Zhong-Tao; Dlugogorski, Bogdan Z

    2016-08-01

    Plastics containing brominated flame retardants (BFRs) constitute the major fraction of nonmetallic content in e-waste. Co-pyrolysis of BFRs with hematite (Fe2O3) represents a viable option for the thermal recycling of BFRs. Consensus of experimental findings confirms the excellent bromine fixation ability of Fe2O3 and the subsequent formation of iron bromides. This contribution provides a comprehensive mechanistic account of the primary reactions between a cluster model of Fe2O3 and major bromine-bearing products from the decomposition of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBA), the most commonly deployed BFR. We estimate the thermo-kinetic parameters for interactions of Fe2O3 with HBr, brominated alkanes and alkenes, bromobenzene, and bromophenol. Dissociative addition of HBr at a Fe-O bond proceeds through a trivial barrier of 8.2 kcal/mol with fitted parameters in the Arrhenius equation of k(T) = 7.96 × 10(11) exp(-6400/RT) s(-1). The facile and irreversible nature for HBr addition to Fe2O3 accords with the experimentally reported 90% reduction in HBr emission when Fe2O3 interacts with TBBA pyrolysates. A detailed kinetic analysis indicates that, transformation of Fe2O3 into iron bromides and oxybromides occurs via successive addition of HBr to Fe(Br)-O(H) entities. Elimination of a water molecule proceeds through an intramolecular H transfer. A direct elimination one-step mechanism operates in the dehydrohalogenation of bromoethane into ethene over Fe2O3. Dissociative decomposition and direct elimination channels assume comparable reaction rates in formation of acetylene from vinyl bromide. Results from this study provide an atomic-based insight into a promising thermal recycling route of e-waste. PMID:27366936

  11. Brominated Biphenyls Prime Extensive Microbial Reductive Dehalogenation of Aroclor 1260 in Housatonic River Sediment

    OpenAIRE

    Bedard, Donna L.; Van Dort, Heidi; DeWeerd, Kim A.

    1998-01-01

    The upper Housatonic River and Woods Pond (Lenox, Mass.), a shallow impoundment on the river, are contaminated with polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), the residue of partially dechlorinated Aroclor 1260. Certain PCB congeners have the ability to activate or “prime” anaerobic microorganisms in Woods Pond sediment to reductively dehalogenate the Aroclor 1260 residue. We proposed that brominated biphenyls might have the same effect and tested the priming activities of 14 mono-, di-, and tribromin...

  12. The bromination Hypocrellin A and the spectra character of the reaction of gelatin with the derivative

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bromination derivates of hypocrellin A (Br-HA) was prepared in this paper, and the photodynamic activity also was appraised. UV-Vis spectroscopy and Fluorescence spectrophotometer were employed to detect the reaction of Br-HA with gelatin. The result shown the Br-HA can react with gelatin, and the HA-Br also photodegraded the pyridinoline cross-link formation in gelatin.

  13. Reactive airways dysfunction and systemic complaints after mass exposure to bromine.

    OpenAIRE

    Woolf, A; Shannon, M.

    1999-01-01

    Occasionally children are the victims of mass poisoning from an environmental contaminant that occurs due to an unexpected common point source of exposure. In many cases the contaminant is a widely used chemical generally considered to be safe. In the following case, members of a sports team visiting a community for an athletic event were exposed to chemicals while staying at a local motel. Bromine-based sanitizing agents and other chemicals such as hydrochloric acid, which were used in exces...

  14. On bromine, nitrogen oxides and ozone depletion in the tropospheric plume of Erebus volcano (Antarctica)

    OpenAIRE

    Boichu, Marie; Oppenheimer, Clive; Roberts, Tjarda J.; V. I. Tsanev; Kyle, Philip R

    2011-01-01

    International audience Since the discovery of bromine oxide (BrO) in volcanic emissions, there has been speculation concerning its role in chemical evolution and notably ozone depletion in volcanic plumes. We report the first measurements using Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) of BrO in the tropospheric plume of the persistently degassing Erebus volcano (Antarctica). These are the first observations pertaining to emissions from an alkaline phonolitic magma. The observed ...

  15. Interactions of bromine, chlorine, and iodine photochemistry during ozone depletions in Barrow, Alaska

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, C. R.; P. B. Shepson; Liao, J.; Huey, L.G.; E. C. Apel; Cantrell, C. A.; Flocke, F.; Orlando, J.; Fried, A.; Hall, S. R; R. S. Hornbrook; D. J. Knapp; Mauldin III, R. L; Montzka, D. D.; B. C. Sive

    2014-01-01

    The springtime depletion of tropospheric ozone in the Arctic is known to be caused by active halogen photochemistry resulting from halogen atom precursors emitted from snow, ice, or aerosol surfaces. The role of bromine in driving ozone depletion events (ODEs) has been generally accepted, but much less is known about the role of chlorine radicals in ozone depletion chemistry. While the potential impact of iodine in the High Arctic is more uncertain, there ha...

  16. Interactions of bromine, chlorine, and iodine photochemistry during ozone depletions in Barrow, Alaska

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, C. R.; P. B. Shepson; Liao, J.; Huey, L.G.; E. C. Apel; Cantrell, C. A.; Flocke, F.; Orlando, J.; Fried, A.; Hall, S. R; R. S. Hornbrook; D. J. Knapp; Mauldin III, R. L; Montzka, D. D.; B. C. Sive

    2015-01-01

    The springtime depletion of tropospheric ozone in the Arctic is known to be caused by active halogen photochemistry resulting from halogen atom precursors emitted from snow, ice, or aerosol surfaces. The role of bromine in driving ozone depletion events (ODEs) has been generally accepted, but much less is known about the role of chlorine radicals in ozone depletion chemistry. While the potential impact of iodine in the High Arctic is more uncertain, there have been indicatio...

  17. Brominated and organophosphate flame retardants in selected consumer products on the Japanese market in 2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → We examined the flame retardants in electronics, curtains, wallpaper and insulator. → Use of alternative brominated and organophosphate flame retardants was suggested. → All the products investigated also contained PBDEs, TBBPA and polybromophenols. → Incorporation of recycled materials containing hazardous substance was suggested. - Abstract: The concentrations of traditional brominated flame retardants (BFRs) and organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) in new consumer products, including electronic equipment, curtains, wallpaper, and building materials, on the Japanese market in 2008 were investigated. Although some components of the electronic equipment contained bromine at concentrations on the order of percent by weight, as indicated by X-ray fluorescence analysis, the bromine content could not be fully accounted for by the BFRs analyzed in this study, which included polybrominated diphenylethers, decabromodiphenyl ethane, tetrabromobisphenol A, polybromophenols, and hexabromocyclododecanes. These results suggest the use of alternative BFRs such as newly developed formulations derived from tribromophenol, tetrabromobisphenol A, or both. Among the 11 OPFRs analyzed, triphenylphosphate was present at the highest concentrations in all the products investigated, which suggests the use of condensed-type OPFRs as alternative flame retardants, because they contain triphenylphosphate as an impurity. Tripropylphosphate was not detected in any samples; and trimethylphosphate, tributyl tris(2-butoxyethyl)phosphate, and tris(1,3-dichloro-2-propyl)phosphate were detected in only some components and at low concentrations. Note that all the consumer products evaluated in this study also contained traditional BFRs in amounts that were inadequate to impart flame retardancy, which implies the incorporation of recycled plastic materials containing BFRs that are of global concern.

  18. Simultaneous determination of bromine and iodine in the rat thyroid by short-term INAA

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pavelka, Stanislav; Vobecký, Miloslav; Babický, Arnošt

    Tokyo: Tokyo Metropolitan University, 2007. s. 118-118. [International Conference on Modern Trends in Activation Analysis /12./. 16.09.2007-21.09.2007, Hachioji] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB401630701 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50110509; CEZ:AV0Z40310501 Keywords : spo2 * bromine * iodine * thyroid gland Subject RIV: FB - Endocrinology, Diabetology, Metabolism, Nutrition

  19. Detailed modeling of the atmospheric degradation mechanism of very-short lived brominated species

    OpenAIRE

    G. Krysztofiak; Catoire, Valéry; Poulet, G.; Marécal, V.; Pirre, Michel; Louis, F.; Canneaux, S.; B. Josse

    2012-01-01

    International audience Detailed chemical reaction schemes for the atmospheric degradations of the very short-lived species (VSLS) bromoform (CHBr3) and dibromomethane (CH2Br2) have been established. These degradation schemes have been implemented in the meteorological/tracer transport model CATT-BRAMS used in the present case as pseudo one-dimensional model with chemistry of CH4, CO, HOx, NOx, NOy and Ox. They include the main possible reactions of the intermediate brominated peroxy radica...

  20. Meteorological controls on the vertical distribution of bromine monoxide in the lower troposphere

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, P K; Simpson, W. R.; K. A. Pratt; P. B. Shepson; U. Frieß; J. Zielcke; Platt, U.; Walsh, S J; S. V. Nghiem

    2014-01-01

    Multiple axis differential absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements of bromine monoxide (BrO) probed the vertical structure of halogen activation events during March–May 2012 at Barrow, Alaska. An analysis of the BrO averaging kernels and degrees of freedom obtained by optimal-estimation-based inversions from raw MAX-DOAS measurements reveals the information is best represented by reducing the retrieved BrO profile to two ...

  1. Diterpenoid tetracyclic hydrocarbons of petroleum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vorob' eva, N.S.; Zemskova, Z.K.; Pekh, T.I.; Petrov, A.A.

    1987-08-01

    Diterpenoid hydrocarbons are fairly widespread in various caustobioliths. However, if petroleums contain mainly acyclic diterpenoids (phytane, pristane and norpristane), cyclic diterpaenes such as fichtelite, pimarane, iosene (kaurane) and hibbane are often found in hydrocarbons isolated from coal and shale. Recent advances in the chemistry of diterpenoids isolated from caustobioliths, are described in a separate paper. Much less is known about petroleum polycyclic diterpenoid hydrocarbons, particularly those with four saturated rings. A series of tetracyclic hydrocarbons C/sub 19/H/sub 32/ (molar mass 260), found in a number of light petroleums and gas condensates from the Jura deposits of Central Kara-Kum (Turkmen S.S.R.), are examined here. These hydrocarbons are present in petroleums and condensates from the Davaly, Erden, Ortakak, Southern Beuideshik deposits, they are always identical and occur in the same ratios. The composition of the tretracyclanes isolated from the Ortakak gas condensates (well 17) will be examined in detail.

  2. Hydrocarbon sensors and materials therefor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Ai Quoc; Glass, Robert S.

    2000-01-01

    An electrochemical hydrocarbon sensor and materials for use in sensors. A suitable proton conducting electrolyte and catalytic materials have been found for specific application in the detection and measurement of non-methane hydrocarbons. The sensor comprises a proton conducting electrolyte sandwiched between two electrodes. At least one of the electrodes is covered with a hydrocarbon decomposition catalyst. Two different modes of operation for the hydrocarbon sensors can be used: equilibrium versus non-equilibrium measurements and differential catalytic. The sensor has particular application for on-board monitoring of automobile exhaust gases to evaluate the performance of catalytic converters. In addition, the sensor can be utilized in monitoring any process where hydrocarbons are exhausted, for instance, industrial power plants. The sensor is low cost, rugged, sensitive, simple to fabricate, miniature, and does not suffer cross sensitivities.

  3. MISCIBILITY AND MORPHOLOGY OF THIN FILMS OF BLENDS OF POLYSTYRENE WITH BROMINATED POLYSTYRENES: EFFECTS OF VARYING THE MOLECULAR WEIGHT,BROMINATION DEGREE AND ANNEALING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui Song; De-bin Yang; Ling-hao He; Guang-tao Yao

    2006-01-01

    Thin films of incompatible polymer blends can form a variety of structures during preparation and subsequent annealing process. For the polymer blend system consisting of polystyrene and poly(styrene-co-p-bromo-styrene), I.e.,PS/PBrxS, its compatibility could be adjusted by varying the degree of bromination and the molecular weight of both components comprised. In this paper, surface chemical compositions of the cast and the annealing films were investigated by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and contact angle measurement; meanwhile, surface topographical changes are followed by atomic force microscopy (AFM). In addition, substantial attention was paid to the effect of annealing on the morphologic variations induced by phase separation and/or dewetting of the thin film. Moreover, the influences of the molecular weight, Mw, as well as the brominated degree, x%, on the sample surface are explored systematically, and the corresponding observations are explained in virtue of the Flory-Huggins theory, along with the dewetting of the polymer thin film.

  4. [Halogenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in surface sediments of Maozhou River, Shenzhen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jian-Lin; Ni, Hong-Gang; Ding, Chao; Zeng, Hui

    2012-09-01

    Surface sediments collected from the Maozhou River watershed in Shenzhen were analyzed for the concentration levels and spatial distribution characteristics of halogenated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (HPAHs) using GC-MS. Total concentrations of three chlorinated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (ClPAHs) and six brominated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (BrPAHs) of concern ranged from 3.00 to 301 ng x g(-1) and 7.52 to 285 ng x g(-1), respectively. Source appointments indicated that the HPAHs in these surface sediments were mainly derived from waste incineration, fossil fuel combustion, vehicle emission, and burning of crop straw, accounting for 40%, 20.5% 11.9%, and 11.7% of the total loading, respectively. Additionally, the toxic equivalency quotients (TEQ) of total ClPAHs and BrPAHs ranged from 7.95 to 38.1 pg x g(-1) and 38.1 to 105 pg x g(-1) respectively. Finally, the relationships between the HPAHs levels and different land use types were examined. Results indicated that the levels of HPAHs in surface sediments showed a decreasing trend after the first increase to the peak with the density of industrial land, but inversely proportional to the density of agricultural land. PMID:23243864

  5. Effect of Bromine Substitution on Human Dermal Absorption of Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdallah, Mohamed Abou-Elwafa; Pawar, Gopal; Harrad, Stuart

    2015-09-15

    Human dermal absorption of eight mono- to deca-brominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) was investigated for the first time using EPISKIN human skin equivalent tissue. Using a standard in vitro protocol, EPISKIN tissues mounted in specially designed diffusion cells were exposed to the target PBDEs for 24 h. Estimated steady-state flux (Jss) and permeation coefficients (Papp) across the skin increased with decreasing bromine substitution from BDE-153 (Papp = 4.0 × 10(-4) cm/h) to BDE-1 (Papp = 1.1 × 10(-2) cm/h). This was accompanied by an increase in the time required to traverse the skin tissue into the receptor fluid (lag time) from 0.25 h for BDE-1 to 1.26 h for BDE-153. Papp values for the studied PBDEs were correlated significantly (P water solubility and log KOW. While less brominated congeners achieved faster dermal penetration, higher PBDEs displayed greater accumulation within the skin tissue. The PBDEs thus accumulated represent a contaminant depot from which they may be slowly released to the systemic circulation over a prolonged period. Maximal percutaneous penetration was observed for BDE-1 (∼ 30% of the applied 500 ng/cm(2) dose). Interestingly, BDE-183 and BDE-209 showed very low dermal absorption, exemplified by a failure to reach the steady state within the 24 h exposure period that was studied. PMID:26301594

  6. Effects of Assistant Solvents and Mixing Intensity on the Bromination Process of Butyl Rubber

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王伟; 邹海魁; 初广文; 向阳; 彭晗; 陈建峰

    2014-01-01

    A slow bromination process of butyl rubber (IIR) suffers from low efficiency and low selectivity (S) of target-product. To obtain suitable approach to intensify the process, effects of assistant solvents and mixing inten-sity on the bromination process were systemically studied in this paper. The reaction process was found constantly accelerated with the increasing dosage and polarity of assistant solvent. Hexane with 30%(by volume) dichloro-methane was found as the suitable solvent component, where the stable conversion of 1,4-isoprene transferring to target product (xA1s) of 80.2%and the corresponding S of 91.2%were obtained in 5 min. The accelerated reaction process was demonstrated being remarkably affected by mixing intensity until the optimal stirring rate of 1100 r·min-1 in a stirred tank reactor. With better mixing condition, a further intensification of the process was achieved in a ro-tating packed bed (RPB) reactor, where xA1s of 82.6% and S of 91.9% were obtained in 2 min. The usage of the suitable solvent component and RPB has potential application in the industrial bromination process intensification.

  7. Monitoring of WEEE plastics in regards to brominated flame retardants using handheld XRF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldrian, Alexia; Ledersteger, Alfred; Pomberger, Roland

    2015-02-01

    This contribution is focused on the on-site determination of the bromine content in waste electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE), in particular waste plastics from television sets (TV) and personal computer monitors (PC) using a handheld X-ray fluorescence (XRF) device. The described approach allows the examination of samples in regards to the compliance with legal specifications for polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) and polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) directly after disassembling and facilitates the sorting out of plastics with high contents of brominated flame retardants (BFRs). In all, over 3000 pieces of black (TV) and 1600 pieces of grey (PC) plastic waste were analysed with handheld XRF technique for this study. Especially noticeable was the high percentage of pieces with a bromine content of over 50,000ppm for TV (7%) and PC (39%) waste plastics. The applied method was validated by comparing the data of handheld XRF with results obtained by GC-MS. The results showed the expected and sufficiently accurate correlation between these two methods. It is shown that handheld XRF technique is an effective tool for fast monitoring of large volumes of WEEE plastics in regards to BFRs for on-site measurements. PMID:25464945

  8. Computer simulation of the cluster destruction of stratospheric ozone by bromine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    A.E.Galashev; O.R.Rakhmanova

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of (Br-)i(H2O)50-i,0≤i≤6 clusters with oxygen and ozone molecules is investigated by the method of molecular dynamics simulation.The ozone molecules as well as the bromine ions do not leave the cluster during the calculation of 25 ps.The ability of the cluster containing molecular oxygen to absorb the infrared (IR)radiation is reduced in the frequency range of 0 ≤ ω ≤ 3500 cm-1 when the number of the bromine ions in the cluster grows.The intensity of the Raman spectrum is not changed significantly when the Br-ions are added to the ozonecontaining system.The power of the emitted IR radiation is increased when the number of bromine ions grows in the oxygen-containing system.The data obtained in this study on the IR and the Raman spectra of the water clusters that contain ozone,oxygen,and Br-can be used to develop an investigation of the mechanisms of ozone depletion.

  9. Measurement and human exposure assessment of brominated flame retardants in household products from South China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), and decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) were examined in household products in the Pearl River Delta, South China, including electronic appliances, furniture and upholstery, car interiors, and raw materials for electronics. The concentrations of PBDEs derived from penta-BDE mixture were much lower (<111 ng/g) than those for octa- and deca-BDE commercially derived PBDEs, with maximum values of 15,107 and 1,603,343 ng/g, respectively, in all the household products. Our findings suggest the recycling of old electronic products and their reuse might be also a potential important source of discontinued PBDEs to the environment. DBDPE was found in 20.0% of all the samples, ranging from 311 to 268,230 ng/g. PBDE congener profiles in both the household products and raw materials suggest that some less brominated BDEs in the environment may be derived from the decomposition of higher brominated PBDEs in PBDE-containing products in process of the manufacturing, use and/or recycling. Human exposure to PBDEs from household products via inhalation ranged from 175 to 612 pg/kg bw day, accounting for a small proportion of the total daily exposure via indoor inhalation. Despite the low deleterious risk associated with household products with regard to PBDEs, they are of special concern because of the relatively higher exposures observed for young children and further work is required.

  10. Computer simulation of the cluster destruction of stratospheric ozone by bromine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interaction of (Br−)i(H2O)50−i, 0 ≤ i ≤ 6 clusters with oxygen and ozone molecules is investigated by the method of molecular dynamics simulation. The ozone molecules as well as the bromine ions do not leave the cluster during the calculation of 25 ps. The ability of the cluster containing molecular oxygen to absorb the infrared (IR) radiation is reduced in the frequency range of 0 ≤ ω ≤ 3500 cm−1 when the number of the bromine ions in the cluster grows. The intensity of the Raman spectrum is not changed significantly when the Br− ions are added to the ozone-containing system. The power of the emitted IR radiation is increased when the number of bromine ions grows in the oxygen-containing system. The data obtained in this study on the IR and the Raman spectra of the water clusters that contain ozone, oxygen, and Br− can be used to develop an investigation of the mechanisms of ozone depletion

  11. Bromine recovery in residual solutions generated in the 15 N isotopic determination methodology (Rittenberg, 1946)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The isotopic determination of 15 N (Rittenberg, 1946) is a methodology used in the Laboratory of Isotope Stable (CENA/USP). In this procedure, in the oxidation of nitrogen species for N2, solution of Li Br O is used, generating as residue 50 L y-1 of solution contends Li Br and Li Br O. Seeking to recover the bromine contained in that residue, very toxic substance, a special line was built composed by reaction balloons (1 and 2 liters), addition funnel, gas flow regulator and connections in glass. In the system proposed, after the acidification (sulfuric acid) of the alkaline residual solution, the liberated bromine (Br2) it was then dragged by flow of nitrogen and reacted with solution of LiOH. That reaction facilitated the production of Li Br O in solution (Efficiency = 82±2%), that was reused later on same analytic procedure. The high cost of the liquid bromine is another attractiveness that corroborates the employment of the developed procedure. They took place isotopic determinations using the recovered solutions and prepared, and the observed values didn't show statistical difference (T test of Student). The presented procedure is part of the Management Program of Chemical Residues of CENA/USP, which seeks to destine the residues of responsibility of the institution appropriately, forming professionals to the practices of environmental management. (author)

  12. A satellite based study of tropospheric bromine explosion events and their linkages to polar cyclone development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blechschmidt, Anne-Marlene; Richter, Andreas; Burrows, John P.; Kaleschke, Lars; Strong, Kimberly; Theys, Nicolas; Weber, Mark; Zhao, Xiaoyi; Zien, Achim; Hodges, Kevin I.

    2016-04-01

    Intense, cyclone-like shaped plumes of tropospheric bromine monoxide (BrO) are regularly observed by the UV-vis satellite instruments GOME-2/MetOp-A and SCIAMACHY/Envisat over Arctic and Antarctic sea ice in polar spring. The plumes are associated with an autocatalytic chemical chain reaction involving tropospheric ozone depletion and initiated by the release of bromine from cold brine-covered ice or snow to the atmosphere. This influences atmospheric chemistry as it affects the oxidising capacity of the troposphere through OH production and may also influence the local weather/temperature of the polar atmosphere, as ozone is a major greenhouse gas. Here, we make combined use of satellite retrievals and numerical model simulations to study individual BrO plume cases in the polar atmosphere. In agreement with previous studies, our analysis shows that the plumes are often transported by high latitude cyclones, sometimes over several days despite the short atmospheric lifetime of BrO. Moreover, general characteristics of bromine explosion events linked to transport by polar weather systems, such as frequency, spatial distribution and favourable weather conditions are derived based on a new detection method. Our results show that BrO cyclone transport events are by far more common in the Antarctic than in the Arctic.

  13. Surface Snowpack Key to Bromine Activation in a Changing Arctic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratt, Kerri; Custard, Kyle; Shepson, Paul; Douglas, Thomas; Pöhler, Denis; Stephan, General; Zielcke, Johannes; Simpson, William; Platt, Ulrich; von Glasow, Roland; Tanner, David; Huey, L. Gregory; Carlsen, Mark; Stirm, Brian

    2013-04-01

    Arctic sea ice is rapidly declining and transforming from a multiyear ice pack to thinner, more saline, seasonal ice, which has important implications for Arctic atmospheric composition. Following springtime polar sunrise, "ozone depletion events", attributed to bromine chemistry, lead to episodic decreases in lower tropospheric ozone concentrations to near zero, concurrent with mercury depletion and deposition. Despite our increasing understanding of the spatial variability of BrO and possible reaction pathways based on laboratory studies, important questions remain regarding the most efficient sources of and mechanisms for Arctic halogen activation. During the March-April 2012 BRomine, Ozone, and Mercury EXperiment (BROMEX) in Barrow, Alaska, outdoor chamber experiments with snow and ice samples were conducted. Ozone was added as the precursor oxidant, and the samples were investigated with and without ambient sunlight. Samples included first-year sea ice, brine icicles, several layers of snow above first-year sea ice, and seasonal snow above the tundra. Chemical ionization mass spectrometry was utilized to monitor Br2 production. Tundra snow and surface snow above sea ice produced the most Br2, with no production resulting from sea ice and basal snow directly above sea ice. Overall, the most efficient Br2 production was observed from snow samples characterized by lower pH and higher bromide/chloride ratios. Br2 was only observed in the presence of sunlight, indicating the role of snowpack photochemical reactions and the hydroxyl radical in its production. Br2 production via the surface snowpack explains previously-observed BrO enhancements above sea ice, as well as observations of inland tundra hotspots in measured BrO by aircraft-based nadir MAX-DOAS (Multi Axis-Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) measurements, conducted during BROMEX. The findings indicate that atmospherically processed snow is likely a major source of Arctic bromine release, which

  14. Bromine monoxide / sulphur dioxide ratios in relation to volcanological observations at Mt. Etna 2006–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Giuffrida

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Over a 3-yr period, from 2006 to 2009, frequent scattered sunlight DOAS measurements were conducted at Mt. Etna at a distance of around 6 km downwind from the summit craters. During the same period and in addition to these measurements, volcanic observations were made by regularly visiting various parts of Mt. Etna. Here, results from these measurements and observations are presented and their relation is discussed. The focus of the investigation is the bromine monoxide/sulphur dioxide (BrO / SO2 ratio, and its variability in relation to volcanic processes. That the halogen/sulphur ratio can serve as a precursor or indicator for the onset of eruptive activity was already proposed by earlier works (e.g. Noguchi and Kamiya 1963; Menyailov, 1975; Pennisi and Cloarec, 1998; Aiuppa et al., 2002. However, there is still a limited understanding today because of the complexity with which halogens are released, depending on magma composition and degassing conditions. Our understanding of these processes is far from complete, for example of the rate and mechanism of bubble nucleation, growth and ascent in silicate melts (Carroll and Holloway, 1994, the halogen vapour-melt partitioning and the volatile diffusivity in the melt (Aiuppa et al., 2009. With this study we aim to add one more piece to the puzzle of what halogen/sulphur ratios might tell about volcanic activities. Our data set shows an increase of the BrO / SO2 ratio several weeks prior to an eruption, followed by a decline before and during the initial phase of eruptive activities. Towards the end of activity or shortly thereafter, the ratio increases to baseline values again and remains more or less constant during quiet phases. To explain the observed evolution of the BrO / SO2 ratio, a first empirical model is proposed. This model suggests that bromine, unlike chlorine and fluorine, is less soluble in the magmatic melt than sulphur. By using the DOAS method to determine SO2, we actually

  15. Synergetic catalysis in hydrocarbon generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabate, R.W. [San`Doil Exploration L.C., New Orleans, LA (United States); Baker, C.C. [Consulting Petroleum Geologist, Metairie, LA (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Thermogenesis as the sole origin of hydrocarbons has been questioned by Gulf Coast geologists for two reasons: (1) lack of thermally mature source beds except on the basin`s Mesozoic rim and (2) persuasive empirical evidence of shallow, early generation, migration, and emplacement. Enigmatically, even subsequent deeper burial of the reservoirs has not resulted in thermal maturity. However, recent laboratory research has identified several natural catalysts that significantly lower temperatures needed for conversion of organic materials into hydrocarbons. Perhaps synergism among these or as-yet-undiscovered catalysts, together with geologic reaction times, is capable of producing hydrocarbons at temperatures low enough for early emplacement.

  16. Synergetic catalysis in hydrocarbon generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabate, R.W. [San`Doil Exploration L.C., New Orleans, LA (United States); Baker, C.C. [NAC of FINDING, Slidell, LA (United States)

    1994-09-01

    Thermogenesis as the sole origin of hydrocarbons has been questioned by Gulf Coast petroleum geologists for two reasons: (1) lack of thermally mature source beds except on the basin`s Mesozoic rim and (2) persuasive empirical evidence of shallow, early migration and emplacement. Enigmatically, even subsequent deeper burial of the reservoirs has not resulted in thermal maturity. However, recent laboratory research has identified several natural catalysts that significantly lower temperatures needed for conversion of organic materials into hydrocarbons. Perhaps synergism among these or as yet undiscovered catalysts, together with geologic reaction times, is capable of producing hydrocarbons at temperatures low enough for early emplacement.

  17. Proceedings of hydrocarbon contaminated soils and groundwater

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book reports on hydrogen contaminated soils and groundwater. Topics covered include: perspectives on hydrocarbon contamination; emerging hydrocarbon contamination issues; analytical methodologies and site assessment for hydrocarbon contaminated soils and groundwater; environmental fate and modeling; remedial technologies for hydrocarbon contaminated soils and groundwater; and risk assessment and risk management

  18. Hydrocarbon Leak Detection Sensor Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — FTT is proposing the development of a sensor to detect the presence of hydrocarbons in turbopump Inter-Propellant Seals (IPS). The purpose of the IPS is to prevent...

  19. Predicting hydrocarbon release from soil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    'Full text:' The remediation of hazardous chemicals from soils can be a lengthy and costly process. As a result, recent regulatory initiatives have focused on risk-based corrective action (RBCA) approaches. Such approaches attempt to identify the amount of chemical that can be left at a site with contaminated soil and still be protective of human health and the environment. For hydrocarbons in soils to pose risk to human heath and the environment, the hydrocarbons must be released from the soil and accessible to microorganisms, earthworms, or other higher level organisms. The sorption of hydrocarbons to soil can reduce the availability of the hydrocarbon to receptors. Typically in soils and sediments, there is an initial fast release of a hydrocarbon from the soil to the aqueous phase followed by a slower release of the remaining hydrocarbon to the aqueous phase. The rate and extent of slow release can influence aqueous hydrocarbon concentrations and the fate and transport of hydrocarbons in the subsurface. Once the fast fraction of the chemical has been removed from the soil, the remaining fraction of a chemical may desorb at a rate that natural mechanisms can attenuate the released hydrocarbon. Hence, active remediation may be needed only until the fast fraction has been removed. However, the fast fraction is a soil and chemical specific parameter. This presentation will present a tier I type protocol that has been developed to quickly estimate the fraction of hydrocarbons that are readily released from the soil matrix to the aqueous phase. Previous research in our laboratory and elsewhere has used long-term desorption (four months) studies to determine the readily released fraction. This research shows that a single short-term (less than two weeks) batch extraction procedure provides a good estimate of the fast released fraction derived from long-term experiments. This procedure can be used as a tool to rapidly evaluate the release and bioavailability of

  20. Maritime hydrocarbon pollution: Intervention

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The possibility of oil spills is of great concern to Canada because of the large quantities of petroleum that are shipped along its long coastline, the economic importance of fishing and other industries that could be affected by an oil spill, and the severity of climatic conditions in Canadian waters. Measures implemented to handle oil spill emergencies include relevant provisions in the merchant marine laws, establishment of a compensation fund for oil spill cleanup and damage, and provision of oil spill-related services by the Canadian Coast Guard (CCG), whose activities in this regard are summarized. The CCG has a fleet of 119 ships, 4 hydrofoils, 35 helicopters, and various small craft as well as oil spill pollution cleanup equipment worth $35 million stationed at 55 locations across Canada and staff specialists in oil spill emergencies. The CCG is responsible for enforcing the merchant marine law and has created a service for intervening in maritime emergencies. The CCG's equipment includes units for pumping out tankers in an emergency situation, shoreline cleanup devices, skimmers, containment booms, and facilities for adding dispersants to spills. A description of the behavior of hydrocarbons in an oil spill at sea is also included. 26 figs

  1. HYDROCARBONS RESERVES IN VENEZUELA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez Cruz, D.J.

    2007-07-01

    Venezuela is an important player in the energy world, because of its hydrocarbons reserves. The process for calculating oil and associated gas reserves is described bearing in mind that 90% of the gas reserves of Venezuela are associated to oil. Likewise, an analysis is made of the oil reserves figures from 1975 to 2003. Reference is also made to inconsistencies found by international experts and the explanations offered in this respect by the Ministry of Energy and Petroleum (MENPET) and Petroleos de Venezuela (PDVSA) regarding the changes that took place in the 1980s. In turn, Hubbert's Law is explained to determine peak production of conventional oil that a reservoir or field will reach, as well as its relationship with remaining reserves. Emphasis is placed on the interest of the United Nations on this topic. The reserves of associated gas are presented along with their relationship with the different crude oils that are produced and with injected gas, as well as with respect to the possible changes that would take place in the latter if oil reserves are revised. Some recommendations are submitted so that the MENPET starts preparing the pertinent policies ruling reserves. (auth)

  2. Evaluation of hydrocarbon potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cashman, P.H.; Trexler, J.H. Jr. [Univ. of Nevada, Reno, NV (United States)

    1992-09-30

    Task 8 is responsible for assessing the hydrocarbon potential of the Yucca Mountain vincinity. Our main focus is source rock stratigraphy in the NTS area in southern Nevada. (In addition, Trexler continues to work on a parallel study of source rock stratigraphy in the oil-producing region of east central Nevada, but this work is not funded by Task 8.) As a supplement to the stratigraphic studies, we are studying the geometry and kinematics of deformation at NTS, particularly as these pertain to reconstructing Paleozoic stratigraphy and to predicting the nature of the Late Paleozoic rocks under Yucca Mountain. Our stratigraphic studies continue to support the interpretation that rocks mapped as the {open_quotes}Eleana Formation{close_quotes} are in fact parts of two different Mississippian units. We have made significant progress in determining the basin histories of both units. These place important constraints on regional paleogeographic and tectonic reconstructions. In addition to continued work on the Eleana, we plan to look at the overlying Tippipah Limestone. Preliminary TOC and maturation data indicate that this may be another potential source rock.

  3. Bioassay of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Van Kirk, E.A.

    1980-08-01

    A positive relationship was found between the photodynamic activity of 24 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons versus published results on the mutagenicity, carcinogenicity, and initiation of unscheduled DNA synthesis. Metabolic activation of benzo(a)pyrene resulted in detection of increased mutagenesis in Paramecium tetraurelia as found also in the Ames Salmonella assay. The utility of P. tetraurelia as a biological detector of hazardous polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons is discussed.

  4. Aliphatic hydrocarbons of the fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weete, J. D.

    1972-01-01

    Review of studies of aliphatic hydrocarbons which have been recently detected in the spores of phytopathogenic fungi, and are found to be structurally very similar to the alkanes of higher plants. It appears that the hydrocarbon components of the few mycelial and yeast forms reported resemble the distribution found in bacteria. The occurence and distribution of these compounds in the fungi is discussed. Suggested functional roles of fungal spore alkanes are presented.

  5. Production of HBR from bromine and steam for off-peak electrolytic hydrogen generation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlief, R.E.; Hanrahan, R.J.; Stoy, M.A. [Univ. of Florida, Gainesville, FL (United States)] [and others

    1995-09-01

    Progress is reported on the development of a renewable energy source based solar-electrolytic system for production of hydrogen and oxygen. It employs water, bromine, solar energy and supplemental electrical power. The concept is being developed by Solar Reactor Technologies, Inc., (SRT), with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). An overview of the nature and objectives of this program is provided here, and technical progress made during the first (three-month) performance period of the Phase I work effort is reported. The SRT concept entails (1) absorption of concentrated solar radiation by bromine vapor Br{sub 2(g)} in a high-temperature reactor producing Br{sub (g)} atoms, (2) reaction of Br{sub (g)} with water yielding hydrogen bromide (HBr), and (3) electrolysis of stored hydrogen bromide for production of H{sub 2(g)} and recovery of Br{sub 2(I)}. Incorporation of solar radiation in the primary photochemical step (1) reduces by 50 - 70% the electrical power required to split water. The SRT concept is very attractive from an economic viewpoint as well. The reversible fuel cell, employed in the SRT electrolysis concept is capitalized via its use in load leveling by the utility. A 1 kW solar reactor was designed and constructed during the first three-month performance period by SRT personnel at the University of Florida, Gainesville. It was employed in taking survey data of the reaction between bromine and steam at temperatures between 900 and 1300 K. This reaction was run under purely thermal conditions, i.e. in the absence of solar photons. The experimental data are reported and interpreted employing concomitant thermodynamic calculations. The anticipated improvement is discussed briefly as well as the effect of a photochemical boost to the reaction. The amount of this enhancement will be studied in the next three month performance period.

  6. Molecular simulations and density functional theory calculations of bromine in clathrate hydrate phases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bromine forms a tetragonal clathrate hydrate structure (TS-I) very rarely observed in clathrate hydrates of other guest substances. The detailed structure, energetics, and dynamics of Br2 and Cl2 in TS-I and cubic structure I (CS-I) clathrate hydrates are studied in this work using molecular dynamics and quantum chemical calculations. X-ray diffraction studies show that the halogen-water–oxygen distances in the cages of these structures are shorter than the sum of the van der Waals radii of halogen and oxygen atoms. This suggests that the stabilizing effects of halogen bonding or other non-covalent interactions (NCIs) may contribute to the formation of the unique tetragonal bromine hydrate structure. We performed molecular dynamics simulations of Br2 and Cl2 clathrate hydrates using our previously developed five-site charge models for the dihalogen molecules [Dureckova et al. Can. J. Chem. 93, 864 (2015)] which reproduce the computed electrostatic potentials of the dihalogens and account for the electropositive σ-hole of the halogen bond donor (the dihalogen). Analysis of the radial distribution functions, enthalpies of encapsulation, velocity and orientation autocorrelation functions, and polar angle distributions are carried out for Br2 and Cl2 guests in various cages to contrast the properties of these guests in the TS-I and CS-I phases. Quantum chemical partial geometry optimizations of Br2 and Cl2 guests in the hydrate cages using the M06-2X functional give short halogen-water distances compatible with values observed in X-ray diffraction experiments. NCI plots of guest-cage structures are generated to qualitatively show the relative strength of the non-bonding interactions between dihalogens and water molecules. The differences between behaviors of Br2 and Cl2 guests in the hydrate cages may explain why bromine forms the unique TS-I phase

  7. Trophic transfer of naturally produced brominated aromatic compounds in a Baltic Sea food chain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahlgren, Elin; Lindqvist, Dennis; Dahlgren, Henrik; Asplund, Lillemor; Lehtilä, Kari

    2016-02-01

    Brominated aromatic compounds (BACs) are widely distributed in the marine environment. Some of these compounds are highly toxic, such as certain hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs). In addition to anthropogenic emissions through use of BACs as e.g. flame retardants, BACs are natural products formed by marine organisms such as algae, sponges, and cyanobacteria. Little is known of the transfer of BACs from natural producers and further up in the trophic food chain. In this study it was observed that total sum of methoxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (MeO-PBDEs) and OH-PBDEs increased in concentration from the filamentous red alga Ceramium tenuicorne, via Gammarus sp. and three-spined stickleback (Gasterosteus aculeatus) to perch (Perca fluviatilis). The MeO-PBDEs, which were expected to bioaccumulate, increased in concentration accordingly up to perch, where the levels suddenly dropped dramatically. The opposite pattern was observed for OH-PBDEs, where the concentration exhibited a general trend of decline up the food web, but increased in perch, indicating metabolic demethylation of MeO-PBDEs. Debromination was also indicated to occur when progressing through the food chain resulting in high levels of tetra-brominated MeO-PBDE and OH-PBDE congeners in fish, while some penta- and hexa-brominated congeners were observed to be the dominant products in the alga. As it has been shown that OH-PBDEs are potent disruptors of oxidative phosphorylation and that mixtures of different congener may act synergistically in terms of this toxic mode of action, the high levels of OH-PBDEs detected in perch in this study warrants further investigation into potential effects of these compounds on Baltic wildlife, and monitoring of their levels. PMID:26517387

  8. The measurement of bromine monoxide from Fairbanks, AK and comparison with OMI/AURA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mount, G. H.; Spinei, E.; Herman, J. R.; Cede, A.; Abuhassan, N.; Simpson, W. R.; McPeters, R. D.; Bhartia, P. K.; Johnson, B. J.; Salawitch, R. J.; Canty, T. P.; Chance, K.; Kurosu, T. P.; Suleiman, R. M.

    2011-12-01

    Enhanced column bromine monoxide in the Arctic has been observed by satellites for some time and is related to bromine "hotspots" that result in nearly complete removal of surface ozone in springtime. Salawitch et al. (2010) have demonstrated that these enhancements show little relation, at times, to satellite-enhanced column BrO. Several recent studies have shown that closure of the budget for total column BrO is achieved by summing observed tropospheric partial column BrO with a calculated stratospheric partial column that accounts for the supply of 7 ppt of Bry from natural, short-lived biogenic bromocarbons to the lowermost stratosphere. However, the burden of Bry in the upper stratosphere in these studies, 26 ppt, is at the upper limit of Bry levels inferred from upper stratospheric BrO. A ground-based NASA-sponsored field campaign was held in Fairbanks, AK in March and April 2011 to measure bromine monoxide and other trace gases by direct sun and multi-axis scattered skylight in combination with daily ozonesondes and OMI/AURA satellite data of BrO. The tropospheric contribution to column BrO should be near zero at this time/location. The campaign was therefore focused on defining the stratospheric BrO burden and evaluating the accuracy of total column BrO reported by OMI. The comparison of the ground-based BrO data with the OMI data is reported. Additionally, the DOAS derivation of BrO is explored using various spectral fitting windows and an error budget compiled showing the sensitivity of the deduced BrO vertical column with instrument-dependent spectral window.

  9. Thermodynamic properties of bromine fluorene derivatives: An experimental and computational study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Vapour pressures of two bromine derivatives of fluorene were measured. • Combustion energies of two bromine derivatives of fluorene were determined. • Standard molar ΔH, ΔS and ΔG of sublimation and vapourisation were derived. • Standard molar ΔH, ΔS and ΔG of formation in crystal and gas phases were calculated. • Gas phase ΔH of formation was also estimated by quantum chemical calculations. - Abstract: This report presents a comprehensive experimental and computational study of the thermodynamic properties of two bromine fluorene derivatives: 2-bromofluorene and 2,7-dibromofluorene. The standard (p° = 0.1 MPa) molar enthalpies of formation in the crystalline phase of these compounds were derived from the standard molar energies of combustion, in oxygen, at T = 298.15 K, measured by rotating bomb combustion calorimetry. The vapour pressures of the crystalline phase of the two compounds were measured using the Knudsen effusion method and a static method that has also been used to measure the liquid vapour pressures of 2-bromofluorene. From these results the standard molar enthalpies, entropies and Gibbs energies of sublimation of the two compounds studied and of vapourisation of 2-bromofluorene were derived. The enthalpies and temperatures of fusion were determined from DSC experiments. Derived results of standard enthalpies and Gibbs energies of formation, in both gaseous and crystalline phases, were compared with the ones reported in the literature for fluorene. The experimental values of the gas-phase enthalpies of formation of each compound were compared with estimates based on density functional theory calculations using the B3LYP hybrid exchange–correlation energy functional with the 6-311++G(d,p) basis set

  10. With bromine against mercury. Reduction of emission of mercury from combustion gases by 90 % minimally; Mit Brom gegen Quecksilber. Hg-Emissionen aus Verbrennungsabgasen um mindestens 90 % senken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kanefke, Rico [Currenta GmbH und Co. OHG, Leverkusen (Germany)

    2009-01-15

    Emission of mercury is a global problem. If mercury once arrived into the environment, it remains there for a long period of time and increasingly becomes a strain for humans. In particular, the combustion of coal releases mercury. Under this aspect, the author of the contribution under consideration reports on a new procedure to an almost complete separation of mercury from exhaust gases. The complete oxidation of mercury in the flue gas is the basis to the improved separation of mercury. During bromination of mercury in the cooling down flue gas of boilers, mercury bromide is developed. Bromine is given as a bromine compound such as calcium bromide to the fuel such as coal. At temperatures greater than 1,000 Celsius, at first hydrogen bromide is developed which is converted to bromine by means of the bromine-Deacon-process during cooling. At temperatures below 100 Celsius, the formed bromine reacts with sulphur dioxide so that bromine is available in the entire reaction vessel for the oxidation of mercury. With comparable amount of SO{sub 2}, the oxidation of mercury with bromine is at least 25 times more efficient than the oxidation with chlorine. After this, mercury bromide is separated in the wet scrubber and precipitated during the treatment of rinsing water. Then the resulting mercury sulphide is separated as a filter cake from the water and spent on the dump. Thus, mercury is withdrawn from the atmospheric mercury cycle.

  11. Assessment of PCDD/F and PBDD/F Emissions from Coal-fired Power Plants during Injection of Brominated Activated Carbon for Mercury Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effect of the injection of brominated powdered activated carbon (Br-PAC) on the emission of brominated and chlorinated dioxins and furans in coal combustion flue gas has been evaluated. The tests were performed at two U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) demonstration sites where ...

