WorldWideScience

Sample records for broad-band noise characteristics

  1. Broad-band Gausssian noise is most effective in improving motor performance and is most pleasant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos eTrenado

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Modern attempts to improve human performance focus on stochastic resonance (SR. SR is a phenomenon in nonlinear systems characterized by a response increase of the system induced by a particular level of input noise. Recently, we reported that an optimum level of 0-15 Hz Gaussian noise applied to the human index finger improved static isometric force compensation. A possible explanation was a better sensorimotor integration caused by increase in sensitivity of peripheral receptors and/or of internal SR. The present study in 10 subjects compares SR effects in the performance of the same motor task and on pleasantness, by applying three Gaussian noises chosen on the sensitivity of the fingertip receptors (0-15 Hz mostly for Merkel receptors, 250-300 Hz for Pacini corpuscules and 0-300 Hz for all. We document that only the 0-300 Hz noise induced SR effect during the transitory phase of the task. In contrast, the motor performance was improved during the stationary phase for all three noise frequency bandwidths. This improvement was stronger for 0-300 Hz and 250-300 Hz than for 0-15 Hz noise. Further, we found higher degree of pleasantness for 0-300 Hz and 250-300 Hz noise bandwidths than for 0-15 Hz. Thus, we show that the most appropriate Gaussian noise that could be used in haptic gloves is the 0-300 Hz, as it improved motor performance during both stationary and transitory phases. In addition, this noise had the highest degree of pleasantness and thus reveals that the glabrous skin can also forward pleasant sensations. These new findings provide worthy information for neurorehabilitation.

  2. Background Noise of the Aldeia da Serra Region (Portugal) from a temporary broad band network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wachilala, Piedade; Borges, José; Caldeira, Bento; Bezzeghoud, Mourad

    2017-04-01

    In this study, we analyse seismic background noise to assess the effect of noise based on the detectability of a temporary network constituted by DOCTAR (Deep Ocean Test Array), who have been deployed in a period between 2011 and 2012 in Portugal mainland, and the Évora permanent seismic station. This network is constituted by 14 digital broadband stations (14 CMG-3ESP and one STS2 sensors) with a flat response between the 60 sec to 50 Hz, 24-bit and 120s to 60Hz respectively. The temporary network was operated in continuous recording mode (three-components) in a region located in the north of the region of Évora, within a radius of about 30 km around the village of Aldeia da Serra, region in which there is an important seismic activity in the context of Portugal mainland. We calculated power spectral densities of background noise for each station/component and compare them with high-noise model and low-noise model of Peterson (1993). We consider different for day and night local and for different periods of the year. Power spectral density estimates show moderate noise levels with all stations falling within the high and low bounds of Peterson (1993). Considering the results of the noise, we estimate the detection limit of each station and consequently the detectability of the network. From this information and taking in attention the events recorded during the period of DOCTAR operation we analyse the improvement promoted by this temporary network regarding the existent seismic networks to the local seismicity study. This work was partially supported by COMPETE 2020 program (POCI-01-0145-FEDER-007690 project). We acknowledge GFZ Potsdam for providing part of the data used in this study.

  3. Broad Band Data and Noise Observed with Surface Station and Borehole Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunc, Suleyman; Ozel, Oguz; Safa Arslan, Mehmet; Behiye Akşahin, Bengi; Hatipoglu, Mustafa; Cagin Yalcintepe, Ragip; Ada, Samim; Meral Ozel, Nurcan

    2016-04-01

    Marmara region tectonically is very active and many destructive earthquakes happened in the past. North Anatolian Fault Zone crosses the Marmara region and it has three branches. The northern branch passes through Marmara Sea and expected future large earthquake will happen along this fault zone. There is a gap in seismic network in the Marmara region at offshore and onshore areas. We have started broadband borehole seismographic observations to obtain the detailed information about fault geometry and its stick-slip behavior beneath the western Marmara Sea, as a part of the MARsite collaborative Project, namely "New Directions in Seismic Hazard Assessment through Focused Earth Observation in the Marmara Supersite-MARsite". The target area western Marmara of Turkey. In the beginning of the project, we installed eight Broadband surface station around Marmara Sea in April 2014. Then, we added broadband sensor and broadband surface sensor at the same location in November 2014. In this study, we developed a Matlab application to calculate Power Spectral Density against the New Low Noise Model (NLNM) and New High Noise Model (NHNM) determined for one-hour segments of the data. Also we compared ambient noise of broadband borehole sensor and surface broadband sensor.

  4. A Mixed-Methods Trial of Broad Band Noise and Nature Sounds for Tinnitus Therapy: Group and Individual Responses Modeled under the Adaptation Level Theory of Tinnitus

    OpenAIRE

    Durai, Mithila; Searchfield, Grant D.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: A randomized cross-over trial in 18 participants tested the hypothesis that nature sounds, with unpredictable temporal characteristics and high valence would yield greater improvement in tinnitus than constant, emotionally neutral broadband noise. Study Design: The primary outcome measure was the Tinnitus Functional Index (TFI). Secondary measures were: loudness and annoyance ratings, loudness level matches, minimum masking levels, positive and negative emotionality, attention ...

  5. A Mixed-Methods Trial of Broad Band Noise and Nature Sounds for Tinnitus Therapy: Group and Individual Responses Modeled under the Adaptation Level Theory of Tinnitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durai, Mithila; Searchfield, Grant D

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: A randomized cross-over trial in 18 participants tested the hypothesis that nature sounds, with unpredictable temporal characteristics and high valence would yield greater improvement in tinnitus than constant, emotionally neutral broadband noise. Study Design: The primary outcome measure was the Tinnitus Functional Index (TFI). Secondary measures were: loudness and annoyance ratings, loudness level matches, minimum masking levels, positive and negative emotionality, attention reaction and discrimination time, anxiety, depression and stress. Each sound was administered using MP3 players with earbuds for 8 continuous weeks, with a 3 week wash-out period before crossing over to the other treatment sound. Measurements were undertaken for each arm at sound fitting, 4 and 8 weeks after administration. Qualitative interviews were conducted at each of these appointments. Results: From a baseline TFI score of 41.3, sound therapy resulted in TFI scores at 8 weeks of 35.6; broadband noise resulted in significantly greater reduction (8.2 points) after 8 weeks of sound therapy use than nature sounds (3.2 points). The positive effect of sound on tinnitus was supported by secondary outcome measures of tinnitus, emotion, attention, and psychological state, but not interviews. Tinnitus loudness level match was higher for BBN at 8 weeks; while there was little change in loudness level matches for nature sounds. There was no change in minimum masking levels following sound therapy administration. Self-reported preference for one sound over another did not correlate with changes in tinnitus. Conclusions: Modeled under an adaptation level theory framework of tinnitus perception, the results indicate that the introduction of broadband noise shifts internal adaptation level weighting away from the tinnitus signal, reducing tinnitus magnitude. Nature sounds may modify the affective components of tinnitus via a secondary, residual pathway, but this appears to be less important

  6. A Mixed-Methods Trial of Broad Band Noise and Nature Sounds for Tinnitus Therapy: Group and Individual Responses Modeled under the Adaptation Level Theory of Tinnitus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Durai, Mithila; Searchfield, Grant D.

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: A randomized cross-over trial in 18 participants tested the hypothesis that nature sounds, with unpredictable temporal characteristics and high valence would yield greater improvement in tinnitus than constant, emotionally neutral broadband noise. Study Design: The primary outcome measure was the Tinnitus Functional Index (TFI). Secondary measures were: loudness and annoyance ratings, loudness level matches, minimum masking levels, positive and negative emotionality, attention reaction and discrimination time, anxiety, depression and stress. Each sound was administered using MP3 players with earbuds for 8 continuous weeks, with a 3 week wash-out period before crossing over to the other treatment sound. Measurements were undertaken for each arm at sound fitting, 4 and 8 weeks after administration. Qualitative interviews were conducted at each of these appointments. Results: From a baseline TFI score of 41.3, sound therapy resulted in TFI scores at 8 weeks of 35.6; broadband noise resulted in significantly greater reduction (8.2 points) after 8 weeks of sound therapy use than nature sounds (3.2 points). The positive effect of sound on tinnitus was supported by secondary outcome measures of tinnitus, emotion, attention, and psychological state, but not interviews. Tinnitus loudness level match was higher for BBN at 8 weeks; while there was little change in loudness level matches for nature sounds. There was no change in minimum masking levels following sound therapy administration. Self-reported preference for one sound over another did not correlate with changes in tinnitus. Conclusions: Modeled under an adaptation level theory framework of tinnitus perception, the results indicate that the introduction of broadband noise shifts internal adaptation level weighting away from the tinnitus signal, reducing tinnitus magnitude. Nature sounds may modify the affective components of tinnitus via a secondary, residual pathway, but this appears to be less important

  7. Broad-band semiconductor optical amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding Ying [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)]. E-mail: yingding@red.semi.ac.cn; Kan Qiang [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang Junling [Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Pan Jiaoqing [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhou Fan [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Chen Weixi [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang Wei [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2007-01-15

    Broad-band semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) with different thicknesses and thin bulk tensile-strained active layers were fabricated and studied. Amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) spectra and gain spectra of SOAs were measured and analyzed at different CW biases. A maximal 3 dB ASE bandwidth of 136 nm ranging from 1480 to 1616 nm, and a 3 dB optical amplifier gain bandwidth of about 90 nm ranging from 1510 to 1600 nm, were obtained for the very thin bulk active SOA. Other SOAs characteristics such as saturation output power and polarization sensitivity were measured and compared.

  8. Runs 800, 813, 842 and physics runs from 18.1.77 to 21.5.77, Development of a new set-up for working line measurements including a Fast Fourier Transform Spectrum Analyser and using weak beam excitiation with broad-band noise

    CERN Document Server

    Borer, J

    1977-01-01

    Runs 800, 813, 842 and physics runs from 18.1.77 to 21.5.77, Development of a new set-up for working line measurements including a Fast Fourier Transform Spectrum Analyser and using weak beam excitiation with broad-band noise

  9. Broad-Band Analysis of Polar Motion Excitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, J.

    2016-12-01

    Earth rotational changes, i.e. polar motion and length-of-day (LOD), are driven by two types of geophysical excitations: 1) mass redistribution within the Earth system, and 2) angular momentum exchange between the solid Earth (more precisely the crust) and other components of the Earth system. Accurate quantification of Earth rotational excitations has been difficult, due to the lack of global-scale observations of mass redistribution and angular momentum exchange. The over 14-years time-variable gravity measurements from the Gravity Recovery and Climate Experiment (GRACE) have provided a unique means for quantifying Earth rotational excitations from mass redistribution in different components of the climate system. Comparisons between observed Earth rotational changes and geophysical excitations estimated from GRACE, satellite laser ranging (SLR) and climate models show that GRACE-derived excitations agree remarkably well with polar motion observations over a broad-band of frequencies. GRACE estimates also suggest that accelerated polar region ice melting in recent years and corresponding sea level rise have played an important role in driving long-term polar motion as well. With several estimates of polar motion excitations, it is possible to estimate broad-band noise variance and noise power spectra in each, given reasonable assumptions about noise independence. Results based on GRACE CSR RL05 solutions clearly outperform other estimates with the lowest noise levels over a broad band of frequencies.

  10. Design of Metamaterial Surfaces with Broad-band Absorbance

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Chihhui; Shvets, Gennady

    2011-01-01

    A simple design paradigm for making broad-band ultra-thin plasmonic absorbers is introduced. The absorber's unit cell is composed of sub-units of various sizes, resulting in nearly 100% absorbance at multiple adjacent frequencies and high absorbance over a broad frequency range. A simple theoretical model for designing broad-band absorbers is presented. It uses a single-resonance model to describe the optical response of each sub-unit and employs the series circuit model to predict the overal...

  11. Broad-band spectrophotometry of HAT-P-32 b

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mallonn, M.; Bernt, I.; Herrero, E.

    2016-01-01

    Multicolour broad-band transit observations offer the opportunity to characterize the atmosphere of an extrasolar planet with small- to medium-sized telescopes. One of the most favourable targets is the hot Jupiter HAT-P-32 b. We combined 21 new transit observations of this planet with 36 previou...

  12. Broad-band spectrophotometry of HAT-P-32 b

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mallonn, M.; Bernt, I.; Herrero, E.

    2016-01-01

    Multicolour broad-band transit observations offer the opportunity to characterize the atmosphere of an extrasolar planet with small- to medium-sized telescopes. One of the most favourable targets is the hot Jupiter HAT-P-32 b. We combined 21 new transit observations of this planet with 36...

  13. Broad-band hard X-ray reflectors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Joensen, K.D.; Gorenstein, P.; Hoghoj, P.

    1997-01-01

    Interest in optics for hard X-ray broad-band application is growing. In this paper, we compare the hard X-ray (20-100 keV) reflectivity obtained with an energy-dispersive reflectometer, of a standard commercial gold thin-film with that of a 600 bilayer W/Si X-ray supermirror. The reflectivity...... that of the gold, Various other design options are discussed, and we conclude that continued interest in the X-ray supermirror for broad-band hard X-ray applications is warranted....... of the multilayer is found to agree extraordinarily well with theory (assuming an interface roughness of 4.5 Angstrom), while the agreement for the gold film is less, The overall performance of the supermirror is superior to that of gold, extending the band of reflection at least a factor of 2.8 beyond...

  14. Fatigue failure of materials under broad band random vibrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, T. C.; Lanz, R. W.

    1971-01-01

    The fatigue life of material under multifactor influence of broad band random excitations has been investigated. Parameters which affect the fatigue life are postulated to be peak stress, variance of stress and the natural frequency of the system. Experimental data were processed by the hybrid computer. Based on the experimental results and regression analysis a best predicting model has been found. All values of the experimental fatigue lives are within the 95% confidence intervals of the predicting equation.

  15. A comparison between two permanent broad band ocean bottom seismometers in the western Mediterranean Sea

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frontera, T.; Deschamps, A.; Ugalde, A.; Jara, J. A.; Hello, Y.; Goula, X.; Olivera, C.

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this work is to compare two permanent broad band ocean bottom seismometers (OBS) in terms of noise conditions by taking to account their similar instrumentation types, but their very different site characteristics. Both OBS stations have Güralp CMG-3T three component broad band sensors and differential pressure gauges (DPG). The first sensor operates since August 2005 under the framework of a research project that aims to improve the knowledge of the seismicity and seismic risk in the Tarragona region (north eastern Spain). This pioneering project in Spain is being carried out by the Institut Geològic de Catalunya (IGC) and the Observatori de l'Ebre, in collaboration with the Spanish oil company Repsol Investigaciones Petrolíferas, and is being financed by the Ministerio de Educación y Ciencia (CASABLANCA REN2003-06577), FEDER funding, the IGC and the Institut Cartogràfic de Catalunya. The OBS is installed inside the security perimeter of the Casablanca oil platform, which is located 40 km offshore Tarragona. The sensors are submerged at about 400 m to the SW of the oil platform at about 150 m in depth. Data are digitized on-site and are transmitted through a submarine cable to the platform, where they are recorded. In July 2007 some improvements were made: i) the OBS was completely buried and the DPG was moved about 10 m away from the OBS; and ii) via satellite signal transmission was implemented, which allowed to have continuous and real time data in Barcelona so that the OBS could be integrated into the Catalan Seismic Network. The second seismometer operates in the frame of the Antares neutrino telescope project developed in Liguria Sea. Geoazur is carrying out the project of deployment of a broad band seismological instrument in the aim of developing the permanent sea floor observation knowledge necessary to characterize Ligurian Sea seismicity and seismic risk along French Riviera coast (SE France). The operation was facilitated by the

  16. An extremely broad band metamaterial absorber based on destructive interference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jingbo; Liu, Lingyun; Dong, Guoyan; Zhou, Ji

    2011-10-24

    We propose a design of an extremely broad frequency band absorber based on destructive interference mechanism. Metamaterial of multilayered SRRs structure is used to realize a desirable refractive index dispersion spectrum, which can induce a successive anti-reflection in a wide frequency range. The corresponding high absorptance originates from the destructive interference of two reflection waves from the two surfaces of the metamaterial. A strongly absorptive bandwidth of almost 60 GHz is demonstrated in the range of 0 to 70 GHz numerically. This design provides an effective and feasible way to construct broad band absorber in stealth technology, as well as the enhanced transmittance devices. © 2011 Optical Society of America

  17. Broad band spectral analysis of 24 h continuous finger blood pressure: Comparison with intra-arterial recordings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Castiglioni, P.; Parati, G.; Omboni, S.; Mancia, G.; Imholz, B.P.M.; Wesseling, K.H.; Rienzo, M. di

    1999-01-01

    The present study compares the spectral characteristics of 24-h blood pressure variability estimated invasively at the brachial artery level with those estimated by measurement of blood pressure at the finger artery using the non-invasive Portapres device. Broad-band spectra (from 3 x

  18. Broad-band near-field ground motion simulations in 3-dimensional scattering media

    KAUST Repository

    Imperatori, W.

    2012-12-06

    The heterogeneous nature of Earth\\'s crust is manifested in the scattering of propagating seismic waves. In recent years, different techniques have been developed to include such phenomenon in broad-band ground-motion calculations, either considering scattering as a semi-stochastic or purely stochastic process. In this study, we simulate broad-band (0–10 Hz) ground motions with a 3-D finite-difference wave propagation solver using several 3-D media characterized by von Karman correlation functions with different correlation lengths and standard deviation values. Our goal is to investigate scattering characteristics and its influence on the seismic wavefield at short and intermediate distances from the source in terms of ground motion parameters. We also examine scattering phenomena, related to the loss of radiation pattern and the directivity breakdown. We first simulate broad-band ground motions for a point-source characterized by a classic ω2 spectrum model. Fault finiteness is then introduced by means of a Haskell-type source model presenting both subshear and super-shear rupture speed. Results indicate that scattering plays an important role in ground motion even at short distances from the source, where source effects are thought to be dominating. In particular, peak ground motion parameters can be affected even at relatively low frequencies, implying that earthquake ground-motion simulations should include scattering also for peak ground velocity (PGV) calculations. At the same time, we find a gradual loss of the source signature in the 2–5 Hz frequency range, together with a distortion of the Mach cones in case of super-shear rupture. For more complex source models and truly heterogeneous Earth, these effects may occur even at lower frequencies. Our simulations suggests that von Karman correlation functions with correlation length between several hundred metres and few kilometres, Hurst exponent around 0.3 and standard deviation in the 5–10 per cent

  19. High sensitivity ultra-broad-band absorption spectroscopy applied to inductively-coupled plasmas in Cl/O

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foucher, Mickaël; Carbone, Emile; Booth, Jean-Paul; Chabert, Pascal; LPP-Plasmas froids Team

    2014-10-01

    Broad-band absorption spectroscopy is a powerful diagnostic for reactive plasmas, allowing measurement of the absolute densities of numerous atoms, molecules and free radicals in ground and various excited states. Previously Xe arc lamps have been used as the continuum light source, but these suffer from spatiotemporal fluctuations which limit the sensitivity to about 10-3 in absorption. More recently UV light-emitting diodes have been used, but these only emit over a very limited spectral range. Our new absorption spectroscopy setup uses a laser-driven plasma light source, achromatic optics and an aberration free spectrograph. This light source has ideal characteristics for absorption spectroscopy (high intensity, stability and a wide spectral range (200--1000 nm)), overcoming previous limitations. Noise levels as low as 10-5 can be achieved in single-pass absorption, covering up to 250 nm in a single spectrum. Measurements were made in a 13.56 MHz inductively-coupled plasma reactor in O, Cl and Cl/O mixtures. We observed absorption by Cl, O and ClxOy molecules, and excited state atoms. Whereas the Clvibrational distribution is close to equilibrium with the gas translational temperature, Omolecules show high vibrational excitation (up to v = 18, Tvib12,000 K). However, high resolution spectra of O indicated rotational temperatures up to only 500 K. Many oxychloride molecules were detected in Cl/O mixtures.

  20. Characteristics of the snoring noise in patients with and without occlusive sleep apnea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Padilla, J R; Slawinski, E; Difrancesco, L M; Feige, R R; Remmers, J E; Whitelaw, W A

    1993-03-01

    We analyzed snoring noise from 10 nonapneic heavy snorers and nine patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Sound was recorded simultaneously through two microphones, one attached to the manubrium sterni and one suspended in the air 15 cm from the patient's head. Signals were stored on magnetic tape, digitized, and displayed in the time and frequency domains. Most of the power of snoring noise was below 2,000 Hz, and the peak power was usually below 500 Hz. When snores were generated during nose-only breathing (nasal snores), the sound spectrum was made up of a series of discrete, sharp peaks, with a fundamental note and harmonics similar to the spectrum of voiced sounds. When snores were generated during breathing through nose and mouth (oronasal snores), the spectra showed a mixture of sharp peaks and broad-band white noise. Patients with apnea showed a sequence of snores with spectral characteristics that varied markedly through an apnea-respiration cycle. The first postapneic snore consisted mainly of broad-band white noise with relatively more power at higher frequencies, so that the ratio of power above 800 Hz to power below 800 Hz could be used to separate snorers from patients with OSA. Other breaths in the cycle resembled oronasal or nasal snores in nonapneic subjects. Characteristics of the noise give information about the possible mechanism of sound generation and thus about the behavior of the pharynx during snoring. Quality of snoring sound may help to separate patients with obstructive apnea from those with simple snoring.

  1. Broad-band time-resolved near infrared spectroscopy in the TJ-II stellarator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, M.C.; Pastor, I.; Cal, E. de la; McCarthy, K.J. [Laboratorio Nacional de Fusion, CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain); Diaz, D. [Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, Dept Quimica Fisica Aplicada, Madrid (Spain)

    2014-11-15

    First experimental results on broad-band, time-resolved Near Infrared (NIR;here loosely defined as covering from 750 to 1650 nm) passive spectroscopy using a high sensitivity InGaAs detector are reported for the TJ-II Stellarator. Experimental set-up is described together with its main characteristics, the most remarkable ones being its enhanced NIR response, broadband spectrum acquisition in a single shot, and time-resolved measurements with up to 1.8 kHz spectral rate. Prospects for future work and more extended physics studies in this newly open spectral region in TJ-II are discussed. (copyright 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Broad-band polarization-independent metamaterial absorber for solar energy harvesting applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bağmancı, Mehmet; Karaaslan, Muharrem; Ünal, Emin; Akgol, Oguzhan; Karadağ, Faruk; Sabah, Cumali

    2017-06-01

    A novel broad-band polarization-independent with wide-angle metamaterial absorber(MA) is investigated and demonstrated for solar energy harvesting applications. The proposed MA is composed of two metal layers which have different thickness and a dielectric layer which is sandwiched between these metal layers. By this combination, the proposed MA indicates plasmonic resonance characteristic. Numeric results show that proposed MA has perfect absorption characteristic which is above 88.28% with wide-angle for all visible region. It shows almost perfect absorption of 98.4% at the resonance frequency of 621.76 THz and has also 90% absorption between frequencies of 445 THz and 770 THz which is nearly all visible light region. Besides, numerical results validate that the proposed MA could achieve very high absorption at wide-angles of incidence for both transverse electric (TE) and transverse magnetic (TM) waves.. The proposed MA and its variations enable for solar cell applications due to have upper ratio of 90% in the widest range of visible spectrum comparing to the studies in literature. In order to show additional features of the proposed structure, parametric studies are realized and discussed. Furthermore, the absorption characteristic of proposed MA is investigated for infrared and ultraviolet region. The enhancement of absorption of the structure will provide new type of sensors in these frequency ranges.

  3. System Realization of Broad Band Digital Beam Forming for Digital Array Radar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Feng

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Broad band Digital Beam Forming (DBF is the key technique for the realization of Digital Array Radar (DAR. We propose the method of combination realization of the channel equalization and DBF time delay filter function by using adaptive Sample Matrix Inversion algorithm. The broad band DBF function is realized on a new DBF module based on parallel fiber optic engines and Field Program Gate Array (FPGA. Good performance is achieved when it is used to some radar products.

  4. Computer-aided design of broad band reflection type amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hammershaimb, Edgar; Jeppesen, Palle; Schjær-Jacobsen, Hans

    1974-01-01

    . At the same time the impedance of unpackaged devices are obtained by on-line correction for the package parasitics. The microwave circuit chosen is a multiple slug coaxial cavity, that is modelled by sections of lossy transmission lines including step susceptances. The measured small signal impedance......Microwave negative resistance reflection type amplifiers using stable transferred electron devices (TED's) are optimized by numerical optimization techniques programmed for an interactive graphic datascreen. The small signal impedance of packaged TED's is measured on an automatic network analyzer...... of the packaged TED's and the cavity model are used in a direct optimization procedure, in which the calculated minimum gain in the prescribed frequency range is progressively maximized by adjusting the lengths, characteristic impedances and positions of the slugs. The computed results are displayed...

  5. Estimating carbon dioxide fluxes from temperate mountain grasslands using broad-band vegetation indices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Wohlfahrt

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available The broad-band normalised difference vegetation index (NDVI and the simple ratio (SR were calculated from measurements of reflectance of photosynthetically active and short-wave radiation at two temperate mountain grasslands in Austria and related to the net ecosystem CO2 exchange (NEE measured concurrently by means of the eddy covariance method. There was no significant statistical difference between the relationships of midday mean NEE with narrow- and broad-band NDVI and SR, measured during and calculated for that same time window, respectively. The skill of broad-band NDVI and SR in predicting CO2 fluxes was higher for metrics dominated by gross photosynthesis and lowest for ecosystem respiration, with NEE in between. A method based on a simple light response model whose parameters were parameterised based on broad-band NDVI allowed to improve predictions of daily NEE and is suggested to hold promise for filling gaps in the NEE time series. Relationships of CO2 flux metrics with broad-band NDVI and SR however generally differed between the two studied grassland sites indicting an influence of additional factors not yet accounted for.

  6. High broad-band photoresponsivity of mechanically formed InSe-graphene van der Waals heterostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mudd, Garry W; Svatek, Simon A; Hague, Lee; Makarovsky, Oleg; Kudrynskyi, Zakhar R; Mellor, Christopher J; Beton, Peter H; Eaves, Laurence; Novoselov, Kostya S; Kovalyuk, Zakhar D; Vdovin, Evgeny E; Marsden, Alex J; Wilson, Neil R; Patanè, Amalia

    2015-07-01

    High broad-band photoresponsivity of mechanically formed InSe-graphene van der Waals heterostructures is achieved by exploiting the broad-band transparency of graphene, the direct bandgap of InSe, and the favorable band line up of InSe with graphene. The photoresponsivity exceeds that for other van der Waals heterostructures and the spectral response extends from the near-infrared to the visible spectrum. © 2015 The Authors. Published by WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  7. Broad-Band Spectral Indices Variability of BL Lacertae by Wavelet ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. BL Lacertae is one of the famous AGN that shows convincing evidence to support periodic variability. We compile R-band data and radio 22 GHz database from the available literature to build the light curves and to calculate broad-band spectral indices. This paper employs the wavelet periodic estimation method.

  8. Broad-Band Visually Evoked Potentials: Re(convolution in Brain-Computer Interfacing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordy Thielen

    Full Text Available Brain-Computer Interfaces (BCIs allow users to control devices and communicate by using brain activity only. BCIs based on broad-band visual stimulation can outperform BCIs using other stimulation paradigms. Visual stimulation with pseudo-random bit-sequences evokes specific Broad-Band Visually Evoked Potentials (BBVEPs that can be reliably used in BCI for high-speed communication in speller applications. In this study, we report a novel paradigm for a BBVEP-based BCI that utilizes a generative framework to predict responses to broad-band stimulation sequences. In this study we designed a BBVEP-based BCI using modulated Gold codes to mark cells in a visual speller BCI. We defined a linear generative model that decomposes full responses into overlapping single-flash responses. These single-flash responses are used to predict responses to novel stimulation sequences, which in turn serve as templates for classification. The linear generative model explains on average 50% and up to 66% of the variance of responses to both seen and unseen sequences. In an online experiment, 12 participants tested a 6 × 6 matrix speller BCI. On average, an online accuracy of 86% was reached with trial lengths of 3.21 seconds. This corresponds to an Information Transfer Rate of 48 bits per minute (approximately 9 symbols per minute. This study indicates the potential to model and predict responses to broad-band stimulation. These predicted responses are proven to be well-suited as templates for a BBVEP-based BCI, thereby enabling communication and control by brain activity only.

  9. Bitumen content estimation of Athabasca oil sand from broad band infrared reflectance spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rivard, B.; Feng, J. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Earth and Atmospheric Sciences, Earth Observation Systems Laboratory; Lyder, D. [Alberta Environment, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Gallie, A. [Laurentian Univ., Sudbury, ON (Canada). Dept. of Earth Sciences; Cloutis, E. [Winnipeg Univ., MB (Canada). Dept. of Geography; Dougan, P.; Gonzalez, S. [Syncrude Canada Ltd, Edmonton, AB (Canada); Cox, D. [Suncor Energy Inc., Fort McMurray, AB (Canada); Lipsett, M.G. [Alberta Univ., Edmonton, AB (Canada). Dept. of Mechanical Engineering

    2010-10-15

    Oil sand deposits are not homogeneous. The ore has a large variability in clay, bitumen and fines, which impact bitumen recovery. This paper reported on a study in which a linear model was developed to estimate total bitumen content (TBC) with good accuracy and independent of mine location. The purpose of the study was to enable oil sands mining operators to estimate TBC in real time. Modelling of the TBC in the Athabasca oil sands of western Canada was undertaken on the basis of hyperspectral reflectance spectra. A variety of bitumen, water, and clay mineral spectral features were used to develop broad-band TBC predictive models, with less than 1.5 percent error with respect to laboratory methods of bitumen assay. Simple broad band models, based upon previously identified Gaussian features or wavelet features, provided an incremental improvement over the two-band ratio model presently used by industry. This paper also presented a newly developed and improved two-band model which combines the same two bands, normalized to their mean. The influence of water, clay, and textural variation on selected bitumen features was addressed by a wavelet-based, broad-band model comprised of indices and five bands, where the bands were normalized to the mean of the bands. The most robust estimator of TBC appeared to be the five-band model which can be used at different sites within a mine as well as in different mines without additional tuning or calibration. 17 refs., 4 tabs., 8 figs.

  10. Monolithically integrated broad-band Mach-Zehnder interferometers for highly sensitive label-free detection of biomolecules through dual polarization optics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psarouli, A.; Salapatas, A.; Botsialas, A.; Petrou, P. S.; Raptis, I.; Makarona, E.; Jobst, G.; Tukkiniemi, K.; Sopanen, M.; Stoffer, R.; Kakabakos, S. E.; Misiakos, K.

    2015-01-01

    Protein detection and characterization based on Broad-band Mach-Zehnder Interferometry is analytically outlined and demonstrated through a monolithic silicon microphotonic transducer. Arrays of silicon light emitting diodes and monomodal silicon nitride waveguides forming Mach-Zehnder interferometers were integrated on a silicon chip. Broad-band light enters the interferometers and exits sinusoidally modulated with two distinct spectral frequencies characteristic of the two polarizations. Deconvolution in the Fourier transform domain makes possible the separation of the two polarizations and the simultaneous monitoring of the TE and the TM signals. The dual polarization analysis over a broad spectral band makes possible the refractive index calculation of the binding adlayers as well as the distinction of effective medium changes into cover medium or adlayer ones. At the same time, multi-analyte detection at concentrations in the pM range is demonstrated. PMID:26825114

  11. Noise annoys: effects of noise on breeding great tits depend on personality but not on noise characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Naguib, M.; Van Oers, K.; Braakhuis, A.; Griffioen, M.; De Goede, P.; Waas, J.R.

    2013-01-01

    Anthropogenic noise can have serious implications for animals, especially when they communicate acoustically. Yet, the impacts of noise may depend not only on noise characteristics but also on an individual's coping style or personality. We tested whether noise is more disturbing if it masks

  12. Study on Aeroacoustic Noise Characteristic of Retractable Aerial Refueling Assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-11-27

    Undergraduate Student Paper Postgraduate Student Paper Study on Aeroacoustic Noise Characteristic of Retractable Aerial Refueling Assembly ...The aeroacoustic noise influence of retractable assembly on aircraft surface is researched. Based on a smooth surface airplane without retractable... assembly , aeroacoustic noise is calculated and compared with the airplane contains a retractable assembly . The change of noise and the distribution of

  13. Characteristics of Broadband Seismic Noise in Taiwan and Neighboring Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ching-Wei; Rau, Ruey-Juin

    2017-04-01

    We used seismic waveform data from 115 broad-band stations of BATS (Institute of Earth Science, Academia Sinica) and Central Weather Bureau Seismic Network from 2012 to 2016 for noise-level mapping in Taiwan and neighboring islands. We computed Power Spectral Density (PSD) for each station and analyzed long-term variance of microseism energy and polarizations of noise for severe weather events. The island of Taiwan is surrounded by ocean and the Central Range which has the highest peak Jade Mountain at 3,952 meters height occupies more than 66% of the island and departs it into the east and west coasts. The geographic settings then result in the high population density in the western plain and northern Taiwan. The dominant noise source in the microseism band (periods from 4-20 seconds) is the coupling between the near-coast ocean and sea floor which produces the high noise of averaging -130 dB along the west coastal area. In the eastern volcanic-arc coastal areas, the noise level is about 7% smaller than the west coast due to its deeper offshore water depth. As for the shorter periods (0.1-0.25 seconds) band, the so-called culture noise, an anthropic activity variance with the highest -103 dB can be identified in the metropolitan areas, such as the Taipei city and the noise level in the Central Range area is averaging -138 dB. Moreover, the noise also shows a daily and temporal evolution mainly related to the traffic effect. Furthermore, we determined the noise level for the entire island of Taiwan during 26-28 September, 2016, when the typhoon Megi hit the island and retrieved the enhancement of secondary microseism energy for each stations. Typhoon Megi landed in eastern and central Taiwan and reached the maximum wind speed of 45m/s in the surrounded eyewall. The Central Range, as a barrier, decreased the wind speed in southern Taiwan making an enhancement less than 10 dB, while in northern Taiwan where the direction the typhoon headed to, can reach more than 35

  14. Measuring pulse times of arrival from broad-band pulsar observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, K.; Desvignes, G.; Cognard, I.; Stappers, B. W.; Verbiest, J. P. W.; Lee, K. J.; Champion, D. J.; Kramer, M.; Freire, P. C. C.; Karuppusamy, R.

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, instrumentation enabling pulsar observations with unprecedentedly high fractional bandwidth has been under development which can be used to substantially improve the precision of pulsar timing experiments. The traditional template-matching method used to calculate pulse times of arrival (ToAs) may not function effectively on these broad-band data due to a variety of effects such as diffractive scintillation in the interstellar medium, profile variation as a function of frequency, dispersion measure (DM) evolution, and so forth. In this paper, we describe the channelized discrete Fourier transform method that can greatly mitigate the influence of the aforementioned effects when measuring ToAs from broad-band timing data. The method is tested on simulated data, and its potential in improving timing precision is shown. We further apply the method to PSR J1909-3744 data collected at the Nançay Radio Telescope with the Nançay Ultimate Pulsar Processing Instrument. We demonstrate removal of systematics due to the scintillation effect as well as improvement on ToA measurement uncertainties. Our method also determines temporal variations in DM, which are consistent with multichannel timing approaches used earlier.

  15. The diverse broad-band light-curves of Swift GRBs reproduced with the cannonball model

    CERN Document Server

    Dado, Shlomo; De Rújula, A

    2009-01-01

    Two radiation mechanisms, inverse Compton scattering (ICS) and synchrotron radiation (SR), suffice within the cannonball (CB) model of long gamma ray bursts (LGRBs) and X-ray flashes (XRFs) to provide a very simple and accurate description of their observed prompt emission and afterglows. Simple as they are, the two mechanisms and the burst environment generate the rich structure of the light curves at all frequencies and times. This is demonstrated for 33 selected Swift LGRBs and XRFs, which are well sampled from early time until late time and well represent the entire diversity of the broad band light curves of Swift LGRBs and XRFs. Their prompt gamma-ray and X-ray emission is dominated by ICS of glory light. During their fast decline phase, ICS is taken over by SR which dominates their broad band afterglow. The pulse shape and spectral evolution of the gamma-ray peaks and the early-time X-ray flares, and even the delayed optical `humps' in XRFs, are correctly predicted. The canonical and non-canonical X-ra...

  16. Broad-band characteristics of seven new hard X-ray selected cataclysmic variables

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernardini, F.; de Martino, D.; Mukai, K.; Russell, D. M.; Falanga, M.; Masetti, N.; Ferrigno, C.; Israel, G.

    2017-10-01

    We present timing and spectral analysis of a sample of seven hard X-ray selected cataclysmic variable candidates based on simultaneous X-ray and optical observations collected with XMM-Newton, complemented with Swift/BAT and INTEGRAL /IBIS hard X-ray data and ground-based optical photometry. For six sources, X-ray pulsations are detected for the first time in the range of ˜296-6098 s, identifying them as members of the magnetic class. Swift J0927.7-6945, Swift J0958.0-4208, Swift J1701.3-4304, Swift J2113.5+5422 and possibly PBC J0801.2-4625 are intermediate polars (IPs), while Swift J0706.8+0325 is a short (1.7 h) orbital period polar, the 11th hard X-ray-selected identified so far. X-ray orbital modulation is also observed in Swift J0927.7-6945 (5.2 h) and Swift J2113.5+5422 (4.1 h). Swift J1701.3-4304 is discovered as the longest orbital period (12.8 h) deep eclipsing IP. The spectra of the magnetic systems reveal optically thin multitemperature emission between 0.2 and 60 keV. Energy-dependent spin pulses and the orbital modulation in Swift J0927.7-6945 and Swift J2113.5+5422 are due to intervening local high-density absorbing material (NH ˜ 1022 - 23 cm-2). In Swift J0958.0-4208 and Swift J1701.3-4304, a soft X-ray blackbody (kT ˜ 50 and ˜80 eV) is detected, adding them to the growing group of `soft' IPs. White dwarf masses are determined in the range of ˜ 0.58-1.18 M⊙, indicating massive accreting primaries in five of them. Most sources accrete at rates lower than the expected secular value for their orbital period. Formerly proposed as a long-period (9.4 h) nova-like CV, Swift J0746.3-1608 shows peculiar spectrum and light curves suggesting either an atypical low-luminosity CV or a low-mass X-ray binary.

  17. 11th International Conference On Broad-Band Wireless Computing, Communication and Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Xhafa, Fatos; Yim, Kangbin

    2017-01-01

    The success of all-IP networking and wireless technology has changed the ways of living the people around the world. The progress of electronic integration and wireless communications is going to pave the way to offer people the access to the wireless networks on the fly, based on which all electronic devices will be able to exchange the information with each other in ubiquitous way whenever necessary. The aim of the volume is to provide latest research findings, innovative research results, methods and development techniques from both theoretical and practical perspectives related to the emerging areas of broadband and wireless computing. This proceedings volume presents the results of the 11th International Conference on Broad-Band Wireless Computing, Communication And Applications (BWCCA-2016), held November 5-7, 2016, at Soonchunhyang University, Asan, Korea. .

  18. Non relativistic Broad Band wake fields and potential-well distortion

    CERN Document Server

    Quatraro, D; Findlay, A; Mikulec, B

    2010-01-01

    The study of the interaction between a particle beam and wake fields is usually based on the assumption of ultra relativistic beams. This is not the case, for example, for the Proton Synchrotron Booster(PSB), in which protons cover the energy range. There are some examples in literature which derive nonultra relativistic formulae for the resistive wall impedance. In this paper we have extended the Broad-Band resonator model, allowing the impedance to have poles even in the upper half complex plane, in order to obtain a wake function different from zero for. The Haissinski equation has been numerically solved showing longitudinal bunch shape changes with. In addition some longitudinal bunch profile measurements, taken for two different bunch intensities at the PSB, are shown.

  19. Study of transmission line attenuation in broad band millimeter wave frequency range

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pandya, Hitesh Kumar B. [ITER-India, IPR, Gandhinagar, Gujarat (India); Austin, M. E. [Institute for Fusion Studies, the University of Texas at Austin, Austin, Texas (United States); Ellis, R. F. [Laboratory for Plasma and Fusion Energy Studies, University of Maryland, College Park, Maryland 20742 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Broad band millimeter wave transmission lines are used in fusion plasma diagnostics such as electron cyclotron emission (ECE), electron cyclotron absorption, reflectometry and interferometry systems. In particular, the ECE diagnostic for ITER will require efficient transmission over an ultra wide band, 100 to 1000 GHz. A circular corrugated waveguide transmission line is a prospective candidate to transmit such wide band with low attenuation. To evaluate this system, experiments of transmission line attenuation were performed and compared with theoretical loss calculations. A millimeter wave Michelson interferometer and a liquid nitrogen black body source are used to perform all the experiments. Atmospheric water vapor lines and continuum absorption within this band are reported. Ohmic attenuation in corrugated waveguide is very low; however, there is Bragg scattering and higher order mode conversion that can cause significant attenuation in this transmission line. The attenuation due to miter bends, gaps, joints, and curvature are estimated. The measured attenuation of 15 m length with seven miter bends and eighteen joints is 1 dB at low frequency (300 GHz) and 10 dB at high frequency (900 GHz), respectively.

  20. Toward broad-band x-ray detected ferromagnetic resonance in longitudinal geometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ollefs, K. [Fakultät für Physik, Universität Duisburg-Essen, Lotharstr. 1, 47057 Duisburg (Germany); European Synchrotron Radiation Facility (ESRF), CS 40220, 38043 Grenoble Cedex (France); Meckenstock, R.; Spoddig, D.; Römer, F. M.; Hassel, Ch.; Schöppner, Ch.; Farle, M. [Fakultät für Physik, Universität Duisburg-Essen, Lotharstr. 1, 47057 Duisburg (Germany); Ney, V.; Ney, A., E-mail: andreas.ney@jku.at [Fakultät für Physik, Universität Duisburg-Essen, Lotharstr. 1, 47057 Duisburg (Germany); Institut für Halbleiter-und Festkörperphysik, Johannes Kepler Universität, Altenberger Str. 69, 4040 Linz (Austria)

    2015-06-14

    An ultrahigh-vacuum-compatible setup for broad-band X-ray detected ferromagnetic resonance (XFMR) in longitudinal geometry is introduced which relies on a low-power, continuous-wave excitation of the ferromagnetic sample. A simultaneous detection of the conventional ferromagnetic resonance via measuring the reflected microwave power and the XFMR signal of the X-ray absorption is possible. First experiments on the Fe and Co L{sub 3}-edges of a permalloy film covered with Co nanostripes as well as the Fe and Ni K-edges of a permalloy film are presented and discussed. Two different XFMR signals are found, one of which is independent of the photon energy and therefore does not provide element-selective information. The other much weaker signal is element-selective, and the dynamic magnetic properties could be detected for Fe and Co separately. The dependence of the latter XFMR signal on the photon helicity of the synchrotron light is found to be distinct from the usual x-ray magnetic circular dichroism effect.

  1. Study of transmission line attenuation in broad band millimeter wave frequency range.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandya, Hitesh Kumar B; Austin, M E; Ellis, R F

    2013-10-01

    Broad band millimeter wave transmission lines are used in fusion plasma diagnostics such as electron cyclotron emission (ECE), electron cyclotron absorption, reflectometry and interferometry systems. In particular, the ECE diagnostic for ITER will require efficient transmission over an ultra wide band, 100 to 1000 GHz. A circular corrugated waveguide transmission line is a prospective candidate to transmit such wide band with low attenuation. To evaluate this system, experiments of transmission line attenuation were performed and compared with theoretical loss calculations. A millimeter wave Michelson interferometer and a liquid nitrogen black body source are used to perform all the experiments. Atmospheric water vapor lines and continuum absorption within this band are reported. Ohmic attenuation in corrugated waveguide is very low; however, there is Bragg scattering and higher order mode conversion that can cause significant attenuation in this transmission line. The attenuation due to miter bends, gaps, joints, and curvature are estimated. The measured attenuation of 15 m length with seven miter bends and eighteen joints is 1 dB at low frequency (300 GHz) and 10 dB at high frequency (900 GHz), respectively.

  2. Super-Eddington accretion on to the neutron star NGC 7793 P13: Broad-band X-ray spectroscopy and ultraluminous X-ray sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, D. J.; Fürst, F.; Harrison, F. A.; Stern, D.; Bachetti, M.; Barret, D.; Brightman, M.; Fabian, A. C.; Middleton, M. J.; Ptak, A.; Tao, L.

    2018-02-01

    We present a detailed, broad-band X-ray spectral analysis of the ultraluminous X-ray source (ULX) pulsar NGC 7793 P13, a known super-Eddington source, utilizing data from the XMM-Newton, NuSTAR and Chandra observatories. The broad-band XMM-Newton+NuSTAR spectrum of P13 is qualitatively similar to the rest of the ULX sample with broad-band coverage, suggesting that additional ULXs in the known population may host neutron star accretors. Through time-averaged, phase-resolved and multi-epoch studies, we find that two non-pulsed thermal blackbody components with temperatures ∼0.5 and 1.5 keV are required to fit the data below 10 keV, in addition to a third continuum component which extends to higher energies and is associated with the pulsed emission from the accretion column. The characteristic radii of the thermal components appear to be comparable, and are too large to be associated with the neutron star itself, so the need for two components likely indicates the accretion flow outside the magnetosphere is complex. We suggest a scenario in which the thick inner disc expected for super-Eddington accretion begins to form, but is terminated by the neutron star's magnetic field soon after its onset, implying a limit of B ≲ 6 × 1012 G for the dipolar component of the central neutron star's magnetic field. Evidence of similar termination of the disc in other sources may offer a further means of identifying additional neutron star ULXs. Finally, we examine the spectrum exhibited by P13 during one of its unusual 'off' states. These data require both a hard power-law component, suggesting residual accretion on to the neutron star, and emission from a thermal plasma, which we argue is likely associated with the P13 system.

  3. PKS 1718-649: a broad-band study of a young radio jet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobolewska, Malgosia; Siemiginowska, Aneta; Migliori, Giulia; Guainazzi, Matteo; Hardcastle, Martin; Ostorero, Luisa; Stawarz, Lukasz

    2017-08-01

    Physical conditions required to launch and sustain a jet and the jet's impact on black hole surroundings are believed to be strongly linked, and lie at the core of the AGN feedback idea. The physics of the initial stages of a radio jet expansion is still poorly understood. Nevertheless, highly relativistic plasma contained within young radio lobes and shocks accompanying a powerful jet expansion are expected to generate high energy radiation. However, this initial phase is short-lived and observing young radio sources at high energies has been challenging, with only a few sources detected before the Chandra and XMM-Newton era. We compiled a sample of Compact Symmetric Objects (CSO) that have kinematic age determination to study their high energy properties. Here we discuss one of the sources from our sample, PKS 1718-649 (z=0.014), hosting the most compact (2 pc) and youngest (100 years) extragalactic radio jet known to date. We observed PKS 1718-649 for the first time in X-rays and found that it is a low luminosity X-ray source, L(2-10 keV) ~ 6 x 1041 erg s-1, and its X-ray spectrum is consistent with a mildly (intrinsically) absorbed power law (Gamma ~ 1.75, NH ~ 1021 cm-2). In addition, using the Fermi/LAT archive we established that this source is the first robustly confirmed gamma-ray CSO emitter. Merging the archival radio-to-optical data and our high energy results, we constructed a high quality broad-band spectral energy distribution of this source. We tested a theoretical scenario in which the high energy emission of the source arises due to the Inverse Compton upscattering of the low energy photons off the non-thermal electrons in the expanding radio lobes. We discuss the impact of the expanding lobes on the environment, and constraints imposed by the data on the electron distribution within the lobes.

  4. Multi-cavity locally resonant structure with the low frequency and broad band-gaps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiulong Jiang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available A multi-cavity periodic structure with the characteristic of local resonance was proposed in the paper. The low frequency band-gap structure was comparatively analyzed by the finite element method (FEM and electric circuit analogy (ECA. Low frequency band-gap can be opened through the dual influence of the coupling’s resonance in the cavity and the interaction among the couplings between structures. Finally, the influence of the structural factors on the band-gap was analyzed. The results show that the structure, which is divided into three parts equally, has a broader effective band-gap below the frequency of 200 Hz. It is also proved that reducing the interval between unit structures can increase the intensity of the couplings among the structures. And in this way, the width of band-gap would be expanded significantly. Through the parameters adjustment, the structure enjoys a satisfied sound insulation effect below the frequency of 500Hz. In the area of low frequency noise reduction, the structure has a lot of potential applications.

  5. Interaction of Working Memory, Compressor Speed and Background Noise Characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohlenforst, Barbara; MacDonald, Ewen; Souza, Pamela

    Previous studies have shown that individuals with poor working memory perform worse in speech recognition tests when fast compression release time is applied. However, it is not clear why this effect occurs only when modulations are present in the background noise. This study explored...... the relationship between working memory capacity, compression release time and characteristics of the background noise. This relationship is important to understand because the majority of everyday listening situations involve modulated noise. The investigation was carried out by testing two groups of older adults...... with similar degrees of mild-­‐to-­‐moderate sensorineural loss but different working memory abilities. The two groups were tested in their ability to understand a speech signal presented within a modulated background noise, processed with slow and fast compression. The extent of background noise modulation...

  6. Enhancement of broad-band light absorption in monolayer MoS2 using Ag grating hybrid with distributed Bragg reflector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jintao; Wang, Jin; Yang, Guofeng; Lu, Yann; Sun, Rui; Yan, Pengfei; Gao, Shumei

    2017-10-01

    A hybrid novel structure of monolayer MoS2 with Ag nanograting and DBR on Si substrate has been proposed to obtain broad-band absorption response for two-dimensional (2D) materials. It is effective to reduce light loss and reflect the incident light efficiently for monolayer MoS2 absorption with DBR dielectric layers. Moreover, by combining Ag nanograting with DBR structure, the average absorption achieves as high as 59% within broad wavelength ranging from 420 to 700 nm, which is attributed to the plasmonic resonant effect of metal nanostripes. The absorption would be affected by the duty ratio and period of the Ag nanograting, and shows incident angle dependent characteristics, while an average absorption higher than 60% has been obtained at the incident angle around 40°. These results indicate that 2D MoS2 in combination with DBR and metal nanograting have a promising potential applications for optical nano-devices.

  7. High-performance broad-band spectroscopy for breast cancer risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawluczyk, Olga; Blackmore, Kristina; Dick, Samantha; Lilge, Lothar

    2005-09-01

    Medical diagnostics and screening are becoming increasingly demanding applications for spectroscopy. Although for many years the demand was satisfied with traditional spectrometers, analysis of complex biological samples has created a need for instruments capable of detecting small differences between samples. One such application is the measurement of absorbance of broad spectrum illumination by breast tissue, in order to quantify the breast tissue density. Studies have shown that breast cancer risk is closely associated with the measurement of radiographic breast density measurement. Using signal attenuation in transillumination spectroscopy in the 550-1100nm spectral range to measure breast density, has the potential to reduce the frequency of ionizing radiation, or making the test accessible to younger women; lower the cost and make the procedure more comfortable for the patient. In order to determine breast density, small spectral variances over a total attenuation of up to 8 OD have to be detected with the spectrophotometer. For this, a high performance system has been developed. The system uses Volume Phase Holographic (VPH) transmission grating, a 2D detector array for simultaneous registration of the whole spectrum with high signal to noise ratio, dedicated optical system specifically optimized for spectroscopic applications and many other improvements. The signal to noise ratio exceeding 50,000 for a single data acquisition eliminates the need for nitrogen cooled detectors and provides sufficient information to predict breast tissue density. Current studies employing transillumination breast spectroscopy (TIBS) relating to breast cancer risk assessment and monitoring are described.

  8. Vibration and noise characteristics of hook type olive harvesters ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to obtain and evaluate the vibration and noise characteristics of portable hook type mechanical olive harvesters. Experiments included five hook type olive harvesters. In this study, the vibration and sound pressure levels of different harvesters were measured at idling and full load condition.

  9. Characteristics of noise induced hearing loss in gold miners: research

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The characteristics of Noise Induced Hearing Loss (NIHL) in gold miners of different ages and occupation types were examined and the incidence of tinnitus, vertigo/balance problems and nausea were determined. The results indicate that as a group these subjects had symmetrical bilateral, mild hearing loss in the ...

  10. High-efficiency, broad band, high-damage threshold high-index gratings for femtosecond pulse compression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canova, Frederico; Clady, Raphael; Chambaret, Jean-Paul; Flury, Manuel; Tonchev, Svtelen; Fechner, Renate; Parriaux, Olivier

    2007-11-12

    High efficiency, broad-band TE-polarization diffraction over a wavelength range centered at 800 nm is obtained by high index gratings placed on a non-corrugated mirror. More than 96% efficiency wide band top-hat diffraction efficiency spectra, as well as more than 1 J/cm(2) damage threshold under 50 fs pulses are demonstrated experimentally. This opens the way to high-efficiency Chirped Pulse Amplification for high average power laser machining by means of all-dielectric structures as well as for ultra-short high energy pulses by means of metal-dielectric structures.

  11. Using multi-criteria decision-making for selecting broad-band technology for the National University of Colombia, Bogota

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Félix Antonio Cortés Aldana

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The National University of Colombia, Bogotá, has proposed a prolect for improving Internet access by using broad band technology. Four possible technologies have been selected in the first step: LMDS, ADSL, cable modem and optical fibre. The analytic hierarchy process (AHP has been applied for taking such decision. This method, based on multi criteria decision analysis (MCDA allows decision-taking criteria to be established, pondered and the alternatives evaluated regarding the priorities established for each criterion. Different experts’ opinions have been considered as support during the decision-making process. MCDA was used for ranking these alternatives. AHP was used for helping such decision-making.

  12. Fast High-Intensity Single-Bunch Transverse Coherent Instability in Synchrotrons due to a Broad-Band Resonator Impedance

    CERN Document Server

    Métral, Elias

    2001-01-01

    The instability rise-time is computed when it is faster than the synchrotron period, using the mode-coupling formalism. The case is treated of a bunch interacting with a broad-band resonator impedance, and whose length is greater than the inverse of twice the resonance frequency. The formula is compared to the one obtained by Brandt and Gareyte in a beam break-up approach, and to the one first obtained by Ruth and Wang in a fast blow-up theory, and later re-derived by Kernel et al. in a post-head-tail formalism. Stabilisation by synchrotron oscillation is also discussed.

  13. DETERMINATION OF NOISE CHARACTERISTICS AND COMPOSITION OF INDUSTRIAL ENTERPRISE NOISE MAP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SANKOV P. М.

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Problem. The article is devoted to the issues of improving working conditions, preserving the life and health of workers at industrial enterprises and inhabitants of residential areas adjacent to them. This problem at the present stage of the formation of Ukraine as a European state with a developed economy is one of the most important directions of socio-economic policy. Purpose. Scientific substantiation and analysis of the possibility of improving working conditions, preservation of the workers life and health on the local and modern city industrial territories by determining the level of noise on the territories adjacent to the noisy enterprise of weaving production. Methods. Use of a systematic approach in analytical studies of literary sources, modern researches of specialists in urban ecology and life safety for the purpose of organizing safe working conditions and rest of citizens for noise pollution. With the help of this technique, a noise map of the territory adjacent to the investigated industrial enterprise was constructed. Results. The authors have solved the following tasks: the analysis of the working conditions at the enterprise «Industrial complex "Kropyva"» is made; the noise characteristic of this enterprise is determined; a map of the noise spread from the said enterprise in the adjoining areas was constructed. Science novelty. For the first time, on the basis of the proposed methodology for determining the noise characteristics of an industrial enterprise, a map of noise was constructed both in the territory of the enterprise itself and in the adjacent territories. Practical significance: formation of safe living conditions on the different functional zones of modern cities; reduction of noise pollution volumes of the city territories, aimed at protecting the population from harmful effects and consequences of pollution. The results of the research may be used in further studies to conduct a comprehensive assessment of

  14. Characteristics of an anechoic chamber for fan noise testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wazyniak, J. A.; Shaw, L. M.; Essary, J. D.

    1977-01-01

    Acoustical and mechanical design features of NASA Lewis Research Center's engine fan noise facility are described. Acoustic evaluation of the 1420-m (50,000-ft) chamber, which is lined with an array of stepped wedges, is described. Results from the evaluation in terms of cut-off frequency and non-anechoic areas near the walls are detailed. Fan models with 0.51-m (20-in) diameters are electrically driven to 20,600 rpm in either the inlet mode (drawing air from the chamber) or exhaust mode (discharging air into the chamber) to facilitate study of both fore and aft fan noise. Inlet noise characteristics of the first fan tested, the JT8D Refan, are discussed and compared to full-scale levels. Turbulence properties of the inlet flow and acoustic results are compared with and without a turbulence reducing screen over the fan inlet.

  15. Effects of duration and other noise characteristics on the annoyance caused by aircraft-flyover noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mccurdy, D. A.; Powell, C. A.

    1979-01-01

    A laboratory experiment was conducted to determine the effects of duration and other noise characteristics on the annoyance caused by aircraft-flyover noise. Duration, doppler shift, and spectra were individually controlled by specifying aircraft operational factors, such as velocity, altitude, and spectrum, in a computer synthesis of the aircraft-noise stimuli. This control allowed the separation of the effects of duration from the other main factors in the experimental design: velocity, tonal content, and sound pressure level. The annoyance of a set of noise stimuli which were comprised of factorial combinations of a 3 durations, 3 velocities, 3 sound pressure levels, and 2 tone conditions were judged. The judgements were made by using a graphical scale procedure similar to numerical category scaling. Each of the main factors except velocity was found to affect the judged annoyance significantly. The interaction of tonal content with sound pressure level was also found to be significant. The duration correction used in the effective-perceived-noise-level procedure, 3 dB per doubling of effective duration, was found to account most accurately for the effect of duration. No significant effect doppler shift was found.

  16. Broad-Band-Emissive Organic-Inorganic Hybrid Semiconducting Nanowires Based on an ABX3-Type Chain Compound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhenyue; Li, Lina; Ji, Chengmin; Lin, Guoming; Wang, Sasa; Shen, Yaoguo; Sun, Zhihua; Zhao, Sangen; Luo, Junhua

    2017-08-07

    Organic-inorganic hybrid lead halide (e.g., CH3NH3PbX3, where X = CI, Br, and I) nanowires (NWs) with remarkable electric and optical properties have recently garnered increasing attention, owing to their structural flexibility and tunability compared to inorganic semiconducting NWs. While most recently reported NWs are limited to methylammonium/formamidinium three-dimensional lead halide perovskites, it is urgent to develop new organic-inorganic hybrid semiconducting NWs. Here, broad-band-emissive single-crystal semiconductive NWs based on a new ABX3-type organic-inorganic chain hybrid, (2-methylpiperidine)lead tribromide, are reported. It is believed that this work will enrich the organic-inorganic hybrid semiconducting NWs and may provide potential applications for LED displaying.

  17. A flexible experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved broad-band ellipsometry and magneto-optics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boschini, F.; Hedayat, H.; Piovera, C.; Dallera, C. [Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, p.zza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy); Gupta, A. [Department of Chemistry, University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, Alabama 35487 (United States); Carpene, E., E-mail: ettore.carpene@polimi.it [CNR-IFN, Dipartimento di Fisica, Politecnico di Milano, p.zza Leonardo da Vinci 32, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2015-01-15

    A versatile experimental setup for femtosecond time-resolved ellipsometry and magneto-optical Kerr effect measurements in the visible light range is described. The apparatus is based on the pump-probe technique and combines a broad-band probing beam with an intense near-infrared pump. According to Fresnel scattering matrix formalism, the analysis of the reflected beam at different polarization states of the incident probe light allows one to determine the diagonal and the off-diagonal elements of the dielectric tensor in the investigated sample. Moreover, the pump-probe method permits to study the dynamics of the dielectric response after a short and intense optical excitation. The performance of the experimental apparatus is tested on CrO{sub 2} single crystals as a benchmark.

