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Sample records for broadly protective monoclonal

  1. Topical gel formulation of broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibody VRC01 confers protection against HIV-1 vaginal challenge in a humanized mouse model

    OpenAIRE

    Veselinovic, Milena; C Preston Neff; Mulder, Leila R.; Akkina, Ramesh

    2012-01-01

    The new generation broadly neutralizing antibody VRC01 against HIV-1 shows great potential as a topically administered microbicide to prevent sexual transmission. We evaluated its efficacy in a RAG-hu humanized mouse model of vaginal HIV-1 transmission. Mice were challenged vaginally with R5 tropic HIV-1 BaL an hour after intravaginal application of the VRC01 (1mg/ml concentration.) gel. A combination of four first generation bNAbs, namely b12, 2F5, 4E10 and 2G12, was used as a positive effic...

  2. Isolation and Characterization of Broad and Ultrapotent Human Monoclonal Antibodies with Therapeutic Activity against Chikungunya Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Scott A; Silva, Laurie A; Fox, Julie M; Flyak, Andrew I; Kose, Nurgun; Sapparapu, Gopal; Khomandiak, Solomiia; Khomadiak, Solomiia; Ashbrook, Alison W; Kahle, Kristen M; Fong, Rachel H; Swayne, Sherri; Doranz, Benjamin J; McGee, Charles E; Heise, Mark T; Pal, Pankaj; Brien, James D; Austin, S Kyle; Diamond, Michael S; Dermody, Terence S; Crowe, James E

    2015-07-01

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-transmitted RNA virus that causes acute febrile infection associated with polyarthralgia in humans. Mechanisms of protective immunity against CHIKV are poorly understood, and no effective therapeutics or vaccines are available. We isolated and characterized human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that neutralize CHIKV infectivity. Among the 30 mAbs isolated, 13 had broad and ultrapotent neutralizing activity (IC50 vaccine development. PMID:26159721

  3. Structural Basis for Recognition of Human Enterovirus 71 by a Bivalent Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ye, Xiaohua; Fan, Chen; Ku, Zhiqiang; Zuo, Teng; Kong, Liangliang; Zhang, Chao; Shi, Jinping; Liu, Qingwei; Chen, Tan; Zhang, Yingyi; Jiang, Wen; Zhang, Linqi; Huang, Zhong; Cong, Yao

    2016-03-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is the main pathogen responsible for hand, foot and mouth disease with severe neurological complications and even death in young children. We have recently identified a highly potent anti-EV71 neutralizing monoclonal antibody, termed D5. Here we investigated the structural basis for recognition of EV71 by the antibody D5. Four three-dimensional structures of EV71 particles in complex with IgG or Fab of D5 were reconstructed by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) single particle analysis all at subnanometer resolutions. The most critical EV71 mature virion-Fab structure was resolved to a resolution of 4.8 Å, which is rare in cryo-EM studies of virus-antibody complex so far. The structures reveal a bivalent binding pattern of D5 antibody across the icosahedral 2-fold axis on mature virion, suggesting that D5 binding may rigidify virions to prevent their conformational changes required for subsequent RNA release. Moreover, we also identified that the complementary determining region 3 (CDR3) of D5 heavy chain directly interacts with the extremely conserved VP1 GH-loop of EV71, which was validated by biochemical and virological assays. We further showed that D5 is indeed able to neutralize a variety of EV71 genotypes and strains. Moreover, D5 could potently confer protection in a mouse model of EV71 infection. Since the conserved VP1 GH-loop is involved in EV71 binding with its uncoating receptor, the scavenger receptor class B, member 2 (SCARB2), the broadly neutralizing ability of D5 might attribute to its inhibition of EV71 from binding SCARB2. Altogether, our results elucidate the structural basis for the binding and neutralization of EV71 by the broadly neutralizing antibody D5, thereby enhancing our understanding of antibody-based protection against EV71 infection. PMID:26938634

  4. Structural Basis for Recognition of Human Enterovirus 71 by a Bivalent Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody.

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    Xiaohua Ye

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is the main pathogen responsible for hand, foot and mouth disease with severe neurological complications and even death in young children. We have recently identified a highly potent anti-EV71 neutralizing monoclonal antibody, termed D5. Here we investigated the structural basis for recognition of EV71 by the antibody D5. Four three-dimensional structures of EV71 particles in complex with IgG or Fab of D5 were reconstructed by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM single particle analysis all at subnanometer resolutions. The most critical EV71 mature virion-Fab structure was resolved to a resolution of 4.8 Å, which is rare in cryo-EM studies of virus-antibody complex so far. The structures reveal a bivalent binding pattern of D5 antibody across the icosahedral 2-fold axis on mature virion, suggesting that D5 binding may rigidify virions to prevent their conformational changes required for subsequent RNA release. Moreover, we also identified that the complementary determining region 3 (CDR3 of D5 heavy chain directly interacts with the extremely conserved VP1 GH-loop of EV71, which was validated by biochemical and virological assays. We further showed that D5 is indeed able to neutralize a variety of EV71 genotypes and strains. Moreover, D5 could potently confer protection in a mouse model of EV71 infection. Since the conserved VP1 GH-loop is involved in EV71 binding with its uncoating receptor, the scavenger receptor class B, member 2 (SCARB2, the broadly neutralizing ability of D5 might attribute to its inhibition of EV71 from binding SCARB2. Altogether, our results elucidate the structural basis for the binding and neutralization of EV71 by the broadly neutralizing antibody D5, thereby enhancing our understanding of antibody-based protection against EV71 infection.

  5. Broad neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies against influenza virus from vaccinated healthy donors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Mizuta, Hiroyuki [Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Oshita, Masatoshi; Ideno, Shoji [Osaka Research Laboratory, Benesis Corporation, Yodogawa-ku, Osaka 532-6505 (Japan); Yunoki, Mikihiro [Osaka Research Laboratory, Benesis Corporation, Yodogawa-ku, Osaka 532-6505 (Japan); Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kuhara, Motoki [Ina Laboratory, Medical and Biological Laboratories Corporation, Ltd., Ina, Nagano 396-0002 (Japan); Yamamoto, Naomasa [Department of Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ohu University, Koriyama, Fukushima 963-8611 (Japan); Okuno, Yoshinobu [Kanonji Institute, The Research Foundation for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University, Kanonji, Kagawa 768-0061 (Japan); Ikuta, Kazuyoshi, E-mail: ikuta@biken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2009-09-11

    Human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) prepared from patients with viral infections could provide information on human epitopes important for the development of vaccines as well as potential therapeutic applications. Through the fusion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a total of five influenza-vaccinated volunteers, with newly developed murine-human chimera fusion partner cells, named SPYMEG, we obtained 10 hybridoma clones stably producing anti-influenza virus antibodies: one for influenza A H1N1, four for influenza A H3N2 and five for influenza B. Surprisingly, most of the HuMAbs showed broad reactivity within subtype and four (two for H3N2 and two for B) showed broad neutralizing ability. Importantly, epitope mapping revealed that the two broad neutralizing antibodies to H3N2 derived from different donors recognized the same epitope located underneath the receptor-binding site of the hemagglutinin globular region that is highly conserved among H3N2 strains.

  6. Broad neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies against influenza virus from vaccinated healthy donors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) prepared from patients with viral infections could provide information on human epitopes important for the development of vaccines as well as potential therapeutic applications. Through the fusion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a total of five influenza-vaccinated volunteers, with newly developed murine-human chimera fusion partner cells, named SPYMEG, we obtained 10 hybridoma clones stably producing anti-influenza virus antibodies: one for influenza A H1N1, four for influenza A H3N2 and five for influenza B. Surprisingly, most of the HuMAbs showed broad reactivity within subtype and four (two for H3N2 and two for B) showed broad neutralizing ability. Importantly, epitope mapping revealed that the two broad neutralizing antibodies to H3N2 derived from different donors recognized the same epitope located underneath the receptor-binding site of the hemagglutinin globular region that is highly conserved among H3N2 strains.

  7. A broadly flavivirus cross-neutralizing monoclonal antibody that recognizes a novel epitope within the fusion loop of E protein.

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    Yong-Qiang Deng

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses are a group of human pathogenic, enveloped RNA viruses that includes dengue (DENV, yellow fever (YFV, West Nile (WNV, and Japanese encephalitis (JEV viruses. Cross-reactive antibodies against Flavivirus have been described, but most of them are generally weakly neutralizing. In this study, a novel monoclonal antibody, designated mAb 2A10G6, was determined to have broad cross-reactivity with DENV 1-4, YFV, WNV, JEV, and TBEV. Phage-display biopanning and structure modeling mapped 2A10G6 to a new epitope within the highly conserved flavivirus fusion loop peptide, the (98DRXW(101 motif. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that 2A10G6 potently neutralizes DENV 1-4, YFV, and WNV and confers protection from lethal challenge with DENV 1-4 and WNV in murine model. Furthermore, functional studies revealed that 2A10G6 blocks infection at a step after viral attachment. These results define a novel broadly flavivirus cross-reactive mAb with highly neutralizing activity that can be further developed as a therapeutic agent against severe flavivirus infections in humans.

  8. Direct Administration in the Respiratory Tract Improves Efficacy of Broadly Neutralizing Anti-Influenza Virus Monoclonal Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Leyva-Grado, Victor H.; Tan, Gene S.; Leon, Paul E.; Yondola, Mark; Palese, Peter

    2015-01-01

    The emergence of influenza virus strains resistant to approved neuraminidase inhibitors and the time constrains after infection when these drugs can be effective constitute major drawbacks for this class of drugs. This highlights a critical need to discover new therapeutic agents that can be used for the treatment of influenza virus-infected patients. The use of broadly neutralizing anti-influenza monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) has been sought as an alternative immunotherapy against influenza i...

  9. Development of a monoclonal antibody-based broad-specificity ELISA for fluroquinolone antibiotics in foods and molecular modeling studies of cross-reactive compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Development of a competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ciELISA) with monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) having broad specificity for fluoroquinolone (FQ) antibiotics is described. Four FQs, ciprofloxacin (CIP), norfloxacin (NOR), enrofloxacin (ENR) and ofloxacin (OFL) were conjugated to...

  10. Novel neutralizing monoclonal antibodies protect rodents against lethal filovirus challenges

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    Caleb D. Marceau

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Filoviruses are the causative agents of lethal hemorrhagic fever in human and non-human primates (NHP. The family of Filoviridae is composed of three genera, Ebolavirus, Marburgvirus and Cuevavirus. There are currently no approved vaccines or antiviral therapeutics for the treatment of filovirus infections in humans. Passive transfer of neutralizing antibodies targeting the Ebola virus (EBOV glycoprotein (GP has proven effective in protecting mice, guinea pigs and NHP from lethal challenges with EBOV. In this study, we generated two neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs, termed S9 and M4 that recognize the GP of EBOV or multiple strains of Marburg virus (MARV, respectively. We characterized the putative binding site of S9 as a linear epitope on the glycan cap of the GP1 subunit of the EBOV-GP. The M4 antibody recognizes an unknown conformational epitope on MARV-GP. Additionally, we demonstrated the post-exposure protection potential of these antibodies in both the mouse and guinea pig models of filovirus infection. These data indicate that MAbs S9 and M4 would be good candidates for inclusion in an antibody cocktail for the treatment of filovirus infections.

  11. Broadly neutralizing human monoclonal JC polyomavirus VP1-specific antibodies as candidate therapeutics for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelcic, Ivan; Combaluzier, Benoit; Jelcic, Ilijas; Faigle, Wolfgang; Senn, Luzia; Reinhart, Brenda J; Ströh, Luisa; Nitsch, Roger M; Stehle, Thilo; Sospedra, Mireia; Grimm, Jan; Martin, Roland

    2015-09-23

    In immunocompromised individuals, JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) may mutate and gain access to the central nervous system resulting in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), an often fatal opportunistic infection for which no treatments are currently available. Despite recent progress, the contribution of JCPyV-specific humoral immunity to controlling asymptomatic infection throughout life and to eliminating JCPyV from the brain is poorly understood. We examined antibody responses against JCPyV major capsid protein VP1 (viral protein 1) variants in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of healthy donors (HDs), JCPyV-positive multiple sclerosis patients treated with the anti-VLA-4 monoclonal antibody natalizumab (NAT), and patients with NAT-associated PML. Before and during PML, CSF antibody responses against JCPyV VP1 variants show "recognition holes"; however, upon immune reconstitution, CSF antibody titers rise, then recognize PML-associated JCPyV VP1 variants, and may be involved in elimination of the virus. We therefore reasoned that the memory B cell repertoire of individuals who recovered from PML could be a source for the molecular cloning of broadly neutralizing antibodies for passive immunization. We generated a series of memory B cell-derived JCPyV VP1-specific human monoclonal antibodies from HDs and a patient with NAT-associated PML-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). These antibodies exhibited diverse binding affinity, cross-reactivity with the closely related BK polyomavirus, recognition of PML-causing VP1 variants, and JCPyV neutralization. Almost all antibodies with exquisite specificity for JCPyV, neutralizing activity, recognition of all tested JCPyV PML variants, and high affinity were derived from one patient who had recovered from PML. These antibodies are promising drug candidates for the development of a treatment of PML. PMID:26400911

  12. Development of an immunoaffinity column method using broad-specificity monoclonal antibodies for simultaneous extraction and cleanup of quinolone and sulfonamide antibiotics in animal muscle tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    This paper describes a novel mixed-bed immunoaffinity column (IAC) method. The IAC was produced by coupling anti-fluoroquinolone and anti-sulfonamide broad-specificity monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) to Sepharose 4B for simultaneously isolating 13 fluoroquinolones (FQs) and 6 sulfonamides (SAs) from s...

  13. [The protective activity of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to the lipopolysaccharide of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A in in vivo experiments].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Del'vig, A A; Krasnoproshina, L I; Volgareva, G M; Bobyleva, G V; Kuvakina, V I; Artem'eva, T A

    1990-10-01

    The protective activity of the sera of mice immunized with the preparations of native and detoxified N. meningitidis lipopolysaccharide (LPS), group A, as well as with monoclonal antibodies to N. meningitidis antigens, groups A and B, was studied on the mucin model of meningococcal infection. The study showed that the maximum level of anti-LPS antibodies in mice was observed on day 7 after the injection of LPS. Immune sera obtained from mice were capable of protecting the animals from fetal meningococcemia induced by N. meningitidis strains of homologous and heterologous groups. As shown by the results of this study, the alkaline treatment of N. meningitidis native LPS did not decrease the protective properties of antibodies. The monoclonal antibodies under study were found to possess high preventive activity in mice challenged with N. meningitidis, groups A and B. Anti-LPS monoclonal antibodies showed greater protective activity than antipolysaccharide monoclonal antibodies. PMID:2127501

  14. Dengue Virus Envelope Dimer Epitope Monoclonal Antibodies Isolated from Dengue Patients Are Protective against Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanstrom, J. A.; Plante, J. A.; Plante, K. S.; Young, E. F.; McGowan, E.; Gallichotte, E. N.; Widman, D. G.; Heise, M. T.; de Silva, A. M.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus responsible for thousands of cases of severe fetal malformations and neurological disease since its introduction to Brazil in 2013. Antibodies to flaviviruses can be protective, resulting in lifelong immunity to reinfection by homologous virus. However, cross-reactive antibodies can complicate flavivirus diagnostics and promote more severe disease, as noted after serial dengue virus (DENV) infections. The endemic circulation of DENV in South America and elsewhere raises concerns that preexisting flavivirus immunity may modulate ZIKV disease and transmission potential. Here, we report on the ability of human monoclonal antibodies and immune sera derived from dengue patients to neutralize contemporary epidemic ZIKV strains. We demonstrate that a class of human monoclonal antibodies isolated from DENV patients neutralizes ZIKV in cell culture and is protective in a lethal murine model. We also tested a large panel of convalescent-phase immune sera from humans exposed to primary and repeat DENV infection. Although ZIKV is most closely related to DENV compared to other human-pathogenic flaviviruses, most DENV immune sera (73%) failed to neutralize ZIKV, while others had low (50% effective concentration [EC50], 1:100 serum dilution; 9%) levels of cross-neutralizing antibodies. Our results establish that ZIKV and DENV share epitopes that are targeted by neutralizing, protective human antibodies. The availability of potently neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies provides an immunotherapeutic approach to control life-threatening ZIKV infection and also points to the possibility of repurposing DENV vaccines to induce cross-protective immunity to ZIKV. PMID:27435464

  15. Human anti-plague monoclonal antibodies protect mice from Yersinia pestis in a bubonic plague model.

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    Xiaodong Xiao

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis is the etiologic agent of plague that has killed more than 200 million people throughout the recorded history of mankind. Antibiotics may provide little immediate relief to patients who have a high bacteremia or to patients infected with an antibiotic resistant strain of plague. Two virulent factors of Y. pestis are the capsid F1 protein and the low-calcium response (Lcr V-protein or V-antigen that have been proven to be the targets for both active and passive immunization. There are mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against the F1- and V-antigens that can passively protect mice in a murine model of plague; however, there are no anti-Yersinia pestis monoclonal antibodies available for prophylactic or therapeutic treatment in humans. We identified one anti-F1-specific human mAb (m252 and two anti-V-specific human mAb (m253, m254 by panning a naïve phage-displayed Fab library against the F1- and V-antigens. The Fabs were converted to IgG1s and their binding and protective activities were evaluated. M252 bound weakly to peptides located at the F1 N-terminus where a protective mouse anti-F1 mAb also binds. M253 bound strongly to a V-antigen peptide indicating a linear epitope; m254 did not bind to any peptide from a panel of 53 peptides suggesting that its epitope may be conformational. M252 showed better protection than m253 and m254 against a Y, pestis challenge in a plague mouse model. A synergistic effect was observed when the three antibodies were combined. Incomplete to complete protection was achieved when m252 was given at different times post-challenge. These antibodies can be further studied to determine their potential as therapeutics or prophylactics in Y. pestis infection in humans.

  16. Novel Clostridium difficile Anti-Toxin (TcdA and TcdB) Humanized Monoclonal Antibodies Demonstrate In Vitro Neutralization across a Broad Spectrum of Clinical Strains and In Vivo Potency in a Hamster Spore Challenge Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Hongyu; Cassan, Robyn; Johnstone, Darrell; Han, Xiaobing; Joyee, Antony George; McQuoid, Monica; Masi, Andrea; Merluza, John; Hrehorak, Bryce; Reid, Ross; Kennedy, Kieron; Tighe, Bonnie; Rak, Carla; Leonhardt, Melanie; Dupas, Brian; Saward, Laura; Berry, Jody D.; Nykiforuk, Cory L.

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection (CDI) is the main cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated colitis and increased incidence of community-associated diarrhea in industrialized countries. At present, the primary treatment of CDI is antibiotic administration, which is effective but often associated with recurrence, especially in the elderly. Pathogenic strains produce enterotoxin, toxin A (TcdA), and cytotoxin, toxin B (TcdB), which are necessary for C. difficile induced diarrhea and gut pathological changes. Administration of anti-toxin antibodies provides an alternative approach to treat CDI, and has shown promising results in preclinical and clinical studies. In the current study, several humanized anti-TcdA and anti-TcdB monoclonal antibodies were generated and their protective potency was characterized in a hamster infection model. The humanized anti-TcdA (CANmAbA4) and anti-TcdB (CANmAbB4 and CANmAbB1) antibodies showed broad spectrum in vitro neutralization of toxins from clinical strains and neutralization in a mouse toxin challenge model. Moreover, co-administration of humanized antibodies (CANmAbA4 and CANmAbB4 cocktail) provided a high level of protection in a dose dependent manner (85% versus 57% survival at day 22 for 50 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg doses, respectively) in a hamster gastrointestinal infection (GI) model. This study describes the protective effects conferred by novel neutralizing anti-toxin monoclonal antibodies against C. difficile toxins and their potential as therapeutic agents in treating CDI. PMID:27336843

  17. Novel Clostridium difficile Anti-Toxin (TcdA and TcdB Humanized Monoclonal Antibodies Demonstrate In Vitro Neutralization across a Broad Spectrum of Clinical Strains and In Vivo Potency in a Hamster Spore Challenge Model.

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    Hongyu Qiu

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile (C. difficile infection (CDI is the main cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated colitis and increased incidence of community-associated diarrhea in industrialized countries. At present, the primary treatment of CDI is antibiotic administration, which is effective but often associated with recurrence, especially in the elderly. Pathogenic strains produce enterotoxin, toxin A (TcdA, and cytotoxin, toxin B (TcdB, which are necessary for C. difficile induced diarrhea and gut pathological changes. Administration of anti-toxin antibodies provides an alternative approach to treat CDI, and has shown promising results in preclinical and clinical studies. In the current study, several humanized anti-TcdA and anti-TcdB monoclonal antibodies were generated and their protective potency was characterized in a hamster infection model. The humanized anti-TcdA (CANmAbA4 and anti-TcdB (CANmAbB4 and CANmAbB1 antibodies showed broad spectrum in vitro neutralization of toxins from clinical strains and neutralization in a mouse toxin challenge model. Moreover, co-administration of humanized antibodies (CANmAbA4 and CANmAbB4 cocktail provided a high level of protection in a dose dependent manner (85% versus 57% survival at day 22 for 50 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg doses, respectively in a hamster gastrointestinal infection (GI model. This study describes the protective effects conferred by novel neutralizing anti-toxin monoclonal antibodies against C. difficile toxins and their potential as therapeutic agents in treating CDI.

  18. Prophylaxis and Therapy of Inhalational Anthrax by a Novel Monoclonal Antibody to Protective Antigen That Mimics Vaccine-Induced Immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Vitale, Laura; Blanset, Diann; Lowy, Israel; O'Neill, Thomas; Goldstein, Joel; Little, Stephen F.; Andrews, Gerard P.; Dorough, Gary; Taylor, Ronald K.; Keler, Tibor

    2006-01-01

    The neutralizing antibody response to the protective antigen (PA) component of anthrax toxin elicited by approved anthrax vaccines is an accepted correlate for vaccine-mediated protection against anthrax. We reasoned that a human anti-PA monoclonal antibody (MAb) selected on the basis of superior toxin neutralization activity might provide potent protection against anthrax. The fully human MAb (also referred to as MDX-1303 or Valortim) was chosen from a large panel of anti-PA human MAbs gener...

  19. Broad-spectrum sun-protective action of Porphyra-334 derived from Porphyra vietnamensis

    OpenAIRE

    Saurabh Bhatia; Sharma, K.; Namdeo, Ajay G.; B B Chaugule; Kavale, M.; Nanda, S

    2010-01-01

    There are enormous UV-protective compounds present in the current world market, out of which 98% give protection against UV-B range and the remaining 2% are potent against far UV-A range only. Furthermore, these synthetic compounds have various problems related to photo-stability and cross-stability. There is a vital need of sunscreen agents that will remain stable for prolonged periods and provide broad-spectrum protection against harmful UV range. The Indian Ocean contains large amounts of ...

  20. Fully human broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against influenza A viruses generated from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whether the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine can induce heterosubtypic cross-protective anti-hemagglutinin (HA) neutralizing antibodies is an important issue. We obtained a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient. Most of the monoclonal antibodies targeted the HA protein but not the HA1 fragment. Among the analyzed antibodies, seven mAbs exhibited neutralizing activity against several influenza A viruses of different subtypes. The conserved linear epitope targeted by the neutralizing mAbs (FIEGGWTGMVDGWYGYHH) is part of the fusion peptide on HA2. Our work suggests that a heterosubtypic neutralizing antibody response primarily targeting the HA stem region exists in recipients of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine. The HA stem region contains various conserved neutralizing epitopes with the fusion peptide as an important one. This work may aid in the design of a universal influenza A virus vaccine.

  1. Fully human broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against influenza A viruses generated from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Weibin [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Aizhong [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Miao, Yi [Shanghai Xuhui Central Hospital, Shanghai 200031 (China); Xia, Shengli [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450016 (China); Ling, Zhiyang; Xu, Ke; Wang, Tongyan [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Xu, Ying; Cui, Jun; Wu, Hongqiang; Hu, Guiyu; Tian, Lin; Wang, Lingling [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Shu, Yuelong [Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206 (China); Ma, Xiaowei [Hualan Biological Bacterin Company, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Xu, Bianli; Zhang, Jin [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450016 (China); Lin, Xiaojun, E-mail: linxiaojun@hualan.com [Hualan Biological Bacterin Company, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Bian, Chao, E-mail: cbian@sibs.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Sun, Bing, E-mail: bsun@sibs.ac.cn [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China)

    2013-01-20

    Whether the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine can induce heterosubtypic cross-protective anti-hemagglutinin (HA) neutralizing antibodies is an important issue. We obtained a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient. Most of the monoclonal antibodies targeted the HA protein but not the HA1 fragment. Among the analyzed antibodies, seven mAbs exhibited neutralizing activity against several influenza A viruses of different subtypes. The conserved linear epitope targeted by the neutralizing mAbs (FIEGGWTGMVDGWYGYHH) is part of the fusion peptide on HA2. Our work suggests that a heterosubtypic neutralizing antibody response primarily targeting the HA stem region exists in recipients of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine. The HA stem region contains various conserved neutralizing epitopes with the fusion peptide as an important one. This work may aid in the design of a universal influenza A virus vaccine.

  2. The Use of Chimeric Virus-like Particles Harbouring a Segment of Hantavirus Gc Glycoprotein to Generate a Broadly-Reactive Hantavirus-Specific Monoclonal Antibody

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    Aurelija Zvirbliene

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs against viral glycoproteins have important diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In most cases, the MAbs specific to viral glycoproteins are raised against intact virus particles. The biosynthesis of viral glycoproteins in heterologous expression systems such as bacteria, yeast, insect or mammalian cells is often problematic due to their low expression level, improper folding and limited stability. To generate MAbs against hantavirus glycoprotein Gc, we have used initially a recombinant yeast-expressed full-length Puumala virus (PUUV Gc protein. However, this approach was unsuccessful. As an alternative recombinant antigen, chimeric virus-like particles (VLPs harboring a segment of PUUV Gc glycoprotein were generated in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. A 99 amino acid (aa-long segment of Gc protein was inserted into the major capsid protein VP1 of hamster polyomavirus at previously defined positions: either site #1 (aa 80–89 or site #4 (aa 280–289. The chimeric proteins were found to self-assemble to VLPs as evidenced by electron microscopy. Chimeric VLPs induced an efficient insert-specific antibody response in immunized mice. Monoclonal antibody (clone #10B8 of IgG isotype specific to hantavirus Gc glycoprotein was generated. It recognized recombinant full-length PUUV Gc glycoprotein both in ELISA and Western blot assay and reacted specifically with hantavirus-infected cells in immunofluorescence assay. Epitope mapping studies revealed the N-terminally located epitope highly conserved among different hantavirus strains. In conclusion, our approach to use chimeric VLPs was proven useful for the generation of virus-reactive MAb against hantavirus Gc glycoprotein. The generated broadly-reactive MAb #10B8 might be useful for various diagnostic applications.

  3. Schistosoma mansoni. Anti-egg monoclonal antibodies protect against cercarial challenge in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies that bind to surface membranes of developing schistosomula and/or cercarial tails were generated from mice immunized with living schistosome eggs or soluble egg antigen. These monoclonal antibodies detected at least three different surface epitopes. One surface antigen detected by anti-egg monoclonal antibody EG1C4B1 (E.1) persisted on the surface of developing schistosomula for 96 h posttransformation . The same or a cross-reactive antigen was also detected on the surfa...

  4. Sublingual immunization with M2-based vaccine induces broad protective immunity against influenza.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byoung-Shik Shim

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The ectodomain of matrix protein 2 (M2e of influenza A virus is a rationale target antigen candidate for the development of a universal vaccine against influenza as M2e undergoes little sequence variation amongst human influenza A strains. Vaccine-induced M2e-specific antibodies (Abs have been shown to display significant cross-protective activity in animal models. M2e-based vaccine constructs have been shown to be more protective when administered by the intranasal (i.n. route than after parenteral injection. However, i.n. administration of vaccines poses rare but serious safety issues associated with retrograde passage of inhaled antigens and adjuvants through the olfactory epithelium. In this study, we examined whether the sublingual (s.l. route could serve as a safe and effective alternative mucosal delivery route for administering a prototype M2e-based vaccine. The mechanism whereby s.l. immunization with M2e vaccine candidate induces broad protection against infection with different influenza virus subtypes was explored. METHODS AND RESULTS: A recombinant M2 protein with three tandem copies of the M2e (3M2eC was expressed in Escherichia coli. Parenteral immunizations of mice with 3M2eC induced high levels of M2e-specific serum Abs but failed to provide complete protection against lethal challenge with influenza virus. In contrast, s.l. immunization with 3M2eC was superior for inducing protection in mice. In the latter animals, protection was associated with specific Ab responses in the lungs. CONCLUSIONS: The results demonstrate that s.l. immunization with 3M2eC vaccine induced airway mucosal immune responses along with broad cross-protective immunity to influenza. These findings may contribute to the understanding of the M2-based vaccine approach to control epidemic and pandemic influenza infections.

  5. Generation and Characterization of Human Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Anthrax Protective Antigen following Vaccination with a Recombinant Protective Antigen Vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Xiangyang; Li, Jianmin; Liu, Weicen; Wang, Xiaolin; Yin, Kexin; Liu, Ju; Zai, Xiaodong; Li, Liangliang; Song, Xiaohong; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Yin, Ying; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Yu, Changming; Chen, Wei

    2015-05-01

    The anthrax protective antigen (PA) is the central component of the three-part anthrax toxin, and it is the primary immunogenic component in the approved AVA anthrax vaccine and the "next-generation" recombinant PA (rPA) anthrax vaccines. Animal models have indicated that PA-specific antibodies (AB) are sufficient to protect against infection with Bacillus anthracis. In this study, we investigated the PA domain specificity, affinity, mechanisms of neutralization, and synergistic effects of PA-specific antibodies from a single donor following vaccination with the rPA vaccine. Antibody-secreting cells were isolated 7 days after the donor received a boost vaccination, and 34 fully human monoclonal antibodies (hMAb) were identified. Clones 8H6, 4A3, and 22F1 were able to neutralize lethal toxin (LeTx) both in vitro and in vivo. Clone 8H6 neutralized LeTx by preventing furin cleavage of PA in a dose-dependent manner. Clone 4A3 enhanced degradation of nicked PA, thereby interfering with PA oligomerization. The mechanism of 22F1 is still unclear. A fourth clone, 2A6, that was protective only in vitro was found to be neutralizing in vivo in combination with a toxin-enhancing antibody, 8A7, which binds to domain 3 of PA and PA oligomers. These results provide novel insights into the antibody response elicited by the rPA vaccine and may be useful for PA-based vaccine and immunotherapeutic cocktail design. PMID:25787135

  6. Broad-spectrum sun-protective action of Porphyra-334 derived from Porphyra vietnamensis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Bhatia

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available There are enormous UV-protective compounds present in the current world market, out of which 98% give protection against UV-B range and the remaining 2% are potent against far UV-A range only. Furthermore, these synthetic compounds have various problems related to photo-stability and cross-stability. There is a vital need of sunscreen agents that will remain stable for prolonged periods and provide broad-spectrum protection against harmful UV range. The Indian Ocean contains large amounts of macro-algae which synthesize varied amount of mycosporine amino acids, "sun-protective compounds" by shikmic acid pathway. In the present study, we have evaluated the sunscreen protection provided by Porphyra-334, a mycosporine amino acid isolated from Indian sp. of Porphyra. Furthermore, the isolated compound was detected by high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC fingerprinting, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC and ultraviolet (UV, whereas nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR spectroscopy and infrared spectrometry were used for its structural characterization. Stability studies were performed under different storage and pH conditions. Ultimately a sunscreen formulation was developed and its potential against marketed Aloe vera gel was evaluated by in vitro sunscreen protection method. It was observed that sunscreen potential of Porphyra-334 was 5.11-fold greater than that of the marketed Aloe vera gel preparation.

  7. Generation and characterization of a protective mouse monoclonal antibody against human enterovirus 71.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yong-Qiang; Ma, Jie; Xu, Li-Juan; Li, Yue-Xiang; Zhao, Hui; Han, Jian-Feng; Tao, Jiang; Li, Xiao-Feng; Zhu, Shun-Ya; Qin, E-De; Qin, Cheng-Feng

    2015-09-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) infection has emerged as a major threat to children; however, no effective antiviral treatment or vaccine is currently available. Antibody-based treatment shows promises to control this growing public health problem of EV71 infection, and a few potent monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) targeting viral capsid protein have been well described. Here, we generated an EV71-specific mouse mAb 2G8 that conferred full protection against lethal EV71 challenge in a suckling mouse model. 2G8 belonged to IgM isotype and neutralized EV71 at the attachment stage. Biochemical assays mapped the binding epitope of 2G8 to the SP70 peptide, which spanning amino acid residues 208-222 on the VP1 protein. Alanine scanning mutagenesis defined the essential roles of multiple residues, including Y208, T210, G212, K215, K218, L220, E221, and Y222, for 2G8 binding. Then, a panel of single mutation was individually introduced into the EV71 infectious clone by reverse genetics, and three mutant viruses, K215A, K218A, and L220A, were successfully recovered and characterized. Biochemical and neutralization assays revealed that K218A mutant partially escaped 2G8 neutralization, while L220A completely abolished 2G8 binding and neutralization. In particular, neutralization assays with human sera demonstrated that K218A and L220A substitutions are also critical for antibody neutralization in natural infection population. These findings not only generate a protective mAb candidate with therapeutic potential but also provide insights into antibody-mediated EV71 neutralization mechanism. PMID:25967656

  8. Electrophoretic analysis of the major outer membrane protein of Chlamydia psittaci reveals multimers which are recognized by protective monoclonal antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    McCafferty, M C; Herring, A J; Andersen, A A; Jones, G. E.

    1995-01-01

    Purified major outer membrane protein, detergent solubilized and reduced with dithiothreitol but not heated, gave an apparent molecular weight in sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS)-polyacrylamide gels almost three times that observed for the heat-denatured SDS-treated peptide. This is similar to the behavior of porin trimers from gram-negative bacteria. Two protective monoclonal antibodies showed strong binding to the proposed trimer but not to denatured, monomeric major outer membrane protein.

  9. An investigation into the mechanism of protection by local passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies against Streptococcus mutans.

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, J K; Hunjan, M; Smith, R; Kelly, C; Lehner, T.

    1990-01-01

    Local oral passive immunization with Streptococcus mutans-specific monoclonal antibody (MAb) (Guy's 13) prevented recolonization by indigenous S. mutans in human volunteers who had first been treated with a conventional antibacterial agent (chlorhexidine). The F(ab')2 fragment of the MAb was as protective as the intact immunoglobulin G, but the Fab fragment of the molecule failed to prevent recolonization of S. mutans. In subjects receiving the MAb Fab fragment, S. mutans levels in dental pla...

  10. Development of a monoclonal antibody specific to envelope domain III with broad-spectrum detection of all four dengue virus serotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sae-Hae; Kim, Yu Na; Truong, Thang Thua; Thu Thuy, Nguyen Thi; Mai, Le Quynh; Jang, Yong-Suk

    2016-05-13

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a mosquito-borne pathogen that annually infects more than 390 million people in 100 different countries. Symptoms of the viral infection include a relatively weak dengue fever to severe dengue hemorrhagic fever/dengue shock syndrome, which are mortal infectious diseases. As of yet, there is no commercially available vaccine or therapeutic for DENV. Currently, passive immunotherapy using DENV-specific antibody (Ab) is a considered strategy to treat DENV infection. Here, we developed a monoclonal Ab (mAb), EDIIImAb-61, specific to the DENV domain III of the envelope glycoprotein (EDIII) with broad-spectrum detection ability to all four DENV serotypes (DENV-1∼4) to use as a therapeutic Ab. Although EDIII contains non-immunodominant epitopes compared to domains I and II, domain III plays a critical role in host receptor binding. EDIIImAb-61 exhibited cross-reactive binding affinity to all four DENV serotypes that had been isolated from infected humans. To further characterize EDIIImAb-61 and prepare genes for large-scale production using a heterologous expression system, the sequence of the complementarity determining regions was analyzed after cloning the full-length cDNA genes encoding the heavy and light chain of the mAb. Finally, we produced Ab from CHO-K1 cells transfected with the cloned EDIIImAb-61 heavy and light chain genes and confirmed the binding ability of the Ab. Collectively, we conclude that EDIIImAb-61 itself and the recombinant Ab produced using the cloned heavy and light chain gene of EDIIImAb-61 is a candidate for passive immunotherapy against DENV infection. PMID:27059141

  11. Identification and characterization of a broadly cross-reactive HIV-1 human monoclonal antibody that binds to both gp120 and gp41.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Yun Zhang

    Full Text Available Identification of broadly cross-reactive HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs may assist vaccine immunogen design. Here we report a novel human monoclonal antibody (mAb, designated m43, which co-targets the gp120 and gp41 subunits of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env. M43 bound to recombinant gp140 s from various primary isolates, to membrane-associated Envs on transfected cells and HIV-1 infected cells, as well as to recombinant gp120 s and gp41 fusion intermediate structures containing N-trimer structure, but did not bind to denatured recombinant gp140 s and the CD4 binding site (CD4bs mutant, gp120 D368R, suggesting that the m43 epitope is conformational and overlaps the CD4bs on gp120 and the N-trimer structure on gp41. M43 neutralized 34% of the HIV-1 primary isolates from different clades and all the SHIVs tested in assays based on infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs by replication-competent virus, but was less potent in cell line-based pseudovirus assays. In contrast to CD4, m43 did not induce Env conformational changes upon binding leading to exposure of the coreceptor binding site, enhanced binding of mAbs 2F5 and 4E10 specific for the membrane proximal external region (MPER of gp41 Envs, or increased gp120 shedding. The overall modest neutralization activity of m43 is likely due to the limited binding of m43 to functional Envs which could be increased by antibody engineering if needed. M43 may represent a new class of bnAbs targeting conformational epitopes overlapping structures on both gp120 and gp41. Its novel epitope and possibly new mechanism(s of neutralization could helpdesign improved vaccine immunogens and candidate therapeutics.

  12. A monoclonal antibody targeting a highly conserved epitope in influenza B neuraminidase provides protection against drug resistant strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doyle, Tracey M; Li, Changgui; Bucher, Doris J; Hashem, Anwar M; Van Domselaar, Gary; Wang, Junzhi; Farnsworth, Aaron; She, Yi-Min; Cyr, Terry; He, Runtao; Brown, Earl G; Hurt, Aeron C; Li, Xuguang

    2013-11-01

    All influenza viral neuraminidases (NA) of both type A and B viruses have only one universally conserved sequence located between amino acids 222-230. A monoclonal antibody against this region has been previously reported to provide broad inhibition against all nine subtypes of influenza A NA; yet its inhibitory effect against influenza B viral NA remained unknown. Here, we report that the monoclonal antibody provides a broad inhibition against various strains of influenza B viruses of both Victoria and Yamagata genetic lineage. Moreover, the growth and NA enzymatic activity of two drug resistant influenza B strains (E117D and D197E) are also inhibited by the antibody even though these two mutations are conformationally proximal to the universal epitope. Collectively, these data suggest that this unique, highly-conserved linear sequence in viral NA is exposed sufficiently to allow access by inhibitory antibody during the course of infection; it could represent a potential target for antiviral agents and vaccine-induced immune responses against diverse strains of type B influenza virus. PMID:24140051

  13. Identification of protective and broadly conserved vaccine antigens from the genome of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriel, Danilo Gomes; Bertoldi, Isabella; Spagnuolo, Angela; Marchi, Sara; Rosini, Roberto; Nesta, Barbara; Pastorello, Ilaria; Corea, Vanja A Mariani; Torricelli, Giulia; Cartocci, Elena; Savino, Silvana; Scarselli, Maria; Dobrindt, Ulrich; Hacker, Jörg; Tettelin, Hervé; Tallon, Luke J; Sullivan, Steven; Wieler, Lothar H; Ewers, Christa; Pickard, Derek; Dougan, Gordon; Fontana, Maria Rita; Rappuoli, Rino; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Serino, Laura

    2010-05-18

    Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC) are a common cause of disease in both mammals and birds. A vaccine to prevent such infections would be desirable given the increasing antibiotic resistance of these bacteria. We have determined the genome sequence of ExPEC IHE3034 (ST95) isolated from a case of neonatal meningitis and compared this to available genome sequences of other ExPEC strains and a few nonpathogenic E. coli. We found 19 genomic islands present in the genome of IHE3034, which are absent in the nonpathogenic E. coli isolates. By using subtractive reverse vaccinology we identified 230 antigens present in ExPEC but absent (or present with low similarity) in nonpathogenic strains. Nine antigens were protective in a mouse challenge model. Some of them were also present in other pathogenic non-ExPEC strains, suggesting that a broadly protective E. coli vaccine may be possible. The gene encoding the most protective antigen was detected in most of the E. coli isolates, highly conserved in sequence and found to be exported by a type II secretion system which seems to be nonfunctional in nonpathogenic strains. PMID:20439758

  14. Broad spectrum antiviral activity of favipiravir (T-705: protection from highly lethal inhalational Rift Valley Fever.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L Caroline

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Development of antiviral drugs that have broad-spectrum activity against a number of viral infections would be of significant benefit. Due to the evolution of resistance to currently licensed antiviral drugs, development of novel anti-influenza drugs is in progress, including Favipiravir (T-705, which is currently in human clinical trials. T-705 displays broad-spectrum in vitro activity against a number of viruses, including Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV. RVF is an important neglected tropical disease that causes human, agricultural, and economic losses in endemic regions. RVF has the capacity to emerge in new locations and also presents a potential bioterrorism threat. In the current study, the in vivo efficacy of T-705 was evaluated in Wistar-Furth rats infected with the virulent ZH501 strain of RVFV by the aerosol route. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Wistar-Furth rats are highly susceptible to a rapidly lethal disease after parenteral or inhalational exposure to the pathogenic ZH501 strain of RVFV. In the current study, two experiments were performed: a dose-determination study and a delayed-treatment study. In both experiments, all untreated control rats succumbed to disease. Out of 72 total rats infected with RVFV and treated with T-705, only 6 succumbed to disease. The remaining 66 rats (92% survived lethal infection with no significant weight loss or fever. The 6 treated rats that succumbed survived significantly longer before succumbing to encephalitic disease. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Currently, there are no licensed antiviral drugs for treating RVF. Here, T-705 showed remarkable efficacy in a highly lethal rat model of Rift Valley Fever, even when given up to 48 hours post-infection. This is the first study to show protection of rats infected with the pathogenic ZH501 strain of RVFV. Our data suggest that T-705 has potential to be a broad-spectrum antiviral drug.

  15. Human Monoclonal Anti-Protective Antigen Antibody Completely Protects Rabbits and Is Synergistic with Ciprofloxacin in Protecting Mice and Guinea Pigs against Inhalation Anthrax

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Johnny W.; Comer, Jason E.; Noffsinger, David M.; Wenglikowski, Autumn; Walberg, Kristin G.; Chatuev, Bagram M.; Chopra, Ashok K.; Stanberry, Lawrence R.; Kang, Angray S.; Scholz, Wolfgang W.; Sircar, Jagadish

    2006-01-01

    Prevention of inhalation anthrax requires early and extended antibiotic therapy, and therefore, alternative treatment strategies are needed. We investigated whether a human monoclonal antibody (AVP-21D9) to protective antigen (PA) would protect mice, guinea pigs, and rabbits against anthrax. Control animals challenged with Bacillus anthracis Ames spores by the intranasal route died within 3 to 7 days. AVP-21D9 alone provided minimal protection against anthrax in the murine model, but its efficacy was notably better in guinea pigs. When Swiss-Webster mice, challenged with five 50% lethal doses (LD50s) of anthrax spores, were given a single 16.7-mg/kg of body weight AVP-21D9 antibody dose combined with ciprofloxacin (30 mg/kg/day for 6 days) 24 h after challenge, 100% of the mice were protected for more than 30 days, while ciprofloxacin or AVP-21D9 alone showed minimal protection. Similarly, when AVP-21D9 antibody (10 to 50 mg/kg) was combined with a low, nonprotective dose of ciprofloxacin (3.7 mg/kg/day) and administered to guinea pigs for 6 days, synergistic protection against anthrax was observed. In contrast, a single dose of AVP-21D9 antibody (1, 5, 10, or 20 mg/kg) but not 0.2 mg/kg alone completely protected rabbits against challenge with 100 LD50s of B. anthracis Ames spores, and 100% of the rabbits survived rechallenge. Further, administration of AVP-21D9 (10 mg/kg) to rabbits at 0, 6, and 12 h after challenge with anthrax spores resulted in 100% survival; however, delay of antibody treatment by 24 and 48 h reduced survival to 80% and 60%, respectively. Serological analysis of sera from various surviving animals 30 days postprimary infection showed development of a species-specific PA enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay antibody titer that correlated with protection against reinfection. Taken together, the effectiveness of human anti-PA antibody alone or in combination with low ciprofloxacin levels may provide the basis for an improved strategy for

  16. Identification of a novel linear epitope in tetanus toxin recognized by a protective monoclonal antibody: implications for vaccine design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Ping; Qin, Liyan; Mao, Xuhu; Chen, Li; Yu, Shu; Li, Qian; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Weijun; Gu, Jiang; Zou, Quanming

    2012-10-01

    Tetanus, a severe infectious disease, is caused by tetanus toxin (TT) from Clostridium tetani, which remains one of the most critical unsolved health problems despite preventive strategies. The carboxyl terminal of TT (TTC) is responsible for the binding of TT to neurons and for its toxicity and has been proven to be immunogenic and protective in various forms. It would therefore be extremely interesting to identify the epitope on TTC at a molecular level. In this study, we generated a neutralizing monoclonal antibody, 5C4, which inhibited TT binding to its receptor and was efficiently protective at 73.7 IU/mg. Moreover, 5C4 recognized a novel linear epitope on TT, namely TC((1155-1171)), which spans from Lys1155 to Val1171. In addition, TC((1155-1171)) was shown to elicit the production of a serum IgG that protected mice against a challenge with TT. These results suggested that TC((1155-1171)) and the monoclonal antibody 5C4 are good candidates for the development of epitope-based vaccines and therapeutic antibodies against tetanus. PMID:22889825

  17. Detection of anthrax protective antigen (PA) using europium labeled anti-PA monoclonal antibody and time-resolved fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddard, Robyn A; Quinn, Conrad P; Schiffer, Jarad M; Boyer, Anne E; Goldstein, Jason; Bagarozzi, Dennis A; Soroka, Stephen D; Dauphin, Leslie A; Hoffmaster, Alex R

    2014-06-01

    Inhalation anthrax is a rare but acute infectious disease following adsorption of Bacillus anthracis spores through the lungs. The disease has a high fatality rate if untreated, but early and correct diagnosis has a significant impact on case patient recovery. The early symptoms of inhalation anthrax are, however, non-specific and current anthrax diagnostics are primarily dependent upon culture and confirmatory real-time PCR. Consequently, there may be a significant delay in diagnosis and targeted treatment. Rapid, culture-independent diagnostic tests are therefore needed, particularly in the context of a large scale emergency response. The aim of this study was to evaluate the ability of monoclonal antibodies to detect anthrax toxin proteins that are secreted early in the course of B. anthracis infection using a time-resolved fluorescence (TRF) immunoassay. We selected monoclonal antibodies that could detect protective antigen (PA), as PA83 and also PA63 and LF in the lethal toxin complex. The assay reliable detection limit (RDL) was 6.63×10(-6)μM (0.551ng/ml) for PA83 and 2.51×10(-5)μM (1.58ng/ml) for PA63. Despite variable precision and accuracy of the assay, PA was detected in 9 out of 10 sera samples from anthrax confirmed case patients with cutaneous (n=7), inhalation (n=2), and gastrointestinal (n=1) disease. Anthrax Immune Globulin (AIG), which has been used in treatment of clinical anthrax, interfered with detection of PA. This study demonstrates a culture-independent method of diagnosing anthrax through the use of monoclonal antibodies to detect PA and LF in the lethal toxin complex. PMID:24857756

  18. Broad-Spectrum Inhibition of HIV-1 by a Monoclonal Antibody Directed against a gp120-Induced Epitope of CD4

    OpenAIRE

    Burastero, Samuele E.; Frigerio, Barbara; Lopalco, Lucia; Sironi, Francesca; Breda, Daniela; Longhi, Renato; Scarlatti, Gabriella; Canevari, Silvana; Figini, Mariangela; Lusso, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    To penetrate susceptible cells, HIV-1 sequentially interacts with two highly conserved cellular receptors, CD4 and a chemokine receptor like CCR5 or CXCR4. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against such receptors are currently under clinical investigation as potential preventive or therapeutic agents. We immunized Balb/c mice with molecular complexes of the native, trimeric HIV-1 envelope (Env) bound to a soluble form of the human CD4 receptor. Sera from immunized mice were found to conta...

  19. The Use of Chimeric Virus-like Particles Harbouring a Segment of Hantavirus Gc Glycoprotein to Generate a Broadly-Reactive Hantavirus-Specific Monoclonal Antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Aurelija Zvirbliene; Indre Kucinskaite-Kodze; Ausra Razanskiene; Rasa Petraityte-Burneikiene; Boris Klempa; Ulrich, Rainer G.; Alma Gedvilaite

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against viral glycoproteins have important diagnostic and therapeutic applications. In most cases, the MAbs specific to viral glycoproteins are raised against intact virus particles. The biosynthesis of viral glycoproteins in heterologous expression systems such as bacteria, yeast, insect or mammalian cells is often problematic due to their low expression level, improper folding and limited stability. To generate MAbs against hantavirus glycoprotein Gc, we have us...

  20. Human monoclonal antibodies derived from a patient infected with 2009 pandemic influenza A virus broadly cross-neutralize group 1 influenza viruses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Influenza infection can elicit heterosubtypic antibodies to group 1 influenza virus. • Three human monoclonal antibodies were generated from an H1N1-infected patient. • The antibodies predominantly recognized α-helical stem of viral hemagglutinin (HA). • The antibodies inhibited HA structural activation during the fusion process. • The antibodies are potential candidates for future antibody therapy to influenza. - Abstract: Influenza viruses are a continuous threat to human public health because of their ability to evolve rapidly through genetic drift and reassortment. Three human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) were generated in this study, 1H11, 2H5 and 5G2, and they cross-neutralize a diverse range of group 1 influenza A viruses, including seasonal H1N1, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) and avian H5N1 and H9N2. The three HuMAbs were prepared by fusing peripheral blood lymphocytes from an H1N1pdm-infected patient with a newly developed fusion partner cell line, SPYMEG. All the HuMAbs had little hemagglutination inhibition activity but had strong membrane-fusion inhibition activity against influenza viruses. A protease digestion assay showed the HuMAbs targeted commonly a short α-helix region in the stalk of the hemagglutinin. Furthermore, Ile45Phe and Glu47Gly double substitutions in the α-helix region made the HA unrecognizable by the HuMAbs. These two amino acid residues are highly conserved in the HAs of H1N1, H5N1 and H9N2 viruses. The HuMAbs reported here may be potential candidates for the development of therapeutic antibodies against group 1 influenza viruses

  1. Human monoclonal antibodies derived from a patient infected with 2009 pandemic influenza A virus broadly cross-neutralize group 1 influenza viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Yang [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Sasaki, Tadahiro [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); JST/JICA, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Kanonji Institute, The Research Foundation for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University, Kanonji, Kagawa (Japan); JST/JICA, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Inoue, Yuji [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); JST/JICA, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Yasugi, Mayo [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, Izumisano, Osaka (Japan); JST/JICA, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Yamashita, Akifumi; Ramadhany, Ririn; Arai, Yasuha [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Du, Anariwa [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); JST/JICA, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Boonsathorn, Naphatsawan [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Muang, Nonthaburi (Thailand); JST/JICA, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Ibrahim, Madiha S. [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Damanhour University, Damanhour (Egypt); and others

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Influenza infection can elicit heterosubtypic antibodies to group 1 influenza virus. • Three human monoclonal antibodies were generated from an H1N1-infected patient. • The antibodies predominantly recognized α-helical stem of viral hemagglutinin (HA). • The antibodies inhibited HA structural activation during the fusion process. • The antibodies are potential candidates for future antibody therapy to influenza. - Abstract: Influenza viruses are a continuous threat to human public health because of their ability to evolve rapidly through genetic drift and reassortment. Three human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) were generated in this study, 1H11, 2H5 and 5G2, and they cross-neutralize a diverse range of group 1 influenza A viruses, including seasonal H1N1, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) and avian H5N1 and H9N2. The three HuMAbs were prepared by fusing peripheral blood lymphocytes from an H1N1pdm-infected patient with a newly developed fusion partner cell line, SPYMEG. All the HuMAbs had little hemagglutination inhibition activity but had strong membrane-fusion inhibition activity against influenza viruses. A protease digestion assay showed the HuMAbs targeted commonly a short α-helix region in the stalk of the hemagglutinin. Furthermore, Ile45Phe and Glu47Gly double substitutions in the α-helix region made the HA unrecognizable by the HuMAbs. These two amino acid residues are highly conserved in the HAs of H1N1, H5N1 and H9N2 viruses. The HuMAbs reported here may be potential candidates for the development of therapeutic antibodies against group 1 influenza viruses.

  2. Generation and Characterization of Human Monoclonal Antibodies Targeting Anthrax Protective Antigen following Vaccination with a Recombinant Protective Antigen Vaccine

    OpenAIRE

    Chi, Xiangyang; Li, Jianmin; Liu, Weicen; Wang, Xiaolin; Yin, Kexin; Liu, Ju; Zai, Xiaodong; Li, Liangliang; Song, Xiaohong; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Yin, Ying; Fu, Ling; Xu, Junjie; Yu, Changming

    2015-01-01

    The anthrax protective antigen (PA) is the central component of the three-part anthrax toxin, and it is the primary immunogenic component in the approved AVA anthrax vaccine and the “next-generation” recombinant PA (rPA) anthrax vaccines. Animal models have indicated that PA-specific antibodies (AB) are sufficient to protect against infection with Bacillus anthracis. In this study, we investigated the PA domain specificity, affinity, mechanisms of neutralization, and synergistic effects of PA...

  3. Protective efficacy of a bacterially produced modular capsomere presenting M2e from influenza: extending the potential of broadly cross-protecting epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wibowo, Nani; Hughes, Fiona K; Fairmaid, Emily J; Lua, Linda H L; Brown, Lorena E; Middelberg, Anton P J

    2014-06-17

    Influenza A viruses drift and shift, emerging as antigenically distinct strains that lead to epidemics and pandemics of varying severity. Even epitopes associated with broad cross-protection against different strains, such as the ectodomain of matrix protein 2 (M2e), mutate unpredictably. Vaccine protective efficacy is only ensured when the emerging virus lies within the vaccine's cross-protective domain, which is poorly defined in most situations. When virus emerges outside this domain it is essential to rapidly re-engineer the vaccine and hence re-center the cross-protective domain on the new virus. This approach of vaccine re-engineering in response to virus change is the cornerstone of the current influenza control system, based on annual prediction and/or pandemic reaction. This system could become more responsive, and perhaps preventative, if its speed could be improved. Here, we demonstrate vaccine efficacy of a rapidly manufacturable modular capsomere presenting the broadly cross-protecting M2e epitope from influenza. M2e inserted into a viral capsomere at the DNA level was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein (Wibowo et al., 2013). Immunization of mice with this modular capsomere adjuvanted with conventional aluminum hydroxide induced high (more than 10(5) endpoint titer) levels of M2e-specific antibodies that reduced disease severity and viral load in the lungs of challenged mice. The combination of rapid manufacturability of modular capsomere presented in this study, and the established cross-protective efficacy of M2e, allow rapid matching of vaccine to the circulating virus and hence rapid re-centering of the vaccine's cross-protective domain onto the virus. This approach synergizes the discussed benefits of broadly cross-protecting epitopes with rapid scale-up vaccine manufacture using microbial cell factories. PMID:24795225

  4. A Neutralizing Anti-gH/gL Monoclonal Antibody Is Protective in the Guinea Pig Model of Congenital CMV Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Auerbach, Marcy R.; Yan, Donghong; Vij, Rajesh; Hongo, Jo-Anne; Nakamura, Gerald; Vernes, Jean-Michel; Meng, Y. Gloria; Lein, Samantha; Chan, Pamela; Ross, Jed; Carano, Richard; Deng, Rong; Lewin-Koh, Nicholas; Xu, Min; Feierbach, Becket

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is the most common cause of congenital virus infection. Congenital HCMV infection occurs in 0.2–1% of all births, and causes birth defects and developmental abnormalities, including sensorineural hearing loss and developmental delay. Several key studies have established the guinea pig as a tractable model for the study of congenital HCMV infection and have shown that polyclonal antibodies can be protective [1]–[3]. In this study, we demonstrate that an anti-guinea pig CMV (GPCMV) glycoprotein H/glycoprotein L neutralizing monoclonal antibody protects against fetal infection and loss in the guinea pig. Furthermore, we have delineated the kinetics of GPCMV congenital infection, from maternal infection (salivary glands, seroconversion, placenta) to fetal infection (fetus and amniotic fluid). Our studies support the hypothesis that a neutralizing monoclonal antibody targeting an envelope GPCMV glycoprotein can protect the fetus from infection and may shed light on the therapeutic intervention of HCMV congenital infection in humans. PMID:24722349

  5. Stimulated Innate Resistance of Lung Epithelium Protects Mice Broadly against Bacteria and Fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Evans, Scott E; Scott, Brenton L.; Clement, Cecilia G; Larson, Derek T.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios; Lewis, Russell E.; LaSala, P. Rocco; Pawlik, Jennifer; Peterson, Johnny W.; Chopra, Ashok K.; Klimpel, Gary; Bowden, Gabriela; Höök, Magnus; Xu, Yi; Tuvim, Michael J

    2009-01-01

    Pneumonia is a serious problem worldwide. We recently demonstrated that innate defense mechanisms of the lung are highly inducible against pneumococcal pneumonia. To determine the breadth of protection conferred by stimulation of lung mucosal innate immunity, and to identify cells and signaling pathways activated by this treatment, mice were treated with an aerosolized bacterial lysate, then challenged with lethal doses of bacterial and fungal pathogens. Mice were highly protected against a b...

  6. A novel human IgA monoclonal antibody protects against tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balu, Sucharitha; Reljic, Rajko; Lewis, Melanie J; Pleass, Richard J; McIntosh, Richard; van Kooten, Cees; van Egmond, Marjolein; Challacombe, Stephen; Woof, Jenny M; Ivanyi, Juraj

    2011-03-01

    Abs have been shown to be protective in passive immunotherapy of tuberculous infection using mouse experimental models. In this study, we report on the properties of a novel human IgA1, constructed using a single-chain variable fragment clone (2E9), selected from an Ab phage library. The purified Ab monomer revealed high binding affinities for the mycobacterial α-crystallin Ag and for the human FcαRI (CD89) IgA receptor. Intranasal inoculations with 2E9IgA1 and recombinant mouse IFN-γ significantly inhibited pulmonary H37Rv infection in mice transgenic for human CD89 but not in CD89-negative littermate controls, suggesting that binding to CD89 was necessary for the IgA-imparted passive protection. 2E9IgA1 added to human whole-blood or monocyte cultures inhibited luciferase-tagged H37Rv infection although not for all tested blood donors. Inhibition by 2E9IgA1 was synergistic with human rIFN-γ in cultures of purified human monocytes but not in whole-blood cultures. The demonstration of the mandatory role of FcαRI (CD89) for human IgA-mediated protection is important for understanding of the mechanisms involved and also for translation of this approach toward development of passive immunotherapy of tuberculosis. PMID:21257971

  7. Characterization of the mechanism of protection mediated by CS-D7, a monoclonal antibody to Staphylococcus aureus iron regulated surface determinant B (IsdB)

    OpenAIRE

    Gregory ePancari; Hongxia eFan; Sharon eSmith; Amita eJoshi; Robin eHaimbach; Desmond eClark; Yingzhe eLi; Jin eHua; Troy eMcKelvey; Yangsi eOu; James eDrummond; Leslie eCope; Donna eMontgomery; Tessie eMcNeely

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported the development of a human monoclonal antibody (CS-D7, IgG1) with specificity and affinity for the iron regulated surface determinant B (IsdB) of Staphylococcus aureus. CS-D7 mediates opsonophagocytic killing in vitro and protection in a murine sepsis model. In light of recent data indicating that IsdB specific T cells (CD4+, Th17), not Ab, mediate protection after vaccination with IsdB, it is important to investigate the mechanism of protection mediated by CS-D7. Th...