  12. Reaction modelling of Iron Oxide Bromination in the UT-3 thermochemical cycle for Hydrogen production from water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis modelling of the iron oxide bromination had been carried out using experiment data from the iron oxide bromination in the UT-3 thermochemical cycle. Iron oxide in the form of pellets were made of the calcination of the mixture of iron oxide, silica, graphite and cellulose at 1473 K. Thermobalance reactor was used to study the kinetic reactions of the iron oxide bromination at a temperature of 473 K for 2 - 6 hours. The data collected from the experiments were used as input for the common models. However, none of these models could not explain the result of the experiments. A new model, a combination of two kinetic reactions : exposed particle and coated particle was created and worked successfully

  13. Origin of bromine in ancient sutras of the Otani collection. PIXE application to preservation of cultural assets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some small fragments of rag paper - made more than a thousand and a few hundred years ago, and excavated at Turfan, west of China by the Otani-expedition dispatched there during the late Meiji and the Taisho eras - were measured by PIXE. Bromine was highly detected in all of these ancient fragments and modern paper samples that had been placed together with these Turfan manuscripts. In other paper samples, bromine could not be detected (H+, 4 MeV, 50 μC and H+, 2 MeV, 100 μC) and their average concentration was about 1.1 ppm (S.D. = 1.11 ppm, N = 15, 0.3 - 3.4 ppm). The bromine contamination of ancient sutras is mainly caused by larvicide of methyl bromide, and the observation suggests that the ancient manuscripts might be spoiled gradually by agricultural chemicals for protecting them from vermin. (author)

  14. Enriched concentrations of bromine, chlorine, and iodine in urban rainfall as determined by instrumental neutron activation analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concentrations of bromine, chlorine and iodine were determined in bulk rain as part of a detailed urban monitoring program. Instrumental neutron activation gives simultaneous non-destructive analysis of these halogens with detection limits of 2, 30 and 1 ng/g for bromine, chlorine, and iodine, respectively. Results for enrichment factor calculations based on crustal, seawater and lake water reference elements were somewhat contradictory. Elemental ratios of Br/Cl, I/Cl, Br/Pb, and Cl/Pb, together with an analysis of chlorine in urban surface materials, support the suggestions that local anthropogenic sources may cause the high bromine and chlorine concentrations observed in urban precipitation while fractionation from an oceanic source is likely responsible for high iodine concentrations. (author)

  15. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Farid

    2010-01-01

    Carbonaceous materials play an important role in space. Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons (PAHs) are a ubiquitous component of the carbonaceous materials. PAHs are the best-known candidates to account for the IR emission bands. They are also thought to be among the carriers of the diffuse interstellar absorption bands (DIBs). PAH ionization states reflect the ionization balance of the medium while PAH size, composition, and structure reflect the energetic and chemical history of the medium. A major challenge is to reproduce in the laboratory the physical conditions that exist in the emission and absorption interstellar zones. The harsh physical conditions of the ISM -low temperature, collisionless, strong UV radiation fields- are simulated in the laboratory by associating a molecular beam with an ionizing discharge to generate a cold plasma expansion. PAH ions and radicals are formed from the neutral precursors in an isolated environment at low temperature and probed with high-sensitivity cavity ringdown spectroscopy in the NUV-NIR range. Carbon nanoparticles are also formed during the short residence time of the precursors in the plasma and are characterized with time-offlight mass spectrometry. These experiments provide unique information on the spectra of large carbonaceous molecules and ions in the gas phase that can now be directly compared to interstellar and circumstellar observations (IR emission bands, DIBs, extinction curve). These findings also hold great potential for understanding the formation process of interstellar carbonaceous grains. We will review recent progress in the experimental and theoretical studies of PAHs, compare the laboratory data with astronomical observations and discuss the global implications.

  16. Magnetically enhanced triode etching of large area silicon membranes in a molecular bromine plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimization of a process for etching 125 mm silicon membranes formed on 150 mm wafers and bonded to Pyrex rings is discussed. A magnetically enhanced triode etching system was designed to provide an intense, remote plasma surrounding the membrane while, at the same time, suppressing the discharge over the membrane itself. For the optimized molecular bromine process, the silicon etch rate is 40 nm/min and the selectivity relative to SiO2 is 160:1. 14 refs., 6 figs

  17. Neutron Activation Analysis of Vanadium, Copper, Zinc, Bromine and Iodine in Pyura Microcosmus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most of the tunicates seem to accumulate vanadium more energetically than other marine organisms. However, there is a very great variation within the group. Maximum amounts of vanadium were found in the Ascididae family whereas in some species of the Pyuridae family vanadium was apparently absent. This paper describes the simple and rapid determination by activation analysis of vanadium, copper, zinc, bromine and iodine in Pyura microcosmus, a species of the Pyuridae family. The same elements were also investigated in the environmental sea-water. Samples of P. microcosmus and sea-water were collected from a point about 15 m below the surface in the Saronic Gulf near Athens. All irradiations of samples and standards were carried out with the DEMOCRITUS Reactor of the Nuclear Research Centre of Greece, at a neutron flux of 2 x 1011 n/cm2s. The time of irradiation with the pneumatic transfer system ranged from 1 to 25 min, depending on the element being determined. After irradiation and addition of inactive carriers, the radioisotopes of interest were isolated by fast radiochemical procedures based on solvent extraction techniques. Vanadium and copper were extracted as cupferrates into chloroform, and zinc was extracted with 8% methyldioctylamine into trichloroethylene. Bromine and iodine were distilled first and then separated from each other by selective redox and extraction procedures. The photopeak areas of 52V, 64Cu, 69mZn, 82Br and 128I were measured by means of a multichannel analyser and compared with those of standards of the above radionuclides processed in the same manner. After irradiation the time to complete the analysis ranged from 5 to 35 min depending on the element being determined. The quantities of the elements determined in P. microcosmus, expressed in micrograms per gram of dry matter, were: vanadium 1.0, copper 7.5, iodine 14.1, bromine 406 and zinc 702. The per cent concentration of the same elements found in the sea-water was as follows

  18. SYNTHESIS AND GREEN BROMINATION OF SOME CHALCONES AND THEIR ANTIMICROBIAL SCREENING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayur R. Adokar

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Chalcones are the versatile molecules having the structural flexibility which permits structural transformations into flavonoids, flavanones, pyrazoles, oxazoles, pyrimidines etc. Changes in their structure have offered the development of new medicinal agents having improved pharmacological potency. Their derivatives have attracts increasing attention due to numerous pharmacological potential. In the present communication we report the synthesis of chalcones from various acetophenone derivatives with different aromatic aldehydes and green chemistry approach to their bromination with the help of Tetrabutylammonium Tribromide (TBATB. All the synthesized chalcone dibromides were screened for their antimicrobial activity against Aspergillus flavus, Rhizopus sp., Fusarium solani and Aspergillus niger.

  19. Levels of persistent fluorinated, chlorinated and brominated compounds in human blood collected in Sweden in 1997-2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindstroem, G.; Kaerrman, A.; Bavel, B. van [MTM Research Centre, Oerebro Univ. (Sweden); Hardell, L. [Dept. of Oncology, Univ. Hospital, Oerebro (Sweden); Hedlund, B. [Environmental Monitoring Section, Swedish EPA, Stockholm (Sweden)

    2004-09-15

    Levels of persistent fluorinated, chlorinated and brominated compounds in blood collected from the Swedish population have been determined in connection with several exposure and monitoring studies at the MTM Research Centre. A data base with 631 individual congener specific measurements on halogenated POPs such as dioxins, PCBs, HCB, DDE, chlordanes, PBDEs and PFAs including information on residency, age, BMI, diet, occupation, number of children, smoking habits, immunological status etc. has been compiled from samples collected between 1994 and 2004. A brief overview focusing on levels of some persistent chlorinated, brominated and fluorinated, compounds in blood collected in a background population group (n=83) in 1997-2000 is given here.

  20. Price Wars and the Stability of Collusion: A Study of the Pre-World War I Bromine Industry

    OpenAIRE

    Margaret Levenstein

    1993-01-01

    Bromine producers colluded to raise prices and profits during most of the period between 1885 and 1914. Collusion was punctuated by price wars in which prices fell sharply. The characteristics of these price wars are compared with those in the Green-Porter and Abreu- Pearce-Stachetti models. Some of the bromine price wars resulted from the imperfect monitoring problems in these models. Those price wars were short and mild. More severe price wars were part of a bargaining process, in which fir...

  1. Synchrotron X-ray fluorescence studies of a bromine-labelled cyclic RGD peptide interacting with individual tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first example of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence imaging of cultured mammalian cells in cyclic peptide research is reported. The study reports the first quantitative analysis of the incorporation of a bromine-labelled cyclic RGD peptide and its effects on the biodistribution of endogenous elements (for example, K and Cl) within individual tumor cells. The first example of synchrotron X-ray fluorescence imaging of cultured mammalian cells in cyclic peptide research is reported. The study reports the first quantitative analysis of the incorporation of a bromine-labelled cyclic RGD peptide and its effects on the biodistribution of endogenous elements (for example, K and Cl) within individual tumor cells

  2. Hydrocarbons as markers for identifying postirradiated peanuts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrocarbons produced by γ-radiation of peanuts were analyzed to determine the relationship between irradiation and production of hydrocarbons, and the use of hydrocarbons as markers for identifying postirradiated peanuts. Hydrocarbons in peanuts were determined by a sequential procedure of lipid extraction by hexane, Florisil column chromatography, and gas chromatography. Hydrocarbons C17:1, C16:2, C17:2, and C16:3 were easily detected in peanuts irradiated at 0.5 kGy or higher, but not in unirradiated ones. The hydrocarbons were minimally changed by roasting the irradiated peanuts and were not detected in unirradiated roasted peanuts

  3. Occurrence and risk assessment of organophosphorus and brominated flame retardants in the River Aire (UK)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study presents the occurrence and risk of PBDEs, new brominated and organophosphorus flame retardants along a river affected by urban and industrial pressures (River Aire, UK). Tris(2-choroethyl) phosphate (TCEP), tris(2-chloro-1-methylethyl) phosphate (TCPP), tris[2-chloro-1-(chloromethyl)ethyl] phosphate (TDCP) and triphenyl phosphate (TPhP) were detected in all samples, with TCPP present at the highest concentrations, ranging from 113 to 26 050 ng L-1. BDE-209 was detected in most of the sampled sites, ranging from 17 to 295 ng L−1, while hexabromobenzene (HBB) and pentabromoethyl benzene (PBEB) were seldom detected. A risk quotients based on predicted no effect concentrations (PNEC) and flame retardants water concentration proved significant risk for adverse effects for algae, Daphnia and fish in sites close to industrial and urban sewage discharges. This study provides a protocol for the risk estimation of priority and new generation flame retardants based on river concentrations and toxicological values. -- Highlights: •Brominated and organophosphorus flame retardants were monitored in River Aire (UK). •BDE-209 and organophosphorus flame retardants were detected at high concentrations. •A risk assessment was performed based on water concentration and acute toxicity data. •Low to significant risk for adverse effects was observed for algae, fish and Daphnia. -- Organophosphorus flame retardants and BDE-209 were detected at high concentrations along River Aire (UK) and a risk assessment indicated significant risk for adverse effects to aquatic organisms

  4. Iodine-123 and bromine-75 production and development program at Juelich

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The iodine-123 and bromine-75 production and development program at the Nuclear Research Center in Juelich as of 1982 is described, and examples of recent 123I- and 75Br-analogue tracers that have been developed to the level of clinical trial are given. Iodine-123 is produced via the 127I(d,6n)123Xe → 123I process and by the 124Te(p,2n)123I and 122Te(d,n)123I reactions. These production methods are critically reviewed. Bromine-75-labeled benzodiazenes have been prepared for in vivo mapping of benzodiazepine receptor sites. The 7-(75Br)-5-(2-fluorophenyl)-1-methyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-1,4-benzodiazepine-2-one (BFB) was prepared with a specific activity of > 104 Ci/mmole. Finally, preparation and applications of the halogenated amino acid L-3-(123I)-iodo-α-methyltyrosine (IMT) and the analogous 75Br compound (BMT) are reported. Both IMT and BMT have been successfully applied for pancreas imaging and tomography, and IMT has been used for imaging both melanotic and amelanotic malignant melanoma of the eye

  5. Brominated diphenyl ethers in the sediments, porewater, and biota of the Chesapeake Bay, USA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, K.; Klosterhaus, S.; Liebert, D.; Stapleton, H. [Maryland Univ., Solomons, MD (United States)

    2004-09-15

    Levels of brominated diphenyl ethers (BDEs) are rapidly increasing in the environment, and in a short time these chemicals have evolved from 'emerging contaminants' to globally-distributed organic pollutants. Recent research demonstrates BDEs are sufficiently stable to be transported long distances in the environment and to accumulate in higher trophic levels. Photolysis and metabolism appear to be dominant loss processes for the parent compounds, generating a variety of lower brominated diphenyl ethers, hydroxylated metabolites, and other products. BDEs are hydrophobic, and therefore their transport in aquatic systems is likely controlled by sorption to sediments and perhaps exchange across the air-water interface. To date, few studies have examined the geochemistry of BDEs in natural waters. In this paper, we review our recent measurements of BDEs in the Chesapeake Bay, a shallow, productive estuary in eastern North America. We focus on the distribution of BDE congeners sediment, porewater, and in faunal benthos along a contamination gradient downstream from a wastewater treatment plant and on the spatial distribution of BDEs in bottom-feeding and pelagic fish species.

  6. Levelized cost of energy and sensitivity analysis for the hydrogen-bromine flow battery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Nirala; McFarland, Eric W.

    2015-08-01

    The technoeconomics of the hydrogen-bromine flow battery are investigated. Using existing performance data the operating conditions were optimized to minimize the levelized cost of electricity using individual component costs for the flow battery stack and other system units. Several different configurations were evaluated including use of a bromine complexing agent to reduce membrane requirements. Sensitivity analysis of cost is used to identify the system elements most strongly influencing the economics. The stack lifetime and round-trip efficiency of the cell are identified as major factors on the levelized cost of electricity, along with capital components related to hydrogen storage, the bipolar plate, and the membrane. Assuming that an electrocatalyst and membrane with a lifetime of 2000 cycles can be identified, the lowest cost market entry system capital is 220 kWh-1 for a 4 h discharge system and for a charging energy cost of 0.04 kWh-1 the levelized cost of the electricity delivered is 0.40 kWh-1. With systems manufactured at large scales these costs are expected to be lower.

  7. Dissolution of brominated epoxy resins by dimethyl sulfoxide to separate waste printed circuit boards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Ping; Chen, Yan; Wang, Liangyou; Qian, Guangren; Zhang, Wei Jie; Zhou, Ming; Zhou, Jin

    2013-03-19

    Improved methods are required for the recycling of waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs). In this study, WPCBs (1-1.5 cm(2)) were separated into their components using dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) at 60 °C for 45 min and a metallographic microscope was used to verify their delamination. An increased incubation time of 210 min yielded a complete separation of WPCBs into their components, and copper foils and glass fibers were obtained. The separation time decreased with increasing temperature. When the WPCB size was increased to 2-3 cm(2), the temperature required for complete separation increased to 90 °C. When the temperature was increased to 135 °C, liquid photo solder resists could be removed from the copper foil surfaces. The DMSO was regenerated by rotary decompression evaporation, and residues were obtained. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR), thermal analysis, nuclear magnetic resonance, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy were used to verify that these residues were brominated epoxy resins. From FT-IR analysis after the dissolution of brominated epoxy resins in DMSO it was deduced that hydrogen bonding may play an important role in the dissolution mechanism. This novel technology offers a method for separating valuable materials and preventing environmental pollution from WPCBs. PMID:23398278

  8. Stable bromine isotopic composition of methyl bromide released from plant matter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horst, Axel; Holmstrand, Henry; Andersson, Per; Thornton, Brett F.; Wishkerman, Asher; Keppler, Frank; Gustafsson, Örjan

    2014-01-01

    Methyl bromide (CH3Br) emitted from plants constitutes a natural source of bromine to the atmosphere, and is a component in the currently unbalanced global CH3Br budget. In the stratosphere, CH3Br contributes to ozone loss processes. Studies of stable isotope composition may reduce uncertainties in the atmospheric CH3Br budget, but require well-constrained isotope fingerprints of the source end members. Here we report the first measurements of stable bromine isotopes (δ81Br) in CH3Br from abiotic plant emissions. Incubations of both KBr-fortified pectin, a ubiquitous cell-stabilizing macromolecule, and of a natural halophyte (Salicornia fruticosa), yielded an enrichment factor (ε) of -2.00 ± 0.23‰ (1σ, n = 8) for pectin and -1.82 ± 0.02‰ (1σ, n = 4) for Salicornia (the relative amount of the heavier 81Br was decreased in CH3Br compared to the substrate salt). For short incubations, and up to 10% consumption of the salt substrate, this isotope effect was similar for temperatures from 30 up to 300 °C. For longer incubations of up to 90 h at 180 °C the δ81Br values increased from -2‰ to 0‰ for pectin and to -1‰ for Salicornia. These δ81Br source signatures of CH3Br formation from plant matter combine with similar data for carbon isotopes to facilitate multidimensional isotope diagnostics of the CH3Br budget.

  9. Synthesis of α-Bromine- Terminated Polystyrene Macroinitiator and Its Initiation of MMA Polymerization by ATRP

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    In the present paper the synthesis of block copolymers via the transformation from living anionic polymerization (LAP) to atom transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) was described. Α-Bromine-terminated polystyrenes(PStBr) in the LAP step was prepared by using n-BuLi as initiator, tetrahydrofuran (THF) as the activator, α-methylstyrene (α-MeSt) as the capping group and liquid bromine (Br2) as the bromating agent. The effects of reaction conditions such as the amounts of α-MeSt, THF, and Br2 as well as molecular weight of polystyrene on the bromating efficiency (BE) and coupling extent (CE) were examined. The present results show that the yield of PStBr obtained was more than 93.8% and the coupling reaction was substantially absent. PStBr was further used as the macroinitiator in the polymerization of methyl-methacrylate(MMA) in the presence of copper(Ⅰ) halogen and 2,2-bipyridine(bpy) complexes. It was found that the molecular weight of the resulted PSt-b-PMMA increased linearly with the increase of the conversion of MMA and the polydispersity was 1.2-1.6. The structures of PStBr and P(St-b-MMA) were characterized by 1H NMR spectra.

  10. Ultrafast optical limiting properties and transient dynamics of symmetrical phenoxazinium bromine salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zhengguo; Ge, Jianfeng; Li, Zhongguo; Wu, Xingzhi; Fang, Yu; Shi, Guang; Zhang, Xueru; Wang, Yuxiao; Song, Yinglin

    2015-12-01

    A symmetrical phenoxazinium bromine salt with resonant D-π-D structure was prepared and spectroscopically characterized. The ultrafast nonlinear optical (NLO) response of the compound dissolved in DMF was investigated using open aperture Z-scan method with 190 fs laser pulses at 515 nm. And the photo-physical dynamics of the compound was studied using transient absorption spectra at femtosecond time regime. The titled sample showed strong reverse saturable absorption (RSA) at 515 nm. Transient absorption results demonstrated that the compound exhibited RSA signals at 478-580 nm and SA signals at 600-780 nm. A simplified three-energy-level model was used to determine the photo-physical parameters. And the excited-state lifetime was evaluated to be around one nanosecond. Our results show that the phenoxazinium bromine salt has a large ratio of singlet excited-state absorption cross-section to that of ground state cross-section (18.7), indicating it is a candidate material for future ultrafast optical limiters.

  11. Natural solar photolysis of total organic chlorine, bromine and iodine in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abusallout, Ibrahim; Hua, Guanghui

    2016-04-01

    Municipal wastewater has been increasingly used to augment drinking water supplies due to the growing water scarcity. Wastewater-derived disinfection byproducts (DBPs) may negatively affect the aquatic ecosystems and human health of downstream communities during water reuse. The objective of this research was to determine the degradation kinetics of total organic chlorine (TOCl), bromine (TOBr) and iodine (TOI) in water by natural sunlight irradiation. Outdoor solar photolysis experiments were performed to investigate photolytic degradation of the total organic halogen (TOX) formed by fulvic acid and real water and wastewater samples. The results showed that TOX degradation by sunlight irradiation followed the first-order kinetics with half-lives in the range of 2.6-10.7 h for different TOX compounds produced by fulvic acid. The TOX degradation rates were generally in the order of TOI > TOBr ≅ TOCl(NH2Cl) > TOCl(Cl2). High molecular weight TOX was more susceptible to solar photolysis than corresponding low molecular weight halogenated compounds. The nitrate and sulfite induced indirect TOX photolysis rates were less than 50% of the direct photolysis rates under the conditions of this study. Fulvic acid and turbidity in water reduced TOX photodegradation. These results contribute to a better understanding of the fate of chlorinated, brominated and iodinated DBPs in surface waters. PMID:26841230

  12. Novel Spectrophotometric Method for Determination of Macro-paracetamol via Reaction with Bromine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The reaction between Br2 and paracetamol(p-AAP) leads to the formation of a coloured product, which can be used for spectrophotometric determination of the p-AAP content in its pure form and in different pharmaceutical preparations with p-AAP. The stoichiometric composition of the reaction was found to be n(p-AAP)∶n(bromine)=1∶3. The effects of pH and time on the spectra of p-AAP-bromine redox reaction product were studied. The interference of different additives on the measured spectra of the obtained product was also studied. The results obtained by the present method were compared with those obtained by the standard method. The F- and t- test values were calculated for both of the applied procedures and they met a confidence level of 99%. The proposed procedure actually needs no separation of these drugs from their sources before analysis and was unaffected by interference of other phenolic compounds. The proposed method is simpler and faster than the repoeted ones.

  13. Selected chlorobornanes, polychlorinated naphthalenes and brominated flame retardants in Bjornoya (Bear Island) freshwater biota

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levels of selected sparsely investigated persistent organic pollutants (POPs) have been measured in organisms from two Arctic lakes on Bjornoya (Bear Island). Elevated levels of chlorobornanes (CHBs) (up to 46.7 ng/g wet weight=ww), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) (up to 27.2 ng/g ww), polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs) (up to 1.1 ng/g ww) and polychlorinated naphthalenes (PCNs, only 4 congeners) (up to 62.7 pg/g ww), were measured in biota from Lake Ellasjoen. In Lake Oyangen, located only 5 km north of Ellasjoen, levels of these contaminants were significantly lower. δ15N-values were 7-10%o higher in organisms from Ellasjoen as compared to Oyangen. This is attributed to biological inputs related to seabird activities. The present study illustrates that contaminants such as CHBs, brominated flame retardants and PCNs accumulate in the Ellasjoen food web in a manner similar to PCBs and conventional organochlorine pesticides. Transport mechanisms that control PCB and DDT distributions, i.e. atmospheric long-range transport and biotransport by seabirds, are also relevant for the contaminants investigated in the present study. - Elevate levels of chlorobornanes, polychlorinated naphthalenes and brominated flame retardants have been measured in biota from a Norwegian Arctic lake

  14. Development of Zinc/Bromine Batteries for Load-Leveling Applications: Phase 2 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    CLARK,NANCY H.; EIDLER,PHILLIP

    1999-10-01

    This report documents Phase 2 of a project to design, develop, and test a zinc/bromine battery technology for use in utility energy storage applications. The project was co-funded by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Power Technologies through Sandia National Laboratories. The viability of the zinc/bromine technology was demonstrated in Phase 1. In Phase 2, the technology developed during Phase 1 was scaled up to a size appropriate for the application. Batteries were increased in size from 8-cell, 1170-cm{sup 2} cell stacks (Phase 1) to 8- and then 60-cell, 2500-cm{sup 2} cell stacks in this phase. The 2500-cm{sup 2} series battery stacks were developed as the building block for large utility battery systems. Core technology research on electrolyte and separator materials and on manufacturing techniques, which began in Phase 1, continued to be investigated during Phase 2. Finally, the end product of this project was a 100-kWh prototype battery system to be installed and tested at an electric utility.

  15. Tropospheric Bromine Chemistry: Implications for Present and Pre-industrial Ozone and Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parella, J. P.; Jacob, D. J.; Liang, Q.; Zhang, Y.; Mickley, L. J.; Miller, B.; Evans, M. J.; Yang, X.; Pyle, J. A.; Theys, N.; VanRoozendael, M.

    2012-01-01

    We present a new model for the global tropospheric chemistry of inorganic bromine (Bry) coupled to oxidant-aerosol chemistry in the GEOS-Chem chemical transport model (CTM). Sources of tropospheric Bry include debromination of sea-salt aerosol, photolysis and oxidation of short-lived bromocarbons, and transport from the stratosphere. Comparison to a GOME-2 satellite climatology of tropospheric BrO columns shows that the model can reproduce the observed increase of BrO with latitude, the northern mid-latitudes maximum in winter, and the Arctic maximum in spring. This successful simulation is contingent on the HOBr + HBr reaction taking place in aqueous aerosols and ice clouds. Bromine chemistry in the model decreases tropospheric ozone mixing ratios by mercury against oxidation by Br. This suggests that historical anthropogenic mercury emissions may have mostly deposited to northern mid-latitudes, enriching the corresponding surface reservoirs. The persistent rise in background surface ozone at northern mid-latitudes during the past decades could possibly contribute to the observations of elevated mercury in subsurface waters of the North Atlantic.

  16. Small mammal populations in Maryland meadows during four years of herbicide (Brominal? ) applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, D.R., Jr.; Moulton, C.A.; Hines, J.E.; Hoffman, D.J.

    1996-01-01

    The herbicide Brominal? was applied at the recommended rate to one plot in each of three paired 0.6-ha plots; the other three plots were used as controls. Plots were sprayed once in the fall of 1988 and 1989 and twice in the spring of 1990 and 1991. Small mammals were trapped three times during each activity season (April?October) to obtain population estimates before and after spraying and in the spring preceding fall spraying or the fall following spring spraying. Population estimates immediately after spraying gave no evidence of direct mortality. By 1991, dicot vegetation on treated plots was suppressed and mean numbers of meadow voles (Microtus pennsylvanicus) were less than on control plots. Because meadow voles favor dicots over monocots in their diet, reduced availability of dicots may have been related to the smaller vole population estimates. Species diversity of small mammals was negatively correlated with size of vole populations, but was not different between treated and control plots. Brominal apparently induced opaque corneas in nine voles. The condition was found in two voles too small to have been conceived at the time of the last previous spray nearly 8 months earlier, suggesting exposure to residue alone.

  17. Hydrocarbon habitat in rifted basins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ziegler, P.A. [Basel Univ. (Switzerland)

    1996-12-01

    Tectonically active rifts, palaeo-rifts and passive margin basins contain major hydrocarbon provinces. Their hydrocarbon charge can rely exclusively on pre-rift, syn-rift sedimentary sequences or a combination thereof. Maturation of source-rocks can be achieved during the syn-and/or post-rift stage of basin evolution. During rifting, conductive and convective heat transfer accounts for elevated geothermal gradients; these play an important role in the maturation of pre- and syn-rift source-rocks; as geothermal gradients decrease asymptotically during the post-rift stage, maturation of late syn- and post-rift source-rocks depends on massif overburden thicknesses. In most rift structuration and trap-formation predate or are contemporaneous with peak oil and gas generation. Post-rift subsidence and stress-induced basin tilting or inversion can cause modification of trap configurations, causing loss of hydrocarbons. (author). 58 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  18. Enrichment of light hydrocarbon mixture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Dali; Devlin, David; Barbero, Robert S.; Carrera, Martin E.; Colling, Craig W.

    2011-11-29

    Light hydrocarbon enrichment is accomplished using a vertically oriented distillation column having a plurality of vertically oriented, nonselective micro/mesoporous hollow fibers. Vapor having, for example, both propylene and propane is sent upward through the distillation column in between the hollow fibers. Vapor exits neat the top of the column and is condensed to form a liquid phase that is directed back downward through the lumen of the hollow fibers. As vapor continues to ascend and liquid continues to countercurrently descend, the liquid at the bottom of the column becomes enriched in a higher boiling point, light hydrocarbon (propane, for example) and the vapor at the top becomes enriched in a lower boiling point light hydrocarbon (propylene, for example). The hollow fiber becomes wetted with liquid during the process.

  19. Method for producing viscous hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poston, Robert S.

    1982-01-01

    A method for recovering viscous hydrocarbons and synthetic fuels from a subterranean formation by drilling a well bore through the formation and completing the well by cementing a casing means in the upper part of the pay zone. The well is completed as an open hole completion and a superheated thermal vapor stream comprised of steam and combustion gases is injected into the lower part of the pay zone. The combustion gases migrate to the top of the pay zone and form a gas cap which provides formation pressure to produce the viscous hydrocarbons and synthetic fuels.

  20. Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH): ToxFAQs

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... a state: This map displays locations where Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) is known to be present. On ... I get more information? ToxFAQs TM for Total Petroleum Hydrocarbons (TPH) ( Hidrocarburos Totales de Petróleo (TPH) ) August ...

  1. Accumulation of organochlorines and brominated flame retardants in estuarine and marine food chains: Field measurements and model calculations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veltman, K.; Hendriks, J.; Huijbregts, M.; Leonards, P.E.G.; Heuvel-Greve, van den M.J.; Vethaak, D.

    2005-01-01

    Food chain accumulation of organochlorines and brominated flame retardants in estuarine and marine environments is compared to model estimations and fresh water field data. The food chain consists of herbivores, detritivores and primary and secondary carnivores i.e. fish, fish-eating birds and marin

  2. Corrosion mechanism of 13Cr stainless steel in completion fluid of high temperature and high concentration bromine salt

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The corrosion behavior of 13Cr steel exposed to bromine salt completion fluid containing high concentration bromine ions was investigated. • There are passive circles around pits on the 13Cr steel surface after 7 d of exposure. • Macroscopic galvanic corrosion formed between the passive halo and the pit. • The mechanism of pitting corrosion on 13Cr stainless steel exposed to heavy bromine brine was established. - Abstract: A series of corrosion tests of 13Cr stainless steel were conducted in a simulated completion fluid environment of high temperature and high concentration bromine salt. Corrosion behavior of specimens and the component of corrosion products were investigated by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that 13Cr steel suffers from severe local corrosion and there is always a passive halo around every pit. The formation mechanism of the passive halo is established. OH− ligand generates and adsorbs in a certain scale because of abundant OH− on the surface around the pits. Passive film forms around each pit, which leads to the occurrence of passivation in a certain region. Finally, the dissimilarities in properties and morphologies of regions, namely the pit and its corresponding passive halo, can result in different corrosion sensitivities and may promote the formation of macroscopic galvanic pairs

  3. Corrosion mechanism of 13Cr stainless steel in completion fluid of high temperature and high concentration bromine salt

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yan [Corrosion and Protection Center, Key Laboratory for Environmental Fracture (MOE), Institute for Advanced Materials and Technology, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Xu, Lining, E-mail: xulining@ustb.edu.cn [Corrosion and Protection Center, Key Laboratory for Environmental Fracture (MOE), Institute for Advanced Materials and Technology, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Lu, Minxu [Corrosion and Protection Center, Key Laboratory for Environmental Fracture (MOE), Institute for Advanced Materials and Technology, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Meng, Yao [Beijing Institute of Aeronautical Materials, Beijing 100095 (China); Zhu, Jinyang; Zhang, Lei [Corrosion and Protection Center, Key Laboratory for Environmental Fracture (MOE), Institute for Advanced Materials and Technology, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2014-09-30

    Highlights: • The corrosion behavior of 13Cr steel exposed to bromine salt completion fluid containing high concentration bromine ions was investigated. • There are passive circles around pits on the 13Cr steel surface after 7 d of exposure. • Macroscopic galvanic corrosion formed between the passive halo and the pit. • The mechanism of pitting corrosion on 13Cr stainless steel exposed to heavy bromine brine was established. - Abstract: A series of corrosion tests of 13Cr stainless steel were conducted in a simulated completion fluid environment of high temperature and high concentration bromine salt. Corrosion behavior of specimens and the component of corrosion products were investigated by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that 13Cr steel suffers from severe local corrosion and there is always a passive halo around every pit. The formation mechanism of the passive halo is established. OH{sup −} ligand generates and adsorbs in a certain scale because of abundant OH{sup −} on the surface around the pits. Passive film forms around each pit, which leads to the occurrence of passivation in a certain region. Finally, the dissimilarities in properties and morphologies of regions, namely the pit and its corresponding passive halo, can result in different corrosion sensitivities and may promote the formation of macroscopic galvanic pairs.

  4. Exposure to brominated trihalomethanes in water during pregnancy and micronuclei frequency in maternal and cord blood lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stayner, Leslie Thomas; Pedersen, Marie; Patelarou, Evridiki;

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Water disinfection by-products have been associated with an increased cancer risk. Micronuclei (MN) frequency in lymphocytes is a marker of genomic damage and can predict adult cancer risk. OBJECTIVE: We evaluated maternal exposure to drinking water brominated trihalomethanes (BTHM) i...

  5. Preparation of bromine-77 labelled monoclonal anti-hPLAP [human placental alkaline phosphatase] antibody using chloramine-T

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A tumor-associated monoclonal antibody, named 7E8 and raised against human placental alkaline phosphatase (hPLAP), is labelled with bromine-77 by means of chloramine-T. The paper describes optimum radiobromination conditions resulting in 34 % radiochemical yield of labelled antibody with more than 90 % immunoreactivity. (author)

  6. Prenatal Exposure to Organohalogens, Including Brominated Flame Retardants, Influences Motor, Cognitive, and Behavioral Performance at School Age

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roze, Elise; Meijer, Lisethe; Bakker, Attie; Van Braeckel, Koenraad N. J. A.; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; Bos, Arend F.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Organohalogen compounds (OHCs) are known to have neurotoxic effects on the developing brain. OBJECTIVE: We investigated the influence of prenatal exposure to OHCs, including brominated flame retardants, on motor, cognitive, and behavioral outcome in healthy children of school age. METHOD

  7. Weathered Hydrocarbon Wastes: A Risk Management Primer

    OpenAIRE

    Brassington, Kirsty J.; Hough, Rupert L.; Paton, Graeme I.; Semple, Kirk T.; Risdon, Graeme C.; Crossley, Jane; Hay, I; Askari, K.; Pollard, Simon J. T.

    2007-01-01

    We provide a primer and critical review of the characterization, risk assessment, and bioremediation of weathered hydrocarbons. Historically the remediation of soil contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons has been expressed in terms of reductions in total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) load rather than reductions in risk. There are several techniques by which petroleum hydrocarbons in soils can be characterized. Method development is often driven by the objectives of published...

  8. Effective viscosity of confined hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, V.N.; Persson, B.N.J.

    2012-01-01

    We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon films with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. We find that the logarithm of the effective viscosity ηeff for nanometer-thin films depends linearly on the logarithm of the shear rate: log ηeff=C-nlog γ̇, where...

  9. Investigating the lifetime of bromine-quenched G.M. Counters with temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The amount of halogen quench gas as a percentage of the total fill gas contained within a gas-filled Geiger–Müller detector is directly linked to its operational characteristics. Preserving this halogen gas will help maintain the operating lifetime of the detectors. Such halogen gases are highly corrosive and the small quantities within a gas-filled detector can deplete rapidly via interactions with surrounding materials. The rate of interactions is thought to be proportional to not only temperature, but also to the current initiated by ionisation events associated with the formation of each signal pulse. As all pulses are of similar magnitudes, GM detector operational lifetimes are quantified in accumulated counts rather than a given operating time. We have studied three different types of corrosion-resistant mechanisms to protect the bromine halogen gas from any interactions with 446 stainless steel detector components of ZP1200 Geiger–Müller tubes at temperatures up to 125 °C. Three types of surface treatments for these detectors used were labelled as “raw” using only an oxygen-plasma-bombardment process, “passivated” using a combination of nitric acid passivation followed by an oxygen plasma-bombardment process, and thirdly plating with a few micron thickness of chromium followed by an oxygen plasma-bombardment process. 32 detector samples were irradiated at room temperature with a Caesium-137 source at dose rates of approximately 1.3 mSv/hr up to 5.7×1010 accumulated counts; another 32 detector samples were aged to 3.3×1010 counts at 125 °C. At room temperature, the chromium-plated samples exhibited an initial rise in their starting voltage readings. All other detector performance characteristics, for all detector types, did not change significantly during the ageing process, and the surface morphology of the detector cathodes was unaffected. At 125 °C, the chromium-based plating produced the most stable long-term response. These chromium

  10. Mercury oxidation from bromine chemistry in the free troposphere over the southeastern US

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Coburn

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The elevated deposition of atmospheric mercury over the Southeastern United States is currently not well understood. Here we measure partial columns and vertical profiles of bromine monoxide (BrO radicals, a key component of mercury oxidation chemistry, to better understand the processes and altitudes at which mercury is being oxidized in the atmosphere. We use the data from a ground-based MAX-DOAS instrument located at a coastal site ~ 1 km from the Gulf of Mexico in Gulf Breeze, FL, where we had previously detected tropospheric BrO (Coburn et al., 2011. Our profile retrieval assimilates information about stratospheric BrO from the WACCM chemical transport model, and uses only measurements at moderately low solar zenith angles (SZA to estimate the BrO slant column density contained in the reference spectrum (SCDRef. The approach has 2.6 degrees of freedom, and avoids spectroscopic complications that arise at high SZA; knowledge about SCDRef helps to maximize sensitivity in the free troposphere (FT. A cloud-free case study day with low aerosol load (9 April 2010 provided optimal conditions for distinguishing marine boundary layer (MBL: 0–1 km and free tropospheric (FT: 1–15 km BrO from the ground. The average daytime tropospheric BrO vertical column density (VCD of ~ 2.3 × 1013 molec cm−2 (SZA 5 molec cm−2 s−1 for bromine, while contributions from ozone (O3 and chlorine (Cl were 0.9 × 105 and 0.2 × 105 molec cm−2 s−1, respectively. The GOM formation rate is sensitive to recently proposed atmospheric scavenging reactions of the HgBr adduct by nitrogen dioxide (NO2, and to a lesser extent also HO2 radicals. Using a 3-D chemical transport model, we find that surface GOM variations are typical also of other days, and are mainly derived from the free troposphere. Bromine chemistry is active in the FT over Gulf Breeze, where it forms water-soluble GOM that is subsequently available for wet scavenging by thunderstorms or transport to

  11. Bromine release during Plinian eruptions along the Central American Volcanic Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansteen, T. H.; Kutterolf, S.; Appel, K.; Freundt, A.; Perez-Fernandez, W.; Wehrmann, H.

    2010-12-01

    Volcanoes of the Central American Volcanic Arc (CAVA) have produced at least 72 highly explosive eruptions within the last 200 ka. The eruption columns of all these “Plinian” eruptions reached well into the stratosphere such that their released volatiles may have influenced atmospheric chemistry and climate. While previous research has focussed on the sulfur and chlorine emissions during such large eruptions, we here present measurements of the heavy halogen bromine by means of synchrotron radiation induced micro-XRF microanalysis (SR-XRF) with typical detection limits at 0.3 ppm (in Fe rich standard basalt ML3B glass). Spot analyses of pre-eruptive glass inclusions trapped in minerals formed in magma reservoirs were compared with those in matrix glasses of the tephras, which represent the post-eruptive, degassed concentrations. The concentration difference between inclusions and matrix glasses, multiplied by erupted magma mass determined by extensive field mapping, yields estimates of the degassed mass of bromine. Br is probably hundreds of times more effective in destroying ozone than Cl, and can accumulate in the stratosphere over significant time scales. Melt inclusions representing deposits of 22 large eruptions along the CAVA have Br contents between 0.5 and 13 ppm. Br concentrations in matrix glasses are nearly constant at 0.4 to 1.5 ppm. However, Br concentrations and Cl/Br ratios vary along the CAVA. The highest values of Br contents (>8 ppm) and lowest Cl/Br ratios (170 to 600) in melt inclusions occur across central Nicaragua and southern El Salvador, and correlate with bulk-rock compositions of high Ba/La > 85 as well as low La/Yb discharged 700 kilotons of Br. On average, each of the remaining 21 CAVA eruptions studied have discharged c.100 kilotons of bromine. During the past 200 ka, CAVA volcanoes have emitted a cumulative mass of 3.2 Mt of Br through highly explosive eruptions. There are six periods in the past (c. 2ka, 6ka, 25ka, 40ka, 60ka, 75

  12. Mercury oxidation from bromine chemistry in the free troposphere over the southeastern US

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coburn, Sean; Dix, Barbara; Edgerton, Eric; Holmes, Christopher D.; Kinnison, Douglas; Liang, Qing; ter Schure, Arnout; Wang, Siyuan; Volkamer, Rainer

    2016-03-01

    The elevated deposition of atmospheric mercury over the southeastern United States is currently not well understood. Here we measure partial columns and vertical profiles of bromine monoxide (BrO) radicals, a key component of mercury oxidation chemistry, to better understand the processes and altitudes at which mercury is being oxidized in the atmosphere. We use data from a ground-based MAX-DOAS instrument located at a coastal site ˜ 1 km from the Gulf of Mexico in Gulf Breeze, FL, where we had previously detected tropospheric BrO (Coburn et al., 2011). Our profile retrieval assimilates information about stratospheric BrO from the WACCM chemical transport model (CTM), and uses only measurements at moderately low solar zenith angles (SZAs) to estimate the BrO slant column density contained in the reference spectrum (SCDRef). The approach has 2.6 degrees of freedom, and avoids spectroscopic complications that arise at high SZA; knowledge about SCDRef further helps to maximize sensitivity in the free troposphere (FT). A cloud-free case study day with low aerosol load (9 April 2010) provided optimal conditions for distinguishing marine boundary layer (MBL: 0-1 km) and free-tropospheric (FT: 1-15 km) BrO from the ground. The average daytime tropospheric BrO vertical column density (VCD) of ˜ 2.3 × 1013 molec cm-2 (SZA vertical profile locates essentially all tropospheric BrO above 4 km, and shows no evidence for BrO inside the MBL (detection limit rates are about 3.6 × 105 molec cm-2 s-1 for bromine, while the contribution from ozone (O3) is 0.8 × 105 molec cm-2 s-1. Chlorine-induced oxidation is estimated to add rates. The GOM formation rate is sensitive to recently proposed atmospheric scavenging reactions of the HgBr adduct by nitrogen dioxide (NO2), and to a lesser extent also HO2 radicals. Using a 3-D CTM, we find that surface GOM variations are also typical of other days, and are mainly derived from the FT. Bromine chemistry is active in the FT over Gulf

  13. Investigating the lifetime of bromine-quenched G.M. Counters with temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abilama, Marc; Bates, Mike; Lohstroh, Annika

    2015-09-01

    The amount of halogen quench gas as a percentage of the total fill gas contained within a gas-filled Geiger-Müller detector is directly linked to its operational characteristics. Preserving this halogen gas will help maintain the operating lifetime of the detectors. Such halogen gases are highly corrosive and the small quantities within a gas-filled detector can deplete rapidly via interactions with surrounding materials. The rate of interactions is thought to be proportional to not only temperature, but also to the current initiated by ionisation events associated with the formation of each signal pulse. As all pulses are of similar magnitudes, GM detector operational lifetimes are quantified in accumulated counts rather than a given operating time. We have studied three different types of corrosion-resistant mechanisms to protect the bromine halogen gas from any interactions with 446 stainless steel detector components of ZP1200 Geiger-Müller tubes at temperatures up to 125 °C. Three types of surface treatments for these detectors used were labelled as "raw" using only an oxygen-plasma-bombardment process, "passivated" using a combination of nitric acid passivation followed by an oxygen plasma-bombardment process, and thirdly plating with a few micron thickness of chromium followed by an oxygen plasma-bombardment process. 32 detector samples were irradiated at room temperature with a Caesium-137 source at dose rates of approximately 1.3 mSv/hr up to 5.7×1010 accumulated counts; another 32 detector samples were aged to 3.3×1010 counts at 125 °C. At room temperature, the chromium-plated samples exhibited an initial rise in their starting voltage readings. All other detector performance characteristics, for all detector types, did not change significantly during the ageing process, and the surface morphology of the detector cathodes was unaffected. At 125 °C, the chromium-based plating produced the most stable long-term response. These chromium-plated samples

  14. Molecular simulations and density functional theory calculations of bromine in clathrate hydrate phases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dureckova, Hana, E-mail: houci059@uottawa.ca; Woo, Tom K., E-mail: tom.woo@uottawa.ca [Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 5N6 (Canada); Alavi, Saman, E-mail: saman.alavi@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Department of Chemistry and Biomolecular Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario K1N 5N6 (Canada); National Research Council of Canada, 100 Sussex Dr., Ottawa, Ontario K1N 6N5 (Canada); Department of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of British Columbia, Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z3 (Canada)

    2016-01-28

    Bromine forms a tetragonal clathrate hydrate structure (TS-I) very rarely observed in clathrate hydrates of other guest substances. The detailed structure, energetics, and dynamics of Br{sub 2} and Cl{sub 2} in TS-I and cubic structure I (CS-I) clathrate hydrates are studied in this work using molecular dynamics and quantum chemical calculations. X-ray diffraction studies show that the halogen-water–oxygen distances in the cages of these structures are shorter than the sum of the van der Waals radii of halogen and oxygen atoms. This suggests that the stabilizing effects of halogen bonding or other non-covalent interactions (NCIs) may contribute to the formation of the unique tetragonal bromine hydrate structure. We performed molecular dynamics simulations of Br{sub 2} and Cl{sub 2} clathrate hydrates using our previously developed five-site charge models for the dihalogen molecules [Dureckova et al. Can. J. Chem. 93, 864 (2015)] which reproduce the computed electrostatic potentials of the dihalogens and account for the electropositive σ-hole of the halogen bond donor (the dihalogen). Analysis of the radial distribution functions, enthalpies of encapsulation, velocity and orientation autocorrelation functions, and polar angle distributions are carried out for Br{sub 2} and Cl{sub 2} guests in various cages to contrast the properties of these guests in the TS-I and CS-I phases. Quantum chemical partial geometry optimizations of Br{sub 2} and Cl{sub 2} guests in the hydrate cages using the M06-2X functional give short halogen-water distances compatible with values observed in X-ray diffraction experiments. NCI plots of guest-cage structures are generated to qualitatively show the relative strength of the non-bonding interactions between dihalogens and water molecules. The differences between behaviors of Br{sub 2} and Cl{sub 2} guests in the hydrate cages may explain why bromine forms the unique TS-I phase.

