WorldWideScience

Sample records for broad-spectrum human papillomavirus

  1. Detection and typing of human papillomaviruses present in fixed and stained archival cervical smears by a consensus polymerase chain reaction and direct sequence analysis allow the identification of a broad spectrum of human papillomavirus types

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Smits, H. L.; Tieben, L. M.; Tjong-A-Hung, S. P.; Jebbink, M. F.; Minnaar, R. P.; Jansen, C. L.; ter Schegget, J.

    1992-01-01

    DNA well suited for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification was purified from archival Papanicolaou smears. The detection of a wide range of human papillomavirus (HPV) types was made possible using a HPV-specific consensus primer pair, and typing was conveniently done by direct sequence

  2. Development of broad-spectrum human monoclonal antibodies for rabies post-exposure prophylaxis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benedictis, P. de; Minola, A.; Rota, E.; Aiello, R.; Zecchin, B.; Salomoni, A.; Foglierini, M.; Agatic, G.; Vanzetta, F.; Lavenir, R.; Lepelletier, A.; Bentley, E.; Weiss, R.; Cattoli, G.

    2016-01-01

    Full text: Currently available rabies post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) for use in humans includes equine or human rabies immunoglobulins (RIG). The replacement of RIG with an equally or more potent and safer product is strongly encouraged due to the high costs and limited availability of existing RIG. In this study, we identified two broadly neutralizing human monoclonal antibodies that represent a valid and affordable alternative to RIG in rabies PEP. Memory B cells from four selected vaccinated donors were immortalized and monoclonal antibodies were tested for neutralizing activity and epitope specificity. Two antibodies, identified as RVC20 and RVC58 (binding to antigenic site I and III, respectively), were selected for their potency and broad-spectrum reactivity. In vitro, RVC20 and RVC58 were able to neutralize all 35 rabies virus (RABV) and 25 non-RABV lyssaviruses. They showed higher potency and breath compared to antibodies under clinical development (namely CR57, CR4098, and RAB1) and commercially available human RIG. In vivo, the RVC20–RVC58 cocktail protected Syrian hamsters from a lethal RABV challenge and did not affect the endogenous hamster post-vaccination antibody response. (author)

  3. The broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor Boc-Asp-CMK induces cell death in human leukaemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frydrych, Ivo; Mlejnek, Petr; Dolezel, Petr; Zoumpourlis, Vassilis; Krumpochova, Petra

    2008-08-01

    Synthetic caspase inhibitors and particularly broad-spectrum caspase inhibitors can prevent cells from death or at least slow down cell death process and abrogate some apoptotic hallmarks [Kitanaka, C., Kuchino, Y., 1999. Caspase-independent programmed cell death with necrotic morphology. Cell Death and Differentiation 6, 508-515]. However, not all synthetic caspase inhibitors diminish cell death. We have found that the broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor Boc-Asp-CMK induced cell death at micromolar concentrations in human leukaemia cells. Interestingly, low concentrations of Boc-Asp-CMK induced cell death with apoptotic hallmarks. Increasing concentrations of Boc-Asp-CMK led to necrotic cell death. The switch between apoptosis and necrosis seemed to depend upon the degree of inhibition of executioner caspases, including caspase-3/7 with Boc-Asp-CMK. Interestingly, caspase-3 processing was not inhibited even for the highest concentration of Boc-Asp-CMK used. We assume, that toxic properties of Boc-Asp-CMK can be attributed to the chloromethylketone residuum in its molecule, as its analogue Boc-Asp-FMK with fluoromethylketone residuum was more than 13 times less toxic. Our results further indicated that toxicity of Boc-Asp-CMK might arise from its interference with mitochondrial metabolism.

  4. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Why get vaccinated?HPV vaccine prevents infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types that are associated with cause ... at http://www.cdc.gov/hpv. HPV Vaccine (Human Papillomavirus) Information Statement. U.S. Department of Health and ...

  5. HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women HPV (human papillomavirus) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... outside of the body. To Learn More About HPV Human Papillomavirus Vaccine More in For Women Medication ...

  6. Broad spectrum antidermatophytic drug for the control of tinea infection in human beings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadauria, Seema; Kumar, Padma

    2012-07-01

    During antifungal evaluation of various plant extracts, free and bound flavonoids of Piper betle were found to be most effective as an antidermatophytic against human pathogenic dermatophytes Trichophyton rubrum, Trichophyton mentagrophytes, Microsporum gypseum and Candida albicans. Dermatophytic fungi cause both superficial and internal mycoses. These mycoses, although normally not lethal, are unpleasant and difficult to cure and cause considerable financial losses. Earlier workers prove that allopathic drugs are still found effective against dermatomycoses, but these drugs could not be accepted as a routine treatment for every case, because they are expensive and require long treatment. It is almost unaffordable by middle and lower class people. In view of such prospects and constraints, our aim was to explore more new compounds of plant origin for controlling dermatophytic infections. Author explored water, methanolic and flavonoid extracts for screening as antidermatophytic agent. Plant extracts that showed good results in vitro were selected for clinical studies. The study may give cheaper treatment for medium and lower class patients suffering with tinea and may provide them much relief. Well-established paper disc method was used for the screening of different extracts of their antidermatophytic activity. Moreover, it did not exhibit any adverse side effect on mammalian skin. Flavonoids in the form of ointment Pi be I and Pi be II were subjected to topical testing on patients attending out patients department of S.M.S. Hospital, Jaipur, India. Patients were diagnosed as tinea corporis, tinea capitis, tinea manum or tinea pedis. All patients showed positive potassium hydroxide (KOH) results at the beginning of trial. Patients between the ages of 3 months to 58 years were enrolled. At the end of treatment, while 64% of patients cured completely, 24% showed significant improvement and 12% showed little improvement from the disease. Allopathic treatment took

  7. Comparison of broad-spectrum cephalosporin-resistant Escherichia coli isolated from dogs and humans in Hokkaido, Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okubo, Torahiko; Sato, Toyotaka; Yokota, Shin-ichi; Usui, Masaru; Tamura, Yutaka

    2014-04-01

    Resistance to broad-spectrum cephalosporins (BSCs) in Enterobacteriaceae in companion animals has become a great concern for public health. To estimate the dissemination of BSC-resistant bacteria between dog and human, we examined the BSC-resistance determinants of and genetic similarities between 69 BSC-resistant Escherichia coli isolates derived from canine rectal swabs (n = 28) and human clinical samples (n = 41). Some E. coli isolates possessed blaTEM-1b (14 canine and 16 human isolates), blaCTx-M-2 (6 human isolates), blaCTx-M-14 (3 canine and 14 human isolates), blaCTx-M-27 (1 canine and 15 human isolates), and blaCMY-2 (11 canine and 3 human isolates). The possession of CTX-M-type β-lactamases was significantly more frequent in human isolates, whereas CMY-2 was more common in canine isolates. Bacterial typing methods (phylogenetic typing, O-antigen serotyping, and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis) showed little clonal relationship between canine isolates and human isolates. Plasmid analysis and Southern blotting indicated that the plasmids encoding CMY-2 were similar among canine and human isolates. Based on the differences in the major β-lactamase and the divergence of bacterial types between canine and human isolates, it seems that clonal dissemination of BSC-resistant E. coli between canines and humans is limited. The similarity of the CMY-2-encoding plasmid suggests that plasmid-mediated β-lactamase gene transmission plays a role in interspecies diffusion of BSC-resistant E. coli between dog and human. Copyright © 2013 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The Japanese Association for Infectious Diseases. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Human papillomavirus molecular biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harden, Mallory E; Munger, Karl

    Human papillomaviruses are small DNA viruses with a tropism for squamous epithelia. A unique aspect of human papillomavirus molecular biology involves dependence on the differentiation status of the host epithelial cell to complete the viral lifecycle. A small group of these viruses are the etiologic agents of several types of human cancers, including oral and anogenital tract carcinomas. This review focuses on the basic molecular biology of human papillomaviruses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Broad-spectrum sunscreens prevent the secretion of proinflammatory cytokines in human keratinocytes exposed to ultraviolet A and phototoxic lomefloxacin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reinhardt, P.; Cybulski, M.; Miller, S.M.; Ferrarotto, C.; Wilkins, R.; Deslauriers, Y.

    2006-01-01

    The combination of phototoxic drugs and ultraviolet (UV) radiation can trigger the release of proinflammatory cytokines. The present study measured the ability of sunscreens to prevent cytokine secretion in human keratinocytes following cotreatment of these cells with a known photoreactive drug and UVA. Keratinocytes were treated for 1 h with increasing concentrations of lomefloxacin (LOM) or norfloxacin (NOR), exposed to 15 J/cm 2 UVA, and incubated for 24 h. NOR, owing to the absence of a fluorine atom in position 8, was non-phototoxic and used as a negative control. Cell viability and the release of 3 cytokines were assessed, namely interleukin-1α (IL-1α), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). The measurement of these cytokines may be a useful tool for detecting photoreactive compounds. To measure their ability to prevent cytokine secretion, various sunscreens were inserted between the UVA source and the cells. Treatment with NOR, NOR plus UVA, or LOM had no effect on the cells. LOM plus UVA, however, had an effect on cell viability and on cytokine secretion. IL-1α levels increased with LOM concentration. The release of TNF-α and IL-6 followed the same pattern at lower concentrations of LOM but peaked at 15 μmol/L and decreased at higher concentrations. Sunscreens protected the cells from the effects of LOM plus UVA, as cell viability and levels of cytokines remained the same as in the control cells. In conclusion, the application of broad-spectrum sunscreen by individuals exposed to UVA radiation may prevent phototoxic reactions initiated by drugs such as LOM. (author)

  10. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of genital human papillomavirus infection in young women. New England Journal of Medicine 2006; 354(25):2645–2654. [PubMed Abstract] Chaturvedi ... trial of a human papillomavirus type 16 vaccine. New England Journal of Medicine 2002; 347(21):1645-1651. [PubMed Abstract] Petrosky ...

  11. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Screening

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Search Form Controls Cancel Submit Search The CDC Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Note: Javascript is disabled or is ... 6348 Email CDC-INFO U.S. Department of Health & Human Services HHS/Open USA.gov TOP

  12. Human Papillomavirus (HPV)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevention Listen Español Text Size Email Print Share HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Vaccine: What You Need to Know ( ... men get cancer and other diseases from HPV. HPV vaccine HPV vaccine is approved by FDA and ...

  13. Broad-spectrum sunscreens provide better protection from solar ultraviolet-simulated radiation and natural sunlight-induced immunosuppression in human beings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyal, Dominique D; Fourtanier, Anny M

    2008-05-01

    It is well established that ultraviolet (UV) radiation induces immunomodulatory effects that may be involved in skin cancer. Recent studies have shown that UVA (320-400 nm) and UVB (290-320 nm) radiation are immunosuppressive. As a result, sunscreens, which mainly absorb UVB, may be less effective in preventing UV radiation-induced immunosuppression than broad-spectrum products. We sought to study the effects of UVA exposure on human delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response and compare the efficacy of sunscreens having different levels of sun-protection factor (SPF) and UVA protection against both solar-simulated radiation and outdoor real-life sunlight exposure conditions. DTH was assessed using a kit which includes 7 recall antigens that most of the participants encountered during childhood immunization. Evaluation of DTH test response was made 48 hours after test application before and after UV exposure with or without sunscreens. In unprotected participants, the response to DTH tests was significantly reduced irrespective of UV types of exposure (full-spectrum UVA, long UVA, solar-simulated radiation). A UVB sunscreen failed to protect from solar-simulated radiation-induced immunosuppression. In contrast, a broad-spectrum sunscreen with the same SPF but providing a high protection in the UVA range significantly reduced local UV-induced immunosuppression and prevented the distant effects. In the outdoor study, as compared with DTH responses obtained before sun exposure, no alteration of immune response was detected when the skin was protected by a broad-spectrum sunscreen having a high protection level in the UVA (SPF 25, UVA protection factor 14). Conversely a broad-spectrum sunscreen with lower protection against UVA (SPF 25, UVA protection factor 6) failed to prevent UV-impaired response. These results have been obtained after repeated exposure. Additional experiments obtained under acute exposure are in progress. These findings clearly demonstrated the

  14. Papillomaviruses and human disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syrjanen, K.; Gissman, L.; Koss, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 17 selections. Some of the titles are: Papillomaviruses: particles, genome organization and proteins; Physical state of papillomavirus DNA in tumors; Transforming and regulatory functions of bovine papillomavirus Type 1; and Transcription of papillomavirus genomes.

  15. Krüppeling erythropoiesis: An unexpected broad spectrum of human red blood cell disorders due to KLF1 variants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Perkins (Andrew); X. Xu (Xiangmin); D. Higgs (Doug); G.P. Patrinos (George P.); L. Arnaud (Lionel); J.J. Bieker (James J.); J.N.J. Philipsen (Sjaak)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractUntil recently our approach to analyzing human genetic diseases has been to accurately phenotype patients and sequence the genes known to be associated with those phenotypes; for example, in thalassemia, the globin loci are analyzed. Sequencing has become increasingly accessible, and

  16. Oldest human occupation of Wallacea at Laili Cave, Timor-Leste, shows broad-spectrum foraging responses to late Pleistocene environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawkins, Stuart; O'Connor, Sue; Maloney, Tim Ryan; Litster, Mirani; Kealy, Shimona; Fenner, Jack N.; Aplin, Ken; Boulanger, Clara; Brockwell, Sally; Willan, Richard; Piotto, Elena; Louys, Julien

    2017-09-01

    The Wallacea Archipelago provides an extraordinary laboratory for the study of human colonisation and adaptation, yet few detailed archaeological studies have been conducted in the region that span the earliest phase of human settlement. Laili Cave, in northern Timor-Leste, preserves the oldest human occupation in this insular region with a cultural sequence spanning 11,200 to 44,600 cal BP. Small-bodied vertebrates and invertebrates were recovered to the lowest excavated levels, associated with highly concentrated stone artefacts. We report on human behavioural adaptations within the context of Pleistocene environments and changing landscapes using zooarchaeological, stone artefact, bathymetric, and experimental isotopic analyses. Results indicate that Pleistocene humans used the abundant local chert liberally and engaged in mobile broad-spectrum exploitation of invertebrates and fishes from marine, estuarine, and freshwater environments within close proximity of Laili Cave. The faunal assemblage indicates heterogeneous but relatively stable environments during the late Pleistocene. Variability in subsistence strategies over time appears to be a response to changing landscapes and concomitant local resources. This record contrasts with marine specialisations evident from other sites in Timor-Leste and within the broader Wallacean region.

  17. Oncogenic human papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McBride, Alison A

    2017-10-19

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are an ancient group of viruses with small, double-stranded DNA circular genomes. They are species-specific and have a strict tropism for mucosal and cutaneous stratified squamous epithelial surfaces of the host. A subset of these viruses has been demonstrated to be the causative agent of several human cancers. Here, we review the biology, natural history, evolution and cancer association of the oncogenic HPVs.This article is part of the themed issue 'Human oncogenic viruses'. © 2017 The Authors.

  18. Phosphatase Inhibitors Function as Novel, Broad Spectrum Botulinum Neurotoxin Antagonists in Mouse and Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Motor Neuron-Based Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiris, Erkan; Nuss, Jonathan E; Stanford, Stephanie M; Wanner, Laura M; Cazares, Lisa; Maestre, Michael F; Du, Hao T; Gomba, Glenn Y; Burnett, James C; Gussio, Rick; Bottini, Nunzio; Panchal, Rekha G; Kane, Christopher D; Tessarollo, Lino; Bavari, Sina

    2015-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop novel treatments to counter Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT) poisoning. Currently, the majority of BoNT drug development efforts focus on directly inhibiting the proteolytic components of BoNT, i.e. light chains (LC). Although this is a rational approach, previous research has shown that LCs are extremely difficult drug targets and that inhibiting multi-serotype BoNTs with a single LC inhibitor may not be feasible. An alternative approach would target neuronal pathways involved in intoxication/recovery, rather than the LC itself. Phosphorylation-related mechanisms have been implicated in the intoxication pathway(s) of BoNTs. However, the effects of phosphatase inhibitors upon BoNT activity in the physiological target of BoNTs, i.e. motor neurons, have not been investigated. In this study, a small library of phosphatase inhibitors was screened for BoNT antagonism in the context of mouse embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons (ES-MNs). Four inhibitors were found to function as BoNT/A antagonists. Subsequently, we confirmed that these inhibitors protect against BoNT/A in a dose-dependent manner in human ES-MNs. Additionally, these compounds provide protection when administered in post-intoxication scenario. Importantly, the inhibitors were also effective against BoNT serotypes B and E. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing phosphatase inhibitors as broad-spectrum BoNT antagonists.

  19. Phosphatase Inhibitors Function as Novel, Broad Spectrum Botulinum Neurotoxin Antagonists in Mouse and Human Embryonic Stem Cell-Derived Motor Neuron-Based Assays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erkan Kiris

    Full Text Available There is an urgent need to develop novel treatments to counter Botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT poisoning. Currently, the majority of BoNT drug development efforts focus on directly inhibiting the proteolytic components of BoNT, i.e. light chains (LC. Although this is a rational approach, previous research has shown that LCs are extremely difficult drug targets and that inhibiting multi-serotype BoNTs with a single LC inhibitor may not be feasible. An alternative approach would target neuronal pathways involved in intoxication/recovery, rather than the LC itself. Phosphorylation-related mechanisms have been implicated in the intoxication pathway(s of BoNTs. However, the effects of phosphatase inhibitors upon BoNT activity in the physiological target of BoNTs, i.e. motor neurons, have not been investigated. In this study, a small library of phosphatase inhibitors was screened for BoNT antagonism in the context of mouse embryonic stem cell-derived motor neurons (ES-MNs. Four inhibitors were found to function as BoNT/A antagonists. Subsequently, we confirmed that these inhibitors protect against BoNT/A in a dose-dependent manner in human ES-MNs. Additionally, these compounds provide protection when administered in post-intoxication scenario. Importantly, the inhibitors were also effective against BoNT serotypes B and E. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first study showing phosphatase inhibitors as broad-spectrum BoNT antagonists.

  20. Efficacy of broad-spectrum sunscreens against the suppression of elicitation of delayed-type hypersensitivity responses in humans depends on the level of ultraviolet A protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyal, D D; Fourtanier, A M

    2003-04-01

    Sunscreens have been designed to protect against sunburn and their efficacy has, therefore, been labeled by the so-called sun protection factor (SPF). Although this value is well determined using a standardized protocol and it affords a good evaluation of the protection against erythema it may be inadequate to provide a relevant measurement of efficacy against other biologic damages. This is particularly true when action spectra and threshold dose are different from those of erythema. In the case of ultraviolet (UV)-induced immune suppression, the action spectrum is not known, so it cannot be asserted that SPF may accurately predict the level of protection against this endpoint. We addressed this issue by measuring in human volunteers the ability of two broad-spectrum SPF 15 sunscreens with different ultraviolet A (UVA) protection levels, to prevent the alteration of the efferent phase of the local delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) response to recall antigens (Multitest Pasteur/Mérieux, Lyon, France) after acute solar-simulated UV exposure. We first determined the ultraviolet radiation (UVR) dose needed to induce a significant DTH inhibition in several groups of 15 volunteers. Two minimal erythemal doses (2 MED) were found to be the minimal immunosuppressive dose (MISD). As a result, the immune DTH response is reduced in average by 36%. The lower doses tested (0.5 and 1 MED) were ineffective. Sunscreen-treated groups were exposed to either 1 or 2 MED x SPF doses. As expected, no alteration in DTH response was observed in the groups exposed to 1 MED x SPF whatever the sunscreen applied. In contrast, after exposure to 2 MED x SPF, the DTH response remained unaltered in the group pretreated with the sunscreen product with the higher protection in the UVA range but was significantly suppressed by 55.7% in the group pretreated with sunscreen with a much lower protection in the UVA range. These data suggest that SPF may not be sufficient to predict the ability of

  1. Human papillomaviruses and cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Haedicke, Juliane; Iftner, Thomas

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are small oncogenic DNA viruses of which more than 200 types have been identified to date. A small subset of these is etiologically linked to the development of anogenital malignancies such as cervical cancer. In addition, recent studies established a causative relationship between these high-risk HPV types and tonsillar and oropharyngeal cancer. Clinical management of cervical cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) is largely standardized and involves surgical removal of the tumor tissue as well as adjuvant chemoradiation therapy. Notably, the response to therapeutic intervention of HPV-positive HNSCCs has been found to be better as compared to HPV-negative tumors. Although the existing HPV vaccine is solely licensed for the prevention of cervical cancer, it might also have prophylactic potential for the development of high-risk HPV-associated HNSCCs. Another group of viruses, which belongs to the beta-HPV subgroup, has been implicated in nonmelanoma skin cancer, however, the etiology remains to be established. Treatment of HPV-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer is based on local excision. However, topically applied immune-modulating substances represent non-surgical alternatives for the management of smaller cutaneous tumors. In this review we present the current knowledge of the role of HPV in cancer development and discuss clinical management options as well as targets for the development of future intervention therapies

  2. Human papillomaviruses and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haedicke, Juliane; Iftner, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are small oncogenic DNA viruses of which more than 200 types have been identified to date. A small subset of these is etiologically linked to the development of anogenital malignancies such as cervical cancer. In addition, recent studies established a causative relationship between these high-risk HPV types and tonsillar and oropharyngeal cancer. Clinical management of cervical cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) is largely standardized and involves surgical removal of the tumor tissue as well as adjuvant chemoradiation therapy. Notably, the response to therapeutic intervention of HPV-positive HNSCCs has been found to be better as compared to HPV-negative tumors. Although the existing HPV vaccine is solely licensed for the prevention of cervical cancer, it might also have prophylactic potential for the development of high-risk HPV-associated HNSCCs. Another group of viruses, which belongs to the beta-HPV subgroup, has been implicated in nonmelanoma skin cancer, however, the etiology remains to be established. Treatment of HPV-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer is based on local excision. However, topically applied immune-modulating substances represent non-surgical alternatives for the management of smaller cutaneous tumors. In this review we present the current knowledge of the role of HPV in cancer development and discuss clinical management options as well as targets for the development of future intervention therapies. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Human papillomavirus gene expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chow, L.T.; Hirochika, H.; Nasseri, M.; Stoler, M.H.; Wolinsky, S.M.; Chin, M.T.; Hirochika, R.; Arvan, D.S.; Broker, T.R.

    1987-01-01

    To determine the role of tissue differentiation on expression of each of the papillomavirus mRNA species identified by electron microscopy, the authors prepared exon-specific RNA probes that could distinguish the alternatively spliced mRNA species. Radioactively labeled single-stranded RNA probes were generated from a dual promoter vector system and individually hybridized to adjacent serial sections of formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded biopsies of condylomata. Autoradiography showed that each of the message species had a characteristic tissue distribution and relative abundance. The authors have characterized a portion of the regulatory network of the HPVs by showing that the E2 ORF encodes a trans-acting enhancer-stimulating protein, as it does in BPV-1 (Spalholz et al. 1985). The HPV-11 enhancer was mapped to a 150-bp tract near the 3' end of the URR. Portions of this region are duplicated in some aggressive strains of HPV-6 (Boshart and zur Hausen 1986; Rando et al. 1986). To test the possible biological relevance of these duplications, they cloned tandem arrays of the enhancer and demonstrated, using a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) assay, that they led to dramatically increased transcription proportional to copy number. Using the CAT assays, the authors found that the E2 proteins of several papillomavirus types can cross-stimulate the enhancers of most other types. This suggests that prior infection of a tissue with one papillomavirus type may provide a helper effect for superinfection and might account fo the HPV-6/HPV-16 coinfections in condylomata that they have observed

  4. [Human papillomavirus infection and adolescence].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sam Soto, Selene; de la Peña y Carranza, Alejandro Ortiz; Plascencia, Josefina Lira

    2011-04-01

    Infection with human papillomavirus has increased dramatically in recent years. The highest prevalence rates are among adolescents and young women, reflecting changes in sexual behavior associated with biological factors in adolescent development. Adolescents who begin sexual activity early are at greater risk of precursor lesions and cervical cancer. There are adolescents with special circumstances, where no early decision should be delayed cervical cytology and in whom it is important to initiate consultations and periodic reviews with a preventive approach. Cervical cancer can be avoided when the diagnosis and treatment of precursor lesions is early. Despite efforts at sex education based on "safe sex" with the correct use of condoms has not been able to reduce the incidence of infections with human papillomavirus in adolescents. While better than nothing, condom use is not 100% reliable. Studies show that consistent and correct use provides protection against the human papillomavirus only 70%. In Mexico, reported an overall ratio of actual use of condoms from 24.6%. It is clear that the physician who provides care for adolescents plays a fundamental role in sex education. The key to future prevention of cervical cancer and its precursor lesions could be the vaccination.

  5. Perception, acceptance and uptake of Human papillomavirus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Infection with Human papillomavirus (HPV) contributes to malignant changes in the cervix leading to cancer mortality among women. HPV vaccine is now available for its prevention, yet the level of uptake is low. The study aimed at determining Perception, Acceptance and Uptake of Human papillomavirus Vaccine among ...

  6. Commentary: Human papillomavirus and tar hypothesis for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-08-09

    Aug 9, 2010 ... Commentary: Human papillomavirus and tar hypothesis for squamous cell cervical cancer. Christina Bennett Allen E Kuhn Harry W Haverkos. Volume 35 Issue 3 September 2010 pp ... Keywords. Cervical cancer; co-factors; human papillomavirus; tar-based vaginal douche; tobacco smoke; wood smoke ...

  7. Human Papillomavirus Infection and Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentino, Katie; Poronsky, Cathlin B

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is an infection that can be sexually transmitted and result in health consequences including genital warts and cancers. Two vaccines, Gardasil® [Human Papillomavirus Quadrivalent (Types 6, 11, 16, and 18) Vaccine, Recombinant] and Cervarix™ [Human Papillomavirus Bivalent (Types 16 and 18) Vaccine], have been approved for the prevention of HPV and HPV-related diseases. To explore facilitators and barriers associated with HPV vaccine utilization and compliance regarding vaccine series completion in school-aged, adolescent, and young adult females in the United States; to discuss HPV infection and highlight the safety and efficacy of the HPV vaccine; and to illustrate delivery strategies that can improve immunization rates and review implications for healthcare providers. A literature review was performed using health-related online databases (CINAHL, MEDLINE, PubMED, Web of Science, EBSCOHost and Google Scholar) and archival searching to identify current vaccination rates and factors associated with vaccine uptake. Despite the availability of vaccines that prevent cancer, acceptance and utilization rates of both HPV vaccines are less than recommended by the Advisory Committee for Immunization Practices (ACIP). Some of the barriers to HPV vaccination include lack of provider recommendation, negative parent or patient attitudes and beliefs, cost, and missed clinical opportunities. The primary facilitator to HPV vaccination is a strong provider recommendation. Healthcare providers can enhance HPV vaccine utilization by taking an active role with patients. Strategies include education and advocacy for receiving the vaccine, maximizing access to the HPV vaccine, and implementing new strategies for vaccine-delivery. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Human papillomaviruses in epigenetic regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durzynska, Julia; Lesniewicz, Krzysztof; Poreba, Elzbieta

    Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) are double-stranded DNA viruses, that infect epithelial cells and are etiologically involved in the development of human cancer. Today, over 200 types of human papillomaviruses are known. They are divided into low-risk and high-risk HPVs depending on their potential to induce carcinogenesis, driven by two major viral oncoproteins, E6 and E7. By interacting with cellular partners, these proteins are involved in interdependent viral and cell cycles in stratified differentiating epithelium, and concomitantly induce epigenetic changes in infected cells and those undergoing malignant transformation. E6 and E7 oncoproteins interact with and/or modulate expression of many proteins involved in epigenetic regulation, including DNA methyltransferases, histone-modifying enzymes and subunits of chromatin remodeling complexes, thereby influencing host cell transcription program. Furthermore, HPV oncoproteins modulate expression of cellular micro RNAs. Most of these epigenetic actions in a complex dynamic interplay participate in the maintenance of persistent infection, cell transformation, and development of invasive cancer by a considerable deregulation of tumor suppressor and oncogenes. In this study, we have undertaken to discuss a number of studies concerning epigenetic regulations in HPV-dependent cells and to focus on those that have biological relevance to cancer progression. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. "Krüppeling" erythropoiesis : An unexpected broad spectrum of human red blood cell disorders due to KLF1 variants unveiled by genomic sequencing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Perkins (Andrew); X. Xu (Xiangmin); D.R. Higgs (Douglas); G.P. Patrinos (George); A. Lionel, A. (Arnaud); J. Bieker (James); J.N.J. Philipsen (Sjaak)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractUntil recently our approach to the analysis of human genetic diseases has been to accurately phenotype patients and sequence the genes known to be associated with those phenotypes; for example, analysing the globin loci in cases of thalassemia. As sequencing has become increasingly

  10. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and Oropharyngeal Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Español (Spanish) Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Human papillomavirus (HPV) can cause serious health problems, including ... 6348 Email CDC-INFO U.S. Department of Health & Human Services HHS/Open USA.gov TOP

  11. HLA-A2–Restricted Cytotoxic T Lymphocyte Epitopes from Human Heparanase as Novel Targets for Broad-Spectrum Tumor Immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ting Chen

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Peptide vaccination for cancer immunotherapy requires identification of peptide epitopes derived from antigenic proteins associated with tumors. Heparanase (Hpa is broadly expressed in various advanced tumors and seems to be an attractive new tumor-associated antigen. The present study was designed to predict and identify HLA-A2– restricted cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL epitopes in the protein of human Hpa. For this purpose, HLA-A2–restricted CTL epitopes were identified using the following four-step procedure: 1 a computer-based epitope prediction from the amino acid sequence of human Hpa, 2 a peptide-binding assay to determine the affinity of the predicted protein with the HLA-A2 molecule, 3 stimulation of the primary T-cell response against the predicted peptides in vitro, and 4 testing of the induced CTLs toward different kinds of carcinoma cells expressing Hpa antigens and/or HLA-A2. The results demonstrated that, of the tested peptides, effectors induced by peptides of human Hpa containing residues 525-533 (PAFSYSFFV, Hpa525, 277-285 (KMLKSFLKA, Hpa277, and 405-413 (WLSLLFKKL, Hpa405 could effectively lyse various tumor cell lines that were Hpa-positive and HLA-A2-matched. We also found that these peptide-specific CTLs could not lyse autologous lymphocytes with low Hpa activity. Further study revealed that Hpa525, Hpa277, and Hpa405 peptides increased the frequency of IFN-γ–producing T cells compared to a negative peptide. Our results suggest that Hpa525, Hpa277, and Hpa405 peptides are new HLA-A2–restricted CTL epitopes capable of inducing Hpa-specific CTLs in vitro. Because Hpa is expressed in most advanced malignant tumors, Hpa525, Hpa277, and Hpa405 peptide–based vaccines may be useful for the immunotherapy for patients with advanced tumors.

  12. Epigenetics of human papillomaviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johannsen, Eric [Department of Oncology, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Department of Medicine, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); Lambert, Paul F., E-mail: plambert@wisc.edu [Department of Oncology, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States); McArdle Laboratory for Cancer Research, School of Medicine and Public Health, University of Wisconsin, Madison, WI 53706 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Human papilllomaviruses (HPVs) are common human pathogens that infect cutaneous or mucosal epithelia in which they cause warts, self-contained benign lesions that commonly regress. The HPV life cycle is intricately tied to the differentiation of the host epithelium it infects. Mucosotropic HPVs are the most common sexually transmitted pathogen known to mankind. A subset of the mucosotropic HPVs, so-called high risk HPVs, is etiologically associated with numerous cancers of the anogenital tract, most notably the cervix, as well as a growing fraction of head and neck cancers. In these cancers, the HPV genome, which normally exists an a double stranded, circular, nuclear plasmid, is commonly found integrated into the host genome and expresses two viral oncogenes, E6 and E7, that are implicated in the development and maintainance of the cancers caused by these high risk HPVs. Numerous studies, primarily on the high risk HPV16, have documented that the methylation status of the viral genome changes not only in the context of the viral life cycle but also in the context of the progressive neoplastic disease that culminates in cancer. In this article, we summarize the knowledge gained from those studies. We also provide the first analysis of available ChIP-seq data on the occupancy of both epigentically modified histones as well as transcription factors on the high risk HPV18 genome in the context of HeLa cells, a cervical cancer-derived cell line that has been the subject of extensive analyses using this technique. - Highlights: • Methylation status of HPV genomes is dynamic. • Changes are seen in both the viral life cycle and neoplasia. • Histone modification status at LCR is predictive of transcription factor occupancy. • Novel transcription factor binding noted by ChIP-seq.

  13. Epigenetics of human papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johannsen, Eric; Lambert, Paul F

    2013-10-01

    Human papilllomaviruses (HPVs) are common human pathogens that infect cutaneous or mucosal epithelia in which they cause warts, self-contained benign lesions that commonly regress. The HPV life cycle is intricately tied to the differentiation of the host epithelium it infects. Mucosotropic HPVs are the most common sexually transmitted pathogen known to mankind. A subset of the mucosotropic HPVs, so-called high risk HPVs, is etiologically associated with numerous cancers of the anogenital tract, most notably the cervix, as well as a growing fraction of head and neck cancers. In these cancers, the HPV genome, which normally exists an a double stranded, circular, nuclear plasmid, is commonly found integrated into the host genome and expresses two viral oncogenes, E6 and E7, that are implicated in the development and maintainance of the cancers caused by these high risk HPVs. Numerous studies, primarily on the high risk HPV16, have documented that the methylation status of the viral genome changes not only in the context of the viral life cycle but also in the context of the progressive neoplastic disease that culminates in cancer. In this article, we summarize the knowledge gained from those studies. We also provide the first analysis of available ChIP-seq data on the occupancy of both epigentically modified histones as well as transcription factors on the high risk HPV18 genome in the context of HeLa cells, a cervical cancer-derived cell line that has been the subject of extensive analyses using this technique. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Broad-Spectrum Drugs Against Viral Agents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan P. Wong

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Development of antivirals has focused primarily on vaccines and on treatments for specific viral agents. Although effective, these approaches may be limited in situations where the etiologic agent is unknown or when the target virus has undergone mutation, recombination or reassortment. Augmentation of the innate immune response may be an effective alternative for disease amelioration. Nonspecific, broad-spectrum immune responses can be induced by double-stranded (dsRNAs such as poly (ICLC, or oligonucleotides (ODNs containing unmethylated deocycytidyl-deoxyguanosinyl (CpG motifs. These may offer protection against various bacterial and viral pathogens regardless of their genetic makeup, zoonotic origin or drug resistance.

  15. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Bivalent Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) bivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  16. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Nonavalent Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) nonavalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  17. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Quadrivalent Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  18. One Family's Struggles with HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... GETVAXED print ads go to GETVAXED.ORG cme Immunizations HPV (Human Papillomavirus) One family's struggles with HPV ... not possible without a visit to your doctor. Immunizations stop disease from spreading. Check with your family ...

  19. The epidemiology of genital human papillomavirus infection.

    OpenAIRE

    Trottier, Helen; Franco, Eduardo L.

    2006-01-01

    KEYWORDS - CLASSIFICATION: cancer epidemiology;complications;Canada;epidemiology;Evaluation;Female;Genital Diseases,Female;Humans;Incidence;lifestyle modulation of cancer & cancer biomarkers;Papillomaviridae;Papillomavirus Infections;Risk Factors;Uterine Cervical Neoplasms;virology. Clinical and subclinical human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are the most common sexually transmitted infections in the world, and most sexually-active individuals are likely to be exposed to HPV infection du...

  20. Ceftaroline: a new broad-spectrum cephalosporin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Lauren; Sutton, Elizabeth; Brown, Jack

    2011-03-15

    The pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, clinical efficacy, and safety of ceftaroline are reviewed. Ceftaroline, a new broad- spectrum antibiotic, is approved for the treatment of complicated skin and skin structure infections (cSSSIs) and community- acquired pneumonia (CAP). This β-lactam antibiotic has extended activity against gram-positive organisms and has activity against common gram-negative organisms. The drug's spectrum of activity includes both methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. However, its activity against extended-spectrum β-lactamase-producing bacteria is limited. These bacteria, particularly those that express AmpC β-lactamase, greatly reduce the activity of ceftaroline. The prodrug of ceftaroline (ceftaroline fosamil) is rapidly converted to its active form (ceftaroline) in plasma. This dose-linear drug has been found to be pharmacodynamically best correlated with the percentage of time that free drug concentrations remain above the minimum inhibitory concentration. Ceftaroline's safety profile is similar to that of the other cephalosporins, with minimal adverse drug reactions, most of which are considered mild. Currently available pharmacokinetic, animal, and clinical studies have found that ceftaroline has reasonable efficacy and tolerability but have also revealed that dosing regimen modifications may be needed in patients with moderate-to-severe renal impairment. The recommended dosage of ceftaroline for the treatment of cSSSIs and CAP is 600 mg infused intravenously over 60 minutes every 12 hours. The recommended duration of therapy is 5-14 and 5-7 days for cSSSIs and CAP, respectively. Additional Phase III studies are currently underway. Ceftaroline is a new broad-spectrum cephalosporin indicated for the treatment of cSSSIs and CAP caused by susceptible gram-positive and gram-negative organisms.

  1. Bovine and human papillomaviruses: a comparative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munday, J S

    2014-11-01

    Fifty years ago, inoculation with bovine papillomavirus (BPV) was found to cause mesenchymal tumors of the skin in cattle and horses, as well as tumors of the bladder in cattle. Subsequent to these studies of BPVs, human papillomaviruses (HPVs) were found to cause cervical cancer resulting in intense research into papillomaviruses. During the past 50 years, the ways that HPVs and BPVs cause disease have been investigated, and both HPVs and BPVs have been associated with an increasingly diverse range of diseases. Herein, the biology, oncogenic mechanisms, and diseases associated with BPVs are compared with those of HPVs. As reviewed, there are currently significant differences between BPVs and HPVs. However, research 50 years ago into BPVs formed a prologue for the recognition that papillomaviruses have a significant role in human disease, and it is possible that future research may similarly reveal that BPVs are less different from HPVs than is currently recognized. © The Author(s) 2014.

  2. Novel Clostridium difficile Anti-Toxin (TcdA and TcdB Humanized Monoclonal Antibodies Demonstrate In Vitro Neutralization across a Broad Spectrum of Clinical Strains and In Vivo Potency in a Hamster Spore Challenge Model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hongyu Qiu

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile (C. difficile infection (CDI is the main cause of nosocomial antibiotic-associated colitis and increased incidence of community-associated diarrhea in industrialized countries. At present, the primary treatment of CDI is antibiotic administration, which is effective but often associated with recurrence, especially in the elderly. Pathogenic strains produce enterotoxin, toxin A (TcdA, and cytotoxin, toxin B (TcdB, which are necessary for C. difficile induced diarrhea and gut pathological changes. Administration of anti-toxin antibodies provides an alternative approach to treat CDI, and has shown promising results in preclinical and clinical studies. In the current study, several humanized anti-TcdA and anti-TcdB monoclonal antibodies were generated and their protective potency was characterized in a hamster infection model. The humanized anti-TcdA (CANmAbA4 and anti-TcdB (CANmAbB4 and CANmAbB1 antibodies showed broad spectrum in vitro neutralization of toxins from clinical strains and neutralization in a mouse toxin challenge model. Moreover, co-administration of humanized antibodies (CANmAbA4 and CANmAbB4 cocktail provided a high level of protection in a dose dependent manner (85% versus 57% survival at day 22 for 50 mg/kg and 20 mg/kg doses, respectively in a hamster gastrointestinal infection (GI model. This study describes the protective effects conferred by novel neutralizing anti-toxin monoclonal antibodies against C. difficile toxins and their potential as therapeutic agents in treating CDI.

  3. HPV (Human Papillomavirus) vaccine - what you need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is taken in its entirety from the CDC HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/hpv.html . CDC review information for HPV (Human Papillomavirus) ...

  4. Global challenges of implementing human papillomavirus vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra Amrita

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human Papillomavirus vaccines are widely hailed as a sweeping pharmaceutical innovation for the universal benefit of all women. The implementation of the vaccines, however, is far from universal or equitable. Socio-economically marginalized women in emerging and developing, and many advanced economies alike, suffer a disproportionately large burden of cervical cancer. Despite the marketing of Human Papillomavirus vaccines as the solution to cervical cancer, the market authorization (licensing of the vaccines has not translated into universal equitable access. Vaccine implementation for vulnerable girls and women faces multiple barriers that include high vaccine costs, inadequate delivery infrastructure, and lack of community engagement to generate awareness about cervical cancer and early screening tools. For Human Papillomavirus vaccines to work as a public health solution, the quality-assured delivery of cheaper vaccines must be integrated with strengthened capacity for community-based health education and screening.

  5. Arbidol as a broad-spectrum antiviral: an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaising, Julie; Polyak, Stephen J; Pécheur, Eve-Isabelle

    2014-07-01

    Arbidol (ARB) is a Russian-made small indole-derivative molecule, licensed in Russia and China for prophylaxis and treatment of influenza and other respiratory viral infections. It also demonstrates inhibitory activity against other viruses, enveloped or not, responsible for emerging or globally prevalent infectious diseases such as hepatitis B and C, gastroenteritis, hemorrhagic fevers or encephalitis. In this review, we will explore the possibility and pertinence of ARB as a broad-spectrum antiviral, after a careful examination of its physico-chemical properties, pharmacokinetics, toxicity, and molecular mechanisms of action. Recent studies suggest that ARB's dual interactions with membranes and aromatic amino acids in proteins may be central to its broad-spectrum antiviral activity. This could impact on the virus itself, and/or on cellular functions or critical steps in virus-cell interactions, thereby positioning ARB as both a direct-acting antiviral (DAA) and a host-targeting agent (HTA). In the context of recent studies in animals and humans, we will discuss the prospective clinical use of ARB in various viral infections. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Subclinical human papillomavirus infection of the cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Waiz, M.; Al-Saadi, Rabab N.; Al-Saadi, Zahida A.; Al-Rawi, Faiza A.

    2001-01-01

    A prospective study to investigate a group of Iraqi woman with proved genital vulval warts, to seek evidence of human papillomavirus infection in apparently normal looking cervixes and to investigate the natural history of infection. From December 1997 to August 1998, 20 women with vulval warts were enrolled along with 20 aged-matched control cases without warts. Their ages ranged between 19-48 years with a mean of 30.4 years, (+/- standard deviation = 2.3) for patients and 18-48 years with a mean of 29.7 (+/- standard deviation = 2.7) for the control group. General and gynecological examinations were carried out. Cervical swabs for associated genital infection, papilloma smears, speculoscopy and directed punch biopsies were carried out to detect subclinical human papillomavirus infections of the cervix and associated intraepithelial neoplasm. Cytology results showed that 11 (55%) of patients had evidence of cervical infection by human papillomavirus, 6 (30%) showed mild dysplastic changes, 3 (15%) showed moderate dysplastic changes, whilst 2 (10%) showed no dysplastic changes. Speculoscopy and acetowhitening was positive in 11 (55%) and collated histological results showed evidence of human papillomavirus infection in 9 patients (45%). As for the control group one case (5%) had evidence of human papillomavirus infection. Subclinical human papillomavirus infection is more common than was previously thought among Iraqi women. It may appear alone or in association with vulval or exophytic cervical warts, or both, and may be more common than the clinically obvious disease. Speculoscopy as an adjunctive method to colposcopy was found to be a simple and an easy to perform technique. Its combination with cytology gave relatively good results when it was used as a triage instrument, and may have a more promising performance in the future. (author)

  7. Factors affecting transmission of mucosal human papillomavirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veldhuijzen, Nienke J.; Snijders, Peter Jf; Reiss, Peter; Meijer, Chris Jlm; van de Wijgert, Janneke Hhm

    2010-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection. The effect of HPV on public health is especially related to the burden of anogenital cancers, most notably cervical cancer. Determinants of exposure to HPV are similar to those for most sexually transmitted infections, but

  8. Human Papillomavirus types distribution among women with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among females in Angola and human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main risk factor for the development of pre-cancerous squamous intraepithelial lesions. The diversity and frequency of HPV types in Angola has yet to be reported. Aim: to determine the ...

  9. Human papillomavirus DNA in aerodigestive squamous carcinomas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    imInunocytochemistry and in situ DNA hybridisa- tion to demonstrate human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Changes in the epitheliUIn adjacent to the carcinoma were found in 5 of 10 oesophageal and 7 of 10 laryngeal carcinomas. Viral antigens could not be detected with imInunocytochemistry in any of the specimens.

  10. Human papillomavirus DNA in aerodigestive squamous carcinomas ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A series of 10 oesophageal and 10 laryngeal squamous carcinomas was examined by means of immuno cytochemistry and in situ DNA hybridisation to demonstrate human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Changes in the epithelium adjacent to the carcinoma were found in 5 of 10 oesophageal and 7 of 10 laryngeal ...

  11. Human papillomavirus genotypes and clinical management of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted viral disease in the world. HPV infection of the genital epithelium is associated with genital warts and malignancies of the lower genital tract. Objectives. To describe the distribution, phenotypic appearance and HPV type ...

  12. Human papillomavirus genotyping by multiplex pyrosequencing in ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Cervical cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths among women in India. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the causative agent of cervical cancer; and infection with the high-risk genotypes, predominantly HPV16 and 18, is the biggest risk factor. Vaccines targeting HPV16 and 18 have been found to confer ...

  13. One Family's Struggles with HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... GETVAXED.ORG cme Immunizations HPV (Human Papillomavirus) One family's struggles with HPV We provide this video in a variety of formats and lengths for use by your organization free-of-charge. Branded videos contain the "PKIDs. ...

  14. One Family's Struggles with HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... hepatitis report someone you know has hbv/hcv standard precautions Silence the Sounds of Pertussis spokespeople who we are Your Choice! getvaxed about GETVAXED print ads go to GETVAXED.ORG cme Immunizations HPV (Human Papillomavirus) One family's struggles with HPV We provide ...

  15. Screening for human papillomavirus: is urine useful?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D'Hauwers, K.W.M.; Tjalma, W.A.

    2009-01-01

    Persistent infection with high-risk Human papillomavirus (hr-HPV 16, 18, 31, 33, and 45) is the main risk factor for developing malignant genital lesions. Screening methods and follow-up schedules for cervical cancer are well known. A golden standard to screen and monitor men does not exist yet,

  16. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in endometrial cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Tina Bech; Svahn, Malene Frøsig; Faber, Mette Tuxen

    2014-01-01

    HPV is a common sexually transmitted infection and is considered to be a necessary cause of cervical cancer. The anatomical proximity to the cervix has led researchers to investigate whether Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has a role in the etiology of endometrial cancer....

  17. Parental acceptance of Human Papillomavirus vaccines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lenselink, C.H.; Gerrits, M.M.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Hamont, D. van; Bekkers, R.L.M.

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether parents would accept Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination for their children and which variables may influence their decision, including knowledge about cervical cancer and HPV. STUDY DESIGN: Three hundred and fifty-six parents of children aged 10-12 years were

  18. Human papillomavirus targets crossroads in immune signaling

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tummers, Bart

    2016-01-01

    Persistent infections with high-risk type human papillomaviruses (hrHPVs) can progress to cancer. HrHPVs infect keratinocytes (KCs) and successfully suppress host immunity for up to two years despite the fact that KCs are well equipped to detect and initiate immune responses to invading pathogens.

  19. Development of a Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Agent with Activity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Development of a Broad-Spectrum Antiviral Agent with Activity Against Herpesvirus Replication and Gene Expression. ... Tropical Journal of Pharmaceutical Research ... Purpose: To evaluate the broad-spectrum antiviral activity of peptide H9 (H9) in vitro in order to gain insight into its underlying molecular mechanisms.

  20. Prevalence and determinants of human papillomavirus genital infection in men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franceschi, S; Castellsagué, X; Dal Maso, L; Smith, J S; Plummer, M; Ngelangel, C; Chichareon, S; Eluf-Neto, J; Shah, K V; Snijders, P J F; Meijer, C J L M; Bosch, F X; Muñoz, N

    2002-01-01

    Four-hundred-forty-five husbands of women with invasive cervical carcinoma, 165 of women with in situ cervical cancer, and 717 of control women (age range 19–82 years) were interviewed and a sample of exfoliated cells from the penis obtained in seven case–control studies conducted by the International Agency for Research on Cancer. The characteristics of human papillomavirus-positive and human papillomavirus-negative husbands were compared using odds ratios and 95% confidence intervals. Thirteen per cent of the husbands of control women, 18% of the husbands of women with invasive cervical carcinoma, and 21% of the husbands of in situ cervical carcinoma women were positive for penile human papillomavirus DNA. Human papillomavirus 16 was detected in 45 husbands, human papillomavirus 18, 31 or 33 in 19, and human papillomavirus 6/11 in 6, but the majority of human papillomavirus infection (158) was with other or unspecified human papillomavirus types. The same human papillomavirus type was seldom identified in both husband and wife. The strongest variation in penile human papillomavirus infection was by country, with percentages among the husbands of control women ranging between 3% in Spain and 39% in Brazil. Having had over 50 lifetime sexual partners, compared with only one, was associated with an odds ratio of 2.3. British Journal of Cancer (2002) 86, 705–711. DOI: 10.1038/sj/bjc/6600194 www.bjcancer.com © 2002 Cancer Research UK PMID:11875730

  1. Human alpha and beta papillomaviruses use different synonymous codon profiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cladel, Nancy M; Bertotto, Alex; Christensen, Neil D

    2010-06-01

    Human papillomaviruses use rare codons relative to their hosts. It has been theorized that this is a mechanism to allow the virus to escape immune surveillance. In the present study, we examined the codings of four major genes of 21 human alpha (mucosatropic) viruses and 16 human beta (cutaneous-tropic) viruses. We compared the codon usage of different genes from a given papillomavirus and also the same genes from different papillomaviruses. Our data showed that codon usage was not always uniform between two genes of a given papillomavirus or between the same genes of papillomaviruses from different genera. We speculate as to why this might be and conclude that codon usage in the papillomaviruses may not only play a role in facilitating escape from immune surveillance but may also underlie some of the unanswered questions in the papillomavirus field.

  2. Just implementation of human papillomavirus vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malmqvist, Erik; Natunen, Kari; Lehtinen, Matti; Helgesson, Gert

    2012-04-01

    Many countries are now implementing human papillomavirus vaccination. There is disagreement about who should receive the vaccine. Some propose vaccinating both boys and girls in order to achieve the largest possible public health impact. Others regard this approach as too costly and claim that only girls should be vaccinated. We question the assumption that decisions about human papillomavirus vaccination policy should rely solely on estimates of overall benefits and costs. There are important social justice aspects that also need to be considered. Policy makers should consider how to best protect individuals who will remain unvaccinated through no fault of their own. This is especially important if these individuals are already disadvantaged in other ways and if vaccinating other people increases their risk of infection.

  3. Broad Spectrum Sanitizing Wipes with Food Additives, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Microcide proposes to develop novel multipurpose non-toxic sanitizing wipes that are aqueous based, have shelf life of 3-5 years, have broad spectrum microbicidal...

  4. Quality Assurance of Human Papillomavirus Testing

    OpenAIRE

    Tachezy, Ruth; Šmahelová, Jana

    2007-01-01

    The External Quality Assurance (EQA) in medical microbiology in the Czech Republic is well organized. It is coordinated by the Accreditation Department of the Centre of Epidemiology and Microbiology (AD-CEM) of the National Institute of Public Health in Prague. Since 1993 when the first samples were sent out the number of programmes and participating laboratories has been rapidly increasing. EQA for Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been available since 2000. As has been shown for ot...

  5. Duty to Advocate: Human Papillomavirus Vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Nichols, Kristen; Girotto, Jennifer; Steele, Amy Mitchell-Van; Stoffella, Sylvia

    2017-01-01

    Despite the excellent benefit-to-risk ratio for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and recommendations for its routine use from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), significant controversy surrounding HPV vaccination continues to exist. In light of this controversy and continued low rates of vaccination among U.S. adolescents, the Pediatric Pharmacy Advocacy Group (PPAG) endorses the safety and efficacy of HPV vaccination and agrees with ACIP recommendations for protec...

  6. Human Papillomavirus in Head and Neck Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Rosa Garbuglia

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV is currently considered to be a major etiologic factor, in addition to tobacco and alcohol, for oropharyngeal cancer (OPC development. HPV positive OPCs are epidemiologically distinct from HPV negative ones, and are characterized by younger age at onset, male predominance, and strong association with sexual behaviors. HPV16 is the most prevalent types in oral cavity cancer (OCC, moreover the prevalence of beta, and gamma HPV types is higher than that of alpha HPV in oral cavity.

  7. Detection of human papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus DNA sequences in oral mucosa of HIV-infected patients by the polymerase chain reaction.

    OpenAIRE

    Snijders, P. J.; Schulten, E. A.; Mullink, H.; ten Kate, R. W.; Jiwa, M.; van der Waal, I.; Meijer, C. J.; Walboomers, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    The presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was analyzed in 21 oral biopsy specimens of HIV-infected patients using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Biopsies were categorized as hairy leukoplakia (HL) (n = 12), candidiasis (n = 3), oral warts (n = 2), and clinically normal epithelium (n = 4). For HPV detection a modified general primer-mediated PCR method (GP-PCR), which detects a broad spectrum of HPV genotypes at sub-picogram levels, was used. Human pa...

  8. University Students' Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Cervical Cancer, Human Papillomavirus, and Human Papillomavirus Vaccines in Turkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç, Zeliha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The current descriptive study aimed to determine university students' knowledge and attitudes regarding cervical cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV), and HPV vaccines in Turkey. Participants: A total of 800 students participated. Methods: This study was carried out between September 1, 2012, and October 30, 2012, in 8 female…

  9. Human papillomavirus vaccination: the population impact

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Lai-yang; Garland, Suzanne M.

    2017-01-01

    We currently have the knowledge and experience to prevent much of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related disease burden globally. In many countries where prophylactic HPV vaccination programs have been adopted as highly effective public health programs with good vaccine coverage, we are already seeing, in real-world settings, reduction of vaccine-related HPV-type infections, genital warts and cervical pre-cancers with potential reductions in vulvar, vaginal and anal pre-cancers. Moreover, we are ...

  10. Biological relevance of human papillomaviruses in vulvar cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halec, Gordana; Alemany, Laia; Quiros, Beatriz; Clavero, Omar; Höfler, Daniela; Alejo, Maria; Quint, Wim; Pawlita, Michael; Bosch, Francesc X; de Sanjose, Silvia

    2017-04-01

    The carcinogenic role of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) types in the increasing subset of vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia and vulvar cancer in young women has been established. However, the actual number of vulvar cancer cases attributed to HPV is still imprecisely defined. In an attempt to provide a more precise definition of HPV-driven vulvar cancer, we performed HPV-type-specific E6*I mRNA analyses available for 20 HR-/possible HR (pHR)-HPV types, on tissue samples from 447 cases of vulvar cancer. HPV DNA genotyping was performed using SPF10-LiPA 25 assay due to its high sensitivity in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. Data on p16 INK4a expression was available for comparative analysis via kappa statistics. The use of highly sensitive assays covering the detection of HPV mRNA in a broad spectrum of mucosal HPV types resulted in the detection of viral transcripts in 87% of HPV DNA+ vulvar cancers. Overall concordance between HPV mRNA+ and p16 INK4a upregulation (strong, diffuse immunostaining in >25% of tumor cells) was 92% (K=0.625, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.531-0.719). Among these cases, 83% were concordant pairs of HPV mRNA+ and p16 INK4a + and 9% were concordant pairs of HPV mRNA- and p16 INK4a -. Our data confirm the biological role of HR-/pHR-HPV types in the great majority of HPV DNA+ vulvar cancers, resulting in an HPV-attributable fraction of at least 21% worldwide. Most HPV DNA+ vulvar cancers were associated with HPV16 (85%), but a causative role for other, less frequently occurring mucosal HPV types (HPV26, 66, 67, 68, 70 and 73) was also confirmed at the mRNA level for the first time. These findings should be taken into consideration for future screening options as HPV-associated vulvar preneoplastic lesions have increased in incidence in younger women and require different treatment than vulvar lesions that develop from rare autoimmune-related mechanisms in older women.

  11. Transplacental transmission of Human Papillomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serafini Eduardo P

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This paper aimed at studying the transplacental transmission of HPV and looking at the epidemiological factors involved in maternal viral infection. The following sampling methods were used: (1 in the pregnant woman, (a genital; (b peripheral blood; (2 in the newborn, (a oral cavity, axillary and inguinal regions; (b nasopharyngeal aspirate, and (c cord blood; (3 in the placenta. The HPV DNA was identified using two methods: multiplex PCR of human β-globin and of HPV using the PGMY09 and PGMY11 primers; and nested-PCR, which combines degenerated primers of the E6/E7 regions of the HPV virus, that allowed the identification of genotypes 6/11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 42, 52 and 58. Transplacental transmission was considered when type-specific HPV concordance was found between the mother, the placenta and the newborn or the mother and cord blood. The study included 49 HPV DNA-positive pregnant women at delivery. Twelve placentas (24.5%, n = 12/49 had a positive result for HPV DNA. Eleven newborn were HPV DNA positive in samples from the nasopharyngeal or buccal and body or cord blood. In 5 cases (10.2%, n = 5/49 there was HPV type-specific agreement between genital/placenta/newborn samples. In one case (2%, n = 1/49 there was type specific HPV concordance between genital/cord blood and also suggested transplacental transmission. A positive and significant correlation was observed between transplacental transmission of HPV infection and the maternal variables of immunodepression history (HIV, p = 0.011. In conclusion the study suggests placental infection in 23.3% of the cases studied and transplacental transmission in 12.2%. It is suggested that in future HPV DNA be researched in the normal endometrium of women of reproductive age. The possible consequence of fetal exposure to HPV should be observed.

  12. Knowledge of human papillomavirus and the human papillomavirus vaccine in European adolescents: a systematic review.

    OpenAIRE

    Patel, H; Jeve, YB; Sherman, SM; Moss, EL

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is recommended for adolescent girls in many European countries, however there is huge variation in vaccine uptake. METHODS: A mixed methods systematic review to ascertain the level of HPV and HPV vaccine knowledge that exists among European adolescents. Two electronic databases, Ovid Medline and PsychInfo, were searched from origin to September 2014. Meta-analysis was performed for the two primary outcome measures ('have you heard of HPV?' an...

  13. New treatments for human papillomavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Santos, C; Pigem, R; Alsina, M

    2013-12-01

    Human papillomavirus infection is very common. In this article, we review the latest developments in the treatment of lesions caused by this virus, with a particular focus on anogenital warts. Sinecatechins and new imiquimod formulations are among the most significant new developments. Others include photodynamic therapy and intralesional immunotherapy, but there is insufficient evidence to recommend their routine use. Finally, while therapeutic vaccines and inhibitory molecules appear to hold great promise, they are still in the early phases of investigation. More studies are needed, and these should have similar designs, larger samples, and sufficiently long follow-up periods to enable the direct comparison of the short-term and long-term effectiveness of different treatment options. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier España, S.L. and AEDV. All rights reserved.

  14. Human papillomavirus types and recurrent cervical warts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nuovo, G.J. (Columbia Presbyterian Medical Center, New York, NY (USA)); Pedemonte, B.M. (Harlem Hospital Medical Center, New York, NY (USA))

    1990-03-02

    The authors analyzed cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CINs) detected after cryotherapy to determine if recurrence is associated with the same human papillomavirus (HPV) type found in the original lesion. Eight women had detectable HPV DNA in CINs that occurred after ablation of another CIN, and for each patient the HPV type in the pretreatment lesion was different from that in the CIN that appeared after cryotherapy. This compares with 12 women who had HPV detected in two or more CINs present at the same time, 11 of whom had the same HPv type noted. they concluded that although multiple, simultaneous CINs in a woman often contain the same HPV type, recurrent CINs that occur after cryotherapy contain an HPV type different from that present in the pretreatment lesion.

  15. Human papillomavirus types and recurrent cervical warts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuovo, G.J.; Pedemonte, B.M.

    1990-01-01

    The authors analyzed cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CINs) detected after cryotherapy to determine if recurrence is associated with the same human papillomavirus (HPV) type found in the original lesion. Eight women had detectable HPV DNA in CINs that occurred after ablation of another CIN, and for each patient the HPV type in the pretreatment lesion was different from that in the CIN that appeared after cryotherapy. This compares with 12 women who had HPV detected in two or more CINs present at the same time, 11 of whom had the same HPv type noted. they concluded that although multiple, simultaneous CINs in a woman often contain the same HPV type, recurrent CINs that occur after cryotherapy contain an HPV type different from that present in the pretreatment lesion

  16. Duty to Advocate: Human Papillomavirus Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nichols, Kristen; Girotto, Jennifer; Steele, Amy Mitchell-Van; Stoffella, Sylvia

    2017-01-01

    Despite the excellent benefit-to-risk ratio for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and recommendations for its routine use from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), significant controversy surrounding HPV vaccination continues to exist. In light of this controversy and continued low rates of vaccination among U.S. adolescents, the Pediatric Pharmacy Advocacy Group (PPAG) endorses the safety and efficacy of HPV vaccination and agrees with ACIP recommendations for protection of the U.S. population against the potentially severe consequences of HPV. The PPAG recommends that all eligible individuals undergo vaccination. We further recommend that pediatric pharmacists participate in the education of patients and their families and serve as advocates for HPV vaccination. This document serves as an update to the 2008 PPAG position statement.1.

  17. Misconception: human papillomavirus vaccine and infertility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, Christine L; Hanley, Chassidy J; Coyne-Beasley, Tamera

    2014-02-01

    This study sought to determine if parents of males express concerns about vaccine-associated infertility (VAI) with the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine and to understand the impact of those concerns. Parents of sons were surveyed to determine VAI concerns. Logistic regression was used to find if parents worried about VAI had lower knowledge of HPV disease, more concern for side effects, lacked information about vaccination, or had lower intention to vaccinate. In all, 39% of parents were worried about VAI. Parents worried about VAI had similar knowledge of HPV compared with other parents. Parents worried about VAI had twice the odds of agreeing the vaccine may cause side effects and agreeing they did not have enough information compared to their counterparts. Parents worried about VAI less often intended to vaccinate sons than other parents. These findings suggest many parents worry about VAI in sons with HPV vaccine.

