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Sample records for broadly protective monoclonal

  1. Human monoclonal antibodies broadly neutralizing against influenza B virus.

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    Mayo Yasugi

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Influenza virus has the ability to evade host immune surveillance through rapid viral genetic drift and reassortment; therefore, it remains a continuous public health threat. The development of vaccines producing broadly reactive antibodies, as well as therapeutic strategies using human neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs with global reactivity, has been gathering great interest recently. Here, three hybridoma clones producing HuMAbs against influenza B virus, designated 5A7, 3A2 and 10C4, were prepared using peripheral lymphocytes from vaccinated volunteers, and were investigated for broad cross-reactive neutralizing activity. Of these HuMAbs, 3A2 and 10C4, which recognize the readily mutable 190-helix region near the receptor binding site in the hemagglutinin (HA protein, react only with the Yamagata lineage of influenza B virus. By contrast, HuMAb 5A7 broadly neutralizes influenza B strains that were isolated from 1985 to 2006, belonging to both Yamagata and Victoria lineages. Epitope mapping revealed that 5A7 recognizes 316G, 318C and 321W near the C terminal of HA1, a highly conserved region in influenza B virus. Indeed, no mutations in the amino acid residues of the epitope region were induced, even after the virus was passaged ten times in the presence of HuMAb 5A7. Moreover, 5A7 showed significant therapeutic efficacy in mice, even when it was administered 72 hours post-infection. These results indicate that 5A7 is a promising candidate for developing therapeutics, and provide insight for the development of a universal vaccine against influenza B virus.

  2. Development of broad-spectrum human monoclonal antibodies for rabies post-exposure prophylaxis.

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    De Benedictis, Paola; Minola, Andrea; Rota Nodari, Elena; Aiello, Roberta; Zecchin, Barbara; Salomoni, Angela; Foglierini, Mathilde; Agatic, Gloria; Vanzetta, Fabrizia; Lavenir, Rachel; Lepelletier, Anthony; Bentley, Emma; Weiss, Robin; Cattoli, Giovanni; Capua, Ilaria; Sallusto, Federica; Wright, Edward; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Bourhy, Hervé; Corti, Davide

    2016-04-01

    Currently available rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) for use in humans includes equine or human rabies immunoglobulins (RIG). The replacement of RIG with an equally or more potent and safer product is strongly encouraged due to the high costs and limited availability of existing RIG. In this study, we identified two broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies that represent a valid and affordable alternative to RIG in rabies PEP. Memory B cells from four selected vaccinated donors were immortalized and monoclonal antibodies were tested for neutralizing activity and epitope specificity. Two antibodies, identified as RVC20 and RVC58 (binding to antigenic site I and III, respectively), were selected for their potency and broad-spectrum reactivity. In vitro, RVC20 and RVC58 were able to neutralize all 35 rabies virus (RABV) and 25 non-RABV lyssaviruses. They showed higher potency and breath compared to antibodies under clinical development (namely CR57, CR4098, and RAB1) and commercially available human RIG. In vivo, the RVC20-RVC58 cocktail protected Syrian hamsters from a lethal RABV challenge and did not affect the endogenous hamster post-vaccination antibody response. © 2016 Humabs BioMed SA Published under the terms of the CC BY 4.0 license.

  3. Prospects for broadly protective influenza vaccines.

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    Treanor, John Jay

    2015-11-27

    The development of vaccines that could provide broad protection against antigenically variant influenza viruses has long been the ultimate prize in influenza research. Recent developments have pushed us closer to this goal, and such vaccines may now be within reach. This brief review outlines the current approaches to broadly protective vaccines, and the probable hurdles and roadblocks to achieving this goal. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Structural Basis for Recognition of Human Enterovirus 71 by a Bivalent Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibody.

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    Xiaohua Ye

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Enterovirus 71 (EV71 is the main pathogen responsible for hand, foot and mouth disease with severe neurological complications and even death in young children. We have recently identified a highly potent anti-EV71 neutralizing monoclonal antibody, termed D5. Here we investigated the structural basis for recognition of EV71 by the antibody D5. Four three-dimensional structures of EV71 particles in complex with IgG or Fab of D5 were reconstructed by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM single particle analysis all at subnanometer resolutions. The most critical EV71 mature virion-Fab structure was resolved to a resolution of 4.8 Å, which is rare in cryo-EM studies of virus-antibody complex so far. The structures reveal a bivalent binding pattern of D5 antibody across the icosahedral 2-fold axis on mature virion, suggesting that D5 binding may rigidify virions to prevent their conformational changes required for subsequent RNA release. Moreover, we also identified that the complementary determining region 3 (CDR3 of D5 heavy chain directly interacts with the extremely conserved VP1 GH-loop of EV71, which was validated by biochemical and virological assays. We further showed that D5 is indeed able to neutralize a variety of EV71 genotypes and strains. Moreover, D5 could potently confer protection in a mouse model of EV71 infection. Since the conserved VP1 GH-loop is involved in EV71 binding with its uncoating receptor, the scavenger receptor class B, member 2 (SCARB2, the broadly neutralizing ability of D5 might attribute to its inhibition of EV71 from binding SCARB2. Altogether, our results elucidate the structural basis for the binding and neutralization of EV71 by the broadly neutralizing antibody D5, thereby enhancing our understanding of antibody-based protection against EV71 infection.

  5. Prevention of hepatitis C virus infection using a broad cross-neutralizing monoclonal antibody (AR4A) and epigallocatechin gallate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shea, Daire; Law, John; Egli, Adrian; Douglas, Donna; Lund, Gary; Forester, Sarah; Lambert, Joshua; Law, Mansun; Burton, Dennis R; Tyrrell, D L J; Houghton, Michael; Humar, Atul; Kneteman, Norman

    2016-03-01

    The anti-hepatitis C virus (HCV) activity of a novel monoclonal antibody (mAb; AR4A) and epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG) were studied in vitro using a HCV cell culture system and in vivo using a humanized liver mouse model capable of supporting HCV replication. Alone, both exhibit reliable cross-genotype HCV inhibition in vitro, and combination therapy completely prevented HCV infection. In vitro AR4A mAb (alone and combined with EGCG) robustly protects against the establishment of HCV genotype 1a infection. EGCG alone fails to reliably protect against an HCV challenge. In conclusion, AR4A mAb represents a safe and efficacious broadly neutralizing antibody against HCV applicable to strategies to safely prevent HCV reinfection following liver transplantation, and it lends further support to the concept of HCV vaccine development. The poor bioavailability of EGCG limits HCV antiviral activity in vitro. © 2015 American Association for the Study of Liver Diseases.

  6. Novel Cross-Reactive Monoclonal Antibodies against Ebolavirus Glycoproteins Show Protection in a Murine Challenge Model.

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    Duehr, James; Wohlbold, Teddy John; Oestereich, Lisa; Chromikova, Veronika; Amanat, Fatima; Rajendran, Madhusudan; Gomez-Medina, Sergio; Mena, Ignacio; tenOever, Benjamin R; García-Sastre, Adolfo; Basler, Christopher F; Munoz-Fontela, Cesar; Krammer, Florian

    2017-08-15

    Out of an estimated 31,100 cases since their discovery in 1976, ebolaviruses have caused approximately 13,000 deaths. The vast majority (∼11,000) of these occurred during the 2013-2016 West African epidemic. Three out of five species in the genus are known to cause Ebola Virus Disease in humans. Several monoclonal antibodies against the ebolavirus glycoprotein are currently in development as therapeutics. However, there is still a paucity of monoclonal antibodies that can cross-react between the glycoproteins of different ebolavirus species, and the mechanism of these monoclonal antibody therapeutics is still not understood in detail. Here, we generated a panel of eight murine monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) utilizing a prime-boost vaccination regimen with a Zaire ebolavirus glycoprotein expression plasmid followed by infection with a vesicular stomatitis virus expressing the Zaire ebolavirus glycoprotein. We tested the binding breadth of the resulting monoclonal antibodies using a set of recombinant surface glycoproteins from Reston, Taï Forest, Bundibugyo, Zaire, Sudan, and Marburg viruses and found two antibodies that showed pan-ebolavirus binding. An in vivo Stat2-/- mouse model was utilized to test the ability of these MAbs to protect from infection with a vesicular stomatitis virus expressing the Zaire ebolavirus glycoprotein. Several of our antibodies, including the broadly binding ones, protected mice from mortality despite lacking neutralization capability in vitro, suggesting their protection may be mediated by Fc-FcR interactions. Indeed, three antibodies displayed cellular phagocytosis and/or antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity in vitro Our antibodies, specifically the two identified cross-reactive monoclonal antibodies (KL-2E5 and KL-2H7), might add to the understanding of anti-ebolavirus humoral immunity.IMPORTANCE This study describes the generation of a panel of novel anti-ebolavirus glycoprotein monoclonal antibodies, including two

  7. Broad neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies against influenza virus from vaccinated healthy donors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko; Mizuta, Hiroyuki [Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Oshita, Masatoshi; Ideno, Shoji [Osaka Research Laboratory, Benesis Corporation, Yodogawa-ku, Osaka 532-6505 (Japan); Yunoki, Mikihiro [Osaka Research Laboratory, Benesis Corporation, Yodogawa-ku, Osaka 532-6505 (Japan); Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Kuhara, Motoki [Ina Laboratory, Medical and Biological Laboratories Corporation, Ltd., Ina, Nagano 396-0002 (Japan); Yamamoto, Naomasa [Department of Biochemistry, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Ohu University, Koriyama, Fukushima 963-8611 (Japan); Okuno, Yoshinobu [Kanonji Institute, The Research Foundation for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University, Kanonji, Kagawa 768-0061 (Japan); Ikuta, Kazuyoshi, E-mail: ikuta@biken.osaka-u.ac.jp [Department of Virology, Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan)

    2009-09-11

    Human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) prepared from patients with viral infections could provide information on human epitopes important for the development of vaccines as well as potential therapeutic applications. Through the fusion of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a total of five influenza-vaccinated volunteers, with newly developed murine-human chimera fusion partner cells, named SPYMEG, we obtained 10 hybridoma clones stably producing anti-influenza virus antibodies: one for influenza A H1N1, four for influenza A H3N2 and five for influenza B. Surprisingly, most of the HuMAbs showed broad reactivity within subtype and four (two for H3N2 and two for B) showed broad neutralizing ability. Importantly, epitope mapping revealed that the two broad neutralizing antibodies to H3N2 derived from different donors recognized the same epitope located underneath the receptor-binding site of the hemagglutinin globular region that is highly conserved among H3N2 strains.

  8. Broadly protective influenza vaccines: Redirecting the antibody response through adjuvation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, F.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus infections are responsible for significant morbidity worldwide and current vaccines have limited coverage, therefore it remains a high priority to develop broadly protective vaccines. With the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against influenza these vaccines

  9. A broadly flavivirus cross-neutralizing monoclonal antibody that recognizes a novel epitope within the fusion loop of E protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-Qiang Deng

    Full Text Available Flaviviruses are a group of human pathogenic, enveloped RNA viruses that includes dengue (DENV, yellow fever (YFV, West Nile (WNV, and Japanese encephalitis (JEV viruses. Cross-reactive antibodies against Flavivirus have been described, but most of them are generally weakly neutralizing. In this study, a novel monoclonal antibody, designated mAb 2A10G6, was determined to have broad cross-reactivity with DENV 1-4, YFV, WNV, JEV, and TBEV. Phage-display biopanning and structure modeling mapped 2A10G6 to a new epitope within the highly conserved flavivirus fusion loop peptide, the (98DRXW(101 motif. Moreover, in vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that 2A10G6 potently neutralizes DENV 1-4, YFV, and WNV and confers protection from lethal challenge with DENV 1-4 and WNV in murine model. Furthermore, functional studies revealed that 2A10G6 blocks infection at a step after viral attachment. These results define a novel broadly flavivirus cross-reactive mAb with highly neutralizing activity that can be further developed as a therapeutic agent against severe flavivirus infections in humans.

  10. Development and characterization of novel chimeric monoclonal antibodies for broad spectrum neutralization of rabies virus.

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    Pan Kyeom Kim

    Full Text Available Current post-exposure prophylaxis for rabies virus infection has several limitations in terms of supply, cost, safety, and efficacy. Attempts to replace human or equine rabies immune globulins (HRIG or ERIG have been made by several companies and institutes. We developed potent monoclonal antibodies to neutralize a broad spectrum of rabies viruses by screening hybridomas received from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC. Two kinds of chimeric human antibodies (chimeric #7 and #17 were constructed by cloning the variable regions from selected hybridomas and the constant region of a human antibody. Two antibodies were bound to antigenic site III and I/IV, respectively, and were able to neutralize 51 field isolates of rabies virus that were isolated at different times and places such as Asia, Africa, North America, South America, and Australia. These two antibodies neutralize rabies viruses with high efficacy in an in vivo test using Syrian hamster and mouse models and show low risk for adverse immunogenicity.

  11. Development and characterization of novel chimeric monoclonal antibodies for broad spectrum neutralization of rabies virus.

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    Kim, Pan Kyeom; Keum, Sun Ju; Osinubi, Modupe O V; Franka, Richard; Shin, Ji Young; Park, Sang Tae; Kim, Man Su; Park, Mi Jung; Lee, Soo Young; Carson, William; Greenberg, Lauren; Yu, Pengcheng; Tao, Xiaoyan; Lihua, Wang; Tang, Qing; Liang, Guodong; Shampur, Madhusdana; Rupprecht, Charles E; Chang, Shin Jae

    2017-01-01

    Current post-exposure prophylaxis for rabies virus infection has several limitations in terms of supply, cost, safety, and efficacy. Attempts to replace human or equine rabies immune globulins (HRIG or ERIG) have been made by several companies and institutes. We developed potent monoclonal antibodies to neutralize a broad spectrum of rabies viruses by screening hybridomas received from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Two kinds of chimeric human antibodies (chimeric #7 and #17) were constructed by cloning the variable regions from selected hybridomas and the constant region of a human antibody. Two antibodies were bound to antigenic site III and I/IV, respectively, and were able to neutralize 51 field isolates of rabies virus that were isolated at different times and places such as Asia, Africa, North America, South America, and Australia. These two antibodies neutralize rabies viruses with high efficacy in an in vivo test using Syrian hamster and mouse models and show low risk for adverse immunogenicity.

  12. Incomplete Neutralization and Deviation from Sigmoidal Neutralization Curves for HIV Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies.

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    Laura E McCoy

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The broadly neutralizing HIV monoclonal antibodies (bnMAbs PG9, PG16, PGT151, and PGT152 have been shown earlier to occasionally display an unusual virus neutralization profile with a non-sigmoidal slope and a plateau at <100% neutralization. In the current study, we were interested in determining the extent of non-sigmoidal slopes and plateaus at <100% for HIV bnMAbs more generally. Using both a 278 panel of pseudoviruses in a CD4 T-cell (U87.CCR5.CXCR4 assay and a panel of 117 viruses in the TZM-bl assay, we found that bnMAbs targeting many neutralizing epitopes of the spike had neutralization profiles for at least one virus that plateaued at <90%. Across both panels the bnMAbs targeting the V2 apex of Env and gp41 were most likely to show neutralization curves that plateaued <100%. Conversely, bnMAbs targeting the high-mannose patch epitopes were less likely to show such behavior. Two CD4 binding site (CD4bs Abs also showed this behavior relatively infrequently. The phenomenon of incomplete neutralization was also observed in a large peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC-grown molecular virus clone panel derived from patient viral swarms. In addition, five bnMAbs were compared against an 18-virus panel of molecular clones produced in 293T cells and PBMCs and assayed in TZM-bl cells. Examples of plateaus <90% were seen with both types of virus production with no consistent patterns observed. In conclusion, incomplete neutralization and non-sigmoidal neutralization curves are possible for all HIV bnMAbs against a wide range of viruses produced and assayed in both cell lines and primary cells with implications for the use of antibodies in therapy and as tools for vaccine design.

  13. A “Trojan horse” bispecific-antibody strategy for broad protection against ebolaviruses

    OpenAIRE

    Wec, Anna Z.; Nyakatura, Elisabeth K.; Herbert, Andrew S.; Howell, Katie A.; Holtsberg, Frederick W.; Bakken, Russell R.; Mittler, Eva; Christin, John R.; Shulenin, Sergey; Jangra, Rohit K.; Bharrhan, Sushma; Kuehne, Ana I.; Bornholdt, Zachary A.; Flyak, Andrew I.; Saphire, Erica Ollmann

    2016-01-01

    There is an urgent need for monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapies that broadly protect against Ebola virus and other filoviruses. The conserved, essential interaction between the filovirus glycoprotein, GP, and its entry receptor Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) provides an attractive target for such mAbs but is shielded by multiple mechanisms, including physical sequestration in late endosomes. Here, we describe a bispecific-antibody strategy to target this interaction, in which mAbs specific for NPC1 o...

  14. A "Trojan horse" bispecific-antibody strategy for broad protection against ebolaviruses.

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    Wec, Anna Z; Nyakatura, Elisabeth K; Herbert, Andrew S; Howell, Katie A; Holtsberg, Frederick W; Bakken, Russell R; Mittler, Eva; Christin, John R; Shulenin, Sergey; Jangra, Rohit K; Bharrhan, Sushma; Kuehne, Ana I; Bornholdt, Zachary A; Flyak, Andrew I; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Crowe, James E; Aman, M Javad; Dye, John M; Lai, Jonathan R; Chandran, Kartik

    2016-10-21

    There is an urgent need for monoclonal antibody (mAb) therapies that broadly protect against Ebola virus and other filoviruses. The conserved, essential interaction between the filovirus glycoprotein, GP, and its entry receptor Niemann-Pick C1 (NPC1) provides an attractive target for such mAbs but is shielded by multiple mechanisms, including physical sequestration in late endosomes. Here, we describe a bispecific-antibody strategy to target this interaction, in which mAbs specific for NPC1 or the GP receptor-binding site are coupled to a mAb against a conserved, surface-exposed GP epitope. Bispecific antibodies, but not parent mAbs, neutralized all known ebolaviruses by coopting viral particles themselves for endosomal delivery and conferred postexposure protection against multiple ebolaviruses in mice. Such "Trojan horse" bispecific antibodies have potential as broad antifilovirus immunotherapeutics. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  15. Rapid High-Level Production of Functional HIV Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies in Transient Plant Expression Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Yvonne Rosenberg; Markus Sack; David Montefiori; Donald Forthal; Lingjun Mao; Segundo Hernandez-Abanto; Lori Urban; Gary Landucci; Rainer Fischer; Xiaoming Jiang

    2013-01-01

    Passive immunotherapy using anti-HIV broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has shown promise as an HIV treatment, reducing mother-to-child-transmission (MTCT) of simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) in non-human primates and decreasing viral rebound in patients who ceased receiving anti-viral drugs. In addition, a cocktail of potent mAbs may be useful as mucosal microbicides and provide an effective therapy for post-exposure prophylaxis. However, even highly neutralizing HIV...

  16. A Cross-Reactive Monoclonal Antibody to Nematode Haemoglobin Enhances Protective Immune Responses to Nippostrongylus brasiliensis

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    Nieuwenhuizen, Natalie E.; Meter, Jeanne M.; Horsnell, William G.; Hoving, J. Claire; Fick, Lizette; Sharp, Michael F.; Darby, Matthew G.; Parihar, Suraj P.; Brombacher, Frank; Lopata, Andreas L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Nematode secreted haemoglobins have unusually high affinity for oxygen and possess nitric oxide deoxygenase, and catalase activity thought to be important in protection against host immune responses to infection. In this study, we generated a monoclonal antibody (48Eg) against haemoglobin of the nematode Anisakis pegreffii, and aimed to characterize cross-reactivity of 4E8g against haemoglobins of different nematodes and its potential to mediate protective immunity against a murine hookworm infection. Methodology/Principal Findings Immunoprecipitation was used to isolate the 4E8g-binding antigen in Anisakis and Ascaris extracts, which were identified as haemoglobins by peptide mass fingerprinting and MS/MS. Immunological cross-reactivity was also demonstrated with haemoglobin of the rodent hookworm N. brasiliensis. Immunogenicity of nematode haemoglobin in mice and humans was tested by immunoblotting. Anisakis haemoglobin was recognized by IgG and IgE antibodies of Anisakis-infected mice, while Ascaris haemoglobin was recognized by IgG but not IgE antibodies in mouse and human sera. Sequencing of Anisakis haemoglobin revealed high similarity to haemoglobin of a related marine nematode, Psuedoterranova decipiens, which lacks the four –HKEE repeats of Ascaris haemoglobin important in octamer assembly. The localization of haemoglobin in the different parasites was examined by immunohistochemistry and associated with the excretory-secretary ducts in Anisakis, Ascaris and N. brasiliensis. Anisakis haemoglobin was strongly expressed in the L3 stage, unlike Ascaris haemoglobin, which is reportedly mainly expressed in adult worms. Passive immunization of mice with 4E8g prior to infection with N. brasiliensis enhanced protective Th2 immunity and led to a significant decrease in worm burdens. Conclusion The monoclonal antibody 4E8g targets haemoglobin in broadly equivalent anatomical locations in parasitic nematodes and enhances host immunity to a hookworm

  17. Prevention of HCV infection using a broad cross-neutralizing monoclonal antibody (AR4A) and Epigallocatechin-Gallate

    OpenAIRE

    O'Shea, D.; Law, J.; Egli, A.; Douglas, D.; Lund, G; Forester, S; Lambert, J.; Law, M; Burton, D R; Tyrrell, D. L. J.; Houghton, M; Humar, A; Kneteman, N.

    2016-01-01

    The anti-HCV activity of a novel monoclonal antibody (mAb; AR4A) and Epigallocatechin-gallate (EGCG) were studied in-vitro using an HCV cell culture system and in-vivo using a humanized liver mouse model capable of supporting HCV replication. Alone, both exhibit reliable cross-genotype HCV inhibition in-vitro, and combination therapy completely prevented HCV infection. In-vivo AR4A mAb (alone and combined with EGCG) robustly protects against the establishment of HCV genotype 1a infection. EGC...

  18. Rapid high-level production of functional HIV broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies in transient plant expression systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yvonne Rosenberg

    Full Text Available Passive immunotherapy using anti-HIV broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs has shown promise as an HIV treatment, reducing mother-to-child-transmission (MTCT of simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV in non-human primates and decreasing viral rebound in patients who ceased receiving anti-viral drugs. In addition, a cocktail of potent mAbs may be useful as mucosal microbicides and provide an effective therapy for post-exposure prophylaxis. However, even highly neutralizing HIV mAbs used today may lose their effectiveness if resistance occurs, requiring the rapid production of new or engineered mAbs on an ongoing basis in order to counteract the viral resistance or the spread of a certain HIV-1 clade in a particular region or patient. Plant-based expression systems are fast, inexpensive and scalable and are becoming increasingly popular for the production of proteins and monoclonal antibodies. In the present study, Agrobacterium-mediated transient transfection of plants, utilizing two species of Nicotiana, have been tested to rapidly produce high levels of an HIV 89.6PΔ140env and several well-studied anti-HIV neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (b12, 2G12, 2F5, 4E10, m43, VRC01 or a single chain antibody construct (m9, for evaluation in cell-based viral inhibition assays. The protein-A purified plant-derived antibodies were intact, efficiently bound HIV envelope, and were equivalent to, or in one case better than, their counterparts produced in mammalian CHO or HEK-293 cells in both neutralization and antibody dependent viral inhibition assays. These data indicate that transient plant-based transient expression systems are very adaptable and could rapidly generate high levels of newly identified functional recombinant HIV neutralizing antibodies when required. In addition, they warrant detailed cost-benefit analysis of prolonged incubation in plants to further increase mAb production.

  19. Rapid high-level production of functional HIV broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies in transient plant expression systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosenberg, Yvonne; Sack, Markus; Montefiori, David; Forthal, Donald; Mao, Lingjun; Hernandez-Abanto, Segundo; Urban, Lori; Landucci, Gary; Fischer, Rainer; Jiang, Xiaoming

    2013-01-01

    Passive immunotherapy using anti-HIV broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has shown promise as an HIV treatment, reducing mother-to-child-transmission (MTCT) of simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) in non-human primates and decreasing viral rebound in patients who ceased receiving anti-viral drugs. In addition, a cocktail of potent mAbs may be useful as mucosal microbicides and provide an effective therapy for post-exposure prophylaxis. However, even highly neutralizing HIV mAbs used today may lose their effectiveness if resistance occurs, requiring the rapid production of new or engineered mAbs on an ongoing basis in order to counteract the viral resistance or the spread of a certain HIV-1 clade in a particular region or patient. Plant-based expression systems are fast, inexpensive and scalable and are becoming increasingly popular for the production of proteins and monoclonal antibodies. In the present study, Agrobacterium-mediated transient transfection of plants, utilizing two species of Nicotiana, have been tested to rapidly produce high levels of an HIV 89.6PΔ140env and several well-studied anti-HIV neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (b12, 2G12, 2F5, 4E10, m43, VRC01) or a single chain antibody construct (m9), for evaluation in cell-based viral inhibition assays. The protein-A purified plant-derived antibodies were intact, efficiently bound HIV envelope, and were equivalent to, or in one case better than, their counterparts produced in mammalian CHO or HEK-293 cells in both neutralization and antibody dependent viral inhibition assays. These data indicate that transient plant-based transient expression systems are very adaptable and could rapidly generate high levels of newly identified functional recombinant HIV neutralizing antibodies when required. In addition, they warrant detailed cost-benefit analysis of prolonged incubation in plants to further increase mAb production.

  20. Pan-ebolavirus and Pan-filovirus Mouse Monoclonal Antibodies: Protection against Ebola and Sudan Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holtsberg, Frederick W; Shulenin, Sergey; Vu, Hong; Howell, Katie A; Patel, Sonal J; Gunn, Bronwyn; Karim, Marcus; Lai, Jonathan R; Frei, Julia C; Nyakatura, Elisabeth K; Zeitlin, Larry; Douglas, Robin; Fusco, Marnie L; Froude, Jeffrey W; Saphire, Erica Ollmann; Herbert, Andrew S; Wirchnianski, Ariel S; Lear-Rooney, Calli M; Alter, Galit; Dye, John M; Glass, Pamela J; Warfield, Kelly L; Aman, M Javad

    2015-10-14

    The unprecedented 2014-2015 Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak in West Africa has highlighted the need for effective therapeutics against filoviruses. Monoclonal antibody (MAb) cocktails have shown great potential as EVD therapeutics; however, the existing protective MAbs are virus species specific. Here we report the development of pan-ebolavirus and pan-filovirus antibodies generated by repeated immunization of mice with filovirus glycoproteins engineered to drive the B cell responses toward conserved epitopes. Multiple pan-ebolavirus antibodies were identified that react to the Ebola, Sudan, Bundibugyo, and Reston viruses. A pan-filovirus antibody that was reactive to the receptor binding regions of all filovirus glycoproteins was also identified. Significant postexposure efficacy of several MAbs, including a novel antibody cocktail, was demonstrated. For the first time, we report cross-neutralization and in vivo protection against two highly divergent filovirus species, i.e., Ebola virus and Sudan virus, with a single antibody. Competition studies indicate that this antibody targets a previously unrecognized conserved neutralizing epitope that involves the glycan cap. Mechanistic studies indicated that, besides neutralization, innate immune cell effector functions may play a role in the antiviral activity of the antibodies. Our findings further suggest critical novel epitopes that can be utilized to design effective cocktails for broad protection against multiple filovirus species. Filoviruses represent a major public health threat in Africa and an emerging global concern. Largely driven by the U.S. biodefense funding programs and reinforced by the 2014 outbreaks, current immunotherapeutics are primarily focused on a single filovirus species called Ebola virus (EBOV) (formerly Zaire Ebola virus). However, other filoviruses including Sudan, Bundibugyo, and Marburg viruses have caused human outbreaks with mortality rates as high as 90%. Thus, cross-protective

  1. A murine monoclonal antibody with broad specificity for occupationally relevant diisocyanates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, Angela R; Siegel, Paul D; Mhike, Morgen; Law, Brandon F; Hettick, Justin M; Bledsoe, Toni A; Nayak, Ajay P; Beezhold, Donald H; Green, Brett J

    2014-01-01

    Diisocyanates (dNCOs) used in industrial applications are well known low molecular weight allergens. Occupational exposure is associated with adverse health outcomes including allergic sensitization and occupational asthma. In this study, we report the production and initial characterization of a dNCO-hapten specific murine IgM monoclonal antibody (mAb). Female BALB/c mice were immunized intraperitoneally with 25 μg of 4,4'-methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI)-keyhole limpet hemocyanin. Following six biweekly booster immunizations, splenocytes were recovered and fused to Sp2/0-Ag14 murine myeloma cell line for hybridoma production. Hybridomas were then screened in a solid-phase indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) against 40:1 4,4'-MDI- human serum albumin (HSA). mAb reactivity to dNCO-HSA conjugates and dNCO-HSA spiked human serum were characterized using a sandwich ELISA. One hybridoma produced a multimeric IgM mAb (15D4) that reacted with 4,4'-MDI-HSA. Sandwich ELISA analysis demonstrated comparable reactivity with other occupationally relevant dNCO-HSA adducts, including 2,4-toluene diisocyanate (TDI)-HSA, 2,6-TDI-HSA, and 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI)-HSA, but not other electrophilic chemical HSA conjugates. The limit of quantification (LOQ) of 4,4'-MDI-HSA, 2,4-TDI-HSA, 2,6-TDI-HSA, and 1,6-HDI-HSA sandwich ELISAs were 567.2, 172.7, 184.2, and 403.5 ng/mL (8.67, 2.60, 2.77, and 6.07 pmol/mL), respectively. In contrast, experiments using dNCO-supplemented human sera showed an increase in the detectable limit of the assay. A mAb has been produced that has potential utility for detecting mixed diisocyanate exposures in occupational environments. The mAb may have additional utility in the standardization of specific IgE detection immunoassays as well as chromatographic-mass spectrometric methods to enrich dNCO adducted HSA in the plasma of occupationally exposed workers.

  2. Broadly neutralizing human monoclonal JC polyomavirus VP1–specific antibodies as candidate therapeutics for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelcic, Ivan; Combaluzier, Benoit; Jelcic, Ilijas; Faigle, Wolfgang; Senn, Luzia; Reinhart, Brenda J.; Ströh, Luisa; Nitsch, Roger M.; Stehle, Thilo; Sospedra, Mireia; Grimm, Jan; Martin, Roland

    2016-01-01

    In immunocompromised individuals, JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) may mutate and gain access to the central nervous system resulting in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), an often fatal opportunistic infection for which no treatments are currently available. Despite recent progress, the contribution of JCPyV-specific humoral immunity to controlling asymptomatic infection throughout life and to eliminating JCPyV from the brain is poorly understood. We examined antibody responses against JCPyV major capsid protein VP1 (viral protein 1) variants in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of healthy donors (HDs), JCPyV-positive multiple sclerosis patients treated with the anti-VLA-4 monoclonal antibody natalizumab (NAT), and patients with NAT-associated PML. Before and during PML, CSF antibody responses against JCPyV VP1 variants show “recognition holes”; however, upon immune reconstitution, CSF antibody titers rise, then recognize PML-associated JCPyV VP1 variants, and may be involved in elimination of the virus. We therefore reasoned that the memory B cell repertoire of individuals who recovered from PML could be a source for the molecular cloning of broadly neutralizing antibodies for passive immunization. We generated a series of memory B cell-derived JCPyV VP1-specific human monoclonal antibodies from HDs and a patient with NAT-associated PML-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). These antibodies exhibited diverse binding affinity, cross-reactivity with the closely related BK polyomavirus, recognition of PML-causing VP1 variants, and JCPyV neutralization. Almost all antibodies with exquisite specificity for JCPyV, neutralizing activity, recognition of all tested JCPyV PML variants, and high affinity were derived from one patient who had recovered from PML. These antibodies are promising drug candidates for the development of a treatment of PML. PMID:26400911

  3. A broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibody is effective against H7N9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharakaraman, Kannan; Subramanian, Vidya; Viswanathan, Karthik; Sloan, Susan; Yen, Hui-Ling; Barnard, Dale L; Leung, Y H Connie; Szretter, Kristy J; Koch, Tyree J; Delaney, James C; Babcock, Gregory J; Wogan, Gerald N; Sasisekharan, Ram; Shriver, Zachary

    2015-09-01

    Emerging strains of influenza represent a significant public health threat with potential pandemic consequences. Of particular concern are the recently emerged H7N9 strains which cause pneumonia with acute respiratory distress syndrome. Estimates are that nearly 80% of hospitalized patients with H7N9 have received intensive care unit support. VIS410, a human antibody, targets a unique conserved epitope on influenza A. We evaluated the efficacy of VIS410 for neutralization of group 2 influenza strains, including H3N2 and H7N9 strains in vitro and in vivo. VIS410, administered at 50 mg/kg, protected DBA mice infected with A/Anhui/2013 (H7N9), resulting in significant survival benefit upon single-dose (-24 h) or double-dose (-12 h, +48 h) administration (P cytokine responses for nine of the 11 cytokines measured. Based on these results, we find that VIS410 may be effective either as monotherapy or combined with antivirals in treating H7N9 disease, as well as disease from other influenza strains.

  4. Broadly-Reactive Neutralizing and Non-neutralizing Antibodies Directed against the H7 Influenza Virus Hemagglutinin Reveal Divergent Mechanisms of Protection.

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    Gene S Tan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In the early spring of 2013, Chinese health authorities reported several cases of H7N9 influenza virus infections in humans. Since then the virus has established itself at the human-animal interface in Eastern China and continues to cause several hundred infections annually. In order to characterize the antibody response to the H7N9 virus we generated several mouse monoclonal antibodies against the hemagglutinin of the A/Shanghai/1/13 (H7N9 virus. Of particular note are two monoclonal antibodies, 1B2 and 1H5, that show broad reactivity to divergent H7 hemagglutinins. Monoclonal antibody 1B2 binds to viruses of the Eurasian and North American H7 lineages and monoclonal antibody 1H5 reacts broadly to virus isolates of the Eurasian lineage. Interestingly, 1B2 shows broad hemagglutination inhibiting and neutralizing activity, while 1H5 fails to inhibit hemagglutination and demonstrates no neutralizing activity in vitro. However, both monoclonal antibodies were highly protective in an in vivo passive transfer challenge model in mice, even at low doses. Experiments using mutant antibodies that lack the ability for Fc/Fc-receptor and Fc/complement interactions suggest that the protection provided by mAb 1H5 is, at least in part, mediated by the Fc-fragment of the mAb. These findings highlight that a protective response to a pathogen may not only be due to neutralizing antibodies, but can also be the result of highly efficacious non-neutralizing antibodies not readily detected by classical in vitro neutralization or hemagglutination inhibition assays. This is of interest because H7 influenza virus vaccines induce only low hemagglutination inhibiting antibody titers while eliciting robust antibody titers as measured by ELISA. Our data suggest that these binding but non-neutralizing antibodies contribute to protection in vivo.

  5. Characterization of a Broadly Reactive Anti-CD40 Agonistic Monoclonal Antibody for Potential Use as an Adjuvant.

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    Cameron Martin

    Full Text Available Lack of safe and effective adjuvants is a major hindrance to the development of efficacious vaccines. Signaling via CD40 pathway leads to enhanced antigen processing and presentation, nitric oxide expression, pro-inflammatory cytokine expression by antigen presenting cells, and stimulation of B-cells to undergo somatic hypermutation, immunoglobulin class switching, and proliferation. Agonistic anti-CD40 antibodies have shown promising adjuvant qualities in human and mouse vaccine studies. An anti-CD40 monoclonal antibody (mAb, designated 2E4E4, was identified and shown to have strong agonistic effects on primary cells from multiple livestock species. The mAb recognize swine, bovine, caprine, and ovine CD40, and evoked 25-fold or greater proliferation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from these species relative to cells incubated with an isotype control (p<0.001. In addition, the mAb induced significant nitric oxide (p<0.0001 release by bovine macrophages. Furthermore, the mAb upregulated the expression of MHC-II by PBMCs, and stimulated significant (p<0.0001 IL-1α, IL6, IL-8, and TNF-α expression by PBMCs. These results suggest that the mAb 2E4E4 can target and stimulate cells from multiple livestock species and thus, it is a potential candidate for adjuvant development. This is the first study to report an anti-swine CD40 agonistic mAb that is also broadly reactive against multiple species.

  6. Anti-alpha-hemolysin monoclonal antibodies mediate protection against Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia.

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    Ragle, Brook E; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane

    2009-07-01

    Staphylococcus aureus pneumonia is one of the most common invasive diseases caused by this human pathogen. S. aureus alpha-hemolysin, a pore-forming cytotoxin, is an essential virulence factor in the pathogenesis of pneumonia. Vaccine-based targeting of this toxin provides protection against lethal staphylococcal pneumonia in a murine model system, suggesting that a monoclonal antibody-based therapy may likewise prove to be efficacious for prevention and treatment of this disease. We report the generation of two distinct anti-alpha-hemolysin monoclonal antibodies that antagonize toxin activity, preventing human lung cell injury in vitro and protecting experimental animals against lethal S. aureus pneumonia. Each of these two monoclonal antibodies recognized an epitope within the first 50 amino acid residues of the mature toxin and blocked the formation of a stable alpha-hemolysin oligomer on the target cell surface. Active immunization with the first 50 amino acids of the toxin also conferred protection against S. aureus pneumonia. Together, these data reveal passive and active immunization strategies for prevention or therapy of staphylococcal pneumonia and highlight the potential role that a critical epitope may play in defining human susceptibility to this deadly disease.

  7. Modeling neutralization kinetics of HIV by broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies in genital secretions coating the cervicovaginal mucosa.

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    Scott A McKinley

    Full Text Available Eliciting broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAb in cervicovaginal mucus (CVM represents a promising "first line of defense" strategy to reduce vaginal HIV transmission. However, it remains unclear what levels of bnAb must be present in CVM to effectively reduce infection. We approached this complex question by modeling the dynamic tally of bnAb coverage on HIV. This analysis introduces a critical, timescale-dependent competition: to protect, bnAb must accumulate at sufficient stoichiometry to neutralize HIV faster than virions penetrate CVM and reach target cells. We developed a model that incorporates concentrations and diffusivities of HIV and bnAb in semen and CVM, kinetic rates for binding (kon and unbinding (koff of select bnAb, and physiologically relevant thicknesses of CVM and semen layers. Comprehensive model simulations lead to robust conclusions about neutralization kinetics in CVM. First, due to the limited time virions in semen need to penetrate CVM, substantially greater bnAb concentrations than in vitro estimates must be present in CVM to neutralize HIV. Second, the model predicts that bnAb with more rapid kon, almost independent of koff, should offer greater neutralization potency in vivo. These findings suggest the fastest arriving virions at target cells present the greatest likelihood of infection. It also implies the marked improvements in in vitro neutralization potency of many recently discovered bnAb may not translate to comparable reduction in the bnAb dose needed to confer protection against initial vaginal infections. Our modeling framework offers a valuable tool to gaining quantitative insights into the dynamics of mucosal immunity against HIV and other infectious diseases.

  8. Dengue Virus Envelope Dimer Epitope Monoclonal Antibodies Isolated from Dengue Patients Are Protective against Zika Virus

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    J. A. Swanstrom

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV is a mosquito-borne flavivirus responsible for thousands of cases of severe fetal malformations and neurological disease since its introduction to Brazil in 2013. Antibodies to flaviviruses can be protective, resulting in lifelong immunity to reinfection by homologous virus. However, cross-reactive antibodies can complicate flavivirus diagnostics and promote more severe disease, as noted after serial dengue virus (DENV infections. The endemic circulation of DENV in South America and elsewhere raises concerns that preexisting flavivirus immunity may modulate ZIKV disease and transmission potential. Here, we report on the ability of human monoclonal antibodies and immune sera derived from dengue patients to neutralize contemporary epidemic ZIKV strains. We demonstrate that a class of human monoclonal antibodies isolated from DENV patients neutralizes ZIKV in cell culture and is protective in a lethal murine model. We also tested a large panel of convalescent-phase immune sera from humans exposed to primary and repeat DENV infection. Although ZIKV is most closely related to DENV compared to other human-pathogenic flaviviruses, most DENV immune sera (73% failed to neutralize ZIKV, while others had low (50% effective concentration [EC50], 1:100 serum dilution; 9% levels of cross-neutralizing antibodies. Our results establish that ZIKV and DENV share epitopes that are targeted by neutralizing, protective human antibodies. The availability of potently neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies provides an immunotherapeutic approach to control life-threatening ZIKV infection and also points to the possibility of repurposing DENV vaccines to induce cross-protective immunity to ZIKV.

  9. Human anti-plague monoclonal antibodies protect mice from Yersinia pestis in a bubonic plague model.

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    Xiaodong Xiao

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Yersinia pestis is the etiologic agent of plague that has killed more than 200 million people throughout the recorded history of mankind. Antibiotics may provide little immediate relief to patients who have a high bacteremia or to patients infected with an antibiotic resistant strain of plague. Two virulent factors of Y. pestis are the capsid F1 protein and the low-calcium response (Lcr V-protein or V-antigen that have been proven to be the targets for both active and passive immunization. There are mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against the F1- and V-antigens that can passively protect mice in a murine model of plague; however, there are no anti-Yersinia pestis monoclonal antibodies available for prophylactic or therapeutic treatment in humans. We identified one anti-F1-specific human mAb (m252 and two anti-V-specific human mAb (m253, m254 by panning a naïve phage-displayed Fab library against the F1- and V-antigens. The Fabs were converted to IgG1s and their binding and protective activities were evaluated. M252 bound weakly to peptides located at the F1 N-terminus where a protective mouse anti-F1 mAb also binds. M253 bound strongly to a V-antigen peptide indicating a linear epitope; m254 did not bind to any peptide from a panel of 53 peptides suggesting that its epitope may be conformational. M252 showed better protection than m253 and m254 against a Y, pestis challenge in a plague mouse model. A synergistic effect was observed when the three antibodies were combined. Incomplete to complete protection was achieved when m252 was given at different times post-challenge. These antibodies can be further studied to determine their potential as therapeutics or prophylactics in Y. pestis infection in humans.

  10. Dengue Virus Envelope Dimer Epitope Monoclonal Antibodies Isolated from Dengue Patients Are Protective against Zika Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanstrom, J A; Plante, J A; Plante, K S; Young, E F; McGowan, E; Gallichotte, E N; Widman, D G; Heise, M T; de Silva, A M; Baric, R S

    2016-07-19

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne flavivirus responsible for thousands of cases of severe fetal malformations and neurological disease since its introduction to Brazil in 2013. Antibodies to flaviviruses can be protective, resulting in lifelong immunity to reinfection by homologous virus. However, cross-reactive antibodies can complicate flavivirus diagnostics and promote more severe disease, as noted after serial dengue virus (DENV) infections. The endemic circulation of DENV in South America and elsewhere raises concerns that preexisting flavivirus immunity may modulate ZIKV disease and transmission potential. Here, we report on the ability of human monoclonal antibodies and immune sera derived from dengue patients to neutralize contemporary epidemic ZIKV strains. We demonstrate that a class of human monoclonal antibodies isolated from DENV patients neutralizes ZIKV in cell culture and is protective in a lethal murine model. We also tested a large panel of convalescent-phase immune sera from humans exposed to primary and repeat DENV infection. Although ZIKV is most closely related to DENV compared to other human-pathogenic flaviviruses, most DENV immune sera (73%) failed to neutralize ZIKV, while others had low (50% effective concentration [EC50], 1:100 serum dilution; 9%) levels of cross-neutralizing antibodies. Our results establish that ZIKV and DENV share epitopes that are targeted by neutralizing, protective human antibodies. The availability of potently neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies provides an immunotherapeutic approach to control life-threatening ZIKV infection and also points to the possibility of repurposing DENV vaccines to induce cross-protective immunity to ZIKV. ZIKV is an emerging arbovirus that has been associated with severe neurological birth defects and fetal loss in pregnant women and Guillain-Barré syndrome in adults. Currently, there is no vaccine or therapeutic for ZIKV. The identification of a class of antibodies (envelope

  11. Novel Clostridium difficile Anti-Toxin (TcdA and TcdB) Humanized Monoclonal Antibodies Demonstrate In Vitro Neutralization across a Broad Spectrum of Clinical Strains and In Vivo Potency in a Hamster Spore Challenge Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Hongyu; Cassan, Robyn; Johnstone, Darrell; Han, Xiaobing; Joyee, Antony George; McQuoid, Monica; Masi, Andrea; Merluza, John; Hrehorak, Bryce; Reid, Ross; Kennedy, Kieron; Tighe, Bonnie; Rak, Carla; Leonhardt, Melanie; Dupas, Brian; Saward, Laura; Berry, Jody D; Nykiforuk, Cory L

    2016-01-01

    Clostridium difficile (C. difficile) infection (CDI) is the main cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated colitis and increased incidence of community-associated diarrhea in industrialized countries. At present, the primary treatment of CDI is antibiotic administration, which is effective but often associated with recurrence, especially in the elderly. Pathogenic strains produce enterotoxin, toxin A (TcdA), and cytotoxin, toxin B (TcdB), which are necessary for C. difficile induced diarrhea and gut pathological changes. Administration of anti-toxin antibodies provides an alternative approach to treat CDI, and has shown promising results in preclinical and clinical studies. In the current study, several humanized anti-TcdA and anti-TcdB monoclonal antibodies were generated and their protective potency was characterized in a hamster infection model. The humanized anti-TcdA (CANmAbA4) and anti-TcdB (CANmAbB4 and CANmAbB1) antibodies showed broad spectrum in vitro neutralization of toxins from clinical strains and neutralization in a mouse toxin challenge model. Moreover, co-administration of humanized antibodies (CANmAbA4 and CANmAbB4 cocktail) provided a high level of protection in a dose dependent manner (85% versus 57% survival at day 22 for 50 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg doses, respectively) in a hamster gastrointestinal infection (GI) model. This study describes the protective effects conferred by novel neutralizing anti-toxin monoclonal antibodies against C. difficile toxins and their potential as therapeutic agents in treating CDI.

  12. Novel Clostridium difficile Anti-Toxin (TcdA and TcdB Humanized Monoclonal Antibodies Demonstrate In Vitro Neutralization across a Broad Spectrum of Clinical Strains and In Vivo Potency in a Hamster Spore Challenge Model.

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    Hongyu Qiu

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile (C. difficile infection (CDI is the main cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated colitis and increased incidence of community-associated diarrhea in industrialized countries. At present, the primary treatment of CDI is antibiotic administration, which is effective but often associated with recurrence, especially in the elderly. Pathogenic strains produce enterotoxin, toxin A (TcdA, and cytotoxin, toxin B (TcdB, which are necessary for C. difficile induced diarrhea and gut pathological changes. Administration of anti-toxin antibodies provides an alternative approach to treat CDI, and has shown promising results in preclinical and clinical studies. In the current study, several humanized anti-TcdA and anti-TcdB monoclonal antibodies were generated and their protective potency was characterized in a hamster infection model. The humanized anti-TcdA (CANmAbA4 and anti-TcdB (CANmAbB4 and CANmAbB1 antibodies showed broad spectrum in vitro neutralization of toxins from clinical strains and neutralization in a mouse toxin challenge model. Moreover, co-administration of humanized antibodies (CANmAbA4 and CANmAbB4 cocktail provided a high level of protection in a dose dependent manner (85% versus 57% survival at day 22 for 50 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg doses, respectively in a hamster gastrointestinal infection (GI model. This study describes the protective effects conferred by novel neutralizing anti-toxin monoclonal antibodies against C. difficile toxins and their potential as therapeutic agents in treating CDI.

  13. Broad-spectrum inhibition of HIV-1 by a monoclonal antibody directed against a gp120-induced epitope of CD4.

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    Samuele E Burastero

    Full Text Available To penetrate susceptible cells, HIV-1 sequentially interacts with two highly conserved cellular receptors, CD4 and a chemokine receptor like CCR5 or CXCR4. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs directed against such receptors are currently under clinical investigation as potential preventive or therapeutic agents. We immunized Balb/c mice with molecular complexes of the native, trimeric HIV-1 envelope (Env bound to a soluble form of the human CD4 receptor. Sera from immunized mice were found to contain gp120-CD4 complex-enhanced antibodies and showed broad-spectrum HIV-1-inhibitory activity. A proportion of MAbs derived from these mice preferentially recognized complex-enhanced epitopes. In particular, a CD4-specific MAb designated DB81 (IgG1Κ was found to preferentially bind to a complex-enhanced epitope on the D2 domain of human CD4. MAb DB81 also recognized chimpanzee CD4, but not baboon or macaque CD4, which exhibit sequence divergence in the D2 domain. Functionally, MAb DB81 displayed broad HIV-1-inhibitory activity, but it did not exert suppressive effects on T-cell activation in vitro. The variable regions of the heavy and light chains of MAb DB81 were sequenced. Due to its broad-spectrum anti-HIV-1 activity and lack of immunosuppressive effects, a humanized derivative of MAb DB81 could provide a useful complement to current preventive or therapeutic strategies against HIV-1.

  14. Structural Basis for Broad Detection of Genogroup II Noroviruses by a Monoclonal Antibody That Binds to a Site Occluded in the Viral Particle

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    Hansmana, Grant S.; Taylor, David W.; Smith, Thomas J.; McLellan, Jason S.; Georgiev, Ivelin; Tame, Jeremy R.H.; Park, Sam-Yong; Yamazaki, Makoto; Gondaira, Fumio; Miki, Motohiro; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Murata, Kazuyoshi; Kwong, Peter D. (Yale); (Yokohama); (NIID-Japan); (Yokohama); (National Instititute for Physiological Sciences); (Denka-Seiken Co. LTD); (Donald Danforth Plant and Science Center); (NIAID)

    2012-03-13

    Human noroviruses are genetically and antigenically highly divergent. Monoclonal antibodies raised in mice against one kind of norovirus virus-like particle (VLP), however, were found to have broad recognition. In this study, we present the crystal structure of the antigen-binding fragment (Fab) for one of these broadly reactive monoclonal antibodies, 5B18, in complex with the capsid-protruding domain from a genogroup II genotype 10 (GII.10) norovirus at 3.3-{angstrom} resolution and, also, the cryo-electron microscopy structure of the GII.10 VLP at {approx}10-{angstrom} resolution. The GII.10 VLP structure was more similar in overall architecture to the GV.1 murine norovirus virion than to the prototype GI.1 human norovirus VLP, with the GII.10 protruding domain raised {approx}15 {angstrom} off the shell domain and rotated {approx}40{sup o} relative to the GI.1 protruding domain. In the crystal structure, the 5B18 Fab bound to a highly conserved region of the protruding domain. Based on the VLP structure, this region is involved in interactions with other regions of the capsid and is buried in the virus particle. Despite the occluded nature of the recognized epitope in the VLP structure, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) binding suggested that the 5B18 antibody was able to capture intact VLPs. Together, the results provide evidence that the norovirus particle is capable of extreme conformational flexibility, which may allow for antibody recognition of conserved surfaces that would otherwise be buried on intact particles.

  15. Polysaccharide specific monoclonal antibodies provide passive protection against intranasal challenge with Burkholderia pseudomallei.

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    David P AuCoin

    Full Text Available Burkholderia pseudomallei is a Gram-negative bacillus that is the causative agent of melioidosis. The bacterium is inherently resistant to many antibiotics and mortality rates remain high in endemic areas. The lipopolysaccharide (LPS and capsular polysaccharide (CPS are two surface-associated antigens that contribute to pathogenesis. We previously developed two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs specific to the CPS and LPS; the CPS mAb was shown to identify antigen in serum and urine from melioidosis patients. The goal of this study was to determine if passive immunization with CPS and LPS mAbs alone and in combination would protect mice from a lethal challenge with B. pseudomallei. Intranasal (i.n. challenge experiments were performed with B. pseudomallei strains 1026b and K96423. Both mAbs provided significant protection when administered alone. A combination of mAbs was protective when low doses were administered. In addition, combination therapy provided a significant reduction in spleen colony forming units (cfu compared to results when either the CPS or LPS mAbs were administered alone.

  16. Protective efficacy of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies in a nonhuman primate model of Ebola hemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marzi, Andrea; Yoshida, Reiko; Miyamoto, Hiroko; Ishijima, Mari; Suzuki, Yasuhiko; Higuchi, Megumi; Matsuyama, Yukie; Igarashi, Manabu; Nakayama, Eri; Kuroda, Makoto; Saijo, Masayuki; Feldmann, Friederike; Brining, Douglas; Feldmann, Heinz; Takada, Ayato

    2012-01-01

    Ebola virus (EBOV) is the causative agent of severe hemorrhagic fever in primates, with human case fatality rates up to 90%. Today, there is neither a licensed vaccine nor a treatment available for Ebola hemorrhagic fever (EHF). Single monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) specific for Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV) have been successfully used in passive immunization experiments in rodent models, but have failed to protect nonhuman primates from lethal disease. In this study, we used two clones of human-mouse chimeric MAbs (ch133 and ch226) with strong neutralizing activity against ZEBOV and evaluated their protective potential in a rhesus macaque model of EHF. Reduced viral loads and partial protection were observed in animals given MAbs ch133 and ch226 combined intravenously at 24 hours before and 24 and 72 hours after challenge. MAbs circulated in the blood of a surviving animal until virus-induced IgG responses were detected. In contrast, serum MAb concentrations decreased to undetectable levels at terminal stages of disease in animals that succumbed to infection, indicating substantial consumption of these antibodies due to virus replication. Accordingly, the rapid decrease of serum MAbs was clearly associated with increased viremia in non-survivors. Our results indicate that EBOV neutralizing antibodies, particularly in combination with other therapeutic strategies, might be beneficial in reducing viral loads and prolonging disease progression during EHF.

  17. Fully human broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against influenza A viruses generated from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient

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    Hu, Weibin [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Chen, Aizhong [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Miao, Yi [Shanghai Xuhui Central Hospital, Shanghai 200031 (China); Xia, Shengli [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450016 (China); Ling, Zhiyang; Xu, Ke; Wang, Tongyan [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Xu, Ying; Cui, Jun; Wu, Hongqiang; Hu, Guiyu; Tian, Lin; Wang, Lingling [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Shu, Yuelong [Chinese Center for Disease Control and Prevention, Beijing 102206 (China); Ma, Xiaowei [Hualan Biological Bacterin Company, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Xu, Bianli; Zhang, Jin [Center for Disease Control and Prevention of Henan Province, Zhengzhou 450016 (China); Lin, Xiaojun, E-mail: linxiaojun@hualan.com [Hualan Biological Bacterin Company, Xinxiang 453003 (China); Bian, Chao, E-mail: cbian@sibs.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China); Sun, Bing, E-mail: bsun@sibs.ac.cn [Molecular Virus Unit, Key Laboratory of Molecular Virology and Immunology, Institut Pasteur of Shanghai, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200025 (China); Key Laboratory of Molecular Cell Biology, Institute of Biochemistry and Cell Biology, Shanghai Institutes for Biological Sciences, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shanghai 200031 (China)

    2013-01-20

    Whether the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine can induce heterosubtypic cross-protective anti-hemagglutinin (HA) neutralizing antibodies is an important issue. We obtained a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies from the memory B cells of a 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine recipient. Most of the monoclonal antibodies targeted the HA protein but not the HA1 fragment. Among the analyzed antibodies, seven mAbs exhibited neutralizing activity against several influenza A viruses of different subtypes. The conserved linear epitope targeted by the neutralizing mAbs (FIEGGWTGMVDGWYGYHH) is part of the fusion peptide on HA2. Our work suggests that a heterosubtypic neutralizing antibody response primarily targeting the HA stem region exists in recipients of the 2009 pandemic H1N1 influenza vaccine. The HA stem region contains various conserved neutralizing epitopes with the fusion peptide as an important one. This work may aid in the design of a universal influenza A virus vaccine.

  18. Chimeric Hemagglutinin Constructs Induce Broad Protection against Influenza B Virus Challenge in the Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ermler, Megan E; Kirkpatrick, Ericka; Sun, Weina; Hai, Rong; Amanat, Fatima; Chromikova, Veronika; Palese, Peter; Krammer, Florian

    2017-06-15

    Seasonal influenza virus epidemics represent a significant public health burden. Approximately 25% of all influenza virus infections are caused by type B viruses, and these infections can be severe, especially in children. Current influenza virus vaccines are an effective prophylaxis against infection but are impacted by rapid antigenic drift, which can lead to mismatches between vaccine strains and circulating strains. Here, we describe a broadly protective vaccine candidate based on chimeric hemagglutinins, consisting of globular head domains from exotic influenza A viruses and stalk domains from influenza B viruses. Sequential vaccination with these constructs in mice leads to the induction of broadly reactive antibodies that bind to the conserved stalk domain of influenza B virus hemagglutinin. Vaccinated mice are protected from lethal challenge with diverse influenza B viruses. Results from serum transfer experiments and antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC) assays indicate that this protection is antibody mediated and based on Fc effector functions. The present data suggest that chimeric hemagglutinin-based vaccination is a viable strategy to broadly protect against influenza B virus infection.IMPORTANCE While current influenza virus vaccines are effective, they are affected by mismatches between vaccine strains and circulating strains. Furthermore, the antiviral drug oseltamivir is less effective for treating influenza B virus infections than for treating influenza A virus infections. A vaccine that induces broad and long-lasting protection against influenza B viruses is therefore urgently needed. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  19. Protection of rabbits and immunodeficient mice against lethal poxvirus infections by human monoclonal antibodies.

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    Lindsay Crickard

    Full Text Available Smallpox (variola virus is a bioweapon concern. Monkeypox is a growing zoonotic poxvirus threat. These problems have resulted in extensive efforts to develop potential therapeutics that can prevent or treat potentially lethal poxvirus infections in humans. Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against smallpox are a conservative approach to this problem, as the licensed human smallpox vaccine (vaccinia virus, VACV primarily works on the basis of protective antibody responses against smallpox. Fully human mAbs (hmAbs against vaccinia H3 (H3L and B5 (B5R, targeting both the mature virion (MV and extracellular enveloped virion (EV forms, have been developed as potential therapeutics for use in humans. Post-exposure prophylaxis was assessed in both murine and rabbit animal models. Therapeutic efficacy of the mAbs was assessed in three good laboratory practices (GLP studies examining severe combined immunodeficiency mice (SCID given a lethal VACV infection. Pre-exposure combination hmAb therapy provided significantly better protection against disease and death than either single hmAb or vaccinia immune globulin (VIG. Post-exposure combination mAb therapy provided significant protection against disease and death, and appeared to fully cure the VACV infection in ≥50% of SCID mice. Therapeutic efficacy was then assessed in two rabbit studies examining post-exposure hmAb prophylaxis against rabbitpox (RPXV. In the first study, rabbits were infected with RPVX and then provided hmAbs at 48 hrs post-infection, or 1 hr and 72 hrs post-infection. Rabbits in both groups receiving hmAbs were 100% protected from death. In the second rabbitpox study, 100% of animal treated with combination hmAb therapy and 100% of animals treated with anti-B5 hmAb were protected. These findings suggest that combination hmAb treatment may be effective at controlling smallpox disease in immunocompetent or immunodeficient humans.

  20. Protective effect of two Mycoplasma gallisepticum protein fractions affinity purified with monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czifra, G; Sundquist, B G; Hellman, U; Stipkovits, L

    2000-08-01

    Two protein fractions of Mycoplasma gallisepticum (Mg) were affinity purified with monoclonal antibodies A3 and B3, and tested for protective capacity in chickens. One fraction, designated MgP1, appeared as a doublet of 64 and 62kDa bands in sodium dodecyl sulphate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis gels, while MgP2 consisted of five polypeptides (64, 56, 47, 45 and 43 kDa). The molecular mass, haemagglutination activity and matching amino acid sequence of MgP1 suggest that it is identical to pMGA1.2, the putative haemagglutinin of Mg. Groups of Mg-free chickens were immunized once or twice with 1 or 5 mug MgP1 or MgP2, or a combination of the two, and adjuvanted with immunostimulating complexes. Except for the group given 1 mug MgP1, all vaccinated groups showed a significant (P < 0.01) reduction in air sac lesions after challenge compared with unvaccinated controls. MgP2 appeared more protective than MgP1. Vaccination twice with MgP2 was the only regime that produced a detectable serum antibody response.

  1. A neutralizing human monoclonal antibody protects African Green monkeys from Hendra virus challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bossart, Katharine N.; Geisbert, Thomas W.; Feldmann, Heinz; Zhu, Zhongyu; Feldmann, Friederike; Geisbert, Joan B.; Yan, Lianying; Feng, Yan-Ru; Brining, Doug; Scott, Dana; Wang, Yanping; Dimitrov, Antony S.; Callison, Julie; Chan, Yee-Peng; Hickey, Andrew C.; Dimitrov, Dimiter S.; Broder, Christopher C.; Rockx, Barry

    2012-01-01

    Hendra virus (HeV) is a recently emerged zoonotic paramyxovirus that can cause a severe and often fatal disease in horses and humans. HeV is categorized as a biosafety level 4 agent, which has made the development of animal models and testing of potential therapeutics and vaccines challenging. Infection of African Green monkeys (AGMs) with HeV was recently demonstrated and disease mirrored fatal HeV infection in humans, manifesting as a multisystemic vasculitis with widespread virus replication in vascular tissues and severe pathologic manifestations in the lung, spleen and brain. Here, we demonstrate that m102.4, a potent HeV neutralizing human monoclonal antibody (hmAb), can protect AGMs from disease post infection (p.i.) with HeV. Fourteen AGMs were challenged intratracheally with a lethal dose of HeV and twelve subjects were infused twice with a 100 mg dose of m102.4 beginning at either 10 hr, 24 hr or 72 hr p.i. and again approximately 48 hrs later. The presence of viral RNA, infectious virus and HeV-specific immune responses demonstrated that all subjects were infected following challenge. All twelve AGMs that received m102.4 survived infection; whereas the untreated control subjects succumbed to disease on day 8 p.i.. Animals in the 72 hr treatment group exhibited neurological signs of disease but all animals started to recover by day 16 p.i.. These results represent successful post-exposure in vivo efficacy by an investigational drug against HeV and highlight the potential impact a hmAb can have on human disease. PMID:22013123

  2. Identification and characterization of a broadly cross-reactive HIV-1 human monoclonal antibody that binds to both gp120 and gp41.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mei-Yun Zhang

    Full Text Available Identification of broadly cross-reactive HIV-1-neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs may assist vaccine immunogen design. Here we report a novel human monoclonal antibody (mAb, designated m43, which co-targets the gp120 and gp41 subunits of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env. M43 bound to recombinant gp140 s from various primary isolates, to membrane-associated Envs on transfected cells and HIV-1 infected cells, as well as to recombinant gp120 s and gp41 fusion intermediate structures containing N-trimer structure, but did not bind to denatured recombinant gp140 s and the CD4 binding site (CD4bs mutant, gp120 D368R, suggesting that the m43 epitope is conformational and overlaps the CD4bs on gp120 and the N-trimer structure on gp41. M43 neutralized 34% of the HIV-1 primary isolates from different clades and all the SHIVs tested in assays based on infection of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs by replication-competent virus, but was less potent in cell line-based pseudovirus assays. In contrast to CD4, m43 did not induce Env conformational changes upon binding leading to exposure of the coreceptor binding site, enhanced binding of mAbs 2F5 and 4E10 specific for the membrane proximal external region (MPER of gp41 Envs, or increased gp120 shedding. The overall modest neutralization activity of m43 is likely due to the limited binding of m43 to functional Envs which could be increased by antibody engineering if needed. M43 may represent a new class of bnAbs targeting conformational epitopes overlapping structures on both gp120 and gp41. Its novel epitope and possibly new mechanism(s of neutralization could helpdesign improved vaccine immunogens and candidate therapeutics.

  3. Chimeric hemagglutinin influenza virus vaccine constructs elicit broadly protective stalk-specific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krammer, Florian; Pica, Natalie; Hai, Rong; Margine, Irina; Palese, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Current influenza virus vaccine strategies stimulate immune responses toward the globular head domain of the hemagglutinin protein in order to inhibit key steps of the virus life cycle. Because this domain is highly variable across strains, new vaccine formulations are required in most years. Here we demonstrate a novel vaccine strategy that generates immunity to the highly conserved stalk domain by using chimeric hemagglutinin constructs that express unique head and stalk combinations. By repeatedly immunizing mice with constructs that expressed the same stalk but an irrelevant head, we specifically stimulated a stalk-directed response that provided broad-based heterologous and heterosubtypic immunity in mice. Notably, our vaccination scheme provides a universal vaccine approach that protects against challenge with an H5 subtype virus. Furthermore, through in vivo studies using passively transferred antibodies or depletion of CD8(+) T cells, we demonstrated the critical role that humoral mechanisms of immunity play in the protection observed. The present data suggest that a vaccine strategy based on the stalk domain of the hemagglutinin protein could be used in humans to broadly protect against a variety of influenza virus subtypes.

  4. Shigella outer membrane protein PSSP-1 is broadly protective against Shigella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jae-Ouk; Rho, Semi; Kim, Su Hee; Kim, Heejoo; Song, Hyo Jin; Kim, Eun Jin; Kim, Ryang Yeo; Kim, Eun Hye; Sinha, Anuradha; Dey, Ayan; Yang, Jae Seung; Song, Man Ki; Nandy, Ranjan Kumar; Czerkinsky, Cecil; Kim, Dong Wook

    2015-04-01

    In developing countries, Shigella is a primary cause of diarrhea in infants and young children. Although antibiotic therapy is an effective treatment for shigellosis, therapeutic options are narrowing due to the emergence of antibiotic resistance. Thus, preventive vaccination could become the most efficacious approach for controlling shigellosis. We have identified several conserved protein antigens that are shared by multiple Shigella serotypes and species. Among these, one antigen induced cross-protection against experimental shigellosis, and we have named it pan-Shigella surface protein 1 (PSSP-1). PSSP-1-induced protection requires a mucosal administration route and coadministration of an adjuvant. When PSSP-1 was administered intranasally, it induced cross-protection against Shigella flexneri serotypes 2a, 5a, and 6, Shigella boydii, Shigella sonnei, and Shigella dysenteriae serotype 1. Intradermally administered PSSP-1 induced strong serum antibody responses but failed to induce protection in the mouse lung pneumonia model. In contrast, intranasal administration elicited efficient local and systemic antibody responses and production of interleukin 17A and gamma interferon. Interestingly, blood samples from patients with recent-onset shigellosis showed variable but significant mucosal antibody responses to other conserved Shigella protein antigens but not to PSSP-1. We suggest that PSSP-1 is a promising antigen for a broadly protective vaccine against Shigella. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  5. A recombinant multi-antigen vaccine with broad protection potential against avian pathogenic Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Goor, Angelica; Stromberg, Zachary R; Mellata, Melha

    2017-01-01

    Chickens are a major source of protein worldwide, yet infectious diseases continue to threaten the poultry industry. Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC), a subgroup of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC), causes colibacillosis in chickens resulting in economic loss because of treatment, condemnation of products, and death. In this study, we evaluated a recombinant antigens (rAg) vaccine combining common ExPEC surface proteins EtsC, OmpA, OmpT, and TraT for broad protective potential against APEC infections in chickens. The specific objectives were to evaluate antibody (serum) and cytokines (lymphoid organs) responses to vaccination; in vitro bactericidal ability of serum and splenocytes against multiple APEC serotypes; and in vivo protection against APEC challenge in chickens. Groups of four-day old chickens (N = 10) were vaccinated twice (two-week interval) subcutaneously with rAgs alone or in combination and CpG adjuvant or PBS (control). IgY antibody in the serum and mRNA expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-18, IFN-γ, IL-4, IFN-β, and IL-8 in bursa, spleen, and thymus were measured using ELISA and RT-qPCR, respectively. Serum and splenocytes were tested for their bactericidal ability in vitro against multiple APEC isolates. Vaccinated and non-vaccinated chickens were challenged with 108 CFU of APEC-O2 via air sac at 31 days post first vaccination. Vaccine protection was determined by the decrease of bacterial loads in blood and organs (lung, heart, spleen, and liver), as well as gross colibacillosis lesion scores in air sac, heart, and liver. Vaccination significantly (P APEC serotypes, and decreased bacterial loads in the heart and spleen, and gross lesion scores of the air sac, heart and liver in chickens. The vaccine reported may be used to provide broad protection against APEC strains, increasing animal welfare and food production.

