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Sample records for broad substrate specificity

  1. Broad Substrate Specificity of the Loading Didomain of the Lipomycin Polyketide Synthase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuzawa, S; Eng, CH; Katz, L; Keasling, JD

    2013-06-04

    LipPks1, a polyketide synthase subunit of the lipomycin synthase, is believed to catalyze the polyketide chain initiation reaction using isobutyryl-CoA as a substrate, followed by an elongation reaction with methylmalonyl-CoA to start the biosynthesis of antibiotic alpha-lipomycin in Streptomyces aureofaciens Tu117. Recombinant LipPks1, containing the thioesterase domain from the 6-deoxyerythronolide B synthase, was produced in Escherichia coli, and its substrate specificity was investigated in vitro. Surprisingly, several different acyl-CoAs, including isobutyryl-CoA, were accepted as the starter substrates, while no product was observed with acetyl-CoA. These results demonstrate the broad substrate specificity of LipPks1 and may be applied to producing new antibiotics.

  2. Structural and biochemical characterization of the broad substrate specificity of Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron commensal sialidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Kwang-Hyun; Kim, Min-Gyu; Ahn, Hee-Jeong; Lee, Dae-Han; Kim, Jin-Hyo; Kim, Young-Wan; Woo, Eui-Jeon

    2013-08-01

    Sialidases release the terminal sialic acid residue from a wide range of sialic acid-containing polysaccharides. Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, a symbiotic commensal microbe, resides in and dominates the human intestinal tract. We characterized the recombinant sialidase from B. thetaiotaomicron (BTSA) and demonstrated that it has broad substrate specificity with a relative activity of 97, 100 and 64 for 2,3-, 2,6- and 2,8-linked sialic substrates, respectively. The hydrolysis activity of BTSA was inhibited by a transition state analogue, 2-deoxy-2,3-dehydro-N-acetyl neuraminic acid, by competitive inhibition with a Ki value of 35μM. The structure of BSTA was determined at a resolution of 2.3Å. This structure exhibited a unique carbohydrate-binding domain (CBM) at its N-terminus (a.a. 23-190) that is adjacent to the catalytic domain (a.a. 191-535). The catalytic domain has a conserved arginine triad with a wide-open entrance for the substrate that exposes the catalytic residue to the surface. Unlike other pathogenic sialidases, the polysaccharide-binding site in the CBM is near the active site and possibly holds and positions the polysaccharide substrate directly at the active site. The structural feature of a wide substrate-binding groove and closer proximity of the polysaccharide-binding site to the active site could be a unique signature of the commensal sialidase BTSA and provide a molecular basis for its pharmaceutical application. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. APHO1 from the yeast Arxula adeninivorans encodes an acid phosphatase of broad substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Parvinder; Lingner, Anja; Singh, Bijinder; Böer, Erik; Polajeva, Jelena; Steinborn, Gerhard; Bode, Rüdiger; Gellissen, Gerd; Satyanarayana, Tulasi; Kunze, Gotthard

    2007-01-01

    The extracellular acid phosphatase-encoding Arxula adeninivorans APHO1 gene was isolated using degenerated specific oligonucleotide primers in a PCR screening approach. The gene harbours an ORF of 1449 bp encoding a protein of 483 amino acids with a calculated molecular mass of 52.4 kDa. The sequence includes an N-terminal secretion sequence of 17 amino acids. The deduced amino acid sequence exhibits 54% identity to phytases from Aspergillus awamori, Asp. niger and Asp. ficuum and a more distant relationship to phytases of the yeasts Candida albicans and Debaryomyces hansenii (36-39% identity). The sequence contains the phosphohistidine signature and the conserved active site sequence of acid phosphatases. APHO1 expression is induced under conditions of phosphate limitation. Enzyme isolates from wild and recombinant strains with the APHO1 gene expressed under control of the strong A. adeninivorans-derived TEF1 promoter were characterized. For both proteins, a molecular mass of approx. 350 kDa, corresponding to a hexameric structure, a pH optimum of pH 4.8 and a temperature optimum of 60 degrees C were determined. The preferred substrates include p-nitrophenyl-phosphate, pyridoxal-5-phosphate, 3-indoxyl-phosphate, 1-naphthylphosphate, ADP, glucose-6-phosphate, sodium-pyrophosphate, and phytic acid. Thus the enzyme is a secretory acid phosphatase with phytase activity and not a phytase as suggested by strong homology to such enzymes.

  4. Physiological characterization of the ARO10-dependent, broad-substrate-specificity 2-oxo acid decarboxylase activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vuralhan, Zeynep; Luttik, Marijke A H; Tai, Siew Leng; Boer, Viktor M; Morais, Marcos A; Schipper, Dick; Almering, Marinka J H; Kötter, Peter; Dickinson, J Richard; Daran, Jean-Marc; Pronk, Jack T

    2005-06-01

    Aerobic, glucose-limited chemostat cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CEN.PK113-7D were grown with different nitrogen sources. Cultures grown with phenylalanine, leucine, or methionine as a nitrogen source contained high levels of the corresponding fusel alcohols and organic acids, indicating activity of the Ehrlich pathway. Also, fusel alcohols derived from the other two amino acids were detected in the supernatant, suggesting the involvement of a common enzyme activity. Transcript level analysis revealed that among the five thiamine-pyrophospate-dependent decarboxylases (PDC1, PDC5, PDC6, ARO10, and THI3), only ARO10 was transcriptionally up-regulated when phenylalanine, leucine, or methionine was used as a nitrogen source compared to growth on ammonia, proline, and asparagine. Moreover, 2-oxo acid decarboxylase activity measured in cell extract from CEN.PK113-7D grown with phenylalanine, methionine, or leucine displayed similar broad-substrate 2-oxo acid decarboxylase activity. Constitutive expression of ARO10 in ethanol-limited chemostat cultures in a strain lacking the five thiamine-pyrophosphate-dependent decarboxylases, grown with ammonia as a nitrogen source, led to a measurable decarboxylase activity with phenylalanine-, leucine-, and methionine-derived 2-oxo acids. Moreover, even with ammonia as the nitrogen source, these cultures produced significant amounts of the corresponding fusel alcohols. Nonetheless, the constitutive expression of ARO10 in an isogenic wild-type strain grown in a glucose-limited chemostat with ammonia did not lead to any 2-oxo acid decarboxylase activity. Furthermore, even when ARO10 was constitutively expressed, growth with phenylalanine as the nitrogen source led to increased decarboxylase activities in cell extracts. The results reported here indicate the involvement of posttranscriptional regulation and/or a second protein in the ARO10-dependent, broad-substrate-specificity decarboxylase activity.

  5. Substrate specificity screening of oat (Avena sativa) seeds aminopeptidase demonstrate unusually broad tolerance in S1 pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajda, Anna D; Pawełczak, Małgorzata; Drag, Marcin

    2012-05-01

    Aminopeptidases are proteolytic enzymes that remove one amino acid at a time from N-terminus of peptidic substrates. In plants, inhibitors of aminopeptidases can find potential applications in agriculture as herbicides. In this report we have used a library of fluorogenic derivatives of natural and unnatural amino acids for substrate specificity profiling of oat (Avena sativa) aminopeptidase. Interestingly, we have found that this enzyme recognizes effectively among the natural amino acids basic residues like Arg and Lys, hydrophobic Phe, Leu and Met, but also to some extent acidic residues Asp and Glu. In the case of unnatural amino acids hydrophobic residues (hPhe and hCha) and basic hArg were preferentially recognized. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  6. A Fungal α-Galactosidase from Tricholoma matsutake with Broad Substrate Specificity and Good Hydrolytic Activity on Raffinose Family Oligosaccharides

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    Xueran Geng

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available An acidic α-galactosidase designated as TMG was purified from the fruiting bodies The purification protocol entailed ion exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose and of Tricholoma matsutake with 136-fold purification and a specific activity of 909 units/mg. Mono-Q and fast protein liquid chromatography on Superdex 75. TMG is a monomeric protein exhibiting a molecular mass of 47 kDa in SDS-PAGE and gel filtration. The purified enzyme was identified by LC-MS/MS and three inner amino acid sequences were obtained. The optimum pH and temperature for TMG with pNPGal as substrate were pH 4.5 and 55 °C, respectively. The α-galactosidase activity was strongly inhibited by K+, Ca2+, Cd2+, Hg2+, Ag+ and Zn2+ ions. The enzyme activity was inhibited by the chemical modification agent N-bromosuccinimide (NBS, indicating the importance of tryptophan residue(s at or near the active site. Besides hydrolyzing pNPGal, TMG also efficaciously catalyzed the degradation of natural substrates such as stachyose, raffinose, and melibiose. Thus TMG can be exploited commercially for improving the nutritional value of soy milk by degradation of indigestible oligosaccharides.

  7. The prophage-encoded hyaluronate lyase has broad substrate specificity and is regulated by the N-terminal domain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sudhir Kumar; Bharati, Akhilendra Pratap; Singh, Neha; Pandey, Praveen; Joshi, Pankaj; Singh, Kavita; Mitra, Kalyan; Gayen, Jiaur R; Sarkar, Jayanta; Akhtar, Md Sohail

    2014-12-19

    Streptococcus equi is the causative agent of the highly contagious disease "strangles" in equines and zoonotic meningitis in human. Spreading of infection in host tissues is thought to be facilitated by the bacterial gene encoded extracellular hyaluronate lyase (HL), which degrades hyaluronan (HA), chondroitin 6-sulfate, and dermatan sulfate of the extracellular matrix). The clinical strain S. equi 4047 however, lacks a functional extracellular HL. The prophages of S. equi and other streptococci encode intracellular HLs which are reported to partially degrade HA and do not cleave any other glycosaminoglycans. The phage HLs are thus thought to play a role limited to the penetration of streptococcal HA capsules, facilitating bacterial lysogenization and not in the bacterial pathogenesis. Here we systematically looked into the structure-function relationship of S. equi 4047 phage HL. Although HA is the preferred substrate, this HL has weak activity toward chondroitin 6-sulfate and dermatan sulfate and can completely degrade all of them. Even though the catalytic triple-stranded β-helix domain of phage HL is functionally independent, its catalytic efficiency and specificity is influenced by the N-terminal domain. The phage HL also interacts with human transmembrane glycoprotein CD44. The above results suggest that the streptococci can use phage HLs to degrade glycosaminoglycans of the extracellular matrix for spreading virulence factors and toxins while utilizing the disaccharides as a nutrient source for proliferation at the site of infection. © 2014 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. The Prophage-encoded Hyaluronate Lyase Has Broad Substrate Specificity and Is Regulated by the N-terminal Domain*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Sudhir Kumar; Bharati, Akhilendra Pratap; Singh, Neha; Pandey, Praveen; Joshi, Pankaj; Singh, Kavita; Mitra, Kalyan; Gayen, Jiaur R.; Sarkar, Jayanta; Akhtar, Md. Sohail

    2014-01-01

    Streptococcus equi is the causative agent of the highly contagious disease “strangles” in equines and zoonotic meningitis in human. Spreading of infection in host tissues is thought to be facilitated by the bacterial gene encoded extracellular hyaluronate lyase (HL), which degrades hyaluronan (HA), chondroitin 6-sulfate, and dermatan sulfate of the extracellular matrix). The clinical strain S. equi 4047 however, lacks a functional extracellular HL. The prophages of S. equi and other streptococci encode intracellular HLs which are reported to partially degrade HA and do not cleave any other glycosaminoglycans. The phage HLs are thus thought to play a role limited to the penetration of streptococcal HA capsules, facilitating bacterial lysogenization and not in the bacterial pathogenesis. Here we systematically looked into the structure-function relationship of S. equi 4047 phage HL. Although HA is the preferred substrate, this HL has weak activity toward chondroitin 6-sulfate and dermatan sulfate and can completely degrade all of them. Even though the catalytic triple-stranded β-helix domain of phage HL is functionally independent, its catalytic efficiency and specificity is influenced by the N-terminal domain. The phage HL also interacts with human transmembrane glycoprotein CD44. The above results suggest that the streptococci can use phage HLs to degrade glycosaminoglycans of the extracellular matrix for spreading virulence factors and toxins while utilizing the disaccharides as a nutrient source for proliferation at the site of infection. PMID:25378402

  9. Serine Hydroxymethyltransferase from the Cold Adapted Microorganism Psychromonas ingrahamii: A Low Temperature Active Enzyme with Broad Substrate Specificity

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    Stefano Pascarella

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Serine hydroxymethyltransferase from the psychrophilic microorganism Psychromonas ingrahamii was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified as a His-tag fusion protein. The enzyme was characterized with respect to its spectroscopic, catalytic, and thermodynamic properties. The properties of the psychrophilic enzyme have been contrasted with the characteristics of the homologous counterpart from E. coli, which has been structurally and functionally characterized in depth and with which it shares 75% sequence identity. Spectroscopic measures confirmed that the psychrophilic enzyme displays structural properties almost identical to those of the mesophilic counterpart. At variance, the P. ingrahamii enzyme showed decreased thermostability and high specific activity at low temperature, both of which are typical features of cold adapted enzymes. Furthermore, it was a more efficient biocatalyst compared to E. coli serine hydroxymethyltransferase (SHMT particularly for side reactions. Many β-hydroxy-α-amino acids are SHMT substrates and represent important compounds in the synthesis of pharmaceuticals, agrochemicals and food additives. Thanks to these attractive properties, this enzyme could have a significant potential for biotechnological applications.

  10. Biochemical properties and substrate recognition mechanism of GH31 α-glucosidase from Bacillus sp. AHU 2001 with broad substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saburi, Wataru; Okuyama, Masayuki; Kumagai, Yuya; Kimura, Atsuo; Mori, Haruhide

    2015-01-01

    α-Glucosidases are ubiquitous enzymes that hydrolyze the α-glucosidic linkage at the non-reducing end of substrates. In this study, we characterized an α-glucosidase (BspAG31A) belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 31 from Bacillus sp. AHU 2001. Recombinant BspAG31A, produced in Escherichia coli, had high hydrolytic activity toward maltooligosaccharides, kojibiose, nigerose, and neotrehalose. This is the first report of an α-glucosidase with high activity toward neotrehalose. The transglucosylation products, nigerose, kojibiose, isomaltose, and neotrehalose, were generated from 440 mm maltose. Substitution of Tyr268, situated on the β → α loop 1 of BspAG31A, with Trp increased hydrolytic activity toward isomaltose. This mutation reduced the hydrolytic activity toward maltooligosaccharides more than toward kojibiose, nigerose, and neotrehalose. Analysis of the Y173A mutant of BspAG31A showed that Tyr173, situated on the N-terminal domain loop, is associated with the formation of subsite +2. In Y173A, the kcat/Km for maltooligosaccharides slightly decreased with an increasing degree of polymerization compared with wild type. Among the amino acid residues surrounding the substrate binding site, Val543 and Glu545 of BspAG31A were different from the corresponding residues of Bacillus thermoamyloliquefaciens α-glucosidase II, which has higher activity toward isomaltose than BspAG31A. The E545G mutation slightly enhanced isomaltase activity without a large reduction of hydrolytic activities toward other substrates. V543A showed 1.8-3.5-fold higher hydrolytic activities toward all substrates other than neotrehalose compared with wild type, although its preference for isomaltose was unchanged. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and Société française de biochimie et biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  11. Characterization of a Single-Stranded DNA-Binding-Like Protein from Nanoarchaeum equitans--A Nucleic Acid Binding Protein with Broad Substrate Specificity.

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    Marcin Olszewski

    Full Text Available SSB (single-stranded DNA-binding proteins play an essential role in all living cells and viruses, as they are involved in processes connected with ssDNA metabolism. There has recently been an increasing interest in SSBs, since they can be applied in molecular biology techniques and analytical methods. Nanoarchaeum equitans, the only known representative of Archaea phylum Nanoarchaeota, is a hyperthermophilic, nanosized, obligatory parasite/symbiont of Ignicoccus hospitalis.This paper reports on the ssb-like gene cloning, gene expression and characterization of a novel nucleic acid binding protein from Nanoarchaeum equitans archaeon (NeqSSB-like protein. This protein consists of 243 amino acid residues and one OB fold per monomer. It is biologically active as a monomer like as SSBs from some viruses. The NeqSSB-like protein displays a low sequence similarity to the Escherichia coli SSB, namely 10% identity and 29% similarity, and is the most similar to the Sulfolobus solfataricus SSB (14% identity and 32% similarity. The NeqSSB-like protein binds to ssDNA, although it can also bind mRNA and, surprisingly, various dsDNA forms, with no structure-dependent preferences as evidenced by gel mobility shift assays. The size of the ssDNA binding site, which was estimated using fluorescence spectroscopy, is 7 ± 1 nt. No salt-dependent binding mode transition was observed. NeqSSB-like protein probably utilizes a different model for ssDNA binding than the SSB proteins studied so far. This protein is highly thermostable; the half-life of the ssDNA binding activity is 5 min at 100 °C and melting temperature (T(m is 100.2 °C as shown by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC analysis.NeqSSB-like protein is a novel highly thermostable protein which possesses a unique broad substrate specificity and is able to bind all types of nucleic acids.

  12. Purification and characterization of aldehyde dehydrogenase with a broad substrate specificity originated from 2-phenylethanol-assimilating Brevibacterium sp. KU1309.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirano, Jun-ichiro; Miyamoto, Kenji; Ohta, Hiromichi

    2007-08-01

    Phenylacetaldehyde dehydrogenase (PADH) was purified and characterized from Brevibacterium sp. KU1309, which can grow on the medium containing 2-phenylethanol as the sole carbon source. This enzyme was a homotetrameric protein with a subunit of 61 kDa. The enzyme catalyzed the oxidation of aryl (benzaldehyde, phenylacetaldehyde, 3-phenylpropionaldehyde) and aliphatic (hexanal, octanal, decanal) aldehydes to the corresponding carboxylic acids using NAD(+) as the electron acceptor. The PADH activity was enhanced by several divalent cationic ions such as Mg(2+), Ca(2+), and Mn(2+). On the other hand, it was inhibited by SH reagents (Hg(2+), p-chloromercuribenzoate, iodoacetamide, and N-ethylmaleinimide). The substrate specificity of the enzyme is compared with those of various aldehyde dehydrogenases.

  13. Atomization of broad specification aircraft fuels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skifstad, J. G.; Lefebvre, A. H.

    1980-01-01

    The atomization properties of liquid fuels for the potential use in aircraft gas turbine engines are discussed. The significance of these properties are addressed with respect to the ignition and subsequent combustion behavior of the fuel spray/air mixture. It is shown that the fuel properties which affect the atomization behavior (viscosity, surface tension, and density) are less favorable for the broad specification fuels as compared to with those for conventional fuels.

  14. Novel alkali-tolerant GH10 endo-β-1,4-xylanase with broad substrate specificity from Microbacterium trichothecenolyticum HY-17, a gut bacterium of the mole cricket Gryllotalpa orientalis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Do Young; Shin, Dong-Ha; Jung, Sora; Kim, Hyangmi; Lee, Jong Suk; Cho, Han-Young; Bae, Kyung Sook; Sung, Chang-Keun; Rhee, Young Ha; Son, Kwang-Hee; Park, Ho-Yong

    2014-07-01

    The XylH gene (1,167-bp) encoding a novel hemicellulase (41,584 Da) was identified from the genome of Microbacterium trichothecenolyticum HY-17, a gastrointestinal bacterium of Gryllotalpa orientalis. The enzyme consisted of a single catalytic domain, which is 74% identical to that of an endo-β-1,4-xylanase (GH10) from Isoptericola variabilis 225. Unlike other endo-β- 1,4-xylanases from invertebrate-symbiotic bacteria, rXylH was an alkali-tolerant multifunctional enzyme possessing endo-β-1,4-xylanase activity together with β-1,3/β-1,4- glucanase activity, which exhibited its highest xylanolytic activity at pH 9.0 and 60°C, and was relatively stable within a broad pH range of 5.0-10.0. The susceptibilities of different xylosebased polysaccharides to the XylH were assessed to be as follows: oat spelts xylan > beechwood xylan > birchwood xylan > wheat arabinoxylan. rXylH was also able to readily cleave p-nitrophenyl (pNP) cellobioside and pNP-xylopyranoside, but did not hydrolyze other pNP-sugar derivatives, xylobiose, or hexose-based materials. Enzymatic hydrolysis of birchwood xylan resulted in the product composition of xylobiose (71.2%) and xylotriose (28.8%) as end products.

  15. Surprisingly high substrate specificities observed in complex biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nierychlo, Marta; Kindaichi, Tomonori; Kragelund, Caroline

    to investigate the cell-specific in situ substrate uptake pattern of different bacteria. Different substrates were tested by combination of Microautoradiography and Fluorescence in situ Hybridization. Conditions applied (different substrate concentrations, starvation, induction with specific substrates, multiple...... by selection for different specialized species. We hypothesized that bacteria growing in natural environment express strongly conserved substrate specificity which is independent on short-term (few hours) variations in growth conditions. In this study, biofilm from Aalborg wastewater treatment plant was used...

  16. Quantifying Cathepsin S Activity in Antigen Presenting Cells Using a Novel Specific Substrate*

    OpenAIRE

    Lützner, Nicolas; Kalbacher, Hubert

    2008-01-01

    Cathepsin S (CatS) is a lysosomal cysteine protease belonging to the papain superfamily. Because of the relatively broad substrate specificity of this family, a specific substrate for CatS is not yet known. Based on a detailed study of the CatS endopeptidase specificity, using six series of internally quenched fluorescent peptides, we were able to design a specific substrate for CatS. The peptide series was based on the sequence GRWHTVGLRWE-Lys(Dnp)-DArg-NH2, which sho...

  17. The substrate specificity of phospholipase A

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Deenen, L.L.M. van; Haas, Gerard H. de

    1963-01-01

    Investigations on variously modified analogues of phospholipids elucidated the following substrate characteristics for phospholipase A (Crotalus adamanteus). 1. 1. Within the class of α-phosphoglycerides -isomers are readily hydrolysed, while -α-phospholipids appeared not to be attacked. 2.

  18. Modelling substrate specificity and enantioselectivity for lipases and esterases by substrate-imprinted docking

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    Tyagi Sadhna

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previously, ways to adapt docking programs that were developed for modelling inhibitor-receptor interaction have been explored. Two main issues were discussed. First, when trying to model catalysis a reaction intermediate of the substrate is expected to provide more valid information than the ground state of the substrate. Second, the incorporation of protein flexibility is essential for reliable predictions. Results Here we present a predictive and robust method to model substrate specificity and enantioselectivity of lipases and esterases that uses reaction intermediates and incorporates protein flexibility. Substrate-imprinted docking starts with covalent docking of reaction intermediates, followed by geometry optimisation of the resulting enzyme-substrate complex. After a second round of docking the same substrate into the geometry-optimised structures, productive poses are identified by geometric filter criteria and ranked by their docking scores. Substrate-imprinted docking was applied in order to model (i enantioselectivity of Candida antarctica lipase B and a W104A mutant, (ii enantioselectivity and substrate specificity of Candida rugosa lipase and Burkholderia cepacia lipase, and (iii substrate specificity of an acetyl- and a butyrylcholine esterase toward the substrates acetyl- and butyrylcholine. Conclusion The experimentally observed differences in selectivity and specificity of the enzymes were reproduced with an accuracy of 81%. The method was robust toward small differences in initial structures (different crystallisation conditions or a co-crystallised ligand, although large displacements of catalytic residues often resulted in substrate poses that did not pass the geometric filter criteria.

  19. Determinants for Substrate Specificity of Protein Phosphatase 2A

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    Andrew M. Slupe

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Protein phosphatase 2A- (PP2A- catalyzed dephosphorylation of target substrate proteins is widespread and critical for cellular function. PP2A is predominantly found as a heterotrimeric complex of a catalytic subunit (C, a scaffolding subunit (A, and one member of 4 families of regulatory subunits (B. Substrate specificity of the holoenzyme complex is determined by the subcellular locale the complex is confined to, selective incorporation of the B subunit, interactions with endogenous inhibitory proteins, and specific intermolecular interactions between PP2A and target substrates. Here, we discuss recent studies that have advanced our understanding of the molecular determinants for PP2A substrate specificity.

  20. Crystal Structure and Substrate Specificity of PTPN12

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    Hui Li

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available PTPN12 is an important tumor suppressor that plays critical roles in various physiological processes. However, the molecular basis underlying the substrate specificity of PTPN12 remains uncertain. Here, enzymological and crystallographic studies have enabled us to identify two distinct structural features that are crucial determinants of PTPN12 substrate specificity: the pY+1 site binding pocket and specific basic charged residues along its surface loops. Key structurally plastic regions and specific residues in PTPN12 enabled recognition of different HER2 phosphorylation sites and regulated specific PTPN12 functions. In addition, the structure of PTPN12 revealed a CDK2 phosphorylation site in a specific PTPN12 loop. Taken together, our results not only provide the working mechanisms of PTPN12 for desphosphorylation of its substrates but will also help in designing specific inhibitors of PTPN12.

  1. Animal deoxyribonucleoside kinases: 'forward' and 'retrograde' evolution of their substrate specificity.

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    Piskur, Jure; Sandrini, Michael P B; Knecht, Wolfgang; Munch-Petersen, Birgitte

    2004-02-27

    Deoxyribonucleoside kinases, which catalyse the phosphorylation of deoxyribonucleosides, are present in several copies in most multicellular organisms and therefore represent an excellent model to study gene duplication and specialisation of the duplicated copies through partitioning of substrate specificity. Recent studies suggest that in the animal lineage one of the progenitor kinases, the so-called dCK/dGK/TK2-like gene, was duplicated prior to separation of the insect and mammalian lineages. Thereafter, insects lost all but one kinase, dNK (EC 2.7.1.145), which subsequently, through remodelling of a limited number of amino acid residues, gained a broad substrate specificity.

  2. Characterizing Protease Specificity: How Many Substrates Do We Need?

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    Michael Schauperl

    Full Text Available Calculation of cleavage entropies allows to quantify, map and compare protease substrate specificity by an information entropy based approach. The metric intrinsically depends on the number of experimentally determined substrates (data points. Thus a statistical analysis of its numerical stability is crucial to estimate the systematic error made by estimating specificity based on a limited number of substrates. In this contribution, we show the mathematical basis for estimating the uncertainty in cleavage entropies. Sets of cleavage entropies are calculated using experimental cleavage data and modeled extreme cases. By analyzing the underlying mathematics and applying statistical tools, a linear dependence of the metric in respect to 1/n was found. This allows us to extrapolate the values to an infinite number of samples and to estimate the errors. Analyzing the errors, a minimum number of 30 substrates was found to be necessary to characterize substrate specificity, in terms of amino acid variability, for a protease (S4-S4' with an uncertainty of 5 percent. Therefore, we encourage experimental researchers in the protease field to record specificity profiles of novel proteases aiming to identify at least 30 peptide substrates of maximum sequence diversity. We expect a full characterization of protease specificity helpful to rationalize biological functions of proteases and to assist rational drug design.

  3. Global substrate specificity profiling of post-translational modifying enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivry, Sam L; Meyer, Nicole O; Winter, Michael B; Bohn, Markus F; Knudsen, Giselle M; O'Donoghue, Anthony J; Craik, Charles S

    2017-11-23

    Enzymes that modify the proteome, referred to as post-translational modifying (PTM) enzymes, are central regulators of cellular signaling. Determining the substrate specificity of PTM enzymes is a critical step in unraveling their biological functions both in normal physiological processes and in disease states. Advances in peptide chemistry over the last century have enabled the rapid generation of peptide libraries for querying substrate recognition by PTM enzymes. In this review, we highlight various peptide-based approaches for analysis of PTM enzyme substrate specificity. We focus on the application of these technologies to proteases but also discuss specific examples in which they have been used to uncover the substrate specificity of other types of PTM enzymes, such as kinases. In particular, we highlight our Multiplex Substrate Profiling by Mass Spectrometry (MSP-MS) assay, which uses a rationally designed, physicochemically diverse library of tetradecapeptides. We show how this method has been applied to PTM enzymes to uncover biological function, as well as guide substrate and inhibitor design. We also briefly discuss how this technique can be combined with other methods to gain a systems-level understanding of PTM enzyme regulation and function. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. © 2017 The Protein Society.

  4. Molecular Cloning and Characterization of a Broad Substrate Terpenoid Oxidoreductase from Artemisia annua

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ryden, Anna-Margareta; Ruyter-Spira, Carolien; Litjens, Ralph; Takahashi, Shunji; Quax, Wim; Osada, Hiroyuki; Bouwmeester, Harro; Kayser, Oliver

    From Artemisia annua L., a new oxidoreductase (Red 1) was cloned, sequenced and functionally characterized. Through bioinformatics, heterologous protein expression and enzyme substrate conversion assays, the elucidation of the enzymatic capacities of Red1 was achieved. Red1 acts on monoterpenoids,

  5. Molecular cloning and characterization of a broad substrate terpenoid oxidoreductase from Artemisia annua.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ryden, A.M.; Ruyter-Spira, C.P.; Litjens, R.; Takahashi, S.; Quax, W.J.; Osada, H.; Bouwmeester, H.J.; Kayser, O.