  15. Investigating the lifetime of bromine-quenched G.M. Counters with temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abilama, Marc [Centronic Ltd., Croydon (United Kingdom); University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom); Bates, Mike [Centronic Ltd., Croydon (United Kingdom); Lohstroh, Annika [University of Surrey, Guildford (United Kingdom)

    2015-09-21

    The amount of halogen quench gas as a percentage of the total fill gas contained within a gas-filled Geiger–Müller detector is directly linked to its operational characteristics. Preserving this halogen gas will help maintain the operating lifetime of the detectors. Such halogen gases are highly corrosive and the small quantities within a gas-filled detector can deplete rapidly via interactions with surrounding materials. The rate of interactions is thought to be proportional to not only temperature, but also to the current initiated by ionisation events associated with the formation of each signal pulse. As all pulses are of similar magnitudes, GM detector operational lifetimes are quantified in accumulated counts rather than a given operating time. We have studied three different types of corrosion-resistant mechanisms to protect the bromine halogen gas from any interactions with 446 stainless steel detector components of ZP1200 Geiger–Müller tubes at temperatures up to 125 °C. Three types of surface treatments for these detectors used were labelled as “raw” using only an oxygen-plasma-bombardment process, “passivated” using a combination of nitric acid passivation followed by an oxygen plasma-bombardment process, and thirdly plating with a few micron thickness of chromium followed by an oxygen plasma-bombardment process. 32 detector samples were irradiated at room temperature with a Caesium-137 source at dose rates of approximately 1.3 mSv/hr up to 5.7×10{sup 10} accumulated counts; another 32 detector samples were aged to 3.3×10{sup 10} counts at 125 °C. At room temperature, the chromium-plated samples exhibited an initial rise in their starting voltage readings. All other detector performance characteristics, for all detector types, did not change significantly during the ageing process, and the surface morphology of the detector cathodes was unaffected. At 125 °C, the chromium-based plating produced the most stable long-term response. These

  16. Air-snowpack exchange of bromine, ozone and mercury in the springtime Arctic simulated by the 1-D model PHANTAS – Part 1: In-snow bromine activation and its impact on ozone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Toyota

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available To provide a theoretical framework towards better understanding of ozone depletion events (ODEs and atmospheric mercury depletion events (AMDEs in the polar boundary layer, we have developed a one-dimensional model that simulates multiphase chemistry and transport of trace constituents from porous snowpack and through the atmospheric boundary layer (ABL as a unified system. In this paper, we describe a general configuration of the model and the results of simulations related to reactive bromine release from the snowpack and ODEs during the Arctic spring. The model employs a chemical mechanism adapted from the one previously used for the simulation of multiphase halogen chemistry involving deliquesced sea-salt aerosols in the marine boundary layer. A common set of aqueous-phase reactions describe chemistry both in the liquid-like (or brine layer on the grain surface of the snowpack and in "haze" aerosols mainly composed of sulfate in the atmosphere. The process of highly soluble/reactive trace gases, whether entering the snowpack from the atmosphere or formed via gas-phase chemistry in the snowpack interstitial air (SIA, is simulated by the uptake on brine-covered snow grains and subsequent reactions in the aqueous phase while being traveled vertically within the SIA. A "bromine explosion", by which, in a conventional definition, HOBr formed in the ambient air is deposited and then converted heterogeneously to Br2, is a dominant process of reactive bromine formation in the top 1 mm (or less layer of the snowpack. Deeper in the snowpack, HOBr formed within the SIA leads to an in-snow bromine explosion, but a significant fraction of Br2 is also produced via aqueous radical chemistry in the brine on the surface of the snow grains. These top- and deeper-layer productions of Br2 both contribute to the Br2 release into the atmosphere, but the deeper-layer production is found to be more important for the net outflux of reactive bromine. Although ozone

  17. Thinning of CIGS solar cells: Part I: Chemical processing in acidic bromine solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouttemy, M.; Tran-Van, P. [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles (ILV-UMR 8180 CNRS/UVSQ), 45 av. des Etats Unis, 78035 Versailles (France); Gerard, I., E-mail: gerard@chimie.uvsq.fr [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles (ILV-UMR 8180 CNRS/UVSQ), 45 av. des Etats Unis, 78035 Versailles (France); Hildebrandt, T.; Causier, A. [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles (ILV-UMR 8180 CNRS/UVSQ), 45 av. des Etats Unis, 78035 Versailles (France); Pelouard, J.L.; Dagher, G. [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures (LPN-CNRS), route de Nozay 91460 Marcoussis (France); Jehl, Z.; Naghavi, N. [Institut de Recherche et Developpement sur l' Energie Photovoltaique (IRDEP -UMR 7174 CNRS/EDF/Chimie-ParisTech), 6 quai Watier, 78401 Chatou (France); Voorwinden, G.; Dimmler, B. [Wuerth Elektronik Research GmbH, Industriestr. 4, 70565 Stuttgart (Germany); Powalla, M. [Zentrum fuer Sonnenenergie- und Wasserstoff-Forschung (ZSW), Industriestr. 6, 70565 Stuttgart (Germany); Guillemoles, J.F. [Institut de Recherche et Developpement sur l' Energie Photovoltaique (IRDEP -UMR 7174 CNRS/EDF/Chimie-ParisTech), 6 quai Watier, 78401 Chatou (France); Lincot, D. [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures (LPN-CNRS), route de Nozay 91460 Marcoussis (France); Etcheberry, A. [Institut Lavoisier de Versailles (ILV-UMR 8180 CNRS/UVSQ), 45 av. des Etats Unis, 78035 Versailles (France)

    2011-08-31

    CIGSe absorber was etched in HBr/Br{sub 2}/H{sub 2}O to prepare defined thicknesses of CIGSe between 2.7 and 0.5 {mu}m. We established a reproducible method of reducing the absorber thickness via chemical etching. We determine the dissolution kinetics rate of CIGSe using trace analysis by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry of Ga and Cu. The roughness of the etching surface decreases during the first 500 nm of the etching to a steady state value of the root-mean-square roughness near 50 nm. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analyses demonstrate an etching process occurring with a constant chemical composition of the treated surface acidic bromine solutions provide a controlled chemical thinning process resulting in an almost flat surface and a very low superficial Se{sup 0} enrichment.

  18. Brominated flame retardants and organochlorine compounds in duplicate diet samples from a Portuguese academic community.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Sónia D; Sousa, Ana C A; Isobe, Tomohiko; Kunisue, Tatsuya; Nogueira, António J A; Tanabe, Shinsuke

    2016-10-01

    Concentrations of persistent organic pollutants (POPs), including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), hexabromocyclododecanes (HBCDDs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), hexachlorocyclohexane isomers (HCHs), hexachlorobenzene (HCB), chlordane compounds (CHLs) and dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane and its metabolites (DDTs), were measured in duplicate diet samples from 21 volunteers at a Portuguese academic community (University of Aveiro). Overall, the levels of the target compounds were low, with detection frequencies varying widely depending on the compounds and with brominated flame retardants (BFRs) registering the lowest detection frequencies. Among PCB congeners, nondioxin-like PCBs were predominant and detected in the majority of the samples. Organochlorine pesticides were also detected in the majority of the samples, with 100% detection for DDTs and HCHs. Estimated daily intakes (EDIs) were calculated using lower and upper bound estimations, and in both cases values were far below the currently established tolerable daily intakes for PCBs and OCs and the reference doses for PBDEs and HBCDDs. PMID:27367176

  19. Highly sensitive spectrofluorimetric determination of trace amounts of indium with 5-bromine-salicylaldehyde salicyloylhydrazone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fluorescent reaction of 5-bromine-salicylaldehyde salicyloylhydrazone (5-Br-SASH) with indium was studied in detail. Based on this chelating reaction, a sensitive spectrofluorimetric method was developed for the determination of indium in a water-ethanol (37:63) medium at pH 4.6. Under these conditions, the In-5-Br-SASH complex has excitation and emission maximum at 395 nm and 461 nm, respectively. The linear range of the method is from 0 to 1000 ng ml-1 and the detection limit is 2.4 ng ml-1. The molar ratio of indium to the reagent is 1:3. Interferences of other ions were studied. The method was successfully applied to the determination of indium in the chemical reagents such as lead, tin, spelter, zinc sulfide by standard additions method

  20. Labeling of receptor ligands with bromine radionuclides. Progress report, March 1, 1981-February 29, 1984

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed techniques to label several types of organic molecules with radiobromine. We have emphasized techniques to label ligands for the estrogen receptor and have studied two brominated compounds in rat models. One of these compounds has been studied in a limited number of patients and estrogen containing tumors visualized by nuclear medicine imaging. We have recently expanded the size of the work to label receptor ligands with fluorine-18 and have carried out preliminary animal studies which suggest that a clinically useful compound can be prepared. In addition to the receptor studies, we have collaborated in assessing 77Br-labeled compounds as therapeutic agents and in studying 77Br-labeled compounds using perturbed angular correlation techniques

  1. Responses of marine unicellular algae to brominated organic compounds in six growth media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walsh, G.E.; Yoder, M.J.; McLaughlin, L.L.; Lores, E.M.

    1987-12-01

    Marine unicellular algae, Skeletonema costatum, Thalassiosira pseudonana, and Chlorella sp. were exposed to the industrial brominated compounds tetrabromobisphenol A, decabromobiphenyloxide (DBBO), hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD), pentabromomethylbenzene (PBMB), pentabromoethylbenzene (PBEB), and the herbicide bromoxynil (BROM), in six algal growth media. High concentrations of DBBO (1 mg liter-1), PBMB (1 mg liter-1), and PBEB (0.5 mg liter-1) reduced growth by less than 50%. EC50s of the other compounds varied with growth medium, with high EC50/low EC50 ratios between 1.3 and 9.9. Lowest EC50s, 9.3 to 12.0 micrograms liter-1, were obtained with S. costatum and HBCD. It is concluded that responses to toxicants in different media are the results of interactions among algae, growth medium, toxicant, and solvent carrier.

  2. Radio- and photo-sensitization of DNA with compounds containing platinum and bromine atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiations of plasmid DNA by both X-rays and UV light in the presence and absence of compounds containing platinum and bromine atoms, were performed in order to assess the sensitization potential of these compounds. Plasmid DNA pBR322 was incubated with platinum (II) bromide, hydrogen hexabromoplatinate (IV), hydrogen hexahydroxyplatinate (IV) and sodium hexahydroxyplatinate (IV). Incubation was followed by X-ray or UV irradiations. It was found that amongst the sensitizers tested, during irradiations carried out in the presence of platinum (II) bromide, the highest levels of double strand breaks formation upon X-ray treatment were recorded. In contrast much less damage was induced by UV light. Data presented here suggests that this compound may be a promising radiosensitizer for cancer treatment. (authors)

  3. Surface-confined 2D polymerization of a brominated copper-tetraphenylporphyrin on Au(111)

    CERN Document Server

    Smykalla, Lars; Korb, Marcus; Lang, Heinrich; Hietschold, Michael

    2015-01-01

    A coupling-limited approach for the Ullmann reaction-like on-surface synthesis of a two-dimensional covalent organic network starting from a halogenated metallo-porphyrin is demonstrated. Copper-octabromo-tetraphenylporphyrin molecules can diffuse and self-assemble when adsorbed on the inert Au(111) surface. Splitting-off of bromine atoms bonded at the macrocyclic core of the porphyrin starts at room temperature after the deposition and is monitored by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy for different annealing steps. Direct coupling between the reactive carbon sites of the molecules is, however, hindered by the molecular shape. This leads initially to an ordered non-covalently interconnected supramolecular structure. Further heating to 300{\\deg}C and an additional hydrogen dissociation step is required to link the molecular macrocycles via a phenyl group and form large ordered polymeric networks. This approach leads to a close-packed covalently bonded network of overall good quality. The structures are characte...

  4. Bioactive brominated diterpenes from the marine red alga Jania Rubens (L.) Lamx.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, Nagwa E

    2004-04-01

    Seven brominated diterpenes of the parguerene and isoparguerene series were isolated for the first time from the red alga Jania rubens (L.) Lamx., collected from the Red Sea coast at Hurghada, Egypt. The diterpenes were identified as isoparguerol (1), isoparguerol-16-acetate (2), isoparguerol-7,16-diacetate (3), parguerol-16-acetate (4), parguerol-7,16-diacetate (5), deoxyparguerol (6) and deoxyparguerol-7-acetate (7). The isolated diterpenes had a marked antitumour activity. Isoparguerol derivatives were slightly more effective than parguerol derivatives. Moreover, the data implied that the cytotoxicity of these compounds were dependent on the number of acetoxy groups. Also, anthelmintic activities of the isolated compounds on earthworms (Allolobophora caliginosa) were studied. PMID:15162360

  5. Resonant x-ray reflectivity from a bromine-labeled fatty acid Langmuir monolayer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Resonant x-ray reflectivity exploits the energy dependence of atomic scattering factors to locate resonant atoms within the electron density distribution of thin films. We apply the technique to a monolayer of bromo-stearic acid at the air/water interface. The data collection protocol employed cycles through several energies in the vicinity of the bromine K absorption edge and verifies that the energy dependencies observed are indeed resonant effects. The analysis specifies the location of the Br atom with sub-angstrom precision and must consider both the real and imaginary parts of the changes in the scattering factor to be consistent with the known structure and stoichiometry of this test case

  6. Kinetics and mechanism of the oxidation of some -hydroxy acids by hexamethylenetetramine-bromine

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dimple Garg; Seema Kothari

    2004-11-01

    The oxidation of lactic acid, mandelic acid and ten monosubstituted mandelic acids by hexamethylenetetramine-bromine (HABR) in glacial acetic acid, leads to the formation of the corresponding oxoacid. The reaction is first order with respect to each of the hydroxy acids and HABR. It is proposed that HABR itself is the reactive oxidizing species. The oxidation of -deuteriomandelic acid exhibits the presence of a substantial kinetic isotope effect (/ = 5.91 at 298 K). The rates of oxidation of the substituted mandelic acids show excellent correlation with Brown’s + values. The reaction constants are negative. The oxidation exhibits an extensive cross conjugation between the electron-donating substituent and the reaction centre in the transition state. A mechanism involving transfer of a hydride ion from the acid to the oxidant is postulated.

  7. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talmadge, M.; Biddy, M.; Dutta, A.; Jones, S.; Meyer, A.

    2013-03-01

    This technology pathway case investigates the upgrading of woody biomass derived synthesis gas (syngas) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and lowest risk conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas-to-hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline-, diesel- and jet-range hydrocarbon blendstocks.

  8. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Fernando Martins

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Literature on hydrocarbon degradation in extreme hypersaline media presents studies that point to a negative effect of salinity increase on hydrocarbonoclastic activity, while several others report an opposite tendency. Based on information available in the literature, we present a discussion on the reasons that justify these contrary results. Despite the fact that microbial ability to metabolize hydrocarbons is found in extreme hypersaline media, indeed some factors are critical for the occurrence of hydrocarbon degradation in such environments. How these factors affect hydrocarbon degradation and their implications for the assessment of hydrocarbon biodegradation in hypersaline environments are presented in this review.

  9. Associations between brominated flame retardants in house dust and hormone levels in men

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Paula I. [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Stapleton, Heather M. [Nicholas School of the Environment, Box 90328, Duke University, Durham, NC 27708 (United States); Mukherjee, Bhramar [Department of Biostatistics, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Hauser, Russ [Department of Environmental Health, Harvard School of Public Health, 677 Huntington Ave., Boston, MA 02115 (United States); Meeker, John D., E-mail: meekerj@umich.edu [Department of Environmental Health Sciences, University of Michigan, 1415 Washington Heights, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2013-02-15

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are used in the manufacture of a variety of materials and consumer products in order to meet fire safety standards. BFRs may persist in the environment and have been detected in wildlife, humans and indoor dust and air. Some BFRs have demonstrated endocrine and reproductive effects in animals, but human studies are limited. In this exploratory study, we measured serum hormone levels and flame retardant concentrations [31 polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners and 6 alternate flame retardants] in house dust from men recruited through a US infertility clinic. PBDE congeners in dust were grouped by commercial mixtures (i.e. penta-, octa- and deca-BDE). In multivariable linear regression models adjusted by age and body mass index (BMI), significant positive associations were found between house dust concentrations of pentaBDEs and serum levels of free T4, total T3, estradiol, and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), along with an inverse association with follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). There were also positive associations of octaBDE concentrations with serum free T4, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone and an inverse association of decaBDE concentrations with testosterone. Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) was associated with decreased SHBG and increased free androgen index. Dust concentrations of bis-tribromophenoxyethane (BTBPE) and tetrabromo-diethylhexylphthalate (TBPH) were positively associated with total T3. These findings are consistent with our previous report of associations between PBDEs (BDE 47, 99 and 100) in house dust and hormone levels in men, and further suggest that exposure to contaminants in indoor dust may be leading to endocrine disruption in men. - Highlights: ► Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) including PBDEs and alternates were measured. ► Exposure to BFRs is characterized from concentrations in participant vacuum bag dust. ► Exposure to PBDEs and

  10. Scientific Opinion on Emerging and Novel Brominated Flame Retardants (BFRs in Food

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EFSA Panel on Contaminants in the Food Chain (CONTAM

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available EFSA was asked to deliver a scientific opinion on brominated flame retardants (BFRs other than PBDEs, PBBs, HBCDDs, TBBPA and brominated phenols and their derivatives. The BFRs that are the subject of the current opinion, were classified in groups termed ‘emerging’ and ‘novel’ BFRs. Information on 17 emerging and 10 novel BFRs was collected. The information varied widely for these BFRs. There is a lack of experimental data on physico-chemical characteristics, stability/reactivity and current use and production volume of all the emerging and novel BFRs. Due to the very limited information on occurrence, exposure and toxicity, the CONTAM Panel could not perform a risk characterisation for any of the BFRs considered. Instead, an attempt was made to identify those BFRs that could be a potential health concern and should be considered first for future investigations. For this purpose the Panel first evaluated the available experimental data on occurrence in food, behaviour in the environment and toxicity. Secondly, a modelling exercise was performed focussing on the potential of the emerging and novel BFRs for persistence in the environment and for their possible bioaccumulation potential. There is convincing evidence that tris(2,3-dibromopropyl phosphate (TDBPP and dibromoneopentyl glycol (DBNPG are genotoxic and carcinogenic, warranting further surveillance of their occurrence in the environment and in food. Based on the limited experimental data on environmental behaviour, 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxyethane (BTBPE and hexabromobenzene (HBB were identified as compounds that could raise a concern for bioaccumulation. For the modelling exercise, the CONTAM Panel selected two environmental characteristics, overall persistence and potential for bioaccumulation, as being most relevant to provide insight into the possibility that emerging or novel BFRs might accumulate in the food chain, and thus might appear in food intended for human

  11. Determination of chlorine, fluorine, bromine, and iodine in coals with ICP-MS and IC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettinelli, M.; Spezia, S.; Minoia, C.; Ronchi, A. [Salvatore Maugeri Foundation, Pavia (Italy)

    2002-07-01

    The combustion process releases many organic and inorganic pollutants into the atmosphere, both in gaseous and solid form. During coal combustion in thermal power plants without pollution control equipment, chlorine, fluorine, bromine, and iodine present in coals are mainly volatilized as gaseous compounds. Limiting pollutant emissions is a precise requirement of the Italian legislation that fixes (in the case of power plants) 100 mg/Nm{sup 3} as the limit value for chlorine, and 5 mg/Nm{sup 3} for fluorine and bromine (expressed as hydrofluoric and hydrobromic acid respectively). No limit for iodine emissions has been established. From this point of view and in order to maintain control of emissions from combustion plants, it is important to monitor the concentration of halogens in fuels. Unfortunately, in literature there are very few data published with regard to the amount of halogens in fossil fuels, which emphasizes the analytical difficulties with regard to the determination of these analytes. In the present paper a, pyrohydrolysis of the sample at 1100{degree}C, followed by the absorption of volatilized compounds in Na{sub 2}CO{sub 3}/NaHCO{sub 3} solution and the final instrumental analysis of Cl, Br, and F with ion chromatography (IC) and Br and I with inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been adopted. The accuracy of the method, evaluated by analyzing some certified reference materials, was better than 95% for all analytes and the detection limits adequate to the analytical requirements (0.1 mg/kg for Br and I, 1 mg/kg for F, and 10 mg/kg for C1).

  12. Meteorological controls on the vertical distribution of bromine monoxide in the lower troposphere

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. K. Peterson

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple axis differential absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS measurements of bromine monoxide (BrO probed the vertical structure of halogen activation events during March–May 2012 at Barrow, Alaska. An analysis of the BrO averaging kernels and degrees of freedom obtained by optimal-estimation-based inversions from raw MAX-DOAS measurements reveals the information is best represented by reducing the retrieved BrO profile to two quantities, the integrated column from the surface through 200 m (VCD200 m, and the lower tropospheric vertical column density (LT-VCD which represents the integrated column of BrO from the surface through 2 km. The percentage of lower-tropospheric BrO in the lowest 200 m was found to be highly variable ranging from shallow layer events, where BrO is present primarily in the lowest 200 m to distributed column events where BrO is observed at higher altitudes. The highest observed LT-VCD events occurred when BrO was distributed throughout the lower troposphere, rather than concentrated near the surface. Atmospheric stability in the lowest 200 m influenced the percentage of LT-VCD that is in the lowest 200 m, with inverted temperature structures having a first-to-third quartile range (Q1–Q3 of VCD200 m/LT-VCD from 15–39% while near neutral temperature structures had a Q1–Q3 range of 7–13%. Data from this campaign show no clear influence of wind speed on either lower-tropospheric bromine activation (LT-VCD or the vertical distribution of BrO, while examination of seasonal trends and the temperature dependence of the vertical distribution supported the conclusion that the atmospheric stability affects the vertical distribution of BrO.

  13. UTILIZATION OF BROMINATION REACTION FOR THE SPECTROPHOTOMETRIC ASSAY OF DOMPERIDONE IN PHARMACEUTICALS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. ZENITA DEVI

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Three simple and sensitive spectrophotometric methods are described for the determination of domperidone (DOM in bulk drug and in dosage forms using bromate-bromide mixture as brominating agent in acid medium and three dyes, meta-cresol purple (MCP, amaranth (AMR and erioglaucine (EGC. The methods involve the addition of a known excess of bromate-bromide mixture to an acidified solution of DOM followed by the determination of the residual bromine by reacting with a fixed amount of either MCP dye and measuring the absorbance at 530 nm (method A or AMR dye and measuring the absorbance at 520 nm (method B or EGC dye and measuring the absorbance at 630 nm (method C. Beer’s law is obeyed over the concentration ranges, 0.63–10.0, 0.25-4.0 and 0.13-2.0 µg mL-1 for method A, B and C, respectively. The ap¬parent molar absorptivities are calculated to be 3.751x104, 6.604x104 and 1.987x105 L mol-1cm-1 for method A, B and C, respectively, and the corresponding sandell sensitivity values are 0.011, 0.006 and 0.002 μg cm-2. The limit of detection and the limit of quantification are also reported for all the three methods. No interference was observed from common additives found in pharmaceutical preparations. Statistical comparisons of the results with those of the reference method showed excellent agreement, and indicated no significant difference in accuracy and precision. The accuracy and reliability of the methods were further ascertained by performing recovery tests via standardaddition technique.

  14. Associations between brominated flame retardants in house dust and hormone levels in men

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are used in the manufacture of a variety of materials and consumer products in order to meet fire safety standards. BFRs may persist in the environment and have been detected in wildlife, humans and indoor dust and air. Some BFRs have demonstrated endocrine and reproductive effects in animals, but human studies are limited. In this exploratory study, we measured serum hormone levels and flame retardant concentrations [31 polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners and 6 alternate flame retardants] in house dust from men recruited through a US infertility clinic. PBDE congeners in dust were grouped by commercial mixtures (i.e. penta-, octa- and deca-BDE). In multivariable linear regression models adjusted by age and body mass index (BMI), significant positive associations were found between house dust concentrations of pentaBDEs and serum levels of free T4, total T3, estradiol, and sex hormone binding globulin (SHBG), along with an inverse association with follicle stimulating hormone (FSH). There were also positive associations of octaBDE concentrations with serum free T4, thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH), luteinizing hormone (LH) and testosterone and an inverse association of decaBDE concentrations with testosterone. Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) was associated with decreased SHBG and increased free androgen index. Dust concentrations of bis-tribromophenoxyethane (BTBPE) and tetrabromo-diethylhexylphthalate (TBPH) were positively associated with total T3. These findings are consistent with our previous report of associations between PBDEs (BDE 47, 99 and 100) in house dust and hormone levels in men, and further suggest that exposure to contaminants in indoor dust may be leading to endocrine disruption in men. - Highlights: ► Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) including PBDEs and alternates were measured. ► Exposure to BFRs is characterized from concentrations in participant vacuum bag dust. ► Exposure to PBDEs and

  15. Meteorological controls on the vertical distribution of bromine monoxide in the lower troposphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, P. K.; Simpson, W. R.; Pratt, K. A.; Shepson, P. B.; Frieß, U.; Zielcke, J.; Platt, U.; Walsh, S. J.; Nghiem, S. V.

    2014-09-01

    Multiple axis differential absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements of bromine monoxide (BrO) probed the vertical structure of halogen activation events during March-May 2012 at Barrow, Alaska. An analysis of the BrO averaging kernels and degrees of freedom obtained by optimal-estimation-based inversions from raw MAX-DOAS measurements reveals the information is best represented by reducing the retrieved BrO profile to two quantities, the integrated column from the surface through 200 m (VCD200 m), and the lower tropospheric vertical column density (LT-VCD) which represents the integrated column of BrO from the surface through 2 km. The percentage of lower-tropospheric BrO in the lowest 200 m was found to be highly variable ranging from shallow layer events, where BrO is present primarily in the lowest 200 m to distributed column events where BrO is observed at higher altitudes. The highest observed LT-VCD events occurred when BrO was distributed throughout the lower troposphere, rather than concentrated near the surface. Atmospheric stability in the lowest 200 m influenced the percentage of LT-VCD that is in the lowest 200 m, with inverted temperature structures having a first-to-third quartile range (Q1-Q3) of VCD200 m/LT-VCD from 15-39% while near neutral temperature structures had a Q1-Q3 range of 7-13%. Data from this campaign show no clear influence of wind speed on either lower-tropospheric bromine activation (LT-VCD) or the vertical distribution of BrO, while examination of seasonal trends and the temperature dependence of the vertical distribution supported the conclusion that the atmospheric stability affects the vertical distribution of BrO.

  16. Process for recovering hydrocarbons from hydrocarbon-containing biomass

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dzadzic, P.M.; Price, M.C.; Shih, C.J.; Weil, T.A.

    1982-07-06

    A process is disclosed for enzymatically converting whole plant biomass containing hydrocarbon-containing laticifers to soluble sugars and recovering hydrocarbons in increased yields. The process comprises hydrolyzing whole plant cellulosic material in the presence of enzymes, particularly cellulase, hemicellulase, and pectinase, to produce a hydrocarbon product and recovering from the hydrolysis products a major proportion of the cellulase, hemicellulase and pectinase enzymes for reuse. At least some portion of the required make-up of cellulase, hemicellulase and pectinase enzymes is produced in a two-stage operation wherein, in the first stage, a portion of the output sugar solution is used to grow enzyme secreting microorganisms selected from the group consisting of cellulase-secreting microorganisms, hemicellulase-secreting microorganisms, pectinase-secreting microorganisms, and mixtures thereof, and in the second stage, cellulase, hemicellulase and pectinase enzyme formation is induced in the microorganism-containing culture medium by the addition of an appropriate inducer such as biomass. The cellulase, hemicellulase and pectinase enzymes are then recycled for use in the hydrolysis reaction.

  17. Dry reforming of hydrocarbon feedstocks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, Yatish T. [Norfolk State University; Gardner, Todd H. [U.S. DOE

    2014-09-25

    Developments in catalyst technology for the dry reforming of hydrocarbon feedstocks are reviewed for methane, higher hydrocarbons and alcohols. Thermodynamics, mechanisms and the kinetics of dry reforming are also reviewed. The literature on Ni catalysts, bi-metallic Ni catalysts and the role of promoters on Ni catalysts is critically evaluated. The use of noble and transitional metal catalysts for dry reforming is discussed. The application of solid oxide and metal carbide catalysts to dry reforming is also evaluated. Finally, various mechanisms for catalyst deactivation are assessed. This review also examines the various process related issues associated with dry reforming such as its application and heat optimization. Novel approaches such as supercritical dry reforming and microwave assisted dry reforming are briefly expanded upon.

  18. Proceedings of hydrocarbon contaminated soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    While the 1980s witnessed a concentrated effort toward identifying the scientific concerns associated with hydrocarbon contaminated soils, the 1990s offer the hope that even more reliable solutions, both scientific and regulatory, will emerge. The hope for this transition from problem identification to problems solution is evident in these papers from the 5th Annual Conference on Hydrocarbon Contaminated Soils (formerly called Petroleum Contaminated Soils), as the presentations more clearly reflect the maturation of a rapidly evolving field in the areas of chemical analysis, fate, remediation, public health, and regulatory evaluation. This book attempts to address the multidimensional facets of soil contamination by providing various current general perspectives as well as those from the regulatory and the international communities. Technical information is also provided in specific contamination areas such as diesel fuel, as well as analysis and site assessment, remediation, risk assessment, and management

  19. Catalytic ignition of light hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. L. Hohn; C.-C. Huang; C. Cao

    2009-01-01

    Catalytic ignition refers to phenomenon where sufficient energy is released from a catalytic reaction to maintain further reaction without additional extemai heating. This phenomenon is important in the development of catalytic combustion and catalytic partial oxidation processes, both of which have received extensive attention in recent years. In addition, catalytic ignition studies provide experimental data which can be used to test theoretical hydrocarbon oxidation models. For these reasons, catalytic ignition has been frequently studied. This review summarizes the experimental methods used to study catalytic ignition of light hydrocarbons and describes the experimental and theoretical results obtained related to catalytic ignition. The role of catalyst metal, fuel and fuel concentration, and catalyst state in catalytic ignition are examined, and some conclusions are drawn on the mechanism of catalytic ignition.

  20. Hydrocarbon Rocket Technology Impact Forecasting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuber, Eric; Prasadh, Nishant; Edwards, Stephen; Mavris, Dimitri N.

    2012-01-01

    Ever since the Apollo program ended, the development of launch propulsion systems in the US has fallen drastically, with only two new booster engine developments, the SSME and the RS-68, occurring in the past few decades.1 In recent years, however, there has been an increased interest in pursuing more effective launch propulsion technologies in the U.S., exemplified by the NASA Office of the Chief Technologist s inclusion of Launch Propulsion Systems as the first technological area in the Space Technology Roadmaps2. One area of particular interest to both government agencies and commercial entities has been the development of hydrocarbon engines; NASA and the Air Force Research Lab3 have expressed interest in the use of hydrocarbon fuels for their respective SLS Booster and Reusable Booster System concepts, and two major commercially-developed launch vehicles SpaceX s Falcon 9 and Orbital Sciences Antares feature engines that use RP-1 kerosene fuel. Compared to engines powered by liquid hydrogen, hydrocarbon-fueled engines have a greater propellant density (usually resulting in a lighter overall engine), produce greater propulsive force, possess easier fuel handling and loading, and for reusable vehicle concepts can provide a shorter turnaround time between launches. These benefits suggest that a hydrocarbon-fueled launch vehicle would allow for a cheap and frequent means of access to space.1 However, the time and money required for the development of a new engine still presents a major challenge. Long and costly design, development, testing and evaluation (DDT&E) programs underscore the importance of identifying critical technologies and prioritizing investment efforts. Trade studies must be performed on engine concepts examining the affordability, operability, and reliability of each concept, and quantifying the impacts of proposed technologies. These studies can be performed through use of the Technology Impact Forecasting (TIF) method. The Technology Impact

  1. Catalytic method for synthesizing hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapienza, Richard S.; Sansone, Michael J.; Slegeir, William A. R.

    1984-01-01

    A method for synthesizing hydrocarbons from carbon monoxide and hydrogen by contacting said gases with a slurry of a catalyst composed of palladium or platinum and cobalt supported on a solid phase is disclosed. The catalyst is prepared by heating a heterogeneous component of the palladium or platinum deposited on the solid support in a solution of cobalt carbonyl or precursors thereof. The catalyst exhibits excellent activity, stability in air, and produces highly desirable product fractions even with dilute gaseous reactants.

  2. Biodegradation of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons

    OpenAIRE

    DEMİR, İsmail; DEMİRBAĞ, Zihni

    1999-01-01

    Polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), such as petroleum and petroleum derivatives, are widespread organic pollutants entering the environment, chiefly, through oil spills and incomplete combustion of fossil fuels. Since most PAHs are persist in the environment for a long period of time and bioaccumulate, they cause environmental pollution and effect biological equilibrium dramatically. Biodegradation of some PAHs by microorganisms has been biochemically and genetically investigated. Ge...

  3. Deep desulfurization of hydrocarbon fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Chunshan; Ma, Xiaoliang; Sprague, Michael J.; Subramani, Velu

    2012-04-17

    The invention relates to processes for reducing the sulfur content in hydrocarbon fuels such as gasoline, diesel fuel and jet fuel. The invention provides a method and materials for producing ultra low sulfur content transportation fuels for motor vehicles as well as for applications such as fuel cells. The materials and method of the invention may be used at ambient or elevated temperatures and at ambient or elevated pressures without the need for hydrogen.

  4. Source rock hydrocarbons. Present status

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report first presents the characteristics of conventional oil and gas system, and the classification of liquid and gaseous non conventional hydrocarbons, with the peculiar case of coal-bed methane. The authors then describe how source rock hydrocarbons are produced: production of shale oils and gases (horizontal drilling, hydraulic fracturing, exploitation) and of coal-bed methane and coal mine methane. In the next part, they address and discuss the environmental impact of source rock hydrocarbon production: installation footprint, water resource management, drilling fluids, fracturing fluids composition, toxicity and recycling, air pollution, induced seismicity, pollutions from other exploitation and production activities. They propose an overview of the exploitation and production of source rock gas, coal-bed gas and other non conventional gases in the world. They describe the current development and discuss their economic impacts: world oil context and trends in the USA, in Canada and other countries, impacts on the North American market, on the world oil industry, on refining industries, on the world oil balance. They analyse the economic impacts of non conventional gases: development potential, stakes for the world gas trade, consequence for gas prices, development opportunities for oil companies and for the transport sector, impact on CO2 emissions, macro-economic impact in the case of the USA

  5. Hydrocarbon prospectivity in Western Greece

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maravelis, Angelos; Makrodimitras, George; Zelilidis, Avraam [Patras Univ. (Greece). Lab. of Sedimentology

    2012-06-15

    The geology of Western Greece is dominated by the most external zones of the Hellenide fold-and-thrust belt, namely the Pre-Apulian (or Paxoi) and Ionian zones. With Western Greece and Albania having undergone, in broad terms, similar geological histories, also the hydrocarbon potentials of both areas may be compared. Likewise, the hydrocarbon potential of Italy's Apulian Platform, adjoining in the westerly offshore, may serve as an analogue. Three basin types within Western Greece that deserve hydrocarbon exploration have been examined and are grouped, correlated to major tectonic features, namely foreland (Ionian thrusts' foreland basin), piggy-back (Ionian thrusts' back-arc basin) and strike-slip basins. Additionally, strike-slip basins are further subdivided into the basin north of the Borsh-Khardhiqit strike-slip fault and the Preveza basin, north of Cephalonia transfer fault. Their filling histories suggest the occurrence of Mesozoic carbonate plays and Oligocene/Miocene sandstone plays both for oil and gas.

  6. $100 million for hydrocarbon exploration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tollinsky, N.

    2009-12-01

    The hydrocarbon and base metal potential of the onshore and offshore segments of the Hudson Platform will be the focus of a $100 million, 5 year study undertaken by the Geological Survey of Canada (GSC) together with the Nunavut, Ontario, Quebec and Manitoba provincial surveys. This geological region encompasses 25 per cent of Canada's landmass. Seventy-five per cent of the budget will be spent in the Canadian Arctic, with the remainder committed to studying the Hudson Platform in Ontario, Quebec and Manitoba. The GSC has stated that although the geoscience information is limited, there are indications that world-class hydrocarbon source rocks are present. Very porous potential reservoir units have been identified. The project will define the basic elements of the hydrocarbon systems in the Hudson and Foxe Basins. According to the thermal conditions in the Hudson Platform, it is probably an oil domain. However, gas may exist in the thicker successions in the northern part of Hudson Bay. The young Devonian rock units in northern Ontario have the potential to eventually generate shallow natural gas called shale gas, a new target that is currently being developed in northern British Columbia. GSC researchers will also study gas escape structures known as pockmarks, discovered during a seafloor mapping program in the northern part of Hudson Bay. The geoscience data will also contribute to land use planning and provide a better understanding on the potential for gas hydrates. 2 refs., 1 fig.

  7. Hydrocarbon Reserves: Abundance or Scarcity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IFP and the OAPEC jointly organize a regular international seminar dealing with world oil-related problems appearing in the news. For the first time, this seminar has been opened to oil and gas company specialists, service companies, research centers and independents. This year's theme concerns oil and gas reserves: are they abundant or are we headed towards the shortages announced by some experts? This theme is especially topical in that: oil and gas currently meet two thirds of world energy needs and almost completely dominate the transport sector; the reserves declared by the OAPEC countries account for nearly half of world reserves; the price of a barrel of oil went through the roof in 2004; world energy demand is growing fast and alternative sources of energy are far from ready to take over from oil and gas in the next few decades. Since the reserves correspond to the volume it is technically and economically viable to produce, the seminar has, of course, dealt with the technical and economic questions that arise in connection with exploration and production, but it has also considered changes in the geopolitical context. Presentations by the leading companies of the OAPEC countries and by the IFP group were completed by presentation from the International Energy Agency (IEA), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the IHS Energy Group, Total and Gaz de France. This document gathers the transparencies of the following presentations: Hydrocarbon reserves in OAPEC members countries: current and future (M. Al-Lababidi); Non OAPEC liquid reserves and production forecasts (Y. Mathieu); World oil and gas resources and production outlook (K. Chew); Global investments in the upstream (F. Birol); Total's policy in the oil and gas sector (C. de Margerie); Gaz de France's policy in the oil and gas sector (J. Abiteboul); NOC/IOC's opportunities in OPEC countries (I. Sandrea); Relationships between companies, countries and investors: How they may impact on the growth

  8. Hydrocarbon Reserves: Abundance or Scarcity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2005-07-01

    IFP and the OAPEC jointly organize a regular international seminar dealing with world oil-related problems appearing in the news. For the first time, this seminar has been opened to oil and gas company specialists, service companies, research centers and independents. This year's theme concerns oil and gas reserves: are they abundant or are we headed towards the shortages announced by some experts? This theme is especially topical in that: oil and gas currently meet two thirds of world energy needs and almost completely dominate the transport sector; the reserves declared by the OAPEC countries account for nearly half of world reserves; the price of a barrel of oil went through the roof in 2004; world energy demand is growing fast and alternative sources of energy are far from ready to take over from oil and gas in the next few decades. Since the reserves correspond to the volume it is technically and economically viable to produce, the seminar has, of course, dealt with the technical and economic questions that arise in connection with exploration and production, but it has also considered changes in the geopolitical context. Presentations by the leading companies of the OAPEC countries and by the IFP group were completed by presentation from the International Energy Agency (IEA), the United States Geological Survey (USGS), the IHS Energy Group, Total and Gaz de France. This document gathers the transparencies of the following presentations: Hydrocarbon reserves in OAPEC members countries: current and future (M. Al-Lababidi); Non OAPEC liquid reserves and production forecasts (Y. Mathieu); World oil and gas resources and production outlook (K. Chew); Global investments in the upstream (F. Birol); Total's policy in the oil and gas sector (C. de Margerie); Gaz de France's policy in the oil and gas sector (J. Abiteboul); NOC/IOC's opportunities in OPEC countries (I. Sandrea); Relationships between companies, countries and investors: How they may

  9. Bromine monoxide/sulphur dioxide ratios in relation to volcanological observations at Mt. Etna 2006–2009

    OpenAIRE

    N. Bobrowski; Giuffrida, G

    2012-01-01

    Over a three year period, from 2006 to 2009, frequent scattered sun light DOAS measurements were conducted at Mt. Etna in a distance of around six kilometres downwind from the summit craters. During the same period and in addition to these measurements, volcanic observations were made by regularly visiting various parts of Mt. Etna.

    Results from these measurements and observations are presented and their relation is discussed. The focus of the investigation is the bromin...

  10. Utilization of a Green Brominating Agent for the Spectrophotometric Determination of Pipazethate HCl in Pure Form and Pharmaceutical Preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayman A. Gouda

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Five simple, accurate, and sensitive spectrophotometric methods (A–E have been described for the indirect assay of pipazethate HCl (PZT either in pure form or in pharmaceutical preparations. The proposed methods are based on the bromination of pipazethate HCl with a solution of excess bromate-bromide mixture in hydrochloric acid medium and subsequent estimation of the residual bromine by different reaction schemes. In the first three methods (A–C, the determination of the residual bromine is based on its ability to bleach the color of methyl orange, indigo carmine, or thymol blue dyes and measuring the absorbance at 520, 610, and 550 nm for methods A, B, and C, respectively. Methods D and E involves treating the unreacted bromine with a measured excess of iron(II, and the remaining iron(II is complexed with 1,10-phenanthroline, and the increase in absorbance is measured at 510 nm for method D and the resulting iron(III is complexed with thiocyanate and the absorbance is measured at 480 nm for method E. The different experimental parameters affecting the development and stability of the color are carefully studied and optimized. Regression analysis of the Beer-Lambert plots showed good correlation in the concentration ranges of 0.5–8.0 μg . The apparent molar absorptivity, Sandell's sensitivity, detection and quantitation limits were evaluated. The proposed methods have been applied and validated successfully for the analysis of the drug in its pure form and pharmaceutical formulations with mean recoveries of 99.94%–100.15% and relative standard deviation ≤1.53. No interference was observed from a common pharmaceutical adjuvant. Statistical comparison of the results with the reference method shows excellent agreement and indicates no significant difference in accuracy and precision.

  11. Comparison of Nuclear Activation Methods for Bromine. Instrumental Analyses of Pesticides in Plant Materials Close to the Limit of Sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There has been worldwide interest in pesticide residue analysis for control and ecological purposes. Although several agricultural research establishments have in the past developed suitable radioisotope tracer techniques to detect and remove organic pesticides from food, suitable micro-analytical techniques for the measurement of traces of toxic elements present in these materials have not been available. In cooperation with the United States Department of Agriculture, Plant Pest Control Laboratory, an investigation has been conducted on the use of neutron activation techniques for determining bromine, arsenic and mercury residues in soils, foliage, fruit, and vegetable materials. This paper discusses the various instrumental and data reduction techniques which were developed to measure traces of bromine by neutron activation methods, especially those employed in the limit of sensitivity range wherein special statistical methods are necessary. A large number of samples of soils, foliage, orange and vegetable materials, activated in the Texas A and M Research Reactor were counted at appropriate times after activation using three different counting systems: firstly, an automated system with an Nal (Tl) spectrometer; secondly, a 2 cm3 Ge(Li) solid-state detector connected to a Victoreen 3200-channel analyzer; and thirdly a slow γ-γ coincidence unit. The spectral data from the automated system were reduced by the AA-6 least squares method, and alternatively by means of computer spectrum stripping and peak area computation methods. The photopeak activities from the solid-state detector spectra were measured by the peak area method. The results obtained from the three counting systems using different data reduction techniques were compared to determine the best for the measurement of bromine concentration in the limit-of-sensitivity range. The γ-γ coincidence counting technique appears to have advantages in measuring the bromine content even in the ppm range in

  12. Bromine is an essential trace element for assembly of collagen IV scaffolds in tissue development and architecture

    OpenAIRE

    McCall, A. Scott; Cummings, Christopher F.; Bhave, Gautam; Vanacore, Roberto; Page-McCaw, Andrea; Hudson, Billy G.

    2014-01-01

    Bromine is ubiquitously present in animals as ionic bromide (Br−) yet has no known essential function. Herein, we demonstrate that Br− is a required cofactor for peroxidasin-catalyzed formation of sulfilimine crosslinks, a post-translational modification essential for tissue development and architecture found within the collagen IV scaffold of basement membranes (BMs). Bromide, converted to hypobromous acid, forms a bromosulfonium-ion intermediate that energetically selects for sulfilimine fo...

  13. Prenatal Exposure to Organohalogens, Including Brominated Flame Retardants, Influences Motor, Cognitive, and Behavioral Performance at School Age

    OpenAIRE

    Roze, Elise; Meijer, Lisethe; Bakker, Attie; Van Braeckel, Koenraad N. J. A.; Sauer, Pieter J. J.; Bos, Arend F

    2009-01-01

    Background Organohalogen compounds (OHCs) are known to have neurotoxic effects on the developing brain. Objective We investigated the influence of prenatal exposure to OHCs, including brominated flame retardants, on motor, cognitive, and behavioral outcome in healthy children of school age. Methods This study was part of the prospective Groningen infant COMPARE (Comparison of Exposure-Effect Pathways to Improve the Assessment of Human Health Risks of Complex Environmental Mixtures of Organoha...