  6. A recombinant multi-antigen vaccine with broad protection potential against avian pathogenic Escherichia coli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stromberg, Zachary R.; Mellata, Melha

    2017-01-01

    Chickens are a major source of protein worldwide, yet infectious diseases continue to threaten the poultry industry. Avian pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC), a subgroup of extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC), causes colibacillosis in chickens resulting in economic loss because of treatment, condemnation of products, and death. In this study, we evaluated a recombinant antigens (rAg) vaccine combining common ExPEC surface proteins EtsC, OmpA, OmpT, and TraT for broad protective potential against APEC infections in chickens. The specific objectives were to evaluate antibody (serum) and cytokines (lymphoid organs) responses to vaccination; in vitro bactericidal ability of serum and splenocytes against multiple APEC serotypes; and in vivo protection against APEC challenge in chickens. Groups of four-day old chickens (N = 10) were vaccinated twice (two-week interval) subcutaneously with rAgs alone or in combination and CpG adjuvant or PBS (control). IgY antibody in the serum and mRNA expression of IL-1β, IL-6, IL-18, IFN-γ, IL-4, IFN-β, and IL-8 in bursa, spleen, and thymus were measured using ELISA and RT-qPCR, respectively. Serum and splenocytes were tested for their bactericidal ability in vitro against multiple APEC isolates. Vaccinated and non-vaccinated chickens were challenged with 108 CFU of APEC-O2 via air sac at 31 days post first vaccination. Vaccine protection was determined by the decrease of bacterial loads in blood and organs (lung, heart, spleen, and liver), as well as gross colibacillosis lesion scores in air sac, heart, and liver. Vaccination significantly (P chickens. The vaccine reported may be used to provide broad protection against APEC strains, increasing animal welfare and food production. PMID:28837660

  7. Monoclonal antibodies to the reactive centre loop (RCL) of human corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) can protect against proteolytic cleavage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, John G; Elder, Peter A

    2017-07-01

    Corticosteroid-binding globulin (CBG) binds most of the cortisol in circulation and is a non-functional member of the family of serine protease inhibitors (serpins) with an exposed elastase sensitive reactive centre loop (RCL). The RCL can be cleaved by human neutrophil elastase, released from activated neutrophils, and can also be cleaved at nearby site(s) by elastase released by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and at two further sites, also within the RCL, by bovine chymotrypsin. Cleavage of the RCL results in a conformational change accompanied by a marked decrease in affinity for cortisol and hence its release at the site of proteolysis. These cleavages are irreversible and the similar half-lives of cleaved and intact CBG could mean that there may be some advantage in slowing the rate of CBG cleavage in acute inflammation thereby increasing the proportion of intact CBG in circulation. Here we show, for the first time, that pre-incubation of tethered human CBG with two monoclonal antibodies to the RCL of CBG protects against cleavage by all three enzymes. Furthermore, in plasma, pre-incubation with both RCL monoclonal antibodies delays neutrophil elastase cleavage of the RCL and one of these RCL monoclonal antibodies also delays bovine chymotrypsin cleavage of the RCL. These findings may provide a basis and rationale for the concept of the use of RCL antibodies as therapeutic agents to effectively increase the proportion of intact CBG in circulation which may be of benefit in acute inflammation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Production and Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies Against the Protective Antigen Component of Bacillus anthracis Toxin

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-01-21

    characterization of monoclonal antibodies against Clostridium perfringens type A enterotoxin. Infect. Immun. 50:442-448. 32. Wright, 6. 6., and 6. L...and inhibits growth of certain cell lines (15). No enzymatic activity has been identified for LF. Both the lethal and edema toxins inhibit the

  9. Monovalent H5 vaccine based on epitope-chimeric HA provides broad cross-clade protection against variant H5N1 viruses in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Fang; Prabakaran, Mookkan; Rajesh Kumar, Subaschandrabose; Tan, Yunrui; Kwang, Jimmy

    2014-05-01

    H5N1 HPAI virus continues to be a severe threat for public health, as well as for the poultry industry, due to its high mortality and antigenic drift rate. There is no monovalent vaccine available which provides broad protection against those major circulating strains. In the present study, a monovalent H5 vaccine strain was developed with antigenic sequence analysis and epitope mutations. H5 from Indonesia strain (A/Indonesia/CDC669/2006) was used as backbone sequence. Three amino acids were mutated to express immunogenic epitopes from other circulating H5N1s in the backbone. RG influenza virus expressing the epitope-chimeric H5 can react in HI with multiple H5 monoclonal antibodies which fail to neutralize wild type CDC669. High titers in HI and virus neutralization against different clades H5N1s (clade 1, 2, 4 and 7) were detected using sera from mice immunized with the epitope-chimeric H5N1. The monovalent vaccine with RG-epitope-chimeric H5N1 protected mice from lethal challenge with H5N1s of different clades, including clade 1.0, 2.1, 2.2 and 2.3. This study indicates that the broad immune response elicited by this single H5N1 virus allows it to be a promising candidate for a monovalent H5 universal vaccine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Protection of immunosuppressed mice against infection with pseudomonas aeruginosa by monoclonal antibodies to outer membrane protein OprI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahner, R; Eckhardt, A; Duchêne, M; Domdey, H; von Specht, B U

    1990-01-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) designated 2A1 and 6A4 which had been shown to be directed against Pseudomonas aeruginosa outer membrane lipoprotein I were tested in cyclophosphamide treated mice for their protective ability against P. aeruginosa infection. Pretreatment of mice with either 2 mg of 2A1 or 4 mg of 6A4 in combination with lethally irradiated human leucocytes reduced the mortality after subsequent subcutaneous injection of 100 living P. aeruginosa organisms to 50% of the controls. Without leucocytes only mAb 2A1 (isotype IgG2b) showed protection (47%). Irradiated leucocytes alone without mAb did not protect the mice significantly from fatal P. aeruginosa infection.

  11. Human-monoclonal-antibody therapy protects nonhuman primates against advanced Lassa fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mire, Chad E; Cross, Robert W; Geisbert, Joan B; Borisevich, Viktoriya; Agans, Krystle N; Deer, Daniel J; Heinrich, Megan L; Rowland, Megan M; Goba, Augustine; Momoh, Mambu; Boisen, Mathew L; Grant, Donald S; Fullah, Mohamed; Khan, Sheik Humarr; Fenton, Karla A; Robinson, James E; Branco, Luis M; Garry, Robert F; Geisbert, Thomas W

    2017-10-01

    There are no approved treatments for Lassa fever, which is endemic to the same regions of West Africa that were recently devastated by Ebola. Here we show that a combination of human monoclonal antibodies that cross-react with the glycoproteins of all four clades of Lassa virus is able to rescue 100% of cynomolgus macaques when treatment is initiated at advanced stages of disease, including up to 8 d after challenge.

  12. Broad spectrum antiviral activity of favipiravir (T-705: protection from highly lethal inhalational Rift Valley Fever.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amy L Caroline

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Development of antiviral drugs that have broad-spectrum activity against a number of viral infections would be of significant benefit. Due to the evolution of resistance to currently licensed antiviral drugs, development of novel anti-influenza drugs is in progress, including Favipiravir (T-705, which is currently in human clinical trials. T-705 displays broad-spectrum in vitro activity against a number of viruses, including Rift Valley Fever virus (RVFV. RVF is an important neglected tropical disease that causes human, agricultural, and economic losses in endemic regions. RVF has the capacity to emerge in new locations and also presents a potential bioterrorism threat. In the current study, the in vivo efficacy of T-705 was evaluated in Wistar-Furth rats infected with the virulent ZH501 strain of RVFV by the aerosol route. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Wistar-Furth rats are highly susceptible to a rapidly lethal disease after parenteral or inhalational exposure to the pathogenic ZH501 strain of RVFV. In the current study, two experiments were performed: a dose-determination study and a delayed-treatment study. In both experiments, all untreated control rats succumbed to disease. Out of 72 total rats infected with RVFV and treated with T-705, only 6 succumbed to disease. The remaining 66 rats (92% survived lethal infection with no significant weight loss or fever. The 6 treated rats that succumbed survived significantly longer before succumbing to encephalitic disease. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Currently, there are no licensed antiviral drugs for treating RVF. Here, T-705 showed remarkable efficacy in a highly lethal rat model of Rift Valley Fever, even when given up to 48 hours post-infection. This is the first study to show protection of rats infected with the pathogenic ZH501 strain of RVFV. Our data suggest that T-705 has potential to be a broad-spectrum antiviral drug.

  13. A stable trimeric influenza hemagglutinin stem as a broadly protective immunogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impagliazzo, Antonietta; Milder, Fin; Kuipers, Harmjan; Wagner, Michelle V; Zhu, Xueyong; Hoffman, Ryan M B; van Meersbergen, Ruud; Huizingh, Jeroen; Wanningen, Patrick; Verspuij, Johan; de Man, Martijn; Ding, Zhaoqing; Apetri, Adrian; Kükrer, Başak; Sneekes-Vriese, Eveline; Tomkiewicz, Danuta; Laursen, Nick S; Lee, Peter S; Zakrzewska, Anna; Dekking, Liesbeth; Tolboom, Jeroen; Tettero, Lisanne; van Meerten, Sander; Yu, Wenli; Koudstaal, Wouter; Goudsmit, Jaap; Ward, Andrew B; Meijberg, Wim; Wilson, Ian A; Radošević, Katarina

    2015-09-18

    The identification of human broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) targeting the hemagglutinin (HA) stem revitalized hopes of developing a universal influenza vaccine. Using a rational design and library approach, we engineered stable HA stem antigens ("mini-HAs") based on an H1 subtype sequence. Our most advanced candidate exhibits structural and bnAb binding properties comparable to those of full-length HA, completely protects mice in lethal heterologous and heterosubtypic challenge models, and reduces fever after sublethal challenge in cynomolgus monkeys. Antibodies elicited by this mini-HA in mice and nonhuman primates bound a wide range of HAs, competed with human bnAbs for HA stem binding, neutralized H5N1 viruses, and mediated antibody-dependent effector activity. These results represent a proof of concept for the design of HA stem mimics that elicit bnAbs against influenza A group 1 viruses. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  14. Effect of imipenem on monoclonal antibody-mediated protection against Escherichia coli O18K5.

    OpenAIRE

    Frasa, H; Benaissa-Trouw, B.; Tavares, L.; Kessel, K; Hustinx, W; Schellekens, J; Kraaijeveld, K; Verhoef, J.

    1996-01-01

    Flow cytometry revealed that the binding of immunoglobulin M monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to Escherichia coli O18K5 was modulated by exposure of the bacteria to subinhibitory concentrations of imipenem. The binding of anti-K5 MAb was decreased, while the binding of anti-O18 MAb was increased. In addition, anti-lipid A MAbs bound only to imipenem-treated bacteria. The biological effect of MAb binding was investigated in BALB/c mice by determination of the levels of bacteremia, tumor necrosis f...

  15. Drift of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein gp120 toward increased neutralization resistance over the course of the epidemic: a comprehensive study using the most potent and broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouvin-Pley, M; Morgand, M; Meyer, L; Goujard, C; Moreau, A; Mouquet, H; Nussenzweig, M; Pace, C; Ho, D; Bjorkman, P J; Baty, D; Chames, P; Pancera, M; Kwong, P D; Poignard, P; Barin, F; Braibant, M

    2014-12-01

    Extending our previous analyses to the most recently described monoclonal broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs), we confirmed a drift of HIV-1 clade B variants over 2 decades toward higher resistance to bNAbs targeting almost all the identified gp120-neutralizing epitopes. In contrast, the sensitivity to bNAbs targeting the gp41 membrane-proximal external region remained stable, suggesting a selective pressure on gp120 preferentially. Despite this evolution, selected combinations of bNAbs remain capable of neutralizing efficiently most of the circulating variants. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. Lactobacillus plantarum with Broad Antifungal Activity as a Protective Starter Culture for Bread Production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pasquale Russo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Bread is a staple food consumed worldwide on a daily basis. Fungal contamination of bread is a critical concern for producers since it is related to important economic losses and safety hazards due to the negative impact of sensorial quality and to the potential occurrence of mycotoxins. In this work, Lactobacillus plantarum UFG 121, a strain with characterized broad antifungal activity, was analyzed as a potential protective culture for bread production. Six different molds belonging to Aspergillus spp., Penicillium spp., and Fusarium culmorum were used to artificially contaminate bread produced with two experimental modes: (i inoculation of the dough with a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain (control and (ii co-inoculation of the dough with the commercial S. cerevisiae strain and with L. plantarum UFG 121. L. plantarum strain completely inhibited the growth of F. culmorum after one week of storage. The lactic acid bacterium modulated the mold growth in samples contaminated with Aspergillus flavus, Penicillium chrysogenum, and Penicillium expansum, while no antagonistic effect was found against Aspergillus niger and Penicillium roqueforti. These results indicate the potential of L. plantarum UFG 121 as a biocontrol agent in bread production and suggest a species- or strain-depending sensitivity of the molds to the same microbial-based control strategy.

  17. Noradrenaline transmission reducing drugs may protect against a broad range of diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, P J

    2015-04-01

    1 A growing body of evidence suggests that the signalling molecule, noradrenaline (NA), plays a pathophysiological role in a broad range of psychiatric, neurological and peripheral disorders. Both preclinical and clinical data suggest that elevated NA signalling may be involved in the aetiology of major diseases such as depression, Alzheimer's disease and diabetes mellitus. 2 The molecular pathways by which NA may cause the manifestation of disease remain poorly understood, although they may include G protein-coupled receptor modulation of the Ras/MAP kinase, Stat3 and PI3K pathways, among others. In both individual animals and humans, NA tone may be elevated largely due to genetics, but also because of the exposure to marked psychological stress or trauma, or other environmental factors. 3 As NA is involved in the 'fight or flight' response by the sympathetic nervous system, this transmitter may be elevated in a large number of organisms due to evolutionary selection of enhancing responses to immediate environmental dangers. Likewise, acetylcholine signalling by the parasympathetic ('rest and digest') nervous system may be relatively diminished. This putative autonomic imbalance may result in diminished engagement in homeostatic processes, resulting in the emergence and progression of a number of diseases throughout the body. 4 In this scenario, a large number of individuals may benefit from chronic use of pharmacological agents - such as clonidine, guanfacine, propranolol or prazosin - that diminish NA signalling throughout the body. If so, NA transmission lowering drugs may protect against a wide range of diseases. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. High-Sensitivity Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for Homoserine Lactones Protect Mice from Lethal Pseudomonas aeruginosa Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downham, Christina; Broadbent, Ian; Charlton, Keith; Porter, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    A number of bacteria, including pathogens like Pseudomonas aeruginosa, utilize homoserine lactones (HSLs) as quorum sensing (QS) signaling compounds and engage in cell-to-cell communication to coordinate their behavior. Blocking this bacterial communication may be an attractive strategy for infection control as QS takes a central role in P. aeruginosa biology. In this study, immunomodulation of HSL molecules by monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) was used as a novel approach to prevent P. aeruginosa infections and as tools to detect HSLs in bodily fluids as a possible first clue to an undiagnosed Gram-negative infection. Using sheep immunization and recombinant antibody technology, a panel of sheep-mouse chimeric MAbs were generated which recognized HSL compounds with high sensitivity (nanomolar range) and cross-reactivity. These MAbs retained their nanomolar sensitivity in complex matrices and were able to recognize HSLs in P. aeruginosa cultures grown in the presence of urine. In a nematode slow-killing assay, HSL MAbs significantly increased the survival of worms fed on the antibiotic-resistant strain PA058. The therapeutic benefit of these MAbs was further studied using a mouse model of Pseudomonas infection in which groups of mice treated with HSL-2 and HSL-4 MAbs survived, 7 days after pathogen challenge, in significantly greater numbers (83 and 67%, respectively) compared with the control groups. This body of work has provided early proof-of-concept data to demonstrate the potential of HSL-specific, monoclonal antibodies as theranostic clinical leads suitable for the diagnosis, prevention, and treatment of life-threatening bacterial infections. PMID:24185854

  19. Non-random escape pathways from a broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibody map to a highly conserved region on the hepatitis C virus E2 glycoprotein encompassing amino acids 412-423.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keck, Zhen-yong; Angus, Allan G N; Wang, Wenyan; Lau, Patrick; Wang, Yong; Gatherer, Derek; Patel, Arvind H; Foung, Steven K H

    2014-08-01

    A challenge for hepatitis C virus (HCV) vaccine development is to define epitopes that are able to elicit protective antibodies against this highly diverse virus. The E2 glycoprotein region located at residues 412-423 is conserved and antibodies to 412-423 have broadly neutralizing activities. However, an adaptive mutation, N417S, is associated with a glycan shift in a variant that cannot be neutralized by a murine but by human monoclonal antibodies (HMAbs) against 412-423. To determine whether HCV escapes from these antibodies, we analyzed variants that emerged when cell culture infectious HCV virions (HCVcc) were passaged under increasing concentrations of a specific HMAb, HC33.1. Multiple nonrandom escape pathways were identified. Two pathways occurred in the context of an N-glycan shift mutation at N417T. At low antibody concentrations, substitutions of two residues outside of the epitope, N434D and K610R, led to variants having improved in vitro viral fitness and reduced sensitivity to HC33.1 binding and neutralization. At moderate concentrations, a S419N mutation occurred within 412-423 in escape variants that have greatly reduced sensitivity to HC33.1 but compromised viral fitness. Importantly, the variants generated from these pathways differed in their stability. N434D and K610R-associated variants were stable and became dominant as the virions were passaged. The S419N mutation reverted back to N419S when immune pressure was reduced by removing HC33.1. At high antibody concentrations, a mutation at L413I was observed in variants that were resistant to HC33.1 neutralization. Collectively, the combination of multiple escape pathways enabled the virus to persist under a wide range of antibody concentrations. Moreover, these findings pose a different challenge to vaccine development beyond the identification of highly conserved epitopes. It will be necessary for a vaccine to induce high potency antibodies that prevent the formation of escape variants, which

  20. In Vitro Neutralization Is Not Predictive of Prophylactic Efficacy of Broadly Neutralizing Monoclonal Antibodies CR6261 and CR9114 against Lethal H2 Influenza Virus Challenge in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sutton, Troy C; Lamirande, Elaine W; Bock, Kevin W; Moore, Ian N; Koudstaal, Wouter; Rehman, Muniza; Weverling, Gerrit Jan; Goudsmit, Jaap; Subbarao, Kanta

    2017-12-15

    Influenza viruses of the H1N1, H2N2, and H3N2 subtypes have caused previous pandemics. H2 influenza viruses represent a pandemic threat due to continued circulation in wild birds and limited immunity in the human population. In the event of a pandemic, antiviral agents are the mainstay for treatment, but broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) may be a viable alternative for short-term prophylaxis or treatment. The hemagglutinin stem binding bNAbs CR6261 and CR9114 have been shown to protect mice from severe disease following challenge with H1N1 and H5N1 and with H1N1, H3N2, and influenza B viruses, respectively. Early studies with CR6261 and CR9114 showed weak in vitro activity against human H2 influenza viruses, but the in vivo efficacy against H2 viruses is unknown. Therefore, we evaluated these antibodies against human- and animal-origin H2 viruses A/Ann Arbor/6/1960 (H2N2) (AA60) and A/swine/MO/4296424/06 (H2N3) (Sw06). In vitro, CR6261 neutralized both H2 viruses, while CR9114 only neutralized Sw06. To evaluate prophylactic efficacy, mice were given CR6261 or CR9114 and intranasally challenged 24 h later with lethal doses of AA60 or Sw06. Both antibodies reduced mortality, weight loss, airway inflammation, and pulmonary viral load. Using engineered bNAb variants, antibody-mediated cell cytotoxicity reporter assays, and Fcγ receptor-deficient (Fcer1g-/-) mice, we show that the in vivo efficacy of CR9114 against AA60 is mediated by Fcγ receptor-dependent mechanisms. Collectively, these findings demonstrate the in vivo efficacy of CR6261 and CR9114 against H2 viruses and emphasize the need for in vivo evaluation of bNAbs.IMPORTANCE bNAbs represent a strategy to prevent or treat infection by a wide range of influenza viruses. The evaluation of these antibodies against H2 viruses is important because H2 viruses caused a pandemic in 1957 and could cross into humans again. We demonstrate that CR6261 and CR9114 are effective against infection with H2 viruses of

  1. Cross-protection of newly emerging HPAI H5 viruses by neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies: A viable alternative to oseltamivir.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Huanhuan; Wang, Guiqin; Wang, Shuangshuang; Chen, Honglin; Chen, Zhiwei; Hu, Hongxing; Cheng, Genhong; Zhou, Paul

    2016-01-01

    Newly emerging highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N2, H5N3, H5N5, H5N6, H5N8 and H5N9 viruses have been spreading in poultry and wild birds. The H5N6 viruses have also caused 10 human infections with 4 fatal cases in China. Here, we assessed the cross-neutralization and cross-protection of human and mouse monoclonal antibodies against 2 viruses: a HPAI H5N8 virus, A/chicken/Netherlands/14015526/2014 (NE14) and a HPAI H5N6 virus, A/Sichuan/26221/2014 (SC14). The former was isolated from an infected chicken in Netherlands in 2014 and the latter was isolated from an infected human patient in Sichuan, China. We show that antibodies FLA5.10, FLD21.140, 100F4 and 65C6, but not AVFluIgG01, AVFluIgG03, S139/1 and the VRC01 control, potently cross-neutralize the H5N8 NE14 and H5N6 SC14 viruses. Furthermore, we show that a single injection of >1 mg/kg of antibody 100F4 at 4 hours before, or 20 mg/kg antibody 100F4 at 72 hours after, a lethal dose of H5N8 NE14 enables mice to withstand the infection. Finally, we show that a single injection of 0.5 or 1 mg/kg antibody 100F4 prophylactically or 10 mg/kg 100F4 therapeutically outperforms a 5-day course of 10 mg/kg/day oseltamivir treatment against lethal H5N8 NE14 or H5N6 SC14 infection in mice. Our results suggest that further preclinical evaluation of human monoclonal antibodies against newly emerging H5 viruses is warranted.

  2. Human monoclonal antibodies derived from a patient infected with 2009 pandemic influenza A virus broadly cross-neutralize group 1 influenza viruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Yang [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Sasaki, Tadahiro [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); JST/JICA, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Kubota-Koketsu, Ritsuko [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Kanonji Institute, The Research Foundation for Microbial Diseases of Osaka University, Kanonji, Kagawa (Japan); JST/JICA, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Inoue, Yuji [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); JST/JICA, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Yasugi, Mayo [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Graduate School of Life and Environmental Sciences, Osaka Prefecture University, Izumisano, Osaka (Japan); JST/JICA, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Yamashita, Akifumi; Ramadhany, Ririn; Arai, Yasuha [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Du, Anariwa [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); JST/JICA, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Boonsathorn, Naphatsawan [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Department of Medical Sciences, Ministry of Public Health, Muang, Nonthaburi (Thailand); JST/JICA, Science and Technology Research Partnership for Sustainable Development (SATREPS), Tokyo (Japan); Ibrahim, Madiha S. [Research Institute for Microbial Diseases, Osaka University, Suita, Osaka (Japan); Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, Damanhour University, Damanhour (Egypt); and others

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • Influenza infection can elicit heterosubtypic antibodies to group 1 influenza virus. • Three human monoclonal antibodies were generated from an H1N1-infected patient. • The antibodies predominantly recognized α-helical stem of viral hemagglutinin (HA). • The antibodies inhibited HA structural activation during the fusion process. • The antibodies are potential candidates for future antibody therapy to influenza. - Abstract: Influenza viruses are a continuous threat to human public health because of their ability to evolve rapidly through genetic drift and reassortment. Three human monoclonal antibodies (HuMAbs) were generated in this study, 1H11, 2H5 and 5G2, and they cross-neutralize a diverse range of group 1 influenza A viruses, including seasonal H1N1, 2009 pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm) and avian H5N1 and H9N2. The three HuMAbs were prepared by fusing peripheral blood lymphocytes from an H1N1pdm-infected patient with a newly developed fusion partner cell line, SPYMEG. All the HuMAbs had little hemagglutination inhibition activity but had strong membrane-fusion inhibition activity against influenza viruses. A protease digestion assay showed the HuMAbs targeted commonly a short α-helix region in the stalk of the hemagglutinin. Furthermore, Ile45Phe and Glu47Gly double substitutions in the α-helix region made the HA unrecognizable by the HuMAbs. These two amino acid residues are highly conserved in the HAs of H1N1, H5N1 and H9N2 viruses. The HuMAbs reported here may be potential candidates for the development of therapeutic antibodies against group 1 influenza viruses.

  3. Induction of virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes as a basis for the development of broadly protective influenza vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L.B. Hillaire (Marine); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThere is considerable interest in the development of broadly protective influenza vaccines because of the continuous emergence of antigenic drift variants of seasonal influenza viruses and the threat posed by the emergence of antigenically distinct pandemic influenza viruses. It has been

  4. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killington, R. A.; Powell, K. L.

    1984-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have provided an exciting addition to the "armory" of the molecular biologist and immunologist. This article discusses briefly the concept of, techniques available for, production of, and possible uses of monoclonal antibodies. (Author)

  5. Monoclonal antibodies protect from Staphylococcal Enterotoxin K (SEK) induced toxic shock and sepsis by USA300 Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar, Jorge L; Varshney, Avanish K; Pechuan, Ximo; Dutta, Kaushik; Nosanchuk, Joshua D; Fries, Bettina C

    2017-08-18

    Staphylococcus aureus is a leading infectious cause of life-threatening disease in humans, yet there is currently no vaccine to combat this bacterium. The pathogenesis of S. aureus is mediated by a diverse array of protein toxins including a large family of secreted pyrogenic superantigens. Neutralization of superantigens, including SEB and TSST-1, has proven to be protective in several animal models of toxic shock and sepsis. We demonstrate, for the first time, that a far more prevalent staphylococcal superantigen, SEK, can also induce lethal shock in mice. Additionally, we describe monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that inhibit SEK-induced mitogenicity as well as protect against SEK-induced lethality, and enhance survival from S. aureus septicemia in murine models. MAb-4G3 (IgG2b), mAb-5G2 (IgG1), and mAb-9H2 (IgG1), all inhibit SEK-induced proliferation and cytokine production of human immune cells. We then demonstrate that passive immunization with a combination of mAb-4G3 and mAb-5G4, 2 mAbs that do not compete for epitope(s) on SEK, significantly enhance survival in a murine model of SEK-induced toxic shock (p = 0.006). In the setting of sepsis, passive immunization with this combination of mAbs also significantly enhances survival in mice after challenge with CA-MRSA strain USA300 (p = 0.03). Furthermore, septic mice that received mAb treatment in conjunction with vancomycin exhibit less morbidity than mice treated with vancomycin alone. Taken together, these findings suggest that the contribution of SEK to S. aureus pathogenesis may be greater than previously appreciated, and that adjunctive therapy with passive immunotherapy against SEs may be beneficial.

  6. Induction of Virus-Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes as a Basis for the Development of Broadly Protective Influenza Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Hillaire, Marine L. B.; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Guus F Rimmelzwaan

    2011-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the development of broadly protective influenza vaccines because of the continuous emergence of antigenic drift variants of seasonal influenza viruses and the threat posed by the emergence of antigenically distinct pandemic influenza viruses. It has been recognized more than three decades ago that influenza A virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes recognize epitopes located in the relatively conserved proteins like the nucleoprotein and that they cross-react ...

  7. Influenza hemagglutinin stem-fragment immunogen elicits broadly neutralizing antibodies and confers heterologous protection

    OpenAIRE

    Mallajosyula, Vamsee V. A.; Citron, Michael; Ferrara, Francesca; Lu, Xianghan; Callahan, Cheryl; Heidecker, Gwendolyn J.; Sarma, Siddhartha P.; Flynn, Jessica A.; Temperton, Nigel J.; Liang, Xiaoping; Varadarajan, Raghavan

    2014-01-01

    Influenza hemagglutinin (HA) is the primary target of the humoral response during infection/vaccination. Current influenza vaccines typically fail to elicit/boost broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs), thereby limiting their efficacy. Although several bnAbs bind to the conserved stem domain of HA, focusing the immune response to this conserved stem in the presence of the immunodominant, variable head domain of HA is challenging. We report the design of a thermotolerant, disulfide-free, and ...

  8. Current models broadly neglect specific needs of biodiversity conservation in protected areas under climate change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieck, Mungla; Ibisch, Pierre L; Moloney, Kirk A; Jeltsch, Florian

    2011-05-03

    Protected areas are the most common and important instrument for the conservation of biological diversity and are called for under the United Nations' Convention on Biological Diversity. Growing human population densities, intensified land-use, invasive species and increasing habitat fragmentation threaten ecosystems worldwide and protected areas are often the only refuge for endangered species. Climate change is posing an additional threat that may also impact ecosystems currently under protection. Therefore, it is of crucial importance to include the potential impact of climate change when designing future nature conservation strategies and implementing protected area management. This approach would go beyond reactive crisis management and, by necessity, would include anticipatory risk assessments. One avenue for doing so is being provided by simulation models that take advantage of the increase in computing capacity and performance that has occurred over the last two decades.Here we review the literature to determine the state-of-the-art in modeling terrestrial protected areas under climate change, with the aim of evaluating and detecting trends and gaps in the current approaches being employed, as well as to provide a useful overview and guidelines for future research. Most studies apply statistical, bioclimatic envelope models and focus primarily on plant species as compared to other taxa. Very few studies utilize a mechanistic, process-based approach and none examine biotic interactions like predation and competition. Important factors like land-use, habitat fragmentation, invasion and dispersal are rarely incorporated, restricting the informative value of the resulting predictions considerably. The general impression that emerges is that biodiversity conservation in protected areas could benefit from the application of modern modeling approaches to a greater extent than is currently reflected in the scientific literature. It is particularly true that

  9. Induction of Virus-Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes as a Basis for the Development of Broadly Protective Influenza Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine L. B. Hillaire

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable interest in the development of broadly protective influenza vaccines because of the continuous emergence of antigenic drift variants of seasonal influenza viruses and the threat posed by the emergence of antigenically distinct pandemic influenza viruses. It has been recognized more than three decades ago that influenza A virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes recognize epitopes located in the relatively conserved proteins like the nucleoprotein and that they cross-react with various subtypes of influenza A viruses. This implies that these CD8+ T lymphocytes may contribute to protective heterosubtypic immunity induced by antecedent influenza A virus infections. In the present paper, we review the evidence for the role of virus-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes in protective immunity against influenza virus infections and discuss vaccination strategies that aim at the induction of cross-reactive virus-specific T-cell responses.

  10. Current models broadly neglect specific needs of biodiversity conservation in protected areas under climate change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moloney Kirk A

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protected areas are the most common and important instrument for the conservation of biological diversity and are called for under the United Nations' Convention on Biological Diversity. Growing human population densities, intensified land-use, invasive species and increasing habitat fragmentation threaten ecosystems worldwide and protected areas are often the only refuge for endangered species. Climate change is posing an additional threat that may also impact ecosystems currently under protection. Therefore, it is of crucial importance to include the potential impact of climate change when designing future nature conservation strategies and implementing protected area management. This approach would go beyond reactive crisis management and, by necessity, would include anticipatory risk assessments. One avenue for doing so is being provided by simulation models that take advantage of the increase in computing capacity and performance that has occurred over the last two decades. Here we review the literature to determine the state-of-the-art in modeling terrestrial protected areas under climate change, with the aim of evaluating and detecting trends and gaps in the current approaches being employed, as well as to provide a useful overview and guidelines for future research. Results Most studies apply statistical, bioclimatic envelope models and focus primarily on plant species as compared to other taxa. Very few studies utilize a mechanistic, process-based approach and none examine biotic interactions like predation and competition. Important factors like land-use, habitat fragmentation, invasion and dispersal are rarely incorporated, restricting the informative value of the resulting predictions considerably. Conclusion The general impression that emerges is that biodiversity conservation in protected areas could benefit from the application of modern modeling approaches to a greater extent than is currently reflected in the

  11. Evaluation of Recombinant Attenuated Salmonella Vaccine Strains for Broad Protection against Extraintestinal Pathogenic Escherichia coli

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob T. Maddux

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Antibiotic-resistant bacterial infections are difficult to treat, producing a burden on healthcare and the economy. Extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli (ExPEC strains frequently carry antibiotic resistance genes, cause infections outside of the intestine, and are causative agents of hospital-acquired infections. Developing a prevention strategy against this pathogen is challenging due to its antibiotic resistance and antigenic diversity. E. coli common pilus (ECP is frequently found in ExPEC strains and may serve as a common antigen to induce protection against several ExPEC serotypes. In addition, live recombinant attenuated Salmonella vaccine (RASV strains have been used to prevent Salmonella infection and can also be modified to deliver foreign antigens. Thus, the objective of this study was to design a RASV to produce ECP on its surface and assess its ability to provide protection against ExPEC infections. To constitutively display ECP in a RASV strain, we genetically engineered a vector (pYA4428 containing aspartate-β-semialdehyde dehydrogenase and E. coli ecp genes and introduced it into RASV χ9558. RASV χ9558 containing an empty vector (pYA3337 was used as a control to assess protection conferred by the RASV strain without ECP. We assessed vaccine efficacy in in vitro bacterial inhibition assays and mouse models of ExPEC-associated human infections. We found that RASV χ9558(pYA4428 synthesized the major pilin (EcpA and tip pilus adhesin (EcpD on the bacterial surface. Mice orally vaccinated with RASV χ9558(pYA3337 without ECP or χ9558(pYA4428 with ECP, produced anti-Salmonella LPS and anti-E. coli EcpA and EcpD IgG and IgA antibodies. RASV strains showed protective potential against some E. coli and Salmonella strains as assessed using in vitro assays. In mouse sepsis and urinary tract infection challenge models, both vaccines had significant protection in some internal organs. Overall, this work showed that RASVs can elicit

  12. M2e-tetramer-specific memory CD4 T cells are broadly protective against influenza infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasson, D G; Omokanye, A; Schön, K; Wenzel, U A; Bernasconi, V; Bemark, M; Kolpe, A; El Bakkouri, K; Ysenbaert, T; Deng, L; Fiers, W; Saelens, X; Lycke, N

    2018-01-01

    Matrix protein 2 ectodomain (M2e) is considered an attractive component of a broadly protective, universal influenza A vaccine. Here we challenge the canonical view that antibodies against M2e are the prime effectors of protection. Intranasal immunizations of Balb/c mice with CTA1-3M2e-DD-generated M2e-specific memory CD4 T cells that were I-A d restricted and critically protected against infection, even in the complete absence of antibodies, as observed in JhD mice. Whereas some M2e-tetramer-specific memory CD4 T cells resided in spleen and lymph nodes, the majority were lung-resident Th17 cells, that rapidly expanded upon a viral challenge infection. Indeed, immunized IL-17A -/- mice were significantly less well protected compared with wild-type mice despite exhibiting comparable antibody levels. Similarly, poor protection was also observed in congenic Balb/B (H-2 b ) mice, which failed to develop M2e-specific CD4 T cells, but exhibited comparable antibody levels. Lung-resident CD69 + CD103 low M2e-specific memory CD4 T cells were αβ TCR + and 50% were Th17 cells that were associated with an early influx of neutrophils after virus challenge. Adoptively transferred M2e memory CD4 T cells were strong helper T cells, which accelerated M2e- but more importantly also hemagglutinin-specific IgG production. Thus, for the first time we demonstrate that M2e-specific memory CD4 T cells are broadly protective.

  13. Live attenuated nephropathogenic infectious bronchitis virus vaccine provides broad cross protection against new variant strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, T-H; Kim, M-S; Jang, J-H; Lee, D-H; Park, J-K; Youn, H-N; Lee, J-B; Park, S-Y; Choi, I-S; Song, C-S

    2012-01-01

    Infectious bronchitis virus (IBV) infections cause great economic losses to the poultry industry worldwide, and the emergence of new variant strains complicates disease control. The present study investigated the genetic and protectotypic features of newly emerged Korean IBV strains. A phylogenetic analysis showed that several recent isolates formed 2 different clusters (new cluster 1 and 2), which were distinct from other preexisting clusters. New cluster 1 IBV strains represented recombinants between Korean nephropathogenic strain KM91 and the QXIBV strain. New cluster 2 IBV strains showed low amino acid homology (vaccines (H120 and K2 strain) against these new isolates. In cross-protection studies, the H120 strain did not provide sufficient protection against these variants. However, highly attenuated nephropathogenic IBV vaccine, K2 strain, provided significantly higher levels of protection against variants compared with chickens vaccinated with H120 (P vaccine could be helpful for the reduction of economic losses caused by newly evolving IBV recombinants (new cluster 1) and variants (new cluster 2).

  14. Protection of hamsters from amebic liver abscess formation by a monoclonal antibody to a 150-kDa surface lectin of Entamoeba histolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, X J; Tachibana, H; Kaneda, Y

    1999-01-01

    We examined the effects of passive immunization with a monoclonal antibody (EH3015) that recognizes a 150-kDa surface lectin of Entamoeba histolytica on amebic liver-abscess formation in hamsters. The hamsters were inoculated i.p with 0.1, 1.0, or 10 mg of EH3015 at 24 h prior to an intrahepatic challenge with 10(5) trophozoites of E. histolytica. In hamsters treated with 1.0 and 10 mg of EH3015 the incidence of liver abscesses was significantly reduced. These results demonstrate that monoclonal antibody EH3015 can prevent the development of amebic liver abscesses and that the 150-kDa lectin may be a protective antigen on the surface of E. histolytica.

  15. Structures of the Zika Virus Envelope Protein and Its Complex with a Flavivirus Broadly Protective Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Lianpan; Song, Jian; Lu, Xishan; Deng, Yong-Qiang; Musyoki, Abednego Moki; Cheng, Huijun; Zhang, Yanfang; Yuan, Yuan; Song, Hao; Haywood, Joel; Xiao, Haixia; Yan, Jinghua; Shi, Yi; Qin, Cheng-Feng; Qi, Jianxun; Gao, George F

    2016-05-11

    Zika virus (ZIKV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, is a current global public health concern. The flavivirus envelope (E) glycoprotein is responsible for virus entry and represents a major target of neutralizing antibodies for other flaviviruses. Here, we report the structures of ZIKV E protein at 2.0 Å and in complex with a flavivirus broadly neutralizing murine antibody 2A10G6 at 3.0 Å. ZIKV-E resembles all the known flavivirus E structures but contains a unique, positively charged patch adjacent to the fusion loop region of the juxtaposed monomer, which may influence host attachment. The ZIKV-E-2A10G6 complex structure reveals antibody recognition of a highly conserved fusion loop. 2A10G6 binds to ZIKV-E with high affinity in vitro and neutralizes currently circulating ZIKV strains in vitro and in mice. The E protein fusion loop epitope represents a potential candidate for therapeutic antibodies against ZIKV. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Broad protection against avian influenza virus by using a modified vaccinia Ankara virus expressing a mosaic hemagglutinin gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamlangdee, Attapon; Kingstad-Bakke, Brock; Anderson, Tavis K; Goldberg, Tony L; Osorio, Jorge E

    2014-11-01

    A critical failure in our preparedness for an influenza pandemic is the lack of a universal vaccine. Influenza virus strains diverge by 1 to 2% per year, and commercially available vaccines often do not elicit protection from one year to the next, necessitating frequent formulation changes. This represents a major challenge to the development of a cross-protective vaccine that can protect against circulating viral antigenic diversity. We have constructed a recombinant modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) that expresses an H5N1 mosaic hemagglutinin (H5M) (MVA-H5M). This mosaic was generated in silico using 2,145 field-sourced H5N1 isolates. A single dose of MVA-H5M provided 100% protection in mice against clade 0, 1, and 2 avian influenza viruses and also protected against seasonal H1N1 virus (A/Puerto Rico/8/34). It also provided short-term (10 days) and long-term (6 months) protection postvaccination. Both neutralizing antibodies and antigen-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells were still detected at 5 months postvaccination, suggesting that MVA-H5M provides long-lasting immunity. Influenza viruses infect a billion people and cause up to 500,000 deaths every year. A major problem in combating influenza is the lack of broadly effective vaccines. One solution from the field of human immunodeficiency virus vaccinology involves a novel in silico mosaic approach that has been shown to provide broad and robust protection against highly variable viruses. Unlike a consensus algorithm which picks the most frequent residue at each position, the mosaic method chooses the most frequent T-cell epitopes and combines them to form a synthetic antigen. These studies demonstrated that a mosaic influenza virus H5 hemagglutinin expressed by a viral vector can elicit full protection against diverse H5N1 challenges as well as induce broader immunity than a wild-type hemagglutinin. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  17. IgM but not IgG monoclonal anti-Nocardia brasiliensis antibodies confer protection against experimental actinomycetoma in BALB/c mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Suarez, Maria L; Salinas-Carmona, Mario C; Pérez-Rivera, Isabel

    2009-10-01

    Nocardia brasiliensis is a facultative intracellular microorganism that produces a human chronic infection known as actinomycetoma. Human and mouse anti-N. brasiliensis antibody response identify P24, P26 and P61 immunodominant antigens. In this work, we generated immunoglobulin M (IgM) and IgG monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) specific to immunodominant P61 antigen. The monoclonal IgM (NbM1) and IgG2a (NbG1) antibodies were assessed for their in vitro bactericidal activity, in vivo protective effect and ability to block catalase activity. These mAbs specifically recognized P61, but they did not inhibit its enzyme activity. The in vitro bactericidal effect of NbG1 was higher than the killing ability of the IgM mAb. In vivo experiments with a murine model of experimental infection with N. brasiliensis injected into rear footpads was used to test the effect of NbM1 and NbG1. The negative untreated group developed a chronic actinomycetoma within 4 weeks. IgM mAbs conferred protection to BALB/c mice infected with N. brasiliensis. IgG mAb lacked this protective effect. IgM mAb showed a dose-response correlation between antibody concentration and lesion size. These results demonstrate that humoral immune response mediated by antigen-specific IgM antibody protects against an intracellular bacterial infection.

  18. Characterization of the UVA protection provided by avobenzone, zinc oxide, and titanium dioxide in broad-spectrum sunscreen products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beasley, Donathan G; Meyer, Thomas A

    2010-12-01

    Solar UV radiation (UVR) is composed of UVB (290-320 nm) and UVA (320-400 nm) wavelengths. Only two sunscreen active ingredients approved in the US, avobenzone (butylmethoxydibenzoylmethane) and zinc oxide (ZnO), provide true broad-spectrum protection against UVA wavelengths >360 nm. Although effective against shorter UVR wavelengths sunscreen film during UVR exposure, avobenzone needs to be formulated into sunscreen products using sound formulation strategies. To characterize the efficacy of avobenzone, ZnO, and TiO(2) in terms of their abilities to provide broad UVA protection and to demonstrate the effectiveness of the different formulation strategies used today to maintain the efficacy of avobenzone even during prolonged exposures to UVR. UVA efficacy was assessed by measuring absorbance profiles in vitro using Vitro Skin® (IMS Inc., Orange, CT, USA) as an inert substrate and by determining UVA protection factors (PFA) on human skin. The impact of avobenzone loss on sun protection factor (SPF) and PFA values was evaluated by serially reducing avobenzone concentrations in an otherwise photostable product. The photostabilizing influence of specific formulation ingredients was monitored by measuring the extent to which they prevented UVR-induced degradation of avobenzone, whereas photostability of commercial sunscreen products was quantified by measuring the percentage change in absorbance within the UVB and UVA spectral regions following irradiation of thin product films on inert substrates. Model formulations containing 3% avobenzone or 5% ZnO provided superior attenuation of UVA wavelengths >360 nm compared with formulas containing 5% TiO(2). Additionally, sunscreen products of similar SPF containing avobenzone or ZnO exhibited significantly higher PFA values than those containing TiO(2). The addition of photostabilized avobenzone or ZnO increased PFA values nearly 3-fold, whereas the addition of TiO(2) increased PFA values only modestly. Judicious

  19. Human monoclonal antibody combination against SARS coronavirus: synergy and coverage of escape mutants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Meulen, Jan; van den Brink, Edward N.; Poon, Leo L. M.; Marissen, Wilfred E.; Leung, Cynthia S. W.; Cox, Freek; Cheung, Chung Y.; Bakker, Arjen Q.; Bogaards, Johannes A.; van Deventer, Els; Preiser, Wolfgang; Doerr, Hans Wilhelm; Chow, Vincent T.; de Kruif, John; Peiris, Joseph S. M.; Goudsmit, Jaap

    2006-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Experimental animal data show that protection against severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) infection with human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is feasible. For an effective immune prophylaxis in humans, broad coverage of different strains of SARS-CoV and control of

  20. Preclinical refinements of a broadly protective VLP-based HPV vaccine targeting the minor capsid protein, L2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumban, Ebenezer; Muttil, Pavan; Escobar, Carolina Andrea A; Peabody, Julianne; Wafula, Denis; Peabody, David S; Chackerian, Bryce

    2015-06-26

    An ideal prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine would provide broadly protective and long-lasting immune responses against all high-risk HPV types, would be effective after a single dose, and would be formulated in such a manner to allow for long-term storage without the necessity for refrigeration. We have developed candidate HPV vaccines consisting of bacteriophage virus-like particles (VLPs) that display a broadly neutralizing epitope derived from the HPV16 minor capsid protein, L2. Immunization with 16L2 VLPs elicited high titer and broadly cross-reactive and cross-neutralizing antibodies against diverse HPV types. In this study we introduce two refinements for our candidate vaccines, with an eye towards enhancing efficacy and clinical applicability in the developing world. First, we assessed the role of antigen dose and boosting on immunogenicity. Mice immunized with 16L2-MS2 VLPs at doses ranging from 2 to 25 μg with or without alum were highly immunogenic at all doses; alum appeared to have an adjuvant effect at the lowest dose. Although boosting enhanced antibody titers, even a single immunization could elicit strong and long-lasting antibody responses. We also developed a method to enhance vaccine stability. Using a spray dry apparatus and a combination of sugars & an amino acid as protein stabilizers, we generated dry powder vaccine formulations of our L2 VLPs. Spray drying of our L2 VLPs did not affect the integrity or immunogenicity of VLPs upon reconstitution. Spray dried VLPs were stable at room temperature and at 37 °C for over one month and the VLPs were highly immunogenic. Taken together, these enhancements are designed to facilitate implementation of a next-generation VLP-based HPV vaccine which addresses U.S. and global disparities in vaccine affordability and access in rural/remote populations. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. Efficient single tobamoviral vector-based bioproduction of broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibody VRC01 in Nicotiana benthamiana plants and utility of VRC01 in combination microbicides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamorsky, Krystal Teasley; Grooms-Williams, Tiffany W; Husk, Adam S; Bennett, Lauren J; Palmer, Kenneth E; Matoba, Nobuyuki

    2013-05-01

    Broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (bnMAbs) may offer powerful tools for HIV-1 preexposure prophylaxis, such as topical microbicides. However, this option is hampered due to expensive MAb biomanufacturing based on mammalian cell culture. To address this issue, we developed a new production system for bnMAb VRC01 in Nicotiana benthamiana plants using a tobamovirus replicon vector. Unlike conventional two-vector-based expression, this system was designed to overexpress full-length IgG1 from a single polypeptide by means of kex2p-like enzyme recognition sites introduced between the heavy and light chains. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed that gp120-binding VRC01 IgG1 was maximally accumulated on 5 to 7 days following vector inoculation, yielding ~150 mg of the bnMAb per kg of fresh leaf material. The plant-made VRC01 (VRC01p) was efficiently purified by protein A affinity followed by hydrophobic-interaction chromatography. ELISA, surface plasmon resonance, and an HIV-1 neutralization assay demonstrated that VRC01p has gp120-binding affinity and HIV-1-neutralization capacity virtually identical to the human-cell-produced counterpart. To advance VRC01p's use in topical microbicides, we analyzed combinations of the bnMAb with other microbicide candidates holding distinct antiviral mechanisms in an HIV-1 neutralization assay. VRC01p exhibited clear synergy with the antiviral lectin griffithsin, the CCR5 antagonist maraviroc, and the reverse transcriptase inhibitor tenofovir in multiple CCR5-tropic HIV-1 strains from clades A, B, and C. In summary, VRC01p is amenable to robust, rapid, and large-scale production and may be developed as an active component in combination microbicides with other anti-HIV agents such as antiviral lectins, CCR5 antagonists, and reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

  2. Increased antibody affinity confers broad in vitro protection against escape mutants of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Mridula; Bolles, Meagan; Donaldson, Eric F; Van Blarcom, Thomas; Baric, Ralph; Iverson, Brent; Georgiou, George

    2012-09-01

    Even though the effect of antibody affinity on neutralization potency is well documented, surprisingly, its impact on neutralization breadth and escape has not been systematically determined. Here, random mutagenesis and DNA shuffling of the single-chain variable fragment of the neutralizing antibody 80R followed by bacterial display screening using anchored periplasmic expression (APEx) were used to generate a number of higher-affinity variants of the severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV)-neutralizing antibody 80R with equilibrium dissociation constants (K(D)) as low as 37 pM, a >270-fold improvement relative to that of the parental 80R single-chain variable fragment (scFv). As expected, antigen affinity was shown to correlate directly with neutralization potency toward the icUrbani strain of SARS-CoV. Additionally, the highest-affinity antibody fragment displayed 10-fold-increased broad neutralization in vitro and completely protected against several SARS-CoV strains containing substitutions associated with antibody escape. Importantly, higher affinity also led to the suppression of viral escape mutants in vitro. Escape from the highest-affinity variant required reduced selective pressure and multiple substitutions in the binding epitope. Collectively, these results support the hypothesis that engineered antibodies with picomolar dissociation constants for a neutralizing epitope can confer escape-resistant protection.

  3. Protective efficacy of passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies in animal models of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasushi Itoh

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI viruses of the H5N1 subtype often cause severe pneumonia and multiple organ failure in humans, with reported case fatality rates of more than 60%. To develop a clinical antibody therapy, we generated a human-mouse chimeric monoclonal antibody (MAb ch61 that showed strong neutralizing activity against H5N1 HPAI viruses isolated from humans and evaluated its protective potential in mouse and nonhuman primate models of H5N1 HPAI virus infections. Passive immunization with MAb ch61 one day before or after challenge with a lethal dose of the virus completely protected mice, and partial protection was achieved when mice were treated 3 days after the challenge. In a cynomolgus macaque model, reduced viral loads and partial protection against lethal infection were observed in macaques treated with MAb ch61 intravenously one and three days after challenge. Protective effects were also noted in macaques under immunosuppression. Though mutant viruses escaping from neutralization by MAb ch61 were recovered from macaques treated with this MAb alone, combined treatment with MAb ch61 and peramivir reduced the emergence of escape mutants. Our results indicate that antibody therapy might be beneficial in reducing viral loads and delaying disease progression during H5N1 HPAI virus infection in clinical cases and combined treatment with other antiviral compounds should improve the protective effects of antibody therapy against H5N1 HPAI virus infection.

  4. Novel bacteriophage lysin with broad lytic activity protects against mixed infection by Streptococcus pyogenes and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilmer, Daniel B; Schmitz, Jonathan E; Euler, Chad W; Fischetti, Vincent A

    2013-06-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus [GrAS]) cause serious and sometimes fatal human diseases. They are among the many Gram-positive pathogens for which resistance to leading antibiotics has emerged. As a result, alternative therapies need to be developed to combat these pathogens. We have identified a novel bacteriophage lysin (PlySs2), derived from a Streptococcus suis phage, with broad lytic activity against MRSA, vancomycin-intermediate S. aureus (VISA), Streptococcus suis, Listeria, Staphylococcus simulans, Staphylococcus epidermidis, Streptococcus equi, Streptococcus agalactiae (group B streptococcus [GBS]), S. pyogenes, Streptococcus sanguinis, group G streptococci (GGS), group E streptococci (GES), and Streptococcus pneumoniae. PlySs2 has an N-terminal cysteine-histidine aminopeptidase (CHAP) catalytic domain and a C-terminal SH3b binding domain. It is stable at 50 °C for 30 min, 37 °C for >24 h, 4°C for 15 days, and -80 °C for >7 months; it maintained full activity after 10 freeze-thaw cycles. PlySs2 at 128 μg/ml in vitro reduced MRSA and S. pyogenes growth by 5 logs and 3 logs within 1 h, respectively, and exhibited a MIC of 16 μg/ml for MRSA. A single, 2-mg dose of PlySs2 protected 92% (22/24) of the mice in a bacteremia model of mixed MRSA and S. pyogenes infection. Serially increasing exposure of MRSA and S. pyogenes to PlySs2 or mupirocin resulted in no observed resistance to PlySs2 and resistance to mupirocin. To date, no other lysin has shown such notable broad lytic activity, stability, and efficacy against multiple, leading, human bacterial pathogens; as such, PlySs2 has all the characteristics to be an effective therapeutic.

  5. A humanized monoclonal antibody neutralizes yellow fever virus strain 17D-204 in vitro but does not protect a mouse model from disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvert, Amanda E; Dixon, Kandice L; Piper, Joseph; Bennett, Susan L; Thibodeaux, Brett A; Barrett, Alan D T; Roehrig, John T; Blair, Carol D

    2016-07-01

    The yellow fever virus (YFV) vaccine 17D-204 is considered safe and effective, yet rare severe adverse events (SAEs), some resulting in death, have been documented following vaccination. Individuals exhibiting post-vaccinal SAEs are ideal candidates for antiviral monoclonal antibody (MAb) therapy; the time until appearance of clinical signs post-exposure is usually short and patients are quickly hospitalized. We previously developed a murine-human chimeric monoclonal antibody (cMAb), 2C9-cIgG, reactive with both virulent YFV and 17D-204, and demonstrated its ability to prevent and treat YF disease in both AG129 mouse and hamster models of infection. To counteract possible selection of 17D-204 variants that escape neutralization by treatment with a single MAb (2C9-cIgG), we developed a second cMAb, 864-cIgG, for use in combination with 2C9-cIgG in post-vaccinal therapy. MAb 864-cIgG recognizes/neutralizes only YFV 17D-204 vaccine substrain and binds to domain III (DIII) of the viral envelope protein, which is different from the YFV type-specific binding site of 2C9-cIgG in DII. Although it neutralized 17D-204 in vitro, administration of 864-cIgG had no protective capacity in the interferon receptor-deficient AG129 mouse model of 17D-204 infection. The data presented here show that although DIII-specific 864-cIgG neutralizes virus infectivity in vitro, it does not have the ability to abrogate disease in vivo. Therefore, combination of 864-cIgG with 2C9-cIgG for treatment of YF vaccination SAEs does not appear to provide an improvement on 2C9-cIgG therapy alone. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. A humanised murine monoclonal antibody protects mice from Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, Everglades virus and Mucambo virus when administered up to 48 h after airborne challenge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Brien, Lyn M., E-mail: lmobrien@dstl.gov.uk; Goodchild, Sarah A.; Phillpotts, Robert J.; Perkins, Stuart D.

    2012-05-10

    Currently there are no licensed antiviral treatments for the Alphaviruses Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV), Everglades virus and Mucambo virus. We previously developed a humanised version of the mouse monoclonal antibody 1A3B-7 (Hu1A3B-7) which exhibited a wide range of reactivity in vitro and was able to protect mice from infection with VEEV. Continued work with the humanised antibody has now demonstrated that it has the potential to be a new human therapeutic. Hu1A3B-7 successfully protected mice from infection with multiple Alphaviruses. The effectiveness of the humanisation process was determined by assessing proliferation responses in human T-cells to peptides derived from the murine and humanised versions of the V{sub H} and V{sub L} domains. This analysis showed that the number of human T-cell epitopes within the humanised antibody had been substantially reduced, indicating that Hu1A3B-7 may have reduced immunogenicity in vivo.

  7. Pre-exposure Prophylaxis With OspA-Specific Human Monoclonal Antibodies Protects Mice Against Tick Transmission of Lyme Disease Spirochetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yang; Kern, Aurélie; Boatright, Naomi K; Schiller, Zachary A; Sadowski, Andrew; Ejemel, Monir; Souders, Colby A; Reimann, Keith A; Hu, Linden; Thomas, William D; Klempner, Mark S

    2016-07-15

    Tick transmission of Borrelia spirochetes to humans results in significant morbidity from Lyme disease worldwide. Serum concentrations of antibodies against outer surface protein A (OspA) were shown to correlate with protection from infection with Borrelia burgdorferi, the primary cause of Lyme disease in the United States. Mice transgenic for human immunoglobulin genes were immunized with OspA from B. burgdorferi to generate human monoclonal antibodies (HuMabs) against OspA. HuMabs were generated and tested in in vitro borreliacidal assays and animal protection assays. Nearly 100 unique OspA-specific HuMabs were generated, and 4 HuMabs (221-7, 857-2, 319-44, and 212-55) were selected as lead candidates on the basis of borreliacidal activity. HuMabs 319-44, 857-2, and 212-55 were borreliacidal against 1 or 2 Borrelia genospecies, whereas 221-7 was borreliacidal (half maximal inhibitory concentration, Lyme disease. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geskin, Larisa J

    2015-10-01

    Use of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) has revolutionized cancer therapy. Approaches targeting specific cellular targets on the malignant cells and in tumor microenvironment have been proved to be successful in hematologic malignancies, including cutaneous lymphomas. mAb-based therapy for cutaneous T-cell lymphoma has demonstrated high response rates and a favorable toxicity profile in clinical trials. Several antibodies and antibody-based conjugates are approved for use in clinical practice, and many more are in ongoing and planned clinical trials. In addition, these safe and effective drugs can be used as pillars for sequential therapies in a rational stepwise manner. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterization of the mechanism of protection mediated by CS-D7, a monoclonal antibody to Staphylococcus aureus iron regulated surface determinant B (IsdB

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory ePancari

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available We previously reported the development of a human monoclonal antibody (CS-D7, IgG1 with specificity and affinity for the iron regulated surface determinant B (IsdB of Staphylococcus aureus. CS-D7 mediates opsonophagocytic killing in vitro and protection in a murine sepsis model. In light of recent data indicating that IsdB specific T cells (CD4+, Th17, not Ab, mediate protection after vaccination with IsdB, it is important to investigate the mechanism of protection mediated by CS-D7. The mAb was examined to determine if it blocked heme binding to IsdB in vitro. The mAb was not found to have heme blocking activity, nor did it prevent bacterial growth under in vivo conditions, in an implanted growth chamber. To assess the role of the mAb Fc a point mutation was introduced at aa 297 (CS-D7●N297A. This point mutation removes Fc effector functions. In vitro analysis of the mutein confirmed that it lacked measurable binding to FcγR, and that it did not fix complement. The mutein had dramatically reduced in vitro opsonic OP activity compared to CS-D7. Nonetheless, the mutein conferred protection equivalent to the wild type mAb in the murine sepsis model. Both wild type and mutein mAbs were efficacious in FcγR deletion mice (including both FcγRII-/- mice and FcγRIII-/- mice, indicating that these receptors were not essential for mAb mediated protection in vivo. Protection mediated by CS-D7 was lost in Balb/c mice depleted of C3 with cobra venom factor (CFV, was lost in mice depleted of superoxide dismutase (SOD in P47phox deletion mice, and was absent in SCID mice. Enhanced clearance of S. aureus in the liver of CS-D7 treated mice and enhanced production of INF-γ, but not of IL17, may play a role in the mechanism of protection mediated by the mAb. CS-D7 apparently mediates survival in challenged mice through a mechanism involving complement, phagocytes, and lymphocytes, but which does not depend on interaction with FcγR, or on blocking heme

  10. Rapid effects of a protective O-polysaccharide-specific monoclonal IgA on Vibrio cholerae agglutination, motility, and surface morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levinson, Kara J; De Jesus, Magdia; Mantis, Nicholas J

    2015-04-01

    2D6 is a dimeric monoclonal immunoglobulin A (IgA) specific for the nonreducing terminal residue of Ogawa O-polysaccharide (OPS) of Vibrio cholerae. It was previously demonstrated that 2D6 IgA is sufficient to passively protect suckling mice from oral challenge with virulent V. cholerae O395. In this study, we sought to define the mechanism by which 2D6 IgA antibody protects the intestinal epithelium from V. cholerae infection. In a mouse ligated-ileal-loop assay, 2D6 IgA promoted V. cholerae agglutination in the intestinal lumen and limited the ability of the bacteria to associate with the epithelium, particularly within the crypt regions. In vitro fluorescence digital video microscopy analysis of antibody-treated V. cholerae in liquid medium revealed that 2D6 IgA not only induced the rapid (5- to 10-min) onset of agglutination but was an equally potent inhibitor of bacterial motility. Scanning electron microscopy showed that 2D6 IgA promoted flagellum-flagellum cross-linking, as well as flagellar entanglement with bacterial bodies, suggesting that motility arrest may be a consequence of flagellar tethering. However, monovalent 2D6 Fab fragments also inhibited V. cholerae motility, demonstrating that antibody-mediated agglutination and motility arrest are separate phenomena. While 2D6 IgA is neither bactericidal nor bacteriostatic, exposure of V. cholerae to 2D6 IgA (or Fab fragments) resulted in a 5-fold increase in surface-associated blebs, as well an onset of a wrinkled surface morphotype. We propose that the protective immunity conferred by 2D6 IgA is the result of multifactorial effects on V. cholerae, including agglutination, motility arrest, and possibly outer membrane stress. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  11. A broad spectrum high-SPF photostable sunscreen with a high UVA-PF can protect against cellular damage at high UV exposure doses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Curtis; Appa, Yohini; Ou-Yang, Hao

    2014-08-01

    Advances in sunscreen technologies have yielded broad spectrum sunscreens at high-sun protection factor (SPF) and ultraviolet A protection factor (UVA-PF) levels that are photostable and powerful in protecting skin from erythema. Questions arise whether these sunscreens protect proportionally against cellular skin damage caused by high ultraviolet exposures. The objective of this study is to evaluate if high-SPF sunscreen can protect skin at a cellular level under UV exposure doses [>50 minimal erythema dose (MED)] similarly to the SPF value. Sunburn cells, Langerhans cells, thymine dimers, protein 53 (p53), and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and MMP-9 endpoints were evaluated in biopsies from 12 subjects following four treatments: unprotected exposed to 0, 1 and 3 MED and sunscreen (SPF 55) protected exposed to 55 MED of UV radiation. All the markers showed significantly more damage for the 3 MED-untreated sites when compared with non-irradiated control, and majority of the markers showed marked damage following unprotected 1 MED exposure. After 55 MEDs, sunscreen-protected sites showed significantly less p53 and MMP-9 (keratinocyte) staining than the 1 MED-exposed unprotected sites, while all the other biomarkers in sunscreen protected sites showed no statistical differences from 1 MED-exposed unprotected sites. A high-SPF photostable sunscreen with high UVA-PF can provide proportionately high protection against multiple cellular damage markers. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. A Bivalent Heterologous DNA Virus-Like-Particle Prime-Boost Vaccine Elicits Broad Protection against both Group 1 and 2 Influenza A Viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Wenbo; Wang, Shuangshuang; Chen, Honglin; Ren, Huanhuan; Huang, Xun; Wang, Guiqin; Chen, Ze; Chen, Ling; Chen, Zhiwei; Zhou, Paul

    2017-05-01

    Current seasonal influenza vaccines are efficacious when vaccine strains are matched with circulating strains. However, they do not protect antigenic variants and newly emerging pandemic and outbreak strains. Thus, there is a critical need for developing so-called "universal" vaccines that protect against all influenza viruses. In the present study, we developed a bivalent heterologous DNA virus-like particle prime-boost vaccine strategy. We show that mice immunized with this vaccine were broadly protected against lethal challenge from group 1 (H1, H5, and H9) and group 2 (H3 and H7) viruses, with 94% aggregate survival. To determine the immune correlates of protection, we performed passive immunizations and in vitro assays. We show that this vaccine elicited antibody responses that bound HA from group 1 (H1, H2, H5, H6, H8, H9, H11, and H12) and group 2 (H3, H4, H7, H10, H14, and H15) and neutralized homologous and intrasubtypic H5 and H7 and heterosubtypic H1 viruses and hemagglutinin-specific CD4 and CD8 T cell responses. As a result, passive immunization with immune sera fully protected mice against H5, H7, and H1 challenge, whereas with both immune sera and T cells the mice survived heterosubtypic H3 and H9 challenge. Thus, it appears that (i) neutralizing antibodies alone fully protect against homologous and intrasubtypic H5 and H7 and (ii) neutralizing and binding antibodies are sufficient to protect against heterosubtypic H1, (iii) but against heterosubtypic H3 and H9, binding antibodies and T cells are required for complete survival. We believe that this vaccine regimen could potentially be a candidate for a "universal" influenza vaccine. IMPORTANCE Influenza virus infection is global health problem. Current seasonal influenza vaccines are efficacious only when vaccine strains are matched with circulating strains. However, these vaccines do not protect antigenic variants and newly emerging pandemic and outbreak strains. Because of this, there is an urgent

  13. Combination Therapy Using Chimeric Monoclonal Antibodies Protects Mice from Lethal H5N1 Infection and Prevents Formation of Escape Mutants

    OpenAIRE

    Mookkan Prabakaran; Nayana Prabhu; Fang He; Qian Hongliang; Hui-Ting Ho; Jia Qiang; Tao Meng; Michael Goutama; Jimmy Kwang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Given that there is a possibility of a human H5N1 pandemic and the fact that the recent H5N1 viruses are resistant to the anti-viral drugs, newer strategies for effective therapy are warranted. Previous studies show that single mAbs in immune prophylaxis can be protective against H5N1 infection. But a single mAb may not be effective in neutralization of a broad range of different strains of H5N1 and control of potential neutralization escape mutants. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We...

  14. Rational Design of Vaccines to Elicit Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies to HIV-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Peter D.; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.

    2011-01-01

    The development of a highly effective AIDS vaccine will likely depend on success in designing immunogens that elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies to naturally circulating strains of HIV-1. Although the antibodies induced after natural infection with HIV-1 are often directed to strain-specific or nonneutralizing determinants, it is now evident that 10%–25% of HIV-infected individuals generate neutralizing antibody responses of considerable breadth. In the past, only four broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies had been defined, but more than a dozen monoclonal antibodies of substantial breadth have more recently been isolated. An understanding of their recognition sites, the structural basis of their interaction with the HIV Env, and their development pathways provides new opportunities to design vaccine candidates that will elicit broadly protective antibodies against this virus. PMID:22229123

  15. Serum-neutralizing, non-precipitating, partially protective monoclonal IgA antibody against VSV-NJ

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Englen, M.D.; Ristow, S.; Yilma, T.

    1986-03-05

    A BALB/c mouse hybridoma that secretes an isotype IgA kappa-antibody specific for the New Jersey serotype of vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV-NJ) has been cloned. This antibody is serum-neutralizing yet fails to immunoprecipitate /sup 35/S-labeled G glycoprotein from virus-infected cell lysates. To determine if the antibody could protect mice from a lethal challenge dose of VSV-NJ, passive transfer experiments were performed with ascites fluid containing the IgA antibody. Mice given antibody IP or IV 24 hr before challenge all succumbed to progressive encephalitis, as did control mice. The only mice to survive were those given a virus preparation that had been preincubated with the ascites fluid for 1 hr at 37/sup 0/C. To characterize this antibody physically, Coomassie-stained polyacrylamide gels were prepared in which samples of affinity-purified antibody were prepared under reducing and non-reducing conditions. The results indicate that the molecule is composed of a disulfide bonded light-chain dimer and a disulfide bonded heavy-chain dimer.

  16. Vaccine composition formulated with a novel TLR7-dependent adjuvant induces high and broad protection against Staphylococcus aureus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnoli, Fabio; Fontana, Maria Rita; Soldaini, Elisabetta; Mishra, Ravi P. N.; Fiaschi, Luigi; Cartocci, Elena; Nardi-Dei, Vincenzo; Ruggiero, Paolo; Nosari, Sarah; De Falco, Maria Grazia; Lofano, Giuseppe; Marchi, Sara; Galletti, Bruno; Mariotti, Paolo; Bacconi, Marta; Torre, Antonina; Maccari, Silvia; Scarselli, Maria; Rinaudo, C. Daniela; Inoshima, Naoko; Savino, Silvana; Mori, Elena; Rossi-Paccani, Silvia; Baudner, Barbara; Pallaoro, Michele; Swennen, Erwin; Petracca, Roberto; Brettoni, Cecilia; Liberatori, Sabrina; Norais, Nathalie; Monaci, Elisabetta; Bubeck Wardenburg, Juliane; Schneewind, Olaf; O’Hagan, Derek T.; Valiante, Nicholas M.; Bensi, Giuliano; Bertholet, Sylvie; De Gregorio, Ennio; Rappuoli, Rino; Grandi, Guido

    2015-01-01

    Both active and passive immunization strategies against Staphylococcus aureus have thus far failed to show efficacy in humans. With the attempt to develop an effective S. aureus vaccine, we selected five conserved antigens known to have different roles in S. aureus pathogenesis. They include the secreted factors α-hemolysin (Hla), ess extracellular A (EsxA), and ess extracellular B (EsxB) and the two surface proteins ferric hydroxamate uptake D2 and conserved staphylococcal antigen 1A. The combined vaccine antigens formulated with aluminum hydroxide induced antibodies with opsonophagocytic and functional activities and provided consistent protection in four mouse models when challenged with a panel of epidemiologically relevant S. aureus strains. The importance of antibodies in protection was demonstrated by passive transfer experiments. Furthermore, when formulated with a toll-like receptor 7-dependent (TLR7) agonist recently designed and developed in our laboratories (SMIP.7–10) adsorbed to alum, the five antigens provided close to 100% protection against four different staphylococcal strains. The new formulation induced not only high antibody titers but also a Th1 skewed immune response as judged by antibody isotype and cytokine profiles. In addition, low frequencies of IL-17–secreting T cells were also observed. Altogether, our data demonstrate that the rational selection of mixtures of conserved antigens combined with Th1/Th17 adjuvants can lead to promising vaccine formulations against S. aureus. PMID:25775551

  17. The necessity of broad consent and complementary regulations for the protection of personal data in biobanks: what can we learn from the German case?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taupitz, J; Weigel, J

    2012-01-01

    In order to follow population-based approaches for certain causes and risks of illnesses, more and more biobanks have been set up during the last years. Here, samples and personal data of the donors are collected and saved, whereby concrete research aims, at the time of storage of the bio-probes and the related data, are mostly undetermined. Biobanks, therefore, have the character of a collection of material and data that can be used for initially undetermined research projects. Under legal aspects the question arises whether the data subjects can consent only to an already determined use of their samples and data or can consent to a general use for research. In this article, we discuss the validity of broad consent and in how far the arising deficits in data protection need to be and can be compensated. Broad consent is, in our opinion, generally legally valid. It leads, however, to an encroachment of the ruling basic principles of data protection law. The 5-pillar concept of the German Ethics Council therefore suggests additional regulations to compensate the lacks of broad consent. While other recommendations and opinions - as far as can be seen - do only describe in vague terms the conditions for statutory regulations, the opinion of the German Ethics Council comprises very concrete statements. It, therefore, might serve as a model in the international debate on privacy and biobanks. As a result of the current debate, we identify this as a paradigm shift in data protection in biobanks. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  18. The broad-spectrum antiviral favipiravir protects guinea pigs from lethal Lassa virus infection post-disease onset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safronetz, David; Rosenke, Kyle; Westover, Jonna B; Martellaro, Cynthia; Okumura, Atsushi; Furuta, Yousuke; Geisbert, Joan; Saturday, Greg; Komeno, Takashi; Geisbert, Thomas W; Feldmann, Heinz; Gowen, Brian B

    2015-10-12

    With up to 500,000 infections annually, Lassa virus (LASV), the cause of Lassa fever, is one of the most prevalent etiological agents of viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in humans. LASV is endemic in several West African countries with sporadic cases and prolonged outbreaks observed most commonly in Sierra Leone, Liberia, Guinea and Nigeria. Additionally several cases of Lassa fever have been imported into North America, Europe and Asia making LASV a global threat to public health. Despite this, currently no approved therapeutic or vaccine exists to treat or prevent LASV infections. Here, using a passaged strain of LASV that is uniformly lethal in Hartley guinea pigs, we demonstrate that favipiravir, a broad-spectrum antiviral agent and leading treatment option for influenza, has potent activity against LASV infection. In this model, once daily treatment with favipiravir significantly reduced viral titers in tissue samples and reduced mortality rates when compared with animals receiving vehicle-only or ribavirin, the current standard of care for Lassa fever. Favipiravir remained highly effective against lethal LASV infection when treatments were initiated nine days post-infection, a time when animals were demonstrating advanced signs of disease. These results support the further preclinical evaluation of favipiravir for Lassa fever and other VHFs.