    2010-01-01

    From Artemisia annua L., a new oxidoreductase (Red 1) was cloned, sequenced and functionally characterized. Through bioinformatics, heterologous protein expression, and enzyme substrate conversion assays, the elucidation of the enzymatic capacities of Red1 was achieved. Red1 acts on monoterpenoids,

  6. Structural basis for substrate specificities of cellular deoxyribonucleoside kinases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, K.; Ramaswamy, S.; Ljungcrantz, C.

    2001-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleoside kinases phosphorylate deoxyribonucleosides and activate a number of medically important nucleoside analogs. Here we report the structure of the Drosophila deoxyribonucleoside kinase with deoxycytidine bound at the nucleoside binding site and that of the human deoxyguanosine ki......; this is apparently due to the presence of Arg 118, which provides favorable hydrogen bonding interactions with the substrate. The two new structures provide an explanation for the substrate specificity of cellular deoxyribonucleoside kinases....

  7. Fungi from koala (Phascolarctos cinereus) faeces exhibit a broad range of enzyme activities against recalcitrant substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, R A; Bradner, J R; Roberts, T H; Nevalainen, K M H

    2009-02-01

    Identification of fungi isolated from koala faeces and screening for their enzyme activities of biotechnological interest. Thirty-seven fungal strains were isolated from koala faeces and identified by the amplification and direct sequencing of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region of the ribosomal DNA. The fungi were screened for selected enzyme activities using agar plates containing a single substrate for each target class of enzyme. For xylanase, endoglucanase, ligninase (ligninolytic phenoloxidase) and protease over two-thirds of the isolates produced a clearing halo at 25 degrees C, indicating the secretion of active enzyme by the fungus, and one-third produced a halo indicating amylase, mannanase and tannase activity. Some isolates were also able to degrade crystalline cellulose and others displayed lipase activity. Many of the fungal isolates also produced active enzymes at 15 degrees C and some at 39 degrees C. Koala faeces, consisting of highly lignified fibre, undigested cellulose and phenolics, are a novel source of fungi with high and diverse enzyme activities capable of breaking down recalcitrant substrates. To our knowledge, this is the first time fungi from koala faeces have been identified using ITS sequencing and screened for their enzyme activities.

  8. Expression of Aspergillus nidulans phy Gene in Nicotiana benthamiana Produces Active Phytase with Broad Specificities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tae-Kyun Oh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A full-length phytase gene (phy of Aspergillus nidulans was amplified from the cDNA library by polymerase chain reaction (PCR, and it was introduced into a bacterial expression vector, pET-28a. The recombinant protein (rPhy-E, 56 kDa was overexpressed in the insoluble fraction of Escherichia coli culture, purified by Ni-NTA resin under denaturing conditions and injected into rats as an immunogen. To express A. nidulans phytase in a plant, the full-length of phy was cloned into a plant expression binary vector, pPZP212. The resultant construct was tested for its transient expression by Agrobacterium-infiltration into Nicotiana benthamiana leaves. Compared with a control, the agro-infiltrated leaf tissues showed the presence of phy mRNA and its high expression level in N. benthamiana. The recombinant phytase (rPhy-P, 62 kDa was strongly reacted with the polyclonal antibody against the nonglycosylated rPhy-E. The rPhy-P showed glycosylation, two pH optima (pH 4.5 and pH 5.5, an optimum temperature at 45~55 °C, thermostability and broad substrate specificities. After deglycosylation by peptide-N-glycosidase F (PNGase-F, the rPhy-P significantly lost the phytase activity and retained 1/9 of the original activity after 10 min of incubation at 45 °C. Therefore, the deglycosylation caused a significant reduction in enzyme thermostability. In animal experiments, oral administration of the rPhy-P at 1500 U/kg body weight/day for seven days caused a significant reduction of phosphorus excretion by 16% in rat feces. Besides, the rPhy-P did not result in any toxicological changes and clinical signs.

  9. Structural basis for substrate specificity of mammalian neuraminidases.

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    Victoria Smutova

    Full Text Available The removal of sialic acid (Sia residues from glycoconjugates in vertebrates is mediated by a family of neuraminidases (sialidases consisting of Neu1, Neu2, Neu3 and Neu4 enzymes. The enzymes play distinct physiological roles, but their ability to discriminate between the types of linkages connecting Sia and adjacent residues and between the identity and arrangement of the underlying sugars has never been systematically studied. Here we analyzed the specificity of neuraminidases by studying the kinetics of hydrolysis of BODIPY-labeled substrates containing common mammalian sialylated oligosaccharides: 3'Sia-LacNAc, 3'SiaLac, SiaLex, SiaLea, SiaLec, 6'SiaLac, and 6'SiaLacNAc. We found significant differences in substrate specificity of the enzymes towards the substrates containing α2,6-linked Sia, which were readily cleaved by Neu3 and Neu1 but not by Neu4 and Neu2. The presence of a branching 2-Fuc inhibited Neu2 and Neu4, but had almost no effect on Neu1 or Neu3. The nature of the sugar residue at the reducing end, either glucose (Glc or N-acetyl-D-glucosamine (GlcNAc had only a minor effect on all neuraminidases, whereas core structure (1,3 or 1,4 bond between D-galactose (Gal and GlcNAc was found to be important for Neu4 strongly preferring β3 (core 1 to β4 (core 2 isomer. Neu3 and Neu4 were in general more active than Neu1 and Neu2, likely due to their preference for hydrophobic substrates. Neu2 and Neu3 were examined by molecular dynamics to identify favorable substrate orientations in the binding sites and interpret the differences in their specificities. Finally, using knockout mouse models, we confirmed that the substrate specificities observed in vitro were recapitulated in enzymes found in mouse brain tissues. Our data for the first time provide evidence for the characteristic substrate preferences of neuraminidases and their ability to discriminate between distinct sialoside targets.

  10. Unnatural amino acids increase activity and specificity of synthetic substrates for human and malarial cathepsin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poreba, Marcin; Mihelic, Marko; Krai, Priscilla; Rajkovic, Jelena; Krezel, Artur; Pawelczak, Malgorzata; Klemba, Michael; Turk, Dusan; Turk, Boris; Latajka, Rafal; Drag, Marcin

    2014-04-01

    Mammalian cathepsin C is primarily responsible for the removal of N-terminal dipeptides and activation of several serine proteases in inflammatory or immune cells, while its malarial parasite ortholog dipeptidyl aminopeptidase 1 plays a crucial role in catabolizing the hemoglobin of its host erythrocyte. In this report, we describe the systematic substrate specificity analysis of three cathepsin C orthologs from Homo sapiens (human), Bos taurus (bovine) and Plasmodium falciparum (malaria parasite). Here, we present a new approach with a tailored fluorogenic substrate library designed and synthesized to probe the S1 and S2 pocket preferences of these enzymes with both natural and a broad range of unnatural amino acids. Our approach identified very efficiently hydrolyzed substrates containing unnatural amino acids, which resulted in the design of significantly better substrates than those previously known. Additionally, in this study significant differences in terms of the structures of optimal substrates for human and malarial orthologs are important from the therapeutic point of view. These data can be also used for the design of specific inhibitors or activity-based probes.

  11. Non-competitive ELISA with broad specificity for microcystins and nodularins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sultana Akter

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Simple and cost-effective methods with sufficient sensitivities for preliminary screening of cyanobacterial toxins are in high demand for assessing water quality and safety. We have recently developed a highly sensitive and rapid time-resolved fluorometry based non-competitive immunoassay for detection of microcystins and nodularins. The assay is based on a synthetic broad-specific anti-immunocomplex antibody SA51D1 capable of recognizing the immunocomplex formed by a generic anti-Adda monoclonal antibody (mAb bound to either microcystins or nodularins. Using the same antibody pair, here we describe a very simple and cost-efficient non-competitive ELISA test for microcystins and nodularins based on conventional alkaline phosphatase (AP activity measurement. The recombinant SA51D1 single-chain fragment of antibody variable domain (scFv was produced as a fusion with bacterial alkaline phosphatase in Escherichia coli. After one step affinity purification through His-tag, the scFv-AP fusion protein could directly be used in the assay. For the assay, toxin standard/sample, biotinylated anti-Adda mAb and the scFv-AP were incubated together for one hour on streptavidin-coated microtiter wells, washed and AP activity was then measured by incubating (1 h at 37 ˚C with chromogenic substrate para-nitrophenylphosphate (pNPP. The assay was capable of detecting all the eleven tested toxin variants (microcystin-LR, -dmLR, -RR, -dmRR, -YR, LA -LY, -LF -LW, -WR, and nodularin-R below WHO guide line value of 1 µg L-1. The detection limit (based on blank+3SD response for microcystin-LR was ~0.2 µg L-1. The assay was verified using spiked (0.25 - 4 µg L-1 of microcystin-LR tap, river and lake water samples with recoveries from 64 to 101%. The assay showed good correlation (r2>0.9 with four reference methods for its performance in detecting extracted intracellular microcystin/nodularin from 17 natural surface water samples. The described easy-to-perform assay

  12. A loop of coagulation factor VIIa influencing macromolecular substrate specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjelke, Jais R; Persson, Egon; Rasmussen, Hanne B

    2006-01-01

    Coagulation factor VIIa (FVIIa) belongs to a family of proteases being part of the stepwise, self-amplifying blood coagulation cascade. To investigate the impact of the mutation Met(298{156})Lys in FVIIa, we replaced the Gly(283{140})-Met(298{156}) loop with the corresponding loop of factor Xa....../Met(298{156})Lys-FVIIa with almost the same activity and specificity profile. We conclude that a lysine residue in position 298{156} of FVIIa requires a hydrophilic environment to be fully accommodated. This position appears critical for substrate specificity among the proteases of the blood coagulation...

  13. Molecular mechanism of strict substrate specificity of an extradiol dioxygenase, DesB, derived from Sphingobium sp. SYK-6.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keisuke Sugimoto

    Full Text Available DesB, which is derived from Sphingobium sp. SYK-6, is a type II extradiol dioxygenase that catalyzes a ring opening reaction of gallate. While typical extradiol dioxygenases show broad substrate specificity, DesB has strict substrate specificity for gallate. The substrate specificity of DesB seems to be required for the efficient growth of S. sp. SYK-6 using lignin-derived aromatic compounds. Since direct coordination of hydroxyl groups of the substrate to the non-heme iron in the active site is a critical step for the catalytic reaction of the extradiol dioxygenases, the mechanism of the substrate recognition and coordination of DesB was analyzed by biochemical and crystallographic methods. Our study demonstrated that the direct coordination between the non-heme iron and hydroxyl groups of the substrate requires a large shift of the Fe (II ion in the active site. Mutational analysis revealed that His124 and His192 in the active site are essential to the catalytic reaction of DesB. His124, which interacts with OH (4 of the bound gallate, seems to contribute to proper positioning of the substrate in the active site. His192, which is located close to OH (3 of the gallate, is likely to serve as the catalytic base. Glu377' interacts with OH (5 of the gallate and seems to play a critical role in the substrate specificity. Our biochemical and structural study showed the substrate recognition and catalytic mechanisms of DesB.

  14. Determination of substrate specificity of polyamine transporters in roseobacter species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madhuri, S.; Mou, X.

    2012-12-01

    Polyamines, such as cadaverine, putrescine, spermidine, spermine and norspermine are a class of dissolved organic nitrogen (DON) that is ubiquitously found in marine environments. Intracellular polyamines are important in a variety of biological reactions, such as nucleic acid synthesis and protein synthesis. Free polyamines in seawater can be transported into bacterial cells by ABC transporter systems, each of which consists of four components including one substrate binding protein, one ATPase and two permeases. In silico analysis of marine bacterial genomes has revealed that roseobacter, a numerically and ecologically important taxa of marine bacteria, have at least two sets of polyamine transporter genes. This study was to examine the potential preference of roseobacter to different polyamine compounds and the substrate specificity of different polyamine transporters. Eleven roseobacter species, which genomes have been sequenced, were grown in defined media supplied with single polyamine compound as the sole carbon and nitrogen source. Growth assay showed a small number of roseobacter isolates to be generalist showing no preference among the tested polyamines (Ruegeria pomeroyi DSS-3, Roseovarius sp. TM1035, Roseovarius nubinhibens ISM, Jannaschia sp. CCS1 and Sagittula stellata E-37), whereas other isolates were specilists and were specific on polyamine compounds (Roseobacter sp. CCS2 and Roseobacter denitrificans OCh 114). Primers that probe poly-1 and pot-D genes, the two genes that encode common polyamine-binding genes of polyamine transporter systems were designed using net primer and primer design program. The specificity of the primers was validated by PCR followed by amplicon sequencing. Single step reverse transcription quantitative polymerase chain reactions (RT-qPCR) was performed to investigate substrate specificity of poly-1 and pot-D genes. Key-words Roseobacter, polyamine, polyamine transporter, dissolved organic nitrogen

  15. A Novel Scaffold for Developing Specific or Broad-Spectrum Chitinase Inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Xi; Kumar, Ashutosh; Liu, Tian; Zhang, Kam Y J; Yang, Qing

    2016-12-27

    Chitinases play important roles in pathogen invasion, arthropod molting, plant defense, and human inflammation. Inhibition of the activity of a typical chitinase by small molecules is of significance in drug development and biological research. On the basis of a recent reported crystal structure of OfChtI, the insect chitinase derived from the pest Ostrinia furnacalis, we computationally identified 17 compounds from a library of over 4 million chemicals by two rounds virtual screening. Among these, three compounds from one chemical class inhibited the activity of OfChtI with single-digit-micromolar IC50 values, and one compound from another chemical class exhibited a broad inhibitory activity not only toward OfChtI but also toward bacterial, fungal, and human chitinases. A new scaffold was discovered, and a structure-inhibitory activity relationship was proposed. This work may provide a novel starting point for the development of specific or broad-spectrum chitinase inhibitors.

  16. Substrate specificity determinants of the methanogen homoaconitase enzyme: structure and function of small subunit residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeyakanthan, Jeyaraman [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center; Drevland, Randy [University of Texas, Austin; Gayathri, Dasara [University of Madras; Velmurugan, Devadasan [University of Madras; Shinkai, Akeo [SPring8/JASRI, Mikazuki, Hyogo and RIKEN, Japan; Kuramitsu, Seiki [SPring8/JASRI, Mikazuki, Hyogo and RIKEN, Japan; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki [University of Tokyo, Tokyo, Japan; Graham, David E [ORNL

    2010-01-01

    The aconitase family of hydro-lyase enzymes includes three classes of proteins that catalyze the isomerization of -hydroxyacids to -hydroxyacids. Besides aconitase, isopropylmalate isomerase (IPMI) proteins specifically catalyze the isomerization of , -dicarboxylates with hydrophobic -chain groups, and homoaconitase (HACN) proteins catalyze the isomerization of tricarboxylates with variable chain length -carboxylate groups. These enzymes stereospecific hydro-lyase activities make them attractive catalysts to produce diastereomers from unsaturated precursors. However, sequence similarity and convergent evolution among these proteins leads to widespread misannotation and uncertainty about gene function. To find the substrate specificity determinants of homologous IPMI and HACN proteins from Methanocaldococcus jannaschii, the small-subunit HACN protein (MJ1271) was crystallized for X-ray diffraction. The structural model showed characteristic residues in a flexible loop region between 2 and 3 that distinguish HACN from IPMI and aconitase proteins. Site-directed mutagenesis of MJ1271 produced loop-region variant proteins that were reconstituted with wild-type MJ1003 large-subunit protein. The heteromers formed promiscuous hydro-lyases with reduced activity but broader substrate specificity. Both R26K and R26V variants formed relatively efficient IPMI enzymes, while the T27A variant had uniformly lower specificity constants for both IPMI and HACN substrates. The R26V T27Y variant resembles the MJ1277 IPMI small subunit in its flexible loop sequence, but demonstrated the broad substrate specificity of the R26V variant. These mutations may reverse the evolution of HACN activity from an ancestral IPMI gene, demonstrating the evolutionary potential for promiscuity in hydro-lyase enzymes. Understanding these specificity determinants enables the functional reannotation of paralogous HACN and IPMI genes in numerous genome sequences. These structural and kinetic results will

  17. Substrate specificity of transthyretin: identification of natural substrates in the nervous system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liz, Márcia A; Fleming, Carolina E; Nunes, Ana F; Almeida, Maria R; Mar, Fernando M; Choe, Youngchool; Craik, Charles S; Powers, James C; Bogyo, Matthew; Sousa, Mónica M

    2009-04-15

    Besides functioning as the plasma transporter of retinol and thyroxine, TTR (transthyretin) is a protease, cleaving apoA-I (apolipoprotein A-I) after a phenylalanine residue. In the present study, we further investigated TTR substrate specificity. By using both P-diverse libraries and a library of phosphonate inhibitors, a TTR preference for a lysine residue in P1 was determined, suggesting that TTR might have a dual specificity and that, in addition to apoA-I, other TTR substrates might exist. Previous studies revealed that TTR is involved in the homoeostasis of the nervous system, as it participates in neuropeptide maturation and enhances nerve regeneration. We investigated whether TTR proteolytic activity is involved in these functions. Both wild-type TTR and TTR(prot-) (proteolytically inactive TTR) had a similar effect in the expression of peptidylglycine alpha-amidating mono-oxygenase, the rate-limiting enzyme in neuropeptide amidation, excluding the involvement of TTR proteolytic activity in neuropeptide maturation. However, TTR was able to cleave amidated NPY (neuropeptide Y), probably contributing to the increased NPY levels reported in TTR-knockout mice. To assess the involvement of TTR proteolytic activity in axonal regeneration, neurite outgrowth of cells cultivated with wild-type TTR or TTR(prot-), was measured. Cells grown with TTR(prot-) displayed decreased neurite length, thereby suggesting that TTR proteolytic activity is important for its function as a regeneration enhancer. By showing that TTR is able to cleave NPY and that its proteolytic activity affects axonal growth, the present study shows that TTR has natural substrates in the nervous system, establishing further its relevance in neurobiology.

  18. Molecular Determinants of Substrate Specificity in Plant 5-Methylthioadenosine Nucleosidases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siu,K.; Lee, J.; Sufrin, J.; Moffatt, B.; McMillan, M.; Cornell, K.; Isom, C.; Howell, L.

    2008-01-01

    5?-Methylthioadenosine (MTA)/S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH) nucleosidase (MTAN) is essential for cellular metabolism and development in many bacterial species. While the enzyme is found in plants, plant MTANs appear to select for MTA preferentially, with little or no affinity for SAH. To understand what determines substrate specificity in this enzyme, MTAN homologues from Arabidopsis thaliana (AtMTAN1 and AtMTAN2, which are referred to as AtMTN1 and AtMTN2 in the plant literature) have been characterized kinetically. While both homologues hydrolyze MTA with comparable kinetic parameters, only AtMTAN2 shows activity towards SAH. AtMTAN2 also has higher catalytic activity towards other substrate analogues with longer 5?-substituents. The structures of apo AtMTAN1 and its complexes with the substrate- and transition-state-analogues, 5?-methylthiotubercidin and formycin A, respectively, have been determined at 2.0-1.8 Angstroms resolution. A homology model of AtMTAN2 was generated using the AtMTAN1 structures. Comparison of the AtMTAN1 and AtMTAN2 structures reveals that only three residues in the active site differ between the two enzymes. Our analysis suggests that two of these residues, Leu181/Met168 and Phe148/Leu135 in AtMTAN1/AtMTAN2, likely account for the divergence in specificity of the enzymes. Comparison of the AtMTAN1 and available Escherichia coli MTAN (EcMTAN) structures suggests that a combination of differences in the 5?-alkylthio binding region and reduced conformational flexibility in the AtMTAN1 active site likely contribute to its reduced efficiency in binding substrate analogues with longer 5?-substituents. In addition, in contrast to EcMTAN, the active site of AtMTAN1 remains solvated in its ligand-bound forms. As the apparent pKa of an amino acid depends on its local environment, the putative catalytic acid Asp225 in AtMTAN1 may not be protonated at physiological pH and this suggests the transition state of AtMTAN1, like human MTA phosphorylase and

  19. NASA Broad Specification Fuels Combustion Technology program - Pratt and Whitney Aircraft Phase I results and status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lohmann, R. P.; Fear, J. S.

    1982-01-01

    In connection with increases in the cost of fuels and the reduced availability of high quality petroleum crude, a modification of fuel specifications has been considered to allow acceptance of poorer quality fuels. To obtain the information upon which a selection of appropriate fuels for aircraft can be based, the Broad Specification Fuels Combustion Technology program was formulated by NASA. A description is presented of program-related investigations conducted by an American aerospace company. The specific objective of Phase I of this program has been to evaluate the impact of the use of broadened properties fuels on combustor design through comprehensive combustor rig testing. Attention is given to combustor concepts, experimental evaluation, results obtained with single stage combustors, the stage combustor concept, and the capability of a variable geometry combustor.

  20. Molecular basis for the substrate specificity of quorum signal synthases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Shi-Hui; Frane, Nicole D; Christensen, Quin H; Greenberg, E Peter; Nagarajan, Rajesh; Nair, Satish K

    2017-08-22

    In several Proteobacteria , LuxI-type enzymes catalyze the biosynthesis of acyl-homoserine lactones (AHL) signals using S -adenosyl-l-methionine and either cellular acyl carrier protein (ACP)-coupled fatty acids or CoA-aryl/acyl moieties as progenitors. Little is known about the molecular mechanism of signal biosynthesis, the basis for substrate specificity, or the rationale for donor specificity for any LuxI member. Here, we present several cocrystal structures of BjaI, a CoA-dependent LuxI homolog that represent views of enzyme complexes that exist along the reaction coordinate of signal synthesis. Complementary biophysical, structure-function, and kinetic analysis define the features that facilitate the unusual acyl conjugation with S -adenosylmethionine (SAM). We also identify the determinant that establishes specificity for the acyl donor and identify residues that are critical for acyl/aryl specificity. These results highlight how a prevalent scaffold has evolved to catalyze quorum signal synthesis and provide a framework for the design of small-molecule antagonists of quorum signaling.

  1. Substrate Specificity and Enzyme Recycling Using Chitosan Immobilized Laccase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Everton Skoronski

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The immobilization of laccase (Aspergillus sp. on chitosan by cross-linking and its application in bioconversion of phenolic compounds in batch reactors were studied. Investigation was performed using laccase immobilized via chemical cross-linking due to the higher enzymatic operational stability of this method as compared to immobilization via physical adsorption. To assess the influence of different substrate functional groups on the enzyme’s catalytic efficiency, substrate specificity was investigated using chitosan-immobilized laccase and eighteen different phenol derivatives. It was observed that 4-nitrophenol was not oxidized, while 2,5-xylenol, 2,6-xylenol, 2,3,5-trimethylphenol, syringaldazine, 2,6-dimetoxyphenol and ethylphenol showed reaction yields up 90% at 40 °C. The kinetic of process, enzyme recyclability and operational stability were studied. In batch reactors, it was not possible to reuse the enzyme when it was applied to syringaldazne bioconversion. However, when the enzyme was applied to bioconversion of 2,6-DMP, the activity was stable for eight reaction batches.

  2. Detailed characterization of the substrate specificity of mouse wax synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklaszewska, Magdalena; Kawiński, Adam; Banaś, Antoni

    2013-01-01

    Wax synthases are membrane-associated enzymes catalysing the esterification reaction between fatty acyl-CoA and a long chain fatty alcohol. In living organisms, wax esters function as storage materials or provide protection against harmful environmental influences. In industry, they are used as ingredients for the production of lubricants, pharmaceuticals, and cosmetics. Currently the biological sources of wax esters are limited to jojoba oil. In order to establish a large-scale production of desired wax esters in transgenic high-yielding oilseed plants, enzymes involved in wax esters synthesis from different biological resources should be characterized in detail taking into consideration their substrate specificity. Therefore, this study aims at determining the substrate specificity of one of such enzymes -- the mouse wax synthase. The gene encoding this enzyme was expressed heterologously in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In the in vitro assays (using microsomal fraction from transgenic yeast), we evaluated the preferences of mouse wax synthase towards a set of combinations of 11 acyl-CoAs with 17 fatty alcohols. The highest activity was observed for 14:0-CoA, 12:0-CoA, and 16:0-CoA in combination with medium chain alcohols (up to 5.2, 3.4, and 3.3 nmol wax esters/min/mg microsomal protein, respectively). Unsaturated alcohols longer than 18°C were better utilized by the enzyme in comparison to the saturated ones. Combinations of all tested alcohols with 20:0-CoA, 22:1-CoA, or Ric-CoA were poorly utilized by the enzyme, and conjugated acyl-CoAs were not utilized at all. Apart from the wax synthase activity, mouse wax synthase also exhibited a very low acyl-CoA:diacylglycerol acyltransferase activity. However, it displayed neither acyl-CoA:monoacylglycerol acyltransferase, nor acyl-CoA:sterol acyltransferase activity.

  3. Bacillus subtilis 5'-nucleotidases with various functions and substrate specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terakawa, Ayako; Natsume, Ayane; Okada, Atsushi; Nishihata, Shogo; Kuse, Junko; Tanaka, Kosei; Takenaka, Shinji; Ishikawa, Shu; Yoshida, Ken-Ichi

    2016-10-26

    In Escherichia coli, nagD, yrfG, yjjG, yieH, yigL, surE, and yfbR encode 5'-nucleotidases that hydrolyze the phosphate group of 5'-nucleotides. In Bacillus subtilis, genes encoding 5'-nucleotidase have remained to be identified. We found that B. subtilis ycsE, araL, yutF, ysaA, and yqeG show suggestive similarities to nagD. Here, we expressed them in E. coli to purify the respective His 6 -tagged proteins. YcsE exhibited significant 5'-nucleotidase activity with a broader specificity, whereas the other four enzymes had rather weak but suggestive activities with various capacities and substrate specificities. In contrast, B. subtilis yktC shares high similarity with E. coli suhB encoding an inositol monophosphatase. YktC exhibited inositol monophosphatase activity as well as 5'-nucleotidase activity preferential for GMP and IMP. The ycsE, yktC, and yqeG genes are induced by oxidative stress and were dispensable, although yqeG was required to maintain normal growth on solid medium. In the presence of diamide, only mutants lacking yktC exhibited enhanced growth defects, whereas the other mutants without ycsE or yqeG did not. Accordingly, in B. subtilis, at least YcsE and YktC acted as major 5'-nucleotidases and the four minor enzymes might function when the intracellular concentrations of substrates are sufficiently high. In addition, YktC is involved in resistance to oxidative stress caused by diamide, while YqeG is necessary for normal colony formation on solid medium.

  4. Allosteric Control of Substrate Specificity of the Escherichia coli ADP-Glucose Pyrophosphorylase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana C. Ebrecht

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The substrate specificity of enzymes is crucial to control the fate of metabolites to different pathways. However, there is growing evidence that many enzymes can catalyze alternative reactions. This promiscuous behavior has important implications in protein evolution and the acquisition of new functions. The question is how the undesirable outcomes of in vivo promiscuity can be prevented. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase from Escherichia coli is an example of an enzyme that needs to select the correct substrate from a broad spectrum of alternatives. This selection will guide the flow of carbohydrate metabolism toward the synthesis of reserve polysaccharides. Here, we show that the allosteric activator fructose-1,6-bisphosphate plays a role in such selection by increasing the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme toward the use of ATP rather than other nucleotides. In the presence of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, the kcat/S0.5 for ATP was near ~600-fold higher that other nucleotides, whereas in the absence of activator was only ~3-fold higher. We propose that the allosteric regulation of certain enzymes is an evolutionary mechanism of adaptation for the selection of specific substrates.

  5. Allosteric Control of Substrate Specificity of the Escherichia coli ADP-glucose Pyrophosphorylase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebrecht, Ana C.; Solamen, Ligin; Hill, Benjamin L.; Iglesias, Alberto A.; Olsen, Kenneth W.; Ballicora, Miguel A.

    2017-06-01

    The substrate specificity of enzymes is crucial to control the fate of metabolites to different pathways. However, there is growing evidence that many enzymes can catalyze alternative reactions. This promiscuous behavior has important implications in protein evolution and the acquisition of new functions. The question is how the undesirable outcomes of in vivo promiscuity can be prevented. ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase from Escherichia coli is an example of an enzyme that needs to select the correct substrate from a broad spectrum of alternatives. This selection will guide the flow of carbohydrate metabolism towards the synthesis of reserve polysaccharides. Here, we show that the allosteric activator fructose-1,6-bisphosphate plays a role in such selection by increasing the catalytic efficiency of the enzyme towards the use of ATP rather than other nucleotides. In the presence of fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, the kcat/S0.5 for ATP was near 600-fold higher that other nucleotides, whereas in the absence of activator was only 3-fold higher. We propose that the allosteric regulation of certain enzymes is an evolutionary mechanism of adaptation for the selection of specific substrates.

  6. Origin and evolution of transporter substrate specificity within the NPF family

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Morten Egevang; Xu, Deyang; Crocoll, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    across more than 2500 species outside of the Brassicales. Biochemical characterization of orthologs along the phylogenetic lineage from cassava to A. thaliana, suggests that alterations in the electrogenicity of the transporters accompanied changes in substrate specificity. Linking the evolutionary path...... of transporter substrate specificities to that of the biosynthetic pathways, exemplify how transporter substrate specificities originate and evolve as new biosynthesis pathways emerge....