  14. An investigation into the sensitivity of the atmospheric chlorine and bromine loading using a globally averaged mass balance model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowdell, David C.; Matthews, G. Peter; Wells, Ian

    Two globally averaged mass balance models have been developed to investigate the sensitivity and future level of atmospheric chlorine and bromine as a result of the emission of 14 chloro- and 3 bromo-carbons. The models use production, growth, lifetime and concentration data for each of the halocarbons and divide the production into one of eight uses, these being aerosol propellants, cleaning agents, blowing agents in open and closed cell foams, non-hermetic and hermetic refrigeration, fire retardants and a residual "other" category. Each use category has an associated emission profile which is built into the models to take into account the proportion of halocarbon retained in equipment for a characteristic period of time before its release. Under the Montreal Protocol 3 requirements, a peak chlorine loading of 3.8 ppb is attained in 1994, which does not reduce to 2.0 ppb (the approximate level of atmospheric chlorine when the ozone hole formed) until 2053. The peak bromine loading is 22 ppt, also in 1994, which decays to 12 ppt by the end of next century. The models have been used to (i) compare the effectiveness of Montreal Protocols 1, 2 and 3 in removing chlorine from the atmosphere, (ii) assess the influence of the delayed emission assumptions used in these models compared to immediate emission assumptions used in previous models, (iii) assess the relative effect on the chlorine loading of a tightening of the Montreal Protocol 3 restrictions, and (iv) calculate the influence of chlorine and bromine chemistry as well as the faster phase out of man-made methyl bromide on the bromine loading.

  15. Inorganic bromine and iodine in the TTL and in the mid-latitude lower stratosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkamer, Rainer; Apel, Eric; Atlas, Elliot; Bowdalo, Dene; Bresch, Jim; Dix, Barbara; Eloranta, Ed; Evans, Matthew; Gao, Ru-Shan; Jacob, Daniel; Kinnison, Doug; Koenig, Theodore; Lamarque, Jean-Francois; Morley, Bruce; Pierce, Brad; Saiz-Lopez, Alfonso; Salawitch, Ross; Schmidt, Johan; Wang, Siyuan

    2015-04-01

    Tropospheric chemistry of halogens (bromine and iodine) over tropical oceans modifies ozone and atmospheric aerosols, yet atmospheric models remain largely untested for lack of vertically resolved measurements of bromine monoxide (BrO) and iodine monoxide (IO) in the tropical troposphere. We present recent field measurements of BrO, IO, and their organic precursors that were conducted within the framework of the Tropical Ocean tRoposphere Exchange of Reactive halogen species and Oxygenated volatile organic compounds (TORERO, Jan/Feb 2012) over the tropical Eastern Pacific Ocean (tEPO). TORERO deployed an innovative payload of optical spectroscopic-, mass spectrometric-, and remote sensing instruments aboard the NSF/NCAR GV aircraft (HIAPER) with the objective to probe the composition of the TTL. BrO and IO were measured by the University of Colorado Airborne Multi AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS) instrument, organic precursor gases by the Trace Organic Gas Analyzer (TOGA), and in situ aerosol size distributions by an Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS); other parameters were also measured on the aircraft and used to constrain a photochemical box model to infer BrY. The measured BrO concentration strongly increased with altitude to 3.0 pptv BrO at 14.5 km (RF12, 9.1 to 8.6°N; 101.2 to 97.4°W). The average tropospheric BrO VCD in the tropics was 1.5 x1013 molec cm-2, which is in reasonable agreement with earlier satellite observations in the study area (~1.6 x1013 molec cm-2, Theys et al., 2011). However, the observed BrO VCD is 2-4 times higher than predictions from the GEOS-Chem model. Early results from the recent CONTRAST field campaign (CONvective TRansport of Active Species in the Tropics, Jan/Feb 2014) suggest lower tropospheric BrO over the Western Pacific Ocean (compared to the tEPO), but BrO is still higher than predicted by the CAM-Chem model. The largest model-measurement differences are observed in the

  16. On electron trapping in crystalline hydrocarbon matrices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of trapped electrons in γ irradiated polycrystalline hydrocarbon matrices is examined by E.S.R. at 77 and 4 K. Results indicate that no thermalized electrons are trapped in polycrystalline matrices of linear hydrocarbons (from n-hexane to n-hexadecane). They also strongly suggest that the trapped electrons in polycrystalline hydrocarbons so far reported may have been trapped in glassy regions in the matrices used. (author)

  17. EVALUATION OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS ELUTION FROM SOIL

    OpenAIRE

    Janina Piekutin

    2015-01-01

    The paper presents studies on oil removal from soil by means of water elution with a help of shaking out the contaminants from the soil. The tests were performed on simulated soil samples contaminated with a mixture of petroleum hydrocarbons. The study consisted in recording the time influence and the number of elution cycles to remove contaminants from the soil. The samples were then subject to the determination of petroleum hydrocarbons, aliphatic hydrocarbons, and BTEX compounds (benzene, ...

  18. Statistical Method of Estimating Nigerian Hydrocarbon Reserves

    OpenAIRE

    Jeffrey O. Oseh; Ifeanyi A. Oguamah; Charles U.Omohimoria; Omotara O. Oluwagbenga

    2015-01-01

    Hydrocarbon reserves are basic to planning and investment decisions in Petroleum Industry. Therefore its proper estimation is of considerable importance in oil and gas production. The estimation of hydrocarbon reserves in the Niger Delta Region of Nigeria has been very popular, and very successful, in the Nigerian oil and gas industry for the past 50 years. In order to fully estimate the hydrocarbon potentials in Nigerian Niger Delta Region, a clear understanding of the reserve geology and...

  19. Brominated flame retardants in the surrounding soil of two manufacturing plants in China: Occurrence, composition profiles and spatial distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Long; Liu, Li-Yan; Zhang, Zi-Feng; Song, Wei-Wei; Huo, Chun-Yan; Qiao, Li-Na; Ma, Wan-Li; Li, Yi-Fan

    2016-06-01

    Surface soil samples were collected surrounding two brominated flame retardants (BFRs) manufacturing plants in China in August 2014 and analyzed for 23 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and 8 novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs). BDE209 and decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE) were the predominant compounds in soil with the median levels of 1600 and 560 ng/g dw, respectively. The PBDEs profiles in soil samples were consistent with that of commercial product (comDecaBDE). The percentage contributions to total PBDEs decreased from higher to lower brominated homologues. Lower concentrations of NBFRs (excluding DBDPE) were detected in soil surrounding the two plants, suggesting they are byproducts or degradation products of the manufacturing activities. The concentrations of most BFRs dropped exponentially within 3-5 km of the manufacturing plants, suggesting recent deposition of these compounds to the soil. Directional distribution indicated that PBDEs and DBDPE concentrations were highest in the north direction of Plants 1. Three-day air parcel forward trajectories confirmed that the air parcel was responsible for the higher concentration of BFRs in the soil of north direction of the plant. PMID:26874313

  20. Occurrence of brominated flame retardants in black thermo cups and selected kitchen utensils purchased on the European market.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samsonek, J; Puype, F

    2013-01-01

    In order to screen for the presence of a recycled polymer waste stream from waste electric and electronic equipment (WEEE), a market survey was conducted on black plastic food-contact articles (FCA). An analytical method was applied combining X-ray fluorescence spectrometry (XRF) with thermal desorption gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (thermal desorption GC-MS). Firstly, XRF spectrometry was applied to distinguish bromine-positive samples. Secondly, bromine-positive samples were submitted for identification by thermal desorption GC-MS. Generally, the bromine-positive samples contained mainly technical decabromodiphenyl ether (decaBDE). Newer types of BFRs such as tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), tetrabromobisphenol A bis(2,3-dibromopropyl), ether (TBBPA-BDBPE) and decabromodiphenylethane (DBDPE), replacing the polybrominated diphenyleters (PBDEs) and polybrominated diphenyls (PBBs), were also identified. In none of the tested samples were PBBs or hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) found. Polymer identification was carried out using Fourier-transformed infrared spectroscopy measurement (FTIR) on all samples. The results indicate that polypropylene-polyethylene copolymers (PP-PE) and mainly styrene-based food-contact materials, such as acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene (ABS) have the highest risk of containing BFRs. PMID:24040839

  1. Bromination of Graphene: A New Route to Making High Performance Transparent Conducting Electrodes with Low Optical Losses

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Ahmed E.

    2015-07-22

    The unique optical and electrical properties of graphene have triggered great interest in its application as a transparent conducting electrode material and significant effort has been invested in achieving high conductivity while maintaining transparency. Doping of graphene has been a popular route for reducing its sheet resistance, but this has typically come at a significant cost in optical transmission. We demonstrate doping of few layers graphene with bromine as a means of enhancing the conductivity via intercalation without major optical losses. Our results demonstrate the encapsulation of bromine leads to air-stable transparent conducting electrodes with five-fold improvement of sheet resistance reaching at the cost of only 2-3% loss of optical transmission. The remarkably low tradeoff in optical transparency leads to the highest enhancements in the figure of merit reported thus far for FLG. Furthermore, we tune the workfunction by up to 0.3 eV by tuning the bromine content. These results should help pave the way for further development of graphene as a potential substitute to transparent conducting polymers and metal oxides used in optoelectronics, photovoltaics and beyond.

  2. Occurrence of PBDEs and other alternative brominated flame retardants in sludge from wastewater treatment plants in Korea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sunggyu; Song, Geum-Ju; Kannan, Kurunthachalam; Moon, Hyo-Bang

    2014-02-01

    Studies on the occurrence of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and other alternative brominated flame retardants in the environment are scarce. In this study, PBDEs and non-PBDE brominated flame retardants (NBFRs), including decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), were measured in sludge collected from three types of wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs) in Korea. Total concentrations of PBDEs (∑PBDE) in sludge ranged from 298 to 48,000 (mean: 3240) ng/g dry weight. Among 10 NBFRs analyzed, DBDPE and BTBPE were the only ones detected in sludge samples. Concentrations of DBDPE and BTBPE ranged from parametric multidimensional scaling ordination showed that congener profiles of PBDEs in sludge are dependent on the types of WWTPs. Almost all sludge samples contained a low ratio (mean: 0.18) of DBDPE/BDE 209, indicating an on-going contamination by PBDEs in Korea. However, the high ratios (>1) of DBDPE/BDE 209 were found in sludge from I-WWTPs, reflecting a shift in the usage pattern of BFRs by the Korean industry. The nationwide annual emission fluxes of ∑PBDE, DBDPE and BTBPE via WWTPs to the environment were estimated to be 7400, 480, and 3.7 kg/year, respectively. This is the first study on the occurrence of alternative brominated flame retardants in sludge from Korea. PMID:23993837

  3. Potential formation of PCDD/Fs and related bromine-substituted compounds from heating processes for ashes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermal experiments were conducted using real boiler ash and fly ash samples from three types of municipal or industrial solid waste incineration plants to understand the formation reactions of polychlorinated dibenzo-p-dioxin and furans (PCDD/Fs) and related bromine compounds that were chlorinated-brominated dibenzodioxins and furans (PXDD/Fs) and polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxin and furans (PBDD/Fs). The results obtained were as follows: The formation of PCDD/Fs was clearly shown, and fly ash containing abundant carbon matter had a significant potential for de novo synthesis. The homologous distribution change apparently showed that the formation of PXDD/Fs occurred from the substitution of a bromine atom with a chlorine atom in the PCDD/F molecules. This suggests that PXDD/Fs are usually formed with PCDD/Fs on the ash. PBDD/Fs might be formed from any reaction mechanism different from that of PXDD/Fs. The existence of carbonaceous matters always does not mean the potential formation of PCDD/Fs. However, any addition of catalytic copper may influence the nature of ash to increase the formation potential. The findings suggest that there are many instances that result in the unintended production of trace hazardous pollutants in the incineration process and show that careful and sophisticated control is required to prevent the formation of pollutants.

  4. Theoretical study of the reaction kinetics of atomic bromine with tetrahydropyran

    KAUST Repository

    Giri, Binod

    2015-02-12

    A detailed theoretical analysis of the reaction of atomic bromine with tetrahydropyran (THP, C5H10O) was performed using several ab initio methods and statistical rate theory calculations. Initial geometries of all species involved in the potential energy surface of the title reaction were obtained at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory. These molecular geometries were reoptimized using three different meta-generalized gradient approximation (meta-GGA) functionals. Single-point energies of the stationary points were obtained by employing the coupled-cluster with single and double excitations (CCSD) and fourth-order Møller-Plesset (MP4 SDQ) levels of theory. The computed CCSD and MP4(SDQ) energies for optimized structures at various DFT functionals were found to be consistent within 2 kJ mol-1. For a more accurate energetic description, single-point calculations at the CCSD(T)/CBS level of theory were performed for the minimum structures and transition states optimized at the B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory. Similar to other ether + Br reactions, it was found that the tetrahydropyran + Br reaction proceeds in an overall endothermic addition-elimination mechanism via a number of intermediates. However, the reactivity of various ethers with atomic bromine was found to vary substantially. In contrast with the 1,4-dioxane + Br reaction, the chair form of the addition complex (c-C5H10O-Br) for THP + Br does not need to undergo ring inversion to form a boat conformer (b-C4H8O2-Br) before the intramolecular H-shift can occur to eventually release HBr. Instead, a direct, yet more favorable route was mapped out on the potential energy surface of the THP + Br reaction. The rate coefficients for all relevant steps involved in the reaction mechanism were computed using the energetics of coupled cluster calculations. On the basis of the results of the CCSD(T)/CBS//B3LYP/cc-pVTZ level of theory, the calculated overall rate coefficients can be expressed as kov.,calc.(T) = 4.60 × 10

  5. Development of Zinc/Bromine Batteries for Load-Leveling Applications: Phase 1 Final Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eidler, Phillip

    1999-07-01

    The Zinc/Bromine Load-Leveling Battery Development contract (No. 40-8965) was partitioned at the outset into two phases of equal length. Phase 1 started in September 1990 and continued through December 1991. In Phase 1, zinc/bromine battery technology was to be advanced to the point that it would be clear that the technology was viable and would be an appropriate choice for electric utilities wishing to establish stationary energy-storage facilities. Criteria were established that addressed most of the concerns that had been observed in the previous development efforts. The performances of 8-cell and 100-cell laboratory batteries demonstrated that the criteria were met or exceeded. In Phase 2, 100-kWh batteries will be built and demonstrated, and a conceptual design for a load-leveling plant will be presented. At the same time, work will continue to identify improved assembly techniques and operating conditions. This report details the results of the efforts carried out in Phase 1. The highlights are: (1) Four 1-kWh stacks achieved over 100 cycles, One l-kWh stack achieved over 200 cycles, One 1-kWh stack achieved over 300 cycles; (2) Less than 10% degradation in performance occurred in the four stacks that achieved over 100 cycles; (3) The battery used for the zinc loading investigation exhibited virtually no loss in performance for loadings up to 130 mAh/cm{sup 2}; (4) Charge-current densities of 50 ma/cm{sup 2} have been achieved in minicells; (5) Fourteen consecutive no-strip cycles have been conducted on the stack with 300+ cycles; (6) A mass and energy balance spreadsheet that describes battery operation was completed; (7) Materials research has continued to provide improvements in the electrode, activation layer, and separator; and (8) A battery made of two 50-cell stacks (15 kWh) was produced and delivered to Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) for testing. The most critical development was the ability to assemble a battery stack that remained leak free. The

  6. Modelling the impact of chlorine and bromine emissions from large Plinian eruptions on ozone

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brenna, Hans; Krüger, Kirstin; Kutterolf, Steffen

    2016-04-01

    Large Plinian volcanic eruptions inject large amounts of atmosphere-relevant gases (e.g. S, Cl, Br) and materials into the stratosphere. If the eruption occurs in the tropics, it can have a global impact due to the dispersal through the large scale meridional overturning circulation. Most climate model studies concentrate on the sulfate aerosol effects on climate. In contrast, ozone-depletion initiated by volcanic halogens from tropical eruptions was believed to play an insignificant role for the global atmosphere, based on observations from the recent El Chichon and Pinatubo eruptions. New results regarding the halogen release by Plinian eruptions, as well as recent volcanic plume observations and model simulations facilitate now our investigation into what effect the combined chlorine and bromine emissions from large tropical eruptions have on ozone and the atmosphere in general. A complete halogen data set for the last 200 ka (Kutterolf et al., 2015), derived by the petrological method from paleo-eruptions of the Central American Volcanic Arc (CAVA), are used to force simulations with the advanced chemistry climate model WACCM (Whole Atmosphere Community Climate Model). The goal is to quantify the impact of volcanic halogens on the preindustrial atmosphere when the background chlorine levels were low compared to the present day with the main focus on stratospheric ozone. We carried out 5 model simulations assuming that 10% of the Cl and Br (9.51e+6 kg Br and 2.93e+9 kg Cl) emitted from the average CAVA eruption is injected into the tropical stratosphere during January. The model response reveals a global impact on the ozone layer affecting via radiation also atmospheric dynamics for more than 5 years. Given the current decline in anthropogenic chlorine, the results will become relevant for future halogen-rich explosive eruptions in the tropics. References: Kutterolf, S., T. Hansteen, A. Freundt, H. Wehrmann, K. Appel, K. Krüger, and W. Pérez (2015), Bromine

  7. Temperature dependence of bromine activation due to reaction with ozone in a proxy for organic aerosols

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edebeli, Jacinta; Ammann, Markus; Gilgen, Anina; Eichler, Anja; Schneebeli, Martin; Bartels-Rausch, Thorsten

    2016-04-01

    The discovery of boundary layer ozone depletion events in the Polar Regions [1] and in the mid-latitudes [2], two areas of very different temperature regimes, begs the question of temperature dependence of reactions responsible for these observations [3]. These ODEs have been attributed to ozone reacting with halides leading to reactive halogens (halogen activation) of which bromide is extensively studied, R1 - R3 [4, 5] (R1 is a multiphase reaction). O3 + Br‑→ O2 + OBr‑ (R1) OBr‑ + H+ ↔ HOBr (R2) HOBr + H+ + Br‑→ Br2 + H2O (R3) Despite extensive studies of ozone-bromide interactions, the temperature dependence of bromine activation is not clear [3]. This limits parameterization of the involved reactions and factors in atmospheric models [3, 6]. Viscosity changes in the matrix (such as organic aerosols) due to temperature have been shown to influence heterogeneous reaction rates and products beyond pure temperature effect [7]. With the application of coated wall flow-tubes, the aim of this study is therefore to investigate the temperature dependence of bromine activation by ozone interaction while attempting to characterize the contributions of the bulk and surface reactions to observed ozone uptake. Citric acid is used in this study as a hygroscopically characterized matrix whose viscosity changes with temperature and humidity. Here, we present reactive ozone uptake measured between 258 and 289 K. The data show high reproducibility. Comparison of measured uptake with modelled bulk uptake at different matrix compositions (and viscosities) indicate that bulk reactive uptake dominates, but there are other factors which still need further consideration in the model. References 1. Barrie, L.A., et al., Nature, 1988. 334: p. 138 - 141. 2. Hebestreit, K., et al., Science, 1999. 283: p. 55-57. 3. Simpson, W.R., et al., Atmospheric Chemistry and Physics, 2007. 7: p. 4375 - 4418. 4. Haag, R.W. and J. Hoigné, Environ Sci Technol, 1983. 17: p. 261-267. 5. Oum

  8. Detection of hydrocarbons in irradiated foods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Miyahara, Makoto; Maitani, Tamio [National Inst. of Health Sciences, Tokyo (Japan); Saito, Akiko; Kamimura, Tomomi; Nagasawa, Taeko [Kitasato Univ., Sagamihara, Kanagawa (Japan). School of Allied Health Sciences; Kobayashi, Yasuo; Ito, Hitoshi [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Establishment

    2003-06-01

    The hydrocarbon method for the detection of irradiated foods is now recognized as the international technique. This method is based on radiolysis of fatty acids in food to give hydrocarbons. In order to expand this technique's application, ten foods (butter, cheese, chicken, pork, beef, tuna, dry shrimp, avocado, papaya, and mango) were irradiated in the range from 0.5 to 10 kGy and the hydrocarbons in them were detected. Recoveries of the hydrocarbons from most foods were acceptable (38-128%). Some hydrocarbons were found in non-irradiated foods, particularly, in butter, cheese, tuna, and shrimp. Seven irradiated foods, butter, cheese, chicken, beef, pork, tuna, dry shrimp, and avocado were detectable at their practical doses by measuring the appropriate marker hydrocarbons. In most case, marker hydrocarbon will be 1,7-hexadecadiene. However, the marker hydrocarbons produced only in irradiated foods varied from food to food; therefore, it is necessary to check a specific irradiated food for marker hydrocarbons. On the other hand, two irradiated foods (papaya and mango which were irradiated at their practical doses) were difficult to distinguish from non-irradiated foods using this method. (author)

  9. Detection of hydrocarbons in irradiated foods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hydrocarbon method for the detection of irradiated foods is now recognized as the international technique. This method is based on radiolysis of fatty acids in food to give hydrocarbons. In order to expand this technique's application, ten foods (butter, cheese, chicken, pork, beef, tuna, dry shrimp, avocado, papaya, and mango) were irradiated in the range from 0.5 to 10 kGy and the hydrocarbons in them were detected. Recoveries of the hydrocarbons from most foods were acceptable (38-128%). Some hydrocarbons were found in non-irradiated foods, particularly, in butter, cheese, tuna, and shrimp. Seven irradiated foods, butter, cheese, chicken, beef, pork, tuna, dry shrimp, and avocado were detectable at their practical doses by measuring the appropriate marker hydrocarbons. In most case, marker hydrocarbon will be 1,7-hexadecadiene. However, the marker hydrocarbons produced only in irradiated foods varied from food to food; therefore, it is necessary to check a specific irradiated food for marker hydrocarbons. On the other hand, two irradiated foods (papaya and mango which were irradiated at their practical doses) were difficult to distinguish from non-irradiated foods using this method. (author)

  10. Investigation of the Stratospheric Bromine Chemistry by Balloon-Borne Spectroscopic Observations and Photochemical Modelling: A Case Study of J(BrONO2) / k[BrO][NO2

    OpenAIRE

    Kreycy, Sebastian

    2013-01-01

    Besides chlorine, bromine is the second most important halogen when it comes to the destruction of ozone in the stratosphere. Although 150 times more chlorine than bromine is transported into the stratosphere, the higher ozone-depleting efficiency of bromine (by a factor of 45) makes it very important for catalytic cycles. In this study, balloon-borne DOAS (Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy) measurements of direct sunlight and limb measurements of scattered skylight, recorded...

  11. Commercial valuation of hydrocarbon resources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A practical business process is described which enables all categories of hydrocarbon resources to be valued in a commercially consistent manner. The benefits of the process are increased if there is a transparent corporate strategic plan which can be used to test the value of a resource against a desired portfolio, described quantitatively in terms of value and risk. Individual opportunities for both acquisition and disposal can then be measured against an assessed ''Corporate preference profile'' and pursued with increased confidence in the overall fit

  12. Analysis of reactive bromine production and ozone depletion in the Arctic boundary layer using 3-D simulations with GEM-AQ: inference from synoptic-scale patterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Toyota

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Episodes of high bromine levels and surface ozone depletion in the springtime Arctic are simulated by an online air-quality model, GEM-AQ, with gas-phase and heterogeneous reactions of inorganic bromine species and a simple scheme of air-snowpack chemical interactions implemented for this study. Snowpack on sea ice is assumed to be the only source of bromine to the atmosphere and to be capable of converting relatively stable bromine species to photolabile Br2 via air-snowpack interactions. A set of sensitivity model runs are performed for April 2001 at a horizontal resolution of approximately 100 km×100 km in the Arctic, to provide insights into the effects of temperature and the age (first-year, FY, versus multi-year, MY of sea ice on the release of reactive bromine to the atmosphere. The model simulations capture much of the temporal variations in surface ozone mixing ratios as observed at stations in the high Arctic and the synoptic-scale evolution of areas with enhanced BrO column amount ("BrO clouds" as estimated from satellite observations. The simulated "BrO clouds" are in modestly better agreement with the satellite measurements when the FY sea ice is assumed to be more efficient at releasing reactive bromine to the atmosphere than on the MY sea ice. Surface ozone data from coastal stations used in this study are not sufficient to evaluate unambiguously the difference between the FY sea ice and the MY sea ice as a source of bromine. The results strongly suggest that reactive bromine is released ubiquitously from the snow on the sea ice during the Arctic spring while the timing and location of the bromine release are largely controlled by meteorological factors. It appears that a rapid advection and an enhanced turbulent diffusion associated with strong boundary-layer winds drive transport and dispersion of ozone to the near-surface air over the sea ice, increasing the oxidation rate of bromide (Br in the surface

  13. Bromine monoxide/sulphur dioxide ratios in relation to volcanological observations at Mt. Etna 2006–2009

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. Bobrowski

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Over a three year period, from 2006 to 2009, frequent scattered sun light DOAS measurements were conducted at Mt. Etna in a distance of around six kilometres downwind from the summit craters. During the same period and in addition to these measurements, volcanic observations were made by regularly visiting various parts of Mt. Etna.

    Results from these measurements and observations are presented and their relation is discussed. The focus of the investigation is the bromine monoxide/sulphur dioxide (BrO/SO2 ratio, and its variability in relation to volcanic processes.

    That the halogen/sulphur ratio can serve as a precursor or indicator for the onset of eruptive activity was already proposed by earlier works (e.g. Noguchi and Kamiya, 1963; Menyailov, 1975; Pennisi and Cloarec, 1998; Aiuppa, 2002. However, there is still a limited understanding today because of the complexity with which halogens are released, depending on magma composition and degassing conditions. Our understanding of these processes is far from complete, for example of the rate and mechanism of bubble nucleation, growth and ascent in silicate melts (Carroll and Holloway, 1994, the halogen vapour-melt partitioning and the volatile diffusivity in the melt (Aiuppa et al., 2009.

    With this study we aim to add one more piece to the puzzle of what halogen/sulphur ratios might tell about volcanic activities. Our data set shows an increase of the BrO/SO2 ratio several weeks prior to an eruption, followed by a decline before and during the initial phase of eruptive activities. Towards the end of activity or short afterwards, the ratio increases to baseline values again and remains more or less constant during quiet phases. To explain the observed evolution of the BrO/SO2 ratio, a first empirical model is proposed. This model suggests that bromine, unlike chlorine and fluorine, is less soluble in the magmatic melt than sulphur

  14. Hydrocarbon production with nuclear explosives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The tremendous energy of nuclear explosives and the small dimensions of the explosive package make an ideal combination for drill-hole explosive emplacement in deep, thick hydrocarbon deposits. Potential applications exist in fracturing low permeability natural-gas and petroleum formations for stimulating production, fracturing oil shale to permit in situ retorting, and creating storage chimneys for natural gas, liquefied petroleum gas, petroleum, petroleum products, helium, and other fluids. Calculations show, for example, that less than 100 shots per year would be needed to stabilize the natural gas reserves to production ratio. Under the Government-industry Plowshare program, two experiments, Projects Gasbuggy and Rulison, were conducted to stimulate natural gas production from low-permeability formations. Incomplete information indicates that both were technically successful. Potential problems associated with the use of nuclear explosives for underground engineering applications are radioactive contamination, maximum yield limitations, high costs of detonating contained nuclear explosives, and adverse public opinion. Results at Project Gasbuggy and other considerations indicated that the problem of radioactive contamination was about as predicted and not an insurmountable one. Also, it was demonstrated that shots at adequate depths could be detonated without appreciable damage to existing surface and subsurface buildings, natural features, and equipment. However, costs must be reduced and the public must be better informed before these techniques can be widely used in field operations. On the basis of present knowledge, the potential of nuclear-explosive stimulation of hydrocarbon production appears good. Additional field experiments will be required to adequately explore that potential. (author)

  15. Unsaturated medium hydrocarbons pollution evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When the so called porous unsaturated medium, that's the vertical subsoil section between both the ground and water-table level, is interested by a hydrocarbons spill, the problem to evaluate the pollution becomes difficult: considering, essentially, the natural coexistence in it of two fluids, air and water, and the interactions between them. This paper reports that the problems tend to increase when a third fluid, the pollutant, immiscible with water, is introduced into the medium: a three-phases flow, which presents several analogies with the flow conditions present in an oil-reservoir, will be established. In such a situation, it would be very useful to handle the matter by the commonly used parameters in the oil reservoirs studies such as: residual saturation, relative permeability, phases mobility, to derive a first semiquantitative estimation of the pollution. The subsoil pollution form hydrocarbons agents is one of the worldwide more diffused causes of contamination: such events are generally referable to two main effects: accidental (oil pipeline breakdowns, e.g.), and continuous (underground tanks breaks, industrial plants leakages, e.g.)

  16. Brominated flame retardants in the indoor environment - Comparative study of indoor contamination from three countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venier, Marta; Audy, Ondřej; Vojta, Šimon; Bečanová, Jitka; Romanak, Kevin; Melymuk, Lisa; Krátká, Martina; Kukučka, Petr; Okeme, Joseph; Saini, Amandeep; Diamond, Miriam L; Klánová, Jana

    2016-09-01

    Concentrations of more than 20 brominated flame retardants (FRs), including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and emerging FRs, were measured in air, dust and window wipes from 63 homes in Canada, the Czech Republic and the United States in the spring and summer of 2013. Among the PBDEs, the highest concentrations were generally BDE-209 in all three matrices, followed by Penta-BDEs. Among alternative FRs, EHTBB and BEHTBP were detected at the highest concentrations. DBDPE was also a major alternative FR detected in dust and air. Bromobenzenes were detected at lower levels than PBDEs and other alternative FRs; among the bromobenzenes, HBB and PBEB were the most abundant compounds. In general, FR levels were highest in the US and lowest in the Czech Republic - a geographic trend that reflects the flame retardants' market. No statistically significant differences were detected between bedroom and living room FR concentrations in the same house (n=10), suggesting that sources of FRs are widespread indoors and mixing between rooms. The concentrations of FRs in air, dust, and window film were significantly correlated, especially for PBDEs. We found a significant relationship between the concentrations in dust and window film and in the gas phase for FRs with log KOA values values >14. This hypothesis was confirmed by a large discrepancy between values predicted using a partitioning model and the measured values for FRs with log KOA values >14. PMID:27248661

  17. Simple and rapid quantification of brominated vegetable oil in commercial soft drinks by LC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chitranshi, Priyanka; Gamboa da Costa, Gonçalo

    2016-12-15

    We report here a simple and rapid method for the quantification of brominated vegetable oil (BVO) in soft drinks based upon liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. Unlike previously reported methods, this novel method does not require hydrolysis, extraction or derivatization steps, but rather a simple "dilute and shoot" sample preparation. The quantification is conducted by mass spectrometry in selected ion recording mode and a single point standard addition procedure. The method was validated in the range of 5-25μg/mL BVO, encompassing the legal limit of 15μg/mL established by the US FDA for fruit-flavored beverages in the US market. The method was characterized by excellent intra- and inter-assay accuracy (97.3-103.4%) and very low imprecision [0.5-3.6% (RSD)]. The direct nature of the quantification, simplicity, and excellent statistical performance of this methodology constitute clear advantages in relation to previously published methods for the analysis of BVO in soft drinks. PMID:27451219

  18. Formation of brominated trihalomethanes in chlorinated drinking-water from Lake Constance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The formation of trihalomethanes (THMs) in raw water and drinking water from Lake Constance containing low amounts of DOC and bromide was studied with special emphasis on brominated trihalomethanes (Br-THMs). If the raw water was ozonated prior to chlorination, the formation of THMs was reduced by 37%, and if a rapid sandfiltration was interposed, the THM-formation was again slightly enhanced. The percentage of Br-THMs on total-THMs increased from 16% to 35% during the treatment process. In the drinking water distribution system of BWV the formation of Br-THMs and CHCl3 was studied with respect to residence time and post-chlorination. Unless the post-chlorination was performed, the THM-formation in the distribution system resembled that obtained from laboratory studies, except for small amounts of THMs being purged due to transport in the mains and residence in the reservoirs. Post-chlorination increased CHCl3- and the CHBrCl2-formation, but there was no effect on the formation of CHBr2Cl and CHBr3. However, the total THM-concentration in the drinking water never exceeded the German drinking water standard of 10 μg/L. (orig.)

  19. In vitro screening of the endocrine disrupting potency of brominated flame retardants and their metabolites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hamers, T.; Kamstra, J.H. [Inst. for Environmental Studies (IVM), Amsterdam (Netherlands); Sonneveld, E. [BioDetection Systems (BDS), Amsterdam (Netherlands); Murk, A.J. [Wageningen Univ., Toxicology Group, Wageningen (Netherlands); Zegers, B.N.; Boon, J.P. [Royal Netherlands Inst. for Sea Research (NIOZ), Den Burg (Netherlands); Brouwer, A. [Umea Univ., Umea (Sweden)

    2004-09-15

    Substantial evidence is recently becoming available that brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are potential endocrine disruptors. The toxicological profile of BFRs, however, is too incomplete and insufficient to perform human and ecological risk assessment. To fill these gaps, the EU funded research program FIRE was started in December 2002. This program aims at the identification and toxicological characterization of the most potent and environmentally relevant BFRs and their possible risk for human and wildlife health. As part of a hazard identification approach, twenty seven BFRs have been selected within the framework of FIRE for pre-screening their endocrinedisrupting potencies. Selection of test compounds was based on a maximal variation in physicochemical characteristics of BFRs within the test set, allowing the establishment of quantitative structure-activity relationships (QSARs). In addition, environmental relevance (e.g. high production volumes and persistence) and availability for testing were used as selection criteria. BFRs were tested in seven different in vitro bioassays for their potency to interfere via estrogenic, thyroidal, androgenic, progestagenic, and Ah-receptor mediated pathways. Metabolisation rates of BFRs were determined using phenobarbital-induced rat liver microsomes. Finally, the endocrine disrupting potency of the metabolites was determined in the same in vitro bio-assays and compared to the potency of the parent compounds.

  20. Characterizing Variability in the Spatial Distribution of Bromine Explosion Events in the Vicinity of Barrow, Alaska

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, P.; Pratt, K.; Simpson, W. R.; Shepson, P. B.; Pöhler, D.; Friess, U.; Zielcke, J.; Platt, U.; Nghiem, S. V.; Sihler, H.

    2015-12-01

    Reactive halogens (e.g. Br, BrO) are produced photochemically during springtime in the Arctic. Some dramatic effects of these halogen species are known (e.g. ozone depletion, mercury deposition), but changes in atmospheric composition related to this halogen chemistry, particularly those related to increasing sea ice loss and the transformation of Arctic sea ice cover, are unknown. In March 2012, the Bromine, Ozone, Mercury EXperiment (BROMEX) provided an opportunity to enhance our understanding of the spatial and temporal variability of halogen chemistry in the vicinity of Barrow, Alaska. During BROMEX, we used Multiple Axis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) to measure BrO lower tropospheric vertical column densities (LT-VCD) and near-surface mixing ratios at Barrow, as well as on land-fast ice 40 km north east of Barrow, and a drifting platform on seasonal sea ice west of Barrow. Concurrently, an aircraft equipped with the Heidelberg Airborne Imaging DOAS Instrument (HAIDI) collected airborne BrO data at altitudes up to 3 km. These measurements showed several instances of spatial gradients in BrO between measurement sites, as well as times when BrO was present up to 1km aloft. We explore explanations for these features using local and synoptic meteorology, back-trajectory modelling, MODIS and airborne imagery, as well as satellite-instrument-based maps of synoptic sea ice classes and tropospheric BrO.

  1. [Optimization of determination of aflatoxins in foods with bromine postcolumn derivatization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwiecki, Ludwik; Wilczyńska, Grazyna

    2007-01-01

    The method for determination of aflatoxin B1, B2, G1 i G2 in nuts, culinary spices, cereals and cereal products was described. To optimize the analytical procedure in several products, condition of proper extraction, clean-up, HPLC and detection were selected. After extraction by means of methanol and water (80+20 v/v) or (70+30 v/v), clean-up on IAC columns, HPLC on C18 columns--Nucleosil and Nova Pak with mobile phase-methanol, acetonitrile, water (20+20+60 v/v) was performed. For fluorometric detection at 362/430 nm, post-column derivatization of aflatoxin B1 and G1 with bromine was carried out. The mean recovery of the method depending on matrix and aflatoxin, was 52-102% at RSD% 0.2-8.3. LOD and LOQ, respectively were: 0.01 and 0.02 microg/kg for nuts and 0.05 and 0.1 microg/kg for culinary spices and cereal products. The concentrations of aflatoxins in 86 samples of foods from market were below the permissible maximum levels legally binding. PMID:18246653

  2. Identification of highly brominated analogues of Q1 in marine mammals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teuten, Emma L; Pedler, Byron E; Hangsterfer, Alexandra N; Reddy, Christopher M

    2006-11-01

    Three novel halogenated organic compounds (HOCs) have been identified in the blubber of marine mammals from coastal New England with the molecular formulae C(9)H(3)N(2)Br(6)Cl, C(9)H(3)N(2)Br(7), and C(9)H(4)N(2)Br(5)Cl. They were identified using high and low resolution gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) and appear to be highly brominated analogues of Q1, a heptachlorinated HOC suspected to be naturally produced. These compounds were found in Atlantic white sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchus acutus), bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus), common dolphin (Delphinus delphis), Risso's dolphin (Grampus griseus), harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena), beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas), fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus), grey seal (Halichoerus grypus), harp seal (Phoca groenlandica) and a potential food source (Loligo pealei) with concentrations as high as 2.7 microg/g (lipid weight). The regiospecificity of C(9)H(3)N(2)Br(6)Cl is suggestive of a biogenic origin. Debromination of C(9)H(3)N(2)Br(6)Cl may be significant in the formation of C(9)H(4)N(2)Br(5)Cl. PMID:16517037

  3. Photochemical transformation of five novel brominated flame retardants: Kinetics and photoproducts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ya-Nan; Chen, Jingwen; Xie, Qing; Li, Yingjie; Zhou, Chengzhi

    2016-05-01

    Many novel brominated flame retardants (NBFRs) are used as substitutes of polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) in recent years. However, little is known about their phototransformation behavior, which may influence the environmental fate of these chemicals. In this study, photochemical behavior of five NBFRs, allyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (ATE), 2-bromoallyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (BATE), 2,3-dibromopropyl-2,4,6-tribromophenyl ether (DPTE), 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), and 2,4,6-tris(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)-1,3,5-triazine (TTBP-TAZ) was investigated. Results show all the five NBFRs can undergo photochemical transformation under simulated sunlight irradiation. Quantum yields (Φ) of the five NBFRs varied from 0.012 of TTBP-TAZ in hexane to 0.091 of BTBPE in methanol. Half-lives (t1/2) relevant with solar irradiation of these NBFRs were estimated using the determined Φ, and the values are 1.5-12.0 d in summer and 17.1-165.0 d in winter. Debrominated and ether bond cleavage products were identified in the phototransformation of DPTE and BTBPE. Debromination on the phenyl is a main phototransformation pathway for DPTE, and both debromination and ether bond cleavage are main phototransformation pathways for BTBPE. This study is helpful to better understand the phototransformation behavior of the NBFRs. PMID:26796587

  4. Nickel foam and carbon felt applications for sodium polysulfide/bromine redox flow battery electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first use of nickel foam (NF) as electrocatalytic negative electrode in a polysulfide/bromine battery (PSB) is described. The performance of a PSB employing NF and polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon felt (CF) as negative and positive electrode materials, respectively, was evaluated by constant current charge-discharge tests in a single cell. Charge/discharge curves of the cell, positive and negative electrodes show that the rapid fall in cell voltage is due to the drop of positive potential caused by depletion of Br2 dissolved in the catholyte at the end of discharge. Cell voltage efficiency was limited by the relatively high internal ohmic resistance drop (iR drop). Polarization curves indicated that both NF and CF have excellent catalytic activity for the positive and negative redox reactions of PSB. The average energy efficiency of the single cell designed in this work could be as high as 77.2% at 40 mA cm-2 during 48 charge-discharge cycles

  5. Identification of highly brominated analogues of Q1 in marine mammals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three novel halogenated organic compounds (HOCs) have been identified in the blubber of marine mammals from coastal New England with the molecular formulae C9H3N2Br6Cl, C9H3N2Br7, and C9H4N2Br5Cl. They were identified using high and low resolution gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) and appear to be highly brominated analogues of Q1, a heptachlorinated HOC suspected to be naturally produced. These compounds were found in Atlantic white sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchus acutus), bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus), common dolphin (Delphinus delphis), Risso's dolphin (Grampus griseus), harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena), beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas), fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus), grey seal (Halichoerus grypus), harp seal (Phoca groenlandica) and a potential food source (Loligo pealei) with concentrations as high as 2.7 μg/g (lipid weight). The regiospecificity of C9H3N2Br6Cl is suggestive of a biogenic origin. Debromination of C9H3N2Br6Cl may be significant in the formation of C9H4N2Br5Cl. - Three novel bioaccumulated compounds were identified as C9H3N2Br6Cl, C9H3N2Br7 and C9H4N2Br5Cl

  6. Is cloud seeding in coastal Antarctica linked to bromine and nitrate variability in snow?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Considering the significance of methanesulfonate (MSA) in the sulfur cycle and global climate, we analyzed MSA and other ionic species in snow from the coastal Larsemann Hills, East Antarctica. MSA concentrations recorded were high (0.58 ± 0.7 μM) with ice-cap regions showing significantly higher concentrations (df = 10, p 2 cells l-1) with subsequent production of brominated compounds. The consequent elevated Br- (3.2 ± 2.2 μM) in the ice-cap region could result in the release of Br atoms through photoactivated reactions on aerosols and the snow surface. Activated Br atoms in the atmosphere could react with ozone leading to BrO enhancement with subsequent dimethylsulfide (DMS) oxidation and production of sulfur aerosols. Since BrO based DMS oxidation is much faster than the OH/NO3 pathway, elevated Br- in ice-cap snow could contribute more than ice-free sites towards formation of cloud condensation nuclei at the expense of ozone.

  7. On temperate sources of bromoform and other reactive organic bromine gases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, L. J.; Liss, P. S.

    2000-08-01

    Current estimates of annual bromoform production by temperate marine algae underestimate, by at least an order of magnitude, the flux required to sustain atmospheric concentrations. In the light of recent evidence of the potential of bromoform to deplete upper-tropospheric/lower-stratospheric ozone, such a substantial discrepancy in global emission rates is of considerable concern. Here we present new information on air and seawater CHBr3, CH2Br2, and CHBr2Cl concentrations in the coastal east Atlantic and review previous data from widespread locations which suggest that concentrations and ratios of reactive organobromines are consistent with marine macroalgal emissions. Detailed reviews of algal halocarbon emissions and biomass estimates imply that macroalgae produce around 70% of the world's bromoform, rather than only ˜20% as previously thought, and that the underestimation was most likely caused by over conservative biomass estimates. Our total global source strength estimate of 2.2×1011 g CHBr3 yr-1 agrees well with recent calculations derived from atmospheric data. Given the dominant role of macroalgae in producing bromoform, the effect of changing climate and environment on seaweed populations and consequent effect on biogenic bromine emissions should be investigated.

  8. Brominated flame retardants in Chinese air before and after the phase out of polybrominated diphenyl ethers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Wen-Long; Qi, Hong; Ma, Wan-Li; Liu, Li-Yan; Zhang, Zhi; Mohammed, Mohammed O. A.; Song, Wei-Wei; Zhang, Zifeng; Li, Yi-Fan

    2015-09-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs), including polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and novel non-BDE flame retardants (NBFRs), were analyzed in Chinese air during China's POPs Soil and Air Monitoring Program Phase I (SAMP-I) and Phase II (SAMP-II). The levels of Σ12PBDEs and Σ6NBFRs in urban sites were significantly higher than those in rural sites and background sites. The higher detection rate and concentrations of high molecular weight PBDEs and NBFRs in Phase II indicated the changing of the commercial pattern of BFRs after the phase out of PBDEs in China. Temperature was the major factor affecting the seasonal variations of molecular weight BFRs in atmosphere. A significant correlation between BFRs concentration and gross domestic product (GDP) was observed, with the GDP parameter explained 59.4% and 72.7% of the total variability for Octa-BDEs and low molecular weight NBFRs, respectively. Our findings indicated an evolving commercial usage of BFRs from SAMP-I to SAMP-II, i.e. shifting from lower molecular weight to higher molecular weight congeners in China.

  9. A study of the presence of brominated flame retardants in Australian fauna

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Symons, R.; Burniston, D.; Piro, N.; Stevenson, G.; Yates, A. [Australian Government Analytical Laboratories, Sydney (Australia)

    2004-09-15

    Brominated flame retardants, in particular polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) gained prominence in the late nineties when Noren et al. reported an exponential increase in PBDE levels found in Swedish mothers milk over a quarter of a century period with an associated decrease in levels of dioxin-like compounds. PBDEs have since become exceptionally widely studied being detected in most environmental compartments and food as well as human tissues. Only limited information on the distribution if PBDEs is available for the Southern Hemisphere, however, elevated levels of PBDEs in pork fat were detected during the routine screening for organochlorine pesticide residues. More recently an investigation of breast milk for PBDE levels also demonstrated that levels were comparable with those in the Northern Hemisphere. BFRs are not manufactured in Australia but it has been estimated that over 500 tonnes are imported yearly of which 340 tonnes are PBDEs. In addition, the amount of PBDEs that are contained in imported articles used both in domestic and industrial applications is unknown. In this paper, we report levels of PBDEs in a range of different Australian fauna that show that these POPs have indeed become widely distributed both in terms of the types of the fauna but also the levels determined.