  8. S2 expressed from recombinant virus confers broad protection against infectious bronchitis virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    We previously demonstrated that overexposing the IBV (infectious bronchitis virus) S2 to the chicken immune system by means of a vectored vaccine, followed by boost with whole virus, protects chickens against IBV showing dissimilar S1. We developed recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) LaSota (...

  9. Infectious bronchitis virus S2 expressed from recombinant virus confers broad protection against challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    We developed recombinant Newcastle disease virus (NDV) LaSota (rLS) expressing the IBV S2 gene (rLS/IBV.S2). The recombinant virus showed reduced pathogenicity compared to the parental LaSota strain but effectively elicited hemagglutination inhibition antibodies and protected chickens against lethal...

  10. Current models broadly neglect specific needs of biodiversity conservation in protected areas under climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moloney Kirk A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protected areas are the most common and important instrument for the conservation of biological diversity and are called for under the United Nations' Convention on Biological Diversity. Growing human population densities, intensified land-use, invasive species and increasing habitat fragmentation threaten ecosystems worldwide and protected areas are often the only refuge for endangered species. Climate change is posing an additional threat that may also impact ecosystems currently under protection. Therefore, it is of crucial importance to include the potential impact of climate change when designing future nature conservation strategies and implementing protected area management. This approach would go beyond reactive crisis management and, by necessity, would include anticipatory risk assessments. One avenue for doing so is being provided by simulation models that take advantage of the increase in computing capacity and performance that has occurred over the last two decades. Here we review the literature to determine the state-of-the-art in modeling terrestrial protected areas under climate change, with the aim of evaluating and detecting trends and gaps in the current approaches being employed, as well as to provide a useful overview and guidelines for future research. Results Most studies apply statistical, bioclimatic envelope models and focus primarily on plant species as compared to other taxa. Very few studies utilize a mechanistic, process-based approach and none examine biotic interactions like predation and competition. Important factors like land-use, habitat fragmentation, invasion and dispersal are rarely incorporated, restricting the informative value of the resulting predictions considerably. Conclusion The general impression that emerges is that biodiversity conservation in protected areas could benefit from the application of modern modeling approaches to a greater extent than is currently reflected in the

  11. Cross-protective potential of a novel monoclonal antibody directed against antigenic site B of the hemagglutinin of influenza A viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiko Yoshida

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The hemagglutinin (HA of influenza A viruses has been classified into sixteen distinct subtypes (H1-H16 to date. The HA subtypes of influenza A viruses are principally defined as serotypes determined by neutralization or hemagglutination inhibition tests using polyclonal antisera to the respective HA subtypes, which have little cross-reactivity to the other HA subtypes. Thus, it is generally believed that the neutralizing antibodies are not broadly cross-reactive among HA subtypes. In this study, we generated a novel monoclonal antibody (MAb specific to HA, designated MAb S139/1, which showed heterosubtypic cross-reactive neutralization and hemagglutination inhibition of influenza A viruses. This MAb was found to have broad reactivity to many other viruses (H1, H2, H3, H5, H9, and H13 subtypes in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. We further found that MAb S139/1 showed neutralization and hemagglutination-inhibition activities against particular strains of H1, H2, H3, and H13 subtypes of influenza A viruses. Mutant viruses that escaped neutralization by MAb S139/1 were selected from the A/Aichi/2/68 (H3N2, A/Adachi/2/57 (H2N2, and A/WSN/33 (H1N1 strains, and sequence analysis of the HA genes of these escape mutants revealed amino acid substitutions at positions 156, 158, and 193 (H3 numbering. A molecular modeling study showed that these amino acids were located on the globular head of the HA and formed a novel conformational epitope adjacent to the receptor-binding domain of HA. Furthermore, passive immunization of mice with MAb S139/1 provided heterosubtypic protection. These results demonstrate that MAb S139/1 binds to a common antigenic site shared among a variety of HA subtypes and neutralizes viral infectivity in vitro and in vivo by affecting viral attachment to cells. The present study supports the notion that cross-reactive antibodies play some roles in heterosubtypic immunity against influenza A virus infection, and underscores the

  12. Broadly protective adenovirus-based multivalent vaccines against highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses for pandemic preparedness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vemula, Sai V; Ahi, Yadvinder S; Swaim, Anne-Marie; Katz, Jacqueline M; Donis, Ruben; Sambhara, Suryaprakash; Mittal, Suresh K

    2013-01-01

    Recurrent outbreaks of H5, H7 and H9 avian influenza viruses in domestic poultry accompanied by their occasional transmission to humans have highlighted the public health threat posed by these viruses. Newer vaccine approaches for pandemic preparedness against these viruses are needed, given the limitations of vaccines currently approved for H5N1 viruses in terms of their production timelines and the ability to induce protective immune responses in the absence of adjuvants. In this study, we evaluated the feasibility of an adenovirus (AdV)-based multivalent vaccine approach for pandemic preparedness against H5, H7 and H9 avian influenza viruses in a mouse model. Replication-defective AdV vectors expressing hemagglutinin (HA) from different subtypes and nucleoprotein (NP) from one subtype induced high levels of humoral and cellular immune responses and conferred protection against virus replication following challenge with H5, H7 and H9 avian influenza virus subtypes. Inclusion of HA from the 2009 H1N1 pandemic virus in the vaccine formulation further broadened the vaccine coverage. Significantly high levels of HA stalk-specific antibodies were observed following immunization with the multivalent vaccine. Inclusion of NP into the multivalent HA vaccine formulation resulted in the induction of CD8 T cell responses. These results suggest that a multivalent vaccine strategy may provide reasonable protection in the event of a pandemic caused by H5, H7, or H9 avian influenza virus before a strain-matched vaccine can be produced. PMID:23638099

  13. Structures of the Zika Virus Envelope Protein and Its Complex with a Flavivirus Broadly Protective Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lianpan; Song, Jian; Lu, Xishan; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Musyoki, Abednego Moki; Cheng, Huijun; Zhang, Yanfang; Yuan, Yuan; Song, Hao; Haywood, Joel; Xiao, Haixia; Yan, Jinghua; Shi, Yi; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Qi, Jianxun; Gao, George F

    2016-05-11

    Zika virus (ZIKV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, is a current global public health concern. The flavivirus envelope (E) glycoprotein is responsible for virus entry and represents a major target of neutralizing antibodies for other flaviviruses. Here, we report the structures of ZIKV E protein at 2.0 Å and in complex with a flavivirus broadly neutralizing murine antibody 2A10G6 at 3.0 Å. ZIKV-E resembles all the known flavivirus E structures but contains a unique, positively charged patch adjacent to the fusion loop region of the juxtaposed monomer, which may influence host attachment. The ZIKV-E-2A10G6 complex structure reveals antibody recognition of a highly conserved fusion loop. 2A10G6 binds to ZIKV-E with high affinity in vitro and neutralizes currently circulating ZIKV strains in vitro and in mice. The E protein fusion loop epitope represents a potential candidate for therapeutic antibodies against ZIKV. PMID:27158114

  14. Delivery of a multivalent scrambled antigen vaccine induces broad spectrum immunity and protection against tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, Nicholas P; Thomson, Scott A; Triccas, James A; Medveczky, C Jill; Ramshaw, Ian A; Britton, Warwick J

    2011-10-13

    The development of effective anti-Tuberculosis (TB) vaccines is an important step towards improved control of TB in high burden countries. Subunit vaccines are advantageous in terms of safety, particularly in the context of high rates of HIV co-infection, but they must contain sufficient Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens to stimulate immunity in genetically diverse human populations. We have used a novel approach to develop a synthetic scrambled antigen vaccine (TB-SAVINE), comprised of overlapping, recombined peptides from four M. tuberculosis proteins, Ag85B, ESAT-6, PstS3 and Mpt83, each of which is immunogenic and protective against experimental TB. This polyvalent TB-SAVINE construct stimulated CD4 and CD8T cell responses against the individual proteins and M. tuberculosis in C57BL/6 and Balb/c mice, when delivered as DNA, Fowl Pox Virus or Vaccinia Virus vaccines. In addition, the DNA-TBS vaccine induced protective immunity against pulmonary M. tuberculosis infection in C57BL/6 mice. Co-immunization of Balb/c mice with virally expressed TBS and HIV1-SAVINE vaccine stimulated strong T cell responses to both the M. tuberculosis and HIV proteins, indicating no effects of antigenic competition. Further development of this TB-SAVINE vaccine expressing components from multiple M. tuberculosis proteins may prove an effective vaccine candidate against TB, which could potentially form part of a safe, combined preventative strategy together with HIV immunisations. PMID:21846485

  15. Protection against SHIV Challenge by Subcutaneous Administration of the Plant-Derived PGT121 Broadly Neutralizing Antibody in Macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Yvonne J.; Montefiori, David C.; LaBranche, Celia C.; Lewis, Mark G.; Sack, Markus; Lees, Jonathan P.; Jiang, Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Intravascular delivery of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) has shown promise for prevention and treatment of HIV infection. However, multiple IV administrations in geographic locations with poor accessibility to medical care have practical limitations. We have assessed the efficacy of plant-derived PGT121 delivered subcutaneously (SC) against pre-and post-intravaginal challenge using a rigorous SHIV-SF162P3 macaque protection model. SC administered PGT121 exhibited a longer serum half-life than IV administration and was more consistent than intramuscular delivery. A dose of 3.5mg/kg PGT121 prevented infection at a minimum ID50 neutralization titer of 1:295 while 5mg/kg protected five of six macaques when delivered immediately post-challenge. These results suggest the utility of plant-derived bnAbs delivered SC for HIV prevention. PMID:27031108

  16. Human anti-anthrax protective antigen neutralizing monoclonal antibodies derived from donors vaccinated with anthrax vaccine adsorbed

    OpenAIRE

    Sawada-Hirai, Ritsuko; Jiang, Ivy; Wang, Fei; Sun, Shu Man; Nedellec, Rebecca; Ruther, Paul; Alvarez, Alejandro; Millis, Diane; Morrow, Phillip R.; Kang, Angray S

    2004-01-01

    Background Potent anthrax toxin neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies were generated from peripheral blood lymphocytes obtained from Anthrax Vaccine Adsorbed (AVA) immune donors. The anti-anthrax toxin human monoclonal antibodies were evaluated for neutralization of anthrax lethal toxin in vivo in the Fisher 344 rat bolus toxin challenge model. Methods Human peripheral blood lymphocytes from AVA immunized donors were engrafted into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. Vaccination w...

  17. Identification of broadly conserved cross-species protective Leishmania antigen and its responding CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mou, Zhirong; Li, Jintao; Boussoffara, Thouraya; Kishi, Hiroyuki; Hamana, Hiroshi; Ezzati, Peyman; Hu, Chuanmin; Yi, Weijing; Liu, Dong; Khadem, Forough; Okwor, Ifeoma; Jia, Ping; Shitaoka, Kiyomi; Wang, Shufeng; Ndao, Momar; Petersen, Christine; Chen, Jianping; Rafati, Sima; Louzir, Hechmi; Muraguchi, Atsushi; Wilkins, John A; Uzonna, Jude E

    2015-10-21

    There is currently no clinically effective vaccine against leishmaniasis because of poor understanding of the antigens that elicit dominant T cell immunity. Using proteomics and cellular immunology, we identified a dominant naturally processed peptide (PEPCK335-351) derived from Leishmania glycosomal phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK). PEPCK was conserved in all pathogenic Leishmania, expressed in glycosomes of promastigotes and amastigotes, and elicited strong CD4(+) T cell responses in infected mice and humans. I-A(b)-PEPCK335-351 tetramer identified protective Leishmania-specific CD4(+) T cells at a clonal level, which comprised ~20% of all Leishmania-reactive CD4(+) T cells at the peak of infection. PEPCK335-351-specific CD4(+) T cells were oligoclonal in their T cell receptor usage, produced polyfunctional cytokines (interleukin-2, interferon-γ, and tumor necrosis factor), and underwent expansion, effector activities, contraction, and stable maintenance after lesion resolution. Vaccination with PEPCK peptide, DNA expressing full-length PEPCK, or rPEPCK induced strong durable cross-species protection in both resistant and susceptible mice. The effectiveness and durability of protection in vaccinated mice support the development of a broadly cross-species protective vaccine against different forms of leishmaniasis by targeting PEPCK. PMID:26491077

  18. Vector optimization and needle-free intradermal application of a broadly protective polyvalent influenza A DNA vaccine for pigs and humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borggren, Marie; Nielsen, Jens; Bragstad, Karoline;

    2015-01-01

    The threat posed by the 2009 pandemic H1N1 virus emphasized the need for new influenza A virus vaccines inducing a broad cross-protective immune response for use in both humans and pigs. An effective and broad influenza vaccine for pigs would greatly benefit the pork industry and contribute to pu...

  19. Sublingual immunization with a live attenuated influenza a virus lacking the nonstructural protein 1 induces broad protective immunity in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hae-Jung Park

    Full Text Available The nonstructural protein 1 (NS1 of influenza A virus (IAV enables the virus to disarm the host cell type 1 IFN defense system. Mutation or deletion of the NS1 gene leads to attenuation of the virus and enhances host antiviral response making such live-attenuated influenza viruses attractive vaccine candidates. Sublingual (SL immunization with live influenza virus has been found to be safe and effective for inducing protective immune responses in mucosal and systemic compartments. Here we demonstrate that SL immunization with NS1 deleted IAV (DeltaNS1 H1N1 or DeltaNS1 H5N1 induced protection against challenge with homologous as well as heterosubtypic influenza viruses. Protection was comparable with that induced by intranasal (IN immunization and was associated with high levels of virus-specific antibodies (Abs. SL immunization with DeltaNS1 virus induced broad Ab responses in mucosal and systemic compartments and stimulated immune cells in mucosa-associated and systemic lymphoid organs. Thus, SL immunization with DeltaNS1 offers a novel potential vaccination strategy for the control of influenza outbreaks including pandemics.

  20. Passive immunization with Leptospira LPS-specific agglutinating but not non-agglutinating monoclonal antibodies protect guinea pigs from fatal pulmonary hemorrhages induced by serovar Copenhageni challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Challa, Sreerupa; Nally, Jarlath E; Jones, Carroll; Sheoran, Abhineet S

    2011-06-15

    Leptospira interrogans serovar Copenhageni causes pulmonary hemorrhages with respiratory failure, a major cause of death in leptospirosis patients. Protective immunity to Leptospira is known to correlate with the production of leptospiral lipopolysaccharide (L-LPS)-specific agglutinating antibodies. We generated L-LPS-specific mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) and investigated if these MAbs can protect guinea pigs against fatal pulmonary hemorrhages caused by serovar Copenhageni. The MAbs L8H4 and L9B11 against 22kDa L-LPS agglutinated leptospires and completely protected guinea pigs from the development of fatal pulmonary hemorrhages by serovar Copenhageni, whereas the MAb L4C1 against 8kDa L-LPS neither agglutinated the bacteria nor protected the animals against the fatal pulmonary hemorrhages. PMID:21549788

  1. Guardians at the gate: Patent protection of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies through product life cycle management—Part 3

    OpenAIRE

    McCabe, Kevin W; Calvo, Paul A

    2009-01-01

    Product life cycle management, which necessarily utilizes a multi-disciplinary approach, is an essential tool for companies that develop or market therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). Too little attention to such a plan, or use of the wrong resources, could substantially curtail a product's life span. The most difficult part of the therapeutic antibody business is the development of high-quality, safe and effective products. Great care should thus be taken to ensure that products with th...

  2. Mechanism of Lethal Toxin Neutralization by a Human Monoclonal Antibody Specific for the PA20 Region of Bacillus anthracis Protective Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jessica Camacho

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The primary immunogenic component of the currently approved anthrax vaccine is the protective antigen (PA unit of the binary toxin system. PA-specific antibodies neutralize anthrax toxins and protect against infection. Recent research has determined that in humans, only antibodies specific for particular determinants are capable of effecting toxin neutralization, and that the neutralizing epitopes recognized by these antibodies are distributed throughout the PA monomer. The mechanisms by which the majority of these epitopes effect neutralization remain unknown. In this report we investigate the process by which a human monoclonal antibody specific for the amino-terminal domain of PA neutralizes lethal toxin in an in vitro assay of cytotoxicity, and find that it neutralizes LT by blocking the requisite cleavage of the amino-terminal 20 kD portion of the molecule (PA20 from the remainder of the PA monomer. We also demonstrate that the epitope recognized by this human monoclonal does not encompass the 166RKKR169 furin recognition sequence in domain 1 of PA.

  3. A humanised murine monoclonal antibody protects mice from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, Everglades virus and Mucambo virus when administered up to 48 h after airborne challenge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Currently there are no licensed antiviral treatments for the Alphaviruses Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), Everglades virus and Mucambo virus. We previously developed a humanised version of the mouse monoclonal antibody 1A3B-7 (Hu1A3B-7) which exhibited a wide range of reactivity in vitro and was able to protect mice from infection with VEEV. Continued work with the humanised antibody has now demonstrated that it has the potential to be a new human therapeutic. Hu1A3B-7 successfully protected mice from infection with multiple Alphaviruses. The effectiveness of the humanisation process was determined by assessing proliferation responses in human T-cells to peptides derived from the murine and humanised versions of the VH and VL domains. This analysis showed that the number of human T-cell epitopes within the humanised antibody had been substantially reduced, indicating that Hu1A3B-7 may have reduced immunogenicity in vivo.

  4. Influenza B-Cells Protective Epitope Characterization: A Passkey for the Rational Design of New Broad-Range Anti-Influenza Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Burioni

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The emergence of new influenza strains causing pandemics represents a serious threat to human health. From 1918, four influenza pandemics occurred, caused by H1N1, H2N2 and H3N2 subtypes. Moreover, in 1997 a novel influenza avian strain belonging to the H5N1 subtype infected humans. Nowadays, even if its transmission is still circumscribed to avian species, the capability of the virus to infect humans directly from avian reservoirs can result in fatalities. Moreover, the risk that this or novel avian strains could adapt to inter-human transmission, the development of resistance to anti-viral drugs and the lack of an effective prevention are all incumbent problems for the world population. In this scenario, the identification of broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs directed against conserved regions shared among influenza isolates has raised hopes for the development of monoclonal antibody-based immunotherapy and “universal” anti-influenza vaccines.

  5. Monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) are antibodies having single specificity for a given antigen site (epitope). The development of hybridoma technology and the relative ease by which MAbs can be prepared has revolutionized many aspects of serological applications in diagnosis and differentiation of disease producing agents. The property of monospecificity offers advantages in diagnostic applications over polyclonal sera in that tests can be defined exactly with regard to the antigen detected and the affinity of reaction between the given antigenic site and the monoclonal reagent. In addition, MAbs offer better possibilities for test standardization, because the same reagent can be used in different laboratories. Such an MAb can be supplied by a central laboratory or 'grown' from hybridoma cells, ensuring that the resultant product is identical from laboratory to laboratory and that the part of the test involving the MAb reaction is the same. The methodologies for inoculation regimes, mice, cloning methods, selection of fusion partners, etc., have been validated extensively in developed country laboratories. The decision to establish a MAb production facility must be examined on a strict cost-benefit basis, since it is still expensive to produce a product. There are many MAbs available that should be sought to allow exploitation in developing tests. If a production facility is envisaged, it should produce reagents for national needs, i.e. there should be a clear problem oriented approach whereby exact needs are defined. In the field of veterinary applications, MAbs are the central reagent in many immunoassays based on the enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The development of specific tests for diagnosing diseases is dominated by MAbs and has been fuelled by a strong research base, mainly in developed countries allied to developing countries through the study of related diseases. Thus, there are very many assays dependent on MAbs, some of which form the basis of

  6. Monoclonal antibodies to the distinct antigenic sites on glycoproteins C and B and their protective abilities in herpes simplex virus infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The relative importance of the humoral immune response to various antigenic sites on the glycoproteins C and B (gC, gB) of herpes simplex virus (HSV) was evaluated in BALB/c and DBA/2 mice passively immunized with monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) and then challenged with lethal dose of infectious virus. Eight MoAbs to three topographically distinct antigenic sites on gC and eight MoAbs to two distinct antigenic sites on gB were selected. The results indicated that any antigenic site on gC and gB contains epitopes for the protective immunity. However, individual MoAbs to different epitopes of the same antigenic site (i.e. antigenic site III on gC, and antigenic site II on gB) varied extremely in their protective ability. The protection did not correlate with the virus neutralization in vitro whereas it correlated significantly with the immune cytolysis in the presence of complement. The information about protective epitopes is essential for understanding the immunology of HSV infection at molecular level and may have implications for the design of HSV vaccine. (authors)

  7. Prophylaxis With a Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV)-Specific Human Monoclonal Antibody Protects Rabbits From MERS-CoV Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Houser, Katherine V; Gretebeck, Lisa; Ying, Tianlei; Wang, Yanping; Vogel, Leatrice; Lamirande, Elaine W; Bock, Kevin W; Moore, Ian N; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Subbarao, Kanta

    2016-05-15

    With >1600 documented human infections with Middle East respiratory syndrome coronavirus (MERS-CoV) and a case fatality rate of approximately 36%, medical countermeasures are needed to prevent and limit the disease. We examined the in vivo efficacy of the human monoclonal antibody m336, which has high neutralizing activity against MERS-CoV in vitro. m336 was administered to rabbits intravenously or intranasally before infection with MERS-CoV. Prophylaxis with m336 resulted in a reduction of pulmonary viral RNA titers by 40-9000-fold, compared with an irrelevant control antibody with little to no inflammation or viral antigen detected. This protection in rabbits supports further clinical development of m336. PMID:26941283

  8. Protection of mice against Japanese encephalitis virus group II strain infections by combinations of monoclonal antibodies to different antigenic domains on glycoprotein E

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashok Kumar Gupta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A combination of at least three hemagglutination- inhibition-positive (HAI and virus-specific (Hs monoclonal antibodies (MAbs to glycoprotein E (gpE of Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV fully protected (100% mice against JEV strain 733913 infections (group 1. However, these representative epitopes are reported to have been lost on JEV group II strains. In the present study, therefore, the protective effect of various combinations of anti-gpE MAbs representing antigenic epitopes other than Hs was studied on mice infections with JEV group II strains: JEV strains 641686 and 691004. MAbs used in the protective experiments were characterized as HAI-negative virus-specific (NHs and HAI-positive flavivirus cross-reactive (Hx. Additionally, one of the Hs MAbs (MAb Hs-3 was included in the experiments. Mice were first administered single MAbs or their combinations intraperitoneally and 24 h later, infected with the virus intracerebrally. Protection rates of 70-75% were obtained with a combination of four MAbs: MAbs NHs-1, Hx-1, Hx-3 and Hs-3. However, protection rates of only 20-40% were obtained with three MAbs but none was observed with single or two MAbs. There was, however, a substantial increase in mice survival. The protective effect of several combinations of anti-gpE MAbs representing different antigenic epitopes might be due to the enhancement of binding within the same group and also between different MAb groups. The present results indicate that NHs and Hx epitopes should be incorporated with three Hs epitopes in a JEV vaccine that would have an added advantage, particularly in the flaviviral endemic areas with JEV strain variations.

  9. A humanised murine monoclonal antibody protects mice from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, Everglades virus and Mucambo virus when administered up to 48 h after airborne challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Lyn M., E-mail: lmobrien@dstl.gov.uk; Goodchild, Sarah A.; Phillpotts, Robert J.; Perkins, Stuart D.

    2012-05-10

    Currently there are no licensed antiviral treatments for the Alphaviruses Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), Everglades virus and Mucambo virus. We previously developed a humanised version of the mouse monoclonal antibody 1A3B-7 (Hu1A3B-7) which exhibited a wide range of reactivity in vitro and was able to protect mice from infection with VEEV. Continued work with the humanised antibody has now demonstrated that it has the potential to be a new human therapeutic. Hu1A3B-7 successfully protected mice from infection with multiple Alphaviruses. The effectiveness of the humanisation process was determined by assessing proliferation responses in human T-cells to peptides derived from the murine and humanised versions of the V{sub H} and V{sub L} domains. This analysis showed that the number of human T-cell epitopes within the humanised antibody had been substantially reduced, indicating that Hu1A3B-7 may have reduced immunogenicity in vivo.

  10. Human Monoclonal Antibody AVP-21D9 to Protective Antigen Reduces Dissemination of the Bacillus anthracis Ames Strain from the Lungs in a Rabbit Model▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Johnny W.; Comer, Jason E.; Baze, Wallace B.; Noffsinger, David M.; Wenglikowski, Autumn; Walberg, Kristin G.; Hardcastle, Jason; Pawlik, Jennifer; Bush, Kathryn; Taormina, Joanna; Moen, Scott; Thomas, John; Chatuev, Bagram M.; Sower, Laurie; Chopra, Ashok K.; Stanberry, Lawrence R.; Sawada, Ritsuko; Scholz, Wolfgang W.; Sircar, Jagadish

    2007-01-01

    Dutch-belted and New Zealand White rabbits were passively immunized with AVP-21D9, a human monoclonal antibody to protective antigen (PA), at the time of Bacillus anthracis spore challenge using either nasal instillation or aerosol challenge techniques. AVP-21D9 (10 mg/kg) completely protected both rabbit strains against lethal infection with Bacillus anthracis Ames spores, regardless of the inoculation method. Further, all but one of the passively immunized animals (23/24) were completely resistant to rechallenge with spores by either respiratory challenge method at 5 weeks after primary challenge. Analysis of the sera at 5 weeks after primary challenge showed that residual human anti-PA levels decreased by 85 to 95%, but low titers of rabbit-specific anti-PA titers were also measured. Both sources of anti-PA could have contributed to protection from rechallenge. In a subsequent study, bacteriological and histopathology analyses revealed that B. anthracis disseminated to the bloodstream in some naïve animals as early as 24 h postchallenge and increased in frequency with time. AVP-21D9 significantly reduced the dissemination of the bacteria to the bloodstream and to various organs following infection. Examination of tissue sections from infected control animals, stained with hematoxylin-eosin and the Gram stain, showed edema and/or hemorrhage in the lungs and the presence of bacteria in mediastinal lymph nodes, with necrosis and inflammation. Tissue sections from infected rabbits dosed with AVP-21D9 appeared comparable to corresponding tissues from uninfected animals despite lethal challenge with B. anthracis Ames spores. Concomitant treatment with AVP-21D9 at the time of challenge conferred complete protection in the rabbit inhalation anthrax model. Early treatment increased the efficacy progressively and in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, AVP-21D9 could offer an adjunct or alternative clinical treatment regimen against inhalation anthrax. PMID:17452469

  11. Human monoclonal antibody AVP-21D9 to protective antigen reduces dissemination of the Bacillus anthracis Ames strain from the lungs in a rabbit model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Johnny W; Comer, Jason E; Baze, Wallace B; Noffsinger, David M; Wenglikowski, Autumn; Walberg, Kristin G; Hardcastle, Jason; Pawlik, Jennifer; Bush, Kathryn; Taormina, Joanna; Moen, Scott; Thomas, John; Chatuev, Bagram M; Sower, Laurie; Chopra, Ashok K; Stanberry, Lawrence R; Sawada, Ritsuko; Scholz, Wolfgang W; Sircar, Jagadish

    2007-07-01

    Dutch-belted and New Zealand White rabbits were passively immunized with AVP-21D9, a human monoclonal antibody to protective antigen (PA), at the time of Bacillus anthracis spore challenge using either nasal instillation or aerosol challenge techniques. AVP-21D9 (10 mg/kg) completely protected both rabbit strains against lethal infection with Bacillus anthracis Ames spores, regardless of the inoculation method. Further, all but one of the passively immunized animals (23/24) were completely resistant to rechallenge with spores by either respiratory challenge method at 5 weeks after primary challenge. Analysis of the sera at 5 weeks after primary challenge showed that residual human anti-PA levels decreased by 85 to 95%, but low titers of rabbit-specific anti-PA titers were also measured. Both sources of anti-PA could have contributed to protection from rechallenge. In a subsequent study, bacteriological and histopathology analyses revealed that B. anthracis disseminated to the bloodstream in some naïve animals as early as 24 h postchallenge and increased in frequency with time. AVP-21D9 significantly reduced the dissemination of the bacteria to the bloodstream and to various organs following infection. Examination of tissue sections from infected control animals, stained with hematoxylin-eosin and the Gram stain, showed edema and/or hemorrhage in the lungs and the presence of bacteria in mediastinal lymph nodes, with necrosis and inflammation. Tissue sections from infected rabbits dosed with AVP-21D9 appeared comparable to corresponding tissues from uninfected animals despite lethal challenge with B. anthracis Ames spores. Concomitant treatment with AVP-21D9 at the time of challenge conferred complete protection in the rabbit inhalation anthrax model. Early treatment increased the efficacy progressively and in a dose-dependent manner. Thus, AVP-21D9 could offer an adjunct or alternative clinical treatment regimen against inhalation anthrax. PMID:17452469

  12. Characterization of the mechanism of protection mediated by CS-D7, a monoclonal antibody to Staphylococcus aureus iron regulated surface determinant B (IsdB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory ePancari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported the development of a human monoclonal antibody (CS-D7, IgG1 with specificity and affinity for the iron regulated surface determinant B (IsdB of Staphylococcus aureus. CS-D7 mediates opsonophagocytic killing in vitro and protection in a murine sepsis model. In light of recent data indicating that IsdB specific T cells (CD4+, Th17, not Ab, mediate protection after vaccination with IsdB, it is important to investigate the mechanism of protection mediated by CS-D7. The mAb was examined to determine if it blocked heme binding to IsdB in vitro. The mAb was not found to have heme blocking activity, nor did it prevent bacterial growth under in vivo conditions, in an implanted growth chamber. To assess the role of the mAb Fc a point mutation was introduced at aa 297 (CS-D7●N297A. This point mutation removes Fc effector functions. In vitro analysis of the mutein confirmed that it lacked measurable binding to FcγR, and that it did not fix complement. The mutein had dramatically reduced in vitro opsonic OP activity compared to CS-D7. Nonetheless, the mutein conferred protection equivalent to the wild type mAb in the murine sepsis model. Both wild type and mutein mAbs were efficacious in FcγR deletion mice (including both FcγRII-/- mice and FcγRIII-/- mice, indicating that these receptors were not essential for mAb mediated protection in vivo. Protection mediated by CS-D7 was lost in Balb/c mice depleted of C3 with cobra venom factor (CFV, was lost in mice depleted of superoxide dismutase (SOD in P47phox deletion mice, and was absent in SCID mice. Enhanced clearance of S. aureus in the liver of CS-D7 treated mice and enhanced production of INF-γ, but not of IL17, may play a role in the mechanism of protection mediated by the mAb. CS-D7 apparently mediates survival in challenged mice through a mechanism involving complement, phagocytes, and lymphocytes, but which does not depend on interaction with FcγR, or on blocking heme

  13. Multi-epitope Models Explain How Pre-existing Antibodies Affect the Generation of Broadly Protective Responses to Influenza

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zarnitsyna, Veronika I.; Lavine, Jennie; Ellebedy, Ali; Ahmed, Rafi; Antia, Rustom

    2016-01-01

    The development of next-generation influenza vaccines that elicit strain-transcendent immunity against both seasonal and pandemic viruses is a key public health goal. Targeting the evolutionarily conserved epitopes on the stem of influenza’s major surface molecule, hemagglutinin, is an appealing prospect, and novel vaccine formulations show promising results in animal model systems. However, studies in humans indicate that natural infection and vaccination result in limited boosting of antibodies to the stem of HA, and the level of stem-specific antibody elicited is insufficient to provide broad strain-transcendent immunity. Here, we use mathematical models of the humoral immune response to explore how pre-existing immunity affects the ability of vaccines to boost antibodies to the head and stem of HA in humans, and, in particular, how it leads to the apparent lack of boosting of broadly cross-reactive antibodies to the stem epitopes. We consider hypotheses where binding of antibody to an epitope: (i) results in more rapid clearance of the antigen; (ii) leads to the formation of antigen-antibody complexes which inhibit B cell activation through Fcγ receptor-mediated mechanism; and (iii) masks the epitope and prevents the stimulation and proliferation of specific B cells. We find that only epitope masking but not the former two mechanisms to be key in recapitulating patterns in data. We discuss the ramifications of our findings for the development of vaccines against both seasonal and pandemic influenza. PMID:27336297

  14. Vaccination with embryonic stem cells protects against lung cancer: is a broad-spectrum prophylactic vaccine against cancer possible?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavitha Yaddanapudi

    Full Text Available The antigenic similarity between tumors and embryos has been appreciated for many years and reflects the expression of embryonic gene products by cancer cells and/or cancer-initiating stem cells. Taking advantage of this similarity, we have tested a prophylactic lung cancer vaccine composed of allogeneic murine embryonic stem cells (ESC. Naïve C57BL/6 mice were vaccinated with ESC along with a source of granulocyte macrophage-colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF in order to provide immunostimulatory adjuvant activity. Vaccinated mice were protected against subsequent challenge with implantable Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC. ESC-induced anti-tumor immunity was not due to a non-specific "allo-response" as vaccination with allogeneic murine embryonic fibroblasts did not protect against tumor outgrowth. Vaccine efficacy was associated with robust tumor-reactive primary and memory CD8(+ T effector responses, Th1 cytokine response, higher intratumoral CD8(+ T effector/CD4(+CD25(+Foxp3(+ T regulatory cell ratio, and reduced myeloid derived suppressor cells in the spleen. Prevention of tumorigenesis was found to require a CD8-mediated cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL response because in vivo depletion of CD8(+ T lymphocytes completely abrogated the protective effect of vaccination. Importantly, this vaccination strategy also suppressed the development of lung cancer induced by the combination of carcinogen administration and chronic pulmonary inflammation. Further refinement of this novel vaccine strategy and identification of shared ESC/tumor antigens may lead to immunotherapeutic options for lung cancer patients and, perhaps more importantly, could represent a first step toward the development of prophylactic cancer vaccines.

  15. Development of a novel monoclonal antibody with reactivity to a wide range of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phelps Amanda L

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is currently a requirement for antiviral therapies capable of protecting against infection with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV, as a licensed vaccine is not available for general human use. Monoclonal antibodies are increasingly being developed as therapeutics and are potential treatments for VEEV as they have been shown to be protective in the mouse model of disease. However, to be truly effective, the antibody should recognise multiple strains of VEEV and broadly reactive monoclonal antibodies are rarely and only coincidentally isolated using classical hybridoma technology. Results In this work, methods were developed to reliably derive broadly reactive murine antibodies. A phage library was created that expressed single chain variable fragments (scFv isolated from mice immunised with multiple strains of VEEV. A broadly reactive scFv was identified and incorporated into a murine IgG2a framework. This novel antibody retained the broad reactivity exhibited by the scFv but did not possess virus neutralising activity. However, the antibody was still able to protect mice against VEEV disease induced by strain TrD when administered 24 h prior to challenge. Conclusion A monoclonal antibody possessing reactivity to a wide range of VEEV strains may be of benefit as a generic antiviral therapy. However, humanisation of the murine antibody will be required before it can be tested in humans. Crown Copyright © 2009

  16. Monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The ability to produce and exploit monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized many areas of biological sciences. The unique property of an mAb is that it is a single species of immunoglobulin (IG) molecule. This means that the specificity of the interaction of the paratopes on the IG, with the epitopes on an antigenic target, is the same on every molecule. This property can be used to great benefit in immunoassays to provide tests of defined specificity and sensitivity, which improve the possibilities of standardization. The performance of assays can often be determined relating the actual weight of antibody (hence the number of molecules) to the activity. Often the production of an mAb against a specific epitope is the only way that biological entities can be differentiated. This chapter outlines the areas involving the development of assays based on mAbs. The problems involved address include the physical aspects of mAbs and how they may affect assay design and also the implications of results based on monospecific reagents. Often these are not fully understood, leading to assays that are less than satisfactory, which does not justify the relatively high cost of preparing and screening of mAbs. There are many textbooks and reviews dealing with the preparation of mAbs, the principles involved, and various purification and manipulative methods for the preparation of fragments and conjugation. There has been little general information attempting to summarize the best approaches to assay design using mAbs. Much time can be wasted through bad planning, and this is particularly relevant to mAbs. A proper understanding of some basic principles is essential. It is beyond the scope of this chapter to discuss all aspects, but major areas are highlighted. PMID:19219589

  17. Co-administration of the broad-spectrum antiviral, brincidofovir (CMX001), with smallpox vaccine does not compromise vaccine protection in mice challenged with ectromelia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Scott; Crump, Ryan; Foster, Scott; Hartzler, Hollyce; Hembrador, Ed; Lanier, E Randall; Painter, George; Schriewer, Jill; Trost, Lawrence C; Buller, R Mark

    2014-11-01

    Natural orthopoxvirus outbreaks such as vaccinia, cowpox, cattlepox and buffalopox continue to cause morbidity in the human population. Monkeypox virus remains a significant agent of morbidity and mortality in Africa. Furthermore, monkeypox virus's broad host-range and expanding environs make it of particular concern as an emerging human pathogen. Monkeypox virus and variola virus (the etiological agent of smallpox) are both potential agents of bioterrorism. The first line response to orthopoxvirus disease is through vaccination with first-generation and second-generation vaccines, such as Dryvax and ACAM2000. Although these vaccines provide excellent protection, their widespread use is impeded by the high level of adverse events associated with vaccination using live, attenuated virus. It is possible that vaccines could be used in combination with antiviral drugs to reduce the incidence and severity of vaccine-associated adverse events, or as a preventive in individuals with uncertain exposure status or contraindication to vaccination. We have used the intranasal mousepox (ectromelia) model to evaluate the efficacy of vaccination with Dryvax or ACAM2000 in conjunction with treatment using the broad spectrum antiviral, brincidofovir (BCV, CMX001). We found that co-treatment with BCV reduced the severity of vaccination-associated lesion development. Although the immune response to vaccination was quantifiably attenuated, vaccination combined with BCV treatment did not alter the development of full protective immunity, even when administered two days following ectromelia challenge. Studies with a non-replicating vaccine, ACAM3000 (MVA), confirmed that BCV's mechanism of attenuating the immune response following vaccination with live virus was, as expected, by limiting viral replication and not through inhibition of the immune system. These studies suggest that, in the setting of post-exposure prophylaxis, co-administration of BCV with vaccination should be considered

  18. Protective efficacy of a broadly cross-reactive swine influenza DNA vaccine encoding M2e, cytotoxic T lymphocyte epitope and consensus H3 hemagglutinin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Bin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pigs have been implicated as mixing reservoir for the generation of new pandemic influenza strains, control of swine influenza has both veterinary and public health significance. Unlike human influenza vaccines, strains used for commercially available swine influenza vaccines are not regularly replaced, making the vaccines provide limited protection against antigenically diverse viruses. It is therefore necessary to develop broadly protective swine influenza vaccines that are efficacious to both homologous and heterologous virus infections. In this study, two forms of DNA vaccines were constructed, one was made by fusing M2e to consensus H3HA (MHa, which represents the majority of the HA sequences of H3N2 swine influenza viruses. Another was made by fusing M2e and a conserved CTL epitope (NP147-155 to consensus H3HA (MNHa. Their protective efficacies against homologous and heterologous challenges were tested. Results BALB/c mice were immunized twice by particle-mediated epidermal delivery (gene gun with the two DNA vaccines. It was shown that the two vaccines elicited substantial antibody responses, and MNHa induced more significant T cell-mediated immune response than MHa did. Then two H3N2 strains representative of different evolutional and antigenic clusters were used to challenge the vaccine-immunized mice (homosubtypic challenge. Results indicated that both of the DNA vaccines prevented homosubtypic virus infections completely. The vaccines’ heterologous protective efficacies were further tested by challenging with a H1N1 swine influenza virus and a reassortant 2009 pandemic strain. It was found that MNHa reduced the lung viral titers significantly in both challenge groups, histopathological observation showed obvious reduction of lung pathogenesis as compared to MHa and control groups. Conclusions The combined utility of the consensus HA and the conserved M2e and CTL epitope can confer complete and partial protection

  19. Monoclonal Antibody Therapies against Anthrax

    OpenAIRE

    Zhaochun Chen; Mahtab Moayeri; Robert Purcell

    2011-01-01

    Anthrax is a highly lethal infectious disease caused by the spore-forming bacterium Bacillus anthracis. It not only causes natural infection in humans but also poses a great threat as an emerging bioterror agent. The lethality of anthrax is primarily attributed to the two major virulence factors: toxins and capsule. An extensive effort has been made to generate therapeutically useful monoclonal antibodies to each of the virulence components: protective antigen (PA), lethal factor (LF) and ede...

  20. A Broadly Cross-protective Vaccine Presenting the Neighboring Epitopes within the VP1 GH Loop and VP2 EF Loop of Enterovirus 71.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Longfa; He, Delei; Yang, Lisheng; Li, Zhiqun; Ye, Xiangzhong; Yu, Hai; zhao, Huan; Li, Shuxuan; Yuan, Lunzhi; Qian, Hongliu; Que, Yuqiong; Shih, James Wai Kuo; Zhu, Hua; Li, Yimin; Cheng, Tong; Xia, Ningshao

    2015-01-01

    Human enterovirus 71 (EV71) and coxsackievirus A16 (CA16) are the major etiological agents of hand, foot and mouth disease (HFMD) and are often associated with neurological complications. Currently, several vaccine types are being developed for EV71 and CA16. In this study, we constructed a bivalent chimeric virus-like particle (VLP) presenting the VP1 (aa208-222) and VP2 (aa141-155) epitopes of EV71 using hepatitis B virus core protein (HBc) as a carrier, designated HBc-E1/2. Immunization with the chimeric VLPs HBc-E1/2 induced higher IgG titers and neutralization titers against EV71 and CA16 in vitro than immunization with only one epitope incorporated into HBc. Importantly, passive immunization with the recombinant HBc-E2 particles protected neonatal mice against lethal EV71 and CA16 infections. We demonstrate that anti-VP2 (aa141-155) sera bound authentic CA16 viral particles, whereas anti-VP1 (aa208-222) sera could not. Moreover, the anti-VP2 (aa141-155) antibodies inhibited the binding of human serum to virions, which demonstrated that the VP2 epitope is immunodominant between EV71 and CA16. These results illustrated that the chimeric VLP HBc-E1/2 is a promising candidate for a broad-spectrum HFMD vaccine, and also reveals mechanisms of protection by the neighboring linear epitopes of the VP1 GH and VP2 EF loops. PMID:26243660

  1. Tallow amphopolycarboxyglycinate-stabilized silver nanoparticles: new frontiers in development of plant protection products with a broad spectrum of action against phytopathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutyakov, Yurii A.; Kudrinskiy, Alexey A.; Zherebin, Pavel M.; Yapryntsev, Alexey D.; Pobedinskaya, Marina A.; Elansky, Sergey N.; Denisov, Albert N.; Mikhaylov, Dmitry M.; Lisichkin, Georgii V.

    2016-07-01

    Sustainable agriculture calls for minimal use of agrochemicals in order to protect the environment. It has caused an increase in the rate of nanoparticles use, in particular silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) due to their safety for mammals, unique biological activity and a broad spectrum of action against fungal and bacterial pathogens. Until now the use of AgNPs dispersions in the agricultural sector has been essentially limited due to many factors decreased their stability (mixing with other pesticides, presence of electrolytes). We present a versatile synthesis of polyampholyte surfactant (tallow amphopolycarboxyglycinate) stabilized AgNPs. We took a close look at unique aggregation behavior (via dynamic light scattering and UV–vis spectroscopy) and biocidal activity of obtained silver colloids. AgNPs are characterized by exclusively high aggregative stability in the presence of coagulating agents NaNO3 and NaSO4 (up to 1 M), during drying/redispergation, and frost/defrost cycles. The dispersion of AgNPs shows high biocidal activity (EC50 is ten times lower than commercial species ones) with respect to Phytophthora infestans and phytopathogenic fungi. This points to the possibility of successful application of silver preparations within agriculture with the goal of partial reduction of the use of toxic and expensive synthetic antibiotics and pesticides.

  2. Combination therapy using chimeric monoclonal antibodies protects mice from lethal H5N1 infection and prevents formation of escape mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mookkan Prabakaran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Given that there is a possibility of a human H5N1 pandemic and the fact that the recent H5N1 viruses are resistant to the anti-viral drugs, newer strategies for effective therapy are warranted. Previous studies show that single mAbs in immune prophylaxis can be protective against H5N1 infection. But a single mAb may not be effective in neutralization of a broad range of different strains of H5N1 and control of potential neutralization escape mutants. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We selected two mAbs which recognized different epitopes on the hemagglutinin molecule. These two mAbs could each neutralize in vitro escape mutants to the other and in combination could effectively neutralize viruses from clades 0, 1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 4, 7 and 8 of influenza A H5N1 viruses. This combination of chimeric mAbs when administered passively, pre or post challenge with 10 MLD50 (50% mouse lethal dose HPAI H5N1 influenza A viruses could protect 100% of the mice from two different clades of viruses (clades 1 and 2.1. We also tested the efficacy of a single dose of the combination of mAbs versus two doses. Two doses of the combination therapy not only affected early clearance of the virus from the lung but could completely prevent lung pathology of the H5N1 infected mice. No escape variants were detected after therapy. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our studies provide proof of concept that the synergistic action of two or more mAbs in combination is required for preventing the generation of escape mutants and also to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of passive therapy against H5N1 infection. Combination therapy may allow for a lower dose of antibody to be administered for passive therapy of influenza infection and hence can be made available at reduced economic costs during an outbreak.

  3. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  4. 抗IL-6R单克隆抗体对脓毒症大鼠的保护机制研究%Protective effects of anti-IL-6R monoclonal antibody in septic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    武华栋; 周荣斌

    2011-01-01

    目的 观察抗IL-6受体单克隆抗体(抗IL-6R单抗)干预盲肠结扎穿孔(CLP)脓毒症大鼠的作用,并探讨可能的作用机制.方法 50只Wistar大鼠随机分为五组:假手术组(A组)、CLP+兔IgG 200 μg/kg组(B组)、CLP+IL-6R单抗50 μg/kg组(C组)、CLP+IL-6R单抗100 μg/kg组(D组)、CLP+IL-6R单抗200 μg/kg组(E组),每组10只.观察各组脓毒症大鼠存活率的变化,并使用酶联免疫吸附技术分析各组血清TNF-α、IL-6、IL-17A及IL-21浓度.结果 与B组比较,C、D、E组7 d存活率显著增加(P<0.05),血清TNF-α和IL-6浓度差异无统计学意义,而IL-17A和IL-21浓度则显著减少(P<0.05).结论 抗IL-6R单抗对CLP脓毒症大鼠具有保护作用,该作用可能与Th17细胞受到抑制有关.%Objective To investigate the effects of anti - rat IL - 6R monoclonal antibody in the sepsis model of cecal ligation puncture ( CLP) , and try to find out the potential mechanisms. Methods Fifty female Wista Rats were randomly divided into 5 groups, 10 Rats in each group. The control group was the sham group( group A) . Group B was the model of CLP treated with rabbit IgG ( 200 μg/kg) .Group C, D and E were the model of CLP and were separately treated with anti - rat IL -6R monoclonal antibody 50 μg/kg, 100 μg/kg and 200 μg/kg. Enzyme - linked immunosorbent assay ( ELISA ) was used to detect levels of TNF - α ,IL - 6 , IL - 17A and IL - 21 , and then the survival rates of each group were compared. Results Anti - rat IL - 6R monoclonal antibody treatment resulted in significantly improved survival rate with the increase of dose, the highest dose group had the best survival rate. There was no difference in the concentrations of IL - 6 and TNF - α among the group of treatment with rabbit IgG( group B) and the groups of treatment with anti - rat IL - 6R monoclonal antibody( group C, D and E) . In contrast with group B, the concentrations of IL - 17A and IL - 21 was significantly reduced.Conclusion Protective

  5. PRODUCTION OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    TOLKOVA E.S.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The article considers the use of monoclonal antibodies in immunotherapy and immunodiagnostics of oncological diseases and their production using hybridoma technolody with flow diagram and technological scheme of manufacturing process

  6. PRODUCTION OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES

    OpenAIRE

    TOLKOVA E.S.

    2015-01-01

    The article considers the use of monoclonal antibodies in immunotherapy and immunodiagnostics of oncological diseases and their production using hybridoma technolody with flow diagram and technological scheme of manufacturing process

  7. A GFP expressing influenza A virus to report in vivo tropism and protection by a matrix protein 2 ectodomain-specific monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Baets, Sarah; Verhelst, Judith; Van den Hoecke, Silvie; Smet, Anouk; Schotsaert, Michael; Job, Emma R; Roose, Kenny; Schepens, Bert; Fiers, Walter; Saelens, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The severity of influenza-related illness is mediated by many factors, including in vivo cell tropism, timing and magnitude of the immune response, and presence of pre-existing immunity. A direct way to study cell tropism and virus spread in vivo is with an influenza virus expressing a reporter gene. However, reporter gene-expressing influenza viruses are often attenuated in vivo and may be genetically unstable. Here, we describe the generation of an influenza A virus expressing GFP from a tri-cistronic NS segment. To reduce the size of this engineered gene segment, we used a truncated NS1 protein of 73 amino acids combined with a heterologous dimerization domain to increase protein stability. GFP and nuclear export protein coding information were fused in frame with the truncated NS1 open reading frame and separated from each other by 2A self-processing sites. The resulting PR8-NS1(1-73)GFP virus was successfully rescued and replicated as efficiently as the parental PR8 virus in vitro and was slightly attenuated in vivo. Flow cytometry-based monitoring of cells isolated from PR8-NS1(1-73)GFP virus infected BALB/c mice revealed that GFP expression peaked on day two in all cell types tested. In particular respiratory epithelial cells and myeloid cells known to be involved in antigen presentation, including dendritic cells (CD11c+) and inflammatory monocytes (CD11b+ GR1+), became GFP positive following infection. Prophylactic treatment with anti-M2e monoclonal antibody or oseltamivir reduced GFP expression in all cell types studied, demonstrating the usefulness of this reporter virus to analyze the efficacy of antiviral treatments in vivo. Finally, deep sequencing analysis, serial in vitro passages and ex vivo analysis of PR8-NS1(1-73)GFP virus, indicate that this virus is genetically and phenotypically stable. PMID:25816132

  8. Monoclonal antibodies and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The usefulness of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies for imaging and treatment of human (ovarian) cancer was investigated. A review of tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies is presented. Special attention is given to factors that influence the localization of the antibodies in tumors, isotope choice and methods of radiolabeling of the monoclonal antibodies. Two monoclonal antibodies, OC125 and OV-TL3, with high specificity for human epithelial ovarian cancer are characterized. A simple radio-iodination technique was developed for clinical application of the monoclonal antibodies. The behavior of monoclonal antibodies in human tumor xenograft systems and in man are described. Imaging of tumors is complicated because of high background levels of radioactivity in other sites than the tumor, especially in the bloodpool. A technique was developed to improve imaging of human tumor xenographs in nude mice, using subtraction of a specific and a non-specific antibody, radiolabeled with 111In, 67Ga and 131I. To investigate the capability of the two monoclonal antibodies, to specifically localize in human ovarian carcinomas, distribution studies in mice bearing human ovarian carcinoma xenografts were performed. One of the antibodies, OC125, was used for distribution studies in ovarian cancer patients. OC125 was used because of availability and approval to use this antibody in patients. The same antibody was used to investigate the usefulness of radioimmunoimaging in ovarian cancer patients. The interaction of injected radiolabeled antibody OC125 with circulating antigen and an assay to measure the antibody response in ovarian cancer patients after injection of the antibody is described. 265 refs.; 30 figs.; 19 tabs

  9. 77 FR 50144 - Broad Stakeholder Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-20

    ... SECURITY Broad Stakeholder Survey AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate, DHS. ACTION: 60-day... comments concerning the Broad Stakeholder Survey. DATES: Comments are encouraged and will be accepted until... across the Nation. The Broad Stakeholder Survey is designed to gather stakeholder feedback on...

  10. 76 FR 34087 - Broad Stakeholder Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-06-10

    ... SECURITY Broad Stakeholder Survey AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate, DHS. ACTION: 60-day... comments concerning the Broad Stakeholder Survey. DATES: Comments are encouraged and will be accepted until.... The Broad Stakeholder Survey is designed to gather stakeholder feedback on the effectiveness of...

  11. 78 FR 20119 - Broad Stakeholder Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-03

    ... SECURITY Broad Stakeholder Survey AGENCY: National Protection and Programs Directorate, DHS. ACTION: 30-day... soliciting comments concerning the Broad Stakeholder Survey. DHS previously published this ICR in the Federal... responders across the Nation. The Broad Stakeholder Survey is designed to gather stakeholder feedback on...

  12. Monoclonal antibodies in myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergeld, P.; van de Donk, N. W. C. J.; Richardson, P. G.;

    2015-01-01

    The development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the treatment of disease goes back to the vision of Paul Ehrlich in the late 19th century; however, the first successful treatment with a mAb was not until 1982, in a lymphoma patient. In multiple myeloma, mAbs are a very recent and exciting add...

  13. Monoclonal antibody as radiopharmaceutical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purification of anti-CEA monoclonal antibody 4C11 belonging to IgG sub(2a) subclass from mouse ascitis, donated by Ludwig Institute, Brazil was developed. The fragmentation of purified IgG sub(2a) by pepsin digestion and analytical studies by polyacrilamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS-PAGE) were done as preliminary assessment for their specific application in immunoscintigraphy. (author)

  14. The 2010 Broad Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2011

    2011-01-01

    A new data analysis, based on data collected as part of The Broad Prize process, provides insights into which large urban school districts in the United States are doing the best job of educating traditionally disadvantaged groups: African-American, Hispanics, and low-income students. Since 2002, The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation has awarded The…

  15. Monoclonal antibodies to Pneumocystis carinii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, J A; Halpern, J L; Lundgren, B; Swan, J C; Parrillo, J E; Masur, H

    1989-01-01

    To increase understanding of the antigenic structure of Pneumocystis carinii, we developed monoclonal antibodies to rat and human P. carinii. The specificity of the antibodies was demonstrated by immunofluorescence and immunoblot studies. Only one of five monoclonal antibodies to rat P. carinii...... reacted with human P. carinii, and none of four monoclonal antibodies to human P. carinii reacted with rat P. carinii. Two antibodies to human P. carinii reacted by immunofluorescence with only one human P. carinii isolate. Immunoblot studies identified major antigens of rat P. carinii with molecular...

  16. Monoclonal gammopathy associated with visceral leishmaniasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vishal Sharma

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal gammopathy can accompany diverse conditions and is usually benign. It should be distinguished from monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS which can rarely turn malignant. Visceral leishmaniasis has only rarely been associated with monoclonal gammopathy. We describe the case of a 55-year-old male who had monoclonal gammopathy associated with visceral leishmanisais, which reversed with stibogluconate therapy.

  17. Characterization and evaluation of monoclonal antibodies developed for typing influenza A and influenza B viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Walls, H H; Harmon, M W; Slagle, J J; Stocksdale, C; Kendal, A P

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies that are broadly reactive with influenza A or influenza B viruses were produced as stable reagents for typing influenza viruses. Monoclonal antibodies to influenza A were specific for either matrix protein or nucleoprotein. The antibodies to influenza B were specific for nucleoprotein or hemagglutinin protein. In an enzyme immunoassay procedure, influenza A antibodies detected H1N1, H2N2, and H3N2 influenza A virus strains collected between 1934 and 1984. Each of the inf...

  18. Effects of laser pretreatment on cells of broad bean in UV-B-induced damage protection%激光预处理可保护蚕豆细胞免受UV-B辐射的损伤

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    齐智; 岳明; 王勋陵

    2000-01-01

    The embryos of broad bean (Vicia faba L.) were irradiated for 5 min by a He-Ne laser (632.8 nm,1.63 J·mm-2) or for 1 min by a CO2 laser (1,060 nm,2.53 J·mm-2).Afterwards they were cultivated in Petri dish in the constant temperature incubator in Knop until the length of epicotyl of broad bean was perhaply 3 cm that could be treated by ultraviolet-B (UV-B) radiation.The epicotyl of broad bean was irradiated for 7 h by 1.02,3.03,4.52 kJ·m-2 UV-B respectively in the ambient condition of 70 μmol·m-2·s-1 photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) in the growth cabinet.According to the changes of content of MDA,ascorbate acid (AsA) and UV-B absorbing compounds (absorbance at 300 nm),the effects of protecting of laser to the epicotyl of broad bean from UV-B radiation were tested.The results showed that laser pretreatment on the embryos could enhance the resistance of UV-B stress in epicotyl.Comparing with the control (without UV-B or laser radiation) and UV-B radiation alone,the MDA content was decreased significantly while AsA content was increased in the condition of laser pretreatment.It was also found that laser pretreatment alone could improve the content of UV-B absorbing compounds.If laser pretreatment followed UV-B radiation,the content of UV-B absorbing compounds was improved higher than laser treatment and UV-B treatment respectively.We suppose that laser pretreatment could enhance stress resistance in plant by a pathway of increasing the content of AsA and UV-B absorbing compounds while decreasing the MDA concentration.%当蚕豆的胚被He-Ne激光(632.8 nm,1.63 J·mm-2)照射5 min或被CO2激光(1060 nm,2.53 J·mm-2) 照射1 min后,将其置入Knop营养液中进行恒温培养.当蚕豆的上胚轴长到大约3 cm时,在光背景(PAR)为70 μmol·m-2·s-1条件下,分别用1.02、3.03、4.52 kJ·m-2的UV-B 辐射蚕豆的上胚轴7 h.根据蚕豆丙二醛(MDA)、抗坏血酸(AsA)和UV-B吸收物的含量变化,来测试激光对UV-B照射蚕豆的上

  19. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  20. Detection of Campylobacter species using monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Colin R.; Lee, Alice; Stanker, Larry H.

    1999-01-01

    A panel of species specific monoclonal antibodies were raised to Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter lari. The isotypes, and cross-reactivity profiles of each monoclonal antibody against an extensive panel of micro- organisms, were determined.