  18. Improving Human Papillomavirus Vaccinations in Military Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wedel, Sarah; Navarrete, Rebecca; Burkard, Joseph F; Clark, Mary Jo

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this evidence-based project was to provide patient education to increase human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates in military women. Despite the availability of a vaccine, HPV continues to be the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States. The goal of this program was to increase patient knowledge and HPV vaccination rates by providing education and a verbal recommendation for vaccination during regularly scheduled well-woman exams. The project resulted in a 65% increase in vaccination rates, raising the preprogram vaccination rate of 55% to a postintervention vaccine percentage of 91%. The results demonstrate the importance of patient education and provider recommendation in vaccine acceptance. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  19. Broad spectrum antiangiogenic treatment for ocular neovascular diseases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ofra Benny

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Pathological neovascularization is a hallmark of late stage neovascular (wet age-related macular degeneration (AMD and the leading cause of blindness in people over the age of 50 in the western world. The treatments focus on suppression of choroidal neovascularization (CNV, while current approved therapies are limited to inhibiting vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF exclusively. However, this treatment does not address the underlying cause of AMD, and the loss of VEGF's neuroprotective can be a potential side effect. Therapy which targets the key processes in AMD, the pathological neovascularization, vessel leakage and inflammation could bring a major shift in the approach to disease treatment and prevention. In this study we have demonstrated the efficacy of such broad spectrum antiangiogenic therapy on mouse model of AMD.Lodamin, a polymeric formulation of TNP-470, is a potent broad-spectrum antiangiogenic drug. Lodamin significantly reduced key processes involved in AMD progression as demonstrated in mice and rats. Its suppressive effects on angiogenesis, vascular leakage and inflammation were studied in a wide array of assays including; a Matrigel, delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH, Miles assay, laser-induced CNV and corneal micropocket assay. Lodamin significantly suppressed the secretion of various pro-inflammatory cytokines in the CNV lesion including monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1/Ccl2. Importantly, Lodamin was found to regress established CNV lesions, unlike soluble fms-like tyrosine kinase-1 (sFlk-1. The drug was found to be safe in mice and have little toxicity as demonstrated by electroretinography (ERG assessing retinal and by histology.Lodamin, a polymer formulation of TNP-470, was identified as a first in its class, broad-spectrum antiangiogenic drug that can be administered orally or locally to treat corneal and retinal neovascularization. Several unique properties make Lodamin especially beneficial for ophthalmic

  20. Human papillomavirus molecular biology and disease association

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, Nagayasu; Griffin, Heather; Kranjec, Christian; Murakami, Isao

    2015-01-01

    Summary Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have evolved over millions of years to propagate themselves in a range of different animal species including humans. Viruses that have co‐evolved slowly in this way typically cause chronic inapparent infections, with virion production in the absence of apparent disease. This is the case for many Beta and Gamma HPV types. The Alpha papillomavirus types have however evolved immunoevasion strategies that allow them to cause persistent visible papillomas. These viruses activate the cell cycle as the infected epithelial cell differentiates in order to create a replication competent environment that allows viral genome amplification and packaging into infectious particles. This is mediated by the viral E6, E7, and E5 proteins. High‐risk E6 and E7 proteins differ from their low‐risk counterparts however in being able to drive cell cycle entry in the upper epithelial layers and also to stimulate cell proliferation in the basal and parabasal layers. Deregulated expression of these cell cycle regulators underlies neoplasia and the eventual progression to cancer in individuals who cannot resolve high‐risk HPV infection. Most work to date has focused on the study of high‐risk HPV types such as HPV 16 and 18, which has led to an understanding of the molecular pathways subverted by these viruses. Such approaches will lead to the development of better strategies for disease treatment, including targeted antivirals and immunotherapeutics. Priorities are now focused toward understanding HPV neoplasias at sites other than the cervix (e.g. tonsils, other transformation zones) and toward understanding the mechanisms by which low‐risk HPV types can sometimes give rise to papillomatosis and under certain situations even cancers. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25752814

  1. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus Type 58 in Women With or ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus Type 58 in Women With or Without Cervical Lesions in Northeast Brazil. JV Fernandes, MGF Carvalho, TAAM de Fernandes, JMG Araújo, PRM Azevedo, JCV Azevedo, RV Meissner ...

  2. Oropharyngeal perinatal colonization by human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Torices, María Soledad; Corrales-Millan, Rocío; Hijona-Elosegui, Jesús J

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common human sexually transmitted disease. It is clinically relevant because this condition is necessary for the development of epithelial cervical cancer, and it is also a factor closely associated with the occurrence of diverse tumours and various benign and malignant lesions of the head and neck area. The infective mechanism in most of these cases is associated with sexual intercourse, but there is recent scientific evidence suggesting that HPV infection may also be acquired by other routes of infection not necessarily linked to sexual contact. One of them is vertical transmission from mother to child, either during pregnancy or at the time of delivery. The aim of our research was to study maternal-foetal HPV transmission during childbirth in detail, establishing the rate of oropharyngeal neonatal HPV in vaginal deliveries. The presence and type of HPV viral DNA at the time of delivery in samples of maternal cervical secretions, amniotic fluid, venous cord blood samples and neonatal oropharynx in pregnant women (and their babies) were determined. The rate of oropharyngeal neonatal HPV colonization in vaginal deliveries was 58.24%. The maternal and neonatal HPV colonization mechanism is essentially, but not exclusively, transvaginal. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Otorrinolaringología y Cirugía de Cabeza y Cuello. All rights reserved.

  3. Cellular redox, cancer and human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruz-Gregorio, Alfredo; Manzo-Merino, Joaquín; Lizano, Marcela

    2018-02-15

    High-risk Human Papillomavirus (HR-HPV) is the causative agent of different human cancers. A persistent HR-HPV infection alters several cellular processes involved in cell proliferation, apoptosis, immune evasion, genomic instability and transformation. Cumulative evidence from past studies indicates that HR-HPV proteins are associated with oxidative stress (OS) and has been proposed as a risk factor for cancer development. Reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) regulate a plethora of processes inducing cellular proliferation, differentiation and death. Oxidative stress (OS) is generated when an imbalance in the redox state occurs due to deregulation of the oxidant and antioxidant systems, which, in turn, promotes the damage of DNA, proteins and lipids, allowing the accumulation of mutations and genome instability. OS has been associated with the establishment and development of different cancers, and it has recently been proposed as a co-factor in cervical cancer development. This review is focused on evidence regarding the association of OS with HR-HPV proteins, and the interplay of the viral proteins with different elements of the antioxidant and DNA damage response (DDR) systems, emphasizing the processes that might be required for the viral life cycle and viral DNA integration into the host genome, which is a key element in the carcinogenic process induced by HR-HPV. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. [Human papillomavirus nonavalent vaccine. Update 2017].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, F X; Moreno, D; Redondo, E; Torné, A

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the causative agent of 5% of human cancers. HPV infection is necessary for the development of cervical cancer and is responsible of a variable percentage of cancers of anus, vulva, vagina, penis, and oropharynx. Since 2007, 2 vaccines against HPV have been commercially available in Spain: bivalent (HPV types 16/18), and tetravalent (HPV types 6/11/16/18). In order to extend the protection afforded by HPV vaccines, a clinical program was launched in 2006 for the new nonavalent vaccine, including 9 HPV types (6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58). These types are responsible for 90% of cervical cancers, 82% of high-grade ano-genital pre-cancerous lesions, and 90% of genital warts. The purpose of this publication is to provide healthcare professionals with the scientific evidence that supports the new vaccine, as well as the clinical value that it offers in our environment. Copyright © 2017 Sociedad Española de Médicos de Atención Primaria (SEMERGEN). Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  5. Human papillomavirus type 56-associated Bowen disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimizu, A; Tamura, A; Abe, M; Amano, H; Motegi, S; Nakatani, Y; Hoshino, H; Ishikawa, O

    2012-11-01

    Some cases of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 56 infection in Bowen disease have been reported. However, the incidence and clinical characteristics are still unclear. To clarify the prevalence of HPV type 56-positive Bowen disease in our department and to characterize the clinical manifestations. Sixty-eight specimens of Bowen disease were examined by polymerase chain reaction using HPV consensus primers, and the amplified products were subjected to DNA sequence analyses. Moreover, positive samples were investigated by in situ hybridization. These findings were used to clarify the clinical characteristics of HPV-positive Bowen disease. Eight out of 68 specimens (12%) of Bowen disease were HPV-positive, of which six specimens were HPV type 56-positive. The HPV type 56-positive lesions were characterized by a longitudinal melanonychia or a deeply pigmented keratotic lesion. The remaining two specimens were genital Bowen disease in which HPV type 16 was detected. In situ hybridization demonstrated the positive cells in the upper layer of epidermis. The HPV type 56 detected in the samples of longitudinal melanonychia can be divided into at least into two types. This study determined the prevalence of HPV type 56-positive Bowen disease. Longitudinal melanonychia is the most characteristic manifestation of HPV type 56-associated Bowen disease. © 2012 The Authors. BJD © 2012 British Association of Dermatologists.

  6. Human Papillomaviruses: Genetic Basis of Carcinogenicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burk, Robert D.; Chen, Zigui; Van Doorslaer, Koenraad

    2009-01-01

    Persistent infection by specific oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is established as the necessary cause of cervix cancer. DNA sequence differences between HPV genomes determine whether an HPV has the potential to cause cancer. Of the more than 100 HPV genotypes characterized at the genetic level, at least 15 are associated, to varying degrees, with cervical cancer. Classification based on nucleotide similarity places nearly all HPVs that infect the cervicovaginal area within the α-PV genus. Within this genus, phylogenetic trees inferred from the entire viral genome cluster all cancer-causing types together, suggesting the existence of a common ancestor for the oncogenic HPVs. However, in separate trees built from the early open reading frames (ORFs; i.e. E1, E2, E6, E7) or the late ORFs (i.e. L1, L2), the carcinogenic potential sorts with the early region of the genome, but not the late region. Thus, genetic differences within the early region specify the pathogenic potential of α-HPV infections. Since the HPV genomes are monophyletic and sites are highly correlated across the genome, diagnosis of oncogenic types and non-oncogenic types can be accomplished using any region across the genome. Here we review our current understanding of the evolutionary history of the oncogenic HPVs, in particular, we focus on the importance of viral genome heterogeneity and discuss the genetic basis for the oncogenic phenotype in some but not all α-PVs. PMID:19684441

  7. Maraviroc (UK-427,857), a Potent, Orally Bioavailable, and Selective Small-Molecule Inhibitor of Chemokine Receptor CCR5 with Broad-Spectrum Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Dorr, Patrick; Westby, Mike; Dobbs, Susan; Griffin, Paul; Irvine, Becky; Macartney, Malcolm; Mori, Julie; Rickett, Graham; Smith-Burchnell, Caroline; Napier, Carolyn; Webster, Rob; Armour, Duncan; Price, David; Stammen, Blanda; Wood, Anthony

    2005-01-01

    Maraviroc (UK-427,857) is a selective CCR5 antagonist with potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) activity and favorable pharmacological properties. Maraviroc is the product of a medicinal chemistry effort initiated following identification of an imidazopyridine CCR5 ligand from a high-throughput screen of the Pfizer compound file. Maraviroc demonstrated potent antiviral activity against all CCR5-tropic HIV-1 viruses tested, including 43 primary isolates from various clades a...

  8. Maraviroc (UK-427,857), a potent, orally bioavailable, and selective small-molecule inhibitor of chemokine receptor CCR5 with broad-spectrum anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorr, Patrick; Westby, Mike; Dobbs, Susan; Griffin, Paul; Irvine, Becky; Macartney, Malcolm; Mori, Julie; Rickett, Graham; Smith-Burchnell, Caroline; Napier, Carolyn; Webster, Rob; Armour, Duncan; Price, David; Stammen, Blanda; Wood, Anthony; Perros, Manos

    2005-11-01

    Maraviroc (UK-427,857) is a selective CCR5 antagonist with potent anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) activity and favorable pharmacological properties. Maraviroc is the product of a medicinal chemistry effort initiated following identification of an imidazopyridine CCR5 ligand from a high-throughput screen of the Pfizer compound file. Maraviroc demonstrated potent antiviral activity against all CCR5-tropic HIV-1 viruses tested, including 43 primary isolates from various clades and diverse geographic origin (geometric mean 90% inhibitory concentration of 2.0 nM). Maraviroc was active against 200 clinically derived HIV-1 envelope-recombinant pseudoviruses, 100 of which were derived from viruses resistant to existing drug classes. There was little difference in the sensitivity of the 200 viruses to maraviroc, as illustrated by the biological cutoff in this assay (= geometric mean plus two standard deviations [SD] of 1.7-fold). The mechanism of action of maraviroc was established using cell-based assays, where it blocked binding of viral envelope, gp120, to CCR5 to prevent the membrane fusion events necessary for viral entry. Maraviroc did not affect CCR5 cell surface levels or associated intracellular signaling, confirming it as a functional antagonist of CCR5. Maraviroc has no detectable in vitro cytotoxicity and is highly selective for CCR5, as confirmed against a wide range of receptors and enzymes, including the hERG ion channel (50% inhibitory concentration, >10 microM), indicating potential for an excellent clinical safety profile. Studies in preclinical in vitro and in vivo models predicted maraviroc to have human pharmacokinetics consistent with once- or twice-daily dosing following oral administration. Clinical trials are ongoing to further investigate the potential of using maraviroc for the treatment of HIV-1 infection and AIDS.

  9. The biology of beta human papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tommasino, Massimo

    2017-03-02

    The beta genus comprises more than 50 beta human papillomavirus (HPV) types that are suspected to be involved, together with ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), the most common form of human cancer. Two members of the genus beta, HPV5 and HPV8, were first identified in patients with a genetic disorder, epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV), that confers high susceptibility to beta HPV infection and NMSC development. The fact that organ transplant recipients (OTRs) with an impaired immune system have an elevated risk of NMSC raised the hypothesis that beta HPV types may also be involved in skin carcinogenesis in non-EV patients. Epidemiological studies have shown that serological and viral DNA markers are weakly, but significantly, associated with history of NMSC in OTRs and the general population. Functional studies on mucosal high-risk (HR) HPV types have clearly demonstrated that the products of two early genes, E6 and E7, are the main viral oncoproteins, which are able to deregulate events closely linked to transformation, such as cell cycle progression and apoptosis. Studies on a small number of beta HPV types have shown that their E6 and E7 oncoproteins also have the ability to interfere with the regulation of key pathways/events associated with cellular transformation. However, the initial functional data indicate that the molecular mechanisms leading to cellular transformation are different from those of mucosal HR HPV types. Beta HPV types may act only at early stages of carcinogenesis, by potentiating the deleterious effects of other carcinogens, such as UV radiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Genetically Engineered Broad-Spectrum Disease Resistance in Tomato

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oldroyd, Giles E. D.; Staskawicz, Brian J.

    1998-08-01

    Resistance in tomato to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato requires Pto and Prf. Mutations that eliminate Prf show a loss of both Pto resistance and sensitivity to the organophosphate insecticide fenthion, suggesting that Prf controls both phenotypes. Herein, we report that the overexpression of Prf leads to enhanced resistance to a number of normally virulent bacterial and viral pathogens and leads to increased sensitivity to fenthion. These plants express levels of salicylic acid comparable to plants induced for systemic acquired resistance (SAR) and constitutively express pathogenesis related genes. These results suggest that the overexpression of Prf activates the Pto and Fen pathways in a pathogen-independent manner and leads to the activation of SAR. Transgene-induced SAR has implications for the generation of broad spectrum disease resistance in agricultural crop plants.

  11. [Human papillomavirus vaccine. Efficacy and safety].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruni, Laia; Serrano, Beatriz; Bosch, Xavier; Castellsagué, Xavier

    2015-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) related disease remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Prophylactic vaccines have been recognized as the most effective intervention to control for HPV-related diseases. This article reviews the major phaseii/iii trials of the bivalent (HPVs16/18), quadrivalent (HPVs6/11/16/18), and the recently approved 9-valent vaccine (HPVs6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58). Large trials have been conducted showing the safety, immunogenicity and high efficacy of the bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines in the prevention of pre-invasive lesions and infection, especially when administered at young ages before exposure to HPV. Trials of the 9-valent vaccine have also demonstrated the safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of the vaccine in the prevention of infection and disease associated with the vaccine types, and its potential to substantially increase the overall prevention of HPV-related diseases. Post-licensure country reports have shown the recent and early impact of these vaccines at population level after the implementation of established HPV vaccination programs, including decreases in the prevalence of vaccine HPV types, the incidence of genital warts, and the incidence of high-grade cervical abnormalities. If widely implemented, current HPV vaccines may drastically reduce the incidence of cervical cancer and other HPV-related cancers and diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. y Sociedad Española de Enfermedades Infecciosas y Microbiología Clínica. All rights reserved.

  12. Human papillomavirus infections in the oral mucosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rautava, Jaana; Syrjänen, Stina

    2011-08-01

    Public awareness of human papillomavirus (HPV) as the causal agent of cervical cancer and of the availability of HPV vaccines has increased. As a result, more patients are asking their dentists about oral HPV infection and its prevention by means of vaccination. Parents of pediatric dental patients also may be concerned when their children have HPV-associated oral lesions, because HPV infection still often is considered a purely sexually transmitted disease. In this review, the authors provide the latest information for dental professionals about HPV infection in the oral mucosa and in general. The authors searched PubMed for all studies regarding HPV infection in the oral mucosa, and they reviewed relevant publications focusing exclusively on HPV infections of the oral cavity. In selecting studies for review, the authors made a clear distinction between studies regarding HPV infections in the mouth and those regarding HPV infection in the oropharynx or in other head and neck sites. HPV can infect oral mucosa. A subgroup of oral cancer clearly is associated with HPV. Oral HPV infection is transmitted sexually but also can be transmitted from mouth to mouth and vertically from an infected mother during delivery. Persistent HPV infection in the oral mucosa might increase the risk of developing oral cancer. Regular and meticulous clinical examination is the dentist's most important tool in detecting HPV-associated changes in the oral mucosae. HPV-associated oral cancer may affect a population younger than that typically affected by HPV-independent oral cancer. Alcohol and tobacco use increase the risk of developing oral cancer, so good practice includes encouraging patients to avoid these habits. The available HPV vaccines cover the HPV genotypes found most commonly in the oral mucosa, but their protective effect against oral cancer remains to be elucidated. Copyright © 2011 American Dental Association. All rights reserved.

  13. Human papillomavirus vaccination: the population impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Lai-Yang; Garland, Suzanne M

    2017-01-01

    We currently have the knowledge and experience to prevent much of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related disease burden globally. In many countries where prophylactic HPV vaccination programs have been adopted as highly effective public health programs with good vaccine coverage, we are already seeing, in real-world settings, reduction of vaccine-related HPV-type infections, genital warts and cervical pre-cancers with potential reductions in vulvar, vaginal and anal pre-cancers. Moreover, we are seeing a change in cervical screening paradigms, as HPV-based screening programs now have strong evidence to support their use as more sensitive ways to detect underlying cervical abnormalities, as compared with conventional cervical cytology. This article describes the impact of prophylactic vaccination on these outcomes and in settings where these vaccines have been implemented in national immunisation programs. Given the successes seen to date and the availability of essential tools, there has been a global push to ensure that every woman has access to effective cervical screening and every girl has the opportunity for primary prevention through vaccination. A gender-neutral approach by offering vaccination to young boys has also been adopted by some countries and is worthy of consideration given that HPV-related cancers also affect males. Furthermore, vaccination of young boys has the advantage of reducing the risk of HPV transmission to sexual partners, lowering the infectious pool of HPV in the general population and ultimately HPV-related diseases for both genders. Therefore, it is appropriate that all countries consider and promote national guidelines and programs to prevent HPV-related diseases.

  14. Safety of human papillomavirus vaccines: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macartney, Kristine K; Chiu, Clayton; Georgousakis, Melina; Brotherton, Julia M L

    2013-06-01

    Vaccination to prevent human papillomavirus (HPV)-related infection leading to cancer, particularly cervical cancer, is a major public health breakthrough. There are currently two licensed HPV vaccines, both of which contain recombinant virus-like particles of HPV types 16 and 18 (which account for approximately 70 % of cervical cancer). One vaccine also protects against HPV types 6 and 11, which cause genital warts. The safety profile of both vaccines was assessed extensively in randomised controlled clinical trials conducted prior to licensure and has been further elucidated following licensure from surveillance and specific studies in large populations. This review aims to examine current evidence regarding the safety of HPV vaccines. In summary, both vaccines are associated with relatively high rates of injection site reactions, particularly pain, but this is usually of short duration and resolves spontaneously. Systemic reactions have generally been mild and self-limited. Post vaccination syncope has occurred, but can be avoided with appropriate care. Serious vaccine-attributable adverse events, such as anaphylaxis, are rare, and although not recommended for use in pregnancy, abnormal pregnancy outcomes following inadvertent administration do not appear to be associated with vaccination. HPV vaccines are used in a three-dose schedule predominantly in adolescent females: as such case reports linking vaccination with a range of new onset chronic conditions, including autoimmune diseases, have been made. However, well-conducted population-based studies show no association between HPV vaccine and a range of such conditions. Whilst this reassuring safety profile affirms the positive risk benefit of vaccination, as HPV vaccine use expands into more diverse populations, including males, ongoing safety assessment using well-conducted studies is appropriate.

  15. Human papillomaviruses genotyping in plantar warts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Planell-Mas, Elena; Martínez-Garriga, Blanca; Zalacain, Antonio Jesús; Vinuesa, Teresa; Viñas, Miguel

    2017-05-01

    Plantar warts are caused by human papillomaviruses (HPVs) and have been associated with several HPV genotypes. However, there are few studies focused exclusively on plantar warts. In this work, we aim to identify the HPV genotypes of plantar warts and explore their relation to demographic and clinical characteristics of patients. A total of 72 patients diagnosed with plantar warts were recruited at the Laser unit at Podiatric Hospital, University of Barcelona, Spain. Inner hyperkeratosis laminar sections of warts were collected and DNA of samples were extracted. Amplification of a conserved region of the HPV L1 gene was performed with the SK-Polymerase chain reaction method. DNA amplicons were sequenced and HPV types identified. The most prevalent genotypes detected among the 105 analyzed plantar warts were HPV-57 (37.1%), HPV-27 (23.8%), HPV-1a (20.9%), HPV-2 (15.2%), and HPV-65 (2.8%). The majority of patients (78%) presented one single plantar wart, whereas multiple warts were detected in 22.2% of patients. One patient with multiple warts presented HPV types from two different genera, suggesting the spread of warts by self-inoculation as well as by de novo infection. No significant differences between the number of warts in toes, midfoot and heel were found. The most prevalent HPV types detected in all areas belonged to the alpha genus. This work provides new insight on plantar warts and their associated HPV genotypes, and evidences the usefulness and reliability of both the sample collection procedure and the PCR method used for HPV detection and typing. J. Med. Virol. 89:902-907, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Detection of human papillomavirus by nonradioactive hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marrero, M; Väldes, O; Alvarez, M; Peñate, G; Morales, E; Rogés, G; Otero, A; Cutie, E

    1994-02-01

    The presence of the human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA sequence in cervical smears of women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) was investigated through dot blot using a nonradioactive method based on the principle of enhanced chemiluminiscence. From 154 samples examined, 59 (38.3%) had HPV-related sequences determined by dot-blot hybridization; among these, 18 samples (11.68%) reacted either to HPV 6/11 or to HPV 16/18 probes, 20 (12.98%) reacted to only HPV 16/18, and 21 (13.63%) reacted exclusively to HPV 6/11. The relative sensitivity of the method was controlled comparing the results of both tests with those obtained by Southern blot in 32 samples. The risk of HPV positivity was increased in women who first had intercourse at an early age and in patients with CIN II or III. Both associations were significant at the 95% confidence interval (CI). An increased risk of HPV positivity was also associated with patient's age at diagnosis, education levels, number of sexual partners, and use of oral contraceptives, but none of these factors were significant at 95% CI. Other risk factors for cervical cancer, such as the number of pregnancies or cigarette smoking, were not found to be associated with HPV infection and indicate that the association of these factors with cervical cancer probably is independent of HPV infection. Even if HPV is the major risk factor for CIN, this also supports a multifactorial model of cervical cancer etiology with an increased risk of HPV infection.

  17. Human papillomavirus-related basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder associated with genital tract human papillomavirus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginori, Alessandro; Barone, Aurora; Santopietro, Rosa; Barbanti, Gabriele; Cecconi, Filippo; Tripodi, Sergio Antonio

    2015-02-01

    Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma is a biologically aggressive neoplasm mainly found in the head and neck region. Recently, four cases of basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder have been reported, and three of them occurred in patients with neurogenic bladder, repeated catheterizations and human papillomavirus infection of the urinary tract. To the best of our knowledge, none of the patients affected by basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder described in the literature had documented genital involvement by human papillomavirus. Herein, we describe the case of a woman with neurogenic bladder affected by basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder and by a concomitant genital tract human papillomavirus infection. © 2014 The Japanese Urological Association.

  18. Socioeconomic predictors of human papillomavirus vaccination in Danish men - A nationwide study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollerup, Signe; Baldur-Felskov, Birgitte; Dehlendorff, Christian

    2017-01-01

    and the socioeconomic factors that may predict human papillomavirus vaccination. METHODS: Using the Civil Registration System, we identified all boys and men aged 9-26 years in 2006-2013 and their mothers. By linkage to Statistics Denmark and the National Prescription Registry, we obtained information on socioeconomic......BACKGROUND: The quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine was licensed in Denmark in 2006. Unlike women, men are not offered human papillomavirus vaccination free of charge but can have it at their own expense. We investigated human papillomavirus vaccine uptake by men in Denmark...... variables and human papillomavirus vaccination during the study period. Using Cox regression, we examined the associations between socioeconomic variables and human papillomavirus vaccination. RESULTS: Between 2006 and 2013, 6253 (0.8%) males aged 9-26 years were vaccinated against human papillomavirus...

  19. Model systems of human papillomavirus-associated disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doorbar, John

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause a range of serious diseases, including the vast majority of cervical cancers, most anal cancers and around half of head and neck cancers. They are also responsible for troublesome benign epithelial lesions, including genital warts and laryngeal papillomas, and in some individuals HPVs lead to recurrent respiratory papillomatosis and other difficult-to-manage diseases. As a result, there is a great need for model systems that accurately mimic papillomavirus infections in humans. This is complicated by the diverse variety of HPVs, which now number over 200 types, and the different strategies they have evolved to persist in the population. The most well-developed models involve the culture of HPV-containing keratinocytes in organotypic raft culture, an approach which appears to accurately mimic the life cycle of several of the high-risk cancer-associated HPV types. Included amongst these are HPV16 and 18, which cause the majority of cervical cancers. The low-risk HPV types persist less well in tissue-culture models, and our ability to study the productive life cycle of these viruses is more limited. Although ongoing research is likely to improve this situation, animal models of papillomavirus disease can provide considerable basic information as to how lesions form, regress and can be controlled by the immune system. The best studied are cottontail rabbit papillomavirus, rabbit oral papillomavirus and, more recently, mouse papillomavirus (MmuPV), the last of which is providing exciting new insights into viral tropisms and immune control. In addition, transgenic models of disease have helped us to understand the consequences of persistent viral gene expression and the importance of co-factors such as hormones and UV irradiation in the development of neoplasia and cancer. It is hoped that such disease models will eventually lead us to better understanding and better treatments for human disease. Copyright © 2015 Pathological Society

  20. Therapy of human papillomavirus-related disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stern, Peter L; van der Burg, Sjoerd H; Hampson, Ian N; Broker, Thomas R; Fiander, Alison; Lacey, Charles J; Kitchener, Henry C; Einstein, Mark H

    2012-11-20

    This chapter reviews the current treatment of chronic and neoplastic human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated conditions and the development of novel therapeutic approaches. Surgical excision of HPV-associated lower genital tract neoplasia is very successful but largely depends on secondary prevention programmes for identification of disease. Only high-risk HPV-driven chronic, pre-neoplastic lesions and some very early cancers cannot be successfully treated by surgical procedures alone. Chemoradiation therapy of cervical cancer contributes to the 66-79% cervical cancer survival at 5 years. Outlook for those patients with persistent or recurrent cervical cancer following treatment is very poor. Topical agents such as imiquimod (immune response modifier), cidofovir (inhibition of viral replication; induction apoptosis) or photodynamic therapy (direct damage of tumour and augmentation of anti-tumour immunity) have all shown some useful efficacy (~50-60%) in treatment of high grade vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia (VIN). Provider administered treatments of genital warts include cryotherapy, trichloracetic acid, or surgical removal which has the highest primary clearance rate. Patient applied therapies include podophyllotoxin and imiquimod. Recurrence after "successful" treatment is 30-40%. Further improvements could derive from a rational combination of current therapy with new drugs targeting molecular pathways mediated by HPV in cancer. Small molecule inhibitors targeting the DNA binding activities of HPV E1/E2 or the anti-apoptotic consequences of E6/E7 oncogenes are in preclinical development. Proteasome and histone deacetylase inhibitors, which can enhance apoptosis in HPV positive tumour cells, are being tested in early clinical trials. Chronic high-risk HPV infection/neoplasia is characterised by systemic and/or local immune suppressive regulatory or escape factors. Recently two E6/E7 vaccines have shown some clinical efficacy in high grade VIN patients and this

  1. human papillomaviruses E6 and E7 oncoproteins

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    the second most prevalent cancer in women worldwide. The HPVs can be divided into two groups, the 'low risk' ..... The physiological implications of such an inter- action are still under investigation (Gao et al 1999, .... genital human papillomavirus infection as a risk factor for persistent cervical dysplasia; J. Natl. Cancer Inst.

  2. Human papillomavirus infection and disease in men: Impact of HIV ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    There is growing evidence of a significant burden of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and associated disease in men. High rates of HPV infection have been observed in men from sub-Saharan Africa where HIV prevalence is high. HIV infection increases HPV prevalence, incidence and persistence and is strongly ...

  3. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus Type 58 in Women With or ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    lesions.[7,8] Among these, at least 15 are considered high‑risk. HPV (HR‑HPV) and are strongly associated with progression. Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus Type 58 in Women With or Without Cervical Lesions in. Northeast Brazil. Fernandes JV, Carvalho MGF1, de Fernandes TAAM2, Araújo JMG, Azevedo PRM3,.

  4. Human Papillomavirus Infection Among 2460 Men in Denmark

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hebnes, Julie Buchholt; Munk, Christian; Nøhr, Bugge

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: It is crucial to understand the epidemiology and natural history of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in both men and women, to prevent the increasing HPV-related disease burden in men. Data on HPV prevalence among men in the general population are limited. In this cross...

  5. Age-specific prevalence of cervical human papillomavirus infection ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This cross-sectional study describes the age-specific prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and cytological abnormalities among this urban and peri-urban population. Method. Over the period March 2009 - September 2011, 1 524 women attending public sector primary healthcare clinics were invited to

  6. Knowledge of Human Papillomavirus Infection and Acceptability of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Introduction: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections and has been implicated in over 70% of cases of cervical cancer. This study assessed the knowledge of HPV infection and acceptability of HPV vaccination among nursing students in Benin City. Methodology: A ...

  7. Human papillomavirus: cause of epithelial lacrimal sac neoplasia?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sjö, Nicolai Christian; von Buchwald, Christian; Cassonnet, Patricia

    2007-01-01

    PURPOSE: Epithelial tumours of the lacrimal sac are rare but important entities that may carry grave prognoses. In this study the prevalence and possible role of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in epithelial tumours of the lacrimal sac were evaluated. METHODS: Five papillomas and six carcino...

  8. Intention of College Students to Receive the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to better understand what influences the intentions of college students to receive the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the USA and cancers related to HPV are on the rise. Design/Methodology/Approach: A 2×2 experimental design was used to predict the…

  9. Impact and effectiveness of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Garland, Suzanne M; Kjaer, Susanne K.; Muñoz, Nubia

    2016-01-01

    Prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programs constitute major public health initiatives worldwide. We assessed the global effect of quadrivalent HPV (4vHPV) vaccination on HPV infection and disease. PubMed and Embase were systematically searched for peer-reviewed articles from Jan...

  10. False-positive Human Papillomavirus DNA tests in cervical screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Pribac, Igor; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2011-01-01

    Based on data from randomised controlled trials (RCT) on primary cervical screening, it has been reported that the problem of more frequent false-positive tests in Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA screening compared to cytology could be overcome. However, these reports predominantly operated with a...

  11. Differences in transcriptional activity of cutaneous human papillomaviruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasiljevic, Natasa; Nielsen, Lone; Doherty, Geoff

    2008-01-01

    The interaction between UV-B irradiation and cutaneous human papillomaviruses (HPV) has been suggested to be of relevance for the development of non-melanoma skin cancers. We investigated the activity within the upstream regulatory region (URR) of the HPV types 8, 38, 92, 93 and 96, as well...

  12. Low risk and high risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) and cervical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Low risk and high risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) and cervical cancer in Zimbabwe: epidemiological evidence. M Chirara, G A Stanczuk, S A Tswana, L Nystrom, S Bergstrom, S R Moyo, M J Nzara. Abstract. No Abstract. Central African Journal of Medicine Vol. 47 (2) 2001: pp. 32-34.

  13. Transient expression of Human papillomavirus type 16 L2 epitope ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2012-01-11

    terminus of coat protein of Potato virus X in plants. J. Biosci. 37 125–133]. DOI 10.1007/s12038-011-9177-z. 1. Introduction. Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes cervical cancer and is the second biggest cause of female cancer ...

  14. Human papillomavirus infection among women in South and North Vietnam.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pham, TH; Nguyen, T.H.; Herrero, R; Vaccarella, S; Smith, J.S.; Thuy, TT Nguyen; Nguyen, HN; Nguyen, BD; Ashley, R; Snijders, P.J.F.; Meijer, C.J.L.M.; Munoz, N.; Parkin, DM; Franceschi, S

    2003-01-01

    The incidence rate of invasive cervical carcinoma (ICC) is 4-fold higher in Ho Chi Minh City, in the South of Vietnam, than in Hanoi, in the North. Thus, we explored the prevalence of and the risk factors for human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in these 2 areas. A population-based random sample of

  15. Human papillomavirus vaccine | Souter | South African Family Practice

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    South African Family Practice. Journal Home · ABOUT THIS JOURNAL · Advanced Search · Current Issue · Archives · Journal Home > Vol 55, No 5 (2013) >. Log in or Register to get access to full text downloads. Username, Password, Remember me, or Register. Human papillomavirus vaccine. J Souter. Abstract.

  16. Are the Currently Existing Anti‑Human Papillomavirus Vaccines ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    are transmitted during sexual activity (oro‑genital, ano‑genital, penile‑vaginal intercourse, and digital intimate contact).[10,11]. Two HPV vaccines are currently available. The bivalent vaccine immunizes against the two HR‑HPV 16 and 18; the. Are the Currently Existing Anti‑Human. Papillomavirus Vaccines Appropriate for ...

  17. Development of a Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Intervention for Australian Adolescents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, Spring C.; Davies, Cristyn; McBride, Kate; Blades, Joanna; Stoney, Tanya; Marshall, Helen; Skinner, S. Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Australia has implemented a nation-wide programme providing a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to girls and boys through school-based programmes. Previous research has identified three distinct areas for attention: (1) lack of understanding about HPV and HPV vaccination, (2) young people's desire for involvement in decision-making…

  18. Human papillomavirus and tar hypothesis for squamous cell cervical ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2010-08-09

    Aug 9, 2010 ... Keywords. Cervical cancer; co-factors; human papillomavirus; tar-based vaginal douche; tobacco smoke; wood smoke. Author Affiliations. Christina Bennett1 Allen E Kuhn2 Harry W Haverkos3. Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, Indiana 46202-5149, USA; Suite 300, Hamilton Mason Road ...

  19. A Broad-Spectrum Inhibitor of CRISPR-Cas9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Lucas B; Doxzen, Kevin W; Ma, Enbo; Liu, Jun-Jie; Knott, Gavin J; Edraki, Alireza; Garcia, Bianca; Amrani, Nadia; Chen, Janice S; Cofsky, Joshua C; Kranzusch, Philip J; Sontheimer, Erik J; Davidson, Alan R; Maxwell, Karen L; Doudna, Jennifer A

    2017-09-07

    CRISPR-Cas9 proteins function within bacterial immune systems to target and destroy invasive DNA and have been harnessed as a robust technology for genome editing. Small bacteriophage-encoded anti-CRISPR proteins (Acrs) can inactivate Cas9, providing an efficient off switch for Cas9-based applications. Here, we show that two Acrs, AcrIIC1 and AcrIIC3, inhibit Cas9 by distinct strategies. AcrIIC1 is a broad-spectrum Cas9 inhibitor that prevents DNA cutting by multiple divergent Cas9 orthologs through direct binding to the conserved HNH catalytic domain of Cas9. A crystal structure of an AcrIIC1-Cas9 HNH domain complex shows how AcrIIC1 traps Cas9 in a DNA-bound but catalytically inactive state. By contrast, AcrIIC3 blocks activity of a single Cas9 ortholog and induces Cas9 dimerization while preventing binding to the target DNA. These two orthogonal mechanisms allow for separate control of Cas9 target binding and cleavage and suggest applications to allow DNA binding while preventing DNA cutting by Cas9. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Broad spectrum microarray for fingerprint-based bacterial species identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frey Jürg E

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarrays are powerful tools for DNA-based molecular diagnostics and identification of pathogens. Most target a limited range of organisms and are based on only one or a very few genes for specific identification. Such microarrays are limited to organisms for which specific probes are available, and often have difficulty discriminating closely related taxa. We have developed an alternative broad-spectrum microarray that employs hybridisation fingerprints generated by high-density anonymous markers distributed over the entire genome for identification based on comparison to a reference database. Results A high-density microarray carrying 95,000 unique 13-mer probes was designed. Optimized methods were developed to deliver reproducible hybridisation patterns that enabled confident discrimination of bacteria at the species, subspecies, and strain levels. High correlation coefficients were achieved between replicates. A sub-selection of 12,071 probes, determined by ANOVA and class prediction analysis, enabled the discrimination of all samples in our panel. Mismatch probe hybridisation was observed but was found to have no effect on the discriminatory capacity of our system. Conclusions These results indicate the potential of our genome chip for reliable identification of a wide range of bacterial taxa at the subspecies level without laborious prior sequencing and probe design. With its high resolution capacity, our proof-of-principle chip demonstrates great potential as a tool for molecular diagnostics of broad taxonomic groups.

  1. Ceftaroline fosamil: a new broad-spectrum cephalosporin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laudano, Joseph B

    2011-04-01

    Ceftaroline fosamil, the prodrug of the active metabolite, ceftaroline, is a new, broad-spectrum cephalosporin recently approved in the USA for the treatment of acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSIs) and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP). Ceftaroline has potent in vitro activity against Gram-positive organisms, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumoniae, as well as common Gram-negative organisms. The high affinity of ceftaroline for penicillin-binding proteins is responsible for the potent activity observed against clinically relevant pathogens. With respect to the treatment of CABP, the activity of ceftaroline against pathogens such as S. pneumoniae, S. aureus, Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis demonstrates coverage across a broad range of pathogens typically encountered in clinical practice. Ceftaroline is also very active against common pathogens seen in ABSSSIs such as S. aureus (methicillin-susceptible S. aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus) and Streptococcus pyogenes. Ceftaroline exhibits a dose-proportional pharmacokinetic profile, similar to other renally excreted cephalosporins, and has a well-tolerated safety profile consistent with the cephalosporin class. Ceftaroline fosamil is compatible via Y-site administration with many other commonly administered parenteral drugs.

  2. Pathobiology of human papillomaviruses in human immunodeficiency virus - Infected persons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurti, Uma; Unger, Elizabeth R

    2017-07-01

    There is a complex interrelationship between human papillomaviruses (HPV) and human immunodeficiency viruses (HIV) that has been recognized from the start of the HIV epidemic. Cervical cancer was used as a surveillance indicator for acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) before definitive identification of the viral etiology of either condition were known. Careful epidemiologic studies combined with clinical and laboratory measures of HPV, HPV-associated disease, and HIV have helped us understand many aspects of the relationship between these two virus groups; however, questions remain. The histopathology associated with HPV is identical in HIV-positive and negative patients though the lesions are more frequent, with higher frequency of multiple HPV types, and persistent in HIV infected individuals. In this review we will briefly explain the pathobiology of HPV in HIV-infected persons and the potential impact of secondary (screening) and primary (vaccination) prevention to reduce HPV-associated disease in those infected with HIV. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Identification and validation of human papillomavirus encoded microRNAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kui Qian

    Full Text Available We report here identification and validation of the first papillomavirus encoded microRNAs expressed in human cervical lesions and cell lines. We established small RNA libraries from ten human papillomavirus associated cervical lesions including cancer and two human papillomavirus harboring cell lines. These libraries were sequenced using SOLiD 4 technology. We used the sequencing data to predict putative viral microRNAs and discovered nine putative papillomavirus encoded microRNAs. Validation was performed for five candidates, four of which were successfully validated by qPCR from cervical tissue samples and cell lines: two were encoded by HPV 16, one by HPV 38 and one by HPV 68. The expression of HPV 16 microRNAs was further confirmed by in situ hybridization, and colocalization with p16INK4A was established. Prediction of cellular target genes of HPV 16 encoded microRNAs suggests that they may play a role in cell cycle, immune functions, cell adhesion and migration, development, and cancer. Two putative viral target sites for the two validated HPV 16 miRNAs were mapped to the E5 gene, one in the E1 gene, two in the L1 gene and one in the LCR region. This is the first report to show that papillomaviruses encode their own microRNA species. Importantly, microRNAs were found in libraries established from human cervical disease and carcinoma cell lines, and their expression was confirmed in additional tissue samples. To our knowledge, this is also the first paper to use in situ hybridization to show the expression of a viral microRNA in human tissue.

  4. Frequency of human papillomavirus infection in patients with gastrointestinal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roesch-Dietlen, F; Cano-Contreras, A D; Sánchez-Maza, Y J; Espinosa-González, J M; Vázquez-Prieto, M Á; Valdés-de la O, E J; Díaz-Roesch, F; Carrasco-Arroniz, M Á; Cruz-Palacios, A; Grube-Pagola, P; Sumoza-Toledo, A; Vivanco-Cid, H; Mellado-Sánchez, G; Meixueiro-Daza, A; Silva-Cañetas, C S; Carrillo-Toledo, M G; Lagunes-Torres, R; Amieva-Balmori, M; Gómez-Castaño, P C; Reyes-Huerta, J U; Remes-Troche, J M

    2018-02-15

    Cancer is the result of the interaction of genetic and environmental factors. It has recently been related to viral infections, one of which is human papillomavirus. The aim of the present study was to describe the frequency of human papillomavirus infection in patients with digestive system cancers. A prospective, multicenter, observational study was conducted on patients with gastrointestinal cancer at 2public healthcare institutes in Veracruz. Two tumor samples were taken, one for histologic study and the other for DNA determination of human papillomavirus and its genotypes. Anthropometric variables, risk factors, sexual habits, tumor location, and histologic type of the cancer were analyzed. Absolute and relative frequencies were determined using the SPSS version 24.0 program. Fifty-three patients were studied. They had gastrointestinal cancer located in: the colon (62.26%), stomach (18.87%), esophagus (7.55%), rectum (7.55%), and small bowel (3.77%). Human papillomavirus was identified in 11.32% of the patients, 66.7% of which corresponded to squamous cell carcinoma and 33.3% to adenocarcinoma. Only genotype 18 was identified. Mean patient age was 61.8±15.2 years, 56.60% of the patients were men, and 43.40% were women. A total of 15.8% of the patients had a family history of cancer and 31.6% had a personal history of the disease, 38.6% were tobacco smokers, and 61.4% consumed alcohol. Regarding sex, 5.3% of the patients said they were homosexual, 3.5% were bisexual, 29.8% engaged in oral sex, and 24.6% in anal sex. Our study showed that human papillomavirus infection was a risk factor for the development of gastrointestinal cancer, especially of squamous cell origin. Copyright © 2018 Asociación Mexicana de Gastroenterología. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  5. Detection of human papillomavirus in oral warts using in situ hybridization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suzana Orsini Machado de Sousa

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The human papillomavirus is a group of DNA epitheliotrophic viruses associated with the etiology of benign and malignant oral warts. More than 100 types have been identified and among them, 24 have been found into the oral cavity. The aim of this study was to analyze human papillomavirus prevalence and its subtypes in 50 oral warts, of which 20 were squamous papillomas, 17 condylomaacuminatum and 13 verruca vulgaris. Method: In situ hybridization was used with biotinylated DNA probes for wide-spectrum HPV and with specific probes for human papillomavirus 6/11, human papillomavirus 16/18 and human papillomavirus 31/33. Results: Human papillomavirus was present in ten (20% of the 50 oral wart cases, 03 (3/20 squamous papillomas, 05 (5/17 condyloma acuminatum and 02 (2/13 verruca vulgaris. Of these, 8 (16% were positive to the HPV probe 6/11 being 5 condyloma acuminatum, 1 squamous papilloma and 2 verruca vulgaris. Three cases (6% demonstrated positivity to the human papillomavirus probe 16/18, with 2 being cases of condyloma and the other a case of squamous papilloma. Of the six positive cases to the human papillomavirus probe 31/33, (12% 4 were condyloma acuminatum and 2 squamous papillomas. Conclusion: The human papillomavirus expression (20% found in this study was low, but within the average found in the literature. Nonetheless, in addition to in situ hybridization, other methods may be necessary for confirming the presence of human papillomavirus.

  6. Genitoanal human papillomavirus infection and associated neoplasias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gross, Gerd

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted virus infection; about 40 out of 150 known HPV genotypes have been associated with genitoanal lesions in the female and male. They have been divided into low-risk (LR) and high-risk (HR) HPV types according to the association of each HPV genotype with genitoanal benign warts, genitoanal cancer and precursor lesions. For the most part, genitoanal HPV infection is equally common in men and in women. Genitoanal HPVs are predominantly transmitted by sexual intercourse. In a minor number of individuals where HR HPV infection has persisted, malignant squamous-cell tumors may develop. There are 15 mucosal oncogenic HPV types which are the etiological factor of cervical cancer and other genitoanal cancers. DNAs of HR HPV types are present in 100% of all cervical carcinomas and in 100% of the precursor lesions, the cervical intraepithelial neoplasias 2 and 3. HPV-16 and -18 alone account for 70% of the oncogenic mucosal HPV types identified. HR HPV types, mostly HPV-16 and -18, are the causes of vaginal and vulvar cancers in females, anal cancers in both genders and cancer of the penis in men. While anal cancers are linked to HR HPVs in more than 80% of cases, only 40% of vulvar cancers and 50% of penile cancers are HPV positive. Genitoanal cancers have a similar anatomy, histology and similar risk factors as well as natural histories. About 60% of vulvar and 50% of penile cancers are HPV negative, but associated with chronic inflammatory disorders, mainly lichen sclerosus. Clinical manifestations of LR HPVs in both sexes are genitoanal warts (condylomata acuminata), which are benign highly infectious tumors. The highest rate of warts is observed in females 16-24 years of age. In males the peak is at the age of 20-24 years. Diagnosis of genitoanal warts should exclude other sexually transmitted infections and diseases. A high number of genitoanal dermatoses, benign tumors, malignant squamous

  7. Broad spectrum antiviral activity for paramyxoviruses is modulated by biophysical properties of fusion inhibitory peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Cyrille; Augusto, Marcelo T; Niewiesk, Stefan; Horvat, Branka; Palermo, Laura M; Sanna, Giuseppina; Madeddu, Silvia; Huey, Devra; Castanho, Miguel A R B; Porotto, Matteo; Santos, Nuno C; Moscona, Anne

    2017-03-08

    Human paramyxoviruses include global causes of lower respiratory disease like the parainfluenza viruses, as well as agents of lethal encephalitis like Nipah virus. Infection is initiated by viral glycoprotein-mediated fusion between viral and host cell membranes. Paramyxovirus viral fusion proteins (F) insert into the target cell membrane, and form a transient intermediate that pulls the viral and cell membranes together as two heptad-repeat regions refold to form a six-helix bundle structure that can be specifically targeted by fusion-inhibitory peptides. Antiviral potency can be improved by sequence modification and lipid conjugation, and by adding linkers between the protein and lipid components. We exploit the uniquely broad spectrum antiviral activity of a parainfluenza F-derived peptide sequence that inhibits both parainfluenza and Nipah viruses, to investigate the influence of peptide orientation and intervening linker length on the peptides' interaction with transitional states of F, solubility, membrane insertion kinetics, and protease sensitivity. We assessed the impact of these features on biodistribution and antiviral efficacy in vitro and in vivo. The engineering approach based on biophysical parameters resulted in a peptide that is a highly effective inhibitor of both paramyxoviruses and a set of criteria to be used for engineering broad spectrum antivirals for emerging paramyxoviruses.

  8. Molecular characterization of the L1 gene of papillomaviruses in epithelial lesions of cats and comparative analysis with corresponding gene sequences of human and feline papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anis, Eman A; O'Neill, Sarah H; Newkirk, Kim M; Brahmbhatt, Rupal A; Abd-Eldaim, Mohamed; Frank, Linda A; Kania, Stephen A

    2010-12-01

    To characterize the L1 gene of papillomaviruses detected in epithelial lesions of cats and to determine the relationship between those L1 gene nucleotide sequences and known L1 gene sequences of human and feline papillomaviruses. 10 tissue samples of epithelial lesions from 8 cats. DNA was extracted from tissue samples. Primers were designed to amplify the L1 gene of papillomaviruses. Amplicons of DNA were sequenced; nucleotide sequences were compared with known L1 gene nucleotide sequences of papillomaviruses and used for phylogenetic analysis. Tissue samples were obtained from lesions (diagnosed as dysplasia [n=1], squamous cell carcinoma in situ [3], or squamous cell carcinoma [6]) of the skin (9) and oral mucosa [1]. Two amplicons had 99% homology with the L1 gene nucleotide sequence of human papillomavirus type 38b subtype FA125. Another amplicon had 84% homology with the L1 gene nucleotide sequence of human papillomavirus type 80 and was considered to be a new type of papillomavirus. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that these 3 papillomaviruses were grouped into 2 clades that were not similar to the clades of Felis domesticus papillomavirus type 1 or F domesticus papillomavirus type 2 (FdPV2). The remaining 7 amplicons had 98% to 100% homology with the L1 gene nucleotide sequence of FdPV2. Phylogenetic tree analysis revealed that those 7 papillomaviruses were grouped nto a single clade with FdPV2. Results support the likelihood of transmission of papillomaviruses between humans and cats.

  9. Risk Factors for Emergence of Resistance to Broad-Spectrum Cephalosporins among Enterobacter spp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaye, Keith S.; Cosgrove, Sara; Harris, Anthony; Eliopoulos, George M.; Carmeli, Yehuda

    2001-01-01

    Among 477 patients with susceptible Enterobacter spp., 49 subsequently harbored third-generation cephalosporin-resistant Enterobacter spp. Broad-spectrum cephalosporins were independent risk factors for resistance (relative risk [OR] = 2.3, P = 0.01); quinolone therapy was protective (OR = 0.4, P = 0.03). There were trends toward decreased risk for resistance among patients receiving broad-spectrum cephalosporins and either aminoglycosides or imipenem. Of the patients receiving broad-spectrum cephalosporins, 19% developed resistance. PMID:11502540

  10. The association of human papillomavirus vaccination with sexual behaviours and human papillomavirus knowledge: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coles, Victoria A H; Patel, Ajay S; Allen, Felicity L; Keeping, Sam T; Carroll, Stuart M

    2015-10-01

    Since the 2008 introduction of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programme for adolescent girls in the UK, parents and other groups have expressed fears that immunisation condones sexual activity, promotes promiscuity and encourages risky sexual behaviour. This study aimed to explore whether HPV vaccination programmes have increased knowledge surrounding HPV and associated disease and whether uptake has influenced sexual behaviour. MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Library and PsycINFO electronic databases were interrogated. Studies of behaviour, attitudes and knowledge associated with HPV vaccination (or vaccination intent) in subjects of any age and gender in programmes reflective of UK practice were included in the review (n = 58). The evidence regarding the association of HPV vaccination with high-risk sexual behaviour was varied, primarily due to the heterogeneous nature of the included studies. Young females typically exhibited better knowledge than males, and vaccinated respondents (or those with vaccination intent) had higher levels of knowledge than the unvaccinated. However, knowledge surrounding HPV and genital warts was generally poor. This review highlights the need to provide effective education regarding the HPV vaccine and HPV-associated disease to adolescents of vaccination age, nurses, teachers, parents and guardians to ultimately allow informed decisions to be made regarding receipt of the HPV vaccine. © The Author(s) 2015.

  11. Model Systems of Human Papillomavirus-Associated Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Doorbar, John

    2015-01-01

    Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause a range of serious disease, including the vast majority of cervical cancers, most anal and vulval [AQ: comment from Reviewer, is this acceptable?] cancers and around half of head and neck cancers. They are also responsible for troublesome benign epithelial lesions, including genital warts and laryngeal papillomas, and in some individuals HPVs lead to recurrent respiratory papillomatosis and other difficult to manage diseases. As a result, there is a great n...

  12. Variables associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine acceptance by men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferris, Daron G; Waller, Jennifer L; Miller, Jeremiah; Patel, Pratik; Price, George A; Jackson, Lanier; Wilson, Courtesia

    2009-01-01

    To determine correlates of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine acceptance for men. A convenience sample of men aged 18 to 45 years read a one-page information sheet about HPV and the HPV vaccine, then completed a 29-item questionnaire. chi(2) tests were used to determine whether differences in demographic, sexual, and vaccine-related variables existed between levels of wanting the HPV vaccine. Positive correlates of HPV vaccine acceptance included higher education (P acceptance of the HPV vaccine by men.

  13. Knowledge, attitudes and practices about human papillomavirus in educated adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Castro Reyes Elkin Mauricio; Miranda Machado Pablo Andrés; Borre Arrieta Orlando

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: cervical cancer (CC) is the second most frequent cancer in women in theworld, South America and Colombia. It represents the fourth cause of death by cancerin the world, the third cause in South America and the first cause in Colombia. The interesanprincipalrisk factor is the persistent infection with the Human Papillomavirus (HPV). TheCC can be prevented and the patient can be treated if it is detected early.Objective: to establish the knowledge, attitudes and practices about Hu...

  14. Human papillomavirus vaccination induces neutralising antibodies in oral mucosal fluids

    OpenAIRE

    Handisurya, A; Schellenbacher, C; Haitel, A; Senger, T; Kirnbauer, R

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mucosal human papillomaviruses (HPV) are a major cause of cancers and papillomas of the anogenital and oropharyngeal tract. HPV-vaccination elicits neutralising antibodies in sera and cervicovaginal secretions and protects uninfected individuals from persistent anogenital infection and associated diseases caused by the vaccine-targeted HPV types. Whether immunisation can prevent oropharyngeal infection and diseases and whether neutralising antibodies represent the correlate of pro...

  15. The human papillomavirus immunisation programme and sexual behaviour

    OpenAIRE

    Forster, A. S.

    2011-01-01

    The introduction of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination has caused some parents to report concern that their daughters may change their sexual behaviour following vaccination. This concern consistently relates to vaccination acceptance, but had not been investigated in detail. Accordingly, five studies addressed the thesis objective: to explore parents’ concern about adolescent sexual behaviour following HPV vaccination in the context of the UK immunisation programme and to ...

  16. Transmissioon of and infektion with human papillomavirus in the oropharynx

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohr, Anne; Grønhøj, Christian; Lajer, Christel

    2017-01-01

    The incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated oropharyngeal cancer is rising in the Western world, but little is known about transmission of the infection and the premalignant phase of the disease. In this article there is an overview of current knowledge with focus on transmission of HPV...... and risk factors which may lead to persistent infection and eventually cancer. Furthermore, there is a discussion about issues concerning the ability to measure and detect infection and the premalignant stadium in the oropharyngeal tissue....

  17. Long-term Study of a Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus Vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferris, Daron; Samakoses, Rudiwilai; Block, Stan L

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We present a long-term safety, immunogenicity, and effectiveness study of a quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV4) vaccine. METHODS: Sexually naive boys and girls aged 9 to 15 years (N = 1781) were assigned (2:1) to receive HPV4 vaccine or saline placebo at day 1 and months 2 and 6.......: When administered to adolescents, the HPV4 vaccine demonstrated durability in clinically effective protection and sustained antibody titers over 8 years....

  18. Incidence of cervical human papillomavirus infection in systemic lupus erythematosus women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Pinto, C; García-Carrasco, M; Vallejo-Ruiz, V; Méndez-Martínez, S; Taboada-Cole, A; Etchegaray-Morales, I; Muñóz-Guarneros, M; Reyes-Leyva, J; López-Colombo, A

    2017-08-01

    Objectives Our objective was to study the incidence, persistence and clearance of human papillomavirus infection in systemic lupus erythematosus women and assess risk factors for persistence of human papillomavirus infection. Methods We carried out a prospective, observational cohort study of 127 systemic lupus erythematosus women. Patients were evaluated at baseline and at three years. Traditional and systemic lupus erythematosus women-related disease risk factors were collected. Gynaecological evaluations and cervical cytology screening were made. Human papillomavirus detection and genotyping were made by polymerase chain reaction and linear array. Results The cumulative prevalence of human papillomavirus infection increased from 22.8% at baseline to 33.8% at three years; p = lupus erythematosus women, the cumulative prevalence of human papillomavirus infection, including high risk-human papillomavirus and multiple human papillomavirus infections, may increase over time. Most persistent infections were low risk-human papillomavirus. The number of lifetime sexual partners and the cumulative cyclophosphamide dose were independently associated with incident human papillomavirus infection.

  19. 5-Carboxy-8-hydroxyquinoline is a Broad Spectrum 2-Oxoglutarate Oxygenase Inhibitor which Causes Iron Translocation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hopkinson, Richard J; Tumber, Anthony; Yapp, Clarence; Chowdhury, Rasheduzzaman; Aik, WeiShen; Che, Ka Hing; Li, Xuan Shirley; Kristensen, Jan B L; King, Oliver N F; Chan, Mun Chiang; Yeoh, Kar Kheng; Choi, Hwanho; Walport, Louise J; Thinnes, Cyrille C; Bush, Jacob T; Lejeune, Clarisse; Rydzik, Anna M; Rose, Nathan R; Bagg, Eleanor A; McDonough, Michael A; Krojer, Tobias; Yue, Wyatt W; Ng, Stanley S; Olsen, Lars; Brennan, Paul E; Oppermann, Udo; Muller-Knapp, Susanne; Klose, Robert J; Ratcliffe, Peter J; Schofield, Christopher J; Kawamura, Akane

    2013-08-01

    2-Oxoglutarate and iron dependent oxygenases are therapeutic targets for human diseases. Using a representative 2OG oxygenase panel, we compare the inhibitory activities of 5-carboxy-8-hydroxyquinoline (IOX1) and 4-carboxy-8-hydroxyquinoline (4C8HQ) with that of two other commonly used 2OG oxygenase inhibitors, N -oxalylglycine (NOG) and 2,4-pyridinedicarboxylic acid (2,4-PDCA). The results reveal that IOX1 has a broad spectrum of activity, as demonstrated by the inhibition of transcription factor hydroxylases, representatives of all 2OG dependent histone demethylase subfamilies, nucleic acid demethylases and γ-butyrobetaine hydroxylase. Cellular assays show that, unlike NOG and 2,4-PDCA, IOX1 is active against both cytosolic and nuclear 2OG oxygenases without ester derivatisation. Unexpectedly, crystallographic studies on these oxygenases demonstrate that IOX1, but not 4C8HQ, can cause translocation of the active site metal, revealing a rare example of protein ligand-induced metal movement.

  20. Viral trans-factor independent replication of human papillomavirus genomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angeletti Peter C

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Papillomaviruses (PVs establish a persistent infection in the proliferating basal cells of the epithelium. The viral genome is replicated and maintained as a low-copy nuclear plasmid in basal keratinocytes. Bovine and human papillomaviruses (BPV and HPV are known to utilize two viral proteins; E1, a DNA helicase, and E2, a transcription factor, which have been considered essential for viral DNA replication. However, growing evidence suggests that E1 and E2 are not entirely essential for stable replication of HPV. Results Here we report that multiple HPV16 mutants, lacking either or both E1 and E2 open reading frame (ORFs and the long control region (LCR, still support extrachromosomal replication. Our data clearly indicate that HPV16 has a mode of replication, independent of viral trans-factors, E1 and E2, which is achieved by origin activity located outside of the LCR.

  1. Detection of human papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus DNA sequences in oral mucosa of HIV-infected patients by the polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snijders, P. J.; Schulten, E. A.; Mullink, H.; ten Kate, R. W.; Jiwa, M.; van der Waal, I.; Meijer, C. J.; Walboomers, J. M.

    1990-01-01

    The presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) was analyzed in 21 oral biopsy specimens of HIV-infected patients using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. Biopsies were categorized as hairy leukoplakia (HL) (n = 12), candidiasis (n = 3), oral warts (n = 2), and clinically normal epithelium (n = 4). For HPV detection a modified general primer-mediated PCR method (GP-PCR), which detects a broad spectrum of HPV genotypes at sub-picogram levels, was used. Human papillomavirus DNA was only found in two oral warts and was identified as HPV type 32. Epstein-Barr virus DNA was detected in 16 biopsy specimens, including the 12 HLs, 2 cases of candidiasis, and 2 samples of normal epithelium. Epstein-Barr virus positivity in HL could be confirmed by Southern blot analysis and DNA in situ hybridization using biotinylated DNA probes (bio-DISH). Epstein-Barr virus bio-DISH was also positive in one sample of normal epithelium from a patient with HL. The results indicate that HL is strongly associated with EBV and not with any of the common HPV types that react with general HPV primers in the PCR. However the detection of EBV in normal oral epithelium by PCR and bio-DISH suggests that the presence of this virus is not exclusively related to HL. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 PMID:2169191

  2. Papillomaviruses: Molecular and clinical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Howley, P.M.; Broker, T.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains nine sections, each consisting of several papers. The section headings are : Papillomaviruses and Human Genital Tract Diseases;Papillomaviruses and Human Cutaneous Diseases, Papillomaviruses and Human Oral and Laryngeal Diseases;Therapeutic Approaches to Papillomavirus Infections;Animal Papillomaviruses;Molecular Biology;Transcription, Replication, and Genome Organization;Epithelial Cell Culture;Papillomavirus Transformation;and Viral Vectors.

  3. Immune Responses to Broad-Spectrum Antibiotic Treatment and Fecal Microbiota Transplantation in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekmekciu, Ira; von Klitzing, Eliane; Fiebiger, Ulrike; Escher, Ulrike; Neumann, Christian; Bacher, Petra; Scheffold, Alexander; Kühl, Anja A; Bereswill, Stefan; Heimesaat, Markus M

    2017-01-01

    Compelling evidence demonstrates the pivotal role of the commensal intestinal microbiota in host physiology and the detrimental effects of its perturbations following antibiotic treatment. Aim of this study was to investigate the impact of antibiotics induced depletion and subsequent restoration of the intestinal microbiota composition on the murine mucosal and systemic immunity. To address this, conventional C57BL/6j mice were subjected to broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment for 8 weeks. Restoration of the intestinal microbiota by peroral fecal microbiota transplantation (FMT) led to reestablishment of small intestinal CD4 + , CD8 + , and B220 + as well as of colonic CD4 + cell numbers as early as 7 days post-FMT. However, at d28 following FMT, colonic CD4 + and B220 + cell numbers were comparable to those in secondary abiotic (ABx) mice. Remarkably, CD8 + cell numbers were reduced in the colon upon antibiotic treatment, and FMT was not sufficient to restore this immune cell subset. Furthermore, absence of gut microbial stimuli resulted in decreased percentages of memory/effector T cells, regulatory T cells, and activated dendritic cells in the small intestine, colon, mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN), and spleen. Concurrent antibiotic treatment caused decreased cytokine production (IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-22, and IL-10) of CD4 + cells in respective compartments. These effects were, however, completely restored upon FMT. In summary, broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment resulted in profound local (i.e., small and large intestinal), peripheral (i.e., MLN), and systemic (i.e., splenic) changes in the immune cell repertoire that could, at least in part, be restored upon FMT. Further studies need to unravel the distinct molecular mechanisms underlying microbiota-driven changes in immune homeostasis subsequently providing novel therapeutic or even preventive approaches in human immunopathologies.