  10. Shuttle Environmental Assurance: Brominated Flame Retardants - Concerns, Drivers, Potential Impacts and Mitigation Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark-Ingram, Marceia

    2010-01-01

    Brominated Flame Retardants (BFRs) are widely used in the manufacture of electrical and electronic components and as additives in formulations for foams, plastics and rubbers. The United States (US) and the European Union (EU)have increased regulation and monitoring of of targeted BFRs, such as Polybrominated Diphenyl Ethers (PBDEs) due to the bioaccumulative effects in humans and animals. In response, manufacturers and vendors of BFR-containing materials are changing flame-retardant additives, sometimes without notifying BFR users. In some instances, Deca-bromodiphenylether (Deca-BDE) and other families of flame retardants are being used as replacement flame retardants for penta-BDE and octa-BDE. The reformulation of the BFR-containing material typically results in the removal of the targeted PBDE and replacement with a non-PBDE chemical or non-targeted PBDE. Many users of PBDE -based materials are concerned that vendors will perform reformulation and not inform the end user. Materials performance such as flammability, adhesion , and tensile strength may be altered due to reformulation. The requalification of newly formulated materials may be required, or replacement materials may have to be identified and qualified. The Shuttle Enviornmental Assurance (SEA) team indentified a risk to the Space Shuttle Program associated with the possibility that targeted PBDEs may be replaced without notification. Resultant decreases in flame retardancy, Liquid Oxygen (LOX) compatibility, or material performance could have serious consequences.

  11. 40 CFR 52.1877 - Control strategy: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... oxidants (hydrocarbons). 52.1877 Section 52.1877 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY....1877 Control strategy: Photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons). (a) The requirements of Subpart G of this... national standard for photochemical oxidants (hydrocarbons) in the Metropolitan Cincinnati...

  12. Abiogenic origin of petroleum hydrocarbons: Need to rethink exploration strategies

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Paropkari, A.L.

    The origin of petroleum hydrocarbons is a matter of debate since its discovery. During last several decades it is firmly believed that the origin of petroleum hydrocarbons is 'biogenic' due to chemical similarity between the natural hydrocarbons...

  13. Hydrocarbon Collision Database: Revisions, Upgrades and Extensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kinetic analysis of the behaviour of hydrocarbons in fusion plasmas requires knowledge of cross-sections for their most relevant collision processes. Upgrades and extensions of the HYDKIN (HYDride KINetics) on-line cross-section database and analysis toolbox for collisions of hydrocarbons with electrons and protons in relevant fusion plasma conditions are presented. (author)

  14. Conversion of organic solids to hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenbaum, Elias

    1995-01-01

    A method of converting organic solids to liquid and gaseous hydrocarbons includes impregnating an organic solid with photosensitizing ions and exposing the impregnated solid to light in a non-oxidizing atmosphere for a time sufficient to photocatalytically reduce the solid to at least one of a liquid and a gaseous hydrocarbon.

  15. An Easy Synthesis of Two Cage Hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Dao Cong

    1982-01-01

    Describes a simple, three-step synthesis of two cage molecules, birdcage hydrocarbon (VIII) and its homologue, the homobirdcage hydrocarbon IX. Indicates that all products are easily purified and formed in high yields in this activity suitable for advanced undergraduate laboratory courses. (Author/JN)

  16. Polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons for fullerene synthesis in flames

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alford, J. Michael; Diener, Michael D.

    2006-12-19

    This invention provides improved methods for combustion synthesis of carbon nanomaterials, including fullerenes, employing multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels selected for high carbon conversion to extractable fullerenes. The multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels include those that contain polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. More specifically, multiple-ring aromatic hydrocarbon fuels contain a substantial amount of indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof. Coal tar and petroleum distillate fractions provide low cost hydrocarbon fuels containing polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons, including without limitation, indene, methylnapthalenes or mixtures thereof.

  17. Part 2: Potencies and interactions of polybrominated aromatic hydrocarbons in rainbow trout early life stage mortality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hornung, M.W.; Zabel, E.W.; Peterson, R.E. [Univ. of Wisconsin, Madison, WI (United States); Bergman, A. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden); Safe, S. [Texas A and M Univ., College Station, TX (United States)

    1994-12-31

    Polybrominated biphenyls (PBBs), dibenzo-p-dioxins (PBDDs), dibenzofurans (PBDFs), and diphenylethers (PBDPES) in aquatic environments may pose a risk to fish early life stage survival. Following rainbow trout egg microinjection, the potencies of these polybrominated aromatic hydrocarbons were determined using fish specific toxic equivalency factors (TEFs). TEFs are defined as the ratio of TCDD LD{sub 50} to brominated congener LD{sub 50}. Sac fry stage specific TCDD like toxicity included yolk sac edema, pericardial edema, multifocal hemorrhages and craniofacial malformations. TEFs of active congeners were: 2,3,7,8-TBDF = 0.23; 2,3,4,7,8-PBDF = 0.069; 1,2,3,4,7,8-HxBDD = 0.009. No signs of toxicity with 2,2{prime},4,4{prime}-TBDPE, 2,2{prime},3,4,4{prime}-PBDPE, or 2,2{prime},4,4{prime},5-PBDPE occurred at egg concentrations up to 126,37 {mu}g/g. Since these congeners occur as complex mixtures, the potential for additive, antagonistic, or synergistic interactions must also be determined for accurate risk assessment. Graded doses of 2,3,7,8-TBDD or 1,2,3,7,8-PBDD alone, or graded doses of fixed ratios of the two congeners were injected into newly fertilized rainbow trout eggs. Separate dose response curves were determined for each ratio and each individual congener. Isobolographic analysis supports the hypothesis that these congeners act additively.

  18. The role of bromine and chlorine chemistry for arctic ozone depletion events in Ny-Ålesund and comparison with model calculations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Martinez

    Full Text Available During the Arctic Tropospheric Ozone Chemistry (ARCTOC campaigns at Ny-Ålesund, Spitsbergen, the role of halogens in the depletion of boundary layer ozone was investigated. In spring 1995 and 1996 up to 30 ppt bromine monoxide were found whenever ozone decreased from normal levels of about 40 ppb. Those main trace gases and others were specifically followed in the UV-VIS spectral region by differential optical absorption spectroscopy (DOAS along light paths running between 20 and 475 m a.s.l.. The daily variation of peroxy radicals closely followed the ozone photolysis rate J(O3(O1D in the absence of ozone depletion most of the time. However, during low ozone events this close correlation was no longer found because the measurement of radicals by chemical amplification (CA turned out to be sensitive to peroxy radicals and ClOx. Large CA signals at night can sometimes definitely be assigned to ClOx and reached up to 2 ppt. Total bromine and iodine were both stripped quantitatively from air by active charcoal traps and measured after neutron activation of the samples. Total bromine increased from background levels of about 15 ppt to a maximum of 90 ppt during an event of complete ozone depletion. For the spring season a strong source of bromine is identified in the pack ice region according to back trajectories. Though biogenic emission sources cannot be completely ruled out, a primary activation of halogenides by various oxidants seems to initiate an efficient autocatalytic process, mainly driven by ozone and light, on ice and perhaps on aerosols. Halogenides residing on pack ice surfaces are continuously oxidised by hypohalogenous acids releasing bromine and chlorine into the air. During transport and especially above open water this air mixes with upper layer pristine air. As large quantities of bromine, often in the form of BrO, have been observed at polar sunrise also around Antarctica, its release

  19. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons with SPICA

    CERN Document Server

    Berne, O; Mulas, G; Tielens, A G G M; Goicoechea, J R

    2009-01-01

    Thanks to high sensitivity and angular resolution and broad spectral coverage, SPICA will offer a unique opportunity to better characterize the nature of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) and very small grains (VSGs), to better use them as probes of astrophysical environments. The angular resolution will enable to probe the chemical frontiers in the evolution process from VSGs to neutral PAHs, to ionized PAHs and to "Grand-PAHs" in photodissotiation regions and HII regions, as a function of G$_0$/n (UV radiation field / density). High sensitivity will favor the detection of the far-IR skeletal emission bands of PAHs, which provide specific fingerprints and could lead to the identification of individual PAHs. This overall characterization will allow to use PAH and VSG populations as tracers of physical conditions in spatially resolved protoplanetary disks and nearby galaxies (using mid-IR instruments), and in high redshift galaxies (using the far-IR instrument), thanks to the broad spectral coverage SPIC...

  20. Novel analytical approach for brominated flame retardants based on the use of gas chromatography-atmospheric pressure chemical ionization-tandem mass spectrometry with emphasis in highly brominated congeners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portolés, Tania; Sales, Carlos; Gómara, Belén; Sancho, Juan Vicente; Beltrán, Joaquim; Herrero, Laura; González, María José; Hernández, Félix

    2015-10-01

    The analysis of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) commonly relies on the use of gas chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (GC-MS) operating in electron ionization (EI) and electron capture negative ionization (ECNI) modes using quadrupole, triple quadrupole, ion trap, and magnetic sector analyzers. However, these brominated contaminants are examples of compounds for which a soft and robust ionization technique might be favorable since they show high fragmentation in EI and low specificity in ECNI. In addition, the low limits of quantification (0.01 ng/g) required by European Commission Recommendation 2014/118/EU on the monitoring of traces of BFRs in food put stress on the use of highly sensitive techniques/methods. In this work, a new approach for the extremely sensitive determination of BFRs taking profit of the potential of atmospheric pressure chemical ionization (APCI) combined with GC and triple quadrupole (QqQ) mass analyzer is proposed. The objective was to explore the potential of this approach for the BFRs determination in samples at pg/g levels, taking marine samples and a cream sample as a model. Ionization and fragmentation behavior of 14 PBDEs (congeners 28, 47, 66, 85, 99, 100, 153, 154, 183, 184, 191, 196, 197, and 209) and two novel BFRs, decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) and 1,2-bis(2,4,6-tribromophenoxy)ethane (BTBPE), in the GC-APCI-MS system has been investigated. The formation of highly abundant (quasi) molecular ion was the main advantage observed in relation to EI. Thus, a notable improvement in sensitivity and specificity was observed when using it as precursor ion in tandem MS. The improved detectability (LODs < 10 fg) achieved when using APCI compared to EI has been demonstrated, which is especially relevant for highly brominated congeners. Analysis of samples from an intercomparison exercise and samples from the marine field showed the potential of this approach for the reliable identification and quantification at very low

  1. Emissions of Bromine and Iodine from the Marine Environment in New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Aviles, M.; Kreher, K.; Johnston, P. V.; Hay, T.; Thomas, A.; Schofield, R.

    2009-12-01

    of determining coastal sites where high active halogen release could be observed. The selected sites had high biomass concentration of marine algae that would be exposed by low tides. Local macro algae type, tidal height, sunlight, temperature, and wind speed were recorded and correlated to the resulting data in order to better understand the environmental factors that modulate the emissions of halogen oxides from the marine environment to the troposphere. Results of this multi-disciplinary approach to studying brominated VSLS and their atmospheric implications are presented. As well, the chemical processes taking place and producing these halogen oxides are discussed in a thorough manner. This study contributes to a better understanding of the origin of bromine and iodine in the lowermost atmosphere (i.e. marine boundary layer). Particularly, the role that natural emissions of halogenated VSLS from the ocean may play in the halogen budget of the lower atmosphere is addressed by quantitatively understanding key links in this chain so that its potential future impacts on atmospheric chemistry, surface UV radiation, and the biosphere can be thoroughly assessed.

  2. Distribution of hydrocarbon-utilizing microorganisms and hydrocarbon biodegradation potentials in Alaskan continental shelf areas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydrocarbon-utilizing microogranisms were enumerated from Alaskan continental shelf areas by using plate counts and a new most-probable-number procedure based on mineralization of 14C-labeled hydrocarbons. Hydrocarbon utilizers were ubiquitously distributed, with no significant overall concentration differences between sampling regions or between surface water and sediment samples. There were, however, significant seasonal differences in numbers of hydrocarbon utilizers. Distribution of hydrocarbon utilizers within Cook Inlet was positively correlated with occurrence of hydrocarbons in the environment. Hydrocarbon biodegradation potentials were measured by using 14C-radiolabeled hydrocarbon-spiked crude oil. There was no significant correlation between numbers of hydrocarbon utilizers and hydrocarbon biodegradation potentials. The biodegradation potentials showed large seasonal variations in the Beaufort Sea, probably due to seasonal depletion of available nutrients. Non-nutrient-limited biodegradation potentials followed the order hexadecane > naphthalene >> pristane > benzanthracene. In Cook Inlet, biodegradation potentials for hexadecane and naphthalene were dependent on availability of inorganic nutrients. Biodegradation potentials for pristane and benzanthracene were restricted, probably by resistance to attack by available enzymes in the indigenous population

  3. A modified microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons assay to account for the presence of hydrocarbon droplets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoueki, Caroline Warne; Tufenkji, Nathalie; Ghoshal, Subhasis

    2010-04-15

    The microbial adhesion to hydrocarbons (MATH) assay has been used widely to characterize microbial cell hydrophobicity and/or the extent of cell adhesion to hydrophobic liquids. The classical MATH assay involves spectrophotometric absorbance measurements of the initial and final cell concentrations in an aqueous cell suspension that has been contacted with a hydrocarbon liquid. In this study, microscopic examination of the aqueous cell suspension after contact with hexadecane or a hexadecane/toluene mixture revealed the presence of hydrocarbon droplets. The hydrocarbon droplets contributed to the absorbance values during spectrophotometric measurements and caused erroneous estimates of cell concentrations and extents of microbial adhesion. A modified MATH assay that avoids such artefacts is proposed here. In this modified assay, microscopic examination of the aqueous suspension and direct cell counts provides cell concentrations that are free of interference from hydrocarbon droplets. The presence of hydrocarbon droplets was noted in MATH assays performed with three bacterial strains, and two different hydrocarbons, at ionic strengths of 0.2 mM and 20 mM and pH 6. In these experiments, the formation of quasi-stable hydrocarbon droplets cannot be attributed to the presence of biosurfactants, or stabilization by biocolloids. The presence of surface potential at the hydrocarbon-water interface that was characterized by electrophoretic mobility of up to -1 and -2 microm cm/Vs, likely caused the formation of the quasi-stable hydrocarbon droplets that provided erroneous results using the classical MATH assay. PMID:20129613

  4. Aircraft measurements of bromine monoxide, iodine monoxide, and glyoxal profiles in the tropics: comparison with ship-based and in situ measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Volkamer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Tropospheric chemistry of halogens and organic carbon over tropical oceans modifies ozone and atmospheric aerosols, yet atmospheric models remain largely untested for lack of vertically resolved measurements of bromine monoxide (BrO, iodine monoxide (IO, and small oxygenated hydrocarbons like glyoxal (CHOCHO in the tropical troposphere. BrO, IO, glyoxal, nitrogen dioxide (NO2, water vapor (H2O and O2-O2 collision complexes (O4 were measured by the CU Airborne Multi AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS instrument, in situ aerosol size distributions by an Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS, and in situ H2O by Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser hygrometer (VCSEL. Data are presented from two research flights (RF12, RF17 aboard the NSF/NCAR GV aircraft over the tropical Eastern Pacific Ocean (tEPO as part of the "Tropical Ocean tRoposphere Exchange of Reactive halogens and Oxygenated hydrocarbons" (TORERO project. We assess the accuracy of O4 slant column density (SCD measurements in the presence and absence of aerosols, and find O4-inferred aerosol extinction profiles at 477 nm agree within 5% with Mie calculations of extinction profiles constrained by UHSAS. CU AMAX-DOAS provides a flexible choice of geometry which we exploit to minimize the SCD in the reference spectrum (SCDREF, maximize signal-to-noise, and to test the robustness of BrO, IO, and glyoxal differential SCDs. The RF12 case study was conducted in pristine marine and free tropospheric air. The RF17 case study was conducted above the NOAA RV Ka'imimoana (TORERO cruise, KA-12-01, and provides independent validation data from ship-based in situ Cavity Enhanced- and MAX-DOAS. Inside the marine boundary layer (MBL no BrO was detected (smaller than 0.5 pptv, and 0.2–0.55 pptv IO and 32–36 pptv glyoxal were observed. The near surface concentrations agree within 20% (IO and 10% (glyoxal between ship and aircraft. The BrO concentration strongly

  5. Aircraft measurements of bromine monoxide, iodine monoxide, and glyoxal profiles in the tropics: comparison with ship-based and in situ measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volkamer, R.; Baidar, S.; Campos, T. L.; Coburn, S.; DiGangi, J. P.; Dix, B.; Koenig, T. K.; Ortega, I.; Pierce, B. R.; Reeves, M.; Sinreich, R.; Wang, S.; Zondlo, M. A.; Romashkin, P. A.

    2015-01-01

    Tropospheric chemistry of halogens and organic carbon over tropical oceans modifies ozone and atmospheric aerosols, yet atmospheric models remain largely untested for lack of vertically resolved measurements of bromine monoxide (BrO), iodine monoxide (IO), and small oxygenated hydrocarbons like glyoxal (CHOCHO) in the tropical troposphere. BrO, IO, glyoxal, nitrogen dioxide (NO2), water vapor (H2O) and O2-O2 collision complexes (O4) were measured by the CU Airborne Multi AXis Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (CU AMAX-DOAS) instrument, in situ aerosol size distributions by an Ultra High Sensitivity Aerosol Spectrometer (UHSAS), and in situ H2O by Vertical-Cavity Surface-Emitting Laser hygrometer (VCSEL). Data are presented from two research flights (RF12, RF17) aboard the NSF/NCAR GV aircraft over the tropical Eastern Pacific Ocean (tEPO) as part of the "Tropical Ocean tRoposphere Exchange of Reactive halogens and Oxygenated hydrocarbons" (TORERO) project. We assess the accuracy of O4 slant column density (SCD) measurements in the presence and absence of aerosols, and find O4-inferred aerosol extinction profiles at 477 nm agree within 5% with Mie calculations of extinction profiles constrained by UHSAS. CU AMAX-DOAS provides a flexible choice of geometry which we exploit to minimize the SCD in the reference spectrum (SCDREF, maximize signal-to-noise), and to test the robustness of BrO, IO, and glyoxal differential SCDs. The RF12 case study was conducted in pristine marine and free tropospheric air. The RF17 case study was conducted above the NOAA RV Ka'imimoana (TORERO cruise, KA-12-01), and provides independent validation data from ship-based in situ Cavity Enhanced- and MAX-DOAS. Inside the marine boundary layer (MBL) no BrO was detected (smaller than 0.5 pptv), and 0.2-0.55 pptv IO and 32-36 pptv glyoxal were observed. The near surface concentrations agree within 20% (IO) and 10% (glyoxal) between ship and aircraft. The BrO concentration strongly

  6. The Reaction between Bromine and the Water Dimer and the Highly Exothermic Reverse Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Guoliang; Wang, Hui; Li, Qian-Shu; Xie, Yaoming; Schaefer, Henry F

    2016-01-15

    The entrance complex, transition state, and exit complex for the bromine atom plus water dimer reaction Br + (H2O)2 → HBr + (H2O)OH and its reverse reaction have been investigated using the CCSD(T) method with correlation consistent basis sets up to cc-pVQZ-PP. Based on the CCSD(T)/cc-pVQZ-PP results, the reaction is endothermic by 31.7 kcal/mol. The entrance complex Br⋯(H2O)2 is found to lie 6.5 kcal/mol below the separated reactants. The classical barrier lies 28.3 kcal/mol above the reactants. The exit complex HBr⋯(H2O)OH is bound by 6.0 kcal/mol relative to the separated products. Compared with the corresponding water monomer reaction Br + H2 O → HBr + OH, the second water molecule lowers the relative energies of the entrance complex, transition state, and exit complex by 3.0, 3.8, and 3.7 kcal/mol, respectively. Both zero-point vibrational energies and spin-orbit coupling effects make significant changes to the above classical energetics. Including both effects, the predicted energies relation to separated Br + (H2O)2 are -3.0 kcal/mol [Br···(H2O)2 ], 28.2 kcal/mol [transition state], 26.4 kcal/mol [HBr···(H2O)OH], and 30.5 kcal/mol [separated HBr + (H2O)OH]. The potential energy surface for the Br + (H2O)2 reaction is related to that for the valence isoelectronic Cl + (H2O)2 system but radically different from the F + (H2O)2 system. PMID:26040856

  7. Reductive dehalogenation of brominated phenolic compounds by microorganisms associated with the marine sponge Aplysina aerophoba.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Young-Beom; Rhee, Sung-Keun; Fennell, Donna E; Kerkhof, Lee J; Hentschel, Ute; Häggblom, Max M

    2003-07-01

    Marine sponges are natural sources of brominated organic compounds, including bromoindoles, bromophenols, and bromopyrroles, that may comprise up to 12% of the sponge dry weight. Aplysina aerophoba sponges harbor large numbers of bacteria that can amount to 40% of the biomass of the animal. We postulated that there might be mechanisms for microbially mediated degradation of these halogenated chemicals within the sponges. The capability of anaerobic microorganisms associated with the marine sponge to transform haloaromatic compounds was tested under different electron-accepting conditions (i.e., denitrifying, sulfidogenic, and methanogenic). We observed dehalogenation activity of sponge-associated microorganisms with various haloaromatics. 2-Bromo-, 3-bromo-, 4-bromo-, 2,6-dibromo-, and 2,4,6-tribromophenol, and 3,5-dibromo-4-hydroxybenzoate were reductively debrominated under methanogenic and sulfidogenic conditions with no activity observed in the presence of nitrate. Monochlorinated phenols were not transformed over a period of 1 year. Debromination of 2,4,6-tribromophenol, and 2,6-dibromophenol to 2-bromophenol was more rapid than the debromination of the monobrominated phenols. Ampicillin and chloramphenicol inhibited activity, suggesting that dehalogenation was mediated by bacteria. Characterization of the debrominating methanogenic consortia by using terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (TRFLP) and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis analysis indicated that different 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) phylotypes were enriched on the different halogenated substrates. Sponge-associated microorganisms enriched on organobromine compounds had distinct 16S rDNA TRFLP patterns and were most closely related to the delta subgroup of the proteobacteria. The presence of homologous reductive dehalogenase gene motifs in the sponge-associated microorganisms suggested that reductive dehalogenation might be coupled to dehalorespiration. PMID:12839794

  8. Bromination vis-a-vis chlorination as a biocide feasibility study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    friendly. This paper highlights the brief details on the feasibility studies carried out on bromination. (author)

  9. The NOx dependence of bromine chemistry in the Arctic atmospheric boundary layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Custard, K. D.; Thompson, C. R.; Pratt, K. A.; Shepson, P. B.; Liao, J.; Huey, L. G.; Orlando, J. J.; Weinheimer, A. J.; Apel, E.; Hall, S. R.; Flocke, F.; Mauldin, L.; Hornbrook, R. S.; Pöhler, D.; S., General; Zielcke, J.; Simpson, W. R.; Platt, U.; Fried, A.; Weibring, P.; Sive, B. C.; Ullmann, K.; Cantrell, C.; Knapp, D. J.; Montzka, D. D.

    2015-09-01

    Arctic boundary layer nitrogen oxides (NOx = NO2 + NO) are naturally produced in and released from the sunlit snowpack and range between 10 to 100 pptv in the remote background surface layer air. These nitrogen oxides have significant effects on the partitioning and cycling of reactive radicals such as halogens and HOx (OH + HO2). However, little is known about the impacts of local anthropogenic NOx emission sources on gas-phase halogen chemistry in the Arctic, and this is important because these emissions can induce large variability in ambient NOx and thus local chemistry. In this study, a zero-dimensional photochemical kinetics model was used to investigate the influence of NOx on the unique springtime halogen and HOx chemistry in the Arctic. Trace gas measurements obtained during the 2009 OASIS (Ocean - Atmosphere - Sea Ice - Snowpack) field campaign at Barrow, AK were used to constrain many model inputs. We find that elevated NOx significantly impedes gas-phase halogen radical-based depletion of ozone, through the production of a variety of reservoir species, including HNO3, HO2NO2, peroxyacetyl nitrate (PAN), BrNO2, ClNO2 and reductions in BrO and HOBr. The effective removal of BrO by anthropogenic NOx was directly observed from measurements conducted near Prudhoe Bay, AK during the 2012 Bromine, Ozone, and Mercury Experiment (BROMEX). Thus, while changes in snow-covered sea ice attributable to climate change may alter the availability of molecular halogens for ozone and Hg depletion, predicting the impact of climate change on polar atmospheric chemistry is complex and must take into account the simultaneous impact of changes in the distribution and intensity of anthropogenic combustion sources. This is especially true for the Arctic, where NOx emissions are expected to increase because of increasing oil and gas extraction and shipping activities.

  10. Formation and emission of brominated dioxins and furans during secondary aluminum smelting processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mei; Liu, Guorui; Jiang, Xiaoxu; Li, Sumei; Liu, Wenbin; Zheng, Minghui

    2016-03-01

    Secondary aluminum smelting (SAl) processes have previously been found to be important sources of polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxins and dibenzofurans (PBDD/Fs). It is crucial that the key factors that influence the formation and emission of PBDD/Fs are identified to allow techniques for decreasing PBDD/F emissions during SAl processes to be developed. In this study, stack gas samples were collected from four typical secondary aluminum smelters that used different raw materials, and the samples were analyzed to allow differences between PBDD/F emissions from different SAl plants to be assessed. The composition of the raw materials was found to be one of the key factors influencing the amounts of PBDD/Fs emitted. The PBDD/F emission factors (per tonne of aluminum produced) for the plants using 100% (Plant1), 80% (Plant2), and 50% (Plant3) dirty aluminum scrap in the raw material feed were 180, 86, and 14 μg t(-1), respectively. The amounts of PBDD/Fs emitted at different stages of the smelting process (feeding-fusion, refining, and casting) were compared, and the feeding-fusion stage was found to be the main stage in which PBDD/Fs were formed and emitted. Effective aluminum scrap pretreatments could significantly decrease PBDD/F emissions. Much higher polybrominated dibenzofuran concentrations than polybrominated dibenzo-p-dioxin concentrations were found throughout the SAl process. The more-brominated congeners (including octabromodibenzo-p-dioxin, octabromodibenzofuran, heptabromodibenzo-p-dioxins, and heptabromodibenzofurans) were the dominant contributors to the total PBDD/F concentrations. The results could help in the development of techniques and strategies for controlling PBDD/F emissions during metallurgical processes. PMID:26706932

  11. Fabric phase sorptive extraction: Two practical sample pretreatment techniques for brominated flame retardants in water.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Guiqi; Dong, Sheying; Zhang, Mengfei; Zhang, Haihan; Huang, Tinglin

    2016-09-15

    Sample pretreatment is the critical section for residue monitoring of hazardous pollutants. In this paper, using the cellulose fabric as host matrix, three extraction sorbents such as poly (tetrahydrofuran) (PTHF), poly (ethylene glycol) (PEG) and poly (dimethyldiphenylsiloxane) (PDMDPS), were prepared on the surface of the cellulose fabric. Two practical extraction techniques including stir bar fabric phase sorptive extraction (stir bar-FPSE) and magnetic stir fabric phase sorptive extraction (magnetic stir-FPSE) have been designed, which allow stirring of fabric phase sorbent during the whole extraction process. In the meantime, three brominated flame retardants (BFRs) [tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), tetrabromobisphenol A bisallylether (TBBPA-BAE), tetrabromobisphenol A bis(2,3-dibromopropyl)ether (TBBPA-BDBPE)] in the water sample were selected as model analytes for the practical evaluation of the proposed two techniques using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). Moreover, various experimental conditions affecting extraction process such as the type of fabric phase, extraction time, the amount of salt and elution conditions were also investigated. Due to the large sorbent loading capacity and unique stirring performance, both techniques possessed high extraction capability and fast extraction equilibrium. Under the optimized conditions, high recoveries (90-99%) and low limits of detection (LODs) (0.01-0.05 μg L(-1)) were achieved. In addition, the reproducibility was obtained by evaluating the intraday and interday precisions with relative standard deviations (RSDs) less than 5.1% and 6.8%, respectively. The results indicated that two pretreatment techniques were promising and practical for monitoring of hazardous pollutants in the water sample. Due to low solvent consumption and high repeated use performance, proposed techniques also could meet green analytical criteria. PMID:27300591

  12. Accurate determination and certification of bromine in plastic by isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohata, Masaki, E-mail: m-oohata@aist.go.jp; Miura, Tsutomu

    2014-07-21

    Highlights: • Accurate analytical method of Br in plastic was studied by isotope dilution ICPMS. • A microwave acid digestion using quartz vessel was suitable for Br analysis. • Sample dilution by NH{sub 3} solution could remove memory effect for ICPMS measurement. • The analytical result of the ID-ICPMS showed consistency with that of INAA. • The ID-ICPMS developed could apply to certification of Br in candidate plastic CRM. - Abstract: The accurate analytical method of bromine (Br) in plastic was developed by an isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-ICPMS). The figures of merit of microwave acid digestion procedures using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) or quartz vessels were studied and the latter one was suitable for Br analysis since its material was free from Br contamination. The sample dilution procedures using Milli-Q water or ammonium (NH{sub 3}) solution were also studied to remove memory effect for ICPMS measurement. Although severe memory effect was observed on Milli-Q water dilution, NH{sub 3} solution could remove it successfully. The accuracy of the ID-ICPMS was validated by a certified reference material (CRM) as well as the comparison with the analytical result obtained by an instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) as different analytical method. From these results, the ID-ICPMS developed in the present study could be evaluated as accurate analytical method of Br in plastic materials and it could apply to certification of Br in candidate plastic CRM with respect to such regulations related to RoHS (restriction of the use of hazardous substances in electrical and electronics equipment) directive.

  13. Characterization of bromine-76-labelled 5-bromo-6-nitroquipazine for PET studies of the serotonin transporter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundkvist, Camilla E-mail: Lundkvis@shfj.cea.fr; Loc' h, Christian; Halldin, Christer; Bottlaender, Michel; Ottaviani, Michele; Coulon, Christine; Fuseau, Chantal; Mathis, Chester; Farde, Lars; Maziere, Bernard

    1999-07-01

    The development of suitable radioligands for brain imaging of the serotonin transporter is of great importance for the study of depression and other affective disorders. The potent and selective serotonin transporter ligand, 5-iodo-6-nitro-2-piperazinylquinoline, has been labelled with iodine-123 and used as a radioligand for single photon emission computerized tomography. To evaluate the potential of the bromine-76-labelled analogue, 5-bromo-6-nitroquipazine, as a radioligand for positron emission tomography (PET), its brain distribution and binding characteristics were examined in rats. In vivo brain distribution and ex vivo autoradiography demonstrated that [{sup 76}Br]5-bromo-6-nitroquipazine enters the brain rapidly. The regional brain distribution of [{sup 76}Br]5-bromo-6-nitroquipazine was consistent with the known distribution of serotonin transporters in the midbrain, pons, thalamus, striatum, and neocortex. Specific binding was inhibited by the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor citalopram. The peripheral metabolism in plasma was rapid, but more than 90% of the radioactivity in brain represented unchanged radioligand 2 h postinjection (p.i.). A preliminary PET study was also performed in a baboon. Following the intravenous injection of [{sup 76}Br]5-bromo-6-nitroquipazine in a baboon, there was a conspicuous accumulation of radioactivity in thalamus, striatum, and pons. The radioactivity in these brain regions was 1.5 times higher than in the cerebellum at 3 h and 2.5-4 times higher at 24 h. A rapid metabolism of the radioligand in plasma was observed (38% unchanged after 5 min). The results indicate that [{sup 76}Br]5-bromo-6-nitroquipazine has potential for PET imaging of the serotonin transporter.

  14. Batch sorption experiments with iodine, bromine, strontium, sodium and cesium on Grimsel mylonite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Promylonite surrounding the fracture at the migration site was not available in sufficient amounts, so mylonite from an adjacent fault zone was used. All the work has been carried out in glove boxes in a nitrogen atmosphere with very low O2 and CO2 levels. Mylonite was equilibrated with the natural Grimsel groundwater (NGW) prior to sorption experiments. The first series of sorption experiments was carried out without shaking. This caused sedimentation of the mylonite and led to slow kinetics. In the later experiments therefore, gentle, continuous agitation was used. No sorption of iodine and bromine on mylonite was observed under the experimental conditions used. It was observed that the sorption coefficient of 85Sr and 22Na were not affected by varying nuclide concentrations, provided these were kept much below their natural levels in NGW. This indicates that, in this nuclide concentration range, isotopic exchange takes place. Sorption coefficients did not vary with the rock/water ratio. Experiments with a bulky displacing cation suggested that some sodium ions were on less accessible internal sites and this could account for the slow kinetics for sodium. Further experiments with samples with smaller particle size confirmed this hypothesis. Batch sorption experiments on mylonite at initial cesium concentrations of between 3,2.10-8 and 5,0.10-4 M showed that sorption was reversible and non-linear; sorption coefficients were between 3800 and 21 ml/g. Increasing the potassium concentration in the solution led to reduced sorption of cesium, suggesting that Cs and K compete for the sorption sites. At the lowest Cs concentration used, sorption appears to be due to exchange with K at specific sites on mica, together with possible isotopic exchange. For these conditions and by making some assumptions, a Cs sorption coefficient for waters with different concentrations could be estimated. (author) 7 figs., 12 tabs., 42 refs

  15. Leaching characteristics of heavy metals and brominated flame retardants from waste printed circuit boards

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Cu and Pb were the most leachable heavy metals in WPCBs according to TCLP and SPLP. ► Penta-BDE congeners were dominated in all extracts. ► High dissolved organic matter condition promoted the BFRs leaching rate. ► Leaching from WPCBs was a significant emission source of BFRs in landfill. -- Abstract: Leaching assessment on five heavy metals (copper, zinc, lead, nickel and cadmium) and two brominated flame retardants (BFRs), polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), from waste printed circuit boards (WPCBs) were conducted using various leaching methods. The mean leaching concentrations of copper were the highest in both toxicity characteristic leaching procedures (TCLP) and synthetic precipitation leaching procedures (SPLP) tests at 8.6 mg/L and 1.1 mg/L, while only lead (6.2 mg/L) exceeded the TCLP criteria and Chinese EPA regulatory limit (both 5.0 mg/L). However, PBDEs and TBBPA were not detected in TCLP and SPLP tests. Then the BFRs leaching trends and potential leachabilities were further investigated in actual landfill leachates using a modified method. Leaching characteristics that fast-leaching initially followed by slow-desorption over time were generally observed. In landfill leachate tests, the highest leaching concentrations of PBDEs and TBBPA were determined at 30.39 and 12.27 μg/L. Meanwhile, the highest leaching rates were estimated to reach 0.08% and 1.00%, respectively, which were significantly influenced by the dissolved organic carbon contents of extracts, the hydrophobicities of target BFRs and the specific surface areas of WPCBs materials. These results proved that leaching from WPCBs was a significant emission source of BFRs in landfill and electronic waste recycling dumpsite

  16. Fate and metabolism of the brominated flame retardant tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) in rice cell suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Songfeng; Cao, Siqi; Wang, Yongfeng; Jiang, Bingqi; Wang, Lianhong; Sun, Feifei; Ji, Rong

    2016-07-01

    Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is the brominated flame retardant with the highest production volume and its bioaccumulation in environment has caused both human health and environmental concerns, however the fate and metabolism of TBBPA in plants is unknown. We studied the fate, metabolites, and transformation of (14)C-labeled TBBPA in rice cell suspension culture. During the incubation for 14 days, TBBPA degradation occurred continuously in the culture, accompanied by formation of one anisolic metabolite [2,6-dibromo-4-(2-(2-hydroxy)-propyl)-anisole] (DBHPA) (50% of the degraded TBBPA) and cellular debris-bound residues (46.4%) as well as mineralization (3.6%). The cells continuously accumulated TBBPA in the cytoplasm, while a small amount of DBHPA (2.1% of the initially applied TBBPA) was detectable inside the cells only at the end of incubation. The majority of the accumulated residues in the cells was attributed to the cellular debris-bound residues, accounting for 70-79% of the accumulation after the first incubation day. About 5.4% of the accumulation was associated with cell organelles, which contributed 7.5% to the cellular debris-bound residues. Based on the fate and metabolism of TBBPA in the rice cell suspension culture, a type II ipso-substitution pathway was proposed to describe the initial step for TBBPA degradation in the culture and balance the fate of TBBPA in the cells. To the best of our knowledge, our study provides for the first time the insights into the fate and metabolism of TBBPA in plants and points out the potential role of type II ipso-hydroxylation substitution in degradation of alkylphenols in plants. Further studies are required to reveal the mechanisms for the bound-residue formation (e.g., binding of residues to specific cell wall components), nature of the binding, and toxicological effects of the bound residues and DBHPA. PMID:27105166

  17. Accurate determination and certification of bromine in plastic by isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Accurate analytical method of Br in plastic was studied by isotope dilution ICPMS. • A microwave acid digestion using quartz vessel was suitable for Br analysis. • Sample dilution by NH3 solution could remove memory effect for ICPMS measurement. • The analytical result of the ID-ICPMS showed consistency with that of INAA. • The ID-ICPMS developed could apply to certification of Br in candidate plastic CRM. - Abstract: The accurate analytical method of bromine (Br) in plastic was developed by an isotope dilution inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ID-ICPMS). The figures of merit of microwave acid digestion procedures using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) or quartz vessels were studied and the latter one was suitable for Br analysis since its material was free from Br contamination. The sample dilution procedures using Milli-Q water or ammonium (NH3) solution were also studied to remove memory effect for ICPMS measurement. Although severe memory effect was observed on Milli-Q water dilution, NH3 solution could remove it successfully. The accuracy of the ID-ICPMS was validated by a certified reference material (CRM) as well as the comparison with the analytical result obtained by an instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA) as different analytical method. From these results, the ID-ICPMS developed in the present study could be evaluated as accurate analytical method of Br in plastic materials and it could apply to certification of Br in candidate plastic CRM with respect to such regulations related to RoHS (restriction of the use of hazardous substances in electrical and electronics equipment) directive

  18. Identification of highly brominated analogues of Q1 in marine mammals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teuten, Emma L. [Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 360 Woods Hole Road, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States)]. E-mail: emma.teuten@plymouth.ac.uk; Pedler, Byron E. [Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 360 Woods Hole Road, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States)]. E-mail: bpedler@whoi.edu; Hangsterfer, Alexandra N. [Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 360 Woods Hole Road, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States)]. E-mail: ahangsterfer@whoi.edu; Reddy, Christopher M. [Department of Marine Chemistry and Geochemistry, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, 360 Woods Hole Road, Woods Hole, MA 02543 (United States)]. E-mail: creddy@whoi.edu

    2006-11-15

    Three novel halogenated organic compounds (HOCs) have been identified in the blubber of marine mammals from coastal New England with the molecular formulae C{sub 9}H{sub 3}N{sub 2}Br{sub 6}Cl, C{sub 9}H{sub 3}N{sub 2}Br{sub 7}, and C{sub 9}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}Br{sub 5}Cl. They were identified using high and low resolution gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GCMS) and appear to be highly brominated analogues of Q1, a heptachlorinated HOC suspected to be naturally produced. These compounds were found in Atlantic white sided dolphin (Lagenorhynchus acutus), bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus), common dolphin (Delphinus delphis), Risso's dolphin (Grampus griseus), harbor porpoise (Phocoena phocoena), beluga whale (Delphinapterus leucas), fin whale (Balaenoptera physalus), grey seal (Halichoerus grypus), harp seal (Phoca groenlandica) and a potential food source (Loligo pealei) with concentrations as high as 2.7 {mu}g/g (lipid weight). The regiospecificity of C{sub 9}H{sub 3}N{sub 2}Br{sub 6}Cl is suggestive of a biogenic origin. Debromination of C{sub 9}H{sub 3}N{sub 2}Br{sub 6}Cl may be significant in the formation of C{sub 9}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}Br{sub 5}Cl. - Three novel bioaccumulated compounds were identified as C{sub 9}H{sub 3}N{sub 2}Br{sub 6}Cl, C{sub 9}H{sub 3}N{sub 2}Br{sub 7} and C{sub 9}H{sub 4}N{sub 2}Br{sub 5}Cl.

  19. Brominated flame retardants - Exposure and risk assessment for the general population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fromme, H; Becher, G; Hilger, B; Völkel, W

    2016-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are a large group of different substances used in numerous products to prevent fire hazards. Some of them are persistent in the environment, accumulate in the food chain and are of toxicological concern, while for others current data are limited. Meanwhile, BFRs have been found in many environmental media, foods, and biota including humans. This review presents recent findings obtained from monitoring data in environmental media relevant for human exposure, as well as dietary exposure. In this context, concentrations in indoor and ambient air and in house dust are outlined. Furthermore, we summarize human biomonitoring data on BFR levels in blood and breast milk. Current estimates of the overall exposure of the general population using different relevant subsets are also addressed. All of these data are discussed in relation to currently available toxicological reference values used for risk assessment purposes. Obviously, the exposure of the general population varies considerably in different parts of the world and even within countries. Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) show the highest intake during infancy. While the highest intake for BDE 47 for all groups was observed in the US, the total BDE 209 and HBCD intake was highest in the UK. For HBCD and all PBDEs except BDE 209, diet accounts for a large proportion of the total intake during infancy in all countries. With regard to toddlers and adults, the contribution of diet to total intake is high in Germany and the UK, while in the US, the high concentrations of PBDE in dust resulted in a notably smaller proportion of the intake being attributed to diet. PMID:26412400

  20. Field and Satellite Observations of the Formation and Distribution of Arctic Atmospheric Bromine Above a Rejuvenated Sea Ice Cover

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghiem, Son V.; Rigor, Ignatius G.; Richter, Andreas; Burrows, John P.; Shepson, Paul B.; Bottenheim, Jan; Barber, David G.; Steffen, Alexandra; Latonas, Jeff; Wang, Feiyue; Stern, Gary; Clemente-Colon, Pablo; Martin, Seelye; Hall, Dorothy K.; Kaleschke, Lars; Tackett, Philip; Neumann, Gregory; Asplin, Matthew G.

    2012-01-01

    Recent drastic reduction of the older perennial sea ice in the Arctic Ocean has resulted in a vast expansion of younger and saltier seasonal sea ice. This increase in the salinity of the overall ice cover could impact tropospheric chemical processes. Springtime perennial ice extent in 2008 and 2009 broke the half-century record minimum in 2007 by about one million km2. In both years seasonal ice was dominant across the Beaufort Sea extending to the Amundsen Gulf, where significant field and satellite observations of sea ice, temperature, and atmospheric chemicals have been made. Measurements at the site of the Canadian Coast Guard Ship Amundsen ice breaker in the Amundsen Gulf showed events of increased bromine monoxide (BrO), coupled with decreases of ozone (O3) and gaseous elemental mercury (GEM), during cold periods in March 2008. The timing of the main event of BrO, O3, and GEM changes was found to be consistent with BrO observed by satellites over an extensive area around the site. Furthermore, satellite sensors detected a doubling of atmospheric BrO in a vortex associated with a spiral rising air pattern. In spring 2009, excessive and widespread bromine explosions occurred in the same region while the regional air temperature was low and the extent of perennial ice was significantly reduced compared to the case in 2008. Using satellite observations together with a Rising-Air-Parcel model, we discover a topographic control on BrO distribution such that the Alaskan North Slope and the Canadian Shield region were exposed to elevated BrO, whereas the surrounding mountains isolated the Alaskan interior from bromine intrusion.

  1. Accumulation of chlorinated and brominated persistent toxic substances (PTS) and their relationship to testosterone suppression in Norway rats from Japan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takasuga, T.; Senthilkumar, K. [Shimadzu Techno-Research Inc. (Japan); Ishizuka, M.; Fujita, S. [Graduate School of Veterinary Medicine, Hokkaido Univ. (Japan); Tanikawa, R. [Inst. of Tech., Ikari Corp. (Japan)

    2004-09-15

    Contamination of chlorinated/brominated persistent toxic substances (PTS) such as polychlorinated, -dibenzo-p-dioxins (PCDDs), -dibenzofurans (PCDFs), -biphenyls (PCBs), - organochlorine pesticides (OCPs) {l_brace}e.g., aldrin, dieldrin, endrin, chlordane compounds [cis/transchlordane, cis/trans-nonachlor, oxychlordane, heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide], hexachlorobenzene (HCB), 2,2-bis(p-chlorophenyl)-1,1,1-trichloroethane (DDTs) and its metabolities [o,p/p,p'-DDD and DDE] and hexachlorocyclohexane (HCHs){r_brace} and -brominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) are considered to important class of chemicals due to persistence in nature, bioaccumulation potential and adverse health effects in wildlife and humans. Among South East Asian countries, Japan reported to contaminated with aforesaid chemicals with considerable amounts. There is no document reports contamination of PTS in wild animals, which in-habit near humans. Norway rat (NR) inhabits not only near human environment but also distributed worldwide. Especially, NR feeds on human waste and shelter in and around human environment and thus exposure of toxic contaminants in this animal considered to similar with those in humans. In addition, rats have unique physiology that match with humans (e.g., they have similar pathogens as humans have). Therefore, analysis of toxic contaminants in NR considered as indirect measure in humans. Considering those facts, in this study, we analyzed NR collected from urban area, rural area, waste dumping or land fill site and isolated remote island from Japan. Particularly several chlorinated and brominated organic contaminants such as PCDDs, PCDFs, PCBs, DDTs, HCHs, chlordane compounds, heptachlor, heptachlor epoxide, HCB, aldrin, dieldrin, endrin and PBDEs were analyzed in rat livers by isotope dilution technique using HRGC-HRMS. In addition, laboratory Wistar rats (WR) were used as control.