  1. Development of a candidate influenza vaccine based on virus-like particles displaying influenza M2e peptide into the immunodominant region of hepatitis B core antigen: Broad protective efficacy of particles carrying four copies of M2e.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsybalova, Liudmila M; Stepanova, Liudmila A; Kuprianov, Victor V; Blokhina, Elena A; Potapchuk, Marina V; Korotkov, Alexander V; Gorshkov, Andrey N; Kasyanenko, Marina A; Ravin, Nikolai V; Kiselev, Oleg I

    2015-06-26

    A long-term objective when designing influenza vaccines is to create one with broad cross-reactivity that will provide effective control over influenza, no matter which strain has caused the disease. Here we summarize the results from an investigation into the immunogenic and protective capacities inherent in variations of a recombinant protein, HBc/4M2e. This protein contains four copies of the ectodomain from the influenza virus protein M2 (M2e) fused within the immunodominant loop of the hepatitis B virus core antigen (HBc). Variations of this basic design include preparations containing M2e from the consensus human influenza virus; the M2e from the highly pathogenic avian A/H5N1 virus and a combination of two copies from human and two copies from avian influenza viruses. Intramuscular delivery in mice with preparations containing four identical copies of M2e induced high IgG titers in blood sera and bronchoalveolar lavages. It also provoked the formation of memory T-cells and antibodies were retained in the blood sera for a significant period of time post immunization. Furthermore, these preparations prevented the death of 75-100% of animals, which were challenged with lethal doses of virus. This resulted in a 1.2-3.5 log10 decrease in viral replication within the lungs. Moreover, HBc particles carrying only "human" or "avian" M2e displayed cross-reactivity in relation to human (A/H1N1, A/H2N2 and A/H3N2) or A/H5N1 and A(H1N1)pdm09 viruses, respectively; however, with the particles carrying both "human" and "avian" M2e this effect was much weaker, especially in relation to influenza virus A/H5N1. It is apparent from this work that to quickly produce vaccine for a pandemic it would be necessary to have several variations of a recombinant protein, containing four copies of M2e (each one against a group of likely influenza virus strains) with these relevant constructs housed within a comprehensive collection Escherichia coli-producers and maintained ready for use

  2. Broadly Neutralizing Alphavirus Antibodies Bind an Epitope on E2 and Inhibit Entry and Egress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, Julie M; Long, Feng; Edeling, Melissa A; Lin, Hueylie; van Duijl-Richter, Mareike K S; Fong, Rachel H; Kahle, Kristen M; Smit, Jolanda M; Jin, Jing; Simmons, Graham; Doranz, Benjamin J; Crowe, James E; Fremont, Daved H; Rossmann, Michael G; Diamond, Michael S

    2015-11-19

    We screened a panel of mouse and human monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against chikungunya virus and identified several with inhibitory activity against multiple alphaviruses. Passive transfer of broadly neutralizing MAbs protected mice against infection by chikungunya, Mayaro, and O'nyong'nyong alphaviruses. Using alanine-scanning mutagenesis, loss-of-function recombinant proteins and viruses, and multiple functional assays, we determined that broadly neutralizing MAbs block multiple steps in the viral lifecycle, including entry and egress, and bind to a conserved epitope on the B domain of the E2 glycoprotein. A 16 Å resolution cryo-electron microscopy structure of a Fab fragment bound to CHIKV E2 B domain provided an explanation for its neutralizing activity. Binding to the B domain was associated with repositioning of the A domain of E2 that enabled cross-linking of neighboring spikes. Our results suggest that B domain antigenic determinants could be targeted for vaccine or antibody therapeutic development against multiple alphaviruses of global concern. PMID:26553503

  3. Radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies: a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the description by Kohler and Milstein 1975 of their technique for producing monoclonal antibodies of predefined specificity, it has become a mainstay in most laboratories that utilize immunochemical techniques to study problems in basic, applied or clinical research. Paradoxically, the very success of monoclonal antibodies has generated a literature which is now so vast and scattered that it has become difficult to obtain a perspective. This brief review represents the distillation of many publications relating to the production and use of monoclonaal antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals. Significant advances were made possible in the last few years by combined developments in the fields of tumor-associated antigens and of monoclonal antibodies. In fact monoclonal antibodies against some well defined tumor-associated antigens, has led to significantly greater practical possibilities for producing highly specific radiolabeled antibodies as radiopharmaceuticals for diagnosis and therapy of human tumors. One of the main requirements of this methodology is the availability of stable radiopharmaceutical reagents which after labeling in vivo injection retain the capacity of specific interaction with the defined antigen and their molecular integrity. Since injection into human is the objetive of this kind of study all the specifications of radiopharmaceutical have to be fulfilled e.g. sterility, apirogenicity and absence of toxicity. (author)

  4. Tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many monoclonal antibodies directed against tumor-associated antigens have been identified, but so far none of these are tumor specific. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies have been used for imaging of a wide variety of tumors with success. Radiolabeling of antibody is usually done with iodine isotopes of which 123I is the best candidate for radioimmunodetection purposes. The labeling of antibodies through chelates makes it possible to use metal radioisotopes like 111In, which is the best radioisotope for imaging with monoclonal antibodies due to its favorable half-life of 2.5 days. Usually imaging cannot be performed within 24 h after injection, but clearance of antibody can be increased by using F(ab)2 of Fab. Another approach is to clear non-bound antibody by a second antibody, directed against the first. The detection limit of immunoimaging is about 2 cm, but will be improved by tomography or SPECT. There is still a high false positive and false negative rate, which makes it impossible to use radioimmunodetection as the only technique for diagnosis of tumors. In combination with other detection techniques, tumor imaging with monoclonal antibodies can improve diagnosis. 44 refs.; 3 tabs

  5. Glycan masking of hemagglutinin for adenovirus vector and recombinant protein immunizations elicits broadly neutralizing antibodies against H5N1 avian influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shih-Chang; Liu, Wen-Chun; Jan, Jia-Tsrong; Wu, Suh-Chin

    2014-01-01

    The highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 virus, a known trigger of diseases in poultry and humans, is perceived as a serious threat to public health. There is a clear need for a broadly protective H5N1 vaccine or vaccines for inducing neutralizing antibodies against multiple clades/subclades. We constructed single, double, and triple mutants of glycan-masked hemagglutiinin (HA) antigens at residues 83, 127 and 138 (i.e., g83, g127, g138, g83+g127, g127+g138, g83+g138 and g83+g127+g138), and then obtained their corresponding HA-expressing adenovirus vectors and recombinant HA proteins using a prime-boost immunization strategy. Our results indicate that the glycan-masked g127+g138 double mutant induced more potent HA-inhibition, virus neutralization antibodies, cross-clade protection against heterologous H5N1 clades, correlated with the enhanced bindings to the receptor binding sites and the highly conserved stem region of HA. The immune refocusing stem-specific antibodies elicited by the glycan-masked H5HA g127+g138 and g83+g127+g138 mutants overlapped with broadly neutralizing epitopes of the CR6261 monoclonal antibody that neutralizes most group 1 subtypes. These findings may provide useful information in the development of a broadly protective H5N1 influenza vaccine. PMID:24671139

  6. Monoclonal antibodies technology. Protocols

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Immunization. The first step in preparing useful monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is to immunize an animal (Balb/c for example) with an appropriate antigen. Methods (only for soluble antigen): Solubilize selected antigen in Phosphate buffer solution (PBS) at pH 7.2-7.4, ideally at a final concentration per animal between 10 to 50 μg/ml. It is recommended that the antigen under consideration be incorporated into the emulsion adjuvants in 1:1 volumetric relation. We commonly use Frend's adjuvant (FA) to prepared immunized solution. The first immunization should be prepared with complete FA, and the another could be prepared with incomplete FA. It is recommended to inject mice with 0.2 ml intraperitoneal (ip) or subcutaneous (sc). Our experience suggests the sc route is the preferred route. A minimum protocol for immunizing mice to generate cells for preparing hybridomas is s follows: immunize sc on day 0, boost sc on day 21, take a trial bleeding on day 26; if antibody titters are satisfactory, boost ip on day 35 with antigen only, and remove the spleen to obtain cells for fusion on day 38. Fusion protocol. The myeloma cell line we are using is X63 Ag8.653. At the moment of fusion myeloma cells need a good viability (at least a 95%). 1. Remove the spleen cells from immunized mice using sterile conditions. An immune spleen should yield between 7 a 10x107 nucleated cells. 2. Place the spleen in 20 ml of serum-free RPMI 1640 in a Petri dish. Using a needle and syringe, inject the spleen with medium to distend and disrupt the spleen stroma and free the nucleated cells. 3. Flush the cell suspension with a Pasteur pipet to disperse clumps of cells. 4. Centrifuge the spleen cell suspension at 250g for 10 min. Resuspend the pellet in serum-free RPMI 1640. Determine cell concentration using Neuhabuer chamber. 5. Mix the myeloma cells and spleen cells in a conical 50-ml tube in serum-free RPMI 1640, 1 x107 spleen cells to 1x106 myeloma cells (ratio 10:1). Centrifuge

  7. Monoclonal antibody therapy for Junin virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlin, Larry; Geisbert, Joan B; Deer, Daniel J; Fenton, Karla A; Bohorov, Ognian; Bohorova, Natasha; Goodman, Charles; Kim, Do; Hiatt, Andrew; Pauly, Michael H; Velasco, Jesus; Whaley, Kevin J; Altmann, Friedrich; Gruber, Clemens; Steinkellner, Herta; Honko, Anna N; Kuehne, Ana I; Aman, M Javad; Sahandi, Sara; Enterlein, Sven; Zhan, Xiaoguo; Enria, Delia; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2016-04-19

    Countermeasures against potential biothreat agents remain important to US Homeland Security, and many of these pharmaceuticals could have dual use in the improvement of global public health. Junin virus, the causative agent of Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF), is an arenavirus identified as a category A high-priority agent. There are no Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved drugs available for preventing or treating AHF, and the current treatment option is limited to administration of immune plasma. Whereas immune plasma demonstrates the feasibility of passive immunotherapy, it is limited in quantity, variable in quality, and poses safety risks such as transmission of transfusion-borne diseases. In an effort to develop a monoclonal antibody (mAb)-based alternative to plasma, three previously described neutralizing murine mAbs were expressed as mouse-human chimeric antibodies and evaluated in the guinea pig model of AHF. These mAbs provided 100% protection against lethal challenge when administered 2 d after infection (dpi), and one of them (J199) was capable of providing 100% protection when treatment was initiated 6 dpi and 92% protection when initiated 7 dpi. The efficacy of J199 is superior to that previously described for all other evaluated drugs, and its high potency suggests that mAbs like J199 offer an economical alternative to immune plasma and an effective dual use (bioterrorism/public health) therapeutic. PMID:27044104

  8. Monoclonal antibodies in targeted therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Powroźnik

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Targeted therapy is a new therapeutic method consisting in the inhibition of specific molecular pathways. In modern therapy, the key role is played by monoclonal antibodies, included in the group of biological agents. The success of molecularly targeted therapy is to define the proper “molecular target”, selecting the right drug active against a specific “target” and selecting a group of patients who benefit from treatment. Introduction of targeted therapy resulted in improved results of the treatment of many serious and chronic diseases. In general, targeted molecular therapies have good toxicity profiles, but some patients are exquisitely sensitive to these drugs and can develop particular and severe toxicities. Patient selection and proper monitoring significantly decrease the risk of life-threatening adverse events. Data concerning late side effects are still unavailable because of the short follow-up of molecularly targeted therapy. Currently in the U.S. and Europe there are approximately 31 registered therapeutic monoclonal antibodies, while 160 are subjected to clinical trials. This paper presents an overview of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies currently used in therapy and the present state of knowledge about them. 

  9. Advances in monoclonal antibody application in myocarditis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li-na HAN; Shuang HE; Yu-tang WANG; Li-ming YANG; Si-yu LIU; Ting ZHANG

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have become a part of daily preparation technologies in many laboratories.Attempts have been made to apply monoclonal antibodies to open a new train of thought for clinical treatments of autoimmune diseases,inflammatory diseases,cancer,and other immune-associated diseases.This paper is a prospective review to anticipate that monoclonal antibody application in the treatment of myocarditis,an inflammatory disease of the heart,could be a novel approach in the future.In order to better understand the current state of the art in monoclonal antibody techniques and advance applications in myocarditis,we,through a significant amount of literature research both domestic and abroad,developed a systematic elaboration of monoclonal antibodies,pathogenesis of myocarditis,and application of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis.This paper presents review of the literature of some therapeutic aspects of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis and dilated cardiomyopathy to demonstrate the advance of monoclonal antibody application in myocarditis and a strong anticipation that monoclonal antibody application may supply an effective therapeutic approach to relieve the severity of myocarditis in the future.Under conventional therapy,myocarditis is typically associated with congestive heart failure as a progressive outcome,indicating the need for alternative therapeutic strategies to improve long-term results.Reviewing some therapeutic aspects of monoclonal antibodies in myocarditis,we recently found that monoclonal antibodies with high purity and strong specificity can accurately act on target and achieve definite progress in the treatment of viral myocarditis in rat model and may meet the need above.However,several issues remain.The technology on howto make a higher homologous and weak immunogenic humanized or human source antibody and the treatment mechanism of monoclonal antibodies may provide solutions for these open issues.If we are to further stimulate

  10. Library of monoclonal antibodies against brush border membrane epithelial antigens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A purified fraction of proximal tubule brush border membranes (BBM) was prepared from dog kidney and used to immunize mice. The standard technique of hybridoma production was followed as described by Kohler and Milstein. Production of antibodies was detected by indirect immunofluorescence on dog kidney slices and by immunodot against the purified fraction on nitrocellulose. Five hybrids exhibited anti BBM activity. These were cloned twice and yielded stable cell lines producing IgG type monoclonal antibodies against BBM. They were designated A1, C7, D3, D7 and H4. As a family these five monoclonals have broad tissue specificity, i.e. positive staining of the surface mucosa of intestinal kidney proximal tubules. D3 exhibits even broader specificity for epithelium reacting with bile canaliculi and choroid plexus. The authors have verified that at least 4/5 antibodies are directed against BBM protein as revealed by immunoprecipitation of solubilized BBM and detected by Coomassie blue staining or autoradiography of lactoperoxidase labelled BBM. Most interestingly all antibodies bind to the surface of LL CPK1 cells, a continuous pig kidney cell line of undefined origin but exhibiting many characteristics of proximal tubule cells. The library of monoclonal antibodies obtained provide important probes with which to study membrane biogenesis and polarization in epithelial cells

  11. Monoclonal antibodies to human butyrylcholinesterase reactive with butyrylcholinesterase in animal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hong; Brimijoin, Stephen; Hrabovska, Anna; Krejci, Eric; Blake, Thomas A; Johnson, Rudolph C; Masson, Patrick; Lockridge, Oksana

    2016-01-01

    Five mouse anti-human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) monoclonal antibodies bind tightly to native human BChE with nanomolar dissociation constants. Pairing analysis in the Octet system identified the monoclonal antibodies that bind to overlapping and independent epitopes on human BChE. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of 4 monoclonal antibodies are deposited in GenBank. Our goal was to determine which of the 5 monoclonal antibodies recognize BChE in the plasma of animals. Binding of monoclonal antibodies 11D8, B2 18-5, B2 12-1, mAb2 and 3E8 to BChE in animal plasma was measured using antibody immobilized on Pansorbin cells and on Dynabeads Protein G. A third method visualized binding by the shift of BChE activity bands on nondenaturing gels stained for BChE activity. Gels were counterstained for carboxylesterase activity. The three methods agreed that B2 18-5 and mAb2 have broad species specificity, but the other monoclonal antibodies interacted only with human BChE, the exception being 3E8, which also bound chicken BChE. B2 18-5 and mAb2 recognized BChE in human, rhesus monkey, horse, cat, and tiger plasma. A weak response was found with rabbit BChE. Monoclonal mAb2, but not B2 18-5, bound pig and bovine BChE. Gels stained for carboxylesterase activity confirmed that plasma from humans, monkey, pig, chicken, and cow does not contain carboxylesterase, but plasma from horse, cat, tiger, rabbit, guinea pig, mouse, and rat has carboxylesterase. Rabbit plasma carboxylesterase hydrolyzes butyrylthiocholine. In conclusion monoclonal antibodies B2 18-5 and mAb2 can be used to immuno extract BChE from the plasma of humans, monkey and other animals. PMID:26585590

  12. Production of monoclonal antibodies to human glomerular basement membrane.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mino,Yasuaki

    1984-10-01

    Full Text Available Using the technique of somatic cell fusion, we produced monoclonal antibodies to collagenase-digested human glomerular basement membrane (GBM. Fourteen monoclonal antibodies which reacted with normal human kidney in indirect immunofluorescence (IIF studies were produced. An analysis of the binding patterns indicated that the antigens recognized could be divided into six broad groups. Monoclonal antibody B3-H10 (Group 1 reacted with only GBM in a fine granular pattern. A5-B12 and B5-C2 (Group 2 reacted with GBM and peritubular capillary in a linear pattern. B2-A12 (Group 3 reacted with only epithelial cells. Al-C9 and A4-E2 (Group 4 showed a mesangial pattern in glomerulus and a lineal pattern in tubular basement membrane (TBM, Bowman's capsule and peritubular capillary. A1-E1, A1-E11, A2-E6, A3-B6, A4-F8 and B5-H2 (Group 5 recognized determinants common to GBM, TBM, Bowman's capsule and/or peritubular capillary. A3-F1 and B5-E10 (Group 6 reacted with TBM and Bowman's capsule. The staining pattern of B3-H10 (Group 1 was characteristic because it was not linear, but finely granular along the GBM. The staining pattern of B2-A12 (Group 3 was also characteristic because only epithelial cells were stained, and processes of epithelial cells were observed as fine fibrils. To the best of our knowledge, these two types of monoclonal antibodies have not been reported previously.

  13. Monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to assess the current status of in-vivo use of monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer. Publications appearing between 1980 and 1988 were identified by computer searches using MEDLINE and CANCERLIT, by reviewing the table of contents of recently published journals, and by searching bibliographies of identified books and articles. More than 700 articles, including peer-reviewed articles and book chapters, were identified and selected for analysis. The literature was reviewed and 235 articles were selected as relevant and representative of the current issues and future applications for in-vivo monoclonal antibodies for cancer therapy and of the toxicity and efficacy which has been associated with clinical trials. Approaches include using antibody alone (interacting with complement or effector cells or binding directly with certain cell receptors) and immunoconjugates (antibody coupled to radioisotopes, drugs, toxins, or other biologicals). Most experience has been with murine antibodies. Trials of antibody alone and radiolabeled antibodies have confirmed the feasibility of this approach and the in-vivo trafficking of antibodies to tumor cells. However, tumor cell heterogeneity, lack of cytotoxicity, and the development of human antimouse antibodies have limited clinical efficacy. Although the immunoconjugates are very promising, heterogeneity and the antimouse immune response have hampered this approach as has the additional challenge of chemically or genetically coupling antibody to cytotoxic agents. As a therapeutic modality, monoclonal antibodies are still promising but their general use will be delayed for several years. New approaches using human antibodies and reducing the human antiglobulin response should facilitate treatment. 235 references

  14. Monoclonal Antibodies for Lipid Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feinstein, Matthew J; Lloyd-Jones, Donald M

    2016-07-01

    In recent years, biochemical and genetic studies have identified proprotein convertase subtilisin/kexin type 9 (PCSK9) as a major mediator of low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-c) levels and thereby a potential novel target for reducing risk of coronary heart disease (CHD). These observations led to the development of PCSK9 inhibitors, which lower LDL-c levels more than any other non-invasive lipid-lowering therapy presently available. The PCSK9 inhibitors furthest along in clinical trials are subcutaneously injected monoclonal antibodies. These PCSK9 inhibitors have demonstrated LDL-c-lowering efficacy with acceptable safety in phase III clinical trials and may offer a useful therapy in addition to maximally tolerated HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins) in certain patient groups. Longer-term data are required to ensure sustained efficacy and safety of this new class of medications. This review provides an overview of the biology, genetics, development, and clinical trials of monoclonal antibodies designed to inhibit PCSK9. PMID:27221501

  15. Radioimmunoguided surgery using monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The potential proficiency of radioimmunoguided surgery in the intraoperative detection of tumors was assessed using labeled monoclonal antibody B72.3 in 66 patients with tissue-proved tumor. Monoclonal antibody B72.3 was injected 5 to 42 days preoperatively, and the hand-held gamma-detecting probe was used intraoperatively to detect the presence of tumor. Intraoperative probe counts of less than 20 every 2 seconds, or tumor-to-adjacent normal tissue ratios less than 2:1 were considered negative (system failure). Positive probe counts were detected in 5 of 6 patients with primary colon cancer (83 percent), in 31 of 39 patients with recurrent colon cancer (79 percent), in 4 of 5 patients with gastric cancer (80 percent), in 3 of 8 patients with breast cancer (37.5 percent), and in 4 of 8 patients with ovarian cancer (50 percent) undergoing second-look procedures. Additional patients in each group were scored as borderline positive. Overall, radioimmunoguided surgery using B72.3 identified tumors in 47 patients (71.2 percent), bordered on positive in 6 patients (9.1 percent), and failed to identify tumor in 13 patients (19.7 percent). Improved selection of patients for antigen-positive tumors, the use of higher affinity second-generation antibodies, alternate routes of antibody administration, alternate radionuclides, and more sophisticatedly bioengineered antibodies and antibody combinations should all lead to improvements in radioimmunoguided surgery

  16. Monoclonal antibodies to Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona.

    OpenAIRE

    Ainsworth, A J; Lester, T L; Capley, G

    1985-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies produced against Leptospira interrogans serovar pomona have been studied for their diagnostic usefulness. All three monoclonals reacted strongly in the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and indirect fluorescent antibody test with serovar pomona and did not react with serovars grippotyphosa, canicola, icterohaemorrhagiae and hardjo.

  17. Integrating Hot and Cool Intelligences: Thinking Broadly about Broad Abilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Joel Schneider

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although results from factor-analytic studies of the broad, second-stratum abilities of human intelligence have been fairly consistent for decades, the list of broad abilities is far from complete, much less understood. We propose criteria by which the list of broad abilities could be amended and envision alternatives for how our understanding of the hot intelligences (abilities involving emotionally-salient information and cool intelligences (abilities involving perceptual processing and logical reasoning might be integrated into a coherent theoretical framework.

  18. Neutralization of Japanese Encephalitis Virus by heme-induced broadly reactive human monoclonal antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Nimesh Gupta; Mélissanne de Wispelaere; Maxime Lecerf; Manjula Kalia; Tobias Scheel; Sudhanshu Vrati; Claudia Berek; Kaveri, Srinivas V.; Philippe Desprès; Sébastien Lacroix-Desmazes; Dimitrov, Jordan D.

    2015-01-01

    International audience Geographical expansion and re-emerging new genotypes of the Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) require the development of novel therapeutic approaches. Here, we studied a non-conventional approach for antibody therapy and show that, upon exposure to heme, a fraction of natural human immunoglobulins acquires high-affinity reactivity with the antigenic domain-III of JEV E glycoprotein. These JEV-reactive antibodies exhibited neutralizing activity against recently domina...

  19. Monoclonal antibody-based broad-specificity immunoassay for monitoring organophosphorus pesticides in environmental water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    The extensive use of organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) in agriculture and domestic settings can result in widespread water contamination. The development of easy-to-use and rapid-screening immunoassay methods in a class-selective manner is a topic of considerable environmental interest. In this wo...

  20. 75 FR 3244 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Monoclonal Antibodies Against Smallpox/Orthopoxviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Monoclonal... provided significantly greater protection than that afforded by VIG. The prospective exclusive license will.... The prospective exclusive license may be granted unless, within thirty (30) days from the date of...

  1. Mucosal vaccination with recombinant Lactobacillus casei-displayed CTA1-conjugated consensus matrix protein-2 (sM2) induces broad protection against divergent influenza subtypes in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Mohammed Y E; Li, Rui; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Park, Min-Eun; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Pathinayake, Prabuddha; Weeratunga, Prasanna; Song, Man Ki; Son, Hwa-Young; Hong, Seung-Pyo; Sung, Moon-Hee; Lee, Jong-Soo; Kim, Chul-Joong

    2014-01-01

    To develop a safe and effective mucosal vaccine against pathogenic influenza viruses, we constructed recombinant Lactobacillus casei strains that express conserved matrix protein 2 with (pgsA-CTA1-sM2/L. casei) or without (pgsA-sM2/L. casei) cholera toxin subunit A1 (CTA1) on the surface. The surface localization of the fusion protein was verified by cellular fractionation analyses, flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. Oral and nasal inoculations of recombinant L. casei into mice resulted in high levels of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and mucosal IgA. However, the conjugation of cholera toxin subunit A1 induced more potent mucosal, humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. In a challenge test with 10 MLD50 of A/EM/Korea/W149/06(H5N1), A/Puerto Rico/8/34(H1N1), A/Aquatic bird /Korea/W81/2005(H5N2), A/Aquatic bird/Korea/W44/2005(H7N3), and A/Chicken/Korea/116/2004(H9N2) viruses, the recombinant pgsA-CTA1-sM2/L. casei provided better protection against lethal challenges than pgsA-sM2/L. casei, pgsA/L. casei and PBS in mice. These results indicate that mucosal immunization with recombinant L. casei expressing CTA1-conjugated sM2 protein on its surface is an effective means of eliciting protective immune responses against diverse influenza subtypes. PMID:24714362

  2. Mucosal Vaccination with Recombinant Lactobacillus casei-Displayed CTA1-Conjugated Consensus Matrix Protein-2 (sM2) Induces Broad Protection against Divergent Influenza Subtypes in BALB/c Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Mohammed Y. E.; Li, Rui; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Park, Min-Eun; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Pathinayake, Prabuddha; Weeratunga, Prasanna; Song, Man Ki; Son, Hwa-Young; Hong, Seung-Pyo; Sung, Moon-Hee; Lee, Jong-Soo; Kim, Chul-Joong

    2014-01-01

    To develop a safe and effective mucosal vaccine against pathogenic influenza viruses, we constructed recombinant Lactobacillus casei strains that express conserved matrix protein 2 with (pgsA-CTA1-sM2/L. casei) or without (pgsA-sM2/L. casei) cholera toxin subunit A1 (CTA1) on the surface. The surface localization of the fusion protein was verified by cellular fractionation analyses, flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. Oral and nasal inoculations of recombinant L. casei into mice resulted in high levels of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and mucosal IgA. However, the conjugation of cholera toxin subunit A1 induced more potent mucosal, humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. In a challenge test with 10 MLD50 of A/EM/Korea/W149/06(H5N1), A/Puerto Rico/8/34(H1N1), A/Aquatic bird /Korea/W81/2005(H5N2), A/Aquatic bird/Korea/W44/2005(H7N3), and A/Chicken/Korea/116/2004(H9N2) viruses, the recombinant pgsA-CTA1-sM2/L. casei provided better protection against lethal challenges than pgsA-sM2/L. casei, pgsA/L. casei and PBS in mice. These results indicate that mucosal immunization with recombinant L. casei expressing CTA1-conjugated sM2 protein on its surface is an effective means of eliciting protective immune responses against diverse influenza subtypes. PMID:24714362

  3. Monitoring monoclonal antibody delivery in oncology: the example of bevacizumab.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Nugue

    Full Text Available Developing therapeutic monoclonal antibodies paves the way for new strategies in oncology using targeted therapy which should improve specificity. However, due to a lack of biomarkers, a personalized therapy scheme cannot always be applied with monoclonal antibodies. As a consequence, the efficacy or side effects associated with this type of treatment often appear to be sporadic. Bevacizumab is a therapeutic monoclonal antibody targeting Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF. It is used to limit tumor vascularization. No prognosis or response biomarker is associated with this antibody, we therefore assessed whether the administration protocol could be a possible cause of heterogeneous responses (or variable efficacy. To do this, we developed a bevacizumab assay with a broad sensitivity range to measure blood bevacizumab concentrations. We then analyzed bevacizumab concentrations in 17 patients throughout the first quarter of treatment. In line with previously published data, average blood concentrations were 88+/-27 mg/L following the first dose administered, and 213+/-105 mg/L after the last (6(th dose administered. However, the individual values were scattered, with a mean 4-fold difference between the lowest and the highest concentration for each dose administered. We demonstrated that the bevacizumab administration schedule results in a high inter-individual variability in terms of blood concentrations. Comparison of assay data with clinical data indicates that blood concentrations above the median are associated with side effects, whereas values below the median favor inefficacy. In conclusion, bevacizumab-based therapy could benefit from a personalized administration schedule including follow-up and adjustment of circulating bevacizumab concentrations.

  4. Relationship between hyperthyroidism and monoclonal gammapathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 66-year-old man with primary hyperparathyroidism (PHPT) and monoclonal gammapathy associated to it of uncertain significance (MGUS). A possible pathogenic relationship between HPTP and MGUS is analyzed. Interleukin 6 could play a pivotal role.

  5. Application of Monoclonal Antibodies in Veterinary Parasitology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta A.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of hybridoma technology by Kohler and Milstein in 1975, heralded a new era in antibody research. Mouse hybridomas were the first reliable source of monoclonal antibodies. The generation of monoclonal antibodies from species other than rats and mice, has developed slowly over the last 30 years. The advent of antibody engineering and realization of the advantages of non murine antibodies has increased their relevance recently. However, in the area of veterinary parasitology, monoclonal antibodies are just beginning to fulfill the promises inherent in their great specificity for recognizing and selectively binding to antigens. This review describes the recent advances in the application of monoclonal antibodies for immunodiagnosis / prophylaxis and immunotherapy of parasitic diseases. [Vet. World 2011; 4(4.000: 183-188

  6. Analysis of Defined Combinations of Monoclonal Antibodies in Anthrax Toxin Neutralization Assays and Their Synergistic Action

    OpenAIRE

    Ngundi, Miriam M.; Meade, Bruce D.; Little, Stephen F.; Quinn, Conrad P.; Corbett, Cindi R; Brady, Rebecca A.; Burns, Drusilla L.

    2012-01-01

    Antibodies against the protective antigen (PA) component of anthrax toxin play an important role in protection against disease caused by Bacillus anthracis. In this study, we examined defined combinations of PA-specific monoclonal antibodies for their ability to neutralize anthrax toxin in cell culture assays. We observed additive, synergistic, and antagonistic effects of the antibodies depending on the specific antibody combination examined and the specific assay used. Synergistic toxin-neut...

  7. Antibodies and Selection of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanack, Katja; Messerschmidt, Katrin; Listek, Martin

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are universal binding molecules with a high specificity for their target and are indispensable tools in research, diagnostics and therapy. The biotechnological generation of monoclonal antibodies was enabled by the hybridoma technology published in 1975 by Köhler and Milstein. Today monoclonal antibodies are used in a variety of applications as flow cytometry, magnetic cell sorting, immunoassays or therapeutic approaches. First step of the generation process is the immunization of the organism with appropriate antigen. After a positive immune response the spleen cells are isolated and fused with myeloma cells in order to generate stable, long-living antibody-producing cell lines - hybridoma cells. In the subsequent identification step the culture supernatants of all hybridoma cells are screened weekly for the production of the antibody of interest. Hybridoma cells producing the antibody of interest are cloned by limited dilution till a monoclonal hybridoma is found. This is a very time-consuming and laborious process and therefore different selection strategies were developed since 1975 in order to facilitate the generation of monoclonal antibodies. Apart from common automation of pipetting processes and ELISA testing there are some promising approaches to select the right monoclonal antibody very early in the process to reduce time and effort of the generation. In this chapter different selection strategies for antibody-producing hybridoma cells are presented and analysed regarding to their benefits compared to conventional limited dilution technology. PMID:27236550

  8. A monoclonal antibody against leptin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmoudian, Jafar; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Vojgani, Yasaman; Tavangar, Banafsheh; Hadavi, Reza; Zarei, Saeed

    2012-10-01

    Leptin is an important protein that regulates energy storage and homeostasis in humans and animals. Leptin deficiency results in various abnormalities such as diabetes, obesity, and infertility. Producing a high affinity monoclonal antibody against human leptin provides an important tool to monitor and trace leptin function in different biological fluids. In this study, recombinant human leptin was conjugated to KLH and injected into mice. After immunization, mouse myeloma SP2/0 cells were fused with murine splenocytes followed by selection of antibody-producing hybridoma cells. After screening of different hybridoma colonies by ELISA, a high affinity antibody was selected and purified by affinity chromatography. The affinity constant of the antibody was measured by ELISA. Western blot, immunocytochemistry, and flow cytometry experiments were used to characterize the antibody. The anti-leptin antibody had a high affinity (around 1.13 × 10(-9) M) for its antigen. The saturation of the antibody with leptin (20 moles leptin per 1 mole antibody) in Western blot analysis proved that the antibody had specific binding to its antigen. Immunocytochemistry and flow cytometry on JEG-3 (human placental choriocarcinoma cell) cells revealed that the anti-leptin antibody recognized intracellular leptin. In conclusion, we report here the production and characterization of a murine anti-leptin antibody with high affinity for human leptin. PMID:23098305

  9. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to the edta extract of Leptospira interrogans, serovar icterohaemorrhagiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Terezinha de Queiroz Leite

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies (MABs ivere produced against an etbylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA extract of Leptospira interrogans serovar icterohaemorrhagiae being characterized by gel precipitation as IgM and IgG (IgGl and IgG2b. The EDTA extract was detected as several bands by silver staining in SDS-PAGE. In the Western blot the bands around 20 KDa reacted with a monoclonal antibody, 47B4D6, and was oxidized by periodate and was not digested by pronase, suggesting that the determinant is of carbohydrate nature, lmmunocytochemistry, using colloidal gold labeling, showed that an EDTA extract determinant recognized by monoclonal antibody 47B4D6, is localized under the outer envelope of serovar icterohaemorrhagiae. Hoe AIAB raised against the EDTA extract was not able to protect hamsters from lethal challenge with virulent homologous leptospires.

  10. Broad Diphotons from Narrow States

    CERN Document Server

    An, Haipeng; Zhang, Yue

    2015-01-01

    ATLAS and CMS have each reported a modest diphoton excess consistent with the decay of a broad resonance at ~ 750 GeV. We show how this signal can arise in a weakly coupled theory comprised solely of narrow width particles. In particular, if the decaying particle is produced off-shell, then the associated diphoton resonance will have a broad, adjustable width. We present simplified models which explain the diphoton excess through the three-body decay of a scalar or fermion. Our minimal ultraviolet completion is a weakly coupled and renormalizable theory of a singlet scalar plus a heavy vector-like quark and lepton. The smoking gun of this mechanism is an asymmetric diphoton peak recoiling against missing transverse energy, jets, or leptons.

  11. Cochlear microphonic broad tuning curves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayat, Mohammad; Teal, Paul D.; Searchfield, Grant D.; Razali, Najwani

    2015-12-01

    It is known that the cochlear microphonic voltage exhibits much broader tuning than does the basilar membrane motion. The most commonly used explanation for this is that when an electrode is inserted at a particular point inside the scala media, the microphonic potentials of neighbouring hair cells have different phases, leading to cancelation at the electrodes location. In situ recording of functioning outer hair cells (OHCs) for investigating this hypothesis is exceptionally difficult. Therefore, to investigate the discrepancy between the tuning curves of the basilar membrane and those of the cochlear microphonic, and the effect of phase cancellation of adjacent hair cells on the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves, we use an electromechanical model of the cochlea to devise an experiment. We explore the effect of adjacent hair cells (i.e., longitudinal phase cancellation) on the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves in different locations. The results of the experiment indicate that active longitudinal coupling (i.e., coupling with active adjacent outer hair cells) only slightly changes the broadness of the CM tuning curves. The results also demonstrate that there is a π phase difference between the potentials produced by the hair bundle and the soma near the place associated with the characteristic frequency based on place-frequency maps (i.e., the best place). We suggest that the transversal phase cancellation (caused by the phase difference between the hair bundle and the soma) plays a far more important role than longitudinal phase cancellation in the broadness of the cochlear microphonic tuning curves. Moreover, by increasing the modelled longitudinal resistance resulting the cochlear microphonic curves exhibiting sharper tuning. The results of the simulations suggest that the passive network of the organ of Corti determines the phase difference between the hair bundle and soma, and hence determines the sharpness of the

  12. Trends in Malignant Glioma Monoclonal Antibody Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chekhonin, Ivan; Gurina, Olga

    2015-01-01

    Although new passive and active immunotherapy methods are emerging, unconjugated monoclonal antibodies remain the only kind of biological preparations approved for high-grade glioma therapy in clinical practice. In this review, we combine clinical and experimental data discussion. As antiangiogenic therapy is the standard of care for recurrent glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), we analyze major clinical trials and possible therapeutic combinations of bevacizumab, the most common monoclonal antibody to vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Another humanized antibody to gain recognition in GBM is epidermal growth factor (EGFR) antagonist nimotuzumab. Other antigens (VEGF receptor, platelet-derived growth factor receptor, hepatocyte growth factor and c-Met system) showed significance in gliomas and were used to create monoclonal antibodies applied in different malignant tumors. We assess the role of genetic markers (isocitrate dehydrogenase, O6-methylguanine-DNA methyltransnsferase) in GBM treatment outcome prediction. Besides antibodies studied in clinical trials, we focus on perspective targets and briefly list other means of passive immunotherapy.

  13. Development of Biodegradable Nanocarriers Loaded with a Monoclonal Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Gdowski

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Treatments utilizing monoclonal antibody therapeutics against intracellular protein-protein interactions in cancer cells have been hampered by several factors, including poor intracellular uptake and rapid lysosomal degradation. Our current work examines the feasibility of encapsulating monoclonal antibodies within poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles using a water/oil/water double emulsion solvent evaporation technique. This method can be used to prepare protective polymeric nanoparticles for transporting functional antibodies to the cytoplasmic compartment of cancer cells. Nanoparticles were formulated and then characterized using a number of physical and biological parameters. The average nanoparticle size ranged from 221 to 252 nm with a low polydispersity index. Encapsulation efficiency of 16%–22% and antibody loading of 0.3%–1.12% were observed. The antibody molecules were released from the nanoparticles in a sustained manner and upon release maintained functionality. Our studies achieved successful formulation of antibody loaded polymeric nanoparticles, thus indicating that a PLGA-based antibody nanoformulation is a promising intracellular delivery vehicle for a large number of new intracellular antibody targets in cancer cells.

  14. Mouse monoclonal antibodies against estrogen receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Rosa, Caterina; Rossi, Valentina; Abbondanza, Ciro

    2014-01-01

    The production of monoclonal antibodies, by cloning hybridoma derived from the fusion of myeloma cells and spleen lymphocytes, has allowed to obtain great advances in many fields of biological knowledge. The use of specific antibodies to the estrogen receptor, in fact, has been an invaluable method to bring out its mechanisms of action and its effects, both genomic and extra-genomic. Here we describe, step by step, the production of monoclonal antibodies, starting from protocol for antigen preparation to the selection of antibody-secreting hybridoma. PMID:25182770

  15. Radiolabelling of monoclonal antibodies for radiotherapy. Thailand

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine is now playing a great role not only in diagnostic application but also in therapy of cancer patients. Under the concept of targeted radiotherapy, a number of radiopharmaceuticals based on radiolabelled biomolecules had been evaluated for treatment of cancer by many investigators. Of these, monoclonal antibodies and some small specific peptides labelled with beta emitting radiometals such as Sm-153, Re-186, Re-188 or Y-90, are being introduced into clinical trials. The objective of this project is to develop laboratory procedures to label monoclonal antibodies, peptide or other proteins with beta emitting radionuclides to prepare radiopharmaceuticals for therapeutic purpose

  16. Radiolabelling of monoclonal antibodies for radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear medicine is now playing a great role not only in diagnostic application but also in therapy of cancer patients. Under the concept of targeted radiotherapy, a number of radiopharmaceuticals based on radiolabelled biomolecules had been evaluated for treatment of cancer by many investigators. Of these, monoclonal antibodies and some small specific peptides labelled with beta emitting radiometals such as Sm-153, Re-186, Re-188 or Y-90, are being introduced into clinical trials. The objective of this project is to develop laboratory procedures to label monoclonal antibodies, peptide or other proteins with beta emitting radionuclides to prepare radiopharmaceuticals for therapeutic purpose

  17. Analysis of memory B cell responses and isolation of novel monoclonal antibodies with neutralizing breadth from HIV-1-infected individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Corti

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The isolation of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs that neutralize a broad spectrum of primary HIV-1 isolates and the characterization of the human neutralizing antibody B cell response to HIV-1 infection are important goals that are central to the design of an effective antibody-based vaccine. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We immortalized IgG(+ memory B cells from individuals infected with diverse clades of HIV-1 and selected on the basis of plasma neutralization profiles that were cross-clade and relatively potent. Culture supernatants were screened using various recombinant forms of the envelope glycoproteins (Env in multiple parallel assays. We isolated 58 mAbs that were mapped to different Env surfaces, most of which showed neutralizing activity. One mAb in particular (HJ16 specific for a novel epitope proximal to the CD4 binding site on gp120 selectively neutralized a multi-clade panel of Tier-2 HIV-1 pseudoviruses, and demonstrated reactivity that was comparable in breadth, but distinct in neutralization specificity, to that of the other CD4 binding site-specific neutralizing mAb b12. A second mAb (HGN194 bound a conserved epitope in the V3 crown and neutralized all Tier-1 and a proportion of Tier-2 pseudoviruses tested, irrespective of clade. A third mAb (HK20 with broad neutralizing activity, particularly as a Fab fragment, recognized a highly conserved epitope in the HR-1 region of gp41, but showed striking assay-dependent selectivity in its activity. CONCLUSIONS: This study reveals that by using appropriate screening methods, a large proportion of memory B cells can be isolated that produce mAbs with HIV-1 neutralizing activity. Three of these mAbs show unusual breadth of neutralization and therefore add to the current panel of HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies with potential for passive protection and template-based vaccine design.

  18. Immunohistochemical diagnosis of fusariosis with monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, H.E.; Aalbæk, B.; Jungersen, Gregers; Hartvig, T.; Moser, C.; Rozell, B.L.; Blennow, O.

    establishing an accurate diagnosis. Although molecular techniques (e.g. in situ hybridization and PCR) have been explored for diagnostic use, the development of specific monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) for immunohistochemical identification of Fusarium spp. will extend the availability of diagnostic options for...

  19. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy for Advanced Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI is sponsoring two clinical trials of a monoclonal antibody called ch14.18, in combination with other drugs, to see if the antibody may be helpful for children or young adults (up to age 21) with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.

  20. Monoclonal antibodies against chicken interleukin-6

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) were produced against a recombinant (r) chicken interleukin-6 (IL-6). Eight mAbs that were produced were tested for isotype; ability to inhibit recombinant forms of chicken (ch), human (h) and murine (m) IL-6; and recognition of rchIL-6 by Western immunoblotting. The mA...

  1. Isolation of highly active monoclonal antibodies against multiresistant gram-positive bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike S Rossmann

    Full Text Available Multiresistant nosocomial pathogens often cause life-threatening infections that are sometimes untreatable with currently available antibiotics. Staphylococci and enterococci are the predominant Gram-positive species associated with hospital-acquired infections. These infections often lead to extended hospital stay and excess mortality. In this study, a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies was isolated from a healthy individual by selection of B-cells producing antibodies with high opsonic killing against E. faecalis 12030. Variable domains (VH and VL of these immunoglobulin genes were amplified by PCR and cloned into an eukaryotic expression vector containing the constant domains of a human IgG1 molecule and the human lambda constant domain. These constructs were transfected into CHO cells and culture supernatants were collected and tested by opsonophagocytic assay against E. faecalis and S. aureus strains (including MRSA. At concentrations of 600 pg/ml, opsonic killing was between 40% and 70% against all strains tested. Monoclonal antibodies were also evaluated in a mouse sepsis model (using S. aureus LAC and E. faecium, a mouse peritonitis model (using S. aureus Newman and LAC and a rat endocarditis model (using E. faecalis 12030 and were shown to provide protection in all models at a concentration of 4 μg/kg per animal. Here we present a method to produce fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibodies that are opsonic in vitro and protective in vivo against several multiresistant Gram-positive bacteria. The monoclonal antibodies presented in this study are significantly more effective compared to another monoclonal antibody currently in clinical trials.

  2. PRODUCTION OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY AGAINST HUMAN IMMUNOGLOBULIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Majidi

    2000-04-01

    Full Text Available Immunoglobulin E is one of the five classes of immonoglobulins that plays an important role in allergic diseases. Production of monoclonal antibodies by a single clonotype against different epitopes of immunoglobulin E has high priority in development of diagnostic kits.In this study, an attempt was made to produce monoclonal antibodies against human immunoglobulin E. Balb/c mice were immunized with semipurified immunoglobulin E and spleen cells fused with SP2.0 mouse myeloma eel! line in the presence of polyethylene glycol. Supernatant of hybridoma cells was screened for detection of antibody by enzyme linked immonosorbent assay method. Cloning of selective high absorbance wells were done with limiting dilution method. The suitable clone (monoclone was selected by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and confirmed by immunoblot. The subclass of the chosen monoclonal antibodies was determined and the clones freezed and kept in liquid nitrogen.During this study three successful fusions were carried out, which resulted in development of 156 clones with high production of anti-IgE. Fourteen clones with the highest titres were selected for cloning. After limiting dilution more than 100 monoclonal antibodies were produced and the suitable (me (GJ0F7, i.e.; the clone which displayed the high absorbance in reaction with purified immunoglobulin E and the lowest cross-reactivity with immunoglobulin M, immunoglobulin G and immoglobulin A was chosen. In immunoblotting, presence of high density band in reaction with immunoglobulin E was confirmed. The suitable mab was shown to be IgG 1 subclass with kappa light chain. It seems that, this mab could be successfully used in diagnostic kits.

  3. Monoclonal antibody against Klebsiella capsular polysaccharide reduces severity and hematogenic spread of experimental Klebsiella pneumoniae pneumonia.

    OpenAIRE

    Held, T K; Trautmann, M.; Mielke, M E; Neudeck, H; Cryz, S J; Cross, A S

    1992-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an important nosocomial pathogen causing severe pulmonary infections. The majority of clinical Klebsiella isolates produce a high-molecular-weight capsular polysaccharide (CPS) which is one of the dominant virulence factors. In the present study, we examined the potency of a murine immunoglobulin M monoclonal antibody (MAb) with specificity to Klebsiella type 2 CPS to protect rats against experimental Klebsiella pneumonia. The MAb did not prevent the invasion of virul...

  4. Monoclonal antibodies biosimilarity assessment using transient isotachophoresis capillary zone electrophoresis-tandem mass spectrometry

    OpenAIRE

    Gahoual, Rabah; Biacchi, Michaël; Chicher, Johana; Kuhn, Lauriane; Hammann, Philippe; Beck, Alain; Leize-Wagner, Emmanuelle; François, Yannis N

    2014-01-01

    Out of all categories, monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics attract the most interest due to their strong therapeutic potency and specificity. Six of the 10 top-selling drugs are antibody-based therapeutics that will lose patent protection soon. The European Medicines Agency has pioneered the regulatory framework for approval of biosimilar products and approved the first biosimilar antibodies by the end of 2013. As highly complex glycoproteins with a wide range of micro-variants, mAbs requi...

  5. Ghost imaging with broad distance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    段德洋; 张路; 杜少将; 夏云杰

    2015-01-01

    We present a scheme that is able to achieve the ghost imaging with broad distance. The physical nature of our scheme is that the different wavelength beams are separated in free space by an optical media according to the slow light or dispersion principle. Meanwhile, the equality of the optical distance of the two light arms is not violated. The photon correlation is achieved by the rotating ground glass plate (RGGP) and spatial light modulator (SLM), respectively. Our work shows that a monochromic ghost image can be obtained in the case of RGGP. More importantly, the position (or distance) of the object can be ascertained by the color of the image. Thus, the imaging and ranging processes are combined as one process for the first time to the best of our knowledge. In the case of SLM, we can obtain a colored image regardless of where the object is.

  6. Novel rabies virus-neutralizing epitope recognized by human monoclonal antibody: Fine mapping and escape mutant analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marissen, W.E.; Kramer, R.A.; Rice, A.; Weldon, W.C.; Niezgoda, M.; Faber, M.; Slootstra, J.W.; Meloen, R.H.; Clijsters-van der Horst, M.; Visser, T.J.; Jongeneelen, M.; Thijsse, S.; Throsby, M.; Kruif, de J.; Rupprecht, C.E.; Dietzschold, B.; Goudsmit, J.; Bakker, A.B.H.

    2005-01-01

    Anti-rabies virus immunoglobulin combined with rabies vaccine protects humans from lethal rabies infections. For cost and safety reasons, replacement of the human or equine polyclonal immunoglobulin is advocated, and the use of rabies virus-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is recommended. We pr

  7. Passive Immunization with Melanin-Binding Monoclonal Antibodies Prolongs Survival of Mice with Lethal Cryptococcus neoformans Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Rosas, Ángel L.; Nosanchuk, Joshua D.; Casadevall, Arturo

    2001-01-01

    Passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to melanin prolonged the survival of and reduced the fungal burden in Cryptococcus neoformans-infected mice in comparison to controls. MAbs to melanin reduced the growth rate of in vitro-melanized C. neoformans cells, suggesting a new mechanism of antibody-mediated protection.

  8. Prophylaxis and therapy of influenza pneumonia in mice by intratracheal instillation of monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study on passive immunity dealt principally with the following topics: pathogenesis of the pneumonia produced by influenza virus (PR8) in CF-1 mice; the distribution and retention of monoclonal antibody instilled intratracheally (IT) into the lung; and prophylaxis and therapy of influenza pneumonia using specific monoclonal antibody (IgG 2a/k anti-HA). The fate of a single 50 ul bolus of antibody instilled IT was determined by monitoring the activity of 125I-labelled monoclonal IgG in the lungs and by lavage recovery of functional antibody.Antibody was demonstrated in high concentrations for the first 3 days and was present in the lungs for a period of 7 days. For prophylaxis several trials indicated that monoclonal antibody provided significant protection from lethal effects of the virus. Antibody given to clinically ill mice on day 3 produced a highly significant reduction in mortality (P < 0.001) when compared to control mice. The treatment reversed the weight loss and apparently arrested the development of lesions in most of the mice within 2 days following antibody administration

  9. Broad-specificity immunoassay for O,O-diethyl organophosphorus pesticides: Application of molecular modeling to improve assay sensitivity and study antibody recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    A monoclonal antibody (MAb) against 4-(diethoxyphosphorothioyloxy)benzoic acid (hapten 1) was raised and used to develop a broad-specificity competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ciELISA) for 14 O,O-diethyl organophosphorus pesticides (OPs). Computer-assisted molecular modeling was...

  10. Ghost imaging with broad distance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, De-Yang; Zhang, Lu; Du, Shao-Jiang; Xia, Yun-Jie

    2015-10-01

    We present a scheme that is able to achieve the ghost imaging with broad distance. The physical nature of our scheme is that the different wavelength beams are separated in free space by an optical media according to the slow light or dispersion principle. Meanwhile, the equality of the optical distance of the two light arms is not violated. The photon correlation is achieved by the rotating ground glass plate (RGGP) and spatial light modulator (SLM), respectively. Our work shows that a monochromic ghost image can be obtained in the case of RGGP. More importantly, the position (or distance) of the object can be ascertained by the color of the image. Thus, the imaging and ranging processes are combined as one process for the first time to the best of our knowledge. In the case of SLM, we can obtain a colored image regardless of where the object is. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 61178012, 11204156, 11304179, and 11247240), the Specialized Research Fund for the Doctoral Program of Higher Education of China (Grant Nos. 20133705110001 and 20123705120002), the Scientific Research Foundation for Outstanding Young Scientists of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. BS2013DX034), and the Natural Science Foundation of Shandong Province, China (Grant No. ZR2012FQ024).

  11. Monoclonal antibodies for radioimmunoimaging: Current perspectives

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability to image tumor using radiolabeled monoclonal antibody products has been widely demonstrated. The questions of safety and efficacy remain open and require further experience, but in some clinical situations, radioimmunoimaging has provided clinically useful information. This paper deals with a set of current problems in imaging with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies and current perspectives on the possible solutions to these problems. The major areas discussed here are the following: (a) The selection process. How might we choose the ''best'' antibody for imaging from among the multitude now available and what form (i.e., which fragments) may be useful? (b) The imaging procedure: What are the basic optimal imaging parameters and how does the data produced by this modality interface with information obtained by more standard methods of imaging? (c) Quantitative techniques: How can noninvasive quantitative techniques provide information useful to the antibody selection process and to the diagnostic and therapeutic applications

  12. Recent developments in monoclonal antibody radiolabeling techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have shown the potential to serve as selective carriers of radionuclides to specific in vivo antigens. Accordingly, there has been an intense surge of research activity in an effort to develop and evaluate MAb-based radiopharmaceuticals for tumor imaging (radioimmunoscintigraphy) and therapy (radioimmunotherapy), as well as for diagnosing nonmalignant diseases. A number of problems have recently been identified, related to the MAbs themselves and to radiolabeling techniques, that comprise both the selectivity and the specificity of the in vivo distribution of radiolabeled MAbs. This paper will address some of these issues and primarily discuss recent developments in the techniques for radiolabeling monoclonal antibodies that may help resolve problems related to the poor in vivo stability of the radiolabel and may thus produce improved biodistribution. Even though many issues are identical with therapeutic radionuclides, the discussion will focus mainly on radioimmunoscintigraphic labels. 78 refs., 6 tabs

  13. Technological progresses in monoclonal antibody production systems

    OpenAIRE

    Rodrigues, E.; Costa, A R; Henriques, Mariana; Azeredo, Joana; Oliveira, Rosário

    2009-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become vitally important to modern medicine and are currently one of the major biopharmaceutical products in development. However, the high clinical dose requirements of mAbs demand a greater biomanufacturing capacity, leading to the development of new technologies for their large-scale production, with mammalian cell culture dominating the scenario. Although some companies have tried to meet these demands by creating bioreactors of increased capacity, the op...

  14. Detection of enterovirus 70 with monoclonal antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, L J; Hatch, M. H.; Flemister, M R; Marchetti, G E

    1984-01-01

    To improve the ability to identify enterovirus-70 (EV-70) from patients with acute hemorrhagic conjunctivitis, we developed four monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to EV-70. We reacted the four MAbs against nine previously characterized strains of EV-70 and heterologous viruses by virus neutralization, indirect immunofluorescence, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Two of the MAbs neutralized all nine strains of EV-70 and none of the other enterovirus types tested. Two of the MAbs gave ...

  15. A monoclonal thyroid-stimulating antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Ando, Takao; Latif, Rauf; Pritsker, Alla; Moran, Thomas; Nagayama, Yuji; Davies, Terry F.

    2002-01-01

    The thyrotropin receptor, also known as the thyroid-stimulating hormone receptor (TSHR), is the primary antigen of Graves disease. Stimulating TSHR antibodies are the cause of thyroid overstimulation and were originally called long-acting thyroid stimulators due to their prolonged action. Here we report the successful cloning and characterization of a monoclonal antibody (MS-1) with TSHR-stimulating activity. The thyroid-stimulating activity of MS-1 was evident at IgG concentrations as low as...

  16. Imaging tumors with radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a metallic radionuclide, either directly bound to a monoclonal antibody, or to a chelating agent (such as di-ethylenetriamine-pentaacetic acid (DTPA)) conjugated to the antibody, a tumor can be traced rapidly and with high specificity. The labelled antibody is injected into the host. In some cases, a localization of distant metastases is possible, giving an indication of tumor spreading. Detection occurs by photoscanning. (Auth.)

  17. The role of adipokines in monoclonal gammopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Oliveira, Luís Alberto Resendes de

    2015-01-01

    In the pathogenesis of monoclonal gammopathies (MG), namely in multiple myeloma (MM), the bone marrow microenvironment displays a critical role. As there is accumulating evidence supporting a link between obesity and MM, it is possible that this association is made through altered adipokines secretion levels. Whereas these hormones are important in several physiologic functions, there are studies showing that they also participate in the carcinogenesis process of some solid tumors. However, a...

  18. Monoclonal antibodies to Bacteroides fragilis lipopolysaccharide.

    OpenAIRE

    Linko-Kettunen, L; Arstila, P; Jalkanen, M; Jousimies-Somer, H; Lassila, O; Lehtonen, O P; Weintraub, A; Viljanen, M K

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) to the lipopolysaccharide (LPS) of Bacteroides fragilis were produced by immunizing mice before hybridization with bacterial outer membranes solubilized with Triton X-100. Nineteen stabile clones were established. They all produced antibodies that reacted more strongly with purified B. fragilis LPS than with crude sonicated antigen in an enzyme immunoassay. Four MoAbs were studied by immunoblotting and enzyme immunoassay inhibition. Immunoblotting confirmed that ...

  19. Radioimmunoscintigraphy with anti-thyroglobulin monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal mouse antibodies to human thyroglobulin were conjugated to the cyclic dianhydride of DTPA. After radiolabelling with 111In this compound was injected into nude mice bearing various human thyroid carcinomas. Repeated imaging studies were carried out 15 min to 50 h after tracer administration. In both papillary and undifferentiated thyroid carcinoma no significant uptake of radiolabelled anti-hTG-MAb was observed. (orig.)

  20. Conjugates of monoclonal antibodies and chelating polymers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The primary purpose of protein modification with chelating polymers is to prepare monoclonal antibodies labeled with heavy metal isotopes (alpha-, beta-, and gamma-emitting metal and paramagnetic ions for NMR tomography). Conventional binding of metals to proteins via chelating agents directly coupled to proteins does not permit binding of a large number of metal atoms per protein molecule without causing alterations in the specific properties of the protein molecules. On the other hand, metal ion binding to proteins via intermediate chelating polymers should permit binding of several dozens of the metal atoms per protein molecule without affect the specific properties adversely. Moreover, the biodistribution and clearance rates can be regulated by varying the polymer properties. Modified antibodies may be used successfully in nuclear and NMR diagnostic applications and in radiotherapy. Possible applications of this approach shall be demonstrated with monoclonal antibody R11D10 for visualization of acute myocardial infarction. Use of this modification with other monoclonal antibodies is also discussed. The chemistry of protein modification with these polymers is presented

  1. Monoclonal antibodies as diagnostics; an appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddiqui M

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Ever since the development of Hybridoma Technology in 1975 by Kohler and Milstein, our vision for antibodies as tools for research for prevention, detection and treatment of diseases, vaccine production, antigenic characterization of pathogens and in the study of genetic regulation of immune responses and disease susceptibility has been revolutionized. The monoclonal antibodies being directed against single epitopes are homogeneous, highly specific and can be produced in unlimited quantities. In animal disease diagnosis, they are very useful for identification and antigenic characterization of pathogens. Monoclonal antibodies have tremendous applications in the field of diagnostics, therapeutics and targeted drug delivery systems, not only for infectious diseases caused by bacteria, viruses and protozoa but also for cancer, metabolic and hormonal disorders. They are also used in the diagnosis of lymphoid and myeloid malignancies, tissue typing, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, radio immunoassay, serotyping of microorganisms, immunological intervention with passive antibody, antiidiotype inhibition, or magic bullet therapy with cytotoxic agents coupled with anti mouse specific antibody. Recombinant deoxyribonucleic acid technology through genetic engineering has successfully led to the possibility of reconstruction of monoclonal antibodies viz. chimeric antibodies, humanized antibodies and complementarily determining region grafted antibodies and their enormous therapeutic use.

  2. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accurate determination of the biodistribution of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) is important for calculation of dosimetry and evaluation of pharmacokinetic variables such as antibody dose and route of administration. The hypothesis of this application is that the biodistribution of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) can be quantitatively determined using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The major thrusts during the third year include the continued development and evaluation of improved 3D SPECT acquisition and reconstruction approaches to improve quantitative imaging of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs), and the implementation and evaluation of algorithms to register serial SPECT image data sets, or to register 3D SPECT images with 3D image data sets acquired from positron emission tomography (PEI) and magnetic resonance images (MRI). The research has involved the investigation of statistical models and iterative reconstruction algorithms that accurately account for the physical characteristics of the SPECT acquisition system. It is our belief that SPECT quantification can be improved by accurately modeling the physical processes such as attenuation, scatter, geometric collimator response, and other factors that affect the measured projection data

  3. [Glomerulopathies with organized monoclonal immunoglobulin deposits].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touchard, Guy; Bridoux, Frank; Goujon, Jean-Michel

    2016-02-01

    The spectrum of glomerular disorders with organized immunoglobulin (Ig) deposits is heterogeneous. It encompasses 2 mains categories: glomerulopathies with fibrillary deposits are mostly represented by immunoglobulinic amyloidosis (most commonly AL amyloidosis, characterized by monoclonal light chain deposits often of the lambda isotype), and pseudo-amyloid fibrillary glomerulonephritis in which deposits predominantly contain polyclonal IgG4. Glomerulopathies with microtubular deposits include cryoglobulinemic glomerulonephritis (type I and type II, with or without detectable serum cryoglobulin) and glomerulonephritis with organized microtubular monoclonal Ig deposits (GOMMID) also referred to as immunotactoid glomerulopathy. Pathological diagnosis requires meticulous studies by light microscopy (with systematic Congo red staining), immunofluorescence with specific conjugates, and electron microscopy. Ultrastructural studies are required to differentiate amyloid fibrils (8 to 10 nm in external diameter), pseudo-amyloid fibrils (15-20 nm) and microtubules (10 to 50 nm in external diameter, with a central hollow core). Glomerular deposits in type I cryoglobulinemic glomerulonephritis are arranged into parallel straight microtubules similar to those observed in GOMMID, but with different topography that allows distinction between the two entities. Glomerular substructures composed of circulating Igs should be distinguished from collagen fibrils that are commonly observed in glomerular disorders with or without deposition of monoclonal or polyclonal Igs. PMID:26810049

  4. Directed Selection of Recombinant Human Monoclonal Antibodies to Herpes Simplex Virus Glycoproteins from Phage Display Libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanna, Pietro Paolo; Williamson, R. Anthony; de Logu, Alessandro; Bloom, Floyd E.; Burton, Dennis R.

    1995-07-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies have considerable potential in the prophylaxis and treatment of viral disease. However, only a few such antibodies suitable for clinical use have been produced to date. We have previously shown that large panels of human recombinant monoclonal antibodies against a plethora of infectious agents, including herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, can be established from phage display libraries. Here we demonstrate that facile cloning of recombinant Fab fragments against specific viral proteins in their native conformation can be accomplished by panning phage display libraries against viral glycoproteins "captured" from infected cell extracts by specific monoclonal antibodies immobilized on ELISA plates. We have tested this strategy by isolating six neutralizing recombinant antibodies specific for herpes simplex glycoprotein gD or gB, some of which are against conformationally sensitive epitopes. By using defined monoclonal antibodies for the antigen-capture step, this method can be used for the isolation of antibodies to specific regions and epitopes within the target viral protein. For instance, monoclonal antibodies to a nonneutralizing epitope can be used in the capture step to clone antibodies to neutralizing epitopes, or antibodies to a neutralizing epitope can be used to clone antibodies to a different neutralizing epitope. Furthermore, by using capturing antibodies to more immunodominant epitopes, one can direct the cloning to less immunogenic ones. This method should be of value in generating antibodies to be used both in the prophylaxis and treatment of viral infections and in the characterization of the mechanisms of antibody protective actions at the molecular level.