  19. Development of a novel monoclonal antibody with reactivity to a wide range of Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus strains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phelps Amanda L

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is currently a requirement for antiviral therapies capable of protecting against infection with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus (VEEV, as a licensed vaccine is not available for general human use. Monoclonal antibodies are increasingly being developed as therapeutics and are potential treatments for VEEV as they have been shown to be protective in the mouse model of disease. However, to be truly effective, the antibody should recognise multiple strains of VEEV and broadly reactive monoclonal antibodies are rarely and only coincidentally isolated using classical hybridoma technology. Results In this work, methods were developed to reliably derive broadly reactive murine antibodies. A phage library was created that expressed single chain variable fragments (scFv isolated from mice immunised with multiple strains of VEEV. A broadly reactive scFv was identified and incorporated into a murine IgG2a framework. This novel antibody retained the broad reactivity exhibited by the scFv but did not possess virus neutralising activity. However, the antibody was still able to protect mice against VEEV disease induced by strain TrD when administered 24 h prior to challenge. Conclusion A monoclonal antibody possessing reactivity to a wide range of VEEV strains may be of benefit as a generic antiviral therapy. However, humanisation of the murine antibody will be required before it can be tested in humans. Crown Copyright © 2009

  20. Topical nicotinamide modulates cellular energy metabolism and provides broad-spectrum protection against ultraviolet radiation-induced immunosuppression in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivapirabu, G; Yiasemides, E; Halliday, G M; Park, J; Damian, D L

    2009-12-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation can profoundly suppress the cutaneous immune system, thus enhancing carcinogenesis. Agents that prevent UV-induced immunosuppression may thus reduce skin cancer. Nicotinamide (vitamin B3) prevents UV-induced immunosuppression and carcinogenesis in mice, and solar-simulated (ss) UV-induced immunosuppression in humans. Its effectiveness against different UV wavebands and mechanism of action is as yet unknown. To determine the effects and mechanisms of topical nicotinamide on UV-induced suppression of delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) responses in humans. Healthy Mantoux-positive volunteers in four randomised, double-blinded studies were irradiated with solar-simulated (ss)UV (UVB + UVA) or narrowband UVB (300 nm) or UVA (385 nm). Topical nicotinamide (0.2% or 5%) or its vehicle were applied immediately after each irradiation. Mantoux testing was performed at irradiated sites and adjacent unirradiated control sites 48 h after the first irradiation and measured 72 h later. Immunosuppression was calculated as the difference in Mantoux-induced erythema and induration at test sites compared to control sites. Human keratinocyte cell cultures, with and without ssUV and nicotinamide, were used for quantitative real-time reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction assessment of TP53 and enzymes that regulate oxidative phosphorylation. Nicotinamide cooperated with ssUV to increase enzymes involved in cellular energy metabolism and p53, and significantly protected against immunosuppression caused by UVB, longwave UVA and single and repeated ssUV exposures. Longwave UVA, which is poorly filtered by most sunscreens, was highly immune suppressive even at doses equivalent to 20 min of sun exposure. Nicotinamide, which protected against both UVB and UVA, is a promising agent for skin cancer prevention.

  1. Synthetic Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR7 ligands as influenza virus vaccine adjuvants induce rapid, sustained, and broadly protective responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goff, Peter H; Hayashi, Tomoko; Martínez-Gil, Luis; Corr, Maripat; Crain, Brian; Yao, Shiyin; Cottam, Howard B; Chan, Michael; Ramos, Irene; Eggink, Dirk; Heshmati, Mitra; Krammer, Florian; Messer, Karen; Pu, Minya; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Palese, Peter; Carson, Dennis A

    2015-03-01

    Current vaccines against influenza virus infection rely on the induction of neutralizing antibodies targeting the globular head of the viral hemagglutinin (HA). Protection against seasonal antigenic drift or sporadic pandemic outbreaks requires further vaccine development to induce cross-protective humoral responses, potentially to the more conserved HA stalk region. Here, we present a novel viral vaccine adjuvant comprised of two synthetic ligands for Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) and TLR7. 1Z105 is a substituted pyrimido[5,4-b]indole specific for the TLR4-MD2 complex, and 1V270 is a phospholipid-conjugated TLR7 agonist. Separately, 1Z105 induces rapid Th2-associated IgG1 responses, and 1V270 potently generates Th1 cellular immunity. 1Z105 and 1V270 in combination with recombinant HA from the A/Puerto Rico/8/1934 strain (rPR/8 HA) effectively induces rapid and sustained humoral immunity that is protective against lethal challenge with a homologous virus. More importantly, immunization with the combined adjuvant and rPR/8 HA, a commercially available split vaccine, or chimeric rHA antigens significantly improves protection against both heterologous and heterosubtypic challenge viruses. Heterosubtypic protection is associated with broadly reactive antibodies to HA stalk epitopes. Histological examination and cytokine profiling reveal that intramuscular (i.m.) administration of 1Z105 and 1V270 is less reactogenic than a squalene-based adjuvant, AddaVax. In summary, the combination of 1Z105 and 1V270 with a recombinant HA induces rapid, long-lasting, and balanced Th1- and Th2-type immunity; demonstrates efficacy in a variety of murine influenza virus vaccine models assaying homologous, heterologous, and heterosubtypic challenge viruses; and has an excellent safety profile. Novel adjuvants are needed to enhance immunogenicity and increase the protective breadth of influenza virus vaccines to reduce the seasonal disease burden and ensure pandemic preparedness. We show

  2. Broad protection with an inactivated vaccine against primary-isolated lethal enterovirus 71 infection in newborn mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Junliang; Li, Jingliang; Liu, Xin; Liu, Guanchen; Yang, Jiaxin; Wei, Wei; Zhang, Wenyan; Yu, Xiao-Fang

    2015-07-15

    Circulating enterovirus 71 (EV-A71)-associated hand, foot, and mouth disease is on the rise in the Asian-Pacific region. Although animal models have been developed using mouse-adapted EV-A71 strains, mouse models using primary EV-A71 isolates are scarce. Lethal animal models with circulating EV-A71 infection would contribute to studies of pathogenesis as well as vaccine development and evaluation. In this study, we established a lethal mouse model using primary EV-A71 isolates from patients infected with serotypes that are currently circulating in humans. We also characterized the dose-dependent virulence and pathologic changes of circulating EV-A71 in this mouse model. Most importantly, we have established this mouse model as a suitable system for EV-A71 vaccine evaluation. An inactivated EV-A71 vaccine candidate offered complete protection from death induced by various circulating EV-A71 viruses to neonatal mice that were born to immunized female mice. The sera of the immunized dams and their pups showed higher neutralization titers against multiple circulating EV-A71 viruses. Thus, our newly established animal model using primary EV-A71 isolates is helpful for future studies on viral pathogenesis and vaccine and drug development.

  3. Efficacy of broad-spectrum sunscreens against the suppression of elicitation of delayed-type hypersensitivity responses in humans depends on the level of ultraviolet A protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyal, D D; Fourtanier, A M

    2003-04-01

    Sunscreens have been designed to protect against sunburn and their efficacy has, therefore, been labeled by the so-called sun protection factor (SPF). Although this value is well determined using a standardized protocol and it affords a good evaluation of the protection against erythema it may be inadequate to provide a relevant measurement of efficacy against other biologic damages. This is particularly true when action spectra and threshold dose are different from those of erythema. In the case of ultraviolet (UV)-induced immune suppression, the action spectrum is not known, so it cannot be asserted that SPF may accurately predict the level of protection against this endpoint. We addressed this issue by measuring in human volunteers the ability of two broad-spectrum SPF 15 sunscreens with different ultraviolet A (UVA) protection levels, to prevent the alteration of the efferent phase of the local delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to recall antigens (Multitest Pasteur/Mérieux, Lyon, France) after acute solar-simulated UV exposure. We first determined the ultraviolet radiation (UVR) dose needed to induce a significant DTH inhibition in several groups of 15 volunteers. Two minimal erythemal doses (2 MED) were found to be the minimal immunosuppressive dose (MISD). As a result, the immune DTH response is reduced in average by 36%. The lower doses tested (0.5 and 1 MED) were ineffective. Sunscreen-treated groups were exposed to either 1 or 2 MED x SPF doses. As expected, no alteration in DTH response was observed in the groups exposed to 1 MED x SPF whatever the sunscreen applied. In contrast, after exposure to 2 MED x SPF, the DTH response remained unaltered in the group pretreated with the sunscreen product with the higher protection in the UVA range but was significantly suppressed by 55.7% in the group pretreated with sunscreen with a much lower protection in the UVA range. These data suggest that SPF may not be sufficient to predict the ability of

  4. Microneedle delivery of an M2e-TLR5 ligand fusion protein to skin confers broadly cross-protective influenza immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Bao-Zhong; Gill, Harvinder S; He, Cheng; Ou, Changbo; Wang, Li; Wang, Ying-Chun; Feng, Hao; Zhang, Han; Prausnitz, Mark R; Compans, Richard W

    2014-03-28

    Influenza vaccines with broad cross-protection are urgently needed to prevent an emerging influenza pandemic. A fusion protein of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 5-agonist domains from flagellin and multiple repeats of the conserved extracellular domain of the influenza matrix protein 2 (M2e) was constructed, purified and evaluated as such a vaccine. A painless vaccination method suitable for possible self-administration using coated microneedle arrays was investigated for skin-targeted delivery of the fusion protein in a mouse model. The results demonstrate that microneedle immunization induced strong humoral as well as mucosal antibody responses and conferred complete protection against homo- and heterosubtypic lethal virus challenges. Protective efficacy with microneedles was found to be significantly better than that seen with conventional intramuscular injection, and comparable to that observed with intranasal immunization. Because of its advantages for administration, safety and storage, microneedle delivery of M2e-flagellin fusion protein is a promising approach for an easy-to-administer universal influenza vaccine. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Discovery of a Prefusion Respiratory Syncytial Virus F-Specific Monoclonal Antibody That Provides Greater In Vivo Protection than the Murine Precursor of Palivizumab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Min; Zheng, Zi-Zheng; Chen, Man; Modjarrad, Kayvon; Zhang, Wei; Zhan, Lu-Ting; Cao, Jian-Li; Sun, Yong-Peng; McLellan, Jason S; Graham, Barney S; Xia, Ning-Shao

    2017-08-01

    Palivizumab, a humanized murine monoclonal antibody that recognizes antigenic site II on both the prefusion (pre-F) and postfusion (post-F) conformations of the respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) F glycoprotein, is the only prophylactic agent approved for use for the treatment of RSV infection. However, its relatively low neutralizing potency and high cost have limited its use to a restricted population of infants at high risk of severe disease. Previously, we isolated a high-potency neutralizing antibody, 5C4, that specifically recognizes antigenic site Ø at the apex of the pre-F protein trimer. We compared in vitro and in vivo the potency and protective efficacy of 5C4 and the murine precursor of palivizumab, antibody 1129. Both antibodies were synthesized on identical murine backbones as either an IgG1 or IgG2a subclass and evaluated for binding to multiple F protein conformations, in vitro inhibition of RSV infection and propagation, and protective efficacy in mice. Although 1129 and 5C4 had similar pre-F protein binding affinities, the 5C4 neutralizing activity was nearly 50-fold greater than that of 1129 in vitro In BALB/c mice, 5C4 reduced the peak titers of RSV 1,000-fold more than 1129 did in both the upper and lower respiratory tracts. These data indicate that antibodies specific for antigenic site Ø are more efficacious at preventing RSV infection than antibodies specific for antigenic site II. Our data also suggest that site Ø-specific antibodies may be useful for the prevention or treatment of RSV infection and support the use of the pre-F protein as a vaccine antigen.IMPORTANCE There is no vaccine yet available to prevent RSV infection. The use of the licensed antibody palivizumab, which recognizes site II on both the pre-F and post-F proteins, is restricted to prophylaxis in neonates at high risk of severe RSV disease. Recommendations for using passive immunization in the general population or for therapy in immunocompromised persons with

  6. Microneedle patch delivery to the skin of virus-like particles containing heterologous M2e extracellular domains of influenza virus induces broad heterosubtypic cross-protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Chul; Lee, Jeong Woo; Choi, Hyo-Jick; Lee, Yu-Na; Hwang, Hye Suk; Lee, Jongsang; Kim, Cheol; Lee, Jong Seok; Montemagno, Carlo; Prausnitz, Mark R; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2015-07-28

    A broadly cross-protective influenza vaccine that can be administrated by a painless self-immunization method would be a value as a potential universal mass vaccination strategy. This study developed a minimally-invasive microneedle (MN) patch for skin vaccination with virus-like particles containing influenza virus heterologous M2 extracellular (M2e) domains (M2e5x VLPs) as a universal vaccine candidate without adjuvants. The stability of M2e5x VLP-coated microneedles was maintained for 8weeks at room temperature without losing M2e antigenicity and immunogenicity. MN skin immunization induced strong humoral and mucosal M2e antibody responses and conferred cross-protection against heterosubtypic H1N1, H3N2, and H5N1 influenza virus challenges. In addition, M2e5x VLP MN skin vaccination induced T-helper type 1 responses such as IgG2a isotype antibodies and IFN-γ producing cells at higher levels than those by conventional intramuscular injection. These potential immunological and logistic advantages for skin delivery of M2e5x VLP MN vaccines could offer a promising approach to develop an easy-to-administer universal influenza vaccine. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  7. Combination therapy using chimeric monoclonal antibodies protects mice from lethal H5N1 infection and prevents formation of escape mutants.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mookkan Prabakaran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Given that there is a possibility of a human H5N1 pandemic and the fact that the recent H5N1 viruses are resistant to the anti-viral drugs, newer strategies for effective therapy are warranted. Previous studies show that single mAbs in immune prophylaxis can be protective against H5N1 infection. But a single mAb may not be effective in neutralization of a broad range of different strains of H5N1 and control of potential neutralization escape mutants. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We selected two mAbs which recognized different epitopes on the hemagglutinin molecule. These two mAbs could each neutralize in vitro escape mutants to the other and in combination could effectively neutralize viruses from clades 0, 1, 2.1, 2.2, 2.3, 4, 7 and 8 of influenza A H5N1 viruses. This combination of chimeric mAbs when administered passively, pre or post challenge with 10 MLD50 (50% mouse lethal dose HPAI H5N1 influenza A viruses could protect 100% of the mice from two different clades of viruses (clades 1 and 2.1. We also tested the efficacy of a single dose of the combination of mAbs versus two doses. Two doses of the combination therapy not only affected early clearance of the virus from the lung but could completely prevent lung pathology of the H5N1 infected mice. No escape variants were detected after therapy. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our studies provide proof of concept that the synergistic action of two or more mAbs in combination is required for preventing the generation of escape mutants and also to enhance the therapeutic efficacy of passive therapy against H5N1 infection. Combination therapy may allow for a lower dose of antibody to be administered for passive therapy of influenza infection and hence can be made available at reduced economic costs during an outbreak.

  8. Co-administration of the broad-spectrum antiviral, brincidofovir (CMX001), with smallpox vaccine does not compromise vaccine protection in mice challenged with ectromelia virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Scott; Crump, Ryan; Foster, Scott; Hartzler, Hollyce; Hembrador, Ed; Lanier, E Randall; Painter, George; Schriewer, Jill; Trost, Lawrence C; Buller, R Mark

    2014-11-01

    Natural orthopoxvirus outbreaks such as vaccinia, cowpox, cattlepox and buffalopox continue to cause morbidity in the human population. Monkeypox virus remains a significant agent of morbidity and mortality in Africa. Furthermore, monkeypox virus's broad host-range and expanding environs make it of particular concern as an emerging human pathogen. Monkeypox virus and variola virus (the etiological agent of smallpox) are both potential agents of bioterrorism. The first line response to orthopoxvirus disease is through vaccination with first-generation and second-generation vaccines, such as Dryvax and ACAM2000. Although these vaccines provide excellent protection, their widespread use is impeded by the high level of adverse events associated with vaccination using live, attenuated virus. It is possible that vaccines could be used in combination with antiviral drugs to reduce the incidence and severity of vaccine-associated adverse events, or as a preventive in individuals with uncertain exposure status or contraindication to vaccination. We have used the intranasal mousepox (ectromelia) model to evaluate the efficacy of vaccination with Dryvax or ACAM2000 in conjunction with treatment using the broad spectrum antiviral, brincidofovir (BCV, CMX001). We found that co-treatment with BCV reduced the severity of vaccination-associated lesion development. Although the immune response to vaccination was quantifiably attenuated, vaccination combined with BCV treatment did not alter the development of full protective immunity, even when administered two days following ectromelia challenge. Studies with a non-replicating vaccine, ACAM3000 (MVA), confirmed that BCV's mechanism of attenuating the immune response following vaccination with live virus was, as expected, by limiting viral replication and not through inhibition of the immune system. These studies suggest that, in the setting of post-exposure prophylaxis, co-administration of BCV with vaccination should be considered

  9. Therapeutic Recombinant Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakhtiar, Ray

    2012-01-01

    During the last two decades, the rapid growth of biotechnology-derived techniques has led to a myriad of therapeutic recombinant monoclonal antibodies with significant clinical benefits. Recombinant monoclonal antibodies can be obtained from a number of natural sources such as animal cell cultures using recombinant DNA engineering. In contrast to…

  10. Peptide-Based Vaccinology: Experimental and Computational Approaches to Target Hypervariable Viruses through the Fine Characterization of Protective Epitopes Recognized by Monoclonal Antibodies and the Identification of T-Cell-Activating Peptides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Castelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Defining immunogenic domains of viral proteins capable of eliciting a protective immune response is crucial in the development of novel epitope-based prophylactic strategies. This is particularly important for the selective targeting of conserved regions shared among hypervariable viruses. Studying postinfection and postimmunization sera, as well as cloning and characterization of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs, still represents the best approach to identify protective epitopes. In particular, a protective mAb directed against conserved regions can play a key role in immunogen design and in human therapy as well. Experimental approaches aiming to characterize protective mAb epitopes or to identify T-cell-activating peptides are often burdened by technical limitations and can require long time to be correctly addressed. Thus, in the last decade many epitope predictive algorithms have been developed. These algorithms are continually evolving, and their use to address the empirical research is widely increasing. Here, we review several strategies based on experimental techniques alone or addressed by in silico analysis that are frequently used to predict immunogens to be included in novel epitope-based vaccine approaches. We will list the main strategies aiming to design a new vaccine preparation conferring the protection of a neutralizing mAb combined with an effective cell-mediated response.

  11. Tallow amphopolycarboxyglycinate-stabilized silver nanoparticles: new frontiers in development of plant protection products with a broad spectrum of action against phytopathogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krutyakov, Yurii A.; Kudrinskiy, Alexey A.; Zherebin, Pavel M.; Yapryntsev, Alexey D.; Pobedinskaya, Marina A.; Elansky, Sergey N.; Denisov, Albert N.; Mikhaylov, Dmitry M.; Lisichkin, Georgii V.

    2016-07-01

    Sustainable agriculture calls for minimal use of agrochemicals in order to protect the environment. It has caused an increase in the rate of nanoparticles use, in particular silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) due to their safety for mammals, unique biological activity and a broad spectrum of action against fungal and bacterial pathogens. Until now the use of AgNPs dispersions in the agricultural sector has been essentially limited due to many factors decreased their stability (mixing with other pesticides, presence of electrolytes). We present a versatile synthesis of polyampholyte surfactant (tallow amphopolycarboxyglycinate) stabilized AgNPs. We took a close look at unique aggregation behavior (via dynamic light scattering and UV-vis spectroscopy) and biocidal activity of obtained silver colloids. AgNPs are characterized by exclusively high aggregative stability in the presence of coagulating agents NaNO3 and NaSO4 (up to 1 M), during drying/redispergation, and frost/defrost cycles. The dispersion of AgNPs shows high biocidal activity (EC50 is ten times lower than commercial species ones) with respect to Phytophthora infestans and phytopathogenic fungi. This points to the possibility of successful application of silver preparations within agriculture with the goal of partial reduction of the use of toxic and expensive synthetic antibiotics and pesticides.

  12. Broad Cross-Protection Is Induced in Preclinical Models by a Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Composed of L1/L2 Chimeric Virus-Like Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boxus, Mathieu; Fochesato, Michel; Miseur, Agnès; Mertens, Emmanuel; Dendouga, Najoua; Brendle, Sarah; Balogh, Karla K.; Christensen, Neil D.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT At least 15 high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are linked to anogenital preneoplastic lesions and cancer. Currently, there are three licensed prophylactic HPV vaccines based on virus-like particles (VLPs) of the L1 major capsid protein from HPV-2, -4, or -9, including the AS04-adjuvanted HPV-16/18 L1 vaccine. The L2 minor capsid protein contains HPV-neutralizing epitopes that are well conserved across numerous high-risk HPVs. Therefore, the objective of our study was to assess the capacity to broaden vaccine-mediated protection using AS04-adjuvanted vaccines based on VLP chimeras of L1 with one or two L2 epitopes. Several chimeric VLPs were constructed by inserting L2 epitopes within the DE loop and/or C terminus of L1. Based on the shape, yield, size, and immunogenicity, one of seven chimeras was selected for further evaluation in mouse and rabbit challenge models. The chimeric VLP consisted of HPV-18 L1 with insertions of HPV-33 L2 (amino acid residues 17 to 36; L1 DE loop) and HPV-58 L2 (amino acid residues 56 to 75; L1 C terminus). This chimeric L1/L2 VLP vaccine induced persistent immune responses and protected against all of the different HPVs evaluated (HPV-6, -11, -16, -31, -35, -39, -45, -58, and -59 as pseudovirions or quasivirions) in both mouse and rabbit challenge models. The degree and breadth of protection in the rabbit were further enhanced when the chimeric L1/L2 VLP was formulated with the L1 VLPs from the HPV-16/18 L1 vaccine. Therefore, the novel HPV-18 L1/L2 chimeric VLP (alone or in combination with HPV-16 and HPV-18 L1 VLPs) formulated with AS04 has the potential to provide broad protective efficacy in human subjects. IMPORTANCE From evaluations in human papillomavirus (HPV) protection models in rabbits and mice, our study has identified a prophylactic vaccine with the potential to target a wide range of HPVs linked to anogenital cancer. The three currently licensed vaccines contain virus-like particles (VLPs) of the L1 major

  13. Monoclonal antibody "gold rush".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maggon, Krishan

    2007-01-01

    The market, sales and regulatory approval of new human medicines, during the past few years, indicates increasing number and share of new biologics and emergence of new multibillion dollar molecules. The global sale of monoclonal antibodies in 2006 were $20.6 billion. Remicade had annual sales gain of $1 billion during the past 3 years and five brands had similar increase in 2006. Rituxan with 2006 sales of $4.7 billion was the best selling monoclonal antibody and biological product and the 6th among the top selling medicinal brand. It may be the first biologic and monoclonal antibody to reach $10 billion annual sales in the near future. The strong demand from cancer and arthritis patients has surpassed almost all commercial market research reports and sales forecast. Seven monoclonal antibody brands in 2006 had sales exceeding $1 billion. Humanized or fully human monoclonal antibodies with low immunogenicity, enhanced antigen binding and reduced cellular toxicity provide better clinical efficacy. The higher technical and clinical success rate, overcoming of technical hurdles in large scale manufacturing, low cost of market entry and IND filing, use of fully human and humanized monoclonal antibodies has attracted funds and resources towards R&D. Review of industry research pipeline and sales data during the past 3 years indicate a real paradigm shift in industrial R&D from pharmaceutical to biologics and monoclonal antibodies. The antibody bandwagon has been joined by 200 companies with hundreds of new projects and targets and has attracted billions of dollars in R&D investment, acquisitions and licensing deals leading to the current Monoclonal Antibody Gold Rush.

  14. Passive immunization with anti-glucosaminidase monoclonal antibodies protects mice from implant-associated osteomyelitis by mediating opsonophagocytosis of Staphylococcus aureus megaclusters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varrone, John J; de Mesy Bentley, Karen L; Bello-Irizarry, Sheila N; Nishitani, Kohei; Mack, Sarah; Hunter, Joshua G; Kates, Stephen L; Daiss, John L; Schwarz, Edward M

    2014-10-01

    Towards the development of a methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) vaccine we evaluated a neutralizing anti-glucosaminidase (Gmd) monoclonal antibody (1C11) in a murine model of implant-associated osteomyelitis, and compared its effects on LAC USA300 MRSA versus a placebo and a Gmd-deficient isogenic strain (ΔGmd). 1C11 significantly reduced infection severity, as determined by bioluminescent imaging of bacteria, micro-CT assessment of osteolysis, and histomorphometry of abscess numbers (p aggregates (megaclusters) that sedimented out of solution, which was not observed in ΔGmd cultures or 1C11 treated cultures of a protein A-deficient strain (ΔSpa), suggesting that the combined effects of Gmd inhibition and antibody-mediated agglutination are required. Finally, we demonstrated that macrophage opsonophagocytosis of MRSA and megaclusters is significantly increased by 1C11 (p < 0.01). Collectively, these results suggest that the primary mechanism of anti-Gmd humoral immunity against MRSA osteomyelitis is macrophage invasion of Staphylococcal abscess communities (SAC) and opsonophagocytosis of megaclusters. . © 2014 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  15. A GFP expressing influenza A virus to report in vivo tropism and protection by a matrix protein 2 ectodomain-specific monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Baets, Sarah; Verhelst, Judith; Van den Hoecke, Silvie; Smet, Anouk; Schotsaert, Michael; Job, Emma R; Roose, Kenny; Schepens, Bert; Fiers, Walter; Saelens, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The severity of influenza-related illness is mediated by many factors, including in vivo cell tropism, timing and magnitude of the immune response, and presence of pre-existing immunity. A direct way to study cell tropism and virus spread in vivo is with an influenza virus expressing a reporter gene. However, reporter gene-expressing influenza viruses are often attenuated in vivo and may be genetically unstable. Here, we describe the generation of an influenza A virus expressing GFP from a tri-cistronic NS segment. To reduce the size of this engineered gene segment, we used a truncated NS1 protein of 73 amino acids combined with a heterologous dimerization domain to increase protein stability. GFP and nuclear export protein coding information were fused in frame with the truncated NS1 open reading frame and separated from each other by 2A self-processing sites. The resulting PR8-NS1(1-73)GFP virus was successfully rescued and replicated as efficiently as the parental PR8 virus in vitro and was slightly attenuated in vivo. Flow cytometry-based monitoring of cells isolated from PR8-NS1(1-73)GFP virus infected BALB/c mice revealed that GFP expression peaked on day two in all cell types tested. In particular respiratory epithelial cells and myeloid cells known to be involved in antigen presentation, including dendritic cells (CD11c+) and inflammatory monocytes (CD11b+ GR1+), became GFP positive following infection. Prophylactic treatment with anti-M2e monoclonal antibody or oseltamivir reduced GFP expression in all cell types studied, demonstrating the usefulness of this reporter virus to analyze the efficacy of antiviral treatments in vivo. Finally, deep sequencing analysis, serial in vitro passages and ex vivo analysis of PR8-NS1(1-73)GFP virus, indicate that this virus is genetically and phenotypically stable.

  16. Monoclonal antibodies in myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sondergeld, P.; van de Donk, N. W. C. J.; Richardson, P. G.

    2015-01-01

    The development of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) for the treatment of disease goes back to the vision of Paul Ehrlich in the late 19th century; however, the first successful treatment with a mAb was not until 1982, in a lymphoma patient. In multiple myeloma, mAbs are a very recent and exciting add...

  17. A mixture of functionally oligoclonal humanized monoclonal antibodies that neutralize Clostridium difficile TcdA and TcdB with high levels of in vitro potency shows in vivo protection in a hamster infection model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Nicola L; Compson, Joanne E; Mackenzie, Brendon; O'Dowd, Victoria L; Oxbrow, Amanda K F; Heads, James T; Turner, Alison; Sarkar, Kaushik; Dugdale, Sarah L; Jairaj, Mark; Christodoulou, Louis; Knight, David E O; Cross, Amanda S; Hervé, Karine J M; Tyson, Kerry L; Hailu, Hanna; Doyle, Carl B; Ellis, Mark; Kriek, Marco; Cox, Matthew; Page, Matthew J T; Moore, Adrian R; Lightwood, Daniel J; Humphreys, David P

    2013-03-01

    Clostridium difficile infections are a major cause of antibiotic-associated diarrhea in hospital and care facility patients. In spite of the availability of effective antibiotic treatments, C. difficile infection (CDI) is still a major cause of patient suffering, death, and substantial health care costs. Clostridium difficile exerts its major pathological effects through the actions of two protein exotoxins, TcdA and TcdB, which bind to and disrupt gut tissue. Antibiotics target the infecting bacteria but not the exotoxins. Administering neutralizing antibodies against TcdA and TcdB to patients receiving antibiotic treatment might modulate the effects of the exotoxins directly. We have developed a mixture of three humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) which neutralize TcdA and TcdB to address three clinical needs: reduction of the severity and duration of diarrhea, reduction of death rates, and reduction of the rate of recurrence. The UCB MAb mixture showed higher potency in a variety of in vitro binding and neutralization assays (∼10-fold improvements), higher levels of protection in a hamster model of CDI (82% versus 18% at 28 days), and higher valencies of toxin binding (12 versus 2 for TcdA and 3 versus 2 for TcdB) than other agents in clinical development. Comparisons of the MAb properties also offered some insight into the potential relative importance of TcdA and TcdB in the disease process.

  18. An attenuated Shigella mutant lacking the RNA-binding protein Hfq provides cross-protection against Shigella strains of broad serotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitobe, Jiro; Sinha, Ritam; Mitra, Soma; Nag, Dhrubajyoti; Saito, Noriko; Shimuta, Ken; Koizumi, Nobuo; Koley, Hemanta

    2017-07-01

    Few live attenuated vaccines protect against multiple serotypes of bacterial pathogen because host serotype-specific immune responses are limited to the serotype present in the vaccine strain. Here, immunization with a mutant of Shigella flexneri 2a protected guinea pigs against subsequent infection by S. dysenteriae type 1 and S. sonnei strains. This deletion mutant lacked the RNA-binding protein Hfq leading to increased expression of the type III secretion system via loss of regulation, resulting in attenuation of cell viability through repression of stress response sigma factors. Such increased antigen production and simultaneous attenuation were expected to elicit protective immunity against Shigella strains of heterologous serotypes. Thus, the vaccine potential of this mutant was tested in two guinea pig models of shigellosis. Animals vaccinated in the left eye showed fewer symptoms upon subsequent challenge via the right eye, and even survived subsequent intestinal challenge. In addition, oral vaccination effectively induced production of immunoglobulins without severe side effects, again protecting all animals against subsequent intestinal challenge with S. dysenteriae type 1 or S. sonnei strains. Antibodies against common virulence proteins and the O-antigen of S. flexneri 2a were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy. Reaction of antibodies with various strains, including enteroinvasive Escherichia coli, suggested that common virulence proteins induced protective immunity against a range of serotypes. Therefore, vaccination is expected to cover not only the most prevalent serotypes of S. sonnei and S. flexneri 2a, but also various Shigella strains, including S. dysenteriae type 1, which produces Shiga toxin.

  19. Monoclonal Antibodies production technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Rocha

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Since the first cells were capable of maintain a continuous antibody supply, developed by Köhler and Milstein in 1975, its use in medicine and industry showed a great potential. New researches were developed to enhance the use of such cells, including immunizations, mieloma cells, fusion methodology, screening techniques, cloning, culture media, among several details which enable and optimizes its use. Nowadays, monoclonal antibodies are a well-established tool for proteomics research and it have countless applications on several knowledge areas, mainly human and/or animal disease diagnostic, identification and tracking of allergenic compounds in food and residues in the environment. This review can be used by professionals, researches and students searching for a compiled papers contributing to the improvement of the monoclonal antibodies technology, used at different knowledge areas such as human diseases and diseases and disorders in agriculture and livestock chain.

  20. Evaluating bococizumab, a monoclonal antibody to PCSK9, on lipid levels and clinical events in broad patient groups with and without prior cardiovascular events: Rationale and design of the Studies of PCSK9 Inhibition and the Reduction of vascular Events (SPIRE) Lipid Lowering and SPIRE Cardiovascular Outcomes Trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ridker, Paul M.; Amarenco, Pierre; Brunell, Robert; Glynn, Robert J.; Jukema, J. Wouter; Kastelein, John J. P.; Koenig, Wolfgang; Nissen, Steven; Revkin, James; Santos, Raul D.; Schwartz, Pamela F.; Yunis, Carla; Tardif, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Although statins significantly reduce vascular event rates, residual cholesterol risk remains high in many patient groups, including those with known vascular disease as well as in the setting of high-risk primary prevention. Bococizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that inhibits proprotein

  1. An attenuated Shigella mutant lacking the RNA-binding protein Hfq provides cross-protection against Shigella strains of broad serotype.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiro Mitobe

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Few live attenuated vaccines protect against multiple serotypes of bacterial pathogen because host serotype-specific immune responses are limited to the serotype present in the vaccine strain. Here, immunization with a mutant of Shigella flexneri 2a protected guinea pigs against subsequent infection by S. dysenteriae type 1 and S. sonnei strains. This deletion mutant lacked the RNA-binding protein Hfq leading to increased expression of the type III secretion system via loss of regulation, resulting in attenuation of cell viability through repression of stress response sigma factors. Such increased antigen production and simultaneous attenuation were expected to elicit protective immunity against Shigella strains of heterologous serotypes. Thus, the vaccine potential of this mutant was tested in two guinea pig models of shigellosis. Animals vaccinated in the left eye showed fewer symptoms upon subsequent challenge via the right eye, and even survived subsequent intestinal challenge. In addition, oral vaccination effectively induced production of immunoglobulins without severe side effects, again protecting all animals against subsequent intestinal challenge with S. dysenteriae type 1 or S. sonnei strains. Antibodies against common virulence proteins and the O-antigen of S. flexneri 2a were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy. Reaction of antibodies with various strains, including enteroinvasive Escherichia coli, suggested that common virulence proteins induced protective immunity against a range of serotypes. Therefore, vaccination is expected to cover not only the most prevalent serotypes of S. sonnei and S. flexneri 2a, but also various Shigella strains, including S. dysenteriae type 1, which produces Shiga toxin.

  2. Broadly protective immunity against divergent influenza viruses by oral co-administration of Lactococcus lactis expressing nucleoprotein adjuvanted with cholera toxin B subunit in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lei, Han; Peng, Xiaojue; Jiao, Huifeng; Zhao, Daxian; Ouyang, Jiexiu

    2015-08-05

    Current influenza vaccines need to be annually reformulated to well match the predicated circulating strains. Thus, it is critical for developing a novel universal influenza vaccine that would be able to confer cross-protection against constantly emerging divergent influenza virus strains. Influenza virus A is a genus of the Orthomyxoviridae family of viruses. Influenza virus nucleoprotein (NP) is a structural protein which encapsidates the negative strand viral RNA, and anti-NP antibodies play role in cross-protective immunity. Lactococcus lactis (L. lactis) is an ideal vaccine delivery vehicle via oral administration route. However, L. lactis vectored vaccine exhibits poor immunogenicity without the use of mucosal adjuvant. To enhance the immunogenicity of L. lactis vectored vaccine, cholera toxin B (CTB) subunit, one of mucosal adjuvants, is a safe adjuvant for oral route, when combined with L. lactis vectored vaccine. In this study, we hypothesized that pNZ8008, a L. lactis expression plasmid, encoding NP antigen, would be able to elicit cross-protection with the use of CTB via oral administration route. To construct L. lactis vectored vaccine, nucleoprotein (NP) gene of A/California/04/2009(H1N1) was sub-cloned into a L. lactis expression plasmid, pNZ8008. The expression of recombinant L. lactis/pNZ8008-NP was confirmed by Western blot, immunofluorescence assay and flow cytometric analysis. Further, immunogenicity of L. lactis/pNZ8008-NP alone or adjuvanted with cholera toxin B (CTB) subunit was evaluated in a mouse model via oral administration route. Antibodies responses were detected by ELISA. The result indicated that oral administration of L. lactis/pNZ8008-NP adjuvanted with CTB could elicit significant humoral and mucosal immune responses, as well as cellular immune response, compared with L. lactis/pNZ8008-NP alone. To further assess the cross-protective immunity of L. lactis/pNZ8008-NP adjuvanted with CTB, we used L. lactis/pNZ8110-pgsA-HA1 alone or

  3. Report on the first WHO integrated meeting on development and clinical trials of influenza vaccines that induce broadly protective and long-lasting immune responses: Hong Kong SAR, China, 24-26 January 2013.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Girard, Marc P; Tam, John S; Pervikov, Yuri; Katz, Jacqueline M

    2013-08-20

    On January 24-26, 2013, the World Health Organization convened the first integrated meeting on "The development and clinical trials of vaccines that induce broadly protective and long-lasting immune responses" to review the current status of development and clinical evaluation of novel influenza vaccines as well as strategies to produce and deliver vaccines in novel ways. Special attention was given to the development of possible universal influenza vaccines. Other topics that were addressed included an update on clinical trials of pandemic and seasonal influenza vaccines in high-risk groups and vaccine safety, as well as regulatory issues. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  4. Expanding the scope of PNA-encoded synthesis (PES): Mtt-protected PNA fully orthogonal to fmoc chemistry and a broad array of robust diversity-generating reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chouikhi, Dalila; Ciobanu, Mihai; Zambaldo, Claudio; Duplan, Vincent; Barluenga, Sofia; Winssinger, Nicolas

    2012-10-01

    Nucleic acid-encoded libraries are emerging as an attractive and highly miniaturized format for the rapid identification of protein ligands. An important criterion in the synthesis of nucleic acid encoded libraries is the scope of reactions that can be used to introduce molecular diversity and devise divergent pathways for diversity-oriented synthesis (DOS). To date, the protecting group strategies that have been used in peptide nucleic acid (PNA) encoded synthesis (PES) have limited the choice of reactions used in the library synthesis to just a few prototypes. Herein, we describe the preparation of PNA monomers with a protecting group combination (Mtt/Boc) that is orthogonal to Fmoc-based synthesis and compatible with a large palette of reactions that have been productively used in DOS (palladium cross-couplings, metathesis, reductive amination, amidation, heterocycle formation, nucleophilic addition, conjugate additions, Pictet-Spengler cyclization). We incorporate γ-modifications in the PNA backbone that are known to enhance hybridization and solubility. We demonstrate the robustness of this strategy with a library synthesis that is characterized by MALDI MS analysis at every step. Copyright © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. Therapeutic DNA vaccine induces broad T cell responses in the gut and sustained protection from viral rebound and AIDS in SIV-infected rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deborah Heydenburg Fuller

    Full Text Available Immunotherapies that induce durable immune control of chronic HIV infection may eliminate the need for life-long dependence on drugs. We investigated a DNA vaccine formulated with a novel genetic adjuvant that stimulates immune responses in the blood and gut for the ability to improve therapy in rhesus macaques chronically infected with SIV. Using the SIV-macaque model for AIDS, we show that epidermal co-delivery of plasmids expressing SIV Gag, RT, Nef and Env, and the mucosal adjuvant, heat-labile E. coli enterotoxin (LT, during antiretroviral therapy (ART induced a substantial 2-4-log fold reduction in mean virus burden in both the gut and blood when compared to unvaccinated controls and provided durable protection from viral rebound and disease progression after the drug was discontinued. This effect was associated with significant increases in IFN-γ T cell responses in both the blood and gut and SIV-specific CD8+ T cells with dual TNF-α and cytolytic effector functions in the blood. Importantly, a broader specificity in the T cell response seen in the gut, but not the blood, significantly correlated with a reduction in virus production in mucosal tissues and a lower virus burden in plasma. We conclude that immunizing with vaccines that induce immune responses in mucosal gut tissue could reduce residual viral reservoirs during drug therapy and improve long-term treatment of HIV infection in humans.

  6. Cloning and determination of biochemical properties of protective and broadly conserved vaccine antigens from the genome of extraintestinal pathogenic Escherichia coli into pET28a vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jamil Kheirvari Khezerloo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections are one of the most common infectious diseases that lead to significant health problems in the world. Urinary tract infections are referred to any infection in any part of the renal system. Uropathogenic Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, and Klebsiella are main organisms that are involved in these infections. After identifying same protective and conserved virulence sequences in these microorganisms with similarity upper than 80%, sequences of synthetic gene was provided by bioinformatics techniques and ordered from Thermo Fisher Scientific Company. PCR amplification of this gene was performed by specific primers designed for this purpose. Construction of gene was performed by overlap PCR. The synthetic gene was cloned into pET28a vector. Our gene was amplified in E. coli Top10 tested. To confirm cloning, three methods including colony PCR, digestion and sequencing were used. First, two techniques were performed using horizontal electrophoresis, and also the synthetic gene showed significant homology with the sequence (99% Identified in sequencing. Sequencing of this gene showed that fusion was constructed correctly. Determination of biochemical properties such as 3D structure, Ramachandran and comparison of Non-redundant Set of PDB structure was done by bioinformatic software and had exact and expectable results. A large part of the health system in the world is occupied by a urinary tract infection and governments spend a huge amount of money for the treatment and recovery of patients with these infections. On the other hands, antibiotic resistance in the not-far future will be a disaster for medical societies. This is the most important reason for the emergence of vaccine production against urinary tract infections.

  7. Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootla, Bharath; Denic, Aleksandar; Rodriguez, Moses

    2014-01-01

    Immunoglobulins (Ig) or antibodies are heavy plasma proteins, with sugar chains added to amino-acid residues by N-linked glycosylation and occasionally by O-linked glycosylation. The versatility of antibodies is demonstrated by the various functions that they mediate such as neutralization, agglutination, fixation with activation of complement and activation of effector cells. Naturally occurring antibodies protect the organism against harmful pathogens, viruses and infections. In addition, almost any organic chemical induces antibody production of antibodies that would bind specifically to the chemical. These antibodies are often produced from multiple B cell clones and referred to as polyclonal antibodies. In recent years, scientists have exploited the highly evolved machinery of the immune system to produce structurally and functionally complex molecules such as antibodies from a single B clone, heralding the era of monoclonal antibodies. Most of the antibodies currently in the clinic, target components of the immune system, are not curative and seek to alleviate symptoms rather than cure disease. Our group used a novel strategy to identify reparative human monoclonal antibodies distinct from conventional antibodies. In this chapter, we discuss the therapeutic relevance of both polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies in clinic.

  8. Multiepitope fusion antigen induces broadly protective antibodies that prevent adherence of Escherichia coli strains expressing colonization factor antigen I (CFA/I), CFA/II, and CFA/IV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Xiaosai; Knudsen, David E; Wollenberg, Katie M; Sack, David A; Zhang, Weiping

    2014-02-01

    Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death in children younger than 5 years and continues to be a major threat to global health. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are the most common bacteria causing diarrhea in developing countries. ETEC strains are able to attach to host small intestinal epithelial cells by using bacterial colonization factor antigen (CFA) adhesins. This attachment helps to initiate the diarrheal disease. Vaccines that induce antiadhesin immunity to block adherence of ETEC strains that express immunologically heterogeneous CFA adhesins are expected to protect against ETEC diarrhea. In this study, we created a CFA multiepitope fusion antigen (MEFA) carrying representative epitopes of CFA/I, CFA/II (CS1, CS2, and CS3), and CFA/IV (CS4, CS5, and CS6), examined its immunogenicity in mice, and assessed the potential of this MEFA as an antiadhesin vaccine against ETEC. Mice intraperitoneally immunized with this CFA MEFA exhibited no adverse effects and developed immune responses to CFA/I, CFA/II, and CFA/IV adhesins. Moreover, after incubation with serum of the immunized mice, ETEC or E. coli strains expressing CFA/I, CFA/II, or CFA/IV adhesins were significantly inhibited in adherence to Caco-2 cells. Our results indicated this CFA MEFA elicited antibodies that not only cross-reacted to CFA/I, CFA/II and CFA/IV adhesins but also broadly inhibited adherence of E. coli strains expressing these seven adhesins and suggested that this CFA MEFA could be a candidate to induce broad-spectrum antiadhesin protection against ETEC diarrhea. Additionally, this antigen construction approach (creating an MEFA) may be generally used in vaccine development against heterogenic pathogens.

  9. Multiepitope Fusion Antigen Induces Broadly Protective Antibodies That Prevent Adherence of Escherichia coli Strains Expressing Colonization Factor Antigen I (CFA/I), CFA/II, and CFA/IV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Xiaosai; Knudsen, David E.; Wollenberg, Katie M.

    2014-01-01

    Diarrhea is the second leading cause of death in children younger than 5 years and continues to be a major threat to global health. Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) strains are the most common bacteria causing diarrhea in developing countries. ETEC strains are able to attach to host small intestinal epithelial cells by using bacterial colonization factor antigen (CFA) adhesins. This attachment helps to initiate the diarrheal disease. Vaccines that induce antiadhesin immunity to block adherence of ETEC strains that express immunologically heterogeneous CFA adhesins are expected to protect against ETEC diarrhea. In this study, we created a CFA multiepitope fusion antigen (MEFA) carrying representative epitopes of CFA/I, CFA/II (CS1, CS2, and CS3), and CFA/IV (CS4, CS5, and CS6), examined its immunogenicity in mice, and assessed the potential of this MEFA as an antiadhesin vaccine against ETEC. Mice intraperitoneally immunized with this CFA MEFA exhibited no adverse effects and developed immune responses to CFA/I, CFA/II, and CFA/IV adhesins. Moreover, after incubation with serum of the immunized mice, ETEC or E. coli strains expressing CFA/I, CFA/II, or CFA/IV adhesins were significantly inhibited in adherence to Caco-2 cells. Our results indicated this CFA MEFA elicited antibodies that not only cross-reacted to CFA/I, CFA/II and CFA/IV adhesins but also broadly inhibited adherence of E. coli strains expressing these seven adhesins and suggested that this CFA MEFA could be a candidate to induce broad-spectrum antiadhesin protection against ETEC diarrhea. Additionally, this antigen construction approach (creating an MEFA) may be generally used in vaccine development against heterogenic pathogens. PMID:24351757

  10. Characterization and evaluation of monoclonal antibodies developed for typing influenza A and influenza B viruses.

    OpenAIRE

    Walls, H H; Harmon, M.W.; Slagle, J J; Stocksdale, C; Kendal, A P

    1986-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies that are broadly reactive with influenza A or influenza B viruses were produced as stable reagents for typing influenza viruses. Monoclonal antibodies to influenza A were specific for either matrix protein or nucleoprotein. The antibodies to influenza B were specific for nucleoprotein or hemagglutinin protein. In an enzyme immunoassay procedure, influenza A antibodies detected H1N1, H2N2, and H3N2 influenza A virus strains collected between 1934 and 1984. Each of the inf...

  11. The 2010 Broad Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2011

    2011-01-01

    A new data analysis, based on data collected as part of The Broad Prize process, provides insights into which large urban school districts in the United States are doing the best job of educating traditionally disadvantaged groups: African-American, Hispanics, and low-income students. Since 2002, The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation has awarded The…

  12. Broad ligament ectopic pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Rama C; Lepakshi G; Raju SN

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy in the broad ligament is a rare form of ectopic pregnancy with a high risk of maternal mortality. Ultrasonography may help in the early diagnosis but mostly the diagnosis is established during surgery. We report the case of a patient with broad ligament ectopic pregnancy diagnosed intraoperatively. The patient had uneventful postoperative recovery.

  13. Report on the second WHO integrated meeting on development and clinical trials of influenza vaccines that induce broadly protective and long-lasting immune responses: Geneva, Switzerland, 5-7 May 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Nancy J; Hickling, Julian; Jones, Rebecca; Rimmelzwaan, Guus F; Lambert, Linda C; Boslego, John; Rudenko, Larisa; Yeolekar, Leena; Robertson, James S; Hombach, Joachim; Ortiz, Justin R

    2015-11-27

    On 5-7 May 2014, the World Health Organization (WHO) convened the second integrated meeting on "influenza vaccines that induce broadly protective and long-lasting immune responses". Around 100 invited experts from academia, the vaccine industry, research and development funders, and regulatory and public health agencies attended the meeting. Areas covered included mechanisms of protection in natural influenza-virus infection and vaccine-induced immunity, new approaches to influenza-vaccine design and production, and novel routes of vaccine administration. A timely focus was on how this knowledge could be applied to both seasonal influenza and emerging viruses with pandemic potential such as influenza A (H7N9), currently circulating in China. Special attention was given to the development of possible universal influenza vaccines, given that the Global Vaccine Action Plan calls for at least one licensed universal influenza vaccine by 2020. This report highlights some of the topics discussed and provides an update on studies published since the report of the previous meeting. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  14. Fragmentation of monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vlasak, Josef

    2011-01-01

    Fragmentation is a degradation pathway ubiquitously observed in proteins despite the remarkable stability of peptide bond; proteins differ only by how much and where cleavage occurs. The goal of this review is to summarize reports regarding the non-enzymatic fragmentation of the peptide backbone of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). The sites in the polypeptide chain susceptible to fragmentation are determined by a multitude of factors. Insights are provided on the intimate chemical mechanisms that can make some bonds prone to cleavage due to the presence of specific side-chains. In addition to primary structure, the secondary, tertiary and quaternary structures have a significant impact in modulating the distribution of cleavage sites by altering local flexibility, accessibility to solvent or bringing in close proximity side chains that are remote in sequence. This review focuses on cleavage sites observed in the constant regions of mAbs, with special emphasis on hinge fragmentation. The mechanisms responsible for backbone cleavage are strongly dependent on pH and can be catalyzed by metals or radicals. The distribution of cleavage sites are different under acidic compared to basic conditions, with fragmentation rates exhibiting a minimum in the pH range 5–6; therefore, the overall fragmentation pattern observed for a mAb is a complex result of structural and solvent conditions. A critical review of the techniques used to monitor fragmentation is also presented; usually a compromise has to be made between a highly sensitive method with good fragment separation and the capability to identify the cleavage site. The effect of fragmentation on the function of a mAb must be evaluated on a case-by-case basis depending on whether cleavage sites are observed in the variable or constant regions, and on the mechanism of action of the molecule. PMID:21487244

  15. Monoclonal gammopathies of renal significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caravaca-Fontán, Fernando; Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Delgado Lillo, Ramón; Praga, Manuel

    The term monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance (MGRS) comprises a group of diseases pathogenetically characterised by proliferation of a B-cell or plasma cell clone that synthesises and secretes a monoclonal immunoglobulin or its components (light and/or heavy chains), that may deposit and cause glomerular, tubular, interstitial and/or vascular damage. The importance of differentiating the term MGRS from other monoclonal gammopathies lies in the fact that diagnostic and therapeutic procedures aimed at controlling monoclonal protein synthesis and secretion can be indicated, irrespective of the classic criteria based on malignant tumour expansion. Renal pathology associated with MGRS is highly heterogeneous, and therefore renal biopsy should be considered a key diagnostic tool. A precise diagnostic approach, however, must also identify the monoclonal protein in plasma and/or in urine, together with a complete haematological study in order to determine the nature and extension of cell clones. Recent advances in the understanding of these entities have resulted in significant improvements in clinical course and survival in several forms of MGRS, although more studies and clinical experience are needed in order to delineate more effective therapeutic strategies. In this review, we summarise the main clinical and pathological features of MGRS, highlighting the most appropriate diagnostic approach and current therapeutic options. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Monoclonal antibodies to Pneumocystis carinii

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovacs, J A; Halpern, J L; Lundgren, B

    1989-01-01

    To increase understanding of the antigenic structure of Pneumocystis carinii, we developed monoclonal antibodies to rat and human P. carinii. The specificity of the antibodies was demonstrated by immunofluorescence and immunoblot studies. Only one of five monoclonal antibodies to rat P. carinii...... reacted with human P. carinii, and none of four monoclonal antibodies to human P. carinii reacted with rat P. carinii. Two antibodies to human P. carinii reacted by immunofluorescence with only one human P. carinii isolate. Immunoblot studies identified major antigens of rat P. carinii with molecular...... antigenically different. Further studies with these antibodies should increase understanding of the antigenic nature of P. carinii and of the interaction of P. carinii with its host....

  17. HIV-1 gp41-specific monoclonal mucosal IgAs derived from highly exposed but IgG-seronegative individuals block HIV-1 epithelial transcytosis and neutralize CD4(+) cell infection: an IgA gene and functional analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor, D; Derrien, M; Diomede, L; Drillet, A-S; Houimel, M; Moog, C; Reynes, J-M; Lopalco, L; Bomsel, M

    2009-09-01

    AIDS is mainly a sexually transmitted disease, and accordingly, mucosal tissues are the primary sites of natural human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) transmission. Mucosal immunoglobulin A (IgA) antibody specific for HIV-1 envelope gp41 subunit is one correlate of protection in individuals who are highly sexually exposed to HIV-1 but remain persistently IgG seronegative (HEPS). Understanding these peculiar IgAs at the gene and functional level is possible only with monoclonal IgAs. We have constructed a mucosal Fab IgA library from HEPS and have characterized a series of HIV-1 IgAs specific for gp41 that, in vitro, are transcytosis-blocking and infection-neutralizing. Characterization of their IgA genes shows that Fab specific for the gp41 membrane-proximal region harbors a long heavy-chain CDR3 loop (CDRH3) similar to the two broadly neutralizing IgG monoclonal antibodies, 2F5 and 4E10. Furthermore, the selected Fab IgA shows extensive somatic mutations that cluster in the CDR regions, indicating that affinity maturation due to an antigen-driven process had occurred in HEPS individuals, presumably upon multiple exposures to HIV. This analysis of HEPS monoclonal IgA gives a unique opportunity to correlate an antibody function (resistance to a pathogen in vivo) with an antibody gene. Such neutralizing monoclonal IgAs could be used in microbicide formulation.

  18. Detection of Campylobacter species using monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Colin R.; Lee, Alice; Stanker, Larry H.

    1999-01-01

    A panel of species specific monoclonal antibodies were raised to Campylobacter coli, Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter lari. The isotypes, and cross-reactivity profiles of each monoclonal antibody against an extensive panel of micro- organisms, were determined.

  19. Uses of monoclonal antibody 8H9

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheung, Nai-Kong V.

    2013-04-09

    This invention provides a composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a suitable carrier. This invention provides a pharmaceutical composition comprising an effective amount of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof and a pharmaceutically acceptable carrier. This invention also provides an antibody other than the monoclonal antibody 8H9 comprising the complementary determining regions of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof, capable of binding to the same antigen as the monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention provides a substance capable of competitively inhibiting the binding of monoclonal antibody 8H9. This invention also provides an isolated scFv of monoclonal antibody 8H9 or a derivative thereof. This invention also provides the 8H9 antigen. This invention also provides different uses of the monoclonal antibody 8H9 or its derivative.

  20. Evaluating bococizumab, a monoclonal antibody to PCSK9, on lipid levels and clinical events in broad patient groups with and without prior cardiovascular events: Rationale and design of the Studies of PCSK9 Inhibition and the Reduction of vascular Events (SPIRE) Lipid Lowering and SPIRE Cardiovascular Outcomes Trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridker, Paul M; Amarenco, Pierre; Brunell, Robert; Glynn, Robert J; Jukema, J Wouter; Kastelein, John J P; Koenig, Wolfgang; Nissen, Steven; Revkin, James; Santos, Raul D; Schwartz, Pamela F; Yunis, Carla; Tardif, Jean-Claude

    2016-08-01

    Although statins significantly reduce vascular event rates, residual cholesterol risk remains high in many patient groups, including those with known vascular disease as well as in the setting of high-risk primary prevention. Bococizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that inhibits proprotein convertase subtilisin-kexin type 9 (PCSK9), prolongs the half-life of hepatic low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptors, and reduces circulating atherogenic cholesterol levels. The SPIRE program comprises 6 lipid-lowering studies and 2 cardiovascular outcomes trials, each comparing bococizumab (150 mg subcutaneously every 2 weeks) to matching placebo. The 6 SPIRE lipid-lowering studies include 3 parallel 12-month assessments of bococizumab on atherogenic lipids among statin-treated individuals at high residual risk (SPIRE-HR, SPIRE-LDL, SPIRE-LL), one 12-month study of bococizumab among individuals with familial hypercholesterolemia (SPIRE-FH), one 6-month study of bococizumab among those with statin intolerance (SPIRE-SI), and one 3-month study of bococizumab delivery using an auto-injector device (SPIRE-AI). The SPIRE-1 and SPIRE-2 event-driven cardiovascular outcome trials will assess the efficacy and safety of bococizumab in the prevention of incident vascular events in high-risk populations with and without clinically evident cardiovascular disease who have directly measured entry LDL cholesterol levels ≥70 mg/dL (SPIRE-1, n = 17,000) or ≥100 mg/dL (SPIRE-2, n = 11,000). The SPIRE trials, inclusive of more than 30,000 participants worldwide, will ascertain the magnitude of reduction in atherogenic lipids that accrue with bococizumab and determine whether the addition of this PCSK9 inhibitor to standard treatment significantly reduces cardiovascular morbidity and mortality in high-risk patients, including those without a history of clinical cardiovascular events. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Monoclonal antibodies: application in radiopharmacy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ligiero, Thais Braga; de Souza Albernaz, Marta; de Carvalho, Samira Marques; de Oliveira, Silvia Maria Velasques; Santos-Oliveira, Ralph

    2013-12-01

    In this study was carried on a systematic review of the data was carried out in the topic of monoclonal antibodies in the last 40 years. All the data collected and summarized revealed that this new class of medicine may bring great advance in the field of radiopharmacy, oncology and imaging.

  2. Yellow fever monoclonal antibodies: type-specific and cross-reactive determinants identified by immunofluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monath, T P; Schlesinger, J J; Brandriss, M W; Cropp, C B; Prange, W C

    1984-07-01

    Monoclonal antibodies directed against the envelope glycoprotein and the NV3 non-structural viral protein of yellow fever (YF) were tested by the indirect fluorescent antibody technique against a variety of YF virus strains and heterologous flaviviruses. Monoclonal antibodies directed against the envelope glycoprotein exhibited YF strain-specificity, YF type-specificity, broad group cross-reactivity, or limited subgroup reactivity (YF + Banzi or YF + Koutango + Zika + Usutu + Uganda S). Monoclonal antibodies directed against NV3 reacted either with YF + Koutango or with YF + Banzi. These findings generally correlated with the results of biological tests reported previously. Monoclonal antibodies that were type-specific to YF will be useful for the rapid specific identification of YF virus isolates and are available from the Centers for Disease Control on request.

  3. Development of Human Monoclonal Antibodies Against Respiratory Syncytial Virus Using a High Efficiency Human Hybridoma Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Gabriela; Crowe, James E

    2016-01-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies against RSV have high potential for use as prophylaxis or therapeutic molecules, and they also can be used to define the structure of protective epitopes for rational vaccine design. In the past, however, isolation of human monoclonal antibodies was difficult and inefficient. Here, we describe contemporary methods for activation and proliferation of primary human memory B cells followed by cytofusion to non-secreting myeloma cells by dielectrophoresis to generate human hybridomas secreting RSV-specific monoclonal antibodies. We also provide experimental methods for screening human B cell lines to obtain RSV-specific lines, especially lines secreting neutralizing antibodies.

  4. Monoclonal Antibodies, Derived from Humans Vaccinated with the RV144 HIV Vaccine Containing the HVEM Binding Domain of Herpes Simplex Virus (HSV) Glycoprotein D, Neutralize HSV Infection, Mediate Antibody-Dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity, and Protect Mice from Ocular Challenge with HSV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kening; Tomaras, Georgia D; Jegaskanda, Sinthujan; Moody, M Anthony; Liao, Hua-Xin; Goodman, Kyle N; Berman, Phillip W; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Nitayapan, Sorachai; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Haynes, Barton F; Cohen, Jeffrey I

    2017-10-01

    The RV144 HIV vaccine trial included a recombinant HIV glycoprotein 120 (gp120) construct fused to a small portion of herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) glycoprotein D (gD) so that the first 40 amino acids of gp120 were replaced by the signal sequence and the first 27 amino acids of the mature form of gD. This region of gD contains most of the binding site for HVEM, an HSV receptor important for virus infection of epithelial cells and lymphocytes. RV144 induced antibodies to HIV that were partially protective against infection, as well as antibodies to HSV. We derived monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) from peripheral blood B cells of recipients of the RV144 HIV vaccine and showed that these antibodies neutralized HSV-1 infection in cells expressing HVEM, but not the other major virus receptor, nectin-1. The MAbs mediated antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC), and mice that received the MAbs and were then challenged by corneal inoculation with HSV-1 had reduced eye disease, shedding, and latent infection. To our knowledge, this is the first description of MAbs derived from human recipients of a vaccine that specifically target the HVEM binding site of gD. In summary, we found that monoclonal antibodies derived from humans vaccinated with the HVEM binding domain of HSV-1 gD (i) neutralized HSV-1 infection in a cell receptor-specific manner, (ii) mediated ADCC, and (iii) reduced ocular disease in virus-infected mice. IMPORTANCE Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) causes cold sores and neonatal herpes and is a leading cause of blindness. Despite many trials, no HSV vaccine has been approved. Nectin-1 and HVEM are the two major cellular receptors for HSV. These receptors are expressed at different levels in various tissues, and the role of each receptor in HSV pathogenesis is not well understood. We derived human monoclonal antibodies from persons who received the HIV RV144 vaccine that contained the HVEM binding domain of HSV-1 gD fused to HIV gp120. These antibodies were

  5. [Evolution of monoclonal antibodies in cancer treatment].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubczak, Małgorzata; Rogalińska, Małgorzata

    Since late 90s of last century the new age of directed therapy began using mainly biological constructs produced in rodents called monoclonal antibodies. The side effects of monoclonal antibodies were a challenge for pharmaceutical companies to improve the biological properties of these biological drugs. The humanization of monoclonal constructs was an idea to improve monoclonal antibodies next generation activity cancer cell reduction in humans. Moreover for some other patients sensitive for monoclonal antibodies therapy could also potentially induce immunological differences that might imply on human health. The new idea related to monoclonal antibodies was to design a small molecule constructs of nanoantibodies with ability to enter into cells. Such small molecules could find their targets inside human cells, even in nuclei leading to differences in cancer cells expression. The existing knowledge on monoclonal antibodies as well as directed activity of nanoantibodies could improve anticancer treatment efficancy of diseases.

  6. Immuno-PET : A navigator in monoclonal antibody development and applications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Dongen, Guus A. M. S.; Visser, Gerard W. M.; Hooge, Marjolijn N. Lub-de; Perk, Lars R.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.

    2007-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have been approved for use as diagnostics and therapeutics in a broad range of medical indications, but especially in oncology. In addition, hundreds of new mAbs, engineered mAb fragments, and nontraditional antibody-like scaffolds directed against either validated or

  7. HuEP5C7 as a humanized monoclonal anti-E/P-selectin neurovascular protective strategy in a blinded placebo-controlled trial of nonhuman primate stroke.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mocco, J; Choudhri, Tanvir; Huang, Judy; Harfeldt, Elisabeth; Efros, Lyubov; Klingbeil, Corine; Vexler, Vladimir; Hall, William; Zhang, Yuan; Mack, William; Popilskis, Sulli; Pinsky, David J; Connolly, E Sander

    2002-11-15

    Although inhibiting interaction of beta(2) integrins with cognate immunoglobulin class adhesion receptor ligands is an effective neuroprotective strategy in small mammal models of stroke, the strategy has failed in human trials. A completely different antiadhesion receptor strategy was therefore rigorously tested in a model that may more closely approximate human reperfused stroke. Early leukoadhesive events in postischemic cerebral microvessels are mediated by upregulated selectin-class adhesion receptors on endothelial cells. Therefore, a blocking antibody prepared against common P- and E-selectin epitopes was humanized to suppress complement activation and tested in a reperfused hemispheric stroke model in Papio anubis (baboon). Histological examination of postischemic cerebral microvessels revealed a strong upregulation of E-and P-selectin expression. Placebo-blinded administration of the humanized anti-human E- and P-selectin monoclonal antibody (HuEP5C7, 20 mg/kg IV, n=9; placebo, n=9) immediately after the onset of 1 hour of temporary ischemia resulted in trends showing reduced polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) infiltration into ischemic cortex, reduced infarct volumes (by 41%), improved neurological score (by 35%), and improved ability to self-care (by 39%). Importantly, there was no evidence of systemic complement activation, immune suppression, or pathological coagulopathy associated with this therapy. These data suggest that a humanized anti-E/P-selectin antibody approach is safe and may be effective as a clinical treatment for human stroke.

  8. HIV therapy by a combination of broadly neutralizing antibodies in humanized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klein, Florian; Halper-Stromberg, Ariel; Horwitz, Joshua A; Gruell, Henning; Scheid, Johannes F; Bournazos, Stylianos; Mouquet, Hugo; Spatz, Linda A; Diskin, Ron; Abadir, Alexander; Zang, Trinity; Dorner, Marcus; Billerbeck, Eva; Labitt, Rachael N; Gaebler, Christian; Marcovecchio, Paola; Incesu, Reha-Baris; Eisenreich, Thomas R; Bieniasz, Paul D; Seaman, Michael S; Bjorkman, Pamela J; Ravetch, Jeffrey V; Ploss, Alexander; Nussenzweig, Michel C

    2012-12-06

    Human antibodies to human immunodeficiency virus-1 (HIV-1) can neutralize a broad range of viral isolates in vitro and protect non-human primates against infection. Previous work showed that antibodies exert selective pressure on the virus but escape variants emerge within a short period of time. However, these experiments were performed before the recent discovery of more potent anti-HIV-1 antibodies and their improvement by structure-based design. Here we re-examine passive antibody transfer as a therapeutic modality in HIV-1-infected humanized mice. Although HIV-1 can escape from antibody monotherapy, combinations of broadly neutralizing antibodies can effectively control HIV-1 infection and suppress viral load to levels below detection. Moreover, in contrast to antiretroviral therapy, the longer half-life of antibodies led to control of viraemia for an average of 60 days after cessation of therapy. Thus, combinations of potent monoclonal antibodies can effectively control HIV-1 replication in humanized mice, and should be re-examined as a therapeutic modality in HIV-1-infected individuals.

  9. Monoclonal antibodies to human butyrylcholinesterase reactive with butyrylcholinesterase in animal plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Hong; Brimijoin, Stephen; Hrabovska, Anna; Krejci, Eric; Blake, Thomas A; Johnson, Rudolph C; Masson, Patrick; Lockridge, Oksana

    2016-01-05

    Five mouse anti-human butyrylcholinesterase (BChE) monoclonal antibodies bind tightly to native human BChE with nanomolar dissociation constants. Pairing analysis in the Octet system identified the monoclonal antibodies that bind to overlapping and independent epitopes on human BChE. The nucleotide and amino acid sequences of 4 monoclonal antibodies are deposited in GenBank. Our goal was to determine which of the 5 monoclonal antibodies recognize BChE in the plasma of animals. Binding of monoclonal antibodies 11D8, B2 18-5, B2 12-1, mAb2 and 3E8 to BChE in animal plasma was measured using antibody immobilized on Pansorbin cells and on Dynabeads Protein G. A third method visualized binding by the shift of BChE activity bands on nondenaturing gels stained for BChE activity. Gels were counterstained for carboxylesterase activity. The three methods agreed that B2 18-5 and mAb2 have broad species specificity, but the other monoclonal antibodies interacted only with human BChE, the exception being 3E8, which also bound chicken BChE. B2 18-5 and mAb2 recognized BChE in human, rhesus monkey, horse, cat, and tiger plasma. A weak response was found with rabbit BChE. Monoclonal mAb2, but not B2 18-5, bound pig and bovine BChE. Gels stained for carboxylesterase activity confirmed that plasma from humans, monkey, pig, chicken, and cow does not contain carboxylesterase, but plasma from horse, cat, tiger, rabbit, guinea pig, mouse, and rat has carboxylesterase. Rabbit plasma carboxylesterase hydrolyzes butyrylthiocholine. In conclusion monoclonal antibodies B2 18-5 and mAb2 can be used to immuno extract BChE from the plasma of humans, monkey and other animals. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. [Monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Seco, Victoria Galán; Casanova Peño, Ignacio; Arroyo González, Rafael

    2014-12-01

    Until the mid 1990s, with the appearance of interferon beta and glatiramer acetate, there was no treatment for multiple sclerosis (MS). However, due to their moderate therapeutic potential in some patients, a broad search was continued to find new and more effective treatment strategies, largely concentrated on monoclonal antibodies (MOAB). Natalizumab, the first MOAB for the treatment of MS, was approved at the end of 2004, representing a major advance in the field of neuroimmunology. Today, there is broad experience with natalizumab and other MOAB (alemtuzumab, daclizumab, rituximab, ocrelizumab, ofatumumab and anti-lingo-1) that are pending commercialization or are under phase II or III of development with promising results. The present review analyzes the efficacy and safety results of all these drugs. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  11. Monoclonal antibodies in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrajoli, Alessandra; Faderl, Stefan; Keating, Michael J

    2006-09-01

    Multiple options are now available for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Over the last 10 years, monoclonal antibodies have become an integral part of the management of this disease. Alemtuzumab has received approval for use in patients with fludarabine-refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Rituximab has been investigated extensively in chronic lymphocytic leukemia both as a single agent and in combination with chemotherapy and other monoclonal antibodies. Epratuzumab and lumiliximab are newer monoclonal antibodies in the early phase of clinical development. This article will review the monoclonal antibodies more commonly used to treat chronic lymphocytic leukemia, the results obtained with monoclonal antibodies as single agents and in combination with chemotherapy, and other biological agents and newer compounds undergoing clinical trials.

  12. Monoclonal antibodies in pediatric allergy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amelia Licari

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Production of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs involving human-mouse hybrid cells was first described in 1970s, but these biologics are now used for a variety of diseases including cancers, autoimmune disorders and allergic diseases. The aim of this article is to review current and future applications of mAbs, in particular focusing on anti-IgE therapy, in the field of pediatric allergy. Proceedings of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology and Satellite Meetings · Cagliari (Italy · October 26th-31st, 2015 · From the womb to the adultGuest Editors: Vassilios Fanos (Cagliari, Italy, Michele Mussap (Genoa, Italy, Antonio Del Vecchio (Bari, Italy, Bo Sun (Shanghai, China, Dorret I. Boomsma (Amsterdam, the Netherlands, Gavino Faa (Cagliari, Italy, Antonio Giordano (Philadelphia, USA

  13. Application of Monoclonal Antibodies in Veterinary Parasitology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta A.

