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Sample records for broad-range pcr cloning

  1. Aggregatibacter aphrophilus infective endocarditis confirmed by broad-range PCR diagnosis: A case report

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    Koji Hirano

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: A rare disease, Aggregatibacter aphrophilus infective endocarditis was successfully treated with surgical repair and appropriate antibiotic therapy. To avoid misdiagnosis, br-PCR testing should be performed in patients with blood culture-negative endocarditis.

  2. Broad-Range Detection of Microorganisms Directly from Bronchoalveolar Lavage Specimens by PCR/Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullberg, Måns; Lüthje, Petra; Mölling, Paula; Strålin, Kristoffer

    2017-01-01

    The clinical demand on rapid microbiological diagnostic is constantly increasing. PCR coupled to electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, PCR/ESI-MS, offers detection and identification of over 750 bacteria and Candida species directly from clinical specimens within 6 hours. In this study, we investigated the clinical performance of the IRIDICA BAC LRT Assay for detection of bacterial pathogens in 121 bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples that were received consecutively at our bacterial laboratory for BAL culture. Commensal or pathogenic microorganisms were detected in 118/121 (98%) BAL samples by PCR/ESI-MS, while in 104/121 (86%) samples by routine culture (PPCR/ESI-MS was evaluated in comparison with conventional culture-based or molecular methods. The agreement between positive findings was overall good. Most Staphylococcus aureus-positive PCR/ESI-MS results were confirmed by culture or species-specific PCR (27/33, 82%). The identity of Streptococcus pneumoniae could however be confirmed for only 6/17 (35%) PCR/ESI-MS-positive samples. Non-cultivable and fastidious pathogens, which were not covered by standard culture procedures were readily detected by PCR/ESI-MS, including Legionella pneumophila, Bordetella pertussis, Norcadia species and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. In conclusion, PCR/ESI-MS detected a broad range of potential pathogens with equal or superior sensitivity compared to conventional methods within few hours directly from BAL samples. This novel method might thus provide a relevant tool for diagnostics in critically ill patients. PMID:28085931

  3. Broad-Range Detection of Microorganisms Directly from Bronchoalveolar Lavage Specimens by PCR/Electrospray Ionization-Mass Spectrometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Måns Ullberg

    Full Text Available The clinical demand on rapid microbiological diagnostic is constantly increasing. PCR coupled to electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry, PCR/ESI-MS, offers detection and identification of over 750 bacteria and Candida species directly from clinical specimens within 6 hours. In this study, we investigated the clinical performance of the IRIDICA BAC LRT Assay for detection of bacterial pathogens in 121 bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL samples that were received consecutively at our bacterial laboratory for BAL culture. Commensal or pathogenic microorganisms were detected in 118/121 (98% BAL samples by PCR/ESI-MS, while in 104/121 (86% samples by routine culture (P<0.01. Detection of potentially pathogenic microorganisms by PCR/ESI-MS was evaluated in comparison with conventional culture-based or molecular methods. The agreement between positive findings was overall good. Most Staphylococcus aureus-positive PCR/ESI-MS results were confirmed by culture or species-specific PCR (27/33, 82%. The identity of Streptococcus pneumoniae could however be confirmed for only 6/17 (35% PCR/ESI-MS-positive samples. Non-cultivable and fastidious pathogens, which were not covered by standard culture procedures were readily detected by PCR/ESI-MS, including Legionella pneumophila, Bordetella pertussis, Norcadia species and Mycoplasma pneumoniae. In conclusion, PCR/ESI-MS detected a broad range of potential pathogens with equal or superior sensitivity compared to conventional methods within few hours directly from BAL samples. This novel method might thus provide a relevant tool for diagnostics in critically ill patients.

  4. Inverse fusion PCR cloning.

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    Markus Spiliotis

    Full Text Available Inverse fusion PCR cloning (IFPC is an easy, PCR based three-step cloning method that allows the seamless and directional insertion of PCR products into virtually all plasmids, this with a free choice of the insertion site. The PCR-derived inserts contain a vector-complementary 5'-end that allows a fusion with the vector by an overlap extension PCR, and the resulting amplified insert-vector fusions are then circularized by ligation prior transformation. A minimal amount of starting material is needed and experimental steps are reduced. Untreated circular plasmid, or alternatively bacteria containing the plasmid, can be used as templates for the insertion, and clean-up of the insert fragment is not urgently required. The whole cloning procedure can be performed within a minimal hands-on time and results in the generation of hundreds to ten-thousands of positive colonies, with a minimal background.

  5. Disclosing respiratory coinfections: a Broad-Range Panel Assay for Avian Respiratory Pathogens on a Nanofluidic PCR Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Croville, Guillaume; Foret, Charlotte; Heuillard, Pauline; Senet, Alexis; Delpont, Mattias; Mouahid, Mohammed; Ducatez, Mariette F; Kichou, Faouzi; Guerin, Jean-Luc

    2018-01-19

    Respiratory syndromes (RS) are among the most significant pathological conditions in food animals and are caused by complex coactions of pathogens and environmental factors. In poultry, low pathogenic avian Influenza A viruses, metapneumoviruses, infectious bronchitis virus, infectious laryngotracheitis virus, Mycoplasma spp. Escherichia coli and/or Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale (ORT) in turkeys, are considered as key co-infectious agents of respiratory syndromes. Aspergillus sp., Pasteurella multocida, Avibacterium paragallinarum or Chlamydia psittaci may also be involved in respiratory outbreaks. An innovative quantitative PCR method, based on a nanofluidic technology, has the ability to screen up to 96 samples with 96 pathogen-specific PCR primers, at the same time, in one run of real-time quantitative PCR (RTqPCR). This platform was used for the screening of avian respiratory pathogens: 15 respiratory agents, including viruses, bacteria and fungi potentially associated with respiratory infections of poultry were targeted. Primers were designed and validated for SYBR green RTqPCR and subsequently validated on the Biomark high throughput PCR nanofluidic platform (Fluidigm©). As a clinical assessment, tracheal swabs were sampled on turkeys showing respiratory syndromes and submitted to this panel assay. Beside systematic detection of E. coli, avian metapneumovirus, Mycoplasma gallisepticum and M. synoviae were frequently detected, with distinctive co-infection patterns between French and Moroccan flocks. This proof-of-concept study illustrates the potential of such panel assay for unveiling respiratory co-infections profiles in poultry.

  6. Time window for positive cerebrospinal fluid broad-range bacterial PCR and Streptococcus pneumoniae immunochromatographic test in acute bacterial meningitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brink, Magnus; Welinder-Olsson, Christina; Hagberg, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Reliable microbiological tests are essential for the diagnosis of acute bacterial meningitis (ABM). In this study we investigated the time period after the start of antibiotic therapy during which culture, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and the immunochromatographic test (ICT) are able to detect bacteria in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). The study was performed on CSF samples from adults with ABM admitted to the Department of Infectious Diseases, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, Gothenburg, Sweden, from January 2007 to April 2014. In addition to the initial lumbar puncture (LP), the participants underwent one or two more LPs during 10 days following the start of antibiotics. The analyses performed on the CSF samples were culture, PCR and ICT. The study comprised 70 CSF samples from 25 patients with ABM. A bacterium could be identified by CSF culture in 44%, by blood culture in 58% and by PCR in 100% of the patients. There were no positive CSF cultures in samples taken later than the day of starting antibiotics. PCR was positive in 89% on days 1-3, 70% on days 4-6 and 33% on days 7-10. For cases of pneumococcal meningitis, the ICT was positive in 88% on days 1-3, 90% on days 4-6 and 75% on days 7-10. This study shows that PCR is highly sensitive for bacterial detection in CSF samples taken up to 1 week into antibiotic therapy. The ICT is highly sensitive for the detection of pneumococci in CSF samples taken during the first week of antibiotic treatment.

  7. Comparison of broad range 16S rDNA PCR and conventional blood culture for diagnosis of sepsis in the newborn: a case control study

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    Nakstad Britt

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early onset bacterial sepsis is a feared complication of the newborn. A large proportion of infants admitted to the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU for suspected sepsis receive treatment with potent systemic antibiotics while a diagnostic workup is in progress. The gold standard for detecting bacterial sepsis is blood culture. However, as pathogens in blood cultures are only detected in approximately 25% of patients, the sensitivity of blood culture is suspected to be low. Therefore, the diagnosis of sepsis is often based on the development of clinical signs, in combination with laboratory tests such as a rise in C – reactive protein (CRP. Molecular assays for the detection of bacterial DNA in the blood represent possible new diagnostic tools for early identification of a bacterial cause. Methods A broad range 16S rDNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR without preincubation was compared to conventional diagnostic work up for clinical sepsis, including BACTEC blood culture, for early determination of bacterial sepsis in the newborn. In addition, the relationship between known risk factors, clinical signs, and laboratory parameters considered in clinical sepsis in the newborn were explored. Results Forty-eight infants with suspected sepsis were included in this study. Thirty-one patients were diagnosed with sepsis, only 6 of these had a positive blood culture. 16S rDNA PCR analysis of blinded blood samples from the 48 infants revealed 10 samples positive for the presence of bacterial DNA. PCR failed to be positive in 2 samples from blood culture positive infants, and was positive in 1 sample where a diagnosis of a non-septic condition was established. Compared to blood culture the diagnosis of bacterial proven sepsis by PCR revealed a 66.7% sensitivity, 87.5% specificity, 95.4% positive and 75% negative predictive value. PCR combined with blood culture revealed bacteria in 35.1% of the patients diagnosed with sepsis

  8. An rRT-PCR assay to detect the matrix gene of a broad range of avian paramyxovirus serotype-1 strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hines, Nichole L; Killian, Mary Lea; Pedersen, Janice C; Reising, Monica M; Mosos, Nestor A; Mathieu-Benson, Christian; Miller, Cathy L

    2012-06-01

    The current U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA)-validated real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (rRT-PCR) assay designed to detect the matrix gene of avian paramyxovirus serotype-1 (APMV-1) is the primary screening assay used in the United States. It has previously been shown to be unable to consistently detect all members of class I APMV-1. Diagnostic testing relies on rRT-PCR to quickly detect APMV-1 in wild birds, backyard flocks, live bird markets, commercial poultry, and for export testing. Limitations of the current USDA assay have raised concerns about the potential for some strains of APMV-1 to remain undetected by the primary screening assay. Mismatches in the probe were shown to cause a loss in template binding efficiency, resulting in lack of detection by the assay. Here, we describe the development and analytical validation of a new rRT-PCR assay designed to target a highly conserved region of the matrix gene across a wide range of APMV-1 strains. Limit of detection testing revealed a 3 log10 decrease in sensitivity for one low-virulence strain when compared to the USDA validated assay. Conversely, the assay showed increased sensitivity for a class I isolate and two virulent strains of APMV-1 that were not detected by the USDA-validated assay. The new assay also demonstrated a high degree of specificity by the lack of detection of 43 non-APMV-1 viruses.

  9. Comparison of two commercial broad-range PCR and sequencing assays for identification of bacteria in culture-negative clinical samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stavnsbjerg, Camilla; Frimodt-Møller, Niels; Moser, Claus; Bjarnsholt, Thomas

    2017-03-27

    Culturing has long been the gold standard for detecting aetiologic agents in bacterial infections. In some cases, however, culturing fails to detect the infection. To further investigate culture-negative samples, amplification and subsequent sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene is often applied. The aim of the present study was to compare the current method used at our Department of Clinical Microbiology, based on the MicroSeq ID system (Applied Biosystems, USA) with the Universal Microbe Detection (UMD) SelectNA kit (Molzym, Germany). 76 culture-negative samples were first processed with the MicroSeq ID analysis, where total DNA was extracted and the 16S gene amplified and sequenced with the MicroSeq ID system. Samples were subsequently processed with the UMD SelectNA analysis, where human DNA was removed during the DNA extraction procedure and the 16S gene amplified in a real-time PCR and sequenced. 22 of 76 samples (28.9%) were positive for bacteria with the UMD SelectNA, which was significantly more (p = 0.0055) than the MicroSeq ID where 11 of 76 samples (14.5%) were positive. The UMD SelectNA assay identified more relevant bacterial pathogens than the MicroSeq ID analysis (p = 0.0233), but also found a number of species that were considered contaminations. The UMD SelectNA assay was valuable for the identification of pathogens in culture-negative samples; however, due to the sensitive nature of the assay, extreme care is suggested in order to avoid false positives.

  10. Development of a Broad-Range 23S rDNA Real-Time PCR Assay for the Detection and Quantification of Pathogenic Bacteria in Human Whole Blood and Plasma Specimens

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    Paolo Gaibani

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Molecular methods are important tools in the diagnosis of bloodstream bacterial infections, in particular in patients treated with antimicrobial therapy, due to their quick turn-around time. Here we describe a new broad-range real-time PCR targeting the 23S rDNA gene and capable to detect as low as 10 plasmid copies per reaction of targeted bacterial 23S rDNA gene. Two commercially available DNA extraction kits were evaluated to assess their efficiency for the extraction of plasma and whole blood samples spiked with different amount of either Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli, in order to find the optimal extraction method to be used. Manual QIAmp extraction method with enzyme pre-treatment resulted the most sensitive for detection of bacterial load. Sensitivity of this novel assay ranged between 10 and 103 CFU per PCR reaction for E. coli and S. aureus in human whole blood samples depending on the extraction methods used. Analysis of plasma samples showed a 10- to 100-fold reduction of bacterial 23S rDNA in comparison to the corresponding whole blood specimens, thus indicating that whole blood is the preferential sample type to be used in this real-time PCR protocol. Our results thus show that the 23S rDNA gene represents an optimal target for bacteria quantification in human whole blood.

  11. Development of a broad-range 23S rDNA real-time PCR assay for the detection and quantification of pathogenic bacteria in human whole blood and plasma specimens.

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    Gaibani, Paolo; Mariconti, Mara; Bua, Gloria; Bonora, Sonia; Sassera, Davide; Landini, Maria Paola; Mulatto, Patrizia; Novati, Stefano; Bandi, Claudio; Sambri, Vittorio

    2013-01-01

    Molecular methods are important tools in the diagnosis of bloodstream bacterial infections, in particular in patients treated with antimicrobial therapy, due to their quick turn-around time. Here we describe a new broad-range real-time PCR targeting the 23S rDNA gene and capable to detect as low as 10 plasmid copies per reaction of targeted bacterial 23S rDNA gene. Two commercially available DNA extraction kits were evaluated to assess their efficiency for the extraction of plasma and whole blood samples spiked with different amount of either Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli, in order to find the optimal extraction method to be used. Manual QIAmp extraction method with enzyme pre-treatment resulted the most sensitive for detection of bacterial load. Sensitivity of this novel assay ranged between 10 and 10(3) CFU per PCR reaction for E. coli and S. aureus in human whole blood samples depending on the extraction methods used. Analysis of plasma samples showed a 10- to 100-fold reduction of bacterial 23S rDNA in comparison to the corresponding whole blood specimens, thus indicating that whole blood is the preferential sample type to be used in this real-time PCR protocol. Our results thus show that the 23S rDNA gene represents an optimal target for bacteria quantification in human whole blood.

  12. Diagnostic utility of broad range bacterial 16S rRNA gene PCR with degradation of human and free bacterial DNA in bloodstream infection is more sensitive than an in-house developed PCR without degradation of human and free bacterial DNA.

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    Rogina, Petra; Skvarc, Miha; Stubljar, David; Kofol, Romina; Kaasch, Achim

    2014-01-01

    We compared a commercial broad range 16S rRNA gene PCR assay (SepsiTest) to an in-house developed assay (IHP). We assessed whether CD64 index, a biomarker of bacterial infection, can be used to exclude patients with a low probability of systemic bacterial infection. From January to March 2010, 23 patients with suspected sepsis were enrolled. CD64 index, procalcitonin, and C-reactive protein were measured on admission. Broad range 16S rRNA gene PCR was performed from whole blood (SepsiTest) or blood plasma (IHP) and compared to blood culture results. Blood samples spiked with Staphylococcus aureus were used to assess sensitivity of the molecular assays in vitro. CD64 index was lower in patients where possible sepsis was excluded than in patients with microbiologically confirmed sepsis (P = 0.004). SepsiTest identified more relevant pathogens than blood cultures (P = 0.008); in three patients (13%) results from blood culture and SepsiTest were congruent, whereas in four cases (17.4%) relevant pathogens were detected by SepsiTest only. In vitro spiking experiments suggested equal sensitivity of SepsiTest and IHP. A diagnostic algorithm using CD64 index as a decision maker to perform SepsiTest shows improved detection of pathogens in patients with suspected blood stream infection and may enable earlier targeted antibiotic therapy.

  13. Diagnostic Utility of Broad Range Bacterial 16S rRNA Gene PCR with Degradation of Human and Free Bacterial DNA in Bloodstream Infection Is More Sensitive Than an In-House Developed PCR without Degradation of Human and Free Bacterial DNA

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    Petra Rogina

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We compared a commercial broad range 16S rRNA gene PCR assay (SepsiTest to an in-house developed assay (IHP. We assessed whether CD64 index, a biomarker of bacterial infection, can be used to exclude patients with a low probability of systemic bacterial infection. From January to March 2010, 23 patients with suspected sepsis were enrolled. CD64 index, procalcitonin, and C-reactive protein were measured on admission. Broad range 16S rRNA gene PCR was performed from whole blood (SepsiTest or blood plasma (IHP and compared to blood culture results. Blood samples spiked with Staphylococcus aureus were used to assess sensitivity of the molecular assays in vitro. CD64 index was lower in patients where possible sepsis was excluded than in patients with microbiologically confirmed sepsis (P=0.004. SepsiTest identified more relevant pathogens than blood cultures (P=0.008; in three patients (13% results from blood culture and SepsiTest were congruent, whereas in four cases (17.4% relevant pathogens were detected by SepsiTest only. In vitro spiking experiments suggested equal sensitivity of SepsiTest and IHP. A diagnostic algorithm using CD64 index as a decision maker to perform SepsiTest shows improved detection of pathogens in patients with suspected blood stream infection and may enable earlier targeted antibiotic therapy.

  14. pPCV, a versatile vector for cloning PCR products

    OpenAIRE

    Janner, Christiane R; Brito, Ana L?via P; Moraes, Lidia Maria P; Reis, Viviane CB; Torres, Fernando AG

    2013-01-01

    The efficiency of PCR product cloning depends on the nature of the DNA polymerase employed because amplicons may have blunt-ends or 3? adenosines overhangs. Therefore, for amplicon cloning, available commercial vectors are either blunt-ended or have a single 3? overhanging thymidine. The aim of this work was to offer in a single vector the ability to clone both types of PCR products. For that purpose, a minimal polylinker was designed to include restriction sites for EcoRV and XcmI which enab...

  15. pPCV, a versatile vector for cloning PCR products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janner, Christiane R; Brito, Ana Lívia P; Moraes, Lidia Maria P; Reis, Viviane Cb; Torres, Fernando Ag

    2013-01-01

    The efficiency of PCR product cloning depends on the nature of the DNA polymerase employed because amplicons may have blunt-ends or 3' adenosines overhangs. Therefore, for amplicon cloning, available commercial vectors are either blunt-ended or have a single 3' overhanging thymidine. The aim of this work was to offer in a single vector the ability to clone both types of PCR products. For that purpose, a minimal polylinker was designed to include restriction sites for EcoRV and XcmI which enable direct cloning of amplicons bearing blunt-ends or A-overhangs, respectively, still offering blue/white selection. When tested, the resulting vector, pPCV, presented high efficiency cloning of both types of amplicons.

  16. SVSVGMKPSPRP: a broad range adhesion peptide.

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    Estephan, Elias; Dao, Jérôme; Saab, Marie-Belle; Panayotov, Ivan; Martin, Marta; Larroque, Christian; Gergely, Csilla; Cuisinier, Frédéric J G; Levallois, Bernard

    2012-12-01

    A combinatorial phage display approach was previously used to evolve a 12-mer peptide (SVSVGMKPSPRP) with the highest affinity for different semiconductor surfaces. The discovery of the multiple occurrences of the SVSVGMKPSPRP sequence in an all-against-all basic local alignment search tool search of PepBank sequences was unexpected, and a Google search using the peptide sequence recovered 58 results concerning 12 patents and 16 scientific publications. The number of patent and articles indicates that the peptide is perhaps a broad range adhesion peptide. To evaluate peptide properties, we conducted a study to investigate peptide adhesion on different inorganic substrates by mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy for gold, carbon nanotubes, cobalt, chrome alloy, titanium, and titanium alloy substrates. Our results showed that the peptide has a great potential as a linker to functionalize metallic surfaces if specificity is not a key factor. This peptide is not specific to a particular metal surface, but it is a good linker for the functionalization of a wide range of metallic materials. The fact that this peptide has the potential to adsorb on a large set of inorganic surfaces suggests novel promising directions for further investigation. Affinity determination of SVSVGMKPSPRP peptide would be an important issue for eventual commercial uses.

  17. PCR cloning protocols [Methods in molecular biology, v. 192

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Janes, Harry W; Chen, Bing-Yuan

    2002-01-01

    .... The techniques bring to both new and established researchers the power to apply PCR-based methodology to the cloning and modification of DNA, either through innovative protocols or by fostering individual creativity to modify and customize the protocols to best fit their own needs" [publisher's web site].

  18. Exponential megapriming PCR (EMP cloning--seamless DNA insertion into any target plasmid without sequence constraints.

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    Alexander Ulrich

    Full Text Available We present a fast, reliable and inexpensive restriction-free cloning method for seamless DNA insertion into any plasmid without sequence limitation. Exponential megapriming PCR (EMP cloning requires two consecutive PCR steps and can be carried out in one day. We show that EMP cloning has a higher efficiency than restriction-free (RF cloning, especially for long inserts above 2.5 kb. EMP further enables simultaneous cloning of multiple inserts.

  19. Simple cloning and DNA assembly in Escherichia coli by prolonged overlap extension PCR.

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    You, Chun; Zhang, Y-H Percival

    2014-01-01

    We developed a simple method (Simple Cloning) for subcloning one, two, or three DNA fragments into any location of a targeted vector without the need for restriction enzyme, ligase, exonuclease, or recombinase. This cloning technology can be applied to a few common Escherichia coli hosts (e.g., BL21(DE3), DH5α, JM109, TOP10). The protocol includes three steps: (a) linear DNA fragments (i.e., the insert DNA and the vector backbone) with two overlap ends were generated by regular high-fidelity PCR, (b) the DNA multimers were generated based on these equimolar DNA templates by using prolonged overlap extension PCR (POE-PCR) without primers added, and (c) the POE-PCR product was transformed to E. coli strains directly. Because positive colony efficiencies are very high, it is not necessary to identify desired clones by using colony PCR. Simple Cloning provides a new cloning and DNA assembly method with great simplicity and flexibility.

  20. FastCloning: a highly simplified, purification-free, sequence- and ligation-independent PCR cloning method

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    Lu Jia

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although a variety of methods and expensive kits are available, molecular cloning can be a time-consuming and frustrating process. Results Here we report a highly simplified, reliable, and efficient PCR-based cloning technique to insert any DNA fragment into a plasmid vector or into a gene (cDNA in a vector at any desired position. With this method, the vector and insert are PCR amplified separately, with only 18 cycles, using a high fidelity DNA polymerase. The amplified insert has the ends with ~16-base overlapping with the ends of the amplified vector. After DpnI digestion of the mixture of the amplified vector and insert to eliminate the DNA templates used in PCR reactions, the mixture is directly transformed into competent E. coli cells to obtain the desired clones. This technique has many advantages over other cloning methods. First, it does not need gel purification of the PCR product or linearized vector. Second, there is no need of any cloning kit or specialized enzyme for cloning. Furthermore, with reduced number of PCR cycles, it also decreases the chance of random mutations. In addition, this method is highly effective and reproducible. Finally, since this cloning method is also sequence independent, we demonstrated that it can be used for chimera construction, insertion, and multiple mutations spanning a stretch of DNA up to 120 bp. Conclusion Our FastCloning technique provides a very simple, effective, reliable, and versatile tool for molecular cloning, chimera construction, insertion of any DNA sequences of interest and also for multiple mutations in a short stretch of a cDNA.

  1. Restriction enzyme body doubles and PCR cloning: on the general use of type IIs restriction enzymes for cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Eszter; Huszár, Krisztina; Bencsura, Petra; Kulcsár, Péter István; Vodicska, Barbara; Nyeste, Antal; Welker, Zsombor; Tóth, Szilvia; Welker, Ervin

    2014-01-01

    The procedure described here allows the cloning of PCR fragments containing a recognition site of the restriction endonuclease (Type IIP) used for cloning in the sequence of the insert. A Type IIS endonuclease--a Body Double of the Type IIP enzyme--is used to generate the same protruding palindrome. Thus, the insert can be cloned to the Type IIP site of the vector without digesting the PCR product with the same Type IIP enzyme. We achieve this by incorporating the recognition site of a Type IIS restriction enzyme that cleaves the DNA outside of its recognition site in the PCR primer in such a way that the cutting positions straddle the desired overhang sequence. Digestion of the PCR product by the Body Double generates the required overhang. Hitherto the use of Type IIS restriction enzymes in cloning reactions has only been used for special applications, the approach presented here makes Type IIS enzymes as useful as Type IIP enzymes for general cloning purposes. To assist in finding Body Double enzymes, we summarised the available Type IIS enzymes which are potentially useful for Body Double cloning and created an online program (http://group.szbk.u-szeged.hu/welkergr/body_double/index.html) for the selection of suitable Body Double enzymes and the design of the appropriate primers.

  2. Optimal Cloning of PCR Fragments by Homologous Recombination in Escherichia coli

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    Jacobus, Ana Paula; Gross, Jeferson

    2015-01-01

    PCR fragments and linear vectors containing overlapping ends are easily assembled into a propagative plasmid by homologous recombination in Escherichia coli. Although this gap-repair cloning approach is straightforward, its existence is virtually unknown to most molecular biologists. To popularize this method, we tested critical parameters influencing the efficiency of PCR fragments cloning into PCR-amplified vectors by homologous recombination in the widely used E. coli strain DH5α. We found that the number of positive colonies after transformation increases with the length of overlap between the PCR fragment and linear vector. For most practical purposes, a 20 bp identity already ensures high-cloning yields. With an insert to vector ratio of 2:1, higher colony forming numbers are obtained when the amount of vector is in the range of 100 to 250 ng. An undesirable cloning background of empty vectors can be minimized during vector PCR amplification by applying a reduced amount of plasmid template or by using primers in which the 5′ termini are separated by a large gap. DpnI digestion of the plasmid template after PCR is also effective to decrease the background of negative colonies. We tested these optimized cloning parameters during the assembly of five independent DNA constructs and obtained 94% positive clones out of 100 colonies probed. We further demonstrated the efficient and simultaneous cloning of two PCR fragments into a vector. These results support the idea that homologous recombination in E. coli might be one of the most effective methods for cloning one or two PCR fragments. For its simplicity and high efficiency, we believe that recombinational cloning in E. coli has a great potential to become a routine procedure in most molecular biology-oriented laboratories. PMID:25774528

  3. Development of a dual-expression vector facilitated with selection-free PCR recombination cloning strategy.

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    Cao, Liting; Zhou, Yancheng; Huang, Lin; Dong, Shiqi; Ma, Yue

    2017-12-01

    The conventional procedure for the construction of recombinant expression vector of a target gene includes PCR cloning and restriction enzyme mediated subcloning, which is time-consuming and sometimes troublesome because of the inefficiency of ligation. A variety of ligase-independent PCR cloning strategies have been developed, but they either involve complicated PCR procedures or need other DNA modifying enzymes. In this study, we report the design, and construction of an omnipotent expression vector pOmni, with which a target gene can be easily cloned through innovative selection-free PCR recombination cloning strategy with only one pair of primer and two times of PCR in one work day, without using any restriction enzymes, ligase and other DNA modifying enzymes. Furthermore, the target gene cloned in pOmni is ready to be high-efficiently expressed in either Escherichia coli cells or eukaryotic cells because of the elaborate design of compatible T7 promoter and CMV promoter expression elements in the vector. The cloning capability and reliability of selection-free PCR recombination cloning with pOmni were validated through cloning of 6 DNA fragments with length from 315 to 4557 bp, and the dual-expression function of the vector was verified through the cloning and expression of EGFP in E. coli BL21 and HeLa cells. pOmni developed in our study provides a powerful tool for gene cloning and expression, and is of special value for researches in which both prokaryotic and eukaryotic expression of a target gene are necessary.

  4. New focal plane detector system for the broad range spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sjoreen, T.P.

    1984-01-01

    A focal plane detector system consisting of a vertical drift chamber, parallel plate avalanche counters, and an ionization chamber with segmented anodes has been installed in the Broad Range Spectrometer at the Holifield Facility at Oak Ridge. The system, which has been designed for use with light-heavy ions with energies ranging from 10 to 25 MeV/amu, has a position resolution of approx. 0.1 mm, a scattering angle resolution of approx. 3 mrad, and a mass resolution of approx. 1/60.

  5. Bifunctional lacZ alpha-ccdB genes for selective cloning of PCR products.

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    Gabant, P; Drèze, P L; Van Reeth, T; Szpirer, J; Szpirer, C

    1997-11-01

    The use of PCR-amplified DNA-fragments is a classical approach to generate recombinant DNA. To facilitate the cloning of PCR products, we have constructed two new pKIL vectors that allow selection of recombinants. The multiple cloning sites (MCS) of these plasmids contain two adjacent Aspel sites and a unique HindII site. Cleavage of these vectors with Aspel produce linearized molecules with a single thymidine nucleotide at the 3' ends allowing TA cloning of Taq-amplified fragments. On the other hand, cleavage with HindII can be used for the cloning of blunt-ended PCR products generated by other DNA polymerases. The LacZ alpha-CcdB fusion protein produced by these plasmids has retained both the CcdB killer activity and the ability to alpha-complement the truncated LacZ delta M15. This bifunctionality allowed us to show that small PCR products (< 1000 bp) that do not disrupt lacZ alpha efficiently do inactivate CcdB, which demonstrates that the CcdB-based selection is well adapted for cloning of PCR products, especially for small size fragments.

  6. PCR

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    sunny

    (5'-. MGATAAGRTGTAATCCW-3') and. (5'-. TGGAAGCCATCATCGACGAAGCCAT-3') were designed to amplify a new partial rbcS gene by PCR. About 400 bp DNA fragment was obtained by PCR. This DNA fragment was cloned into the pMD18-T vector. (TakaRa) for sequencing. Sequence analysis of this DNA fragment.

  7. PCR Cloning of Partial "nbs" Sequences from Grape ("Vitis aestivalis" Michx)

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    Chang, Ming-Mei; DiGennaro, Peter; Macula, Anthony

    2009-01-01

    Plants defend themselves against pathogens via the expressions of disease resistance (R) genes. Many plant R gene products contain the characteristic nucleotide-binding site (NBS) and leucine-rich repeat (LRR) domains. There are highly conserved motifs within the NBS domain which could be targeted for polymerase chain reaction (PCR) cloning of R…

  8. Diagnosis of ventricular drainage-related bacterial meningitis by broad-range real-time polymerase chain reaction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Deutch, Susanna; Dahlberg, Daniel; Hedegaard, Jesper

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare a broad-range real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) diagnostic strategy with culture to evaluate additional effects on the etiological diagnosis and the quantification of the bacterial load during the course of ventricular drainage-related bacterial meningitis (VR...

  9. A new trilocus sequence-based multiplex-PCR to detect major Acinetobacter baumannii clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Natacha; Picão, Renata Cristina; Cerqueira-Alves, Morgana; Uehara, Aline; Barbosa, Lívia Carvalho; Riley, Lee W; Moreira, Beatriz Meurer

    2016-08-01

    A collection of 163 Acinetobacter baumannii isolates detected in a large Brazilian hospital, was potentially related with the dissemination of four clonal complexes (CC): 113/79, 103/15, 109/1 and 110/25, defined by University of Oxford/Institut Pasteur multilocus sequence typing (MLST) schemes. The urge of a simple multiplex-PCR scheme to specify these clones has motivated the present study. The established trilocus sequence-based typing (3LST, for ompA, csuE and blaOXA-51-like genes) multiplex-PCR rapidly identifies international clones I (CC109/1), II (CC118/2) and III (CC187/3). Thus, the system detects only one (CC109/1) out of four main CC in Brazil. We aimed to develop an alternative multiplex-PCR scheme to detect these clones, known to be present additionally in Africa, Asia, Europe, USA and South America. MLST, performed in the present study to complement typing our whole collection of isolates, confirmed that all isolates belonged to the same four CC detected previously. When typed by 3LST-based multiplex-PCR, only 12% of the 163 isolates were classified into groups. By comparative sequence analysis of ompA, csuE and blaOXA-51-like genes, a set of eight primers was designed for an alternative multiplex-PCR to distinguish the five CC 113/79, 103/15, 109/1, 110/25 and 118/2. Study isolates and one CC118/2 isolate were blind-tested with the new alternative PCR scheme; all were correctly clustered in groups of the corresponding CC. The new multiplex-PCR, with the advantage of fitting in a single reaction, detects five leading A. baumannii clones and could help preventing the spread in healthcare settings. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in extrapulmonary biopsy samples using PCR targeting IS6110, rpoB, and nested-rpoB PCR Cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meghdadi, Hossein; Khosravi, Azar D; Ghadiri, Ata A; Sina, Amir H; Alami, Ameneh

    2015-01-01

    Present study was aimed to examine the diagnostic utility of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and nested PCR techniques for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) DNA in samples from patients with extra pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB). In total 80 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples comprising 70 samples with definite diagnosis of EPTB and 10 samples from known non- EPTB on the basis of histopathology examination, were included in the study. PCR amplification targeting IS6110, rpoB gene and nested PCR targeting the rpoB gene were performed on the extracted DNAs from 80 FFPE samples. The strong positive samples were directly sequenced. For negative samples and those with weak band in nested-rpoB PCR, TA cloning was performed by cloning the products into the plasmid vector with subsequent sequencing. The 95% confidence intervals (CI) for the estimates of sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each method. Fourteen (20%), 34 (48.6%), and 60 (85.7%) of the 70 positive samples confirmed by histopathology, were positive by rpoB-PCR, IS6110-PCR, and nested-rpoB PCR, respectively. By performing TA cloning on samples that yielded weak (n = 8) or negative results (n = 10) in the PCR methods, we were able to improve their quality for later sequencing. All samples with weak band and 7 out of 10 negative samples, showed strong positive results after cloning. So nested-rpoB PCR cloning revealed positivity in 67 out of 70 confirmed samples (95.7%). The sensitivity of these combination methods was calculated as 95.7% in comparison with histopathology examination. The CI for sensitivity of the PCR methods were calculated as 11.39-31.27% for rpoB-PCR, 36.44-60.83% for IS6110- PCR, 75.29-92.93% for nested-rpoB PCR, and 87.98-99.11% for nested-rpoB PCR cloning. The 10 true EPTB negative samples by histopathology, were negative by all tested methods including cloning and were used to calculate the specificity of the applied methods. The CI for 100

  11. [Cloning associated genes using microdissection-cDNA PCR-SSH in gastric dysplasia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hao, Dong-mei; Sun, Xiu-ju; Zheng, Zhi-hong; He, Guang; Ma, Ming-chao; Xu, Hui-mian; Wang, Mei-xian; Sun, Kai-lai

    2003-10-01

    To construct cDNA subtracted libraries from gastric dysplasia and further screen differentially expressed genes. Relatively pure dysplasia and normal tissue were procured by manual microdissection, and amplified by cDNA-PCR, which was used to carry on for suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH). Subtracted cDNA fragments were linked with vector, cloned, screened, sequenced, and made homologous search. Differentially expressed fragments were verified by dot hybridization. Two subtracted cDNA libraries were constructed. Among 26 sequenced clones, 15 fragments corresponded to known genes, 3 fragments were known EST and 8 fragments were unknown EST (GenBank BQ164614-BQ164616, BQ291516-BQ291520). Fifteen fragments were verified to be differentially expressed in gastric dysplasia. Subtracted cDNA libraries from gastric dysplasia are constructed using combination of microdissection-cDNA PCR and SSH setup in our laboratory. Some fragments have been screened and verified to help to search for novel associated genes with gastric carcinogenesis.

  12. Human papillomavirus type 70 genome cloned from overlapping PCR products: complete nucleotide sequence and genomic organization.

    OpenAIRE

    Forslund, O; Hansson, B G

    1996-01-01

    The genome of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 70 (HPV 70), isolated from a cervical condyloma, was obtained by cloning overlapping PCR products. By automated DNA sequence analysis, the genome was found to consist of 7,905 bp with a G + C content of 40%. The genomic organization showed the characteristic features shared by other sequenced HPVs. Nucleotide sequence comparison with previously known HPV types demonstrated the closest homology with HPV 68 (82%), HPV 39 (82%), HPV 18 (70%), HPV 45 ...

  13. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in extrapulmonary biopsy samples using PCR targeting IS6110, rpoB and nested-rpoB PCR Cloning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein eMeghdadi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Present study was aimed to examine the diagnostic utility of PCR and nested PCR techniques for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB DNA in samples from patients with extra pulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB. In total 80 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE samples comprising 70 samples with definite diagnosis of EPTB and 10 samples from known non- EPTB on the basis of histopathology examination, were included in the study.PCR amplification targeting IS6110, rpoB gene and nested PCR targeting the rpoB gene were performed on the extracted DNAs from 80 FFPE samples. The strong positive samples were directly sequenced. For negative samples and those with weak band in nested-rpoB PCR, TA cloning was performed by cloning the products into the plasmid vector with subsequent sequencing. The 95% confidence intervals for the estimates of sensitivity and specificity were calculated for each method.Fourteen (20%, 34 (48.6% and 60 (85.7% of the 70 positive samples confirmed by histopathology, were positive by rpoB-PCR, IS6110- PCR and nested-rpoB PCR, respectively. By performing TA cloning on samples that yielded weak (no.=8 or negative results (no.=10 in the PCR methods, we were able to improve their quality for later sequencing. All samples with weak band and 7 out of 10 negative samples, showed strong positive results after cloning. So nested-rpoB PCR cloning revealed positivity in 67 out of 70 confirmed samples (95.7%. The sensitivity of these combination methods was calculated as 95.7% in comparison with histopathology examination. The confidence intervals for sensitivity of the PCR methods were calculated as 11.39-31.27% for rpoB-PCR, 36.44-60.83% for IS6110- PCR, 75.29-92.93% for nested-rpoB PCR and 87.98-99.11% for nested-rpoB PCR cloning. The 10 true EPTB negative samples by histopathology, were negative by all tested methods including cloning and were used to calculate the specificity of the applied methods. The confidence intervals for

  14. Sources of Blood Meals of Sylvatic Triatoma guasayana near Zurima, Bolivia, Assayed with qPCR and 12S Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, David E.; Ribera, Wilma; Pizarro, Juan Carlos; Plaza, Carlos; Gordon, Levi W.; Peña, Reynaldo; Morrissey, Leslie A.; Rizzo, Donna M.; Stevens, Lori

    2014-01-01

    Background In this study we compared the utility of two molecular biology techniques, cloning of the mitochondrial 12S ribosomal RNA gene and hydrolysis probe-based qPCR, to identify blood meal sources of sylvatic Chagas disease insect vectors collected with live-bait mouse traps (also known as Noireau traps). Fourteen T. guasayana were collected from six georeferenced trap locations in the Andean highlands of the department of Chuquisaca, Bolivia. Methodology/Principal Findings We detected four blood meals sources with the cloning assay: seven samples were positive for human (Homo sapiens), five for chicken (Gallus gallus) and unicolored blackbird (Agelasticus cyanopus), and one for opossum (Monodelphis domestica). Using the qPCR assay we detected chicken (13 vectors), and human (14 vectors) blood meals as well as an additional blood meal source, Canis sp. (4 vectors). Conclusions/Significance We show that cloning of 12S PCR products, which avoids bias associated with developing primers based on a priori knowledge, detected blood meal sources not previously considered and that species-specific qPCR is more sensitive. All samples identified as positive for a specific blood meal source by the cloning assay were also positive by qPCR. However, not all samples positive by qPCR were positive by cloning. We show the power of combining the cloning assay with the highly sensitive hydrolysis probe-based qPCR assay provides a more complete picture of blood meal sources for insect disease vectors. PMID:25474154

  15. Sources of blood meals of sylvatic Triatoma guasayana near Zurima, Bolivia, assayed with qPCR and 12S cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucero, David E; Ribera, Wilma; Pizarro, Juan Carlos; Plaza, Carlos; Gordon, Levi W; Peña, Reynaldo; Morrissey, Leslie A; Rizzo, Donna M; Stevens, Lori

    2014-12-01

    In this study we compared the utility of two molecular biology techniques, cloning of the mitochondrial 12S ribosomal RNA gene and hydrolysis probe-based qPCR, to identify blood meal sources of sylvatic Chagas disease insect vectors collected with live-bait mouse traps (also known as Noireau traps). Fourteen T. guasayana were collected from six georeferenced trap locations in the Andean highlands of the department of Chuquisaca, Bolivia. We detected four blood meals sources with the cloning assay: seven samples were positive for human (Homo sapiens), five for chicken (Gallus gallus) and unicolored blackbird (Agelasticus cyanopus), and one for opossum (Monodelphis domestica). Using the qPCR assay we detected chicken (13 vectors), and human (14 vectors) blood meals as well as an additional blood meal source, Canis sp. (4 vectors). We show that cloning of 12S PCR products, which avoids bias associated with developing primers based on a priori knowledge, detected blood meal sources not previously considered and that species-specific qPCR is more sensitive. All samples identified as positive for a specific blood meal source by the cloning assay were also positive by qPCR. However, not all samples positive by qPCR were positive by cloning. We show the power of combining the cloning assay with the highly sensitive hydrolysis probe-based qPCR assay provides a more complete picture of blood meal sources for insect disease vectors.

  16. PCR-based cloning and immunological characterization of Parietaria judaica pollen profilin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asturias, J A; Ibarrola, I; Eseverri, J L; Arilla, M Carmen; González-Rioja, R; Martínez, A

    2004-01-01

    Profilin has been described as an allergen present in pollen of trees, grasses and weeds. Since Parietaria judaica profilin has a molecular mass similar to other Parietaria allergens (Par j 1 and Par j 2) in the 14-10 kDa range, it is difficult to assess the prevalence of profilin by immunoblotting or to obtain sufficient amounts of purified native profilin for investigation and diagnosis. The aim of this study was to identify P. judaica profilin by PCR-based cDNA cloning and to elucidate its allergenic characteristics. Two cDNA clones encoding P. judaica pollen profilin were isolated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification using degenerate primers. Sequencing of both clones (Par j 3.0101 and Par j 3.0102) demonstrated a high amino acid sequence homology. Immunodetection of P. judaica pollen after isoelectrofocusing and incubation with rabbit antiserum against profilin indicated the existence of at least 2 isoforms. Expression in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3) was carried out using a vector based in the T7 expression system, and the recombinant allergen was isolated by affinity chromatography on poly-(L-proline)-Sepharose. Cross-reactivity has been found between recombinant P. judaica pollen profilin and profilins from other botanical unrelated plants.

  17. Comparison of broad range 16S rDNA PCR to conventional blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Neonatal sepsis is a significant cause of morbidity and mortality in neonates. The gold standard for detecting bacterial sepsis is blood culture. However, it has low sensitivity and a reporting delay of approximately 48–72 h. Molecular assays for the detection of bacterial DNA represent possible new diagnostic tools for early ...

  18. Comparison of broad range 16S rDNA PCR to conventional blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Nehal I. Draz

    2013-06-17

    Jun 17, 2013 ... So, implementation of simple infection control measures such as hand ... delivery. Streptococcus agalactiae (Group B streptococcus,. GBS) is the most common cause of neonatal sepsis in many countries; gram negative bacilli (Escherichia ..... be either due to the delivery room acting as a source of infec-.

  19. Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cloning describes the processes used to create an exact genetic replica of another cell, tissue or organism. ... named Dolly. There are three different types of cloning: Gene cloning, which creates copies of genes or ...

  20. Rapid restriction enzyme-free cloning of PCR products: a high-throughput method applicable for library construction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay K Chaudhary

    Full Text Available Herein, we describe a novel cloning strategy for PCR-amplified DNA which employs the type IIs restriction endonuclease BsaI to create a linearized vector with four base-long 5'-overhangs, and T4 DNA polymerase treatment of the insert in presence of a single dNTP to create vector-compatible four base-long overhangs. Notably, the insert preparation does not require any restriction enzyme treatment. The BsaI sites in the vector are oriented in such a manner that upon digestion with BsaI, a stuffer sequence along with both BsaI recognition sequences is removed. The sequence of the four base-long overhangs produced by BsaI cleavage were designed to be non-palindromic, non-compatible to each other. Therefore, only ligation of an insert carrying compatible ends allows directional cloning of the insert to the vector to generate a recombinant without recreating the BsaI sites. We also developed rapid protocols for insert preparation and cloning, by which the entire process from PCR to transformation can be completed in 6-8 h and DNA fragments ranging in size from 200 to 2200 bp can be cloned with equal efficiencies. One protocol uses a single tube for insert preparation if amplification is performed using polymerases with low 3'-exonuclease activity. The other protocol is compatible with any thermostable polymerase, including those with high 3'-exonuclease activity, and does not significantly increase the time required for cloning. The suitability of this method for high-throughput cloning was demonstrated by cloning batches of 24 PCR products with nearly 100% efficiency. The cloning strategy is also suitable for high efficiency cloning and was used to construct large libraries comprising more than 108 clones/µg vector. Additionally, based on this strategy, a variety of vectors were constructed for the expression of proteins in E. coli, enabling large number of different clones to be rapidly generated.

  1. Fusion primer and nested integrated PCR (FPNI-PCR): a new high-efficiency strategy for rapid chromosome walking or flanking sequence cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background The advent of genomics-based technologies has revolutionized many fields of biological enquiry. However, chromosome walking or flanking sequence cloning is still a necessary and important procedure to determining gene structure. Such methods are used to identify T-DNA insertion sites and so are especially relevant for organisms where large T-DNA insertion libraries have been created, such as rice and Arabidopsis. The currently available methods for flanking sequence cloning, including the popular TAIL-PCR technique, are relatively laborious and slow. Results Here, we report a simple and effective fusion primer and nested integrated PCR method (FPNI-PCR) for the identification and cloning of unknown genomic regions flanked known sequences. In brief, a set of universal primers was designed that consisted of various 15-16 base arbitrary degenerate oligonucleotides. These arbitrary degenerate primers were fused to the 3' end of an adaptor oligonucleotide which provided a known sequence without degenerate nucleotides, thereby forming the fusion primers (FPs). These fusion primers are employed in the first step of an integrated nested PCR strategy which defines the overall FPNI-PCR protocol. In order to demonstrate the efficacy of this novel strategy, we have successfully used it to isolate multiple genomic sequences namely, 21 orthologs of genes in various species of Rosaceace, 4 MYB genes of Rosa rugosa, 3 promoters of transcription factors of Petunia hybrida, and 4 flanking sequences of T-DNA insertion sites in transgenic tobacco lines and 6 specific genes from sequenced genome of rice and Arabidopsis. Conclusions The successful amplification of target products through FPNI-PCR verified that this novel strategy is an effective, low cost and simple procedure. Furthermore, FPNI-PCR represents a more sensitive, rapid and accurate technique than the established TAIL-PCR and hiTAIL-PCR procedures. PMID:22093809

  2. Testing and validation of high density resequencing microarray for broad range biothreat agents detection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomasz A Leski

    Full Text Available Rapid and effective detection and identification of emerging microbiological threats and potential biowarfare agents is very challenging when using traditional culture-based methods. Contemporary molecular techniques, relying upon reverse transcription and/or polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR/PCR provide a rapid and effective alternative, however, such assays are generally designed and optimized to detect only a limited number of targets, and seldom are capable of differentiation among variants of detected targets. To meet these challenges, we have designed a broad-range resequencing pathogen microarray (RPM for detection of tropical and emerging infectious agents (TEI including biothreat agents: RPM-TEI v 1.0 (RPM-TEI. The scope of the RPM-TEI assay enables detection and differential identification of 84 types of pathogens and 13 toxin genes, including most of the class A, B and C select agents as defined by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC, Atlanta, GA. Due to the high risks associated with handling these particular target pathogens, the sensitivity validation of the RPM-TEI has been performed using an innovative approach, in which synthetic DNA fragments are used as templates for testing the assay's limit of detection (LOD. Assay specificity and sensitivity was subsequently confirmed by testing with full-length genomic nucleic acids of selected agents. The LOD for a majority of the agents detected by RPM-TEI was determined to be at least 10(4 copies per test. Our results also show that the RPM-TEI assay not only detects and identifies agents, but is also able to differentiate near neighbors of the same agent types, such as closely related strains of filoviruses of the Ebola Zaire group, or the Machupo and Lassa arenaviruses. Furthermore, each RPM-TEI assay results in specimen-specific agent gene sequence information that can be used to assess pathogenicity, mutations, and virulence markers, results that are not generally

  3. An infinitely expandable cloning strategy plus repeat-proof PCR for working with multiple shRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glen John McIntyre

    Full Text Available Vector construction with restriction enzymes (REs typically involves the ligation of a digested donor fragment (insert to a reciprocally digested recipient fragment (vector backbone. Creating a suitable cloning plan becomes increasingly difficult for complex strategies requiring repeated insertions such as constructing multiple short hairpin RNA (shRNA expression vectors for RNA interference (RNAi studies. The problem lies in the reduced availability of suitable RE recognition sites with an increasing number of cloning events and or vector size. This report details a technically simple, directional cloning solution using REs with compatible cohesive ends that are repeatedly destroyed and simultaneously re-introduced with each round of cloning. Donor fragments can be made by PCR or sub-cloned from pre-existing vectors and inserted ad infinitum in any combination. The design incorporates several cloning cores in order to be compatible with as many donor sequences as possible. We show that joining sub-combinations made in parallel is more time-efficient than sequential construction (of one cassette at a time for any combination of 4 or more insertions. Screening for the successful construction of combinations using Taq polymerase based PCR became increasingly difficult with increasing number of repeated sequence elements. A Pfu polymerase based PCR was developed and successfully used to amplify combinations of up to eleven consecutive hairpin expression cassettes. The identified PCR conditions can be beneficial to others working with multiple shRNA or other repeated sequences, and the infinitely expandable cloning strategy serves as a general solution applicable to many cloning scenarios.

  4. MEGAWHOP cloning: a method of creating random mutagenesis libraries via megaprimer PCR of whole plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Kentaro

    2011-01-01

    MEGAWHOP allows for the cloning of DNA fragments into a vector and is used for conventional restriction digestion/ligation-based procedures. In MEGAWHOP, the DNA fragment to be cloned is used as a set of complementary primers that replace a homologous region in a template vector through whole-plasmid PCR. After synthesis of a nicked circular plasmid, the mixture is treated with DpnI, a dam-methylated DNA-specific restriction enzyme, to digest the template plasmid. The DpnI-treated mixture is then introduced into competent Escherichia coli cells to yield plasmids carrying replaced insert fragments. Plasmids produced by the MEGAWHOP method are virtually free of contamination by species without any inserts or with multiple inserts, and also the parent. Because the fragment is usually long enough to not interfere with hybridization to the template, various types of fragments can be used with mutations at any site (either known or unknown, random, or specific). By using fragments having homologous sequences at the ends (e.g., adaptor sequence), MEGAWHOP can also be used to recombine nonhomologous sequences mediated by the adaptors, allowing rapid creation of novel constructs and chimeric genes. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. In vivo cloning of up to 16 kb plasmids in E. coli is as simple as PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faqing Huang

    Full Text Available The precise assembly of defined DNA sequences into plasmids is an essential task in bioscience research. While a number of molecular cloning techniques have been developed, many methods require specialized expensive reagents or laborious experimental procedure. Not surprisingly, conventional cloning techniques based on restriction digestion and ligation are still commonly used in routine DNA cloning. Here, we describe a simple, fast, and economical cloning method based on RecA- and RecET-independent in vivo recombination of DNA fragments with overlapping ends using E. coli. All DNA fragments were prepared by a 2-consecutive PCR procedure with Q5 DNA polymerase and used directly for transformation resulting in 95% cloning accuracy and zero background from parental template plasmids. Quantitative relationships were established between cloning efficiency and three factors-the length of overlapping nucleotides, the number of DNA fragments, and the size of target plasmids-which can provide general guidance for selecting in vivo cloning parameters. The method may be used to accurately assemble up to 5 DNA fragments with 25 nt overlapping ends into relatively small plasmids, and 3 DNA fragments into plasmids up to 16 kb in size. The whole cloning procedure may be completed within 2 days by a researcher with little training in cloning. The combination of high accuracy and zero background eliminates the need for screening a large number of colonies. The method requires no enzymes other than Q5 DNA polymerase, has no sequence restriction, is highly reliable, and represents one of the simplest, fastest, and cheapest cloning techniques available. Our method is particularly suitable for common cloning tasks in the lab where the primary goal is to quickly generate a plasmid with a pre-defined sequence at low costs.

  6. In vivo cloning of up to 16 kb plasmids in E. coli is as simple as PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Faqing; Spangler, Joseph Rankin; Huang, Allen Yang

    2017-01-01

    The precise assembly of defined DNA sequences into plasmids is an essential task in bioscience research. While a number of molecular cloning techniques have been developed, many methods require specialized expensive reagents or laborious experimental procedure. Not surprisingly, conventional cloning techniques based on restriction digestion and ligation are still commonly used in routine DNA cloning. Here, we describe a simple, fast, and economical cloning method based on RecA- and RecET-independent in vivo recombination of DNA fragments with overlapping ends using E. coli. All DNA fragments were prepared by a 2-consecutive PCR procedure with Q5 DNA polymerase and used directly for transformation resulting in 95% cloning accuracy and zero background from parental template plasmids. Quantitative relationships were established between cloning efficiency and three factors-the length of overlapping nucleotides, the number of DNA fragments, and the size of target plasmids-which can provide general guidance for selecting in vivo cloning parameters. The method may be used to accurately assemble up to 5 DNA fragments with 25 nt overlapping ends into relatively small plasmids, and 3 DNA fragments into plasmids up to 16 kb in size. The whole cloning procedure may be completed within 2 days by a researcher with little training in cloning. The combination of high accuracy and zero background eliminates the need for screening a large number of colonies. The method requires no enzymes other than Q5 DNA polymerase, has no sequence restriction, is highly reliable, and represents one of the simplest, fastest, and cheapest cloning techniques available. Our method is particularly suitable for common cloning tasks in the lab where the primary goal is to quickly generate a plasmid with a pre-defined sequence at low costs.

  7. Detection of bacteria in platelet concentrates: comparison of broad-range real-time 16S rDNA polymerase chain reaction and automated culturing

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mohammadi, Tamimount; Pietersz, Ruby N. I.; Vandenbroucke-Grauls, Christina M. J. E.; Savelkoul, Paul H. M.; Reesink, Henk W.

    2005-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Based on real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technology, a broad-range 16S rDNA assay was validated and its performance was compared to that of an automated culture system to determine its usefulness for rapid routine screening of platelet concentrates (PCs). STUDY DESIGN AND

  8. Activation of toll-like receptors and dendritic cells by a broad range of bacterial molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boele, L.C.L.; Bajramovic, J.J.; Vries, A.M.M.B.C. de; Voskamp-Visser, I.A.I.; Kaman, W.E.; Kleij, D. van der

    2009-01-01

    Activation of pattern recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors (TLRs) by pathogens leads to activation and maturation of dendritic cells (DC), which orchestrate the development of the adaptive immune response. To create an overview of the effects of a broad range of pathogenic bacteria,

  9. Sterility Testing of Stem Cell Products by Broad-Range Bacterial 16S Ribosomal DNA Polymerase Chain Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokuno, Osamu; Hayakawa, Akira; Yanai, Tomoko; Mori, Takeshi; Ohnuma, Kenichiro; Tani, Ayumi; Minami, Hironobu; Sugimoto, Takeshi

    2015-01-01

    To evaluate broad-range 16S ribosomal DNA (rDNA) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) as a rapid screening tool to detect bacterial contamination of stem-cell products. We performed the evaluation using whole blood spiked with serially diluted bacterial-type strains. Detection sensitivity was defined as the bacterial concentration for which all replicates were positive at each concentration (100% detection). We tested the sterility of 29 bags of autologous peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) products harvested at our facility using the 16S rDNA PCR method. The detection sensitivity of 16S rDNA PCR in spiked whole blood was 10¹ to 10² colony-forming units (CFU) per mL, depending on the bacterial strain. We detected no amplified 16S rDNA among the PBSCs we used in this study. The BacT/ALERT automated bacterial culture system that we used also showed no positive signals in any of the PBSCs tested. Our data indicate that bacterial 16S rDNA PCR is a useful alternative for rapid sterility testing, not only for blood products used in transfusion medicine but also for stem-cell products used in regenerative medicine. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology (ASCP).

  10. Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... such as the liver, brain and heart. Other consequences include premature aging and problems with the immune system. Another potential ... cell dies. This is part of the natural aging process that seems to happen in all cell types. As a consequence, clones created from a cell taken from an ...

  11. Characterization of a broad range antibacterial substance from a new Bacillus species isolated from Amazon basin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motta, Amanda S; Cannavan, Fabiana S; Tsai, Siu-Mui; Brandelli, Adriano

    2007-10-01

    A Bacillus sp. strain producing a bacteriocin-like substance was characterized by biochemical profiling and 16S rDNA sequencing. The phylogenetic analysis indicated that this strain has low sequence similarity with most Bacillus spp., suggesting a new species was isolated. The antimicrobial activity was detected starting at the exponential growth phase, and maximum activity was observed at stationary phase. The substance was inhibitory to a broad range of indicator strains, including pathogenic and food spoilage bacteria such as Listeria monocytogenes, B. cereus, Aeromonas hydrophila, Erwinia carotovora, Pasteurella haemolytica, Salmonella Gallinarum, among other. The antibacterial substance was stable over a wide pH range, but it was sensitive to pronase E and lipase. The antibacterial substance was bactericidal and bacteriolytic to L. monocytogenes and B. cereus at 160 AU ml(-1). The identification of a broad range bacteriocin-like inhibitory substance active against L. monocytogenes addresses an important aspect of food protection against pathogens and spoilage microorganisms.

  12. NGS tools for traceability in candies as high processed food products: Ion Torrent PGM versus conventional PCR-cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Colmenero, Marta; Martínez, Jose Luis; Roca, Agustín; Garcia-Vazquez, Eva

    2017-01-01

    The Next Generation Sequencing methodologies are considered the next step within DNA-based methods and their applicability in different fields is being evaluated. Here, we tested the usefulness of the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine (PGM) in food traceability analyzing candies as a model of high processed foods, and compared the results with those obtained by PCR-cloning-sequencing (PCR-CS). The majority of samples exhibited consistency between methodologies, yielding more information and species per product from the PGM platform than PCR-CS. Significantly higher AT-content in sequences of the same species was also obtained from PGM. This together with some taxonomical discrepancies between methodologies suggest that the PGM platform is still pre-mature for its use in food traceability of complex highly processed products. It could be a good option for analysis of less complex food, saving time and cost per sample. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Synthesis, cloning, and expression of Mycoplasma suis inorganic pyrophosphatase gene using PCR-based accurate synthesis and overlap-extension PCR, and its immunogenicity analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jianzhu; Cheng, Ziqiang; Zhou, Dong; Zhang, Li; Yan, Zhengui; Wang, Zhenyong; Yang, Dubao; Liu, Yongxia; Chai, Tongjie

    2011-12-01

    Mycoplasma suis (M. suis), a hemotrophic pathogen of pigs, causes economic losses in swine production throughout the world. Inorganic pyrophosphatase (ppa) is a very important gene in M. suis. The ppa gene of M. suis was synthesized by PCR-based accurate synthesis (PAS) and overlapextension PCR, inserted into vector pMD18-T, and then subcloned to the prokaryotic expression vector pET28c.The recombinant plasmid pET28c_ppa was transformed to E. coli BL21 for expression under induction of isopropyl thiogalactoside. The expressed product was identified by SDS-PAGE and Western blot, which suggested that the recombinant protein has good antigenicity. Piglets were immunised with purified recombinant protein, and specific antibodies to the recombinant protein were detected in piglet serum. The results show that the ppa gene can be efficiently expressed in E. coli and that the expressed recombinant protein can elicit a specific serum antibody response in piglets. PAS and overlap-extension PCR were first used to synthesize the ppa of M. suis. They provide simple, rapid, reliable and relatively inexpensive methods to synthesize, clone, and express genes. The experiment conducted in this paper will enable future research into the role and function of the ppa gene. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Nanoporous Anodic Alumina 3D FDTD Modelling for a Broad Range of Inter-pore Distances.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertó-Roselló, Francesc; Xifré-Pérez, Elisabet; Ferré-Borrull, Josep; Pallarès, Josep; Marsal, Lluis F

    2016-12-01

    The capability of the finite difference time domain (FDTD) method for the numerical modelling of the optical properties of nanoporous anodic alumina (NAA) in a broad range of inter-pore distances is evaluated. FDTD permits taking into account in the same numerical framework all the structural features of NAA, such as the texturization of the interfaces or the incorporation of electrolyte anions in the aluminium oxide host. The evaluation is carried out by comparing reflectance measurements from two samples with two very different inter-pore distances with the simulation results. Results show that considering the texturization is crucial to obtain good agreement with the measurements. On the other hand, including the anionic layer in the model leads to a second-order contribution to the reflectance spectrum.

  15. Time-of-flight electron spectrometer for a broad range of kinetic energies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kothe, Alexander; Metje, Jan; Wilke, Martin; Moguilevski, Alexandre; Engel, Nicholas; Al-Obaidi, Ruba; Richter, Clemens; Golnak, Ronny; Kiyan, Igor Yu.; Aziz, Emad F. [Joint Ultrafast Dynamics Lab in Solutions and at Interfaces (JULiq), Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie (HZB), Albert-Einstein-Str. 15, 12489 Berlin (Germany) and Freie Universitaet Berlin, Fachbereich Physik, Arnimallee 14, 14195 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-02-15

    A newly constructed time-of-flight electron spectrometer of the magnetic bottle type is characterized for electron detection in a broad range of kinetic energies. The instrument is designed to measure the energy spectra of electrons generated from liquids excited by strong laser fields and photons in the range of extreme ultra violet and soft X-rays. Argon inner shell electrons were recorded to calibrate the spectrometer and investigate its characteristics, such as energy resolution and collection efficiency. Its energy resolution {Delta}E/E of 1.6% allows resolving the Ar 2p spin orbit structure at kinetic energies higher than 100 eV. The collection efficiency is determined and compared to that of the spectrometer in its field-free configuration.