  4. Tetraspanins in infections by human cytomegalo- and papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fast, Laura A; Lieber, Diana; Lang, Thorsten; Florin, Luise

    2017-04-15

    Members of the tetraspanin family have been identified as essential cellular membrane proteins in infectious diseases by nearly all types of pathogens. The present review highlights recently published data on the role of tetraspanin CD151, CD81, and CD63 and their interaction partners in host cell entry by human cytomegalo- and human papillomaviruses. Moreover, we discuss a model for tetraspanin assembly into trafficking platforms at the plasma membrane. These platforms might persist during intracellular viral trafficking. © 2017 The Author(s); published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  5. Cigarette smoking and human papillomavirus in patients with reported cervical cytological abnormality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, M. P.; Hollema, H.; Gouw, A. S.; Pieters, W. J.; Quint, W. G.

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess the relation between two risk factors for cervical neoplasia: smoking and infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus. It has been suggested that smoking causes a local immunological defect, which could facilitate the infection and persistence of human papillomavirus. DESIGN:

  6. Cigarette-smoking and human papillomavirus in patients with reported cervical cytological abnormality

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, M. P. M.; Hollema, H.; Gouw, A. S. H.; Pieters, W. J. L. M.; Quint, W. G. V.

    1993-01-01

    Objective-To assess the relation between two risk factors for cervical neoplasia: smoking and infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus. It has been suggested that smoking causes a local immunological defect, which could facilitate the infection and persistence of human papillomavirus.

  7. Cytologic and Clinical Evaluation of Human Papillomavirus in Women Underwent Routine Gynecologic Examination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zehra Safi Öz

    2009-08-01

    CONCLUSION: Pap smear examination is a value of detection of cellular changes belonging Human Papillomavirus and if in this examination it is need to, these patients refer to Human Papillomavirus DNA screening it would be more cost effective.

  8. [Melanoma and Human Papillomaviruses: Is There an Outlook for Study?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volgareva, G M; Mikhaylova, I N; Golovina, D A

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most aggressive human malignant tumors. Its incidence and mortality are growing steadily. Ultraviolet irradiation is the main risk factor for melanoma involved in melanomagenesis. The probability of viral etiology of melanoma has been discussed. Human papillomaviruses (HPV) have been mentioned among candidates for its etiologic agents because some HPV types are the powerful carcinogens causing cervical cancer and other cancers. The review analyses the literature data on the association of melanoma with HPV Several groupsfound HPVin skin melanomas as well as in mucosa; viruses of high oncogenic risk were detected in some cases. For some organs the etiological role of high-risk HPV as inducers of invasive carcinomas is confirmed. These organs require special mention: cervix uteri, vulva, vagina, penis, anal region, and oral cavity. However in the majority of the studies in which viral DNA-positive melanomas were found, testing for viral genome expression was not done while this is the fact of primary importance. HPVare found in normal skin and mucous membranes thus creating justifiable threat of tumor specimen contamination with viral DNA in vivo. There are limited data on aggravation of the disease prognosis in papillomavirus-positive melanomas. However, any systematic observation of a sizeable patient group distinguished by that tumor type has not been performed yet. Viral E6 and E7 oncogenes of high-risk papillomaviruses were shown to be able to transform normal human melanocytes in vitro experiments. Thus, we can assume the presence of the association of melanoma with oncogenic HPV. The clinical significance of this problem is indisputable under the conditions of the steady increase in melanoma incidence and mortality rates in Russia and abroad. The problem requires further study.

  9. Porokeratoma: A Possible Association with Human Papillomavirus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patricia Caseiro Silverio

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Porokeratoma is a rare, relatively newly described and still unclear entity. Here, we describe the case of a 52-year-old male patient who presented with four well-defined, verrucous and hyperkeratotic lesions. Microscopically, one of the lesions showed acanthopapillomatosis overlying compact orthokeratosis. Prominent broad and confluent cornoid lamellae were present, with no granular layer and some dyskeratotic keratinocytes. PCR sequencing and in situ hybridization revealed the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV type 16 in the lesion. The association of porokeratoma and HPV infection has not previously been reported.

  10. Human papillomavirus testing and genotyping in cervical screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Lynge, Elsebeth; Bonde, Jesper

    2011-01-01

    Mass vaccination against human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes 16 and 18 will, in the long term, reduce the incidence of cervical cancer, but screening will remain an important cancer control measure in both vaccinated and unvaccinated women. Since the 1960s, cytology screening has helped to reduce...... the incidence of cervical cancer, but has a low sensitivity for high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and requires frequent testing. Several HPV tests have become available commercially. They appear to be more sensitive for high-grade CIN, and may further reduce the incidence of cervical cancer...

  11. Vaccines for human papillomavirus infection: a critical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, Amiya Kumar; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2009-01-01

    This article takes a critical look at the pros and cons of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines. There is enough evidence to suggest that the prophylactic vaccines are efficacious in preventing various benign and malignant conditions (including cervical cancers) caused by HPV. Even though the vaccine is costly, hypothetical analysis has shown that HPV vaccination will be cost effective in the long run. Therapeutic HPV vaccines used to treat established disease are still undergoing evaluation in clinical studies, and results seem to be encouraging. Although several countries have started mandatory vaccination programs with the prophylactic HPV vaccines, conservatives have voiced concerns regarding the moral impact of such vaccination programs.

  12. Development and characterization of novel chimeric monoclonal antibodies for broad spectrum neutralization of rabies virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pan Kyeom Kim

    Full Text Available Current post-exposure prophylaxis for rabies virus infection has several limitations in terms of supply, cost, safety, and efficacy. Attempts to replace human or equine rabies immune globulins (HRIG or ERIG have been made by several companies and institutes. We developed potent monoclonal antibodies to neutralize a broad spectrum of rabies viruses by screening hybridomas received from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC. Two kinds of chimeric human antibodies (chimeric #7 and #17 were constructed by cloning the variable regions from selected hybridomas and the constant region of a human antibody. Two antibodies were bound to antigenic site III and I/IV, respectively, and were able to neutralize 51 field isolates of rabies virus that were isolated at different times and places such as Asia, Africa, North America, South America, and Australia. These two antibodies neutralize rabies viruses with high efficacy in an in vivo test using Syrian hamster and mouse models and show low risk for adverse immunogenicity.

  13. Development and characterization of novel chimeric monoclonal antibodies for broad spectrum neutralization of rabies virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pan Kyeom; Keum, Sun Ju; Osinubi, Modupe O V; Franka, Richard; Shin, Ji Young; Park, Sang Tae; Kim, Man Su; Park, Mi Jung; Lee, Soo Young; Carson, William; Greenberg, Lauren; Yu, Pengcheng; Tao, Xiaoyan; Lihua, Wang; Tang, Qing; Liang, Guodong; Shampur, Madhusdana; Rupprecht, Charles E; Chang, Shin Jae

    2017-01-01

    Current post-exposure prophylaxis for rabies virus infection has several limitations in terms of supply, cost, safety, and efficacy. Attempts to replace human or equine rabies immune globulins (HRIG or ERIG) have been made by several companies and institutes. We developed potent monoclonal antibodies to neutralize a broad spectrum of rabies viruses by screening hybridomas received from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). Two kinds of chimeric human antibodies (chimeric #7 and #17) were constructed by cloning the variable regions from selected hybridomas and the constant region of a human antibody. Two antibodies were bound to antigenic site III and I/IV, respectively, and were able to neutralize 51 field isolates of rabies virus that were isolated at different times and places such as Asia, Africa, North America, South America, and Australia. These two antibodies neutralize rabies viruses with high efficacy in an in vivo test using Syrian hamster and mouse models and show low risk for adverse immunogenicity.

  14. Broad-spectrum non-toxic antiviral nanoparticles with a virucidal inhibition mechanism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cagno, Valeria; Andreozzi, Patrizia; D'Alicarnasso, Marco; Jacob Silva, Paulo; Mueller, Marie; Galloux, Marie; Le Goffic, Ronan; Jones, Samuel T.; Vallino, Marta; Hodek, Jan; Weber, Jan; Sen, Soumyo; Janeček, Emma-Rose; Bekdemir, Ahmet; Sanavio, Barbara; Martinelli, Chiara; Donalisio, Manuela; Rameix Welti, Marie-Anne; Eleouet, Jean-Francois; Han, Yanxiao; Kaiser, Laurent; Vukovic, Lela; Tapparel, Caroline; Král, Petr; Krol, Silke; Lembo, David; Stellacci, Francesco

    2018-02-01

    Viral infections kill millions yearly. Available antiviral drugs are virus-specific and active against a limited panel of human pathogens. There are broad-spectrum substances that prevent the first step of virus-cell interaction by mimicking heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), the highly conserved target of viral attachment ligands (VALs). The reversible binding mechanism prevents their use as a drug, because, upon dilution, the inhibition is lost. Known VALs are made of closely packed repeating units, but the aforementioned substances are able to bind only a few of them. We designed antiviral nanoparticles with long and flexible linkers mimicking HSPG, allowing for effective viral association with a binding that we simulate to be strong and multivalent to the VAL repeating units, generating forces (~190 pN) that eventually lead to irreversible viral deformation. Virucidal assays, electron microscopy images, and molecular dynamics simulations support the proposed mechanism. These particles show no cytotoxicity, and in vitro nanomolar irreversible activity against herpes simplex virus (HSV), human papilloma virus, respiratory syncytial virus (RSV), dengue and lenti virus. They are active ex vivo in human cervicovaginal histocultures infected by HSV-2 and in vivo in mice infected with RSV.

  15. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in women from Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turki, Rola; Sait, Khalid; Anfinan, Nisreen; Sohrab, Sayed Sartaj; Abuzenadah, Adel Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the main causes of cervical cancer in women worldwide. The goal of the present study was to determine the prevalence and distribution of HPV genotypes in women from Saudi Arabia. Recently, several HPV detection methods have been developed, each with different sensitivities and specificities. In this study, total forty cervical samples were subjected to polymerase chain reaction and hybridization to BioFilmChip microarray assessment. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections were found in 43% of the specimens. The most prevalent genotypes were HPV 16 (30%) HPV 18 (8.0%) followed by type HPV 45, occurring at 5.0%. Our finding showed the HPV infection and prevalence is increasing at alarming rate in women of Saudi Arabia. There was no low risk infection detected in the tested samples. The BioFilmChip microarray detection system is highly accurate and suitable for detection of single and multiple infections, allowing rapid detection with less time-consumption and easier performance as compared with other methods.

  16. Economic evaluation of human papillomavirus vaccination in the United Kingdom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jit, Mark; Choi, Yoon Hong; Edmunds, W John

    2008-07-17

    To assess the cost effectiveness of routine vaccination of 12 year old schoolgirls against human papillomavirus infection in the United Kingdom. Economic evaluation. UK. Population Schoolgirls aged 12 or older. Costs, quality adjusted life years (QALYs), and incremental cost effectiveness ratios for a range of vaccination options. Vaccinating 12 year old schoolgirls with a quadrivalent vaccine at 80% coverage is likely to be cost effective at a willingness to pay threshold of pound30,000 (euro37,700; $59,163) per QALY gained, if the average duration of protection from the vaccine is more than 10 years. Implementing a catch-up campaign of girls up to age 18 is likely to be cost effective. Vaccination of boys is unlikely to be cost effective. A bivalent vaccine with the same efficacy against human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 costing pound13- pound21 less per dose (depending on the duration of vaccine protection) may be as cost effective as the quadrivalent vaccine although less effective as it does not prevent anogenital warts. Routine vaccination of 12 year old schoolgirls combined with an initial catch-up campaign up to age 18 is likely to be cost effective in the UK. The results are robust to uncertainty in many parameters and processes. A key influential variable is the duration of vaccine protection.

  17. [High oncogenic risk human papillomavirus and urinary bladder cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loran, O B; Sinyakova, L A; Gundorova, L V; Kosov, V A; Kosova, I V; Pogodina, I E; Kolbasov, D N

    2017-07-01

    To determine the role of human papillomavirus (HPV) of high oncogenic risk in the development of urinary bladder cancer. 100 patients (72 men and 28 women) aged 38 to 90 years (mean age 65+/-10 years) diagnosed with bladder cancer were examined and underwent treatment. Clinical assessment was complemented by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays for the presence of antiviral antibodies to herpes simplex virus (HSV) type 1 and type 2, cytomegalovirus (CMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), urethra scraping for detecting high oncogenic risk HPV. Tumor tissue was sampled for PCR virus detection. Semi-quantitative analysis was used to evaluate the components of lymphocyte-plasmocyte and leukocyte infiltrates and cytopathic changes in tumor tissue. There were positive correlations between cytopathic cell changes (koylocytosis and intranuclear inclusions, as manifestations of HPV) and the level of antiviral antibodies, the presence of viruses in the tumor, as well as with the components of the lymphoid-plasmocyte infiltrate. Negative correlations were found between the presence of papillomatosis and the above changes. Human papillomavirus is believed to be a trigger for the initiation of a tumor in young patients with a latent infection (CMV and EBV, HSV, HPV). Cytopathic changes (kylocytosis and intranuclear inclusions) were associated with the activity and morphological features of herpes-viral infections. Their degree varied depending on the stage of the process, but not on the anaplasia degree. Papillomatosis is associated with a more favorable course of the tumor process.

  18. [Human papillomavirus infection in male genitalia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cano Garfias, R; Villarreal Peral, C; Juárez Azpilcueta, A

    1995-10-01

    A prospective and transversal study in 100 patients since January to December of 1994, was done, to know the human papiloma virus infection prevalence in male genitals. The patients were studied by a clinical history, genital area colposcopic revision after acetic acid 5% application, biopsy of the lesion and histopathology study. The patients age was among 16 to 71 years old, with a media of 38.8 years old. The sexual activity beginning was from 12 to 27 years old, with an average of 18 years old. Forty one percent of the patients have had sexual relations with prostitutes, 26% have had sexually transmitted diseases, 9% of the patients referred only 1 sexual mate and 82% had human papiloma virus infection.

  19. Human papillomavirus type-specific prevalence in the cervical cancer screening population of Czech women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Tachezy

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPVtypes has been recognized as a causal factor for the development of cervical cancer and a number of other malignancies. Today, vaccines against HPV, highly effective in the prevention of persistent infection and precancerous lesions, are available for the routine clinical practice. OBJECTIVES: The data on the prevalence and type-specific HPV distribution in the population of each country are crucial for the surveillance of HPV type-specific prevalence at the onset of vaccination against HPV. METHODS: Women attending a preventive gynecological examination who had no history of abnormal cytological finding and/or surgery for cervical lesions were enrolled. All samples were tested for the presence of HPV by High-Risk Hybrid Capture 2 (HR HC2 and by a modified PCR-reverse line blot assay with broad spectrum primers (BS-RLB. RESULTS: Cervical smears of 1393 women were analyzed. In 6.5% of women, atypical cytological findings were detected. Altogether, 28.3% (394/1393 of women were positive for any HPV type by BS-RLB, 18.2% (254/1393 by HR HC2, and 22.3% (310/1393 by BS-RLB for HR HPV types. In women with atypical findings the prevalence for HR and any HPV types were significantly higher than in women with normal cytological findings. Overall, 36 different HPV types were detected, with HPV 16 being the most prevalent (4.8%. HPV positivity decreased with age; the highest prevalence was 31.5% in the age group 21-25 years. CONCLUSIONS: Our study subjects represent the real screening population. HPV prevalence in this population in the Czech Republic is higher than in other countries of Eastern Europe. Also the spectrum of the most prevalent HPV types differs from those reported by others but HPV 16 is, concordantly, the most prevalent type. Country-specific HPV type-specific prevalences provide baseline information which will enable to measure the impact of HPV vaccination in the future.

  20. Detection of human papillomavirus in laryngeal lesions by in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Multhaupt, H A; Fessler, J N; Warhol, M J

    1994-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with human neoplasms of squamous epithelium. Squamous papillomas and verrucous carcinomas are two types of squamous neoplasms of the larynx that present difficult problems in differential diagnosis. Using in situ hybridization with biotinylated DNA probes,...

  1. Silver nanoparticles are broad-spectrum bactericidal and virucidal compounds

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ixtepan-Turrent Liliana

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The advance in nanotechnology has enabled us to utilize particles in the size of the nanoscale. This has created new therapeutic horizons, and in the case of silver, the currently available data only reveals the surface of the potential benefits and the wide range of applications. Interactions between viral biomolecules and silver nanoparticles suggest that the use of nanosystems may contribute importantly for the enhancement of current prevention of infection and antiviral therapies. Recently, it has been suggested that silver nanoparticles (AgNPs bind with external membrane of lipid enveloped virus to prevent the infection. Nevertheless, the interaction of AgNPs with viruses is a largely unexplored field. AgNPs has been studied particularly on HIV where it was demonstrated the mechanism of antiviral action of the nanoparticles as well as the inhibition the transmission of HIV-1 infection in human cervix organ culture. This review discusses recent advances in the understanding of the biocidal mechanisms of action of silver Nanoparticles.

  2. Ceftaroline fosamil: a novel broad-spectrum cephalosporin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bazan, J A; Martin, S I

    2010-10-01

    Ceftaroline fosamil is a new extended-spectrum cephalosporin with activity against drug-resistant Grampositive pathogens such as methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae. At the same time, its Gramnegative spectrum of coverage includes common respiratory pathogens such as Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis, as well as wild-type Enterobacteriaceae. In vivo efficacy for the treatment of experimental endocarditis, pneumonia, myositis and osteomyelitis has been demonstrated in animal models, while efficacy in the treatment of complicated skin and soft tissue infections and community-acquired pneumonia has been demonstrated in phase II and III clinical trials in humans. The drug is well tolerated and has a low rate of reported adverse events. The dose of ceftaroline fosamil used is 600 mg i.v. every 12 h for patients with normal renal function or mild renal dysfunction. In patients with moderate renal dysfunction, it has been suggested that ceftaroline fosamil be dosed at 400 mg i.v. over 60 min every 12 h. Ceftaroline fosamil is still under review by the U.S. FDA, and when approved, will be one of the first commercially available β-lactams with the ability to treat infections due to MRSA and other drug-resistant Gram-positive pathogens. Copyright 2010 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  3. The effect of intrauterine devices on acquisition and clearance of human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Averbach, Sarah H; Ma, Yifei; Smith-McCune, Karen; Shiboski, Stephen; Moscicki, Anna B

    2017-04-01

    Previous studies have shown a decrease in cervical cancer associated with intrauterine device use. It has been hypothesized that intrauterine device use may alter the natural history of human papillomavirus infections, preempting development of precancerous lesions of the cervix and cervical cancer, but the effect of intrauterine devices on the natural history of human papillomavirus infection and subsequent development of cervical cancer is poorly understood. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the association between intrauterine device use and cervical high-risk human papillomavirus acquisition and clearance. This is a prospective cohort study conducted from October 2000 through June 2014 among 676 sexually active young women and girls enrolled from family planning clinics in San Francisco, CA. Data were analyzed using a Cox proportional hazards model, including time-varying indicators of intrauterine device use, and adjusting for fixed and time-dependent predictor variables. A total of 85 women used an intrauterine device at some time during follow-up. Among 14,513 study visits, women reported intrauterine device use at 505 visits. After adjusting for potential behavioral confounders, there was no association between intrauterine device use and human papillomavirus acquisition (hazard ratio, 0.50; 95% confidence interval, 0.20-1.23; P = .13) or clearance of human papillomavirus infection (hazard ratio, 1.44; 95% confidence interval, 0.76-2.72; P = .26). Current intrauterine device use is not associated with acquisition or persistence of human papillomavirus infection. Intrauterine device use is safe among women and girls with human papillomavirus infections and at risk for human papillomavirus acquisition. Intrauterine device use may play a role further downstream in the natural history of cervical cancer by inhibiting the development of precancerous lesions of the cervix in human papillomavirus-infected women, or enhancing clearance of established

  4. Adenocarcinoma in situ and associated human papillomavirus type distribution observed in two clinical trials of a quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ault, Kevin A; Joura, Elmar A; Kjaer, Susanne K

    2011-01-01

    The primary objective of this report is to describe the detection of adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and associated human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution that was observed in the context of two phase 3 clinical trials of a quadrivalent HPV6/11/16/18 vaccine. In this intention-to-treat analysi...... HPV16/18-related, prophylactic HPV vaccination should reduce the incidence of invasive adenocarcinoma.......The primary objective of this report is to describe the detection of adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and associated human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution that was observed in the context of two phase 3 clinical trials of a quadrivalent HPV6/11/16/18 vaccine. In this intention-to-treat analysis......, we include all women who had at least one follow-up visit postenrollment. Healthy women (17,622) aged 15-26 with no history of HPV disease and a lifetime number of less than five sex partners (average follow-up of 3.6 years) were randomized (1:1) to receive vaccine or placebo at day 1, months 2...

  5. Evasion of host immune defenses by human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westrich, Joseph A; Warren, Cody J; Pyeon, Dohun

    2017-03-02

    A majority of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are asymptomatic and self-resolving in the absence of medical interventions. Various innate and adaptive immune responses, as well as physical barriers, have been implicated in controlling early HPV infections. However, if HPV overcomes these host immune defenses and establishes persistence in basal keratinocytes, it becomes very difficult for the host to eliminate the infection. The HPV oncoproteins E5, E6, and E7 are important in regulating host immune responses. These oncoproteins dysregulate gene expression, protein-protein interactions, posttranslational modifications, and cellular trafficking of critical host immune modulators. In addition to the HPV oncoproteins, sequence variation and dinucleotide depletion in papillomavirus genomes has been suggested as an alternative strategy for evasion of host immune defenses. Since anti-HPV host immune responses are also considered to be important for antitumor immunity, immune dysregulation by HPV during virus persistence may contribute to immune suppression essential for HPV-associated cancer progression. Here, we discuss cellular pathways dysregulated by HPV that allow the virus to evade various host immune defenses. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Clinicopathological aspects and prevalence of human papillomavirus in anal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Tayla Mesquita Aguiar

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Anal cancer is relatively rare; however, its incidence has increased in recent years. Several risk factors are associated with the development of anal cancer, including age older than 50 years, low-fiber diet, chronic anal fistulas, smoking, multiple partners, anal intercourse practice, Human Immunodeficiency Virus infection and immunosuppression. However, the presence of human papillomavirus represents the main risk factor for the development of anal cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the clinicopathological aspects of a series of patients with anal carcinomas diagnosed in Hospital Araújo Jorge, Goiânia-Goiás, as well as the prevalence of human papillomavirus genome in these tumors. Clinical, pathological and socio-demographic data were collected from the respective medical files and paraffin blocks containing anal carcinomas specimens were used for DNA extraction and detection of human papillomavirus, by means of polymerase chain reaction, using short PCR fragment primers. Forty-three cases were selected and had the data analyzed, while 38 cases were tested for human papillomavirus genome detection. Among the evaluated patients, 62.8% were women; 53.4% of tumors were squamous cell carcinoma and 46.5% of the patients were aged between 60 and 75 years. Risk factors, such as smoking (39.5% and alcoholism (20.9% were recorded in the studied group. Lymph node metastases were detected in 30.2% of cases and 7.0% had distant metastasis. The detection of human papillomavirus DNA was positive in 76% of cases assessed and this was significantly associated with squamous cell carcinomas. Aggressive behavior and advanced stage of anal cancer described in this study highlight the need for preventive measures that contemplate these tumors, including vaccination against human papillomavirus. Resumo: O câncer anal é relativamente raro, entretanto, sua incidência aumentou nos últimos anos. Vários fatores de risco são associados ao

  7. Human papillomaviruses and carcinogenesis: well-established and novel models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viarisio, Daniele; Gissmann, Lutz; Tommasino, Massimo

    2017-10-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) infect the cutaneous or mucosal epithelia and are classified phylogenetically as genera and species. Persistent infections by the mucosal high-risk (HR) HPV types from genus alpha are associated with cancer development of the genital and upper respiratory tracts. The products of two early genes, E6 and E7, are the major HR HPV oncoproteins, being essential in all steps of the carcinogenic process. Cutaneous beta HPV types are proposed, together with ultraviolet (UV) radiation, to promote non-melanoma skin cancer development. However, in contrast to the HR HPV types, beta HPV types appear to be required only at an early stage of carcinogenesis, facilitating the accumulation of UV-induced DNA mutations. Although findings in experimental models also suggest that beta HPV types and other carcinogens may synergize in the induction of malignancies, these possibilities need to be confirmed in human studies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Manipulation of the innate immune response by human papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Shiyuan; Laimins, Laimonis A

    2017-03-02

    The innate immune response constitutes the first line of defense against infections by pathogens. Successful pathogens such as human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have evolved mechanisms that target several points in these pathways including sensing of viral genomes, blocking the synthesis of interferons and inhibiting the action of JAK/STAT transcription factors. Disruption of these inhibitory mechanisms contributes to the ability of HPVs to establish persistent infections, which is the major etiological factor in the development of anogenital cancers. Interestingly, HPVs also positively activate several members of these pathways such as STAT-5 that are important for their differentiation-dependent life cycle. STAT-5 activation induces the ATM and ATR DNA damage response pathways that play critical roles in HPV genome amplification. Targeting of these pathways by pharmaceuticals can provide novel opportunities to inhibit infections by these important human pathogens. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Prevalence of oral and oropharyngeal human papillomavirus infection in Brazilian population studies: a systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leandro Luongo de Matos

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT INTRODUCTION: Human papillomavirus has been associated with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. However, there is no conclusive evidence on the prevalence of oral or pharyngeal infection by human papillomavirus in the Brazilian population. OBJECTIVE: To determine the rate of human papillomavirus infection in the Brazilian population. METHODS: Systematic review of published articles. Medline, The Cochrane Library, Embase, Lilacs (Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences and Scielo electronic databases were searched. The search included published articles up to December 2014 in Portuguese, Spanish and English. A wide search strategy was employed in order to avoid publication biases and to assess studies dealing only with oral and/or oropharyngeal human papillomavirus infections in the Brazilian population. RESULTS: The 42 selected articles enrolled 4066 patients. It was observed that oral or oropharyngeal human papillomavirus infections were identified in 738 patients (18.2%; IC 95 17.6-18.8, varying between 0.0% and 91.9%. The prevalences of oral or oropharyngeal human papillomavirus infections were respectively 6.2%, 44.6%, 44.4%, 27.4%, 38.5% and 11.9% for healthy people, those with benign oral lesions, pre-malignant lesions, oral or oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, risk groups (patients with genital human papillomavirus lesions or infected partners and immunocompromised patients. The risk of human papillomavirus infection was estimated for each subgroup and it was evident that, when compared to the healthy population, the risk of human papillomavirus infection was approximately 1.5-9.0 times higher, especially in patients with an immunodeficiency, oral lesions and squamous cell carcinoma. The rates of the most well-known oncogenic types (human papillomavirus 16 and/or 18 also show this increased risk. CONCLUSIONS: Globally, the Brazilian healthy population has a very low oral human papillomavirus infection rate. Other

  10. Validation of a Diagnostic Microarray for Human Papillomavirus: Coverage of 102 Genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Tuttleton Arron

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Papillomaviruses have been implicated in a variety of human diseases ranging from common warts to invasive carcinoma of the anogenital mucosa. Existing assays for genotyping human papillomavirus are restricted to a small number of types. Here, we present a comprehensive, accurate microarray strategy for detection and genotyping of 102 human papillomavirus types and validate its use in a panel of 91 anal swabs. This array has equal performance to traditional dot blot analysis with the benefits of added genotype coverage and the ability to calibrate readout over a range of sensitivity or specificity values.

  11. Comparison of nitroethane, 2-nitro-1-propanol, lauric acid, Lauricidin and the Hawaiian marine algae, Chaetoceros, for potential broad-spectrum control of anaerobically grown lactic acid bacteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    The gastrointestinal tract of bovines often contains bacteria that contribute to disorders of the rumen and may also contain foodborne or opportunistic human pathogens as well as bacteria capable of causing mastitis in cows. Thus, there is a need to develop broad-spectrum therapies that are effecti...

  12. [Infection with human papillomavirus in men].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aranda-Flores, Carlos Eduardo

    2015-11-01

    Review updated (HPV) HPV in Man virus information, the role as a sexually transmitted infection (STI) that negatively impacts your partner(s) sexual(s) and represents a public health problem globally. In the case of men they have been identified specific risk factors that place it as the main factor in the transmission of the disease (infection, cancer and cancer precursor lesions in the genital tract), both heterosexual and homosexual practice as the subjects infected with HIV (HIV) in whom HPV prevalence rises to 95%. SEARCH METHODOLOGY: A systematic review of the literature of the past six years to date (2015) was made. Human papilloma virus vaccine, warts and sexually transmitted: In the database PubMed, LILACS and EMBASE were searched keywords. Only items that directly related to studies in men and that referred to the vaccine were analyzed. The mean time of disappearance of persistent injuries HPV-6, 11, 16, and 18 (defined as two consecutive negative results) was 6.7; 3.2; 9.2; and 4.7 months respectively. In conclusion, this study showed that the acquisition of HPV-6, 11, 16, or 18 is common among men. Differences in detection rates of HPV DNA in anogenital different anatomical sites were found. It has been found that the average time of dlisappearance of lesions is ≥ 6 months. In another study conducted on a sample that included Mexican population, the median duration of HPV infection was 7.52 months (6.80-8.61) for any type of HPV and 12-19 months (7.16-18.17) for HPV-16. The prevention of this disease has had a significant change with the introduction of the HPV vaccine, which has led organizations like the World Health Organization (WHO) to take a position in favor of including these biological in national immunization programs, to thereby contribute to the eradication of not only genital cancer in women, also in man, which is being reflected gradually in such programs.

  13. Ceftiofur sodium, a broad-spectrum cephalosporin: evaluation in vitro and in vivo in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yancey, R J; Kinney, M L; Roberts, B J; Goodenough, K R; Hamel, J C; Ford, C W

    1987-07-01

    Ceftiofur sodium, a broad-spectrum beta-lactamase-resistant cephalosporin, was evaluated in vitro and in vivo in mice. Ceftiofur is the sodium salt of (6R, 7R)-7[( 2-amino-4-thiazolyl)-Z- (methoxyimino)acetyl]amino)-3-[( (2-furanylcarbonyl)thio]methyl)-8-oxo-5- thia-1-azabicyclo-[4.2.0]oct-2-ene-2-carboxylate. Minimal inhibitory concentration values were obtained with 264 strains representing 9 genera and 17 species of bacterial pathogens from cattle, swine, sheep, horses, poultry, dogs, cats, and human beings. Ceftiofur was more active than was ampicillin against all strains tested including beta-lactamase-producing organisms. In mice with systemic infections, ceftiofur was more active than or equivalent to ampicillin, cephalothin, cefamandole, cloxacillin, cefoperazone, or pirlimycin. These protection tests included infections with Escherichia coli, Haemophilus pleuropneumoniae, H somnus, Pasteurella haemolytica, P multocida, Salmonella typhimurium, or Staphylococcus aureus. In infant mice with E coli-induced lethal diarrhea and in mice with S aureus and E coli-induced mastitis, ceftiofur was comparable or more active than was ampicillin.

  14. Systematic study of non-natural short cationic lipopeptides as novel broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohan, Sandeep; Cameotra, Swaranjit S; Bisht, Gopal S

    2013-11-01

    We describe the design and synthesis of a new series of non-natural short cationic lipopeptides (MW = 700) as antimicrobial agents. All of the synthesized lipopeptides were tested against a range of microbes such as Gram-positive, Gram-negative bacteria, fungi including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis (MRSE). By systematic study of design template, we found that three ornithine residues conjugated with myristic acid are minimum requirement for a compound to be an antimicrobial agent. The most potent lipopeptide LP16 possesses broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity and has MICs in the range of 1.5-6.25 μg/mL against Escherichia coli, S. aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Bacillus subtilis, and MRSE. All lipopeptides showed high selectivity toward microbial strains as compared to human red blood cells (HC50 > 250 μg/mL). Moreover, most potent lipopeptides (LP16 and LP23) did not induce drug resistance in S. aureus even after 15 rounds of passaging. In addition, a representative lipopeptide (LP16) showed tryptic stability for 24 h. These results suggest the potential of short cationic lipopeptides to boost the discovery of future antimicrobial therapeutics. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  15. Bismuth antimicrobial drugs serve as broad-spectrum metallo-β-lactamase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Runming; Lai, Tsz-Pui; Gao, Peng; Zhang, Hongmin; Ho, Pak-Leung; Woo, Patrick Chiu-Yat; Ma, Guixing; Kao, Richard Yi-Tsun; Li, Hongyan; Sun, Hongzhe

    2018-01-30

    Drug-resistant superbugs pose a huge threat to human health. Infections by Enterobacteriaceae producing metallo-β-lactamases (MBLs), e.g., New Delhi metallo-β-lactamase 1 (NDM-1) are very difficult to treat. Development of effective MBL inhibitors to revive the efficacy of existing antibiotics is highly desirable. However, such inhibitors are not clinically available till now. Here we show that an anti-Helicobacter pylori drug, colloidal bismuth subcitrate (CBS), and related Bi(III) compounds irreversibly inhibit different types of MBLs via the mechanism, with one Bi(III) displacing two Zn(II) ions as revealed by X-ray crystallography, leading to the release of Zn(II) cofactors. CBS restores meropenem (MER) efficacy against MBL-positive bacteria in vitro, and in mice infection model, importantly, also slows down the development of higher-level resistance in NDM-1-positive bacteria. This study demonstrates a high potential of Bi(III) compounds as the first broad-spectrum B1 MBL inhibitors to treat MBL-positive bacterial infection in conjunction with existing carbapenems.

  16. Quantitative immunodetection of viral oncoprotein levels in human papillomavirus-transformed human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, J A; Gangemi, J D

    2000-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) comprise a genus in the species Papovaviridae, which consist of small, naked icosahedral viruses containing circular dsDNA. HPV types 16 and 18 infect squamous epithelium of the genitalia and may infect as many as 45% of the female population in developed countries (1).

  17. Human papillomavirus prevalence among men in sub-Saharan Africa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Tina Bech; Munk, Christian; Christensen, Jane

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We performed a systematic review and meta-analysis to summarise the available data on the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) among men in sub-Saharan Africa. METHODS: PubMed and Embase were searched up to 10 March 2014. Random effects meta-analyses were used to calculate a pooled...... prevalence of any HPV and high-risk (HR) HPV. RESULTS: A total of 11 studies comprising 9342 men were identified. We found that HPV is very common among men in sub-Saharan Africa, the prevalence of any HPV ranging between 19.1% and 100%. Using random effects meta-analysis, the pooled prevalence of any HPV...... among men in sub-Saharan Africa, which could contribute to the high rates of penile and cervical cancer in this part of the world. Implementation of the prophylactic HPV vaccines could potentially help prevent this large burden of HPV and HPV-associated disease in sub-Saharan Africa. CLINICALTRIALS...

  18. Awareness of human papillomavirus after introduction of HPV vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Louise T; Nygård, Mari; Stensen, Signe

    2017-01-01

    Using a large, population-based survey, we assessed the levels and correlates of human papillomavirus (HPV) awareness among Scandinavian women after introduction of HPV vaccination. In 2011-2012, a random sample of women aged between 18 and 45 years from Denmark, Sweden and Norway received...... a questionnaire on lifestyle, health and HPV awareness. We included 47 895 women (response rate 60.6%) in our study. Country-specific and age-specific proportions of women who had heard of HPV in 2011-2012 (postvaccination survey) were compared with corresponding proportions in an identical survey from 2004......-2005 (prevaccination survey, n=54 079, response rate 71.3%). Correlates of HPV awareness in the postvaccination survey were assessed by logistic regression. In all countries and age groups, awareness of HPV increased from the prevaccination to the postvaccination survey. In the postvaccination survey, HPV awareness...

  19. Immune evasion mechanisms of human papillomavirus: An update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinbach, Alina; Riemer, Angelika B

    2018-01-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most frequently sexually transmitted agent in the world. It can cause cervical and other anogenital malignancies, and oropharyngeal cancer. HPV has the unique ability to persist in the host's epithelium for a long time-longer than most viruses do-which is necessary to complete its replication cycle. To this end, HPV has developed a variety of immune evasion mechanisms, which unfortunately also favor the progression of the disease from infection to chronic dysplasia and eventually to cancer. This article summarizes the current knowledge about HPV immune evasion strategies. A special emphasis lies in HPV-mediated changes of the antigen processing machinery, which is generating epitopes for T cells and contributes to the detectability of infected cells. © 2017 UICC.

  20. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination at a Time of Changing Sexual Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baussano, Iacopo; Lazzarato, Fulvio; Brisson, Marc; Franceschi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence varies widely worldwide. We used a transmission model to show links between age-specific sexual patterns and HPV vaccination effectiveness. We considered rural India and the United States as examples of 2 heterosexual populations with traditional age-specific sexual behavior and gender-similar age-specific sexual behavior, respectively. We simulated these populations by using age-specific rates of sexual activity and age differences between sexual partners and found that transitions from traditional to gender-similar sexual behavior in women sexual behavior and that increased risk for HPV infection attributable to transition is preventable by early vaccination. Our study highlights the importance of using time-limited opportunities to introduce HPV vaccination in traditional populations before changes in age-specific sexual patterns occur.

  1. Human papillomaviruses: research priorities for the next decade.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langsfeld, Erika; Laimins, Laimonis A

    2016-05-01

    Human papillomaviruses are the causative agents of cervical, anal as well as many oropharyngeal cancers. While prophylactic vaccines have been developed, uptake is low in the US and other Western countries, and access is limited in less developed countries. A number of areas are emerging as critical for future study. These include investigation of the mechanisms regulating infection and progression to cancer at both cervical and oropharyngeal sites as these appear to be distinct. HPV-induced cancers also may be susceptible to immune therapy, revealing opportunities for treating advanced cervical disease and reducing the morbidity of treatments for oropharyngeal cancers. We believe these areas are critical focal points for HPV cancer research in the next decade.

  2. The transmembrane channel-like protein family and human papillomaviruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horton, Jaime S; Stokes, Alexander J

    2014-01-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare genodermatosis characterized by increased sensitivity to infection by the β-subtype of human papillomaviruses (β-HPVs), causing persistent, tinea versicolor-like dermal lesions. In a majority of affected individuals, these macular lesions progress to invasive cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) in sun-exposed areas. While mutations in transmembrane channel-like 6 (TMC6 / EVER1) and 8 (TMC8 / EVER2) have been causally linked to EV, their molecular functions are unclear. It is likely that their protective effects involve regulation of the β-HPV life cycle, host keratinocyte apoptosis vs. survival balance and/or T-cell interaction with infected host cells. PMID:24800179

  3. Human papillomaviruses: shared and distinct pathways for pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galloway, Denise A; Laimins, Laimonis A

    2015-10-01

    Over 200 types of human papillomaviruses (HPV) have been identified that infect epithelial cells at different anatomic locations. HPVs are grouped into five genera with the alpha and beta viruses being the most commonly studied. Members of the alpha HPV genus infect genital epithelia and are the causative agents of many anogenital cancers. Beta HPVs infect cutaneous epithelia and have been suggested as co-factors in the development of non-melanoma skin cancers. Recent studies have shown that activation of DNA damage pathways is important for the productive life cycle of the alpha HPVs while the beta viruses suppress their activation. These differences likely contribute to the varying types of lesions and malignancies that are associated with these viruses. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Young Hispanic Men and Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Choices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Tami L; Stephens, Dionne P; Johnson-Mallard, Versie; Higgins, Melinda

    2016-03-01

    This exploratory descriptive study examined perceived vulnerabilities to human papillomavirus (HPV) and the correlation to factors influencing vaccine beliefs and vaccine decision making in young Hispanic males attending a large public urban university. Only 24% of participants believed that the HPV vaccine could prevent future problems, and 53% said they would not be vaccinated. The best predictors of HPV vaccination in young Hispanic men were agreement with doctor recommendations and belief in the vaccine's efficacy. Machismo cultural norms influence young Hispanic men's HPV-related decision making, their perceptions of the vaccine, and how they attitudinally act on what little HPV information they have access to. This study provides culturally relevant information for the development of targeted health education strategies aimed at increasing HPV vaccination in young Hispanic men. © The Author(s) 2014.

  5. Human papillomavirus infection in oral potentially malignant disorders and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xun; Zhao, Yu

    2017-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infects keratinocytes in the mucosa or skin, and persistent infection with HPV may lead to premalignant lesions and invasive cancer, especially cervical cancer. It has also been hypothesized that HPV infection is an etiological factor of oral squamous cell carcinoma and oral precancerous disorders such as lichen planus, leukoplakia, and erythroplakia. A high percentage of HPV in oral lesions supports the possible viral contribution, but an association of HPV infection with these lesions remains to be established. The current paper will update the latest progress of HPV infection in several oral potentially malignant disorders and oral squamous cell carcinoma and discuss the impact of HPV infection on the progression of oral potentially malignant disorders. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. The Spanish human papillomavirus vaccine consensus group: a working model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortés-Bordoy, Javier; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2010-08-01

    Successful implementation of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in each country can only be achieved from a complementary and synergistic perspective, integrating all the different points of view of the diverse related professionals. It is this context where the Spanish HPV Vaccine Consensus Group (Grupo Español de Consenso sobre la Vacuna VPH, GEC-VPH) was created. GEC-VPH philosophy, objectives and experience are reported in this article, with particular attention to the management of negative publicity and anti-vaccine groups. Initiatives as GEC-VPH--adapted to each country's particular idiosyncrasies--might help to overcome the existing barriers and to achieve wide and early implementation of HPV vaccination.

  7. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Guideline Update: American Cancer Society Guideline Endorsement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saslow, Debbie; Andrews, Kimberly S.; Manassaram-Baptiste, Deana; Loomer, Lacey; Lam, Kristina E.; Fisher-Borne, Marcie; Smith, Robert A.; Fontham, Elizabeth T. H.

    2017-01-01

    The American Cancer Society (ACS) reviewed and updated its guideline on human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination based on a methodologic and content review of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) HPV vaccination recommendations. A literature review was performed to supplement the evidence considered by the ACIP and to address new vaccine formulations and recommendations as well as new data on population outcomes since publication of the 2007 ACS guideline. The ACS Guideline Development Group determined that the evidence supports ACS endorsement of the ACIP recommendations, with one qualifying statement related to late vaccination. The ACS recommends vaccination of all children at ages 11 and 12 years to protect against HPV infections that lead to several cancers and precancers. Late vaccination for those not vaccinated at the recommended ages should be completed as soon as possible, and individuals should be informed that vaccination may not be effective at older ages. PMID:27434803

  8. Human papillomavirus vaccination in the prevention of cervical neoplasia.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Astbury, Katharine

    2012-02-01

    Cervical cancer remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality for women worldwide. Although the introduction of comprehensive screening programs has reduced the disease incidence in developed countries, it remains a major problem in the developing world. The recent licensing of 2 vaccines against human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 and HPV-18, the viruses responsible for 70% of cervical cancer cases, offers the hope of disease prevention. In this article, we review the role of HPV in the etiology of cervical cancer and the evidence to support the introduction of vaccination programs in young women and discuss the potential obstacles to widespread vaccination. In addition, we discuss the issues that remain to be elucidated, including the potential need for booster doses of the vaccine and the role of concomitant vaccination in men.

  9. Prevalence of human papillomavirus genotypes and their variants in high risk West Africa women immigrants in South Italy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Piccoli Roberto

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The distribution of human papillomaviruses (HPVs varies greatly across populations and HPV surveys have been performed in different geographical regions in order to apply appropriate vaccine strategies. Little information, however, exists regarding HPV genotypes distribution in immigrant women from countries at high incidence for cervical cancer. The aim of this study was to determine the spectrum of HPVs and their variants among HIV-positive and HIV-negative women immigrants in South Italy mainly from West Africa and with a history of prostitution. Results Cervical cytological samples have been collected from 14 HIV-positive and 31 HIV-negative immigrants (38 out of 45 were born in Nigeria, attending a gynecological outpatient clinic in the Campania region. Human papillomaviruses were detected by broad spectrum consensus-primer-pairs MY09/MY11 and GP5+/GP6+-based polymerase chain reaction and characterized by nucleotide sequence analysis. Altogether, 42.2% (19/45 of samples were HPV positive with detection rates of 57.1% (8/14 in HIV-positive and 35.5% (11/31 in HIV-negative women. Among the twelve different viral genotypes identified, HPV33, 58, 70 and 81 were the prevalent genotypes with a frequency of 6.7% each, followed by HPV16, 35, 42, 54, 31, 52, 56 and 67, in descending order of prevalence. Sequence homology studies performed on the L1 amplified fragments of HPV16, 52 and 58 isolates allowed the identification of nucleotide changes distinctive of non-European variants. Conclusion The overall HPV prevalence (42.2% was high in this immigrant women group with the most common viral types other than HPV16 and 18, against which current vaccine strategies have been developed. The distribution of HPV genotypes and their variants in high-risk immigrants reflects that of their original countries. The surveillance of risk groups that may act as viral reservoirs of uncommon genotypes within different countries are necessary to

  10. Health awareness among young women vaccinated against human papillomavirus infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Bąk

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : Genital human papillomavirus (HPV infections are essentials factors in the development of cervical cancer. Human papillomavirus vaccines can contribute to reducing the high incidence of this disease, provided that this form of prophylaxis is commonly accepted. Participation in vaccinations is restricted by the belief that their implementation and consequent feeling of safety will reduce women’s participation in other forms of cervical carcinoma prophylaxis and will encourage them to be sexually promiscuous. Aim of the research study : To determine the awareness of cervical carcinoma prophylaxis among young women vaccinated against HPV by comparing them with a group of unvaccinated women. Material and methods: The survey covered a group of 210 young women in the age range 18 to 20 years, who were vaccinated against HPV. Within the framework of comparison, the survey covered a group of 255 young HPV-unvaccinated women, adequately selected in respect of age and education. Results: The HPVvaccinated women declared participation in medical check-ups and cytological tests no less frequently than the unvaccinated women. In both groups, the usage of condoms, sexual partners hygiene, monogamy and smoking abstinence were determined as behaviours limiting the occurrence of cervical carcinoma. Conclusions: Awareness of the application of supplementary prophylaxis of cervical carcinoma was high among the HPV vaccinated woman and did not differ from the unvaccinated woman’s awareness. Young women did not show a tendency for promiscuous behaviours, and were more likely touse condoms in the prevention of cervical carcinoma than were the unvaccinated woman.

  11. Genotyping human papillomavirus type 16 isolates from persistently infected promiscuous individuals and cervical neoplasia patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A.F. van Belkum (Alex); L. Juffermans (Leon); L. Schrauwen (Lianne); M. Burger; G.J.J. van Doornum (Gerard); W.G.V. Quint (Wim)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractNucleotide sequence variation in the noncoding region of the genome of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) was determined by direct sequencing and single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis of DNA fragments amplified by PCR. Individuals of diverse

  12. Human papillomavirus prevalence and type-distribution in cervical glandular neoplasias

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holl, Katsiaryna; Nowakowski, Andrzej M; Powell, Ned

    2015-01-01

    Cervical glandular neoplasias (CGN) present a challenge for cervical cancer prevention due to their complex histopathology and difficulties in detecting preinvasive stages with current screening practices. Reports of human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and type-distribution in CGN vary, providi...

  13. HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Gardasil® Vaccine - what you need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is taken in its entirety from the CDC HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Vaccine - Gardasil® Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/hpv-gardasil.html . CDC review information for HPV Gardasil® ...

  14. HPV vaccine (Human Papillomavirus) Cervarix® - what you need to know

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... is taken in its entirety from the CDC HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Cervarix® Vaccine Information Statement: www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/hpv-cervarix.html . CDC review information for HPV Cervarix® ...

  15. Poor Prognosis Associated With Human Papillomavirus α7 Genotypes in Cervical Carcinoma Cannot Be Explained by Intrinsic Radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, John S.; Iype, Rohan; Armenoult, Lucile S.C. [Translational Radiobiology Group, Institute of Cancer Sciences, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Taylor, Janet [Translational Radiobiology Group, Institute of Cancer Sciences, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom); Applied Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester (United Kingdom); Miller, Crispin J. [Applied Computational Biology and Bioinformatics Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester (United Kingdom); Davidson, Susan [Christie National Health Service Foundation Trust, Manchester (United Kingdom); Sanjose, Silvia de; Bosch, Xavier [Cancer Epidemiology Research Program, Catalan Institute of Oncology, L' Hospitalet de Llobregat (Spain); Stern, Peter L. [Immunology Group, Paterson Institute for Cancer Research, Manchester (United Kingdom); West, Catharine M.L., E-mail: Catharine.West@manchester.ac.uk [Translational Radiobiology Group, Institute of Cancer Sciences, Manchester Academic Health Science Centre, University of Manchester, Manchester (United Kingdom)

    2013-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) genotype and outcome after radiation therapy and intrinsic radiosensitivity. Methods and Materials: HPV genotyping was performed on cervix biopsies by polymerase chain reaction using SPF-10 broad-spectrum primers, followed by deoxyribonucleic acid enzyme immunoassay and genotyping by reverse hybridization line probe assay (LiPA{sub 25}) (version 1) (n=202). PapilloCheck and quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction were used to genotype cervix cancer cell lines (n=16). Local progression-free survival after radiation therapy alone was assessed using log-rank and Cox proportionate hazard analyses. Intrinsic radiosensitivity was measured as surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) using clonogenic assays. Results: Of the 202 tumors, 107 (53.0%) were positive for HPV16, 29 (14.4%) for HPV18, 9 (4.5%) for HPV45, 23 (11.4%) for other HPV genotypes, and 22 (10.9%) were negative; 11 (5.5%) contained multiple genotypes, and 1 tumor was HPV X (0.5%). In 148 patients with outcome data, those with HPVα9-positive tumors had better local progression-free survival compared with α7 patients in univariate (P<.004) and multivariate (hazard ratio 1.54, 95% confidence interval 1.11-1.76, P=.021) analyses. There was no difference in the median SF2 of α9 and α7 cervical tumors (n=63). In the cell lines, 9 were α7 and 4 α9 positive and 3 negative. There was no difference in SF2 between α9 and α7 cell lines (n=14). Conclusion: The reduced radioresponsiveness of α7 cervical tumors is not related to intrinsic radiosensitivity.

  16. Human papillomavirus 1a complete DNA sequence: a novel type of genome organization among papovaviridae.

    OpenAIRE

    Danos, O; Katinka, M; Yaniv, M

    1982-01-01

    The complete nucleotide sequence of human papillomavirus type 1a (7811 nucleotides) has been established. The overall organization of the viral genome is different from that of other related papovaviruses (SV40, BKV, polyoma). Firstly, genetic information seems to be coded by one strand. Secondly, no significant homology is found with SV40 or polyoma coding sequence for either DNA or deducted protein sequences. The relatedness of human and bovine papillomaviruses is revealed by a conserved co...

  17. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in epithelial ovarian cancer tissue. A meta-analysis of observational studies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svahn, Malene F; Faber, Mette Tuxen; Christensen, Jane

    2014-01-01

    The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is controversial, and conflicting results have been published. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of HPV in epithelial ovarian cancer tissue.......The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is controversial, and conflicting results have been published. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis to estimate the prevalence of HPV in epithelial ovarian cancer tissue....

  18. Laboratory production in vivo of infectious human papillomavirus type 11

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kreider, J.W.; Howett, M.K.; Leure-Dupree, A.E.; Zaino, R.J.; Weber, J.A.

    1987-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) induce among patients natural lesions which produce small amounts of virus. Infection of human cell cultures does not lead to the multiplication of virus, which also does not replicate in experimental animals. The authors have developed a unique system for the laboratory production of HPV type 11 (HPV-11). Fragments of human neonatal foreskin were infected with an extract of naturally occurring human vulvar condylomata and grafted beneath the renal capsule of athymic mice. Later (3 to 5 months), condylomatous cysts developed from those grafts. Nuclei of koilocytotic cells contained large amounts of capsid antigen and intranuclear virions. The experimentally induced condylomata were homogenized, and the virions were extracted and used to infect another generation of human foreskin grafts in athymic mice. The HPV-11 DNA content and infectivity of the natural and experimental condylomata were similar. Extracts of experimental condylomata were subjected to differential ultracentrifugation and sedimentation in CsCl density gradients. A single, opalescent band was visible at a density of 1.34 g/ml. It contained HPV virions with HPV-11 DNA. This report is the first demonstration of the laboratory production of an HPV

  19. Laboratory production in vivo of infectious human papillomavirus type 11

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreider, J.W.; Howett, M.K.; Leure-Dupree, A.E.; Zaino, R.J.; Weber, J.A.

    1987-02-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) induce among patients natural lesions which produce small amounts of virus. Infection of human cell cultures does not lead to the multiplication of virus, which also does not replicate in experimental animals. The authors have developed a unique system for the laboratory production of HPV type 11 (HPV-11). Fragments of human neonatal foreskin were infected with an extract of naturally occurring human vulvar condylomata and grafted beneath the renal capsule of athymic mice. Later (3 to 5 months), condylomatous cysts developed from those grafts. Nuclei of koilocytotic cells contained large amounts of capsid antigen and intranuclear virions. The experimentally induced condylomata were homogenized, and the virions were extracted and used to infect another generation of human foreskin grafts in athymic mice. The HPV-11 DNA content and infectivity of the natural and experimental condylomata were similar. Extracts of experimental condylomata were subjected to differential ultracentrifugation and sedimentation in CsCl density gradients. A single, opalescent band was visible at a density of 1.34 g/ml. It contained HPV virions with HPV-11 DNA. This report is the first demonstration of the laboratory production of an HPV.

  20. Cloning of monomeric human papillomavirus type 16 DNA integrated within cell DNA from a cervical carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsukura, T.; Kanda, T.; Furuno, A.; Yoshikawa, H.; Kawana, T.; Yoshiike, K.

    1986-06-01

    The authors have molecularly cloned and characterized monomeric human papillomavirus type 16 DNA with flanking cell DNA sequences from a cervical carcinoma. Determination of nucleotide sequence around the junctions of human papillomavirus and cell DNAs revealed that at the site of integration within cell DNA the cloned viral DNA had a deletion between nucleotides 1284 and 4471 (numbering system from K. Seedorf, G. Kraemmer, M. Duerst, S. Suhai, and W.G. Roewkamp), which includes the greater part of E1 gene and the entire E2 gene. In the remaining part of the E1 gene, three guanines were found at the location where two guanines at nucleotides 1137 and 1138 have been recorded. This additional guanine shifted the reading frame and erased an interruption in the E1 gene. The data strongly suggest that, like other papillomaviruses, human papillomavirus type 16 has an uninterrupted E1 gene.

  1. Human Papillomavirus Infection Among 2460 Men in Denmark: Prevalence in Relation to Age Using 2 Human Papillomavirus DNA Testing Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hebnes, Julie Buchholt; Munk, Christian; Nøhr, Bugge; Nielsen, Ann; Jørgensen, Hans Ole; Iftner, Thomas; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger

    2015-08-01

    It is crucial to understand the epidemiology and natural history of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in both men and women, to prevent the increasing HPV-related disease burden in men. Data on HPV prevalence among men in the general population are limited. In this cross-sectional population-based study, we aimed to estimate genital HPV infection prevalence in Danish men using 2 different test methods. Penile swab samples from 2460 male employees and conscripts at military barracks in Denmark were tested for HPV DNA with the hybrid capture 2 (HC2) method, and a polymerase chain reaction (PCR) assay, Inno-LiPA. The overall and age- and type-specific prevalence of HPV infection with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were estimated, and the correlation between the 2 assays was assessed. The overall HPV prevalence was 22.2% (95% CI, 20.6-23.9) in the HC2 test and 41.8% (95% CI, 39.9-43.8) with PCR. Of the PCR-positive samples, 50.9% were negative in the HC2 test. Of 183 PCR-positive samples that could not be genotyped (HPVX), 88.0% (95% CI, 83.2-92.7) were HC2 negative. The most prevalent types were HPV-51, HPV-16, HPV-66, HPV-53, and HPV-6. The prevalence of high-risk and low-risk HPV peaked among men aged 20 to 29 years, whereas the HPVX prevalence increased with age. Human papillomavirus is highly prevalent in the general male population of Denmark, with HPV-16 and HPV-51 being the most prevalent. Polymerase chain reaction detects twice as many positive samples as HC2 but includes HPVX, possibly representing cutaneous HPV types found on normal genital skin.

  2. Accuracy of urinary human papillomavirus testing for the presence of cervical human papillomaviruses and higher grades of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piyathilake, Chandrika J; Badiga, Suguna; Chambers, Michelle M; Brill, Ilene K; Matthews, Roland; Partridge, Edward E

    2016-09-15

    Although urine-based testing for human papillomavirus (HPV) is being explored as a practical approach for cervical cancer screening, whether the results differ by age, race, or indicators of excess body weight or in populations exposed to HPV vaccines has not been documented by previous studies. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of urinary HPV testing for the presence of cervical HPVs and high-grade cervical intraepithelial lesions (grade 2 and 3 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia [CIN]) by the aforementioned population characteristics. The study population consisted of 502 women diagnosed with different grades of CIN. HPV testing was performed with paired urine and cervical cell DNA with the Roche Diagnostics Linear Array test. Agreement coefficient 1 and probabilities were calculated to determine the accuracy of urinary HPV testing for the presence of cervical HPVs and CIN lesions. Substantial to almost perfect agreement (0.66-0.83) was observed in the detection of any HPV genotype in urine specimens versus cervical specimens, regardless of the population characteristics. Although the positive predictive value for the detection of CIN lesions was relatively low, the negative predictive value for CIN-3 was high (≥90%) among women positive for any of the urinary or cervical high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) genotypes or HPV genotypes not included in currently available HPV vaccines. The results demonstrate that urinary HPV testing provides highly satisfactory results for excluding the possibility of any cervical HPV infections, including HPV types not included in vaccines and CIN lesions associated with any HR-HPV, regardless of a woman's age, race, or excess body weight. Cancer 2016. © 2016 American Cancer Society. Cancer 2016;122:2836-2844. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  3. Novel water-based antiseptic lotion demonstrates rapid, broad-spectrum kill compared with alcohol antiseptic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Czerwinski, Steven E; Cozean, Jesse; Cozean, Colette

    2014-01-01

    A novel alcohol-based antiseptic and a novel water-based antiseptic lotion, both with a synergistic combination of antimicrobial ingredients containing 0.2% benzethonium chloride, were evaluated using the standard time-kill method against 25 FDA-specified challenge microorganisms. The purpose of the testing was to determine whether a non-alcohol product could have equivalent rapid and broad-spectrum kill to a traditional alcohol sanitizer. Both the alcohol- and water-based products showed rapid and broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity. The average 15-s kill was 99.999% of the challenge organism for the alcohol-based antiseptic and 99.971% for the water-based antiseptic. The alcohol-based product demonstrated 100% of peak efficacy (60s) within the first 15s, whereas the water-based product showed 99.97%. The novel alcohol-based antiseptic reduced concentrations of 100% of organisms by 99.999%, whereas the water-based antiseptic lotion showed the same reduction for 96% of organisms. A novel water-based antiseptic product demonstrated equivalent rapid, broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity to an alcohol-based sanitizer and provided additional benefits of reduced irritation, persistent effect, and greater efficacy against common viruses. The combination of rapid, broad-spectrum immediate kill and persistent efficacy against pathogens may have significant clinical benefit in limiting the spread of disease. Copyright © 2014 King Saud Bin Abdulaziz University for Health Sciences. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Factors influencing success of clinical genome sequencing across a broad spectrum of disorders

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Taylor, Jenny C; Martin, Hilary C; Lise, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    To assess factors influencing the success of whole-genome sequencing for mainstream clinical diagnosis, we sequenced 217 individuals from 156 independent cases or families across a broad spectrum of disorders in whom previous screening had identified no pathogenic variants. We quantified the numb...

  5. NF-kB signalling is attenuated by the E7 protein from cutaneous human papillomaviruses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Byg, Luise M; Stensson, Jessica; Vasiljevic, Natasa

    2012-01-01

    The high-risk Alpha-types of human papillomavirus (HPV) are the causative agent of cervical cancer, which is the second major cause of death among women worldwide. Recent investigations have shown that E7 from the Alpha-papillomavirus HPV-16 interacts with IKKa and IKKß of the IKK complex in the NF......-¿B pathway leading to an attenuation of the activity. There is a possible link between development of non melanoma skin cancer and cutaneous Beta-papillomavirus but if these HPV types attenuate the NF-¿B pathway is unclear. Seven different E7 proteins, representing four out of the five different species...

  6. Novel engineered cationic antimicrobial peptides display broad-spectrum activity against Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis and Burkholderia pseudomallei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelbaqi, Suha; Deslouches, Berthony; Steckbeck, Jonathan; Montelaro, Ronald; Reed, Douglas S

    2016-02-01

    Broad-spectrum antimicrobials are needed to effectively treat patients infected in the event of a pandemic or intentional release of a pathogen prior to confirmation of the pathogen's identity. Engineered cationic antimicrobial peptides (eCAPs) display activity against a number of bacterial pathogens including multi-drug-resistant strains. Two lead eCAPs, WLBU2 and WR12, were compared with human cathelicidin (LL-37) against three highly pathogenic bacteria: Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis and Burkholderia pseudomallei. Both WLBU2 and WR12 demonstrated bactericidal activity greater than that of LL-37, particularly against F. tularensis and Y. pestis. Only WLBU2 had bactericidal activity against B. pseudomallei. WLBU2, WR12 and LL-37 were all able to inhibit the growth of the three bacteria in vitro. Because these bacteria can be facultative intracellular pathogens, preferentially infecting macrophages and dendritic cells, we evaluated the activity of WLBU2 against F. tularensis in an ex vivo infection model with J774 cells, a mouse macrophage cell line. In that model WLBU2 was able to achieve greater than 50% killing of F. tularensis at a concentration of 12.5 μM. These data show the therapeutic potential of eCAPs, particularly WLBU2, as a broad-spectrum antimicrobial for treating highly pathogenic bacterial infections.

  7. Changes in Cell Viability of Wounded Fibroblasts following Laser Irradiation in Broad-Spectrum or Infrared Light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, D.; Abrahamse, H.