  2. Stabilization of Z-DNA by chemical bromination and its recognition by anti-Z-DNA antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limited chemical bromination of poly[r(C-G)] (32% br8G, 26% br5C) results in partial modification of guanine C8 and cytosine C5, producing a mixture of A- and Z-RNA forms. The Z conformation in the brominated polynucleotide is stabilized at much lower ionic strength than in the unmodified polynucleotide. Raising the ionic strength to 6 M NaBr or NaClO4 results in a transition in Br-poly[r(C-G)] to a Z-RNA (Z/sub R/) conformation as judged by CD spectroscopy. 1H NMR data demonstrate a 1/1 mixture of A- and Z-RNAs in 110 mM NaBr buffer at 370C. Nuclear Overhauser effect (NOE) experiments permit complete assignments of GH8, CH6, CH5, GH1', AND CH1' resonances in both the A- and Z-forms. The NMR results indicate that unbrominated guanine residues undergo transition to the syn conformation (Z-form). Raman scattering data are consistent with a mixture of A- and Z-RNAs in 110 mM NaCl buffer at 37 0C. 31P NMR spectra show six to eight resonances spread over a 1.8 ppm range whose chemical shifts are also consistent with an equilibrium mixture of A- and Z-RNAs. Radioimmunoassay and nitrocellulose filter binding competition experiments were performed to determine the extent of recognition of Br-poly[r(C-G)] by anti-Z-DNA antibodies. Competition RIA experiments verify the presence of a Z-DNA-like determinant in left-handed Br-poly[r(C-G)] at physiological NaCl concentration. In summary, these spectroscopic and immunochemical studies demonstrate that under conditions of conformational stress (i.e., containing brominated nucleosides) left-handed Z-RNA is stable and is specifically recognized by proteins at physiological temperature and ionic strength

  3. Formation of brominated phenolic contaminants from natural manganese oxides-catalyzed oxidation of phenol in the presence of Br(.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Kunde; Song, Lianghui; Zhou, Shiyang; Chen, Da; Gan, Jay

    2016-07-01

    Brominated phenolic compounds (BPCs) are a class of persistent and potentially toxic compounds ubiquitously present in the aquatic environment. However, the origin of BPCs is not clearly understood. In this study, we investigated the formation of BPCs from natural manganese oxides (MnOx)-catalyzed oxidation of phenol in the presence of Br(-). Experiments at ambient temperature clearly demonstrated that BPCs were readily produced via the oxidation of phenol by MnOx in the presence of Br(-). In the reaction of MnOx sand with 0.213 μmol/L phenol and 0.34 mmol/L Br(-) for 10 min, more than 60% of phenol and 56% of Br(-) were consumed to form BPCs. The yield of BPCs increased with increasing concentrations of phenol and Br(-). Overall, a total of 14 BPCs including simple bromophenols (4-bromophenol, 2,4-dibromophenol, and 2,4,6-tribromophenol), hydroxylated polybrominated diphenyl ethers (OH-PBDEs), and hydroxylated polybrominated biphenyls (OH-PBBs) were identified. The production of BPCs increased with increasing concentrations of Br(-) or phenol. It was deduced that Br(-) was first oxidized to form active bromine, leading to the subsequent bromination of phenol to form bromophenols. The further oxidation of bromophenols by MnOx resulted in the formation of OH-PBDEs and OH-PBBs. In view of the ubiquity of phenol, Br(-), and MnOx in the environment, MnOx-mediated oxidation may play a role on the natural production of BPCs. PMID:27131033

  4. Synthesis and evaluation of a bromine-76-labeled PPAR{gamma} antagonist 2-bromo-5-nitro-N-phenylbenzamide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hsiaoju [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Finck, Brian N. [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Geriatrics and Nutritional Science, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis. MO 63110 (United States); Jones, Lynne A. [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Welch, Michael J. [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States); Mach, Robert H. [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology, Washington University School of Medicine, St. Louis, MO 63110 (United States)]. E-mail: rhmach@mir.wustl.edu

    2006-10-15

    Peroxisome proliferator activated-receptor gamma (PPAR{gamma}) binds to peroxisome receptor response elements with its heterodimeric partner, retinoid X receptor, and regulates downstream gene expression. PPAR{gamma} transcriptionally modulates fat metabolism, and receptor agonists have been developed to treat type II diabetes. PPAR{gamma} is also overexpressed in some tumor cell lines and primary tumors, including breast and prostate tumors. Two PPAR{gamma} antagonists, 2-chloro-5-nitro-N-phenylbenzamide (GW9662) and 2-chloro-5-nitro-N-pyridin-4-yl-benzamide (T0070907), represent good lead compounds for radiotracer development. In the current study, four additional halogen substituted analogs were synthesized and evaluated in a whole cell screening assay for PPAR{gamma} binding activity. Two bromine-containing analogs having EC{sub 5} values <5 nM were chosen for bromine-76 radiolabeling. Bromine-76-labeled 2-bromo-5-nitro-N-phenyl-benzamide was selected for subsequent in vitro and in vivo studies due to its superior radiolabeling yield ({approx}70%) and the well-characterized pharmacological properties of its analog GW9662. An in vitro stability study showed that 40% of the compound remained intact in plasma and about 25% in whole blood after 30 min. Biodistribution studies in MDA-MB-435 human breast tumor-bearing nude mice were carried out at 5 min, 30 min, 2 h and 24 h post injection of the radiotracer. Although in vivo metabolite studies demonstrated rapid compound degradation, at least 10% of the parent compound was delivered to the tumor. We are currently exploring second generation analogs of these lead compounds for the development of radiolabeled antagonists of the PPAR{gamma} receptor.

  5. Microwave assisted extraction of iodine and bromine from edible seaweed for inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romarís-Hortas, Vanessa; Moreda-Piñeiro, Antonio; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar

    2009-08-15

    The feasibility of microwave energy to assist the solubilisation of edible seaweed samples by tetramethylammonium hydroxide (TMAH) has been investigated to extract iodine and bromine. Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) has been used as a multi-element detector. Variables affecting the microwave assisted extraction/solubilisation (temperature, TMAH volume, ramp time and hold time) were firstly screened by applying a fractional factorial design (2(5-1)+2), resolution V and 2 centre points. When extracting both halogens, results showed statistical significance (confidence interval of 95%) for TMAH volume and temperature, and also for the two order interaction between both variables. Therefore, these two variables were finally optimized by a 2(2)+star orthogonal central composite design with 5 centre points and 2 replicates, and optimum values of 200 degrees C and 10 mL for temperature and TMAH volume, respectively, were found. The extraction time (ramp and hold times) was found statistically non-significant, and values of 10 and 5 min were chosen for the ramp time and the hold time, respectively. This means a fast microwave heating cycle. Repeatability of the over-all procedure has been found to be 6% for both elements, while iodine and bromine concentrations of 24.6 and 19.9 ng g(-1), respectively, were established for the limit of detection. Accuracy of the method was assessed by analyzing the NIES-09 (Sargasso, Sargassum fulvellum) certified reference material (CRM) and the iodine and bromine concentrations found have been in good agreement with the indicative values for this CRM. Finally, the method was applied to several edible dried and canned seaweed samples. PMID:19576469

  6. Waste Plastic Converting into Hydrocarbon Fuel Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarker, Moinuddin; Mamunor Rashid, Mohammad; Molla, Mohammad

    2010-09-15

    The increased demand and high prices for energy sources are driving efforts to convert organic compounds into useful hydrocarbon fuels. Although much of this work has focused on biomass, there are strong benefits to deriving fuels from waste plastic material. Natural State Research Inc. (NSR) has invented a simple and economically viable process to decompose the hydrocarbon polymers of waste plastic into the shorter chain hydrocarbon of liquid fuel (patent pending). The method and principle of the production / process will be discussed. Initial tests with several widely used polymers indicate a high potential for commercialization.

  7. Transport of petroleum hydrocarbons in permafrost soils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sampling program was conducted to determine the presence and extent of petroleum hydrocarbon contamination in permafrost soils at an abandoned arctic weather station. Core samples were taken of frozen silty clay at two known contaminated sites and analyzed for total petroleum hydrocarbon content. Contamination was observed at depths of 0.5 m into the permafrost. The most influential transport mechanism is likely to be migration of hydrocarbons through cracks, fissures and filled voids in the permafrost soil due to gravity drainage and capillary action. Another possible transport mechanism is by diffusion in unfrozen water within the permafrost. 19 refs., 4 figs

  8. Using supercritical fluids to refine hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    2015-06-09

    A system and method for reactively refining hydrocarbons, such as heavy oils with API gravities of less than 20 degrees and bitumen-like hydrocarbons with viscosities greater than 1000 cp at standard temperature and pressure, using a selected fluid at supercritical conditions. A reaction portion of the system and method delivers lightweight, volatile hydrocarbons to an associated contacting unit which operates in mixed subcritical/supercritical or supercritical modes. Using thermal diffusion, multiphase contact, or a momentum generating pressure gradient, the contacting unit separates the reaction products into portions that are viable for use or sale without further conventional refining and hydro-processing techniques.

  9. Detection of irradiated meats by hydrocarbon method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meats, for example, lamb, razorback, wild duck and turkey were irradiated by gamma ray, and the amounts of hydrocarbons formed from fatty acids were measured. Since C20:0 was found from wild duck and turkey. C1-18:1 was recommended for internal standard. Good correlation was found between the amount of hydrocarbons and the doses of gamma irradiation. This study shows that such hydrocarbons induced after radiation procedure as C1,7-16:2, C8-17:1, C1-14:1, and C15:0 may make it possible to detect irradiated lamb, razorback, wild duck and turkey. (author)

  10. Neurobehavioral function and low-level exposure to brominated flame retardants in adolescents: a cross-sectional study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kiciński Michał

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Animal and in vitro studies demonstrated a neurotoxic potential of brominated flame retardants, a group of chemicals used in many household and commercial products to prevent fire. Although the first reports of detrimental neurobehavioral effects in rodents appeared more than ten years ago, human data are sparse. Methods As a part of a biomonitoring program for environmental health surveillance in Flanders, Belgium, we assessed the neurobehavioral function with the Neurobehavioral Evaluation System (NES-3, and collected blood samples in a group of high school students. Cross-sectional data on 515 adolescents (13.6-17 years of age was available for the analysis. Multiple regression models accounting for potential confounders were used to investigate the associations between biomarkers of internal exposure to brominated flame retardants [serum levels of polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE congeners 47, 99, 100, 153, 209, hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD, and tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA] and cognitive performance. In addition, we investigated the association between brominated flame retardants and serum levels of FT3, FT4, and TSH. Results A two-fold increase of the sum of serum PBDE’s was associated with a decrease of the number of taps with the preferred-hand in the Finger Tapping test by 5.31 (95% CI: 0.56 to 10.05, p = 0.029. The effects of the individual PBDE congeners on the motor speed were consistent. Serum levels above the level of quantification were associated with an average decrease of FT3 level by 0.18 pg/mL (95% CI: 0.03 to 0.34, p = 0.020 for PBDE-99 and by 0.15 pg/mL (95% CI: 0.004 to 0.29, p = 0.045 for PBDE-100, compared with concentrations below the level of quantification. PBDE-47 level above the level of quantification was associated with an average increase of TSH levels by 10.1% (95% CI: 0.8% to 20.2%, p = 0.033, compared with concentrations below the level of quantification. We did not

  11. Highly brominated anthracenes as precursors for the convenient synthesis of 2,9,10-trisubstituted anthracene derivatives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available When 9,10-dibromoanthracene was treated with bromine in CCl4 without a catalyst, 1,2,3,4,9,10-hexabromo-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroanthracene (3 was obtained in 95% yield in the absence of other stereoisomers or rearomatization products. We investigated the base-induced elimination reaction of hexabromide 3 under various conditions. Pyridine-induced elimination of hexabromide 3 afforded 2,9,10-tribromoanthracene (12 in 75% yield, and tribromide 12 was transformed to trimethoxy compound 13 and trinitrile 14 by copper-assisted nucleophilic substitution reactions.

  12. Experimental transition probabilities of intercombination transitions in Mg-like and Al-like ions of bromine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Time-resolved extreme ultraviolet spectra of foil-excited 120-MeV Br ions have been recorded, using a spectrometer equipped with a position-sensitive detector. The spectra near λ=20--30 nm were measured at times after excitation of up to 6 ns. Prominent in the delayed spectra were the long-lived decays of the intercombination transitions in the Mg-like Br23+ and Al-like Br22+ ions. The present paper reports on lifetime measurements for intercombination transitions in highly charged bromine ions using such a position-sensitive detector

  13. Implementation of thermal processes for feedstock recycling of bromine and antimony, with energy recovery, from plastics waste of electrical and electronic equipment (WEEE). Phase 1. Literature survey/status update, evaluation, and ranking of combustion, gasification, and pyrolysis based technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boerrigter, H. [ECN Biomass, Petten (Netherlands)

    2000-11-01

    The bromine industry wants to process plastic Waste from Electrical and Electronic Equipment (WEEE), containing brominated flame retardants (BFRs), to recycle bromine, antimony, and other valuable metals, with energy recovery for sustainable production and closing the bromine loop at the End-of-Life. The motivation to perform the underlying study was that insufficient detailed information was available regarding the technical and economical feasibility of processing of WEEE with thermal processes (i.e. combustion, gasification, and pyrolysis-based technologies). The objective of the study was to make an inventory of available processes and evaluate them based on the following six criteria:Energy efficiency, Bromine and Antimony recovery, Emissions (legislation permits), General quality of residues/secondary products, Operational experience, and Profit expectations (ROI). 57 refs.

  14. 40 CFR 86.1321-94 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 19 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 86... Procedures § 86.1321-94 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. The FID hydrocarbon analyzer shall receive the... into service and at least annually thereafter, the FID hydrocarbon analyzer shall be adjusted...

  15. 40 CFR 92.119 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 92... Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. The HFID hydrocarbon analyzer shall receive the following initial and... into service and at least annually thereafter, the HFID hydrocarbon analyzer shall be adjusted...

  16. 40 CFR 86.317-79 - Hydrocarbon analyzer specifications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer specifications....317-79 Hydrocarbon analyzer specifications. (a) Hydrocarbon measurements are to be made with a heated... measures hydrocarbon emissions on a dry basis is permitted for gasoline-fueled testing; Provided,...

  17. 21 CFR 172.882 - Synthetic isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Synthetic isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons. 172... hydrocarbons. Synthetic isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons may be safely used in food, in accordance with the.../code_of_federal_regulations/ibr_locations.html. (b) Isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons may...

  18. 21 CFR 178.3530 - Isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons, synthetic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons, synthetic... hydrocarbons, synthetic. Isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons, synthetic, may be safely used in the production... isoparaffinic petroleum hydrocarbons, produced by synthesis from petroleum gases consist of a mixture of...

  19. Spectroscopic UV/vis limb measurements from aboard the NASA Global Hawk: Implications for the photochemistry and budget of bromine in the tropical tropopause layer

    OpenAIRE

    Werner, Bodo

    2016-01-01

    The present thesis reports on the world's first measurements of the second most important ozone-depleting halogen bromine at the entrance to the stratosphere (14 - 18.5 km, theta = 330 - 400 K) over the East and Central Pacific in late winter 2013. The measurements were performed within the NASA-ATTREX project from aboard the unmanned aerial vehicle Global Hawk. For the interpretation of the remote-sensing DOAS measurements of O3, NO2 and BrO, use of complementary measurements of brominated s...

  20. Using microorganisms to aid in hydrocarbon degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons are threatening the potable water supply and the aquatic ecosystem. Given the right microbial inhabitant(s), a large portion of these aliphatic hydrocarbons could be biodegraded before reaching the water supply. The authors' purpose is to isolate possible oil-degrading organisms. Soil samples were taken from hydrocarbon-laden soils at petroleum terminals, a petroleum refinery waste-treatment facility, a sewage-treatment plant grease collector, a site of previous bioremediation, and various other places. Some isolates known to be good degraders were obtained from culture collection services. These samples were plated on a 10w-30 multigrade motor oil solid medium to screen for aliphatic hydrocarbon degraders. The degrading organisms were isolated, identified, and tested (CO2 evolution, BOD, and COD) to determine the most efficient degrader(s). Thirty-seven organisms were tested, and the most efficient degraders were Serratia marcescens, Escherichia coli, and Enterobacter agglomerans

  1. Using microorganisms to aid in hydrocarbon degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Black, W.; Zamora, J. (Middle Tennessee State Univ., Murfreesboro (United States))

    1993-04-01

    Aliphatic hydrocarbons are threatening the potable water supply and the aquatic ecosystem. Given the right microbial inhabitant(s), a large portion of these aliphatic hydrocarbons could be biodegraded before reaching the water supply. The authors' purpose is to isolate possible oil-degrading organisms. Soil samples were taken from hydrocarbon-laden soils at petroleum terminals, a petroleum refinery waste-treatment facility, a sewage-treatment plant grease collector, a site of previous bioremediation, and various other places. Some isolates known to be good degraders were obtained from culture collection services. These samples were plated on a 10w-30 multigrade motor oil solid medium to screen for aliphatic hydrocarbon degraders. The degrading organisms were isolated, identified, and tested (CO[sub 2] evolution, BOD, and COD) to determine the most efficient degrader(s). Thirty-seven organisms were tested, and the most efficient degraders were Serratia marcescens, Escherichia coli, and Enterobacter agglomerans.

  2. Volatilisation of aromatic hydrocarbons from soil

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindhardt, B.; Christensen, T.H.

    1996-01-01

    The non-steady-state fluxes of aromatic hydrocarbons were measured in the laboratory from the surface of soils contaminated with coal tar Four soil samples from a former gasworks site were used for the experiments. The fluxes were quantified for 11 selected compounds, 4 mono- and 7 polycyclic...... aromatic hydrocarbons, for a period of up to 8 or 16 days. The concentrations of the selected compounds in the soils were between 0.2 and 3,100 mu g/g. The study included the experimental determination of the distribution coefficient of the aromatic hydrocarbons between the sorbed phase and the water under...... saturated conditions. The determined distribution coefficients showed that the aromatic hydrocarbons were more strongly sorbed to the total organic carbon including the coal tar pitch - by a factor of 8 to 25 - than expected for natural organic matter. The fluxes were also estimated using an analytical...

  3. Collision data involving hydro-carbon molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hydro-carbon molecules are abundantly produced when graphites are used as internal wall materials of hydrogen plasmas and strongly influence properties of low temperature plasmas near the edges as well as those of high temperature plasmas at the center. In this report, following simple description of the production mechanisms of hydro-carbon molecules under the interactions between graphite and hydrogen plasma, the present status of collision data for hydro-carbon molecules by electron impact is discussed and the relevant data are summarized in a series of figures and tables. It should also be noted that, in addition to fusion plasmas, these hydrocarbon data compiled here are quite useful in other applications such as plasma chemistry and material processing. (author)

  4. Quantitative Hydrocarbon Energies from the PMO Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Charles F.

    1979-01-01

    Details a procedure for accurately calculating the quantum mechanical energies of hydrocarbons using the perturbational molecular orbital (PMO) method, which does not require the use of a computer. (BT)

  5. Deuterated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons: Revisited

    CERN Document Server

    Doney, Kirstin D; Mori, Tamami; Onaka, Takashi; Tielens, A G G M

    2016-01-01

    The amount of deuterium locked up in polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) has to date been an uncertain value. We present a near-infrared (NIR) spectroscopic survey of HII regions in the Milky Way, Large Magellanic Cloud (LMC), and Small Magellanic Cloud (SMC) obtained with AKARI, which aims to search for features indicative of deuterated PAHs (PAD or Dn-PAH) to better constrain the D/H ratio of PAHs. Fifty-three HII regions were observed in the NIR (2.5-5 {\\mu}m), using the Infrared Camera (IRC) on board the AKARI satellite. Through comparison of the observed spectra with a theoretical model of deuterated PAH vibrational modes, the aromatic and (a)symmetric aliphatic C-D stretch modes were identified. We see emission features between 4.4-4.8 {\\mu}m, which could be unambiguously attributed to deuterated PAHs in only six of the observed sources, all of which are located in the Milky Way. In all cases, the aromatic C-D stretching feature is weaker than the aliphatic C-D stretching feature, and, in the case o...

  6. PROTONATED POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBONS REVISITED

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We reconsider the contribution that singly protonated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs; HPAH+s) might make to the Class A component of the 6.2 μm interstellar emission feature in light of the recent experimental measurements of protonated naphthalene and coronene. Our calculations on the small HPAH+s have a band near 6.2 μm, as found in experiment. While the larger HPAH+s still have emission near 6.2 μm, the much larger intensity of the band near 6.3 μm overwhelms the weaker band at 6.2 μm, so that the 6.2 μm band is barely visible. Since the large PAHs are more representative of those in the interstellar medium, our work suggests that large HPAH+s cannot be major contributors to the observed emission at 6.2 μm (i.e., Class A species). Saturating large PAH cations with hydrogen atoms retains the 6.2 μm Class A band position, but the rest of the spectrum is inconsistent with observed spectra.

  7. Synthesis and characterization of hydrocarbon sphere

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With glucose as starting material, hydrocarbon sphere which was rich in oxygen containing functional groups was synthesized by hydrothermal carbonization process, and characterized by SEM and FTIR techniques. The results show that the size and dispersion of carbon spheres depend on many factors, including the concentration of glucose, the reaction temperature and the adulterated organic monomer. The obtained hydrocarbon spheres contain rich functional groups which can greatly improve the hydrophilicity and chemical reactivity. (authors)

  8. Nitrocarburizing in ammonia-hydrocarbon gas mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Hanne; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    2011-01-01

    The present work investigates the possibility of nitrocarburising in ammonia-acetylene-hydrogen and ammonia-propene-hydrogen gas mixtures, where unsaturated hydrocarbon gas is the carbon source during nitrocarburising. Consequently, nitrocarburising is carried out in a reducing atmosphere and...... microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. It is shown that the use of unsaturated hydrocarbon gas in nitrocarburising processes is a viable alternative to traditional nitrocarburising methods....

  9. Nitrocarburising in ammonia-hydrocarbon gas mixtures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Hanne; Christiansen, Thomas; Somers, Marcel A. J.

    The present work investigates the possibility of nitrocarburising in ammonia-acetylene-hydrogen and ammoniapropene- hydrogen gas mixtures, where unsaturated hydrocarbon gas is the carbon source during nitrocarburising. Consequently, nitrocarburising is carried out in a reducing atmosphere and...... microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis. It is shown that the use of unsaturated hydrocarbon gas in nitrocarburising processes is a viable alternative to traditional nitrocarburising methods....

  10. Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in hypersaline environments

    OpenAIRE

    Luiz Fernando Martins; Raquel Silva Peixoto

    2012-01-01

    Literature on hydrocarbon degradation in extreme hypersaline media presents studies that point to a negative effect of salinity increase on hydrocarbonoclastic activity, while several others report an opposite tendency. Based on information available in the literature, we present a discussion on the reasons that justify these contrary results. Despite the fact that microbial ability to metabolize hydrocarbons is found in extreme hypersaline media, indeed some factors are critical for the occu...

  11. Biodegradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Soil

    OpenAIRE

    MR Mehrasbi; B Haghighi; M.Shariat; S Naseri; Naddafi, K

    2003-01-01

    Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons (20 g/kg dw soil) was investigated in 3 media, differing in the kind of petroleum fractions. In the laboratory experiments, during 5 months, the activities of petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms and dehydrogenase activity of soil was determined. Gas chromatographic analysis showed the biological decontaminations for gas oil, kerosene and synthetic mixture (gas oil, kerosene and furnace oil) are 60 %, 36 % and 55 %, respectively. Dehydrogenas...

  12. Direct spectral analysis and determination of high content of carcinogenic bromine in bread using UV pulsed laser induced breakdown spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehder, A O; Gondal, Mohammed A; Dastageer, Mohamed A; Habibullah, Yusuf B; Iqbal, Mohammed A; Oloore, Luqman E; Gondal, Bilal

    2016-06-01

    Laser induced breakdown spectroscopy (LIBS) was applied for the detection of carcinogenic elements like bromine in four representative brands of loaf bread samples and the measured bromine concentrations were 352, 157, 451, and 311 ppm, using Br I (827.2 nm) atomic transition line as the finger print atomic transition. Our LIBS system is equipped with a pulsed laser of wavelength 266 nm with energy 25 mJ pulse(-1), 8 ns pulse duration, 20 Hz repetition rate, and a gated ICCD camera. The LIBS system was calibrated with the standards of known concentrations in the sample (bread) matrix and such plot is linear in 20-500 ppm range. The capability of our system in terms of limit of detection and relative accuracy with respect to the standard inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICPMS) technique was evaluated and these values were 5.09 ppm and 0.01-0.05, respectively, which ensures the applicability of our system for Br trace level detection, and LIBS results are in excellent agreement with that of ICPMS results. PMID:26950676

  13. Accumulation of organochlorines and brominated flame retardants in estuarine and marine food chains: field measurements and model calculations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veltman, Karin; Hendriks, Jan; Huijbregts, Mark; Leonards, Pim; van den Heuvel-Greve, Martine; Vethaak, Dick

    2005-10-01

    Food chain accumulation of organochlorines and brominated flame retardants in estuarine and marine environments is compared to model estimations and fresh water field data. The food chain consists of herbivores, detritivores and primary and secondary carnivores i.e. fish, fish-eating birds and marine mammals. Accumulation of polychlorinated biphenyls is predicted well by OMEGA for herbi-detritivores and primary and secondary carnivorous fish. Ratios are similar to those found for fresh water species. Accumulation ratios for fish-eating birds and mammals are overestimated by the model, which is attributed partly to biotransformation of meta-para unsubstituted congeners. Additionally, birds may feed in other less polluted areas. For brominated diphenylethers (BDE) accumulation patterns are highly species and congener specific. Accumulation depends on both K(ow) and metabolization capacities. BDE47 is the predominant congener in lower trophic levels. For marine birds and mammals accumulation ratios of BDE99 and 100 are similar to or higher than ratios of persistent PCBs. PMID:15893330

  14. Bromination of graphene: a new route to making high performance transparent conducting electrodes with low optical losses

    KAUST Repository

    Mansour, Ahmed

    2015-09-03

    The high optical transmittance, electrical conductivity, flexibility and chemical stability of graphene have triggered great interest in its application as a transparent conducting electrode material and as a potential replacement for indium doped tin oxide. However, currently available large scale production methods such as chemical vapor deposition produce polycrystalline graphene, and require additional transfer process which further introduces defects and impurities resulting in a significant increase in its sheet resistance. Doping of graphene with foreign atoms has been a popular route for reducing its sheet resistance which typically comes at a significant loss in optical transmission. Herein, we report the successful bromine doping of graphene resulting in air-stable transparent conducting electrodes with up to 80% reduction of sheet resistance reaching ~180 Ω/ at the cost of 2-3% loss of optical transmission in case of few layer graphene and 0.8% in case of single layer graphene. The remarkably low tradeoff in optical transparency leads to the highest enhancements in figure of merit reported thus far. Furthermore, our results show a controlled increase in the workfunction up to 0.3 eV with the bromine content. These results should help pave the way for further development of graphene as potentially a highly transparent substitute to other transparent conducting electrodes in optoelectronic devices.

  15. Cobalt catalyzed peroxymonosulfate oxidation of tetrabromobisphenol A: Kinetics, reaction pathways, and formation of brominated by-products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Yuefei; Kong, Deyang; Lu, Junhe; Jin, Hao; Kang, Fuxing; Yin, Xiaoming; Zhou, Quansuo

    2016-08-01

    Degradation of tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA), a flame retardant widely spread in the environment, in Co(II) catalyzed peroxymonosulfate (PMS) oxidation process was systematically explored. The second-order-rate constant for reaction of sulfate radical (SO4(-)) with TBBPA was determined to be 5.27×10(10)M(-1)s(-1). Apparently, degradation of TBBPA showed first-order kinetics to the concentrations of both Co(II) and PMS. The presence of humic acid (HA) and bicarbonate inhibited TBBPA degradation, most likely due to their competition for SO4(-). Degradation of TBBPA was initiated by an electron abstraction from one of the phenolic rings. Detailed transformation pathways were proposed, including β-scission of isopropyl bridge, phenolic ring oxidation, debromination and coupling reactions. Further oxidative degradation of intermediates in Co(II)/PMS process yielded brominated disinfection by-products (Br-DBPs) such as bromoform and brominated acetic acids. Evolution profile of Br-DBPs showed an initially increasing and then decreasing pattern with maximum concentrations occurring around 6-10h. The presence of HA enhanced the formation of Br-DBPs significantly. These findings reveal potentially important, but previously unrecognized, formation of Br-DBPs during sulfate radical-based oxidation of bromide-containing organic compounds that may pose toxicological risks to human health. PMID:27107323

  16. Association between exposures to brominated trihalomethanes, hepatic injury and type II diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makris, Konstantinos C; Andrianou, Xanthi D; Charisiadis, Pantelis; Burch, James B; Seth, Ratanesh K; Ioannou, Androniki; Picolos, Michael; Christophi, Costas A; Chatterjee, Saurabh

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) is considered the most common liver disorder in the Western world, commonly diagnosed in the majority of obese patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Metabolic disrupting chemicals with short half-lives, such as those of halogenated structure (trihalomethanes, THM) have been linked with hepatic insulin resistance phenomena in animal studies. However, human studies evaluating the role of THM exposure on liver pathogenesis and T2DM disease process are scarce. The objectives of this study were to: i) determine the association of urinary brominated THM (BrTHM) levels and T2DM disease status, and ii) investigate the association between urinary BrTHM levels and serum alanine aminotransferase (ALT) concentrations, often used as surrogate markers of NAFLD. A pilot case-control study was conducted in Nicosia, Cyprus (n=95). Cases were physician-diagnosed T2DM patients and controls were healthy individuals. Liver enzymes, leptin and TNF-α were measured in sera, while urinary THM levels were measured using tandem mass spectrometry. Diabetics had higher levels of serum leptin, body mass index and ALT than the controls. Among all study participants those with serum ALT levels above the median (17IU/L) had higher mean tribromomethane (TBM) concentrations compared to those with serum ALT below 17IU/L. A significant increase in the odds of having above the median serum ALT levels [OR 6.38, 95% CI: 1.11, 42.84 (p=0.044)] was observed for each unit increase in creatinine-unadjusted urinary TBM levels, along with BMI and past smoking, after adjusting for possible confounders, such as urinary creatinine, age, sex, and leptin; no other THM compound showed a significant association with serum ALT. Logistic regression models for T2DM using the urinary BrTHM as exposure variables did not reach the predetermined level of significance. The interplay between exposures to BrTHM and the initiation of key pathophysiological events relating to

  17. Hydrogen generation using a calcium-bromine thermochemical water-splitting cycle

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Secure Transportable Autonomous (STAR-H2) project is part of the US Department of Energy's (DOE's) Nuclear Energy Research Initiative (NERI) to develop Generation IV (Gen IV) nuclear reactors that will supply high-temperature (over 1100 K; 800 deg C) heat. The goal of NERI is to develop an economical, proliferation-resistant, sustainable, nuclear-based energy supply system based on a modular-sized fast reactor that is passively safe and cooled with heavy liquid metal. STAR-H2 consists of the following: - A 400-MWThermal reactor with Pb as the primary coolant; - Exchange of primary Pb coolant for a salt heat transfer pipe; - Exchange of salt for steam; - A combined thermochemical water-splitting cycle to generate hydrogen; - CO2 Brayton cycle to generate electricity (η = 47%), and - An optional capability to produce potable water from brackish or salt water. Here we review the thermodynamic basis for a three-stage calcium-bromine (Ca-Br) water-splitting cycle. The research builds upon pioneering work on the four-stage University of Tokyo Cycle no.3 (UT--3) process, but employs a plasma-chemical stage for the recovery of HBr as H2 and Br2 as a substitute for the final two stages of UT-3. A detailed process design, developed by using the ASPEN model, suggests that the practical efficiency is 39-45% for the STAR-H2 Ca-Br cycle. For each tonne of H2 produced hourly (1 000 kg/h), the demand for electricity for the plasma-chemical stage (13.5 MWe) is much lower than the demand (28.5 MWe) for a steam-electrolysis system. At current power grid heat-to-electricity efficiencies (η = 33%), there is a clear benefit for using the STAR-H2 Ca-Br cycle. Anticipating Brayton cycle performance (η = 47%), H2 production will demand a total power of 74 MWThermal per ton of H2 from the Gen IV reactor. It is important to recognize that there are capital and operating cost tradeoffs that will depend on the market value of low-carbon electricity in the future. Steam-electrolysis is a

  18. Revision and extension to the analysis of the third spectrum of bromine: Br III

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spectrum of doubly ionized bromine (Br III) has been investigated in the vacuum ultraviolet wavelength region. Br2+ is an As-like ion with ground configuration of 4s24p3, thus a 3-electron system possessing a complex structure. The theoretical prediction was made using Cowan's quasi-relativistic Hartree–Fock code with superposition of configurations involving the 4s4p4, 4s24p2 (4d+5d+6d+5s+6s+7s), 4s4p3 (5p+4f), 4p4(4d+5s), 4s24p5s5p, 4s4p2 (4d2+5s2), 4s4p24f2 configurations for the even parity matrix and the 4s24p3, 4s24p2 (5p+6p+4f+5f) configurations for the odd parity matrix. Several previously reported levels of Br III have been revised, and new configurations have been added to the analysis. The spectrum used for this work was recorded on a 3-m normal incidence spectrograph in the wavelength region of 400–1326 Å using a triggered vacuum spark source. One hundred and two energy levels belonging to the 4s24p3, 4s4p4, 4s24p2 (4d+5d+6d+5s+6s +7s) configurations have been established, eighty-six being new. Two hundred and seventy-eight lines have been identified in this spectrum. The accuracy of our wavelength measurements for sharp and unblended lines is ±0.006 Å. The ionization potential of Br III was found to be 281,250±100 cm−1 (34.870±0.012 eV). - Highlights: • The spectrum of Br was recorded on a 3-m grating spectrograph with a triggered spark source. • Most of the known energy levels have been revised and further new configurations have been added. • Superposition-of-configurations calculations with relativistic corrections were made for theoretical predictions. • Radiative weighted oscillator strength (gf) & radiative transition probabilities (gA) were calculated. • Ionization Potential of Br III was determined experimentally

  19. Measurement-based modelling of bromine-induced oxidation of mercury above the Dead Sea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Tas

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Atmospheric mercury depletion events (AMDEs outside the polar region – driven by high levels of gaseous Br and BrO (i.e., BrOx – were observed recently in the warm Dead Sea boundary layer. The efficient oxidation of gaseous elemental mercury (GEM under temperate conditions by BrOx was unexpected considering that the thermal back dissociation reaction of HgBr is about 2.5 orders of magnitude higher under Dead Sea temperatures compared to polar temperatures, and hence was expected to significantly slow down GEM oxidation under warm temperatures. The goal of this modelling study was to improve understanding of the interaction of reactive bromine and mercury during Dead Sea AMDEs using numerical simulations based on a comprehensive measurement campaign in summer 2009.

    Our analysis is focused on daytime AMDE when chemical processes dominate concentration changes. Best agreements between simulations and observations were achieved using rate constants for kHg+Br and kHg+BrO of 2.7 × 10−13 cm3 molecule−1 s−1 and 1.5 × 10−13 cm3 molecule−1 s−1, respectively. Our model also predicted that a rate constant kHg+BrO of 5.0 × 10−14 cm3 molecule−1 s−1 may be considered as a minimum, which is higher than most reported values. These rate constants suggest that BrO could be a more efficient oxidant than Br in the troposphere as long as [Br]/[BrO] ratios are smaller than ~0.2 to 0.5. Under Dead Sea conditions, these kinetics demonstrate a high efficiency and central role of BrOx for AMDEs, with relative contributions to GEM depletion of more than ~90%. Unexpectedly, BrO was found to be the dominant oxidant with relative contributions above 80%. The strong contribution of BrO could explain why the efficiency of GEM

  20. High-resolution gas chromatographic analysis of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and aliphatic hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the analysis by gas chromatography of aromatic polycyclic hydrocarbons and aliphatic hydrocarbons is presented. The separation has been carried out by glass and fused silica capillary column in two different polar stationary phases OV-1 and SE-54. The limitation and the advantages of the procedure are discussed in terms of separation, sensitivity and precision. (Author) 20 refs

  1. Hydrocarbon level detection with nanosecond laser ablation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanosecond laser induced breakdown in liquid is used as a technique to detect hydrocarbon levels in water. A Q-switched Nd:YAG laser was focused to generate optical breakdown associated with shock wave generation. The shock wave was propagated at the speed of sound in the medium after travelling 1 μs outward from the center of optical breakdown. Different amplitudes of sound were traced with the aid of an ultrasonic probe. The optical properties of the hydrocarbon solution were quantified via fundamental refractive index measurement (the Snell law). A continuous mode diode pumped solid state laser with second harmonic generation was used as the illumination light source. A CCD video camera with Matrox version 4.2 software was utilized to analyze the recording image. Option line analysis was performed to analyze the intensity of optical breakdown at different input energies. Gray level analysis was also conducted on the scattering light after passing through the hydrocarbon solution at different concentrations. The hydrocarbon solution comprised impurities or particles that varied according to the concentration. The average of the gray level is assumed to present the size of the particle. Inherently, as the acoustic wave propagates outward, it transports the mass (particles or impurities) and impacts on the ultrasonic probe. As a result a higher concentration of hydrocarbons reveals a larger amplitude of sound waves. This phenomenon is identified as a finger print for hydrocarbon levels between 100 and 1000 ppm. The transient detection, without complicated sampling preparation and no hazardous chemical involvement, makes laser ablation a promising technique to detect in situ hydrocarbon levels in water. (paper)

  2. Comparison of direct injection nebulizer and desolvating microconcentric nebulizer for analysis of chlorine-, bromine- and iodine-containing compounds by reversed phase HPLC with ICP-MS detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, B.P.; Gammelgaard, Bente; Hansen, S.H.;

    2003-01-01

    With the purpose of finding ways to combine micro-bore reversed phase HPLC with ICP-MS detection for analysis of drug substances containing chlorine, bromine and iodine, the suitability of a direct injection nebulizer and an Aridus desolvating microconcentric nebulizer was compared. Using the...

  3. A comparison of the in vitro cyto- and neurotoxicity of brominated and halogen-free flame retardants : prioritization in search for safe(r) alternatives

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hendriks, Hester S; Meijer, Marieke; Muilwijk, Mirthe; van den Berg, Martin; Westerink, Remco H S

    2014-01-01

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are abundant persistent organic pollutants with well-studied toxicity. The toxicological and ecological concerns associated with BFRs argue for replacement by safe(r) alternatives. Though previous research identified the nervous system as a sensitive target organ f

  4. Synthesis, characterization, crystal structure, catalytic activity in oxidative bromination, and thermal study of a new oxidovanadium Schiff base complex containing O, N-bidentate Schiff base ligand

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Grivani, G.; Tahmasebi, V.; Khalaji, A.D.; Eigner, Václav; Dušek, Michal

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 67, č. 22 (2014), s. 3664-3677. ISSN 0095-8972 Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : oxidovanadium(IV) * Schiff base * single crystal * oxidative bromination Subject RIV: CA - Inorganic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.012, year: 2014

  5. Brominated flame retardant levels in human milk and serum from MAMA study participants: Correlations over time, matrix, and with questionnaire results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are synthetic, lipophilic, and bioaccumulative compounds used to prevent the combustion of a variety of items including electronics and furniture. There are 75 classes of BFRs, two of which are the polybrominated biphenyls (PBB) and the polybrom...

  6. Resistivity features in intercalated graphite compounds with bromine and iodine chloride in the region of structural phase transitions in the layer of intercalate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the paper anomalous changes of resistivity in graphite intercalated compounds with iodine chloride and bromine are investigated in the phase transition temperature interval. It is shown that these anomalies are caused by the change of carriers mobility in the phase transitional interval as well as by the origin of ''mobile ions liquids''

  7. Simultaneous balloon-borne measurements of the key inorganic bromine species BrO and BrONO2 in the stratosphere: DOAS and MIPAS-B evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazarski, Sebastian; Maucher, Guido; Ebersoldt, Andreas; Butz, André; Friedl-Vallon, Felix; Höpfner, Michael; Kleinert, Anne; Nordmeyer, Hans; Oelhaf, Hermann; Pfeilsticker, Klaus; Sinnhuber, Björn-Martin; Wetzel, Gerald; Orphal, Johannes

    2015-04-01

    Inorganic bromine contributes to a loss of stratospheric ozone of about 25 - 30%. Past studies have demonstrated several uncertainties in the photochemistry of stratospheric bromine, especially by considering the three body reaction (kBrONO2) BrO + NO2 + M → BrONO2 + M, and the photolysis frequencies of BrONO2 (jBrONO2). Hence, an improved knowledge of the ratio jBrONO2/kBrONO2 is crucial to better assess the bromine-related loss of ozone as well as the total amount of bromine in the stratosphere. Here, we report on the first simultaneous balloon-borne measurements of NO2, BrO, and BrONO2 in the stratosphere, performed over Timmins (Ontario, 49 °N, Canada) on Sept., 7th and 8th, 2014. During the flight the targeted species were monitored by remote sensing in the UV, visible and mid-IR spectral ranges by Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy (DOAS) and Michelson Interferometer for Passive Atmospheric Sounding (MIPAS-B), respectively. The analysis and interpretation of the measurements involves radiative transfer as well as photochemical modelling. Major features of the applied techniques are reported and first results of the DOAS as well as MIPAS-B evaluation are discussed. Further investigations address inter-comparisons of the retrieved NO2, BrO, and O3 concentrations and volume mixing ratios, to demonstrate validations of both evaluation methods.

  8. Formation of brominated disinfection byproducts from natural organic matter isolates and model compounds in a sulfate radical-based oxidation process

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Yuru

    2014-12-16

    A sulfate radical-based advanced oxidation process (SR-AOP) has received increasing application interest for the removal of water/wastewater contaminants. However, limited knowledge is available on its side effects. This study investigated the side effects in terms of the production of total organic bromine (TOBr) and brominated disinfection byproducts (Br-DBPs) in the presence of bromide ion and organic matter in water. Sulfate radical was generated by heterogeneous catalytic activation of peroxymonosulfate. Isolated natural organic matter (NOM) fractions as well as low molecular weight (LMW) compounds were used as model organic matter. Considerable amounts of TOBr were produced by SR-AOP, where bromoform (TBM) and dibromoacetic acid (DBAA) were identified as dominant Br-DBPs. In general, SR-AOP favored the formation of DBAA, which is quite distinct from bromination with HOBr/OBr- (more TBM production). SR-AOP experimental results indicate that bromine incorporation is distributed among both hydrophobic and hydrophilic NOM fractions. Studies on model precursors reveal that LMW acids are reactive TBM precursors (citric acid > succinic acid > pyruvic acid > maleic acid). High DBAA formation from citric acid, aspartic acid, and asparagine was observed; meanwhile aspartic acid and asparagine were the major precursors of dibromoacetonitrile and dibromoacetamide, respectively.

  9. Hydrocarbons in soils: Origin, composition, and behavior (Review)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennadiev, A. N.; Pikovskii, Yu. I.; Tsibart, A. S.; Smirnova, M. A.

    2015-10-01

    It has been shown that a large body of evidence on the sources, transformation, and migration of hydrocarbons in soils has been acquired by different researchers. Available data about the origin and behavior of hydrocarbon gases, total petroleum hydrocarbons, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, alkanes, and other compounds have been considered successively. A wide range of natural and anthropogenic factors affecting the transformation and migration of hydrocarbons in soils have been analyzed. The indicative value of these compounds has been explained. At the same time, many problems related to hydrocarbons in soils are still insufficiently understood. Sparse and fragmentary data are available in the literature on the interaction of different hydrocarbon groups in the soil. Few data refer to the features of hydrocarbons in background zonal soils; there are almost no interzonal comparisons. The behavior of hydrocarbons in soils of different landscape-geographical positions is characterized in isolated publications. The hydrocarbon status of soils as an integral complex of interrelated hydrocarbons is almost not analyzed. Hydrocarbons of a single class (polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons, hydrocarbon gases, n-alkanes, etc.) are usually characterized in each publication.

  10. Worldwide overview of hydrocarbons and perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication presents and comments data regarding the share of hydrocarbons in the world energy consumption, hydrocarbon trade flows, the new situation created by the emergence of shale hydrocarbons and the consequences for the world economy, and possible risks. The authors first comment the evolution of energy consumption and outline that the objectives of CO2 and greenhouse gas emission will not be reached (these emissions increased in 2012 and in 2013). They indicate the emission situation in the USA and Japan, and notice that the objectives defined by the IEA are quite different from those defined by the EU. They analyse the evolutions by distinguishing different periods: 2005-2008 as a reference period, 2008-2012 as a period of change, and the current period as a period of flow inversion. Then, the authors propose two different scenarios of evolution of economic and energy policies. The evolution of hydrocarbon demand is commented, and the levels of reserves (oil, conventional gas, coal, nuclear fuels) are discussed. The market evolution is also discussed, not only from an economic point of view, but also in relationship with geopolitics. The authors notably outline that the energy price is different from one country to the other, discuss the issue of hydrocarbon refining, the role of CO2 tax

  11. Foaming of mixtures of pure hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, J. V.; Woods, W. W.

    1950-01-01

    Mixtures of pure liquid hydrocarbons are capable of foaming. Nine hydrocarbons were mixed in pairs, in all possible combinations, and four proportions of each combination. These mixtures were sealed in glass tubes, and the foaming was tested by shaking. Mixtures of aliphatic with other aliphatic hydrocarbons, or of alkyl benzenes with other alkyl benzenes, did not foam. Mixtures of aliphatic hydrocarbons with alkyl benzenes did foam. The proportions of the mixtures greatly affected the foaming, the maximum foaming of 12 of 20 pairs being at the composition 20 percent aliphatic hydrocarbon, 80 percent alkyl benzene. Six seconds was the maximum foam lifetime of any of these mixtures. Aeroshell 120 lubricating oil was fractionated into 52 fractions and a residue by extraction with acetone in a fractionating extractor. The index of refraction, foam lifetime, color, and viscosity of these fractions were measured. Low viscosity and high index fractions were extracted first. The viscosity of the fractions extracted rose and the index decreased as fractionation proceeded. Foam lifetimes and color were lowest in the middle fractions. Significance is attached to the observation that none of the foam lifetimes of the fractions or residue is as high as the foam lifetime of the original Aeroshell, indicating that the foaming is not due to a particular foaming constituent, but rather to the entire mixture.