  16. Monoglyceride-based organogelator for broad-range oil uptake with high capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Dong; Niu, Jian; Wang, Zhenggong; Jin, Jian

    2015-02-10

    Oil/water separation has been a worldwide subject because of increasing release of oil-containing wastewater as well as several marine oil spills. The phase-selective organogelators (PSOGs) are thought to offer a potential and effective implement for addressing this issue. An ideal PSOG for oil adsorption must fulfill some requirements involving effective gelation, easy synthesis, low cost, and recyclable for reuse. However, beyond those, the ability of gelation for a broad-range oil phase without selectivity is also important. However, most of the reported PSOGs have limitation in this respect thus far. In this paper, a new class of saturated 1-monoglyceride-derived organogelators can efficiently uptake almost all of the common fuel oils from water and gelate organic solvents with extremely low minimum gelation concentration (MGC). In addition, the oils in the gel and gelator molecules can be recovered quantitatively through simple vacuum distillation.

  17. Improving the catalytic activity of hyperthermophilic Pyrococcus prolidases for detoxification of organophosphorus nerve agents over a broad range of temperatures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theriot, Casey M; Du, Xuelian; Tove, Sherry R; Grunden, Amy M

    2010-08-01

    Prolidase isolated from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus has potential for application for decontamination of organophosphorus compounds in certain pesticides and chemical warfare agents under harsh conditions. However, current applications that use an enzyme-based cocktail are limited by poor long-term enzyme stability and low reactivity over a broad range of temperatures. To obtain a better enzyme for OP nerve agent decontamination and to investigate structural factors that influence protein thermostability and thermoactivity, randomly mutated P. furiosus prolidases were prepared by using XL1-red-based mutagenesis and error-prone PCR. An Escherichia coli strain JD1 (lambdaDE3) (auxotrophic for proline [DeltaproA] and having deletions in pepQ and pepP dipeptidases with specificity for proline-containing dipeptides) was constructed for screening mutant P. furiosus prolidase expression plasmids. JD1 (lambdaDE3) cells were transformed with mutated prolidase expression plasmids and plated on minimal media supplemented with 50 muM Leu-Pro as the only source of proline. By using this positive selection, Pyrococcus prolidase mutants with improved activity over a broader range of temperatures were isolated. The activities of the mutants over a broad temperature range were measured for both Xaa-Pro dipeptides and OP nerve agents, and the thermoactivity and thermostability of the mutants were determined.

  18. Diagnosis of neonatal sepsis by broad-range 16S real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlin, Andreas; Bäckman, Anders; Ewald, Uwe; Schollin, Jens; Björkqvist, Maria

    2012-01-01

    The standard diagnostic test (blood culture) for suspected neonatal sepsis has limitations in sensitivity and specificity, and 16S polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been suggested as a new diagnostic tool for neonatal sepsis. To develop and evaluate a new real-time PCR method for detection of bacterial DNA in blood samples collected from infants with suspected neonatal sepsis. Immediately after blood culture, a study sample of 0.5-1.0 ml whole blood was collected and used for a novel 16S real-time PCR assay. All positive samples were sequenced. Detailed case studies were performed in all cases with conflicting results, to verify if PCR could detect pathogens in culture negative sepsis. 368 samples from 317 infants were included. When compared with blood culture, the assay yielded a sensitivity of 79%, a specificity of 90%, a positive predictive value of 59%, and a negative predictive value of 96%. Seven of the 31 samples with a positive PCR result and a negative blood culture had definite or suspected bacterial sepsis. In five samples, PCR (but not blood culture) could detect a pathogen that was present in a blood culture collected more than 24 h prior to the PCR sample. This study presents an evaluation of a new real-time PCR technique that can detect culture-positive sepsis, and suggests that PCR has the potential to detect bacteria in culture-negative samples even after the initiation of intravenous antibiotics. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Cloning-free genome alterations in Saccharomyces cerevisiae using adaptamer-mediated PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Reid, Robert J D; Lisby, Michael; Rothstein, Rodney

    2002-01-01

    Each of the adaptamer-directed genome manipulation methods is predicated on the fact that recombination between two DNAs is enhanced by increasing the length of homology. Many of the current PCR-based genome manipulation techniques rely on very short homologies to promote recombination. In these ...

  20. Simple Cloning via Direct Transformation of PCR Product (DNA Multimer) to Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis

    OpenAIRE

    You, Chun; Zhang, Xiao-Zhou; Zhang, Y.-H. Percival

    2012-01-01

    We developed a general restriction enzyme-free and ligase-free method for subcloning up to three DNA fragments into any location of a plasmid. The DNA multimer generated by prolonged overlap extension PCR was directly transformed in Escherichia coli [e.g., TOP10, DH5α, JM109, and BL21(DE3)] and Bacillus subtilis for obtaining chimeric plasmids.

  1. Recombinant thermostable AP exonuclease from Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis: cloning, expression, purification, properties and PCR application

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabrowski, Slawomir; Brillowska-Dabrowska, Anna; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2013-01-01

    and transformed into Escherichia coli. The protein product showed high identity (80%) to human Ape1 nuclease, whereas to E. coli exonuclease III - 78%. This is the first prokaryotic AP nuclease that exhibits such high identity to human Ape1 nuclease. The very high expression level (57% of total soluble proteins......Apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) sites in DNA are considered to be highly mutagenic and must be corrected to preserve genetic integrity, especially at high temperatures. The gene encoding a homologue of AP exonuclease was cloned from the thermophilic anaerobic bacterium Thermoanaerobacter tengcongensis......) of fully active and soluble His6-tagged Tte AP enzyme with His6-tag on C-terminal end was obtained in Escherichia coli Rosetta (DE3) pLysS. The active enzyme was purified up to 98% homogeneity in one chromatographic step using metal-affinity chromatography on Ni(2+)-IDA-Sepharose resin. The yield was 90 mg...

  2. Authentication of commercial candy ingredients using DNA PCR-cloning methodology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Colmenero, Marta; Martínez, Jose Luis; Roca, Agustín; García-Vázquez, Eva

    2016-02-01

    Commercial candies are consumed by all population age sectors worldwide. Methods for quality control and composition authentication are therefore needed for best compliance with consumers' preferences. In this study applications of DNA-based methodology for candy quality control have been tested. Eighteen samples of commercial candies (marshmallows, gumdrops, jelly, sherbet, gelatin-based desserts) produced by five countries were analyzed to identify the component species by polymerase chain reaction, cloning and sequencing of 16S rRNA and ribulose -1,5-diphosphate carboxylase oxygenase genes, and the species determined from BLAST comparison with universal databases and phylogenetic analysis. Positive DNA extraction and amplification of the target genes were obtained for 94% of candies assayed, even those containing as little as sweets we recommend the use of DNA tests for quality control of these popular sweets. DNA tests have been useful in this field but next-generation sequencing methods could be more effective. © 2015 Society of Chemical Industry.

  3. Oxidative Stress and Mitochondrial Dysfunction across Broad-Ranging Pathologies: Toward Mitochondria-Targeted Clinical Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Pagano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Beyond the disorders recognized as mitochondrial diseases, abnormalities in function and/or ultrastructure of mitochondria have been reported in several unrelated pathologies. These encompass ageing, malformations, and a number of genetic or acquired diseases, as diabetes and cardiologic, haematologic, organ-specific (e.g., eye or liver, neurologic and psychiatric, autoimmune, and dermatologic disorders. The mechanistic grounds for mitochondrial dysfunction (MDF along with the occurrence of oxidative stress (OS have been investigated within the pathogenesis of individual disorders or in groups of interrelated disorders. We attempt to review broad-ranging pathologies that involve mitochondrial-specific deficiencies or rely on cytosol-derived prooxidant states or on autoimmune-induced mitochondrial damage. The established knowledge in these subjects warrants studies aimed at elucidating several open questions that are highlighted in the present review. The relevance of OS and MDF in different pathologies may establish the grounds for chemoprevention trials aimed at compensating OS/MDF by means of antioxidants and mitochondrial nutrients.

  4. Noradrenaline transmission reducing drugs may protect against a broad range of diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, P J

    2015-04-01

    1 A growing body of evidence suggests that the signalling molecule, noradrenaline (NA), plays a pathophysiological role in a broad range of psychiatric, neurological and peripheral disorders. Both preclinical and clinical data suggest that elevated NA signalling may be involved in the aetiology of major diseases such as depression, Alzheimer's disease and diabetes mellitus. 2 The molecular pathways by which NA may cause the manifestation of disease remain poorly understood, although they may include G protein-coupled receptor modulation of the Ras/MAP kinase, Stat3 and PI3K pathways, among others. In both individual animals and humans, NA tone may be elevated largely due to genetics, but also because of the exposure to marked psychological stress or trauma, or other environmental factors. 3 As NA is involved in the 'fight or flight' response by the sympathetic nervous system, this transmitter may be elevated in a large number of organisms due to evolutionary selection of enhancing responses to immediate environmental dangers. Likewise, acetylcholine signalling by the parasympathetic ('rest and digest') nervous system may be relatively diminished. This putative autonomic imbalance may result in diminished engagement in homeostatic processes, resulting in the emergence and progression of a number of diseases throughout the body. 4 In this scenario, a large number of individuals may benefit from chronic use of pharmacological agents - such as clonidine, guanfacine, propranolol or prazosin - that diminish NA signalling throughout the body. If so, NA transmission lowering drugs may protect against a wide range of diseases. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Personal glucose meters for detection and quantification of a broad range of analytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Xiang, Yu

    2015-02-03

    A general methodology for the development of highly sensitive and selective sensors that can achieve portable, low-cost and quantitative detection of a broad range of targets using only a personal glucose meter (PGM) is disclosed. The method uses recognition molecules that are specific for a target agent, enzymes that can convert an enzyme substrate into glucose, and PGM. Also provided are sensors, which can include a solid support to which is attached a recognition molecule that permits detection of a target agent, wherein the recognition molecule specifically binds to the target agent in the presence of the target agent but not significantly to other agents as well as an enzyme that can catalyze the conversion of a substance into glucose, wherein the enzyme is attached directly or indirectly to the recognition molecule, and wherein in the presence of the target agent the enzyme can convert the substance into glucose. The disclosed sensors can be part of a lateral flow device. Methods of using such sensors for detecting target agents are also provided.

  6. First exploration of Nitrobacter diversity in soils by a PCR cloning-sequencing approach targeting functional gene nxrA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poly, Franck; Wertz, Sophie; Brothier, Elisabeth; Degrange, Valérie

    2008-01-01

    Nitrite oxidoreductase (NXR) is the key enzyme responsible for the oxidation of NO(2)(-) to NO(3)(-) in nitrite-oxidizing bacteria. For the first time a molecular approach for targeting the nxrA gene was developed, encoding the catalytic subunit of the NXR, to study diversity of Nitrobacter-like organisms based on the phylogeny of nxrA gene sequences in soils. NxrA sequences of the Nitrobacter strains analysed (Nitrobacter hamburgensis, Nitrobacter vulgaris, Nitrobacter winogradskyi, Nitrobacter alkalicus) by PCR, cloning and sequencing revealed the occurrence of multiple copies of nxrA genes in these strains. The copy number and similarity varied among strains. The diversity of Nitrobacter-like nxrA sequences was explored in three soils (a French permanent pasture soil, a French fallow soil, and an African savannah soil) using a cloning and sequencing approach. Most nxrA sequences found in these soils (84%) differed from nxrA sequences obtained from Nitrobacter strains. Moreover, the phylogenetic distribution and richness of nxrA-like sequences was extremely variable depending on soil type. This nxrA tool extends the panel of functional genes available for studying bacteria involved in the nitrogen cycle.

  7. PCR

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-11

    Jul 11, 2011 ... The overall prevalence of human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection in 16 ... Key words: Cytomegalovirus, PCR, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) and ELISA. .... McGeoch DJ, Hayward GS (2003). The human cytomegalovirus genome revisited: Comparison with the chimpanzee cytomegalovirus genome.

  8. Forest response to elevated CO2 is conserved across a broad range of productivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norby, Richard J.; DeLucia, Evan H.; Gielen, Birgit; Calfapietra, Carlo; Giardina, Christian P.; King, John S.; Ledford, Joanne; McCarthy, Heather R.; Moore, David J. P.; Ceulemans, Reinhart; De Angelis, Paolo; Finzi, Adrien C.; Karnosky, David F.; Kubiske, Mark E.; Lukac, Martin; Pregitzer, Kurt S.; Scarascia-Mugnozza, Giuseppe E.; Schlesinger, William H.; Oren, Ram

    2005-01-01

    Climate change predictions derived from coupled carbon-climate models are highly dependent on assumptions about feedbacks between the biosphere and atmosphere. One critical feedback occurs if C uptake by the biosphere increases in response to the fossil-fuel driven increase in atmospheric [CO2] (“CO2 fertilization”), thereby slowing the rate of increase in atmospheric [CO2]. Carbon exchanges between the terrestrial biosphere and atmosphere are often first represented in models as net primary productivity (NPP). However, the contribution of CO2 fertilization to the future global C cycle has been uncertain, especially in forest ecosystems that dominate global NPP, and models that include a feedback between terrestrial biosphere metabolism and atmospheric [CO2] are poorly constrained by experimental evidence. We analyzed the response of NPP to elevated CO2 (≈550 ppm) in four free-air CO2 enrichment experiments in forest stands. We show that the response of forest NPP to elevated [CO2] is highly conserved across a broad range of productivity, with a stimulation at the median of 23 ± 2%. At low leaf area indices, a large portion of the response was attributable to increased light absorption, but as leaf area indices increased, the response to elevated [CO2] was wholly caused by increased light-use efficiency. The surprising consistency of response across diverse sites provides a benchmark to evaluate predictions of ecosystem and global models and allows us now to focus on unresolved questions about carbon partitioning and retention, and spatial variation in NPP response caused by availability of other growth limiting resources. PMID:16330779

  9. A simple, flexible and efficient PCR-fusion/Gateway cloning procedure for gene fusion, site-directed mutagenesis, short sequence insertion and domain deletions and swaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etchells J Peter

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The progress and completion of various plant genome sequencing projects has paved the way for diverse functional genomic studies that involve cloning, modification and subsequent expression of target genes. This requires flexible and efficient procedures for generating binary vectors containing: gene fusions, variants from site-directed mutagenesis, addition of protein tags together with domain swaps and deletions. Furthermore, efficient cloning procedures, ideally high throughput, are essential for pyramiding of multiple gene constructs. Results Here, we present a simple, flexible and efficient PCR-fusion/Gateway cloning procedure for construction of binary vectors for a range of gene fusions or variants with single or multiple nucleotide substitutions, short sequence insertions, domain deletions and swaps. Results from selected applications of the procedure which include ORF fusion, introduction of Cys>Ser mutations, insertion of StrepII tag sequence and domain swaps for Arabidopsis secondary cell wall AtCesA genes are demonstrated. Conclusion The PCR-fusion/Gateway cloning procedure described provides an elegant, simple and efficient solution for a wide range of diverse and complicated cloning tasks. Through streamlined cloning of sets of gene fusions and modification variants into binary vectors for systematic functional studies of gene families, our method allows for efficient utilization of the growing sequence and expression data.

  10. A simple, flexible and efficient PCR-fusion/Gateway cloning procedure for gene fusion, site-directed mutagenesis, short sequence insertion and domain deletions and swaps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Atanassov, Ivan I; Atanassov, Ilian I; Etchells, J Peter; Turner, Simon R

    2009-01-01

    Background The progress and completion of various plant genome sequencing projects has paved the way for diverse functional genomic studies that involve cloning, modification and subsequent expression of target genes. This requires flexible and efficient procedures for generating binary vectors containing: gene fusions, variants from site-directed mutagenesis, addition of protein tags together with domain swaps and deletions. Furthermore, efficient cloning procedures, ideally high throughput, are essential for pyramiding of multiple gene constructs. Results Here, we present a simple, flexible and efficient PCR-fusion/Gateway cloning procedure for construction of binary vectors for a range of gene fusions or variants with single or multiple nucleotide substitutions, short sequence insertions, domain deletions and swaps. Results from selected applications of the procedure which include ORF fusion, introduction of Cys>Ser mutations, insertion of StrepII tag sequence and domain swaps for Arabidopsis secondary cell wall AtCesA genes are demonstrated. Conclusion The PCR-fusion/Gateway cloning procedure described provides an elegant, simple and efficient solution for a wide range of diverse and complicated cloning tasks. Through streamlined cloning of sets of gene fusions and modification variants into binary vectors for systematic functional studies of gene families, our method allows for efficient utilization of the growing sequence and expression data. PMID:19863796

  11. Use of high throughput qPCR screening to rapidly clone low frequency tumour specific T-cells from peripheral blood for adoptive immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Serrano Oscar K

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The adoptive transfer of autologous tumor reactive lymphocytes can mediate significant tumor regression in some patients with refractory metastatic cancer. However, a significant obstacle for this promising therapy has been the availability of highly efficient methods to rapidly isolate and expand a variety of potentially rare tumor reactive lymphocytes from the natural repertoire of cancer patients. Methods We developed a novel in vitro T cell cloning methodology using high throughput quantitative RT-PCR (qPCR assay as a rapid functional screen to detect and facilitate the limiting dilution cloning of a variety of low frequency T cells from bulk PBMC. In preclinical studies, this strategy was applied to the isolation and expansion of gp100 specific CD8+ T cell clones from the peripheral blood of melanoma patients. Results In optimization studies, the qPCR assay could detect the reactivity of 1 antigen specific T cell in 100,000 background cells. When applied to short term sensitized PBMC microcultures, this assay could detect T cell reactivity against a variety of known melanoma tumor epitopes. This screening was combined with early limiting dilution cloning to rapidly isolate gp100154–162 reactive CD8+ T cell clones. These clones were highly avid against peptide pulsed targets and melanoma tumor lines. They had an effector memory phenotype and showed significant proliferative capacity to reach cell numbers appropriate for adoptive transfer trials (~1010 cells. Conclusion This report describes a novel high efficiency strategy to clone tumor reactive T cells from peripheral blood for use in adoptive immunotherapy.

  12. Testing and Validation of High Density Resequencing Microarray for Broad Range Biothreat Agents Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-08-11

    parvum TU502 Nucleic acid NRL Bacillus anthracis Ames Nucleic acid AFIP Bacillus cereus ATCC 14579 Live cells ATCC Bartonella quintana ATCC 51694 Live...Wheeler K, Park C, Kim D, et al. (2005) Rapid genotypic detection of Bacillus anthracis and the Bacillus cereus group by multiplex real- time PCR...assay enables detection and differential identification of 84 types of pathogens and 13 toxin genes, including most of the class A, B and C select agents

  13. Simple Cloning by Prolonged Overlap Extension-PCR with Application to the Preparation of Large-Size Random Gene Mutagenesis Library in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Chao; You, Chun; Wei, Ping; Zhang, Yi-Heng Percival

    2017-01-01

    We developed a simple method (simple cloning) for subcloning DNA fragments into any location of a targeted vector without the need of restriction enzyme, ligase, exonuclease, or recombinase in Escherichia coli. This technology can be applied to common E. coli hosts (e.g., DH5α, JM109, TOP10, BL21(DE3)). The protocol includes three steps: (1) generate DNA insert and linear vector backbone by regular high-fidelity PCR, where these two DNA fragments contain 3' and 5' overlapping termini; (2) generate DNA multimers based on these two DNA fragments by using prolonged overlap extension-PCR (POE-PCR) without primers added; and (3) transform POE-PCR product to competent Escherichia coli cells directly, yielding the desired plasmid. Simple cloning provides a new cloning method with great simplicity and flexibility. Furthermore, this new method can be modified for the preparation of a large-size mutant library for directed evolution in E. coli. Using this method, it is very easy to generate a mutant library with a size of more than 10(7) per 50 μL of the POE-PCR product within 1 day.

  14. Clones identification and genetic characterization of Garnacha grapevine by means of different PCR-derived marker systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meneghetti, Stefano; Costacurta, Angelo; Frare, Enrica; Da Rold, Graziana; Migliaro, Daniele; Morreale, Giacomo; Crespan, Manna; Sotés, Vicente; Calò, Antonio

    2011-07-01

    This study uses PCR-derived marker systems to investigate the extent and distribution of genetic variability of 53 Garnacha accessions coming from Italy, France and Spain. The samples studied include 28 Italian accessions (named Tocai rosso in Vicenza area; Alicante in Sicily and Elba island; Gamay perugino in Perugia province; Cannonau in Sardinia), 19 Spanish accessions of different types (named Garnacha tinta, Garnacha blanca, Garnacha peluda, Garnacha roja, Garnacha erguida, Garnacha roya) and 6 French accessions (named Grenache and Grenache noir). In order to verify the varietal identity of the samples, analyses based on 14 simple sequence repeat (SSR) loci were performed. The presence of an additional allele at ISV3 locus (151 bp) was found in four Tocai rosso accessions and in a Sardinian Cannonau clone, that are, incidentally, chimeras. In addition to microsatellite analysis, intravarietal variability study was performed using AFLP, SAMPL and M-AFLP molecular markers. AFLPs could discriminate among several Garnacha samples; SAMPLs allowed distinguishing few genotypes on the basis of their geographic origin, whereas M-AFLPs revealed plant-specific markers, differentiating all accessions. Italian samples showed the greatest variability among themselves, especially on the basis of their different provenance, while Spanish samples were the most similar, in spite of their morphological diversity.

  15. Leptospirosis in animals and human contacts in Egypt: broad range surveillance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed Samir

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Leptospirosis is a re-emerging zoonotic disease of humans and animals worldwide. The disease is caused by pathogenic species of the genus Leptospira. These organisms are maintained in nature via chronic renal infection of carrier animals, which excrete the organisms in their urine. Humans become infected through direct or indirect exposure to infected animals and their urine or through contact with contaminated water and soil. This study was conducted to investigate Leptospira infections as a re-emerging zoonosis that has been neglected in Egypt. METHODS: Samples from 1,250 animals (270 rats, 168 dogs, 625 cows, 26 buffaloes, 99 sheep, 14 horses, 26 donkeys and 22 camels, 175 human contacts and 45 water sources were collected from different governorates in Egypt. The samples were collected from different body sites and prepared for culture, PCR and the microscopic agglutination test (MAT. RESULTS: The isolation rates of Leptospira serovars were 6.9%, 11.3% and 1.1% for rats, dogs and cows, respectively, whereas the PCR results revealed respective detection rates of 24%, 11.3% and 1.1% for rats, dogs and cows. Neither the other examined animal species nor humans yielded positive results via these two techniques. Only six Leptospira serovars (Icterohaemorrhagiae, Pomona, Canicola, Grippotyphosa, Celledoni and Pyrogenes could be isolated from rats, dogs and cows. Moreover, the seroprevalence of leptospiral antibodies among the examined humans determined using MAT was 49.7%. CONCLUSIONS: The obtained results revealed that rats, dogs and cows were the most important animal reservoirs for leptospirosis in Egypt, and the high seroprevalence among human contacts highlights the public health implications of this neglected zoonosis.

  16. TA-GC cloning: A new simple and versatile technique for the directional cloning of PCR products for recombinant protein expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athanasios Niarchos

    Full Text Available During the last few decades, the recombinant protein expression finds more and more applications. The cloning of protein-coding genes into expression vectors is required to be directional for proper expression, and versatile in order to facilitate gene insertion in multiple different vectors for expression tests. In this study, the TA-GC cloning method is proposed, as a new, simple and efficient method for the directional cloning of protein-coding genes in expression vectors. The presented method features several advantages over existing methods, which tend to be relatively more labour intensive, inflexible or expensive. The proposed method relies on the complementarity between single A- and G-overhangs of the protein-coding gene, obtained after a short incubation with T4 DNA polymerase, and T and C overhangs of the novel vector pET-BccI, created after digestion with the restriction endonuclease BccI. The novel protein-expression vector pET-BccI also facilitates the screening of transformed colonies for recombinant transformants. Evaluation experiments of the proposed TA-GC cloning method showed that 81% of the transformed colonies contained recombinant pET-BccI plasmids, and 98% of the recombinant colonies expressed the desired protein. This demonstrates that TA-GC cloning could be a valuable method for cloning protein-coding genes in expression vectors.

  17. PrecisePrimer: an easy-to-use web server for designing PCR primers for DNA library cloning and DNA shuffling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauthenier, Cyrille; Faulon, Jean-Loup

    2014-01-01

    PrecisePrimer is a web-based primer design software made to assist experimentalists in any repetitive primer design task such as preparing, cloning and shuffling DNA libraries. Unlike other popular primer design tools, it is conceived to generate primer libraries with popular PCR polymerase buffers proposed as pre-set options. PrecisePrimer is also meant to design primers in batches, such as for DNA libraries creation of DNA shuffling experiments and to have the simplest interface possible. It integrates the most up-to-date melting temperature algorithms validated with experimental data, and cross validated with other computational tools. We generated a library of primers for the extraction and cloning of 61 genes from yeast DNA genomic extract using default parameters. All primer pairs efficiently amplified their target without any optimization of the PCR conditions. PMID:24829457

  18. Selection strategy and the design of hybrid oligonucleotide primers for RACE-PCR: cloning a family of toxin-like sequences from Agelena orientalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lipkin Alexey

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background the use of specific but partially degenerate primers for nucleic acid hybridisations and PCRs amplification of known or unknown gene families was first reported well over a decade ago and the technique has been used widely since then. Results here we report a novel and successful selection strategy for the design of hybrid partially degenerate primers for use with RT-PCR and RACE-PCR for the identification of unknown gene families. The technique (named PaBaLiS has proven very effective as it allowed us to identify and clone a large group of mRNAs encoding neurotoxin-like polypeptide pools from the venom of Agelena orientalis species of spider. Our approach differs radically from the generally accepted CODEHOP principle first reported in 1998. Most importantly, our method has proven very efficient by performing better than an independently generated high throughput EST cloning programme. Our method yielded nearly 130 non-identical sequences from Agelena orientalis, whilst the EST cloning technique yielded only 48 non-identical sequences from 2100 clones obtained from the same Agelena material. In addition to the primer design approach reported here, which is almost universally applicable to any PCR cloning application, our results also indicate that venom of Agelena orientalis spider contains a much larger family of related toxin-like sequences than previously thought. Conclusion with upwards of 100,000 species of spider thought to exist, and a propensity for producing diverse peptide pools, many more peptides of pharmacological importance await discovery. We envisage that some of these peptides and their recombinant derivatives will provide a new range of tools for neuroscience research and could also facilitate the development of a new generation of analgesic drugs and insecticides.

  19. Performance of a PCR assay for the rapid identification of the Klebsiella pneumoniae ST258 epidemic clone in Latin American clinical isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez, S A; Rapoport, M; Piergrossi, N; Faccone, D; Pasteran, F; De Belder, D; ReLAVRA-Group; Petroni, A; Corso, A

    2016-10-01

    The worldwide dissemination of Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC)-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae ST258 demands a rapid PCR-based typing method to detect unique genes of the ST258 clone. This study evaluates a PCR developed by Adler et al. (2014) for the detection of ST258 in K. pneumoniae clinical isolates centered on the identification of the pilv-I and prp genes. We tested 143 clinical isolates from Argentina (n=109), Chile (n=1), Colombia (n=1), Costa Rica (n=2), Ecuador (n=5), El Salvador (n=2), Nicaragua (n=5), Panamá (n=2), Paraguay (n=2), Perú (n=3) and Trinidad and Tobago (n=11) recovered from 2006 to 2015. blaKPC, pilv-l and prp genes were detected by PCR and sequenced by standard procedures. ST258 and non-ST258 were defined by PFGE and/or MLST. Isolates were grouped according to PFGE patterns: 58 were compatible with ST258 (group 1) and 85 with non-ST258 (group 2). MLST study was done on an arbitrary selection of isolates. The pilv-l gene was present only in ST258 isolates, regardless of the presence of the blaKPC gene. Results for the prp gene were variable. Its presence did not define ST258. The pilv-I PCR had a sensitivity and specificity of 100%, respectively, for the detection of ST258 in the isolates under investigation. Given our findings, the pilv-I PCR could replace more time and resource consuming methods, allowing for more rapid detection of the circulating high risk K. pneumoniae clone ST258 in Latin American (LA) countries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Flexible cross-correlated (C2) imaging method for the modal content characterization in a broad range of wavelengths

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muliar, Olena; Usuga Castaneda, Mario A.; Michieletto, Mattia

    2017-01-01

    as the phase distribution are extracted by the alternative method of 2D FT filtering. Being exceptionally tunable the flexible C2 method gives an ability to adapt the system’s parameters in a desired manner satisfying even measurements of very specific fiber designs opening up new possibilities for advanced......We demonstrate a flexible cross-correlated (C2) imaging method in the time domain by application of a tunable and highly flexible light source. An advantage of the flexible C2method is shown by characterization of the step-index fiber (SMF28) over a broad range of wavelengths from 870nm to 1090nm...

  1. Cloning of the koi herpesvirus (KHV gene encoding thymidine kinase and its use for a highly sensitive PCR based diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilad Oren

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Outbreaks with mass mortality among common carp Cyprinus carpio carpio and koi Cyprinus carpio koi have occurred worldwide since 1998. The herpes-like virus isolated from diseased fish is different from Herpesvirus cyprini and channel catfish virus and was accordingly designated koi herpesvirus (KHV. Diagnosis of KHV infection based on viral isolation and current PCR assays has a limited sensitivity and therefore new tools for the diagnosis of KHV infections are necessary. Results A robust and sensitive PCR assay based on a defined gene sequence of KHV was developed to improve the diagnosis of KHV infection. From a KHV genomic library, a hypothetical thymidine kinase gene (TK was identified, subcloned and expressed as a recombinant protein. Preliminary characterization of the recombinant TK showed that it has a kinase activity using dTTP but not dCTP as a substrate. A PCR assay based on primers selected from the defined DNA sequence of the TK gene was developed and resulted in a 409 bp amplified fragment. The TK based PCR assay did not amplify the DNAs of other fish herpesviruses such as Herpesvirus cyprini (CHV and the channel catfish virus (CCV. The TK based PCR assay was specific for the detection of KHV and was able to detect as little as 10 fentograms of KHV DNA corresponding to 30 virions. The TK based PCR was compared to previously described PCR assays and to viral culture in diseased fish and was shown to be the most sensitive method of diagnosis of KHV infection. Conclusion The TK based PCR assay developed in this work was shown to be specific for the detection of KHV. The TK based PCR assay was more sensitive for the detection of KHV than previously described PCR assays; it was as sensitive as virus isolation which is the golden standard method for KHV diagnosis and was able to detect as little as 10 fentograms of KHV DNA corresponding to 30 virions.

  2. Development and Validation of Broad-Range Qualitative and Clade-Specific Quantitative Molecular Probes for Assessing Mercury Methylation in the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Geoff A; Wymore, Ann M; King, Andrew J; Podar, Mircea; Hurt, Richard A; Santillan, Eugenio U; Soren, Ally; Brandt, Craig C; Brown, Steven D; Palumbo, Anthony V; Wall, Judy D; Gilmour, Cynthia C; Elias, Dwayne A

    2016-10-01

    Two genes, hgcA and hgcB, are essential for microbial mercury (Hg) methylation. Detection and estimation of their abundance, in conjunction with Hg concentration, bioavailability, and biogeochemistry, are critical in determining potential hot spots of methylmercury (MeHg) generation in at-risk environments. We developed broad-range degenerate PCR primers spanning known hgcAB genes to determine the presence of both genes in diverse environments. These primers were tested against an extensive set of pure cultures with published genomes, including 13 Deltaproteobacteria, nine Firmicutes, and nine methanogenic Archaea genomes. A distinct PCR product at the expected size was confirmed for all hgcAB(+) strains tested via Sanger sequencing. Additionally, we developed clade-specific degenerate quantitative PCR (qPCR) primers that targeted hgcA for each of the three dominant Hg-methylating clades. The clade-specific qPCR primers amplified hgcA from 64%, 88%, and 86% of tested pure cultures of Deltaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Archaea, respectively, and were highly specific for each clade. Amplification efficiencies and detection limits were quantified for each organism. Primer sensitivity varied among species based on sequence conservation. Finally, to begin to evaluate the utility of our primer sets in nature, we tested hgcA and hgcAB recovery from pure cultures spiked into sand and soil. These novel quantitative molecular tools designed in this study will allow for more accurate identification and quantification of the individual Hg-methylating groups of microorganisms in the environment. The resulting data will be essential in developing accurate and robust predictive models of Hg methylation potential, ideally integrating the geochemistry of Hg methylation to the microbiology and genetics of hgcAB IMPORTANCE: The neurotoxin methylmercury (MeHg) poses a serious risk to human health. MeHg production in nature is associated with anaerobic microorganisms. The recent

  3. Rapid molecular characterization of Acinetobacter baumannii clones with rep-PCR and evaluation of carbapenemase genes by new multiplex PCR in Hospital District of Helsinki and Uusimaa.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Pasanen

    Full Text Available Multidrug-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (MDRAB is an increasing problem worldwide. Prevalence of carbapenem resistance in Acinetobacter spp. due to acquired carbapenemase genes is not known in Finland. The purpose of this study was to examine prevalence and clonal spread of multiresistant A. baumannii group species, and their carbapenemase genes. A total of 55 Acinetobacter isolates were evaluated with repetitive PCR (DiversiLab to analyse clonality of isolates, in conjunction with antimicrobial susceptibility profile for ampicillin/sulbactam, colistin, imipenem, meropenem, rifampicin and tigecycline. In addition, a new real-time PCR assay, detecting most clinically important carbapenemase genes just in two multiplex reactions, was developed. The assay detects genes for KPC, VIM, IMP, GES-1/-10, OXA-48, NDM, GIM-1, SPM-1, IMI/NMC-A, SME, CMY-10, SFC-1, SIM-1, OXA-23-like, OXA-24/40-like, OXA-58 and ISAbaI-OXA-51-like junction, and allows confident detection of isolates harbouring acquired carbapenemase genes. There was a time-dependent, clonal spread of multiresistant A. baumannii strongly correlating with carbapenamase gene profile, at least in this geographically restricted study material. The new carbapenemase screening assay was able to detect all the genes correctly suggesting it might be suitable for epidemiologic screening purposes in clinical laboratories.

  4. DNRA and denitrification coexist over a broad range of acetate/N-NO3- ratios, in a chemostat enrichment culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eveline Maria Van Den Berg

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Denitrification and dissimilatory nitrate reduction to ammonium (DNRA compete for nitrate in natural and engineered environments. A known important factor in this microbial competition is the ratio of available electron donor and elector acceptor, here expressed as Ac/N ratio (acetate/nitrate-nitrogen. We studied the impact of the Ac/N ratio on the nitrate reduction pathways in chemostat enrichment cultures, grown on acetate mineral medium. Stepwise, conditions were changed from nitrate limitation to nitrate excess in the system by applying a variable Ac/N ratio in the feed. We observed a clear correlation between Ac/N ratio and DNRA activity and the DNRA population in our reactor. The DNRA bacteria dominated under nitrate limiting conditions in the reactor and were outcompeted by denitrifiers under limitation of acetate. Interestingly, in a broad range of Ac/N ratios a dual limitation of acetate and nitrate occurred with co-occurrence of DNRA bacteria and denitrifiers. To explain these observations, the system was described using a kinetic model. The model illustrates that the Ac/N effect and concomitant broad dual limitation range related to the difference in stoichiometry between both processes, as well as the differences in electron donor and acceptor affinities. Population analysis showed that the presumed DRNA-performing bacteria were the same under nitrate limitation and under dual limiting conditions, whereas the presumed denitrifying population changed under single and dual limitation conditions.

  5. Potent autologous and heterologous neutralizing antibody responses occur in HIV-2 infection across a broad range of infection outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Silva, Thushan I; Aasa-Chapman, Marlén; Cotten, Matthew; Hué, Stéphane; Robinson, James; Bibollet-Ruche, Frederic; Sarge-Njie, Ramu; Berry, Neil; Jaye, Assan; Aaby, Peter; Whittle, Hilton; Rowland-Jones, Sarah; Weiss, Robin

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have explored the role of neutralizing antibody (NAb) responses in controlling HIV-2 viremia and disease progression. Using a TZM-bl neutralization assay, we assessed heterologous and autologous NAb responses from a community cohort of HIV-2-infected individuals with a broad range of disease outcomes in rural Guinea-Bissau. All subjects (n = 40) displayed exceptionally high heterologous NAb titers (50% inhibitory plasma dilution or 50% inhibitory concentration [IC(50)], 1:7,000 to 1:1,000,000) against 5 novel primary HIV-2 envelopes and HIV-2 7312A, whereas ROD A and 3 primary envelopes were relatively resistant to neutralization. Most individuals also showed high autologous NAb against contemporaneous envelopes (78% of plasma-envelope combinations in 69 envelopes from 21 subjects), with IC(50)s above 1:10,000. No association between heterologous or autologous NAb titer and greater control of HIV-2 was found. A subset of envelopes was found to be more resistant to neutralization (by plasma and HIV-2 monoclonal antibodies). These envelopes were isolated from individuals with greater intrapatient sequence diversity and were associated with changes in potential N-linked glycosylation sites but not CD4 independence or CXCR4 use. Plasma collected from up to 15 years previously was able to potently neutralize recent autologous envelopes, suggesting a lack of escape from NAb and the persistence of neutralization-sensitive variants over time, despite significant NAb pressure. We conclude that despite the presence of broad and potent NAb responses in HIV-2-infected individuals, these are not the primary forces behind the dichotomous outcomes observed but reveal a limited capacity for adaptive selection and escape from host immunity in HIV-2 infection.

  6. Establishment of Sequence-Tagged Sites on 15q11-q13 by Alu-Vector PCR Cloning of Yac-Generated Fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. S. Kim

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available Angelman syndrome (AS is caused by the loss of function of undefined gene(s on human chromosome 15. The majority of subjects have deletions involving maternally-derived chromosome 15q II-q 13, and the shortest region of deletion overlap (SRO has been localized to the region between D15S10 and D15S113. In this study, yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs, 6G-D4, 9H-D2 and 37D-F9, mapping within the AS SRO, were isolated from the ICI Y AC library. Alu-vector PCR products were amplified from the YACs and from YACs A229A2 and A33FI 0 which had been obtained from the St. Louis Y AC library. The PCR products were cloned and sequenced, and three new sequence-tagged sites were generated within the AS SRO, facilitating the characterization of gene(s involved in the Angelman syndrome.

  7. [PCR, clone and sequence analysis of rDNA-ITS of Nelumbo nucifera from different geographical origins in China].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Shan; Zheng, Wei-wen; Wu, Jin-zhong; Zhou, Li-juan; Song, Ya-na

    2007-04-01

    To provide DNA molecular marker for identification of Nelumbo nucifera by exploring the differences of nrDNA-ITS sequence of N. nucifera originated from different habitats. To compare nrDNA-ITS base sequence using specific PCR-ITS. The completed sequence of ITS and 5.8 S rDNA, and the partial sequences of 18S rDNA and 26S rDNA, totally 750 bp, from N. nucifera were obtained. The differences among N. nucifera from different habitats and from different cultivars were found. The method can be used to identify N. nucifera among different species and to distinguish their fakes. It provided the basis for identifying N. nucifera from different geographical regions by comparison of their ITS sequences.

  8. Optimizing Taq polymerase concentration for improved signal-to-noise in the broad range detection of low abundance bacteria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rudolph Spangler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: PCR in principle can detect a single target molecule in a reaction mixture. Contaminating bacterial DNA in reagents creates a practical limit on the use of PCR to detect dilute bacterial DNA in environmental or public health samples. The most pernicious source of contamination is microbial DNA in DNA polymerase preparations. Importantly, all commercial Taq polymerase preparations inevitably contain contaminating microbial DNA. Removal of DNA from an enzyme preparation is problematical. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: This report demonstrates that the background of contaminating DNA detected by quantitative PCR with broad host range primers can be decreased greater than 10-fold through the simple expedient of Taq enzyme dilution, without altering detection of target microbes in samples. The general method is: For any thermostable polymerase used for high-sensitivity detection, do a dilution series of the polymerase crossed with a dilution series of DNA or bacteria that work well with the test primers. For further work use the concentration of polymerase that gave the least signal in its negative control (H(2O while also not changing the threshold cycle for dilutions of spiked DNA or bacteria compared to higher concentrations of Taq polymerase. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: It is clear from the studies shown in this report that a straightforward procedure of optimizing the Taq polymerase concentration achieved "treatment-free" attenuation of interference by contaminating bacterial DNA in Taq polymerase preparations. This procedure should facilitate detection and quantification with broad host range primers of a small number of bona fide bacteria (as few as one in a sample.

  9. Broad-range detection of arboviruses belonging to Simbu serogroup lineage 1 and specific detection of Akabane, Aino and Peaton viruses by newly developed multiple TaqMan assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirafuji, Hiroaki; Yazaki, Ryu; Shuto, Yozo; Yanase, Tohru; Kato, Tomoko; Ishikura, Youji; Sakaguchi, Zenjiro; Suzuki, Moemi; Yamakawa, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    TaqMan assays were developed for the broad-range detection of arboviruses belonging to Simbu serogroup lineage 1 in the genus Orthobunyavirus and also for the specific detection of three viruses in the lineage, Akabane, Aino and Peaton viruses (AKAV, AINOV and PEAV, respectively). A primer and probe set was designed for the broad-range detection of Simbu serogroup lineage 1 (Pan-Simbu1 set) mainly targeting AKAV, AINOV, PEAV, Sathuperi and Shamonda viruses (SATV and SHAV), and the forward and reverse primers of the Pan-Simbu1 set were also used for the specific detection of AKAV with another probe (AKAV-specific set). In addition, two more primer and probe sets were designed for AINOV- and PEAV-specific detection, respectively (AINOV- and PEAV-specific sets). All of the four primer and probe sets successfully detected targeted viruses, and thus broad-range and specific detection of all the targeted viruses can be achieved by using two multiplex assays and a single assay in a dual (two-color) assay format when another primer and probe set for a bovine β-actin control is also used. The assays had an analytical sensitivity of 10 copies/tube for AKAV, at least 100 copies/tube for AINOV, 100 copies/tube for PEAV, one copy/tube for SATV and at least 10 copies/tube for SHAV, respectively. Diagnostic sensitivity of the assays was tested with field-collected bovine samples, and the results suggested that the sensitivity was higher than that of a conventional RT-PCR. These data indicate that the newly developed TaqMan assays will be useful tools for the diagnosis and screening of field-collected samples for infections of AKAV and several other arboviruses belonging to the Simbu serogroup lineage 1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Microbial diversity and dynamics of microbial communities during back-slop soaking of soybeans as determined by PCR-DGGE and molecular cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yinzhuo; Wolkers-Rooijackers, Judith; Nout, M J Robert; Han, Beizhong

    2013-10-01

    Tempe is a traditional fermented food in Indonesia. The manufacture process is quite complex, which comprises two stages, preparatory soaking of soybeans and fungal solid state fermentation. Daily addition of previous soak water (back-slopping) during the soybean soaking step is considered to be crucial in the manufacture of high quality tempe. The microbial diversity and dynamics of the microbial communities evolving during back-slop soaking of soybeans for tempe making was investigated by culture-independent PCR-DGGE and molecular cloning. Both DNA and total RNA were isolated and included in this study, to obtain a view on the succession of total and viable bacteria in the complex microbiota. DGGE profiles indicated that Enterobacter sp., Enterococcus sp., Pseudomonas putida, Leuconostoc fallax, Pediococcus pentosaceus, and Weissella cibaria, were the predominant bacteria. Their occurrence shifted dramatically during the back-slop soaking procedure. This study combined with previous culture-dependent studies could gain a better understanding of the complex microbiota of traditional fermented food and give useful information for its quality control.

  11. Construction of a self- luminescent cyanobacterial bioreporter that detects a broad range of bioavailable heavy metals in aquatic environments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keila eMartin-Betancor

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A self-luminescent bioreporter strain of the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7942 was constructed by fusing the promoter region of the smt locus (encoding the transcriptional repressor SmtB and the metallothionein SmtA to luxCDABE from Photorhabdus luminescens; the sensor smtB gene controlling the expression of smtA was cloned in the same vector. The bioreporter performance was tested with a range of heavy metals and was shown to respond linearly to divalent Zn, Cd, Cu, Co, Hg and monovalent Ag. Chemical modelling was used to link bioreporter response with metal speciation and bioavailability. Limits of Detection (LODs, Maximum Permissive Concentrations (MPCs and dynamic ranges for each metal were calculated in terms of free ion concentrations. The ranges of detection varied from 11 to 72 pM for Hg2+ (the ion to which the bioreporter was most sensitive to 1.54-5.35 µM for Cd2+ with an order of decreasing sensitivity as follows: Hg2+ >> Cu2+ >> Ag+ > Co2+ ≥ Zn2+ > Cd2+. However, the maximum induction factor reached 75-fold in the case of Zn2+ and 56-fold in the case of Cd2+, implying that Zn2+ is the preferred metal in vivo for the SmtB sensor, followed by Cd2+, Ag+ and Cu2+ (around 45-50-fold induction, Hg2+ (30-fold and finally Co2+ (20-fold. The bioreporter performance was tested in real environmental samples with different water matrix complexity artificially contaminated with increasing concentrations of Zn, Cd, Ag and Cu, confirming its validity as a sensor of free heavy metal cations bioavailability in aquatic environments.

  12. Influences of the common FTO rs9939609 variant on inflammatory markers throughout a broad range of body mass index

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zimmermann, Esther; Skogstrand, Kristin; Hougaard, David M

    2011-01-01

    A recent study reported that the fatness associated A-allele of FTO rs9939609 increased plasma high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) levels independent of fatness. We aimed to investigate if this gene variant had fatness-independent effects on plasma hs-CRP and 10 additional circulating ob...... obesity-related adipokines throughout a broad range of body mass index (BMI) among Danish men....

  13. Fluorescence ratiometric optical broad range pH sensor based on CdSe/ZnS quantum dots and O170 embedded in ethyl cellulose matrix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Cheng-Shane; Su, Chih-Jen

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a ratiometric optical broad range pH sensor that comprises an optical fiber coated at one end with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots (QDs) and Oxazine 170 perchlorate (O170) embedded in ethyl cellulose (EC) matrix. The feasibility of coating an optical fiber with the sensing film to fabricate a ratiometric fiber optic broad range pH sensor is investigated. Using an LED with a central wavelength 405 nm as an excitation light source, the CdSe/ZnS QDs shows that the emission wavelength at 575 nm highly sensitive to pH and O170 shows the emission wavelength at 655 nm insensitive to pH. The ratio of fluorescence intensities at 575 nm and 655 nm has a linear relationship with pH in the 0.9-12.2 range. The ratiometric sensing approach presented in this study has the advantage of suppressing spurious fluctuations in the intensity of the excitation source and optical transmission properties of the optical fiber sensor.

  14. Nitrogen-rich functional groups carbon nanoparticles based fluorescent pH sensor with broad-range responding for environmental and live cells applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bingfang; Su, Yubin; Zhang, Liangliang; Liu, Rongjun; Huang, Mengjiao; Zhao, Shulin

    2016-08-15

    A nitrogen-rich functional groups carbon nanoparticles (N-CNs) based fluorescent pH sensor with a broad-range responding was prepared by one-pot hydrothermal treatment of melamine and triethanolamine. The as-prepared N-CNs exhibited excellent photoluminesence properties with an absolute quantum yield (QY) of 11.0%. Furthermore, the N-CNs possessed a broad-range pH response. The linear pH response range was 3.0 to 12.0, which is much wider than that of previously reported fluorescent pH sensors. The possible mechanism for the pH-sensitive response of the N-CNs was ascribed to photoinduced electron transfer (PET). Cell toxicity experiment showed that the as-prepared N-CNs exhibited low cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility with the cell viabilities of more than 87%. The proposed N-CNs-based pH sensor was used for pH monitoring of environmental water samples, and pH fluorescence imaging of live T24 cells. The N-CNs is promising as a convenient and general fluorescent pH sensor for environmental monitoring and bioimaging applications. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. RT-PCR Screening for ETV6-RUNX1-positive Clones in Cord Blood From Newborns in the Danish National Birth Cohort

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Marianne; Hjalgrim, Henrik; Melbye, Mads

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND:: Several large biobanks comprising umbilical cord blood samples have been established allowing efforts to characterize the prevalence and risk factors for preleukemic cell clones in healthy newborns. This study explores the feasibility of demonstrating translocation ETV6-RUNX1 transcr...

  16. Carbon dots with strong excitation-dependent fluorescence changes towards pH. Application as nanosensors for a broad range of pH

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barati, Ali [Faculty of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Department of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Shamsipur, Mojtaba, E-mail: mshamsipur@yahoo.com [Department of Chemistry, Razi University, Kermanshah (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Abdollahi, Hamid, E-mail: abd@iasbs.ac.ir [Faculty of Chemistry, Institute for Advanced Studies in Basic Sciences, Zanjan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2016-08-10

    In this study, preparation of novel pH-sensitive N-doped carbon dots (NCDs) using glucose and urea is reported. The prepared NCDs present strong excitation-dependent fluorescence changes towards the pH that is a new behavior from these nanomaterials. By taking advantage of this unique behavior, two separated ratiometric pH sensors using emission spectra of the NCDs for both acidic (pH 2.0 to 8.0) and basic (pH 7.0 to 14.0) ranges of pH are constructed. Additionally, by considering the entire Excitation–Emission Matrix (EEM) of NCDs as analytical signal and using a suitable multivariate calibration method, a broad range of pH from 2.0 to 14.0 was well calibrated. The multivariate calibration method was independent from the concentration of NCDs and resulted in a very low average prediction error of 0.067 pH units. No changes in the predicted pH under UV irradiation (for 3 h) and at high ionic strength (up to 2 M NaCl) indicated the high stability of this pH nanosensor. The practicality of this pH nanosensor for pH determination in real water samples was validated with good accuracy and repeatability. - Highlights: • Novel pH-sensitive carbon dots with strong FL changes towards pH are reported. • Ratiometric FL pH-sensors for both acidic and basic ranges of pH are constructed. • Multivariate calibration methods were used to calibrate a broad range of pH. • Using EEM of carbon dots and ANN, pH from 2.0 to 14.0 was well calibrated. • The pH prediction is stable even at high ionic strength up to 2 M NaCl.

  17. Carotenoid production from n-alkanes with a broad range of chain lengths by the novel species Gordonia ajoucoccus A2(T).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin Ho; Kim, Se Hyeuk; Yoon, Jeong Hoon; Lee, Pyung Cheon

    2014-04-01

    A novel diesel-degrading bacterial strain, A2(T), was isolated from soil that was heavily contaminated with oil. Based on phenotypic, phylogenetic, and DNA analyses, strain A2(T) was identified as a novel species of the genus Gordonia and named Gordonia ajoucoccus A2(T) (KCTC 11900BP and CECT8382). G. ajoucoccus A2(T) is able to synthesize carotenoids and produces mainly γ-carotene and keto-γ-carotene. G. ajoucoccus A2(T) is also capable of assimilating n-alkanes with a broad range of chain lengths (C6, C8-C25). Batch culture of G. ajoucoccus A2(T) in a bioreactor containing 1 % (v/v) hexadecane or 1 % (v/v) commercial diesel yielded 25 mg L⁻¹ and 2.6 mg L⁻¹ of carotenoids, respectively. Gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC-MS) analysis of hexadecane and hexane degradation metabolites suggested that G. ajoucoccus A2(T) may possess a terminal oxidation pathway that allows it to utilize n-alkanes and hexane as carbon and energy sources. G. ajoucoccus A2(T) could therefore serve as a good model system for understanding microbial n-alkane degradation pathways. Additionally, the metabolic capabilities of G. ajoucoccus A2(T) suggest potential biotechnological applications, such as the bioproduction of carotenoids from industrial discharge or other sources of n-alkanes.

  18. A cross-sectional study on trans-fatty acids and risk markers of CHD among middle-aged men representing a broad range of BMI

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Birgit M.; Nielsen, Marie M.; Jakobsen, Marianne U.

    2011-01-01

    Intake of trans-fatty acids (TFA), especially industrially produced TFA (I-TFA), has been associated with the risk of CHD through influence on serum lipid levels. Other causal pathways remain less investigated. In the present cross-sectional study of middle-aged men representing a broad range...... of BMI, the association between intake of TFA, I-TFA and ruminant TFA (R-TFA) and obesity-associated risk markers of CHD was assessed. The study comprised 393 Danish men (median age 49 years) with a median BMI of 28·4 kg/m2. Intake of TFA was estimated based on 7 d dietary records, whereas outcomes...... pressure and insulin homeostasis. Among middle-aged men with a generally low intake of TFA, neither I-TFA nor R-TFA was significantly related to obesity-associated risk markers of CHD. The decreased average intake of I-TFA in Denmark since 1995 is suggested to effectively prevent occurrence of the adverse...

  19. Antimicrobial properties of zeolite-X and zeolite-A ion-exchanged with silver, copper, and zinc against a broad range of microorganisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demirci, Selami; Ustaoğlu, Zeynep; Yılmazer, Gonca Altın; Sahin, Fikrettin; Baç, Nurcan

    2014-02-01

    Zeolites are nanoporous alumina silicates composed of silicon, aluminum, and oxygen in a framework with cations, water within pores. Their cation contents can be exchanged with monovalent or divalent ions. In the present study, the antimicrobial (antibacterial, anticandidal, and antifungal) properties of zeolite type X and A, with different Al/Si ratio, ion exchanged with Ag(+), Zn(2+), and Cu(2+) ions were investigated individually. The study presents the synthesis and manufacture of four different zeolite types characterized by scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The ion loading capacity of the zeolites was examined and compared with the antimicrobial characteristics against a broad range of microorganisms including bacteria, yeast, and mold. It was observed that Ag(+) ion-loaded zeolites exhibited more antibacterial activity with respect to other metal ion-embedded zeolite samples. The results clearly support that various synthetic zeolites can be ion exchanged with Ag(+), Zn(2+), and Cu(2+) ions to acquire antimicrobial properties or ion-releasing characteristics to provide prolonged or stronger activity. The current study suggested that zeolite formulations could be combined with various materials used in manufacturing medical devices, surfaces, textiles, or household items where antimicrobial properties are required.

  20. Phagocytosis of environmental or metabolic crystalline particles induces cytotoxicity by triggering necroptosis across a broad range of particle size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honarpisheh, Mohsen; Foresto-Neto, Orestes; Desai, Jyaysi; Steiger, Stefanie; Gómez, Lidia Anguiano; Popper, Bastian; Boor, Peter; Anders, Hans-Joachim; Mulay, Shrikant R

    2017-11-14

    In crystallopathies, crystals or crystalline particles of environmental and metabolic origin deposit within tissues, induce inflammation, injury and cell death and eventually lead to organ-failure. The NLRP3-inflammasome is involved in mediating crystalline particles-induced inflammation, but pathways leading to cell death are still unknown. Here, we have used broad range of intrinsic and extrinsic crystal- or crystalline particle-sizes and shapes, e.g. calcium phosphate, silica, titanium dioxide, cholesterol, calcium oxalate, and monosodium urate. As kidney is commonly affected by crystallopathies, we used human and murine renal tubular cells as a model system. We showed that all of the analysed crystalline particles induce caspase-independent cell death. Deficiency of MLKL, siRNA knockdown of RIPK3, or inhibitors of necroptosis signaling e.g. RIPK-1 inhibitor necrostatin-1s, RIPK3 inhibitor dabrafenib, and MLKL inhibitor necrosulfonamide, partially protected tubular cells from crystalline particles cytotoxicity. Furthermore, we identify phagocytosis of crystalline particles as an upstream event in their cytotoxicity since a phagocytosis inhibitor, cytochalasin D, prevented their cytotoxicity. Taken together, our data confirmed the involvement of necroptosis as one of the pathways leading to cell death in crystallopathies. Our data identified RIPK-1, RIPK3, and MLKL as molecular targets to limit tissue injury and organ failure in crystallopathies.

  1. Quantum mechanical free energy profiles with post-quantization restraints: Binding free energy of the water dimer over a broad range of temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, Kevin P.; Roy, Pierre-Nicholas

    2018-03-01

    Free energy calculations are a crucial part of understanding chemical systems but are often computationally expensive for all but the simplest of systems. Various enhanced sampling techniques have been developed to improve the efficiency of these calculations in numerical simulations. However, the majority of these approaches have been applied using classical molecular dynamics. There are many situations where nuclear quantum effects impact the system of interest and a classical description fails to capture these details. In this work, path integral molecular dynamics has been used in conjunction with umbrella sampling, and it has been observed that correct results are only obtained when the umbrella sampling potential is applied to a single path integral bead post quantization. This method has been validated against a Lennard-Jones benchmark system before being applied to the more complicated water dimer system over a broad range of temperatures. Free energy profiles are obtained, and these are utilized in the calculation of the second virial coefficient as well as the change in free energy from the separated water monomers to the dimer. Comparisons to experimental and ground state calculation values from the literature are made for the second virial coefficient at higher temperature and the dissociation energy of the dimer in the ground state.

  2. Cloning, expression, and purification of the His(6)-tagged hyper-thermostable dUTPase from Pyrococcus woesei in Escherichia coli: application in PCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dabrowski, Slawomir; Ahring, Birgitte Kiær

    2003-01-01

    The gene encoding dUTPase from Pyrococcus woesei was cloned into Escherichia coli expression system. It shows 100% gene identity to homologous gene in Pyrococcus furiosus. The expression of N-terminal His(6)-tagged Pwo dUTPase was performed in E coli BL21(DE3)pLysS and E. coli Rosetta(DE3)p......LysS strain that contains plasmid encoding additional copies of rare E. coli tRNAs. E. coli Rosetta(pLysS) strain was found with two times higher expression yield of His(6)-tagged Pwo dUTPase than E. coli BL21(DE3)pLysS. The His(6)-tagged Pwo dUTPase was purified on Ni2+-IDA-Sepharose, dialyzed...

  3. Elevated Norepinephrine may be a Unifying Etiological Factor in the Abuse of a Broad Range of Substances: Alcohol, Nicotine, Marijuana, Heroin, Cocaine, and Caffeine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fitzgerald, Paul J

    2013-10-13

    A wide range of commonly abused drugs have effects on the noradrenergic neurotransmitter system, including alterations during acute intoxication and chronic use of these drugs. It is not established, however, that individual differences in noradrenergic signaling, which may be present prior to use of drugs, predispose certain persons to substance abuse. This paper puts forth the novel hypothesis that elevated noradrenergic signaling, which may be raised largely due to genetics but also due to environmental factors, is an etiological factor in the abuse of a wide range of substances, including alcohol, nicotine, marijuana, heroin, cocaine, and caffeine. Data are reviewed for each of these drugs comprising their interaction with norepinephrine during acute intoxication, long-term use, subsequent withdrawal, and stress-induced relapse. In general, the data suggest that these drugs acutely boost noradrenergic signaling, whereas long-term use also affects this neurotransmitter system, possibly suppressing it. During acute withdrawal after chronic drug use, noradrenergic signaling tends to be elevated, consistent with the observation that norepinephrine lowering drugs such as clonidine reduce withdrawal symptoms. Since psychological stress can promote relapse of drug seeking in susceptible individuals and stress produces elevated norepinephrine release, this suggests that these drugs may be suppressing noradrenergic signaling during chronic use or instead elevating it only in reward circuits of the brain. If elevated noradrenergic signaling is an etiological factor in the abuse of a broad range of substances, then chronic use of pharmacological agents that reduce noradrenergic signaling, such as clonidine, guanfacine, lofexidine, propranolol, or prazosin, may help prevent or treat drug abuse in general.

  4. Nanohole-based surface plasmon resonance instruments with improved spectral resolution quantify a broad range of antibody-ligand binding kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Hyungsoon; Sutherland, Jamie N; Maynard, Jennifer A; Oh, Sang-Hyun

    2012-02-21

    We demonstrate an affordable low-noise surface plasmon resonance (SPR) instrument based on extraordinary optical transmission (EOT) in metallic nanohole arrays and quantify a broad range of antibody-ligand binding kinetics with equilibrium dissociation constants ranging from 200 pM to 40 nM. This nanohole-based SPR instrument is straightforward to construct, align, and operate, since it is built around a standard microscope and a portable fiber-optic spectrometer. The measured refractive index resolution of this platform is 3.1 × 10(-6) without on-chip cooling, which is among the lowest reported for SPR sensors based on EOT. This is accomplished via rapid full-spectrum acquisition in 10 ms followed by frame averaging of the EOT spectra, which is made possible by the production of template-stripped gold nanohole arrays with homogeneous optical properties over centimeter-sized areas. Sequential SPR measurements are performed using a 12-channel microfluidic flow cell after optimizing surface modification protocols and antibody injection conditions to minimize mass-transport artifacts. The immobilization of a model ligand, the protective antigen of anthrax on the gold surface, is monitored in real-time with a signal-to-noise ratio of ~860. Subsequently, real-time binding kinetic curves were measured quantitatively between the antigen and a panel of small, 25 kDa single-chain antibodies at concentrations down to 1 nM. These results indicate that nanohole-based SPR instruments have potential for quantitative antibody screening and as a general-purpose platform for integrating SPR sensors with other bioanalytical tools.