  5. Learning from the 2009 H1N1 pandemic: prospects for more broadly effective influenza vaccines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ethan C. Settembre; Philip R. Dormitzer; Rino Rappuoli

    2011-01-01

    Calls to develop a universal influenza vaccine have increased in the wake of the 2009 H1 N1 influenza pandemic. This demand comes at a time when analyses of the human antibody repertoire, informed by structures of complexes between broadly neutralizing antibodies and influenza hemagglutinin, have revealed the target of a class of broadly neutralizing antibodies. Recent studies suggest a path forward to more broadly protective influenza vaccines.%@@ Calls to develop a universal influenza vaccine have increased in the wake of the 2009 H1 N1 influenza pandemic.This demand comes at a time when analyses of the human antibody repertoire, informed by structures of complexes between broadly neutralizing antibodies and influenza hemagglutinin, have revealed the target of a class of broadly neutralizing antibodies.Recent studies suggest a path forward to more broadly protective influenza vaccines.

  6. Prevalence of Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance: A Systematic Review

    OpenAIRE

    Wadhera, Rishi K.; Rajkumar, S. Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a premalignant plasma cell disorder that is associated with a lifelong risk of multiple myeloma. We conducted a systematic review of all studies investigating the prevalence and incidence of MGUS in the online database PubMed. The review was conducted from January 6, 2009, through January 15, 2010. The following MeSH search headings were used: monoclonal gammopathy, benign and prevalence; monoclonal gammopathy, benign and incidence;...

  7. Laboratory Persistence and Clinical Progression of Small Monoclonal Abnormalities

    OpenAIRE

    Murray, David L.; Seningen, Justin L.; Dispenzieri, Angela; Snyder, Melissa R.; Kyle, Robert A.; Rajkumar, S. Vincent; Katzmann, Jerry A.

    2012-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) that presents with no quantifiable M spike on immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE) can be termed IFE MGUS. We retrospectively identified patients with IFE MGUS who were monitored with at least 1 subsequent assessment that included an IFE, and evaluated the persistence of the monoclonal protein and the progression of disease. Although the monoclonal proteins persisted in the majority of patients, 16% did not experience this persistence,...

  8. Critical evaluation of monoclonal antibody staining in breast carcinoma.

    OpenAIRE

    Parham, D M; Coghill, G; Robertson, A.J.

    1989-01-01

    The immunoperoxidase staining of 84 primary invasive breast carcinomas with four monoclonal antibodies (BRST-1, HMFG1, EMA, B72.3) was evaluated by semiquantitative light microscopical examination and quantitative image analysis. Major differences in the staining of the tumours for each of the monoclonal antibodies was observed. Correlation between monoclonal antibody staining and patient age, survival, histological grade, tumour diameter and cellularity was also carried out. This showed a si...

  9. Interaction of [3H] estradiol - and [3H] monohydroxytamoxifen-estrogen receptor complexes with a monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tate, A C; DeSombre, E R; Greene, G L; Jensen, E V; Jordan, V C

    1983-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare and contrast the interaction of estrogen [( 3H]17 beta-estradiol)- or antiestrogen [( 3H]monohydroxytamoxifen)-receptor complexes from human breast tumor cytosols with monoclonal antibodies raised to the human breast tumor estrogen receptor. Breast tumor cytosols containing estrogen receptor which sedimented as radiolabeled peaks in either the 8S, 8S and 4S, or 4S regions of sucrose density gradients, interacted with the monoclonal antibody D547 to produce a broad 9-10S peak, a broad 8S-10S peak, or a more discrete 8S peak, respectively. On high salt (0.4M KC1) sucrose density gradients the 4S ligand-receptor complex plus antibody produced a binding peak at approximately the 8S region of the gradient. These sedimentation studies with the monoclonal antibody D547, and similar studies with the monoclonal antibody D58, could detect no differences in the cytosolic estrogen receptor whether complexed with [3H]estradiol or with [3H]monohydroxytamoxifen. These observations were confirmed by Scatchard equilibrium saturation analysis and sucrose density gradient analysis of cytosols from the MCF-7 human breast cancer cell line. The antibody D547 interacted with 8S ER from these cytosols to produce a broad 8S-10S peak, but the antibody produced no change in the affinity or number of binding sites present in these cytosols. It seems, therefore, that the antigenic determinants recognized by these particular antibodies on the breast tumor cytosolic receptor are not significantly altered by the binding of either an estrogen or an antiestrogen to the receptor. PMID:6671136

  10. 9G4 autoreactivity is increased in HIV-infected patients and correlates with HIV broadly neutralizing serum activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Kobie

    Full Text Available The induction of a broadly neutralizing antibody (BNAb response against HIV-1 would be a desirable feature of a protective vaccine. Vaccine strategies thus far have failed to elicit broadly neutralizing antibody responses; however a minority of HIV-infected patients do develop circulating BNAbs, from which several potent broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs have been isolated. The findings that several BNmAbs exhibit autoreactivity and that autoreactive serum antibodies are observed in some HIV patients have advanced the possibility that enforcement of self-tolerance may contribute to the rarity of BNAbs. To examine the possible breakdown of tolerance in HIV patients, we utilized the 9G4 anti-idiotype antibody system, enabling resolution of both autoreactive VH4-34 gene-expressing B cells and serum antibodies. Compared with healthy controls, HIV patients had significantly elevated 9G4+ serum IgG antibody concentrations and frequencies of 9G4+ B cells, a finding characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients, both of which positively correlated with HIV viral load. Compared to the global 9G4-IgD--memory B cell population, the 9G4+IgD--memory fraction in HIV patients was dominated by isotype switched IgG+ B cells, but had a more prominent bias toward "IgM only" memory. HIV envelope reactivity was observed both in the 9G4+ serum antibody and 9G4+ B cell population. 9G4+ IgG serum antibody levels positively correlated (r = 0.403, p = 0.0019 with the serum HIV BNAbs. Interestingly, other serum autoantibodies commonly found in SLE (anti-dsDNA, ANA, anti-CL did not correlate with serum HIV BNAbs. 9G4-associated autoreactivity is preferentially expanded in chronic HIV infection as compared to other SLE autoreactivities. Therefore, the 9G4 system provides an effective tool to examine autoreactivity in HIV patients. Our results suggest that the development of HIV BNAbs is not merely a consequence of a general breakdown in

  11. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against dog immunoglobulin isotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arce, C; Moreno, A; Millán, Y; Martín de las Mulas, J; Llanes, D

    2002-09-01

    A panel of six monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) recognizing antigenic determinants on canine immunoglobulin (Ig) heavy or light chains was produced and characterized. All monoclonals recognized the IgG(2) subclass, although only two were subclass-specific (CA3H1 and CA4F1). The CA3B8 mAb was found to be specific for an epitope on canine immunoglobulin G heavy chain, (IgG(1) and IgG(2) subclasses). Two mAbs (CA2E9 and CA5B2) reacted with an epitope on the heavy chain of canine IgG and IgM and another, CA4E7, bound to canine IgA, IgG and IgM isotypes; CA4E7 recognized an epitope on canine immunoglobulin light chain. CA4E7, CA4F1 and CA5B2 recognized an epitope in the Fab region. Three mAbs, CA3B8, CA4E7 and CA5B2, showed much lower reactivity with canine IgG by ELISA when IgG was periodate-treated, suggesting that they recognized a carbohydrate determinant. Cross-reactivity analysis of these mAbs with sera from horse, goat, cow, sheep, pig, cat, rabbit, hamster, rat, mouse and human indicated that two mAbs, CA3B8 and CA5B2, recognized a canine IgG-specific epitope; two others, CA3H1 and CA4E7, recognized an epitope also present in rabbit and sheep immunoglobulin respectively; and the remaining two (CA2E9 and CA4F1) recognized an epitope broadly present on the Igs of the species analyzed. This panel of antibodies will be a useful tool for future canine immunodiagnosis tests. With the exception of CA2E9, all mAbs were able to recognize plasma cells on paraffin-embedded tissues, and will thus be useful for immunohistochemical assays. PMID:12088642

  12. Production of Monoclonal Antibody against Human Nestin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadavi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ahmadvand, Negah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Sadeghi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Tarahomi, Majid; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2010-04-01

    We have employed a peptide-based antibody generation protocol for producing antibody against human nestin. Using a 12-mer synthetic peptide from repetitive region of human nestin protein devoid of any N- or O-glyco-sylation sequences, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody capable of recognizing human, mouse, bovine, and rat nestin. A wide variety of nestin proteins ranging from 140-250 kDa was detected by this antibody. This antibody is highly specific and functional in applications such as ELISA, flow cytometry, immunocytochemistry, and Western blot assays. PMID:23407796

  13. Production of Monoclonal Antibody against Human Nestin

    OpenAIRE

    Hadavi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ahmadvand, Negah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Sadeghi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Akhondi, Mohammad mehdi; Tarahomi, Majid; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2010-01-01

    We have employed a peptide-based antibody generation protocol for producing antibody against human nestin. Using a 12-mer synthetic peptide from repetitive region of human nestin protein devoid of any N- or O-glyco-sylation sequences, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody capable of recognizing human, mouse, bovine, and rat nestin. A wide variety of nestin proteins ranging from 140–250 kDa was detected by this antibody. This antibody is highly specific and functional in applications such a...

  14. Bone marrow dosimetry for monoclonal antibody therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immunoglobulins must permeate through the basement membrane of capillaries in order to enter the extracellular space (ECS) of tissue. Since the process is quite slow, the blood plasma activity in various organs contributes considerably to the radiation dose of the dose-limiting tissues. In bone marrow the basement membrane is absent and the blood circulation is functionally open. Therefore, blood plasma and marrow ECS maintain equal concentrations of labeled immunoglobulins. A combination of factors including intravenous administration, slow absorption into most tissues, slow breakdown and elimination of labeled immunoglobulin, and rapid entry into bone marrow ECS as well as known radiosensitivity of marrow led the authors to expect this tissue would prove to be the primary tissue at risk for systemic monoclonal antibody therapy. They have developed and applied in a Phase I clinical study of 131I labeled CEA antibody a procedure for estimation of radiation dose to red bone marrow. Serieal measurements of blood plasma and total body retention are carried out. Binding of labeled antibody to the cellular components of blood is verified to be very low. They have observed bone marrow depression at doses greater than 400 rad. If no special procedures are used to reconstitute marrow after radiation treatment, this level represents a much greater than generally recognized limitation to radiolabeled monoclonal antibody therapy. 25 references, 4 tables

  15. Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for Hippurate Hydrolase of Campylobacter jejuni

    OpenAIRE

    Steele, Marina; Gyles, Carlton; Chan, Voon Loong; Odumeru, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    Eleven monoclonal antibodies raised against recombinant Campylobacter jejuni hippurate hydrolase were tested for binding to lysates from 19 C. jejuni strains, 12 other Campylobacter strains, and 21 non-Campylobacter strains. Several monoclonal antibodies bound to C. jejuni but not to other Campylobacter species and may be useful in a species-specific immunoassay.

  16. Assay for the specificity of monoclonal antibodies in crossed immunoelectrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, K; Schou, C; Koch, C

    1984-01-01

    A method is described based on crossed immunoelectrophoresis of a complex antigen mixture in agarose gel followed by incubation of the gel with the monoclonal antibody. The bound monoclonal antibody is detected by the use of a secondary enzyme-labelled antibody. Using this technique we have been ...

  17. Broad Prize: Do the Successes Spread?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    When the Broad Prize for Urban Education was created in 2002, billionaire philanthropist Eli Broad said he hoped the awards, in addition to rewarding high-performing school districts, would foster healthy competition; boost the prestige of urban education, long viewed as dysfunctional; and showcase best practices. Over the 10 years the prize has…

  18. Production of monoclonal antibody with Celline-350 bioreactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibodies are protein that are highly specific and sensitive in their reaction with specific sites on target molecules that they have become reagents of central importance in the diagnostic and treatment of human diseases. This paper reports the use of CELLine-350 bioreactor to produce continuous supply of serum-free breast cancer monoclonal antibody. Initial volume of 5ml (1.5 x 106 viable cells/ml) is inoculated into the bioreactor and harvesting is done every 5 days to obtain high yield monoclonal antibody. The serum-free supernatant is precipitated with 50% saturated ammonia sulfate and the antibody is purified by protein-G affinity chromatography. The concentration of monoclonal antibody successfully produced by the bioreactor is 0.91mg/ml respectively and it is measured by the Lowry method. This result shows that bioreactor Celline-350 is easy to handle and cost effective for the continuous production of serum free monoclonal antibody. (Author)

  19. Broad and potent HIV-1 neutralization by a human antibody that binds the gp41-gp120 interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinghe; Kang, Byong H; Pancera, Marie; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Tong, Tommy; Feng, Yu; Imamichi, Hiromi; Georgiev, Ivelin S; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Laub, Leo; Sliepen, Kwinten; van Gils, Marit J; de la Peña, Alba Torrents; Derking, Ronald; Klasse, Per-Johan; Migueles, Stephen A; Bailer, Robert T; Alam, Munir; Pugach, Pavel; Haynes, Barton F; Wyatt, Richard T; Sanders, Rogier W; Binley, James M; Ward, Andrew B; Mascola, John R; Kwong, Peter D; Connors, Mark

    2014-11-01

    The isolation of human monoclonal antibodies is providing important insights into the specificities that underlie broad neutralization of HIV-1 (reviewed in ref. 1). Here we report a broad and extremely potent HIV-specific monoclonal antibody, termed 35O22, which binds a novel HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) epitope. 35O22 neutralized 62% of 181 pseudoviruses with a half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50) <50 μg ml(-1). The median IC50 of neutralized viruses was 0.033 μg ml(-1), among the most potent thus far described. 35O22 did not bind monomeric forms of Env tested, but did bind the trimeric BG505 SOSIP.664. Mutagenesis and a reconstruction by negative-stain electron microscopy of the Fab in complex with trimer revealed that it bound to a conserved epitope, which stretched across gp120 and gp41. The specificity of 35O22 represents a novel site of vulnerability on HIV Env, which serum analysis indicates to be commonly elicited by natural infection. Binding to this new site of vulnerability may thus be an important complement to current monoclonal-antibody-based approaches to immunotherapies, prophylaxis and vaccine design. PMID:25186731

  20. Broad and potent HIV-1 neutralization by a human antibody that binds the gp41-gp120 interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jinghe; Kang, Byong H.; Pancera, Marie; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Tong, Tommy; Feng, Yu; Imamichi, Hiromi; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Laub, Leo; Sliepen, Kwinten; van Gils, Marit J.; de la Peña, Alba Torrents; Derking, Ronald; Klasse, Per-Johan; Migueles, Stephen A.; Bailer, Robert T.; Alam, Munir; Pugach, Pavel; Haynes, Barton F.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Binley, James M.; Ward, Andrew B.; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.; Connors, Mark [NIH

    2015-10-15

    The isolation of human monoclonal antibodies is providing important insights into the specificities that underlie broad neutralization of HIV-1 (reviewed in ref. 1). Here we report a broad and extremely potent HIV-specific monoclonal antibody, termed 35O22, which binds a novel HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) epitope. 35O22 neutralized 62% of 181 pseudoviruses with a half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50) <50 μg ml-1. The median IC50 of neutralized viruses was 0.033 μg ml-1, among the most potent thus far described. 35O22 did not bind monomeric forms of Env tested, but did bind the trimeric BG505 SOSIP.664. Mutagenesis and a reconstruction by negative-stain electron microscopy of the Fab in complex with trimer revealed that it bound to a conserved epitope, which stretched across gp120 and gp41. The specificity of 35O22 represents a novel site of vulnerability on HIV Env, which serum analysis indicates to be commonly elicited by natural infection. Binding to this new site of vulnerability may thus be an important complement to current monoclonal-antibody-based approaches to immunotherapies, prophylaxis and vaccine design.

  1. Potent neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against Ebola virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Gui, Miao; Niu, Xuefeng; He, Shihua; Wang, Ruoke; Feng, Yupeng; Kroeker, Andrea; Zuo, Yanan; Wang, Hua; Wang, Ying; Li, Jiade; Li, Chufang; Shi, Yi; Shi, Xuanling; Gao, George F; Xiang, Ye; Qiu, Xiangguo; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Linqi

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus infections cause a deadly hemorrhagic disease for which no vaccines or therapeutics has received regulatory approval. Here we show isolation of three (Q206, Q314 and Q411) neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the surface glycoprotein (GP) of Ebola virus identified in West Africa in 2014 through sequential immunization of Chinese rhesus macaques and antigen-specific single B cell sorting. These mAbs demonstrated potent neutralizing activities against both pseudo and live Ebola virus independent of complement. Biochemical, single particle EM, and mutagenesis analysis suggested Q206 and Q411 recognized novel epitopes in the head while Q314 targeted the glycan cap in the GP1 subunit. Q206 and Q411 appeared to influence GP binding to its receptor NPC1. Treatment with these mAbs provided partial but significant protection against disease in a mouse model of Ebola virus infection. These novel mAbs could serve as promising candidates for prophylactic and therapeutic interventions against Ebola virus infection. PMID:27181584

  2. Potent neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against Ebola virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qi; Gui, Miao; Niu, Xuefeng; He, Shihua; Wang, Ruoke; Feng, Yupeng; Kroeker, Andrea; Zuo, Yanan; Wang, Hua; Wang, Ying; Li, Jiade; Li, Chufang; Shi, Yi; Shi, Xuanling; Gao, George F.; Xiang, Ye; Qiu, Xiangguo; Chen, Ling; Zhang, Linqi

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus infections cause a deadly hemorrhagic disease for which no vaccines or therapeutics has received regulatory approval. Here we show isolation of three (Q206, Q314 and Q411) neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the surface glycoprotein (GP) of Ebola virus identified in West Africa in 2014 through sequential immunization of Chinese rhesus macaques and antigen-specific single B cell sorting. These mAbs demonstrated potent neutralizing activities against both pseudo and live Ebola virus independent of complement. Biochemical, single particle EM, and mutagenesis analysis suggested Q206 and Q411 recognized novel epitopes in the head while Q314 targeted the glycan cap in the GP1 subunit. Q206 and Q411 appeared to influence GP binding to its receptor NPC1. Treatment with these mAbs provided partial but significant protection against disease in a mouse model of Ebola virus infection. These novel mAbs could serve as promising candidates for prophylactic and therapeutic interventions against Ebola virus infection. PMID:27181584

  3. Development of a monoclonal antibody specific to cooked mammalian meats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Y H; Sheu, S C; Bridgman, R C

    1998-04-01

    Detection of species adulteration in ground meat products is important for consumer protection and food-labeling law enforcement. This study was conducted to develop monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that can be used in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for rapid detection of any cooked mammalian meats in cooked poultry products. Soluble muscle proteins extracted from cooked pork (heated at 100 degrees C for 15 min) were used as the antigen to immunized mice for developing the MAb. One that was developed, MAb 2F8 (IgG2b class), strongly reacted with cooked meat of five mammalian species (beef cattle, hogs, sheep, horse, and deer) but did not react with any cooked poultry (chicken, turkey, and duck) or raw meats. At least 0.5% by weight of pork, beef, lamb, and horse meats in a chicken-based mixture could not detect using the indirect ELISA with MAb 2F8. The MAb 2F8 is useful in a single initial screening test to detect the presence of five nonpoultry meat adulterants in cooked poultry products. PMID:9709213

  4. Comprehensive Mapping Antigenic Epitopes of NS1 Protein of Japanese Encephalitis Virus with Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Rong-Hong; Liu, Li-Ke; Chen, Zhen-Shi; Li, Ye-Nan; Bu, Zhi-Gao

    2013-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV) non-structural protein 1 (NS1) contributes to virus replication and elicits protective immune responses during infection. JEV NS1-specific antibody responses could be a target in the differential diagnosis of different flavivirus infections. However, the epitopes on JEV NS1 are poorly characterized. The present study describes the full mapping of linear B-cell epitopes in JEV NS1. We generated eleven NS1-specific monoclonal antibodies from mice immunized with recombinant NS1. For epitope mapping of monoclonal antibodies, a set of 51 partially-overlapping peptides covering the entire NS1 protein were expressed with a GST-tag and then screened using monoclonal antibodies. Through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), five linear epitope-containing peptides were identified. By sequentially removing amino acid residues from the carboxy and amino terminal of peptides, the minimal units of the five linear epitopes were identified and confirmed using monoclonal antibodies. Five linear epitopes are located in amino acids residues (5)AIDITRK(11), (72)RDELNVL(78), (251)KSKHNRREGY(260), (269)DENGIVLD(276), and (341)DETTLVRS(348). Furthermore, it was found that the epitopes are highly conserved among JEV strains through sequence alignment. Notably, none of the homologous regions on NS1 proteins from other flaviviruses reacted with the MAbs when they were tested for cross-reactivity, and all five epitope peptides were not recognized by sera against West Nile virus or Dengue virus. These novel virus-specific linear B-cell epitopes of JEV NS1 would benefit the development of new vaccines and diagnostic assays. PMID:23825668

  5. Comprehensive Mapping Antigenic Epitopes of NS1 Protein of Japanese Encephalitis Virus with Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Hong Hua

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV non-structural protein 1 (NS1 contributes to virus replication and elicits protective immune responses during infection. JEV NS1-specific antibody responses could be a target in the differential diagnosis of different flavivirus infections. However, the epitopes on JEV NS1 are poorly characterized. The present study describes the full mapping of linear B-cell epitopes in JEV NS1. We generated eleven NS1-specific monoclonal antibodies from mice immunized with recombinant NS1. For epitope mapping of monoclonal antibodies, a set of 51 partially-overlapping peptides covering the entire NS1 protein were expressed with a GST-tag and then screened using monoclonal antibodies. Through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, five linear epitope-containing peptides were identified. By sequentially removing amino acid residues from the carboxy and amino terminal of peptides, the minimal units of the five linear epitopes were identified and confirmed using monoclonal antibodies. Five linear epitopes are located in amino acids residues (5AIDITRK(11, (72RDELNVL(78, (251KSKHNRREGY(260, (269DENGIVLD(276, and (341DETTLVRS(348. Furthermore, it was found that the epitopes are highly conserved among JEV strains through sequence alignment. Notably, none of the homologous regions on NS1 proteins from other flaviviruses reacted with the MAbs when they were tested for cross-reactivity, and all five epitope peptides were not recognized by sera against West Nile virus or Dengue virus. These novel virus-specific linear B-cell epitopes of JEV NS1 would benefit the development of new vaccines and diagnostic assays.

  6. Monoclonal Antibodies and Toxins—A Perspective on Function and Isotype

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siu-Kei Chow

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Antibody therapy remains the only effective treatment for toxin-mediated diseases. The development of hybridoma technology has allowed the isolation of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs with high specificity and defined properties, and numerous mAbs have been purified and characterized for their protective efficacy against different toxins. This review summarizes the mAb studies for 6 toxins—Shiga toxin, pertussis toxin, anthrax toxin, ricin toxin, botulinum toxin, and Staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB—and analyzes the prevalence of mAb functions and their isotypes. Here we show that most toxin-binding mAbs resulted from immunization are non-protective and that mAbs with potential therapeutic use are preferably characterized. Various common practices and caveats of protection studies are discussed, with the goal of providing insights for the design of future research on antibody-toxin interactions.

  7. Monoclonal antibodies in treatment of multiple sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rommer, P S; Dudesek, A; Stüve, O; Zettl, UK

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are used as therapeutics in a number of disciplines in medicine, such as oncology, rheumatology, gastroenterology, dermatology and transplant rejection prevention. Since the introduction and reintroduction of the anti-alpha4-integrin mAb natalizumab in 2004 and 2006, mAbs have gained relevance in the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS). At present, numerous mAbs have been tested in clinical trials in relapsing–remitting MS, and in progressive forms of MS. One of the agents that might soon be approved for very active forms of relapsing–remitting MS is alemtuzumab, a humanized mAb against CD52. This review provides insights into clinical studies with the mAbs natalizumab, alemtuzumab, daclizumab, rituximab, ocrelizumab and ofatumumab. PMID:24001305

  8. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The long-term goal of this research project is to develop methods to improve the utility of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECI) to quantify the biodistribution of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) labeled with clinically relevant radionuclides (123I, 131I, and 111In) and with another radionuclide,211At, recently used in therapy. We describe here our progress in developing quantitative SPECT methodology for 111In and 123I. We have focused our recent research thrusts on the following aspects of SPECT: (1) The development of improved SPECT hardware, such as improved acquisition geometries. (2) The development of better reconstruction methods that provide accurate compensation for the physical factors that affect SPECT quantification. (3) The application of carefully designed simulations and experiments to validate our hardware and software approaches

  9. Harnessing the protective potential of HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Abigail Smith

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent biological, structural, and technical advances are converging within the HIV-1 vaccine field to harness the power of antibodies for prevention and therapy. Numerous monoclonal antibodies with broad neutralizing activity against diverse HIV-1 isolates have now been identified, revealing at least five sites of vulnerability on the envelope (Env glycoproteins. While there are practical and technological barriers blocking a clear path from broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAb to a protective vaccine, this is not a dead end. Scientists are revisiting old approaches with new technology, cutting new trails through unexplored territory, and paving new roads in the hopes of preventing HIV-1 infection. Other promising avenues to capitalize on the power of bNAbs are also being pursued, such as passive antibody immunotherapy and gene therapy approaches. Moreover, non-neutralizing antibodies have inhibitory activities that could have protective potential, alone or in combination with bNAbs. With a new generation of bNAbs, and a clinical trial that associated antibodies with reduced acquisition, the field is closer than ever to developing strategies to use antibodies against HIV-1.

  10. A single injection of anti-HIV-1 antibodies protects against repeated SHIV challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gautam, Rajeev; Nishimura, Yoshiaki; Pegu, Amarendra; Nason, Martha C; Klein, Florian; Gazumyan, Anna; Golijanin, Jovana; Buckler-White, Alicia; Sadjadpour, Reza; Wang, Keyun; Mankoff, Zachary; Schmidt, Stephen D; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Mascola, John R; Nussenzweig, Michel C; Martin, Malcolm A

    2016-05-01

    Despite the success of potent anti-retroviral drugs in controlling human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection, little progress has been made in generating an effective HIV-1 vaccine. Although passive transfer of anti-HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies can protect mice or macaques against a single high-dose challenge with HIV or simian/human (SIV/HIV) chimaeric viruses (SHIVs) respectively, the long-term efficacy of a passive antibody transfer approach for HIV-1 has not been examined. Here we show, on the basis of the relatively long-term protection conferred by hepatitis A immune globulin, the efficacy of a single injection (20 mg kg(-1)) of four anti-HIV-1-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (VRC01, VRC01-LS, 3BNC117, and 10-1074 (refs 9 - 12)) in blocking repeated weekly low-dose virus challenges of the clade B SHIVAD8. Compared with control animals, which required two to six challenges (median = 3) for infection, a single broadly neutralizing antibody infusion prevented virus acquisition for up to 23 weekly challenges. This effect depended on antibody potency and half-life. The highest levels of plasma-neutralizing activity and, correspondingly, the longest protection were found in monkeys administered the more potent antibodies 3BNC117 and 10-1074 (median = 13 and 12.5 weeks, respectively). VRC01, which showed lower plasma-neutralizing activity, protected for a shorter time (median = 8 weeks). The introduction of a mutation that extends antibody half-life into the crystallizable fragment (Fc) domain of VRC01 increased median protection from 8 to 14.5 weeks. If administered to populations at high risk of HIV-1 transmission, such an immunoprophylaxis regimen could have a major impact on virus transmission. PMID:27120156

  11. Monoclonal gammopathy: a diagnosis for to keep in mind

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    How to identify monoclonal gammopathies at risk for progression has been studied for the last year. 40 patients were studied in which a monoclonal band had been detected, in some of the cases de novo. The electrophoresis was performed in the Hydrasys system. Of the total of electrophoresis carried out, the 14% was monoclonal gammopathy. In 36% a diagnostic assumption was not stated. Most frequent diagnosis in the group of patients with a diagnosis was multiple myeloma. Average age of patients was 61.5 years and there were differences among percentages for sex

  12. Sub-Nanogram Detection of RDX Explosive by Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaeto, David O; Hutchinson, Alistair P; Nicklin, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies were raised to protein carrier molecules haptenized with RDX, a major component of many plastic explosives including Semtex. Sera from immunized mice detected RDX protein conjugates in standard ELISA. Clonally purified monoclonal antibodies had detection limits in the sub-ng/mL range for underivatized RDX in competition ELISA. The monoclonal antibodies are not dependent on the presence of taggants added during the manufacturing process, and are likely to have utility in the detection of any explosive containing RDX, or RDX contamination of environmental sites. PMID:26252765

  13. Monoclonal antibodies and Fc fragments for treating solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisenbeis AM

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrea M Eisenbeis, Stefan J GrauDepartment of Neurosurgery, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, GermanyAbstract: Advances in biotechnology, better understanding of pathophysiological processes, as well as the identification of an increasing number of molecular markers have facilitated the use of monoclonal antibodies and Fc fragments in various fields in medicine. In this context, a rapidly growing number of these substances have also emerged in the field of oncology. This review will summarize the currently approved monoclonal antibodies used for the treatment of solid tumors with a focus on their clinical application, biological background, and currently ongoing trials.Keywords: targeted therapy, monoclonal antibodies, cancer, biological therapy

  14. Heterohybridoma for the production of non murine monoclonal antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kh.Victoria Chanu and M. Ayub Ali

    Full Text Available Hybridoma technology described by kohler and Milstein produce only mouse immunoglobulins. Such immunoglobulins have limited use due to its negative side effects such as the recipient’s immune response. The production of a non murine monoclonal antibody to combat the problems of murine monoclonal antibody is again difficult due to the lack of a suitable myeloma cell line. Heterohybridoma formed by the fusion of lymphocyte of one species with the myeloma cell of a different species is the solution, which can be used for the production of non murine monoclonal antibodies. [Veterinary World 2010; 3(8.000: 390-392

  15. Markedly prolonged incubation period of hepatitis B in a chimpanzee passively immunized with a human monoclonal antibody to the a determinant of hepatitis B surface antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Ogata, N.; Ostberg, L; Ehrlich, P H; Wong, D C; Miller, R H; Purcell, R H

    1993-01-01

    The protective efficacy of a human monoclonal antibody directed against the a determinant of hepatitis B virus (HBV) surface antigen was studied in a chimpanzee. A single high dose of 5 mg/kg (body weight) of monoclonal antibody SDZ OST 577 was intravenously administered to a chimpanzee, followed by intravenous challenge with 10(3.5) chimpanzee infectious doses of a wild-type HBV, the MS-2 strain (ayw subtype). The passively acquired antibody to HBV surface antigen could be detected for 40 we...

  16. Generation and characterization of monoclonal antibodies specific to Coenzyme A

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malanchuk O. M.

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Generation of monoclonal antibodies specific to Coenzyme A. Methods. Hybridoma technique. KLH carrier protein conjugated with CoA was used for immunization. Screening of positive clones was performed with BSA conjugated to CoA. Results. Monoclonal antibody that specifically recognizes CoA and CoA derivatives, but not its precursors ATP and cysteine has been generated. Conclusion. In this study, we describe for the first time the production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against CoA. The monoclonal antibody 1F10 was shown to recognize specifically CoA in Western blotting, ELISA and immunoprecipitation. These properties make this antiboby a particularly valuable reagent for elucidating CoA function in health and disease.

  17. BROAD PHONEME CLASSIFICATION USING SIGNAL BASED FEATURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deekshitha G

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Speech is the most efficient and popular means of human communication Speech is produced as a sequence of phonemes. Phoneme recognition is the first step performed by automatic speech recognition system. The state-of-the-art recognizers use mel-frequency cepstral coefficients (MFCC features derived through short time analysis, for which the recognition accuracy is limited. Instead of this, here broad phoneme classification is achieved using features derived directly from the speech at the signal level itself. Broad phoneme classes include vowels, nasals, fricatives, stops, approximants and silence. The features identified useful for broad phoneme classification are voiced/unvoiced decision, zero crossing rate (ZCR, short time energy, most dominant frequency, energy in most dominant frequency, spectral flatness measure and first three formants. Features derived from short time frames of training speech are used to train a multilayer feedforward neural network based classifier with manually marked class label as output and classification accuracy is then tested. Later this broad phoneme classifier is used for broad syllable structure prediction which is useful for applications such as automatic speech recognition and automatic language identification.

  18. A monoclonal antibody toolkit for C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayla Hadwiger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antibodies are critical tools in many avenues of biological research. Though antibodies can be produced in the research laboratory setting, most research labs working with vertebrates avail themselves of the wide array of commercially available reagents. By contrast, few such reagents are available for work with model organisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report the production of monoclonal antibodies directed against a wide range of proteins that label specific subcellular and cellular components, and macromolecular complexes. Antibodies were made to synaptobrevin (SNB-1, a component of synaptic vesicles; to Rim (UNC-10, a protein localized to synaptic active zones; to transforming acidic coiled-coil protein (TAC-1, a component of centrosomes; to CENP-C (HCP-4, which in worms labels the entire length of their holocentric chromosomes; to ORC2 (ORC-2, a subunit of the DNA origin replication complex; to the nucleolar phosphoprotein NOPP140 (DAO-5; to the nuclear envelope protein lamin (LMN-1; to EHD1 (RME-1 a marker for recycling endosomes; to caveolin (CAV-1, a marker for caveolae; to the cytochrome P450 (CYP-33E1, a resident of the endoplasmic reticulum; to beta-1,3-glucuronyltransferase (SQV-8 that labels the Golgi; to a chaperonin (HSP-60 targeted to mitochondria; to LAMP (LMP-1, a resident protein of lysosomes; to the alpha subunit of the 20S subcomplex (PAS-7 of the 26S proteasome; to dynamin (DYN-1 and to the alpha-subunit of the adaptor complex 2 (APA-2 as markers for sites of clathrin-mediated endocytosis; to the MAGUK, protein disks large (DLG-1 and cadherin (HMR-1, both of which label adherens junctions; to a cytoskeletal linker of the ezrin-radixin-moesin family (ERM-1, which localized to apical membranes; to an ERBIN family protein (LET-413 which localizes to the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells and to an adhesion molecule (SAX-7 which localizes to the plasma membrane at cell-cell contacts. In addition to

  19. Development of a monoclonal antibody detection assay for species-specific identification of abalone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopata, Andreas L; Luijx, Thomas; Fenemore, Bartha; Sweijd, Neville A; Cook, Peter A

    2002-10-01

    Species identification based on biochemical and molecular techniques has a broad range of applications. These include compliance enforcement, the management and conservation of marine organisms, and commercial quality control. Abalone poaching worldwide and illegal trade in abalone products have increased mainly because of the attractive prices obtained and caused a sharp decline in stocks. Alleged poachers have been acquitted because of lack of evidence to correctly identify species. Therefore, a robust method is required that would identify tissue of abalone origin to species level. The aim of this study was to develop immunologic techniques, using monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, to identify 10 different abalone species and subspecies from South Africa, the United States, Australia, and Japan. The combination of 3 developed monoclonal antibodies to South African abalone (Haliotis midae) enabled differentiation between most of the 10 species including the subspecies H. diversicolor supertexta and H. diversicolor diversicolor. In a novel approach, using antibodies of patients with allergy to abalone, the differentiation of additional subspecies, H. discus discus and H. discus hannai, was possible. A field-based immunoassay was developed to identify confiscated tissue of abalone origin. PMID:14961238

  20. Identification and typing of herpes simplex viruses with monoclonal antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Balachandran, N; Frame, B; Chernesky, M; Kraiselburd, E; Kouri, Y; Garcia, D.; Lavery, C; Rawls, W. E.

    1982-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies which reacted with type-specific antigens of herpes simplex virus type 2 or with antigens shared by herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 were used in an indirect immunofluorescence assay to type virus isolates and to detect viral antigens in cells obtained from herpetic lesions. Complete concordance was obtained for 42 isolates typed by endonuclease restriction analysis of viral DNA and by indirect immunofluorescence with monoclonal antibodies. Examination of a limited num...

  1. Production and characterization of yeast killer toxin monoclonal antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Polonelli, L; Morace, G

    1987-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were obtained after fusion of mouse myeloma cells with spleen cells isolated from mice primed with a crude extract of yeast killer toxin produced by a strain of Hansenula anomala. Hybridomas were selected by specific immunoassay reaction of their fluid with crude yeast killer toxin extract. Among the monoclonal antibodies, which were characterized by the Western blot technique, one (designated KT4) proved to have precipitating properties, thus permitting the neutralizati...

  2. Characterization of human serum spreading factor with monoclonal antibody.

    OpenAIRE

    Barnes, D W; Silnutzer, J; See, C; Shaffer, M

    1983-01-01

    Serum spreading factor is a glycoprotein isolated from human serum that promotes spreading of a variety of cell types on culture dishes. We developed mouse hybridoma lines secreting monoclonal antibody to serum spreading factor that markedly inhibited the rate of serum spreading factor-promoted spreading of both fibroblastic and epithelial cells in culture. Fibronectin-promoted cell spreading was unaffected by monoclonal antibody to serum spreading factor, and the factor appeared to be distin...

  3. Immunophenotypic studies of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance

    OpenAIRE

    McKenna Robert W; Chen Weina; Wang Huan-You; Olteanu Horatiu; Karandikar Nitin J

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a common plasma cell dyscrasia, comprising the most indolent form of monoclonal gammopathy. However, approximately 25% of MGUS cases ultimately progress to plasma cell myeloma (PCM) or related diseases. It is difficult to predict which subset of patients will transform. In this study, we examined the immunophenotypic differences of plasma cells in MGUS and PCM. Methods Bone marrow specimens from 32 MGUS patients ...

  4. Current research status of radioimmunotherapy monoclonal antibody drug

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radioimmunotherapy (RIT) was one of the most important progresses in the field of cancer therapy over the past 20 years. It has been successfully applied in the treatment of blood system tumors such as NHL. For the utilization of RIT in therapy of solid tumors, however, development of more effective monoclonal antibodies, labeling methods and so on are needed. The current status of radionuclides, monoclonal antibodies and drugs commonly used in the RIT were briefly reviewed. (authors)

  5. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 mutants that escape neutralization by human monoclonal antibody IgG1b12. off.

    OpenAIRE

    Mo, H; Stamatatos, L; Ip, J E; Barbas, C F; Parren, P W; Burton, D R; Moore, J. P.; Ho, D D

    1997-01-01

    IgG1b12, a human monoclonal antibody (MAb) to an epitope overlapping the CD4-binding site on gp120, has broad and potent neutralizing activity against most primary human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) isolates. To assess whether and how escape mutants resistant to IgG1b12 can be generated, we cultured primary HIV-1 strain JRCSF in its presence. An escape mutant emerged which was approximately 100-fold more resistant to neutralization by IgG1b12. Both virion-associated and solubilized g...

  6. Giant Broad Line Regions in Dwarf Seyferts

    CERN Document Server

    Devereux, Nick

    2015-01-01

    High angular resolution spectroscopy obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has revealed a remarkable population of galaxies hosting dwarf Seyfert nuclei with an unusually large broad-line region (BLR). These objects are remarkable for two reasons. Firstly, the size of the BLR can, in some cases, rival those seen in the most luminous quasars. Secondly, the size of the BLR is not correlated with the central continuum luminosity, an observation that distinguishes them from their reverberating counterparts. Collectively, these early results suggest that non-reverberating dwarf Seyferts are a heterogeneous group and not simply scaled versions of each other. Careful inspection reveals broad H Balmer emission lines with single peaks, double peaks, and a combination of the two, suggesting that the broad emission lines are produced in kinematically distinct regions centered on the black hole (BH). Because the gravitational field strength is already known for these objects, by virtue of knowing their BH mass, ...

  7. Production of monoclonal antibodies against canine leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Paulo Henrique Palis; Borges dos Santos, Roberto Robson; Lima, Carla Andrade; Rios de Sousa Gomes, Hilton; Larangeira, Daniela Farias; Santos, Patrícia Meira; Barrouin-Melo, Stella Maria; Conrado dos-Santos, Washington Luis; Pontes-de-Carvalho, Lain

    2004-04-01

    A panel of anti-canine leukocyte monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was produced by immunizing BALB/c mice with canine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), either resting or stimulated with concanavalin A (ConA). Three out of 28 clones-IH1, AB6, and HG6-screened by ELISA and producing antibody with the highest specificity for canine cell immunostaining, were subjected to three subsequent subcloning steps by limiting dilution, and selected for further characterization. These MAbs belonged to IgG1 (HG6 and IH1) and IgG2a (AB6) isotypes. The distribution of cell populations expressing the antigen recognized by the antibodies was identified by indirect immunoflorescence on canine PBMC and on tissue sections of lymph node, spleen, liver and skin. The possible crossreactivity with human PBMC was also examined in immunocytochemistry. One of the antibodies specifically recognized macrophages. The MAbs presented here can be foreseen as possible valuable diagnostic and research tools to study immune functions in dogs. PMID:15165486

  8. Technological progresses in monoclonal antibody production systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Maria Elisa; Costa, Ana Rita; Henriques, Mariana; Azeredo, Joana; Oliveira, Rosário

    2010-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become vitally important to modern medicine and are currently one of the major biopharmaceutical products in development. However, the high clinical dose requirements of mAbs demand a greater biomanufacturing capacity, leading to the development of new technologies for their large-scale production, with mammalian cell culture dominating the scenario. Although some companies have tried to meet these demands by creating bioreactors of increased capacity, the optimization of cell culture productivity in normal bioreactors appears as a better strategy. This review describes the main technological progresses made with this intent, presenting the advantages and limitations of each production system, as well as suggestions for improvements. New and upgraded bioreactors have emerged both for adherent and suspension cell culture, with disposable reactors attracting increased interest in the last years. Furthermore, the strategies and technologies used to control culture parameters are in constant evolution, aiming at the on-line multiparameter monitoring and considering now parameters not seen as relevant for process optimization in the past. All progresses being made have as primary goal the development of highly productive and economic mAb manufacturing processes that will allow the rapid introduction of the product in the biopharmaceutical market at more accessible prices. PMID:20043321

  9. Monoclonal antibodies to human urinary thrombopoietin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibodies (MA) to a thrombocytopoiesis-stimulating factor (TSF or thrombopoietin) were obtained from hybridomas derived from the fusion of P3 x 63/Ag 8 cells and spleen cells from TSF-immunized BALB/c mice. Media from several hybrid cultures were tested in a microantibody detection technique that measured the binding of MA to a 125I-purified TSF preparation from human embryonic kidney (HEK) cells. Hybridized cells were injected into pristane-primed mice and the antibodies produced in the ascites fluid were also shown to bind the 125I-TSF. Compared to the results of normal mouse serum, ascites fluid containing MA was shown to bind the unlabeled TSF from HEK cells. The TSF activity was significantly reduced in the supernatant fluid after precipitating the TSF-anti-TSF immune complex by a second antibody when tested in an immunothrombocythemic mouse assay. After SDS-PAGE, the precipitate from this TSF-Ma conjugate showed that the antiserum bound a single 32,000 mol wt component, indicating the monospecificity of the MA. MA directed toward human TSF will allow studies that were not previously possible

  10. Occult choriocarcinoma: Detection using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Occult choriocarcinoma, manifested only by an elevated B-hCG level, can be a difficult management problem. The authors evaluated the ability of I-131-labeled 5F9.3, a murine monoclonal antibody reactive with choriocarcinomas but not hCG, to detect foci of choriocarcinoma in five patients referred with elevated B-hCG levels but in whom the location of residual disease was uncertain. I-131 5F9.3, 0.5-1.0 mCi, was injected intravenously in each patient and images with dynamic background subtraction of TcHSA were obtained at later time points. In four patients chest studies were true positive (confirmed surgically in all), the chest CT scans in these patients had been interpreted as not definitely showing active disease. In the fifth patient no abnormal focus of uptake was seen and subsequent B-hCG levels normalized. In two of the patients with chest lesions, foci of abdominal uptake were seen that were not due to tumor. One of these patients had a partial small bowel obstruction; the other appeared to have a false-positive study. I-131 5F9.3 is a promising agent for the detection of occult choriocarcinomas

  11. Drug Development of Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mould, Diane R; Meibohm, Bernd

    2016-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have become a substantial part of many pharmaceutical company portfolios. However, the development process of MAbs for clinical use is quite different than for small-molecule drugs. MAb development programs require careful interdisciplinary evaluations to ensure the pharmacology of both the MAb and the target antigen are well-understood. Selection of appropriate preclinical species must be carefully considered and the potential development of anti-drug antibodies (ADA) during these early studies can limit the value and complicate the performance and possible duration of preclinical studies. In human studies, many of the typical pharmacology studies such as renal or hepatic impairment evaluations may not be needed but the pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics of these agents is complex, often necessitating more comprehensive evaluation of clinical data and more complex bioanalytical assays than might be used for small molecules. This paper outlines concerns and strategies for development of MAbs from the early in vitro assessments needed through preclinical and clinical development. This review focuses on how to develop, submit, and comply with regulatory requirements for MAb therapeutics. PMID:27342605

  12. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies against fowl poxvirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, P; Tripathy, D N

    2000-01-01

    Vaccines for the prevention of fowl pox in chickens and turkeys have been available for more than five decades. However, in recent years outbreaks have occurred in several previously vaccinated chicken flocks. Presumably, fowl poxviruses (FPVs) antigenically different from the attenuated vaccine strains are responsible for such occurrences. In support of this concept, we previously detected minor antigenic changes in field isolates based on comparative immunoblotting with polyclonal anti-FPV serum. Realizing the need for antibodies specific against the dominant antigens of FPV, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were produced by immunizing mice with either a field strain of FPV or a pigeon poxvirus, currently used for vaccination. Three hybridoma clones producing MAbs reacting with a specific FPV protein were selected from a total of 83 clones. In immunoblots, two of the MAbs, P1D9 and P2H10, recognized an antigen with an apparent molecular weight varying from 39 to 46 kD, depending on the FPV strain. The third MAb, P2D4, reacted with an approximately 80-kD protein, regardless of which FPV isolate was tested. Immunofluorescent staining with P1D9 and P2D4 revealed that these MAbs react with intracytoplasmic antigens in FPV-infected cells. PMID:10879917

  13. Licensed monoclonal antibodies and associated challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Amjad Hayat; Sadroddiny, Esmaeil

    2015-12-23

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are the leading class of targeted therapeutics and remarkably effective in addressing autoimmune diseases, inflammations, infections, and various types of cancer. Several mAbs approved by US food and drug administration (FDA), are available on the market and a number are pending for approval. Luckily, FDA approved mAbs have played a pivotal role in the treatment and prevention of lethal diseases. However, claiming that licensed mAbs are 100% safe is still debatable, because infections, malignancies, anaphylactoid, and anaphylactic reactions are the more frequently associated adverse events. To evaluate benefit to risk ratio of mAbs, it is important for the clinical research staff or physicians to monitor and follow-up the patients who are receiving mAbs dozes. It is recommended that patients, physicians, biopharmaceutical companies, and researchers should keep in touch to highlight and resolve antibody-based adverse events. In this review we underscore the associated challenges of mAbs, approved by FDA from 2007-2014. PMID:27472864

  14. Monoclonal antibodies based on hybridoma technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yagami, Hisanori; Kato, Hiroshi; Tsumoto, Kanta; Tomita, Masahiro

    2013-03-01

    Based on the size and scope of the present global market for medicine, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have a very promising future, with applications for cancers through autoimmune ailments to infectious disease. Since mAbs recognize only their target antigens and not other unrelated proteins, pinpoint medical treatment is possible. Global demand is dramatically expanding. Hybridoma technology, which allows production of mAbs directed against antigens of interest is therefore privileged. However, there are some pivotal points for further development to generate therapeutic antibodies. One is selective generation of human mAbs. Employment of transgenic mice producing human antibodies would overcome this problem. Another focus is recognition sites and conformational epitopes in antigens may be just as important as linear epitopes, especially when membrane proteins such as receptors are targeted. Recognition of intact structures is of critical importance for medical purposes. In this review, we describe patent related information for therapeutic mAbs based on hybridoma technology and also discuss new advances in hybridoma technology that facilitate selective production of stereospecific mAbs. PMID:24237029

  15. Monoclonal Antibodies for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Moroni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of monoclonal antibodies (mAb are now under investigation in clinical trials to assess their potential role in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE. The most frequently used mAb is rituximab, which is directed against CD20, a membrane protein expressed on B lymphocytes. Uncontrolled trials reported an improvement of SLE activity in non-renal patients and other studies even reported an improvement of severe lupus nephritis unresponsive to conventional treatments. However two randomized trials failed to show the superiority of rituximab over conventional treatment in non renal SLE and in lupus nephritis. Preliminary trials reported promising results with epratuzumab, a humanized mAb directed against CD22, and with belimumab, a human mAb that specifically recognizes and inhibits the biological activity of BLyS a cytokine of the tumornecrosis-factor (TNF ligand superfamily. Other clinical trials with mAb directed against TNF-alpha, interleukin-10 (Il-10, Il-6, CD154, CD40 ligand, IL-18 or complement component C5 are under way. At present, however, in spite of good results reported by some studies, no firm conclusion on the risk-benefit profile of these mAbs in patients with SLE can be drawn from the available studies.

  16. Automated pipeline for rapid production and screening of HIV-specific monoclonal antibodies using pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kartik A; Clark, John J; Goods, Brittany A; Politano, Timothy J; Mozdzierz, Nicholas J; Zimnisky, Ross M; Leeson, Rachel L; Love, J Christopher; Love, Kerry R

    2015-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind and neutralize human pathogens have great therapeutic potential. Advances in automated screening and liquid handling have resulted in the ability to discover antigen-specific antibodies either directly from human blood or from various combinatorial libraries (phage, bacteria, or yeast). There remain, however, bottlenecks in the cloning, expression and evaluation of such lead antibodies identified in primary screens that hinder high-throughput screening. As such, "hit-to-lead identification" remains both expensive and time-consuming. By combining the advantages of overlap extension PCR (OE-PCR) and a genetically stable yet easily manipulatable microbial expression host Pichia pastoris, we have developed an automated pipeline for the rapid production and screening of full-length antigen-specific mAbs. Here, we demonstrate the speed, feasibility and cost-effectiveness of our approach by generating several broadly neutralizing antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). PMID:26032261

  17. Analysis of defined combinations of monoclonal antibodies in anthrax toxin neutralization assays and their synergistic action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ngundi, Miriam M; Meade, Bruce D; Little, Stephen F; Quinn, Conrad P; Corbett, Cindi R; Brady, Rebecca A; Burns, Drusilla L

    2012-05-01

    Antibodies against the protective antigen (PA) component of anthrax toxin play an important role in protection against disease caused by Bacillus anthracis. In this study, we examined defined combinations of PA-specific monoclonal antibodies for their ability to neutralize anthrax toxin in cell culture assays. We observed additive, synergistic, and antagonistic effects of the antibodies depending on the specific antibody combination examined and the specific assay used. Synergistic toxin-neutralizing antibody interactions were examined in more detail. We found that one mechanism that can lead to antibody synergy is the bridging of PA monomers by one antibody, with resultant bivalent binding of the second antibody. These results may aid in optimal design of new vaccines and antibody therapies against anthrax. PMID:22441391

  18. Plasma Redshift in the Broad Line Region

    CERN Document Server

    Hansen, Peter M

    2013-01-01

    Astronomical properties of the broad line emission region (BLR) of active galactic nuclei (AGN) and quasi-stellar objects (QSO) are used to formulate a model of dynamic and electromagnetic scattering characteristics. The results of this modeling show that the observed redshift of these objects may be more complex than that from recession alone due to ionization or plasma effects.

  19. Broad resonances and beta-decay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisager, K.; Fynbo, H. O. U.; Hyldegaard, S.;

    2015-01-01

    Beta-decay into broad resonances gives a distorted lineshape in the observed energy spectrum. Part of the distortion arises from the phase space factor, but we show that the beta-decay matrix element may also contribute. Based on a schematic model for p-wave continuum neutron states it is argued...

  20. Engineering, expression in transgenic plants and characterisation of E559, a rabies virus-neutralising monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dolleweerd, Craig J; Teh, Audrey Y-H; Banyard, Ashley C; Both, Leonard; Lotter-Stark, Hester C T; Tsekoa, Tsepo; Phahladira, Baby; Shumba, Wonderful; Chakauya, Ereck; Sabeta, Claude T; Gruber, Clemens; Fooks, Anthony R; Chikwamba, Rachel K; Ma, Julian K-C

    2014-07-15

    Rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) currently comprises administration of rabies vaccine together with rabies immunoglobulin (RIG) of either equine or human origin. In the developing world, RIG preparations are expensive, often in short supply, and of variable efficacy. Therefore, we are seeking to develop a monoclonal antibody cocktail to replace RIG. Here, we describe the cloning, engineering and production in plants of a candidate monoclonal antibody (E559) for inclusion in such a cocktail. The murine constant domains of E559 were replaced with human IgG1κ constant domains and the resulting chimeric mouse-human genes were cloned into plant expression vectors for stable nuclear transformation of Nicotiana tabacum. The plant-expressed, chimeric antibody was purified and biochemically characterized, was demonstrated to neutralize rabies virus in a fluorescent antibody virus neutralization assay, and conferred protection in a hamster challenge model. PMID:24511101

  1. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to the edta extract of Leptospira interrogans, serovar icterohaemorrhagiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilian Terezinha de Queiroz Leite

    1996-10-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies (MABs ivere produced against an etbylenediaminetetraacetate (EDTA extract of Leptospira interrogans serovar icterohaemorrhagiae being characterized by gel precipitation as IgM and IgG (IgGl and IgG2b. The EDTA extract was detected as several bands by silver staining in SDS-PAGE. In the Western blot the bands around 20 KDa reacted with a monoclonal antibody, 47B4D6, and was oxidized by periodate and was not digested by pronase, suggesting that the determinant is of carbohydrate nature, lmmunocytochemistry, using colloidal gold labeling, showed that an EDTA extract determinant recognized by monoclonal antibody 47B4D6, is localized under the outer envelope of serovar icterohaemorrhagiae. Hoe AIAB raised against the EDTA extract was not able to protect hamsters from lethal challenge with virulent homologous leptospires.Anticorpos monoclonais (AcM foram produzidos contra o extrato EDTA obtido de Leptospira interrogans, sorovar icterohaemorrhagiae. Pelo teste de precipitação foram caracterizados como IgM e IgG (IgGl e IgG2. A eletroforese em gel de poliacrilamida do extrato EDTA revelou diversas bandas quando corada pela prata. No "Western blot", as bandas em torno de 20 kDa reagiram com o AcM 47B4D6, foram oxidadas pelo periodato e não digeridas pela pronase, sugerindo que o determinante é de natureza carboidrato. O determinante reconhecido pelo AcM 47B4D6 estã localizado sob o envelope externo como revelado pela imunocitoquímica usando marcação com ouro coloidal. O AcM contra extrato EDTA do sorovar icterohaemorrahagiae não protegeu hamsters quando inoculados com lepstopira homóloga virulenta.

  2. Flow over an Erodible Broad Crested Weir

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. K. C.Sahu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The overtopping flow of water over an earthen embankment causes erosion of soil from its surfaces and the eroded surface of the embankment acts as a Broad crest weir. But the longitudinal profile of the weir goes on changing with time of erosion. Hence crest height of the weir goes changing in accelerated flow condition. In this paper, the discharge equation for this type of flow situation is established for different types of soils used in the embankment. Then, the experiments have been carried out as the analogous rigid beds of the captured eroded profiles at any time of erosion of the broad crested weir to compare the discharge equation and to study the energy loss in dislodging the soil from the surface of the weir and transporting them down stream.

  3. Broad line regions in Seyfert-1 galaxies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To reproduce observed emission profiles of Seyfert galaxies, rotation in an accretion disk has been proposed. In this thesis, the profiles emitted by such an accretion disk are investigated. Detailed comparison with the observed profiles yields that a considerable fraction can be fitted with a power-law function, as predicted by the model. The author analyzes a series of high quality spectra of Seyfert galaxies, obtained with the 2.5m telescope at Las Campanas. He presents detailed analyses of two objects: Mkn335 and Akn120. In both cases, strong evidence is presented for the presence of two separate broad line zones. These zones are identified with an accretion disk and an outflowing wind. The disk contains gas with very high densities and emits predominantly the lower ionization lines. He reports on the discovery of very broad wings beneath the strong forbidden line 5007. (Auth.)

  4. Broad iron lines in Active Galactic Nuclei

    CERN Document Server

    Fabian, A C; Reynolds, C S; Young, A J

    2000-01-01

    An intrinsically narrow line emitted by an accretion disk around a black hole appears broadened and skewed as a result of the Doppler effect and gravitational redshift. The fluorescent iron line in the X-ray band at 6.4-6.9keV is the strongest such line and is seen in the X-ray spectrum of many active galactic nuclei and, in particular, Seyfert galaxies. It is an important diagnostic with which to study the geometry and other properties of the accretion flow very close to the central black hole. The broad iron line indicates the presence of a standard thin accretion disk in those objects, often seen at low inclination. The broad iron line has opened up strong gravitational effects around black holes to observational study with wide-reaching consequences for both astrophysics and physics.

  5. Monoclonal antibodies to drosophila cytochrome P-450's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hybridomas producing monoclonal antibodies were prepared by the fusion of SP2/0 myeloma cells and spleen cells from a female BALB/c mouse immunized by cytochrome P-450-A and P-450-B purified from Drosophila Hikone-R (BG) microsomes. P-450-A and P-450-B are electrophoretically distinct subsets of Drosophila P-450. P-450-A is ubiquitous among strains tested, while P-450-B is present in only a few strains displaying unique enzyme activities and increased insecticide resistance. The Oregon-R strain contains only cytochromes P-450-A and is susceptible to insecticides. The authors Hikone-R (BG) strain expresses both cytochromes P-450-A and P-450-B and is insecticide resistant. Antibody producing hybridomas were detected in a solid-phase radioimmunoassay (RIA) by binding to Hikone-R (BG) or Oregon-R microsomes. Four independent hybridomas were identified as producing monoclonal antibodies that recognized proteins in the P-450 complex by immunoblot experiments. Three monoclonal antibodies recognized P-450-A proteins, while one monoclonal antibody bound predominantly P-450-B. This monoclonal antibody also recognized southern armyworm (Spodoptera eridania, Cramer) microsomal proteins

  6. Monoclonal antibodies to drosophila cytochrome P-450's

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundseth, S.S.; Kennel, S.J.; Waters, L.C.

    1987-05-01

    Hybridomas producing monoclonal antibodies were prepared by the fusion of SP2/0 myeloma cells and spleen cells from a female BALB/c mouse immunized by cytochrome P-450-A and P-450-B purified from Drosophila Hikone-R (BG) microsomes. P-450-A and P-450-B are electrophoretically distinct subsets of Drosophila P-450. P-450-A is ubiquitous among strains tested, while P-450-B is present in only a few strains displaying unique enzyme activities and increased insecticide resistance. The Oregon-R strain contains only cytochromes P-450-A and is susceptible to insecticides. The authors Hikone-R (BG) strain expresses both cytochromes P-450-A and P-450-B and is insecticide resistant. Antibody producing hybridomas were detected in a solid-phase radioimmunoassay (RIA) by binding to Hikone-R (BG) or Oregon-R microsomes. Four independent hybridomas were identified as producing monoclonal antibodies that recognized proteins in the P-450 complex by immunoblot experiments. Three monoclonal antibodies recognized P-450-A proteins, while one monoclonal antibody bound predominantly P-450-B. This monoclonal antibody also recognized southern armyworm (Spodoptera eridania, Cramer) microsomal proteins.

  7. Unusual Manifestations of Monoclonal Gammopathy: I. Ocular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia R. Balderman

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Essential monoclonal gammopathy is usually an asymptomatic condition, the characteristics of which have been defined over approximately 70 years of study. It has a known population-attributable risk of undergoing clonal evolution to a progressive, symptomatic B-cell neoplasm. In a very small fraction of patients, the monoclonal immunoglobulin has biophysical characteristics that can lead to tissue deposition syndrome (e.g. Fanconi renal syndrome or, by chance, have characteristics of an autoantibody that may inactivate critical proteins (e.g. acquired von Willebrand disease. In this report, we describe the very uncommon forms of ocular injury that may accompany essential monoclonal gammopathy, which include crystalline keratopathy, crystal-storing histiocytosis, hypercupremic keratopathy, and maculopathy. The first three syndromes result from uncommon physicochemical alterations of the monoclonal immunoglobulin that favor crystallization or exaggerated copper binding. The last-mentioned syndrome is of uncertain pathogenesis. These syndromes may result in decreased visual acuity. These ocular findings may lead, also, to the diagnosis of monoclonal gammopathy.