  18. Importance of double-pole CFS-PML for broad-band seismic wave simulation and optimal parameters selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Haike; Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Xiaofei

    2017-05-01

    The perfectly matched layer (PML) is an efficient absorbing technique for numerical wave simulation. The complex frequency-shifted PML (CFS-PML) introduces two additional parameters in the stretching function to make the absorption frequency dependent. This can help to suppress converted evanescent waves from near grazing incident waves, but does not efficiently absorb low-frequency waves below the cut-off frequency. To absorb both the evanescent wave and the low-frequency wave, the double-pole CFS-PML having two poles in the coordinate stretching function was developed in computational electromagnetism. Several studies have investigated the performance of the double-pole CFS-PML for seismic wave simulations in the case of a narrowband seismic wavelet and did not find significant difference comparing to the CFS-PML. Another difficulty to apply the double-pole CFS-PML for real problems is that a practical strategy to set optimal parameter values has not been established. In this work, we study the performance of the double-pole CFS-PML for broad-band seismic wave simulation. We find that when the maximum to minimum frequency ratio is larger than 16, the CFS-PML will either fail to suppress the converted evanescent waves for grazing incident waves, or produce visible low-frequency reflection, depending on the value of α. In contrast, the double-pole CFS-PML can simultaneously suppress the converted evanescent waves and avoid low-frequency reflections with proper parameter values. We analyse the different roles of the double-pole CFS-PML parameters and propose optimal selections of these parameters. Numerical tests show that the double-pole CFS-PML with the optimal parameters can generate satisfactory results for broad-band seismic wave simulations.

  19. Limiting characteristics of a superconducting quantum interferometer. I - Signal characteristic. II - Signal-to-noise ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butikov, E. I.; Feofilov, S. P.

    1980-11-01

    An investigation is presented of a dc SQUID with two Josephson junctions in a system for measuring small changes of a magnetic field with low-frequency modulation of the magnetic flux. Idealized theoretical signal characteristics are obtained, and their dependence on the modes of operation and parameters of the SQUID are studied. These characteristics are used to determine the minimum detectable changes of magnetic flux characterizing the limiting sensitivity of the SQUID. The spectral density of thermal noise is obtained for the low-frequency range which constrains the limiting sensitivity; the signal/noise ratio is studied as a function of the operating modes and parameters of the SQUID.

  20. The Seismic Broad Band Western Mediterranean (wm) Network and the Obs Fomar Pool: Current state and Obs activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pazos, Antonio; Davila, Jose Martin; Buforn, Elisa; Bezzeghoud, Mourad; Harnafi, Mimoun; Mattesini, Mauricio; Caldeira, Bento; Hanka, Winfried; El Moudnib, Lahcen; Strollo, Angelo; Roca, Antoni; Lopez de Mesa, Mireya; Dahm, Torsten; Cabieces, Roberto

    2016-04-01

    The Western Mediterranean (WM) seismic network started in 1996 as an initiative of the Royal Spanish Navy Observatory (ROA) and the Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), with the collaboration of the GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ) of Potsdam. A first broad band seismic station (SFUC) was installed close to Cádiz (South Spain). Since then, additional stations have been installed in the Ibero-Moghrebian region. In 2005, the "WM" code was assigned by the FDSN and new partners were jointed: Evora University (UEVO, Portugal), the Scientifique Institute of Rabat (ISRABAT, Morocco), and GFZ. Now days, the WM network is composed by 15 BB stations, all of them with Streckaisen STS-2 or STS-2.5 sensors, Quanterra or Earthdata digitizers and SeiscomP. Most them have co-installed a permanent geodetic GPS stations, and some them also have an accelerometer. There are 10 stations deployed in Spanish territory (5 in the Iberian peninsula, 1 in Balearic islands and 4 in North Africa Spanish places) with VSAT or Internet communications, 2 in Portugal (one of them without real time), and 3 in Morocco (2 VSAT and 1 ADSL). Additionally, 2 more stations (one in South Spain and one in Morocco) will be installed along this year. Additionally ROA has deployed a permanent real time VBB (CMG-3T: 360s) station at the Alboran Island. Due to the fact that part of the seismic activity is located at marine areas, and also because of the poor geographic azimuthal coverage at some zones provided by the land stations (specially in the SW of the San Vicente Cape area), ROA and UCM have acquired six broad band "LOBSTERN" OBS, manufactured by KUM (Kiel, Germany), conforming the OBS FOMAR pool. Three of them with CMG-40T sensor and the other with Trillium 120. These OBS were deployed along the Gibraltar strait since January to November 2014 to study the microseismicity in the Gibraltar strait area. In September 2015 FOMAR network has been deployed in SW of the San Vicente Cape for 8 months as a part of

  1. Broad Band Light Absorption and High Photocurrent of (In,Ga)N Nanowire Photoanodes Resulting from a Radial Stark Effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamimura, Jumpei; Bogdanoff, Peter; Corfdir, Pierre; Brandt, Oliver; Riechert, Henning; Geelhaar, Lutz

    2016-12-21

    The photoelectrochemical properties of (In,Ga)N nanowire photoanodes are investigated using H2O2 as a hole scavenger to prevent photocorrosion. Under simulated solar illumination, In0.16Ga0.84N nanowires grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy show a high photocurrent of 2.7 mA/cm2 at 1.2 V vs reversible hydrogen electrode. This value is almost the theoretical maximum expected from the corresponding band gap (2.8 eV) for homogeneous bulk material without taking into account surface effects. These nanowires exhibit a higher incident photon-to-current conversion efficiency over a broader wavelength range and a higher photocurrent than a compact layer with higher In content of 28%. These results are explained by the combination of built-in electric fields at the nanowire sidewall surfaces and compositional fluctuations in (In,Ga)N, which gives rise to a radial Stark effect. This effect enables spatially indirect transitions at energies much lower than the band gap. The resulting broad band light absorption leads to high photocurrents. This benefit of the radial Stark effect in (In,Ga)N nanowires for solar harvesting applications opens up the perspective to break the theoretical limit for photocurrents.

  2. Performance of the NIST goniocolorimeter with a broad-band source and multichannel charged coupled device based spectrometer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podobedov, V B; Miller, C C; Nadal, M E

    2012-09-01

    The authors describe the NIST high-efficiency instrument for measurements of bidirectional reflectance distribution function of colored materials, including gonioapparent materials such as metallic and pearlescent coatings. The five-axis goniospectrometer measures the spectral reflectance of samples over a wide range of illumination and viewing angles. The implementation of a broad-band source and a multichannel CCD spectrometer corrected for stray light significantly increased the efficiency of the goniometer. In the extended range of 380 nm to 1050 nm, a reduction of measurement time from a few hours to a few minutes was obtained. Shorter measurement time reduces the load on the precise mechanical assembly ensuring high angular accuracy over time. We describe the application of matrix-based correction of stray light and the extension of effective dynamic range of measured fluxes to the values of 10(6) to 10(7) needed for the absolute characterization of samples. The measurement uncertainty was determined to be 0.7% (k = 2), which is comparable with similar instruments operating in a single channel configuration. Several examples of reflectance data obtained with the improved instrument indicate a 0.3% agreement compared to data collected with the single channel configuration.

  3. Efficient full-spectrum utilization, reception and conversion of solar energy by broad-band nanospiral antenna.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huaqiao; Gao, Huotao; Cao, Ting; Li, Boya

    2018-01-22

    In this work, the collection of solar energy by a broad-band nanospiral antenna is investigated in order to solve the low efficiency of the solar rectenna based on conventional nanoantennas. The antenna impedance, radiation, polarization and effective area are all considered in the efficiency calculation using the finite integral technique. The wavelength range investigated is 300-3000 nm, which corresponds to more than 98% of the solar radiation energy. It's found that the nanospiral has stronger field enhancement in the gap than a nanodipole counterpart. And a maximum harvesting efficiency about 80% is possible in principle for the nanospiral coupled to a rectifier resistance of 200 Ω, while about 10% for the nanodipole under the same conditions. Moreover, the nanospiral could be coupled to a rectifier diode of high resistance more easily than the nanodipole. These results indicate that the efficient full-spectrum utilization, reception and conversion of solar energy can be achieved by the nanospiral antenna, which is expected to promote the solar rectenna to be a promising technology in the clean, renewable energy application.

  4. Extreme Emission Line Galaxies in CANDELS: Broad-Band Selected, Star-Bursting Dwarf Galaxies at Z greater than 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    vanderWel, A.; Straughn, A. N.; Rix, H.-W.; Finkelstein, S. L.; Koekemoer, A. M.; Weiner, B. J.; Wuyts, S.; Bell, E. F.; Faber, S. M.; Trump, J. R.; hide

    2012-01-01

    We identify an abundant population of extreme emission line galaxies (EELGs) at redshift z approx. 1.7 in the Cosmic Assembly Near-IR Deep Extragalactic Legacy Survey (CANDELS) imaging from Hubble Space Telescope/Wide Field Camera 3 (HST/WFC3). 69 EELG candidates are selected by the large contribution of exceptionally bright emission lines to their near-infrared broad-band magnitudes. Supported by spectroscopic confirmation of strong [OIII] emission lines . with rest-frame equivalent widths approx. 1000A in the four candidates that have HST/WFC3 grism observations, we conclude that these objects are galaxies with approx.10(exp 8) Solar Mass in stellar mass, undergoing an enormous starburst phase with M*/M* of only approx. 15 Myr. These bursts may cause outflows that are strong enough to produce cored dark matter profiles in low-mass galaxies. The individual star formation rates and the co-moving number density (3.7x10(exp -4) Mpc(sup -3) can produce in approx.4 Gyr much of the stellar mass density that is presently contained in 10(exp 8) - 10(exp 9) Solar Mass dwarf galaxies. Therefore, our observations provide a strong indication that many or even most of the stars in present-day dwarf galaxies formed in strong, short-lived bursts, mostly at z > 1.

  5. Spectral modification of the laser emission of a terahertz quantum cascade laser induced by broad-band double pulse injection seeding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Markmann, Sergej, E-mail: sergej.markmann@ruhr-uni-bochum.de; Nong, Hanond, E-mail: nong.hanond@ruhr-uni-bochum.de; Hekmat, Negar; Jukam, Nathan [AG Terahertz Spektroskopie und Technologie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Pal, Shovon [AG Terahertz Spektroskopie und Technologie, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Lehrstuhl für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Scholz, Sven; Kukharchyk, Nadezhda; Ludwig, Arne; Wieck, Andreas D. [Lehrstuhl für Angewandte Festkörperphysik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany); Dhillon, Sukhdeep; Tignon, Jérôme [Laboratoire Pierre Aigrain, Ecole Normale Supérieure, UMR 8551 CNRS, UPMC, Univ. Paris 6, 75005 Paris (France); Marcadet, Xavier [Alcatel-Thales III-V Lab, Route Départementale 128, 91767 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Bock, Claudia; Kunze, Ulrich [Lehrstuhl für Werkstoffe und Nanoelektronik, Ruhr-Universität Bochum, D-44780 Bochum (Germany)

    2015-09-14

    We demonstrate by injection seeding that the spectral emission of a terahertz (THz) quantum cascade laser (QCL) can be modified with broad-band THz pulses whose bandwidths are greater than the QCL bandwidth. Two broad-band THz pulses delayed in time imprint a modulation on the single THz pulse spectrum. The resulting spectrum is used to injection seed the THz QCL. By varying the time delay between the THz pulses, the amplitude distribution of the QCL longitudinal modes is modified. By applying this approach, the QCL emission is reversibly switched from multi-mode to single mode emission.

  6. Electrical and noise characteristics of graphene field-effect transistors: ambient effects, noise sources and physical mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumyantsev, S; Liu, G; Stillman, W; Shur, M; Balandin, A A

    2010-10-06

    We fabricated a large number of single and bilayer graphene transistors and carried out a systematic experimental study of their low-frequency noise characteristics. Special attention was given to determining the dominant noise sources in these devices and the effect of aging on the current-voltage and noise characteristics. The analysis of the noise spectral density dependence on the area of graphene channel showed that the dominant contributions to the low-frequency electronic noise come from the graphene layer itself rather than from the contacts. Aging of graphene transistors due to exposure to ambient conditions for over a month resulted in substantially increased noise, attributed to the decreasing mobility of graphene and increasing contact resistance. The noise spectral density in both single and bilayer graphene transistors either increased with deviation from the charge neutrality point or depended weakly on the gate bias. This observation confirms that the low-frequency noise characteristics of graphene transistors are qualitatively different from those of conventional silicon metal-oxide-semiconductor field-effect transistors.

  7. Anisotropy of S wave velocity in the lowermost mantle using broad-band data recorded at Syowa in Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Y.; Hiramatsu, Y.; Furumoto, M.; Kanao, M.

    2003-12-01

    We investigate the velocity structure of the lowermost mantle (D") beneath the Antarctic Ocean. We analyze seismograms from 16 deep earthquakes in south Pacific subduction zones from 1990 to 2001 recorded by STS-1 broad-band seismographs at Syowa station in Antarctica. The source-receiver combinations span distances range 85\\deg-95\\deg with associated S waves passing through D" beneath the Antarctic ocean. Differential travel times of split S waves are estimated to be up to 2s, showing that longitudinal components (SV) energy arrives earlier than transverse components (SH) energy. The absence of significant splitting for S waves with turning points more than four hundred kilometers above the core-mantle boundary (CMB) indicates that anisotropy is localized within the D" region. Differential travel times among S, ScS and SKS phases and waveform modeling are used to construct the velocity structure in D". We calculate synthetic waveforms by the Direct Solution Method (DSM: Geller and Ohminato, 1994; Geller and Takeuchi, 1995). SH shows a double arrival at the epicentral distance near 89\\deg. However SV in this range remains a single arrival. Isotropic model_@can not explain these observation. We find that synthetics for transverse isotropic models with SH velocity discontinuity (SYYM model) explain well the observed differential travel times and waveforms. The thickness of the anisotropic zone, where SH wave is faster up to 2.0% than SV wave, estimated to be about 350 km. This study region corresponds to the high velocity region at the lowermost mantle by tomographic studies (Kuo et al., 2000; Masters et al., 2000). This kind of transverse anisotropy correlates with high velocity regions where paleo-slabs may descend into the lower mantle (Kendall and Silver, 1996; Garnero and Lay, 1997). We conclude that these observations may be explained by an anisotropic D" layer and D" layer anisotropy is attributed to the paleo-slab material subducted during 120Myr-180Myr.

  8. Synchronous Chaos and Broad Band Gamma Rhythm in a Minimal Multi-Layer Model of Primary Visual Cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battaglia, Demian; Hansel, David

    2011-01-01

    Visually induced neuronal activity in V1 displays a marked gamma-band component which is modulated by stimulus properties. It has been argued that synchronized oscillations contribute to these gamma-band activity. However, analysis of Local Field Potentials (LFPs) across different experiments reveals considerable diversity in the degree of oscillatory behavior of this induced activity. Contrast-dependent power enhancements can indeed occur over a broad band in the gamma frequency range and spectral peaks may not arise at all. Furthermore, even when oscillations are observed, they undergo temporal decorrelation over very few cycles. This is not easily accounted for in previous network modeling of gamma oscillations. We argue here that interactions between cortical layers can be responsible for this fast decorrelation. We study a model of a V1 hypercolumn, embedding a simplified description of the multi-layered structure of the cortex. When the stimulus contrast is low, the induced activity is only weakly synchronous and the network resonates transiently without developing collective oscillations. When the contrast is high, on the other hand, the induced activity undergoes synchronous oscillations with an irregular spatiotemporal structure expressing a synchronous chaotic state. As a consequence the population activity undergoes fast temporal decorrelation, with concomitant rapid damping of the oscillations in LFPs autocorrelograms and peak broadening in LFPs power spectra. We show that the strength of the inter-layer coupling crucially affects this spatiotemporal structure. We predict that layer VI inactivation should induce global changes in the spectral properties of induced LFPs, reflecting their slower temporal decorrelation in the absence of inter-layer feedback. Finally, we argue that the mechanism underlying the emergence of synchronous chaos in our model is in fact very general. It stems from the fact that gamma oscillations induced by local delayed

  9. Synchronous chaos and broad band gamma rhythm in a minimal multi-layer model of primary visual cortex.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demian Battaglia

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Visually induced neuronal activity in V1 displays a marked gamma-band component which is modulated by stimulus properties. It has been argued that synchronized oscillations contribute to these gamma-band activity. However, analysis of Local Field Potentials (LFPs across different experiments reveals considerable diversity in the degree of oscillatory behavior of this induced activity. Contrast-dependent power enhancements can indeed occur over a broad band in the gamma frequency range and spectral peaks may not arise at all. Furthermore, even when oscillations are observed, they undergo temporal decorrelation over very few cycles. This is not easily accounted for in previous network modeling of gamma oscillations. We argue here that interactions between cortical layers can be responsible for this fast decorrelation. We study a model of a V1 hypercolumn, embedding a simplified description of the multi-layered structure of the cortex. When the stimulus contrast is low, the induced activity is only weakly synchronous and the network resonates transiently without developing collective oscillations. When the contrast is high, on the other hand, the induced activity undergoes synchronous oscillations with an irregular spatiotemporal structure expressing a synchronous chaotic state. As a consequence the population activity undergoes fast temporal decorrelation, with concomitant rapid damping of the oscillations in LFPs autocorrelograms and peak broadening in LFPs power spectra. We show that the strength of the inter-layer coupling crucially affects this spatiotemporal structure. We predict that layer VI inactivation should induce global changes in the spectral properties of induced LFPs, reflecting their slower temporal decorrelation in the absence of inter-layer feedback. Finally, we argue that the mechanism underlying the emergence of synchronous chaos in our model is in fact very general. It stems from the fact that gamma oscillations induced by

  10. Evolution of broad-band SED during outburst rise in NS X-ray Nova Aql X-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meshcheryakov, Alexander V.; Tsygankov, Sergey S.; Khamitov, Irek M.; Shakura, Nikolay I.; Bikmaev, Ilfan F.; Eselevich, Maxim V.; Vlasyuk, Valeriy V.; Pavlinsky, Mikhail N.

    2018-01-01

    The observed evolution of the broad-band spectral energy distribution (SED) in NS X-ray Nova Aql X-1 during the rise phase of a bright Fast-Rise-Exponential-Decay-type outburst in 2013 can be understood in the framework of thermal emission from non-stationary accretion disc with radial temperature distribution transforming from a single-temperature blackbody emitting ring into the multicolour irradiated accretion disc. SED evolution during the hard to soft X-ray state transition looks unusual, as it cannot be reproduced by the standard disc irradiation model with a single irradiation parameter for NUV, Optical and NIR spectral bands. NIR (NUV) band is correlated with soft (hard) X-ray flux changes during the state transition interval, respectively. In our interpretation, at the moment of X-ray state transition UV-emitting parts of the accretion disc are screened from direct X-ray illumination from the central source and are heated primarily by hard X-rays (E > 10 keV), scattered in the hot corona or wind possibly formed above the optically thick outer accretion flow; the outer edge of multicolour disc, which emits in Optical-NIR, can be heated primarily by direct X-ray illumination. We point out that future simultaneous multiwavelength observations of X-ray Nova systems during the fast X-ray state transition interval are of great importance, as it can serve as 'X-ray tomograph' to study physical conditions in outer regions of accretion flow. This can provide an effective tool to directly test the energy-dependent X-ray heating efficiency, vertical structure and accretion flow geometry in transient low-mass X-ray binaries.

  11. X-Ray Emitting GHz-Peaked Spectrum Galaxies: Testing a Dynamical-Radiative Model with Broad-Band Spectra

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ostorero, L.; /Turin U. /INFN, Turin; Moderski, R.; /Warsaw, Copernicus Astron. Ctr. /KIPAC, Menlo Park; Stawarz, L.; /KIPAC, Menlo Park /Jagiellonian U., Astron. Observ.; Diaferio, A.; /Turin U. /INFN, Turin; Kowalska, I.; /Warsaw U. Observ.; Cheung, C.C.; /NASA, Goddard /Naval Research Lab, Wash., D.C.; Kataoka, J.; /Waseda U., RISE; Begelman, M.C.; /JILA, Boulder; Wagner, S.J.; /Heidelberg Observ.

    2010-06-07

    In a dynamical-radiative model we recently developed to describe the physics of compact, GHz-Peaked-Spectrum (GPS) sources, the relativistic jets propagate across the inner, kpc-sized region of the host galaxy, while the electron population of the expanding lobes evolves and emits synchrotron and inverse-Compton (IC) radiation. Interstellar-medium gas clouds engulfed by the expanding lobes, and photoionized by the active nucleus, are responsible for the radio spectral turnover through free-free absorption (FFA) of the synchrotron photons. The model provides a description of the evolution of the GPS spectral energy distribution (SED) with the source expansion, predicting significant and complex high-energy emission, from the X-ray to the {gamma}-ray frequency domain. Here, we test this model with the broad-band SEDs of a sample of eleven X-ray emitting GPS galaxies with Compact-Symmetric-Object (CSO) morphology, and show that: (i) the shape of the radio continuum at frequencies lower than the spectral turnover is indeed well accounted for by the FFA mechanism; (ii) the observed X-ray spectra can be interpreted as non-thermal radiation produced via IC scattering of the local radiation fields off the lobe particles, providing a viable alternative to the thermal, accretion-disk dominated scenario. We also show that the relation between the hydrogen column densities derived from the X-ray (N{sub H}) and radio (N{sub HI}) data of the sources is suggestive of a positive correlation, which, if confirmed by future observations, would provide further support to our scenario of high-energy emitting lobes.

  12. Broad-band green phosphor screens as a light source for head up displays in moving platforms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Jack; Withnall, Robert; Rose, John; Wilstead, Nicola; Fern, George; Bishton, Stephen; Klein, David; Rhodes, Bob; Barclay, Charles; Whitmarsh, John

    2005-06-01

    A broad-band green light source for a head-up display is presented. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a green phosphor screen being excited by a blue LED as a backlight for monochrome HUDs. The phosphor screen not only generates the green light but it acts as a diffuser to give a homogeneous illumination. A microlens array focuses the emissions from LED sources on to the diffusing screen eliminating halo effects from the individual LEDs. The purpose of using a green phosphor is to exploit the fact that the eye is sensitive to more shades of green than any other colour. In uses where there are elements of danger such as automobiles (in busy areas), vehicles on construction sites and military vehicles in war zones, green displays have obvious attractions. This paper presents a discussion of the green phosphors that can be used in green screen fabrication, the deposition of the phosphor powders on the screens, the influence of the thickness of the phosphor powder on the screen brightness. In addition, the factors that influence the CIE coordinates of the light emitted from the screen are considered. The importance of choosing the optimum LED emission wavelength along with the general construction of the HUD is discussed. The merits of using a green screen are compared to those when using full colour displays based on white phosphor screens in which yellow emitting phosphors are excited by blue LEDs. Heat management in these HUD devices is achieved by pulsing the LEDs and rastering rows within the LED array.

  13. Analysis of the Noise Characteristics of CMOS Current Conveyors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Erik

    1997-01-01

    The definition of the current conveyor is reviewed and a multiple-output second generation current conveyor (CCII) is shown to combine the different generations of current conveyors presently existing. Next, noise sources are introduced, and a general noise model for the current conveyor...... is described. This model is used for the analysis of selected examples of current conveyor based operational amplifier configurations and the noise performance of these configurations is compared. Finally, the noise model is developed for a CMOS current conveyor implementation, and approaches...... to an optimization of the noise performance are discussed. It is concluded that a class AB implementation can yield a lower noise output for the same dynamic range than a class A implementation. For both the class A implementation and the class AB implementation it is essential to design low noise current mirrors...

  14. Narrow-band ultraviolet B phototherapy versus broad-band ultraviolet B or psoralen-ultraviolet A photochemotherapy for psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaomei; Yang, Ming; Cheng, Yan; Liu, Guan J; Zhang, Min

    2013-10-23

    The most commonly used types of phototherapy for treating psoriasis are narrow-band ultraviolet B (NB-UVB); broad-band ultraviolet B (BB-UVB), which includes selective (delivering radiation with a wavelength range of 305 to 325 nm) and conventional BB-UVB (280 to 320 nm); and psoralen ultraviolet A photochemotherapy (oral or bath PUVA). There is substantial controversy regarding their efficacy when compared with each other. To assess the effects of narrow-band ultraviolet B phototherapy versus broad-band ultraviolet B or psoralen ultraviolet A photochemotherapy for psoriasis. We searched the following databases up to August 2013: the Cochrane Skin Group Specialised Register, CENTRAL in The Cochrane Library (2013, Issue 7), MEDLINE (from 1946), and EMBASE (from 1974). We searched the following databases up to November 2012: CNKI (from 1974) and CBM (from 1978). We also searched trials registers and the OpenGrey database. We included all randomised controlled trials (RCTs) that compared NB-UVB phototherapy with BB-UVB or PUVA for treating psoriasis, which included chronic plaque psoriasis (CPP), guttate psoriasis (GP), and palmoplantar psoriasis (PPP). Two review authors independently conducted the study selection, 'Risk of bias' assessment, and data extraction. We included 13 RCTs, with a total of 662 participants. We report the results of intention-to-treat analyses (ITT) here. Our primary outcomes of interest were as follows: Participant-rated global improvement, Percentage of participants reaching Psoriasis Area and Severity Index (PASI) 75 (which meant equal to or more than 75% reduction in PASI score), Withdrawal due to side-effects, and Clearance rate.In one RCT of NB-UVB compared with oral PUVA in participants with CPP, the difference in PASI 75 was not statistically significant (risk ratio (RR) 0.91, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.63 to 1.32; N = 51; low quality). In three other RCTs of CPP, the clearance rates were inconsistent because in one, there was no

  15. Exposure to Road, Railway, and Aircraft Noise and Arterial Stiffness in the SAPALDIA Study: Annual Average Noise Levels and Temporal Noise Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foraster, Maria; Eze, Ikenna C; Schaffner, Emmanuel; Vienneau, Danielle; Héritier, Harris; Endes, Simon; Rudzik, Franziska; Thiesse, Laurie; Pieren, Reto; Schindler, Christian; Schmidt-Trucksäss, Arno; Brink, Mark; Cajochen, Christian; Marc Wunderli, Jean; Röösli, Martin; Probst-Hensch, Nicole

    2017-09-07

    The impact of different transportation noise sources and noise environments on arterial stiffness remains unknown. We evaluated the association between residential outdoor exposure to annual average road, railway, and aircraft noise levels, total noise intermittency (IR), and total number of noise events (NE) and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (baPWV) following a cross-sectional design. We measured baPWV (meters/second) in 2,775 participants (49-81 y old) at the second follow-up (2010-2011) of the Swiss Cohort Study on Air Pollution and Lung and Heart Diseases in Adults (SAPALDIA). We assigned annual average road, railway, and aircraft noise levels (Ldensource), total day- and nighttime NEtime and IRtime (percent fluctuation=0%, none or constant noise; percent fluctuation=100%, high fluctuation) at the most exposed façade using 2011 Swiss noise models. We applied multivariable linear mixed regression models to analyze associations. Medians [interquartile ranges (IQRs)] were baPWV=13.4 (3.1) m/s; Ldenair (57.6% exposed)=32.8 (8.0) dB; Ldenrail (44.6% exposed)=30.0 (8.1) dB; Ldenroad (99.7% exposed): 54.2 (10.6) dB; NEnight=123 (179); NEday=433 (870); IRnight=73% (27); and IRday=63.8% (40.3). We observed a 0.87% (95% CI: 0.31, 1.43%) increase in baPWV per IQR of Ldenrail, which was greater with IRnight>80% or with daytime sleepiness. We observed a nonsignificant positive association between Ldenroad and baPWV in urban areas and a negative tendency in rural areas. NEnight, but not NEday, was associated with baPWV. Associations were independent of the other noise sources and air pollution. Long-term exposure to railway noise, particularly in an intermittent nighttime noise environment, and to nighttime noise events, mainly related to road noise, may affect arterial stiffness, a major determinant of cardiovascular disease. Ascertaining noise exposure characteristics beyond average noise levels may be relevant to better understand noise-related health

  16. Biological and biochemical characterization of venom from the broad-banded copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix laticinctus): isolation of two new dimeric disintegrins

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez-Acosta, Alexis; Lucena, Sara; Alfonso, Andrea; Goins, Amber; Walls, Robert; Guerrero, Belsy; Suntravat, Montamas; Sánchez, Elda E.

    2016-01-01

    Disintegrins represent a family of effective cell-cell and cell-matrix inhibitors by binding to integrin receptors. Integrins are heterodimeric, transmembrane receptors that are the bridges for these cell interactions. Disintegrins have been shown to have many therapeutic implications for the treatment of strokes, heart attacks, and cancer. Two novel heterodimeric disintegrins were isolated from the venom of the broad-banded copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix laticinctus). Crude venom separat...

  17. Research on the Energy Characteristics of Battlefield Blasting Noise Based on Wavelet Packet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Kai; Yan, Shoucheng; Zhu, Yichao; Zhao, Ming; Mei, Bi

    2017-12-01

    When the acoustic fuse of smart landmines tries to detect and recognize a ground vehicle target, it is usually affected by gun shooting, explosive blasting or other similar noises on the actual battlefield. To improve the target recognition of smart landmines, it would be necessary to study the characteristics of these acoustic signals. Using sample data of the shooting noise of a certain type of rifle, the blasting noise of TNT, and the acoustic signals of a certain type of WAV, the energy characteristics of these noise signals are compared and analyzed. The result shows that the wavelet-packet energy method is effective in describing the characteristics of these acoustic signals with distinct intertype variations, and the frequency at the peak energy value can serve as a signature parameter for recognizing battlefield blasting noise signals from vehicle target signals.

  18. Characteristics of computed tomographic reconstruction noise and their effect on detectability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanson, K.M.; Boyd, D.P.

    1977-01-01

    The EMI 5005 scanner produces images with noise characteristics similar to those in simulated CT reconstructions. A detectability phantom is described which will provide a means of investigation of the effect on human detection capability of the peculiar correlations present in the noise present in CT scanner images.

  19. Vibration and noise characteristics of hook type olive harvesters

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Jane

    2011-08-03

    Aug 3, 2011 ... involves circulatory disorders (for example, vibration white finger), sensory and motor disorders and mus- culoskeletal disorders, which may occur in workers who use vibrating handheld tools (Vegara et al., 2008). The noise exposure can cause different disorders and symptoms. Levels from 66 dB (A) to 85 ...

  20. Numerical Study of Noise Characteristics in Overexpanded Jet Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-05

    Bourne, M., and Fisher, M. J., “The Noise from Shock Waves in Supersonic Jets,” AGARD -CP- 131, 1973, pp. 1-13. [2]. Tanna, H. K., “An Experimental Study...speed turbulent jets using an LES database ”, Journal of Sound and Vibration 333 (2014) 6900-6923. [53]. Crawley, M. and Samimy, M., “Decomposition of

  1. Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noise is all around you, from televisions and radios to lawn mowers and washing machines. Normally, you ... sensitive structures of the inner ear and cause noise-induced hearing loss. More than 30 million Americans ...

  2. The geometrical effect of single walled carbon nanotube network transistors on low frequency noise characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Un Jeong; Kil, Joon Pyo; Park, Wanjun

    2011-07-01

    The noise characteristics of randomly networked single walled carbon nanotubes grown directly by plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition with field effect transistor. Geometrical complexity due to the large number of tube-tube junctions in the nanotube network is expected to be one of the key factors for the noise power of 1/f dependence. We investigated low frequency noise as a function of channel length (2-10 microm) and found that increased with longer channel length. Percolational behaviors of nanotube network that differs from ordinary semiconducting and metallic materials can be characterized by a geometrical picture with electrical homo- and hetero-junctions. Fixed nanotube density provides a test conditions to evaluate the contributions of junctions as a noise center. Hooge's empirical law is applied to investigate the low frequency noise characteristics of single walled carbon nanotube random network transistors. The noise power shows the dependence of the transistor channel length. It is understood that nanotube/nanotube junctions act as a noise center. However, the differences induced by channel length in the noise power are observed as not so significant. We conclude that tolerance of low frequency noise is important property for SWNT networks as an electronic device application.

  3. Detecting shapes in noise: tuning characteristics of global shape mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidtmann, Gunnar; Gordon, Gael E.; Bennett, David M.; Loffler, Gunter

    2013-01-01

    The proportion of signal elements embedded in noise needed to detect a signal is a standard tool for investigating motion perception. This paradigm was applied to the shape domain to determine how local information is pooled into a global percept. Stimulus arrays consisted of oriented Gabor elements that sampled the circumference of concentric radial frequency (RF) patterns. Individual Gabors were oriented tangentially to the shape (signal) or randomly (noise). In different conditions, signal elements were located randomly within the entire array or constrained to fall along one of the concentric contours. Coherence thresholds were measured for RF patterns with various frequencies (number of corners) and amplitudes (“sharpness” of corners). Coherence thresholds (about 10% = 15 elements) were lowest for circular shapes. Manipulating shape frequency or amplitude showed a range where thresholds remain unaffected (frequency ≤ RF4; amplitude ≤ 0.05). Increasing either parameter caused thresholds to rise. Compared to circles, thresholds increased by approximately four times for RF13 and five times for amplitudes of 0.3. Confining the signals to individual contours significantly reduced the number of elements needed to reach threshold (between 4 and 6), independent of the total number of elements on the contour or contour shape. Finally, adding external noise to the orientation of the elements had a greater effect on detection thresholds than adding noise to their position. These results provide evidence for a series of highly sensitive, shape-specific analysers which sum information globally but only from within specific annuli. These global mechanisms are tuned to position and orientation of local elements from which they pool information. The overall performance for arrays of elements can be explained by the sensitivity of multiple, independent concentric shape detectors rather than a single detector integrating information widely across space (e.g. Glass

  4. Experimental investigation of noise characteristics for HVAC silencers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bujoreanu Carmen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC systems represent a major source of inside buildings noise with a negative effect on the acoustical environment. Therefore, it is necessary to add attenuation to the system. This is provided by sound attenuators or silencers manufactured in different geometrical configurations and with various absorptive lining materials. The paper deals with the insertion loss, as a performance criterion for in-duct noise, of some dissipative silencers types. The measured data are compared in order to establish the efficiency of every tested silencer type. Third-octave band analysis of random noise of an air handling unit (AHU from a HVAC system is realized without and with silencers (ducts fitted. Insertion loss measurements are made in an anechoic room using a test facility that agrees the requirements of ISO 7235:2009. The results highlight the effects of the silencers geometry, pressure-air flow and loading relations upon the sound attenuation level. The silencers selection could be a difficult task for the designers which have to consider all these parameters.

  5. Noise characteristics analysis of short wave infrared InGaAs focal plane arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chunlei; Li, Xue; Yang, Bo; Huang, Songlei; Shao, Xiumei; Zhang, Yaguang; Gong, Haimei

    2017-09-01

    The increasing application of InGaAs short wave infrared (SWIR) focal plane arrays (FPAs) in low light level imaging requires ultra-low noise FPAs. This paper presents the theoretical analysis of FPA noise, and point out that both dark current and detector capacitance strongly affect the FPA noise. The impact of dark current and detector capacitance on FPA noise is compared in different situations. In order to obtain low noise performance FPAs, the demand for reducing detector capacitance is higher especially when pixel pitch is smaller, integration time is shorter, and integration capacitance is larger. Several InGaAs FPAs were measured and analyzed, the experiments' results could be well fitted to the calculated results. The study found that the major contributor of FPA noise is coupled noise with shorter integration time. The influence of detector capacitance on FPA noise is more significant than that of dark current. To investigate the effect of detector performance on FPA noise, two kinds of photodiodes with different concentration of the absorption layer were fabricated. The detectors' performance and noise characteristics were measured and analyzed, the results are consistent with that of theoretical analysis.

  6. Biological and biochemical characterization of venom from the broad-banded copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix laticinctus): isolation of two new dimeric disintegrins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodríguez-Acosta, Alexis; Lucena, Sara; Alfonso, Andrea; Goins, Amber; Walls, Robert; Guerrero, Belsy; Suntravat, Montamas; Sánchez, Elda E

    2016-01-01

    Disintegrins represent a family of effective cell-cell and cell-matrix inhibitors by binding to integrin receptors. Integrins are heterodimeric, transmembrane receptors that are the bridges for these cell interactions. Disintegrins have been shown to have many therapeutic implications for the treatment of strokes, heart attacks, and cancer. Two novel heterodimeric disintegrins were isolated from the venom of the broad-banded copperhead (Agkistrodon contortrix laticinctus). Crude venom separated by cation-exchange chromatography resulted in several fractions possessing hemorrhagic, fibrinolytic, gelatinase, and platelet activities. Venom fractions 2-3 and 17-19 showed fibrinolytic activity. Fractions 2-6, 8-11, and 16-21 had hemorrhagic activity. Gelatinase activity was found in fractions 3, 11, and 19. The isolation of laticinstatins 1 and 2 was accomplished by fractionating crude venom using reverse phase chromatography. Data from both SDS-PAGE and N-terminal sequencing determined that laticinstatins 1 and 2 were heterodimeric disintegrins, and both were assayed for their ability to inhibit platelet aggregation in human whole blood. Future functional evaluation of snake venom disintegrins shows considerable promise for elucidating the biochemical mechanisms of integrin-ligand interactions that will allow the development of adequate medications for hemostatic pathologies such as thrombosis, stroke, and cerebral and cardiac accidents. In this study, we are presenting the first report of the purification, and partial characterization of two new dimeric disintegrins isolated from the venom of broad-banded copperhead snakes.

  7. The effect of broad-band Alfven-cyclotron waves spectra on the preferential heating and differential acceleration of He{sup ++} ions in the solar wind

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maneva, Y. G. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington DC, 20064 (United States) and Heliophysics Science Devision, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Ofman, L. [Department of Physics, Catholic University of America, Washington, DC 20064 (United States) and Heliophysics Science Devision, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Vinas, A. F. [Heliophysics Science Devision, NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States)

    2013-06-13

    In anticipation of results from inner heliospheric missions such as the Solar Orbiter and the Solar Probe we present the results from 1.5D hybrid simulations to study the role of magnetic fluctuations for the heating and differential acceleration of He{sup ++} ions in the solar wind. We consider the effects of nonlinear Alfven-cyclotron waves at different frequency regimes. Monochromatic nonlinear Alfven-alpha-cyclotron waves are known to preferentially heat and accelerate He{sup ++} ions in collisionless low beta plasma. In this study we demonstrate that these effects are preserved when higherfrequency monochromatic and broad-band spectra of Alfven-proton-cyclotron waves are considered. Comparison between several nonlinear monochromatic waves shows that the ion temperatures, anisotropies and relative drift are quantitatively affected by the shift in frequency. Including a broad-band wave-spectrum results in a significant reduction of both the parallel and the perpendicular temperature components for the He{sup ++} ions, whereas the proton heating is barely influenced, with the parallel proton temperature only slightly enhanced. The differential streaming is strongly affected by the available wave power in the resonant daughter ion-acoustic waves. Therefore for the same initial wave energy, the relative drift is significantly reduced in the case of initial wave-spectra in comparison to the simulations with monochromatic waves.

  8. Broad-band Fourier transform spectroradiometer for the characterisation of atmospheric emission in the far infrared spectral range

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palchetti, L.; Bianchini, G.; Esposito, F.

    A spectroradiometer has been developed for the characterisation of the atmospheric emission in the 100-1100 cm-1 spectral range with a resolution of 0.5 cm-1 and a signal-to-noise ratio of 100. This instrument has been studied in the framework of the REFIR (Radiation Explorer in the Far InfraRed) space project, which addresses the need for new data in a range not yet covered by any current or planned space mission for improving our knowledge of the distribution of the atmospheric components that modulate the Earh's emission, such as mid and upper tropospheric water vapour and clouds. The spectroradiometer is a based on a Fourier transform polarising interferometer with a new optical scheme that makes use of four polarising beam splitters and room-temperature pyroelectric detectors. It provides all the desired features including broad spectral coverage, two separated input ports and two output ports, optical compensation for tilt errors in the moving mirror unit, measurement of the overall input signal (both planes of polarization) on the same detector. This optical configuration maximizes the reliability of the spectrometer in particular for long lifetime space operations or for field campaigns and optimizes its performances with room temperature operations. The spectroradiometer is a compact instrument designed both for laboratory applications and for field campaings. In particular it has been designed for operations in high-altitude ground-based campaigns and on a stratospheric balloon platform. This work describes the design and fabrication of this instrument, the results of the spectroscopic characterisation performed in laboratory conditions and under vacuum, and possibly the first tests on atmospheric measurements scheduled for the beginning of 2004 in the South of Italy.

  9. Noise characteristics of stacked CMOS active pixel sensor for charged particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kunihiro, Takuya E-mail: kunihiro@geo.titech.ac.jp; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Takayanagi, Isao; Nakamura, Junichi; Kosaka, Koji; Yurimoto, Hisayoshi

    2001-09-11

    The noise characteristics of a stacked CMOS active pixel sensor (SCAPS) for incident charged particles have been analyzed under 4.5 keV Si{sup +} ion irradiation. The source of SCAPS dark current was found to change from thermal to electron leakage with decreasing device temperature. Leakage current at charge integration part in a pixel has been reduced to 0.1 electrons s{sup -1} at 77 K. The incident ion signals are computed by subtracting reset frame values from each frame using a non-destructive readout operation. With increase of irradiated ions, the dominant noise source changed from read noise, and shot noise from the incident ions, to signal frame fixed-pattern noise from variations in sensitivity between pixels. Pixel read noise is equivalent to ten incident ions. The charge of an incident ion is converted to 1.5 electrons in the pixel capacitor. Shot noise corresponds to the statistical fluctuation of incident ions. Signal frame fixed-pattern noise is 0.7% of the signal. By comparing full well conditions to noise floor, a dynamic range of 80 dB is achieved. SCPAS is useful as a two-dimensional detector for microanalyses such as stigmatic secondary ion mass spectrometry.

  10. Two-dimensional simulation of broad-band ferrite electromagnetic wave absorbers by using the FDTD method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Hyun Jin; Kim, Dong Il [Korea Maritime University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-10-15

    The purpose of this simulation study is to design and fabricate an electromagnetic (EM) wave absorber in order to develop a wide-band absorber. We have proposed and modeled a bird-eye-type and cutting-cone-type EM wave absorber by using the equivalent material constants method (EMCM), and we simulated them by using a finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. A two or a three-dimensional simulation would be desirable to analyze the EM wave absorber characteristics and to develop new structures. The two-dimensional FDTD simulation requires less computer resources than a three-dimensional simulation to consider the structural effects of the EM wave absorbers. The numerical simulation by using the FDTD method shows propagating EM waves in various types of periodic structure EM wave absorbers. Simultaneously, a Fourier analysis is used to characterize the input pulse and the reflected EM waves for ferrite absorbers with various structures. The results have a wide-band reflection-reducing characteristic. The validity of the proposed model was confirmed by comparing the two-dimensional simulation with the experimental results. The simulations were carried out in the frequency band from 30 MHz to 10 GHz.

  11. Research on characteristics of radiated noise of large cargo ship in shallow water

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yongdong; Zhang, Liang

    2017-01-01

    With the rapid development of the shipping industry, the number of the world's ship is gradually increasing. The characteristics of the radiated noise of the ship are also of concern. Since the noise source characteristics of multichannel interference, the surface wave and the sea temperature microstructure and other reasons, the sound signal received in the time-frequency domain has varying characteristics. The signal of the radiated noise of the large cargo ship JOCHOH from horizontal hydrophone array in some shallow water of China is processed and analyzed in the summer of 2015, and the results show that a large cargo ship JOCHOH has a number of noise sources in the direction of the ship's bow and stern lines, such as host, auxiliary and propellers. The radiating sound waves generated by these sources do not meet the spherical wave law at lower frequency in the ocean, and its radiated noise has inherent spatial distribution, the variation characteristics of the radiated noise the large cargo ship in time and frequency domain are given. The research method and results are of particular importance.

  12. Flow and Noise Characteristics of Centrifugal Fan under Different Stall Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Zhang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available An implicit, time-accurate 3D Reynolds-averaged Navier-Stokes (RANS solver is used to simulate the rotating stall phenomenon in a centrifugal fan. The goal of the present work is to shed light on the flow field and particularly the aerodynamic noise at different stall conditions. Aerodynamic characteristics, frequency domain characteristics, and the contours of sound power level under two different stall conditions are discussed in this paper. The results show that, with the decrease of valve opening, the amplitude of full pressure and flow fluctuations tends to be larger and the stall frequency remains the same. The flow field analysis indicates that the area occupied by stall cells expands with the decrease of flow rate. The noise calculation based on the simulation underlines the role of vortex noise after the occurrence of rotating stall, showing that the high noise area rotates along with the stall cell in the circumferential direction.

  13. Evaluation of noise propagation characteristics of compressors in tehran oil refinery center and presenting control methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golmohammadi, Rostam; Monazzam, Mohammad Reza; Nourollahi, Maryam; Nezafat, Ali; Momen Bellah Fard, Samaneh

    2010-06-24

    The adverse effects of noise are well known and noise problems due to industrialization of communities are increasing over the time. Oil industries due to the process and nature of production; contain many noise sources such as compressors, turbines, and pumps, which cause excessive noise exposure. The objective of this study was to evaluate the noise characteristics of compressors in Tehran Oil Refinery and study on visible control measures.  To get to the appropriate control method, procedures such as basic theories, measuring sound parameters, frequency analysis, related diagrams and noise propagation schemes due to the measurement results, equivalent noise exposure level (L(eq(8h))) and exposure noise dose and  technical specification of compressors are considered in this paper. Considering field and analytical re-sults, module enclosure with particular specifications (like absorbent layer, specific wall, window and door design etc.) is predicted to be the best control method.  Calculation results of multiple layer density of the enclosure (W = 16.5 kg/m(2)) and needed density for the dominant frequency of the source (W = 12 kg/m(2)) demonstrated that the designed enclosure satisfies the goal. RESULTS of designing sandwich layers' module demonstrated that install-ing the designed enclosure causes 20 dB(A) reduction in total sound pres-sure level of the source's dominant frequency.

  14. An Experimental Study on the Radiation Noise Characteristics of a Centrifugal Pump with Various Working Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang Guo

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the radiation noise characteristics of a centrifugal pump under various working conditions, a noise measurement system is established; afterwards, the distribution of different points and intervals, as well as the overall level of noise, are studied. The total sound pressure level distribution for different points manifests the dipole and asymmetric directivity characteristics. Additionally, the acoustic energy is introduced to compare the noise of different intervals to reveal the asymmetric characteristics, and it is found that variation in working conditions has little impact on the acoustic energy distribution, and the ratio of the acoustic energy in the direction facing the tongue, as well as that in the direction against the tongue, to total acoustic energy fluctuate around 0.410 and 0.160, respectively, under various working conditions. Also, the A-weighted average sound pressure level (LpA is applied to describe the overall level of noise, and LpA increases gradually with the growth of rotational speed, but the growth slope decreases. While in the operation of throttling regulation, LpA shows the trend that first increases, then remains stable, and increases again with the growth of flow rate. This study could provide guidance for optimizing the operating conditions and noise control of centrifugal pumps.

  15. Extrapolation of earth-based solar irradiance measurements to exoatmospheric levels for broad-band and selected absorption-band observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reagan, John A.; Pilewskie, Peter A.; Scott-Fleming, Ian C.; Herman, Benjamin M.; Ben-David, Avishai

    1987-01-01

    Techniques for extrapolating earth-based spectral band measurements of directly transmitted solar irradiance to equivalent exoatmospheric signal levels were used to aid in determining system gain settings of the Halogen Occultation Experiment (HALOE) sunsensor being developed for the NASA Upper Atmosphere Research Satellite and for the Stratospheric Aerosol and Gas (SAGE) 2 instrument on the Earth Radiation Budget Satellite. A band transmittance approach was employed for the HALOE sunsensor which has a broad-band channel determined by the spectral responsivity of a silicon detector. A modified Langley plot approach, assuming a square-root law behavior for the water vapor transmittance, was used for the SAGE-2 940 nm water vapor channel.

  16. Investigation of Relative Time Constant Influence of Inertial Part of Superheater on Quality of Steam Temperature Control Behind Boiler in Broad Band of Loading Variations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. T. Kulakov

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is devoted to computational investigation of influence relative time constant of an object which changes in broad band on quality of steam temperature control behind a boiler with due account of value of regulating action in the system with PI- and PID- regulator. The simulation has been based on a single-loop automatic control system (ACS. It has been revealed that the less value of the relative time constant of an object leads to more integral control error in system with PID- regulator while operating external ACS perturbation. Decrease of numerical value of relative time constant of an object while operating external perturbation causes decrease of relative time concerning appearance of maximum dynamic control error from common relative control time.

  17. The broad-band X-ray spectra of Mrk 926, 4U 1344-60 and ESO 141-G055

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohfink, Anne; Fabian, Andrew C.; Buisson, Douglas; Kara, Erin; Reynolds, Christopher S.

    2017-08-01

    Mrk 926, 4U 1344-60 and ESO 141-G055 are bright Seyfert 1 galaxies that contrary to many of the Seyfert 1s studied in-depth with NuSTAR do not show signs of relativistic reflection. We present results from the spectroscopic analyses of simultaneous Swift-NuSTAR or in case of Mrk 926 XMM-NuSTAR observations of these three AGN. The broad-band spectral coverage and the simplicity of the spectra allows us to measure the primary emission with great accuracy. We use the results from our spectral studies and others in the literature to explore whether the differences in reflection-strength in bright Seyfert 1s coincide with any differences in the Comptonization parameters. This allows us to test the hypothesis that the detection of a relativistic reflection component is geometry-driven.

  18. Significance of data-quality control in passive seismic experiments exemplified on CZ broad-band seismic pool MOBNET in the AlpArray collaborative project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vecsey, Ludek; Plomerova, Jaroslava; Jedlicka, Petr; Babuska, Vladislav

    2017-04-01

    We focus on major issues related to data reliability and the MOBNET network performance in the AlpArray seismic experiment. Twenty temporary broad-band stations of the Czech MOBNET pool of mobile stations are currently involved in the AlpArray Seismological Network and previously were deployed in the AlpArray EASI complementary experiment. Currently-used high-resolution seismological methods require high-quality data (1) during a long-time period from observatories as well as (2) during full-time operation of temporary stations. We present both hardware and software tools we have developed to reach the high standard of quality of broad-band seismic data. Special attention is paid to issues like a detection of sensor mis-orientation, timing problems, exchange of components and/or their polarity reversal, as well as sensor mass centring, or anomalous channel amplitudes due to, e.g., imperfectly set gain. Thorough data-quality control should represent an integral constituent of seismic data recordings, pre-processing and archiving, especially for the data from temporary stations in passive seismic experiments. Large international experiments require enormous efforts of scientists from different countries and institutions to gather hundreds of stations to be deployed in the field simultaneously for a limited time period. Each participating group is required to contribute to the experiment with high-quality and reliable seismic data. We demonstrate beneficial effects of the suggested procedures for having a large set of high-quality and reliable data to be shared among researchers.

  19. Investigation of the correlation between noise and vibration characteristics and unsteady flow in a circulator pump

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Denghao; Ren, Yun; Mou, Jiegang; Gu, Yunqing [Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou (China)

    2017-05-15

    Circulator pumps have wide engineering applications but the acoustics, vibration and unsteady flow structures of the circulator pump are still not fully understood. We investigated the noise and vibration characteristics and unsteady flow structures in a circulator pump at different flow rates. Three-dimensional, unsteady RANS equations were solved on high-quality structured meshes with SST k-ω turbulence model numerically. Measurements were made in a semi-anechoic chamber to get an overview of noise and vibration level of a pump at different flow rates. The 1/3 octave-band filter technique was applied to obtain the explicit frequency spectra of sound, pressure fluctuations and vibration signals and their principal frequencies were identified successfully. The air-borne noise level of the designed condition is lower than that of the off-design conditions, and the highest sound pressure level is found at part-load condition. The acoustic emission from the pump is mainly caused by unsteady flow structures and pressure fluctuations. In addition, both the link between air- borne noise and pressure fluctuation, and the correlation between vibration and unsteady hydrodynamic forces, were quantitatively examined and verified. This work offers good data to understand noise and vibration characteristics of circulator pumps and the relationships among the noise, vibration and unsteady flow structures.

  20. Characteristics Analysis of Joint Acoustic Echo and Noise Suppression in Periodic Drillstring Waveguide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A new method of wireless data telemetry used by oil industry uses compressional acoustic waves to transmit downhole information from the bottom hole to the surface. Unfortunately, acoustic echoes and drilling vibration noises in periodic drillstring are a major issue in transmission performance. A combined acoustic echo and noise suppression method based on wave motion characteristic in drillstring is adopted to enhance an upward-going transmitted acoustic signal. The presented scheme consists of a primary acoustic echo canceller using an array of two accelerometers for dealing with the downward-going noises and a secondary acoustic insulation structure for restraining the upward-going vibration noises. Furthermore, the secondary acoustic insulation structure exhibits a banded and dispersive spectral structure because of periodic groove configuration. By using a finite-differential algorithm for the one-dimensional propagation of longitudinal waves, acoustic receiving characteristics of transmitted signals are simulated with additive Gaussian noise in a periodic pipe structure of limited length to investigate the effects on transmission performance optimization. The results reveal that the proposed scheme can achieve a much lower error bit ratio over a specified acoustic isolation frequency range with a 30–40 dB reduction in the average noise level compared to traditional single-receiver scheme.

  1. Internal atmospheric noise characteristics in twentieth century coupled atmosphere-ocean model simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colfescu, Ioana; Schneider, Edwin K.

    2017-09-01

    The statistical characteristics of the atmospheric internal variability (hereafter internal atmospheric noise) for surface pressure (PS) in twentieth century simulations of a coupled general circulation model are documented. The atmospheric noise is determined from daily post-industrial (1871-1998) Community Climate System Model 3 simulations by removing the SST and externally forced responses from the total fields. The forced responses are found from atmosphere-only simulations forced by the SST and external forcing of the coupled runs. However, we do not address the influence of the SST variability on the synoptic scale high frequency weather noise.The spatial patterns of the main seasonal modes of atmospheric noise variability are found for boreal winter and summer from empirical orthogonal function analyses performed globally and for various regions, including the North Atlantic, the North Pacific, and the equatorial Pacific. The temporal characteristics of the modes are illustrated by power spectra and probability density functions (PDF) of the principal components (PC). Our findings show that, for two different realizations of noise, the variability is dominated by large scale spatial structures of the atmospheric noise that resemble observed patterns, and that their relative amplitudes in the CGCM and AGCM simulations are very similar. The regional expression of the dominant global mode, a seasonally dependent AO-like or AAO-like pattern is also found in the regional analyses, with similar time dependence. The PCs in the CGCM and the corresponding SST forced AGCM simulations are uncorrelated, but the spectra and PDFs of the CGCM and AGCM PCs are similar.The temporal structures of the noise PCs are white at timescales larger than few months, so that these modes can be thought of as stochastic forcings (in time) for the climate system. The PDFs of the noise PCs are not statistically distinguishable from Gaussian distributions with the same standard deviation

  2. Objective approach for analysis of noise source characteristics and acoustic conditions in noisy computerized embroidery workrooms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aliabadi, Mohsen; Golmohammadi, Rostam; Mansoorizadeh, Muharram

    2014-03-01

    It is highly important to analyze the acoustic properties of workrooms in order to identify best noise control measures from the standpoint of noise exposure limits. Due to the fact that sound pressure is dependent upon environments, it cannot be a suitable parameter for determining the share of workroom acoustic characteristics in producing noise pollution. This paper aims to empirically analyze noise source characteristics and acoustic properties of noisy embroidery workrooms based on special parameters. In this regard, reverberation time as the special room acoustic parameter in 30 workrooms was measured based on ISO 3382-2. Sound power quantity of embroidery machines was also determined based on ISO 9614-3. Multiple linear regression was employed for predicting reverberation time based on acoustic features of the workrooms using MATLAB software. The results showed that the measured reverberation times in most of the workrooms were approximately within the ranges recommended by ISO 11690-1. Similarity between reverberation time values calculated by the Sabine formula and measured values was relatively poor (R (2) = 0.39). This can be due to the inaccurate estimation of the acoustic influence of furniture and formula preconditions. Therefore, this value cannot be considered representative of an actual acoustic room. However, the prediction performance of the regression method with root mean square error (RMSE) = 0.23 s and R (2) = 0.69 is relatively acceptable. Because the sound power of the embroidery machines was relatively high, these sources get the highest priority when it comes to applying noise controls. Finally, an objective approach for the determination of the share of workroom acoustic characteristics in producing noise could facilitate the identification of cost-effective noise controls.

  3. Noise and Electrical Characteristics below 10 K of small CHFET Circuits and Discrete Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Thomas J.; Gee, Russell; Fossum, Eric R.; Baier, Steven M.

    1993-01-01

    This paper discusses the lates results of a continuing study of the properties of the complementary heterojunction field-effect transistor (CHFET) at 4K. The electrical characteristics, including the gate leakage current and the subthreshold transconductance, and the input-referred noise voltage for a new lot of discrete CHFETs is presented and discussed.

  4. Frequency-dependent noise characteristics in a gas-to-liquid plant ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Frequency-dependent noise characteristics in a gas-to-liquid plant in the swamp area of the Niger delta. GI Alaminiokuma, VB Omubo-Pepple, MA Briggs-Kamara. Abstract. No Abstract. Global Journal of Pure and Applied Sciences Vol. 13 (2) 2007: pp. 305-312. Full Text: EMAIL FULL TEXT EMAIL FULL TEXT

  5. On the Analysis of Wind-Induced Noise in Seismological Recordings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lott, Friederike F.; Ritter, Joachim R. R.; Al-Qaryouti, Mahmoud; Corsmeier, Ulrich

    2017-03-01

    Atmospheric processes, ranging from microscale turbulence to severe storms on the synoptic scale, impact the continuous ground motion of the earth and have the potential to induce strong broad-band noise in seismological recordings. We designed a target-oriented experiment to quantify the influence of wind on ground motion velocity in the Dead Sea valley. For the period from March 2014 to February 2015, a seismological array, consisting of 15 three-component short-period and broad-band stations, was operated near Madaba, Jordan, complemented by one meteorological tower providing synchronized, continuous three-component measurements of wind speed. Results reveal a pronounced, predominantly linear increase of the logarithmic power of ground motion velocity with rising mean horizontal wind speed at all recording stations. Measurements in rough, mountainous terrain further identify a strong dependency of wind-induced noise on surface characteristics, such as topography and, therefore, demonstrate the necessity to consider wind direction as well. To assess the noise level of seismological recordings with respect to a dynamically changing wind field, we develop a methodology to account for the dependency of power spectral density of ground motion velocity on wind speed and wind direction for long, statistically significant periods. We further introduce the quantitative measure of the ground motion susceptibility to estimate the vulnerability of seismological recordings to the presence of wind.