  5. Expression levels of the yeast alcohol acetyltransferase genes ATF1, Lg-ATF1, and ATF2 control the formation of a broad range of volatile esters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstrepen, Kevin J; Van Laere, Stijn D M; Vanderhaegen, Bart M P; Derdelinckx, Guy; Dufour, Jean-Pierre; Pretorius, Isak S; Winderickx, Joris; Thevelein, Johan M; Delvaux, Freddy R

    2003-09-01

    Volatile aroma-active esters are responsible for the fruity character of fermented alcoholic beverages such as beer and wine. Esters are produced by fermenting yeast cells in an enzyme-catalyzed intracellular reaction. In order to investigate and compare the roles of the known Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcohol acetyltransferases, Atf1p, Atf2p and Lg-Atf1p, in volatile ester production, the respective genes were either deleted or overexpressed in a laboratory strain and a commercial brewing strain. Subsequently, the ester formation of the transformants was monitored by headspace gas chromatography and gas chromatography combined with mass spectroscopy (GC-MS). Analysis of the fermentation products confirmed that the expression levels of ATF1 and ATF2 greatly affect the production of ethyl acetate and isoamyl acetate. GC-MS analysis revealed that Atf1p and Atf2p are also responsible for the formation of a broad range of less volatile esters, such as propyl acetate, isobutyl acetate, pentyl acetate, hexyl acetate, heptyl acetate, octyl acetate, and phenyl ethyl acetate. With respect to the esters analyzed in this study, Atf2p seemed to play only a minor role compared to Atf1p. The atf1Delta atf2Delta double deletion strain did not form any isoamyl acetate, showing that together, Atf1p and Atf2p are responsible for the total cellular isoamyl alcohol acetyltransferase activity. However, the double deletion strain still produced considerable amounts of certain other esters, such as ethyl acetate (50% of the wild-type strain), propyl acetate (50%), and isobutyl acetate (40%), which provides evidence for the existence of additional, as-yet-unknown ester synthases in the yeast proteome. Interestingly, overexpression of different alleles of ATF1 and ATF2 led to different ester production rates, indicating that differences in the aroma profiles of yeast strains may be partially due to mutations in their ATF genes.

  6. Elevated Norepinephrine may be a Unifying Etiological Factor in the Abuse of a Broad Range of Substances: Alcohol, Nicotine, Marijuana, Heroin, Cocaine, and Caffeine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J. Fitzgerald

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A wide range of commonly abused drugs have effects on the noradrenergic neurotransmitter system, including alterations during acute intoxication and chronic use of these drugs. It is not established, however, that individual differences in noradrenergic signaling, which may be present prior to use of drugs, predispose certain persons to substance abuse. This paper puts forth the novel hypothesis that elevated noradrenergic signaling, which may be raised largely due to genetics but also due to environmental factors, is an etiological factor in the abuse of a wide range of substances, including alcohol, nicotine, marijuana, heroin, cocaine, and caffeine. Data are reviewed for each of these drugs comprising their interaction with norepinephrine during acute intoxication, long-term use, subsequent withdrawal, and stress-induced relapse. In general, the data suggest that these drugs acutely boost noradrenergic signaling, whereas long-term use also affects this neurotransmitter system, possibly suppressing it. During acute withdrawal after chronic drug use, noradrenergic signaling tends to be elevated, consistent with the observation that norepinephrine lowering drugs such as clonidine reduce withdrawal symptoms. Since psychological stress can promote relapse of drug seeking in susceptible individuals and stress produces elevated norepinephrine release, this suggests that these drugs may be suppressing noradrenergic signaling during chronic use or instead elevating it only in reward circuits of the brain. If elevated noradrenergic signaling is an etiological factor in the abuse of a broad range of substances, then chronic use of pharmacological agents that reduce noradrenergic signaling, such as clonidine, guanfacine, lofexidine, propranolol, or prazosin, may help prevent or treat drug abuse in general.

  7. Inactivation of pathogenic viruses by plant-derived tannins: strong effects of extracts from persimmon (Diospyros kaki on a broad range of viruses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyoko Ueda

    Full Text Available Tannins, plant-derived polyphenols and other related compounds, have been utilized for a long time in many fields such as the food industry and manufacturing. In this study, we investigated the anti-viral effects of tannins on 12 different viruses including both enveloped viruses (influenza virus H3N2, H5N3, herpes simplex virus-1, vesicular stomatitis virus, Sendai virus and Newcastle disease virus and non-enveloped viruses (poliovirus, coxsachievirus, adenovirus, rotavirus, feline calicivirus and mouse norovirus. We found that extracts from persimmon (Diospyros kaki, which contains ca. 22% of persimmon tannin, reduced viral infectivity in more than 4-log scale against all of the viruses tested, showing strong anti-viral effects against a broad range of viruses. Other tannins derived from green tea, acacia and gallnuts were effective for some of the viruses, while the coffee extracts were not effective for any of the virus. We then investigated the mechanism of the anti-viral effects of persimmon extracts by using mainly influenza virus. Persimmon extracts were effective within 30 seconds at a concentration of 0.25% and inhibited attachment of the virus to cells. Pretreatment of cells with the persimmon extracts before virus infection or post-treatment after virus infection did not inhibit virus replication. Protein aggregation seems to be a fundamental mechanism underlying the anti-viral effect of persimmon tannin, since viral proteins formed aggregates when purified virions were treated with the persimmon extracts and since the anti-viral effect was competitively inhibited by a non-specific protein, bovine serum albumin. Considering that persimmon tannin is a food supplement, it has a potential to be utilized as a safe and highly effective anti-viral reagent against pathogenic viruses.

  8. What is Cloning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donate Home Cloning What is Cloning What is Cloning Clones are organisms that are exact genetic copies. ... clones made through modern cloning technologies. How Is Cloning Done? Many people first heard of cloning when ...

  9. Characterization of rumen ciliate community composition in domestic sheep, deer, and cattle, feeding on varying diets, by means of PCR-DGGE and clone libraries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittelmann, Sandra; Janssen, Peter H

    2011-03-01

    The structure and variability of ciliate protozoal communities in the rumens of domestic New Zealand ruminants feeding on different diets was investigated. The relative abundance of ciliates compared with bacteria was similar across all samples. However, molecular fingerprinting of communities showed ruminant-specific differences in species composition. Community compositions of cattle were significantly influenced by diet. In contrast, diet effects in deer and sheep were weaker than the animal-to-animal variation. Cloning and sequencing of almost-full-length 18S rRNA genes from representative samples revealed that New Zealand ruminants were colonized by at least nine genera of ciliates and allowed the assignment of samples to two distinct community types. Cattle contained A-type communities, with most sequences closely related to those of the genera Polyplastron and Ostracodinium. Deer and sheep (with one exception) harboured B-type communities, with the majority of sequences belonging to the genera Epidinium and Eudiplodinium. It has been suggested that species composition of ciliate communities may impact methane formation in ruminants, with the B-type producing more methane. Therefore, manipulation of ciliate communities may be a means of mitigating methane emissions from grazing sheep and deer in New Zealand. © 2011 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Somatic embryogenesis from seeds in a broad range of Vitis vinifera L. varieties: rescue of true-to-type virus-free plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    San Pedro, Tània; Gammoudi, Najet; Peiró, Rosa; Olmos, Antonio; Gisbert, Carmina

    2017-11-29

    Somatic embryogenesis is the preferred method for cell to plant regeneration in Vitis vinifera L. However, low frequencies of plant embryo conversion are commonly found. In a previous work we obtained from cut-seeds of a grapevine infected with the Grapevine leafroll associated viruses 1 and 3 (GLRaV-1 and GLRaV-3), high rates of direct regeneration, embryo plant conversion and sanitation. The aim of this study is to evaluate the usefulness of this procedure for regeneration of other grapevine varieties which include some infected with one to three common grapevine viruses (GLRaV-3, Grapevine fanleaf virus (GFLV) and Grapevine fleck virus (GFkV)). As grapevine is highly heterozygous, it was necessary to select from among the virus-free plants those that regenerated from mother tissues around the embryo, (true-to-type). Somatic embryogenesis and plant regeneration were achieved in a first experiment, using cut-seeds from the 14 grapevine varieties Airén, Cabernet Franc, Cabernet Sauvignon, Mencía, Merlot, Monastrell, Petit Verdot, Pinot Blanc (infected by GFLV and GFkV), Pinot Gris, Pinot Meunier, Pinot Noir, Syrah, Tempranillo (infected by GFLV), and Verdil. All regenerated plants were confirmed to be free of GFkV whereas at least 68% sanitation was obtained for GFLV. The SSR profiles of the virus-free plants showed, in both varieties, around 10% regeneration from mother tissue (the same genetic make-up as the mother plant). In a second experiment, this procedure was used to sanitize the varieties Cabernet Franc, Godello, Merlot and Valencí Blanc infected by GLRaV-3, GFkV and/or GFLV. Cut-seeds can be used as explants for embryogenesis induction and plant conversion in a broad range of grapevine varieties. The high regeneration rates obtained with this procedure facilitate the posterior selection of true-to-type virus-free plants. A sanitation rate of 100% was obtained for GFkV as this virus is not seed-transmitted. However, the presence of GLRaV-3 and GFLV in

  11. Use of degenerate primers and heat-soaked polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to clone a serine protease antigen from Dermatophilus congolensis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mine, O M; Carnegie, P R

    1997-10-01

    Serine proteases are thought to be involved in the initial attack on sheep skin by Dermatophilus congolensis and are obvious antigens for inclusion in a vaccine to prevent lumpy wool disease (dermatophilosis). Degenerate primers were designed after alignment of seven bacterial serine proteases. Inosine was incorporated into the primers at positions of three- and four-base redundancy, and this reduced the complexity of the primer mixtures from several thousand to sixteen different sequences for each primer. The primers were validated by production and sequencing of amplicons from serine protease genes in Bacillus subtilis and Serratia marcescens. The primers were used with heat-soaked polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to produce amplicons from two D. congolensis strains, AG and MB. In the amplicon codons for arginine, rather than the expected serine, were found where inosine was used for both the first and third positions for a codon in the primer. A search with the deduced amino acid sequences of the amplicons showed significant similarity to a keratinase and other serine proteases from various organisms. Similarity was most apparent around the active site residues and other essential secondary structural elements.

  12. A novel Sarcocystis neurona genotype XIII is associated with severe encephalitis in an unexpectedly broad range of marine mammals from the northeastern Pacific Ocean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbosa, Lorraine; Johnson, Christine K.; Lambourn, Dyanna M.; Gibson, Amanda K.; Haman, Katherine H.; Huggins, Jessica L.; Sweeny, Amy R.; Sundar, Natarajan; Raverty, Stephen A.; Grigg, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Sarcocystis neurona is an important cause of protozoal encephalitis among marine mammals in the northeastern Pacific Ocean. To characterize the genetic type of S. neurona in this region, samples from 227 stranded marine mammals, most with clinical or pathological evidence of protozoal disease, were tested for the presence of coccidian parasites using a nested PCR assay. The frequency of S. neurona infection was 60% (136/227) among pinnipeds and cetaceans, including seven marine mammal species not previously known to be susceptible to infection by this parasite. Eight S. neurona fetal infections identified this coccidian parasite as capable of being transmitted transplacentally. Thirty-seven S. neurona-positive samples were multilocus sequence genotyped using three genetic markers: SnSAG1-5-6, SnSAG3 and SnSAG4. A novel genotype, referred to as Type XIII within the S. neurona population genetic structure, has emerged recently in the northeastern Pacific Ocean and is significantly associated with an increased severity of protozoal encephalitis and mortality among multiple stranded marine mammal species. PMID:25997588

  13. Academic Cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikula, John P.; Sikula, Andrew F.

    1980-01-01

    The authors define "cloning" as an integral feature of all educational systems, citing teaching practices which reward students for closely reproducing the teacher's thoughts and/or behaviors and administrative systems which tend to promote like-minded subordinates. They insist, however, that "academic cloning" is not a totally…

  14. Iodometric and Molecular Detection of ESBL Production Among Clinical Isolates of E. coli Fingerprinted by ERIC-PCR: The First Egyptian Report Declares the Emergence of E. coli O25b-ST131clone Harboring blaGES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Badawy, Mohamed F; Tawakol, Wael M; Maghrabi, Ibrahim A; Mansy, Moselhy S; Shohayeb, Mohamed M; Ashour, Mohammed S

    2017-09-01

    The extensive use of β-lactam antibiotics has led to emergence and spread of extended-spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs). This study was conducted to investigate the prevalence of 7 different ESBL genes (bla TEM , bla SHV , bla CTX-M , bla VEB , bla PER , bla GES , and bla OXA-10 ) and O25b-ST131 high-risk clone among 61 clinical isolates of Escherichia coli. Also, one broad-spectrum β-lactamase (bla OXA-1 ) was investigated. This study was also constructed to evaluate iodometric overlay method in detection of ESBL production. Phenotypic identification of E. coli isolates using API 20E revealed 18 distinct biotypes. DNA fingerprinting using enterobacterial repetitive intergenic consensus polymerase chain reaction (ERIC-PCR) differentiated all isolates into 2 main phylogenetic groups with 60 distinct genetic profiles. Elevated values of minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) 50 and MIC 90 for third- and fourth-generation cephalosporins were observed. Phenotypic tests revealed that 85.24% of isolates were ESBL producers. The incidence rates of bla TEM , bla SHV , bla CTX-M , bla GES , bla OXA-1 , and bla OXA-10 among E. coli ESBL producer phenotype were 69.23%, 25%, 96.15%, 3.85%, 11.54%, and 48%, respectively. On the other hand, bla VEB and bla PER were not detected. Sequencing of bla TEM and bla SHV revealed that bla TEM-214 and bla SHV-11 were the most prevalent variants. Group characterization of bla CTX-M revealed that bla CTX-M-1 was the most prevalent group of bla CTX-M family. It was found that 30.77% of E. coli ESBL producers belonged to O25b-ST131 clone harboring bla CTX-M-15 . This study concluded that iodometric overlay method was 100% sensitive in detection of ESBL production. To our knowledge, this is the first Egyptian study that declares the emergence of E. coli O25b-ST131 harboring bla GES .

  15. Characterization of two novel pacifastin-like peptide precursor isoforms in the desert locust (Schistocerca gregaria): cDNA cloning, functional analysis and real-time RT-PCR gene expression studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simonet, Gert; Breugelmans, Bert; Proost, Paul; Claeys, Ilse; Van Damme, Jozef; De Loof, Arnold; Vanden Broeck, Jozef

    2005-05-15

    In the last decade, a new serine protease inhibitor family has been described in arthropods. Eight members of the family were purified from locusts and share a conserved cysteine array (Cys-Xaa(9-12)-Cys-Asn-Xaa-Cys-Xaa-Cys-Xaa(2-3)-Gly-Xaa(3-6)-Cys-Thr-Xaa3-Cys) with nine inhibitory domains of the light chain of the crayfish protease inhibitor, pacifastin (PLDs; pacifastin light chain domains). Using cDNA cloning, several pacifastin-related precursors have been identified, encoding additional PLD-related peptides in different insect species. In the present study, two isoforms of a novel pacifastin-related precursor (SGPP-4) have been identified in the desert locust, predicting the previously identified SGPI-5 (Schistocerca gregaria PLD-related inhibitor-5) peptide and two novel PLD-related peptide sequences. One novel peptide (SGPI-5A) was synthesized chemically, and its inhibitory activity was assessed in vitro. Although proteases from a locust midgut extract were very sensitive to SGPI-5A, the same peptide proved to be a relatively poor inhibitor of bovine trypsin. By an in silico datamining approach, a novel pacifastin-related precursor with seven PLD-related domains was identified in the mosquito, Aedes aegypti. As in other insect pacifastin-related precursors, the Aedes precursor showed a particular domain architecture that is not encountered in other serine protease inhibitor families. Finally, a comparative real-time RT-PCR analysis of SGPP-4 transcripts in different tissues of isolated- (solitarious) and crowded-reared (gregarious) locusts was performed. This showed that SGPP-4 mRNA levels are higher in the brain, testes and fat body of gregarious males than of solitarious males. These results have been compared with data from a similar study on SGPP-1-3 transcripts and discussed with respect to a differential regulation of serine-protease-dependent pathways as a possible mechanism underlying locust phase polymorphism.

  16. Why Clone?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... to clone agricultural animals, such as cattle and pigs, that are efficient producers of high-quality milk ... risks involved. Visit Teach.Genetics Cite this page Feedback Disclaimer Permissions Policy Privacy Policy Copyright © University of ...

  17. Cloning, clones and clonal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luzzatto, L

    2000-01-01

    In the past, cloning has been familiar to plant breeders because many plants can be easily reproduced in this way, bypassing the lengthy process of cross-fertilisation. Recently, the concept of cloning has become popular in human biology and medicine on two accounts. First, individual genes can be cloned from the enormous complexity of the DNA that makes up the human genetic material. It is expected that, within a few years, all the estimated 100,000 human genes will be isolated by this approach. This should make it possible to identify all the genes that determine the individual characteristics of human beings, including those responsible for causing human diseases or for making people more or less susceptible to pick up diseases from the environment. Cloned genes made into pharmaceutical products are already in use for treating a variety of diseases, from hormonal deficiencies to certain types of anaemia.

  18. Cloning of partial putative gonadotropin hormone receptor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Equus asinus. –. 71·0. –. Macaca fascicularis. –. 83·9. –. Gallus gallus. –. 74·2. –. Canis familiaris. –. –. 74·2. Drosophila melanogaster. –. 61·3. –. Figure 2. Structure of the cloned insert. (a) Diagrammatic representation of the cloned DNA fragment; arrangement of the PCR products are illustrated with primers. Letters 'F' and.

  19. Molecular cloning, characterization and expression of WAG-2 ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Gel Extraction kit (Qiagen, Shanghai, China). Purified PCR products were cloned in a pMD20T vector following the man- ufacturer's instructions (Takara, Dalian, China). Transfor- mants were plated on LB agar containing ampicillin. Clones. Table 1. Primers and probes for WAG-2 cloning and expression from Ae. tauschii.

  20. Molecular cloning of endochitinase 33 (ECH33) gene from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-09-28

    Sep 28, 2011 ... This study was conducted to screen for the presence of ech33 gene in 80 isolates of Trichoderma. Furthermore, using gene specific primers, ech33 gene were cloned into pTZ57R/T from T. harzanium. IABT1068. The clone was confirmed through PCR amplification and restriction analysis. The clones.

  1. Cloning-free CRISPR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mandana Arbab

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available We present self-cloning CRISPR/Cas9 (scCRISPR, a technology that allows for CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genomic mutation and site-specific knockin transgene creation within several hours by circumventing the need to clone a site-specific single-guide RNA (sgRNA or knockin homology construct for each target locus. We introduce a self-cleaving palindromic sgRNA plasmid and a short double-stranded DNA sequence encoding the desired locus-specific sgRNA into target cells, allowing them to produce a locus-specific sgRNA plasmid through homologous recombination. scCRISPR enables efficient generation of gene knockouts (∼88% mutation rate at approximately one-sixth the cost of plasmid-based sgRNA construction with only 2 hr of preparation for each targeted site. Additionally, we demonstrate efficient site-specific knockin of GFP transgenes without any plasmid cloning or genome-integrated selection cassette in mouse and human embryonic stem cells (2%–4% knockin rate through PCR-based addition of short homology arms. scCRISPR substantially lowers the bar on mouse and human transgenesis.

  2. Human Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-07-20

    research group, headed by Douglas Melton and Kevin Eggan, submitted their proposal to a Harvard committee composed of ethicists, scientists and public...United States. Although the company offered no proof of its claim, Dr . Brigette Boisselier, Managing Director of Clonaid, stated that genetic tests would...a year of the Dolly announcement, concerns over human cloning were heightened when Dr . Richard Seed, a Chicago scientist, announced on January 7

  3. ExCyto PCR amplification.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinay Dhodda

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available ExCyto PCR cells provide a novel and cost effective means to amplify DNA transformed into competent bacterial cells. ExCyto PCR uses host E. coli with a chromosomally integrated gene encoding a thermostable DNA polymerase to accomplish robust, hot-start PCR amplification of cloned sequences without addition of exogenous enzyme.Because the thermostable DNA polymerase is stably integrated into the bacterial chromosome, ExCyto cells can be transformed with a single plasmid or complex library, and then the expressed thermostable DNA polymerase can be used for PCR amplification. We demonstrate that ExCyto cells can be used to amplify DNA from different templates, plasmids with different copy numbers, and master mixes left on ice for up to two hours. Further, PCR amplification with ExCyto cells is comparable to amplification using commercial DNA polymerases. The ability to transform a bacterial strain and use the endogenously expressed protein for PCR has not previously been demonstrated.ExCyto PCR reduces pipetting and greatly increases throughput for screening EST, genomic, BAC, cDNA, or SNP libraries. This technique is also more economical than traditional PCR and thus broadly useful to scientists who utilize analysis of cloned DNAs in their research.

  4. PCR protocols: current methods and applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    White, Bruce Alan

    1993-01-01

    ..." between "small" and "big" labs, since its use makes certain projects, especially those related to molecular cloning, now far more feasible for the small lab with a modest budget. This new volume on PCR Protocols does not attempt the impossible task of representing all PCR-based protocols. Rather, it presents a range of protocols, both analytical ...

  5. Real-time PCR and microscopy: are the two methods measuring the same unit of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal abundance?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gamper, Hannes A; Young, J Peter W; Jones, David L; Hodge, Angela

    2008-05-01

    To enable quantification of mycelial abundance in mixed-species environments, eight new TaqMan((R)) real-time PCR assays were developed for five arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF, Glomeromycota) taxa. The assays targeted genes encoding 18S rRNA or actin, and were tested on DNA from cloned gene fragments, from spores, mycelia, and from root-free soil, and on reverse-transcribed rRNA templates from entire mycelia and from colonized roots. The assays showed high specificity, sensitivity, and reproducibility, enabling reliable quantitation over broad ranges of template molecules. From cultured mycelia, DNA and RNA measures both correlated with spore number rather than extraradical hyphal length, and epifluorescence microscopy identified pronounced heterogeneity in vitality and nuclear distribution in hyphae. Root colonization was also spatially heterogeneous, as shown by a mixing experiment with root fragments of different length. Therefore, although real-time PCR can reproducibly and accurately quantify AMF nucleic acids, these are poorly correlated with visual measures because of spatial heterogeneity.

  6. Characteristic miRNA expression signature and random forest survival analysis identify potential cancer-driving miRNAs in a broad range of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma subtypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunez Lopez, Yury O; Victoria, Berta; Golusinski, Pawel; Golusinski, Wojciech; Masternak, Michal M

    2018-01-01

    To characterize the miRNA expression profile in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSSC) accounting for a broad range of cancer subtypes and consequently identify an optimal miRNA signature with prognostic value. HNSCC is consistently among the most common cancers worldwide. Its mortality rate is about 50% because of the characteristic aggressive behavior of these cancers and the prevalent late diagnosis. The heterogeneity of the disease has hampered the development of robust prognostic tools with broad clinical utility. The Cancer Genome Atlas HNSC dataset was used to analyze level 3 miRNA-Seq data from 497 HNSCC patients. Differential expression (DE) analysis was implemented using the limma package and multivariate linear model that adjusted for the confounding effects of age at diagnosis, gender, race, alcohol history, anatomic neoplasm subdivision, pathologic stage, T and N stages, and vital status. Random forest (RF) for survival analysis was implemented using the randomForestSRC package. A characteristic DE miRNA signature of HNSCC, comprised of 11 upregulated (i.e., miR-196b-5p, miR-1269a, miR-196a-5p, miR-4652-3p, miR-210-3p, miR-1293, miR-615-3p, miR-503-5p, miR-455-3p, miR-205-5p, and miR-21-5p) and 9 downregulated (miR-376c-3p, miR-378c, miR-29c-3p, miR-101-3p, miR-195-5p, miR-299-5p, miR-139-5p, miR-6510-3p, miR-375) miRNAs was identified. An optimal RF survival model was built from seven variables including age at diagnosis, miR-378c, miR-6510-3p, stage N, pathologic stage, gender, and race (listed in order of variable importance). The joint differential miRNA expression and survival analysis controlling for multiple confounding covariates implemented in this study allowed for the identification of a previously undetected prognostic miRNA signature characteristic of a broad range of HNSCC.

  7. Identification of CTX-M15-, SHV-28-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae ST15 as an epidemic clone in the Copenhagen area using a semi-automated Rep-PCR typing assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J B; Skov, M N; Jørgensen, R L

    2011-01-01

    Rapid molecular typing methods can be a valuable aid in the investigation of suspected outbreaks. We used a semi-automated repetitive sequence-based polymerase chain reaction (Rep-PCR) typing assay and pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) to investigate the relationship between local Klebsiella...

  8. Mixed quantum/classical calculations of total and differential elastic and rotationally inelastic scattering cross sections for light and heavy reduced masses in a broad range of collision energies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semenov, Alexander; Babikov, Dmitri

    2014-01-28

    The mixed quantum/classical theory (MQCT) for rotationally inelastic scattering developed recently [A. Semenov and D. Babikov, J. Chem. Phys. 139, 174108 (2013)] is benchmarked against the full quantum calculations for two molecular systems: He + H2 and Na + N2. This allows testing new method in the cases of light and reasonably heavy reduced masses, for small and large rotational quanta, in a broad range of collision energies and rotational excitations. The resultant collision cross sections vary through ten-orders of magnitude range of values. Both inelastic and elastic channels are considered, as well as differential (over scattering angle) cross sections. In many cases results of the mixed quantum/classical method are hard to distinguish from the full quantum results. In less favorable cases (light masses, larger quanta, and small collision energies) some deviations are observed but, even in the worst cases, they are within 25% or so. The method is computationally cheap and particularly accurate at higher energies, heavier masses, and larger densities of states. At these conditions MQCT represents a useful alternative to the standard full-quantum scattering theory.

  9. Virtual PCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gardner, S N; Clague, D S; Vandersall, J A; Hon, G; Williams, P L

    2006-02-23

    The polymerase chain reaction (PCR) stands among the keystone technologies for analysis of biological sequence data. PCR is used to amplify DNA, to generate many copies from as little as a single template. This is essential, for example, in processing forensic DNA samples, pathogen detection in clinical or biothreat surveillance applications, and medical genotyping for diagnosis and treatment of disease. It is used in virtually every laboratory doing molecular, cellular, genetic, ecologic, forensic, or medical research. Despite its ubiquity, we lack the precise predictive capability that would enable detailed optimization of PCR reaction dynamics. In this LDRD, we proposed to develop Virtual PCR (VPCR) software, a computational method to model the kinetic, thermodynamic, and biological processes of PCR reactions. Given a successful completion, these tools will allow us to predict both the sequences and concentrations of all species that are amplified during PCR. The ability to answer the following questions will allow us both to optimize the PCR process and interpret the PCR results: What products are amplified when sequence mixtures are present, containing multiple, closely related targets and multiplexed primers, which may hybridize with sequence mismatches? What are the effects of time, temperature, and DNA concentrations on the concentrations of products? A better understanding of these issues will improve the design and interpretation of PCR reactions. The status of the VPCR project after 1.5 years of funding is consistent with the goals of the overall project which was scoped for 3 years of funding. At half way through the projected timeline of the project we have an early beta version of the VPCR code. We have begun investigating means to improve the robustness of the code, performed preliminary experiments to test the code and begun drafting manuscripts for publication. Although an experimental protocol for testing the code was developed, the preliminary

  10. Human cloning 2001.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, David L; Weston, Gareth; Pera, Martin F; Rombauts, Luk; Trounson, Alan O

    2002-05-01

    This review summaries human cloning from a clinical perspective. Natural human clones, that is, monozygotic twins, are increasing in the general community. Iatrogenic human clones have been produced for decades in infertile couples given fertility treatment such as ovulation induction. A clear distinction must be made between therapeutic cloning using embryonic stem cells and reproductive cloning attempts. Unlike the early clinical years of in vitro fertilization, with cloning there is no animal model that is safe and dependable. Until there is such a model, 'Dolly'-style human cloning is medically unacceptable.

  11. Recombination-assisted megaprimer (RAM) cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mathieu, Jacques; Alvarez, Emilia; Alvarez, Pedro J.J.

    2014-01-01

    No molecular cloning technique is considered universally reliable, and many suffer from being too laborious, complex, or expensive. Restriction-free cloning is among the simplest, most rapid, and cost-effective methods, but does not always provide successful results. We modified this method to enhance its success rate through the use of exponential amplification coupled with homologous end-joining. This new method, recombination-assisted megaprimer (RAM) cloning, significantly extends the application of restriction-free cloning, and allows efficient vector construction with much less time and effort when restriction-free cloning fails to provide satisfactory results. The following modifications were made to the protocol:•Limited number of PCR cycles for both megaprimer synthesis and the cloning reaction to reduce error propagation.•Elimination of phosphorylation and ligation steps previously reported for cloning methods that used exponential amplification, through the inclusion of a reverse primer in the cloning reaction with a 20 base pair region of homology to the forward primer.•The inclusion of 1 M betaine to enhance both reaction specificity and yield. PMID:26150930

  12. Cloning of observables

    OpenAIRE

    Ferraro, Alessandro; Galbiati, Matteo; Paris, Matteo G. A.

    2005-01-01

    We introduce the concept of cloning for classes of observables and classify cloning machines for qubit systems according to the number of parameters needed to describe the class under investigation. A no-cloning theorem for observables is derived and the connections between cloning of observables and joint measurements of noncommuting observables are elucidated. Relationships with cloning of states and non-demolition measurements are also analyzed.

  13. Cloning and differential expression of 1- aminocyclopropane-1 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2010-04-12

    Apr 12, 2010 ... Cloning of the DenACS from Dendrobium hybrid cultivar Anna was performed by RT-PCR and ..... The ACS gene of the Dendrobium hybrid cultivar Anna ..... Cloning of a cDNA encoding 1-aminocyclopropane-1- carboxylate synthase and expression of its mRNA in ripening apple fruit. Planta. 185: 38-45.

  14. Cloning of partial putative gonadotropin hormone receptor ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Keywords. Glycoprotein hormone receptor; gonadotropin receptor; Labeo rohita; luteinizing hormone receptor; mariner transposon; PCR cloning. Abstract. A search for the presence of mariner-like elements in the Labeo rohita genome by polymerase chain reaction led to the amplification of a partial DNA sequence coding ...

  15. CloneAssistant 1.0: a stand-alone software for automated cloning primer design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Chaogang; Meng, Yijun; Lv, Shaolei; Zhong, Wei; Wang, Zheyu; Chen, Ming

    2010-11-01

    "CloneAssistant 1.0" is a stand-alone software compatible with the current Windows operating systems, which can automatically design cloning primers with full consideration of the sequence information of vectors and genes, cloning strategies, the principles of primer design, reading frames, position effects, and enzymatic reaction conditions for users. Five internal XML (extensible markup language) databases [restriction enzymes, plasmids, universal buffers, PCR (polymerase chain reaction) protection bases, and an MCS (multiple cloning site) double digest interference database] were established to serve as the basic support for "CloneAssistant 1.0". The primer pairs designed are sorted according to the difficulty of the follow-up experiments. Once a primer pair is selected by the user, detailed experimental guidance for this primer pair will be provided. In addition, "CloneAssistant 1.0" can be used for restriction map analysis, ORF (open reading frame) finding, sequence alignment and complementary analysis, translation, restriction enzyme and universal buffer queries, and isocaudamer analysis. "CloneAssistant 1.0" makes gene clone design much easier, and it can be freely downloaded from http://bis.zju.edu.cn/clone. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. The effect of high-fat diet on the composition of the gut microbiota in cloned and non-cloned pigs of lean and obese phenotype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rebecca; Andersen, Anders Daniel; Hermann-Bank, Marie Louise

    2013-01-01

    overall composition of their gut microbiota. The colon of lean cloned pigs contained relatively more bacteria belonging to the phylum Firmicutes and less from the phylum Bacteroidetes than obese cloned pigs as estimated by qPCR. Fluidigm qPCR results revealed differences in specific bacterial groups......The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of high-far-high-energy diet on cloned and non-cloned domestic pigs of both lean and obese phenotype and to evaluate if the lean cloned pigs had a lower inter-individual variation as compared with non-cloned pigs. The microbiota of colon...... and terminal ileum was investigated in cloned and non-cloned pigs that received a high-far-high-energy diet with either restricted or ad libitum access to feed, resulting in lean and obese phenotypes, respectively. The fecal microbiota of lean pigs was investigated by terminal restriction fragment length...

  17. Cloning and shake flask expression of hrIDS- Like in Pichia pastoris ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The human Iduronate-2-sulfate sulfatase (hIDS-Like) was cloned into the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris under the control of alcohol oxidase promoter (AOX1) and the -mating factor signal peptide (a-factor). Six clones were identified by PCR. Using clone IDS28, the enzyme was secreted into the culture medium, ...

  18. Cloning and sequencing of a cellobiohydrolase gene from Trichoderma harzianum FP108

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patrick Guilfoile; Ron Burns; Zu-Yi Gu; Matt Amundson; Fu-Hsian Chang

    1999-01-01

    A cbbl cellobiohydrolase gene was cloned and sequenced from the fungus Trichoderrna harzianum FP108. The cloning was performed by PCR amplification of T. harzianum genomic DNA, using PCR primers whose sequence was based on the cbbl gene from Tricboderma reesei. The 3' end of the gene was isolated by inverse...

  19. PCR thermocycler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benett, William J.; Richards, James B.

    2003-01-01

    A sleeve-type silicon polymerase chain reaction (PCR) chamber or thermocycler having improved thermal performance. The silicon sleeve reaction chamber is improved in thermal performance by etched features therein that reduce thermal mass and increase the surface area of the sleeve for cooling. This improved thermal performance of the thermocycler enables an increase in speed and efficiency of the reaction chamber. The improvement is accomplished by providing grooves in the faces of the sleeve and a series of grooves on the interior surfaces that connect with grooves on the faces of the sleeve. The grooves can be anisotropically etched in the silicon sleeve simultaneously with formation of the chamber.

  20. The effect of high-fat diet on the composition of the gut microbiota in cloned and non-cloned pigs of lean and obese phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pedersen, Rebecca; Andersen, Anders Daniel; Hermann-Bank, Marie Louise; Stagsted, Jan; Boye, Mette

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of high-far-high-energy diet on cloned and non-cloned domestic pigs of both lean and obese phenotype and to evaluate if the lean cloned pigs had a lower inter-individual variation as compared with non-cloned pigs. The microbiota of colon and terminal ileum was investigated in cloned and non-cloned pigs that received a high-far-high-energy diet with either restricted or ad libitum access to feed, resulting in lean and obese phenotypes, respectively. The fecal microbiota of lean pigs was investigated by terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP). The intestinal microbiota of lean and obese cloned and non-cloned pigs was analyzed by quantitative real time PCR and a novel high-throughput qPCR platform (Fluidigm). Principal component analysis (PCA) of the T-RFLP profiles revealed that lean cloned and non-cloned pigs had a different overall composition of their gut microbiota. The colon of lean cloned pigs contained relatively more bacteria belonging to the phylum Firmicutes and less from the phylum Bacteroidetes than obese cloned pigs as estimated by qPCR. Fluidigm qPCR results revealed differences in specific bacterial groups in the gut microbiota of both lean and obese pigs. Our results suggest that high-far-high-energy diet is associated with changes in the gut microbiota even in the absence of obesity. Overall, the cloned pigs had a different gut microbiota from that of non-cloned pigs. To our knowledge this is the first study to investigate the gut microbiota of cloned domestic pigs of lean and obese phenotype.

  1. Empirical Results on Cloning and Clone Detection

    OpenAIRE

    Wagner, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    Cloning means the use of copy-paste as method in developing software artefacts. This practice has several problems, such as unnecessary increase of these artefacts, and thereby increased comprehension and change efforts, as well as potential inconsistencies. The automatic detection of clones has been a topic for research for several years now and we have made huge progress in terms of precision and recall. This led to a series of empirical analyses we have performed on the effects and the amo...

  2. Generating in vivo cloning vectors for parallel cloning of large gene clusters by homologous recombination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeongmin Lee

    Full Text Available A robust method for the in vivo cloning of large gene clusters was developed based on homologous recombination (HR, requiring only the transformation of PCR products into Escherichia coli cells harboring a receiver plasmid. Positive clones were selected by an acquired antibiotic resistance, which was activated by the recruitment of a short ribosome-binding site plus start codon sequence from the PCR products to the upstream position of a silent antibiotic resistance gene in receiver plasmids. This selection was highly stringent and thus the cloning efficiency of the GFPuv gene (size: 0.7 kb was comparable to that of the conventional restriction-ligation method, reaching up to 4.3 × 10(4 positive clones per μg of DNA. When we attempted parallel cloning of GFPuv fusion genes (size: 2.0 kb and carotenoid biosynthesis pathway clusters (sizes: 4 kb, 6 kb, and 10 kb, the cloning efficiency was similarly high regardless of the DNA size, demonstrating that this would be useful for the cloning of large DNA sequences carrying multiple open reading frames. However, restriction analyses of the obtained plasmids showed that the selected cells may contain significant amounts of receiver plasmids without the inserts. To minimize the amount of empty plasmid in the positive selections, the sacB gene encoding a levansucrase was introduced as a counter selection marker in receiver plasmid as it converts sucrose to a toxic levan in the E. coli cells. Consequently, this method yielded completely homogeneous plasmids containing the inserts via the direct transformation of PCR products into E. coli cells.

  3. A MultiSite Gateway Toolkit for Rapid Cloning of Vertebrate Expression Constructs with Diverse Research Applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Daniel K; Stewart, Scott; Seredick, Steve; Eisen, Judith S; Stankunas, Kryn; Washbourne, Philip

    2016-01-01

    Recombination-based cloning is a quick and efficient way to generate expression vectors. Recent advancements have provided powerful recombinant DNA methods for molecular manipulations. Here, we describe a novel collection of three-fragment MultiSite Gateway cloning system-compatible vectors providing expanded molecular tools for vertebrate research. The components of this toolkit encompass a broad range of uses such as fluorescent imaging, dual gene expression, RNA interference, tandem affinity purification, chemically-inducible dimerization and lentiviral production. We demonstrate examples highlighting the utility of this toolkit for producing multi-component vertebrate expression vectors with diverse primary research applications. The vectors presented here are compatible with other Gateway toolkits and collections, facilitating the rapid generation of a broad range of innovative DNA constructs for biological research.

  4. Cloning of zebrafish BAD, a BH3-only proapoptotic protein, whose overexpression leads to apoptosis in COS-1 cells and zebrafish embryos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsieh, Yueh-Chun; Chang, Mau-Sun; Chen, Jeou-Yuan; Yen, Jeffrey Jong-Young; Lu, I-Ching; Chou, Chih-Ming; Huang, Chang-Jen

    2003-05-16

    The BH3-only proapoptotic protein, BAD, was cloned from zebrafish embryos and its properties were characterized. Zebrafish BAD (zBAD) is a protein with 147 amino acids that contains a BH3 domain and a putative 14-3-3 binding site with the sequence of RPRSRS(84)AP, corresponding to S(136) in mouse BAD (mBAD). zBAD shares 34%, 28%, and 29% amino acid sequence identity to the human, mouse, and rat BAD, respectively. RT-PCR analysis revealed that the expression of zBAD gene is found in various parts of zebrafish tissues. The treatment with the z-VAD fmk, a broad-range caspase inhibitor, in COS-1 cells significantly increased the expression of zebrafish BAD fusion proteins (GFP-zBAD and HA-zBAD), indicating that zebrafish BAD fusion proteins may be cleaved by caspase(s). zBAD was shown to induce apoptosis when it was overexpressed in COS-1 cells. In addition, zBAD was also expressed in muscle cells under the muscle-specific promoter from zebrafish alpha-actin gene. Abnormality in the skeletal muscles and the loss of green fluorescence signal in the same region were observed. Taken together, our results indicate that zBAD could induce apoptosis in vitro and in vivo and may have biological implications in apoptosis during zebrafish development.

  5. Statement on Human Cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... as our understanding of this technology advances. Support Stem Cell Research (including Research Cloning) AAAS supports stem cell research, including the use of nuclear transplantation techniques (also ...

  6. Gateway Recombinational Cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reece-Hoyes, John S; Walhout, Albertha J M

    2018-01-02

    The Gateway recombinatorial cloning system was developed for cloning multiple DNA fragments in parallel (e.g., in 96-well formats) in a standardized manner using the same enzymes. Gateway cloning is based on the highly specific integration and excision reactions of bacteriophage λ into and out of the Escherichia coli genome. Because the sites of recombination (" att " sites) are much longer (25-242 bp) than restriction sites, they are extremely unlikely to occur by chance in DNA fragments. Therefore, the same recombination enzyme can be used to robustly clone many different fragments of variable size in parallel reactions. © 2018 Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  7. Ribosomal PCR and DNA sequencing for detection and identification of bacteria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Kristine Helander; Dargis, Rimtas; Christensen, Jens Jørgen

    2014-01-01

    The use of broad range PCR and DNA sequencing of bacterial 16S ribosomal RNA genes for routine diagnostics of bacterial infections was evaluated. Here, the results from more than 2600 analyses during a 6-year period (2003-2009) are presented. Almost half of the samples were from joints and bones......-haemolytic streptococci, especially within the mitis group. The data show that ribosomal PCR with subsequent DNA sequencing of the PCR product is a most valuable supplement to culture for identifying bacterial agents of both acute and prolonged infections. However, some bacteria, including non-haemolytic streptococci...

  8. Culture independent PCR: an alternative enzyme discovery strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Jonas; Lydolph, Magnus; Lange, Lene

    2005-01-01

    Degenerate primers were designed for use in a culture-independent PCR screening of DNA from composite fungal communities, inhabiting residues of corn stovers and leaves. According to similarity searches and alignments amplified clone sequences affiliated with glycosyl hydrolase family 7 and glyco......Degenerate primers were designed for use in a culture-independent PCR screening of DNA from composite fungal communities, inhabiting residues of corn stovers and leaves. According to similarity searches and alignments amplified clone sequences affiliated with glycosyl hydrolase family 7...... the value of culture-independent PCR in microbial diversity studies and could add to development of a new enzyme screening technology....

  9. An asymmetric PCR-based, reliable and rapid single-tube native DNA engineering strategy

    OpenAIRE

    Bi Yanzhen; Qiao Xianfeng; Hua Zaidong; Zhang Liping; Liu Ximei; Li Li; Hua Wenjun; Xiao Hongwei; Zhou Jingrong; Wei Qingxin; Zheng Xinmin

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Widely used restriction-dependent cloning methods are labour-intensive and time-consuming, while several types of ligase-independent cloning approaches have inherent limitations. A rapid and reliable method of cloning native DNA sequences into desired plasmids are highly desired. Results This paper introduces ABI-REC, a novel strategy combining asymmetric bridge PCR with intramolecular homologous recombination in bacteria for native DNA cloning. ABI-REC was developed to pr...

  10. Cloning-free CRISPR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arbab, Mandana; Srinivasan, Sharanya; Hashimoto, Tatsunori; Geijsen, Niels; Sherwood, Richard I

    2015-01-01

    We present self-cloning CRISPR/Cas9 (scCRISPR), a technology that allows for CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genomic mutation and site-specific knockin transgene creation within several hours by circumventing the need to clone a site-specific single-guide RNA (sgRNA) or knockin homology construct for each

  11. Cloning, killing, and identity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMahan, J

    1999-01-01

    One potentially valuable use of cloning is to provide a source of tissues or organs for transplantation. The most important objection to this use of cloning is that a human clone would be the sort of entity that it would be seriously wrong to kill. I argue that entities of the sort that you and I essentially are do not begin to exist until around the seventh month of fetal gestation. Therefore to kill a clone prior to that would not be to kill someone like you or me but would be only to prevent one of us from existing. And even after one of us begins to exist, the objections to killing it remain comparatively weak until its psychological capacities reach a certain level of maturation. These claims support the permissibility of killing a clone during the early stages of its development in order to use its organs for transplantation. PMID:10226909

  12. USER-derived cloning methods and their primer design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salomonsen, Bo; Mortensen, Uffe H; Halkier, Barbara A

    2014-01-01

    Uracil excision-based cloning through USER™ (Uracil-Specific Excision Reagent) is an efficient ligase-free cloning technique that comprises USER cloning, USER fusion, and USER cassette-free (UCF) USER fusion. These USER-derived cloning techniques enable seamless assembly of multiple DNA fragments in one construct. Though governed by a few simple rules primer design for USER-based fusion of PCR fragments can prove time-consuming for inexperienced users. The Primer Help for USER (PHUSER) software is an easy-to-use primer design tool for USER-based methods. In this chapter, we present a PHUSER software protocol for designing primers for USER-derived cloning techniques.

  13. Rapid identification of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus transmission in hospitals by use of phage-derived open reading frame typing enhanced by multiplex PCR and reverse line blot assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Sullivan, Matthew V N; Kong, Fanrong; Sintchenko, Vitali; Gilbert, Gwendolyn L

    2010-08-01

    The relatively high-level clonality of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) and its frequent high-level endemicity in nosocomial settings complicate the development of methods for rapid subtyping of MRSA strains that are capable of identifying person-to-person transmission in hospitals. Phage-derived open reading frame (PDORF) typing is an MRSA typing method targeting mobile genetic elements that was recently described and evaluated using a geographically restricted set of isolates. The objective of this study was to develop a multiplex PCR-reverse line blot (mPCR/RLB) assay for PDORF typing and to test its applicability on a broad range of isolates and in an environment where MRSA is highly endemic. The 16 targets were identified using a 23-primer-pair mPCR/RLB assay with two probes for each target. The method was evaluated using 42 MRSA reference strains, including those representing major international clones, and 35 isolates from episodes of suspected nosocomial transmission. In vivo stability was explored using 81 isolate pairs. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) and spa typing were performed for comparison. Among the 42 reference strains, there were 33 PFGE subtypes, 30 PDORF types, and 22 spa types. Simpson's index of diversity was 0.987, 0.971, and 0.926 for PFGE subtyping, PDORF typing, and spa typing, respectively. Typing of clinical isolates by PDORF typing and PFGE demonstrated concordant results. mPCR/RLB-based PDORF typing has similar discriminatory power to that of PFGE, can assist in tracking MRSA transmission events in a setting of high-level endemicity, and has the advantage of being a high-throughput technique.

  14. Molecular cloning using polymerase chain reaction, an educational guide for cellular engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoseini, Sayed Shahabuddin; Sauer, Martin G

    2015-01-01

    Over the last decades, molecular cloning has transformed biological sciences. Having profoundly impacted various areas such as basic science, clinical, pharmaceutical, and environmental fields, the use of recombinant DNA has successfully started to enter the field of cellular engineering. Here, the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) represents one of the most essential tools. Due to the emergence of novel and efficient PCR reagents, cloning kits, and software, there is a need for a concise and comprehensive protocol that explains all steps of PCR cloning starting from the primer design, performing PCR, sequencing PCR products, analysis of the sequencing data, and finally the assessment of gene expression. It is the aim of this methodology paper to provide a comprehensive protocol with a viable example for applying PCR in gene cloning. Exemplarily the sequence of the tdTomato fluorescent gene was amplified with PCR primers wherein proper restriction enzyme sites were embedded. Practical criteria for the selection of restriction enzymes and the design of PCR primers are explained. Efficient cloning of PCR products into a plasmid for sequencing and free web-based software for the consecutive analysis of sequencing data is introduced. Finally, confirmation of successful cloning is explained using a fluorescent gene of interest and murine target cells. Using a practical example, comprehensive PCR-based protocol with important tips was introduced. This methodology paper can serve as a roadmap for researchers who want to quickly exploit the power of PCR-cloning but have their main focus on functional in vitro and in vivo aspects of cellular engineering.

  15. BIOETHICS AND HUMAN CLONING

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Željko Kaluđerović

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper the authors analyze the process of negotiating and beginning of the United Nations Declaration on Human Cloning as well as the paragraphs of the very Declaration. The negotiation was originally conceived as a clear bioethical debate that should have led to a general agreement to ban human cloning. However, more often it had been discussed about human rights, cultural, civil and religious differences between people and about priorities in case of eventual conflicts between different value systems. In the end, a non-binding Declaration on Human Cloning had been adopted, full of numerous compromises and ambiguous formulations, that relativized the original intention of proposer states. According to authors, it would have been better if bioethical discussion and eventual regulations on cloning mentioned in the following text had been left over to certain professional bodies, and only after the public had been fully informed about it should relevant supranational organizations have taken that into consideration.

  16. Main: Clone Detail [KOME

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Clone Detail Mapping Pseudomolecule data detail Detail information Mapping to the T...IGR japonica Pseudomolecules kome_mapping_pseudomolecule_data_detail.zip kome_mapping_pseudomolecule_data_detail ...

  17. Unified Approach to Universal Cloning and Phase-Covariant Cloning

    OpenAIRE

    Hu, Jia-Zhong; Yu, Zong-Wen; Wang, Xiang-Bin

    2008-01-01

    We analyze the problem of approximate quantum cloning when the quantum state is between two latitudes on the Bloch's sphere. We present an analytical formula for the optimized 1-to-2 cloning. The formula unifies the universal quantum cloning (UQCM) and the phase covariant quantum cloning.

  18. Enzyme free cloning for high throughput gene cloning and expression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Jong, R.N.; Daniëls, M.; Kaptein, R.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/074334603; Folkers, G.E.|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/162277202

    2006-01-01

    Structural and functional genomics initiatives significantly improved cloning methods over the past few years. Although recombinational cloning is highly efficient, its costs urged us to search for an alternative high throughput (HTP) cloning method. We implemented a modified Enzyme Free Cloning

  19. Rainbow Vectors for Broad-Range Bacterial Fluorescence Labeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariette Barbier

    Full Text Available Since their discovery, fluorescent proteins have been widely used to study protein function, localization or interaction, promoter activity and regulation, drug discovery or for non-invasive imaging. They have been extensively modified to improve brightness, stability, and oligomerization state. However, only a few studies have focused on understanding the dynamics of fluorescent proteins expression in bacteria. In this work, we developed a set plasmids encoding 12 fluorescent proteins for bacterial labeling to facilitate the study of pathogen-host interactions. These broad-spectrum plasmids can be used with a wide variety of Gram-negative microorganisms including Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Burkholderia cepacia, Bordetella bronchiseptica, Shigella flexneri or Klebsiella pneumoniae. For comparison, fluorescent protein expression and physical characteristics in Escherichia coli were analyzed using fluorescence microscopy, flow cytometry and in vivo imaging. Fluorescent proteins derived from the Aequorea Victoria family showed high photobleaching, while proteins form the Discosoma sp. and the Fungia coccina family were more photostable for microscopy applications. Only E2-Crimson, mCherry and mKeima were successfully detected for in vivo applications. Overall, E2-Crimson was the fastest maturing protein tested in E. coli with the best overall performance in the study parameters. This study provides a unified comparison and comprehensive characterization of fluorescent protein photostability, maturation and toxicity, and offers general recommendations on the optimal fluorescent proteins for in vitro and in vivo applications.

  20. Increased fuel standards among broad range of energy options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Showstack, Randy

    During simpler times, the mention of the word 'cafe' might have primarily conjured up images of sidewalk coffee and tea bars along Paris' Champs-Elysees. However, with today's concerns about energy needs, CAFE or Corporate Average Fuel Economy standards for automobile fuel efficiency is a hot topic.On August 2, the U.S. House of Representa tives passed an energy bill rejecting a proposal to substantially increase CAFE standards for increasingly popular sport utility vehicles (SUVs). The proposal, which would have required SUVs to increase their current fleet average of 20.5 miles per gallon (mpg) to 27.5 mpg by 2007, to equal the current passenger car fleet requirement, was shelved for a requirement to more modestly raise mpgs by cutting total SUV gasoline usage by 5 billion gallons over 6 years.

  1. Microchip green laser sources: broad range of possibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Essaian, Stepan; Khaydarov, John; Slavov, Slav; Ter-Mikirtychev, Vartan; Gabrielyan, Gevorg; Keroopyan, Meruzhan; Soghomonyan, Suren

    2012-02-01

    Spectralus presents its progress in development of miniature, highly efficient, and versatile diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) green laser source, based on a monolithic cavity microchip laser platform. The use of periodically poled MgO-doped Lithium Niobate (PPMgOLN) as the nonlinear frequency doubler together with gain material Nd3+:YVO4 allows obtaining a significant increase in the overall efficiency of the green microchip laser in comparison with other compact green laser source architectures with comparable output power. Originally, this laser source was designed to be part of the miniature and efficient RGB light source for microdisplay-based (LCOS, DLP or similar) mobile projector devices. Recently, we have extended range of operations for our original laser platform. In particular, we demonstrate the following: high peak power (>500mW), high average power (>200mW), broad temperature range of operation (-30°C - 60°C), and low noise CW operation (<0.5% RMS).

  2. Improved PCR Amplification of Broad Spectrum GC DNA Templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guido, Nicholas; Starostina, Elena; Leake, Devin; Saaem, Ishtiaq

    2016-01-01

    Many applications in molecular biology can benefit from improved PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a wide range of GC content. Conventional PCR amplification of DNA sequences with regions of GC less than 30%, or higher than 70%, is complex due to secondary structures that block the DNA polymerase as well as mispriming and mis-annealing of the DNA. This complexity will often generate incomplete or nonspecific products that hamper downstream applications. In this study, we address multiplexed PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a wide range of GC content. In order to mitigate amplification complications due to high or low GC regions, we tested a combination of different PCR cycling conditions and chemical additives. To assess the fate of specific oligonucleotide (oligo) species with varying GC content in a multiplexed PCR, we developed a novel method of sequence analysis. Here we show that subcycling during the amplification process significantly improved amplification of short template pools (~200 bp), particularly when the template contained a low percent of GC. Furthermore, the combination of subcycling and 7-deaza-dGTP achieved efficient amplification of short templates ranging from 10-90% GC composition. Moreover, we found that 7-deaza-dGTP improved the amplification of longer products (~1000 bp). These methods provide an updated approach for PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a broad range of GC content.

  3. cDNA cloning and characterization of a mannose-binding lectin from ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    pension method while hot-shock method was adopted in. E. coli transformation in terms of the protocol of Sam- brook et al (1989). The PCR positive clone was sequenced using T7/SP6 primers (Sangon). 2.4 5′ RACE. The 5′ RACE System for RACE (GIBCO BRL, Life. Technologies, USA) was used for 5′ cDNA cloning.

  4. Molecular cloning and characteristic analysis of a thioredoxin from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user

    2012-04-12

    Apr 12, 2012 ... Molecular cloning and characteristic analysis of a thioredoxin from Neobenedenia ... with the egg stage. These results indicate that NmTrx could function as an important antioxidant molecule under physiological .... Fluorescence Quantitative PCR machine (CapitalBio, Beijing,. China) using the following ...

  5. Enzyme assay, cloning and sequencing of novel β-glucosidase ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bioinformatics studies also suggested that the cloned β-glucosidases share some characteristics with their bacterial counterparts. The findings in this study highlight the increasing need for more information on β-glucosidase structure and function. Keywords: Aspergillus niger, β-glucosidase, cellulase, PCR, sequencing, ...

  6. Cloning and characterization of an insecticidal crystal protein gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    A 1.9-kb DNA fragment, PCR-amplified from HD549 using cryII-gene-specific primers, was cloned and expressed in E. coli. The recombinant protein produced 92% mortality in first-instar larvae of Spodoptera litura and 86% inhibition of adult emergence in Phthorimaea operculella, but showed very low toxicity against ...

  7. Cloning and expression of cell wall acid invertase gene fragment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A fragment of invertase gene containing catalytic sites of cysteine was cloned from poinsettia (Euphorbia pulcherrima wild.) by using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. The length of the fragment was 521 bp, encoding 173 amino acids and containing a part of open reading frames, but no intron. It had a high ...

  8. Assessment of genetic diversity in different clones of Dalbergia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Genetic diversity of forty (40) clones of Dalbergia sissoo Roxb was analyzed using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) markers by selecting 30 decamer primers, which were later reduced to 10 based on the preliminary PCR amplification. A total of 129 distinct DNA fragments (bands) were amplified, of which 104 ...

  9. Cloning and mRNA expression pattern analysis under low ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This research cloned endochitinase-antifreeze protein precursor (EAPP) gene of Dong-mu 70 rye (Secale cereale) by designing special primers according to Genbank's EAPP gene sequence, and analyzing the influence of low temperature stress on the expression of mRNA with RT-PCR. The results indicated that the ...

  10. Cloning, expression and characterisation of a novel gene encoding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    微软用户

    2012-01-12

    Jan 12, 2012 ... 1Department of Entomology, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100193, China. 2Plant Protection Institute of Hebei Academy of Agricultural and Forestry Sciences, Baoding 071000, China. ... cDNA from Bemisia tabaci encoding a CSP (GU250808), denoted BtabCSP was cloned by RT-PCR and.

  11. Molecular cloning of full-length coding sequences and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Molecular cloning of full-length coding sequences and characterization of α chains for donkey ( Equus asinus ) type I collagen. ... in donkey tissues were evaluated by quantitative real-time PCR. Keywords: Collagen, Col1a1, Col1a2, donkey, complementary DNA African Journal of Biotechnology Vol. 12(27), pp. 4290-4302 ...

  12. Molecular Cloning And Sequencing Of Disintegrin Like Domain ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Disintegrin-like domain was cloned and sequenced from Cerastes cerastes venom gland tissue. Nested RT-PCR was performed using initial primers designed based on the homology of disintegrins from Trimeresurus flavoviridis, Glodius halys , Agkistrodon halys and Trimeresurus macrosquamatus. The homology was ...

  13. Cloning and mRNA expression pattern analysis under low ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-13

    Jul 13, 2011 ... This research cloned endochitinase-antifreeze protein precursor (EAPP) gene of Dong-mu 70 rye. (Secale cereale) by designing special primers according to Genbank's EAPP gene sequence, and analyzing the influence of low temperature stress on the expression of mRNA with RT-PCR. The results.

  14. cDNA, genomic sequence cloning and overexpression of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cytochrome c oxidase (COX) is a component of the mitochondria respiratory chain. COX6b1 is one of the COX small subunits encoded by nuclear genes. In currently study, the cDNA and the genomic sequence of COX6b1 were successfully cloned from the Ailuropoda melanoleuca with the RT-PCR technology and ...

  15. Cloning and expression of cell wall acid invertase gene fragment ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-01-25

    Jan 25, 2010 ... A fragment of invertase gene containing catalytic sites of cysteine was cloned from poinsettia. (Euphorbia pulcherrima wild.) by using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. The length of the fragment was 521 bp, encoding 173 amino acids and containing a part of open reading frames, but no intron.

  16. Optimal asymptotic cloning machines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiribella, Giulio; Yang, Yuxiang

    2014-06-01

    We pose the question whether the asymptotic equivalence between quantum cloning and quantum state estimation, valid at the single-clone level, still holds when all clones are examined globally. We conjecture that the answer is affirmative and present a large amount of evidence supporting our conjecture, developing techniques to derive optimal asymptotic cloners and proving their equivalence with estimation in virtually all scenarios considered in the literature. Our analysis covers the case of arbitrary finite sets of states, arbitrary families of coherent states, arbitrary phase- and multiphase-covariant sets of states, and two-qubit maximally entangled states. In all these examples we observe that the optimal asymptotic cloners enjoy a universality property, consisting in the fact that scaling of their fidelity does not depend on the specific details of the input states, but only on the number of free parameters needed to specify them.

  17. Quantitative discrimination of Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans highly leukotoxic JP2 clone from non-JP2 clones in diagnosis of aggressive periodontitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshida, Akihiro; Ennibi, Oum-Keltoum; Miyazaki, Hideo; Hoshino, Tomonori; Hayashida, Hideaki; Nishihara, Tatsuji; Awano, Shuji; Ansai, Toshihiro

    2012-10-11

    Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is the etiological agent of periodontitis, and there is a strong association between clone JP2 and aggressive periodontitis in adolescents of African descent. The JP2 clone has an approximately 530-bp deletion (∆530) in the promoter region of the lkt/ltx gene, which encodes leukotoxin, and this clone has high leukotoxic activity. Therefore, this clone is very important in aggressive periodontitis. To diagnose this disease, culture methods and conventional PCR techniques are used. However, quantitative detection based on qPCR for the JP2 clone has not been developed due to genetic difficulties. In this study, we developed a qPCR-based quantification method specific to the JP2 clone. Based on our analysis of the DNA sequence of the lkt/ltx gene and its flanking region, we designed a reverse primer specific for the ∆530 deletion border sequence and developed a JP2-specific PCR-based quantification method using this primer. We also analyzed the DNA sequence of the ∆530 locus and found it to be highly conserved (97-100%) among 17 non-JP2 strains. Using the ∆530 locus, we designed a qPCR primer-probe set specific to non-JP2 clones. Next, we determined the numbers of JP2 and non-JP2 clone cells in the periodontal pockets of patients with aggressive periodontitis. The JP2-specific primers specifically amplified the genomic DNA of the A. actinomycetemcomitans JP2 clone and did not react with other bacterial DNA, whereas the non-JP2 specific primers reacted only with A. actinomycetemcomitans non-JP2 clones. Samples from the 88 periodontal sites in the 11 patients with aggressive periodontitis were analyzed. The bacterial cell numbers in 88 periodontal sites ranged from 0 to 4.8 × 10(8) (mean 1.28 × 10(7)) for JP2 clones and from 0 to 1.6 × 10(6) for non-JP2 clones (mean 1.84 × 10(5)). There were significant differences in the JP2 cell number between a clinical attachment level (CAL) ≤6 mm and a level ≥7 mm (p aggressive

  18. The Cloning of America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobson, Judith E.; Dobson, Russell L.

    1981-01-01

    Proposes that the U.S. school system purports to prize human variability, but many educators are engaged in activities that seek to homogenize students. Describes these activities, including diagnosis, labeling, ability grouping, and positive reinforcement. Presents suggestions for counselors to combat sources of cloning and self-validation. (RC)

  19. Applications of quantum cloning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomarico, E.; Sanguinetti, B.; Sekatski, P.; Zbinden, H.; Gisin, N.

    2011-10-01

    Quantum Cloning Machines (QCMs) allow for the copying of information, within the limits imposed by quantum mechanics. These devices are particularly interesting in the high-gain regime, i.e., when one input qubit generates a state of many output qubits. In this regime, they allow for the study of certain aspects of the quantum to classical transition. The understanding of these aspects is the root of the two recent applications that we will review in this paper: the first one is the Quantum Cloning Radiometer, a device which is able to produce an absolute measure of spectral radiance. This device exploits the fact that in the quantum regime information can be copied with only finite fidelity, whereas when a state becomes macroscopic, this fidelity gradually increases to 1. Measuring the fidelity of the cloning operation then allows to precisely determine the absolute spectral radiance of the input optical source. We will then discuss whether a Quantum Cloning Machine could be used to produce a state visible by the naked human eye, and the possibility of a Bell Experiment with humans playing the role of detectors.

  20. Self-Cloning CRISPR

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arbab, M.; Sherwood, R. I.