  7. Chimeric hemagglutinin influenza virus vaccine constructs elicit broadly protective stalk-specific antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krammer, Florian; Pica, Natalie; Hai, Rong; Margine, Irina; Palese, Peter

    2013-06-01

    Current influenza virus vaccine strategies stimulate immune responses toward the globular head domain of the hemagglutinin protein in order to inhibit key steps of the virus life cycle. Because this domain is highly variable across strains, new vaccine formulations are required in most years. Here we demonstrate a novel vaccine strategy that generates immunity to the highly conserved stalk domain by using chimeric hemagglutinin constructs that express unique head and stalk combinations. By repeatedly immunizing mice with constructs that expressed the same stalk but an irrelevant head, we specifically stimulated a stalk-directed response that provided broad-based heterologous and heterosubtypic immunity in mice. Notably, our vaccination scheme provides a universal vaccine approach that protects against challenge with an H5 subtype virus. Furthermore, through in vivo studies using passively transferred antibodies or depletion of CD8(+) T cells, we demonstrated the critical role that humoral mechanisms of immunity play in the protection observed. The present data suggest that a vaccine strategy based on the stalk domain of the hemagglutinin protein could be used in humans to broadly protect against a variety of influenza virus subtypes.

  8. An ABC-type multidrug transporter of Lactococcus lactis possesses an exceptionally broad substrate specificity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Poelarends, GJ; Mazurkiewicz, P; Putman, M; Cool, RH; van Veen, HW; Konings, WN

    2000-01-01

    LmrA is a 590-amino acid membrane protein which confers multidrug resistance on Lactococcus lactis cells by extruding amphiphilic compounds from the inner leaflet of the cytoplasmic membrane at the expense of ATP hydrolysis. Its structural and functional characteristics place it in the

  9. Substrate specificity of thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent 2-oxo-acid decarboxylases in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romagnoli, Gabriele; Luttik, Marijke A H; Kötter, Peter; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2012-11-01

    Fusel alcohols are precursors and contributors to flavor and aroma compounds in fermented beverages, and some are under investigation as biofuels. The decarboxylation of 2-oxo acids is a key step in the Ehrlich pathway for fusel alcohol production. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, five genes share sequence similarity with genes encoding thiamine pyrophosphate-dependent 2-oxo-acid decarboxylases (2ODCs). PDC1, PDC5, and PDC6 encode differentially regulated pyruvate decarboxylase isoenzymes; ARO10 encodes a 2-oxo-acid decarboxylase with broad substrate specificity, and THI3 has not yet been shown to encode an active decarboxylase. Despite the importance of fusel alcohol production in S. cerevisiae, the substrate specificities of these five 2ODCs have not been systematically compared. When the five 2ODCs were individually overexpressed in a pdc1Δ pdc5Δ pdc6Δ aro10Δ thi3Δ strain, only Pdc1, Pdc5, and Pdc6 catalyzed the decarboxylation of the linear-chain 2-oxo acids pyruvate, 2-oxo-butanoate, and 2-oxo-pentanoate in cell extracts. The presence of a Pdc isoenzyme was also required for the production of n-propanol and n-butanol in cultures grown on threonine and norvaline, respectively, as nitrogen sources. These results demonstrate the importance of pyruvate decarboxylases in the natural production of n-propanol and n-butanol by S. cerevisiae. No decarboxylation activity was found for Thi3 with any of the substrates tested. Only Aro10 and Pdc5 catalyzed the decarboxylation of the aromatic substrate phenylpyruvate, with Aro10 showing superior kinetic properties. Aro10, Pdc1, Pdc5, and Pdc6 exhibited activity with all branched-chain and sulfur-containing 2-oxo acids tested but with markedly different decarboxylation kinetics. The high affinity of Aro10 identified it as a key contributor to the production of branched-chain and sulfur-containing fusel alcohols.

  10. A Bystander Mechanism Explains the Specific Phenotype of a Broadly Expressed Misfolded Protein

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klabonski, Lauren; Senthilkumar, Lakshana; Gidalevitz, Tali

    2016-01-01

    Misfolded proteins in transgenic models of conformational diseases interfere with proteostasis machinery and compromise the function of many structurally and functionally unrelated metastable proteins. This collateral damage to cellular proteins has been termed 'bystander' mechanism. How a single misfolded protein overwhelms the proteostasis, and how broadly-expressed mutant proteins cause cell type-selective phenotypes in disease are open questions. We tested the gain-of-function mechanism of a R37C folding mutation in an endogenous IGF-like C.elegans protein DAF-28. DAF-28(R37C) is broadly expressed, but only causes dysfunction in one specific neuron, ASI, leading to a distinct developmental phenotype. We find that this phenotype is caused by selective disruption of normal biogenesis of an unrelated endogenous protein, DAF-7/TGF-β. The combined deficiency of DAF-28 and DAF-7 biogenesis, but not of DAF-28 alone, explains the gain-of-function phenotype—deficient pro-growth signaling by the ASI neuron. Using functional, fluorescently-tagged protein, we find that, in animals with mutant DAF-28/IGF, the wild-type DAF-7/TGF-β is mislocalized to and accumulates in the proximal axon of the ASI neuron. Activation of two different branches of the unfolded protein response can modulate both the developmental phenotype and DAF-7 mislocalization in DAF-28(R37C) animals, but appear to act through divergent mechanisms. Our finding that bystander targeting of TGF-β explains the phenotype caused by a folding mutation in an IGF-like protein suggests that, in conformational diseases, bystander misfolding may specify the distinct phenotypes caused by different folding mutations. PMID:27926939

  11. A Bystander Mechanism Explains the Specific Phenotype of a Broadly Expressed Misfolded Protein.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren Klabonski

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Misfolded proteins in transgenic models of conformational diseases interfere with proteostasis machinery and compromise the function of many structurally and functionally unrelated metastable proteins. This collateral damage to cellular proteins has been termed 'bystander' mechanism. How a single misfolded protein overwhelms the proteostasis, and how broadly-expressed mutant proteins cause cell type-selective phenotypes in disease are open questions. We tested the gain-of-function mechanism of a R37C folding mutation in an endogenous IGF-like C.elegans protein DAF-28. DAF-28(R37C is broadly expressed, but only causes dysfunction in one specific neuron, ASI, leading to a distinct developmental phenotype. We find that this phenotype is caused by selective disruption of normal biogenesis of an unrelated endogenous protein, DAF-7/TGF-β. The combined deficiency of DAF-28 and DAF-7 biogenesis, but not of DAF-28 alone, explains the gain-of-function phenotype-deficient pro-growth signaling by the ASI neuron. Using functional, fluorescently-tagged protein, we find that, in animals with mutant DAF-28/IGF, the wild-type DAF-7/TGF-β is mislocalized to and accumulates in the proximal axon of the ASI neuron. Activation of two different branches of the unfolded protein response can modulate both the developmental phenotype and DAF-7 mislocalization in DAF-28(R37C animals, but appear to act through divergent mechanisms. Our finding that bystander targeting of TGF-β explains the phenotype caused by a folding mutation in an IGF-like protein suggests that, in conformational diseases, bystander misfolding may specify the distinct phenotypes caused by different folding mutations.

  12. Screening of recombinant glycosyltransferases reveals the broad acceptor specificity of stevia UGT-76G1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dewitte, Griet; Walmagh, Maarten; Diricks, Margo; Lepak, Alexander; Gutmann, Alexander; Nidetzky, Bernd; Desmet, Tom

    2016-09-10

    UDP-glycosyltransferases (UGTs) are a promising class of biocatalysts that offer a sustainable alternative for chemical glycosylation of natural products. In this study, we aimed to characterize plant-derived UGTs from the GT-1 family with an emphasis on their acceptor promiscuity and their potential application in glycosylation processes. Recombinant expression in E. coli provided sufficient amounts of enzyme for the in-depth characterization of the salicylic acid UGT from Capsella rubella (UGT-SACr) and the stevia UGT from Stevia rebaudiana (UGT-76G1Sr). The latter was found to have a remarkably broad specificity with activities on a wide diversity of structures, from aliphatic and branched alcohols, over small phenolics to larger flavonoids, terpenoids and even higher glycoside compounds. As an example for its industrial potential, the glycosylation of curcumin was thoroughly evaluated. Under optimized conditions, 96% of curcumin was converted within 24h into the corresponding curcumin β-glycosides. In addition, the reaction was performed in a coupled system with sucrose synthase from Glycine max, to enable the cost-efficient (re)generation of UDP-Glc from sucrose as abundant and renewable resource. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. HIV-1-Specific Chimeric Antigen Receptors Based on Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Ayub; Kitchen, Scott G; Chen, Irvin S Y; Ng, Hwee L; Zack, Jerome A; Yang, Otto O

    2016-08-01

    Although the use of chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) based on single-chain antibodies for gene immunotherapy of cancers is increasing due to promising recent results, the earliest CAR therapeutic trials were done for HIV-1 infection in the late 1990s. This approach utilized a CAR based on human CD4 as a binding domain and was abandoned for a lack of efficacy. The growing number of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (BNAbs) offers the opportunity to generate novel CARs that may be more active and revisit this modality for HIV-1 immunotherapy. We used sequences from seven well-defined BNAbs varying in binding sites and generated single-chain-antibody-based CARs. These CARs included 10E8, 3BNC117, PG9, PGT126, PGT128, VRC01, and X5. Each novel CAR exhibited conformationally relevant expression on the surface of transduced cells, mediated specific proliferation and killing in response to HIV-1-infected cells, and conferred potent antiviral activity (reduction of viral replication in log10 units) to transduced CD8(+) T lymphocytes. The antiviral activity of these CARs was reproducible but varied according to the strain of virus. These findings indicated that BNAbs are excellent candidates for developing novel CARs to consider for the immunotherapeutic treatment of HIV-1. While chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) using single-chain antibodies as binding domains are growing in popularity for gene immunotherapy of cancers, the earliest human trials of CARs were done for HIV-1 infection. However, those trials failed, and the approach was abandoned for HIV-1. The only tested CAR against HIV-1 was based on the use of CD4 as the binding domain. The growing availability of HIV-1 broadly neutralizing antibodies (BNAbs) affords the opportunity to revisit gene immunotherapy for HIV-1 using novel CARs based on single-chain antibodies. Here we construct and test a panel of seven novel CARs based on diverse BNAb types and show that all these CARs are functional against HIV-1

  14. Proteomic analyses reveal an acidic prime side specificity for the astacin metalloprotease family reflected by physiological substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker-Pauly, Christoph; Barré, Olivier; Schilling, Oliver; Auf dem Keller, Ulrich; Ohler, Anke; Broder, Claudia; Schütte, André; Kappelhoff, Reinhild; Stöcker, Walter; Overall, Christopher M

    2011-09-01

    Astacins are secreted and membrane-bound metalloproteases with clear associations to many important pathological and physiological processes. Yet with only a few substrates described their biological roles are enigmatic. Moreover, the lack of knowledge of astacin cleavage site specificities hampers assay and drug development. Using PICS (proteomic identification of protease cleavage site specificity) and TAILS (terminal amine isotopic labeling of substrates) degradomics approaches >3000 cleavage sites were proteomically identified for five different astacins. Such broad coverage enables family-wide determination of specificities N- and C-terminal to the scissile peptide bond. Remarkably, meprin α, meprin β, and LAST_MAM proteases exhibit a strong preference for aspartate in the peptide (P)1' position because of a conserved positively charged residue in the active cleft subsite (S)1'. This unparalleled specificity has not been found for other families of extracellular proteases. Interestingly, cleavage specificity is also strongly influenced by proline in P2' or P3' leading to a rare example of subsite cooperativity. This specificity characterizes the astacins as unique contributors to extracellular proteolysis that is corroborated by known cleavage sites in procollagen I+III, VEGF (vascular endothelial growth factor)-A, IL (interleukin)-1β, and pro-kallikrein 7. Indeed, cleavage sites in VEGF-A and pro-kallikrein 7 identified by terminal amine isotopic labeling of substrates matched those reported by Edman degradation. Moreover, the novel substrate FGF-19 was validated biochemically and shown to exhibit altered biological activity after meprin processing.

  15. Isoform-Specific Substrate Inhibition Mechanism of Human Tryptophan Hydroxylase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tidemand, Kasper D; Peters, Günther H; Harris, Pernille; Stensgaard, Eva; Christensen, Hans E M

    2017-11-21

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) catalyzes the initial and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of serotonin, which is associated with a variety of disorders such as depression and irritable bowel syndrome. TPH exists in two isoforms: TPH1 and TPH2. TPH1 catalyzes the initial step in the synthesis of serotonin in the peripheral tissues, while TPH2 catalyzes this step in the brain. In this study, the steady-state kinetic mechanism for the catalytic domain of human TPH1 has been determined. Varying substrate tryptophan (Trp) and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) results in a hybrid Ping Pong-ordered mechanism in which the reaction can either occur through a Ping Pong or a sequential mechanism depending on the concentration of tryptophan. The catalytic domain of TPH1 shares a sequence identity of 81% with TPH2. Despite the high sequence identity, differences in the kinetic parameters of the isoforms have been identified; i.e., only TPH1 displays substrate tryptophan inhibition. This study demonstrates that the difference can be traced to an active site loop which displays different properties in the TPH isoforms. Steady-state kinetic results of the isoforms, and variants with point mutations in a loop lining the active site, show that the kinetic parameters of only TPH1 are significantly changed upon mutations. Mutations in the active site loop of TPH1 result in an increase in the substrate inhibition constant, Ki, and therefore turnover rate. Molecular dynamics simulations reveal that this substrate inhibition mechanism occurs through a closure of the cosubstrate, BH4, binding pocket, which is induced by Trp binding.

  16. Structure of human aspartyl aminopeptidase complexed with substrate analogue: insight into catalytic mechanism, substrate specificity and M18 peptidase family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chaikuad Apirat

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Backround Aspartyl aminopeptidase (DNPEP, with specificity towards an acidic amino acid at the N-terminus, is the only mammalian member among the poorly understood M18 peptidases. DNPEP has implicated roles in protein and peptide metabolism, as well as the renin-angiotensin system in blood pressure regulation. Despite previous enzyme and substrate characterization, structural details of DNPEP regarding ligand recognition and catalytic mechanism remain to be delineated. Results The crystal structure of human DNPEP complexed with zinc and a substrate analogue aspartate-β-hydroxamate reveals a dodecameric machinery built by domain-swapped dimers, in agreement with electron microscopy data. A structural comparison with bacterial homologues identifies unifying catalytic features among the poorly understood M18 enzymes. The bound ligands in the active site also reveal the coordination mode of the binuclear zinc centre and a substrate specificity pocket for acidic amino acids. Conclusions The DNPEP structure provides a molecular framework to understand its catalysis that is mediated by active site loop swapping, a mechanism likely adopted in other M18 and M42 metallopeptidases that form dodecameric complexes as a self-compartmentalization strategy. Small differences in the substrate binding pocket such as shape and positive charges, the latter conferred by a basic lysine residue, further provide the key to distinguishing substrate preference. Together, the structural knowledge will aid in the development of enzyme-/family-specific aminopeptidase inhibitors.

  17. Alteration in substrate specificity of horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase by an acyclic nicotinamide analog of NAD(+).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malver, Olaf; Sebastian, Mina J; Oppenheimer, Norman J

    2014-11-01

    A new, acyclic NAD-analog, acycloNAD(+) has been synthesized where the nicotinamide ribosyl moiety has been replaced by the nicotinamide (2-hydroxyethoxy)methyl moiety. The chemical properties of this analog are comparable to those of β-NAD(+) with a redox potential of -324mV and a 341nm λmax for the reduced form. Both yeast alcohol dehydrogenase (YADH) and horse liver alcohol dehydrogenase (HLADH) catalyze the reduction of acycloNAD(+) by primary alcohols. With HLADH 1-butanol has the highest Vmax at 49% that of β-NAD(+). The primary deuterium kinetic isotope effect is greater than 3 indicating a significant contribution to the rate limiting step from cleavage of the carbon-hydrogen bond. The stereochemistry of the hydride transfer in the oxidation of stereospecifically deuterium labeled n-butanol is identical to that for the reaction with β-NAD(+). In contrast to the activity toward primary alcohols there is no detectable reduction of acycloNAD(+) by secondary alcohols with HLADH although these alcohols serve as competitive inhibitors. The net effect is that acycloNAD(+) has converted horse liver ADH from a broad spectrum alcohol dehydrogenase, capable of utilizing either primary or secondary alcohols, into an exclusively primary alcohol dehydrogenase. This is the first example of an NAD analog that alters the substrate specificity of a dehydrogenase and, like site-directed mutagenesis of proteins, establishes that modifications of the coenzyme distance from the active site can be used to alter enzyme function and substrate specificity. These and other results, including the activity with α-NADH, clearly demonstrate the promiscuity of the binding interactions between dehydrogenases and the riboside phosphate of the nicotinamide moiety, thus greatly expanding the possibilities for the design of analogs and inhibitors of specific dehydrogenases. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Cooperation between Strain-Specific and Broadly Neutralizing Responses Limited Viral Escape and Prolonged the Exposure of the Broadly Neutralizing Epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anthony, Colin; York, Talita; Bekker, Valerie; Matten, David; Selhorst, Philippe; Ferreria, Roux-Cil; Garrett, Nigel J; Karim, Salim S Abdool; Morris, Lynn; Wood, Natasha T; Moore, Penny L; Williamson, Carolyn

    2017-09-15

    V3-glycan-targeting broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAbs) are a focus of HIV-1 vaccine development. Understanding the viral dynamics that stimulate the development of these antibodies can provide insights for immunogen design. We used a deep-sequencing approach, together with neutralization phenotyping, to investigate the rate and complexity of escape from V3-glycan-directed bNAbs compared to overlapping early strain-specific neutralizing antibody (ssNAb) responses to the V3/C3 region in donor CAP177. Escape from the ssNAb response occurred rapidly via an N334-to-N332 glycan switch, which took just 7.5 weeks to reach >50% frequency. In contrast, escape from the bNAbs was mediated via multiple pathways and took longer, with escape first occurring through an increase in V1 loop length, which took 46 weeks to reach 50% frequency, followed by an N332-to-N334 reversion, which took 66 weeks. Importantly, bNAb escape was incomplete, with contemporaneous neutralization observed up to 3 years postinfection. Both the ssNAb response and the bNAb response were modulated by the presence/absence of the N332 glycan, indicating an overlap between the two epitopes. Thus, selective pressure by ssNAbs to maintain the N332 glycan may have constrained the bNAb escape pathway. This slower and incomplete viral escape resulted in prolonged exposure of the bNAb epitope, which may in turn have aided the maturation of the bNAb lineage.IMPORTANCE The development of an HIV-1 vaccine is of paramount importance, and broadly neutralizing antibodies are likely to be a key component of a protective vaccine. The V3-glycan-targeting bNAb responses are among the most promising vaccine targets, as they are commonly elicited during infection. Understanding the interplay between viral evolution and the development of these antibodies provides insights that may guide immunogen design. Our work contrasted the dynamics of the early strain-specific antibodies and the later broadly neutralizing responses to

  19. Crystal structure and substrate specificity of D-galactose-6-phosphate isomerase complexed with substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Woo-Suk; Singh, Raushan Kumar; Lee, Jung-Kul; Pan, Cheol-Ho

    2013-01-01

    D-Galactose-6-phosphate isomerase from Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LacAB; EC 5.3.1.26), which is encoded by the tagatose-6-phosphate pathway gene cluster (lacABCD), catalyzes the isomerization of D-galactose-6-phosphate to D-tagatose-6-phosphate during lactose catabolism and is used to produce rare sugars as low-calorie natural sweeteners. The crystal structures of LacAB and its complex with D-tagatose-6-phosphate revealed that LacAB is a homotetramer of LacA and LacB subunits, with a structure similar to that of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (Rpi). Structurally, LacAB belongs to the RpiB/LacAB superfamily, having a Rossmann-like αβα sandwich fold as has been identified in pentose phosphate isomerase and hexose phosphate isomerase. In contrast to other family members, the LacB subunit also has a unique α7 helix in its C-terminus. One active site is distinctly located at the interface between LacA and LacB, whereas two active sites are present in RpiB. In the structure of the product complex, the phosphate group of D-tagatose-6-phosphate is bound to three arginine residues, including Arg-39, producing a different substrate orientation than that in RpiB, where the substrate binds at Asp-43. Due to the proximity of the Arg-134 residue and backbone Cα of the α6 helix in LacA to the last Asp-172 residue of LacB with a hydrogen bond, a six-carbon sugar-phosphate can bind in the larger pocket of LacAB, compared with RpiB. His-96 in the active site is important for ring opening and substrate orientation, and Cys-65 is essential for the isomerization activity of the enzyme. Two rare sugar substrates, D-psicose and D-ribulose, show optimal binding in the LacAB-substrate complex. These findings were supported by the results of LacA activity assays.

  20. Crystal structure and substrate specificity of D-galactose-6-phosphate isomerase complexed with substrates.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo-Suk Jung

    Full Text Available D-Galactose-6-phosphate isomerase from Lactobacillus rhamnosus (LacAB; EC 5.3.1.26, which is encoded by the tagatose-6-phosphate pathway gene cluster (lacABCD, catalyzes the isomerization of D-galactose-6-phosphate to D-tagatose-6-phosphate during lactose catabolism and is used to produce rare sugars as low-calorie natural sweeteners. The crystal structures of LacAB and its complex with D-tagatose-6-phosphate revealed that LacAB is a homotetramer of LacA and LacB subunits, with a structure similar to that of ribose-5-phosphate isomerase (Rpi. Structurally, LacAB belongs to the RpiB/LacAB superfamily, having a Rossmann-like αβα sandwich fold as has been identified in pentose phosphate isomerase and hexose phosphate isomerase. In contrast to other family members, the LacB subunit also has a unique α7 helix in its C-terminus. One active site is distinctly located at the interface between LacA and LacB, whereas two active sites are present in RpiB. In the structure of the product complex, the phosphate group of D-tagatose-6-phosphate is bound to three arginine residues, including Arg-39, producing a different substrate orientation than that in RpiB, where the substrate binds at Asp-43. Due to the proximity of the Arg-134 residue and backbone Cα of the α6 helix in LacA to the last Asp-172 residue of LacB with a hydrogen bond, a six-carbon sugar-phosphate can bind in the larger pocket of LacAB, compared with RpiB. His-96 in the active site is important for ring opening and substrate orientation, and Cys-65 is essential for the isomerization activity of the enzyme. Two rare sugar substrates, D-psicose and D-ribulose, show optimal binding in the LacAB-substrate complex. These findings were supported by the results of LacA activity assays.

  1. Isoform-Specific Substrate Inhibition Mechanism of Human Tryptophan Hydroxylase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tidemand, Kasper Damgaard; Peters, Günther H.J.; Harris, Pernille

    2017-01-01

    Tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH) catalyzes the initial and rate-limiting step in the biosynthesis of serotonin, which is associated with a variety of disorders such as depression and irritable bowel syndrome. TPH exists in two isoforms: TPH1 and TPH2. TPH1 catalyzes the initial step in the synthesis...... of serotonin in the peripheral tissues, while TPH2 catalyzes this step in the brain. In this study, the steady-state kinetic mechanism for the catalytic domain of human TPH1 has been determined. Varying substrate tryptophan (Trp) and tetrahydrobiopterin (BH4) results in a hybrid Ping Pong-ordered mechanism...

  2. Substrate specificity of the sialic acid biosynthetic pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacobs, Christina L.; Goon, Scarlett; Yarema, Kevin J.; Hinderlich, Stephan; Hang, Howard C.; Chai, Diana H.; Bertozzi, Carolyn R.

    2001-07-18

    Unnatural analogs of sialic acid can be delivered to mammalian cell surfaces through the metabolic transformation of unnatural N-acetylmannosamine (ManNAc) derivatives. In previous studies, mannosamine analogs bearing simple N-acyl groups up to five carbon atoms in length were recognized as substrates by the biosynthetic machinery and transformed into cell-surface sialoglycoconjugates [Keppler, O. T., et al. (2001) Glycobiology 11, 11R-18R]. Such structural alterations to cell surface glycans can be used to probe carbohydrate-dependent phenomena. This report describes our investigation into the extent of tolerance of the pathway toward additional structural alterations of the N-acyl substituent of ManNAc. A panel of analogs with ketone-containing N-acyl groups that varied in the lengthor steric bulk was chemically synthesized and tested for metabolic conversion to cell-surface glycans. We found that extension of the N-acyl chain to six, seven, or eight carbon atoms dramatically reduced utilization by the biosynthetic machinery. Likewise, branching from the linear chain reduced metabolic conversion. Quantitation of metabolic intermediates suggested that cellular metabolism is limited by the phosphorylation of the N-acylmannosamines by ManNAc 6-kinase in the first step of the pathway. This was confirmed by enzymatic assay of the partially purified enzyme with unnatural substrates. Identification of ManNAc 6-kinase as a bottleneck for unnatural sialic acid biosynthesis provides a target for expanding the metabolic promiscuity of mammalian cells.

  3. Structural and biochemical studies of sulphotransferase 18 from Arabidopsis thaliana explain its substrate specificity and reaction mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirschmann, Felix; Krause, Florian; Baruch, Petra; Chizhov, Igor; Mueller, Jonathan Wolf; Manstein, Dietmar J; Papenbrock, Jutta; Fedorov, Roman

    2017-06-23

    Sulphotransferases are a diverse group of enzymes catalysing the transfer of a sulfuryl group from 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphosulphate (PAPS) to a broad range of secondary metabolites. They exist in all kingdoms of life. In Arabidopsis thaliana (L.) Heynh. twenty-two sulphotransferase (SOT) isoforms were identified. Three of those are involved in glucosinolate (Gl) biosynthesis, glycosylated sulphur-containing aldoximes containing chemically different side chains, whose break-down products are involved in stress response against herbivores, pathogens, and abiotic stress. To explain the differences in substrate specificity of desulpho (ds)-Gl SOTs and to understand the reaction mechanism of plant SOTs, we determined the first high-resolution crystal structure of the plant ds-Gl SOT AtSOT18 in complex with 3'-phosphoadenosine 5'-phosphate (PAP) alone and together with the Gl sinigrin. These new structural insights into the determination of substrate specificity were complemented by mutagenesis studies. The structure of AtSOT18 invigorates the similarity between plant and mammalian sulphotransferases, which illustrates the evolutionary conservation of this multifunctional enzyme family. We identified the essential residues for substrate binding and catalysis and demonstrated that the catalytic mechanism is conserved between human and plant enzymes. Our study indicates that the loop-gating mechanism is likely to be a source of the substrate specificity in plants.

  4. Fucosyltransferase substrate specificity and the order of fucosylation in invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschinger, Katharina; Staudacher, Erika; Stemmer, Ute; Fabini, Gustáv; Wilson, Iain B H

    2005-05-01

    Core alpha1,6-fucosylation is a conserved feature of animal N-linked oligosaccharides being present in both invertebrates and vertebrates. To prove that the enzymatic basis for this modification is also evolutionarily conserved, cDNAs encoding the catalytic regions of the predicted Caenorhabditis elegans and Drosophila melanogaster homologs of vertebrate alpha1,6-fucosyltransferases (E.C. 2.4.1.68) were engineered for expression in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Recombinant forms of both enzymes were found to display core fucosyltransferase activity as shown by a variety of methods. Unsubstituted nonreducing terminal GlcNAc residues appeared to be an obligatory feature of the substrate for the recombinant Caenorhabditis and Drosophila alpha1,6-fucosyltransferases, as well as for native Caenorhabditis and Schistosoma mansoni core alpha1,6-fucosyltransferases. On the other hand, these alpha1,6-fucosyltransferases could not act on N-glycopeptides already carrying core alpha1,3-fucose residues, whereas recombinant Drosophila and native Schistosoma core alpha1,3-fucosyltransferases were able to use core alpha1,6-fucosylated glycans as substrates. Lewis-type fucosylation was observed with native Schistosoma extracts and could take place after core alpha1,3-fucosylation, whereas prior Lewis-type fucosylation precluded the action of the Schistosoma core alpha1,3-fucosyltransferase. Overall, we conclude that the strict order of fucosylation events, previously determined for fucosyltransferases in crude extracts from insect cell lines (core alpha1,6 before core alpha1,3), also applies for recombinant Drosophila core alpha1,3- and alpha1,6-fucosyltransferases as well as for core fucosyltransferases in schistosomal egg extracts.

  5. Nonconventional amide bond formation catalysis: programming enzyme specificity with substrate mimetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bordusa F.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reports on the design and characteristics of substrate mimetics in protease-catalyzed reactions. Firstly, the basis of protease-catalyzed peptide synthesis and the general advantages of substrate mimetics over common acyl donor components are described. The binding behavior of these artificial substrates and the mechanism of catalysis are further discussed on the basis of hydrolysis, acyl transfer, protein-ligand docking, and molecular dynamics studies on the trypsin model. The general validity of the substrate mimetic concept is illustrated by the expansion of this strategy to trypsin-like, glutamic acid-specific, and hydrophobic amino acid-specific proteases. Finally, opportunities for the combination of the substrate mimetic strategy with the chemical solid-phase peptide synthesis and the use of substrate mimetics for non-peptide organic amide synthesis are presented.