  6. Audiologic characteristics in a sample of recently-separated military Veterans: The Noise Outcomes in Servicemembers Epidemiology Study (NOISE Study).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, J S; Griest, S E; Thielman, E J; Carlson, K F; Helt, W J; Lewis, M S; Blankenship, C; Austin, D; Theodoroff, S M; Henry, J A

    2017-06-01

    Military Service Members are often exposed to high levels of occupational noise, solvents, and other exposures that can be damaging to the auditory system. Little is known about hearing loss and how it progresses in Veterans following military service. This epidemiology study is designed to evaluate and monitor a cohort of Veterans for 20 years or more to determine how hearing loss changes over time and how those changes are related to noise exposure and other ototoxic exposures encountered during military service. Data reported here are from baseline assessments of the first 100 study participants (84 males; 16 females; mean age 33.5 years; SD 8.8; range 21-58). Each participant was asked to complete a comprehensive audiologic examination and self-report questionnaires regarding sociodemographic characteristics, noise and solvent exposures, health conditions common among post-deployment Veterans, and the social and emotional consequences of hearing loss. For this relatively young cohort, 29% exhibited hearing loss, defined as average hearing threshold >20 dB HL in the conventional audiometric range. Forty-two percent exhibited hearing loss in the extended-high-frequency audiometric range using the same criterion (average hearing threshold >20 dB HL). Certain factors were found to be associated with poorer hearing in both conventional and extended-high-frequency ranges, including age, type of military branch, years of military service, number of military deployments, noise exposure, tinnitus, and a positive screen for post-traumatic stress disorder. Although the majority of participants had hearing within normal limits, 27% reported a self-perceived mild/moderate hearing handicap and 14% reported a significant handicap. Further research is needed to identify a cause for this discrepancy in audiologic results versus self-report. The information obtained from this longitudinal study could be used in future resource planning with the goal of preventing, as much as

  7. Noise attenuation characteristics of a foam type earplug measured using a dummy head.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Idota, Nozomi; Horie, Seichi; Tsutsui, Takao; Inoue, Jinro

    2002-03-01

    The attenuation characteristics of the earplug using a dummy head (KEMAR; Knowles Electronics Manikin for Acoustic Research) were measured, when it was exposed to pure tones or broadband noises at three different sound pressure levels (SPLs) of 70, 80 and 90 dB SPL in the 'wide frequency range from 250 to 20 k Hz. We ascertained the satisfactory capacity of noise attenuation except for from 10 k to 14 k Hz. The noise attenuation level increased with frequency until 2 k Hz, became almost constant until 8 k Hz, then decreased at around 10 k to 14 k Hz, and recovered in the range from 16 k to 20 k Hz. The frequency characteristics were identical among three different sound pressure levels and almost identical between pure tones and broadband noises. The change of frequency characteristics affected by the depth of the earplug that was inserted into the artificial ear canal of the KEMAR was also investigated. Measured sound pressure level by the builetin microphone in the KEMAR revealed a region in which the measured sound pressure levels were relatively higher around 10 k Hz. The frequency of the region moved higher when the earplug was inserted more deeply. Therefore it was considered that this phenomenon was related to the resonance frequency of the cylinder-like cavity made between the end section of the earplug and the diaphragm of the built-in microphone.

  8. Disentangling the complex broad-band X-ray spectrum of IRAS 13197-1627 with NuSTAR, XMM-Newton and Suzaku

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walton, D. J.; Brightman, M.; Risaliti, G.; Fabian, A. C.; Fürst, F.; Harrison, F. A.; Lohfink, A.; Matt, G.; Miniutti, G.; Parker, M. L.; Stern, D.

    2018-02-01

    We present results from a coordinated XMM-Newton+NuSTAR observation of the type 1.8 Seyfert galaxy IRAS 13197-1627. This is a highly complex source, with strong contributions from relativistic reflection from the inner accretion disc, neutral absorption and further reprocessing by more distant material, and ionized absorption from an outflow. We undertake a detailed spectral analysis combining the broad-band coverage provided by XMM-Newton+NuSTAR with a multi-epoch approach incorporating archival observations performed by XMM-Newton and Suzaku. Our focus is on characterizing the reflection from the inner accretion disc, which previous works have suggested may dominate the AGN emission, and constraining the black hole spin. Using lamppost disc reflection models, we find that the results for the inner disc are largely insensitive to assumptions regarding the geometry of the distant reprocessor and the precise form of the illuminating X-ray continuum. However, these results do depend on the treatment of the iron abundance of the distant absorber/reprocessor. The multi-epoch data favour a scenario in which the AGN is chemically homogeneous, and we find that a rapidly rotating black hole is preferred, with a* ≥ 0.7, but a slowly rotating black hole is not strongly excluded. In addition to the results for the inner disc, we also find that both the neutral and ionized absorbers vary from epoch to epoch, implying that both have some degree of inhomogeneity in their structure.

  9. Sensitivity of broad-band ground-motion simulations to earthquake source and Earth structure variations: an application to the Messina Straits (Italy)

    KAUST Repository

    Imperatori, W.

    2012-03-01

    In this paper, we investigate ground-motion variability due to different faulting approximations and crustal-model parametrizations in the Messina Straits area (Southern Italy). Considering three 1-D velocity models proposed for this region and a total of 72 different source realizations, we compute broad-band (0-10 Hz) synthetics for Mw 7.0 events using a fault plane geometry recently proposed. We explore source complexity in terms of classic kinematic (constant rise-time and rupture speed) and pseudo-dynamic models (variable rise-time and rupture speed). Heterogeneous slip distributions are generated using a Von Karman autocorrelation function. Rise-time variability is related to slip, whereas rupture speed variations are connected to static stress drop. Boxcar, triangle and modified Yoffe are the adopted source time functions. We find that ground-motion variability associated to differences in crustal models is constant and becomes important at intermediate and long periods. On the other hand, source-induced ground-motion variability is negligible at long periods and strong at intermediate-short periods. Using our source-modelling approach and the three different 1-D structural models, we investigate shaking levels for the 1908 Mw 7.1 Messina earthquake adopting a recently proposed model for fault geometry and final slip. Our simulations suggest that peak levels in Messina and Reggio Calabria must have reached 0.6-0.7 g during this earthquake.

  10. Fast label-free detection of C-reactive protein using broad-band Mach-Zehnder interferometers integrated on silicon chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Psarouli, Aimilia; Botsialas, Athanasios; Salapatas, Alexandros; Stefanitsis, Gerasimos; Nikita, Dimitra; Jobst, Gerhard; Chaniotakis, Nikolaos; Goustouridis, Dimitrios; Makarona, Eleni; Petrou, Panagiota S; Raptis, Ioannis; Misiakos, Konstantinos; Kakabakos, Sotirios E

    2017-04-01

    An immunosensor for fast and accurate determination of C-reactive protein (CRP) in human serum samples based on an array of all-silicon broad-band Mach-Zehnder interferometers (BB-MZIs) is demonstrated. The detection was based on monitoring the spectral shifts during the binding of CRP on the antibody molecules that have been immobilized on the sensing arms of the BB-MZIs. By employing the reaction rate as the analytical signal the assay time was compressed to few minutes. The detection limit was 2.1ng/mL, the quantification limit was 4.2ng/mL and the linear dynamic range extended up to 100ng/mL. The measurements performed in human serum samples with the developed immunosensor were characterized by high repeatability and accuracy as it was demonstrated by dilution linearity and recovery experiments. In addition, the concentration values determined were in excellent agreement with those determined for the same samples by a standard clinical laboratory method. The compact size of the chip makes the proposed immunosensor attractive for incorporation into miniaturized devices for the determination of clinical analytes at the point-of-need. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Self-organizing map and its application in the analysis of ambient noise characteristics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Chunxia; Li, Guijuan; Che, Shuwei; Bai, Jin

    2017-01-01

    The Self-organizing map (SOM) is an unsupervised neural network based on competitive learning, and can solve the problem that the center of clustering is unknown. SOM's theory and the implementation of algorithm are studied in this paper. Simulating example is given to approve the feasibility of SOM in characteristic assessment for multivariate sample. The Ambient sea noise measurement is made in August 2014 on some sea of China. The total source level was forecasted using "ROSS formula" and the sailing information. The statistical variability of broadband ambient noise at frequencies between 20Hz and 31.5 kHz is obtained using SOM. The comparison between measured sound pressure and forecasting pressure is given, and the preliminary analysis of the relationship between ambient noise level and vessels is carried out. The results provide the technical reference to understand the temporal and spatial statistical variability of ambient noise, and are an efficient tool in assessing the potential effect of shipping noise on marine mammals in the special sea area.

  12. Occupational noise exposure and hearing loss characteristics of a blue-collar population

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Helmkamp, J.C.; Talbott, E.O.; Margolis, H.

    1984-12-01

    Recent studies of health effects from chronic exposure to noise in the workplace have not consistently addressed nonoccupational variables. A cross-sectional study was conducted with 197 randomly selected male hourly workers from a noisy plant ( greater than or equal to 89 dBA) in Pittsburgh to fully assess noise exposure and hearing loss, incorporating information on duration of exposure, noise level, occupational and medical histories, audiometric evaluation, and external noise sources. Population audiometric profiles are characteristic of noise-induced hearing loss; mean hearing thresholds for press room men were significantly higher at 2, 3, and 6 kHz (p less than or equal to .05). Only 40% of the men consistently wore hearing protection. Recent use of ototoxic drugs, noisy hobbies/second jobs, military service, family history of hearing loss, and ear-related problems were not found to have a significant effect on hearing levels at high frequencies, suggesting that observed hearing losses were of an occupational origin. 31 references, 3 figures, 3 tables.

  13. Overall noise characteristics of reduced images on liquid crystal display and advantages of independent subpixel driving technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamazaki, Asumi; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Kodera, Yoshie; Funahashi, Masao

    2013-02-01

    During soft-copy diagnoses, medical images with a large number of matrices often need to display reduced images on liquid crystal displays (LCDs) because of the spatial resolution limitation of LCDs. A new technology, known as independent subpixel driving (ISD), was recently applied to clinical uses aiming to improve the spatial resolution. The authors' study demonstrates the overall noise characteristics of images displayed on a LCD at various display magnifications, with and without ISD application. Measurements of the overall noise power spectra (NPS) of x-ray images displayed on LCD were performed at varying display magnifications, with and without ISD. The NPS of displayed images in several display situations were also simulated based on hypothetical noise factors. The measured and simulated NPS showed that noise characteristics worsened when the display magnification was reduced, due to aliasing errors. The overall noise characteristics were attributed to luminance-value fluctuation converted from pixel values, image-interpolation effects, inherent noise, and blurring of the LCD. ISD improved the noise characteristics because it suppressed noise increments by aliasing errors. ISD affected the noise-characteristic advantages of reduced images displayed on LCDs, particularly at low frequencies.

  14. Simultaneous exposure to ethyl benzene and noise : synergistic effects on outer hair cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cappaert, N.L.M.; Klis, S.F.L.; Muijser, H.; Kulig, B.M.; Smoorenburg, G.F.

    2001-01-01

    The effects on hearing of simultaneous exposure to the ototoxic organic solvent ethyl benzene and broad-band noise were evaluated in rats. The effects of three ethyl benzene concentrations (0, 300 or 400 ppm) and three noise levels (95 or 105 dBlin SPL or background noise at 65 dBlin SPL) and all

  15. Modelling the variable broad-band optical/UV/X-ray spectrum of PG1211+143: implications for the ionized outflow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papadakis, I. E.; Nicastro, F.; Panagiotou, C.

    2016-06-01

    Context. We present the results from a detailed analysis of the 2007 Swift monitoring campaign of the quasar PG1211+143. Aims: We study its broad-band optical/UV-X-ray spectral energy distribution and its variations, with the use of physically motivated models. Methods: We constructed broad-band, optical/UV-X-ray spectral energy distributions over three X-ray flux intervals, and we fitted them with a model which accounts for the disc and the X-ray coronal emission. We also added a spectral model component to account for the presence of the warm absorber which has been well established from past observations of the source. Results: We detected no optical/UV variations over the two-month period of the monitoring campaign. On the other hand, the X-rays are highly variable in a correlated way in the soft and hard X-ray bands with an amplitude larger than has been commonly observed in nearby Seyferts, even on longer time scales. The three flux spectra are well fitted by the model we considered. The disc inner temperature remains constant at ~2 eV, while X-rays are variable in slope and normalization. The absorber covers almost 90% of the central source. It is outflowing with a velocity less than 2.3 × 104 km s-1 (3σ upper limit), and has a column density of log NH ~ 23.2. Its ionization parameter varies by a factor of 1.6, and it is in photo-ionizing equilibrium with the ionizing flux. It is located at a distance of less than 0.35 pc from the central source, and its relative thickness, ΔR/R, is less than 0.1. The absorber's ionization parameter variations can explain the larger than average amplitude of the X-ray variations. Conclusions: The absence of optical/UV variations are consistent with the high black hole mass estimate of ~108M⊙ for this object, which implies variability time scales longer than the period of the Swift observations. It argues against the presence of inward propagating fluctuations in the disc as the reason for the flux variability in this

  16. Optical broad-band photometry and reference image for APMUKS(BJ) B215839.70-615403.9 / ASASSN-15lh from the Dark Energy Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melchior, Peter; Drlica-Wagner, Alexander; Bechtol, Keith; Rykoff, Eli; Hartley, William; Dark Energy Survey Collaboration

    2015-07-01

    We report optical broad-band photometry of the host galaxy APMUKS(BJ) B215839.70-615403.9 of SLSN ASASSN-15lh (ATel #7642; Dong et al., arXiv:1507.03010). The images were obtained using the DECam imager on the Blanco 4-m telescope at NOAO's Cerro Tololo Inter-American Observatory during Year-2 observations of the Dark Energy Survey (DES). A preliminary reduction of the images was performed by the DES Data Management pipeline (Mohr et al. 2012, SPIE Conference Series, 84510D; Desai et al. 2012, ApJ, 757, 83). The photometry was measured using SExtractor with additional calibration via stellar locus regression to provide magnitude zero points with 2-3% calibration uncertainty for point sources (relative to 2MASS) and mildly increased uncertainties for extended sources. We fit the DES g-r, r-i, and i-z colors to a red-sequence model from redMaPPer (Rykoff et al. 2014, ApJ, 785, 104) and obtain a redshift 0.25±0.02, consistent with the spectroscopic redshift of z = 0.2326 (ATel #7774). Fixed to that redshift, the host photometry is fully consistent with a red-sequence galaxy. We combine photometry from DES grizY with VHS NIR (ATel #7776) and WISE IR and fit a linear combination of single stellar populations with a variety of ages. We find that the fit is dominated by an old (5 Gyr) component, consistent with those of elliptical galaxies. We further compare with dusty SEDs taken from the latest set of templates in EAZY (Brammer, van Dokkum & Coppi, 2008, ApJ, 686, 1503). The combined host photometry is not well described by any of the dusty templates.

  17. Surface wave tomography of North America and the Caribbean using global and regional broad-band networks: Phase velocity maps and limitations of ray theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godey, S.; Snieder, R.; Villasenor, A.; Benz, H.M.

    2003-01-01

    We present phase velocity maps of fundamental mode Rayleigh waves across the North American and Caribbean plates. Our data set consists of 1846 waveforms from 172 events recorded at 91 broad-band stations operating in North America. We compute phase velocity maps in four narrow period bands between 50 and 150 s using a non-linear waveform inversion method that solves for phase velocity perturbations relative to a reference Earth model (PREM). Our results show a strong velocity contrast between high velocities beneath the stable North American craton, and lower velocities in the tectonically active western margin, in agreement with other regional and global surface wave tomography studies. We perform detailed comparisons with global model results, which display good agreement between phase velocity maps in the location and amplitude of the anomalies. However, forward modelling shows that regional maps are more accurate for predicting waveforms. In addition, at long periods, the amplitude of the velocity anomalies imaged in our regional phase velocity maps is three time larger than in global phase velocity models. This amplitude factor is necessary to explain the data accurately, showing that regional models provide a better image of velocity structures. Synthetic tests show that the raypath coverage used in this study enables one to resolve velocity features of the order of 800-1000 km. However, only larger length-scale features are observed in the phase velocity maps. The limitation in resolution of our maps can be attributed to the wave propagation theory used in the inversion. Ray theory does not account for off-great-circle ray propagation effects, such as ray bending or scattering. For wavelengths less than 1000 km, scattering effects are significant and may need to be considered.

  18. Low-frequency noise characteristics of lamellar ferrielectric crystal CuInP2S6 at the phase transition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamaraite, I.; Matukas, J.; Pralgauskaite, S.; Vysochanskii, Yu.; Banys, J.; Dziaugys, A.

    2017-07-01

    The detailed investigations of low-frequency noise characteristics of a ferrielectric CuInP2S6 crystal are presented at the vicinity of phase transition. The white noise spectra are observed at room temperature. Voltage noise spectra are characterized by 1/f noise above the phase transition temperature. Lorentzian-type spectra were applied to investigate the normalized voltage fluctuation density, in order to obtain a deeper insight into the phenomenon of 1/f noise in the CuInP2S6 crystal. The analysis of experimental data revealed that the source of the 1/f noise in the CuInP2S6 crystal is the carrier number fluctuation due to the recombination between defect levels. The obtained results indicate noise spectroscopy as being a reliable, sensitive, and non-destructive tool complementary to the other measurement techniques for the characterization of ferroelectric materials.

  19. Wind turbine noise diagnostics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richarz, W. [Aerocoustics Engineering Ltd., Toronto, ON (Canada); Richarz, H.

    2009-07-01

    This presentation proposed a self-consistent model for broad-band noise emitted from modern wind turbines. The simple source model was consistent with the physics of sound generation and considered the unique features of wind turbines. Although the acoustics of wind turbines are similar to those of conventional propellers, the dimensions of wind turbines pose unique challenges in diagnosing noise emission. The general features of the sound field were deduced. Source motion and source directivity appear to be responsible for amplitude variations. The amplitude modulation is likely to make wind-turbine noise more audible, and may be partly responsible for annoyance that has been reported in the literature. Acoustic array data suggests that broad-band noise is emitted predominantly during the downward sweep of each rotor blade. Source motion and source directivity account for the observed pattern. Rotor-tower interaction effects are of lesser importance. Predicted amplitude modulation ranges from 1 dB to 6dB. 2 refs., 9 figs.

  20. Ultrathin, high-efficiency, broad-band, omni-acceptance, organic solar cells enhanced by plasmonic cavity with subwavelength hole array.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Stephen Y; Ding, Wei

    2013-01-14

    Three of central challenges in solar cells are high light coupling into solar cell, high light trapping and absorption in a sub-absorption-length-thick active layer, and replacement of the indium-tin-oxide (ITO) transparent electrode used in thin-film devices. Here, we report a proposal and the first experimental study and demonstration of a new ultra-thin high-efficiency organic solar cell (SC), termed "plasmonic cavity with subwavelength hole-array (PlaCSH) solar cell", that offers a solution to all three issues with unprecedented performances. The ultrathin PlaCSH-SC is a thin plasmonic cavity that consists of a 30 nm thick front metal-mesh electrode with subwavelength hole-array (MESH) which replaces ITO, a thin (100 nm thick) back metal electrode, and in-between a polymer photovoltaic active layer (P3HT/PCBM) of 85 nm thick (1/3 average absorption-length). Experimentally, the PlaCSH-SCs have achieved (1) light coupling-efficiency/absorptance as high as 96% (average 90%), broad-band, and Omni acceptance (light coupling nearly independent of both light incident angle and polarization); (2) an external quantum efficiency of 69% for only 27% single-pass active layer absorptance; leading to (3) a 4.4% power conversion efficiency (PCE) at standard-solar-irradiation, which is 52% higher than the reference ITO-SC (identical structure and fabrication to PlaCSH-SC except MESH replaced by ITO), and also is among the highest PCE for the material system that was achievable previously only by using thick active materials and/or optimized polymer compositions and treatments. In harvesting scattered light, the Omni acceptance can increase PCE by additional 81% over ITO-SC, leading to a total 175% increase (i.e. 8% PCE). Furthermore, we found that (a) after formation of PlaCSH the light reflection and absorption by MESH are reduced by 2 to 6 fold from the values when it is alone; and (b) the sheet resistance of a 30 nm thick MESH is 2.2 ohm/sq or less-4.5 fold or more lower

  1. Simulation of broad-band strong ground motion for a hypothetical Mw 7.1 earthquake on the Enriquillo Fault in Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Douilly, Roby; Mavroeidis, George P.; Calais, Eric

    2017-10-01

    The devastating 2010 Mw 7.0 Haiti earthquake demonstrated the need to improve mitigation and preparedness for future seismic events in the region. Previous studies have shown that the earthquake did not occur on the Enriquillo Fault, the main plate boundary fault running through the heavily populated Port-au-Prince region, but on the nearby and previously unknown transpressional Léogâne Fault. Slip on that fault has increased stresses on the segment of Enriquillo Fault to the east of Léogâne, which terminates in the ˜3-million-inhabitant capital city of Port-au-Prince. In this study, we investigate ground shaking in the vicinity of Port-au-Prince, if a hypothetical rupture similar to the 2010 Haiti earthquake occurred on that segment of the Enriquillo Fault. We use a finite element method and assumptions on regional tectonic stress to simulate the low-frequency ground motion components using dynamic rupture propagation for a 52-km-long segment. We consider eight scenarios by varying parameters such as hypocentre location, initial shear stress and fault dip. The high-frequency ground motion components are simulated using the specific barrier model in the context of the stochastic modeling approach. The broad-band ground motion synthetics are subsequently obtained by combining the low-frequency components from the dynamic rupture simulation with the high-frequency components from the stochastic simulation using matched filtering at a crossover frequency of 1 Hz. Results show that rupture on a vertical Enriquillo Fault generates larger horizontal permanent displacements in Léogâne and Port-au-Prince than rupture on a south-dipping Enriquillo Fault. The mean horizontal peak ground acceleration (PGA), computed at several sites of interest throughout Port-au-Prince, has a value of ˜0.45 g, whereas the maximum horizontal PGA in Port-au-Prince is ˜0.60 g. Even though we only consider a limited number of rupture scenarios, our results suggest more intense ground

  2. Influence of mixture composition on the noise and frictional characteristics of flexible pavements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalski, Karol J.

    Both traffic noise and wet pavement-tire friction are mainly affected by the tire/pavement interaction. Existing laboratory test methods allow for evaluation of polishing resistance of the aggregates only. Currently, there is no generally accepted standardized laboratory test method to address noise related issues and the overall frictional properties of pavements (including macrotexture). In this research, which included both laboratory and field components, friction and noise properties of the flexible (asphalt) pavements were investigated. As a part of this study, a laboratory device to polish asphalt specimens was developed and the procedure to evaluate mixture frictional properties was proposed. Following this procedure, forty-six different Superpave mixtures (each utilizing a different aggregate blends), one stone matrix asphalt (SMA) mixture and one porous friction course (PFC) mixture were tested. Six of the above mixes (four Superpave mixtures, SMA mixture and PFC mixture) were selected for laboratory noise testing. This testing was performed using a one-of-a-kind tester called the Tire/Pavement Test Apparatus (TPTA). In addition, the field sections constructed using Superpave, SMA and PFC mixtures were also periodically tested for friction and noise. Field measurements included testing of total of 23 different asphalt and two concrete pavements. The field friction testing was performed using both portable CTM and DFT devices and the (ASTM E 274) locked wheel friction trailer. The laboratory friction testing was performed using CTM and DFT devices only. The results of both field and laboratory friction measurements were used to develop an International Friction Index (IFI)-based frictional requirement for laboratory friction measurements. The results collected in the course of the study indicate that the IFI-based flag values could be successfully used in place of SN-based flag values to characterize frictional characteristics of pavements.

  3. Tyre-road noise measurements: influence of tyre tread and road characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bezemer-Krijnen, Marieke; Wijnant, Ysbrand H.; de Boer, Andries

    2016-01-01

    Traffic noise is a well known problem. For speeds above approximately 40 km/h the noise is mostly tyre-road noise. The noise level depends on the tyre, the road and the interaction between the tyre and the road. There are various well-known methods to measure tyre-road noise and in this paper the

  4. Experimental investigation on noise radiation characteristics of pulse detonation engine–driven ejector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi-qiao Huang

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available The noise radiation characteristics of multi-cycle pulse detonation engine with and without ejector were investigated under different operating frequencies utilizing gasoline as fuel and air as oxidizer. The straight cylindrical ejector with convergent inlet geometry was coaxially installed at different axial locations relative to the exit of the detonation tube. In all the experiments, the equivalence ratios of gasoline–air mixture and the fill fraction were 1.2 and 1.0, respectively. The experimental results implied that the addition of ejector could drastically change the far-field acoustic performance of pulse detonation engine exit and the peak sound pressure level of noise radiation was a strong function of the ejector axial position. But the peak sound pressure level was not sensitive to the operating frequencies which varied from 10 to 25 Hz. The pulse sound pressure level, however, increased with the increase in operating frequencies. The far-field jet-noise measurements of the pulse detonation engine-ejector system also showed that ejector could decrease the peak sound pressure level of pulse detonation engine. The maximum reduction was approximately 8.5 dB. For the current pulse detonation engine test conditions, an optimum ejector position was found to be a downstream axial placement of x/DPDE  = 0.5.

  5. The degradation of doppler sodar performance due to noise. a review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crescenti, Gennaro H.

    Ambient background noise is a common problem for poor Doppler sodar performance. This noise can be active or passive and broad-band or narrow-band. Active broad-band noise decreases the sounding range of the sodar by decreasing the signal-to-noise ratio. Active narrow-band noise can be interpreted as erroneous wind values. Passive noise sources are objects which reflect the transmitted acoustic pulse back to the sodar with zero Doppler shift. Use of acoustic shielding is discussed as a method of noise pollution control by isolating the side lobe energy of the transmitted acoustic pulse. At the same time, these acoustic shields are effective in blocking out active ambient background noise. Previous studies which experienced noise interference are shown as examples of problems that are frequently encountered.

  6. Transport and current noise characteristics of a T-shape double-quantum-dot system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, K; Tifrea, I [Department of Physics and Astronomy, California State University, Fullerton, CA 92834 (United States); Crisan, M [Department of Theoretical Physics, ' Babes-Bolyai' University, 40084 Cluj-Napoca (Romania)

    2009-05-27

    We consider the transport and the noise characteristics for the case of a T-shape double-quantum-dot system using the equation of motion method. Our theoretical results, obtained in an approximation equivalent to the Hartree-Fock approximation, account for non-zero on-site Coulomb interaction in both the detector and side dots. The existence of a non-zero Coulomb interaction implies an additional two resonances in the detector's dot density of states and thereafter affects the electronic transport properties of the system. The system's conductance presents two Fano dips as a function of the energy of the localized electronic level in the side dot. The Fano dips in the system's conductance can be observed for both strong (fast detector) and weak coupling (slow detector) between the detector dot and the external electrodes. Due to stronger electronic correlations, the noise characteristics in the case of a slow detector are much higher. This setup may be of interest for the practical realization of qubit states in quantum dot systems.

  7. Transport and current noise characteristics of a T-shape double-quantum-dot system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, K; Crisan, M; Tifrea, I

    2009-05-27

    We consider the transport and the noise characteristics for the case of a T-shape double-quantum-dot system using the equation of motion method. Our theoretical results, obtained in an approximation equivalent to the Hartree-Fock approximation, account for non-zero on-site Coulomb interaction in both the detector and side dots. The existence of a non-zero Coulomb interaction implies an additional two resonances in the detector's dot density of states and thereafter affects the electronic transport properties of the system. The system's conductance presents two Fano dips as a function of the energy of the localized electronic level in the side dot. The Fano dips in the system's conductance can be observed for both strong (fast detector) and weak coupling (slow detector) between the detector dot and the external electrodes. Due to stronger electronic correlations, the noise characteristics in the case of a slow detector are much higher. This setup may be of interest for the practical realization of qubit states in quantum dot systems.

  8. Cross-correlation methods for studying near- and far-field noise characteristics of several flow-surface interaction problems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Y. S.

    1974-01-01

    Systematic methods based on cross-correlation techniques are presented for experimental studies of near- and far-field noise characteristics of airflow-surface interaction problems. By cross-correlating any two of three-kinds of microphone measurements: one flush-mounted on the surface, one located in the near field, and one placed in the far field, far-field noise intensities and near-field acoustic energy fluxes can be determined. In both near and far fields, the noise characteristics due to the flow turbulence and surface fluctuating pressure contributions can be evaluated separately. Specific applications to the noise field generated by impinging jets, by surface blowing jets, and by turbulent flow over trailing edges are discussed.

  9. Trends in aircraft noise annoyance: The role of study and sample characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kroesen, M.; Molin, E.J.E.; Miedema, H.M.E.; Vos, H.; Janssen, S.A.; Wee, B. van

    2010-01-01

    This study assesses the effects of aircraft noise on residential satisfaction, an important indicator of subjective well-being. A structural equation model is specified that estimates the relationships between objective variables, noise annoyance variables and residential satisfaction. Secondary

  10. Is it necessary to penalize impulsive noise +5 dB due to higher risk of hearing damage?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Toro, Miguel Angel Aranda; Ordoñez, Rodrigo Pizarro; Reuter, Karen

    2011-01-01

    It is studied whether the +5 dB penalty for impulsiveness established by ISO 1999:1990 accounts for a higher risk of noise-induced hearing loss. A total of 16 normal-hearing human subjects were exposed for 10 min to two types of binaural industrial-recordings: (1) a continuous broad-band noise no...

  11. Statistical Characteristics of the Gaussian-Noise Spikes Exceeding the Specified Threshold as Applied to Discharges in a Thundercloud

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klimenko, V. V.

    2017-12-01

    We obtain expressions for the probabilities of the normal-noise spikes with the Gaussian correlation function and for the probability density of the inter-spike intervals. As distinct from the delta-correlated noise, in which the intervals are distributed by the exponential law, the probability of the subsequent spike depends on the previous spike and the interval-distribution law deviates from the exponential one for a finite noise-correlation time (frequency-bandwidth restriction). This deviation is the most pronounced for a low detection threshold. Similarity of the behaviors of the distributions of the inter-discharge intervals in a thundercloud and the noise spikes for the varying repetition rate of the discharges/spikes, which is determined by the ratio of the detection threshold to the root-mean-square value of noise, is observed. The results of this work can be useful for the quantitative description of the statistical characteristics of the noise spikes and studying the role of fluctuations for the discharge emergence in a thundercloud.

  12. Noise characteristics of resistors buried in low-temperature co-fired ceramics

    CERN Document Server

    Kolek, A; Dziedzic, A

    2003-01-01

    The comparison of noise properties of conventional thick film resistors prepared on alumina substrates and resistors embedded in low-temperature co-fired ceramics (LTCCs) is presented. Both types of resistors were prepared from commercially available resistive inks. Noise measurements of LTCC resistors below 1 kHz show Gaussian 1/f noise. This is concluded from the calculations of the second spectra as well as from studying the volume dependence of noise intensity. It has occurred that noise index of LTCC resistors on average is not worse than that of conventional resistors. A detailed study of co-fired surface resistors and co-fired buried resistors show that burying a resistor within LTCC substrate usually leads to (significant) enhancement of resistance but not of noise intensity. We interpret this behaviour as another argument in favour of tunnelling as the dominant conduction mechanism in LTCC resistors.

  13. Exploring the Relationship Between Working Memory, Compressor Speed, and Background Noise Characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohlenforst, Barbara; Souza, Pamela E.; MacDonald, Ewen

    2016-01-01

    grouped by high or low working memory according to their performance on a reading span test. Speech intelligibility was measured for low-context sentences presented in background noise, where the noise varied in the extent of amplitude modulation. Simulated fast- or slowacting compression amplification......Objectives: Previous work has shown that individuals with lower working memory demonstrate reduced intelligibility for speech processed with fast-acting compression amplification. This relationship has been noted in fluctuating noise, but the extent of noise modulation that must be present...... to elicit such an effect is unknown. This study expanded on previous study by exploring the effect of background noise modulations in relation to compression speed and working memory ability, using a range of signal to noise ratios. Design: Twenty-six older participants between ages 61 and 90 years were...

  14. Deep ocean sound speed characteristics passively derived from the ambient acoustic noise field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evers, L. G.; Wapenaar, K.; Heaney, K. D.; Snellen, M.

    2017-07-01

    The propagation of acoustic waves in the ocean strongly depends on the temperature. Low-frequency acoustic waves can penetrate the ocean down to depths where few in situ measurements are available. It is therefore attractive to obtain a measure of the deep ocean temperature from acoustic waves. The latter is especially true if the ambient acoustic noise field can be used instead of deterministic transient signals. In this study the acoustic velocity, and hence the temperature, is derived in an interferometric approach from hydrophone array recordings. The arrays were separated by over 125 km, near Ascension Island in the Atlantic Ocean, at a depth of 850 m. Furthermore, the dispersive characteristics of the deep ocean sound channel are resolved based on the retrieved lag times for different modes. In addition, it is shown how the resolution of the interferometric approach can be increased by cross correlating array beams rather than recordings from single-sensor pairs. The observed acoustic lag times between the arrays corresponds well to modelled values, based on full-wave modelling through best-known oceanic models.

  15. Exploring the Relationship Between Working Memory, Compressor Speed, and Background Noise Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohlenforst, Barbara; Souza, Pamela E; MacDonald, Ewen N

    2016-01-01

    Previous work has shown that individuals with lower working memory demonstrate reduced intelligibility for speech processed with fast-acting compression amplification. This relationship has been noted in fluctuating noise, but the extent of noise modulation that must be present to elicit such an effect is unknown. This study expanded on previous study by exploring the effect of background noise modulations in relation to compression speed and working memory ability, using a range of signal to noise ratios. Twenty-six older participants between ages 61 and 90 years were grouped by high or low working memory according to their performance on a reading span test. Speech intelligibility was measured for low-context sentences presented in background noise, where the noise varied in the extent of amplitude modulation. Simulated fast- or slow-acting compression amplification combined with individual frequency-gain shaping was applied to compensate for the individual's hearing loss. Better speech intelligibility scores were observed for participants with high working memory when fast compression was applied than when slow compression was applied. The low working memory group behaved in the opposite way and performed better under slow compression compared with fast compression. There was also a significant effect of the extent of amplitude modulation in the background noise, such that the magnitude of the score difference (fast versus slow compression) depended on the number of talkers in the background noise. The presented signal to noise ratios were not a significant factor on the measured intelligibility performance. In agreement with earlier research, high working memory allowed better speech intelligibility when fast compression was applied in modulated background noise. In the present experiment, that effect was present regardless of the extent of background noise modulation.

  16. Noise and False Alarm Rate Characteristics for Envelope Detector Systems Preceded by RF Amplification

    Science.gov (United States)

    1988-11-01

    ratio. The normalized True RMS Spectrum Voltmeter Analyzer Model # Model # HP 3403C HP 3585A Adjustable ,, I Comparator Micronetics [ Filter Noise...range of FARs measured. Figure 20 shows the detector video amplifier chain designed by Richard S. Hughes of NWC to replace the Micronetics noise sotuce

  17. Analysis of the interface characteristics of CVD-grown monolayer MoS2by noise measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tae-Young; Song, Younggul; Cho, Kyungjune; Amani, Matin; Ho Ahn, Geun; Kim, Jae-Keun; Pak, Jinsu; Chung, Seungjun; Javey, Ali; Lee, Takhee

    2017-04-07

    We investigated the current-voltage and noise characteristics of two-dimensional (2D) monolayer molybdenum disulfide (MoS 2 ) synthesized by chemical vapor deposition (CVD). A large number of trap states were produced during the CVD process of synthesizing MoS 2 , resulting in a disordered monolayer MoS 2 system. The interface trap density between CVD-grown MoS 2 and silicon dioxide was extracted from the McWhorter surface noise model. Notably, generation-recombination noise which is attributed to charge trap states was observed at the low carrier density regime. The relation between the temperature and resistance following the power law of a 2D inverted-random void model supports the idea that disordered CVD-grown monolayer MoS 2 can be analyzed using a percolation theory. This study can offer a viewpoint to interpret synthesized low-dimensional materials as highly disordered systems.

  18. BOLD contrast and noise characteristics of densely sampled multi-echo fMRI data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiew, Mark; Graham, Simon J

    2011-09-01

    Blood oxygenation level dependent (BOLD) contrast in functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) can be enhanced using multi-echo imaging and postprocessing techniques that combine the echoes in weighted summation. Here, existing echo-weighting methods are reassessed in the context of an explicit physiological noise model, and a new method is introduced: weights that scale linearly with echo time. Additionally, a method using data-driven weights defined using principal component analysis (PCA) is included for comparison. Differences in BOLD contrast enhancement between methods were compared analytically where possible, and using Monte Carlo simulations for different noise conditions and different combinations of acquisition parameters. The comparisons were also validated through densely sampled (256-echo) multi-echo fMRI experimental data acquired at 1.5T and 3.0T. Results indicated that the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) of the studied weighting methods have a strong dependence on the physiological noise, echo spacing and the width of the sampling window. With low noise correlations between echoes, contrast gain for all weighting methods was shown to have a square root dependence on the echo sampling density, and in typical experimental noise conditions, increasing the sampling window beyond 3·T2* produced marginal additional benefit. Simulations and experiments also emphasized that noise correlations between echoes are likely the main factor limiting the potential CNR gains achievable by densely sampled multi-echo fMRI.

  19. Resistivity and low-frequency noise characteristics of epoxy-carbon composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    PralgauskaitÄ--, Sandra; Matukas, Jonas; Tretjak, Marina; Macutkevic, Jan; Banys, Juras; Selskis, Algirdas; Cataldo, Antonino; Micciulla, Federico; Bellucci, Stefano; Fierro, Vanessa; Celzard, Alain

    2017-03-01

    Noise and electrical transport properties of composites based on epoxy resin filled with various carbon inclusions (single-walled carbon nanotubes, high surface area carbon black, and exfoliated graphite) were investigated in depth. The temperature dependence of resistivity shows that Mott's hopping and tunneling between conductive carbon particles dominate the charge carrier transport at low temperature, whereas a positive temperature coefficient effect occurs at higher temperature. Low-frequency noise spectra of the investigated materials comprise 1/fα type components. The noise level is the highest for composites close to the percolation threshold. The percolation threshold value of the system also strongly impacts both the temperature dependence of the noise level and the resistivity. Close to the percolation threshold, the noise level increases due to the carrier tunneling throughout the polymer matrix and decreases due to the rapid expansion of the polymer matrix. In contrast, the latter has almost no influence on the noise level far above the percolation threshold, and the small kink in the temperature dependence of the noise level indicates a crossover between tunneling and thermally activated electron transport mechanisms.

  20. Work-Related Noise Exposure in a Cohort of Patients with Chronic Tinnitus: Analysis of Demographic and Audiological Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ralli, Massimo; Balla, Maria Paola; Greco, Antonio; Altissimi, Giancarlo; Ricci, Pasquale; Turchetta, Rosaria; de Virgilio, Armando; de Vincentiis, Marco; Ricci, Serafino; Cianfrone, Giancarlo

    2017-09-08

    Work-related noise exposure is one of the major factors contributing to the development of adult-onset hearing loss and tinnitus. The aim of this study was to analyze, in patients with chronic tinnitus and long-term occupational noise exposure, (A) characteristics of hearing loss, tinnitus, comorbidities, demographic characteristics and a history of work-related noise exposure and (B) differences among individuals employed in occupations with high and low risk of developing work-related noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). One hundred thirty six patients with chronic tinnitus and at least a 10 year-long working history were divided into two groups based on the risk of their profession to induce NIHL. Individuals employed in jobs at high risk for NIHL were mostly males and exhibited a poorer hearing threshold, more evident in the left ear. Tinnitus was mostly bilateral; the next largest presentation was left-sided; patients described their tinnitus as buzzing or high-pitched. Correlation between age, length of tinnitus and worse hearing was found. Patients with a higher degree of hearing impairment were mostly males and were more likely to have a family history of hearing loss and at least one cardiovascular comorbidity. Our study shows some differences in individuals with tinnitus and a history of a profession associated with increased exposure to NIHL compared to those without such a history.

  1. Work-Related Noise Exposure in a Cohort of Patients with Chronic Tinnitus: Analysis of Demographic and Audiological Characteristics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimo Ralli

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Work-related noise exposure is one of the major factors contributing to the development of adult-onset hearing loss and tinnitus. The aim of this study was to analyze, in patients with chronic tinnitus and long-term occupational noise exposure, (A characteristics of hearing loss, tinnitus, comorbidities, demographic characteristics and a history of work-related noise exposure and (B differences among individuals employed in occupations with high and low risk of developing work-related noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL. One hundred thirty six patients with chronic tinnitus and at least a 10 year-long working history were divided into two groups based on the risk of their profession to induce NIHL. Individuals employed in jobs at high risk for NIHL were mostly males and exhibited a poorer hearing threshold, more evident in the left ear. Tinnitus was mostly bilateral; the next largest presentation was left-sided; patients described their tinnitus as buzzing or high-pitched. Correlation between age, length of tinnitus and worse hearing was found. Patients with a higher degree of hearing impairment were mostly males and were more likely to have a family history of hearing loss and at least one cardiovascular comorbidity. Our study shows some differences in individuals with tinnitus and a history of a profession associated with increased exposure to NIHL compared to those without such a history.

  2. Transmission loss characteristics of aircraft sidewall systems to control cabin interior noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yesil, Oktay; Serati, Paul M.; Hofbeck, Eric V.; Glover, Billy M.

    We have explored the possibility of using new, light weight, and acoustically effective materials on aircraft interiors to control noise. The sidewall system elements were evaluated for increased TL in the laboratory. Measured TL for a given configuration, relative to a baseline, was used as an indication of the TL change to be expected for modifications. Test data were in good agreement with the predicted levels. The TL contributions due to all sidewall components were important for interior cabin noise control. Polyimide foam insulation was inferior to fiberglass in the mid-frequency range; however, foam was a better performer at high frequencies. Fiberglass/polyimide foam composite blankets, with less weight, provided noise reductions similar to fiberglass. 'Premium' fiberglass was slightly better performer than the standard fiberglass. Solid fiberglass interior trim panel provided adequate noise performance. Production-type trim attachment design could be improved to control flanking path for sound transmission.

  3. Exploring the Relationship Between Working Memory, Compressor Speed, and Background Noise Characteristics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohlenforst, Barbara; Souza, Pamela E.; MacDonald, Ewen

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: Previous work has shown that individuals with lower working memory demonstrate reduced intelligibility for speech processed with fast-acting compression amplification. This relationship has been noted in fluctuating noise, but the extent of noise modulation that must be present...... grouped by high or low working memory according to their performance on a reading span test. Speech intelligibility was measured for low-context sentences presented in background noise, where the noise varied in the extent of amplitude modulation. Simulated fast- or slowacting compression amplification...... combined with individual frequency gain shaping was applied to compensate for the individual’s hearing loss. Results: Better speech intelligibility scores were observed for participants with high working memory when fast compression was applied than when slow compression was applied. The low working memory...

  4. Studies of ambient noise in shallow water environments off Mexico and Alaska: characteristics, metrics and time-synchronization applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Melania

    Sound in the ocean originates from multiple mechanisms, both natural and anthropogenic. Collectively, underwater ambient noise accumulates valuable information about both its sources and the oceanic environment that propagates this noise. Characterizing the features of ambient noise source mechanisms is challenging, but essential, for properly describing an acoustic environment. Disturbances to a local acoustic environment may affect many aquatic species that have adapted to be heavily dependent on this particular sense for survival functions. In the case of marine mammals, which are federally protected, demand exists for understanding such potential impacts, which drives important scientific efforts that utilize passive acoustic monitoring (PAM) tools to inform regulatory decisions. This dissertation presents two independent studies that use PAM data to investigate the characteristics of source mechanisms that dominate ambient noise in two diverse shallow water environments. The study in Chapter 2 directly addresses the concern of how anthropogenic activities can degrade the effectiveness of PAM. In the Alaskan Beaufort Sea, an environment where ambient noise is normally dominated by natural causes, seismic surveys create impulsive sounds to map the composition of the bottom. By inspecting single-sensor PAM data, the spectral characteristics of seismic survey airgun reverberation are measured, and their contribution to the overall ambient noise is quantified. This work is relevant to multiple ongoing mitigation protocols that rely on PAM to acoustically detect marine mammal presence during industrial operations. Meanwhile, Chapter 3 demonstrates that by analyzing data from multiple PAM sensors, features embedded in both directional and omnidirectional ambient noise can be used to develop new time-synchronization processing techniques for aligning autonomous elements of an acoustic array, a tool commonly used in PAM for detecting and tracking marine mammals. Using

  5. Limiting characteristics of a superconducting quantum interferometer. II. Signal-to-noise ratio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Butikov, E.I.; Feofilov, S.P.

    1980-11-01

    In the approximation of small fluctuations, the spectral density of intrinsic thermal noise limiting the maximal sensitivity of a constant-current SQUID is found in the low-frequency region. The dependence of the signal-to-noise ratio on the SQUID parameters and operating conditions of an interferometer with low-frequency magnetic flux modulation is studied. Estimates are given for the smallest detectable magnetic flux corresponding to optimal operating conditions of a SQUID.

  6. Characteristics of the Energy-Like Detector of a Gaussian Signal Against the Background of Likhter Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostylev, V. I.; Gres', I. P.

    2017-10-01

    We propose an energy-like detector of signals and analyze its efficiency by an example of detecting a Gaussian signal with zero mathematical expectation and uncorrelated readouts against the background of Likhter noise with independent readouts. Analytical expressions for the probability of correct detection are obtained and statistical simulation is performed. Using particular examples, we show that the energy-like detection characteristics can be much closer to the optimal ones than those of the energy detection.

  7. Evaluation of noise level and site response at Mt. Etna volcano and Aeolian Islands

    Science.gov (United States)

    D Amico, S.; Giampiccolo, E.; Maiolino, V.; Patanè, D.; Ursino, A.

    2003-04-01

    The aim of this work was to test the quality of the sites where the stations of the INGV-CT seismic network are installed. This because most of the installations will be soon improved with new broad-band sensors, which require a low level of background noise. Therefore, we investigated the noise level and estimated the site response at the seismic stations deployed at Mt. Etna and at Aeolian Islands, in order to evidence possible disturbs which can be related to anthropic activity, environmental factors and/or to the local soil conditions. Noise measurements were carried out using a portable digital seismic station equipped with a 3-component, 20 s sensor. The acquisition was performed both inside the vault structures where the remote stations are located and in proximity of them, on the outcropping terrain. The noise spectra were compared with the NLNM (New Low Noise Model) and NHNM (New High Noise Model) models described by Peterson (1993). A preliminary estimate of site response at each station, by applying the Nakamura (1989) technique, was also performed. The obtained results show, for some stations, higher noise levels mainly due to volcanic tremor and/or bad soil conditions. Moreover, in several cases, vault design need to be deeply reviewed and for some installations the substitution of the sites is required. References Nakamura, Y., (1989). A method for dynamic characteristics estimation of subsurface using microtremor on the ground surface. Quarterly R of Report RTRI, 30, 25-33. Peterson, J., (1993). Observations and modelling of background seismic noise. Open File Report 93-322, U. S. Geological Survey, Albuquerque, NM.

  8. Analysis of Spectral Characteristics of Seismic Noise Preceding Kachchh, India Earthquake of 19 June 2012 for Advance Warning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, I. N.; Schaff, D. P.; Rastogi, B. K.; Mahesh, P.; Wagner, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    A significant fraction of the ambient short-period seismic noise at a given site may be attributed to P, S, Rayleigh and Love waves with spectral characteristics strongly dependent on the geological structure underlying the recording station. Unlike an underground nuclear explosion, an earthquake may have intense pre-event activity within the hypocentral region. This pre-earthquake activity may occur at one or more places at various depths mostly within the hypocentral region and over short and/or long periods of time, leading to significant temporal variations in the geological environment. Some of this activity, such as generation of new cracks, may create seismic waves contributing to short-period seismic noise. All these underground phenomena will have significant influence on the spectral characteristics of noise as observed at nearby three-component recording stations.Kachchh, India Mw 5.1 Earthquake of 19 June 2012 was well recorded at several broadband stations at various epicentral distances. Analysis of limited data from two stations has indicated two distinct premonitory variations in the low-frequency (less than 0.5 Hz) spectral characteristics of noise, initiating several days before the earthquake: (1) systematic shift of peak frequencies to lower values and (2) significant changes among the three components (vertical V, radial, R and transverse, T) of ground motion, evidenced by spectral ratios such as T/R. These results for premonitory variations are similar to those observed for several earthquakes in the United States. Although these preliminary results need to be confirmed by analyzing considerably more data from several additional recording stations, they appear to suggest an entirely new methodology for obtaining advance warning of a few days or more before a large earthquake.

  9. Broad band antennas and feed methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benzel, David M.; Twogood, Richard E.

    2017-04-18

    Two or more Vivaldi antennas, consisting of two plates each, each with the antenna's natural impedance of approximately 100 ohms, are placed in parallel to achieve a 50 ohm impedance in the case of two antennas or other impedances (100/n ohms) for more than two antennas. A single Vivaldi antenna plate (half Vivaldi antenna) over a ground plane can also be used to achieve a 50 ohm impedance, or two or more single plates over a ground plane to achieve other impedances. Unbalanced 50 ohm transmission lines, e.g. coaxial cables, can be used to directly feed, the dual Vivaldi (four plate) antenna in a center fed angled center departure, or more desirably, a center fed offset departure configuration.

  10. Free electron broad-band THz radiator

    CERN Document Server

    Doria, A; Giovenale, E

    2002-01-01

    In this paper, a comparison between the conventional Tera-Hertz (THz) sources and a THz radiator based on free electron devices is proposed. The basic idea of the exploitation of some of the features of the RF FELs will be presented together with some examples that could represent an appealing source to start with. A discussion about the link between the spectrum of the emitted radiation and the electron bunch length is presented. The necessity of generating very short bunch of electrons to be injected in the radiator is demonstrated.

  11. Broad band antennas and feed methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benzel, David M.; Twogood, Richard E.

    2017-04-18

    Two or more Vivaldi antennas, consisting of two plates each, each with the antenna's natural impedance of approximately 100 ohms, are placed in parallel to achieve a 50 ohm impedance in the case of two antennas or other impedances (100/n ohms) for more than two antennas. A single Vivaldi antenna plate (half Vivaldi antenna) over a ground plane can also be used to achieve a 50 ohm impedance, or two or more single plates over a ground plane to achieve other impedances. Unbalanced 50 ohm transmission lines, e.g. coaxial cables, can be used to directly feed, the dual Vivaldi (four plate) antenna in a center fed angled center departure, or more desirably, a center fed offset departure configuration.

  12. Broad-Band Activatable White-Opsin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata Batabyal

    Full Text Available Currently, the use of optogenetic sensitization of retinal cells combined with activation/inhibition has the potential to be an alternative to retinal implants that would require electrodes inside every single neuron for high visual resolution. However, clinical translation of optogenetic activation for restoration of vision suffers from the drawback that the narrow spectral sensitivity of an opsin requires active stimulation by a blue laser or a light emitting diode with much higher intensities than ambient light. In order to allow an ambient light-based stimulation paradigm, we report the development of a 'white-opsin' that has broad spectral excitability in the visible spectrum. The cells sensitized with white-opsin showed excitability at an order of magnitude higher with white light compared to using only narrow-band light components. Further, cells sensitized with white-opsin produced a photocurrent that was five times higher than Channelrhodopsin-2 under similar photo-excitation conditions. The use of fast white-opsin may allow opsin-sensitized neurons in a degenerated retina to exhibit a higher sensitivity to ambient white light. This property, therefore, significantly lowers the activation threshold in contrast to conventional approaches that use intense narrow-band opsins and light to activate cellular stimulation.

  13. Broad Band/MILS Listening System

    Science.gov (United States)

    1971-03-02

    environmental sensors provide a means oZ long term correlation studies of temperature and current variations with acoustic propagacion phenomena. r...change in their natural resonant frequency oihen the termperature of the element itself changes. The output signal is a constant amplitude varying

  14. Experimental research on the double-peak characteristic of underwater radiated noise in the near field on top of a submarine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Ning; Wang, Sande; Guo, Tao; Li, Xiyou; Yu, Ziyang

    2011-06-01

    The double-peak characteristic of underwater radiated noise in the near field on top of the target submarine was analyzed in depth on the basis of submarine test data on the sea. The contribution of three major noise sources to the radiated noise of a submarine were compared and analyzed, and emphasis was put on the original source, production mechanism, and their correlative characteristics. On the basis of analysis on underwater tracking and pass through characteristics of the target submarine, the double-peak phenomenon was reasonably interpreted. Furthermore, the correctness of the theoretical interpretation was verified adequately in real submarine tests. The double-peak phenomenon indicates that the space distributing character on submarine radiated noise are both asymmetrical with time and space, whereas that is provided with directivity. Studying the double-peak phenomenon in depth has important reference value and meaning in engineering practice for understanding the underwater radiated noise field of submarines.

  15. Compensation of a Primary Transducer Resistance Alteration by Changing the Amplitude-Frequency Characteristics of a Noise-Thermometer Input Circle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdan STADNYK

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Method of compensation for the influence of a primary transducer resistance temperature alteration upon the determination of a noise-voltage square mean value, proportional to the measured temperature, by changing the Amplitude-Frequency Characteristics (AFCh of a noise-thermometer input circle.

  16. Characteristics and origins of common chemical noise ions in negative ESI LC-MS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trötzmüller, Martin; Guo, Xinghua; Fauland, Alexander; Köfeler, Harald; Lankmayr, Ernst

    2011-06-01

    Ionic chemical background noise in LC-MS has been one of the major problems encountered in trace analysis. In this study, the typical negative background ions in ESI LC-MS are investigated exemplarily. It was carried out using tandem mass spectrometry to study the products and precursors of the major background ions to examine their structures and structure relationship. Various typical LC eluents with different compositions and additives such as ammonium formate/formic acid and ammonium acetate/acetic acid have been studied. Several types of negative noise ions are concluded, which include the cluster chemical background ions only from mobile phase components and additives. Furthermore, there are also abundant clusters resulting from the solvation of some typical individual contaminants (e.g. additives and degradation products from tubing, impurities in the mobile phase, etc.), accompanied by some minor contribution from contaminants. The elemental composition of some selected ions was confirmed using the FT-ICR accurate mass measurement. This work provides us insight into information about the structures and types of common negative background ions and will help to understand their formation and origins. More importantly, it will guide us to prevent chemical noise interference in practice and also contribute to develop methods for noise reduction based on selective ion-molecule reactions. Copyright © 2011 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Dissemination stability and phase noise characteristics in a cascaded, fiber-based long-haul radio frequency dissemination network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, C; Wang, B; Zhu, X; Yuan, Y B; Wang, L J

    2015-09-01

    To study the dissemination stability and phase noise characteristics of the cascaded fiber-based RF dissemination, we perform an experiment using three sets of RF modulated frequency dissemination systems. The experimental results show that the total transfer stability of the cascaded system can be given by σ(T)(2)=∑(i=1)(N)σ(i)(2) (σ(i) is the frequency dissemination stability of the ith segment and N is the quantity of segments). Furthermore, for each segment, the phase noise of recovered frequency signal is also measured. The results show that for an N-segment, cascaded dissemination system, its stability degrades only by a factor of N. This sub-linear relation makes the cascaded, RF-dissemination method a very attractive one for long-haul, time and frequency dissemination network.

  18. Phase Noise Characteristics of Fiber Lasers as Potential Ultra-Stable Master Oscillators

    CERN Document Server

    Winter, Axel; Ilday, Fatih O; Kaertner, Franz X; Kim, Jung-Won; Schlarb, Holger; Schmüser, Peter

    2005-01-01

    Fourth-generation light sources, such as the European X-Ray free electron laser facility (XFEL) require timing signals distributed over distances of the order of kilometers with a timing jitter in the order of femtoseconds. The master clock for the proposed optical distribution system must operate with exceptionally low timing jitter. A promising approach is the use of a mode-locked laser that generates ultrastable pulses which are distributed via timing stabilized fiber links. Candidates for the pulse source are mode-locked Erbium doped fiber lasers, featuring very low high frequency noise. In this paper, we present a study of the phase noise of various fiber lasers in view of their applicability as laser-based master oscillators for femtosecond timing distributions.

  19. Analysis of low frequency noise characteristics in p-type polycrystalline silicon thin film transistors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuan; En, Yun-Fei; Fang, Wen-Xiao

    2017-07-01

    Low frequency noises in the p-type polycrystalline silicon thin film transistors are investigated. It shows a pure 1/fγ (with γ near one) noise behavior which can be explained by emission and trapping processes of carriers between trapping states. Subsequently, the gate voltage-dependent drain current noise power spectral densities closely follow the mobility fluctuation model, and the average Hooge’s parameter is then extracted. By considering traditional tunneling processes, the flat-band voltage spectral density is extracted and the concentration of traps in the grain boundary is calculated to be 7.17 × 1020cm-3eV-1. By converting the frequency to tunneling depth of carriers in the gate oxide, the spatial distribution of gate oxide trapped charges are obtained. Finally, the distribution of localized states in the energy band is extracted. The experimental results show an exponential deep states and tail states distribution in the band gap while NDD is about 1.5 × 1020cm-3eV-1, TDD is ˜617 K, NTD is ˜3.6 × 1021cm-3eV-1 and TTD is ˜265 K.

  20. Characteristics of CALIOP attenuated backscatter noise: implication for cloud/aerosol detection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. L. Wu

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available A research algorithm is developed for noise evaluation and feature detection of the CALIOP (Cloud-Aerosol Lidar with Orthogonal Polarization Level 1 (L1 backscatter data with an emphasis on cloud/aerosol features in the upper troposphere and lower stratosphere (UT/LS. CALIOP measurement noise of the version v2.01 and v2.02 L1 backscatter data aggregated to (5 km horizontal resolution is analyzed with two approaches in this study. One is to compare the observed and modeled molecular scatter profiles by scaling the modeled profile (with a fitted scaling factor α to the observed clear-sky backscatter profiles. This scaling α value is sensitive to errors in the calibrated backscatter and the atmospheric model used. Most of the nighttime 532-nm α values are close to unity, as expected, but an abrupt drop occurred in October 2008 in the daytime 532-nm α, which is likely indicative of a problem in the v2.02 daytime calibrated data. The 1064-nm night α is generally close to 2 while its day α is ~3. The other approach to evaluate the lidar measurement noise is to use the calibrated lidar backscatter data at altitudes above 19 km. With this method, the 532-nm and 1064-nm measurement noises are analyzed and characterized individually for each profile in terms of the mean (μ and standard deviation (σ, showing larger σ values in general over landmasses or bright surfaces during day and in radiation-hard regions during night. A significant increasing trend is evident in the nighttime 1064-nm σ, which is likely responsible for the increasing difference between the feature occurrence frequencies (532-nm vs. 1064-nm derived from this study. For feature detection with the research algorithm, we apply a σ–based method to the aggregated L1 data. The derived morphology of feature occurrence frequency is in general agreement with that obtained from the Level 2 (L2 05 km_CLAY+05 km_ALAY products at 5 km horizontal resolution. Finally, a normalized

  1. Electronic characteristics of doped InAs/GaAs quantum dot photodetector: temperature dependent dark current and noise density

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Chung-Chi; Tang, Shiang-Feng; Chen, Tzu-Chiang; Chiang, Cheng-Der; Yang, San-Te; Su, Wen-Kuan

    2006-02-01

    The noise characteristics associated with dark current, photoconductive gain (PC), capture probability in doped InAs dots embedded in In 0.1Ga 0.9As/GaAs spacer layer have been proposed. The photoconductive and photovoltaic behaviors of the InAs/GaAs quantum dot infrared photodetector (QDIP) from the intersubband transition measurements are also clearly observed. Through noise measurement in dynamic signal analyzer (HP35670A) 1, the electronic bandpass filter frequencies are set up ranging from 3 to 10 KHz in a low noise current preamplifier (SR570) 2. The lock-in amplifier (SR830) 3 can be also used to measure and calibrate the noise density by means of the mean average deviation (MAD) contrast with noise spectra from HP35670A. The InAs/GaAs QDIP studied in this work belongs to n +-n-n + structure with the top and free blocking barrier layers. It is observed that the owing blocking layer of QDIP not only suppress dark current successfully but also probably reduce the photocurrent 4-6. By systematically optoelectronic measurements and simulations, the modified model of noise current, photoconductive gain, and capture probability in the quantum devices have been proposed. It is shown that photoconductive gain is almost independent of bias under the lower bias, then increasing exponentially under higher bias and below the temperature of 80K. In contrast to quantum well infrared photodetector (QWIP), a higher photoconductive gain of the quantum dot infrared photodetector has been demonstrated and attributed to the longer lifetimes of excited carriers in quantum dots 7-10. At 80K, a photoconductive gain of tens of thousand is shown in the regions of higher biases. It is clear to note that the highest detectivity of the QDIP surprisingly approach to 3.0×10 12 cmHz 1/2/W at -0.6V under measured temperature 20 K. Under 80K, the average D* is obtained ~10 10 cmHz 1/2/W. To our knowledge, this is the one of highest D* data in the world.