    2007-01-01

    Objective. This study aimed to establish if broad-spectrum or infrared (IR) light in combination with laser therapy can assist phototherapy to improve the cell function of wounded cells. Background. The effect of laser light may be partly or completely reduced by broad-spectrum light. Methods. Wounded human skin fibroblasts were irradiated with 5 J/cm2 using a helium-neon laser, a diode laser, or an Nd:YAG laser in the dark, in the light, or in IR. Changes in cell viability were evaluated by cell morphology, ATP cell viability, LDH membrane integrity, and caspase 3/7 as an early marker of apoptosis. Results. Wounded cells exposed to 5 J/cm2 using 632.8 nm in the dark or 830 nm in the light or 1064 nm in the dark showed an increase in ATP viability, an increase in cytokine expression, and a decrease in LDH cytotoxicity indicating that the metabolic activity of the wounded cells was stimulated. Conclusion. Wounded cells irradiated in IR light showed an undesirable thermal effect that was proportional to the duration of exposure.

  8. The Interaction Between Human Papillomavirus and Other Viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guidry, J. T.; Scott, R. S.

    2016-01-01

    The etiological role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in anogenital tract and head and neck cancers is well established. However, only a low percentage of HPV-positive women develop cancer, indicating that HPV is necessary but not sufficient in carcinogenesis. Several biological and environmental cofactors have been implicated in the development of HPV-associated carcinoma that include immune status, hormonal changes, parity, dietary habits, tobacco usage, and co-infection with other sexually transmissible agents. Such cofactors likely contribute to HPV persistent infection through diverse mechanisms related to immune control, efficiency of HPV infection, and influences on tumor initiation and progression. Conversely, HPV co-infection with other factors may also harbor anti-tumor effects. Here, we review epidemiological and experimental studies investigating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and 2, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), BK virus (BKV) JC virus (JCV), and adeno-associated virus (AAV) as viral cofactors in or therapeutic factors against the development of genital and oral HPV-associated carcinomas. PMID:27826043

  9. Human papillomavirus vaccine introduction in Vietnam: formative research findings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nghi, Nguyen Quy; Lamontagne, D Scott; Bingham, Allison; Rafiq, Mirriam; Mai, Le Thi Phuong; Lien, Nguyen Thi Phuong; Khanh, Nguyen Cong; Hong, Duong Thi; Huyen, Dang Thi Thanh; Tho, Nguyen Thi Thi; Hien, Nguyen Tran

    2010-09-01

    Formative research is a useful tool for designing new health interventions. This paper presents key findings from formative research conducted in Vietnam to guide human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine introduction. We explored the sociocultural environment, health system capacity and the policy-making process using a combined quantitative and qualitative methodology. Data collection was done through literature review, in-depth interviews, focus group discussions, observation checklists and a structured questionnaire on knowledge, attitudes and practices. Populations of interest included 11- to 14-year-old girls, their parents, community leaders, teachers, health workers, health and education officials, and policy-makers at all levels. Although HPV vaccines are new, we found high potential acceptance among parents and girls. HPV vaccine introduction was also favourably supported by health professionals if assurances for system preparedness, e.g. cold chain and human resources, were made. There were no significant barriers from the policy perspective that would prevent the introduction of a new vaccine. However, several concerns related to this new vaccine would need to be adequately addressed before implementation. Our findings provide options for potential vaccine delivery strategies, appropriate communication strategies and targeted advocacy strategies to introduce HPV vaccines in the Vietnamese context.

  10. The Epidemiology of Human Papillomavirus Infection and Cervical Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Xavier Bosch

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cervical cancer has been recognized as a rare outcome of a common Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI. The etiologic association is restricted to a limited number of viral types of the family of the Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs. The association is causal in nature and under optimal testing systems, HPV DNA can be identified in all specimens of invasive cervical cancer. As a consequence, it has been claimed that HPV infection is a necessary cause of cervical cancer. The evidence is consistent worldwide and implies both the Squamous Cell Carcinomas (SCC, the adenocarcinomas and the vast majority (i.e. > 95% of the immediate precursors, namely High Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions (HSIL/Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia 3 (CIN3/Carcinoma in situ. Co-factors that modify the risk among HPV DNA positive women include the use of oral contraceptives (OC for five or more years, smoking, high parity (five or more full term pregnancies and previous exposure to other sexually transmitted diseases such as Chlamydia Trachomatis (CT and Herpes Simplex Virus type 2 (HSV-2. Women exposed to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV are at high risk for HPV infection, HPV DNA persistency and progression of HPV lesions to cervical cancer.

  11. Human Papillomavirus 16 Infection Induces VAP-Dependent Endosomal Tubulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqa, Abida; Massimi, Paola; Pim, David; Broniarczyk, Justyna; Banks, Lawrence

    2018-03-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection involves complex interactions with the endocytic transport machinery, which ultimately facilitates the entry of the incoming viral genomes into the trans -Golgi network (TGN) and their subsequent nuclear entry during mitosis. The endosomal pathway is a highly dynamic intracellular transport system, which consists of vesicular compartments and tubular extensions, although it is currently unclear whether incoming viruses specifically alter the endocytic machinery. In this study, using MICAL-L1 as a marker for tubulating endosomes, we show that incoming HPV-16 virions induce a profound alteration in global levels of endocytic tubulation. In addition, we also show a critical requirement for the endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-anchored protein VAP in this process. VAP plays an essential role in actin nucleation and endosome-to-Golgi transport. Indeed, the loss of VAP results in a dramatic decrease in the level of endosomal tubulation induced by incoming HPV-16 virions. This is also accompanied by a marked reduction in virus infectivity. In VAP knockdown cells, we see that the defect in virus trafficking occurs after capsid disassembly but prior to localization at the trans -Golgi network, with the incoming virion-transduced DNA accumulating in Vps29/TGN46-positive hybrid vesicles. Taken together, these studies demonstrate that infection with HPV-16 virions induces marked alterations of endocytic transport pathways, some of which are VAP dependent and required for the endosome-to-Golgi transport of the incoming viral L2/DNA complex. IMPORTANCE Human papillomavirus infectious entry involves multiple interactions with the endocytic transport machinery. In this study, we show that incoming HPV-16 virions induce a dramatic increase in endocytic tubulation. This tubulation requires ER-associated VAP, which plays a critical role in ensuring the delivery of cargoes from the endocytic compartments to the trans -Golgi network. Indeed, the loss of

  12. Cancerl cells 5. Papillomaviruses

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steinberg, B.M.; Brandsma, J.L. (Long Island Jewish Medical Center, NY (US)); Taichman, L.B. (State Univ. of New York, Stony Brook, NY (US))

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 30 selections. Some of the titles are: Elements that Control the Transcription of Genital Human Papillomavirus Type 18; Human Paillomavirus Gene Expression; RNA Probes to Analyze Human Papillomavirus Gene Expression in Squamous Papilloma of the Respiratory Tract; Expression of Human Papillomavirus Type-1 E4 Gene Products in Warts; and Underreplication of Human Papillomavirus Type-1 DNA in Cultures of Foreskin Keratinocytes.

  13. Human Papillomavirus - Prevalence of High-Risk and Low-Risk Types among Females Aged 14-59 Years, National Health and ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Archive Data & Statistics Sexually Transmitted Diseases Figure 45. Human Papillomavirus — Prevalence of High-risk and Low-risk ... on the STD Data and Statistics page . * HPV = human papillomavirus. NOTE: Error bars indicate 95% confidence interval. ...

  14. Human papillomavirus vaccination induces neutralising antibodies in oral mucosal fluids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handisurya, A; Schellenbacher, C; Haitel, A; Senger, T; Kirnbauer, R

    2016-02-16

    Mucosal human papillomaviruses (HPV) are a major cause of cancers and papillomas of the anogenital and oropharyngeal tract. HPV-vaccination elicits neutralising antibodies in sera and cervicovaginal secretions and protects uninfected individuals from persistent anogenital infection and associated diseases caused by the vaccine-targeted HPV types. Whether immunisation can prevent oropharyngeal infection and diseases and whether neutralising antibodies represent the correlate of protection, is still unclear. We determined IgG and neutralising antibodies against low-risk HPV6 and high-risk HPV16/18 in sera and oral fluids from healthy females (n=20) before and after quadrivalent HPV-vaccination and compared the results with non-vaccinated controls. HPV-vaccination induced type-specific antibodies in sera and oral fluids of the vaccinees. Importantly, the antibodies in oral fluids were capable of neutralising HPV pseudovirions in vitro, indicating protection from infection. The increased neutralising antibody levels against HPV16/18 in sera and oral fluids post-vaccination correlated significantly within an individual. We provide experimental proof that HPV-vaccination elicits neutralising antibodies to the vaccine-targeted types in oral fluids. Hence, immunisation may confer direct protection against type-specific HPV infection and associated diseases of the oropharyngeal tract. Measurement of antibodies in oral fluids represents a suitable tool to assess vaccine-induced protection within the mucosal milieu of the orophayrynx.

  15. Human Papillomavirus Testing in the Prevention of Cervical Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wacholder, Sholom; Kinney, Walter; Gage, Julia C.; Castle, Philip E.

    2011-01-01

    Strong evidence now supports the adoption of cervical cancer prevention strategies that explicitly focus on persistent infection with the causal agent, human papillomavirus (HPV). To inform an evidence-based transition to a new public health approach for cervical cancer screening, we summarize the natural history and cervical carcinogenicity of HPV and discuss the promise and uncertainties of currently available screening methods. New HPV infections acquired at any age are virtually always benign, but persistent infections with one of approximately 12 carcinogenic HPV types explain virtually all cases of cervical cancer. In the absence of an overtly persistent HPV infection, the risk of cervical cancer is extremely low. Thus, HPV test results predict the risk of cervical cancer and its precursors (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3) better and longer than cytological or colposcopic abnormalities, which are signs of HPV infection. The logical and inevitable move to HPV-based cervical cancer prevention strategies will require longer screening intervals that will disrupt current gynecologic and cytology laboratory practices built on frequent screening. A major challenge will be implementing programs that do not overtreat HPV-positive women who do not have obvious long-term persistence of HPV or treatable lesions at the time of initial evaluation. The greatest potential for reduction in cervical cancer rates from HPV screening is in low-resource regions that can implement infrequent rounds of low-cost HPV testing and treatment. PMID:21282563

  16. Challenging 'girls only' publicly funded human papillomavirus vaccination programmes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Law, Victoria G; Gustafson, Diana L

    2017-01-01

    This analysis examines the 'girls only' policy for publicly funded human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programmes. Current funding policy in most Canadian provinces covers 'girls only' with the goal of reducing mortality and morbidity rates of HPV-related cervical cancer. Recent studies indicate increasing rates of other HPV-related cancers among cisgender men and women. The HPV vaccine is proving effective against some of these cancers. Statistics on HPV vaccine uptake among individuals with different gender expressions are scarce. Critics argue that a 'girls only' HPV vaccine policy is inequitable. We add to this critique by reflecting on the gender binary embedded in such policies and produced through epidemiological studies that attend differentially to females, reinforcing exclusionary practices that leave out those who form their gender identities across the spectrum. We then draw on deontological (duties-based) and utilitarian (utility-based) frameworks to show that these gendered policies are also unethical. These challenges to the assumptions underlying 'girls only' immunization programmes have implications for nurses and the healthcare system. If we are to advance equitable and ethical health outcomes, we entreat nurses as a collective to mobilize the public to lobby federal, provincial and territorial governments to fund more inclusive HPV vaccination policies. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. The prevalence of human papillomavirus infection in Mombasa, Kenya.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Vuyst, Hugo; Parisi, Maria Rita; Karani, Andrew; Mandaliya, Kishor; Muchiri, Lucy; Vaccarella, Salvatore; Temmerman, Marleen; Franceschi, Silvia; Lillo, Flavia

    2010-12-01

    A human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence survey was done in Mombasa, Kenya, to improve the knowledge of HPV prevalence and genotype distribution in sub-Saharan African countries overall, and in women of different ages. HPV prevalence was assessed using PCR in women older than 15 years attending family planning and mother-child care services. Among 496 women, HPV prevalence was high (42.3%; 95% CI: 37.9-46.8; world age-standardized). Moreover, 46% of HPV-positive women harbored multiple-type infections. The most common types were HPV58 (10.5% of women), HPV16 (7.7%), HPV53 (6.7%), HPV18 (4.6%), and HPV6 (4.4%), and the prevalence of any high-risk HPV type was 28.8%. HPV prevalence was elevated among all age-groups (range 36.4-45.7%). Independent associations with HPV positivity were found for being in a polygamous marriage (OR = 1.7) and lifetime number of sexual partners (OR for ≥ 3 vs. 1 = 1.5), although they were of only borderline statistical significance. These findings differ from other world regions, showing a high HPV burden in all age-groups with a high proportion of multiple-type infections. Our data strengthen the urgency of HPV vaccination in Kenya but also highlight the elevated number of women who would have positive results in an HPV-based screening program in the country.

  18. Human papillomaviruses in Amerindian women from Brazilian Amazonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brito, E. B.; Martins, S. J.; Menezes, R. C.

    2002-01-01

    We evaluated the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in Amerindian women from a tribe in Brazilian Amazonia. Demographic data, pap smears and cervical samples for HPV DNA detection by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were obtained for women aged above 10 years old. In total, 79 (85.9%) out of 92 eligible women who lived there were interviewed; all women already had engaged in sexual activity. Seventy-eight and 49 women allowed collection of pap smears and PCR samples, respectively. Cytological signs of HPV infection were observed in 11 patients; 6 of these were probed for HPV infection and 1 shown to be HPV 16. Overall prevalence of HPV infection detected by PCR was 14.3%. Three patients presented high-risk HPV DNA types:two HPV 16 and one co-infection of HPV 16 and 58. Cervical infection by oncogenic HPV types occurs in Amerindian women and cervical cancer screening should be a priority in this setting. PMID:12113494

  19. The influence of human papillomavirus on nasopharyngeal carcinoma in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kano, Makoto; Kondo, Satoru; Wakisaka, Naohiro; Moriyama-Kita, Makiko; Nakanishi, Yosuke; Endo, Kazuhira; Murono, Shigeyuki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Yoshizaki, Tomokazu

    2017-06-01

    Although Japan is a non-endemic area with nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC), the proportion of WHO type I NPC in Japan are different from that in non-endemic areas such as North America and Europe. Recently, it is said that not only Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) but also human papillomavirus (HPV) has an influence on NPC in non-endemic areas. The aim of this study is to clarify the influence of HPV on NPC in Japan. Paraffin-embedded tumor specimens were available for 59 patients with NPC diagnosed between 1996 and 2015. We detected the virus status by p16 immunohistochemistry, HPV PCR, and in situ hybridization for Epstein-Barr virus (EBV)-encoded RNA. Kaplan-Meier curves were used to compare the overall survival by viral status. Among the 59 patients, 49 (83%) were EBV-positive/HPV-negative, 2 (3%) were EBV-positive/HPV-positive, and 8 (16%) were EBV-negative/HPV-negative. All HPV-positive NPCs were co-infected with EBV. There were no significant differences between the overall survival in the three groups (p=0.111). In Japan, HPV was detected in a few patients with NPC, and we suggest that HPV has no influence on NPC carcinogenesis in this population. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Human papillomavirus (HPV): making the case for 'Immunisation for All'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prue, G; Lawler, M; Baker, P; Warnakulasuriya, S

    2017-09-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) contributes to the most common sexually transmitted infections, with repeated and persistent infection with particular types causing disease in both men and women. Infection with low-risk HPV types can lead to genital warts and benign lesions of the oral cavity, while high-risk types can cause various HPV-related malignancies. The incidence of head and neck cancers has been rising in the past number of decades mostly due to oropharyngeal cancer linked to HPV infection. HPV vaccination has been shown to be effective for cervical and other anogenital HPV-related cancers, and there is significant potential for HPV vaccination to prevent oropharyngeal cancers, given that the HPV types implicated in this disease can be protected against by the HPV vaccine. Few countries have implemented a universal HPV vaccination programme for males and females, with many countries arguing that female-only vaccination programmes protect males via herd immunity and that men who have sex with men will be protected via targeted vaccination programmes. We argue these may be limited in their effectiveness. We propose that the most effective, practical, ethical and potentially cost-effective solution is universal HPV vaccination that might lead to control of HPV-related diseases in men and women alike. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Estimating progression rates for human papillomavirus infection from epidemiological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jit, Mark; Gay, Nigel; Soldan, Kate; Hong Choi, Yoon; Edmunds, William John

    2010-01-01

    A Markov model was constructed in order to estimate type-specific rates of cervical lesion progression and regression in women with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV). The model was fitted to age- and type-specific data regarding the HPV DNA and cytological status of women undergoing cervical screening in a recent screening trial, as well as cervical cancer incidence. It incorporates different assumptions about the way lesions regress, the accuracy of cytological screening, the specificity of HPV DNA testing, and the age-specific prevalence of HPV infection. Combinations of assumptions generate 162 scenarios for squamous cell carcinomas and 54 scenarios for adenocarcinomas. Simulating an unscreened cohort of women infected with high-risk HPV indicates that the probability of an infection continuing to persist and to develop into invasive cancer depends on the length of time it has already persisted. The scenarios and parameter sets that produce the best fit to available epidemiological data provide a basis for modeling the natural history of HPV infection and disease.

  2. Human papillomavirus in the etiology of head and neck carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michl, Petr; Pazdera, Jindrich; Prochazka, Martin; Pink, Richard; Stosova, Tatana

    2010-03-01

    For more than 20 years, infection with the human papillomavirus (HPV) has been of a matter of interest not only to gynecologists but also to maxillofacial surgeons and othorhinolaryngologists. HPV is generally known to be involved in cervical cancer. Recently, there are many clinical studies pointed out the potentially dangerous connection between HPV infection and head and neck carcinomas (HNC). HPV infection was identified as a possible etiological factor in 15-30% of HNC. Aim of this article is to summarize the recent knowledge about the HPV infection with regards to etiology of head and neck cancer. It has been proven that HPV infection is related to development of head and neck cancer and that the sexual behavior has played an important role in the viral transmission. HNC of viral etiology have been observed mostly in younger people; their curability is difficult and prognosis serious. Beside the well known correlation between developing of new head and neck cancer and bad habits (smoking, alcohol abuse, poor oral hygiene etc.) we should take into consideration the sexual promiscuity and alternative sexual practices. Vaccination against cervical cancer, recommended to young women, should be extended to their male partners to prevent the virus transmission and decrease the HNC incidence.

  3. A review of methods for detect human Papillomavirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abreu André L P

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human Papillomavirus (HPV is the most common sexually transmitted virus. Worldwide, the most common high-risk (HR-HPV are -16/18, and approximately 70% of cervical cancers (CC are due to infection by these genotypes. Persistent infection by HR-HPV is a necessary but not sufficient cause of this cancer, which develops over a long period through precursor lesions, which can be detected by cytological screening. Although this screening has decreased the incidence of CC, HPV-related cervical disease, including premalignant and malignant lesions, continues to be a major burden on health-care systems. Although not completely elucidated, the HPV-driven molecular mechanisms underlying the development of cervical lesions have provided a number of potential biomarkers for both diagnostic and prognostic use in the clinical management of women with HPV-related cervical disease, and these biomarkers can also be used to increase the positive predictive value of current screening methods. In addition, they can provide insights into the biology of HPV-induced cancer and thus lead to the development of nonsurgical therapies. Considering the importance of detecting HPV and related biomarkers, a variety of methods are being developed for these purposes. This review summarizes current knowledge of detection methods for HPV, and related biomarkers that can be used to discriminate lesions with a high risk of progression to CC.

  4. Target cell cyclophilins facilitate human papillomavirus type 16 infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Bienkowska-Haba

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Following attachment to primary receptor heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG, human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16 particles undergo conformational changes affecting the major and minor capsid proteins, L1 and L2, respectively. This results in exposure of the L2 N-terminus, transfer to uptake receptors, and infectious internalization. Here, we report that target cell cyclophilins, peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases, are required for efficient HPV16 infection. Cell surface cyclophilin B (CyPB facilitates conformational changes in capsid proteins, resulting in exposure of the L2 N-terminus. Inhibition of CyPB blocked HPV16 infection by inducing noninfectious internalization. Mutation of a putative CyP binding site present in HPV16 L2 yielded exposed L2 N-terminus in the absence of active CyP and bypassed the need for cell surface CyPB. However, this mutant was still sensitive to CyP inhibition and required CyP for completion of infection, probably after internalization. Taken together, these data suggest that CyP is required during two distinct steps of HPV16 infection. Identification of cell surface CyPB will facilitate the study of the complex events preceding internalization and adds a putative drug target for prevention of HPV-induced diseases.

  5. Human papillomavirus infection in Brazilian women with normal cervical cytology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miranda, P M; Pitol, B C V; Moran, M S; Silva, N N T; Felix, P M; Lima-Filho, J L; Carneiro, C M; Silva, I D C G; Carvalho, R F; Lima, A A; Beçak, W; Stocco, R C

    2012-06-29

    We examined the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in a sample of Brazilian women presenting normal cervical cytology. Possible interactions between patient characteristics and HPV infection were analyzed in order to provide background data to improve cervical cancer screening and prophylaxis. Cervical samples of 399 women, received for routine evaluation in the Health Department of Ouro Preto, MG, Brazil, were subjected to HPV-DNA testing by PCR with MY09/11 primers. HPV-positive specimens were typed by RFLP. A structured epidemiological questionnaire was administered to each woman. HPV prevalence among these cytologically normal women was 11%. Twelve viral types were detected, the most common being HPV-16, -6, -61, -83, and -66. HPV was more prevalent in younger women; high-risk viral types were detected in 61% of the infected women and 27% of the infected women had multiple HPV infections. Significant associations of HPV infection were found with age, literacy, residence, marital status, lifetime number of sexual partners, and parity. We detected a great diversity of HPV types in women with normal cytology. This kind of information about local populations is useful for HPV prevention and vaccination strategies.

  6. Human papillomavirus vaccine acceptability among young adult men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerend, Mary A; Barley, Jessica

    2009-01-01

    For human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination to have maximum benefit to public health, both men and women should be vaccinated. Although efficacy trials in men are still ongoing, the HPV vaccine will likely be licensed for men in the near future. Little is known about men's interest in HPV vaccination. This study assessed whether informing men about the benefits of male HPV vaccination for their female sexual partner(s) boosted interest in the HPV vaccine beyond informing them about the benefits to men alone. Predictors of HPV vaccine acceptability were also identified. Heterosexual male college students (n = 356) were randomly assigned to receive a self-protection versus a self-protection and partner protection message about HPV and the quadrivalent HPV vaccine. Participants provided demographic and sexual history information, HPV-related awareness and knowledge, health beliefs, and HPV vaccination intentions. : Men reported moderate interest in the HPV vaccine; vaccine acceptability did not differ by experimental condition. A multivariate regression model identified several independent predictors of HPV vaccine acceptability including sexual activity, perceived susceptibility to HPV, perceived benefits of the vaccine, perceived hassle and cost of vaccination, self-efficacy for vaccination, and perceived norms for vaccination. Informing men about the benefits of male HPV vaccination for reducing cervical cancer risk in women did not increase men's interest in the vaccine. Correlates of vaccine acceptability among men were generally consistent with those identified for women. Findings have important implications for future HPV vaccination campaigns targeting young adult men.

  7. Pharmacology update in adolescents: contraception and human papillomavirus vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feucht, Cynthia; VandenBussche, Heather

    2013-04-01

    The ideal contraceptive agent remains elusive for the adolescent population. Contraceptive failure is often caused by inappropriate or inconsistent use, and discontinuation within the first year is not uncommon. Various methods have been explored within the adolescent population to increase efficacy rates, minimize side effects, and prevent unwanted pregnancies. The use of intrauterine devices and continuous use of combined oral contraceptives may lead to greater efficacy because of the ease of use and reduction in menstrual symptoms. Recent literature supports the continued use of medroxyprogesterone for adolescents without time limits, and advances in emergency contraception have increased access and use, but have not affected pregnancy rates. Human papillomavirus infection is the most common sexually transmitted infection and is associated with genital warts and the risk for cervical, penile, anal, and vulvovaginal cancer caused by persistent infection. A quadrivalent vaccine is indicated for both males and females to prevent genital warts and cancer, whereas the bivalent vaccine is indicated only for females and cancer prevention. Vaccination rates remain low among adolescents, and except in Virginia and the District of Columbia, vaccination is not a requirement for school entry. Research is ongoing for a 2-dose vaccine to improve vaccination rates while maintaining efficacy. Education is critical to prevent future infections and enhance vaccination rates.

  8. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine: State of the Art and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panatto, Donatella; Amicizia, Daniela; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Rizzitelli, Emanuela; Tramalloni, Daniela; Valle, Ivana; Gasparini, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a widely distributed and common virus, that causes benign lesions (such as warts and papillomas) but, if not cleared, can lead to malignant lesions as well, such as intraepithelial lesions and neoplasia. An extensive body of researches has demonstrated that E1 and E2 are involved in viral transcription and replication, E5, E6, and E7 act as oncoproteins, whilst L1 and L2 contribute to the formation of the capsid. However, this view has been recently challenged, since also E2 could play a role in HPV-induced carcinogenesis. Therefore, a complex picture is emerging, opening new ways and perspectives. The present article provides an overview of the biology of HPV, paying particular attention to its structural details and molecular mechanisms. The article also shows how this knowledge has been exploited for developing effective vaccines, both prophilactic/preventive and therapeutic ones. L1-based prophylactic vaccines, like Gardasil, Cervarix, and Gardasil 9, have been already licensed, whilst L2-based second generation preventive vaccines are still under clinical trials. New, highly immunogenic and effective vaccines can be further developed thanks to computer-aided design and bioinformatics/computational biology. The optimization of combinational therapies is another promising opportunity. © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Safety of Human Papillomavirus Vaccines: An Updated Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Anastasia; Patel, Cyra; Pillsbury, Alexis; Brotherton, Julia; Macartney, Kristine

    2017-12-26

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are now included in immunisation programmes in 71 countries. Unfortunately, uptake has been impacted in some countries by reduced confidence in the safety of the HPV vaccine. In 2013, we published an extensive review demonstrating a reassuring safety profile for bivalent (2vHPV) and quadrivalent (4vHPV) vaccines. A nonavalent (9vHPV) vaccine is now available and HPV immunisation programmes have been extended to males in 11 countries. The aim of this updated narrative review was to examine the evidence on HPV vaccine safety, focusing on the 9vHPV vaccine, special populations and adverse events of special interest (AESI). The previous searches were replicated to identify studies to August 2016, including additional search terms for AESI. We identified 109 studies, including 15 population-based studies in over 2.5 million vaccinated individuals across six countries. All vaccines demonstrated an acceptable safety profile; injection-site reactions were slightly more common for 9vHPV vaccine than for 4vHPV vaccine. There was no consistent evidence of an increased risk of any AESI, including demyelinating syndromes or neurological conditions such as complex regional pain or postural orthostatic tachycardia syndromes. The risk-benefit profile for HPV vaccines remains highly favourable.

  10. The Interaction Between Human Papillomaviruses and the Stromal Microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodby, B; Scott, M; Bodily, J

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small, double-stranded DNA viruses that replicate in stratified squamous epithelia and cause a variety of malignancies. Current efforts in HPV biology are focused on understanding the virus-host interactions that enable HPV to persist for years or decades in the tissue. The importance of interactions between tumor cells and the stromal microenvironment has become increasingly apparent in recent years, but how stromal interactions impact the normal, benign life cycle of HPVs, or progression of lesions to cancer is less understood. Furthermore, how productively replicating HPV impacts cells in the stromal environment is also unclear. Here we bring together some of the relevant literature on keratinocyte-stromal interactions and their impacts on HPV biology, focusing on stromal fibroblasts, immune cells, and endothelial cells. We discuss how HPV oncogenes in infected cells manipulate other cells in their environment, and, conversely, how neighboring cells may impact the efficiency or course of HPV infection. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Human papillomavirus vaccination induces neutralising antibodies in oral mucosal fluids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handisurya, A; Schellenbacher, C; Haitel, A; Senger, T; Kirnbauer, R

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mucosal human papillomaviruses (HPV) are a major cause of cancers and papillomas of the anogenital and oropharyngeal tract. HPV-vaccination elicits neutralising antibodies in sera and cervicovaginal secretions and protects uninfected individuals from persistent anogenital infection and associated diseases caused by the vaccine-targeted HPV types. Whether immunisation can prevent oropharyngeal infection and diseases and whether neutralising antibodies represent the correlate of protection, is still unclear. Methods: We determined IgG and neutralising antibodies against low-risk HPV6 and high-risk HPV16/18 in sera and oral fluids from healthy females (n=20) before and after quadrivalent HPV-vaccination and compared the results with non-vaccinated controls. Results: HPV-vaccination induced type-specific antibodies in sera and oral fluids of the vaccinees. Importantly, the antibodies in oral fluids were capable of neutralising HPV pseudovirions in vitro, indicating protection from infection. The increased neutralising antibody levels against HPV16/18 in sera and oral fluids post-vaccination correlated significantly within an individual. Conclusions: We provide experimental proof that HPV-vaccination elicits neutralising antibodies to the vaccine-targeted types in oral fluids. Hence, immunisation may confer direct protection against type-specific HPV infection and associated diseases of the oropharyngeal tract. Measurement of antibodies in oral fluids represents a suitable tool to assess vaccine-induced protection within the mucosal milieu of the orophayrynx. PMID:26867163

  12. Characteristics of Adolescents Lacking Provider-Recommended Human Papillomavirus Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krakow, Melinda; Beavis, Anna; Cosides, Olivia; Rositch, Anne F

    2017-05-01

    To characterize subgroups of teens in the United States for whom provider recommendation is less likely to impact human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine initiation. We analyzed provider-verified vaccination data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention's 2014 National Immunization Survey-Teen. Poisson regression models identified characteristics associated with the lack of HPV vaccine initiation among teens who received a provider recommendation (n = 12,742). Top qualitative reasons for nonvaccination among teens who received a provider recommendation were summarized (n = 1,688). Among teens with provider recommendations, males, younger teens, and white teens were less likely to initiate vaccination, compared to peers. Believing the vaccine was unnecessary, concerns about safety and lack of vaccine knowledge were common reasons parents did not initiate the vaccine, despite receiving provider recommendations. These key subgroups and barriers to HPV vaccination should be targeted with interventions that complement provider recommendation to achieve broad vaccine uptake in the United States. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Human Papillomavirus Infection, Infertility, and Assisted Reproductive Outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nigel Pereira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The human papillomavirus (HPV is a sexually transmitted infection common among men and women across all geographic and socioeconomic subgroups worldwide. Recent evidence suggests that HPV infection may affect fertility and alter the efficacy of assisted reproductive technologies. In men, HPV infection can affect sperm parameters, specifically motility. HPV-infected sperm can transmit viral DNA to oocytes, which may be expressed in the developing blastocyst. HPV can increase trophoblastic apoptosis and reduce the endometrial implantation of trophoblastic cells, thus increasing the theoretical risk of miscarriage. Vertical transmission of HPV during pregnancy may be involved in the pathophysiology of preterm rupture of membranes and spontaneous preterm birth. In patients undergoing intrauterine insemination for idiopathic infertility, HPV infection confers a lower pregnancy rate. In contrast, the evidence regarding any detrimental impact of HPV infection on IVF outcomes is inconclusive. It has been suggested that vaccination could potentially counter HPV-related sperm impairment, trophoblastic apoptosis, and spontaneous miscarriages; however, these conclusions are based on in vitro studies rather than large-scale epidemiological studies. Improvement in the understanding of HPV sperm infection mechanisms and HPV transmission into the oocyte and developing blastocyst may help explain idiopathic causes of infertility and miscarriage.

  14. Correlates of human papillomavirus vaccination among female university students.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefkowitz, Eva S; Kelly, Kate M; Vasilenko, Sara A; Maggs, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most frequently occurring sexually transmitted infection in the United States, but only one third of adolescent girls have received the HPV vaccine (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention [CDC], 2012; Committee on Infectious Diseases, 2012). Understanding correlates of vaccination behavior among young women has important implications for health care delivery and public service messages targeting HPV vaccination. Female college students (N = 313) completed web-based surveys during their sophomore (second) year of college, fall 2008. Surveys included questions about HPV vaccination, demographic factors (ethnicity/race, socioeconomic status [SES]), individual characteristics (romantic relationship status, grade point average, religiosity), and sexual behavior. Lifetime HPV vaccination was reported by 46.5% of participants. Being African American/Black was associated with a lower likelihood of vaccination. Having a mother with more education, adhering to religious teachings about sex-related principles, and having engaged in recent penetrative sex were associated with a higher likelihood of vaccination. Health care providers should consider young women to be an important group for HPV vaccine education and catch-up, particularly for African American/Black young women and young women from lower SES backgrounds. Providing vaccine education and access to young women before they become sexually active is critical.

  15. Human papillomavirus type 16 DNA in periungual squamous cell carcinomas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moy, R.L.; Eliezri, Y.D.; Bennett, R.G. (UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (USA)); Nuovo, G.J.; Siverstein, S. (UCLA School of Medicine, Los Angeles, CA (USA) Columbia Univ., New York, NY (USA)); Zitelli, J.A. (Montefiore Hospital, Pittsburgh, PA (USA))

    1989-05-12

    Ten squamous cell carcinomas (in situ or invasive) of the fingernail region were analyzed for the presence of DNA sequences homologous to human papilloma-virus (HPV) by dot blot hybridization. In most patients, the lesions were verrucae of long-term duration that were refractory to conventional treatment methods. Eight of the lesions contained HPV DNA sequences, and in six of these the sequences were related to HPV 16 as deduced from low-stringency nucleic acid hybridization followed by low- and high-stringency washes. Furthermore, the restriction endonuclease digestion pattern of DNA isolated from four of these lesions was diagnostic of episomal HPV 16. The high-frequency association of HPV 16 with periungual squamous cell carcinoma is similar to that reported for HPV 16 with squamous cell carcinomas on mucous membranes at other sites, notably the genital tract. The findings suggest that HPV 16 may play an important role in the development of squamous cell carcinomas of the finger, most notably those lesions that are chronic and located in the periungual area.

  16. Risk factors for genital human papillomavirus among men in Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Tina Bech; Mwaiselage, Julius; Iftner, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    were offered HIV testing. Risk factors for HPV (HC2 high-risk and/or low-risk positivity) were assessed using logistic regression with adjustment for age, lifetime number of sexual partners, and HIV status. Altogether, 372 men (20.5%) were HPV-positive. Among men tested for HIV (n = 1,483), the HIV......The objective of the study was to assess risk factors for Human Papillomavirus (HPV) among men in Tanzania, both overall and in relation to HIV status. In a cross-sectional study conducted among 1,813 men in Tanzania, penile swabs were tested for HPV using Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2). Study participants......, although not being statistically significant. In conclusion, HIV is a strong risk factor for HPV among men in Tanzania. Additionally, in HIV-positive men a high BMI seems to be associated with a lower risk of HPV. Finally, we observed a tendency toward a lower risk of HPV both among HIV-positive and HIV...

  17. Maternal Support for Human Papillomavirus Vaccination in Honduras

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langrish, Sarah M.; Cotton, Deborah J.; Simon, Carol J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Cervical cancer is a leading cause of cancer death for women in Latin America, and vaccinating against human papillomavirus (HPV) has the potential to limit this disease. We sought to determine Honduran women's awareness of HPV vaccination and interest in vaccinating their daughters against HPV. Methods We interviewed mothers aged ≥17 at primary care clinics in Honduras. First, we collected demographic information and assessed knowledge related to cervical cancer prevention and awareness of HPV and HPV vaccination. Because most participants were not familiar with HPV, education about the relationships among HPV, sexual activity, and cervical cancer was provided before we asked participants if they would accept HPV vaccination for a 9-year-old daughter. We used multivariable logistic regression to determine predictors of vaccine acceptance. Results We interviewed 632 mothers. Only 13% had heard of HPV vaccination before the interview. After education, 91% would accept HPV vaccination for a 9-year-old daughter. Mothers who intended to vaccinate knew more at baseline about cervical cancer prevention than did those who did not endorse vaccination. Demographic characteristics did not predict vaccine acceptance. Conclusions Few Honduran mothers were aware of HPV or HPV vaccination. However, most Honduran mothers would accept HPV vaccination for their daughters after receiving education about the relationship between HPV infection and cervical cancer. Baseline cervical cancer knowledge was associated with vaccine acceptance. PMID:21091226

  18. High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Targets Crossroads in Immune Signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bart Tummers

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Persistent infections with a high-risk type human papillomavirus (hrHPV can progress to cancer. High-risk HPVs infect keratinocytes (KCs and successfully suppress host immunity for up to two years despite the fact that KCs are well equipped to detect and initiate immune responses to invading pathogens. Viral persistence is achieved by active interference with KCs innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. To this end hrHPV utilizes proteins encoded by its viral genome, as well as exploits cellular proteins to interfere with signaling of innate and adaptive immune pathways. This results in impairment of interferon and pro-inflammatory cytokine production and subsequent immune cell attraction, as well as resistance to incoming signals from the immune system. Furthermore, hrHPV avoids the killing of infected cells by interfering with antigen presentation to antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Thus, hrHPV has evolved multiple mechanisms to avoid detection and clearance by both the innate and adaptive immune system, the molecular mechanisms of which will be dealt with in detail in this review.

  19. The host response to lesions induced by human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanley, M; Coleman, N; Chambers, M

    1994-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are strictly intraepithelial pathogens: in the natural productive infection they induce benign epithelial proliferations of mucocutaneous surfaces, some of which may progress to malignancy. Benign HPV-induced lesions are chronic persistent growths; high levels of viral antigen are expressed in the apparent absence of a host immune response suggesting that these viruses have evolved efficient mechanisms of immune evasion. Cell-mediated responses are central in the pathogenesis of HPV and regression of both cutaneous and genital warts histologically resembles a delayed-type hypersensitivity response (DTH). The antigen(s) in the wart against which this response is initiated are not known but in an experimental murine model DTH responses to the E6 and E7 proteins of HPV-16 can be elicited when viral antigen is presented via the epithelial route. Priming with low levels of viral antigen in this model induces non-responsiveness and the loss of DTH. In HPV-associated cancers the E6/E7 genes are expressed and an antibody response to the proteins is found in at least 50% of cases indicating that these oncoproteins are potential targets for immunotherapy.

  20. Broad-Spectrum Antibiotic Treatment and Subsequent Childhood Type 1 Diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Tine D; Bergholt, Thomas; Bouaziz, Olivier

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Studies link antibiotic treatment and delivery by cesarean section with increased risk of chronic diseases through changes of the gut-microbiota. We aimed to evaluate the association of broad-spectrum antibiotic treatment during the first two years of life with subsequent onset...... of childhood type 1 diabetes and the potential effect-modification by mode of delivery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A Danish nationwide cohort study including all singletons born during 1997-2010. End of follow-up by December 2012. Four national registers provided information on antibiotic redemptions, outcome...... and confounders. Redemptions of antibiotic prescriptions during the first two years of life was classified into narrow-spectrum or broad-spectrum antibiotics. Children were followed from age two to fourteen, both inclusive. The risk of type 1 diabetes with onset before the age of 15 years was assessed by Cox...

  1. Investigating AAK1-and GAK-Regulated Virus-Host Interactions Uncovers Broad-Spectrum Antivirals

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-16

    vaccines or 46 therapies. Targeting host pathways exploited by multiple viruses could offer broad-spectrum 47 solutions. We previously reported that...known as severe dengue, particularly 71 upon a secondary infection with a heterologous DENV strain. Consequently, development of a 72 dengue vaccine ...disease severity (3-5). While an Ebola vaccine has shown promise 76 recently (6), it is not yet approved. Moreover, there is no effective antiviral

  2. Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Epiphytic and Endophytic Fungi from Marine Organisms: Isolation, Bioassay and Taxonomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan-Hua Zhu

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available In the search for new marine derived antibiotics, 43 epi- and endophytic fungal strains were isolated from the surface or the inner tissue of different marine plants and invertebrates. Through preliminary and secondary screening, 10 of them were found to be able to produce broad-spectrum antimicrobial metabolites. By morphological and molecular biological methods, three active strains were characterized to be Penicillium glabrum, Fusarium oxysporum, and Alternaria alternata.

  3. Broad-Spectrum Antimicrobial Epiphytic and Endophytic Fungi from Marine Organisms: Isolation, Bioassay and Taxonomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yi; Mu, Jun; Feng, Yan; Kang, Yue; Zhang, Jia; Gu, Peng-Juan; Wang, Yu; Ma, Li-Fang; Zhu, Yan-Hua

    2009-01-01

    In the search for new marine derived antibiotics, 43 epi- and endophytic fungal strains were isolated from the surface or the inner tissue of different marine plants and invertebrates. Through preliminary and secondary screening, 10 of them were found to be able to produce broad-spectrum antimicrobial metabolites. By morphological and molecular biological methods, three active strains were characterized to be Penicillium glabrum, Fusarium oxysporum, and Alternaria alternata. PMID:19597575

  4. Establishment of human papillomavirus infection requires cell cycle progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dohun Pyeon

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomaviruses (HPVs are DNA viruses associated with major human cancers. As such there is a strong interest in developing new means, such as vaccines and microbicides, to prevent HPV infections. Developing the latter requires a better understanding of the infectious life cycle of HPVs. The HPV infectious life cycle is closely linked to the differentiation state of the stratified epithelium it infects, with progeny virus only made in the terminally differentiating suprabasal compartment. It has long been recognized that HPV must first establish its infection within the basal layer of stratified epithelium, but why this is the case has not been understood. In part this restriction might reflect specificity of expression of entry receptors. However, this hypothesis could not fully explain the differentiation restriction of HPV infection, since many cell types can be infected with HPVs in monolayer cell culture. Here, we used chemical biology approaches to reveal that cell cycle progression through mitosis is critical for HPV infection. Using infectious HPV16 particles containing the intact viral genome, G1-synchronized human keratinocytes as hosts, and early viral gene expression as a readout for infection, we learned that the recipient cell must enter M phase (mitosis for HPV infection to take place. Late M phase inhibitors had no effect on infection, whereas G1, S, G2, and early M phase cell cycle inhibitors efficiently prevented infection. We conclude that host cells need to pass through early prophase for successful onset of transcription of the HPV encapsidated genes. These findings provide one reason why HPVs initially establish infections in the basal compartment of stratified epithelia. Only this compartment of the epithelium contains cells progressing through the cell cycle, and therefore it is only in these cells that HPVs can establish their infection. By defining a major condition for cell susceptibility to HPV infection, these

  5. Human papillomaviruses in urological malignancies: a critical assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tolstov, Yanis; Hadaschik, Boris; Pahernik, Sascha; Hohenfellner, Markus; Duensing, Stefan

    2014-01-01

    Infection with human papillomaviruses (HPVs) is intimately associated with anogenital tract malignancies including cervical and vulvar cancer, a subset of oropharyngeal cancers and certain types of skin cancer. A number of urological tumors have likewise been suggested to be associated with high-risk HPV infection; however, many studies are hampered by a limited number of detection methods. The goal of this review article is to define a set of key criteria when implicating a virus in a human cancer and to apply these criteria to HPV infection in urological cancers. We performed a survey of the literature to corroborate the evidence to support a causal relationship between HPV infection and major urological malignancies. A number of previous reports have implicated HPVs in urological malignancies including penile, prostate, and bladder cancer. Most reports, however, rely only on a limited number of detection methods and frequently use contamination-prone polymerase chain reaction based methods. To firmly establish a link between a viral infection and a human malignancy, it is paramount that an array of techniques is employed and that the virus is ultimately traced by either direct visualization or, in the case of viral genome that has integrated into the host genome, detection of viral genes and gene products as well as functional cellular perturbations. In any case, seroepidemiological studies are likewise crucial to support the evidence. Such evidence for a role of HPV in urological malignancies based on currently available techniques is only present for penile squamous cell carcinomas. An increasing number of immunocompromised patients as well as novel developments in patient care may change the spectrum of HPV-associated neoplasms. This is examplified by results demonstrating a role of HPVs in rare urothelial carcinomas with squamous differentiation in patients with neurogenic bladder. Hence, it is important to keep HPV infection in mind when confronted with

  6. Antibiotic combination therapy can select for broad-spectrum multidrug resistance in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vestergaard, Martin; Paulander, Wilhelm; Marvig, Rasmus L; Clasen, Julie; Jochumsen, Nicholas; Molin, Søren; Jelsbak, Lars; Ingmer, Hanne; Folkesson, Anders

    2016-01-01

    Combination therapy with several antibiotics is one strategy that has been applied in order to limit the spread of antimicrobial resistance. We compared the de novo evolution of resistance during combination therapy with the β-lactam ceftazidime and the fluoroquinolone ciprofloxacin with the resistance evolved after single-drug exposure. Combination therapy selected for mutants that displayed broad-spectrum resistance, and a major resistance mechanism was mutational inactivation of the repressor gene mexR that regulates the multidrug efflux operon mexAB-oprM. Deregulation of this operon led to a broad-spectrum resistance phenotype that decreased susceptibility to the combination of drugs applied during selection as well as to unrelated antibiotic classes. Mutants isolated after single-drug exposure displayed narrow-spectrum resistance and carried mutations in the MexCD-OprJ efflux pump regulator gene nfxB conferring ciprofloxacin resistance, or in the gene encoding the non-essential penicillin-binding protein DacB conferring ceftazidime resistance. Reconstruction of resistance mutations by allelic replacement and in vitro fitness assays revealed that in contrast to single antibiotic use, combination therapy consistently selected for mutants with enhanced fitness expressing broad-spectrum resistance mechanisms. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  7. FGI-104: a broad-spectrum small molecule inhibitor of viral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kinch, Michael S; Yunus, Abdul S; Lear, Calli; Mao, Hanwen; Chen, Hanson; Fesseha, Zena; Luo, Guangxiang; Nelson, Eric A; Li, Limin; Huang, Zhuhui; Murray, Michael; Ellis, William Y; Hensley, Lisa; Christopher-Hennings, Jane; Olinger, Gene G; Goldblatt, Michael

    2009-01-05

    The treatment of viral diseases remains an intractable problem facing the medical community. Conventional antivirals focus upon selective targeting of virus-encoded targets. However, the plasticity of viral nucleic acid mutation, coupled with the large number of progeny that can emerge from a single infected cells, often conspire to render conventional antivirals ineffective as resistant variants emerge. Compounding this, new viral pathogens are increasingly recognized and it is highly improbable that conventional approaches could address emerging pathogens in a timely manner. Our laboratories have adopted an orthogonal approach to combat viral disease: Target the host to deny the pathogen the ability to cause disease. The advantages of this novel approach are many-fold, including the potential to identify host pathways that are applicable to a broad-spectrum of pathogens. The acquisition of drug resistance might also be minimized since selective pressure is not directly placed upon the viral pathogen. Herein, we utilized this strategy of host-oriented therapeutics to screen small molecules for their abilities to block infection by multiple, unrelated virus types and identified FGI-104. FGI-104 demonstrates broad-spectrum inhibition of multiple blood-borne pathogens (HCV, HBV, HIV) as well as emerging biothreats (Ebola, VEE, Cowpox, PRRSV infection). We also demonstrate that FGI-104 displays an ability to prevent lethality from Ebola in vivo. Altogether, these findings reinforce the concept of host-oriented therapeutics and present a much-needed opportunity to identify antiviral drugs that are broad-spectrum and durable in their application.

  8. Targeting an Essential GTPase Obg for the Development of Broad-Spectrum Antibiotics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josephine A Bonventre

    Full Text Available A promising new drug target for the development of novel broad-spectrum antibiotics is the highly conserved small GTPase Obg (YhbZ, CgtA, a protein essential for the survival of all bacteria including Neisseria gonorrhoeae (GC. GC is the agent of gonorrhea, a prevalent sexually transmitted disease resulting in serious consequences on reproductive and neonatal health. A preventive anti-gonorrhea vaccine does not exist, and options for effective antibiotic treatments are increasingly limited. To address the dire need for alternative antimicrobial strategies, we have designed and optimized a 384-well GTPase assay to identify inhibitors of Obg using as a model Obg protein from GC, ObgGC. The assay was validated with a pilot screen of 40,000 compounds and achieved an average Z' value of 0.58 ± 0.02, which suggests a robust assay amenable to high-throughput screening. We developed secondary assessments for identified lead compounds that utilize the interaction between ObgGC and fluorescent guanine nucleotide analogs, mant-GTP and mant-GDP, and an ObgGC variant with multiple alterations in the G-domains that prevent nucleotide binding. To evaluate the broad-spectrum potential of ObgGC inhibitors, Obg proteins of Klebsiella pneumoniae and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus were assessed using the colorimetric and fluorescence-based activity assays. These approaches can be useful in identifying broad-spectrum Obg inhibitors and advancing the therapeutic battle against multidrug resistant bacteria.

  9. Multicenter Study of Human Papillomavirus and the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine: Knowledge and Attitudes among People of African Descent

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Blackman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To compare knowledge and attitudes of human papillomavirus (HPV and the vaccine between different cultures of African descent. Methods. A cross-sectional survey of 555 African-Americans and Afro-Caribbeans residing in the US and the Bahamas (BHM was conducted. Results. General knowledge about HPV and the HPV vaccine differed between the two countries significantly. Bahamian respondents were less likely to have higher numbers of correct knowledge answers when compared to Americans (Adjusted Odds Ratio [Adj. OR] 0.47, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 0.30–0.75. Older age, regardless of location, was also associated with answering fewer questions correctly (Adj. OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.40–0.92. Attitudes related to HPV vaccination were similar between the US and BHM, but nearly 80% of BHM respondents felt that children should not be able to receive the vaccine without parental consent compared to 57% of American respondents. Conclusions. Grave lack of knowledge, safety and cost concerns, and influence of parental restrictions may negatively impact vaccine uptake among African-American and Afro-Caribbean persons. Interventions to increase the vaccine uptake in the Caribbean must include medical provider and parental involvement. Effective strategies for education and increasing vaccine uptake in BHM are crucial for decreasing cervical cancer burden in the Caribbean.

  10. Adenocarcinoma in situ and associated human papillomavirus type distribution observed in two clinical trials of a quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ault, Kevin A; Joura, Elmar A; Kjaer, Susanne K

    2011-01-01

    The primary objective of this report is to describe the detection of adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS) and associated human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution that was observed in the context of two phase 3 clinical trials of a quadrivalent HPV6/11/16/18 vaccine. In this intention-to-treat analysis......, and 6. Women underwent colposcopy and biopsy according to a Papanicolaou triage algorithm. All tissue specimens were tested for 14 HPV types and were adjudicated by a pathology panel. During the trials, 22 women were diagnosed with AIS (six vaccine and 16 placebo). There were 25 AIS lesions in total......, we include all women who had at least one follow-up visit postenrollment. Healthy women (17,622) aged 15-26 with no history of HPV disease and a lifetime number of less than five sex partners (average follow-up of 3.6 years) were randomized (1:1) to receive vaccine or placebo at day 1, months 2...

  11. Rodent Papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uberoi, Aayushi; Lambert, Paul F

    2017-11-27

    Preclinical infection model systems are extremely valuable tools to aid in our understanding of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) biology, disease progression, prevention, and treatments. In this context, rodent papillomaviruses and their respective infection models are useful tools but remain underutilized resources in the field of papillomavirus biology. Two rodent papillomaviruses, MnPV1, which infects the Mastomys species of multimammate rats, and MmuPV1, which infects laboratory mice, are currently the most studied rodent PVs. Both of these viruses cause malignancy in the skin and can provide attractive infection models to study the lesser understood cutaneous papillomaviruses that have been frequently associated with HPV-related skin cancers. Of these, MmuPV1 is the first reported rodent papillomavirus that can naturally infect the laboratory strain of mice. MmuPV1 is an attractive model virus to study papillomavirus pathogenesis because of the ubiquitous availability of lab mice and the fact that this mouse species is genetically modifiable. In this review, we have summarized the knowledge we have gained about PV biology from the study of rodent papillomaviruses and point out the remaining gaps that can provide new research opportunities.

  12. Is there an association between prostate cancer and human papillomaviruses? Returning to the unresolved problem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Volgareva

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Prostate cancer morbidity and mortality rates are steadily increasing in Russia and the world. The etiology of this cancer has not been adequately studied. In particular, the role of high-risk human papillomavirus types that are potent biological carcinogens in a number of other human organs remains unclear. Different laboratories worldwide continue to provide information, the authors of which make mutually exclusive conclusions regarding the involvement of these viruses in the genesis of prostate cancer. This review contains an analysis of the data available in the literature on the possible involvement of human papillomaviruses in prostate cancer.

  13. Human papillomavirus infects placental trophoblast and Hofbauer cells, but appears not to play a causal role in miscarriage and preterm labor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambühl, Lea M M; Leonhard, Anne K; Widen Zakhary, Carina; Jørgensen, Annemette; Blaakaer, Jan; Dybkaer, Karen; Baandrup, Ulrik; Uldbjerg, Niels; Sørensen, Suzette

    2017-10-01

    Recently, an association between human papillomavirus infection and both spontaneous abortion and spontaneous preterm delivery was suggested. However, the reported human papillomavirus prevalence in pregnant women varies considerably and reliable conclusions are difficult. We aimed to investigate human papillomavirus infection in placental tissue of a Danish study cohort. Furthermore, we studied the cellular localization of human papillomavirus. In this prospective case-control study, placental tissue was analyzed for human papillomavirus infection by nested PCR in the following four study groups: full-term delivery (n = 103), spontaneous preterm delivery (n = 69), elective abortion (n = 54), and spontaneous abortion (n = 44). Moreover, human papillomavirus cellular target was identified using in situ hybridization. Human papillomavirus prevalence in placental tissue was 8.7% in full-term deliveries, 8.8% in spontaneous preterm deliveries, 10.9% in spontaneous abortions, and 20.4% in elective abortions. Twelve different human papillomavirus types were detected, and placental human papillomavirus infection was associated to a disease history of cervical cancer. Human papillomavirus DNA was identified in trophoblast cells, cells of the placental villi mesenchyme including Hofbauer cells, and in parts of the encasing endometrium. Placental human papillomavirus infections are not likely to constitute a risk factor for spontaneous preterm labor or spontaneous abortions in the Danish population, although an effect of human papillomavirus DNA in placental cells cannot be excluded. © 2017 Nordic Federation of Societies of Obstetrics and Gynecology.

  14. Preventing human papillomavirus-related cancers: we are all in this together.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dilley, Sarah; Scarinci, Isabel; Kimberlin, David; Straughn, J Michael

    2017-06-01

    Human papillomavirus-related cancers, which include cervical, vulvovaginal, anal, and oropharyngeal cancers, are on the rise in the United States. Although the human papillomavirus vaccine has been on the market for 10 years, human papillomavirus vaccination rates are well below national goals. Research identified many barriers and facilitators to human papillomavirus vaccination, and provider recommendation remains the most important factor in parental and patient decisions to vaccinate. While much of the burden of human papillomavirus vaccine provision falls on pediatricians and primary care providers, they cannot do it alone. As clinicians who care for a large proportion of human papillomavirus-related conditions, obstetrician-gynecologists and other women's health care providers must share the responsibility for vaccination of eligible patients. Obstetrician-gynecologists can support the efforts to eradicate human papillomavirus-related disease in their patients and their families via multiple avenues, including providing the human papillomavirus vaccine and being community leaders in support of vaccination. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Risk Factors for High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Detection Among HIV-Negative and HIV-Positive Women From Tanzania

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dartell, Myassa Arkam; Rasch, Vibeke; Munk, Christian

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide. The prevalence is dependent on several known factors notably sexual behavior and age, and factors still under scrutiny.......Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide. The prevalence is dependent on several known factors notably sexual behavior and age, and factors still under scrutiny....

  16. Management of women with human papillomavirus persistence: long-term follow-up of a randomized clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elfgren, Kristina; Elfström, K Miriam; Naucler, Pontus; Arnheim-Dahlström, Lisen; Dillner, Joakim

    2017-03-01

    Introduction of human papillomavirus-based screening is ongoing in many countries, given its higher sensitivity and longer-lasting protection compared with cytology-based screening. However, optimal clinical management of human papillomavirus-positive but cytology-negative women is unclear, and additional studies with clinical follow-up are warranted. The aim of the current study was to investigate the long-term outcomes of the clinical management used in a double-blind, randomized clinical trial of human papillomavirus screening conducted in the context of the routine, organized screening program in Sweden. Among 12,527 women aged 32-38 years enrolled in the trial, we followed up the 195 women who attended the colposcopy screening who were cytologically normal but persistently human papillomavirus positive (at least 12 months later; median, 19 months) in the human papillomavirus testing arm (n = 100) or were randomly selected from the control arm (n = 95). Women in the human papillomavirus testing arm were followed up with repeated human papillomavirus testing, cytologies, and colposcopies if persistently human papillomavirus-positive without cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse. A similar number of random colposcopies and tests were carried out in the control arm. Women were followed up over 13 years for the main outcome measures: cumulative incidence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 or worse. Among women who continued to attend and had continuous human papillomavirus persistence, all (40 of 40, 100% [95% confidence interval, 91-100%]) developed cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse. There were no cases among women who cleared their human papillomavirus persistence (0 of 35, 0% (95% confidence interval, 0-10%) (P < .001). Among women who had had human papillomavirus persistence but did not continue with repeated human papillomavirus tests (unknown persistence

  17. Fostering acceptance of human papillomavirus and herpes simplex virus vaccines among adolescents and parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Short, Mary B; Rosenthal, Susan L

    2006-02-01

    Vaccines for human papillomavirus and herpes simplex virus are currently in development, and these vaccines could be an effective and cost-effective strategy to control these diseases. Young adolescents are likely to be the target recipients of these vaccines. These vaccines, however, will only be successful in reducing the prevalence of these diseases if accepted. This manuscript will focus on the issues associated with the acceptability of these vaccines by healthcare providers, parents, and adolescents/young adults. Recent studies with healthcare providers, parents, and adolescent/young adults have found support for the acceptability of the human papillomavirus and herpes simplex virus vaccines. Protecting adolescents from serious diseases may be a more important priority for parents than concern about how the disease is transmitted. It is likely that vaccines for human papillomavirus and herpes simplex virus will find acceptance among these groups. Strategies to increase acceptability and foster access, however, will still be needed.

  18. High risk human papillomavirus and Epstein Barr virus in human breast milk.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glenn, Wendy K; Whitaker, Noel J; Lawson, James S

    2012-09-01

    Multiple viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus, Epstein Barr virus (EBV) and mouse mammary tumour virus have been identified in human milk. High risk human papillomavirus (HPV) sequences have been identified in breast cancer. The aim of this study is to determine if viral sequences are present in human milk from normal lactating women. Standard (liquid) and in situ polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques were used to identify HPV and EBV in human milk samples from normal lactating Australian women who had no history of breast cancer.High risk human papillomavirus was identified in milk samples of 6 of 40 (15%) from normal lactating women - sequencing on four samples showed three were HPV 16 and one was HPV 18. Epstein Barr virus was identified in fourteen samples (33%). The presence of high risk HPV and EBV in human milk suggests the possibility of milk transmission of these viruses. However, given the rarity of viral associated malignancies in young people, it is possible but unlikely, that such transmission is associated with breast or other cancers.

  19. High risk human papillomavirus and Epstein Barr virus in human breast milk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glenn Wendy K

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Multiple viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus, Epstein Barr virus (EBV and mouse mammary tumour virus have been identified in human milk. High risk human papillomavirus (HPV sequences have been identified in breast cancer. The aim of this study is to determine if viral sequences are present in human milk from normal lactating women. Findings Standard (liquid and in situ polymerase chain reaction (PCR techniques were used to identify HPV and EBV in human milk samples from normal lactating Australian women who had no history of breast cancer. High risk human papillomavirus was identified in milk samples of 6 of 40 (15% from normal lactating women - sequencing on four samples showed three were HPV 16 and one was HPV 18. Epstein Barr virus was identified in fourteen samples (33%. Conclusion The presence of high risk HPV and EBV in human milk suggests the possibility of milk transmission of these viruses. However, given the rarity of viral associated malignancies in young people, it is possible but unlikely, that such transmission is associated with breast or other cancers.

  20. Tenacity of exogenous human papillomavirus DNA in sperm washing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brossfield, J E; Chan, P J; Patton, W C; King, A

    1999-07-01

    Sperm cells have been shown to take up exogenous DNA readily. The hypothesis was that sperm washing would remove exogenous viral DNA infecting sperm cells. The objective was to compare three types of sperm washing procedures for their capacity to remove exogenous human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA from infected sperm. Prewashed sperm were equally divided and sperm in one portion were exposed to L1 HPV DNA fragments for 30 min at 37 degrees C. Untreated washed sperm served as the control. After transfection, the sperm were washed by either centrifuge, two-layer Isolate colloid wash, or test-yolk buffer procedures. Sperm parameters were measured on a Hamilton Thorn HTM-C analyzer. Sperm DNA were extracted and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was carried out targeting the L1 consensus gene of HPV and the designated sentinel gene, 17q21 spanning the D17S855 gene. Amplified products were analyzed in 2% agarose gel electrophoresis. PCR analyses detected the consensus L1 HPV gene in sperm after they were processed through either of the three procedures. Controls were negative for the L1 gene. Extracted DNA were verified by PCR amplification of 17q21 spanning the D17S855 gene. Transfected sperm had higher percentages of total motility and progression compared with the control. Centrifuged, washed, transfected sperm exhibited a greater curvilinear velocity and hyperactivation. The data showed that washing would not remove exogenous HPV DNA from sperm cells. The viral DNA was tenaciously bound to the sperm, suggesting an internalization into the sperm. The viral DNA also increased the motility of the sperm by affecting the velocity and progression of the sperm, which suggested either an increase in metabolism, an enhancement of the calcium-regulated motility mechanism, or an artifact of PCR reagents. More studies are needed to elucidate the mechanism of DNA stimulated sperm motility.

  1. Prevalence of tonsillar human papillomavirus infections in Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusan, M; Klug, T E; Henriksen, J J; Bonde, J H; Fuursted, K; Ovesen, T

    2015-09-01

    The incidence of tonsillar carcinomas associated with Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection has increased dramatically over the last three decades. In fact, currently in Scandinavia, HPV-associated cases account for over 80 % of tonsillar carcinoma cases. Yet, the epidemiology and natural history of tonsillar HPV infections remains poorly characterized. Our aim was to characterize such infections in the Danish population in tumor-free tonsillar tissue. Unlike previous studies, we considered both palatine tonsils. We examined both tonsils from 80 patients with peritonsillar abscess (n = 25) or chronic tonsillar disease (n = 55). HPV was detected by nested PCR with PGMY 09/11 and GP5+/GP6+L1 consensus primers, and typed by sequencing. Samples were also analyzed using a higher-throughput method, the CLART HPV 2 Clinical Array Assay. The overall prevalence of HPV tonsillar infection was 1.25 % (1/80, 95 % CI 0.03-6.77 %) by nested PCR, and 0 % by CLART HPV2 Clinical Array. The HPV-positive patient was a 16-year-old female with recurrent tonsillitis and tonsillar hypertrophy. The type detected was HPV6. HPV was not detected in the contralateral tonsil of this patient. Compared to cervical HPV infections in Denmark, tonsillar HPV infections are 10- to 15-fold less frequent. In the HPV-positive patient in this study, HPV was detected in only one of the tonsils. This raises the possibility that prior studies may underestimate the prevalence of HPV infections, as they do not consider both palatine tonsils.