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The discovery of hybridoma technology by Kohler and Milstein in 1975, heralded a new era in antibody research. Mouse hybridomas were the first reliable source of monoclonal antibodies. The generation of monoclonal antibodies from species other than rats and mice, has developed slowly over the last 30 years. The advent of antibody engineering and realization of the advantages of non murine antibodies has increased their relevance recently. However, in the area of veterinary parasitology, monoclonal antibodies are just beginning to fulfill the promises inherent in their great specificity for recognizing and selectively binding to antigens. This review describes the recent advances in the application of monoclonal antibodies for immunodiagnosis / prophylaxis and immunotherapy of parasitic diseases. [Vet. World 2011; 4(4.000: 183-188

  14. Monitoring monoclonal antibody delivery in oncology: the example of bevacizumab.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Nugue

    Full Text Available Developing therapeutic monoclonal antibodies paves the way for new strategies in oncology using targeted therapy which should improve specificity. However, due to a lack of biomarkers, a personalized therapy scheme cannot always be applied with monoclonal antibodies. As a consequence, the efficacy or side effects associated with this type of treatment often appear to be sporadic. Bevacizumab is a therapeutic monoclonal antibody targeting Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF. It is used to limit tumor vascularization. No prognosis or response biomarker is associated with this antibody, we therefore assessed whether the administration protocol could be a possible cause of heterogeneous responses (or variable efficacy. To do this, we developed a bevacizumab assay with a broad sensitivity range to measure blood bevacizumab concentrations. We then analyzed bevacizumab concentrations in 17 patients throughout the first quarter of treatment. In line with previously published data, average blood concentrations were 88+/-27 mg/L following the first dose administered, and 213+/-105 mg/L after the last (6(th dose administered. However, the individual values were scattered, with a mean 4-fold difference between the lowest and the highest concentration for each dose administered. We demonstrated that the bevacizumab administration schedule results in a high inter-individual variability in terms of blood concentrations. Comparison of assay data with clinical data indicates that blood concentrations above the median are associated with side effects, whereas values below the median favor inefficacy. In conclusion, bevacizumab-based therapy could benefit from a personalized administration schedule including follow-up and adjustment of circulating bevacizumab concentrations.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies to immunodeterminants of lipoteichoic acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, D E; Wong, W; Largen, M T; Shockman, G D

    1984-03-01

    Murine hybrid cell lines producing monoclonal antibodies directed against determinants present on lipoteichoic acids were generated. Hapten inhibition studies showed that one group of monoclonal antibodies was inhibited by deacylated cardiolipin, and the second group was inhibited by kojibiose. Thus, antibodies directed against the polyglycerophosphate chain, which is common to the lipoteichoic acids of many gram-positive species, and against the streptococcal group D antigen were obtained.

  16. Monoclonal antibodies to immunodeterminants of lipoteichoic acids.

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, D E; Wong, W; Largen, M T; Shockman, G. D.

    1984-01-01

    Murine hybrid cell lines producing monoclonal antibodies directed against determinants present on lipoteichoic acids were generated. Hapten inhibition studies showed that one group of monoclonal antibodies was inhibited by deacylated cardiolipin, and the second group was inhibited by kojibiose. Thus, antibodies directed against the polyglycerophosphate chain, which is common to the lipoteichoic acids of many gram-positive species, and against the streptococcal group D antigen were obtained.

  17. Monoclonal gammopathy missed by capillary zone electrophoresis

    OpenAIRE

    Schild, Christof; Egger, Florence; Kaelin-Lang, Alain; Nuoffer, Jean-Marc

    2017-01-01

    Background: Serum protein electrophoresis is used as a screening test for monoclonal gammopathies. Here, we present a case of a high-concentration monoclonal immunoglobulin (M-protein) that was missed by serum protein electrophoresis on a Capillarys 2 capillary zone electrophoresis system. The aim of our study was to identify the reason for the failure of the system to detect the M-protein. Methods: M-protein solubility was examined in response to temperature, pH, ionic strength, the chaotrop...

  18. Monoclonal Antibodies to Shigella Lipopolysaccharide Are Useful for Vaccine Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jisheng; Smith, Mark A; Benjamin, William H; Kaminski, Robert W; Wenzel, Heather; Nahm, Moon H

    2016-08-01

    There is a significant need for an effective multivalent Shigella vaccine that targets the most prevalent serotypes. Most Shigella vaccines under development utilize serotype-specific lipopolysaccharides (LPSs) as a major component based on protection and epidemiological data. As vaccine formulations advance from monovalent to multivalent, assays and reagents need to be developed to accurately and reproducibly quantitate the amount of LPSs from multiple serotypes in the final product. To facilitate this effort, we produced 36 hybridomas that secrete monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against the O antigen on the LPS from Shigella flexneri 2a, Shigella flexneri 3a, and Shigella sonnei We used six of these monoclonal antibodies for an inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (iELISA), measuring LPSs with high sensitivity and specificity. It was also demonstrated that the Shigella serotype-specific MAbs were useful for bacterial surface staining detected by flow cytometry. These MAbs are also useful for standardizing the serum bactericidal assay (SBA) for Shigella Functional assays, such as the in vitro bactericidal assay, are necessary for vaccine evaluation and may serve as immunological correlates of immunity. An S. flexneri 2a-specific monoclonal antibody killed S. flexneri 2b isolates, suggesting that S. flexneri 2a LPS may induce cross-protection against S. flexneri 2b. Overall, the Shigella LPS-specific MAbs described have potential utility to the vaccine development community for assessing multivalent vaccine composition and as a reliable control for multiple immunoassays used to assess vaccine potency. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Antibodies and Selection of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanack, Katja; Messerschmidt, Katrin; Listek, Martin

    Monoclonal antibodies are universal binding molecules with a high specificity for their target and are indispensable tools in research, diagnostics and therapy. The biotechnological generation of monoclonal antibodies was enabled by the hybridoma technology published in 1975 by Köhler and Milstein. Today monoclonal antibodies are used in a variety of applications as flow cytometry, magnetic cell sorting, immunoassays or therapeutic approaches. First step of the generation process is the immunization of the organism with appropriate antigen. After a positive immune response the spleen cells are isolated and fused with myeloma cells in order to generate stable, long-living antibody-producing cell lines - hybridoma cells. In the subsequent identification step the culture supernatants of all hybridoma cells are screened weekly for the production of the antibody of interest. Hybridoma cells producing the antibody of interest are cloned by limited dilution till a monoclonal hybridoma is found. This is a very time-consuming and laborious process and therefore different selection strategies were developed since 1975 in order to facilitate the generation of monoclonal antibodies. Apart from common automation of pipetting processes and ELISA testing there are some promising approaches to select the right monoclonal antibody very early in the process to reduce time and effort of the generation. In this chapter different selection strategies for antibody-producing hybridoma cells are presented and analysed regarding to their benefits compared to conventional limited dilution technology.

  20. Improved monoclonal antibodies to halodeoxyuridine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlaan, M.; Dolbeare, F.A.; Gray, J.W.; Thomas, C.B.

    1983-10-18

    The development, method of production, characterization and methods of use of two hybridomas, CIdU-1 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8321) and CIdU-2 (ATCC Accession No. HB-8320), are described. These secrete IgG/sub 1/(K) immunoglobulins that react with halodeoxyuridine (HdU or halodU) such as bromo, chloro, fluoro and iodo deoxyuridine (BrdU, CldU, FdU and IdU), whether these are free in solution or incorporated into single stranded DNA in whole cells. The antibodies do not react with naturally occurring free nucleic acids or with deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) or ribonucleic acid (RNA) polymers. These antibodies are suitable for use in enzyme immunoassays for free CldU, FdU, IdU and BrdU and for detecting cells with these nucleotides incorporated into them. The monoclonal antibodies are useful in the detection of the sensitivity of tumor cells to specific chemotherapeutic agents, in the measurement of the rate of cellular DNA synthesis, in the measurement of the rate of proliferation of normal and malignant cells and in the detection of HPRT deficiency in cells. 1 tab.

  1. Mechanisms of monoclonal antibody stabilization and release from silk biomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guziewicz, Nicholas A.; Massetti, Andrew J.; Perez-Ramirez, Bernardo J.; Kaplan, David L.

    2013-01-01

    The availability of stabilization and sustained delivery systems for antibody therapeutics remains a major clinical challenge, despite the growing development of antibodies for a wide range of therapeutic applications due to their specificity and efficacy. A mechanistic understanding of protein-matrix interactions is critical for the development of such systems and is currently lacking as a mode to guide the field. We report mechanistic insight to address this need by using well-defined matrices based on silk gels, in combination with a monoclonal antibody. Variables including antibody loading, matrix density, charge interactions, hydrophobicity and water access were assessed to clarify mechanisms involved in the release of antibody from the biomaterial matrix. The results indicate that antibody release is primarily governed by hydrophobic interactions and hydration resistance, which are controlled by silk matrix chemistry, peptide domain distribution and protein density. Secondary ionic repulsions are also critical in antibody stabilization and release. Matrix modification by free methionine incorporation was found to be an effective strategy for mitigating encapsulation induced antibody oxidation. Additionally, these studies highlight a characterization approach to improve the understanding and development of other protein sustained delivery systems, with broad applicability to the rapidly developing monoclonal antibody field. PMID:23859659

  2. Glycan modulation and sulfoengineering of anti–HIV-1 monoclonal antibody PG9 in plants

    OpenAIRE

    Loos, Andreas; Gach, Johannes S.; Hackl, Thomas; Maresch, Daniel; Henkel, Theresa; Porodko, Andreas; Bui-Minh, Duc; Sommeregger, Wolfgang; Wozniak-Knopp, Gordana; Forthal, Donald N.; Altmann, Friedrich; Steinkellner, Herta; Mach, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    The broadly neutralizing anti–HIV-1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) PG9 requires multiple posttranslational modifications to exhibit its full biological activity, including proper N-glycosylation and tyrosine sulfation. We now describe a technology that permits the controlled synthesis of these modifications in Nicotiana benthamiana. This technology allowed us to show that sulfated PG9 neutralizes HIV-1 with much higher potency than unsulfated antibody. We also found that glycooptimized mAb version...

  3. Desensitization for Drug Hypersensitivity to Chemotherapy and Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonamichi-Santos, Rafael; Castells, Mariana

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapies drugs and monoclonal antibodies are key components of the treatment of cancer patients and patients with chronic inflammatory conditions to provide increase in life expectancy and quality of life. Their increased use has lead to an increase in drugs hypersensitivity reactions (DHR) worldwide. DHR to those agents prevented their use and promoted the use of second line therapies to protect patients' hypersensitive reactions and anaphylaxis. Second line medications may not fully address the patients' medical condition and it is desirable to keep patients on first line therapy. Drug hypersensitivity symptoms can range from mild cutaneous reactions to life-threatening anaphylaxis. Rapid drug desensitization (RDD) is a novel approach to the management of drug hypersensitivity reactions which are IgE and non-IgE mediated. Through the diferent desensitization protocols patients can receive the full dose of the medications that they have presented a hypersensitive reaction and been protected against anaphylaxis. This review looks at the current literature on hypersensitivity reactions (HSR) to chemotherapy drugs and monoclonal antibodies and the potential use of RDD for their management. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  4. Moving through three-dimensional phase diagrams of monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rakel, Natalie; Baum, Miriam; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2014-01-01

    Protein phase behavior characterization is a multivariate problem due to the high amount of influencing parameters and the diversity of the proteins. Single influences on the protein are not understood and fundamental knowledge remains to be obtained. For this purpose, a systematic screening method was developed to characterize the influence of fluid phase conditions on the phase behavior of proteins in three-dimensional phase diagrams. This approach was applied to three monoclonal antibodies to investigate influences of pH, protein and salt concentrations, with five different salts being tested. Although differences exist between the antibodies, this extensive study confirmed the general applicability of the Hofmeister series over the broad parameter range analyzed. The influence of the different salts on the aggregation (crystallization and precipitation) probability was described qualitatively using this Hofmeister series, with a differentiation between crystallization and precipitation being impossible, however. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  5. Structural Basis for Escape of Human Astrovirus from Antibody Neutralization: Broad Implications for Rational Vaccine Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bogdanoff, Walter A.; Perez, Edmundo I.; López, Tomás; Arias, Carlos F.; DuBois, Rebecca M.; Schultz-Cherry, Stacey

    2017-10-25

    ABSTRACT

    Human astroviruses are recognized as a leading cause of viral diarrhea worldwide in children, immunocompromised patients, and the elderly. There are currently no vaccines available to prevent astrovirus infection; however, antibodies developed by healthy individuals during previous infection correlate with protection from reinfection, suggesting that an effective vaccine could be developed. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanism by which several strains of human astrovirus serotype 2 (HAstV-2) are resistant to the potent HAstV-2-neutralizing monoclonal antibody PL-2 (MAb PL-2). Sequencing of the HAstV-2 capsid genes reveals mutations in the PL-2 epitope within the capsid's spike domain. To understand the molecular basis for resistance from MAb PL-2 neutralization, we determined the 1.35-Å-resolution crystal structure of the capsid spike from one of these HAstV-2 strains. Our structure reveals a dramatic conformational change in a loop within the PL-2 epitope due to a serine-to-proline mutation, locking the loop in a conformation that sterically blocks binding and neutralization by MAb PL-2. We show that mutation to serine permits loop flexibility and recovers MAb PL-2 binding. Importantly, we find that HAstV-2 capsid spike containing a serine in this loop is immunogenic and elicits antibodies that neutralize all HAstV-2 strains. Taken together, our results have broad implications for rational selection of vaccine strains that do not contain prolines in antigenic loops, so as to elicit antibodies against diverse loop conformations.

    IMPORTANCEHuman astroviruses (HAstVs) infect nearly every person in the world during childhood and cause diarrhea, vomiting, and fever. In this study, we investigated how several strains of HAstV are resistant to a virus-neutralizing monoclonal antibody. We determined the crystal structure of the capsid protein spike domain from one of these HAstV strains and found that

  6. Cold denaturation of monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazar, Kristi L; Patapoff, Thomas W

    2010-01-01

    The susceptibility of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to undergo cold denaturation remains unexplored. In this study, the phenomenon of cold denaturation was investigated for a mAb, mAb1, through thermodynamic and spectroscopic analyses. tryptophan fluorescence and circular dichroism (CD) spectra were recorded for the guanidine hydrochloride (GuHCl)-induced unfolding of mAb1 at pH 6.3 at temperatures ranging from −5 to 50°C. A three-state unfolding model incorporating the linear extrapolation method was fit to the fluorescence data to obtain an apparent free energy of unfolding, ΔGu, at each temperature. CD studies revealed that mAb1 exhibited polyproline II helical structure at low temperatures and at high GuHCl concentrations. the Gibbs-Helmholtz expression fit to the ΔGu versus temperature data from fluorescence gave a ΔCp of 8.0 kcal mol−1 K−1, a maximum apparent stability of 23.7 kcal mol−1 at 18°C, and an apparent cold denaturation temperature (TCD) of −23°C. ΔGu values for another mAb (mAb2) with a similar framework exhibited less stability at low temperatures, suggesting a depressed protein stability curve and a higher relative TCD. Direct experimental evidence of the susceptibility of mAb1 and mAb2 to undergo cold denaturation in the absence of denaturant was confirmed at pH 2.5. thus, mAbs have a potential to undergo cold denaturation at storage temperatures near −20°C (pH 6.3), and this potential needs to be evaluated independently for individual mAbs. PMID:20093856

  7. Mucosal Vaccination with Recombinant Lactobacillus casei-Displayed CTA1-Conjugated Consensus Matrix Protein-2 (sM2) Induces Broad Protection against Divergent Influenza Subtypes in BALB/c Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Mohammed Y. E.; Li, Rui; Kim, Jae-Hoon; Park, Min-Eun; Kim, Tae-Hwan; Pathinayake, Prabuddha; Weeratunga, Prasanna; Song, Man Ki; Son, Hwa-Young; Hong, Seung-Pyo; Sung, Moon-Hee; Lee, Jong-Soo; Kim, Chul-Joong

    2014-01-01

    To develop a safe and effective mucosal vaccine against pathogenic influenza viruses, we constructed recombinant Lactobacillus casei strains that express conserved matrix protein 2 with (pgsA-CTA1-sM2/L. casei) or without (pgsA-sM2/L. casei) cholera toxin subunit A1 (CTA1) on the surface. The surface localization of the fusion protein was verified by cellular fractionation analyses, flow cytometry and immunofluorescence microscopy. Oral and nasal inoculations of recombinant L. casei into mice resulted in high levels of serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and mucosal IgA. However, the conjugation of cholera toxin subunit A1 induced more potent mucosal, humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. In a challenge test with 10 MLD50 of A/EM/Korea/W149/06(H5N1), A/Puerto Rico/8/34(H1N1), A/Aquatic bird /Korea/W81/2005(H5N2), A/Aquatic bird/Korea/W44/2005(H7N3), and A/Chicken/Korea/116/2004(H9N2) viruses, the recombinant pgsA-CTA1-sM2/L. casei provided better protection against lethal challenges than pgsA-sM2/L. casei, pgsA/L. casei and PBS in mice. These results indicate that mucosal immunization with recombinant L. casei expressing CTA1-conjugated sM2 protein on its surface is an effective means of eliciting protective immune responses against diverse influenza subtypes. PMID:24714362

  8. Fixed Dosing of Monoclonal Antibodies in Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendrikx, Jeroen J M A; Haanen, John B A G; Voest, Emile E; Schellens, Jan H M; Huitema, Alwin D R; Beijnen, Jos H

    2017-10-01

    Most monoclonal antibodies in oncology are administered in body-size-based dosing schedules. This is believed to correct for variability in both drug distribution and elimination between patients. However, monoclonal antibodies typically distribute to the blood plasma and extracellular fluids only, which increase less than proportionally with the increase in body weight. Elimination takes place via proteolytic catabolism, a nonspecific immunoglobulin G elimination pathway, and intracellular degradation after binding to the target. The latter is the primary route of elimination and is related to target expression levels rather than body size. Taken together, the minor effects of body size on distribution and elimination of monoclonal antibodies and their usually wide therapeutic window do not support body-size-based dosing. We evaluated effects of body weight on volume of distribution and clearance of monoclonal antibodies in oncology and show that a fixed dose for most of these drugs is justified based on pharmacokinetics. A survey of the savings after fixed dosing of monoclonal antibodies at our hospital showed that fixed dosing can reduce costs of health care, especially when pooling of preparations is not possible (which is often the case in smaller hospitals). In conclusion, based on pharmacokinetic parameters of monoclonal antibodies, there is a rationale for fixed dosing of these drugs in oncology. Therefore, we believe that fixed dosing is justified and can improve efficiency of the compounding. Moreover, drug spillage can be reduced and medication errors may become less likely. The currently available knowledge of elimination of monoclonal antibodies combined with the publicly available data from clinical trials and extensive population pharmacokinetic (PopPK) modeling justifies fixed dosing. Interpatient variation in exposure is comparable after body weight and fixed dosing and most monoclonal antibodies show relatively flat dose-response relationships

  9. Inactivated and live bivalent fowl adenovirus (FAdV8b + FAdV11) breeder vaccines provide broad-spectrum protection in chicks against inclusion body hepatitis (IBH).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ashish; Popowich, Shelly; Ojkic, Davor; Kurukulasuriya, Shanika; Chow-Lockerbie, Betty; Gunawardana, Thushari; Goonewardene, Kalhari; Karunarathna, Ruwani; Ayalew, Lisanework E; Ahmed, Khawaja Ashfaque; Tikoo, Suresh K; Willson, Philip; Gomis, Susantha

    2018-01-29

    Fowl adenovirus (FAdV) is comprised of five species (A to E) and 12 serotypes (1-7, 8a, 8b, 9-11). Inclusion body hepatitis (IBH) is caused by FAdV-7, 8a, 8b (species E) and FAdV-2 and 11 (species D). Commercial vaccines against IBH are not available in Canada. Autogenous FAdV broiler breeder vaccines are now used in some areas where outbreaks of IBH are occurring. The objective of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of a bivalent (species D and E) live and an inactivated FAdV broiler breeder vaccine in protecting broiler chicks against IBH through maternal antibody (MtAb) transfer. FAdV seronegative broiler breeders (n = 300/group) received either a live or inactivated bivalent (FAdV-8b-SK + FAdV-11-1047) vaccine. The live vaccine (1 × 104 TCID50 of each virus/bird) was given orally once at 16 weeks of age and the inactivated vaccine (1 × 106TCID50 of each virus + 20% Emulsigen D) was given intramuscularly at 16 and 19 weeks of age. Controls (n = 150) were given saline orally. The inactivated vaccine group was boosted 3 weeks later with the same vaccine. Neutralizing antibodies (NAb) in sera (n = 10) were detected at 19, 22, 30 and 48 weeks of age. NAb were able to neutralize various FAdV serotypes within species D and E. Mean NAb were similar in the both live and killed vaccine groups at 19, 30 and 48 weeks and ranged from 2.4 to 3.7 log10. Approximately 26 ± 7% of MtAbs were passively transferred through eggs to day-old chicks. Progeny challenged with a lethal dose (1 × 107 TCID50/bird intramuscularly) of FAdV-8b-SK, FAdV-11-1047, or FAdV-2-685 (n = 90/group) at 14 days post-hatch (dph) showed 98-100% protection in broiler chicks to homologous or heterologous FAdV challenges. Our data suggests that a bivalent live and an inactivated FAdV vaccine are equally effective and have the potential for the control of IBH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. A LAIR-1 insertion generates broadly reactive antibodies against malaria variant antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Joshua; Pieper, Kathrin; Piccoli, Luca; Abdi, Abdirahman; Perez, Mathilde Foglierini; Geiger, Roger; Tully, Claire Maria; Jarrossay, David; Maina Ndungu, Francis; Wambua, Juliana; Bejon, Philip; Fregni, Chiara Silacci; Fernandez-Rodriguez, Blanca; Barbieri, Sonia; Bianchi, Siro

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum antigens expressed on the surface of infected erythrocytes are important targets of naturally acquired immunity against malaria, but their high number and variability provide the pathogen with a powerful means of escape from host antibodies 1?4 . Although broadly reactive antibodies against these antigens could be useful as therapeutics and in vaccine design, their identification has proven elusive. Here, we report the isolation of human monoclonal antibodies that recogn...

  11. Development of Biodegradable Nanocarriers Loaded with a Monoclonal Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Gdowski

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Treatments utilizing monoclonal antibody therapeutics against intracellular protein-protein interactions in cancer cells have been hampered by several factors, including poor intracellular uptake and rapid lysosomal degradation. Our current work examines the feasibility of encapsulating monoclonal antibodies within poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA nanoparticles using a water/oil/water double emulsion solvent evaporation technique. This method can be used to prepare protective polymeric nanoparticles for transporting functional antibodies to the cytoplasmic compartment of cancer cells. Nanoparticles were formulated and then characterized using a number of physical and biological parameters. The average nanoparticle size ranged from 221 to 252 nm with a low polydispersity index. Encapsulation efficiency of 16%–22% and antibody loading of 0.3%–1.12% were observed. The antibody molecules were released from the nanoparticles in a sustained manner and upon release maintained functionality. Our studies achieved successful formulation of antibody loaded polymeric nanoparticles, thus indicating that a PLGA-based antibody nanoformulation is a promising intracellular delivery vehicle for a large number of new intracellular antibody targets in cancer cells.

  12. Reshaped Human Monoclonal Antibodies for Therapy and Passive Immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-11-01

    Monoclonal Antibodies for Therapy and Passive Immunisation by Reshaping Rodent Monoclonal Antibodies". Two mouse monoclonal antibody producing cell...could be simply extended to make human monoclonals, but this has proved not to be the case. There are difficulties in finding appropriately immunised ...human donors and suitable fusion partners for the antibody producing cells. In vitro immunisation techniques have been tried, but only low affinity 1gM

  13. The Broad Superintendents Academy, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broad Foundation, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Broad Superintendents Academy is an executive training program that identifies and prepares prominent leaders--executives with experience successfully leading large organizations and a passion for public service--then places them in urban school districts to dramatically improve the quality of education for America's students. This brochure…

  14. Monoclonal Antibody Therapy for Advanced Neuroblastoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    NCI is sponsoring two clinical trials of a monoclonal antibody called ch14.18, in combination with other drugs, to see if the antibody may be helpful for children or young adults (up to age 21) with relapsed or refractory neuroblastoma.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L; Shaw, A; Slupsky, J; Vos, H; Poppema, S

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia were developed to aid in the diagnosis of this subtype of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and to gain better insight into the origin of hairy cells. Three antibodies were found to be of value in the diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia.

  16. Strain differentiation of polioviruses with monoclonal antibodies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); A.L. van Wezel; A.J.H. Stegmann; J.A.A.M. van Asten (Jack)

    1984-01-01

    textabstractPanels of monoclonal antibodies raised against different poliovirus type 1, 2 and 3 strains, were tested in a micro-neutralization test and in a micro-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay against a large number of poliovirus strains. The results were compared with those obtained with the

  17. Reactivity of commercially available monoclonal antibodies to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to cell surface molecules have been proven as a key tool for phenotypic and functional characterization of the cellular immune response. One of the major difficulties in studying camel cellular immunity consists in the lack of mAbs that dtect their leukocyte differentiation antigens. In the present ...

  18. [Preparation of clenbuterol monoclonal antibody with subtractive immunization method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiao-Li; Li, Xiao-Fang; Ning, Bao-An; Wu, Da-Cheng; Wang, Hong-Yong; Chen, Xiang; Ma, Xin-Hua; Ou, Guo-Rong; Gau, Zhi-Xian

    2009-11-01

    To obtain Clenbuterol monoclonal antibodies. Clenbuterol complete antigen was prepared with diazotization method. BALB/c mice was immunized with subtractive immunization, Clenbuterol monoclonal antibody was prepared with rule hybridoma technique. The mice obtained tolerance to BSA by subtractive immunization. The rate of the hybridoma cell with positive reaction which had obtained was 8.2%, and the specific clenbuterol monoclonal antibody was obtained at last. Monoclonal antibodies to micromolecule contaminant be prepared by subtractive immunization, could decrease the workload in the bolting of monoclonal antibodies, and increase the chance to obtain the antibody of expected.

  19. Isolation of highly active monoclonal antibodies against multiresistant gram-positive bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Friederike S Rossmann

    Full Text Available Multiresistant nosocomial pathogens often cause life-threatening infections that are sometimes untreatable with currently available antibiotics. Staphylococci and enterococci are the predominant Gram-positive species associated with hospital-acquired infections. These infections often lead to extended hospital stay and excess mortality. In this study, a panel of fully human monoclonal antibodies was isolated from a healthy individual by selection of B-cells producing antibodies with high opsonic killing against E. faecalis 12030. Variable domains (VH and VL of these immunoglobulin genes were amplified by PCR and cloned into an eukaryotic expression vector containing the constant domains of a human IgG1 molecule and the human lambda constant domain. These constructs were transfected into CHO cells and culture supernatants were collected and tested by opsonophagocytic assay against E. faecalis and S. aureus strains (including MRSA. At concentrations of 600 pg/ml, opsonic killing was between 40% and 70% against all strains tested. Monoclonal antibodies were also evaluated in a mouse sepsis model (using S. aureus LAC and E. faecium, a mouse peritonitis model (using S. aureus Newman and LAC and a rat endocarditis model (using E. faecalis 12030 and were shown to provide protection in all models at a concentration of 4 μg/kg per animal. Here we present a method to produce fully human IgG1 monoclonal antibodies that are opsonic in vitro and protective in vivo against several multiresistant Gram-positive bacteria. The monoclonal antibodies presented in this study are significantly more effective compared to another monoclonal antibody currently in clinical trials.

  20. Analysis of memory B cell responses and isolation of novel monoclonal antibodies with neutralizing breadth from HIV-1-infected individuals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davide Corti

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The isolation of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs that neutralize a broad spectrum of primary HIV-1 isolates and the characterization of the human neutralizing antibody B cell response to HIV-1 infection are important goals that are central to the design of an effective antibody-based vaccine.We immortalized IgG(+ memory B cells from individuals infected with diverse clades of HIV-1 and selected on the basis of plasma neutralization profiles that were cross-clade and relatively potent. Culture supernatants were screened using various recombinant forms of the envelope glycoproteins (Env in multiple parallel assays. We isolated 58 mAbs that were mapped to different Env surfaces, most of which showed neutralizing activity. One mAb in particular (HJ16 specific for a novel epitope proximal to the CD4 binding site on gp120 selectively neutralized a multi-clade panel of Tier-2 HIV-1 pseudoviruses, and demonstrated reactivity that was comparable in breadth, but distinct in neutralization specificity, to that of the other CD4 binding site-specific neutralizing mAb b12. A second mAb (HGN194 bound a conserved epitope in the V3 crown and neutralized all Tier-1 and a proportion of Tier-2 pseudoviruses tested, irrespective of clade. A third mAb (HK20 with broad neutralizing activity, particularly as a Fab fragment, recognized a highly conserved epitope in the HR-1 region of gp41, but showed striking assay-dependent selectivity in its activity.This study reveals that by using appropriate screening methods, a large proportion of memory B cells can be isolated that produce mAbs with HIV-1 neutralizing activity. Three of these mAbs show unusual breadth of neutralization and therefore add to the current panel of HIV-1 neutralizing antibodies with potential for passive protection and template-based vaccine design.

  1. Long-term treatment of pigs with low doses of monoclonal antibodies against porcine CD4 and CD8 antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lohse, Louise; Nielsen, Jens; Eriksen, Lis

    2006-01-01

    In vivo depletion of lymphocyte subsets allows investigation of the role of specific subsets in protective immunity. In the present study we evaluated the effects of long-term, low-dose treatment with murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against porcine CD4 and CD8 surface antigens on lymphocyte...

  2. Generation of human antigen-specific monoclonal IgM antibodies using vaccinated "human immune system" mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Becker, P.D.; Legrand, N.; van Geelen, C.M.M.; Noerder, M.; Huntington, N.D.; Lim, A.; Yasuda, E.; Diehl, S.A.; Scheeren, F.A.; Ott, M.; Weijer, K.; Wedemeyer, H.; Di Santo, J.P.; Beaumont, T.; Guzman, C.A.; Spits, H.

    2010-01-01

    Passive transfer of antibodies not only provides immediate short-term protection against disease, but also can be exploited as a therapeutic tool. However, the 'humanization' of murine monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is a time-consuming and expensive process that has the inherent drawback of

  3. Novel rabies virus-neutralizing epitope recognized by human monoclonal antibody: Fine mapping and escape mutant analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marissen, W.E.; Kramer, R.A.; Rice, A.; Weldon, W.C.; Niezgoda, M.; Faber, M.; Slootstra, J.W.; Meloen, R.H.; Clijsters-van der Horst, M.; Visser, T.J.; Jongeneelen, M.; Thijsse, S.; Throsby, M.; Kruif, de J.; Rupprecht, C.E.; Dietzschold, B.; Goudsmit, J.; Bakker, A.B.H.

    2005-01-01

    Anti-rabies virus immunoglobulin combined with rabies vaccine protects humans from lethal rabies infections. For cost and safety reasons, replacement of the human or equine polyclonal immunoglobulin is advocated, and the use of rabies virus-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is recommended. We

  4. Novel rabies virus-neutralizing epitope recognized by human monoclonal antibody: fine mapping and escape mutant analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Marissen, Wilfred E.; Kramer, R. Arjen; Rice, Amy; Weldon, William C.; Niezgoda, Michael; Faber, Milosz; Slootstra, Jerry W.; Meloen, Rob H.; Clijsters-van der Horst, Marieke; Visser, Therese J.; Jongeneelen, Mandy; Thijsse, Sandra; Throsby, Mark; de Kruif, John; Rupprecht, Charles E.; Dietzschold, Bernhard; Goudsmit, Jaap; Bakker, Alexander B. H.

    2005-01-01

    Anti-rabies virus immunoglobulin combined with rabies vaccine protects humans from lethal rabies infections. For cost and safety reasons, replacement of the human or equine polyclonal immunoglobulin is advocated, and the use of rabies virus-specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) is recommended. We

  5. Recent developments in monoclonal antibody radiolabeling techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Mease, R.C.

    1989-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) have shown the potential to serve as selective carriers of radionuclides to specific in vivo antigens. Accordingly, there has been an intense surge of research activity in an effort to develop and evaluate MAb-based radiopharmaceuticals for tumor imaging (radioimmunoscintigraphy) and therapy (radioimmunotherapy), as well as for diagnosing nonmalignant diseases. A number of problems have recently been identified, related to the MAbs themselves and to radiolabeling techniques, that comprise both the selectivity and the specificity of the in vivo distribution of radiolabeled MAbs. This paper will address some of these issues and primarily discuss recent developments in the techniques for radiolabeling monoclonal antibodies that may help resolve problems related to the poor in vivo stability of the radiolabel and may thus produce improved biodistribution. Even though many issues are identical with therapeutic radionuclides, the discussion will focus mainly on radioimmunoscintigraphic labels. 78 refs., 6 tabs.

  6. The future of monoclonal antibody technology

    OpenAIRE

    Zider, Alexander; Drakeman, Donald L

    2010-01-01

    With the rapid growth of monoclonal antibody-based products, new technologies have emerged for creating modified forms of antibodies, including fragments, conjugates and multi-specific antibodies. We created a database of 450 therapeutic antibodies in development to determine which technologies and indications will constitute the “next generation” of antibody products. We conclude that the antibodies of the future will closely resemble the antibodies that have already been approved for commer...

  7. Monoclonal Antibodies as Diagnostics; an Appraisal

    OpenAIRE

    Siddiqui M

    2010-01-01

    Ever since the development of Hybridoma Technology in 1975 by Kohler and Milstein, our vision for antibodies as tools for research for prevention, detection and treatment of diseases, vaccine production, antigenic characterization of pathogens and in the study of genetic regulation of immune responses and disease susceptibility has been revolutionized. The monoclonal antibodies being directed against single epitopes are homogeneous, highly specific and can be produced in unlimited quantities....

  8. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1992-02-01

    The accurate determination of the biodistribution of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) is important for calculation of dosimetry and evaluation of pharmacokinetic variables such as antibody dose and route of administration. The hypothesis of this application is that the biodistribution of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) can be quantitatively determined using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). The major thrusts during the third year include the continued development and evaluation of improved 3D SPECT acquisition and reconstruction approaches to improve quantitative imaging of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs), and the implementation and evaluation of algorithms to register serial SPECT image data sets, or to register 3D SPECT images with 3D image data sets acquired from positron emission tomography (PEI) and magnetic resonance images (MRI). The research has involved the investigation of statistical models and iterative reconstruction algorithms that accurately account for the physical characteristics of the SPECT acquisition system. It is our belief that SPECT quantification can be improved by accurately modeling the physical processes such as attenuation, scatter, geometric collimator response, and other factors that affect the measured projection data.

  9. Guardians at the gate: Biosimilar and patent reform legislation could fundamentally change the guards for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies--Part 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, Kevin W

    2009-01-01

    Patent protection and FDA exclusivities are the two principal forms of protection available to companies that develop therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. Propo-sed changes to both forms of protection are currently being debated in the United States Congress. Specifically, Congress is presently debating both biosimilar and patent reform legislations. Although no bill has yet passed, it is expected that patent reform legislation should pass this year. It is less likely that a biosimilar bill will pass this year. However, when legislations are enacted, the changes will significantly impact the business of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies.

  10. Structural Determination of the Broadly Reactive Anti-IGHV1-69 Anti-idiotypic Antibody G6 and Its Idiotope

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuval Avnir

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The heavy chain IGHV1-69 germline gene exhibits a high level of polymorphism and shows biased use in protective antibody (Ab responses to infections and vaccines. It is also highly expressed in several B cell malignancies and autoimmune diseases. G6 is an anti-idiotypic monoclonal Ab that selectively binds to IGHV1-69 heavy chain germline gene 51p1 alleles that have been implicated in these Ab responses and disease processes. Here, we determine the co-crystal structure of humanized G6 (hG6.3 in complex with anti-influenza hemagglutinin stem-directed broadly neutralizing Ab D80. The core of the hG6.3 idiotope is a continuous string of CDR-H2 residues starting with M53 and ending with N58. G6 binding studies demonstrate the remarkable breadth of binding to 51p1 IGHV1-69 Abs with diverse CDR-H3, light chain, and antigen binding specificities. These studies detail the broad expression of the G6 cross-reactive idiotype (CRI that further define its potential role in precision medicine.

  11. Broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1: templates for a vaccine

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gils, Marit J.; Sanders, Rogier W.

    2013-01-01

    The need for an effective vaccine to prevent the global spread of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) is well recognized. Passive immunization and challenge studies in non-human primates testify that broadly neutralizing antibodies (BrNAbs) can accomplish protection against infection. In

  12. Simulation model for overloaded monoclonal antibody variants separations in ion-exchange chromatography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guélat, Bertrand; Ströhlein, Guido; Lattuada, Marco; Delegrange, Lydia; Valax, Pascal; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2012-08-31

    A model was developed for the design of a monoclonal antibody charge variants separation process based on ion-exchange chromatography. In order to account for a broad range of operating conditions in the simulations, an explicit pH and salt concentration dependence has been included in the Langmuir adsorption isotherm. The reliability of this model was tested using experimental chromatographic retention times as well as information about the structural characteristics of the different charge variants, e.g. C-terminal lysine groups and deamidated groups. Next, overloaded isocratic elutions at various pH and salt concentrations have been performed to determine the saturation capacity of the ion-exchanger. Furthermore, the column simulation model was applied for the prediction of monoclonal antibody variants separations with both pH and salt gradient elutions. A good prediction of the elution times and peak shapes was observed, even though none of the model parameters was adjusted to fit the experimental data. The trends in the separation performance obtained through the simulations were generally sufficient to identify the most promising operating conditions. The predictive column simulation model thus developed in this work, including a set of parameters determined through specific independent experiments, was experimentally validated and offers a useful basis for a rational optimization of monoclonal antibody variants separation processes on ion-exchange chromatography. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Identification of a Broadly Cross-Reactive Epitope in the Inner Shell of the Norovirus Capsid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel I Parra

    Full Text Available Noroviruses are major pathogens associated with acute gastroenteritis. They are diverse viruses, with at least six genogroups (GI-GVI and multiple genotypes defined by differences in the major capsid protein, VP1. This diversity has challenged the development of broadly cross-reactive vaccines as well as efficient detection methods. Here, we report the characterization of a broadly cross-reactive monoclonal antibody (MAb raised against the capsid protein of a GII.3 norovirus strain. The MAb reacted with VLPs and denatured VP1 protein from GI, GII, GIV and GV noroviruses, and mapped to a linear epitope located in the inner shell domain. An alignment of all available VP1 sequences showed that the putative epitope (residues 52-56 is highly conserved across the genus Norovirus. This broadly cross-reactive MAb thus constitutes a valuable reagent for the diagnosis and study of these diverse viruses.

  14. Analysis of viral clearance unit operations for monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miesegaes, George; Lute, Scott; Brorson, Kurt

    2010-06-01

    Demonstration of viral clearance is a critical step in assuring the safety of biotechnology products. We generated a viral clearance database that contains product information, unit operation process parameters, and viral clearance data from monoclonal antibody and antibody-related regulatory submissions to FDA. Here we present a broad overview of the database and resulting analyses. We report that the diversity of model viruses tested expands as products transition to late-phase. We also present averages and ranges of viral clearance results by Protein A and ion exchange chromatography steps, low pH chemical inactivation, and virus filtration, focusing on retro- and parvoviruses. For most unit operations, an average log reduction value (LRV, a measure of clearance power) for retrovirus of >4 log(10) were measured. Cases where clearance data fell outside of the anticipated range (i.e., outliers) were rationally explained. Lastly, a historical analysis did not find evidence of any improvement trend in viral clearance over time. The data collectively suggest that many unit operations in general can reliably clear viruses.

  15. Recognition of Coccidioides immitis Antigens with Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1986-09-30

    AD-A114 322 RECOGNITION OF COCCIDIOIDES IMMITIS ANTIGENS NITH 1/1 MONOCLONAL ANT ISODIESMU CALIFORNIA UNIV OAKLAND NAVAL SIOSCIENCES LAB S J KRAEGER...031 NR204-123_ 11 (1lEWnld SeuiyCasification) ([L ECOGNITIB’N OF COCCIDIQIDES IMMITIS ANTIGENS WITH MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES 12 PERSONAL A THOR(S...specificity and suitability for diagnostic use of seven 1gM monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) prepared in 1984 with c. immitis Silveira spherules and

  16. [Preparation and application of monoclonal antibodies against DR region of Na+-K+-ATPase α1 subunit].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Xiaofei; Wu, Litao; DU, Xiaojuan; Li, Jing; Zhang, Fujun; Han, Yan; Lyu, Shemin; Li, Dongmin

    2016-12-01

    Objective To prepare monoclonal antibodies against DR region (897DVEDSYGQQWTYEQR911) of Na+-K+-ATPase α1 subunit and identify their properties. Methods BALB/c mice were immunized with DR-keyholelimpet hemocyanin (KLH). Splenocytes from the immunized mice were collected and subsequently fused with SP2/0 mouse myeloma cells. Positive hybridoma clones were obtained after cell fusion and selection. ELISA was used to detect DR antibody titer in the cell supernatants. DR region-specific monoclonal antibodies were analyzed by dot blotting, Western blotting and immunofluorescence assay. Na+-K+-ATPase activity was detected by SensoLyteR FDP Protein Phosphatase Assay Kit and the protective effect of the monoclonal antibody against high glucose-induced cell injury was assessed in H9c2 cells. Results Three hybridoma cell lines which secreted stable DR monoclonal antibody were obtained. The strongest positive cell line, named DRm217, was selected to prepare ascites. Dot blotting, Western blotting and immunofluorescence assay showed that DRm217 recognized specially DR region of Na+-K+-ATPase and bound on H9c2 cell membranes. DRm217 stimulated Na+-K+-ATPase activity and alleviated high glucose-induced H9c2 cells injury. Conclusion The monoclonal antibodies against DR region of Na+-K+-ATPase α1 subunit is prepared.

  17. The Role of Monoclonal Antibodies in the Management of Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamad Cherry

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available This article will review the monoclonal antibodies more commonly used in leukemias. In the last three decades, scientists have made considerable progress understanding the structure and the functions of various surface antigens, such as CD20, CD33. The introduction of rituximab, an anti CD20 monoclonal antibody, had a great impact in the treatment of lymphoproliferative disorders. Gemtuzumab, an anti CD 33 conjugated monoclonal antibody has activity in acute mylegenous leukemia (AML. As this field is undergoing a rapid growth, the years will see an increasing use of monoclonal antibodies in hematological malignancies.

  18. The Role of Monoclonal Antibodies in the Management of Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Ameri, Ali; Cherry, Mohamad; Al-Kali, Aref; Ferrajoli, Alessandra

    2010-01-01

    This article will review the monoclonal antibodies more commonly used in leukemias. In the last three decades, scientists have made considerable progress understanding the structure and the functions of various surface antigens, such as CD20, CD33. The introduction of rituximab, an anti CD20 monoclonal antibody, had a great impact in the treatment of lymphoproliferative disorders. Gemtuzumab, an anti CD 33 conjugated monoclonal antibody has activity in acute mylegenous leukemia (AML). As this field is undergoing a rapid growth, the years will see an increasing use of monoclonal antibodies in hematological malignancies.

  19. Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and smoldering multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Robert A; San-Miguel, Jesus F; Mateos, Maria-Victoria; Rajkumar, S Vincent

    2014-10-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is characterized by an M spike less than 3 g/dL and a bone marrow containing fewer than 10% plasma cells without evidence of CRAB (hypercalcemia, renal insufficiency, anemia, or bone lesions). Light chain MGUS has an abnormal free light chain (FLC) ratio, increased level of the involved FLC, no monoclonal heavy chain, and fewer than 10% monoclonal plasma cells in the bone marrow. Smoldering multiple myeloma has an M protein of at least 3 g/dL and/or at least 10% monoclonal plasma cells in the bone marrow without CRAB features. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Memory protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Denning, Peter J.

    1988-01-01

    Accidental overwriting of files or of memory regions belonging to other programs, browsing of personal files by superusers, Trojan horses, and viruses are examples of breakdowns in workstations and personal computers that would be significantly reduced by memory protection. Memory protection is the capability of an operating system and supporting hardware to delimit segments of memory, to control whether segments can be read from or written into, and to confine accesses of a program to its segments alone. The absence of memory protection in many operating systems today is the result of a bias toward a narrow definition of performance as maximum instruction-execution rate. A broader definition, including the time to get the job done, makes clear that cost of recovery from memory interference errors reduces expected performance. The mechanisms of memory protection are well understood, powerful, efficient, and elegant. They add to performance in the broad sense without reducing instruction execution rate.

  1. Molecular basis for broad neuraminidase immunity: conserved epitopes in seasonal and pandemic H1N1 as well as H5N1 influenza viruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Hongquan; Gao, Jin; Xu, Kemin; Chen, Hongjun; Couzens, Laura K; Rivers, Katie H; Easterbrook, Judy D; Yang, Kevin; Zhong, Lei; Rajabi, Mohsen; Ye, Jianqiang; Sultana, Ishrat; Wan, Xiu-Feng; Liu, Xiufan; Perez, Daniel R; Taubenberger, Jeffery K; Eichelberger, Maryna C

    2013-08-01

    Influenza A viruses, including H1N1 and H5N1 subtypes, pose a serious threat to public health. Neuraminidase (NA)-related immunity contributes to protection against influenza virus infection. Antibodies to the N1 subtype provide protection against homologous and heterologous H1N1 as well as H5N1 virus challenge. Since neither the strain-specific nor conserved epitopes of N1 have been identified, we generated a panel of mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) that exhibit different reactivity spectra with H1N1 and H5N1 viruses and used these MAbs to map N1 antigenic domains. We identified 12 amino acids essential for MAb binding to the NA of a recent seasonal H1N1 virus, A/Brisbane/59/2007. Of these, residues 248, 249, 250, 341, and 343 are recognized by strain-specific group A MAbs, while residues 273, 338, and 339 are within conserved epitope(s), which allows cross-reactive group B MAbs to bind the NAs of seasonal H1N1 and the 1918 and 2009 pandemic (09pdm) H1N1 as well as H5N1 viruses. A single dose of group B MAbs administered prophylactically fully protected mice against lethal challenge with seasonal and 09pdm H1N1 viruses and resulted in significant protection against the highly pathogenic wild-type H5N1 virus. Another three N1 residues (at positions 396, 397, and 456) are essential for binding of cross-reactive group E MAbs, which differ from group B MAbs in that they do not bind 09pdm H1N1 viruses. The identification of conserved N1 epitopes reveals the molecular basis for NA-mediated immunity between H1N1 and H5N1 viruses and demonstrates the potential for developing broadly protective NA-specific antibody treatments for influenza.

  2. Laboratory testing for monoclonal gammopathies: Focus on monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and smoldering multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willrich, Maria A V; Murray, David L; Kyle, Robert A

    2018-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathies (MG) are defined by increased proliferation of clonal plasma cells, resulting in a detectable abnormality called monoclonal component or M-protein. Detection of the M-protein as either narrow peaks on protein electrophoresis and discrete bands on immunofixation is the defining feature of MG. MG are classified as low-tumor burden disorders, pre-malignancies and malignancies. Since significant disease can be present at any level, several different tests are employed in order to encompass the inherent diverse nature of the M-proteins. In this review, we discuss the main characteristics and limitations of clinical assays to detect M-proteins: protein electrophoresis, immunofixation, immunoglobulin quantitation, serum free light chains and heavy-light chain assays, as well as the newly developed MALDI-TOF mass spectrometric methods. In addition, the definitions of the pre-malignancies monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) and smoldering multiple myeloma (SMM), as well as monoclonal gammopathy of renal significance (MGRS) are presented in the context of the 2014 international guidelines for definition of myeloma requiring treatment, and the role of the laboratory in test selection for screening and monitoring these conditions is highlighted. Copyright © 2017 The Canadian Society of Clinical Chemists. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Nuclear oncology with monoclonal antibodies and peptides

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosono, Makoto [Saitama Medical School, Kawagoe (Japan). Saitama Medical Center

    1998-10-01

    Imaging and therapy using radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies have proved useful in many clinical studies. However, immunogenicity of mouse antibodies to human and insufficient tumor-to-normal tissue ratios remained to be solved. Chimerization and humanization by genetic engineering, and multistep targeting techniques have enabled lower immunogenicity and higher tumor-to-normal tissue contrast. Peptides like somatostatin-analogs have been reportedly useful in imaging tumors, which are either somatostatin receptor positive or negative. Elevated normal tissue accumulation of radiolabeled peptides is a drawback in aiming internal radiation therapy. (author). 51 refs.

  4. Monoclonal Antibodies for Relapsing Multiple Sclerosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blinkenberg, Morten; Soelberg Sørensen, Per

    2017-01-01

    leading to chronic central nervous system (CNS) demyelination, neural loss, and, finally, neurological disability. Although a number of disease-modifying treatments are available for the treatment of the inflammatory phase of MS, there is still a need for highly efficacious therapies with an acceptable...... safety profile in order to gain therapeutic control early in the disease course. Monoclonal antibodies have proven to be some of the most efficacious disease-modifying therapies in the field of MS, and recent developments in clinical research hold promise for new compounds fulfilling the need...

  5. Production of Monoclonal Antibody against Human Nestin

    OpenAIRE

    Hadavi, Reza; Zarnani, Amir Hassan; Ahmadvand, Negah; Mahmoudi, Ahmad Reza; Bayat, Ali Ahmad; Mahmoudian, Jafar; Sadeghi, Mohammad-Reza; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Akhondi, Mohammad Mehdi; Tarahomi, Majid; Jeddi-Tehrani, Mahmood; Rabbani, Hodjattallah

    2010-01-01

    We have employed a peptide-based antibody generation protocol for producing antibody against human nestin. Using a 12-mer synthetic peptide from repetitive region of human nestin protein devoid of any N- or O-glyco-sylation sequences, we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody capable of recognizing human, mouse, bovine, and rat nestin. A wide variety of nestin proteins ranging from 140?250 kDa was detected by this antibody. This antibody is highly specific and functional in applications such a...

  6. Vaccine and Monoclonal Antibody That Enhance Mouse Resistance to Candidiasis ▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Hong; Cutler, Jim E.

    2011-01-01

    Previously we showed that antibodies specific for the glycan β-1,2-mannotriose [β-(Man)3] on the cell surface of Candida albicans protect mice against disseminated candidiasis (H. Xin, S. Dziadek, D. R. Bundle, and J. E. Cutler, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 105:13526–13531, 2008). Furthermore, six 14-mer peptides that are within the N-terminal portion of C. albicans wall proteins were conjugated to the glycan in an attempt to create immunogenic glycopeptide conjugates. By a dendritic cell (DC)-based immunization approach, all were immunogenic and three of the six conjugates induced a high degree of protection in mice. Interestingly, whereas all six peptides induced antibody responses when used alone to pulse DCs for subsequent immunizations, three peptides induced protection, and one in particular, peptide Fba (derived from fructose-bisphosphate aldolase), induced robust protective responses and is the focus of the current work. Fba peptide is not restricted by the major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC-II), as it induced anti-Fba antibodies in mice of different H-2 haplotypes and in rabbits. Furthermore, the peptide induced protection against disease caused by different C. albicans strains. Partial protection was achieved when alum was used in place of DCs for Fba immunizations. The passive transfer of immune sera from Fba-vaccinated mice, but not immune serum preabsorbed with fungal cells, conferred protection in naïve mice. This result, along with our finding that a monoclonal antibody specific for the peptide, E2-9 (IgM), protected mice against candidiasis, provide strong evidence that antibodies contribute to protection. Our work demonstrates the utility of cell wall peptides alone or as glycopeptides in vaccines designed for the induction of immunity against candidiasis and monoclonal antibodies as a rapid immunoprotective approach against the disease. PMID:21832099

  7. Emerging monoclonal antibodies against Clostridium difficile infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Péchiné, Séverine; Janoir, Claire; Collignon, Anne

    2017-04-01

    Clostridium difficile infections are characterized by a high recurrence rate despite antibiotic treatments and there is an urgent need to develop new treatments such as fecal transplantation and immonotherapy. Besides active immunotherapy with vaccines, passive immunotherapy has shown promise, especially with monoclonal antibodies. Areas covered: Herein, the authors review the different assays performed with monoclonal antibodies against C. difficile toxins and surface proteins to treat or prevent primary or recurrent episodes of C. difficile infection in animal models and in clinical trials as well. Notably, the authors lay emphasis on the phase III clinical trial (MODIFY II), which allowed bezlotoxumab to be approved by the Food and Drug Administration and the European Medicines Agency. They also review new strategies for producing single domain antibodies and nanobodies against C. difficile and new approaches to deliver them in the digestive tract. Expert opinion: Only two human Mabs against TcdA and TcdB have been tested alone or in combination in clinical trials. However, many animal model studies have provided rationale for the use of Mabs and nanobodies in C. difficile infection and pave the way for further clinical investigation.

  8. Monoclonal gammopathy missed by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schild, Christof; Egger, Florence; Kaelin-Lang, Alain; Nuoffer, Jean-Marc

    2011-07-01

    Serum protein electrophoresis is used as a screening test for monoclonal gammopathies. Here, we present a case of a high-concentration monoclonal immunoglobulin (M-protein) that was missed by serum protein electrophoresis on a Capillarys 2 capillary zone electrophoresis system. The aim of our study was to identify the reason for the failure of the system to detect the M-protein. M-protein solubility was examined in response to temperature, pH, ionic strength, the chaotropic agent urea and the reducing agent 2-mercaptoethanol. Precipitation of the M-protein was not cold-induced, but solubility decreased at pH 8.5 or higher, when the pH approached the apparent isoelectric point. The M-protein also precipitated in alkaline Capillarys 2 electrophoresis buffer (pH 10), which was the reason for the false-negative electrophoresis result. Precipitation of the M-protein was not related to the ionic strength of the buffer. Solubility improved in presence of urea. Pre-treatment of serum with 2-mercaptoethanol revealed the missing M-protein peak of 36 g/L on the electropherogram. This case shows that insolubility of M-proteins in alkaline buffer is one possible cause of false-negative results on capillary zone electrophoresis systems. False-negative results should be considered, especially when accompanying laboratory results are inconsistent with the electropherogram.

  9. Aggregates in monoclonal antibody manufacturing processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vázquez-Rey, María; Lang, Dietmar A

    2011-07-01

    Monoclonal antibodies have proved to be a highly successful class of therapeutic products. Large-scale manufacturing of pharmaceutical antibodies is a complex activity that requires considerable effort in both process and analytical development. If a therapeutic protein cannot be stabilized adequately, it will lose partially or totally its therapeutic properties or even cause immunogenic reactions thus potentially further endangering the patients' health. The phenomenon of protein aggregation is a common issue that compromises the quality, safety, and efficacy of antibodies and can happen at different steps of the manufacturing process, including fermentation, purification, final formulation, and storage. Aggregate levels in drug substance and final drug product are a key factor when assessing quality attributes of the molecule, since aggregation might impact biological activity of the biopharmaceutical. In this review it is analyzed how aggregates are formed during monoclonal antibody industrial production, why they have to be removed and the manufacturing process steps that are designed to either minimize or remove aggregates in the final product. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Crossreactivity of boar sperm monoclonal antibodies with human ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Monoclonal antibodies against the head (H mabs) and tail (Tmabs) of boar spermatozoa were produced. Spermatozoa from boar, stallion, bull, human, ram, goat and rabbit were independently incubated with the monoclonal antibodies and later stained by immunofluorescence method. There were positive reactions of the ...

  11. Monoclonal antibodies and method for detecting dioxins and dibenzofurans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanderlaan, Martin; Stanker, Larry H.; Watkins, Bruce E.; Bailey, Nina R.

    1989-01-01

    Compositions of matter are described which include five monoclonal antibodies that react with dioxins and dibenzofurans, and the five hybridomas that produce these monoclonal antibodies. In addition, a method for the use of these antibodies in a sensitive immunoassay for dioxins and dibenzofurans is given, which permits detection of these pollutants in samples at concentrations in the range of a few parts per billion.

  12. Monoclonal Antibodies Specific for Hippurate Hydrolase of Campylobacter jejuni

    OpenAIRE

    Steele, Marina; Gyles, Carlton; Chan, Voon Loong; Odumeru, Joseph

    2002-01-01

    Eleven monoclonal antibodies raised against recombinant Campylobacter jejuni hippurate hydrolase were tested for binding to lysates from 19 C. jejuni strains, 12 other Campylobacter strains, and 21 non-Campylobacter strains. Several monoclonal antibodies bound to C. jejuni but not to other Campylobacter species and may be useful in a species-specific immunoassay.

  13. Monoclonal antibodies: A review of therapeutic applications and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The increasing demand for monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) used for diagnostic and therapeutic applications has led to the development of large scale manufacturing processes, with improvements in production achieved through continuous optimization of the inherent systems. The number of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) ...

  14. Monoclonal antibodies in immunodiagnostic assays: a review of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have proven to be effective biological reagents in the immunodiagnostic assays. This is due to their binding accuracy to many pathogens, thus, making them valuable research tools. Since the discovery of hybridoma technology by Kohler and Milstein, the use of monoclonal antibodies ...

  15. A monoclonal blocking ELISA to detect chicken anaemia virus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To provide a rapid, easy and economical method for detecting antibodies to chicken anaemia virus (CAV) especially in large numbers of chicken sera, we established a monoclonal blocking enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (MBE). A monoclonal antibody (MAb), 2A9, directed against the 52 kDa protein of the ...

  16. New monoclonal antibodies on the horizon in multiple myeloma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Donnell, Elizabeth K; Raje, Noopur S

    2017-02-01

    Across all cancers, monoclonal antibodies have emerged as a potential strategy for cancer therapy. Monoclonal antibodies target antigens expressed on the surface of cancer cells and accessory cells. This targeted approach uses the host's immune system to promote the killing of cancer cells. Multiple myeloma (MM) is the second most common hematologic malignancy that remains incurable in the majority of patients. The treatment of MM has evolved dramatically over the past decade and continues to evolve with the approval of four new drugs in 2015. Most recently the United States Food and Drug Administration (US FDA) approved two monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of this disease. Monoclonal antibodies are generally well-tolerated and offer a novel method of action for treated relapsed and refractory disease and are now being studied in the upfront setting. In this article, we review the evidence for the existing approved monoclonal antibodies and discuss promising targeted therapies and innovative strategies for the treatment of MM.

  17. Generation and testing anti-influenza human monoclonal antibodies in a new humanized mouse model (DRAGA: HLA-A2. HLA-DR4. Rag1 KO. IL-2Rγc KO. NOD).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Mirian; Ballesteros, Angela; Qi, Qiu; Sang, Luis Pow; Shashikumar, Soumya; Casares, Sofia; Brumeanu, Teodor-D

    2017-11-14

    Pandemic outbreaks of influenza type A viruses have resulted in numerous fatalities around the globe. Since the conventional influenza vaccines (CIV) provide less than 20% protection for individuals with weak immune system, it has been considered that broadly cross-neutralizing antibodies may provide a better protection. Herein, we showed that a recently generated humanized mouse (DRAGA mouse; HLA-A2. HLA-DR4. Rag1KO. IL-2Rγc KO. NOD) that lacks the murine immune system and expresses a functional human immune system can be used to generate cross-reactive, human anti-influenza monoclonal antibodies (hu-mAb). DRAGA mouse was also found to be suitable for influenza virus infection, as it can clear a sub-lethal infection and sustain a lethal infection with PR8/A/34 influenza virus. The hu-mAbs were designed for targeting a human B-cell epitope (180WGIHHPPNSKEQ QNLY195) of hemagglutinin (HA) envelope protein of PR8/A/34 (H1N1) virus with high homology among seven influenza type A viruses. A single administration of HA180-195 specific hu-mAb in PR8-infected DRAGA mice significantly delayed the lethality by reducing the lung damage. The results demonstrated that DRAGA mouse is a suitable tool to (i) generate heterotype cross-reactive, anti-influenza human monoclonal antibodies, (ii) serve as a humanized mouse model for influenza infection, and (iii) assess the efficacy of anti-influenza antibody-based therapeutics for human use.

  18. Induction and characterization of monoclonal anti-idiotypic antibodies reactive with idiotopes of canine parvovirus neutralizing monoclonal antibodies.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus); J. van Es (Johan); G.A. Drost; F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1991-01-01

    textabstractMonoclonal anti-idiotypic (anti-Id) antibodies (Ab2) were generated against idiotypes (Id) of canine parvovirus (CPV) specific monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs). The binding of most of these anti-Id antibodies to their corresponding Id could be inhibited by antigen, thus classifying these

  19. Guardians at the gate: Biosimilar and patent reform legislation could fundamentally change the guards for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies—Part 2

    OpenAIRE

    McCabe, Kevin W.

    2009-01-01

    Patent protection and FDA exclusivities are the two principal forms of protection available to companies that develop therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. Propo-sed changes to both forms of protection are currently being debated in the United States Congress. Specifically, Congress is presently debating both biosimilar and patent reform legislations. Although no bill has yet passed, it is expected that patent reform legislation should pass this year. It is less likely that a biosimilar bill wil...

  20. Immunohistochemical diagnosis of fusariosis with monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, H.E.; Aalbæk, B.; Jungersen, Gregers

    for fusariosis. A panel of newly developed Mabs for immunohistochemical diagnosis of fusariosis was screened for specificity on experimentally infected laboratory animal tissue and on skin tissue biopsies from two neutropenic patients with Fusarium sepsis. Methods: Somatic antigens were made from F. solani (CBS...... for establishing an accurate diagnosis. Although molecular techniques (e.g. in situ hybridization and PCR) have been explored for diagnostic use, the development of specific monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) for immunohistochemical identification of Fusarium spp. will extend the availability of diagnostic options...... containing homologous (fusariosis) and heterologous (aspergillosis, candidosis, and scedosporidiosis) fungal elements. Tissue reactive Mabs were then tested on skin biopsies from two patients with fusariosis sepsis with dissemination to the skin In the patients, a diagnosis of fusariosis-sepsis had been...

  1. Phase Separation in Solutions of Monoclonal Antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benedek, George; Wang, Ying; Lomakin, Aleksey; Latypov, Ramil

    2012-02-01

    We report the observation of liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) in a solution of humanized monoclonal antibodies, IgG2, and the effects of human serum albumin, a major blood protein, on this phase separation. We find a significant reduction of phase separation temperature in the presence of albumin, and a preferential partitioning of the albumin into the antibody-rich phase. We provide a general thermodynamic analysis of the antibody-albumin mixture phase diagram and relate its features to the magnitude of the effective inter-protein interactions. Our analysis suggests that additives (HSA in this report), which have moderate attraction with antibody molecules, may be used to forestall undesirable protein condensation in antibody solutions. Our findings are relevant to understanding the stability of pharmaceutical solutions of antibodies and the mechanisms of cryoglobulinemia.

  2. SPECT assay of radiolabeled monoclonal antibodies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jaszczak, R.J.

    1992-02-01

    The long-term goal of this research project is to develop methods to improve the utility of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECI) to quantify the biodistribution of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) labeled with clinically relevant radionuclides ({sup 123}I, {sup 131}I, and {sup 111}In) and with another radionuclide,{sup 211}At, recently used in therapy. We describe here our progress in developing quantitative SPECT methodology for {sup 111}In and {sup 123}I. We have focused our recent research thrusts on the following aspects of SPECT: (1) The development of improved SPECT hardware, such as improved acquisition geometries. (2) The development of better reconstruction methods that provide accurate compensation for the physical factors that affect SPECT quantification. (3) The application of carefully designed simulations and experiments to validate our hardware and software approaches.

  3. Novel monoclonal treatments in severe asthma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meteran, Howraman; Meteran, Hanieh; Porsbjerg, Celeste

    2017-01-01

    AIM: To provide a general overview of the current biological treatments and discuss their potential anti-asthmatic effects. DATA SOURCES: We reviewed articles in PubMed found using the search words "Asthma/therapy AND antibodies, monoclonal/therapeutic use AND cytokines." STUDY SELECTIONS: Only...... articles published in English since 2000 were considered. The search identified 29 studies; 8 additional studies were found by hand search, generating 37 studies. RESULTS: Of the 37 studies investigating biological treatments of asthma, 5 were on the effects of anti-IgE (omalizumab); 12 on anti-IL-5; 8...... TSLP, IL-9, and TNF-α lacked convincing effectiveness. CONCLUSION: Research on the biological treatment of asthma shows promising results. While anti-IgE (omalizumab) has been used in the treatment of asthma for some years, anti-IL-5 has recently been approved for use. The efficacy of results of other...

  4. Polineuropatia, Hepatoesplenomegalia, Gamapatia monoclonal e Plasmocitoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Pessuti

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Homem, 70 anos, com diagnóstico prévio de hipotireoidismo é internado para investigação de quadro clínico de perda de peso significativa (25 Kg em um ano associada a parestesia bilateral e simétrica em pés, que evoluiu após quatro meses para paresia em membros inferiores e superiores, e posteriormente para fraqueza muscular em membros inferiores nos dois meses seguintes. Durante a internação foram realizados exames laboratoriais e tomografia computadorizada (TC de tórax e abdome que gamapatia monoclonal, plasmocitoma em parede torácica direita, hepatomegalia, esplenomegalia, ascite e derrame pleural à direita, assim como pela polineuropatia periférica e perda de peso.

  5. Monoclonal antibodies to Mycoplasma gallisepticum membrane proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czifra, G; Tuboly, T; Sundquist, B G; Stipkovits, L

    1993-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were prepared to study the immunogenesis of Mycoplasma gallisepticum. Balb/c mice were immunized with M. gallisepticum immunostimulating complexes and the supernatant of heterokaryotes screened with M. gallisepticum and closely related M. synoviae as antigens in indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. All selected MAbs proved to be M. gallisepticum species-specific when they were tested against 10 different avian Mycoplasma species. After immunoblotting analysis, five polypeptides were identified with estimated molecular weights of 110,000, 66,000, 64,000, 56,000, and 50,000. Cell membrane localization of the recognized polypeptides was studied by immunoelectron microscopy. None of the MAbs inhibited the hemagglutinating activity of freshly prepared M. gallisepticum. However, one MAb (B3) specific for p56 agglutinated the stained M. gallisepticum antigen in the slide agglutination test. Results seemed to correlate with published information on the protein composition and agglutinating activity of Mycoplasma gallisepticum.

  6. Isolation and characterization of broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies to the e1 glycoprotein of hepatitis C virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meunier, Jean-Christophe; Russell, Rodney S.; Goossens, Vera

    2008-01-01

    The relative importance of humoral and cellular immunity in the prevention or clearance of hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is poorly understood. However, there is considerable evidence that neutralizing antibodies are involved in disease control. Here we describe the detailed analysis of human...

  7. 9G4 autoreactivity is increased in HIV-infected patients and correlates with HIV broadly neutralizing serum activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James J Kobie

    Full Text Available The induction of a broadly neutralizing antibody (BNAb response against HIV-1 would be a desirable feature of a protective vaccine. Vaccine strategies thus far have failed to elicit broadly neutralizing antibody responses; however a minority of HIV-infected patients do develop circulating BNAbs, from which several potent broadly neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs have been isolated. The findings that several BNmAbs exhibit autoreactivity and that autoreactive serum antibodies are observed in some HIV patients have advanced the possibility that enforcement of self-tolerance may contribute to the rarity of BNAbs. To examine the possible breakdown of tolerance in HIV patients, we utilized the 9G4 anti-idiotype antibody system, enabling resolution of both autoreactive VH4-34 gene-expressing B cells and serum antibodies. Compared with healthy controls, HIV patients had significantly elevated 9G4+ serum IgG antibody concentrations and frequencies of 9G4+ B cells, a finding characteristic of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE patients, both of which positively correlated with HIV viral load. Compared to the global 9G4-IgD--memory B cell population, the 9G4+IgD--memory fraction in HIV patients was dominated by isotype switched IgG+ B cells, but had a more prominent bias toward "IgM only" memory. HIV envelope reactivity was observed both in the 9G4+ serum antibody and 9G4+ B cell population. 9G4+ IgG serum antibody levels positively correlated (r = 0.403, p = 0.0019 with the serum HIV BNAbs. Interestingly, other serum autoantibodies commonly found in SLE (anti-dsDNA, ANA, anti-CL did not correlate with serum HIV BNAbs. 9G4-associated autoreactivity is preferentially expanded in chronic HIV infection as compared to other SLE autoreactivities. Therefore, the 9G4 system provides an effective tool to examine autoreactivity in HIV patients. Our results suggest that the development of HIV BNAbs is not merely a consequence of a general breakdown in

  8. Comprehensive Mapping Antigenic Epitopes of NS1 Protein of Japanese Encephalitis Virus with Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong-Hong Hua

    Full Text Available Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV non-structural protein 1 (NS1 contributes to virus replication and elicits protective immune responses during infection. JEV NS1-specific antibody responses could be a target in the differential diagnosis of different flavivirus infections. However, the epitopes on JEV NS1 are poorly characterized. The present study describes the full mapping of linear B-cell epitopes in JEV NS1. We generated eleven NS1-specific monoclonal antibodies from mice immunized with recombinant NS1. For epitope mapping of monoclonal antibodies, a set of 51 partially-overlapping peptides covering the entire NS1 protein were expressed with a GST-tag and then screened using monoclonal antibodies. Through enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, five linear epitope-containing peptides were identified. By sequentially removing amino acid residues from the carboxy and amino terminal of peptides, the minimal units of the five linear epitopes were identified and confirmed using monoclonal antibodies. Five linear epitopes are located in amino acids residues (5AIDITRK(11, (72RDELNVL(78, (251KSKHNRREGY(260, (269DENGIVLD(276, and (341DETTLVRS(348. Furthermore, it was found that the epitopes are highly conserved among JEV strains through sequence alignment. Notably, none of the homologous regions on NS1 proteins from other flaviviruses reacted with the MAbs when they were tested for cross-reactivity, and all five epitope peptides were not recognized by sera against West Nile virus or Dengue virus. These novel virus-specific linear B-cell epitopes of JEV NS1 would benefit the development of new vaccines and diagnostic assays.

  9. [The broad bean's syndrome in ancient Egypt].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, D

    1989-01-01

    The problem of broad bean's syndrome and lathyrism in ancient Greece has been deeply studied, with particular referrement to the hypothetic medica and mystical reasons of the Pythagoric order not to eat broad beans. It is impossible to prove Egyptian influence of Phythagora's precept, but we can, however, consider the hypothesis that they had noticed the potential deadly effect of broad beans' use, too, and wonder if their interduction had the same motivations.