  2. Instantaneous geodetic positioning with 10-50 Hz GPS measurements: Noise characteristics and implications for monitoring networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Genrich, Joachim F.; Bock, Yehuda

    2006-03-01

    Recent earthquake recordings from high-rate (1 Hz) continuous GPS stations in California indicate that even higher temporal resolution provided by modern GPS receivers is desirable. We measured seven baselines during time intervals devoid of detectable transient signals at sampling rates of 1-50 Hz with geodetic receivers from four manufacturers to investigate the noise characteristics of these data. Our tests over short distances (meters) to typical station spacing (tens of kilometers) of regional GPS networks show no loss of spatial resolution compared to 1-Hz samples. Measurement noise is red with the typical ramp profile of log-log spectra below about 0.5 Hz. Above this frequency, noise is essentially white. Low-pass filtering of high-rate positions achieves improved spatial resolution compared to decimated raw samples. Averaging 20-Hz measurements to 2-Hz samples on a 40-km baseline, for example, yields about 0.5 mm horizontal and about 3-4 mm vertical accuracy at high frequencies. These estimates are a factor of 2-2.5 better than for 2-Hz raw samples. The improvements in spatial resolution due to averaging at high frequencies are substantial and approach the theoretical "square-root-of-n" expectation for independent samples. However, since noise spectral densities rise rapidly below about 0.5-Hz, low-pass filtering is only effective above this frequency. These results have important implications for the design of continuous GPS networks for crustal deformation and structural monitoring and for positioning and attitude determination of dynamic platforms.

  3. Efficiency of neural transmission as a function of synaptic noise, threshold, and source characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paprocki, Bartosz; Szczepanski, Janusz

    2011-07-01

    There has been a growing interest in the estimation of information carried by a single neuron and multiple single units or population of neurons to specific stimuli. In this paper we analyze, inspired by article of Levy and Baxter (2002), the efficiency of a neuronal communication by considering dendrosomatic summation as a Shannon-type channel (1948) and by considering such uncertain synaptic transmission as part of the dendrosomatic computation. Specifically, we study Mutual Information between input and output signals for different types of neuronal network architectures by applying efficient entropy estimators. We analyze the influence of the following quantities affecting transmission abilities of neurons: synaptic failure, activation threshold, firing rate and type of the input source. We observed a number of surprising non-intuitive effects. It turns out that, especially for lower activation thresholds, significant synaptic noise can lead even to twofold increase of the transmission efficiency. Moreover, the efficiency turns out to be a non-monotonic function of the activation threshold. We find a universal value of threshold for which a local maximum of Mutual Information is achieved for most of the neuronal architectures, regardless of the type of the source (correlated and non-correlated). Additionally, to reach the global maximum the optimal firing rates must increase with the threshold. This effect is particularly visible for lower firing rates. For higher firing rates the influence of synaptic noise on the transmission efficiency is more advantageous. Noise is an inherent component of communication in biological systems, hence, based on our analysis, we conjecture that the neuronal architecture was adjusted to make more effective use of this attribute. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Vibration and Acoustic Noise Characteristic on SRM with compensating winding by two stage commutation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oh, Seok Gyu; Choi, Tae Wan [Chinju National University (Korea); Lee, Jong Gun [Kumho Electronics Co., Ltd. (Korea)

    2001-06-01

    SRM drives generate large vibration and acoustic noise because it is rotated by step pulse mmf and switching commutation mechanism. The main vibration source of SRM drive is generated by rapidly variation of radial force when phase winding current is extinguished for commutation action. So the rapidly variation of radial force is repressed firstly to reduce vibrating force of SRM drive. This paper suggests an SRM excitation scheme using unidirect-short compensation winding to reduce vibration of the motor. The motor is excited by a two stage commutation method during commutation period. This reduction effect of vibration is verified with the result obtained in the test of prototype machine. (author). 7 refs., 11 figs.

  5. Relation between measures of speech-in-noise performance and measures of efferent activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Brad; Harkrider, Ashley; Burchfield, Samuel; Nabelek, Anna

    2003-04-01

    Individual differences in auditory perceptual abilities in noise are well documented but the factors causing such variability are unclear. The purpose of this study was to determine if individual differences in responses measured from the auditory efferent system were correlated to individual variations in speech-in-noise performance. The relation between behavioral performance on three speech-in-noise tasks and two objective measures of the efferent auditory system were examined in thirty normal-hearing, young adults. Two of the speech-in-noise tasks measured an acceptable noise level, the maximum level of speech-babble noise that a subject is willing to accept while listening to a story. For these, the acceptable noise level was evaluated using both an ipsilateral (story and noise in same ear) and a contralateral (story and noise in opposite ears) paradigm. The third speech-in-noise task evaluated speech recognition using monosyllabic words presented in competing speech babble. Auditory efferent activity was assessed by examining the resulting suppression of click-evoked otoacoustic emissions following the introduction of a contralateral, broad-band stimulus and the activity of the ipsilateral and contralateral acoustic reflex arc was evaluated using tones and broad-band noise. Results will be discussed relative to current theories of speech in noise performance and auditory inhibitory processes.

  6. Enhanced 2 μm broad-band emission and NIR to visible frequency up-conversion from Ho3+/Yb3+ co-doped Bi2O3-GeO2-ZnO glasses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Kaushik; Sontakke, Atul D; Sen, R; Annapurna, K

    2013-08-01

    In this work, a new and non-conventional oxide glass composition based on Bi2O3-GeO2-ZnO system has been formulated with an aim to realize low phonon oxide glass and elucidate its performance when co-doped with Ho(3+)/Yb(3+) for the energy transfer based NIR emission at 2 μm from Ho(3+) ions under Yb(3+) excitation. The glass with 1.0 mol% Ho2O3 and 0.5 mol% Yb2O3 has exhibited maximum energy transfer rate (3602 s(-1)) and energy transfer efficiency (65.92%). Important radiative properties have been predicted for emission transitions of Ho(3+) ions using intensity parameters derived from measured absorption spectra using standard Judd-Ofelt theory. At lower acceptor ion concentration (0.1 mol%), an efficient NIR to visible up-conversion emission has been observed based on two photon absorption process which has found to be reduced significantly at higher Ho(3+) concentrations with simultaneous enhancement in 2 μm emission. Hence, this newly developed glass codoped with Yb(3+)/Ho(3+) is promising glass for sensitized 2 μm emission applications as broad band tunable lasers because of the combination of low phonon energy (707 cm(-1)), high energy transfer efficiency, moderately high emission cross-section (5.33×10(-21) cm(2)) and larger effective half-width of the emission band value of 169 nm. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Scaling characteristics of one-dimensional fractional diffusion processes in the presence of power-law distributed random noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nezhadhaghighi, Mohsen Ghasemi

    2017-08-01

    Here, we present results of numerical simulations and the scaling characteristics of one-dimensional random fluctuations with heavy-tailed probability distribution functions. Assuming that the distribution function of the random fluctuations obeys Lévy statistics with a power-law scaling exponent, we investigate the fractional diffusion equation in the presence of μ -stable Lévy noise. We study the scaling properties of the global width and two-point correlation functions and then compare the analytical and numerical results for the growth exponent β and the roughness exponent α . We also investigate the fractional Fokker-Planck equation for heavy-tailed random fluctuations. We show that the fractional diffusion processes in the presence of μ -stable Lévy noise display special scaling properties in the probability distribution function (PDF). Finally, we numerically study the scaling properties of the heavy-tailed random fluctuations by using the diffusion entropy analysis. This method is based on the evaluation of the Shannon entropy of the PDF generated by the random fluctuations, rather than on the measurement of the global width of the process. We apply the diffusion entropy analysis to extract the growth exponent β and to confirm the validity of our numerical analysis.

  8. Propagation characteristics of audible noise generated by single corona source under positive DC voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuebao; Cui, Xiang; Lu, Tiebing; Wang, Donglai

    2017-10-01

    The directivity and lateral profile of corona-generated audible noise (AN) from a single corona source are measured through experiments carried out in the semi-anechoic laboratory. The experimental results show that the waveform of corona-generated AN consists of a series of random sound pressure pulses whose pulse amplitudes decrease with the increase of measurement distance. A single corona source can be regarded as a non-directional AN source, and the A-weighted SPL (sound pressure level) decreases 6 dB(A) as doubling the measurement distance. Then, qualitative explanations for the rationality of treating the single corona source as a point source are given on the basis of the Ingard's theory for sound generation in corona discharge. Furthermore, we take into consideration of the ground reflection and the air attenuation to reconstruct the propagation features of AN from the single corona source. The calculated results agree with the measurement well, which validates the propagation model. Finally, the influence of the ground reflection on the SPL is presented in the paper.

  9. Propagation characteristics of audible noise generated by single corona source under positive DC voltage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuebao Li

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available The directivity and lateral profile of corona-generated audible noise (AN from a single corona source are measured through experiments carried out in the semi-anechoic laboratory. The experimental results show that the waveform of corona-generated AN consists of a series of random sound pressure pulses whose pulse amplitudes decrease with the increase of measurement distance. A single corona source can be regarded as a non-directional AN source, and the A-weighted SPL (sound pressure level decreases 6 dB(A as doubling the measurement distance. Then, qualitative explanations for the rationality of treating the single corona source as a point source are given on the basis of the Ingard’s theory for sound generation in corona discharge. Furthermore, we take into consideration of the ground reflection and the air attenuation to reconstruct the propagation features of AN from the single corona source. The calculated results agree with the measurement well, which validates the propagation model. Finally, the influence of the ground reflection on the SPL is presented in the paper.

  10. High-quality octa-level fringe pattern generation for improving the noise characteristics of measured depth maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Zi-Xin; Chan, Yuk-Hee; Lun, Daniel P. K.

    2017-11-01

    Since the introduction of the binary defocusing technique, various algorithms have been proposed to optimize binary fringe patterns for reducing the phase root mean square (rms) error. Our recent study showed that octa-level fringe patterns can further reduce the phase rms error at no extra cost and patch-based fringe patterns can cause harmonic distortion to the measured depth map. This paper presents a novel method to produce patch-based octa-level fringe patterns of ideal noise characteristics by (1) formulating the optimization problem in a better way, (2) starting the optimization process with a better initial estimate and (3) adopting a necessity-oriented strategy to refine the fringe patterns during the optimization process.

  11. A comparison of two diagnostic performance measures: signal-to-noise ratio versus partial area under receiver operating characteristic curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taner, Mehmet Tolga; Sezen, Bulent; Atwat, Kamal

    2013-01-01

    This paper aims to compare two diagnostic performance measures, i.e. signal-to-noise ratio (S/N ratio) and partial area under receiver operating characteristic curves (pAUC). It proposes the use of S/N ratio rather than pAUC for establishing optimal cut-off point for diagnostic biomarkers. This paper discusses the properties, uses, advantages and shortcomings of the two performance measures, namely the partial area under receiver operating characteristic curve (pAUC) and Taguchi's signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio. The benefits of S/N ratio have been illustrated in a sample of four biomarkers, each having five cut-off points. The S/N ratio is compared to the pAUC index. The SAS software is employed to calculate pAUC and AUC. This paper shows that S/N ratio can be used as a measure of diagnostic accuracy. The cut-off point with the highest S/N ratio is the optimal cut-off point for the biomarker. The proposed method has the advantages of being easier, more practical and less costly than that of pAUC. This paper includes implications for the development of a more practical, equally powerful and less costly means of measuring clinical accuracy thereby reducing the costs and risks resulting from wrong selection of cut-off point can be decreased. This paper supports suggestions in the recent literature to replace pAUC with a new, more meaningful index.

  12. Statistical characteristic in time-domain of direct current corona-generated audible noise from conductor in corona cage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuebao; Cui, Xiang; Lu, Tiebing; Ma, Wenzuo; Bian, Xingming; Wang, Donglai; Hiziroglu, Huseyin

    2016-03-01

    The corona-generated audible noise (AN) has become one of decisive factors in the design of high voltage direct current (HVDC) transmission lines. The AN from transmission lines can be attributed to sound pressure pulses which are generated by the multiple corona sources formed on the conductor, i.e., transmission lines. In this paper, a detailed time-domain characteristics of the sound pressure pulses, which are generated by the DC corona discharges formed over the surfaces of a stranded conductors, are investigated systematically in a laboratory settings using a corona cage structure. The amplitude of sound pressure pulse and its time intervals are extracted by observing a direct correlation between corona current pulses and corona-generated sound pressure pulses. Based on the statistical characteristics, a stochastic model is presented for simulating the sound pressure pulses due to DC corona discharges occurring on conductors. The proposed stochastic model is validated by comparing the calculated and measured A-weighted sound pressure level (SPL). The proposed model is then used to analyze the influence of the pulse amplitudes and pulse rate on the SPL. Furthermore, a mathematical relationship is found between the SPL and conductor diameter, electric field, and radial distance.

  13. Improvements of Real Time First Motion Focal Mechanism and Noise Characteristics of New Sites at the Puerto Rico Seismic Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, D. M.; Lopez, A. M.; Huerfano, V.; Lugo, J.; Cancel, J.

    2011-12-01

    the sensor. Two Guralps CMG-3T's connected to RefTek's 150 digitizers were used at PRSN's MPR site seismic vault to compare the two types of insulation. Two temperature loggers were placed along each seismic sensor for a period of one week to observe how much thermal fluctuations occur in each insulation method and then compared its capability for noise reduction due to thermal fluctuations. With only a single degree Celsius fluctuation inside the sand (compared to almost twice that value for the foam) the sensor buried in sand provided the best insulation for the seismic vault. In addition, the quality of the data was analyzed by comparing both sensors using PQLX. We show results of this analysis and also provide a site characteristic of new stations to be included in the daily earthquake location operations at the PRSN.

  14. Change in the characteristics of EEG color noise in Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vysata, Oldrich; Procházka, Ales; Mares, Jan; Rusina, Robert; Pazdera, Ladislav; Valis, Martin; Kukal, Jaromír

    2014-07-01

    Neurophysiological experiments support the hypothesis of the presence of critical dynamics of brain activity. This is also manifested by power law of electroencephalography (EEG) power spectra, which can be described by the relation 1/f(alpha). This dependence is a result of internal interactions between parts of the brain and is probably required for optimal processing of information. In Alzheimer's disease, changes in the functional organization of the brain occur, which may be manifested by changes in the alpha coefficient. We compared the average values of alpha for 19 electrodes in the resting EEG record in 110 patients with moderate to severe Alzheimer's disease (Mini-Mental State Examination [MMSE] score = 10-19) with 110 healthy controls. Statistically, the most significant differences are present in the prefrontal areas. In addition to the prefrontal and frontal areas, the largest separation value in the evaluation of receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves was recorded in the temporal area. The coefficient alpha has few false-positive results in the optimal operating point of the ROC curve, and is thereby highly specific for Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Some characteristic features of the construction of the amplifying channel for working with semiconductor detectors in the charged particle energy spectrometer. [noise minimization at preamplifier input

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzyuta, E. I.

    1974-01-01

    A transistorized spectrometric amplifier with a shaper is reported that selects the shape of the frequency characteristic of the amplifying channel for which the primary frequency spectrum of the signal will pass, but where the noise spectrum is limited to the maximum. A procedure is presented for selecting the shaping circuits and their inclusion principles.

  16. Noise suppression by noise

    OpenAIRE

    Vilar, J. M. G.; Rubí Capaceti, José Miguel

    2001-01-01

    We have analyzed the interplay between an externally added noise and the intrinsic noise of systems that relax fast towards a stationary state, and found that increasing the intensity of the external noise can reduce the total noise of the system. We have established a general criterion for the appearance of this phenomenon and discussed two examples in detail.

  17. Site Response Characteristics of Simeulue Island, Indonesia as Inferred from H/V Spectral Ratio of Ambient Noise Records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Titi Anggono

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Simeulue Island is an outer island arc west of Sumatra Island. The island is located close to the interface of the subduction zone between the Indo-Australian and Eurasian plates. Seismic activities around the island include devastating megathrust earthquakes, such as the 2004 MW 9.2 Sumatra-Andaman and 2005 MW 8.7 Nias earthquakes. We have investigated site response characteristics using the Horizontal-to-Vertical (H/V Spectral Ratio method based on continuous ambient noise records from eight broadband seismometers. From the calculation results, generally, strong peaks were observed in the H/V spectral ratio curves caused by strong impedance contrast in this area. However, the BATU, LABU and DEHI sites showed relatively flat H/V spectral ratio curves caused by a lack of sharp impedance contrast beneath the site. Multiple peaks were observed at several sites, which may indicate the presence of a more highly weathered soil/clay layer on top of a more compact medium. H/V peak frequencies, which reveal the fundamental resonant frequencies of the soil sites, were generally observed in the range of 2.0 Hz-16.4 Hz.

  18. Influence of sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction of CT data on image noise characteristics and low-contrast detectability: an objective approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian von Falck

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: To utilize a novel objective approach combining a software phantom and an image quality metric to systematically evaluate the influence of sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT data on image noise characteristics and low-contrast detectability (LCD. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A low-contrast and a high-contrast phantom were examined on a 128-slice scanner at different dose levels. The datasets were reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP and SAFIRE and virtual low-contrast lesions (-20HU were inserted. LCD was evaluated using the multiscale structural similarity index (MS-SIM*. Image noise texture and spatial resolution were objectively evaluated. RESULTS: The use of SAFIRE led to an improvement of LCD for all dose levels and lesions sizes. The relative improvement of LCD was inversely related to the dose level, declining from 208%(±37%, 259%(±30% and 309%(±35% at 25mAs to 106%(±6%, 119%(±9% and 123%(±8% at 200mAs for SAFIRE filter strengths of 1, 3 and 5 (p<0.05. SAFIRE reached at least the LCD of FBP at a relative dose of 50%. There was no statistically significant difference in spatial resolution. The use of SAFIRE led to coarser image noise granularity. CONCLUSION: A novel objective approach combining a software phantom and the MS-SSIM* image quality metric was used to analyze the detectability of virtual low-contrast lesions against the background of image noise as created using SAFIRE in comparison to filtered back-projection. We found, that image noise characteristics using SAFIRE at 50% dose were comparable to the use of FBP at 100% dose with respect to lesion detectability. The unfamiliar imaging appearance of iteratively reconstructed datasets may in part be explained by a different, coarser noise characteristic as demonstrated by a granulometric analysis.

  19. Investigation of the noise characteristics of an x-ray detector on the basis of the FEU-87 with an organic scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karmanova, A.P.; Stepanov, E.E.

    1976-01-01

    The authors investigate the noise characteristics of a scintillation detector, consisting of a plastic scintillator and FEU-87. Study of the dependence of counting rate of impulses from the PM at various thresholds of registration with a source and without allows selecting the optimal one from the viewpoint of the signal-to-noise ratio and registration threshold. The nuclide /sup 241/Am with a ..gamma.. energy of 59 keV was used. In the course of the experiment the authors measured the effectiveness of quanta registration.

  20. Research on voltage characteristic of the third generation low-light-level image intensifier tube's output signal to noise ratio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Xiaofeng; Yin, Lei; Hu, Wen; Shi, Feng; Hou, Zhipeng; Shi, Hongli; He, Yingping

    2012-10-01

    Signal to noise ratio is an important parameter to evaluate the 3rd generation low-light-level image intensifier. In this article, voltage in different poles have been changed respectively, output signal to noise ratio referring to different voltages have been studied, and the relationship between each voltage and output signal to noise ratio has been analyzed. The study results show that voltage of photocathode is not less than 150 V, voltage of MCP is between 800 V and 900 V, and voltage of screen is between 5000 V and 6000 V while output signal to noise ratio of filmed image intensifier is optimized. The study in this article is worthwhile for developing signal to noise ratio of the 3rd low-light-level image intensifier sufficiently.

  1. Eliminating thermal violin spikes from LIGO noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santamore, D. H.; Levin, Yuri

    2001-08-15

    We have developed a scheme for reducing LIGO suspension thermal noise close to violin-mode resonances. The idea is to monitor directly the thermally induced motion of a small portion of (a 'point' on) each suspension fiber, thereby recording the random forces driving the test-mass motion close to each violin-mode frequency. One can then suppress the thermal noise by optimally subtracting the recorded fiber motions from the measured motion of the test mass, i.e., from the LIGO output. The proposed method is a modification of an analogous but more technically difficult scheme by Braginsky, Levin and Vyatchanin for reducing broad-band suspension thermal noise. The efficiency of our method is limited by the sensitivity of the sensor used to monitor the fiber motion. If the sensor has no intrinsic noise (i.e. has unlimited sensitivity), then our method allows, in principle, a complete removal of violin spikes from the thermal-noise spectrum. We find that in LIGO-II interferometers, in order to suppress violin spikes below the shot-noise level, the intrinsic noise of the sensor must be less than {approx}2 x 10{sup -13} cm/Hz. This sensitivity is two orders of magnitude greater than that of currently available sensors.

  2. Optimization of the exposure parameters with signal-to-noise ratios considering human visual characteristics in digital mammography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Maki; Kato, Yuri; Fujita, Naotoshi; Kodera, Yoshie

    2010-04-01

    The use of digital mammography systems has become widespread recently. However, the optimal exposure parameters are uncertain in clinical practice. We need to optimize the exposure parameter in digital mammography while maximizing image quality and minimizing patient dose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the most beneficial exposure variable-tube voltage for each compressed breast thickness-with these indices: noise power spectrum, noise equivalent quanta, detective quantum efficiency, and signal-to-noise ratios (SNR). In this study, the SNRs were derived from the perceived statistical decision theory model with the internal noise of eye-brain system (SNRi), contrived and studied by Loo LN1), Ishida M et al. 2) These image quality indices were obtained under a fixed average glandular dose (AGD) and a fixed image contrast. Our results indicated that when the image contrast and AGD was constant, for phantom thinner than 5 cm, an increase of the tube voltage did not improve the noise property of images very much. The results also showed that image property with the target/filter Mo/Rh was better than that with Mo/Mo for phantom thicker than 4 cm. In general, it is said that high tube voltage delivers improved noise property. Our result indicates that this common theory is not realized with the x-ray energy level for mammography.

  3. Low frequency noise from wind turbines and other sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leventhall, Geoff [Ashtead, Surrey (United Kingdom)], email: geoff@activenoise.co.uk

    2011-07-01

    When it comes to low frequency noise and infrasound, many misconceptions can arise with regard to harm to human health and the disturbance threshold. This paper aims to investigate these misconceptions concerning low frequency noise sources, particularly with regard to noise assessment and the impact of wind turbines. Using a review of the literature, the paper first explains what exactly infrasound and low frequency noise are, the important difference between tonal and broad band noise, and how the hearing threshold is related to both frequency and sound pressure levels. It is explains how different people may react to low frequency noise, depending on their hearing sensitivity and, more significantly, their exposure to negative external publicity about wind turbines and noise annoyance. These points highlight the sometimes non-relevant noise assessment regulations in effect and the problem of weighting in assessing noise disturbance. Wind turbines are concluded not to be sources of low frequency noise, only their swish noise can be considered a disturbance, and that is related to individual hearing sensitivity and attitude towards turbines.

  4. Characteristics of the Operational Noise from Full Scale Wave Energy Converters in the Lysekil Project: Estimation of Potential Environmental Impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mats Leijon

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Wave energy conversion is a clean electric power production technology. During operation there are no emissions in the form of harmful gases. However there are unsolved issues considering environmental impacts such as: electromagnetism; the artificial reef effect and underwater noise. Anthropogenic noise is increasing in the oceans worldwide and wave power will contribute to this sound pollution in the oceans; but to what extent? The main purpose of this study was to examine the noise emitted by a full scale operating Wave Energy Converter (WEC in the Lysekil project at Uppsala University in Sweden. A minor review of the hearing capabilities of fish and marine mammals is presented to aid in the conclusions of impact from anthropogenic sound. A hydrophone was deployed to the seabed in the Lysekil research site park at distance of 20 and 40 m away from two operational WECs. The measurements were performed in the spring of 2011. The results showed that the main noise was a transient noise with most of its energy in frequencies below 1 kHz. These results indicate that several marine organisms (fish and mammals will be able to hear the operating WECs of a distance of at least 20 m.

  5. Comparative analysis of emission characteristics and noise test of an I.C. engine using different biodiesel blends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hossain, Md. Alamgir; Rahman, Fariha; Mamun, Maliha; Naznin, Sadia; Rashid, Adib Bin

    2017-12-01

    Biodiesel is a captivating renewable resource providing the potential to reduce particulate emissions in compressionignition engines. A comparative study is conducted to evaluate the effects of using biodiesel on exhaust emissions. Exhaust smokiness, noise and exhaust regulated gas emissions such as carbon di oxides, carbon monoxide and oxygen are measured. It is observed that methanol-biodiesel blends (mustard oil, palm oil) cause reduction of emissions remarkably. Most of the harmful pollutants in the exhaust are reduced significantly with the use of methanol blended fuels. Reduction in CO emission is more with mustard oil blend compared to palm oil blend. Comparatively clean smoke is observed with biodiesel than diesel. It is also observed that, there is a decrease of noise while performing with biodiesel blends which is around 78 dB whereas noise caused by diesel is 80 dB. Biodiesel, more importantly mustard oil is a clean burning fuel that does not contribute to the net increase of carbon dioxide.

  6. Influence of Sinogram Affirmed Iterative Reconstruction of CT Data on Image Noise Characteristics and Low-Contrast Detectability: An Objective Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Falck, Christian; Bratanova, Vesela; Rodt, Thomas; Meyer, Bernhard; Waldeck, Stephan; Wacker, Frank; Shin, Hoen-oh

    2013-01-01

    Objectives To utilize a novel objective approach combining a software phantom and an image quality metric to systematically evaluate the influence of sinogram affirmed iterative reconstruction (SAFIRE) of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) data on image noise characteristics and low-contrast detectability (LCD). Materials and Methods A low-contrast and a high-contrast phantom were examined on a 128-slice scanner at different dose levels. The datasets were reconstructed using filtered back projection (FBP) and SAFIRE and virtual low-contrast lesions (-20HU) were inserted. LCD was evaluated using the multiscale structural similarity index (MS-SIM*). Image noise texture and spatial resolution were objectively evaluated. Results The use of SAFIRE led to an improvement of LCD for all dose levels and lesions sizes. The relative improvement of LCD was inversely related to the dose level, declining from 208%(±37%), 259%(±30%) and 309%(±35%) at 25mAs to 106%(±6%), 119%(±9%) and 123%(±8%) at 200mAs for SAFIRE filter strengths of 1, 3 and 5 (piteratively reconstructed datasets may in part be explained by a different, coarser noise characteristic as demonstrated by a granulometric analysis. PMID:23468886

  7. Reduced Subthreshold Characteristics and Flicker Noise of an AlGaAs/InGaAs PHEMT Using Liquid Phase Deposited TiO2 as a Gate Dielectric

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-Yuen Lam

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available This study presents the fabrication and improved properties of an AlGaAs/InGaAs metal-oxide-semiconductor pseudomorphic high-electron-mobility transistor (MOS-PHEMT using liquid phase deposited titanium dioxide (LPD-TiO2 as a gate dielectric. Sulfur pretreatment and postoxidation rapid thermal annealing (RTA were consecutively employed before and after the gate dielectric was deposited to fill dangling bonds and therefore release interface trapped charges. Compared with a benchmark PHEMT, the AlGaAs/InGaAs MOS-PHEMT using LPD-TiO2 exhibited larger gate bias operation, higher breakdown voltage, suppressed subthreshold characteristics, and reduced flicker noise. As a result, the device with proposed process and using LPD-TiO2 as a gate dielectric is promising for high-speed applications that demand little noise at low frequencies.

  8. Changes in distortion product oto-acoustic emissions after exposure to continuous and impulsive noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Toro, Miguel Angel Aranda; Ordoñez, Rodrigo Pizarro; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2012-01-01

    and legislation correlates to a higher risk of hearing damage. Subjects were exposed to two types of binaural recordings consisting of a continuous broad-band noise-exposure normalized to LEX,8h = 80~dB and the interaction of the previous stimulus with a noise of impulsive character normalized to LEX,8h = 75 + 5......Temporary changes in the hearing of human subjects were monitored with distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) after control sound exposures in a laboratory. The objectives of the experiment were to investigate whether the +5~dB penalty for impulsiveness used in international standards...

  9. Changes in distortion product oto-acoustic emissions after exposure to continuous and impulsive noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    de Toro, Miguel Angel Aranda; Ordoñez, Rodrigo Pizarro; Hammershøi, Dorte

    2012-01-01

    and legislation correlates to a higher risk of hearing damage. Subjects were exposed to two types of binaural recordings consisting of a continuous broad-band noise-exposure normalized to LEX,8h = 80 dBA and the interaction of the previous stimulus with a noise of impulsive character normalized to LEX,8h = 75 + 5......Temporary changes in hearing of the subjects were monitored with distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAEs) after control sound exposures in a laboratory. The objectives of the experiment was to investigate whether the +5 dB penalty for impulsiveness used in international standards...

  10. Underwater noise from a wave energy converter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tougaard, Jakob

    A recent addition to the anthropogenic sources of underwater noise is offshore wave energy converters. Underwater noise was recorded from the Wavestar wave energy converter located at Hastholm, Denmark (57°7.73´N, 8°37.23´E). The Wavestar is a full-scale test and demonstration converter...... in full operation and start and stop of the converter. Median broad band (10 Hz – 20 kHz) sound pressure level (Leq) was 123 dB re. 1 Pa, irrespective of status of the wave energy converter (stopped, running or starting/stopping). The most pronounced peak in the third-octave spectrum was in the 160 Hz...... significant noise above ambient could be detected above the 250 Hz band. The absolute increase in noise above ambient was very small. L50 third-octave levels in the four bands with the converter running were thus only 1-2 dB above ambient L50 levels. The noise recorded 25 m from the wave energy converter...

  11. Noise Characteristics of 64-channel 2nd-order DROS Gradiometer System inside a Poorly Magnetically-shielded Room

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, J. M.; Lee, Y. H.; Yu, K. K.; Kim, K.; Kwon, H.; Park, Y. K. [Biosignal Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Standards and Science, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Sasada, Ichiro [Dept. of Applied Science for Electronics and Materials, Ktushu University, Fukuoka (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-10-15

    We have developed a second-order double relaxation oscillation SQUID(DROS) gradiometer with a baseline of 35 mm, and constructed a poorly magnetically-shielded room(MSR) with an aluminum layer and permalloy layers for magnetocardiography(MCG). The 2nd-order DROS gradiometer has a noise level of 20 fT/Hz at 1 Hz and 8 fT/Hz at 200 Hz inside the heavily-shielded MSR with a shielding factor of10{sup 3}at 1 Hz and 10{sup 4} - 10{sup 5} at 100 Hz. The poorly-shielded MSR, built of a 12-mm-thick aluminum layer and 4-6 permalloy layers of 0.35 mm thickness, is 2.4 m x 2.4 m x 2.4 m in size, and has a shielding factor of 40 at 1 Hz, 10{sup 4} at 100 Hz. Our 64-channel second-order gradiometer MCG system consists of 64 2nd-order DROS gradiometers, flux-locked loop electronics, and analog signal processors. With the 2nd-order DROS gradiometers and flux-locked loop electronics installed inside the poorly-shielded MSR, and with the analog signal processor installed outside it, the noise level was measured to be 20 fT/Hz at 1 Hz and 8 fT/Hz at 200 Hz on the average even though the MSR door is open. This result leads to a low noise level, low enough to obtain a human MCG at the same level as that measured in the heavily-shielded MSR. However, filters or active shielding is needed fur clear MCG when there is large low-frequency noise from heavy air conditioning or large ac power consumption near the poorly-shielded MSR.

  12. Conversion of mammographic images to appear with the noise and sharpness characteristics of a different detector and x-ray system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackenzie, Alistair; Dance, David R; Workman, Adam; Yip, Mary; Wells, Kevin; Young, Kenneth C

    2012-05-01

    Undertaking observer studies to compare imaging technology using clinical radiological images is challenging due to patient variability. To achieve a significant result, a large number of patients would be required to compare cancer detection rates for different image detectors and systems. The aim of this work was to create a methodology where only one set of images is collected on one particular imaging system. These images are then converted to appear as if they had been acquired on a different detector and x-ray system. Therefore, the effect of a wide range of digital detectors on cancer detection or diagnosis can be examined without the need for multiple patient exposures. Three detectors and x-ray systems [Hologic Selenia (ASE), GE Essential (CSI), Carestream CR (CR)] were characterized in terms of signal transfer properties, noise power spectra (NPS), modulation transfer function, and grid properties. The contributions of the three noise sources (electronic, quantum, and structure noise) to the NPS were calculated by fitting a quadratic polynomial at each spatial frequency of the NPS against air kerma. A methodology was developed to degrade the images to have the characteristics of a different (target) imaging system. The simulated images were created by first linearizing the original images such that the pixel values were equivalent to the air kerma incident at the detector. The linearized image was then blurred to match the sharpness characteristics of the target detector. Noise was then added to the blurred image to correct for differences between the detectors and any required change in dose. The electronic, quantum, and structure noise were added appropriate to the air kerma selected for the simulated image and thus ensuring that the noise in the simulated image had the same magnitude and correlation as the target image. A correction was also made for differences in primary grid transmission, scatter, and veiling glare. The method was validated by

  13. Conversion of mammographic images to appear with the noise and sharpness characteristics of a different detector and x-ray system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mackenzie, Alistair; Dance, David R.; Workman, Adam; Yip, Mary; Wells, Kevin; Young, Kenneth C. [National Coordinating Centre for the Physics of Mammography, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, GU2 7XX, United Kingdom and Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Northern Ireland Regional Medical Physics Service, Forster Green Hospital, Belfast, BT8 4HD (United Kingdom); Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal Processing, Faculty of Engineering and Physical Sciences, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom); National Coordinating Centre for the Physics of Mammography, Royal Surrey County Hospital, Guildford, GU2 7XX, United Kingdom and Department of Physics, University of Surrey, Guildford, GU2 7XH (United Kingdom)

    2012-05-15

    Purpose: Undertaking observer studies to compare imaging technology using clinical radiological images is challenging due to patient variability. To achieve a significant result, a large number of patients would be required to compare cancer detection rates for different image detectors and systems. The aim of this work was to create a methodology where only one set of images is collected on one particular imaging system. These images are then converted to appear as if they had been acquired on a different detector and x-ray system. Therefore, the effect of a wide range of digital detectors on cancer detection or diagnosis can be examined without the need for multiple patient exposures. Methods: Three detectors and x-ray systems [Hologic Selenia (ASE), GE Essential (CSI), Carestream CR (CR)] were characterized in terms of signal transfer properties, noise power spectra (NPS), modulation transfer function, and grid properties. The contributions of the three noise sources (electronic, quantum, and structure noise) to the NPS were calculated by fitting a quadratic polynomial at each spatial frequency of the NPS against air kerma. A methodology was developed to degrade the images to have the characteristics of a different (target) imaging system. The simulated images were created by first linearizing the original images such that the pixel values were equivalent to the air kerma incident at the detector. The linearized image was then blurred to match the sharpness characteristics of the target detector. Noise was then added to the blurred image to correct for differences between the detectors and any required change in dose. The electronic, quantum, and structure noise were added appropriate to the air kerma selected for the simulated image and thus ensuring that the noise in the simulated image had the same magnitude and correlation as the target image. A correction was also made for differences in primary grid transmission, scatter, and veiling glare. The method was

  14. Signal and noise characteristics of a CdTe-based photon counting detector: cascaded systems analysis and experimental studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Xu; Zhang, Ran; Ge, Yongshuai; Chen, Guang-Hong; Li, Ke

    2017-03-01

    Recent advances in single photon counting detectors (PCDs) are opening up new opportunities in medical imaging. However, the performance of PCDs is not flawless. Problems such as charge sharing may deteriorate the performance of PCD. This work studied the dependence of the signal and noise properties of a cadmium telluride (CdTe)-based PCD on the charge sharing effect and the anti-charge sharing (ACS) capability offered by the PCD. Through both serial and parallel cascaded systems analysis, a theoretical model was developed to trace the origin of charge sharing in CdTe-based PCD, which is primarily related to remote k-fluorescence re-absorption and spatial spreading of charge cloud. The ACS process was modeled as a sub-imaging state prior to the energy thresholding stage, and its impact on the noise power spectrum (NPS) of PCD can be qualitatively determined by the theoretical model. To validate the theoretical model, experimental studies with a CdTe-based PCD system (XC-FLITE X1, XCounter AB) was performed. Two x-ray radiation conditions, including an RQA-5 beam and a 40 kVp beam, were used for the NPS measurements. Both theoretical predictions and experimental results showed that ACS makes the NPS of the CdTe-based PCD flatter, which corresponds to reduced noise correlation length. The flatness of the NPS is further boosted by increasing the energy threshold or reducing the x-ray energy, both of which reduce the likelihood of registering multiple counts from the same incidenting x-ray photon.

  15. Noise Gating Solar Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeForest, Craig; Seaton, Daniel B.; Darnell, John A.

    2017-08-01

    I present and demonstrate a new, general purpose post-processing technique, "3D noise gating", that can reduce image noise by an order of magnitude or more without effective loss of spatial or temporal resolution in typical solar applications.Nearly all scientific images are, ultimately, limited by noise. Noise can be direct Poisson "shot noise" from photon counting effects, or introduced by other means such as detector read noise. Noise is typically represented as a random variable (perhaps with location- or image-dependent characteristics) that is sampled once per pixel or once per resolution element of an image sequence. Noise limits many aspects of image analysis, including photometry, spatiotemporal resolution, feature identification, morphology extraction, and background modeling and separation.Identifying and separating noise from image signal is difficult. The common practice of blurring in space and/or time works because most image "signal" is concentrated in the low Fourier components of an image, while noise is evenly distributed. Blurring in space and/or time attenuates the high spatial and temporal frequencies, reducing noise at the expense of also attenuating image detail. Noise-gating exploits the same property -- "coherence" -- that we use to identify features in images, to separate image features from noise.Processing image sequences through 3-D noise gating results in spectacular (more than 10x) improvements in signal-to-noise ratio, while not blurring bright, resolved features in either space or time. This improves most types of image analysis, including feature identification, time sequence extraction, absolute and relative photometry (including differential emission measure analysis), feature tracking, computer vision, correlation tracking, background modeling, cross-scale analysis, visual display/presentation, and image compression.I will introduce noise gating, describe the method, and show examples from several instruments (including SDO

  16. A matrix formulation for noise transduction as a general case of noise measure

    OpenAIRE

    Hallgren, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    Conventional noise characteristics of an active device or circuit are given by the minimum noise figure, the optimum source reflection coefficient, and a noise resistance. The noise measure proposed extends the noise figure to include the available gain of the network, for the case of a conjugate output match, and gives values that minimize the noise power available from the network consistent with maximum available gain. Noise transduction follows as a general case of the noise measure by us...

  17. Tire-pavement and environmental traffic noise research study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-01

    In response to an interest in traffic noise, particularly tirepavement noise, CDOT elected to conduct tirepavement : noise research. Following a rigid set of testing protocols, data was collected on highway traffic : noise characteristics along wi...

  18. Noise prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    Methods for noise abatement are discussed. Noise nuisance, types of noise (continuous, fluctuating, intermittent, pulsed), and types of noise abatement (absorption, vibration damping, isolation) are defined. Rockwool panels, industrial ceiling panels, baffles, acoustic foam panels, vibration dampers, acoustic mats, sandwich panels, isolating cabins and walls, ear protectors, and curtains are presented.

  19. Características do zumbido em trabalhadores expostos a ruído The characteristics of tinnitus in workers exposed to noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luciara Giacobe Steinmetz

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available O zumbido é um sintoma auditivo relatado por indivíduos expostos ao ruído. OBJETIVO: Estudar as características do zumbido relatadas por indivíduos expostos ao ruído ocupacional. FORMA DE ESTUDO: Descritivo prospectivo. MATERIAL E MÉTODO: Participaram 52 indivíduos com idade média de 29 anos que faziam parte do programa de prevenção da perda auditiva de um frigorífico. Os indivíduos responderam a uma anamnese e suas audiometrias realizadas em 2005 e 2006 foram utilizadas. RESULTADOS: No presente estudo, 71% dos indivíduos apresentaram audiometria normal. A prevalência do zumbido para o sexo masculino foi de 16% e para o sexo feminino foi de 9% apresentando tempo médio de exposição ao ruído de sete anos a um nível médio de ruído entre 86 e 91 dBA (48%. Verificou-se um predomínio do zumbido bilateral (46%, do tipo chiado (40% de intensidade média (49%, com tempo de instalação do sintoma entre um a cinco anos (67%, sendo sua freqüência semanal (41% e a noite o período que mais perturba (34%. Encontrou-se significância entre a periodicidade do zumbido e o nível de ruído. CONCLUSÃO: Recomenda-se a inclusão do tema zumbido em programas de prevenção da perda auditiva a fim de promover a saúde auditiva dos trabalhadores.Tinnitus is a common auditory complaint among individuals exposed to noise. AIM: this paper aims to study the characteristics of tinnitus in workers exposed to noise. STUDY DESIGN: this is a descriptive prospective study. MATERIALS AND METHOD: Fifty-two individuals averaging 29 years of age were enrolled in a hearing loss prevention program at a meat processing plant. The participants were interviewed and had their hearing tested in 2005 and 2006. RESULTS: seventy-one percent of the participants were found to have normal hearing. Tinnitus was present in 16% of the males and in 9% of the females. Mean noise exposure length was 7 years and noise levels ranged from 86 to 91 dBA (48%. Bilateral tinnitus

  20. Parallel Processing of Broad-Band PPM Signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Andrew; Kang, Edward; Lay, Norman; Vilnrotter, Victor; Srinivasan, Meera; Lee, Clement

    2010-01-01

    A parallel-processing algorithm and a hardware architecture to implement the algorithm have been devised for timeslot synchronization in the reception of pulse-position-modulated (PPM) optical or radio signals. As in the cases of some prior algorithms and architectures for parallel, discrete-time, digital processing of signals other than PPM, an incoming broadband signal is divided into multiple parallel narrower-band signals by means of sub-sampling and filtering. The number of parallel streams is chosen so that the frequency content of the narrower-band signals is low enough to enable processing by relatively-low speed complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) electronic circuitry. The algorithm and architecture are intended to satisfy requirements for time-varying time-slot synchronization and post-detection filtering, with correction of timing errors independent of estimation of timing errors. They are also intended to afford flexibility for dynamic reconfiguration and upgrading. The architecture is implemented in a reconfigurable CMOS processor in the form of a field-programmable gate array. The algorithm and its hardware implementation incorporate three separate time-varying filter banks for three distinct functions: correction of sub-sample timing errors, post-detection filtering, and post-detection estimation of timing errors. The design of the filter bank for correction of timing errors, the method of estimating timing errors, and the design of a feedback-loop filter are governed by a host of parameters, the most critical one, with regard to processing very broadband signals with CMOS hardware, being the number of parallel streams (equivalently, the rate-reduction parameter).

  1. Broad-Band EUV Multilayer Coatings For Solar Physics Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop and commercialize a new class of aperiodic multilayer coating that is designed to provide high normal-incidence reflectance over a wide...

  2. Free space optical networks for ultra-broad band services

    CERN Document Server

    Kartalopoulos, Stamatios V

    2011-01-01

    "Free Space Optical Network is a next generation communication network which uses optical waves instead of microwaves, potentially offering faster communication with ultra band width, meaning more complex communication services can be simultaneously offered. This book describes the network concepts in simple language starting with point-to-point free space optics basics and discusses networking, interoperability with existing communication network, and security. An ideal resource for communication professionals just entering the free space optical communication field and graduate students majoring in optical communications"--Provided by publisher.

  3. A prism based magnifying hyperlens with broad-band imaging

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Habib, Md. Samiul; Stefani, Alessio; Atakaramians, Shaghik

    2017-01-01

    Magnification in metamaterial hyperlenses has been demonstrated using curved geometries or tapered devices, at frequencies ranging from the microwave to the ultraviolet spectrum. One of the main issues of such hyperlenses is the difficulty in manufacturing. In this letter, we numerically and expe...

  4. High Reflectivity, Broad-Band Silver Coating Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Silver coatings for optics greater than 2-meters in diameter are sought by NASA for future space telescope systems. In the Phase I research, Surface Optics...

  5. Broad band spectral energy distribution studies of Fermi bright blazars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monte, C., E-mail: claudia.monte@ba.infn.i [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ' M. Merlin' dell' Universita e del Politecnico, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Giommi, P.; Cavazzuti, E.; Gasparrini, D. [Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI) Science Data Center I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Raino, S. [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Sezione di Bari, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Dipartimento di Fisica ' M. Merlin' dell' Universita e del Politecnico, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Fuhrmann, L.; Angelakis, E. [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Radioastronomie, Auf dem Huegel 69, D-53121 Bonn (Germany); Villata, M.; Raiteri, C.M. [INAF, Osservatorio Astronomico di Torino, I-10025 Pino Torinese (Italy); Perri, M. [Agenzia Spaziale Italiana (ASI) Science Data Center I-00044 Frascati (Roma) (Italy); Richards, J. [California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, CA (United States)

    2011-02-21

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope was successfully launched on June 11, 2008 and has already opened a new era for gamma-ray astronomy. The Large Area Telescope (LAT), the main instrument on board Fermi, presents a significant improvement in sensitivity over its predecessor EGRET, due to its large field of view and effective area, combined with its excellent timing capabilities. The preliminary results of the Spectral Energy Distribution Analysis performed on a sample of bright blazars are presented. For this study, the data from the first three months of data collection of Fermi have been used. The analysis is extended down to radio, mm, near-IR, optical, UV and X-ray bands and up to TeV energies based on unprecedented sample of simultaneous multi-wavelength observations by GASP-WEBT.

  6. Broad band spectral energy distribution studies of Fermi bright blazars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monte, C.; Giommi, P.; Cavazzuti, E.; Gasparrini, D.; Rainò, S.; Fuhrmann, L.; Angelakis, E.; Villata, M.; Raiteri, C. M.; Perri, M.; Richards, J.

    2011-02-01

    The Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope was successfully launched on June 11, 2008 and has already opened a new era for gamma-ray astronomy. The Large Area Telescope (LAT), the main instrument on board Fermi, presents a significant improvement in sensitivity over its predecessor EGRET, due to its large field of view and effective area, combined with its excellent timing capabilities. The preliminary results of the Spectral Energy Distribution Analysis performed on a sample of bright blazars are presented. For this study, the data from the first three months of data collection of Fermi have been used. The analysis is extended down to radio, mm, near-IR, optical, UV and X-ray bands and up to TeV energies based on unprecedented sample of simultaneous multi-wavelength observations by GASP-WEBT.

  7. High Reflectivity, Broad-Band Silver Coating Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Future space telescopes such as the Super Nova Acceleration Probe (SNAP) require exceptionally reflective coatings applied to mirrors several meters in diameter. In...

  8. Broad-band transmission spectra of Hot Jupiters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moyano, M.; Almeida, L. A.

    2017-07-01

    We have carried out a campaign to characterize the hot Jupiters WASP-5b, WASP-44b, and WASP-46b using multi-band photometry collected at the Observatório do Pico Dos Dias in Brazil. We have determined the planetary physical properties and new transit ephemerides for these systems. The new orbital parameters and physical properties are consistent with previous estimates. We also studied the transit times including our new ephemerides. We did not find variations of a linear trend due to extra companions. Finally, we studied the fractional radius variation as a function of wavelength for these systems.

  9. Rayleigh Wave Velocity Measurements Using Broad Band Frequency Sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-07-01

    Heukelom 4I and Foster 1960, Chang and Ballard 1973, Ballard and McLean 1975). The procedure for measuring the Rayleigh wave velocity has consisted... Heukelom , W., and Foster, C. R. 1960. "Dynamic Testing of Pavements," Journal, Soil Mechanics and Foundations Division, American Society of Civil Engineers

  10. Transient noise suppression algorithm in speech system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Keyu; Wang, Mingjiang

    2017-08-01

    In this paper, I mainly introduce the algorithm of transient noise suppression in speech system. Firstly, it divides into impulsive noise and other types of transient noise according to the characteristics of transient noise. In the impulse noise suppression algorithm, I mainly use the averaging energy threshold method to detect the impulse noise, and then I use the amplitude threshold method to reduce the impulse noise which was detected. In the other types of transient noise suppression algorithm, I mainly use the Optimally Modified-Log Spectral Amplitude estimation (OM-LSA) algorithm and the Minimum Control Recursive Average (MCRA) algorithm to suppress the transient noise.

  11. Reduction of belt CVT gear noise by gear train modification. Optimize vibration characteristics of gear train; Belt CVT no gear noise teigen gijutsu. Gear train shindo tokusei no saitekika

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arimatsu, M.; Kawakami, T. [Nissan Motor Co. Ltd., Tokyo (Japan)

    1997-10-01

    With the reduction of vehicle noise, the requirements for an efficient method to reduce transmission gear noise have become stronger yearly. So far efforts to reduce gear noise have generally focused on ways of improving the gears themselves. In addition to these traditional methods, it proved very beneficial to us to optimize the gear train structure. Nissan has just released the new Belt CVT for 2.0L Front wheel drive vehicles. We have been analyzing vibration of the gear train by using a finite element model since the early development stage, and we could achieve the quiet gears effectively. 2 refs., 9 figs.

  12. Noise Pollution

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... primarily to one’s overall health. Top of Page Health Effects Noise pollution adversely affects the lives of millions of people. ... its effect, disseminate information to the public regarding noise pollution and its adverse health effects, respond to inquiries on matters related to noise, ...

  13. Response to Comment: RE: Ohlenforst et al. (2016) Exploring the Relationship Between Working Memory, Compressor Speed, and Background Noise Characteristics, Ear Hear 37, 137–143

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ohlenforst, Barbara; Souza, Pamela E.; MacDonald, Ewen N.

    2017-01-01

    We appreciate the opportunity to respond to the comment on our study (Ohlenforst et al. 2016). The issue of concern to the letter writer, “The speech and the noise signals were separately compressed before the SNRs [signal-to-noise ratios] were computed based on the signal’s root mean square valu...

  14. Noise Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    1980-01-01

    Environmental Health Systems puts forth an increasing effort in the U.S. to develop ways of controlling noise, particularly in industrial environments due to Federal and State laws, labor union insistence and new findings relative to noise pollution impact on human health. NASA's Apollo guidance control system aided in the development of a noise protection product, SMART. The basis of all SMART products is SMART compound a liquid plastic mixture with exceptional energy/sound absorbing qualities. The basic compound was later refined for noise protection use.

  15. Imaging architecture of the Jakarta Basin, Indonesia with transdimensional inversion of seismic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saygin, E.; Cummins, P. R.; Cipta, A.; Hawkins, R.; Pandhu, R.; Murjaya, J.; Masturyono, Irsyam, M.; Widiyantoro, S.; Kennett, B. L. N.

    2016-02-01

    In order to characterize the subsurface structure of the Jakarta Basin, Indonesia, a dense portable seismic broad-band network was operated by The Australian National University (ANU) and the Indonesian Agency for Meteorology, Climatology and Geophysics (BMKG) between October 2013 and February 2014. Overall 96 locations were sampled through successive deployments of 52 seismic broad-band sensors at different parts of the city. Oceanic and anthropogenic noises were recorded as well as regional and teleseismic earthquakes. We apply regularized deconvolution to the recorded ambient noise of the vertical components of available station pairs, and over 3000 Green's functions were retrieved in total. Waveforms from interstation deconvolutions show clear arrivals of Rayleigh fundamental and higher order modes. The traveltimes that were extracted from group velocity filtering of fundamental mode Rayleigh wave arrivals, are used in a 2-stage Transdimensional Bayesian method to map shear wave structure of subsurface. The images of S wave speed show very low velocities and a thick basin covering most of the city with depths up to 1.5 km. These low seismic velocities and the thick basin beneath the city potentially cause seismic amplification during a subduction megathrust or other large earthquake close to the city of Jakarta.

  16. Interferometric Constraints on Quantum Geometrical Shear Noise Correlations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chou, Aaron; Glass, Henry; Gustafson, H. Richard; Hogan, Craig J.; Kamai, Brittany L.; Kwon, Ohkyung; Lanza, Robert; McCuller, Lee; Meyer, Stephan S.; Richardson, Jonathan W.; Stoughton, Chris; Tomlin, Ray; Weiss, Rainer

    2017-03-24

    Final measurements and analysis are reported from the first-generation Holometer, the first instrument capable of measuring correlated variations in space-time position at strain noise power spectral densities smaller than a Planck time. The apparatus consists of two co-located, but independent and isolated, 40 m power-recycled Michelson interferometers, whose outputs are cross-correlated to 25 MHz. The data are sensitive to correlations of differential position across the apparatus over a broad band of frequencies up to and exceeding the inverse light crossing time, 7.6 MHz. By measuring with Planck precision the correlation of position variations at spacelike separations, the Holometer searches for faint, irreducible correlated position noise backgrounds predicted by some models of quantum space-time geometry. The first-generation optical layout is sensitive to quantum geometrical noise correlations with shear symmetry---those that can be interpreted as a fundamental noncommutativity of space-time position in orthogonal directions. General experimental constraints are placed on parameters of a set of models of spatial shear noise correlations, with a sensitivity that exceeds the Planck-scale holographic information bound on position states by a large factor. This result significantly extends the upper limits placed on models of directional noncommutativity by currently operating gravitational wave observatories.

  17. Noise characterization of enhancement-mode AlGaN graded barrier MIS-HEMT devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanbabu, A.; Saravana Kumar, R.; Mohankumar, N.

    2017-12-01

    This paper reports a systematic theoretical study on the microwave noise performance of graded AlGaN/GaN metal-insulator semiconductor high-electron mobility transistors (MIS-HEMTs) built on an Al2O3 substrate. The HfAlOx/AlGaN/GaN MIS-HEMT devices designed for this study show an outstanding small signal analog/RF and noise performance. The results on 1 μm gate length device show an enhancement mode operation with threshold voltage, VT = + 5.3 V, low drain leakage current, Ids,LL in the order of 1 × 10-9 A/mm along with high current gain cut-off frequency, fT of 17 GHz and maximum oscillation frequency fmax of 47 GHz at Vds = 10 V. The device Isbnd V and low-frequency noise estimation of the gate and drain noise spectral density and their correlation are evaluated using a Green's function method under different biasing conditions. The devices show a minimum noise figure (NFmin) of 1.053 dB in combination with equivalent noise resistance (Rn) of 23 Ω at 17 GHz, at Vgs = 6 V and Vds = 5 V which is relatively low and is suitable for broad-band low-noise amplifiers. This study shows that the graded AlGaN MIS-HEMT with HfAlOX gate insulator is appropriate for application requiring high-power and low-noise.

  18. Kurtosis corrected sound pressure level as a noise metric for risk assessment of occupational noises

    OpenAIRE

    Goley, G. Steven; Song, Won Joon; Kim, Jay H.

    2011-01-01

    Current noise guidelines use an energy-based noise metric to predict the risk of hearing loss, and thus ignore the effect of temporal characteristics of the noise. The practice is widely considered to underestimate the risk of a complex noise environment, where impulsive noises are embedded in a steady-state noise. A basic form for noise metrics is designed by combining the equivalent sound pressure level (SPL) and a temporal correction term defined as a function of kurtosis of the noise. Sev...

  19. Noise equivalent circuit of a semiconductor laser diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, C.; Margalit, S.; Yariv, A.; Katz, J.; Shacham, J.

    1982-01-01

    A small-signal model of a semiconductor laser is extended to include the effects of intrinsic noise by adding current and voltage noise sources. The current noise source represents the shot noise of carrier recombination, while the voltage noise source represents the random process of simulated emission. The usefulness of the noise equivalent circuit is demonstrated by calculating the modulation and noise characteristics of a current-driven diode as a function of bias current and frequency.

  20. Noise equivalent circuit of a semiconductor laser diode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harder, C.; Margalit, S.; Yariv, A.; Katz, J.; Shacham, J.

    1982-03-01

    A small-signal model of a semiconductor laser is extended to include the effects of intrinsic noise by adding current and voltage noise sources. The current noise source represents the shot noise of carrier recombination, while the voltage noise source represents the random process of simulated emission. The usefulness of the noise equivalent circuit is demonstrated by calculating the modulation and noise characteristics of a current-driven diode as a function of bias current and frequency.

  1. Investigation of Diesel’s Residual Noise on Predictive Vehicles Noise Cancelling using LMS Adaptive Algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arttini Dwi Prasetyowati, Sri; Susanto, Adhi; Widihastuti, Ida

    2017-04-01

    Every noise problems require different solution. In this research, the noise that must be cancelled comes from roadway. Least Mean Square (LMS) adaptive is one of the algorithm that can be used to cancel that noise. Residual noise always appears and could not be erased completely. This research aims to know the characteristic of residual noise from vehicle’s noise and analysis so that it is no longer appearing as a problem. LMS algorithm was used to predict the vehicle’s noise and minimize the error. The distribution of the residual noise could be observed to determine the specificity of the residual noise. The statistic of the residual noise close to normal distribution with = 0,0435, = 1,13 and the autocorrelation of the residual noise forming impulse. As a conclusion the residual noise is insignificant.

  2. Characteristics of unsteady flow field and flow-induced noise for an axial cooling fan used in a rack mount server computer Characteristics of unsteady flow field and flow-induced noise for an axial cooling fan used in a rack mount server computer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lim, Tae Gyun; Jeon, Wan Ho [Technical Research Lab., CEDIC Co., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Minorikawa, Gaku [Dept. of f Mechanical Engineering, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Hosei University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-10-15

    The recent development of small and lightweight rack mount servers and computers has resulted in the decrease of the size of cooling fans. However, internal fans still need to achieve a high performance to release the heat generated from interior parts, and they should emit low noise. On the contrary, measurement data, such as flow properties and flow visualizations, cannot be obtained easily when cooling fans are small. Thus, a numerical analysis approach is necessary for the performance evaluation and noise reduction of small cooling fans. In this study, the noise of a small cooling fan used for computers or servers was measured and then compared with the aeroacoustic noise result based on a numerical analysis. Three-dimensional Navier-Stokes equations were solved to predict the unsteady flow field and surface pressure fluctuation according to the blades and casing surface used. The simplified Ffowcs Williams and Hawkings equation was used to predict aeroacoustic noise by assuming that a dipole is the major cause of fan noise. Results of the aeroacoustic noise analysis agreed well with that of the experiment, and a tonal noise whose frequency was lower than the first blade passing frequency could be identified in the noise spectrum. This phenomenon is caused by the shape of the bell mouth. A coherence analysis was performed to examine the correlation between the shape of the cooling fan and the noise.

  3. A matrix formulation for noise transduction as a general case of noise measure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hallgren, Robert B.

    1992-01-01

    Conventional noise characteristics of an active device or circuit are given by the minimum noise figure, the optimum source reflection coefficient, and a noise resistance. The noise measure proposed extends the noise figure to include the available gain of the network, for the case of a conjugate...... output match, and gives values that minimize the noise power available from the network consistent with maximum available gain. Noise transduction follows as a general case of the noise measure by using the transducer gain with any output load. A new noise equation is derived that is solved...... for the minimum transduced noise, the optimum source impedance, and the optimum load impedance. These equations minimize the noise power delivered to the load impedance consistent with a maximum in the transducer gain...