  2. [Acceptability of human papillomavirus vaccine in mothers from Valencia (Spain)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Navarro-Illana, P; Caballero, P; Tuells, J; Puig-Barberá, J; Diez-Domingo, J

    2015-11-01

    In October 2008, Valencian Community started its human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination schedules for 14 year-old girls. The aim of this study is to assess knowledge about HPV infection and its vaccine among the mothers of these girls, and to identify factors associated with the willingness to vaccinate their daughters. Cross-sectional study by means of a questionnaire to mothers of girls born in 1995, and attending secondary schools in the province of Valencia during 2010-2011. Cluster stratified random sample (n=1279). percentages, confidence intervals, OR, Chi-squared and multivariate logistic regression contrasts. A total of 833 (65.1%) questionnaires were completed. The results obtained showed that, 76.6% of mothers had vaccinated their daughters against HPV; 93.8% knew about the vaccine, particularly through television (71.5%); and 78.5% received positive advice from a health professional which increased the vaccination of their daughters (OR: 2.4). There was low overall knowledge about HPV infection and vaccination. Confidence of the mothers in vaccines as a preventative method increases the HPV vaccination (OR: 3.8). The first reason for refusal was the fear of adverse events (45.6%). Apparently, the media does not influence the willingness to vaccinate. It would be desirable to minimize the perception of risk of the vaccine. Positive health advice from a health professional can have a positive effect on vaccination. There is a gap between the level of knowledge and decision-making to vaccinate. Copyright © 2014 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  3. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Rates in Young Cancer Survivors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klosky, James L; Hudson, Melissa M; Chen, Yanjun; Connelly, James A; Wasilewski-Masker, Karen; Sun, Can-Lan; Francisco, Liton; Gustafson, Laura; Russell, Kathryn M; Sabbatini, Gina; Flynn, Jessica S; York, Jocelyn M; Giuliano, Anna R; Robison, Leslie L; Wong, F Lennie; Bhatia, Smita; Landier, Wendy

    2017-11-01

    Purpose Cancer survivors are at high risk for human papillomavirus (HPV)-related morbidities; we estimated the prevalence of HPV vaccine initiation in cancer survivors versus the US population and examined predictors of noninitiation. Methods Participants included 982 cancer survivors (9 to 26 years of age; 1 to 5 years postcompletion of therapy); we assessed HPV vaccine initiation, sociodemographic and clinical characteristics, and vaccine-specific health beliefs; age-, sex-, and year-matched US population comparisons were from the National Immunization Survey-Teen and the National Health Interview Survey (2012-2015). Results The mean age at the time of the study was 16.3 ± 4.7 years; the mean time off therapy was 2.7 ± 1.2 years; participants were 55% male and 66% non-Hispanic white; 59% had leukemia/lymphoma. Vaccine initiation rates were significantly lower in cancer survivors versus the general population (23.8%; 95% CI, 20.6% to 27.0% v 40.5%; 95% CI, 40.2% to 40.7%; P P P young adult survivors and peers (ages 18 to 26 years) was comparably low (25.3%; 95% CI, 20.9% to 29.7% v 24.2%; 95% CI, 23.6% to 24.9%). Predictors of noninitiation included lack of provider recommendation (OR, 10.8; 95% CI, 6.5 to 18.0; P P P P P < .001; comparison, 13 to 17 years). Conclusion HPV vaccine initiation rates in cancer survivors are low. Lack of provider recommendation and barriers to vaccine receipt should be targeted in vaccine promotion efforts.

  4. Human papillomavirus infection in women in four regions of Senegal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mbaye, El Hadji Seydou; Gheit, Tarik; Dem, Ahmadou; McKay-Chopin, Sandrine; Toure-Kane, Ndeye Coumba; Mboup, Souleymane; Tommasino, Massimo; Sylla, Bakary S; Boye, Cheikh Saad Bouh

    2014-02-01

    Cervical cancer is the most frequent cancer among women in Senegal. However, there are few data concerning the human papillomavirus (HPV) types inducing neoplasia and cervical cancers and their prevalence in the general population of Senegal. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of HPV infection in Senegalese women aged 18 years and older in Dakar Region and three other regions. Cervical samples were collected from 498 women aged 18-80 years (mean, 42.1 years) in Dakar Region. Also, 438 samples were collected from three other regions: Thiès, Saint-Louis, and Louga. The samples were screened for 21 HPV genotypes using an HPV type-specific E7 PCR bead-based multiplex genotyping assay (TS-MPG). The prevalence of high risk (HR)-HPV in Dakar Region was 17.4%. HPV 52 (3.2%) was the most prevalent HPV type, followed by HPV 31 (3.0%) and HPV 16, 45, and 53 (all 2.8%). In the Thiès, Saint-Louis, and Louga Regions, the prevalence of HR-HPV was 23.2%, 13.1%, and 19.4%, respectively. The study revealed the specificity of HPV prevalence in Dakar Region and other regions of Senegal. The observed patterns show some differences compared with other regions of the world. These findings raise the possibility that, in addition to HPV 16 and HPV 18, other HPV types should be considered for a vaccination program in Senegal. However, additional studies to determine the HPV type distribution in cervical cancer specimens in Senegal are required to further corroborate this hypothesis. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Human papillomavirus infection in women from tlaxcala, Mexico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez-Márquez, Noé; Jaime Jiménez-Aranda, Lucio; Sánchez-Alonso, Patricia; Santos-López, Gerardo; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica

    2010-07-01

    Cervical cancer is an important health problem in women living in developing countries. Infection with some genotypes of human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most important risk factor associated with cervical cancer. Little information exists about HPV genotype distribution in rural and suburban regions of Mexico. Thus, we determined the prevalence of HPV genotypes in women from Tlaxcala, one of the poorest states in central Mexico, and we evaluated age infection prevalence and risk factors associated with cervical neoplasm. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 236 women seeking gynecological care at the Mexican Institute for Social Security in Tlaxcala, Mexico. Cervical scrapings were diagnosed as normal, low-grade, and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LGSIL, HGSIL). Parallel samples were used to detect HPV genotypes by PCR assays using type-specific primers for HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, and 31. An epidemiological questionnaire was applied. Prevalence of HPV infection was 31.3%. From the infected samples, prevalence of HPV 16 was 45.9%; HPV 18, 31.1%; HPV 31, 16.2%; HPV 6, 10.8%; HPV 11, 6.7%. With regard to age, the highest HPV prevalence (43.5%) was found in the 18- to 24-year-old group and the lowest (19%) in the 45- to 54-year-old group. None of the risk factors showed association with cervical neoplasia grade. HPV 16 was the most common in cervical lesions. HPV was present in 22% of normal samples and, of these, 82.6% represented high-risk HPVs. Tlaxcala showed HPV prevalence comparable to that of the largest cities in Mexico, with higher prevalence for HPV 31.

  6. Molecular testing of human papillomavirus in cervical specimens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazzaz, Faten Salah B.

    2007-01-01

    Objective was to improve the diagnosis of cervical neoplasia by early detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) in uterine cervix, by adding molecular testing of HPV using hybrid capture 2 (HC2) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) tests to Papanicoalou (Pap) test. One hundred women were enrolled in this study. The mean age (mean+-SD) was 41.97+- 8.76 years and range was 27-65 years. All women had undergone cervical cytological screening with cervical cytology, HPV DNA testing by HC2 and PCR, during the period from January to December 2006, at King Abdul-Aziz University Hospital (KAAUH) and King Fahd research Center, Jeddah, Saudi Arabia. The results were obtained by HC2 for detection of HPV were 5(5%) high-risk HPV, one low-risk HPV (1%) and 94(94%) negative cases. The PCR detected only 4(4%) cases. Using the HC2 test as a reference, sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive, negative predictive values and accuracy of base line Pap were 50, 85, 17.7, 96.4 and 83%; of final Pap smear were 100, 96.8, 66.7, 100, and 97% and for PCR were 66.7, 100, 100, 97.9 and 98%. The Pap test was repeated within a year for patients with abnormal Pap test with positive HPV DNA. Combined screening by cytology and HPV testing using both HC2 and PCR sensitively detects women with existing disease. The absence of HPV DNA provides reassurance that patients are unlikely to develop cancer for several years. We suggest using Pap with HC2 and PCR in screening programs to ensure that women with the double negative result at baseline might safely be screened at longer intervals. (author)

  7. The Cell Cycle Timing of Human Papillomavirus DNA Replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinson, Tormi; Henno, Liisi; Toots, Mart; Ustav, Mart; Ustav, Mart

    2015-01-01

    Viruses manipulate the cell cycle of the host cell to optimize conditions for more efficient viral genome replication. One strategy utilized by DNA viruses is to replicate their genomes non-concurrently with the host genome; in this case, the viral genome is amplified outside S phase. This phenomenon has also been described for human papillomavirus (HPV) vegetative genome replication, which occurs in G2-arrested cells; however, the precise timing of viral DNA replication during initial and stable replication phases has not been studied. We developed a new method to quantitate newly synthesized DNA levels and used this method in combination with cell cycle synchronization to show that viral DNA replication is initiated during S phase and is extended to G2 during initial amplification but follows the replication pattern of cellular DNA during S phase in the stable maintenance phase. E1 and E2 protein overexpression changes the replication time from S only to both the S and G2 phases in cells that stably maintain viral episomes. These data demonstrate that the active synthesis and replication of the HPV genome are extended into the G2 phase to amplify its copy number and the duration of HPV genome replication is controlled by the level of the viral replication proteins E1 and E2. Using the G2 phase for genome amplification may be an important adaptation that allows exploitation of changing cellular conditions during cell cycle progression. We also describe a new method to quantify newly synthesized viral DNA levels and discuss its benefits for HPV research.

  8. Molecular epidemiology and pathogenic potential of underdiagnosed human papillomavirus types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzo, Stefano; Ciavattini, Andrea; Bagnarelli, Patrizia; Marinelli, Katia; Sisti, Stefano; Clementi, Massimo

    2008-07-04

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) tests are crucial diagnostic tools for the prevention of neoplastic lesions of the uterine cervix. However most commercial methods are designed to detect high-risk (HR) HPV types and a limited selection of low-risk ones, thus missing a fair number of intermediate/low-risk types. As a result, many HPV infections remain undiagnosed, generating distrust in virological diagnosis among gynaecologists, who continue to rely preferentially on cytological and colposcopic findings. In this study, we tested 6,335 consecutive clinical samples, most of them from Italian patients with cytological abnormalities. The samples, collected in 2000-2007, were analyzed using PCR amplification of a 173-206 bp (depending on HPV type) conserved region in the L1 open reading frame, restriction endonuclease analysis and, where required, sequence analysis for type determination. Analysis of a smaller male sample and long term follow-up of a few female subjects was also performed. A total of 2,161 samples tested positive for HPV DNA (32.1%); 21.3% of them were mixed infections. Overall, 59 known and 2 unknown HPV types were detected. Their relative prevalence was calculated; notably, types not clearly identifiable using the most common commercial method accounted for 36% of infections. Clinical findings associated with the underdiagnosed types ranged from H-SIL to low-grade abnormalities, although none of these infections resulted in invasive cancer. Given the high prevalence of some underdiagnosed HPV types in the population (principally HPV53, HPV66, HPV84, and HPV87) and their frequent association with cytological abnormalities, techniques capable of detecting and typing them would prove extremely useful.

  9. The Laboratory Diagnosis of Genital Human Papillomavirus Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Coutlee

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomaviruses (HPVs are the etiological agents of several genital cancers, including cancer of the uterine cervix. The detection of HPV infection in genital samples may increase the sensitivity of primary and secondary screenings of cervical cancer. HPV testing may also improve the specificity of screening programs, resulting in the avoidance of overtreatment and cost savings for confirmatory procedures. The major determinants of clinical progression of HPV infection include persistence of HPV infection, involvement of high-risk HPV types, high HPV viral load, integration of viral DNA and presence of several potential cofactors. Signal amplification HPV-DNA detection techniques (Hybrid Capture II, Digene Corporation, USA are standardized, commercially available, and capable of detecting several high-risk HPV types. They also increase the sensitivity of screening for high-grade lesions in combination with cytology. The sensitivity of these techniques to detect high-grade lesions is higher than that of cytology, but the referral rate for colposcopy is greater. These techniques are approved for the triage to colposcopy of women with cervical smears interpreted as atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance. Triage and screening for cervical cancer using HPV will probably be restricted to women aged 30 years or older because of the high prevalence of infection in younger women. Amplification techniques are ideal for epidemiological studies because they minimize the misclassification of HPV infection status. These techniques can detect low HPV burden infections. Consensus primers amplify most genital types in one reaction, and the reverse hybridization of amplicons with type-specific probes allows for the typing of HPV-positive samples. Consensus PCR assays are currently under evaluation for diagnostic purposes. HPV testing is currently implemented for the clinical management of women.

  10. Potential benefits of second-generation human papillomavirus vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kiatpongsan, Sorapop; Campos, Nicole Gastineau; Kim, Jane J

    2012-01-01

    Current prophylactic vaccines against human papillomavirus (HPV) target two oncogenic types (16 and 18) that contribute to 70% of cervical cancer cases worldwide. Our objective was to quantify the range of additional benefits conferred by second-generation HPV prophylactic vaccines that are expected to expand protection to five additional oncogenic types (31, 33, 45, 52 and 58). A microsimulation model of HPV and cervical cancer calibrated to epidemiological data from two countries (Kenya and Uganda) was used to estimate reductions in lifetime risk of cervical cancer from the second-generation HPV vaccines. We explored the independent and joint impact of uncertain factors (i.e., distribution of HPV types, co-infection with multiple HPV types, and unidentifiable HPV types in cancer) and vaccine properties (i.e., cross-protection against non-targeted HPV types), compared against currently-available vaccines. Assuming complete uptake of the second-generation vaccine, reductions in lifetime cancer risk were 86.3% in Kenya and 91.8% in Uganda, representing an absolute increase in cervical cancer reduction of 26.1% in Kenya and 17.9% in Uganda, compared with complete uptake of current vaccines. The range of added benefits was 19.6% to 29.1% in Kenya and 14.0% to 19.5% in Uganda, depending on assumptions of cancers attributable to multiple HPV infections and unidentifiable HPV types. These effects were blunted in both countries when assuming vaccine cross-protection with both the current and second-generation vaccines. Second-generation HPV vaccines that protect against additional oncogenic HPV types have the potential to improve cervical cancer prevention. Co-infection with multiple HPV infections and unidentifiable HPV types can influence vaccine effectiveness, but the magnitude of effect may be moderated by vaccine cross-protective effects. These benefits must be weighed against the cost of the vaccines in future analyses.

  11. Commercially available molecular tests for human papillomaviruses (HPV): 2015 update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poljak, Mario; Kocjan, Boštjan J; Oštrbenk, Anja; Seme, Katja

    2016-03-01

    Commercial molecular tests for human papillomaviruses (HPV) are invaluable diagnostic tools in cervical carcinoma screening and management of women with cervical precancerous lesions as well as important research tools for epidemiological studies, vaccine development, and implementation and monitoring of vaccination programs. In this third inventory of commercial HPV tests, we identified 193 distinct commercial HPV tests and at least 127 test variants available on the market in 2015, which represents a 54% and 79% increase in the number of distinct HPV tests and variants, respectively, in comparison to our last inventory performed in 2012. Identified HPV tests were provisionally divided into eight main groups and several subgroups. Among the 193 commercial HPV tests, all but two target alpha-HPV types only. Although the number of commercial HPV tests with at least one published study in peer-reviewed literature has increased significantly in the last three years, several published performance evaluations are still not in line with agreed-upon standards in the HPV community. Manufacturers should invest greater effort into evaluating their products and publishing validation/evaluation results in peer-reviewed journals. To achieve this, more clinically oriented external quality-control panels and initiatives are required. For evaluating the analytical performance of the entire range of HPV tests currently on the market, more diverse and reliable external quality-control programs based on international standards for all important HPV types are indispensable. The performance of a wider range of HPV tests must be promptly evaluated on a variety of alternative clinical specimens. In addition, more complete HPV assays containing validated sample-extraction protocols and appropriate internal controls are urgently needed. Provision of a broader range of automated systems allowing large-scale HPV testing as well as the development of reliable, rapid, and affordable molecular

  12. Human Papillomavirus Infection in Women from Tlaxcala, Mexico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velázquez-Márquez, Noé; Jaime Jiménez-Aranda, Lucio; Sánchez-Alonso, Patricia; Santos-López, Gerardo; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica

    2010-01-01

    Cervical cancer is an important health problem in women living in developing countries. Infection with some genotypes of human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most important risk factor associated with cervical cancer. Little information exists about HPV genotype distribution in rural and suburban regions of Mexico. Thus, we determined the prevalence of HPV genotypes in women from Tlaxcala, one of the poorest states in central Mexico, and we evaluated age infection prevalence and risk factors associated with cervical neoplasm. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 236 women seeking gynecological care at the Mexican Institute for Social Security in Tlaxcala, Mexico. Cervical scrapings were diagnosed as normal, low-grade, and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LGSIL, HGSIL). Parallel samples were used to detect HPV genotypes by PCR assays using type-specific primers for HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, and 31. An epidemiological questionnaire was applied. Prevalence of HPV infection was 31.3%. From the infected samples, prevalence of HPV 16 was 45.9%; HPV 18, 31.1%; HPV 31, 16.2%; HPV 6, 10.8%; HPV 11, 6.7%. With regard to age, the highest HPV prevalence (43.5%) was found in the 18- to 24-year-old group and the lowest (19%) in the 45- to 54-year-old group. None of the risk factors showed association with cervical neoplasia grade. HPV 16 was the most common in cervical lesions. HPV was present in 22% of normal samples and, of these, 82.6% represented high-risk HPVs. Tlaxcala showed HPV prevalence comparable to that of the largest cities in Mexico, with higher prevalence for HPV 31. PMID:24031552

  13. Human Papillomavirus and Tonsillar and Base of Tongue Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torbjörn Ramqvist

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available In 2007, human papillomavirus (HPV type 16 was recognized as a risk factor by the International Agency for Research on Cancer, for oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC, where tonsillar and base of tongue cancer (TSCC and BOTSCC dominate. Furthermore, patients with HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC, had a much better clinical outcome than those with corresponding HPV-negative cancer and other head and neck cancer. More specifically, survival was around 80% for HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC vs. 40% five-year disease free survival, for the corresponding HPV-negative tumors with conventional radiotherapy and surgery, while this could not be observed for HPV-positive OSCC at other sites. In addition, the past 20–40 years in many Western Countries, the incidence of HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC has risen, and >70% are men. This has resulted in a relative increase of patients with HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC that may not need the intensified chemo-radiotherapy (with many more severe debilitating side effects often given today to patients with head and neck cancer. However, before tapering therapy, one needs to enable selection of patients for such treatment, by identifying clinical and molecular markers that together with HPV-positive status will better predict patient prognosis and response to therapy. To conclude, there is a new increasing group of patients with HPV-positive TSCC and BOTSCC with good clinical outcome, where options for better-tailored therapy are needed. For prevention, it would be of benefit to vaccinate both girls and boys against HPV16 infection. For potential future screening the ways to do so need optimizing.

  14. Evaluation of optic neuritis following human papillomavirus vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sridhar, Gayathri; Tian, Fang; Forshee, Richard; Kulldorff, Martin; Selvam, Nandini; Sutherland, Andrea; Bryan, Wilson; Barone, Samuel; Xu, Lei; Izurieta, Hector S

    2017-07-03

    To assess the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and occurrence of optic neuritis (ON) and to evaluate a claims-based algorithm for identification of ON. Females of 9-26 year olds in the HealthCore's Integrated Research Database (HIRD SM ) with and without claims evidence of HPV vaccination between 2007 and 2012 were included in this study. Potential ON cases were identified using the claims-based algorithm, positive predictive value (PPV) was determined using medical chart review. For the claims analysis, two study designs, a self-controlled temporal scan statistic and a retrospective matched cohort analysis, were used. ON was defined based on an algorithm developed using diagnosis and procedure codes from the medical claims. The PPV for ON cases using charts that had enough information for reviewers to make a determination was 62.5% (95% CI: 49.5%-74.3%). With the self-controlled temporal scan statistic, the primary analysis restricting on recommended vaccination schedule timing showed an increased risk of potential ON after second dose (RR = 3.39; p = 0.03), this finding was not confirmed for any of the additional analyses performed for individual or combined doses. With the cohort design, there was no increased risk of potential ON following vaccination in either individual or combined dose analyses. The risk of potential ON was higher among participants with a history of prior autoimmune diseases. In conclusion, identifying confirmed ON cases through administrative claims data proved challenging. The claims-based analysis in this study did not provide evidence for an association of ON with HPV vaccination.

  15. Human Papillomavirus Genome Integration and Head and Neck Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinatti, L M; Walline, H M; Carey, T E

    2017-12-01

    We conducted a critical review of human papillomavirus (HPV) integration into the host genome in oral/oropharyngeal cancer, reviewed the literature for HPV-induced cancers, and obtained current data for HPV-related oral and oropharyngeal cancers. In addition, we performed studies to identify HPV integration sites and the relationship of integration to viral-host fusion transcripts and whether integration is required for HPV-associated oncogenesis. Viral integration of HPV into the host genome is not required for the viral life cycle and might not be necessary for cellular transformation, yet HPV integration is frequently reported in cervical and head and neck cancer specimens. Studies of large numbers of early cervical lesions revealed frequent viral integration into gene-poor regions of the host genome with comparatively rare integration into cellular genes, suggesting that integration is a stochastic event and that site of integration may be largely a function of chance. However, more recent studies of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) suggest that integration may represent an additional oncogenic mechanism through direct effects on cancer-related gene expression and generation of hybrid viral-host fusion transcripts. In HNSCC cell lines as well as primary tumors, integration into cancer-related genes leading to gene disruption has been reported. The studies have shown that integration-induced altered gene expression may be associated with tumor recurrence. Evidence from several studies indicates that viral integration into genic regions is accompanied by local amplification, increased expression in some cases, interruption of gene expression, and likely additional oncogenic effects. Similarly, reported examples of viral integration near microRNAs suggest that altered expression of these regulatory molecules may also contribute to oncogenesis. Future work is indicated to identify the mechanisms of these events on cancer cell behavior.

  16. Smoking and subsequent human papillomavirus infection: a mediation analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eldridge, Ronald C; Pawlita, Michael; Wilson, Lauren; Castle, Philip E; Waterboer, Tim; Gravitt, Patti E; Schiffman, Mark; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2017-11-01

    Smoking is an established risk factor for a human papillomavirus (HPV) infection advancing to cervical precancer and cancer, but its role earlier in the natural history is less clear. Smoking is inversely associated with possessing HPV antibodies from a past infection suggesting that smoking may influence acquiring subsequent infections. In a cohort of 1976 U.S. women, we evaluate whether reduced antibodies to HPV-16 is a mechanism for smoking's role on acquiring a subsequent HPV-16 infection, through the analytic technique of causal mediation analysis. We posit a causal model and estimate two counterfactually defined effects: a smoking impaired antibody-mediated indirect effect and a nonmediated direct effect representing all other potential mechanisms of smoking. Compared to never smokers, current smokers had increased odds of HPV-16 infection by the antibody-mediated indirect effect (odds ratio [OR] = 1.29; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.11, 1.73); the estimated direct effect was very imprecise (OR = 0.57; 95% CI, 0.26-1.13). We observed a stronger estimated indirect effect among women who smoked at least half a pack of cigarettes daily (OR = 1.61, 95% CI, 1.27-2.15) than among women who smoked less than that threshold (OR = 1.09; 95% CI, 0.94-1.44). This is the first study to directly test the mechanism underlying smoking as an HPV cofactor. The results support current smoking as a risk factor earlier in the natural history of HPV and are consistent with the hypothesis that smoking increases the risk of a subsequent infection by reducing immunity. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Treatment of human papillomavirus with peg-interferon alfa-2b and ribavirin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.H.P. Pavan

    Full Text Available We reported one case of human immunodeficiency virus and hepatitis C virus co-infected patient who presented a significant improvement of human papillomavirus (HPV lesions during the treatment of chronic hepatitis using peg-interferon alfa-2b and ribavirin.

  18. Human papillomavirus infection, cervical dysplasia and invasive cervical cancer in Honduras: a case-control study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferrera, A.B.; Velema, J.P.; Figueroa, M.; Bulnes, R.; Toro, L.A.; Claros, J.M.; Barahona, O. de; Melchers, W.J.G.

    1999-01-01

    A substantial body of evidence has confirmed human papillomavirus (HPV) infection as the central etiological agents in human cervical carcinogenesis. In Honduras, cervical cancer is the most common cancer among women, with a high annual incidence. We conducted a population-based, case-control study

  19. No increased sperm DNA fragmentation index in semen containing human papillomavirus or herpesvirus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaspersen, Maja Døvling; Bungum, Mona Berger Håkonsen; Fedder, J

    2013-01-01

    It remains unknown whether human papillomaviruses (HPVs) or human herpesviruses (HHVs) in semen affect sperm DNA integrity. We investigated whether the presence of these viruses in semen was associated with an elevated sperm DNA fragmentation index. Semen from 76 sperm donors was examined by a PCR...

  20. Human papillomavirus and oropharyngeal cancer in Greenland in 1994-2010

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Avnstorp, Magnus Balslev; Jensen, Ramon Gordon; Garnæs, Emilie

    2013-01-01

    Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is associated with the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV), smoking and alcohol. In Greenland, a high rate of HPV-induced cervical cancer and venereal diseases are found, which exposes the population for high risk of HPV infection. In Gree......Oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is associated with the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus (HPV), smoking and alcohol. In Greenland, a high rate of HPV-induced cervical cancer and venereal diseases are found, which exposes the population for high risk of HPV infection....... In Greenland, only girls are included in the mandatory HPV vaccination program....

  1. Impact of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 and 18 vaccination on prevalent infections and rates of cervical lesions after excisional treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildesheim, Allan; Gonzalez, Paula; Kreimer, Aimee R; Wacholder, Sholom; Schussler, John; Rodriguez, Ana C; Porras, Carolina; Schiffman, Mark; Sidawy, Mary; Schiller, John T; Lowy, Douglas R; Herrero, Rolando

    2016-08-01

    Human papillomavirus vaccines prevent human papillomavirus infection and cervical precancers. The impact of vaccinating women with a current infection or after treatment for an human papillomavirus-associated lesion is not fully understood. To determine whether human papillomavirus-16/18 vaccination influences the outcome of infections present at vaccination and the rate of infection and disease after treatment of lesions. We included 1711 women (18-25 years) with carcinogenic human papillomavirus infection and 311 women of similar age who underwent treatment for cervical precancer and who participated in a community-based trial of the AS04-adjuvanted human papillomavirus-16/18 virus-like particle vaccine. Participants were randomized (human papillomavirus or hepatitis A vaccine) and offered 3 vaccinations over 6 months. Follow-up included annual visits (more frequently if clinically indicated), referral to colposcopy of high-grade and persistent low-grade lesions, treatment by loop electrosurgical excisional procedure when clinically indicated, and cytologic and virologic follow-up after treatment. Among women with human papillomavirus infection at the time of vaccination, we considered type-specific viral clearance, and development of cytologic (squamous intraepithelial lesions) and histologic (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia) lesions. Among treated women, we considered single-time and persistent human papillomavirus infection, squamous intraepithelial lesions, and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia 2 or greater. Outcomes associated with infections absent before treatment also were evaluated. Infection-level analyses were performed and vaccine efficacy estimated. Median follow-up was 56.7 months (women with human papillomavirus infection) and 27.3 months (treated women). There was no evidence of vaccine efficacy to increase clearance of human papillomavirus infections or decrease incidence of cytologic/histologic abnormalities associated with human

  2. Ceftobiprole: A novel, broad-spectrum cephalosporin with activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dauner, Daniel G; Nelson, Robert E; Taketa, Donna C

    2010-06-15

    The pharmacology, antimicrobial activity, pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics, clinical efficacy, safety, and place in therapy of ceftobiprole are reviewed. Ceftobiprole, a novel, broad-spectrum, parenteral cephalosporin, inhibits the cell-wall synthesis of penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) PBP2a and PBP2x, responsible for the resistance in staphylococci and pneumococci, respectively. Ceftobiprole has good activity against gram-positive aerobes and anaerobes, and its activity against gram-negative aerobes and anaerobes is species dependent. Ceftobiprole is relatively inactive against Acinetobacter species. Its ability to bind relevant PBPs of resistant gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria indicates its potential use in the treatment of hospital-acquired pneumonia and complicated skin and skin-structure infections (cSSSIs). Ceftobiprole is primarily excreted unchanged by the kidneys and exhibits linear pharmacokinetics. The half-life of the drug is approximately 3-4 hours. It exhibits minimal plasma protein binding (16%). Ceftobiprole does not inhibit the cytochrome P-450 isoenzyme system, so the possibility of drug-drug interactions is low. The drug has not been approved for use in the United States but has been approved in Canada and elsewhere. Ceftobiprole is currently undergoing Phase III clinical trials and has demonstrated activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, penicillin-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. Completed Phase III trials used i.v. dosages of 500 mg every 8-12 hours. The most commonly observed adverse effects of ceftobiprole included headache and gastrointestinal upset. Ceftobiprole is a novel, broad-spectrum, parenteral cephalosporin undergoing Phase III clinical trials. Its broad spectrum of activity makes it a candidate for monotherapy of cSSSIs and pneumonias that have required combination therapy in the past.

  3. Significant changes in sexual behavior after a diagnosis of human papillomavirus-positive and human papillomavirus-negative oral cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taberna, Miren; Inglehart, Ronald C; Pickard, Robert K L; Fakhry, Carole; Agrawal, Amit; Katz, Mira L; Gillison, Maura L

    2017-04-01

    Sexual behavior and oral human papillomavirus (HPV) infection are risk factors for oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). The effects of OSCC diagnosis and treatment on subsequent relationship stress and sexual behavior are unknown. Incident cases of HPV-positive or HPV-negative OSCC in patients who had a partnered relationship and partners of patients with oropharyngeal cancer were eligible for a study in which surveys were administered at diagnosis and at the 6-month follow-up time point to assess relationship distress, HPV transmission and concerns about health consequences, and sexual behavior. The frequency distributions of responses, stratified by tumor HPV status, were compared at baseline and follow-up. In total, 262 patients with OSCC and 81 partners were enrolled. Among the patients, 142 (54.2%) had HPV-positive OSCC, and 120 (45.8%) had HPV-negative OSCC. Relationship distress was infrequently reported, and 69% of patients felt that their relationship had strengthened since the cancer diagnosis. Both HPV-positive patients (25%) and their partners (14%) reported feelings of guilt or responsibility for the diagnosis of an HPV-caused cancer. Concern over sexual, but not nonsexual, HPV transmission to partners was reported by 50%. Significant declines in the frequency of vaginal and oral sexual behaviors were reported at follow-up, regardless of tumor HPV status. From baseline to 6 months, significant increases in abstinence from vaginal sex (from 10% to 34%; P Sexual behavior is an important quality-of-life outcome to assess within clinical trials. [See related editorial on pages 000-000, this issue.] Cancer 2017. © 2017 American Cancer Society. Cancer 2017;123:1156-1165. © 2016 American Cancer Society. © 2017 American Cancer Society.

  4. Broad spectrum moderators and advanced reflector filters using 208Pb

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schönfeldt, Troels; Batkov, K.; Klinkby, Esben Bryndt

    2015-01-01

    thermalizing property of 208Pb to design a broad spectrum moderator, i.e. a moderator which emits thermal and cold neutrons from the same position. Using 208Pb as a reflector filter material is shown to be slightly less efficient than a conventional beryllium reflector filter. However, when surrounding...... the reflector filter by a cold moderator it is possible to regain the neutrons with wavelengths below the Bragg edge, which are suppressed in the beryllium reflector filter. In both the beryllium and lead case surrounding the reflector filter with a cold moderator increases the cold brightness significantly...

  5. Mimotope ELISA for detection of broad spectrum antibody against avian H5N1 influenza virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yingwei Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: We have raised a panel of broad spectrum neutralizing monoclonal antibodies against the highly pathogenic H5N1 avian influenza virus, which neutralize the infectivity of, and afford protection against infection by, most of the major genetic groups of the virus evolved since 1997. Peptide mimics reactive with one of these broad spectrum H5N1 neutralizing antibodies, 8H5, were identified from random phage display libraries. METHOD: The amino acid residues of the most reactive 12mer peptide, p125 (DTPLTTAALRLV, were randomly substituted to improve its mimicry of the natural 8H5 epitope. RESULT: 133 reactive peptides with unique amino acid sequences were identified from 5 sub-libraries of p125. Four residues (2,4,5.9 of the parental peptide were preserved among all the derived peptides and probably essential for 8H5 binding. These are interspersed among four other residues (1,3,8,10, which exhibit restricted substitution and probably could contribute to binding, and another four (6,7,11,12 which could be randomly substituted and probably are not essential for binding. One peptide, V-1b, derived by substituting 5 of the latter residues is the most reactive and has a binding constant of 3.16×10(-9 M, which is 38 fold higher than the affinity of the parental p125. Immunoassay produced with this peptide is specifically reactive with 8H5 but not also the other related broad spectrum H5N1 avian influenza virus neutralizing antibodies. Serum samples from 29 chickens infected with H5N1 avian influenza virus gave a positive result by this assay and those from 12 uninfected animals gave a negative test result. CONCLUSION: The immunoassay produced with the 12 mer peptide,V1-b, is specific for the natural 8H5 epitope and can be used for detection of antibody against the broad spectrum neutralization site of H5N1 avian influenza virus.

  6. Acquisition of Broad-Spectrum Cephalosporin Resistance Leading to Colistin Resistance in Klebsiella pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jayol, Aurélie; Nordmann, Patrice; Desroches, Marine; Decousser, Jean-Winoc; Poirel, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    An extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing and colistin-resistant Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical isolate was recovered from a patient who was treated with cefotaxime. This isolate harbored a blaCTX-M-15 ESBL gene that was associated with an ISEcp1 insertion sequence. Transposition of that tandem occurred within the chromosomal mgrB gene, leading to inactivation of the mgrB gene and consequently to acquired resistance to colistin. We showed here a coselection of colistin resistance as a result of a broad-spectrum cephalosporin selective pressure. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  7. In vivo transformation of human skin with human papillomavirus type 11 from condylomatot acuminata

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kreider, J.W.; Howett, M.K.; Lill, N.L.; Bartlett, G.L.; Zaino, R.J.; Sedlacek, T.V.; Mortel, R.

    1986-08-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have been implicated in the development of a number of human malignancies, but direct tests of their involvement have not been possible. The authors describe a system in which human skin from various skin from various sites was infected with HPV type 11 (HPV-11) extracted from vulvar condylomata and was grafted beneath the renal capsule of athymic mice. Most of the skin grafts so treated underwent morphological transformation, resulting in the development of condylomata identical to those which occur spontaneously in patients. Foreskins responded with the most vigorous proliferative response to HPV-11. The lesions produced the characteristic intranuclear group-specific antigen of papillomaviruses. Both dot blot and Southern blot analysis of DNA from the lesions revealed the presence of HPV-11 DNA in the transformed grafts. These results demonstrate the first laboratory system for the study of the interaction of human skin with an HPV. The method may be useful in understanding the mechanisms of HPV transformation and replication and is free of the ethical restraints which have impeded study. This system will allow the direct study of factors which permit neoplastic progression of HPV-induced cutaneous lesions in human tissues.

  8. Monitoring human papillomavirus prevalence in urine samples: a review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enerly E

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Espen Enerly, Cecilia Olofsson, Mari NygårdDepartment of Research, Cancer Registry of Norway, Oslo, NorwayAbstract: Human papillomavirus (HPV is the main cause of cervical cancer, and many countries now offer vaccination against HPV to girls by way of government-funded national immunization programs. Monitoring HPV prevalence in adolescents could offer a near-term biological measure of vaccine impact, and urine sampling may be an attractive large-scale method that could be used for this purpose. Our objective was to provide an overview of the literature on HPV DNA detection in urine samples, with an emphasis on adolescents. We searched the PubMed database using the terms “HPV” and “urine” and identified 21 female and 14 male study populations in which HPV prevalence in urine samples was reported, four of which included only asymptomatic female adolescents. We provide herein an overview of the recruitment setting, age, urine sampling procedure, lesion type, HPV assay, and HPV prevalence in urine samples and other urogenital samples for the studies included in this review. In female study populations, concordance for any HPV type and type-specific concordance in paired urine and cervical samples are provided in addition to sensitivity and specificity. We concluded that few studies on HPV prevalence in urine samples have been performed in asymptomatic female adolescent populations but that urine samples may be a useful alternative to cervical samples to monitor changes in HPV prevalence in females in the post-HPV vaccination era. However, care should be taken when extrapolating HPV findings from urine samples to the cervix. In males, urine samples do not seem to be optimal for monitoring HPV prevalence due to a low human genomic DNA content and HPV DNA detection rate compared to other urogenital sites. In each situation the costs and benefits of HPV DNA detection in urine compared to alternative monitoring options should be carefully

  9. Human papillomaviruses associated with epidermodysplasia verruciformis. II. Molecular cloning and biochemical characterization of human papillomavirus 3a, 8, 10, and 12 genomes.

    OpenAIRE

    Kremsdorf, D; Jablonska, S; Favre, M; Orth, G

    1983-01-01

    The DNAs of four human papillomaviruses (HPVs) that were found in the benign lesions of three patients suffering from epidermodysplasia verruciformis have been characterized. The flat wart-like lesions and the macular lesions of patient 1 contained two viruses, HPV-3a and HPV-8, respectively, whose genomes had previously been only partially characterized. The flat wart-like lesions of patient 2 and the macular lesions of patient 3 each contained a virus previously considered as belonging to t...

  10. Broad-spectrum biosensor capable of detecting and identifying diverse bacterial and Candida species in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metzgar, David; Frinder, Mark; Lovari, Robert; Toleno, Donna; Massire, Christian; Blyn, Lawrence B; Ranken, Raymond; Carolan, Heather E; Hall, Thomas A; Moore, David; Hansen, Christian J; Sampath, Rangarajan; Ecker, David J

    2013-08-01

    We describe an assay which uses broad-spectrum, conserved-site PCR paired with mass spectrometry analysis of amplicons (PCR/electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry [ESI-MS]) to detect and identify diverse bacterial and Candida species in uncultured specimens. The performance of the assay was characterized using whole-blood samples spiked with low titers of 64 bacterial species and 6 Candida species representing the breadth of coverage of the assay. The assay had an average limit of detection of 100 CFU of bacteria or Candida per milliliter of blood, and all species tested yielded limits of detection between 20 and 500 CFU per milliliter. Over 99% of all detections yielded correct identifications, whether they were obtained at concentrations well above the limit of detection or at the lowest detectable concentrations. This study demonstrates the ability of broad-spectrum PCR/ESI-MS assays to detect and identify diverse organisms in complex natural matrices that contain high levels of background DNA.

  11. Shape and size engineered cellulosic nanomaterials as broad spectrum anti-microbial compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Priyanka R; Kamble, Sunil; Sarkar, Dhiman; Anand, Amitesh; Varma, Anjani J

    2016-06-01

    Oxidized celluloses have been used for decades as antimicrobial wound gauzes and surgical cotton. We now report the successful synthesis of a next generation narrow size range (25-35nm) spherical shaped nanoparticles of 2,3,6-tricarboxycellulose based on cellulose I structural features, for applications as new antimicrobial materials. This study adds to our previous study of 6-carboxycellulose. A wide range of bacteria such as Escherichia coli, Staphloccocus aureus, Bacillus subtilis and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (non-pathogenic as well as pathogenic strains) were affected by these polymers in in vitro studies. Activity against Mycobacteria were noted at high concentrations (MIC99 values 250-1000μg/ml, as compared to anti-TB drug Isoniazid 0.3μg/ml). However, the broad spectrum activity of oxidized celluloses and their nanoparticles against a wide range of bacteria, including Mycobacteria, show that these materials are promising new biocompatible and biodegradable drug delivery vehicles wherein they can play the dual role of being a drug encapsulant as well as a broad spectrum anti-microbial and anti-TB drug. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Novel Bacterial Topoisomerase Inhibitors with Potent Broad-Spectrum Activity against Drug-Resistant Bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charrier, Cédric; Salisbury, Anne-Marie; Savage, Victoria J; Duffy, Thomas; Moyo, Emmanuel; Chaffer-Malam, Nathan; Ooi, Nicola; Newman, Rebecca; Cheung, Jonathan; Metzger, Richard; McGarry, David; Pichowicz, Mark; Sigerson, Ralph; Cooper, Ian R; Nelson, Gary; Butler, Hayley S; Craighead, Mark; Ratcliffe, Andrew J; Best, Stuart A; Stokes, Neil R

    2017-05-01

    The novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitor class is an investigational type of antibacterial inhibitor of DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV that does not have cross-resistance with the quinolones. Here, we report the evaluation of the in vitro properties of a new series of this type of small molecule. Exemplar compounds selectively and potently inhibited the catalytic activities of Escherichia coli DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV but did not block the DNA breakage-reunion step. Compounds showed broad-spectrum inhibitory activity against a wide range of Gram-positive and Gram-negative pathogens, including biodefence microorganisms and Mycobacterium tuberculosis No cross-resistance with fluoroquinolone-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and E. coli isolates was observed. Measured MIC 90 values were 4 and 8 μg/ml against a panel of contemporary multidrug-resistant isolates of Acinetobacter baumannii and E. coli , respectively. In addition, representative compounds exhibited greater antibacterial potency than the quinolones against obligate anaerobic species. Spontaneous mutation rates were low, with frequencies of resistance typically 100 μM). In summary, the compounds' distinct mechanism of action relative to the fluoroquinolones, whole-cell potency, low potential for resistance development, and favorable in vitro safety profile warrant their continued investigation as potential broad-spectrum antibacterial agents. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  13. Nanomedicine for Infectious Disease Applications: Innovation towards Broad-Spectrum Treatment of Viral Infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackman, Joshua A; Lee, Jaywon; Cho, Nam-Joon

    2016-03-02

    Nanomedicine enables unique diagnostic and therapeutic capabilities to tackle problems in clinical medicine. As multifunctional agents with programmable properties, nanomedicines are poised to revolutionize treatment strategies. This promise is especially evident for infectious disease applications, for which the continual emergence, re-emergence, and evolution of pathogens has proven difficult to counter by conventional approaches. Herein, a conceptual framework is presented that envisions possible routes for the development of nanomedicines as superior broad-spectrum antiviral agents against enveloped viruses. With lipid membranes playing a critical role in the life cycle of medically important enveloped viruses including HIV, influenza, and Ebola, cellular and viral membrane interfaces are ideal elements to incorporate into broad-spectrum antiviral strategies. Examples are presented that demonstrate how nanomedicine strategies inspired by lipid membranes enable a wide range of targeting opportunities to gain control of critical stages in the virus life cycle through either direct or indirect approaches involving membrane interfaces. The capabilities can be realized by enabling new inhibitory functions or improving the function of existing drugs through nanotechnology-enabled solutions. With these exciting opportunities, due attention is also given to the clinical translation of nanomedicines for infectious disease applications, especially as pharmaceutical drug-discovery pipelines demand new routes of innovation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  14. Identification and Structural Characterization of Naturally-Occurring Broad-Spectrum Cyclic Antibiotics Isolated from Paenibacillus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knolhoff, Ann M.; Zheng, Jie; McFarland, Melinda A.; Luo, Yan; Callahan, John H.; Brown, Eric W.; Croley, Timothy R.

    2015-08-01

    The rise of antimicrobial resistance necessitates the discovery and/or production of novel antibiotics. Isolated strains of Paenibacillus alvei were previously shown to exhibit antimicrobial activity against a number of pathogens, such as E. coli, Salmonella, and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). The responsible antimicrobial compounds were isolated from these Paenibacillus strains and a combination of low and high resolution mass spectrometry with multiple-stage tandem mass spectrometry was used for identification. A group of closely related cyclic lipopeptides was identified, differing primarily by fatty acid chain length and one of two possible amino acid substitutions. Variation in the fatty acid length resulted in mass differences of 14 Da and yielded groups of related MSn spectra. Despite the inherent complexity of MS/MS spectra of cyclic compounds, straightforward analysis of these spectra was accomplished by determining differences in complementary product ion series between compounds that differ in molecular weight by 14 Da. The primary peptide sequence assignment was confirmed through genome mining; the combination of these analytical tools represents a workflow that can be used for the identification of complex antibiotics. The compounds also share amino acid sequence similarity to a previously identified broad-spectrum antibiotic isolated from Paenibacillus. The presence of such a wide distribution of related compounds produced by the same organism represents a novel class of broad-spectrum antibiotic compounds.

  15. Vimentin Modulates Infectious Internalization of Human Papillomavirus 16 Pseudovirions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schäfer, Georgia; Graham, Lisa M; Lang, Dirk M; Blumenthal, Melissa J; Bergant Marušič, Martina; Katz, Arieh A

    2017-08-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common viral infection of the reproductive tract, with virtually all cases of cervical cancer being attributable to infection by oncogenic HPVs. However, the exact mechanism and receptors used by HPV to infect epithelial cells are controversial. The current entry model suggests that HPV initially attaches to heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) at the cell surface, followed by conformational changes, cleavage by furin convertase, and subsequent transfer of the virus to an as-yet-unidentified high-affinity receptor. In line with this model, we established an in vitro infection system using the HSPG-deficient cell line pgsD677 together with HPV16 pseudovirions (HPV16-PsVs). While pgsD677 cells were nonpermissive for untreated HPV16-PsVs, furin cleavage of the particles led to a substantial increase in infection. Biochemical pulldown assays followed by mass spectrometry analysis showed that furin-precleaved HPV16-PsVs specifically interacted with surface-expressed vimentin on pgsD677 cells. We further demonstrated that both furin-precleaved and uncleaved HPV16-PsVs colocalized with surface-expressed vimentin on pgsD677, HeLa, HaCaT, and NIKS cells, while binding of incoming viral particles to soluble vimentin protein before infection led to a substantial decrease in viral uptake. Interestingly, decreasing cell surface vimentin by small interfering RNA (siRNA) knockdown in HeLa and NIKS cells significantly increased HPV16-PsV infectious internalization, while overexpression of vimentin had the opposite effect. The identification of vimentin as an HPV restriction factor enhances our understanding of the initial steps of HPV-host interaction and may lay the basis for the design of novel antiviral drugs preventing HPV internalization into epithelial cells. IMPORTANCE Despite HPV being a highly prevalent sexually transmitted virus causing significant disease burden worldwide, particularly cancer of the cervix, cell surface

  16. Comprehensive control of human papillomavirus infections and related diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, F Xavier; Broker, Thomas R; Forman, David; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Gillison, Maura L; Doorbar, John; Stern, Peter L; Stanley, Margaret; Arbyn, Marc; Poljak, Mario; Cuzick, Jack; Castle, Philip E; Schiller, John T; Markowitz, Lauri E; Fisher, William A; Canfell, Karen; Denny, Lynette A; Franco, Eduardo L; Steben, Marc; Kane, Mark A; Schiffman, Mark; Meijer, Chris J L M; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Castellsagué, Xavier; Kim, Jane J; Brotons, Maria; Alemany, Laia; Albero, Ginesa; Diaz, Mireia; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2013-11-22

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as one of the major causes of infection-related cancer worldwide, as well as the causal factor in other diseases. Strong evidence for a causal etiology with HPV has been stated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer for cancers of the cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx (including base of the tongue and tonsils). Of the estimated 12.7 million new cancers occurring in 2008 worldwide, 4.8% were attributable to HPV infection, with substantially higher incidence and mortality rates seen in developing versus developed countries. In recent years, we have gained tremendous knowledge about HPVs and their interactions with host cells, tissues and the immune system; have validated and implemented strategies for safe and efficacious prophylactic vaccination against HPV infections; have developed increasingly sensitive and specific molecular diagnostic tools for HPV detection for use in cervical cancer screening; and have substantially increased global awareness of HPV and its many associated diseases in women, men, and children. While these achievements exemplify the success of biomedical research in generating important public health interventions, they also generate new and daunting challenges: costs of HPV prevention and medical care, the implementation of what is technically possible, socio-political resistance to prevention opportunities, and the very wide ranges of national economic capabilities and health care systems. Gains and challenges faced in the quest for comprehensive control of HPV infection and HPV-related cancers and other disease are summarized in this review. The information presented may be viewed in terms of a reframed paradigm of prevention of cervical cancer and other HPV-related diseases that will include strategic combinations of at least four major components: 1) routine introduction of HPV vaccines to women in all countries, 2) extension and simplification of

  17. The Australian experience with the human papillomavirus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garland, Suzanne M

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to review the current human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine program and its outcomes to date in Australia. This was a review of the published data relating to the introduction and subsequent measurable outcomes of the quadrivalent vaccine, which became part of the Australian national HPV immunization program in 2007. Australia commenced an ongoing, schoolbased, government-funded, HPV vaccination program using the quadrivalent vaccine from April 2007 for adolescent female subjects aged 12 to 13 years, together with a catch-up program for female subjects 13 to 26 years of age from July 2007 to December 31, 2009. The Australian community (lay and clinical) have embraced the program, resulting in high coverage with >70% for 3 doses in the 12- to 13-year-old ongoing target population. Vaccine effectiveness (outcomes of vaccination in a real-world setting) is already being seen. This effectiveness has been noted in significant reductions in HPV vaccine-related infections in vaccine eligible age female subjects (77% fall in prevalence), rapid reduction of >90% in genital warts (first marker of disease reduction, as well as herd immunity), and reduction in high-grade cervical lesions in this age group. These remarkable changes so soon after implementation of the vaccine in the country occurred faster, and to a greater extent, than anyone could have predicted. These findings from Australia should encourage other countries to follow suit, with the ultimate aim of translating treatment into reductions in HPV-related neoplasia globally. The greatest success from such an approach will only be realized when prophylactic vaccines are rolled out effectively, with high coverage and at affordable costs, to those areas of the world with the highest burden of disease. To achieve this outcome requires government endorsement and commitment; education of the community at large; realization of the safety, efficacy, and immunogenicity of the available prophylactic

  18. Characterization of human papillomavirus type 16 pseudovirus containing histones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyoung Jin; Kwag, Hye-Lim; Kim, Hong-Jin

    2016-08-27

    Pseudoviruses (PsVs) that encapsidate a reporter plasmid DNA have been used as surrogates for native human papillomavirus (HPV), whose continuous production is technically difficult. HPV PsVs have been designed to form capsids made up of the major capsid protein L1 and the minor capsid proteins L2. HPV PsVs have been produced in 293TT cells transfected with plasmid expressing L1 and L2 protein and plasmid containing the reporter gene. Several studies have suggested that naturally occurring HPV virions contain cellular histones, and histones have also been identified in mature HPV PsVs. However, the effect of the histones on the properties of the PsVs has not been investigated. Using heparin chromatography, we separated mature HPV type 16 PsVs into three fractions (I, II, and III) according to their heparin-binding affinities. The amounts of cellular histone and cellular nucleotides per PsV were found to increase in the order fraction I, II and III. It appeared that PsVs in fraction I contains just small amount of cellular histone in Western blot analysis. The proportions of the three fractions in PsV preparations were 83.4, 7.5, and 9.1 % for fraction I, II, and III PsVs, respectively. In the electron microscope PsVs in fraction I appeared to have a more condensed structure than those in fractions II and III. Under the electron microscope fraction II and III PsVs appeared to be covered by substantial amounts of cellular histone while there was no visible histone covering PsVs of fraction I. Also the levels of reporter gene expression in infections of fraction II and III PsVs to 293TT cells were significantly lower than those in infections of fraction I PsV, and fraction II and III particles had significantly reduced immunogenicity. Our findings suggest that the involvement of large amounts of cellular histones during PsV formation interferes with the structural integrity of the PsVs and affects their immunogenicity. The fraction I particle therefore has the most

  19. Comprehensive Control of Human Papillomavirus Infections and Related Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, F. Xavier; Broker, Thomas R.; Forman, David; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Gillison, Maura L.; Doorbar, John; Stern, Peter L.; Stanley, Margaret; Arbyn, Marc; Poljak, Mario; Cuzick, Jack; Castle, Philip E.; Schiller, John T.; Markowitz, Lauri E.; Fisher, William A.; Canfell, Karen; Denny, Lynette A.; Franco, Eduardo L.; Steben, Marc; Kane, Mark A.; Schiffman, Mark; Meijer, Chris J.L.M.; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Castellsagué, Xavier; Kim, Jane J.; Brotons, Maria; Alemany, Laia; Albero, Ginesa; Diaz, Mireia; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as one of the major causes of infection-related cancer worldwide, as well as the causal factor in other diseases. Strong evidence for a causal etiology with HPV has been stated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer for cancers of the cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx (including base of the tongue and tonsils). Of the estimated 12.7 million new cancers occurring in 2008 worldwide, 4.8% were attributable to HPV infection, with substantially higher incidence and mortality rates seen in developing versus developed countries. In recent years, we have gained tremendous knowledge about HPVs and their interactions with host cells, tissues and the immune system; have validated and implemented strategies for safe and efficacious prophylactic vaccination against HPV infections; have developed increasingly sensitive and specific molecular diagnostic tools for HPV detection for use in cervical cancer screening; and have substantially increased global awareness of HPV and its many associated diseases in women, men, and children. While these achievements exemplify the success of biomedical research in generating important public health interventions, they also generate new and daunting challenges: costs of HPV prevention and medical care, the implementation of what is technically possible, socio-political resistance to prevention opportunities, and the very wide ranges of national economic capabilities and health care systems. Gains and challenges faced in the quest for comprehensive control of HPV infection and HPV-related cancers and other disease are summarized in this review. The information presented may be viewed in terms of a reframed paradigm of prevention of cervical cancer and other HPV-related diseases that will include strategic combinations of at least four major components: 1) routine introduction of HPV vaccines to women in all countries, 2) extension and simplification of

  20. High prevalence of human papillomaviruses in Ghanaian pregnant women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Marco H; Völker, Fabian M; Lugert, Raimond; Cooper, Paul; Hasenclever, Kai; Groß, Uwe; Pfister, Herbert; Silling, Steffi

    2016-12-01

    Data about the prevalence of human papillomaviruses (HPV) in African women with normal and abnormal cervical cytology are still scarce. Current HPV vaccines contain HPV types, which mainly represent the HPV epidemiology of industrial countries. As further developments of HPV vaccines are going on, it is necessary to regard regional differences in HPV type prevalence to ensure optimal protection by the vaccine. Vaginal swabs of Ghanaian pregnant women, routinely collected before delivery to rule out bacterial infections causing early onset sepsis, were screened for 12 high-risk (HR), 13 probably/possibly (pHR), and 18 low-risk (LR) HPV types. Most pregnant women come for delivery to the hospital. This was considered as appropriate possibility to have an unselected group of women. HPV DNA were detected in 55/165 women (33.3, 95 % CI 26.3-41.1 %). Thirty-four out of fifty-five (61.8, 95 % CI 47.7-74.3 %) of HPV-positive women were infected with HR and/or pHR HPV types. The five most prevalent HR or pHR HPV types were HPV-52 and HPV-67 (7 women each, 4.2, 95 % CI 1.9-8.9 %), HPV-53 (six women, 3.6, 95 % CI 1.5-8.1 %), HPV-45 (five women, 3.0, 95 % CI 1.1-7.3 %), and HPV-18 (four women, 2.4, 95 % CI 0.8-6.5 %), respectively. HPV-16 was found in two women only (1.2, 95 % CI 0.2-4.8 %). Future HPV vaccine research may devote special interest to HPV-67 and HPV-53 provided further studies confirm their high prevalence in the general population of Sub-Saharan African countries. The true carcinogenic potential of HPV-67, which is a member of species alpha9 including HPV-16, and so far categorized as pHR, should be clarified.

  1. Treatment of Emphysematous Pyelonephritis with Broad-spectrum Antibacterials and Percutaneous Renal Drainage: An Analysis of 10 Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pei-Hui Chan

    2005-01-01

    Conclusion: Combined broad-spectrum antibacterial therapy and percutaneous renal drainage is a safe and effective treatment for EPN, especially in high-risk patients for whom nephrectomy under general anesthesia is not feasible.

  2. Human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncoproteins as risk factors for ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is small, double-stranded DNA virus that infects mucosal and cutaneous epithelial tissue. HPV is sexually transmitted and the viral DNA replicates extrachromosomally. The virus is non-enveloped and has an icosahedral capsid. There are approximately 118 types of HPV, which are ...

  3. 4-Valent Human Papillomavirus (4vHPV) Vaccine in Preadolescents and Adolescents After 10 Years

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ferris, Daron G; Samakoses, Rudiwilai; Block, Stanley L

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: We describe the final 10-year data for the long-term follow-up study of the 4-valent human papillomavirus (4vHPV) vaccine in preadolescents and adolescents. METHODS: In the base study (V501-018), 1661 sexually inactive boys and girls received the 4vHPV vaccine (early vaccination group...

  4. Print News Coverage of School-Based Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Mandates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casciotti, Dana M.; Smith, Katherine C.; Andon, Lindsay; Vernick, Jon; Tsui, Amy; Klassen, Ann C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In 2007, legislation was proposed in 24 states and the District of Columbia for school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine mandates, and mandates were enacted in Texas, Virginia, and the District of Columbia. Media coverage of these events was extensive, and media messages both reflected and contributed to controversy surrounding…

  5. Cross-reactivity profiles of hybrid capture II, cobas, and APTIMA human papillomavirus assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Preisler, Sarah Nørgaard; Rebolj, Matejka; Ejegod, Ditte Møller

    2016-01-01

    Background High-risk Human Papillomavirus (HPV) testing is replacing cytology in cervical cancer screening as it is more sensitive for preinvasive cervical lesions. However, the bottleneck of HPV testing is the many false positive test results (positive tests without cervical lesions). Here, we e...

  6. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Informational Behaviors of College Students in Regard to the Human Papillomavirus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandfort, Jessica R.; Pleasant, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess students' human papillomavirus (HPV) knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Participants/ Methods: Students (N = 1,282) at a large, public university in the Northeast United States completed a questionnaire during February 2008 assessing HPV knowledge, prevalence, transmission, cervical cancer risk and stigma; sexual behavior,…

  7. No evidence for active human papillomavirus (HPV) in fields surrounding HPV-positive oropharyngeal tumors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietbergen, M.M.; Braakhuis, B.J.M.; Moukhtari, N.; Bloemena, E.; Brink, A.; Sie, D.; Ylstra, B.; Baatenburg de Jong, R.J.; Snijders, P.J.F.; Brakenhoff, R.H.; Leemans, C.R.

    2014-01-01

    Background Patients with human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCCs) have a better prognosis than patients with HPV-negative OPSCCs. Important factors contributing to this better prognosis are relatively low numbers of local/regional recurrences (LRRs) and

  8. Epidemiological and clinical aspects of human papillomavirus detection in the prevention of cervical cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bekkers, R.L.M.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Bulten, J.; Melchers, W.J.G.

    2004-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a major cause of death, and the second most frequent cancer in women worldwide. Many studies have indicated a causal relation between genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infections and cervical cancer. High-risk HPV genotypes have been detected in almost 100% of all cervical

  9. Human papillomavirus, lichen sclerosus and penile cancer: a study in Belgium

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hauwers, K.W.M. d'; Depuydt, C.E.; Bogers, J.J.; Noel, J.C.; Delvenne, P.; Marbaix, E.; Donders, A.R.T.; Tjalma, W.A.

    2012-01-01

    PURPOSE: The prevalence of penile cancer varies between 1.5 (industrialized countries) and 4.5 per 100,000 men (non-industrialized countries). Predominant histological subtype is squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Human papillomavirus (HPV) is found in 40-46% of cases: penile cancer is considered to

  10. Human papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus in the etiology of testicular germ cell tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Hørding, U; Nielsen, H W

    1994-01-01

    sequences of two viruses with known transforming abilities, human papillomavirus (HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used. In none of the 19 successfully amplified samples were DNA sequences of HPV type 16 or type 18 detected. In six cases a faint trace...

  11. [Safety of human papillomavirus 6, 11, 16 and 18 (recombinant): systematic review and meta-analysis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coelho, Pedro Luiz Spinelli; da Silva Calestini, Gustavo Lacerda; Alvo, Fernando Salgueiro; de Moura Freitas, Jefferson Michel; Castro, Paula Marcela Vilela; Konstantyner, Tulio

    2015-12-01

    To identify and quantify the adverse effects associated with the recombinant human papillomavirus (types 6, 11, 16 and 18) vaccine in adolescents. Systematic review of randomized clinical trials from PubMed, SciELO and Lilacs databases. Articles investigating the safety of the vaccine in subjects under 18 years and comparing the recombinant human papillomavirus types 6, 11, 16 and 18 vaccine with a control group were included. Meta-analyses were performed for the outcomes of pain, erythema, swelling and fever, using clinical trials with maximum Jadad score. Fourteen studies were included. The most commons adverse effects related to the human papillomavirus vaccine were effects with no severity (pain, erythema, edema, and fever). Five studies were used for the meta-analyses: Pain-Risk Difference (RD)=11% (p<0.001); edema-RD=8% (p<0.001); erythema-RD=5% (p<0.001); fever-RD=2% (p<0.003). The recombinant human papillomavirus types 6, 11, 16 and 18 vaccine was safe and well tolerated. The main adverse effects related to vaccination were pain, erythema, edema and fever. The low frequency of severe adverse effects encourages the administration of the vaccine in the population at risk. Copyright © 2015 Sociedade de Pediatria de São Paulo. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  12. Opportunities for Increasing Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Provision in School Health Centers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, Jennifer L.; Feld, Ashley L.; O'Malley, Brittany; Entzel, Pamela; Smith, Jennifer S.; Gilkey, Melissa B.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Uptake of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine remains low among adolescents in the United States. We sought to assess barriers to HPV vaccine provision in school health centers to inform subsequent interventions. Methods: We conducted structured interviews in the fall of 2010 with staff from all 33 school health centers in North…

  13. [Vaccination perspective against human papillomavirus and consequences for the screening of uterine cervical neoplasm].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delvenne, Ph

    2007-01-01

    The link between cervical cancer and some types of human papillomavirus (HPV) has generated, in recent years, a great interest for the development of anti-HPV vaccines. The purpose of this article is to review the current perspectives for anti-HPV prophylactic vaccination and to describe the potential implications for the cervical cytology screening programs.

  14. Population-level impact, herd immunity, and elimination after human papillomavirus vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brisson, Marc; Bénard, Élodie; Drolet, Mélanie

    2016-01-01

    BackgroundModelling studies have been widely used to inform human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination policy decisions; however, many models exist and it is not known whether they produce consistent predictions of population-level effectiveness and herd effects. We did a systematic review and meta-a...