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR/Cas9-gene editing has emerged as a revolutionary technology to easily modify specific genomic loci by designing complementary sgRNA sequences and introducing these into cells along with Cas9. Self-cloning CRISPR/Cas9 (scCRISPR) uses a self-cleaving palindromic sgRNA plasmid (sgPal) that

  1. Secure the Clones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Thomas; Kirchner, Florent; Pichardie, David

    Exchanging mutable data objects with untrusted code is a delicate matter because of the risk of creating a data space that is accessible by an attacker. Consequently, secure programming guidelines for Java stress the importance of using defensive copying before accepting or handing out references to an internal mutable object. However, implementation of a copy method (like clone()) is entirely left to the programmer. It may not provide a sufficiently deep copy of an object and is subject to overriding by a malicious sub-class. Currently no language-based mechanism supports secure object cloning. This paper proposes a type-based annotation system for defining modular copy policies for class-based object-oriented programs. A copy policy specifies the maximally allowed sharing between an object and its clone. We present a static enforcement mechanism that will guarantee that all classes fulfill their copy policy, even in the presence of overriding of copy methods, and establish the semantic correctness of the overall approach in Coq. The mechanism has been implemented and experimentally evaluated on clone methods from several Java libraries.

  2. A Seminar on Human Cloning: Cloning in Reproductive Medicine

    OpenAIRE

    Illmensee, Karl

    2001-01-01

    This review article summarizes the historical development of mammalian cloning, presents current advances and presumed risk factors in the field of reproductive cloning, discusses possible clinical applications of therapeutic and diagnostic cloning and outlines prospective commercial trends in pharmacytical cloning. Predictable progress in biotechnology and stem cell engineering should prove to be advantageous for patients' health and for novel benefits in reproductive and regenerative medicine.

  3. Software-Supported USER Cloning Strategies for Site-Directed Mutagenesis and DNA Assembly

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Genee, Hans Jasper; Bonde, Mads Tvillinggaard; Bagger, Frederik Otzen

    2015-01-01

    USER cloning is a fast and versatile method for engineering of plasmid DNA. We have developed a user friendly Web server tool that automates the design of optimal PCR primers for several distinct USER cloning-based applications. Our Web server, named AMUSER (Automated DNA Modifications with USER...... cloning), facilitates DNA assembly and introduction of virtually any type of site-directed mutagenesis by designing optimal PCR primers for the desired genetic changes. To demonstrate the utility, we designed primers for a simultaneous two-position site-directed mutagenesis of green fluorescent protein...

  4. The First Human Cloned Embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cibelli, Jose B.; Lanza, Robert P.; West, Michael D.; Ezzell, Carol

    2002-01-01

    Describes a process known as parthenogenesis which produces cloned, early-stage embryos and human embryos generated only from eggs. Speculates that this technology puts therapeutic cloning within reach. (DDR)

  5. [Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiao-Ming; Lei, An-Min; Hua, Jin-Lian; Dou, Zhong-Ying

    2005-03-01

    Nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning have widespread and attractive prospects in animal agriculture and biomedical applications. We reviewed that the quality of oocytes and nuclear reprogramming of somatic donor cells were the main reasons of the common abnormalities in cloned animals and the low efficiency of cloning and showed the problems and outlets in therapeutic cloning, such as some basic problems in nuclear transfer affected clinical applications of therapeutic cloning. Study on isolation and culture of nuclear transfer embryonic stem (ntES) cells and specific differentiation of ntES cells into important functional cells should be emphasized and could enhance the efficiency. Adult stem cells could help to cure some great diseases, but could not replace therapeutic cloning. Ethics also impeded the development of therapeutic cloning. It is necessary to improve many techniques and reinforce the research of some basic theories, then somatic nuclear transfer and therapeutic cloning may apply to agriculture reproduction and benefit to human life better.

  6. Animal Cloning and Food Safety

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Animal Cloning and Food Safety Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More sharing options ... on clones of livestock animals to evaluate the safety of food from these animals. The resulting report, called a ...

  7. Screening of YAC clones and building a map of the chromosome 13 region often deleted during chronic B-cell lymphocytic leucosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brodyanskii, VM; Sulimova, GE; Udina, IG; Aitova, SS; Shaikhaev, GO; Sharikova, OA; Zakharev, VM; Fedorova, LI; Zelenin, AV; Eikhorn, S; Baush, C; Laland, M; Ross, M; Yankovskii, NK

    1995-01-01

    Pools of YAC clones from the ICRF library were analyzed by PCR using PBKpt, MGG15, and D13S25 markers that flank the chromosome 13 region often deleted during chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Ten clones were found and described. Nine mega-YAC clones from the CEPH library flanking the region of interest

  8. HUMAN CLONING AND FDA REGULATION

    OpenAIRE

    Vosk, Ted

    1998-01-01

    In the February 27, 1997 issue of the journal Nature scientists from Scotland's Roslin Institute reported their successful efforts to clone an adult sheep using differentiated somatic cells from the animal. The clone, named Dolly, was the first instance of the successful cloning of an adult mammal. The shock waves created by the possible ramifications of this development were immediately felt around the world. For the first time, the cloning of an adult human being was no longer being conside...

  9. Blunt-end vectors generated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blunt-end cloning is a convenient way to clone polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products generated by proof-reading DNA polymerase. However, it is a time consuming procedure to prepare the linearized blunt-end vector, which usually involves plasmid extraction and restriction enzyme digestion. Moreover, 5' ...

  10. Blunt-end vectors generated by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    2011-09-19

    Sep 19, 2011 ... Blunt-end cloning is a convenient way to clone polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products generated by proof-reading DNA polymerase. However, it is a time consuming procedure to prepare the linearized blunt-end vector, which usually involves plasmid extraction and restriction enzyme digestion.

  11. cDNA, genomic cloning and sequence analysis of ribosomal protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ribosomal protein S4X (RPS4X) is one of the 40S ribosomal proteins encoded by the RPS4X gene. The cDNA and the genomic sequence of RPS4X were cloned successfully from giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and touchdown-PCR technology ...

  12. Recombinational Cloning Using Gateway and In-Fusion Cloning Schemes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Throop, Andrea L.; LaBaer, Joshua

    2015-01-01

    The comprehensive study of protein structure and function, or proteomics, depends on the obtainability of full-length cDNAs in species-specific expression vectors and subsequent functional analysis of the expressed protein. Recombinational cloning is a universal cloning technique based on site-specific recombination that is independent of the insert DNA sequence of interest, which differentiates this method from the classical restriction enzyme-based cloning methods. Recombinational cloning enables rapid and efficient parallel transfer of DNA inserts into multiple expression systems. This unit summarizes strategies for generating expression-ready clones using the most popular recombinational cloning technologies, including the commercially available Gateway® (Life Technologies) and In-Fusion® (Clontech) cloning technologies. PMID:25827088

  13. Gene Cloning of Iranian Leishmania major Mannose-1-Phosphate Guanyltransferase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Salehi

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available "nBackground: Leishmania is an obligatory intracellular protozoan parasite, which infects human be­ings when infected sand fly vector takes a blood meal.  Most efforts are towards designing an effective vaccine to prevent leishmaniasis. In this way, development of candidate antigen for vaccine has spe­cial im­portant. In this study, we cloned mannose-1-phosphate guanyltransferase gene of Iranian L .major in pET32a expression vector. "nMethods: Primers based on L. major mannose-1-phosphate guanyltransferase sequence gene was de­signed and synthesized. DNA of Leishmania promastigotes was extracted and PCR reaction was done. PCR product was cloned into pTZ57R and sub cloned into pET32a expression vector. "nResults: Recombinant plasmid containing 1140 bp as L. major mannose-1-phosphate guanyltrans­ferase gene was extracted and confirmed by restriction analysis. PCR product was sequenced and de­posited to GenBank. There were some differences in amino acid sequences between Iranian L. major mannose-1-phosphate guanyltransferase and others previously accepted in GenBank "nConclusion: We amplified and cloned Iranian L. major mannose-1-phosphate guanyltransferase successfully.

  14. cDNA cloning and sequencing of ostrich Growth hormone

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doosti Abbas

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, industrial breeding of ostrich (Struthio camelus has been widely developed in Iran. Growth hormone (GH is a peptide hormone that stimulates growth and cell reproduction in different animals. The aim of this study was to clone and sequence the ostrich growth hormone gene in E. coli, done for the first time in Iran. The cDNA that encodes ostrich growth hormone was isolated from total mRNA of the pituitary gland and amplified by RT-PCR using GH specific PCR primers. Then GH cDNA was cloned by T/A cloning technique and the construct was transformed into E. coli. Finally, GH cDNA sequence was submitted to the GenBank (Accession number: JN559394. The results of present study showed that GH cDNA was successfully cloned in E. coli. Sequencing confirmed that GH cDNA was cloned and that the length of ostrich GH cDNA was 672 bp; BLAST search showed that the sequence of growth hormone cDNA of the ostrich from Iran has 100% homology with other records existing in GenBank.

  15. Three concepts of cloning in human beings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Ke-Hui

    2005-07-01

    Human cloning, organ cloning and tissue cloning are various types of cloning that occur at different levels with different methodologies. According to three standards of terminology for an embryo (fertilization through germ cells, development in the uterus and having the potential to produce a human life), tissue cloning and type I organ cloning will not produce an embryo. In contrast, human cloning and type II organ cloning will produce an embryo. Thus, only non-germinal tissue cloning and type I organ cloning are beyond the ethical question and will not change human beings as a species. Using cloned tissues to make new tissues or organs is promising for the future of medicine.

  16. Optimally cloned binary coherent states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, C. R.; Leuchs, G.; Marquardt, Ch.; Andersen, U. L.

    2017-10-01

    Binary coherent state alphabets can be represented in a two-dimensional Hilbert space. We capitalize this formal connection between the otherwise distinct domains of qubits and continuous variable states to map binary phase-shift keyed coherent states onto the Bloch sphere and to derive their quantum-optimal clones. We analyze the Wigner function and the cumulants of the clones, and we conclude that optimal cloning of binary coherent states requires a nonlinearity above second order. We propose several practical and near-optimal cloning schemes and compare their cloning fidelity to the optimal cloner.

  17. STITCHER: A web resource for high-throughput design of primers for overlapping PCR applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Halloran, Damien M

    2015-06-01

    Overlapping PCR is routinely used in a wide number of molecular applications. These include stitching PCR fragments together, generating fluorescent transcriptional and translational fusions, inserting mutations, making deletions, and PCR cloning. Overlapping PCR is also used for genotyping by traditional PCR techniques and in detection experiments using techniques such as loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). STITCHER is a web tool providing a central resource for researchers conducting all types of overlapping PCR experiments with an intuitive interface for automated primer design that's fast, easy to use, and freely available online (http://ohalloranlab.net/STITCHER.html). STITCHER can handle both single sequence and multi-sequence input, and specific features facilitate numerous other PCR applications, including assembly PCR, adapter PCR, and primer walking. Field PCR, and in particular, LAMP, offers promise as an on site tool for pathogen detection in underdeveloped areas, and STITCHER includes off-target detection features for pathogens commonly targeted using LAMP technology.

  18. Advantages and Limitations of Direct PCR Amplification of Bacterial 16S-rDNA from Resected Heart Tissue or Swabs Followed by Direct Sequencing for Diagnosing Infective Endocarditis: A Retrospective Analysis in the Routine Clinical Setting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniela Maneg

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis (IE is a life-threatening disease that is associated with high morbidity and mortality. Its long-term prognosis strongly depends on a timely and optimized antibiotic treatment. Therefore, identification of the causative pathogen is crucial and currently based on blood cultures followed by characterization and susceptibility testing of the isolate. However, antibiotic treatment starting prior to blood sampling or IE caused by fastidious or intracellular microorganisms may cause negative culture results. Here we investigate the additional diagnostic value of broad-range PCR in combination with direct sequencing on resected heart tissue or swabs in patients with tissue or swab culture-negative IE in a routine clinical setting. Sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values of broad-range PCR from diagnostic material in our patients were 33.3%, 76.9%, 90.9%, and 14.3%, respectively. We identified a total of 20 patients (21.5% with tissue or culture-negative IE who profited by the additional application of broad-range PCR. We conclude that broad-range PCR on resected heart tissue or swabs is an important complementary diagnostic approach. It should be seen as an indispensable new tool for both the therapeutic and diagnostic management of culture-negative IE and we thus propose its possible inclusion in Duke’s diagnostic classification scheme.

  19. The full-ORF clone resource of the German cDNA Consortium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Guenter

    2007-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background With the completion of the human genome sequence the functional analysis and characterization of the encoded proteins has become the next urging challenge in the post-genome era. The lack of comprehensive ORFeome resources has thus far hampered systematic applications by protein gain-of-function analysis. Gene and ORF coverage with full-length ORF clones thus needs to be extended. In combination with a unique and versatile cloning system, these will provide the tools for genome-wide systematic functional analyses, to achieve a deeper insight into complex biological processes. Results Here we describe the generation of a full-ORF clone resource of human genes applying the Gateway cloning technology (Invitrogen. A pipeline for efficient cloning and sequencing was developed and a sample tracking database was implemented to streamline the clone production process targeting more than 2,200 different ORFs. In addition, a robust cloning strategy was established, permitting the simultaneous generation of two clone variants that contain a particular ORF with as well as without a stop codon by the implementation of only one additional working step into the cloning procedure. Up to 92 % of the targeted ORFs were successfully amplified by PCR and more than 93 % of the amplicons successfully cloned. Conclusion The German cDNA Consortium ORFeome resource currently consists of more than 3,800 sequence-verified entry clones representing ORFs, cloned with and without stop codon, for about 1,700 different gene loci. 177 splice variants were cloned representing 121 of these genes. The entry clones have been used to generate over 5,000 different expression constructs, providing the basis for functional profiling applications. As a member of the recently formed international ORFeome collaboration we substantially contribute to generating and providing a whole genome human ORFeome collection in a unique cloning system that is made freely available

  20. Simplified methods for the construction of RNA and DNA virus infectious clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagata, Tatsuya; Inoue-Nagata, Alice Kazuko

    2015-01-01

    Infectious virus clones are one of the most powerful tools in plant pathology, molecular biology, and biotechnology. The construction of infectious clones of RNA and DNA viruses, however, usually requires laborious cloning and subcloning steps. In addition, instability of the RNA virus genome is frequently reported after its introduction into the vector and transference to Escherichia coli. These difficulties hamper the cloning procedures, making it tedious and cumbersome. This chapter describes two protocols for a simple construction of infectious viruses, an RNA virus, the tobamovirus Pepper mild mottle virus, and a DNA virus, a bipartite begomovirus. For this purpose, the strategy of overlap-extension PCR was used for the construction of infectious tobamovirus clone and of rolling circle amplification (RCA) for the construction of a dimeric form of the begomovirus clone.

  1. Ethical issues in animal cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fiester, Autumn

    2005-01-01

    The issue of human reproductive cloning has recently received a great deal attention in public discourse. Bioethicists, policy makers, and the media have been quick to identify the key ethical issues involved in human reproductive cloning and to argue, almost unanimously, for an international ban on such attempts. Meanwhile, scientists have proceeded with extensive research agendas in the cloning of animals. Despite this research, there has been little public discussion of the ethical issues raised by animal cloning projects. Polling data show that the public is decidedly against the cloning of animals. To understand the public's reaction and fill the void of reasoned debate about the issue, we need to review the possible objections to animal cloning and assess the merits of the anti-animal cloning stance. Some objections to animal cloning (e.g., the impact of cloning on the population of unwanted animals) can be easily addressed, while others (e.g., the health of cloned animals) require more serious attention by the public and policy makers.

  2. Update to the multiplex PCR strategy for assignment of mec element types in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milheiriço, Catarina; Oliveira, Duarte C; de Lencastre, Hermínia

    2007-09-01

    Staphylococcal cassette chromosome mec (SCCmec) typing is important for the identification and definition of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus clones, and for routine purposes, multiplex PCR assays are the most adequate for SCCmec typing. Here, we describe an update to the multiplex PCR strategy for SCCmec typing that we described in 2002 so that SCCmec types IV and V may be properly identified.

  3. Hepatitis C virus infection of a Vero cell clone displaying efficient virus-cell binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valli, M B; Carloni, G; Manzin, A; Nasorri, F; Ponzetto, A; Clementi, M

    1997-01-01

    The susceptibility of Vero cells and derivative cell clones to hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection was assayed by qualitative and quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based methods. Cell extracts from Vero cells inoculated with HCV were tested for the presence of both positive and negative strands of HCV RNA; in parallel, cell-free HCV genomes were assayed in culture supernatant fluids. Quantitation of genomic HCV RNA molecules in infected cells by competitive reverse transcription PCR (cRT-PCR) indicated that HCV replication was more efficient in a derivative clone (named clone 10) than in parental Vero cells or other clones under study. Analysis of HCV-binding to cell receptors, performed by cRT-PCR quantitation of viral particles adsorbed to the cell surface, demonstrated a 10-fold higher virus-binding level of clone 10 than that of parental Vero cells. The results shown here indicate that the Vero clone 10 may constitute an efficient model system for analysing early events in HCV infection as well as a source of virus for diagnostic and biotechnological applications.

  4. Genetic diversity analysis with ISSR PCR on green algae Chlorella vulgaris and Chlorella pyrenoidosa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Songdong

    2008-11-01

    In the present study, genetic polymorphism and diversity in unicellular clones of Chlorella vulgaris Beijerinck and Chlorella pyrenoidosa Chick were studied with Inter Simple Sequence Repeats PCR (ISSR PCR). Samples including four clones of C. vulgaris and three clones of C. pyrenoidosa were purified by single-clone-choice method. For four C. vulgaris unicellular clones, the total number of the bands scored for 18 primers was 298; and the number of the polymorphic bands was 118, of which 39.6% were polymorphic. The size of PCR products ranged from 200 to 2 500 bp. The total number of bands scored for 18 primers, the number of polymorphic bands and the percentage of three C. pyrenoidosa unicellular clones was 194.83 and 30.8%, respectively. POPGENE analysis show that the average Nei genetic diversity (h*) and Shannon index of diversity (I*) in the four C. vulgaris unicellular clones was 0.2181 and 0.3208, respectively, which is slightly higher than those of the three C. pyrenoidosa unicellular clones (0.190 3 and 0.274 8), which agreed with the percentage of polymorphic bands in the mixed samples of the two species. The results suggest that ISSR is a useful method to Chlorella for intraspecies genetic analysis.

  5. Lessons learned from cloning dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, M J; Oh, H J; Kim, G A; Park, J E; Park, E J; Jang, G; Ra, J C; Kang, S K; Lee, B C

    2012-08-01

    The aim of this article is to review dog cloning research and to suggest its applications based on a discussion about the normality of cloned dogs. Somatic cell nuclear transfer was successfully used for production of viable cloned puppies despite limited understanding of in vitro dog embryo production. Cloned dogs have similar growth characteristics to those born from natural fertilization, with no evidence of serious adverse effects. The offspring of cloned dogs also have similar growth performance and health to those of naturally bred puppies. Therefore, cloning in domestic dogs can be applied as an assisted reproductive technique to conserve endangered species, to treat sterile canids or aged dogs, to improve reproductive performance of valuable individuals and to generate disease model animals. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. PCR-RFLP

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-03-30

    Mar 30, 2012 ... in Cymbidium Based on RAPD Markers and PCR-RFLP Analyses of · Organellar DNAs. Acta Horticulturae Sinica, 33(2): 349-355. HEINZE B (2001). A data base for PCR primers in the chloroplast genome[DB]. http://bfw.ac.at/200/1859.html. Huang JC, Sun M (2000). Genetic diversity and relationships of ...

  7. Cloning and characterization of the NADPH cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase gene from the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brink, J.M. van den; Zeijl, C.M.J. van; Brons, J.F.; Hondel, C.A.M.J.J. van den; Gorcom, R.F.M. van

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, we describe the cloning and molecular characterization of the Aspergillus niger cytochrome P450 reductase (CPR) gene, cprA. Attempts to clone the cprA gene by heterologous hybridization techniques were unsuccessful. Using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with degenerate primers

  8. Human cloning and child welfare.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burley, J; Harris, J

    1999-01-01

    In this paper we discuss an objection to human cloning which appeals to the welfare of the child. This objection varies according to the sort of harm it is expected the clone will suffer. The three formulations of it that we will consider are: 1. Clones will be harmed by the fearful or prejudicial attitudes people may have about or towards them (H1); 2. Clones will be harmed by the demands and expectations of parents or genotype donors (H2); 3. Clones will be harmed by their own awareness of their origins, for example the knowledge that the genetic donor is a stranger (H3). We will show why these three versions of the child welfare objection do not necessarily supply compelling reasons to ban human reproductive cloning. The claim that we will develop and defend in the course of our discussion is that even if it is the case that a cloned child will suffer harms of the type H1-H3, it is none the less permissible to conceive by cloning so long as these cloning-induced welfare deficits are not such as to blight the existence of the resultant child, whoever this may be. PMID:10226914

  9. Comprehensive Cloning of Patient-derived 9022-bp Amplicons of Hepatitis C Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yang; Xu, Yanjuan; Di Bisceglie, Adrian M.; Fan, Xiaofeng

    2013-01-01

    The instability of recombinant clones accommodating large or full-length viral genomes is frequently a technical challenge in RNA virus research. In an attempt to establish a rapid plasmid-based reverse genetics system that utilizes long RT-PCR technique (LRP), similar difficulty was encountered in the cloning of 9022-bp LRP amplicon. All HCV genotype 1a strains used for LRP cloning showed a remarkable difference in terms of cloning stability. Subsequent analysis revealed the predictive value of phylogenetic positions in determining the cloning stability. Putative E. coli promoters on the HCV genome might be responsible for such cloning difference. An exhaustive exploration, testing nearly one hundred cloning protocols, did not reveal a general approach that can achieve stable cloning for all HCV 1a strains. The selection of appropriate strains, guided by phylogenetic analysis, appears to be necessary prior to the construction of infectious HCV 1a clones. These observations are not only valuable for potentially establishing an HCV 1a cell culture model but also have general implications for other RNA viruses due to concern about cloning instability. PMID:23602804

  10. Competitive PCR for quantification of minimal residual disease in acute lymphoblastic leukaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nyvold, C; Madsen, H O; Ryder, L P

    2000-01-01

    A very precise and reproducible polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was developed in order to quantify minimal residual disease (MRD) in children with acute lymphoblastic leukaemia (ALL). A clone-specific competitor was constructed by introducing a restriction site in a PCR product identical...... under identical conditions. After restriction enzyme cleavage, the PCR products originating from the competitor and the malignant clone can be distinguished by size in a gel electrophoresis step and the amount of residual disease can be determined. The method is very sensitive with a detection limit...

  11. Molecular cloning and characterization of a novel human kinase ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Molecular cloning and sequencing of PDIK1L cDNA: Human foetal brain polyA+ RNA was purchased from Clontech. (Cat. No. 6525-1). Double-stranded cDNA was prepared with the SMART PCR cDNA Synthesis kit (Clontech,. Cat. No. K1052-1) according to the manufacturer's re- commendation. The cDNAs were digested ...

  12. Cloning of the repertoire of individual Plasmodium falciparum var genes using transformation associated recombination (TAR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annette Gaida

    Full Text Available One of the major virulence factors of the malaria causing parasite is the Plasmodium falciparum encoded erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1. It is translocated to It the membrane of infected erythrocytes and expressed from approximately 60 var genes in a mutually exclusive manner. Switching of var genes allows the parasite to alter functional and antigenic properties of infected erythrocytes, to escape the immune defense and to establish chronic infections. We have developed an efficient method for isolating VAR genes from telomeric and other genome locations by adapting transformation-associated recombination (TAR cloning, which can then be analyzed and sequenced. For this purpose, three plasmids each containing a homologous sequence representing the upstream regions of the group A, B, and C var genes and a sequence homologous to the conserved acidic terminal segment (ATS of var genes were generated. Co-transfection with P. falciparum strain ITG2F6 genomic DNA in yeast cells yielded 200 TAR clones. The relative frequencies of clones from each group were not biased. Clones were screened by PCR, as well as Southern blotting, which revealed clones missed by PCR due to sequence mismatches with the primers. Selected clones were transformed into E. coli and further analyzed by RFLP and end sequencing. Physical analysis of 36 clones revealed 27 distinct types potentially representing 50% of the var gene repertoire. Three clones were selected for sequencing and assembled into single var gene containing contigs. This study demonstrates that it is possible to rapidly obtain the repertoire of var genes from P. falciparum within a single set of cloning experiments. This technique can be applied to individual isolates which will provide a detailed picture of the diversity of var genes in the field. This is a powerful tool to overcome the obstacles with cloning and assembly of multi-gene families by simultaneously cloning each member.

  13. Cloning of the repertoire of individual Plasmodium falciparum var genes using transformation associated recombination (TAR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaida, Annette; Becker, Marion M; Schmid, Christoph D; Bühlmann, Tobias; Louis, Edward J; Beck, Hans-Peter

    2011-03-07

    One of the major virulence factors of the malaria causing parasite is the Plasmodium falciparum encoded erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1). It is translocated to It the membrane of infected erythrocytes and expressed from approximately 60 var genes in a mutually exclusive manner. Switching of var genes allows the parasite to alter functional and antigenic properties of infected erythrocytes, to escape the immune defense and to establish chronic infections. We have developed an efficient method for isolating VAR genes from telomeric and other genome locations by adapting transformation-associated recombination (TAR) cloning, which can then be analyzed and sequenced. For this purpose, three plasmids each containing a homologous sequence representing the upstream regions of the group A, B, and C var genes and a sequence homologous to the conserved acidic terminal segment (ATS) of var genes were generated. Co-transfection with P. falciparum strain ITG2F6 genomic DNA in yeast cells yielded 200 TAR clones. The relative frequencies of clones from each group were not biased. Clones were screened by PCR, as well as Southern blotting, which revealed clones missed by PCR due to sequence mismatches with the primers. Selected clones were transformed into E. coli and further analyzed by RFLP and end sequencing. Physical analysis of 36 clones revealed 27 distinct types potentially representing 50% of the var gene repertoire. Three clones were selected for sequencing and assembled into single var gene containing contigs. This study demonstrates that it is possible to rapidly obtain the repertoire of var genes from P. falciparum within a single set of cloning experiments. This technique can be applied to individual isolates which will provide a detailed picture of the diversity of var genes in the field. This is a powerful tool to overcome the obstacles with cloning and assembly of multi-gene families by simultaneously cloning each member.

  14. [The discrete horror of cloning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guibourg, Ricardo A

    2009-01-01

    The author raises the topic of cloning after the decision of the Argentine government, which concerned for the "dignity of the human person", passed a decree of need and urgency, No. 200/97 (Annex), prohibiting cloning experiments with human beings. Therefore, considering that the topic is so terribly urgent and necessary, the author feels it is timely to consider it.

  15. [Scientific ethics of human cloning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenzuela, Carlos Y

    2005-01-01

    True cloning is fission, budding or other types of asexual reproduction. In humans it occurs in monozygote twinning. This type of cloning is ethically and religiously good. Human cloning can be performed by twinning (TWClo) or nuclear transfer (NTClo). Both methods need a zygote or a nuclear transferred cell, obtained in vitro (IVTec). They are under the IVTec ethics. IVTecs use humans (zygotes, embryos) as drugs or things; increase the risk of malformations; increase development and size of abnormalities and may cause long-term changes. Cloning for preserving extinct (or almost extinct) animals or humans when sexual reproduction is not possible is ethically valid. The previous selection of a phenotype in human cloning violates some ethical principles. NTClo for reproductive or therapeutic purposes is dangerous since it increases the risk for nucleotide or chromosome mutations, de-programming or re-programming errors, aging or malignancy of the embryo cells thus obtained.

  16. Animal cloning: problems and prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wells, D N

    2005-04-01

    An efficient animal cloning technology would provide many new opportunities for livestock agriculture, human medicine, and animal conservation. Nuclear cloning involves the production of animals that are genetically identical to the donor cells used in a technique known as nuclear transfer (NT). However, at present it is an inefficient process: in cattle, only around 6% of the embryos transferred to the reproductive tracts of recipient cows result in healthy, longterm surviving clones. Of concern are the high losses throughout gestation, during birth and in the post-natal period through to adulthood. Many of the pregnancy losses relate to failure of the placenta to develop and function correctly. Placental dysfunction may also have an adverse influence on postnatal health. These anomalies are probably due to incorrect epigenetic reprogramming of the donor genome following NT, leading to inappropriate patterns of gene expression during the development of clones. Whilst some physiological tests on surviving clones suggest normality, other reports indicate a variety of post-natal clone-associated abnormalities. This variability in outcome may reflect species-specific and/or cloning methodological differences. Importantly, to date it appears that these clone-associated phenotypes are not transmitted to offspring following sexual reproduction. This indicates that they represent epigenetic errors, rather than genetic errors, which are corrected during gametogenesis. Whilst this needs confirmation at the molecular level, it provides initial confidence in the first application of NT in agriculture, namely, the production of small numbers of cloned sires from genetically elite bulls, for natural mating, to effectively disseminate genetic gain. In addition to the animal welfare concerns with the technology, the underlying health of the animals and the consequential effect on food safety are critical aspects that require investigation to gain regulatory and consumer

  17. Rapid Construction of Complex Plant RNA Virus Infectious cDNA Clones for Agroinfection Using a Yeast-E. coli-Agrobacterium Shuttle Vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Kai; Zhao, Danyang; Liu, Yong; Huang, Changjun; Zhang, Wei; Li, Zhenghe

    2017-11-07

    The availability of infectious full-length clone is indispensable for reverse genetics studies of virus biology, pathology and construction of viral vectors. However, for RNA viruses with large genome sizes or those exhibiting inherent cloning difficulties, procedure to generate biologically active circular DNA (cDNA) clones can be time-consuming or technically challenging. Here we have constructed a yeast- Escherichia coli - Agrobacterium shuttle vector that enables highly efficient homologous recombination in yeast for assembly of Agrobacterium compatible plant virus clones. Using this vector, we show that infectious cDNA clones of a plant negative-stranded RNA virus, sonchus yellow net rhabdovirus, can be rapidly assembled. In addition, one-step assembly of infectious clones of potato virus Y in yeast, either with or without intron, was readily achieved from as many as eight overlapping DNA fragments. More importantly, the recovered yeast plasmids can be transformed directly into Agrobacterium for inoculation, thereby obviating the E. coli cloning steps and associated toxicity issues. This method is rapid, highly efficient and cost-effective and should be readily applicable to a broad range of plant viruses.

  18. Rapid Construction of Complex Plant RNA Virus Infectious cDNA Clones for Agroinfection Using a Yeast-E. coli-Agrobacterium Shuttle Vector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai Sun

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The availability of infectious full-length clone is indispensable for reverse genetics studies of virus biology, pathology and construction of viral vectors. However, for RNA viruses with large genome sizes or those exhibiting inherent cloning difficulties, procedure to generate biologically active complementary DNA (cDNA clones can be time-consuming or technically challenging. Here we have constructed a yeast-Escherichia coli-Agrobacterium shuttle vector that enables highly efficient homologous recombination in yeast for assembly of Agrobacterium compatible plant virus clones. Using this vector, we show that infectious cDNA clones of a plant negative-stranded RNA virus, sonchus yellow net rhabdovirus, can be rapidly assembled. In addition, one-step assembly of infectious clones of potato virus Y in yeast, either with or without intron, was readily achieved from as many as eight overlapping DNA fragments. More importantly, the recovered yeast plasmids can be transformed directly into Agrobacterium for inoculation, thereby obviating the E. coli cloning steps and associated toxicity issues. This method is rapid, highly efficient and cost-effective and should be readily applicable to a broad range of plant viruses.

  19. Mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in ovine fetuses and sheep cloned by somatic cell nuclear transfer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Müller Mathias

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA of the cloned sheep "Dolly" and nine other ovine clones produced by somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT was reported to consist only of recipient oocyte mtDNA without any detectable mtDNA contribution from the nucleus donor cell. In cattle, mouse and pig several or most of the clones showed transmission of nuclear donor mtDNA resulting in mitochondrial heteroplasmy. To clarify the discrepant transmission pattern of donor mtDNA in sheep clones we analysed the mtDNA composition of seven fetuses and five lambs cloned from fetal fibroblasts. Results The three fetal fibroblast donor cells used for SCNT harboured low mtDNA copy numbers per cell (A: 753 ± 54, B: 292 ± 33 and C: 561 ± 88. The ratio of donor to recipient oocyte mtDNAs was determined using a quantitative amplification refractory mutation system (ARMS PCR (i.e. ARMS-qPCR. For quantification of SNP variants with frequencies below 0.1% we developed a restriction endonuclease-mediated selective quantitative PCR (REMS-qPCR. We report the first cases (n = 4 fetuses, n = 3 lambs of recipient oocyte/nuclear donor mtDNA heteroplasmy in SCNT-derived ovine clones demonstrating that there is no species-effect hindering ovine nucleus-donor mtDNA from being transmitted to the somatic clonal offspring. Most of the heteroplasmic clones exhibited low-level heteroplasmy (0.1% to 0.9%, n = 6 indicating neutral transmission of parental mtDNAs. High-level heteroplasmy (6.8% to 46.5% was observed in one case. This clone possessed a divergent recipient oocyte-derived mtDNA genotype with three rare amino acid changes compared to the donor including one substitution at an evolutionary conserved site. Conclusion Our study using state-of-the-art techniques for mtDNA quantification, like ARMS-qPCR and the novel REMS-qPCR, documents for the first time the transmission of donor mtDNA into somatic sheep clones. MtDNA heteroplasmy was detected in seven of 12 clones

  20. Human cloning: can it be made safe?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhind, Susan M; Taylor, Jane E; De Sousa, Paul A; King, Tim J; McGarry, Michelle; Wilmut, Ian

    2003-11-01

    There are continued claims of attempts to clone humans using nuclear transfer, despite the serious problems that have been encountered in cloning other mammals. It is known that epigenetic and genetic mechanisms are involved in clone failure, but we still do not know exactly how. Human reproductive cloning is unethical, but the production of cells from cloned embryos could offer many potential benefits. So, can human cloning be made safe?

  1. Quantum Cloning Machines and the Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Fan, Heng; Wang, Yi-Nan; Jing, Li; Yue, Jie-Dong; Shi, Han-Duo; Zhang, Yong-Liang; Mu, Liang-Zhu

    2013-01-01

    No-cloning theorem is fundamental for quantum mechanics and for quantum information science that states an unknown quantum state cannot be cloned perfectly. However, we can try to clone a quantum state approximately with the optimal fidelity, or instead, we can try to clone it perfectly with the largest probability. Thus various quantum cloning machines have been designed for different quantum information protocols. Specifically, quantum cloning machines can be designed to analyze the securit...

  2. Innate immune responses to obesity in cloned and wild-type domestic pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højbøge, Tina Rødgaard; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Stagsted, Jan

    months of age. mRNA expression levels were determined for 39 innate immune factors on a high-throughput qPCR system in samples from liver, abdominal fat, mesenteric fat and subcutaneous fat. Previous findings have suggested that cloning may affect certain phenotypic traits of pigs including basic...... concentrations and responsiveness of components of the innate immune system. Terminal body weights at 7½ - 9½ months of age were significantly higher for both (WT and cloned) obese groups compared to the lean groups. However, obese WT pigs weighed significantly more than obese cloned pigs (P... significant differences between WT and cloned pigs in the gene response to obesity. Thus, significant phenotypic differences were established for central innate immune factors between cloned and WT pigs, including differences in the response of these factors to an obesity-promoting diet. This should be taken...

  3. Solid-phase cloning for high-throughput assembly of single and multiple DNA parts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lundqvist, Magnus; Edfors, Fredrik; Sivertsson, Åsa

    2015-01-01

    present a robust automated protocol for restriction enzyme based SPC and its performance for the cloning of >60 000 unique human gene fragments into expression vectors. In addition, we report on SPC-based single-strand assembly for applications where exact control of the sequence between fragments......We describe solid-phase cloning (SPC) for high-throughput assembly of expression plasmids. Our method allows PCR products to be put directly into a liquid handler for capture and purification using paramagnetic streptavidin beads and conversion into constructs by subsequent cloning reactions. We...

  4. Expression of Innate Immune Response Genes in Liver and Three Types of Adipose Tissue in Cloned Pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højbøge, Tina Rødgaard; Skovgaard, Kerstin; Stagsted, Jan

    2012-01-01

    The pig has been proposed as a relevant model for human obesity-induced inflammation, and cloning may improve the applicability of this model. We tested the assumptions that cloning would reduce interindividual variation in gene expression of innate immune factors and that their expression would...... remain unaffected by the cloning process. We investigated the expression of 40 innate immune factors by high-throughput quantitative real-time PCR in samples from liver, abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT), visceral adipose tissue (VAT), and neck SAT in cloned pigs compared to normal outbred pigs...

  5. [Construction of RNAi vectors for SmNAC1 transcription factors of Salvia miltiorrhiza using Gateway cloning technology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Rong; Rong, Qi-Xian; Liu, Yu-Zhong; Shen, Ye; Huang, Lu-Qi

    2014-05-01

    NAC transcription factors involved in plant growth and development, as well as responses to biotic and abiotic stress. RNAi Vectors for SmNAC transcription factors of Salvia miltiorrhiza was constructed by using Gateway cloning technology, in order to further study the function of SmNAC1 transcription factor. According to Gateway cloning technology, the specific fragments of SmNAC1 containing attB adapter was amplified by PCR using ultra-fideling phusion polymerase of NEB. By the BP recombination reaction, the PCR product containing attB was transferred to an donor vector (pENTR/SD/D-TOPO). Finally, SmNACi specific gene was cloned into pK7GWIWG2D plant expression vectors by LR recombination reaction. Experimental results showed that Gateway cloning technology provide a rapid and highly efficient way to clone the interested gene.

  6. Limitations on Cloning in Classical Mechanics

    OpenAIRE

    Fenyes, Aaron

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we show that a result precisely analogous to the traditional quantum no-cloning theorem holds in classical mechanics. This classical no-cloning theorem does not prohibit classical cloning, we argue, because it is based on a too-restrictive definition of cloning. Using a less popular, more inclusive definition of cloning, we give examples of classical cloning processes. We also prove that a cloning machine must be at least as complicated as the object it is supposed to clone.

  7. Therapeutic cloning in the mouse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mombaerts, Peter

    2003-01-01

    Nuclear transfer technology can be applied to produce autologous differentiated cells for therapeutic purposes, a concept termed therapeutic cloning. Countless articles have been published on the ethics and politics of human therapeutic cloning, reflecting the high expectations from this new opportunity for rejuvenation of the aging or diseased body. Yet the research literature on therapeutic cloning, strictly speaking, is comprised of only four articles, all in the mouse. The efficiency of derivation of embryonic stem cell lines via nuclear transfer is remarkably consistent among these reports. However, the efficiency is so low that, in its present form, the concept is unlikely to become widespread in clinical practice. PMID:12949262

  8. Human therapeutic cloning (NTSC): applying research from mammalian reproductive cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Andrew J; Wood, Samuel H; Trounson, Alan O

    2006-01-01

    Human therapeutic cloning or nuclear transfer stem cells (NTSC) to produce patient-specific stem cells, holds considerable promise in the field of regenerative medicine. The recent withdrawal of the only scientific publications claiming the successful generation of NTSC lines afford an opportunity to review the available research in mammalian reproductive somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) with the goal of progressing human NTSC. The process of SCNT is prone to epigenetic abnormalities that contribute to very low success rates. Although there are high mortality rates in some species of cloned animals, most surviving clones have been shown to have normal phenotypic and physiological characteristics and to produce healthy offspring. This technology has been applied to an increasing number of mammals for utility in research, agriculture, conservation, and biomedicine. In contrast, attempts at SCNT to produce human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have been disappointing. Only one group has published reliable evidence of success in deriving a cloned human blastocyst, using an undifferentiated hESC donor cell, and it failed to develop into a hESC line. When optimal conditions are present, it appears that in vitro development of cloned and parthenogenetic embryos, both of which may be utilized to produce hESCs, may be similar to in vitro fertilized embryos. The derivation of ESC lines from cloned embryos is substantially more efficient than the production of viable offspring. This review summarizes developments in mammalian reproductive cloning, cell-to-cell fusion alternatives, and strategies for oocyte procurement that may provide important clues facilitating progress in human therapeutic cloning leading to the successful application of cell-based therapies utilizing autologous hESC lines.

  9. Birth of clones of the world's first cloned dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Jung; Oh, Hyun Ju; Kim, Geon A; Setyawan, Erif Maha Nugraha; Choi, Yoo Bin; Lee, Seok Hee; Petersen-Jones, Simon M; Ko, CheMyong J; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2017-11-10

    Animal cloning has gained popularity as a method to produce genetically identical animals or superior animals for research or industrial uses. However, the long-standing question of whether a cloned animal undergoes an accelerated aging process is yet to be answered. As a step towards answering this question, we compared longevity and health of Snuppy, the world's first cloned dog, and its somatic cell donor, Tai, a male Afghan hound. Briefly, both Snuppy and Tai were generally healthy until both developed cancer to which they succumbed at the ages of 10 and 12 years, respectively. The longevity of both the donor and the cloned dog was close to the median lifespan of Afghan hounds which is reported to be 11.9 years. Here, we report creation of 4 clones using adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells from Snuppy as donor cells. Clinical and molecular follow-up of these reclones over their lives will provide us with a unique opportunity to study the health and longevity of cloned animals compared with their cell donors.

  10. The diagnosis of microorganism involved in infective endocarditis (IE) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and real-time PCR: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faraji, Reza; Behjati-Ardakani, Mostafa; Moshtaghioun, Seyed Mohammad; Kalantar, Seyed Mehdi; Namayandeh, Seyedeh Mahdieh; Soltani, Mohammadhossien; Emami, Mahmood; Zandi, Hengameh; Firoozabadi, Ali Dehghani; Kazeminasab, Mahmood; Ahmadi, Nastaran; Sarebanhassanabadi, Mohammadtaghi

    2018-02-01

    Broad-range bacterial rDNA polymerase chain reaction (PCR) followed by sequencing may be identified as the etiology of infective endocarditis (IE) from surgically removed valve tissue; therefore, we reviewed the value of molecular testing in identifying organisms' DNA in the studies conducted until 2016. We searched Google Scholar, Scopus, ScienceDirect, Cochrane, PubMed, and Medline electronic databases without any time limitations up to December 2016 for English studies reporting microorganisms involved in infective endocarditis microbiology using PCR and real-time PCR. Most studies were prospective. Eleven out of 12 studies used valve tissue samples and blood cultures while only 1 study used whole blood. Also, 10 studies used the molecular method of PCR while 2 studies used real-time PCR. Most studies used 16S rDNA gene as the target gene. The bacteria were identified as the most common microorganisms involved in infective endocarditis. Streptococcus spp. and Staphylococcus spp. were, by far, the most predominant bacteria detected. In all studies, PCR and real-time PCR identified more pathogens than blood and tissue cultures; moreover, the sensitivity and specificity of PCR and real-time PCR were more than cultures in most of the studies. The highest sensitivity and specificity were 96% and 100%, respectively. The gram positive bacteria were the most frequent cause of infective endocarditis. The molecular methods enjoy a greater sensitivity compared to the conventional blood culture methods; yet, they are applicable only to the valve tissue of the patients undergoing cardiac valve surgery. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Taiwan.

  11. Successful pod infections by Moniliophthora roreri result in differential Theobroma cacao gene expression depending on the clone's level of tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Shahin S; Melnick, Rachel L; Crozier, Jayne; Phillips-Mora, Wilberth; Strem, Mary D; Shao, Jonathan; Zhang, Dapeng; Sicher, Richard; Meinhardt, Lyndel; Bailey, Bryan A

    2014-09-01

    An understanding of the tolerance mechanisms of Theobroma cacao used against Moniliophthora roreri, the causal agent of frosty pod rot, is important for the generation of stable disease-tolerant clones. A comparative view was obtained of transcript populations of infected pods from two susceptible and two tolerant clones using RNA sequence (RNA-Seq) analysis. A total of 3009 transcripts showed differential expression among clones. KEGG (Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes) pathway analysis of differentially expressed genes indicated shifts in 152 different metabolic pathways between the tolerant and susceptible clones. Real-time quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (real-time qRT-PCR) analyses of 36 genes verified the differential expression. Regression analysis validated a uniform progression in gene expression in association with infection levels and fungal loads in the susceptible clones. Expression patterns observed in the susceptible clones diverged in tolerant clones, with many genes showing higher expression at a low level of infection and fungal load. Principal coordinate analyses of real-time qRT-PCR data separated the gene expression patterns between susceptible and tolerant clones for pods showing malformation. Although some genes were constitutively differentially expressed between clones, most results suggested that defence responses were induced at low fungal load in the tolerant clones. Several elicitor-responsive genes were highly expressed in tolerant clones, suggesting rapid recognition of the pathogen and induction of defence genes. Expression patterns suggested that the jasmonic acid-ethylene- and/or salicylic acid-mediated defence pathways were activated in the tolerant clones, being enhanced by reduced brassinosteroid (BR) biosynthesis and catabolic inactivation of both BR and abscisic acids. Finally, several genes associated with hypersensitive response-like cell death were also induced in tolerant clones. © 2014

  12. PCR-mediated recombination between Cryptosporidium spp. of lizards and snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ling; Yang, Chunfu; Xiao, Lihua

    2003-01-01

    The presence or absence of genetic recombination has often been used as one of the criteria for Cryptosporidium species designation and population structure delineation. During a recent study of cryptosporidiosis in reptiles that were housed in the same room, 4 lizards were found to have concurrent infections of C. serpentis (a gastric parasite) and C. saurophilum (an intestinal parasite), and 6 snakes were concurrently infected with C. serpentis, C. saurophilum and a new Cryptosporidium as indicated by PCR-RFLP analysis of the SSU rRNA gene. DNA sequence analysis of cloned PCR products confirmed the diagnosis of mixed infections. Surprisingly, it appeared that 11 of the 22 clones (8 and 14 clones from a lizard and a snake, respectively) had chimeric sequences of two Cryptosporidium spp. BootScan analysis indicated the existence of recombinants among the cloned sequences and detection of the informative sites confirmed the BootScan results. Because the probability for genetic recombination between gastric and intestinal parasites is small, these hybrid sequences were likely results of PCR artifacts due to the presence of multiple templates. This was confirmed by PCR-sequencing analysis of single-copy templates using diluted DNA samples. Direct sequencing of 69 PCR products from 100- to 1,000-fold diluted DNAs from the same snake and lizard produced only sequences of C. serpentis, C. saurophilum and the unnamed Cryptosporidium sp. Thus, care should be taken to eliminate PCR artifacts when determining the presence of genetic recombination or interpreting results of population genetic studies.

  13. Human cloning and 'posthuman' society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackford, Russell

    2005-01-01

    Since early 1997, when the creation of Dolly the sheep by somatic cell nuclear transfer was announced in Nature, numerous government reports, essays, articles and books have considered the ethical problems and policy issues surrounding human reproductive cloning. In this article, I consider what response a modern liberal society should give to the prospect of human cloning, if it became safe and practical. Some opponents of human cloning have argued that permitting it would place us on a slippery slope to a repugnant future society, comparable to that portrayed in Aldous Huxley's novel, Brave New World. I conclude that, leaving aside concerns about safety, none of the psychological or social considerations discussed in this article provides an adequate policy justification for invoking the state's coercive powers to prevent human cloning.

  14. Human Cloning: Let's Discuss It.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taras, Loretta; Stavroulakis, Anthea M.; Ortiz, Mary T.

    1999-01-01

    Describes experiences with holding discussions on cloning at a variety of levels in undergraduate biology courses. Discusses teaching methods used and student reactions to the discussions. Contains 12 references. (WRM)

  15. Islamic perspectives on human cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadeghi, Mahmoud

    2007-01-01

    The present paper seeks to assess various views from Islamic jurists relating to human cloning, which is one of the controversial topics in the recent past. Taking Islamic jurisprudence principles, such as the rule of necessity for self preservation and respect for human beings, the rule of la darar wa la dirar ('the necessity to refrain from causing harm to oneself and others') and the rule of usr wa haraj, one may indicate that if human cloning could not be prohibited, as such, it could still be opposed because it gives way to various harmful consequences, which include family disorder, chaos in the clone's family relationships, physical and mental diseases for clones and suffering of egg donors and surrogate mothers. However with due attention to the fact that the reasons behind the prohibition of abortion only restrict the destruction of human embryos in their post-implantation stages, human cloning for biomedical research and exploitation of stem cells from cloned embryos at the blastocyst stage for therapeutic purposes would be acceptable.

  16. Cloning goes to the movies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cormick, Craig

    2006-10-01

    Public attitude research conducted by Biotechnology Australia shows that one of the major sources of information on human reproductive cloning is movies. Traditionally, understanding of new and emerging technologies has come through the mass media but human cloning, being so widely addressed through the popular culture of movies, is more effectively defined by Hollywood than the news media or science media. But how well are the science and social issues of cloning portrayed in box office hits such as The Island, Multiplicity, Star Wars: Attack of the Clones and Jurassic Park? These movies have enormous reach and undoubted influence, and are therefore worth analyzing in some detail. This study looks at 33 movies made between 1971 and 2005 that address human reproductive cloning, and it categorizes the films based on their genre and potential influence. Yet rather than simply rating the quality of the science portrayed, the study compares the key messages in these movies with public attitudes towards cloning, to examine the correlations.

  17. Artificial cloning of domestic animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keefer, Carol L

    2015-07-21

    Domestic animals can be cloned using techniques such as embryo splitting and nuclear transfer to produce genetically identical individuals. Although embryo splitting is limited to the production of only a few identical individuals, nuclear transfer of donor nuclei into recipient oocytes, whose own nuclear DNA has been removed, can result in large numbers of identical individuals. Moreover, clones can be produced using donor cells from sterile animals, such as steers and geldings, and, unlike their genetic source, these clones are fertile. In reality, due to low efficiencies and the high costs of cloning domestic species, only a limited number of identical individuals are generally produced, and these clones are primarily used as breed stock. In addition to providing a means of rescuing and propagating valuable genetics, somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) research has contributed knowledge that has led to the direct reprogramming of cells (e.g., to induce pluripotent stem cells) and a better understanding of epigenetic regulation during embryonic development. In this review, I provide a broad overview of the historical development of cloning in domestic animals, of its application to the propagation of livestock and transgenic animal production, and of its scientific promise for advancing basic research.

  18. Aptamer-based detection of adenosine triphosphate via qPCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modh, Harshvardhan; Witt, Martin; Urmann, Katharina; Lavrentieva, Antonina; Segal, Ester; Scheper, Thomas; Walter, Johanna-Gabriela

    2017-09-01

    Sensitive and specific detection and quantification of small molecules often remain challenging. We developed a novel magnetic bead-based aptamer-assisted real-time PCR (Apta-qPCR) assay to provide a versatile platform for quantification of small molecules. The assay has been realized for the detection of ATP as a model system. The assay relies on a combination of qPCR with the target-induced dissociation (TID) of ATP aptamer from an oligonucleotide, complementary to the ATP binding site of the aptamer. The complementary oligonucleotide was immobilized on deoxythymidine (dT)-modified magnetic beads (dT-beads) and hybridized with the aptamer. The presence of ATP resulted in dissociation of the aptamer from the dT-beads and the dissociated aptamer was quantified using qPCR. The Apta-qPCR assay was able to detect 17nM ATP with a broad dynamic range from 50nM to 5mM. The assay is label-free, and real-time PCR-based detection of aptamer facilitates high sensitivity. The presented method is highly versatile and can be applied to various aptamer-target pairs to allow detection of a broad range of target analytes. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  19. Towards Clone Detection in UML Domain Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Störrle, Harald

    2010-01-01

    , we discuss how model clones arise by analyzing several practical scenarios. We propose a formal definition of models and clones, that allows us to specify a generic clone detection algorithm. Through a thorough analysis of the detail structure of sample UML domain models, recommendations for clone...

  20. cDNA amplification by SMART-PCR and suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH)-PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hillmann, Andrew; Dunne, Eimear; Kenny, Dermot

    2009-01-01

    The comparison of two RNA populations that differ from the effects of a single-independent variable, such as a drug treatment or a specific genetic defect, can identify differences in the abundance of specific transcripts that vary in a population-dependent manner. There are a variety of methods for identifying differentially expressed genes, including microarray, SAGE, qRT-PCR, and DDGE. This protocol describes a potentially less sensitive yet relatively easy and cost-effective alternative that does not require prior knowledge of the transcriptomes under investigation and is particularly applicable when minimal levels of starting material, RNA, are available. RNA input can often be a limiting factor when analyzing RNA from, for example, rigorously purified blood cells. This protocol describes the use of SMART-PCR to amplify cDNA from sub-microgram levels of RNA. The amplified cDNA populations under comparison are then subjected to suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH-PCR), a technique that couples subtractive hybridization with suppression PCR to selectively amplify fragments of differentially expressed genes. The final products are cDNA populations enriched for significantly over-represented transcripts in either of the two input RNA preparations. These cDNA populations may then be cloned to make subtracted cDNA libraries and/or used as probes to screen subtracted cDNA, global cDNA, or genomic DNA libraries.

  1. RT-PCR Protocols - Methods in Molecular Biology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Monti

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available “The first record I have of it, is when I made a computer file which I usually did whenever I had an idea, that would have been on the Monday when I got back, and I called it Chain Reaction.POL, meaning polymerase. That was the identifier for it and later I called the thing the Polymerase Chain Reaction, which a lot of people thought was a dumb name for it, but it stuck, and it became PCR”. With these words the Nobel prize winner, Kary Mullis, explains how he named the PCR: one of the most important techniques ever invented and currently used in molecular biology. This book “RT-PCR Protocols” covers a wide range of aspects important for the setting of a PCR experiment for both beginners and advanced users. In my opinion the book is very well structured in three different sections. The first one describes the different technologies now available, like competitive RT-PCR, nested RT-PCR or RT-PCR for cloning. An important part regards the usage of PCR in single cell mouse embryos, stressing how important...........

  2. Cloning and Expression of Recombinant Plasmid Containing P36/LACK Gene of Leishmania infantum Iranian Strain.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saloomeh Shirali

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available There are several methods, such as vaccination, to control visceral leishmaniasis. Although there is no efficient vaccine, it seem DNA vaccination with stimulates both cellular and humoral immunity apparently is the best way. The aim of this study was cloning and expression of LACK gene, a 36kD protein, as a candidate protein for vaccination against Iranian L. infantum.Iranian strain of L. infantum [MCAN/IR/07/Moheb-gh] was used as a template for PCR to amplify LACK gene. The LACK gene was cloned in pTZ57R/T vector and after confirmation it was digested by restriction enzymes (BamH1 and cloned in pcDNA3.1 expression vector. Recombinant plasmid was extracted and analyzed by sequencing, restriction digestion analysis and PCR reaction. The pc- LACK recombinant plasmid was purified from transformed E.coli (DH5α and its expression was analyzed by SDS-PAGE and Western blot.The results of sequencing, restriction digestion analysis and PCR reaction revealed that LACK gene was cloned correctly in pcDNA3.1 vector and the results of SDS PAGE and Western blot emphasized that LACK protein of Iranian L. infantum is a well-expressed protein.We amplified, cloned and expressed Iranian L. infantum LACK gene successfully.

  3. [Cloning of mouse TLR-2 gene and its expression in Pichia pastroris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Wen-zhong; Jiang, Hai-yan; Liu, Yan-jun; Zhu, Ping; Fu, Ning

    2004-07-01

    To clone the mouse TLR-2 gene and to express it in Pichia pastroris. Full-length gene encoding mouse Toll-like receptor 2 (mTLR-2) was amplified by RT-PCR, cloned into pUCm-T vector, and confirmed by sequencing. The target gene was then inserted into Pichia pastroris expression vector pPICZalphaC, which was transformed into Pichia pastroris. The recombinant Pichia pastroris was confirmed by PCR and RT-PCR. Expressed protein was identified by SDS-PAGE and Western blot. The full-length mTLR-2 gene(GenBank accession No.AY179346) was cloned. The homology of the cloned gene to published mTLR-2 gene reached 99.84%. The recombinant expression plasmid pPICZ- mTLR-2 was constructed successfully. SDS-PAGE analysis showed that the relative molecular mass(M(r)) of recombinant protein was about 97 000. Western blot analysis showed expressed product can react to rabbit anti- mTLR-2 antibody. The full-length mTLR-2 gene is cloned and the recombinant protein can be expressed in Pichia pastroris correctly.

  4. Cloning of pCDNA3-IgG4 and pQE-2-IgG4 human hinge region ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    GREGORY

    2011-12-16

    Dec 16, 2011 ... 5'NdeI and 3' Not1 restriction endonuclease cleavage sites to facilitate directional cloning into plasmid pQE-2 and p-CDNA3 vector. The sequences of primers were as follows: Forward primer. 3: 5'-catatgagcttgggcacgaagacct-3'; reverse primer 4: 5'- gcggccgccacgcacgtgacctc-3'. Cloning of PCR products.

  5. [Mystery and problems of cloning].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikitin, V A

    2010-01-01

    The attention of investigators is attracted to the fact that, in spite of great efforts in mammalian cloning, advances that have been made in this area of research are not great, and cloned animals have developmental pathologies often incompatible with life and/or reproduction ability. It is yet not clear what technical or biological factors underlie this, and how they are connected or interact with each other, which is more realistic strategically. There is a great number of articles dealing with the influence of cloning with the nuclear transfer on genetic and epigenetic reprogramming of donor cells. At the same time we can see the practical absence of analytical investigations concerning the technology of cloning as such, its weak points, and possible sources of cellular trauma in the course of microsurgery of nuclear transfer or twinning. This article discusses step by step several nuclear transfer techniques and the methods of dividing early preimplanted embryos for twinning with the aim to reveal possible sources of cell damage during micromanipulation that may have negative influence on the development of cloned organisms. Several new author's technologies based on the study of cell biophysical characteristics are described, which allow one to avoid cellular trauma during manipulation and minimize the possibility of cell damage at any rate.

  6. [Cloning and law in Hungary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Julesz, Máté

    2015-03-01

    Reproductive human cloning is prohibited in Hungary, as in many other countries. Therapeutic human cloning is not prohibited, just like in many other countries. Stem cell therapy is also allowed. Article III, paragraph (3) of the Hungarian basic law (constitution) strictly forbids total human cloning. Article 1 of the Additional Protocol to the Oviedo Convention, on the Prohibition of Cloning Human Beings (1998) stipulates that any intervention seeking to create a human being genetically identical to another human being, whether living or dead, is prohibited. In Hungary, according to Article 174 of the Criminal Code, total human cloning constitutes a crime. Article 180, paragraph (3) of the Hungarian Act on Health declares that embryos shall not be brought about for research purposes; research shall be conducted only on embryos brought about for reproductive purposes when this is authorized by the persons entitled to decide upon its disposal, or when the embryo is damaged. Article 180, paragraph (5) of the Hungarian Act on Health stipulates that multiple individuals who genetically conform to one another shall not be brought about. According to Article 181, paragraph (1) of the Hungarian Act on Health, an embryo used for research shall be kept alive for not longer than 14 days, not counting the time it was frozen for storage and the time period of research.

  7. PCR-DGGE

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-05-23

    May 23, 2011 ... bioquímicos y tecnológicos del metabolismo de cultivos puros y mixtos de levaduras y bacterias ácido lácticas en panificación. Food Sci. Technol. Int., 2: p. 349. Endo A, Futagawa-Endo Y, Dicks L (2009). Lactobacillus and. Bifidobacterium Diversity in Horse Feces, Revealed by PCR-DGGE. Curr. Microbiol.

  8. PCR in forensic genetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morling, Niels

    2009-01-01

    Since the introduction in the mid-1980s of analyses of minisatellites for DNA analyses, a revolution has taken place in forensic genetics. The subsequent invention of the PCR made it possible to develop forensic genetics tools that allow both very informative routine investigations and still more...... and more advanced, special investigations in cases concerning crime, paternity, relationship, disaster victim identification etc. The present review gives an update on the use of DNA investigations in forensic genetics....

  9. Evaluation of PCR and multiplex PCR in relation to nested PCR for diagnosing Theileria equi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danielle C. Leal

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Conventional PCR (PCRTeq for diagnosing Theileria equi and multiplex PCR (M/PCRTeq-Bc for diagnosing T. equi and Babesia caballi were comparatively evaluated with nested PCR (N/PCR-Teq for diagnosing equine piroplasmosis. In DNA sensitivity determinations, in multiple dilutions of equine blood that had tested positive for T. equi, PCR-Teq and N/PCR-Teq detected hemoparasite DNA in the larger dilutions (1:128, but did not differ significantly from the M/PCRTeq-Bc (1:64. In analyses on equine serum tested by ELISA, there was high agreement between this serological test and PCR-Teq (k = 0.780 and moderate agreement with N/PCR-Teq (k = 0.562 and M/PCRTeq-Bc (k = 0.488. PCR-Teq found a higher frequency of T. equi both in extensively and intensively reared horses, but this was not significant in relation to N/PCR-Teq (P>0.05, and both PCRs indicated that there was an endemic situation regarding T. equi in the population of horses of this sample. PCR-Teq was only significantly different from M/PCR-Teq-Bc (P<0.05. PCR-Teq presented high sensitivity and specificity, comparable to N/PCR-Teq, but with the advantage of higher speed in obtaining results and lower costs and risks of laboratory contamination. This accredits PCR-Teq for epidemiological studies and for determinations on affected horses.

  10. The Flp double cross system a simple efficient procedure for cloning DNA fragments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sadowski Paul D

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background While conventional cloning methods using restriction enzymes and polynucleotide ligase are adequate for most DNAs, fragments made by the polymerase chain reaction are difficult to clone because the amplifying DNA polymerase tends to add untemplated nucleotides to the 3'-termini of the amplified strands. Conservative site-specific recombinases offer an efficient alternative to conventional cloning methods. Results In this paper I describe the use of the Flp site-specific recombinase for cloning PCR-amplified fragments. A DNA fragment is amplified with primers that contain at their ends inverted target sequences for Flp. Flp readily recombines these fragments in vitro into a vector that also contains two inverted Flp target sequences surrounding the α-complementing region of the lacZ gene of E. coli. The recombinants are conveniently detected as white colonies by the familiar blue/white screening test for lacZ activity. A useful feature of the system is that both orientations of the inserted DNA are usually obtained. If the recipient vector is cut between the two inverted Flp targets, Flp "heals" the double-strand break by inserting a linear fragment flanked by Flp targets. Conclusion This system ("The Flp Double Cross System" should be useful for cloning multiple PCR fragments into many sites in several vectors. It has certain advantages over other available recombinase-based cloning procedures.