  10. Enhancing antibody patent protection using epitope mapping information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Xiaoxiang; Storz, Ulrich; Doranz, Benjamin J

    2017-11-09

    As the $100B therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb) market continues to grow, developers of therapeutic mAbs increasingly face the need to strengthen patent protection of their products and enforce their patents in courts. In view of changes in the patent law landscape, patent applications are strategically using information on the precise binding sites of their mAbs, i.e., the epitopes, to support patent novelty, non-obviousness, subject matter, and a tightened written description requirement for broad genus antibody claims. Epitope data can also allow freedom-to-operate for second-generation mAbs by differentiation from patented first-generation mAbs. Numerous high profile court cases, including Amgen v. Sanofi over rival mAbs that block PCSK9 activity, have been centered on epitope mapping claims, highlighting the importance of epitopes in determining broad mAb patent rights. Based on these cases, epitope mapping claims must describe a sufficiently large number of mAbs that share an epitope, and each epitope must be described at amino acid resolution. Here, we review current best practices for the use of epitope information to overcome the increasing challenges of patenting mAbs, and how the quality, conformation, and resolution of epitope residue data can influence the breadth and strength of mAb patents.

  11. Sub-Nanogram Detection of RDX Explosive by Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaeto, David O; Hutchinson, Alistair P; Nicklin, Stephen

    2015-08-01

    Polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies were raised to protein carrier molecules haptenized with RDX, a major component of many plastic explosives including Semtex. Sera from immunized mice detected RDX protein conjugates in standard ELISA. Clonally purified monoclonal antibodies had detection limits in the sub-ng/mL range for underivatized RDX in competition ELISA. The monoclonal antibodies are not dependent on the presence of taggants added during the manufacturing process, and are likely to have utility in the detection of any explosive containing RDX, or RDX contamination of environmental sites.

  12. Monoclonal gammopathy associated membranous glomerulonephritis: A rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K K Gowda

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A 40-year-old male presented with nephrotic syndrome. Light microscopic analysis of the renal biopsy showed thickening of the glomerular capillary wall. Immunofluorescence examination revealed granular deposition of monoclonal immunoglobulin (Ig G3-kappa and complement C3 along the glomerular basement membrane. Electron microscopy showed subepithelial electron dense deposits, thus confirming membranous glomerulonephritis (MGN with monoclonal gammopathy. MGN with monoclonal gammopathy is an extremely rare but distinctive entity. This patient was treated with a combination of bortezomib, thalidomide and dexamethasone and showed partial remission of his nephrotic state and dysproteinemia.

  13. Monoclonal antibodies and Fc fragments for treating solid tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eisenbeis AM

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Andrea M Eisenbeis, Stefan J GrauDepartment of Neurosurgery, University Hospital of Cologne, Cologne, GermanyAbstract: Advances in biotechnology, better understanding of pathophysiological processes, as well as the identification of an increasing number of molecular markers have facilitated the use of monoclonal antibodies and Fc fragments in various fields in medicine. In this context, a rapidly growing number of these substances have also emerged in the field of oncology. This review will summarize the currently approved monoclonal antibodies used for the treatment of solid tumors with a focus on their clinical application, biological background, and currently ongoing trials.Keywords: targeted therapy, monoclonal antibodies, cancer, biological therapy

  14. Proliferação monoclonal B CD5+ subclínica Monoclonal B CD5+ subclinical proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto P. Falcão

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available O termo proliferação monoclonal B CD5+ subclínica refere-se a um conjunto de entidades clínicas ou laboratoriais descritas em indivíduos normais (0,14%-5,5%, em familiares de pacientes com leucemia linfocítica crônica familiar (13,5% a 18% e em pacientes com linfocitose B monoclonal no sangue periférico mas com contagens Monoclonal B CD5+ subclinical proliferation is related to a group of clinical or laboratory entities described in normal subjects (0.14%-5.5%, in normal members of families with cases of familial CLL (13.5%-18% and in patients with monoclonal B lympho­cytosis with lymphocyte counts of <5 x 10(9/L and with <30% of lymphocytes in bone marrow. These three entities are now named monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis. Additionally, there are cases that fulfill the diagnostic criteria for CLL but present with stable non-progressive disease and are also named as benign monoclonal B lymphocytosis, smoldering CLL, idiopathic persistent chronic lymphocytosis, and B-monoclonal lympho­cytosis of undetermined significance.

  15. The anomalous tides near Broad Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Jason H.; Buchwald, V. T.; Huthnance, John M.

    Observations of tidal current and height, in conjunction with theoretical mathematical models are used to investigate the propagation of the tide near Broad Sound, a narrowing estuary situated on a wide section of continental shelf toward the southern end of the Great Barrier Reef. The observations indicate that the dense offshore reefs severely inhibit tidal flow, with the result that tides flood toward Broad Sound from the north and from the south, along the main lagoon. There is a local magnification of the semi-diurnal tides within Broad Sound itself. Models of flow across reefs confirm the effectiveness of dense, shallow, and broad reefs in acting as a barrier to the tide. The diffraction of tides through large gaps in the reef is modelled using conformal mapping techniques and with the inclusion of energy leakage, the diffraction model predicts magnification of the semi-diurnal tidal heights by a factor of about 4 and a phase lag of 3 h on the shelf near Broad Sound, these values being consistent with observation. The observed convergence of the tide close to, and within Broad Sound itself is consistent with the proximity of the semi-diurnal tidal period to the natural period for flow in Broad Sound, considered as a narrowing estuary. This results in further amplification, by an additional factor of about 1.5, so that the tides in Broad Sound are increased by a factor of between 5 and 6, altogether, compared with those elsewhere on the east Australian coast.

  16. Broad Prize: Do the Successes Spread?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    When the Broad Prize for Urban Education was created in 2002, billionaire philanthropist Eli Broad said he hoped the awards, in addition to rewarding high-performing school districts, would foster healthy competition; boost the prestige of urban education, long viewed as dysfunctional; and showcase best practices. Over the 10 years the prize has…

  17. Broad Academy's Growing Reach Draws Scrutiny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    Billionaire businessman Eli Broad, one of the country's most active philanthropists, founded the "Broad Superintendents Academy" in 2002 with an extraordinarily optimistic goal: Find leaders from both inside and outside education, train them, and have them occupying the superintendencies in a third of the 75 largest school districts--all in just…

  18. Broad and potent HIV-1 neutralization by a human antibody that binds the gp41-gp120 interface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Jinghe; Kang, Byong H.; Pancera, Marie; Lee, Jeong Hyun; Tong, Tommy; Feng, Yu; Imamichi, Hiromi; Georgiev, Ivelin S.; Chuang, Gwo-Yu; Druz, Aliaksandr; Doria-Rose, Nicole A.; Laub, Leo; Sliepen, Kwinten; van Gils, Marit J.; de la Peña, Alba Torrents; Derking, Ronald; Klasse, Per-Johan; Migueles, Stephen A.; Bailer, Robert T.; Alam, Munir; Pugach, Pavel; Haynes, Barton F.; Wyatt, Richard T.; Sanders, Rogier W.; Binley, James M.; Ward, Andrew B.; Mascola, John R.; Kwong, Peter D.; Connors, Mark [NIH

    2015-10-15

    The isolation of human monoclonal antibodies is providing important insights into the specificities that underlie broad neutralization of HIV-1 (reviewed in ref. 1). Here we report a broad and extremely potent HIV-specific monoclonal antibody, termed 35O22, which binds a novel HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein (Env) epitope. 35O22 neutralized 62% of 181 pseudoviruses with a half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50) <50 μg ml-1. The median IC50 of neutralized viruses was 0.033 μg ml-1, among the most potent thus far described. 35O22 did not bind monomeric forms of Env tested, but did bind the trimeric BG505 SOSIP.664. Mutagenesis and a reconstruction by negative-stain electron microscopy of the Fab in complex with trimer revealed that it bound to a conserved epitope, which stretched across gp120 and gp41. The specificity of 35O22 represents a novel site of vulnerability on HIV Env, which serum analysis indicates to be commonly elicited by natural infection. Binding to this new site of vulnerability may thus be an important complement to current monoclonal-antibody-based approaches to immunotherapies, prophylaxis and vaccine design.

  19. A monoclonal antibody toolkit for C. elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gayla Hadwiger

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antibodies are critical tools in many avenues of biological research. Though antibodies can be produced in the research laboratory setting, most research labs working with vertebrates avail themselves of the wide array of commercially available reagents. By contrast, few such reagents are available for work with model organisms. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report the production of monoclonal antibodies directed against a wide range of proteins that label specific subcellular and cellular components, and macromolecular complexes. Antibodies were made to synaptobrevin (SNB-1, a component of synaptic vesicles; to Rim (UNC-10, a protein localized to synaptic active zones; to transforming acidic coiled-coil protein (TAC-1, a component of centrosomes; to CENP-C (HCP-4, which in worms labels the entire length of their holocentric chromosomes; to ORC2 (ORC-2, a subunit of the DNA origin replication complex; to the nucleolar phosphoprotein NOPP140 (DAO-5; to the nuclear envelope protein lamin (LMN-1; to EHD1 (RME-1 a marker for recycling endosomes; to caveolin (CAV-1, a marker for caveolae; to the cytochrome P450 (CYP-33E1, a resident of the endoplasmic reticulum; to beta-1,3-glucuronyltransferase (SQV-8 that labels the Golgi; to a chaperonin (HSP-60 targeted to mitochondria; to LAMP (LMP-1, a resident protein of lysosomes; to the alpha subunit of the 20S subcomplex (PAS-7 of the 26S proteasome; to dynamin (DYN-1 and to the alpha-subunit of the adaptor complex 2 (APA-2 as markers for sites of clathrin-mediated endocytosis; to the MAGUK, protein disks large (DLG-1 and cadherin (HMR-1, both of which label adherens junctions; to a cytoskeletal linker of the ezrin-radixin-moesin family (ERM-1, which localized to apical membranes; to an ERBIN family protein (LET-413 which localizes to the basolateral membrane of epithelial cells and to an adhesion molecule (SAX-7 which localizes to the plasma membrane at cell-cell contacts. In addition to

  20. Assay for the specificity of monoclonal antibodies in crossed immunoelectrophoresis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjødt, K; Schou, C; Koch, C

    1984-01-01

    A method is described based on crossed immunoelectrophoresis of a complex antigen mixture in agarose gel followed by incubation of the gel with the monoclonal antibody. The bound monoclonal antibody is detected by the use of a secondary enzyme-labelled antibody. Using this technique we have been...... able to identify the precipitate arc in crossed immunoelectrophoresis of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules in a mixture of all detergent solubilized cell membrane molecules by means of a monoclonal antibody, the specificity of which was known independently to be against MHC class...... I molecules. In other experiments using the same technique we demonstrated the reaction of a monoclonal antibody specific for chicken Ig light chains. Udgivelsesdato: 1984-Aug-3...

  1. DEVELOPMENT OF MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES AGAINST FATHEAD MINNOW (PIMEPHALES PROMELAS) VITELLOGENIN

    Science.gov (United States)

    We have obtained a panel of monoclonal antibodies directed against fathead minnow vitellogenin (Vtg) for use in sensitive ELISAs to quantify the response of exposure in vivo to estrogen or estrogen mimics.

  2. New monoclonal antibodies on the horizon in multiple myeloma

    OpenAIRE

    O’Donnell, Elizabeth K.; Raje, Noopur S.

    2016-01-01

    Across all cancers, monoclonal antibodies have emerged as a potential strategy for cancer therapy. Monoclonal antibodies target antigens expressed on the surface of cancer cells and accessory cells. This targeted approach uses the host’s immune system to promote the killing of cancer cells. Multiple myeloma (MM) is the second most common hematologic malignancy that remains incurable in the majority of patients. The treatment of MM has evolved dramatically over the past decade and continues to...

  3. Monoclonal Antibodies for Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriella Moroni

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A number of monoclonal antibodies (mAb are now under investigation in clinical trials to assess their potential role in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus (SLE. The most frequently used mAb is rituximab, which is directed against CD20, a membrane protein expressed on B lymphocytes. Uncontrolled trials reported an improvement of SLE activity in non-renal patients and other studies even reported an improvement of severe lupus nephritis unresponsive to conventional treatments. However two randomized trials failed to show the superiority of rituximab over conventional treatment in non renal SLE and in lupus nephritis. Preliminary trials reported promising results with epratuzumab, a humanized mAb directed against CD22, and with belimumab, a human mAb that specifically recognizes and inhibits the biological activity of BLyS a cytokine of the tumornecrosis-factor (TNF ligand superfamily. Other clinical trials with mAb directed against TNF-alpha, interleukin-10 (Il-10, Il-6, CD154, CD40 ligand, IL-18 or complement component C5 are under way. At present, however, in spite of good results reported by some studies, no firm conclusion on the risk-benefit profile of these mAbs in patients with SLE can be drawn from the available studies.

  4. Monoclonal antibodies therapies for ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leone Roberti Maggiore, Umberto; Bellati, Filippo; Ruscito, Ilary; Gasparri, Maria Luisa; Alessandri, Franco; Venturini, Pier Luigi; Ferrero, Simone

    2013-05-01

    Despite aggressive debulking surgery, intraperitoneal therapies and the use of new drugs for chemotherapy, patients with ovarian cancer (OC) still have poor prognosis and, therefore, new strategies for its management are needed. Molecular-targeted agents can be considered a new option in drug research. Several antigens related to OC have been isolated and they could be potential target of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs); therefore, different mAbs have been developed and are emerging as new potential OC treatments. This article aims to review the literature on the use of mAbs in the treatment of OC. The purposes of this manuscript are to offer a brief explanation of the mechanisms of action of mAbs and to help readers in understanding the current role of mAbs in the treatment of OC. A deeper knowledge of the molecular biology of OC has brought new developments in targeted therapies. Among these therapies, bevacizumab demonstrated the higher clinical efficacy. Further larger trials are needed to better define the role of the other mAbs in OC treatment. There is a strong need to identify and validate robust biomarkers for a more focused patient selection and for tailoring therapies, optimizing dose and assessing response.

  5. Functional analysis of the anti-adalimumab response using patient-derived monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Schouwenburg, Pauline A; Kruithof, Simone; Votsmeier, Christian; van Schie, Karin; Hart, Margreet H; de Jong, Rob N; van Buren, Esther E L; van Ham, Marieke; Aarden, Lucien; Wolbink, Gertjan; Wouters, Diana; Rispens, Theo

    2014-12-12

    The production of antibodies to adalimumab in autoimmune patients treated with adalimumab is shown to diminish treatment efficacy. We previously showed that these antibodies are almost exclusively neutralizing, indicating a restricted response. Here, we investigated the characteristics of a panel of patient-derived monoclonal antibodies for binding to adalimumab. Single B-cells were isolated from two patients, cultured, and screened for adalimumab specificity. Analysis of variable region sequences of 16 clones suggests that the immune response against adalimumab is broad, involving multiple B-cell clones each using different combinations of V(D)J segments. A strong bias for replacement mutations in the complementarity determining regions was found, indicating an antigen-driven response. We recombinantly expressed 11 different monoclonal antibodies and investigated their affinity and specificity. All clones except one are of high affinity (Kd between 0.6 and 233 pm) and compete with TNF as well as each other for binding to adalimumab. However, binding to a panel of single-point mutants of adalimumab indicates markedly different fine specificities that also result in a differential tendency of each clone to form dimeric and multimeric immune complexes. We conclude that although all anti-adalimumab antibodies compete for binding to TNF, the response is clonally diverse and involves multiple epitopes on adalimumab. These results are important for understanding the relationship between self and non-self or idiotypic determinants on therapeutic antibodies and their potential immunogenicity. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  6. Prophylactic and therapeutic activity of fully human monoclonal antibodies directed against Influenza A M2 protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gwerder Myriam

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Influenza virus infection is a prevalent disease in humans. Antibodies against hemagglutinin have been shown to prevent infection and hence hemagglutinin is the major constituent of current vaccines. Antibodies directed against the highly conserved extracellular domain of M2 have also been shown to mediate protection against Influenza A infection in various animal models. Active vaccination is generally considered the best approach to combat viral diseases. However, passive immunization is an attractive alternative, particularly in acutely exposed or immune compromized individuals, young children and the elderly. We recently described a novel method for the rapid isolation of natural human antibodies by mammalian cell display. Here we used this approach to isolate human monoclonal antibodies directed against the highly conserved extracellular domain of the Influenza A M2 protein. The identified antibodies bound M2 peptide with high affinities, recognized native cell-surface expressed M2 and protected mice from a lethal influenza virus challenge. Moreover, therapeutic treatment up to 2 days after infection was effective, suggesting that M2-specific monoclonals have a great potential as immunotherapeutic agents against Influenza infection.

  7. Molecular evolution of broadly neutralizing Llama antibodies to the CD4-binding site of HIV-1.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura E McCoy

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available To date, no immunization of humans or animals has elicited broadly neutralizing sera able to prevent HIV-1 transmission; however, elicitation of broad and potent heavy chain only antibodies (HCAb has previously been reported in llamas. In this study, the anti-HIV immune responses in immunized llamas were studied via deep sequencing analysis using broadly neutralizing monoclonal HCAbs as a guides. Distinct neutralizing antibody lineages were identified in each animal, including two defined by novel antibodies (as variable regions called VHH identified by robotic screening of over 6000 clones. The combined application of five VHH against viruses from clades A, B, C and CRF_AG resulted in neutralization as potent as any of the VHH individually and a predicted 100% coverage with a median IC50 of 0.17 µg/ml for the panel of 60 viruses tested. Molecular analysis of the VHH repertoires of two sets of immunized animals showed that each neutralizing lineage was only observed following immunization, demonstrating that they were elicited de novo. Our results show that immunization can induce potent and broadly neutralizing antibodies in llamas with features similar to human antibodies and provide a framework to analyze the effectiveness of immunization protocols.

  8. Measuring Prevention More Broadly, An Empirical...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Measuring Prevention More Broadly, An Empirical Assessment of CHIPRA Core Measures Differences in CHIP design and structure, across states and over time, may limit...

  9. Antibodies in infectious diseases: polyclonals, monoclonals and niche biotechnology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Jody D; Gaudet, Ryan G

    2011-09-01

    Antibody preparations have a long history of providing protection from infectious diseases. Although antibodies remain the only natural host-derived defense mechanism capable of completely preventing infection, as products, they compete against inexpensive therapeutics such as antibiotics, small molecule inhibitors and active vaccines. The continued discovery in the monoclonal antibody (mAb) field of leads with broadened cross neutralization of viruses and demonstrable synergy of antibody with antibiotics for bacterial diseases, clearly show that innovation remains. The commercial success of mAbs in chronic disease has not been paralleled in infectious diseases for several reasons. Infectious disease immunotherapeutics are limited in scope as endemic diseases necessitate active vaccine development. Also, the complexity of these small markets draws the interest of niche companies rather than big pharmaceutical corporations. Lastly, the cost of goods for mAb therapeutics is inherently high for infectious agents due to the need for antibody cocktails, which better mimic polyclonal immunoglobulin preparations and prevent antigenic escape. In cases where vaccine or convalescent populations are available, current polyclonal hyperimmune immunoglobulin preparations (pIgG), with modern and highly efficient purification technology and standardized assays for potency, can make economic sense. Recent innovations to broaden the potency of mAb therapies, while reducing cost of production, are discussed herein. On the basis of centuries of effective use of Ab treatments, and with growing immunocompromised populations, the question is not whether antibodies have a bright future for infectious agents, but rather what formats are cost effective and generate safe and efficacious treatments to satisfy regulatory approval. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Automated pipeline for rapid production and screening of HIV-specific monoclonal antibodies using pichia pastoris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Kartik A; Clark, John J; Goods, Brittany A; Politano, Timothy J; Mozdzierz, Nicholas J; Zimnisky, Ross M; Leeson, Rachel L; Love, J Christopher; Love, Kerry R

    2015-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind and neutralize human pathogens have great therapeutic potential. Advances in automated screening and liquid handling have resulted in the ability to discover antigen-specific antibodies either directly from human blood or from various combinatorial libraries (phage, bacteria, or yeast). There remain, however, bottlenecks in the cloning, expression and evaluation of such lead antibodies identified in primary screens that hinder high-throughput screening. As such, "hit-to-lead identification" remains both expensive and time-consuming. By combining the advantages of overlap extension PCR (OE-PCR) and a genetically stable yet easily manipulatable microbial expression host Pichia pastoris, we have developed an automated pipeline for the rapid production and screening of full-length antigen-specific mAbs. Here, we demonstrate the speed, feasibility and cost-effectiveness of our approach by generating several broadly neutralizing antibodies against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. A Monoclonal Antibody-Based ELISA for Multiresidue Determination of Avermectins in Milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxiao Jiang

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Due to the widespread use and potential toxicity of avermectins (AVMs, multi-residue monitoring of AVMs in edible tissues, especially in milk, has become increasingly important. With the aim of developing a broad-selective immunoassay for AVMs, a broad-specific monoclonal antibody (Mab was raised. Based on this Mab, a homologous indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for the rapid detection of AVMs in milk was developed. Under the optimized conditions, the IC50 values in assay buffer were estimated to be 3.05 ng/mL for abamectin, 13.10 ng/mL for ivermectin, 38.96 ng/mL for eprinomectin, 61.00 ng/mL for doramectin, 14.38 ng/mL for emamectin benzoate. Detection capability (CCβ of the ELISA was less than 5 ng/mL and 2 ng/mL in milk samples prepared by simple dilution and solvent extraction, respectively. The optimized ELISA was used to quantify AVMs in milk samples spiked at different amounts. The mean recovery and coefficient of variation (CV were 95.90% and 15.42%, respectively. The Mab-based ELISA achieved a great improvement in AVMs detection. Results proved this broad-selective ELISA would be useful for the multi-residue determination of AVMs in milk without purification process.

  12. Novel monoclonal treatments in severe asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meteran, Howraman; Meteran, Hanieh; Porsbjerg, Celeste; Backer, Vibeke

    2017-12-01

    To provide a general overview of the current biological treatments and discuss their potential anti-asthmatic effects. We reviewed articles in PubMed found using the search words "Asthma/therapy AND antibodies, monoclonal/therapeutic use AND cytokines." Only articles published in English since 2000 were considered. The search identified 29 studies; 8 additional studies were found by hand search, generating 37 studies. Of the 37 studies investigating biological treatments of asthma, 5 were on the effects of anti-IgE (omalizumab); 12 on anti-IL-5; 8 on anti-IL-13; 5 on anti-IL-4R-α; 3 on anti-IL-9; one on TNF-α; one on anti-IL-2R-α; one on TSLP (Thymic Stromal Lymphopoietin); and one on OX40L. Sample sizes ranged from 3 to 943 participants. Studies of therapies targeting IgE, IL-2, IL4R-α, IL-5, and IL-13 showed some efficacy, whereas those targeting TSLP, IL-9, and TNF-α lacked convincing effectiveness. Research on the biological treatment of asthma shows promising results. While anti-IgE (omalizumab) has been used in the treatment of asthma for some years, anti-IL-5 has recently been approved for use. The efficacy of results of other large studies with a longer duration is needed to draw a firm conclusion. Such studies should not only focus on clinical outcomes, but also consider asthma-related quality of life. Knowledge on the asthma phenotypes and identification of biomarkers associated with these will be useful for physicians considering the right treatment for the asthma patient.

  13. Systemic sclerosis and prevalence of monoclonal immunoglobulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trad, Salim; Nosbaum, Audrey; Musset, Lucile; Ghillani-Dalbin, Pascale; Launay, David; Costedoat-Chalumeau, Nathalie; Saadoun, David; Cabane, Jean; Hachulla, Eric; Hanslik, Thomas; Frances, Camille

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to estimate the prevalence of monoclonal immunoglobulin (MIg) among patients with systemic sclerosis (SSc) according to the capillary electrophoresis or immunofixation method of detection and to search for any related clinical correlations. Retrospective multicenter comparison of capillary electrophoresis and immunofixation results in SSc patients and of the characteristics of patients with and without MIg. The study included 244 SSc patients (216 women and 28 men, mean age: 55±14 years). Median time since SSc diagnosis was 51 months [0-320]; disease was diffuse in 48% of cases. Ten percent of patients had cancer, including Waldenström macroglobulinemia (n=1) and multiple myeloma (n=3). Capillary electrophoresis showed a γ-globulin anomaly in 41% of cases, and immunofixation in 18%: MIg (13.5%) and restriction of heterogeneity (4.5%). Capillary electrophoresis failed to detect 60% of the 33 MIg patients. Measurable MIg concentrations were obtained from 7 patients. MIg patients were significantly older at SSc diagnosis than those without MIg (p=0.002), had a lower diffusing capacity (p=0.002), a higher prevalence of pulmonary hypertension and cancer (p=0.002) and were more frequently positive for anti-mitochondrial and anti-beta2-glycoprotein-I antibodies (p=0.03 and p=0.02, respectively). Multivariate analyses showed that only age at test [hazard ratio 1.03 (95% CI, 1.00-1.07, p=0.04)] and presence of cancer [hazard ratio 4.46 (95% CI, 1.6-12.4, p=0.004)] were associated with MIg. Immunofixation detected a high prevalence of MIg among SSc patients especially in patients aged 50-years or older. MIg was not detected by the standard capillary electrophoresis in 60% of cases and was significantly associated with cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Neutralizing antibody affords comparable protection against vaginal and rectal simian/human immunodeficiency virus challenge in macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moldt, Brian; Le, Khoa M; Carnathan, Diane G; Whitney, James B; Schultz, Niccole; Lewis, Mark G; Borducchi, Erica N; Smith, Kaitlin M; Mackel, Joseph J; Sweat, Shelby L; Hodges, Andrew P; Godzik, Adam; Parren, Paul W H I; Silvestri, Guido; Barouch, Dan H; Burton, Dennis R

    2016-06-19

    Passive administration of broadly neutralizing antibodies has been shown to protect against both vaginal and rectal challenge in the simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)/macaque model of HIV transmission. However, the relative efficacy of antibody against the two modes of exposure is unknown and, given differences in the composition and immunology of the two tissue compartments, this is an important gap in knowledge. To investigate the significance of the challenge route for antibody-mediated protection, we performed a comparative protection study in macaques using the highly potent human monoclonal antibody, PGT126. Animals were administered PGT126 at three different doses before challenged either vaginally or rectally with a single dose of SHIVSF163P3. Viral loads, PGT126 serum concentrations, and serum neutralizing titers were monitored. In vaginally challenged animals, sterilizing immunity was achieved in all animals administered 10 mg/kg, in two of five animals administered 2 mg/kg and in one of five animals administered 0.4 mg/kg PGT126. Comparable protection was observed for the corresponding groups challenged rectally as sterilizing immunity was achieved in three of four animals administered 10 mg/kg, in two of four animals administered 2 mg/kg and in none of four animals administered 0.4 mg/kg PGT126. Serological analysis showed similar serum concentrations of PGT126 and serum neutralization titers in animals administered the same antibody dose. Our data suggest that broadly neutralizing antibody-mediated protection is not strongly dependent on the mucosal route of challenge, which indicates that a vaccine aimed to induce a neutralizing antibody response would have broadly similar efficacy against both primary transmission routes for HIV.

  15. Engineering, Expression in Transgenic Plants and Characterisation of E559, a Rabies Virus-Neutralising Monoclonal Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dolleweerd, Craig J.; Teh, Audrey Y-H.; Banyard, Ashley C.; Both, Leonard; Lotter-Stark, Hester C. T.; Tsekoa, Tsepo; Phahladira, Baby; Shumba, Wonderful; Chakauya, Ereck; Sabeta, Claude T.; Gruber, Clemens; Fooks, Anthony R.; Chikwamba, Rachel K.; Ma, Julian K-C.

    2014-01-01

    Rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) currently comprises administration of rabies vaccine together with rabies immunoglobulin (RIG) of either equine or human origin. In the developing world, RIG preparations are expensive, often in short supply, and of variable efficacy. Therefore, we are seeking to develop a monoclonal antibody cocktail to replace RIG. Here, we describe the cloning, engineering and production in plants of a candidate monoclonal antibody (E559) for inclusion in such a cocktail. The murine constant domains of E559 were replaced with human IgG1κ constant domains and the resulting chimeric mouse-human genes were cloned into plant expression vectors for stable nuclear transformation of Nicotiana tabacum. The plant-expressed, chimeric antibody was purified and biochemically characterized, was demonstrated to neutralize rabies virus in a fluorescent antibody virus neutralization assay, and conferred protection in a hamster challenge model. PMID:24511101

  16. Monoclonal antibodies against genetically manipulated hepatitis B core antigen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlozánek, I; Korec, E; Dostálová, V; Stará, J; König, J; Bichko, V V; Seichertová, A; Gren, E J

    1987-01-01

    Four different hybridoma clones secreting anti-HBcAg antibodies were constructed by fusing cells of the mouse myeloma line SP2/0 with lymphocytes from mice immunized with bacterially produced HBcAg. The monoclonal antibodies were immunologically characterized and used for HBcAg detection by ELISA. This monoclonal-antibody-based assay was compared with ELISA based on polyclonal human anti-HBcAg IgG for sensitivity and specificity. The monoclonal antibody reacted specifically both with the bacterially produced HBcAg and HBcAg isolated from human liver, but did not react with HBeAg. The human polyclonal antibody reacted with HBcAg, but also with HBeAg.

  17. Impact of cell culture on recombinant monoclonal antibody product heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongcheng; Nowak, Christine; Shao, Mei; Ponniah, Gomathinayagam; Neill, Alyssa

    2016-09-01

    Recombinant monoclonal antibodies are commonly expressed in mammalian cell culture and purified by several steps of filtration and chromatography. The resulting high purity bulk drug substance still contains product variants differing in properties such as charge and size. Posttranslational modifications and degradations occurring during cell culture are the major sources of heterogeneity in bulk drug substance of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. The focus of the current review is the impact of cell culture conditions on the types and levels of various modifications and degradations of recombinant monoclonal antibodies. Understanding the relationship between cell culture and product variants can help to make consistently safe and efficacious products. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers Biotechnol. Prog., 32:1103-1112, 2016. © 2016 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  18. Management of Children with Hypersensitivity to Antibiotics and Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, Allison Eaddy; Broyles, Ana Dioun

    2017-11-01

    Proper management of drug allergy in children is based on a thorough history, in vitro testing (if available), in vivo testing, and drug challenge. This approach has been well developed with beta-lactam drugs but not with non-beta-lactam drugs and monoclonal antibodies. Children commonly develop rashes during an antibiotic course, which can lead to misdiagnosis of drug allergy. Clinical reactions to monoclonal antibodies vary and are managed depending on the type. A better knowledge of drug reactions that can occur in antibiotic allergy and monoclonal allergy can aid a provider in better management of their drug-allergic pediatric patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Preparation and identification of monoclonal antibodies against ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    (Hashimoto et al., 2005). HN has been found to protect neurons from AD-relevant neurotoxicity (Hashimoto et al.,. 2001b, 2001c). It can also exhibit neuroprotective activity against toxicity by familial amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. (ALS)-related mutant superoxide dismutase (Matsuoka et. *Corresponding author: E-mail: ...

  20. Generation of monoclonal antibodies to native active human glycosyltransferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vester-Christensen, Malene Bech; Bennett, Eric Paul; Clausen, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    using monoclonal antibodies therefore provides an excellent strategy to analyze the glycosylation process in cells. A major drawback has been difficulties in generating antibodies to glycosyltransferases and validating their specificities. Here we describe a simple strategy for generating...... and characterizing monoclonal antibodies to human glycosyltransferases. This strategy includes a process for recombinant production and purification of enzymes for immunization, a simple selection strategy for isolation of antibodies with optimal properties for in situ detection of enzyme expression......, and a comprehensive strategy for characterizing the fine specificity of such antibodies....

  1. Teaching the Broad, Interdisciplinary Impact of Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, David; Atlas, Pierre; Haberski, Raymond; Higgs, Jamie; Kiley, Patrick; Maxwell, Michael, Jr.; Mirola, William; Norton, Jamey

    2009-01-01

    As perhaps the most encompassing idea in biology, evolution has impacted not only science, but other academic disciplines as well. The broad, interdisciplinary impact of evolution was the theme of a course taught at Marian College, Indianapolis, Indiana in 2002, 2004, and 2006. Using a strategy that could be readily adopted at other institutions,…

  2. Giant Broad Line Regions in Dwarf Seyferts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High angular resolution spectroscopy obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has revealed a remarkable population of galaxies hosting dwarf Seyfert nuclei with an unusually large broad-line region (BLR). These objects are remarkable for two reasons. Firstly, the size of the BLR can, in some cases, rival those ...

  3. Investigation of a panel of monoclonal antibodies and polyclonal sera against anthrax toxins resulted in identification of an anti-lethal factor antibody with disease-enhancing characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulshreshtha, Parul; Tiwari, Ashutosh; Priyanka; Joon, Shikha; Sinha, Subrata; Bhatnagar, Rakesh

    2015-12-01

    Hybridomas were created using spleen of mice that were actively immunized with rLFn (recombinant N-terminal domain of lethal factor). Later on, separate group of mice were immunized with rLFn to obtain a polyclonal control for passive immunization studies of monoclonal antibodies. This led to the identification of one cohort of rLFn-immnized mice that harboured disease-enhancing polyclonal antibodies. At the same time, the monoclonal antibodies secreted by all the hybridomas were being tested. Two hybridomas secreted monoclonal antibodies (H10 and H8) that were cross-reactive with EF (edema factor) and LF (lethal factor), while the other two hybridomas secreted LF-specific antibodies (H7 and H11). Single chain variable fragment (LETscFv) was derived from H10 hybridoma. H11 was found to have disease-enhancing property. Combination of H11 with protective monoclonal antibodies (H8 and H10) reduced its disease enhancing nature. This in vitro abrogation of disease-enhancement provides the proof of concept that in polyclonal sera the disease enhancing character of a fraction of antibodies is overshadowed by the protective nature of the rest of the antibodies generated on active immunization. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  4. Use of Monoclonal Antibodies in the Sensitive Detection and Neutralization of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Luisa W; Henderson, Thomas D; Lam, Tina I; Stanker, Larry H

    2015-11-27

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNT) are some of nature's most potent toxins. Due to potential food contamination, and bioterrorism concerns, the development of detection reagents, therapeutics and countermeasures are of urgent interest. Recently, we have developed a sensitive electrochemiluminescent (ECL) immunoassay for BoNT/B, using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) MCS6-27 and anti-BoNT/B rabbit polyclonal antibodies as the capture and detector. The ECL assay detected as little as 1 pg/mL BoNT/B in the buffer matrix, surpassing the detection sensitivities of the gold standard mouse bioassays. The ECL assay also allowed detection of BoNT/B in sera matrices of up to 100% sera with negligible matrix effects. This highly-sensitive assay allowed the determination of the biological half-lives of BoNT/B holotoxin in vivo. We further tested the toxin neutralization potential of our monoclonal antibodies using the mouse systemic and oral intoxication models. A combination of mAbs protected mice in both pre- and post-exposure models to lethal doses of BoNT/B. MAbs were capable of increasing survival of animals when administered even 10 h post-intoxication in an oral model, suggesting a likely time for BoNT/B complexes to reach the blood stream. More sensitive detection assays and treatments against BoNT intoxication will greatly enhance efforts to combat botulism.

  5. Monoclonal antibodies specific to Streptococcus mutans GS-5 glucosyltransferase-C inhibit bacterial glucosyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Mi-Ah; Lee, Kyung-Yeol; Kim, Jae-Gon

    2013-10-01

    Glucosyltransferase-C (GTFC) is a virulence factor of Streptococcus mutans. Additionally, GTFC represents an essential element required for bacterial cell coherence, allowing for the formation of dental plaque, which leads to dental caries. As such, monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against S. mutans are believed to offer some protection against dental caries. In the current study, we amplified an approximately 1.5 kb fragment of the N-terminal half of the S. mutans gtfC gene by PCR, then induced expression of this gene. This protein was designated GTFCN. After the expressed protein was purified, it was used as an immunogen and injected into BALB/c mice. We selected and established two MAbs by producing hybridomas (HCN17 and HCN37). The anti-GTFCN antibody isotype was confirmed as IgG2a for HCN17 and IgG2b for HCN37. The anti-GTFCN antibody was found to specifically react with the GTFCN protein. The enzymatic activity of the crude glucosyltransferase of S. mutans GS-5 was significantly inhibited at a concentration of 350 ng of MAb/mL. These results suggest that the monoclonal anti-GTFCN antibodies could represent an alternative modality for passive immunization to prevent S. mutans aggregation and dental plaque.

  6. Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies Display Potential for Prevention of HIV-1 Infection of Mucosal Tissue Superior to That of Nonneutralizing Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheeseman, Hannah M; Olejniczak, Natalia J; Rogers, Paul M; Evans, Abbey B; King, Deborah F L; Ziprin, Paul; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F; Shattock, Robin J

    2017-01-01

    Definition of the key parameters mediating effective antibody blocking of HIV-1 acquisition within mucosal tissue may prove critical to effective vaccine development and the prophylactic use of monoclonal antibodies. Although direct antibody-mediated neutralization is highly effective against cell-free virus, antibodies targeting different sites of envelope vulnerability may display differential activity against mucosal infection. Nonneutralizing antibodies (nnAbs) may also impact mucosal transmission events through Fc-gamma receptor (FcγR)-mediated inhibition. In this study, a panel of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) and nnAbs, including those associated with protection in the RV144 vaccine trial, were screened for the ability to block HIV-1 acquisition and replication across a range of cellular and mucosal tissue models. Neutralization potency, as determined by the TZM-bl infection assay, did not fully predict activity in mucosal tissue. CD4-binding site (CD4bs)-specific bnAbs, in particular VRC01, were consistent in blocking HIV-1 infection across all cellular and tissue models. Membrane-proximal external region (MPER) (2F5) and outer domain glycan (2G12) bnAbs were also efficient in preventing infection of mucosal tissues, while the protective efficacy of bnAbs targeting V1-V2 glycans (PG9 and PG16) was more variable. In contrast, nnAbs alone and in combinations, while active in a range of cellular assays, were poorly protective against HIV-1 infection of mucosal tissues. These data suggest that tissue resident effector cell numbers and low FcγR expression may limit the potential of nnAbs to prevent establishment of the initial foci of infection. The solid protection provided by specific bnAbs clearly demonstrates their superior potential over that of nonneutralizing antibodies for preventing HIV-1 infection at the mucosal portals of infection. Key parameters mediating effective antibody blocking of HIV-1 acquisition within mucosal tissue have not

  7. Understanding the impact of different bioprocess conditions on monoclonal antibody glycosylation in CHO cell cultures through experimental and computational analyses

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Si N Sou; Christopher Sellick; Ken Lee; Alison Mason; Sarantos Kyriakopoulos; Karen M Polizzi; Cleo Kontoravdi

    2015-01-01

      Key Words: Monoclonal antibody glycosylation, stable & transient gene expression, mild hypothermia, mathematical modelling, flux balance analysis With positive outcomes from medical treatments, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs...

  8. Monoclonal antibodies in animal production : their use in diagnostics and passive immunization

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Booman, P.

    1989-01-01

    One of the landmarks in immunology was the invention and development of monoclonal antibody-secreting hybridomas by Milstein and his coworkers. The enormous promise of monoclonal antibody technology, which became apparent soon after its discovery, may explain the unusual speed with which monoclonal

  9. 75 FR 3244 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Monoclonal Antibodies Against Smallpox/Orthopoxviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-20

    ... in the following patent applications: E-145-2004/0,1,2,3,4, Purcell et al., ``Monoclonal Antibodies... limited to monoclonal antibodies against orthopoxviruses (smallpox) for use in humans. Properly filed... HUMAN SERVICES National Institutes of Health Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Monoclonal...

  10. Production of monoclonal antibodies against Mycobacterium leprae and armadillo-derived mycobacteria

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolk, A. H.; Ho, M. L.; Klatser, P. R.; Eggelte, T. A.; Portaels, F.

    1985-01-01

    Six monoclonal antibodies to Mycobacterium leprae and armadillo-derived mycobacteria were produced. The monoclonal antibodies were characterized by an immunofluorescence assay using 22 mycobacterial strains. One monoclonal antibody, F47-21-3, reacted only with M. leprae; two, F45-9 and F45-15,

  11. 78 FR 7438 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: Development of Human Monoclonal Antibodies Against DR4

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-01

    ... Human Monoclonal Antibodies Against DR4 AGENCY: National Institutes of Health, Public Health Service... Monoclonal Antibodies Against DR4'' (HHS Ref. No. E-158-2010/0) to Customized Biosciences, Inc., which is... relates to the development of two human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that bind to death receptor 4 (``DR4...

  12. Monoclonal antibodies for the detection of Puccinia striiformis urediniospores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter; Frøkiær, Hanne; Hearty, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Pst causes yellow rust disease in wheat plants leading to crop losses. The organism spreads by releasing wind-dispersed urediniospores from infected plants. In this study a library of novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) was developed against Pst urediniospores. Nine m...

  13. Palladium-109 labeled anti-melanoma monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Ferrone, S.

    1984-04-30

    The invention consists of new monoclonal antibodies labelled with Palladium 109, a beta-emitting radionuclide, the method of preparing this material, and its use in the radiotherapy of melanoma. The antibodies are chelate-conjugated and demonstrate a high uptake in melanomas. (ACR)

  14. Indium-111 labeled anti-melanoma monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, S.C.; Fawwaz, R.A.; Ferrone, S.

    1984-04-30

    A monoclonal antibody to a high molecular weight melanoma-associated antigen was chelated and radiolabeled with indium-111. This material shows high affinity for melanoma and thus can be used in the detection, localization and imaging of melanoma. 1 figure.

  15. Generation and characterization of a monoclonal antibody to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-05-24

    May 24, 2010 ... generate and characterize a monoclonal antibody to penicillic acid for the efficient detection of penicillic acid from Penicillium ... barley, oats, wheat, corn and rice, are able to produce penicillic acid with a high output and ... dissolved in hot water, ethanol, ether and chloroform but not in pentane or hexane.

  16. Generation and characterization of a monoclonal antibody to ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Penicillic acid is one of the main mycotoxins in moldy feedstuff and has toxic effect on livestock and poultry and probably humans due to food chain transmission. The objective of this study was to generate and characterize a monoclonal antibody to penicillic acid for the efficient detection of penicillic acid from Penicillium ...

  17. Production and potential use of monoclonal antibodies against polio viruses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); A.L. van Wezel; G. van Steenis (Bert); A.G. Hazendonk

    1982-01-01

    textabstractLymphocyte hybridomas secreting monoclonal antibodies against different strains of polio virus type 1, 2, or 3 have been produced. For this purpose Balb/C mice were immunized with purified and inactivated virus suspensions and their splenocytes were fused with P3X63Ag8 mouse myeloma

  18. Analysis of human chorionic gonadotropin-monoclonal antibody ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    However we observed that in a high affinity antigen-antibody system [human chorionic gonadotropin-monoclonal antibody (hCG-mAb)] dissociation is insignificant and the sensogram data cannot be used to measure the equilibrium and kinetic parameters. At low concentrations of mAb the complete sensogram could be ...

  19. MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES TO IDENTIFY TOMATO MOSAIC TOBAMOVIRUS (TOMV

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duarte Keila M.R.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies were obtained against Tomato mosaic tobamovirus (ToMV isolated in Brazil. One antibody (8G7G2 isotyped as IgG2b (kappa light chain showed strong specificity and very low cross reaction with the Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV. It can be used in identification of tomato mosaic virus (ToMV.

  20. A mouse monoclonal antibody against Alexa Fluor 647.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuethrich, Irene; Guillen, Eduardo; Ploegh, Hidde L

    2014-04-01

    Fluorophores are essential tools in molecular and cell biology. However, their application is mostly confined to the singular exploitation of their fluorescent properties. To enhance the versatility and expand the use of the fluorophore Alexa Fluor 647 (AF647), we generated a mouse monoclonal antibody against it. We demonstrate its use of AF647 for immunoblot, immunoprecipitation, and cytofluorimetry.

  1. Monoclonal antibodies in clinical diagnosis: A brief review application

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    SERVER

    2008-04-17

    Apr 17, 2008 ... Monoclonal antibodies (mAb) have been an invaluable tool that has added to our biological knowledge for over a decade. mAb are important diagnostic reagents used in biomedical research, microbiological research in diagnosis of Hepatitis, AIDs, influenza, herpes simplex, Chlamydia infections and in.

  2. Immunohistochemical diagnosis of systemic bovine zygomycosis by murine monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, H.E.; Aalbaek, B.; Lind, Peter

    1996-01-01

    Murine monoclonal antibodies (Mabs) against water-soluble somatic antigens (WSSA) and the wall fraction (WF) from Rhizopus arrhizus (Rhizopus oryzae) were produced in vitro by fusion of splenocytes from immunized BALB/c mice with mouse myeloma X63-Ag 8.653 cells. Supernatants reacting only...

  3. High throughput production of mouse monoclonal antibodies using antigen microarrays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Masi, Federico; Chiarella, P.; Wilhelm, H.

    2005-01-01

    Recent advances in proteomics research underscore the increasing need for high-affinity monoclonal antibodies, which are still generated with lengthy, low-throughput antibody production techniques. Here we present a semi-automated, high-throughput method of hybridoma generation and identification...

  4. Monoclonal antibodies for the detection of Puccinia striiformis urediniospores

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Frøkiær, Hanne; Hearty, Stephen

    2007-01-01

    The fungal pathogen Pst causes yellow rust disease in wheat plants leading to crop losses. The organism spreads by releasing wind-dispersed urediniospores from infected plants. In this study a library of novel monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) was developed against Pst urediniospores. Nine mAb-produci...

  5. Monoclonal antibodies specific for the organophosphate pesticide azinphos-methyl

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jones, WT; Harvey, D; Jones, SD; Ryan, GB; Wynberg, H; TenHoeve, W; Reynolds, PHS

    1995-01-01

    2-(2-Mercapto-5-methyl-1,3,2-dioxaphosphorinan-5-yl,2-sulphide) methoxyacetic acid has been synthesized and used to prepare an azinphos hapten and protein conjugates. Monoclonal antibodies of high affinity against the pesticide azinphos-methyl were prepared from mice immunized with the

  6. Characterization of a Type-Common Human Recombinant Monoclonal Antibody to Herpes Simplex Virus with High Therapeutic Potential

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Logu, Alessandro; Williamson, R. Anthony; Rozenshteyn, Roman; Ramiro-Ibañez, Fernando; Simpson, Cindy D.; Burton, Dennis R.; Paolo Sanna, Pietro

    1998-01-01

    We report the characterization of a type-common human recombinant monoclonal antibody previously isolated by antigen selection from a phage-displayed combinatorial antibody library established from a herpes simplex virus (HSV)-seropositive individual. Competition with well-characterized murine monoclonal antibodies and immunodetection of gD truncations revealed that this antibody recognizes the group Ib antigenic site of glycoprotein D, a highly conserved and protective type-common determinant. To our knowledge, this is the first human group Ib monoclonal antibody ever described. The antibody also displayed first-order neutralization kinetics and a high neutralization rate constant, was capable of completely inhibiting syncytium formation by a fusogenic strain of HSV type 1, and efficiently neutralized low-passage clinical isolates of both HSV serotypes. Taken together with our earlier observations of the in vivo antiviral activities of this human recombinant antibody in animal models of HSV infection, the present results support the high therapeutic potential of this antibody. PMID:9774565

  7. Parallel evaluation of broad virus detection methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modrof, Jens; Berting, Andreas; Kreil, Thomas R

    2014-01-01

    The testing for adventitious viruses is of critical importance during development and production of biological products. The recent emergence and ongoing development of broad virus detection methods calls for an evaluation of whether these methods can appropriately be implemented into current adventitious agent testing procedures. To assess the suitability of several broad virus detection methods, a comparative experimental study was conducted: four virus preparations, which were spiked at two different concentrations each into two different cell culture media, were sent to four investigators in a blinded fashion for analysis with broad virus detection methods such as polymerase chain reaction-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR-ESI/MS), microarray, and two approaches utilizing massively parallel sequencing. The results that were reported by the investigators revealed that all methods were able to identify the majority of samples correctly (mean 83%), with a surprisingly narrow range among the methods, that is, between 72% (PCR-ESI/MS) and 95% (microarray). In addition to the correct results, a variety of unexpected assignments were reported for a minority of samples, again with little variation regarding the methods used (range 20-45%), while false negatives were reported for 0-25% of the samples. Regarding assay sensitivity, the viruses were detected by all methods included in this study at concentrations of about 4-5 log10 quantitative PCR copies/mL, and probably with higher sensitivity in some cases. In summary, the broad virus detection methods investigated were shown to be suitable even for detection of relatively low virus concentrations. However, there is also some potential for the production of false-positive as well as false-negative assignments, which indicates the requirement for further improvements before these methods can be considered for routine use. © PDA, Inc. 2014.

  8. Atomization of broad specification aircraft fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skifstad, J. G.; Lefebvre, A. H.

    1980-01-01

    The atomization properties of liquid fuels for the potential use in aircraft gas turbine engines are discussed. The significance of these properties are addressed with respect to the ignition and subsequent combustion behavior of the fuel spray/air mixture. It is shown that the fuel properties which affect the atomization behavior (viscosity, surface tension, and density) are less favorable for the broad specification fuels as compared to with those for conventional fuels.

  9. Isolation and characterization of human monoclonal antibodies from individuals infected with West Nile Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throsby, Mark; Geuijen, Cecile; Goudsmit, Jaap; Bakker, Arjen Q; Korimbocus, Jehanara; Kramer, R Arjen; Clijsters-van der Horst, Marieke; de Jong, Maureen; Jongeneelen, Mandy; Thijsse, Sandra; Smit, Renate; Visser, Therese J; Bijl, Nora; Marissen, Wilfred E; Loeb, Mark; Kelvin, David J; Preiser, Wolfgang; ter Meulen, Jan; de Kruif, John

    2006-07-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) neutralizing West Nile Virus (WNV) have been shown to protect against infection in animal models and have been identified as a correlate of protection in WNV vaccine studies. In the present study, antibody repertoires from three convalescent WNV-infected patients were cloned into an scFv phage library, and 138 human MAbs binding to WNV were identified. One hundred twenty-one MAbs specifically bound to the viral envelope (E) protein and four MAbs to the premembrane (prM) protein. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay-based competitive-binding assays with representative E protein-specific MAbs demonstrated that 24/51 (47%) bound to domain II while only 4/51 (8%) targeted domain III. In vitro neutralizing activity was demonstrated for 12 MAbs, and two of these, CR4374 and CR4353, protected mice from lethal WNV challenge at 50% protective doses of 12.9 and 357 mug/kg of body weight, respectively. Our data analyzing three infected individuals suggest that the human anti-WNV repertoire after natural infection is dominated by nonneutralizing or weakly neutralizing MAbs binding to domain II of the E protein, while domain III-binding MAbs able to potently neutralize WNV in vitro and in vivo are rare.

  10. Specific Monoclonal Antibody Overcomes the Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium's Adaptive Mechanisms of Intramacrophage Survival and Replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarmistha Devi Aribam

    Full Text Available Salmonella-specific antibodies play an important role in host immunity; however, the mechanisms of Salmonella clearance by pathogen-specific antibodies remain to be completely elucidated since previous studies on antibody-mediated protection have yielded inconsistent results. These inconsistencies are at least partially attributable to the use of polyclonal antibodies against Salmonella antigens. Here, we developed a new monoclonal antibody (mAb-449 and identified its related immunogen that protected BALB/c mice from infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. In addition, these data indicate that the mAb-449 immunogen is likely a major protective antigen. Using in vitro infection studies, we also analyzed the mechanism by which mAb-449 conferred host protection. Notably, macrophages infected with mAb-449-treated S. Typhimurium showed enhanced pathogen uptake compared to counterparts infected with control IgG-treated bacteria. Moreover, these macrophages produced elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα and nitric oxide, indicating that mAb-449 enhanced macrophage activation. Finally, the number of intracellular bacteria in mAb-449-activated macrophages decreased considerably, while the opposite was found in IgG-treated controls. Based on these findings, we suggest that, although S. Typhimurium has the potential to survive and replicate within macrophages, host production of a specific antibody can effectively mediate macrophage activation for clearance of intracellular bacteria.

  11. Specific Monoclonal Antibody Overcomes the Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhimurium's Adaptive Mechanisms of Intramacrophage Survival and Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aribam, Swarmistha Devi; Harada, Tomoyuki; Elsheimer-Matulova, Marta; Iwata, Taketoshi; Kanehira, Katsushi; Hikono, Hirokazu; Matsui, Hidenori; Ogawa, Yohsuke; Shimoji, Yoshihiro; Eguchi, Masahiro

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella-specific antibodies play an important role in host immunity; however, the mechanisms of Salmonella clearance by pathogen-specific antibodies remain to be completely elucidated since previous studies on antibody-mediated protection have yielded inconsistent results. These inconsistencies are at least partially attributable to the use of polyclonal antibodies against Salmonella antigens. Here, we developed a new monoclonal antibody (mAb)-449 and identified its related immunogen that protected BALB/c mice from infection with Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. In addition, these data indicate that the mAb-449 immunogen is likely a major protective antigen. Using in vitro infection studies, we also analyzed the mechanism by which mAb-449 conferred host protection. Notably, macrophages infected with mAb-449-treated S. Typhimurium showed enhanced pathogen uptake compared to counterparts infected with control IgG-treated bacteria. Moreover, these macrophages produced elevated levels of pro-inflammatory cytokine TNFα and nitric oxide, indicating that mAb-449 enhanced macrophage activation. Finally, the number of intracellular bacteria in mAb-449-activated macrophages decreased considerably, while the opposite was found in IgG-treated controls. Based on these findings, we suggest that, although S. Typhimurium has the potential to survive and replicate within macrophages, host production of a specific antibody can effectively mediate macrophage activation for clearance of intracellular bacteria.

  12. Broad virus resistance in transgenic plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Prins, M.W.

    2003-01-01

    Viruses are significant threats to agricultural crops worldwide and the limited sources of natural resistance warrant the development of novel resistance sources. Several methods of transgenic protection have been successfully applied, including protein- and RNA-mediated approaches. Increased

  13. Immunoassays for trifloxystrobin analysis. Part I. Rational design of regioisomeric haptens and production of monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Moreno, Rosario; Mercader, Josep V; Agulló, Consuelo; Abad-Somovilla, Antonio; Abad-Fuentes, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    Trifloxystrobin is one of the main active principles belonging to the strobilurin family of crop protection compounds. In this article, the synthesis of a battery of regioisomeric functionalized derivatives of trifloxystrobin is described. The same aliphatic linear carboxylated chain was introduced as spacer arm in all of the synthesized haptens, but it was located at different positions of the parent molecule. N,N'-Disuccinimidyl carbonate was employed for hapten activation, so the resulting N-hydroxysuccinimyl ester could be readily purified and efficiently coupled to proteins. After immunization and hybridoma generation, a collection of 20 mouse monoclonal antibodies from different immunizing haptens was obtained. The analytical performance of these immunoreagents was evaluated in terms of affinity and selectivity with the aim to develop rapid and practical immunochemical procedures for trifloxystrobin determination. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Priming Cross-Protective Bovine Viral Diarrhea Virus-Specific Immunity Using Live-Vectored Mosaic Antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shehnaz Lokhandwala

    Full Text Available Bovine viral diarrhea virus (BVDV plays a key role in bovine respiratory disease complex, which can lead to pneumonia, diarrhea and death of calves. Current vaccines are not very effective due, in part, to immunosuppressive traits and failure to induce broad protection. There are diverse BVDV strains and thus, current vaccines contain representative genotype 1 and 2 viruses (BVDV-1 & 2 to broaden coverage. BVDV modified live virus (MLV vaccines are superior to killed virus vaccines, but they are susceptible to neutralization and complement-mediated destruction triggered by passively acquired antibodies, thus limiting their efficacy. We generated three novel mosaic polypeptide chimeras, designated NproE2123; NS231; and NS232, which incorporate protective determinants that are highly conserved among BVDV-1a, 1b, and BVDV-2 genotypes. In addition, strain-specific protective antigens from disparate BVDV strains were included to broaden coverage. We confirmed that adenovirus constructs expressing these antigens were strongly recognized by monoclonal antibodies, polyclonal sera, and IFN-γ-secreting T cells generated against diverse BVDV strains. In a proof-of-concept efficacy study, the multi-antigen proto-type vaccine induced higher, but not significantly different, IFN-γ spot forming cells and T-cell proliferation compared to a commercial MLV vaccine. In regards to the humoral response, the prototype vaccine induced higher BVDV-1 specific neutralizing antibody titers, whereas the MLV vaccine induced higher BVDV-2 specific neutralizing antibody titers. Following BVDV type 2a (1373 challenge, calves immunized with the proto-type or the MLV vaccine had lower clinical scores compared to naïve controls. These results support the hypothesis that a broadly protective subunit vaccine can be generated using mosaic polypeptides that incorporate rationally selected and validated protective determinants from diverse BVDV strains. Furthermore, regarding

  15. Broad-band semiconductor optical amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding Ying [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)]. E-mail: yingding@red.semi.ac.cn; Kan Qiang [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang Junling [Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Pan Jiaoqing [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhou Fan [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Chen Weixi [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang Wei [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2007-01-15

    Broad-band semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) with different thicknesses and thin bulk tensile-strained active layers were fabricated and studied. Amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) spectra and gain spectra of SOAs were measured and analyzed at different CW biases. A maximal 3 dB ASE bandwidth of 136 nm ranging from 1480 to 1616 nm, and a 3 dB optical amplifier gain bandwidth of about 90 nm ranging from 1510 to 1600 nm, were obtained for the very thin bulk active SOA. Other SOAs characteristics such as saturation output power and polarization sensitivity were measured and compared.

  16. Broad spectrum antibiotic compounds and use thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koglin, Alexander; Strieker, Matthias

    2016-07-05

    The discovery of a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene cluster in the genome of Clostridium thermocellum that produces a secondary metabolite that is assembled outside of the host membrane is described. Also described is the identification of homologous NRPS gene clusters from several additional microorganisms. The secondary metabolites produced by the NRPS gene clusters exhibit broad spectrum antibiotic activity. Thus, antibiotic compounds produced by the NRPS gene clusters, and analogs thereof, their use for inhibiting bacterial growth, and methods of making the antibiotic compounds are described.

  17. Crx broadly modulates the pineal transcriptome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rovsing, Louise; Clokie, Samuel; Bustos, Diego M

    2011-01-01

    Cone-rod homeobox (Crx) encodes Crx, a transcription factor expressed selectively in retinal photoreceptors and pinealocytes, the major cell type of the pineal gland. In this study, the influence of Crx on the mammalian pineal gland was studied by light and electron microscopy and by use...... of microarray and qRTPCR technology, thereby extending previous studies on selected genes (Furukawa et al. 1999). Deletion of Crx was not found to alter pineal morphology, but was found to broadly modulate the mouse pineal transcriptome, characterized by a > 2-fold down-regulation of 543 genes and a > 2-fold up......-regulation of 745 genes (p pineal glands of wild...

  18. 77 FR 9678 - Prospective Grant of Exclusive License: The Development of Human Anti-CD22 Monoclonal Antibodies...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-17

    ... Human Anti-CD22 Monoclonal Antibodies for the Treatment of Human Cancers and Autoimmune Disease AGENCY... Monoclonal Antibodies Against CD22'' , U.S. patent application 12/934,214 entitled ``Human Monoclonal... and m972 (SMB-002) monoclonal antibodies as therapies for the treatment of B cell cancers and...

  19. Crx broadly modulates the pineal transcriptome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovsing, Louise; Clokie, Samuel; Bustos, Diego M.; Rohde, Kristian; Coon, Steven L.; Litman, Thomas; Rath, Martin F.; Møller, Morten; Klein, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Cone-rod homeobox (Crx) encodes Crx, a transcription factor expressed selectively in retinal photoreceptors and pinealocytes, the major cell type of the pineal gland. Here, the influence of Crx on the mammalian pineal gland was studied by light and electron microscopy and by use of microarray and qRTPCR technology, thereby extending previous studies on selected genes (Furukawa et al. 1999). Deletion of Crx was not found to alter pineal morphology, but was found to broadly modulate the mouse pineal transcriptome, characterized by a >2-fold downregulation of 543 genes and a >2-fold upregulation of 745 genes (p pineal glands of wild-type animals; only eight of these were also day/night expressed in the Crx−/− pineal gland. However, in the Crx−/− pineal gland 41 genes exhibit differential night/day expression that is not seen in wild-type animals. These findings indicate that Crx broadly modulates the pineal transcriptome and also influences differential night/day gene expression in this tissue. Some effects of Crx deletion on the pineal transcriptome might be mediated by Hoxc4 upregulation. PMID:21797868

  20. Choriocarcinoma: blocking factor and monoclonal antibody iodine 131 imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pattillo, R.A.; Khazaeli, M.B.; Ruckert, A.C.; Hussa, R.O.; Collier, B.D.; Beierwaltes, W.; Mattingly, R.F.

    1984-04-01

    Postoperative iodine 131 monoclonal antibody localization in metastatic choriocarcinoma was accomplished in this study. The monoclonal antibody was prepared to male choriocarcinoma which cross reacted with gestational choriocarcinoma. The antibody was raised against whole choriocarcinoma cells and human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) cross reactivity was excluded. The purified antibody was iodinated with /sup 131/I and successfully imaged BeWo choriocarcinoma transplanted in nude mice; however, imaging of choriocarcinoma in a patient was verified only after resection. It is our belief that failure to sufficiently concentrate the antibody in the tumor before operation was due to blocking factor in the serum of the patient. Blocking factor and hCG dropped postoperatively. Blocking factor activity in 15 patients with metastatic trophoblastic disease was monitored and, like hCG, was found to be a sensitive indicator of the presence of disease. Its efficacy may be in the small number of patients without hCG but with persistent disease.

  1. Production of a Chaetomium globosum Enolase Monoclonal Antibody

    OpenAIRE

    Green, Brett J.; Nayak, Ajay P.; Lemons, Angela R.; Rittenour, William R.; Justin M. Hettick; Beezhold, Donald H.

    2014-01-01

    Chaetomium globosum is a hydrophilic fungal species and a contaminant of water-damaged building materials in North America. Methods to detect Chaetomium species include subjective identification of ascospores, viable culture, or molecular-based detection methods. In this study, we describe the production and initial characterization of a monoclonal antibody (MAb) for C. globosum enolase. MAb 1C7, a murine IgG1 isotype MAb, was produced and reacted with recombinant C. globosum enolase (rCgEno)...

  2. Safety profile and practical considerations of monoclonal antibody treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casanova Estruch, B

    2013-04-01

    Monoclonal antibodies are immunoglobulins specially designed to act against specific targets, in such a way that their administration stops a specific pathogenic process, stimulates a particular cellular action, or changes a cell mechanism to another pathway of interest. Their production is based on the establishment of modified immortal B lymphocytes to produce a specific immunoglobulin. Depending on the level of purity, this immunoglobulin may be murine complement (ending in "o", for example muromonab); chimeric, in which all the immunoglobulin is human, except in the variable region which is murine (ending in "xi", for example, rituximab); humanised, in which all the immunoglobulin is human, except in the variable complement region which remains murine (ending in "zu", for example, natalizumab); and human complement (ending in "u", for example, adalimumab). Therefore, there will be two types of secondary effects: those arising from the action of the antibody, such as opportunistic infections due to immunosuppression, and those arising from the administration of a protein, such as anaphylactic reactions. The sources used for the present articles were articles published in PubMed, located by searching for "Monoclonal antibodies and Secondary effects", and the web pages of the European Medicines Agency (EMEA) and the US Food and Drus Administration (FDA). The secondary effects arising from the mechanisms of action were opportunistic infections, common infections, development of tumours and autoimmune phenomena, and those arising from the administration of proteins: anaphylactic reaction, cytokine release syndrome, and the development of neutralising antibodies. Finally, the management of monoclonal antibodies in clinical practice and in special situations is discussed, including administering vaccines, pregnancy and paediatric use. Reference will be made to immune recovery syndrome. Monoclonal antibodies are highly effective drugs when specifically indicated, but

  3. Monoclonal antibodies to Nocardia asteroides and Nocardia brasiliensis antigens.

    OpenAIRE

    Jiménez, T; Díaz, A M; Zlotnik, H

    1990-01-01

    Nocardia asteroides and Nocardia brasiliensis whole-cell extracts were used as antigens to generate monoclonal antibodies (MAbs). Six stable hybrid cell lines secreting anti-Nocardia spp. MAbs were obtained. These were characterized by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, Western blot (immunoblot), and immunofluorescence assay. Although all the MAbs exhibited different degrees of cross-reactivity with N. asteroides and N. brasiliensis antigens as well as with culture-filtrate antigens from Myco...

  4. Human monoclonal antibodies: the residual challenge of antibody immunogenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waldmann, Herman

    2014-01-01

    One of the major reasons for seeking human monoclonal antibodies has been to eliminate immunogenicity seen with rodent antibodies. Thus far, there has yet been no approach which absolutely abolishes that risk for cell-binding antibodies. In this short article, I draw attention to classical work which shows that monomeric immunoglobulins are intrinsically tolerogenic if they can be prevented from creating aggregates or immune complexes. Based on these classical studies two approaches for active tolerization to therapeutic antibodies are described.

  5. MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES AND BREAST CANCER. CURRENT THERAPEUTIC PROGRESS

    OpenAIRE

    Collignon, Joëlle; Gennigens, Christine; Rorive, Andrée; Coucke, Philippe; Lifrange, Eric; Maweja, Sylvie; Fillet, Georges; Jerusalem, Guy

    2009-01-01

    About 9,500 new breast cancers are diagnosed in Belgium every year. Improvement of our knowledge of altered molecular events leading to the proliferation of tumor cells has resulted in the development of targeted therapies in subgroups of cancers. One of the first validation of targeted therapy is the anti-HER-2 monoclonal antibody trastuzumab (Herceptin) in patients with overexpression of human epidermal growth factor receptor type 2 (HER2) occurring in 20 to 25% of invasive breast carcinoma...

  6. Novel monoclonal antibodies to study tissue regeneration in planarians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ross, Kelly G; Omuro, Kerilyn C; Taylor, Matthew R; Munday, Roma K; Hubert, Amy; King, Ryan S; Zayas, Ricardo M

    2015-01-21

    Planarians are an attractive model organism for studying stem cell-based regeneration due to their ability to replace all of their tissues from a population of adult stem cells. The molecular toolkit for planarian studies currently includes the ability to study gene function using RNA interference (RNAi) and observe gene expression via in situ hybridizations. However, there are few antibodies available to visualize protein expression, which would greatly enhance analysis of RNAi experiments as well as allow further characterization of planarian cell populations using immunocytochemistry and other immunological techniques. Thus, additional, easy-to-use, and widely available monoclonal antibodies would be advantageous to study regeneration in planarians. We have created seven monoclonal antibodies by inoculating mice with formaldehyde-fixed cells isolated from dissociated 3-day regeneration blastemas. These monoclonal antibodies can be used to label muscle fibers, axonal projections in the central and peripheral nervous systems, two populations of intestinal cells, ciliated cells, a subset of neoblast progeny, and discrete cells within the central nervous system as well as the regeneration blastema. We have tested these antibodies using eight variations of a formaldehyde-based fixation protocol and determined reliable protocols for immunolabeling whole planarians with each antibody. We found that labeling efficiency for each antibody varies greatly depending on the addition or removal of tissue processing steps that are used for in situ hybridization or immunolabeling techniques. Our experiments show that a subset of the antibodies can be used alongside markers commonly used in planarian research, including anti-SYNAPSIN and anti-SMEDWI, or following whole-mount in situ hybridization experiments. The monoclonal antibodies described in this paper will be a valuable resource for planarian research. These antibodies have the potential to be used to better understand

  7. Production of Monoclonal Antibodies in Plants for Cancer Immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Ghislain Moussavou; Kisung Ko; Jeong-Hwan Lee; Young-Kug Choo

    2015-01-01

    Plants are considered as an alternative platform for recombinant monoclonal antibody (mAb) production due to the improvement and diversification of transgenic techniques. The diversity of plant species offers a multitude of possibilities for the valorization of genetic resources. Moreover, plants can be propagated indefinitely, providing cheap biomass production on a large scale in controlled conditions. Thus, recent studies have shown the successful development of plant systems for the produ...

  8. Broad ion beam serial section tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winiarski, B., E-mail: b.winiarski@manchester.ac.uk [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Materials Division, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Gholinia, A. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Mingard, K.; Gee, M. [Materials Division, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Thompson, G.E.; Withers, P.J. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-15

    Here we examine the potential of serial Broad Ion Beam (BIB) Ar{sup +} ion polishing as an advanced serial section tomography (SST) technique for destructive 3D material characterisation for collecting data from volumes with lateral dimensions significantly greater than 100 µm and potentially over millimetre sized areas. Further, the associated low level of damage introduced makes BIB milling very well suited to 3D EBSD acquisition with very high indexing rates. Block face serial sectioning data registration schemes usually assume that the data comprises a series of parallel, planar slices. We quantify the variations in slice thickness and parallelity which can arise when using BIB systems comparing Gatan PECS and Ilion BIB systems for large volume serial sectioning and 3D-EBSD data acquisition. As a test case we obtain 3D morphologies and grain orientations for both phases of a WC-11%wt. Co hardmetal. In our case we have carried out the data acquisition through the manual transfer of the sample between SEM and BIB which is a very slow process (1–2 slice per day), however forthcoming automated procedures will markedly speed up the process. We show that irrespective of the sectioning method raw large area 2D-EBSD maps are affected by distortions and artefacts which affect 3D-EBSD such that quantitative analyses and visualisation can give misleading and erroneous results. Addressing and correcting these issues will offer real benefits when large area (millimetre sized) automated serial section BIBS is developed. - Highlights: • In this work we examine how microstructures can be reconstructed in three-dimensions (3D) by serial argon broad ion beam (BIB) milling, enabling much larger volumes (>250×250×100µm{sup 3}) to be acquired than by serial section focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM). • The associated low level of damage introduced makes BIB milling very well suited to 3D-EBSD acquisition with very high indexing rates. • We explore

  9. Monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of Ebola virus disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moekotte, A L; Huson, M A M; van der Ende, A J; Agnandji, S T; Huizenga, E; Goorhuis, A; Grobusch, M P

    2016-11-01

    To date, the management of patients with suspected or confirmed Ebolavirus disease (EVD) depends on quarantine, symptomatic management and supportive care, as there are no approved vaccines or treatments available for human use. However, accelerated by the recent large outbreak in West Africa, significant progress has been made towards vaccine development but also towards specific treatment with convalescent plasma and monoclonal antibodies. Areas covered: We describe recent developments in monoclonal antibody treatment for EVD, encompassing mAb114 and the MB-003, ZMAb, ZMapp™ and MIL-77E cocktails. Expert opinion: Preventive measures, are, and will remain essential to curb EVD outbreaks; even more so with vaccine development progressing. However, research for treatment options must not be neglected. Small-scale animal and individual human case studies show that monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) can be effective for EVD treatment; thus justifying exploration in clinical trials. Potential limitations are that high doses may be needed to yield clinical efficacy; epitope mutations might reduce efficacy; and constant evolution of (outbreak-specific) mAb mixtures might be required. Interim advice based on the clinical experience to date is that treatment of patients with mAbs is sensible, provided those could be made available in the necessary amounts in time.