  15. Investigating Stakeholder Attitudes and Opinions on School-Based Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Programs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nodulman, Jessica A.; Starling, Randall; Kong, Alberta S.; Buller, David B.; Wheeler, Cosette M.; Woodall, W. Gill

    2015-01-01

    Background: In several countries worldwide, school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programs have been successful; however, little research has explored US stakeholders' acceptance toward school-based HPV vaccination programs. Methods: A total of 13 focus groups and 12 key informant interviews (N?=?117; 85% females; 66% racial/ethnic…

  16. Whole-Genome Sequencing and Variant Analysis of Human Papillomavirus 16 Infections.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Weele, Pascal; Meijer, Chris J L M; King, Audrey J

    2017-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a strongly conserved DNA virus, high-risk types of which can cause cervical cancer in persistent infections. The most common type found in HPV-attributable cancer is HPV16, which can be subdivided into four lineages (A to D) with different carcinogenic properties.

  17. Attribution of 12 High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Genotypes to Infection and Cervical Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joura, Elmar A.; Ault, Kevin A.; Bosch, F. Xavier

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We estimated the prevalence and incidence of 14 human papillomavirus (HPV) types (6/11/16/18/31/33/35/39/45/51/52/56/58/59) in cervicovaginal swabs, and the attribution of these HPV types in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), and adenocarcinoma in situ (AIS), using predefined a...

  18. Condom use in prevention of Human Papillomavirus infections and cervical neoplasia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lam, Janni Uyen Hoa; Rebolj, Matejka; Dugué, Pierre-Antoine

    2014-01-01

    Based on cross-sectional studies, the data on protection from Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infections related to using male condoms appear inconsistent. Longitudinal studies are more informative for this purpose. We undertook a systematic review of longitudinal studies on the effectiveness of male ...... condoms in preventing HPV infection and cervical neoplasia....

  19. Characterization of two novel cutaneous human papillomaviruses, HPV93 and HPV96

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vasiljevic, Natasa; Hazard, Kristina; Eliasson, Linda

    2007-01-01

    Two novel human papillomaviruses (HPVs), HPV93 and HPV96, with genomes of 7450 and 7438 bp, respectively, are described. The L1 open reading frame of HPV93 showed highest identity to HPV24 (79%) and that of HPV96 had highest identity to HPV92 (71%). Real-time PCR for HPV92, 93 and 96 on stripped...

  20. Detection of human papillomavirus DNA in plucked hairs from renal transplant recipients and healthy volunteers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boxman, I. L.; Berkhout, R. J.; Mulder, L. H.; Wolkers, M. C.; Bouwes Bavinck, J. N.; Vermeer, B. J.; ter Schegget, J.

    1997-01-01

    We have previously detected a group of human papillomaviruses originally found in skin lesions of epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) patients in skin cancers from renal transplant recipients and from non-immunosuppressed patients. The reservoir of EV-HPVs is still unknown. In the current study we

  1. Molecular interactions of 'high risk'human papillomaviruses E6 and ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The aetiology of cervical cancer has been primarily attributed to human papillomaviruses (HPVs). These are characterized by the persistent expression of the two oncogenes, E6 and E7. Experimental studies show that E6 and E7 genes of the high risk HPVs deregulate key cell cycle controls. Recent work has uncovered ...

  2. Activities of E7 promoters in the human papillomavirus type 16 genome during cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christina Neigaard; Nielsen, Lone; Norrild, Bodil

    2010-01-01

    Worldwide, one of the most common cancer forms diagnosed in women is cervical cancer induced by infections with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) with HPV type 16 (HPV-16) being the most frequently identified. The oncogenicity is caused mainly by expression of the oncogenes E6 and E7 leading...

  3. Differential Detection of Human Papillomavirus Genotypes and Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia by Four Commercial Assays

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Bonde, Jesper; Preisler, Sarah

    2016-01-01

    Laboratories can nowadays choose from >100 Human Papillomavirus (HPV) assays for cervical screening. Our previous analysis based on the data from the Danish Horizon study, however, showed that four widely used assays, Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2), cobas, CLART and APTIMA, frequently do not detect the s...

  4. Improving Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Uptake in College Students: A Socioecological Perspective

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanning, Beth; Golman, Mandy; Crosslin, Katie

    2017-01-01

    Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates remain relatively low, despite new recommendations found in "Healthy People 2020." Purpose: The purpose of this study was to determine vaccination rates, identify factors that influenced initiation/continuance of HPV vaccine series, and identify levels of influence for HPV health…

  5. Beliefs and Knowledge about the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine among Undergraduate Men

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, Theresa; Weinstein, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to assess male undergraduate students' human papillomavirus (HPV) knowledge and intentions to receive the HPV vaccination. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Method: A sample of 116 male undergraduate students from a university in the Midwestern USA completed a survey questionnaire assessing various aspects…

  6. Oral human papillomavirus infection in HIV-negative and HIV-infected MSM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, Sofie H.; Boot, Hein J.; Speksnijder, Arjen G. C. L.; Stolte, Ineke G.; Meijer, Chris J. L. M.; Snijders, Peter J. F.; Verhagen, Dominique W. M.; King, Audrey J.; de Vries, Henry J. C.; Quint, Wim G. V.; van der Sande, Marianne A. B.; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.

    2013-01-01

    Oral infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with a subset of head and neck cancers. We compared prevalence of, and risk factors for, oral HPV infection among HIV-negative and HIV-infected MSM. Analysis of baseline data from a prospective cohort study. MSM aged 18 years or older were

  7. Chlamydia trachomatis and genital human papillomavirus infections in female university students in Honduras.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tabora, N.; Zelaya, A.; Bakkers, J.; Melchers, W.J.; Ferrera, A.

    2005-01-01

    Sexually transmitted infections are a serious health problem in Honduras. Human papillomavirus (HPV) and Chlamydia trachomatis are major causes of sexually transmitted diseases. To determine the prevalence of C. trachomatis and HPV in young women, 100 female university students in Honduras were

  8. Engineering of Paraoxonases for Pre- and Post-treatment of Intoxication by a Broad Spectrum of Nerve Agents and Pesticides

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-01

    0047 TITLE: Engineering of Paraoxonases for Pre- and Post-treatment of Intoxication by a Broad Spectrum of Nerve Agents and Pesticides ...SUBTITLE Engineering of Paraoxonases for Pre- and Post-treatment of Intoxication by a Broad Spectrum of Nerve Agents and Pesticides 5a... mutations . Specifically, we targeted residues 72, 189, 192, 193, 196 and 292, which our docking model of VX with PON1 implicated in substrate binding

  9. Deep sequencing extends the diversity of human papillomaviruses in human skin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bzhalava, Davit; Mühr, Laila Sara Arroyo; Lagheden, Camilla; Ekström, Johanna; Forslund, Ola; Dillner, Joakim; Hultin, Emilie

    2014-07-24

    Most viruses in human skin are known to be human papillomaviruses (HPVs). Previous sequencing of skin samples has identified 273 different cutaneous HPV types, including 47 previously unknown types. In the present study, we wished to extend prior studies using deeper sequencing. This deeper sequencing without prior PCR of a pool of 142 whole genome amplified skin lesions identified 23 known HPV types, 3 novel putative HPV types and 4 non-HPV viruses. The complete sequence was obtained for one of the known putative types and almost the complete sequence was obtained for one of the novel putative types. In addition, sequencing of amplimers from HPV consensus PCR of 326 skin lesions detected 385 different HPV types, including 226 previously unknown putative types. In conclusion, metagenomic deep sequencing of human skin samples identified no less than 396 different HPV types in human skin, out of which 229 putative HPV types were previously unknown.

  10. New insights into broad spectrum communities of the Early Holocene Near East: The birds of Hallan Çemi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeder, Melinda A.; Spitzer, Megan D.

    2016-11-01

    The Early Holocene in Near East was a pivotal transitional period that witnessed dramatic changes in climate and environment, human settlement, major changes in subsistence strategies focusing on a broad range of different plant and animal resources, and a radical restructuring of social relations. The remarkable corpus of avifauna from the Early Holocene site of Hallan Çemi in southeastern Turkey sheds new light on key issues about this dynamic period that has been termed the ;Broad Spectrum Revolution;. The avifauna from this important site demonstrate how Hallan Çemi occupants took advantage of the site's strategic location at the junction of multiple environmental zones by extracting a diverse range of seasonally available resources from both near-by and more distant eco-zones to cobble together a stable subsistence economy capable of supporting this small community throughout the year. They give testimony to the impacts of resource utilization over time, especially on species unable to rebound from sustained human hunting. At the same time, they show how Hallan Çemi residents mitigated these impacts by replacing depleted resources with alternative, more resilient ones that could be more sustainably harvested. They open a window onto the growing investment in feasting and ritual activity that helped bind this community together. In so doing they provide a means of empirically evaluating the efficacy of contrasting explanatory frameworks for the Broad Spectrum Revolution that gave rise to the subsequent domestication of plant and animals in the Near East. Contrary to frameworks that cast these developments as responses to resource depression, lessons learned from the Hallan Çemi avifauna lend support to frameworks that emphasize the human capacity to strategically target, capitalize, and improve upon circumscribed resource rich environments in a way that permits more permanent occupation of these niches. And they underscore the degree to which social and

  11. Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection: Differences in Prevalence Between Sexes and Concordance With Genital Human Papillomavirus Infection, NHANES 2011 to 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonawane, Kalyani; Suk, Ryan; Chiao, Elizabeth Y; Chhatwal, Jagpreet; Qiu, Peihua; Wilkin, Timothy; Nyitray, Alan G; Sikora, Andrew G; Deshmukh, Ashish A

    2017-11-21

    The burden of human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is disproportionately high among men, yet empirical evidence regarding the difference in prevalence of oral HPV infection between men and women is limited. Concordance of oral and genital HPV infection among men is unknown. To determine the prevalence of oral HPV infection, as well as the concordance of oral and genital HPV infection, among U.S. men and women. Nationally representative survey. Civilian noninstitutionalized population. Adults aged 18 to 69 years from NHANES (National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey), 2011 to 2014. Oral rinse, penile swab, and vaginal swab specimens were evaluated by polymerase chain reaction followed by type-specific hybridization. The overall prevalence of oral HPV infection was 11.5% (95% CI, 9.8% to 13.1%) in men and 3.2% (CI, 2.7% to 3.8%) in women (equating to 11 million men and 3.2 million women nationwide). High-risk oral HPV infection was more prevalent among men (7.3% [CI, 6.0% to 8.6%]) than women (1.4% [CI, 1.0% to 1.8%]). Oral HPV 16 was 6 times more common in men (1.8% [CI, 1.3% to 2.2%]) than women (0.3% [CI, 0.1% to 0.5%]) (1.7 million men vs. 0.27 million women). Among men and women who reported having same-sex partners, the prevalence of high-risk HPV infection was 12.7% (CI, 7.0% to 18.4%) and 3.6% (CI, 1.4% to 5.9%), respectively. Among men who reported having 2 or more same-sex oral sex partners, the prevalence of high-risk HPV infection was 22.2% (CI, 9.6% to 34.8%). Oral HPV prevalence among men with concurrent genital HPV infection was 4-fold greater (19.3%) than among those without it (4.4%). Men had 5.4% (CI, 5.1% to 5.8%) greater predicted probability of high-risk oral HPV infection than women. The predicted probability of high-risk oral HPV infection was greatest among black participants, those who smoked more than 20 cigarettes daily, current marijuana users, and those who reported 16 or more lifetime

  12. The Tortoise and the Hare. Small-Game Use, the Broad-Spectrum Revolution, and Paleolithic Demography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stiner; Munro; Surovell

    2000-02-01

    This study illustrates the potential of small-game data for identifying and dating Paleolithic demographic pulses such as those associated with modern human origins and the later evolution of food-producing economies. Archaeofaunal series from Israel and Italy serve as our examples. Three important implications of this study are that (1) early Middle Paleolithic populations were exceptionally small and highly dispersed, (2) the first major population growth pulse in the eastern Mediterranean probably occurred before the end of the Middle Paleolithic, and (3) subsequent demographic pulses in the Upper and Epi-Paleolithic greatly reshaped the conditions of selection that operated on human subsistence ecology, technology, and society. The findings of this study are consistent with the main premise of Flannery's broad-spectrum-revolution hypothesis. However, ranking small prey in terms of work of capture (in the absence of special harvesting tools) proved far more effective in this investigation of human diet breadth than have the taxonomic-diversity analyses published previously.

  13. Sentimentos vivenciados por mulheres submetidas a tratamento para Papillomavirus Humano Sentimientos vivenciados por mujeres sometidas a Tratamiento para el Papillomavirus Humano Feelings experienced by women submitted to a treatment for Human Papillomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Luiza Santos de Carvalho

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A carência de informações sobre o papillomavirus humano pode gerar idéias errôneas sobre o tratamento, o que interfere no contexto sócio-familiar da mulher. Com o objetivo de conhecer os sentimentos vivenciados por mulheres submetidas a tratamento de lesões por papillomavirus humano, foi realizada uma pesquisa qualitativa de natureza exploratória com 12 mulheres, baseada na obtenção e análise de depoimentos por meio de entrevista semi-estruturada. As informações foram analisadas de acordo com a literatura e dispostas em duas temáticas: Reações emocionais e Repercussões no relacionamento. Conclui-se que a mulher que está sendo submetida a tratamento de lesões por papillomavirus humano necessita de cuidados, por parte dos enfermeiros, como forma de melhor enfrentar esse período a qual está vivenciando.La carencia de informaciones sobre el papillomavirus humano puede generar ideas erradas sobre el tratamiento, lo que interfiere en el contexto social y familiar de la mujer. Con el objetivo de conocer los sentimientos vividos por mujeres sometidas a tratamiento de lesiones por papillomavirus humanos, fue realizada una investigación cualitativa de naturaleza exploratoria con 12 mujeres, basada en la obtención y análisis de deposiciones por medio de entrevistas medio-estructurada. Las informaciones fueran analizadas conforme con la literatura y dispuestas en dos temáticas: Reacciones emocionales y Repercusiones en el reracionamiento. Concluyese que la mujer que esta siendo sometida al tratamiento de lesiones por papillomavirus humano necesita de cuidados, por parte de los enfermeros, como forma de mejor enfrentar ese periodo el cual esta viviendo.The lack of information on the papillomavirus human can generate misconception on the treatment interfering in the familiar and social context of the woman. With the purpose to know the feelings experienced by women submitted to treatment of lesions by human papillomavirus, was carried

  14. Claramines : A new class of broad-spectrum antimicrobial agents with bimodal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanchet, Marine; Borselli, Diane; Rodallec, Anne; Peiretti, Franck; Vidal, Nicolas; Bolla, Jean Michel; Digiorgio, Carole; Morrison, Kelly; Wuest, William; Brunel, Jean Michel

    2018-02-21

    The emergence of multidrug resistant bacteria/pathogens has highlighted the need for the development of new antibiotics. In this manuscript, we report herein our results dealing with the broad spectrum of antibacterial activity against both sensitive and resistant Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial strains of an easily prepared water soluble polyaminosterol compound namely claramine A1. We will also demonstrate its peculiar mechanism of action (different from all the well-known classes of antibiotics) towards Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria. Finally, due to its low cytotoxicity, this class of molecules could constitute one of the most appropriate response against the questionable emergence of multidrug resistant bacteria and the associated consequence in the name of nosocomial diseases. © 2018 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Synergistic effect of broad-spectrum Sunscreens and antihistamines in the control of idiopathic solar urticaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, A.; Wulf, Hans Chr.

    2008-01-01

    . Observations: Three patients with idiopathic solar urticaria underwent phototesting with UV-B and UV-A radiation. The minimal urticarial dose (MUD) was determined 15 minutes after irradiation. The patients were subsequently tested with 5 times the MUD, and the reaction was graded every minute for 15 minutes....... The patients were then treated with a high-protection, broad-spectrum sunscreen and a nonsedative antihistamine alone and in combination and underwent similar phototesting. The use of sunscreen allowed the patients to tolerate much higher doses of UV radiation (32-38 times the MUD on untreated skin......). Antihistamine use did not increase the patients' MUD but did suppress wheal formation and itch, and only immediate erythema sharply located in the irradiated areas occurred. The combination of sunscreen and antihistamine acted synergistically and increased the tolerance to UV radiation markedly (80-267 times...

  16. Development of a broad-spectrum antiviral with activity against Ebola virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aman, M Javad; Kinch, Michael S; Warfield, Kelly; Warren, Travis; Yunus, Abdul; Enterlein, Sven; Stavale, Eric; Wang, Peifang; Chang, Shaojing; Tang, Qingsong; Porter, Kevin; Goldblatt, Michael; Bavari, Sina

    2009-09-01

    We report herein the identification of a small molecule therapeutic, FGI-106, which displays potent and broad-spectrum inhibition of lethal viral hemorrhagic fevers pathogens, including Ebola, Rift Valley and Dengue Fever viruses, in cell-based assays. Using mouse models of Ebola virus, we further demonstrate that FGI-106 can protect animals from an otherwise lethal infection when used either in a prophylactic or therapeutic setting. A single treatment, administered 1 day after infection, is sufficient to protect animals from lethal Ebola virus challenge. Cell-based assays also identified inhibitory activity against divergent virus families, which supports a hypothesis that FGI-106 interferes with a common pathway utilized by different viruses. These findings suggest FGI-106 may provide an opportunity for targeting viral diseases.

  17. Synergistic effect of broad-spectrum Sunscreens and antihistamines in the control of idiopathic solar urticaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Faurschou, A.; Wulf, Hans Chr.

    2008-01-01

    Background: It can be difficult to provide patients with idiopathic solar urticaria adequate protection from sunlight. In a nonrandomized controlled trial, we used a standardized phototest procedure to determine the effects of using sunscreen and antihistamine to control idiopathic solar urticaria....... The patients were then treated with a high-protection, broad-spectrum sunscreen and a nonsedative antihistamine alone and in combination and underwent similar phototesting. The use of sunscreen allowed the patients to tolerate much higher doses of UV radiation (32-38 times the MUD on untreated skin......). Antihistamine use did not increase the patients' MUD but did suppress wheal formation and itch, and only immediate erythema sharply located in the irradiated areas occurred. The combination of sunscreen and antihistamine acted synergistically and increased the tolerance to UV radiation markedly (80-267 times...

  18. Human Papillomaviruses; Epithelial Tropisms, and the Development of Neoplasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egawa, Nagayasu; Egawa, Kiyofumi; Griffin, Heather; Doorbar, John

    2015-07-16

    Papillomaviruses have evolved over many millions of years to propagate themselves at specific epithelial niches in a range of different host species. This has led to the great diversity of papillomaviruses that now exist, and to the appearance of distinct strategies for epithelial persistence. Many papillomaviruses minimise the risk of immune clearance by causing chronic asymptomatic infections, accompanied by long-term virion-production with only limited viral gene expression. Such lesions are typical of those caused by Beta HPV types in the general population, with viral activity being suppressed by host immunity. A second strategy requires the evolution of sophisticated immune evasion mechanisms, and allows some HPV types to cause prominent and persistent papillomas, even in immune competent individuals. Some Alphapapillomavirus types have evolved this strategy, including those that cause genital warts in young adults or common warts in children. These strategies reflect broad differences in virus protein function as well as differences in patterns of viral gene expression, with genotype-specific associations underlying the recent introduction of DNA testing, and also the introduction of vaccines to protect against cervical cancer. Interestingly, it appears that cellular environment and the site of infection affect viral pathogenicity by modulating viral gene expression. With the high-risk HPV gene products, changes in E6 and E7 expression are thought to account for the development of neoplasias at the endocervix, the anal and cervical transformation zones, and the tonsilar crypts and other oropharyngeal sites. A detailed analysis of site-specific patterns of gene expression and gene function is now prompted.

  19. Human Papillomaviruses; Epithelial Tropisms, and the Development of Neoplasia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagayasu Egawa

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Papillomaviruses have evolved over many millions of years to propagate themselves at specific epithelial niches in a range of different host species. This has led to the great diversity of papillomaviruses that now exist, and to the appearance of distinct strategies for epithelial persistence. Many papillomaviruses minimise the risk of immune clearance by causing chronic asymptomatic infections, accompanied by long-term virion-production with only limited viral gene expression. Such lesions are typical of those caused by Beta HPV types in the general population, with viral activity being suppressed by host immunity. A second strategy requires the evolution of sophisticated immune evasion mechanisms, and allows some HPV types to cause prominent and persistent papillomas, even in immune competent individuals. Some Alphapapillomavirus types have evolved this strategy, including those that cause genital warts in young adults or common warts in children. These strategies reflect broad differences in virus protein function as well as differences in patterns of viral gene expression, with genotype-specific associations underlying the recent introduction of DNA testing, and also the introduction of vaccines to protect against cervical cancer. Interestingly, it appears that cellular environment and the site of infection affect viral pathogenicity by modulating viral gene expression. With the high-risk HPV gene products, changes in E6 and E7 expression are thought to account for the development of neoplasias at the endocervix, the anal and cervical transformation zones, and the tonsilar crypts and other oropharyngeal sites. A detailed analysis of site-specific patterns of gene expression and gene function is now prompted.

  20. Ceftaroline fosamil: a novel broad-spectrum cephalosporin with expanded anti-Gram-positive activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biek, Donald; Critchley, Ian A; Riccobene, Todd A; Thye, Dirk A

    2010-11-01

    Ceftaroline fosamil is a novel cephalosporin with broad-spectrum activity against Gram-positive pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and multidrug-resistant Streptococcus pneumoniae, and common Gram-negative organisms. The activity of ceftaroline against MRSA is attributed to its ability to bind to penicillin-binding protein (PBP) 2a with high affinity and inhibit the biochemical activity of PBP 2a more efficiently than other presently available β-lactams. The activity of ceftaroline against MRSA and the β-haemolytic streptococci makes it an attractive monotherapy agent for the treatment of complicated skin and skin structure infections (cSSSIs). Recent profiling and surveillance studies have shown that ceftaroline is active against contemporary skin pathogens collected from US and European medical centres in 2008. The mean free drug %T  >  MIC (percentage of time the drug concentration remains above the MIC) needed for stasis ranged from 26% for S. aureus to 39% for S. pneumoniae in the murine thigh infection model. Pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic target attainment predictions for 600 mg of ceftaroline fosamil every 12 h showed that the mean %T  >  MICs for which plasma free-drug concentrations exceeded an MIC of 1 and 2 mg/L were 71% and 51% of the dosing interval, respectively. For a 40% T  >  MIC target, the predicted attainments for infections due to pathogens for which ceftaroline MICs were 1 or 2 mg/L were 100% and 90%, respectively. Clinical and microbiological successes of ceftaroline fosamil in treating cSSSIs were demonstrated in two Phase III clinical studies, in which 96.8% of all baseline cSSSI isolates from the microbiologically evaluable population were inhibited by ceftaroline at ≤ 2 mg/L. Ceftaroline fosamil is a promising broad-spectrum agent for the treatment of cSSSIs.

  1. Surveillance of broad-spectrum antibiotic prescription in Singaporean hospitals: a 5-year longitudinal study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Xin Liew

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inappropriate prescription of antibiotics may contribute towards higher levels antimicrobial resistance. A key intervention for improving appropriate antibiotic prescription is surveillance of prescription. This paper presents the results of a longitudinal surveillance of broad-spectrum antibiotic prescription in 5 public-sector hospitals in Singapore from 2006 to 2010. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Quarterly antibiotic prescription data were obtained and converted to defined daily doses (DDDs per 1,000 inpatient-days. The presence of significant trends in antibiotic prescription over time for both individual and combined hospitals was tested by regression analysis and corrected for autocorrelation between time-points. Excluding fluoroquinolones, there was a significant increase in prescription of all monitored antibiotics from an average of 233.12 defined daily doses (DDD/1,000 inpatient-days in 2006 to 254.38 DDD/1,000 inpatient-days in 2010 (Coefficient = 1.13, 95%CI: 0.16-2.09, p = 0.025. Increasing utilization of carbapenems, piperacillin/tazobactam, and Gram-positive agents were seen in the majority of the hospitals, while cephalosporins were less prescribed over time. The combined expenditure for 5 hospitals increased from USD9.9 million in 2006 to USD16.7 million in 2010. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The rate of prescription of broad-spectrum antibiotics in Singaporean hospitals is much higher compared to those of European hospitals. This may be due to high rates of antimicrobial resistance. The increase in expenditure on monitored antibiotics over the past 5 years outstripped the actual increase in DDD/1,000 inpatient-days of antibiotics prescribed. Longitudinal surveillance of antibiotic prescription on a hospital and countrywide level is important for detecting trends for formulating interventions or policies. Further research is needed to understand the causes for the various prescription trends and to act on these where

  2. Broad spectrum antibiotic enrofloxacin modulates contact sensitivity through gut microbiota in a murine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzępa, Anna; Majewska-Szczepanik, Monika; Lobo, Francis M; Wen, Li; Szczepanik, Marian

    2017-07-01

    Medical advances in the field of infection therapy have led to an increasing use of antibiotics, which, apart from eliminating pathogens, also partially eliminate naturally existing commensal bacteria. It has become increasingly clear that less exposure to microbiota early in life may contribute to the observed rise in "immune-mediated" diseases, including autoimmunity and allergy. We sought to test whether the change of gut microbiota with the broad spectrum antibiotic enrofloxacin will modulate contact sensitivity (CS) in mice. Natural gut microbiota were modified by oral treatment with enrofloxacin prior to sensitization with trinitrophenyl chloride followed by CS testing. Finally, adoptive cell transfers were performed to characterize the regulatory cells that are induced by microbiota modification. Oral treatment with enrofloxacin suppresses CS and production of anti-trinitrophenyl chloride IgG1 antibodies. Adoptive transfer experiments show that antibiotic administration favors induction of regulatory cells that suppress CS. Flow cytometry and adoptive transfer of purified cells show that antibiotic-induced suppression of CS is mediated by TCR αβ + CD4 + CD25 + FoxP3 + Treg, CD19 + B220 + CD5 + IL-10 + , IL-10 + Tr1, and IL-10 + TCR γδ + cells. Treatment with the antibiotic induces dysbiosis characterized by increased proportion of Clostridium coccoides (cluster XIVa), C coccoides-Eubacterium rectale (cluster XIVab), Bacteroidetes, and Bifidobacterium spp, but decreased segmented filamentous bacteria. Transfer of antibiotic-modified gut microbiota inhibits CS, but this response can be restored through oral transfer of control gut bacteria to antibiotic-treated animals. Oral treatment with a broad spectrum antibiotic modifies gut microbiota composition and promotes anti-inflammatory response, suggesting that manipulation of gut microbiota can be a powerful tool to modulate the course of CS. Copyright © 2017 American Academy of Allergy, Asthma & Immunology

  3. Human Papillomavirus Cervical Infection and Associated Risk Factors in a Region of Argentina With a High Incidence of Cervical Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Tonon

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess the prevalence and potential risk factors associated with human papillomavirus (HPV cervical infection among women residing in a region of northeastern Argentina with a high incidence of cervical cancer.

  4. Recurrent integration of human papillomaviruses 16, 45, and 67 near translocation breakpoints in new cervical cancer cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopman, L. A.; Szuhai, K.; van Eendenburg, J. D.; Bezrookove, V.; Kenter, G. G.; Schuuring, E.; Tanke, H.; Fleuren, G. J.

    1999-01-01

    Progressive chromosomal changes and integration of human papillomavirus (HPV) sequences mark the development of invasive cervical cancer. Chromosomal localization of HPV integration is essential to the study of genomic regions involved in HPV-induced pathogenesis. Yet, the available information

  5. Detection of human papillomavirus DNA in peri-tumor tissues and pelvic lymph nodes as potential molecular marker of micrometastasis in cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tortora, Marianna; Annunziata, Clorinda; Liguori, Giuseppina; Losito, Simona; Botti, Gerardo; Greggi, Stefano; Buonaguro, Luigi; Buonaguro, Franco M; Tornesello, Maria Lina

    2016-01-01

    The association between high risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) and cervical cancer has been firmly established. HPV genome is present in nearly all cases of cervical cancer and detection of viral DNA could therefore be used as a surrogate marker of micrometastasis in peri-tumor tissues and lymph nodes. We analyzed primary cervical carcinomas, peri-tumor biopsies and pelvic lymph nodes in 20 women with invasive cancer (FIGO stage I-II) who underwent radical pelvic surgery and lymphadenectomy. HPV DNA was searched by broad spectrum PCR in 142 DNA samples extracted from paraffin embedded tissues. Viral genotypes were identified by direct sequencing analysis. HPV DNA sequences were identified in all available primary cervical tumors (n = 15). The most common genotype was HPV16 (60 %), followed by HPV18 (20 %), HPV35 (7 %), HPV45 (7 %) and HPV66 (7 %). Seven out of 20 (35 %) women had metastatic spread in peri-tumor tissues and/or lymph nodes, as determined by histology. HPV DNA was detected in all histological positive samples as well as in 16 and 25 % of histological negative peri-tumor tissues and lymph nodes, respectively. Three out of 20 (15 %) women without histological evidence of metastatic spread had HPV-positive lymph nodes. HPV genotype was found always concordant between primary tumor and metastatic lesions. The remaining 10 women (50 %) were histology and HPV-negative in all peri-tumor biopsies and lymph nodes analyzed. Evaluation of HPV DNA in peri-tumor tissues as well as pelvic lymph nodes could be a sensitive marker to identify micrometastasis or isolated tumor cells and to monitor the risk of disease recurrence in women with cervical cancer.

  6. Comparatively low attendance during Human Papillomavirus catch-up vaccination among teenage girls in the Netherlands: Insights from a behavioral survey among parents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gefenaite Giedre

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Dutch Human Papillomavirus (HPV catch-up vaccination program in 2009 appeared less successful than expected. We aimed to identify the most important determinants of refusing the vaccination. Methods Two thousand parents of girls born in 1996 targeted for HPV vaccination received an invitation letter to participate in a questionnaire study. Two study groups were defined: the first group consisted of parents of girls who had accepted the vaccine and already received the first dose of HPV vaccination. The second group consisted of parents whose daughters were not vaccinated. The questionnaire consisted of a broad spectrum of possible determinants that were revealed after literature search and discussions with the stakeholders. Results Four hundred sixty nine questionnaires (24% were returned, 307 (31% from those who accepted and 162 (16% from those who declined the vaccine. The decision not to accept the vaccine was largely determined by: (i perception that the information provided by the government about the vaccine was limited or biased (OR 13.27; (ii limited trust, that the government would stop the vaccination program if there were serious side effects (OR 9.95; (iii lack of knowledge about the effectiveness of the vaccine (OR 7.67; (iv concerns about the side effects of the vaccine (OR 4.94; (v lack of conviction that HPV can be extremely harmful (OR 3.78; (vi perception that the government is strongly influenced by vaccine producers (OR 3.54; and (vii religious convictions (OR 2.18. Conclusions This study revealed several determinants for HPV vaccination uptake after implementation of the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. These determinants should be taken into consideration in order to successfully implement HPV vaccination into National Immunization Programs.

  7. Comparatively low attendance during Human Papillomavirus catch-up vaccination among teenage girls in the Netherlands: Insights from a behavioral survey among parents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gefenaite, Giedre; Smit, Marieke; Nijman, Hans W; Tami, Adriana; Drijfhout, Ingrid H; Pascal, Astrid; Postma, Maarten J; Wolters, Bert A; van Delden, Johannes J M; Wilschut, Jan C; Hak, Eelko

    2012-07-02

    The Dutch Human Papillomavirus (HPV) catch-up vaccination program in 2009 appeared less successful than expected. We aimed to identify the most important determinants of refusing the vaccination. Two thousand parents of girls born in 1996 targeted for HPV vaccination received an invitation letter to participate in a questionnaire study. Two study groups were defined: the first group consisted of parents of girls who had accepted the vaccine and already received the first dose of HPV vaccination. The second group consisted of parents whose daughters were not vaccinated. The questionnaire consisted of a broad spectrum of possible determinants that were revealed after literature search and discussions with the stakeholders. Four hundred sixty nine questionnaires (24%) were returned, 307 (31%) from those who accepted and 162 (16%) from those who declined the vaccine. The decision not to accept the vaccine was largely determined by: (i) perception that the information provided by the government about the vaccine was limited or biased (OR 13.27); (ii) limited trust, that the government would stop the vaccination program if there were serious side effects (OR 9.95); (iii) lack of knowledge about the effectiveness of the vaccine (OR 7.67); (iv) concerns about the side effects of the vaccine (OR 4.94); (v) lack of conviction that HPV can be extremely harmful (OR 3.78); (vi) perception that the government is strongly influenced by vaccine producers (OR 3.54); and (vii) religious convictions (OR 2.18). This study revealed several determinants for HPV vaccination uptake after implementation of the HPV vaccine for adolescent girls. These determinants should be taken into consideration in order to successfully implement HPV vaccination into National Immunization Programs.

  8. Sexual behaviour and risk factors for the acquisition of human papillomavirus infections in young people in Italy: suggestions for future vaccination policies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panatto Donatella

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection. The main risk factors correlated with HPV infection are: early sexual debut, the number of partners, frequency and type of sexual contact and partner’s sexual histories. We surveyed sexual habits among young people in order to provide information that might orient decision-makers in adopting HPV multi-cohort vaccination policies. Methods We administered a questionnaire to students (14–24 years old in five Italian cities. Results 7298 questionnaires were analyzed (4962 females and 2336 males; 55.3% of females (95% CI 53.9–56.7 and 52.5% of males (95% CI 50.5–54.5 reported regular sexual activity. The mean age at sexual debut was 15.7 ± 1.6 and 15.6 ± 1.6 for females and males, respectively, and the median age was 16 for both sexes. With regard to contraceptive use during the last year, 63.6% of males and 62.8% of females responded affirmatively; 42.6% of males and 42.8% of females used condoms. Conclusion The results reveal precocious sexual activity among respondents, with the mean age at first intercourse declining as age decreases. Condom use proved to be scant. Considering lifestyle-related risk factors, males appear to have a higher probability of acquiring HPV infection than females. These data support the importance of promoting multi-cohort HPV vaccination strategies for females up to 25 years of age. It is essential to improve vaccination coverage through different broad-spectrum strategies, including campaigns to increase awareness of sexually transmitted diseases and their prevention.

  9. The Nasal Mucosa Contains a Large Spectrum of Human Papillomavirus Types from the Betapapillomavirus and Gammapapillomavirus Genera

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Forslund, Ola; Johansson, Hanna; Madsen, Klaus Gregaard

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) types from the Betapapillomavirus and Gammapapillomavirus genera are common at cutaneous sites. The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of these HPV types in oral and nasal samples....... Human papillomavirus (HPV) types from the Betapapillomavirus and Gammapapillomavirus genera are common at cutaneous sites. The aim of this study was to analyze the prevalence of these HPV types in oral and nasal samples....

  10. Using organotypic (raft) epithelial tissue cultures for the biosynthesis and isolation of infectious human papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozbun, Michelle A; Patterson, Nicole A

    2014-08-01

    Papillomaviruses have a strict tropism for epithelial cells, and they are fully reliant on cellular differentiation for completion of their life cycles, resulting in the production of progeny virions. Thus, a permissive environment for full viral replication in vitro-wherein virion morphogenesis occurs under cooperative viral and cellular cues-requires the cultivation of epithelium. Presented in the first section of this unit is a protocol to grow differentiating epithelial tissues that mimic many important morphological and biochemical aspects of normal skin. The technique involves growing epidermal cells atop a dermal equivalent consisting of live fibroblasts and a collagen lattice. Epithelial stratification and differentiation ensues when the keratinocyte-dermal equivalent is placed at the air-liquid interface. The apparent floating nature of the cell-matrix in this method led to the nickname "raft" cultures. The general technique can be applied to normal low passage keratinocytes, to cells stably transfected with papillomavirus genes or genomes, or keratinocytes established from neoplastic lesions. However, infectious papillomavirus particles have only been isolated from organotypic epithelial cultures initiated with cells that maintain oncogenic human papillomavirus genomes in an extrachomosomal replicative form. The second section of this unit is dedicated to a virion isolation method that minimizes aerosol and skin exposure to these human carcinogens. Although the focus of the protocols is on the growth of tissues that yields infectious papillomavirus progeny, this culture system facilitates the investigation of these fastidious viruses during their complex replicative cycles, and raft tissues can be manipulated and harvested at any point during the process. Importantly, a single-step virus growth cycle is achieved in this process, as it is unlikely that progeny virions are released to initiate subsequent rounds of infection. Copyright © 2014 John Wiley

  11. Role of papillomavirus oncogenes in human cervical cancer: Transgenic animal studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griep, A.E.; Lambert, P.F. [Univ. of Wisconsin School of Medicine, Madison, WI (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Human papillomaviruses are believed to be etiologic agents for the majority of human cervical carcinoma, a common cancer that is a leading cause of death by cancer among women worldwide. In cervical carcinoma, a subset of papillomaviral genes, namely E6 and E7, are expressed. In vitro tissue culture studies indicate that HPV E6 and E7 are oncogenes, and that their oncogenicity is due in part to their capacity to inactivate cellular tumor suppressor genes. The behavior of E6 and E7 in vitro and the genetic evidence from analysis of human cancers suggest that the E6 and E7 genes play a significant role in the development of cervical cancer. This hypothesis is now being tested using animal models. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of the oncogenicity of papillomavirus genes that has been generated through their study in transgenic mice. 82 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  12. Choline and Geranate Deep Eutectic Solvent as a Broad-Spectrum Antiseptic Agent for Preventive and Therapeutic Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrewsky, Michael; Banerjee, Amrita; Apte, Sanjana; Kern, Theresa L; Jones, Mattie R; Sesto, Rico E Del; Koppisch, Andrew T; Fox, David T; Mitragotri, Samir

    2016-06-01

    Antiseptic agents are the primary arsenal to disinfect skin and prevent pathogens spreading within the host as well as into the surroundings; however the Food and Drug Administration published a report in 2015 requiring additional validation of nearly all current antiseptic agents before their continued use can be allowed. This vulnerable position calls for urgent identification of novel antiseptic agents. Recently, the ability of a deep eutectic, Choline And Geranate (CAGE), to treat biofilms of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Salmonella enterica was demonstrated. Here it is reported that CAGE exhibits broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity against a number of drug-resistant bacteria, fungi, and viruses including clinical isolates of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Staphylococcus aureus, and Candida albicans as well as laboratory strains of Herpes Simplex Virus. Studies in human keratinocytes and mice show that CAGE affords negligible local or systemic toxicity, and an ≈180-14 000-fold improved efficacy/toxicity ratio over currently used antiseptic agents. Further, CAGE penetrates deep into the dermis and treats pathogens located in deep skin layers as confirmed by the ability of CAGE in vivo to treat Propionibacterium acnes infection. In combination, the results clearly demonstrate CAGE holds promise as a transformative platform antiseptic agent for preventive as well as therapeutic applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  13. Trends in broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing for children with acute otitis media in the United States, 1998–2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gambler Angela S

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Overuse of broad-spectrum antibiotics is associated with antibiotic resistance. Acute otitis media (AOM is responsible for a large proportion of antibiotics prescribed for US children. Rates of broad-spectrum antibiotic prescribing for AOM are unknown. Methods Analysis of the National Ambulatory Medical Care Survey and National Hospital Ambulatory Medical Care Survey, 1998 to 2004 (N = 6,878. Setting is office-based physicians, hospital outpatient departments, and emergency departments. Patients are children aged 12 years and younger prescribed antibiotics for acute otitis media. Main outcome measure is percentage of broad-spectrum antibiotics, defined as amoxicillin/clavulanate, macrolides, cephalosporins and quinolones. Results Broad-spectrum prescribing for acute otitis media increased from 34% of visits in 1998 to 45% of visits in 2004 (P Conclusion Prescribing of broad-spectrum antibiotics for acute otitis media has steadily increased from 1998 to 2004. Associations with non-clinical factors suggest potential for improvement in prescribing practice.

  14. Targeting N-glycan cryptic sugar moieties for broad-spectrum virus neutralization: progress in identifying conserved molecular targets in viruses of distinct phylogenetic origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Denong; Tang, Jin; Tang, Jiulai; Wang, Lai-Xi

    2015-03-12

    Identifying molecular targets for eliciting broadly virus-neutralizing antibodies is one of the key steps toward development of vaccines against emerging viral pathogens. Owing to genomic and somatic diversities among viral species, identifying protein targets for broad-spectrum virus neutralization is highly challenging even for the same virus, such as HIV-1. However, viruses rely on host glycosylation machineries to synthesize and express glycans and, thereby, may display common carbohydrate moieties. Thus, exploring glycan-binding profiles of broad-spectrum virus-neutralizing agents may provide key information to uncover the carbohydrate-based virus-neutralizing epitopes. In this study, we characterized two broadly HIV-neutralizing agents, human monoclonal antibody 2G12 and Galanthus nivalis lectin (GNA), for their viral targeting activities. Although these agents were known to be specific for oligomannosyl antigens, they differ strikingly in virus-binding activities. The former is HIV-1 specific; the latter is broadly reactive and is able to neutralize viruses of distinct phylogenetic origins, such as HIV-1, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV). In carbohydrate microarray analyses, we explored the molecular basis underlying the striking differences in the spectrum of anti-virus activities of the two probes. Unlike 2G12, which is strictly specific for the high-density Man9GlcNAc2Asn (Man9)-clusters, GNA recognizes a number of N-glycan cryptic sugar moieties. These include not only the known oligomannosyl antigens but also previously unrecognized tri-antennary or multi-valent GlcNAc-terminating N-glycan epitopes (Tri/m-Gn). These findings highlight the potential of N-glycan cryptic sugar moieties as conserved targets for broad-spectrum virus neutralization and suggest the GNA-model of glycan-binding warrants focused investigation.

  15. Targeting N-Glycan Cryptic Sugar Moieties for Broad-Spectrum Virus Neutralization: Progress in Identifying Conserved Molecular Targets in Viruses of Distinct Phylogenetic Origins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denong Wang

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Identifying molecular targets for eliciting broadly virus-neutralizing antibodies is one of the key steps toward development of vaccines against emerging viral pathogens. Owing to genomic and somatic diversities among viral species, identifying protein targets for broad-spectrum virus neutralization is highly challenging even for the same virus, such as HIV-1. However, viruses rely on host glycosylation machineries to synthesize and express glycans and, thereby, may display common carbohydrate moieties. Thus, exploring glycan-binding profiles of broad-spectrum virus-neutralizing agents may provide key information to uncover the carbohydrate-based virus-neutralizing epitopes. In this study, we characterized two broadly HIV-neutralizing agents, human monoclonal antibody 2G12 and Galanthus nivalis lectin (GNA, for their viral targeting activities. Although these agents were known to be specific for oligomannosyl antigens, they differ strikingly in virus-binding activities. The former is HIV-1 specific; the latter is broadly reactive and is able to neutralize viruses of distinct phylogenetic origins, such as HIV-1, severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV, and human cytomegalovirus (HCMV. In carbohydrate microarray analyses, we explored the molecular basis underlying the striking differences in the spectrum of anti-virus activities of the two probes. Unlike 2G12, which is strictly specific for the high-density Man9GlcNAc2Asn (Man9-clusters, GNA recognizes a number of N-glycan cryptic sugar moieties. These include not only the known oligomannosyl antigens but also previously unrecognized tri-antennary or multi-valent GlcNAc-terminating N-glycan epitopes (Tri/m-Gn. These findings highlight the potential of N-glycan cryptic sugar moieties as conserved targets for broad-spectrum virus neutralization and suggest the GNA-model of glycan-binding warrants focused investigation.

  16. Inactivation of high-risk human papillomaviruses by Holder pasteurization: implications for donor human milk banking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donalisio, Manuela; Cagno, Valeria; Vallino, Marta; Moro, Guido E; Arslanoglu, Sertac; Tonetto, Paola; Bertino, Enrico; Lembo, David

    2014-01-01

    Several studies have recently reported the detection of oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPV) in human milk of a minority of lactating mothers. These findings raised safety concerns in the context of human donor milk banking given the potential risk of HPV transmission to recipient infants. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the Holder pasteurization, a procedure currently in use in human donor milk banks for milk pasteurization, completely inactivates high-risk and low-risk HPV. HPV pseudoviruses (PsV) were generated, spiked into cell culture medium or donor human milk and subjected to thermal inactivation. HPV PsV infectivity and morphological integrity was analyzed by cell-based assay and by electron microscopy, respectively. The Holder pasteurization completely inactivated the infectivity of high-risk (types 16 and 18) and low-risk (type 6) HPV both in cell culture medium and in human milk causing PsV particle disassembly. The results presented here indicate that the Holder pasteurization is an efficient procedure to inactivate high-risk and low-risk HPV thus preventing the potential risk of their transmission through human donor milk.

  17. Cost-effectiveness of human papillomavirus vaccination in low and middle income countries: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fesenfeld, Michaela; Hutubessy, Raymond; Jit, Mark

    2013-08-20

    The World Health Organization recommends establishing that human papillomavirus vaccination is cost-effective before vaccine introduction. We searched Pubmed, Embase and the Cochrane Library to 1 April 2012 for economic evaluations of human papillomavirus vaccination in low and middle income countries. We found 25 articles, but almost all low income countries and many middle income countries lacked country-specific studies. Methods, assumptions and consequently results varied widely, even for studies conducted for the same country. Despite the heterogeneity, most studies conclude that vaccination is likely to be cost-effective and possibly even cost saving, particularly in settings without organized cervical screening programmes. However, study uncertainty could be reduced by clarity about vaccine prices and vaccine delivery costs. The review supports extending vaccination to low income settings where vaccine prices are competitive, donor funding is available, cervical cancer burden is high and screening options are limited. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. The most effective and promising population health strategies to advance human papillomavirus vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, Robert M; Agunwamba, Amenah A; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Finney Rutten, Lila J

    2016-01-01

    The US is failing to make substantive progress toward improving rates of human papillomavirus vaccine uptake. While the Healthy People 2020 goal for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination is 80%, the three-dose completion rate in the US in 2014 for 13- to 17-year-old females is less than 40%, and the rate for males is just above 20%. Experts point to a number of reasons for the poor HPV vaccination rates including parental concerns about safety, necessity, and timing. However, the evidence refuting these concerns is substantial. Efforts focusing on education and communication have not shown promise, but several population health strategies have reminder/recall systems; practice-focused strategies targeting staff, clinicians, and parents; assessment and feedback activities; and school-based HPV vaccination programs.

  19. Role of high-risk human papillomavirus in the etiology of oral and oropharyngeal cancers in Thailand: A case-control study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chotipanich, Adit; Siriarechakul, Surattaya; Mungkung, On-Ong

    2018-01-01

    Among developing countries, Thailand shows no increase in the incidence of human papillomavirus-driven oropharyngeal cancer. The causal role of human papillomavirus infection in this pathology has not been researched thoroughly. A hospital-based, case-control study was performed which included 104 patients with newly diagnosed oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas and 104 individuals without cancer. The Cervista high-risk human papillomavirus and 16/18 assays were used to detect human papillomavirus. Odds ratios were used to assess the association between high-risk genotypes of human papillomavirus and the cancers. High-risk human papillomavirus was detected in 4 of 52 (7.7%) oral cancer cases, 6 of 52 (11.5%) oropharyngeal cancer cases, and 1 of 104 (0.96%) control subjects. Of 104 cancer patients in the study, 83 were smokers. High-risk human papillomavirus was significantly associated with oropharyngeal cancer (odds ratio = 13.44, 95% confidence interval = 1.6-114.8) but was nonsignificantly associated with oral cancer (odds ratio = 8.58, 95% confidence interval = 0.9-78.9). However, after adjustment for smoking, high-risk human papillomavirus was determined to be nonsignificantly associated with oropharyngeal cancer (adjusted odds ratio = 5.83, 95% confidence interval = 0.8-43.5). Although low human papillomavirus prevalence was observed, the rate of high-risk human papillomavirus infection in the cancer group was still higher than that in the control group. Smoking may have an influence on the etiology of human papillomavirus-related cancers. However, the study is underpowered to clarify the role of human papillomavirus as the independent risk factor for oral and oropharyngeal cancers in the Thai population.

  20. Metastatic MHC class I-negative mouse cells derived by transformation with human papillomavirus type 16

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Šmahel, M.; Sobotková, E.; Bubeník, Jan; Šímová, Jana; Žák, R.; Ludvíková, V.; Mikyšková, Romana; Kovařík, J.; Jelínek, F.; Povýšil, C.; Marinov, J.; Vonka, V.

    2001-01-01

    Roč. 84, č. 3 (2001), s. 374-380 ISSN 0007-0920 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC5900; GA MZd NC5526; GA ČR GA312/99/0542; GA ČR GA312/98/0826 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : human papillomavirus * E6/E7 oncogenes * cell transformation Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 3.942, year: 2001

  1. Human Papillomavirus (HPV): Making the case for “Immunisation for All”

    OpenAIRE

    Prue, Gillian; Lawler, Mark; Baker, Peter; Warnakulasuriya, Saman

    2016-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) contributes to the most common sexually transmitted infections, with repeated and persistent infection with particular types causing disease in both men and women. Infection with low-risk HPV types can lead to genital warts and benign lesions of the oral cavity, while high-risk types can cause various HPV-related malignancies. The incidence of head and neck cancer has been rising in the past number of decades mostly due to oropharyngeal cancer linked to HPV infectio...

  2. Sexual behaviour of women with human papillomavirus (HPV) lesions of the uterine cervix.

    OpenAIRE

    Syrjänen, K; Väyrynen, M; Castrén, O; Yliskoski, M; Mäntyjärvi, R; Pyrhönen, S; Saarikoski, S

    1984-01-01

    To analyse the epidemiological aspects contributing to the transmission of human papillomavirus (HPV) lesions (flat, inverted, and papillomatous condylomas) of the uterine cervix, we recorded the sexual behaviour of 146 women who consecutively attended the department of obstetrics and gynaecology of Kuopio University Central Hospital with a cervical HPV lesion (with or without concomitant cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN]. Similar data were collected from an age matched group of women ...

  3. Human Papillomavirus Genotype Distributions: Implications for Vaccination and Cancer Screening in the United States

    OpenAIRE

    Wheeler, Cosette M.; Hunt, William C.; Joste, Nancy E.; Key, Charles R.; Quint, Wim G. V.; Castle, Philip E.

    2009-01-01

    Background Limited data are available describing human papillomavirus (HPV) genotype distributions in cervical cancer in the United States. Such studies are needed to predict how HPV vaccination and HPV-based screening will influence cervical cancer prevention. Methods We used the New Mexico Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results Registry to ascertain cases of in situ (n = 1213) and invasive (n = 808) cervical cancer diagnosed during 1985?1999 and 1980?1999, respectively, in the state of...

  4. Characterization of human papillomavirus type 66 from an invasive carcinoma of the uterine cervix.

    OpenAIRE

    Tawheed, A R; Beaudenon, S; Favre, M; Orth, G

    1991-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA sequences coexisting with HPV16 and HPV45 were cloned from an invasive cervical carcinoma. The cloned HPV was shown to be a novel type, named HPV66, and is related to HPV56 (an HPV detected in cervical cancer). After screening 160 anogenital biopsies, four specimens exhibited histological features of intraepithelial neoplasia and contained HPV66 sequences. Of these, three were found to be associated with another HPV type.

  5. Genome Sequence of Human Papillomavirus Type 20, Strain HPV-20/Lancaster/2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Kate V; Bishop, Lisa A; Rhodes, Glenn; Salez, Nicolas; McEwan, Neil R; Hegarty, Matthew J; Robey, Julie; Harding, Nicola; Wetherell, Simon; Lauder, Robert M; Pickup, Roger W; Wilkinson, Mark; Gatherer, Derek

    2017-08-03

    The genome sequence of human papillomavirus type 20 (HPV-20; family Papillomaviridae , genus Betapapillomavirus , species Betapapillomavirus 1 , type 20) was assembled by deep sequencing from nasopharyngeal swabs. The assembled genome is 0.37% divergent over its full length from the single complete genome of HPV-20 in GenBank (U31778). We named the strain HPV-20/Lancaster/2015. Copyright © 2017 Atkinson et al.

  6. Genome Sequence of Human Papillomavirus 23 Strain HPV-23/Lancaster/2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atkinson, Kate V; Bishop, Lisa A; Rhodes, Glenn; Salez, Nicolas; McEwan, Neil R; Hegarty, Matthew J; Robey, Julie; Harding, Nicola; Wetherell, Simon; Lauder, Robert M; Pickup, Roger W; Wilkinson, Mark; Gatherer, Derek

    2017-05-18

    The genome of human papillomavirus type 23 (HPV-23; family Papillomaviridae , genus Betapapillomavirus , species Betapapillomavirus 2 , type 23) was assembled by deep sequencing from nasopharyngeal swabs. The assembled genome is 2.7% divergent over its full length from the single complete genome of HPV-23 in GenBank (accession no. U31781). We named the strain HPV-23/Lancaster/2015. Copyright © 2017 Atkinson et al.

  7. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 perturbs DREAM to promote cellular proliferation and mitotic gene expression

    OpenAIRE

    DeCaprio, James A.

    2013-01-01

    Study of the small DNA tumor viruses continues to provide valuable new insights into oncogenesis and fundamental biological processes. While much has already been revealed about how the human papillomaviruses (HPVs) can transform cells and contribute to cervical and oropharyngeal cancer, there clearly is much more to learn. In this issue of Oncogene, Pang et al. demonstrate that the high-risk HPV16 E7 oncogene can promote cellular proliferation by interacting with the DREAM (DP, RB-like, E2F ...

  8. Perceptions and Experiences of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection and Testing among Low-Income Mexican Women

    OpenAIRE

    Le?n-Maldonado, Leith; Wentzell, Emily; Brown, Brandon; Allen-Leigh, Betania; Torres-Ibarra, Leticia; Salmer?n, Jorge; Billings, Deborah L.; Thrasher, James F.; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo

    2016-01-01

    Background HPV infection causes cervical cancer, a major contributor to morbidity and mortality among low-income Mexican women. Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA testing is now a primary screening strategy in Mexico?s early cervical cancer detection program (ECDP). Research on Mexican women?s perceptions of HPV and testing is necessary for establishing culturally appropriate protocols and educational materials. Here, we explore perceptions about HPV and HPV-related risk factors among low-income ...

  9. Evaluating human papillomavirus vaccination programs in Canada: should provincial healthcare pay for voluntary adult vaccination?

    OpenAIRE

    Smith? Robert J; Llamazares Marco

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Recently, provincial health programs in Canada and elsewhere have begun rolling out vaccination against human papillomavirus for girls aged 9–13. While vaccination is voluntary, the cost of vaccination is waived, to encourage parents to have their daughters vaccinated. Adult women who are eligible for the vaccine may still receive it, but at a cost of approximately CAN$400. Given the high efficacy and immunogenicity of the vaccine, the possibility of eradicating targeted t...

  10. Current Issues Facing The Introduction Of Human Papillomavirus Vaccine In Malaysia

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, LP; Sam, IC

    2007-01-01

    Certain human papillomavirus (HPV) types are strongly associated with cervical cancer. Recently-described effective vaccines against these HPV types represent a great medical breakthrough in preventing cervical cancer. In Malaysia, the vaccine has just received regulatory approval. We are likely to face similar barriers to implementing HPV vaccination as reported by countries where vaccination has been introduced. Most women have poor understanding of HPV and its link to cervical cancer. Phys...

  11. Exploring human papillomavirus vaccination refusal among ethnic minorities in England: A comparative qualitative study

    OpenAIRE

    Forster, Alice S.; Rockliffe, Lauren; Marlow, Laura A.V.; Bedford, Helen; McBride, Emily; Waller, Jo

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objectives In England, uptake of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination to prevent HPV‐related cancer is lower among girls from ethnic minority backgrounds. We aimed to explore the factors that prevented ethnic minority parents from vaccinating, compared to White British nonvaccinating parents and vaccinating ethnic minority parents. Methods Interviews with 33 parents (n = 14 ethnic minority non‐vaccinating, n = 10 White British nonvaccinating, and n = 9 ethnic minority vaccinating) ...

  12. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein mediates CCNA1 promoter methylation

    OpenAIRE

    Chalertpet, Kanwalat; Pakdeechaidan, Watcharapong; Patel, Vyomesh; Mutirangura, Apiwat; Yanatatsaneejit, Pattamawadee

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) oncoproteins drive distinctive promoter methylation patterns in cancer. However, the underlying mechanism remains to be elucidated. Cyclin A1 (CCNA1) promoter methylation is strongly associated with HPV-associated cancer. CCNA1 methylation is found in HPV-associated cervical cancers, as well as in head and neck squamous cell cancer. Numerous pieces of evidence suggest that E7 may drive CCNA1 methylation. First, the CCNA1 promoter is methylated in HPV-positive epithe...

  13. Broad-spectrum inhibition of HIV-1 by a monoclonal antibody directed against a gp120-induced epitope of CD4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samuele E Burastero

    Full Text Available To penetrate susceptible cells, HIV-1 sequentially interacts with two highly conserved cellular receptors, CD4 and a chemokine receptor like CCR5 or CXCR4. Monoclonal antibodies (MAbs directed against such receptors are currently under clinical investigation as potential preventive or therapeutic agents. We immunized Balb/c mice with molecular complexes of the native, trimeric HIV-1 envelope (Env bound to a soluble form of the human CD4 receptor. Sera from immunized mice were found to contain gp120-CD4 complex-enhanced antibodies and showed broad-spectrum HIV-1-inhibitory activity. A proportion of MAbs derived from these mice preferentially recognized complex-enhanced epitopes. In particular, a CD4-specific MAb designated DB81 (IgG1Κ was found to preferentially bind to a complex-enhanced epitope on the D2 domain of human CD4. MAb DB81 also recognized chimpanzee CD4, but not baboon or macaque CD4, which exhibit sequence divergence in the D2 domain. Functionally, MAb DB81 displayed broad HIV-1-inhibitory activity, but it did not exert suppressive effects on T-cell activation in vitro. The variable regions of the heavy and light chains of MAb DB81 were sequenced. Due to its broad-spectrum anti-HIV-1 activity and lack of immunosuppressive effects, a humanized derivative of MAb DB81 could provide a useful complement to current preventive or therapeutic strategies against HIV-1.

  14. The effects of exogenous catalase on broad-spectrum near-UV (300-400nm) treated Escherichia coli cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sammartano, L.J.; Tuveson, R.W.

    1984-01-01

    Catalase incorporated into plating medium protects against inactivation and mutagenesis by broad-spectrum near-ultraviolet wavelength (300-400nm) (NUV) radiation in strains of Escherichia coli. Plating medium containing catalase does not provide protection against inactivation by wavelengths in the FUV region. Catalase added to the cell suspension during or added immediately after NUV exposure also protects against inactivation. The protection provided by catalase suggests a possible role for hydrogen peroxide in the processes of inactivation and mutagenesis by broad-spectrum NUV. (author)

  15. Broad-spectrum sun-protective action of Porphyra-334 derived from Porphyra vietnamensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatia, Saurabh; Sharma, K.; Namdeo, Ajay G.; Chaugule, B. B.; Kavale, M.; Nanda, S.

    2010-01-01

    There are enormous UV-protective compounds present in the current world market, out of which 98% give protection against UV-B range and the remaining 2% are potent against far UV-A range only. Furthermore, these synthetic compounds have various problems related to photo-stability and cross-stability. There is a vital need of sunscreen agents that will remain stable for prolonged periods and provide broad-spectrum protection against harmful UV range. The Indian Ocean contains large amounts of macro-algae which synthesize varied amount of mycosporine amino acids, “sun-protective compounds” by shikmic acid pathway. In the present study, we have evaluated the sunscreen protection provided by Porphyra-334, a mycosporine amino acid isolated from Indian sp. of Porphyra. Furthermore, the isolated compound was detected by high performance thin layer chromatography (HPTLC) fingerprinting, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and ultraviolet (UV), whereas nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and infrared spectrometry were used for its structural characterization. Stability studies were performed under different storage and pH conditions. Ultimately a sunscreen formulation was developed and its potential against marketed Aloe vera gel was evaluated by in vitro sunscreen protection method. It was observed that sunscreen potential of Porphyra-334 was 5.11-fold greater than that of the marketed Aloe vera gel preparation. PMID:21808539

  16. Oxabicyclooctane-Linked Novel Bacterial Topoisomerase Inhibitors as Broad Spectrum Antibacterial Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Sheo B.; Kaelin, David E.; Wu, Jin; Miesel, Lynn; Tan, Christopher M.; Meinke, Peter T.; Olsen, David; Lagrutta, Armando; Bradley, Prudence; Lu, Jun; Patel, Sangita; Rickert, Keith W.; Smith, Robert F.; Soisson, Stephen; Wei, Changqing; Fukuda, Hideyuki; Kishii, Ryuta; Takei, Masaya; Fukuda, Yasumichi (Merck); (WuXi App Tec); (Kyorin)

    2014-05-08

    Bacterial resistance is eroding the clinical utility of existing antibiotics necessitating the discovery of new agents. Bacterial type II topoisomerase is a clinically validated, highly effective, and proven drug target. This target is amenable to inhibition by diverse classes of inhibitors with alternative and distinct binding sites to quinolone antibiotics, thus enabling the development of agents that lack cross-resistance to quinolones. Described here are novel bacterial topoisomerase inhibitors (NBTIs), which are a new class of gyrase and topo IV inhibitors and consist of three distinct structural moieties. The substitution of the linker moiety led to discovery of potent broad-spectrum NBTIs with reduced off-target activity (hERG IC50 > 18 μM) and improved physical properties. AM8191 is bactericidal and selectively inhibits DNA synthesis and Staphylococcus aureus gyrase (IC50 = 1.02 μM) and topo IV (IC50 = 10.4 μM). AM8191 showed parenteral and oral efficacy (ED50) at less than 2.5 mg/kg doses in a S. aureus murine infection model. A cocrystal structure of AM8191 bound to S. aureus DNA-gyrase showed binding interactions similar to that reported for GSK299423, displaying a key contact of Asp83 with the basic amine at position-7 of the linker.

  17. [Ceftaroline, a new broad-spectrum cephalosporin in the era of multiresistance].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horcajada, Juan Pablo; Cantón, Rafael

    2014-03-01

    Antimicrobial resistance has increased during the last few years, representing a public health concern. Among Gram-positive organisms, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and Streptococcus pneumoniae are paradigms of resistance and of the dispersion of multiresistant clones. Ceftaroline, a broad-spectrum cephalosporin that includes MRSA and penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae, is the first β-lactam antibiotic useful in infections due to MRSA. Phase-III clinical trials have demonstrated its efficacy in the treatment of community-acquired pneumonia and in skin and soft tissue infections, which are the current indications for ceftaroline. Due to its microbiological and pharmacological (PK/PD) profiles, these indications could be expanded to include bacteremia, endocarditis, and even osteoarticular infections. Another notable feature is the activity of this drug against Gram-negative bacilli susceptible to third generation cephalosporins, indicating that ceftaroline could be useful when these organisms are suspected or demonstrated in polymicrobial infections. Clinical follow-up of ceftaroline use will more clearly define future ceftaroline indications. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  18. Characterization and partial purification of a broad spectrum antibiotic AS-48 produced by Streptococcus faecalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gálvez, A; Maqueda, M; Valdivia, E; Quesada, A; Montoya, E

    1986-10-01

    Streptococcus faecalis S-48 produces a broad spectrum antibiotic, active against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. This substance is produced in solid and liquid media and also in a defined basal medium. It is sensitive to protease, pronase, or trypsin, heating at 70 degrees C, and alkaline pH, but resistant to treatment with lipase, lysozyme, alkaline phosphatase, DNAase, RNAase, acidic or neutral pHs, and also lower temperatures (60 degrees C). Several organic solvents cause precipitation, but not inactivation. This antibiotic has been partially purified by gel filtration and further ion-exchange chromatography. Its molecular weight has been estimated close to 2000. The biological activity of this antagonistic substance against the selected indicator strains, Streptococcus faecalis S-47 and Escherichia coli U-9, is bactericidal. The characterization of this substance, initially classified as a bacteriocin, indicates that it is an antibiotic of peptidic nature. The significance of antibiotic occurrence in group D of the genus Streptococcus is also discussed.