  6. Benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus. Substrate specificities and inhibition studies.

    OpenAIRE

    Mackintosh, R W; Fewson, C A

    1988-01-01

    The apparent Km and maximum velocity values of benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase and benzaldehyde dehydrogenase II from Acinetobacter calcoaceticus were determined for a range of alcohols and aldehydes and the corresponding turnover numbers and specificity constants were calculated. Benzyl alcohol was the most effective alcohol substrate for benzyl alcohol dehydrogenase. Perillyl alcohol was the second most effective substrate, and was the only non-aromatic alcohol oxidized. The other substrates o...

  7. Substrate specificity of undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase from the hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Takeshi; Ogawa, Takuya; Yoshimura, Tohru; Hemmi, Hisashi

    2013-06-28

    Cis-prenyltransferase from a hyperthermophilic archaeon Aeropyrum pernix was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified for characterization. Properties such as substrate specificity, product chain-length, thermal stability and cofactor requirement were investigated using the recombinant enzyme. In particular, the substrate specificity of the enzyme attracts interest because only dimethylallyl diphosphate and geranylfarnesyl diphosphate, both of which are unusual substrates for known cis-prenyltransferases, are likely available as an allylic primer substrate in A. pernix. From the enzymatic study, the archaeal enzyme was shown to be undecaprenyl diphosphate synthase that has anomalous substrate specificity, which results in a preference for geranylfarnesyl diphosphate. This means that the product of the enzyme, which is probably used as the precursor of the glycosyl carrier lipid, would have an undiscovered structure. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Engineering Substrate Preference in Subtilisin: Structural and Kinetic Analysis of a Specificity Mutant

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruan, Biao; London, Viktoriya; Fisher, Kathryn E.; Gallagher, D. Travis; Bryan, Philip N. (UMBI)

    2008-08-06

    Bacillus subtilisin has been a popular model protein for engineering altered substrate specificity. Although some studies have succeeded in increasing the specificity of subtilisin, they also demonstrate that high specificity is difficult to achieve solely by engineering selective substrate binding. In this paper, we analyze the structure and transient state kinetic behavior of Sbt160, a subtilisin engineered to strongly prefer substrates with phenylalanine or tyrosine at the P4 position. As in previous studies, we measure improvements in substrate affinity and overall specificity. Structural analysis of an inactive version of Sbt160 in complex with its cognate substrate reveals improved interactions at the S4 subsite with a P4 tyrosine. Comparison of transient state kinetic behavior against an optimal sequence (DFKAM) and a similar, but suboptimal, sequence (DVRAF) reveals the kinetic and thermodynamic basis for increased specificity, as well as the limitations of this approach. While highly selective substrate binding is achieved in Sbt160, several factors cause sequence specificity to fall short of that observed with natural processing subtilisins. First, for substrate sequences which are nearly optimal, the acylation reaction becomes faster than substrate dissociation. As a result, the level of discrimination among these substrates diminishes due to the coupling between substrate binding and the first chemical step (acylation). Second, although Sbt160 has 24-fold higher substrate affinity for the optimal substrate DFKAM than for DVRAF, the increased substrate binding energy is not translated into improved transition state stabilization of the acylation reaction. Finally, as interactions at subsites become stronger, the rate-determining step in peptide hydrolysis changes from acylation to product release. Thus, the release of the product becomes sluggish and leads to a low k{sub cat} for the reaction. This also leads to strong product inhibition of substrate

  9. Substrate-Specific Development of Thermophilic Bacterial Consortia by Using Chemically Pretreated Switchgrass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eichorst, Stephanie A; Joshua, Chijioke; Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon; Singh, Seema; Simmons, Blake A; Singer, Steven W

    2014-12-01

    Microbial communities that deconstruct plant biomass have broad relevance in biofuel production and global carbon cycling. Biomass pretreatments reduce plant biomass recalcitrance for increased efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis. We exploited these chemical pretreatments to study how thermophilic bacterial consortia adapt to deconstruct switchgrass (SG) biomass of various compositions. Microbial communities were adapted to untreated, ammonium fiber expansion (AFEX)-pretreated, and ionic-liquid (IL)-pretreated SG under aerobic, thermophilic conditions using green waste compost as the inoculum to study biomass deconstruction by microbial consortia. After microbial cultivation, gravimetric analysis of the residual biomass demonstrated that both AFEX and IL pretreatment enhanced the deconstruction of the SG biomass approximately 2-fold. Two-dimensional nuclear magnetic resonance (2D-NMR) experiments and acetyl bromide-reactive-lignin analysis indicated that polysaccharide hydrolysis was the dominant process occurring during microbial biomass deconstruction, and lignin remaining in the residual biomass was largely unmodified. Small-subunit (SSU) rRNA gene amplicon libraries revealed that although the dominant taxa across these chemical pretreatments were consistently represented by members of the Firmicutes, the Bacteroidetes, and Deinococcus-Thermus, the abundance of selected operational taxonomic units (OTUs) varied, suggesting adaptations to the different substrates. Combining the observations of differences in the community structure and the chemical and physical structure of the biomass, we hypothesize specific roles for individual community members in biomass deconstruction. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  10. Two nucleoside transporters in Lactococcus lactis with different substrate specificities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martinussen, Jan; Sørensen, Claus; Jendresen, Christian Bille

    2010-01-01

    , and the utilization of nucleotides is dependent on exogenous phosphatases. The composition of transporters with specificity for purine and pyrimidine nucleosides and nucleobases is subject to variation. The ability of Lactococcus lactis to transport different nucleosides across the cell membrane was characterized...... at both genetic and physiological level, using mutagenesis and by measuring the growth and uptake of nucleosides in the different mutants supplemented with different nucleosides. Two high affinity transporters were identified: BmpA-NupABC was shown to be an ABC transporter with the ability to actively...

  11. High and stable substrate specificities of microorganisms in enhanced biological phosphorus removal plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kindaichi, Tomonori; Nierychlo, Marta; Kragelund, Caroline; Nielsen, Jeppe Lund; Nielsen, Per Halkjaer

    2013-06-01

    Microbial communities are typically characterized by conditions of nutrient limitation so the availability of the resources is likely a key factor in the niche differentiation across all species and in the regulation of the community structure. In this study we have investigated whether four species exhibit any in situ short-term changes in substrate uptake pattern when exposed to variations in substrate and growth conditions. Microautoradiography was combined with fluorescence in situ hybridization to investigate in situ cell-specific substrate uptake profiles of four probe-defined coexisting species in a wastewater treatment plant with enhanced biological phosphorus removal. These were the filamentous 'Candidatus Microthrix' and Caldilinea (type 0803), the polyphosphate-accumulating organism 'Candidatus Accumulibacter', and the denitrifying Azoarcus. The experimental conditions mimicked the conditions potentially encountered in the respective environment (starvation, high/low substrate concentration, induction with specific substrates, and single/multiple substrates). The results showed that each probe-defined species exhibited very distinct and constant substrate uptake profile in time and space, which hardly changed under any of the conditions tested. Such niche partitioning implies that a significant change in substrate composition will be reflected in a changed community structure rather than the substrate uptake response from the different species. © 2012 Society for Applied Microbiology and Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  12. The Essential Role of ClpXP in Caulobacter crescentus Requires Species Constrained Substrate Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert H. Vass

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available The ClpXP protease is a highly conserved AAA+ degradation machine that is present throughout bacteria and in eukaryotic organelles. ClpXP is essential in some bacteria, such as Caulobacter crescentus, but dispensible in others, such as Escherichia coli. In Caulobacter, ClpXP normally degrades the SocB toxin and increased levels of SocB result in cell death. ClpX can be deleted in cells lacking this toxin, but these ΔclpX strains are still profoundly deficient in morphology and growth supporting the existence of additional important functions for ClpXP. In this work, we characterize aspects of ClpX crucial for its cellular function. Specifically, we show that although the E. coli ClpX functions with the Caulobacter ClpP in vitro, this variant cannot complement wildtype activity in vivo. Chimeric studies suggest that the N-terminal domain of ClpX plays a crucial, species-specific role in maintaining normal growth. We find that one defect of Caulobacter lacking the proper species of ClpX is the failure to properly proteolytically process the replication clamp loader subunit DnaX. Consistent with this, growth of ΔclpX cells is improved upon expression of a shortened form of DnaX in trans. This work reveals that a broadly conserved protease can acquire highly specific functions in different species and further reinforces the critical nature of the N-domain of ClpX in substrate choice.

  13. Tryptophan Synthase Uses an Atypical Mechanism To Achieve Substrate Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buller, Andrew R; van Roye, Paul; Murciano-Calles, Javier; Arnold, Frances H

    2016-12-27

    Tryptophan synthase (TrpS) catalyzes the final steps in the biosynthesis of l-tryptophan from l-serine (Ser) and indole-3-glycerol phosphate (IGP). We report that native TrpS can also catalyze a productive reaction with l-threonine (Thr), leading to (2S,3S)-β-methyltryptophan. Surprisingly, β-substitution occurs in vitro with a 3.4-fold higher catalytic efficiency for Ser over Thr using saturating indole, despite a >82000-fold preference for Ser in direct competition using IGP. Structural data identify a novel product binding site, and kinetic experiments clarify the atypical mechanism of specificity: Thr binds efficiently but decreases the affinity for indole and disrupts the allosteric signaling that regulates the catalytic cycle.

  14. Relative Expression Levels Rather Than Specific Activity Plays the Major Role in Determining In Vivo AKT Isoform Substrate Specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel S. Lee

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The AKT protooncogene mediates many cellular processes involved in normal development and disease states such as cancer. The three structurally similar isoforms: AKT1, AKT2, and AKT3 exhibit both functional redundancy and isoform-specific functions; however the basis for their differential signalling remains unclear. Here we show that in vitro, purified AKT3 is ∼47-fold more active than AKT1 at phosphorylating peptide and protein substrates. Despite these marked variations in specific activity between the individual isoforms, a comprehensive analysis of phosphorylation of validated AKT substrates indicated only subtle differences in signalling via individual isoforms in vivo. Therefore, we hypothesise, at least in this model system, that relative tissue/cellular abundance, rather than specific activity, plays the dominant role in determining AKT substrate specificity in situ.

  15. Induction of Virus-Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes as a Basis for the Development of Broadly Protective Influenza Vaccines

    OpenAIRE

    Hillaire, Marine L. B.; Osterhaus, Albert D M E; Guus F Rimmelzwaan

    2011-01-01

    There is considerable interest in the development of broadly protective influenza vaccines because of the continuous emergence of antigenic drift variants of seasonal influenza viruses and the threat posed by the emergence of antigenically distinct pandemic influenza viruses. It has been recognized more than three decades ago that influenza A virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes recognize epitopes located in the relatively conserved proteins like the nucleoprotein and that they cross-react ...

  16. Changes in Consumer Attitudes toward Broad-Based and Environment-Specific Sodium Policies—SummerStyles 2012 and 2015

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odom, Erika C.; Whittick, Corine; Tong, Xin; Cogswell, Mary E.

    2017-01-01

    We examined temporal changes in consumer attitudes toward broad-based actions and environment-specific policies to limit sodium in restaurants, manufactured foods, and school and workplace cafeterias from the 2012 and 2015 SummerStyle surveys. We used two online, national research panel surveys to conduct a cross-sectional analysis of 7845 U.S. adults. Measures included self-reported agreement with broad-based actions and environment-specific policies to limit sodium in restaurants, manufactured foods, school cafeterias, workplace cafeterias, and quick-serve restaurants. Wald Chi-square tests were used to examine the difference between the two survey years and multivariate logistic regression was used to obtain odds ratios. Agreement with broad-based actions to limit sodium in restaurants (45.9% agreed in 2015) and manufactured foods (56.5% agreed in 2015) did not change between 2012 and 2015. From 2012 to 2015, there was a significant increase in respondents that supported environment-specific policies to lower sodium in school cafeterias (80.0% to 84.9%; p cafeterias (71.2% to 76.6%; p < 0.0001), and quick-serve restaurants (70.8% to 76.7%; p < 0.0001). Results suggest substantial agreement and support for actions to limit sodium in commercially-processed and prepared foods since 2012, with most consumers ready for actions to lower sodium in foods served in schools, workplaces, and quick-serve restaurants. PMID:28777339

  17. Changes in Consumer Attitudes toward Broad-Based and Environment-Specific Sodium Policies-SummerStyles 2012 and 2015.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odom, Erika C; Whittick, Corine; Tong, Xin; John, Katherine A; Cogswell, Mary E

    2017-08-04

    We examined temporal changes in consumer attitudes toward broad-based actions and environment-specific policies to limit sodium in restaurants, manufactured foods, and school and workplace cafeterias from the 2012 and 2015 SummerStyle surveys. We used two online, national research panel surveys to conduct a cross-sectional analysis of 7845 U.S. adults. Measures included self-reported agreement with broad-based actions and environment-specific policies to limit sodium in restaurants, manufactured foods, school cafeterias, workplace cafeterias, and quick-serve restaurants. Wald Chi-square tests were used to examine the difference between the two survey years and multivariate logistic regression was used to obtain odds ratios. Agreement with broad-based actions to limit sodium in restaurants (45.9% agreed in 2015) and manufactured foods (56.5% agreed in 2015) did not change between 2012 and 2015. From 2012 to 2015, there was a significant increase in respondents that supported environment-specific policies to lower sodium in school cafeterias (80.0% to 84.9%; p cafeterias (71.2% to 76.6%; p < 0.0001), and quick-serve restaurants (70.8% to 76.7%; p < 0.0001). Results suggest substantial agreement and support for actions to limit sodium in commercially-processed and prepared foods since 2012, with most consumers ready for actions to lower sodium in foods served in schools, workplaces, and quick-serve restaurants.

  18. Kinetics of reactions of the Actinomadura R39 DD-peptidase with specific substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adediran, S A; Kumar, Ish; Nagarajan, Rajesh; Sauvage, Eric; Pratt, R F

    2011-01-25

    The Actinomadura R39 DD-peptidase catalyzes the hydrolysis and aminolysis of a number of small peptides and depsipeptides. Details of its substrate specificity and the nature of its in vivo substrate are not, however, well understood. This paper describes the interactions of the R39 enzyme with two peptidoglycan-mimetic substrates 3-(D-cysteinyl)propanoyl-D-alanyl-D-alanine and 3-(D-cysteinyl)propanoyl-D-alanyl-D-thiolactate. A detailed study of the reactions of the former substrate, catalyzed by the enzyme, showed DD-carboxypeptidase, DD-transpeptidase, and DD-endopeptidase activities. These results confirm the specificity of the enzyme for a free D-amino acid at the N-terminus of good substrates and indicated a preference for extended D-amino acid leaving groups. The latter was supported by determination of the structural specificity of amine nucleophiles for the acyl-enzyme generated by reaction of the enzyme with the thiolactate substrate. It was concluded that a specific substrate for this enzyme, and possibly the in vivo substrate, may consist of a partly cross-linked peptidoglycan polymer where a free side chain N-terminal un-cross-linked amino acid serves as the specific acyl group in an endopeptidase reaction. The enzyme is most likely a DD-endopeptidase in vivo. pH-rate profiles for reactions of the enzyme with peptides, the thiolactate named above, and β-lactams indicated the presence of complex proton dissociation pathways with sticky substrates and/or protons. The local structure of the active site may differ significantly for reactions of peptides and β-lactams. Solvent kinetic deuterium isotope effects indicate the presence of classical general acid/base catalysis in both acylation and deacylation; there is no evidence of the low fractionation factor active site hydrogen found previously in class A and C β-lactamases.

  19. The functional consequences of relative substrate specificity in complex biochemical systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan eZeng

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available A biochemical activity, that is, enzymatic reaction or molecular interaction, frequently involves a molecule, for example, an enzyme, capable of interacting with numerous substrates or partners. Specificity is a fundamental property of biochemical activities, and relative specificity refers to the situation whereby a molecule interacts with multiple substrates or partners but with different affinities. Here, a hypothesis is proposed that any molecule, such as an enzyme, would have a range of preferences or relative specificity for its many native substrates, which differentially impacts the phenotypes of these substrates and hence shapes the relevant biological processes in vivo. While the mechanisms underlying the specific recognition between enzymes and individual substrates have been studied extensively, whether any enzyme exhibits intrinsic selectivity towards its ensemble of substrates is often overlooked, and whether this selectivity has any functional consequences is much less appreciated. There are, however, several lines of evidence in the literature that are consistent with the hypothesis and reviewed here. Furthermore, this hypothesis is supported by our analyses of a number of diverse biochemical systems at a large scale. Thus, the human microRNA processing machinery possesses relative specificity towards its hundreds of substrates, which might contribute to differential microRNA biogenesis; the promoter binding affinity of the transcription factor Ndt80 might regulate Ndt80 target mRNA expression in the budding yeast; Cdk1 kinase specificity might lead to variable substrate phosphorylation in vivo; and the density of HuR deposition to its thousands of RNA targets might partly explain differential RNA expression in human cells. It is proposed, therefore, that relative specificity is a universal property of complex biochemical systems and that the hypothesis could denote a general principle in biology.

  20. Prediction of membrane transport proteins and their substrate specificities using primary sequence information.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitish K Mishra

    Full Text Available Membrane transport proteins (transporters move hydrophilic substrates across hydrophobic membranes and play vital roles in most cellular functions. Transporters represent a diverse group of proteins that differ in topology, energy coupling mechanism, and substrate specificity as well as sequence similarity. Among the functional annotations of transporters, information about their transporting substrates is especially important. The experimental identification and characterization of transporters is currently costly and time-consuming. The development of robust bioinformatics-based methods for the prediction of membrane transport proteins and their substrate specificities is therefore an important and urgent task.Support vector machine (SVM-based computational models, which comprehensively utilize integrative protein sequence features such as amino acid composition, dipeptide composition, physico-chemical composition, biochemical composition, and position-specific scoring matrices (PSSM, were developed to predict the substrate specificity of seven transporter classes: amino acid, anion, cation, electron, protein/mRNA, sugar, and other transporters. An additional model to differentiate transporters from non-transporters was also developed. Among the developed models, the biochemical composition and PSSM hybrid model outperformed other models and achieved an overall average prediction accuracy of 76.69% with a Mathews correlation coefficient (MCC of 0.49 and a receiver operating characteristic area under the curve (AUC of 0.833 on our main dataset. This model also achieved an overall average prediction accuracy of 78.88% and MCC of 0.41 on an independent dataset.Our analyses suggest that evolutionary information (i.e., the PSSM and the AAIndex are key features for the substrate specificity prediction of transport proteins. In comparison, similarity-based methods such as BLAST, PSI-BLAST, and hidden Markov models do not provide accurate predictions

  1. Structure of the arginine methyltransferase PRMT5-MEP50 reveals a mechanism for substrate specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meng-Chiao Ho

    Full Text Available The arginine methyltransferase PRMT5-MEP50 is required for embryogenesis and is misregulated in many cancers. PRMT5 targets a wide variety of substrates, including histone proteins involved in specifying an epigenetic code. However, the mechanism by which PRMT5 utilizes MEP50 to discriminate substrates and to specifically methylate target arginines is unclear. To test a model in which MEP50 is critical for substrate recognition and orientation, we determined the crystal structure of Xenopus laevis PRMT5-MEP50 complexed with S-adenosylhomocysteine (SAH. PRMT5-MEP50 forms an unusual tetramer of heterodimers with substantial surface negative charge. MEP50 is required for PRMT5-catalyzed histone H2A and H4 methyltransferase activity and binds substrates independently. The PRMT5 catalytic site is oriented towards the cross-dimer paired MEP50. Histone peptide arrays and solution assays demonstrate that PRMT5-MEP50 activity is inhibited by substrate phosphorylation and enhanced by substrate acetylation. Electron microscopy and reconstruction showed substrate centered on MEP50. These data support a mechanism in which MEP50 binds substrate and stimulates PRMT5 activity modulated by substrate post-translational modifications.

  2. Insight into the role of substrate-binding residues in conferring substrate specificity for the multifunctional polysaccharide lyase Smlt1473.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Logan C; Berger, Bryan W

    2014-06-27

    Anionic polysaccharides are of growing interest in the biotechnology industry due to their potential pharmaceutical applications in drug delivery and wound treatment. Chemical composition and polymer length strongly influence the physical and biological properties of the polysaccharide and thus its potential industrial and medical applications. One promising approach to determining monomer composition and controlling the degree of polymerization involves the use of polysaccharide lyases, which catalyze the depolymerization of anionic polysaccharides via a β-elimination mechanism. Utilization of these enzymes for the production of custom-made oligosaccharides requires a high degree of control over substrate specificity. Previously, we characterized a polysaccharide lyase (Smlt1473) from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia k279a, which exhibited significant activity against hyaluronan (HA), poly-β-d-glucuronic acid (poly-GlcUA), and poly-β-d-mannuronic acid (poly-ManA) in a pH-regulated manner. Here, we utilize a sequence structure guided approach based on a homology model of Smlt1473 to identify nine putative substrate-binding residues and examine their effect on substrate specificity via site-directed mutagenesis. Interestingly, single point mutations H221F and R312L resulted in increased activity and specificity toward poly-ManA and poly-GlcUA, respectively. Furthermore, a W171A mutant nearly eliminated HA activity, while increasing poly-ManA and poly-GlcUA activity by at least 35%. The effect of these mutations was analyzed by comparison with the high resolution structure of Sphingomonas sp. A1-III alginate lyase in complex with poly-ManA tetrasaccharide and by taking into account the structural differences between HA, poly-GlcUA, and poly-ManA. Overall, our results demonstrate that even minor changes in active site architecture have a significant effect on the substrate specificity of Smlt1473, whose structural plasticity could be applied to the design of highly

  3. Efficient broad color luminescence from InGaN/GaN single quantum-well nanocolumn crystals on Si (111) substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wei; Zhang, Xuehua; Wang, Yongjin; Hu, Fangren

    2017-10-01

    Nanocolumn InGaN/GaN single quantum well crystals were deposited on Si (111) substrate with nitrified Ga dots as buffer layer. Transmission electron microscopy image shows the crystals' diameter of 100-130 nm and length of about 900 nm. Nanoscale spatial phase separation of cubic and hexagonal GaN was observed by selective area electron diffraction on the quantum well layer. Raman spectrum of the quantum well crystals proved that the crystals were fully relaxed. Room temperature photoluminescence from 450 to 750 nm and full width at half maximum of about 420 meV indicate broad color luminescence covering blue, green, yellow and red emission, which is helpful for the fabrication of tunable optoelectronic devices and colorful light emitting diodes.

  4. Long-term nonprogression and broad HIV-1-specific proliferative T-cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nesrina eImami

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Complex mechanisms underlying the maintenance of fully functional, proliferative, HIV-1-specific T-cell responses involve processes from early T-cell development through to the final stages of T-cell differentiation and antigen recognition. Virus-specific proliferative CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses, important for the control of infection, are observed in some HIV-1+ patients during early stages of disease, and are maintained in long-term nonprogressing subjects. In the vast majority of HIV-1+ patients, full immune functionality is lost when proliferative HIV-1-specific T-cell responses undergo a variable progressive decline throughout the course of chronic infection. This appears irreparable despite administration of potent combination antiretroviral therapy, which to date is non-curative, necessitating life-long administration and the development of effective, novel, therapeutic interventions. While a sterilising cure, involving clearance of virus from the host, remains a primary aim, a functional cure may be a more feasible goal with considerable impact on worldwide HIV-1 infection. Such an approach would enable long-term co-existence of host and virus in the absence of toxic and costly drugs. Effective immune homeostasis coupled with a balanced response appropriately targeting conserved viral antigens, in a manner that avoids hyperactivation and exhaustion, may prove to be the strongest correlate of durable viral control. This review describes novel concepts underlying full immune functionality in the context of HIV-1 infection, which may be utilised in future strategies designed to improve upon existing therapy. The aim will be to induce long-term nonprogressor or elite controller status in every infected host, through immune-mediated control of viraemia and reduction of viral reservoirs, leading to lower HIV-1 transmission rates.

  5. A murine monoclonal antibody with broad specificity for occupationally relevant diisocyanates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lemons, Angela R; Siegel, Paul D; Mhike, Morgen; Law, Brandon F; Hettick, Justin M; Bledsoe, Toni A; Nayak, Ajay P; Beezhold, Donald H; Green, Brett J

    2014-01-01

    Diisocyanates (dNCOs) used in industrial applications are well known low molecular weight allergens. Occupational exposure is associated with adverse health outcomes including allergic sensitization and occupational asthma. In this study, we report the production and initial characterization of a dNCO-hapten specific murine IgM monoclonal antibody (mAb). Female BALB/c mice were immunized intraperitoneally with 25 μg of 4,4'-methylene diphenyl diisocyanate (MDI)-keyhole limpet hemocyanin. Following six biweekly booster immunizations, splenocytes were recovered and fused to Sp2/0-Ag14 murine myeloma cell line for hybridoma production. Hybridomas were then screened in a solid-phase indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) against 40:1 4,4'-MDI- human serum albumin (HSA). mAb reactivity to dNCO-HSA conjugates and dNCO-HSA spiked human serum were characterized using a sandwich ELISA. One hybridoma produced a multimeric IgM mAb (15D4) that reacted with 4,4'-MDI-HSA. Sandwich ELISA analysis demonstrated comparable reactivity with other occupationally relevant dNCO-HSA adducts, including 2,4-toluene diisocyanate (TDI)-HSA, 2,6-TDI-HSA, and 1,6-hexamethylene diisocyanate (HDI)-HSA, but not other electrophilic chemical HSA conjugates. The limit of quantification (LOQ) of 4,4'-MDI-HSA, 2,4-TDI-HSA, 2,6-TDI-HSA, and 1,6-HDI-HSA sandwich ELISAs were 567.2, 172.7, 184.2, and 403.5 ng/mL (8.67, 2.60, 2.77, and 6.07 pmol/mL), respectively. In contrast, experiments using dNCO-supplemented human sera showed an increase in the detectable limit of the assay. A mAb has been produced that has potential utility for detecting mixed diisocyanate exposures in occupational environments. The mAb may have additional utility in the standardization of specific IgE detection immunoassays as well as chromatographic-mass spectrometric methods to enrich dNCO adducted HSA in the plasma of occupationally exposed workers.

  6. Family history interview of a broad phenotype in specific language impairment and matched controls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalnak, N; Peyrard-Janvid, M; Sahlén, B; Forssberg, H

    2012-11-01

    The aim was to study a broader phenotype of language-related diagnoses and problems in three generations of relatives of children with specific language impairment (SLI). Our study is based on a family history interview of the parents of 59 children with SLI and of 100 matched control children, exploring the prevalence of problems related to language, reading, attention, school achievement and social communication as well as diagnoses such as attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), autism, Asperger syndrome, dyslexia, mental retardation, cleft palate and stuttering. The results show a spectrum of language-related problems in families of SLI children. In all three generations of SLI relatives, we found significantly higher prevalence rates of language, literacy and social communication problems. The risk of one or both parents having language-related diagnoses or problems was approximately six times higher for the children with SLI (85%) than for the control children (13%) (odds ratio = 37.2). We did not find a significantly higher prevalence of the diagnoses ADHD, autism or Asperger syndrome in the relatives of the children with SLI. However, significantly more parents of the children with SLI had problems with attention/hyperactivity when compared with the parents of controls. Our findings suggest common underlying mechanisms for problems with language, literacy and social communication, and possibly also for attention/hyperactivity symptoms. © 2012 The Authors. Genes, Brain and Behavior © 2012 Blackwell Publishing Ltd and International Behavioural and Neural Genetics Society.

  7. Fungal Glucosylceramide-Specific Camelid Single Domain Antibodies Are Characterized by Broad Spectrum Antifungal Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara De Coninck

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemical crop protection is widely used to control plant diseases. However, the adverse effects of pesticide use on human health and environment, resistance development and the impact of regulatory requirements on the crop protection market urges the agrochemical industry to explore innovative and alternative approaches. In that context, we demonstrate here the potential of camelid single domain antibodies (VHHs generated against fungal glucosylceramides (fGlcCer, important pathogenicity factors. To this end, llamas were immunized with purified fGlcCer and a mixture of mycelium and spores of the fungus Botrytis cinerea, one of the most important plant pathogenic fungi. The llama immune repertoire was subsequently cloned in a phage display vector to generate a library with a diversity of at least 108 different clones. This library was incubated with fGlcCer to identify phages that bind to fGlcCer, and VHHs that specifically bound fGlcCer but not mammalian or plant-derived GlcCer were selected. They were shown to inhibit the growth of B. cinerea in vitro, with VHH 41D01 having the highest antifungal activity. Moreover, VHH 41D01 could reduce disease symptoms induced by B. cinerea when sprayed on tomato leaves. Based on all these data, anti-fGlcCer VHHs show the potential to be used as an alternative approach to combat fungal plant diseases.