  4. A community survey of helicopter noise annoyance conducted under controlled noise exposure conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, J. M.; Powell, C. A.

    1985-01-01

    Reactions to low numbers of helicopter noise events (less than 50 per day) were studied in a community setting. Community residents were repeatedly interviewed about daily noise annoyance reactions on days when helicopter noise exposures were, without the residents' knowledge, controlled. The effects of maximum noise level and number of noise events on helicopter noise annoyance are consistent with the principles contained in LEQ-based noise indices. The effect of the duration of noise events is also consistent with LEQ-based indices. After removing the effect of differences in noise levels (LEQ) there is not an important difference between reactions to impulsive and nonimpulsive types of helicopters. EPNL, where corrected for number of overflights, and LEQ are approximately equally successful in representing the characteristics of noise which are related to human response. The new type of design provided estimates of the parameters in a noise reaction model which would not obtained with a similar degree of precision from conventional study designs.

  5. Noise from windmills; Stoey fra vindmoeller

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solberg, Sigurd [KILDE Akustikk, (Norway)

    2000-07-01

    The report gives a technical description of noise from windmills. Characteristic levels of noise and noise calculations is described. The influence of wind in the area 5-15 m/s is surveyed. Rules and regulations in five other countries are summarized. (author)

  6. Image upconversion, a low noise infrared sensor?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    for detection of infrared images. Silicon cameras have much smaller intrinsic noise than their IR counter part- some models even offer near single photon detection capability. We demonstrate that an ordinary CCD camera combined with a low noise upconversion has superior noise characteristics when compared...

  7. Drone noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tinney, Charles; Sirohi, Jayant; University of Texas at Austin Team

    2017-11-01

    A basic understanding of the noise produced by single and multirotor drones operating at static thrust conditions is presented. This work acts as an extension to previous efforts conducted at The University of Texas at Austin (Tinney et al. 2017, AHS Forum 73). Propeller diameters ranging from 8 inch to 12 inch are examined for configurations comprising an isolated rotor, a quadcopter configuration and a hexacopter configuration, and with a constant drone pitch of 2.25. An azimuthal array of half-inch microphones, placed between 2 and 3 hub-center diameters from the drone center, are used to assess the acoustic near-field. Thrust levels, acquired using a six degree-of-freedom load cell, are then used to correlate acoustic noise levels to aerodynamic performance for each drone configuration. The findings reveal a nearly logarithmic increase in noise with increasing thrust. However, for the same thrust condition, considerable noise reduction is achieved by increasing the number of propeller blades thereby reducing the blade passage frequency and both the thickness and loading noise sources that accompany it.

  8. Dental drill noise reduction using a combination of active noise control, passive noise control and adaptive filtering

    OpenAIRE

    Kaymak, E; Atherton, MA; Rotter, K; Millar, B

    2007-01-01

    Dental drills produce a characteristic high frequency, narrow band noise that is uncomfortable for patients and is also known to be harmful to dentists under prolonged exposure. It is therefore desirable to protect the patient and dentist whilst allowing two-way communication. A solution is to use a combination of the three main noise control methods, namely, Passive Noise Control (PNC), Adaptive Filtering (AF) and Active Noise Control (ANC). This paper discusses the application of the three ...

  9. Extraaural effects of noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marth, E.; Gruber, M.; Koeck, M.; Moese, J.R.; Gallasch, E.; Fueger, G.F.

    This study investigates the effects of a short-term exposition (15 sec) to an indifferent, broad spectrum of noise. Noise levels were set at 85 dB(A) and 110 dB(A). Stress mediators and compensatory mechanisms were studied in 30 test persons. The study was particularly concerned with the metabolic processes providing energy for fight or flight reactions. Most importantly triglycerides are hydrolysed in order to be able to produce the fatty acids that are released. This catabolism is a function of an ACTH-activated lipase. In 93% of the person tested, triglycerides decreased by 7 to 40% of the initial concentration. Blood sugar reaction can be described in two phases: Initially, there was a slight increase in the blood sugar concentration; at higher noise levels, it was followed by a slight decrease. This behaviour was even more characteristic of the insulin concentration. At 85 dB(A), no significant difference concentration was found compared with the levels previous to noise exposition. At 110 dB(A), there was a significant decrease in the insulin level. Vaso constriction of the peripheral blood vessels is a useful parameter for the stress caused by noise. This was shown by registering the finger pulse during the test.

  10. Optimal Gaussian Filter for Effective Noise Filtering

    OpenAIRE

    Kopparapu, Sunil; Satish, M

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we show that the knowledge of noise statistics contaminating a signal can be effectively used to choose an optimal Gaussian filter to eliminate noise. Very specifically, we show that the additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) contaminating a signal can be filtered best by using a Gaussian filter of specific characteristics. The design of the Gaussian filter bears relationship with the noise statistics and also some basic information about the signal. We first derive a relationship...

  11. Combined effects of noise and neomycin. Cochlear changes in the guinea pig.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, J J; Brummett, R E; Meikle, M B; Vernon, J

    1978-01-01

    Cochlear damage resulting from the combination of neomycin with acoustic overstimulation was investigated in guinea pigs. Four groups of animals received subcutaneous injections and exposure to broad band noise daily for 7 days, as follows: I. Neomycin (200 mg/kg) followed by 10 hours of noise at 115 dB SPL; II. Saline followed by 115 dB noise: III. Neomycin followed by low intensity noise (45 dB as an acoustic control); or IV. Saline followed by 45 dB noise. After a 30 day stabilization period, each ear was examined electrophysiologically and histologically. Measures of cochlear integrity included AC cochlear potentials from 100 Hz through 20 kHz as well as outer hair cell (OHC) counts. A marked interaction leading to augmentation of damage was found when neomycin was combined with 115 dB noise (Group I). Losses in cochlear sensitivity, averaged across all frequencies, amounted to 62 dB in Group I, whereas the averaged losses for Groups II and III were only 16 dB and 17 dB respectively. Loss of OHC's was close to 100% in Group I, while OHC losses were only 17% in Group II and 26% in Group III.

  12. Noise-control needs in the developing energy technologies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Keast, D.N.

    1978-03-01

    The noise characteristics of existing energy conversion technologies, e.g., from obtaining and processing fossil fuels to power plants operations, and of developing energy technologies (wind, geothermal sources, solar energy or fusion systems) are discussed in terms of the effects of noise on humans, animals, structures, and equipment and methods for noise control. Regulations for noise control are described. Recommendations are made for further research on noise control and noise effects. (LCL)

  13. Adjusting phenotypes by noise control.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung H Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Genetically identical cells can show phenotypic variability. This is often caused by stochastic events that originate from randomness in biochemical processes involving in gene expression and other extrinsic cellular processes. From an engineering perspective, there have been efforts focused on theory and experiments to control noise levels by perturbing and replacing gene network components. However, systematic methods for noise control are lacking mainly due to the intractable mathematical structure of noise propagation through reaction networks. Here, we provide a numerical analysis method by quantifying the parametric sensitivity of noise characteristics at the level of the linear noise approximation. Our analysis is readily applicable to various types of noise control and to different types of system; for example, we can orthogonally control the mean and noise levels and can control system dynamics such as noisy oscillations. As an illustration we applied our method to HIV and yeast gene expression systems and metabolic networks. The oscillatory signal control was applied to p53 oscillations from DNA damage. Furthermore, we showed that the efficiency of orthogonal control can be enhanced by applying extrinsic noise and feedback. Our noise control analysis can be applied to any stochastic model belonging to continuous time Markovian systems such as biological and chemical reaction systems, and even computer and social networks. We anticipate the proposed analysis to be a useful tool for designing and controlling synthetic gene networks.

  14. Estimation of Signal Coherence Threshold and Concealed Spectral Lines Applied to Detection of Turbofan Engine Combustion Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miles, Jeffrey Hilton

    2010-01-01

    Combustion noise from turbofan engines has become important, as the noise from sources like the fan and jet are reduced. An aligned and un-aligned coherence technique has been developed to determine a threshold level for the coherence and thereby help to separate the coherent combustion noise source from other noise sources measured with far-field microphones. This method is compared with a statistics based coherence threshold estimation method. In addition, the un-aligned coherence procedure at the same time also reveals periodicities, spectral lines, and undamped sinusoids hidden by broadband turbofan engine noise. In calculating the coherence threshold using a statistical method, one may use either the number of independent records or a larger number corresponding to the number of overlapped records used to create the average. Using data from a turbofan engine and a simulation this paper shows that applying the Fisher z-transform to the un-aligned coherence can aid in making the proper selection of samples and produce a reasonable statistics based coherence threshold. Examples are presented showing that the underlying tonal and coherent broad band structure which is buried under random broadband noise and jet noise can be determined. The method also shows the possible presence of indirect combustion noise. Copyright 2011 Acoustical Society of America. This article may be downloaded for personal use only. Any other use requires prior permission of the author and the Acoustical Society of America.

  15. Graph-analytic method of approximate calculation of the levels and contours of noise from aircraft

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    О.І. Запорожець

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available  The paper presents substantiation of methodologies for evaluation of aircraft noise levels and noise countures using their acoustical characteristics approved in the certificate of aircraft type. The graphic analytical method of noise levels and noise contures is analysed. The comparison of certified noise levels and noise levels calculated for EPNL criteria is done using INM software.

  16. A numerical analysis of the influence of tram characteristics and rail profile on railway traffic ground-borne noise and vibration in the Brussels Region.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouroussis, G; Pauwels, N; Brux, P; Conti, C; Verlinden, O

    2014-06-01

    Nowadays, damage potentially caused by passing train in dense cities is of increasing concern and restricts improvement to the interconnection of various public transport offers. Although experimental studies are common to quantify the effects of noise and vibration on buildings and on people, their reach is limited since the causes of vibrations can rarely be deduced from data records. This paper presents the numerical calculations that allow evaluating the main contributions of railway-induced ground vibrations in the vicinity of buildings. The reference case is the Brussels Region and, more particularly, the T2000 tram circulating in Brussels city. Based on a pertinent selection of the vibration assessment indicators and a numerical prediction approach, various results are presented and show that the free-field analysis is often improperly used in this kind of analysis as the interaction of soil and structure is required. Calculated high ground vibrations stem from singular rail surface defects. The use of resilient wheels is recommended in order to reduce the ground-borne noise and vibration to permissible values. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Real-time dynamic range and signal to noise enhancement in beam-scanning microscopy by integration of sensor characteristics, data acquisition hardware, and statistical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kissick, David J.; Muir, Ryan D.; Sullivan, Shane Z.; Oglesbee, Robert A.; Simpson, Garth J.

    2013-02-01

    Despite the ubiquitous use of multi-photon and confocal microscopy measurements in biology, the core techniques typically suffer from fundamental compromises between signal to noise (S/N) and linear dynamic range (LDR). In this study, direct synchronous digitization of voltage transients coupled with statistical analysis is shown to allow S/N approaching the theoretical maximum throughout an LDR spanning more than 8 decades, limited only by the dark counts of the detector on the low end and by the intrinsic nonlinearities of the photomultiplier tube (PMT) detector on the high end. Synchronous digitization of each voltage transient represents a fundamental departure from established methods in confocal/multi-photon imaging, which are currently based on either photon counting or signal averaging. High information-density data acquisition (up to 3.2 GB/s of raw data) enables the smooth transition between the two modalities on a pixel-by-pixel basis and the ultimate writing of much smaller files (few kB/s). Modeling of the PMT response allows extraction of key sensor parameters from the histogram of voltage peak-heights. Applications in second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy are described demonstrating S/N approaching the shot-noise limit of the detector over large dynamic ranges.

  18. An ultra low noise AC beam transformer for deceleration and diagnostics of low intensity beams

    CERN Document Server

    González, C

    1999-01-01

    The design of a broad band ultra-low noise ferrite loaded AC beam transformer is presented. It is designed for use in the CERN Antiproton Decelerator (AD), where beams of a few 107 charges must be decelerated from 3.5 GeV/c to 100 MeV/c. It is used in the RF beam-phase loop, and for intensity and bunch shape measurements during deceleration. When the beam is debunched for cooling on magnetic flat tops, the pick-up is used for measurements of intensity and momentum distribution by means of longitudinal Schottky scans. When used as Schottky pick-up, the signal to noise ratio should be better by about 40 dB than the existing stripline based longitudinal Schottky pick-up. The integrated design of pick-up and associated low-noise amplifier is presented. The achieved noise performance of a few from 1 to 3 MHz is obtained by attaching a low-noise, high-impedance silicon JFET (junction field effect transistor) amplifier to a high-Q resonant ferrite loaded cavity, and then eliminating the resonant response by low-nois...

  19. Noise in Optical Amplifiers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jeppesen, Palle

    1997-01-01

    Noise in optical amplifiers is discussed on the basis of photons and electromagntic fields. Formulas for quantum noise from spontaneous emission, signal-spontaneous beat noise and spontaneous-spontaneous beat noise are derived.......Noise in optical amplifiers is discussed on the basis of photons and electromagntic fields. Formulas for quantum noise from spontaneous emission, signal-spontaneous beat noise and spontaneous-spontaneous beat noise are derived....

  20. Low noise road surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Bolčina, Matjaž

    2014-01-01

    Noise is everywhere. Noise is a sound that makes people stressful and irritate. It often couses sleep disorders and also health problems like different cardiovascular disorders, hearing loss…In most cases traffic noise is the most disturbing. There are different ways to prevent people from traffic noise like building noise barriers and insulation of facades. However noise barriers and insulation of facades do not prevent noise formation, but are lowering existing noise. Another disadvantage i...

  1. Destruction of noise in biotelemetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraden, J

    1979-01-01

    The difference in statistical characteristics between physiological signals and noise creates the possibility of designing a selective circuit to separate signals from noise. Analysis shows that by an extremely low signal-to-noise ratio before the pulse conditioner in a biotelemetry system, the mixture of normal and spurious pulses are present at the demodulator input. The system of noise destruction analyzes the sequential distances between two following pulses and blanks all spurious pulses using the criteria of high autocorrelation of physiological signals in short intervals. Evaluation of the circuit demonstrates a dramatic increase in accuracy in the presence of strong interference because the system of noise destruction performs a linear extrapolation of free-of-noise parts of pulse flow into destroyed spaces. The equations to calculate selective thresholds and output errors are delineated. The noise destructor is especially useful in long-term monitoring and automatic data analysis because it prevents a formation of sharp noisy spikes at the biotelemetry system's output.

  2. Kurtosis corrected sound pressure level as a noise metric for risk assessment of occupational noises.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goley, G Steven; Song, Won Joon; Kim, Jay H

    2011-03-01

    Current noise guidelines use an energy-based noise metric to predict the risk of hearing loss, and thus ignore the effect of temporal characteristics of the noise. The practice is widely considered to underestimate the risk of a complex noise environment, where impulsive noises are embedded in a steady-state noise. A basic form for noise metrics is designed by combining the equivalent sound pressure level (SPL) and a temporal correction term defined as a function of kurtosis of the noise. Several noise metrics are developed by varying this basic form and evaluated utilizing existing chinchilla noise exposure data. It is shown that the kurtosis correction term significantly improves the correlation of the noise metric with the measured hearing losses in chinchillas. The average SPL of the frequency components of the noise that define the hearing loss with a kurtosis correction term is identified as the best noise metric among tested. One of the investigated metrics, the kurtosis-corrected A-weighted SPL, is applied to a human exposure study data as a preview of applying the metrics to human guidelines. The possibility of applying the noise metrics to human guidelines is discussed. © 2011 Acoustical Society of America

  3. Patrol Officer Daily Noise Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbertson, Lynn R; Vosburgh, Donna J H

    2015-01-01

    Previous research shows that police officers are at a higher risk for noise induced hearing loss (NIHL). Little data exists on the occupational tasks, outside of the firing range, that might lead to the increased risk of NIHL. The current study collected noise dosimetry from patrol officers in a smaller department and a larger department in southern Wisconsin, United States. The noise dosimeters simultaneously measured noise in three virtual dosimeters that had different thresholds, criterion levels, and exchange rates. The virtual dosimeters were set to: the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) hearing conservation criteria (OSHA-HC), the OSHA permissible exposure level criteria (OSHA-PEL), and the American Conference of Governmental Industrial Hygienists (ACGIH). In addition to wearing a noise dosimeter during their respective work days, officers completed a log form documenting the type of task performed, the duration of that task, if the task involved the use of a siren, and officer characteristics that may have influenced their noise exposure, such as the type of dispatch radio unit worn. Analysis revealed that the normalized 8-hour time weighted averages (TWA) for all officers fell below the recommended OSHA and ACGIH exposure limits. The tasks involving the use of the siren had significantly higher levels than the tasks without (p = 0.005). The highest noise exposure levels were encountered when patrol officers were assisting other public safety agencies such as a fire department or emergency medical services (79 dBA). Canine officers had higher normalized 8-hr TWA noise exposure than regular patrol officers (p = 0.002). Officers with an evening work schedule had significantly higher noise exposure than the officers with a day or night work schedule (p = 0.023). There were no significant differences in exposure levels between the two departments (p = 0.22). Results suggest that this study population is unlikely to experience NIHL as

  4. The Problems with "Noise Numbers" for Wind Farm Noise Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorne, Bob

    2011-01-01

    Human perception responds primarily to sound character rather than sound level. Wind farms are unique sound sources and exhibit special audible and inaudible characteristics that can be described as modulating sound or as a tonal complex. Wind farm compliance measures based on a specified noise number alone will fail to address problems with noise…

  5. Noise suppression in surface microseismic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forghani-Arani, Farnoush; Batzle, Mike; Behura, Jyoti; Willis, Mark; Haines, Seth S.; Davidson, Michael

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a passive noise suppression technique, based on the τ − p transform. In the τ − p domain, one can separate microseismic events from surface noise based on distinct characteristics that are not visible in the time-offset domain. By applying the inverse τ − p transform to the separated microseismic event, we suppress the surface noise in the data. Our technique significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratios of the microseismic events and is superior to existing techniques for passive noise suppression in the sense that it preserves the waveform. We introduce a passive noise suppression technique, based on the τ − p transform. In the τ − p domain, one can separate microseismic events from surface noise based on distinct characteristics that are not visible in the time-offset domain. By applying the inverse τ − p transform to the separated microseismic event, we suppress the surface noise in the data. Our technique significantly improves the signal-to-noise ratios of the microseismic events and is superior to existing techniques for passive noise suppression in the sense that it preserves the waveform.

  6. Occupational noise management

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2010-06-15

    Occupational noise is a frequently encountered on-the-job health hazard. This guide presented the responsibilities and regulatory requirements related to business activities where noise above 80 decibels is present. The guide provided a definition of noise and discussed noise hazards, types of noise, and on-the-job noise exposure. A risk assessment to noise in the work environment was also discussed. A guide to a hearing conservation program was also included. The main purpose of a hearing conservation program is the prevention of noise induced hearing loss for employees exposed to occupational noise. The components of such a program were outlined, with particular reference to noise monitoring; noise exposure control; worker education and training; hearing (audiometric) testing; and annual program review and record keeping. It was concluded that in terms of record keeping, it can be very helpful to file noise exposure assessments, particularly personal exposure measurements, with hearing test records to facilitate for future reference. refs., appendices.

  7. Low-Noise Band-Pass Amplifier

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinberg, L.

    1982-01-01

    Circuit uses standard components to overcome common limitation of JFET amplifiers. Low-noise band-pass amplifier employs JFET and operational amplifier. High gain and band-pass characteristics are achieved with suitable choice of resistances and capacitances. Circuit should find use as low-noise amplifier, for example as first stage instrumentation systems.

  8. Inhibitory noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alain Destexhe

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Cortical neurons in vivo may operate in high-conductance states, in which the major part of the neuron's input conductance is due to synaptic activity, sometimes several-fold larger than the resting conductance. We examine here the contribution of inhibition in such high-conductance states. At the level of the absolute conductance values, several studies have shown that cortical neurons in vivo are characterized by strong inhibitory conductances. However, conductances are balanced and spiking activity is mostly determined by fluctuations, but not much is known about excitatory and inhibitory contributions to these fluctuations. Models and dynamic-clamp experiments show that, during high-conductance states, spikes are mainly determined by fluctuations of inhibition, or by inhibitory noise. This stands in contrast to low-conductance states, in which excitatory conductances determine spiking activity. To determine these contributions from experimental data, maximum likelihood methods can be designed and applied to intracellular recordings in vivo. Such methods indicate that action potentials are indeed mostly correlated with inhibitory fluctuations in awake animals. These results argue for a determinant role for inhibitory fluctuations in evoking spikes, and do not support feed-forward modes of processing, for which opposite patterns are predicted.

  9. STUDY NOISE POLLUTION TYUMEN USING GIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Dobryakova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the most harmful factors of environment of the city is the noise, and its weight among the factors adversely affecting the life and health of the population has been increasing steadily [Sheina and etc., 2007; Polovinkina and etc., 2012]. Today, most major cities of the Russian Federation (70% have a high noise pollution problem. The system of support for the monitoring and control of acoustic situation in the city can be considered noise pollution electronic cards made using geographic information systems (GIS. There are two fundamentally different approaches to the selection of software for creation of noise maps. According to the first of them, use universal multifunctional complexes GIS (ArcGIS, MapInfo. According to the distribution of data points on the noise characteristics is created TIN model. A second approach to create noise maps using highly specialized software (MapNoise, SoundPLAN, Mitha, Cadna, ExNOISE et al.. To calculate noise propagation area is divided on the grid with a certain step, the most relevant mapping purposes. Calculation of noise levels is carried out in a grid cell by measurements based on diffraction and reflection of sound barriers and absorbing underlying surface. Noise pollution is also displayed using contour lines.

  10. Noise-Measuring Method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, J. M.

    1965-01-01

    A noise-measuring method based on the use of a calibrated noise generator and an output meter with a special scale is described. The method eliminates the effect of noise contributions occurring in the circuits following the device under test.......A noise-measuring method based on the use of a calibrated noise generator and an output meter with a special scale is described. The method eliminates the effect of noise contributions occurring in the circuits following the device under test....

  11. Individual daytime noise exposure in different microenvironments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraus, Ute; Breitner, Susanne; Hampel, Regina; Wolf, Kathrin; Cyrys, Josef; Geruschkat, Uta; Gu, Jianwei; Radon, Katja; Peters, Annette; Schneider, Alexandra

    2015-07-01

    Numerous studies showed that chronic noise exposure modeled through noise mapping is associated with adverse health effects. However, knowledge about real individual noise exposure, emitted by several sources, is limited. To explain the variation in individual daytime noise exposure regarding different microenvironments, activities and individual characteristics. In a repeated measures study in Augsburg, Germany (March 2007-December 2008), 109 individuals participated in 305 individual noise measurements with a mean duration of 5.5h. Whereabouts and activities were recorded in a diary. One-minute averages of A-weighted equivalent continuous sound pressure levels (Leq) were determined. We used mixed additive models to elucidate the variation of Leq by diary-based information, baseline characteristics and time-invariant variables like long-term noise exposure. Overall noise levels were highly variable (median: 64 dB(A); range: 37-105 dB(A)). Highest noise levels were measured in traffic during bicycling (69 dB(A); 49-97 dB(A)) and lowest while resting at home (54 dB(A); 37-94 dB(A)). Nearly all diary-based information as well as physical activity, sex and age-group had significant influences on individual noise. In an additional analysis restricted to times spent at the residences, long-term noise exposure did not improve the model fit. Individual exposures to day-time noise were moderate to high and showed high variations in different microenvironments except when being in traffic. Individual noise levels were greatly determined by personal activities but also seemed to depend on environmental noise levels. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Image upconversion - a low noise infrared sensor?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dam, Jeppe Seidelin; Tidemand-Lichtenberg, Peter; Pedersen, Christian

    for detection of infrared images. Silicon cameras have much smaller intrinsic noise than their IR counter part- some models even offer near single photon detection capability. We demonstrate that an ordinary CCD camera combined with a low noise upconversion has superior noise characteristics when compared......Low noise upconversion of IR images by three-wave mixing, can be performed with high efficiency when mixing the object with a powerful laser field inside a highly non-linear crystal such as periodically poled Lithium Niobate. This feature effectively allows the use of silicon based cameras...... to even state-of-the art IR cameras....

  13. Realized Variance and Market Microstructure Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Peter R.; Lunde, Asger

    2006-01-01

    estimation based on high-frequency data. Finally, we apply cointegration techniques to decompose transaction prices and bid-ask quotes into an estimate of the efficient price and noise. This framework enables us to study the dynamic effects on transaction prices and quotes caused by changes in the efficient......We study market microstructure noise in high-frequency data and analyze its implications for the realized variance (RV) under a general specification for the noise. We show that kernel-based estimators can unearth important characteristics of market microstructure noise and that a simple kernel...

  14. External noise distinguishes attention mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Z L; Dosher, B A

    1998-05-01

    We developed and tested a powerful method for identifying and characterizing the effect of attention on performance in visual tasks as due to signal enhancement, distractor exclusion, or internal noise suppression. Based on a noisy Perceptual Template Model (PTM) of a human observer, the method adds increasing amounts of external noise (white gaussian random noise) to the visual stimulus and observes the effect on performance of a perceptual task for attended and unattended stimuli. The three mechanisms of attention yield three "signature" patterns of performance. The general framework for characterizing the mechanisms of attention is used here to investigate the attentional mechanisms in a concurrent location-cued orientation discrimination task. Test stimuli--Gabor patches tilted slightly to the right or left--always appeared on both the left and the right of fixation, and varied independently. Observers were cued on each trial to attend to the left, the right, or evenly to both stimuli, and decide the direction of tilt of both test stimuli. For eight levels of added external noise and three attention conditions (attended, unattended, and equal), subjects' contrast threshold levels were determined. At low levels of external noise, attention affected threshold contrast: threshold contrasts for non-attended stimuli were systematically higher than for equal attention stimuli, which were, in turn, higher than for attended stimuli. Specifically, when the rms contrast of the external noise is below 10%, there is a consistent 17% elevation of contrast threshold from attended to unattended condition across all three subjects. For higher levels of external noise, attention conditions did not affect threshold contrast values at all. These strong results are characteristic of a signal enhancement, or equivalently, an internal additive noise reduction mechanism of attention.

  15. Noise properties of graphene films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Nan; Liu, Xinyu; Arnold, Gerald; Ruggiero, Steven; Department of Physics Team

    2013-03-01

    We present results for the noise characteristics of graphene flakes on SiO2 as a function of gate bias. Our results are in accord with a new tunnel/trap model based on the interaction of graphene carriers with the underlying substrate, which incorporates trap position, energy, and barrier height for tunneling into a given trap, along with the band-structure of the graphene. We will also discuss recent work on the properties of MBE-grown GaAs on graphene, in the context of noise in spin transport.

  16. Supersonic Jet Noise Reduction Using Microjets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gutmark, Ephraim; Cuppoletti, Dan; Malla, Bhupatindra

    2013-11-01

    Fluidic injection for jet noise reduction involves injecting secondary jets into a primary jet to alter the noise characteristics of the primary jet. A major challenge has been determining what mechanisms are responsible for noise reduction due to varying injector designs, injection parameters, and primary jets. The current study provides conclusive results on the effect of injector angle and momentum ux ratio on the acoustics and shock structure of a supersonic Md = 1.56 jet. It is shown that the turbulent mixing noise scales primarily with the injector momentum flux ratio. Increasing the injector momentum flux ratio increases streamwise vorticity generation and reduces peak turbulence levels. It is found that the shock-related noise components are most affected by the interaction of the shocks from the injectors with the primary shock structure of the jet. Increasing momentum flux ratio causes shock noise reduction until a limit where shock noise increases again. It is shown that the shock noise components and mixing noise components are reduced through fundamentally different mechanisms and maximum overall noise reduction is achieved by balancing the reduction of both components.

  17. Studying propagation of seismic waves across the Valley of Mexico from correlations of seismic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivet, D. N.; Campillo, M.; Shapiro, N. M.; Singh, S.; Cruz Atienza, V. M.; Quintanar, L.; Valdés, C.

    2009-12-01

    We reconstruct Rayleigh and Love waves from cross-correlations of ambient seismic noise recorded at 22 broad-band stations of the MesoAmerica Seismic Experiment (MASE) and Valley of Mexico Experiment (VMEX). The cross-correlations are computed over 2 years of noise data for the 9 MASE stations and over 1 year for the 13 VMEX stations. Surface waves with sufficient signal-to-noise ratio are then used in the group velocity dispersion analysis. We use the reconstructed waveforms to measure group velocity dispersion curves at period of 0.5 to 5 seconds. For traveling path inside the lake-bed zone, the maximum energy is observed at velocity higher than expected for the fundamental mode. This indicates that the propagation within the Mexico basin is dominated by higher modes of surface waves that propagate deeper in the basin. We identify the propagation modes by comparing observations with theoretical dispersion curves and eigenfunctions calculated for Rayleigh and Loves waves associated with a given model of the upper crust. The fundamental mode shows a very low group velocity, determining factor in the long duration of the seismic signal. A better velocity constraint on the deeper structure of the basin is thus needed to fully understand this phenomenon.

  18. Non-Markovian noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fulinski, A. (Institute of Physics, Jagellonian University, Reymonta 4, PL-30-059 Krakow (Poland))

    1994-10-01

    The properties of non-Markovian noises with exponentially correlated memory are discussed. Considered are dichotomic noise, white shot noise, Gaussian white noise, and Gaussian colored noise. The stationary correlation functions of the non-Markovian versions of these noises are given by linear combinations of two or three exponential functions (colored noises) or of the [delta] function and exponential function (white noises). The non-Markovian white noises are well defined only when the kernel of the non-Markovian master equation contains a nonzero admixture of a Markovian term. Approximate equations governing the probability densities for processes driven by such non-Markovian noises are derived, including non-Markovian versions of the Fokker-Planck equation and the telegrapher's equation. As an example, it is shown how the non-Markovian nature changes the behavior of the driven linear process.

  19. assessment of noise pollutio noise pollutio noise pollution

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    This study examine. This study examined noise pollution pollution pollution from sawmillin from sawmillin using HD600 digital data l using HD600 digital data logging sound level me ogging sound level me designed to elicit noise related information. The res sawmills was 58.1 sawmills was 58.1-64.86 dB(A) while machine ...

  20. assessment of noise pollutio noise pollutio noise pollution

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    related ailments such as tinnitus (96.6%), headache (86.6%) se prevention and control strategies are suggested in additio. , education, and enforcement of noise regulations. , education, and enforcement of noise regulations. machine, workers, impacts. , particularly at global concern as strong some high-ranking health.

  1. Aircraft engine noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennepohl, F.

    An overview of the main aircraft engine noise sources is given. Special emphasis is devoted to turbomachinery/rotor noise, which plays an important role in all engine concepts appropriate to regional aircraft, such as turbofans, propellers, or new propfan engine concepts. The noise generating mechanisms, including propagation within the engine, and calculation methods used are described. Noise reduction methods are considered, with emphasis on cutoff design of turbomachines. Some noise features of counter rotating propellers and swept rotor blades are mentioned.

  2. Cortical signal-in-noise coding varies by noise type, signal-to-noise ratio, age, and hearing status.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maamor, Nashrah; Billings, Curtis J

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effects of noise type, signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), age, and hearing status on cortical auditory evoked potentials (CAEPs) to speech sounds. This helps to explain the hearing-in-noise difficulties often seen in the aging and hearing impaired population. Continuous, modulated, and babble noise types were presented at varying SNRs to 30 individuals divided into three groups according to age and hearing status. Significant main effects of noise type, SNR, and group were found. Interaction effects revealed that the SNR effect varies as a function of noise type and is most systematic for continuous noise. Effects of age and hearing loss were limited to CAEP latency and were differentially modulated by energetic and informational-like masking. It is clear that the spectrotemporal characteristics of signals and noises play an important role in determining the morphology of neural responses. Participant factors such as age and hearing status, also play an important role in determining the brain's response to complex auditory stimuli and contribute to the ability to listen in noise. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Noise equivalent circuit of a semiconductor laser diode

    OpenAIRE

    Harder, Christoph; Katz, Joseph; Margalit, S.; Shacham, J.; Yariv, A.

    1982-01-01

    The noise equivalent circuit of a semiconductor laser diode is derived from the rate equations including Langevin noise sources. This equivalent circuit allows a straightforward calculation of the noise and modulation characteristics of a laser diode combined with electronic components. The intrinsic junction voltage noise spectrum and the light intensity fluctuation of a current driven laser diode are calculated as a function of bias current and frequency.

  4. Noise-Induced “Toughening” Effect in Wistar Rats: Enhanced Auditory Brainstem Responses Are Related to Calretinin and Nitric Oxide Synthase Upregulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvarado, Juan C.; Fuentes-Santamaría, Verónica; Gabaldón-Ull, María C.; Jareño-Flores, Tania; Miller, Josef M.; Juiz, José M.

    2016-01-01

    An appropriate conditioning noise exposure may reduce a subsequent noise-induced threshold shift. Although this “toughening” effect helps to protect the auditory system from a subsequent traumatic noise exposure, the mechanisms that regulate this protective process are not fully understood yet. Accordingly, the goal of the present study was to characterize physiological processes associated with “toughening” and to determine their relationship to metabolic changes in the cochlea and cochlear nucleus (CN). Auditory brainstem responses (ABR) were evaluated in Wistar rats before and after exposures to a sound conditioning protocol consisting of a broad-band white noise of 118 dB SPL for 1 h every 72 h, four times. After the last ABR evaluation, animals were perfused and their cochleae and brains removed and processed for the activity markers calretinin (CR) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS). Toughening was demonstrated by a progressively faster recovery of the threshold shift, as well as wave amplitudes and latencies over time. Immunostaining revealed an increase in CR and nNOS levels in the spiral ganglion, spiral ligament, and CN in noise-conditioned rats. Overall, these results suggest that the protective mechanisms of the auditory toughening effect initiate in the cochlea and extend to the central auditory system. Such phenomenon might be in part related to an interplay between CR and nitric oxide signaling pathways, and involve an increased cytosolic calcium buffering capacity induced by the noise conditioning protocol. PMID:27065815

  5. Solution for Vehicles Noise Cancellation With Modification of LMS Adaptive Algorithm

    OpenAIRE

    Sri Arttini Dwi Prasetyowati; Bustanul Arifin; Eka Nuryanto Budi Susila

    2012-01-01

    The problems of noise cancelling systems are based on the specific characteristics of their sources. Therefore, the knowledge of each noise source should be represented prior to the excecution ofthe designed noise cancelling scheme. Since the noises emitted vary with the types of the passing vehicles, the scheme should be well adjusted automatically. The delay must be minimixed by managing the value of step size. Five representing types of noise producing vehicles (noise from: bus, truck, mot...

  6. Solar noise storms

    CERN Document Server

    Elgaroy, E O

    2013-01-01

    Solar Noise Storms examines the properties and features of solar noise storm phenomenon. The book also presents some theories that can be used to gain a better understanding of the phenomenon. The coverage of the text includes topics that cover the features and behavior of noise storms, such as the observable features of noise storms; the relationship between noise storms and the observable features on the sun; and ordered behavior of storm bursts in the time-frequency plane. The book also covers the spectrum, polarization, and directivity of noise storms. The text will be of great use to astr

  7. Noise and Hearing Protection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... often becomes permanent. Some people react to loud noise with anxiety and irritability, an increase in pulse rate and blood pressure, or an increase in stomach acid. Very loud noise can reduce efficiency in performing difficult tasks by ...

  8. Noise Analysis of Switched-Capacitor Circuits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Retdian, Nicodimus; Takagi, Shigetaka

    Switched-capacitor (SC) circuit has been a well known analog circuit block. Since their characteristics are determined by capacitance ratio, SC circuits are suitable for on-chip implementations. Eventhough there are so many publications on the design of SC circuits, only a few of them discuss the property of noise in SC circuits. Linear noise analysis are common in continuous-time systems. However, SC circuits are operating in discrete-time domain and their noise properties are known to be a non-linear phenomenon and dificult to be analyzed by hand. This paper will show a noise analysis of an SC integrator as an example for a better understanding of the analysis method. It will be shown by simulation results that the proposed formula gives a better approximation of noise power spectral density (PSD).

  9. Ocean Ambient Noise Measurement and Theory

    CERN Document Server

    Carey, William M

    2011-01-01

    This book develops the theory of ocean ambient noise mechanisms and measurements, and also describes general noise characteristics and computational methods.  It concisely summarizes the vast ambient noise literature using theory combined with key representative results.  The air-sea boundary interaction zone is described in terms of non-dimensional variables requisite for future experiments.  Noise field coherency, rare directional measurements, and unique basin scale computations and methods are presented.  The use of satellite measurements in these basin scale models is demonstrated.  Finally, this book provides a series of appendices giving in-depth mathematical treatments.  With its complete and careful discussions of both theory and experimental results, this book will be of the greatest interest to graduate students and active researchers working in fields related to ambient noise in the ocean.

  10. Noise in mesoscopic physics

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Thierry

    2005-01-01

    This is a course on noise which covers some of the scattering theory for normal metals, Hanbury Brown and Twiss analogs for noise correlations with electrons, noise correlations in superconducting/normal metal junctions. Entanglement in such NS systems is described with a criterion for violating Bell inegalities. The last section is devoted to the perturbative derivation of noise in a particular one dimensional correlated electron system (Luttinger liquid): edge states in the fractional quant...

  11. Active noise control in a duct to cancel broadband noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kuan-Chun; Chang, Cheng-Yuan; Kuo, Sen M.

    2017-09-01

    The paper presents cancelling duct noises by using the active noise control (ANC) techniques. We use the single channel feed forward algorithm with feedback neutralization to realize ANC. Several kinds of ducts noises including tonal noises, sweep tonal signals, and white noise had investigated. Experimental results show that the proposed ANC system can cancel these noises in a PVC duct very well. The noise reduction of white noise can be up to 20 dB.

  12. Classical noise, quantum noise and secure communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tannous, C.; Langlois, J.

    2016-01-01

    Secure communication based on message encryption might be performed by combining the message with controlled noise (called pseudo-noise) as performed in spread-spectrum communication used presently in Wi-Fi and smartphone telecommunication systems. Quantum communication based on entanglement is another route for securing communications as demonstrated by several important experiments described in this work. The central role played by the photon in unifying the description of classical and quantum noise as major ingredients of secure communication systems is highlighted and described on the basis of the classical and quantum fluctuation dissipation theorems.

  13. WHO Environmental Noise Guidelines for the European Region: A Systematic Review on Environmental Noise and Annoyance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rainer Guski

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: This paper describes a systematic review and meta-analyses on effects of environmental noise on annoyance. The noise sources include aircraft, road, and rail transportation noise as well as wind turbines and noise source combinations. Objectives: Update knowledge about effects of environmental noise on people living in the vicinity of noise sources. Methods: Eligible were published studies (2000–2014 providing comparable acoustical and social survey data including exposure-response functions between standard indicators of noise exposure and standard annoyance responses. The systematic literature search in 20 data bases resulted in 62 studies, of which 57 were used for quantitative meta-analyses. By means of questionnaires sent to the study authors, additional study data were obtained. Risk of bias was assessed by means of study characteristics for individual studies and by funnel plots to assess the risk of publication bias. Main Results: Tentative exposure-response relations for percent highly annoyed residents (%HA in relation to noise levels for aircraft, road, rail, wind turbine and noise source combinations are presented as well as meta-analyses of correlations between noise levels and annoyance raw scores, and the OR for increase of %HA with increasing noise levels. Quality of evidence was assessed using the GRADE terminology. The evidence of exposure-response relations between noise levels and %HA is moderate (aircraft and railway or low (road traffic and wind turbines. The evidence of correlations between noise levels and annoyance raw scores is high (aircraft and railway or moderate (road traffic and wind turbines. The evidence of ORs representing the %HA increase by a certain noise level increase is moderate (aircraft noise, moderate/high (road and railway traffic, and low (wind turbines. Strengths and Limitations: The strength of the evidence is seen in the large total sample size encompassing the included studies (e

  14. Direct-reading dial for noise temperature and noise resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Diamond, J.M.

    1967-01-01

    An attenuator arrangement for a noise generator is described. The scheme permits direct reading of both noise resistance and noise temperature¿the latter with a choice of source resistance.......An attenuator arrangement for a noise generator is described. The scheme permits direct reading of both noise resistance and noise temperature¿the latter with a choice of source resistance....

  15. Using noise to probe and characterize gene circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Chris D; McCollum, James M; Allen, Michael S; Dar, Roy D; Simpson, Michael L

    2008-08-05

    Stochastic fluctuations (or "noise") in the single-cell populations of molecular species are shaped by the structure and biokinetic rates of the underlying gene circuit. The structure of the noise is summarized by its autocorrelation function. In this article, we introduce the noise regulatory vector as a generalized framework for making inferences concerning the structure and biokinetic rates of a gene circuit from its noise autocorrelation function. Although most previous studies have focused primarily on the magnitude component of the noise (given by the zero-lag autocorrelation function), our approach also considers the correlation component, which encodes additional information concerning the circuit. Theoretical analyses and simulations of various gene circuits show that the noise regulatory vector is characteristic of the composition of the circuit. Although a particular noise regulatory vector does not map uniquely to a single underlying circuit, it does suggest possible candidate circuits, while excluding others, thereby demonstrating the probative value of noise in gene circuit analysis.

  16. Noise from wind turbines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fegeant, Olivier [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Building Sciences

    2002-02-01

    A rapid growth of installed wind power capacity is expected in the next few years. However, the siting of wind turbines on a large scale raises concerns about their environmental impact, notably with respect to noise. To this end, variable speed wind turbines offer a promising solution for applications in densely populated areas like the European countries, as this design would enable an efficient utilisation of the masking effect due to ambient noise. In rural and recreational areas where wind turbines are sited, the ambient noise originates from the action of wind on the vegetation and about the listener's ear (pseudo-noise). It shows a wind speed dependence similar to that of the noise from a variable speed wind turbine and can therefore mask the latter for a wide range of conditions. However, a problem inherent to the design of these machines is their proclivity to pure tone generation, because of the enhanced difficulty of avoiding structural resonances in the mechanical parts. Pure tones are deemed highly annoying and are severely regulated by most noise policies. In relation to this problem, the vibration transmission of structure-borne sound to the tower of the turbine is investigated, in particular when the tower is stiffened at its upper end. Furthermore, since noise annoyance due to wind turbine is mostly a masking issue, the wind-related sources of ambient noise are studied and their masking potentials assessed. With this aim, prediction models for wind-induced vegetation noise and pseudo-noise have been developed. Finally, closely related to the effect of masking, is the difficulty, regularly encountered by local authorities and wind farm developers, to measure noise immission from wind turbines. A new measurement technique has thus been developed in the course of this work. Through improving the signal-to-noise ratio between wind turbine noise and ambient noise, the new technique yields more accurate measurement results.

  17. Advanced Multi-Photon Chromophores for Broad-Band Ultra-Fast Optical Limiting

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-11-04

    characterized by the fluorescence method. 3. We have explored structure-property relationships in an extensive library of porphyrins and porphyrin dimers...Amplified two-photon absorption in trans-A2B2- porphyrins bearing nitrophenylethynyl substituents [11]. We show that peripheral nitro groups enhance...the maximum two-photon absorption cross section of trans-A2B2- porphyrins bearing two phenylethynyl substituents by more than one order of magnitude

  18. Seismo-volcano source localization with triaxial broad-band seismic array

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inza, L. A.; Mars, J. I.; Métaxian, J. P.; O'Brien, G. S.; Macedo, O.

    2011-10-01

    Seismo-volcano source localization is essential to improve our understanding of eruptive dynamics and of magmatic systems. The lack of clear seismic wave phases prohibits the use of classical location methods. Seismic antennas composed of one-component (1C) seismometers provide a good estimate of the backazimuth of the wavefield. The depth estimation, on the other hand, is difficult or impossible to determine. As in classical seismology, the use of three-component (3C) seismometers is now common in volcano studies. To determine the source location parameters (backazimuth and depth), we extend the 1C seismic antenna approach to 3Cs. This paper discusses a high-resolution location method using a 3C array survey (3C-MUSIC algorithm) with data from two seismic antennas installed on an andesitic volcano in Peru (Ubinas volcano). One of the main scientific questions related to the eruptive process of Ubinas volcano is the relationship between the magmatic explosions and long-period (LP) swarms. After introducing the 3C array theory, we evaluate the robustness of the location method on a full wavefield 3-D synthetic data set generated using a digital elevation model of Ubinas volcano and an homogeneous velocity model. Results show that the backazimuth determined using the 3C array has a smaller error than a 1C array. Only the 3C method allows the recovery of the source depths. Finally, we applied the 3C approach to two seismic events recorded in 2009. Crossing the estimated backazimuth and incidence angles, we find sources located 1000 ± 660 m and 3000 ± 730 m below the bottom of the active crater for the explosion and the LP event, respectively. Therefore, extending 1C arrays to 3C arrays in volcano monitoring allows a more accurate determination of the source epicentre and now an estimate for the depth.

  19. On the design of novel compact broad-band planar filters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menzel, W.; Zhu, Lei; Wu, Ke; Bogelsack, F.

    2003-02-01

    On the basis of impedance steps and coupled-line sections as inverter circuits, novel wide-band and very compact filters are presented. The application of alternately high- and low-impedance lines presented to the connected transmission-line resonators partly reduces their lengths to a quarter-wavelength only. In addition, effective techniques are demonstrated to reduce spurious stopband resonance resulting from a remaining half-wavelength resonator. Both suspended stripline (SSL) and microstrip filters were designed, fabricated, and tested, proving this concept in an excellent way. For the prototype filters, center frequencies around 6 GHz were selected. Bandwidths are between 2.5-3.25 GHz, and insertion-loss amounts to around 0.25 dB for the microstrip filters and 0.5 dB (including the transitions to coaxial line) for the SSL filters, respectively. For the selected center frequency and on a substrate with a dielectric constant of 10.8, the smallest microstrip filter is only 15 mm×5 mm in size.

  20. Compact High-Resolution Broad-Band Terahertz Fabry-Perot Spectrometer Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our objective is to develop a compact scanning Fabry-Perot spectrometer, for satellite far-infrared astronomy and Earth remote sensing, that operates at wavelengths...

  1. Broad-band second-harmonic generation in holey optical fibers

    OpenAIRE

    Monro, T.M.; Pruneri, V.; Broderick, N.G.R.; Faccio, D.; Kazansky, P. G.; Richardson, D.J.

    2001-01-01

    Holey fibers are shown to have an ideal geometry for efficient parametric processes due to their tailorable modal properties. These fibers can have the additional advantage of single-mode operation at all the interacting wavelengths. We demonstrate theoretically that by appropriate choice of holey fiber geometry, these fibers can be up to four orders of magnitude more efficient for second harmonic generation than conventional poled fibers

  2. Teleseismic SKS splitting beneath East Antarctica using broad-band stations around Soya Coast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usui, Y.; Kanao, M.

    2006-12-01

    We observed shear wave splitting of SKS waves from digital seismographs that are recorded at 5 stations around Soya Coast in the Lutzow-Holm Bay, East Antarctica. Their recording systems are composed of a three-component broadband seismometer (CMG-40T), a digital recording unit and a solar power battery supply. The events used were selected from 1999 to 2004 and phase arrival times were calculated using the IASPEI91 earth model (Kennet, 1995). In general, we chose the data from earthquakes with m>6.0 and a distance range 85° < Δ < 130° for the most prominent SKS waves We used the methods of Silver and Chan (1991) for the inversion of anisotropy parameters and estimated the splitting parameters φ (fast polarization direction) and δt (delay time between split waves) assuming a single layer of hexagonal symmetry with a horizontal symmetry axis. The weighted averages of all splitting parameters (φ, δt) for each station are AKR (30±4, 1.30±0.2), LNG (58±6, 1.27±0.2), SKL (67±10, 0.94±0.2), SKV (40±6, 1.28±0.3) and TOT (52±8, 1.26±0.3), where the weights are inversely proportional to the standard deviations for each solution. As compared to typical delay times of SKS waves which show 1.2s (Silver and Chan 1991; Vinnik et al., 1992), the result shows generally the same value. In previous study, Kubo and Hiramatsu (1998) estimate the splitting parameter for Syowa station (SYO), where is located near our using stations in East Antarctica, and the results are (49±3, 0.70±0.1). Although it is consistent with our results for fast polarization direction, δt for our results are large relatively to those of SYO. The difference may be due to either different incident angle or more complex anisotropic structure. We found that fast polarization direction is systematically parallel to coast line in the Lutzow-Holm Bay, East Antarctica, which is consistent with NE-SW paleo compressional stress. The absolute plate motion based on the HS2-NUVEL1 (Gripp and Gordon, 1990), that may reflect the present horizontal mantle flow, shows the direction of N120°E and velocity of 1cm/yr in this study region. Since it doesn't coincide with fast polarization direction (the difference is about 50°~90°), we conclude that the mechanism of observed anisotropy is lattice preferred orientation of olivine along the mantle flow which caused NE-SW paleo compressional stress. In future works, we will accomplish the analysis assumed more complex anisotropy systems, such as a two layer model of azimuthal anisotropy, because we could find there is the possibility of azimuthal variations of the splitting parameters in a few station.

  3. Particle acceleration model for the broad-band baseline spectrum of the Crab nebula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fraschetti, F.; Pohl, M.

    2017-11-01

    We develop a simple one-zone model of the steady-state Crab nebula spectrum encompassing both the radio/soft X-ray and the GeV/multi-TeV observations. By solving the transport equation for GeV-TeV electrons injected at the wind termination shock as a log-parabola momentum distribution and evolved via energy losses, we determine analytically the resulting differential energy spectrum of photons. We find an impressive agreement with the observed spectrum of synchrotron emission, and the synchrotron self-Compton component reproduces the previously unexplained broad 200-GeV peak that matches the Fermi/Large Area Telescope (LAT) data beyond 1 GeV with the Major Atmospheric Gamma Imaging Cherenkov (MAGIC) data. We determine the parameters of the single log-parabola electron injection distribution, in contrast with multiple broken power-law electron spectra proposed in the literature. The resulting photon differential spectrum provides a natural interpretation of the deviation from power law customarily fitted with empirical multiple broken power laws. Our model can be applied to the radio-to-multi-TeV spectrum of a variety of astrophysical outflows, including pulsar wind nebulae and supernova remnants, as well as to interplanetary shocks.

  4. Coaxial Sensors For Broad-Band Complex Permittivity Measurements of Petroleum Fluids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Folgeroe, K.

    1996-12-31

    This doctoral thesis verifies that dielectric spectroscopy and microwave permittivity measurements can be used to characterize petroleum liquids. It concentrates on developing sensors for three potential industrial applications: quality characterization of crude oil and petroleum fractions, monitoring of gas-hydrate formation in water-in-oil emulsions, and determination of water-content in thin liquid layers. The development of a permittivity measurement system for crude oil and petroleum fractions is described. As black oils have low dielectric constant and loss, the system must be very sensitive in order to measure the dielectric spectra and to distinguish oils of different permittivity. Such a system was achieved by combining impedance and scattering parameter measurements with appropriate permittivity calculation methods. The frequency range from 10 kHz to 6 GHz was found convenient for observing the main dispersion of the oils. All the oils had dielectric constants between 2.1 and 2.9 and dielectric loss below 0.01. The oils studied were samples of the feedstock for the cracker and coke processes at a petroleum refinery. This verifies that dielectric spectroscopy is a potential technique for on-line quality monitoring of the feedstock at petroleum refineries. Gas hydrates may cause major problems like clogging of pipelines. Dielectric spectroscopy is proposed as a means of monitoring the formation of gas hydrates in emulsions. It is found that open-ended coaxial probes fulfill the sensitivity requirements for such sensors. 312 refs., 87 figs., 20 tabs.

  5. A tunable, linac based, intense, broad-band THz source forpump-probe experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmerge, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Adolphsen, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Corbett, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Dolgashev, V. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Durr, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fazio, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Fisher, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Frisch, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Gaffney, K. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Guehr, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hastings, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hettel, B. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hoffmann, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Hogan, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Holtkamp, N. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Huang, X. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Huang, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Kirchmann, P. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); LaRue, J. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Limborg, C. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Lindenberg, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Loos, H. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Maxwell, T. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Nilsson, A. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Raubenheimer, T. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Reis, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Ross, M. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Shen, Z. -X. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Stupakov, G. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Tantawi, S. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Tian, K. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Wu, Z. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Xiang, D. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States); Yakimenko, V. [SLAC National Accelerator Lab., Menlo Park, CA (United States)

    2015-02-02

    We propose an intense THz source with tunable frequency and bandwidth that can directly interact with the degrees of freedom that determine the properties of materials and thus provides a new tool for controlling and directing these ultrafast processes as well as aiding synthesis of new materials with new functional properties. This THz source will broadly impact our understanding of dynamical processes in matter at the atomic-scale and in real time. Established optical pumping schemes using femtosecond visible frequency laser pulses for excitation are extended into the THz frequency regime thereby enabling resonant excitation of bonds in correlated solid state materials (phonon pumping), to drive low energy electronic excitations, to trigger surface chemistry reactions, and to all-optically bias a material with ultrashort electric fields or magnetic fields. A linac-based THz source can supply stand-alone experiments with peak intensities two orders of magnitude stronger than existing laser-based sources, but when coupled with atomic-scale sensitive femtosecond x-ray probes it opens a new frontier in ultrafast science with broad applications to correlated materials, interfacial and liquid phase chemistry, and materials in extreme conditions.

  6. Broad Band Observations of Gravitationally Lensed Blazar during a Gamma-Ray Outburst

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julian Sitarek

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available QSO B0218+357 is a gravitationally lensed blazar located at a cosmological redshift of 0.944. In July 2014 a GeV flare was observed by Fermi-LAT, triggering follow-up observations with the MAGIC telescopes at energies above 100 GeV. The MAGIC observations at the expected time of arrival of the trailing component resulted in the first detection of QSO B0218+357 in Very-High-Energy (VHE, >100 GeV gamma rays. We report here the observed multiwavelength emission during the 2014 flare.

  7. Beam-based model of broad-band impedance of the Diamond Light Source

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Victor Smaluk; Ian Martin; Richard Fielder; Riccardo Bartolini

    2015-01-01

    .... At the Diamond Light Source (DLS) to get the model parameters, a set of measured data has been used including current-dependent shift of betatron tunes and synchronous phase, chromatic damping rates, and bunch lengthening...

  8. Multiwavelength observations of the energetic GRB 080810: detailed mapping of the broad-band spectral evolution

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Page, K.L.; Willingale, R.; Bissaldi, E.; de Ugarte Postigo, A.; Holland, S.T.; McBreen, S.; O'Brien, P.T.; Osborne, J.P.; Prochaska, J.X.; Rol, E.; Rykoff, E.S.; Starling, R.L.C.; Tanvir, N.R.; van der Horst, A.J.; Wiersema, K.; Zhang, B.; Aceituno, F.J.; Akerlof, C.; Beardmore, A.P.; Briggs, M.S.; Burrows, D.N.; Castro-Tirado, A.J.; Connaughton, V.; Evans, P.A.; Fynbo, J.P.U.; Gehrels, N.; Guidorzi, C.; Howard, A.W.; Kennea, J.A.; Kouveliotou, C.; Pagani, C.; Preece, R.; Perley, D.; Steele, I.A.; Yuan, F.

    2009-01-01

    GRB 080810 was one of the first bursts to trigger both Swift and the Fermi Gamma-ray Space Telescope. It was subsequently monitored over the X-ray and UV/optical bands by Swift, in the optical by Robotic Optical Transient Search Experiment (ROTSE) and a host of other telescopes, and was detected in

  9. Broad-band dielectric spectroscopy of Ba 2NaNb 5O 15 single crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buixaderas, E.; Porokhonskyy, V.; Paskhin, A.; Savinov, M.; Petzelt, J.

    2002-12-01

    Barium sodium niobate (BNN) single crystals are studied by IR spectroscopy, time-domain THz transmission spectroscopy, HF coaxial wave-guide technique and LF dielectric spectroscopy to cover the frequency range 10^2 10^{14} Hz in a wide temperature interval. The dielectric response parallel and perpendicular to the polar c-axis is discussed. The ferroelectric transition at T_c=830 K is driven by a relaxational soft mode coupled with another central-mode type relaxation which both gradually disappear on cooling in the ferroelectric phase. Below T_i the parameters of the expected IR active amplitudon were estimated. The low-temperature permittivity increase on cooling for the {ěc E}bot {ěc c} field direction has been explained by an incipient proper ferroelectric-ferroelastic transition driven by an IR and Raman active B2-symmetry soft mode.

  10. Broad Band Spectral Index TeV Blazars Detected by Fermi LAT ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    and we seek to find the same kind of flux states (low/average/high), and we define the minimum flux in ... According to the definition of composite spectral indices (Ledden & O'Dell 1985) and the data compiled by ... (U1231202, 11063004), the innovation team of gravitation theory research in Yun- nan Normal University ...

  11. Broad-band chopper for a CW proton linac at Fermilab

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gianfelice-Wendt, E.; Lebedev, V.A.; Solyak, N.; Nagaitsev, S.; Sun, D.; /Fermilab

    2011-03-01

    The future Fermilab program in the high energy physics is based on a new facility called the Project X [1] to be built in the following decade. It is based on a 3 MW CW linear accelerator delivering the 3 GeV 1 mA H{sup -} beam to a few experiments simultaneously. Small fraction of this beam will be redirected for further acceleration to 8 GeV to be injected to the Recycler/Main Injector for a usage in a neutrino program and other synchrotron based high energy experiments. Requirements and technical limitations to the bunch-by-bunch chopper for the Fermilab Project X are discussed.

  12. YIG based broad band microwave absorber: A perspective on synthesis methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Vinay; Saha, J.; Patnaik, S.; Kuanr, Bijoy K.

    2017-10-01

    The fabrication of a thin layer of microwave absorber that operates over a wide band of frequencies is still a challenging task. With recent advances in nanostructure synthesis techniques, considerable progress has been achieved in realizations of thin nanocomposite layer designed for full absorption of incident electromagnetic (EM) radiation covering S to K band frequencies. The primary objective of this investigation is to achieve best possible EM absorption with a wide bandwidth and attenuation >10 dB for a thin absorbing layer (few hundred of microns). Magnetic yttrium iron garnet (Y3Fe5O12; in short YIG) nanoparticles (NPs) were prepared by sol-gel (SG) as well as solid-state (SS) reaction methods to elucidate the effects of nanoscale finite size on the magnetic behavior of the particles and hence their microwave absorption capabilities. It is found that YIG prepared by these two methods are different in many ways. Magnetic properties investigated using vibrating sample magnetometry (VSM) exhibit that the coercivity (Hc) of solid-state NPs is much larger (72 Oe) than the sol-gel NPs (31 Oe). Microwave absorption properties were studied by ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) technique in field sweep mode at different fixed frequencies. A thin layer (∼300 μm) of YIG film was deposited using electrophoretic deposition (EPD) technique over a coplanar waveguide (CPW) transmission line made on copper coated RT/duroid® 5880 substrates. Temperature dependent magnetic properties were also investigated using VSM and FMR techniques. Microwave absorption properties were investigated at high temperatures (up to 300 °C) both for sol-gel and solid-state synthesized NPs and are related to skin depth of YIG films. It is observed that microwave absorption almost vanishes when the temperature reached the Néel temperature of YIG.