  8. Preparation and Identification of Anti-rabies Virus Monoclonal Antibodies

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wen-juan Wang; Xiong Li; Li-hua Wang; Hu Shan; Lei Cao; Peng-cheng Yu; Qing Tang; Guo-dong Liang

    2012-01-01

    To provide a foundation for the development of rapid and specific methods for the diagnosis of rabies virus infection,anti-rabies virus monoclonal antibodies were prepared and rabies virus nucleoprotein and human rabies virus vaccine strain (PV strain) were used as immunogens to immunize 6-8 week old female BALB/c mice.Spleen cells and SP2/0 myeloma cells were fused according to conventional methods:the monoclonal cell strains obtained were selected using the indirect immunofluorescence test; this was followed by preparation of monoclonal antibody ascitic fluid; and finally,systematic identification of subclass,specificity and sensitivity was carried out.Two high potency and specific monoclonal antibodies against rabies virus were obtained and named 3B12 and 4A12,with ascitic fluid titers of 1∶8000 and 1∶10000,respectively.Both belonged to the IgG2a subclass.These strains secrete potent,stable and specific anti-rabies virus monoclonal antibodies,which makes them well suited for the development of rabies diagnosis reagents.

  9. Fourier evaluation of broad Moessbauer spectra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It is shown by the Fourier analysis of broad Moessbauer spectra that the even part of the distribution of the dominant hyperfine interaction (hyperfine field or quadrupole splitting) can be obtained directly without using least-square fitting procedures. Also the odd part of this distribution correlated with other hyperfine parameters (e.g. isomer shift) can be directly determined. Examples for amorphous magnetic and paramagnetic iron-based alloys are presented. (author)

  10. A Broad View of Macroeconomic Stability

    OpenAIRE

    José Antonio Ocampo

    2005-01-01

    This paper recommends a broad concept of macroeconomic stability, whereby “sound macroeconomic frameworks” include not only price stability and sound fiscal policies, but also a well-functioning real economy, sustainable debt ratios and healthy public and private sector balance sheets. These multiple dimensions imply using multiple policy instruments. The paper elaborates a framework for developing countries that involves active use of counter-cyclical macroeconomic policies (exchange rate, m...

  11. Crx broadly modulates the pineal transcriptome

    OpenAIRE

    Rovsing, Louise; Clokie, Samuel; Bustos, Diego M.; Rohde, Kristian; Steven L Coon; Litman, Thomas; Rath, Martin F.; Møller, Morten; Klein, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Cone-rod homeobox (Crx) encodes Crx, a transcription factor expressed selectively in retinal photoreceptors and pinealocytes, the major cell type of the pineal gland. Here, the influence of Crx on the mammalian pineal gland was studied by light and electron microscopy and by use of microarray and qRTPCR technology, thereby extending previous studies on selected genes (Furukawa et al. 1999). Deletion of Crx was not found to alter pineal morphology, but was found to broadly modulate the mouse p...

  12. Relativistic redshifts in quasar broad lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The broad emission lines commonly seen in quasar spectra have velocity widths of a few percent of the speed of light, so special- and general-relativistic effects have a significant influence on the line profile. We have determined the redshift of the broad Hβ line in the quasar rest frame (determined from the core component of the [O III] line) for over 20,000 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey Data Release 7 quasar catalog. The mean redshift as a function of line width is approximately consistent with the relativistic redshift that is expected if the line originates in a randomly oriented Keplerian disk that is obscured when the inclination of the disk to the line of sight exceeds ∼30°-45°, consistent with simple active galactic nucleus unification schemes. This result also implies that the net line-of-sight inflow/outflow velocities in the broad-line region are much less than the Keplerian velocity when averaged over a large sample of quasars with a given line width.

  13. Relativistic redshifts in quasar broad lines

    CERN Document Server

    Tremaine, Scott; Liu, Xin; Loeb, Abraham

    2014-01-01

    The broad emission lines commonly seen in quasar spectra have velocity widths of a few per cent of the speed of light, so special- and general-relativistic effects have a significant influence on the line profile. We have determined the redshift of the broad H-beta line in the quasar rest frame (determined from the core component of the [OIII] line) for over 20,000 quasars from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey DR7 quasar catalog. The mean redshift as a function of line width is approximately consistent with the relativistic redshift that is expected if the line originates in a randomly oriented Keplerian disk that is obscured when the inclination of the disk to the line of sight exceeds ~30-45 degrees, consistent with simple AGN unification schemes. This result also implies that the net line-of-sight inflow/outflow velocities in the broad-line region are much less than the Keplerian velocity when averaged over a large sample of quasars with a given line width.

  14. Improved iodine radiolabels for monoclonal antibody therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stein, Rhona; Govindan, Serengulam V; Mattes, M Jules; Chen, Susan; Reed, Linda; Newsome, Guy; McBride, Bill J; Griffiths, Gary L; Hansen, Hans J; Goldenberg, David M

    2003-01-01

    A major disadvantage of (131)iodine (I)-labeled monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) for radioimmunotherapy has been the rapid diffusion of iodotyrosine from target cells after internalization and catabolism of the radioiodinated MAbs. We recently reported that a radioiodinated, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-appended peptide, designated immunomedics' residualizing peptide 1 (IMP-R1), was a residualizing iodine label that overcame many of the limitations that had impeded the development of residualizing iodine for clinical use. To determine the factors governing the therapeutic index of the labeled MAb, as well as the factors required for production of radioiodinated MAb in high yield and with high specific activity, variations in the peptide structure of IMP-R1 were evaluated. A series of radioiodinated, diethylenetriaminepentaacetic acid-appended peptide moieties (IMP-R1 through IMP-R8) that differed in overall hydrophilicity and charge were compared. Radioiodinations of the peptides followed by conjugations to disulfide-reduced RS7 (an anti-epithelial glycoprotein-1 MAb) furnished radioimmunoconjugates in good overall incorporations, with immunoreactivities comparable to that of directly radioiodinated RS7. Specific activities of up to 8 mCi/mg and yields > 80% have been achieved. In vitro processing experiments showed marked increases in radioiodine retention with all of the adducts; radioiodine retention at 45 h was up to 86% greater in cells than with directly iodinated RS7. Each of the (125)I-peptide-RS7 conjugates was compared with (131)I-RS7 (labeled by the chloramine-T method) in paired-label biodistribution studies in nude mice bearing human lung tumor xenografts. All of the residualizing substrates exhibited significantly enhanced retention in tumor in comparison to directly radioiodinated RS7, but the nontarget uptakes differed significantly among the residualizing labels. The best labels were IMP-R4 and IMP-R8, showing superior tumor-to-non-tumor ratios

  15. Radioimmunoimaging of experimental gliomas using radiolabelled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biodistribution and tumour uptake of radiolabelled (131 I) glioma-seeking monoclonal antibodies (14 AC1) and their F(ab')2 fragments were investigated in nude mice having received glioma transplants. Radioimmunoimaging by external scintigraphy at 48 and 96 hours pointed to a superior tumour localisation by the fragments that was clearly related to the dose. Wholebody determinations of the biokinetic behaviour led to the following results: Faster clearance anc more ready elimination from the blood pool for the fragments, preferential uptake in the tumour; intact antibodies; binding in the liver, spleen and lungs. The study confirmed the value of fragments of monoclonal antibodies in the diagnosis of tumours and pointed to the possibility of using intact monoclonal antibodies as carriers of radioisotopes and cytotoxic drugs within the scope of therapeutic programmes. (TRV)

  16. Monoclonal antibodies against human placental glutathione transferase (class pi).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massoud, R; Lo Bello, M; De Stefano, E; Molino, A; Zelaschi, D; Federici, G

    1991-02-01

    Five monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were produced in a mouse hybridoma system against human placental glutathione transferase (GST pi). Four of these monoclonal antibodies, named 461 to 464, were of immunoglobulin G class, whereas the monoclonal antibody 465 was of IgA class. All these MAbs specifically recognized the glutathione transferase from human placenta (class pi) showing no cross reactivity against the basic and the neutral forms of GST from human liver. When each MAb was incubated with the GST pi, no inhibition of enzymatic activity towards 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene was observed except for MAb 465 which showed a slight inhibition to a serial dilution of 1:128. PMID:1709614

  17. Monoclonal gammopathy: The good, the bad and the ugly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glavey, Siobhan V; Leung, Nelson

    2016-05-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a condition characterized by the presence of a monoclonal gammopathy (MG) in which the clonal mass has not reached a predefined state in which the condition is considered malignant. It is a precursor to conditions such as multiple myeloma or lymphoma at a rate of ~1%/year. Thus, from a hematologic standpoint, MGUS is a fairly benign condition. However, it is now recognized that organ damage resulting from just the MG without the need MM or lymphoma can occur. One of the most recognized is nephropathy secondary to monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance (MGRS). Other well-recognized conditions include neuropathies, oculopathies and dermopathies. Some conditions such as autoimmune diseases and coagulopathies are less common and recognized. Finally, systemic involvement of multiple organs is well described in several entities. In all of these conditions, the role of the MG is no longer insignificant. Thus, the term MGUS should be avoided when describing these entities. PMID:26732417

  18. Monoclonal regulatory T cells provide insights into T cell suppression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubser, Céline; Schmaler, Mathias; Rossi, Simona W; Palmer, Ed

    2016-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have a crucial role in maintaining lymphocyte homeostasis. However an understanding of how Tregs function at a cellular and molecular level has not yet been fully elucidated. Here, we make use of a T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic, Rag(-/-) mouse expressing a Forkhead-Box-Protein P3 (Foxp3) transgene. This mouse provides a source of monoclonal CD4(+) Foxp3(+) T cells with a defined specificity. Here we show that monoclonal B3K506 Tregs are functional in vitro and in vivo and clearly require cognate antigen to be suppressive. We further show that the strength of Treg stimulation determines the strength of Treg mediated suppression. Finally we analysed various suppressive mechanisms used by monoclonal Tregs and found that Treg-Tconv proximity is a parameter, which correlates with enhanced suppression. PMID:27210828

  19. Engineering broadly neutralizing antibodies for HIV prevention and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Casey K; Ackerman, Margaret E

    2016-08-01

    A combination of advances spanning from isolation to delivery of potent HIV-specific antibodies has begun to revolutionize understandings of antibody-mediated antiviral activity. As a result, the set of broadly neutralizing and highly protective antibodies has grown in number, diversity, potency, and breadth of viral recognition and neutralization. These antibodies are now being further enhanced by rational engineering of their anti-HIV activities and coupled to cutting edge gene delivery and strategies to optimize their pharmacokinetics and biodistribution. As a result, the prospects for clinical use of HIV-specific antibodies to treat, clear, and prevent HIV infection are gaining momentum. Here we discuss the diverse methods whereby antibodies are being optimized for neutralization potency and breadth, biodistribution, pharmacokinetics, and effector function with the aim of revolutionizing HIV treatment and prevention options. PMID:26827912

  20. Use of Monoclonal Antibodies in the Sensitive Detection and Neutralization of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luisa W. Cheng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT are some of nature’s most potent toxins. Due to potential food contamination, and bioterrorism concerns, the development of detection reagents, therapeutics and countermeasures are of urgent interest. Recently, we have developed a sensitive electrochemiluminescent (ECL immunoassay for BoNT/B, using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs MCS6-27 and anti-BoNT/B rabbit polyclonal antibodies as the capture and detector. The ECL assay detected as little as 1 pg/mL BoNT/B in the buffer matrix, surpassing the detection sensitivities of the gold standard mouse bioassays. The ECL assay also allowed detection of BoNT/B in sera matrices of up to 100% sera with negligible matrix effects. This highly-sensitive assay allowed the determination of the biological half-lives of BoNT/B holotoxin in vivo. We further tested the toxin neutralization potential of our monoclonal antibodies using the mouse systemic and oral intoxication models. A combination of mAbs protected mice in both pre- and post-exposure models to lethal doses of BoNT/B. MAbs were capable of increasing survival of animals when administered even 10 h post-intoxication in an oral model, suggesting a likely time for BoNT/B complexes to reach the blood stream. More sensitive detection assays and treatments against BoNT intoxication will greatly enhance efforts to combat botulism.

  1. Efficacy of Wnt-1 monoclonal antibody in sarcoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sarcomas are one of the most refractory diseases among malignant tumors. More effective therapies based on an increased understanding of the molecular biology of sarcomas are needed as current forms of therapy remain inadequate. Recently, it has been reported that Wnt-1/β-catenin signaling inhibits apoptosis in several cancers. In this study, we investigated the efficacy of a monoclonal anti-Wnt-1 antibody in sarcoma cells. We treated cell lines A-204, SJSA-1, and fresh primary cultures of lung metastasis of sarcoma with a monoclonal anti-Wnt-1 antibody. Wnt-1 siRNA treatment was carried out in A-204. We assessed cell death using Crystal Violet staining. Apoptosis induction was estimated by flow cytometry analysis (Annexin V and PI staining). Cell signaling changes were determined by western blotting analysis. We detected Wnt-1 expression in all tissue samples and cell lines. Significant apoptosis induction was found in monoclonal anti-Wnt-1 antibody treated cells compared to control monoclonal antibody treated cells (p < 0.02). Similarly, we observed increased apoptosis in Wnt-1 siRNA treated cells. Blockade of Wnt-1 signaling in both experiments was confirmed by analyzing intracellular levels of Dishevelled-3 and of cytosolic β-catenin. Furthermore, the monoclonal anti-Wnt-1 antibody also induced cell death in fresh primary cultures of metastatic sarcoma in which Wnt-1 signaling was active. Our results indicate that Wnt-1 blockade by either monoclonal antibody or siRNA induces cell death in sarcoma cells. These data suggest that Wnt-1 may be a novel therapeutic target for the treatment of a subset of sarcoma cells in which Wnt-1/β-catenin signaling is active

  2. Purification of Murine Monoclonal IgM Antibody

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    This paper presents the purification of a monoclonal IgM antibody against human tumor associated antigen Lewis-Y by ion exchange chromatography and gel filtration.Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE) were used to identify purified IgM antibody.In flow cytometry analysis, the purified IgM antibody recognizes human breast tumor cell line MCF-7 which expresses Lewis-Y antigen.This work presents a new way for the purification of murine monoclonal IgM antibody.

  3. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies specific for Pseudorabies virus

    OpenAIRE

    Marković Ljiljana; Ašanin Ružica; Radojičić Sonja; Isenović Esma

    2007-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Pseudorabies virus (PrV) were obtained by the fusion of P3x-Ag8.653 myeloma and spleen cells from immunized BALB/c mice with a suspension of Pseudorabies (PrV) virus strains: MAVE (Morbus Aujeszk'y virus Ercegovac) and NS 257 (Novosadski virus strain). A total of 95 antibody-secreting hybridoma cells against the virus strain (MAVE and NS 257) of Pseudorabies virus have been isolated. Ten of these monoclonal antibodies were found by ELISA (Enzy...

  4. A Potent and Broad Neutralizing Antibody Recognizes and Penetrates the HIV Glycan Shield

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R. Pejchal; K.J. Doores; L.M. Walker; R. Khayat; P.S. Huang; S.K. Wang; R.L. Stanfield; J.P. Julien; A. Ramos; M. Crispin; R. Depetris; U. Katpally; A. Marozsan; A. Cupo; S. Maloveste; Y. Liu; R. McBride; Y. Ito; R.W. Sanders; C. Ogohara; J.C. Paulson; T. Feizi; C.N. Scanlan; C.H. Wong; J.P. Moore; W.C. Olson; A.B. Ward; P. Poignard; W.R. Schief; D.R. Burton; I.A. Wilson

    2011-01-01

    The HIV envelope (Env) protein gp120 is protected from antibody recognition by a dense glycan shield. However, several of the recently identified PGT broadly neutralizing antibodies appear to interact directly with the HIV glycan coat. Crystal structures of antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) PGT 127 a

  5. Studies on radiolabelling of monoclonal antibodies with 99Tcm and other radionuclides for scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work performed on the development of radiolabelling of monoclonal antibodies for scintigraphy using direct 99Tcm labelling and other radiolabelling methods of monoclonal antibodies with In-111, Ga-67 or Ru-103

  6. Production and radioiodination of monoclonal antibodies and its applications in nuclear medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basis of the monoclonal antibody production methodology, some immunological concepts which are important for the understanding of what is a Monoclonal Antibody, its radioiodination and acceptance as receptor-specific radiopharmaceuticals in nuclear medicine are reviewed. (author)

  7. Broad spectrum antibiotic compounds and use thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koglin, Alexander; Strieker, Matthias

    2016-07-05

    The discovery of a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene cluster in the genome of Clostridium thermocellum that produces a secondary metabolite that is assembled outside of the host membrane is described. Also described is the identification of homologous NRPS gene clusters from several additional microorganisms. The secondary metabolites produced by the NRPS gene clusters exhibit broad spectrum antibiotic activity. Thus, antibiotic compounds produced by the NRPS gene clusters, and analogs thereof, their use for inhibiting bacterial growth, and methods of making the antibiotic compounds are described.

  8. Monoclonal antibodies in animal production; their use in diagnostics and passive immunization.

    OpenAIRE

    Booman, P.

    1989-01-01

    One of the landmarks in immunology was the invention and development of monoclonal antibody-secreting hybridomas by Milstein and his coworkers. The enormous promise of monoclonal antibody technology, which became apparent soon after its discovery, may explain the unusual speed with which monoclonal antibodies have been applied to biological and medical sciences.In animal production monoclonal antibodies are increasingly finding application in the areas of diagnostics, passive immunization and...

  9. Specific Monoclonal Antibody Overcomes the Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium's Adaptive Mechanisms of Intramacrophage Survival and Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarmistha Devi Aribam

    Full Text Available Salmonella-specific antibodies play an important role in host immunity; however, the mechanisms of Salmonella clearance by pathogen-specific antibodies remain to be completely elucidated since previous studies on antibody-mediated protection have yielded inconsistent results. These inconsistencies are at least partially attributable to the use of polyclonal antibodies against Salmonella antigens. Here, we developed a new monoclonal antibody (mAb-449 and identified its related immunogen that protected BALB/c mice from infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. In addition, these data indicate that the mAb-449 immunogen is likely a major protective antigen. Using in vitro infection studies, we also analyzed the mechanism by which mAb-449 conferred host protection. Notably, macrophages infected with mAb-449-treated S. Typhimurium showed enhanced pathogen uptake compared to counterparts infected with control IgG-treated bacteria. Moreover, these macrophages produced elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα and nitric oxide, indicating that mAb-449 enhanced macrophage activation. Finally, the number of intracellular bacteria in mAb-449-activated macrophages decreased considerably, while the opposite was found in IgG-treated controls. Based on these findings, we suggest that, although S. Typhimurium has the potential to survive and replicate within macrophages, host production of a specific antibody can effectively mediate macrophage activation for clearance of intracellular bacteria.

  10. High-throughput epitope binning of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies: why you need to bin the fridge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooks, Benjamin D; Miles, Adam R; Abdiche, Yasmina N

    2014-08-01

    Analytical tools are evolving to meet the need for the higher-throughput characterization of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. An antibody's epitope is arguably its most important property because it underpins its functional activity but, because epitope selection is innate, it remains an empirical process. Here, we focus on the emergence of label-free biosensors with throughput capabilities orders of magnitude higher than the previous state-of-the-art, which can facilitate large assays such as epitope binning so that they can be incorporated alongside functional activity screens, enabling the rapid identification of leads that exhibit unique and functional epitopes. In addition to streamlining the drug development process by saving time and cost, the information from epitope binning assays could provide the basis for intellectual property protection. PMID:24880105

  11. Indium-111 labeled anti-melanoma monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Ferrone, S.

    1984-04-30

    A monoclonal antibody to a high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen was chelated and radiolabeled with indium-111. This material shows high affinity for melanoma and thus can be used in the detection, localization and imaging of melanoma. 1 figure.

  12. Palladium-109 labeled anti-melanoma monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Ferrone, S.

    1984-04-30

    The invention consists of new monoclonal antibodies labelled with Palladium 109, a beta-emitting radionuclide, the method of preparing this material, and its use in the radiotherapy of melanoma. The antibodies are chelate-conjugated and demonstrate a high uptake in melanomas. (ACR)

  13. High throughput production of mouse monoclonal antibodies using antigen microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Masi, Federico; Chiarella, P.; Wilhelm, H.;

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in proteomics research underscore the increasing need for high-affinity monoclonal antibodies, which are still generated with lengthy, low-throughput antibody production techniques. Here we present a semi-automated, high-throughput method of hybridoma generation and identification...

  14. Immunohistochemical diagnosis of systemic bovine zygomycosis by murine monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, H.E.; Aalbaek, B.; Lind, Peter;

    1996-01-01

    Murine monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against water-soluble somatic antigens (WSSA) and the wall fraction (WF) from Rhizopus arrhizus (Rhizopus oryzae) were produced in vitro by fusion of splenocytes from immunized BALB/c mice with mouse myeloma X63-Ag 8.653 cells. Supernatants reacting only with h...

  15. Radioimmunodetection of human tumors with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present study reports the use of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies prospectively as a diagnostic method in order to localize tumor sites in patients with a suspicion of recurrence or metastasis based on isolated elevation of serum tumor markers. Results of immunoscintigraphy are compared to data obtained with more conventional investigations including essentially ultra sonography and CT scan. (Auth.)

  16. Generation and Characterization of Novel Human IRAS Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bo Wang

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Imidazoline receptors were first proposed by Bousquet et al., when they studied antihypertensive effect of clonidine. A strong candidate for I1R, known as imidazoline receptor antisera-selected protein (IRAS, has been cloned from human hippocampus. We reported that IRAS mediated agmatine-induced inhibition of opioid dependence in morphine-dependent cells. To elucidate the functional and structure properties of I1R, we developed the newly monoclonal antibody against the N-terminal hIRAS region including the PX domain (10–120aa through immunization of BALB/c mice with the NusA-IRAS fusion protein containing an IRAS N-terminal (10–120aa. Stable hybridoma cell lines were established and monoclonal antibodies specifically recognized full-length IRAS proteins in their native state by immunoblotting and immunoprecipitation. Monoclonal antibodies stained in a predominantly punctate cytoplasmic pattern when applied to IRAS-transfected HEK293 cells by indirect immunofluorescence assays and demonstrated excellent reactivity in flow immunocytometry. These monoclonal antibodies will provide powerful reagents for the further investigation of hIRAS protein functions.

  17. Monoclonal antibodies to Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this thesis the production and characterisation of monoclonal antibodies to Herpes Simplex Virus Type 2 is described. The development of a suitable radioimmunoassay for the detection of anti-HSV-2 antibodies, and the selection of an optimal immunisation schedule, is given. Three assay systems are described and their reliability and sensitivity compared. (Auth.)

  18. Side-effects of monoclonal antibodies during immunoscintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When monoclonal antibodies, most of which are developed from mouse hybridomas, are injected into the patient they are recognized as foreign globulins. The resulting immune response leads to the development of human anti-mouse antibodies or so called side-effects. (author). 1 ref

  19. Novel electrokinetic approaches to improve purification processes with monoclonal antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Faude, Alexander

    2009-01-01

    This work was focussed on mAb separations using cation exchange and hydrophobic interaction chromatography. Methods to accelerate long winded development strategies of purification processes with monoclonal antibodies were developed facilitated by further improvement of understanding the basic adsorption mechanisms of proteins on chromatographic resins. The new experimental electrokinetic methods introduced are zeta potential determination with proteins via laser light scattering and electro-...

  20. The significance of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance

    OpenAIRE

    Kyle, Robert A.; Kumar, Shaji

    2009-01-01

    Since it is now well established that all patients with multiple myeloma have a preceding monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), identification of potential risk factors for the progression becomes most important. In this perspective article, Drs. Kyle and Kumar highlight the need for a better understanding of the etiology and biology of MGUS. See related paper on page 1714.

  1. Prevention of Progression in Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance

    OpenAIRE

    Rajkumar, S. Vincent

    2009-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is a common premalignant plasma cell proliferative disorder with a lifelong risk of progression to multiple myeloma. Since myeloma is an incurable malignancy, strategies to delay or prevent progression in high-risk patients are of considerable importance.

  2. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against mink leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, W.S.; Pedersen, Mikael; Gram-Nielsen, S.;

    1997-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were generated against mink leukocytes. One antibody reacted with all T lymphocytes, one with all monocytes and one had platelet reactivity. Under reducing conditions, the T lymphocyte reactive antibody immunoprecipitated 18 kDa, 23 kDa, 25 kDa and 32-40 kDa pol...

  3. MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES TO IDENTIFY TOMATO MOSAIC TOBAMOVIRUS (TOMV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte Keila M.R.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies were obtained against Tomato mosaic tobamovirus (ToMV isolated in Brazil. One antibody (8G7G2 isotyped as IgG2b (kappa light chain showed strong specificity and very low cross reaction with the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV. It can be used in identification of tomato mosaic virus (ToMV.

  4. Development of monoclonal antibodies that recognize Treponema pallidum.

    OpenAIRE

    Saunders, J. M.; Folds, J D

    1983-01-01

    We developed a panel of monoclonal antibodies to Treponema pallidum (Nichols) antigens, some of which recognize treponemal antigens on T. pallidum (Nichols), T. pallidum strain 14, and Treponema phagedenis biotype Reiter. The antibodies were detected by either an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay or a radioimmunoassay.

  5. Characterization of Binding Epitopes of CA125 Monoclonal Antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Marcos-Silva, Lara; Narimatsu, Yoshiki; Halim, Adnan;

    2014-01-01

    The most used cancer serum biomarker is the CA125 immunoassay for ovarian cancer that detects the mucin glycoprotein MUC16. Several monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) including OC125 and M11 are used in CA125 assays. However, despite considerable efforts, our knowledge of the molecular characteristics ...

  6. Enhancement of Monoclonal Antibody Production by Lysine-Containing Peptides

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Franěk, František; Eckschlager, T.; Hermann, K.

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 19, č. 1 (2003), s. 169-174. ISSN 8756-7938 R&D Projects: GA MŠk OC 844.10 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910; CEZ:MSM 111300005 Keywords : Monoclonal Antibody * Lysine -Containing Peptides Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.488, year: 2003

  7. Use of monoclonal antibodies in local passive immunization to prevent colonization of human teeth by Streptococcus mutans.

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, J K; Smith, R; Lehner, T.

    1987-01-01

    Local passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) raised against streptococcal antigen (SA) I/II protects monkeys against colonization of teeth by Streptococcus mutans and the subsequent development of dental caries. In this study we extended the preclinical experiments to human subjects. In the first study of eight healthy subjects, four had anti-SA I/II MAb (immunoglobulin G2a [IgG2a]) and four had saline applied to their teeth on three occasions. A streptomycin-resistant S. muta...

  8. A broad view of model validation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety assessment of a nuclear waste repository requires the use of models. Such models need to be validated to ensure, as much as possible, that they are a good representation of the actual processes occurring in the real system. In this paper we attempt to take a broad view by reviewing step by step the modeling process and bringing out the need to validating every step of this process. This model validation includes not only comparison of modeling results with data from selected experiments, but also evaluation of procedures for the construction of conceptual models and calculational models as well as methodologies for studying data and parameter correlation. The need for advancing basic scientific knowledge in related fields, for multiple assessment groups, and for presenting our modeling efforts in open literature to public scrutiny is also emphasized. 16 refs

  9. Buildup factors for broad gamma beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with buildup factors for the photon number and the exposure in broad conical beams penetrating through iron slabs. Using the Monte Carlo method, the dependence on the thickness of the slabs is calculated for various geometrical configurations of the 137Cs radiation source, the slab and the detector. The same dependence has also been measured for 137Cs and 60Co. The results show the dependence of the buildup factor B on the collimation angle α (B increases with increasing α), on the distance a between the source and the slab (B increases with increasing a), and on the distance b between the detector and the slab (B decreases with increasing b). Comparison of the obtained results with those from model configurations shows that in the latter case errors may range up to nearly 100%. (author)

  10. Broad-band acoustic hyperbolic metamaterial

    CERN Document Server

    Shen, Chen; Sui, Ni; Wang, Wenqi; Cummer, Steven A; Jing, Yun

    2015-01-01

    Acoustic metamaterials (AMMs) are engineered materials, made from subwavelength structures, that exhibit useful or unusual constitutive properties. There has been intense research interest in AMMs since its first realization in 2000 by Liu et al. A number of functionalities and applications have been proposed and achieved using AMMs. Hyperbolic metamaterials are one of the most important types of metamaterials due to their extreme anisotropy and numerous possible applications, including negative refraction, backward waves, spatial filtering, and subwavelength imaging. Although the importance of acoustic hyperbolic metamaterials (AHMMs) as a tool for achieving full control of acoustic waves is substantial, the realization of a broad-band and truly hyperbolic AMM has not been reported so far. Here, we demonstrate the design and experimental characterization of a broadband AHMM that operates between 1.0 kHz and 2.5 kHz.

  11. Crx broadly modulates the pineal transcriptome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rovsing, Louise; Clokie, Samuel; Bustos, Diego M;

    2011-01-01

    microarray and qRTPCR technology, thereby extending previous studies on selected genes (Furukawa et al. 1999). Deletion of Crx was not found to alter pineal morphology, but was found to broadly modulate the mouse pineal transcriptome, characterized by a > 2-fold down-regulation of 543 genes and a > 2-fold up-regulation...... of 745 genes (p < 0.05). Of these, one of the most highly up-regulated (18-fold) was Hoxc4, a member of the Hox gene family, members of which are known to control gene expression cascades. During a 24-h period, a set of 51 genes exhibited differential day/night expression in pineal glands of wild...... influences differential night/day gene expression in this tissue. Some effects of Crx deletion on the pineal transcriptome might be mediated by Hoxc4 up-regulation....

  12. Magnetohydrodynamic stability of broad line region clouds

    CERN Document Server

    Krause, Martin; Burkert, Andreas

    2012-01-01

    Hydrodynamic stability has been a longstanding issue for the cloud model of the broad line region in active galactic nuclei. We argue that the clouds may be gravitationally bound to the supermassive black hole. If true, stabilisation by thermal pressure alone becomes even more difficult. We further argue that if magnetic fields should be present in such clouds at a level that could affect the stability properties, they need to be strong enough to compete with the radiation pressure on the cloud. This would imply magnetic field values of a few Gauss for a sample of Active Galactic Nuclei we draw from the literature. We then investigate the effect of several magnetic configurations on cloud stability in axi-symmetric magnetohydrodynamic simulations. For a purely azimuthal magnetic field which provides the dominant pressure support, the cloud first gets compressed by the opposing radiative and gravitational forces. The pressure inside the cloud then increases, and it expands vertically. Kelvin-Helmholtz and colu...

  13. Geoconservation and protected areas

    OpenAIRE

    Brilha, J. B.

    2002-01-01

    Conservation will fail if nature conservation policies impose artificial boundaries on the natural world. The protected area manager’s main task is biodiversity preservation. Nevertheless, nature conservation requires a broad perspective. Incorporating geology into conservation policies at the same level as biology is urgent. The slow rate of many geological processes leads to the misconception that geological resources are inexhaustible and immutable. Geologists know that this is not true an...

  14. Ability to develop broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies is not restricted by the germline immunoglobulin gene repertoire1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheepers, Cathrine; Shrestha, Ram K.; Lambson, Bronwen E.; Jackson, Katherine J. L.; Wright, Imogen A.; Naicker, Dshanta; Goosen, Mark; Berrie, Leigh; Ismail, Arshad; Garrett, Nigel; Karim, Quarraisha Abdool; Karim, Salim S. Abdool; Moore, Penny L.; Travers, Simon A.; Morris, Lynn

    2015-01-01

    The human immunoglobulin repertoire is vast, producing billions of unique antibodies from a limited number of germline immunoglobulin genes. The immunoglobulin heavy chain variable region (IGHV) is central to antigen binding and is comprised of 48 functional genes. Here we analyzed whether HIV-1 infected individuals who develop broadly neutralizing antibodies show a distinctive germline IGHV profile. Using both 454 and Illumina technologies we sequenced the IGHV repertoire of 28 HIV-infected South African women from the Center for the AIDS Programme of Research in South African (CAPRISA) 002 and 004 cohorts, 13 of whom developed broadly neutralizing antibodies. Of the 259 IGHV alleles identified in this study, approximately half were not found in the International Immunogenetics Database (IMGT). This included 85 entirely novel alleles and 38 alleles that matched rearranged sequences in non-IMGT databases. Analysis of the rearranged H chain V region genes of monoclonal antibodies isolated from 7 of the CAPRISA women and previously isolated broadly neutralizing antibodies from other donors provided evidence that at least 8 novel or non-IMGT alleles contributed to functional antibodies. Importantly, we found that despite a wide range in the number of IGHV alleles in each individual, including alleles used by known broadly neutralizing antibodies, there were no significant differences in germline IGHV repertoires between individuals who do and do not develop broadly neutralizing antibodies. This study reports novel IGHV repertoires and highlights the importance of a fully comprehensive immunoglobulin database for germline gene usage prediction. Furthermore, these data suggest a lack of genetic bias in broadly neutralizing antibody development in HIV-1 infection, with implications for HIV vaccine design. PMID:25825450

  15. Sun Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Emitting Products Radiation-Emitting Products and Procedures Tanning Sun Protection Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing ... for integrating sun protection into your daily routine. Sun Protection Tips Avoid overexposure to UV rays from ...

  16. Neutralization of low energy broad ion beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper is devoted to experimental and theoretical investigation of a low energy broad ion beam space charge and current compensation and ion-beam plasma (IBP), which would be created in transport space of the beam. The beam had cylindrical symmetry. The continuous uniform and hole tube like ion beams are used in the experiments. Different channels of electron appearing have been investigated for cases of neutralization due to secondary γ-electrons from the target and by electrons from glow cathode-neutralizer with metal or dielectric target. Results of neutralizing electrons energy distributions function measurements are presented as well as dependences of electron temperature and self-consisted plasma potential vs. beam parameters, ambient gas pressure, neutralizer parameters. Role of the thermoelectrons and dependence of IBP parameters on neutralizer area, location and potential are discussed. Significant role in neutralization of spatial collisional processes has been revealed even in neutralization by thermocathode. On the base of the experimental results self-consistent theoretical model have been developed, which describes the behavior of intense ion beam passing through the neutral gas at low pressure within conductive walls. The collisionless approach is used which means absence of collisional relaxation of the beam. This theory is used to derive the plasma potential and electron temperature within the beam

  17. Human Non-neutralizing HIV-1 Envelope Monoclonal Antibodies Limit the Number of Founder Viruses during SHIV Mucosal Infection in Rhesus Macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sampa Santra

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 mucosal transmission begins with virus or virus-infected cells moving through mucus across mucosal epithelium to infect CD4+ T cells. Although broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs are the type of HIV-1 antibodies that are most likely protective, they are not induced with current vaccine candidates. In contrast, antibodies that do not neutralize primary HIV-1 strains in the TZM-bl infection assay are readily induced by current vaccine candidates and have also been implicated as secondary correlates of decreased HIV-1 risk in the RV144 vaccine efficacy trial. Here, we have studied the capacity of anti-Env monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against either the immunodominant region of gp41 (7B2 IgG1, the first constant region of gp120 (A32 IgG1, or the third variable loop (V3 of gp120 (CH22 IgG1 to modulate in vivo rectal mucosal transmission of a high-dose simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-BaL in rhesus macaques. 7B2 IgG1 or A32 IgG1, each containing mutations to enhance Fc function, was administered passively to rhesus macaques but afforded no protection against productive clinical infection while the positive control antibody CH22 IgG1 prevented infection in 4 of 6 animals. Enumeration of transmitted/founder (T/F viruses revealed that passive infusion of each of the three antibodies significantly reduced the number of T/F genomes. Thus, some antibodies that bind HIV-1 Env but fail to neutralize virus in traditional neutralization assays may limit the number of T/F viruses involved in transmission without leading to enhancement of viral infection. For one of these mAbs, gp41 mAb 7B2, we provide the first co-crystal structure in complex with a common cyclical loop motif demonstrated to be critical for infection by other retroviruses.

  18. Radiolabelling of monoclonal antibodies with technetium-99 m via metallothionein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Metallothionein (MT), a small cysteine-rich protein, was used as a bifunctional chelating agent in the radiolabelling of monoclonal antibodies with Tc-99m. The efficiency of the conjugation reaction of MT with antibodies (Ab) was found as 58%. The yield of radiolabelling of Tc-99m to MT-Ab by reduction method was higher than 90%, while the unspecific radiolabelling occurred less than 10%. The Tc-99m-MT-Ab has proven to be satisfactory stable in Vitro in the presence of a couple of strong chelating agents. The preliminary biological experimental results in tumor-bearing nude mice indicated that the Tc-99m-labelled anti-colorectal carcinoma monoclonal antibody 2C10 had strong affinity toward tumor and was stable in vivo

  19. Monoclonal antibodies to cell surface antigens of human melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have worked with three human melanoma antigens which have been defined by monoclonal mouse antibodies: p97, a glycoprotein that is structurally related to transferrin, a proteoglycan, and a GD3 ganglioside that is slightly different from the GD3 of normal brain. All three antigens can be detected in frozen sections of melanoma, using immunohistological techniques. Antibodies and Fab fragments, specific for either p97 or the proteoglycan antigen, have been radiolabelled with 131I and successfully used for tumor imaging, and Phase I therapeutic trails are underway, using 131I-labelled Fab fragments, specific for p97 or the proteoglycan antigen, to localize a potentially therapeutic dose of radiation into tumors. It may be feasible to use the same monoclonal antibodies, or antibody fragments, as carriers of neutron capturers, such as boron, for possible use in tumor therapy. The initial experiments on this are best carried out by using nude mice (or rats) carrying human melanoma xenografts

  20. Choriocarcinoma: blocking factor and monoclonal antibody iodine 131 imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattillo, R.A.; Khazaeli, M.B.; Ruckert, A.C.; Hussa, R.O.; Collier, B.D.; Beierwaltes, W.; Mattingly, R.F.

    1984-04-01

    Postoperative iodine 131 monoclonal antibody localization in metastatic choriocarcinoma was accomplished in this study. The monoclonal antibody was prepared to male choriocarcinoma which cross reacted with gestational choriocarcinoma. The antibody was raised against whole choriocarcinoma cells and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) cross reactivity was excluded. The purified antibody was iodinated with /sup 131/I and successfully imaged BeWo choriocarcinoma transplanted in nude mice; however, imaging of choriocarcinoma in a patient was verified only after resection. It is our belief that failure to sufficiently concentrate the antibody in the tumor before operation was due to blocking factor in the serum of the patient. Blocking factor and hCG dropped postoperatively. Blocking factor activity in 15 patients with metastatic trophoblastic disease was monitored and, like hCG, was found to be a sensitive indicator of the presence of disease. Its efficacy may be in the small number of patients without hCG but with persistent disease.

  1. Development of radiolabelling techniques of anti-CEA monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work was to label monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies with 99Tcm such as the ior-CEA-1 antibody and polyclonal IgG using a direct method, to check the radiochemical and biological behavior of labelled products, to prepare it under sterile and apyrogenic conditions as a lyophilized kit and to employ it in clinical trials. In addition, a photoactivation method was used to label polyclonal IgG with 99Tcm and to compare with the established method using mercaptoethanol (2-ME) as the reducing agent. Finally polyclonal IgG was labelled using an indirect method in which a chelator was covalently attached to the protein and the 99Tcm added as glucoheptonate complex. The properties of 99Tcm when labelled with monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies by different methods were assessed by in vitro and in vivo studies

  2. Preparation and identification of monoclonal antibodies against Ractopamine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to prepare the monoclonal antibody against Ractopamine (RCT), RCT-conjugated antigen was produced by methods of mixed acid anhydride. The spleen cells of BALB/c mice immunized by RCT-BSA were fused with SP2/0 plasmacytoma cells using PEG4000. A hybridoma cell line of 3E1-C9-E10 was screened for specificity to RCT and cloned by limited dilution method, which secreted stable monoclonal antibodies against RCT with indirect ELISA titers of 1 x 105 in supernatant, 1 x 107 in ascites. The McAb of 3E1-C9-E10 generally had 24% cross-reactivity to Dobutamine, and showed little or no cross-reactivity to Salbutamol and Clenbuterol. (authors)

  3. Broad spectrum anthelmintic potential of Cassia plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Suman Kundu; Saptarshi Roy; Larisha Mawkhleing Lyndem

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To study the in vitro anthelmintic efficacy of Cassia alata (C. alata), Cassia(C. angustifolia) and Cassia occidentalis (C. occidentalis). angustifolia Methods: Crude ethanol extract from leaves of the three plants were prepared in rotary evaporator and different concentrations (10, 20 and 40 mg/mL) of leaf extracts were used for treatment on different representatives of helminthes (Heterakis gallinarum, Raillietina tetragona and Catatropis sp.) from domestic fowl (Gallus gallus domesticus). Loss of motility and death were monitored frequently.Results: C. alata showed early paralysis in all worms treated followed by C. angustifolia. C. occidentalis in combination with C. alata together caused early paralysis in all treated worms than the combination of C. alata with C. angustfolia. While Heterakis gallinarum in control survived for (81.33±2.07) h, treated worms lost their motility at (5.71±0.10) h, (6.60±0.86) h and (13.95±0.43) h with C. angustifolia, C. alata and C. occidentalis respectively at a concentration of 40 mg/mL which showed better efficacy than albendazole. Catatropis sp. survival period was (26.49±1.38) h in control, but with plant treatment, it lost its motility in just (0.57±0.08) h, (1.00±0.12) h and (1.47±0.40) h at 40 mg/mL concentration of C. alata, C. angustifolia and C. occidentalis respectively.Raillietina tetragona on the other hand became paralysed at (1.68±0.27) h, (2.95±0.29) h and (4.13±0.31) h with above concentrations treated with three plants respectively, however in control it survived up to (81.93±4.71) h.Conclusions:This present study indicated broad spectrum vermifugal activity of all plants tested.

  4. Microlensing of Quasar Broad Emission Lines: Constraints on Broad Line Region Size

    CERN Document Server

    Guerras, E; Jimenez-Vicente, J; Kochanek, C S; Muñoz, J A; Falco, E; Motta, V

    2012-01-01

    We measure the differential microlensing of the broad emission lines between 18 quasar image pairs in 16 gravitational lenses. We find that high ionization lines such as CIV are more strongly microlensed than low ionization lines, indicating that the high ionization line emission regions are more compact. If we statistically model the distribution of microlensing magnifications, we obtain estimates for the broad line region radius of 24 (-15/+22) and 55 (-35/+150) light-days (90% confidence) for the high and low ionization lines, respectively. When the sample is divided attending to quasar luminosity, we find that the line emission regions of more luminous quasars are larger, with a slope consistent with the expected scaling from photoionization models. Our estimates also agree well with the results from local reveberation mapping studies.

  5. Bucklin Voting is Broadly Resistant to Control

    CERN Document Server

    Erdélyi, Gábor; Rothe, Jörg

    2010-01-01

    Electoral control models ways of changing the outcome of an election via such actions as adding/deleting/partitioning either candidates or voters. These actions modify an election's participation structure and aim at either making a favorite candidate win ("constructive control") or prevent a despised candidate from winning ("destructive control"), which yields a total of 22 standard control scenarios. To protect elections from such control attempts, computational complexity has been used to show that electoral control, though not impossible, is computationally prohibitive. Among natural voting systems with a polynomial-time winner problem, the two systems with the highest number of proven resistances to control types (namely 19 out of 22) are "sincere-strategy preference-based approval voting" (SP-AV, a modification of a system proposed by Brams and Sanver) and fallback voting. Both are hybrid systems; e.g., fallback voting combines approval with Bucklin voting. In this paper, we study the control complexity...

  6. Microelectrochemical radioiodination of monoclonal antibody: a preliminary study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optimal reaction conditions for the microelectrochemical iodination of immunoglobulins were determined with non-specific human serum immunoglobulins. These conditions were used for the efficient radioiodination of a monoclonal antibody, 140.240, in submilligram quantities. An approximately five-fold decrease in the titre of the antibody against melanoma cells, as determined by the miniaturized mixed hemadsorption assay, was observed after iodination with an average of 0.85 atoms of iodine per molecule of antibody. (author)

  7. T-cell detection with monoclonal antibody T101 kits.

    OpenAIRE

    Pollack, S M; Cimino, E F; Robbins, D S; Hoffman, P M

    1986-01-01

    A solid-phase immunoadsorption procedure (Quantigen T&B cell kit; Bio-Rad Laboratories, Richmond, Calif.) employing monoclonal antibody T101 detected mean percentages of peripheral blood T cells comparable to those obtained by rosetting with sheep erythrocytes, while lower values were obtained with an indirect immunofluorescence procedure (Cytotag T&B cell kit; Hybritech, Inc., San Diego, Calif.) employing the same antibody. Therefore, T101 binding appears to be more easily detected by solid-...

  8. Guidelines to cell engineering for monoclonal antibody production

    OpenAIRE

    Costa, A.; Rodrigues, E; Henriques, Mariana; Azeredo, Joana; Oliveira, Rosário

    2010-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are currently used for many diagnostic and therapeutic applications. The high demand for these biopharmaceuticals has led to the development of large-scale manufacturing processes, with productivity improvements being mainly achieved by optimization of bioreactor systems. However, more recently, the early steps of production, previous to bioreactor culture, have been presented as alternative areas where productivity enhancements can be achieved. Thus, ...

  9. Development of Monoclonal Antibodies in China: Overview and Prospects

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become increasingly important as human therapeutic agents. Yet, current research concentrates on technology itself and pays attention to developed countries. This paper aims to provide a comprehensive review of mAbs development in China through systematic analysis of drug registry, patent applications, clinical trials, academic publication, and ongoing R&D projects. The trends in therapeutic areas and industrialization process are also highlighted. Developmen...

  10. Transformation-related antigens identified by monoclonal antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Strand, M

    1980-01-01

    Tumor-cell proteins that were antigenic in a syngeneic animal were identified by immunoprecipitation with monoclonal antibodies. Spleen cells of BALB/c mice immunized with plasma membranes of Kirsten RNA sarcoma virus-transformed BALB/3T3 cells were fused with NS-1 myeloma cells. Antibodies secreted into the culture fluid from these hybridomas were distinguished by their reactivity against proteins of different target cells. A total of 191 cultures were established; 143 produced antibodies th...

  11. Sources of DNA for detecting B cell monoclonality using PCR.

    OpenAIRE

    Diss, T. C.; Pan, L.; Peng, H; Wotherspoon, A C; Isaacson, P G

    1994-01-01

    AIMS--To evaluate the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) demonstration of clonal immunoglobulin heavy chain gene rearrangements using routinely prepared, unstained, and stained formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded tissue samples. METHODS--Extracts from (a) fresh frozen tissue samples, (b) unstained, and (c) haematoxylin and eosin stained formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded 5 microns tissue sections from 42 cases of low grade B cell lymphoma, all shown to be monoclonal by Southern blot analysi...

  12. Screening Panels for Monoclonal Gammopathies: Time to Change

    OpenAIRE

    Katzmann, Jerry A.

    2009-01-01

    The introduction of quantitative assays for serum free light chains (FLC) has changed the approach to screening for monoclonal gammopathies. Recent guidelines from the International Myeloma Working Group have recommended the use of serum protein electrophoresis (SPEP), immunofixation electrophoresis (IFE) and FLC as the screening panel unless primary amyloidosis (AL) is suspected. If screening for AL, then urine IFE should also be performed. We discuss the background for these recommendations...

  13. Axonal neuropathy associated with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance

    OpenAIRE

    GORSON, K.; Ropper, A.

    1997-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—The neuropathy associated with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is typically a predominantly demyelinating process that may have additional features of axonal degeneration. Sixteen patients with MGUS and a pure or predominantly axonal neuropathy are reported and compared with 20 consecutive patients with demyelinating neuropathy and MGUS who were seen during the same period.
METHODS—Retrospective review of a consecutive series of patients w...

  14. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance associated with blue finger syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Alaa M. Ali; Aibek E. Mirrakhimov

    2013-01-01

    An 86-year-old Caucasian woman with a medical history of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) was admitted to the hospital with a chief complaint of sudden onset of bluish discolouration of the fifth left hand digit. On a physical examination, cyanosis of the fifth digit of the left hand was noticed with decreased capillary fill but no ulcers. The patient had no tenderness on palpation. Pulses were palpable over the radial arteries bilaterally. Patients with MGUS may be a...

  15. Prevalence of monoclonal gammopathy in HIV patients in 2014

    OpenAIRE

    Philippe Genet; Laurent Sutton; Driss Chaoui; Ahmad Al Jijakli; Juliette Gerbe; Virginie Masse; Bouchra Wifaq

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: In non-HIV patients, Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance (MGUS) is associated with an increased risk of subsequent development of haematologic malignancies, especially multiple myeloma (MM) and it has been recently demonstrated that MM is always preceded by a MGUS phase. A higher prevalence of MGUS and MM has been observed in HIV patients compared to the general population. Nevertheless, it has been shown that MGUS in the context of HIV can disappear with antiretr...

  16. Production of Bartonella Genus-Specific Monoclonal Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Liang, Zhongxing; La Scola, Bernard; Lepidi, Hubert; Raoult, Didier

    2001-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) which react with heat-resistant proteins with molecular masses of 32 to 33 kDa of 14 different Bartonella species were produced. These antibodies did not react with antigens of 26 diverse bacterial strains by microimmunofluorescence assay except MAb B3D4, which reacted with Chlamydia psittaci and Chlamydia trachomatis at low titers. The identification of a common Bartonella antigenic protein will make it possible to later produce a diagnostic antigen by cloning an...

  17. Production of Monoclonal Antibodies in Plants for Cancer Immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Ghislain Moussavou; Kisung Ko; Jeong-Hwan Lee; Young-Kug Choo

    2015-01-01

    Plants are considered as an alternative platform for recombinant monoclonal antibody (mAb) production due to the improvement and diversification of transgenic techniques. The diversity of plant species offers a multitude of possibilities for the valorization of genetic resources. Moreover, plants can be propagated indefinitely, providing cheap biomass production on a large scale in controlled conditions. Thus, recent studies have shown the successful development of plant systems for the produ...

  18. Monoclonal antibody radioimmunodetection of human-derived colon cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was designed to determine whether monoclonal antibody directed against carcinoembryonic antigen could successfully be used in the scintigraphic localization of a human-derived colon carcinoma in a hamster model. An immunoglobulin G (IgG)-1 kappa monoclonal antibody, prepared in this laboratory, against carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) was radiolabeled with iodine-131 (131I). Four Syrian hamsters bearing GW-39 human colon cancers received intracardiac injections of 50 mu Ci of 131I (14 micrograms of antibody). Gamma camera images were obtained at 24-hour intervals. Animals were sacrificed at 11 days, and the tumors and entire animals were counted. A double-label antibody experiment was conducted with 131I anti-CEA and nonspecific MOPC 21 IgG iodine-125 (125I) to assess localization specificity. The scintiphotos clearly showed the tumor at 24 hours, but there was significant background (blood-pool activity). Later images at six and 11 days showed a gradual decrease in background activity and more clear definition of the tumor. Animals sacrificed at 11 days showed 48-80% of residual whole body radioactivity to be present in the tumor. However, these tumors were large at sacrifice, weighing 8.9 to 12.4 g. Specific localization was confirmed by the double-label experiments where specific localization was twice nonspecific accretion of IgG in the tumor. This study has shown that a specific monoclonal antibody can successfully be used to scintigraphically localize a colon tumor of human origin. Although clearance of background activity is a gradual process, eventually most radioactivity left in the animal is localized in the tumor. This study illustrates that the potential radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies hold as immunodiagnostic agents

  19. [Hashimoto's thyroiditis and monoclonal gammapathy (two cases) (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groussin, P; Fine, J M; Leroux, E; Lebranchu, Y; Lecomte, P; Bertrand, G

    1979-01-01

    The authors describe two cases of Hashimoto's thyroiditis with a monoclonal dysproteinemia (IgG lambda in one case and IgG kappa in the other). They show that the antithyroid activity (anti-microsomial in the first case, anti thyroglobulin in the second case) is not carried by the abnormal gammaglobulin. The two diseases, therefore, appear to be separate but can both be considered as the consequence of a particular immunological state. PMID:117737

  20. [Renal involvement in benign monoclonal gammopathies: an underdiagnosed condition].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, R; Poveda, R; Bernís, C; Ara, J; Sunyer, M; Arrizabalaga, P; Grinyó, J M

    2008-01-01

    Renal involvement is observed frequently in association with malignant gammopathies, mainly those related to light chain deposition, although has also been described in non-malignant monoclonal gammopathy. This study reports the clinicopathological findings and outcome in 9 patients with nephropaty secondary to monoclonal immunoglobulin deposit in absence of malignancy. They were three men and six women and they were 59.2+/-12 years old. All patients presented proteinuria and different levels of renal insufficiency (mean creatinin = 315+/-187 micromol/L) at the moment of diagnostic. Two patients required dialysis at the time of renal biopsy. The pathology studies revealed a nodular sclerosing glomerulopathy in four cases, mesangiocapilary glomerulonephritis in three cases, only tubular lesions in one and mesangial lesions in the other one. The treatment applied was: Prednisone alone (two cases), with chemotherapy associated (melfalan in two, clorambucil in one and ciclophosphamide in another one). One patient received plasmapheresis and mycophenolate and another patient undergone a bone marrow authotransplant associated to mycophenolate and prednisone. One of the two patients who required dialysis at the moment of presentation was not treated. After a follow-up of more than 4 years (4.89 +/-DE: 3.69) renal function improved or remained stable in three patients and proteinuria was disappeared in more than 50% of patients. Four patients had a worsening of renal function and they required dialysis during the time of follow-up (in 2,4 years +/- DE: 4,3). In any case malignitation was observed. Chemotherapy stabilized or improved renal function in 3 of nine patients (33%) with non-malignant monoclonal gammopathy. Non-malignant monoclonal gammopathy could go unnoticed. Appearance of abnormalities in renal routine tests deserves more in-depth diagnostic procedures, including renal biopsy. Evolution to end stage renal disease could probably be avoided or reduced in

  1. Validation, automatic generation and use of broad phonetic transcriptions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bael, Cristophe Patrick Jan Van

    2007-01-01

    Broad phonetic transcriptions represent the pronunciation of words as strings of characters from specifically designed symbol sets. In everyday life, broad phonetic transcriptions are often used as aids to pronounce (foreign) words. In addition, broad phonetic transcriptions are often used for lingu

  2. Characterization of two anti-dengue human monoclonal antibodies prepared from PBMCs of patients with dengue illness in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Z-Y; Yamashita, A; Kawashita, N; Sasaki, T; Pan, Y; Ono, K-I; Ikuta, K; Li, Y-G

    2016-06-01

    The global spread of the four dengue virus (DENV) serotypes (dengue-1 to -4) has made this virus a major and growing public health concern. Generally, pre-existing neutralizing antibodies derived from primary infection play a significant role in protecting against subsequent infection with the same serotype. By contrast, these pre-existing antibodies are believed to mediate a non-protective response to subsequent heterotypic DENV infections, leading to the onset of dengue illness. In this study, two monoclonal antibodies prepared by using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from patients with dengue fever were characterized. Epitope mapping revealed that amino acid residues 254-278 in domain II of the viral envelope protein E were the target region of these antibodies. A database search revealed that certain sequences in this epitope region showed high conservation among the four serotypes of DENV. These two human monoclonal antibodies could neutralize DENV-2,-4 more effectively than DENV-1,-3. The amino acid sequences could not explain this difference in neutralizing activity. However, the 3D structure results showed that amino acid 274 could be the critical residue for the difference in neutralization. These results may provide basic information for the development of a dengue vaccine. PMID:27265466

  3. The Use of Monoclonal Antibodies in Human Prion Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodemer, Walter

    Detection of PrP and its pathological isoform(s) is the key to understanding the etiology and pathogenesis of transmissible spongiform encephalopathy. There is ample evidence that PrP isoforms constitute a major component of an unknown and perhaps unconventional infectious agent. An etiological relationship between human and zoonotic transmissible spongiform encephalopathies may be revealed with monoclonal antibodies. Knowledge of the conformational transition rendering a nonpathogenic, almost ubiquitous cellular protein into a pathogenic one is crucial to defining pathomechanisms. The stepwise or even continuous formation of pathogenic molecules can be monitored. Any improvement in the early diagnosis could help to conceive new therapeutic measures which are not currently available. Determination of PrP isoforms in tissue, cells, or body fluids may be of prognostic value. Many experimental approaches in molecular medicine and molecular biology of the prion protein already rely on monoclonal antibodies. Recombinant antibodies such as the single-chain Fv may soon replace traditional hybridoma techniques. Binding affinity can easily be manipulated by a number of techniques, including in vitro mutagenesis - a step which could never be carried out using the traditional hybridoma technology. Monoclonal antibodies are and will remain an essential support for ongoing research on the prion protein in general and on the unconventional infectious prions.

  4. Protection limits on free speech

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李敏

    2014-01-01

    Freedom of speech is one of the basic rights of citizens should receive broad protection, but in the real context of China under what kind of speech can be protected and be restricted, how to grasp between state power and free speech limit is a question worth considering. People tend to ignore the freedom of speech and its function, so that some of the rhetoric cannot be demonstrated in the open debates.

  5. Microarray-based MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry enables monitoring of monoclonal antibody production in batch and perfusion cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinhoff, Robert F; Karst, Daniel J; Steinebach, Fabian; Kopp, Marie R G; Schmidt, Gregor W; Stettler, Alexander; Krismer, Jasmin; Soos, Miroslav; Pabst, Martin; Hierlemann, Andreas; Morbidelli, Massimo; Zenobi, Renato

    2016-07-15

    Cell culture process monitoring in monoclonal antibody (mAb) production is essential for efficient process development and process optimization. Currently employed online, at line and offline methods for monitoring productivity as well as process reproducibility have their individual strengths and limitations. Here, we describe a matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS)-based on a microarray for mass spectrometry (MAMS) technology to rapidly monitor a broad panel of analytes, including metabolites and proteins directly from the unpurified cell supernatant or from host cell culture lysates. The antibody titer is determined from the intact antibody mass spectra signal intensity relative to an internal protein standard spiked into the supernatant. The method allows a semi-quantitative determination of light and heavy chains. Intracellular mass profiles for metabolites and proteins can be used to track cellular growth and cell productivity. PMID:26707204

  6. Enhanced methanol production in plants provides broad spectrum insect resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Dixit

    Full Text Available Plants naturally emit methanol as volatile organic compound. Methanol is toxic to insect pests; but the quantity produced by most of the plants is not enough to protect them against invading insect pests. In the present study, we demonstrated that the over-expression of pectin methylesterase, derived from Arabidopsis thaliana and Aspergillus niger, in transgenic tobacco plants enhances methanol production and resistance to polyphagous insect pests. Methanol content in the leaves of transgenic plants was measured using proton nuclear spectroscopy (1H NMR and spectra showed up to 16 fold higher methanol as compared to control wild type (WT plants. A maximum of 100 and 85% mortality in chewing insects Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera litura larvae was observed, respectively when fed on transgenic plants leaves. The surviving larvae showed less feeding, severe growth retardation and could not develop into pupae. In-planta bioassay on transgenic lines showed up to 99 and 75% reduction in the population multiplication of plant sap sucking pests Myzus persicae (aphid and Bemisia tabaci (whitefly, respectively. Most of the phenotypic characters of transgenic plants were similar to WT plants. Confocal microscopy showed no deformities in cellular integrity, structure and density of stomata and trichomes of transgenic plants compared to WT. Pollen germination and tube formation was also not affected in transgenic plants. Cell wall enzyme transcript levels were comparable with WT. This study demonstrated for the first time that methanol emission can be utilized for imparting broad range insect resistance in plants.

  7. Production and Identification of High Affinity Monoclonal Antibodies Against Pesticide Carbofuran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    To produce high-affinity monoclonal antibodies against pesticide carbofuran, and the develop immunochemical assays for people's health and environmental protection, the hapten 4-[[(2,3-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-7-benzofuranyloxy) carbonyl]-amino]-butanoic acid (BFNB) of carbofuran was synthesized and Balb/c mice were immunized by the hapten-carrier (BFNB-bovine serum albumin, BFNB-BSA) conjugates. The splenocytes of immunized mice were fused with Sp2/0 cells and the cultural supernatants of hybridoma cells were screened by the indirect enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA), based on BFNB-ovoalbumin conjugates (BFNB-OVA). Purified monoclonal antibody (McAb) was obtained from fluids of ascites, deposited by octanoic acid and ammonium sulfate. The affinity and the specificity of McAb were characterized by ELISA or indirect competitive ELISA. A hybridoma cell line (5D3) secreting anti-carbofuran McAb had been established. The titer of culture medium and ascites was up to 1:2.048 × 103 and 1:1.024 × 106, respectively, and the subtype of the McAb was IgG1. The affinity constant of the McAb was about 2.54 × 109 L mol-1, with an IC50 value of 1.18 ng mL-1 and a detection limit of 0.01 ng mL-1. Cross-reactivity studies showed that the McAb was quiet specific for carbofuran, as among the four analogous compounds, they were all hardly recognized (4.59 × 10-4% for 2,3-dihydro-2,2-dimethyl-7-benzofuranol and less than 3.0 × 10-4% for others). The prepared McAb had a very high affinity and specificity,and it could be used to develop ELISA for rapid determination of carbofuran.