  19. Broad-spectrum light versus blue light for phototherapy in neonatal hyperbilirubinemia: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pratesi, Simone; Di Fabio, Sandra; Bresci, Cecilia; Di Natale, Cecilia; Bar, Shahar; Dani, Carlo

    2015-07-01

    Phototherapy is standard care for treatment of neonatal hyperbilirubinemia. Our aim was to compare the effectiveness of broad-spectrum light (BSL) to that of blue light emitting diodes (LED) phototherapy for the treatment of jaundiced late preterm and term infants. Infants with gestational age from 35(+0) to 41(+6) weeks of gestation and nonhemolytic hyperbilirubinemia were randomized to treatment with BSL phototherapy or blue LED phototherapy. A total of 20 infants were included in the blue LED phototherapy group and 20 in the BSL phototherapy group. The duration of phototherapy was lower in the BSL than in the blue LED phototherapy group (15.8 ± 4.9 vs. 20.6 ± 6.0 hours; p = 0.009), and infants in the former group had a lower probability (p = 0.015) of remaining in phototherapy than infants in the latter. We concluded that BSL phototherapy is more effective than blue LED phototherapy for the treatment of hyperbilirubinemia in late preterm and term infants. Our data suggest that these results are not due to the different irradiance of the two phototherapy systems, but probably depend on their different peak light emissions. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  20. Broad spectrum pro-quorum-sensing molecules as inhibitors of virulence in vibrios.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wai-Leung Ng

    Full Text Available Quorum sensing (QS is a bacterial cell-cell communication process that relies on the production and detection of extracellular signal molecules called autoinducers. QS allows bacteria to perform collective activities. Vibrio cholerae, a pathogen that causes an acute disease, uses QS to repress virulence factor production and biofilm formation. Thus, molecules that activate QS in V. cholerae have the potential to control pathogenicity in this globally important bacterium. Using a whole-cell high-throughput screen, we identified eleven molecules that activate V. cholerae QS: eight molecules are receptor agonists and three molecules are antagonists of LuxO, the central NtrC-type response regulator that controls the global V. cholerae QS cascade. The LuxO inhibitors act by an uncompetitive mechanism by binding to the pre-formed LuxO-ATP complex to inhibit ATP hydrolysis. Genetic analyses suggest that the inhibitors bind in close proximity to the Walker B motif. The inhibitors display broad-spectrum capability in activation of QS in Vibrio species that employ LuxO. To the best of our knowledge, these are the first molecules identified that inhibit the ATPase activity of a NtrC-type response regulator. Our discovery supports the idea that exploiting pro-QS molecules is a promising strategy for the development of novel anti-infectives.

  1. Development of Broad-Spectrum Halomethyl Ketone Inhibitors Against Coronavirus Main Protease 3CL(pro)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bacha,U.; Barilla, J.; Gabelli, S.; Kiso, Y.; Amzel, L.; Freire, E.

    2008-01-01

    Coronaviruses comprise a large group of RNA viruses with diverse host specificity. The emergence of highly pathogenic strains like the SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV), and the discovery of two new coronaviruses, NL-63 and HKU1, corroborates the high rate of mutation and recombination that have enabled them to cross species barriers and infect novel hosts. For that reason, the development of broad-spectrum antivirals that are effective against several members of this family is highly desirable. This goal can be accomplished by designing inhibitors against a target, such as the main protease 3CLpro (Mpro), which is highly conserved among all coronaviruses. Here 3CLpro derived from the SARS-CoV was used as the primary target to identify a new class of inhibitors containing a halomethyl ketone warhead. The compounds are highly potent against SARS 3CLpro with Ki's as low as 300 nm. The crystal structure of the complex of one of the compounds with 3CLpro indicates that this inhibitor forms a thioether linkage between the halomethyl carbon of the warhead and the catalytic Cys 145. Furthermore, Structure Activity Relationship (SAR) studies of these compounds have led to the identification of a pharmacophore that accurately defines the essential molecular features required for the high affinity.

  2. Dissecting disease entities out of the broad spectrum of bipolar-disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levine, Joseph; Toker, Lilach; Agam, Galila

    2018-01-01

    The etiopathology of bipolar disorders is yet unraveled and new avenues should be pursued. One such avenue may be based on the assumption that the bipolar broad spectrum includes, among others, an array of rare medical disease entities. Towards this aim we propose a dissecting approach based on a search for rare medical diseases with known etiopathology which also exhibit bipolar disorders symptomatology. We further suggest that the etiopathologic mechanisms underlying such rare medical diseases may also underlie a rare variant of bipolar disorder. Such an assumption may be further reinforced if both the rare medical disease and its bipolar clinical phenotype demonstrate a] a similar mode of inheritance (i.e, autosomal dominant); b] brain involvement; and c] data implicating that the etiopathological mechanisms underlying the rare diseases affect biological processes reported to be associated with bipolar disorders and their treatment. We exemplify our suggested approach by a rare case of autosomal dominant leucodystrophy, a disease entity exhibiting nuclear lamin B1 pathology also presenting bipolar symptomatology. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Four year efficacy of prophylactic human papillomavirus quadrivalent vaccine against low grade cervical, vulvar, and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia and anogenital warts: randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dillner, Joakim; Kjaer, Susanne K; Wheeler, Cosette M

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the prophylactic efficacy of the human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine in preventing low grade cervical, vulvar, and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasias and anogenital warts (condyloma acuminata)....

  4. Human papillomavirus infection in Beijing, People's Republic of China: a population-based study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, R; Zhang, W Y; Wu, M H; Zhang, S W; Pan, J; Zhu, L; Zhang, Y P; Li, H; Gu, Y S; Liu, X Z

    2009-01-01

    Background: No recent data exist on human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in Beijing, People's Republic of China. Materials and method We interviewed and examined a representative, randomly selected sample of 5552 sexually active women aged 25–54 years. Cervical cell samples were analysed for HPV DNA by a MY09/11-based PCR assay. Results: Human papillomavirus prevalence was 6.7% overall and 4.8% among women without cervical abnormalities. Of the 21 subtypes identified, HPV16 was the commonest type (2.6% overall; 39.1% of HPV-positive women), followed by HPV 58 (1.0%), 33 (0.8%), 43 (0.7%) and 56 (0.7%). High-risk HPV types predominated in all age groups. Human papillomavirus prevalence was highest in young to middle-aged women. Marital status, number of husband's sexual partners, age at sexual debut and nulligravidity were all associated with being HPV positive. Conclusions: In our survey, HPV 16, HPV 58 and HPV 33 were the most prevalent HPV types in Beijing, indicating the potential for the prophylactic HPV 16/18 vaccine in China. PMID:19862002

  5. Will vaccination against human papillomavirus prevent eye disease? A review of the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, D S; Powell, N; Fiander, A N

    2008-04-01

    The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in eye disease is controversial. However, a recent case illustrates the possible role of HPV in conjunctival squamous carcinoma and the potentially devastating effects of this disease. The development of two vaccines to prevent infection with HPV types most commonly associated with anogenital cancers has led to debate about the pros and cons of a national immunisation programme to prevent cervical cancer. The introduction of such a vaccination programme may have an additional beneficial effect on the occurrence of some head and neck, including ocular, cancers. This review discusses the nature of papillomaviruses, mechanisms of infection and carcinogenesis, the possible role of HPV in eye disease, and finally the likely impact of the new prophylactic vaccines.

  6. Human papillomavirus vaccination and subsequent cervical cancer screening in a large integrated healthcare system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chao, Chun; Silverberg, Michael J; Becerra, Tracy A; Corley, Douglas A; Jensen, Christopher D; Chen, Qiaoling; Quinn, Virginia P

    2017-02-01

    Human papillomavirus vaccination may result in lowered intention to be screened for cervical cancer, potentially leading to gaps in screening coverage and avoidable cervical cancer diagnoses. The purpose of this study was to examine the association between human papillomavirus vaccination and subsequent cervical cancer screening initiation and adherence to recommended screening intervals to detect gaps in screening coverage and inform future prevention efforts. A retrospective cohort study was conducted in 2 distinct cohorts of female members of Kaiser Permanente Southern California, which is a large integrated healthcare delivery system. Papanicolaou screening initiation was evaluated in women who reached 21 years from 2010-2013. Adherence to recommended screening intervals was evaluated in women who were 25-30 years old in 2010. All women were observed to the end of 2013 for the evaluation of their screening behaviors. History of human papillomavirus vaccination and Papanicolaou screening were obtained from electronic medical records. Adherence to recommended screening intervals was measured as ≥85% vs vaccination history and screening initiation and interval adherence. Demographic characteristics, gynecologic health history, healthcare use, and characteristics of women's primary care providers were included as potential confounders in the analyses. There were 27,352 and 41,328 women included in the screening initiation and screening interval adherence analyses, respectively. In comparison with unvaccinated women, adjusted hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals [CIs]) for screening initiation among women who had been vaccinated against human papillomavirus were 1.19 (95% CI, 1.11-1.28), 1.44 (95% CI, 1.34-1.53), and 1.57 (95% CI, 1.50-1.65) for 1, 2, and ≥3 doses, respectively. Adjusted odds ratios for screening interval adherence were 0.93 (95% CI, 0.83-1.04), 1.73 (95% CI, 1.52-1.97), and 2.29 (95% CI, 2.05-2.56), for 1, 2, and ≥3 doses, respectively

  7. Successful five-item triage for the broad spectrum of mental disorders in pregnancy - A validation study

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Quispel (Chantal); T.A.J. Schneider (Tom); W.J.G. Hoogendijk (Witte); G.J. Bonsel (Gouke); M.P. Lambregtse-van den Berg (Mijke)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Mental disorders are prevalent during pregnancy, affecting 10% of women worldwide. To improve triage of a broad spectrum of mental disorders, we investigated the decision impact validity of: 1) a short set of currently used psychiatric triage items, 2) this set with the

  8. First Detection of Human Papillomaviruses and Human Polyomaviruses in River Waters in Italy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iaconelli, M; Petricca, S; Libera, S Della; Di Bonito, P; La Rosa, G

    2015-12-01

    Waterborne exposure to human viruses is possible through contact with contaminated water environments and can result in infections associated with a wide range of illnesses, including gastrointestinal, respiratory, ear, ocular, and skin infections. Recently, the occurrence in water environments of two groups of human viruses-both known with oncogenic potential, human polyomaviruses (HPyVs) and papillomaviruses (HPVs)-has been reported worldwide. These viruses, responsible for highly prevalent infections worldwide, have recently been proposed as potentially emerging waterborne pathogens. The objective of the present study was to examine the occurrence of HPyVs and HPVs in surface waters, by monitoring two rivers in Northwestern Italy, by nested PCR assays and sequencing. HPyVs (JC, BK, and Merkel cell polyomavirus) were detected in 10/25 (40%) samples. HPVs (HPV8, 17, 21, 25, 32, 80, 99, 105, and putative new HPVs) were identified in 14/25 (56%) river samples. The number of HPV DNA copies in waters was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. To our knowledge, this is the first detection and quantification of HPVs in surface waters. The possibility that HPyVs and HPVs can be transmitted by the waterborne route deserves to be explored in future studies.

  9. A Broad-Spectrum Integrative Design for Cancer Prevention and Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Block, Keith I.; Gyllenhaal, Charlotte; Lowe, Leroy; Amedei, Amedeo; Amin, A.R.M. Ruhul; Amin, Amr; Aquilano, Katia; Arbiser, Jack; Arreola, Alexandra; Arzumanyan, Alla; Ashraf, S. Salman; Azmi, Asfar S.; Benencia, Fabian; Bhakta, Dipita; Bilsland, Alan; Bishayee, Anupam; Blain, Stacy W.; Block, Penny B.; Boosani, Chandra S.; Carey, Thomas E.; Carnero, Amancio; Carotenuto, Marianeve; Casey, Stephanie C.; Chakrabarti, Mrinmay; Chaturvedi, Rupesh; Chen, Georgia Zhuo; Chen, Helen; Chen, Sophie; Chen, Yi Charlie; Choi, Beom K.; Ciriolo, Maria Rosa; Coley, Helen M.; Collins, Andrew R.; Connell, Marisa; Crawford, Sarah; Curran, Colleen S.; Dabrosin, Charlotta; Damia, Giovanna; Dasgupta, Santanu; DeBerardinis, Ralph J.; Decker, William K.; Dhawan, Punita; Diehl, Anna Mae E.; Dong, Jin-Tang; Dou, Q. Ping; Drew, Janice E.; Elkord, Eyad; El-Rayes, Bassel; Feitelson, Mark A.; Felsher, Dean W.; Ferguson, Lynnette R; Fimognari, Carmela; Firestone, Gary L.; Frezza, Christian; Fujii, Hiromasa; Fuster, Mark M.; Generali, Daniele; Georgakilas, Alexandros G.; Gieseler, Frank; Gilbertson, Michael; Green, Michelle F.; Grue, Brendan; Guha, Gunjan; Halicka, Dorota; Helferich, William G.; Heneberg, Petr; Hentosh, Patricia; Hirschey, Matthew D.; Hofseth, Lorne J.; Holcombe, Randall F.; Honoki, Kanya; Hsu, Hsue-Yin; Huang, Gloria S.; Jensen, Lasse D.; Jiang, Wen G.; Jones, Lee W.; Karpowicz, Phillip A.; Keith, W Nicol; Kerkar, Sid P.; Khan, Gazala N.; Khatami, Mahin; Ko, Young H.; Kucuk, Omer; Kulathinal, Rob J.; Kumar, Nagi B.; Kumara, H.M.C. Shantha; Kwon, Byoung S.; Le, Anne; Lea, Michael A.; Lee, Ho-Young; Lichtor, Terry; Lin, Liang-Tzung; Locasale, Jason W.; Lokeshwar, Bal L.; Longo, Valter D.; Lyssiotis, Costas A.; MacKenzie, Karen L.; Malhotra, Meenakshi; Marino, Maria; Martinez-Chantar, Maria L.; Matheu, Ander; Maxwell, Christopher; McDonnell, Eoin; Meeker, Alan K.; Mehrmohamadi, Mahya; Mehta, Kapil; Michelotti, Gregory A.; Mohammad, Ramzi M.; Mohammed, Sulma I.; Morre, D. James; Muqbil, Irfana; Muralidhar, Vinayak; Murphy, Michael P.; Nagaraju, Ganji Purnachandra; Nahta, Rita; Niccolai, Elena; Nowsheen, Somaira; Panis, Carolina; Pantano, Francesco; Parslow, Virginia R.; Pawelec, Graham; Pedersen, Peter L.; Poore, Brad; Poudyal, Deepak; Prakash, Satya; Prince, Mark; Raffaghello, Lizzia; Rathmell, Jeffrey C.; Rathmell, W. Kimryn; Ray, Swapan K.; Reichrath, Jörg; Rezazadeh, Sarallah; Ribatti, Domenico; Ricciardiello, Luigi; Robey, R. Brooks; Rodier, Francis; Rupasinghe, H.P. Vasantha; Russo, Gian Luigi; Ryan, Elizabeth P.; Samadi, Abbas K.; Sanchez-Garcia, Isidro; Sanders, Andrew J.; Santini, Daniele; Sarkar, Malancha; Sasada, Tetsuro; Saxena, Neeraj K.; Shackelford, Rodney E; Sharma, Dipali; Shin, Dong M.; Sidransky, David; Siegelin, Markus David; Signori, Emanuela; Singh, Neetu; Sivanand, Sharanya; Sliva, Daniel; Smythe, Carl; Spagnuolo, Carmela; Stafforini, Diana M.; Stagg, John; Subbarayan, Pochi R.; Sundin, Tabetha; Talib, Wamidh H.; Thompson, Sarah K.; Tran, Phuoc T.; Ungefroren, Hendrik; Vander Heiden, Matthew G.; Venkateswaran, Vasundara; Vinay, Dass S.; Vlachostergios, Panagiotis J.; Wang, Zongwei; Wellen, Kathryn E.; Whelan, Richard L.; Yang, Eddy S.; Yang, Huanjie; Yang, Xujuan; Yaswen, Paul; Yedjou, Clement; Yin, Xin; Zhu, Jiyue; Zollo, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Targeted therapies and the consequent adoption of “personalized” oncology have achieved notable successes in some cancers; however, significant problems remain with this approach. Many targeted therapies are highly toxic, costs are extremely high, and most patients experience relapse after a few disease-free months. Relapses arise from genetic heterogeneity in tumors, which harbor therapy-resistant immortalized cells that have adopted alternate and compensatory pathways (i.e., pathways that are not reliant upon the same mechanisms as those which have been targeted). To address these limitations, an international task force of 180 scientists was assembled to explore the concept of a low-toxicity “broad-spectrum” therapeutic approach that could simultaneously target many key pathways and mechanisms. Using cancer hallmark phenotypes and the tumor microenvironment to account for the various aspects of relevant cancer biology, interdisciplinary teams reviewed each hallmark area and nominated a wide range of high-priority targets (74 in total) that could be modified to improve patient outcomes. For these targets, corresponding low-toxicity therapeutic approaches were then suggested; many of which were phytochemicals. Proposed actions on each target and all of the approaches were further reviewed for known effects on other hallmark areas and the tumor microenvironment. Potential contrary or procarcinogenic effects were found for 3.9% of the relationships between targets and hallmarks, and mixed evidence of complementary and contrary relationships was found for 7.1%. Approximately 67% of the relationships revealed potentially complementary effects, and the remainder had no known relationship. Among the approaches, 1.1% had contrary, 2.8% had mixed and 62.1% had complementary relationships. These results suggest that a broad-spectrum approach should be feasible from a safety standpoint. This novel approach has potential to help us address disease relapse, which is a

  10. Expression of mouse beta defensin 2 in Escherichia coli and its broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianxiang Gong

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Mature mouse beta defensin 2 (mBD2 is a small cationic peptide with antimicrobial activity. Here we established a prokaryotic expression vector containing the cDNA of mature mBD2 fused with thioredoxin (TrxA, pET32a-mBD2. The vector was transformed into Escherichia Coli (E. coli Rosseta-gami (2 for expression fusion protein. Under the optimization of fermentation parameters: induce with 0.6 mM isopropylthiogalactoside (IPTG at 34ºC in 2×YT medium and harvest at 6 h postinduction, fusion protein TrxA-mBD2 was high expressed in the soluble fraction (>95%. After cleaved fusion protein by enterokinase, soluble mature mBD2 was achieved 6 mg/L with a volumetric productivity. Purified recombinant mBD2 demonstrated clear broad-spectrum antimicrobial activity for fungi, bacteria and virus. The MIC of antibacterial activity of against Staphylococcus aureus was 50 µg/ml. The MIC of against Candida albicans (C. albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans (C. neoformans was 12.5µg/ml and 25µg/ml, respectively. Also, the antimicrobial activity of mBD2 was effected by NaCl concentration. Additionally, mBD2 showed antiviral activity against influenza A virus (IAV, the protective rate for Madin-Darby canine kidney cells (MDCK was 93.86% at the mBD2 concentration of 100 µg/ml. These works might provide a foundation for the following research on the mBD2 as therapeutic agent for medical microbes.

  11. Depletion of Cultivatable Gut Microbiota by Broad-Spectrum Antibiotic Pretreatment Worsens Outcome After Murine Stroke

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winek, Katarzyna; Engel, Odilo; Koduah, Priscilla; Heimesaat, Markus M.; Fischer, André; Bereswill, Stefan; Dames, Claudia; Kershaw, Olivia; Gruber, Achim D.; Curato, Caterina; Oyama, Naoki; Meisel, Christian; Meisel, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Antibiotics disturbing microbiota are often used in treatment of poststroke infections. A bidirectional brain–gut microbiota axis was recently suggested as a modulator of nervous system diseases. We hypothesized that gut microbiota may be an important player in the course of stroke. Methods— We investigated the outcome of focal cerebral ischemia in C57BL/6J mice after an 8-week decontamination with quintuple broad-spectrum antibiotic cocktail. These microbiota-depleted animals were subjected to 60 minutes middle cerebral artery occlusion or sham operation. Infarct volume was measured using magnetic resonance imaging, and mice were monitored clinically throughout the whole experiment. At the end point, tissues were preserved for further analysis, comprising histology and immunologic investigations using flow cytometry. Results— We found significantly decreased survival in the middle cerebral artery occlusion microbiota-depleted mice when the antibiotic cocktail was stopped 3 days before surgery (compared with middle cerebral artery occlusion specific pathogen-free and sham-operated microbiota-depleted mice). Moreover, all microbiota-depleted animals in which antibiotic treatment was terminated developed severe acute colitis. This phenotype was rescued by continuous antibiotic treatment or colonization with specific pathogen-free microbiota before surgery. Further, infarct volumes on day one did not differ between any of the experimental groups. Conclusions— Conventional microbiota ensures intestinal protection in the mouse model of experimental stroke and prevents development of acute and severe colitis in microbiota-depleted mice not given antibiotic protection after cerebral ischemia. Our experiments raise the clinically important question as to whether microbial colonization or specific microbiota are crucial for stroke outcome. PMID:27056982

  12. Mur-LH, the Broad-Spectrum Endolysin of Lactobacillus helveticus Temperate Bacteriophage φ-0303

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deutsch, Stéphanie-Marie; Guezenec, Stéphane; Piot, Michel; Foster, Simon; Lortal, Sylvie

    2004-01-01

    φ-0303 is a temperate bacteriophage isolated from Lactobacillus helveticus CNRZ 303 strain after mitomycin C induction. In this work, the gene coding for a lytic protein of this bacteriophage was cloned using a library of φ-0303 in Escherichia coli DH5α. The lytic activity was detected by its expression, using whole cells of the sensitive strain L. helveticus CNRZ 892 as the substrate. The lysin gene was within a 4.1-kb DNA fragment of φ-0303 containing six open reading frames (ORFs) and two truncated ORFs. No sequence homology with holin genes was found within the cloned fragment. An integrase-encoding gene was also present in the fragment, but it was transcribed in a direction opposite that of the lysin gene. The lysin-encoding lys gene was verified by PCR amplification from the total phage DNA and subcloned. The lys gene is a 1,122-bp sequence encoding a protein of 373 amino acids (Mur-LH), whose product had a deduced molecular mass of 40,207 Da. Comparisons with sequences in sequence databases showed homology with numerous endolysins of other bacteriophages. Mur-LH was expressed in E. coli BL21, and by renaturing sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with L. helveticus CNRZ 892 as the substrate, the recombinant protein showed an apparent molecular mass of 40 kDa. The N-terminal sequence of the protein confirmed the start codon. Hydrolysis of cell walls of L. helveticus CNRZ 303 by the endolysin and biochemical analysis of the residues produced demonstrated that Mur-LH has N-acetylmuramidase activity. Last, the endolysin exhibited a broad spectrum of lytic activity, as it was active on different species, mainly thermophilic lactobacilli but also lactococci, pediococci, Bacillus subtilis, Brevibacterium linens, and Enterococcus faecium. PMID:14711630

  13. Overexpression of NPR1 in Brassica juncea Confers Broad Spectrum Resistance to Fungal Pathogens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajad Ali

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Brassica juncea (Indian mustard is a commercially important oil seed crop, which is highly affected by many biotic stresses. Among them, Alternaria leaf blight and powdery mildew are the most devastating diseases leading to huge yield losses in B. juncea around the world. In this regard, genetic engineering is a promising tool that may possibly allow us to enhance the B. juncea disease resistance against these pathogens. NPR1 (non-expressor of pathogen-related gene 1 is a bonafide receptor of salicylic acid (SA which modulates multiple immune responses in plants especially activation of induced and systemic acquired resistance (SAR. Here, we report the isolation and characterization of new NPR1 homolog (BjNPR1 from B. juncea. The phylogenetic tree constructed based on the deduced sequence of BjNPR1 with homologs from other species revealed that BjNPR1 grouped together with other known NPR1 proteins of Cruciferae family, and was nearest to B. napus. Furthermore, expression analysis showed that BjNPR1 was upregulated after SA treatment and fungal infection but not by jasmonic acid or abscisic acid. To understand the defensive role of this gene, we generated B. juncea transgenic lines overexpressing BjNPR1, and further confirmed by PCR and Southern blotting. The transgenic lines showed no phenotypic abnormalities, and constitutive expression of BjNPR1 activates defense signaling pathways by priming the expression of antifungal PR genes. Moreover, BjNPR1 transgenic lines showed enhanced resistance to Alternaria brassicae and Erysiphe cruciferarum as there was delay in symptoms and reduced disease severity than non-transgenic plants. In addition, the rate of disease spreading to uninfected or distal parts was also delayed in transgenic plants thus suggesting the activation of SAR. Altogether, the present study suggests that BjNPR1 is involved in broad spectrum of disease resistance against fungal pathogens.

  14. Isolation and Characterization of a Broad Spectrum Bacteriocin from Bacillus amyloliquefaciens RX7

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kong Boon Lim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We isolated a Bacillus strain, RX7, with inhibitory activity against Listeria monocytogenes from soil and identified it as Bacillus amyloliquefaciens based on 16S rRNA gene sequencing. The inhibitory activity was stable over a wide range of pH and was fully retained after 30 min at 80°C, after which it decreased gradually at higher temperatures. The activity was sensitive to the proteolytic action of α-chymotrypsin, proteinase-K, and trypsin, indicating its proteinaceous nature. This bacteriocin was active against a broad spectrum of bacteria and the fungus Candida albicans. Direct detection of antimicrobial activity on a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel suggested an apparent molecular mass of approximately 5 kDa. Ammonium sulfate precipitation and anion-exchange and gel permeation chromatography integrated with reverse phase-high-performance liquid chromatography were used for bacteriocin purification. Automated N-terminal Edman degradation of the purified RX7 bacteriocin recognized the first 15 amino acids as NH2-X-Ala-Trp-Tyr-Asp-Ile-Arg-Lys-Leu-Gly-Asn-Lys-Gly-Ala, where the letter X in the sequence indicates an unknown or nonstandard amino acid. Based on BLAST similarity search and multiple alignment analysis, the obtained partial sequence showed high homology with the two-peptide lantibiotic haloduracin (HalA1 from Bacillus halodurans, although at least two amino acids differed between the sequences. A time-kill study demonstrated a bactericidal mode of action of RX7 bacteriocin.

  15. Baulamycins A and B, broad-spectrum antibiotics identified as inhibitors of siderophore biosynthesis in Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus anthracis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tripathi, Ashootosh; Schofield, Michael M; Chlipala, George E; Schultz, Pamela J; Yim, Isaiah; Newmister, Sean A; Nusca, Tyler D; Scaglione, Jamie B; Hanna, Philip C; Tamayo-Castillo, Giselle; Sherman, David H

    2014-01-29

    Siderophores are high-affinity iron chelators produced by microorganisms and frequently contribute to the virulence of human pathogens. Targeted inhibition of the biosynthesis of siderophores staphyloferrin B of Staphylococcus aureus and petrobactin of Bacillus anthracis hold considerable potential as a single or combined treatment for methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) and anthrax infection, respectively. The biosynthetic pathways for both siderophores involve a nonribosomal peptide synthetase independent siderophore (NIS) synthetase, including SbnE in staphyloferrin B and AsbA in petrobactin. In this study, we developed a biochemical assay specific for NIS synthetases to screen for inhibitors of SbnE and AsbA against a library of marine microbial-derived natural product extracts (NPEs). Analysis of the NPE derived from Streptomyces tempisquensis led to the isolation of the novel antibiotics baulamycins A (BmcA, 6) and B (BmcB, 7). BmcA and BmcB displayed in vitro activity with IC50 values of 4.8 μM and 19 μM against SbnE and 180 μM and 200 μM against AsbA, respectively. Kinetic analysis showed that the compounds function as reversible competitive enzyme inhibitors. Liquid culture studies with S. aureus , B. anthracis , E. coli , and several other bacterial pathogens demonstrated the capacity of these natural products to penetrate bacterial barriers and inhibit growth of both Gram-positive and Gram-negative species. These studies provide proof-of-concept that natural product inhibitors targeting siderophore virulence factors can provide access to novel broad-spectrum antibiotics, which may serve as important leads for the development of potent anti-infective agents.

  16. Human papillomavirus infection and immunohistochemical p16(INK4a) expression as predictors of outcome in penile squamous cell carcinomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bezerra, Stephania M; Chaux, Alcides; Ball, Mark W; Faraj, Sheila F; Munari, Enrico; Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda; Sharma, Rajni; Bivalacqua, Trinity J; Burnett, Arthur L; Netto, George J

    2015-04-01

    Approximately 50% of penile squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) are associated with high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection. We evaluated the correlation of p16(INK4a) expression and HR-HPV with clinicopathological features and outcome in a cohort of patients with penile SCC. Two tissue microarrays were constructed from 53 invasive penile SCC at our hospital. p16(INK4a) expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry (CINtec Kit). High-risk human papillomavirus status was assessed by in situ hybridization (INFORM HPV III family 16 probe B cocktail). High-risk human papillomavirus was detected in 8 cases (15%), and p16(INK4a) overexpression was found in 23 cases (44%). Both markers showed a significant association with histologic subtype (P = .017 and P = .01, respectively) and lymphovascular invasion (P = .015 and P = .015, respectively). Regarding outcome analyses, neither HPV infection nor p16(INK4a) overexpression significantly predicted overall survival or cancer-specific survival using Cox proportional hazards regression model. High-risk human papillomavirus positivity and p16(INK4a) overexpression were significantly associated with histologic subtype and presence of lymphovascular invasion. Human papillomavirus status was not predictive of outcome in our cohort. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Human genomic diversity, viral genomics and proteomics, as exemplified by human papillomaviruses and H5N1 influenza viruses

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-01-01

    The diversity of hosts, pathogens and host-pathogen relationships reflects the influence of selective pressures that fuel diversity through ongoing interactions with other rapidly evolving molecules in the environment. This paper discusses specific examples illustrating the phenomenon of diversity of hosts and pathogens, with special reference to human papillomaviruses and H5NI influenza viruses. We also review the influence of diverse host-pathogen interactions that determine the pathophysiology of infections, and their responses to drugs or vaccines. PMID:19706363

  18. Ceftaroline fosamil: a novel broad-spectrum cephalosporin with activity against methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jorgenson, Margaret R; DePestel, Daryl D; Carver, Peggy L

    2011-11-01

    To review the pharmacology, microbiology, chemistry, in vitro activity, pharmacokinetics, clinical efficacy, safety, dosage, and administration of ceftaroline fosamil (Teflaro, Forest Laboratories, Inc.), a novel parenteral broad-spectrum cephalosporin approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) on October 29, 2010, for the treatment of adults with acute bacterial skin and skin structure infections (ABSSSI) and community-acquired bacterial pneumonia (CABP). A search of MEDLINE (1966-July 2011) using the search terms ceftaroline fosamil, ceftaroline, TAK-599, PPI-0903, PPI-0903M, and T-91825 was performed. Supplementary sources included program abstracts from the Interscience Conference on Antimicrobial Agents and Chemotherapy, American Society of Microbiology, European Congress on Clinical Microbiology and Infectious Diseases, and the Infectious Diseases Society of America from 2005 to 2010, as well as information available from the manufacturer's Web site. All English-language articles identified from the data sources were evaluated. In vitro, preclinical, and Phase 1, 2, and 3 clinical trials were included. Clinical trials have been conducted evaluating use of ceftaroline for treatment of ABSSSI and CABP. Safety data from Phase 1, 2, and 3 clinical trials suggest that it is well tolerated and has a safety and tolerability profile common to the cephalosporin class. Ceftaroline has excellent in vitro activity against gram-positive pathogens, including methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA), which makes it an attractive monotherapy for the treatment of ABSSSI. However, it lacks activity against problem gram-negative bacteria (eg, Pseudomonas spp.), which will likely limit its use for serious health care-associated infections. While its role in treating CABP is supported by excellent in vitro activity against Streptococcus pneumoniae and clinical efficacy data, currently available comparators may offer some advantages over ceftaroline. Finally

  19. Integrated DNA walking system to characterize a broad spectrum of GMOs in food/feed matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraiture, Marie-Alice; Herman, Philippe; Lefèvre, Loic; Taverniers, Isabel; De Loose, Marc; Deforce, Dieter; Roosens, Nancy H

    2015-08-14

    In order to provide a system fully integrated with qPCR screening, usually used in GMO routine analysis, as well as being able to detect, characterize and identify a broad spectrum of GMOs in food/feed matrices, two bidirectional DNA walking methods targeting p35S or tNOS, the most common transgenic elements found in GM crops, were developed. These newly developed DNA walking methods are completing the previously implemented DNA walking method targeting the t35S pCAMBIA element. Food/feed matrices containing transgenic crops (Bt rice or MON863 maize) were analysed using the integrated DNA walking system. First, the newly developed DNA walking methods, anchored on the sequences used for the p35S or tNOS qPCR screening, were tested on Bt rice that contains these two transgenic elements. Second, the methods were assessed on a maize sample containing a low amount of the GM MON863 event, representing a more complex matrix in terms of genome size and sensitivity. Finally, to illustrate its applicability in GMO routine analysis by enforcement laboratories, the entire workflow of the integrated strategy, including qPCR screening to detect the potential presence of GMOs and the subsequent DNA walking methods to characterize and identify the detected GMOs, was applied on a GeMMA Scheme Proficiency Test matrix. Via the characterization of the transgene flanking region between the transgenic cassette and the plant genome as well as of a part of the transgenic cassette, the presence of GMOs was properly confirmed or infirmed in all tested samples. Due to their simple procedure and their short time-frame to get results, the developed DNA walking methods proposed here can be easily implemented in GMO routine analysis by the enforcement laboratories. In providing crucial information about the transgene flanking regions and/or the transgenic cassettes, this DNA walking strategy is a key molecular tool to prove the presence of GMOs in any given food/feed matrix.

  20. Four year efficacy of prophylactic human papillomavirus quadrivalent vaccine against low grade cervical, vulvar, and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasia and anogenital warts: randomised controlled trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dillner, Joakim; Kjaer, Susanne K; Wheeler, Cosette M

    2010-01-01

    To evaluate the prophylactic efficacy of the human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine in preventing low grade cervical, vulvar, and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasias and anogenital warts (condyloma acuminata).......To evaluate the prophylactic efficacy of the human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine in preventing low grade cervical, vulvar, and vaginal intraepithelial neoplasias and anogenital warts (condyloma acuminata)....

  1. Reported changes in sexual behaviour and human papillomavirus knowledge in Peruvian female sex workers following participation in a human papillomavirus vaccine trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, B; Blas, M M; Heidari, O; Carcamo, C; Halsey, N A

    2013-07-01

    Limited data exist on the effect of clinical trial participation on sexual behavioural change. Two hundred female sex workers working in Lima, Peru received human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in either the standard (0, 2, 6 months) or modified (0, 3, 6 months) schedule. Participants received comprehensive screening and treatment for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), counselling on safe sex practices, education about HPV and the HPV vaccine, contraceptives (oral and condoms) and family planning at each visit. We assessed vaccine completion rates, change in sexual practices, and changes in HPV knowledge before and after participation in the vaccine trial. There were high rates of vaccine completion, 91% overall. The estimated number of reported new and total clients over a 30-day period decreased significantly (P related disease increased among all participants. In addition, all participants listed at least one preventive strategy during the month 7 follow-up survey.

  2. The prophylactic role for the human papillomavirus quadrivalent vaccine in males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yancey, Abigail M; Pitlick, Jamie M; Forinash, Alicia B

    2010-01-01

    To determine the role of human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine in males. PubMed (1966-March 2010) was searched using the terms human papillomavirus, human papillomavirus vaccine, quadrivalent, males, cancer, and genital warts. Reference citations were reviewed for relevant information. All studies including humans and published in English with data describing HPV quadrivalent vaccine administration in males were evaluated. The HPV quadrivalent vaccine is currently recommended in females, but its role in males is still being defined. Three clinical trials evaluated the immunogenicity and tolerability of the vaccine in more than 1100 males 9-26 years of age. Greater than 99.5% of males seroconverted for HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18 at 1 month post-completion and titers were found to be numerically higher than those in females 16-26 years old. One study found that immune response persisted in >92.5% of males at 1 year. The results show high efficacy against detection of new anogenital lesions in males 29 months after receiving the quadrivalent HPV vaccine. In addition, the quadrivalent HPV vaccine appears to be well tolerated, with the most common adverse effects being syncope, fever, local site reactions, dizziness, nausea, and headache. The HPV quadrivalent vaccine appears to be safe and induces an effective immune response in males. It may also decrease the incidence of anogenital and penile cancer, although current data are limited in number and duration of follow-up. Further analysis of the long-term immunogenicity and effects on HPV-associated complications is needed.

  3. Pharmacy sales data versus ward stock accounting for the surveillance of broad-spectrum antibiotic use in hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haug, Jon B; Myhr, Randi; Reikvam, Asmund

    2011-12-13

    Antibiotic consumption in hospitals is commonly measured using the accumulated amount of drugs delivered from the pharmacy to ward held stocks. The reliability of this method, particularly the impact of the length of the registration periods, has not been evaluated and such evaluation was aim of the study. During 26 weeks, we performed a weekly ward stock count of use of broad-spectrum antibiotics--that is second- and third-generation cephalosporins, carbapenems, and quinolones--in five hospital wards and compared the data with corresponding pharmacy sales figures during the same period. Defined daily doses (DDDs) for antibiotics were used as measurement units (WHO ATC/DDD classification). Consumption figures obtained with the two methods for different registration intervals were compared by use of intraclass correlation analysis and Bland-Altman statistics. Broad-spectrum antibiotics accounted for a quarter to one-fifth of all systemic antibiotics (ATC group J01) used in the hospital and varied between wards, from 12.8 DDDs per 100 bed days in a urological ward to 24.5 DDDs in a pulmonary diseases ward. For the entire study period of 26 weeks, the pharmacy and ward defined daily doses figures for all broad-spectrum antibiotics differed only by 0.2%; however, for single wards deviations varied from -4.3% to 6.9%. The intraclass correlation coefficient, pharmacy versus ward data, increased from 0.78 to 0.94 for parenteral broad-spectrum antibiotics with increasing registration periods (1-4 weeks), whereas the corresponding figures for oral broad-spectrum antibiotics (ciprofloxacin) were from 0.46 to 0.74. For all broad-spectrum antibiotics and for parenteral antibiotics, limits of agreement between the two methods showed, according to Bland-Altman statistics, a deviation of ± 5% or less from average mean DDDs at 3- and 4-weeks registration intervals. Corresponding deviation for oral antibiotics was ± 21% at a 4-weeks interval. There is a need for caution in

  4. Limitations of widely used high-risk human papillomavirus laboratory-developed testing in cervical cancer screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nance KV

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Keith V Nance Medical Directory of Cytology, Rex Hospital, Raleigh, and Department of Pathology, The University of North Carolina School of Medicine, Chapel Hill, NC, USAI read with interest the recently published article by Naryshkin and Austin entitled "Limitations of widely used high-risk human papillomavirus laboratory-developed testing in cervical cancer screening".1 The article is a single case report of squamous cell carcinoma of the cervix diagnosed in a patient who had negative Hybrid Capture 2 (Qiagen NV, Hilden, Germany high-risk human papillomavirus testing from SurePath™ (Becton-Dickinson, Franklin Lakes, NJ samples. The authors then discuss several valid points regarding the use of human papillomavirus testing and cervical cancer screening not approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA. Their conclusion is that such testing should not be done using the SurePath collection medium.View the original paper by Naryshkin and Austin.

  5. [Low rate of oropharyngeal human papillomavirus infection among women with cervical lesion. Preliminary results from the South-Eastern Hungarian population].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanya, Melinda; Jakó, Mária; Terhes, Gabriella; Szakács, László; Kaiser, László; Deák, Judit; Bártfai, György

    2016-01-10

    Although the natural history of cervical and oral human papillomavirus infection has been intensively investigated in the past years, the ability of this virus to infect oral and genital mucosae in the same individual and its potential to co-infect both cervical and oral mucosa are still unclear. The aim of the authors was to assess the presence of oropharyngeal human papillomavirus infection in women with cervical lesions in the South-Eastern Hungarian population. The total of 103 women have been included in the study between March 1, 2013 and January 1, 2015. Brushing was used to collect cells from the oropharyngeal mucosa. Human papillomavirus DNA was detected using polymerase chain reaction, and Amplicor line blot test was used for genotyping. Oropharyngeal human papillomavirus infection was detected in 2 cases (3%). The detected genotypes were 31, 40/61 and 73 in the oropharyngeal region. The results indicate that in women with cervical lesions oropharyngeal human papillomavirus infection rarely occurs.

  6. Prevention of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related tumors in people living with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poljak, Mario; Šterbenc, Anja; Lunar, Maja M

    2017-11-01

    In comparison to their HIV-negative counterparts, people living with HIV (PLWH) have a higher prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in various anatomical sites coupled with increased HPV persistence, higher risk of HPV-related tumors, and faster disease progression. Areas covered: Gender-neutral prevention strategies for HPV-related cancers in PLWH discussed: ABC approach, HPV vaccination, antiretroviral treatment (ART), anal cancer screening, and smoking cessation. Gender specific strategies: cervical cancer screening reduces the incidence and mortality of cervical cancer and circumcision might reduce the risk of HPV infections in men. Expert commentary: HPV-related cancer incidence has not declined (e.g. cervical cancer) and has even increased (e.g. anal cancer) in the ART era, demanding an effective HPV prevention strategy. HPV vaccination should be introduced into national prevention programs worldwide immediately because current prophylactic vaccines are safe, tolerable, and immunogenic in PLWH. HPV vaccine efficacy trials in PLWH are essential to determine the most appropriate immunization schedule. The population most at risk of anal cancer is HIV-positive men who have sex with men, who are not protected by herd immunity if only the female population is vaccinated. Unvaccinated PLWH need enhanced surveillance for early detection of HPV-related cancers and their precursors.

  7. Human Papillomavirus Genotyping Testing Practice in 2014: Results of a College of American Pathologists National Survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Chengquan; Crothers, Barbara A; Ghofrani, Mohiedean; Li, Zaibo; Souers, Rhona J; Hussain, Mujtaba; Fan, Fang; Ocal, Idris Tolgay; Goodrich, Kelly; Shen, Rulong; Davey, Diane D

    2016-12-01

    - College of American Pathologists (CAP) surveys are used to establish national benchmarks for laboratories. - To investigate human papillomavirus (HPV) genotyping testing practice patterns in laboratories in 2014. - Data were analyzed from the CAP HPV Genotyping Practices Supplemental Questionnaire distributed to 749 laboratories participating in the CAP Human Papillomavirus (High Risk) for Cytology Program. - Six hundred four of 749 laboratories (80.6%) responded to the survey. More laboratories offered HPV genotyping testing and performed in-house HPV genotyping testing as compared to previous surveys. The Roche cobas HPV test was the most commonly used genotyping method (37.0%; 160 of 433), followed by Hologic Aptima HPV16 18/45 (26.1%; 113 of 433) and Hologic Cervista HPV16/18 (14.3%; 62 of 433). Most laboratories (287 of 399; 71.9%) offered HPV genotyping for high-risk HPV cases regardless of Papanicolaou (Pap) test results and patient age; this pattern was more common in laboratories using cobas. The remaining laboratories specifically offered testing to women with a negative Pap test result at age 30 years and older (65.2%, 73 of 112) or all ages (37.5%, 42 of 112). The median reporting rates of HPV16 and/or HPV18 positivity were 20.6%, 25.7%, 21.1%, and 57.4% for women with positive high-risk HPV adjunctive negative Pap results, atypical squamous cells of undermined significance, low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, and high-grade squamous lesion, respectively. - Human papillomavirus genotyping testing has increased. Roche cobas and Hologic Aptima genotype methods were the most common, and laboratories using cobas usually offered genotyping regardless of Pap test result and age. The data provide a baseline and trend of HPV genotyping test practices in 2014.

  8. Analysis of cis-elements that facilitate extrachromosomal persistence of human papillomavirus genomes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pittayakhajonwut, Daraporn; Angeletti, Peter C.

    2008-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are maintained latently in dividing epithelial cells as nuclear plasmids. Two virally encoded proteins, E1, a helicase, and E2, a transcription factor, are important players in replication and stable plasmid maintenance in host cells. Recent experiments in yeast have demonstrated that viral genomes retain replication and maintenance function independently of E1 and E2 [Angeletti, P.C., Kim, K., Fernandes, F.J., and Lambert, P.F. (2002). Stable replication of papillomavirus genomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J. Virol. 76(7), 3350-8; Kim, K., Angeletti, P.C., Hassebroek, E.C., and Lambert, P.F. (2005). Identification of cis-acting elements that mediate the replication and maintenance of human papillomavirus type 16 genomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J. Virol. 79(10), 5933-42]. Flow cytometry studies of EGFP-reporter vectors containing subgenomic HPV fragments with or without a human ARS (hARS), revealed that six fragments located in E6-E7, E1-E2, L1, and L2 regions showed a capacity for plasmid stabilization in the absence of E1 and E2 proteins. Interestingly, four fragments within E7, the 3' end of L2, and the 5' end of L1 exhibited stability in plasmids that lacked an hARS, indicating that they possess both replication and maintenance functions. Two fragments lying in E1-E2 and the 3' region of L1 were stable only in the presence of hARS, that they contained only maintenance function. Mutational analyses of HPV16-GFP reporter constructs provided evidence that genomes lacking E1 and E2 could replicate to an extent similar to wild type HPV16. Together these results support the concept that cellular factors influence HPV replication and maintenance, independently, and perhaps in conjunction with E1 and E2, suggesting a role in the persistent phase of the viral lifecycle

  9. Human papillomavirus type 16 E7 protein inhibits DNA binding by the retinoblastoma gene product.

    OpenAIRE

    Stirdivant, S M; Huber, H E; Patrick, D R; Defeo-Jones, D; McAvoy, E M; Garsky, V M; Oliff, A; Heimbrook, D C

    1992-01-01

    The human papillomavirus E7 gene can transform murine fibroblasts and cooperate with other viral oncogenes in transforming primary cell cultures. One biochemical property associated with the E7 protein is binding to the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene product (pRB). Biochemical properties associated with pRB include binding to viral transforming proteins (E1A, large T, and E7), binding to cellular proteins (E2F and Myc), and binding to DNA. The mechanism by which E7 stimulates cell growt...

  10. Discrete-time semi-Markov modeling of human papillomavirus persistence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, C. E.; Hudgens, M. G.; King, C. C.; Cu-Uvin, S.; Lo, Y.; Rompalo, A.; Sobel, J.; Smith, J. S.

    2011-01-01

    Multi-state modeling is often employed to describe the progression of a disease process. In epidemiological studies of certain diseases, the disease state is typically only observed at periodic clinical visits, producing incomplete longitudinal data. In this paper we consider fitting semi-Markov models to estimate the persistence of human papillomavirus (HPV) type-specific infection in studies where the status of HPV type(s) is assessed periodically. Simulation study results are presented indicating the semi-Markov estimator is more accurate than an estimator currently used in the HPV literature. The methods are illustrated using data from the HIV Epidemiology Research Study (HERS). PMID:21538985

  11. Specificity of the Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test for detecting human papillomavirus genotype 52 (HPV-52)

    OpenAIRE

    Kocjan, Boštjan; Poljak, Mario; Oštrbenk, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: HPV-52 is one of the most frequent human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes causing significant cervical pathology. The most widely used HPV genotyping assay, the Roche Linear Array HPV Genotyping Test (Linear Array), is unable to identify HPV- 52 status in samples containing HPV-33, HPV-35, and/or HPV-58. Methods: Linear Array HPV-52 analytical specificity was established by testing 100 specimens reactive with the Linear Array HPV- 33/35/52/58 cross-reactive probe, but not with the...

  12. The role of human papillomavirus vaccines in cervical cancer: Prevention and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bogani, Giorgio; Leone Roberti Maggiore, Umberto; Signorelli, Mauro; Martinelli, Fabio; Ditto, Antonino; Sabatucci, Ilaria; Mosca, Lavinia; Lorusso, Domenica; Raspagliesi, Francesco

    2018-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted disease, worldwide. Primary prevention thorough vaccination si able to reduce the burden of HPV-related lesions. Ten years ago the Food and drug Administration (FDA) approved the first vaccine against HPV. In the last decades, growing data on safety and effectiveness have been collected. In the present review we report the current knowledge on vaccine against HPV, highlighting the current value and prospective regarding the widespread diffusion of HPV vaccines. The role of emerging therapeutic vaccines is reviewed. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Controversy undermines support for state mandates on the human papillomavirus vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gollust, Sarah E; Dempsey, Amanda F; Lantz, Paula M; Ubel, Peter A; Fowler, Erika Franklin

    2010-11-01

    State actions requiring adolescent girls to receive the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine created controversy following the vaccine's approval in 2006. Some health professionals worried that the controversy might dampen public support for those state policies and for other school immunizations in general. We fielded an experimental Internet survey to determine how controversy affects attitudes about vaccines. We discovered that public support for the HPV vaccine mandates wanes when the public is informed that the policies are controversial. However, the experimental survey also revealed that exposure to this policy controversy did not spill over and reduce public support for immunizations in general.

  14. Effect of HIV Infection on Human Papillomavirus Types Causing Invasive Cervical Cancer in Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Clifford, Gary M.; de Vuyst, Hugo; Tenet, Vanessa; Plummer, Martyn; Tully, Stephen; Franceschi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: HIV infection is known to worsen the outcome of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and may do so differentially by HPV type. Design: Twenty-one studies were included in a meta-analysis of invasive cervical cancers (ICC) among women infected with HIV in Africa. Method: Type-specific HPV DNA prevalence was compared with data from a similar meta-analysis of HIV-negative ICC using prevalence ratios (PR). Results: HPV detection was similar in 770 HIV-positive (91.2%) and 384...

  15. [Extragenital, disseminated infection with human papillomaviruses : Therapeutic response through vaccination with HPV].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiskemann, L; Durani, B; Hartschuh, W

    2018-03-01

    A 50-year-old man with widespread manifestation of warts and distinct pruritus for the last 5 years was diagnosed with a reactivated human papillomavirus (HPV) infection by three, genetically verified types (6, 16, 18), which are included in the vaccine Gardasil®. Conventional treatment was not successful, but a rapid and significant reduction of the skin manifestation was observed after vaccination with Gardasil®. To what extent therapy-resistant infections with HPV can be influenced through an active HPV vaccination should be investigated in future trials.

  16. Human Papillomaviruses Preferentially Recruit DNA Repair Factors to Viral Genomes for Rapid Repair and Amplification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Kavi; Laimins, Laimonis

    2018-02-13

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) activate the ataxia telangiectasia mutated-dependent (ATM) DNA damage response as well as the ataxia telangiectasia mutated-dependent DNA-related (ATR) pathway in the absence of external DNA damaging agents for differentiation-dependent genome amplification. Through the use of comet assays and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis, our studies showed that these pathways are activated in response to DNA breaks induced by the viral proteins E6 and E7 alone and independently of viral replication. The majority of these virally induced DNA breaks are present in cellular DNAs and only minimally in HPV episomes. Treatment of HPV-positive cells with inhibitors of both ATM and ATR leads to the generation of DNA breaks and the fragmentation of viral episomes, indicating that DNA breaks are introduced into HPV genomes. These breaks, however, are rapidly repaired through the preferential recruitment of homologous recombination repair enzymes, such as RAD51 and BRCA1, to viral genomes at the expense of cellular DNAs. When HPV-positive cells are treated with hydroxyurea, this recruitment of RAD51 and BRCA1 to viral genomes is greatly enhanced with little recruitment to damaged cellular DNAs and with retention of the ability of viral genomes to amplify. Overall, our studies demonstrated that human papillomaviruses induce breaks into cellular and viral DNAs and that the preferential repair of these lesions in viral episomes leads to genome amplification. IMPORTANCE High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the etiologic agents of cervical cancer and are linked to the development of many other anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers. Replication of high-risk HPVs requires the activation of the ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) and ATM- and Rad3-related (ATR) DNA repair pathways. Our studies have shown that HPVs activate these pathways by inducing double-strand breaks primarily in cellular DNAs and minimally in viral genomes. Breaks are induced in

  17. Classification of weakly carcinogenic human papillomavirus types: addressing the limits of epidemiology at the borderline

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buonaguro Franco M

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Virtually all cases of cervical cancer are caused by persistent infections with a restricted set of human papillomaviruses (HPV. Some HPV types, like HPV16 and HPV18, are clear and powerful carcinogens. However, the categorization of the most weakly carcinogenic HPV types is extremely challenging. The decisions are important for screening test and vaccine development. This article describes for open discussion an approach recently taken by a World Health Organization International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC Monographs Working Group to re-assess the carcinogenicity of different HPV types.

  18. A systematic review of factors influencing human papillomavirus vaccination among immigrant parents in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyounghae; LeClaire, Anna-Rae

    2017-11-21

    To critically appraise factors influencing human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among immigrant parents in the United States, a comprehensive search of electronic databases and reference lists was conducted. The findings from 22 articles were ordered based on a socioecological model. About 30% of children initiated and 14% completed a three-dose series. Correlates of HPV vaccine initiation rates included lack of information, concerns about vaccine safety and promiscuity, providers' recommendations, school mandates, financial issues, immigration laws, and living in disadvantaged neighborhoods. Upstream initiatives embracing cultural descriptors could facilitate HPV vaccination, reducing HPV-related disparities in cancer among immigrants in the US.

  19. Correlation between human papillomavirus and p16 overexpression in oropharyngeal tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønhøj Larsen, C; Gyldenløve, M; Jensen, D H

    2014-01-01

    A significant proportion of squamous cell carcinomas of the oropharynx (OP-SCC) are related to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and p16 overexpression. This subgroup proves better prognosis and survival but no evidence exists on the correlation between HPV and p16 overexpression based...... on diagnostic measures and definition of p16 overexpression. We evaluated means of p16 and HPV diagnostics, and quantified overexpression of p16 in HPV-positive and -negative OP-SCCs by mode of immunohistochemical staining of carcinoma cells....

  20. Broad-spectrum enhanced absorption of graphene-molybdenum disulfide photovoltaic cells in metal-mirror microcavity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang-Tao, Liu; Yun-Kai, Cao; Hong, Tong; Dai-Qiang, Wang; Zhen-Hua, Wu

    2018-04-01

    The optical absorption of graphene-molybdenum disulfide photovoltaic cells (GM-PVc) in wedge-shaped metal-mirror microcavities (w-MMCs) combined with a spectrum-splitting structure was studied. Results showed that the combination of spectrum-splitting structure and w-MMC can enable the light absorption of GM-PVcs to reach about 65% in the broad spectrum. The influence of processing errors on the absorption of GM-PVcs in w-MMCs was 3-14 times lower than that of GM-PVcs in wedge photonic crystal microcavities. The light absorption of GM-PVcs reached 60% in the broad spectrum, even with the processing errors. The proposed structure is easy to implement and may have potentially important applications in the development of ultra-thin and high-efficiency solar cells and optoelectronic devices.

  1. Human papillomavirus-associated lesions of the vagina and cervix. Treatment with a laser and topical 5-fluorouracil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodman, M; Dottino, P; Friedman, F; Heller, D; Bleiweiss, I; Sperling, R

    1992-05-01

    Twenty women with cervical and vaginal human papillomavirus-associated lesions were treated with CO2 laser ablation followed by eight weekly applications of 5-fluorouracil. Viral subtyping in a majority of patients and histology were obtained before and after treatment. After treatment 88% (15 of 17) had normal vaginal biopsies, and 59% (10 of 17) had normal cervical biopsies. There were no treatment failures with subtype 6/11 infection of the cervix or vagina. All the failures were with viral subtypes 16/18 and 31/35/51. The protocol was effective in treating patients with cervical and vaginal human papillomavirus-associated lesions.

  2. Treatment of Emphysematous Pyelonephritis with Broad-spectrum Antibacterials and Percutaneous Renal Drainage: An Analysis of 10 Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, Pei-Hui; Kho, Victor Ka-Siong; Lai, Siu-Kei; Yang, Ching-Hwa; Chang, Hsiao-Chun; Chiu, Bin; Tseng, Shei-Chain

    2005-01-01

    This retrospective study was designed to determine the efficacy of broad-spectrum antibacterials combined with percutaneous renal drainage in the treatment of emphysematous pyelonephritis (EPN). Methods: From July 1992 to September 2002, 10 patients (nine females and one male) with EPN were managed at our institution. All patients had diabetes and presented with fever and chills, flank pain or tenderness, vomiting, and altered consciousness. The diagnosis of EPN was confirmed by the presen...

  3. Vacinas contra o Papilomavirus humano Vaccines against human Papillomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sidney Roberto Nadal

    2006-09-01

    outras doenças anogenitais associadas à infecção pelo HPV.Papillomavirus infection is more common in young sexually active people. It is so prevalent that from 75% to 80% of this population will be infected in their lifetime. Most lesions will be eradicated spontaneously at the point of not being detected even with the most sensible methods. Persistent infections with oncogenic HPV increase intraepithelial neoplasia and cancer risks. Two ways of prevention may be proposed: screening for precursor lesions and immunization against HPV, to avoid them. Although anogenital cancer incidence is decreasing with screening methods, costs are high and emotional disturbance may be caused by an abnormal result. So, vaccines to prevent diseases associated to HPV must be available. In the last decade, clinical tests began with several vaccines targeting the most frequent HPV types. The goal of prophylactic vaccines is to prevent primary or persistent HPV infections, and thus prevent cervical cancer and/or genital warts and the aim of the therapeutic types is to prevent progression of HPV infection, induce regression of intraepithelial neoplasia or condylomata, or eradicate residual cervical cancer. Prophylactic HPV vaccines in late stages of clinical testing are composed of HPV L1 capsid protein that self-assemble into virus-like particles (VLPs when expressed in recombinant systems, resulting in strong adaptive immune responses that are capable of neutralizing subsequent natural infections. Some studies observed 100% efficacy in preventing clinical disease for specific HPV types at least 5 years after immunization. Vaccines that target E6 and E7 proteins also represent an important strategy to control HPV-associated lesions and are in test in animal models. HPV vaccines seem to be more effective when administered prior to initiation of sexual activity, and vaccination campaigns should target preadolescent and adolescent populations. It is expected that with good coverage of the

  4. Overexpression of BSR1 confers broad-spectrum resistance against two bacterial diseases and two major fungal diseases in rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Satoru; Hayashi, Nagao; Sasaya, Takahide; Mori, Masaki

    2016-06-01

    Broad-spectrum disease resistance against two or more types of pathogen species is desirable for crop improvement. In rice, Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo), the causal bacteria of rice leaf blight, and Magnaporthe oryzae, the fungal pathogen causing rice blast, are two of the most devastating pathogens. We identified the rice BROAD-SPECTRUM RESISTANCE 1 (BSR1) gene for a BIK1-like receptor-like cytoplasmic kinase using the FOX hunting system, and demonstrated that BSR1-overexpressing (OX) rice showed strong resistance to the bacterial pathogen, Xoo and the fungal pathogen, M. oryzae. Here, we report that BSR1-OX rice showed extended resistance against two other different races of Xoo, and to at least one other race of M. oryzae. In addition, the rice showed resistance to another bacterial species, Burkholderia glumae, which causes bacterial seedling rot and bacterial grain rot, and to Cochliobolus miyabeanus, another fungal species causing brown spot. Furthermore, BSR1-OX rice showed slight resistance to rice stripe disease, a major viral disease caused by rice stripe virus. Thus, we demonstrated that BSR1-OX rice shows remarkable broad-spectrum resistance to at least two major bacterial species and two major fungal species, and slight resistance to one viral pathogen.

  5. Reverse engineering truncations of an antimicrobial peptide dimer to identify the origins of potency and broad spectrum of action.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantharaman, Aparna; Sahal, Dinkar

    2010-08-26

    Antimicrobial peptides hold promise against antibiotic resistant pathogens. Here, to find the physicochemical origins of potency and broad spectrum antimicrobial action, we report the structure-activity relationships of synthetic intermediates (peptides A-D) of a potent lysine branched dimeric antibacterial peptide DeltaFd. Our studies show that a tetracationic character in a weak helical fold (peptide C) elicits potent but narrow spectrum antimicrobial activity [Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) E. coli 10 microM, S. aureus>100 microM]. In contrast, a hexacationic character in a strong, amphipathic helix (DeltaFd) confers potent and broad spectrum action [MICs E. coli 2.5 microM, S. aureus 5 microM]. While DeltaFd caused rapid and potent permeabilization of the E. coli membranes, the less helical intermediates (peptides A-D) showed slow and weak to no responses. Two seminal findings that may aid future drug design are (a) at identical helicity, increasing charge enhanced outer membrane permeabilization, and (b) at identical charge, increasing helicity stimulated rate of outer membrane permeabilization and kill kinetics besides enhancing potency leading to broad spectrum action.

  6. Human Papillomavirus Detection from Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Colombian Women's Paired Urine and Cervical Samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, Marina; Camargo, Milena; Soto-De Leon, Sara C.; Sanchez, Ricardo; Parra, Diana; Pineda, Andrea C.; Sussmann, Otto; Perez-Prados, Antonio; Patarroyo, Manuel E.; Patarroyo, Manuel A.