  8. Broad Targeting Specificity during Bacterial Type III CRISPR-Cas Immunity Constrains Viral Escape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pyenson, Nora C; Gayvert, Kaitlyn; Varble, Andrew; Elemento, Olivier; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2017-09-13

    CRISPR loci are a cluster of repeats separated by short "spacer" sequences derived from prokaryotic viruses and plasmids that determine the targets of the host's CRISPR-Cas immune response against its invaders. For type I and II CRISPR-Cas systems, single-nucleotide mutations in the seed or protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) of the target sequence cause immune failure and allow viral escape. This is overcome by the acquisition of multiple spacers that target the same invader. Here we show that targeting by the Staphylococcus epidermidis type III-A CRISPR-Cas system does not require PAM or seed sequences, and thus prevents viral escape via single-nucleotide substitutions. Instead, viral escapers can only arise through complete target deletion. Our work shows that, as opposed to type I and II systems, the relaxed specificity of type III CRISPR-Cas targeting provides robust immune responses that can lead to viral extinction with a single spacer targeting an essential phage sequence. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Structure determinants of substrate specificity of hydroxynitrile lyase from Manihot esculenta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lauble, Hanspeter; Miehlich, Burkhard; Förster, Siegfried; Kobler, Christoph; Wajant, Harald; Effenberger, Franz

    2002-01-01

    Tryptophan 128 of hydroxynitrile lyase of Manihot esculenta (MeHNL) covers a significant part of a hydrophobic channel that gives access to the active site of the enzyme. This residue was therefore substituted in the mutant MeHNL-W128A by alanine to study its importance for the substrate specificity of the enzyme. Wild-type MeHNL and MeHNL-W128A showed comparable activity on the natural substrate acetone cyanohydrin (53 and 40 U/mg, respectively). However, the specific activities of MeHNL-W128A for the unnatural substrates mandelonitrile and 4-hydroxymandelonitrile are increased 9-fold and ∼450-fold, respectively, compared with the wild-type MeHNL. The crystal structure of the MeHNL-W128A substrate-free form at 2.1 Å resolution indicates that the W128A substitution has significantly enlarged the active-site channel entrance, and thereby explains the observed changes in substrate specificity for bulky substrates. Surprisingly, the MeHNL-W128A–4-hydroxybenzaldehyde complex structure at 2.1 Å resolution shows the presence of two hydroxybenzaldehyde molecules in a sandwich type arrangement in the active site with an additional hydrogen bridge to the reacting center. PMID:11742123

  10. Induction of Virus-Specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes as a Basis for the Development of Broadly Protective Influenza Vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine L. B. Hillaire

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is considerable interest in the development of broadly protective influenza vaccines because of the continuous emergence of antigenic drift variants of seasonal influenza viruses and the threat posed by the emergence of antigenically distinct pandemic influenza viruses. It has been recognized more than three decades ago that influenza A virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes recognize epitopes located in the relatively conserved proteins like the nucleoprotein and that they cross-react with various subtypes of influenza A viruses. This implies that these CD8+ T lymphocytes may contribute to protective heterosubtypic immunity induced by antecedent influenza A virus infections. In the present paper, we review the evidence for the role of virus-specific CD8+ T lymphocytes in protective immunity against influenza virus infections and discuss vaccination strategies that aim at the induction of cross-reactive virus-specific T-cell responses.

  11. Characterization of HIV-Specific CD4+T Cell Responses against Peptides Selected with Broad Population and Pathogen Coverage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buggert, Marcus; Norstrom, Melissa M.; Czarnecki, Chris

    2012-01-01

    CD4+ T cells orchestrate immunity against viral infections, but their importance in HIV infection remains controversial. Nevertheless, comprehensive studies have associated increase in breadth and functional characteristics of HIV-specific CD4+ T cells with decreased viral load. A major challenge...... for the identification of HIV-specific CD4+ T cells targeting broadly reactive epitopes in populations with diverse ethnic background stems from the vast genomic variation of HIV and the diversity of the host cellular immune system. Here, we describe a novel epitope selection strategy, PopCover, that aims to resolve......% of the predicted peptides were found to induce HIV-specific CD4+ T cell responses. The Gag and Nef peptides induced most responses. The vast majority of the peptides (93%) had predicted restriction to the patient's HLA alleles. Interestingly, the viral load in viremic patients was inversely correlated...

  12. Developing and Validating a Computerized Adaptive Test to Measure Broad and Specific Factors of Internalizing in a Community Sample.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunderland, Matthew; Batterham, Philip; Carragher, Natacha; Calear, Alison; Slade, Tim

    2017-05-01

    Highly efficient assessments that better account for comorbidity between mood and anxiety disorders (internalizing) are required to identify individuals who are most at risk of psychopathology in the community. The current study examined the efficiency and validity associated with a multidimensional computerized adaptive test (CAT) to measure broad and specific levels of internalizing psychopathology. The sample comprised 3,175 respondents to an online survey. Items from five banks (generalized anxiety, depression, obsessive-compulsive disorder, panic disorder, social anxiety disorder) were jointly calibrated using a bifactor item response theory model. Simulations indicated that an adaptive algorithm could accurately ( rs ≥ 0.90) estimate general internalizing and specific disorder scores using on average 44 items in comparison with the full 133-item bank (67% reduction in items). Scores on the CAT demonstrate convergent and divergent validity with previously validated short severity scales and could significantly differentiate cases of DSM-5 disorder. As such, the CAT validly measures both broad and specific constructs of internalizing disorders in a manner similar to the full item bank and a static brief form but with greater gains in efficiency and, therefore, a reduced degree of respondent burden.

  13. M2e-tetramer-specific memory CD4 T cells are broadly protective against influenza infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eliasson, D G; Omokanye, A; Schön, K; Wenzel, U A; Bernasconi, V; Bemark, M; Kolpe, A; El Bakkouri, K; Ysenbaert, T; Deng, L; Fiers, W; Saelens, X; Lycke, N

    2018-01-01

    Matrix protein 2 ectodomain (M2e) is considered an attractive component of a broadly protective, universal influenza A vaccine. Here we challenge the canonical view that antibodies against M2e are the prime effectors of protection. Intranasal immunizations of Balb/c mice with CTA1-3M2e-DD-generated M2e-specific memory CD4 T cells that were I-A d restricted and critically protected against infection, even in the complete absence of antibodies, as observed in JhD mice. Whereas some M2e-tetramer-specific memory CD4 T cells resided in spleen and lymph nodes, the majority were lung-resident Th17 cells, that rapidly expanded upon a viral challenge infection. Indeed, immunized IL-17A -/- mice were significantly less well protected compared with wild-type mice despite exhibiting comparable antibody levels. Similarly, poor protection was also observed in congenic Balb/B (H-2 b ) mice, which failed to develop M2e-specific CD4 T cells, but exhibited comparable antibody levels. Lung-resident CD69 + CD103 low M2e-specific memory CD4 T cells were αβ TCR + and 50% were Th17 cells that were associated with an early influx of neutrophils after virus challenge. Adoptively transferred M2e memory CD4 T cells were strong helper T cells, which accelerated M2e- but more importantly also hemagglutinin-specific IgG production. Thus, for the first time we demonstrate that M2e-specific memory CD4 T cells are broadly protective.

  14. Substrate Specificity and Possible Heterologous Targets of Phytaspase, a Plant Cell Death Protease*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiullina, Raisa A.; Kasperkiewicz, Paulina; Chichkova, Nina V.; Szalek, Aleksandra; Serebryakova, Marina V.; Poreba, Marcin; Drag, Marcin; Vartapetian, Andrey B.

    2015-01-01

    Plants lack aspartate-specific cell death proteases homologous to animal caspases. Instead, a subtilisin-like serine-dependent plant protease named phytaspase shown to be involved in the accomplishment of programmed death of plant cells is able to hydrolyze a number of peptide-based caspase substrates. Here, we determined the substrate specificity of rice (Oryza sativa) phytaspase by using the positional scanning substrate combinatorial library approach. Phytaspase was shown to display an absolute specificity of hydrolysis after an aspartic acid residue. The preceding amino acid residues, however, significantly influence the efficiency of hydrolysis. Efficient phytaspase substrates demonstrated a remarkable preference for an aromatic amino acid residue in the P3 position. The deduced optimum phytaspase recognition motif has the sequence IWLD and is strikingly hydrophobic. The established pattern was confirmed through synthesis and kinetic analysis of cleavage of a set of optimized peptide substrates. An amino acid motif similar to the phytaspase cleavage site is shared by the human gastrointestinal peptide hormones gastrin and cholecystokinin. In agreement with the established enzyme specificity, phytaspase was shown to hydrolyze gastrin-1 and cholecystokinin at the predicted sites in vitro, thus destroying the active moieties of the hormones. PMID:26283788

  15. Specific Effects of Fiber Size and Fiber Swelling on Biomass Substrate Surface Area and Enzymatic Digestibility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ju, Xiaohui; Grego, Courtnee; Zhang, Xiao

    2013-09-01

    To clarify the specific effect of biomass substrate surface area on its enzymatic digestibility, factors of fiber size reduction and swelling changes were investigated by using poplar substrates with controlled morphological and chemical properties after modified chemical pulping. Results showed that fiber size changes had insignificant influence on enzymatic hydrolysis, although the external surface area increased up to 41% with the reduction of fiber size. Swelling changes caused by increased biomass fiber porosities after PFI refining showed a significant influence on the efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis. It is also found that chemical properties such as xylan and lignin content can influence the swelling effect. Xylan is confirmed to facilitate substrate hydrolysability by swelling, while lignin restricts swelling effect and thus minimizes the enzyme accessibility to substrates.

  16. Sequential and Multistep Substrate Interrogation Provides the Scaffold for Specificity in Human Flap Endonuclease 1

    KAUST Repository

    Sobhy, M.

    2013-06-06

    Human flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1), one of the structure-specific 5\\' nucleases, is integral in replication, repair, and recombination of cellular DNA. The 5\\' nucleases share significant unifying features yet cleave diverse substrates at similar positions relative to 5\\' end junctions. Using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer, we find a multistep mechanism that verifies all substrate features before inducing the intermediary-DNA bending step that is believed to unify 5\\' nuclease mechanisms. This is achieved by coordinating threading of the 5\\' flap of a nick junction into the conserved capped-helical gateway, overseeing the active site, and bending by binding at the base of the junction. We propose that this sequential and multistep substrate recognition process allows different 5\\' nucleases to recognize different substrates and restrict the induction of DNA bending to the last common step. Such mechanisms would also ensure the protection ofDNA junctions from nonspecific bending and cleavage. 2013 The Authors.

  17. Technetium-99m Tricarbonyl Labeled a Broad-spectrum Quinolone as a Specific Imaging Agent in Infection Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoramrouz, Seyed Javad; Erfani, Mostafa; Athari Allaf, Mitra

    2017-01-01

    Nuclear medicine imaging has been used to localize infection sites, and efforts have been continued to develop modified infection specific radiopharmaceuticals. In this study gemifloxacin as a broad-spectrum quinolone has been labeled with [(99m)Tc (CO)3 (H2O)3](+) core in order to evaluate its feasibility as an infection imaging agent for in-vivo use. The stability of radioconjugate was checked in human serum at 37 °C and biodistribution was studied in mice. Labeling yield of > 95% was obtained corresponding to a specific activity of 0.14 GBq/μmol. The radioconjugate showed good stability in human serum. Our main achievement was the high accumulation in the infected muscle in mice (T/NT = 2.93 ± 0.3 at 1 h post injection), which may diagnostically be beneficial for differentiate sites of infection from sites of inflammation.

  18. The effect of substrate composition and storage time on urine specific gravity in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, E; Drobatz, K; Aronson, L

    2009-10-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate the effects of substrate composition and storage time on urine specific gravity in dogs. A descriptive cohort study of 15 dogs. The urine specific gravity of free catch urine samples was analysed during a 5-hour time period using three separate storage methods; a closed syringe, a diaper pad and non-absorbable cat litter. The urine specific gravity increased over time in all three substrates. The syringe sample had the least change from baseline and the diaper sample had the greatest change from baseline. The urine specific gravity for the litter and diaper samples had a statistically significant increase from the 1-hour to the 5-hour time point. The urine specific gravity from canine urine stored either on a diaper or in a non-absorbable litter increased over time. Although the change was found to be statistically significant over the 5-hour study period it is unlikely to be clinically significant.

  19. Substrate Specificity Profiling of Histone-Modifying Enzymes by Peptide Microarray.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornett, E M; Dickson, B M; Vaughan, R M; Krishnan, S; Trievel, R C; Strahl, B D; Rothbart, S B

    2016-01-01

    The dynamic addition and removal of covalent posttranslational modifications (PTMs) on histone proteins serves as a major mechanism regulating chromatin-templated biological processes in eukaryotic genomes. Histone PTMs and their combinations function by directly altering the physical structure of chromatin and as rheostats for effector protein interactions. In this chapter, we detail microarray-based methods for analyzing the substrate specificity of lysine methyltransferase and demethylase enzymes on immobilized synthetic histone peptides. Consistent with the "histone code" hypothesis, we reveal a strong influence of adjacent and, surprisingly, distant histone PTMs on the ability of histone-modifying enzymes to methylate or demethylate their substrates. This platform will greatly facilitate future investigations into histone substrate specificity and mechanisms of PTM signaling that regulate the catalytic properties of histone-modifying enzymes. © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against substrate specific loop region of Plasmodium falciparum lactate dehydrogenase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaushal, Nuzhat A; Kaushal, Deep C

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodial lactate dehydrogenase, terminal enzyme of the glycolytic pathway, has been shown to be biochemically, immunologically and structurally different from the mammalian enzyme. The substrate specific loop region of plasmodial lactate dehydrogenase (pLDH) has 5 amino acids insert (DKEWN) important for anti-malarial drug targeting. In the present study, we have produced six monoclonal antibodies, which are against three different epitopes of Plasmodium falciparum LDH (PfLDH). Two of these monoclonal antibodies (10C4D5 and 10D3G2) are against the substrate specific loop region of PfLDH (residues 98-109, AGFTKAPGKSDKEWNR). The 10C4D5 and 10D3G2 monoclonals bind to substrate specific loop region resulting in inhibition of PfLDH activity. A Microplate Sandwich ELISA was developed employing high affinity non-inhibitory (10A5H5, Kaff 1.272 ± 0.057 nM) and inhibitory (10C4D5, Kaff 0.306 ± 0.011 nM) monoclonal antibodies and evaluated using gossypol, a well known inhibitor of pLDH. The binding of gossypol to substrate specific loop region resulted in inhibition of binding of 10C4D5 monoclonal. This Microplate Sandwich ELISA can be utilized for identification of compounds inhibitory to PfLDH (binding to substrate specific loop region of parasite LDH) from combinatory chemical libraries or medicinal plants extracts. The Microplate Sandwich ELISA has also shown potential for specific diagnosis of malaria using finger prick blood samples.

  1. Three extracellular dipeptidyl peptidases found in Aspergillus oryzae show varying substrate specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Hiroshi; Sakai, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Takuji; Morita, Hiroto; Okamoto, Ayako; Takeuchi, Michio; Kusumoto, Ken-Ichi; Amano, Hitoshi; Ishida, Hiroki; Yamagata, Youhei

    2016-06-01

    Three extracellular dipeptidyl peptidase genes, dppB, dppE, and dppF, were unveiled by sequence analysis of the Aspergillus oryzae genome. We investigated their differential enzymatic profiles, in order to gain an understanding of the diversity of these genes. The three dipeptidyl peptidases were expressed using Aspergillus nidulans as the host. Each recombinant enzyme was purified and subsequently characterized. The enzymes displayed similar optimum pH values, but optimum temperatures, pH stabilities, and substrate specificities varied. DppB was identified as a Xaa-Prolyl dipeptidyl peptidase, while DppE scissile substrates were similar to the substrates for Aspergillus fumigatus DPPV (AfDPPV). DppF was found to be a novel enzyme that could digest both substrates for A. fumigatus DPPIV and AfDPPV. Semi-quantitative PCR revealed that the transcription of dppB in A. oryzae was induced by protein substrates and repressed by the addition of an inorganic nitrogen source, despite the presence of protein substrates. The transcription of dppE depended on its growth time, while the transcription of dppF was not affected by the type of the nitrogen source in the medium, and it started during the early stage of the fungal growth. Based on these results, we conclude that these enzymes may represent the nutrition acquisition enzymes. Additionally, DppF may be one of the sensor peptidases responsible for the detection of the protein substrates in A. oryzae environment. DppB may be involved in nitrogen assimilation control, since the transcription of dppB was repressed by NaNO3, despite the presence of protein substrates.

  2. Specifically modified Env immunogens activate B-cell precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies in transgenic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGuire, Andrew T.; Gray, Matthew D.; Dosenovic, Pia; Gitlin, Alexander D.; Freund, Natalia T.; Petersen, John; Correnti, Colin; Johnsen, William; Kegel, Robert; Stuart, Andrew B.; Glenn, Jolene; Seaman, Michael S.; Schief, William R.; Strong, Roland K.; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Stamatatos, Leonidas

    2016-01-01

    VRC01-class broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies protect animals from experimental infection and could contribute to an effective vaccine response. Their predicted germline forms (gl) bind Env inefficiently, which may explain why they are not elicited by HIV-1 Env-immunization. Here we show that an optimized Env immunogen can engage multiple glVRC01-class antibodies. Furthermore, this immunogen activates naive B cells expressing the human germline heavy chain of 3BNC60, paired with endogenous mouse light chains in vivo. To address whether it activates B cells expressing the fully humanized gl3BNC60 B-cell receptor (BCR), we immunized mice carrying both the heavy and light chains of gl3BNC60. B cells expressing this BCR display an autoreactive phenotype and fail to respond efficiently to soluble forms of the optimized immunogen, unless it is highly multimerized. Thus, specifically designed Env immunogens can activate naive B cells expressing human BCRs corresponding to precursors of broadly neutralizing HIV-1 antibodies even when the B cells display an autoreactive phenotype. PMID:26907590

  3. Probing the Donor and Acceptor Substrate Specificity of the Gamma-Glutamyl Transpeptidase

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-17

    Probing the Donor and Acceptor Substrate Specificity of the γ-Glutamyl Transpeptidase Xin Hu,*,†,∥ Patricia M. Legler,*,‡ Ilja Khavrutskii,† Angelo...algorithm with a time constant for heat- bath coupling of 0.2 ps. The resulting trajectories were analyzed using the PTRAJ module from AMBER. The root

  4. Engineering the substrate and inhibitor specificities of human coagulation Factor VIIa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Katrine S; Østergaard, Henrik; Bjelke, Jais R

    2007-01-01

    promiscuous, however, with some preference for aromatic amino acids at both positions. Interestingly, a significant degree of interdependence between the S3 and S4 was observed and, as a consequence, the optimal substrate for FVIIa could not be derived directly from a subsite-directed specificity screen...

  5. A DNA sequence recognition loop on APOBEC3A controls substrate specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C Logue

    Full Text Available APOBEC3A (A3A, one of the seven-member APOBEC3 family of cytidine deaminases, lacks strong antiviral activity against lentiviruses but is a potent inhibitor of adeno-associated virus and endogenous retroelements. In this report, we characterize the biochemical properties of mammalian cell-produced and catalytically active E. coli-produced A3A. The enzyme binds to single-stranded DNA with a Kd of 150 nM and forms dimeric and monomeric fractions. A3A, unlike APOBEC3G (A3G, deaminates DNA substrates nonprocessively. Using a panel of oligonucleotides that contained all possible trinucleotide contexts, we identified the preferred target sequence as TC (A/G. Based on a three-dimensional model of A3A, we identified a putative binding groove that contains residues with the potential to bind substrate DNA and to influence target sequence specificity. Taking advantage of the sequence similarity to the catalytic domain of A3G, we generated A3A/A3G chimeric proteins and analyzed their target site preference. We identified a recognition loop that altered A3A sequence specificity, broadening its target sequence preference. Mutation of amino acids in the predicted DNA binding groove prevented substrate binding, confirming the role of this groove in substrate binding. These findings shed light on how APOBEC3 proteins bind their substrate and determine which sites to deaminate.

  6. Properties and substrate specificities of proteolytic enzymes from the edible basidiomycete Grifola frondosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiwaki, Toshikazu; Asano, Satoshi; Ohyama, Takuji

    2009-06-01

    Highly active proteolytic enzymes are found in the fruiting bodies of Grifola frondosa. The general properties and substrate specificities of these proteases from G. frondosa (ProGF) were studied. The optimal pH for ProGF activity was pH 3 or 7 using hemoglobin or Hammersten casein as a substrate, respectively. The ProGF exhibited over 70% of maximal activity within the pH range of 4.5-8.5. In terms of temperature, the ProGF were maximally active at 55 degrees C, while over 80% of maximal activity was observed within the range of 50-75 degrees C. These proteases were substrate-specific, mainly cleaving at Ala(14)-Leu(15), Tyr(16)-Leu(17), and Pro(28)-Lys(29) bonds, with occasional cleavage of Phe(24)-Phe(25) bonds in the oxidized insulin B-chain. The ProGF also liberated hydrophobic amino acids, such as valine, leucine, and phenylalanine, using the oxidized insulin B-chain as a substrate. When soy protein was used as a substrate, valine, leucine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine were selectively released from the hydrolysate. Thus, over the time course of incubation, the peptide concentration increased as the average peptide chain length decreased. These results indicate that the ProGF include both endopeptidases recognizing leucine, phenylalanine, and lysine at the P1' position, and aminopeptidases preferentially releasing hydrophobic and aromatic amino acids such as valine, leucine, phenylalanine, and tyrosine.

  7. Interdisciplinary Evaluation of Broadly-Reactive HLA Class II Restricted Epitopes Eliciting HIV-Specific CD4+T Cell Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buggert, M.; Norström, M.; Lundegaard, Claus

    2011-01-01

    Background: CD4+ T cells orchestrate immune protection by ‘‘helping’’ other cells of our immune system to clear viral infections. It is well known that the preferential infection and depletion of CD4+ T cells contributes to hampered systemic T cell help following HIV infection. However......, the functional and immunodominant discrepancies of CD4+ T cell responses targeting promiscuous MHC II restricted HIV epitopes remains poorly defined. Thus, utilization of interdisciplinary approaches might aid revealing broadly- reactive peptides eliciting CD4 + T cell responses. Methods: We utilized the novel...... epitopes improved the polyfunctionality compared with overlapping HIV Gag (p55) peptides. Conclusion: Using an unbiased approach where we have predicted peptides with same prerequisites, we demonstrate that HIV-specific CD4 + T cell immunodominance is heavily skewed, targeting particularly Gag and Nef....

  8. Improving the Specificity of the Prostate-Specific Antigen Substrate Glutaryl-Hyp-Ala-Ser-Chg-Gln as a Promoiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aloysius, Herve; Hu, Longqin

    2015-10-01

    To develop PSA peptide substrates with improved specificity and plasma stability from the known substrate sequence glutaryl-Hyp-Ala-Ser-Chg-Gln, systematic replacements of the N-terminal segment with D-retro-inverso-peptides were performed with the incorporation of 7-amino-4-methylcoumarin (7-AMC) after Gln for convenient fluorometric determination and ranking of the PSA substrate activity. The D-retro-inverso-peptide conjugates with P2-P5 D-amino acid substitutions were moderate but poorer PSA substrates as compared to the original peptide, suggesting that inversion of the amide bonds and/or incorporation of the additional atom as in the urea linker adversely affected PSA binding. However, P5 substitution of Hyp with Ser showed significant improvements in PSA cleavage rate; the resulting AMC conjugate, glutaryl-Ser-Ala-Ser-Chg-Gln-AMC (11), exhibited the fastest PSA cleavage rate of 351 pmol/min/100 nmol PSA. In addition, GABA←mGly-Ala-Ser-Chg-Gln-AMC (conjugate 6) was the second best PSA substrate and released 7-AMC at a rate of 225 pmol/min/100 nmol PSA as compared to 171 pmol/min/100 nmol PSA for the control conjugate glutaryl-Hyp-Ala-Ser-Chg-Gln-AMC. Incubations of selected AMC conjugates with mouse and human plasma revealed that GABA←D-Ser-ψ[NH-CO-NH]-Ala-Ser-Chg-Gln-AMC (5) and GABA←mGly-Ala-Ser-Chg-Gln-AMC (6) were most stable to non-PSA-mediated proteolysis. Our results suggest that the PSA specificity of glutaryl-Hyp-Ala-Ser-Chg-Gln is improved with Ser and mGly substitutions of Hyp at the P5. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  9. Eggplant Resistance to the Ralstonia solanacearum Species Complex Involves Both Broad-Spectrum and Strain-Specific Quantitative Trait Loci

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylvia Salgon

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacterial wilt (BW is a major disease of solanaceous crops caused by the Ralstonia solanacearum species complex (RSSC. Strains are grouped into five phylotypes (I, IIA, IIB, III, and IV. Varietal resistance is the most sustainable strategy for managing BW. Nevertheless, breeding to improve cultivar resistance has been limited by the pathogen’s extensive genetic diversity. Identifying the genetic bases of specific and non-specific resistance is a prerequisite to breed improvement. A major gene (ERs1 was previously mapped in eggplant (Solanum melongena L. using an intraspecific population of recombinant inbred lines derived from the cross of susceptible MM738 (S × resistant AG91-25 (R. ERs1 was originally found to control three strains from phylotype I, while being totally ineffective against a virulent strain from the same phylotype. We tested this population against four additional RSSC strains, representing phylotypes I, IIA, IIB, and III in order to clarify the action spectrum of ERs1. We recorded wilting symptoms and bacterial stem colonization under controlled artificial inoculation. We constructed a high-density genetic map of the population using single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs developed from genotyping-by-sequencing and added 168 molecular markers [amplified fragment length polymorphisms (AFLPs, simple sequence repeats (SSRs, and sequence-related amplified polymorphisms (SRAPs] developed previously. The new linkage map based on a total of 1,035 markers was anchored on eggplant, tomato, and potato genomes. Quantitative trait locus (QTL mapping for resistance against a total of eight RSSC strains resulted in the detection of one major phylotype-specific QTL and two broad-spectrum QTLs. The major QTL, which specifically controls three phylotype I strains, was located at the bottom of chromosome 9 and corresponded to the previously identified major gene ERs1. Five candidate R-genes were underlying this QTL, with different alleles

  10. Tissue-specific and substrate-specific mitochondrial bioenergetics in feline cardiac and skeletal muscles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Liselotte Bruun; Dela, Flemming; Koch, Jørgen

    2015-01-01

    fibers. Biopsies of left ventricular cardiac muscle and soleus muscle, a type I-rich oxidative skeletal muscle, were obtained from 15 healthy domestic cats. Enzymatic activity of citrate synthase (CS), a biomarker of mitochondrial content, was measured. Mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity with various kinds......-specific quantitative and qualitative differences in mitochondrial OXPHOS capacity between the different types of oxidative muscles from cats....

  11. Phylogenetic and functional analysis of the Cation Diffusion Facilitator (CDF family: improved signature and prediction of substrate specificity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeandroz Sylvain

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The Cation Diffusion Facilitator (CDF family is a ubiquitous family of heavy metal transporters. Much interest in this family has focused on implications for human health and bioremediation. In this work a broad phylogenetic study has been undertaken which, considered in the context of the functional characteristics of some fully characterised CDF transporters, has aimed at identifying molecular determinants of substrate selectivity and at suggesting metal specificity for newly identified CDF transporters. Results Representative CDF members from all three kingdoms of life (Archaea, Eubacteria, Eukaryotes were retrieved from genomic databases. Protein sequence alignment has allowed detection of a modified signature that can be used to identify new hypothetical CDF members. Phylogenetic reconstruction has classified the majority of CDF family members into three groups, each containing characterised members that share the same specificity towards the principally-transported metal, i.e. Zn, Fe/Zn or Mn. The metal selectivity of newly identified CDF transporters can be inferred by their position in one of these groups. The function of some conserved amino acids was assessed by site-directed mutagenesis in the poplar Zn2+ transporter PtdMTP1 and compared with similar experiments performed in prokaryotic members. An essential structural role can be assigned to a widely conserved glycine residue, while aspartate and histidine residues, highly conserved in putative transmembrane domains, might be involved in metal transport. The potential role of group-conserved amino acid residues in metal specificity is discussed. Conclusion In the present study phylogenetic and functional analyses have allowed the identification of three major substrate-specific CDF groups. The metal selectivity of newly identified CDF transporters can be inferred by their position in one of these groups. The modified signature sequence proposed in this work can be

  12. Roles of s3 site residues of nattokinase on its activity and substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shuming; Feng, Chi; Zhong, Jin; Huan, Liandong

    2007-09-01

    Nattokinase (Subtilisin NAT, NK) is a bacterial serine protease with high fibrinolytic activity. To probe their roles on protease activity and substrate specificity, three residues of S3 site (Gly(100), Ser(101) and Leu(126)) were mutated by site-directed mutagenesis. Kinetics parameters of 20 mutants were measured using tetrapeptides as substrates, and their fibrinolytic activities were determined by fibrin plate method. Results of mutation analysis showed that Gly(100) and Ser(101) had reverse steric and electrostatic effects. Residues with bulky or positively charged side chains at position 100 decreased the substrate binding and catalytic activity drastically, while residues with the same characters at position 101 could obviously enhance protease and fibrinolytic activity of NK. Mutation of Leu(126) might impair the structure of the active cleft and drastically decreased the activity of NK. Kinetics studies of the mutants showed that S3 residues were crucial to keep protease activity while they moderately affected substrate specificity of NK. The present study provided some original insight into the P3-S3 interaction in NK and other subtilisins, as well as showed successful protein engineering cases to improve NK as a potential therapeutic agent.