  8. Broad-Spectrum Solution-Processed Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ip, Alexander Halley

    High global demand for energy coupled with dwindling fossil fuel supply has driven the development of sustainable energy sources such as solar photovoltaics. Emerging solar technologies aim for low-cost, solution-processable materials which would allow wide deployment. Colloidal quantum dots (CQDs) are such a materials system which exhibits the ability to absorb across the entire solar spectrum, including in the infrared where many technologies cannot harvest photons. However, due to their nanocrystalline nature, CQDs are susceptible to surface-associated electronic traps which greatly inhibit performance. In this thesis, surface engineering of CQDs is presented through a combined ligand approach which improves the passivation of surface trap states. A metal halide treatment is found to passivate quantum dot surfaces in solution, while bifunctional organic ligands produce a dense film in solid state. This approach reduced midgap trap states fivefold compared with conventional passivation strategies and led to solar cells with a record certified 7.0% power conversion efficiency. The effect of this process on the electronic structure is studied through photoelectron spectroscopy. It is found that while the halide provides deep trap passivation, the nature of the metal cation on the CQD surface affects the density of band tail states. This effect is explored further through a wide survey of materials, and it is found that the coordination ability of the metal cation is responsible for the suppression of shallow traps. With this understanding of CQD surface passivation, broad spectral usage is then explored through a study of visible-absorbing organolead halide perovskite materials as well as narrow-bandgap CQD solar cells. Control over growth conditions and modification of electrode interfaces resulted in efficient perovskite devices with effective usages of visible photons. For infrared-absorbing CQDs, it is found that, in addition to providing surface trap

  9. Broad-beam transmission data for new brachytherapy sources, Tm-170 and Yb-169

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The characteristics of the radionuclides 170Tm and 169Yb are highly interesting for their use as high dose-rate brachytherapy sources. The introduction of brachytherapy equipment containing these sources will lead to smaller required thicknesses of the materials used in radiation protection barriers compared with the use of conventional sources such as 192Ir and 137Cs. The purpose of this study is to determine the required thicknesses of protection material for the design of the protecting walls. Using the Monte Carlo method, transmission data were derived for broad-beam geometries through lead and concrete barriers, from which the first half value layer and tenth value layer are obtained. In addition, the dose reduction in a simulated patient was studied to determine whether transmission in the patient is a relevant factor in radiation protection calculations. (authors)

  10. Structural and Antigenic Definition of Hepatitis C Virus E2 Glycoprotein Epitopes Targeted by Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Sautto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is the major cause of chronic liver disease as well as the major indication for liver transplantation worldwide. Current standard of care is not completely effective, not administrable in grafted patients, and burdened by several side effects. This incomplete effectiveness is mainly due to the high propensity of the virus to continually mutate under the selective pressure exerted by the host immune response as well as currently administered antiviral drugs. The E2 envelope surface glycoprotein of HCV (HCV/E2 is the main target of the host humoral immune response and for this reason one of the major variable viral proteins. However, broadly cross-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs directed against HCV/E2 represent a promising tool for the study of virus-host interplay as well as for the development of effective prophylactic and therapeutic approaches. In the last few years many anti-HCV/E2 mAbs have been evaluated in preclinical and clinical trials as possible candidate antivirals, particularly for administration in pre- and post-transplant settings. In this review we summarize the antigenic and structural characteristics of HCV/E2 determined through the use of anti-HCV/E2 mAbs, which, given the absence of a crystal structure of this glycoprotein, represent currently the best tool available.

  11. Discovery and Characterization of Phage Display-Derived Human Monoclonal Antibodies against RSV F Glycoprotein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhifeng; Zhang, Lan; Tang, Aimin; Callahan, Cheryl; Pristatsky, Pavlo; Swoyer, Ryan; Cejas, Pedro; Nahas, Debbie; Galli, Jennifer; Cosmi, Scott; DiStefano, Daniel; Hoang, Van M; Bett, Andrew; Casimiro, Danilo; Vora, Kalpit A

    2016-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a leading cause of lower respiratory tract infection in infants, the elderly and in immunosuppressed populations. The vast majority of neutralizing antibodies isolated from human subjects target the RSV fusion (F) glycoprotein, making it an attractive target for the development of vaccines and therapeutic antibodies. Currently, Synagis® (palivizumab) is the only FDA approved antibody drug for the prevention of RSV infection, and there is a great need for more effective vaccines and therapeutics. Phage display is a powerful tool in antibody discovery with the advantage that it does not require samples from immunized subjects. In this study, Morphosys HuCAL GOLD® phage libraries were used for panning against RSV prefusion and postfusion F proteins. Panels of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against RSV F protein were discovered following phage library panning and characterized. Antibodies binding specifically to prefusion or postfusion F proteins and those binding both conformations were identified. 3B1 is a prototypic postfusion F specific antibody while 2E1 is a prototypic prefusion F specific antibody. 2E1 is a potent broadly neutralizing antibody against both RSV A and B strains. Epitope mapping experiments identified a conformational epitope spanning across three discontinuous sections of the RSV F protein, as well as critical residues for antibody interaction. PMID:27258388

  12. Discovery and Characterization of Phage Display-Derived Human Monoclonal Antibodies against RSV F Glycoprotein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhifeng Chen

    Full Text Available Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV is a leading cause of lower respiratory tract infection in infants, the elderly and in immunosuppressed populations. The vast majority of neutralizing antibodies isolated from human subjects target the RSV fusion (F glycoprotein, making it an attractive target for the development of vaccines and therapeutic antibodies. Currently, Synagis® (palivizumab is the only FDA approved antibody drug for the prevention of RSV infection, and there is a great need for more effective vaccines and therapeutics. Phage display is a powerful tool in antibody discovery with the advantage that it does not require samples from immunized subjects. In this study, Morphosys HuCAL GOLD® phage libraries were used for panning against RSV prefusion and postfusion F proteins. Panels of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against RSV F protein were discovered following phage library panning and characterized. Antibodies binding specifically to prefusion or postfusion F proteins and those binding both conformations were identified. 3B1 is a prototypic postfusion F specific antibody while 2E1 is a prototypic prefusion F specific antibody. 2E1 is a potent broadly neutralizing antibody against both RSV A and B strains. Epitope mapping experiments identified a conformational epitope spanning across three discontinuous sections of the RSV F protein, as well as critical residues for antibody interaction.

  13. Conformation-dependent high-affinity potent ricin-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Wei-Gang; Yin, Junfei; Chau, Damon; Hu, Charles Chen; Lillico, Dustin; Yu, Justin; Negrych, Laurel M; Cherwonogrodzky, John W

    2013-01-01

    Ricin is a potential biothreat agent with no approved antidote available for ricin poisoning. The aim of this study was to develop potent antibody-based antiricin antidotes. Four strong ricin resistant hybridoma clones secreting antiricin monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were developed. All four mAbs are bound to conformational epitopes of ricin toxin B (RTB) with high affinity (KD values from 2.55 to 36.27 nM). RTB not only triggers cellular uptake of ricin, but also facilitates transport of the ricin toxin A (RTA) from the endoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol, where RTA exerts its toxic activity. The four mAbs were found to have potent ricin-neutralizing capacities and synergistic effects among them as determined by an in vitro neutralization assay. In vivo protection assay demonstrated that all four mAbs had strong efficacy against ricin challenges. D9 was found to be exceptionally effective. Intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration of D9, at a dose of 5 μ g, 6 weeks before or 6 hours after an i.p. challenge with 5 × LD50 of ricin was able to protect or rescue 100% of the mice, indicating that mAb D9 is an excellent candidate to be developed as a potent antidote against ricin poisoning for both prophylactic and therapeutic purposes. PMID:23484120

  14. Development of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies for oncogenic human papillomavirus types 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Martha J; Seitz, Hanna; Towne, Victoria; Müller, Martin; Finnefrock, Adam C

    2014-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the etiological agent for all cervical cancers, a significant number of other anogenital cancers, and a growing number of head and neck cancers. Two licensed vaccines offer protection against the most prevalent oncogenic types, 16 and 18, responsible for approximately 70% of cervical cancer cases worldwide and one of these also offers protection against types 6 and 11, responsible for 90% of genital warts. The vaccines are comprised of recombinantly expressed major capsid proteins that self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs) and prevent infection by eliciting neutralizing antibodies. Adding the other frequently identified oncogenic types 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58 to a vaccine would increase the coverage against HPV-induced cancers to approximately 90%. We describe the generation and characterization of panels of monoclonal antibodies to these five additional oncogenic HPV types, and the selection of antibody pairs that were high affinity and type specific and recognized conformation-dependent neutralizing epitopes. Such characteristics make these antibodies useful tools for monitoring the production and potency of a prototype vaccine as well as monitoring vaccine-induced immune responses in the clinic. PMID:24574536

  15. Analysis of T-cell-dependent and -independent antigens of Rickettsia conorii with monoclonal antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Feng, H M; Walker, D H; Wang, J. G.

    1987-01-01

    Four monoclonal antibodies from euthymic mice and two monoclonal antibodies from athymic mice were directed against antigens of Rickettsia conorii, as shown by both indirect immunofluorescence and an enzyme immunoassay. There was extensive cross-reactivity with other spotted fever group rickettsiae. Euthymic monoclonal antibodies 3-2 and 9-2 (immunoglobulin G2a [IgG2a]) and 27-10 (IgG1) distinctly outlined the acetone-fixed rickettsial surface, as determined by indirect immunofluorescence; on...

  16. Differentiation of Naegleria fowleri from Acanthamoeba species by using monoclonal antibodies and flow cytometry.

    OpenAIRE

    Flores, B M; Garcia, C A; Stamm, W E; Torian, B E

    1990-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies to Naegleria fowleri and Acanthamoeba polyphaga were analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, and fluorescence flow cytometry to assess specificity and cross-reactivity with axenically cultured N. fowleri and Acanthamoeba spp. Four monoclonal antibodies to N. fowleri were specific for N. fowleri and had no reactivity to A. polyphaga. Similarly, four monoclonal antibodies to A. polyphaga did not react with N. fowleri. Two of t...

  17. Anti-idiotypic immunity in multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance

    OpenAIRE

    Bergenbrant Glas, Susanne

    1997-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathies such as multiple myeloma (MM) and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) are lymphoproliferative B cell diseases. B cells/plasma cells produce the monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig) which can be detected in plasma and/or urine. Such Ig have unique variable regions of the heavy and light chains and may be regarded as tumour-specific antigens and as such potential targets for immune regulation of the tumour cell clone, by anti-idiotype (I...

  18. Laboratory investigation of monoclonal gammopathy during 10 years of screening in a general hospital.

    OpenAIRE

    V. Malacrida; De Francesco, D.; Banfi, G; Porta, F A; Riches, P G

    1987-01-01

    Protein electrophoresis was carried out on 102,000 samples from the patients of a district general hospital over 10 years, and a monoclonal protein was detected in 730 cases; of these, 114 could be classified as B cell malignancies and 261 as monoclonal gammopathy of undefined significance (MGUS). The various clinical and laboratory features of monoclonal gammopathy were examined with respect to distinguishing the malignant conditions from MGUS at first presentation.

  19. Population-based studies on familiality and prognosis in patients with monoclonal gammopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Kristinsson, Sigurður Yngvi

    2009-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathies constitute a group of diseases which have in common an overproduction of monoclonal immunoglobulins, M-proteins. Clues to their etiology have been found in studies showing familial aggregation of these diseases. We included 2,144 patients with lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/Waldenström s macroglobulinemia (LPL/WM) and 4,458 patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), their 6,177 and 14,621 first-degree relatives respectively,...

  20. Rabbit monoclonal antibodies: generating a fusion partner to produce rabbit-rabbit hybridomas.

    OpenAIRE

    Spieker-Polet, H; Sethupathi, P; Yam, P C; Knight, K L

    1995-01-01

    During the last 15 years several laboratories have attempted to generate rabbit monoclonal antibodies, mainly because rabbits recognize antigens and epitopes that are not immunogenic in mice or rats, two species from which monoclonal antibodies are usually generated. Monoclonal antibodies from rabbits could not be generated, however, because a plasmacytoma fusion partner was not available. To obtain a rabbit plasmacytoma cell line that could be used as a fusion partner we generated transgenic...

  1. Improving food and agricultural production. Thailand. Application on monoclonal antibodies for progesterone measurement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The duties of the mission were to provide instructions on the maintenance of hybridoma cell lines and their culture and the harvesting of monoclonal antibodies; to assist the counterparts in Thailand to develop work plans for the use of monoclonal antibodies in radioimmunoassay measurements of progesterone; and to assess the need for and feasibility of establishing a laboratory for producing monoclonal antibodies directed against progesterone. The report contains a summary of the activities performed in fulfillment of these duties

  2. Monoclonal antibodies to coagulation factor IX define a high-frequency polymorphism by immunoassays.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, K. J.

    1985-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have been used to demonstrate a polymorphism of human plasma coagulation factor IX antigen in double antibody solid-phase immunoradiometric assays. This polymorphism is detected in an assay where a monoclonal antibody (A-1) adsorbed to microtiter wells is used to bind factor IX from diluted plasma samples. Plasma samples with the factor IX polymorphism have less than 0.2 U/ml of apparent antigen when tested with the A-1 antibody, while assays with other monoclonal antibo...

  3. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies of Shrimp White Spot Syndrome Virus Envelope Protein VP28

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wan-gang GU; Jun-fa YUAN; Ge-lin XU; Li-juan LI; Ni LIU; Cong ZHANG; Jian-hong ZHANG; Zheng-li SHI

    2007-01-01

    BALB/c mice were immunized with purified White spot syndrome virus (WSSV).Six monoclonal antibody cell lines were selected by ELISA with VP28 protein expressed in E.coll in vitro neutralization experiments showed that 4 of them could inhibit the virus infection in crayfish.Westernblot suggested that all these monoclonal antibodies were against the conformational structure of VP28.The monoclonal antibody 7B4 was labeled with colloidal gold particles and used to locate the VP28 on virus envelope by immunogold labeling.These monoclonal antibodies could be used to develop immunological diagnosis methods for WSSV infection.

  4. Broadly neutralizing human antibody that recognizes the receptor-binding pocket of influenza virus hemagglutinin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittle, James R.R.; Zhang, Ruijun; Khurana, Surender; King, Lisa R.; Manischewitz, Jody; Golding, Hana; Dormitzer, Philip R.; Haynes, Barton F.; Walter, Emmanuel B.; Moody, M. Anthony; Kepler, Thomas B.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Harrison, Stephen C. (Harvard-Med); (Novartis); (US-FDA); (Duke)

    2011-09-20

    Seasonal antigenic drift of circulating influenza virus leads to a requirement for frequent changes in vaccine composition, because exposure or vaccination elicits human antibodies with limited cross-neutralization of drifted strains. We describe a human monoclonal antibody, CH65, obtained by isolating rearranged heavy- and light-chain genes from sorted single plasma cells, coming from a subject immunized with the 2007 trivalent influenza vaccine. The crystal structure of a complex of the hemagglutinin (HA) from H1N1 strain A/Solomon Islands/3/2006 with the Fab of CH65 shows that the tip of the CH65 heavy-chain complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) inserts into the receptor binding pocket on HA1, mimicking in many respects the interaction of the physiological receptor, sialic acid. CH65 neutralizes infectivity of 30 out of 36 H1N1 strains tested. The resistant strains have a single-residue insertion near the rim of the sialic-acid pocket. We conclude that broad neutralization of influenza virus can be achieved by antibodies with contacts that mimic those of the receptor.

  5. Passive protection by polyclonal antibodies against Bacillus anthracis infection in guinea pigs.

    OpenAIRE

    Little, S F; Ivins, B E; Fellows, P F; Friedlander, A M

    1997-01-01

    The protective effects of polyclonal antisera produced by injecting guinea pigs with protective antigen (PA), the chemical anthrax vaccine AVA, or Sterne spore vaccine, as well as those of toxin-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) produced against PA, lethal factor, and edema factor, were examined in animals infected with Bacillus anthracis spores. Only the anti-PA polyclonal serum significantly protected the guinea pigs from death, with 67% of infected animals surviving. Although none ...

  6. Sheep Monoclonal Antibodies Prevent Systemic Effects of Botulinum Neurotoxin A1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles B. Shoemaker

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT is responsible for causing botulism, a potentially fatal disease characterized by paralysis of skeletal muscle. Existing specific treatments include polyclonal antisera derived from immunized humans or horses. Both preparations have similar drawbacks, including limited supply, risk of adverse effects and batch to batch variation. Here, we describe a panel of six highly protective sheep monoclonal antibodies (SMAbs derived from sheep immunized with BoNT/A1 toxoid (SMAbs 2G11, 4F7 or BoNT/A1 heavy chain C-terminus (HcC (SMAbs 1G4, 5E2, 5F7, 16F9 with or without subsequent challenge immunization with BoNT/A1 toxin. Although each SMAb bound BoNT/A1 toxin, differences in specificity for native and recombinant constituents of BoNT/A1 were observed. Structural differences were suggested by pI (5E2 = 8.2; 2G11 = 7.1; 4F7 = 8.8; 1G4 = 7.4; 5F7 = 8.0; 16F9 = 5.1. SMAb protective efficacy vs. 10,000 LD50 BoNT/A1 was evaluated using the mouse lethality assay. Although not protective alone, divalent and trivalent combinations of SMabs, IG4, 5F7 and/or 16F9 were highly protective. Divalent combinations containing 0.5–4 μg/SMAb (1–8 μg total SMAb were 100% protective against death with only mild signs of botulism observed; relative efficacy of each combination was 1G4 + 5F7 > 1G4 + 16F9 >> 5F7 + 16F9. The trivalent combination of 1G4 + 5F7 + 16F9 at 0.25 μg/SMAb (0.75 μg total SMAb was 100% protective against clinical signs and death. These results reflect levels of protective potency not reported previously.

  7. Environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this chapter environmental protection in the Slovak Republic in 1997 are reviewed. The economics of environmental protection, state budget, Slovak state environmental fund, economic instruments, environmental laws, environmental impact assessment, environmental management systems, and environmental education are presented

  8. Cuban Monoclonal Antibodies for Radioimmunodiagnosis and Radioimmunotherapy of Cancer Diseases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Centre of Molecular Immunology produces monoclonal antibodies for treating cancer diseases. We are mainly focus on two target systems; one is the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) because there is a tremendous relationship between the EGF/EGF-R system and several human tumours such as lung, head and neck, ovarian breast and brain cancers; the second one is the ganglioside system, the relevance of certain gangliosides in tumour growth and metastatic dissemination has been well documented, GM3(NeuGc) ganglioside is particularly interesting due to its restrictive expression in normal human tissues. Nimotuzumab (h-R3) is a humanized monoclonal antibody (mAb) that was obtained by complementarity-determining regions grafting of a murine mAb (ior egf/r3) to a human framework having remarkable antiproliferative, pro-apoptotic, and antiangiogenic effects. A Phase I clinical trial was performed to evaluate the toxicity and clinical effect of an intracavitary (intracerebral) administration of a single dose of nimotuzumab (h-R3) labelled with increasing doses of 188Re. All patients bearing astrocytomas grade III/IV should be treated previously with conventional therapies and have an EGF-R overexpression in the tumour, demonstrated by immunohistochemical study. Maximal tolerated dose was 3 mg of the h-R3 labelled with 10 mCi of 188Re. The radioimmunoconjugate showed a high retention in the surgical created resection cavity and the brain adjacent tissues with a mean value of 85.5% of the injected dose one hour post-administration. This radioimmunoconjugate may be relatively safe and a promising therapeutic approach for treating high grade gliomas. GM3(NeuGc) ganglioside is particularly interesting due to its restrictive expression in normal human tissues according to immunohistochemical studies, using either polyclonal or monoclonal antibodies. But both immunohistochemical and biochemical methods have strongly suggested its over-expression in human breast and colon

  9. Imaging thrombus with radiolabelled monoclonal antibody to platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Indium-111-hydroxyquinoline labelled platelets, though useful in the detection of thrombus, have not gained widespread use owing to the time and technical skill required for their preparation. A study was therefore conducted evaluating a new method of imaging thrombus with platelets radiolabelled with a 111In labelled monoclonal antibody, P256, directed to the platelet surface glycoprotein complex IIb/IIIa. When the number of receptors occupied by P256 was less than 3% of the total available on the platelet surface platelet function, as assessed by platelet aggregometry, was undisturbed. P256 was radiolabelled with 111In using diethylenetriaminepenta-acetic acid, which achieved a specific activity of 185 MBq (5 mCi)/mg. No impairment of immunoreactivity was detected at this specific activity. Platelets were labelled with radiolabelled monoclonal antibody in vitro in two patients at a receptor occupancy of 6% and in vivo - that is, by direct intravenous injection of P256 - in six patients at a receptor occupancy of 1%. In vivo recovery and biodistribution kinetics suggested that after in vitro labelling platelets were minimally activated. The 111In kinetics recorded after intravenous P256 suggested rapid and efficient radiolabelling of platelets and gave no indication of platelet activation. Of the six patients who received intravenous P256, three had documented thrombus, tow of whom gave positive results on P256 platelet scintigraphy. The third subject had chromic deep venous thrombosis and was scintigraphically negative. Imaging thrombus using a radiolabelled monoclonal antibody directed to platelets appears to offer great potential as a simple, non-invasive approach to the diagnosis of thrombosis. 3 refs. (Author)

  10. Development of a protein biochip to identify 6 monoclonal antibodies against subtypes of recombinant human interferons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zhenshan; Du, Weidong; Zhang, Ping; Wang, Xuan; Ma, Xueling; Shi, Liqin; Song, Lihua

    2010-04-01

    Recombinant human interferons (rhIFNs) are broadly used as effective therapeutic agents with antiviral, antitumor, and immune-modulating properties. Advances in protein biochip technology have benefited the medical community greatly, making true parallelism, miniaturization, and high throughput possible. In this study, 5 rhIFN proteins (IFN-alpha1b, IFN-alpha2a, IFN-alpha2b, IFN-beta, and IFN-gamma) were immobilized onto an N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS)-modified gold-based biochip. The protein biochip was incubated with 6 specific mouse IgG antibodies (AK1, AK2, AK3, AK4, BK1, and CK1) against the human IFNs and then with Cy3-conjugated goat anti-mouse IgG antibody. The results showed that monoclonal antibody AK1 presented a unique binding characteristic to IFN-alpha1b. AK2 reacted in immunoassays equally with IFN-alpha2a and IFN-alpha2b. AK3 detected IFN-alpha1b, IFN-alpha2a, and IFN-alpha2b. AK4 had positive immunological responses directed to both IFN-alpha1b and IFN-alpha2b. Monoclonal antibodies BK1 and CK1 recognized epitope of IFN-beta and IFN-gamma, specifically. The assay specificity of the biochip was further confirmed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and western blotting. Finally, 88 serum samples from patients treated with rhIFN-alpha2b were simultaneously tested on a single biochip. The result demonstrated that 6.8% (6 of 88 cases) presented positive reactions to anti-IFN-alpha2b antibodies, indicating that the patients under rhIFN-alpha2b therapy produced neutralized antibody against the IFN. The biochip format would offer a competitive alternative tool not only for facilitating characterization of IFN subtypes but also potentially for enabling clinical serum detection of corresponding antibodies directed against IFNs. PMID:20230300

  11. Monoclonal Antibody Shows Promise as Potential Therapeutic for MERS | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    A monoclonal antibody has proven effective in preventing Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) in lab animals, suggesting further development as a potential intervention for the deadly disease in humans, according to new research. MERS is a newly emerged coronavirus first detected in humans in 2012. Most cases have occurred in the Middle East, but the disease has appeared elsewhere. In all, MERS has infected more than 1,700 individuals and killed more than 600, according to the World Health Organization. No vaccines or antiviral therapies currently exist. Several candidate vaccines are being developed, and some have been tested in animal models, a prerequisite to human clinical trials.

  12. Preparation of monoclonal antibody against crocin and its characterization

    OpenAIRE

    Xuan, Lijiang; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Xu, Yaming; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    1999-01-01

    Three crocin-carrier protein conjugates were synthesized and their hapten numbers were determined by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time of flight mass spectrometry. Three monoclonal antibodies against crocin were produced by hybridomas fused with the splenocytes immunized with crocin hemisuccinate-bovine serum albumin conjugate and HAT-sensitive mouse myeloma cell line, P3-X63-Ag8-653. They were identified as IgG2a and IgG2b possessing λ light chain, respectively. Their wide rea...

  13. Monoclonal antibody against a Burkitt lymphoma-associated antigen.

    OpenAIRE

    Wiels, J; Fellous, M.; Tursz, T

    1981-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody, referred to as 38.13, was obtained by fusing murine myeloma cells with Lewis rat splenocytes sensitized with Daudi cells (human Burkitt lymphoma containing Epstein--Barr virus genome but lacking HLA-A, -B, and -C and beta 2-microglobulin molecules at the cell surface). 38.13 antibody was demonstrated to be a rat IgM. By complement-dependent microcytotoxicity and indirect immunofluorescence assays, 38.13 antibody was shown to react specifically with cells derived from Bu...

  14. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies Against Thytoxine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Four hybridoma cell lines (T410D11,T415611, T413A4, T409F6) producing MAbs againstthytoxine(T4) are established by using T4-conjugated bovine serum albumin as an immunogen. These monoclonal antibodies have high affinitiess and specific against T4. The association constants of these MAbs are higher than 108 L/mol. Their cross-reactivities with T3, T2 and rT3 are lower than 0.4%, 0.04% and 0.22%, respectively. The clinical application of the T4 ELISA Kit

  15. Mapping by monoclonal antibody detection of glycosaminoglycans in connective tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Caterson, B; Christner, J E;

    1984-01-01

    glycosaminoglycan (GAG), particularly with respect to self-association and interactions with other extracellular matrix components. Interactions with specific molecules from different connective tissue types, such as the collagens and their associated glycoproteins, could be favoured by particular charge...... organizations on the GAG molecule endowed by the sulphate groups. So far, it has not been possible to identify and map chondroitins of differing sulphation in tissues, but we have now raised three monoclonal antibodies which specifically recognize unsulphated, 4-sulphated and 6-sulphated chondroitin and...

  16. Monoclonal antibodies for the detection of Puccinia striiformis urediniospores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Frøkiær, Hanne; Hearty, Stephen;

    2007-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Pst causes yellow rust disease in wheat plants leading to crop losses. The organism spreads by releasing wind-dispersed urediniospores from infected plants. In this study a library of novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) was developed against Pst urediniospores. Nine m......Ab-producing cell lines were cloned and their cross-reactivities characterised against a panel of airborne fungal spores representing genera commonly found in the same environment as Pst. Two specific mAbs were used to develop a competitive ELISA (Pst mAb4) and a subtractive inhibition ELISA (Pst mAb8). Standard...

  17. A monoclonal antibody to triplex DNA binds to eucaryotic chromosomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, J. S.; Burkholder, G D; Latimer, L J; Haug, B L; Braun, R P

    1987-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (Jel 318) was produced by immunizing mice with poly[d(TmC)].poly[d(GA)].poly[d(mCT) which forms a stable triplex at neutral pH. Jel 318 did not bind to calf thymus DNA or other non pyrimidine.purine DNAs such as poly[d(TG)].poly[d(CA)]. In addition the antibody did not recognize pyrimidine.purine DNAs containing mA (e.g. poly[d(TC)].poly[d(GmA)]) which cannot form a triplex since the methyl group blocks Hoogsteen base-pairing. The binding of Jel 318 to chromosomes was as...

  18. Prevalence of monoclonal gammopathy in HIV patients in 2014

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philippe Genet

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: In non-HIV patients, Monoclonal Gammopathy of Undetermined Significance (MGUS is associated with an increased risk of subsequent development of haematologic malignancies, especially multiple myeloma (MM and it has been recently demonstrated that MM is always preceded by a MGUS phase. A higher prevalence of MGUS and MM has been observed in HIV patients compared to the general population. Nevertheless, it has been shown that MGUS in the context of HIV can disappear with antiretroviral therapy (ART. So, measuring MGUS prevalence in HIV patients in the recent period appears of special interest. Materials and Methods: From January to June 2014, in each out-patient seen in our unit, a serum protein electrophoresis was performed. Results: A total of 393 patients were screened. Eight patients with HIV2 and one patient with HIV1+HIV2 infection were excluded. Finally, 383 patients (173 female, 210 male with HIV1 infection were analyzed. Characteristics of patients were as follows: median age 42.2 years (19.1–79.1, hepatitis B virus (HBV and/or hepatitis C virus (HCV co-infection 47 (18.8%, median CD4 610 (2–1758, CD8 793 (113–4010, presence of a past AIDS event for 88 patients (23%. Median time with HIV infection was 11 years (0–30. Three hundred fifty-nine patients (93.7% were on ART for a median duration of 105 months (0–287. For 320 patients (83.6%, viral load was below 50 viral copies/ml. Twelve cases of MGUS (3.1% were observed: IgG Kappa (five cases, IgG Lambda (five cases, biclonal with two IgG Kappa (one case and in one case, three monoclonal immunoglobulins were observed (IgG Kappa×2+IgG Lambda. The monoclonal immunoglobulin's level was low and below 1 g/l in all cases except two (2.1 and 11.6 g/l. No factor was found to be predictive of the presence of MGUS in particular age, CD4, HBV/HCV co-infection, viral load or ART. Conclusions: In the context of modern ART, the prevalence of MGUS remains above those observed in the

  19. Structural identification and characterization of monoclonal antibodies to rat angiotensinogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balb/c mice were immunised in vivo using angiotensinogen obtained from rats. In order to confirm that an immunoreaction had taken place, the concentration of specific antibodies was determined in selected sera on the basis of a radioimmunological method. In view of the fact that the affinity of the antibodies of the three monoclonal lines isolated here was calculated to be in the order of 107 l/mol it appears that their main field of use in affinity chromatography would be the purification of angiotensinogen from rats. (orig./MG)

  20. Immunosuppression associated with novel chemotherapy agents and monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Vicki A

    2014-11-15

    The introduction of novel agents to the therapeutic armamentarium for oncologic, rheumatologic, and neurologic disorders has resulted in major clinical advances. These agents impact immune function, resulting in a discrete spectrum of infectious complications. Purine analogues and alemtuzumab alter cell-mediated immunity, resulting in opportunistic viral/fungal infections. Herpes zoster incidence increases with bortezomib. Hepatitis B reactivation may occur with rituximab. Cases of progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy have occurred following monoclonal antibody therapy. Tumor necrosis factor-α inhibitor therapy is complicated by tuberculosis reactivation and fungal infections. We summarize the impact of these therapies on pathogenesis and spectrum of infection complicating their usage. PMID:25352632

  1. Characterization of a monoclonal antibody to a novel glycan-dependent epitope in the V1/V2 domain of the HIV-1 envelope protein, gp120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doran, Rachel C; Morales, Javier F; To, Briana; Morin, Trevor J; Theolis, Richard; O'Rourke, Sara M; Yu, Bin; Mesa, Kathryn A; Berman, Phillip W

    2014-11-01

    Recent studies have described several broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bN-mAbs) that recognize glycan-dependent epitopes (GDEs) in the HIV-1 envelope protein, gp120. These were recovered from HIV-1 infected subjects, and several (e.g., PG9, PG16, CH01, CH03) target glycans in the first and second variable (V1/V2) domain of gp120. The V1/V2 domain is thought to play an important role in conformational masking, and antibodies to the V1/V2 domain were recently identified as the only immune response that correlated with protection in the RV144 HIV-1 vaccine trial. While the importance of antibodies to polymeric glycans is well established for vaccines targeting bacterial diseases, the importance of antibodies to glycans in vaccines targeting HIV has only recently been recognized. Antibodies to GDEs may be particularly significant in HIV vaccines based on gp120, where 50% of the molecular mass of the envelope protein is contributed by N-linked carbohydrate. However, few studies have reported antibodies to GDEs in humans or animals immunized with candidate HIV-1 vaccines. In this report, we describe the isolation of a mouse mAb, 4B6, after immunization with the extracellular domain of the HIV-1 envelope protein, gp140. Epitope mapping using glycopeptide fragments and in vitro mutagenesis showed that binding of this antibody depends on N-linked glycosylation at asparagine N130 (HXB2 numbering) in the gp120 V1/V2 domain. Our results demonstrate that, in addition to natural HIV-1 infection, immunization with recombinant proteins can elicit antibodies to the GDEs in the V1/V2 domain of gp120. Although little is known regarding conditions that favor antibody responses to GDEs, our studies demonstrate that these antibodies can arise from a short-term immunization regimen. Our results suggest that antibodies to GDEs are more common than previously suspected, and that further analysis of antibody responses to the HIV-1 envelope protein will lead to the discovery of

  2. Selection of therapeutic H5N1 monoclonal antibodies following IgVH repertoire analysis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Sean A; Moore, Margaret; VandenEkart, Emily J; Roque, Richard P; Bowen, Richard A; Van Hoeven, Neal; Wiley, Steven R; Clegg, Christopher H

    2016-07-01

    The rapid rate of influenza virus mutation drives the emergence of new strains that inflict serious seasonal epidemics and less frequent, but more deadly, pandemics. While vaccination provides the best protection against influenza, its utility is often diminished by the unpredictability of new pathogenic strains. Consequently, efforts are underway to identify new antiviral drugs and monoclonal antibodies that can be used to treat recently infected individuals and prevent disease in vulnerable populations. Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) and the analysis of antibody gene repertoires is a valuable tool for Ab discovery. Here, we describe a technology platform for isolating therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) by analyzing the IgVH repertoires of mice immunized with recombinant H5N1 hemagglutinin (rH5). As an initial proof of concept, 35 IgVH genes were selected using a CDRH3 search algorithm and co-expressed in a murine IgG2a expression vector with a panel of germline murine kappa genes. Culture supernatants were then screened for antigen binding. Seventeen of the 35 IgVH MAbs (49%) bound rH5VN1203 in preliminary screens and 8 of 9 purified MAbs inhibited 3 heterosubtypic strains of H5N1 virus when assayed by HI. Two of these MAbs demonstrated prophylactic and therapeutic activity in virus-challenged mice. This is the first example in which an NGS discovery platform has been used to isolate anti-influenza MAbs with relevant therapeutic activity. PMID:27109194

  3. Monoclonal Antibodies against the MET/HGF Receptor and Its Ligand: Multitask Tools with Applications from Basic Research to Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Prat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies can be seen as valuable tools for many aspects of basic as well as applied sciences. In the case of MET/HGFR, they allowed the identification of truncated isoforms of the receptor, as well as the dissection of different epitopes, establishing structure–function relationships. Antibodies directed against MET extracellular domain were found to be full or partial receptor agonists or antagonists. The agonists can mimic the effects of the different isoforms of the natural ligand, but with the advantage of being more stable than the latter. Thus, some agonist antibodies promote all the biological responses triggered by MET activation, including motility, proliferation, morphogenesis, and protection from apoptosis, while others can induce only a migratory response. On the other hand, antagonists can inhibit MET-driven biological functions either by competing with the ligand or by removing the receptor from the cell surface. Since MET/HGFR is often over-expressed and/or aberrantly activated in tumors, monoclonal antibodies can be used as probes for MET detection or as “bullets” to target MET-expressing tumor cells, thus pointing to their use in diagnosis and therapy.

  4. Killed but Metabolically Active Bacillus anthracis Vaccines Induce Broad and Protective Immunity against Anthrax▿

    OpenAIRE

    Skoble, Justin; Beaber, John W.; Gao, Yi; Lovchik, Julie A.; Sower, Laurie E.; Liu, Weiqun; Luckett, William; Johnny W. Peterson; Calendar, Richard; Daniel A Portnoy; Lyons, C. Rick; Dubensky, Thomas W

    2009-01-01

    Bacillus anthracis is the causative agent of anthrax. We have developed a novel whole-bacterial-cell anthrax vaccine utilizing B. anthracis that is killed but metabolically active (KBMA). Vaccine strains that are asporogenic and nucleotide excision repair deficient were engineered by deleting the spoIIE and uvrAB genes, rendering B. anthracis extremely sensitive to photochemical inactivation with S-59 psoralen and UV light. We also introduced point mutations into the lef and cya genes, which ...

  5. Shigella Outer Membrane Protein PSSP-1 Is Broadly Protective against Shigella Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Jae-Ouk; Rho, Semi; Kim, Su Hee; Kim, Heejoo; Song, Hyo Jin; Kim, Eun Jin; Kim, Ryang Yeo; Kim, Eun Hye; Sinha, Anuradha; Dey, Ayan; Yang, Jae Seung; Song, Man Ki; Nandy, Ranjan Kumar; Czerkinsky, Cecil; Kim, Dong Wook

    2015-01-01

    In developing countries, Shigella is a primary cause of diarrhea in infants and young children. Although antibiotic therapy is an effective treatment for shigellosis, therapeutic options are narrowing due to the emergence of antibiotic resistance. Thus, preventive vaccination could become the most efficacious approach for controlling shigellosis. We have identified several conserved protein antigens that are shared by multiple Shigella serotypes and species. Among these, one antigen induced c...

  6. Reformulation of a thermostable broadly protective recombinant vaccine against human papilloma virus

    OpenAIRE

    Spagnoli, Gloria

    2016-01-01

    The causal relationship between Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) infection and cervical cancer has motivated the development, and further improvement, of prophylactic vaccines against this virus. 70% of cervical cancers, 80% of which in low-resources countries, are associated to HPV16 and HPV18 infection, with 13 additional HPV types, classified as high-risk, responsible for the remaining 30% of tumors. Current vaccines, Cervarix® (GlaxoSmithKline) and Gardasil®(Merk), are based on virus-like part...

  7. Isolation of human monoclonal antibodies from peripheral blood B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinghe; Doria-Rose, Nicole A; Longo, Nancy S; Laub, Leo; Lin, Chien-Li; Turk, Ellen; Kang, Byong H; Migueles, Stephen A; Bailer, Robert T; Mascola, John R; Connors, Mark

    2013-10-01

    Isolation of monoclonal antibodies is an important technique for understanding the specificities and characteristics of antibodies that underlie the humoral immune response to a given antigen. Here we describe a technique for isolating monoclonal antibodies from human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The protocol includes strategies for the isolation of switch-memory B cells from peripheral blood, the culture of B cells, the removal of the supernatant for screening and the lysis of B cells in preparation for immunoglobulin heavy-chain and light-chain amplification and cloning. We have observed that the addition of cytokines IL-2, IL-21 and irradiated 3T3-msCD40L feeder cells can successfully stimulate switch-memory B cells to produce high concentrations of IgG in the supernatant. The supernatant may then be screened by appropriate assays for binding or for other functions. This protocol can be completed in 2 weeks. It is adaptable to use in other species and enables the efficient isolation of antibodies with a desired functional characteristic without prior knowledge of specificity. PMID:24030440

  8. Monkey-derived monoclonal antibodies against Plasmodium falciparum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stanley, H.A.; Reese, R.T.

    1985-09-01

    A system has been developed that allows efficient production of monkey monoclonal antibodies from owl monkeys. Splenocytes or peripheral blood lymphocytes from monkeys immune to the human malarial parasite, Plasmodium falciparum, were fused with P3X63 Ag8.653 mouse myelomas. The resulting hybridomas were screened by an indirect fluorescent antibody test for the production of monkey monoclonal antibodies (mAb) reactive with P. falciparum. Most of the mAb reacted with the P. falciparum merozoites and immunoprecipitated a parasite-derived glycoprotein having a relative molecular weight of 185,000. These mAb gave a minimum of five different immunoprecipitation patterns, thus demonstrating that a large number of polypeptides obtained when parasitized erythrocytes are solubilized share epitopes with this large glycoprotein. In addition, mAb were obtained that reacted with antigens associated with the infected erythrocyte membrane. One of these mAb bound a M/sub r/ 95,000 antigen. Radioimmunoprecipitation assays using /sup 125/T-antibodies were done.

  9. Treating multiple sclerosis with monoclonal antibodies: a 2013 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiß, Annika; Brecht, Isabel; Haarmann, Axel; Buttmann, Mathias

    2013-03-01

    The third part of this in-depth review series on the treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS) with monoclonal antibodies covers the years 2010-2012. The natalizumab section gives a progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy update, focusing on clinically relevant aspects. Furthermore, it outlines problems around natalizumab cessation and current evidence on therapeutic strategies thereafter. Finally, it reviews evidence on Janus-faced modes of natalizumab action besides anti-inflammatory effects, including proinflammatory effects. The section on alemtuzumab critically analyzes recent Phase III results and discusses which patients might be best suited for alemtuzumab treatment, and reviews the long-term immunological impact of this anti-CD52 antibody. The daclizumab section critically summarizes results from the Phase IIb SELECT/SELECTION trial and introduces the Phase III program. The section on anti-CD20 antibodies reviews Phase II results on ocrelizumab and ofatumumab, and discusses current perspectives of these antibodies for MS therapy. Promising recent Phase II results on the anti-IL-17A antibody secukinumab (AIN457) are outlined and a short update on tabalumab (LY2127399) is given. Other highlighted antibodies currently being tested in MS patients include GNbAC1, BIIB033, MOR103 and MEDI-551. Finally, the authors give an update on the role monoclonal antibodies could play in the therapeutic armamentarium for MS in the medium term. PMID:23448220

  10. Monoclonal Antibody Production against Human Spermatozoal Surface Antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Jedi-Tehrani

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: As monoclonal antibodies are potential tools for characterization of soluble or cellular surface antigens, use of these proteins has always been considered in infertility and reproduction research. Therefore, in this study, monoclonal antibodies against human sperm surface antigens were produced. Material and Methods: To produce specific clones against human sperm surface antigens, proteins were extracted using solubilization methods. Balb/c mice were immunized intraperitoneally with the proteins using complete Freund’s adjuvant in the first injection and incomplete Adjuvant in the following booster injections. Hybridoma cells producing ASA were cloned by limiting dilution. Results: Five stable ASA producing hybridoma clones were achieved and their antibody isotypes were determined by ELISA. All the isotypes were of IgG class. Their cross reactivity with rat and mice spermatozoa was examined but they did not have any cross reactivity. Conclusion: The produced antibodies can be used in further studies to characterize and evaluate each of the antigens present on human sperm surface and determining their role in fertilization.

  11. Immunotherapy of hepatoma with a monoclonal antibody against murine endoglin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guang-Hong Tan; Feng-Ying Huang; Hua Wang; Yong-Hao Huang; Ying-Ying Lin; Yue-Nan Li

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To explore the capability of a monoclonal antibody(mAb) against murine endoglin to inhibit tumor angiogenesis and suppression of hepatoma growth in murine models.METHODS: A monoclonal antibody against murine endoglin was purified by affinity chromatography and passively transfused through tail veins in two murine hepatoma models. Tumor volume and survival time were observed at three-day intervals for 48 d. Microvessels in tumor tissues were detected by immunohistochemistry against CD31, and angiogenesis in vivo was determined by alginate encapsulated assay. In addition, tumor cell apoptosis was detected by TUNEL assay.RESULTS: Passive immunotherapy with anti-endoglin mAb could effectively suppress tumor growth, and prolonged the survival time of hepatoma-bearing mice.Angiogenesis was apparently inhibited within the tumor tissues, and the vascularization of alginate beads was also reduced in the mice passively transfused with antiendoglin mAb. In addition, increased apoptotic cells were observed within the tumor tissues from the mice passively transfused with anti-endoglin mAb.CONCLUSION: Passive immunotherapy with antiendoglin mAb effectively inhibits tumor growth via inhibiting tumor angiogenesis and increasing tumor cell apoptosis, which may be highly correlated with the blockage of endoglin-related signal pathway induced by anti-endoglin mAb.

  12. Fingerprinting of Natural Product by Eastern Blotting Using Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroyuki Tanaka

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We succeeded in developing the fingerprint of natural product by eastern blotting using monoclonal antibodies. After developing and separating them on a TLC plate, solasodine glycosides are oxidized by NaIO4 and reacted with a protein to give conjugates which are recognized with anti-solamargine monoclonal antibody (MAb. Anti-solamargine MAb having wide cross-reactivity can stain and detect all solasodine glycosides by fingerprint. Different sensitivity between solamargine and solasonine was observed. The detection limit was 1.6 ng of solasonine. The hydrolysed products of solamargine were determined by fingerprint of eastern blotting compared to their Rf values depending on the sugar number. Fingerprint by eastern blotting using anti-ginsenoside Rb1 MAb distinguished the formula containing ginseng prescribed in traditional Chinese medicine. By double-staining of ginsenosides it is possible to suggest that the staining color shows the pharmacological activity, such as the purple bands indicate ginsenosides having stimulation activity, and the blue color indicated compound like ginsenosides possessed the depression affect for the central nervous system (CNS, respectively.

  13. Immunolocalization of neuroblastoma using radiolabeled monoclonal antibody UJ13A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The monoclonal antibody UJ13A, raised after immunization of mice with human fetal brain, recognized an antigen expressed on human neuroblastoma cell lines and fresh tumors. Antibody was purified and radiolabeled with iodine isotopes using chloramine-T. In preclinical studies, 125I-labeled UJ13A was injected intravenously into nude mice bearing xenografts of human neuroblastoma. Radiolabeled UJ13A uptake by the tumors was four to 23 times greater than that by blood. In control animals, injected with a similar quantity of a monoclonal antibody known not to bind to neuroblastoma cells in vitro (FD44), there was no selective tumor uptake. Nine patients with histologically confirmed neuroblastoma each received 100 to 300 micrograms UJ13A radiolabeled with 1 to 2.8 mCi 123I or 131I. Sixteen positive sites were visible on gamma scans 1 to 7 days after injection: 15 were primary or secondary tumor sites, and one was a false positive; there were two false negatives. In two of the 15 positive sites, tumor had not been demonstrated by other imaging techniques; these were later confirmed as areas of malignant infiltration. No toxicity was encountered

  14. Detection of grass carp reovirus (GCRV) with monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongli, Jing; Lifeng, Zhang; Zhenzhen, Fang; Lipu, Xu; Min, Zhang; Na, Wang; Yulin, Jiang; Xiangmei, Lin

    2014-04-01

    Grass carp reovirus (GCRV) is a pathogen that causes hemorrhagic disease of grass carp. It is the most serious infectious disease of carp and causes serious losses of fingerlings of grass carp and black carp. In this study, a recombinant VP4, one of the viral core proteins, was constructed with a histidine tag and expressed at a high level in E. coli, and the expressed protein was mainly found in the form of inclusion bodies. The expressed VP4 protein was recognized by an anti-His-tag monoclonal antibody and goat anti-GCRV serum. Four monoclonal antibodies (16B7, 39E12, 13C3 and 14D1) against the recombinant VP4 protein were produced. These MAbs did not react with any of the tested viruses or fish cells lines in the ELISA tests except GCRV. In western blotting analysis, a protein band was observed when the recombinant VP4 protein of GCRV was used as an antigen, but a 68-kDa band was observed when natural capsid proteins of GCRV were used as antigens. Furthermore, a sandwich ELISA was developed for detection of GCRV. The detection limit of the test was 105 TCID50 of GCRV per mL. PMID:24122108

  15. 10 CFR 33.13 - Requirements for the issuance of a Type A specific license of broad scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... radiological safety officer who is qualified by training and experience in radiation protection, and who is... the adequacy of facilities and equipment, training and experience of the user, and the operating or... of broad scope. 33.13 Section 33.13 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC...

  16. 10 CFR 33.14 - Requirements for the issuance of a Type B specific license of broad scope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... officer who is qualified by training and experience in radiation protection, and who is available for... the adequacy of facilities and equipment, training and experience of the user, and the operating or... of broad scope. 33.14 Section 33.14 Energy NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION SPECIFIC DOMESTIC...

  17. Welfare Schemes and Social Protection in India

    OpenAIRE

    Raghbendra Jha

    2013-01-01

    This paper provides a broad overview of welfare schemes in India and their impact on social protection during a period of high economic growth. It summarizes India's performance with respect to select economic and social indicators relative to select low and middle income countries in the Asia Pacific region. It further overviews trends in some key select economic and social indicators for India and discusses India's attainment in Social Protection relative to an index of such protection prov...

  18. Cross-protection by conventional influenza vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Roos, A.L.E.

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis, we explore whether the protective efficacy of a trivalent virosomal seasonal influenza vaccine (TVV) can be broadened and thereby increase pandemic preparedness until more broadly protective influenza vaccines may become available. Chapter 2 examines the ability of a vaccination regimen comprising multiple immunizations to improve the cross-protective efficacy of TVV in mice. Chapter 3 explores whether priming a TVV with vaccine homologous HA DNA can improve its efficacy of in...

  19. Social Protection, Decent Work and Development

    OpenAIRE

    Saith, Ashwani

    2004-01-01

    This paper argues that the notion of decent work – and social protection, which is one of its four constituents – needs to be considered within a broad development context, rather than in a narrow focus on the workplace or enterprise alone. This study places social protection within the wider context of Decent Work, and relates both concepts to economic and social development. The paper concludes that failure to take account of this in designing policy would reduce social protection intervent...

  20. Method of rapid production of hybridomas expressing monoclonal antibodies on the cell surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meagher, Richard B.; Laterza, Vince

    2006-12-12

    The present invention relates to genetically altered hybridomas, myelomas and B cells. The invention also relates to utilizing genetically altered hybridomas, myelomas and B cells in methods of making monoclonal antibodies. The present invention also provides populations of hybridomas and B cells that can be utilized to make a monoclonal antibody of interest.

  1. 76 FR 63317 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: The Development of Human Anti-Mesothelin Monoclonal...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-10-12

    ... monoclonal antibody m912 (SM-101) as an antibody therapy for the treatment of pancreatic cancer, ovarian... Human Anti-Mesothelin Monoclonal Antibodies for the Treatment of Human Cancers AGENCY: National... the antibody for the treatment of mesothelin-expressing cancers, including mesothelioma, lung...

  2. Inhibition of lipoxygenase activity in lentil protoplasts by monoclonal antibodies introduced into the cells via electroporation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Maccarrone, M.; Veldink, G.A.

    1992-01-01

    The isolation of lentil protoplasts and the transfer of anti-lipoxygenase monoclonal antibodies into plant protoplasts by electroporation is reported. The dependence of the efficiency of monoclonal antibody incorporation on the field strength is shown as well. The transferred immunoglobulins retaine

  3. Current status of cancer immunodetection with radiolabeled human monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Jager, R; Abdel-Nabi, H; Serafini, A; Pecking, A; Klein, J L; Hanna, M G

    1993-04-01

    The use of radiolabeled murine monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) for cancer immunodetection has been limited by the development of human antimouse antibodies (HAMA). Human monoclonal antibodies do not elicit a significant human antihuman (HAHA) response. The generation and production of human monoclonal antibodies met with technical difficulties that resulted in delaying their clinical testing. Human monoclonal antibodies of all isotypes have been obtained. Most were immunoglobulin (Ig) M directed against intracellular antigens. Two antibodies, 16.88 (IgM) and 88BV59 (IgG3k), recognize different epitopes on a tumor-associated antigen, CTA 16.88, homologous to cytokeratins 8, 18, and 19. CTA 16.88 is expressed by most epithelial-derived tumors including carcinomas of the colon, pancreas, breast, ovary, and lung. The in vivo targeting by these antibodies is related to their localization in nonnecrotic areas of tumors. Repeated administration of 16.88 over 5 weeks to a cumulative dose of 1,000 mg did not elicit a HAHA response. Two of 53 patients developed a low titer of HAHA 1 to 3 months after a single administration of 88BV59. Planar imaging of colorectal cancer with Iodine-131 (131I)-16.88 was positive in two studies in 9 of 12 and 16 of 20 patients preselected by immunohistochemistry. Tumors less than 2 cm in diameter are usually not detected. The lack of immunogenicity and long tumor residence time (average = 17 days) makes 16.88 a good candidate for therapy. Radioimmunlymphoscintigraphy with indium-111 (111In)-LiLo-16.88 administered by an intramammary route was used in the presurgical staging of primary breast cancer. The negative predictive value of lymph node metastases for tumors less than 3 cm was 90.5%. Planar and single photon emission computed tomography imaging of colorectal carcinoma with technetium-99m (99mTc) 88BV59 was compared with computed tomography (CT) scan in 36 surgical patients. The antibody scan was more sensitive than the CT scan in detecting

  4. Fragments of the V1/V2 domain of HIV-1 glycoprotein 120 engineered for improved binding to the broadly neutralizing PG9 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales, Javier F; Yu, Bin; Perez, Gerardo; Mesa, Kathryn A; Alexander, David L; Berman, Phillip W

    2016-09-01

    The V1/V2 domain of the HIV-1 envelope protein gp120 possesses two important epitopes: a glycan-dependent epitope recognized by the prototypic broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibody (bN-mAb), PG9, as well as an epitope recognized by non-neutralizing antibodies that has been associated with protection from HIV infection in the RV144 HIV vaccine trial. Because both of these epitopes are poorly immunogenic in the context of full length envelope proteins, immunization with properly folded and glycosylated fragments (scaffolds) represents a potential way to enhance the immune response to these specific epitopes. Previous studies showed that V1/V2 domain scaffolds could be produced from a few selected isolates, but not from many of the isolates that would be advantageous in a multivalent vaccine. In this paper, we used a protein engineering approach to improve the conformational stability and antibody binding activity of V1/V2 domain scaffolds from multiple diverse isolates, including several that were initially unable to bind the prototypic PG9 bN-mAb. Significantly, this effort required replicating both the correct glycan structure as well as the β-sheet structure required for PG9 binding. Although scaffolds incorporating the glycans required for PG9 binding (e.g., mannose-5) can be produced using glycosylation inhibitors (e.g., swainsonine), or mutant cell lines (e.g. GnTI(-) 293 HEK), these are not practical for biopharmaceutical production of proteins intended for clinical trials. In this report, we describe engineered glycopeptide scaffolds from three different clades of HIV-1 that bind PG9 with high affinity when expressed in a wildtype cell line suitable for biopharmaceutical production. The mutations that improved PG9 binding to scaffolds produced in normal cells included amino acid positions outside of the antibody contact region designed to stabilize the β-sheet and turn structures. The scaffolds produced address three major problems in HIV vaccine

  5. Resistance of nanobacteria isolated from urinary and kidney stones to broad-spectrum antibiotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Sardarabadi

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Nanoscopic life forms called Nanobacteria or calcifying nanoparticles (CNP are unconventional agents. These novel organisms are very small (0.1 to 0.5 microns and possess unusual properties such as high resistance to heat and routine antimicrobial agents. Nanobacteria are 100 times smaller than bacteria and protected by a shell of apatite, so they could be as candidate for emerging and progress of in vivo pathological calcification. In this study, the inhibitory effect of broad-spectrum antibiotics on growth of these new forms of life has been investigated.Powdered urinary and kidney stones were demineralized with HCl and neutralized with appropriate buffers and became filtered. Finally suspension was incubated in DMEM medium with Fetal Bovine Serum (FBS and broad-spectrum antibiotics (100U/ml for penicillin and 100μg/ml for streptomycin for 60 days.In the presence of broad-spectrum antibiotics, Scanning Electron Micrographs (SEM showed a spherical shape of these nanobacteria. Also, Energy Dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS showed a pick for calcium and phosphor. Transmission Electron Microscopy (TEM results illustrated cover around the nanobacteria.The growth of calcifying nanoparticles after adding the broad-spectrum antibiotics may be due to their apatite hard shells supporting them against penetration of the antibiotics.

  6. First Membrane Proximal External Region-Specific Anti-HIV1 Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal IgA1 Presenting Short CDRH3 and Low Somatic Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benjelloun, Fahd; Oruc, Zeliha; Thielens, Nicole; Verrier, Bernard; Champier, Gael; Vincent, Nadine; Rochereau, Nicolas; Girard, Alexandre; Jospin, Fabienne; Chanut, Blandine; Genin, Christian; Cogné, Michel; Paul, Stephane

    2016-09-01

    Mucosal HIV-1-specific IgA have been described as being able to neutralize HIV-1 and to block viral transcytosis. In serum and saliva, the anti-HIV IgA response is predominantly raised against the envelope of HIV-1. In this work, we describe the in vivo generation of gp41-specific IgA1 in humanized α1KI mice to produce chimeric IgA1. Mice were immunized with a conformational immunogenic gp41-transfected cell line. Among 2300 clones screened by immunofluorescence microscopy, six different gp41-specific IgA with strong recognition of gp41 were identified. Two of them have strong neutralizing activity against primary HIV-1 tier 1, 2, and 3 strains and present a low rate of somatic mutations and autoreactivity, unlike what was described for classical gp41-specific IgG. Epitopes were identified and located in the hepted repeat 2/membrane proximal external region. These Abs could be of interest in prophylactic treatment to block HIV-1 penetration in mucosa or in chronically infected patients in combination with antiretroviral therapy to reduce viral load and reservoir. PMID:27481846

  7. Machine Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, R.

    2016-01-01

    The protection of accelerator equipment is as old as accelerator technology and was for many years related to high-power equipment. Examples are the protection of powering equipment from overheating (magnets, power converters, high-current cables), of superconducting magnets from damage after a quench and of klystrons. The protection of equipment from beam accidents is more recent. It is related to the increasing beam power of high-power proton accelerators such as ISIS, SNS, ESS and the PSI ...

  8. Application of GP5 protein to develop monoclonal antibody against porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Hong; Cheng, Yan; Wu, Jin-yang; He, Jian-hui; Shang, You-jun; Liu, Xiang-tao

    2011-08-01

    In this study, a panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus(PRRSV), named as 8C9 and4B4, were produced by fusing SP2/0 myeloma cells and spleen cells of BALB/c mice immunized with the PRRSV (TCID(50)=5.5), screened by the indirect ELISA and subjected to several limiting dilutions. mAbs were then identified by biological characterization. Among the two fusion cell strains, 8C9 belonged to the IgG1 subclass and 4B4 belonged to the IgG2a subclass. The titers in cell culture supernatant and abdomen liquor reached to 1:10(4)and 1:10(5), respectively. The specificity test indicated that the two cells had specific reactions for the PRRSV and GP5 protein respectively, and no reaction with Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) or Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV). The molecular weights of the heavy chain and light chain were about 45.0 kDa and 25.0 kDa, respectively. In neutralization activity tests, the results showed that the prepared mAb 4B4 can protect 50% of cells with no CPE in dilution up to 1:512, but mAB 8C9 has no neutralization activities to PRRSV. PMID:21847758

  9. Application of GP5 Protein to Develop Monoclonal Antibody against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Tian; Yan Cheng; Jin-yang Wu; Jian-hui He; You-jun Shang; Xiang-tao Liu

    2011-01-01

    In this study,a panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus(PRRSV),named as 8C9 and4B4,were produced by fusing SP2/0 myeloma cells and spleen cells of BALB/c mice immunized with the PRRSV (TCID50=5.5),screened by the indirect ELISA and subjected to several limiting dilutions.mAbs were then identified by biological characterization.Among the two fusion cell strains,8C9 belonged to the IgG1 subclass and 4B4 belonged to the IgG2a subclass.The titers in cell culture supernatant and abdomen liquor reached to 1:104and 1:105,respectively.The specificity test indicated that the two cells had specific reactions for the PRRSV and GP5 protein respectively,and no reaction with Classical swine fever virus (CSFV) or Swine vesicular disease virus (SVDV).The molecular weights of the heavy chain and light chain were about 45.0 kDa and 25.0 kDa,respectively.In neutralization activity tests,the results showed that the prepared mAb 4B4 can protect 50% of cells with no CPE in dilution up to 1:512,but mAB 8C9 has no neutralization activities to PRRSV.

  10. Mouse in Vivo Neutralization of Escherichia coli Shiga Toxin 2 with Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larry H. Stanker

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC food contaminations pose serious health concerns, and have been the subject of massive food recalls. STEC has been identified as the major cause of the life-threatening complication of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. Besides supportive care, there currently are no therapeutics available. The use of antibiotics for combating pathogenic E. coli is not recommended because they have been shown to stimulate toxin production. Clearing Stx2 from the circulation could potentially lessen disease severity. In this study, we tested the in vivo neutralization of Stx2 in mice using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. We measured the biologic half-life of Stx2 in mice and determined the distribution phase or t1/2 α to be 3 min and the clearance phase or t1/2 β to be 40 min. Neutralizing mAbs were capable of clearing Stx2 completely from intoxicated mouse blood within minutes. We also examined the persistence of these mAbs over time and showed that complete protection could be passively conferred to mice 4 weeks before exposure to Stx2. The advent of better diagnositic methods and the availability of a greater arsenal of therapeutic mAbs against Stx2 would greatly enhance treatment outcomes of life threatening E. coli infections.