  11. Construction of adenovirus vectors encoding the lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Gui-Fang; Qi, Bing; Tu, Lei-Lei; Liu, Lian; Yu, Guo-Cheng; Zhong, Jing-Xiang

    2016-01-01

    To construct adenovirus vectors of lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology to further understand the role of lumican gene in myopia. Gateway recombinant cloning technology was used to construct adenovirus vectors. The wild-type (wt) and mutant (mut) forms of the lumican gene were synthesized and amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The lumican cDNA fragments were purified and ligated into the adenovirus shuttle vector pDown-multiple cloning site (MCS)-/internal ribozyme entry site (IRES)/enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Then the desired DNA fragments were integrated into the destination vector pAV.Des1d yielding the final expression constructs pAV.Ex1d-cytomegalovirus (CMV)>wt-lumican/IRES/EGFP and pAV.Ex1d-CMV>mut-lumican/IRES /EGFP, respectively. The adenovirus plasmids pAV.Ex1d-CMV>wt-lumican/IRES/EGFP and pAV.Ex1d-CMV>mut-lumican/IRES/EGFP were successfully constructed by gateway recombinant cloning technology. Positive clones identified by PCR and sequencing were selected and packaged into recombinant adenovirus in HEK293 cells. We construct adenovirus vectors containing the lumican gene by gateway recombinant cloning technology, which provides a basis for investigating the role of lumican gene in the pathogenesis of high myopia.

  12. Cloning and sequence analysis of hyaluronoglucosaminidase (nagH gene of Clostridium chauvoei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saroj K. Dangi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Blackleg disease is caused by Clostridium chauvoei in ruminants. Although virulence factors such as C. chauvoei toxin A, sialidase, and flagellin are well characterized, hyaluronidases of C. chauvoei are not characterized. The present study was aimed at cloning and sequence analysis of hyaluronoglucosaminidase (nagH gene of C. chauvoei. Materials and Methods: C. chauvoei strain ATCC 10092 was grown in ATCC 2107 media and confirmed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR using the primers specific for 16-23S rDNA spacer region. nagH gene of C. chauvoei was amplified and cloned into pRham-SUMO vector and transformed into Escherichia cloni 10G cells. The construct was then transformed into E. cloni cells. Colony PCR was carried out to screen the colonies followed by sequencing of nagH gene in the construct. Results: PCR amplification yielded nagH gene of 1143 bp product, which was cloned in prokaryotic expression system. Colony PCR, as well as sequencing of nagH gene, confirmed the presence of insert. Sequence was then subjected to BLAST analysis of NCBI, which confirmed that the sequence was indeed of nagH gene of C. chauvoei. Phylogenetic analysis of the sequence showed that it is closely related to Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium paraputrificum. Conclusion: The gene for virulence factor nagH was cloned into a prokaryotic expression vector and confirmed by sequencing.

  13. cDNA, genomic cloning and sequence analysis of ribosomal protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    enoh

    2012-03-13

    Mar 13, 2012 ... Ribosomal protein S4X (RPS4X) is one of the 40S ribosomal proteins encoded by the RPS4X gene. The. cDNA and the genomic sequence of RPS4X were cloned successfully from giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca) using reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and touchdown- ...

  14. Identification of a genomic clone to ACC oxidase from papaya (Carica papaya L.) and expression studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Gómez, Rodolfo; Morales-Domínguez, Francisco; Mendoza Alcázar, Omar; Gómez-Lim, Miguel Angel

    2004-02-25

    In this paper are presented structural analysis and expression studies of one genomic clone encoding a 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate oxidase (ACC oxidase) from papaya. Using RT-PCR amplification of ACC oxidase cDNAs from ripe papaya, a product of 800 bp was obtained, which after sequence analysis was found to code for a protein highly homologous to ACC oxidase proteins. This PCR product was used as a probe for screening a genomic library, and two different groups of clones were obtained as indicated by restriction mapping. One clone (CPACCO-1) was selected for further study and fully sequenced. Comparison of this sequence with the PCR product and other cloned ACC oxidase genes revealed that CPACCO-1 encoded the transcript in four exons interrupted by three introns. Southern blot analysis showed one or two major bands hybridized to the PCR probe, suggesting that the ACC oxidase gene is present in one or two copies in the papaya genome. By northern blot analysis it was found that the ACC oxidase transcripts appear in the pulp earlier than in the peel, suggesting a developmental regulation. A wounding experiment revealed the highest expression of this gene by 2 h. Transcriptional regulation by ethylene could be due to the presence of a putative GCC box in the promoter region.

  15. Cloning and bioinformatics analysis of an ubiquitin gene of the rice ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-10-05

    Oct 5, 2011 ... 2Institute of Plant Protection, Anhui Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Hefei 230031, P. R., China. 3Institute of Applied Entomology, Yangzhou University, ... GU238420) was cloned by RT-PCR and sequenced in this study, with primers according to the sequences of ubiquitin genes from Homo sapiens, ...

  16. Cloning and expression of islandisin, a new thermostable subtilisin from Fervidobacterium islandicum, in Escheria coli

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Godde, C.; Sahm, K.; Brouns, S.J.J.; Kluskens, L.D.; Oost, van der J.; Vos, de W.M.; Antranikian, G.

    2005-01-01

    A gene encoding a subtilisin-like protease, designated islandisin, from the extremely thermophilic bacterium Fervidobacterium islandicum (DSMZ 5733) was cloned and actively expressed in Escherichia coli. The gene was identified by PCR using degenerated primers based on conserved regions around two

  17. Cloning and expression trait of UDP-glucose:flavonoid 3-O ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    glucose:flavonoid 3-O-glucosyltransferase (UF3GT) is a committed catalytic enzyme in the late stage of anthocyanin biosynthesis. BrUF3GT1 and BrUF3GT2 genes were cloned by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) method ...

  18. [Pyruvate oxidase gene from Streptococcus sanguis: molecular cloning and sequence analysis of the gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, B; Zhang, R; Zhang, J; Qian, W; Zhang, Y

    2001-09-01

    To clone and sequence the gene of pyruvate oxidase (Sopox) from Streptococcus sanguis. The PCR primers for Sopox gene were designed and synthesized according to the sequence of pyruvate oxidase (spxB) gene of S. pneumonia. The amplified PCR product was cloned into pUC18 and then subcloned into M13mp18 and M13mp19. The DNA sequence of the gene was analyzed. Sopox gene was successfully amplified from S. sanguis ATCC10557. The nucleotide sequence of the whole gene was revealed to be 1788 base pairs with one open reading frame coding pyruvate oxidase with 591 amino acid residuals. The clone and DNA sequence of Sopox gene were obtained which could serve as a foundation on which to elucidate the molecular mechanisms of hydrogen peroxide production and its regulation by oral streptococci.

  19. One-stop polymerase chain reaction (PCR): An improved PCR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -cycling steps to visualize amplicons, decelerating PCR sample processing and result calling. “One-stop PCR” was developed by including both the loading buffer and nontoxic staining dye within a single PCR tube, allowing direct loading and ...

  20. Public perceptions of animal cloning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jelsøe, Erling; Vincentsen, Ulla; Andersen, Ida-Elisabeth

    What was from the outset meant to be a survey testing predefined categories of ethical positions related to new biotechnologies with animal cloning as an example was subsequently developed into a process of broader involvement of groups of citizens in the issue. The survey was conducted at meetings...... in four different cities in Denmark. The participants were introduced to animal cloning and after that they filled out the questionnaire. Finally, the issue was discussed in focus groups. The process as a whole was run in a dialogue oriented way. Through the information they received in combination...... with reflecting on the survey questions the participants were well prepared for discussions in the focus groups. This approach made it possible, on the one hand to get a measure of the citizen's perceptions of the ethical aspects of animal cloning, but also to go deeper into their own thoughts of the issue...

  1. The topsy-turvy cloning law.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brassington, Iain; Oultram, Stuart

    2011-03-01

    In debates about human cloning, a distinction is frequently drawn between therapeutic and reproductive uses of the technology. Naturally enough, this distinction influences the way that the law is framed. The general consensus is that therapeutic cloning is less morally problematic than reproductive cloning--one can hold this position while holding that both are morally unacceptable--and the law frequently leaves the way open for some cloning for the sake of research into new therapeutic techniques while banning it for reproductive purposes. We claim that the position adopted by the law has things the wrong way around: if we accept a moral distinction between therapeutic and reproductive cloning, there are actually more reasons to be morally worried about therapeutic cloning than about reproductive cloning. If cloning is the proper object of legal scrutiny, then, we ought to make sure that we are scrutinising the right kind of clone.

  2. Directed PCR-free engineering of highly repetitive DNA sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Preissler Steffen

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Highly repetitive nucleotide sequences are commonly found in nature e.g. in telomeres, microsatellite DNA, polyadenine (poly(A tails of eukaryotic messenger RNA as well as in several inherited human disorders linked to trinucleotide repeat expansions in the genome. Therefore, studying repetitive sequences is of biological, biotechnological and medical relevance. However, cloning of such repetitive DNA sequences is challenging because specific PCR-based amplification is hampered by the lack of unique primer binding sites resulting in unspecific products. Results For the PCR-free generation of repetitive DNA sequences we used antiparallel oligonucleotides flanked by restriction sites of Type IIS endonucleases. The arrangement of recognition sites allowed for stepwise and seamless elongation of repetitive sequences. This facilitated the assembly of repetitive DNA segments and open reading frames encoding polypeptides with periodic amino acid sequences of any desired length. By this strategy we cloned a series of polyglutamine encoding sequences as well as highly repetitive polyadenine tracts. Such repetitive sequences can be used for diverse biotechnological applications. As an example, the polyglutamine sequences were expressed as His6-SUMO fusion proteins in Escherichia coli cells to study their aggregation behavior in vitro. The His6-SUMO moiety enabled affinity purification of the polyglutamine proteins, increased their solubility, and allowed controlled induction of the aggregation process. We successfully purified the fusions proteins and provide an example for their applicability in filter retardation assays. Conclusion Our seamless cloning strategy is PCR-free and allows the directed and efficient generation of highly repetitive DNA sequences of defined lengths by simple standard cloning procedures.

  3. Enhancement of PCR Detection Limit by Single-Tube Restriction Endonuclease-PCR (RE-PCR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datta, Sibnarayan; Budhauliya, Raghvendra; Chatterjee, Soumya; Vanlalhmuaka; Veer, Vijay; Chakravarty, Runu

    2016-06-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is widely used in biological research and diagnostics because of its high sensitivity and specificity. However, the sensitivity of PCR is strongly influenced by topological characteristics of the template. Supercoiled templates are known to inhibit PCR, whereas linearized forms of the same supercoiled templates facilitate PCR. This study was conducted to compare the PCR efficiency of circular supercoiled DNA templates to their restriction endonuclease (RE)-mediated linearized forms. Additionally, we also evaluated the possibility of RE digestion of the circular supercoiled templates within the complete PCR buffer. Following a systematic approach, we demonstrated that circular supercoiled templates could be efficiently linearized by RE in the complete PCR buffer itself. This allowed linearization of circular supercoiled templates and their subsequent amplification in the PCR buffer in a single-tube format. Using this extremely simple RE-PCR approach, we documented up to tenfold increases in detection efficiency of PCR with two different circular supercoiled templates of clinical origin, including an international calibration standard. This inexpensive and easy approach to increasing PCR sensitivity can be easily adapted to any standard PCR protocol aimed at amplifying circular supercoiled genomes. Apart from its application in the development of sensitive clinical diagnostic PCR assays for a large number of organisms, this method could also prove to be very useful in simplifying the existing protocols for other applications where pre-PCR restriction digestion is required, such as mutation detection, genotyping, and selective template amplification.

  4. Potential complications when developing gene deletion clones in Xylella fastidiosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Kameka L; Cursino, Luciana; Athinuwat, Dusit; Burr, Thomas J; Mowery, Patricia

    2015-04-16

    The Gram-negative xylem-limited bacterium, Xylella fastidiosa, is an important plant pathogen that infects a number of high value crops. The Temecula 1 strain infects grapevines and induces Pierce's disease, which causes symptoms such as scorching on leaves, cluster collapse, and eventual plant death. In order to understand the pathogenesis of X. fastidiosa, researchers routinely perform gene deletion studies and select mutants via antibiotic markers. Site-directed pilJ mutant of X. fastidiosa were generated and selected on antibiotic media. Mutant cultures were assessed by PCR to determine if they were composed of purely transformant cells or included mixtures of non-transformants cells. Then pure pilJ mutant and wildtype cells were mixed in PD2 medium and following incubation and exposure to kanamycin were assessed by PCR for presence of mutant and wildtype populations. We have discovered that when creating clones of targeted mutants of X. fastidiosa Temecula 1 with selection on antibiotic plates, X. fastidiosa lacking the gene deletion often persist in association with targeted mutant cells. We believe this phenomenon is due to spontaneous antibiotic resistance and/or X. fastidiosa characteristically forming aggregates that can be comprised of transformed and non-transformed cells. A combined population was confirmed by PCR, which showed that targeted mutant clones were mixed with non-transformed cells. After repeated transfer and storage the non-transformed cells became the dominant clone present. We have discovered that special precautions are warranted when developing a targeted gene mutation in X. fastidiosa because colonies that arise following transformation and selection are often comprised of transformed and non-transformed cells. Following transfer and storage the cells can consist primarily of the non-transformed strain. As a result, careful monitoring of targeted mutant strains must be performed to avoid mixed populations and confounding results.

  5. Development and Validation of a HPV-32 Specific PCR Assay

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leigh Janet

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human Papillomavirus-32 (HPV-32 has traditionally been associated with focal-epithelial-hyperplasia (FEH. It is also present in 58% of oral warts of HIV-positive individuals whose prevalence is increasing. Current methods for the detection of HPV-32 are labor-intensive and insensitive so the goal of this work was to develop a highly sensitive and easy to use specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR assay. Materials and methods An HPV-32 L1 specific PCR assay was developed and optimized. The sensitivity and specificity was compared to previous assays utilized for detection (PGMY and MY09/11 PCR with dot blot hybridization using cloned HPV-32 L1, the closely related HPV-42 L1 as well as clinical samples (oral swabs and fluids from 89 HIV-positive subjects. Results The HPV-32 specific PCR assay showed improved sensitivity to 5 copies of HPV-32 as compared to the PGMY PCR, MY09/11 PCR and dot blot which had a limit of detection of approximately 3,000 copies. Using the HPV-32 dot blot hybridization assay as the gold standard, the HPV-32 specific PCR assay has a sensitivity of 95.8% and 88.9% by sample and subject, respectively, and specificity was 87.8% and 58.8% by sample and subject, respectively. The low sensitivity is due to the HPV-32 specific PCR assays ability to detect more HPV-32 positive samples and may be the new gold standard. Conclusion Due to the ease, sensitivity, and specificity the HPV-32 specific PCR assay is superior to previous assays and is ideal for detection of HPV-32 in large cohorts. This assay provides an excellent tool to study the natural history of HPV-32 infection and the development of oral warts.

  6. High-throughput clone screening followed by protein expression cross-check: A visual assay platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bose, Partha Pratim; Kumar, Prakash

    2017-01-01

    In high-throughput biotechnology and structural biology, molecular cloning is an essential prerequisite for attaining high yields of recombinant protein. However, a rapid, cost-effective, easy clone screening protocol is still required to identify colonies with desired insert along with a cross check method to certify the expression of the desired protein as the end product. We report an easy, fast, sensitive and cheap visual clone screening and protein expression cross check protocol employing gold nanoparticle based plasmonic detection phenomenon. This is a non-gel, non-PCR based visual detection technique, which can be used as simultaneous high throughput clone screening followed by the determination of expression of desired protein. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. PCR performance of a thermostable heterodimeric archaeal DNA polymerase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killelea, Tom; Ralec, Céline; Bossé, Audrey; Henneke, Ghislaine

    2014-01-01

    DNA polymerases are versatile tools used in numerous important molecular biological core technologies like the ubiquitous polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cDNA cloning, genome sequencing, and nucleic acid based diagnostics. Taking into account the multiple DNA amplification techniques in use, different DNA polymerases must be optimized for each type of application. One of the current tendencies is to reengineer or to discover new DNA polymerases with increased performance and broadened substrate spectra. At present, there is a great demand for such enzymes in applications, e.g., forensics or paleogenomics. Current major limitations hinge on the inability of conventional PCR enzymes, such as Taq, to amplify degraded or low amounts of template DNA. Besides, a wide range of PCR inhibitors can also impede reactions of nucleic acid amplification. Here we looked at the PCR performances of the proof-reading D-type DNA polymerase from P. abyssi, Pab-polD. Fragments, 3 kilobases in length, were specifically PCR-amplified in its optimized reaction buffer. Pab-polD showed not only a greater resistance to high denaturation temperatures than Taq during cycling, but also a superior tolerance to the presence of potential inhibitors. Proficient proof-reading Pab-polD enzyme could also extend a primer containing up to two mismatches at the 3' primer termini. Overall, we found valuable biochemical properties in Pab-polD compared to the conventional Taq, which makes the enzyme ideally suited for cutting-edge PCR-applications. PMID:24847315

  8. PCR performance of a thermostable heterodimeric archaeal DNA polymerase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom eKillelea

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available DNA polymerases are versatile tools used in numerous important molecular biological core technologies like the ubiquitous polymerase chain reaction (PCR, cDNA cloning, genome sequencing and nucleic acid based diagnostics. Taking into account the multiple DNA amplification techniques in use, different DNA polymerases must be optimized for each type of application. One of the current tendencies is to reengineer or to discover new DNA polymerases with increased performance and broadened substrate spectra. At present, there is a great demand for such enzymes in applications, e.g., forensics or paleogenomics. Current major limitations hinge on the inability of conventional PCR enzymes, such as Taq, to amplify degraded or low amounts of template DNA. Besides, a wide range of PCR inhibitors can also impede reactions of nucleic acid amplification. Here we looked at the PCR performances of the proof-reading D-type DNA polymerase from P. abyssi, Pab-polD. Fragments, 3 kilobases in length, were specifically PCR-amplified in its optimized reaction buffer. Pab-polD showed not only a greater resistance to high denaturation temperatures than Taq during cycling, but also a superior tolerance to the presence of potential inhibitors. Proficient proof-reading Pab-polD enzyme could also extend a primer containing up to two mismatches at the 3’ primer termini. Overall, we found valuable biochemical properties in Pab-polD compared to the conventional Taq, which makes the enzyme ideally suited for cutting-edge PCR-applications.

  9. PCR performance of a thermostable heterodimeric archaeal DNA polymerase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killelea, Tom; Ralec, Céline; Bossé, Audrey; Henneke, Ghislaine

    2014-01-01

    DNA polymerases are versatile tools used in numerous important molecular biological core technologies like the ubiquitous polymerase chain reaction (PCR), cDNA cloning, genome sequencing, and nucleic acid based diagnostics. Taking into account the multiple DNA amplification techniques in use, different DNA polymerases must be optimized for each type of application. One of the current tendencies is to reengineer or to discover new DNA polymerases with increased performance and broadened substrate spectra. At present, there is a great demand for such enzymes in applications, e.g., forensics or paleogenomics. Current major limitations hinge on the inability of conventional PCR enzymes, such as Taq, to amplify degraded or low amounts of template DNA. Besides, a wide range of PCR inhibitors can also impede reactions of nucleic acid amplification. Here we looked at the PCR performances of the proof-reading D-type DNA polymerase from P. abyssi, Pab-polD. Fragments, 3 kilobases in length, were specifically PCR-amplified in its optimized reaction buffer. Pab-polD showed not only a greater resistance to high denaturation temperatures than Taq during cycling, but also a superior tolerance to the presence of potential inhibitors. Proficient proof-reading Pab-polD enzyme could also extend a primer containing up to two mismatches at the 3' primer termini. Overall, we found valuable biochemical properties in Pab-polD compared to the conventional Taq, which makes the enzyme ideally suited for cutting-edge PCR-applications.

  10. Positional cloning of deafness genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kremer, H.; Cremers, F.P.M.

    2009-01-01

    The identification of the majority of the known causative genes involved in nonsyndromic sensorineural hearing loss (NSHL) started with linkage analysis as part of a positional cloning procedure. The human and mouse genome projects in combination with technical developments on genotyping,

  11. CDNA cloning, characterization and expression of an endosperm-specific barley peroxidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Søren Kjærsgård; Welinder, K.G.; Hejgaard, J.

    1991-01-01

    A barley peroxidase (BP 1) of pI ca. 8.5 and M(r) 37000 has been purified from mature barley grains. Using antibodies towards peroxidase BP 1, a cDNA clone (pcR7) was isolated from cDNA expression library. The nucleotide sequence of pcR7 gave a derived amino acid sequence identical to the 158 C......-terminal amino acid residues of mature BP 1. The clone pcR7 encodes an additional C-terminal sequence of 22 residues, which apparently are removed during processing. BP 1 is less than 50% identical to other sequenced plant peroxidases. Analyses of RNA and protein from aleurone, endosperm and embryo tissue showed...

  12. Quantum cloning machines and the applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Heng; Wang, Yi-Nan; Jing, Li; Yue, Jie-Dong; Shi, Han-Duo; Zhang, Yong-Liang; Mu, Liang-Zhu

    2014-11-01

    No-cloning theorem is fundamental for quantum mechanics and for quantum information science that states an unknown quantum state cannot be cloned perfectly. However, we can try to clone a quantum state approximately with the optimal fidelity, or instead, we can try to clone it perfectly with the largest probability. Thus various quantum cloning machines have been designed for different quantum information protocols. Specifically, quantum cloning machines can be designed to analyze the security of quantum key distribution protocols such as BB84 protocol, six-state protocol, B92 protocol and their generalizations. Some well-known quantum cloning machines include universal quantum cloning machine, phase-covariant cloning machine, the asymmetric quantum cloning machine and the probabilistic quantum cloning machine. In the past years, much progress has been made in studying quantum cloning machines and their applications and implementations, both theoretically and experimentally. In this review, we will give a complete description of those important developments about quantum cloning and some related topics. On the other hand, this review is self-consistent, and in particular, we try to present some detailed formulations so that further study can be taken based on those results.

  13. Quantum cloning machines and the applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fan, Heng, E-mail: hfan@iphy.ac.cn [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Collaborative Innovation Center of Quantum Matter, Beijing 100190 (China); Wang, Yi-Nan; Jing, Li [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Yue, Jie-Dong [Beijing National Laboratory for Condensed Matter Physics, Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Shi, Han-Duo; Zhang, Yong-Liang; Mu, Liang-Zhu [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China)

    2014-11-20

    No-cloning theorem is fundamental for quantum mechanics and for quantum information science that states an unknown quantum state cannot be cloned perfectly. However, we can try to clone a quantum state approximately with the optimal fidelity, or instead, we can try to clone it perfectly with the largest probability. Thus various quantum cloning machines have been designed for different quantum information protocols. Specifically, quantum cloning machines can be designed to analyze the security of quantum key distribution protocols such as BB84 protocol, six-state protocol, B92 protocol and their generalizations. Some well-known quantum cloning machines include universal quantum cloning machine, phase-covariant cloning machine, the asymmetric quantum cloning machine and the probabilistic quantum cloning machine. In the past years, much progress has been made in studying quantum cloning machines and their applications and implementations, both theoretically and experimentally. In this review, we will give a complete description of those important developments about quantum cloning and some related topics. On the other hand, this review is self-consistent, and in particular, we try to present some detailed formulations so that further study can be taken based on those results.

  14. PCR, exit stage left ...

    CERN Multimedia

    2004-01-01

    The Prevessin Control Room during LEP's start up in 1989. The Prévessin Control Room (PCR) was recently engulfed in a wave of nostalgia. The PCR, scene of some of the greatest moments in CERN's history, is being dismantled to prepare for a complete overhaul. In February 2006, a new combined control centre for all the accelerators will open its doors on the same site, together with a new building currently under construction (see Bulletin issue 27/2004 of 28 June 2004). This marks the end of an important chapter in CERN's history. The Prévessin Control Room saw its first momentous event 28 years ago when the 400 GeV beam for the SPS was commissioned in the presence of Project Leader John Adams. It was also here that the first proton-antiproton collisions were observed, in 1981. Eight years later, in 1989, operators and directors alike jumped for joy at the announcement of the first electron-positron collisions at the start up of LEP, the biggest accelerator in the world. Today the 80 terminals and PCs have b...

  15. Particle infectivity of HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones in a subtype C heterosexual transmission pair following high fidelity amplification and unbiased cloning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deymier, Martin J., E-mail: mdeymie@emory.edu [Emory Vaccine Center, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, 954 Gatewood Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30329 (United States); Claiborne, Daniel T., E-mail: dclaibo@emory.edu [Emory Vaccine Center, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, 954 Gatewood Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30329 (United States); Ende, Zachary, E-mail: zende@emory.edu [Emory Vaccine Center, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, 954 Gatewood Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30329 (United States); Ratner, Hannah K., E-mail: hannah.ratner@emory.edu [Emory Vaccine Center, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, 954 Gatewood Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30329 (United States); Kilembe, William, E-mail: wkilembe@rzhrg-mail.org [Zambia-Emory HIV Research Project (ZEHRP), B22/737 Mwembelelo, Emmasdale Post Net 412, P/BagE891, Lusaka (Zambia); Allen, Susan, E-mail: sallen5@emory.edu [Zambia-Emory HIV Research Project (ZEHRP), B22/737 Mwembelelo, Emmasdale Post Net 412, P/BagE891, Lusaka (Zambia); Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Hunter, Eric, E-mail: eric.hunter2@emory.edu [Emory Vaccine Center, Yerkes National Primate Research Center, 954 Gatewood Road NE, Atlanta, GA 30329 (United States); Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2014-11-15

    The high genetic diversity of HIV-1 impedes high throughput, large-scale sequencing and full-length genome cloning by common restriction enzyme based methods. Applying novel methods that employ a high-fidelity polymerase for amplification and an unbiased fusion-based cloning strategy, we have generated several HIV-1 full-length genome infectious molecular clones from an epidemiologically linked transmission pair. These clones represent the transmitted/founder virus and phylogenetically diverse non-transmitted variants from the chronically infected individual's diverse quasispecies near the time of transmission. We demonstrate that, using this approach, PCR-induced mutations in full-length clones derived from their cognate single genome amplicons are rare. Furthermore, all eight non-transmitted genomes tested produced functional virus with a range of infectivities, belying the previous assumption that a majority of circulating viruses in chronic HIV-1 infection are defective. Thus, these methods provide important tools to update protocols in molecular biology that can be universally applied to the study of human viral pathogens. - Highlights: • Our novel methodology demonstrates accurate amplification and cloning of full-length HIV-1 genomes. • A majority of plasma derived HIV variants from a chronically infected individual are infectious. • The transmitted/founder was more infectious than the majority of the variants from the chronically infected donor.

  16. Rapid diagnosis of sepsis with TaqMan-Based multiplex real-time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chang-Feng; Shi, Xin-Ping; Chen, Yun; Jin, Ye; Zhang, Bing

    2018-02-01

    The survival rate of septic patients mainly depends on a rapid and reliable diagnosis. A rapid, broad range, specific and sensitive quantitative diagnostic test is the urgent need. Thus, we developed a TaqMan-Based Multiplex real-time PCR assays to identify bloodstream pathogens within a few hours. Primers and TaqMan probes were designed to be complementary to conserved regions in the 16S rDNA gene of different kinds of bacteria. To evaluate accurately, sensitively, and specifically, the known bacteria samples (Standard strains, whole blood samples) are determined by TaqMan-Based Multiplex real-time PCR. In addition, 30 blood samples taken from patients with clinical symptoms of sepsis were tested by TaqMan-Based Multiplex real-time PCR and blood culture. The mean frequency of positive for Multiplex real-time PCR was 96% at a concentration of 100 CFU/mL, and it was 100% at a concentration greater than 1000 CFU/mL. All the known blood samples and Standard strains were detected positively by TaqMan-Based Multiplex PCR, no PCR products were detected when DNAs from other bacterium were used in the multiplex assay. Among the 30 patients with clinical symptoms of sepsis, 18 patients were confirmed positive by Multiplex real-time PCR and seven patients were confirmed positive by blood culture. TaqMan-Based Multiplex real-time PCR assay with highly sensitivity, specificity and broad detection range, is a rapid and accurate method in the detection of bacterial pathogens of sepsis and should have a promising usage in the diagnosis of sepsis. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. A Nested Reverse Transcriptase PCR Assay for Detection of Small Round-Structured Viruses in Environmentally Contaminated Molluscan Shellfish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, J.; Henshilwood, K.; Gallimore, C. I.; Brown, D. W. G.; Lees, D. N.

    1998-01-01

    We describe the evaluation of a nested reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) procedure for the detection of small round-structured viruses (SRSVs) in molluscan shellfish and the application of this assay for the detection of SRSVs in commercially produced shellfish and in shellfish implicated in outbreaks of gastroenteritis. The range of virus strains detected and the sensitivity of detection were evaluated by using a representative panel of 21 well-characterized SRSV strains. The nested RT-PCR detected 15 of 21 SRSVs, demonstrating that the assay detects a broad range of SRSVs including strains from both genogroup I and genogroup II. Seeding experiments showed the nested RT-PCR assay to be 10 to 1,000 times more sensitive than the single-round RT-PCR assay for the detection of SRSV in shellfish. SRSV-contaminated samples were identified by nested RT-PCR for shellfish grown in polluted harvesting areas and for shellfish associated with outbreaks of gastroenteritis which were negative by a previously described single-round RT-PCR. The assay was shown to be effective for investigation of virus elimination during commercial shellfish processing procedures such as depuration and relaying and has potential applications for monitoring at-risk shellfish harvesting areas, for investigation of SRSV contamination in shellfish from producers linked to gastroenteritis outbreaks, and for the direct detection of virus in shellfish implicated in outbreaks. PMID:9501426

  18. A Novel Duplex Real-Time Reverse-Transcription PCR Assay for the Detection of Influenza A and the Novel Influenza A(H1N1 Strain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Theo P. Sloots

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Timely implementation of antiviral treatment and other public health based responses are dependent on accurate and rapid diagnosis of the novel pandemic influenza A(H1N1 strain. In this study we developed a duplex real-time PCR (RT-PCR (dFLU-TM assay for the simultaneous detection of a broad range of influenza A subtypes and specific detection of the novel H1N1 2009 pandemic strain. The assay was compared to the combined results of two previously described monoplex RT-PCR assays using 183 clinical samples and 10 seasonal influenza A isolates. Overall, the results showed that the dFLU-TM RT-PCR method is suitable for detection of influenza A, including the novel H1N1 pandemic strain, in clinical samples.

  19. Energy Values of Nine Populus Clones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terry F. Strong

    1980-01-01

    Compares calorific values for components of nine Populus clones. The components include stem wood, stem bark, and branches. Also compares calorific values for clones of balsam poplar and black cottonwood parentages.

  20. Human reproductive cloning: a conflict of liberties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havstad, Joyce C

    2010-02-01

    Proponents of human reproductive cloning do not dispute that cloning may lead to violations of clones' right to self-determination, or that these violations could cause psychological harms. But they proceed with their endorsement of human reproductive cloning by dismissing these psychological harms, mainly in two ways. The first tactic is to point out that to commit the genetic fallacy is indeed a mistake; the second is to invoke Parfit's non-identity problem. The argument of this paper is that neither approach succeeds in removing our moral responsibility to consider and to prevent psychological harms to cloned individuals. In fact, the same commitment to personal liberty that generates the right to reproduce by means of cloning also creates the need to limit that right appropriately. Discussion of human reproductive cloning ought to involve a careful and balanced consideration of both the relevant aspects of personal liberty - the parents' right to reproductive freedom and the cloned child's right to self-determination.

  1. Effective and efficient model clone detection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Störrle, Harald

    2015-01-01

    automatically (“MDD-style”) or hand-crafted following the blueprint defined by the model (“MBSD-style”). Unfortunately, however, model clones are much less well studied than code clones. In this paper, we present a clone detection algorithm for UML domain models. Our approach covers a much greater variety...

  2. Identification and characterization of a novel tospovirus species using a new RT-PCR approach

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cortez, I.; Saaijer, J.; Wonjkaew, K.S.; Pereira, A.M.; Goldbach, R.W.; Peters, D.; Kormelink, R.

    2001-01-01

    Summary. A novel tospovirus serologically distinct from all established tospo- virus species was found in Thailand in Physalis minima L. The S RNA of this virus was cloned by a new RT-PCR approach revealing a nucleotide sequence of 3257 nucleotides. The ambisense RNA segment encoded a nonstructural

  3. Engineered XcmI cassette-containing vector for PCR-based ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    T-vector; direct cloning; XcmI cassette; sequencing; PCR; marine population genetics. Author Affiliations. Futoshi Aranishi1 2 Takane Okimoto1 3. Molecular Biology Division, National Institute of Fisheries Science, Yokohama 236-8648, Japan; Department of Biological and Environmental Sciences, Mirjazaki University, ...

  4. Synthesis of the human VEGF165 gene based on overlap PCR and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-16

    Jan 16, 2012 ... human VEGF165 (hVEGF165) gene based on overlap PCR method and recombinant expressed in Chinese's hamster ovary (CHO) ... recombinant human VEGF165 (rhVEGF165) protein in CHO cells. Key words: Overlap .... Stable transfected positive clones appeared after 14 days when the. CHO cells not ...

  5. A single-copy galK promoter cloning vector suitable for cloning strong promoters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dandanell, Gert; Court, Donald L.; Hammer, Karin

    1986-01-01

    We report the construction of lambda galK promoter cloning vectors for cloning and characterization of strong promoters. This phage, which contains a unique HindIII cloning site, was applied to the cloning and analysis of transcription initiations of the regulatory region of the deo-operon of...

  6. Phage display used for gene cloning of human recombinant antibody against the erythrocyte surface antigen, rhesus D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziegiel, M; Nielsen, L K; Andersen, P S

    1995-01-01

    A novel phage display system has been developed for PCR amplification and cloning of the Fab fragments of human immunoglobulin genes. Using this system, we have cloned an antibody from a mouse-human hybridoma cell line directed against the erythrocyte antigen rhesus D. Intact erythrocytes were used...... for absorption of the Fab phages. Soluble Fab fragments produced from the cloned material showed identical performance to the parental antibody in agglutination assays. Gel filtration confirmed that the Fab fragment consists of a kappa-Fd heterodimer. The successful use of intact cells for selection of specific...

  7. Removal of Contaminant DNA by Combined UV-EMA Treatment Allows Low Copy Number Detection of Clinically Relevant Bacteria Using Pan-Bacterial Real-Time PCR.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruce Humphrey

    Full Text Available More than two decades after its discovery, contaminant microbial DNA in PCR reagents continues to impact the sensitivity and integrity of broad-range PCR diagnostic techniques. This is particularly relevant to their use in the setting of human sepsis, where a successful diagnostic on blood samples needs to combine universal bacterial detection with sensitivity to 1-2 genome copies, because low levels of a broad range of bacteria are implicated.We investigated the efficacy of ethidium monoazide (EMA and propidium monoazide (PMA treatment as emerging methods for the decontamination of PCR reagents. Both treatments were able to inactivate contaminating microbial DNA but only at concentrations that considerably affected assay sensitivity. Increasing amplicon length improved EMA/PMA decontamination efficiency but at the cost of assay sensitivity. The same was true for UV exposure as an alternative decontamination strategy, likely due to damage sustained by oligonucleotide primers which were a significant source of contamination. However, a simple combination strategy with UV-treated PCR reagents paired with EMA-treated primers produced an assay capable of two genome copy detection and a <5% contamination rate. This decontamination strategy could have important utility in developing improved pan-bacterial assays for rapid diagnosis of low pathogen burden conditions such as in the blood of patients with suspected blood stream infection.

  8. Removal of Contaminant DNA by Combined UV-EMA Treatment Allows Low Copy Number Detection of Clinically Relevant Bacteria Using Pan-Bacterial Real-Time PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humphrey, Bruce; McLeod, Neil; Turner, Carrie; Sutton, J Mark; Dark, Paul M; Warhurst, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    More than two decades after its discovery, contaminant microbial DNA in PCR reagents continues to impact the sensitivity and integrity of broad-range PCR diagnostic techniques. This is particularly relevant to their use in the setting of human sepsis, where a successful diagnostic on blood samples needs to combine universal bacterial detection with sensitivity to 1-2 genome copies, because low levels of a broad range of bacteria are implicated. We investigated the efficacy of ethidium monoazide (EMA) and propidium monoazide (PMA) treatment as emerging methods for the decontamination of PCR reagents. Both treatments were able to inactivate contaminating microbial DNA but only at concentrations that considerably affected assay sensitivity. Increasing amplicon length improved EMA/PMA decontamination efficiency but at the cost of assay sensitivity. The same was true for UV exposure as an alternative decontamination strategy, likely due to damage sustained by oligonucleotide primers which were a significant source of contamination. However, a simple combination strategy with UV-treated PCR reagents paired with EMA-treated primers produced an assay capable of two genome copy detection and a <5% contamination rate. This decontamination strategy could have important utility in developing improved pan-bacterial assays for rapid diagnosis of low pathogen burden conditions such as in the blood of patients with suspected blood stream infection.

  9. Rapid customised operon assembly by yeast recombinational cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Michael A; Kenyon, Johanna J; Lee, Jason; Reeves, Peter R

    2017-06-01

    We have developed a system called the Operon Assembly Protocol (OAP), which takes advantage of the homologous recombination DNA repair pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to assemble full-length operons from a series of overlapping PCR products into a specially engineered yeast-Escherichia coli shuttle vector. This flexible, streamlined system can be used to assemble several operon clones simultaneously, and each clone can be expressed in the same E. coli tester strain to facilitate direct functional comparisons. We demonstrated the utility of the OAP by assembling and expressing a series of E. coli O1A O-antigen gene cluster clones containing various gene deletions or replacements. We then used these constructs to assess the substrate preferences of several Wzx flippases, which are responsible for translocation of oligosaccharide repeat units (O units) across the inner membrane during O-antigen biosynthesis. We were able to identify several O unit structural features that appear to be important determinants of Wzx substrate preference. The OAP system should be broadly applicable for the genetic manipulation of any bacterial operon and can be modified for use in other host species. It could also have potential uses in fields such as glycoengineering.

  10. El envejecimiento de los clones

    OpenAIRE

    Trippi, Victorio S.

    2007-01-01

    El envejecimiento de los clones se observa en plantas que muestran crecimiento definido por un determinismo genético, cuando se multiplican con tejidos que evolucionan hacia el crecimiento reproductivo. Las plantas fuertemente influenciadas por el ambiente, pueden mostrar fenómenos de senescencia cuando la condición de ambiente determina el crecimiento reproductivo. Los cambios asociados con la edad resultan de alteraciones del citoplasma como un tipo de diferenciación cel...

  11. Therapeutic and reproductive cloning: a critique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowring, Finn

    2004-01-01

    This article is a critical examination of the science and ethics of human cloning. It summarises the key scientific milestones in the development of nuclear transplantation, explains the importance of cloning to research into the medical potential of embryonic stem cells, and discusses the well-worn distinction between 'therapeutic' and 'reproductive' cloning. Suggesting that this distinction will be impossible to police, it goes on to consider the ethics of full human cloning. It is concluded that it represents an unacceptable form of parental despotism, and that the genetic engineering and cloning of future human beings will fracture the foundations of modern humanism.

  12. Cloning expeditions: risky but rewarding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodish, Harvey

    2013-12-01

    In the 1980s, a good part of my laboratory was using the then-new recombinant DNA techniques to clone and characterize many important cell surface membrane proteins: GLUT1 (the red cell glucose transporter) and then GLUT2 and GLUT4, the red cell anion exchange protein (Band 3), asialoglycoprotein receptor subunits, sucrase-isomaltase, the erythropoietin receptor, and two of the subunits of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) receptor. These cloned genes opened many new fields of basic research, including membrane insertion and trafficking of transmembrane proteins, signal transduction by many members of the cytokine and TGF-β families of receptors, and the cellular physiology of glucose and anion transport. They also led to many insights into the molecular biology of several cancers, hematopoietic disorders, and diabetes. This work was done by an exceptional group of postdocs and students who took exceptionally large risks in developing and using novel cloning technologies. Unsurprisingly, all have gone on to become leaders in the fields of molecular cell biology and molecular medicine.

  13. Cloning Expeditions: Risky but Rewarding

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    In the 1980s, a good part of my laboratory was using the then-new recombinant DNA techniques to clone and characterize many important cell surface membrane proteins: GLUT1 (the red cell glucose transporter) and then GLUT2 and GLUT4, the red cell anion exchange protein (Band 3), asialoglycoprotein receptor subunits, sucrase-isomaltase, the erythropoietin receptor, and two of the subunits of the transforming growth factor β (TGF-β) receptor. These cloned genes opened many new fields of basic research, including membrane insertion and trafficking of transmembrane proteins, signal transduction by many members of the cytokine and TGF-β families of receptors, and the cellular physiology of glucose and anion transport. They also led to many insights into the molecular biology of several cancers, hematopoietic disorders, and diabetes. This work was done by an exceptional group of postdocs and students who took exceptionally large risks in developing and using novel cloning technologies. Unsurprisingly, all have gone on to become leaders in the fields of molecular cell biology and molecular medicine. PMID:24061478

  14. Inverse PCR and Quantitative PCR as Alternative Methods to Southern Blotting Analysis to Assess Transgene Copy Number and Characterize the Integration Site in Transgenic Woody Plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stefano, Biricolti; Patrizia, Bogani; Matteo, Cerboneschi; Massimo, Gori

    2016-06-01

    One of the major unanswered questions with respect to the commercial use of genetic transformation in woody plants is the stability of the transgene expression over several decades within the same individual. Gene expression is strongly affected by the copy number which has been integrated into the plant genome and by the local DNA features close to the integration sites. Because woody plants cannot be subjected to selfing or backcrossing to modify the transgenic allelic structure without affecting the valuable traits of the cultivar, molecular characterization of the transformation event is therefore crucial. After assessing the transgene copy number of a set of apple transgenic clones with Southern blotting, we describe two alternative methods: the first is based on inverse PCR (i-PCR) and the second on the quantitative PCR (q-PCR). The methods produced comparable results with the exception of the data regarding a high copy number clone, but while the q-PCR-based system is rapid and easily adaptable to high throughput systems, the i-PCR-based method can provide information regarding the transformation event and the characteristics of the sequences flanking the transgenic construct.

  15. Cloning and characterization of the major histone H2A genes completes the cloning and sequencing of known histone genes of Tetrahymena thermophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X; Gorovsky, M A

    1996-01-01

    A truncated cDNA clone encoding Tetrahymena thermophila histone H2A2 was isolated using synthetic degenerate oligonucleotide probes derived from H2A protein sequences of Tetrahymena pyriformis. The cDNA clone was used as a homologous probe to isolate a truncated genomic clone encoding H2A1. The remaining regions of the genes for H2A1 (HTA1) and H2A2 (HTA2) were then isolated using inverse PCR on circularized genomic DNA fragments. These partial clones were assembled into intact HTA1 and HTA2 clones. Nucleotide sequences of the two genes were highly homologous within the coding region but not in the noncoding regions. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequences with protein sequences of T. pyriformis H2As showed only two and three differences respectively, in a total of 137 amino acids for H2A1, and 132 amino acids for H2A2, indicating the two genes arose before the divergence of these two species. The HTA2 gene contains a TAA triplet within the coding region, encoding a glutamine residue. In contrast with the T. thermophila HHO and HTA3 genes, no introns were identified within the two genes. The 5'- and 3'-ends of the histone H2A mRNAs; were determined by RNase protection and by PCR mapping using RACE and RLM-RACE methods. Both genes encode polyadenylated mRNAs and are highly expressed in vegetatively growing cells but only weakly expressed in starved cultures. With the inclusion of these two genes, T. thermophila is the first organism whose entire complement of known core and linker histones, including replication-dependent and basal variants, has been cloned and sequenced. PMID:8760889

  16. Cloning, expression and purification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis ESAT-6 and CFP-10 antigens

    OpenAIRE

    Shima Mahmoudi; Setareh Mamishi; Mona Ghazi; Reihaneh Hosseinpour Sadeghi; Babak Pourakbari

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives ESAT-6 (6-kDaearly secretory antigenic target) and CFP-10 (10-kDa culture filtrate protein) have been described as dominant antigens recognized by T-cells and considered as virulence factors in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The aim of this study was to clone, express and purify recombinant ESAT-6 andCFP-10 proteins of M. tuberculosis in soluble form. Materials and Methods ESAT-6 andCFP-10 genes were amplified by PCR, cloned into pET32a (+) vector, and overexpress-ed us...

  17. One-stop polymerase chain reaction (PCR): An improved PCR ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2011-12-21

    Dec 21, 2011 ... 2RNA Group, College of Life Science, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072, P. R. China. 3Institute of ... The widely used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) protocol requires several post-cycling steps to visualize amplicons ... direct loading and simultaneous staining of PCR products for electrophoresis and ...

  18. An asymmetric PCR-based, reliable and rapid single-tube native DNA engineering strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bi Yanzhen

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Widely used restriction-dependent cloning methods are labour-intensive and time-consuming, while several types of ligase-independent cloning approaches have inherent limitations. A rapid and reliable method of cloning native DNA sequences into desired plasmids are highly desired. Results This paper introduces ABI-REC, a novel strategy combining asymmetric bridge PCR with intramolecular homologous recombination in bacteria for native DNA cloning. ABI-REC was developed to precisely clone inserts into defined location in a directional manner within recipient plasmids. It featured an asymmetric 3-primer PCR performed in a single tube that could robustly amplify a chimeric insert-plasmid DNA sequence with homologous arms at both ends. Intramolecular homologous recombination occurred to the chimera when it was transformed into E.coli and produced the desired recombinant plasmids with high efficiency and fidelity. It is rapid, and does not involve any operational nucleotides. We proved the reliability of ABI-REC using a double-resistance reporter assay, and investigated the effects of homology and insert length upon its efficiency. We found that 15 bp homology was sufficient to initiate recombination, while 25 bp homology had the highest cloning efficiency. Inserts up to 4 kb in size could be cloned by this method. The utility and advantages of ABI-REC were demonstrated through a series of pig myostatin (MSTN promoter and terminator reporter plasmids, whose transcriptional activity was assessed in mammalian cells. We finally used ABI-REC to construct a pig MSTN promoter-terminator cassette reporter and showed that it could work coordinately to express EGFP. Conclusions ABI-REC has the following advantages: (i rapid and highly efficient; (ii native DNA cloning without introduction of extra bases; (iii restriction-free; (iv easy positioning of directional and site-specific recombination owing to formulated primer design. ABI

  19. An asymmetric PCR-based, reliable and rapid single-tube native DNA engineering strategy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bi, Yanzhen; Qiao, Xianfeng; Hua, Zaidong; Zhang, Liping; Liu, Ximei; Li, Li; Hua, Wenjun; Xiao, Hongwei; Zhou, Jingrong; Wei, Qingxin; Zheng, Xinmin

    2012-07-06

    Widely used restriction-dependent cloning methods are labour-intensive and time-consuming, while several types of ligase-independent cloning approaches have inherent limitations. A rapid and reliable method of cloning native DNA sequences into desired plasmids are highly desired. This paper introduces ABI-REC, a novel strategy combining asymmetric bridge PCR with intramolecular homologous recombination in bacteria for native DNA cloning. ABI-REC was developed to precisely clone inserts into defined location in a directional manner within recipient plasmids. It featured an asymmetric 3-primer PCR performed in a single tube that could robustly amplify a chimeric insert-plasmid DNA sequence with homologous arms at both ends. Intramolecular homologous recombination occurred to the chimera when it was transformed into E.coli and produced the desired recombinant plasmids with high efficiency and fidelity. It is rapid, and does not involve any operational nucleotides. We proved the reliability of ABI-REC using a double-resistance reporter assay, and investigated the effects of homology and insert length upon its efficiency. We found that 15 bp homology was sufficient to initiate recombination, while 25 bp homology had the highest cloning efficiency. Inserts up to 4 kb in size could be cloned by this method. The utility and advantages of ABI-REC were demonstrated through a series of pig myostatin (MSTN) promoter and terminator reporter plasmids, whose transcriptional activity was assessed in mammalian cells. We finally used ABI-REC to construct a pig MSTN promoter-terminator cassette reporter and showed that it could work coordinately to express EGFP. ABI-REC has the following advantages: (i) rapid and highly efficient; (ii) native DNA cloning without introduction of extra bases; (iii) restriction-free; (iv) easy positioning of directional and site-specific recombination owing to formulated primer design. ABI-REC is a novel approach to DNA engineering and gene functional

  20. Production of Cloned Pigs with Targeted Attenuation of Gene Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bordignon, Vilceu; El-Beirouthi, Nayla; Gasperin, Bernardo G.; Albornoz, Marcelo S.; Martinez-Diaz, Mario A.; Schneider, Carine; Laurin, Denyse; Zadworny, David; Agellon, Luis B.

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to demonstrate that RNA interference (RNAi) and somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) technologies can be used to attenuate the expression of specific genes in tissues of swine, a large animal species. Apolipoprotein E (apoE), a secreted glycoprotein known for its major role in lipid and lipoprotein metabolism and transport, was selected as the target gene for this study. Three synthetic small interfering RNAs (siRNA) targeting the porcine apoE mRNA were tested in porcine granulosa cells in primary culture and reduced apoE mRNA abundance ranging from 45–82% compared to control cells. The most effective sequence was selected for cloning into a short hairpin RNA (shRNA) expression vector under the control of RNA polymerase III (U6) promoter. Stably transfected fetal porcine fibroblast cells were generated and used to produce embryos with in vitro matured porcine oocytes, which were then transferred into the uterus of surrogate gilts. Seven live and one stillborn piglet were born from three gilts that became pregnant. Integration of the shRNA expression vector into the genome of clone piglets was confirmed by PCR and expression of the GFP transgene linked to the expression vector. Analysis showed that apoE protein levels in the liver and plasma of the clone pigs bearing the shRNA expression vector targeting the apoE mRNA was significantly reduced compared to control pigs cloned from non-transfected fibroblasts of the same cell line. These results demonstrate the feasibility of applying RNAi and SCNT technologies for introducing stable genetic modifications in somatic cells for eventual attenuation of gene expression in vivo in large animal species. PMID:23737990

  1. Molecular Cloning, Characterization, and Expression Analysis of Lignin Genes from Sugarcane Genotypes Varying in Lignin Content.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasirajan, Lakshmi; Aruchamy, Kalaivaani; Thirugnanasambandam, Prathima P; Athiappan, Selvi

    2017-04-01

    Sugarcane (Saccharum spp.) is one of the highest biomass-producing plant and the best lignocellulosic feedstock for ethanol production. To achieve more efficient conversion of biomass to ethanol, a better understanding of the main factors affecting biomass recalcitrance is needed. Therefore, with this objective, here, we report a systematic study on lignin content, deposition, identification, and cloning of genes involved in lignin biosynthesis and their differential expression in five sugarcane clones, EC11003, EC11010, IK 76-91, IK 76-99, and Co 86032. Lignin content among the clones varied from 26.87 to 23.19 % with the highest in the clone EC11010 and the lowest in high sugar Co86032. Lignin deposition studied through phloroglucinol staining of the cell walls implied that the sclerenchyma cells of the energy canes (EC11010 and EC11003) have more lignin deposition followed by the Erianthus (IK 76-91 and IK 76-99) clones whereas Co86032 has the minimum amount of lignin deposition. We cloned partial coding regions of important genes of lignification COMT (650 bp), CCR (332 bp), and PAL (650 bp) from Erianthus, wild relative of sugarcane followed by the expression analysis through real-time PCR. Differential expression analysis showed high level of expression for the three genes in the energy cane EC11010.

  2. Multiple-clone activation of hypnozoites is the leading cause of relapse in Plasmodium vivax infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Carolina F de Araujo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Plasmodium vivax infection is characterized by a dormant hepatic stage, the hypnozoite that is activated at varying periods of time after clearance of the primary acute blood-stage, resulting in relapse. Differentiation between treatment failure and new infections requires characterization of initial infections, relapses, and clone multiplicity in vivax malaria infections. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Parasite DNA obtained from primary/relapse paired blood samples of 30 patients with P. vivax infection in Brazil was analyzed using 10 molecular markers (8 microsatellites and MSP-1 blocks 2 and 10. Cloning of PCR products and genotyping was used to identify low-frequency clones of parasites. We demonstrated a high frequency of multiple-clone infections in both primary and relapse infections. Few alleles were identified per locus, but the combination of these alleles produced many haplotypes. Consequently, the majority of parasites involved in relapse showed haplotypes that were distinct from those of primary infections. Plasmodium vivax relapse was characterized by temporal variations in the predominant parasite clones. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The high rate of low frequency alleles observed in both primary and relapse infections, along with temporal variation in the predominant alleles, might be the source of reported heterologous hypnozoite activation. Our findings complicate the concept of heterologous activation, suggesting the involvement of undetermined mechanisms based on host or environmental factors in the simultaneous activation of multiple clones of hypnozoites.

  3. Hybrid sequencing approach applied to human fecal metagenomic clone libraries revealed clones with potential biotechnological applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mária Džunková

    Full Text Available Natural environments represent an incredible source of microbial genetic diversity. Discovery of novel biomolecules involves biotechnological methods that often require the design and implementation of biochemical assays to screen clone libraries. However, when an assay is applied to thousands of clones, one may eventually end up with very few positive clones which, in most of the cases, have to be "domesticated" for downstream characterization and application, and this makes screening both laborious and expensive. The negative clones, which are not considered by the selected assay, may also have biotechnological potential; however, unfortunately they would remain unexplored. Knowledge of the clone sequences provides important clues about potential biotechnological application of the clones in the library; however, the sequencing of clones one-by-one would be very time-consuming and expensive. In this study, we characterized the first metagenomic clone library from the feces of a healthy human volunteer, using a method based on 454 pyrosequencing coupled with a clone-by-clone Sanger end-sequencing. Instead of whole individual clone sequencing, we sequenced 358 clones in a pool. The medium-large insert (7-15 kb cloning strategy allowed us to assemble these clones correctly, and to assign the clone ends to maintain the link between the position of a living clone in the library and the annotated contig from the 454 assembly. Finally, we found several open reading frames (ORFs with previously described potential medical application. The proposed approach allows planning ad-hoc biochemical assays for the clones of interest, and the appropriate sub-cloning strategy for gene expression in suitable vectors/hosts.

  4. PCR, RAPD and ARDRA analyses

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-03-20

    Mar 20, 2009 ... The rhizobia, Sinorhizobium meliloti and Rhizobium sullae, which fix nitrogen in root nodules of alfalfa. (Medicago sativa L.) and sulla (Hedysarum sp.) forage legumes, respectively, were isolated from root nodules and soils from Morocco. We used three PCR-based techniques namely, rep-PCR, RAPD and.

  5. Allele Specific Locked Nucleic Acid Quantitative PCR (ASLNAqPCR): An Accurate and Cost-Effective Assay to Diagnose and Quantify KRAS and BRAF Mutation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, Luca; de Biase, Dario; Visani, Michela; Cesari, Valentina; De Maglio, Giovanna; Pizzolitto, Stefano; Pession, Annalisa; Tallini, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    The use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) requires the testing for hot spot mutations of the molecular effectors downstream the membrane-bound tyrosine kinases since their wild type status is expected for response to TKI therapy. We report a novel assay that we have called Allele Specific Locked Nucleic Acid quantitative PCR (ASLNAqPCR). The assay uses LNA-modified allele specific primers and LNA-modified beacon probes to increase sensitivity, specificity and to accurately quantify mutations. We designed primers specific for codon 12/13 KRAS mutations and BRAF V600E, and validated the assay with 300 routine samples from a variety of sources, including cytology specimens. All were analyzed by ASLNAqPCR and Sanger sequencing. Discordant cases were pyrosequenced. ASLNAqPCR correctly identified BRAF and KRAS mutations in all discordant cases and all had a mutated/wild type DNA ratio below the analytical sensitivity of the Sanger method. ASLNAqPCR was 100% specific with greater accuracy, positive and negative predictive values compared with Sanger sequencing. The analytical sensitivity of ASLNAqPCR is 0.1%, allowing quantification of mutated DNA in small neoplastic cell clones. ASLNAqPCR can be performed in any laboratory with real-time PCR equipment, is very cost-effective and can easily be adapted to detect hot spot mutations in other oncogenes. PMID:22558339

  6. Allele specific locked nucleic acid quantitative PCR (ASLNAqPCR: an accurate and cost-effective assay to diagnose and quantify KRAS and BRAF mutation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Morandi

    Full Text Available The use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs requires the testing for hot spot mutations of the molecular effectors downstream the membrane-bound tyrosine kinases since their wild type status is expected for response to TKI therapy. We report a novel assay that we have called Allele Specific Locked Nucleic Acid quantitative PCR (ASLNAqPCR. The assay uses LNA-modified allele specific primers and LNA-modified beacon probes to increase sensitivity, specificity and to accurately quantify mutations. We designed primers specific for codon 12/13 KRAS mutations and BRAF V600E, and validated the assay with 300 routine samples from a variety of sources, including cytology specimens. All were analyzed by ASLNAqPCR and Sanger sequencing. Discordant cases were pyrosequenced. ASLNAqPCR correctly identified BRAF and KRAS mutations in all discordant cases and all had a mutated/wild type DNA ratio below the analytical sensitivity of the Sanger method. ASLNAqPCR was 100% specific with greater accuracy, positive and negative predictive values compared with Sanger sequencing. The analytical sensitivity of ASLNAqPCR is 0.1%, allowing quantification of mutated DNA in small neoplastic cell clones. ASLNAqPCR can be performed in any laboratory with real-time PCR equipment, is very cost-effective and can easily be adapted to detect hot spot mutations in other oncogenes.

  7. Cloning and Sequencing of Truncated Toxoplasma gondii Subtilisin-Like 1 Antigen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Rouhizadeh

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular protozoan parasite which has significant medical and veterinary impact on all around the world. Tracking of specific antigens or antibodies for toxoplasmosis is the main choice in its diagnosis. Recombinant proteins will improve sensitivity and specificity and reduce problems of standardization and reproducibility of diagnostic kits. Toxoplasma gondii Subtilisin-like protein (TgSUB1 is a novel example of a glycosylphosphatidylinositol GPI (-anchored protein which can be considered as a potential marker for serodiagnosis of toxoplasmosis. Objectives The aims of this study were to find out major antigenic parts of this whole protein and to develop a recombinant prokaryotic plasmid. Methods In this experimental study, using bioinformatics softwares Parker Hydrophilicity prediction and Bepipred linear Epitope prediction to select best highly antigenic region of this protein, a 744 bp fragment was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR on cDNA obtained from T. gondii RNA. The PCR product was cloned in PCR2.1 vector and subcloned into expression pET28a vector. The PCR2.1-SUB1 and PET28a-SUB1constructs were analyzed by PCR, restriction analysis and sequencing. Results A highly antigenic region in the hydrophilic part of the protein including amino acid residues 549 to 795 was successfully cloned and the sequences were confirmed. All nucleotide sequences in the PCR product have 100% homology with the published reference sequence. Conclusions Pairing bioinformatics tools and cloning of the candidate molecules in vaccine development studies and diagnostic approaches will have powerful impact on promotion of research in infectious diseases. This strategy is considered as available and inexpensive technology even in less developed countries where the infectious diseases like toxoplasmosis is prevalent.

  8. Towards Clone Detection in UML Domain Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Störrle, Harald

    2013-01-01

    Code clones (i.e., duplicate fragments of code) have been studied for long, and there is strong evidence that they are a major source of software faults. Anecdotal evidence suggests that this phenomenon occurs similarly in models, suggesting that model clones are as detrimental to model quality...... as they are to code quality. However, programming language code and visual models have significant differences that make it difficult to directly transfer notions and algorithms developed in the code clone arena to model clones. In this article, we develop and propose a definition of the notion of “model clone” based...... on the thorough analysis of practical scenarios. We propose a formal definition of model clones, specify a clone detection algorithm for UML domain models, and implement it prototypically. We investigate different similarity heuristics to be used in the algorithm, and report the performance of our approach. While...

  9. Cloning cattle: the methods in the madness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oback, Björn; Wells, David N

    2007-01-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is much more widely and efficiently practiced in cattle than in any other species, making this arguably the most important mammal cloned to date. While the initial objective behind cattle cloning was commercially driven--in particular to multiply genetically superior animals with desired phenotypic traits and to produce genetically modified animals-researchers have now started to use bovine SCNT as a tool to address diverse questions in developmental and cell biology. In this paper, we review current cattle cloning methodologies and their potential technical or biological pitfalls at any step of the procedure. In doing so, we focus on one methodological parameter, namely donor cell selection. We emphasize the impact of epigenetic and genetic differences between embryonic, germ, and somatic donor cell types on cloning efficiency. Lastly, we discuss adult phenotypes and fitness of cloned cattle and their offspring and illustrate some of the more imminent commercial cattle cloning applications.

  10. Comparison of three different commercial PCR assays for the detection of pathogens in critically ill sepsis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schreiber, J; Nierhaus, A; Braune, S A; de Heer, G; Kluge, S

    2013-05-01

    The high mortality rate associated with sepsis necessitates a timely identification of the causative organism in order to optimize antimicrobial therapy. PCR assays are increasingly being used for this purpose. The aim of this study was to compare three commercially available PCR systems for the diagnosis of systemic infections. In a prospective observational study, a broad-range (SepsiTest®; Molzym, Bremen, Germany) and two multiplex PCR assays (VYOO®; SIRS-Lab, Jena, Germany and LightCycler® SeptiFast; Roche, Mannheim, Germany) were compared to blood cultures with respect to the clinical course of 50 critically ill patients with sepsis, severe sepsis or septic shock. Pathogens were detected by PCR in 12 % (SepsiTest®), 10 % (VYOO®) and 14 % (LightCycler® SeptiFast) of samples and in 26 % by blood culture. Negative results were obtained using all four methods in 32 samples (64 %) and 3 (6 %) samples were positive in all tests. Upon consideration of additional diagnostic findings and the clinical course, eight (16 %) of the positive blood culture results were deemed clinically relevant. All three PCR assays could also identify the causative organism (or a specific gene thereof) in three of these eight positive blood cultures, whereas for five of the eight, all three PCR assays were negative. In one patient with a negative blood culture, the SepsiTest®, VYOO® and LightCycler® SeptiFast assays were positive for Streptococcus species. The PCR assays appeared to be less susceptible than blood cultures to false-positive results arising from contamination with coagulase-negative staphylococcal organisms. There was some variability between the three PCR assays tested and the corresponding blood cultures with regards to the type of pathogen detected. The three PCR assays appeared to be less susceptible to false-positive results than blood cultures.