  13. A wide-angle and polarization insensitive infrared broad band metamaterial absorber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Ting; Chen, Zhong; Ma, Rongyi; Zhong, Min

    2017-01-01

    In this paper, we present the design and experimental demonstration of a broad single-band metamaterial absorber composed of a simple two-dimensional periodic silver-SiO2-silver sandwich array. The experimental results show that a near-perfect absorption band with a bandwidth of approximately 0.4 μm in the THz region is obtained, which is in reasonable agreement with the simulated results. The calculated electric field intensity distributions indicate that the broad absorption band is achieved by plasmonic hybridization of two plasmon resonances: one originates from outward coupling between adjacent unit cells and the other arises from inward coupling between the two sub-structures. The effects of the structural parameters and the SiO2 layer thickness on the broad absorption band are investigated experimentally. The effect of the angle of incidence on the broad absorption band is also investigated experimentally and the absorption band remains high at large angles of incidence (60°), which thus provides more efficient absorption of obliquely incident beams.

  14. The Leaky Lens: A Broad-Band Fixed-Beam Leaky-Wave Antenna

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neto, A.; Bruni, S.; Gerini, G.; Sabbadini, M.

    2005-01-01

    A novel type of leaky-wave antenna is presented. Differently from previously reported leaky-wave antennas, it is characterized by a constant beam direction over a very wide range of frequencies. The radiation originates at a slot etched at the interface between air and a dense dielectric, which is

  15. Combined front and back diffraction gratings for broad band light trapping in thin film solar cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Xianqin; Drouard, Emmanuel; Gomard, Guillaume; Peretti, Romain; Fave, Alain; Seassal, Christian

    2012-09-10

    In this paper, we present the integration of combined front and back 1D and 2D diffraction gratings with different periods, within thin film photovoltaic solar cells based on crystalline silicon layers. The grating structures have been designed considering both the need for incident light absorption enhancement and the technological feasibility. Long wavelength absorption is increased thanks to the long period (750 nm) back grating, while the incident light reflection is reduced by using a short period (250 nm) front grating. The simulated short circuit current in a solar cell combining a front and a back grating structures with a 1.2 µm thick c-Si layer, together with the back electrode and TCO layers, is increased up to 30.3 mA/cm2, compared to 18.4 mA/cm2 for a reference stack, as simulated using the AM1.5G solar spectrum intensity distribution from 300 nm to 1100 nm, and under normal incidence.

  16. First record of the broad-banded cardinal fish Apogon fasciatus (White, 1790 from Turkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. TURAN

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Two specimens of the alien cardinal fish Apogon fasciatus (White, 1790 are recorded for the first time from Turkey and second time from the Mediterranean Sea. This is the fourth Indo-Pacific apogonid species documented in the Mediterranean Sea, and the introduction of this species to the eastern Mediterranean is due to migration from the Red Sea via the Suez Canal.

  17. Beam-based model of broad-band impedance of the Diamond Light Source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Smaluk

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In an electron storage ring, the interaction between a single-bunch beam and a vacuum chamber impedance affects the beam parameters, which can be measured rather precisely. So we can develop beam-based numerical models of longitudinal and transverse impedances. At the Diamond Light Source (DLS to get the model parameters, a set of measured data has been used including current-dependent shift of betatron tunes and synchronous phase, chromatic damping rates, and bunch lengthening. A matlab code for multiparticle tracking has been developed. The tracking results and analytical estimations are quite consistent with the measured data. Since Diamond has the shortest natural bunch length among all light sources in standard operation, the studies of collective effects with short bunches are relevant to many facilities including next generation of light sources.

  18. Beam-based model of broad-band impedance of the Diamond Light Source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smaluk, Victor; Martin, Ian; Fielder, Richard; Bartolini, Riccardo

    2015-06-01

    In an electron storage ring, the interaction between a single-bunch beam and a vacuum chamber impedance affects the beam parameters, which can be measured rather precisely. So we can develop beam-based numerical models of longitudinal and transverse impedances. At the Diamond Light Source (DLS) to get the model parameters, a set of measured data has been used including current-dependent shift of betatron tunes and synchronous phase, chromatic damping rates, and bunch lengthening. A matlab code for multiparticle tracking has been developed. The tracking results and analytical estimations are quite consistent with the measured data. Since Diamond has the shortest natural bunch length among all light sources in standard operation, the studies of collective effects with short bunches are relevant to many facilities including next generation of light sources.

  19. Broad-band properties of the CfA Seyfert galaxies. III - Ultraviolet variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelson, R. A.; Pike, G. F.; Krolik, J. H.

    1990-01-01

    A total of 657 archived IUE spectra are used to study the UV variability properties of six members of the CfA Seyfert I galaxy sample. All show strong evidence for continuum and line variations and a tendency for less luminous objects to be more strongly variable. Most objects show a clear correlation at zero lag between UV spectral index and luminosity, evidence that the variable component is an accretion disk around a black hole which is systematically smaller in less luminous sources. No correlation is seen between the continuum luminosity and equivalent width of the C IV, Mg II, and semiforbidden C III emission lines when the entire sample is examined, but a clear anticorrelation is present when only repeated observations of individual objects are considered. This is due to a combination of light-travel time effects in the broad-line region and the nonlinear responses of lines to continuum fluctuations.

  20. Broad-band properties of the CfA Seyfert Galaxies. II - Infrared to millimeter properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edelson, R. A.; Malkan, M. A.; Rieke, G. H.

    1987-01-01

    IR and mm observations of the 48 Seyfert 1 and 2 galaxies (SG1s and SG2s) of the CfA sample (Huchra and Berg, 1987) are reported. Data obtained (1) in the NIR using the 1.55-m reflector at Stewart Observatory and the 3-m IRTF during 1984-1986, (2) in the FIR with IRAS, and (3) at 1.3 mm using the 12-m NRAO telescope at KPNO in June 1984 are presented in extensive tables and graphs and characterized in detail. None of the objects was detected at 1.3 mm, and the IR spectra of the SG2s are found to be significantly steeper (indicating thermal emission) than those of SG1s and QSOs (nonthermal emission). Turnover in the IR emission below 100 microns (in half of the objects detected at three or more IRAS wavelengths) is shown to be consistent with an accretion disk in dust-free SG1s and with unusually warm (35-65 K) dust in SG2s. It is inferred that a 60-100-micron cool excess is masking turnover in the other SGs, so that a general association of SG nuclei with strong star formation can be confirmed.

  1. Towards doubling solar harvests using wide-angle, broad-band microfluidic beam steering arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiDomenico, Leo D

    2015-11-30

    This paper introduces Microfluidic Beam Steering (MBS), which is a new technique for electronically steering light having multiple octaves of bandwidth, any polarization state and incidence from any direction of the sky without significant restrictions due to physical area, optical loss and power handling capacity. It is based on optical elements comprising both transparent solids and electronically controllable fluids to control Total Internal Reflection (TIR), refraction and/or diffraction from micro-structured surfaces within a transparent solid. A TIR-based MBS is discussed in the context of solar energy and its potential to significantly increase annual energy harvests from solar arrays situated on fixed areas like roofs. The advantages and challenges associated with analog and digital MBS systems are discussed and early-stage MBS hardware is demonstrated. Finally, an analytic model of sun-tracking is provided to formally establish the potential for MBS to increase annual solar energy harvests by approximately 45% more than conventional 0-Degree Of Freedom (0-DOF) solar arrays, 62% more than 1-DOF arrays and 233% more than 2-DOF arrays, all at 20% atmospheric aerosol scattering.

  2. On the prediction of impact noise, V: The noise from drop hammers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richards, E. J.; Carr, I.; Westcott, M.

    1983-06-01

    In earlier papers in this series, the concepts of "acceleration" and "ringing" noise have been studied in relation to impact machines, and values of radiation efficiency have been obtained for the various types of structural components. In the work reported in this paper the predicted and measured noise radiation from a drop hammer, both in full-scale and in {1}/{3}- scale model form, were examined. It is found that overall noise levels ( Leq per event) can be predicted from vibration measurements to within ± 1·5 dB, and to within ±2·5 dB in one-third octave bands. In turn this has permitted noise reduction techniques to be examined by studies of local component vibration levels rather than overall noise, a method which provides considerable enlightenment at the design stage. It is shown that on one particular drop hammer, the noise energy is shared surprisingly uniformly over four or five sources, and that when these have been reduced, the overall noise reduction is severely limited by the "acceleration" noise from the "tup" or "hammer" itself. As this is difficult to eliminate without a basic change in forging technology, it follows that "tup" enclosure or modification of the sharpness of the final "hard" impact are the only means available for any serious noise reduction. Also indicated is the reliability of using model techniques, suitably scaled in frequency and impulse magnitude, in developing machinery with impact characteristics.

  3. Helicopter rotor noise investigation during ice accretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Baofeng

    and turbulence intensity (and ultimately the TBL-TE noise). The results show that boundary layer thickness and turbulence intensity at the trailing edge increase with the increased roughness height. Using Howe's trailing edge noise model, the increased sound pressure level (SPL) of the trailing edge noise due to the increased displacement thickness and normalized integrated turbulence intensity are 6.2 dB and 1.6 dB for large and small accreted ice roughness heights, respectively. The estimated increased SPL values agree well with the experimental results, which are 5.8 dB and 2.6 dB for large and small roughness height, respectively. Finally a detailed broadband noise spectral scaling for all measured broadband noise in both AERTS and UMAC facilities is conducted. The magnitude and the frequency spectrum of the measured broadband noise are scaled on characteristic velocity and length. The peak of the laminar boundary layer - vortex shedding (LBL-VS) noise coalesces well on the Strouhal scaling in those cases. For the measured broadband noise from a rotor with relatively large roughness heights, no contribution of the LBL-VS noise is observed. The velocity scaling shows that the TBL-TE noise, which is the dominant source mechanism, scales with Mach number to the fifth power based on the absolute frequency. The length scaling shows that the TBL-TE noise scales well on the absolute roughness height based on Howe's TE noise theory.

  4. assessment of noise pollutio noise pollutio noise pollution

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    eobe

    related ailments impairment (71.9%). Therefore noi impairment (71.9%). Therefore noise prevention se prevention audiometric tests, training, education, and enforcem. Keywords: Keywords: .... marketing for local consumption or transportation to the northern ..... disorders in workers as well as those living within the vicinity of ...

  5. Poultry Plant Noise Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    1982-01-01

    A demonstration conducted last winter at the Tip Top Poultry Plant intended to show poultry plant managers from all over the U.S. potential solutions to the problem of plant noise. Plastic covers used over sound absorbing materials need to meet cleanability requirements, high- pressure water cleaning and other harsh maintenance procedures peculiar to the poultry processing industry. For the demonstration, Fiber Flex, Inc. manufactured and donated 750 noise panels; Owens-Corning Fiberglas Corporation donated the fiberglas cores; and the cover material was purchased from Howe and Bainbridge. The Engineering Experiment Station (EES) conducted before and after noise surveys and is evaluating the effect of noise reduction on turnover and productivity in the demonstration plant. EES plans to conduct a noise abatement workshop and update a handbook to help poultry processors with noise problems. EES study and demonstration may be applicable to other food processing plants where similar sanitary constraints exist.

  6. On autocorrelation analysis of jet noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harker, Blaine M; Gee, Kent L; Neilsen, Tracianne B; Wall, Alan T; McInerny, Sally A; James, Michael M

    2013-06-01

    Meaningful use of the autocorrelation in jet noise analysis is examined. The effect of peak frequency on the autocorrelation function width is removed through a temporal scaling prior to making comparisons between measurements or drawing conclusions about source characteristics. In addition, a Hilbert transform-based autocorrelation envelope helps to define consistent characteristic time scales. Application of these processes to correlation functions based on large and fine-scale similarity spectra reveal that the large-scale noise radiation from an F-22A deviates from the similarity spectrum model.

  7. Noise at the Interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prior, Andrew

    2011-01-01

    The notion of noise occupies a contested territory, in which it is framed as pollution and detritus even as it makes its opposite a possibility - noise is always defined in opposition to something else, even if this ‘other’ is not quite clear. This paper explores noise in the context of ‘the...... interface’ asking what its affordances as an idea may contribute to our understanding of interface. I draw historically on information theory in particular to initiate this exploration....

  8. Acceptable noise level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Nielsen, Lars Holme; Lantz, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) is used to quantify the amount of background noise that subjects can accept while listening to speech, and is suggested for prediction of individual hearing-aid use. The aim of this study was to assess the repeatability of the ANL measured in normal-hearing subjects...... using running Danish and non-semantic speech materials as stimuli and modulated speech-spectrum and multi-talker babble noises as competing stimuli....

  9. The crustal structure beneath the Netherlands from ambient seismic noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paulssen, Hanneke; Yudistira, Tedi; Trampert, Jeannot

    2017-04-01

    A 3-D shear velocity model of the crust beneath the Netherlands is determined from fundamental mode Rayleigh and Love wave group measurements derived from ambient seismic noise recordings. The data are obtained from a temporary array of broad-band seismometers in and around the Netherlands (the NARS-Netherlands project, 2008-2012) complemented with data from existing networks in the Netherlands, Belgium and Germany. Rayleigh and Love wave group velocity maps were constructed for the period range of 10 to 30 s. Lateral variations in the group velocity maps primarily reflect variations in sedimentary thickness across the Netherlands. The 2-psi Rayleigh wave and 4-psi Love wave fast directions of the group velocity maps are in agreement with the NW-SE direction of maximum compressive stress as well as with the NW-SE dominant direction of faulting in the Netherlands. The frequency dependence suggests that the azimuthal anisotropy is caused by lattice preferred orientation (LPO) of lower crustal minerals. A 3-D shear-velocity model is obtained by inversion of the group velocity maps using the Neighbourhood Algorithm. The results show a top layer that varies in thickness from 2 to 4 km with with a pattern that is similar to the base of the Rotliegend. A midcrustal discontinuity is found at a depth of about 13 km. The Moho appears to be relatively flat with an average depth of 33 km. Radial anisotropy is mainly positive (Vsh - Vsv > 0) for the lower crust. This can be an expression of LPO but also of horizontal layering or lamination. The top layer shows the largest variations in radial anisotropy with distinct areas of negative radial anisotropy that can be attributed to high-density near-vertical faulting in those regions.

  10. Noise upon the Sinusoids

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Karl Kristoffer

    2005-01-01

    Sinusoids are used for making harmonic and other sounds. In order to having life in the sounds and adding a wide variety of noises, irregularities are inserted in the frequency and amplitudes. A simple and intuitive noise model is presented, consisting of a low-pass filtered noise, and having...... control for strength and bandwidth. The noise is added on the frequency and amplitudes of the sinusoids, and the resulting irregularity’s (jitter and shimmer) bandwidth is derived. This, together with an overview of investigation methods of the jitter and shimmer results in an analysis of the necessary...

  11. Noise in biological circuits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simpson, Michael L; Cox, Chris D; Allen, Michael S; McCollum, James M; Dar, Roy D; Karig, David K; Cooke, John F

    2009-01-01

    Noise biology focuses on the sources, processing, and biological consequences of the inherent stochastic fluctuations in molecular transitions or interactions that control cellular behavior. These fluctuations are especially pronounced in small systems where the magnitudes of the fluctuations approach or exceed the mean value of the molecular population. Noise biology is an essential component of nanomedicine where the communication of information is across a boundary that separates small synthetic and biological systems that are bound by their size to reside in environments of large fluctuations. Here we review the fundamentals of the computational, analytical, and experimental approaches to noise biology. We review results that show that the competition between the benefits of low noise and those of low population has resulted in the evolution of genetic system architectures that produce an uneven distribution of stochasticity across the molecular components of cells and, in some cases, use noise to drive biological function. We review the exact and approximate approaches to gene circuit noise analysis and simulation, and review many of the key experimental results obtained using flow cytometry and time-lapse fluorescent microscopy. In addition, we consider the probative value of noise with a discussion of using measured noise properties to elucidate the structure and function of the underlying gene circuit. We conclude with a discussion of the frontiers of and significant future challenges for noise biology. (c) 2009 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  12. Landing gear noise attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moe, Jeffrey W. (Inventor); Whitmire, Julia (Inventor); Kwan, Hwa-Wan (Inventor); Abeysinghe, Amal (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A landing gear noise attenuator mitigates noise generated by airframe deployable landing gear. The noise attenuator can have a first position when the landing gear is in its deployed or down position, and a second position when the landing gear is in its up or stowed position. The noise attenuator may be an inflatable fairing that does not compromise limited space constraints associated with landing gear retraction and stowage. A truck fairing mounted under a truck beam can have a compliant edge to allow for non-destructive impingement of a deflected fire during certain conditions.

  13. Noise and Health: How does noise affect us?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, H.M.E.

    2001-01-01

    Noise annoyance is a primary indication that noise is a problem, and by itself noise annoyance means that the quality of life is adversely affected. Results from noise annoyance research are presented that make possible a detailed evaluation of noise exposures with respect to the annoyance induced.

  14. Microwave noise modeling of FinFETs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crupi, Giovanni; Caddemi, Alina; Schreurs, Dominique M. M.-P.; Wiatr, Wojciech; Mercha, Abdelkarim

    2011-02-01

    The noise characteristics of advanced silicon semiconductor devices fabricated with FinFET technology are investigated and modeled at the probe tip reference planes in the microwave frequency range. The transistor noise model is obtained by assigning an equivalent temperature to each resistor of the small signal equivalent circuit. These temperatures are selected to be equal to the room temperature with the exception of the temperature values of the intrinsic output, feedback, and substrate resistances, which are selected in order to reproduce accurately the 50 Ω noise factor measurements over a broadband frequency range going from 0.5 GHz up to 26.5 GHz. Accurate model simulations are obtained at such high frequencies, thanks to the inclusion of the noise temperature associated to the feedback and substrate resistances representing non-quasi-static effects which cannot be neglected in the investigated frequency range.

  15. Measurement with verification of stationary signals and noise in extremely quiet environments: Measuring below the noise floor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellingson, Roger M.; Gallun, Frederick J.; Bock, Guillaume

    2015-01-01

    It can be problematic to measure stationary acoustic sound pressure level in any environment when the target level approaches or lies below the minimum measureable sound pressure level of the measurement system itself. This minimum measureable level, referred to as the inherent measurement system noise floor, is generally established by noise emission characteristics of measurement system components such as microphones, preamplifiers, and other system circuitry. In this paper, methods are presented and shown accurate measuring stationary levels within 20 dB above and below this system noise floor. Methodology includes (1) measuring inherent measurement system noise, (2) subtractive energy based, inherent noise adjustment of levels affected by system noise floor, and (3) verifying accuracy of inherent noise adjustment technique. While generalizable to other purposes, the techniques presented here were specifically developed to quantify ambient noise levels in very quiet rooms used to evaluate free-field human hearing thresholds. Results obtained applying the methods to objectively measure and verify the ambient noise level in an extremely quiet room, using various measurement system noise floors and analysis bandwidths, are presented and discussed. The verified results demonstrate the adjustment method can accurately extend measurement range to 20 dB below the measurement system noise floor, and how measurement system frequency bandwidth can affect accuracy of reported noise levels. PMID:25786932

  16. Ambient Noise in an Urbanized Tidal Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassett, Christopher

    the pressure fluctuations when the turbulent scales are on order of, or smaller than, the characteristic size of the hydrophone. At both sites, flow-noise levels can exceed ambient noise levels during slack currents by more than 50 dB at 20 Hz and flow-noise is measured at frequencies greater than 500 Hz. In Admiralty Inlet, the use of a compact flow shield is shown to reduce flow-noise levels by up to 30 dB. Below 1 kHz, the dominant source of ambient noise is vessel traffic, though during periods of strong currents, the propagating noise from vessels can be difficult to identify because of flow-noise. At frequencies above 1 kHz, during periods of strong currents, the dominant source of ambient noise is bedload transport. Observation of this higher frequency sound is not affected by flow-noise, which is limited to lower frequencies in northern Admiralty Inlet. These results are combined with marine species hearing thresholds, a turbine source spectrum, and a simple propagation model to roughly quantify the probability of marine animals detecting the sound of operating turbines against ambient noise. The results suggest that the likely detection range of operating turbines is limited to less than 1 km under most conditions. The sound produced by operating tidal turbines at the proposed demonstration-scale tidal power project is not likely to have any significant behavioral effect at greater range. Finally, the ambient statistics at the site are also combined with a sound propagation model and vocalization characteristics of Southern Resident killer whales to determine the effective range for passive acoustic monitoring techniques at the proposed project location. Due to the frequency overlap between sediment-generated noise and killer whale vocalizations, during peak currents the detection range for vocalizations is reduced by up to 90% when compared to slack current noise levels. Although the reduction in detection range is significant, this analysis suggests that

  17. Noise in miniature microphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Stephen C; LoPresti, Janice L; Ring, Eugene M; Nepomuceno, Henry G; Beard, John J; Ballad, William J; Carlson, Elmer V

    2002-02-01

    The internal noise spectrum in miniature electret microphones of the type used in the manufacture of hearing aids is measured. An analogous circuit model of the microphone is empirically fit to the measured data and used to determine the important sources of noise within the microphone. The dominant noise source is found to depend on the frequency. Below 40 Hz and above 9 kHz, the dominant source is electrical noise from the amplifier circuit needed to buffer the electrical signal from the microphone diaphragm. Between approximately 40 Hz and 1 kHz, the dominant source is thermal noise originating in the acoustic flow resistance of the small hole pierced in the diaphragm to equalize barometric pressure. Between approximately 1 kHz and 9 kHz, the noise originates in the acoustic flow resistances of sound entering the microphone and propagating to the diaphragm. To further reduce the microphone internal noise in the audio band requires attacking these sources. A prototype microphone having reduced acoustical noise is measured and discussed.

  18. Mediality is Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prior, Andrew

    This PhD is concerned with the use of noise as a material within media arts practice, especially in ‘post-digital’ contexts such as glitch electronica, glitch art and uses of old media. It examines the relationship between informational culture and noise, exploring the ways in which the structuring...

  19. Acceptable noise level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olsen, Steen Østergaard; Nielsen, Lars Holme; Lantz, Johannes

    2012-01-01

    The acceptable noise level (ANL) is used to quantify the amount of background noise that subjects can accept while listening to speech, and is suggested for prediction of individual hearing-aid use. The aim of this study was to assess the repeatability of the ANL measured in normal-hearing subjec...

  20. Military Tactical Aircraft Engine Noise Matching to Infrared Signatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-12-16

    understand jet engine noise emission based on design characteristics. This type of noise prediction proves to be a difficult problem , since the...emitted, or what mix of peaks is emitted, from a simple MWIR principal component image of the engine . 4.6 A surprising potential application One...FINAL REPORT Military Tactical Aircraft Engine Noise Matching to Infrared Signatures SERDP Project WP-2404 JANUARY 2016 Dr

  1. The Relation between Scores on Noise Annoyance and Noise Disturbed Sleep in a Public Health Survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frits van den Berg

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available The relation between responses to survey questions on noise annoyance and self-reported sleep disturbance has been analysed to gain insight in its dependency on noise source or noise type and on individual characteristics. The results show a high correlation between responses (scores 0–10 with Pearson’s correlation coefficient close to 0.8 for respondents who report hearing the source. At the same level of annoyance, scooters and neighbours are associated with more sleep disturbance, air and road traffic with less. The relation between Annoyance (A and Sleep Disturbance (SD is also significantly related to age, the use of sleeping drugs, and living alone. However, the differences in the A-SD relations with respect to source and characteristic are small. Noise-related sleep disturbance is associated more strongly to noise annoyance than it is to noise exposure. For transportation noise both scores are more often equal when the annoyance score is 7 or higher; this change in scoring behaviour could be an indication for a change to severe annoyance.

  2. The Relation between Scores on Noise Annoyance and Noise Disturbed Sleep in a Public Health Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, Frits; Verhagen, Claudia; Uitenbroek, Daan

    2014-01-01

    The relation between responses to survey questions on noise annoyance and self-reported sleep disturbance has been analysed to gain insight in its dependency on noise source or noise type and on individual characteristics. The results show a high correlation between responses (scores 0–10) with Pearson’s correlation coefficient close to 0.8 for respondents who report hearing the source. At the same level of annoyance, scooters and neighbours are associated with more sleep disturbance, air and road traffic with less. The relation between Annoyance (A) and Sleep Disturbance (SD) is also significantly related to age, the use of sleeping drugs, and living alone. However, the differences in the A-SD relations with respect to source and characteristic are small. Noise-related sleep disturbance is associated more strongly to noise annoyance than it is to noise exposure. For transportation noise both scores are more often equal when the annoyance score is 7 or higher; this change in scoring behaviour could be an indication for a change to severe annoyance. PMID:24566056

  3. Hypotension and Environmental Noise: A Replication Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Lercher

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Up to now, traffic noise effect studies focused on hypertension as health outcome. Hypotension has not been considered as a potential health outcome although in experiments some people also responded to noise with decreases of blood pressure. Currently, the characteristics of these persons are not known and whether this down regulation of blood pressure is an experimental artifact, selection, or can also be observed in population studies is unanswered. In a cross-sectional replication study, we randomly sampled participants (age 20–75, N = 807 from circular areas (radius = 500 m around 31 noise measurement sites from four noise exposure strata (35–44, 45–54, 55–64, >64 Leq, dBA. Repeated blood pressure measurements were available for a smaller sample (N = 570. Standardized information on socio-demographics, housing, life style and health was obtained by door to door visits including anthropometric measurements. Noise and air pollution exposure was assigned by GIS based on both calculation and measurements. Reported hypotension or hypotension medication past year was the main outcome studied. Exposure-effect relationships were modeled with multiple non-linear logistic regression techniques using separate noise estimations for total, highway and rail exposure. Reported hypotension was significantly associated with rail and total noise exposure and strongly modified by weather sensitivity. Reported hypotension medication showed associations of similar size with rail and total noise exposure without effect modification by weather sensitivity. The size of the associations in the smaller sample with BMI as additional covariate was similar. Other important cofactors (sex, age, BMI, health and moderators (weather sensitivity, adjacent main roads and associated annoyance need to be considered as indispensible part of the observed relationship. This study confirms a potential new noise effect pathway and discusses potential patho

  4. Complexity in White Noise Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hida, Takeyuki

    We restrict our attention to random complex systems and discuss degree their degree of complexity based on a white noise. The white noise is realized as the time derivative of a Brownian motion B(t), and denoted by Ḃ(t). The collection {Ḃ(t)}, is a system of idealized elementary variables and at the same time the system is a stochastic representation of the time t, in other words it is time-oriented. Having expressed the given evolutional random phenomena in question in terms of the Ḃ(t), we introduce the notion of spectral multiplicity, which describes how much the phenomena are complex. The multiplicity is the number of cyclic subspaces that are spanned by the given random phenomena. Each cyclic subspace has further structure. Typical property is multiple Markov property, although this property appears only particular cases. As a related property, in fact as a characteristic of a complex system, one can speak of the time reversibility and irreversibility of certain random phenomena in terms of the white noise. We expect an irreversible random complex system may be decomposed into reversible systems.

  5. Effect of spatial charge inhomogeneity on 1/f noise behavior in graphene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Guangyu; Torres, Carlos M; Zhang, Yuegang; Liu, Fei; Song, Emil B; Wang, Minsheng; Zhou, Yi; Zeng, Caifu; Wang, Kang L

    2010-09-08

    Scattering mechanisms in graphene are critical to understanding the limits of signal-to-noise ratios of unsuspended graphene devices. Here we present the four-probe low-frequency noise (1/f) characteristics in back-gated single layer graphene (SLG) and bilayer graphene (BLG) samples. Contrary to the expected noise increase with the resistance, the noise for SLG decreases near the Dirac point, possibly due to the effects of the spatial charge inhomogeneity. For BLG, a similar noise reduction near the Dirac point is observed, but with a different gate dependence of its noise behavior. Some possible reasons for the different noise behavior between SLG and BLG are discussed.

  6. Psychoacoustic considerations for helicopter noise quantification: Metrics, human response and criteria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, C. A.

    1982-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to examine several aspects of helicopter noise quantification from the standpoint of psychoacoustics. Noise metrics in common use to describe far-field aircraft noise and the noise characteristics which they consider are discussed. Some findings of recent psychoacoustic research related specifically to helicopter noise quantification are presented. Criteria for the accuracy of noise metrics to quantify helicopter noise are discussed. Finally, the prospects for improved metrics and research needed to develop and validate improved metrics or existing metrics are discussed.

  7. A de-noising method using the improved wavelet threshold function based on noise variance estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Wang, Weida; Xiang, Changle; Han, Lijin; Nie, Haizhao

    2018-01-01

    The precise and efficient noise variance estimation is very important for the processing of all kinds of signals while using the wavelet transform to analyze signals and extract signal features. In view of the problem that the accuracy of traditional noise variance estimation is greatly affected by the fluctuation of noise values, this study puts forward the strategy of using the two-state Gaussian mixture model to classify the high-frequency wavelet coefficients in the minimum scale, which takes both the efficiency and accuracy into account. According to the noise variance estimation, a novel improved wavelet threshold function is proposed by combining the advantages of hard and soft threshold functions, and on the basis of the noise variance estimation algorithm and the improved wavelet threshold function, the research puts forth a novel wavelet threshold de-noising method. The method is tested and validated using random signals and bench test data of an electro-mechanical transmission system. The test results indicate that the wavelet threshold de-noising method based on the noise variance estimation shows preferable performance in processing the testing signals of the electro-mechanical transmission system: it can effectively eliminate the interference of transient signals including voltage, current, and oil pressure and maintain the dynamic characteristics of the signals favorably.

  8. Effects of background noise on total noise annoyance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willshire, K. F.

    1987-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted to assess the effects of combined community noise sources on annoyance. The first experiment baseline relationships between annoyance and noise level for three community noise sources (jet aircraft flyovers, traffic and air conditioners) presented individually. Forty eight subjects evaluated the annoyance of each noise source presented at four different noise levels. Results indicated the slope of the linear relationship between annoyance and noise level for the traffic noise was significantly different from that of aircraft and of air conditioner noise, which had equal slopes. The second experiment investigated annoyance response to combined noise sources, with aircraft noise defined as the major noise source and traffic and air conditioner noise as background noise sources. Effects on annoyance of noise level differences between aircraft and background noise for three total noise levels and for both background noise sources were determined. A total of 216 subjects were required to make either total or source specific annoyance judgements, or a combination of the two, for a wide range of combined noise conditions.

  9. The response to railway noise in residential areas in Great Britain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fields, J. M.; Walker, J. G.

    1982-11-01

    The effects of railway noise on residents have been measured with a combined social survey (1453 respondents) and noise measurement survey (over 2000 noise measurements) at 403 locations in 75 study areas in Great Britain. In the analysis of the data methods have been used which take into account many typical noise survey problems including noise measurement errors, unique locality effects and the weakness of the noise annoyance relationship. Railway noise bothers 2% of the nation's population. Approximately 170 000 people live where railway noise levels are above 65 dB(A) 24 hour Leq. Annoyance increases steadily with noise level; thus there is no particular "acceptable" noise level. Railway noise is less annoying than aircraft or road traffic noise of equivalent noise level, at least above 50 to 65 Leq. Noise is rated as the most serious environmental nuisance caused by railways. Maintenance noise is rated as a bigger problem than passing train noise. Vibration is the most important non-noise problem. Reactions to vibrations are related to distance from route, train speed and number of trains. The railway survey's highly stratified, probability sample design with many study areas makes it possible to evaluate the effects of area characteristics on reactions. The 24 h Leq dB(A) noise index is more closely related to annoyance than are other accepted noise indices examined. There is no support for ambient noise level or night-time corrections. Thirteen railway operation characteristics were examined. One, the type of traction, has a strong effect on reactions after controlling for Leq (overhead electrified routes are the equivalent of about 10 dB less annoying at high noise levels). Three indicators of railway ancillary noises and non-noise environmental nuisances affect annoyance but most operational characteristics have no effect. The effects of over 35 demographic, attitudinal and neighbourhood characteristics on annoyance are examined. Though most objective

  10. Noise and Hearing Loss Prevention

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... visit this page: About CDC.gov . NOISE AND HEARING LOSS PREVENTION Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Hearing ... noise levels cannot be adequately reduced. Noise and Hearing Loss on the NIOSH Science Blog Read and comment ...

  11. Low-frequency noise in planar Hall effect bridge sensors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Persson, Anders; Bejhedb, R.S.; Bejhed, R.S.

    2011-01-01

    The low-frequency characteristics of planar Hall effect bridge sensors are investigated as function of the sensor bias current and the applied magnetic field. The noise spectra reveal a Johnson-like spectrum at high frequencies, and a 1/f-like excess noise spectrum at lower frequencies, with a knee...

  12. Knowledge on the Effects and Perceived Health Problems of Noise ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Questionnaire elicited information on respondents' socio-demographic characteristics, knowledge on the effects of noise in an academic setting and perceived health problems related to noise exposure experienced, six weeks prior to the survey. Descriptive statistics and Chi- square were used for data analysis at 95% level ...

  13. Mode Colouration in Shallow-Water Ambient Noise,

    Science.gov (United States)

    The spectrum of ambient noise observed in the shallow waters of the Bristol Channel shows a series of characteristic peaks, e.g. at 10, 28, 47 Hz etc...and the presence of gas at the sea-bed. The significance is discussed for theories of ambient noise, microseisms and acoustic transmission. (Author)

  14. Study on noise prediction model and control schemes for substation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chuanmin; Gao, Yang; Liu, Songtao

    2014-01-01

    With the government's emphasis on environmental issues of power transmission and transformation project, noise pollution has become a prominent problem now. The noise from the working transformer, reactor, and other electrical equipment in the substation will bring negative effect to the ambient environment. This paper focuses on using acoustic software for the simulation and calculation method to control substation noise. According to the characteristics of the substation noise and the techniques of noise reduction, a substation's acoustic field model was established with the SoundPLAN software to predict the scope of substation noise. On this basis, 4 reasonable noise control schemes were advanced to provide some helpful references for noise control during the new substation's design and construction process. And the feasibility and application effect of these control schemes can be verified by using the method of simulation modeling. The simulation results show that the substation always has the problem of excessive noise at boundary under the conventional measures. The excess noise can be efficiently reduced by taking the corresponding noise reduction methods.

  15. Substation noise screening tool

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maybee, Nigel; Everton, Pascal [HFP Acoustical Consultants Corp. (Canada)], email: nigel.maybee@hfpacoustical.com; Chow, Vincent [Altalink Management Ltd. (Canada)], email: Vincent.Chow@AltaLink.ca

    2011-07-01

    Alberta noise regulations require energy-related facilities to conduct predictions on sound levels, especially for large and medium noise sources. This is usually done with well-known modelling software, but that can be disadvantageous when assessing the noise impact of smaller noise sources, such as transformer substations. This paper focuses on the development of a spreadsheet substation noise screening tool to assess the noise impact of a small transformer substation with precision and ease-of-use. Three aspects must be considered: transformer sound levels, which can be provided by the manufacturer or extracted from accepted sound level references; sound power calculations, which depend on the substation size and operating regime; and sound propagation calculations, which take into account the distance of the receptor from the substation and sound absorption by the air and ground. Comparison of results obtained with this tool with results generated by standard sound modelling software shows the utility, accuracy and ease-of-use of this screening method for assessing the noise impact of transformer substations.

  16. Effects of slow- and fast-acting compression on the detection of gaps in narrow bands of noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, B C; Glasberg, B R; Alcántara, J I; Launer, S; Kuehnel, V

    2001-12-01

    The inherent amplitude fluctuations in narrow bands of noise may limit the ability to detect gaps in the noise; 'dips' in the noise may be confused with the gap to be detected. For people with cochlear hearing loss, loudness recruitment may effectively magnify the fluctuations and this could partly account for the reduced ability to detect gaps in noise bands that is usually found for such people. Previously, we tested these ideas by processing the envelopes of noise bands to alter the amount of envelope fluctuation. We showed that instantaneous compression, implemented via processing of the Hilbert envelope, led to smaller (that is, better) gap detection thresholds for subjects with cochlear hearing loss. In the present experiment, we determined whether fast-acting compression of the type sometimes used in hearing aids could also lead to improved gap detection. A behind-the-ear (BTE) digital hearing aid was programmed to implement multi-band compression, either fast-acting or slow-acting (control condition). A reference condition using unaided listening was also used. Stimuli were delivered via an earphone placed over the hearing aid. Overall stimulus levels at the output of the hearing aid were similar across conditions. Thresholds for detecting gaps in noise bands centred at 4 kHz were measured as a function of noise bandwidth (10-500 Hz). To prevent the detection of spectral changes introduced by the gap, stimuli were presented in a broad-band background noise. Three normally hearing subjects and three subjects with bilateral cochlear hearing loss were tested. Gap thresholds varied non-monotonically with noise bandwidth, being maximal around 50 Hz. Gap thresholds were generally higher for the hearing-impaired than for the normally hearing subjects. For the latter, gap thresholds were similar for the three conditions. For the hearing-impaired subjects, gap thresholds were similar for the unaided condition and the condition using slow compression. However, fast

  17. Audible Noise Measurement and Analysis of the Main Power Apparatus in UHV GIS Substations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Nian Guang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Investigation of audible noise characteristics of the main power apparatus in UHV GIS substations provides essential statistics for the noise prediction and control. Noise pressure level, spectrum and attenuation characteristics of the main transformers and high voltage (HV reactors are measured and analyzed in this paper. The result shows that the main transformer and HV reactor have identical A-weighted equivalent sound pressure level. The medium- and low-frequency noises are the primary components in the spectral. More attention should be paid to the low-frequency bands in the noise control process. The noise of cooling fan has a large influence on that of the main transformer. Without the consideration of corona noise, the average A-weighted sound pressure level shows an overall decreasing trend with the increase of the propagation distance. Obvious interference phenomenon of the noises at 100 and 200Hz exists in the noise propagation process.

  18. Pneumatic muffler noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cudworth, A L; Hanson, W J; Vuisting, W

    1978-11-01

    Sixty-five commercial pneumatic mufflers in the size range of 1/8 to 3/8-inch American Standard Taper Pipe Thread (NPT) were evaluated for noise level as a function of air supply pressure and back pressure. Also, typical directivity pattern and spectral content were determined. A rating system has been devised, as well as individual prediction formulas, to rank order the mufflers and provide a capability of calculating expected noise levels for a given supply pressure. As this study reveals, noise reductions in excess of 40 dBA may be achieved by employing an efficient pneumatic muffler.

  19. Controlled Noise Seismology

    KAUST Repository

    Hanafy, Sherif M.

    2015-08-19

    We use controlled noise seismology (CNS) to generate surface waves, where we continuously record seismic data while generating artificial noise along the profile line. To generate the CNS data we drove a vehicle around the geophone line and continuously recorded the generated noise. The recorded data set is then correlated over different time windows and the correlograms are stacked together to generate the surface waves. The virtual shot gathers reveal surface waves with moveout velocities that closely approximate those from active source shot gathers.

  20. QUIESST, toward a better knowledge and understanding of how efficient noise barriers could actually be: noise in the built environment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Clairbois, J.-P.; Roo, F. de; Garai, M.; Conter, M.; Defrance, J.; Oltean-Dumbrava, C.; Fusco, I.

    2010-01-01

    Since the early 80's, one models noise propagation, in the early 90's one started to standardize how to measure the intrinsic characteristics of manufactured noise barriers: in 1997, the EU funded ADRIENNE research ([1] and [2]) was a first step, but many problems still remained. Since years, all

  1. Cochlear implant optimized noise reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauger, Stefan J.; Arora, Komal; Dawson, Pam W.

    2012-12-01

    Noise-reduction methods have provided significant improvements in speech perception for cochlear implant recipients, where only quality improvements have been found in hearing aid recipients. Recent psychoacoustic studies have suggested changes to noise-reduction techniques specifically for cochlear implants, due to differences between hearing aid recipient and cochlear implant recipient hearing. An optimized noise-reduction method was developed with significantly increased temporal smoothing of the signal-to-noise ratio estimate and a more aggressive gain function compared to current noise-reduction methods. This optimized noise-reduction algorithm was tested with 12 cochlear implant recipients over four test sessions. Speech perception was assessed through speech in noise tests with three noise types; speech-weighted noise, 20-talker babble and 4-talker babble. A significant speech perception improvement using optimized noise reduction over standard processing was found in babble noise and speech-weighted noise and over a current noise-reduction method in speech-weighted noise. Speech perception in quiet was not degraded. Listening quality testing for noise annoyance and overall preference found significant improvements over the standard processing and over a current noise-reduction method in speech-weighted and babble noise types. This optimized method has shown significant speech perception and quality improvements compared to the standard processing and a current noise-reduction method.

  2. Residents' annoyance responses to aircraft noise events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, T. K.; Stephens, D. G.; Fields, J. M.; Shepherd, K. P.

    1983-01-01

    In a study conducted in the vicinity of Salt Lake City International Airport, community residents reported their annoyance with individual aircraft flyovers during rating sessions conducted in their homes. Annoyance ratings were obtained at different times of the day. Aircraft noise levels were measured, and other characteristics of the aircraft were noted by trained observers. Metrics commonly used for assessing aircraft noise were compared, but none performed significantly better than A-weighted sound pressure level. A significant difference was found between the ratings of commercial jet aircraft and general aviation propeller aircraft, with the latter being judged less annoying. After the effects of noise level were accounted for, no significant differences were found between the ratings of landings and takeoffs. Aircraft noise annoyance reactions are stronger in lowered ambient noise conditions. This is consistent with the theory that reduced nighttime and evening ambient levels could create different reactions at different times of day. After controlling for ambient noise in a multiple regression analysis, no significant differences were found between the ratings of single events obtained during the three time periods: morning, afternoon, and evenings.

  3. Underwater Noise Modelling of Wave Energy Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2009-07-01

    Future large-scale implementation of wave energy converts (WECs) will introduce an anthropogenic activity in the ocean which may contribute to underwater noise. The Ocean houses several marine species with acoustic sensibility; consequently the potential impact of the underwater noise needs to be addressed. At present, there are no acoustic impact studies based on acquired data. The WEAM project (Wave Energy Acoustic Monitoring) aims at developing an underwater noise monitoring plan for WECs. The development of an acoustic monitoring plan must consider the sound propagation in the ocean, identify noise sources, understand the operational characteristics and select adequate instrumentation. Any monitoring strategy must involve in-situ measurements. However, the vast distances which sound travels within the ocean, can make in-situ measurements covering the entire area of interest, impracticable. This difficulty can be partially overcome through acoustic numerical modelling. This paper presents a synthetic study, on the application of acoustic forward modelling and the evaluation of the impact of noise produced by wave energy devices on marine mammals using criteria based on audiograms of dolphins, or other species. The idea is to illustrate the application of that methodology, and to show to what extent it allows for estimating distances of impacts due to acoustic noise.

  4. Noise levels associated with urban land use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Gavin; Roland-Mieszkowski, Marek; Jason, Timothy; Rainham, Daniel G

    2012-12-01

    Recent trends towards the intensification of urban development to increase urban densities and avoid sprawl should be accompanied by research into the potential for related health impacts from environmental exposure. The objective of the current study was to examine the effect of the built environment and land use on levels of environmental noise. Two different study areas were selected using a combination of small area census geography, land use information, air photography, and ground-truthing. The first study area represented residential land use and consisted of two- to three-story single-family homes. The second study area was characteristic of mixed-use urban planning with apartment buildings as well as commercial and institutional development. Study areas were subdivided into six grids, and a location was randomly selected within each grid for noise monitoring. Each location was sampled four times over a 24-h day, resulting in a total of 24 samples for each of the two areas. Results showed significant variability in noise within study areas and significantly higher levels of environmental noise in the mixed-use area. Both study areas exceeded recommended noise limits when evaluated against World Health Organization guidelines and yielded average noise events values in the moderate to serious annoyance range with the potential to obscure normal conversation and cause sleep disturbance.

  5. Development of Noise Measurements. Part 4. Problems and Methodology

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bohdan Stadnyk; Ihor Mykytyn; Svyatoslav Yatsyshyn; Zenoviy Kolodiy

    2013-01-01

    .... In this paper, an effect of uninformative noise signals on the result of measuring integral characteristics and possibility of optimizing the duration of measurement in the input circuit has been scrutinized...

  6. 14 CFR Appendix A to Part 150 - Noise Exposure Maps

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... depicting aircraft noise characteristics (if not already a part of the computer program's stored data bank... precise definition of the yearly day-night average sound level (Ldn), the data necessary for its...

  7. Reconstructing spectral cues for sound localization from responses to rippled noise stimuli

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vliegen, Joyce; Van Esch, Thamar

    2017-01-01

    Human sound localization in the mid-saggital plane (elevation) relies on an analysis of the idiosyncratic spectral shape cues provided by the head and pinnae. However, because the actual free-field stimulus spectrum is a-priori unknown to the auditory system, the problem of extracting the elevation angle from the sensory spectrum is ill-posed. Here we test different spectral localization models by eliciting head movements toward broad-band noise stimuli with randomly shaped, rippled amplitude spectra emanating from a speaker at a fixed location, while varying the ripple bandwidth between 1.5 and 5.0 cycles/octave. Six listeners participated in the experiments. From the distributions of localization responses toward the individual stimuli, we estimated the listeners’ spectral-shape cues underlying their elevation percepts, by applying maximum-likelihood estimation. The reconstructed spectral cues resulted to be invariant to the considerable variation in ripple bandwidth, and for each listener they had a remarkable resemblance to the idiosyncratic head-related transfer functions (HRTFs). These results are not in line with models that rely on the detection of a single peak or notch in the amplitude spectrum, nor with a local analysis of first- and second-order spectral derivatives. Instead, our data support a model in which the auditory system performs a cross-correlation between the sensory input at the eardrum-auditory nerve, and stored representations of HRTF spectral shapes, to extract the perceived elevation angle. PMID:28333967

  8. Reconstructing spectral cues for sound localization from responses to rippled noise stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A John Van Opstal

    Full Text Available Human sound localization in the mid-saggital plane (elevation relies on an analysis of the idiosyncratic spectral shape cues provided by the head and pinnae. However, because the actual free-field stimulus spectrum is a-priori unknown to the auditory system, the problem of extracting the elevation angle from the sensory spectrum is ill-posed. Here we test different spectral localization models by eliciting head movements toward broad-band noise stimuli with randomly shaped, rippled amplitude spectra emanating from a speaker at a fixed location, while varying the ripple bandwidth between 1.5 and 5.0 cycles/octave. Six listeners participated in the experiments. From the distributions of localization responses toward the individual stimuli, we estimated the listeners' spectral-shape cues underlying their elevation percepts, by applying maximum-likelihood estimation. The reconstructed spectral cues resulted to be invariant to the considerable variation in ripple bandwidth, and for each listener they had a remarkable resemblance to the idiosyncratic head-related transfer functions (HRTFs. These results are not in line with models that rely on the detection of a single peak or notch in the amplitude spectrum, nor with a local analysis of first- and second-order spectral derivatives. Instead, our data support a model in which the auditory system performs a cross-correlation between the sensory input at the eardrum-auditory nerve, and stored representations of HRTF spectral shapes, to extract the perceived elevation angle.

  9. Airframe noise prediction evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kingo J.; Donelson, Michael J.; Huang, Shumei C.; Joshi, Mahendra C.

    1995-01-01

    The objective of this study is to evaluate the accuracy and adequacy of current airframe noise prediction methods using available airframe noise measurements from tests of a narrow body transport (DC-9) and a wide body transport (DC-10) in addition to scale model test data. General features of the airframe noise from these aircraft and models are outlined. The results of the assessment of two airframe prediction methods, Fink's and Munson's methods, against flight test data of these aircraft and scale model wind tunnel test data are presented. These methods were extensively evaluated against measured data from several configurations including clean, slat deployed, landing gear-deployed, flap deployed, and landing configurations of both DC-9 and DC-10. They were also assessed against a limited number of configurations of scale models. The evaluation was conducted in terms of overall sound pressure level (OASPL), tone corrected perceived noise level (PNLT), and one-third-octave band sound pressure level (SPL).

  10. Acoustics Noise Test Cell

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Acoustic Noise Test Cell at the NASA/Caltech Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is located adjacent to the large vibration system; both are located in a class 10K...

  11. Acoustic ambient noise recorder

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Saran, A.K.; Navelkar, G.S.; Almeida, A.M.; More, S.R.; Chodankar, P.V.; Murty, C.S.

    with a robust outfit that can withstand high pressures and chemically corrosion resistant materials. Keeping these considerations in view, a CMOS micro-controller-based marine acoustic ambient noise recorder has been developed with a real time clock...

  12. Active noise control primer

    CERN Document Server

    Snyder, Scott D

    2000-01-01

    Active noise control - the reduction of noise by generating an acoustic signal that actively interferes with the noise - has become an active area of basic research and engineering applications. The aim of this book is to present all of the basic knowledge one needs for assessing how useful active noise control will be for a given problem and then to provide some guidance for designing, setting up, and tuning an active noise-control system. Written for students who have no prior knowledge of acoustics, signal processing, or noise control but who do have a reasonable grasp of basic physics and mathematics, the book is short and descriptive. It leaves for more advanced texts or research monographs all mathematical details and proofs concerning vibrations, signal processing and the like. The book can thus be used in independent study, in a classroom with laboratories, or in conjunction with a kit for experiment or demonstration. Topics covered include: basic acoustics; human perception and sound; sound intensity...

  13. Does health promotion work in relation to noise?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchgrevink, H M

    2003-01-01

    Noise is a health risk. The only scientifically established adverse health effect of noise is noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL). Besides noise may affect quality of life and cause annoyance and sleep disturbance. The present scientific evidence of potential non-auditory effects of noise on health is quite weak. Whether health promotion works in relation to noise may be reflected by permanent hearing threshold shift development in population studies. Hearing impairment continues to be the most prevalent disability in Western societies. The National Institute of Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) still rates noise induced hearing loss among the top ten work-related problems. Recent studies report that employees continue to develop noise induced hearing loss although to a lesser extent than before, in spite of occupational hearing conservation programmes. Besides socio-acusis and leisure noise seem to be an increasing hazard to hearing, also in young children and adolescents. This seems partly related to acute leisure noise exposure (e.g. toy pistols, amplified music). However, population studies increasingly find non-normal high-frequency hearing including the characteristic NIHL-"notch" around 6 kHz also in subjects who do not report noise exposure incidents or activities. Today 12.5% of US children 6-19 years show a noise-"notch" in one or both ears (n= 5249, Niskar et al 2001). A Norwegian county audiometry survey on adults >/= 20 years n=51.975) showed mean unscreened thresholds +10 dB at 6 kHz for both genders even or the youngest age group 20-24 years (Borchgrevink et al 2001). Accordingly, the present health promotion initiatives seem insufficient in relation to noise and noise-induced hearing loss.

  14. Design and Noise Optimization of RF Low Noise Amplifier for IEEE Standard 802.11A WLAN

    OpenAIRE

    Munish Kumar; Ravinder Kumar; Viranjay M. Srivastava

    2012-01-01

    Low noise amplifier is the front end block of radio-frequency receiver system. Its design required various characteristics such as power gain, noise figure, insertion losses and power consumption. In this paper we have proposed a single stage low noise amplifier design with high gain and low noise using inductive source degeneration topology for frequency range of 3 GHz to 7 GHz and also use the active biasing devices. A range of devices like inductors and capacitors are used to achieve 50 Ω ...

  15. Noise in the Sea and Its Impacts on Marine Organisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chao; Zhao, Xinguo; Liu, Guangxu

    2015-01-01

    With the growing utilization and exploration of the ocean, anthropogenic noise increases significantly and gives rise to a new kind of pollution: noise pollution. In this review, the source and the characteristics of noise in the sea, the significance of sound to marine organisms, and the impacts of noise on marine organisms are summarized. In general, the studies about the impact of noise on marine organisms are mainly on adult fish and mammals, which account for more than 50% and 20% of all the cases reported. Studies showed that anthropogenic noise can cause auditory masking, leading to cochlear damage, changes in individual and social behavior, altered metabolisms, hampered population recruitment, and can subsequently affect the health and service functions of marine ecosystems. However, since different sampling methodologies and unstandarized measurements were used and the effects of noise on marine organisms are dependent on the characteristics of the species and noise investigated, it is difficult to compare the reported results. Moreover, the scarcity of studies carried out with other species and with larval or juvenile individuals severely constrains the present understanding of noise pollution. In addition, further studies are needed to reveal in detail the causes for the detected impacts. PMID:26437424

  16. Noise in the Sea and Its Impacts on Marine Organisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Peng

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available With the growing utilization and exploration of the ocean, anthropogenic noise increases significantly and gives rise to a new kind of pollution: noise pollution. In this review, the source and the characteristics of noise in the sea, the significance of sound to marine organisms, and the impacts of noise on marine organisms are summarized. In general, the studies about the impact of noise on marine organisms are mainly on adult fish and mammals, which account for more than 50% and 20% of all the cases reported. Studies showed that anthropogenic noise can cause auditory masking, leading to cochlear damage, changes in individual and social behavior, altered metabolisms, hampered population recruitment, and can subsequently affect the health and service functions of marine ecosystems. However, since different sampling methodologies and unstandarized measurements were used and the effects of noise on marine organisms are dependent on the characteristics of the species and noise investigated, it is difficult to compare the reported results. Moreover, the scarcity of studies carried out with other species and with larval or juvenile individuals severely constrains the present understanding of noise pollution. In addition, further studies are needed to reveal in detail the causes for the detected impacts.

  17. Noise in the Sea and Its Impacts on Marine Organisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Chao; Zhao, Xinguo; Liu, Guangxu

    2015-09-30

    With the growing utilization and exploration of the ocean, anthropogenic noise increases significantly and gives rise to a new kind of pollution: noise pollution. In this review, the source and the characteristics of noise in the sea, the significance of sound to marine organisms, and the impacts of noise on marine organisms are summarized. In general, the studies about the impact of noise on marine organisms are mainly on adult fish and mammals, which account for more than 50% and 20% of all the cases reported. Studies showed that anthropogenic noise can cause auditory masking, leading to cochlear damage, changes in individual and social behavior, altered metabolisms, hampered population recruitment, and can subsequently affect the health and service functions of marine ecosystems. However, since different sampling methodologies and unstandarized measurements were used and the effects of noise on marine organisms are dependent on the characteristics of the species and noise investigated, it is difficult to compare the reported results. Moreover, the scarcity of studies carried out with other species and with larval or juvenile individuals severely constrains the present understanding of noise pollution. In addition, further studies are needed to reveal in detail the causes for the detected impacts.

  18. Noise and vibration in friction systems

    CERN Document Server

    Sergienko, Vladimir P

    2015-01-01

    The book analyzes the basic problems of oscillation processes and theoretical aspects of noise and vibration in friction systems. It presents generalized information available in literature data and results of the authors in vibroacoustics of friction joints, including car brakes and transmissions. The authors consider the main approaches to abatement of noise and vibration in non-stationary friction processes. Special attention is paid to materials science aspects, in particular to advanced composite materials used to improve the vibroacoustic characteristics of tribopairs The book is intended for researchers and technicians, students and post-graduates specializing in mechanical engineering, maintenance of machines and transport means, production certification, problems of friction and vibroacoustics.

  19. Training Methods for Image Noise Level Estimation on Wavelet Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. De Stefano

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available The estimation of the standard deviation of noise contaminating an image is a fundamental step in wavelet-based noise reduction techniques. The method widely used is based on the mean absolute deviation (MAD. This model-based method assumes specific characteristics of the noise-contaminated image component. Three novel and alternative methods for estimating the noise standard deviation are proposed in this work and compared with the MAD method. Two of these methods rely on a preliminary training stage in order to extract parameters which are then used in the application stage. The sets used for training and testing, 13 and 5 images, respectively, are fully disjoint. The third method assumes specific statistical distributions for image and noise components. Results showed the prevalence of the training-based methods for the images and the range of noise levels considered.

  20. Theory of Mesoscopic Threshold Detectors of non-Gaussian Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Andrew

    2009-03-01

    Recently, measurements of current fluctuations arising from the charge discreteness (shot noise) have become an invaluable tool in mesoscopic physics, the most noticeable achievement being the measurement of quasi-particle charge in the fractional quantum Hall state. Typically, shot noise experiments report measurements of the zero-frequency noise power, which is a characteristic of the Gaussian component of current fluctuations. A natural generalization of the noise power, the counting statistics of charge transmitted through a system, is interesting in itself, because it contains complete information about the electron transport on a long time scale. However, the measurement of non-Gaussian noise effects presents an experimental challenge because of the limitations imposed by the central limit theorem. This difficulty can be partly overcome by placing an auxiliary mesoscopic system (detector) very close to the noise source and arranging strong coupling to the noise. This leads to the idea of a threshold detector, which is able to measure rare current fluctuations. Its basic principle is analogous to a pole vault: A detection event occurs when the measured system variable exceeds a given threshold value. A natural candidate for such a threshold detector is a metastable system operating on an activation principle. By measuring the rate of switching out of the metastable state, information about the statistical properties of the noise driving the system may be extracted. This requires solving the Kramers' problem of noise-activated escape from a metastable state beyond the Gaussian noise approximation and investigating how the measurement circuit affects threshold detection.

  1. Noise sensitivity and sleep disturbance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Laszlo, H.E.; Janssen, S.A.; Babisch, W.; Hansell, A.L.

    2012-01-01

    It has been shown that noise induced health effects are strongly related to non-acoustical factors such as noise sensitivity. It is a stable personality trait and it can be conceptualised as a causal pathway confounder and/or effect modifier between noise and health. Furthermore noise sensitivity

  2. Community response to tramway noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, H.M.E.; Berg, R. van den

    1988-01-01

    A study concerning tramway noise is described and results are presented. The study consisted of a social survey and a noise measurement program. It appeared that tramway noise does not contribute to the annoyance of the total noise if tramway annoyance is substantially below road traffic annoyance

  3. Simultaneous seismic and magnetic measurements in the Low-Noise Underground Laboratory (LSBB) of Rustrel, France, during the 2001 January 26 Indian earthquake

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaffet, S.; Guglielmi, Y.; Virieux, J.; Waysand, G.; Chwala, A.; Stolz, R.; Emblanch, C.; Auguste, M.; Boyer, D.; Cavaillou, A.

    2003-12-01

    Since the decommission of the underground launching control room of the ground-based component of the French nuclear missile system, the whole installation has been turned into a cross-disciplinary underground laboratory. The LSBB is a unique low-noise underground laboratory because of its initial military conception and its location in the regional park of Luberon far from large cities, industry and heavy traffic. The deepest point is 500 m below the surface. At this depth a huge and non-conventional shielded cylindrical capsule is installed with no μ-metal, 1268 m3 in volume, with a residual electromagnetic noise lower than 2 fT Hz-1/2 above 10 Hz. As a result, fluctuations of the Earth's magnetic field under 10 Hz can be recorded at a very low-noise level with a low-Tc SQUID 3-D magnetometer. Taking advantage of the main gallery topology, a broad-band underground seismic array has been deployed since 2001. An analysis of data recorded simultaneously by the seismic underground array and by the magnetometer sensors during the Indian earthquake of 2001 January 26 is presented. Evidence of a magnetic field perturbation induced by the seismic waves at teleseismic distance (6250 km) is supported by a polarization analysis of seismic and magnetic signals. Spectral analysis shows specific frequency bands of perturbation related to physical processes such as ground water flow acceleration within the mountain structure.

  4. Noise in the operating room

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasfeldt-Hansen, Dorthe; Lærkner, Eva Ann; Birkelund, Regner

    2010-01-01

    Because noise is a general stressor, noise in the OR should be avoided whenever possible. This article presents the results of a review of the research literature on the topic of noise in the OR. A systematic literature search was conducted. Eighteen relevant articles were identified...... and categorized as follows: noise levels, noise sources, staff performances, and patient’s perception of noise. Each study was assessed according to the strength of the evidence and the quality of the study. Noise levels in the OR in general exceed recommended levels, and the noise sources are related...... to equipment and staff behavior. The main effect of noise on staff performances is related to impaired communication, resulting in a negative effect on patient safety. The literature on patients’ perception of noise is both limited and inconsistent, and more research on this topic is needed....