  11. Identification of an immunogenic protein of Giardia lamblia using monoclonal antibodies generated from infected mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jael Quintero

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The humoral immune response plays an important role in the clearance of Giardia lamblia. However, our knowledge about the specific antigens of G. lamblia that induce a protective immune response is limited. The purpose of this study was to identify and characterise the immunogenic proteins of G. lamblia in a mouse model. We generated monoclonal antibodies (moAbs specific to G. lamblia (1B10, 2C9.D11, 3C10.E5, 3D10, 5G8.B5, 5F4, 4C7, 3C5 and 3C6 by fusing splenocytes derived from infected mice. Most of these moAbs recognised a band of ± 71 kDa (5G8 protein and this protein was also recognised by serum from the infected mice. We found that the moAbs recognised conformational epitopes of the 5G8 protein and that this antigen is expressed on the cell surface and inside trophozoites. Additionally, antibodies specific to the 5G8 protein induced strong agglutination (> 70-90% of trophozoites. We have thus identified a highly immunogenic antigen of G. lamblia that is recognised by the immune system of infected mice. In summary, this study describes the identification and partial characterisation of an immunogenic protein of G. lamblia. Additionally, we generated a panel of moAbs specific for this protein that will be useful for the biochemical and immunological characterisation of this immunologically interesting Giardia molecule.

  12. Curcumin for the prevention of progression in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance: A word of caution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vermorken, A J M; Zhu, J; VAN DE Ven, W J M; Cui, Y; Fryns, J P

    2010-03-01

    A recent pilot study found that curcumin, in certain patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), decreases the paraprotein load and the urinary N-telopeptide of type 1 collagen bone turnover marker. While this result is encouraging, the easy availability of the food component turmeric, containing curcumin, may lead to intake by MGUS patients without medical supervision. Curcumin is generally considered safe. Nevertheless, it is known that curcumin inhibits interleukin-12 production in dendritic cells, thereby dampening the Th1 response. It is also well established that Th1 cells are protective against invading pathogens and tumors. The present study describes a case in which bronchitis developed upon turmeric intake for gastrointestinal complaints. While one case does not provide proof of curcumin toxicity, a thorough literature overview suggests that turmeric may have an immunosuppressive effect, notably in patients with a compromised immune system. A warning against the use of turmeric or curcumin without medical supervision in immunocompromised patients seems therefore very opportune. Patients with MGUS, in whom the levels of non-affected immunoglobulins are reduced, should be carefully monitored for toxicity when curcumin is administered. PMID:22993538

  13. Human monoclonal antibodies to West Nile virus identify epitopes on the prM protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hybridoma cell lines (2E8, 8G8 and 5G12) producing fully human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) specific for the pre-membrane (prM) protein of West Nile virus (WNV) were prepared using a human fusion partner cell line, MFP-2, and human peripheral blood lymphocytes from a blood donor diagnosed with WNV fever in 2004. Using site-directed mutagenesis of a WNV-like particle (VLP) we identified 4 amino acid residues in the prM protein unique to WNV and important in the binding of these hMAbs to the VLP. Residues V19 and L33 are important epitopes for the binding of all three hMAbs. Mutations at residue, T20 and T24 affected the binding of hMAbs, 8G8 and 5G12 only. These hMAbs did not significantly protect AG129 interferon-deficient mice or Swiss Webster outbred mice from WNV infection.

  14. A Potent and Broad Neutralizing Antibody Recognizes and Penetrates the HIV Glycan Shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pejchal, Robert; Doores, Katie J.; Walker, Laura M.; Khayat, Reza; Huang, Po-Ssu; Wang, Sheng-Kai; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Ramos, Alejandra; Crispin, Max; Depetris, Rafael; Katpally, Umesh; Marozsan, Andre; Cupo, Albert; Maloveste, Sebastien; Liu, Yan; McBride, Ryan; Ito, Yukishige; Sanders, Rogier W.; Ogohara, Cassandra; Paulson, James C.; Feizi, Ten; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Wong, Chi-Huey; Moore, John P.; Olson, William C.; Ward, Andrew B.; Poignard, Pascal; Schief, William R.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A. (UWASH); (Progenics); (ICL); (Weill-Med); (NIH); (JSTA); (Scripps); (Oxford)

    2015-10-15

    The HIV envelope (Env) protein gp120 is protected from antibody recognition by a dense glycan shield. However, several of the recently identified PGT broadly neutralizing antibodies appear to interact directly with the HIV glycan coat. Crystal structures of antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) PGT 127 and 128 with Man{sub 9} at 1.65 and 1.29 angstrom resolution, respectively, and glycan binding data delineate a specific high mannose-binding site. Fab PGT 128 complexed with a fully glycosylated gp120 outer domain at 3.25 angstroms reveals that the antibody penetrates the glycan shield and recognizes two conserved glycans as well as a short {beta}-strand segment of the gp120 V3 loop, accounting for its high binding affinity and broad specificify. Furthermore, our data suggest that the high neutralization potency of PGT 127 and 128 immunoglobulin Gs may be mediated by cross-linking Env trimers on the viral surface.

  15. Broad and potent HIV-1 neutralization by a human antibody that binds the gp41-120 interface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jinghe; Kang, Byong H.; Pancera, Marie; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Tong, Tommy; Feng, Yu; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Laub, Leo; Sliepen, Kwinten; van Gils, Marit J.; de la Peña, Alba Torrents; Derking, Ronald; Klasse, Per-Johan; Migueles, Stephen A.; Bailer, Robert T.; Alam, Munir; Pugach, Pavel; Haynes, Barton F.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Binley, James M.; Ward, Andrew B.; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.; Connors, Mark

    2014-01-01

    The isolation of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is providing important insights regarding the specificities that underlie broad neutralization of HIV-1 (reviewed in1). Here we report a broad and extremely potent HIV-specific mAb, termed 35O22, which binds novel HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) epitope. 35O22 neutralized 62% of 181 pseudoviruses with an IC50<50 μg/ml. The median IC50 of neutralized viruses was 0.033 μg/ml, among the most potent thus far described. 35O22 did not bind monomeric forms of Env tested, but did bind the trimeric BG505 SOSIP.664. Mutagenesis and a reconstruction by negative-stain electron microscopy of the Fab in complex with trimer revealed it to bind a conserved epitope, which stretched across gp120 and gp41. The specificity of 35O22 represents a novel site of vulnerability on HIV Env, which serum analysis indicates to be commonly elicited by natural infection. Binding to this new site of vulnerability may thus be an important complement to current mAb-based approaches to immunotherapies, prophylaxis, and vaccine design. PMID:25186731

  16. Ultra-broad bandwidth parametric amplification at degeneracy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limpert, J; Aguergaray, C; Montant, S; Manek-Hönninger, I; Petit, S; Descamps, D; Cormier, E; Salin, F

    2005-09-19

    We report on a novel approach of ultra-broad bandwidth parametric amplification around degeneracy. A bandwidth of up to 400 nm centered around 800 nm is amplified in a BBO crystal by using chirped pump pulses with a bandwitdth as broad as 10 nm. A supercontinuum signal is generated in a microstructured fiber, having to first order a quadratic chirp, which is necessary to ensure temporal overlap of the interacting waves over this broad bandwidth. Furthermore, we discuss the potential of this approach for an octave-spanning parametric amplification. PMID:19498762

  17. Broadly Neutralizing Antibody Responses in a Large Longitudinal Sub-Saharan HIV Primary Infection Cohort.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Landais

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs are thought to be a critical component of a protective HIV vaccine. However, designing vaccines immunogens able to elicit bnAbs has proven unsuccessful to date. Understanding the correlates and immunological mechanisms leading to the development of bnAb responses during natural HIV infection is thus critical to the design of a protective vaccine. The IAVI Protocol C program investigates a large longitudinal cohort of primary HIV-1 infection in Eastern and South Africa. Development of neutralization was evaluated in 439 donors using a 6 cross-clade pseudo-virus panel predictive of neutralization breadth on larger panels. About 15% of individuals developed bnAb responses, essentially between year 2 and year 4 of infection. Statistical analyses revealed no influence of gender, age or geographical origin on the development of neutralization breadth. However, cross-clade neutralization strongly correlated with high viral load as well as with low CD4 T cell counts, subtype-C infection and HLA-A*03(- genotype. A correlation with high overall plasma IgG levels and anti-Env IgG binding titers was also found. The latter appeared not associated with higher affinity, suggesting a greater diversity of the anti-Env responses in broad neutralizers. Broadly neutralizing activity targeting glycan-dependent epitopes, largely the N332-glycan epitope region, was detected in nearly half of the broad neutralizers while CD4bs and gp41-MPER bnAb responses were only detected in very few individuals. Together the findings suggest that both viral and host factors are critical for the development of bnAbs and that the HIV Env N332-glycan supersite may be a favorable target for vaccine design.

  18. Environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The question of environment protection related to the use of nuclear energy aiming to power generation, based on the harmonic concept of economic and industrial development, preserving the environment, is discussed. A brief study of environmental impacts for some energy sources, including nuclear energy, to present the systems of a nuclear power plant which aim at environmental protection, is done. (M.C.K.)

  19. Expression of class 5 antigens by meningococcal strains obtained from patients in Brazil and evaluation of two new monoclonal antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth N. De Gaspari

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available Determining the profile of antigen expression among meningococci is important for epidemiologic surveillance and vaccine development. To this end, two new mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs have been derived against Neisseria meningitidis proteins (class 5. The MAbs were reactive against outer membrane antigens and were bactericidal. Selected anti-class 5 MAbs [(5.1-3E6-2; (5.3-3BH4-C7; (5.4-1BG11-C7; (5.5-3DH-F5G9 also 5F1F4-T3(5.c], and the two new monoclonal antibodies C14F10Br2 (5.8 and 7F11B5Br3 (5.9, were then tested against different meningococcal strains, (63 strains of serogroup A, 60 strains of serogroup C (from 1972 to 1974; and 136 strains of serogroup B (from 1992 meningococci. Our results demonstrated that the expression of class 5 proteins in the N. meningitidis B Brazilian strains studied is highly heterogeneous. The serotypes and subtypes of B:4:P1.15, B:4:P1.9, B:4:P1.7, B:4:P1.3, B:4:P1.14, B:4:P1.16, B:4:NT, and B:NT:NT were detected in N. meningitidis B serogroups.The strains C:2a:P1.2 and A:4.21:P1.9 were dominant in the C and A serogroups, respectively. Serogroup B organisms expressed the class 5 epitopes 5.4 (18%, 5.5 (22%, 5.8 (3.6%, 5.9 (8.0% and 5c (38%. Serogroup C expressed class 5 epitopes 5.1 (81%, 5.4 (35%, 5.5 (33% and 5.9 (5.0%; and serogroup A showed reactivity directed at the class 5 protein 5c (47%; and reactivity was present with the new monoclonal antibody, 5.9 (5.5%. We conclude that the two new MAbs are useful in detecting important group B, class 5 antigens, and that a broad selection of serogroup B, class 5 proteins would be required for an effective vaccine based on the class 5 proteins.

  20. Information booklet on personal protective equipment: ear protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High noise levels are associated with a number of industrial operations and machines. Excessive exposures to high levels of noise can cause irreparable damage to hearing, in addition to some other physiological and psychological damages. In order to protect the hearing capacity of all the persons working in the industries, the noise exposure should be kept well within the specified permissible limits. Wherever the noise exposures exceed the permissible values, control measures should be adopted to reduce the effective exposures. Engineering control measures such as institution of enclosures, process change and use of personal protective equipment for ear protection are employed as noise control measure. The ear protectors are broadly classified into the following: 1) ear plugs (permanent, disposable), 2) ear muffs, 3) helmets having special ear protection provisions. Criteria for selecting ear protectors for nuclear facilities are given. (M.K.V.). 1 annexure, 1 appendix

  1. Interaction with the 5D3 monoclonal antibody is regulated by intramolecular rearrangements but not by covalent dimer formation of the human ABCG2 multidrug transporter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ozvegy-Laczka, Csilla; Laczkó, Rozália; Hegedus, Csilla;

    2008-01-01

    Human ABCG2 is a plasma membrane glycoprotein working as a homodimer or homo-oligomer. The protein plays an important role in the protection/detoxification of various tissues and may also be responsible for the multidrug-resistant phenotype of cancer cells. In our previous study we found that the 5......D3 monoclonal antibody shows a function-dependent reactivity to an extracellular epitope of the ABCG2 transporter. In the current experiments we have further characterized the 5D3-ABCG2 interaction. The effect of chemical cross-linking and the modulation of extracellular S-S bridges on the...

  2. Negotiating Protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bille, Mikkel

    This thesis examines protection against risks as material and social phenomena among the Ammarin tribe in Petra - a settled Bedouin community in southern Jordan. By examining the active role of material culture that is often disregarded in risk studies, the thesis discusses how protective...... architecture, the social use of luminosity, prophylactic items, saint veneration, Qur'anic items, and heritage production. The thesis challenges the preoccupation with "meaning" in material culture studies, by focusing on conceptualizations of "presence" and "absence" as equally important to protective...... strategies are entangled in cultural, religious, and national identities. Using ethnographic methods, I investigate protection against selected risks: harm from evil eyes, violation of domestic sanctity, and cultural heritage dilapidation. Protection against these risks is examined through studies of...

  3. The Hemagglutinin Stem-Binding Monoclonal Antibody VIS410 Controls Influenza Virus-Induced Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranovich, Tatiana; Jones, Jeremy C; Russier, Marion; Vogel, Peter; Szretter, Kristy J; Sloan, Susan E; Seiler, Patrick; Trevejo, Jose M; Webby, Richard J; Govorkova, Elena A

    2016-04-01

    Most cases of severe influenza are associated with pulmonary complications, such as acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS), and no antiviral drugs of proven value for treating such complications are currently available. The use of monoclonal antibodies targeting the stem of the influenza virus surface hemagglutinin (HA) is a rapidly developing strategy for the control of viruses of multiple HA subtypes. However, the mechanisms of action of these antibodies are not fully understood, and their ability to mitigate severe complications of influenza has been poorly studied. We evaluated the effect of treatment with VIS410, a human monoclonal antibody targeting the HA stem region, on the development of ARDS in BALB/c mice after infection with influenza A(H7N9) viruses. Prophylactic administration of VIS410 resulted in the complete protection of mice against lethal A(H7N9) virus challenge. A single therapeutic dose of VIS410 given 24 h after virus inoculation resulted in dose-dependent protection of up to 100% of mice inoculated with neuraminidase inhibitor-susceptible or -resistant A(H7N9) viruses. Compared to the outcomes in mock-treated controls, a single administration of VIS410 improved viral clearance from the lungs, reduced virus spread in lungs in a dose-dependent manner, resulting in a lower lung injury score, reduced the extent of the alteration in lung vascular permeability and protein accumulation in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, and improved lung physiologic function. Thus, antibodies targeting the HA stem can reduce the severity of ARDS and show promise as agents for controlling pulmonary complications in influenza. PMID:26787699

  4. Classification method for heterogeneity in monoclonal cell population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aburatani, S.; Tashiro, K.; Kuhara, S.

    2015-09-01

    Monoclonal cell populations are known to be composed of heterogeneous subpopulations, thus complicating the data analysis. To gain clear insights into the mechanisms of cellular systems, biological data from a homogeneous cell population should be obtained. In this study, we developed a method based on Latent Profile Analysis (LPA) combined with Confirmatory Factor Analysis (CFA) to divide mixed data into classes, depending on their heterogeneity. In general cluster analysis, the number of measured points is a constraint, and thereby the data must be classified into fewer groups than the number of samples. By our newly developed method, the measured data can be divided into groups depending on their latent effects, without constraints. Our method is useful to clarify all types of omics data, including transcriptome, proteome and metabolic information.

  5. Monoclonal antibodies for the detection of Puccinia striiformis urediniospores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter; Frøkiær, Hanne; Hearty, Stephen; O'Kennedy, Richard; Hejgaard, Jørn; Nicolaisen, Mogens; Justesen, Annemarie Fejer

    2007-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Pst causes yellow rust disease in wheat plants leading to crop losses. The organism spreads by releasing wind-dispersed urediniospores from infected plants. In this study a library of novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) was developed against Pst urediniospores. Nine m......Ab-producing cell lines were cloned and their cross-reactivities characterised against a panel of airborne fungal spores representing genera commonly found in the same environment as Pst. Two specific mAbs were used to develop a competitive ELISA (Pst mAb4) and a subtractive inhibition ELISA (Pst mAb8). Standard...... curves for both assays had good intra- and interday reproducibility. The subtractive inhibition ELISA had greater sensitivity with a detection limit of 1.5 105 spores ml1. Cross-reactivity studies of Pst mAb8 in the subtractive inhibition ELISA, showed reaction with other Puccinia spores only, suggesting...

  6. [Continuous perfusion culture hybridoma cells for production of monoclonal antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mi, Li; Li, Ling; Feng, Qiang; Yu, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Zhi-Nan

    2002-05-01

    Hybridoma cells were cultured by continuous perfusion in Fibra-Cel of 5L packed-bed bioreactor for 22 days in low serum or serum-free media. The corresponded amino acids were fed and serum concentration was decreased by analyzing glucose concentration, oxygen uptake rate, secretary antibody amount and amino acids concentration in culture supernatant. Comparing with continuous perfusion culture that amino acids were not fed, antibody amount of production was increased about 2-3 times. The inoculated cell density was 2.5 x 10(5) cells/mL, while the final cell density was 8.79 x 10(8) cells/mL. Antibody production was reached 295 mg/L/d at average level, and the highest level was reached 532 mg/L/d. These results provided a primary mode of enlarge culture for monoclonal antibody industralization. PMID:12192875

  7. Parenteral Treatment of Multiple Sclerosis: The Advent of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singer, Barry A

    2016-04-01

    Improved disease control is critical for enhancing the lives of those living with multiple sclerosis. With specific immunologic targets, monoclonal antibody (mAb) treatments are highly effective options for relapsing forms of multiple sclerosis. The mechanism, efficacy, and current safety profiles are detailed for the two mAb therapies, natalizumab and alemtuzumab, with regulatory approval in multiple countries. Daclizumab, which targets the interleukin-2 receptor, and ocrelizumab, which depletes B cells, have convincing phase 3 clinical trial data and may very well provide new options in the near future. Trial results of other B-cell-directed therapies, ofatumumab and rituximab, are reviewed. Less-frequent dosing of glatiramer acetate and interferon β-1a highlight developments in the first generation of parenteral immunomodulatory therapy. Remyelination using mAbs has moved into clinical trials with the first agents, anti-LINGO-1, rHIgM22, and anti-SEMA 4D. PMID:27116720

  8. Design and manufacture of monoclonal antibodies for radioimmunotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Appropriate design and manufacture of monoclonal antibodies is fundamental to their use for radioimmunotherapy. Besides the right selection of antibody specificity and affinity, recombinant antibodies can be designed to simplify manufacture and minimise unwanted side effects. Although many innovative new technologies have been developed in recent years, antibodies are still most commonly produced from mammalian cells and purified by column chromatography. Purification methods have to be designed and validated to remove potential contaminants, especially retroviruses which in principle might be present in mammalian cell lines. Adherence to relevant Good Manufacturing Practice is mandatory in the production of any medicinal product and there are numerous guidelines regarding the manufacture of antibodies. This article outlines some methods used for fermentation, purification and quality control of antibodies intended for radiolabelling

  9. A monoclonal antibody to pestviruses in bovine and ovine sera

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An enzyme-linked immunoabsorbent assay (ELISA) has been developed to defeat antibodies to pestviruses in bovine and ovine sera. Single sera from 211 cattle and 22 sheep from 7 different farms were tested using ELISA and Serum Neutralisation Test (SNT). 17 Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) directed against P80, gp48 and gp53 were tested for ability to coat ELISA plates and capture the bovine viral diarrhea antigen. 5 mabs(WB 103, WB, 105, WB 112 against P80 kDa protein, WB 210 and WB 214 directed against gp48 and gp 53 kDa protein. Specific antibody to BVDV was detected by rabbit anti-bovine and anti-ovine IgG antisera. The quantitative correlation between two tests was good

  10. Preparation and Characteristic Identification of Monoclonal Antibody Against Sulfamethazine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DING Liangjun; LI Jichang; FU Rui; ZHOU Yanjun; HUO Guicheng

    2006-01-01

    Two artificial antigens were synthesized successfully by diazotizing method, sulfamethazine(SM2)-human serum albumin (HSA) was used for the immunogen, and SM2-ovalbumin(OVA) was used for the coating antigen.The coupled reaction was successful by confirmation of the ultraviolet scanning spectrometer, and the conjugation ratio of SM2 with HSA and OVA was 9:1 and 15:1, respectively. Using cell-fusion and limiting dilution method to reclone 5times to get 3 hybridoma strains, which could stably secret monoclonal antibody (Mab), named CB7, BC4 and BB12. The subtype of BC4 Mab was IgG1 and chain, the molecular weight was 162 ku, the numbers of chromosomal were about 90,the affinity constant was 6.1 × 1012 M-1. No cross reactivity was seen between the Mab and the other 4 sulfonamides, as well as the 2 carries proteins. The Mab antibody had excellent stability.

  11. Iodination of monoclonal antibodies, proteins and peptide using iodogen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of the iodinating reagent 1,3,4,6-tetrachloro-3α, 6α-diphenylglycholuril (Iodogen) to label monoclonal antibodies (McAbs). Proteins and peptides was invesrigated with McAbs identified as mouse IgG and IgM, arginine-vasopressin (AVP), glucagon (Glu), human insulin(hI) and albumin(Alb). The labeled products were purified by gel chromatography and their immunoreactivity were detected by RIA or IRMA> Comparison of the Iodogen method with the lactoperoxides and chloramine-T methods showed that the Iodogen method had a number of advantages: 1) technically simpler ; 2) a high labeling efficiency could be obtained; 3) the immunoreactivity of the products was minimally affected; 4) the products were stable for up to 4 months

  12. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies directed against human thyroid stimulating hormone

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibodies directed against human thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) were obtained from hybrid myelomas, following fusion of mouse NSI myeloma cells with mouse spleen cells. Ten different antibodies were obtained from 4 separate fusions. Eight antibodies were of the IgG1 subclass. Affinities of antibodies for TSH were in the range 2 x 108-5 x 1010 M-1. Five of the antibodies were specific for TSH and did not react with LH, FSH or hCG. The remaining antibodies reacted with all these hormones and were assumed to recognise their common (α) subunit. The 5 specific antibodies fell into 3 subgroups recognising distinct antigenic determinants, whereas the 5 non-specific antibodies recognised a single determinant or closely related set of sites. It is concluded that these antibodies should be valuable reagents for use in sensitive and specific two-site immunoradiometric assays. (Auth.)

  13. Production of monoclonal antibody against Salmonella typhimurium by hybridoma technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this research S.typhimurium killed by irradiation was used as antigen was prepared by exposing the bacteria to gamma rays from 60Cobalt source with the dose of 2.5 kGy, Specific lymphocyte cell were obtained by immunizing 3 months old Balb-C mice with the antigen. the immunizations were done by subcutan route with the interval of 2 weeks. The hybridoma cells were made by fussing the specific lymphocyte cells with the myeloma cells. It was found that the animals (immunization + irradiation with a low dose of I Gy ) yielded monoclonal antibody with higher value (5.15 mg/ml) than the control animals (3.25 mg/ml). (author)

  14. Characteristics of Monoclonal Antibody Against Infectious Bursal Disease Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Thirteen strains of monoclonal antibodies (McAbs) against infectious bursal disease virus (IBDV) were obtained by using hybridoma technique and their characteristics were studied by double immunodiffusion,en- zyme- linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), virus neutralization test (VNT) and Western- blotting assay (WBA). The result showed that nine of the thirteen McAbs belonged to IgG class and four of them belonged to IgM class. No crossreactions were detected betwween the McAbs and Newscastle disease virus (NDV) ,in- fectious bronchitis virus(IBV) and Marek's disease virus(MDV). All of McAbs were positively specific reac- tive with IBDV and five of them can neutralize viral infectivity. Their recognized epitopes of the neutralizing McAbs were all presented on VP2 of the IBDV.

  15. Characteristics of Monoclonal Antibody Against Infectious Bursal Disease Virus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiYan-Fei; WangWei; 等

    1999-01-01

    Thirteen strains of monoclonal antibodies(McAbs) against infections bursal disease virus(IBDV) were obtained by using hydridoma technique and their characteristics were studied by double immunodiffusion,enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay(ELISA),virus neutralization test(VNT) and Western-blotting assay (WBA).The result showed that nine of the thirteen McAbs belonged to IgG class and four of them belonged to IgM class.No crossreactions were detected betwween the McAbs and Newscastle disease virus (NDV),infectious bronchitis virus(IBV) and Marek's disease virus(MDV).All of McAbs were positively specific reactive with IBDV and five of them can neutralize viral infectivity.Their recognized epitopes of the neutralizing McAbs were all presented on VP2 of the IBDV.

  16. Novel CD20 monoclonal antibodies for lymphoma therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cang Shundong

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Rituximab (RTX, a monoclonal antibody (mAb against CD20, has been widely used for lymphoma therapy. RTX in combination with cyclophosphamide /doxorubicin /vincristine /prednisone (R-CHOP remains the standard frontline regimen for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. However, suboptimal response and /or resistance to rituximab have remained a challenge in the therapy of B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma (NHL. Novel agents are under active clinical trials. This review will summarize the latest development in new mAbs against CD20, which include second-generation mAbs, ofatumumab, veltuzumab (IMMU-106, ocrelizumab (PRO70769, and third-generation mAbs, AME-133v (ocaratuzumab, PRO131921 and GA101 (obinutumumab.

  17. Localization of melanoma with radiolabelled monoclonal antibody fragments and iodoamphetamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liewendahl, K.; Kairento, A.L.; Lindroth, L.; Pyroenen, S.; Franssila, K.; Virkkunen, P.; Asko-Seljavaara, S.; Launes, J.

    1986-10-01

    In two melanoma patients, metastases accumulated both /sup 99m/Tc-labelled monoclonal anti-tumor F(ab')/sub 2/ fragments and N-isopropyl-p-(/sup 123/I)-iodoamphetamine. Small metastatic deposits were localized only by labelled antibody, for which a higher target-to-nontarget ratio was observed than for radioiodoamphetamine, indicating that immunoscintigraphy may be the more sensitive method. In these two patients positive immunohistochemical staining for the antibody used was observed, whereas in a third patient, with no concentration of labelled antibody, the staining result was negative showing the specificity of the immunoscintigraphy findings. It is possible that the accumulation of radio-iodoamphetamine is due to binding to melanin but this is not certain as tissue samples from one of the two patients with positive scintigrams did not contain stainable melanin.

  18. Preparation and Identification of Monoclonal Antibodies Against Vibrio anguillarum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Shiyong(陈师勇); Zhang Peijun; Mo Zhaolan; Zhang Zhendong; Zou Yuxia; Xu Yongli

    2004-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against V.anguillarum strain M3 are prepared, and their isotypes are also characterized. Among them, C1C5 is the only Mab which does not crossreact with other eleven non-V.anguillarum strains. The proteinase K digestion test shows that the epitopes recognized by C1C5, C6C3 and C6C32 Mabs contained protein. The periodate oxidation test showed that the epitopes recognized by Mabs except C1C5 are glycosylated. In addition, results of additivity test indicate that the epitopes recognized by C6C3 and C6C32 Mabs are similar, and quite different from those recognized by Mab C1C5.

  19. Discovery and characterization of hydroxylysine in recombinant monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Qing; Moore, Benjamin; Beardsley, Richard L

    2016-01-01

    Tryptic peptide mapping analysis of a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO)-expressed, recombinant IgG1 monoclonal antibody revealed a previously unreported +16 Da modification. Through a combination of MS(n) experiments, and preparation and analysis of known synthetic peptides, the possibility of a sequence variant (Ala to Ser) was ruled out and the presence of hydroxylysine was confirmed. Post-translational hydroxylation of lysine was found in a consensus sequence (XKG) known to be the site of modification in other proteins such as collagen, and was therefore presumed to result from the activity of the CHO homolog of the lysyl hydroxylase complex. Although this consensus sequence was present in several locations in the antibody sequence, only a single site on the heavy-chain Fab was found to be modified. PMID:26651858

  20. Monoclonal Antibodies Attached to Carbon Nanotube Transistors for Paclitaxel Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonbae; Lau, Calvin; Richardson, Mark; Rajapakse, Arith; Weiss, Gregory; Collins, Philip; UCI, Molecular Biology; Biochemistry Collaboration; UCI, Departments of Physics; Astronomy Collaboration

    Paclitaxel is a naturally-occurring pharmaceutical used in numerous cancer treatments, despite its toxic side effects. Partial inhibition of this toxicity has been demonstrated using weakly interacting monoclonal antibodies (3C6 and 8A10), but accurate monitoring of antibody and paclitaxel concentrations remains challenging. Here, single-molecule studies of the kinetics of antibody-paclitaxel interactions have been performed using single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. The devices were sensitized with single antibody attachments to record the single-molecule binding dynamics of paclitaxel. This label-free technique recorded a range of dynamic interactions between the antibody and paclitaxel, and it provided sensitive paclitaxel detection for pM to nM concentrations. Measurements with two different antibodies suggest ways of extending this working range and uncovering the mechanistic differences among different antibodies.

  1. Monoclonal Antibodies as Treatment Modalities in Head and Neck Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Radhakrishnan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The standard treatments of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC causes disturbance to normal surrounding tissues, systemic toxicities and functional problems with eating, speaking, and breathing. With early detection, many of these cancers can be effectively treated, but treatment should also focus on retaining the function of the proximal nerves, tissues and vasculature surrounding the tumor. With current research focused on understanding pathogenesis of these cancers in a molecular level, targeted therapy using monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs, can be modified and directed towards tumor genes, proteins and signal pathways with the potential to reduce unfavorable side effects of current treatments. This review will highlight the current MoAb therapies used in HNSCC, and discuss ongoing research efforts to develop novel treatment agents with potential to improve efficacy, increase overall survival (OS rates and reduce toxicities.

  2. Kinetic epitope mapping of monoclonal antibodies raised against the Yersinia pestis virulence factor LcrV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Read, Thomas; Olkhov, Rouslan V; Williamson, E Diane; Shaw, Andrew M

    2014-10-01

    Five monoclonal antibodies, mAb7.3, mAb29.3, mAb46.3, mAb12.3 and mAb36.3, raised to the LcrV virulence factor from Yersinia pestis were characterised for their Fab affinity against the purified protein and their Fc affinity to Protein A/G as a proxy for the FcγR receptor. Kinetic measurements were performed label-free in a localised particle plasmon array reader. The Fc-ProteinA/G complex first-order half-life was determined for each antibody and fell in the range of 0.8-3.8h. The Fab first-order half-lives had ranged from 3.4 to 9.2h although two antibodies, mAb12.3 and mAb36.3, showed low affinity interactions. Competitive binding studies of mixtures of the Fab-active antibodies were performed to measure the relative binding efficiency of one antibody in the presence of the other. A geometric relative positioning of the epitopes of mAb7.3, mAb29.3 and mAb46.3 was determined based on the footprint locus of the antibody and the percentage of competitive binding. The two known protective antibodies mAb7.3 and mAb29.3 showed greater interference, indicating epitopes close to one another compared to the non-protective mAb46.3 antibody. The Fab-Fc complex half-life screen and epitope mapping are potentially useful tools in the screening of therapeutic antibodies or vaccine candidates. PMID:25461137

  3. Radioimmunoassay of human growth hormone: characterization of a monoclonal antibody

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The introduction of cell-hybridization techniques by Koehler and Milstein in 1975 to produce monoclonal antibodies (MA) was a definite improvement in methodological tools of radioimmunoassay, quite apart from all other applications of this technique in immunohistochemistry, affinity chromatography, target-directed drug delivery systems etc. MAs would ideally be suited in RIAs, when the specificity is the crucial aspect of the determination. However, for reasons which are not completely understood, assays with MAs very often lack the attribute of being highly sensitive. Despite several reports in the literature on MAs against human growth hormone (HGH), none of these seem sensitive enough to be of use in clinical chemistry, where a too strongly marked specificity may even be unwanted. However, from the scientific point of view, MAs against polypeptide hormones are of great interest. An MA to HGH was developed with a sensitivity limit of 0.2 ng. The titre of the ascites fluid is higher than 1:106 and the specificity against human placental lactogen, human prolactin and rat growth hormone is nearly complete. A critical step of the RIA procedure is the separation of bound and free hormone. A combination of human immunoglobulin (Sandoglobulin) with polyethylene glycol gives optimal results. A Scatchard plot reveals an affinity constant of 4x10-11M-bar and a maximal binding capacity of 2x108cpm/μL. In conclusion, our monoclonal antibody represents an excellent investigational tool for endocrine research and it seems to be the most sensitive and specific MA to HGH described to date. However, for practical clinical applications, there seems to be little advantage of an MA over a conventional polyclonal antiserum. (author)

  4. Immunophenotypic studies of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    McKenna Robert W

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS is a common plasma cell dyscrasia, comprising the most indolent form of monoclonal gammopathy. However, approximately 25% of MGUS cases ultimately progress to plasma cell myeloma (PCM or related diseases. It is difficult to predict which subset of patients will transform. In this study, we examined the immunophenotypic differences of plasma cells in MGUS and PCM. Methods Bone marrow specimens from 32 MGUS patients and 32 PCM patients were analyzed by 4-color flow cytometry, using cluster analysis of ungated data, for the expression of several markers, including CD10, CD19, CD20, CD38, CD45, CD56 and surface and intracellular immunoglobulin light chains. Results All MGUS patients had two subpopulations of plasma cells, one with a "normal" phenotype [CD19(+, CD56(-, CD38(bright +] and one with an aberrant phenotype [either CD19(-/CD56(+ or CD19(-/CD56(-]. The normal subpopulation ranged from 4.4 to 86% (mean 27% of total plasma cells. Only 20 of 32 PCM cases showed an identifiable normal subpopulation at significantly lower frequency [range 0–32%, mean 3.3%, p 90% CD19(- plasma cells showed progression of disease, whereas none of the cases with >10% CD19(+ plasma cells evolved to PCM. Conclusion MGUS cases with potential for disease progression appeared to lack CD19 expression on >90% of their plasma cells, displaying an immunophenotypic profile similar to PCM plasma cells. A higher relative proportion of CD19(+ plasma cells in MGUS may be associated with a lower potential for disease progression.

  5. Laboratory testing in monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance (MGRS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Nelson; Barnidge, David R; Hutchison, Colin A

    2016-06-01

    Recently, monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance (MGRS) reclassified all monoclonal (M) gammopathies that are associated with the development of a kidney disease but do not meet the definition of symptomatic multiple myeloma (MM) or malignant lymphoma. The purpose was to distinguish the M gammopathy as the nephrotoxic agent independent from the clonal mass. The diagnosis of MGRS obviously depends on the detection of the M-protein. More importantly, the success of treatment is correlated with the reduction of the M-protein. Therefore, familiarity with the M-protein tests is a must. Protein electrophoresis performed in serum or urine is inexpensive and rapid due to automation. However, poor sensitivity especially with the urine is an issue particularly with the low-level M gammopathy often encountered with MGRS. Immunofixation adds to the sensitivity and specificity but also the cost. Serum free light chain (sFLC) assays have significantly increased the sensitivity of M-protein detection and is relatively inexpensive. It is important to recognize that there is more than one assay on the market and their results are not interchangeable. In addition, in certain diseases, immunofixation is more sensitive than sFLC. Finally, novel techniques with promising results are adding to the ability to identify M-proteins. Using the time of flight method, the use of mass spectrometry of serum samples has been shown to dramatically increase the sensitivity of M-protein detection. In another technique, oligomeric LCs are identified on urinary exosomes amplifying the specificity for the nephrotoxic M-protein. PMID:27107835

  6. Cell line profiling to improve monoclonal antibody production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Sohye; Ren, Da; Xiao, Gang; Daris, Kristi; Buck, Lynette; Enyenihi, Atim A; Zubarev, Roman; Bondarenko, Pavel V; Deshpande, Rohini

    2014-04-01

    Mammalian cell culture performance is influenced by both intrinsic (genetic) and extrinsic (media and process) factors. In this study, intrinsic capacity of various monoclonal antibody-producing Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cell lines was compared by exposing them to the same culture condition. Microarray-based transcriptomics and LC-MS/MS shotgun proteomics technologies were utilized to obtain expression landscape of different cell lines. Specific transcripts and proteins correlating with productivity, growth rate and cell size have been identified. The proteomics analysis results showed a strong correlation between the intracellular protein expression levels of the recombinant DHFR and productivity. In contrast, neither the light chain nor the heavy chain of the recombinant monoclonal antibody showed correlation to productivity. Other top ranked proteins which demonstrated positive correlation to productivity included the adaptor protein complex subunits AP3D1and AP2B2, DNA repair protein DDB1 and the ER translocation complex component, SRPR. The subunits of molecular chaperone T-complex protein 1 and the regulator of mitochondrial one-carbon metabolism MTHFD2 showed negative correlation to productivity. The transcriptomics analysis has identified the regulators of calcium signaling, Tmem20 and Rcan1, as the top ranked genes displaying positive and negative correlation to productivity, respectively. For the second part of the study, the principal component analysis (PCA) was generated to view the underlying global structure of the expression data. A clear division and expression polarity was observed between the two distinct clusters of cell lines, independent of link to productivity or any other traits examined. The primary component of the PCA generated from either transcriptomics or proteomics data displayed a strong correlation to cell size and doubling time, while none of the main principal components showed correlation to productivity. Our findings suggest

  7. Preparation of monoclonal antibodies against radiation-induced protein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We obtained the 6 monoclonal antibodies against gamma-induced proteins of Deinococcus radiodurans, and these antibodies were designated as Mab-3F, 4B, 4D, 4F, 4G and 12G. Using these antibodies, we investigated the relations between gamma-induced proteins and other stress protein in strain R1, and the induction of proteins were compared among strain R1, resistant mutant (rec1) and radiosensitive mutant (rec30). We found new 6 proteins recognized by these monoclonal antibodies which were induced after gamma-irradiation especially in strain R1 and rec 1, but not induced in strain rec30. We suppose that these proteins participate in repair of DNA damages including double strand breaks caused by gamma-irradiation. One of them was around 46kDa protein band recognized by Mab-12G, and this protein was so induced in a large quantity after irradiation that the protein could detect by gold staining. In addition to this observation, we found some proteins which were induced in R1 and rec 1 by gamma-irradiation and other stress, but not in strain rec30, such as 31kDa protein band recognized by Mab-3F, 4B and 4G, and other 11 proteins which were especially induced in irradiated strain R1. The latter proteins might be reinforcement factor to radioresistance such as GroE and DnaK, or participant in repair of damage by gamma-irradiation in strain R1. (author)

  8. Broad Spectrum Sanitizing Wipes with Food Additives Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microcide proposes to develop novel multipurpose non-toxic sanitizing wipes that are aqueous based, have shelf life of 3-5 years, have broad spectrum microbicidal...

  9. AGN Broad Line Regions Scale with Bolometric Luminosity

    CERN Document Server

    Trippe, Sascha

    2015-01-01

    The masses of supermassive black holes in active galactic nuclei (AGN) can be derived spectroscopically via virial mass estimators based on selected broad optical/ultraviolet emission lines. These estimates commonly use the line width as a proxy for the gas speed and the monochromatic continuum luminosity as a proxy for the radius of the broad line region. However, if the size of the broad line region scales with bolometric rather than monochromatic AGN luminosity, mass estimates based on different emission lines will show a systematic discrepancy which is a function of the color of the AGN continuum. This has actually been observed in mass estimates based on H-alpha / H-beta and C IV lines, indicating that AGN broad line regions indeed scale with bolometric luminosity. Given that this effect seems to have been overlooked as yet, currently used single-epoch mass estimates are likely to be biased.

  10. A competitive solid-phase radioimmunoassay for translational factors employing monoclonal antibodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibodies produced by the hybridoma techniques were purified by chromatography on DEAE Affi-Gel blue, and covalently coupled to Affi-Gel 10 to purify their antigens. The purified components were used to develop a sensitive competitive radioimmune assay for the quantitative determination of translational factors, as described here with a monoclonal antibody directed against yeast elongation factor 3. Antigen was adsorbed to polyvinyl chloride plastic surfaces and a limiting concentration of monoclonal antibody necessary to bind to the adsorbed antigen was determined. Varying concentrations of purified antigen and of samples containing unknown amounts of antigen were then mixed with the limiting concentration of monoclonal antibody, prior to or at the same time as the reaction of the antibody with the surface-adsorbed antigen. The amount of monoclonal antibody that bound to the surface-adsorbed antigen was determined with a second antibody, radioactive goat anti-mouse antibody. The addition of the free antigen preparations to the monoclonal antibody served to compete for the antibody with the antigen adsorbed to the plastic surfaces. The concentration of antigen in the unknown samples was estimated from the titration curves obtained with varying concentrations of pure antigen. This technique did not require isotopic labeling, modification or derivatization of the monoclonal antibody or its antigen. (Auth.)

  11. Packaging and Performance of 980nm Broad Area Semiconductor Lasers

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    High power broad area semiconductor lasers have found increasing applications in pumping of solid state laser systems and fiber amplifiers, frequency doubling, medical systems and material processing.Packaging including the assembly design, process and thermal management, has a significant impact on the optical performance and reliability of a high power broad area laser. In this paper, we introduce the package structures and assembling process of 980nm broad area lasers and report the performances including output power, thermal behavior and far fields.We will report two types of high power broad area laser assemblies.One is a microchannel liquid cooled assembly and the other is a conduction cooled CT-mount assembly. Optical powers of 15W and 10W were achieved from a 980nm broad area laser with a 120 μ m stripe width in a microchannel liquid cooled assembly and conduction cooled CT-mount assembly, respectively.Furthermore,a high power of 6.5W out of fiber was demonstrated from a pigtailed, fully packaged butterfly-type module without TEC (Thermoelectric cooler).The measurement results showed that thermal management is the key in not only improving output power, but also significantly improving beam divergence and far field distribution.The results also showed that the die attach solder can significant impact the reliability of high power broad area lasers and that indium solder is not suitable for high power laser applications due to electromigration at high current densities and high temperatures.

  12. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A NRPB leaflet in the 'At-a-Glance' series explains in a simple but scientifically accurate way what radiation is, the biological effects and the relative sensitivity of different parts of the human body. The leaflet then discusses radiation protection principles, radiation protection in the UK and finally the effectiveness of this radiation protection as judged by a breakdown of the total dose received by an average person in the UK, a heavy consumer of Cumbrian seafood, an average nuclear industry worker and an average person in Cornwall. (UK)

  13. Isolation of monoclonal antibodies specific for products of avian oncogene myb.

    OpenAIRE

    Evan, G. I.; Lewis, G K; Bishop, J M

    1984-01-01

    We isolated a series of monoclonal antibodies which were raised against a bacterially expressed protein, bp37v-myb, and coded for by part of the avian v-myb gene. These monoclonal antibodies recognized a range of antigenic specificities on bp37v-myb, and this was reflected in their differing specificities for the gene products of the v-myb, c-myb, and E26 viral oncogenes. One monoclonal antibody recognized, in addition to the v-myb and c-myb gene products, a conserved nuclear protein found in...

  14. Radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work define procedures and controls about ionizing radiations. Between some definitions it found the following topics: radiation dose, risk, biological effects, international radioprotection bodies, workers exposure, accidental exposure, emergencies and radiation protection

  15. Eye Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of protection is wise indeed. WHAT ARE THE DANGERS ASSOCIATED WITH WELDING? Acetylene torch welding and cutting ... welding masks with filtering lenses. Mail order and Internet–based safety suppliers are also an option. National ...

  16. Environmental Protection

    OpenAIRE

    Berger, Regina; Diewald, Martin

    2003-01-01

    Nature protection and conservation are fundamental elements of environmental protection as this is an important part of the human existence; it is a vital component of the present and future harmonious socio economic development. The ecosystems and the organisms, like the marine and atmospheric terrestrial resources used by humankind, must be administrated in such a way that their optimum and continuous productivity may be assured and maintained. It is necessary to take rigorous measures agai...

  17. Radiation Protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Major achievements of SCK-CEN's Radiation Protection Department in 2000 are described. The main areas for R and D of the department remain neutron dosimetry and neutron activation analysis, safeguards information handling and non-destructive assay techniques. Further activities include low-level radioactivity measurements in environmental and biological samples and radiation protection research. Finally, achievements in decision strategy research and social sciences in nuclear research are reported

  18. Induction of broadly neutralizing H1N1 influenza antibodies by vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chih-Jen; Boyington, Jeffrey C; McTamney, Patrick M; Kong, Wing-Pui; Pearce, Melissa B; Xu, Ling; Andersen, Hanne; Rao, Srinivas; Tumpey, Terrence M; Yang, Zhi-Yong; Nabel, Gary J

    2010-08-27

    The rapid dissemination of the 2009 pandemic influenza virus underscores the need for universal influenza vaccines that elicit protective immunity to diverse viral strains. Here, we show that vaccination with plasmid DNA encoding H1N1 influenza hemagglutinin (HA) and boosting with seasonal vaccine or replication-defective adenovirus 5 vector encoding HA stimulated the production of broadly neutralizing influenza antibodies. This prime/boost combination increased the neutralization of diverse H1N1 strains dating from 1934 to 2007 as compared to either component alone and conferred protection against divergent H1N1 viruses in mice and ferrets. These antibodies were directed to the conserved stem region of HA and were also elicited in nonhuman primates. Cross-neutralization of H1N1 subtypes elicited by this approach provides a basis for the development of a universal influenza vaccine for humans. PMID:20647428

  19. Synergistic effect of broad-spectrum Sunscreens and antihistamines in the control of idiopathic solar urticaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, A.; Wulf, Hans Chr.

    2008-01-01

    Background: It can be difficult to provide patients with idiopathic solar urticaria adequate protection from sunlight. In a nonrandomized controlled trial, we used a standardized phototest procedure to determine the effects of using sunscreen and antihistamine to control idiopathic solar urticaria....... The patients were then treated with a high-protection, broad-spectrum sunscreen and a nonsedative antihistamine alone and in combination and underwent similar phototesting. The use of sunscreen allowed the patients to tolerate much higher doses of UV radiation (32-38 times the MUD on untreated skin......). Antihistamine use did not increase the patients' MUD but did suppress wheal formation and itch, and only immediate erythema sharply located in the irradiated areas occurred. The combination of sunscreen and antihistamine acted synergistically and increased the tolerance to UV radiation markedly (80-267 times...

  20. Targeting N-Glycan Cryptic Sugar Moieties for Broad-Spectrum Virus Neutralization: Progress in Identifying Conserved Molecular Targets in Viruses of Distinct Phylogenetic Origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denong Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Identifying molecular targets for eliciting broadly virus-neutralizing antibodies is one of the key steps toward development of vaccines against emerging viral pathogens. Owing to genomic and somatic diversities among viral species, identifying protein targets for broad-spectrum virus neutralization is highly challenging even for the same virus, such as HIV-1. However, viruses rely on host glycosylation machineries to synthesize and express glycans and, thereby, may display common carbohydrate moieties. Thus, exploring glycan-binding profiles of broad-spectrum virus-neutralizing agents may provide key information to uncover the carbohydrate-based virus-neutralizing epitopes. In this study, we characterized two broadly HIV-neutralizing agents, human monoclonal antibody 2G12 and Galanthus nivalis lectin (GNA, for their viral targeting activities. Although these agents were known to be specific for oligomannosyl antigens, they differ strikingly in virus-binding activities. The former is HIV-1 specific; the latter is broadly reactive and is able to neutralize viruses of distinct phylogenetic origins, such as HIV-1, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV, and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV. In carbohydrate microarray analyses, we explored the molecular basis underlying the striking differences in the spectrum of anti-virus activities of the two probes. Unlike 2G12, which is strictly specific for the high-density Man9GlcNAc2Asn (Man9-clusters, GNA recognizes a number of N-glycan cryptic sugar moieties. These include not only the known oligomannosyl antigens but also previously unrecognized tri-antennary or multi-valent GlcNAc-terminating N-glycan epitopes (Tri/m-Gn. These findings highlight the potential of N-glycan cryptic sugar moieties as conserved targets for broad-spectrum virus neutralization and suggest the GNA-model of glycan-binding warrants focused investigation.

  1. Radiological protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work is directed to all those people related with the exercise of the radiological protection and has the purpose of providing them a base of knowledge in this discipline so that they can make decisions documented on technical and scientist factors for the protection of the personnel occupationally exposed, the people in general and the environment during the work with ionizing radiations. Before de lack of a text on this matter, this work seeks to cover the specific necessities of our country, providing a solid presentation of the radiological protection, included the bases of the radiations physics, the detection and radiation dosimetry, the radiobiology, the normative and operational procedures associates, the radioactive wastes, the emergencies and the transport of the radioactive material through the medical and industrial applications of the radiations, making emphasis in the relative particular aspects to the radiological protection in Mexico. The book have 16 chapters and with the purpose of supplementing the given information, are included at the end four appendixes: 1) the radioactive waste management in Mexico, 2-3) the Mexican official standards related with the radiological protection, 4) a terms glossary used in radiological protection. We hope this book will be of utility for those people that work in the investigation and the applications of the ionizing radiations. (Author)

  2. Bid Optimization in Broad-Match Ad auctions

    CERN Document Server

    Even-dar, Eyal; Mirrokni, Vahab; Muthukrishnan, S; Nadav, Uri

    2009-01-01

    Ad auctions in sponsored search support ``broad match'' that allows an advertiser to target a large number of queries while bidding only on a limited number. While giving more expressiveness to advertisers, this feature makes it challenging to optimize bids to maximize their returns: choosing to bid on a query as a broad match because it provides high profit results in one bidding for related queries which may yield low or even negative profits. We abstract and study the complexity of the {\\em bid optimization problem} which is to determine an advertiser's bids on a subset of keywords (possibly using broad match) so that her profit is maximized. In the query language model when the advertiser is allowed to bid on all queries as broad match, we present an linear programming (LP)-based polynomial-time algorithm that gets the optimal profit. In the model in which an advertiser can only bid on keywords, ie., a subset of keywords as an exact or broad match, we show that this problem is not approximable within any ...

  3. Structural basis of hepatitis C virus neutralization by broadly neutralizing antibody HCV1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Leopold; Giang, Erick; Robbins, Justin B.; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A.; Law, Mansun (Scripps)

    2012-10-29

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects more than 2% of the global population and is a leading cause of liver cirrhosis, hepatocellular carcinoma, and end-stage liver diseases. Circulating HCV is genetically diverse, and therefore a broadly effective vaccine must target conserved T- and B-cell epitopes of the virus. Human mAb HCV1 has broad neutralizing activity against HCV isolates from at least four major genotypes and protects in the chimpanzee model from primary HCV challenge. The antibody targets a conserved antigenic site (residues 412-423) on the virus E2 envelope glycoprotein. Two crystal structures of HCV1 Fab in complex with an epitope peptide at 1.8-{angstrom} resolution reveal that the epitope is a {beta}-hairpin displaying a hydrophilic face and a hydrophobic face on opposing sides of the hairpin. The antibody predominantly interacts with E2 residues Leu{sup 413} and Trp{sup 420} on the hydrophobic face of the epitope, thus providing an explanation for how HCV isolates bearing mutations at Asn{sup 415} on the same binding face escape neutralization by this antibody. The results provide structural information for a neutralizing epitope on the HCV E2 glycoprotein and should help guide rational design of HCV immunogens to elicit similar broadly neutralizing antibodies through vaccination.

  4. Protected Areas - Protected Federal Lands

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — The Federal Lands data consists of land areas that are run and maintained by U.S. Governmental authorities and are considered protected.The Department of Natural...

  5. NCI Requests Targets for Monoclonal Antibody Production and Characterization - Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    In an effort to provide well-characterized monoclonal antibodies to the scientific community, NCI's Antibody Characterization Program requests cancer-related protein targets for affinity production and distribution.

  6. Improved detection of Pneumocystis carinii by an immunofluorescence technique using monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orholm, M; Holten-Andersen, W; Lundgren, Jens Dilling

    1990-01-01

    To assess whether a recently developed indirect immunofluorescent stain using monoclonal antibodies was more sensitive in detecting Pneumocystis carinii than the combination of Giemsa and methenamine silver nitrate stains which has routinely been used in the laboratory, 88 lavage fluid specimens...... and 34 induced sputum specimens were examined. All specimens were stained by five techniques: immunofluorescence using a combination of three monoclonal antibodies (from the National Institutes of Health, USA), immunofluorescence using a single monoclonal antibody (from Dakopatts), Giemsa, methenamine...... silver nitrate and toluidine blue O. Immunofluorescence using the monoclonal antibodies from the NIH was significantly more sensitive than any other single staining method and than the combination of Giemsa and methenamine silver nitrate staining. The study also showed that the cytospin centrifuge was...

  7. Discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies targeting G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkinson, Trevor C I

    2016-06-15

    The development of recombinant antibody therapeutics is a significant area of growth in the pharmaceutical industry with almost 50 approved monoclonal antibodies on the market in the US and Europe. Despite this growth, however, certain classes of important molecular targets have remained intractable to therapeutic antibodies due to complexity of the target molecules. These complex target molecules include G-protein-coupled receptors and ion channels which represent a large potential target class for therapeutic intervention with monoclonal antibodies. Although these targets have typically been addressed by small molecule approaches, the exquisite specificity of antibodies provides a significant opportunity to provide selective modulation of these target proteins. Given this opportunity, substantial effort has been applied to address the technical challenges of targeting these complex membrane proteins with monoclonal antibodies. In this review recent progress made in the strategies for discovery of functional monoclonal antibodies for these challenging membrane protein targets is addressed. PMID:27284048

  8. Anti-Mesothelin Monoclonal Antibodies for the Treatment of Cancer | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Molecular Biology is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to further co-develop monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of mesothelin-expressing cancers.

  9. Metal chelate conjugated monoclonal antibodies, wherein the metal is an α emitter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Methods of manufacturing and purifying metal chelate conjugated monoclonal antibodies are described, wherein the chelated metal emits alpha radiation. The conjugates are suited for therapeutic uses being substantially free of nonchelated radiometal. (author)

  10. CHARACTERIZATION OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES AGAINST BOTH PIG AND RABBIT ZONA PELLUCIDA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    OURU-QIANG

    1989-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were raised against both pig and rabbit zona pellucida with a dual immunization protocol employing heat soluble pig zona (HSPZ) and heat soluble rabbit zona (HSRZ), Of the 140 wells screencd, 12 wells were positive to

  11. Use of monoclonal antibodies against avian retroviral protein p19 for competitive radioimmunoassay and immunodiffusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibodies were used in competitive binding assays to investigate the arrangement of three epitopes on protein p19 of the avian myeloblastosis virus (AMV). It is reasoned that if the epitopes recognized by two monoclonal antibodies are physically close, the binding of one antibody will sterically block the binding of the other; conversely no blocking will occur if the epitopes are sufficiently distant. The results of these competitive binding assays demonstrated the presence of two distinct antigenic sites on protein p19. The monoclonal antibodies against protein p19 of AMV were also tested in gel double immunodiffusion. Since p19 protein shows strong tendency to aggregate, it was not surprising that clear precipitin lines with these monoclonal antibodies were obtained. (author)

  12. Immunolocation of antisperm monoclonal antibody 6B10 and corresponding antigen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    高绍荣; 胡国俊; 段崇文; 刘辉; 韩之明; 宋祥芬; 陈大元

    1999-01-01

    An antisperm monoclonal antibody 6B10 was produced by hybridoma technique of the isotype IgG. The monoclonal antibody was purified by means of ammonium sulfate precipitation and protein A-Sepharose Cl-4B affinity chromatography. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis was used to evaluate the purity of the antibody. Evaluation of the sperm acrosomal status was determined by chlortetracycline (CTC) staining. It was found that monoclonal antibody 6B10 can inhibit the sperm acrosome reaction induced by progesterone. The corresponding antigen recognized by monoclonal antibody 6B10 was located on the plasma membrane of the sperm acrosome by indirect immunofluorescent microscopy and immunoelectronmicroscopy. Sperm protein was extracted by 1% Triton X-100. The molecular weight of the antigen is 50 ku, detected by Western blot. The antigen is a key protein in the sperm acrosome reaction and may be the receptor of progesterone on the sperm acrosome. It may either be developed as a candidate contraceptive vaccine

  13. DEMONSTRATION OF MULTIPLE ANTIGENIC DETERMINANTS ON 'MYCOPLASMA PNEUMONIAE' ATTACHMENT PROTEIN BY MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Distinct multiple antigenic determinants of the attachment protein of Mycoplasma pneumoniae have been identified by limited proteolytic cleavage using specific monoclonal antibodies. Western blots prepared from the gels containing the cleaved fragments were probed with antiserum ...

  14. Efficient generation of monoclonal antibodies against peptide in the context of MHCII using magnetic enrichment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanier, Justin A; Frederick, Daniel R; Taylor, Justin J; Heffernan, James R; Kotov, Dmitri I; Martinov, Tijana; Osum, Kevin C; Ruggiero, Jenna L; Rust, Blake J; Landry, Samuel J; Jenkins, Marc K; McLachlan, James B; Fife, Brian T

    2016-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies specific for foreign antigens, auto-antigens, allogeneic antigens and tumour neo-antigens in the context of major histocompatibility complex II (MHCII) are highly desirable as novel immunotherapeutics. However, there is no standard protocol for the efficient generation of monoclonal antibodies that recognize peptide in the context of MHCII, and only a limited number of such reagents exist. In this report, we describe an approach for the generation and screening of monoclonal antibodies specific for peptide bound to MHCII. This approach exploits the use of recombinant peptide:MHC monomers as immunogens, and subsequently relies on multimers to pre-screen and magnetically enrich the responding antigen-specific B cells before fusion and validation, thus saving significant time and reagents. Using this method, we have generated two antibodies enabling us to interrogate antigen presentation and T-cell activation. This methodology sets the standard to generate monoclonal antibodies against the peptide-MHCII complexes. PMID:27292946

  15. Machine Protection

    CERN Document Server

    Schmidt, R

    2014-01-01

    The protection of accelerator equipment is as old as accelerator technology and was for many years related to high-power equipment. Examples are the protection of powering equipment from overheating (magnets, power converters, high-current cables), of superconducting magnets from damage after a quench and of klystrons. The protection of equipment from beam accidents is more recent. It is related to the increasing beam power of high-power proton accelerators such as ISIS, SNS, ESS and the PSI cyclotron, to the emission of synchrotron light by electron–positron accelerators and FELs, and to the increase of energy stored in the beam (in particular for hadron colliders such as LHC). Designing a machine protection system requires an excellent understanding of accelerator physics and operation to anticipate possible failures that could lead to damage. Machine protection includes beam and equipment monitoring, a system to safely stop beam operation (e.g. dumping the beam or stopping the beam at low energy) and an ...

  16. Neospora caninum: identification of 19-, 38-, and 40-kDa surface antigens and a 33-kDa dense granule antigen using monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schares, G; Dubremetz, J F; Dubey, J P; Bärwald, A; Loyens, A; Conraths, F J

    1999-06-01

    Neospora caninum, a coccidian parasite closely related to Toxoplasma gondii, can infect a broad host range and is regarded as an important cause of bovine abortion worldwide. In the present study, four antigens of N. caninum were partially characterized using monoclonal antibodies. Immunofluorescence of viable tachyzoites as well as the immunoprecipitation of antigens extracted from tachyzoites previously labeled by surface biotinylation revealed that three of these antigens with apparent molecular weights of 40, 38, and 19 kDa are located in the outer surface membrane of this parasite stage. Further evidence for the surface localization of the 38-kDa antigen was obtained by immunoelectron microscopy. In addition to the surface molecules, an antigen located in dense granules and in the tubular network of the parasitophorous vacuole was detected by another monoclonal antibody. When tachyzoite antigens separated under nonreducing conditions were probed on Western blots, this antibody reacted mainly with a 33-kDa antigen. Immunohistochemical analysis of infected tissue sections indicated that the 33-kDa dense granule antigen is present in both tachyzoites and bradyzoites, while the 38-kDa surface antigen from tachyzoites seems to be absent in bradyzoites. PMID:10366536

  17. Failure of a diagnostic monoclonal immunofluorescent reagent to detect Legionella pneumophila in environmental samples.