  11. Telomeres and the ethics of human cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allhoff, Fritz

    2004-01-01

    In search of a potential problem with cloning, I investigate the phenomenon of telomere shortening which is caused by cell replication; clones created from somatic cells will have shortened telomeres and therefore reach a state of senescence more rapidly. While genetic intervention might fix this problem at some point in the future, I ask whether, absent technological advances, this biological phenomenon undermines the moral permissibility of cloning.

  12. Reliable cloning of functional antibody variable domains from hybridomas and spleen cell repertoires employing a reengineered phage display system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebber, A; Bornhauser, S; Burmester, J; Honegger, A; Willuda, J; Bosshard, H R; Plückthun, A

    1997-02-14

    A prerequisite for the use of recombinant antibody technologies starting from hybridomas or immune repertoires is the reliable cloning of functional immunoglobulin genes. For this purpose, a standard phage display system was optimized for robustness, vector stability, tight control of scFv-delta geneIII expression, primer usage for PCR amplification of variable region genes, scFv assembly strategy and subsequent directional cloning using a single rare cutting restriction enzyme. This integrated cloning, screening and selection system allowed us to rapidly obtain antigen binding scFvs derived from spleen-cell repertoires of mice immunized with ampicillin as well as from all hybridoma cell lines tested to date. As representative examples, cloning of monoclonal antibodies against a his tag, leucine zippers, the tumor marker EGP-2 and the insecticide DDT is presented. Several hybridomas whose genes could not be cloned in previous experimental setups, but were successfully obtained with the present system, expressed high amounts of aberrant heavy and light chain mRNAs, which were amplified by PCR and greatly exceeded the amount of binding antibody sequences. These contaminating variable region genes were successfully eliminated by employing the optimized phage display system, thus avoiding time consuming sequencing of non-binding scFv genes. To maximize soluble expression of functional scFvs subsequent to cloning, a compatible vector series to simplify modification, detection, multimerization and rapid purification of recombinant antibody fragments was constructed.

  13. Protocol: Streamline cloning of genes into binary vectors in Agrobacterium via the Gateway® TOPO vector system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Ruqiang

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In plant functional genomic studies, gene cloning into binary vectors for plant transformation is a routine procedure. Traditionally, gene cloning has relied on restriction enzyme digestion and ligation. In recent years, however, Gateway® cloning technology (Invitrogen Co. has developed a fast and reliable alternative cloning methodology which uses a phage recombination strategy. While many Gateway- compatible vectors are available, we frequently encounter problems in which antibiotic resistance genes for bacterial selection are the same between recombinant vectors. Under these conditions, it is difficult, if not sometimes impossible, to use antibiotic resistance in selecting the desired transformants. We have, therefore, developed a practical procedure to solve this problem. Results An integrated protocol for cloning genes of interest from PCR to Agrobacterium transformants via the Gateway® System was developed. The protocol takes advantage of unique characteristics of the replication origins of plasmids used and eliminates the necessity for restriction enzyme digestion in plasmid selections. Conclusion The protocol presented here is a streamlined procedure for fast and reliable cloning of genes of interest from PCR to Agrobacterium via the Gateway® System. This protocol overcomes a key problem in which two recombinant vectors carry the same antibiotic selection marker. In addition, the protocol could be adapted for high-throughput applications.

  14. A simplified approach to construct infectious cDNA clones of a tobamovirus in a binary vector.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Bruna Rayane Teodoro; Nicolini, Cícero; Lucinda, Natalia; Orílio, Anelise Franco; Nagata, Tatsuya

    2014-03-01

    Infectious cDNA clones of RNA viruses are important tools to study molecular processes such as replication and host-virus interactions. However, the cloning steps necessary for construction of cDNAs of viral RNA genomes in binary vectors are generally laborious. In this study, a simplified method of producing an agro-infectious Pepper mild mottle virus (PMMoV) clone is described in detail. Initially, the complete genome of PMMoV was amplified by a single-step RT-PCR, cloned, and subcloned into a small plasmid vector under the T7 RNA polymerase promoter to confirm the infectivity of the cDNA clone through transcript inoculation. The complete genome was then transferred to a binary vector using a single-step, overlap-extension PCR. The selected clones were agro-infiltrated to Nicotiana benthamiana plants and showed to be infectious, causing typical PMMoV symptoms. No differences in host responses were observed when the wild-type PMMoV isolate, the T7 RNA polymerase-derived transcripts and the agroinfiltration-derived viruses were inoculated to N. benthamiana, Capsicum chinense PI 159236 and Capsicum annuum plants. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. AN APPROACH FOR CLONE DETECTION IN DOCUMENTATION REUSE

    OpenAIRE

    D. V. Lutsiv; D. V. Koznov; H. A. Basit; E. L. Ouh; M. N. Smirnov; K. Y. Romanovsky

    2014-01-01

    The paper focuses on the searching method for repetitions in DocBook/DRL or plain text documents. An algorithm has been designed based on software clone detection. The algorithm supports filtering results: clones are rejected if clone length in the group is less than 5 symbols, intersection of clone groups is eliminated, meaningfulness clones are removed, the groups containing clones consisting only of XML are eliminated. Remaining search is supported: found clones are extracted from the docu...

  16. Porcine ubiquitin-like 5 (UBL5) gene: genomic organization, polymorphisms, mRNA cloning, splicing variants and association study

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Masopust, Martin; Weisz, Filip; Bartenschlager, H.; Knoll, A.; Vykoukalová, Z.; Geldermann, H.; Čepica, Stanislav

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 4 (2014), s. 2353-2362 ISSN 0301-4851 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP502/10/1216 Institutional support: RVO:67985904 Keywords : pig * UBL5 * PCR cloning Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 2.024, year: 2014

  17. Cloning and occurrence of czrC, a gene conferring cadmium and zinc resistance in MRSA CC398 Isolates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cavaco, Lina; Hasman, Henrik; Stegger, Marc

    2010-01-01

    determinant, czrC, by PCR. The cloning of czrC confirmed that the zinc chloride and cadmium acetate MICs for isogenic constructs carrying this gene were increased compared to those for S. aureus RN4220. No difference in susceptibility to sodium arsenate, copper sulfate, or silver nitrate was observed. Seventy...

  18. Basic DNA electrophoresis in molecular cloning: a comprehensive guide for beginners.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makovets, Svetlana

    2013-01-01

    Presented here is a complete molecular cloning protocol consisting of a number of separate but interconnected methods such as preparation of E. coli competent cells; in vitro DNA digestion and ligation; PCR; DNA agarose gel electrophoresis and gel extraction; and screening transformants by colony PCR, analytical restriction digests, and sequencing. The method is described in a lot of details so that it can be easily followed by those with very little relevant knowledge and skills. It also contains many tips that even experienced researchers may find useful.

  19. Cloning and alignment of WaaF gene of Campylobacter jejuni Lulei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    XING Cong-cong

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective To clone the WaaF gene of Campylobacter jejuni, and analyse its relationship with WaaF genetic evolution. Methods Amplified WaaF gene of Campylobacter jejuni Lulei by PCR, and constructed pGEM-T-WaaF cloning plasmid. Downloaded five WaaF associated with Guillain-Barré syndrome (GBS and one WaaF not associated with GBS, and then constructed phylogenetic tree. Results pGEM-T-WaaF cloning plasmid was constructed successfully. WaaF presented cluster phenomenon in Campylobacter jejuni associated with GBS. Conclusion WaaF gene of Campylobacter jejuni Lulei is the fragment of 807 bp, and has the nearest relationship with the genetic evolution of Lichang.

  20. [Cloning and characterization of genes differentially expressed in human dental pulp cells and gingival fibroblasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhong-dong; Wu, Ji-nan; Zhou, Lin; Ling, Jun-qi; Guo, Xi-min; Xiao, Ming-zhen; Zhu, Feng; Pu, Qin; Chai, Yu-bo; Zhao, Zhong-liang

    2007-02-01

    To study the biological properties of human dental pulp cells (HDPC) by cloning and analysis of genes differentially expressed in HDPC in comparison with human gingival fibroblasts (HGF). HDPC and HGF were cultured and identified by immunocytochemistry. HPDC and HGF subtractive cDNA library was established by PCR-based modified subtractive hybridization, genes differentially expressed by HPDC were cloned, sequenced and compared to find homogeneous sequence in GenBank by BLAST. Cloning and sequencing analysis indicate 12 genes differentially expressed were obtained, in which two were unknown genes. Among the 10 known genes, 4 were related to signal transduction, 2 were related to trans-membrane transportation (both cell membrane and nuclear membrane), and 2 were related to RNA splicing mechanisms. The biological properties of HPDC are determined by the differential expression of some genes and the growth and differentiation of HPDC are associated to the dynamic protein synthesis and secretion activities of the cell.

  1. Map-Based Cloning of Genes Important for Maize Anther Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anaya, Y.; Walbot, V.; Nan, G.

    2012-12-01

    Map-Based cloning for maize mutant MS13 . Scientists still do not understand what decides the fate of a cell in plants. Many maize genes are important for anther development and when they are disrupted, the anthers do not shed pollen, i.e. male sterile. Since the maize genome has been fully sequenced, we conduct map-based cloning using a bulk segregant analysis strategy. Using PCR (polymerase chain reaction), we look for biomarkers that are linked to our gene of interest, Male Sterile 13 (MS13). Recombinations occur more often if the biomarkers are further away from the gene, therefore we can estimate where the gene is and design more PCR primers to get closer to our gene. Genetic and molecular analysis will help distinguish the role of key genes in setting cell fates before meiosis and for being in charge of the switch from mitosis to meiosis.

  2. Human cloning: Eastern Mediterranean Region perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdur Rab, M; Khayat, M H

    2006-01-01

    Recent advances in genomics and biotechnology have ushered in a new era in health development. Therapeutic cloning possesses enormous potential for revolutionizing medical and therapeutic techniques. Cloning technology, however, is perceived as having the potential for reproductive cloning, which raises serious ethical and moral concerns. It is important that the Islamic countries come to a consensus on this vital issue. Developing science and technology for better health is a religious and moral obligation. There is an urgent need for Muslim scholars to discuss the issue of stem cell research and cloning rationally; such dialogue will not only consider the scientific merits but also the moral, ethical and legal implications.

  3. Metabolomic phenotyping of a cloned pig model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Callesen Henrik

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pigs are widely used as models for human physiological changes in intervention studies, because of the close resemblance between human and porcine physiology and the high degree of experimental control when using an animal model. Cloned animals have, in principle, identical genotypes and possibly also phenotypes and this offer an extra level of experimental control which could possibly make them a desirable tool for intervention studies. Therefore, in the present study, we address how phenotype and phenotypic variation is affected by cloning, through comparison of cloned pigs and normal outbred pigs. Results The metabolic phenotype of cloned pigs (n = 5 was for the first time elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR-based metabolomic analysis of multiple bio-fluids including plasma, bile and urine. The metabolic phenotype of the cloned pigs was compared with normal outbred pigs (n = 6 by multivariate data analysis, which revealed differences in the metabolic phenotypes. Plasma lactate was higher for cloned vs control pigs, while multiple metabolites were altered in the bile. However a lower inter-individual variability for cloned pigs compared with control pigs could not be established. Conclusions From the present study we conclude that cloned and normal outbred pigs are phenotypically different. However, it cannot be concluded that the use of cloned animals will reduce the inter-individual variation in intervention studies, though this is based on a limited number of animals.

  4. Metabolomic phenotyping of a cloned pig model

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Pigs are widely used as models for human physiological changes in intervention studies, because of the close resemblance between human and porcine physiology and the high degree of experimental control when using an animal model. Cloned animals have, in principle, identical genotypes and possibly also phenotypes and this offer an extra level of experimental control which could possibly make them a desirable tool for intervention studies. Therefore, in the present study, we address how phenotype and phenotypic variation is affected by cloning, through comparison of cloned pigs and normal outbred pigs. Results The metabolic phenotype of cloned pigs (n = 5) was for the first time elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomic analysis of multiple bio-fluids including plasma, bile and urine. The metabolic phenotype of the cloned pigs was compared with normal outbred pigs (n = 6) by multivariate data analysis, which revealed differences in the metabolic phenotypes. Plasma lactate was higher for cloned vs control pigs, while multiple metabolites were altered in the bile. However a lower inter-individual variability for cloned pigs compared with control pigs could not be established. Conclusions From the present study we conclude that cloned and normal outbred pigs are phenotypically different. However, it cannot be concluded that the use of cloned animals will reduce the inter-individual variation in intervention studies, though this is based on a limited number of animals. PMID:21859467

  5. Species-specific challenges in dog cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, G A; Oh, H J; Park, J E; Kim, M J; Park, E J; Jo, Y K; Jang, G; Kim, M K; Kim, H J; Lee, B C

    2012-12-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) is now an established procedure used in cloning of several species. SCNT in dogs involves multiple steps including the removal of the nuclear material, injection of a donor cell, fusion, activation of the reconstructed oocytes and finally transfer to a synchronized female recipient. There are therefore many factors that contribute to cloning efficiency. By performing a retrospective analysis of 2005-2012 published papers regarding dog cloning, we define the optimum procedure and summarize the specific feature for dog cloning. © 2012 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Quantum cloning disturbed by thermal Davies environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dajka, Jerzy; Łuczka, Jerzy

    2016-06-01

    A network of quantum gates designed to implement universal quantum cloning machine is studied. We analyze how thermal environment coupled to auxiliary qubits, `blank paper' and `toner' required at the preparation stage of copying, modifies an output fidelity of the cloner. Thermal environment is described in terms of the Markovian Davies theory. We show that such a cloning machine is not universal any more but its output is independent of at least a part of parameters of the environment. As a case study, we consider cloning of states in a six-state cryptography's protocol. We also briefly discuss cloning of arbitrary input states.

  7. Human cloning and our sense of self.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brock, Dan W

    2002-04-12

    This Viewpoint formulates and responds to three lines of argument concerning human reproductive cloning's potential to undermine our sense of self or identity. First, cloning would undermine our sense of individuality or uniqueness. But it could only undermine our genetic uniqueness, not our full individuality. Second, cloning would undermine the value or worth of human beings. But it would not make individuals replaceable or of any less moral worth. Third, a clone's freedom or autonomy to construct his or her own life would be undermined by the presence of an earlier twin. But only a mistaken belief in genetic determinism supports this feared loss of freedom.

  8. AFEAP cloning: a precise and efficient method for large DNA sequence assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Fanli; Zang, Jinping; Zhang, Suhua; Hao, Zhimin; Dong, Jingao; Lin, Yibin

    2017-11-14

    Recent development of DNA assembly technologies has spurred myriad advances in synthetic biology, but new tools are always required for complicated scenarios. Here, we have developed an alternative DNA assembly method named AFEAP cloning (Assembly of Fragment Ends After PCR), which allows scarless, modular, and reliable construction of biological pathways and circuits from basic genetic parts. The AFEAP method requires two-round of PCRs followed by ligation of the sticky ends of DNA fragments. The first PCR yields linear DNA fragments and is followed by a second asymmetric (one primer) PCR and subsequent annealing that inserts overlapping overhangs at both sides of each DNA fragment. The overlapping overhangs of the neighboring DNA fragments annealed and the nick was sealed by T4 DNA ligase, followed by bacterial transformation to yield the desired plasmids. We characterized the capability and limitations of new developed AFEAP cloning and demonstrated its application to assemble DNA with varying scenarios. Under the optimized conditions, AFEAP cloning allows assembly of an 8 kb plasmid from 1-13 fragments with high accuracy (between 80 and 100%), and 8.0, 11.6, 19.6, 28, and 35.6 kb plasmids from five fragments at 91.67, 91.67, 88.33, 86.33, and 81.67% fidelity, respectively. AFEAP cloning also is capable to construct bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC, 200 kb) with a fidelity of 46.7%. AFEAP cloning provides a powerful, efficient, seamless, and sequence-independent DNA assembly tool for multiple fragments up to 13 and large DNA up to 200 kb that expands synthetic biologist's toolbox.

  9. [Cloning and prokaryotic expression of malate dehydrogenase gene of Taenia saginata asiatica and immunogenicity analysis of the recombinant protein].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiang; Hu, Xu-Chu; Wu, Xuan; Xu, Jin; Yu, Xin-Bing; Bao, Huai-En; Lang, Shu-Yuan; Liao, Xing-Jiang

    2008-08-01

    To clone and express the lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) gene of Taenia saginata asiatica and analyze the immunogenicity of the recombinant protein. By screening the full length cDNA plasmid library, the coding region of LDH was amplified with PCR, and cloned into the prokaryotic expression vector pET-30a (+), then expressed in E. coli BL21 with IPTG induction. The recombinant protein was detected by SDS-PAGE and purified by Ni-IDA affinity chromatography, and its immunogenicity was analyzed by Western blotting. PCR, double enzyme digestion and DNA sequencing confirmed that the recombinant expression plasmid was constructed. The expression products were obtained and purified by Ni-IDA affinity chromatography. Western blotting analysis of LDH recombinant protein testified that the recombinant protein could be recognized by sera of the Taenia saginata asiatica infected swine and the patient. The LDH gene of Taenia saginata asiatica has been cloned and expressed, and the purified protein has been confirmed with immunogenicity.

  10. One-step generation of error-prone PCR libraries using Gateway® technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Error-prone PCR (epPCR) libraries are one of the tools used in directed evolution. The Gateway® technology allows constructing epPCR libraries virtually devoid of any background (i.e., of insert-free plasmid), but requires two steps: the BP and the LR reactions and the associated E. coli cell transformations and plasmid purifications. Results We describe a method for making epPCR libraries in Gateway® plasmids using an LR reaction without intermediate BP reaction. We also describe a BP-free and LR-free sub-cloning method for in-frame transferring the coding sequence of selected clones from the plasmid used to screen the library to another one devoid of tag used for screening (such as the green fluorescent protein). We report preliminary results of a directed evolution program using this method. Conclusions The one-step method enables producing epPCR libraries of as high complexity and quality as does the regular, two-step, protocol for half the amount of work. In addition, it contributes to preserve the original complexity of the epPCR product. PMID:22289297

  11. Cloning and Expression Study of the hcpD Gene of Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eslami

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives: hcpD gene in Helicobacter pylori is a member of cysteine-rich proteins family which triggers the host's immune system and antibody production. H. pylori is found in human's stomach and causes digestive diseases such as duodenal ulcer, chronic gastritis and stomach cancer. The objectives of this study were to isolate, amplify and clone H. pylori's hcpD gene in pcDNA3.1 (- vector and to study its expression in eukaryotic system. Methods: H. pylori genomic DNA was isolated by extraction kit. The hcpD gene was amplified using PCR reaction and then purified from gel, followed by pTZ cloning. Subcloning of hcpD was performed in pcDNA3.1 (- eukaryotic expression vector. The accuracy of cloning steps was investigated through PCR, enzymatic digestion by BamHI and EcoRV enzymes, and sequencing, respectively. Transfer of expression construct into CHO cells was done by electroporation. The gene expression in these cells was analyzed using RT-PCR and SDS-PAGE. Results: PCR results showed amplification of a 933bp segment related to hcpD gene. Successful cloning of the gene in pTZ vector and construction of pTZ-hcpD recombinant vector were achieved. Enzymatic digestion and sequencing confirmed the correctness of subcloning and creation of pcDNA3.1 (--hcpD construct. hcpD was expressed in eukaryotic system, and its protein product was observed on SDS-PAGE gel. Conclusion: pTZ-hcpD construct can be used as a source of H. pylori's hcpD gene for future research, like production of recombinant protein and vaccine in different systems. Furthermore, successful expression of the gene using pcDNA3.1 (--hcpD in CHO animal cells shows the potential of vector as a gene vaccine against H. pylori.

  12. Transformation and Stability of Cloned Polysaccharidase Genes in Gram-Positive Bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    EKİNCİ, Mehmet Sait

    2002-01-01

    Polysaccharidase genes from rumen bacteria were transferred to and expressed in ruminal and non-ruminal Gram-positive bacteria. The transformation efficiency and genetic stability of polysaccharidase genes in bacteria from different habitats were investigated. PCR amplification of cloned polysaccharidase genes from Escherichia coli, Lactococcus lactis, Enterococcus faecalis, Streptococcus sanguis and S. bovis strain 26 showed that rearrangement of plasmid and the gene fragment did not occur. ...

  13. Molecular cloning and genomic organization of a second probable allatostatin receptor from Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenz, C; Williamson, M; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    2000-01-01

    with a Drosophila genomic database clone that contained a DNA sequence coding for a protein having, again, structural similarities with the rat galanin receptors. Using PCR with primers coding for the presumed exons of this second Drosophila receptor gene, 5'- and 3'-RACE, and Drosophila cDNA as template, we...... at the right arm of the third chromosome, position 98 D-E. This is the first report on the existence of two different allatostatin receptors in an animal....

  14. Molecular cloning, expression and characterization of bovine UQCC and its association with body measurement traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yongfeng; Zan, Linsen; Zhao, Shuanping

    2010-01-01

    models of height as well as other stature indexes. We have cloned the cDNA sequence coding UQCC gene in bovine. Genomic structural analysis indicated that bovine UQCC shares a high similarity with human UQCC. Furthermore, Real-Time PCR analysis show that the expression of bovine UQCC is remarkably...... measurement traits in bovine reproduction and breeding, and provide data for establishing of an animal model using cattle to study big animal body type....

  15. Molecular cloning of Clostridium septicum vaccine strain alpha toxin gene in E. coli

    OpenAIRE

    Bozorgkhoo; Pilehchian Langroudi; Khaki; Jabbari; Moradi Bidhendi; Moosawi Shoshtari

    2014-01-01

    Clostridium septicum a Gram positive anaerobic bacterium produces several toxins including alpha, beta, gamma and delta. C. septicum alpha toxin is lethal and is responsible for a serious disease known as gas gangrene. The aim of the present study was to molecular cloning and sequencing of C. septicum vaccine strain alpha toxin gene. Genomic DNA was extracted using standard phenol and chloroform extraction method, and the target gene was amplified through PCR by specific primers. Quality and ...

  16. Fetal Tissues Tested for Microbial Sterility by Culture- and PCR-Based Methods Can be Safely Used in Clinics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitrenko, Yakov; Kostenko, Iryna; Kulebyakina, Kateryna; Duda, Alla; Klunnyk, Mariya; Sorochynska, Khrystyna

    2017-02-16

    Cell preparations to be used in clinical practice must be free of infectious agents. Safety concerns are especially elevated upon the use of human fetal tissues, which are otherwise highly advantageous in cell therapy. We demonstrate that treating fetal samples with antibiotic, extensive washing, and homogenization prior to cryoconservation efficiently removes microbes in general. Screening a large collection by an automatic culture system showed that 89.2% fetal tissue samples were sterile, while contamination was detected in 10.8% samples. Liver and chorion were contaminated more than the brain, kidney, lung, and soft tissues. Broad-range PCR from the bacterial 16s rRNA gene was adopted as a confirmatory assay; however, the concordance between the culture-based and PCR assays was weak. Taxonomic identification was done for contaminated samples by bacteriological methods and sequencing 16s rRNA PCR products. The two approaches revealed different spectra of taxonomic groups sharing only Lactobacillus, the most frequently found genus. In addition, other representatives of vaginal microbiota were detected by culture-based identification, while PCR product sequencing has also revealed a subset of nosocomial microorganisms. Importantly, species known to cause sepsis were identified by both techniques, arguing for their indispensability and mutual complementarity. We suggest that most contaminations are taken up during collection of fetal material rather than originating from an in utero infection. In conclusion, a rigorous microbiological control by culture and PCR is a prerequisite for safe clinical use of fetal tissue suspensions.

  17. Simultaneous detection of peanut and hazelnut allergens in food matrices using multiplex PCR method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Renčová

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Multiplex PCR analysis for the detection of two targeting segments of genes coding major food protein allergens as peanut (Arachis hypogaea Ara h 1 gene and hazelnut (Corylus avellana Cor a 1 gene was developed. Two sets of primers were designed and tested to their specificity on a broad range of ingredients. The identity of amplicons (Ara h 1- 180 bp, Cor a 1 – 258 bp by sequencing and alignment of sequences with sequences deposited in Genbank was confirmed. When testing the specificity of designed primer pairs on a spectrum of food ingredients, no cross reactions were detected. A potential inhibition of PCR reaction was eliminated using the universal plant primers of chloroplast gene 124 bp for the plant matrices confirmation. The intrinsic detection limit was 10 pg·ml-1 and the practical detection limit was 0.001% w/w (10 mg·kg-1 for both peanuts and hazelnuts. The method was applied to the investigation of 60 commercial food samples. The developed multiplex PCR method is cheap, specific and sensitive enough and can be used as a simple, one day procedure for the checking of undeclared peanut and hazelnut major allergens in food.

  18. Molecular cloning of Reteplase and its expression in E. coli using tac promoter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Safieh Aghaabdollahian

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims: This study aimed to clone and express the reteplase cDNA, a thrombolytic agent used for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction and stroke, in E. coli, utilizing tac promoter for its expression. Materials and Methods: Reteplase cDNA was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR with designed primers. The product was then cloned into pTZ57R plasmid. The cloned cDNA was digested out and ligated into pGEX-5x-1 expression vector. The presence of the insert was confirmed by restriction digestion. By using 0.2, 0.5 and 1 mM isopropyl beta-D thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG, expression of reteplase was induced in E. coli TOP10 cells and analyzed by SDS-PAGE. Results: Electrophoresis of PCR product and also double digested recombinant pTZ57R plasmid, also, pGEX-5x-1 vector, showed a 1068bp band of reteplase. SDS-PAGE analysis showed a 60 KDa band of protein product induced with different concentrations of IPTG. Conclusion: In the present study, reteplase cDNA was successfully cloned and expressed using tac promoter. This vector will be used for the optimization of the expression of reteplase in E. coli.

  19. Cloning and sequencing of adhesion protein gene of Trichomonas gallinae from pigeon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, F; Li, G Q; Su, R Q; Liang, G; Chen, Z H; Hicham, W

    2010-02-26

    The adhesion protein (AP) gene of Trichomonas gallinae from pigeon was cloned and sequenced. The first-strand cDNA of the AP gene of T. gallinae from pigeon was amplified by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) with total RNA extracting kit and cloned in the vector pMD18-T. The recombinant plasmid was identified by PCR and restriction endonuclease, and the positive clone was sequenced and analysed by comparing the sequence similarity with other sequences in the GenBank. The AP gene of T. gallinae had a length of 1032bp, which contained a complete open reading frame (ORF) of 930bp long, coding for 309 amino acids. The sequence analysis revealed that the homology with three AP genes of Trichomonas vaginalis (i.e., TVU87096, TVU87097 and TVU87098) was 94.2%, 92.6% and 92.0%, respectively. It is concluded that the successfully cloned AP gene from T. gallinae will provide the basis for the expression of the AP gene in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells and the preparation of its recombinant protein.

  20. Molecular cloning of Reteplase and its expression in E. coli using tac promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aghaabdollahian, Safieh; Rabbani, Mohammad; Ghaedi, Kamran; Sadeghi, Hamid Mir Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to clone and express the reteplase cDNA, a thrombolytic agent used for the treatment of acute myocardial infarction and stroke, in E. coli, utilizing tac promoter for its expression. Reteplase cDNA was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with designed primers. The product was then cloned into pTZ57R plasmid. The cloned cDNA was digested out and ligated into pGEX-5x-1 expression vector. The presence of the insert was confirmed by restriction digestion. By using 0.2, 0.5 and 1 mM isopropyl beta-D thiogalactopyranoside (IPTG), expression of reteplase was induced in E. coli TOP10 cells and analyzed by SDS-PAGE. Electrophoresis of PCR product and also double digested recombinant pTZ57R plasmid, also, pGEX-5x-1 vector, showed a 1068bp band of reteplase. SDS-PAGE analysis showed a 60 KDa band of protein product induced with different concentrations of IPTG. In the present study, reteplase cDNA was successfully cloned and expressed using tac promoter. This vector will be used for the optimization of the expression of reteplase in E. coli.

  1. Fluorescence-PCR Assays and Isolation of Luminescent Bacterial Clones Using an Automated Plate Reader

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, Thomas E.

    2011-01-01

    The genes responsible for luminescence in various species of the marine microorganism "Photobacterium", have been used for many years as a tool by researchers and instructors. In particular, the "lux" operon of "Photobacterium fischeri" has been used by many instructors to teach recombinant DNA techniques. Two methods using an automated plate…

  2. Future and applications of cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trounson, Alan O

    2006-01-01

    The birth of viable offspring from somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) in mammals caused a major re-examination of the understanding of the commitment of cells to specific tissue lineages during differentiation. The questions of whether cells undergo dedifferentiation or transdifferentiation during the development of offspring and how these changes are controlled is a source of ongoing debate that is yet to be resolved. Irrespective of the outcome of this debate, it is clear that cloning using SCNT has a place and purpose in the future of research and animal breeding. The future uses of SCNT could include the production of transgenic mice, the production of transgenic livestock and assisting with the re-establishment of endangered species. Human medicine also would benefit from future use of SCNT because it would allow the production of patient-specific embryonic stem cells.

  3. Cloning and functional characterization of endo-β-1,4-glucanase gene from metagenomic library of vermicompost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasir, Muhammad; Khan, Haji; Azam, Syed Sikander; Telke, Amar; Kim, Seon Won; Chung, Young Ryun

    2013-06-01

    In the vermicomposting of paper mill sludge, the activity of earthworms is very dependent on dietetic polysaccharides including cellulose as energy sources. Most of these polymers are degraded by the host microbiota and considered potentially important source for cellulolytic enzymes. In the present study, a metagenomic library was constructed from vermicompost (VC) prepared with paper mill sludge and dairy sludge (fresh sludge, FS) and functionally screened for cellulolytic activities. Eighteen cellulase expressing clones were isolated from about 89,000 fosmid clones libraries. A short fragment library was constructed from the most active positive clone (cMGL504) and one open reading frame (ORF) of 1,092 bp encoding an endo-β-1,4-glucanase was indentified which showed 88% similarity with Cellvibrio mixtus cellulase A gene. The endo-β-1,4-glucanase cmgl504 gene was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant cmgl504 cellulase displayed activities at a broad range of temperature (25-55°C) and pH (5.5-8.5). The enzyme degraded carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC) with 15.4 U, while having low activity against avicel. No detectable activity was found for xylan and laminarin. The enzyme activity was stimulated by potassium chloride. The deduced protein and three-dimensional structure of metagenome-derived cellulase cmgl504 possessed all features, including general architecture, signature motifs, and N-terminal signal peptide, followed by the catalytic domain of cellulase belonging to glycosyl hydrolase family 5 (GHF5). The cellulases cloned in this work may play important roles in the degradation of celluloses in vermicomposting process and could be exploited for industrial application in future.

  4. The ethics of human reproductive cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, Carson

    2005-03-01

    This article addresses the question of whether human reproductive cloning could be ethically justifiable in at least some cases involving infertile couples who would choose cloning as a way to have a genetically related child. At present, the risk of congenital anomalies constitutes a compelling argument against human reproductive cloning. The article explores whether reproductive cloning could be ethically justifiable if, at some future time, cloning becomes possible without an elevated risk of anomalies. It is argued that freedom to use cloning is a form of procreative freedom and, as such, deserves respect. All of the objections that have been raised against human reproductive cloning fall under three main categories: those that appeal to the interests of the child, those based on consequences for society, and those arising from teleological views. Objections that appeal to the child's interests are, in turn, of two main kinds: consequentialist and deontological. All of these types of objections are examined, and it is found that each involves serious problems that prevent it from being a reasonable objection in the context of the infertility cases considered. It is concluded that human reproductive cloning would be ethically justifiable in at least some cases involving infertile couples, provided that it could be performed without an elevated risk of anomalies.

  5. What's so bad about human cloning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitowitz, Yitzchok

    2002-12-01

    There appears to be a consensus in the general community that reproductive cloning is an immoral technology that should be banned. It may, however, be argued, at least from the perspective of the Jewish tradition, that reproductive cloning has many positive benefits. It is thus essential that one carefully weigh the costs and the benefits before deciding on a definitive course of action.

  6. Computerized adaptive testing with item cloning

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Glas, Cornelis A.W.; van der Linden, Willem J.

    2003-01-01

    To increase the number of items available for adaptive testing and reduce the cost of item writing, the use of techniques of item cloning has been proposed. An important consequence of item cloning is possible variability between the item parameters. To deal with this variability, a multilevel item

  7. Challenges in regulating farm animal cloning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gunning, Jennifer; Hartlev, Mette; Gamborg, Christian

    Report from the project Cloning in Public: A specific support action within the 6th framework programme, priority 5: Food quality and safety......Report from the project Cloning in Public: A specific support action within the 6th framework programme, priority 5: Food quality and safety...

  8. Cloning of endangered mammalian species: any progress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loi, Pasqualino; Galli, Cesare; Ptak, Grazyna

    2007-05-01

    Attempts through somatic cell nuclear transfer to expand wild populations that have shrunk to critical numbers is a logical extension of the successful cloning of mammals. However, although the first mammal was cloned 10 years ago, nuclear reprogramming remains phenomenological, with abnormal gene expression and epigenetic deregulation being associated with the cloning process. In addition, although cloning of wild animals using host oocytes from different species has been successful, little is known about the implication of partial or total mitochondrial DNA heteroplasmy in cloned embryos, fetuses and offspring. Finally, there is a need for suitable foster mothers for inter-intra specific cloned embryos. Considering these issues, the limited success achieved in cloning endangered animals is not surprising. However, optimism comes from the rapid gain in the understanding of the molecular clues underlying nuclear reprogramming. If it is possible to achieve a controlled reversal of the differentiated state of a cell then it is probable that other issues that impair the cloning of endangered animals, such as the inter-intra species oocyte or womb donor, will be overcome in the medium term.

  9. Cloning and superluminal signaling£

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    is possible, we can then have (usable) superluminal signaling [8]. The basic principle behind no exact cloning is the principle of no-signaling (i.e., no superluminal signaling). Allowing no-signaling, Gisin [7] has reproduced the 1. 2 optimal universal symmetric cloning machine of Buzek and Hillery [2] for qubits. We shall ...

  10. Metabolomic phenotyping of af cloned pig model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Morten Rahr; Christensen, Kirstine Lykke; Hedemann, Mette Skou

    2011-01-01

    outbred pigs. Results The metabolic phenotype of cloned pigs (n = 5) was for the first time elucidated by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based metabolomic analysis of multiple bio-fluids including plasma, bile and urine. The metabolic phenotype of the cloned pigs was compared with normal outbred pigs (n...

  11. Single-Step qPCR and dPCR Detection of Diverse CRISPR-Cas9 Gene Editing Events In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Micol Falabella

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR-CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9-based technology is currently the most flexible means to create targeted mutations by recombination or indel mutations by nonhomologous end joining. During mouse transgenesis, recombinant and indel alleles are often pursued simultaneously. Multiple alleles can be formed in each animal to create significant genetic complexity that complicates the CRISPR-Cas9 approach and analysis. Currently, there are no rapid methods to measure the extent of on-site editing with broad mutation sensitivity. In this study, we demonstrate the allelic diversity arising from targeted CRISPR editing in founder mice. Using this DNA sample collection, we validated specific quantitative and digital PCR methods (qPCR and dPCR, respectively for measuring the frequency of on-target editing in founder mice. We found that locked nucleic acid (LNA probes combined with an internal reference probe (Drop-Off Assay provide accurate measurements of editing rates. The Drop-Off LNA Assay also detected on-target CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing in blastocysts with a sensitivity comparable to PCR-clone sequencing. Lastly, we demonstrate that the allele-specific LNA probes used in qPCR competitor assays can accurately detect recombinant mutations in founder mice. In summary, we show that LNA-based qPCR and dPCR assays provide a rapid method for quantifying the extent of on-target genome editing in vivo, testing RNA guides, and detecting recombinant mutations.

  12. Single-Step qPCR and dPCR Detection of Diverse CRISPR-Cas9 Gene Editing Events in Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falabella, Micol; Sun, Linqing; Barr, Justin; Pena, Andressa Z.; Kershaw, Erin E.; Gingras, Sebastien; Goncharova, Elena A.; Kaufman, Brett A.

    2017-01-01

    Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats (CRISPR)-CRISPR-associated protein 9 (Cas9)-based technology is currently the most flexible means to create targeted mutations by recombination or indel mutations by nonhomologous end joining. During mouse transgenesis, recombinant and indel alleles are often pursued simultaneously. Multiple alleles can be formed in each animal to create significant genetic complexity that complicates the CRISPR-Cas9 approach and analysis. Currently, there are no rapid methods to measure the extent of on-site editing with broad mutation sensitivity. In this study, we demonstrate the allelic diversity arising from targeted CRISPR editing in founder mice. Using this DNA sample collection, we validated specific quantitative and digital PCR methods (qPCR and dPCR, respectively) for measuring the frequency of on-target editing in founder mice. We found that locked nucleic acid (LNA) probes combined with an internal reference probe (Drop-Off Assay) provide accurate measurements of editing rates. The Drop-Off LNA Assay also detected on-target CRISPR-Cas9 gene editing in blastocysts with a sensitivity comparable to PCR-clone sequencing. Lastly, we demonstrate that the allele-specific LNA probes used in qPCR competitor assays can accurately detect recombinant mutations in founder mice. In summary, we show that LNA-based qPCR and dPCR assays provide a rapid method for quantifying the extent of on-target genome editing in vivo, testing RNA guides, and detecting recombinant mutations. PMID:28860183

  13. Molecular cloning, genomic characterization and over-expression of a novel gene, XRRA1, identified from human colorectal cancer cell HCT116Clone2_XRR and macaque testis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hashimoto Katsuyuki

    2003-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background As part of our investigation into the genetic basis of tumor cell radioresponse, we have isolated several clones with a wide range of responses to X-radiation (XR from an unirradiated human colorectal tumor cell line, HCT116. Using human cDNA microarrays, we recently identified a novel gene that was down-regulated by two-fold in an XR-resistant cell clone, HCT116Clone2_XRR. We have named this gene as X-ray radiation resistance associated 1 (XRRA1 (GenBank BK000541. Here, we present the first report on the molecular cloning, genomic characterization and over-expression of the XRRA1 gene. Results We found that XRRA1 was expressed predominantly in testis of both human and macaque. cDNA microarray analysis showed three-fold higher expression of XRRA1 in macaque testis relative to other tissues. We further cloned the macaque XRRA1 cDNA (GenBank AB072776 and a human XRRA1 splice variant from HCT116Clone2_XRR (GenBank AY163836. In silico analysis revealed the full-length human XRRA1, mouse, rat and bovine Xrra1 cDNAs. The XRRA1 gene comprises 11 exons and spans 64 kb on chromosome 11q13.3. Human and macaque cDNAs share 96% homology. Human XRRA1 cDNA is 1987 nt long and encodes a protein of 559 aa. XRRA1 protein is highly conserved in human, macaque, mouse, rat, pig, and bovine. GFP-XRRA1 fusion protein was detected in both the nucleus and cytoplasm of HCT116 clones and COS-7 cells. Interestingly, we found evidence that COS-7 cells which over-expressed XRRA1 lacked Ku86 (Ku80, XRCC5, a non-homologous end joining (NHEJ DNA repair molecule, in the nucleus. RT-PCR analysis showed differential expression of XRRA1 after XR in HCT116 clones manifesting significantly different XR responses. Further, we found that XRRA1 was expressed in most tumor cell types. Surprisingly, mouse Xrra1 was detected in mouse embryonic stem cells R1. Conclusions Both XRRA1 cDNA and protein are highly conserved among mammals, suggesting that XRRA1 may have

  14. A noncommercial polymerase chain reaction-based method to approach one hundred percent recombinant clone selection efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shareef, Mohammed M; Dancea, Horatiu C; Gross, Jessica L; Myers, Tamara T; Griggs, Wendy W; Ahmed, Mansoor M; Sheldon, David G

    2008-11-01

    Molecular cloning is an important procedure in molecular biology, but this is often a rate-limiting step and can be very time-consuming, possibly due to low ligation efficiency. Here, we describe a simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based strategy to approach 100% selection efficiency. The post-ligation mixture containing the recombinant was subjected to insert-specific primer-mediated PCR amplification using a high-fidelity DNA Pfu polymerase generating a plasmid containing staggered nicks. The PCR mixture was then digested with endonuclease DpnI, which digests the methylated and hemimethylated parental DNA template. The nicked vector was transformed into XL1 blue supercompetent cells where the nicks were repaired, thus amplifying and selecting only the newly amplified recombinant clones.

  15. [Human cloning in Muslim and Arab law].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldeeb Abu-Sahlieh, Sami A

    2009-01-01

    Cloning is a modern medical procedure that Muslim religious authorities treat en resorting to the general principles established by classical Muslim law based on the Koran and the Sunnah of Muhhamad as the messenger of God. In this regard, human beings are not capable of deciding what is or what is not lawful without resorting to divine norms. Cloning clashes with several principles. Firstly, the principle of the respect for life in relation to surpernumeraries, but Muslim authors are not in unanimous agreement on the determination of the moment at which life begins. Secondly, is the respect of progeny: cloning could only take place between a married couple. But even if these two principles are respected, cloning poses two major problems: the diversity of species expounded by the Koran and the Sunnah and a lack of interest. Which explains the quasi-unanimous opposition of Muslim writings regarding cloning.

  16. "Goodbye Dolly?" The ethics of human cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, J

    1997-01-01

    The ethical implications of human clones have been much alluded to, but have seldom been examined with any rigour. This paper examines the possible uses and abuses of human cloning and draws out the principal ethical dimensions, both of what might be done and its meaning. The paper examines some of the major public and official responses to cloning by authorities such as President Clinton, the World Health Organisation, the European parliament, UNESCO, and others and reveals their inadequacies as foundations for a coherent public policy on human cloning. The paper ends by defending a conception of reproductive rights of "procreative autonomy" which shows human cloning to be not inconsistent with human rights and dignity. PMID:9451604

  17. Cloning and sequencing the genes encoding goldfish and carp ependymin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, D S; Shashoua, V E

    1994-04-20

    Ependymins (EPNs) are brain glycoproteins thought to function in optic nerve regeneration and long-term memory consolidation. To date, epn genes have been characterized in two orders of teleost fish. In this study, polymerase chain reactions (PCR) were used to amplify the complete 1.6-kb epn genes, gf-I and cc-I, from genomic DNA of Cypriniformes, goldfish and carp, respectively. Amplified bands were cloned and sequenced. Each gene consists of six exons and five introns. The exon portion of gf-I encodes a predicted 215-amino-acid (aa) protein previously characterized as GF-I, while cc-I encodes a predicted 215-aa protein 95% homologous to GF-I.

  18. Cloning and Heterologous Expression of the Grecocycline Biosynthetic Gene Cluster.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oksana Bilyk

    Full Text Available Transformation-associated recombination (TAR in yeast is a rapid and inexpensive method for cloning and assembly of large DNA fragments, which relies on natural homologous recombination. Two vectors, based on p15a and F-factor replicons that can be maintained in yeast, E. coli and streptomycetes have been constructed. These vectors have been successfully employed for assembly of the grecocycline biosynthetic gene cluster from Streptomyces sp. Acta 1362. Fragments of the cluster were obtained by PCR and transformed together with the "capture" vector into the yeast cells, yielding a construct carrying the entire gene cluster. The obtained construct was heterologously expressed in S. albus J1074, yielding several grecocycline congeners. Grecocyclines have unique structural moieties such as a dissacharide side chain, an additional amino sugar at the C-5 position and a thiol group. Enzymes from this pathway may be used for the derivatization of known active angucyclines in order to improve their desired biological properties.

  19. Determination of human papillomavirus type 16 genotype and construction of cloning vector pTZ57R encoding HPV16 E7 gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshkat, Zahra; Soleimanjahi, Hoorieh; Mahmoudi, Mahmoud; Mirshahabi, Hessam; Hassan, Zuhair M; Ghaffari, Saeed R; Sabokbar, Tayebeh

    2007-10-01

    To isolate and construct a cloning vector containing the human papillomavirus (HPV)16-E7 gene as a target for application as a DNA vaccine. The study was performed in 2005 in Iran. The E7 gene, one of the most important HPV oncoproteins and a target molecule for therapeutic vaccines, was amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The PCR product was cloned into a suitable cloning vector and confirmed by colony-PCR, restriction enzyme analysis, and sequenced. The desired plasmid was sequenced and indicated 99% homology with those mentioned in the Genbank. The Iranian HPV16 E7 gene sequence is very similar to other sequences in the Genbank, and it can be used as a candidate gene in a therapeutic vaccine for Iranian patients with cervical cancer.

  20. AQUA Cloning: A Versatile and Simple Enzyme-Free Cloning Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes M Beyer

    Full Text Available Assembly cloning is increasingly replacing conventional restriction enzyme and DNA-ligase-dependent cloning methods for reasons of efficiency and performance. Here, we describe AQUA (advanced quick assembly, a simple and versatile seamless assembly cloning approach. We demonstrate the applicability and versatility of AQUA Cloning in selected proof-of-principle applications including targeted insertion-, deletion- and site-directed point-mutagenesis, and combinatorial cloning. Furthermore, we show the one pot de novo assembly of multiple DNA fragments into a single circular plasmid encoding a complex light- and chemically-regulated Boolean A NIMPLY B logic operation. AQUA Cloning harnesses intrinsic in vivo processing of linear DNA fragments with short regions of homology of 16 to 32 bp mediated by Escherichia coli. It does not require any kits, enzymes or preparations of reagents and is the simplest assembly cloning protocol to date.

  1. Characterization of a highly pathogenic molecular clone of feline immunodeficiency virus clade C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Rozières, Sohela; Mathiason, Candace K; Rolston, Matthew R; Chatterji, Udayan; Hoover, Edward A; Elder, John H

    2004-09-01

    We have derived and characterized a highly pathogenic molecular isolate of feline immunodeficiency virus subtype C (FIV-C) CABCpady00C. Clone FIV-C36 was obtained by lambda cloning from cats that developed severe immunodeficiency disease when infected with CABCpady00C (Abbotsford, British Columbia, Canada). Clone FIV-C36 Env is 96% identical to the noninfectious FIV-C isolate sequence deposited in GenBank (FIV-Cgb; GenBank accession number AF474246) (A. Harmache et al.) but is much more divergent in Env when compared to the subgroup A clones Petaluma (34TF10) and FIV-PPR (76 and 78% divergence, respectively). Clone FIV-C36 was able to infect freshly isolated feline peripheral blood mononuclear cells and primary T-cell lines but failed to productively infect CrFK cells, as is typical of FIV field isolates. Two-week-old specific-pathogen-free cats infected with FIV-C36 tissue culture supernatant became PCR positive and developed severe acute immunodeficiency disease similar to that caused by the uncloned CABCpady00C parent. At 4 to 5 weeks postinfection (PI), 3 of 4 animals developed CD4(+)-T-cell depletion, fever, weight loss, diarrhea, and opportunistic infections, including ulcerative stomatitis and tonsillitis associated with abundant bacterial growth, pneumonia, and pyelonephritis, requiring euthanasia. Histopathology confirmed severe thymic and systemic lymphoid depletion. Interestingly, the dam also became infected with a high viral load at 5 weeks PI of the kittens and developed a similar disease syndrome, requiring euthanasia at 11 weeks PI of the kittens. This constitutes the first report of a replication-competent, infectious, and pathogenic molecular clone of FIV-C. Clone FIV-C36 will facilitate dissection of the pathogenic determinants of FIV.

  2. Sequence characterisation of deletion breakpoints in the dystrophin gene by PCR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abbs, S.; Sandhu, S.; Bobrow, M. [Guy`s Hospital, London (United Kingdom)

    1994-09-01

    Partial deletions of the dystrophin gene account for 65% of cases of Duchenne muscular dystrophy. A high proportion of these structural changes are generated by new mutational events, and lie predominantly within two `hotspot` regions, yet the underlying reasons for this are not known. We are characterizing and sequencing the regions surrounding deletion breakpoints in order to: (i) investigate the mechanisms of deletion mutation, and (ii) enable the design of PCR assays to specifically amplify mutant and normal sequences, allowing us to search for the presence of somatic mosaicism in appropriate family members. Using this approach we have been able to demonstrate the presence of somatic mosaicism in a maternal grandfather of a DMD-affected male, deleted for exons 49-50. Three deletions, namely of exons 48-49, 49-50, and 50, have been characterized using a PCR approach that avoids any cloning procedures. Breakpoints were initially localized to within regions of a few kilobases using Southern blot restriction analyses with exon-specific probes and PCR amplification of exonic and intronic loci. Sequencing was performed directly on PCR products: (i) mutant sequences were obtained from long-range or inverse-PCR across the deletion junction fragments, and (ii) normal sequences were obtained from the products of standard PCR, vectorette PCR, or inverse-PCR performed on YACs. Further characterization of intronic sequences will allow us to amplify and sequence across other deletion breakpoints and increase our knowledge of the mechanisms of mutation in the dystophin gene.

  3. Utility of real-time PCR for detection of Exserohilum rostratum in body and tissue fluids during the multistate outbreak of fungal meningitis and other infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gade, Lalitha; Grgurich, Dale E; Kerkering, Thomas M; Brandt, Mary E; Litvintseva, Anastasia P

    2015-02-01

    Exserohilum rostratum was the major cause of the multistate outbreak of fungal meningitis linked to contaminated injections of methylprednisolone acetate produced by the New England Compounding Center. Previously, we developed a fungal DNA extraction procedure and broad-range and E. rostratum-specific PCR assays and confirmed the presence of fungal DNA in 28% of the case patients. Here, we report the development and validation of a TaqMan real-time PCR assay for the detection of E. rostratum in body fluids, which we used to confirm infections in 57 additional case patients, bringing the total number of case patients with PCR results positive for E. rostratum to 171 (37% of the 461 case patients with available specimens). Compared to fungal culture and the previous PCR assays, this real-time PCR assay was more sensitive. Of the 139 identical specimens from case patients tested by all three methods, 19 (14%) were positive by culture, 41 (29%) were positive by the conventional PCR assay, and 65 (47%) were positive by the real-time PCR assay. We also compared the utility of the real-time PCR assay with that of the previously described beta-d-glucan (BDG) detection assay for monitoring response to treatment in case patients with serially collected CSF. Only the incident CSF specimens from most of the case patients were positive by real-time PCR, while most of the subsequently collected specimens were negative, confirming our previous observations that the BDG assay was more appropriate than the real-time PCR assay for monitoring the response to treatment. Our results also demonstrate that the real-time PCR assay is extremely susceptible to contamination and its results should be used only in conjunction with clinical and epidemiological data. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  4. Utility of Real-Time PCR for Detection of Exserohilum rostratum in Body and Tissue Fluids during the Multistate Outbreak of Fungal Meningitis and Other Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gade, Lalitha; Grgurich, Dale E.; Kerkering, Thomas M.; Brandt, Mary E.

    2014-01-01

    Exserohilum rostratum was the major cause of the multistate outbreak of fungal meningitis linked to contaminated injections of methylprednisolone acetate produced by the New England Compounding Center. Previously, we developed a fungal DNA extraction procedure and broad-range and E. rostratum-specific PCR assays and confirmed the presence of fungal DNA in 28% of the case patients. Here, we report the development and validation of a TaqMan real-time PCR assay for the detection of E. rostratum in body fluids, which we used to confirm infections in 57 additional case patients, bringing the total number of case patients with PCR results positive for E. rostratum to 171 (37% of the 461 case patients with available specimens). Compared to fungal culture and the previous PCR assays, this real-time PCR assay was more sensitive. Of the 139 identical specimens from case patients tested by all three methods, 19 (14%) were positive by culture, 41 (29%) were positive by the conventional PCR assay, and 65 (47%) were positive by the real-time PCR assay. We also compared the utility of the real-time PCR assay with that of the previously described beta-d-glucan (BDG) detection assay for monitoring response to treatment in case patients with serially collected CSF. Only the incident CSF specimens from most of the case patients were positive by real-time PCR, while most of the subsequently collected specimens were negative, confirming our previous observations that the BDG assay was more appropriate than the real-time PCR assay for monitoring the response to treatment. Our results also demonstrate that the real-time PCR assay is extremely susceptible to contamination and its results should be used only in conjunction with clinical and epidemiological data. PMID:25520443

  5. Real-time PCR and microscopy: Are the two methods measuring the same unit of arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal abundance?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gamper, H.A.; Young, J.P.W.; Jones, D.L.; Hodge, A.

    2008-01-01

    To enable quantification of mycelial abundance in mixed-species environments, eight new TaqMan® real-time PCR assays were developed for five arbuscular mycorrhizal fungal (AMF, Glomeromycota) taxa. The assays targeted genes encoding 18S rRNA or actin, and were tested on DNA from cloned gene

  6. A real-time PCR assay for the specific identification of serotype O : 9 of Yersinia enterocolitica

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, N.R.; Bogdanovich, T.; Skurnik, M.

    2005-01-01

    A real-time PCR assay was developed based on a 18 1 -bp fragment of the recently cloned per gene, including an internal amplification control (124 bp), for the detection of Yersinia enterocolitica 0:9 (Ye 0:9). The validation included 48 Ye 0:9, 33 Y enterocolitica non-0:9 and 35 other closely...

  7. Underestimation of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria abundance by amplification bias in amoA-targeted qPCR

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dechesne, Arnaud; Musovic, Sanin; Palomo, Alejandro

    2016-01-01

    quantitative PCR methods to enumerate ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB): one targeting the phylogenetic gene 16S rRNA and the other, the functional gene amoA. Cloning-sequencing with both primer sets on DNA from two waterworks revealed contrasting images of AOB diversity. The amoA-based approach preferentially...

  8. A colony multiplex quantitative PCR-Based 3S3DBC method and variations of it for screening DNA libraries.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang An

    Full Text Available A DNA library is a collection of DNA fragments cloned into vectors and stored individually in host cells, and is a valuable resource for molecular cloning, gene physical mapping, and genome sequencing projects. To take the best advantage of a DNA library, a good screening method is needed. After describing pooling strategies and issues that should be considered in DNA library screening, here we report an efficient colony multiplex quantitative PCR-based 3-step, 3-dimension, and binary-code (3S3DBC method we used to screen genes from a planarian genomic DNA fosmid library. This method requires only 3 rounds of PCR reactions and only around 6 hours to distinguish one or more desired clones from a large DNA library. According to the particular situations in different research labs, this method can be further modified and simplified to suit their requirements.

  9. Human embryo cloning prohibited in Hong Kong.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Athena

    2005-12-01

    Since the birth of Dolly (the cloned sheep) in 1997, debates have arisen on the ethical and legal questions of cloning-for-biomedical-research (more commonly termed "therapeutic cloning") and of reproductive cloning using human gametes. Hong Kong enacted the Human Reproductive Technology Ordinance (Cap 561) in 2000. Section 15(1)(e) of this Ordinance prohibits the "replacing of the nucleus of a cell of an embryo with a nucleus taken from any other cell," i.e., nucleus substitution. Section 15(1)(f) prohibits the cloning of any embryo. The scope of the latter, therefore, is arguably the widest, prohibiting all cloning techniques such as cell nucleus replacement, embryo splitting, parthenogenesis, and cloning using stem cell lines. Although the Human Reproductive Technology Ordinance is not yet fully operative, this article examines how these prohibitions may adversely impact on basic research and the vision of the Hong Kong scientific community. It concludes that in light of recent scientific developments, it is time to review if the law offers a coherent set of policies in this area.

  10. High-throughput scanning of the rat genome using interspersed repetitive sequence-PCR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gösele, C; Hong, L; Kreitler, T; Rossmann, M; Hieke, B; Gross, U; Kramer, M; Himmelbauer, H; Bihoreau, M T; Kwitek-Black, A E; Twigger, S; Tonellato, P J; Jacob, H J; Schalkwyk, L C; Lindpaintner, K; Ganten, D; Lehrach, H; Knoblauch, M

    2000-11-01

    We report the establishment of a hybridization-based marker system for the rat genome based on the PCR amplification of interspersed repetitive sequences (IRS). Overall, 351 IRS markers were mapped within the rat genome. The IRS marker panel consists of 210 nonpolymorphic and 141 polymorphic markers that were screened for presence/absence polymorphism patterns in 38 different rat strains and substrains that are commonly used in biomedical research. The IRS marker panel was demonstrated to be useful for rapid genome screening in experimental rat crosses and high-throughput characterization of large-insert genomic library clones. Information on corresponding YAC clones is made available for this IRS marker set distributed over the whole rat genome. The two existing rat radiation hybrid maps were integrated by placing the IRS markers in both maps. The genetic and physical mapping data presented provide substantial information for ongoing positional cloning projects in the rat. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  11. Cloning and Functional Characterization of Cycloartenol Synthase from the Red Seaweed Laurencia dendroidea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calegario, Gabriela; Pollier, Jacob; Arendt, Philipp; de Oliveira, Louisi Souza; Thompson, Cristiane; Soares, Angélica Ribeiro; Pereira, Renato Crespo; Goossens, Alain; Thompson, Fabiano L

    2016-01-01

    The red seaweed Laurencia dendroidea belongs to the Rhodophyta, a phylum of eukaryotic algae that is widely distributed across the oceans and that constitute an important source of bioactive specialized metabolites. Laurencia species have been studied since 1950 and were found to contain a plethora of specialized metabolites, mainly halogenated sesquiterpenes, diterpenes and triterpenes that possess a broad spectrum of pharmacological and ecological activities. The first committed step in the biosynthesis of triterpenes is the cyclization of 2,3-oxidosqualene, an enzymatic reaction carried out by oxidosqualene cyclases (OSCs), giving rise to a broad range of different compounds, such as the sterol precursors cycloartenol and lanosterol, or triterpene precursors such as cucurbitadienol and β-amyrin. Here, we cloned and characterized the first OSC from a red seaweed. The OSC gene was identified through mining of a L. dendroidea transcriptome dataset and subsequently cloned and heterologously expressed in yeast for functional characterization, which indicated that the corresponding enzyme cyclizes 2,3-oxidosqualene to the sterol precursor cycloartenol. Accordingly, the gene was named L. dendroidea cycloartenol synthase (LdCAS). A phylogenetic analysis using OSCs genes from plants, fungi and algae revealed that LdCAS grouped together with OSCs from other red algae, suggesting that cycloartenol could be the common product of the OSC in red seaweeds. Furthermore, profiling of L. dendroidea revealed cholesterol as the major sterol accumulating in this species, implicating red seaweeds contain a 'hybrid' sterol synthesis pathway in which the phytosterol precursor cycloartenol is converted into the major animal sterol cholesterol.

  12. Serial cloning of pigs by somatic cell nuclear transfer: restoration of phenotypic normality during serial cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seong-Keun; Kim, Jae-Hwan; Park, Jong-Yi; Choi, Yun-Jung; Bang, Jae-Il; Hwang, Kyu-Chan; Cho, Eun-Jeong; Sohn, Sea-Hwan; Uhm, Sang Jun; Koo, Deog-Bon; Lee, Kyung-Kwang; Kim, Teoan; Kim, Jin-Hoi

    2007-12-01

    Somatic cell nuclear transfer (scNT) is a useful way to create cloned animals. However, scNT clones exhibit high levels of phenotypic instability. This instability may be due to epigenetic reprogramming and/or genomic damage in the donor cells. To test this, we produced transgenic pig fibroblasts harboring the truncated human thrombopoietin (hTPO) gene and used them as donor cells in scNT to produce first-generation (G1) cloned piglets. In this study, 2,818 scNT embryos were transferred to 11 recipients and five G1 piglets were obtained. Among them, a clone had a dimorphic facial appearance with severe hypertelorism and a broad prominent nasal bridge. The other clones looked normal. Second-generation (G2) scNT piglets were then produced using ear cells from a G1 piglet that had an abnormal nose phenotype. We reasoned that, if the phenotypic abnormality of the G1 clone was not present in the G2 and third-generation (G3) clones, or was absent in the G2 clones but reappeared in the G3 clones, the phenotypic instability of the G1 clone could be attributed to faulty epigenetic reprogramming rather than to inherent/accidental genomic damage to the donor cells. Blastocyst rates, cell numbers in blastocyst, pregnancy rates, term placenta weight and ponderal index, and birth weight between G1 and G2 clones did not differ, but were significantly (P clones and could not find any significant differences in the methylation patterns between G1 and G2 clones. Indeed, we failed to detect the phenotypic abnormality in the G2 and G3 clones. Thus, the phenotypic abnormality of the G1 clone is likely to be due to epigenetic dysregulation. Additional observations then suggested that expression of the hTPO gene in the transgenic clones did not appear to be the cause of the phenotypic abnormality in the G1 clones and that the abnormality was acquired by only a few of the G1 clone's cells during its gestational development. 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc

  13. Methylation-Specific PCR Unraveled

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Derks

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Methylation‐specific PCR (MSP is a simple, quick and cost‐effective method to analyze the DNA methylation status of virtually any group of CpG sites within a CpG island. The technique comprises two parts: (1 sodium bisulfite conversion of unmethylated cytosine's to uracil under conditions whereby methylated cytosines remains unchanged and (2 detection of the bisulfite induced sequence differences by PCR using specific primer sets for both unmethylated and methylated DNA. This review discusses the critical parameters of MSP and presents an overview of the available MSP variants and the (clinical applications.

  14. Simplified cryopreservation of porcine cloned blastocysts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Yutao; Zhang, Yunhai; Li, Juan

    2007-01-01

    )â€"handmade cloning (HMC)â€"to establish a simplified and efficient cryopreservation system for porcine cloned embryos. In Experiment 1, zonae pellucidae of oocytes were partially digested with pronase, followed by centrifugation to polarize lipid particles. Ninety percent (173/192) oocytes were successfully......). Our results prove that porcine embryos produced from delipated oocytes by PA or HMC can be cryopreserved effectively by ultrarapid vitrification. Further experiments are required to assess the in vivo developmental competence of the cloned-vitrified embryos  ...