  13. Molecular Modeling of Peroxidase and Polyphenol Oxidase: Substrate Specificity and Active Site Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lalida Shank

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Peroxidases (POD and polyphenol oxidase (PPO are enzymes that are well known to be involved in the enzymatic browning reaction of fruits and vegetables with different catalytic mechanisms. Both enzymes have some common substrates, but each also has its specific substrates. In our computational study, the amino acid sequence of grape peroxidase (ABX was used for the construction of models employing homology modeling method based on the X-ray structure of cytosolic ascorbate peroxidase from pea (PDB ID:1APX, whereas the model of grape polyphenol oxidase was obtained directly from the available X-ray structure (PDB ID:2P3X. Molecular docking of common substrates of these two enzymes was subsequently studied. It was found that epicatechin and catechin exhibited high affinity with both enzymes, even though POD and PPO have different binding pockets regarding the size and the key amino acids involved in binding. Predicted binding modes of substrates with both enzymes were also compared. The calculated docking interaction energy of trihydroxybenzoic acid related compounds shows high affinity, suggesting specificity and potential use as common inhibitor to grape ascorbate peroxidase and polyphenol oxidase.

  14. A broad set of different llama antibodies specific for a 16 kDa heat shock protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anke K Trilling

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recombinant antibodies are powerful tools in engineering of novel diagnostics. Due to the small size and stable nature of llama antibody domains selected antibodies can serve as a detection reagent in multiplexed and sensitive assays for M. tuberculosis. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Antibodies for Mycobacterium tuberculosis (M. tb recognition were raised in Alpaca, and, by phage display, recombinant variable domains of heavy-chain antibodies (VHH binding to M. tuberculosis antigens were isolated. Two phage display selection strategies were followed: one direct selection using semi-purified protein antigen, and a depletion strategy with lysates, aiming to avoid cross-reaction to other mycobacteria. Both panning methods selected a set of binders with widely differing complementarity determining regions. Selected recombinant VHHs were produced in E. coli and shown to bind immobilized lysate in direct Enzymelinked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA tests and soluble antigen by surface plasmon resonance (SPR analysis. All tested VHHs were specific for tuberculosis-causing mycobacteria (M. tuberculosis, M. bovis and exclusively recognized an immunodominant 16 kDa heat shock protein (hsp. The highest affinity VHH had a dissociation constant (KD of 4 × 10(-10 M. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A broad set of different llama antibodies specific for 16 kDa heat shock protein of M. tuberculosis is available. This protein is highly stable and abundant in M. tuberculosis. The VHH that detect this protein are applied in a robust SPR sensor for identification of tuberculosis-causing mycobacteria.

  15. Broadly neutralizing human monoclonal JC polyomavirus VP1–specific antibodies as candidate therapeutics for progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jelcic, Ivan; Combaluzier, Benoit; Jelcic, Ilijas; Faigle, Wolfgang; Senn, Luzia; Reinhart, Brenda J.; Ströh, Luisa; Nitsch, Roger M.; Stehle, Thilo; Sospedra, Mireia; Grimm, Jan; Martin, Roland

    2016-01-01

    In immunocompromised individuals, JC polyomavirus (JCPyV) may mutate and gain access to the central nervous system resulting in progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML), an often fatal opportunistic infection for which no treatments are currently available. Despite recent progress, the contribution of JCPyV-specific humoral immunity to controlling asymptomatic infection throughout life and to eliminating JCPyV from the brain is poorly understood. We examined antibody responses against JCPyV major capsid protein VP1 (viral protein 1) variants in the serum and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) of healthy donors (HDs), JCPyV-positive multiple sclerosis patients treated with the anti-VLA-4 monoclonal antibody natalizumab (NAT), and patients with NAT-associated PML. Before and during PML, CSF antibody responses against JCPyV VP1 variants show “recognition holes”; however, upon immune reconstitution, CSF antibody titers rise, then recognize PML-associated JCPyV VP1 variants, and may be involved in elimination of the virus. We therefore reasoned that the memory B cell repertoire of individuals who recovered from PML could be a source for the molecular cloning of broadly neutralizing antibodies for passive immunization. We generated a series of memory B cell-derived JCPyV VP1-specific human monoclonal antibodies from HDs and a patient with NAT-associated PML-immune reconstitution inflammatory syndrome (IRIS). These antibodies exhibited diverse binding affinity, cross-reactivity with the closely related BK polyomavirus, recognition of PML-causing VP1 variants, and JCPyV neutralization. Almost all antibodies with exquisite specificity for JCPyV, neutralizing activity, recognition of all tested JCPyV PML variants, and high affinity were derived from one patient who had recovered from PML. These antibodies are promising drug candidates for the development of a treatment of PML. PMID:26400911

  16. Genome-Wide Association Analyses Based on Broadly Different Specifications for Prior Distributions, Genomic Windows, and Estimation Methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chunyu; Steibel, Juan P; Tempelman, Robert J

    2017-08-01

    A currently popular strategy (EMMAX) for genome-wide association (GWA) analysis infers association for the specific marker of interest by treating its effect as fixed while treating all other marker effects as classical Gaussian random effects. It may be more statistically coherent to specify all markers as sharing the same prior distribution, whether that distribution is Gaussian, heavy-tailed (BayesA), or has variable selection specifications based on a mixture of, say, two Gaussian distributions [stochastic search and variable selection (SSVS)]. Furthermore, all such GWA inference should be formally based on posterior probabilities or test statistics as we present here, rather than merely being based on point estimates. We compared these three broad categories of priors within a simulation study to investigate the effects of different degrees of skewness for quantitative trait loci (QTL) effects and numbers of QTL using 43,266 SNP marker genotypes from 922 Duroc-Pietrain F2-cross pigs. Genomic regions were based either on single SNP associations, on nonoverlapping windows of various fixed sizes (0.5-3 Mb), or on adaptively determined windows that cluster the genome into blocks based on linkage disequilibrium. We found that SSVS and BayesA lead to the best receiver operating curve properties in almost all cases. We also evaluated approximate maximum a posteriori (MAP) approaches to BayesA and SSVS as potential computationally feasible alternatives; however, MAP inferences were not promising, particularly due to their sensitivity to starting values. We determined that it is advantageous to use variable selection specifications based on adaptively constructed genomic window lengths for GWA studies. Copyright © 2017 by the Genetics Society of America.

  17. Substrate specificity and subsite affinities of rabbit liver acid alpha-glucosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onodera, S; Matsui, H; Chiba, S

    1994-07-01

    The substrate specificity of rabbit liver acid alpha-glucosidase was investigated. The enzyme showed a wide specificity for various substrates, and hydrolyzed alpha-glucans such as glycogen and soluble starch. The k0 values (s-1) for maltose, kojibiose, nigerose, isomaltose, phenyl alpha-glucoside, panose, phenyl alpha-maltoside, soluble starch, beta-limit dextrin, amylopectin, shellfish glycogen, and rabbit liver glycogen were estimated to be 94.8, 18.8, 143, 3.6, 11.8, 27.8, 115, 99.2, 155, 83.5, 126, and 108, and the Km values (concentration of non-reducing terminal) for these substrates were 2.1, 1.8, 7.5, 36, 5.4, 1.9, 1.2, 0.90, 9.1, 1.0, 16, and 13 mM, respectively. Isomaltose and phenyl alpha-glucoside were unfavorable as substrates. The acid alpha-glucosidase is characterized by a relatively high activity toward glycogen. The k0 values (s-1) for maltotriose, -tetraose, -pentaose, -hexaose, -heptaose, and -octaose, and maltodextrin (n = 17) were 140, 140, 131, 132, 134, 132, and 74.3, and the Km values, 2.1, 1.8, 1.9, 3.4, 5.0, 4.9, 4.9 and 2.6 mM, respectively. Based on the rate parameters for the series of maltooligosaccharides, the subsite affinities (Ais) in the active site were evaluated as 0.54 (A1), 5.34 (A2), and 0.34 (A3) kcal/mol for subsites 1, 2, and 3, respectively. These three subsites were considered to be predominantly responsible for the binding of substrates to the active site.

  18. Identification of crucial amino acids in mouse aldehyde oxidase 3 that determine substrate specificity.

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    Martin Mahro

    Full Text Available In order to elucidate factors that determine substrate specificity and activity of mammalian molybdo-flavoproteins we performed site directed mutagenesis of mouse aldehyde oxidase 3 (mAOX3. The sequence alignment of different aldehyde oxidase (AOX isoforms identified variations in the active site of mAOX3 in comparison to other AOX proteins and xanthine oxidoreductases (XOR. Based on the structural alignment of mAOX3 and bovine XOR, differences in amino acid residues involved in substrate binding in XORs in comparison to AOXs were identified. We exchanged several residues in the active site to the ones found in other AOX homologues in mouse or to residues present in bovine XOR in order to examine their influence on substrate selectivity and catalytic activity. Additionally we analyzed the influence of the [2Fe-2S] domains of mAOX3 on its kinetic properties and cofactor saturation. We applied UV-VIS and EPR monitored redox-titrations to determine the redox potentials of wild type mAOX3 and mAOX3 variants containing the iron-sulfur centers of mAOX1. In addition, a combination of molecular docking and molecular dynamic simulations (MD was used to investigate factors that modulate the substrate specificity and activity of wild type and AOX variants. The successful conversion of an AOX enzyme to an XOR enzyme was achieved exchanging eight residues in the active site of mAOX3. It was observed that the absence of the K889H exchange substantially decreased the activity of the enzyme towards all substrates analyzed, revealing that this residue has an important role in catalysis.

  19. GSHSite: exploiting an iteratively statistical method to identify s-glutathionylation sites with substrate specificity.

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    Yi-Ju Chen

    Full Text Available S-glutathionylation, the covalent attachment of a glutathione (GSH to the sulfur atom of cysteine, is a selective and reversible protein post-translational modification (PTM that regulates protein activity, localization, and stability. Despite its implication in the regulation of protein functions and cell signaling, the substrate specificity of cysteine S-glutathionylation remains unknown. Based on a total of 1783 experimentally identified S-glutathionylation sites from mouse macrophages, this work presents an informatics investigation on S-glutathionylation sites including structural factors such as the flanking amino acids composition and the accessible surface area (ASA. TwoSampleLogo presents that positively charged amino acids flanking the S-glutathionylated cysteine may influence the formation of S-glutathionylation in closed three-dimensional environment. A statistical method is further applied to iteratively detect the conserved substrate motifs with statistical significance. Support vector machine (SVM is then applied to generate predictive model considering the substrate motifs. According to five-fold cross-validation, the SVMs trained with substrate motifs could achieve an enhanced sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy, and provides a promising performance in an independent test set. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by the correct identification of previously reported S-glutathionylation sites of mouse thioredoxin (TXN and human protein tyrosine phosphatase 1b (PTP1B. Finally, the constructed models are adopted to implement an effective web-based tool, named GSHSite (http://csb.cse.yzu.edu.tw/GSHSite/, for identifying uncharacterized GSH substrate sites on the protein sequences.

  20. Paradoxical suppression of poly-specific broadly neutralizing antibodies in the presence of strain-specific neutralizing antibodies following HIV infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciupe, Stanca M; De Leenheer, Patrick; Kepler, Thomas B

    2011-05-21

    One of the first immunologic responses against HIV infection is the presence of neutralizing antibodies that seem able to inactivate several HIV strains. Moreover, in vitro studies have shown the existence of monoclonal antibodies that exhibit broad crossclade neutralizing potential. Yet their number is low and slow to develop in vivo. In this paper, we investigate the potential benefits of inducing poly-specific neutralizing antibodies in vivo throughout immunization. We develop a mathematical model that considers the activation of families of B lymphocytes producing poly-specific and strain-specific antibodies and use it to demonstrate that, even if such families are successful in producing neutralizing antibodies, the competition between them may limit the poly-specific response allowing the virus to escape. We modify this model to account for viral evolution under the pressure of antibody responses in natural HIV infection. The model can reproduce viral escape under certain conditions of B lymphocyte competition. Using these models we provide explanations for the observed antibody failure in controlling natural infection and predict quantitative measures that need to be satisfied for long-term control of HIV infection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. The substrate specificities of sunflower and soybean phospholipases D using transphosphatidylation reaction

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    Abdelkafi Slim

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Phospholipase D (PLD belongs to a lipolytic enzyme subclass which catalyzes the hydrolysis and transesterification of glycerophospholipids at the terminal phosphodiester bond. Results In this work, we have studied the substrate specificity of PLDs from germinating sunflower seeds and cultured-soybean cells, using their capacity of transphosphatidylation. In the presence of a nucleophilic acceptor, such as [14C]ethanol, PLD catalyzes the production of phosphatidyl-[14C]-ethanol. The resulting product is easily identified since it is well separated from the other lipids by thin-layer chromatography. The main advantage of this assay is that the phospholipid used as substrate does not need to be radiolabelled and thus allow us a large choice of polar heads and fatty acids. In vitro, we observed that sunflower and soybean cell PLD show the following decreasing order of specificity: phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol; while phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol are utilized much less efficiently. Conclusions The substrate specificity is modulated by the fatty acid composition of the phosphatidylcholine used as well as by the presence of other charged phospholipids.

  2. The substrate specificities of sunflower and soybean phospholipases D using transphosphatidylation reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelkafi, Slim; Abousalham, Abdelkarim

    2011-11-01

    Phospholipase D (PLD) belongs to a lipolytic enzyme subclass which catalyzes the hydrolysis and transesterification of glycerophospholipids at the terminal phosphodiester bond. In this work, we have studied the substrate specificity of PLDs from germinating sunflower seeds and cultured-soybean cells, using their capacity of transphosphatidylation. In the presence of a nucleophilic acceptor, such as [¹⁴C]ethanol, PLD catalyzes the production of phosphatidyl-[¹⁴C]-ethanol. The resulting product is easily identified since it is well separated from the other lipids by thin-layer chromatography. The main advantage of this assay is that the phospholipid used as substrate does not need to be radiolabelled and thus allow us a large choice of polar heads and fatty acids. In vitro, we observed that sunflower and soybean cell PLD show the following decreasing order of specificity: phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and phosphatidylglycerol; while phosphatidylserine and phosphatidylinositol are utilized much less efficiently. The substrate specificity is modulated by the fatty acid composition of the phosphatidylcholine used as well as by the presence of other charged phospholipids.

  3. Sequential and Multistep Substrate Interrogation Provides the Scaffold for Specificity in Human Flap Endonuclease 1

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    Mohamed A. Sobhy

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Human flap endonuclease 1 (FEN1, one of the structure-specific 5′ nucleases, is integral in replication, repair, and recombination of cellular DNA. The 5′ nucleases share significant unifying features yet cleave diverse substrates at similar positions relative to 5′ end junctions. Using single-molecule Förster resonance energy transfer, we find a multistep mechanism that verifies all substrate features before inducing the intermediary-DNA bending step that is believed to unify 5′ nuclease mechanisms. This is achieved by coordinating threading of the 5′ flap of a nick junction into the conserved capped-helical gateway, overseeing the active site, and bending by binding at the base of the junction. We propose that this sequential and multistep substrate recognition process allows different 5′ nucleases to recognize different substrates and restrict the induction of DNA bending to the last common step. Such mechanisms would also ensure the protection of DNA junctions from nonspecific bending and cleavage.

  4. Crystal Structure and Substrate Specificity of Drosophila 3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine Decarboxylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Q.; Ding, H; Robinson, H; Christensen, B; Li, J

    2010-01-01

    3,4-Dihydroxyphenylalanine decarboxylase (DDC), also known as aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase, catalyzes the decarboxylation of a number of aromatic L-amino acids. Physiologically, DDC is responsible for the production of dopamine and serotonin through the decarboxylation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine and 5-hydroxytryptophan, respectively. In insects, both dopamine and serotonin serve as classical neurotransmitters, neuromodulators, or neurohormones, and dopamine is also involved in insect cuticle formation, eggshell hardening, and immune responses. In this study, we expressed a typical DDC enzyme from Drosophila melanogaster, critically analyzed its substrate specificity and biochemical properties, determined its crystal structure at 1.75 Angstrom resolution, and evaluated the roles residues T82 and H192 play in substrate binding and enzyme catalysis through site-directed mutagenesis of the enzyme. Our results establish that this DDC functions exclusively on the production of dopamine and serotonin, with no activity to tyrosine or tryptophan and catalyzes the formation of serotonin more efficiently than dopamine. The crystal structure of Drosophila DDC and the site-directed mutagenesis study of the enzyme demonstrate that T82 is involved in substrate binding and that H192 is used not only for substrate interaction, but for cofactor binding of drDDC as well. Through comparative analysis, the results also provide insight into the structure-function relationship of other insect DDC-like proteins.

  5. Isotype modulates epitope specificity, affinity, and antiviral activities of anti-HIV-1 human broadly neutralizing 2F5 antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor, Daniela; Yu, Huifeng; Maupetit, Julien; Drillet, Anne-Sophie; Bouceba, Tahar; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle; Lopalco, Lucia; Tuffery, Pierre; Bomsel, Morgane

    2012-07-31

    The constant heavy chain (CH1) domain affects antibody affinity and fine specificity, challenging the paradigm that only variable regions contribute to antigen binding. To investigate the role of the CH1 domain, we constructed IgA2 from the broadly neutralizing anti-HIV-1 2F5 IgG1, and compared 2F5 IgA2 and IgG binding affinity and functional activities. We found that 2F5 IgA2 bound to the gp41 membrane proximal external region with higher affinity than IgG1. Functionally, compared with IgG1, 2F5 IgA2 more efficiently blocked HIV-1 transcytosis across epithelial cells and CD4(+) cell infection by R5 HIV-1. The 2F5 IgG1 and IgA2 acted synergistically to fully block HIV-1 transfer from Langerhans to autologous CD4(+) T cells and to inhibit CD4(+) T-cell infection. Epitope mapping performed by screening a random peptide library and in silico docking modeling suggested that along with the 2F5 IgG canonical ELDKWA epitope on gp41, the IgG1 recognized an additional 3D-conformational epitope on the gp41 C-helix. In contrast, the IgA2 epitope included a unique conformational motif on the gp41 N-helix. Overall, the CH1 region of 2F5 contributes to shape its epitope specificity, antibody affinity, and functional activities. In the context of sexually transmitted infections such as HIV-1/AIDS, raising a mucosal IgA-based vaccine response should complement an IgG-based vaccine response in blocking HIV-1 transmission.

  6. Isotype modulates epitope specificity, affinity, and antiviral activities of anti–HIV-1 human broadly neutralizing 2F5 antibody

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tudor, Daniela; Yu, Huifeng; Maupetit, Julien; Drillet, Anne-Sophie; Bouceba, Tahar; Schwartz-Cornil, Isabelle; Lopalco, Lucia; Tuffery, Pierre; Bomsel, Morgane

    2012-01-01

    The constant heavy chain (CH1) domain affects antibody affinity and fine specificity, challenging the paradigm that only variable regions contribute to antigen binding. To investigate the role of the CH1 domain, we constructed IgA2 from the broadly neutralizing anti–HIV-1 2F5 IgG1, and compared 2F5 IgA2 and IgG binding affinity and functional activities. We found that 2F5 IgA2 bound to the gp41 membrane proximal external region with higher affinity than IgG1. Functionally, compared with IgG1, 2F5 IgA2 more efficiently blocked HIV-1 transcytosis across epithelial cells and CD4+ cell infection by R5 HIV-1. The 2F5 IgG1 and IgA2 acted synergistically to fully block HIV-1 transfer from Langerhans to autologous CD4+ T cells and to inhibit CD4+ T-cell infection. Epitope mapping performed by screening a random peptide library and in silico docking modeling suggested that along with the 2F5 IgG canonical ELDKWA epitope on gp41, the IgG1 recognized an additional 3D-conformational epitope on the gp41 C-helix. In contrast, the IgA2 epitope included a unique conformational motif on the gp41 N-helix. Overall, the CH1 region of 2F5 contributes to shape its epitope specificity, antibody affinity, and functional activities. In the context of sexually transmitted infections such as HIV-1/AIDS, raising a mucosal IgA-based vaccine response should complement an IgG-based vaccine response in blocking HIV-1 transmission. PMID:22723360

  7. Distinct substrate specificities and unusual substrate flexibilities of two hydroxycinnamoyltransferases, rosmarinic acid synthase and hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:shikimate hydroxycinnamoyl-transferase, from Coleus blumei Benth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Marion; Petersen, Maike

    2011-06-01

    cDNAs and genes encoding a hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:hydroxyphenyllactate hydroxycinnamoyltransferase (CbRAS; rosmarinic acid synthase) and a hydroxycinnamoyl-CoA:shikimate hydroxycinnamoyltransferase (CbHST) were isolated from Coleus blumei Benth. (syn. Solenostemon scutellarioides (L.) Codd; Lamiaceae). The proteins were expressed in E. coli and the substrate specificity of both enzymes was tested. CbRAS accepted several CoA-activated phenylpropenoic acids as donor substrates and D-(hydroxy)phenyllactates as acceptors resulting in ester formation while shikimate and quinate were not accepted. Unexpectedly, amino acids (D-phenylalanine, D-tyrosine, D-DOPA) also yielded products, showing that RAS can putatively catalyze amide formation. CbHST was able to transfer cinnamic, 4-coumaric, caffeic, ferulic as well as sinapic acid from CoA to shikimate but not to quinate or acceptor substrates utilized by CbRAS. In addition, 3-hydroxyanthranilate, 3-hydroxybenzoate and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoate were used as acceptor substrates. The reaction product with 3-aminobenzoate putatively is an amide. For both enzymes, structural requirements for donor and acceptor substrates were deduced. The acceptance of unusual acceptor substrates by CbRAS and CbHST resulted in the formation of novel compounds. The rather relaxed substrate as well as reaction specificity of both hydroxycinnamoyltransferases opens up possibilities for the evolution of novel enzymes forming novel secondary metabolites in plants and for the in vitro formation of new compounds with putatively interesting biological activities.

  8. Air proteins control differential TRAMP substrate specificity for nuclear RNA surveillance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Karyn; Xu, Zhenjiang; Mathews, David H; Butler, J Scott

    2012-10-01

    RNA surveillance systems function at critical steps during the formation and function of RNA molecules in all organisms. The RNA exosome plays a central role in RNA surveillance by processing and degrading RNA molecules in the nucleus and cytoplasm of eukaryotic cells. The exosome functions as a complex of proteins composed of a nine-member core and two ribonucleases. The identity of the molecular determinants of exosome RNA substrate specificity remains an important unsolved aspect of RNA surveillance. In the nucleus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, TRAMP complexes recognize and polyadenylate RNAs, which enhances RNA degradation by the exosome and may contribute to its specificity. TRAMPs contain either of two putative RNA-binding factors called Air proteins. Previous studies suggested that these proteins function interchangeably in targeting the poly(A)-polymerase activity of TRAMPs to RNAs. Experiments reported here show that the Air proteins govern separable functions. Phenotypic analysis and RNA deep-sequencing results from air mutants reveal specific requirements for each Air protein in the regulation of the levels of noncoding and coding RNAs. Loss of these regulatory functions results in specific metabolic and plasmid inheritance defects. These findings reveal differential functions for Air proteins in RNA metabolism and indicate that they control the substrate specificity of the RNA exosome.

  9. Phylogenetic and Functional Substrate Specificity for Endolithic Microbial Communities in hyper-arid environments

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    Alexander eCrits-Christoph

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Under extreme water deficit, endolithic (inside rock microbial ecosystems are considered environmental refuges for life in cold and hot deserts, yet their diversity and functional adaptations remain vastly unexplored. The metagenomic analyses of the communities from two rock substrates, calcite and ignimbrite, revealed that they were dominated by Cyanobacteria, Actinobacteria, and Chloroflexi. The relative distribution of major phyla was significantly different between the two substrates and biodiversity estimates, from 16S rRNA gene sequences and from the metagenomic data, all pointed to a higher taxonomic diversity in the calcite community. While both endolithic communities showed adaptations to extreme aridity and to the rock habitat, their functional capabilities revealed significant differences. ABC transporters and pathways for osmoregulation were more diverse in the calcite chasmoendolithic community. In contrast, the ignimbrite cryptoendolithic community was enriched in pathways for secondary metabolites, such as non-ribosomal peptides (NRP and polyketides (PK. Assemblies of the metagenome data produced population genomes for the major phyla found in both communities and revealed a greater diversity of Cyanobacteria population genomes for the calcite substrate. Draft genomes of the dominant Cyanobacteria in each community were constructed with more than 93% estimated completeness. The two annotated proteomes shared 64% amino acid identity and a significantly higher number of genes involved in iron update, and NRPS gene clusters, were found in the draft genomes from the ignimbrite. Both the community-wide and genome-specific differences may be related to higher water availability and the colonization of large fissures and cracks in the calcite in contrast to a harsh competition for colonization space and nutrient resources in the narrow pores of the ignimbrite. Together, these results indicated that the habitable architecture of both

  10. Crystal structure of inulosucrase from Lactobacillus: insights into the substrate specificity and product specificity of GH68 fructansucrases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pijning, Tjaard; Anwar, Munir A; Böger, Markus; Dobruchowska, Justyna M; Leemhuis, Hans; Kralj, Slavko; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Dijkstra, Bauke W

    2011-09-09

    Fructansucrases (FSs) catalyze a transfructosylation reaction with sucrose as substrate to produce fructo-oligosaccharides and fructan polymers that contain either β-2,1 glycosidic linkages (inulin) or β-2,6 linkages (levan). Levan-synthesizing FSs (levansucrases) have been most extensively investigated, while detailed information on inulosucrases is limited. Importantly, the molecular basis of the different product specificities of levansucrases and inulosucrases is poorly understood. We have elucidated the three-dimensional structure of a truncated active bacterial GH68 inulosucrase, InuJ of Lactobacillus johnsonii NCC533 (residues 145-708), in its apo form, with a bound substrate (sucrose), and with a transfructosylation product. The sucrose binding pocket and the sucrose binding mode are virtually identical with those of GH68 levansucrases, confirming that both enzyme types use the same fully conserved structural framework for the binding and cleavage of the donor substrate sucrose in the active site. The binding mode of the first transfructosylation product 1-kestose (Fru-β(2-1)-Fru-α(2-1)-Glc, where Fru=fructose and Glc=glucose) in subsites -1 to +2 shows for the first time how inulin-type fructo-oligosaccharide bind in GH68 FS and how an inulin-type linkage can be formed. Surprisingly, observed interactions with the sugar in subsites +1 and +2 are provided by residues that are also present in levansucrases. The binding mode of 1-kestose and the presence of a more distant sucrose binding site suggest that residues beyond the +2 subsite, in particular residues from the nonconserved 1B-1C loop, determine product linkage type specificity in GH68 FSs. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Substrate Specificity and Inhibitor Sensitivity of Plant UDP-Sugar Producing Pyrophosphorylases

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    Daniel Decker

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available UDP-sugars are essential precursors for glycosylation reactions producing cell wall polysaccharides, sucrose, glycoproteins, glycolipids, etc. Primary mechanisms of UDP sugar formation involve the action of at least three distinct pyrophosphorylases using UTP and sugar-1-P as substrates. Here, substrate specificities of barley and Arabidopsis (two isozymes UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylases (UGPase, Arabidopsis UDP-sugar pyrophosphorylase (USPase and Arabidopsis UDP-N-acetyl glucosamine pyrophosphorylase2 (UAGPase2 were investigated using a range of sugar-1-phosphates and nucleoside-triphosphates as substrates. Whereas all the enzymes preferentially used UTP as nucleotide donor, they differed in their specificity for sugar-1-P. UGPases had high activity with D-Glc-1-P, but could also react with Fru-1-P and Fru-2-P (Km values over 10 mM. Contrary to an earlier report, their activity with Gal-1-P was extremely low. USPase reacted with a range of sugar-1-phosphates, including D-Glc-1-P, D-Gal-1-P, D-GalA-1-P (Km of 1.3 mM, β-L-Ara-1-P and α-D-Fuc-1-P (Km of 3.4 mM, but not β-L-Fuc-1-P. In contrast, UAGPase2 reacted only with D-GlcNAc-1-P, D-GalNAc-1-P (Km of 1 mM and, to some extent, D-Glc-1-P (Km of 3.2 mM. Generally, different conformations/substituents at C2, C4, and C5 of the pyranose ring of a sugar were crucial determinants of substrate specificity of a given pyrophosphorylase. Homology models of UDP-sugar binding to UGPase, USPase and UAGPase2 revealed more common amino acids for UDP binding than for sugar binding, reflecting differences in substrate specificity of these proteins. UAGPase2 was inhibited by a salicylate derivative that was earlier shown to affect UGPase and USPase activities, consistent with a common structural architecture of the three pyrophosphorylases. The results are discussed with respect to the role of the pyrophosphorylases in sugar activation for glycosylated end-products.