    OpenAIRE

    Vickers, R M; Stout, J E; Yu, V L

    1990-01-01

    Three commercial diagnostic fluorescein-labeled antibodies, one monoclonal and two polyclonal, were compared to evaluate their abilities to detect Legionella pneumophila in environmental samples. The monoclonal conjugate failed to detect L. pneumophila in the 12 environmental samples studied by direct immunofluorescence. In contrast, the two polyclonal conjugates detected L. pneumophila in all 12 samples by both direct and indirect immunofluorescence. However, isolates recovered by culture fr...

  18. Monoclonal antibodies to the apical chloride channel in Necturus gallbladder inhibit the chloride conductance.

    OpenAIRE

    Finn, A L; Tsai, L M; Falk, R J

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies raised by injecting Necturus gallbladder cells into mice were tested for their ability to inhibit the apical chloride conductance induced by elevation of cellular cAMP. Five of these monoclonal antibodies bound to the apical cells, as shown by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, and inhibited the chloride conductance; one antibody that bound only to subepithelial smooth muscle, by indirect immunofluorescence microscopy, showed no inhibition of chloride transport. The...

  19. Gel Electrophoresis as Quality Control Method of the Radiolabeled Monoclonal Antibodies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kocurová, Veronika

    Rijeka : InTech, 2012 - (Magdeldin, S.), s. 447-462 ISBN 978-953-51-0457-5 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IBS1048301 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10480505 Keywords : monoclonal antibodies * gel electrophoresis * radiodiagnostic Subject RIV: FR - Pharmacology ; Medidal Chemistry http://www.intechopen.com/books/ gel - electrophoresis -advanced-techniques/ gel - electrophoresis -as-quality-control-method-of-the-radiolabeled-monoclonal-antibodies

  20. In silico design, construction and cloning of Trastuzumab humanized monoclonal antibody: A possible biosimilar for Herceptin

    OpenAIRE

    Soudabeh Akbarzadeh-Sharbaf; Bagher Yakhchali; Zarrin Minuchehr; Mohammad Ali Shokrgozar; Sirous Zeinali

    2012-01-01

    Background: There is a novel hypothesis in that antibodies may have specificity for two distinct antigens that have been named "dual specificity." This hypothesis was evaluated for some defined therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) such as Trastuzumab, Pertuzumab, Bevacizumab, and Cetuximab. In silico design and construction of expression vectors for trastuzumab monoclonal antibody also in this work were performed. Materials and Methods: First, in bioinformatics studies the 3D structur...

  1. Development of an antigen microarray for high throughput monoclonal antibody selection

    OpenAIRE

    Staudt, Nicole; Müller-Sienerth, Nicole; Wright, Gavin J.

    2014-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are valuable laboratory reagents and are increasingly being exploited as therapeutics to treat a range of diseases. Selecting new monoclonal antibodies that are validated to work in particular applications, despite the availability of several different techniques, can be resource intensive with uncertain outcomes. To address this, we have developed an approach that enables early screening of hybridoma supernatants generated from an animal immunised with up to five differ...

  2. High-Efficiency Screening of Monoclonal Antibodies for Membrane Protein Crystallography

    OpenAIRE

    Lim, Hyun-Ho; Fang, Yiling; Williams, Carole

    2011-01-01

    Determination of crystal structures of membrane proteins is often limited by difficulties obtaining crystals diffracting to high resolution. Co-crystallization with Fab fragments of monoclonal antibodies has been reported to improve diffraction of membrane proteins crystals. However, it is not simple to generate useful monoclonal antibodies for membrane protein crystallography. In this report, we present an optimized process for efficient screening from immunization to final validation of mon...

  3. Production and characterization of a monoclonal antibody to the O-acetylated peptidoglycan of Proteus mirabilis.

    OpenAIRE

    Gyorffy, S; Clarke, A J

    1992-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (PmPG5-3) specific for the O-acetylated peptidoglycan of Proteus mirabilis 19 was produced by an NS-1 myeloma cell line and purified from ascites fluid by a combination of ammonium sulfate precipitation and affinity chromatography. The monoclonal antibody (an immunoglobulin M) was characterized by a competition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay to be equally specific for both insoluble and soluble O-acetylated peptidoglycan but weakly recognized chemically de-O-acetylate...

  4. Study of Leishmania major-infected macrophages by use of lipophosphoglycan-specific monoclonal antibodies.

    OpenAIRE

    Handman, E

    1990-01-01

    Leishmania major infection of macrophages is followed by a time-dependent appearance of lipophosphoglycan (LPG) that can be detected on the surface of infected cells by monoclonal antibodies. The origin of these LPG epitopes is probably the intracellular amastigote. LPG epitopes could be detected on the amastigote and the infected macrophage by a number of monoclonal antibodies directed to several distinct determinants on the phosphoglycan moiety. The macrophage-expressed LPG may be modified ...

  5. Immunohistochemical study of human pulmonary surfactant apoproteins with monoclonal antibodies. Pathologic application for hyaline membrane disease.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuroki, Y.; Dempo, K.; Akino, T

    1986-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies, PC6, PE10, and PE12, were used for immunohistochemical studies of human lungs by immunoperoxidase staining. Monoclonal antibodies PC6 and PE10 against pulmonary surfactant apoproteins stained faint granules in the cytoplasm of some alveolar wall cells in adult lung. These stained cells appeared to be alveolar Type II cells. A fetal lung of 20 weeks' gestation had no any positive staining. However, a few scattered positive cells were observed in a newborn lung of 3...

  6. Production and Characterization of a Murine Monoclonal Antibody Against Human Ferritin

    OpenAIRE

    Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Yeganeh, Omid; Ghods, Roya; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ardekani, Reza Bahjati; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Haghighat-Noutash, Farzaneh; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood

    2013-01-01

    Background Ferritin is an iron storage protein, which plays a key role in iron metabolism. Measurement of ferritin level in serum is one of the most useful indicators of iron status and also a sensitive measurement of iron deficiency. Monoclonal antibodies may be useful as a tool in various aspects of ferritin investigations. In this paper, the production of a murine monoclonal antibody (mAb) against human ferritin was reported. Methods Balb/c mice were immunized with purified human ferritin ...

  7. Effect of kinase inhibitors on the therapeutic properties of monoclonal antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Duong, Minh Ngoc; Matera, Eva-Laure; Mathé, Doriane; Evesque, Anne; Valsesia-Wittmann, Sandrine; Clémenceau, Béatrice; Dumontet, Charles

    2014-01-01

    Targeted therapies of malignancies currently consist of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies and small molecule kinase inhibitors. The combination of these novel agents raises the issue of potential antagonisms. We evaluated the potential effect of 4 kinase inhibitors, including the Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor ibrutinib, and 3 PI3K inhibitors idelalisib, NVP-BEZ235 and LY294002, on the effects of the 3 monoclonal antibodies, rituximab and obinutuzumab (directed against CD20) and trastuzumab...

  8. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy does not Abrogate Rejection Risk in Renal Transplant Recipients

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjeev Goswami

    2013-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are being increasingly used as therapeutic agents in medicine. Rituximab (anti-CD20) and Daclizumab (anti-IL2Rα) are two such monoclonal antibodies used to prevent organ rejection, but are not fail-safe. We have analyzed the pre and post-transplant antibody profile in serum of renal transplant recipients receiving Rituximab and /or Daclizumab. Study Group: Kidney recipients with acute rejection and having PRA > 10% pre-transplant were selected for the study (n=11). Those...

  9. Monoclonal antibody analysis of specific antigenic similarities among pathogenic Treponema pallidum subspecies.

    OpenAIRE

    Marchitto, K S; Jones, S A; Schell, R F; Holmans, P L; Norgard, M V

    1984-01-01

    Murine monoclonal antibodies directed against a 47,000-dalton immunodominant surface-exposed antigen of Treponema pallidum subsp. pallidum (Nichols) were isolated. These monoclonal antibodies cross-reacted with analogous 47,000-dalton antigens of two other virulent treponemes, T. pallidum subsp. pertenue and T. pallidum subsp. endemicum (Bosnia A), as determined by radioimmunoassay and immunoblot analyses. Immunoelectron microscopy confirmed that the 47,000-dalton antigen of T. pallidum subsp...

  10. Staining characteristics of six commercially available monoclonal immunofluorescence reagents for direct diagnosis of Chlamydia trachomatis infections.

    OpenAIRE

    Cles, L D; Bruch, K; Stamm, W. E.

    1988-01-01

    Using purified elementary bodies of 14 Chlamydia trachomatis serovars in an in vitro assay, we compared the staining characteristics of six commercially available monoclonal antibody reagents used for direct immunofluorescent staining of patient smears. Considerable variation in the degree of brightness, consistency of staining, and specificity of the six reagents was found. Monoclonal antibodies against the major outer membrane proteins of C. trachomatis produced brighter fluorescence, more ...

  11. Specificities of monoclonal antibodies against the activated delta-endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis var. thuringiensis.

    OpenAIRE

    Huber-Lukac, M; Lüthy, P; Braun, D G

    1983-01-01

    Eight hybrid cell lines secreting monoclonal antibodies directed against the activated delta-endotoxin of Bacillus thuringiensis var. thuringiensis were grown in BALB/c mice. Ascites fluids were collected, and the antibodies were purified by antigen-affinity chromatography. The specificity of each monoclonal antibody for the toxin and protoxin was established by the indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All the antibodies consisted of gamma 1 heavy and kappa light chains. They were reac...

  12. Elicitation of broadly neutralizing influenza antibodies in animals with previous influenza exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Chih-Jen; Yassine, Hadi M; McTamney, Patrick M; Gall, Jason G D; Whittle, James R R; Boyington, Jeffrey C; Nabel, Gary J

    2012-08-15

    The immune system responds to influenza infection by producing neutralizing antibodies to the viral surface protein, hemagglutinin (HA), which regularly changes its antigenic structure. Antibodies that target the highly conserved stem region of HA neutralize diverse influenza viruses and can be elicited through vaccination in animals and humans. Efforts to develop universal influenza vaccines have focused on strategies to elicit such antibodies; however, the concern has been raised that previous influenza immunity may abrogate the induction of such broadly protective antibodies. We show here that prime-boost immunization can induce broadly neutralizing antibody responses in influenza-immune mice and ferrets that were previously infected or vaccinated. HA stem-directed antibodies were elicited in mice primed with a DNA vaccine and boosted with inactivated vaccine from H1N1 A/New Caledonia/20/1999 (1999 NC) HA regardless of preexposure. Similarly, gene-based vaccination with replication-defective adenovirus 28 (rAd28) and 5 (rAd5) vectors encoding 1999 NC HA elicited stem-directed neutralizing antibodies and conferred protection against unmatched 1934 and 2007 H1N1 virus challenge in influenza-immune ferrets. Indeed, previous exposure to certain strains could enhance immunogenicity: The strongest HA stem-directed immune response was observed in ferrets previously infected with a divergent 1934 H1N1 virus. These findings suggest that broadly neutralizing antibodies against the conserved stem region of HA can be elicited through vaccination despite previous influenza exposure, which supports the feasibility of developing stem-directed universal influenza vaccines for humans. PMID:22896678

  13. The sub-millimeter properties of broad absorption line quasars

    OpenAIRE

    Willott, Chris J.; Rawlings, Steve; Grimes, Jennifer A.

    2003-01-01

    We have carried out the first systematic survey of the sub-millimeter properties of broad absorption line (BAL) quasars. 30 BAL quasars drawn from a homogeneously selected sample from the Sloan Digital Sky Survey at redshifts 2 3 sigma significance. The far-infrared luminosities of these quasars are > 10^{13} L_solar. There is no correlation of sub-millimeter flux with either the strength of the broad absorption feature or with absolute magnitude in our sample. We compare the sub-millimeter f...

  14. Analysis of fuel system technology for broad property fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffinberry, G. A.

    1984-01-01

    An analytical study was performed in order to assess relative performance and economic factors involved with alternative advanced fuel systems for future commercial aircraft operating with broad property fuels. Significant results, with emphasis on design practicality from the engine manufacturer' standpoint, are highlighted. Several advanced fuel systems were modeled to determine as accurately as possible the relative merits of each system from the standpoint of compatibility with broad property fuel. Freezing point, thermal stability, and lubricity were key property issues. A computer model was formulated to determine the investment incentive for each system. Results are given.

  15. Broad-band hard X-ray reflectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensen, K.D.; Gorenstein, P.; Hoghoj, P.;

    1997-01-01

    Interest in optics for hard X-ray broad-band application is growing. In this paper, we compare the hard X-ray (20-100 keV) reflectivity obtained with an energy-dispersive reflectometer, of a standard commercial gold thin-film with that of a 600 bilayer W/Si X-ray supermirror. The reflectivity of...... that of the gold, Various other design options are discussed, and we conclude that continued interest in the X-ray supermirror for broad-band hard X-ray applications is warranted....

  16. Development of broad-view camera unit for laparoscopic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Tomohiro; Takaki, Takeshi; Ishii, Idaku; Okajima, Masazumi

    2009-01-01

    A disadvantage of laparoscopic surgery is the narrow operative field provided by the endoscope camera. This paper describes a newly developed broad-view camera unit for use with the Broad-View Camera System, which is capable of providing a wider view of the internal organs during laparoscopic surgery. The developed camera unit is composed of a miniature color CMOS camera, an indwelling needle, and an extra-thin connector. The specific design of the camera unit and the method for positioning it are shown. The performance of the camera unit has been confirmed through basic and animal experiments. PMID:19963983

  17. Reactivity of monoclonal antibodies to species-specific antigens of Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, H; Kobayashi, S; Nagakura, K; Kaneda, Y; Takeuchi, T

    1991-01-01

    Twenty monoclonal antibodies were produced against trophozoites of Entamoeba histolytica strains HK-9 and HM-1: IMSS. When reactivity to various enteric protozoa was examined by an indirect fluorescence antibody test, 15 of the monoclonal antibodies were strongly reactive with E. histolytica trophozoites. Species-specific antigens recognized by these monoclonal antibodies were located on the plasma membrane, nucleus, cytoplasm, and cytoskeletal structures of the trophozoites. Two of the remaining five monoclonals reacted strongly with trophozoites of the E. histolytica-like Laredo strain. The determinant antigen was located in the cytoplasm. The three remaining monoclonal antibodies were found to recognize cross-reactive antigens between E. histolytica and E. histolytica-like Laredo, E. hartmanni, E. coli, Dientamoeba fragilis, Giardia lamblia, and Trichomonas hominis. These three antibodies were also reactive with T. vaginalis and mammalian cells such as HeLa cells. Thus, the combined use of monoclonal antibodies seems capable of distinguishing E. histolytica and/or E. histolytica-like Laredo from other enteric protozoa. PMID:1724012

  18. Physical protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Myre, W.C.; DeMontmollin, J.M. (Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (USA))

    1989-07-01

    Serious concern about physical protection of nuclear facilities began around 1972. R and D was initiated at Sandia National Laboratories which had developed techniques to protect weapons for many years. Special vehicles, convoy procedures, and a communications system previously developed for weapons shipments were improved and extended for shipments of other sensitive materials. Barriers, perimeter alarms, portal and internal control systems were developed, tested, and published in handbooks and presented at symposia. Training programs were initiated for U.S. and foreign personnel. Containment and surveillance techniques were developed for the IAEA. Presently emphasis is on computer security, active barriers, and techniques to prevent theft or sabotage by insiders .

  19. Radioiodination of monoclonal antibody intact anti-CEA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to examine a convenient system that can be used to iodinate monoclonal antibodies which is rapid, simple, efficient and reproducible, and which can be accomplished in radiopharmaceutical laboratories. It is important to remember that antibodies are sensitive biochemicals, subject to losses of the activity that is essential to their mode of action, namely the ability to bind specific antigen. The advent of solid phase iodination agents has greatly expanded the range of gentle iodination techniques available for iodinating sensitive biological materials. The agent most widely used is the Iodogen (1,3,4,6 tetrachloro-3a-6a diphenylglycoluril) method. Anti-CEA 4C sub(11) IgG sub(2a,k) (prepared in the Ludwig Institute-Sao Paulo-Brazil ) is used as model to evaluate the Iodogen methodology. The miniature chromatographic system, also rapid, accurate, simple, efficient was elaborated to determine the labelling efficiency incorporation of iodine into immunoglobulin, and the radiochemical purity of sup(131)I-anti-CEA. (author)

  20. Treating multiple sclerosis with monoclonal antibodies: a 2010 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buttmann, Mathias

    2010-05-01

    Treating multiple sclerosis (MS) with monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has been marked by both progress and setbacks in the past 2 years, which are reviewed here. The natalizumab section of the article centers around progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), and discusses PML risk in relation to treatment duration, bioassays for individual risk prediction, the concept of drug holidays, clinical course and treatment of PML, as well as safety-related regulatory actions. The rituximab section critically analyzes recent clinical trial results, discusses the clinical relevance of anti-idiotypic mAbs and makes a short excursion to neuromyelitis optica. Following this, the newer anti-CD20 mAbs ocrelizumab and ofatumumab, which are currently being tested in Phase II for MS, are reviewed and compared. The alemtuzumab section highlights novel data on mechanisms of action, potentially allowing individual risk prediction, and new results from the CAMMS223 trial, as well as the current status of the pivotal MS studies. The daclizumab section summarizes new open-label data, shedding more light on the adverse-effect profile of the drug in MS patients, and reports on its Phase III status. Subsequently, a failed ustekinumab trial and LY2127399 are reviewed. Taking into account late Phase II and III data on novel oral agents, the final section attempts to provide a detailed perspective on disease-modifying MS therapy in the medium term. PMID:20420497

  1. Gamma radiations an effective way of monoclonal antibodies sterilization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sterilization for radiations of pharmaceutical products is an effective, sure and reliable procedure; that it have been proving technically and grateful for different pharmacopoeia. The Monoclonal Antibodies (Acm) produced in the Center of Molecular Immunology (CIM) are products parenteral for the one which results indispensable that they complete the requirements of established sterility. The radio sterilization result the method more recommend for the sterilization of the Acm deep drying, due to the contained first floor of humidity remnant that minimizes the formation of sub-product that they affect their properties. With the objective of proposing a good dose of irradiation for the sterilization, we were carried out a study of the radius sensibility so much of the product like of the polluting of greater frequency of isolation of the clean area of the CIM. The characterization of the radius sensibility of the different micro- organisms was determined by D10 characteristic of each isolated strains. From the developed studies the Gram-positive rods endospore-forming were the most resistant strains at the deep drying, the radiations and they were of the greater frequency of apparition in the carried out isolations. We could conclude that utilizing a dose of 10 kGy it is possible to eliminate of the pollution more radio resistant, assuring the sterility required in the product, and without inducing effects under desire radiolytic in the same

  2. ANTITUMOR EFFECTS OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODY FAB′ FRAGMENT CONTAINING IMMUNOCONJUGATES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘小云; 甄永苏

    2002-01-01

    Objective.Using monoclonal antibody (mAb) Fab′ fragment to develop mAb immunoconjugates for cancer. Methods.Fab′ fragment of mAb 3A5 was prepared by digestion of the antibody with pepsin and then reduced by dithiothreitol (DTT),while Fab′ fragment of mAb 3D6 was obtained by digestion of the antibody with ficin and subsequently reduced by β mercaptoethanol.The conjugation between Fab′ fragment and pingyangmycin (PYM),an antitumor antibiotic,was mediated by dextran T 40.Immunoreactivity of Fab′ PYM conjugates with cancer cells was determined by ELISA,and the cytotoxicity of those conjugates to cancer cells was determined by clonogenic assay.Antitumor effects of the Fab′ PYM conjugates were evaluated by subcutaneously transplanted tumors in mice. Results.The molecular weight of Fab′ fragment was approximately 53 kD,while the average molecular weight of Fab′ PYM conjugate was 170 kD.The Fab′ PYM conjugates showed immunoreactivity with antigen relevant cancer cells and selective cytotoxicity against target cells.Administered intravenously,Fab′ PYM conjugates were more effective against the growth of tumors in mice than free PYM and PYM conjugated with intact mAb. Conclusion.Fab′ PYM conjugate may be capable of targeting cancer cells and effectively inhibiting tumor growth,suggesting its therapeutic potential in cancer treatment.

  3. Production of monoclonal antibodies reactive with ovine eosinophils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meeusen Els NT

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is strong evidence implicating eosinophils in host defence against parasites as well as allergic disease pathologies. However, a lack of reagents such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs specific for eosinophils has made it difficult to confirm the functional role of eosinophils in such disease conditions. Using an established mammary model of allergic inflammation in sheep, large numbers of inflammatory cells enriched for eosinophils were collected from parasite-stimulated mammary glands and used for the generation of mAbs against ovine eosinophils. Results A panel of mAbs was raised against ovine eosinophils of which two were shown to be highly specific for eosinophils. The reactivity of mAbs 3.252 and 1.2 identified eosinophils from various cell and tissue preparations with no detectable reactivity on cells of myeloid or lymphoid lineage, tissue mast cells, dendritic cells, epithelial cells or other connective tissues. Two other mAbs generated in this study (mAbs 4.4 and 4.10 were found to have reactivity for both eosinophils and neutrophils. Conclusion This study describes the production of new reagents to identify eosinophils (as well as granulocytes in sheep that will be useful in studying the role of eosinophils in disease pathologies in parasite and allergy models.

  4. Clinical application of antibody monoclonal humanized anti-EGFrnimotuzumab labeled

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most malignant tumors are of epithelial origin. These are characterized by overexpression of the receptor of epidermal growth factor (EGFR), which the neoplastic cells escape the regulatory mechanisms are allowed, so its high concentration of membrane is generally associated with a poor prognosis . By binding an antibody specifically to this receptor, preventing binding of EGF latter and activation mechanism tyrosine kinase inhibiting cell mitosis and apoptosis causing tumor cell. For this reason, the EGFr has been considered as an attractive target for anti-tumor therapy. The humanized monoclonal antibody anti-EGFr nimotuzumab was developed by the Center of Molecular Immunology (Havana, Cuba). Numerous clinical trials have been developed in the Department of Clinical Research Center Isotopes (Cuba), in which it has been applied this antibody, both labeled with 99mTc for immuno gammagraphic detection of tumors, as labeled with 188Re for radioimmunotherapy of gliomas high degree of malignancy. The aim of this paper is to show the experience of the Department of Clinical Research of CENTIS in various clinical trials with marking for both immuno gammagraphics detection of tumors, such as for radioimmunotherapy nimotuzumab. (author)

  5. Characterization of novel neutralizing monoclonal antibodies specific to human neurturin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hongo, J A; Tsai, S P; Moffat, B; Schroeder, K A; Jung, C; Chuntharapai, A; Lampe, P A; Johnson, E M; de Sauvage, F J; Armanini, M; Phillips, H; Devaux, B

    2000-08-01

    Neurturin (NTN) a structural and functional relative of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor, was originally identified based on its ability to support the survival of sympathetic neurons in culture. Similar to glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), Neurturin has been shown to bind to a high affinity glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked receptor (GFRalpha2) and induce phosphorylation of the tyrosine kinase receptor Ret, resulting in the activation of the mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) signalling pathway. A panel of six novel murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific to human Neurturin has been developed and characterized. Four of the MAbs tested inhibit, to varying degrees, binding of NTN to the GPI-linked GFRalpha2 receptor. Three MAbs cross-react with the murine homolog. These antibodies have been shown to be useful reagents for Western blotting, immunohistochemistry, and also for the development of a sensitive, quantitative enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for human NTN. Novel, specific MAbs with varying epitope specificities and blocking activity will be valuable tools for both the in vitro and in vivo characterization of NTN and its relationship to the GFRalpha2 and Ret receptors. PMID:11001403

  6. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibody Against Recombinant Human Erythropoietin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIE-BO MI; JIN YAN; XIAO-JIE DING; ZHEN-QUAN GUO; MEI-PING ZHAO; WEN-BAO CHANG

    2007-01-01

    Objective To produce specific monoclonal antibody(mAb)against recombinant human erythropoietin(rHuEPO)for development of higmy efficient methods for erythropoietin detection in biological fluids.Methods rHuEPO was covalently coupled with bovine serum albumin(BSA)and the conjugate was used to immunize mice to produce specific mAb against rHuEPO based on hybridoma technology.The obtained F3-mAb was characterized by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA),SDS-PAGE and Western blot.Results The isotype of F3-mAb Was found to be IgM with an affinity constant of 2.1x108 L/mol.The competitive ELISA using the obtained IgM showed a broader linear range and lower detection limit compared with previous work.Conclusions The modification of rHuEPO was proved to be successful in generating required specific mAb with high avidity to rHuEPO.

  7. DNA immunization as a technology platform for monoclonal antibody induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuying; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2016-01-01

    To combat the threat of many emerging infectious diseases, DNA immunization offers a unique and powerful approach to the production of high-quality monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against various pathogens. Compared with traditional protein-based immunization approaches, DNA immunization is efficient for testing novel immunogen designs, does not require the production or purification of proteins from a pathogen or the use of recombinant protein technology and is effective at generating mAbs against conformation-sensitive targets. Although significant progress in the use of DNA immunization to generate mAbs has been made over the last two decades, the literature does not contain an updated summary of this experience. The current review provides a comprehensive analysis of the literature, including our own work, describing the use of DNA immunization to produce highly functional mAbs, in particular, those against emerging infectious diseases. Critical factors such as immunogen design, delivery approach, immunization schedule, use of immune modulators and the role of final boost immunization are discussed in detail. PMID:27048742

  8. Application of monoclonal antibodies in diagnostics of the colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Immunoscintigraphy with CEA monoclonal antibodies (MoA) in patients with colorectal cancer has been applied since 1987 by the authors. MoA from the hybridoma F023C5 are used (IgG1-class) and their fragments labelled with 131I and 111In. The labelled MoA are introduced intravenously in the course of 30 min, the total activity is 2.5 - 3.5 mCi. The scanning is made 48 and 96 hours on gamma camera. An additional activity on 99mTc-sulfocolloid and 99mTc-DTPA is applied for outlining the liver and kidney contours. Digital substraction technique is applied for image processing with contrast and background reduction. The thyroid is blocked with Lugol solution in a course of 5-6 days. Among all of the 18 investigated patients a positive result has been observed in 16. Metastases bigger than 1 cm have a positive scan. No initial invasion in the regional lymph nodes has been established. 3 figs., 4 refs

  9. Cysteinylation of a monoclonal antibody leads to its inactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McSherry, Troy; McSherry, Jennifer; Ozaeta, Panfilo; Longenecker, Kenton; Ramsay, Carol; Fishpaugh, Jeffrey; Allen, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Post-translational modifications can have a signification effect on antibody stability. A comprehensive approach is often required to best understand the underlying reasons the modification affects the antibody's potency or aggregation state. Monoclonal antibody 001 displayed significant variation in terms of potency, as defined by surface plasmon resonance testing (Biacore), from lot to lot independent of any observable aggregation or degradation, suggesting that a post-translational modification could be driving this variability. Analysis of different antibody lots using analytical hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) uncovered multiple peaks of varying size. Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) indicated that the antibody contained a cysteinylation post-translational modification in complementarity-determining region (CDR) 3 of the antibody light chain. Fractionation of the antibody by HIC followed by ESI-MS and Biacore showed that the different peaks were antibody containing zero, one, or two cysteinylation modifications, and that the modification interferes with the ability of the modified antibody arm to bind antigen. Molecular modeling of the modified region shows that this oxidation of an unpaired cysteine in the antibody CDR would block a potential antigen binding pocket, suggesting an inhibition mechanism. PMID:27050640

  10. Epitope Mapping of Fc gamma RIIa Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caroline Tan Sardjono

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available FcγRIIa (CD32 is an IgG receptor which has been shown to be important in autoimmune disease pathology. IV.3, 8.7, and 7.30 are anti-FcγRIIa monoclonal antibodies (mAbs, which block the interaction between FcγRIIa and complex IgG. In this study, the three mAbs were demonstrated to inhibit FcγRIIa function. The determination of the precise epitopes of the IV.3, 8.7, and 7.30 mAbs may become a potential approach for designing inhibitors for FcγRIIa. The epitope of IV.3, 8.7, and 7.30 were determined using chimeric receptors based on the extracellular domains of FcγRIIa and the FcεRI a chain. The epitopes for IV.3 was found to be mapped on amino acid residues 132-137, while 8.7 and 7.30 were on amino acid residues 112-119 and 157-162. Based on the crystal 3D model of FcγRIIa molecule, these amino acid sequences are clustered together forming a contiguous region within the ligand binding site of the receptor.

  11. Reversible cluster formation in concentrated monoclonal antibody solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godfrin, P. Douglas; Porcar, Lionel; Falus, Peter; Zarraga, Isidro; Wagner, Norm; Liu, Yun

    2015-03-01

    Protein cluster formation in solution is of fundamental interest for both academic research and industrial applications. Recently, industrial scientists are also exploring the effect of reversible cluster formation on biopharmaceutical processing and delivery. However, despite of its importance, the understanding of protein clusters at concentrated solutions remains scientifically very challenging. Using the neutron spin echo technique to study the short time dynamics of proteins in solutions, we have recently systematically studied cluster formation in a few monoclonal antibody (mAb) solutions and their relation with solution viscosity. We show that the existence of anisotropic attraction can cause the formation of finite sized clusters, which increases the solution viscosity. Interestingly, once clusters form at relatively low concentrations, the average size of clusters in solutions remains almost constant over a wide range of concentrations similar to that of micelle formation. For a different mAb we have also investigated, the attraction is mostly induced by hydrophobic patches. As a result, these mAbs form large clusters with loosely linked proteins. In both cases, the formation of clusters all increases the solution viscosity substantially. However, due to different physics origins of cluster formation, solutions viscosities for these two different types of mAbs need to be controlled by different ways.

  12. Production of radiolabeled monoclonal antibody conjugates by photoaffinity labeling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Volkert, W.A.; Ketring, A.R.; Kuntz, R.R.; Holmes, R.A.; Mitchell, E.P. (Missouri Univ., Columbia, MO (USA)); Feldbush, T.L. (Harry S. Truman Memorial Veterans Hospital, Columbia, MO (USA))

    1990-06-01

    This report discusses activities and progress that has occurred since initiation of this project on September 1, 1989. We have synthesized ethyl N,N{prime}-bis(benzoylmercaptoacetyl)-2,3-diaminopropanoate, a ligand to be used as a bifunctional chelating agent (BFCA), to form {sup 186}Re or {sup 188}Re ({sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re) complexes. {sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re, in reducing media, reacts with this ligand to form {sup 186}Re/{sup 188}Re-CO{sub 2}DADS chelates that will be used to formulate new radiolabeled photoaffinity labels (RPALs). Initial steps have been taken to synthesize R-As-dithiol compounds. This approach will be used to produce {sup 77}As-RPALs or covalently link {sup 77}As directly to monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). The R group will contain a group that can be used for conjugation reactions. Spectral and photochemical properties of various types of photoaffinity labels (PALs) have been studied. Acrylo-azido compounds and 9-azido acridine have been studied as well as several other photoprobes. The binding characteristics of the azido-based PALs to HSA have been studied and progress has been made on developing techniques for efficiently separating of non-covalently sound PALs. The Nd-YAG laser was purchased and arrived in 1990. It has been assembled and tested and is now operational.

  13. Production of a diagnostic monoclonal antibody in perennial alfalfa plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoudi, H; Laberge, S; Ferullo, J M; Bazin, R; Darveau, A; Castonguay, Y; Allard, G; Lemieux, R; Vézina, L P

    1999-07-20

    The increasing use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) in diagnostic reagents necessitates efficient and cost-effective mAb production methods. In blood banks, one of the most routinely used reagents is the anti-human IgG reagent used for the detection of non-agglutinating antibodies. Here we report the production of a functional, purified anti-human IgG, through the expression of its encoding genes in perennial transgenic alfalfa. Transgenic plants expressing the light- and heavy-chain encoding mRNAs were obtained, and plants from crosses were found to express fully assembled C5-1. The purification procedure yielded mainly the H2L2 form with specificity and affinity identical to those of hybridoma-derived C5-1. The ability to accumulate the antibody was maintained both in parental F1 lines during repeated harvesting and in clonal material; the antibody was stable in the drying hay as in extracts made in pure water. Also, plant and hybridoma-derived C5-1 had similar in vivo half-lives in mice. These results indicate that plant C5-1 could be used in a diagnostic reagent as effectively as hybridoma-derived C5-1, and demonstrates the usefulness of perennial systems for the cost-effective, stable, and reliable production of large amounts of mAbs. PMID:10397849

  14. Warfarin improves neuropathy in monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henry Gomez, Teny; Holkova, Beata; Noreika, Danielle; Del Fabbro, Egidio

    2016-01-01

    We report a case of a 60-year-old man who was referred to a palliative care clinic with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS)-associated neuropathy, responding to a therapeutic trial of warfarin. Electromyography showed distal symmetric sensory axonal neuropathy. The patient reported having had improvement of his neuropathic symptoms while taking warfarin postoperatively for thromboprophylaxis 1 year prior, and recurrence of his symptoms after the warfarin was discontinued. The patient was rechallenged with a trial of warfarin, targeting an international normalised ratio of 1.5-2.0. His pain scores decreased from 5/10 to 3/10 at 1 month and symptom improvement was maintained through 24 months of follow-up. Warfarin had a remarkable impact on our patient's symptoms and quality of life. The mechanisms mediating the symptomatic benefit with warfarin are unclear; however, a placebo effect is unlikely. Further studies may help guide the use of warfarin for MGUS-associated neuropathy. PMID:27317760

  15. DNA immunization as a technology platform for monoclonal antibody induction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shuying; Wang, Shixia; Lu, Shan

    2016-01-01

    To combat the threat of many emerging infectious diseases, DNA immunization offers a unique and powerful approach to the production of high-quality monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against various pathogens. Compared with traditional protein-based immunization approaches, DNA immunization is efficient for testing novel immunogen designs, does not require the production or purification of proteins from a pathogen or the use of recombinant protein technology and is effective at generating mAbs against conformation-sensitive targets. Although significant progress in the use of DNA immunization to generate mAbs has been made over the last two decades, the literature does not contain an updated summary of this experience. The current review provides a comprehensive analysis of the literature, including our own work, describing the use of DNA immunization to produce highly functional mAbs, in particular, those against emerging infectious diseases. Critical factors such as immunogen design, delivery approach, immunization schedule, use of immune modulators and the role of final boost immunization are discussed in detail. PMID:27048742

  16. Novel monoclonal autoantibody specificity associated with ribonucleoprotein complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors describe an IgG/sub 2a/, kappa monoclonal autoantibody (mAb) F78 derived from a 6-month old MRL-Mp lpr/lpr mouse that recognizes a novel epitope associated with small nuclear ribonuclear protein complexes (snRNP). Indirect immunofluorescent staining of HEp-2 cells with F78 showed a nonnucleolar speckled nuclear pattern characteristic of anti-RNP and anti-Sm mAbs which could be abrogated by pretreating fixed cells with 0.1M HCl prior to staining. Immunoblots of whole cell extracts (dissociated in SDS, urea and mercaptan at 40C then subjected to SDS-PAGE) showed that F78 selectively bound to a component of M/sub r/ = 100,000 clearly distinct from components recognized by two mAbs described by Billings et al that detected, respectively, proteins of M/sub r/ = 70,000 associated with RNP and M/sub r/ = 13,000 associated with Sm. Incubation of extracts at 1000C prior to SDS-PAGE eliminated subsequent binding of F78 but not of the other nAbs. F78 as well as the other mAbs selectively immunoprecipitated characteristic patterns of small nuclear RNAs (U1, U2, U4, U5, U6) from extracts of 32P-phosphate labeled HeLa cells. These results suggest a new specificity associated with snRNP that is recognized in the MRL autoimmune response

  17. Monoclonal antibody characterization of a leukoagglutinin produced by Renibacterium salmoninarum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiens, G D; Kaattari, S L

    1991-02-01

    Renibacterium salmoninarum causes a chronic disease of salmonid fish known as bacterial kidney disease. High concentrations of bacterially produced extracellular protein (ECP) are present in plasma, kidney, and spleen tissue of naturally and experimentally infected fish. ECP agglutinated salmonid leukocytes in vitro at concentrations which correspond to levels found in highly infected fish. Association of biological activity with the structure of the major protein constituent of ECP, p57, was accomplished by monoclonal antibody (MAb) analysis. Location of the antigenic binding sites recognized by the MAbs was determined by two-dimensional electrophoresis and Western immunoblotting of the proteolytic breakdown fragments of p57. Eight MAbs have been classified into three groups on the basis of their differential recognition of these proteolytic breakdown products. Group I MAbs bound a region proximal to the amino terminus of the protein. Two of these MAbs were also able to block leukoagglutinating activity. Group III MAbs bound to a region associated with the bacterial cell surface, while group II MAbs bound a region between group I and group III. These analyses have allowed the identification of potential structural and functional regions of p57. PMID:1987079

  18. Characterization of Endotrypanum Parasites Using Specific Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramos Franco Antonia Maria

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A large number of Endotrypanum stocks (representing an heterogeneous population of strains have been screened against a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs derived for selected species of Endotrypanum or Leishmania, to see whether this approach could be used to group/differentiate further among these parasites. Using different immunological assay systems, MAbs considered specific for the genus Endotrypanum (E-24, CXXX-3G5-F12 or strain M6159 of E. schaudinni (E-2, CXIV-3C7-F5 reacted variably according to the test used but in the ELISA or immunofluorescence assay both reacted with all the strains tested. Analyses using these MAbs showed antigenic diversity occurring among the Endotrypanum strains, but no qualitative or quantitative reactivity pattern could be consistently related to parasite origin (i.e., host species involved or geographic area of isolation. Western blot analyses of the parasites showed that these MAbs recognized multiple components. Differences existed either in the epitope density or molecular forms associated with the antigenic determinants and therefore allowed the assignment of the strains to specific antigenic groups. Using immunofluorescence or ELISA assay, clone E-24 produced reaction with L. equatorensis (which is a parasite of sloth and rodent, but not with other trypanosomatids examined. Interestingly, the latter parasite and the Endotrypanum strains cross-reacted with a number of MAbs that were produced against members of the L. major-L. tropica complex

  19. Analysis of Tn antigenicity with a panel of new IgM and IgG1 monoclonal antibodies raised against leukemic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blixt, Klas Ola; Lavrova, Olga I; Mazurov, Dmitriy V; Cló, Emiliano; Kracun, Stjepan K; Bovin, Nicolai V; Filatov, Alexander V

    2012-01-01

    antigenicity remain poorly understood. As a consequence, a broad variety of anti-Tn monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been generated. To further investigate the nature and complexity of the Tn antigen, we generated seven different anti-Tn mAbs of IgM and IgG classes raised against human Jurkat T cells, which...... GSP motif (glycosylation sites are underlined). The major O-glycan carrier proteins CD43 and CD162 and isoforms of CD45 expressed on Jurkat cells were precipitated by anti-Tn mAbs with different affinities. In summary, our data suggest that Tn antigen-Ab binding capacity is determined by the peptide...

  20. Monoclonal antibodies to the thyrotropin receptor raised by an autoantiidiotypic protocol and their relationship to monoclonal autoantibodies from Graves' patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoclonal antibodies that bind to the TSH receptor were obtained by an autoantiidiotypic approach in which immunization of BALB/c mice was performed with mixtures of bovine (b) and human (h) TSH. Two of 28 positive wells were selected for cloning and characterization: D2 and 4G11. Their antiidiotypic character was evidenced by TSH-inhibitable binding to affinity-purified polyclonal anti-TSH. The specificity of D2 and 4G11 for the hormone-binding region of the TSH receptor was demonstrated by several findings: 1) they inhibited the binding of [125I]iodo-bTSH to receptor in a dose-dependent manner; 2) their binding to partially purified thyroid plasma membranes could be completely inhibited by bTSH and hTSH; and 3) they inhibited the TSH-dependent growth and adenylate cyclase stimulation in FRTL-5 cells in a dose-dependent manner. By Western blot analysis of bovine thyroid membranes, D2 bound to a polypeptide of 188,000-195,000 mol wt under nonreducing conditions and 54,000-59,000 mol wt after treatment of membranes with beta-mercaptoethanol; the 4G11 epitope was undetectable. Scatchard analysis of the binding of 125I-labeled antibodies to receptor showed that 4G11 bound to a single site with a Kd of 5.7 X 10(-9) M, whereas D2 showed complex binding characterized by high affinity (Kd = 1.74 X 10(-11) M) and low affinity (Kd = 1.3 X 10(-8) M) sites. Binding studies in which D2 and 4G11 competed with each other for the TSH receptor showed mutual but unequal inhibition. The data suggest that portions of the D2 and 4G11 epitopes overlap, but that there is a high affinity binding site(s) for D2 for which 4G11 competes less effectively. The binding of D2 and 4G11 to TSH receptor was inhibited by monoclonal antibodies secreted by Graves' heterohybridomas, showing that D2 and 4G11 share characteristics with autoantibodies of Graves' disease

  1. Improved fluoroquinolone detection in ELISA through engineering of a broad-specific single-chain variable fragment binding simultaneously to 20 fluoroquinolones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Kai; Nölke, Greta; Schillberg, Stefan; Wang, Zhanhui; Zhang, Suxia; Wu, Congming; Jiang, Haiyang; Meng, Hui; Shen, Jianzhong

    2012-07-01

    Fluoroquinolones (FQs) are a group of synthetic, broad-spectrum antibacterial agents. Due to its extensive use in animal industry and aquaculture, residues of these antibiotics and the emergence of bacteria resistant to FQs have become a major public health issue. To prepare a generic antibody capable of recognizing nearly all FQs, a single-chain variable fragment (scFv) was generated from the murine hybridoma cells C49H1 producing a FQ-specific monoclonal antibody. This scFv was characterized by indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ciELISA), and it showed identical binding properties to parental monoclonal antibody: it was capable of recognizing 17 of 20 targeted FQs below maximum residue limits, except for sarafloxacin (SAR), difloxacin (DIF), and trovafloxacin (TRO) which are highly concerned members in the FQs family. In order to broaden the specificity of this scFv to SAR and its analogues (DIF and TRO), protein homology modeling and antibody-ligands docking analysis were employed to identify the potential key amino acid residues involved in hapten antibody. A mutagenesis phage display library was generated by site directed mutagenesis randomizing five aminoacid residues in the third heavy-chain complementarity determining region. After one round of panning against biotinylated norfloxacin (NOR) and four rounds of panning against biotinylated SAR, scFv variants we screened showed up to 10-fold improved IC(50) against SAR, DIF, and TRO in ciELISA while the specificity against other FQs was fully retained. PMID:22549819

  2. Localization of immunodominant epitopes within the "a" determinant of hepatitis B surface antigen using monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golsaz-Shirazi, Forough; Mohammadi, Hamed; Amiri, Mohammad Mehdi; Khoshnoodi, Jalal; Kardar, Gholam Ali; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Shokri, Fazel

    2016-10-01

    The common "a" determinant is the major immunodominant region of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) shared by all serotypes and genotypes of hepatitis B virus (HBV). Antibodies against this region are thought to confer protection against HBV and are essential for viral clearance. Mutations within the "a" determinant may lead to conformational changes in this region, which can affect the binding of neutralizing antibodies. There is an increasing concern about identification and control of mutant viruses which is possible by comprehensive structural investigation of the epitopes located within this region. Anti-HBs monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against different epitopes of HBsAg are a promising tool to meet this goal. In the present study, 19 anti-HBs mAbs were employed to map epitopes localized within the "a" determinant, using a panel of recombinant mutant HBsAgs. The topology of the epitopes was analyzed by competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Our results indicate that all of the mAbs seem to recognize epitopes within or in the vicinity of the "a" determinant of HBsAg. Different patterns of binding with mutant forms were observed with different mAbs. Amino acid substitutions at positions 123, 126, 129, 144, and 145 dramatically reduced the reactivity of antibodies with HBsAg. The T123N mutation had the largest impact on antibody binding to HBsAg. The reactivity pattern of our panel of mAbs with mutant forms of HBsAg could have important clinical implications for immunoscreening, diagnosis of HBV infection, design of a new generation of recombinant HB vaccines, and immunoprophylaxis of HBV infection as an alternative to therapy with hepatitis B immune globulin (HBIG). PMID:27439498

  3. Monoclonal antibodies biosimilarity assessment using transient isotachophoresis capillary zone electrophoresis-tandem mass spectrometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gahoual, Rabah; Biacchi, Michaël; Chicher, Johana; Kuhn, Lauriane; Hammann, Philippe; Beck, Alain; Leize-Wagner, Emmanuelle; François, Yannis N

    2014-01-01

    Out of all categories, monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapeutics attract the most interest due to their strong therapeutic potency and specificity. Six of the 10 top-selling drugs are antibody-based therapeutics that will lose patent protection soon. The European Medicines Agency has pioneered the regulatory framework for approval of biosimilar products and approved the first biosimilar antibodies by the end of 2013. As highly complex glycoproteins with a wide range of micro-variants, mAbs require extensive characterization through multiple analytical methods for structure assessment rendering manufacturing control and biosimilarity studies particularly product and time-consuming. Here, capillary zone electrophoresis coupled to mass spectrometry by a sheathless interface (CESI-MS) was used to characterize marketed reference mAbs and their respective biosimilar candidate simultaneously over different facets of their primary structure. CESI-MS/MS data were compared between approved mAbs and their biosimilar candidates to prove/disconfirm biosimilarity regarding recent regulation directives. Using only a single sample injection of 200 fmol, CESI-MS/MS data enabled 100% amino acids (AA) sequence characterization, which allows a difference of even one AA between 2 samples to be distinguished precisely. Simultaneously glycoforms were characterized regarding their structures and position through fragmentation spectra and glycoforms semiquantitative analysis was established, showing the capacity of the developed methodology to detect up to 16 different glycans. Other posttranslational modifications hotspots were characterized while their relative occurrence levels were estimated and compared to biosimilars. These results proved the value of using CESI-MS because the separation selectivity and ionization efficiency provided by the system allowed substantial improvement in the characterization workflow robustness and accuracy. Biosimilarity assessment could be performed

  4. Protection Myopia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laursen, Keld; Salter, Ammon; Li, Cher

    The strategies firms use to protect their intellectual property and knowledge can strongly influence their ability to capture the benefits of their innovative efforts. Using the attention-based theory, we explore positive and negative sides of legal appropriability. While asserting the benefits...

  5. Broad-Band Spectroscopy of Hercules X-1 with Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asami, Fumi; Enoto, Teruaki; Iwakiri, Wataru; Yamada, Shin'ya; Tamagawa, Toru; Mihara, Tatehiro; Nagase, Fumiaki

    2014-01-01

    Hercules X-1 was observed with Suzaku in the main-on state from 2005 to 2010. The 0.4- 100 keV wide-band spectra obtained in four observations showed a broad hump around 4-9 keV in addition to narrow Fe lines at 6.4 and 6.7 keV. The hump was seen in all the four observations regardless of the selection of the continuum models. Thus it is considered a stable and intrinsic spectral feature in Her X-1. The broad hump lacked a sharp structure like an absorption edge. Thus it was represented by two different spectral models: an ionized partial covering or an additional broad line at 6.5 keV. The former required a persistently existing ionized absorber, whose origin was unclear. In the latter case, the Gaussian fitting of the 6.5-keV line needs a large width of sigma = 1.0-1.5 keV and a large equivalent width of 400-900 eV. If the broad line originates from Fe fluorescence of accreting matter, its large width may be explained by the Doppler broadening in the accretion flow. However, the large equivalent width may be inconsistent with a simple accretion geometry.

  6. Document understanding for a broad class of documents

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aiello, Marco; Monz, Christof; Todoran, Leon; Worring, Marcel

    2002-01-01

    We present a document analysis system able to assign logical labels and extract the reading order in a broad set of documents. All information sources, from geometric features and spatial relations to the textual features and content are employed in the analysis. To deal effectively with these infor

  7. Broad-Area Laser Diode With Fiber-Optic Injection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hazel, Geoffrey; Mead, Patricia; Davis, Christopher; Cornwell, Donald

    1992-01-01

    Fiber-optic injection-locked broad-area laser diode features single-mode output via fiber-optic injection and serves as compact, rugged, high-power near-infrared source. Useful in free-space and fiber-optic communication links, as communication-receiver preamplifier, and pump source for solid-state lasers.

  8. Silver Nanoparticles with Broad Multiband Linear Optical Absorption

    KAUST Repository

    Bakr, Osman M.

    2009-07-06

    A simple one-pot method produces silver nanoparticles coated with aryl thiols that show intense, broad nonplasmonic optical properties. The synthesis works with many aryl-thiol capping ligands, including water-soluble 4-mercaptobenzoic acid. The nanoparticles produced show linear absorption that is broader, stronger, and more structured than most conventional organic and inorganic dyes.

  9. Children and trauma : a broad perspective on exposure and recovery

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alisic, E.

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation was to generate a broad overview of children’s exposure to and recovery from trauma in order to promote theory building and the design of prevention and intervention activities. First, a general population study was conducted in 1770 primary school children. They fil

  10. Dusty origin of the Broad Line Region in active galaxies

    CERN Document Server

    Czerny, Bozena; Kaluzny, Janusz; Maity, Ishita

    2012-01-01

    The most characteristic property of active galaxies, including quasars, are prominent broad emission lines. I will discuss an interesting possibility that dust is responsible for this phenomenon. The dust is known to be present in quasars in the form of a dusty/molecular torus which results in complexity of the appearance of active galaxies. However, this dust is located further from the black hole than the Broad Line Region. We propose that the dust is present also closer in and it is actually responsible for formation of the broad emission lines. The argument is based on determination of the temperature of the disk atmosphere underlying the Broad Line Region: it is close to 1000 K, independently from the black hole mass and accretion rate of the object. The mechanism is simple and universal but leads to a considerable complexity of the active nucleus surrounding. The understanding the formation of BLR opens a way to use it reliably - in combination with reverberation measurement of its size - as standard ca...

  11. Lymphoma, melanoma, colon cancer: diagnosis and treatment with radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies. The 1986 Eugene P. Pendergrass New Horizons Lecture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of monoclonal antibodies for use as in vivo carriers of radioactivity for diagnosis and therapy of malignant neoplasms is proceeding rapidly within academic and commercial sectors. The author and his colleagues studied anticancer antibodies formed against tumors of both somatic and hematopoietic origins. Several general principles have been established with the work with somatic tumors, including the following: Improved tumor-to-normal-tissue ratios can be achieved with Fab fragments as opposed to whole IgG; each antitumor antibody has a characteristic biodistribution in humans that cannot be readily predicted from tissue or small animal studies; and for many antibodies, there is a strong dependency of tumor uptake on total mass amount of antibody administered (greater uptake with greater mass dose). Initial work with iodine-131 labeled Fab fragments of the antimelanoma antibodies, 96.5 and 48-7, documented that tumor uptake was broadly proportional to antigen content of the tumors and that under optimal conditions, some tumors were sufficiently loaded with radiolabeled antibody to serve as radiation therapy. The antitumor antibody B-72.3, as IgG, has been particularly promising when administered intraperitoneally. In ten patients who were administered I-131 B-72.3 via a Tenkhoff catheter, the sensitivity and specificity of tumor location were excellent for peritoneal implants, and in three of these patients, surgically confirmed tumor was seen with the radiolabeled antibody technique when abdominal computed tomography and magnetic resonance studies were negative

  12. A monoclonal antibody against a canine CD45 homologue: analysis of tissue distribution, biochemical properties and in vitro immunological activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguiar, Paulo Henrique Palis; Barrouin-Melo, Stella Maria; Franke, Carlos Roberto; dos Santos, Roberto Robson Borges; Silva, Tânia Maria Correia; Mengel, José O; dos-Santos, Washington Luis Conrado; Pontes-de-Carvalho, Lain

    2007-01-01

    This report describes the characterisation of a monoclonal antibody (mAb), AB6, which recognises specifically a cluster of canine leukocyte surface molecules. The immunogen used for obtaining the AB6 mAb was a lysate of canine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). This novel mAb belongs to the IgG2a isotype, and reacted in Western blot with four different canine leukocyte glycoproteins with apparent molecular weights of 180, 190, 205 and 220 kDa. The AB6 mAb recognised the majority of canine peripheral blood leukocytes as determined by flow cytometry (97%). It also exhibited a broad reactivity pattern against lymphoid and myeloid cells, inhibited the proliferation of mitogen-stimulated canine PBMC and did not recognise human PBMC and murine splenocytes. The biochemical properties, cell and tissue specificity, and in vitro biological activity of the AB6 mAb indicate that it recognises a canine CD45 homologue. The mAb could become a valuable diagnostic and research tool for the evaluation of immune functions in dogs. PMID:16249107

  13. Development of a specific monoclonal antibody-based ELISA to measure the artemether content of antimalarial drugs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suqin Guo

    Full Text Available Artemether is one of the artemisinin derivatives that are active ingredients in antimalarial drugs. Counterfeit and substandard antimalarial drugs have become a serious problem, which demands reliable analytical tools and implementation of strict regulation of drug quality. Structural similarity among artemisinin analogs is a challenge to develop immunoassays that are specific to artemisinin derivatives. To produce specific antibodies to artemether, we used microbial fermentation of artemether to obtain 9-hydroxyartemether, which was subsequently used to prepare a 9-O-succinylartemether hapten for conjugation with ovalbumin as the immunogen. A monoclonal antibody (mAb, designated as 2G12E1, was produced with high specificity to artemether. 2G12E1 showed low cross reactivities to dihydroartemisinin, artemisinin, artesunate and other major antimalarial drugs. An indirect competitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (icELISA developed showed a concentration causing 50% of inhibition for artemether as 3.7 ng mL⁻¹ and a working range of 0.7-19 ng mL⁻¹. The icELISA was applied for determination of artemether content in different commercial drugs and the results were comparable to those determined by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. In comparison with reported broad cross activity of anti-artemisinin mAbs, the most notable advantage of the 2G12E1-based ELISA is its high specificity to artemether only.

  14. Development of a Specific Monoclonal Antibody for the Quantification of Artemisinin in Artemisia annua and Rat Serum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Suqin; Cui, Yongliang; Wang, Kunbi; Zhang, Wei; Tan, Guiyu; Wang, Baomin; Cui, Liwang

    2016-03-01

    Artemisinin, extracted from Artemisia annua, and its derivatives are important frontline antimalarials. To produce specific antibodies for the detection and quantification of artemisinin, artemisinin was transformed to 9-hydroxyartemisinin by microbial fermentation, which was used to prepare a 9-succinate artemisinin hapten for conjugation with ovalbumin. A monoclonal antibody (mAb), designated as 3H7A10, was selected from hybridoma cell lines which showed high specificity to artemisinin. No competitive inhibition was observed with artesunate, dihydroartemisinin, and artemether for up to 20,000 ng mL(-1). An indirect competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (icELISA) was developed, which showed a concentration causing 50% of inhibition (IC50) for artemisinin as 2.6 ng mL(-1) and a working range of 0.6-11.5 ng mL(-1). The icELISA was applied for the quantification of artemisinin in crude extracts of wild A. annua and the study of pharmacokinetics of artemisinin in rat serum after intraperitoneal injection. The results were highly correlated with those determined by HPLC-UV analysis (R(2) = 0.9919). In comparison with reported antiartemisinin mAbs which have broad cross-reactivity with other artemisinin derivatives, the high specificity of 3H7A10 for artemisinin will enable development of methods for quantification of artemisinin in Artemisia plants and antimalarial drugs such as Arco and for pharmacokinetic studies. PMID:26822789

  15. Crystal structure of the Hendra virus attachment G glycoprotein bound to a potent cross-reactive neutralizing human monoclonal antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Xu

    Full Text Available The henipaviruses, represented by Hendra (HeV and Nipah (NiV viruses are highly pathogenic zoonotic paramyxoviruses with uniquely broad host tropisms responsible for repeated outbreaks in Australia, Southeast Asia, India and Bangladesh. The high morbidity and mortality rates associated with infection and lack of licensed antiviral therapies make the henipaviruses a potential biological threat to humans and livestock. Henipavirus entry is initiated by the attachment of the G envelope glycoprotein to host cell membrane receptors. Previously, henipavirus-neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies (hmAb have been isolated using the HeV-G glycoprotein and a human naïve antibody library. One cross-reactive and receptor-blocking hmAb (m102.4 was recently demonstrated to be an effective post-exposure therapy in two animal models of NiV and HeV infection, has been used in several people on a compassionate use basis, and is currently in development for use in humans. Here, we report the crystal structure of the complex of HeV-G with m102.3, an m102.4 derivative, and describe NiV and HeV escape mutants. This structure provides detailed insight into the mechanism of HeV and NiV neutralization by m102.4, and serves as a blueprint for further optimization of m102.4 as a therapeutic agent and for the development of entry inhibitors and vaccines.

  16. Monoclonal antibody:the corner stone of modern biotherapeutics%Monoclonal antibody: the corner stone of modern biotherapeutics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIA Zhi-nan; CAI Xue-ting; CAO Peng

    2012-01-01

    Worldwide sales of biologic drugs exceeded 100 billion USD in 2011.About 32% is from therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb).With many blockbuster biopharmaceutical patents expiring over the next decade,there is a great opportunity for biosimilar to enter the worldwide especially emerging market.Both European Medicines Agency (EMA) and Food and Drug Administration (FDA) have introduced regulatory frameworks for the potential approval of biosimilar mAb therapeutics.Rather than providing a highly abbreviated path,as in the case for small molecule chemical drug,approval for biosimilar mAb will require clinical trial and the details will be very much on a case-by-case basis.Since mAb is the dominant category of biologic drugs,mAb will be the focus of this review.First,the United States (US) and European Union (EU) approved mAb and those in phase 3 trials will be reviewed,then strategies on how to win biosimilar competition will be reviewed.

  17. Chile : Household Risk Management and Social Protection

    OpenAIRE

    World Bank, (WB)

    2004-01-01

    This report is part of the World Bank's advisory and analytical assistance to the Government of Chile. The report examines whether Chile has a social protection "system" - broadly defined to include policy interventions, public institutions, and the regulation of private institutions that lower the welfare costs of adverse shocks to income from job loss and extended unemployment, health ep...

  18. International Physical Protection Advisory Service

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since its inception in 1996, the purpose of the International Physical Protection Advisory Service (IPPAS) has been to provide advice and assistance to International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Member States on strengthening and enhancing the effectiveness of their state system of physical protection of nuclear materials and facilities. Since the protection of nuclear materials and facilities is a Member State's responsibility, participation within the IPPAS program is voluntary. At the request of a Member State, the IAEA forms a multinational IPPAS team consisting of physical protection specialists. These specialists have broad experience in physical protection system design, implementation, and regulatory oversight. The exact make-up of the team depends upon the needs of the requesting state. IPPAS missions to participating states strive to compare the domestic procedures and practices of the state against international physical protection guidelines (IAEA Information Circular 225) and internationally accepted practice. The missions utilize a top to bottom approach and begin by reviewing the legal and regulatory structure and conclude with reviews of the implementation of the state regulations and international guidelines at individual facilities. IPPAS findings are treated as IAEA Safeguards Confidential Information. To date, IPPAS missions have been concluded in Slovenia, Bulgaria, Romania, Hungary, and Poland

  19. Radiation protection in medical imaging and radiation oncology

    CERN Document Server

    Stoeva, Magdalena S

    2016-01-01

    Radiation Protection in Medical Imaging and Radiation Oncology focuses on the professional, operational, and regulatory aspects of radiation protection. Advances in radiation medicine have resulted in new modalities and procedures, some of which have significant potential to cause serious harm. Examples include radiologic procedures that require very long fluoroscopy times, radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies, and intravascular brachytherapy. This book summarizes evidence supporting changes in consensus recommendations, regulations, and health physics practices associated with these recent advances in radiology, nuclear medicine, and radiation oncology. It supports intelligent and practical methods for protection of personnel, the public, and patients. The book is based on current recommendations by the International Commission on Radiological Protection and is complemented by detailed practical sections and professional discussions by the world’s leading medical and health physics professionals. It also ...

  20. Mass-Production and Characterization of Anti-CD20 Monoclonal Antibody in Peritoneum of Balb/c Mice

    OpenAIRE

    Leili Aghebati; Jalal Abdolalizadeh; Jafar Majidi; Behzad Baradaran; Koushan Sineh Sepehr; Fatemeh Zare Shahneh

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: Monoclonal antibodies are important tools are used in basic research as well as, in diagnosis, imaging and treatment of immunodeficiency diseases, infections and cancers. The purpose of this study was to produce large scale of monoclonal antibody against CD20 in order to diagnostic application in leukemia and lymphomas disorders. Methods: Hybridoma cells that produce monoclonal antibody against human CD20 were administered into the peritoneum of the Balb/c mice which have previously ...