    2013-01-01

    Infection, coinfection and type-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) distribution was evaluated in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive women from paired cervical and urine samples. Paired cervical and urine samples (n = 204) were taken from HIV-positive women for identifying HPV-DNA presence by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with three generic primer sets (GP5+/6+, MY09/11 and pU1M/2R). HPV-positive samples were typed for six high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) (HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -45 and -58) and two low-risk (LR-HPV) (HPV-6/11) types. Agreement between paired sample results and diagnostic performance was evaluated. HPV infection prevalence was 70.6% in cervical and 63.2% in urine samples. HPV-16 was the most prevalent HPV type in both types of sample (66.7% in cervical samples and 62.0% in urine) followed by HPV-31(47.2%) in cervical samples and HPV-58 (35.7%) in urine samples. There was 55.4% coinfection (infection by more than one type of HPV) in cervical samples and 40.2% in urine samples. Abnormal Papanicolau smears were observed in 25.3% of the women, presenting significant association with HPV-DNA being identified in urine samples. There was poor agreement of cervical and urine sample results in generic and type-specific detection of HPV. Urine samples provided the best diagnosis when taking cytological findings as reference. In conclusion including urine samples could be a good strategy for ensuring adherence to screening programs aimed at reducing the impact of cervical cancer, since this sample is easy to obtain and showed good diagnostic performance. PMID:23418581

  7. Biochemical and Functional Interactions of Human Papillomavirus Proteins with Polycomb Group Proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaughlin-Drubin, Margaret E.; Munger, Karl

    2013-01-01

    The role of enzymes involved in polycomb repression of gene transcription has been studied extensively in human cancer. Polycomb repressive complexes mediate oncogene-induced senescence, a principal innate cell-intrinsic tumor suppressor pathway that thwarts expansion of cells that have suffered oncogenic hits. Infections with human cancer viruses including human papillomaviruses (HPVs) and Epstein-Barr virus can trigger oncogene-induced senescence, and the viruses have evolved strategies to abrogate this response in order to establish an infection and reprogram their host cells to establish a long-term persistent infection. As a consequence of inhibiting polycomb repression and evading oncogene induced-senescence, HPV infected cells have an altered epigenetic program as evidenced by aberrant homeobox gene expression. Similar alterations are frequently observed in non-virus associated human cancers and may be harnessed for diagnosis and therapy. PMID:23673719

  8. Biochemical and Functional Interactions of Human Papillomavirus Proteins with Polycomb Group Proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret E. McLaughlin-Drubin

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The role of enzymes involved in polycomb repression of gene transcription has been studied extensively in human cancer. Polycomb repressive complexes mediate oncogene-induced senescence, a principal innate cell-intrinsic tumor suppressor pathway that thwarts expansion of cells that have suffered oncogenic hits. Infections with human cancer viruses including human papillomaviruses (HPVs and Epstein-Barr virus can trigger oncogene-induced senescence, and the viruses have evolved strategies to abrogate this response in order to establish an infection and reprogram their host cells to establish a long-term persistent infection. As a consequence of inhibiting polycomb repression and evading oncogene induced-senescence, HPV infected cells have an altered epigenetic program as evidenced by aberrant homeobox gene expression. Similar alterations are frequently observed in non-virus associated human cancers and may be harnessed for diagnosis and therapy.

  9. [Pap test used for detection of cellular changes associated with human papillomavirus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Valencia, Marcelino; Carrillo-Pacheco, Adia; Hernández-Quijano, Tomás; Zárate, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    Human papilloma virus can infect any mucous of the body and can cause cancer of the uterine cervix. This suggests recommending the Papanicolaou smear combined with a test for detection of human papillomavirus with a frequency interval of 3 years, since it grants greater information and fidelity to the result. The detection studies should begin at the age of 21 years and should stop at 65 years age. Until recently specific treatments did not exist to treat human papilloma virus, but recently some drugs that have demonstrated good effectiveness in curing the infection of human papilloma virus. One example is glycirrhicinic acid, which has demonstrated fewer adverse effects, as well as the possibility that its systemic employment allows treatment of lesions that are difficult to approach. The medical recommendations should be in constant revision, since a clinical trial can modify the interpretation of what is necessary to individualize each patient's treatment.

  10. Is routine human papillomavirus vaccination an option for Ghana ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cervical cancer remains an important public health problem in developing countries where over 80% of the global burden occurs annually but screening has been ineffective. In a polygamous country like Ghana with a high incidence of cervical cancer but no national screening program, the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) ...

  11. Detection of human papillomavirus DNA with in situ hybridisation in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    HPV-16, 18 and 33, have been implicated in squamous cell carcinogenesis because of their ability to immortalise human. Department of Medical Virology, University of Stelienbosch,. Tygerberg, W. Cape. Estrelita Janse Van Rensburg, M.MED. (VIROL). Department of Oral Pathology and Oral Biology, Medical University.

  12. Differential effects of human papillomavirus type 6, 16, and 18 DNAs on immortalization and transformation of human cervical epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pecoraro, G.; Morgan, D.; Defendi, V. (New York Univ. Medical Center, NY (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are associated with specific benign and malignant lesions of the skin and mucosal epithelia. Cloned viral DNAs from HPV types 6b, 16, and 18 associated with different pathological manifestations of genital neoplasia in vivo were introduced into primary human cervical epithelial cells by electroporation. Cells transfected with HPV16 or HPV18 DNA acquired indefinite lifespans, distinct morphological alterations, and anchorage-independent growth (HPV18), and contain integrated transcriptionally active viral genomes. HPV6b or plasmid electroporated cells senesced at low passage. The alterations in growth and differentiation of the cells appear to reflect the progressive oncogenic processes that result in cervical carcinoma in vivo.

  13. [Genetics and susceptibility to human papillomaviruses: epidermodysplasia verruciformis, a disease model].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orth, Gérard

    2010-06-01

    The outcomes of infection by human papillomaviruses (HPV), both oncogenic and non oncogenic, show major interindividual variability The underlying genetic factors and mechanisms are poorly known, but their complexity is illustrated by epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV), a rare autosomal recessive genodermatosis associated with a high risk of non melanoma skin cancer. This model disease is characterized by abnormal susceptibility to widespread betapapillomaviruses, including HPV-5, a virus associated with EV cancers. Most cases of EV are caused by a mutation that inactivates either of two related genes, EVER1 and EVER2. This inactivation likely compensates for the absence of a viral gene (E5 or E8) essential for HPV pathogenicity. Proteins E5 and E8 interfere with the interaction between EVER proteins and ZnT1, a zinc transporter EV is thus likely to represent a primary defect of intrinsic (constitutive) immunity or innate immunity to betapapillomaviruses, involving modulation of zinc homeostasis upon keratinocyte infection. It remains to be established which cellular genes are involved in intrinsic, innate or acquired immune responses to other human papillomaviruses, including oncogenic genital types.

  14. Detection of High-Risk Human Papillomaviruses in the Prevention of Cervical Cancer in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baskaran, Krishnan; Kumar, P Kranthi; Karunanithi, Santha; Sethupathy, Subramanian; Thamaraiselvi, B; Swaruparani, S

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small, non-enveloped, double-stranded DNA viruses that infect epithelial tissues. Specific genotypes of human papillomavirus are the single most common etiological agents of cervical intraepithelial lesions and cervical cancer. Cervical cancer usually arises at squamous metaplastic epithelium of transformation zone (TZ) of the cervix featuring infection with one or more oncogenic or high-risk HPV (HR- HPV) types. A hospital- based study in a rural set up was carried out to understand the association of HR-HPV with squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs) and cervical cancer. In the present study, HR-HPV was detected in 65.7% of low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSILs), 84.6% of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs) and 94% of cervical cancer as compared to 10.7% of controls. The association of HPV infection with SIL and cervical cancer was analyzed with Chi square test (p<0.001). The significant association found confirmed that detection of HR-HPV is a suitable candidate for early identification of cervical precancerous lesions and in the prevention of cervical cancer in India.

  15. Molecular Characterization of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus in Women in Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ina Marie Angèle Traore

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV is found in over 99% of cervical cancers. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of HPV in a population of women in Bobo-Dioulasso and to identify the high-risk types present in these women. From May to June, 2015, 181 women who came for consultation at the Souro Sanou University Hospital of Bobo-Dioulasso have been included in this study. Uterine endocervical swabs have been taken in these women. DNA obtained by extraction from the samples thus collected was used to determine the prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus genotypes through real-time PCR. The age of the women ranged from 20 to 56 years with a mean of 35.3±8.1 years. The prevalence of infection by high-risk HPV types was 25.4% (46/181. The most common high-risk HPV genotypes were HPV 39 (18.5%, HPV 52 (16.7%, HPV 18 (14.8%, and HPV 35 (13.0%. HPV 16 which is included in the HPV vaccines was not found in the population studied. This type of study which is the first one in Bobo-Dioulasso has showed a high prevalence of genotypes HPV 39, HPV 52, and HPV 35 which are not yet covered by a vaccine.

  16. Molecular Characterization of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus in Women in Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Traore, Ina Marie Angèle; Zohoncon, Théodora Mahoukèdè; Dembele, Adama; Djigma, Florencia W; Obiri-Yeboah, Dorcas; Traore, Germain; Bambara, Moussa; Ouedraogo, Charlemagne; Traore, Yves; Simpore, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is found in over 99% of cervical cancers. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of HPV in a population of women in Bobo-Dioulasso and to identify the high-risk types present in these women. From May to June, 2015, 181 women who came for consultation at the Souro Sanou University Hospital of Bobo-Dioulasso have been included in this study. Uterine endocervical swabs have been taken in these women. DNA obtained by extraction from the samples thus collected was used to determine the prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus genotypes through real-time PCR. The age of the women ranged from 20 to 56 years with a mean of 35.3 ± 8.1 years. The prevalence of infection by high-risk HPV types was 25.4% (46/181). The most common high-risk HPV genotypes were HPV 39 (18.5%), HPV 52 (16.7%), HPV 18 (14.8%), and HPV 35 (13.0%). HPV 16 which is included in the HPV vaccines was not found in the population studied. This type of study which is the first one in Bobo-Dioulasso has showed a high prevalence of genotypes HPV 39, HPV 52, and HPV 35 which are not yet covered by a vaccine.

  17. Human papillomavirus-exposed Langerhans cells are activated by stabilized Poly-I:C

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diane M. Da Silva

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomaviruses (HPV establish persistent infections because of evolved immune evasion mechanisms, particularly HPV-mediated suppression of the immune functions of Langerhans cells (LC, the antigen presenting cells of the epithelium. Polyinosinic-polycytidilic acid (Poly-I:C is broadly immunostimulatory with the ability to enhance APC expression of costimulatory molecules and inflammatory cytokines resulting in T cell activation. Here we investigated the activation of primary human LC derived from peripheral blood monocytes after exposure to HPV16 virus like particles followed by treatment with stabilized Poly-I:C compounds (s-Poly-I:C, and their subsequent induction of HPV16-specific T cells. Our results indicate that HPV16 particles alone were incapable of inducing LC activation as demonstrated by the lack of costimulatory molecules, inflammatory cytokines, chemokine-directed migration, and HPV16-specific CD8+ T cells in vitro. Conversely, s-Poly-I:C caused significant upregulation of costimulatory molecules and induction of chemokine-directed migration of LC that were pre-exposed to HPV16. In HLA-A*0201-positive donors, s-Poly-I:C treatment was able to induce CD8+ T cell immune responses against HPV16-derived peptides. Thus, s-Poly-I:C compounds are attractive for translation into therapeutics in which they could potentially mediate clearance of persistent HPV infection. Keywords: Papillomavirus, HPV16, Langerhans cells, Immune escape

  18. Are 20 human papillomavirus types causing cervical cancer?

    OpenAIRE

    Arbyn, Marc; Tommasino, Massimo; Depuydt, Christophe; Dillner, Joakim

    2014-01-01

    Abstract: In 2012, the International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded that there was consistent and sufficient epidemiological, experimental and mechanistic evidence of carcinogenicity to humans for 12 HPV types (HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV39, HPV45, HPV51, HPV52, HPV56, HPV58 and HPV59) for cervical cancer. Therefore, these types were considered as 1A carcinogens. They all belong to the family of the -Papillomaviridae, in particular to the species 5 (HPV51), 6 (HPV56), 7 (H...

  19. Recruitment of Brd4 to the Human Papillomavirus Type 16 DNA Replication Complex Is Essential for Replication of Viral DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xin; Helfer, Christine M.; Pancholi, Neha; Bradner, James E.; You, Jianxin

    2013-01-01

    Replication of the human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA genome relies on viral factors E1 and E2 and the cellular replication machinery. Bromodomain-containing protein 4 (Brd4) interacts with viral E2 protein to mediate papillomavirus (PV) genome maintenance and viral transcription. However, the functional role of Brd4 in the HPV life cycle remains to be clearly defined. In this study, we provide the first look into the E2-Brd4 interaction in the presence of other important viral factors, such as t...

  20. Immunogenicity of bivalent human papillomavirus DNA vaccine using human endogenous retrovirus envelope-coated baculoviral vectors in mice and pigs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hee-Jung Lee

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus is known to be the major pathogen of cervical cancer. Here, we report the efficacy of a bivalent human papillomavirus type 16 and 18 DNA vaccine system following repeated dosing in mice and pigs using a recombinant baculovirus bearing human endogenous retrovirus envelope protein (AcHERV as a vector. The intramuscular administration of AcHERV-based HPV16L1 and HPV18L1 DNA vaccines induced antigen-specific serum IgG, vaginal IgA, and neutralizing antibodies to levels comparable to those achieved using the commercially marketed vaccine Cervarix. Similar to Cervarix, AcHERV-based bivalent vaccinations completely blocked subsequent vaginal challenge with HPV type-specific pseudovirions. However, AcHERV-based bivalent vaccinations induced significantly higher cell-mediated immune responses than Cervarix, promoting 4.5- (HPV16L1 and 3.9-(HPV18L1 fold higher interferon-γ production in splenocytes upon stimulation with antigen type-specific pseudovirions. Repeated dosing did not affect the immunogenicity of AcHERV DNA vaccines. Three sequential immunizations with AcHERV-HP18L1 DNA vaccine followed by three repeated dosing with AcHERV-HP16L1 over 11 weeks induced an initial production of anti-HPV18L1 antibody followed by subsequent induction of anti-HPV16L1 antibody. Finally, AcHERV-based bivalent DNA vaccination induced antigen-specific serum IgG immune responses in pigs. These results support the further development of AcHERV as a bivalent human papillomavirus DNA vaccine system for use in preventing the viral infection as well as treating the infected women by inducing both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. Moreover, the possibility of repeated dosing indicates the utility of AcHERV system for reusable vectors of other viral pathogen vaccines.

  1. Serology for human papillomavirus Serología para el virus del papiloma humano

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Coursaget

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Difficulties with serology for papillomavirus are associated with the large number of human papillomavirus, cross-reactions between papillomavirus, and to the diversity of lesions and target sites for infection. In addition, the expression of the papillomavirus in the superficial layers of the epithelium gives rise to the weak presentation to immunocompetent cells of viral antigens, which in turn gives rise to a weak serological response. Distinct efforts have been made in previous decades to develop more specific and sensitive serological assays. These former studies use fusion proteins and synthetic peptides, although they remain on the whole uninteresting, due to their lack of sensitivity and specificity. Only in the last few years, and principally due to the advent of various virus-like particles (VLP, have more sensitive and specific assays become available.Las limitaciones para la utilización de la serología para el estudio del virus del papiloma humano con fines clínicos están asociadas con la gran variedad de subtipos humanos, con las reacciones cruzadas que existen entre diversos genotipos, la diversidad de lesiones precursoras de cáncer y con los sitios blancos de infección. Asimismo, la expresión del virus del papiloma humano en las capas superficiales del epitelio dan origen a una débil presentación de células inmunocompetentes de antígenos virales, lo cual origina una elevación de la respuesta serológica. Distintos esfuerzos se han realizado en décadas previas para desarrollar ensayos serológicos más específicos y sensibles. En muchas investigaciones se ha utilizado una fusión de proteínas y péptidos sintéticos que tienen como principal limitación su escasa sensibilidad y especificidad. Sólo en los últimos años, y principalmente debido al arribo de partículas parecidas a este virus, tenemos disponibles ensayos más sensibles y específicos, ampliamente descritos en este artículo.

  2. Human papillomavirus in young women with Chlamydia trachomatis infection 7 years after the Australian human papillomavirus vaccination programme: a cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chow, Eric P F; Danielewski, Jennifer A; Fehler, Glenda; Tabrizi, Sepehr N; Law, Matthew G; Bradshaw, Catriona S; Garland, Suzanne M; Chen, Marcus Y; Fairley, Christopher K

    2015-11-01

    The national quadrivalent human papillomavirus (4vHPV) vaccination programme was launched in Australia in April, 2007. In this study, we aimed to explore the prevalence of vaccine-targeted human papillomavirus (HPV) types contained in the 4vHPV and nine-valent HPV (9vHPV) vaccines detected in young women diagnosed with chlamydia. In this cross-sectional study, we identified specimens from women aged 25 years or younger who attended the Melbourne Sexual Health Centre (Melbourne, VIC, Australia) diagnosed with chlamydia. We calculated the prevalence of 4vHPV types (6, 11, 16, and 18) and the extra five 9vHPV types (31, 33, 45, 52, and 58 alone) excluding 4vHPV types, stratified by Australian financial year (and according to the prevaccination and postvaccination periods) and self-reported vaccination status, for all women, Australian-born women, Australian-born women aged 21 years and younger, and overseas-born women. We calculated adjusted prevalence ratios using binomial log linear regression. Between July 1, 2004, and June 30, 2014, we included 1202 women. The prevalence of 4vHPV types in Australian-born women decreased during this period (HPV 6 and 11: 2004-05 nine [16%, 95% CI 8-28] of 56 vs 2013-14 one [2%, 0-9] of 57, ptypes from 66 (41%, 95% CI 34-49) of 160 in the prevaccination period (from July 1, 2004, to June 30, 2007) to five (19%, 6-38) of 27 in the postvaccination period (July 1, 2007, to June 30, 2014; p=0·031), but not in the 9vHPV types, excluding 4vHPV (36 [23%, 95% CI 16-30] vs seven [26%, 11-46]; p=0·805). The three-dose vaccination coverage was sufficient for the 4vHPV types to almost disappear in Australian-born women aged 21 years or younger within 3 years of introduction of the national HPV vaccination programme. We noted strong herd protection, with a significant decrease in the prevalence of 4vHPV in unvaccinated women. The 4vHPV vaccination programme in Australia has been successful at protecting women against 4vHPV types. Australian

  3. Association between human papillomavirus vaccine uptake uptake and cervical cancer screening in the Netherlands: Implications for future impact on prevention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Steens, A.; Wielders, C.C.; Bogaards, J.A.; Boshuizen, H.C.; Greeff, de S.C.; Melker, de H.E.

    2013-01-01

    Several countries recently added human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination to cervical cancer screening in the effort to prevent cervical cancer. They include the Netherlands, where both programs are free. To estimate their combined future impact on cancer prevention, information is needed on the

  4. The Role of Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-Related Stigma on HPV Vaccine Decision-Making among College Males

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Georden; Perez, Samara; Huta, Veronika; Rosberger, Zeev; Lebel, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The goals of the present study are (1) to identify sociodemographic and psychosocial predictors of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related stigma and (2) to examine the relationship between HPV-related stigma in predicting HPV vaccine decision-making among college males. Participants: Six hundred and eighty college males aged 18--26 from 3…

  5. Prognostic significance of serum antibodies to human papillomavirus-16 E4 and E7 peptides in cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaarenstroom, K. N.; Kenter, G. G.; Bonfrer, J. M.; Korse, C. M.; Gallee, M. P.; Hart, A. A.; Müller, M.; Trimbos, J. B.; Helmerhorst, T. J.

    1994-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The objective of this study was to investigate the prognostic significance of serum antibodies to human papillomavirus (HPV)-16 peptides in patients with squamous cell cervical cancer. METHODS: Pretreatment sera from 78 patients and 198 control women were tested by an enzyme-linked

  6. Human papillomavirus detection and comorbidity: critical issues in selection of patients with oropharyngeal cancer for treatment De-escalation trials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rietbergen, M.M.; Brakenhoff, R.H.; Bloemena, E.; Witte, B.I.; Snijders, P.J.F.; Heideman, D.A.M.; Boon, D.; Koljenovic, S.; Baatenburg-de Jong, R.J.; Leemans, C.R.

    2013-01-01

    Background: The presence of human papillomavirus (HPV)-infection in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is a major determinant in prognostic risk modeling. However, most risk models are based on clinical trials which only include a selected patient population. The clinical significance of

  7. Prevalence and Type Distribution of Human Papillomavirus Among 1813 Men in Tanzania and the Relationship to HIV Status

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Tina Bech; Iftner, Thomas; Mwaiselage, Julius

    2013-01-01

    Infection with high-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with penile cancer in men, cervical cancer in women, and anal cancer and certain types of head and neck cancers in both sexes. Few studies have assessed the prevalence and type distribution of HPV among men in sub-Saharan Africa...

  8. Production of human papillomavirus type16 E7 oncoprotein fused with ß-glucuronidase in transgenic tomato and potato

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bříza, Jindřich; Pavingerová, Daniela; Vlasák, Josef; Ludvíková, V.; Niedermeierová, Hana

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 51, č. 2 (2007), s. 268-276 ISSN 0006-3134 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA521/05/2092 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50510513 Keywords : transgenic plants * human papillomavirus Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 1.259, year: 2007

  9. Comparison of different assays to assess human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16- and 18-specific antibodies after HPV infection and vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scherpenisse, Mirte; Schepp, Rutger M.; Mollers, Madelief; Mooij, Sofie H.; Meijer, Chris J. L. M.; Berbers, Guy A. M.; van der Klis, Fiona R. M.

    2013-01-01

    We compared the measurement of human papillomavirus (HPV)-specific serum antibody levels with the virus-like-particle multiplex immunoassay (VLP-MIA), competitive Luminex immunoassay (cLIA), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) L1-based MIA. Using a large panel of serum samples, these assays showed

  10. Rapid enrichment of human papillomavirus (HPV)-specific polyclonal T cell populations for adoptive immunotherapy of cervical cancer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, Annemieke; van der Hulst, Jeanette M.; Kenter, Gemma G.; Drijfhout, Jan Wouter; Franken, Kees L. M. C.; Vermeij, Pieter; Offringa, Rienk; van der Burg, Sjoerd H.; Melief, Cornelis J. M.

    2005-01-01

    The majority of cervical cancers are caused by human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16). Cervical cancer is associated with an ineffective host immune response against the HPV16 oncoproteins, characterized by the lack of the strong E6-specific T-helper type 1 (Th1) immunity that is generally present in

  11. Applying a gender lens on human papillomavirus infection: cervical cancer screening, HPV DNA testing, and HPV vaccination

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brankovic, I; Verdonk, P.; Klinge, I.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Our aim is to provide a state-of-the-art overview of knowledge on sex (biological) and gender (sociocultural) aspects of Human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer for educational purposes. Considerable disparities exist in cervical cancer incidences between different subgroups of

  12. Immunogenicity and safety of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in Asian populations from six countries : a meta-analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Setiawan, Didik; Luttjeboer, Jos; Pouwels, Koen B.; Wilschut, Jan C.; Postma, Maarten J.

    Cervical cancer is a serious public-health problem in Asian countries. Since human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the main risk factor for cervical cancer, HPV vaccination is considered a promising strategy to prevent cervical cancer. However, comprehensive immunogenicity and safety information

  13. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Risk Factors, Vaccination Patterns, and Vaccine Perceptions among a Sample of Male College Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontenot, Holly B.; Collins Fantasia, Heidi; Charyk, Anna; Sutherland, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates, including initiation and completion of the vaccine series, and barriers to vaccination in a sample of male college students. Participants: Male students between the ages of 18 and 25 who reported being currently or previously sexually active (N = 735). Methods: A cross-sectional…

  14. Correlates to Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Status and Willingness to Vaccinate in Low-Income Philadelphia High School Students

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, Sarah B.; Leader, Amy; Shwarz, Michelle; Greener, Judith; Patterson, Freda

    2015-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the correlates of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination or willingness to be vaccinated in urban, minority adolescents. Methods: Using responses to the 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Survey in Philadelphia, a random sample of high schools provided weighted data representing 20,941 9th to 12th graders. Stratified by…

  15. How to Inform: Comparing Written and Video Education Interventions to Increase Human Papillomavirus Knowledge and Vaccination Intentions in Young Adults

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Andrea; Lau, Elsa; Perez, Samara; Delisle, Vanessa; Amsel, Rhonda; Rosberger, Zeev

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of 2 human papillomavirus (HPV) educational interventions on increasing HPV knowledge and vaccination intentions in college students. Participants: Male (n = 60) and female (n = 140) undergraduates (M[subscript age] = 20.4, SD = 2.3) recruited from a university in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, from October 2009 to…

  16. Relative Persuasiveness of Gain- versus Loss-Framed Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Messages for the Present- and Future-Minded

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nan, Xiaoli

    2012-01-01

    This research examines how young adults' attitudes toward human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and their intentions to get the vaccine are influenced by the framing of health messages (gain vs. loss) and time orientation (i.e., the extent to which people value immediate vs. distant consequences of their decisions). Results of an experiment…

  17. Deconstructing Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Knowledge: Objective and Perceived Knowledge in Males' Intentions to Receive the HPV Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krawczyk, Andrea; Stephenson, Ellen; Perez, Samara; Lau, Elsa; Rosberger, Zeev

    2013-01-01

    Background: The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was recently approved for men. To effectively tailor HPV education efforts toward men, it is important to understand what men know about HPV and how this knowledge relates to their decision to receive the vaccine. This study examines how objective HPV knowledge, objective HPV vaccine knowledge,…

  18. Disparities in Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Literacy and Vaccine Completion among Asian American Pacific Islander Undergraduates: Implications for Cancer Health Equity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hee Yun; Kwon, Melissa; Vang, Suzanne; DeWolfe, Jessica; Kim, Nam Keol; Lee, Do Kyung; Yeung, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Low rates of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among young Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) women need to be addressed, particularly given the high incidence of cervical cancer in this population. The current study aims to investigate predictors of HPV vaccination in young AAPI and non-Latina white (NLW) women. Methods: A…

  19. Does Mother Know Best? An Actor-Partner Model of College-Age Women's Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krieger, Janice L.; Kam, Jennifer A.; Katz, Mira L.; Roberto, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the associations of perceived threat, perceived efficacy, and parent-child communication with the extent to which college-age women received the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. Daughters and their mothers completed a survey about the HPV vaccine (N = 182 dyads). The results showed that mothers' perceived self-efficacy to…

  20. Human papillomavirus type influences the extent of chromosomal lag during mitosis in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, M. P.; van Leeuwen, A. M.; Hollema, H.; Quint, W. G.; Pieters, W. J.

    1997-01-01

    The level of risk for carcinoma in the uterine cervix depends on the type of human papillomavirus (HPV) present. We examined whether the HPV type influences the proliferation rate and occurrence of mitotic figures with lagging chromosomes in the precursor of cervical carcinoma. The study group

  1. Human papillomavirus type influences the extent of chromosomal lag during mitosis in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade III

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burger, MPM; VanLeeuwen, AM; Hollema, H; Quint, WGV; Pieters, WJLM

    The level of risk for carcinoma in the uterine cervix depends on the type of human papillomavirus (HPV) present. We examined whether the HPV type influences the proliferation rate and occurrence of mitotic figures with lagging chromosomes in the precursor of cervical carcinoma. The study group

  2. Chlamydia trachomatis and risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 or worse in women with persistent human papillomavirus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kirsten E; Thomsen, Louise T; Schmiedel, Sven

    2014-01-01

    Some studies suggest that Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) enhances cervical carcinogenesis; however, a possible confounding effect of persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection was not addressed. We examined the potential role of CT infection in the development of subsequent cervical intraepithel...... intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 or worse (CIN3+) in women with prevalent HPV infection and in a subgroup of women with persistent HPV infection....

  3. Hybrid Capture 2 and cobas human papillomavirus assays perform similarly on SurePath samples from women with abnormalities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fornari, D; Rebolj, M; Bjerregaard, B

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In two laboratories (Departments of Pathology, Copenhagen University Hospitals of Herlev and Hvidovre), we compared cobas and Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) human papillomavirus (HPV) assays using SurePath® samples from women with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) at...

  4. NucliSENS EasyQ HPV v1 test - Testing for oncogenic activity of human papillomaviruses.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeantet, D.; Schwarzmann, F.; Tromp, J.; Melchers, W.J.G.; Wurff, A.A. van der; Oosterlaken, T.; Jacobs, M.; Troesch, A.

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Analytical sensitivity of DNA-based assays to detect infection with human papillomaviruses is very high, but clinical specificity for cervical cancer strongly depends on the age of the patient and case classification. To solve the dilemma between sensitivity and specificity, a new

  5. Heparin increases the infectivity of Human Papillomavirus type 16 independent of cell surface proteoglycans and induces L1 epitope exposure

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cerqueira, C.; Liu, Y.; Kuhling, L.; Chai, W.; Hafezi, W.; Kuppevelt, T.H. van; Kuhn, J.E.; Feizi, T.; Schelhaas, M.

    2013-01-01

    Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the etiological agents of cervical cancer, and HPV-16 is the most prevalent type. Several HPVs require heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPGs) for cell binding. Here, we analyse the phenomenon that preincubation of HPV-16 with increasing concentrations of heparin

  6. The interferon-related developmental regulator 1 is used by human papillomavirus to suppress NFκB activation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. Tummers (Bart); R. Goedemans (Renske); L.P.L. Pelascini (Laetitia P. L.); E.S. Jordanova (Ekaterina S.); E.M.G. Van Esch (Edith M. G.); C. Meyers (Craig); C.J. Melief (Cornelius); J.M. Boer (Judith); S.H. van der Burg (Sjoerd)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractHigh-risk human papillomaviruses (hrHPVs) infect keratinocytes and successfully evade host immunity despite the fact that keratinocytes are well equipped to respond to innate and adaptive immune signals. Using non-infected and freshly established or persistent hrHPV-infected

  7. Identification of a novel human papillomavirus by metagenomic analysis of samples from patients with febrile respiratory illness

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mokili, J.L.; Dutilh, B.E.; Lim, Y.W.; Schneider, B.S.; Taylor, T.; Haynes, M.R.; Metzgar, D.; Myers, C.A.; Blair, P.J.; Nosrat, B.; Wolfe, N.D.; Rohwer, F.

    2013-01-01

    As part of a virus discovery investigation using a metagenomic approach, a highly divergent novel Human papillomavirus type was identified in pooled convenience nasal/oropharyngeal swab samples collected from patients with febrile respiratory illness. Phylogenetic analysis of the whole genome and

  8. Biological evidence that human papillomaviruses are etiologically involved in a subgroup of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Houten, V. M.; Snijders, P. J.; van den Brekel, M. W.; Kummer, J. A.; Meijer, C. J.; van Leeuwen, B.; Denkers, F.; Smeele, L. E.; Snow, G. B.; Brakenhoff, R. H.

    2001-01-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have been proposed to be associated with a subset of head and neck cancers (HNSCCs). However, clear biological evidence linking HPV-mediated oncogenesis to the development of HNSCC is hardly available. An important biological mechanism underlying HPV-mediated

  9. A novel strategy for human papillomavirus detection and genotyping with SybrGreen and molecular beacon polymerase chain reaction

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Szuhai, K; Sandhaus, E; Kolkman-Uljee, SM; Lemaitre, M; Truffert, JC; Dirks, RW; Tanke, HJ; Fleuren, GJ; Schuuring, E; Raap, AK

    2001-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) play an important role in the pathogenesis of cervical cancer. For identification of the large number of different HPV types found in (pre)malignant lesions, a robust methodology is needed that combines general HPV detection with HPV genotyping. We have developed for

  10. ANALYSIS OF THE IMPACT OF PROPHYLACTIC VACCINATION AGAINST HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS INFECTION USING A DYNAMIC-MODELLING APPROACH

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, T.; Nijman, H.; Wilschut, J.; Daemen, T.; Postma, M.

    2012-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: Since 2008, teenage girls are being vaccinated against Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in Europe. The vaccine coverage did not reach high uptake. The aim of this study is to design a dynamic transmission framework to model HPVtransmission in the population in order to predict epidemiologic

  11. High-risk human papillomavirus and cervical lesions among women living with HIV/AIDS in Brazilian Amazon, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila da Silva

    2015-11-01

    Conclusions: In the present study high-risk human papillomavirus infection was frequent and it was associated to high-SIL. These results show the importance of gynecologic examinations in routine care and follow-up required by those who present with cervical lesions.

  12. Human papillomavirus type 16 and TP53 mutation in oral cancer: matched analysis of the IARC multicenter study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dai, M; Clifford, GM; Calvez, F le; Castellsague, X; Snijders, P.J.F.; Pawlita, M; Herrero, R; Hainaut, P; Franceschi, S

    2004-01-01

    TP53 mutations were analyzed in 35 human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 DNA-positive cancers of the oral cavity and oropharynx and in 35 HPV DNA-negative cancers matched by subsite, country, sex, age, and tobacco and alcohol consumption. Wild-type TP53 was found more frequently in cancer specimens

  13. The epidemiology of human papillomavirus in HIV-negative and HIV-infected men who have sex with men

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mooij, S.H.

    2015-01-01

    This thesis studied the epidemiology and seroepidemiology of human papillomavirus (HPV) among HIV-negative and HIV-infected men who have sex with men (MSM) in Amsterdam, the Netherlands. Anal, penile, and oral HPV prevalence and incidence were high, in particular among HIV-infected MSM. Clearance of

  14. Cost-effectiveness of human papillomavirus vaccination programmes parallel to current routine vaccination of young teenage girls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Westra, T.A.; Postma, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives: Since 2009, 12-year-old Dutch teenage girls are vaccinated against human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. The current uptake of HPV vaccination, being approximately 60% nowadays, is however comparatively low. Consequently, a large group of women are still at risk of developing HPV-induced

  15. Acceptability of School-Based Health Centers for Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Visits: A Mixed-Methods Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Caitlin E.; Okoloko, Edirin; Ogunbajo, Adedotun; North, Anna; Niccolai, Linda M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Countries with high human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates have achieved this success largely through school-based vaccination. Using school-based health centers (SBHCs) in the United States, where HPV vaccine remains underutilized, could improve uptake. In this mixed-methods study, we examined acceptability, facilitators, and…

  16. Anal and penile high-risk human papillomavirus prevalence in HIV-negative and HIV-infected MSM

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Aar, Fleur; Mooij, Sofie H.; van der Sande, Marianne A. B.; Speksnijder, Arjen G. C. L.; Stolte, Ineke G.; Meijer, Chris J. L. M.; Verhagen, Dominique W. M.; King, Audrey J.; de Vries, Henry J. C.; Schim van der Loeff, Maarten F.

    2013-01-01

    Anal and penile high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is associated with anogenital cancer, which is especially common in HIV-infected MSM. We assessed HPV prevalence and determinants in MSM. Analysis of baseline data from a prospective cohort study. MSM aged 18 years or older were

  17. Predicting Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Intentions of College-Aged Males: An Examination of Parents' and Son's Perceptions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katz, Mira L.; Kam, Jennifer A.; Krieger, Janice L.; Roberto, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine male students' and their parents' human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine communication in relation to males' willingness to discuss the vaccine with their health care provider and the likelihood of being vaccinated. Participants: Dyads (n = 111) of students and parents. Methods: Participants completed a HPV vaccine survey based…

  18. The Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in Cervical Cancer in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortazavi, SH; Zali, MR; Raoufi, M; Nadji, M; Kowsarian, P; Nowroozi, A

    2002-01-01

    Background: The human papiloma virus (HPV), which is sexually transmitted, and most commonly causes genital warts, has been linked to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive carcinoma. Of ninety plus types of HPV, HPV-16 is the most prevalent in cervical cancer, followed by HPV-18, and HPV-33. As HPV's implication has not been assessed in the Middle East the main focus of this retrospective study was to determine the prevalence of HPV -16,18, and 33 in cases of cervical cancer from Iran. Material and Methods: This retrospective study covered 100 patients with uterine cervical carcinomas who were referred to two referral centers for cancer in Tehran-Iran. Pathological blocks were collected for these cases and initial review of the blocks showed poor specimens in 18 cases, which left 82 cases for the study. These samples were histologically examined to verify the presence and the type of carcinoma. The next step was in situ hybridzation for the detection of HPV common DNA. In Situ hybridization was preformed on all samples. Finally, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) was preformed for the HPV types 16, 18, and 33. PCR amplification of exon 5 of the p53 gene was used as an internal control for the integrity of DNA. Takara PCR Human papilloma Detection method was used which includes primer for HPV 16, 18, and 33. Three primers were used alone, or in combination, in order to increase the sensitivity of the detection. Results: The majority of tumors were squamous cell carcinomas (87%). The rest were adenosquamous carcinoma and adenocarcinomas. None of the 82 different cervical carcinoma tissue samples were found to be positive by in situ hybridization. In the PCR samples, amplification of DNA was observed for 69 tumor specimens. In the remainning13 cases, the DNA in fixed tissue was degraded, as verified by the absence of an internal control band (p53). Out of the total 69 tumors (85.5%) with adequate DNA contained HPV band on PCR. The majority (73.9%) of HPV

  19. Human Papillomaviruses and Non-Melanoma Skin Cancer: Basic Virology and Clinical Manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingo Nindl

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomaviruses (HPV infect cutaneous and mucosal epithelia and induce benign and malignant lesions. Non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC, encompassing basal cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC, is the most frequent cancer in the Caucasian population, and the incidence has increased dramatically worldwide. Ultraviolet (UV radiation is a major risk factor for NMSC, and cutaneous HPV is also considered to play an active role during the pathogenesis of these cancers. The first evidence for the involvement of HPV in NMSC was reported in patients with Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV. HPV types detected in skin tumours of these patients are referred to as EV/cutaneous HPV types belonging to the beta- and gamma-papillomaviruses (PV. Epidemiological studies have shown a higher risk of several EV/cutaneous HPV types for NMSC. Furthermore, in vitro and animal models show transforming properties of some PV types. The anti-apoptotic activities, and the delay of DNA repair mechanism caused by some EV/cutaneous HPV E6 proteins in response to UV-induced mutations, may lead to the persistence of DNA-damaged keratinocytes. Thus, specific EV/cutaneous HPV types as co-factors in association with UV-radiation and the immune system seem to be involved in the early pathogenesis of cutaneous SCC.

  20. Seroprevalence of 34 human papillomavirus types in the German general population.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristina M Michael

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The natural history of infections with many human papillomavirus (HPV types is poorly understood. Here, we describe for the first time the age- and sex-dependent antibody prevalence for 29 cutaneous and five mucosal HPV types from 15 species within five phylogenetic genera (alpha, beta, gamma, mu, nu in a general population. Sera from 1,797 German adults and children (758 males and 1,039 females between 1 and 82 years (median 37 years were analysed for antibodies to the major capsid protein L1 by Luminex-based multiplex serology. The first substantial HPV antibody reactions observed already in children and young adults are those to cutaneous types of the genera nu (HPV 41 and mu (HPV 1, 63. The antibody prevalence to mucosal high-risk types, most prominently HPV 16, was elevated after puberty in women but not in men and peaked between 25 and 34 years. Antibodies to beta and gamma papillomaviruses (PV were rare in children and increased homogeneously with age, with prevalence peaks at 40 and 60 years in women and 50 and 70 years in men. Antibodies to cutaneous alpha PV showed a heterogeneous age distribution. In summary, these data suggest three major seroprevalence patterns for HPV of phylogenetically distinct genera: antibodies to mu and nu skin PV appear early in life, those to mucosal alpha PV in women after puberty, and antibodies to beta as well as to gamma skin PV accumulate later in life.

  1. Long-term results of treatment for benign cervical epithelial changes associated with human papillomavirus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. G. Kedrova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A better understanding of the life cycle of human papillomaviruses (HPV and innate immune control responses made it possible to lookfor ways of reducing the replication load of viral proteins and to activate the mechanisms of innate immunity for rapid viral elimination. This is extremely important since persistent infection mainly with papillomavirus types 16, 18, 35, 45, and 52 is the major cause of cervical cancer. Over 3 years, the screening program proposed by the World Health Organization in 2001 could reveal about 10 % of the 30 000 women who had moderate and severe or more cervical epithelial lesion and other 14 % had a HPV positive test showing mainly the presence of several strains. The level of persistent infection (the presence of one type of the virus within 12 months was significantly higher among smokers and women older than 35 years of age. In our trial, the use of Isoprinosine in a dose of 50 mg/kg/day for 28 days contributed to rapid viral elimination persisting longer than 12 months in 91.8 % of the patients.

  2. Economic burden of human papillomavirus-related diseases in Italy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Baio

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Human papilloma virus (HPV genotypes 6, 11, 16, and 18 impose a substantial burden of direct costs on the Italian National Health Service that has never been quantified fully. The main objective of the present study was to address this gap: (1 by estimating the total direct medical costs associated with nine major HPV-related diseases, namely invasive cervical cancer, cervical dysplasia, cancer of the vulva, vagina, anus, penis, and head and neck, anogenital warts, and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, and (2 by providing an aggregate measure of the total economic burden attributable to HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18 infection. METHODS: For each of the nine conditions, we used available Italian secondary data to estimate the lifetime cost per case, the number of incident cases of each disease, the total economic burden, and the relative prevalence of HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18, in order to estimate the aggregate fraction of the total economic burden attributable to HPV infection. RESULTS: The total direct costs (expressed in 2011 Euro associated with the annual incident cases of the nine HPV-related conditions included in the analysis were estimated to be €528.6 million, with a plausible range of €480.1-686.2 million. The fraction attributable to HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18 was €291.0 (range €274.5-315.7 million, accounting for approximately 55% of the total annual burden of HPV-related disease in Italy. CONCLUSIONS: The results provided a plausible estimate of the significant economic burden imposed by the most prevalent HPV-related diseases on the Italian welfare system. The fraction of the total direct lifetime costs attributable to HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18 infections, and the economic burden of noncervical HPV-related diseases carried by men, were found to be cost drivers relevant to the making of informed decisions about future investments in programmes of HPV prevention.

  3. Human papillomavirus and its influence on head and neck cancer predisposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamil H. Nelke

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Human papillomavirus (HPV is a virus often infecting humans. It is often present on skin or mucousmembranes. These diverse DNA viruses are often linked to many various benign and malignant neoplasticlesions. Over 40 types of HPV are transmitted through sexual contact and infect the anogenital regionwhich might be secondly transmitted to the oral mucous. Over 150 HPV viruses are defined according tothe invaded site. Oral papillomas are marked with numbers 6, 7, 11, 16 and 32. Squamous cell papillomais often found in laryngeal epithelial tumor associated with HPV-6 and HPV-11 and also HPV-16 in oralsquamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. In the last 15 years OSCC has become more common in children andyoung adults. The role of HPV virus causing oral squamous cell carcinomas is more often realized, butpeople’s lack of knowledge and risky sexual behavior is still the main factor in growing HPV infections.

  4. Human papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus in the etiology of testicular germ cell tumours

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Hørding, U; Nielsen, H W

    1994-01-01

    Epidemiological features suggest that the risk of testicular cancer may be related to exposure to unknown infectious agents, including viruses. Therefore a series of twenty specimens of testicular germ cell tumours, including preinvasive carcinoma in-situ, were tested for the presence of DNA...... sequences of two viruses with known transforming abilities, human papillomavirus (HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used. In none of the 19 successfully amplified samples were DNA sequences of HPV type 16 or type 18 detected. In six cases a faint trace...... that a significant direct involvement of HPV and EBV in human testicular germ cell carcinogenesis is unlikely. However, a putative growth-stimulating role of EBV-transformed lymphocytes, which are frequently present in the stromal tissues of testicular tumours, cannot be excluded....

  5. Detection of human papillomavirus in laryngeal lesions by in situ hybridization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Multhaupt, H A; Fessler, J N; Warhol, M J

    1994-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with human neoplasms of squamous epithelium. Squamous papillomas and verrucous carcinomas are two types of squamous neoplasms of the larynx that present difficult problems in differential diagnosis. Using in situ hybridization with biotinylated DNA probes...... carcinomas contained demonstrable HPV (none of 11). Some of the squamous papillomas were recurrences, which shows the persistence of the virus. These results indicate that laryngeal papillomas may be related to HPV, but verrucous carcinomas are not......., we examined benign squamous papillomas and verrucous squamous carcinomas of the larynx for the presence of HPV. Forty-two biopsy specimens from 18 patients with laryngeal papillomas and 11 biopsy specimens from seven patients with verrucous carcinomas were obtained from the files of Pennsylvania...

  6. Impact of computerized pre-authorization of broad spectrum antibiotics in Pseudomonas aeruginosa at a children's hospital in Japan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horikoshi, Yuho; Higuchi, Hiroshi; Suwa, Junichi; Isogai, Mihoko; Shoji, Takayo; Ito, Kenta

    2016-08-01

    The spread of antimicrobial-resistant organisms is a global concern. To stem this tide, an antimicrobial stewardship program at hospitals is essential to optimize the prescription of broad spectrum antibiotics. In this study we examined the impact of computerized pre-authorization for broad spectrum antibiotics for Pseudomonas aeruginosa at a children's hospital. An antimicrobial stewardship program at Tokyo Metropolitan Children's Medical Center was assessed between March 2010 and March 2015. A paper-based post-prescription audit was switched to computerized pre-authorization for broad antipseudomonal agents in October 2011. The prescriber was required to obtain approval from physicians in the pediatric infectious diseases division before prescribing restricted antimicrobial agents. Approved prescriptions were processed and logged electronically. We evaluated days of therapy per 1000 patient-days, the cost of antibiotics, and the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to piperacillin, ceftazidime, cefepime, piperacillin/tazobactam, carbapenems, and ciprofloxacin. Also, the average length of admission and infection-related mortality at 30 days were compared pre- and post-intervention. Administration of carbapenems, piperacillin/tazobactam, and ceftazidime decreased significantly after the introduction of computerized pre-authorization. Antibiotic costs were reduced by JPY2.86 million (USD 26,000) annually. None of the antipseudomonal agents showed decreased sensitivity. The average length of admission was shorter in post-intervention. Infection-related mortality at 30 days showed no difference between the pre- and post-intervention periods. An antimicrobial stewardship program using computerized pre-authorization decreased the use and cost of broad spectrum antibiotics without significant difference in infection-related mortality at 30 days, although our study did not improve susceptibilities of P. aeruginosa. Copyright © 2016 Japanese Society of Chemotherapy and The

  7. High-risk human papillomavirus and cervical lesions among women living with HIV/AIDS in Brazilian Amazon, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Leila da; Miranda, Angélica; Batalha, Rosieny; Ferreira, Luiz; Santos, Mayara; Talhari, Sinésio

    2015-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the prevalence of human papillomavirus infection infection and cervical lesions and its associated factors among HIV infected women attending an AIDS clinic in Amazonas state, Brazil. Cross-sectional study. Women attending an AIDS clinic in the city of Manaus between March and December 2011 for gynecological examination were invited to participate. Enrolled patients answered a standardized interview including demographical, behavioral, and clinical data. Additionally, patients underwent a gynecological evaluation with collection of cervical samples for cytological analysis and high-risk human papillomavirus infection hybrid capture. A blood sample was also obtained to determine CD4 and viral load levels. A total of 310 (82.9%) women participated in the study. High-risk human papillomavirus infection was detected in 191 (61.6%) cases; 24 (13.5%) had low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (SIL) and 4 (2.2%) high-grade SIL. No invasive cervical cancer was diagnosed. Median age was 32 (interquartile range (IQR): 27-38) years and median of education was 8.5 (IQR 4-11) years of schooling and 56.1% had a monthly income up to US$180. In multivariate analysis, being less than 30 years old [OR=1.7 (95% CI: 1.2-2.4, p=0.005)], high-grade SIL [OR=6.5 (95% CI: 1.6-23.0, p=0.009)], and CD4 counts <200cells/mm(3) [OR=1.6 (95% CI: 1.2-2.0, p<0.001)] were associated with high risk human papillomavirus infection infection. In the present study high-risk human papillomavirus infection was frequent and it was associated to high-SIL. These results show the importance of gynecologic examinations in routine care and follow-up required by those who present with cervical lesions. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Human papillomavirus-mediated carcinogenesis and HPV-associated oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. Part 2: Human papillomavirus associated oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khammissa Razia AG

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Human papillomavirus (HPV infection of the mouth and oropharynx can be acquired by a variety of sexual and social forms of transmission. HPV-16 genotype is present in many oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomata. It has an essential aetiologic role in the development of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in a subset of subjects who are typically younger, are more engaged with high-risk sexual behaviour, have higher HPV-16 serum antibody titer, use less tobacco and have better survival rates than in subjects with HPV-cytonegative oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. In this subset of subjects the HPV-cytopositive carcinomatous cells have a distinct molecular profile. In contrast to HPV-cytopositive oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma, the causal association between HPV-16 and other high-risk HPV genotypes and squamous cell carcinoma of the oral mucosa is weak, and the nature of the association is unclear. It is likely that routine administration of HPV vaccination against high-risk HPV genotypes before the start of sexual activity will bring about a reduction in the incidence of HPV-mediated oral and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma. This article focuses on aspects of HPV infection of the mouth and the oropharynx with emphasis on the link between HPV and squamous cell carcinoma, and on the limitations of the available diagnostic tests in identifying a cause-and-effect relationship of HPV with squamous cell carcinoma of the mouth and oropharynx.

  9. AHNS series: Do you know your guidelines? Management of head and neck cancer in the era of human papillomavirus: Educating our patients on human papillomavirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Theresa; Goldenberg, David; Fakhry, Carole

    2017-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has changed the face of head and neck cancer over the past 2 decades. No longer is this solely a disease of older patients with a history of heavy tobacco and alcohol use. Patients with HPV-related head and neck cancers tend to be younger, healthier, and have an improved prognosis, compared with those with HPV-negative tumors. As more patients are diagnosed with HPV-related head and neck cancer, physicians have important topics to consider. These include prevalence, transmission, and natural history of HPV, the role of screening, vaccines, and HPV testing in head and neck cancer. This article continues a series developed by the American Head and Neck Society's Education Committee entitled "Do you know your guidelines?" and is intended to provide guidance for navigating common questions and concerns patients may have about HPV infection and HPV-related head and neck cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck 39: 833-839, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Designing a polytope for use in a broad-spectrum dengue virus vaccine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karimatul Himmah, M.Si

    2018-04-01

    virus. The results of this study suggest that this polytope warrants further development for use in a broad-spectrum vaccine against dengue virus. الكلمات المفتاحية: حمى الضنك, أجسام مضادة محايدة على نطاق واسع, بوليتوب, نمط غير متجانس, بقايا, Keywords: bnAbs, Dengue, Heterotype, Polytope, Residue

  11. Knowledge, attitudes, and perception towards human papillomavirus among university students in Pakistan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tahir Mehmood Khan

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available This cross-sectional study comprises a questionnaire-based survey regarding knowledge about human papillomavirus and its vaccine among students in different educational fields at public and private universities in the city of Lahore in Pakistan. A 26-item questionnaire was used to attain the objective of this study. The reliability of this tool was assessed using Cronbach's alpha (0.79 and the Kaiser-Meyer-Olkin value was 0.827. The response rate to the survey was 78.0%, of whom the majority (74.9% were females and 308 (79% were single (median age=23 years. While assessing the respondents' knowledge about HPV, 223(57% students reported that they had already heard of HPV (human papillomavirus and nearly 215 (55% reported that HPV causes cervical cancer and can infect both men and women. Gender and field of study were two main factors found influencing the respondents' knowledge about HPV. Moreover, students' understanding about the mode of transmission of HPV was cursory: 40.51% said they did not know how HPV is transmitted, 133 (34.10% stated that HPV spreads through the exchange of bodily fluids, and 22 (5.64% selected cough/sneezing. In terms of prevention, 175 (44.87% students stated that HPV can be prevented by vaccination, 30.0% reported sexual abstinence, 21.54% using condoms, and nearly 5.38% disclosed use of antibiotics. Addressing the knowledge of students regarding HPV vaccine, nearly 53% stated there is no vaccine against HPV and almost 64% rejected the statement that HPV vaccine prevents cervical cancer. In addition, students reported that they will be more than willing to get vaccinated for HPV if their physician recommend them (RII=0.74 followed by parents (RII=0.69. The results of this study revealed a poor understanding among respondents about the health problems associated with HPV, its prevention, modes of transmission and arability of HPV vaccine in Pakistan. Keywords: Human papillomavirus, Vaccine, Knowledge, Attitude

  12. Minor Capsid Protein L2 Polytope Induces Broad Protection against Oncogenic and Mucosal Human Papillomaviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouyanfard, Somayeh; Spagnoli, Gloria; Bulli, Lorenzo; Balz, Kathrin; Yang, Fan; Odenwald, Caroline; Seitz, Hanna; Mariz, Filipe C; Bolchi, Angelo; Ottonello, Simone; Müller, Martin

    2018-02-15

    The amino terminus of the human papillomavirus (HPV) minor capsid protein L2 contains a major cross-neutralization epitope which provides the basis for the development of a broadly protecting HPV vaccine. A wide range of protection against different HPV types would eliminate one of the major drawbacks of the commercial, L1-based prophylactic vaccines. Previously, we have reported that insertion of the L2 epitope into a scaffold composed of bacterial thioredoxin protein generates a potent antigen inducing comprehensive protection against different animal and human papillomaviruses. We also reported, however, that although protection is broad, some oncogenic HPV types escape the neutralizing antibody response, if L2 epitopes from single HPV types are used as immunogen. We were able to compensate for this by applying a mix of thioredoxin proteins carrying L2 epitopes from HPV16, -31, and -51. As the development of a cost-efficient HPV prophylactic vaccines is one of our objectives, this approach is not feasible as it requires the development of multiple good manufacturing production processes in combination with a complex vaccine formulation. Here, we report the development of a thermostable thioredoxin-based single-peptide vaccine carrying an L2 polytope of up to 11 different HPV types. The L2 polytope antigens have excellent abilities in respect to broadness of protection and robustness of induced immune responses. To further increase immunogenicity, we fused the thioredoxin L2 polytope antigen with a heptamerization domain. In the final vaccine design, we achieve protective responses against all 14 oncogenic HPV types that we have analyzed plus the low-risk HPVs 6 and 11 and a number of cutaneous HPVs. IMPORTANCE Infections by a large number of human papillomaviruses lead to malignant and nonmalignant disease. Current commercial vaccines based on virus-like particles (VLPs) effectively protect against some HPV types but fail to do so for most others. Further, only

  13. Identification of a Novel Human Papillomavirus by Metagenomic Analysis of Samples from Patients with Febrile Respiratory Illness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mokili, John L.; Dutilh, Bas E.; Lim, Yan Wei; Schneider, Bradley S.; Taylor, Travis; Haynes, Matthew R.; Metzgar, David; Myers, Christopher A.; Blair, Patrick J.; Nosrat, Bahador; Wolfe, Nathan D.; Rohwer, Forest

    2013-01-01

    As part of a virus discovery investigation using a metagenomic approach, a highly divergent novel Human papillomavirus type was identified in pooled convenience nasal/oropharyngeal swab samples collected from patients with febrile respiratory illness. Phylogenetic analysis of the whole genome and the L1 gene reveals that the new HPV identified in this study clusters with previously described gamma papillomaviruses, sharing only 61.1% (whole genome) and 63.1% (L1) sequence identity with its closest relative in the Papillomavirus episteme (PAVE) database. This new virus was named HPV_SD2 pending official classification. The complete genome of HPV-SD2 is 7,299 bp long (36.3% G/C) and contains 7 open reading frames (L2, L1, E6, E7, E1, E2 and E4) and a non-coding long control region (LCR) between L1 and E6. The metagenomic procedures, coupled with the bioinformatic methods described herein are well suited to detect small circular genomes such as those of human papillomaviruses. PMID:23554892

  14. Identification of a novel human papillomavirus by metagenomic analysis of samples from patients with febrile respiratory illness.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John L Mokili

    Full Text Available As part of a virus discovery investigation using a metagenomic approach, a highly divergent novel Human papillomavirus type was identified in pooled convenience nasal/oropharyngeal swab samples collected from patients with febrile respiratory illness. Phylogenetic analysis of the whole genome and the L1 gene reveals that the new HPV identified in this study clusters with previously described gamma papillomaviruses, sharing only 61.1% (whole genome and 63.1% (L1 sequence identity with its closest relative in the Papillomavirus episteme (PAVE database. This new virus was named HPV_SD2 pending official classification. The complete genome of HPV-SD2 is 7,299 bp long (36.3% G/C and contains 7 open reading frames (L2, L1, E6, E7, E1, E2 and E4 and a non-coding long control region (LCR between L1 and E6. The metagenomic procedures, coupled with the bioinformatic methods described herein are well suited to detect small circular genomes such as those of human papillomaviruses.

  15. Kallikrein-8 Proteolytically Processes Human Papillomaviruses in the Extracellular Space To Facilitate Entry into Host Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cerqueira, Carla; Samperio Ventayol, Pilar; Vogeley, Christian; Schelhaas, Mario

    2015-07-01

    The entry of human papillomaviruses into host cells is a complex process. It involves conformational changes at the cell surface, receptor switching, internalization by a novel endocytic mechanism, uncoating in endosomes, trafficking of a subviral complex to the Golgi complex, and nuclear entry during mitosis. Here, we addressed how the stabilizing contacts in the capsid of human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) may be reversed to allow uncoating of the viral genome. Using biochemical and cell-biological analyses, we determined that the major capsid protein L1 underwent proteolytic cleavage during entry. In addition to a dispensable cathepsin-mediated proteolysis that occurred likely after removal of capsomers from the subviral complex in endosomes, at least two further proteolytic cleavages of L1 were observed, one of which was independent of the low-pH environment of endosomes. This cleavage occurred extracellularly. Further analysis showed that the responsible protease was the secreted trypsin-like serine protease kallikrein-8 (KLK8) involved in epidermal homeostasis and wound healing. Required for infection, the cleavage was facilitated by prior interaction of viral particles with heparan sulfate proteoglycans. KLK8-mediated cleavage was crucial for further conformational changes exposing an important epitope of the minor capsid protein L2. Occurring independently of cyclophilins and of furin that mediate L2 exposure, KLK8-mediated cleavage of L1 likely facilitated access to L2, located in the capsid lumen, and potentially uncoating. Since HPV6 and HPV18 also required KLK8 for entry, we propose that the KLK8-dependent entry step is conserved. Our analysis of the proteolytic processing of incoming HPV16, an etiological agent of cervical cancer, demonstrated that the capsid is cleaved extracellularly by a serine protease active during wound healing and that this cleavage was crucial for infection. The cleavage of L1 is one of at least four structural alterations that

  16. Isolation and characterization of broad spectrum bacteriophages lytic to Vibrio harveyi from shrimp farms of Kerala, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Surekhamol, I S; Deepa, G D; Somnath Pai, S; Sreelakshmi, B; Varghese, S; Bright Singh, I S

    2014-03-01

    Of 33 phages isolated from various shrimp farms in Kerala, India, six were segregated to have broad spectrum lytic efficiency towards 87 isolates of Vibrio harveyi with cross-infecting potential to a few other important aquaculture pathogens. They were further tested on beneficial aquaculture micro-organisms such as probiotics and nitrifying bacterial consortia and proved to be noninfective. Morphological characterization by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and molecular characterization by RAPD and SDS-PAGE proved them distinct and positioned under Caudovirales belonging to Myoviridae and Siphoviridae. In sustainable aquaculture, application of antibiotics is prohibited to manage vibriosis, including the one caused by Vibrio harveyi. In lieu of antibiotics, an eco-friendly alternative method, phage therapy, is recommended here. To facilitate the same, a set of six broad spectrum V. harveyi phages, as cocktail, has been constituted and characterized based on morphological traits and by employing molecular tools. These phages were also found to infect other aquaculture pathogens belonging to Vibrio and Aeromonas. Subsequent to in vivo trials, they can find application in shrimp hatcheries as prophylactics and therapeutics. © 2013 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  17. Photobiological interactions of blue light and photosynthetic photon flux: effects of monochromatic and broad-spectrum light sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cope, Kevin R; Snowden, M Chase; Bugbee, Bruce

    2014-01-01

    Photosynthesis (Pn) and photomorphogenesis (Pm) are affected by light quality, light intensity and photoperiod. Although blue light (BL) is necessary for normal development, it is less efficient in driving Pn than other wavelengths of photosynthetically active radiation. The effects of BL on Pm are highly species dependent. Here we report the interacting effects of BL and photosynthetic photon flux (PPF) on growth and development of lettuce, radish and pepper. We used light-emitting diode (LED) arrays to provide BL fractions from 11% to 28% under broad-spectrum white LEDs, and from 0.3% to 92% under monochromatic LEDs. All treatments were replicated three times at each of two PPFs (200 and 500 μmol m(-2) s(-1)). Other than light quality, environmental conditions were uniformly maintained across chambers. Regardless of PPF, BL was necessary to prevent shade-avoidance responses in radish and lettuce. For lettuce and radish, increasing BL reduced stem length, and for both species, there were significant interactions of BL with PPF for leaf expansion. Increasing BL reduced petiole length in radish and flower number in pepper. BL minimally affected pepper growth and other developmental parameters. Pepper seedlings were more photobiologically sensitive than older plants. Surprisingly, there were few interactions between monochromatic and broad-spectrum light sources. © 2013 The American Society of Photobiology.

  18. Referral population studies underestimate differences between human papillomavirus assays in primary cervical screening

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, M.; Njor, S.; Lynge, E.

    2017-01-01

    Objective: We studied how representative cytologically abnormal women (“referral populations”) are with respect to uncovering differences between human papillomavirus (HPV) assays in the primary screening where most women are cytologically normal. Methods: A total of 4997 women were tested...... with SurePath® cytology, and Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2), cobas, CLART and APTIMA HPV assays. Women with positive test results were offered a follow-up. For all detected HPV infections and HPV-positive high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (≥CIN2), we studied the distributions of assay-specific signal.......7-31.3), respectively; for APTIMA, S/CO 10.2 (IQR: 5.8-11.3) vs 11.1 (IQR: 9.4-15.5), respectively. Similar patterns were observed for HPV-positive ≥CIN2. The four HPV assays more frequently returned discordant test results in normal than in abnormal cytology. Relative frequency of discordance in detecting HPV...

  19. [Efficiency of human papillomavirus vaccination--estimates based on Dutch cost effectiveness analyses].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westra, Tjalke A; Daemen, Toos; Postma, Maarten J; Wilschut, Jan C

    2009-01-01

    Up to now the turnout for the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programme implemented this year in the Netherlands has been lower than expected. This may be the result of negative publicity and doubts about the efficacy of the vaccination programme. To provide some clarity about the efficacy, this article gives an overview of the cost effectiveness analyses carried out on the introduction of HPV vaccination in the Netherlands. These studies have shown that vaccination of a cohort of 12-year-old girls using the HPV vaccine may ultimately prevent per year 217-421 cases of cervical cancer and 93-173 deaths caused by this disease in the Netherlands. It has also been shown that HPV vaccination is a cost effective strategy and that about 1000 girls must be vaccinated to prevent 1 death. The actual health benefits gained by HPV vaccination are strongly dependent on vaccination coverage. It is therefore important that this remains high (85-100%).

  20. Restriction of human papillomavirus DNA testing in primary cervical screening to women above age 30

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rebolj, Matejka; Njor, Sisse H; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2012-01-01

    Cervical screening with human papillomavirus (HPV) testing is less specific for high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (=CIN3) than cytology. The aim of this systematic review was to determine whether a restriction of HPV testing to women aged at least 30 years would eliminate the problem....... On the basis of the data from randomized controlled trials, we calculated the relative detection of CIN1 and CIN2, and the relative risks of false-positive tests (positive tests without subsequent =CIN3) per age group and trial for HPV testing versus cytology. For women aged at least 30 years in trials...... with a low cytology abnormality rate, detection of CIN1 increased significantly by 50-90% in the two trials with reported data; detection of CIN2 was doubled in three trials; the risks of false-positive HPV tests were also doubled. In trials with a high cytology abnormality rate, these risks were similar...