  10. New monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farhadfar, Nosha; Litzow, Mark R

    2016-10-01

    Monoclonal antibodies represent a major advance in treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Targeted delivery of these agents based on leukemic cell-surface receptor recognition, improves efficacy and minimizes off-target toxicity. The antigens CD19, CD20, CD22 and CD52, are the most common antigens to which monoclonal antibodies in B-cell ALL have been directed. Rituximab, an anti-CD20 antibody, in combination with conventional chemotherapy has been shown to improve survival in newly diagnosed CD20 positive B-cell ALL. Blinatumomab, a bispecific T-cell engager, as monotherapy in relapsed and refractory B-cell ALL resulted in prolonged relapse free survival. Inotuzumab ozogamicin, an anti-CD22 antibody, alone and in combination with chemotherapy has been promising in relapsed and refractory B-cell ALL. The effectiveness and safety of several newer monoclonal antibodies including ofatumumab, obinutuzumab, epratuzumab, denintuzumab mafodotin and moxetumomab pasudotox as single agents or in combination with a chemotherapeutic back bone are currently under investigation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. The safety of monoclonal antibodies for treatment of colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berger, Martin D; Lenz, Heinz-Josef

    2016-06-01

    Monoclonal antibodies such as bevacizumab, ramucirumab, cetuximab and panitumumab play an important role in the treatment of metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC). With the introduction of these drugs considerable improvements in both progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival (OS) were achieved. However these antibodies are associated with a unique side effect profile. This review provides an overview about drug efficacy of bevacizumab, cetuximab, panitumumab and ramucirumab in the treatment algorithm of mCRC. Additionally, we discuss the most common toxicites of these monoclonal antibodies. The most common toxicities associated with the VEGF-A directed antibody bevacizumab are hypertension, proteinuria, thromboembolism, bleeding, gastrointestinal perforation and prolonged wound healing. Similarly, the rate of hypertension and proteinuria is increased during treatment with the VEGFR2 antibody ramucirumab. On the other hand the most frequent side effects of EGFR targeted antibodies are skin rash, hypersensitivity reactions and hypomagnesemia. Due to the murine portions of cetuximab the incidence of infusion reactions is more frequent compared to panitumumab which is a pure human monoclonal antibody.

  12. [Neutralizing Monoclonal and Chimeric Antibodies to Human IFN-γ].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larina, M V; Aliev, T K; Solopova, O N; Pozdnyakova, L P; Korobova, S V; Yakimov, S A; Sveshnikov, P G; Dolgikh, D A; Kirpichnikov, M P

    2015-01-01

    Autoiminune disorders are chronic diseases characterized by abnormal immune response directed against self-antigens that leads to tissue damage and violation of its normal functioning. Such diseases often result in disability or even death of patients. Nowadays a number of monoclonal antibodies to pro-inflammatory cytokines and their receptors are successfully used for the targeted treatment of autoimmune diseases. One of the perspective targets in autoimmune disease therapy is interferon gamma, a key cytokine in Th1 cells differentiation, activation of macrophages, and inflammation. In the present work, 5 monoclonal antibodies to human IFN-γ were obtained. For the development of potential therapeutic agent, we have performed neutralizing activity and affinity analysis of the antibodies. Based on the data obtained, the monoclonal antibody F1 was selected. This antibody has a dissociation constant 1.7 x 10(-9) M and IC90 = 8.9 ± 2.0 nM measured upon antibody inhibition of the IFN-γ-induced HLA-DR expression on the surface of U937 cells. We have constructed a bicistronic vector for the production of recombinant chimeric Fab fragment F1 chim in E. coli cells. The recombinant chimeric Fab fragment Fl chim neutralizes IFN-γ activity in vitro and has a dissociation constant 1.8 x 10(-9) M.

  13. Recent Advances in Monoclonal Antibody Therapies for Multiple Sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wootla, Bharath; Watzlawik, Jens O; Stavropoulos, Nikolaos; Wittenberg, Nathan J; Dasari, Harika; Abdelrahim, Murtada A; Henley, John R; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Warrington, Arthur E; Rodriguez, Moses

    2016-06-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common chronic inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the CNS and results in neurological disability. Existing immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive approaches lower the number of relapses but do not cure or reverse existing deficits nor improve long-term disability in MS patients. Monogenic antibodies were described as treatment options for MS, however the immunogenicity of mouse antibodies hampered the efficacy of potential therapeutics in humans. Availability of improved antibody production technologies resulted in a paradigm shift in MS treatment strategies. In this review, an overview of immunotherapies for MS that use conventional monoclonal antibodies reactive to immune system and their properties and mechanisms of action will be discussed, including recent advances in MS therapeutics and highlight natural autoantibodies (NAbs) that directly target CNS cells. Recent challenges for MS therapy are the identification of relevant molecular and cellular targets, time frame of treatment, and antibody toxicity profiles to identify safe treatment options for MS patients. The application of monoclonal antibody therapies with better biological efficacy associated with minimum side effects possesses huge clinical potential. Advances in monoclonal antibody technologies that directly target cells of nervous system may promote the CNS regeneration field from bench to bedside.

  14. Detection of Tilletia controversa using immunofluorescent monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, L; Feng, C; Li, B; Liu, T; Liu, B; Chen, W

    2015-02-01

    Tilletia controversa is an internationally quarantined pathogenic fungus that causes dwarf bunt of wheat and is similar to Tilletia caries in both teliospore morphology and genetic structure. This study developed a rapid and sensitive immunofluorescence method for differentiating the teliospores of T. controversa from T. caries. The method utilizes monoclonal antibody D-1 against teliospores of T. controversa as well as a PE-Cy3-conjugated goat anti-mouse antibody (overlapping light excitation of 495 and 555 nm). The orange cycle fluorescent signal was stronger against T. controversa teliospores in the outer spore wall and net ridge, whereas only the green signal was observed for the protoplasm of T. caries teliospores. The detection limit of this method was 2.0 μg ml(-1) of the D-1 monoclonal antibody. This study describes the production and diagnostic application of a novel mouse monoclonal antibody specific to T. controversa teliospores. This method could be used for the on-site identification of T. controversa teliospores in the near future and will help in selecting fungicides to control dwarf bunt of wheat as further technical developments are achieved. © 2014 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  15. Recent Advances in Monoclonal Antibody Therapies for Multiple Sclerosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavropoulos, Nikolaos; Wittenberg, Nathan J.; Dasari, Harika; Abdelrahim, Murtada A.; Henley, John R.; Oh, Sang-Hyun; Warrington, Arthur E.; Rodriguez, Moses

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Multiple sclerosis (MS) is the most common chronic inflammatory, demyelinating disease of the CNS and results in neurological disability. Existing immunomodulatory and immunosuppressive approaches lower the number of relapses but do not cure or reverse existing deficits nor improve long-term disability in MS patients. Areas Covered Monogenic antibodies were described as treatment options for MS, however the immunogenicity of mouse antibodies hampered the efficacy of potential therapeutics in humans. Availability of improved antibody production technologies resulted in a paradigm shift in MS treatment strategies. In this review, an overview of immunotherapies for MS that use conventional monoclonal antibodies reactive to immune system and their properties and mechanisms of action will be discussed, including recent advances in MS therapeutics and highlight natural autoantibodies (NAbs) that directly target CNS cells. Expert Opinion Recent challenges for MS therapy are the identification of relevant molecular and cellular targets, time frame of treatment, and antibody toxicity profiles to identify safe treatment options for MS patients. The application of monoclonal antibody therapies with better biological efficacy associated with minimum side effects possesses huge clinical potential. Advances in monoclonal antibody technologies that directly target cells of nervous system may promote the CNS regeneration field from bench to bedside. PMID:26914737

  16. Against a Broad Definition of "Empathy"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Songhorian

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I will try to provide some arguments against a broad definition of “empathy”. Firstly, I will deal with attempts to define empathy as an umbrella concept. Then, I will try to point out the four main elements which contribute to the confusion that researchers in both the social and political as well as the scientific and philosophical domains face when dealing with empathy. In order to resolve this confusion, I suggest applying David Marr’s distinction to the field of empathy. Instead of providing an umbrella definition for empathy, which tries to account for all the data coming from different disciplines, I believe understanding that there are different levels of explanations and that different disciplines can contribute to each of them will provide a more detailed and less confused definition of empathy.

  17. High Resolution Mapping of Bactericidal Monoclonal Antibody Binding Epitopes on Staphylococcus aureus Antigen MntC.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexey V Gribenko

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Staphylococcus aureus manganese transporter protein MntC is under investigation as a component of a prophylactic S.aureus vaccine. Passive immunization with monoclonal antibodies mAB 305-78-7 and mAB 305-101-8 produced using MntC was shown to significantly reduce S. aureus burden in an infant rat model of infection. Earlier interference mapping suggested that a total of 23 monoclonal antibodies generated against MntC could be subdivided into three interference groups, representing three independent immunogenic regions. In the current work binding epitopes for selected representatives of each of these interference groups (mAB 305-72-5 - group 1, mAB 305-78-7 - group 2, and mAB 305-101-8 - group 3 were mapped using Hydrogen-Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry (DXMS. All of the identified epitopes are discontinuous, with binding surface formed by structural elements that are separated within the primary sequence of the protein but adjacent in the context of the three-dimensional structure. The approach was validated by co-crystallizing the Fab fragment of one of the antibodies (mAB 305-78-7 with MntC and solving the three-dimensional structure of the complex. X-ray results themselves and localization of the mAB 305-78-7 epitope were further validated using antibody binding experiments with MntC variants containing substitutions of key amino acid residues. These results provided insight into the antigenic properties of MntC and how these properties may play a role in protecting the hostagainst S. aureus infection by preventing the capture and transport of Mn2+, a key element that the pathogen uses to evade host immunity.

  18. Human Non-neutralizing HIV-1 Envelope Monoclonal Antibodies Limit the Number of Founder Viruses during SHIV Mucosal Infection in Rhesus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santra, Sampa; Tomaras, Georgia D; Warrier, Ranjit; Nicely, Nathan I; Liao, Hua-Xin; Pollara, Justin; Liu, Pinghuang; Alam, S Munir; Zhang, Ruijun; Cocklin, Sarah L; Shen, Xiaoying; Duffy, Ryan; Xia, Shi-Mao; Schutte, Robert J; Pemble Iv, Charles W; Dennison, S Moses; Li, Hui; Chao, Andrew; Vidnovic, Kora; Evans, Abbey; Klein, Katja; Kumar, Amit; Robinson, James; Landucci, Gary; Forthal, Donald N; Montefiori, David C; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Robb, Merlin L; Michael, Nelson L; Kim, Jerome H; Soderberg, Kelly A; Giorgi, Elena E; Blair, Lily; Korber, Bette T; Moog, Christiane; Shattock, Robin J; Letvin, Norman L; Schmitz, Joern E; Moody, M A; Gao, Feng; Ferrari, Guido; Shaw, George M; Haynes, Barton F

    2015-08-01

    HIV-1 mucosal transmission begins with virus or virus-infected cells moving through mucus across mucosal epithelium to infect CD4+ T cells. Although broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) are the type of HIV-1 antibodies that are most likely protective, they are not induced with current vaccine candidates. In contrast, antibodies that do not neutralize primary HIV-1 strains in the TZM-bl infection assay are readily induced by current vaccine candidates and have also been implicated as secondary correlates of decreased HIV-1 risk in the RV144 vaccine efficacy trial. Here, we have studied the capacity of anti-Env monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against either the immunodominant region of gp41 (7B2 IgG1), the first constant region of gp120 (A32 IgG1), or the third variable loop (V3) of gp120 (CH22 IgG1) to modulate in vivo rectal mucosal transmission of a high-dose simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-BaL) in rhesus macaques. 7B2 IgG1 or A32 IgG1, each containing mutations to enhance Fc function, was administered passively to rhesus macaques but afforded no protection against productive clinical infection while the positive control antibody CH22 IgG1 prevented infection in 4 of 6 animals. Enumeration of transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses revealed that passive infusion of each of the three antibodies significantly reduced the number of T/F genomes. Thus, some antibodies that bind HIV-1 Env but fail to neutralize virus in traditional neutralization assays may limit the number of T/F viruses involved in transmission without leading to enhancement of viral infection. For one of these mAbs, gp41 mAb 7B2, we provide the first co-crystal structure in complex with a common cyclical loop motif demonstrated to be critical for infection by other retroviruses.

  19. SVSVGMKPSPRP: a broad range adhesion peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estephan, Elias; Dao, Jérôme; Saab, Marie-Belle; Panayotov, Ivan; Martin, Marta; Larroque, Christian; Gergely, Csilla; Cuisinier, Frédéric J G; Levallois, Bernard

    2012-12-01

    A combinatorial phage display approach was previously used to evolve a 12-mer peptide (SVSVGMKPSPRP) with the highest affinity for different semiconductor surfaces. The discovery of the multiple occurrences of the SVSVGMKPSPRP sequence in an all-against-all basic local alignment search tool search of PepBank sequences was unexpected, and a Google search using the peptide sequence recovered 58 results concerning 12 patents and 16 scientific publications. The number of patent and articles indicates that the peptide is perhaps a broad range adhesion peptide. To evaluate peptide properties, we conducted a study to investigate peptide adhesion on different inorganic substrates by mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy for gold, carbon nanotubes, cobalt, chrome alloy, titanium, and titanium alloy substrates. Our results showed that the peptide has a great potential as a linker to functionalize metallic surfaces if specificity is not a key factor. This peptide is not specific to a particular metal surface, but it is a good linker for the functionalization of a wide range of metallic materials. The fact that this peptide has the potential to adsorb on a large set of inorganic surfaces suggests novel promising directions for further investigation. Affinity determination of SVSVGMKPSPRP peptide would be an important issue for eventual commercial uses.

  20. Broad-Band Activatable White-Opsin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata Batabyal

    Full Text Available Currently, the use of optogenetic sensitization of retinal cells combined with activation/inhibition has the potential to be an alternative to retinal implants that would require electrodes inside every single neuron for high visual resolution. However, clinical translation of optogenetic activation for restoration of vision suffers from the drawback that the narrow spectral sensitivity of an opsin requires active stimulation by a blue laser or a light emitting diode with much higher intensities than ambient light. In order to allow an ambient light-based stimulation paradigm, we report the development of a 'white-opsin' that has broad spectral excitability in the visible spectrum. The cells sensitized with white-opsin showed excitability at an order of magnitude higher with white light compared to using only narrow-band light components. Further, cells sensitized with white-opsin produced a photocurrent that was five times higher than Channelrhodopsin-2 under similar photo-excitation conditions. The use of fast white-opsin may allow opsin-sensitized neurons in a degenerated retina to exhibit a higher sensitivity to ambient white light. This property, therefore, significantly lowers the activation threshold in contrast to conventional approaches that use intense narrow-band opsins and light to activate cellular stimulation.

  1. Protocols for the analytical characterization of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies. I - Non-denaturing chromatographic techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goyon, Alexandre; D'Atri, Valentina; Bobaly, Balazs; Wagner-Rousset, Elsa; Beck, Alain; Fekete, Szabolcs; Guillarme, Davy

    2017-07-15

    Size-, charge- and hydrophobicity-related variants of a biopharmaceutical product have to be deeply characterized for batch consistency and for the assessment of immunogenicity and safety effects. Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) and ion exchange chromatography (IEX) are considered as the gold standard for the analysis of high molecular weight species (HMWS) and charge-related variants, respectively. Hydrophobic interaction chromatography (HIC) has drawn renewed attention to monitor the small drug payload distribution in the cysteine-linked antibody-drug conjugates (ADC). These three chromatographic techniques, namely SEC, HIC and IEX, are historical, non-denaturing and robust approaches widely used for the characterization of biopharmaceutical proteins. Despite the broad spectrum of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) structures, isoelectric points (pIs) and hydrophobicities, generic protocols can be applied to separate their size-, charge- and hydrophobicity-related variants, using the last generation of chromatographic columns and appropriate mobile phase conditions. Straightforward protocols are described in this manuscript with representative chromatograms of ten distinct Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and European Medicines Agency (EMA) approved therapeutic mAb products to illustrate the performance of the SEC, IEX and HIC methods. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Structural and Antigenic Definition of Hepatitis C Virus E2 Glycoprotein Epitopes Targeted by Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Sautto

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is the major cause of chronic liver disease as well as the major indication for liver transplantation worldwide. Current standard of care is not completely effective, not administrable in grafted patients, and burdened by several side effects. This incomplete effectiveness is mainly due to the high propensity of the virus to continually mutate under the selective pressure exerted by the host immune response as well as currently administered antiviral drugs. The E2 envelope surface glycoprotein of HCV (HCV/E2 is the main target of the host humoral immune response and for this reason one of the major variable viral proteins. However, broadly cross-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (mAbs directed against HCV/E2 represent a promising tool for the study of virus-host interplay as well as for the development of effective prophylactic and therapeutic approaches. In the last few years many anti-HCV/E2 mAbs have been evaluated in preclinical and clinical trials as possible candidate antivirals, particularly for administration in pre- and post-transplant settings. In this review we summarize the antigenic and structural characteristics of HCV/E2 determined through the use of anti-HCV/E2 mAbs, which, given the absence of a crystal structure of this glycoprotein, represent currently the best tool available.

  3. Radiolabeling and biodistribution of monoclonal antibody (MAb) anti-CD20 with iodine-131

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akanji, Akinkunmi Ganiyu; Muramoto, Emiko; Caldeira Filho, Jose de Souza; Couto, Renata Martinussi; Araujo, Elaine Bortoletti de [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN-CNEN/SP), SP (Brazil)

    2005-10-15

    Radioactive isotopes of iodine, mainly iodine-131 have been broadly used in many monoclonal antibody radioiodination settings, employing different methods. In this study, using a Chloramine-T procedure, the influence of incubation time, CT mass, and Ab/activity ratio on the radiochemical yield of the anti-CD20 antibody labeled with iodine-131 was observed. Radiochemical yield was > 97 %, employing different Chloramine-T masses, independently of incubation time. Radiochemical purity was above 99 % after purification of the labeled compound. The relationship between Ab mass and radioactivity was tested and no difference was observed when 90.6 MBq (2.45mCi) of activity was incorporated in the Ab-mass range studied. Biodistribution study in normal Swiss mice showed higher uptake by the liver and intestines. Low thyroid uptake indicated a suitable in vivo stability. Slight blood uptake was considered a result of circulating radioactivity in normal organs and tissues. A favorable biological distribution of {sup 131} I-anti-CD20 suggests this radiopharmaceutical may be effectively used in the therapy of Non Hodgkin Lymphoma.(author)

  4. Glycan modulation and sulfoengineering of anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibody PG9 in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loos, Andreas; Gach, Johannes S; Hackl, Thomas; Maresch, Daniel; Henkel, Theresa; Porodko, Andreas; Bui-Minh, Duc; Sommeregger, Wolfgang; Wozniak-Knopp, Gordana; Forthal, Donald N; Altmann, Friedrich; Steinkellner, Herta; Mach, Lukas

    2015-10-13

    Broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies, such as PG9, and its derivative RSH hold great promise in AIDS therapy and prevention. An important feature related to the exceptional efficacy of PG9 and RSH is the presence of sulfated tyrosine residues in their antigen-binding regions. To maximize antibody functionalities, we have now produced glycan-optimized, fucose-free versions of PG9 and RSH in Nicotiana benthamiana. Both antibodies were efficiently sulfated in planta on coexpression of an engineered human tyrosylprotein sulfotransferase, resulting in antigen-binding and virus neutralization activities equivalent to PG9 synthesized by mammalian cells ((CHO)PG9). Based on the controlled production of both sulfated and nonsulfated variants in plants, we could unequivocally prove that tyrosine sulfation is critical for the potency of PG9 and RSH. Moreover, the fucose-free antibodies generated in N. benthamiana are capable of inducing antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, an activity not observed for (CHO)PG9. Thus, tailoring of the antigen-binding site combined with glycan modulation and sulfoengineering yielded plant-produced anti-HIV-1 antibodies with effector functions superior to PG9 made in CHO cells.

  5. Population-based studies on familiality and prognosis in patients with monoclonal gammopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Kristinsson, Sigurður Yngvi

    2009-01-01

    Monoclonal gammopathies constitute a group of diseases which have in common an overproduction of monoclonal immunoglobulins, M-proteins. Clues to their etiology have been found in studies showing familial aggregation of these diseases. We included 2,144 patients with lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma/Waldenström s macroglobulinemia (LPL/WM) and 4,458 patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), their 6,177 and 14,621 first-degree relatives respectively,...

  6. The clinical relevance and management of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and related disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van de Donk, Niels W C J; Palumbo, Antonio; Johnsen, Hans Erik

    2014-01-01

    and light chain production, are helpful in predicting risk of progression of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance to symptomatic disease. Furthermore, alterations in the bone marrow microenvironment of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance patients result in an increased risk...... of venous and arterial thrombosis, infections, osteoporosis, and bone fractures. In addition, the small clone may occasionally be responsible for severe organ damage through the production of a monoclonal protein that has autoantibody activity or deposits in tissues. These disorders are rare and often...

  7. VLPs displaying a single L2 epitope induce broadly cross-neutralizing antibodies against human papillomavirus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebenezer Tumban

    Full Text Available Virus-like Particles (VLPs display can be used to increase the immunogenicity of heterologous antigens. Here, we report the use of a bacteriophage MS2-based VLP display platform to develop a monovalent vaccine targeting a broadly neutralizing epitope in the minor capsid protein human papillomavirus (HPV that provides broad protection from diverse HPV types in a mouse pseudovirus infection model.Peptides spanning a previously described cross-neutralizing epitope from HPV type 16 were genetically inserted at the N-terminus of MS2 bacteriophage coat protein. Three of the four recombinant L2-coat proteins assembled into VLPs. L2-VLPs elicited high-titer anti-L2 antibodies in mice, similar to recombinant VLPs that we had previously made in which the L2 peptide was displayed on a surface-exposed loop on VLPs of a related bacteriophage, PP7. Somewhat surprisingly, L2-MS2 VLPs elicited antibodies that were much more broadly cross-reactive with L2 peptides from diverse HPV isolates than L2-PP7 VLPs. Similarly, mice immunized with L2-MS2 VLPs were protected from genital and cutaneous infection by highly diverse HPV pseudovirus types.We show that peptides can be displayed in a highly immunogenic fashion at the N-terminus of MS2 coat protein VLPs. A VLP-based vaccine targeting HPV L2 elicits broadly cross-reactive and cross-protective antibodies to heterologous HPV types. L2-VLPs could serve as the basis of a broadly protective second generation HPV vaccine.

  8. The combination of external beam radiotherapy and experimental radioimmunotargeting with a monoclonal anticytokeratin antibody

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Johansson, Amanda; Eriksson, David; Ullén, Anders; Löfroth, Per‐Olov; Johansson, Lennart; Riklund‐Åhlström, Katrine; Stigbrand, Torgny

    2002-01-01

    .... The purpose of this study was to detect potential benefits with different treatment timing strategies when combining external beam radiotherapy and radioimmunotargeting, with the anticytokeratin monoclonal antibody (MAb...

  9. Arctic Change Information for a Broad Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soreide, N. N.; Overland, J. E.; Calder, J.

    2002-12-01

    Demonstrable environmental changes have occurred in the Arctic over the past three decades. NOAA's Arctic Theme Page is a rich resource web site focused on high latitude studies and the Arctic, with links to widely distributed data and information focused on the Arctic. Included is a collection of essays on relevant topics by experts in Arctic research. The website has proven useful to a wide audience, including scientists, students, teachers, decision makers and the general public, as indicated through recognition by USA Today, Science magazine, etc. (http://www.arctic.noaa.gov) Working jointly with NSF and the University of Washington's Polar Science Center as part of the Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) program, NOAA has developed a website for access to pan-Arctic time series spanning diverse data types including climate indices, atmospheric, oceanic, sea ice, terrestrial, biological and fisheries. Modest analysis functions and more detailed analysis results are provided. (http://www.unaami.noaa.gov/). This paper will describe development of an Artic Change Detection status website to provide a direct and comprehensive view of previous and ongoing change in the Arctic for a broad climate community. For example, composite metrics are developed using principal component analysis based on 86 multivariate pan-Arctic time series for seven data types. Two of these metrics can be interpreted as a regime change/trend component and an interdecadal component. Changes can also be visually observed through tracking of 28 separate biophysical indicators. Results will be presented in the form of a web site with relevant, easily understood, value-added knowledge backed by peer review from Arctic scientists and scientific journals.

  10. Feedback from Broad Absorption Line Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartas, George; Saez, C.

    2008-03-01

    The fraction of the total bolometric energy released over an AGN's lifetime into the ISM and IGM in the form kinetic energy injection scales as the outflow velocity to the third power so we expect that powerful broad absorption line (BAL) quasars may have mass outflow rates that are large enough to influence significantly the formation of the host galaxy and to regulate the growth of the central black hole. One of the most promising radio quiet quasars for studying the properties of the outflow is the lensed BAL quasar APM 08279+5255. The large flux magnification by a factor of about 100 provided by the gravitational lens effect combined with the large redshift (z = 3.91) of the quasar have provided the highest S/N X-ray spectra of a quasar containing X-ray BALs. We present results from recent monitoring observations of APM 08279+5255. performed with the Suzaku, XMM-Newton and Chandra observatories. Significant variability of the X-ray BALs is detected on timescales as short as 4 days (proper time) implying launching radii of about 6 times the Schwarzschild radius. The fitted width of the X-ray absorption troughs imply a large gradient in the outflow velocity of the X-ray absorbers with projected outflow velocities of up to 0.5c. The notch-like shape of the detected X-ray BALs are similar to those produced in recent numerical simulations (i.e. Schurch & Done 2007) that include radiative transfer calculations through highly ionized X-ray absorbers outflowing at near relativistic velocities. We provide preliminary constraints of the outflows properties.

  11. The use of combinations of monoclonal antibodies in clinical oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henricks, Linda M; Schellens, Jan H M; Huitema, Alwin D R; Beijnen, Jos H

    2015-12-01

    Treatment with monoclonal antibodies is becoming increasingly important in clinical oncology. These antibodies specifically inhibit signaling pathways in tumor growth and/or induce immunological responses against tumor cells. By combining monoclonal antibodies several pathways may be targeted simultaneously, potentially leading to additive or synergistic effects. Theoretically, antibodies are very suitable for use in combination therapy, because of limited overlapping toxicity and lack of pharmacokinetic interactions. In this article an overview is given of preclinical and clinical data on twenty-five different combinations of antibodies in oncology. Some of these combinations have proven clinical benefit, for example the combination of trastuzumab and pertuzumab in HER2-positive breast cancer, which exemplifies an additive or synergistic effect on antitumor activity in clinical studies and the combination of nivolumab and ipilimumab, which results in significant increases in progression-free and overall survival in patients with advanced melanoma. However, other combinations may lead to unfavorable results, such as bevacizumab with cetuximab or panitumumab in advanced colorectal cancer. These combinations result in shorter progression-free survival and increased toxicity compared to therapy with a single antibody. In summary, the different published studies showed widely varying results, depending on the combination of antibodies, indication and patient population. More preclinical and clinical studies are necessary to unravel the mechanisms behind synergistic or antagonistic effects of combining monoclonal antibodies. Most research on combination therapies is still in an early stage, but it is expected that for several tumor types the use of combination therapy of antibodies will become standard of care in the near future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Analysis of monoclonal antibodies by sedimentation velocity analytical ultracentrifugation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stine, W Blaine

    2013-01-01

    Development of a thorough understanding of the solution polydispersity of therapeutic glycoproteins including monoclonal antibodies is an important and challenging undertaking. Degradation pathways involving fragmentation could result in loss of therapeutic efficacy. Protein aggregation on the other hand is frequently considered a critical quality attribute, and concerns exist that protein aggregates could result in undesirable immunological consequences (1). Sedimentation velocity analysis performed in the analytical ultracentrifuge (SV-AUC) provides a uniquely powerful first principal measure of the hydrodynamic size and shape of proteins under conditions that can come very close to the formulated drug product. This technique avoids the potential pitfalls associated with size exclusion chromatography (SEC) including on-column dilution, adsorption or disruption of species by a stationary phase, and the need to use high ionic strength mobile phases to screen unwanted electrostatic interactions (2, 3). Furthermore, not only does SV-AUC provide a quantitative size distribution analysis, but it also provides information about macromolecular conformation. For these reasons, use of SV-AUC for analysis of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies has become widespread throughout the biopharmaceutical industry and is one of the most common orthogonal techniques to SEC for measuring aggregate and fragment levels (4-9). The studies outlined in this chapter describe the basic principles of designing, collecting, and analyzing experimental data using SV-AUC with a focus on methods for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies and other similar biologics. Details are given that facilitate the acquisition of high quality data sets that in turn simplify data analysis resulting in robust and accurate measures of solution polydispersity.

  13. Structural analysis of hepatitis B surface antigen by monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Porath, E; Wands, J R; Marciniak, R A; Wong, M A; Hornstein, L; Ryder, R; Canlas, M; Lingao, A; Isselbacher, K J

    1985-10-01

    A method has been developed for the analysis of hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) antigenic structure at the molecular level that creates "fingerprints" or "signatures" of various hepatitis B viral (HBV) strains. This technique employs high affinity IgM and IgG monoclonal antibodies (anti-HBs) directed against distinct and separate determinants on HBsAg. In performing this antigenic structural analysis, separate binding curves for different monoclonal anti-HBs are generated by measuring immunoreactivity in serial dilutions of HBsAg-positive serum by radioimmunoassay. Since the HBsAg concentration in serum is unknown, the binding profiles of groups of samples are aligned by an iterative least-squares procedure to generate the numerical signature characteristic of the viral strain. The numerical signatures are then displayed on a computer-graphic plot. The signature profiles of HBsAg subtypes are a true reflection of their antigenic structure, and in vertical and horizontal transmission studies the molecular characteristics of the viral epitopes are conserved. By signature analysis we found substantial antigenic heterogeneity among the ayw3 strain both in the U.S. and France, as well as in populations of the Far East and Africa. Populations in Ethiopia, Gambia, and the Philippines were infected with two antigenically distinct HBV strains. In some newly identified HBV strains, it was found that epitopes identified by some monoclonal antibodies were absent or substantially reduced, which suggested that a genetic mutation may have occurred. Thus this study suggests that there is far more antigenic heterogeneity in HBV than previously recognized. These variants are antigenically distinct from each other at the epitope level, and were heretofore unrecognized by polyvalent anti-HBsAg antibodies.

  14. Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies and derivatives: Historical perspectives and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgers, Kyla R; Chou, Richard C

    2016-11-01

    Biologics, both monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) and fusion proteins, have revolutionized the practice of medicine. This year marks the 30th anniversary of the Food and Drug Administration approval of the first mAb for human use. In this review, we examine the biotechnological breakthroughs that spurred the explosive development of the biopharmaceutical mAb industry, as well as how critical lessons learned about human immunology informed the development of improved biologics. We also discuss the most common mechanisms of action of currently approved biologics and the indications for which they have been approved to date. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies to hepatitis B surface antigen: production and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hlozánek, I; Dostálová, V; Korec, E; Zelený, V; König, J; Nĕmecek, V

    1986-01-01

    Hybridomas secreting anti-HBsAg antibodies were produced by fusion of the mouse myeloma cell line SP2/0 with lymphocytes from mice immunized with purified HBsAg. All clones produced antibodies of the IgG1 idiotype that react with the subtype a determinant of HBsAg. An enzyme immunoassay for detection of HBsAg in human sera using monoclonal antibodies was developed and compared with commercial Sevatest ELISA HBsAg/micro I kit for detection of HBsAg in clinical serum samples.

  16. Adverse Events of Monoclonal Antibodies Used for Cancer Therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Mei Guan; Yan-Ping Zhou; Jin-Lu Sun; Shu-Chang Chen

    2015-01-01

    In 1997, the first monoclonal antibody (MoAb), the chimeric anti-CD20 molecule rituximab, was approved by the US Food and Drug administration for use in cancer patients. Since then, the panel of MoAbs that are approved by international regulatory agencies for the treatment of hematopoietic and solid malignancies has continued to expand, currently encompassing a stunning amount of 20 distinct molecules for 11 targets. We provide a brief scientific background on the use of MoAbs in cancer thera...

  17. Monoclonal Antibody Shows Promise as Potential Therapeutic for MERS | Poster

    Science.gov (United States)

    A monoclonal antibody has proven effective in preventing Middle Eastern Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) in lab animals, suggesting further development as a potential intervention for the deadly disease in humans, according to new research. MERS is a newly emerged coronavirus first detected in humans in 2012. Most cases have occurred in the Middle East, but the disease has appeared elsewhere. In all, MERS has infected more than 1,700 individuals and killed more than 600, according to the World Health Organization. No vaccines or antiviral therapies currently exist. Several candidate vaccines are being developed, and some have been tested in animal models, a prerequisite to human clinical trials.

  18. IgM monoclonal gammopathy and neuropathy in two siblings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, T S; Schrøder, H D; Jønsson, V

    1988-01-01

    A sister and a brother with a progressive mixed axonal and demyelinating polyneuropathy were found to have a monoclonal IgM gammopathy of kappa and lambda type, respectively. Sural nerve and cutaneous nerve specimens obtained by biopsy showed deposits of IgM on myelin sheets. Sera from both...... patients contained antibodies directed to bovine peripheral nerve myelin as determined by ELISA technique and to normal human peripheral nerve myelin as demonstrated by indirect immunofluorescence histochemistry. These siblings may have a genetic predisposition to the formation of autoantibodies...... with peripheral nerve myelin as the target for the immune attack....

  19. Synthesis of a monoclonal antibody-indium-111-porphyrin conjugate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bedel-Cloutour, C H; Maneta-Peyret, L; Pereyre, M; Bezian, J H

    1991-11-05

    Antibodies were labelled with indium-111 with a view to their use in the radio-immunodetection of cancers. The covalent coupling between indium-111 porphyrin and monoclonal antibodies (IgG and F(ab')2 fragment) was achieved using the ester activated method [N-hydroxy-succinimide/1-ethyl-3-(3-dimethylaminopropyl)carbodiimide]. After purification, this provided conjugated with specific activities of 6 muCi/micrograms Mab (9.3 molecules per Mab) or 1 muCi/microgram (F(ab')2 fragment (1.5 molecule per F(ab')2). ELISA procedures suggested the full retention of immunoreactivity by the radiolabelled antibodies.

  20. Alemtuzumab and Natalizumab: The Monoclonal Antibody Story Continues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BL Johnston

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In the July/August 2006 issue of this journal, the infectious complications associated with the use of infliximab, etanercept and adalimumab were reviewed (1. These represent only three of the many monoclonal antibodies either licensed or in clinical trials for therapeutic use in cancer and autoimmune disease or to prevent rejection in both solid organ and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. While most of these agents have not been associated with increased infection rates, alemtuzumab and natalizumab have gained particular attention related to either the frequency or type of infection seen in some individuals who have received them.

  1. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against mink leukocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, W.S.; Pedersen, Mikael; Gram-Nielsen, S.

    1997-01-01

    Three monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were generated against mink leukocytes. One antibody reacted with all T lymphocytes, one with all monocytes and one had platelet reactivity. Under reducing conditions, the T lymphocyte reactive antibody immunoprecipitated 18 kDa, 23 kDa, 25 kDa and 32-40 k...... leukocytes of human and various animal species have been analysed for cross-reactivity to mink leukocytes. We found eight to cross-react with mink. Of particular importance was an anticanine CD11a mAb, an antihuman CD79a mAb and an antihuman bcl-2 mAb....

  2. Monoclonal Antibodies as Prophylactic and Therapeutic Agents Against Chikungunya Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clayton, April M

    2016-12-15

    Chikungunya virus (CHIKV) is a mosquito-borne alphavirus that is responsible for considerable epidemics worldwide and recently emerged in the Americas in 2013. CHIKV may cause long-lasting arthralgia after acute infection. With currently no licensed vaccines or antivirals, the design of effective therapies to prevent or treat CHIKV infection is of utmost importance and will be facilitated by increased understanding of the dynamics of chikungunya. In this article, monoclonal antibodies against CHIKV as viable prophylactic and therapeutic agents will be discussed. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For permissions, e-mail journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Production of monoclonal antibodies in plants for cancer immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moussavou, Ghislain; Ko, Kisung; Lee, Jeong-Hwan; Choo, Young-Kug

    2015-01-01

    Plants are considered as an alternative platform for recombinant monoclonal antibody (mAb) production due to the improvement and diversification of transgenic techniques. The diversity of plant species offers a multitude of possibilities for the valorization of genetic resources. Moreover, plants can be propagated indefinitely, providing cheap biomass production on a large scale in controlled conditions. Thus, recent studies have shown the successful development of plant systems for the production of mAbs for cancer immunotherapy. However, their several limitations have to be resolved for efficient antibody production in plants.

  4. Production of Monoclonal Antibodies in Plants for Cancer Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghislain Moussavou

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Plants are considered as an alternative platform for recombinant monoclonal antibody (mAb production due to the improvement and diversification of transgenic techniques. The diversity of plant species offers a multitude of possibilities for the valorization of genetic resources. Moreover, plants can be propagated indefinitely, providing cheap biomass production on a large scale in controlled conditions. Thus, recent studies have shown the successful development of plant systems for the production of mAbs for cancer immunotherapy. However, their several limitations have to be resolved for efficient antibody production in plants.

  5. MICROLENSING OF QUASAR BROAD EMISSION LINES: CONSTRAINTS ON BROAD LINE REGION SIZE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerras, E.; Mediavilla, E. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Via Lactea S/N, La Laguna E-38200, Tenerife (Spain); Jimenez-Vicente, J. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, Campus de Fuentenueva, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Kochanek, C. S. [Department of Astronomy and the Center for Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, The Ohio State University, 4055 McPherson Lab, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43221 (United States); Munoz, J. A. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad de Valencia, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Falco, E. [Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Motta, V. [Departamento de Fisica y Astronomia, Universidad de Valparaiso, Avda. Gran Bretana 1111, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2013-02-20

    We measure the differential microlensing of the broad emission lines between 18 quasar image pairs in 16 gravitational lenses. We find that the broad emission lines are in general weakly microlensed. The results show, at a modest level of confidence (1.8{sigma}), that high ionization lines such as C IV are more strongly microlensed than low ionization lines such as H{beta}, indicating that the high ionization line emission regions are more compact. If we statistically model the distribution of microlensing magnifications, we obtain estimates for the broad line region size of r{sub s} = 24{sup +22} {sub -15} and r{sub s} = 55{sup +150} {sub -35} lt-day (90% confidence) for the high and low ionization lines, respectively. When the samples are divided into higher and lower luminosity quasars, we find that the line emission regions of more luminous quasars are larger, with a slope consistent with the expected scaling from photoionization models. Our estimates also agree well with the results from local reveberation mapping studies.

  6. Detection of Signal Regulatory Protein α in Saimiri sciureus (Squirrel Monkey) by Anti-Human Monoclonal Antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Souza, Hugo Amorim dos Santos; Costa-Correa, Edmar Henrique; Bianco-Junior, Cesare; Andrade, Márcia Cristina Ribeiro; Lima-Junior, Josué da Costa; Pratt-Riccio, Lilian Rose; Daniel-Ribeiro, Cláudio Tadeu; Totino, Paulo Renato Rivas

    2017-01-01

    Non-human primates (NHP) are suitable models for studying different aspects of the human system, including pathogenesis and protective immunity to many diseases. However, the lack of specific immunological reagents for neo-tropical monkeys, such as Saimiri sciureus, is still a major factor limiting studies in these models. An alternative strategy to circumvent this obstacle has been the selection of immunological reagents directed to humans, which present cross-reactivity with NHP molecules. In this context and considering the key role of inhibitory immunoreceptors—such as the signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα)—in the regulation of immune responses, in the present study, we attempted to evaluate the ability of anti-human SIRPα monoclonal antibodies to recognize SIRPα in antigen-presenting S. sciureus peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). As shown by flow cytometry analysis, the profile of anti-SIRPα staining as well as the levels of SIRPα-positive cells in PBMC from S. sciureus were similar to those observed in human PBMC. Furthermore, using anti-SIRPα monoclonal antibody, it was possible to detect a decrease of the SIRPα levels on surface of S. sciureus cells after in vitro stimulation with lipopolysaccharides. Finally, using computed-based analysis, we observed a high degree of conservation of SIRPα across six species of primates and the presence of shared epitopes in the extracellular domain between humans and Saimiri genus that could be targeted by antibodies. In conclusion, we have identified a commercially available anti-human monoclonal antibody that is able to detect SIRPα of S. sciureus monkeys and that, therefore, can facilitate the study of the immunomodulatory role of SIRPα when S. sciureus is used as a model. PMID:29312325

  7. Detection of Signal Regulatory Protein α in Saimiri sciureus (Squirrel Monkey by Anti-Human Monoclonal Antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hugo Amorim dos Santos de Souza

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Non-human primates (NHP are suitable models for studying different aspects of the human system, including pathogenesis and protective immunity to many diseases. However, the lack of specific immunological reagents for neo-tropical monkeys, such as Saimiri sciureus, is still a major factor limiting studies in these models. An alternative strategy to circumvent this obstacle has been the selection of immunological reagents directed to humans, which present cross-reactivity with NHP molecules. In this context and considering the key role of inhibitory immunoreceptors—such as the signal regulatory protein α (SIRPα—in the regulation of immune responses, in the present study, we attempted to evaluate the ability of anti-human SIRPα monoclonal antibodies to recognize SIRPα in antigen-presenting S. sciureus peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. As shown by flow cytometry analysis, the profile of anti-SIRPα staining as well as the levels of SIRPα-positive cells in PBMC from S. sciureus were similar to those observed in human PBMC. Furthermore, using anti-SIRPα monoclonal antibody, it was possible to detect a decrease of the SIRPα levels on surface of S. sciureus cells after in vitro stimulation with lipopolysaccharides. Finally, using computed-based analysis, we observed a high degree of conservation of SIRPα across six species of primates and the presence of shared epitopes in the extracellular domain between humans and Saimiri genus that could be targeted by antibodies. In conclusion, we have identified a commercially available anti-human monoclonal antibody that is able to detect SIRPα of S. sciureus monkeys and that, therefore, can facilitate the study of the immunomodulatory role of SIRPα when S. sciureus is used as a model.

  8. Enhanced methanol production in plants provides broad spectrum insect resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Sameer; Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Harpal; Sidhu, Om Prakash; Verma, Praveen Chandra; K, Chandrashekar

    2013-01-01

    Plants naturally emit methanol as volatile organic compound. Methanol is toxic to insect pests; but the quantity produced by most of the plants is not enough to protect them against invading insect pests. In the present study, we demonstrated that the over-expression of pectin methylesterase, derived from Arabidopsis thaliana and Aspergillus niger, in transgenic tobacco plants enhances methanol production and resistance to polyphagous insect pests. Methanol content in the leaves of transgenic plants was measured using proton nuclear spectroscopy (1H NMR) and spectra showed up to 16 fold higher methanol as compared to control wild type (WT) plants. A maximum of 100 and 85% mortality in chewing insects Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera litura larvae was observed, respectively when fed on transgenic plants leaves. The surviving larvae showed less feeding, severe growth retardation and could not develop into pupae. In-planta bioassay on transgenic lines showed up to 99 and 75% reduction in the population multiplication of plant sap sucking pests Myzus persicae (aphid) and Bemisia tabaci (whitefly), respectively. Most of the phenotypic characters of transgenic plants were similar to WT plants. Confocal microscopy showed no deformities in cellular integrity, structure and density of stomata and trichomes of transgenic plants compared to WT. Pollen germination and tube formation was also not affected in transgenic plants. Cell wall enzyme transcript levels were comparable with WT. This study demonstrated for the first time that methanol emission can be utilized for imparting broad range insect resistance in plants.

  9. Enhanced Methanol Production in Plants Provides Broad Spectrum Insect Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixit, Sameer; Upadhyay, Santosh Kumar; Singh, Harpal; Sidhu, Om Prakash; Verma, Praveen Chandra; K, Chandrashekar

    2013-01-01

    Plants naturally emit methanol as volatile organic compound. Methanol is toxic to insect pests; but the quantity produced by most of the plants is not enough to protect them against invading insect pests. In the present study, we demonstrated that the over-expression of pectin methylesterase, derived from Arabidopsis thaliana and Aspergillus niger, in transgenic tobacco plants enhances methanol production and resistance to polyphagous insect pests. Methanol content in the leaves of transgenic plants was measured using proton nuclear spectroscopy (1H NMR) and spectra showed up to 16 fold higher methanol as compared to control wild type (WT) plants. A maximum of 100 and 85% mortality in chewing insects Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera litura larvae was observed, respectively when fed on transgenic plants leaves. The surviving larvae showed less feeding, severe growth retardation and could not develop into pupae. In-planta bioassay on transgenic lines showed up to 99 and 75% reduction in the population multiplication of plant sap sucking pests Myzus persicae (aphid) and Bemisia tabaci (whitefly), respectively. Most of the phenotypic characters of transgenic plants were similar to WT plants. Confocal microscopy showed no deformities in cellular integrity, structure and density of stomata and trichomes of transgenic plants compared to WT. Pollen germination and tube formation was also not affected in transgenic plants. Cell wall enzyme transcript levels were comparable with WT. This study demonstrated for the first time that methanol emission can be utilized for imparting broad range insect resistance in plants. PMID:24223989

  10. Enhanced methanol production in plants provides broad spectrum insect resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameer Dixit

    Full Text Available Plants naturally emit methanol as volatile organic compound. Methanol is toxic to insect pests; but the quantity produced by most of the plants is not enough to protect them against invading insect pests. In the present study, we demonstrated that the over-expression of pectin methylesterase, derived from Arabidopsis thaliana and Aspergillus niger, in transgenic tobacco plants enhances methanol production and resistance to polyphagous insect pests. Methanol content in the leaves of transgenic plants was measured using proton nuclear spectroscopy (1H NMR and spectra showed up to 16 fold higher methanol as compared to control wild type (WT plants. A maximum of 100 and 85% mortality in chewing insects Helicoverpa armigera and Spodoptera litura larvae was observed, respectively when fed on transgenic plants leaves. The surviving larvae showed less feeding, severe growth retardation and could not develop into pupae. In-planta bioassay on transgenic lines showed up to 99 and 75% reduction in the population multiplication of plant sap sucking pests Myzus persicae (aphid and Bemisia tabaci (whitefly, respectively. Most of the phenotypic characters of transgenic plants were similar to WT plants. Confocal microscopy showed no deformities in cellular integrity, structure and density of stomata and trichomes of transgenic plants compared to WT. Pollen germination and tube formation was also not affected in transgenic plants. Cell wall enzyme transcript levels were comparable with WT. This study demonstrated for the first time that methanol emission can be utilized for imparting broad range insect resistance in plants.

  11. Developments in therapy with monoclonal antibodies and related proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shepard, H Michael; Phillips, Gail Lewis; D Thanos, Christopher; Feldmann, Marc

    2017-06-01

    Monoclonal antibody therapeutics have been approved for over 30 targets and diseases, most commonly cancer. Antibodies have become the new backbone of the pharmaceutical industry, which previously relied on small molecules. Compared with small molecules, monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have exquisite target selectivity and hence less toxicity as a result of binding other targets. The clinical value of both mAbs and ligand traps has been proven. New applications of mAbs are being tested and mAbs have now been designed to target two (bi-specific, eg TNF-α and IL-17) or more targets simultaneously, augmenting their therapeutic potential. Because of space limitations and the wide ranging scope of this review there are regrettably, but inevitably, omissions and missing citations. We have chosen to highlight the first successes in inflammatory diseases and cancer, but a broader overview of approved mAbs and related molecules can be found in Table 1. © Royal College of Physicians 2017. All rights reserved.

  12. Characterization of pathogenic human monoclonal autoantibodies against GM-CSF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yanni; Thomson, Christy A; Allan, Lenka L; Jackson, Linda M; Olson, Melanie; Hercus, Timothy R; Nero, Tracy L; Turner, Amanda; Parker, Michael W; Lopez, Angel L; Waddell, Thomas K; Anderson, Gary P; Hamilton, John A; Schrader, John W

    2013-05-07

    The origin of pathogenic autoantibodies remains unknown. Idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis is caused by autoantibodies against granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF). We generated 19 monoclonal autoantibodies against GM-CSF from six patients with idiopathic pulmonary alveolar proteinosis. The autoantibodies used multiple V genes, excluding preferred V-gene use as an etiology, and targeted at least four nonoverlapping epitopes on GM-CSF, suggesting that GM-CSF is driving the autoantibodies and not a B-cell epitope on a pathogen cross-reacting with GM-CSF. The number of somatic mutations in the autoantibodies suggests that the memory B cells have been helped by T cells and re-entered germinal centers. All autoantibodies neutralized GM-CSF bioactivity, with general correlations to affinity and off-rate. The binding of certain autoantibodies was changed by point mutations in GM-CSF that reduced binding to the GM-CSF receptor. Those monoclonal autoantibodies that potently neutralize GM-CSF may be useful in treating inflammatory disease, such as rheumatoid arthritis and multiple sclerosis, cancer, and pain.

  13. Monoclonal antibodies directed to fucoidan preparations from brown algae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas A Torode

    Full Text Available Cell walls of the brown algae contain a diverse range of polysaccharides with useful bioactivities. The precise structures of the sulfated fucan/fucoidan group of polysaccharides and their roles in generating cell wall architectures and cell properties are not known in detail. Four rat monoclonal antibodies, BAM1 to BAM4, directed to sulfated fucan preparations, have been generated and used to dissect the heterogeneity of brown algal cell wall polysaccharides. BAM1 and BAM4, respectively, bind to a non-sulfated epitope and a sulfated epitope present in the sulfated fucan preparations. BAM2 and BAM3 identified additional distinct epitopes present in the fucoidan preparations. All four epitopes, not yet fully characterised, occur widely within the major brown algal taxonomic groups and show divergent distribution patterns in tissues. The analysis of cell wall extractions and fluorescence imaging reveal differences in the occurrence of the BAM1 to BAM4 epitopes in various tissues of Fucus vesiculosus. In Ectocarpus subulatus, a species closely related to the brown algal model Ectocarpus siliculosus, the BAM4 sulfated epitope was modulated in relation to salinity levels. This new set of monoclonal antibodies will be useful for the dissection of the highly complex and yet poorly resolved sulfated polysaccharides in the brown algae in relation to their ecological and economic significance.

  14. Monoclonal antibodies specific to heat-treated porcine blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja Nhari, Raja Mohd Hafidz; Hamid, Muhajir; Rasli, Nurmunirah Mohamad; Omar, Abdul Rahman; El Sheikha, Aly Farag; Mustafa, Shuhaimi

    2016-05-01

    Porcine blood is potentially being utilized in food as a binder, gelling agent, emulsifier or colorant. However, for certain communities, the usage of animal blood in food is strictly prohibited owing to religious concerns and health reasons. This study reports the development of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against heat-treated soluble proteins (HSPs) of autoclaved porcine blood; characterization of MAbs against blood, non-blood and plasma from different animal species using qualitative indirect non-competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA); and immunoblotting of antigenic components in HSPs of porcine blood. Fifteen MAbs are specific to heat-treated and raw porcine blood and not cross-reacted with other animal blood and non-blood proteins (meat and non-meat). Twelve MAbs are specific to porcine plasma, while three MAbs specific to porcine plasma are cross-reacted with chicken plasma. Immunoblotting revealed antigenic protein bands (∼60, ∼85-100 and ∼250 kDa) in porcine blood and plasma recognized by the MAbs. Selection of MAbs that recognized 60 kDa HSPs of porcine blood and plasma as novel monoclonal antibodies would be useful for detection of porcine plasma in processed food using the immunoassay method. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  15. Ofatumumab: a novel monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas S Lin

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Thomas S LinGlaxoSmithKline Oncology R&D, Collegeville, PA, USAAbstract: Ofatumumab, a novel humanized monoclonal anti-CD20 antibody, was recently approved by the FDA for the treatment of fludarabine and alemtuzumab refractory chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL. Ofatumumab effectively induces complement-dependent cytotoxicity (CDC in vitro, and recent studies demonstrated that ofatumumab also effectively mediates antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC. Pharmacokinetic studies indicated that increased exposure to the antibody correlated with improved clinical outcome in CLL. Thus, pharmacogenomics may be important in identifying which patients are more likely to respond to ofatumumab therapy, although such studies have not yet been performed. Patients with the high-affinity FCGR3a 158 V/V polymorphism may be more likely to respond to therapy, if ADCC is the primary in vivo mechanism of action of ofatumumab. Patients with increased expression of the complement defense proteins CD55 and CD59 may be less likely to respond if ofatumumab works in vivo primarily via CDC. Patients with increased metabolism and clearance of ofatumumab may have lower exposure and be less likely to respond clinically. Thus, pharmacogenomics may determine the responsiveness of patients to ofatumumab therapy.Keywords: monoclonal antibody, CD20, CLL, NHL, lymphoma

  16. Prediction and Reduction of the Aggregation of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Kant, Rob; Karow-Zwick, Anne R; Van Durme, Joost; Blech, Michaela; Gallardo, Rodrigo; Seeliger, Daniel; Aßfalg, Kerstin; Baatsen, Pieter; Compernolle, Griet; Gils, Ann; Studts, Joey M; Schulz, Patrick; Garidel, Patrick; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic

    2017-04-21

    Protein aggregation remains a major area of focus in the production of monoclonal antibodies. Improving the intrinsic properties of antibodies can improve manufacturability, attrition rates, safety, formulation, titers, immunogenicity, and solubility. Here, we explore the potential of predicting and reducing the aggregation propensity of monoclonal antibodies, based on the identification of aggregation-prone regions and their contribution to the thermodynamic stability of the protein. Although aggregation-prone regions are thought to occur in the antigen binding region to drive hydrophobic binding with antigen, we were able to rationally design variants that display a marked decrease in aggregation propensity while retaining antigen binding through the introduction of artificial aggregation gatekeeper residues. The reduction in aggregation propensity was accompanied by an increase in expression titer, showing that reducing protein aggregation is beneficial throughout the development process. The data presented show that this approach can significantly reduce liabilities in novel therapeutic antibodies and proteins, leading to a more efficient path to clinical studies. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  17. Generation of monoclonal antibodies against highly conserved antigens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongzhe Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Therapeutic antibody development is one of the fastest growing areas of the pharmaceutical industry. Generating high-quality monoclonal antibodies against a given therapeutic target is very crucial for the success of the drug development. However, due to immune tolerance, some proteins that are highly conserved between mice and humans are not very immunogenic in mice, making it difficult to generate antibodies using a conventional approach. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this report, the impaired immune tolerance of NZB/W mice was exploited to generate monoclonal antibodies against highly conserved or self-antigens. Using two highly conserved human antigens (MIF and HMGB1 and one mouse self-antigen (TNF-alpha as examples, we demonstrate here that multiple clones of high affinity, highly specific antibodies with desired biological activities can be generated, using the NZB/W mouse as the immunization host and a T cell-specific tag fused to a recombinant antigen to stimulate the immune system. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We developed an efficient and universal method for generating surrogate or therapeutic antibodies against "difficult antigens" to facilitate the development of therapeutic antibodies.

  18. Monoclonal anti-elastin antibody labelled with technetium-99m

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oliveira, Marcia B.N. de; Silva, Claudia R. da; Araujo, Adriano C. de; Bernardo Filho, Mario [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes. Lab. de Radiofarmacia; Porto, Luis Cristovao M.S.; Gutfilen, Bianca [Universidade do Estado, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Instituto de Biologia Roberto Alcantara Gomes; Souza, J.E.Q. [Instituto Nacional do Cancer, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Centro de Pesquisa Basica; Frier, Malcolm [University Hospital, Nottingham (United Kingdom). Dept. of Medical Physics

    1999-11-01

    Technetium-99m ({sup 99m} Tc) is widely employed in nuclear medicine due to its desirable physical, chemical and biological properties. Moreover, it is easily available and normally is inexpensive. A reducing agent is necessary to label cells and molecules with {sup 99m} Tc and stannous chloride (Sn C L{sub 2}) is usually employed. Elastin is the functional protein component of the elastic fiber and it is related with some diseases such as arteriosclerosis, pulmonary emphysema and others. The present study refers to the preparation of the {sup 99m} Tc labeled monoclonal anti-elastin antibody. The monoclonal antibody was incubated with an excess of 2-iminothiolane. The free thiol groups created, were capable of binding with the reduced technetium. Labeling was an exchange reaction with {sup 99m} Tc-glucoheptonate. The labeled preparation was left at 4 deg C for one hour. Then, it was passed through a Sephadex G50 column. Various fractions were collected and counted. A peak corresponding to the radiolabeled antibody was obtained. Stability studies of the labelled anti-elastin were performed at 0,3 6, 24 hours, at both 4 deg C or room temperature. The biodistribution pattern of the {sup 99m} Tc-anti-elastin was studied in healthy male Swiss mice. The immunoreactivity was also determined. An useful labeled-anti-elastin was obtained to future immunoscintigraphic investigations. (author) 4 refs., 7 figs., 6 tabs.

  19. Hepatitis B viral antigenic structure: signature analysis by monoclonal radioimmunoassays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wands, J R; Wong, M A; Shorey, J; Brown, R D; Marciniak, R A; Isselbacher, K J

    1984-04-01

    An approach has been developed for the analysis of hepatitis B viral (HBV) antigenic structure that creates numerical "signatures" of HBV strains. This technique employs high-affinity IgM and IgG monoclonal antibodies (anti-HBsAg) directed toward distinct and separate determinants on hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg). Such antibodies have been used to develop sensitive and specific radioimmuno-assays for measurement of HBsAg-associated determinants in serum. In performing "signature" analysis separate binding curves for each monoclonal anti-HBsAg are generated by measuring immunoreactivity in serial dilutions of HBsAg-positive serum. Since the HBsAg concentration in serum is unknown, the binding profiles of groups of samples from the same "classic" HBV subtype are aligned by an iterative maximum likelihood procedure to give the numerical signature of that HBV subtype. By using this approach, HBsAg shows far more antigenic heterogeneity than previously recognized by polyvalent anti-HBsAg antibodies. Indeed, there are subgroups within the classic HBsAg subtypes. In addition, the a domain (common to all known subtypes or strains of HBV) has been shown to be multideterminant. Thus, these studies have demonstrated heretofore unrecognized differences in HBV subtypes. This approach also has broader significance for the study of subtle or major antigenic changes among other viral agents since it is not necessary to know the concentration of virus or viral protein in complex protein mixtures.

  20. Plant Factories for the Production of Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheshukova, E V; Komarova, T V; Dorokhov, Y L

    2016-10-01

    Like animal cells, plant cells bear mechanisms for protein synthesis and posttranslational modification (glycosylation and phosphorylation) that allow them to be seriously considered as factories for therapeutic proteins, including antibodies, with the development of biotechnology. The plant platform for monoclonal antibody production is an attractive approach due to its flexibility, speed, scalability, low cost of production, and lack of contamination risk from animal-derived pathogens. Contemporary production approaches for therapeutic proteins rely on transgenic plants that are obtained via the stable transformation of plant cells as well as the transient (temporary) expression of foreign proteins. In this review, we discuss present-day approaches for monoclonal antibody production in plants (MAPP), features of carbohydrate composition, and methods for the humanization of the MAPP carbohydrate profile. MAPPs that have successfully passed preclinical studies and may be promising for use in clinical practice are presented here. Perspectives on using MAPPs are determined by analyzing their economic benefits and production rates, which are especially important in personalized cancer therapy as well as in cases of bioterrorism and pandemics.

  1. [Improved protein-A chromatography for monoclonal antibody purification].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Quan; Toh, Phyllicia; Hoi, Aina; Xian, Mo; Peng, Xinying; Yang, Yuansheng; Zhang, Haibo; Nian, Rui; Zhang, Wei

    2016-06-25

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibodies become the major product class within the biopharmaceutical market. Protein A as the first capture step is still dominant in current platforms for purification of monoclonal antibodies. In this study, we developed a new antibody harvest process that incorporates acidic treatment of cell harvest, demonstrating high process yield, improved clearance of host cell associated contaminants, like non-histone host cell protein, histone, DNA and heteroaggregates. Host protein contamination was reduced about 10-fold compared to protein A loaded with harvest clarified by centrifugation and microfiltration. Turbidity increase of eluted IgG upon pH neutralization was nearly eliminated. Residual levels of impurities in the protein A eluate were achieved that potentially meet requirements of drug substance and thus alleviate the burden for further impurities removal in subsequent chromatography steps. The mechanism of host cell associated contaminants removal during acidic treatment was also explored. After a polishing step by Capto adhere, host cell protein was reduced to less than 5 ppm, DNA less than 1 ppb, histone to undetectable level, heteroaggregates less than 0.01% with total IgG recovery around 87%. This efficient process can be easily integrated into current IgG purification platforms, and may overcome downstream processing challenges.

  2. Preparation of a generic monoclonal antibody and development of a highly sensitive indirect competitive ELISA for the detection of phenothiazines in animal feed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Wang, Yulian; Pan, Yuanhu; Chen, Dongmei; Liu, Zhenli; Feng, Liang; Peng, Dapeng; Yuan, Zonghui

    2017-04-15

    In this study, a broadly specific monoclonal antibody was prepared and a sensitive monoclonal-based indirect competitive enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ic-ELISA) was subsequently developed to determine the phenothiazines in animal feed with a simple sample preparation procedure for the first time. The obtained antibody 3A5 was of the immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) isotype possessing a kappa light chain, which broadly cross-reacted to nine phenothiazines. The limit of detections of the method ranged from 1.1μgkg-1 to 15.3μgkg-1 in the swine feed and the fish feed. The recoveries of the phenothiazines were in the range of 78.2-116.6%. The coefficient of variations were less than 16.7%. A positive correlation (r>0.9249) between the results of the ic-ELISA and the high-performance liquid chromatography were also observed, which indicated that the developed ic-ELISA is reliable and can be used to monitor phenothiazines in animal feed. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Synthetic methyl hexagalacturonate hapten inhibitors of antihomogalacturonan monoclonal antibodies LM7, JIM5 and JIM7

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Mads Hartvig; Willats, William George Tycho; Knox, J. Paul

    2003-01-01

    A range of synthetic methyl hexagalacturonates were used as potential hapten inhibitors in competitive-inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) with anti-homogalacturonan monoclonal antibodies LM7, JIM5 and JIM7. The selective inhibition of these antibodies by different haptens...... provides insight into the structures of the partially methyl-esterified pectin epitopes of these widely used monoclonal antibodies....

  4. Monoclonal antibodies to cyclodiene insecticides and method for detecting the same

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanker, Larry H.; Vanderlaan, Martin; Watkins, Bruce E.

    1994-01-01

    Methods are described for making specific monoclonal antibodies useful for detection of cyclodienes in foods and environmental samples. Monoclonal antibodies specifically reactive with cyclodienes can detect accumulated pesticides in food, tissue or environmental samples. Extraction and preparation of organic samples for immunoassay in a polar-nonpolar reaction medium permits detection of halogenated organic ring structures at concentrations in samples.

  5. Production of a new anti-A monoclonal reagent | Sadiq | African ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Monoclonal antibodies are essential tools in molecular and cellular immunology research. They have essentially replaced the polyclonal antibodies in identifying blood groups and detecting cell markers and pathogenic agents. The aim of the present study is to produce monoclonal antibody identifying the ABO blood ...

  6. Development and characterization of mouse monoclonal antibodies specific for chicken interleukin 18

    Science.gov (United States)

    Four mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) which are specific for chicken interleukin 18 (chIL18) were produced and characterized by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blotting, quantitative real-time PCR and neutralization assays. Monoclonal antibodies specific for chIL18 identified a ...

  7. The classification of Sejroe group serovars of Leptospira interrogans with monoclonal antibodies

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Terpstra, W. J.; Korver, H.; van Leeuwen, J.; Klatser, P. R.; Kolk, A. H.

    1985-01-01

    Using the hybridoma technique we produced monoclonal antibodies to serovars of Leptospira interrogans. We focussed on serovar hardjo which is an important pathogen for humans and animals, and on other serovars of the Sejroe group. With combinations of monoclonals, characteristic patterns of

  8. Effect of monoclonal antibodies on phagocytosis and killing of Toxoplasma gondii by normal macrophages.

    OpenAIRE

    Hauser, W E; Remington, J S

    1981-01-01

    Treatment of intact toxoplasma tachyzoites with individual mouse monoclonal antibodies to toxoplasma which are directed against individual membrane-associated antigenic determinants facilitated the phagocytosis of toxoplasma and also prepared the toxoplasma for intracellular destruction by nonelicited mouse peritoneal macrophages. In instances in which the organisms survived intracellularly, their multiplication was significantly reduced. Such monoclonal antibodies should be useful in further...

  9. Two monoclonal anti-CD3 antibodies can induce different events in human T lymphocyte activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roosnek, E. E.; van Lier, R. A.; Aarden, L. A.

    1987-01-01

    Two monoclonal antibodies, WT32 and CLB-T3/4.2a, directed against the CD3 complex were used to study the mechanism of activation of human peripheral T lymphocytes. WT32, a mouse monoclonal IgG2a antibody with a low avidity (much less than OKT3) for the CD3 complex, effectively induces mitogenesis of

  10. An ELISA-inhibition test using monoclonal antibody for the serology of leprosy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klatser, P. R.; de Wit, M. Y.; Kolk, A. H.

    1985-01-01

    In this study a mouse monoclonal antibody (47-9) is described, which recognized an epitope on the 36 kD protein antigen of M. leprae. The monoclonal antibody showed specificity for M. leprae. An ELISA-inhibition test based on the competitive inhibition by antibodies from human test sera of the

  11. Systematic comparison of monoclonal versus polyclonal antibodies for mapping histone modifications by ChIP-seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, Michele; Xue, Catherine; Li, Catherine; Farjoun, Yossi; Gienger, Elizabeth; Yofe, Ido; Gladden, Adrianne; Epstein, Charles B; Cornett, Evan M; Rothbart, Scott B; Nusbaum, Chad; Goren, Alon

    2016-01-01

    The robustness of ChIP-seq datasets is highly dependent upon the antibodies used. Currently, polyclonal antibodies are the standard despite several limitations: They are non-renewable, vary in performance between lots and need to be validated with each new lot. In contrast, monoclonal antibody lots are renewable and provide consistent performance. To increase ChIP-seq standardization, we investigated whether monoclonal antibodies could replace polyclonal antibodies. We compared monoclonal antibodies that target five key histone modifications (H3K4me1, H3K4me3, H3K9me3, H3K27ac and H3K27me3) to their polyclonal counterparts in both human and mouse cells. Overall performance was highly similar for four monoclonal/polyclonal pairs, including when we used two distinct lots of the same monoclonal antibody. In contrast, the binding patterns for H3K27ac differed substantially between polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. However, this was most likely due to the distinct immunogen used rather than the clonality of the antibody. Altogether, we found that monoclonal antibodies as a class perform equivalently to polyclonal antibodies for the detection of histone post-translational modifications in both human and mouse. Accordingly, we recommend the use of monoclonal antibodies in ChIP-seq experiments.

  12. Effect of Surfactants on Mechanical, Thermal, and Photostability of a Monoclonal Antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agarkhed, Meera; O'Dell, Courtney; Hsieh, Ming-Ching; Zhang, Jingming; Goldstein, Joel; Srivastava, Arvind

    2018-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the effect of commonly used surfactants (at 0.01% w/v concentration) on mechanical, thermal, and photostability of a monoclonal antibody (MAb1) of IgG1 sub-class and to evaluate the minimum concentration of surfactant (Polysorbate 80) required in protecting MAb1 from mechanical stress. Surfactants evaluated were non-ionic surfactants, Polysorbate 80, Polysorbate 20, Pluronic F-68 (polyoxyethylene-polyoxypropylene block polymer), Brij 35 (polyoxyethylene lauryl ether), Triton X-100, and an anionic surfactant, Caprylic acid (1-Heptanecarboxylic acid). After evaluating effect of surfactants and determining stabilizing effect of Polysorbate 80 against mechanical stress without compromising thermal and photostability of MAb1, the minimum concentration of Polysorbate 80 required for mechanical stability was further examined. Polysorbate 80 concentration was varied from 0 to 0.02%. Mechanical stability was evaluated by agitation of MAb1 at 300 rotations per minute at room temperature for 72 h. Samples were analyzed for purity by SEC-HPLC, turbidity by absorbance at 350 nm, visible particles by visual inspection, and sub-visible particles by light obscuration technique on a particle analyzer. All non-ionic surfactants tested showed a similar effect in protecting against mechanical stress and did not exhibit any significant negative effect on thermal and photostability. However, Caprylic acid had a slightly negative effect on mechanical and photostability when compared to the non-ionic surfactants or sample without surfactant. This work demonstrated that polysorbate 80 is better than other surfactants tested and that a concentration of at least 0.005% (w/v) Polysorbate 80 is needed to protect MAb1 against mechanical stress.

  13. Prevention of herpes simplex virus induced stromal keratitis by a glycoprotein B-specific monoclonal antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adalbert Krawczyk

    Full Text Available The increasing incidence of acyclovir (ACV and multidrug-resistant strains in patients with corneal HSV-1 infections leading to Herpetic Stromal Keratitis (HSK is a major health problem in industrialized countries and often results in blindness. To overcome this obstacle, we have previously developed an HSV-gB-specific monoclonal antibody (mAb 2c that proved to be highly protective in immunodeficient NOD/SCID-mice towards genital infections. In the present study, we examined the effectivity of mAb 2c in preventing the immunopathological disease HSK in the HSK BALB/c mouse model. Therefore, mice were inoculated with HSV-1 strain KOS on the scarified cornea to induce HSK and subsequently either systemically or topically treated with mAb 2c. Systemic treatment was performed by intravenous administration of mAb 2c 24 h prior to infection (pre-exposure prophylaxis or 24, 40, and 56 hours after infection (post-exposure immunotherapy. Topical treatment was performed by periodical inoculations (5 times per day of antibody-containing eye drops as control, starting at 24 h post infection. Systemic antibody treatment markedly reduced viral loads at the site of infection and completely protected mice from developing HSK. The administration of the antiviral antibody prior or post infection was equally effective. Topical treatment had no improving effect on the severity of HSK. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that mAb 2c proved to be an excellent drug for the treatment of corneal HSV-infections and for prevention of HSK and blindness. Moreover, the humanized counterpart (mAb hu2c was equally effective in protecting mice from HSV-induced HSK when compared to the parental mouse antibody. These results warrant the future development of this antibody as a novel approach for the treatment of corneal HSV-infections in humans.