  12. Emissions of hydrocarbons from combustion of biofuels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evaluations and measurements of emissions of hydrocarbons from power plants with a capacity exceeding 1 MW using biofuels (wood fuels and peat) have been studied in order to identify and quantify the emissions of incompletely combusted hydrocarbons. The influence of the type of fuel and the combustion technology applied were also studied, using literature references. The report summarizes monitoring results from a number of plants using biofuels. The reported emissions from the different plants can not be compared as they are relatively few and the test results have been obtained under various conditions using different methods of testing and analysis. The methods used are often poorly documented in the studied reports. Few investigations of emissions of hydrocarbons from plants in the range of 1 to 10 MW have been carried out. The plant and the technology used are important factors determining the amount and type of emissions of hydrocarbons. Larger temporary emissions can occur during start up, operational disturbances or when using fuel of inhomogeneous quality. In order to minimize the emissions the combustion process must be efficiently controlled, and a fuel of a hohogeneous quality must be used. The report also summarizes sampling and analysis methods used for monitoring emissions of hydrocarbons. (29 refs., 17 figs.)

  13. Syngas Upgrading to Hydrocarbon Fuels Technology Pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talmadge, M.; Biddy, Mary J.; Dutta, Abhijit; Jones, Susanne B.; Meyer, Pimphan A.

    2013-03-31

    In support of the Bioenergy Technologies Office, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) and the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) are undertaking studies of biomass conversion technologies to hydrocarbon fuels to identify barriers and target research toward reducing conversion costs. Process designs and preliminary economic estimates for each of these pathway cases were developed using rigorous modeling tools (Aspen Plus and Chemcad). These analyses incorporated the best information available at the time of development, including data from recent pilot and bench-scale demonstrations, collaborative industrial and academic partners, and published literature and patents. This pathway case investigates the upgrading of biomass derived synthesis gas (‘syngas’) to hydrocarbon biofuels. While this specific discussion focuses on the conversion of syngas via a methanol intermediate to hydrocarbon blendstocks, there are a number of alternative conversion routes for production of hydrocarbons through a wide array of intermediates from syngas. Future work will also consider the variations to this pathway to determine the most economically viable and risk adverse conversion route. Technical barriers and key research needs have been identified that should be pursued for the syngas to hydrocarbon pathway to be competitive with petroleum-derived gasoline, diesel and jet range blendstocks.

  14. Hydrogenative decomposition device for hydrocarbon oil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The vessel for decomposition according to the present invention comprises a water decomposition vessel disposed around a storage portion of a radioactive material container to which water for decomposition is injected, a gas separation column for separating hydrogen gas generated by decomposition of water, and a reaction vessel having a gas mixture fluid of hydrocarbon oil and hydrogen gas disposed around the storage portion, and from which hydrocarbon product is taken out. Radiation rays from radioactive materials stored in both of the water decomposition vessel and the reaction vessel are absorbed by water and hydrocarbon oil at the periphery thereof. Water is partially decomposed into oxygen gas and hydrogen gas by irradiation of radiation rays, and hydrogen gas is separated and sent to the reaction vessel. A portion of molecular chains of the hydrocarbon oil is splitted by irradiation of radiation rays to reduce molecular weight, and hydrocarbon products in a stable state are obtained by hydrogenation. Hydrogen is formed using radioactive wastes as an energy source and the quality of heavy crude oils can be improved. (T.M.)

  15. Bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The bioremediation of petroleum hydrocarbons in soil environments was reviewed via a literature survey and discussions with workers in relevant disciplines. The impacts of hydrocarbons on soil are discussed along with a range of methods available to assist in their decomposition by soil microorganisms. The range of petroleum-based materials considered includes conventional and synthetic crude oils, refined oils, sludges, asphalts and bitumens, drilling mud residues, creosote tars, and some pesticides. The degradability of hydrocarbons largely depends upon their aqueous solubility and their adsorption on soil surfaces and, therefore, is related to their molecular structures. The ease of decomposition decreases with increasing complexity of structure, in the order aliphatics > aromatics > heterocyclics and asphaltenes (most recalcitrant). Most soils contain an adequate population of microorganisms and hence bioaugmentation may only be needed in special circumstances. Decomposition is fastest in soils where the hydrocarbon loading rate, aeration, nutrition, moisture, and pH are all optimized. At spill sites there is little control over the application rate, although containment measures can assist in either limiting contamination or distributing it more evenly. The enhancement of bioremediation is discussed in light of all these factors. Other techniques such as enhanced aeration, hydrocarbon decomposition by anaerobic processes, surfactants, and burning are also discussed. 211 refs., 11 figs., 10 tabs

  16. Deriving an atmospheric budget of total organic bromine using airborne in situ measurements from the western Pacific area during SHIVA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sala, S.; Bönisch, H.; Keber, T.; Oram, D. E.; Mills, G.; Engel, A.

    2014-07-01

    During the recent SHIVA (Stratospheric Ozone: Halogen Impacts in a Varying Atmosphere) project an extensive data set of all halogen species relevant for the atmospheric budget of total organic bromine was collected in the western Pacific region using the Falcon aircraft operated by the German Aerospace agency DLR (Deutsches Zentrum für Luft- und Raumfahrt) covering a vertical range from the planetary boundary layer up to the ceiling altitude of the aircraft of 13 km. In total, more than 700 measurements were performed with the newly developed fully automated in situ instrument GHOST-MS (Gas chromatograph for the Observation of Tracers - coupled with a Mass Spectrometer) by the Goethe University of Frankfurt (GUF) and with the onboard whole-air sampler WASP with subsequent ground-based state-of-the-art GC / MS analysis by the University of East Anglia (UEA). Both instruments yield good agreement for all major (CHBr3 and CH2Br2) and minor (CH2BrCl, CHBrCl2 and CHBr2Cl) VSLS (very short-lived substances), at least at the level of their 2σ measurement uncertainties. In contrast to the suggestion that the western Pacific could be a region of strongly increased atmospheric VSLS abundance (Pyle et al., 2011), we found only in the upper troposphere a slightly enhanced amount of total organic bromine from VSLS relative to the levels reported in Montzka and Reimann et al. (2011) for other tropical regions. From the SHIVA observations in the upper troposphere, a budget for total organic bromine, including four halons (H-1301, H-1211, H-1202, H-2402), CH3Br and the VSLS, is derived for the level of zero radiative heating (LZRH), the input region for the tropical tropopause layer (TTL) and thus also for the stratosphere. With the exception of the two minor VSLS CHBrCl2 and CHBr2Cl, excellent agreement with the values reported in Montzka and Reimann et al. (2011) is found, while being slightly higher than previous studies from our group based on balloon-borne measurements.

  17. Speciation of the bio-available iodine and bromine forms in edible seaweed by high performance liquid chromatography hyphenated with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romaris-Hortas, Vanessa; Bermejo-Barrera, Pilar [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Bromatology, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Santiago de Compostela, Avenida das Ciencias, s/n. 15782 - Santiago de Compostela (Spain); Moreda-Pineiro, Jorge [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Faculty of Sciences, University of A Coruna, Campus da Zapateira, s/n. 15071, A Coruna (Spain); Moreda-Pineiro, Antonio, E-mail: antonio.moreda@usc.es [Department of Analytical Chemistry, Nutrition and Bromatology, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Santiago de Compostela, Avenida das Ciencias, s/n. 15782 - Santiago de Compostela (Spain)

    2012-10-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bioavailable iodine and bromine speciation in edible seaweed were developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In vitro dialyzability was used to assess the bioavailable fractions. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer AEC hyphenated with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry was used. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Iodide, MIT, DIT, bromide and bromate were found in dialyzates from edible seaweed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Positive correlation between bioavailability and protein contents was found. - Abstract: A bioavailability study based on an in vitro dialyzability approach has been applied to assess the bio-available fractions of iodine and bromine species from edible seaweed. Iodide, iodate, 3-iodo-tyrosine (MIT), 3,5-diiodo-tyrosine (DIT), bromide and bromate were separated by anion exchange chromatography under a gradient elution mode (175 mM ammonium nitrate plus 15% (v/v) methanol, pH 3.8, as a mobile phase, and flow rates within the 0.5-1.5 mL min{sup -1} range). Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used as a selective detector for iodine ({sup 127}I) and bromine ({sup 79}Br). Low dialyzability ratios (within the 2.0-18% range) were found for iodine species; whereas, moderate dialyzability percentages (from 9.0 to 40%) were obtained for bromine species. Iodide and bromide were the major species found in the dialyzates from seaweed, although MIT and bromate were also found in the dialyzates from most of the seaweed samples analysed. However, DIT was only found in dialyzates from Wakame, Kombu, and NIES 09 (Sargasso) certified reference material; whereas, iodate was not found in any dialyzate. Iodine dialyzability was found to be dependent on the protein content (negative correlation), and on the carbohydrate and dietary fibre levels (positive correlation). However, bromine dialyzability was only dependent on the protein amount in seaweed (negative correlation).

  18. 海水提溴技术的发展与研究现状%Research and development status of bromine extracting technique from sea water

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    林源; 王浩宇; 周亚蓉; 叶俊伟; 宁桂玲

    2012-01-01

    Bromine is one of the important chemical materials.lt has been widely used in the fields of flame retardants,oil exploration,fungicides,pesticides, photographic materials,and pharmaceutical etc..Bromine's preparation technology and potential value are highly attached by domestic and foreign scholars.The status of bromine production and extraction methods from sea water,including air stripping method,steam distillation method,ion exchange adsorption method,and membrane separation method at home and abroad were briefly introduced.The advantages and disadvantages of those methods were compared.Meanwhile, the preparation method of ultrapure bromine was briefly described.Finally, the future development direction of extracting bromine from sea water was suggested.%溴素是重要的化工原料之一,在阻燃剂、石油开采、杀菌剂、农药、感光材料及医药等领域广泛应用,其制备技术和应用价值受到国内外学者的高度重视.综述了国内外溴素生产现状和海水提溴的方法,介绍了空气吹出法、水蒸气蒸馏法、离子交换吸附法和膜分离法提溴技术的研究现状,分析了各种方法的优缺点.简述了超纯溴的制备方法.提出了海水提溴的未来发展方向.

  19. Speciation of the bio-available iodine and bromine forms in edible seaweed by high performance liquid chromatography hyphenated with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Bioavailable iodine and bromine speciation in edible seaweed were developed. ► In vitro dialyzability was used to assess the bioavailable fractions. ► AEC hyphenated with inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry was used. ► Iodide, MIT, DIT, bromide and bromate were found in dialyzates from edible seaweed. ► Positive correlation between bioavailability and protein contents was found. - Abstract: A bioavailability study based on an in vitro dialyzability approach has been applied to assess the bio-available fractions of iodine and bromine species from edible seaweed. Iodide, iodate, 3-iodo-tyrosine (MIT), 3,5-diiodo-tyrosine (DIT), bromide and bromate were separated by anion exchange chromatography under a gradient elution mode (175 mM ammonium nitrate plus 15% (v/v) methanol, pH 3.8, as a mobile phase, and flow rates within the 0.5–1.5 mL min−1 range). Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used as a selective detector for iodine (127I) and bromine (79Br). Low dialyzability ratios (within the 2.0–18% range) were found for iodine species; whereas, moderate dialyzability percentages (from 9.0 to 40%) were obtained for bromine species. Iodide and bromide were the major species found in the dialyzates from seaweed, although MIT and bromate were also found in the dialyzates from most of the seaweed samples analysed. However, DIT was only found in dialyzates from Wakame, Kombu, and NIES 09 (Sargasso) certified reference material; whereas, iodate was not found in any dialyzate. Iodine dialyzability was found to be dependent on the protein content (negative correlation), and on the carbohydrate and dietary fibre levels (positive correlation). However, bromine dialyzability was only dependent on the protein amount in seaweed (negative correlation).

  20. Maternal transfer of emerging brominated and chlorinated flame retardants in European eels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sühring, Roxana, E-mail: roxana.suehring@hzg.de [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Institute of Coastal Research, Department for Environmental Chemistry, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Leuphana University Lüneburg, Institute of Sustainable and Environmental Chemistry, Scharnhorststraße 1, 21335 Lüneburg (Germany); Freese, Marko [Thünen Institute of Fisheries Ecology, Palmaille 9, 22767 Hamburg (Germany); Schneider, Mandy [Leuphana University Lüneburg, Institute of Sustainable and Environmental Chemistry, Scharnhorststraße 1, 21335 Lüneburg (Germany); Schubert, Sophia; Pohlmann, Jan-Dag [Thünen Institute of Fisheries Ecology, Palmaille 9, 22767 Hamburg (Germany); Alaee, Mehran [Water Science and Technology Directorate, Environment Canada, Burlington, Ontario, L7R4A6 Canada (Canada); Wolschke, Hendrik [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Institute of Coastal Research, Department for Environmental Chemistry, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Leuphana University Lüneburg, Institute of Sustainable and Environmental Chemistry, Scharnhorststraße 1, 21335 Lüneburg (Germany); Hanel, Reinhold [Thünen Institute of Fisheries Ecology, Palmaille 9, 22767 Hamburg (Germany); Ebinghaus, Ralf [Helmholtz-Zentrum Geesthacht, Centre for Materials and Coastal Research, Institute of Coastal Research, Department for Environmental Chemistry, Max-Planck-Strasse 1, 21502 Geesthacht (Germany); Marohn, Lasse [Thünen Institute of Fisheries Ecology, Palmaille 9, 22767 Hamburg (Germany)

    2015-10-15

    The European eel (Anguilla anguilla) is regarded as a critically endangered species. Scientists are in agreement that the “quality of spawners” is a vital factor for the survival of the species. This quality can be impaired by parasites, disease and pollution. Especially endocrine disrupting organic chemicals pose a potential threat to reproduction and development of offspring. To our knowledge, the findings in this publication for the first time describe maternal transfer of contaminants in eels. We analysed the concentrations of in total 53 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and their halogenated substitutes in muscle, gonads and eggs of artificially matured European eels and in muscle and gonads of untreated European eels that were used for comparison. We found evidence that persistent organic pollutants such as PBDEs, as well as their brominated and chlorinated substitutes are redistributed from muscle tissue to gonads and eggs. Concentrations ranged from 0.001 ng g{sup −1} ww for sum Dechlorane metabolites (DPMA, aCL{sub 10}DP, aCl{sub 11}DP) to 2.1 ng g{sup −1} ww for TBA in eggs, 0.001 ng g{sup −1} ww for Dechlorane metabolites to 9.4 ng g{sup −1} ww for TBA in gonads and 0.002 ng g{sup −1} ww for Dechlorane metabolites to 54 ng g{sup −1} ww for TBA in muscle tissue. Average egg muscle ratios (EMRs) for compounds detectable in artificially matured eels from both Schlei Fjord and Ems River ranged from 0.01 for Dechlorane 602 (DDC-DBF) to 10.4 for PBEB. Strong correlations were found between flame retardant concentrations and lipid content in the analysed tissue types, as well as transfer rates and octanol–water partitioning coefficient, indicating that these parameters were the driving factors for the observed maternal transfer. Furthermore, indications were found, that TBP-DBPE, TBP-AE, BATE and TBA have a significant uptake from the surrounding water, rather than just food and might additionally be formed by metabolism or

  1. Maternal transfer of emerging brominated and chlorinated flame retardants in European eels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The European eel (Anguilla anguilla) is regarded as a critically endangered species. Scientists are in agreement that the “quality of spawners” is a vital factor for the survival of the species. This quality can be impaired by parasites, disease and pollution. Especially endocrine disrupting organic chemicals pose a potential threat to reproduction and development of offspring. To our knowledge, the findings in this publication for the first time describe maternal transfer of contaminants in eels. We analysed the concentrations of in total 53 polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) and their halogenated substitutes in muscle, gonads and eggs of artificially matured European eels and in muscle and gonads of untreated European eels that were used for comparison. We found evidence that persistent organic pollutants such as PBDEs, as well as their brominated and chlorinated substitutes are redistributed from muscle tissue to gonads and eggs. Concentrations ranged from 0.001 ng g−1 ww for sum Dechlorane metabolites (DPMA, aCL10DP, aCl11DP) to 2.1 ng g−1 ww for TBA in eggs, 0.001 ng g−1 ww for Dechlorane metabolites to 9.4 ng g−1 ww for TBA in gonads and 0.002 ng g−1 ww for Dechlorane metabolites to 54 ng g−1 ww for TBA in muscle tissue. Average egg muscle ratios (EMRs) for compounds detectable in artificially matured eels from both Schlei Fjord and Ems River ranged from 0.01 for Dechlorane 602 (DDC-DBF) to 10.4 for PBEB. Strong correlations were found between flame retardant concentrations and lipid content in the analysed tissue types, as well as transfer rates and octanol–water partitioning coefficient, indicating that these parameters were the driving factors for the observed maternal transfer. Furthermore, indications were found, that TBP-DBPE, TBP-AE, BATE and TBA have a significant uptake from the surrounding water, rather than just food and might additionally be formed by metabolism or biotransformation processes. Dechloranes seem to be of

  2. EVALUATION OF PETROLEUM HYDROCARBONS ELUTION FROM SOIL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janina Piekutin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents studies on oil removal from soil by means of water elution with a help of shaking out the contaminants from the soil. The tests were performed on simulated soil samples contaminated with a mixture of petroleum hydrocarbons. The study consisted in recording the time influence and the number of elution cycles to remove contaminants from the soil. The samples were then subject to the determination of petroleum hydrocarbons, aliphatic hydrocarbons, and BTEX compounds (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, xylene. Due to adding various concentrations of petroleum into particular soil samples and applying different shaking times, it was possible to find out the impact of petroleum content and sample shaking duration on the course and possibility of petroleum substances removal by means of elution process.

  3. Artificial Hydrocarbon Networks Fuzzy Inference System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiram Ponce

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a novel fuzzy inference model based on artificial hydrocarbon networks, a computational algorithm for modeling problems based on chemical hydrocarbon compounds. In particular, the proposed fuzzy-molecular inference model (FIM-model uses molecular units of information to partition the output space in the defuzzification step. Moreover, these molecules are linguistic units that can be partially understandable due to the organized structure of the topology and metadata parameters involved in artificial hydrocarbon networks. In addition, a position controller for a direct current (DC motor was implemented using the proposed FIM-model in type-1 and type-2 fuzzy inference systems. Experimental results demonstrate that the fuzzy-molecular inference model can be applied as an alternative of type-2 Mamdani’s fuzzy control systems because the set of molecular units can deal with dynamic uncertainties mostly present in real-world control applications.

  4. Using supercritical fluids to refine hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarbro, Stephen Lee

    2014-11-25

    This is a method to reactively refine hydrocarbons, such as heavy oils with API gravities of less than 20.degree. and bitumen-like hydrocarbons with viscosities greater than 1000 cp at standard temperature and pressure using a selected fluid at supercritical conditions. The reaction portion of the method delivers lighter weight, more volatile hydrocarbons to an attached contacting device that operates in mixed subcritical or supercritical modes. This separates the reaction products into portions that are viable for use or sale without further conventional refining and hydro-processing techniques. This method produces valuable products with fewer processing steps, lower costs, increased worker safety due to less processing and handling, allow greater opportunity for new oil field development and subsequent positive economic impact, reduce related carbon dioxide, and wastes typical with conventional refineries.

  5. Velocity Dependence of Friction of Confined Hydrocarbons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sivebæk, Ion Marius; Samoilov, Vladimir N.; Persson, Bo N. J.

    2010-01-01

    frictional shear stress for both cases. In our simulations, the polymer films are very thin (∼3 nm), and the solid walls are connected to a thermostat at a short distance from the polymer slab. Under these circumstances we find that frictional heating effects are not important, and the effective temperature......We present molecular dynamics friction calculations for confined hydrocarbon “polymer” solids with molecular lengths from 20 to 1400 carbon atoms. Two cases are considered: (a) polymer sliding against a hard substrate and (b) polymer sliding on polymer. We discuss the velocity dependence of the...... in the polymer film is always close to the thermostat temperature. In the first setup (a), for hydrocarbons with molecular lengths from 60 to 1400 carbon atoms, the shear stresses are nearly independent of molecular length, but for the shortest hydrocarbon C20H42 the frictional shear stress is lower...

  6. Mechanisms of Hydrocarbon Based Polymer Etch

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Barton; Ventzek, Peter; Matsukuma, Masaaki; Suzuki, Ayuta; Koshiishi, Akira

    2015-09-01

    Dry etch of hydrocarbon based polymers is important for semiconductor device manufacturing. The etch mechanisms for oxygen rich plasma etch of hydrocarbon based polymers has been studied but the mechanism for lean chemistries has received little attention. We report on an experimental and analytic study of the mechanism for etching of a hydrocarbon based polymer using an Ar/O2 chemistry in a single frequency 13.56 MHz test bed. The experimental study employs an analysis of transients from sequential oxidation and Ar sputtering steps using OES and surface analytics to constrain conceptual models for the etch mechanism. The conceptual model is consistent with observations from MD studies and surface analysis performed by Vegh et al. and Oehrlein et al. and other similar studies. Parameters of the model are fit using published data and the experimentally observed time scales.

  7. Length of hydrocarbon chain influences location of curcumin in liposomes: Curcumin as a molecular probe to study ethanol induced interdigitation of liposomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Khoury, Elsy; Patra, Digambara

    2016-05-01

    Using fluorescence quenching of curcumin in 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) and 1,2-dimyristoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DMPC) liposomes by brominated derivatives of fatty acids, the location of curcumin has been studied, which indicates length of hydrocarbon chain has an effect on the location of curcumin in liposomes. Change of fluorescence intensity of curcumin with temperature in the presence of liposomes helps to estimate the phase transition temperature of these liposomes, thus, influence of cholesterol on liposome properties has been studied using curcumin as a molecule probe. The cooperativity due to the interactions between the hydrocarbon chains during melting accelerates the phase transition of DPPC liposomes in the presence of high percentage of cholesterol whereas high percentage of cholesterol generates a rather rigid DMPC liposome over a wide range of temperatures. We used ethanol to induce interdigitation between the hydrophobic chains of the lipids and studied this effect using curcumin as fluorescence probe. As a result of interdigitation, curcumin fluorescence is quenched in liposomes. The compact arrangement of the acyl chains prevents curcumin from penetrating deep near the midplane. In the liquid crystalline phase ethanol introduces a kind of order to the more fluid liposome, and does not leave space for curcumin to be inserted away from water. PMID:26945646

  8. Bioremediation of Petroleum Hydrocarbon Contaminated Sites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fallgren, Paul

    2009-03-30

    Bioremediation has been widely applied in the restoration of petroleum hydrocarbon-contaminated. Parameters that may affect the rate and efficiency of biodegradation include temperature, moisture, salinity, nutrient availability, microbial species, and type and concentration of contaminants. Other factors can also affect the success of the bioremediation treatment of contaminants, such as climatic conditions, soil type, soil permeability, contaminant distribution and concentration, and drainage. Western Research Institute in conjunction with TechLink Environmental, Inc. and the U.S. Department of Energy conducted laboratory studies to evaluate major parameters that contribute to the bioremediation of petroleum-contaminated drill cuttings using land farming and to develop a biotreatment cell to expedite biodegradation of hydrocarbons. Physical characteristics such as soil texture, hydraulic conductivity, and water retention were determined for the petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soil. Soil texture was determined to be loamy sand to sand, and high hydraulic conductivity and low water retention was observed. Temperature appeared to have the greatest influence on biodegradation rates where high temperatures (>50 C) favored biodegradation. High nitrogen content in the form of ammonium enhanced biodegradation as well did the presence of water near field water holding capacity. Urea was not a good source of nitrogen and has detrimental effects for bioremediation for this site soil. Artificial sea water had little effect on biodegradation rates, but biodegradation rates decreased after increasing the concentrations of salts. Biotreatment cell (biocell) tests demonstrated hydrocarbon biodegradation can be enhanced substantially when utilizing a leachate recirculation design where a 72% reduction of hydrocarbon concentration was observed with a 72-h period at a treatment temperature of 50 C. Overall, this study demonstrates the investigation of the effects of

  9. Corrosion mechanism of 13Cr stainless steel in completion fluid of high temperature and high concentration bromine salt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yan; Xu, Lining; Lu, Minxu; Meng, Yao; Zhu, Jinyang; Zhang, Lei

    2014-09-01

    A series of corrosion tests of 13Cr stainless steel were conducted in a simulated completion fluid environment of high temperature and high concentration bromine salt. Corrosion behavior of specimens and the component of corrosion products were investigated by means of scanning electron microscope (SEM), confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The results indicate that 13Cr steel suffers from severe local corrosion and there is always a passive halo around every pit. The formation mechanism of the passive halo is established. OH- ligand generates and adsorbs in a certain scale because of abundant OH- on the surface around the pits. Passive film forms around each pit, which leads to the occurrence of passivation in a certain region. Finally, the dissimilarities in properties and morphologies of regions, namely the pit and its corresponding passive halo, can result in different corrosion sensitivities and may promote the formation of macroscopic galvanic pairs

  10. Fission and nuclear fragmentation of silver and bromine nuclei by photons of 1-6 GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The studies of fission and fragmentation of silver and bromine nuclei by Bremsstrahlung photons of 1.6 GeV energy range are presented. The Il ford-KO nuclear emulsion submitted to Bremsstrahlung beams in Deutsches Elektronen Synchrotron (DESY) with total doses of 10'' equivalent photons, was used for nuclear fragment detection. The discrimination of fission and fragmentation events was done analysing angular distribution, range and angles between fragments. The results of fragment range distributions, angular distributions, distributions of angles between fragments, distributions of ratio between range, velocity distributions forward/backward ratio, cross sections of fission and fragmentation, nuclear fissionability and ternary fission frequency are presented and discussed. (M.C.K.)

  11. Variation in concentrations of organochlorines and brominated flame retardants among eggs in abandoned clutches of a terrestrial raptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bustnes, Jan O; Bangjord, Georg; Yoccoz, Nigel G

    2015-01-01

    Bird eggs are often used to measure various pollutants in monitoring programs. In protected species, however, it might only be possible to collect eggs abandoned by the parent birds. In order to assess the appropriateness of abandoned eggs for contaminant monitoring we examined intra-clutch variation in concentrations of 24 halogenated organic pollutants (16 organochlorines [OCs] and 8 brominated flame retardants) in six abandoned tawny owl (Strix aluco) clutches from central Norway. The variation among eggs within a clutch was low for nearly all compounds (intra-class correlation >0.9 both for lipid- and wet weight). This study suggests that abandoned eggs provide a relatively reliable measurement of lipophilic pollutants in clutches of terrestrial raptors such as the tawny owl. PMID:25463262

  12. Atmospheric bromine flux from the coastal Abu Dhabi sabkhat: A ground-water mass-balance investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, W.W.; Sanford, W.E.

    2007-01-01

    A solute mass-balance study of ground water of the 3000 km2 coastal sabkhat (salt flats) of the Emirate of Abu Dhabi, United Arab Emirates, documents an annual bromide loss of approximately 255 metric tons (0.0032 Gmoles), or 85 kg/km2. This value is an order of magnitude greater than previously published direct measurements from the atmosphere over an evaporative environment of a salar in Bolivia. Laboratory evidence, consistent with published reports, suggests that this loss is by vapor transport to the atmosphere. If this bromine flux to the atmosphere is representative of the total earth area of active salt flats then it is a significant, and generally under recognized, input to the global atmospheric bromide flux.

  13. Determination of bromine, chlorine and iodine in environmental aqueous samples by epithermal neutron activation analysis and Compton suppression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landsberger, S.; O'Kelly, D. J.; Braisted, J.; Panno, S.

    2006-01-01

    Halides, particularly Br- and Cl-, have been used as indicators of potential sources of Na+ and Cl- in surface water and groundwater with limited success. Contamination of groundwater and surface water by Na+ and Cl- is a common occurrence in growing urban areas and adversely affects municipal and private water supplies in Illinois and other states, as well as vegetation in environmentally sensitive areas. Neutron activation analysis (NAA) can be effectively used to determine these halogens, but often the elevated concentrations of sodium and chlorine in water samples can give rise to very high detection limits for bromine and iodine due to elevated backgrounds from the activation process. We present a detailed analytical scheme to determine Cl, Br and I in aqueous samples with widely varying Na and Cl concentrations using epithermal NAA in conjunction with Compton suppression. ?? 2006 Akade??miai Kiado??.

  14. The Effects of Oxy-firing Conditions on Gas-phase Mercury Oxidation by Chlorine and Bromine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buitrago, Paula; Silcox, Geoffrey

    2010-06-30

    Bench-scale experiments were conducted in a quartz-lined, natural gas-fired reactor with the combustion air replaced with a blend of 27 mole percent oxygen, with the balance carbon dioxide. Quench rates of 210 and 440 K/s were tested. In the absence of sulfur dioxide, the oxy-firing environment caused a remarkable increase in oxidation of mercury by chlorine. At 400 ppm chlorine (as HCl equivalent), air-firing results in roughly 5 percent oxidation. At the same conditions with oxy-firing, oxidation levels are roughly 80 percent. Oxidation levels with bromine at 25 and 50 ppm (as HBr equivalent) ranged from 80 to 95 percent and were roughly the same for oxy- and air-firing conditions. Kinetic calculations of levels of oxidation at air- and oxy-conditions captured the essential features of the experimental results but have not revealed a mechanistic basis for the oxidative benefits of oxy-firing conditions. Mixtures of 25 ppm bromine and 100 and 400 ppm chlorine gave more than 90 percent oxidation. At all conditions, the effects of quench rate were not significant. The presence of 500 ppm SO2 caused a dramatic decline in the levels of oxidation at all oxy-fired conditions examined. This effect suggests that SO2 may be preventing oxidation in the gas phase or preventing oxidation in the wetconditioning system that was used in quantifying oxidized and elemental mercury concentrations. Similar effects of SO2 have been noted with air-firing. The addition of sodium thiosulfate to the hydroxide impingers that are part of wet conditioning systems may prevent liquid-phase oxidation from occurring.

  15. Brominated flame retardants (BFRs) in indoor and outdoor air in a community in Guangzhou, a megacity of southern China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Nan; Wang, Tao; Chen, She-Jun; Yu, Mei; Zhu, Zhi-Cheng; Tian, Mi; Luo, Xiao-Jun; Mai, Bi-Xian

    2016-05-01

    Indoor environments contribute a significant portion of human exposure to brominated flame retardants (BFRs) because of their extensive use in various household products. This study investigates the occurrence of a number of BFRs in the indoor and outdoor air in a megacity in southern China, in which little information on indoor BFRs contamination is available. The estimated total PBDE concentrations ranged from 1.43 to 57 pg/m(3) indoors and from 1.21 to 1522 pg/m(3) outdoors. The indoor concentrations of lower brominated PBDEs that are mainly derived from the technical penta- and octa-BDE mixtures were higher than or comparable to the outdoors, while the indoor levels of DecaBDEs and decabromodiphenyl ethane (DBDPE) were apparently lower than the outdoors. The seasonal variations of BFR concentrations indicated that evaporation from old indoor products is the primary source of Penta- and OctaBDEs in the air, whereas most DecaBDEs and DBDPE concentrations showing weak temperature-dependence are largely released from industrial activities. The PBDE congener profiles in the air were generally similar, which were dominated by BDE209, 28, and 47; whereas the appreciable indoor-outdoor differences in the compositions are possibly due to emission sources, photochemical degradation, or congener-specific transport of BFRs in the indoor and outdoor air. Significant correlations between the indoor and outdoor BFRs were observed suggesting the exchange of BFRs between the two compartments, which are more noticeable for PentaBDEs and DecaBDEs with strong indoor and outdoor emission sources, respectively. This study provides significant insights into the sources of BFRs in urban air in China. PMID:26952274

  16. Ranges of Iodine and Bromine Isotopes Produced in the Interaction of High-Energy Protons with Uranium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Conventional range experiments using a thick uranium foil together with aluminium catchers and monitors are carried out at the two CERN accelerators with 0.55-GeV and 18.2-GeV protons. Iodine (or bromine) is chemically isolated and separated in the CERN radioisotope separator. This gives carrier-free samples containing essentially only one pure radioactive isotope. The chemical yield is determined also. The analysis of the data gives directly the range for each isotope in uranium. All iodine isotopes have the same range at 0.55-GeV proton energy, i.e. they are all produced in a fission process. It was known previously that neutron-rich iodine isotopes have about the same range whether the proton energy is above or below I GeV, and that neutron-deficient iodine isotopes show a drastic decrease of about one half when the proton energy increases above 1 GeV. It is shown that this decrease in range occurs rather suddenly, giving a step-function in the range - versus - iodine isotopic mass curve. The neutron-deficient isotopes having a decreased range above 1-GeV proton energy are the same as those for which a strong increase in their excitation function above 1 GeV has been observed. Bromine isotopes show essentially the same range behaviour. The strong increase in the production of neutron.-deficient isotopes is again observed at high bombarding energies. The discussion will concentrate on these neutron-deficient isotopes. They are produced essentially only above 1 GeV and have at the higher combarding energy only about one half the range of normal fission products, indicating that they are produced by a process other than fission. These findings will be discussed in the light of ''spallation'' and ''fragmentation'' models, both terms being redefined. (author)

  17. Levels of brominated flame retardants and other pesistent organic pollutants in breast milk samples from Limpopo province, South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The non-occupational exposure to brominated flame retardants, and other persistent organic pollutants (POPs) was studied by collecting human breast milk samples from mothers residing in Thohoyandou area, a rural district in the Limpopo Province, northern part of South Africa (SA). Of all collected samples to be analysed (n = 28), those with large enough milk volumes, (n = 14) were quantified for polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) (9 congeners: BDE-28, 47, 66, 99, 100, 138, 153, 154, and 183) and hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) on a GC equipped with dual capillary columns and dual electron-capture detectors (ECD). The levels of PBDE congeners (median sumBDE 1.3 ng/g of lipids) and of HBCD were not far from levels generally found in European studies, and this study may be the first report on the presence of PBDEs and HBCD in SA breast milk. On a congener basis, the finding of comparably high BDE-183 levels suggests a specific PBDE usage, or contamination situation in SA. Apart from BFRs, the high DDT levels found in the breast milk from this area (median and maximum sumDDT levels of about 4 600 and over 20 000 ng/g of lipids, respectively; n = 28) have earlier been reported. In addition, other POPs (PCBs, HCB and HCHs) were found in SA breast milk, at relatively low levels. To conclude, measurable levels of PBDEs and HBCD, and a specific BDE congener pattern, were found in breast milk from the Limpopo province, SA. A number of other POPs, including DDTs in high levels, were also present. - Highlights: → Persistent organic pollutants (POPs) were analysed in South African breast milk. → Focus of interest were brominated flame retardants (BRFs). → Sampling area was the rural Limpopo Province, northern SA. → Probably the first reported African data on BFRs (PBDEs, HBCD) in breast milk. → Reported BFR data similar to European levels.

  18. In vitro effects of brominated flame retardants and metabolites on CYP17 catalytic activity: A novel mechanism of action?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fire incidents have decreased significantly over the last 20 years due, in part, to regulations requiring addition of flame retardants (FRs) to consumer products. Five major classes of brominated flame retardants (BFRs) are hexabromocyclododecane isomers (HBCDs), tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA) and three commercial mixtures of penta-, octa- and deca-polybrominated diphenyl ether (PBDE) congeners, which are used extensively as commercial FR additives. Furthermore, concentrations of PBDEs have been rapidly increasing during the 1999s in human breast milk and a number of endocrine effects have been reported. We used the H295R human adrenocortical carcinoma cell line to assess possible effects of some of these BFRs (PBDEs and several of their hydroxylated (OH) and methoxylated (CH3O) metabolites or analogues), TBBPA and brominated phenols (BPs) on the combined 17α-hydroxylase and 17,20-lyase activities of CYP17. CYP17 enzyme catalyzes an important step in sex steroidogenesis and is responsible for the biosynthesis of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and androstenedione in the adrenals. In order to study possible interactions with BFRs, a novel enzymatic method was developed. The precursor substrate of CYP17, pregnenolone, was added to control and exposed H295R cells, and enzymatic production of DHEA was measured using a radioimmunoassay. In order to avoid pregnenolone metabolism via different pathways, specific chemical inhibitor compounds were used. None of the parent/precursor BFRs had a significant effect (P 3O group eliminated this cytotoxic effect, but CYP17 activity measured as DHEA production was still significantly inhibited. Other OH- or CH3O-PBDE analogues were used to elucidate possible structural properties behind this CYP17 inhibition and associated cytotoxicity, but no distinct structure activity relationship could be determined. These in vitro results indicate that OH and CH3O-PBDEs have potential to interfere with CYP17 activity for which the in vivo

  19. THE UPTAKE OF AROMATIC AND BRANCHED CHAIN HYDROCARBONS BY YEAST

    Science.gov (United States)

    Studies of the hydrocarbon utilizing yeasts, Candida maltosa and C. lipolytica, have shown that both were capable of reducing recoverable amounts of branched chain and aromatic hydrocarbons in a mixture of naphthalene, tetradecane, hexadecane, pristane (tetra-methylpentadecane). ...

  20. Methane conversion to hydrocarbons by double discharge

    OpenAIRE

    Ghorbanzadeh, A. M.; M. A. Khodagholi; N. S. Matin; S. Norouzi; M. T. Mohammadi

    2004-01-01

      Methane conversion to higher hydrocarbons by pulsed glow discharge at the atmospheric pressure was investigated. The energy efficiency up to 10 % was obtained which is higher than any value ever published for nonequilibrium plasma conversion of pure methame. This method has a potential for development and it is expected that the energy efficiency will be improved further if the plasma parameters are optimized.

  1. Hydrocarbons in Argentina: networks, territories, integration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Argentinean hydrocarbons networks have lived a huge reorganizing the structure, after the State reform in the 90's. Activities deregulation and the privatization of YPF and Gas del Estado forced the sector re-concentration, since then dominated by foreign companies, leaded by Repsol YPF. The hydrocarbons federalization contributed to the weakening and un-capitalization loss of wealth of the State. These changes resulted in an increase of the hydrocarbons production allowing to achieve the self-supply. Nevertheless, the expansion of internal networks has not been large enough to ensure the coverage of new requirements. Besides, several infrastructures have been built up to join external markets. National networks are connected to those of near neighboring countries. This integration is an opportunity for the 'South Cone' countries to enhance their potentials. In the country, hydrocarbons territories undergo the reorganizing the structure effects (unemployment, loss of territorial identity, etc). With many difficulties and very different possibilities, those territories, like Comodoro Rivadavia, Ensenada et and Bahia Blanca, look for their re-invention. (author)

  2. Task 8: Evaluation of hydrocarbon potential

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cashman, P.H.; Trexler, J.H. Jr.

    1994-12-31

    Our studies focus on the stratigraphy of Late Devonian to early Pennsylvanian rocks at the NTS, because these are the best potential hydrocarbon source rocks in the vicinity of Yucca Mountain. In the last year, our stratigraphic studies have broadened to include the regional context for both the Chainman and the Eleana formations. New age data based on biostratigraphy constrain the age ranges of both Chainman and Eleana; accurate and reliable ages are essential for regional correlation and for regional paleogeographic reconstructions. Source rock analyses throughout the Chainman establish whether these rocks contained adequate organic material to generate hydrocarbons. Maturation analyses of samples from the Chainman determine whether the temperature history has been suitable for the generation of liquid hydrocarbons. Structural studies are aimed at defining the deformation histories and present position of the different packages of Devonian - Pennsylvanian rocks. This report summarizes new results of our structural, stratigraphic and hydrocarbon source rock potential studies at the Nevada Test Site and vicinity. Stratigraphy is considered first, with the Chainman Shale and Eleana Formation discussed separately. New biostratigraphic results are included in this section. New results from our structural studies are summarized next, followed by source rock and maturation analyses of the Chainman Shale. Directions for future work are included where appropriate.

  3. Site characterization and petroleum hydrocarbon plume mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ravishankar, K. [Harding Lawson Associates, Houston, TX (United States)

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a case study of site characterization and hydrocarbon contamination plume mapping/delineation in a gas processing plant in southern Mexico. The paper describes innovative and cost-effective use of passive (non-intrusive) and active (intrusive) techniques, including the use of compound-specific analytical methods for site characterization. The techniques used, on a demonstrative basis, include geophysical, geochemical, and borehole drilling. Geochemical techniques used to delineate the horizontal extent of hydrocarbon contamination at the site include soil gas surveys. The borehole drilling technique used to assess the vertical extent of contamination and confirm geophysical and geochemical data combines conventional hollow-stem auguring with direct push-probe using Geoprobe. Compound-specific analytical methods, such as hydrocarbon fingerprinting and a modified method for gasoline range organics, demonstrate the inherent merit and need for such analyses to properly characterize a site, while revealing the limitations of noncompound-specific total petroleum hydrocarbon analysis. The results indicate that the techniques used in tandem can properly delineate the nature and extent of contamination at a site; often supplement or complement data, while reducing the risk of errors and omissions during the assessment phase; and provide data constructively to focus site-specific remediation efforts. 7 figs.

  4. Energy additivity in branched and cyclic hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gao, H.; Bader, R.F.W. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). Dept. of Chemistry; Cortes-Guzman, F. [Univ. Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, (Mexico). Dept. de Fisicoquimica

    2009-11-15

    This paper reported on a study of the energetic relationships between hydrocarbon molecules and the heats of formation. The quantum theory of atoms in molecules (QTAIM) was used to investigate the degree to which branched hydrocarbons obey a group additivity scheme for energy and populations. The QTAIM defined the properties of the chemical groups. The experimental and theoretical transferability of the methyl and methylene groups of the linear hydrocarbons was also explored. The calculations were performed using a large basis set at the restricted Hartree-Fock and MP2(full) levels of theory. The study also investigated the deviations from additivity, noted for small ring hydrocarbons leading to the definition of strain energy. The QTAIM energies recovered the experimental values. The paper included details regarding the delocalization of the electron density over the surface of the cyclopropane ring, responsible for its homoaromatic properties. The calculations presented in this study satisfied the virial theorem for the atomic definition of energy. The paper discussed the problems associated with the use of the density functional theory (DFT) resulting from its failure to satisfy the virial theorem. 44 refs., 9 tabs., 2 figs.

  5. Method of dispersing a hydrocarbon using bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyndall, Richard L.

    1996-01-01

    New protozoan derived microbial consortia and method for their isolation are provided. Consortia and bacteria isolated therefrom are useful for treating wastes such as trichloroethylene and trinitrotoluene. Consortia, bacteria isolated therefrom, and dispersants isolated therefrom are useful for dispersing hydrocarbons such as oil, creosote, wax, and grease.

  6. Method for recovering hydrocarbons from molten metal halides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pell, Melvyn B.

    1979-01-01

    In a process for hydrocracking heavy carbonaceous materials by contacting such carbonaceous materials with hydrogen in the presence of a molten metal halide catalyst to produce hydrocarbons having lower molecular weights and thereafter recovering the hydrocarbons so produced from the molten metal halide, an improvement comprising injecting into the spent molten metal halide, a liquid low-boiling hydrocarbon stream is disclosed.

  7. Control and assessment of the hydrocarbon contamination of Ukrainian soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miroshnichenko, N. N.

    2008-05-01

    Regularities governing the self-purification of soils from oil hydrocarbons, as well as migration of hydrocarbons, and the effect on the water-physical properties and fertility of soils were revealed in a series of experiments. A system of ecological, economic, and reclamation standards was proposed for regulating economic activities in the case of soil contamination with hydrocarbons.

  8. 40 CFR 86.331-79 - Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 18 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. 86....331-79 Hydrocarbon analyzer calibration. The following steps are followed in sequence to calibrate the hydrocarbon analyzer. It is suggested, but not required, that efforts be made to minimize relative...

  9. 40 CFR 721.4365 - Substituted ethoxylated hydrocarbon (generic).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Substituted ethoxylated hydrocarbon... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.4365 Substituted ethoxylated hydrocarbon (generic). (a) Chemical... as Substituted ethoxylated hydrocarbon (PMN P-99-0313) is subject to reporting under this section...

  10. 40 CFR 721.4380 - Modified hydrocarbon resin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 30 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Modified hydrocarbon resin. 721.4380... Substances § 721.4380 Modified hydrocarbon resin. (a) Chemical substance and significant new uses subject to reporting. (1) The chemical substance identified generically as a modified hydrocarbon resin (P-91-1418)...

  11. 27 CFR 21.125 - Rubber hydrocarbon solvent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 27 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. 21.125 Section 21.125 Alcohol, Tobacco Products and Firearms ALCOHOL AND TOBACCO TAX AND TRADE BUREAU....125 Rubber hydrocarbon solvent. (a) Rubber hydrocarbon solvent is a petroleum derivative....

  12. 40 CFR 721.840 - Alkyl substituted diaromatic hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... hydrocarbons. 721.840 Section 721.840 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... Specific Chemical Substances § 721.840 Alkyl substituted diaromatic hydrocarbons. (a) Chemical substance... alkyl substituted di-aro-matic hydrocarbons (PMN P-91-710) is subject to reporting under this...

  13. 40 CFR 503.44 - Operational standard-total hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... hydrocarbons. 503.44 Section 503.44 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED... standard—total hydrocarbons. (a) The total hydrocarbons concentration in the exit gas from a sewage sludge incinerator shall be corrected for zero percent moisture by multiplying the measured total...

  14. Cuticular hydrocarbons from the bed bug Cimex lectularius L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pentane extracts of male and female bed bugs were analyzed by gas chromatography and mass spectrometry in an effort to identify cuticular hydrocarbons. Seventeen hydrocarbons accounting for nearly 99% of the compounds eluting in the cuticular hydrocarbon region were identified. The sample contained ...