  12. Dynamic culture substrate that captures a specific extracellular matrix protein in response to light

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    Jun Nakanishi, Hidekazu Nakayama, Kazuo Yamaguchi, Andres J Garcia and Yasuhiro Horiike

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of methods for the off–on switching of immobilization or presentation of cell-adhesive peptides and proteins during cell culture is important because such surfaces are useful for the analysis of the dynamic processes of cell adhesion and migration. This paper describes a chemically functionalized gold substrate that captures a genetically tagged extracellular matrix protein in response to light. The substrate was composed of mixed self-assembled monolayers (SAMs of three disulfide compounds containing (i a photocleavable poly(ethylene glycol (PEG, (ii nitrilotriacetic acid (NTA and (iii hepta(ethylene glycol (EG7. Although the NTA group has an intrinsic high affinity for oligohistidine tag (His-tag sequences in its Ni2+-ion complex, the interaction was suppressed by the steric hindrance of coexisting PEG on the substrate surface. Upon photoirradiation of the substrate to release the PEG chain from the surface, this interaction became possible and hence the protein was captured at the irradiated regions, while keeping the non-specific adsorption of non-His-tagged proteins blocked by the EG7 underbrush. In this way, we selectively immobilized a His-tagged fibronectin fragment (FNIII7–10 to the irradiated regions. In contrast, when bovine serum albumin—a major serum protein—was added as a non-His-tagged protein, the surface did not permit its capture, with or without irradiation. In agreement with these results, cells were selectively attached to the irradiated patterns only when a His-tagged FNIII7-10 was added to the medium. These results indicate that the present method is useful for studying the cellular behavior on the specific extracellular matrix protein in cell-culturing environments.

  13. Reversal of Substrate Specificity of CMP N-glycosidase to dCMP†,‡

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikowitz, Megan D.; Cooper, Lisa; Begley, Tadhg P.; Kaminski, Pierre Alexandre; Ealick, Steven E.

    2013-01-01

    MilB is a CMP hydrolase involved in the early steps of biosynthesis of the antifungal compound mildiomycin. An enzyme from the bacimethrin biosynthetic pathway, BcmB, is closely related in both sequence and function to MilB. These two enzymes belong to the nucleoside 2′-deoxyribosyltransferase (NDT) superfamily. NDTs catalyze N-glycosidic bond cleavage of 2′-deoxynucleosides via a covalent 2-deoxyribosyl-enzyme intermediate. Conservation of key active site residues suggests that members of the NDT superfamily share a common mechanism; however, the enzymes differ in their substrate preferences. Substrates vary in the type of nucleobase, the presence or absence of a 2′-hydroxyl group, and the presence or absence of a 5′-phosphate group. We have determined the structures of MilB and BcmB and compared them to previously determined structures of NDT superfamily members. The comparisons reveal how these enzymes differentiate between ribosyl and deoxyribosyl nucleotides or nucleosides, and among different nucleobases. The 1.6 Å structure of the MilB-CMP complex reveals an active site feature that is not obvious from sequence comparisons alone. MilB and BcmB that prefer substrates containing 2′-ribosyl groups have a phenylalanine positioned in the active site whereas NDT family members with preference for 2′-deoxyribosyl groups have a tyrosine residue. Further studies show that the phenylalanine is critical for MilB and BcmB specificity towards CMP, and mutation of this phenylalanine residue to tyrosine results in a 1000-fold reversal of substrate specificity from CMP to dCMP. PMID:23659472

  14. Reversal of the substrate specificity of CMP N-glycosidase to dCMP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sikowitz, Megan D; Cooper, Lisa E; Begley, Tadhg P; Kaminski, Pierre Alexandre; Ealick, Steven E

    2013-06-11

    MilB is a CMP hydrolase involved in the early steps of biosynthesis of the antifungal compound mildiomycin. An enzyme from the bacimethrin biosynthetic pathway, BcmB, is closely related to MilB in both sequence and function. These two enzymes belong to the nucleoside 2'-deoxyribosyltransferase (NDT) superfamily. NDTs catalyze N-glycosidic bond cleavage of 2'-deoxynucleosides via a covalent 2-deoxyribosyl-enzyme intermediate. Conservation of key active site residues suggests that members of the NDT superfamily share a common mechanism; however, the enzymes differ in their substrate preferences. Substrates vary in the type of nucleobase, the presence or absence of a 2'-hydroxyl group, and the presence or absence of a 5'-phosphate group. We have determined the structures of MilB and BcmB and compared them to previously determined structures of NDT superfamily members. The comparisons reveal how these enzymes differentiate between ribosyl and deoxyribosyl nucleotides or nucleosides and among different nucleobases. The 1.6 Å structure of the MilB-CMP complex reveals an active site feature that is not obvious from comparisons of sequence alone. MilB and BcmB that prefer substrates containing 2'-ribosyl groups have a phenylalanine positioned in the active site, whereas NDT family members with a preference for 2'-deoxyribosyl groups have a tyrosine residue. Further studies show that the phenylalanine is critical for the specificity of MilB and BcmB toward CMP, and mutation of this phenylalanine residue to tyrosine results in a 1000-fold reversal of substrate specificity from CMP to dCMP.

  15. Molecular dynamics investigations of BioH protein substrate specificity for biotin synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Qiao; Cui, Ying-Lu; Zheng, Qing-Chuan; Zhang, Hong-Xing

    2016-05-01

    BioH, an enzyme of biotin synthesis, plays an important role in fatty acid synthesis which assembles the pimelate moiety. Pimeloyl-acyl carrier protein (ACP) methyl ester, which is long known to be a biotin precursor, is the physiological substrate of BioH. Azelayl methyl ester, which has a longer chain than pimeloyl methyl ester, conjugated to ACP is also indeed accepted by BioH with very low rate of hydrolysis. To date, the substrate specificity for BioH and the molecular origin for the experimentally observed rate changes of hydrolysis by the chain elongation have remained elusive. To this end, we have investigated chain elongation effects on the structures by using the fully atomistic molecular dynamics simulations combined with binding free energy calculations. The results indicate that the substrate specificity is determined by BioH together with ACP. The added two methylenes would increase the structural flexibility by protein motions at the interface of ACP and BioH, instead of making steric clashes with the side chains of the BioH hydrophobic cavity. On the other hand, the slower hydrolysis of azelayl substrate is suggested to be associated with the loose of contacts between BioH and ACP, and with the lost electrostatic interactions of two ionic/hydrogen bonding networks at the interface of the two proteins. The present study provides important insights into the structure-function relationships of the complex of BioH with pimeloyl-ACP methyl ester, which could contribute to further understanding about the mechanism of the biotin synthetic pathway, including the catalytic role of BioH.

  16. Structural basis of the substrate specificity of Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dessanti, Paola [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-1301 (United States); Università di Sassari, (Italy); Zhang, Yang [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-1301 (United States); Allegrini, Simone [Università di Sassari, (Italy); Tozzi, Maria Grazia [Università di Pisa, (Italy); Sgarrella, Francesco [Università di Sassari, (Italy); Ealick, Steven E., E-mail: see3@cornell.edu [Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853-1301 (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Adenosine phosphorylase from B. cereus shows a strong preference for adenosine over other 6-oxopurine nucleosides. Mutation of Asp204 to asparagine reduces the efficiency of adenosine cleavage but does not affect inosine cleavage, effectively reversing the substrate specificity. The structures of D204N complexes explain these observations. Purine nucleoside phosphorylases catalyze the phosphorolytic cleavage of the glycosidic bond of purine (2′-deoxy)nucleosides, generating the corresponding free base and (2′-deoxy)ribose 1-phosphate. Two classes of PNPs have been identified: homotrimers specific for 6-oxopurines and homohexamers that accept both 6-oxopurines and 6-aminopurines. Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase (AdoP) is a hexameric PNP; however, it is highly specific for 6-aminopurines. To investigate the structural basis for the unique substrate specificity of AdoP, the active-site mutant D204N was prepared and kinetically characterized and the structures of the wild-type protein and the D204N mutant complexed with adenosine and sulfate or with inosine and sulfate were determined at high resolution (1.2–1.4 Å). AdoP interacts directly with the preferred substrate through a hydrogen-bond donation from the catalytically important residue Asp204 to N7 of the purine base. Comparison with Escherichia coli PNP revealed a more optimal orientation of Asp204 towards N7 of adenosine and a more closed active site. When inosine is bound, two water molecules are interposed between Asp204 and the N7 and O6 atoms of the nucleoside, thus allowing the enzyme to find alternative but less efficient ways to stabilize the transition state. The mutation of Asp204 to asparagine led to a significant decrease in catalytic efficiency for adenosine without affecting the efficiency of inosine cleavage.

  17. Selection and application of broad-specificity human domain antibody for simultaneous detection of Bt Cry toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Chongxin; Zhang, Xiao; Liu, Xiaoqin; Liu, Yuan; Hu, Xiaodan; Zhong, Jianfeng; Zhang, Cunzheng; Liu, Xianjin

    2016-11-01

    Bt Cry toxin is a kind of bio-toxins that used for genetically modified crops (GMC) transformation widely. In this study, total 15 positive clones could bind the Bt Cry toxins which isolated from a human domain antibody library by 5 rounds affinity selection. According to analyzing of PCR amplification and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), the most positive phage domain antibody (named F5) gene was cloned into the pET26b vector and expressed in E. coli BL21. The purified antibody was used to develop an indirect competitive ELISA (IC-ELISA) for Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, Cry1B, Cry1C and Cry1F toxins, respectively. The working range of detection for standard curves in IC-ELISA were 0.258-1.407 μg/mL, the medium inhibition concentration (IC50) were 0.727-0.892 μg/mL and detection limit (IC10) were 0.029-0.074 μg/mL for those Bt Cry toxins. The affinity of F5 domain antibody with Cry1Ab, Cry1Ac, Cry1B, Cry1C and Cry1F toxins were 1.21-5.94 × 10(7) M(-1). The average recoveries of the 5 kinds of Bt Cry toxins from spiked wheat samples were ranged from 81.2%-100.8% with a CV at 2.5%-9.4%. The results showed that we successfully obtained the broad-specificity human domain antibody for simultaneous detection of Bt Cry toxins in agricultural product samples. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Changing the substrate specificity of penicillin G acylase from Kluyvera citrophila through selective pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roa, A; Garcia, J L; Salto, F; Cortes, E

    1994-11-01

    Escherichia coli (muT, mutD, Leu-) cells transformed with plasmid pYKD59 harbouring the pac gene encoding penicillin acylase (PA) from Kluyvera citrophila ATCC 21285 were exposed to environmental conditions that made expression of this enzyme essential for growth. Under these conditions, spontaneous mutants were isolated that used adipyl-L-leucine as the sole source of L-leucine. DNA sequencing of the mutant pac genes identified a transversion mutation of thymine to guanine at position 1163. This mutation was located in the beta-subunit of the enzyme and resulted in conversion of Phe-360 to valine. The assignment of this mutation to the shift in substrate specificity was further confirmed by site-directed mutagenesis. Secondary-structure prediction of the region surrounding Phe-360 suggests that this mutation should not produce any significant structural change. The purified mutant acylase was able to hydrolyse adipyl-, glutaryl-, valeryl-, caproyl-, heptanoyl- and phenoxyacetyl-L-leucine at pH 5 with greater efficiency than the wild-type enzyme. However, the mutant enzyme was not able to hydrolyse glutaryl-7-aminocephalosporanic acid and had lost 90% and 50% of activity on penicillin G and phenylacetyl-L-leucine respectively. Nevertheless, mutant PA retained its original activity on 6-nitro-3-phenylacetamidobenzoate and p-nitrophenylphenylacetate, suggesting that the binding specificity of PA by the acyl and amine moieties of the substrate are not independent phenomena. The small differences observed between the c.d. spectra of the mutant enzyme recorded at pH 5 and 8 suggest the existence of different conformational states at the two pH values, but these differences were indistinguishable from those observed in the native enzyme and cannot be correlated with the shift in substrate specificity. Our results demonstrate that it is possible to change the specificity of PA by laboratory evolution and use it to identify the amino acids involved in substrate recognition

  19. Structural features, substrate specificity, kinetic properties of insect α-amylase and specificity of plant α-amylase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Rimaljeet; Kaur, Narinder; Gupta, Anil Kumar

    2014-11-01

    α-Amylase is an important digestive enzyme required for the optimal growth and development of insects. Several insect α-amylases had been purified and their physical and chemical properties were characterized. Insect α-amylases of different orders display variability in structure, properties and substrate specificity. Such diverse properties of amylases could be due to different feeding habits and gut environment of insects. In this review, structural features and properties of several insect α-amylases were compared. This could be helpful in exploring the diversity in characteristics of α-amylase between the members of the same class (insecta). Properties like pH optima are reflected in enzyme structural features. In plants, α-amylase inhibitors (α-AIs) occur as part of natural defense mechanisms against pests by interfering in their digestion process and thus could also provide access to new pest management strategies. AIs are quite specific in their action; therefore, these could be employed according to their effectiveness against target amylases. Potential of transgenics with α-AIs has also been discussed for insect resistance and controlling infestation. The differences in structural features of insect α-amylases provided reasons for their efficient functioning at different pH and the specificity towards various substrates. Various proteinaceous and non-proteinaceous inhibitors discussed could be helpful in controlling pest infestation. In depth detailed studies are required on proteinaceous α-AI-α-amylase interaction at different pH's as well as the insect proteinase action on these inhibitors before selecting the α-AI for making transgenics resistant to particular insect. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Novel {alpha}-glucosidase from human gut microbiome : substrate specificities and their switch.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tan, K.; Tesar, C.; Wilton, R.; Keigher, L.; Babnigg, G.; Joachimiak, A.; Biosciences Division

    2010-01-01

    The human intestine harbors a large number of microbes forming a complex microbial community that greatly affects the physiology and pathology of the host. In the human gut microbiome, the enrichment in certain protein gene families appears to be widespread. They include enzymes involved in carbohydrate metabolism such as glucoside hydrolases of dietary polysaccharides and glycoconjugates. We report the crystal structures (wild type, 2 mutants, and a mutant/substrate complex) and the enzymatic activity of a recombinant {alpha}-glucosidase from human gut bacterium Ruminococcus obeum. The first ever protein structures from this bacterium reveal a structural homologue to human intestinal maltase-glucoamylase with a highly conserved catalytic domain and reduced auxiliary domains. The {alpha}-glucosidase, a member of GH31 family, shows substrate preference for {alpha}(1-6) over {alpha}(1-4) glycosidic linkages and produces glucose from isomaltose as well as maltose. The preference can be switched by a single mutation at its active site, suggestive of widespread adaptation to utilization of a variety of polysaccharides by intestinal micro-organisms as energy resources. Novel {alpha}-glucosidase from human gut microbiome: substrate specificities and their switch.

  1. Aldo-keto reductases in retinoid metabolism: search for substrate specificity and inhibitor selectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porté, Sergio; Xavier Ruiz, F; Giménez, Joan; Molist, Iago; Alvarez, Susana; Domínguez, Marta; Alvarez, Rosana; de Lera, Angel R; Parés, Xavier; Farrés, Jaume

    2013-02-25

    Biological activity of natural retinoids requires the oxidation of retinol to retinoic acid (RA) and its binding to specific nuclear receptors in target tissues. The first step of this pathway, the reversible oxidoreduction of retinol to retinaldehyde, is essential to control RA levels. The enzymes of retinol oxidation are NAD-dependent dehydrogenases of the cytosolic medium-chain (MDR) and the membrane-bound short-chain (SDR) dehydrogenases/reductases. Retinaldehyde reduction can be performed by SDR and aldo-keto reductases (AKR), while its oxidation to RA is carried out by aldehyde dehydrogenases (ALDH). In contrast to SDR, AKR and ALDH are cytosolic. A common property of these enzymes is that they only use free retinoid, but not retinoid bound to cellular retinol binding protein (CRBP). The relative contribution of each enzyme type in retinoid metabolism is discussed in terms of the different subcellular localization, topology of membrane-bound enzymes, kinetic constants, binding affinity of CRBP for retinol and retinaldehyde, and partition of retinoid pools between membranes and cytoplasm. The development of selective inhibitors for AKR enzymes 1B1 and 1B10, of clinical relevance in diabetes and cancer, granted the investigation of some structure-activity relationships. Kinetics with the 4-methyl derivatives of retinaldehyde isomers was performed to identify structural features for substrate specificity. Hydrophilic derivatives were better substrates than the more hydrophobic compounds. We also explored the inhibitory properties of some synthetic retinoids, known for binding to retinoic acid receptors (RAR) and retinoid X receptors (RXR). Consistent with its substrate specificity towards retinaldehyde, AKR1B10 was more effectively inhibited by synthetic retinoids than AKR1B1. A RARβ/γ agonist (UVI2008) inhibited AKR1B10 with the highest potency and selectivity, and docking simulations predicted that its carboxyl group binds to the anion-binding pocket

  2. On the substrate specificity of the rice strigolactone biosynthesis enzyme DWARF27

    KAUST Repository

    Bruno, Mark

    2016-03-05

    Main conclusion: The β-carotene isomerase OsDWARF27 is stereo- and double bond-specific. It converts bicyclic carotenoids with at least one unsubstituted β-ionone ring. OsDWARF27 may contribute to the formation of α-carotene-based strigolactone-like compounds.Strigolactones (SLs) are synthesized from all-trans-β-carotene via a pathway involving the β-carotene isomerase DWARF27, the carotenoid cleavage dioxygenases 7 and 8 (CCD7, CCD8), and cytochrome P450 enzymes from the 711 clade (MAX1 in Arabidopsis). The rice enzyme DWARF27 was shown to catalyze the reversible isomerization of all-trans- into 9-cis-β-carotene in vitro. β-carotene occurs in different cis-isomeric forms, and plants accumulate other carotenoids, which may be substrates of DWARF27. Here, we investigated the stereo and substrate specificity of the rice enzyme DWARF27 in carotenoid-accumulating E. coli strains and in in vitro assays performed with heterologously expressed and purified enzyme. Our results suggest that OsDWARF27 is strictly double bond-specific, solely targeting the C9–C10 double bond. OsDWARF27 did not introduce a 9-cis-double bond in 13-cis- or 15-cis-β-carotene. Substrates isomerized by OsDWARF27 are bicyclic carotenoids, including β-, α-carotene and β,β-cryptoxanthin, that contain at least one unsubstituted β-ionone ring. Accordingly, OsDWARF27 did not produce the abscisic acid precursors 9-cis-violaxanthin or -neoxanthin from the corresponding all-trans-isomers, excluding a direct role in the formation of this carotenoid derived hormone. The conversion of all-trans-α-carotene yielded two different isomers, including 9′-cis-α-carotene that might be the precursor of strigolactones with an ε-ionone ring, such as the recently identified heliolactone. © 2016 Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg

  3. Structural basis of the substrate specificity of Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dessanti, Paola; Zhang, Yang; Allegrini, Simone; Tozzi, Maria Grazia; Sgarrella, Francesco; Ealick, Steven E. (Cornell); (Sassari); (Pisa)

    2012-10-08

    Purine nucleoside phosphorylases catalyze the phosphorolytic cleavage of the glycosidic bond of purine (2{prime}-deoxy)nucleosides, generating the corresponding free base and (2{prime}-deoxy)ribose 1-phosphate. Two classes of PNPs have been identified: homotrimers specific for 6-oxopurines and homohexamers that accept both 6-oxopurines and 6-aminopurines. Bacillus cereus adenosine phosphorylase (AdoP) is a hexameric PNP; however, it is highly specific for 6-aminopurines. To investigate the structural basis for the unique substrate specificity of AdoP, the active-site mutant D204N was prepared and kinetically characterized and the structures of the wild-type protein and the D204N mutant complexed with adenosine and sulfate or with inosine and sulfate were determined at high resolution (1.2-1.4 {angstrom}). AdoP interacts directly with the preferred substrate through a hydrogen-bond donation from the catalytically important residue Asp204 to N7 of the purine base. Comparison with Escherichia coli PNP revealed a more optimal orientation of Asp204 towards N7 of adenosine and a more closed active site. When inosine is bound, two water molecules are interposed between Asp204 and the N7 and O6 atoms of the nucleoside, thus allowing the enzyme to find alternative but less efficient ways to stabilize the transition state. The mutation of Asp204 to asparagine led to a significant decrease in catalytic efficiency for adenosine without affecting the efficiency of inosine cleavage.

  4. Molecular model of the specificity pocket of the hepatitis C virus protease: implications for substrate recognition.

    OpenAIRE

    Pizzi, E; Tramontano, A; Tomei, L; La Monica, N; Failla, C; Sardana, M; Wood, T; De Francesco, R

    1994-01-01

    We have built a model of the specificity pocket of the protease of hepatitis C virus on the basis of the known structures of trypsin-like serine proteases and of the conservation pattern of the protease sequences among various hepatitis C strains. The model allowed us to predict that the substrate of this protease should have a cysteine residue in position P1. This hypothesis was subsequently proved by N-terminal sequencing of two products of the protease. The success of this "blind" test inc...

  5. An in vitro assay to study the recruitment and substrate specificity of chromatin modifying enzymes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vermeulen Michiel

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Post-translational modifications of core histones play an important role in regulating fundamental biological processes such as DNA repair, transcription and replication. In this paper, we describe a novel assay that allows sequential targeting of distinct histone modifying enzymes to immobilized nucleosomal templates using recombinant chimeric targeting molecules. The assay can be used to study the histone substrate specificity of chromatin modifying enzymes as well as whether and how certain enzymes affect each other's histone modifying activities. As such the assay can help to understand how a certain histone code is established and interpreted.

  6. Substrate specificity and distribution of UDP-GalNAc:sialylparagloboside N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase in the human stomach.

    OpenAIRE

    Dohi, T; Nishikawa, A; Ishizuka, I; Totani, M; Yamaguchi, K; Nakagawa, K; Saitoh, O; Ohshiba, S; Oshima, M

    1992-01-01

    The detailed substrate specificity of the UDP-GalNAc:sialylparagloboside N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase to form the Sd(a+) blood group active carbohydrate determinant GalNAc beta 1-4(NeuAc alpha 2-3)Gal was studied using a membrane fraction prepared from human gastric fundic mucosa. Various sialosylated oligosaccharides and gangliosides were examined as acceptor substrates. Oligosaccharide substrates were fluorescence-labelled with 2-aminopyridine, and the transferase activity was quantifi...

  7. Dynamic changes in the secondary structure of ECE-1 and XCE account for their different substrate specificities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ul-Haq Zaheer

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background X-converting enzyme (XCE involved in nervous control of respiration, is a member of the M13 family of zinc peptidases, for which no natural substrate has been identified yet. In contrast, it’s well characterized homologue endothelin-converting enzyme-1 (ECE-1 showed broad substrate specificity and acts as endopeptidase as well as dipeptidase. To explore the structural differences between XCE and ECE-1, homology model of XCE was built using the complex structure of ECE-1 with phosphoramidon (pdb-id: 3DWB as template. Phosphoramidon was docked into the binding site of XCE whereas phosphate oxygen of the inhibitor was used as water molecule to design the apo forms of both enzymes. Molecular dynamics simulation of both enzymes was performed to analyze the dynamic nature of their active site residues in the absence and presence of the inhibitor. Results Homology model of XCE explained the role of non-conserved residues of its S2’ subsite. Molecular dynamics (MD simulations identified the flexible transitions of F149/I150, N566/N571, W714/W719, and R145/R723 residues of ECE-1/XCE for the strong binding of the inhibitor. Secondary structure calculations using DSSP method reveals the folding of R145/R723 residue of ECE-1/XCE into β-sheet structure while unfolding of the S2’ subsite residues in aECE-1 and sustained compact folding of that of aXCE. The results evaluated are in good agreement with available experimental data, thus providing detailed molecular models which can explain the structural and specificities differences between both zinc peptidases. Conclusions Secondary structure changes of both enzymes during the simulation time revealed the importance of β-sheet structure of R145/R723 for its binding with the terminal carboxylate group of the inhibitor. Unfolding of the α-helix comprising the S2’ subsite residues in aECE-1 correlate well with its endopeptidase activity while their compact folding in aXCE may

  8. Examination of the polypeptide substrate specificity for Escherichia coli ClpA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tao; Lucius, Aaron L

    2013-07-23

    Enzyme-catalyzed protein unfolding is essential for a large array of biological functions, including microtubule severing, membrane fusion, morphogenesis and trafficking of endosomes, protein disaggregation, and ATP-dependent proteolysis. These enzymes are all members of the ATPases associated with various cellular activity (AAA+) superfamily of proteins. Escherichia coli ClpA is a hexameric ring ATPase responsible for enzyme-catalyzed protein unfolding and translocation of a polypeptide chain into the central cavity of the tetradecameric E. coli ClpP serine protease for proteolytic degradation. Further, ClpA also uses its protein unfolding activity to catalyze protein remodeling reactions in the absence of ClpP. ClpA recognizes and binds a variety of protein tags displayed on proteins targeted for degradation. In addition, ClpA binds unstructured or poorly structured proteins containing no specific tag sequence. Despite this, a quantitative description of the relative binding affinities for these different substrates is not available. Here we show that ClpA binds to the 11-amino acid SsrA tag with an affinity of 200 ± 30 nM. However, when the SsrA sequence is incorporated at the carboxy terminus of a 30-50-amino acid substrate exhibiting little secondary structure, the affinity constant decreases to 3-5 nM. These results indicate that additional contacts beyond the SsrA sequence are required for maximal binding affinity. Moreover, ClpA binds to various lengths of the intrinsically unstructured protein, α-casein, with an affinity of ∼30 nM. Thus, ClpA does exhibit modest specificity for SsrA when incorporated into an unstructured protein. Moreover, incorporating these results with the known structural information suggests that SsrA makes direct contact with the domain 2 loop in the axial channel and additional substrate length is required for additional contacts within domain 1.

  9. Characterization of 2-aminoisobutyric acid transport in Neurospora crassa: a general amino acid permease-specific substrate.

    OpenAIRE

    Ogilvie-Villa, S; DeBusk, R M; DeBusk, A G

    1981-01-01

    We report the characterization of an amino acid 2-aminoisobutyric acid was transported solely by the general amino acid permease and not by the neutral amino acid permease. Furthermore, this substrate was not metabolized after transport. The potential for a system-specific nonmetabolizable substrate as a tool in the analysis of amino acid transport and its regulation is discussed.

  10. Induction of virus-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes as a basis for the development of broadly protective influenza vaccines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.L.B. Hillaire (Marine); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); G.F. Rimmelzwaan (Guus)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractThere is considerable interest in the development of broadly protective influenza vaccines because of the continuous emergence of antigenic drift variants of seasonal influenza viruses and the threat posed by the emergence of antigenically distinct pandemic influenza viruses. It has been

  11. Substrate specificity of low-molecular mass bacterial DD-peptidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemmara, Venkatesh V; Dzhekieva, Liudmila; Sarkar, Kumar Subarno; Adediran, S A; Duez, Colette; Nicholas, Robert A; Pratt, R F

    2011-11-22

    The bacterial DD-peptidases or penicillin-binding proteins (PBPs) catalyze the formation and regulation of cross-links in peptidoglycan biosynthesis. They are classified into two groups, the high-molecular mass (HMM) and low-molecular mass (LMM) enzymes. The latter group, which is subdivided into classes A-C (LMMA, -B, and -C, respectively), is believed to catalyze DD-carboxypeptidase and endopeptidase reactions in vivo. To date, the specificity of their reactions with particular elements of peptidoglycan structure has not, in general, been defined. This paper describes the steady-state kinetics of hydrolysis of a series of specific peptidoglycan-mimetic peptides, representing various elements of stem peptide structure, catalyzed by a range of LMM PBPs (the LMMA enzymes, Escherichia coli PBP5, Neisseria gonorrhoeae PBP4, and Streptococcus pneumoniae PBP3, and the LMMC enzymes, the Actinomadura R39 dd-peptidase, Bacillus subtilis PBP4a, and N. gonorrhoeae PBP3). The R39 enzyme (LMMC), like the previously studied Streptomyces R61 DD-peptidase (LMMB), specifically and rapidly hydrolyzes stem peptide fragments with a free N-terminus. In accord with this result, the crystal structures of the R61 and R39 enzymes display a binding site specific to the stem peptide N-terminus. These are water-soluble enzymes, however, with no known specific function in vivo. On the other hand, soluble versions of the remaining enzymes of those noted above, all of which are likely to be membrane-bound and/or associated in vivo and have been assigned particular roles in cell wall biosynthesis and maintenance, show little or no specificity for peptides containing elements of peptidoglycan structure. Peptidoglycan-mimetic boronate transition-state analogues do inhibit these enzymes but display notable specificity only for the LMMC enzymes, where, unlike peptide substrates, they may be able to effectively induce a specific active site structure. The manner in which LMMA (and HMM) DD

  12. Kinetic studies on the substrate specificity and active site of rabbit muscle acid alpha-glucosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsui, H; Sasaki, M; Takemasa, E; Kaneta, T; Chiba, S

    1984-10-01

    Mammalian muscle acid alpha-glucosidase was highly purified for the first time from rabbit muscle by fractionation with ammonium sulfate, and chromatographies on Sephadex G-100, CM-TOYOPEARL and TOYOPEARL HW-55. The resulting preparation showed a single band on polyacrylamide disc gel electrophoresis. The molecular weight was estimated to be 1.02 X 10(5) by SDS-electrophoresis. The optimum pH was found to be 4.5. The alpha-glucosidase showed relatively high activity not only toward maltose but also toward alpha-glucans, such as soluble starch, beta-limit dextrin, amylopectin, shellfish glycogen, and amylose. The Km values for maltose and glycogen were 6.3 mM and 12 mM (the concentration of non-reducing glucose units), respectively, and the ratio of the maximum velocities of hydrolyses of the two substrates was 100:66.7, in that order. Rabbit muscle acid alpha-glucosidase showed a wide specificity for various substrates. The Km values for maltose, maltotriose, -tetraose, -pentaose, -hexaose, -heptaose, and -octaose, and maltodextrins of average polymerization degrees of 13 and 17 were 6.3 mM, 2.6 mM, 5.9 mM, 3.0 mM, 5.9 mM, 5.9 mM, 5.9 mM, 7.7 mM, and 5.6 mM, respectively. The relative maximum velocities for maltooligosaccharides consisting of three or more glucose units were 43.5-89.3% of that for maltose. For disaccharides, the rate of hydrolysis decreased in the following order: maltose divided by nigerose greater than kojibiose greater than isomaltose. The purified enzyme was a typical acid alpha-glucosidase of mammalian origin, which hydrolyzed various substrates to produce alpha-glucose. The nature of the active site catalyzing the hydrolyses of maltose and glycogen was investigated by some kinetic methods. In experiments with mixed substrates, maltose and shellfish glycogen, the kinetic features agreed very closely with those theoretically predicted for a single site mechanism. The essential ionizable groups, 1 (on the acidic side) and 2 (on the alkaline side

  13. Reexamination of BT-PABA test (PFD)--on the substrate specificity for pancreatic chymotrypsin in vivo

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Semba, D; Ishihara, Y; Morioka, Y

    1994-01-01

    .... In order to reevaluate the specificity of BT-PABA for chymotrypsin, we investigated the intestinal influence on this substrate in in vivo and in vitro studies using mongrel dogs under the conditions...