  15. Molecular Characterization of Clostridium tetani Strains by Pulsed-Field Gel Electrophoresis and Colony PCR

    OpenAIRE

    Plourde-Owobi, Lucile; Seguin, Delphine; Baudin, Marie-Anne; Moste, Catherine; Rokbi, Bachra

    2005-01-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and PCR were applied for the first time to the molecular characterization of Clostridium tetani. Among five strains tested, one (CN1339) turned out to contain a mixture of two genetically different clones and two (D11 and G761) to contain bacteria differing by the presence or absence of the 74-kb plasmid harboring the tetX gene.

  16. Molecular characterization of Clostridium tetani strains by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and colony PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plourde-Owobi, Lucile; Seguin, Delphine; Baudin, Marie-Anne; Moste, Catherine; Rokbi, Bachra

    2005-09-01

    Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis and PCR were applied for the first time to the molecular characterization of Clostridium tetani. Among five strains tested, one (CN1339) turned out to contain a mixture of two genetically different clones and two (D11 and G761) to contain bacteria differing by the presence or absence of the 74-kb plasmid harboring the tetX gene.

  17. PCR-based detection of bioluminescent microbial populations in Tyrrhenian Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gentile, Gabriela; De Luca, Massimo; Denaro, Renata; La Cono, Violetta; Smedile, Francesco; Scarfì, Simona; De Domenico, Emilio; De Domenico, Maria; Yakimov, Michail M.

    2009-05-01

    The present study is focused on the development of a cultivation-independent molecular approach for specific detection of bioluminescent bacteria within microbial communities by direct amplification of luxA gene from environmental DNA. A new set of primers, specifically targeting free-living bioluminescent bacteria, was designed on the base of l uxA sequences available from the public database. Meso- and bathypelagic seawater samples were collected from two stations in Tyrrhenian Sea at the depths of 500 and 2750 m. The same seawater samples also were used to isolate bioluminescent bacteria that were further subjected to luxA and 16S rRNA gene sequencing. PCR products obtained by amplification with designed primers were cloned, and the phylogenetic affiliation of 40 clones was determined. All of them were clustered into three groups, only distantly related to the Photobacterium phosphoreum and Photobacterium kishitanii clades. The half of all clones formed a tight monophyletic clade, while the rest of clones were organized in "compartment"-specific, meso- and bathypelagic ecotypes. No matches with luxA gene sequences of four bioluminescent strains, isolated from the same seawater samples, were observed. These findings indicate that the PCR-based approach developed in present manuscript, allowed us to detect the novel, "yet to be cultivated" lineages of bioluminescent bacteria, which are likely specific for distinct warm bathypelagic realms of Mediterranean Sea.

  18. A method for cloning and sequencing long palindromic DNA junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rattray, Alison J

    2004-11-08

    DNA sequences containing long adjacent inverted repeats (palindromes) are inherently unstable and are associated with many types of chromosomal rearrangements. The instability associated with palindromic sequences also creates difficulties in their molecular analysis: long palindromes (>250 bp/arm) are highly unstable in Escherichia coli, and cannot be directly PCR amplified or sequenced due to their propensity to form intra-strand hairpins. Here, we show that DNA molecules containing long palindromes (>900 bp/arm) can be transformed and stably maintained in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells lacking a functional SAE2 gene. Treatment of the palindrome-containing DNA with sodium bisulfite at high temperature results in deamination of cytosine, converting it to uracil and thus reducing the propensity to form intra-strand hairpins. The bisulfite-treated DNA can then be PCR amplified, cloned and sequenced, allowing determination of the nucleotide sequence of the junctions. Our data demonstrates that long palindromes with either no spacer (perfect) or a 2 bp spacer can be stably maintained, recovered and sequenced from sae2Delta yeast cells. Since DNA sequences from mammalian cells can be gap repaired by their co-transformation into yeast cells with an appropriate vector, the methods described in this manuscript should provide some of the necessary tools to isolate and characterize palindromic junctions from mammalian cells.

  19. Improve Motor System Efficiency for a Broad Range of Motors with MotorMaster+ International

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2005-05-01

    Available at no charge, MotorMaster+ International is designed to support motor systems improvement planning at industrial facilities by identifying the most cost-effective choice when deciding to repair or replace older motor models.

  20. Enhanced primers for amplification of DNA barcodes from a broad range of marine metazoans

    OpenAIRE

    Lobo, Jorge; Costa, Pedro M; Teixeira, Marcos AL; Ferreira, Maria SG; Costa, Maria H; Costa, Filipe O

    2013-01-01

    Background Building reference libraries of DNA barcodes is relatively straightforward when specifically designed primers are available to amplify the COI-5P region from a relatively narrow taxonomic group (e.g. single class or single order). DNA barcoding marine communities have been comparatively harder to accomplish due to the broad taxonomic diversity and lack of consistently efficient primers. Although some of the so-called ?universal? primers have been relatively successful, they still f...

  1. Enhanced primers for amplification of DNA barcodes from a broad range of marine metazoans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobo, Jorge; Costa, Pedro M; Teixeira, Marcos A L; Ferreira, Maria S G; Costa, Maria H; Costa, Filipe O

    2013-09-10

    Building reference libraries of DNA barcodes is relatively straightforward when specifically designed primers are available to amplify the COI-5P region from a relatively narrow taxonomic group (e.g. single class or single order). DNA barcoding marine communities have been comparatively harder to accomplish due to the broad taxonomic diversity and lack of consistently efficient primers. Although some of the so-called "universal" primers have been relatively successful, they still fail to amplify COI-5P of many marine animal groups, while displaying random success even among species within each group. Here we propose a new pair of primers designed to enhance amplification of the COI-5P region in a wide range of marine organisms. Amplification tests conducted on a wide range of marine animal taxa, rendered possible the first-time sequencing of DNA barcodes from eight separated phyla (Annelida, Arthropoda, Chordata, Cnidaria, Echinodermata, Mollusca, Nemertea and Platyhelminthes), comprising a total of 14 classes, 28 orders, 57 families, 68 genus and 76 species. These primers demonstrated to be highly cost-effective, which is of key importance for DNA barcoding procedures, such as for building comprehensive DNA barcode libraries of marine communities, where the processing of a large numbers of specimens from a wide variety of marine taxa is compulsory.

  2. Design, calibration and application of broad-range optical nanosensors for determining intracellular pH

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søndergaard, Rikke Vicki; Henriksen, Jonas Rosager; Andresen, Thomas Lars

    2014-01-01

    as a reference fluorophore. The nanosensors are spontaneously taken up via endocytosis and directed to the lysosomes where dynamic changes in pH can be measured with live-cell confocal microscopy. The most important focus areas of the protocol are the choice of pH-sensitive fluorophores, the design......Particle-based nanosensors offer a tool for determining the pH in the endosomal-lysosomal system of living cells. Measurements providing absolute values of pH have so far been restricted by the limited sensitivity range of nanosensors, calibration challenges and the complexity of image analysis...

  3. Synthesis of 1-indanones with a broad range of biological activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marika Turek

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This comprehensive review describes methods for the preparation of 1-indanones published in original and patent literature from 1926 to 2017. More than 100 synthetic methods utilizing carboxylic acids, esters, diesters, acid chlorides, ketones, alkynes, alcohols etc. as starting materials, have been performed. This review also covers the most important studies on the biological activity of 1-indanones and their derivatives which are potent antiviral, anti-inflammatory, analgesic, antimalarial, antibacterial and anticancer compounds. Moreover, they can be used in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases and as effective insecticides, fungicides and herbicides.

  4. Enhanced primers for amplification of DNA barcodes from a broad range of marine metazoans

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Lobo, Jorge; Costa, Pedro M; Teixeira, Marcos A L; Ferreira, Maria S G; Costa, Maria H; Costa, Filipe O

    2013-01-01

    Building reference libraries of DNA barcodes is relatively straightforward when specifically designed primers are available to amplify the COI-5P region from a relatively narrow taxonomic group (e.g...

  5. Knockout and fragmentation reactions using a broad range of tin isotopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Sánchez, J. L.; Benlliure, J.; Bertulani, C. A.; Vargas, J.; Ayyad, Y.; Alvarez-Pol, H.; Atkinson, J.; Aumann, T.; Beceiro-Novo, S.; Boretzky, K.; Caamaño, M.; Casarejos, E.; Cortina-Gil, D.; Díaz-Cortes, J.; Fernández, P. Díaz; Estrade, A.; Geissel, H.; Kelić-Heil, A.; Litvinov, Yu. A.; Mostazo, M.; Paradela, C.; Pérez-Loureiro, D.; Pietri, S.; Prochazka, A.; Takechi, M.; Weick, H.; Winfield, J. S.

    2017-09-01

    Production cross sections of residual nuclei obtained by knockout and fragmentation reactions of different tin isotopes accelerated at 1 A GeV have been measured with the fragment separator (FRS) at GSI, Darmstadt. The new measurements are used to investigate the neutron-excess dependence of the neutron- and proton-knockout cross sections. These cross sections are compared to Glauber model calculations coupled to a nuclear de-excitation code in order to investigate the role of the remnant excitations. This bench marking shows an overestimation of the cross sections for the removal of deeply bound nucleons. A phenomenological increase in the excitation energy induced in the remnants produced in these cases allows us to reproduce the measured cross sections.

  6. Fungi from koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) faeces exhibit a broad range of enzyme activities against recalcitrant substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, R A; Bradner, J R; Roberts, T H; Nevalainen, K M H

    2009-02-01

    Identification of fungi isolated from koala faeces and screening for their enzyme activities of biotechnological interest. Thirty-seven fungal strains were isolated from koala faeces and identified by the amplification and direct sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal DNA. The fungi were screened for selected enzyme activities using agar plates containing a single substrate for each target class of enzyme. For xylanase, endoglucanase, ligninase (ligninolytic phenoloxidase) and protease over two-thirds of the isolates produced a clearing halo at 25 degrees C, indicating the secretion of active enzyme by the fungus, and one-third produced a halo indicating amylase, mannanase and tannase activity. Some isolates were also able to degrade crystalline cellulose and others displayed lipase activity. Many of the fungal isolates also produced active enzymes at 15 degrees C and some at 39 degrees C. Koala faeces, consisting of highly lignified fibre, undigested cellulose and phenolics, are a novel source of fungi with high and diverse enzyme activities capable of breaking down recalcitrant substrates. To our knowledge, this is the first time fungi from koala faeces have been identified using ITS sequencing and screened for their enzyme activities.

  7. Peptidoglycan degrading activity of the broad-range Salmonella bacteriophage S-394 recombinant endolysin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Legotsky, Sergey A; Vlasova, Ksenia Yu; Priyma, Anastasia D; Shneider, Mikhail M; Pugachev, Vladimir G; Totmenina, Olga D; Kabanov, Alexander V; Miroshnikov, Konstantin A; Klyachko, Natalia L

    2014-12-01

    The use of bacteriophage endolysins as specific antibacterial agents is a prospective strategy to treat bacterial infections caused by antibiotic-resistant pathogens. In case of Gram-negative species this strategy has limited applications since outer membrane shields the enzyme target and prevents bacteria lysis. We aimed to obtain and characterize the endolysin of the newly discovered anti-Salmonella bacteriophage S-394 (Lys394) and to choose an appropriate permeabilizing agent to disrupt Escherichia coli cells suspended in buffer solution and grown on agar surface. Lys394 synthesized in E. coli C41(DE3) was obtained as an electrophoretically homogenous protein. The protein of 18 kDa molecular weight shows high muralytic activity against various genera of chloroform treated Gram-negatives. Maximum of enzyme activity was observed at pH 8.5 and low ionic strength. In silico analysis of amino acid sequence identified Lys394 as an endopeptidase. Various outer membrane permeabilizers were analyzed in combination with Lys394 to degrade laboratory strain of E. coli CR63. Permeabilizing activity was evaluated using a periplasmic β-lactamase leakage test with untreated E. coli cells as a substrate. The highest rate of planktonic E. coli lysis was reached for Lys394 applied together with 25 μg/ml of poly-l-arginine with molecular weight distribution from 5 to 15 kDa or 20 μg/ml PGLa peptide. Lawn E. coli colony forming ability was decreased by 4 orders of magnitude after 30 min treatment with 25 μg of Lys394, 1 mM EDTA and 50 μg/ml of PGLa peptide at a room temperature. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and Société française de biochimie et biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  8. A broad range quorum sensing inhibitor working through sRNA inhibition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jakobsen, Tim H.; Warming, Anders N.; Vejborg, Rebecca M.

    2017-01-01

    that the repressing effect of ajoene on quorum sensing occurs by inhibition of small regulatory RNAs (sRNA) in P. aeruginosa as well as in Staphylococcus aureus, another important human pathogen that employs quorum sensing to control virulence gene expression. Using various reporter constructs, we found that ajoene...... virulence factors such as hemolysins and proteases were lowered in the presence of ajoene in S. aureus. Importantly, our findings show that sRNAs across bacterial species potentially may qualify as targets of anti-virulence therapy and that ajoene could be a lead structure in search of broad...... lowered expression of the sRNAs RsmY and RsmZ in P. aeruginosa and the small dual-function regulatory RNA, RNAIII in S. aureus, that controls expression of key virulence factors. We confirmed the modulation of RNAIII by RNA sequencing and found that the expression of many QS regulated genes encoding...

  9. Fluorographene Modified by Grignard Reagents: A Broad Range of Functional Nanomaterials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mazánek, V.; Libánská, A.; Šturala, J.; Bouša, D.; Sedmidubský, D.; Pumera, M.; Janoušek, Zbyněk; Plutnar, Jan; Sofer, Z.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, č. 8 (2017), s. 1956-1964 ISSN 0947-6539 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-09001S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : alkylation * click chemistry * fluorine * graphene * Grignard reagents Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 5.317, year: 2016

  10. Broad-range potential of Asphodelus microcarpus leaves extract for drug development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Petrillo, Amalia; Fais, Antonella; Pintus, Francesca; Santos-Buelga, Celestino; González-Paramás, Ana M; Piras, Vincenzo; Orrù, Germano; Mameli, Antonello; Tramontano, Enzo; Frau, Aldo

    2017-07-14

    Many plants have been used in traditional medicine for their antibacterial, antifungal, antiprotozoal, antiviral, antidiarrhoeal, analgesic, antimalarial, antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and anticancer activities. In order to find novel antimicrobial and antiviral agents, the aim of the present study was the evaluation of the antibacterial and antibiofilm susceptibility of Asphodelus microcarpus leaves extract. Moreover, the antiviral activity and the phytochemical composition of the active extract were also determined. Antimicrobial and antibiofilm activities of leaves ethanol extract of A. microcarpus were evaluated on 13 different microbial strains. We selected three different sets of microorganisms: (i) Gram-positive bacteria, (ii) Gram-negative bacteria and (iii) yeasts. The potential antiviral activity of A. microcarpus leaves ethanol extract was evaluated with a luciferase reporter gene assay in which the dsRNA-dependent RIG-I-mediated IFN-β activation was inducted or inhibited by the Ebola virus VP35 protein. HPLC-DAD-MS was used to identify phenolic profile of the active extract. A. microcarpus leaves extract showed a potent inhibitory activity on Gram-positive bacteria while only a reduced inhibition was observed on Gram-negative bacteria. No activity was detected against Yeasts. The extract also showed an interesting antibiofilm motif on various bacterial strains (E. coli, S. aureus, S. haemolyticus and B. clausii). Moreover, this extract significantly affected the Ebola virus VP35 inhibition of the viral RNA (vRNA) induced IFN response. The overall results provide supportive data on the use of A. microcarpus as antimicrobial agent and a potential source of anti-viral natural products. Data collected set the bases for further studies for the identification of single active components and the development of new pharmaceuticals.

  11. Broad-Range Bacterial Capture from Fluid-Samples: Implications for Amplification-Free Contamination Detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monika WEBER

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Fluid-Screen, Inc. presents a bacterial concentration and filtration method based on dielectrophoresis and alternating current kinetics. Dielectrophoresis has been previously shown to induce particle motion; however, bacterial capture efficiency and reproducibility have consistently been low, reducing its potential for practical applications. In this study, we introduce a novel, patent-pending electrode system optimized to simultaneously capture a wide range of bacterial species from a variety of aqueous solutions. Specifically, we show that the method of dielectrophoresis used induces responses in both characteristic Gram- negative Escherichia coli and Gram-positive Enterococcus faecalis bacteria, as well as with Bacillus subtilis and Aestuariimicrobium kwangyangense. We have adapted the electrode design to create a bacterial sample preparatio unit, termed the sample sorter, that is able to capture multiple bacterial species and release them simultaneously for bacterial concentration and exchange from complex matrices to defined buffer media. This technology can be used on its own or in conjunction with standard bacterial detection methods such as mass spectroscopy. The Fluid-Screen product will dramatically improve testing and identification of bacterial contaminants in various industrial settings by eliminating the need for amplification of samples and by reducing the time to identification.

  12. Numerical Upscaling of Transport Through Obstructed Regions Over a Broad Range of Reynolds Numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sund, N. L.; Bolster, D.; Mattis, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    While historically flow and transport in porous media has focused on low Reynolds number and Peclet number regimes there are a variety of examples relevant to environmental fluid dynamics where higher Reynolds number flows are important. A common example might include flow and transport through wetlands where plants act as the solid phase of an effective porous medium. In particular, heterogeneity in the flow field due to presence of the solid phases gives rise to complex transport and mixing behaviors that cannot be upscaled at pre-asymptotic times using conventional approaches. We numerically simulate pore-scale flow and transport through obstructed domains over a range of Reynolds numbers from 15 to 280 and then upscale transport. We upscale using a correlated continuous time random walk (correlated CTRW) model, originally introduced in [1]. We then assess the correlated CTRW's ability to predict observables for both asymptotic and pre-asymptotic time scales and compare our results to those of a classical CTRW to determine when velocity correlations must be accounted for. REFERENCES[1] T.L. Borgne, M. Dentz, J. Carrera: Lagrangian statistical model for transport in highly heterogeneous velocity fields, Physical Review Letters 101 (2008) 090601.

  13. A plasmid-transposon hybrid mutagenesis system effective in a broad range of Enterobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita eMonson

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Random transposon mutagenesis is a powerful technique used to generate libraries of genetic insertions in many different bacterial strains. Here we develop a system facilitating random transposon mutagenesis in a range of different Gram-negative bacterial strains, including Pectobacterium atrosepticum, Citrobacter rodentium, Serratia sp. ATCC39006, Serratia plymuthica, Dickeya dadantii and many more. Transposon mutagenesis was optimized in each of these strains and three studies are presented to show the efficacy of this system. Firstly, the important agricultural pathogen D. dadantii was mutagenized. Two mutants that showed reduced protease production and one mutant producing the previously cryptic pigment, indigoidine, were identified and characterized. Secondly, the enterobacterium, Serratia sp. ATCC39006 was mutagenized and mutants incapable of producing gas vesicles, proteinaceous intracellular organelles, were identified. One of these contained a β-galactosidase transcriptional fusion within the gene gvpA1, essential for gas vesicle production. Finally, the system was used to mutate the biosynthetic gene clusters of the antifungal, anti-oomycete and anticancer polyketide, oocydin A, in the plant-associated enterobacterium, Dickeya solani MK10. The mutagenesis system was developed to allow easy identification of transposon insertion sites by sequencing, after facile generation of a replicon encompassing the transposon and adjacent DNA, post-excision. Furthermore, the system can also create transcriptional fusions with either β-galactosidase or β-glucuronidase as reporters, and exploits a variety of drug resistance markers so that multiple selectable fusions can be generated in a single strain. This system of various transposons has wide utility and can be combined in many different ways.

  14. Design, calibration and application of broad-range optical nanosensors for determining intracellular pH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Søndergaard, Rikke V; Henriksen, Jonas R; Andresen, Thomas L

    2014-12-01

    Particle-based nanosensors offer a tool for determining the pH in the endosomal-lysosomal system of living cells. Measurements providing absolute values of pH have so far been restricted by the limited sensitivity range of nanosensors, calibration challenges and the complexity of image analysis. This protocol describes the design and application of a polyacrylamide-based nanosensor (∼60 nm) that covalently incorporates two pH-sensitive fluorophores, fluorescein (FS) and Oregon Green (OG), to broaden the sensitivity range of the sensor (pH 3.1-7.0), and uses the pH-insensitive fluorophore rhodamine as a reference fluorophore. The nanosensors are spontaneously taken up via endocytosis and directed to the lysosomes where dynamic changes in pH can be measured with live-cell confocal microscopy. The most important focus areas of the protocol are the choice of pH-sensitive fluorophores, the design of calibration buffers, the determination of the effective range and especially the description of how to critically evaluate results. The entire procedure typically takes 2-3 weeks.

  15. A novel, broad-range, CTXΦ-derived stable integrative expression vector for functional studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Bhabatosh; Kumari, Reena; Pant, Archana; Sen Gupta, Sourav; Saxena, Shruti; Mehta, Ojasvi; Nair, Gopinath Balakrish

    2014-12-01

    CTXΦ, a filamentous vibriophage encoding cholera toxin, uses a unique strategy for its lysogeny. The single-stranded phage genome forms intramolecular base-pairing interactions between two inversely oriented XerC and XerD binding sites (XBS) and generates a functional phage attachment site, attP(+), for integration. The attP(+) structure is recognized by the host-encoded tyrosine recombinases XerC and XerD (XerCD), which enables irreversible integration of CTXΦ into the chromosome dimer resolution site (dif) of Vibrio cholerae. The dif site and the XerCD recombinases are widely conserved in bacteria. We took advantage of these conserved attributes to develop a broad-host-range integrative expression vector that could irreversibly integrate into the host chromosome using XerCD recombinases without altering the function of any known open reading frame (ORF). In this study, we engineered two different arabinose-inducible expression vectors, pBD62 and pBD66, using XBS of CTXΦ. pBD62 replicates conditionally and integrates efficiently into the dif of the bacterial chromosome by site-specific recombination using host-encoded XerCD recombinases. The expression level of the gene of interest could be controlled through the PBAD promoter by modulating the functions of the vector-encoded transcriptional factor AraC. We validated the irreversible integration of pBD62 into a wide range of pathogenic and nonpathogenic bacteria, such as V. cholerae, Vibrio fluvialis, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Escherichia coli, Salmonella enterica, and Klebsiella pneumoniae. Gene expression from the PBAD promoter of integrated vectors was confirmed in V. cholerae using the well-studied reporter genes mCherry, eGFP, and lacZ. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  16. PCR

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ELO

    2012-01-05

    Jan 5, 2012 ... Streptococcosis is one of the most important bacterial diseases in farmed salmonid fishes. Streptococcus iniae and Lactococcus garvieae are known as the major pathogens of streptococcosis and lactococcosis in the rainbow trout, Oncorhynchus mykiss. The present study accomplished the detection of the ...

  17. Human cloning and the myth of disenchantment

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Laurențiu, Staicu

    2012-01-01

    This study has a twofold objective: firstly, it aims to examine the main types of argument that have been formulated against human cloning, to identify their presuppositions and to evaluate their strength...

  18. Cloning and molecular characterization of glyceraldehyde-3 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cloning and molecular characterization of glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase gene from thermotolerant mushroom, Lentinus polychrous. ... sequence of the L. polychrous GAPDH-encoded protein shared significant sequence identity with other GAPDH proteins from basidiomycetes. Phylogenetic analysis ...

  19. DNA microarrays : a molecular cloning manual

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Sambrook, Joseph; Bowtell, David

    2002-01-01

    .... This manual, designed to extend and to complement the information in the best-selling Molecular Cloning, is a synthesis of the expertise and experience of more than 30 contributors all innovators in a fast moving field...

  20. Cloning and characterization of new bioluminescent proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szent-Gyorgyi, Christopher; Ballou, Byron T.; Dagnal, Erich; Bryan, Bruce

    1999-07-01

    Over the past two years Prolume has undertaken a comprehensive program to clone luciferases and associated 'green fluorescent proteins' (GFPs) from marine animals that use coelenterazine as the luciferin. To data we have cloned several bioluminescent proteins, including two novel copepod luciferases and two anthozoan GFPs. These four proteins have sequences that differ greatly form previously cloned analogous proteins; the sequence diversity apparently is due to independent evolutionary origins and unusual evolutionary constraints. Thus coelenterazine-based bioluminescent systems may also manifest a variety of useful properties. We discuss form this taxonomic perspective the initial biochemical and spectral characterization of our cloned proteins. Emphasis is placed on the anthozoan luciferase-GFP systems, whose efficient resonance energy transfer has elicited much current interest.

  1. Meat and Milk Compositions of Bovine Clones

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    X. Cindy Tian; Chikara Kubota; Kunihito Sakashita; Yoshiaki Izaike; Ryoichi Okano; Norio Tabara; Carol Curchoe; Lavina Jacob; Yuqin Zhang; Sadie Smith; Charles Bormann; Jie Xu; Masumi Sato; Sheila Andrew; Xiangzhong Yang; R. Michael Roberts

    2005-01-01

    ...? Here, we provide data on >100 parameters that compare the composition of meat and milk from beef and dairy cattle derived from cloning to those of genetic- and breed-matched control animals from conventional reproduction...

  2. Phage display used for gene cloning of human recombinant antibody against the erythrocyte surface antigen, rhesus D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Nielsen, L K; Andersen, P S

    1995-01-01

    A novel phage display system has been developed for PCR amplification and cloning of the Fab fragments of human immunoglobulin genes. Using this system, we have cloned an antibody from a mouse-human hybridoma cell line directed against the erythrocyte antigen rhesus D. Intact erythrocytes were used...... Fab phages demonstrates that it is possible to by-pass purification of the antigen of interest. Comparison with published germline sequences demonstrated that the immunoglobulin coding regions had the highest homology to the VH 1.9III and V kappa Hum kappa v325 germline genes, respectively....

  3. Rapid in vitro splicing of coding sequences from genomic DNA by isothermal recombination reaction-based PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenxuan Chen

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Cloning of coding sequence (CDS is an important step for gene function research. Here, we reported a simple and efficient strategy for assembling multiple-exon into an intron-free CDS from genomic DNA (gDNA by an isothermal recombination reaction-based PCR (IRR-PCR method. As an example, a 2067-bp full-length CDS of the anther-specific expression gene OsABCG15, which is composed of seven exons and six introns, was generated by IRR-PCR using genomic DNA of rice leaf as the template. Actually, this approach can be wildly applied to any DNA sequences assembly to achieve CDS cloning, gene fusion and multiple site-directed mutagenesis in functional genomics studies in vitro.

  4. Endangered wolves cloned from adult somatic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Kyu; Jang, Goo; Oh, Hyun Ju; Yuda, Fibrianto; Kim, Hye Jin; Hwang, Woo Suk; Hossein, Mohammad Shamim; Kim, Joung Joo; Shin, Nam Shik; Kang, Sung Keun; Lee, Byeong Chun

    2007-01-01

    Over the world, canine species, including the gray wolf, have been gradually endangered or extinct. Many efforts have been made to recover and conserve these canids. The aim of this study was to produce the endangered gray wolf with somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT) for conservation. Adult ear fibroblasts from a female gray wolf (Canis lupus) were isolated and cultured in vitro as donor cells. Because of limitations in obtaining gray wolf matured oocytes, in vivo matured canine oocytes obtained by flushing the oviducts from the isthmus to the infundibulum were used. After removing the cumulus cells, the oocyte was enucleated, microinjected, fused with a donor cell, and activated. The reconstructed cloned wolf embryos were transferred into the oviducts of the naturally synchronized surrogate mothers. Two pregnancies were detected by ultrasonography at 23 days of gestation in recipient dogs. In each surrogate dog, two fetal sacs were confirmed by early pregnancy diagnosis at 23 days, but only two cloned wolves were delivered. The first cloned wolf was delivered by cesarean section on October 18, 2005, 60 days after embryo transfer. The second cloned wolf was delivered on October 26, 2005, at 61 days postembryo transfer. Microsatellite analysis was performed with genomic DNA from the donor wolf, the two cloned wolves, and the two surrogate female recipients to confirm the genetic identity of the cloned wolves. Analysis of 19 microsatellite loci confirmed that the cloned wolves were genetically identical to the donor wolf. In conclusion, we demonstrated live birth of two cloned gray wolves by nuclear transfer of wolf somatic cells into enucleated canine oocyte, indicating that SCNT is a practical approach for conserving endangered canids.

  5. Human Interleukine-1 receptor antagonist:Cloning, Expression and Optimization in E.coli Host

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gh. Barati

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction & Objective: Interleukine-1 receptor antagonist (IL-1RA is a powerful anti-inflammatory cytokine which limits the biological effects of IL-1. Due to structural similarity between IL-1 and its antagonist, IL-1RA competitively binds to IL-1 receptor which leads to no signal transduction. Therefore , it is applied in the treatment of patients with inflammatory diseases such as Rheumatoid Arthritis. The aim of this study is cloning, expression and op-timization of IL-1RA in E. coli. Materials & Methods: In this experimental study synthetically prepared cDNA was amplified by PCR. After double digestion with NdeI and XhoI restriction enzymes, this gene was cloned in pET28a expression vector. Expression of desired gene was analyzed at RNA level by RT-PCR and at protein level by SDS-PAGE and followed by western blot to confirm SDS-PAGE results. Optimization of recombinant protein expression was performed in dif-ferent IPTG concentrations and harvesting times after induction. Results: The presence of gene in pET28a was determined by colony-PCR and confirmed by restriction digestion. Transcription of cloned gene and expression of high yield recombinant protein were shown by RT-PCR and SDS-PAGE, respectively. The result of SDS-PAGE was confirmed by western blot. Expression was optimized in different induction time and IPTG concentrations Conclusion: The result of this study demonstrated expression of this recombinant protein at high level in E.coli system by pET28a expression vector. This study also showed a direct as-sociation between the increased level of expression and time of induction . Therefore, an overnight induction time with 0.1 mM IPTG concentration is recommended for a high level expression. (Sci J Hamadan Univ Med Sci 2014; 21 (2:145-151

  6. Emotional reactions to human reproductive cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, Joshua

    2016-01-01

    Extant surveys of people's attitudes towards human reproductive cloning focus on moral judgements alone, not emotional reactions or sentiments. This is especially important given that some (especially Leon Kass) have argued against such cloning on the ground that it engenders widespread negative emotions, like disgust, that provide a moral guide. To provide some data on emotional reactions to human cloning, with a focus on repugnance, given its prominence in the literature. This brief mixed-method study measures the self-reported attitudes and emotions (positive or negative) towards cloning from a sample of participants in the USA. Most participants condemned cloning as immoral and said it should be illegal. The most commonly reported positive sentiment was by far interest/curiosity. Negative emotions were much more varied, but anxiety was the most common. Only about a third of participants selected disgust or repugnance as something they felt, and an even smaller portion had this emotion come to mind prior to seeing a list of options. Participants felt primarily interested and anxious about human reproductive cloning. They did not primarily feel disgust or repugnance. This provides initial empirical evidence that such a reaction is not appropriately widespread. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  7. Reproductive cloning combined with genetic modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strong, C

    2005-11-01

    Although there is widespread opposition to reproductive cloning, some have argued that its use by infertile couples to have genetically related children would be ethically justifiable. Others have suggested that lesbian or gay couples might wish to use cloning to have genetically related children. Most of the main objections to human reproductive cloning are based on the child's lack of unique nuclear DNA. In the future, it may be possible safely to create children using cloning combined with genetic modifications, so that they have unique nuclear DNA. The genetic modifications could be aimed at giving such children genetic characteristics of both members of the couple concerned. Thus, cloning combined with genetic modification could be appealing to infertile, lesbian, or gay couples who seek genetically related children who have genetic characteristics of both members. In such scenarios, the various objections to human reproductive cloning that are based on the lack of genetic uniqueness would no longer be applicable. The author argues that it would be ethically justifiable for such couples to create children in this manner, assuming these techniques could be used safely.

  8. Birth of viable puppies derived from breeding cloned female dogs with a cloned male.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J E; Hong, S G; Kang, J T; Oh, H J; Kim, M K; Kim, M J; Kim, H J; Kim, D Y; Jang, G; Lee, B C

    2009-09-15

    Since the establishment of production of viable cloned dogs by somatic cell nucleus transfer, great concern has been given to the reproductive abilities of these animals (Canis familiaris). Therefore, we investigated reproductive activity of cloned dogs by (1) performing sperm analysis using computer-assisted sperm analysis and early embryonic development, (2) assessing reproductive cycling by measuring serum progesterone (P4) levels and performing vaginal cytology, and (3) breeding cloned dogs using artificial insemination. Results showed that most parameters of sperm motility in a cloned male dog were within the reference range, and in vivo-matured oocytes from a noncloned female were successfully fertilized by spermatozoa from a cloned male dog and develop normally to the 8-cell stage. Three cloned female dogs displayed normal patterns of P4 levels and morphologic changes of the vaginal epithelium. Two cloned female dogs became pregnant using semen from a cloned male dog and successfully delivered 10 puppies by natural labor. In conclusion, these data demonstrated that both cloned male and female dogs are fertile, and their puppies are currently alive and healthy with normal growth patterns.

  9. Do Clones Dream of Love? Images of Clones in Popular Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragana Antonijević

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Fantasies about clones, cyborgs and androids have become part and parcel of the mythology of modern times – the mythologies of the biotechnological era in which the achievements of genetic engineering have inflamed fears of possible abuse of scientific knowledge and the consequences of such abuse. The paper considers the phenomenon of reproductive cloning of human beings as it is represented in popular culture, especially film as it is one of the most important sources of representations and constructions of ideas about clones. After the introductory consideration of this phenomenon in scientific, ethical and media debates which are imbued with rejection of reproductive cloning, I have analyzed the different uses of the clone motif in selected movies. I have examined the structure and content of the genre formula of "social melodrama" which is present in films about clones, and have analyzed the mythical patterns pertaining to the topic of cloning, such as the myth of immortality, the myth of twins, the myth of the uniqueness of human kind etc. Ultimately, the nature and origins of the fear of clones and disgust that clones cause have been examined, and it has been shown that they mostly boil down to the fear of the dehumanization of human beings, the fear of the loss of difference and the transgression of biological, sociocultural and metaphysical boundaries.

  10. Dried Saliva Spots: A Robust Method for Detecting Streptococcus pneumoniae Carriage by PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cassandra L. Krone

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The earliest studies in the late 19th century on Streptococcus pneumoniae (S. pneumoniae carriage used saliva as the primary specimen. However, interest in saliva declined after the sensitive mouse inoculation method was replaced by conventional culture, which made isolation of pneumococci from the highly polymicrobial oral cavity virtually impossible. Here, we tested the feasibility of using dried saliva spots (DSS for studies on pneumococcal carriage. Saliva samples from children and pneumococcus-spiked saliva samples from healthy adults were applied to paper, dried, and stored, with and without desiccant, at temperatures ranging from −20 to 37 °C for up to 35 days. DNA extracted from DSS was tested with quantitative-PCR (qPCR specifically for S. pneumoniae. When processed immediately after drying, the quantity of pneumococcal DNA detected in spiked DSS from adults matched the levels in freshly spiked raw saliva. Furthermore, pneumococcal DNA was stable in DSS stored with desiccant for up to one month over a broad range of temperatures. There were no differences in the results when spiking saliva with varied pneumococcal strains. The collection of saliva can be a particularly useful in surveillance studies conducted in remote settings, as it does not require trained personnel, and DSS are resilient to various transportation conditions.

  11. PCR-Based Assessment of Freshwater Zooplankton Feeding on Edible and "Inedible" Prey In Situ.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nejstgaard, J. C.; Belyaeva, M.; Van den Wyngaert, S.; Berger, S. A.; Grossart, H. P.; Kasprzak, P.

    2016-02-01

    Microbiota in pelagic ecosystems can affect zooplankton nutrition in several ways that are not readily assessable in situ, using classical approaches. In contrast to classical food web models identifying phytoplankton as the dominant food source for crustacean zooplankton, recent findings increasingly suggest that zooplankton may derive a significant part of the diet from a wide variety of taxa including ciliates, aquatic fungi, bacteria and small metazoan zooplankton (e.g. rotifers), in both marine and freshwaters. Direct quantification of soft-bodied and non-pigmented prey in zooplankton guts as well as symbionts and parasites on the prey and zooplankton itself has so far been impeded by the lack of appropriate methodology. We aim to establish molecular approaches to quantify these yet-understudied interactions in lake food webs. As a first step we have validated the qPCR detection method in laboratory experiments with cladoceran, calanoid and cyclopoid predators and algal prey species (Cryptomonas sp.). We plan to apply the method to study the dietary contribution of aquatic fungi - chytrids, which are parasites on inedible phytoplankton species, thus aiming to provide insights into the Mycoloop - energy transfer from inedible phytoplankton to zooplankton via fungal parasites. The quantitative PCR method, when validated for key zooplankton species and specific prey or parasite groups, has a potential for a broad range of applications in food web research.

  12. Public perceptions of farm animal cloning in Europe

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lassen, Jesper

    This report presents a picture of European opinion on farm animal cloning. In the report, both agricultural and biomedical applications of farm animal cloning are considered. With the arrival of Dolly, animal cloning became an integral part of the biotech debate, but this debate did not isolate...... animal cloning as a single issue....

  13. Cloning: Past, Present, and the Exciting Future. Breakthroughs in Bioscience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Berardino, Marie A.

    This document explores the history of cloning by focusing on Dolly the Sheep, one of the first large animal clonings. The disadvantages and advantages of transgenic clones are discussed as well as the future implications of cloning from the perspective of human health. (Contains 10 resources.) (YDS)

  14. AN APPROACH FOR CLONE DETECTION IN DOCUMENTATION REUSE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Lutsiv

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The paper focuses on the searching method for repetitions in DocBook/DRL or plain text documents. An algorithm has been designed based on software clone detection. The algorithm supports filtering results: clones are rejected if clone length in the group is less than 5 symbols, intersection of clone groups is eliminated, meaningfulness clones are removed, the groups containing clones consisting only of XML are eliminated. Remaining search is supported: found clones are extracted from the documentation, and clone search is repeated. One step is proved to be enough. Adaptive reuse technique of Paul Bassett – Stan Jarzabek has been implemented. A software tool has been developed on the basis of the algorithm. The tool supports setting parameters for repetitions detection and visualization of the obtained results. The tool is integrated into DocLine document development environment, and provides refactoring of documents using found clones. The Clone Miner clone detection utility is used for clones search. The method has been evaluated for Linux Kernel Documentation (29 documents, 25000 lines. Five semantic kinds of clones have been selected: terms (abbreviations, one word and two word terms, hyperlinks, license agreements, functionality description, and code examples. 451 meaningful clone groups have been found, average clone length is 4.43 tokens, and average number of clones in a group is 3.56.

  15. Evidence for high specificity and efficiency of multiple recombination signals in mixed DNA cloning by the Multisite Gateway system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Yukari; Sone, Takefumi; Yoshida, Shouhei; Yahata, Kazuhide; Hotta, Junko; Chesnut, Jonathan D; Honda, Takeshi; Imamoto, Fumio

    2004-02-05

    Six types of recombination signal DNA sequences of the Multisite Gateway cloning system were investigated as to their specificity and efficiency in the LR and BP recombination reactions. In the LR reaction to generate an Expression clone by recombination between attL and attR signals which are contained in the Entry clone and the Destination vector, respectively, the cross-reactivity of various attL and attR pairs on six types of respective signal sequences was examined. In the BP reaction to create an Entry clone by transferring the target DNA segment in the Expression clone or the attB-flanked PCR product into a Donor vector, various combinations of attB and attP pairs were tested for their reactivities in recombination. The results obtained indicate a markedly higher specificity and efficiency of cross-reactivity with only the matched att signal pairs, such as attL3-attR3, attB5-attP5, and so on, compared to unmatched signal pairs, such as attL3-attR5, attB5-attP3, and so on, thus verifying a high-throughput production of the positive clones in the Gateway system in which multiple recombination signals exist together in one reaction system. Examples of rapid construction of a three or four DNA-fusion structure in the plasmid are shown.

  16. Strategies for rapidly mapping proviral integration sites and assessing cardiogenic potential of nascent human induced pluripotent stem cell clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dambrot, Cheryl; Buermans, Henk P J; Varga, Eszter; Kosmidis, Georgios; Langenberg, Karin; Casini, Simona; Elliott, David A; Dinnyes, Andras; Atsma, Douwe E; Mummery, Christine L; Braam, Stefan R; Davis, Richard P

    2014-10-01

    Recent methodological advances have improved the ease and efficiency of generating human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs), but this now typically results in a greater number of hiPSC clones being derived than can be wholly characterized. It is therefore imperative that methods are developed which facilitate rapid selection of hiPSC clones most suited for the downstream research aims. Here we describe a combination of procedures enabling the simultaneous screening of multiple clones to determine their genomic integrity as well as their cardiac differentiation potential within two weeks of the putative reprogrammed colonies initially appearing. By coupling splinkerette-PCR with Ion Torrent sequencing, we could ascertain the number and map the proviral integration sites in lentiviral-reprogrammed hiPSCs. In parallel, we developed an effective cardiac differentiation protocol that generated functional cardiomyocytes within 10 days without requiring line-specific optimization for any of the six independent human pluripotent stem cell lines tested. Finally, to demonstrate the scalable potential of these procedures, we picked 20 nascent iPSC clones and performed these independent assays concurrently. Before the clones required passaging, we were able to identify clones with a single integrated copy of the reprogramming vector and robust cardiac differentiation potential for further analysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Statistical significance of quantitative PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazza Christian

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background PCR has the potential to detect and precisely quantify specific DNA sequences, but it is not yet often used as a fully quantitative method. A number of data collection and processing strategies have been described for the implementation of quantitative PCR. However, they can be experimentally cumbersome, their relative performances have not been evaluated systematically, and they often remain poorly validated statistically and/or experimentally. In this study, we evaluated the performance of known methods, and compared them with newly developed data processing strategies in terms of resolution, precision and robustness. Results Our results indicate that simple methods that do not rely on the estimation of the efficiency of the PCR amplification may provide reproducible and sensitive data, but that they do not quantify DNA with precision. Other evaluated methods based on sigmoidal or exponential curve fitting were generally of both poor resolution and precision. A statistical analysis of the parameters that influence efficiency indicated that it depends mostly on the selected amplicon and to a lesser extent on the particular biological sample analyzed. Thus, we devised various strategies based on individual or averaged efficiency values, which were used to assess the regulated expression of several genes in response to a growth factor. Conclusion Overall, qPCR data analysis methods differ significantly in their performance, and this analysis identifies methods that provide DNA quantification estimates of high precision, robustness and reliability. These methods allow reliable estimations of relative expression ratio of two-fold or higher, and our analysis provides an estimation of the number of biological samples that have to be analyzed to achieve a given precision.

  18. Introduction on Using the FastPCR Software and the Related Java Web Tools for PCR and Oligonucleotide Assembly and Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalendar, Ruslan; Tselykh, Timofey V; Khassenov, Bekbolat; Ramanculov, Erlan M

    2017-01-01

    This chapter introduces the FastPCR software as an integrated tool environment for PCR primer and probe design, which predicts properties of oligonucleotides based on experimental studies of the PCR efficiency. The software provides comprehensive facilities for designing primers for most PCR applications and their combinations. These include the standard PCR as well as the multiplex, long-distance, inverse, real-time, group-specific, unique, overlap extension PCR for multi-fragments assembling cloning and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). It also contains a built-in program to design oligonucleotide sets both for long sequence assembly by ligase chain reaction and for design of amplicons that tile across a region(s) of interest. The software calculates the melting temperature for the standard and degenerate oligonucleotides including locked nucleic acid (LNA) and other modifications. It also provides analyses for a set of primers with the prediction of oligonucleotide properties, dimer and G/C-quadruplex detection, linguistic complexity as well as a primer dilution and resuspension calculator. The program consists of various bioinformatical tools for analysis of sequences with the GC or AT skew, CG% and GA% content, and the purine-pyrimidine skew. It also analyzes the linguistic sequence complexity and performs generation of random DNA sequence as well as restriction endonucleases analysis. The program allows to find or create restriction enzyme recognition sites for coding sequences and supports the clustering of sequences. It performs efficient and complete detection of various repeat types with visual display. The FastPCR software allows the sequence file batch processing that is essential for automation. The program is available for download at http://primerdigital.com/fastpcr.html , and its online version is located at http://primerdigital.com/tools/pcr.html .

  19. Phenomenon of Cloning and specificity of its usage

    OpenAIRE

    Yusubova, Zyliya; Zeremskaya, Yuliya Aleksandrovna

    2017-01-01

    Cloning is studied by different branches of science. Medicine is interested in cloning because of its ability to transplant special tissues and organs, genetics - with the purpose of studying heredity and succession, sociology deals with moral and ethic aspects of the phenomenon. The paper is devoted to the study of cloning, its special features and usage in different spheres of social life. The article represents main types of cloning, specificity of vegetative and animal cloning and problem...

  20. Successful completion of a semi-automated enzyme-free cloning method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonacci, Stefano; Buccato, Scilla; Maione, Domenico; Petracca, Roberto

    2016-09-01

    Nowadays, in scientific fields such as Structural Biology or Vaccinology, there is an increasing need of fast, effective and reproducible gene cloning and expression processes. Consequently, the implementation of robotic platforms enabling the automation of protocols is becoming a pressing demand. The main goal of our study was to set up a robotic platform devoted to the high-throughput automation of the polymerase incomplete primer extension cloning method, and to evaluate its efficiency compared to that achieved manually, by selecting a set of bacterial genes that were processed either in the automated platform (330) or manually (94). Here we show that we successfully set up a platform able to complete, with high efficiency, a wide range of molecular biology and biochemical steps. 329 gene targets (99 %) were effectively amplified using the automated procedure and 286 (87 %) of these PCR products were successfully cloned in expression vectors, with cloning success rates being higher for the automated protocols respect to the manual procedure (93.6 and 74.5 %, respectively).

  1. [Screening and identifying cellulose degrading bacteria associated with Bursaphelenchus xylophilus and cloning corresponding genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, Qiuhong; Zhang, Lin; Chu, Xueying; Du, Fengguang; Feng, Wensheng; Hui, Fengli; Ke, Tao; Fan, Yongxin

    2012-11-04

    To screen, identify bacterial strains with high capability to degrade cellulose from bacteria associated with Bursaphelenchus xylophilus and to clone related genes. First, we collected B. xylophilus samples from pine wood nematode disease areas in Nanyang, Henan province, China. Then, we obtained the bacterial strains with high cellulase activities by primarily screening according to Congo red plate methods. The bacterial strain was classified by phenotypic and genotypic characteristics. We designed degenerate primes according to the known endoglucanase gene sequences in GenBank to carry out PCR, and analyzed the cloned sequence. We obtained seven bacterial strains with high cellulase activities. Among them, the bacterial strain numbered C8 showed the highest cellulase activities. The bacterium was classified to be Enterobacter genus. The full length of a cellulase gene cDNA (1104 bp) (GenBank JQ845065) coding region was successfully cloned. The homogeneous analysis demonstrated that the deduced nucleotide and amino acid of the gene separately shared 97% and 92% with the cellulase from E. aerogenes KCTC 2190, and 82% with the endo-1,4-D-glucanase gene from Klebsiella pneumoniae, and 82% with the a cellulase gene from unculturable bacteria. It was a novel cellulose gene cloned from B. xylophilus associated bacteria.

  2. Single-Cell Analysis and Next-Generation Immuno-Sequencing Show That Multiple Clones Persist in Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jitra Kriangkum

    Full Text Available The immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH gene rearrangement in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL provides a unique molecular signature; however, we demonstrate that 26/198 CLL patients (13% had more than one IGH rearrangement, indicating the power of molecular technology over phenotypic analysis. Single-cell PCR analysis and next-generation immuno-sequencing identified IGH-defined clones. In 23% (18/79 of cases whose clones carried unmutated immunoglobulin heavy chain variable (IGHV genes (U-CLL, IGH rearrangements were bialleic with one productive (P and one non-productive (NP allele. Two U-CLL were biclonal, each clone being monoallelic (P. In 119 IGHV-mutated (M-CLL cases, one had biallelic rearrangements in their CLL (P/NP and five had 2-4 distinct clones. Allelic exclusion was maintained in all B-clones analyzed. Based on single-cell PCR analysis, 5/11 partner clones (45% reached levels of >5x10(9 cells/L, suggesting second CLL clones. Partner clones persisted over years. Conventional IGH characterization and next-generation sequencing of 13 CLL, 3 multiple myeloma, 2 Waldenstrom's macroglobulinemia and 3 age-matched healthy donors consistently identified the same rearranged IGH sequences. Most multiple clones occurred in M-CLL, perhaps indicative of weak clonal dominance, thereby associating with a good prognosis. In contrast, biallelic CLL occurred primarily in U-CLL thus being associated with poor prognosis. Extending beyond intra-clonal diversity, molecular analysis of clonal evolution and apparent subclones in CLL may also reflect inter-clonal diversity.

  3. Single-Cell Analysis and Next-Generation Immuno-Sequencing Show That Multiple Clones Persist in Patients with Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriangkum, Jitra; Motz, Sarah N.; Mack, Tanner; Beiggi, Sara; Baigorri, Eva; Kuppusamy, Hemalatha; Belch, Andrew R.; Johnston, James B.; Pilarski, Linda M.

    2015-01-01

    The immunoglobulin heavy chain (IGH) gene rearrangement in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) provides a unique molecular signature; however, we demonstrate that 26/198 CLL patients (13%) had more than one IGH rearrangement, indicating the power of molecular technology over phenotypic analysis. Single-cell PCR analysis and next-generation immuno-sequencing identified IGH-defined clones. In 23% (18/79) of cases whose clones carried unmutated immunoglobulin heavy chain variable (IGHV) genes (U-CLL), IGH rearrangements were bialleic with one productive (P) and one non-productive (NP) allele. Two U-CLL were biclonal, each clone being monoallelic (P). In 119 IGHV-mutated (M-CLL) cases, one had biallelic rearrangements in their CLL (P/NP) and five had 2–4 distinct clones. Allelic exclusion was maintained in all B-clones analyzed. Based on single-cell PCR analysis, 5/11 partner clones (45%) reached levels of >5x109 cells/L, suggesting second CLL clones. Partner clones persisted over years. Conventional IGH characterization and next-generation sequencing of 13 CLL, 3 multiple myeloma, 2 Waldenstrom’s macroglobulinemia and 3 age-matched healthy donors consistently identified the same rearranged IGH sequences. Most multiple clones occurred in M-CLL, perhaps indicative of weak clonal dominance, thereby associating with a good prognosis. In contrast, biallelic CLL occurred primarily in U-CLL thus being associated with poor prognosis. Extending beyond intra-clonal diversity, molecular analysis of clonal evolution and apparent subclones in CLL may also reflect inter-clonal diversity. PMID:26353109

  4. Cloning mice and men: prohibiting the use of iPS cells for human reproductive cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo, Bernard; Parham, Lindsay; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Cedars, Marcelle; Conklin, Bruce; Fisher, Susan; Gates, Elena; Giudice, Linda; Halme, Dina Gould; Hershon, William; Kriegstein, Arnold; Kwok, Pui-Yan; Wagner, Richard

    2010-01-08

    The use of iPSCs and tetraploid complementation for human reproductive cloning would raise profound ethical objections. Professional standards and laws that ban human reproductive cloning by somatic cell nuclear transfer should be revised to also forbid it by other methods, such as iPSCs via tetraploid complementation. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Update on the First Cloned Dog and Outlook for Canine Cloning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Goo; Lee, ByeongChun

    2015-10-01

    As man's best friend, dogs have an important position in human society. Ten years ago, we reported the first cloned dog, and his birth has raised various scientific issues, such as those related to health, reproduction, and life span. He has developed without any unique health issues. In this article, we summarize and present perspectives on canine cloning.

  6. Identification of transgenic cloned dairy goats harboring human lactoferrin and methylation status of the imprinted gene IGF2R in their lungs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y L; Zhang, G M; Wan, Y J; Jia, R X; Li, P Z; Han, L; Wang, F; Huang, M R

    2015-09-22

    Dairy goat is a good model for production of transgenic proteins in milk using somatic cell nuclear transfer (SCNT). However, animals produced from SCNT are often associated with lung deficiencies. We recently produced six transgenic cloned dairy goats harboring the human lactoferrin gene, including three live transgenic clones and three deceased transgenic clones that died from respiratory failure during the perinatal period. Imprinted genes are important regulators of lung growth, and may be subjected to faulty reprogramming. In the present study, first, microsatellite analysis, PCR, and DNA sequence identification were conducted to confirm that these three dead kids were genetically identical to the transgenic donor cells. Second, the CpG island methylation profile of the imprinted insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF2R) gene was assessed in the lungs of the three dead transgenic kids and the normally produced kids using bisulfite sequencing PCR. In addition, the relative mRNA level of IGF2R was also determined by real-time PCR. Results showed that the IGF2R gene in the lungs of the dead cloned kids showed abnormal hypermethylation and higher mRNA expression levels than the control, indicating that aberrant DNA methylation reprogramming is one of the important factors in the death of transgenic cloned animals.

  7. Development and comparison of a real-time PCR assay for detection of Dichelobacter nodosus with culturing and conventional PCR: harmonisation between three laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Ovine footrot is a contagious disease with worldwide occurrence in sheep. The main causative agent is the fastidious bacterium Dichelobacter nodosus. In Scandinavia, footrot was first diagnosed in Sweden in 2004 and later also in Norway and Denmark. Clinical examination of sheep feet is fundamental to diagnosis of footrot, but D. nodosus should also be detected to confirm the diagnosis. PCR-based detection using conventional PCR has been used at our institutes, but the method was laborious and there was a need for a faster, easier-to-interpret method. The aim of this study was to develop a TaqMan-based real-time PCR assay for detection of D. nodosus and to compare its performance with culturing and conventional PCR. Methods A D. nodosus-specific TaqMan based real-time PCR assay targeting the 16S rRNA gene was designed. The inclusivity and exclusivity (specificity) of the assay was tested using 55 bacterial and two fungal strains. To evaluate the sensitivity and harmonisation of results between different laboratories, aliquots of a single DNA preparation were analysed at three Scandinavian laboratories. The developed real-time PCR assay was compared to culturing by analysing 126 samples, and to a conventional PCR method by analysing 224 samples. A selection of PCR-products was cloned and sequenced in order to verify that they had been identified correctly. Results The developed assay had a detection limit of 3.9 fg of D. nodosus genomic DNA. This result was obtained at all three laboratories and corresponds to approximately three copies of the D. nodosus genome per reaction. The assay showed 100% inclusivity and 100% exclusivity for the strains tested. The real-time PCR assay found 54.8% more positive samples than by culturing and 8% more than conventional PCR. Conclusions The developed real-time PCR assay has good specificity and sensitivity for detection of D. nodosus, and the results are easy to interpret. The method is less time-consuming than either

  8. Development and comparison of a real-time PCR assay for detection of Dichelobacter nodosus with culturing and conventional PCR: harmonisation between three laboratories

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frosth Sara

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Ovine footrot is a contagious disease with worldwide occurrence in sheep. The main causative agent is the fastidious bacterium Dichelobacter nodosus. In Scandinavia, footrot was first diagnosed in Sweden in 2004 and later also in Norway and Denmark. Clinical examination of sheep feet is fundamental to diagnosis of footrot, but D. nodosus should also be detected to confirm the diagnosis. PCR-based detection using conventional PCR has been used at our institutes, but the method was laborious and there was a need for a faster, easier-to-interpret method. The aim of this study was to develop a TaqMan-based real-time PCR assay for detection of D. nodosus and to compare its performance with culturing and conventional PCR. Methods A D. nodosus-specific TaqMan based real-time PCR assay targeting the 16S rRNA gene was designed. The inclusivity and exclusivity (specificity of the assay was tested using 55 bacterial and two fungal strains. To evaluate the sensitivity and harmonisation of results between different laboratories, aliquots of a single DNA preparation were analysed at three Scandinavian laboratories. The developed real-time PCR assay was compared to culturing by analysing 126 samples, and to a conventional PCR method by analysing 224 samples. A selection of PCR-products was cloned and sequenced in order to verify that they had been identified correctly. Results The developed assay had a detection limit of 3.9 fg of D. nodosus genomic DNA. This result was obtained at all three laboratories and corresponds to approximately three copies of the D. nodosus genome per reaction. The assay showed 100% inclusivity and 100% exclusivity for the strains tested. The real-time PCR assay found 54.8% more positive samples than by culturing and 8% more than conventional PCR. Conclusions The developed real-time PCR assay has good specificity and sensitivity for detection of D. nodosus, and the results are easy to interpret. The method is less

  9. Benefits and problems with cloning animals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, L C; Bordignon, V; Babkine, M; Fecteau, G; Keefer, C

    2000-01-01

    Animal cloning is becoming a useful technique for producing transgenic farm animals and is likely to be used to produce clones from valuable adults. Other applications will also undoubtedly be discovered in the near future, such as for preserving endangered breeds and species. Although cloning promises great advantages for commerce and research alike, its outcome is not always certain due to high pregnancy losses and high morbidity and mortality during the neonatal period. Research into the mechanisms involved in the reprogramming of the nucleus is being conducted throughout the world in an attempt to better understand the molecular and cellular mechanisms involved in correcting these problems. Although the cause of these anomalies remains mostly unknown, similar phenotypes have been observed in calves derived through in vitro fertilization, suggesting that culture conditions are involved in these phenomena. In the meantime, veterinarians and theriogenologists have an important role to play in improving the efficiency of cloning by finding treatments to assure normal gestation to term and to develop preventative and curative care for cloned neonates. Images Figure 1. PMID:11143925

  10. Elephant grass clones for silage production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rerisson José Cipriano dos Santos

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Ensiling warm-season grasses often requires wilting due to their high moisture content, and the presence of low-soluble sugars in these grasses usually demands the use of additives during the ensiling process. This study evaluated the bromatological composition of the fodder and silage from five Pennisetum sp. clones (IPA HV 241, IPA/UFRPE Taiwan A-146 2.114, IPA/UFRPE Taiwan A-146 2.37, Elephant B, and Mott. The contents of 20 Polyvinyl chloride (PVC silos, which were opened after 90 days of storage, were used for the bromatological analysis and the evaluation of the pH, nitrogen, ammonia, buffer capacity, soluble carbohydrates, and fermentation coefficients. The effluent losses, gases and dry matter recovery were also calculated. Although differences were observed among the clones (p < 0.05 for the concentrations of dry matter, insoluble nitrogen in acid detergents, insoluble nitrogen in neutral detergents, soluble carbohydrates, fermentation coefficients, and in vitro digestibility in the forage before ensiling, no differences were observed for most of these variables after ensiling. All of the clones were efficient in the fermentation process. The IPA/UFRPE TAIWAN A-146 2.37 clone, however, presented a higher dry matter concentration and the best fermentation coefficient, resulting in a better silage quality, compared to the other clones.

  11. Cloning and Expression of Luteinizing Hormone Subunits in Chinese Hamster Ovary Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeinab Soleimanifar

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Luteinizing hormone (LH was secreted by the stimulating cells of the testes and ovaries in the anterior pituitary gland. The application of this hormone is in the treatment of men and women with infertility and amenorrhea respectively.Materials and Methods: In the present study the alpha and beta subunits of human LH gene were cloned into the pEGFP-N1 expression vector and produced the recombinant LH hormone in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO eukaryotic system.Results: Alpha and beta subunits of LH hormone were cloned between NheI and BamHI cut sites of pEGFP_N1 expression plasmid and confirmed by PCR.  Hormone expression was evaluated in CHO cell line by Western blotting using the specific antibody.Conclusion: Alpha and beta subunits of LH hormone were expressed in CHO cell line perfectly.

  12. Direct Cloning of a Xylanase Gene from Pawan-Riau Hot Spring

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IS HELIANTI

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available A functional gene containing an Open Reading Frame (ORF encoding a β-1, 4-endoxylanase glycosyl hydrolase family 11 was cloned directly using metagenomic PCR-cloning method from Pawan Hot Spring sample in Riau. The gene consisted of 642 nucleotides, encoded for 213 amino acids. The amino acid sequence analysis using BLAST showed that the gene has high homology (93% with xylanase gene from Bacillus subtilis. The gene showed its function when it was subcloned into an expression vector and overexpressed in E. coli. The crude extract of the recombinant enzyme had activity for 170 U/ml at 50 °C. The result of this work showed that metagenomic approach was a powerful short cut method to obtain recombinant biocatalyst that was useful for industrial application.

  13. A simple DNA recombination screening method by RT-PCR as an alternative to Southern blot

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Albers, Eliene; Sbroggiò, Mauro; Martin Gonzalez, Javier

    2017-01-01

    The generation of genetically engineered mouse models (GEMMs), including knock-out (KO) and knock-in (KI) models, often requires genomic screening of many mouse ES cell (mESC) clones by Southern blot. The use of large targeting constructs facilitates the recombination of exogenous DNA in a specific...... many false positive and false negative results. Here, we propose an alternative screening method based on the detection of a genetic modification at the mRNA level, which we successfully optimized in two mouse models. This screening method consists of a reverse-transcription PCR (RT-PCR) using primers...... that match exons flanking the targeting construct. The detection of the expected modification in this PCR product confirms the integration at the correct genomic location and shows that the mutant mRNA is expressed. This is a simple and sensitive strategy to screen locus-specific recombination of targeting...

  14. Detection of Porcine Circovirus Type 2 (PCV2 in Mosquitoes from Pig Farms by PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohong Yang, Lidan Hou, Jing Ye, Qigai He and Shengbo Cao*

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available To investigate, whether mosquitoes could be potential vectors that maintain or transmit PCV2, 59 mosquito samples were collected from suspicious PCV2-infected pig farms in Hubei and Anhui province, China. Total DNA from these mosquitoes was extracted and then tested for presence of PCV2 nucleic acid by PCR. Four (6.78% samples showed the positive result. Subsequently, the positive PCR product was cloned into pEASY-T1 vector and sequenced. Sequence analysis displayed that homology between the PCR products and PCV2 strains were more than 94%. These results demonstrate that PCV2 nucleic acid exists in these mosquitoes, which suggests that mosquitoes could serve as mechanical transmission vectors of PCV2.