  14. Isolation of HIV-1-neutralizing mucosal monoclonal antibodies from human colostrum.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Friedman

    Full Text Available Generation of potent anti-HIV antibody responses in mucosal compartments is a potential requirement of a transmission-blocking HIV vaccine. HIV-specific, functional antibody responses are present in breast milk, and these mucosal antibody responses may play a role in protection of the majority of HIV-exposed, breastfeeding infants. Therefore, characterization of HIV-specific antibodies produced by B cells in milk could guide the development of vaccines that elicit protective mucosal antibody responses.We isolated B cells from colostrum of an HIV-infected lactating woman with a detectable neutralization response in milk and recombinantly produced and characterized the resulting HIV-1 Envelope (Env-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs.The identified HIV-1 Env-specific colostrum mAbs, CH07 and CH08, represent two of the first mucosally-derived anti-HIV antibodies yet to be reported. Colostrum mAb CH07 is a highly-autoreactive, weakly-neutralizing gp140-specific mAb that binds to linear epitopes in the gp120 C5 region and gp41 fusion domain. In contrast, colostrum mAb CH08 is a nonpolyreactive CD4-inducible (CD4i gp120-specific mAb with moderate breadth of neutralization.These novel HIV-neutralizing mAbs isolated from a mucosal compartment provide insight into the ability of mucosal B cell populations to produce functional anti-HIV antibodies that may contribute to protection against virus acquisition at mucosal surfaces.

  15. Detection of Parasite Antigens in Leishmania infantum–Infected Spleen Tissue by Monoclonal Antibody-, Piezoelectric-Based Immunosensors

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    G. Cabral-Miranda; J. R. de Jesus; P. R. S. Oliveira; G. S. G. Britto; L. C. Pontes-de-Carvalho; R. F. Dutra; N. M. Alcântara-Neves

    2014-01-01

    .... The use of monoclonal antibodies has ensured high specificity to immunodiagnosis. The development of an immunosensor, coupling a monoclonal antibody to a bioelectronic device capable of quickly detecting Leishmania sp...

  16. Monoclonal Antibodies against the MET/HGF Receptor and Its Ligand: Multitask Tools with Applications from Basic Research to Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Prat

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies can be seen as valuable tools for many aspects of basic as well as applied sciences. In the case of MET/HGFR, they allowed the identification of truncated isoforms of the receptor, as well as the dissection of different epitopes, establishing structure–function relationships. Antibodies directed against MET extracellular domain were found to be full or partial receptor agonists or antagonists. The agonists can mimic the effects of the different isoforms of the natural ligand, but with the advantage of being more stable than the latter. Thus, some agonist antibodies promote all the biological responses triggered by MET activation, including motility, proliferation, morphogenesis, and protection from apoptosis, while others can induce only a migratory response. On the other hand, antagonists can inhibit MET-driven biological functions either by competing with the ligand or by removing the receptor from the cell surface. Since MET/HGFR is often over-expressed and/or aberrantly activated in tumors, monoclonal antibodies can be used as probes for MET detection or as “bullets” to target MET-expressing tumor cells, thus pointing to their use in diagnosis and therapy.

  17. Monoclonal Antibodies against the MET/HGF Receptor and Its Ligand: Multitask Tools with Applications from Basic Research to Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prat, Maria; Oltolina, Francesca; Basilico, Cristina

    2014-12-03

    Monoclonal antibodies can be seen as valuable tools for many aspects of basic as well as applied sciences. In the case of MET/HGFR, they allowed the identification of truncated isoforms of the receptor, as well as the dissection of different epitopes, establishing structure-function relationships. Antibodies directed against MET extracellular domain were found to be full or partial receptor agonists or antagonists. The agonists can mimic the effects of the different isoforms of the natural ligand, but with the advantage of being more stable than the latter. Thus, some agonist antibodies promote all the biological responses triggered by MET activation, including motility, proliferation, morphogenesis, and protection from apoptosis, while others can induce only a migratory response. On the other hand, antagonists can inhibit MET-driven biological functions either by competing with the ligand or by removing the receptor from the cell surface. Since MET/HGFR is often over-expressed and/or aberrantly activated in tumors, monoclonal antibodies can be used as probes for MET detection or as "bullets" to target MET-expressing tumor cells, thus pointing to their use in diagnosis and therapy.

  18. Engineering, expression in transgenic plants and characterisation of E559, a rabies virus-neutralising monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dolleweerd, Craig J; Teh, Audrey Y-H; Banyard, Ashley C; Both, Leonard; Lotter-Stark, Hester C T; Tsekoa, Tsepo; Phahladira, Baby; Shumba, Wonderful; Chakauya, Ereck; Sabeta, Claude T; Gruber, Clemens; Fooks, Anthony R; Chikwamba, Rachel K; Ma, Julian K-C

    2014-07-15

    Rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) currently comprises administration of rabies vaccine together with rabies immunoglobulin (RIG) of either equine or human origin. In the developing world, RIG preparations are expensive, often in short supply, and of variable efficacy. Therefore, we are seeking to develop a monoclonal antibody cocktail to replace RIG. Here, we describe the cloning, engineering and production in plants of a candidate monoclonal antibody (E559) for inclusion in such a cocktail. The murine constant domains of E559 were replaced with human IgG1κ constant domains and the resulting chimeric mouse-human genes were cloned into plant expression vectors for stable nuclear transformation of Nicotiana tabacum. The plant-expressed, chimeric antibody was purified and biochemically characterized, was demonstrated to neutralize rabies virus in a fluorescent antibody virus neutralization assay, and conferred protection in a hamster challenge model. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America.

  19. Broad vs. Narrow Brand Strategies: The Effects of Association Accessibility on Brand Performance

    OpenAIRE

    Olsen, Lars Erling

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this dissertation is to investigate whether brands pursuing a narrow brand strategy perform better than brands pursuing a broad brand strategy. Specifically, the dissertation asks whether associative strength influences a brand’s ability to fight off new competitors (protective performance) and to enhance the evaluation of brand extensions from that brand (growth performance). This dissertation predicts that limiting the number of diagnostic brand associations for brand A ...

  20. Use of commercially available rabbit monoclonal antibodies for immunofluorescence double staining

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bzorek, M.; Stamp, I.M.; Frederiksen, L.

    2008-01-01

    Immunohistochemistry, that is, the use of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies to detect cell and tissue antigens at a microscopical level is a powerful tool for both research and diagnostic purposes. Especially in the field of hematologic disease, there is often a need to detect several antigens...... synchronously, and we report here a fast and easy technique for demonstrating more than 1 antigen in 1 slide using immunofluorescence. We have used commercially available rabbit monoclonal antibodies (Cyclin D1, CD3, CD5, CD23, etc.) paired with mouse monoclonal antibodies (CD7, CD20, CD79a, Pax-5, etc.......) for double immunofluorescence labeling on paraffin-embedded tissue sections. Commercially available rabbit monoclonal antibodies in combination with mouse monoclonal antibodies proved useful in double immunofluorescence labeling on paraffin-embedded tissue, and all combinations used yielded excellent results...

  1. Broadly neutralizing human antibody that recognizes the receptor-binding pocket of influenza virus hemagglutinin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Whittle, James R.R.; Zhang, Ruijun; Khurana, Surender; King, Lisa R.; Manischewitz, Jody; Golding, Hana; Dormitzer, Philip R.; Haynes, Barton F.; Walter, Emmanuel B.; Moody, M. Anthony; Kepler, Thomas B.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Harrison, Stephen C. (Harvard-Med); (Novartis); (US-FDA); (Duke)

    2011-09-20

    Seasonal antigenic drift of circulating influenza virus leads to a requirement for frequent changes in vaccine composition, because exposure or vaccination elicits human antibodies with limited cross-neutralization of drifted strains. We describe a human monoclonal antibody, CH65, obtained by isolating rearranged heavy- and light-chain genes from sorted single plasma cells, coming from a subject immunized with the 2007 trivalent influenza vaccine. The crystal structure of a complex of the hemagglutinin (HA) from H1N1 strain A/Solomon Islands/3/2006 with the Fab of CH65 shows that the tip of the CH65 heavy-chain complementarity determining region 3 (CDR3) inserts into the receptor binding pocket on HA1, mimicking in many respects the interaction of the physiological receptor, sialic acid. CH65 neutralizes infectivity of 30 out of 36 H1N1 strains tested. The resistant strains have a single-residue insertion near the rim of the sialic-acid pocket. We conclude that broad neutralization of influenza virus can be achieved by antibodies with contacts that mimic those of the receptor.

  2. Biological activity of sedaxane---a novel broad-spectrum fungicide for seed treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeun, Ronald; Scalliet, Gabriel; Oostendorp, Michael

    2013-04-01

    Sedaxane is a new broad-spectrum seed treatment fungicide developed by Syngenta Crop Protection for control of seed- and soil-borne diseases in a broad range of crops. Its physicochemical properties and activity spectrum have been optimised for use as a seed treatment providing both local and systemic protection of the seed and roots of target crops. Sedaxane inhibits respiration by binding to the succinate dehydrogenase complex in the fungal mitochondrium. Its activity spectrum covers seed-borne fungi such as Ustilago nuda, Tilletia caries, Monographella nivalis and Pyrenophora graminea, as well as the soil-borne fungi Rhizoctonia solani, R. cerealis and Typhula incarnata. Under greenhouse conditions, sedaxane showed high levels and consistent protection against U. nuda, P. graminea and Rhizoctonia spp. Under field conditions, efficacy against Rhizoctonia spp. resulted in increased yield compared with the untreated check. Efficacy against snow mould has been shown under very high disease pressure conditions. The combination of sedaxane plus fludioxonil against snow mould can provide resistance management for sustainable use. The broad spectrum and high level of activity in combination with excellent crop tolerance allow the use of sedaxane as a seed treatment in a wide variety of crops. It is a potential tool for precautionary resistance management when combined with other fungicides, especially against pathogens showing a potential for resistance development, such as M. nivalis. © 2012 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Homotypic aggregation of human cell lines by HLA class II-, class Ia- and HLA-G-specific monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Odum, Niels; Ledbetter, J A; Martin, P

    1991-01-01

    adhesion between T and B cells by activating the CD18/CD11a (LFA-1) adhesion pathway. Here we report that monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against HLA-DR (L243, p4.1, HB10a, VI15) and certain broad class II reacting mAb (TU35, TU39), but not anti-DQ (TU22, Leu-10) mAb, induced homotypic aggregation of human......, but not the class I-negative parental line, 221, showed homotypic aggregation in response to an HLA-G specific mAb (87G) and a broad reacting class I-specific mAb (IOT2). Both cell lines responded with aggregation to anti-class II mAb (TU35). The anti-class I mAb, W6/32, had no effect on all cell lines tested......Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules have been implicated in cell adhesion in two ways. In addition to the well-established role of class II antigens in low-affinity adhesion provided by interactions between class II and CD4, recent data indicated that class II may also induce...

  4. Functional and immunochemical cross-reactivity of V2-specific monoclonal antibodies from HIV-1-infected individuals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gorny, Miroslaw K.; Pan, Ruimin; Williams, Constance; Wang, Xiao-Hong; Volsky, Barbara; O; Neal, Timothy; Spurrier, Brett; Sampson, Jared M.; Li, Liuzhe; Seaman, Michael S.; Kong, Xiang-Peng; Zolla-Pazner, Susan (Harvard-Med); (VA); (NYUSM)

    2012-05-18

    The recent analysis of the first successful RV144 vaccine trial revealed that a high titer of plasma anti-V2 antibodies (Abs) correlated with a decreased risk of HIV-1 infection in vaccine recipients. To understand the mechanism of immune correlates, we studied seven anti-V2 monoclonal Abs (mAbs) developed from HIV-1 infected individuals. The V2 mAbs target conserved epitopes, including the binding site for {alpha}4{beta}7 integrin, and are broadly cross-reactive with various gp120 proteins. Preferential usage of the VH1-69 gene by V2 mAbs may depend on selection by the same antigenic structure. Six of seven V2 mAbs weakly neutralized four to eight of the 41 pseudoviruses tested and resistance to neutralization was correlated with longer V2 domains. The data suggest the presence of shared, conserved structural elements in the V2 loop, and these can be used in the design of vaccine immunogens inducing broadly reactive Abs with anti-viral activities.

  5. Effect of ambient light on monoclonal antibody product quality during small-scale mammalian cell culture process in clear glass bioreactors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mallaney, Mary; Wang, Szu-Han; Sreedhara, Alavattam

    2014-01-01

    During a small-scale cell culture process producing a monoclonal antibody, a larger than expected difference was observed in the charge variants profile of the harvested cell culture fluid (HCCF) between the 2 L and larger scales (e.g., 400 L and 12 kL). Small-scale studies performed at the 2 L scale consistently showed an increase in acidic species when compared with the material made at larger scale. Since the 2 L bioreactors were made of clear transparent glass while the larger scale reactors are made of stainless steel, the effect of ambient laboratory light on cell culture process in 2 L bioreactors as well as handling the HCCF was carefully evaluated. Photoreactions in the 2 L glass bioreactors including light mediated increase in acidic variants in HCCF and formulation buffers were identified and carefully analyzed. While the acidic variants comprised of a mixture of sialylated, reduced disulfide, crosslinked (nonreducible), glycated, and deamidated forms, an increase in the nonreducible forms, deamidation and Met oxidation was predominantly observed under light stress. The monoclonal antibody produced in glass bioreactors that were protected from light behaved similar to the one produced in the larger scale. Our data clearly indicate that care should be taken when glass bioreactors are used in cell culture studies during monoclonal antibody production. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  6. Characterization of the glycoprotein of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus using neutralizing monoclonal antibodies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Chienjin; Chien, Maw-Sheng; Landolt, Marsha; Winton, James

    1994-01-01

    To study the antigenic nature of the glycoprotein (G protein) of infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV), 31 neutralizing monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) were produced against a reference isolate of the virus. The MAbs were compared using a neutralization assay, an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and by immunoblotting of the G protein in the native, reduced, and deglycosylated forms. Hybridoma culture fluids of the various MAbs could be diluted from 1:2 to 1:512 and still completely neutralize 1 X 104 plaque-forming units of IHNV. Similarly, the end point dilutions that produced optical density readings of 0.1 or greater in the ELISA were 1:40 to 1:10240. Western blotting showed that all of the MAbs reacted with the G protein in the unreduced (i.e. native) conformation; however, only 9 nine of the MAbs were able to react with the G protein following reduction by 2-mercaptoethanol. Deglycosylation of the protein did not influence the binding ability of any of the MAbs. These data indicate that all the MAbs recognized amino acid sequences on the protein itself and that the IHNV glycoprotein contains linear as well as conformation-dependent neutralizing epitopes. When rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss fingerlings were passively immunized with MAbs against either a linear or a conformation-dependent epitope, the fish were protected against challenge with wild-type IHNV.

  7. Impact of Depleting Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies on the Host Adaptive Immunity: A Bonus or a Malus?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deligne, Claire; Milcent, Benoît; Josseaume, Nathalie; Teillaud, Jean-Luc; Sibéril, Sophie

    2017-01-01

    Clinical responses to anti-tumor monoclonal antibody (mAb) treatment have been regarded for many years only as a consequence of the ability of mAbs to destroy tumor cells by innate immune effector mechanisms. More recently, it has also been shown that anti-tumor antibodies can induce a long-lasting anti-tumor adaptive immunity, likely responsible for durable clinical responses, a phenomenon that has been termed the vaccinal effect of antibodies. However, some of these anti-tumor antibodies are directed against molecules expressed both by tumor cells and normal immune cells, in particular lymphocytes, and, hence, can also strongly affect the host adaptive immunity. In addition to a delayed recovery of target cells, lymphocyte depleting-mAb treatments can have dramatic consequences on the adaptive immune cell network, its rebound, and its functional capacities. Thus, in this review, we will not only discuss the mAb-induced vaccinal effect that has emerged from experimental preclinical studies and clinical trials but also the multifaceted impact of lymphocytes-depleting therapeutic antibodies on the host adaptive immunity. We will also discuss some of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of action whereby therapeutic mAbs induce a long-term protective anti-tumor effect and the relationship between the mAb-induced vaccinal effect and the immune response against self-antigens.

  8. Impact of Depleting Therapeutic Monoclonal Antibodies on the Host Adaptive Immunity: A Bonus or a Malus?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claire Deligne

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Clinical responses to anti-tumor monoclonal antibody (mAb treatment have been regarded for many years only as a consequence of the ability of mAbs to destroy tumor cells by innate immune effector mechanisms. More recently, it has also been shown that anti-tumor antibodies can induce a long-lasting anti-tumor adaptive immunity, likely responsible for durable clinical responses, a phenomenon that has been termed the vaccinal effect of antibodies. However, some of these anti-tumor antibodies are directed against molecules expressed both by tumor cells and normal immune cells, in particular lymphocytes, and, hence, can also strongly affect the host adaptive immunity. In addition to a delayed recovery of target cells, lymphocyte depleting-mAb treatments can have dramatic consequences on the adaptive immune cell network, its rebound, and its functional capacities. Thus, in this review, we will not only discuss the mAb-induced vaccinal effect that has emerged from experimental preclinical studies and clinical trials but also the multifaceted impact of lymphocytes-depleting therapeutic antibodies on the host adaptive immunity. We will also discuss some of the molecular and cellular mechanisms of action whereby therapeutic mAbs induce a long-term protective anti-tumor effect and the relationship between the mAb-induced vaccinal effect and the immune response against self-antigens.

  9. Aggregation and chemical modification of monoclonal antibodies under upstream processing conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dengl, Stefan; Wehmer, Marc; Hesse, Friederike; Lipsmeier, Florian; Popp, Oliver; Lang, Kurt

    2013-05-01

    To investigate antibody stability and formation of modified species under upstream processing conditions. The stability of 11 purified monoclonal human IgG1 and IgG4 antibodies, including an IgG1-based bispecific CrossMab, was compared in downscale mixing stress models. One of these molecules was further evaluated in realistic bioreactor stress models and in cell culture fermentations. Analytical techniques include size exclusion chromatography (SEC), turbidity measurements, cation exchange chromatography (cIEX), dynamic light scattering (DLS) and differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Sensitivity in downscale stress models varies among antibodies and results in formation of high molecular weight (HMW) aggregates. Stability is increased in cell culture medium and in bioreactors. Media components stabilizing the proteins were identified. Extensive chemical modifications were detected both in stress models as well as during production of antibodies in cell culture fermentations. Protective compounds must be present in chemically defined fermentation media in order to stabilize antibodies against the formation of HMW aggregates. An increase in chemical modifications is detectable in bioreactor stress models and over the course of cell culture fermentations; this increase is dependent on the expression rate, pH, temperature and fermentation time. Consequently, product heterogeneity increases during upstream processing, and this compromises the product quality.

  10. Mouse in Vivo Neutralization of Escherichia coli Shiga Toxin 2 with Monoclonal Antibodies

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    Larry H. Stanker

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC food contaminations pose serious health concerns, and have been the subject of massive food recalls. STEC has been identified as the major cause of the life-threatening complication of hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS. Besides supportive care, there currently are no therapeutics available. The use of antibiotics for combating pathogenic E. coli is not recommended because they have been shown to stimulate toxin production. Clearing Stx2 from the circulation could potentially lessen disease severity. In this study, we tested the in vivo neutralization of Stx2 in mice using monoclonal antibodies (mAbs. We measured the biologic half-life of Stx2 in mice and determined the distribution phase or t1/2 α to be 3 min and the clearance phase or t1/2 β to be 40 min. Neutralizing mAbs were capable of clearing Stx2 completely from intoxicated mouse blood within minutes. We also examined the persistence of these mAbs over time and showed that complete protection could be passively conferred to mice 4 weeks before exposure to Stx2. The advent of better diagnositic methods and the availability of a greater arsenal of therapeutic mAbs against Stx2 would greatly enhance treatment outcomes of life threatening E. coli infections.

  11. Anti-IL-20 Monoclonal Antibody Suppresses Prostate Cancer Growth and Bone Osteolysis in Murine Models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Hsiang Hsu

    Full Text Available Interleukin (IL-20 is a proinflammatory cytokine in the IL-10 family. IL-20 is associated with tumor promotion in the pathogenesis of oral, bladder, and breast cancer. However, little is known about the role of IL-20 in prostate cancer. We hypothesize that IL-20 promotes the growth of prostate cancer cells. Immunohistochemical staining showed that IL-20 and its receptors were expressed in human PC-3 and LNCaP prostate cancer cell lines and in prostate tumor tissue from 40 patients. In vitro, IL-20 upregulated N-cadherin, STAT3, vimentin, fibronectin, RANKL, cathepsin G, and cathepsin K, and increased the migration and colony formation of prostate cancer cells via activated p38, ERK1/2, AKT, and NF-κB signals in PC-3 cells. We investigated the effects of anti-IL-20 monoclonal antibody 7E on prostate tumor growth in vivo using SCID mouse subcutaneous and intratibial xenograft tumor models. In vivo, 7E reduced tumor growth, suppressed tumor-mediated osteolysis, and protected bone mineral density after intratibial injection of prostate cancer cells. We conclude that IL-20 is involved in the cell migration, colony formation, and tumor-induced osteolysis of prostate cancer. Therefore, IL-20 might be a novel target for treating prostate cancer.

  12. Monoclonal Antibodies Attached to Carbon Nanotube Transistors for Paclitaxel Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonbae; Lau, Calvin; Richardson, Mark; Rajapakse, Arith; Weiss, Gregory; Collins, Philip; UCI, Molecular Biology; Biochemistry Collaboration; UCI, Departments of Physics; Astronomy Collaboration

    Paclitaxel is a naturally-occurring pharmaceutical used in numerous cancer treatments, despite its toxic side effects. Partial inhibition of this toxicity has been demonstrated using weakly interacting monoclonal antibodies (3C6 and 8A10), but accurate monitoring of antibody and paclitaxel concentrations remains challenging. Here, single-molecule studies of the kinetics of antibody-paclitaxel interactions have been performed using single-walled carbon nanotube field-effect transistors. The devices were sensitized with single antibody attachments to record the single-molecule binding dynamics of paclitaxel. This label-free technique recorded a range of dynamic interactions between the antibody and paclitaxel, and it provided sensitive paclitaxel detection for pM to nM concentrations. Measurements with two different antibodies suggest ways of extending this working range and uncovering the mechanistic differences among different antibodies.

  13. Monoclonal Antibodies Radiolabeling with Rhenium-188 for Radioimmunotherapy

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    Licia Uccelli

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhenium-188, obtained from an alumina-based tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generator, is actually considered a useful candidate for labeling biomolecules such as antibodies, antibody fragments, peptides, and DNAs for radiotherapy. There is a widespread interest in the availability of labeling procedures that allow obtaining Re188-labeled radiopharmaceuticals for various therapeutic applications, in particular for the rhenium attachment to tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs for immunotherapy. Different approaches have been developed in order to obtain Re188-radioimmunoconjugates in high radiochemical purity starting from the generator eluted Re188ReO4-. The aim of this paper is to provide a short overview on Re188-labeled (MoAbs, focusing in particular on the radiolabeling methods, quality control of radioimmunoconjugates, and their in vitro stability for radioimmunotherapy (RIT, with particular reference to the most important contributions published in literature in this topic.

  14. Monoclonal Antibodies Radiolabeling with Rhenium-188 for Radioimmunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uccelli, Licia; Martini, Petra; Pasquali, Micol; Boschi, Alessandra

    2017-01-01

    Rhenium-188, obtained from an alumina-based tungsten-188/rhenium-188 generator, is actually considered a useful candidate for labeling biomolecules such as antibodies, antibody fragments, peptides, and DNAs for radiotherapy. There is a widespread interest in the availability of labeling procedures that allow obtaining 188Re-labeled radiopharmaceuticals for various therapeutic applications, in particular for the rhenium attachment to tumor-specific monoclonal antibodies (Mo)Abs for immunotherapy. Different approaches have been developed in order to obtain 188Re-radioimmunoconjugates in high radiochemical purity starting from the generator eluted [188Re]ReO4-. The aim of this paper is to provide a short overview on 188Re-labeled (Mo)Abs, focusing in particular on the radiolabeling methods, quality control of radioimmunoconjugates, and their in vitro stability for radioimmunotherapy (RIT), with particular reference to the most important contributions published in literature in this topic.

  15. The use of monoclonal antibodies to treat Castleman's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robey, Rebecca C; Mletzko, Salvinia; Colley, Charlotte; Balachandran, Kirsty; Bower, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD) is a rare lymphoproliferative disorder presenting with heterogeneous clinical features and with a complex etiology. MCD incidence is increased in people living with HIV/AIDS when it is causally associated with Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpes virus (KSHV). HIV-seronegative individuals present with either idiopathic or KSHV-associated MCD. Central to MCD pathology is altered expression and signaling of IL-6, which promotes B-cell proliferation and causes systemic manifestations. KSHV encodes a viral homolog of human IL-6, accounting for its role in MCD, while recent evidence shows an association between IL-6 receptor polymorphisms and idiopathic MCD. The increased understanding of mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of MCD has guided the use of new monoclonal antibody therapies for treating this complex disorder.

  16. Monoclonal Antibodies as Treatment Modalities in Head and Neck Cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivek Radhakrishnan

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The standard treatments of surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC causes disturbance to normal surrounding tissues, systemic toxicities and functional problems with eating, speaking, and breathing. With early detection, many of these cancers can be effectively treated, but treatment should also focus on retaining the function of the proximal nerves, tissues and vasculature surrounding the tumor. With current research focused on understanding pathogenesis of these cancers in a molecular level, targeted therapy using monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs, can be modified and directed towards tumor genes, proteins and signal pathways with the potential to reduce unfavorable side effects of current treatments. This review will highlight the current MoAb therapies used in HNSCC, and discuss ongoing research efforts to develop novel treatment agents with potential to improve efficacy, increase overall survival (OS rates and reduce toxicities.

  17. Mapping by monoclonal antibody detection of glycosaminoglycans in connective tissues

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Couchman, J R; Caterson, B; Christner, J E

    1984-01-01

    Chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans are widespread connective tissue components and chemical analysis of cartilage and other proteoglycans has demonstrated molecular speciation involving the degree and position of sulphation of the carbohydrate chains. This may, in turn, affect the properties...... organizations on the GAG molecule endowed by the sulphate groups. So far, it has not been possible to identify and map chondroitins of differing sulphation in tissues, but we have now raised three monoclonal antibodies which specifically recognize unsulphated, 4-sulphated and 6-sulphated chondroitin...... and dermatan sulphate. These provide novel opportunities to study the in vivo distribution of chondroitin sulphate proteoglycans. We demonstrate that chondroitin sulphates exhibit remarkable connective tissue specificity and furthermore provide evidence that some proteoglycans may predominantly carry only one...

  18. Monoclonal antibodies against VP7 of bluetongue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen-Shi; Sun, En-Cheng; Liu, Ni-Hong; Yang, Tao; Xu, Qing-Yuan; Qin, Yong-Li; Zhao, Jing; Feng, Yu-Fei; Li, Jun-Pin; Wei, Peng; Zhang, Cui-Yun; Wu, Dong-Lai

    2012-12-01

    VP7 is a major group-specific protein of the bluetongue virus (BTV), and is therefore a candidate for use as a diagnostic reagent. In this study, BALB/c mice were immunized with BTV16, and the lymphocyte hybridoma technique and indirect ELISA screening method were employed to obtain two strains of hybridoma cells secreting specific monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) to BTV16. Eukaryotic recombinant plasmids coding for 10 segments of BTV16 separately were transfected into BHK-21 cells, respectively, followed by immunofluorescence, showing that two MAbs only reacted with BTV-VP7. Western blot analysis showed the same result. Indirect immunofluorescence results indicated that two of the MAbs present different response spectrums with BTV1~24 serotypes. These results indicate that these MAbs may be good candidates for a specific diagnostic method and functional exploration of the VP7 protein.

  19. [Development of HPLC analysis methods for therapeutic monoclonal antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Todoroki, Kenichiro

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic monoclonal antibody (mAb) preparations are produced from cultured cells; therefore, detailed and multidimensional analyses of their heterogeneities are required. We analyzed five commercially available mAb preparations by high-temperature reversed-phase LC using a wide-pore core-shell column for pluralistic quality assessment. At a highly elevated column temperature, isopropanol with high eluotropic strength coefficients and a wide-pore core-shell type octyl column showed good peak resolution of the investigated mAbs and their related constituents. We used this method to estimate the residual rate of intact mAbs after a heat aggregation treatment and conducted fragmentation analysis by analyzing their pepsin digests. Each peak component was identified by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry. All results were compared with those of reversed-phase and size exclusion analyses.

  20. Epitope Mapping of Monoclonal Antibody PMab-38 Against Dog Podoplanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Yao-Wen; Yamada, Shinji; Kaneko, Mika K; Kato, Yukinari

    2017-11-21

    Podoplanin (PDPN), a type I transmembrane sialoglycoprotein, is extensively expressed by normal lymphatic endothelial cells, renal podocytes, and pulmonary type I alveolar cells. Nevertheless, increased expression of PDPN in malignant tumors not only associates with poor prognosis but also facilitates hematogenous metastasis through interaction with C-type lectin-like receptor-2 presented on platelets, followed by PDPN-mediated platelet activation. We previously reported a novel PMab-38 antibody, an anti-dog PDPN (dPDPN) monoclonal antibody, which specifically recognizes PDPN in squamous cell carcinomas melanomas and cancer-associated fibroblasts in canine cancer tissues. However, the specific binding with the epitope of PMab-38 remains undefined. In this study, flow cytometry was utilized to investigate the epitope of PMab-38, which was determined using a series of deletion or point mutants of dPDPN. The results revealed that the critical epitope of PMab-38 is Tyr67 and Glu68 of dPDPN.

  1. Iodine-based contrast media, multiple myeloma and monoclonal gammopathies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stacul, Fulvio; Bertolotto, Michele; Thomsen, Henrik S

    2018-01-01

    , in which 12 unconfounded cases of PC-AKI were found (1.6 %). The majority of patients had intravenous urography with high osmolality ionic contrast media after preparatory dehydration and purgation. CONCLUSIONS: MM and MG alone are not risk factors for PC-AKI. However, the risk of PC-AKI may become......OBJECTIVES: Many radiologists and clinicians still consider multiple myeloma (MM) and monoclonal gammopathies (MG) a contraindication for using iodine-based contrast media. The ESUR Contrast Media Safety Committee performed a systematic review of the incidence of post-contrast acute kidney injury...... (PC-AKI) in these patients. METHODS: A systematic search in Medline and Scopus databases was performed for renal function deterioration studies in patients with MM or MG following administration of iodine-based contrast media. Data collection and analysis were performed according to the PRISMA...

  2. [Monoclonal antibodies in [corrected] development in [corrected] multiple sclerosis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sastre-Garriga, J; Montalban, X

    2011-11-01

    The last fifteen years have see the gradual appearance of a number of different drugs that have been shown to be effective as disease modifying therapies in multiple sclerosis. The opening and subsequent widening of the therapeutic armamentarium in multiple sclerosis will continue on a expanding course in the next few years due to the already known positive results of phase III clinical trials with orally administered molecules. Along with these, we have also seen the appearance of a group of drugs which, instead of being defined by their route of administration, are considered together as a consequence of their similar design: the monoclonal antibodies. The principal safety and efficacy results of three of the monoclonal antibodies that have already obtained positive results in phase II studies will be reviewed in this paper: alemtuzumab, rituximab / ocrelizumab, and daclizumab. For the preparation of this paper, information was obtained from already published articles and from the following web pages: www.clinicaltrials.gov of the National Institute of Health of the U.S.A., the EMA (European Medicines Agency) web page and the Spanish Medicines Agency (Agencia Española del Medicamento) web page. Final results from the phase III clinical trials in progress are required to produce definitive statements on the efficacy and safety of the reviewed drugs. However, and subject to confirmation of the presently available data from phase II trials, it is likely that this group of drugs is to be placed one step beyond the currently available disease-modifying therapies in terms of efficacy, but with a safety pattern which will make careful monitoring of treated patients a mandatory requirement so as to obtain adequate risk/benefit profiles. Copyright © 2010 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  3. Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis in blood donors in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yağcı, Münci; Yegin, Zeynep Arzu; Yenicesu, İdil; Suyanı, Elif; Ulu, Bahar Uncu; İnci, Kamil; Çetin, Zeynep; Yılmaz, Zeynep; Kurşunoğlu, Nevruz; Özkurt, Zübeyde Nur

    2017-06-05

    Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL) is a precursor state of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) with peripheral lymphocytosis below 5 × 10(9)/l. The diagnostic criteria exclude the presence of lymphadenopathy, organomegaly, infections, autoimmune diseases or any sign of a lymphoproliferative disorder. This prospective study was designed in order to evaluate the frequency of MBL in blood donors in Turkey. The diagnosis of MBL was identified by flow cytometry method based on the International Familial CLL Consortium Report. A total of 999 volunteers [median age 34 (18-78) years; male/female: 705/294] were included in the study. Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis was demonstrated in 18 cases (1.8%). A total of 16 cases (1.6%) was evaluated as CLL-like MBL, while 2 (0.2%) had a non-CLL-like phenotype. The subjects were divided into three groups according to age, as 60 years. The prevalence of MBL was 1.1% below 40 years, 0.6% between 40 and 60 years and 0.1% in cases over 60 years, without statistical significance (p > 0.05). The sensitivity of the flow cytometry method is essential and may be responsible for the variations in the prevalence of MBL in different populations which can also be attributed to study design, higher detection rates in the elderly and families with genetic predisposition to CLL. Large population-based studies and standardized laboratory methods are needed to determine the potential risk factors of progression to CLL, including molecular markers and genetic profile.

  4. An Approach to Breast Cancer Immunotherapy: The Apoptotic Activity of Recombinant Anti-Interleukin-6 Monoclonal Antibodies in Intact Tumour Microenvironment of Breast Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abou-Shousha, S; Moaaz, M; Sheta, M; Motawea, M A

    2016-06-01

    Current work is one of our comprehensive preclinical studies, a new approach to breast cancer (BC) immunotherapy through induction of tumour cell apoptosis. Tumour growth is not just a result of uncontrolled cell proliferation but also of reduced apoptosis. High levels of interleukin-6 (IL-6) are associated with metastatic BC and correlated with poor survival as it promotes growth of tumour-initiating cells during early tumorigenesis protecting these cells from apoptosis. Therefore, this study aims at investigating the potential of anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibodies to suppress IL-6 proliferative/anti-apoptotic activities in intact tumour microenvironment of BC. Fresh sterile tumour and normal breast tissue specimens were taken from 50 female Egyptian patients with BC undergoing radical mastectomy. A unique tissue culture system designed to provide cells of each intact tumour/normal tissue sample with its proper microenvironment either supplemented or not with anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibodies. To evaluate the apoptotic activity of anti-IL-6 as a novel candidate for BC treatment strategy, we compared its effects with those obtained using tumour necrosis-related apoptosis-inducing ligand TRAIL as an established apoptotic agent. Our results revealed that levels of either anti-IL-6- or TRAIL-induced apoptosis in the tumour or normal tissue cultures were significantly higher than those in their corresponding untreated ones (P < 0.001). No statistically significant differences have been found between apoptosis levels induced by anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibodies and those induced by TRAIL. Recombinant anti-IL-6 monoclonal antibodies could represent a novel effective element of immunotherapeutic treatment strategy for BC. The selectivity and anti-apoptotic potential of anti-IL-6 is highly hopeful in IL-6- abundant BC tumour microenvironment. © 2016 The Foundation for the Scandinavian Journal of Immunology.

  5. The Fab Fragment of a Humanized Anti-Toll Like Receptor 4 (TLR4 Monoclonal Antibody Reduces the Lipopolysaccharide Response via TLR4 in Mouse Macrophage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Binggang Cai

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharides (LPS can induce acute inflammation, sepsis, or chronic inflammatory disorders through the Toll receptor 4 (TLR4 signaling pathway. The TLR4/MD2 (myeloid differentiation protein 2 complex plays a major role in the immune response to LPS. However, there is not a good method to suppress the immune response induced by LPS via this complex in macrophages. In this article, we aimed to evaluate the effects of humanized anti-TLR4 monoclonal antibodies on LPS-induced responses in mouse macrophages. The peritoneal macrophages of mice were incubated with anti-TLR4 monoclonal antibodies and stimulated with LPS. The expression levels of cytokines were analyzed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Additionally, activation of various signaling pathways was evaluated by Western blotting. The results showed that the humanized anti-TLR4 monoclonal antibody blocked the inflammatory cytokines expression at both the mRNA and protein level. We also found that the Fab fragment significantly inhibited the nuclear factor kappaB signaling pathway by reducing the phosphorylation of the inhibitor of kappaBalpha and decreasing the translocation of p65, resulting in the suppression of p38, extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2, and IFN-β regulatory factor 3 phosphorylation. Therefore, our study showed that this humanized anti-TLR4 monoclonal antibody could effectively protect against LPS-induced responses by blocking the TLR4 signaling pathway in mouse peritoneal macrophages.

  6. Anti-leukemic activity and tolerability of anti-human CD47 monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pietsch, E C; Dong, J; Cardoso, R; Zhang, X; Chin, D; Hawkins, R; Dinh, T; Zhou, M; Strake, B; Feng, P-H; Rocca, M; Santos, C Dos; Shan, X; Danet-Desnoyers, G; Shi, F; Kaiser, E; Millar, H J; Fenton, S; Swanson, R; Nemeth, J A; Attar, R M

    2017-02-24

    CD47, a broadly expressed cell surface protein, inhibits cell phagocytosis via interaction with phagocyte-expressed SIRPα. A variety of hematological malignancies demonstrate elevated CD47 expression, suggesting that CD47 may mediate immune escape. We discovered three unique CD47-SIRPα blocking anti-CD47 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) with low nano-molar affinity to human and cynomolgus monkey CD47, and no hemagglutination and platelet aggregation activity. To characterize the anti-cancer activity elicited by blocking CD47, the mAbs were cloned into effector function silent and competent Fc backbones. Effector function competent mAbs demonstrated potent activity in vitro and in vivo, while effector function silent mAbs demonstrated minimal activity, indicating that blocking CD47 only leads to a therapeutic effect in the presence of Fc effector function. A non-human primate study revealed that the effector function competent mAb IgG1 C47B222-(CHO) decreased red blood cells (RBC), hematocrit and hemoglobin by >40% at 1 mg/kg, whereas the effector function silent mAb IgG2σ C47B222-(CHO) had minimal impact on RBC indices at 1 and 10 mg/kg. Taken together, our findings suggest that targeting CD47 is an attractive therapeutic anti-cancer approach. However, the anti-cancer activity observed with anti-CD47 mAbs is Fc effector dependent as are the side effects observed on RBC indices.

  7. Expression of class 5 antigens by meningococcal strains obtained from patients in Brazil and evaluation of two new monoclonal antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth N. De Gaspari

    Full Text Available Determining the profile of antigen expression among meningococci is important for epidemiologic surveillance and vaccine development. To this end, two new mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs have been derived against Neisseria meningitidis proteins (class 5. The MAbs were reactive against outer membrane antigens and were bactericidal. Selected anti-class 5 MAbs [(5.1-3E6-2; (5.3-3BH4-C7; (5.4-1BG11-C7; (5.5-3DH-F5G9 also 5F1F4-T3(5.c], and the two new monoclonal antibodies C14F10Br2 (5.8 and 7F11B5Br3 (5.9, were then tested against different meningococcal strains, (63 strains of serogroup A, 60 strains of serogroup C (from 1972 to 1974; and 136 strains of serogroup B (from 1992 meningococci. Our results demonstrated that the expression of class 5 proteins in the N. meningitidis B Brazilian strains studied is highly heterogeneous. The serotypes and subtypes of B:4:P1.15, B:4:P1.9, B:4:P1.7, B:4:P1.3, B:4:P1.14, B:4:P1.16, B:4:NT, and B:NT:NT were detected in N. meningitidis B serogroups.The strains C:2a:P1.2 and A:4.21:P1.9 were dominant in the C and A serogroups, respectively. Serogroup B organisms expressed the class 5 epitopes 5.4 (18%, 5.5 (22%, 5.8 (3.6%, 5.9 (8.0% and 5c (38%. Serogroup C expressed class 5 epitopes 5.1 (81%, 5.4 (35%, 5.5 (33% and 5.9 (5.0%; and serogroup A showed reactivity directed at the class 5 protein 5c (47%; and reactivity was present with the new monoclonal antibody, 5.9 (5.5%. We conclude that the two new MAbs are useful in detecting important group B, class 5 antigens, and that a broad selection of serogroup B, class 5 proteins would be required for an effective vaccine based on the class 5 proteins.

  8. Selectivity verification of cardiac troponin monoclonal antibodies for cardiac troponin detection by using conventional ELISA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fathil, M. F. M.; Arshad, M. K. Md; Gopinath, Subash C. B.; Adzhri, R.; Ruslinda, A. R.; Hashim, U.

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents preparation and characterization of conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for cardiac troponin detection to determine the selectivity of the cardiac troponin monoclonal antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies, used to capture and bind the targets in this experiment, are cTnI monoclonal antibody (MAb-cTnI) and cTnT monoclonal antibody (MAb-cTnT), while both cardiac troponin I (cTnI) and T (cTnT) are used as targets. ELISA is performed inside two microtiter plates for MAb-cTnI and MAb-cTnT. For each plate, monoclonal antibodies are tested by various concentrations of cTnI and cTnT ranging from 0-6400 µg/l. The binding selectivity and level of detection between monoclonal antibodies and antigen are determined through visual observation based on the color change inside each well on the plate. ELISA reader is further used to quantitatively measured the optical density of the color changes, thus produced more accurate reading. The results from this experiment are utilized to justify the use of these monoclonal antibodies as bio-receptors for cardiac troponin detection by using field-effect transistor (FET)-based biosensors coupled with substrate-gate in the future.

  9. [Using HTS-ELISA method to make anti-aflatoxin M1 monoclonal antibody].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Shichun; He, Na; Zhang, Lijun; Lu, Mason

    2010-10-01

    To prepare high-affinity anti-aflatoxin M1 monoclonal antibodies by High Throughput Screening ELISA (HTS-ELISA) METHODS: Balb/C mice were immunized by aflatoxin M1-bovine serum albumin conjugate, and screen secret anti-aflatoxin M1 monoclonal antibody hybridoma by HTS-ELISA. The antibody was characterized. Fourteen hybridoma cell lines which could secret high activity anti-aflatoxin M1 monoclonal antibodies were obtained. The affinity of the purified monoclonal antibody was 5.5 x 10(-10) mol/L. The cross-reactivity of the monoclonal antibody clone against aflatoxin M1, aflatoxin M2, aflatoxin B1, aflatoxin B2, aflatoxin G1, aflatoxin G2, deoxynivalenol and BSA was 100%, 4.5%, 21.5%, 1.0%, 16.6%, 1.0%, 0%, 0%, respectively. The sensitivity of the anti-AFM1 monoclonal antibody binding to aflatoxin M1 was 0.01 microg/L and the linear range for developed indirect competitive ELISA was 0.1 - 10 microg/L aflatoxin M1. The binding inhibition IC50 of the anti-aflatoxin M1 monoclonal antibody was 0.82 microg/L. Assays of milk samples mixed with AFM1 ranging in concentration from 0.25 to 5.0 microg/L gave mean indirect competitive ELISA recovery of 60.3% - 152.8%. HTS-ELISA can be used for the preparation of the high-affinity anti-aflatoxin M1 monoclonal antibodies. The anti-aflatoxin M1 monoclonal antibody could be provided as the high quality material in the system of aflatoxin M1 immune detection.

  10. Identification of a human monoclonal antibody to replace equine diphtheria antitoxin for treatment of diphtheria intoxication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevigny, Leila M; Booth, Brian J; Rowley, Kirk J; Leav, Brett A; Cheslock, Peter S; Garrity, Kerry A; Sloan, Susan E; Thomas, William; Babcock, Gregory J; Wang, Yang

    2013-11-01

    Diphtheria antitoxin (DAT) has been the cornerstone of the treatment of Corynebacterium diphtheriae infection for more than 100 years. Although the global incidence of diphtheria has declined steadily over the last quarter of the 20th century, the disease remains endemic in many parts of the world, and significant outbreaks still occur. DAT is an equine polyclonal antibody that is not commercially available in the United States and is in short supply globally. A safer, more readily available alternative to DAT would be desirable. In the current study, we obtained human monoclonal antibodies (hMAbs) directly from antibody-secreting cells in the circulation of immunized human volunteers. We isolated a panel of diverse hMAbs that recognized diphtheria toxoid, as well as a variety of recombinant protein fragments of diphtheria toxin. Forty-five unique hMAbs were tested for neutralization of diphtheria toxin in in vitro cytotoxicity assays with a 50% effective concentration of 0.65 ng/ml for the lead candidate hMAb, 315C4. In addition, 25 μg of 315C4 completely protected guinea pigs from intoxication in an in vivo lethality model, yielding an estimated relative potency of 64 IU/mg. In comparison, 1.6 IU of DAT was necessary for full protection from morbidity and mortality in this model. We further established that our lead candidate hMAb binds to the receptor-binding domain of diphtheria toxin and physically blocks the toxin from binding to the putative receptor, heparin-binding epidermal growth factor-like growth factor. The discovery of a specific and potent human neutralizing antibody against diphtheria toxin holds promise as a potential therapeutic.

  11. Sublingual immunization with M2-based vaccine induces broad protective immunity against influenza

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Shim, Byoung-Shik; Choi, Young Ki; Yun, Cheol-Heui; Lee, Eu-Gene; Jeon, Yoon Seong; Park, Sung-Moo; Cheon, In Su; Joo, Dong-Hyun; Cho, Chung Hwan; Song, Min-Suk; Seo, Sang-Uk; Byun, Young-Ho; Park, Hae-Jung; Poo, Haryoung; Seong, Baik Lin; Kim, Jae Ouk; Nguyen, Huan Huu; Stadler, Konrad; Kim, Dong Wook; Hong, Kee-Jong; Czerkinsky, Cecil; Song, Man Ki

    2011-01-01

    The ectodomain of matrix protein 2 (M2e) of influenza A virus is a rationale target antigen candidate for the development of a universal vaccine against influenza as M2e undergoes little sequence variation amongst human influenza A strains...

  12. Antibodies from a Human Survivor Define Sites of Vulnerability for Broad Protection Against Ebolaviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-31

    chimeras of ADI-15878 were expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and purified from cell supernatants by protein A affinity chromatography, as described...were maintained in high-glucose Dulbecco’s modified Eagle medium (DMEM; Thermo Fisher) supplemented with 10% fetal bovine serum (Atlanta

  13. Social Cognition, Social Skill, and the Broad Autism Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasson, Noah J.; Nowlin, Rachel B.; Pinkham, Amy E.

    2013-01-01

    Social-cognitive deficits differentiate parents with the "broad autism phenotype" from non-broad autism phenotype parents more robustly than other neuropsychological features of autism, suggesting that this domain may be particularly informative for identifying genetic and brain processes associated with the phenotype. The current study…

  14. A Cointegration And Error Correction Approach To Broad Money ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study considered the stability of broad money demand function in Nigeria using data for 1970 to 2004. The study applied the Cointegration and error correction approach The Johansen Cointegration test shows that long run equilibrium relationship exists between broad money demand and its determinants. While the ...

  15. Broad-scale consequences of land management: Columbia basin example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard W. Haynes; Thomas M. Quigley

    2001-01-01

    Integrating management actions to consistently achieve broad ecological and socioeconomic goals is a challenge largely unmet. The presumed or real conflict between these goals establishes a forum for debate. Broad measures are needed to describe tradeoffs, trends in conditions under varying management scenarios, and a transparent science underpinning. The Interior...

  16. Boot Camp for Education CEOs: The Broad Foundation Superintendents Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehlen, Alain

    2012-01-01

    The Broad Foundation Superintendents Academy is the most prominent and most controversial training institute for school chiefs. The Academy is the flagship program of the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, the smallest of a triumvirate of corporate foundations that are at the heart of the billionaire campaign to remake public education in the image…

  17. [Determination of tetanus toxin and toxoid by ELISA using monoclonal antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkin, M A; Sviridov, V V; Perelygina, O V

    2004-01-01

    The procedure of obtaining monoclonal antibodies TT-1, TT-2, and TT-3 against tetanus toxin/toxoid is described. It is shown that both commercial DTP vaccine and tetanus toxoid conjugated with a low-molecular-weight hapten can be used an immunogens. Monoclonal antibodies TT-1 and TT-2 neutralized tetanus toxin in vivo. The monoclonal antibodies obtained were used to design and compare several schemes of quantitative determination of tetanus toxoid and toxin by ELISA. A more sensitive competitive ELISA allowed detecting as much as 0.01 EC/ml toxoid and 50 LD50/ml toxin.

  18. The Use of Humanized Monoclonal Antibodies for the Prevention of Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcello Lanari

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies are widely used both in infants and in adults for several indications. Humanized monoclonal antibodies (palivizumab have been used for many years for the prevention of respiratory syncytial virus infection in pediatric populations (preterm infants, infants with chronic lung disease or congenital heart disease at high risk of severe and potentially lethal course of the infection. This drug was reported to be safe, well tolerated and effective to decrease the hospitalization rate and mortality in these groups of infants by several clinical trials. In the present paper we report the development and the current use of monoclonal antibodies for prophylaxis against respiratory syncytial virus.

  19. Protecting Knowledge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sofka, Wolfgang; de Faria, Pedro; Shehu, Edlira

    2018-01-01

    Most firms use secrecy to protect their knowledge from potential imitators. However, the theoretical foundations for secrecy have not been well explored. We extend knowledge protection literature and propose theoretical mechanisms explaining how information visibility influences the importance...... of secrecy as a knowledge protection instrument. Building on mechanisms from information economics and signaling theory, we postulate that secrecy is more important for protecting knowledge for firms that have legal requirements to reveal information to shareholders. Furthermore, we argue that this effect...... and a firm's investment in fixed assets. Our findings inform both academics and managers on how firms balance information disclosure requirements with the use of secrecy as a knowledge protection instrument....

  20. Protective measures for personnel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickson, J.J.

    1946-12-13

    This document addresses radiation protection concerns for workers in the experimental laboratories and production plants where nuclear fission piles are being used. A broad in-depth discussion is provided based with the experiences gained in the Manhattan Project and being applied to contemporary activities. Discussion is thorough and encompasses control of external irradiations including alpha, beta, gamma, and neutron radiations; and control of radioactivity within the body by control of inhalation, ingestion, and entrance through skin or wounds. General measures for the control of radiation hazards is addressed by provision of clothing and waste disposal. An Appendix 1 is entitled General Rules and Procedures Concerning Activity Hazards.

  1. Single-domain monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of hepatocellular carcinoma | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute seeks parties to license human monoclonal antibodies and immunoconjugates and co-develop, evaluate, and/or commercialize large-scale antibody production and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) xenograft mouse models.

  2. Anti-Mesothelin Monoclonal Antibodies for the Treatment of Cancer | NCI Technology Transfer Center | TTC

    Science.gov (United States)

    The National Cancer Institute, Laboratory of Molecular Biology is seeking parties interested in collaborative research to further co-develop monoclonal antibodies for the treatment of mesothelin-expressing cancers.

  3. Antigen-Specific Monoclonal Antibodies Isolated from B Cells Expressing Constitutively Active STAT5

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scheeren, F.A.; van Geelen, C.M.M.; Yasuda, E.; Spits, H.; Beaumont, T.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Fully human monoclonal antibodies directed against specific pathogens have a high therapeutic potential, but are difficult to generate. Methodology/Principal Findings: Memory B cells were immortalized by expressing an inducible active mutant of the transcription factor Signal Transducer

  4. Improved detection of Pneumocystis carinii by an immunofluorescence technique using monoclonal antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Orholm, M; Holten-Andersen, W; Lundgren, Jens Dilling

    1990-01-01

    To assess whether a recently developed indirect immunofluorescent stain using monoclonal antibodies was more sensitive in detecting Pneumocystis carinii than the combination of Giemsa and methenamine silver nitrate stains which has routinely been used in the laboratory, 88 lavage fluid specimens...... and 34 induced sputum specimens were examined. All specimens were stained by five techniques: immunofluorescence using a combination of three monoclonal antibodies (from the National Institutes of Health, USA), immunofluorescence using a single monoclonal antibody (from Dakopatts), Giemsa, methenamine...... silver nitrate and toluidine blue O. Immunofluorescence using the monoclonal antibodies from the NIH was significantly more sensitive than any other single staining method and than the combination of Giemsa and methenamine silver nitrate staining. The study also showed that the cytospin centrifuge...

  5. Clinical efficacy and management of monoclonal antibodies targeting CD38 and SLAMF7 in multiple myeloma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van de Donk, Niels W C J; Moreau, Philippe; Plesner, Torben

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapeutic strategies are emerging as promising therapeutic approaches in multiple myeloma (MM), with several monoclonal antibodies in advanced stages of clinical development. Of these agents, CD38-targeting antibodies have marked single agent activity in extensively pretreated MM, and pre...

  6. Specific MR imaging of human-lymphocytes by monoclonal antibody-guided dextran-magnetite particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bulte, J. W. M.; Hoekstra, Y; Kamman, R. L.; Magin, R. L.; Webb, A. G.; Briggs, R. W.; Go, K. G.; Hulstaert, C. E.; Miltenyi, S.; The, T. Hauw; de Leij, L

    Human lymphocytes were labeled with biotinylated anti-lymphocyte-directed monoclonal antibodies, to which streptavidin and subsequently biotinylated dextran-magnetite particles were coupled. This labeling resulted in a strong and selective negative contrast enhancement of lymphocyte suspensions at

  7. The impact of microcarrier culture optimization on the glycosylation profile of a monoclonal antibody

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Costa, Ana Rita; Withers, Joanne; Rodrigues, Maria Elisa; McLoughlin, Niaobh; Henriques, Mariana; Oliveira, Rosário; Rudd, Pauline M; Azeredo, Joana

    2013-01-01

    .... Consequently, in this work, the glycosylation profile of a monoclonal antibody (mAb) produced by adherent CHO-K1 cells grown in Cytodex 3 was evaluated under different conditions, and compared to that obtained of typical adherent cultures...

  8. Use of monoclonal-antibodies for the detection of fecal bacteria in water

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Kfir, R

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against heat-killed Escherichia coli and Klebsiella oxytoca originating from wastewater effluent were raised in BALB/C mice. The fusion was highly successful and three hybridomas cloned were selected to study...

  9. Human monoclonal antibody as prophylaxis for SARS coronavirus infection in ferrets

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ter Meulen, Jan; Bakker, Alexander B. H.; van den Brink, Edward N.; Weverling, Gerrit J.; Martina, Byron E. E.; Haagmans, Bart L.; Kuiken, Thijs; de Kruif, John; Preiser, Wolfgang; Spaan, Willy; Gelderblom, Hans R.; Goudsmit, Jaap; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.

    2004-01-01

    SARS coronavirus continues to cause sporadic cases of severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) in China. No active or passive immunoprophylaxis for disease induced by SARS coronavirus is available. We investigated prophylaxis of SARS coronavirus infection with a neutralising human monoclonal

  10. Purification of a Mycoplasma pneumoniae adhesin by monoclonal antibody affinity chromatography.

    OpenAIRE

    Leith, D K; Baseman, J B

    1984-01-01

    A 165,000-dalton surface protein of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, designated protein P1, appears to be the major attachment ligand of the pathogen. We employed monoclonal antibody affinity chromatography to obtain purified protein P1.

  11. In Vitro and In Vivo Studies of Monoclonal Antibodies with Prominent Bactericidal Activity against Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shimin; Feng, Shaw-Huey; Li, Bingjie; Kim, Hyung-Yong; Rodriguez, Joe; Tsai, Shien; Lo, Shyh-Ching

    2011-01-01

    Our laboratory has developed more than a hundred mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei. These antibodies have been categorized into different groups based on their specificities and the biochemical natures of their target antigens. The current study first examined the bactericidal activities of a number of these MAbs by an in vitro opsonic assay. Then, the in vivo protective efficacy of selected MAbs was evaluated using BALB/c mice challenged intranasally with a lethal dose of the bacteria. The opsonic assay using dimethyl sulfoxide-treated human HL-60 cells as phagocytes revealed that 19 out of 47 tested MAbs (40%) have prominent bactericidal activities against B. pseudomallei and/or B. mallei. Interestingly, all MAbs with strong opsonic activities are those with specificity against either the capsular polysaccharides (PS) or the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of the bacteria. On the other hand, none of the MAbs reacting to bacterial proteins or glycoproteins showed prominent bactericidal activity. Further study revealed that the antigenic epitopes on either the capsular PS or LPS molecules were readily available for binding in intact bacteria, while the epitopes on proteins/glycoproteins were less accessible to the MAbs. Our in vivo study showed that four MAbs reactive to either the capsular PS or LPS were highly effective in protecting mice against lethal bacterial challenge. The result is compatible with that of our in vitro study. The MAbs with the highest protective efficacy are those reactive to either the capsular PS or LPS of the Burkholderia bacteria. PMID:21450976

  12. In Vitro and In Vivo studies of monoclonal antibodies with prominent bactericidal activity against Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shimin; Feng, Shaw-Huey; Li, Bingjie; Kim, Hyung-Yong; Rodriguez, Joe; Tsai, Shien; Lo, Shyh-Ching

    2011-05-01

    Our laboratory has developed more than a hundred mouse monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Burkholderia pseudomallei and Burkholderia mallei. These antibodies have been categorized into different groups based on their specificities and the biochemical natures of their target antigens. The current study first examined the bactericidal activities of a number of these MAbs by an in vitro opsonic assay. Then, the in vivo protective efficacy of selected MAbs was evaluated using BALB/c mice challenged intranasally with a lethal dose of the bacteria. The opsonic assay using dimethyl sulfoxide-treated human HL-60 cells as phagocytes revealed that 19 out of 47 tested MAbs (40%) have prominent bactericidal activities against B. pseudomallei and/or B. mallei. Interestingly, all MAbs with strong opsonic activities are those with specificity against either the capsular polysaccharides (PS) or the lipopolysaccharides (LPS) of the bacteria. On the other hand, none of the MAbs reacting to bacterial proteins or glycoproteins showed prominent bactericidal activity. Further study revealed that the antigenic epitopes on either the capsular PS or LPS molecules were readily available for binding in intact bacteria, while the epitopes on proteins/glycoproteins were less accessible to the MAbs. Our in vivo study showed that four MAbs reactive to either the capsular PS or LPS were highly effective in protecting mice against lethal bacterial challenge. The result is compatible with that of our in vitro study. The MAbs with the highest protective efficacy are those reactive to either the capsular PS or LPS of the Burkholderia bacteria.

  13. Design of Metamaterial Surfaces with Broad-band Absorbance

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Chihhui; Shvets, Gennady

    2011-01-01

    A simple design paradigm for making broad-band ultra-thin plasmonic absorbers is introduced. The absorber's unit cell is composed of sub-units of various sizes, resulting in nearly 100% absorbance at multiple adjacent frequencies and high absorbance over a broad frequency range. A simple theoretical model for designing broad-band absorbers is presented. It uses a single-resonance model to describe the optical response of each sub-unit and employs the series circuit model to predict the overal...

  14. Monoclonal Antibodies Production Against a 40KDa Band of Hydatid Cyst Fluid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharafi, Seyedeh Maryam; Shirzad, Hedayat; Khanahmad, Hossein; Ataei, Behrooz; Darani, Hossein Yousofi

    2018-01-01

    Hydatid cyst is the larval stage of the tapeworm Echinococcus granulosus. Hydatid cyst fluid, cyst membrane and Protoscolices, contain a complex mixture of antigens that can induce immune responses in the host. Anti-cancer properties of Protoscolices and hydatid cyst fluid has been shown. In order to identify antigens of hydatid cyst fluid that have anti-cancer effect, in this study production of monoclonal antibodies against one of the hydatid cyst fluid band (40KDa) has been investigated. There are many published patents about applications of monoclonal antibodies. In this experimental study, 40KDa band of hydatid cyst fluid that has cross reaction with sera of patients with breast cancer was used as antigen. A group of mice were immunized with this antigen, and then their spleen cells were extracted and fused with SP2 cells. Monoclonal antibodies production was checked in wells with signs of cell growth using ELISA and western blotting. The reaction of the produced monoclonal antibodies with breast cancer cells was tested using flow cytometry method. Finally, effect of the monoclonal antibodies on growth of breast cancer cells was investigated in vitro. The results of this study showed that in the first plate antibody against 40KDa was detected in several wells. In the second plate monoclonal antibodies with high titer was detected in one well. The produced monoclonal antibodies reacted with the surface of breast cancer cells. However, they had no significant effect on growth of breast cancer cells in culture medium. Monoclonal antibodies against hydatid cyst fluid 40KDa band were produced. These antibodies reacted with the surface of breast cancer cells but had no significant effect on growth of these cells. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Production and immunohistochemical characterization of monoclonal antibodies directed against renal basement membranes of rats

    OpenAIRE

    Hinsch, Klaus-Dieter; Hansen, Diethelm; Zimmermann, Astrid; Bruchhausen, Franz V.

    1988-01-01

    Basement membranes were separated from rat glomeruli and purified by mild procedures, which led to a highly enriched basement membrane fraction. Here, the production and characterization of five monoclonal antibodies against tubular and glomerular basement membranes are described. These antibodies were analyzed immunohistochemically on frozen sections of rat, bovine, and human kidneys as well as on rat embryos. One monoclonal antibody (BM 0 11) exclusively ...

  16. Characterization of a broad range antibacterial substance from a new Bacillus species isolated from Amazon basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, Amanda S; Cannavan, Fabiana S; Tsai, Siu-Mui; Brandelli, Adriano

    2007-10-01

    A Bacillus sp. strain producing a bacteriocin-like substance was characterized by biochemical profiling and 16S rDNA sequencing. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that this strain has low sequence similarity with most Bacillus spp., suggesting a new species was isolated. The antimicrobial activity was detected starting at the exponential growth phase, and maximum activity was observed at stationary phase. The substance was inhibitory to a broad range of indicator strains, including pathogenic and food spoilage bacteria such as Listeria monocytogenes, B. cereus, Aeromonas hydrophila, Erwinia carotovora, Pasteurella haemolytica, Salmonella Gallinarum, among other. The antibacterial substance was stable over a wide pH range, but it was sensitive to pronase E and lipase. The antibacterial substance was bactericidal and bacteriolytic to L. monocytogenes and B. cereus at 160 AU ml(-1). The identification of a broad range bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance active against L. monocytogenes addresses an important aspect of food protection against pathogens and spoilage microorganisms.

  17. Human broadly neutralizing antibodies to the envelope glycoprotein complex of hepatitis C virus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Giang, Erick; Dorner, Marcus; Prentoe, Jannick C

    2012-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infects ∼2% of the world's population. It is estimated that there are more than 500,000 new infections annually in Egypt, the country with the highest HCV prevalence. An effective vaccine would help control this expanding global health burden. HCV is highly variable......, and an effective vaccine should target conserved T- and B-cell epitopes of the virus. Conserved B-cell epitopes overlapping the CD81 receptor-binding site (CD81bs) on the E2 viral envelope glycoprotein have been reported previously and provide promising vaccine targets. In this study, we isolated 73 human m......bs on the E1E2 complex, has an exceptionally broad neutralizing activity toward diverse HCV genotypes and protects against heterologous HCV challenge in a small animal model. The mAb panel will be useful for the design and development of vaccine candidates to elicit broadly neutralizing antibodies...

  18. A Potent and Broad Neutralizing Antibody Recognizes and Penetrates the HIV Glycan Shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pejchal, Robert; Doores, Katie J.; Walker, Laura M.; Khayat, Reza; Huang, Po-Ssu; Wang, Sheng-Kai; Stanfield, Robyn L.; Julien, Jean-Philippe; Ramos, Alejandra; Crispin, Max; Depetris, Rafael; Katpally, Umesh; Marozsan, Andre; Cupo, Albert; Maloveste, Sebastien; Liu, Yan; McBride, Ryan; Ito, Yukishige; Sanders, Rogier W.; Ogohara, Cassandra; Paulson, James C.; Feizi, Ten; Scanlan, Christopher N.; Wong, Chi-Huey; Moore, John P.; Olson, William C.; Ward, Andrew B.; Poignard, Pascal; Schief, William R.; Burton, Dennis R.; Wilson, Ian A. (UWASH); (Progenics); (ICL); (Weill-Med); (NIH); (JSTA); (Scripps); (Oxford)

    2015-10-15

    The HIV envelope (Env) protein gp120 is protected from antibody recognition by a dense glycan shield. However, several of the recently identified PGT broadly neutralizing antibodies appear to interact directly with the HIV glycan coat. Crystal structures of antigen-binding fragments (Fabs) PGT 127 and 128 with Man{sub 9} at 1.65 and 1.29 angstrom resolution, respectively, and glycan binding data delineate a specific high mannose-binding site. Fab PGT 128 complexed with a fully glycosylated gp120 outer domain at 3.25 angstroms reveals that the antibody penetrates the glycan shield and recognizes two conserved glycans as well as a short {beta}-strand segment of the gp120 V3 loop, accounting for its high binding affinity and broad specificify. Furthermore, our data suggest that the high neutralization potency of PGT 127 and 128 immunoglobulin Gs may be mediated by cross-linking Env trimers on the viral surface.

  19. Production of a Chaetomium globosum enolase monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Brett J; Nayak, Ajay P; Lemons, Angela R; Rittenour, William R; Hettick, Justin M; Beezhold, Donald H

    2014-12-01

    Chaetomium globosum is a hydrophilic fungal species and a contaminant of water-damaged building materials in North America. Methods to detect Chaetomium species include subjective identification of ascospores, viable culture, or molecular-based detection methods. In this study, we describe the production and initial characterization of a monoclonal antibody (MAb) for C. globosum enolase. MAb 1C7, a murine IgG1 isotype MAb, was produced and reacted with recombinant C. globosum enolase (rCgEno) in an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and with a putative C. globosum enolase in a Western blot. Epitope mapping showed MAb 1C7 specific reactivity to an enolase decapeptide, LTYEELANLY, that is highly conserved within the fungal class Sordariomycetes. Cross-reactivity studies showed MAb 1C7 reactivity to C. atrobrunneum but not C. indicum. MAb 1C7 did not react with enolase from Aspergillus fumigatus, which is divergent in only two amino acids within this epitope. The results of this study suggest potential utility of MAb 1C7 in Western blot applications for the detection of Chaetomium and other Sordariomycetes species.

  20. [Monoclonal antibodies against PCSK9: from bench to clinic].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guijarro Herraiz, Carlos

    2016-05-01

    Antibodies are glycoproteins with high specificity binding to multiple antigens due to the large number of structural conformations of the variable chains. Hybridoma technology (fusion of myeloma cells with immunoglobulin-producing lymphocytes) has allowed the synthesis of large quantities of unique antibodies (monoclonal [mAb]). mAbs were initially murine. Subsequently, chimeric mAbs were developed, followed by humanized mAbs and finally human mAbs. The high selectivity and good tolerance of human mAbs allows their therapeutic administration to block specific exogenous or endogenous molecules. Selective human mAbs to the catalytic domain of PCSK9 have recently been developed. These antibodies block PCSK9, favour low-density lipoprotein receptor recycling and markedly reduce circulating cholesterol. Preliminary studies indicate that lowering cholesterol through anti-PCSK9 antibodies may significantly reduce the cardiovascular complications of arteriosclerosis. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Arteriosclerosis. All rights reserved.

  1. Anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies in multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreno Torres, Irene; García-Merino, Antonio

    2017-04-01

    The therapeutic utility of the anti-CD20 monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) is currently being evaluated in multiple sclerosis (MS) in line with the better understanding of the role of B lymphocytes in MS pathogenesis. Area covered: We conducted a literature search using Medline/Pub Med database of basic research and available controlled trials about anti-CD20 mAbs in MS. Additionally, ongoing studies were identified in the ClinicalTrials.gov database. B cells exert multiple inflammatory and regulatory functions playing an important role in MS pathogenesis as is demonstrated by the production of autoantibodies, infiltration of B cells in MS lesions and the formation of ectopic B cell follicle-like structures in meninges, among others. B-cell depletion by anti-CD20 mAbs has been shown to have an impact on these pathogenic mechanisms. The efficacy of three of them, rituximab, ocrelizumab and ofatumumab in MS has been confirmed by placebo-controlled clinical trials demonstrating a significant reduction of the annualized relapsing rate (ARR), new gadolinium-enhancing (GdE) and T2 lesions. There have been no significant safety problems so far but the overall benefit to risk profile is still to be determined. Expert commentary: After recent good results of these agents in MS therapy, questions related to maintenance therapy, markers of response and control of B cells values remain unanswered.

  2. Generation and Application of Monoclonal Antibody Against Lycopene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsibezov, Valeriy V; Bashmakov, Yuriy K; Pristenskiy, Dmitry V; Zigangirova, Naylia A; Kostina, Ludmila V; Chalyk, Natalya E; Kozlov, Alexey Y; Morgunova, Elena Y; Chernyshova, Marina P; Lozbiakova, Marina V; Kyle, Nigel H; Petyaev, Ivan M

    2017-04-01

    A monoclonal antibody (Mab) against lycopene was developed from hybridoma clones obtained from BALB/c mice immunized with trans-isomer of lycopene (t-lycopene, t-LC) conjugated with colloidal gold particles. An alternating immunization schedule which included injection of both formulations of immunogen (without and with Freund's adjuvant) was most effective in the elucidation of a measurable immune response to the t-Lycopene conjugate. Selected hybridoma clones were able to produce an Mab positive in competition assay. In particular, preincubation of 6B9 Mabs with t-LC abolished the ability of 6B9 Mabs to bind LC in the competition assay. Mabs produced by other clones (4F10, 4A3, and 3B12) worked similarly. Analysis of antigen specificity showed that 6B9 Mab raised against t-LC did not recognize other carotenoids such as lutein and carotene. Mab 6B9 was shown to recognize lycopene on a glass surface and in the settings of indirect immunofluorescence experiments performed in cultured hepatocytes and alveolar macrophages incubated with and without lycopene, as well as in sebum and corneocyte specimens from the skin of volunteers supplemented with nutraceutical formulation of lycopene. Newly generated Mabs against lycopene may provide a valuable tool for different analytical assays of lycopene content in various biological, agricultural, and food products.