  5. On the Origin of the 1,000 Hz Peak in the Spectrum of the Human Tympanic Electrical Noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javiera Pardo-Jadue

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The spectral analysis of the spontaneous activity recorded with an electrode positioned near the round window of the guinea pig cochlea shows a broad energy peak between 800 and 1,000 Hz. This spontaneous electric activity is called round window noise or ensemble background activity. In guinea pigs, the proposed origin of this peak is the random sum of the extracellular field potentials generated by action potentials of auditory nerve neurons. In this study, we used a non-invasive method to record the tympanic electric noise (TEN in humans by means of a tympanic wick electrode. We recorded a total of 24 volunteers, under silent conditions or in response to stimuli of different modalities, including auditory, vestibular, and motor activity. Our results show a reliable peak of spontaneous activity at ~1,000 Hz in all studied subjects. In addition, we found stimulus-driven responses with broad-band noise that in most subjects produced an increase in the magnitude of the energy band around 1,000 Hz (between 650 and 1,200 Hz. Our results with the vestibular stimulation were not conclusive, as we found responses with all caloric stimuli, including 37°C. No responses were observed with motor tasks, like eye movements or blinking. We demonstrate the feasibility of recording neural activity from the electric noise of the tympanic membrane with a non-invasive method. From our results, we suggest that the 1,000 Hz component of the TEN has a mixed origin including peripheral and central auditory pathways. This research opens up the possibility of future clinical non-invasive techniques for the functional study of auditory and vestibular nerves in humans.

  6. Current Noise Spectrum of a Quantum Shuttle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Flindt, Christian; Novotny, T.; Jauho, Antti-Pekka

    2005-01-01

    peaks at integer multiples of the mechanical frequency, which is slightly renormalized. The renormalization explains a previously observed small deviation of the shuttle Current compared to the expected value given by the product of the natural mechanical frequency and the electron charge. For a certain......We present a method for calculating the full current noise spectrum S(omega) for the class of nano-electromechanical systems (NEMS) that can be described by a Markovian generalized master equation. As a specific example we apply the method to a quantum shuttle. The noise spectrum of the shuttle has...... parameter range the quantum shuttle exhibits a coexistence regime, where the charges are transported by two different mechanisms: Shuttling and sequential tunneling. In our previous studies we showed that characteristic features in the zero-frequency noise could be quantitatively understood as a slow...

  7. Wind Turbines: Unsteady Aerodynamics and Inflow Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Broe, Brian Riget

    the highest emphasis in semi-empirical models. However it is an open question whether inflow noise has a high emphasis. This illustrates the need to investigate and improve the semi-empirical model for noise due to atmospheric turbulence. Three different aerodynamical models are investigated...... in order to estimate the lift fluctuations due to unsteady aerodynamics (Sears, W. R.: 1941, Some aspects of non-stationary airfoil theory and its practical application; Goldstein, M. E. and Atassi, H. M.: 1976, A complete second-order theory for the unsteady flow about an airfoil due to a periodic gust...... profile. Comparison of the aerodynamical models with data shows that the models capture the general characteristics of the measurements, but the data are hampered by background noise from the fan propellers in the wind tunnel. The measurements are in between the completely anisotropic turbulent model...

  8. Resistive Switching Assisted by Noise

    OpenAIRE

    Patterson, G. A.; Fierens, P. I.; Grosz, D. F.

    2013-01-01

    We extend results by Stotland and Di Ventra on the phenomenon of resistive switching aided by noise. We further the analysis of the mechanism underlying the beneficial role of noise and study the EPIR (Electrical Pulse Induced Resistance) ratio dependence with noise power. In the case of internal noise we find an optimal range where the EPIR ratio is both maximized and independent of the preceding resistive state. However, when external noise is considered no beneficial effect is observed.

  9. Noise and Function

    CERN Document Server

    Weinstein, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Noise is widely understood to be something that interferes with a signal or process. Thus, it is generally thought to be destructive, obscuring signals and interfering with function. However, early in the 20th century, mechanical engineers found that mechanisms inducing additional vibration in mechanical systems could prevent sticking and hysteresis. This so-called "dither" noise was later introduced in an entirely different context at the advent of digital information transmission and recording in the early 1960s. Ironically, the addition of noise allows one to preserve information that would otherwise be lost when the signal or image is digitized. As we shall see, the benefits of added noise in these contexts are closely related to the phenomenon which has come to be known as stochastic resonance, the original version of which appealed to noise to explain how small periodic fluctuations in the eccentricity of the earth's orbit might be amplified in such a way as to bring about the observed periodic transiti...

  10. Airport noise and teratogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edmonds, L.D.; Layde, P.M.; Erickson, J.D.

    1979-07-01

    It has been suggested that exposure to high-noise levels near major airports may cause increased incidence of birth defects in the offspring of parents residing near these airports. Using data gathered in Metropolitan Atlanta during 1970 to 1972, we compared the rates of seventeen categories of defects in high- and low-noise census tracts. No significant differences were observed. However, when we subdivided the category of central nervous system defects into several subcategories of specific defects, we noted a significantly increased incidence of spina bifida without hydrocephalus in the high-noise areas. Because of the small number of cases associated with this finding we did a matched case-control study using all cases of central nervous system defects born during the years 1968 to 1976. No significantly increased risk for residents in the high-noise areas was noted in this study. It is our opinion that noise or other factors associated with residence near airports are unlikely to be important environmental teratogens.

  11. Aliasing characteristics of tau-P transform and is application to signal and noise separation; Tau-P henkan no aliasing tokusei to hakei iji wo koryoshita S/N bunri

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawabuchi, H.; Rokugawa, S.; Matsushima, J.; Ichie, Y. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan); Minegishi, M.; Tsuburaya, Y. [Japan National Oil Corp., Tokyo (Japan). Technology Research Center

    1997-05-27

    With respect to the tau-P transform method as a signal and noise (S/N) separation technology used in seismic exploration using the reflection method, a discussion has been given on conditions for the post S/N separation by the tau-P transform to function more effectively. Averaging the energy in performing the tau-P transform makes the wave energy scatter to a certain range. As a result, an aliasing phenomenon appears, in which noise is superimposed on the post-processing record. As a result of the discussion, it was verified that satisfying the two equations of G. Turner is effective in order to reduce the aliasing and maintain the relative amplitude. However, in actual calculation accuracy, waveform change was recognized to some extent, particularly amplification of events in low frequencies, and low restorability in higher frequencies. It was also observed that a method to give the tau-P region a two-dimensional Fourier transform and perform the same processing as an f-k filter can remove aliasing more simply and effectively than the HVF, and improve the S/N ratio maintaining the amplitude at the current level. 5 refs., 13 figs.

  12. Road Traffic Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckenbauer, Thomas

    Road traffic is the most interfering noise source in developed countries. According to a publication of the European Union (EU) at the end of the twentieth century [1], about 40% of the population in 15 EU member states is exposed to road traffic noise at mean levels exceeding 55 dB(A). Nearly 80 million people, 20% of the population, are exposed to levels exceeding 65 dB(A) during daytime and more than 30% of the population is exposed to levels exceeding 55 dB(A) during night time. Such high noise levels cause health risks and social disorders (aggressiveness, protest, and helplessness), interference of communication and disturbance of sleep; the long- and short-term consequences cause adverse cardiovascular effects, detrimental hormonal responses (stress hormones), and possible disturbance of the human metabolism (nutrition) and the immune system. Even performance at work and school could be impaired.

  13. Noise and Tinnitus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansoureh Adel Ghahraman

    1999-03-01

    Full Text Available Tinnitus from the Latin word tinnire meaning ringing is the perception of sound within the human ear in the absence of corresponding external sound. The most common cause is noise induced hearing loss. Tinnitus may be induced by an acoustic trauma or a permanent noise in the workplace. In case that Tinnitus is induced by acoustic trauma the site of lesion is commonly the base of the cochlea. Tinnitus in the senile population is mostly accompanying presbycusis. Although the incidence of permanent tinnitus following noise exposure is high, little is published about this issue. In the current article we are aimed at studying the prevalence of tinnitus in Minoo and other manufactures.

  14. Community response to noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Yano

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Activities from 2008 to 2011 by ICBEN community response to noise team were summarized. That is, individual community-based indexes such as community tolerance Level, Zuricher Fluglarm Index (ZFI and Frankfurter Fluglarm Index (FFI/FNI were newly proposed, differences in railway bonus between Europe and Asia were discussed by a Swedish survey, socio-acoustic surveys were reported from developing countries, and annoyance equivalents and dominant source models were proposed as the adequate combined noise model. Furthermore, not only negative, but also positive aspects of sound were discussed as soundscape studies. Finally, seven items were listed as future team activities.

  15. Noise Source Location Optimization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ed O’Keefe

    1994-01-01

    Full Text Available This article describes a method to determine locations of noise sources that minimize modal coupling in complex acoustic volumes. Using the acoustic source scattering capabilities of the boundary element method, predictions are made of mode shape and pressure levels due to various source locations. Combining knowledge of the pressure field with a multivariable function minimization technique, the source location generating minimum pressure levels can be determined. The analysis also allows for an objective comparison of “best/worst” locations. The technique was implemented on a personal computer for the U.S. Space Station, predicting 5–10 dB noise reduction using optimum source locations.

  16. Jet Engine Noise Reduction

    Science.gov (United States)

    2009-04-01

    all of these noise sources. 6 777-200 A330-300 MD-90-30 MD-11 A320-214 747-400 A300-600R 767-300ER 757 -200 MD-87 MD-82 B-747-300 A300B4-620...broadband shock noise; fluidic/particulate injection; flexible filaments (i.e., wires attached to the nozzle or tail cone ); offset nozzles to reduce...the introduction of the turbojet engine powered Boeing 707 beginning in 1958. Following a series of lawsuits in the United States and public outcry

  17. Introductory guide to noise

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Ferreira, T.M

    1973-01-01

    Full Text Available GepteMehek. WHY IS NOISE SO Our ears are used primarily to communicate with others. to give warning of danger and to absorb sensory pleasures such as from music. The degree of irritation is related to the extent to which a sound interferes with these uses... on aircraft that make too much noise. Motor cars, buses, buzz-bikes and vacuum deaners can be effectively quietened but until now the public has not been prepared to pay the price of legislation. Also, many young sports-car enthusiasts still think...

  18. Crustal thickness across the Trans-European Suture Zone from ambient noise autocorrelations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, G.; Knapmeyer-Endrun, B.

    2018-02-01

    We derive autocorrelations from ambient seismic noise to image the reflectivity of the subsurface and to extract the Moho depth beneath the stations for two different data sets in Central Europe. The autocorrelations are calculated by smoothing the spectrum of the data in order to suppress high amplitude, narrow-band signals of industrial origin, applying a phase autocorrelation algorithm and time-frequency domain phase-weighted stacking. The stacked autocorrelation results are filtered and analysed predominantly in the frequency range of 1-2 Hz. Moho depth is automatically picked inside uncertainty windows obtained from prior information. The processing scheme we developed is applied to data from permanent seismic stations located in different geological provinces across Europe, with varying Moho depths between 25 and 50 km, and to the mainly short period temporary PASSEQ stations along seismic profile POLONAISE P4. The autocorrelation results are spatially and temporarily stable, but show a clear correlation with the existence of cultural noise. On average, a minimum of six months of data is needed to obtain stable results. The obtained Moho depth results are in good agreement with the subsurface model provided by seismic profiling, receiver function estimates and the European Moho depth map. In addition to extracting the Moho depth, it is possible to identify an intracrustal layer along the profile, again closely matching the seismic model. For more than half of the broad-band stations, another change in reflectivity within the mantle is observed and can be correlated with the lithosphere-asthenosphere boundary to the west and a mid-lithospheric discontinuity beneath the East European Craton. With the application of the developed autocorrelation processing scheme to different stations with varying crustal thicknesses, it is shown that Moho depth can be extracted independent of subsurface structure, when station coverage is low, when no strong seismic sources are

  19. Psychoacoustic study on contribution of fan noise to engine noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Junhong; Liu, Hai; Bi, Fengrong; Ni, Guangjian; Zhang, Guichang; Lin, Jiewei; Yu, Hanzhengnan

    2012-07-01

    There are more researches on engine fan noise control focusing on reducing fan noise level through optimizing fan structure, and a lot of research achievements have been obtained. However, researches on the effect of fan noise to engine noise quality are lacking. The influences of the effects of fan structure optimization on the engine noise quality are unclear. Thus, there will be a decline in fan noise level, but the deterioration of engine noise quality. Aiming at the above problems, in consideration of fan structure design and engine noise quality, an innovative method to analyze the contribution of fan noise to engine noise quality using psychoacoustic theory is proposed. The noises of diesel engine installing different cooling fans are measured by using the acoustic pressure method. The experiment results are regarded as analysis samples. The model of sensory pleasantness is used to analyze the sound quality of a diesel engine with different cooling fans. Results show that after installing 10-blade fan in medium diameter the sensory pleasantness at each test point is increased, and the increase is 13.53% on average, which indicate the improvement of the engine noise quality. In order to verify the psychoacoustical analysis, the subjective assessment is carried out. The test result shows the noise quality of engine installed 10-blade fan in medium diameter is most superior. 1/3 octave frequency spectrum analysis is used to study the reason of the improvement of engine noise quality. It is found that after installing proper cooling fan the sound pressure level below 400 Hz are obviously increased, the frequency assignment and spectral envelope are more reasonable and a proper cooling fan can optimize the spectrum structure of the engine noise. The psychoacoustic study is applied in the contribution of fan noise to engine noise, and the idea of engine sound quality improvement through the structure optimization is proposed.

  20. A Multi-Stage Method for Connecting Participatory Sensing and Noise Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mingyuan Hu

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Most simulation-based noise maps are important for official noise assessment but lack local noise characteristics. The main reasons for this lack of information are that official noise simulations only provide information about expected noise levels, which is limited by the use of large-scale monitoring of noise sources, and are updated infrequently. With the emergence of smart cities and ubiquitous sensing, the possible improvements enabled by sensing technologies provide the possibility to resolve this problem. This study proposed an integrated methodology to propel participatory sensing from its current random and distributed sampling origins to professional noise simulation. The aims of this study were to effectively organize the participatory noise data, to dynamically refine the granularity of the noise features on road segments (e.g., different portions of a road segment, and then to provide a reasonable spatio-temporal data foundation to support noise simulations, which can be of help to researchers in understanding how participatory sensing can play a role in smart cities. This study first discusses the potential limitations of the current participatory sensing and simulation-based official noise maps. Next, we explain how participatory noise data can contribute to a simulation-based noise map by providing (1 spatial matching of the participatory noise data to the virtual partitions at a more microscopic level of road networks; (2 multi-temporal scale noise estimations at the spatial level of virtual partitions; and (3 dynamic aggregation of virtual partitions by comparing the noise values at the relevant temporal scale to form a dynamic segmentation of each road segment to support multiple spatio-temporal noise simulations. In this case study, we demonstrate how this method could play a significant role in a simulation-based noise map. Together, these results demonstrate the potential benefits of participatory noise data as dynamic

  1. Noise sensitivity, rather than noise level, predicts the non-auditory effects of noise in community samples: a population-based survey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jangho Park

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Excessive noise affects human health and interferes with daily activities. Although environmental noise may not directly cause mental illness, it may accelerate and intensify the development of latent mental disorders. Noise sensitivity (NS is considered a moderator of non-auditory noise effects. In the present study, we aimed to assess whether NS is associated with non-auditory effects. Methods We recruited a community sample of 1836 residents residing in Ulsan and Seoul, South Korea. From July to November 2015, participants were interviewed regarding their demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, medical history, and NS. The non-auditory effects of noise were assessed using the Center of Epidemiologic Studies Depression, Insomnia Severity index, State Trait Anxiety Inventory state subscale, and Stress Response Inventory-Modified Form. Individual noise levels were recorded from noise maps. A three-model multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors that might affect psychiatric illnesses. Results Participants ranged in age from 19 to 91 years (mean: 47.0 ± 16.1 years, and 37.9% (n = 696 were male. Participants with high NS were more likely to have been diagnosed with diabetes and hyperlipidemia and to use psychiatric medication. The multivariable analysis indicated that even after adjusting for noise-related variables, sociodemographic factors, medical illness, and duration of residence, subjects in the high NS group were more than 2 times more likely to experience depression and insomnia and 1.9 times more likely to have anxiety, compared with those in the low NS group. Noise exposure level was not identified as an explanatory value. Conclusions NS increases the susceptibility and hence moderates there actions of individuals to noise. NS, rather than noise itself, is associated with an elevated susceptibility to non-auditory effects.

  2. Noise sensitivity, rather than noise level, predicts the non-auditory effects of noise in community samples: a population-based survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jangho; Chung, Seockhoon; Lee, Jiho; Sung, Joo Hyun; Cho, Seung Woo; Sim, Chang Sun

    2017-04-12

    Excessive noise affects human health and interferes with daily activities. Although environmental noise may not directly cause mental illness, it may accelerate and intensify the development of latent mental disorders. Noise sensitivity (NS) is considered a moderator of non-auditory noise effects. In the present study, we aimed to assess whether NS is associated with non-auditory effects. We recruited a community sample of 1836 residents residing in Ulsan and Seoul, South Korea. From July to November 2015, participants were interviewed regarding their demographic characteristics, socioeconomic status, medical history, and NS. The non-auditory effects of noise were assessed using the Center of Epidemiologic Studies Depression, Insomnia Severity index, State Trait Anxiety Inventory state subscale, and Stress Response Inventory-Modified Form. Individual noise levels were recorded from noise maps. A three-model multivariate logistic regression analysis was performed to identify factors that might affect psychiatric illnesses. Participants ranged in age from 19 to 91 years (mean: 47.0 ± 16.1 years), and 37.9% (n = 696) were male. Participants with high NS were more likely to have been diagnosed with diabetes and hyperlipidemia and to use psychiatric medication. The multivariable analysis indicated that even after adjusting for noise-related variables, sociodemographic factors, medical illness, and duration of residence, subjects in the high NS group were more than 2 times more likely to experience depression and insomnia and 1.9 times more likely to have anxiety, compared with those in the low NS group. Noise exposure level was not identified as an explanatory value. NS increases the susceptibility and hence moderates there actions of individuals to noise. NS, rather than noise itself, is associated with an elevated susceptibility to non-auditory effects.

  3. Noise effects on human performance: a meta-analytic synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szalma, James L; Hancock, Peter A

    2011-07-01

    Noise is a pervasive and influential source of stress. Whether through the acute effects of impulse noise or the chronic influence of prolonged exposure, the challenge of noise confronts many who must accomplish vital performance duties in its presence. Although noise has diffuse effects, which are shared in common with many other chronic forms of stress, it also exerts its own specific influences on various forms of cognitive and motor response. We present a quantitative evaluation of these influences so that their harmful effects can be mitigated, their beneficial effects exploited, and any residual effects incorporated and synthesized into selection, training, and design strategies to facilitate human performance capacities. Predictions of single and joint moderator effects were made on the basis of major theories of noise and performance, specifically those explanations based on arousal, masking, or cognitive-resource mechanisms. These predictions were tested through moderator analyses of effects as a function of task type, performance measure, noise type and schedule, and the intensity and duration of exposure. Observed outcome effects (797 effect sizes derived from 242 studies) varied as a function of each of these moderators. Collective findings identified continuous versus intermittent noise, noise type, and type of task as the major distinguishing characteristics that moderated response. Mixed evidence was obtained for the traditional arousal and masking explanations for noise effects. The overall pattern of findings was most consistent with the maximal adaptability theory, a mental-resource-based explanation of stress and performance variation.

  4. Noise as a disruption factor in class of sports games

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragić Branislav

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Noise is every unwanted sound, noise appearance (bobbery, murmur, roisterer, banging, speech, etc.. that interferes with work or rest. Physical education is characterized by diversity of content, constant change of intensity, but teaching process is also followed by a large number of students, health and sanitation terms, micro-climate and noise, which are allocated as disturbing factors. This research deals with the origin and the noise level during the implementation of a series of physical education classes in elementary schools in the city of Nis. We assessed the classes of students aged 11 years, who had had sports games for the teaching unit. The obtained results of the noise measurements processed by the up-to-date measuring instruments(sound level meter and methods indicate that noise occurs in certain degree but does not enter the area of critical values. Noise was measured in the phases of the classes and was registered in the range of 69 to 82 dB with the characteristics of the noise continuous type. In order to lower the level of noise in physical education teaching process certain measures and procedures should be taken: improved discipline of the pupils, organisation and the choice of the methodological forms of work, choice of the requisites in the teaching process, and the use of verbal method in the acoustic halls.

  5. Playback Experiments for Noise Exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holles, Sophie; Simpson, Stephen D; Lecchini, David; Radford, Andrew N

    2016-01-01

    Playbacks are a useful tool for conducting well-controlled and replicated experiments on the effects of anthropogenic noise, particularly for repeated exposures. However, playbacks are unlikely to fully reproduce original sources of anthropogenic noise. Here we examined the sound pressure and particle acceleration of boat noise playbacks in a field experiment and reveal that although there remain recognized limitations, the signal-to-noise ratios of boat playbacks to ambient noise do not exceed those of a real boat. The experimental setup tested is therefore of value for use in experiments on the effects of repeated exposure of aquatic animals to boat noise.

  6. Neuroanatomical substrate of noise sensitivity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kliuchko, Marina; Puoliväli, Tuomas; Heinonen-Guzejev, Marja

    2018-01-01

    Recent functional studies suggest that noise sensitivity, a trait describing attitudes towards noise and predicting noise annoyance, is associated with altered processing in the central auditory system. In the present work, we examined whether noise sensitivity could be related to the structural...... and hippocampus was measured as well. According to our findings, noise sensitivity is associated with the grey matter volume in the selected structures. Among those, we propose and discuss particular areas, previously linked to auditory perceptual, emotional and interoceptive processing, in which larger grey...... matter volume seems to be related to higher noise sensitivity....

  7. Impulse Noise Injury Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Philemon; Ho, Kevin; Ryan, Allen F

    2016-05-01

    The new Auditory 4.0 model has been developed for the assessment of auditory outcomes, expressed as temporary threshold shift (TTS) and permanent threshold shift (PTS), from exposures to impulse noise for unprotected ears, including the prediction of TTS recovery. Auditory 4.0 is an empirical model, constructed from test data collected from chinchillas exposed to impulse noise in the laboratory. Injury outcomes are defined as TTS and PTS, and Auditory 4.0 provides the full range of TTS and PTS dose-response curves with the risk factor constructed from A-weighted sound exposure level. Human data from large weapons noise exposure was also used to guide the development of the recovery model. Guided by data, a 28-dBA shift was applied to the dose-response curves to account for the scaling from chinchillas to humans. Historical data from rifle noise tests were used to validate the dose-response curves. New chinchilla tests were performed to collect recovery data to construct the TTS recovery model. Auditory 4.0 is the only model known to date that provides the full TTS and PTS dose-response curves, including a TTS recovery model. The model shows good agreement with historical data. Reprint & Copyright © 2016 Association of Military Surgeons of the U.S.

  8. Curing the noise epidemic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazer, Susan

    2005-09-01

    The argument is made that design does not stop when the fixed architectural and acoustical components are in place. Spaces live and breathe with the people who reside in them. Research and examples are presented that show that noise, auditory clutter, thrives on itself in hospitals. Application of the Lombard reflex studies fit into the hospital setting, but do not offer solutions as to how one might reduce the impact. In addition, the basis for looking at the noise component as a physical as well cultural dynamic will be addressed. Whether the result of the wrong conversation in the wrong place or the right conversation in an unfortunate place, talk mixed with sounds of technology is shown to cause its own symptoms. From heightened anxiety and stress to medical errors, staff burnout, or HIPAA violations, the case is made that noise is pandemic in hospitals and demands financial and operational investment. An explanation of how to reduce noise by design of the dynamic environment - equipment, technology, staff protocols is also provided.

  9. Noise: A Health Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Noise Abatement and Control.

    This booklet contains nine sections describing ways in which noise may endanger health and well-being. Secions are included on: (1) hearing loss; (2) heart disease; (3) other reactions by the body; (4) effects on the unborn; (5) special effects on children; (6) intrusion at home and work; (7) sleep disruption; (8) mental and social well-being; and…

  10. Low Noise Amplifiers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petty, S. M.; Trowbridge, D. L.

    1983-01-01

    One of the great technical challenges facing the Deep Space Network is receiving signals from a severely weight limited spacecraft hundreds of thousands to billions of kilometers from Earth. This weight limitation has always imposed strict limitations on the size of the spacecraft antenna and the amount of transmitter power radiated. The communication burden is placed upon the ground systems of the Deep Space Network which must recover an extremely weak signal in the presence of nearly overwhelming amounts of noise. Two key parameters that determine the signal to noise ratio of a received signal using a deep space station are the collecting area and efficiency of the antenna, and the amount of noise which is generated in, as well as allowed to enter in, the antenna-mounted receiver. These parameters are used to describe the relative ability of a deep space station to receive weak signals. As spacecraft to Earth communication distances have increased, the Deep Space Network engages in a relentless effort to increase the figure of merit through larger and more efficient antennas, higher frequencies, and lower system noise temperature.

  11. Realistic camera noise modeling with application to improved HDR synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goossens, Bart; Luong, Hiêp; Aelterman, Jan; Pižurica, Aleksandra; Philips, Wilfried

    2012-12-01

    Due to the ongoing miniaturization of digital camera sensors and the steady increase of the "number of megapixels", individual sensor elements of the camera become more sensitive to noise, even deteriorating the final image quality. To go around this problem, sophisticated processing algorithms in the devices, can help to maximally exploit the knowledge on the sensor characteristics (e.g., in terms of noise), and offer a better image reconstruction. Although a lot of research focuses on rather simplistic noise models, such as stationary additive white Gaussian noise, only limited attention has gone to more realistic digital camera noise models. In this article, we first present a digital camera noise model that takes several processing steps in the camera into account, such as sensor signal amplification, clipping, post-processing,.. We then apply this noise model to the reconstruction problem of high dynamic range (HDR) images from a small set of low dynamic range (LDR) exposures of a static scene. In literature, HDR reconstruction is mostly performed by computing a weighted average, in which the weights are directly related to the observer pixel intensities of the LDR image. In this work, we derive a Bayesian probabilistic formulation of a weighting function that is near-optimal in the MSE sense (or SNR sense) of the reconstructed HDR image, by assuming exponentially distributed irradiance values. We define the weighting function as the probability that the observed pixel intensity is approximately unbiased. The weighting function can be directly computed based on the noise model parameters, which gives rise to different symmetric and asymmetric shapes when electronic noise or photon noise is dominant. We also explain how to deal with the case that some of the noise model parameters are unknown and explain how the camera response function can be estimated using the presented noise model. Finally, experimental results are provided to support our findings.

  12. Variation of aircraft noise annoyance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dempsey, T. K.

    1980-01-01

    Laboratory and field studies were conducted to determine the basis for increased sensitivity of people to noise during aircraft noise studies. This change in sensitivity could be attributed to either a physiological time-of-day effect (i.e., a circadian rhythm) or simply to the total number of aircraft noise events experienced during a laboratory test period. In order to investigate the time-of-day factor, noise sensitivity measures were obtained from subjects at home with cassette tape recorders/headsets over a 24 hour period. The effect of number of aircraft noise events on noise sensitivity was investigated within a laboratory. In these tests, measures of sensitivity to noise were obtained from subjects before and after their exposure to varying numbers of aircraft noise events. The 24 hour data showed no evidence that noise sensitivity is physiologically cyclical. Consequently, these data can not explain annoyance response variation to aircraft noise tests conducted during the daytime. However, the number of aircraft noise events did influence the subject's noise sensitivity. This effect completely accounts for the systematic increase in noise sensitivity during a laboratory test period.

  13. Noise management by molecular networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frank J Bruggeman

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Fluctuations in the copy number of key regulatory macromolecules ("noise" may cause physiological heterogeneity in populations of (isogenic cells. The kinetics of processes and their wiring in molecular networks can modulate this molecular noise. Here we present a theoretical framework to study the principles of noise management by the molecular networks in living cells. The theory makes use of the natural, hierarchical organization of those networks and makes their noise management more understandable in terms of network structure. Principles governing noise management by ultrasensitive systems, signaling cascades, gene networks and feedback circuitry are discovered using this approach. For a few frequently occurring network motifs we show how they manage noise. We derive simple and intuitive equations for noise in molecule copy numbers as a determinant of physiological heterogeneity. We show how noise levels and signal sensitivity can be set independently in molecular networks, but often changes in signal sensitivity affect noise propagation. Using theory and simulations, we show that negative feedback can both enhance and reduce noise. We identify a trade-off; noise reduction in one molecular intermediate by negative feedback is at the expense of increased noise in the levels of other molecules along the feedback loop. The reactants of the processes that are strongly (cooperatively regulated, so as to allow for negative feedback with a high strength, will display enhanced noise.

  14. Evaluating noise abatement measures using strategic noise maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borst, H.C.; Miedema, H.M.E.; Laan, W.P.N. van der; Lohman, W.J.A.

    2006-01-01

    Noise annoyance due to transportation is widespread in industrialized countries and in urban areas in the developing countries. The European Noise Directive (END) requires an assessment of the noise situation as well as the formulation of action plans for the reduction of the number of people

  15. Rating environmental noise on the basis of noise maps

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, H.M.E.; Borst, H.C.

    2006-01-01

    A system that rates noise on the basis of noise maps has been developed which is based on empirical exposure-response relationships, so that effects in the community will be lower if the system gives a better rating. It is consistent with noise metrics and effect endpoint chosen in the EU, i.e., it

  16. Noise sensitivity and reactions to noise and other environmental conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Miedema, H.M.E.; Vos, H.

    2003-01-01

    This article integrates findings from the literature and new results regarding noise sensitivity. The new results are based on analyses of 28 combined datasets (N=23 038), and separate analyses of a large aircraft noise study (N=10939). Three topics regarding noise sensitivity are discussed, namely,

  17. Annoyance of low frequency noise and traffic noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, F.R.; Poulsen, Torben

    2001-01-01

    The annoyance of different low frequency noise sources was determined and compared to the annoyance from traffic noise. Twenty-two subjects participated in laboratory listening tests. The sounds were presented by loudspeakers in a listening room and the spectra of the low frequency noises were...

  18. Annoyance of low frequency noise and traffic noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Frank Rysgaard; Poulsen, Torben

    2000-01-01

    The annoyance of different low frequency noise sources was determined and compared to the annoyance from traffic noise. Twenty-two test subjects participated in laboratory listening tests. The sounds were presented by loudspeakers in a listening room and the spectra of the low frequency noises were...

  19. Wide Band CMOS Low-Noise Amplifier Exploiting Noise Cancellation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruccoleri, F.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Nauta, Bram

    Well-known elementary wide band amplifiers suffer from a fundamental trade-off between noise factor and source impedance matching, which limits their noise figure (NF) to values typically above 3dB. Negative feedback can be employed to break this trade-off, thus allowing lower noise figures,

  20. Reducing Environmental Noise Impacts: A USAREUR Noise Management Program Handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    1991-06-01

    land use planning . Noise management for specific components of the military community, (airfields, base operations, training areas, and housing and recreation areas) are addressed. The nature of noise generated, means of noise abatement at the source, path, and receiver (both physical and organizational/public relations methods), and a case study example are

  1. Acquired Resistance to Impulse Noise

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Henderson, Donald

    1997-01-01

    Previous experiments have shown that the mammalians auditory system can be made more resistant to the traumatic effects of noise exposure by having the subject exposed to a lower level, prophylactic noise...

  2. Noise sensitivity and hearing disability

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Marja Heinonen-Guzejev; Tapani Jauhiainen; Heikki Vuorinen; Anne Viljanen; Taina Rantanen; Markku Koskenvuo; Kauko Heikkilä; Helena Mussalo-Rauhamaa; Jaakko Kaprio

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association of noise sensitivity with self-reported hearing disability and hearing levels, with consideration of the role of self-reported history of noise...

  3. Noise contributions to the fMRI signal: An overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Thomas T

    2016-12-01

    The ability to discriminate signal from noise plays a key role in the analysis and interpretation of functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) measures of brain activity. Over the past two decades, a number of major sources of noise have been identified, including system-related instabilities, subject motion, and physiological fluctuations. This article reviews the characteristics of the various noise sources as well as the mechanisms through which they affect the fMRI signal. Approaches for distinguishing signal from noise and the associated challenges are also reviewed. These challenges reflect the fact that some noise sources, such as respiratory activity, are generated by the same underlying brain networks that give rise to functional signals that are of interest. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Noise performance of PbS colloidal quantum dot photodetectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Iacovo, A.; Venettacci, C.; Colace, L.; Scopa, L.; Foglia, S.

    2017-11-01

    We report on the noise characterization of photoconductors based on PbS colloidal quantum dots. The devices operate in the near infrared region with peak responsivity exceeding 70 A/W at 1.3 μm at low optical intensity and low voltage bias. The large responsivity, combined with the low dark current of high resistance devices, provides a specific detectivity D* as large as 1011 cm Hz1/2 W-1. The noise characteristics are investigated using noise current spectra measured at different biases both in dark and under optical excitation. The analysis revealed that the noise is clearly dominated by the flicker component up to 100 kHz. The noise performance is investigated at different optical intensities and for different device dimensions and voltage biases.

  5. Non-cavitating propeller noise modeling and inversion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dongho; Lee, Keunhwa; Seong, Woojae

    2014-12-01

    Marine propeller is the dominant exciter of the hull surface above it causing high level of noise and vibration in the ship structure. Recent successful developments have led to non-cavitating propeller designs and thus present focus is the non-cavitating characteristics of propeller such as hydrodynamic noise and its induced hull excitation. In this paper, analytic source model of propeller non-cavitating noise, described by longitudinal quadrupoles and dipoles, is suggested based on the propeller hydrodynamics. To find the source unknown parameters, the multi-parameter inversion technique is adopted using the pressure data obtained from the model scale experiment and pressure field replicas calculated by boundary element method. The inversion results show that the proposed source model is appropriate in modeling non-cavitating propeller noise. The result of this study can be utilized in the prediction of propeller non-cavitating noise and hull excitation at various stages in design and analysis.

  6. Noise Characterization of Supercontinuum Sources for Low Coherence Interferometry Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, William J.; Kim, Sanghoon; Wax, Adam

    2015-01-01

    We examine the noise properties of supercontinuum light sources when used in low coherence interferometry applications. The first application is a multiple-scattering low-coherence interferometry (ms2/LCI) system where high power and long image acquisition times are required to image deep into tissue. For this system we compare the noise characteristics of two supercontinuum sources from different suppliers. Both sources have long term drift that limits the amount of time over which signal averaging is advantageous for reducing noise. The second application is a high resolution optical coherence tomography system where broadband light is needed for high axial resolution. For this system we compare the noise performance of the two supercontinuum sources and a light source based on four superluminescent diodes (SLDs) using imaging contrast as a comparative metric. We find that the NKT SuperK has superior noise performance compared to the Fianium SC-450-4 but neither meets the performance of the SLDs. PMID:25606759

  7. Effects of amplitude modulation on perception of wind turbine noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Ki Seop; Lee, Soo Gab; Gwak, Doo Young [Dept. of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Seong, Yeol Wan [Ammunition Engineering Team, Defense Agency for Technology and Quality, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung Hoon [Aerodynamics Research Team, Korea Aerospace Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Hong, Ji Young [Transportation Environmental Research Team, Green Transport and Logistics Institute, Korea Railroad Research Institute, Uiwang (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Wind turbine noise is considered to be easily detectable and highly annoying at relatively lower sound levels than other noise sources. Many previous studies attributed this characteristic to amplitude modulation. However, it is unclear whether amplitude modulation is the main cause of these properties of wind turbine noise. Therefore, the aim of the current study is to identify the relationship between amplitude modulation and these two properties of wind turbine noise. For this investigation, two experiments were conducted. In the first experiment, 12 participants determined the detection thresholds of six target sounds in the presence of background noise. In the second experiment, 12 participants matched the loudness of modified sounds without amplitude modulation to that of target sounds with amplitude modulation. The results showed that the detection threshold was lowered as the modulation depth increased; additionally, sounds with amplitude modulation had higher subjective loudness than those without amplitude modulation.

  8. The Signal Importance of Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Macy, Michael; Tsvetkova, Milena

    2015-01-01

    Noise is widely regarded as a residual category--the unexplained variance in a linear model or the random disturbance of a predictable pattern. Accordingly, formal models often impose the simplifying assumption that the world is noise-free and social dynamics are deterministic. Where noise is assigned causal importance, it is often assumed to be a…

  9. Weak localization of photon noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Scalia, Paolo S.; Muskens, Otto L.; Lagendijk, Aart

    2013-01-01

    We present an experimental study of coherent backscattering (CBS) of photon noise from multiple scattering media. We use a pseudothermal light source with a microsecond coherence time to produce a noise spectrum covering a continuous transition, from wave fluctuations to shot noise over several MHz.

  10. Noise mapping inside a car

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strekalov, V. A.; Shaimuhametov, R. R.

    2017-09-01

    We present new wireless sensor telemetry system designed to be mounted on different nodes of the car and record acoustic noises. The proposed system is mapping noise inside a car. The noise field is recorded at the ten control regions simultaneously.

  11. Noise and mental performance: personality attributes and noise sensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belojevic, G; Jakovljevic, B; Slepcevic, V

    2003-01-01

    The contradictory and confusing results in noise research on humans may partly be due to individual differences between the subjects participating in different studies. This review is based on a twelve year research on the role of neuroticism, extroversion and subjective noise sensitivity during mental work in noisy environment. Neurotic persons might show enhanced "arousability" i.e. their arousal level increases more in stress. Additional unfavorable factors for neurotics are worrying and anxiety, which might prevent them coping successfully with noise, or some other stressors during mental performance. In numerous experiments introverts have showed higher sensitivity to noise during mental performance compared to extroverts, while extroverts often cope with a boring task even by requesting short periods of noise during performance. Correlation analyses have regularly revealed a highly significant negative relation between extroversion and noise annoyance during mental processing. Numerous studies have shown that people with high noise sensitivity may be prevented from achieving the same work results as other people in noisy environment, thus leading to psychosomatic, neurotic or other difficulties. Positive relation between noise annoyance and subjective noise sensitivity might be very strong. Our results have shown, after matching with the results of other relevant studies, that more stable personality, with extroversive tendencies and with a relatively lower subjective noise sensitivity measured with standard questionnaires, may be expected to better adapt to noise during mental performance, compared to people with opposite personality traits.

  12. Neuron dynamics in the presence of 1/f noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobie, Cameron; Babul, Arif; de Sousa, Rogério

    2011-05-01

    Interest in understanding the interplay between noise and the response of a nonlinear device cuts across disciplinary boundaries. It is as relevant for unmasking the dynamics of neurons in noisy environments as it is for designing reliable nanoscale logic circuit elements and sensors. Most studies of noise in nonlinear devices are limited to either time-correlated noise with a Lorentzian spectrum (of which the white noise is a limiting case) or just white noise. We use analytical theory and numerical simulations to study the impact of the more ubiquitous "natural" noise with a 1/f frequency spectrum. Specifically, we study the impact of the 1/f noise on a leaky integrate and fire model of a neuron. The impact of noise is considered on two quantities of interest to neuron function: The spike count Fano factor and the speed of neuron response to a small steplike stimulus. For the perfect (nonleaky) integrate and fire model, we show that the Fano factor can be expressed as an integral over noise spectrum weighted by a (low-pass) filter function given by F(t,f)=sinc(2)(πft). This result elucidates the connection between low-frequency noise and disorder in neuron dynamics. Under 1/f noise, spike dynamics lacks a characteristic correlation time, inducing the leaky and nonleaky models, to exhibit nonergodic behavior and the Fano factor, increasing logarithmically as a function of time. We compare our results to experimental data of single neurons in vivo [Teich, Heneghan, Lowen, Ozaki, and Kaplan, J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 14, 529 (1997)] and show how the 1/f noise model provides much better agreement than the usual approximations based on Lorentzian noise. The low-frequency noise, however, complicates the case for an information-coding scheme based on interspike intervals by introducing variability in the neuron response time. On a positive note, the neuron response time to a step stimulus is, remarkably, nearly optimal in the presence of 1/f noise. An explanation of this

  13. White noise on bialgebras

    CERN Document Server

    Schürmann, Michael

    1993-01-01

    Stochastic processes with independent increments on a group are generalized to the concept of "white noise" on a Hopf algebra or bialgebra. The main purpose of the book is the characterization of these processes as solutions of quantum stochastic differential equations in the sense of R.L. Hudsonand K.R. Parthasarathy. The notes are a contribution to quantum probability but they are also related to classical probability, quantum groups, and operator algebras. The Az ma martingales appear as examples of white noise on a Hopf algebra which is a deformation of the Heisenberg group. The book will be of interest to probabilists and quantum probabilists. Specialists in algebraic structures who are curious about the role of their concepts in probablility theory as well as quantum theory may find the book interesting. The reader should havesome knowledge of functional analysis, operator algebras, and probability theory.

  14. Ex / Noise / CERN / Deerhoof

    CERN Multimedia

    CERN, SM18,

    2015-01-01

    Indie rockers Deerhoof battled with the noise of CERN’s magnet test facilities on 30 August 2015. The band visited CERN at the invitation of ATLAS physicist James Beacham, whose pilot project Ex/Noise/CERN collides experimental music artists with experimental particle physics. Credits: -Producer- CERN Video Productions James Beacham François Briard -Director- Noemi Caraban -Camera- Yann Krajewski Piotr Traczyk Noemi Caraban -Crane operator- Antonio Henrique Jorge-Costa -Live recording at CERN- Mixing at Rec studio/Geneva By Serge Morattel -Infography- Daniel Dominguez Noemi Caraban -Deerhoof- John Dieterich Satomi Matsuzaki Ed Rodriguez Greg Saunier w/Deron Pulley SPECIAL THANKS TO: Michal Strychalski Marta Bajko Maryline Charrondiere Luca Bottura Christian Giloux Rodrigue Faes Mariane Catallon Georgina Hobgen Hailey Reissman Marine Bass

  15. Noise Analysis of MAIA System and Possible Noise Suppression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Svihlik

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the noise analysis and noise suppression in a system for double station observation of the meteors now known as MAIA (Meteor Automatic Imager and Analyzer. The noise analysis is based on acquisition of testing video sequences in different light conditions and their further statistical evaluation. The main goal is to find a suitable noise model and subsequently determine if the noise is signal dependent or not. Noise and image model in the wavelet domain should be based on Gaussian mixture model (GMM or Generalized Laplacian Model (GLM and the model parameters should be estimated by moment method. Furthermore, noise should be modeled by GMM or GLM also in the space domain. GMM and GLM allow to model various types of probability density functions. Finally the advanced denoising algorithm using Bayesian estimator is applied and its performance is verified.

  16. Noise Phobia in Dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mangle

    Full Text Available Fear of thunderstorms and other forms of noise phobia are common problems in dogs. Administering medications along with changing the pet’s environment, and using behavior modification techniques can help ease the fear. Above all, do not give your pet any attention or reward when he is showing signs of fear; this will only reinforce the fearful behavior. [Veterinary World 2008; 1(11.000: 351-352

  17. Tinnitus and leisure noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Warwick; Carter, Lyndal

    2017-04-01

    To study the relationship of life-time noise exposure and experience of tinnitus. Audiometric measures included otoscopy, pure tone air- and bone-conduction hearing threshold levels (HTL) and otoacoustic emissions (OAEs). Participants completed questionnaires including demographic information, past hearing health, history of participation in loud leisure activities, and attitudes to noise. A representative sample (1435) of the young (11-35 years old) Australian population. Of the sample, 63% indicated they experienced tinnitus in some form. There was no correlation of tinnitus experience with HTL or OAE amplitudes. Although median octave band HTLs for those who experienced tinnitus "all the time" were slightly higher for those who did not, neither group exhibited HTLs outside clinically-normal values. Of those who experienced tinnitus a direct correlation was found between frequency of experience of tinnitus and increasing cumulative, life-time noise exposure. Those who experienced tinnitus were more likely to report noticing deterioration in their hearing ability over time and to report difficulty hearing in quiet and/or noisy situations. Experience of tinnitus was found throughout this young population but not associated with HTLs or variation in OAE amplitudes. Males experienced 'permanent' tinnitus at significantly greater rate than females.

  18. Directionality analysis and Rayleigh wave tomography of ambient seismic noise in southern Norway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köhler, Andreas; Weidle, Christian; Maupin, Valérie

    2011-01-01

    We process seismic broad-band data from southern Norway by cross correlation of ambient seismic noise in view of getting a better image of the crustal structure in the area. The main data set sterns from the temporary MAGNUS network which operated continuously from 2006 September to 2008 June. Additionally, data from permanent stations of the National Norwegian Seismic Network, the NORSAR array and GSN stations in the region are used. We compute vertical component cross-correlation functions using 41 receivers for 3-month time windows. Evaluation of the azimuthal and temporal variation of signal-to-noise ratios (SNRs) and f-k analysis of data from NORSAR array between 3 and 25 s period shows that the dominant source areas of seismic noise are located to the west and north of the network during most of the measurement time, which corresponds well to the Norwegian coast line. During summer months, the SNRs decrease but the azimuthal distribution becomes more uniform between 7 and 12 s period, suggesting a more diffuse character of the wavefield. Primary ocean microseisms above 12 s show different dominant source azimuths during this time period compared to the winter months. Time-frequency analysis is applied to measure Rayleigh wave group velocity dispersion curves between each station pair for each 3-month correlation stack and the mean and variance of all dispersion curves is computed for each path. After rejection of low-quality data, a careful analysis shows that the group velocities are not biased by noise directionality. We invert the data for group velocity maps at period bands between 3 and 25 s. At short periods, we find an average Rayleigh wave group speed of about 3 km s-1 and velocity anomalies that correlate very well with local surface geology. While higher velocities (+5 per cent) can be associated with the Caledonian nappes in the central part of southern Norway, the Oslo Graben is reflected by negative velocity anomalies (-3 to -5 per cent). At

  19. Substrate noise coupling in analog/RF circuits

    CERN Document Server

    Bronckers, Stephane; Vandersteen, Gerd; Rolain, Yves

    2010-01-01

    This practical resource offers you detailed guidance on the impact of substrate noise on a wide range of circuits operating from baseband frequencies up to mm-wave frequencies. This unique book presents case studies to illustrate that careful modeling of the assembly characteristics and layout details is required to bring simulations and measurements into agreement. You learn how to use a proper combination of isolation structures and circuit techniques to make analog/RF circuits more immune to substrate noise.

  20. Noise as an external effect of traffic and transportation

    OpenAIRE

    STARCEVIC SLOBODAN M.; BOJOVIC NEBOJSA J.

    2016-01-01

    The paper deals with the basic concepts and characteristics of external effects of traffic and transport, with an emphasis on the impact of traffic noise as one of the main external effects of transport nowadays. The main negative impacts of traffic noise on human life and social activities are given as well as the causes of elevated levels of noise from road, rail and tram traffic. In addition, the paper provides a review of the common measures that can be applied to reduce the impact of noi...

  1. Age-Related Changes in 1/f Neural Electrophysiological Noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voytek, Bradley; Kramer, Mark A; Case, John; Lepage, Kyle Q; Tempesta, Zechari R; Knight, Robert T; Gazzaley, Adam

    2015-09-23

    Aging is associated with performance decrements across multiple cognitive domains. The neural noise hypothesis, a dominant view of the basis of this decline, posits that aging is accompanied by an increase in spontaneous, noisy baseline neural activity. Here we analyze data from two different groups of human subjects: intracranial electrocorticography from 15 participants over a 38 year age range (15-53 years) and scalp EEG data from healthy younger (20-30 years) and older (60-70 years) adults to test the neural noise hypothesis from a 1/f noise perspective. Many natural phenomena, including electrophysiology, are characterized by 1/f noise. The defining characteristic of 1/f is that the power of the signal frequency content decreases rapidly as a function of the frequency (f) itself. The slope of this decay, the noise exponent (χ), is often noise (defined as χ = 0) with increasing task difficulty. We observed, in both electrophysiological datasets, that aging is associated with a flatter (more noisy) 1/f power spectral density, even at rest, and that visual cortical 1/f noise statistically mediates age-related impairments in visual working memory. These results provide electrophysiological support for the neural noise hypothesis of aging. Significance statement: Understanding the neurobiological origins of age-related cognitive decline is of critical scientific, medical, and public health importance, especially considering the rapid aging of the world's population. We find, in two separate human studies, that 1/f electrophysiological noise increases with aging. In addition, we observe that this age-related 1/f noise statistically mediates age-related working memory decline. These results significantly add to this understanding and contextualize a long-standing problem in cognition by encapsulating age-related cognitive decline within a neurocomputational model of 1/f noise-induced deficits in neural communication. Copyright © 2015 the authors 0270-6474/15/3513257-09$15.00/0.

  2. Economical noise- and heat insulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1982-06-01

    All noise protection and heat insulations measures are interlinked. While noise abatement and insulation is primarily a task of health protection, the economically optimised heat insulation is rather a problem for financial mathematics. Parameters, influencing the heat insulation are subject to changes which will affect the profitability of heat insulation measures in turn. Several options for reducing the noise level are described and some standard values for material cost are supplied. Depending on the kind of noise different abatement methods are suitable which require materials with specific properties. Measures for heat insulation are described which to a great extent are identical will noise abatement measures.

  3. Research on the application of active sound barriers for the transformer noise abatement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hu Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Sound barriers are a type of measure most commonly used in the noise abatement of transformers. In the noise abatement project of substations, the design of sound barriers is restrained by the portal frames which are used to hold up outgoing lines from the main transformers, which impacts the noise reduction effect. If active sound barriers are utilized in these places, the noise diffraction of sound barriers can be effectively reduced. At a 110kV Substation, an experiment using a 15-channel active sound barrier has been carried out. The result of the experiment shows that the mean noise reduction value (MNRV of the noise measuring points at the substation boundary are 1.5 dB (A. The effect of the active noise control system is impacted by the layout of the active noise control system, the acoustic environment on site and the spectral characteristic of the target area.

  4. Accurate Ambient Noise Assessment Using Smartphones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Willian; Calafate, Carlos T.; Cano, Juan-Carlos; Manzoni, Pietro

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, smartphones have become ubiquitous and one of the main communication resources for human beings. Their widespread adoption was due to the huge technological progress and to the development of multiple useful applications. Their characteristics have also experienced a substantial improvement as they now integrate multiple sensors able to convert the smartphone into a flexible and multi-purpose sensing unit. The combined use of multiple smartphones endowed with several types of sensors gives the possibility to monitor a certain area with fine spatial and temporal granularity, a procedure typically known as crowdsensing. In this paper, we propose using smartphones as environmental noise-sensing units. For this purpose, we focus our study on the sound capture and processing procedure, analyzing the impact of different noise calculation algorithms, as well as in determining their accuracy when compared to a professional noise measurement unit. We analyze different candidate algorithms using different types of smartphones, and we study the most adequate time period and sampling strategy to optimize the data-gathering process. In addition, we perform an experimental study comparing our approach with the results obtained using a professional device. Experimental results show that, if the smartphone application is well tuned, it is possible to measure noise levels with a accuracy degree comparable to professional devices for the entire dynamic range typically supported by microphones embedded in smartphones, i.e., 35–95 dB. PMID:28430126

  5. Accurate Ambient Noise Assessment Using Smartphones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zamora, Willian; Calafate, Carlos T; Cano, Juan-Carlos; Manzoni, Pietro

    2017-04-21

    Nowadays, smartphones have become ubiquitous and one of the main communication resources for human beings. Their widespread adoption was due to the huge technological progress and to the development of multiple useful applications. Their characteristics have also experienced a substantial improvement as they now integrate multiple sensors able to convert the smartphone into a flexible and multi-purpose sensing unit. The combined use of multiple smartphones endowed with several types of sensors gives the possibility to monitor a certain area with fine spatial and temporal granularity, a procedure typically known as crowdsensing. In this paper, we propose using smartphones as environmental noise-sensing units. For this purpose, we focus our study on the sound capture and processing procedure, analyzing the impact of different noise calculation algorithms, as well as in determining their accuracy when compared to a professional noise measurement unit. We analyze different candidate algorithms using different types of smartphones, and we study the most adequate time period and sampling strategy to optimize the data-gathering process. In addition, we perform an experimental study comparing our approach with the results obtained using a professional device. Experimental results show that, if the smartphone application is well tuned, it is possible to measure noise levels with a accuracy degree comparable to professional devices for the entire dynamic range typically supported by microphones embedded in smartphones, i.e., 35-95 dB.

  6. Low-frequency 1/f noise in graphene devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balandin, Alexander A.

    2013-08-01

    Low-frequency noise with a spectral density that depends inversely on frequency has been observed in a wide variety of systems including current fluctuations in resistors, intensity fluctuations in music and signals in human cognition. In electronics, the phenomenon, which is known as 1/f noise, flicker noise or excess noise, hampers the operation of numerous devices and circuits, and can be a significant impediment to the development of practical applications from new materials. Graphene offers unique opportunities for studying 1/f noise because of its two-dimensional structure and widely tunable two-dimensional carrier concentration. The creation of practical graphene-based devices will also depend on our ability to understand and control the low-frequency noise in this material system. Here, the characteristic features of 1/f noise in graphene and few-layer graphene are reviewed, and the implications of such noise for the development of graphene-based electronics including high-frequency devices and sensors are examined.

  7. Natural and man-made terrestrial electromagnetic noise: an outlook

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Meloni

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available The terrestrial environment is continuously exposed to electromagnetic radiations which set up a «background» electromagnetic noise. Within the Non Ionizing Radiation band (NIR, i.e. for frequencies lower than 300 GHz, this background can have a natural or an artificial origin. Natural origins of electromagnetic radiations are generally atmospheric or cosmic while artificial origins are technological applications, power transmission, communications, etc. This paper briefly describes the natural and man-made electromagnetic noise in the NIR band. Natural noise comes from a large variety of sources involving different physical phenomena and covering a wide range of frequencies and showing various propagation characteristics with an extremely broad range of power levels. Due to technological growth man-made electromagnetic noise is nowadays superimposed on natural noise almost everywhere on Earth. In the last decades man-made noise has increased dramatically over and above the natural noise in residential and business areas. This increase has led some scientists to consider possible negative effects of electromagnetic waves on human life and living systems in general. Accurate measurements of natural and man-made electromagnetic noise are necessary to understand the relative power levels in the different bands and their influence on life.

  8. Asymmetric noise-induced large fluctuations in coupled systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Ira B.; Szwaykowska, Klimka; Carr, Thomas W.

    2017-10-01

    Networks of interacting, communicating subsystems are common in many fields, from ecology, biology, and epidemiology to engineering and robotics. In the presence of noise and uncertainty, interactions between the individual components can lead to unexpected complex system-wide behaviors. In this paper, we consider a generic model of two weakly coupled dynamical systems, and we show how noise in one part of the system is transmitted through the coupling interface. Working synergistically with the coupling, the noise on one system drives a large fluctuation in the other, even when there is no noise in the second system. Moreover, the large fluctuation happens while the first system exhibits only small random oscillations. Uncertainty effects are quantified by showing how characteristic time scales of noise-induced switching scale as a function of the coupling between the two coupled parts of the experiment. In addition, our results show that the probability of switching in the noise-free system scales inversely as the square of reduced noise intensity amplitude, rendering the virtual probability of switching an extremely rare event. Our results showing the interplay between transmitted noise and coupling are also confirmed through simulations, which agree quite well with analytic theory.

  9. Control of low-frequency noise for piping systems via the design of coupled band gap of acoustic metamaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Yanfei [College of Power Engineering, Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan, 430033 (China); Shen, Huijie, E-mail: shj588@163.com [College of Power Engineering, Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan, 430033 (China); Zhang, Linke [School of Energy and Power Engineering, Wuhan University of Technology, Wuhan, 430063 (China); Su, Yongsheng, E-mail: suyongsheng1981@163.com [College of Power Engineering, Naval University of Engineering, Wuhan, 430033 (China); Yu, Dianlong [Key Laboratory of Science and Technology on Integrated Logistics Support, National University of Defense Technology, Changsha 410073 (China)

    2016-07-01

    Acoustic wave propagation and sound transmission in a metamaterial-based piping system with Helmholtz resonator (HR) attached periodically are studied. A transfer matrix method is developed to conduct the investigation. Calculational results show that the introduction of periodic HRs in the piping system could generate a band gap (BG) near the resonant frequency of the HR, such that the bandwidth and the attenuation effect of HR improved notably. Bragg type gaps are also exist in the system due to the systematic periodicity. By plotting the BG as functions of HR parameters, the effect of resonator parameters on the BG behavior, including bandwidth, location and attenuation performance, etc., is examined. It is found that Bragg-type gap would interplay with the resonant-type gap under some special situations, thereby giving rise to a super-wide coupled gap. Further, explicit formulation for BG exact coupling is extracted and some key parameters on modulating the width and the attenuation coefficient of coupled gaps are investigated. The coupled gap can be located to any frequency range as one concerned, thus rendering the low-frequency noise control feasible in a broad band range. - Highlights: • A metamaterial-type pipe system with Bragg and resonant acoustic gaps. • A low-frequency acoustic coupled gap. • Exact coupling condition for Bragg and resonant gaps. • Effects of resonant parameters on coupled gaps.

  10. Spatial Vertical Directionality and Correlation of Low-Frequency Ambient Noise in Deep Ocean Direct-Arrival Zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Qiulong; Yang, Kunde; Cao, Ran; Duan, Shunli

    2018-01-23

    Wind-driven and distant shipping noise sources contribute to the total noise field in the deep ocean direct-arrival zones. Wind-driven and distant shipping noise sources may significantly and simultaneously affect the spatial characteristics of the total noise field to some extent. In this work, a ray approach and parabolic equation solution method were jointly utilized to model the low-frequency ambient noise field in a range-dependent deep ocean environment by considering their calculation accuracy and efficiency in near-field wind-driven and far-field distant shipping noise fields. The reanalysis databases of National Center of Environment Prediction (NCEP) and Volunteer Observation System (VOS) were used to model the ambient noise source intensity and distribution. Spatial vertical directionality and correlation were analyzed in three scenarios that correspond to three wind speed conditions. The noise field was dominated by distant shipping noise sources when the wind speed was less than 3 m/s, and then the spatial vertical directionality and vertical correlation of the total noise field were nearly consistent with those of distant shipping noise field. The total noise field was completely dominated by near field wind generated noise sources when the wind speed was greater than 12 m/s at 150 Hz, and then the spatial vertical correlation coefficient and directionality pattern of the total noise field was approximately consistent with that of the wind-driven noise field. The spatial characteristics of the total noise field for wind speeds between 3 m/s and 12 m/s were the weighted results of wind-driven and distant shipping noise fields. Furthermore, the spatial characteristics of low-frequency ambient noise field were compared with the classical Cron/Sherman deep water noise field coherence function. Simulation results with the described modeling method showed good agreement with the experimental measurement results based on the vertical line array deployed near

  11. Noise Reduction Techniques in Optical Nondestructive Evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatters, Thomas Clinton

    The purpose of this doctoral work is to develop noise reduction techniques applicable to speckle interferometric techniques, such as electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) and shearography. This effort has led to the development of a new general category of speckle methods called additive -subtractive phase-modulated speckle interferometry (ASPM -SI). ASPM-SI methods utilize a phase-modulation of the object beam and a continuous reference-updating technique to decrease the effects of optical noise. To perform ASPM -SI, additive speckle interference images containing information about the same two states of deformation of a test object undergoing acoustic or pressure stressing are rapidly acquired in each CCD video frame. Meanwhile, phase modulation is introduced in every other frame during the video sequence (using a translating mirror for shearography or an electro -optic modulator for ESPI) and the additive interference images are subtracted sequentially using a real-time image processor. As a consequence of this modulation and image processing, the self-interference component of a speckle interference pattern (associated with additive interferometry) is removed and real-time fringe visibility (usually associated with substractive interferometry) is provided. Hence, the desirable characteristics of both additive speckle interferometry (noise protection) and subtractive speckle interferometry (real-time fringe visibility) have been successfully combined. The susceptibility of ASPM-SI methods to environmental noise caused by induced thermal noise is demonstrated to be lower than that of conventional subtractive speckle interferometric methods. In order to more fully understand the inherent robustness of the ASPM-SI methods in the presence of noise, an analytical model is developed to describe the effects of in-plane translation noise on fringe visibility. In -plane translation generates a loss of correlation between additive interference images which

  12. Noise evaluation of automotive A/C compressor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metwally, Sameh M.; Khalil, Mohamed I.; Abouel-seoud, Shawki A. [Automotive and Tractors Dept., Faculty of Engineering, Helwan University, Cairo (Egypt)

    2011-07-01

    Passenger compartment's interior noise and thermal performance are essential criteria for the driving comfort of vehicles. The air-conditioning system influences both field of comfort. It creates comfortable thermal conditions. On the other hand, the noise radiation of the air-condition system's components can be annoying. The blower, the air distribution ducts and the registers affect air rush noise. In some cases, the refrigerant flow creates hissing noise. Such noise has a great influence on vehicle acoustical comfort and on overall quality perception of a vehicle Therefore, the acoustic performance of air-condition compressors become more important for passenger comfort. At engine idling and at extreme temperatures the air-condition compressor can be audible as the significant sound source. However, the aim of this paper is to quantify air-borne noise characteristics of vehicle air-condition compressor. A simulated experimental model comprises a small wooden box with dimensions of 0.5 x 0.5 x 0.5 m represented the principle of hemi-anechoic room was designed and acoustic characteristics of the sound field inside the box were determined. The air-condition compressor characteristics parameters considered in this paper are fan position and electric motor speed. In addition, a single number of the air column natural frequency is calculated. The results indicate that significant information can be obtained in order to investigate the vehicle air-condition compressor and consequently improve the vehicle interior quietness.