  15. Construction and Evaluation of a Novel Internal Positive Control (IPC) for Detection of Coxiella burnetii by PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majidzadeh, Keivan; Mohseni, Amirhossein; Soleimani, Mohammad

    2014-01-01

    Due to the limitations of the classical methods to detect Coxiella burnetii, direct diagnosis of the pathogen using PCR techniques is still the preferable approach. However, false negative results owing to the presence of PCR inhibitors are troublesome. In order to identify the inhibitors during PCR assay, an internal positive control (IPC) was designed based on 16SrRNA gene of C. burnetii. In the current study, the initial and ending parts of the target gene in an external positive control plasmid (pTZ57R/T-16S) amplified using internal primers which had a BglII restriction site on the 5´ends. Both PCR products (fragments 1 and 2) were cloned into pTZ57R/T vector. Following BglII enzyme digestion, the two obtained linear plasmids were ligated. The ligation product was transformed into Escherichia coli Top10 F'. Screening of the desired recombinant clone was carried out using colony PCR. The size of the PCR product was equal to the sum of the first and second fragments. Sequencing confirmed the presence of the desire insert (IPC sequence) in recombinant plasmid. Consequently, the IPC fragment was longer than the target gene while both ends had similar attachments to the same primer pair. The results showed that direct fusion of the recombinant plasmids containing the initial and ending parts of the target gene are simple and cost-effective techniques for increasing the length of the fragment and constructing IPC.

  16. O3:K6 serotype of Vibrio parahaemolyticus identical to the global pandemic clone associated with diarrhea in Peru.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gil, Ana I; Miranda, Hernan; Lanata, Claudio F; Prada, Ana; Hall, Eric R; Barreno, Carmen M; Nusrin, Suraia; Bhuiyan, Nurul A; Sack, David A; Nair, Gopinath Balakrish

    2007-07-01

    To determine if the Vibrio parahaemolyticus O3:K6 global pandemic clone has spread into Peru. A collection of 100 V. parahaemolyticus strains isolated from diarrhea cases in Peru were serotyped for O:K antigens and genotyped for the presence of the species-specific toxR gene and for the tdh and trh genes. In addition, the group-specific PCR (GS-PCR) and PCR for the presence of the open reading frame ORF8 of the filamentous phage f237 was performed to determine the pandemic status of the strains. Fifty strains of V. parahaemolyticus in this collection were identified as pandemic strains. Forty-six ORF8 and GS-PCR positive strains were identical to the global pandemic clone O3:K6, while four strains that also possessed the pandemic genotype and were ORF8 and GS-PCR positive belonged to serotypes O3:K68, O3:K58 and OUT (untypable):K6. One of the O3:K6 strains was isolated in 1996, indicating that the pandemic strain was present in Peru at about the same time that it caused the first outbreak in Calcutta in February 1996. Based on this first report in Peru of such strains, we recommend including V. parahaemolyticus in the differential diagnosis of the etiologic agents for diarrhea in this part of the world.

  17. Cloning and sequencing of Lol pI, the major allergenic protein of rye-grass pollen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffith, I J; Smith, P M; Pollock, J; Theerakulpisut, P; Avjioglu, A; Davies, S; Hough, T; Singh, M B; Simpson, R J; Ward, L D

    1991-02-25

    We have isolated a full length cDNA clone encoding the major glycoprotein allergen Lol pI. The clone was selected using a combination of immunological screening of a cDNA expression library and PCR amplification of Lol pI-specific transcripts. Lol pI expressed in bacteria as a fusion protein shows recognition by specific IgE antibodies present in sera of grass pollen-allergic subjects. Northern analysis has shown that the Lol pI transcripts are expressed only in pollen of rye-grass. Molecular cloning of Lol pI provides a molecular genetic approach to study the structure-function relationship of allergens.

  18. Cloning and sequence analysis of hsf, an outer membrane protein gene of Pasteurella multocida serotype B:2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Priyadarshini

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The present study was undertaken to clone, sequence and analyze the hsf, an outer membrane protein gene of Pasteurella multocida serotype B:2 Materials and Methods: hsf gene was amplified from genomic DNA of P. multocida. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR product was cloned in pET-32a vector and was characterized. hsf gene was sequenced, analyzed and phylogenetic tree was constructed taking sequences of other strains. Results: Amplicon size was found to be 785 bp. Recombinant got characterized through colony PCR and restriction enzyme analysis. Conclusion: hsf gene of P. multocida serotype B is similar to serotype A, but different from serotype D. Further work is needed to evaluate role of Hsf protein in protection studies and to study the antigenic properties of this recombinant protein as a candidate for vaccine.

  19. Cloning of affecting pyruvate decarboxylase gene in the production bioethanol of agricultural waste in the E.coli bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masome Zeinali

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Ethanol made by a biomass is one of the useful strategies in terms of economic and environmental and as a clean and safe energy to replace fossil fuels considered and examined. Materials and methods: In this study, key enzyme in the production of ethanol (Pyruvate decarboxylase from Zymomonas mobilis bacteria was isolated and cloned at E. coli bacteria by freeze and thaw method. For gene cloning, we used specific primers of pdc and PCR reaction and then pdc gene isolated and pET 28a plasmid double digested with (Sal I and Xho I enzymes. Digestion Products were ligated by T4 DNA ligase in 16 °C for 16 hours. Results: Results of bacteria culture showed that a few colonies containing pET 28a plasmid could grow. Result of colony pcr of pdc gene with specific primers revealed 1700 bp bands in 1% agarose gel electrophoresis. The results of PCR with T7 promotor forward primer and pdc revers primer have proved the accurate direction of integration of pdc gene into plasmid and revealed 1885 bp band. Double digestion of recombinant plasmid with SalI and XhoI enzymes revealed same bands. Finally, RT showed the expected band of 1700 bp that implies the desired gene expression in the samples. Discussion and conclusion: Due to the increased production of ethanol via pyruvate decarboxylase gene cloning in expression plasmids with a strong promoter upstream of the cloning site can conclude that, pyruvate decarboxylase cloning as a key gene would be useful and according to beneficial properties of E. coli bacteria, transfering the gene to bacteria appears to be reasonable.

  20. Molecular characterization of viable Legionella spp. in cooling tower water samples by combined use of ethidium monoazide and PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, Hiroaki; Fujimura, Reiko; Agata, Kunio; Ohta, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Viable Legionella spp. in environmental water samples were characterized phylogenetically by a clone library analysis combining the use of ethidium monoazide and quantitative PCR. To examine the diversity of Legionella spp., six cooling tower water samples and three bath water samples were collected and analyzed. A total of 617 clones were analyzed for their 16S rRNA gene sequences and classified into 99 operational taxonomic units (OTUs). The majority of OTUs were not clustered with currently described Legionella spp., suggesting the wide diversity of not-yet-cultured Legionella groups harbored in cooling tower water environments.

  1. Cloning and characterization of the cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase gene from the zygomycete fungus Cunninghamella.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, J S; Loper, J C

    2000-02-16

    The filamentous fungus Cunninghamella utilizes cytochrome P450 system(s) in the metabolism of a broad range of polyaromatic and aliphatic pollutants and a variety of drugs, but prior attempts at isolation of P450 system components of this fungus have been generally unsuccessful. We report upon the cytochrome P450 oxidoreductase (CPR) gene from two widely studied species, C. elegans and C. echinulata. The C. elegans CPR gene was obtained by screening a genomic library using as probe a PCR amplicon obtained with degenerate primers based on known CPRs. The 2420 bp coding region contained two apparent introns (149 bp and 138 bp). Northern blot analysis showed that the CPR gene is transcriptionally expressed in C. elegans and appears to be inducible by an alkane substrate, n-tetradecane. Phylogenetic comparison of the deduced C. elegans CPR (710 aa) suggested that it is more closely related to animal CPRs (41-42%) than to yeast (38-41%) and plant (35-36%) forms. A 2074 bp sequence containing most of the CPR gene homolog from C. echinulata was also isolated. Copyright 2000 Academic Press.

  2. Scientific hazards of human reproductive 'cloning'.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Lorraine E

    2003-05-01

    The scientific and clinical professional societies and associations covering the remit of Human Fertility are unanimously opposed to human reproductive 'cloning'. This article describes the main scientific objections to human reproductive 'cloning'. Data collected from numerous studies in a range of animal species indicate a high incidence of fetal defects, a stillbirth rate typically of more than 90% and a lack of adequate information on postnatal development. These concerns are exacerbated by misconceptions about the current ability to screen preimplantation embryos for 'cloning-induced' defects. Scientists and clinicians are sometimes treated with mistrust in the eyes of the public and media over such issues, perhaps because scientific information is not as well communicated as it might be. The duty of reproductive specialists is to convey the limits of their knowledge on this issue to the public and policymakers.

  3. Human reproductive cloning and reasons for deprivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, D A

    2008-08-01

    Human reproductive cloning provides the possibility of genetically related children for persons for whom present technologies are ineffective. I argue that the desire for genetically related children is not, by itself, a sufficient reason to engage in human reproductive cloning. I show this by arguing that the value underlying the desire for genetically related children implies a tension between the parent and the future child. This tension stems from an instance of a deprivation and violates a general principle of reasons for deprivation. Alternative considerations, such as a right to procreative autonomy, do not appear helpful in making the case for human reproductive cloning merely on the basis of the desire for genetically related children.

  4. Quantum Nonadiabatic Cloning of Entangled Coherent States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmaylov, Artur F; Joubert-Doriol, Loïc

    2017-04-20

    We propose a systematic approach to the basis set extension for nonadiabatic dynamics of entangled combination of nuclear coherent states (CSs) evolving according to the time-dependent variational principle (TDVP). The TDVP provides a rigorous framework for fully quantum nonadiabatic dynamics of closed systems; however, the quality of results strongly depends on available basis functions. Starting with a single nuclear CS replicated vertically on all electronic states, our approach clones this function when replicas of the CS on different electronic states experience increasingly different forces. Created clones move away from each other (decohere), extending the basis set. To determine a moment for cloning, we introduce generalized forces based on derivatives that maximally contribute to a variation of the total quantum action and thus account for entanglement of all basis functions.

  5. Molecular cloning, heterogenous expression and the induction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    user1

    2012-05-24

    May 24, 2012 ... 2The Key Sericultural Laboratory of the Agricultural Ministry of China, Southwest University, Chongqing, 400716, China. ... RT-PCR analysis showed that .... expression level of Bmae33 after exposure experiment through. qRT-PCR. The products of reverse-transcription was diluted then used as template.

  6. Universal insertion/deletion-enrich PCR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Kuan Chen

    2011-12-01

    Conclusion: Unidel-PCR will remold the capability of PCR-based genetic testing, especially in the field of cancer molecular diagnosis, infectious disease and identification of minor populations of alternative splicing variants of RNA transcribed.

  7. Two-temperature PCR for Microfluidics

    KAUST Repository

    Kodzius, Rimantas

    2010-05-01

    Since its invention in 1983, polymerase chain reaction (PCR) has been the method of choice for DNA amplification. Successful PCR depends on the optimization of several parameters, which is a cumbersome task due to the many variables (conditions and compon

  8. Ultra-low background DNA cloning system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kenta Goto

    Full Text Available Yeast-based in vivo cloning is useful for cloning DNA fragments into plasmid vectors and is based on the ability of yeast to recombine the DNA fragments by homologous recombination. Although this method is efficient, it produces some by-products. We have developed an "ultra-low background DNA cloning system" on the basis of yeast-based in vivo cloning, by almost completely eliminating the generation of by-products and applying the method to commonly used Escherichia coli vectors, particularly those lacking yeast replication origins and carrying an ampicillin resistance gene (Amp(r. First, we constructed a conversion cassette containing the DNA sequences in the following order: an Amp(r 5' UTR (untranslated region and coding region, an autonomous replication sequence and a centromere sequence from yeast, a TRP1 yeast selectable marker, and an Amp(r 3' UTR. This cassette allowed conversion of the Amp(r-containing vector into the yeast/E. coli shuttle vector through use of the Amp(r sequence by homologous recombination. Furthermore, simultaneous transformation of the desired DNA fragment into yeast allowed cloning of this DNA fragment into the same vector. We rescued the plasmid vectors from all yeast transformants, and by-products containing the E. coli replication origin disappeared. Next, the rescued vectors were transformed into E. coli and the by-products containing the yeast replication origin disappeared. Thus, our method used yeast- and E. coli-specific "origins of replication" to eliminate the generation of by-products. Finally, we successfully cloned the DNA fragment into the vector with almost 100% efficiency.

  9. Improved method for detection of methanotrophic bacteria in forest soils by PCR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinkamp, R; Zimmer, W; Papen, H

    2001-05-01

    A primer set was designed for the specific detection of methanotrophic bacteria in forest soils by PCR. The primer sequences were derived from highly conservative regions of the pmoA gene, encoding the alpha-subunit of the particulate methane monooxygenase present in all methanotrophs. In control experiments with genomic DNA from a collection of different type I, II, and X methanotrophs, it could be demonstrated that the new primers were specific for members of the genera Methylosinus, Methylocystis, Methylomonas, Methylobacter, and Methylococcus. To test the suitability of the new primers for the detection of particulate methane monooxygenase (pMMO) containing methanotrophs in environmental samples we used DNA extracts from an acid spruce forest soil. For simple and rapid purification of the DNA extracts, the samples were separated by electrophoresis on a low-melting-point agarose gel. This allowed us to efficiently separate the DNA from coextracted humic acids. The DNA from the melted agarose gel was ready for use in PCR reactions. In PCR reactions with DNA from the Ah soil layer, products of the correct size were amplified by PCR by use of the new primers. By sequencing of cloned PCR products, it could be confirmed that the PCR products represented partial sequences with strong similarity to the pmoA gene. The sequence was most related to the pmoA sequence of a type II methanotroph strain isolated from the Ah layer of the investigated soils.

  10. Thermostable DNA polymerase from a viral metagenome is a potent RT-PCR enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael J Moser

    Full Text Available Viral metagenomic libraries are a promising but previously untapped source of new reagent enzymes. Deep sequencing and functional screening of viral metagenomic DNA from a near-boiling thermal pool identified clones expressing thermostable DNA polymerase (Pol activity. Among these, 3173 Pol demonstrated both high thermostability and innate reverse transcriptase (RT activity. We describe the biochemistry of 3173 Pol and report its use in single-enzyme reverse transcription PCR (RT-PCR. Wild-type 3173 Pol contains a proofreading 3'-5' exonuclease domain that confers high fidelity in PCR. An easier-to-use exonuclease-deficient derivative was incorporated into a PyroScript RT-PCR master mix and compared to one-enzyme (Tth and two-enzyme (MMLV RT/Taq RT-PCR systems for quantitative detection of MS2 RNA, influenza A RNA, and mRNA targets. Specificity and sensitivity of 3173 Pol-based RT-PCR were higher than Tth Pol and comparable to three common two-enzyme systems. The performance and simplified set-up make this enzyme a potential alternative for research and molecular diagnostics.

  11. MOLECULAR DETECTION AND CLONING FOR RICKETTSIA-LIKE BACTERIA OF MILKY HAEMOLYMPH DISEASE OF SPINY LOBSTER Panulirus spp.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isti Koesharyani

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Spiny lobster (Panulirus homarus and Panulirus ornatus are important commodities for Indonesia. The aquaculture of lobster is susceptible for several diseases like parasite, fungi, bacteria, and virus. Among those diseases, milky haemolymph disease (MHD is often seen as a symptom to mass mortality occurred at lobster farms in Gerupuk Bay of Lombok. The purpose of this study was to determine the lobster diseases on cage culture in Gerupuk Bay of Lombok, West Nusa Tenggara. The study was undertaken from January to March 2015. Diseases status was determined by application of molecular plat-form, polymerase chain reaction (PCR with designation of specific primer for MHD (254F/R, 254F: 5’-CGA-GGA-CCA-GAG-ATG-GAC-CTT-3’ and 254R: 5’-GCT-CAT-TGT-CAC-CGC-CAT-TGT-3’ with PCR size product of 254 bp. and for cloned the pathogen was used TA-cloning Invitrogen for the DNA plasmid as positive control for other analysis. Several tissue samples i.e hepatopancreas, haemolymph, part of muscle hepatopancreas P. homarus and P. ornatus were taken from cage culture farms at Gerupuk Bay then preserved on 90% ethanol for further analysis by PCR and then the amplificated DNA were cloned into pCR®2.1 plasmid and transformed into competent E. coli. The result showed that almost all lobster samples from Gerupuk Bay were positive infected by MHD, as the results of PCR amplification whereas the band appeared at 254bp. Also MHD plasmid has been successfully cloned and will be used for further examination. Histopathologically in hepatopancreas infection have seen necrosis that contain numerous of rickettsia-like bacteria.

  12. Gene cloning and heterologous expression of pyranose 2-oxidase from the brown-rot fungus, Gloeophyllum trabeum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diane Dietrich; Casey Crooks

    2009-01-01

    A pyranose 2-oxidase gene from the brown-rot basidiomycete Gloeophyllum trabeum was isolated using homology-based degenerate PCR. The gene structure was determined and compared to that of several pyranose 2-oxidases cloned from white-rot fungi. The G. trabeum pyranose 2-oxidase gene consists of 16 coding exons with canonical promoter CAAT and TATA elements in the 5’UTR...

  13. Cloning arbuscule-related genes from mycorrhizas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Burleigh, Stephen

    2000-01-01

    Until recently little was known about the identity of the genes expressed in the arbuscules of mycorrhizas, due in part to problems associated with cloning genes from the tissues of an obligate symbiont. However, the combination of advanced molecular techniques, innovative use of the materials...... available and fortuitous cloning has resulted in the recent identification of a number of arbuscule-related genes. This article provides a brief summary of the genes involved in arbuscule development, function and regulation, and the techniques used to study them. Molecular techniques include differential...

  14. Reproduction: widespread cloning in echinoderm larvae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaves, Alexandra A; Palmer, A Richard

    2003-09-11

    Asexual reproduction by free-living invertebrate larvae is a rare and enigmatic phenomenon and, although it is known to occur in sea stars and brittle stars, it has not been detected in other echinoderms despite more than a century of intensive study. Here we describe spontaneous larval cloning in three species from two more echinoderm classes: a sea cucumber (Holothuroidea), a sand dollar and a sea urchin (Echinoidea). Larval cloning may therefore be an ancient ability of echinoderms and possibly of deutero-stomes - the group that includes echinoderms, acorn worms, sea squirts and vertebrates.

  15. The PCR revolution: basic technologies and applications

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bustin, Stephen A

    2010-01-01

    ... by leading authorities on the many applications of PCR and how this technology has revolutionized their respective areas of interest. This book conveys the ways in which PCR has overcome many obstacles in life science and clinical research and also charts the PCR's development from time-consuming, low throughput, nonquantitative proced...

  16. Culture-independent nested PCR method reveals high diversity of actinobacteria associated with the marine sponges Hymeniacidon perleve and Sponge sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xin, Yanjuan; Huang, Jianyu; Deng, Maicun; Zhang, Wei

    2008-11-01

    A culture-independent nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) technique was used to investigate the diversity of actinobacteria communities associated with the sponges Hymeniacidon perleve and Sponge sp. The phylogenetic affiliation of sponge-derived actinobacteria was then assessed by 16S rRNA sequencing of cloned DNA fragments. A total of 196 positive clones were screened by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis; 48 unique operational taxonomic units (OTUs) were selected for sequencing. Rarefaction analysis indicated that the clone libraries represented 93% and 94% of the total estimated diversity for the two species, respectively. Phylogenetic analysis of sequence data revealed representatives of various phylogenetic divisions, which were related to the following ten actinobacterial genera: Acidimicrobium, Corynebacterium, Propionibacterium, Actinomyces, Micrococcus, Microbacterium, Streptomyces, Mycobacterium, Cellulosimicrobium, Sporichthya, and unidentified actinobacterial clones. A sponge-specific, previously uncultured actinobacteria community grouped within the subclass Acidimicrobidae was discovered from both H. perleve and Sponge sp. Sequences belonging to Acidimicrobium in the H. perleve and the Sponge sp. clone libraries represented 33% and 24% of the clones, respectively. In the Sponge sp. clone library Mycobacterium dominated, accounting for 70% of all clones. The presence of Acidimicrobium and mycobacteria within two sponges can lay the groundwork for attempts to culture these interesting bacteria for industrial applications.

  17. Isolation of BAC Clones Containing Conserved Genes from Libraries of Three Distantly Related Moths: A Useful Resource for Comparative Genomics of Lepidoptera

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuji Yasukochi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Lepidoptera, butterflies and moths, is the second largest animal order and includes numerous agricultural pests. To facilitate comparative genomics in Lepidoptera, we isolated BAC clones containing conserved and putative single-copy genes from libraries of three pests, Heliothis virescens, Ostrinia nubilalis, and Plutella xylostella, harboring the haploid chromosome number, =31, which are not closely related with each other or with the silkworm, Bombyx mori, (=28, the sequenced model lepidopteran. A total of 108–184 clones representing 101–182 conserved genes were isolated for each species. For 79 genes, clones were isolated from more than two species, which will be useful as common markers for analysis using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH, as well as for comparison of genome sequence among multiple species. The PCR-based clone isolation method presented here is applicable to species which lack a sequenced genome but have a significant collection of cDNA or EST sequences.

  18. Cloning of gp-340, a putative opsonin receptor for lung surfactant protein D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmskov, U; Mollenhauer, J; Madsen, J

    1999-01-01

    in a soluble form and in association with the membranes of alveolar macrophages. The primary structure of gp-340 has been established by molecular cloning, which yielded a 7,686-bp cDNA sequence encoding a polypeptide chain of 2, 413 amino acids. The domain organization features 13 scavenger receptor cysteine...... transcription-PCR analysis showed that the main sites of synthesis of gp-340 are lung, trachea, salivary gland, small intestine, and stomach. Immunohistochemistry revealed strong staining for gp-340 in alveolar and other tissue macrophages. Immunostaining of the macrophage membrane was either uniform or focal...

  19. Molecular cloning and genomic organization of an allatostatin preprohormone from Drosophila melanogaster

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lenz, C; Williamson, M; Grimmelikhuijzen, C J

    2000-01-01

    insect allatostatins. This resulted in alignment with a DNA sequence coding for some Drosophila allatostatins (drostatins). Using PCR with oligonucleotide primers directed against the presumed exons of this Drosophila allatostatin gene and subsequent 3'- and 5'-RACE, we were able to clone its c....... Drostatins-1 and -4 are novel members of the insect allatostatin neuropeptide family. The Drosophila allatostatin preprohormone gene contains two introns and three exons. The gene is located on the right arm of the third chromosome, position 96A-B. The existence of at least four different Drosophila...

  20. Purification and cloning of the two domain glyoxalase I from wheat bran

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, K.S.; Svendsen, I.; Rasmussen, S.K.

    2000-01-01

    U/mg protein (1U = 1 mu mol S-lactoyl glutathione formed/min). Degenerate primers were designed and used for PCR-RACE-based cloning of the corresponding composite cDNA sequence (AJ243528). The wheat bran glyoxalase I amino acid sequence is very similar to the translated sequence of a RNA transcript...... induced by desiccation of the resurrection grass Sporobulus stapfianus, suggesting a role for glyoxalase in de- or rehydration of plant tissue. The 37 kDa wheat enzyme belongs to a group of monomeric glyoxalases and is composed of two similar halves each representing the full-length human glyoxalase I...

  1. Complete Genomes of Classical Swine Fever Virus Cloned into Bacterial Artificial Chromosomes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Thomas Bruun; Reimann, I.; Uttenthal, Åse

    Complete genome amplification of viral RNA provides a new tool for the generation of modified pestiviruses. We have used our full-genome amplification strategy for generation of amplicons representing complete genomes of classical swine fever virus. The amplicons were cloned directly into a stabl...... single-copy bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) generating full-length pestivirus DNAs from which infectious RNA transcripts could be also derived. Our strategy allows construction of stable infectious BAC DNAs from a single full-length PCR product....

  2. [Cloning and analyzing of the cDNA sequence of CHS-A gene of Narcissus].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yin Yi; Shen, Ming Shan; Chen, Liang; Li, Peng; Chen, Mu Zhuan

    2002-09-01

    Chalcone synthase (CHS) is a key enzyme in the biosynthesis of all classes of flavonoids. The production of flower pigment is specifically regulated by the activity of CHS. We cloned the cDNA sequence of CHS-A gene from Narcissus by PCR and analyzed the coding sequence of gene. The result demonstrated that the sequence of the coding region was 1167bp, encoding a protein of 389 amino acid which was more than 80% homology with CHS of the other 8 plants, such as Nicotine abacus and Solana tuberosum.

  3. Real-time PCR in Food Science: PCR Diagnostics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Lazaro, David; Cook, Nigel; Hernandez, Marta

    2013-01-01

    A principal consumer demand is a guarantee of the safety and quality of food. The presence of foodborne pathogens and their potential hazard, the use of genetically modified organisms (GMOs) in food production, and the correct labelling in foods suitable for vegetarians are among the subjects where society demands total transparency. The application of controls within the quality assessment programmes of the food industry is a way to satisfy these demands, and is necessary to ensure efficient analytical methodologies are possessed and correctly applied by the Food Sector. The use of real-time PCR has become a promising alternative approach in food diagnostics. It possesses a number of advantages over conventional culturing approaches, including rapidity, excellent analytical sensitivity and selectivity, and potential for quantification. However, the use of expensive equipment and reagents, the need for qualified personnel, and the lack of standardized protocols are impairing its practical implementation for food monitoring and control.

  4. Multiplex real-time PCR (MRT-PCR) for diarrheagenic.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barletta, Francesca; Ochoa, Theresa J; Cleary, Thomas G

    2013-01-01

    Diarrheagenic Escherichia coli strains are important causes of diarrhea in children from the developing world and are now being recognized as emerging enteropathogens in the developed world. Current methods of detection are too expensive and labor-intensive for routine detection of these organisms to be practical. We developed a real-time fluorescence-based multiplex PCR for the detection of all six of the currently recognized classes of diarrheagenic E. coli. The primers were designed to specifically amplify eight different virulence genes in the same reaction: aggR for enteroaggregative E. coli (EAEC), stIa/stIb and lt for enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), eaeA for enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), stx1 and stx2 for Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC), ipaH for enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), and daaD for diffusely adherent E. coli (DAEC).

  5. Identification and molecular epidemiology of dermatophyte isolates by repetitive-sequence-PCR-based DNA fingerprinting using the DiversiLab system in Turkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koc, A Nedret; Atalay, Mustafa A; Inci, Melek; Sariguzel, Fatma M; Sav, Hafize

    2017-05-01

    Dermatophyte species, isolation and identification in clinical samples are still difficult and take a long time. The identification and molecular epidemiology of dermatophytes commonly isolated in a clinical laboratory in Turkey by repetitive sequence-based PCR (rep-PCR) were assessed by comparing the results with those of reference identification. A total of 44 dermatophytes isolated from various clinical specimens of 20 patients with superficial mycoses in Kayseri and 24 patients in Hatay were studied. The identification of dermatophyte isolates was based on the reference identification and rep-PCR using the DiversiLab System (BioMerieux). The genotyping of dermatophyte isolates from different patients was determined by rep-PCR. In the identification of dermatophyte isolates, agreement between rep-PCR and conventional methods was 87.8 % ( 36 of 41). The dermatophyte strains belonged to four clones (A -D) which were determined by the use of rep-PCR. The dermatophyte strains in Clone B, D showed identical patterns with respect to the region. In conclusion, rep-PCR appears to be useful for evaluation of the identification and clonal relationships between Trichophyton rubrum species complex and Trichophyton mentagrophytes species complex isolates. The similarity and diversity of these isolates may be assessed according to different regions by rep-PCR. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  6. Cloning and Expression Characteristics of the Pig Stra8 Gene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Wang

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Stra8 (Stimulated by Retinoic Acid 8 is considered a meiotic gatekeeper gene. Using reverse transcriptase PCR and rapid amplification of cDNA ends (RACE, the complete sequence of the pig Stra8 gene was cloned. Bioinformatics analyses of this sequence were performed. Using semi-quantitative methods, the expression characteristics of Stra8 in Testis, cauda epididymis, body epididymis, caput epididymis, seminal vesicles, prostate gland, Cowper’s gland, heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, stomach, hypothalamus, pituitary gland, cerebrum, cerebellum, and hippocampus of adult Meishan boar and sow tissues were examined. The expression pattern in the testis of 2-, 30-, 60-, 90-, and 150-day old Meishan boars were analyzed using real-time PCR. We constructed a eukaryotic expression vector for the Stra8 gene and used it to transfect NIH-3T3 cells and third generation pig spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs cultured in vitro. Testes weight and sperm count in the cauda epididymis were evaluated at various time points. The results showed that the length of the pig Stra8 gene cDNA was 1444 bp encoding 366 amino acids with one typical helix-loop-helix (HLH domain. It is testes-specific expression. Expression was first detected in boar testis starting at day 2, and its expression significantly (p < 0.05 increased with age and body weight. When NIH-3T3 cells and pig SSCs were transfected with the eukaryotic expression vector EGFP (enhanced green fluorescent protein-N1-pStra8, it was expressed in the cytoplasm of NIH-3T3 cells. However, in SSCs, Stra8 was expressed predominantly in cytoplasm and few in nucleus. Our data suggest that perhaps Stra8 acts as a transcription factor to initiate meiosis in young boar.

  7. Performance of PCR-REBA assay for screening and identifying pathogens directly in whole blood of patients with suspected sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H-Y; Kim, J; Kim, S; Park, S D; Kim, H Y; Choi, H K; Uh, Y; Lee, H

    2015-11-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of a broad range of bacterial and fungal pathogens is the key to successful management of patients with bloodstream infections (BSIs). The aim of this study was to evaluate the diagnostic performance of PCR-REBA Sepsis-ID test for the detection of BSIs pathogens. EDTA anticoagulated blood for REBA Sepsis-ID assay and blood culture samples from 882 patients with suspected sepsis were simultaneously collected from January 2014 to December 2014. Of 115 patients with positive blood culture, 64 (55·7%) were Gram-positive bacteria, 35 (30·4%) were Gram-negative bacteria, 1 (0·9%) was Candida albicans and 15 (13·0%) were polymicrobial infections. The concordance rate of blood culture system and PCR-REBA Sepsis ID test was 83·0% (95% confidence interval (CI), 79·8-84·8, P detection (P = 0·002). The results of this study suggested that PCR-REBA may be helpful when added to blood culture in the diagnosis and management of sepsis. PCR-REBA Sepsis-ID test is a useful tool for the rapid identification of pathogenic isolates in whole blood to ensure adequate treatment for the causative agents of BSIs. Although the cost of molecular diagnostic assays is higher than the cost of conventional methods, clinical and economic cost-benefit analysis is still needed. PCR-REBA may provide essential information for accelerating therapeutic decisions to ensure effective treatment with antibiotics in the acute phase of pathogen infection. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  8. Cost-effective sequencing of full-length cDNA clones powered by a de novo-reference hybrid assembly.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroshu, Reginaldo M; Watanabe, Junichi; Sugano, Sumio; Morishita, Shinichi; Suzuki, Yutaka; Kasahara, Masahiro

    2010-05-07

    Sequencing full-length cDNA clones is important to determine gene structures including alternative splice forms, and provides valuable resources for experimental analyses to reveal the biological functions of coded proteins. However, previous approaches for sequencing cDNA clones were expensive or time-consuming, and therefore, a fast and efficient sequencing approach was demanded. We developed a program, MuSICA 2, that assembles millions of short (36-nucleotide) reads collected from a single flow cell lane of Illumina Genome Analyzer to shotgun-sequence approximately 800 human full-length cDNA clones. MuSICA 2 performs a hybrid assembly in which an external de novo assembler is run first and the result is then improved by reference alignment of shotgun reads. We compared the MuSICA 2 assembly with 200 pooled full-length cDNA clones finished independently by the conventional primer-walking using Sanger sequencers. The exon-intron structure of the coding sequence was correct for more than 95% of the clones with coding sequence annotation when we excluded cDNA clones insufficiently represented in the shotgun library due to PCR failure (42 out of 200 clones excluded), and the nucleotide-level accuracy of coding sequences of those correct clones was over 99.99%. We also applied MuSICA 2 to full-length cDNA clones from Toxoplasma gondii, to confirm that its ability was competent even for non-human species. The entire sequencing and shotgun assembly takes less than 1 week and the consumables cost only approximately US$3 per clone, demonstrating a significant advantage over previous approaches.

  9. Cost-Effective Sequencing of Full-Length cDNA Clones Powered by a De Novo-Reference Hybrid Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugano, Sumio; Morishita, Shinichi; Suzuki, Yutaka

    2010-01-01

    Background Sequencing full-length cDNA clones is important to determine gene structures including alternative splice forms, and provides valuable resources for experimental analyses to reveal the biological functions of coded proteins. However, previous approaches for sequencing cDNA clones were expensive or time-consuming, and therefore, a fast and efficient sequencing approach was demanded. Methodology We developed a program, MuSICA 2, that assembles millions of short (36-nucleotide) reads collected from a single flow cell lane of Illumina Genome Analyzer to shotgun-sequence ∼800 human full-length cDNA clones. MuSICA 2 performs a hybrid assembly in which an external de novo assembler is run first and the result is then improved by reference alignment of shotgun reads. We compared the MuSICA 2 assembly with 200 pooled full-length cDNA clones finished independently by the conventional primer-walking using Sanger sequencers. The exon-intron structure of the coding sequence was correct for more than 95% of the clones with coding sequence annotation when we excluded cDNA clones insufficiently represented in the shotgun library due to PCR failure (42 out of 200 clones excluded), and the nucleotide-level accuracy of coding sequences of those correct clones was over 99.99%. We also applied MuSICA 2 to full-length cDNA clones from Toxoplasma gondii, to confirm that its ability was competent even for non-human species. Conclusions The entire sequencing and shotgun assembly takes less than 1 week and the consumables cost only ∼US$3 per clone, demonstrating a significant advantage over previous approaches. PMID:20479877

  10. [Progress in digital PCR technology and application].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jiaqi; Su, Guocheng; Su, Wenjin; Zhou, Changyi

    2017-02-25

    Digital PCR is an emerging analysis technology for absolute quantification after realtime-PCR. Through digital PCR, single DNA molecules are distributed into isolated reactions, and the product with fluorescence signal can be detected and analyzed after amplification. With the advantages of higher sensitivity and accuracy, digital PCR, independent of a standard curve, is developing rapidly and applied widely to the next generation sequencing and detection fields, such as gene mutation, copy number variation, microorganism, and genetically modified food. In this article, we reviewed the quantitative method and research progress of digital PCR technology in the main application fields.

  11. 454 sequencing of pooled BAC clones on chromosome 3H of barley

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yamaji Nami

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Genome sequencing of barley has been delayed due to its large genome size (ca. 5,000Mbp. Among the fast sequencing systems, 454 liquid phase pyrosequencing provides the longest reads and is the most promising method for BAC clones. Here we report the results of pooled sequencing of BAC clones selected with ESTs genetically mapped to chromosome 3H. Results We sequenced pooled barley BAC clones using a 454 parallel genome sequencer. A PCR screening system based on primer sets derived from genetically mapped ESTs on chromosome 3H was used for clone selection in a BAC library developed from cultivar "Haruna Nijo". The DNA samples of 10 or 20 BAC clones were pooled and used for shotgun library development. The homology between contig sequences generated in each pooled library and mapped EST sequences was studied. The number of contigs assigned on chromosome 3H was 372. Their lengths ranged from 1,230 bp to 58,322 bp with an average 14,891 bp. Of these contigs, 240 showed homology and colinearity with the genome sequence of rice chromosome 1. A contig annotation browser supplemented with query search by unique sequence or genetic map position was developed. The identified contigs can be annotated with barley cDNAs and reference sequences on the browser. Homology analysis of these contigs with rice genes indicated that 1,239 rice genes can be assigned to barley contigs by the simple comparison of sequence lengths in both species. Of these genes, 492 are assigned to rice chromosome 1. Conclusions We demonstrate the efficiency of sequencing gene rich regions from barley chromosome 3H, with special reference to syntenic relationships with rice chromosome 1.

  12. Identification and characterization of a novel gene differentially expressed in zebrafish cross-subfamily cloned embryos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ya-Ping

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cross-species nuclear transfer has been shown to be a potent approach to retain the genetic viability of a certain species near extinction. However, most embryos produced by cross-species nuclear transfer were compromised because that they were unable to develop to later stages. Gene expression analysis of cross-species cloned embryos will yield new insights into the regulatory mechanisms involved in cross-species nuclear transfer and embryonic development. Results A novel gene, K31, was identified as an up-regulated gene in fish cross-subfamily cloned embryos using SSH approach and RACE method. K31 complete cDNA sequence is 1106 base pairs (bp in length, with a 342 bp open reading frame (ORF encoding a putative protein of 113 amino acids (aa. Comparative analysis revealed no homologous known gene in zebrafish and other species database. K31 protein contains a putative transmembrane helix and five putative phosphorylation sites but without a signal peptide. Expression pattern analysis by real time RT-PCR and whole-mount in situ hybridization (WISH shows that it has the characteristics of constitutively expressed gene. Sub-cellular localization assay shows that K31 protein can not penetrate the nuclei. Interestingly, over-expression of K31 gene can cause lethality in the epithelioma papulosum cyprinid (EPC cells in cell culture, which gave hint to the inefficient reprogramming events occurred in cloned embryos. Conclusion Taken together, our findings indicated that K31 gene is a novel gene differentially expressed in fish cross-subfamily cloned embryos and over-expression of K31 gene can cause lethality of cultured fish cells. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the determination of novel genes involved in nucleo-cytoplasmic interaction of fish cross-subfamily cloned embryos.

  13. Changes in the gut microbiota of cloned and non-cloned control pigs during development of obesity: gut microbiota during development of obesity in cloned pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Rebecca; Andersen, Anders Daniel; Mølbak, Lars

    2013-01-01

    suitable for a diet-intervention study. Cloning of pigs may be an attractive way to reduce genetic influences when investigating the effect of diet and obesity on different physiological sites. The aim of this study was to assess and compare the changes in the composition of the gut microbiota of cloned vs.......0001) and in non-cloned control pigs (r=0.9, Pcomposition or variability of the fecal microbiota between the cloned pigs or between cloned and non-cloned control......Background Obesity induced by a high-caloric diet has previously been associated with changes in the gut microbiota in mice and in humans. In this study, pigs were cloned to minimize genetic and biological variation among the animals with the aim of developing a controlled metabolomic model...

  14. Cloning and characterization of functional keratinassociated protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keratin-associated proteins (KAPs) 5-4 which belongs to keratin-associated protein (KRTAP) type 5 family has two major groups: high/ultrahigh cysteine (HS) and high glycine-tyrosine (HGT). Based on bioinformatic prediction, we experimentally cloned a fragment containingan open reading frame of 1849 bp from maize, ...

  15. Cloning and molecular characterization of glyceraldehyde-3 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-05-31

    May 31, 2010 ... gene encoding this enzyme has been cloned and charac- terized in several filamentous fungi such as Cryphonectria parasitica (Choi and Nuss, 1990), L. edodes (Hirano et al.,. 1999), M. circinelloides (Wolff and Arnau, 2002), Phaeo- sphaeria nodorum (Ueng et al., 2003), Pleurotus sajor- caju (Jeong et al., ...

  16. Information cloning of harmonic oscillator coherent states

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. We show that in the case of unknown harmonic oscillator coherent states it is possible to achieve what we call perfect information cloning. By this we mean that it is still possible to make arbitrary number of copies of a state which has exactly the same information content as the original unknown coherent state.

  17. Cloning, expression, purification and antigenic evaluation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Streptococcus pyogenes produce an extracellular hyaluronidase which is associated with the spread of the organism during infection. Enzyme hyaluronidase is capable of degrading hyaluronic acid. The aim of the present study was to clone and express antigenic regions of the hylA of S.pyogenes in Escherichia coli.

  18. Cloning and characterization of functional keratin- associated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-04-10

    Apr 10, 2012 ... Full Length Research Paper. Cloning and characterization of functional keratin- associated protein 5-4 gene in maize. Lin Yang, Feng-Ling Fu, Long-Qun Deng, Shu-Feng Zhou, Tai-Ming Yong and Wan-Chen Li*. Maize Research Institute, Sichuan Agricultural University, Chengdu, Sichuan 611130, P.R. ...

  19. No-cloning of quantum steering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Ching-Yi; Lambert, Neill; Liao, Teh-Lu; Nori, Franco; Li, Che-Ming

    2016-06-01

    Einstein-Podolsky-Rosen (EPR) steering allows two parties to verify their entanglement, even if one party’s measurements are untrusted. This concept has not only provided new insights into the nature of non-local spatial correlations in quantum mechanics, but also serves as a resource for one-sided device-independent quantum information tasks. Here, we investigate how EPR steering behaves when one-half of a maximally entangled pair of qudits (multidimensional quantum systems) is cloned by a universal cloning machine. We find that EPR steering, as verified by a criterion based on the mutual information between qudits, can only be found in one of the copy subsystems but not both. We prove that this is also true for the single-system analogue of EPR steering. We find that this restriction, which we term ‘no-cloning of quantum steering’, elucidates the physical reason why steering can be used to secure sources and channels against cloning-based attacks when implementing quantum communication and quantum computation protocols.

  20. Information cloning of harmonic oscillator coherent states

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    We show that in the case of unknown harmonic oscillator coherent statesit is possible to achieve what we call perfect information cloning. By this we mean that it is still possible to make arbitrary number of copies of a state which has exactly the same information content as the original unknown coherent state. By making use ...

  1. Cloning, expression, purification and antigenic evaluation of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-31

    Jan 31, 2012 ... Key word: Hyaluronidase gene, cloning, expression of recombinant gene, antigenic region. INTRODUCTION. Group A streptococcus (Streptococcus pyogenes) is an important species of gram-positive pathogenic extra- cellular bacteria. This bacteria can produce wide range of infectious diseases like ...

  2. Cloning and expression of Phanerochaete chrysosporium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Owner

    The Phanerochaete chrysosporium ME446 cbhI.2 cDNA was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli ... demonstrated that two types of mRNA are produced for ... and Technology, Manchester, UK. A 2000-fold-diluted antiserum was able to detect 10 pg of the synthetic CBH peptide. cbhI.2 gene. The sequence data for P.

  3. Metabolomic phenotyping of a cloned pig model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Morten Rahr; Christensen, Kirstine Lykke; Hedemann, Mette Skou

    2011-01-01

    Background Pigs are widely used as models for human physiological changes in intervention studies, because of the close resemblance between human and porcine physiology and the high degree of experimental control when using an animal model. Cloned animals have, in principle, identical genotypes...

  4. Differential gene expression profiling in aggressive bladder transitional cell carcinoma compared to the adjacent microscopically normal urothelium by microdissection-SMART cDNA PCR-SSH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, H T; Ma, F L; Ma, X B; Han, R F; Zhang, Y B; Chang, J W

    2006-01-01

    Identifying novel and known genes that are differentially expressed in aggressive bladder transitional cell carcinoma (BTCC) has important implications in understanding the biology of bladder tumorigenesis and developing new diagnostic and therapeutic agents. In this study we identified the differential gene expression profiles comparing tumor to the adjacent microscopically normal mucosa by manual microdissection on frozen sections. The RNAs extracted from microdissected tissues were amplified by SMART cDNA PCR technology to generate forward subtractive cDNA library by suppressive subtractive hybridization (SSH). We obtained 376 positive clones, one hundred clones of aggressive BTCC subtracted cDNA library were selected at random and inserts were reamplified by PCR. After differential screening by reverse dot blotting, 73 positive clones, that contend inserts putatively upregulated in aggressive BTCC, were further analysed by DNA sequencing, GenBank and EST database searching. Sequencing results showed that 66 clones stand for 23 known genes and 7 clones for three new EST (Genbank number: DN236875, DN236874 and DN236873). In conclusion, microdissection-SMART cDNA PCR-SSH allowed for an efficient way to identify aggressive BTCC-specific differential expressed genes that may potentially be involved in the carcinogenesis and/or progression of aggressive BTCC. These differentially expressed genes may be of potential utility as therapeutic and diagnostic targets for aggressive BTCC.

  5. Real-Time PCR (qPCR) Primer Design Using Free Online Software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Brenda; Basu, Chhandak

    2011-01-01

    Real-time PCR (quantitative PCR or qPCR) has become the preferred method for validating results obtained from assays which measure gene expression profiles. The process uses reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), coupled with fluorescent chemistry, to measure variations in transcriptome levels between samples. The four most…

  6. Molecular cloning and characterization of a threonine/serine protein kinase lvakt from Litopenaeus vannamei

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruan, Lingwei; Liu, Rongdiao; Xu, Xun; Shi, Hong

    2014-07-01

    The phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT pathway is involved in various cellular functions, including anti-apoptosis, protein synthesis, glucose metabolism and cell cycling. However, the role of the PI3K-AKT pathway in crustaceans remains unclear. In the present study, we cloned and characterized the AKT gene lvakt from Litopenaeus vannamei. The 511-residue LVAKT was highly conserved; contained a PH domain, a catalytic domain and a hydrophobic domain; and was highly expressed in the heart and gills of L. vannamei. We found, using Real-Time Quantitative PCR (Q-PCR) analysis, that lvakt was up-regulated during early white spot syndrome virus (WSSV) infection. Moreover, the PI3K-specific inhibitor, LY294002, reduced viral gene transcription, implying that the PI3K-AKT pathway might be hijacked by WSSV. Our results therefore suggest that LVAKT may play an important role in the shrimp immune response against WSSV.

  7. Characterization of infectious Murray Valley encephalitis virus derived from a stably cloned genome-length cDNA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurrelbrink, R J; Nestorowicz, A; McMinn, P C

    1999-12-01

    An infectious cDNA clone of Murray Valley encephalitis virus prototype strain 1-51 (MVE-1-51) was constructed by stably inserting genome-length cDNA into the low-copy-number plasmid vector pMC18. Designated pMVE-1-51, the clone consisted of genome-length cDNA of MVE-1-51 under the control of a T7 RNA polymerase promoter. The clone was constructed by using existing components of a cDNA library, in addition to cDNA of the 3' terminus derived by RT-PCR of poly(A)-tailed viral RNA. Upon comparison with other flavivirus sequences, the previously undetermined sequence of the 3' UTR was found to contain elements conserved throughout the genus FLAVIVIRUS: RNA transcribed from pMVE-1-51 and subsequently transfected into BHK-21 cells generated infectious virus. The plaque morphology, replication kinetics and antigenic profile of clone-derived virus (CDV-1-51) was similar to the parental virus in vitro. Furthermore, the virulence properties of CDV-1-51 and MVE-1-51 (LD(50) values and mortality profiles) were found to be identical in vivo in the mouse model. Through site-directed mutagenesis, the infectious clone should serve as a valuable tool for investigating the molecular determinants of virulence in MVE virus.

  8. PCR associated with hybridization with DNA radioactive probes for diagnosis of asymptomatic infection caused by Leishmania Chagasi; PCR associado a hibridizacao com sondas radioativas de DNA para a identificacao de infeccao subclinica causada por Leishmania Chagasi

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andrade, Antero Silva Ribeiro de [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil); Moreno, Elizabeth Castro [Fundacao Nacional de Saude, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Coordenacao Regional de Minas Gerais; Gomes, Rosangela Fatima; Melo, Maria Norma de; Carneiro, Mariangela [Minas Gerais Univ., Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Parasitologia; Fernandes, Octavio [Fundacao Inst. Oswaldo Cruz (FIOCRUZ), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil). Dept. de Medicina Tropical

    2002-07-01

    Detection systems for diagnosis of leishmaniasis based on PCR are very promising due to their sensitivity and specificity. Secondary detection by specific radioactive DNA probes, able to type the PCR amplified products, increase the specificity and raise about tem-fold the sensitivity of the assay. The aim of this work was evaluate PCR and hybridization as a tool to identify Leishmania (Leishmania) chagasi (the specie that cause the visceral leishmaniasis in Brazil) infection in asymptomatic persons living in a endemic area. Material and Methods: A group of 226 asymptomatic individuals, living in General Carneiro (MG), was selected. Blood samples were harvested and the DNA extracted from the mononucleate cells. PCR was performed using primers addressed to the kinetoplast DNA minicircles. This protocol gives a positive reaction for all Leishmania species. The amplified products were further hybridized with cloned L.chagasi minicircles labeled with {sup 32} P. Results: were identified 111 samples PCR positive, 2 of them hybridization negative and 133 samples hybridization positive, 24 of them PCR negative. The occurrence of samples with hybridization positive and PCR negative was expected since hybridization, with DNA probes labeled with {sup 32} P, increase the sensitivity of the assay. The samples that presented positive PCR and negative hybridization were probably due the presence of other Leishmania species, likely L. (V.) braziliensis (that produce tegumentary leishmaniasis in the region), since L. (L.) chagasi cloned minicircles were used as hybridization probe. We conclude that this procedure is a valuable tool to access subclinical L. (L.) chagasi infections in epidemiological studies. (author)

  9. Creation and validation of a ligation-independent cloning (LIC retroviral vector for stable gene transduction in mammalian cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Asmita

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cloning vectors capable of retroviral transduction have enabled stable gene overexpression in numerous mitotic cell lines. However, the relatively small number of feasible restriction enzyme sequences in their cloning sites can hinder successful generation of overexpression constructs if these sequences are also present in the target cDNA insert. Results Utilizing ligation-independent cloning (LIC technology, we have modified the highly efficient retroviral transduction vector, pBABE, to eliminate reliance on restriction enzymes for cloning. Instead, the modified plasmid, pBLIC, utilizes random 12/13-base overhangs generated by T4 DNA polymerase 3' exonuclease activity. PCR-based introduction of the complementary sequence into any cDNA of interest enables universal cloning into pBLIC. Here we describe creation of the pBLIC plasmid, and demonstrate successful cloning and protein overexpression from three different cDNAs, Bax, catalase, and p53 through transduction into the human prostate cancer cell line, LNCaP or the human lung cancer line, H358. Conclusions Our results show that pBLIC vector retains the high transduction efficiency of the original pBABE while eliminating the requirement for checking individual cDNA inserts for internal restriction sites. Thus it comprises an effective retroviral cloning system for laboratory-scale stable gene overexpression or for high-throughput applications such as creation of retroviral cDNA libraries. To our knowledge, pBLIC is the first LIC vector for retroviral transduction-mediated stable gene expression in mammalian cells.

  10. Influence of cloning by chromatin transfer on placental gene expression at Day 45 of pregnancy in cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesquita, Fernando S; Machado, Sergio A; Drnevich, Jenny; Borowicz, Pawel; Wang, Zhongde; Nowak, Romana A

    2013-01-30

    Poor success rates in somatic cell cloning are often attributed to abnormal early embryonic development as well as late abnormal fetal growth and placental development. Although promising results have been reported following chromatin transfer (CT), a novel cloning method that includes the remodeling of the donor nuclei in vitro prior to their transfer into enucleated oocytes, animals cloned by CT show placental abnormalities similar to those observed following conventional nuclear transfer. We hypothesized that the placental gene expression pattern from cloned fetuses was ontologically related to the frequently observed placental phenotype. The aim of the present study was to compare global gene expression by microarray analysis of Day 44-47 cattle placentas derived from CT cloned fetuses with those derived from in vitro fertilization (i.e. control), and confirm the altered mRNA and protein expression of selected molecules by qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. The differentially expressed genes identified in the present study are known to be involved in a range of activities associated with cell adhesion, cell cycle control, intracellular transport and proteolysis. Specifically, an imprinted gene, involved with cell proliferation and placentomegaly in humans (CDKN1C) and a peptidase that serves as a marker for non-invasive trophoblast cells in human placentas (DPP4), had mRNA and protein altered in CT placentas. It was concluded that the altered pattern of gene expression observed in CT samples may contribute to the abnormal placental development phenotypes commonly identified in cloned offspring, and that expression of imprinted as well as trophoblast invasiveness-related genes is altered in cattle cloned by CT. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Cloning and expression analysis of interferon regulatory factor 7 in the Pacific cod, Gadus macrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Hang; Jiang, Zhiqiang; Mao, Mingguang; Huo, Yuan; Han, Yuzhe; Zhang, Saisai

    2016-02-01

    Interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7) plays an important role in regulating the response of type I interferon (IFN) to viral infection. To understand the mechanisms underlying immune reactions in the Pacific cod, Gadus macrocephalus, the gene encoding G. macrocephalus IRF7 was cloned and characterized. The cDNA of G. macrocephalus IRF7 was also cloned and sequenced. A cDNA sequence of 2032 bp was assembled using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products. It contains an open reading frame of 1323 bp in length, which encoded a 440-amino acid polypeptide that comprised a DNA-binding domain (DBD), an IRF association domain (IAD), and a serine-rich domain (SRD). In the DBD, the tryptophan cluster consisted of only four tryptophans, which is a unique characteristic in fish IRF7. The mRNA of IRF7 was detected in various tissues, including in the spleen, thymus, kidney, intestine, and gills, using relative quantification PCR (R-qPCR). Dynamic expression of IRF7 was observed in larvae throughout post-hatching (ph) development, with the highest level detected at day of ph (dph) 25. Response to immune stimulation was examined by challenging larvae with polyriboinosinic polyribocytidylic acid (pIC) to mimic viral infection and elicit an immune reaction. R-qPCR revealed that the expression of IRF7 significantly increased in pIC-treated groups relative to that in the control groups, in a time-dependent manner, with peak responses at 48 and 72 h after pIC-treatment. These results show that IRF7 is expressed in various tissues of adult fish and larvae and is sensitive to viral infection, suggesting that it plays a role in antiviral immune defense in G. macrocephalus. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. A dual-site gateway cloning system for simultaneous cloning of two genes for plant transformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aboulela, Mostafa; Tanaka, Yuji; Nishimura, Kohji; Mano, Shoji; Kimura, Tetsuya; Nakagawa, Tsuyoshi

    2017-07-01

    Analyses of the subcellular localization of proteins and protein-protein interaction networks are essential to uncover the molecular basis of diverse biological processes in plants. To this end, we have created a Gateway cloning-compatible vector system, named dual-site (DS) Gateway cloning system to allow simple cloning of two expression cassettes in a binary vector and to express them simultaneously in plant cells. In the DS Gateway cloning system, (i) a moderate constitutive nopaline synthase promoter (Pnos), which is much suitable for localization analysis, is used to guide each expression cassette, (ii) four series of vectors with different plant resistance markers are established, (iii) N-terminal fusion with 6 fluorescent proteins and 7 epitope tags is available, (iv) both N- and C-terminal fusions with split enhanced yellow fluorescent protein (EYFP) are possible for efficient detection of protein-protein interactions using a bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) assay. The usefulness of the DS Gateway cloning system has been demonstrated by the analysis of the expression and the subcellular localization patterns of two Golgi proteins in stable expression system using A. thaliana, and by the analyses of interactions between subunits of coat protein complex II (COPII) both in transient and stable expression systems using Japanese leek and A. thaliana, respectively. The DS Gateway cloning system provides a multipurpose, efficient expression tool in gene function analyses and especially suitable for investigating interactions and subcellular localization of two proteins in living plant cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Design and Validation of Real-Time PCR: Quantitative Diagnosis of Common Leishmania Species in Iran.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fekri Soofi Abadi, Maryam; Dabiri, Shahriar; Fotouhi Ardakani, Reza; Fani Malaki, Lina; Amirpoor Rostami, Sahar; Ziasistani, Mahsa; Dabiri, Donya

    2016-07-01

    Design and validation of Real-time PCR on the protected gene region ITS2 to quantify the parasite load in common leishmania (L) species. Probe and primer were designed from the ITS2 region between the rRNA genes with minimum gene variation in three common leishmania species followed by a Real-time PCR using the Taq man probe method in the form of absolute quantification. A series of different concentrations of leishmania were analyzed. After the purified PCR product was successfully placed in a PTG19-T plasmid vector, specialized ITS2 region was cloned in this plasmid. In the last phase, the cloned gene was transferred to the Ecoli.Top10F bacteria. The standard plasmid was provided in 10(7) to 10(1) copies/rxn concentrations. The specification and clinical sensitivity of the data was analyzed using inter and intra scales. The probe and primer were designed using three species, including L. infantum, L. major, and L.tropica. Seven concentrations of purified parasite in culture media showed that the selected region for quantifying the parasite is suitable. Clinical and analytical specificity and sensitivity were both 100%, respectively. The Taq man method for the ITS2 region in leishmania is one the most sensitive diagnostic test for identifying the parasite load and is suggested as a tool for fast identification and quantification of species.

  14. Toxoplasma gondii sexual cross in a single naturally infected feline host: Generation of highly mouse-virulent and avirulent clones, genotypically different from clonal types I, II and III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herrmann Daland C

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Tachyzoite clones obtained from a single Toxoplasma gondii oocyst field sample were genotyped and characterized regarding mouse virulence. PCR-RFLP genotyping of tachyzoites initially isolated from interferon-γ-knockout (GKO mice, BALB/c mice and VERO cell culture using the nine independent, unlinked genetic markers nSAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, L358, PK1 and Apico revealed mixed T. gondii infections showing combinations of type II and type III alleles at different loci. Forty-five individual clones were obtained from all mixed T. gondii tachyzoite cell cultures by limiting dilution. Sixteen T. gondii clones showed type III alleles at all loci and 29 clones displayed a combination of type II and type III alleles at different loci. Five clone groups were identified in total, four of which include T. gondii clones that showed a non-canonical allele pattern and have never been described in natural infections before. All tested clones, except two, were highly virulent in BALB/c mice. The isolation of different non-canonical T. gondii clones originating from an oocyst sample of a single naturally infected cat demonstrate that sexual recombination as well as re-assortment of chromosomes via a sexual cross of T. gondii occur under natural conditions and result in the emergence of clones with increased virulence in mice.

  15. Cloning and expression of cry2Aa from native Bacillus thuringiensis strain SY49-1 and its insecticidal activity against Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yilmaz, Semih; Azizoglu, Ugur; Ayvaz, Abdurrahman; Temizgul, Ridvan; Atciyurt, Zehra Büşra; Karabörklü, Salih

    2017-04-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Berliner) (Bt) is well known for having toxicity against pest insects because of their ability to form endospores and broad-range activity of their parasporal inclusions. In this study, a new member of cry2A gene from previously characterized native B. thuringiensis SY49-1 strain was cloned, expressed and used for its activity against Culex pipiens (Diptera: Culicidae) larvae. The sequence analysis of the cloned cry2A gene revealed that it encodes a polypeptide of 633 aa residues with 99% identity to Cry2Aa protein with expected molecular weight of 70.7 kDa. Bacillus thuringiensis delta-endotoxin nomenclature committee designed our sequence as Cry2Aa18 being a new member of Bt toxins. Bioassays against last instar larvae of C. pipiens indicated that Cry2Aa18 has considerable toxicity with LC50 of 630 μg ml-1. In order to prevent the spread of infectious diseases mediated by C. pipiens, this newly characterized cry2Aa18 gene could constitute as an important biological control tool for controlling mosquito larvae living in freshwater systems and can be used as a good alternative for minimizing the use of chemicals. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Assessment of genetic diversity in different clones of Dalbergia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-07-13

    cluster II consisted maximum of twelve clones followed by cluster I (11 clones) and cluster VI (7 clones) whereas clusters. IV, VII and VIII consisted .... Bhatinda Branch Canal 70-71 L/S, Malerkotla, Sangrur, Punjab. 30° 12' N.

  17. Technological Literacy and Human Cloning. Resources in Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Steven L.

    2002-01-01

    Discusses how technology educators can deal with advances in human genetics, specifically, cloning. Includes a definition and history of cloning, discusses its benefits, and looks at social concerns and arguments for and against human cloning. Includes classroom activities and websites. (Contains 10 references.) (JOW)

  18. Distribution of quantum Fisher information in asymmetric cloning machines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Xing; Yao, Yao; Zhou, Lei-Ming; Wang, Xiaoguang

    2014-12-08

    An unknown quantum state cannot be copied and broadcast freely due to the no-cloning theorem. Approximate cloning schemes have been proposed to achieve the optimal cloning characterized by the maximal fidelity between the original and its copies. Here, from the perspective of quantum Fisher information (QFI), we investigate the distribution of QFI in asymmetric cloning machines which produce two nonidentical copies. As one might expect, improving the QFI of one copy results in decreasing the QFI of the other copy. It is perhaps also unsurprising that asymmetric phase-covariant cloning outperforms universal cloning in distributing QFI since a priori information of the input state has been utilized. However, interesting results appear when we compare the distributabilities of fidelity (which quantifies the full information of quantum states), and QFI (which only captures the information of relevant parameters) in asymmetric cloning machines. Unlike the results of fidelity, where the distributability of symmetric cloning is always optimal for any d-dimensional cloning, we find that any asymmetric cloning outperforms symmetric cloning on the distribution of QFI for d ≤ 18, whereas some but not all asymmetric cloning strategies could be worse than symmetric ones when d > 18.

  19. A Gateway MultiSite recombination cloning toolkit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lena K Petersen

    Full Text Available The generation of DNA constructs is often a rate-limiting step in conducting biological experiments. Recombination cloning of single DNA fragments using the Gateway system provided an advance over traditional restriction enzyme cloning due to increases in efficiency and reliability. Here we introduce a series of entry clones and a destination vector for use in two, three, and four fragment Gateway MultiSite recombination cloning whose advantages include increased flexibility and versatility. In contrast to Gateway single-fragment cloning approaches where variations are typically incorporated into model system-specific destination vectors, our Gateway MultiSite cloning strategy incorporates variations in easily generated entry clones that are model system-independent. In particular, we present entry clones containing insertions of GAL4, QF, UAS, QUAS, eGFP, and mCherry, among others, and demonstrate their in vivo functionality in Drosophila by using them to generate expression clones including GAL4 and QF drivers for various trp ion channel family members, UAS and QUAS excitatory and inhibitory light-gated ion channels, and QUAS red and green fluorescent synaptic vesicle markers. We thus establish a starter toolkit of modular Gateway MultiSite entry clones potentially adaptable to any model system. An inventory of entry clones and destination vectors for Gateway MultiSite cloning has also been established (www.gatewaymultisite.org.

  20. Early selection of Eucalyptus clones in retrospective nursery test ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Within the framework of the eucalyptus breeding programme in the Congo, two retrospective tests were conducted using mature clones in the field and young cuttings under nursery conditions with two hybrids: 13 clones of Eucalyptus tereticornis* Eucalyptus grandis for the test TC 82-1B and 17 clones of Eucalyptus ...