  3. Antigen-specific human monoclonal antibodies from transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mompó, Susana Magadán; González-Fernández, Africa

    2014-01-01

    Due to the difficulties found when generating fully human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) by the traditional method, several efforts have attempted to overcome these problems, with varying levels of success. One approach has been the development of transgenic mice carrying immunoglobulin (Ig) genes in germ line configuration. The engineered mouse genome can undergo productive rearrangement in the B cell population, with the generation of mouse B lymphocytes expressing human Ig (hIg) chains. To avoid the expression of mouse heavy or light chains, the endogenous mouse Ig (mIg) loci must be silenced by gene-targeting techniques. Subsequently, to obtain antigen-specific mAbs, conventional immunization protocols can be followed and the mAb technique used (fusion of activated B cells with mouse myeloma cells, screening, cloning, freezing, and testing) with these animals expressing human Ig genes. This chapter describes the type of transgenic knockout mice generated for various research groups, provides examples of human mAbs developed by research groups and companies, and includes protocols of immunization, generation, production, and purification of human mAbs from such mice. In addition, it also addresses the problems detected, and includes some of the methods that can be used to analyze functional activities with human mAbs.

  4. Monoclonal Antibody Recognizing a Core Epitope on Mucin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter L. Devine

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibody TH1 (IgM was prepared by immunizing mice with deglycosylated (TFMSA-treated cystic fibrosis mucin. TH1 reacted strongly with TFMSA treated cystic fibrosis mucin but not with the fully glycosylated mucin, indicating reactivity with a core mucin epitope. TH1 showed no reactivity with ovine mucin (98% of glycans as sialyl-Tn but reacted strongly with desialylated ovine mucin, indicating the epitope for this mab was the Tn-antigen (O-linked GalNAc. However, TH1 showed no reactivity with Tn-positive red blood cells, and the binding of TH1 was not inhibited by GalNAc at 2.5 mg/ml, illustrating the importance of the peptide sequence to which the GalNAc is attached. TH1 stained the majority of cancers of the colon, lung, stomach, ovary, breast, and cervix, and the cellular distribution of this antigen in normal tissue suggested reactivity with immature mucin. This antibody appears to be a useful reagent for the detection of immature mucin.

  5. Kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies in oncology: clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gharwan, Helen; Groninger, Hunter

    2016-04-01

    Molecularly targeted cancer therapies, such as small-molecule kinase inhibitors and monoclonal antibodies, constitute a rapidly growing and an important part of the oncology armamentarium. Unlike conventional (cytotoxic) chemotherapeutics, targeted therapies were designed to disrupt cancer cell pathogenesis at specific biological points essential for the development and progression of the tumour. These agents were developed to disrupt specific targets with the aim of minimizing treatment burden compared with conventional chemotherapy. Nevertheless the increasingly common use of targeted therapies has revealed some unanticipated, often clinically significant toxic effects, as well as compromising effective palliative and end-of-life management approaches. Although patients and clinicians welcome improvements in cancer prognosis, these changes can also impact patient quality-of-life. Therefore, as demand for oncology expertise increases, physicians need to apprise themselves of targeted therapies and their clinical implications, including drug-specific side effects, impact on quality of life, and cost issues, especially in relation to end-of-life care. This Review provides a useful summary and guide for professionals treating patients with malignant diseases.

  6. Monoclonal antibodies and other targeted therapies for pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cinar, Pelin; Tempero, Margaret A

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic cancer continues to be a challenging disease to treat because of its aggressive nature, advanced stage at the time of diagnosis, and limited treatment options that are available. Traditional cytotoxic chemotherapy provides modest benefit to patients with pancreatic adenocarcinoma. Recently, a FOLFIRINOX regimen revealed improved response in overall and progression-free survival over single-agent gemcitabine in metastatic pancreatic cancer, but there is still much needed advancement in the systemic treatment of pancreatic cancer. There is a growing interest in the development of novel agents, while our understanding of molecular pathogenesis of pancreatic adenocarcinoma continues to expand. With identification of various molecular pathways in pancreatic cancer tumorigenesis, potential targets for drug development have been pursued with the use of monoclonal antibodies and small-molecule inhibitors. Although preclinical studies with multiple targeted therapies demonstrated encouraging results in pancreatic cancer, only erlotinib, an epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor, showed a marginal survival benefit in a phase III clinical trial, when combined with gemcitabine. As further signaling pathways and their importance in pancreatic cancer tumorigenesis are better understood, further clinical trials will need to be designed to study these targeted agents as single agents, in combination with other novel agents or in combination with cytotoxic chemotherapy. In this review, we present the current knowledge on targeted therapy in pancreatic adenocarcinoma and its application in clinical practice.

  7. Monoclonal antibody-based therapies for microbial diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saylor, Carolyn; Dadachova, Ekaterina; Casadevall, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    The monoclonal antibody (mAb) revolution that currently provides many new options for the treatment of neoplastic and inflammatory diseases has largely bypassed the field of infectious diseases. Only one mAb is licensed for use against an infectious disease, although there are many in various stages of development. This situation is peculiar given that serum therapy was one of the first effective treatments for microbial diseases and that specific antibodies have numerous antimicrobial properties. The underdevelopment and underutilization of mAb therapies for microbial diseases has various complex explanations that include the current availability of antimicrobial drugs, small markets, high costs and microbial antigenic variation. However, there are signs that the climate for mAb therapeutics in infectious diseases is changing given increasing antibiotic drug resistance, the emergence of new pathogenic microbes for which no therapy is available, and development of mAb cocktail formulations. Currently, the major hurdle for the widespread introduction of mAb therapies for microbial diseases is economic, given the high costs of immunoglobulin preparations and relatively small markets. Despite these obstacles there are numerous opportunities for mAb development against microbial diseases and the development of radioimmunotherapy provides new options for enhancing the magic bullet. Hence, there is cautious optimism that the years ahead will see more mAbs in clinical use against microbial diseases. PMID:20006139

  8. Biosimilar monoclonal antibodies: the scientific basis for extrapolation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schellekens, Huub; Lietzan, Erika; Faccin, Freddy; Venema, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    Biosimilars are biologic products that receive authorization based on an abbreviated regulatory application containing comparative quality and nonclinical and clinical data that demonstrate similarity to a licensed biologic product. Extrapolation of safety and efficacy has emerged as an important way to simplify biosimilar development. Regulatory authorities have generally reached the consensus that extrapolation of similarity from one indication to other approved indications of the reference product can be permitted if it is scientifically justified. Recently, the first biosimilar, biosimilar infliximab (Remsima/Inflectra) to the innovator monoclonal antibody infliximab (Remicade), was approved in the European Union, Canada and South Korea; the USA subsequently approved its first biosimilar, a less complex molecule (filgrastim-sndz). Based on two clinical trials of biosimilar infliximab in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and ankylosing spondylitis, the European Medicines Agency allowed extrapolation to all eight approved indications for innovator infliximab, whereas Health Canada did not permit extrapolation to the indications for ulcerative colitis and Crohn's disease. These differing decisions on extrapolation of indications for biosimilar infliximab highlight important unanswered regulatory and scientific questions. Here, we propose substantive scientific considerations for indication extrapolation. The preclinical and clinical criteria that are currently required to merit indication extrapolation have not been rigorously evaluated.

  9. New Insights into Monoclonal B-Cell Lymphocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Kalpadakis

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal B-cell lymphocytosis (MBL is a premalignant condition characterized by the presence of less than 5000/μL circulating clonal B cells in otherwise healthy individuals. Three subcategories have been identified according to the immunophenotypic features: CLL-like, CD5(+ atypical, and CD5(− MBL. CLL-like MBL is by far the most frequent and best studied category and further divided in low-count [LC] and high-count [HC] MBL, based on a cutoff value of 500/μL clonal B cells. LC-MBL typically remains stable and probably does not represent a truly premalignant condition, but rather an age-related immune senescence. On the other hand, HC-MBL is closely related to CLL-Rai0, bearing similar immunogenetic profile, and is associated with an annual risk of progression to CLL requiring therapy at a rate of 1.1%. Currently there are no reproducible factors for evaluating the risk of progression to CLL. CD5(− MBL is characterized by an immunophenotype consistent with marginal zone origin and displays many similarities with marginal zone lymphomas (MZL, mainly the splenic MZL. The cutoff value of 5000/μL clonal B cells cannot probably be applied in CD5(− MBL, requiring a new definition to describe those cases.

  10. Production of monoclonal antibodies reactive with ovine eosinophils

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    Meeusen Els NT

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is strong evidence implicating eosinophils in host defence against parasites as well as allergic disease pathologies. However, a lack of reagents such as monoclonal antibodies (mAbs specific for eosinophils has made it difficult to confirm the functional role of eosinophils in such disease conditions. Using an established mammary model of allergic inflammation in sheep, large numbers of inflammatory cells enriched for eosinophils were collected from parasite-stimulated mammary glands and used for the generation of mAbs against ovine eosinophils. Results A panel of mAbs was raised against ovine eosinophils of which two were shown to be highly specific for eosinophils. The reactivity of mAbs 3.252 and 1.2 identified eosinophils from various cell and tissue preparations with no detectable reactivity on cells of myeloid or lymphoid lineage, tissue mast cells, dendritic cells, epithelial cells or other connective tissues. Two other mAbs generated in this study (mAbs 4.4 and 4.10 were found to have reactivity for both eosinophils and neutrophils. Conclusion This study describes the production of new reagents to identify eosinophils (as well as granulocytes in sheep that will be useful in studying the role of eosinophils in disease pathologies in parasite and allergy models.

  11. A monoclonal antibody to triplex DNA binds to eucaryotic chromosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, J S; Burkholder, G D; Latimer, L J; Haug, B L; Braun, R P

    1987-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (Jel 318) was produced by immunizing mice with poly[d(TmC)].poly[d(GA)].poly[d(mCT) which forms a stable triplex at neutral pH. Jel 318 did not bind to calf thymus DNA or other non pyrimidine.purine DNAs such as poly[d(TG)].poly[d(CA)]. In addition the antibody did not recognize pyrimidine.purine DNAs containing mA (e.g. poly[d(TC)].poly[d(GmA)]) which cannot form a triplex since the methyl group blocks Hoogsteen base-pairing. The binding of Jel 318 to chromosomes was assessed by immunofluorescent microscopy of mouse myeloma cells which had been fixed in methanol/acetic acid. An antibody specific for duplex DNA (Jel 239) served as a control. The fluorescence due to Jel 318 was much weaker than that of Jel 239 but binding to metaphase chromosomes and interphase nuclei was observed. The staining by Jel 318 was unaffected by addition of E. coli DNA but it was obliterated in the presence of triplex. Since an acid pH favours triplex formation, nuclei were also prepared from mouse melanoma cells by fixation in cold acetone. Again Jel 318 showed weak but consistent staining of the nuclei. Therefore it seems likely that triplexes are an inherent feature of the structure of eucaryotic DNA. Images PMID:2434928

  12. Immunomodulatory Monoclonal Antibodies in Combined Immunotherapy Trials for Cutaneous Melanoma

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    Mariana Aris

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available In the last few years, there has been a twist in cancer treatment toward immunotherapy thanks to the impressive results seen in advanced patients from several tumor pathologies. Cutaneous melanoma is a highly mutated and immunogenic tumor that has been a test field for the development of immunotherapy. However, there is still a way on the road to achieving complete and long-lasting responses in most patients. It is desirable that immunotherapeutic strategies induce diverse immune reactivity specific to tumor antigens, including the so-called neoantigens, as well as the blockade of immunosuppressive mechanisms. In this review, we will go through the role of promising monoclonal antibodies in cancer immunotherapy with immunomodulatory function, especially blocking of the inhibitory immune checkpoints CTLA-4 and PD-1, in combination with different immunotherapeutic strategies such as vaccines. We will discuss the rational basis for these combinatorial approaches as well as different schemes currently under study for cutaneous melanoma in the clinical trials arena. In this way, the combination of “push and release” immunomodulatory therapies can contribute to achieving a more robust and durable antitumor immune response in patients.

  13. A monoclonal antibody against the plant growth regulator, abscisic acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banowetz, G M; Hess, J R; Carman, J G

    1994-12-01

    Monoclonal antibodies were prepared against the plant growth regulator abscisic acid (ABA) conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin through C-4. One of these antibodies was characterized for use in a competition fluorescence enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (F-ELISA). The antibody detected femtomole quantities of ABA when used in the F-ELISA and showed minimal cross-reactivity with ABA metabolites and structural analogs. Dilution analysis suggested that the F-ELISA could be used to determine the ABA content of methanolic extracts of crude samples of wheat seeds without further purification. The F-ELISA was used to determine the effect of seed priming on ABA levels in wheat seeds. The antibody also was used in a modified noncompetitive indirect ELISA to measure ABA content of wheat caryopses. The noncompetitive ELISA was more sensitive than the F-ELISA, although the F-ELISA had a broader measuring range. When our anti-ABA antibody and a commercially available anti-ABA antibody were compared by indirect ELISA, there were no significant differences between the ABA estimates.

  14. Monoclonal Antibodies for the Diagnosis of Borrelia crocidurae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fotso Fotso, Aurélien; Mediannikov, Oleg; Nappez, Claude; Azza, Saïd; Raoult, Didier; Drancourt, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Relapsing fever borreliae, produced by ectoparasite-borne Borrelia species, cause mild to deadly bacteremia and miscarriage. In the perspective of developing inexpensive assays for the rapid detection of relapsing fever borreliae, we produced 12 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against Borrelia crocidurae and characterized the two exhibiting the highest titers. P3A10 MAb reacts with the 35.6-kDa flagellin B (flaB) of B. crocidurae while P6D9 MAb recognizes a 35.1-kDa variable-like protein (Vlp) in B. crocidurae and a 35.2-kDa Vlp in Borrelia duttonii. Indirect immunofluorescence assay incorporating relapsing fever and Lyme group borreliae and 11 blood-borne organisms responsible for fever in West Africa confirmed the reactivity of these two MAbs. Combining these two MAbs in indirect immunofluorescence assays detected relapsing fever borreliae including B. crocidurae in ticks and the blood of febrile Senegalese patients. Both antibodies could be incorporated into inexpensive and stable formats suited for the rapid point-of-care diagnosis of relapsing fever. These first-ever MAbs directed against African relapsing fever borreliae are available for the scientific community to promote research in this neglected field. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  15. Reversing EGFR Mediated Immunoescape by Targeted Monoclonal Antibody Therapy

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    Fernando Concha-Benavente

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Uncontrolled growth is a signature of carcinogenesis, in part mediated by overexpression or overstimulation of growth factor receptors. The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mediates activation of multiple oncogenic signaling pathways and escape from recognition by the host immune system. We discuss how EGFR signaling downregulates tumor antigen presentation, upregulates suppressive checkpoint receptor ligand programmed death ligand (PD-L1, induces secretion of inhibitory molecules such as transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ and reprograms the metabolic pathways in cancer cells to upregulate aerobic glycolysis and lactate secretion that ultimately lead to impaired cellular immunity mediated by natural killer (NK cell and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL. Ultimately, our understanding of EGFR-mediated escape mechanisms has led us to design EGFR-specific monoclonal antibody therapies that not only inhibit tumor cell metabolic changes and intrinsic oncogenic signaling but also activates immune cells that mediate tumor clearance. Importantly, targeted immunotherapy may also benefit from combination with antibodies that target other immunosuppressive pathways such PD-L1 or TGFβ and ultimately enhance clinical efficacy.

  16. [Identification and production of monoclonal antibody of Siberian tiger's immunoglobulin].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yaonglong; Zhang, Duanling; Zhou, Ming; Xue, Yuan; Hua, Yuping; Ma, Jianzhang

    2010-03-01

    To purify immunoglobulin (Ig) of Siberian Tiger and prepare monoclonal antibody (mAb) against the Ig,which can be used to develop immunological diagnostic kits for diagnosing infectious disease in Siberian Tiger. The Ig of Siberian tigers was purified with saturated ammonium sulfate combined with recombinant Protein G. The C57BL/6 mice were immunized with the purified Ig. Spleno-cytes of the mice immunized were collected and fused with the mouse myeloma cell line (Sp2/0-Ag14). The positive hybridoma clones were selected by ELISA and were identified by western blot. The sandwich ELISA was used to detect immunocompetence of the purified Ig and the mAb. We obtained three mouse hybridoma clones that produced mAbs against Ig of Siberian Tiger. The derived McAbs could recognize Ig heavy chain of Siberian Tiger specifically. The biological activity of the Ig and obtained McAbs also could be identified by detecting the antibody induced by panleukopenia virus (FPV-HLJ) vaccine in Siberian Tiger. The antibody also would be useful for assess the vaccine efficacy against the infectious disease on the Siberian Tiger. Protein G can be used in Ig purification of Siberian Tiger. The obtained McAbs from the hybridoma ADT11 in this study owned strong ability to bind Ig of Siberian Tiger and have a stable immunocompetence. They can be used to develop diagnostic methods for detecting infectious disease in Siberian Tiger and vaccine research.

  17. Monoclonal antibody against Mycoplasma fermentans-specific aminoglycoglycerolipid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuda, K; Li, J L; Ichinose, S; Harasawa, R; Saito, M; Yamamoto, N

    2000-01-01

    Previously, we reported that Mycoplasma fermentans has specific antigens (phosphocholine-containing glycoglycerolipids: GGPL-I and GGPL-III) and discussed the possibility of their pathogenic role. In this paper, we report the characterization of a monoclonal antibody (MF-III-1) specific to GGPL-III (phosphocholine-containing aminoglycoglycerolipid) using methods of electron microscopy, immunofluorescence cell surface staining, laser scanning microscopy, immunoelectron microscopy, and thin-layer chromatography immunostaining. The MF-III-1 antibody specifically recognized M. fermentans attached to the surface of HTLV-I-infected human helper T-cells, and it did not cross-react with other lipids nor with human T-cell antigens. Since MF-III-1 distinguishes GGPL-III from GGPL-I, the binding site may include a serinol (2-amino-1,3-propanediol) residue of GGPL-III. MF-III-1 is useful for the in vitro study of M. fermentans, and may also be useful as a tool for the study of the involvement of M. fermentans in human diseases.

  18. IMMEDIATE REACTIONS TO MONOCLONAL ANTIBODIES IN CLINICAL HEMATOLOGY

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    Vasiliki KYRIAZI

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs have been widely used in clinical hematology. As foreign macro-molecules, they can cause infusional reactions during the administration or within 24 hours after the infusion, which encompass a spectrum of mechanisms. Although most of these reactions are non-allergic, are often indistinguishable from true allergic reactions mediated by IgE immunoglobulins. The diagnosis is often challenging and relies mainly on clinical criteria. They occur during the first doses, soon after the initiation of treatment. The symptoms are usually well controlled by the immediate drug discontinuation or reduction of the infusion rate. The management remains largely supportive, consisting of oxygen, intravenous fluids, bronchodilators, antihistamines and steroids. Most of MoAb protocols recommend premedication with steroids and antihistamines and gradually escalating infusion rates. Increased medical and nursing vigilance is required and resuscitative equipment should always be readily available. These events affect patients' quality of life, leading to treatment delay or discontinuation and series of tests. The decision to rechallenge the treatment depends on severity grading, clinical parameters and treatment goals. This article provides an update of MoAbs used in clinical hematology. It summarizes the pathophysiology, the diagnostic approach, the preventive measures and treatment of MoAb-related reactions.

  19. Defining process design space for monoclonal antibody cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abu-Absi, Susan Fugett; Yang, LiYing; Thompson, Patrick; Jiang, Canping; Kandula, Sunitha; Schilling, Bernhard; Shukla, Abhinav A

    2010-08-15

    The concept of design space has been taking root as a foundation of in-process control strategies for biopharmaceutical manufacturing processes. During mapping of the process design space, the multidimensional combination of operational variables is studied to quantify the impact on process performance in terms of productivity and product quality. An efficient methodology to map the design space for a monoclonal antibody cell culture process is described. A failure modes and effects analysis (FMEA) was used as the basis for the process characterization exercise. This was followed by an integrated study of the inoculum stage of the process which includes progressive shake flask and seed bioreactor steps. The operating conditions for the seed bioreactor were studied in an integrated fashion with the production bioreactor using a two stage design of experiments (DOE) methodology to enable optimization of operating conditions. A two level Resolution IV design was followed by a central composite design (CCD). These experiments enabled identification of the edge of failure and classification of the operational parameters as non-key, key or critical. In addition, the models generated from the data provide further insight into balancing productivity of the cell culture process with product quality considerations. Finally, process and product-related impurity clearance was evaluated by studies linking the upstream process with downstream purification. Production bioreactor parameters that directly influence antibody charge variants and glycosylation in CHO systems were identified.

  20. Role of cosolutes in the aggregation kinetics of monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoud, Lucrèce; Sozo, Margaux; Arosio, Paolo; Yates, Andrew; Norrant, Edith; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2014-10-16

    We propose a general strategy based on kinetic analysis to investigate how cosolutes affect the aggregation behavior of therapeutic proteins. We apply this approach to study the impact of NaCl and sorbitol on the aggregation kinetics of two monoclonal antibodies, an IgG1 and an IgG2. By using a combination of size exclusion chromatography and light scattering techniques, we study the impact of the cosolutes on the monomer depletion, as well as on the formation of dimers, trimers, and larger aggregates. We analyze these macroscopic effects in the frame of a kinetic model based on Smoluchowski's population balance equations modified to account for nucleation events. By comparing experimental data with model simulations, we discriminate the effect of cosolutes on the elementary steps which contribute to the global aggregation process. In the case of the IgG1, it is found that NaCl accelerates the kinetics of aggregation by promoting specifically aggregation events, while sorbitol delays the kinetics of aggregation by specifically inhibiting protein unfolding. In the case of the IgG2, whose monomer depletion kinetics is limited by dimer formation, NaCl and sorbitol are found respectively to accelerate and inhibit conformational changes and aggregation events to the same extent.

  1. A thermal-cycling method for disaggregating monoclonal antibody oligomers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadavarte, Rahul H; Ghosh, Raja

    2014-03-01

    Non-native oligomeric forms of biopharmaceutical proteins are therapeutically inactive, and potentially toxic and immunogenic, and therefore undesirable in pharmaceutical formulations. Immunoglobulin G class of antibodies are known to form stable nonnative oligomers through Fab-Fab interactions. In this paper, we investigate thermal-cycling as a technique for disaggregating antibody oligomers. Aggregate containing monoclonal antibody (mAb) samples were exposed to rapid heating and cooling cycles in a thermal-cycler. The heating phase of the thermal-cycle resulted in partial unfolding of the Fab domain, leading to the release of monomer from the oligomer complexes, whereas the rapid cooling that followed led to refolding and minimized the probability of protein reaggregation. The extent of mAb oligomer disaggregation was determined by size-exclusion chromatography and hydrophobic interaction membrane chromatography, whereas protein refolding was assessed by circular dichroism spectroscopy. The thermal-cycling technique in addition to being suitable for disaggregating protein oligomer samples could also potentially be useful for studying the mechanisms of protein aggregation and disaggregation. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  2. Characterization of Endotrypanum Parasites Using Specific Monoclonal Antibodies

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    Ramos Franco Antonia Maria

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available A large number of Endotrypanum stocks (representing an heterogeneous population of strains have been screened against a panel of monoclonal antibodies (MAbs derived for selected species of Endotrypanum or Leishmania, to see whether this approach could be used to group/differentiate further among these parasites. Using different immunological assay systems, MAbs considered specific for the genus Endotrypanum (E-24, CXXX-3G5-F12 or strain M6159 of E. schaudinni (E-2, CXIV-3C7-F5 reacted variably according to the test used but in the ELISA or immunofluorescence assay both reacted with all the strains tested. Analyses using these MAbs showed antigenic diversity occurring among the Endotrypanum strains, but no qualitative or quantitative reactivity pattern could be consistently related to parasite origin (i.e., host species involved or geographic area of isolation. Western blot analyses of the parasites showed that these MAbs recognized multiple components. Differences existed either in the epitope density or molecular forms associated with the antigenic determinants and therefore allowed the assignment of the strains to specific antigenic groups. Using immunofluorescence or ELISA assay, clone E-24 produced reaction with L. equatorensis (which is a parasite of sloth and rodent, but not with other trypanosomatids examined. Interestingly, the latter parasite and the Endotrypanum strains cross-reacted with a number of MAbs that were produced against members of the L. major-L. tropica complex

  3. Respiratory protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Howard J; Birkner, Jeffrey S

    2012-12-01

    Respiratory protection is used as a method of protecting individuals from inhaling harmful airborne contaminants and in some cases to supply them with breathable air in oxygen-deficient environments. This article focuses on the use and types of personal respiratory protection (respirators) worn by individuals at workplaces where airborne hazardous contaminants may exist. Respirators are increasingly also being used in nonindustrial settings such as health care facilities, as concerns regarding infectious epidemics and terrorist threats grow. Pulmonologists and other clinicians should understand fundamental issues regarding respiratory protection against airborne contaminants and the use of respirators. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Broadly Neutralizing Antibody Responses in a Large Longitudinal Sub-Saharan HIV Primary Infection Cohort.

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    Elise Landais

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs are thought to be a critical component of a protective HIV vaccine. However, designing vaccines immunogens able to elicit bnAbs has proven unsuccessful to date. Understanding the correlates and immunological mechanisms leading to the development of bnAb responses during natural HIV infection is thus critical to the design of a protective vaccine. The IAVI Protocol C program investigates a large longitudinal cohort of primary HIV-1 infection in Eastern and South Africa. Development of neutralization was evaluated in 439 donors using a 6 cross-clade pseudo-virus panel predictive of neutralization breadth on larger panels. About 15% of individuals developed bnAb responses, essentially between year 2 and year 4 of infection. Statistical analyses revealed no influence of gender, age or geographical origin on the development of neutralization breadth. However, cross-clade neutralization strongly correlated with high viral load as well as with low CD4 T cell counts, subtype-C infection and HLA-A*03(- genotype. A correlation with high overall plasma IgG levels and anti-Env IgG binding titers was also found. The latter appeared not associated with higher affinity, suggesting a greater diversity of the anti-Env responses in broad neutralizers. Broadly neutralizing activity targeting glycan-dependent epitopes, largely the N332-glycan epitope region, was detected in nearly half of the broad neutralizers while CD4bs and gp41-MPER bnAb responses were only detected in very few individuals. Together the findings suggest that both viral and host factors are critical for the development of bnAbs and that the HIV Env N332-glycan supersite may be a favorable target for vaccine design.

  5. Broad Spectrum Sanitizing Wipes with Food Additives Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microcide proposes to develop novel multipurpose non-toxic sanitizing wipes that are aqueous based, have shelf life of 3-5 years, have broad spectrum microbicidal...

  6. The broad line region of AGN: Kinematics and physics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Popović L.Č.

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper a discussion of kinematics and physics of the Broad Line Region (BLR is given. The possible physical conditions in the BLR and problems in determination of the physical parameters (electron temperature and density are considered. Moreover, one analyses the geometry of the BLR and the probability that (at least a fraction of the radiation in the Broad Emission Lines (BELs originates from a relativistic accretion disk.

  7. The Broad Line Region of AGN: Kinematics and Physics

    OpenAIRE

    Popović L.Č.

    2006-01-01

    In this paper a discussion of kinematics and physics of the Broad Line Region (BLR) is given. The possible physical conditions in the BLR and problems in determination of the physical parameters (electron temperature and density) are considered. Moreover, one analyses the geometry of the BLR and the probability that (at least) a fraction of the radiation in the Broad Emission Lines (BELs) originates from a relativistic accretion disk.

  8. IMC-A12, a human IgG1 monoclonal antibody to the insulin-like growth factor I receptor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowinsky, Eric K; Youssoufian, Hagop; Tonra, James R; Solomon, Phillip; Burtrum, Douglas; Ludwig, Dale L

    2007-09-15

    Targeted monoclonal antibody therapy is an important strategy in cancer therapeutics. Among the most promising characteristics of therapeutic targets are those that modulate the growth and survival of malignant neoplasms and their sensitivity to anticancer therapies. The insulin-like growth factor-I receptor (IGF-IR) is overexpressed in many types of solid and hematopoietic malignancies, and has been implicated as a principal cause of heightened proliferative and survival signaling. IGF-IR has also been shown to confer resistance to cytotoxic, hormonal, and targeted therapies, suggesting that therapeutics targeting IGF-IR may be effective against a broad range of malignancies. IMC-A12 (ImClone Systems Incorporated), a fully human monoclonal IgG1 antibody that binds with high affinity to the IGF-IR, inhibits ligand-dependent receptor activation and downstream signaling. IMC-A12 also mediates robust internalization and degradation of the IGF-IR. In human tumor xenograft models, IGF-IR blockade by IMC-A12 results in rapid and profound growth inhibition of cancers of the breast, lung, colon, and pancreas, and many other neoplasms. Although promising single-agent activity has been observed, the most impressive effects of targeting the IGF-IR with IMC-A12 have been noted when this agent was combined with cytotoxic agents or other targeted therapeutics. The results with IMC-A12 to date suggest that it may be an effective therapeutic in a diverse array of oncologic indications.

  9. Multiple pathways of escape from HIV broadly cross-neutralizing V2-dependent antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Penny L; Sheward, Daniel; Nonyane, Molati; Ranchobe, Nthabeleng; Hermanus, Tandile; Gray, Elin S; Abdool Karim, Salim S; Williamson, Carolyn; Morris, Lynn

    2013-05-01

    Broadly cross-neutralizing (BCN) antibodies are likely to be critical for an effective HIV vaccine. However, the ontogeny of such antibodies and their relationship with autologous viral evolution is unclear. Here, we characterized viral evolution in CAP256, a subtype C-infected individual who developed potent BCN antibodies targeting positions R166 and K169 in the V2 region. CAP256 was superinfected at 3 months postinfection with a virus that was highly sensitive to BCN V2-dependent monoclonal antibodies. The autologous neutralizing response in CAP256 was directed at V1V2, reaching extremely high titers (>1:40,000) against the superinfecting virus at 42 weeks, just 11 weeks prior to the development of the BCN response targeting the same region. Recombination between the primary and superinfecting viruses, especially in V2 and gp41, resulted in two distinct lineages by 4 years postinfection. Although neutralization of some CAP256 clones by plasma from as much as 2 years earlier suggested incomplete viral escape, nonetheless titers against later clones were reduced at least 40-fold to less than 1:1,000. Escape mutations were identified in each lineage, either at R166 or at K169, suggesting that strain-specific and BCN antibodies targeted overlapping epitopes. Furthermore, the early dependence of CAP256 neutralizing antibodies on the N160 glycan decreased with the onset of neutralization breadth, indicating a change in specificity. These data suggest rapid maturation, within 11 weeks, of CAP256 strain-specific antibodies to acquire breadth, with implications for the vaccine elicitation of BCN V2-dependent antibodies. Overall these studies demonstrate that ongoing viral escape is possible, even from BCN antibodies.

  10. Selection pressure on HIV-1 envelope by broadly neutralizing antibodies to the conserved CD4-binding site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Xueling; Wang, Charlene; O'Dell, Sijy; Li, Yuxing; Keele, Brandon F; Yang, Zhongjia; Imamichi, Hiromi; Doria-Rose, Nicole; Hoxie, James A; Connors, Mark; Shaw, George M; Wyatt, Richard T; Mascola, John R

    2012-05-01

    The monoclonal antibody (MAb) VRC01 was isolated from a slowly progressing HIV-1-infected donor and was shown to neutralize diverse HIV-1 strains by binding to the conserved CD4 binding site (CD4bs) of gp120. To better understand the virologic factors associated with such antibody development, we characterized HIV-1 envelope (Env) variants from this donor and five other donors who developed broadly neutralizing antibodies. A total of 473 env sequences were obtained by single-genome amplification, and 100 representative env clones were expressed and tested for entry and neutralization sensitivity. While VRC01 neutralizes about 90% of the genetically diverse heterologous HIV-1 strains tested, only selective archival Env variants from the VRC01 donor were sensitive to VRC01 and all of the Env variants derived from the donor plasma were resistant, indicating strong antibody-based selection pressure. Despite their resistance to this broadly reactive MAb that partially mimics CD4, all Env variants required CD4 for entry. Three other CD4bs MAbs from the same donor were able to neutralize some VRC01 escape variants, suggesting that CD4bs antibodies continued to evolve in response to viral escape. We also observed a relatively high percentage of VRC01-resistant Env clones in the plasma of four of five additional broadly neutralizing donors, suggesting the presence of CD4bs-directed neutralizing antibodies in these donors. In total, these data indicate that the CD4bs-directed neutralizing antibodies exert ongoing selection pressure on the conserved CD4bs epitope of HIV-1 Env.

  11. Radiation Protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loos, M

    2002-04-01

    Major achievements of SCK-CEN's Radiation Protection Department in 2001 are described. The main areas for R and D of the department are enviromnental remediation, emergency planning, radiation protection research, low-level radioactvity measurements, safeguards and physics measurements, decision strategy research and policy support and social sciences in nuclear research. Main achievements for 2001 in these areas are reported.

  12. Selection of therapeutic H5N1 monoclonal antibodies following IgVH repertoire analysis in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Sean A; Moore, Margaret; VandenEkart, Emily J; Roque, Richard P; Bowen, Richard A; Van Hoeven, Neal; Wiley, Steven R; Clegg, Christopher H

    2016-07-01

    The rapid rate of influenza virus mutation drives the emergence of new strains that inflict serious seasonal epidemics and less frequent, but more deadly, pandemics. While vaccination provides the best protection against influenza, its utility is often diminished by the unpredictability of new pathogenic strains. Consequently, efforts are underway to identify new antiviral drugs and monoclonal antibodies that can be used to treat recently infected individuals and prevent disease in vulnerable populations. Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) and the analysis of antibody gene repertoires is a valuable tool for Ab discovery. Here, we describe a technology platform for isolating therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) by analyzing the IgVH repertoires of mice immunized with recombinant H5N1 hemagglutinin (rH5). As an initial proof of concept, 35 IgVH genes were selected using a CDRH3 search algorithm and co-expressed in a murine IgG2a expression vector with a panel of germline murine kappa genes. Culture supernatants were then screened for antigen binding. Seventeen of the 35 IgVH MAbs (49%) bound rH5VN1203 in preliminary screens and 8 of 9 purified MAbs inhibited 3 heterosubtypic strains of H5N1 virus when assayed by HI. Two of these MAbs demonstrated prophylactic and therapeutic activity in virus-challenged mice. This is the first example in which an NGS discovery platform has been used to isolate anti-influenza MAbs with relevant therapeutic activity. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Geminiviral vectors based on bean yellow dwarf virus for production of vaccine antigens and monoclonal antibodies in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qiang; He, Junyun; Phoolcharoen, Waranyoo; Mason, Hugh S

    2011-03-01

    Expression of recombinant vaccine antigens and monoclonal antibodies using plant viral vectors has developed extensively during the past several years. The approach benefits from high yields of recombinant protein obtained within days after transient delivery of viral vectors to leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana, a tobacco relative. Modified viral genomes of both RNA and DNA viruses have been created. Geminiviruses such as bean yellow dwarf virus (BeYDV) have a small, single stranded DNA genome that replicates in the nucleus of an infected plant cell, using the cellular DNA synthesis apparatus and a virus-encoded replication initiator protein (Rep). BeYDV-derived expression vectors contain deletions of the viral genes encoding coat and movement proteins and insertion of an expression cassette for a protein of interest. Delivery of the geminiviral vector to leaf cells via Agrobacterium-mediated delivery produces very high levels of recombinant DNA that can act as a transcription template, yielding high levels of mRNA for the protein of interest. Several vaccine antigens, including Norwalk virus capsid protein and hepatitis B core antigen, were expressed using the BeYDV vector at levels up to 1 mg per g of leaf mass. BeYDV replicons can be stacked in the same vector molecule by linking them in tandem, which enables production of multi-subunit proteins like monoclonal antibody (mAb) heavy and light chains. The protective mAb 6D8 against Ebola virus was produced at 0.5 mg per g of leaf mass. Multi-replicon vectors could be conveniently used to produce protein complexes, e.g. virus-like particles that require two or more subunits.

  14. Epitope dampening monotypic measles virus hemagglutinin glycoprotein results in resistance to cocktail of monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lech, Patrycja J; Tobin, Gregory J; Bushnell, Ruth; Gutschenritter, Emily; Pham, Linh D; Nace, Rebecca; Verhoeyen, Els; Cosset, François-Loïc; Muller, Claude P; Russell, Stephen J; Nara, Peter L

    2013-01-01

    The measles virus (MV) is serologically monotypic. Life-long immunity is conferred by a single attack of measles or following vaccination with the MV vaccine. This is contrary to viruses such as influenza, which readily develop resistance to the immune system and recur. A better understanding of factors that restrain MV to one serotype may allow us to predict if MV will remain monotypic in the future and influence the design of novel MV vaccines and therapeutics. MV hemagglutinin (H) glycoprotein, binds to cellular receptors and subsequently triggers the fusion (F) glycoprotein to fuse the virus into the cell. H is also the major target for neutralizing antibodies. To explore if MV remains monotypic due to a lack of plasticity of the H glycoprotein, we used the technology of Immune Dampening to generate viruses with rationally designed N-linked glycosylation sites and mutations in different epitopes and screened for viruses that escaped monoclonal antibodies (mAbs). We then combined rationally designed mutations with naturally selected mutations to generate a virus resistant to a cocktail of neutralizing mAbs targeting four different epitopes simultaneously. Two epitopes were protected by engineered N-linked glycosylations and two epitopes acquired escape mutations via two consecutive rounds of artificial selection in the presence of mAbs. Three of these epitopes were targeted by mAbs known to interfere with receptor binding. Results demonstrate that, within the epitopes analyzed, H can tolerate mutations in different residues and additional N-linked glycosylations to escape mAbs. Understanding the degree of change that H can tolerate is important as we follow its evolution in a host whose immunity is vaccine induced by genotype A strains instead of multiple genetically distinct wild-type MVs.

  15. Monoclonal antibodies: A review of therapeutic applications and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    the new mAbs are nearly ten-fold more potent compared to the recently described PG9, PG16 and VRC01 mAbs; and 100-fold more potent compared to the original prototype HIV broadly neutralizing mAbs [32]. ... (alpha-v/beta-3) present in blood vessels supplying tumors but is absent in blood vessels found in normal ...

  16. Comparison of three methods for competitive binding of monoclonal antibodies - The localization of antigenic sites for monoclonal antibodies on Panulirus interruptus hemocyanin

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Perton, FG; Dijkema, JH; Smilda, T; vanUffelen, BE; Beintema, JJ

    1996-01-01

    The competitive binding of a panel of monoclonal antibodies against hemocyanin of Panulirus interruptus hemocyanin was investigated with three different methods, A competitive-binding immunoassay method was more successful in the determination of ternary complexes than gel electrophoresis and gel

  17. Monoclonal antibodies to polioviruses; comparison of intratypic strain differentiation of poliovirus type 1 using monoclonal antibodies versus cross-absorbed antisera.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); A.L. van Wezel; T.G. Hazendonk; F.G.C.M. Uytdehaag (Fons); J.A.A.M. van Asten (Jack); G. van Steenis (Bert)

    1983-01-01

    textabstractA panel of 10 monoclonal antibodies raised to 3 different poliovirus type 1 strains was tested in a micro-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and in a micro-neutralization test against 87 poliovirus type 1 strains. The results, evaluated in a newly developed system for intratypic strain

  18. How germinal centers evolve broadly neutralizing antibodies: the breadth of the follicular helper T cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Boer, Rob J; Perelson, Alan S

    2017-09-06

    Many HIV-1 infected patients evolve broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs). This evolutionary process typically takes several years, and is poorly understood as selection taking place in germinal centers occurs on the basis of antibody affinity. B cells with the highest affinity receptors tend to acquire the most antigen from the FDC network, and present the highest density of cognate peptides to follicular helper T cells (Tfh), which provide survival signals to the B cell. BnAbs are therefore only expected to evolve when the B cell lineage evolving breadth is consistently capturing and presenting more peptides to Tfh cells than other lineages of more specific B cells. Here we develop mathematical models of Tfh in germinal centers to explicitly define the mechanisms of selection in this complex evolutionary process.Our results suggest that broadly reactive B cells presenting a high density of pMHC are readily outcompeted by B cells responding to lineages of HIV-1 that transiently dominate the within host viral population. Conversely, if broadly reactive B cells acquire a large variety of several HIV-1 proteins from the FDC network and present a high diversity of several pMHC, they be rescued by a large fraction of the Tfh repertoire in the germinal center. Under such circumstances the evolution of bnAbs is much more consistent. Increasing the magnitude of the Tfh response, or the breadth of the Tfh repertoire, both markedly facilitate the evolution of bnAbs. Because both can be increased by vaccination with several HIV-1 proteins, this calls for experiments testing.Importance Many HIV-infected patients slowly evolve antibodies that can neutralize a large variety of viruses. Such "broadly neutralizing antibodies" (bnAbs) could in the future become therapeutic agents. BnAbs appear very late and patients are typically not protected by them. At the moment we fail to understand why this takes so long, and how the immune system selects for broadly neutralizing capacity

  19. Targeting N-Glycan Cryptic Sugar Moieties for Broad-Spectrum Virus Neutralization: Progress in Identifying Conserved Molecular Targets in Viruses of Distinct Phylogenetic Origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denong Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Identifying molecular targets for eliciting broadly virus-neutralizing antibodies is one of the key steps toward development of vaccines against emerging viral pathogens. Owing to genomic and somatic diversities among viral species, identifying protein targets for broad-spectrum virus neutralization is highly challenging even for the same virus, such as HIV-1. However, viruses rely on host glycosylation machineries to synthesize and express glycans and, thereby, may display common carbohydrate moieties. Thus, exploring glycan-binding profiles of broad-spectrum virus-neutralizing agents may provide key information to uncover the carbohydrate-based virus-neutralizing epitopes. In this study, we characterized two broadly HIV-neutralizing agents, human monoclonal antibody 2G12 and Galanthus nivalis lectin (GNA, for their viral targeting activities. Although these agents were known to be specific for oligomannosyl antigens, they differ strikingly in virus-binding activities. The former is HIV-1 specific; the latter is broadly reactive and is able to neutralize viruses of distinct phylogenetic origins, such as HIV-1, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV, and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV. In carbohydrate microarray analyses, we explored the molecular basis underlying the striking differences in the spectrum of anti-virus activities of the two probes. Unlike 2G12, which is strictly specific for the high-density Man9GlcNAc2Asn (Man9-clusters, GNA recognizes a number of N-glycan cryptic sugar moieties. These include not only the known oligomannosyl antigens but also previously unrecognized tri-antennary or multi-valent GlcNAc-terminating N-glycan epitopes (Tri/m-Gn. These findings highlight the potential of N-glycan cryptic sugar moieties as conserved targets for broad-spectrum virus neutralization and suggest the GNA-model of glycan-binding warrants focused investigation.

  20. Recognition of multiple Mycoplasma bovis antigens by monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dénes, Béla; Tenk, Miklós; Tekes, Lajos; Varga, Ildikó; Ferenczné, Ildikó P; Stipkovits, László

    2003-02-01

    To produce monoclonal antibodies (MAbs), Balb/c AnN Crl BR mice were inoculated with the cell suspension of a Hungarian Mycoplasma bovis strain designated 26034. Three days after the last immunization the spleen of the immunized mouse was removed aseptically. The fusion of spleen cells with Sp2/0-Ag14 murine myeloma cells was performed in the presence of polyethylene glycol. The obtained hybrid cells were selected with hipoxantine, aminopterine and thymidine (HAT) medium. Two weeks after the fusion, the supernatants of the grown cells were tested by a self-developed indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The results showed that 63 antibody-producing hybridomas had been obtained. For accurate determination of the molecular weight of antigen determinants, the supernatants giving positive reaction in the ELISA were tested by Western blotting. According to the results, the obtained MAbs recognize the antigen determinants of the following molecular weights: 1B11: 63 kDa, 1C7: 63 kDa, 2C5: 22, 25 and 27 kDa, 2C9: 69 kDa, 3G12: 67, 69 and 72 kDa, 4H9: 63 kDa, 5B8: 22, 25 and 27 kDa, 5D3: 22, 25 and 27 kDa, 5C11: 69 kDa, 5E5: 22, 25 and 27 kDa, 6F11: 63 kDa, and 6H10: 22, 25 and 27 kDa. The 12 cell groups selected on the basis of the Western blotting were cloned twice by end-point dilution method. The cloned cells were propagated, and with 5 cell lines antibodies were produced in the CELLine bioreactor (Integra Biosciences, Zurich, Switzerland). Cell line 3G12 showed the highest productivity with an average daily output of 1.5 mg immunoglobulin. Cell line 5E5 produced 1.1 mg, 6H10 0.8 mg, 2C9 0.47 mg and 6F11 0.4 mg antibody per day. The isotype of the antibodies was determined by ELISA. The antibodies produced by the 12 cell lines tested were assigned to the IgG(1) subclass according to the heavy chain. Ten cell lines produced kappa and two produced lambda light-chain antibody. Possible cross-reactions of the produced monoclonal anti-M. bovis antibodies with

  1. Development of new staining technology "eastern blotting" using monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morinaga, Osamu; Shoyama, Yukihiro

    2011-03-01

    Ginsenosides contained in Panax species were separated by silica gel TLC blotted to a polyvinylidene difluoride (PVDF) membrane which was dipped in a sodium periodide (NaIO(4)) solution and reacted with protein, preparing a ginsenoside-protein conjugate for binding a ginsenoside on a PVDF membrane. The blotted spots were stained by anti-ginsenoside-Rb1 monoclonal antibody (MAb) and anti-ginsenoside-Rg1MAb, respectively. The newly established immunostaining method, eastern blotting was applied for the determination of ginsenosides possessing protopanaxadiol and/or protopanaxatriol. Double staining of eastern blotting for ginsenosides using anti-ginsenoside-Rb1 MAb and anti-ginsenoside-Rg1 MAb promoted complete identification of ginsenosides in Panax species. This technique has been devised for the chromatographic separation and identification of ginsenosides using polyethersulfone (PES) membrane. It caused an acceptable separation of ginsenoside-Rb1, -Rc and -Rd in various ginseng extracts. Newly developed technique is quite simple and applies for immunoassay system. Ginsenosides separated using a PES membrane were directly treated with a NaIO(4) solution and then reacted with bovine serum albumin (BSA) for making a ginsenoside-protein conjugate. After the blocking, anti-ginsenoside-Rb1 MAb recognized a ginsenoside on a PES membrane and then a sec-ond antibody labeled with enzyme reacted to the first antibody. Finally a substrate was oxidized with the enzyme and de-veloped the staining of ginsenosides. The staining spots of ginsenosides on membrane were quantitatively evaluated by NIH Image indicating at least 62.5 ng of each ginsenoside-Rb1, -Rc and -Rd were detected with clarity. The determination range of three ginsenosides was from 0.125 to 2.0 µg of direct amount on PES membrane.

  2. Generation and applications of monoclonal antibodies for livestock production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Der Lende, T

    1994-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MCAs) have found widespread applications in livestock production. Although the generation of murine MCAs is at present a routine, the production of homologous MCAs, especially important for in vivo applications, is still hampered by the lack of efficient homologous fusion partners for immortalization of antibody producing lymphocytes of livestock species. At present, MCAs are used in immunodiagnostic tests e.g. to monitor livestock reproduction and quality of livestock products. In the future MCAs will also be used in immunosensors for real-time and on-site applications in the same areas. The commercial application of MCAs for the immunomodulation of (pharmacologically induced) physiological processes underlying important (re)production traits is at present limited to the use of anti-PMSG MCAs in PMSG-induced superovulation. However, many potentially interesting applications are under investigation (e.g. immunopotentiation of growth hormone to enhance growth; immunocytolysis of adipocytes to increase lean meat production; immunoneutralization of GnRH for immunocastration; immunoimitation of hormone activity with anti-idiotype antibodies). Attempts to use specific MCAs for the sexing of embryos have been disappointing, mainly because of the relatively low accuracy. In the future, MCAs against membrane proteins which are specific for X- or Y-chromosome bearing spermatozoa might be used for bulk separation of livestock sperm. In general, it is expected that engineered (homologous) recombinant MCAs will largely contribute to the development of a new generation of rapid immunodiagnostic tests and effective immunomodulation applications. They will further increase the use of MCAs in livestock production.

  3. Monoclonal antibody fragment removal mediated by mixed mode resins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connor, Ellen; Aspelund, Matthew; Bartnik, Frank; Berge, Mark; Coughlin, Kelly; Kambarami, Mutsa; Spencer, David; Yan, Huiming; Wang, William

    2017-05-26

    Efforts to increase monoclonal antibody expression in cell culture can result in the presence of fragmented species requiring removal in downstream processing. Capto adhere, HEA Hypercel, and PPA Hypercel anion exchange/hydrophobic interaction mixed mode resins were evaluated for their fragment removal capabilities and found to separate large hinge IgG1 antibody fragment (LHF) from monomer. Removal of greater than 75% of LHF population occurred at pH 8 and low conductivity. The mechanism of fragment removal was investigated in two series of experiments. The first experimental series consisted of comparison to chromatographic behavior on corresponding single mode resins. Both single mode anion exchange and hydrophobic interaction resins failed to separate LHF. The second experimental series studied the impact of phase modifiers, ethylene glycol, urea, and arginine on the mixed mode mediated removal. The addition of ethylene glycol decreased LHF removal by half. Further decreases in LHF separation were seen upon incubation with urea and arginine. Therefore, it was discovered that the purification is the result of a mixed mode phenomena dominated by hydrophobic interaction and hydrogen bonding effects. The site of interaction between the LHF and mixed mode resin was determined by chemical labeling of lysine residues with sulfo-NHS acetate. The labeling identified the antibody hinge and light chain regions as mediating the fragment separation. Sequence analysis showed that under separation conditions, a hydrophobic proline patch and hydrogen bonding serine and threonine residues mediate the hinge interaction with the Capto adhere ligand. Additionally, a case study is presented detailing the optimization of fragment removal using Capto adhere resin to achieve purity and yield targets in a manufacturing facility. This study demonstrated that mixed mode resins can be readily integrated into commercial antibody platform processes when additional chromatographic abilities

  4. Detection of Abrin Holotoxin Using Novel Monoclonal Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohua He

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Abrin, a member of the ribosome-inactivating protein family, is produced by the Abrus precatorius plant. Having the potential to pose a severe threat to both human and animal health, abrin is classified as a Select Agent by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. However, an immunoassay that is specific for intact abrin holotoxin has not yet been reported. In this study, seven new monoclonal antibodies (mAbs, designated as Abrin-1 through Abrin-7 have been developed. Isotyping analyses indicate these mAbs have IgG1, IgG2a, or IgG2b heavy-chains and kappa light-chains. Western blot analyses identified two abrin A-chain specific mAbs, Abrin-1 and Abrin-2, and four B-chain specific mAbs (Abrin-3, -5, -6, and -7. A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA, capable of detecting a mixture of abrin isoforms and agglutinins was developed using B-chain specific Abrin-3 for capture and A-chain specific Abrin-2 as detector. The ELISA is highly sensitive and detects 1 ng/mL of the abrin holotoxin in phosphate-buffered saline, nonfat milk, and whole milk, significantly below concentrations that would pose a health concern for consumers. This ELISA also detects native abrin in plant extracts with a very low background signal. The new abrin mAbs and ELISA should be useful for detecting this potent toxin in the milk supply chain and other complex matrices.

  5. Characterization of monoclonal antibodies against waterfowl parvoviruses VP3 protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin Xiuchen

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The VP3 protein of goose parvovirus (GPV or Muscovy duck parvovirus (MDPV, a major structural protein, can induce neutralizing antibodies in geese and ducks, but monoclonal antibodies (MAbs against VP3 protein has never been characterized. Results Three hybridoma cell lines secreting anti-GPV VP3 MAbs were obtained and designated 4A8, 4E2, and 2D5. Immunoglobulin subclass tests differentiated them as IgG2b (4A8 and 4E2 and IgG2a (2D5. Dot blotting assays showed that three MAbs reacted with His-VP3 protein in a conformation-independent manner. A competitive binding assay indicated that the MAbs delineated two epitopes, A and B of VP3. Immunofluorescence assay showed that MAbs 4A8, 4E2, and 2D5 could specifically bind to goose embryo fibroblast cells (GEF or duck fibroblast cells (DEF infected with GPV and MDPV. Dot blotting also showed that the MAbs recognized both nature GPV and MDPV antigen. Western blotting confirmed that the MAbs recognized VP3 proteins derived from purified GPV and MDPV particles. The MAbs 4A8 and 2D5 had universal reactivity to heterologous GPV and MDPV tested in an antigen-capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Conclusions Preparation and characterization of these the MAbs suggests that they may be useful for the development of a MAb-capture ELISA for rapid detection of both GPV and MDPV. Virus isolation and PCR are reliable for detecting GPV and MDPV infection, but these procedures are laborious, time-consuming, and requiring instruments. These diagnosis problems highlight the ongoing demand for rapid, reproducible, and automatic methods for the sensitive detection of both GPV and MDPV infection.

  6. Novel monoclonal autoantibody specificity associated with ribonucleoprotein complexes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winkler, A.; Watson-McKown, R.; Wise, K.

    1986-03-01

    The authors describe an IgG/sub 2a/, kappa monoclonal autoantibody (mAb) F78 derived from a 6-month old MRL-Mp lpr/lpr mouse that recognizes a novel epitope associated with small nuclear ribonuclear protein complexes (snRNP). Indirect immunofluorescent staining of HEp-2 cells with F78 showed a nonnucleolar speckled nuclear pattern characteristic of anti-RNP and anti-Sm mAbs which could be abrogated by pretreating fixed cells with 0.1M HCl prior to staining. Immunoblots of whole cell extracts (dissociated in SDS, urea and mercaptan at 4/sup 0/C then subjected to SDS-PAGE) showed that F78 selectively bound to a component of M/sub r/ = 100,000 clearly distinct from components recognized by two mAbs described by Billings et al that detected, respectively, proteins of M/sub r/ = 70,000 associated with RNP and M/sub r/ = 13,000 associated with Sm. Incubation of extracts at 100/sup 0/C prior to SDS-PAGE eliminated subsequent binding of F78 but not of the other nAbs. F78 as well as the other mAbs selectively immunoprecipitated characteristic patterns of small nuclear RNAs (U/sub 1/, U/sub 2/, U/sub 4/, U/sub 5/, U/sub 6/) from extracts of /sup 32/P-phosphate labeled HeLa cells. These results suggest a new specificity associated with snRNP that is recognized in the MRL autoimmune response.

  7. A survey of manufacturing and handling practices for monoclonal antibodies by pharmacy, nursing and medical personnel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, M; King, J; Lingaratnam, S; Byrne, J; MacMillan, K; Mollo, A; Kirsa, S; Green, M

    2016-04-01

    There is a paucity of data available to assess the occupational health and safety risk associated with exposure to monoclonal antibodies. Industry standards and published guidelines are conflicting or outdated. Guidelines offer contrary recommendations based on an array of methodological approaches. This survey aimed to describe current practices, beliefs and attitudes relating to the handling of monoclonal antibodies by Australian medical, nursing and pharmacy clinicians. An electronic survey was distributed between June and September 2013. Respondents were surveyed on three focus areas: institutional guideline availability and content, current practices and attitudes. Demographic data relating to respondent and primary place of practice were also collected. A total of 222 clinicians completed the survey, with representation from all targeted professional groups and from a variety of geographic locations. 92% of respondents reported that their institution prepared or administered monoclonal antibodies, with 87% specifically handling anti-cancer monoclonal antibodies. Monoclonal antibodies were mostly prepared onsite (84-90%) and mostly within pharmacy clean-rooms (75%) and using cytotoxic cabinets (61%). 43% of respondents reported access to institutional monoclonal antibody handling guidelines with risk reduction strategies including training and education (71%), spill and waste management (71%), procedures for transportation (57%) and restricted handling (50%). Nurses had a stronger preference towards pharmacy manufacturing than both doctors and pharmacists for a range of clinical scenarios. 95% of all respondents identified that professional or regulatory body guidelines are an important resource when considering handling practices. Monoclonal antibodies are most commonly handled according to cytotoxic drug standards and often in the absence of formal guidelines. © The Author(s) 2014.

  8. Czech Registry of Monoclonal Gammopathies - Technical Solution, Data Collection and Visualisation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brozova, L; Schwarz, D; Snabl, I; Kalina, J; Pavlickova, B; Komenda, M; Jarkovský, J; Němec, P; Horinek, D; Stefanikova, Z; Pour, L; Hájek, R; Maisnar, V

    2017-01-01

    The Registry of Monoclonal Gammopathies (RMG) was established by the Czech Myeloma Group in 2007. RMG is a registry designed for the collection of clinical data concerning diagnosis, treatment, treatment results and survival of patients with monoclonal gammopathies. Data on patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS), Waldenström macroglobulinaemia (WM), multiple myeloma (MM) or primary AL ("amyloid light-chain") amyloidosis are collected in the registry. Nineteen Czech centres and four Slovak centres currently contribute to the registry. The registry currently contains records on more than 5,000 patients with MM, almost 3,000 patients with MGUS, 170 patients with WM and 26 patients with primary AL amyloidosis, i.e. more than 8,000 records on patients with monoclonal gammopathies altogether. This paper describes technology employed for the collection, storage and subsequent online visualisation of data. The CLADE-IS platform is introduced as a new system for the collection and storage of data from the registry. The form structure and functions of the new system are described for all diagnoses in general; these functions facilitate data entry to the registry and minimise the error rate in data. Publicly available online visualisations of data on patients with MGUS, WM, MM or primary AL amyloidosis from all Czech or Slovak centres are introduced, together with authenticated visualisations of data on patients with MM from selected centres. The RMG represents a data basis that makes it possible to monitor the disease course in patients with monoclonal gammopathies on the population level.Key words: Registry of Monoclonal Gammopathies - RMG - registries - monoclonal gammopathies - CLADE-IS - data visualisation - database.

  9. Crystal structure of the Hendra virus attachment G glycoprotein bound to a potent cross-reactive neutralizing human monoclonal antibody.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Xu

    Full Text Available The henipaviruses, represented by Hendra (HeV and Nipah (NiV viruses are highly pathogenic zoonotic paramyxoviruses with uniquely broad host tropisms responsible for repeated outbreaks in Australia, Southeast Asia, India and Bangladesh. The high morbidity and mortality rates associated with infection and lack of licensed antiviral therapies make the henipaviruses a potential biological threat to humans and livestock. Henipavirus entry is initiated by the attachment of the G envelope glycoprotein to host cell membrane receptors. Previously, henipavirus-neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies (hmAb have been isolated using the HeV-G glycoprotein and a human naïve antibody library. One cross-reactive and receptor-blocking hmAb (m102.4 was recently demonstrated to be an effective post-exposure therapy in two animal models of NiV and HeV infection, has been used in several people on a compassionate use basis, and is currently in development for use in humans. Here, we report the crystal structure of the complex of HeV-G with m102.3, an m102.4 derivative, and describe NiV and HeV escape mutants. This structure provides detailed insight into the mechanism of HeV and NiV neutralization by m102.4, and serves as a blueprint for further optimization of m102.4 as a therapeutic agent and for the development of entry inhibitors and vaccines.

  10. Crystal structure of the Hendra virus attachment G glycoprotein bound to a potent cross-reactive neutralizing human monoclonal antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Kai; Rockx, Barry; Xie, Yihu; DeBuysscher, Blair L; Fusco, Deborah L; Zhu, Zhongyu; Chan, Yee-Peng; Xu, Yan; Luu, Truong; Cer, Regina Z; Feldmann, Heinz; Mokashi, Vishwesh; Dimitrov, Dimiter S; Bishop-Lilly, Kimberly A; Broder, Christopher C; Nikolov, Dimitar B

    2013-01-01

    The henipaviruses, represented by Hendra (HeV) and Nipah (NiV) viruses are highly pathogenic zoonotic paramyxoviruses with uniquely broad host tropisms responsible for repeated outbreaks in Australia, Southeast Asia, India and Bangladesh. The high morbidity and mortality rates associated with infection and lack of licensed antiviral therapies make the henipaviruses a potential biological threat to humans and livestock. Henipavirus entry is initiated by the attachment of the G envelope glycoprotein to host cell membrane receptors. Previously, henipavirus-neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies (hmAb) have been isolated using the HeV-G glycoprotein and a human naïve antibody library. One cross-reactive and receptor-blocking hmAb (m102.4) was recently demonstrated to be an effective post-exposure therapy in two animal models of NiV and HeV infection, has been used in several people on a compassionate use basis, and is currently in development for use in humans. Here, we report the crystal structure of the complex of HeV-G with m102.3, an m102.4 derivative, and describe NiV and HeV escape mutants. This structure provides detailed insight into the mechanism of HeV and NiV neutralization by m102.4, and serves as a blueprint for further optimization of m102.4 as a therapeutic agent and for the development of entry inhibitors and vaccines.

  11. Neutralization of Zika virus by germline-like human monoclonal antibodies targeting cryptic epitopes on envelope domain III.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yanling; Li, Shun; Du, Lanying; Wang, Chunyu; Zou, Peng; Hong, Binbin; Yuan, Mengjiao; Ren, Xiaonan; Tai, Wanbo; Kong, Yu; Zhou, Chen; Lu, Lu; Zhou, Xiaohui; Jiang, Shibo; Ying, Tianlei

    2017-10-11

    The Zika virus (ZIKV), a flavivirus transmitted by Aedes mosquitoes, has emerged as a global public health concern. Pre-existing cross-reactive antibodies against other flaviviruses could modulate immune responses to ZIKV infection by antibody-dependent enhancement, highlighting the importance of understanding the immunogenicity of the ZIKV envelope protein. In this study, we identified a panel of human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that target domain III (DIII) of the ZIKV envelope protein from a very large phage-display naive antibody library. These germline-like antibodies, sharing 98%-100% hoLogy with their corresponding germline IGHV genes, bound ZIKV DIII specifically with high affinities. One mAb, m301, broadly neutralized the currently circulating ZIKV strains and showed a synergistic effect with another mAb, m302, in neutralizing ZIKV in vitro and in a mouse model of ZIKV infection. Interestingly, epitope mapping and competitive binding studies suggest that m301 and m302 bind adjacent regions of the DIII C-C' loop, which represents a recently identified cryptic epitope that is intermittently exposed in an uncharacterized virus conformation. This study extended our understanding of antigenic epitopes of ZIKV antibodies and has direct implications for the design of ZIKV vaccines.

  12. Antiviral Therapy by HIV-1 Broadly Neutralizing and Inhibitory Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhiqing Zhang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 infection causes acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS, a global epidemic for more than three decades. HIV-1 replication is primarily controlled through antiretroviral therapy (ART but this treatment does not cure HIV-1 infection. Furthermore, there is increasing viral resistance to ART, and side effects associated with long-term therapy. Consequently, there is a need of alternative candidates for HIV-1 prevention and therapy. Recent advances have discovered multiple broadly neutralizing antibodies against HIV-1. In this review, we describe the key epitopes on the HIV-1 Env protein and the reciprocal broadly neutralizing antibodies, and discuss the ongoing clinical trials of broadly neutralizing and inhibitory antibody therapy as well as antibody combinations, bispecific antibodies, and methods that improve therapeutic efficacy by combining broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs with latency reversing agents. Compared with ART, HIV-1 therapeutics that incorporate these broadly neutralizing and inhibitory antibodies offer the advantage of decreasing virus load and clearing infected cells, which is a promising prospect in HIV-1 prevention and treatment.

  13. Synergistic effect of broad-spectrum Sunscreens and antihistamines in the control of idiopathic solar urticaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, A.; Wulf, Hans Chr.

    2008-01-01

    . Observations: Three patients with idiopathic solar urticaria underwent phototesting with UV-B and UV-A radiation. The minimal urticarial dose (MUD) was determined 15 minutes after irradiation. The patients were subsequently tested with 5 times the MUD, and the reaction was graded every minute for 15 minutes......Background: It can be difficult to provide patients with idiopathic solar urticaria adequate protection from sunlight. In a nonrandomized controlled trial, we used a standardized phototest procedure to determine the effects of using sunscreen and antihistamine to control idiopathic solar urticaria....... The patients were then treated with a high-protection, broad-spectrum sunscreen and a nonsedative antihistamine alone and in combination and underwent similar phototesting. The use of sunscreen allowed the patients to tolerate much higher doses of UV radiation (32-38 times the MUD on untreated skin...

  14. Collagen-associated molecules in the cornea: localisation with monoclonal antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, P A; Bennett, F A; Mott, M R; Strike, P

    1994-02-01

    This paper describes the biochemical characteristics and immunostaining properties of four monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) raised to the extracellular matrix of bovine corneal endothelial cells in culture. All four antibodies labelled molecules in frozen sections of bovine cornea. MAb A15 labelled the collagen lamellae of the stroma. Immuno-electron microscopy located the label between rather than over the collagen fibrils. Antibody label was removed by collagenase treatment of the stroma. This antibody bound to several denatured collagen types in ELISAs and Western blots, the common epitope being located close to the collagenase binding site. A15 immunoprecipitated native polypeptides of 173 kDa and 150 kDa from the conditioned medium of corneal endothelial cells. Amino acid analysis of the 150 kDa molecule showed broad similarity to bovine type VI collagen although there was no immunological cross reactivity. The binding of this antibody in the corneal stroma may be to a collagen type VI-like molecule. MAb A70 bound to a collagenase sensitive molecule in corneal endothelial cell extracellular matrix in vitro, and to basement membranes in vivo. It showed staining typical of type IV collagen in frozen sections of cornea. MAbs A67 and A49 both labelled flexuous fibre-like structures in the cornea, which appeared to wrap around the fibrillar collagen lamellae. The molecule labelled by A67, of 86 kDa was sensitive to collagenase treatment of endothelial cell conditioned medium, yet totally resistant to collagenase treatment of the cornea, which completely removed the fibrillar collagen from the stroma. In the endothelial extracellular matrix, this antigen was resistant to all proteases tested and required severe denaturing conditions to remove antigenic activity. Amino acid analysis did not yield the high proportion of glycine typical of collagens, so if collagenous sequences occur they must be relatively short. The molecule labelled by A49 was a 51-kDa protein, of

  15. The clinical relevance and management of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance and related disorders: recommendations from the European Myeloma Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Donk, Niels W C J; Palumbo, Antonio; Johnsen, Hans Erik; Engelhardt, Monika; Gay, Francesca; Gregersen, Henrik; Hajek, Roman; Kleber, Martina; Ludwig, Heinz; Morgan, Gareth; Musto, Pellegrino; Plesner, Torben; Sezer, Orhan; Terpos, Evangelos; Waage, Anders; Zweegman, Sonja; Einsele, Hermann; Sonneveld, Pieter; Lokhorst, Henk M

    2014-06-01

    Monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance is one of the most common pre-malignant disorders. IgG and IgA monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance are precursor conditions of multiple myeloma; light-chain monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance of light-chain multiple myeloma; and IgM monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance of Waldenström's macroglobulinemia and other lymphoproliferative disorders. Clonal burden, as determined by bone marrow plasma cell percentage or M-protein level, as well as biological characteristics, including heavy chain isotype and light chain production, are helpful in predicting risk of progression of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance to symptomatic disease. Furthermore, alterations in the bone marrow microenvironment of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance patients result in an increased risk of venous and arterial thrombosis, infections, osteoporosis, and bone fractures. In addition, the small clone may occasionally be responsible for severe organ damage through the production of a monoclonal protein that has autoantibody activity or deposits in tissues. These disorders are rare and often require therapy directed at eradication of the underlying plasma cell or lymphoplasmacytic clone. In this review, we provide an overview of the clinical relevance of monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. We also give general recommendations of how to diagnose and manage patients with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance. Copyright© Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  16. Prophylactic and therapeutic testing of Nicotiana-derived RSV-neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies in the cotton rat model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeitlin, Larry; Bohorov, Ognian; Bohorova, Natasha; Hiatt, Andrew; Kim, Do H; Pauly, Michael H; Velasco, Jesus; Whaley, Kevin J; Barnard, Dale L; Bates, John T; Crowe, James E; Piedra, Pedro A; Gilbert, Brian E

    2013-01-01

    Severe lower respiratory tract infection in infants and small children is commonly caused by respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Palivizumab (Synagis(®)), a humanized IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) approved for RSV immunoprophylaxis in at-risk neonates, is highly effective, but pharmacoeconomic analyses suggest its use may not be cost-effective. Previously described potent RSV neutralizers (human Fab R19 and F2-5; human IgG RF-1 and RF-2) were produced in IgG format in a rapid and inexpensive Nicotiana-based manufacturing system for comparison with palivizumab. Both plant-derived (palivizumab-N) and commercial palivizumab, which is produced in a mouse myeloma cell line, showed protection in prophylactic (p plant-derived human mAbs directed against alternative epitopes displayed neutralizing activity, but conferred less protection in vivo than palivizumab-N or palivizumab. Palivizumab remains one of the most efficacious RSV mAbs described to date. Production in plants may reduce manufacturing costs and improve the pharmacoeconomics of RSV immunoprophylaxis and therapy.

  17. Pollinator Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    What the EPA is doing to protect bees and other pollinators from pesticides; including addressing the issue of Colony Collapse Disorder (CCD), risk assessment, decline in pollinator health in general, and why pollinators are important.

  18. Protected Areas

    Data.gov (United States)

    Kansas Data Access and Support Center — This dataset shows the boundaries of properties in Kansas in public or institutional ownership that contain ecological resources that merit some level of protection....

  19. Corrosion protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Donald W.; Wagh, Arun S.

    2003-05-27

    There has been invented a chemically bonded phosphate corrosion protection material and process for application of the corrosion protection material for corrosion prevention. A slurry of iron oxide and phosphoric acid is used to contact a warm surface of iron, steel or other metal to be treated. In the presence of ferrous ions from the iron, steel or other metal, the slurry reacts to form iron phosphates which form grains chemically bonded onto the surface of the steel.

  20. Radiation Protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loos, M

    2001-04-01

    Major achievements of SCK-CEN's Radiation Protection Department in 2000 are described. The main areas for R and D of the department remain neutron dosimetry and neutron activation analysis, safeguards information handling and non-destructive assay techniques. Further activities include low-level radioactivity measurements in environmental and biological samples and radiation protection research. Finally, achievements in decision strategy research and social sciences in nuclear research are reported.