  13. Frequency response function of motors for switching noise energy with a new experimental approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyunsu [Ensemble Center for Automotive Research, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Jong-Yun [Incheon National University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-06-15

    Switching energy in electrical vehicles can create serious noise from the motors. However, the characteristics of switching noise in vehicle motors are not clear due to the complexity of measuring them. This study proposes a new experimental method to investigate the switching noise energy of a vehicle motor based on frequency response functions. A function generator-amplifier system is used to gen- erate the switching energy instead of the complex battery-inverter system that has previously been used to examine the noise energy characteristics. Even though newly adapted experimental method is simple, the switching noise energy was explicitly investigated under various input signals. Thus, this simple new method can be used to investigate the dynamic characteristics of noise energy in a vehicle motor.

  14. Noise Spectroscopy in Strongly Correlated Oxides

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsaqqa, Ali M.

    important from the fundamental physics point of view and for applications. Its transition from a metal to an insulator (MIT) with simple application of voltage is quite interesting. For use in applications, e.g. transistors, it is very important to have a clear understanding of the MIT. Equally important is the question of whether the thermally- and electrically-driven transitions have the same origin. In this thesis, we tried to answer this question by utilizing three different tuning parameters: temperature, voltage bias and strain. Our results point to an unusual noise behavior in the high-temperature metallic phase, and provide valuable insight into the transport dynamics of this material. CuxV2O5 exhibit a metal-insulator transition and, more interestingly, a superconductivity transition. Unlike VO2, copper vanadium bronzes are much less studied and many questions are still open, including the possibility of charge ordering transition, just like in other members of the vanadium family. In this thesis, we studied this material and found evidences for charge ordering transitions and possibly other transitions as well. The last material, NbSe3, is a prototypical example of charge density wave systems, where Peierls transitions exist. Here, we study the effects of contacts on resistance noise in the 1D limit. The study aimed to confirm that the electric field threshold is sample length independent, to find out if there is a relation between contact separation and the noise generated and to explore the characteristics of the contact noise. The results confirm that the electric field threshold is independent of the sample length. It was also found that the separation between the contacts does not affect the noise. Finally, the contact noise is of the 1/f-type and has a Gaussian distribution. These results are timely for future device applications utilizing NbSe3.

  15. Road traffic noise: self-reported noise annoyance versus GIS modelled road traffic noise exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Birk, Matthias; Ivina, Olga; von Klot, Stephanie; Babisch, Wolfgang; Heinrich, Joachim

    2011-11-01

    self-reported road traffic noise annoyance is commonly used in epidemiological studies for assessment of potential health effects. Alternatively, some studies have used geographic information system (GIS) modelled exposure to road traffic noise as an objective parameter. The aim of this study was to analyse the association between noise exposure due to neighbouring road traffic and the noise annoyance of adults, taking other determinants into consideration. parents of 951 Munich children from the two German birth cohorts GINIplus and LISAplus reported their annoyance due to road traffic noise at home. GIS modelled road traffic noise exposure (L(den), maximum within a 50 m buffer) from the noise map of the city of Munich was available for all families. GIS-based calculated distance to the closest major road (≥10,000 vehicles per day) and questionnaire based-information about family income, parental education and the type of the street of residence were explored for their potential influence. An ordered logit regression model was applied. The noise levels (L(den)) and the reported noise annoyance were compared with an established exposure-response function. the correlation between noise annoyance and noise exposure (L(den)) was fair (Spearman correlation r(s) = 0.37). The distance to a major road and the type of street were strong predictors for the noise annoyance. The annoyance modelled by the established exposure-response function and that estimated by the ordered logit model were moderately associated (Pearson's correlation r(p) = 0.50). road traffic noise annoyance was associated with GIS modelled neighbouring road traffic noise exposure (L(den)). The distance to a major road and the type of street were additional explanatory factors of the noise annoyance appraisal.

  16. ''1/f noise'' in music: Music from 1/f noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voss, R.F.; Clarke, J.

    1978-01-01

    The spectral density of fluctuations in the audio power of many musical selections and of English speech varies approximately as 1/f (f is the frequency) down to a frequency of 5 x 10/sup -4/ Hz. This result implies that the audio-power fluctuations are correlated over all times in the same manner as ''1/f noise'' in electronic components. The frequency fluctuations of music also have a 1/f spectral density at frequencies down to the inverse of the length of the piece of music. The frequency fluctuations of English speech have a quite different behavior, with a single characteristic time of about 0.1 s, the average length of a syllable. The observations on music suggest that 1/f noise is a good choice for stochastic composition. Compositions in which the frequency and duration of each note were determined by 1/f noise sources sounded pleasing. Those generated by white-noise sources sounded too random, while those generated by 1/f/sup 2/ noise sounded too correlated.

  17. Numerical modeling of wind turbine aerodynamic noise in the time domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seunghoon; Lee, Seungmin; Lee, Soogab

    2013-02-01

    Aerodynamic noise from a wind turbine is numerically modeled in the time domain. An analytic trailing edge noise model is used to determine the unsteady pressure on the blade surface. The far-field noise due to the unsteady pressure is calculated using the acoustic analogy theory. By using a strip theory approach, the two-dimensional noise model is applied to rotating wind turbine blades. The numerical results indicate that, although the operating and atmospheric conditions are identical, the acoustical characteristics of wind turbine noise can be quite different with respect to the distance and direction from the wind turbine.

  18. Low noise constant current source for bias dependent noise measurements

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Talukdar, D.; Bose, Suvendu; Bardhan, K. K. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India); Chakraborty, R. K. [Bidhannagar College, EB - 2, Bidhannagar, Kolkata 700064 (India)

    2011-01-15

    A low noise constant current source used for measuring the 1/f noise in disordered systems in ohmic as well as nonohmic regime is described. The source can supply low noise constant current starting from as low as 1 {mu}A to a few tens of milliampere with a high voltage compliance limit of around 20 V. The constant current source has several stages, which can work in a standalone manner or together to supply the desired value of load current. The noise contributed by the current source is very low in the entire current range. The fabrication of a low noise voltage preamplifier modified for bias dependent noise measurements and based on the existing design available in the MAT04 data sheet is also described.

  19. When noise becomes voice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veerasawmy, Rune; McCarthy, John

    2014-01-01

    space in competition with their rivals. The more noise and movement they make, the more screen real estate they gain. BannerBattle therefore enabled us to explore the emergence of imitative and at times inventive behavior in enriched crowd experience, by augmenting and supporting spectator performance...... are distinctive because of the spontaneous, uninhibited behavior exhibited. In crowds, extreme soci- ality and the experience of performing identity in public emerge spontaneously. By bridging crowd theory and pragmatics of experience, we establish an understanding of crowd experience as a distinct sociality...

  20. Noise hazard course

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A 1/2 day course to promote awareness of the risks incurred by noise at the work place and recommendations to settle them. Next course Wednesday 24th September 2003. Costs are covered by TIS, Jacques Coillard from Bureau Véritas will present the course. Registration is obligatory. For more information and to enrol on this course go to the safety section of Human Resources Training and Development web pages, or contact : Ana-Paula Bernardes/TIS-GS (71385) or e-mail Ana-Paula.Bernardes@cern.ch

  1. Noise hazard course

    CERN Multimedia

    2003-01-01

    A 1/2 day course to promote awareness of the risks incurred by noise at the work place and recommendations to settle them. Next course Wednesday 24th September 2003. Costs are covered by TIS, Jacques Coillard from Bureau Véritas will present the course. Registration is obligatory. For more information and to enrol on this course go to the safety section of Human Resources Training and Development web pages, or contact: Ana-Paula Bernardes/TIS-GS (71385) or e-mail Ana-Paula.Bernardes@cern.ch

  2. Consistent modelling of wind turbine noise propagation from source to receiver

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barlas, Emre; Zhu, Wei Jun; Shen, Wen Zhong

    2017-01-01

    The unsteady nature of wind turbine noise is a major reason for annoyance. The variation of far-field sound pressure levels is not only caused by the continuous change in wind turbine noise source levels but also by the unsteady flow field and the ground characteristics between the turbine...... generation and propagation. The local blade relative velocity, angle of attack, and turbulence characteristics are input to the sound generation model. Time-dependent blade locations and the velocity between the noise source and receiver are considered within a quasi-3D propagation model. Long-range noise...

  3. Wind turbines. Unsteady aerodynamics and inflow noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Riget Broe, B.

    2009-12-15

    Aerodynamical noise from wind turbines due to atmospheric turbulence has the highest emphasis in semi-empirical models. However it is an open question whether inflow noise has a high emphasis. This illustrates the need to investigate and improve the semi-empirical model for noise due to atmospheric turbulence. Three different aerodynamical models are investigated in order to estimate the lift fluctuations due to unsteady aerodynamics. Two of these models are investigated to find the unsteady lift distribution or pressure difference as function of chordwise position on the aerofoil. An acoustic model is investigated using a model for the lift distribution as input. The two models for lift distribution are used in the acoustic model. One of the models for lift distribution is for completely anisotropic turbulence and the other for perfectly isotropic turbulence, and so is also the corresponding models for the lift fluctuations derived from the models for lift distribution. The models for lift distribution and lift are compared with pressure data which are obtained by microphones placed flush with the surface of an aerofoil. The pressure data are from two experiments in a wind tunnel, one experiment with a NACA0015 profile and a second with a NACA63415 profile. The turbulence is measured by a triple wired hotwire instrument in the experiment with a NACA0015 profile. Comparison of the aerodynamical models with data shows that the models capture the general characteristics of the measurements, but the data are hampered by background noise from the fan propellers in the wind tunnel. The measurements are in between the completely anisotropic turbulent model and the perfectly isotropic turbulent model. This indicates that the models capture the aerodynamics well. Thus the measurements suggest that the noise due to atmospheric turbulence can be described and modeled by the two models for lift distribution. It was not possible to test the acoustical model by the measurements

  4. Magnetic flux noise in copper oxide superconductors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, M.J.

    1991-11-01

    Magnetic flux noise and flux creep in thin films and single crystals of YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x}, Bi{sub 2}Sr{sub 2}CaCu{sub 2}O{sub 8+x}, Tl{sub 2}Ca{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x}, and TlCa{sub 2}Ba{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub x} are measured with a superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). The noise power spectrum generally scales as 1/f (f is frequency) from 1 Hz to 1 kHz, increases with temperature, and decreases in higher-quality films. It is proportional to the magnetic field B in which the sample is cooled, at least in the range 0.1 mT < B < 3 mT. A model of thermally activated vortex motion is developed which explains the dependence of the noise on frequency, temperature, current, and applied magnetic field. The pinning potential is idealized as an ensemble of double wells, each with a different activation energy separating the two states. From the noise measurements, this model yields the distribution of pinning energies in the samples, the vortex hopping distance, the number density of mobile vortices, and the restoring force on a vortex at a typical pinning site. The distribution of pinning energies in YBa{sub 2}Cu{sub 3}O{sub 7-x} shows a broad peak below 0.1 eV. The small ambient magnetic field, and the detection of noise even in the absence of a driving force, insure that the measured pinning energies are characteristic of isolated vortices near thermal equilibrium. The observed vortex density in fields much less than 0.1 mT is too large to be explained by the ambient field, suggesting a mechanism intrinsic to the sample which produces trapped vortices.

  5. Noise and mental performance: personality attributes and noise sensitivity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Belojevic, G; Jakovljevic, B; Slepcevic, V

    2003-01-01

    .... In numerous experiments introverts have showed higher sensitivity to noise during mental performance compared to extroverts, while extroverts often cope with a boring task even by requesting short...

  6. Noise and Mental Performance: Personality Attributes and Noise Sensitivity

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Belojevic G; Jakovljevic B; Slepcevic V

    2003-01-01

    .... In numerous experiments introverts have showed higher sensitivity to noise during mental performance compared to extroverts, while extroverts often cope with a boring task even by requesting short...

  7. Accurate estimation of camera shot noise in the real-time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheremkhin, Pavel A.; Evtikhiev, Nikolay N.; Krasnov, Vitaly V.; Rodin, Vladislav G.; Starikov, Rostislav S.

    2017-10-01

    Nowadays digital cameras are essential parts of various technological processes and daily tasks. They are widely used in optics and photonics, astronomy, biology and other various fields of science and technology such as control systems and video-surveillance monitoring. One of the main information limitations of photo- and videocameras are noises of photosensor pixels. Camera's photosensor noise can be divided into random and pattern components. Temporal noise includes random noise component while spatial noise includes pattern noise component. Temporal noise can be divided into signal-dependent shot noise and signal-nondependent dark temporal noise. For measurement of camera noise characteristics, the most widely used methods are standards (for example, EMVA Standard 1288). It allows precise shot and dark temporal noise measurement but difficult in implementation and time-consuming. Earlier we proposed method for measurement of temporal noise of photo- and videocameras. It is based on the automatic segmentation of nonuniform targets (ASNT). Only two frames are sufficient for noise measurement with the modified method. In this paper, we registered frames and estimated shot and dark temporal noises of cameras consistently in the real-time. The modified ASNT method is used. Estimation was performed for the cameras: consumer photocamera Canon EOS 400D (CMOS, 10.1 MP, 12 bit ADC), scientific camera MegaPlus II ES11000 (CCD, 10.7 MP, 12 bit ADC), industrial camera PixeLink PL-B781F (CMOS, 6.6 MP, 10 bit ADC) and video-surveillance camera Watec LCL-902C (CCD, 0.47 MP, external 8 bit ADC). Experimental dependencies of temporal noise on signal value are in good agreement with fitted curves based on a Poisson distribution excluding areas near saturation. Time of registering and processing of frames used for temporal noise estimation was measured. Using standard computer, frames were registered and processed during a fraction of second to several seconds only. Also the

  8. Modeling aircraft noise induced sleep disturbance

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Sarah M.

    One of the primary impacts of aircraft noise on a community is its disruption of sleep. Aircraft noise increases the time to fall asleep, the number of awakenings, and decreases the amount of rapid eye movement and slow wave sleep. Understanding these changes in sleep may be important as they could increase the risk for developing next-day effects such as sleepiness and reduced performance and long-term health effects such as cardiovascular disease. There are models that have been developed to predict the effect of aircraft noise on sleep. However, most of these models only predict the percentage of the population that is awakened. Markov and nonlinear dynamic models have been developed to predict an individual's sleep structure during the night. However, both of these models have limitations. The Markov model only accounts for whether an aircraft event occurred not the noise level or other sound characteristics of the event that may affect the degree of disturbance. The nonlinear dynamic models were developed to describe normal sleep regulation and do not have a noise effects component. In addition, the nonlinear dynamic models have slow dynamics which make it difficult to predict short duration awakenings which occur both spontaneously and as a result of nighttime noise exposure. The purpose of this research was to examine these sleep structure models to determine how they could be altered to predict the effect of aircraft noise on sleep. Different approaches for adding a noise level dependence to the Markov Model was explored and the modified model was validated by comparing predictions to behavioral awakening data. In order to determine how to add faster dynamics to the nonlinear dynamic sleep models it was necessary to have a more detailed sleep stage classification than was available from visual scoring of sleep data. An automatic sleep stage classification algorithm was developed which extracts different features of polysomnography data including the

  9. Expected Seismicity and the Seismic Noise Environment of Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panning, Mark P.; Stähler, Simon C.; Huang, Hsin-Hua; Vance, Steven D.; Kedar, Sharon; Tsai, Victor C.; Pike, William T.; Lorenz, Ralph D.

    2018-01-01

    Seismic data will be a vital geophysical constraint on internal structure of Europa if we land instruments on the surface. Quantifying expected seismic activity on Europa both in terms of large, recognizable signals and ambient background noise is important for understanding dynamics of the moon, as well as interpretation of potential future data. Seismic energy sources will likely include cracking in the ice shell and turbulent motion in the oceans. We define a range of models of seismic activity in Europa's ice shell by assuming each model follows a Gutenberg-Richter relationship with varying parameters. A range of cumulative seismic moment release between 1016 and 1018 Nm/yr is defined by scaling tidal dissipation energy to tectonic events on the Earth's moon. Random catalogs are generated and used to create synthetic continuous noise records through numerical wave propagation in thermodynamically self-consistent models of the interior structure of Europa. Spectral characteristics of the noise are calculated by determining probabilistic power spectral densities of the synthetic records. While the range of seismicity models predicts noise levels that vary by 80 dB, we show that most noise estimates are below the self-noise floor of high-frequency geophones but may be recorded by more sensitive instruments. The largest expected signals exceed background noise by ˜50 dB. Noise records may allow for constraints on interior structure through autocorrelation. Models of seismic noise generated by pressure variations at the base of the ice shell due to turbulent motions in the subsurface ocean may also generate observable seismic noise.

  10. New comprehensive standard seismic noise models and 3D seismic noise variation for Morocco territory, North Africa, obtained using seismic broadband stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Fellah, Younes; El-Aal, Abd El-Aziz Khairy Abd; Harnafi, Mimoun; Villaseñor, Antonio

    2017-05-01

    In the current work, we constructed new comprehensive standard seismic noise models and 3D temporal-spatial seismic noise level cubes for Morocco in north-west Africa to be used for seismological and engineering purposes. Indeed, the original global standard seismic noise models published by Peterson (1993) and their following updates by Astiz and Creager (1995), Ekström (2001) and Berger et al. (2003) had no contributing seismic stations deployed in North Africa. Consequently, this preliminary study was conducted to shed light on seismic noise levels specific to north-west Africa. For this purpose, 23 broadband seismic stations recently installed in different structural domains throughout Morocco are used to study the nature and characteristics of seismic noise and to create seismic noise models for Morocco. Continuous data recorded during 2009, 2010 and 2011 were processed and analysed to construct these new noise models and 3D noise levels from all stations. We compared the Peterson new high-noise model (NHNM) and low-noise model (NLNM) with the Moroccan high-noise model (MHNM) and low-noise model (MLNM). These new noise models are comparable to the United States Geological Survey (USGS) models in the short period band; however, in the period range 1.2 s to 1000 s for MLNM and 10 s to 1000 s for MHNM display significant variations. This variation is attributed to differences in the nature of seismic noise sources that dominate Morocco in these period bands. The results of this study have a new perception about permanent seismic noise models for this spectacular region and can be considered a significant contribution because it supplements the Peterson models and can also be used to site future permanent seismic stations in Morocco.

  11. A predictive model of the association between gene polymorphism and the risk of noise-induced hearing loss caused by gunfire noise

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben-Chih Yuan

    2012-01-01

    Conclusion: In this study, we found that although loud noise could usually result in hearing damage, the clinical characteristics of hearing loss were irrelevant to gunfire noise. The gene polymorphisms provide predictors for us to evaluate the risk of NIHL prior to gunshot training.

  12. Measurement and analysis of self-noise in hybrid-driven underwater gliders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LIU Lu

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Hybrid-driven Underwater Glider (HUG is a new type of submersible vehicle which combines the functions of traditional Autonomous Underwater Vehicles(AUVand Autonomous Underwater Gliders(AUG. In order to study its noise source distribution and basic self-noise characteristics, a self-noise acquisition system based on the HUG was designed and developed, and a noise analysis test carried out in a free-field pool. In August 2016, the sea trial of the Petrel II glider was conducted in the South China Sea, with observation data at a depth range of 1 000 m as the research object. The self-noise data of the glider platform under different working conditions was obtained through the step-by-step operation method. The experimental analysis and results show that the self-noise acquisition system is stable. The contribution of mechanical noise to self-noise is greatest when the glider works in the gliding mode, while the self-noise band above 500 Hz is closely related to the work of the buoyancy adjustment unit, and peaks at 1 kHz. According to the analysis of the basic characteristics of self-noise, this provides some guidance for the implementation of vibration and noise reduction.

  13. Noise-induced hearing loss

    OpenAIRE

    Mariola Sliwinska-Kowalska; Adrian Davis

    2012-01-01

    Noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) still remains a problem in developed countries, despite reduced occupational noise exposure, strict standards for hearing protection and extensive public health awareness campaigns. Therefore NIHL continues to be the focus of noise research activities. This paper summarizes progress achieved recently in our knowledge of NIHL. It includes papers published between the years 2008-2011 (in English), which were identified by a literature search of accessible medic...

  14. Assessment of Traffic Noise Impacts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rich, Jeppe Husted; Nielsen, Otto Anker

    2004-01-01

    the true social benefit of infrastructure plans. The paper presents a noise assessment model for the Copenhagen region, which brings together GIS technology and non-linear hedonic regression models to reveal the implicit costs of traffic noise measured as the marginal percentage loss in property values...... with respect to the decibel traffic noise. The model distinguishes between houses and apartments and shows that the ability to include refined accessibility variables have significant impact on estimated prices....

  15. High-Resolution Dual-Comb Spectroscopy with Ultra-Low Noise Frequency Combs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hänsel, Wolfgang; Giunta, Michele; Beha, Katja; Perry, Adam J.; Holzwarth, R.

    2017-06-01

    Dual-comb spectroscopy is a powerful tool for fast broad-band spectroscopy due to the parallel interrogation of thousands of spectral lines. Here we report on the spectroscopic analysis of acetylene vapor in a pressurized gas cell using two ultra-low noise frequency combs with a repetition rate around 250 MHz. Optical referencing to a high-finesse cavity yields a sub-Hertz stability of all individual comb lines (including the virtual comb lines between 0 Hz and the carrier) and permits one to pick a small difference of repetition rate for the two frequency combs on the order of 300 Hz, thus representing an optical spectrum of 100 THz (˜3300 \\wn) within half the free spectral range (125 MHz). The transmission signal is derived straight from a photodetector and recorded with a high-resolution spectrum analyzer or digitized with a computer-controlled AD converter. The figure to the right shows a schematic of the experimental setup which is all fiber-coupled with polarization-maintaining fiber except for the spectroscopic cell. The graph on the lower right reveals a portion of the recorded radio-frequency spectrum which has been scaled to the optical domain. The location of the measured absorption coincides well with data taken from the HITRAN data base. Due to the intrinsic linewidth of all contributing comb lines, each sampling point in the transmission graph corresponds to the probing at an optical frequency with sub-Hertz resolution. This resolution is maintained in coherent wavelength conversion processes such as difference-frequency generation (DFG), sum-frequency generation (SFG) or non-linear broadening (self-phase modulation), and is therefore easily transferred to a wide spectral range from the mid infrared up to the visible spectrum.

  16. Impulse Detectors for Noised Sequences

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. Lukac

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available This paper is focused on a problem of impulse detection in thedynamic image environments corrupted by impulse noise. Using a proposedarchitecture that includes an impulse detector and the median filter,the effective methods can be designed. Thus, the image points areclassified into two classes such as a class of noise free samples and aclass of noised image points. In the case of impulse detection theestimate is performed by a median filter whereas a noise free sample ispassed on the output without the change i.e. system works as anidentity filter.

  17. High level white noise generator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borkowski, Casimer J.; Blalock, Theron V.

    1979-01-01

    A wide band, stable, random noise source with a high and well-defined output power spectral density is provided which may be used for accurate calibration of Johnson Noise Power Thermometers (JNPT) and other applications requiring a stable, wide band, well-defined noise power spectral density. The noise source is based on the fact that the open-circuit thermal noise voltage of a feedback resistor, connecting the output to the input of a special inverting amplifier, is available at the amplifier output from an equivalent low output impedance caused by the feedback mechanism. The noise power spectral density level at the noise source output is equivalent to the density of the open-circuit thermal noise or a 100 ohm resistor at a temperature of approximately 64,000 Kelvins. The noise source has an output power spectral density that is flat to within 0.1% (0.0043 db) in the frequency range of from 1 KHz to 100 KHz which brackets typical passbands of the signal-processing channels of JNPT's. Two embodiments, one of higher accuracy that is suitable for use as a standards instrument and another that is particularly adapted for ambient temperature operation, are illustrated in this application.

  18. Noise management of industrial parks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senden, Virgini [HFP Acoustical Consultants Corp (Canada)], email: virgini.senden@hfpacoustical.com

    2011-07-01

    Because of industrial development, more noise-producing facilities are being built, with negative noise impacts on local residents' lives and comfort. The question raised by this paper is which way would be the best to ensure both acceptable noise impact, and efficient industrial facilities operations? The author presents two approaches: the {sup r}egional noise management plan{sup ,} adopted in Alberta, leaves the different industries present in the region in charge of noise emissions, working both together and individually to maintain acceptable noise pollution levels. The zoned industrial parks approach, in effect in the Netherlands, where industrial parks are situated within a noise zone, outside of which noise impact should be reduced to levels that do not disturb residents. Both approaches are effective, but demand a great deal of effort to achieve noise efficiency. The Alberta approach, thanks to its specificity and the collaborative work of all actors involved, facilitates continuous improvement while the Dutch approach is more rigid, but better suited to industry realities and the space that is available in the Netherlands.

  19. Optical noise and temporal coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chavel, P.

    1980-08-01

    Previous articles have been devoted to the study of optical noise as a function of spatial coherence. The present one completes this study by considering temporal coherence. Noise arising from defects in the pupil plane and affecting the high spatial frequencies of an image is notably reduced by white-light illumination. Temporal coherence has little effect on noise arising from defects in the object plane. However, impulse noise due to small isolated defects is reduced in size. Physical arguments are presented to explain these phenomena and a mathematical study of partially coherent imaging in the presence of random defects is given.

  20. Noise-induced hearing loss

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catlin, F.I.

    1986-03-01

    Hearing loss affects 30 million people in the United States; of these, 21 million are over the age of 65 years. This disorder may have several causes: heredity, noise, aging, and disease. Hearing loss from noise has been recognized for centuries but was generally ignored until some time after the Industrial Revolution. Hearing loss from occupational exposure to hazardous noise was identified as a compensable disability by the United States courts in 1948 to 1959. Development of noisy jet engines and supersonic aircraft created additional claims for personal and property damage in the 1950s and 1960s. These conditions led to legislation for noise control in the form of the Occupational Safety and Health Act of 1970 and the Noise Control Act of 1972. Protection of the noise-exposed employee was also an objective of the Hearing Conservation Act of 1971. Subsequent studies have confirmed the benefits of periodic hearing tests for workers exposed to hazardous noise and of otologic evaluation as part of the hearing conservation process. Research studies in laboratory animals, using scanning electron microscopical techniques, have demonstrated that damage to the inner ear and organ of hearing can occur even though subjective (conditioned) response to sound stimuli remains unaffected. Some investigators have employed an epidemiologic approach to identify risk factors and to develop profiles to susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss. The need for joint involvement of workers and employers in the reduction and control of occupational noise hazards is evident. 19 references.

  1. Noise Pollution and Health Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geravandi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background Noise pollution is of particular importance due to the physical and psychological effects on humans. Noise is a stressor that affects the autonomic nervous system and the endocrine system. Noise is also a threat to marine and terrestrial ecosystems. Health risks from noise are correlated with road traffic. In other words, noise health effects are the health consequences of elevated sound levels. Objectives This study aims to determine the effect of noise pollution (near roadways on health issues in Ahvaz, Iran. Materials and Methods In this cross-sectional study, equivalent sound pressure level were measured by sound level meters TES-1353 in 75 locations around 4 roadways, which had a high load of traffic in Ahvaz City during day time. During the study, 820 measurements were recorded at measuring stations, for 7 days per week with 1-hour interval between each measurement. Statistical analysis was carried out by SPSS software. Results According to the research findings, the equivalent sound pressure levels in all stations were 76.28 ± 3.12 dB (Mean ± SD. According to sound measurements and the survey questionnaire, noise pollution is higher than EPA (US Environmental Protection Agency and Iran standard level. Based on result of this study the worst noise health effects were the nervousness and sleep quality during 2012. Conclusions According to the results of this study, with increasing load of traffic, there is an increasing need for proper consideration plans to control noise pollution and prevent its effects.

  2. Road traffic noise and stroke

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Mette; Hvidberg, Martin; Andersen, Zorana J

    2011-01-01

    Epidemiological studies suggest that long-term exposure to road traffic noise increases the risk of cardiovascular disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between exposure to road traffic noise and risk for stroke, which has not been studied before.......Epidemiological studies suggest that long-term exposure to road traffic noise increases the risk of cardiovascular disorders. The aim of this study was to investigate the relation between exposure to road traffic noise and risk for stroke, which has not been studied before....

  3. Noise Control for a Moving Evaluation Point Using Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Toshiki; Shiraishi, Toshihiko

    2016-09-01

    This paper describes the noise control for a moving evaluation point using neural networks by making the best use of its learning ability. Noise control is a technology which is effective on low-frequency noise. Based on the principle of superposition, a primary sound wave can be cancelled at an evaluation point by emitting a secondary opposite sound wave. To obtain good control performance, it is important to precisely identify the characteristics of all the sound paths. One of the most popular algorithms of noise control is filtered-x LMS algorithm. This algorithm can deliver a good result while all the sound paths do not change. However, the control system becomes uncontrollable while the evaluation point is moving. To solve the problem, the characteristics of all the paths are must be identified at all time. In this paper, we applied neural networks with the learning ability to the noise control system to follow the time-varying paths and verified its control performance by numerical simulations. Then, dropout technique for the networks is also applied. Dropout is a technique that prevent the network from overfitting and enables better control performance. By applying dropout for noise control, it prevents the system from diverging.

  4. Scaling model for a speed-dependent vehicle noise spectrum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni Zambon

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Considering the well-known features of the noise emitted by moving sources, a number of vehicle characteristics such as speed, unladen mass, engine size, year of registration, power and fuel were recorded in a dedicated monitoring campaign performed in three different places, each characterized by different number of lanes and the presence of nearby reflective surfaces. A full database of 144 vehicles (cars was used to identify statistically relevant features. In order to compare the vehicle transit noise in different environmental condition, all 1/3-octave band spectra were normalized and analysed. Unsupervised clustering algorithms were employed to group together spectrum levels with similar profiles. Our results corroborate the well-known fact that speed is the most relevant characteristic to discriminate between different vehicle noise spectrum. In keeping with this fact, we present a new approach to predict analytically noise spectra for a given vehicle speed. A set of speed-dependent analytical functions are suggested in order to fit the normalized average spectrum profile at different speeds. This approach can be useful for predicting vehicle speed based purely on its noise spectrum pattern. The present work is complementary to the accurate analysis of noise sources based on the beamforming technique.

  5. Physiological, Psychological, and Social Effects of Noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kryter, K. D.

    1984-01-01

    The physiological, and behavioral effects of noise on man are investigated. Basic parameters such as definitions of noise, measuring techniques of noise, and the physiology of the ear are presented prior to the development of topics on hearing loss, speech communication in noise, social effects of noise, and the health effects of noise pollution. Recommendations for the assessment and subsequent control of noise is included.

  6. Noise in the passenger cars of high-speed trains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Joo Young; Cha, Yongwon; Jeon, Jin Yong

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the effects of both room acoustic conditions and spectral characteristics of noises on acoustic discomfort in a high-speed train's passenger car. Measurement of interior noises in a high-speed train was performed when the train was operating at speeds of 100 km/h and 300 km/h. Acoustic discomfort caused by interior noises was evaluated by paired comparison methods based on the variation of reverberation time (RT) in a passenger car and the spectral differences in interior noises. The effect of RT on acoustic discomfort was not significant, whereas acoustic discomfort significantly varied depending on spectral differences in noise. Acoustic discomfort increased with increment of the sound pressure level (SPL) ratio at high frequencies, and variation in high-frequency noise components were described using sharpness. Just noticeable differences of SPL with low- and high-frequency components were determined to be 3.7 and 2.9 dB, respectively. This indicates that subjects were more sensitive to differences in SPLs at the high-frequency range than differences at the low-frequency range. These results support that, for interior noises, reduction in SPLs at high frequencies would significantly contribute to improved acoustic quality in passenger cars of high-speed trains.

  7. Assessment of rural soundscapes with high-speed train noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Pyoung Jik; Hong, Joo Young; Jeon, Jin Yong

    2014-06-01

    In the present study, rural soundscapes with high-speed train noise were assessed through laboratory experiments. A total of ten sites with varying landscape metrics were chosen for audio-visual recording. The acoustical characteristics of the high-speed train noise were analyzed using various noise level indices. Landscape metrics such as the percentage of natural features (NF) and Shannon's diversity index (SHDI) were adopted to evaluate the landscape features of the ten sites. Laboratory experiments were then performed with 20 well-trained listeners to investigate the perception of high-speed train noise in rural areas. The experiments consisted of three parts: 1) visual-only condition, 2) audio-only condition, and 3) combined audio-visual condition. The results showed that subjects' preference for visual images was significantly related to NF, the number of land types, and the A-weighted equivalent sound pressure level (LAeq). In addition, the visual images significantly influenced the noise annoyance, and LAeq and NF were the dominant factors affecting the annoyance from high-speed train noise in the combined audio-visual condition. In addition, Zwicker's loudness (N) was highly correlated with the annoyance from high-speed train noise in both the audio-only and audio-visual conditions. © 2013.

  8. Fractal snapshot components in chaos induced by strong noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bódai, Tamás; Károlyi, György; Tél, Tamás

    2011-04-01

    In systems exhibiting transient chaos in coexistence with periodic attractors, the inclusion of weak noise might give rise to noise-induced chaotic attractors. When the noise amplitude exceeds a critical value, an extended attractor appears along the fractal unstable manifold of the underlying nonattracting chaotic set. A further increase of noise leads to a fuzzy nonfractal pattern. By means of the concept of snapshot attractors and random maps, we point out that the fuzzy pattern can be decomposed into well-defined fractal components, the snapshot attractors belonging to a given realization of the noise and generated by following an ensemble of noisy trajectories. The pattern of the snapshot attractor and its characteristic numbers, such as the finite time Lyapunov exponents and numerically evaluated fractal dimensions, change continuously in time. We find that this temporal fluctuation is a robust property of the system which hardly changes with increasing ensemble size. The validity of the Kaplan-Yorke formula is also investigated. A superposition of about 100 snapshot attractors provides a good approximant to the fuzzy noise-induced attractor at the same noise strength.

  9. STUDY ON DE-NOISING METHODS FOR SOIL COMPRESSIVE STRESS SIGNAL DURING VIBRATION COMPACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingzhe Zhang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The compressive stress signal of soil during vibration compaction is an unstable and transient saltation signal accompanied by broadband noise, and the spectra of the signal and noise always overlap. To extract the ideal original signal from noisy data, this paper studies several signal de-noising methods such as low-pass filtering, multi-resolution wavelet transform, spectrum subtraction and independent component analysis. Experiments show that the traditional low-pass filter is only applicable when the spectra of the signal and noise can be separated in the frequency domain. The multi-resolution wavelet transform can decompose the signal into different frequency bands and remove the noise efficiently by extracting useful the frequency band of the signal, but this method is not reliable when the signal to noise ratio (SNR is low. Spectrum subtraction can remove strong background noise with stationary statistical characteristics even if the noise level is high and the spectrum of the signal overlaps with that of the noise. Independent component analysis can extract weak signals which are combined with heavy noise and can separate the noise from signal effectively when the independent channel hypothesis holds. These de-noising methods are of great importance for further analysing vibration signals in engineering.

  10. Suppression of the Landau-Zener transition probability by weak classical noise

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malla, Rajesh K.; Mishchenko, E. G.; Raikh, M. E.

    2017-08-01

    When the drive, which causes the level crossing in a qubit, is slow, the probability PL Z of the Landau-Zener transition is close to 1. In this regime, which is most promising for applications, the noise due to the coupling to the environment reduces the average PL Z. At the same time, the survival probability, 1 -PL Z , which is exponentially small for a slow drive, can be completely dominated by noise-induced correction. Our main message is that the effect of weak classical noise can be captured analytically by treating it as a perturbation in the Schrödinger equation. This allows us to study the dependence of the noise-induced correction to PL Z on the correlation time of the noise. As this correlation time exceeds the bare Landau-Zener transition time, the effect of noise becomes negligible. On the physical level, the mechanism of enhancement of the survival probability can be viewed as an absorption of the "noise quanta" across the gap. With characteristic energy of the quantum governed by the noise spectrum, the slower the noise is, the lower the number of quanta for which absorption is allowed energetically is. We consider two conventional realizations of noise: Gaussian noise and telegraph noise.

  11. Fish Hatchery Noise Levels and Noise Reduction Techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnes, M E; Hewitt, C R; Parker, T M

    2015-07-01

    This study examined occupational noise within two rearing facilities at a production fish hatchery and evaluated two simple noise reduction techniques. Ambient noise levels in the hatchery tank room ranged from 50 dB in the absence of flowing water to over 73 dB when water was flowing to all 35 tanks under typical hatchery operating procedures. Covering the open standpipes did not significantly reduce noise levels. However, placing partial tank covers over the top of the tanks above the water inlet significantly reduced noise levels, both with and without the use of standpipe covers. Noise levels in the salmon building rose from 43.2 dB without any flowing water to 77.5 dB with water flowing to all six in-ground tanks. Significant noise reductions were observed when the tanks were completely covered or with standpipe covers. Decibel levels showed the greatest reduction when the tanks and standpipes were both covered. These results indicate that occupational noise levels in aquaculture environments may be reduced through the use of simple and relatively inexpensive techniques.

  12. Wideband Low Noise Amplifiers Exploiting Thermal Noise Cancellation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruccoleri, F.; Klumperink, Eric A.M.; Nauta, Bram

    2005-01-01

    Low Noise Amplifiers (LNAs) are commonly used to amplify signals that are too weak for direct processing for example in radio or cable receivers. Traditionally, low noise amplifiers are implemented via tuned amplifiers, exploiting inductors and capacitors in resonating LC-circuits. This can render

  13. Spatially adapted total variation model to remove multiplicative noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dai-Qiang; Cheng, Li-Zhi

    2012-04-01

    Multiplicative noise removal based on total variation (TV) regularization has been widely researched in image science. In this paper, inspired by the spatially adapted methods for denoising Gaussian noise, we develop a variational model, which combines the TV regularizer with local constraints. It is also related to a TV model with spatially adapted regularization parameters. The automated selection of the regularization parameters is based on the local statistical characteristics of some random variable. The corresponding subproblem can be efficiently solved by the augmented Lagrangian method. Numerical examples demonstrate that the proposed algorithm is able to preserve small image details, whereas the noise in the homogeneous regions is sufficiently removed. As a consequence, our method yields better denoised results than those of the current state-of-the-art methods with respect to the signal-to-noise-ratio values.

  14. Low frequency noise in resonant Josephson soliton oscillators

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Jørn Bindslev; Holst, T.; Wellstood, Frederick C.

    1991-01-01

    to the Nyquist voltage noise in a resistance equal to the dynamic resistance RD of the current-voltage characteristic of the bias point. In contrast, measurements of the linewidth of the microwave radiation from the same JTL showed that the spectral density of the underlying noise voltage scaled as R D2/RS where......The noise in the resonant soliton mode of long and narrow Josephson tunnel junctions (Josephson transmission lines or JTLs) have been measured in the frequency range from 0.1 Hz to 25 kHz by means of a DC SQUID. The measured white noise was found, to within a factor of two, to be equal...... RS is the static resistance. The origin of the different behavior is not known...

  15. A review and tutorial discussion of noise and signal-to-noise ratios in analytical spectrometry—III. Multiplicative noises

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Alkemade, C.T.J.; Snelleman, W.; Boutilier, G.D.; Winefordner, J.D.

    1980-01-01

    In this review, signal-to-noise ratios are discussed in a tutorial fashion for the case of multiplicative noise. Multiplicative noise is introduced simultaneously with the analyte signal and is therefore much more difficult to reduce than additive noise. The sources of noise, the mathematical

  16. Modeling quantum and structure noise of phosphors used in medical X-ray imaging detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalivas, N.; Costaridou, L.; Kandarakis, I.; Cavouras, D.; Nomicos, C. D.; Panayiotakis, G.

    2002-09-01

    The noise properties of granular phosphors used in X-ray imaging detectors are studied in terms of a noise transfer function, NTF. This study is performed in high-exposure conditions where the contribution of structure noise to total screen noise is considerable. An analytical model, based on the cascaded linear systems methodology presented in the literature, is developed. This model takes into account the quantum noise and structure noise. Furthermore, it considers the effect of the K X-rays reabsorption on the phosphor material and the effect of screen thickness on the NTF. The model was validated against experimental results obtained by a set of Zn 2SiO 4:Mn phosphor screens prepared by sedimentation. The model may be used to evaluate the effect of screen thickness and the effect of the characteristic X-rays on NTF in high-exposure conditions where structure noise is considerable.

  17. Mittag-Leffler noise induced stochastic resonance in a generalized Langevin equation with random inherent frequency

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Guitian; Guo, Dali; Tian, Yan; Li, Tiejun; Luo, Maokang

    2017-10-01

    The generalized stochastic resonance (GSR) and the bona fide stochastic resonance (SR) in a generalized Langevin equation driven by a periodic signal, multiplicative noise and Mittag-Leffler noise are extensively investigated. The expression of the frequency spectrum of the Mittag-Leffler noise is studied. Using the Shapiro-Loginov formula and Laplace transformation technique, the exact expressions of the output amplitude gain and the signal-to-noise ratio are obtained. The simulation results turn out that the output amplitude gain and the signal-to-noise ratio are non-monotonic functions of the characteristics of noise parameters and system parameters. Especially, the influence of the memory exponent and memory time of Mittag-Leffler noise could induce the GSR phenomenon. The influence of the driving frequency could induce the bona fide stochastic resonance. It is found that the system with fractional memory exponent could be more easily induced SR phenomenon than the system with integer memory exponent.

  18. An inexpensive sensor for noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallett, Laura; Tatum, Marcus; Thomas, Geb; Sousan, Sinan; Koehler, Kirsten; Peters, Thomas

    2018-02-08

    Noise is a pervasive workplace hazard that varies spatially and temporally. The cost of direct-reading instruments for noise hampers their use in a network. The objectives for this work were to (1) develop an inexpensive noise sensor (noise sensors for use in an inexpensive sensor network. The inexpensive noise sensor consists of an electret condenser microphone, an amplifier circuit, and a microcontroller with a small form factor (28 mm by 47 mm by 9 mm) than can be operated as a stand-alone unit. Laboratory tests were conducted to evaluate 50 of the new sensors at 5 sound levels: (1) ambient sound in a quiet office; (2) a pink noise test signal from 65 to 85 dBA in 10 dBA increments; and (3) 94 dBA using a SLM calibrator. Ninety-four percent of the noise sensors (n = 46) were within ± 2 dBA of the SLM for sound levels from 65 dBA to 94 dBA. As sound level increased, bias decreased, ranging from 18.3% in the quiet office to 0.48% at 94 dBA. Overall bias of the sensors was 0.83% across the 75 dBA to 94 dBA range. These sensors are available for a variety of uses and can be customized for many applications, including incorporation into a stationary sensor network for continuous monitoring of noise in manufacturing environments.

  19. White noise and sleep induction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, J A; Moran, D J; Lee, A; Talbert, D

    1990-01-01

    We studied two groups of 20 neonates, between 2 and 7 days old, in a randomised trial. Sixteen (80%) fell asleep within five minutes in response to white noise compared with only five (25%) who fell asleep spontaneously in the control group. White noise may help mothers settle difficult babies.

  20. Measuring Excess Noise in SDL's

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzberg, S. J.; Kowitz, H. R.; Rowland, C. W.; Shull, T. A.; Ruggles, S. L.; Matthews, L. F.

    1983-01-01

    New instrument gives quantitive information on "excess noise" in semiconductor-diode laser (SDL's). By proper selection of detector, instrument tests any SDL from visible wavelengths through thermal infrared. Lasers determine excess noise in SKL source by measuring photocurrent generated in photodetector exposed first to reference laser then to SKL under test.

  1. Noise exposure and public health

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Passchier-Vermeer, W.; Passchier, W.F.

    2000-01-01

    Exposure to noise constitutes a health risk. There is sufficient scientific evidence that noise exposure can induce hearing impairment, hypertension and ischemic heart disease, annoyance, sleep disturbance, and decreased school performance. For other effects such as changes in the immune system and

  2. Noise pollution: a modem plague.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goines, Lisa; Hagler, Louis

    2007-03-01

    Noise is defined as unwanted sound. Environmental noise consists of all the unwanted sounds in our communities except that which originates in the workplace. Environmental noise pollution, a form of air pollution, is a threat to health and well-being. It is more severe and widespread than ever before, and it will continue to increase in magnitude and severity because of population growth, urbanization, and the associated growth in the use of increasingly powerful, varied, and highly mobile sources of noise. It will also continue to grow because of sustained growth in highway, rail, and air traffic, which remain major sources of environmental noise. The potential health effects of noise pollution are numerous, pervasive, persistent, and medically and socially significant. Noise produces direct and cumulative adverse effects that impair health and that degrade residential, social, working, and learning environments with corresponding real (economic) and intangible (well-being) losses. It interferes with sleep, concentration, communication, and recreation. The aim of enlightened governmental controls should be to protect citizens from the adverse effects of airborne pollution, including those produced by noise. People have the right to choose the nature of their acoustical environment; it should not be imposed by others.

  3. Fast High-Quality Noise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frisvad, Jeppe Revall; Wyvill, Geoff

    2007-01-01

    At the moment the noise functions available in a graphics programmer's toolbox are either slow to compute or they involve grid-line artifacts making them of lower quality. In this paper we present a real-time noise computation with no grid-line artifacts or other regularity problems. In other wor...

  4. ISAUr : an integrated tool for modeling the noise impact of urban traffic control equipments

    OpenAIRE

    PICAUT, Judicaël; LECLERCQ, Ludovic; LELONG, Joël; CHERVET, Gérard

    2009-01-01

    Urban traffic facilities like roundabouts, limited speed areas, and zigzag are used in urban areas mainly for road traffic flow management and for safety reasons. In many cases, it is considered that such equipments may produce noise abatement, while sometimes it is observed an increase of noise due to modifications of traffic flow characteristics. In order to evaluate the noise impact of such equipments, a numerical tool (ISAUr) was developed. The simulation program is based on the coupling ...

  5. LMS-based active noise cancellation methods for fMRI using sub-band filtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milani, Ali A; Panahi, Issa; Briggs, Richard

    2006-01-01

    We present application of adaptive LMS-based method using two different sub-band filtering techniques for active reduction of 3T-fMRI acoustic noise. Analysis and design of the sub-band filters are discussed based on the characteristics of the noise. Using the fMRI-brain scanner acoustic noise, performance of the methods are analyzed and compared for different number of sub-band filters.

  6. En Route Jet Aircraft Noise Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-15

    Most research into commercial noise is primarily focused on reducing the community noise, noise that the local population near an airport experiences as aircraft takeoff and land. While this type of noise may be a main driver for the noise that commu...

  7. Filter apparatus for actively reducing noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhoff, Arthur P.; Nijsse, G.

    2010-01-01

    A filter apparatus for reducing noise from a primary noise source, comprising a secondary source signal connector for generating secondary noise to reduce said primary noise and a sensor connector for connecting to a sensor for measuring said primary and secondary noise as an error signal. A first

  8. A filter apparatus for actively reducing noise

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berkhoff, Arthur P.; Nijsse, G.

    2006-01-01

    A filter apparatus for reducing noise from a primary noise source, comprising a secondary source signal connector for generating secondary noise to reduce said primary noise and a sensor connector for connecting to a sensor for measuring said primary and secondary noise as an error signal. A first

  9. The Effects of Noise on Pupil Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Barbara Ruth

    Effects of school noise conditions on student written task performance were studied. Three noise levels were examined--(1) irregular interval noise, 75-90 decibels, (2) average or normal noise, and (3) quiet condition, 45-55 decibels. An attempt was made to reproduce noise conditions typical of the school environment. A second controlled…

  10. 23 CFR 772.19 - Construction noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 23 Highways 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Construction noise. 772.19 Section 772.19 Highways... ABATEMENT OF HIGHWAY TRAFFIC NOISE AND CONSTRUCTION NOISE § 772.19 Construction noise. The following general... may be affected by noise from construction of the project. The identification is to be performed...

  11. Railroad Noise: Economic Valuation and Policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brons, M.R.E.; Nijkamp, P.; Pels, E.; Rietveld, P.

    2003-01-01

    In developed countries noise annoyance is an important source of environmental concern. Research on noise annoyance caused by railroad traffic is relatively underdeveloped. Here, a causal chain model is presented in which railroad traffic density, noise emission, noise immission and noise annoyance

  12. Noise spectroscopy of nanowire structures: fundamental limits and application aspects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitusevich, Svetlana; Zadorozhnyi, Ihor

    2017-04-01

    Nanowires (NWs) have recently emerged as a new class of materials demonstrating unique properties which may completely differ from their bulk counterparts. The main aim of this work is to give an overview of results on noise and fluctuation phenomena in NW-based structures. We emphasize that noise is one of the main parameters, which determines the characteristics of the device structures and sets the fundamental limits of the working principles and operation regimes of NWs as key electronic elements, including field-effect transistors (FETs). We review the studies focusing on the understanding of noise sources and the main application aspects of noise spectroscopy. Noise application aspects will provide information about the performance of core-shell NW structures, the gate-coupling effect and its advantages for detection of the useful signal with prospects to extract it from the noise level, random telegraph signal as a useful tool for enhanced sensitivity, novel components of noise reflecting dielectric polarization fluctuation processes and fluctuation phenomena as a sensitive tool for molecular charge dynamics in NW FETs. Moreover, noise spectroscopy assists understanding of electronic transport regimes and effects, transport peculiarities in topological materials and aspects reflecting Majorana bound states. Thus noise in NWs on the basis of Si, Ge, Si/Ge, GaAs, InAs, InGaAs, Au, GaAs/AlGaAs, GaAsSb, SnO2, GaN, ZnO, CuO, In2O3 and AlGaN/GaN materials reflects a great variety of phenomena and processes, information about their stability and reliability. It can be utilized for numerous different applications in nanoelectronics and bioelectronics.

  13. P3a from white noise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, David W; Yee, Ryan B; Polich, John

    2012-08-01

    P3a and P3b event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were elicited with an auditory three-stimulus (target, distracter, and standard) discrimination task in which subjects responded only to the target. Distracter stimuli consisted of white noise or novel sounds with stimulus characteristics perceptually matched. Target/standard discrimination difficulty was manipulated by varying target/standard pitch differences to produce relatively easy, medium, and hard tasks. Error rate and response time increased with increases in task difficulty. P3a was larger for the white noise compared to novel sounds, maximum over the central/parietal recording sites, and did not differ in size across difficulty levels. P3b was unaffected by distracter type, decreased as task difficulty increased, and maximum over the parietal recording sites. The findings indicate that P3a from white noise is robust and should be useful for applied studies as it removes stimulus novelty variability. Theoretical perspectives are discussed. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Heterogeneous noise enhances spatial reciprocity

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Y

    2014-01-01

    Recent research has identified the heterogeneity as crucial for the evolution of cooperation in spatial population. However, the influence of heterogeneous noise is still lack. Inspired by this interesting question, in this work, we try to incorporate heterogeneous noise into the evaluation of utility, where only a proportion of population possesses noise, whose range can also be tuned. We find that increasing heterogeneous noise monotonously promotes cooperation and even translates the full defection phase (of the homogeneous version) into the complete cooperation phase. Moreover, the promotion effect of this mechanism can be attributed to the leading role of cooperators who have the heterogeneous noise. These type of cooperators can attract more agents penetrating into the robust cooperator clusters, which is beyond the text of traditional spatial reciprocity. We hope that our work may shed light on the understanding of the cooperative behavior in the society.

  15. Relationship between noise annoyance from road traffic noise and cardiovascular diseases: a meta-analysis

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Ana Ndrepepa; Dorothee Twardella

    2011-01-01

    Road traffic noise is an important source of noise annoyance in the community. We performed a meta-analysis to assess whether there is an association between noise annoyance from road traffic noise and cardiovascular diseases...

  16. Predetermining acceptable noise limits in EXAFS spectra in the limit of stochastic noise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hu, Yung-Jin; Booth, Corwin H

    2009-12-14

    EXAFS measurements are used to probe a variety of experimental systems, but excel at elucidating local structure in samples which have slight disorder or no long-range crystalline order. Of special interest to the authors is the use of EXAFS in understanding the molecular-level binding structure and characteristics of actinides on the surface of environmental minerals and model mineral analogs. In environmental systems the element of interest can be on the order of 10-7% by weight of the total sample. Obviously such samples would be impossible to measure using EXAFS techniques. It is therefore essential to increase the concentration of the element of interest while still preserving a sample's ability to represent environmental conditions. Under such low concentration limits it is expected that the collected data is countrate, or stochastically limited. This condition occurs as we approach the signal-to-noise (S/N) limit of the technique where the random noise of the measurement process dominates over possible systematic errors. When stochastic error is expected to dominate systematic error, it is possible to predict, with the use of simulations, the ability of model fits to tolerate a certain level of stochastic noise. Elsewhere in these proceedings, we discuss how to tell when systematic errors dominate in measured EXAFS spectrum. Here, we outline a technique for determining the number of EXAFS scans necessary to test the relevance of a given structural model. Appropriate stochastic noise levels are determined for each point in r-space by collecting data on a real system. These noise levels are then applied to EXAFS simulations using a test model. In this way, all significant systematic error sources are eliminated in the simulated data. The structural model is then fit to the simulated data, decreasing the noise and increasing the k-range of the fit until the veracity of the model passes an F-test. This paper outlines a method of testing model systems in

  17. Ultra-broad-band electrical spectroscopy of soils and sediments—a combined permittivity and conductivity model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewer, M.; Günther, T.; Igel, J.; Kruschwitz, S.; Martin, T.; Wagner, N.

    2017-09-01

    We combined two completely different methods measuring the frequency-dependent electrical properties of moist porous materials in order to receive an extraordinary large frequency spectrum. In the low-frequency (LF) range, complex electrical resistivity between 1 mHz and 45 kHz was measured for three different soils and sandstone, using the spectral induced polarization (SIP) method with a four electrode cell. In the high-frequency (HF) radio to microwave range, complex dielectric permittivity was measured between 1 MHz and 10 GHz for the same samples using dielectric spectroscopy by means of the coaxial transmission line technique. The combined data sets cover 13 orders of magnitude and were transferred into their equivalent expressions: the complex effective dielectric permittivity and the complex effective electrical conductivity. We applied the Kramers-Kronig relation in order to justify the validity of the data combination. A new phenomenological model that consists of both dielectric permittivity and electrical conductivity terms in a Debye- and Cole-Cole-type manner was fitted to the spectra. The combined permittivity and conductivity model accounts for the most common representations of the physical quantities with respect to the individual measuring method. A maximum number of four relaxation processes was identified in the analysed frequency range. Among these are the free water and different interfacial relaxation processes, the Maxwell-Wagner effect, the counterion relaxation in the electrical double layer and the direct-current electrical conductivity. There is evidence that free water relaxation does not affect the electrical response in the SIP range. Moreover, direct current conductivity contribution (bulk and interface) dominates the losses in the HF range. Interfacial relaxation processes with relaxations in the HF range are broadly distributed down to the LF range. The slowest observed process in the LF range has a minor contribution to the HF response.

  18. The broad-band X-ray spectrum of IC 4329A from a joint NuSTAR/Suzaku observation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brenneman, L. W.; Madejski, G.; Fuerst, F.

    2014-01-01

    also updated our previously reported measurement of the high-energy cutoff of the hard X-ray emission using both observatories rather than justNuSTAR alone: Ecut = 186±14 keV. This high-energy cutoff acts as a proxy for the temperature of the coronal electron plasma, enabling us to further separate......We have obtained a deep, simultaneous observation of the bright, nearby Seyfert galaxy IC 4329A with Suzaku andNuSTAR. Through a detailed spectral analysis, we are able to robustly separate the continuum, absorption, and distant reflection components in the spectrum. The absorbing column is found...... this parameter from the plasma’s optical depth and to update our results for these parameters as well. We derive kT = 50−3+6 keV with τ = 2.34−0.11+0.16 using a spherical geometry, kT = 61±1 keV with τ = 0.68±0.02 for a slab geometry, with both having an equivalent goodness-of-fit....

  19. Realization of bifunction: dual-band absorption and broad band polarization conversion by zigzag birefringent reflective metamaterial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiao; Yang, Helin; Zhang, Guoping; Yu, Zetai; Huang, Xiaojun; Hu, Sen

    2017-05-01

    In this paper, we propose and fabricate a kind of zigzag birefringent reflective metamaterial, the surface of which is a 1D rough surface. It can realize both multiple absorption and broadband polarization conversion at different frequency ranges of microwave. This metamaterial is made of a ring-shaped metal piece that is deposited on one side of a piece of grounded zigzag dielectric substrate. The absorptivities are 99.4% and 97.3% at 3.32 and 6.87 GHz respectively, and the polarization conversion ratio is more than 90% from 8.43 to 11.55 GHz, when the incident wave illuminates the sample with different polarization angles. A bifunctional device based on this metamaterial can act as either an absorber or a polarizer. This work is of significance to study the electromagnetic properties of rough surface metamaterials and provides an encouraging example in metamaterial design for combining different functions into one device.

  20. Broad-band moment tensor inversion from single station, regional surface waves for the 1990, NW-Iran earthquake sequence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Palombo

    1994-06-01

    Full Text Available e present a method for the inversion of complete waveforms in the 5-30 mHz frequency band for moment tensor determination. The method is based on the calibration of phase and group velocity dispersion curves for Rayleigh and Love fundamental modes to account for heterogeneous lithospheric structure, and is applied to the analysis of single station records of the VSL MEDNET station for the 1990 NW Iran earthquake sequence (the events of June 20, 21 and 24. The revised seismic moment of the June 20, 1990 Iranian earthquake is Mo = 1.56 x 1027 dyne-cm, corresponding to Mw = 7.4. The method proves to be a very robust tool for the analysis of moderate and large earthquakes at regional distances, producing consistent moment tensor solutions trom single station inversions in narrow (2-4 mHz and wide (up to 20 mHz frequency bands across the whole band of interest.