  15. 21 CFR 178.3650 - Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons. 178.3650... SANITIZERS Certain Adjuvants and Production Aids § 178.3650 Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons. Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons may be safely used, as a component of nonfood articles intended for use...

  16. 21 CFR 172.884 - Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 3 2010-04-01 2009-04-01 true Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons. 172.884... HUMAN CONSUMPTION Multipurpose Additives § 172.884 Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons. Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons may be safely used in food, in accordance with the following prescribed...

  17. 21 CFR 573.740 - Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 6 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons. 573.740... ANIMALS Food Additive Listing § 573.740 Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons. Odorless light petroleum hydrocarbons complying with § 172.884(a) and (b) of this chapter may be safely used in an amount not in...

  18. POTENTIAL HYDROCARBON PRODUCING SPECIES OF WESTERN GHATS, TAMIL, NADU, INDIA

    Science.gov (United States)

    The decline in the world supplies of hydrocarbons has lead to the search for alternate sources of fuel and chemicals. Plant species are potential sources of hydrocarbons. Large-scale screening of plants growing in the Western Ghats, Tamil Nadu, India was conducted to assess the hydrocarbon productio...

  19. Green Methodologies to Test Hydrocarbon Reservoirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Verga

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The definition and the economic viability of the best development strategy of a hydrocarbon reservoir mainly depend on the quantity and type of fluids and on the well productivity. Well testing, consisting in producing hydrocarbon to the surface while measuring the pressure variations induced in the reservoir, has been used for decades to determine the fluid nature and well potential. In exploration and appraisal scenarios the hydrocarbons produced during a test are flared, contributing to the emissions of greenhouse gases. Approach: Due to more stringent environmental regulations and a general need for reduced operating expenses, the current industry drivers in today’s formation evaluation methodologies demand short, safe, cost-effective and environmentally friendly test procedures, especially when conventional tests are prohibitively expensive, logistically not feasible or no surface emissions are allowed. Different methods have been proposed or resuscitated in the last years, such as wireline formation tests, closed chamber tests, production/reinjection tests and injection tests, as viable alternatives to conventional well testing. Results: While various short-term tests, test procedures and interpretation methods are apparently available for conducting successful tests without hydrocarbon production at the surface, clarity is lacking for specific applications of these techniques. An attempt to clarify advantages and limitations of each methodology, particularly with respect to the main testing target is pursued in this study. Specific insight is provided on injection testing, which is one of the most promising methodology to replace traditional well testing in reservoir characterization, except for the possibility to sample the formation fluids. Conclusion/Recommendations: Not a single one method but a combination of more methodologies, in particular injection testing and wireline formation testing, is the most promising

  20. Analysis of hydrocarbons generated in coalbeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butala, Steven John M.

    This dissertation describes kinetic calculations using literature data to predict formation rates and product yields of oil and gas at typical low-temperature conditions in coalbeds. These data indicate that gas formation rates from hydrocarbon thermolysis are too low to have generated commercial quantities of natural gas, assuming bulk first-order kinetics. Acid-mineral-catalyzed cracking, transition-metal-catalyzed hydrogenolysis of liquid hydrocarbons, and catalyzed CO2 hydrogenation form gas at high rates. The gaseous product compositions for these reactions are nearly the same as those for typical natural coalbed gases, while those from thermal and catalytic cracking are more representative of atypical coalbed gases. Three Argonne Premium Coals (Upper-Freeport, Pittsburgh #8 and Lewiston-Stockton) were extracted with benzene in both Soxhlet and elevated pressure extraction (EPE) systems. The extracts were compared on the basis of dry mass yield and hydrocarbon profiles obtained by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The dry mass yields for the Upper-Freeport coal gave consistent results by both methods, while the yields from the Pittsburgh #8 and Lewiston-Stockton coals were greater by the EPE method. EPE required ˜90 vol. % less solvent compared to Soxhlet extraction. Single-ion-chromatograms of the Soxhlet extracts all exhibited bimodal distributions, while those of the EPE extracts did not. Hydrocarbons analyzed from Greater Green River Basin samples indicate that the natural oils in the basin originated from the coal seams. Analysis of artificially produced oil indicates that hydrous pyrolysis mimics generation of C15+ n-alkanes, but significant variations were found in the branched alkane, low-molecular-weight n-alkanes, and high-molecular-weight aromatic hydrocarbon distributions.

  1. Comparison of fluorine-18 and bromine-76 imaging in positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, M.J.; Ferreira, N. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, CEA, Orsay (France)]|[Servico de Biofisica - IBILI - FMC, Coimbra (Portugal); Almeida, P.; Strul, D.; Loc`h, C.; Brulon, V.; Trebossen, R.; Maziere, B.; Bendriem, B. [Service Hospitalier Frederic Joliot, CEA, Orsay (France)

    1999-07-01

    State of the art positron emission tomography (PET) systems allow for scatter and attenuation correction. However, the size of the structure being studied and the region of interest (ROI) chosen also influence the accuracy of measurements of radioactive concentration. Furthermore, the limited spatial resolution of PET tomographs, which depends, among other factors, on the range of positrons in matter, can also contribute to a loss in quantitation accuracy. In this paper we address the influence of positron range, structure size and ROI size on the quantitation of radioactive concentration using PET. ECAT EXACT HR+ (HR+) and ECAT 953B/31 (ECAT 953B) PET systems were used in phantom acquisitions performed with two radioisotopes with different positron ranges. The 3D Hoffman phantom was scanned on both scanners with both radioisotopes, to visually analyse the image quality. A resolution phantom having six spheres of different diameters in a Plexiglas cylinder was used to calculate the values of the contrast recovery coefficient or hot spot recovery coefficient and of the spill-over or cold spot recovery coefficient under different imaging conditions used in clinical routine at our institution. Activity ratios were varied between 2 and 30 or between 0.4 and 200 by filling the spheres with fluorine-18 or bromine-76 respectively and the cylinder with {sup 11}C. Dynamic scans were performed on each scanner. Data were reconstructed using the same parameters as are used in clinical protocols. The variations in sphere and cylinder activities with time were fitted using the function M(t)=k{sub 1}.A(t)+k{sub 2}.B(t), where M(t) is the radioactivity concentration measured in an ROI placed on each sphere and A(t) and B(t) represent the true radioactivity concentrations present at time t in the spheres and in the cylinder respectively. k{sub 1} and k{sub 2} are factors representing the contrast recovery coefficient and the spill-over from surrounding activity on measurements

  2. Modeling and experimental studies to optimize the performance of a hydrogen - bromine fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarlagadda, Venkata Raviteja

    The regenerative Hydrogen-Bromine (H2-Br 2) fuel cells are considered to be one of the viable systems for large scale energy storage because of their high energy conversion efficiency, flexible operation, highly reversible reactions and low capital cost. The preliminary performance of a H2-Br2 fuel cell using both conventional as well as novel materials (Nafion and electrospun composite membranes along with platinum and rhodium sulfide electrocatalysts) was discussed. A maximum power density of 0.65 W/cm2 was obtained with a thicker Br 2 electrode (780 mum) and cell temperature of 45°C. The active area and wetting characteristics of Br2 electrodes were improved upon by either pre-treating with HBr or boiling them in de-ionized water. On the other hand, similar or better performances were obtained using dual fiber electrospun composite membranes (maximum power densities of 0.61 W/cm2 and 0.45 W/cm2 obtained with 25 mum and 65 mum electrospun membranes at 45°C) versus using Nafion membranes (maximum power densities of 0.52 W/cm 2 and 0.41 W/cm2 obtained with Nafion 212 and Nafion 115 membranes at 45°C). The rhodium sulfide (RhxSy) electrocatalyst proved to be more stable in the presence of HBr/Br2 than pure Pt. However, the H2 oxidation activity on RhxS y was quite low compared to that of Pt. In conclusion, a stable H 2 electrocatalyst that can match the hydrogen oxidation activity obtained with Pt and a membrane with low Br2/Br- permeability are essential to prolong the lifetime of a H2-Br2 fuel cell. A 1D mathematical model was developed to serve as a theoretical guiding tool for the experimental studies. The impact of convective and diffusive transport and kinetic rate on the performance of a H2-Br2 fuel cell is shown in this study. Of the two flow designs (flow-by and flow-through) incorporated in this study, the flow-through design demonstrated better performance, which can be attributed to the dominant convective transport inside the porous electrode. Both

  3. Current Situation and Application in Coal- Generated Hydrocarbons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Guang; XU Hongdong

    2001-01-01

    The characteristics and research methods of terrigenous organic hydrocarbon - generated source rock in coal measures are studied in this thesis. After abundance of organic matters, pyrolysis parameter of rocks and hydrocarbon generated capacity of macerals are basically discussed in coal measures of the Cretaceous Muleng- Chengzihe formation in Suibin depression in Sanjang basin, the hydrocarbon generated grade in coal- generated source rock is ascertained in this depression. At last, we think that it is a main attack prospect in coal - generated hydrocarbons study in the future to research the macerals of coal measures organic source rock and to build a criterion to classify the coal- generated hydrocarbons in Northeast region.

  4. Preparation of radiopharmaceuticals labelled with bromine positron emitting isotopes for the study of dopaminergic receptors of the central nervous system using positron emission tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The in vivo study of dopaminergic receptors of the central nervous system using positron emission tomography requires the preparation of radiopharmaceuticals labelled with β+ emitting isotopes. The chemical and pharmacological properties of these ligands are evaluated. Cyclotron produced 75 and 76 bromine β+ emitting isotopes are incorporated into dopaminergic ligands by electrophilic substitution using peracetic acid in a no-carrier added form. Purity, lipophilicity and specific activity are analyzed. Pharmacological criteria (specificity, saturability, displacement, localization) required for ligand-receptor binding studies are evaluated in vitro on striatal membranes and in vivo in the rat. Positron emission tomographic studies show that the study of dopaminergic D2 receptors is possible using 75 and 76 bromine labelled bromospiperone and bromolisuride. These ligands are used in physiological and pharmacological studies of the central nervous system

  5. Standard test method for determination of bromine and chlorine in UF6 and uranyl nitrate by X-Ray fluorescence (XRF) spectroscopy

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2001-01-01

    1.1 This method covers the determination of bromine (Br) and chlorine (Cl) in uranium hexafluoride (UF6) and uranyl nitrate solution. The method as written covers the determination of bromine in UF6 over the concentration range of 0.2 to 8 μg/g, uranium basis. The chlorine in UF6 can be determined over the range of 4 to 160 μg/g, uranium basis. Higher concentrations may be covered by appropriate dilutions. The detection limit for Br is 0.2 μg/g uranium basis and for Cl is 4 μg/g uranium basis. 1.2 This standard may involve hazardous materials, operations and equipment. This standard does not purport to address all of the safety concerns, if any, associated with its use. It is the responsibility of the user of this standard to establish appropriate safety and health practices and determine the applicability of regulatory limitations prior to use.

  6. Stereoselective Chlorination and Bromination of Enamides and Enamines via an Electrostatic Attraction Effect Using (1,1-Diacetoxyiodo)benzene and a Halide Source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Linlin; Li, Chunbao

    2015-10-16

    The direct chlorination and bromination of (E)-enamines and (Z)-enamides to the corresponding (Z)-configurated α-chloroenamines, α-bromoenamines, and α-chloroenamides have been realized using NiCl2·6H2O or tetrabutyl ammonium bromide as a halide source and (1,1-diacetoxyiodo)benzene as an oxidant. The high stereoselective reactions which produce products with only (Z)-configurations can be attributed to the structure of the intermediates, the conformations of which are controlled by the electrostatic attractions between the positively charged nitrogen atoms and the oxygen atoms of the carbonyl group. This type of electrostatic effect has never been reported in olefin halogenations. For this reason, the three-membered bromonium ion is only a minor intermediate in the enamine bromination pathway. These methods open pathways to prepare α-chloroenamines and α-chloroenamides, which are not accessible via the currently used methods. PMID:26421836

  7. Evaluation of N-ethyl-N-methyl-morpholinium bromide and N-ethyl-N-methyl-pyrrolidinium bromide as bromine complexing agents in vanadium bromide redox flow batteries

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Evolution of bromine gas in the positive half cell of the Generation 2 (G2) vanadium bromide (V/Br) battery during charging is a concern which can be resolved by the use of bromine complexing agents. In this paper, for the first time, we report the effect of the addition of two quaternary ammonium bromides; N-ethyl-N-methyl-morpholinium bromide (MEM) and N-ethyl-N-methyl-pyrrolidinium bromide (MEP) to the positive and negative half cell electrolytes of the V/Br. Cyclic voltammetry (CV), linear sweep voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) studies showed that the addition of MEM–MEP effectively reduce Br2 vapours. Although the presence of MEM and MEP did not affect the mechanism of the electrode reactions, performance tests conducted in lab scale V/Br cells employing the VF11 cation exchange membrane resulted in lower average cell efficiencies possibly due to the increase in membrane resistance caused by membrane fouling

  8. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-09-06

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  9. Catalytic conversion of alcohols to hydrocarbons with low benzene content

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narula, Chaitanya K.; Davison, Brian H.; Keller, Martin

    2016-03-08

    A method for converting an alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction having a lowered benzene content, the method comprising: converting said alcohol to a hydrocarbon fraction by contacting said alcohol, under conditions suitable for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, with a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon fraction, and contacting said hydrocarbon fraction with a benzene alkylation catalyst, under conditions suitable for alkylating benzene, to form alkylated benzene product in said hydrocarbon fraction. Also described is a catalyst composition useful in the method, comprising a mixture of (i) a metal-loaded zeolite catalyst catalytically active for converting said alcohol to said hydrocarbon, and (ii) a benzene alkylation catalyst, in which (i) and (ii) may be in a mixed or separated state. A reactor for housing the catalyst and conducting the reaction is also described.

  10. What’s in the Pool? A Comprehensive Identification of Disinfection By-Products and Assessment of Mutagenicity of Chlorinated and Brominated Swimming Pool Water

    OpenAIRE

    Richardson, S.D.; Demarini, D.M.; Kogevinas, M; Fernandez, P.; Marco, E.; Lourencetti, C.; Balleste, C.; Heederik, D; Meliefste, K.; McKague, A.B.; Marcos, R.; Font-Ribera, L.; J.O. Grimalt; Villanueva, C M

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Swimming pool disinfectants and disinfection by-products (DBPs) have been linked to human health effects, including asthma and bladder cancer, but no studies have provided a comprehensive identification of DBPs in the water and related that to mutagenicity. OBJECTIVES: We performed a comprehensive identification of DBPs and disinfectant species in waters from public swimming pools in Barcelona, Catalonia, Spain, that disinfect with either chlorine or bromine, and we determined the...

  11. Quorum Sensing-Disrupting Brominated Furanones Protect the Gnotobiotic Brine Shrimp Artemia franciscana from Pathogenic Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio campbellii, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus Isolates†

    OpenAIRE

    Defoirdt, Tom; Crab, Roselien; Wood, Thomas K.; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Verstraete, Willy; Bossier, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Autoinducer 2 (AI-2) quorum sensing was shown before to regulate the virulence of Vibrio harveyi towards the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana. In this study, several different pathogenic V. harveyi, Vibrio campbellii, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolates were shown to produce AI-2. Furthermore, disruption of AI-2 quorum sensing by a natural and a synthetic brominated furanone protected gnotobiotic Artemia from the pathogenic isolates in in vivo challenge tests.

  12. Synthesis and antimicrobial evaluation of some novel 2-imino-3-(4′-carboxamido pyridyl)-5-arylidene-4-thiazolidinones and their brominated derivatives

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra P; Lukose T; Kashaw S

    2007-01-01

    Various novel 2-Imino-3-(4′-carboxamidopyridyl)-5-arylidene-4-thiazolidinones, structurally related to isonicotinic acid hydrazide (isoniazid) were synthesized and evaluated for their antimicrobial and antifungal activities together with their brominated products. Structure of the synthesized compounds was confirmed by means of their IR, 1 H-NMR spectral data and elemental analysis. Investigation of antimicrobial and antifungal activities of compounds was done by liquid dilution metho...

  13. Recent Development on Environmental Geochemistry of Bromine in Atmosphere%大气中溴的环境地球化学研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    彭炳先; 吴代赦; 李萍

    2011-01-01

    溴是大气平流层和对流层中的重要物种,能参与大气中的多种化学过程,对臭氧的损耗影响很大,同时也干扰大气的硫循环和汞循环,在大气化学中起着十分重要的作用.综述了近年来大气对流层和平流层溴的种类和含量、自然来源和人为来源,以及化学性质,并重点总结了活性溴物种BrO在大气中的存在情况及其在臭氧损耗中的作用.最后,提出了目前大气研究的不足之处和尚待深入开展研究的一些重要科学问题.%Bromine species are important components in troposphere and stratosphere, which can participate in many atmospheric chemical processes, play important role in the ozone depletion, and affect sulfur and mercury cycle of atmosphere. This paper provides an up-to-date overview of global bromine emissions from natural and anthropogenic sources, summarizes the level, species and chemistry of bromine in troposphere and stratosphere, and especially reviews the presence and important role of BrO of reactive bromine species in the ozone depletion. Finally,the shortcomings in current atmospheric research and prospect of main scientific problems are put forward.

  14. Quorum Sensing-Disrupting Brominated Furanones Protect the Gnotobiotic Brine Shrimp Artemia franciscana from Pathogenic Vibrio harveyi, Vibrio campbellii, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus Isolates†

    Science.gov (United States)

    Defoirdt, Tom; Crab, Roselien; Wood, Thomas K.; Sorgeloos, Patrick; Verstraete, Willy; Bossier, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Autoinducer 2 (AI-2) quorum sensing was shown before to regulate the virulence of Vibrio harveyi towards the brine shrimp Artemia franciscana. In this study, several different pathogenic V. harveyi, Vibrio campbellii, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus isolates were shown to produce AI-2. Furthermore, disruption of AI-2 quorum sensing by a natural and a synthetic brominated furanone protected gnotobiotic Artemia from the pathogenic isolates in in vivo challenge tests. PMID:16957276

  15. Coupled evolution of BrOx-ClOx-HOx-NOx chemistry during bromine-catalyzed ozone depletion events in the arctic boundary layer

    OpenAIRE

    M. J. Evans; Jacob, Daniel James; Atlas, E.; Cantrell, C; Eisele, F.; Flocke, F.; Fried, A.; Mauldin, R; Ridley, B.; Wert, B; Talbot, R.; Blake, D.; B. Heikes; Snow, J.; Walega, J

    2003-01-01

    Extensive chemical characterization of ozone (O3) depletion events in the Arctic boundary layer during the TOPSE aircraft mission in March–May 2000 enables analysis of the coupled chemical evolution of bromine (BrOx), chlorine (ClOx), hydrogen oxide (HOx) and nitrogen oxide (NOx) radicals during these events. We project the TOPSE observations onto an O3 chemical coordinate to construct a chronology of radical chemistry during O3 depletion events, and we compare this chronology to results from...

  16. Dependence of the vertical distribution of bromine monoxide in the lower troposphere on meteorological factors such as wind speed and stability

    OpenAIRE

    Peterson, P K; Simpson, W. R.; K. A. Pratt; P. B. Shepson; U. Frieß; J. Zielcke; Platt, U.; Walsh, S J; S. V. Nghiem

    2015-01-01

    Multiple axis differential absorption spectroscopy (MAX-DOAS) measurements of bromine monoxide (BrO) probed the vertical structure of halogen activation events during March–May 2012 at Barrow, Alaska. An analysis of the BrO averaging kernels and degrees of freedom obtained by optimal-estimation-based inversions from raw MAX-DOAS measurements reveals the information is best represented by reducing the retrieved BrO profile to two ...

  17. Noble gas and hydrocarbon tracers in multiphase unconventional hydrocarbon systems: Toward integrated advanced reservoir simulators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrah, T.; Moortgat, J.; Poreda, R. J.; Muehlenbachs, K.; Whyte, C. J.

    2015-12-01

    Although hydrocarbon production from unconventional energy resources has increased dramatically in the last decade, total unconventional oil and gas recovery from black shales is still less than 25% and 9% of the totals in place, respectively. Further, the majority of increased hydrocarbon production results from increasing the lengths of laterals, the number of hydraulic fracturing stages, and the volume of consumptive water usage. These strategies all reduce the economic efficiency of hydrocarbon extraction. The poor recovery statistics result from an insufficient understanding of some of the key physical processes in complex, organic-rich, low porosity formations (e.g., phase behavior, fluid-rock interactions, and flow mechanisms at nano-scale confinement and the role of natural fractures and faults as conduits for flow). Noble gases and other hydrocarbon tracers are capably of recording subsurface fluid-rock interactions on a variety of geological scales (micro-, meso-, to macro-scale) and provide analogs for the movement of hydrocarbons in the subsurface. As such geochemical data enrich the input for the numerical modeling of multi-phase (e.g., oil, gas, and brine) fluid flow in highly heterogeneous, low permeability formations Herein we will present a combination of noble gas (He, Ne, Ar, Kr, and Xe abundances and isotope ratios) and molecular and isotopic hydrocarbon data from a geographically and geologically diverse set of unconventional hydrocarbon reservoirs in North America. Specifically, we will include data from the Marcellus, Utica, Barnett, Eagle Ford, formations and the Illinois basin. Our presentation will include geochemical and geological interpretation and our perspective on the first steps toward building an advanced reservoir simulator for tracer transport in multicomponent multiphase compositional flow (presented separately, in Moortgat et al., 2015).

  18. Emissions of brominated flame retardants in Asia: consideration of its potential risk form the view point of the Norwegian regulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kikuchi, Ryunosuke; Gerardo, Romeu; Gorbacheva, Tamara

    2010-05-01

    Flame retardants can be divided into two broad categories: additive or reactive, which can be further more divided into brominated or non-brominated sub-categories. These retardants are found in many commercial products such as computers, television sets, furniture, carpets, etc. They are of environmental concern due to their persistence, potential for bioaccumulation and widespread distribution via atmospheric transport, and possible adverse effects in wildlife and humans. Tetrabromobisphenol-A (TBBPA) is mainly used in electrical and electronic appliances (circuit board in particular), and the application of TBBPA accounts for about two thirds of the global production of brominated flame retardant (BFR). The European Union Risk Assessment does not support the restriction of TBBPA: i.e. no risk is identified for the reactive use of TBBPA such as in epoxy resin used in circuit boards. By contrast, in 2007 Norway notified the World Trade Organization of its intention to prohibit 18 substances from consumer goods (Notification No. 2007/9016/N), called the Prohibition on Certain Hazardous Substances in Consumer Products (PoHS). TBBPA is listed in this prohibition list. Marine conservation is recognized as a key issue in Norwegian fishery management e.g. wastewater management in the framework of the North Sea Declarations. TBBPA is very water-soluble, and dimethyl-TBBPA is lipophilic and may accumulate in fat. TBBPA is not readily biodegradable and can have long-term effects in the aquatic environment. Norwegian examples are summarized: TBBPA was found in marine sediment samples from Tromsø harbor (northern Norway) and in Atlantic cod from Lofoten and Varanger; TBBPA has been detected in Norwegian peregrine falcon and golden eagle eggs; and TBBPA has been detected in the blood in the general population of Norway. From these viewpoints, it can be considered that Norway needs to strictly control TBBPA emissions. In recent times, Asia has emerged as one of the leading

  19. Ultraviolet/Ozone as a Tool To Control Grafting Density in Surface-Initiated Controlled-Radical Polymerizations via Ablation of Bromine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheridan, Richard J; Orski, Sara V; Muramoto, Shin; Stafford, Christopher M; Beers, Kathryn L

    2016-08-16

    We used an ultraviolet-ozone (UVO) cleaner to create substrates for atom-transfer radical polymerization (ATRP) with varying surface initiator coverage. We collected complementary time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry (ToF-SIMS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) measurements to investigate the precise chemical origin of the variation in grafting density. At short exposure times, the atomic composition underwent minor changes except for the relative amount of bromine. At longer UVO exposure times, there is clear evidence of exposure-dependent surface initiator oxidation. We interpret these data as evidence of a bromine ablation process within the UVO cleaner, with additional oxidative modification of the rest of the surface. We then used these substrates to create a series of poly(methyl methacrylate) (PMMA) brushes varying in grafting density, demonstrating the utility of this tool for the control of polymer brush density. The measured brush grafting densities were correlated with the bromine concentration measured by both ToF-SIMS and XPS. XPS and brush thicknesses correlated strongly, following an exponential decay with a half-life of 18 ± 1 s. PMID:27442615

  20. Bromine and Chlorine in Aerosols and Fly Ash when Co-Firing Solid Recovered Fuel, Spruce Bark and Paper Mill Sludge in a 80MWth BFB Boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vainikka, P.; Silvennoinen, J.; Yrjas, P.; Frantsi, A.; Hietanen, L.; Hupa, M.; Taipale, R.

    Aerosol and fly ash sampling was carried out at a 80MWth bubbling fluidised bed (BFB) boiler plant co-firing solid recovered fuel (SRF), spruce bark and paper mill wastewater sludge in two experimental conditions. The SRF-Bark ratio in the fuel mix was kept constant at 50%-50% on dry mass basis in both experiments but two sludge proportions were used: 15% and 4% on dry mass basis. Aerosol samples were collected from the superheater region of the boiler furnace and fly ash from the electrostatic precipitator (ESP). Na, K, Cl and S were found to be in mainly water soluble compounds in the aerosols sampled by means of a Dekati type Low Pressure Impactor (DLPI). Bromine was found in several weight percentages in aerosols and it was amongst the main elements in some of the samples collected. Bromine is assumed to mainly originate from flame retarded plastics and textiles in the SRF. According to the measurements, the fate of Br seems to be analogous to the other main halogen, Cl, and its conversion from fuel to aerosols was high, indicating a strong tendency to form bromine salts.

  1. Predictive models for water sources with high susceptibility for bromine-containing disinfection by-product formation: implications for water treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Kalinda; Farré, Maria José; Birt, James; McGree, James; Knight, Nicole

    2015-02-01

    This study examines a matrix of synthetic water samples designed to include conditions that favour brominated disinfection by-product (Br-DBP) formation, in order to provide predictive models suitable for high Br-DBP forming waters such as salinity-impacted waters. Br-DBPs are known to be more toxic than their chlorinated analogues, in general, and their formation may be favoured by routine water treatment practices such as coagulation/flocculation under specific conditions; therefore, circumstances surrounding their formation must be understood. The chosen factors were bromide concentration, mineral alkalinity, bromide to dissolved organic carbon (Br/DOC) ratio and Suwannee River natural organic matter concentration. The relationships between these parameters and DBP formation were evaluated by response surface modelling of data generated using a face-centred central composite experimental design. Predictive models for ten brominated and/or chlorinated DBPs are presented, as well as models for total trihalomethanes (tTHMs) and total dihaloacetonitriles (tDHANs), and bromide substitution factors for the THMs and DHANs classes. The relationships described revealed that increasing alkalinity and increasing Br/DOC ratio were associated with increasing bromination of THMs and DHANs, suggesting that DOC lowering treatment methods that do not also remove bromide such as enhanced coagulation may create optimal conditions for Br-DBP formation in waters in which bromide is present. PMID:25163557

  2. Hydrocarbon potential of the Trinidad area - 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Persad, K.M.

    1978-06-01

    It is recognized that deltaic and associated sands, together with porous marine limestones, form the vast majority of the reservoirs in the major accumulations of hydrocarbons throughout the world. The source of the hydrocarbons is now thought to be kerogen which is generated from the organic content of principally marine shales which are formed in or near the continental shelves. The Trinidad area contains several sedimentary subbasins, most of which consist largely of deltaic and associated sediments. These sediments, like most of the ancient deltas of the world, contain major reserves of oil and gas. Other less important reserves should occur in sporadic (time-wise) porous limestones. The total proven and probable reserves of the Trinidad area are around 5 billion bbl of oil, of which 1.6 billion bbl already have been produced, and over 47 TCF of gas.

  3. Monitor for hydrogen, oxygen, carbon and hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monitors are described of the activity of hydrogen, oxygen and hydrocarbon mixtures designed for use in technological sodium cooling channels of fast reactor power plants. The hydrogen monitor consists of an iron diffusion membrane and an ion pump which maintains a pressure gradient on the membrane. Its supply current is proportional to hydrogen concentration. The oxygen monitor uses the principle of a concentration galvanic element with a solid ceramic electrolyte. The carbon activity monitor is based on a diffusion membrane and the modified chromatographic unit SU-2 with a flame ionization detector. An identical unit is also used for determining hydrocarbons in the cover gas. For these purposes, the unit is provided with a diffusion standard. The results are described of tests of the said analyzers. (author)

  4. Method and apparatus for synthesizing hydrocarbons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colmenares, C.A.; Somorjai, G.A.; Maj, J.J.

    1983-06-21

    A method and apparatus for synthesizing a mixture of hydrocarbons having five carbons or less is disclosed. An equal molar ratio of CO and H/sub 2/ gases is caused to pass through a ThO/sub 2/ catalyst having a surface area of about 80 to 125 m/sup 2//g. The catalyst further includes Na present as a substitutional cation in an amount of about 5 to 10 atom %. At a temperature of about 340 to 360/sup 0/C, and at pressures of about 20 to 50 atm, CH/sub 3/OH is produced in an amount of about 90 wt % of the total hydrocarbon mixture, and comprised 1 mole % of the effluent gas.

  5. Macroporous polymer foams by hydrocarbon templating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shastri, V P; Martin, I; Langer, R

    2000-02-29

    Porous polymeric media (polymer foams) are utilized in a wide range of applications, such as thermal and mechanical insulators, solid supports for catalysis, and medical devices. A process for the production of polymer foams has been developed. This process, which is applicable to a wide range of polymers, uses a hydrocarbon particulate phase as a template for the precipitation of the polymer phase and subsequent pore formation. The use of a hydrocarbon template allows for enhanced control over pore structure, porosity, and other structural and bulk characteristics of the polymer foam. Polymer foams with densities as low as 120 mg/cc, porosity as high as 87%, and high surface areas (20 m(2)/g) have been produced. Foams of poly(l-lactic acid), a biodegradable polymer, produced by this process have been used to engineer a variety of different structures, including tissues with complex geometries such as in the likeness of a human nose. PMID:10696111

  6. The presence of hydrocarbons in southeast Norway

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hanken, Niels Martin; Hansen, Malene Dolberg; Kresten Nielsen, Jesper;

    pyrobitumen occurs as a jet-black, brittle, amorphous, non-fluorescent substance with a specific gravity of about 1.3 g/cm3 and a conchoidal fracture. Earlier analyses have shown great similarities with regard to the stable isotopes d13C in Alum Shale (Middle Cambrian to Lower Ordovician) and pyrobitumen......, indicating that Alum Shale was the most important source rock. Petrographic investigations combined with stable isotope analyses (d13C and d18O) of the cement containing pyrobitumen indicate two phases of hydrocarbon migration. The first phase probably took place in Upper Silurian to Lower Devonian time......, when the Alum Shale entered the oil window. These hydrocarbons are mostly found as pyrobitumen in primary voids and calcite cemented veins in Cambro-Silurian sedimentary deposits. The second phase is probably of Late Carboniferous/Permian age and was due to the increased heat flow during the formation...

  7. Biodegradation of Petroleum Hydrocarbons in Soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Mehrasbi

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Biodegradation of petroleum hydrocarbons (20 g/kg dw soil was investigated in 3 media, differing in the kind of petroleum fractions. In the laboratory experiments, during 5 months, the activities of petroleum hydrocarbon-degrading microorganisms and dehydrogenase activity of soil was determined. Gas chromatographic analysis showed the biological decontaminations for gas oil, kerosene and synthetic mixture (gas oil, kerosene and furnace oil are 60 %, 36 % and 55 %, respectively. Dehydrogenase activity which was assessed by TTC technique, correlated significantly positive with the numbers of microorganisms. The Spearman rank correlation coefficients(r in contaminated soils with gas oil, kerosene and synthetic mixture were 0.79, 0.80 and 0.69, respectively.

  8. CHARACTERISTICS OF HYDROCARBON EXPLOITATION IN ARCTIC CIRCLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanja Lež

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The existence of large quantities of hydrocarbons is supposed within the Arctic Circle. Assumed quantities are 25% of the total undiscovered hydrocarbon reserves on Earth, mostly natural gas. Over 500 major and minor gas accumulations within the Arctic Circle were discovered so far, but apart from Snøhvit gas field, there is no commercial exploitation of natural gas from these fields. Arctic gas projects are complicated, technically hard to accomplish, and pose a great threat to the return of investment, safety of people and equipment and for the ecosystem. Russia is a country that is closest to the realization of the Arctic gas projects that are based on the giant gas fields. The most extreme weather conditions in the seas around Greenland are the reason why this Arctic region is the least explored and furthest from the realization of any gas project (the paper is published in Croatian .

  9. HYDROCARBON-DEGRADING BACTERIA AND SURFACTANT ACTIVITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brigmon, R; Topher Berry, T; Grazyna A. Plaza, G; jacek Wypych, j

    2006-08-15

    Fate of benzene ethylbenzene toluene xylenes (BTEX) compounds through biodegradation was investigated using two different bacteria, Ralstonia picketti (BP-20) and Alcaligenes piechaudii (CZOR L-1B). These bacteria were isolated from extremely polluted petroleum hydrocarbon contaminated soils. PCR and Fatty Acid Methyl Ester (FAME) were used to identify the isolates. Biodegradation was measured using each organism individually and in combination. Both bacteria were shown to degrade each of the BTEX compounds. Alcaligenes piechaudii biodegraded BTEXs more efficiently while mixed with BP-20 and individually. Biosurfactant production was observed by culture techniques. In addition 3-hydroxy fatty acids, important in biosurfactant production, was observed by FAME analysis. In the all experiments toluene and m+p- xylenes were better growth substrates for both bacteria than the other BTEX compounds. In addition, the test results indicate that the bacteria could contribute to bioremediation of aromatic hydrocarbons (BTEX) pollution increase biodegradation through the action by biosurfactants.

  10. Experimental and theoretical analysis of the kinetics of the reaction of atomic bromine with 1,4-dioxane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giri, Binod Raj; Roscoe, John M; González-García, Núria; Olzmann, Matthias

    2010-01-14

    The rate coefficient for the reaction of atomic bromine with 1,4-dioxane was measured from approximately 300 to 340 K using the relative rate method. Iso-octane and iso-butane were used as reference compounds, and the experiments were made in a bath of argon containing up to 210 Torr of O(2) at total pressures between 200 and 820 Torr. The rate coefficients were not affected by changes in pressure or O(2) concentration over our range of experimental conditions. The ratios of rate coefficients for the reaction of dioxane relative to the reference compound were put on an absolute basis by using the published absolute rate coefficients for the reference reactions. The variation of the experimentally determined rate coefficients with temperature for the reaction of Br with 1,4-dioxane can be given by k(1)(exp)(T) = (1.4 +/- 1.0) x 10(-11)exp[-23.0 +/- 1.8) kJ mol(-1)/(RT)] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1). We rationalized our experimental results in terms of transition state theory with molecular data from quantum chemical calculations. Molecular geometries and frequencies were obtained from MP2/aug-cc-pVDZ calculations, and single-point energies of the stationary points were obtained at CCSD(T)/CBS level of theory. The calculations indicate that the 1,4-dioxane + Br reaction proceeds in an overall endothermic addition-elimination mechanism via a number of intermediates. The rate-determining step is a chair-to-boat conformational change of the Br-dioxane adduct. The calculated rate coefficients, given by k(1)(calc)(T) = 5.6 x 10(-11)exp[-26.6 kJ mol(-1)/(RT)] cm(3) molecule(-1) s(-1), are in very good agreement with the experimental values. Comparison with results reported for the reactions of Br with other ethers suggests that this multistep mechanism differs significantly from that for abstraction of hydrogen from other ethers by atomic bromine. PMID:19848396

  11. Enhancement of the volcanogenic "bromine explosion" via reactive nitrogen chemistry (Kīlauea volcano, Hawai'i

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. G. Salerno

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Since the first detection of bromine monoxide in volcanic plumes attention has focused on the atmospheric synthesis and impact of volcanogenic reactive halogens. We report here new measurements of BrO in the volcanic plume emitted from Kīlauea volcano – the first time reactive halogens have been observed in emissions from a hotspot volcano. Observations were carried out by ground-based Differential Optical Absorption Spectroscopy in 2007 and 2008 at Pu'u'O'o crater, and at the 2008 magmatic vent that opened within Halema'uma'u crater. BrO was readily detected in the Halema'uma'u plume (average column amount of 3×1015 molec cm−2 and its abundance was strongly correlated with that of SO2. However, anticorrelation between NO2 and SO2 (and BrO abundances in the same plume strongly suggest an active role of NOx in reactive halogen chemistry. The calculated SO2/BrO molar ratio of ~1600 is comparable to observations at other volcanoes, although the BrO mixing ratio is roughly double that observed elsewhere. While BrO was not observed in the Pu'u'O'o plume this was probably merely a result of the detection limit of our measurements and based on understanding of the Summit and East Rift magmatic system we expect reactive halogens to be formed also in the Pu'u'O'o emissions. If this is correct then based on the long term SO2 flux from Pu'u'O'o we calculate that Kīlauea emits ~480 Mg yr−1 of reactive bromine and may thus represent an

  12. Hydrochloric acid recycling from chlorinated hydrocarbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sowieja, D. [Sulzer Escher Wyss GmbH, Ravensburg (Germany); Schaub, M. [Sulzer Chemtech Ltd., Winterthur (Switzerland)

    1993-12-31

    Chlorinated hydrocarbons present a major ecological hazard since most of them are only poorly biodegradable. Incineration is an economical process for their destruction, however the usually recovered sodium or calcium chlorides do not present a value and their disposal may even be very costly. Recovery of hydrochloric acid may therefore present an economical solution, mainly were large quantities of highly chlorinated compounds can be processed (author) 6 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Process for the preparation of hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a process for the preparation of hydrocarbons, wherein a feed comprising methanol is contacted at reaction conditions with a catalyst. It comprises: a porous carrier material selected from the group comprising silica, alumina, a mixtures thereof; cobalt as a metal component deposited on the porous carrier; and a promoter selected from the group comprising zirconium, titanium, chromium, ruthenium, iron, magnesium, zinc, thorium and uranium

  14. National Gas Survey. Synthesized gaseous hydrocarbon fuels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1978-06-01

    The supply-Technical Advisory Task Force-Synthesized Gaseous Hydrocarbon Fuels considered coal, hydrocarbon liquids, oil shales, tar sands, and bioconvertible materials as potential feedstocks for gaseous fuels. Current status of process technology for each feedstock was reviewed, economic evaluations including sensitivity analysis were made, and constraints for establishment of a synthesized gaseous hydrocarbon fuels industry considered. Process technology is presently available to manufacture gaseous hydrocarbon fuels from each of the feedstocks. In 1975 there were eleven liquid feedstock SNG plants in the United States having a capacity of 1.1 billion SCFD. There can be no contribution of SNG before 1982 from plants using feedstocks other than liquids because there are no plants in operation or under construction as of 1977. Costs for SNG are higher than current regulated prices for U.S. natural gas. Because of large reserves, coal is a prime feedstock candidate although there are major constraints in the area of coal leases, mining and water permits, and others. Commercial technology is available and several new gasification processes are under development. Oil shale is also a feedstock in large supply and commercial process technology is available. There are siting and permit constraints, and water availability may limit the ultimate size of an oil shale processing industry. Under projected conditions, bioconvertible materials are not expected to support the production of large quantities of pipeline quality gas during the next decade. Production of low or medium Btu gas from municipal solid wastes can be expected to be developed in urban areas in conjunction with savings in disposal costs. In the economic evaluations presented, the most significant factor for liquid feedstock plants is the anticipated cost of feedstock and fuel. The economic viability of plants using other feedstocks is primarily dependent upon capital requirements.

  15. Methane conversion to hydrocarbons by double discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Ghorbanzadeh

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available   Methane conversion to higher hydrocarbons by pulsed glow discharge at the atmospheric pressure was investigated. The energy efficiency up to 10 % was obtained which is higher than any value ever published for nonequilibrium plasma conversion of pure methame. This method has a potential for development and it is expected that the energy efficiency will be improved further if the plasma parameters are optimized.

  16. Enumeration of petroleum hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In-situ biological treatment is one among a number of emerging technologies that may be applied to the remediation of contaminated soils and groundwater. In 1985, a surface spill of 1,500 gallons of dielectric transformer oil at the Sandia National Laboratories (HERMES II facility) resulted in contamination of soil up to depths of 160 feet. The extent of contamination and site characteristics favored the application of in-situ bioremediation as a potential remedial technology. The purpose of this research was to enumerate indigenous microbial populations capable of degrading petroleum hydrocarbons. Microbial enumeration and characterization methods suitably adapted for hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria were used as an indicator of the presence of viable microbial consortia in excavated oil samples with hydrocarbon (TPH) concentrations ranging from 300 to 26,850 ppm. Microbial activity was quantified by direct and streak plating soil samples on silica gel media. Effects of toxicity and temperature were studied using batch cultures of hydrocarbon utilizing bacteria (selectively isolated in an enrichment medium), at temperatures of 20 and 35 C. It was concluded from this study that it is possible to isolate native microorganisms from contaminated soils from depths of 60 to 160 feet, and with oil concentration ranging from 300 to 26,850 ppm. About 62% of the microorganisms isolated form the contaminated soil were capable of using contaminant oil as a substrate for growth and metabolism under aerobic conditions. Growth rates were observed to be 50% higher for the highest contaminant concentration at 20 C. Resistance to toxicity to contaminant oil was also observed to be greater at 20 C than at 35 C

  17. Gaseous Hydrocarbon Separations Using Functionalized Ionic Liquids

    OpenAIRE

    Moura Leila; Santini Catherine C.; Costa Gomes Margarida F.

    2016-01-01

    The functionalization of the side chains on the cation or the anion of an ionic liquid is a common approach to tailor its properties for different processes including the separation of gases. In this paper, we present the current state of the art concerning the usage of ionic liquids for hydrocarbon separations. We also show how the functionalization of ionic liquids or the appropriate anion/cation combinations can contribute to the increase of the performance of the ionic liquids for the sep...

  18. Geophysical monitoring in a hydrocarbon reservoir

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caffagni, Enrico; Bokelmann, Goetz

    2016-04-01

    Extraction of hydrocarbons from reservoirs demands ever-increasing technological effort, and there is need for geophysical monitoring to better understand phenomena occurring within the reservoir. Significant deformation processes happen when man-made stimulation is performed, in combination with effects deriving from the existing natural conditions such as stress regime in situ or pre-existing fracturing. Keeping track of such changes in the reservoir is important, on one hand for improving recovery of hydrocarbons, and on the other hand to assure a safe and proper mode of operation. Monitoring becomes particularly important when hydraulic-fracturing (HF) is used, especially in the form of the much-discussed "fracking". HF is a sophisticated technique that is widely applied in low-porosity geological formations to enhance the production of natural hydrocarbons. In principle, similar HF techniques have been applied in Europe for a long time in conventional reservoirs, and they will probably be intensified in the near future; this suggests an increasing demand in technological development, also for updating and adapting the existing monitoring techniques in applied geophysics. We review currently available geophysical techniques for reservoir monitoring, which appear in the different fields of analysis in reservoirs. First, the properties of the hydrocarbon reservoir are identified; here we consider geophysical monitoring exclusively. The second step is to define the quantities that can be monitored, associated to the properties. We then describe the geophysical monitoring techniques including the oldest ones, namely those in practical usage from 40-50 years ago, and the most recent developments in technology, within distinct groups, according to the application field of analysis in reservoir. This work is performed as part of the FracRisk consortium (www.fracrisk.eu); this project, funded by the Horizon2020 research programme, aims at helping minimize the

  19. Acquired and innate immunity to polyaromatic hydrocarbons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polyaromatic hydrocarbons are ubiquitous environmental pollutants that are potent mutagens and carcinogens. Researchers have taken advantage of these properties to investigate the mechanisms by which chemicals cause cancer of the skin and other organs. When applied to the skin of mice, several carcinogenic polyaromatic hydrocarbons have also been shown to interact with the immune system, stimulating immune responses and resulting in the development of antigen-specific T-cell-mediated immunity. Development of cell-mediated immunity is strain-specific and is governed by Ah receptor genes and by genes located within the major histocompatibility complex. CD8+ T cells are effector cells in the response, whereas CD4+ T cells down-regulate immunity. Development of an immune response appears to have a protective effect since strains of mice that develop a cell-mediated immune response to carcinogenic polyaromatic hydrocarbons are less likely to develop tumors when subjected to a polyaromatic hydrocarbon skin carcinogenesis protocol than mice that fail to develop an immune response. With respect to innate immunity, TLR4-deficient C3H/HeJ mice are more susceptible to polyaromatic hydrogen skin tumorigenesis than C3H/HeN mice in which TLR4 is normal. These findings support the hypothesis that immune responses, through their interactions with chemical carcinogens, play an active role in the prevention of chemical skin carcinogenesis during the earliest stages. Efforts to augment immune responses to the chemicals that cause tumors may be a productive approach to the prevention of tumors caused by these agents

  20. Transformations of aromatic hydrocarbons over zeolites

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Voláková, Martina; Žilková, Naděžda; Čejka, Jiří

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 34, 5-7 (2008), s. 439-454. ISSN 0922-6168 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/05/0197; GA AV ČR 1QS400400560; GA AV ČR KJB4040402 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40400503 Keywords : aromatic hydrocarbons * zeolites * alkylation Subject RIV: CF - Physical ; Theoretical Chemistry Impact factor: 0.514, year: 2008