  14. A structural account of substrate and inhibitor specificity differences between two Naphthol reductases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liao, D.-I.; Thompson, J.E.; Fahnestock, S.; Valent, B.; Jordan, D.B. (DuPont)

    2010-03-08

    Two short chain dehydrogenase/reductases mediate naphthol reduction reactions in fungal melanin biosynthesis. An X-ray structure of 1,3,6,8-tetrahydroxynaphthalene reductase (4HNR) complexed with NADPH and pyroquilon was determined for examining substrate and inhibitor specificities that differ from those of 1,3,8-trihydroxynaphthalene reductase (3HNR). The 1.5 {angstrom} resolution structure allows for comparisons with the 1.7 {angstrom} resolution structure of 3HNR complexed with the same ligands. The sequences of the two proteins are 46% identical, and they have the same fold. The 30-fold lower affinity of the 4HNR-NADPH complex for pyroquilon (a commercial fungicide that targets 3HNR) in comparison to that of the 3HNR-NADPH complex can be explained by unfavorable interactions between the anionic carboxyl group of the C-terminal Ile282 of 4HNR and CH and CH{sub 2} groups of the inhibitor that are countered by favorable inhibitor interactions with 3HNR. 1,3,8-Trihydroxynaphthalene (3HN) and 1,3,6,8-tetrahydroxynaphthalene (4HN) were modeled onto the cyclic structure of pyroquilon in the 4HNR-NADPH-pyroquilon complex to examine the 300-fold preference of the enzyme for 4HN over 3HN. The models suggest that the C-terminal carboxyl group of Ile282 has a favorable hydrogen bonding interaction with the C6 hydroxyl group of 4HN and an unfavorable interaction with the C6 CH group of 3HN. Models of 3HN and 4HN in the 3HNR active site suggest a favorable interaction of the sulfur atom of the C-terminal Met283 with the C6 CH group of 3HN and an unfavorable one with the C6 hydroxyl group of 4HN, accounting for the 4-fold difference in substrate specificities. Thus, the C-terminal residues of the two naphthol reductase are determinants of inhibitor and substrate specificities.

  15. Substrate specificity of the acyl transferase domains of EpoC from the epothilone polyketide synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petković, Hrvoje; Sandmann, Axel; Challis, Iain R; Hecht, Hans-Jürgen; Silakowski, Barbara; Low, Lindsey; Beeston, Nicola; Kuscer, Enej; Garcia-Bernardo, Jose; Leadlay, Peter F; Kendrew, Steven G; Wilkinson, Barrie; Müller, Rolf

    2008-02-07

    The production of epothilone mixtures is a direct consequence of the substrate tolerance of the module 3 acyltransferase (AT) domain of the epothilone polyketide synthase (PKS) which utilises both malonyl- and methylmalonyl-CoA extender units. Particular amino acid motifs in the active site of AT domains influence substrate selection for methylmalonyl-CoA (YASH) or malonyl-CoA (HAFH). This motif appears in hybrid form (HASH) in epoAT3 and may represent the molecular basis for the relaxed specificity of the domain. To investigate this possibility the AT domains from modules 2 and 3 of the epothilone PKS were examined in the heterologous DEBS1-TE model PKS. Substitution of AT1 of DEBS1-TE by epoAT2 and epoAT3 both resulted in functional PKSs, although lower yields of total products were observed when compared to DEBS1-TE (2% and 11.5% respectively). As expected, epoAT3 was significantly more promiscuous in keeping with its nature during epothilone biosynthesis. When the mixed motif (HASH) of epoAT3 within the hybrid PKS was mutated to HAFH (indicative of malonyl-CoA selection) it resulted in a non-productive PKS. When this mixed motif was converted to YASH (indicative of methylmalonyl-CoA selection) the selectivity of the hybrid PKS for methylmalonyl-CoA showed no statistically significant increase, and was associated with a loss of productivity.

  16. A new target region for changing the substrate specificity of amine transaminases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Li-Jun; Ohtsuka, Jun; Okai, Masahiko; Miyakawa, Takuya; Mase, Tomoko; Zhi, Yuehua; Hou, Feng; Ito, Noriyuki; Iwasaki, Akira; Yasohara, Yoshihiko; Tanokura, Masaru

    2015-01-01

    (R)-stereospecific amine transaminases (R-ATAs) are important biocatalysts for the production of (R)-amine compounds in a strict stereospecific manner. An improved R-ATA, ATA-117-Rd11, was successfully engineered for the manufacture of sitagliptin, a widely used therapeutic agent for type-2 diabetes. The effects of the individual mutations, however, have not yet been demonstrated due to the lack of experimentally determined structural information. Here we describe three crystal structures of the first isolated R-ATA, its G136F mutant and engineered ATA-117-Rd11, which indicated that the mutation introduced into the 136th residue altered the conformation of a loop next to the active site, resulting in a substrate-binding site with drastically modified volume, shape, and surface properties, to accommodate the large pro-sitagliptin ketone. Our findings provide a detailed explanation of the previously reported molecular engineering of ATA-117-Rd11 and propose that the loop near the active site is a new target for the rational design to change the substrate specificity of ATAs. PMID:26030619

  17. Effect of C-terminal domain truncation of Thermus thermophilus trehalose synthase on its substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Chang-Bae; Park, Da-Yeon; Lee, Soo-Bok

    2017-01-01

    The C-terminal domain of the three-domain-comprising trehalose synthase from Thermus thermophilus was truncated in order to study the effect on the enzyme's activity and substrate specificity. Compared with the wild-type (WT) enzyme, the two truncated enzymes (DM1 and DM2) showed lower maltose- and trehalose-converting activities and a different transglycosylation reaction mechanism. In the mutants, the glucose moiety cleaved from the maltose substrate was released from the enzyme and intercepted by external glucose oxidase, preventing the production of trehalose. The WT enzyme, however, retained the glucose in the active site to effectively produce trehalose. In addition, DM1 synthesized much higher amounts of mannose-containing disaccharide trehalose analog (Man-TA) than did the WT and DM2. The results suggest that the C-terminal domain in the WT enzyme is important for retaining the glucose moiety within the active site. The mutant enzymes could be used to produce Man-TA, a postulated inhibitor of gut disaccharidases. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Development of a Plate-Based Screening Assay to Investigate the Substrate Specificity of the PRMT Family of Enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hao C; Wang, Min; Salsburg, Andrew; Knuckley, Bryan

    2015-09-14

    There are nine protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs 1-9) expressed in humans that vary in both subcellular localization and substrate specificity. The variation in substrate specificity between isozymes leads to competing effects that result in either activation or repression of tumor suppressor genes. Current methods used to study substrate specificity for these enzymes utilize radioisotopic labeling of substrates, mass spectrometry analysis of complex samples, or coupled assays that monitor cofactor degradation. Herein, we report the development of a rapid, nonradioactive, and sensitive method for screening multiple peptides in parallel to gain insight into the substrate specificity of PRMT enzymes. Our assay provides a major advantage over other high-throughput screening assays (e.g., ELISA, AlphaScreen chemiluminescence) by eliminating the need for purification of individual peptides and provides a timesaving, cost-effective alternative to the traditional PRMT assays. A one-bead one-compound (OBOC) peptide library was synthesized and subsequently screened against PRMT1 in a 96-well plate. This screen resulted in identification of a novel PRMT1 substrate with kinetic parameters similar to histone H4-21 (e.g., the best-known PRMT1 peptide substrate).

  19. Molecular model of the specificity pocket of the hepatitis C virus protease: implications for substrate recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzi, E; Tramontano, A; Tomei, L; La Monica, N; Failla, C; Sardana, M; Wood, T; De Francesco, R

    1994-02-01

    We have built a model of the specificity pocket of the protease of hepatitis C virus on the basis of the known structures of trypsin-like serine proteases and of the conservation pattern of the protease sequences among various hepatitis C strains. The model allowed us to predict that the substrate of this protease should have a cysteine residue in position P1. This hypothesis was subsequently proved by N-terminal sequencing of two products of the protease. The success of this "blind" test increases our confidence in the overall correctness of our proposed alignment of the enzyme sequence with those of other proteases of known structure and constitutes a first step in the construction of a complete model of the viral protease domain.

  20. Two Distinct Broadly Neutralizing Antibody Specificities of Different Clonal Lineages in a Single HIV-1-Infected Donor: Implications for Vaccine Design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montefiori, David C.; Wu, Xueling; Chen, Xi; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Tsao, Chun-Yen; Kozink, Daniel M.; Parks, Robert J.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Crump, John A.; Kapiga, Saidi H.; Sam, Noel E.; Kwong, Peter D.; Kepler, Thomas B.; Liao, Hua-Xin; Mascola, John R.

    2012-01-01

    Plasma from a small subset of subjects chronically infected with HIV-1 shows remarkable magnitude and breadth of neutralizing activity. From one of these individuals (CH0219), we isolated two broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs), CH01 and VRC-CH31, from two clonal lineages of memory B cells with distinct specificities (variable loop 1 and 2 [V1V2] conformational specificity and CD4-binding site specificity, respectively) that recapitulate 95% of CH0219 serum neutralization breadth. These data provide proof of concept for an HIV-1 vaccine that aims to elicit bnAbs of multiple specificities. PMID:22301150

  1. Analysis of substrate specificity of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Mag1 alkylpurine DNA glycosylase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adhikary, Suraj; Eichman, Brandt F. (Vanderbilt)

    2014-10-02

    DNA glycosylases specialized for the repair of alkylation damage must identify, with fine specificity, a diverse array of subtle modifications within DNA. The current mechanism involves damage sensing through interrogation of the DNA duplex, followed by more specific recognition of the target base inside the active site pocket. To better understand the physical basis for alkylpurine detection, we determined the crystal structure of Schizosaccharomyces pombe Mag1 (spMag1) in complex with DNA and performed a mutational analysis of spMag1 and the close homologue from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (scMag). Despite strong homology, spMag1 and scMag differ in substrate specificity and cellular alkylation sensitivity, although the enzymological basis for their functional differences is unknown. We show that Mag preference for 1,N{sup 6}-ethenoadenine ({var_epsilon}A) is influenced by a minor groove-interrogating residue more than the composition of the nucleobase-binding pocket. Exchanging this residue between Mag proteins swapped their {var_epsilon}A activities, providing evidence that residues outside the extrahelical base-binding pocket have a role in identification of a particular modification in addition to sensing damage.

  2. Lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases from Myceliophthora thermophila C1 differ in substrate preference and reducing agent specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frommhagen, Matthias; Koetsier, Martijn J; Westphal, Adrie H; Visser, Jaap; Hinz, Sandra W A; Vincken, Jean-Paul; van Berkel, Willem J H; Kabel, Mirjam A; Gruppen, Harry

    2016-01-01

    Lytic polysaccharide monooxgygenases (LPMOs) are known to boost the hydrolytic breakdown of lignocellulosic biomass, especially cellulose, due to their oxidative mechanism. For their activity, LPMOs require an electron donor for reducing the divalent copper cofactor. LPMO activities are mainly investigated with ascorbic acid as a reducing agent, but little is known about the effect of plant-derived reducing agents on LPMOs activity. Here, we show that three LPMOs from the fungus Myceliophthora thermophila C1, MtLPMO9A, MtLPMO9B and MtLPMO9C, differ in their substrate preference, C1-/C4-regioselectivity and reducing agent specificity. MtLPMO9A generated C1- and C4-oxidized, MtLPMO9B C1-oxidized and MtLPMO9C C4-oxidized gluco-oligosaccharides from cellulose. The recently published MtLPMO9A oxidized, next to cellulose, xylan, β-(1 → 3, 1 → 4)-glucan and xyloglucan. In addition, MtLPMO9C oxidized, to a minor extent, xyloglucan and β-(1 → 3, 1 → 4)-glucan from oat spelt at the C4 position. In total, 34 reducing agents, mainly plant-derived flavonoids and lignin-building blocks, were studied for their ability to promote LPMO activity. Reducing agents with a 1,2-benzenediol or 1,2,3-benzenetriol moiety gave the highest release of oxidized and non-oxidized gluco-oligosaccharides from cellulose for all three MtLPMOs. Low activities toward cellulose were observed in the presence of monophenols and sulfur-containing compounds. Several of the most powerful LPMO reducing agents of this study serve as lignin building blocks or protective flavonoids in plant biomass. Our findings support the hypothesis that LPMOs do not only vary in their C1-/C4-regioselectivity and substrate specificity, but also in their reducing agent specificity. This work strongly supports the idea that the activity of LPMOs toward lignocellulosic biomass does not only depend on the ability to degrade plant polysaccharides like cellulose, but also on their specificity toward plant

  3. Substrate specificity of rabbit aldehyde oxidase for nitroguanidine and nitromethylene neonicotinoid insecticides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dick, Ryan A; Kanne, David B; Casida, John E

    2006-01-01

    The nitroguanidine or nitromethylene moiety of the newest major class of insecticides, the neonicotinoids, is important for potency at insect nicotinic receptors and selectivity relative to mammalian receptors. Aldehyde oxidase (AOX) was recently identified as the imidacloprid nitroreductase of mammalian liver, producing both nitrosoguanidine and aminoguanidine metabolites. The present study considers the ability of AOX, partially purified from rabbit liver, to reduce five commercial nitroguanidine (i.e., imidacloprid, thiamethoxam, clothianidin, and dinotefuran) and nitromethylene (i.e., nitenpyram) neonicotinoid insecticides and three derivatives thereof (i.e., the N-methyl and nitromethylene analogues of imidacloprid and desmethylthiamethoxam). LC/MS/MS was used to demonstrate that AOX reduces nitroguanidines to both nitroso- and aminoguanidines, while nitromethylenes are reduced only to the corresponding nitroso metabolites. Additionally, nitrosonitenpyram was found to spontaneously dehydrate to form a 2-cyanoamidine metabolite, mimicking a predominant photoreaction. The substrate specificity of AOX was characterized as follows: Neonicotinoids with a tertiary nitrogen (N-methylimidacloprid and thiamethoxam) are poor substrates; nitroguanidines are metabolized faster than nitromethylenes; and clothianidin is the most rapidly reduced. Kinetic constants were measured for reduction of three nitroguanidines at two concentrations of AOX. At 2 mg protein/mL, only nitroso metabolites were detected, with Km values of 1.03, 2.99, and 2.41 mM and Vmax values of 5.13, 2.54, and 0.98 nmol/min/mg protein measured for clothianidin, imidacloprid, and dinotefuran, respectively. At 5 mg protein/mL, both amino and nitroso metabolites were detected. However, with each nitroguanidine, the formation of nitroso metabolites did not saturate at substrate levels up to 4 mM, whereas amino metabolite formation exhibited Km values of 0.052, 0.16, and 0.084 mM with corresponding Vmax values

  4. Phylogenetic analyses suggest multiple changes of substrate specificity within the Glycosyl hydrolase 20 family

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Horner David S

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Beta-N-acetylhexosaminidases belonging to the glycosyl hydrolase 20 (GH20 family are involved in the removal of terminal β-glycosidacally linked N-acetylhexosamine residues. These enzymes, widely distributed in microorganisms, animals and plants, are involved in many important physiological and pathological processes, such as cell structural integrity, energy storage, pathogen defence, viral penetration, cellular signalling, fertilization, development of carcinomas, inflammatory events and lysosomal storage diseases. Nevertheless, only limited analyses of phylogenetic relationships between GH20 genes have been performed until now. Results Careful phylogenetic analyses of 233 inferred protein sequences from eukaryotes and prokaryotes reveal a complex history for the GH20 family. In bacteria, multiple gene duplications and lineage specific gene loss (and/or horizontal gene transfer are required to explain the observed taxonomic distribution. The last common ancestor of extant eukaryotes is likely to have possessed at least one GH20 family member. At least one gene duplication before the divergence of animals, plants and fungi as well as other lineage specific duplication events have given rise to multiple paralogous subfamilies in eukaryotes. Phylogenetic analyses also suggest that a second, divergent subfamily of GH20 family genes present in animals derive from an independent prokaryotic source. Our data suggest multiple convergent changes of functional roles of GH20 family members in eukaryotes. Conclusion This study represents the first detailed evolutionary analysis of the glycosyl hydrolase GH20 family. Mapping of data concerning physiological function of GH20 family members onto the phylogenetic tree reveals that apparently convergent and highly lineage specific changes in substrate specificity have occurred in multiple GH20 subfamilies.

  5. Substrate Specificity of the Secreted Nisin Leader Peptidase NisP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagedroste, Marcel; Smits, Sander H J; Schmitt, Lutz

    2017-08-01

    Nisin (NisA) is an antimicrobial peptide produced by Lactococcus lactis and belongs to the class of lanthipeptides, more specifically to the class of lantibiotics. They are ribosomally synthesized as a precursor peptide and are comprised of an N-terminal leader peptide and a C-terminal core peptide. The core peptide is post-translationally modified and contains dehydrated amino acids in addition to five (methyl)-lanthionine rings, which are crucial for its activity. The leader peptide serves as a signal sequence and ensures that NisA remains inactive but secretion-competent within the cell. After translocation into the extracellular space, the leader peptide is cleaved by the leader peptidase NisP, resulting in active nisin. NisP is an extracellular subtilisin-like serine protease, which recognizes the cleavage site GASPR|IT located at the C-terminal end of the leader peptide. Here, we present the biochemical characterization of secreted and purified NisP (NisPs) with its natural substrate, the fully modified NisA (mNisA). Furthermore, we determined the kinetic parameters of NisPs in the presence of NisA containing different modification states. Additionally, in vitro data revealed that NisPs can efficiently cleave the leader peptide of mNisA. However, it is strictly dependent on the modification state of the core peptide. Thus, NisPs has a sequence-based cleavage activity, and the presence of at least one lanthionine ring is crucial for optimal substrate recognition and subsequent cleavage.

  6. Deoxyribonucleoside kinases belonging to the thymidine kinase 2 (TK2)-like group vary significantly in substrate specificity, kinetics and feed-back regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Wolfgang; Petersen, Gitte Ebert; Munch-Petersen, Birgitte; Piskur, Jure

    2002-01-25

    In eukaryotic cells deoxyribonucleoside kinases belonging to three phylogenetic sub-families have been found: (i) thymidine kinase 1 (TK1)-like enzymes, which are strictly pyrimidine deoxyribonucleoside-specific kinases; (ii) TK2-like enzymes, which include pyrimidine deoxyribonucleoside kinases and a single multisubstrate kinase from Drosophila melanogaster (Dm-dNK); and (iii) deoxycytidine/deoxyguanosine kinase (dCK/dGK)-like enzymes, which are deoxycytidine and/or purine deoxyribonucleoside-specific kinases. We cloned and characterized two new deoxyribonucleoside kinases belonging to the TK2-like group from the insect Bombyx mori and the amphibian Xenopus laevis. The deoxyribonucleoside kinase from B. mori (Bm-dNK) turned out to be a multisubstrate kinase like Dm-dNK. But uniquely for a deoxyribonucleoside kinase, Bm-dNK displayed positive cooperativity with all four natural deoxyribonucleoside substrates. The deoxyribonucleoside kinase from X. laevis (Xen-PyK) resembled closely the human and mouse TK2 enzymes displaying their characteristic Michaelis-Menten kinetic with deoxycytidine and negative cooperativity with its second natural substrate thymidine. Bm-dNK, Dm-dNK and Xen-PyK were shown to be homodimers. Significant differences in the feedback inhibition by deoxyribonucleoside triphosphates between these three enzymes were found. The insect multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinases Bm-dNK and Dm-dNK were only inhibited by thymidine triphosphate, while Xen-PyK was inhibited by thymidine and deoxycytidine triphosphate in a complex pattern depending on the deoxyribonucleoside substrate. The broad substrate specificity and different feedback regulation of the multisubstrate insect deoxyribonucleoside kinases may indicate that these enzymes have a different functional role than the other members of the TK2-like group. Copyright 2002 Academic Press.

  7. Structural analysis of the α-glucosidase HaG provides new insights into substrate specificity and catalytic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Xing; Saburi, Wataru; Gai, Zuoqi; Kato, Koji; Ojima-Kato, Teruyo; Yu, Jian; Komoda, Keisuke; Kido, Yusuke; Matsui, Hirokazu; Mori, Haruhide; Yao, Min

    2015-06-01

    α-Glucosidases, which catalyze the hydrolysis of the α-glucosidic linkage at the nonreducing end of the substrate, are important for the metabolism of α-glucosides. Halomonas sp. H11 α-glucosidase (HaG), belonging to glycoside hydrolase family 13 (GH13), only has high hydrolytic activity towards the α-(1 → 4)-linked disaccharide maltose among naturally occurring substrates. Although several three-dimensional structures of GH13 members have been solved, the disaccharide specificity and α-(1 → 4) recognition mechanism of α-glucosidase are unclear owing to a lack of corresponding substrate-bound structures. In this study, four crystal structures of HaG were solved: the apo form, the glucosyl-enzyme intermediate complex, the E271Q mutant in complex with its natural substrate maltose and a complex of the D202N mutant with D-glucose and glycerol. These structures explicitly provide insights into the substrate specificity and catalytic mechanism of HaG. A peculiar long β → α loop 4 which exists in α-glucosidase is responsible for the strict recognition of disaccharides owing to steric hindrance. Two residues, Thr203 and Phe297, assisted with Gly228, were found to determine the glycosidic linkage specificity of the substrate at subsite +1. Furthermore, an explanation of the α-glucosidase reaction mechanism is proposed based on the glucosyl-enzyme intermediate structure.

  8. X-ray structures of the proprotein convertase furin bound with substrate analog inhibitors reveal substrate specificity determinants beyond the S4 pocket.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahms, Sven O; Hardes, Kornelia; Steinmetzer, Torsten; Than, Manuel E

    2018-01-09

    The proprotein convertase (PC) furin is a highly specific serine protease modifying and thereby activating proteins in the secretory pathway by proteolytic cleavage. Its substrates are involved in many diseases including cancer and infections caused by bacteria and viruses. Understanding furin's substrate specificity is of crucial importance for the development of pharmacologically applicable inhibitors. Using protein X-ray crystallography we investigated the extended substrate binding site of furin in complex with three peptide derived inhibitors at up to 1.9 Å resolution. The structure of the protease bound with a hexapeptide inhibitor revealed molecular details of its S6 pocket, which remained completely unknown so far. The arginine residue at P6 induced an unexpected turn-like conformation of the inhibitor backbone, which is stabilized by intra- and intermolecular H-bonds. In addition, we confirmed the binding of arginine to the previously proposed S5 pocket (S51). An alternative S5 site (S52) could be utilized by shorter sidechains as demonstrated for a 4-aminomethyl-phenylacetyl residue, which shows steric properties similar to a lysine side chain. Interestingly, we also observed binding of a peptide with citrulline at P4 substituting the highly conserved arginine. The structural data might indicate an unusual protonation state of Asp264 maintaining the interaction with uncharged citrulline. The herein identified molecular interaction sites at P5 and P6 can be utilized to improve next generation furin inhibitors. Our data will also help to predict furin substrates more precisely based on the additional specificity determinants observed for P5 and P6.

  9. Kinetic Origin of Substrate Specificity in Post-Transfer Editing by Leucyl-tRNA Synthetase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulic, Morana; Cvetesic, Nevena; Zivkovic, Igor; Palencia, Andrés; Cusack, Stephen; Bertosa, Branimir; Gruic-Sovulj, Ita

    2017-10-27

    The intrinsic editing capacities of aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases ensure a high-fidelity translation of the amino acids that possess effective non-cognate aminoacylation surrogates. The dominant error-correction pathway comprises deacylation of misaminoacylated tRNA within the aminoacyl-tRNA synthetase editing site. To assess the origin of specificity of Escherichia coli leucyl-tRNA synthetase (LeuRS) against the cognate aminoacylation product in editing, we followed binding and catalysis independently using cognate leucyl- and non-cognate norvalyl-tRNALeu and their non-hydrolyzable analogues. We found that the amino acid part (leucine versus norvaline) of (mis)aminoacyl-tRNAs can contribute approximately 10-fold to ground-state discrimination at the editing site. In sharp contrast, the rate of deacylation of leucyl- and norvalyl-tRNALeu differed by about 104-fold. We further established the critical role for the A76 3'-OH group of the tRNALeu in post-transfer editing, which supports the substrate-assisted deacylation mechanism. Interestingly, the abrogation of the LeuRS specificity determinant threonine 252 did not improve the affinity of the editing site for the cognate leucine as expected, but instead substantially enhanced the rate of leucyl-tRNALeu hydrolysis. In line with that, molecular dynamics simulations revealed that the wild-type enzyme, but not the T252A mutant, enforced leucine to adopt the side-chain conformation that promotes the steric exclusion of a putative catalytic water. Our data demonstrated that the LeuRS editing site exhibits amino acid specificity of kinetic origin, arguing against the anticipated prominent role of steric exclusion in the rejection of leucine. This feature distinguishes editing from the synthetic site, which relies on ground-state discrimination in amino acid selection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Autocatalytic activity and substrate specificity of the pestivirus N-terminal protease N{sup pro}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottipati, Keerthi; Acholi, Sudheer [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0647 (United States); Ruggli, Nicolas [Institute of Virology and Immunology, CH-3147 Mittelhäusern (Switzerland); Choi, Kyung H., E-mail: kychoi@utmb.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Sealy Center for Structural Biology and Molecular Biophysics, The University of Texas Medical Branch, Galveston, TX 77555-0647 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Pestivirus N{sup pro} is the first protein translated in the viral polypeptide, and cleaves itself off co-translationally generating the N-terminus of the core protein. Once released, N{sup pro} blocks the host's interferon response by inducing degradation of interferon regulatory factor-3. N{sup pro'}s intracellular autocatalytic activity and lack of trans-activity have hampered in vitro cleavage studies to establish its substrate specificity and the roles of individual residues. We constructed N{sup pro}-GFP fusion proteins that carry the authentic cleavage site and determined the autoproteolytic activities of N{sup pro} proteins containing substitutions at the predicted catalytic sites Glu22 and Cys69, at Arg100 that forms a salt bridge with Glu22, and at the cleavage site Cys168. Contrary to previous reports, we show that N{sup pro'}s catalytic activity does not involve Glu22, which may instead be involved in protein stability. Furthermore, N{sup pro} does not have specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site even though this residue is conserved throughout the pestivirus genus. - Highlights: • N{sup pro'}s autoproteolysis is studied using N{sup pro}-GFP fusion proteins. • N-terminal 17 amino acids are dispensable without loss of protease activity. • The putative catalytic residue Glu22 is not involved in protease catalysis. • No specificity for Cys168 at the cleavage site despite evolutionary conservation. • N{sup pro} prefers small amino acids with non-branched beta carbons at the P1 position.

  11. Site-specific deletions of chromosomally located DNA segments with the multimer resolution system of broad-host-range plasmid RP4

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sternberg, Claus; Eberl, Leo; Sanchezromero, Juan M.

    1995-01-01

    The multimer resolution system (mrs) of the broad-host-range plasmid RP4 has been exploited to develop a general method that permits the precise excision of chromosomal segments in a variety of gram-negative bacteria. The procedure is based on the site-specific recombination between two directly...... transposons inserted in the chromosome of Pseudomonas putida, This strategy permits the stable inheritance of heterologous DNA segments virtually devoid of the sequences used initially to select their insertion....

  12. Substrate Specificity of Lymphoid-specific Tyrosine Phosphatase (Lyp) and Identification of Src Kinase-associated Protein of 55 kDa Homolog (SKAP-HOM) as a Lyp Substrate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Xiao; Chen, Ming; Zhang, Sheng; Yu, Zhi-Hong; Sun, Jin-Peng; Wang, Lina; Liu, Sijiu; Imasaki, Tsuyoshi; Takagi, Yuichiro; Zhang, Zhong-Yin (Indiana-Med)

    2012-02-08

    A missense single-nucleotide polymorphism in the gene encoding the lymphoid-specific tyrosine phosphatase (Lyp) has been identified as a causal factor in a wide spectrum of autoimmune diseases. Interestingly, the autoimmune-predisposing variant of Lyp appears to represent a gain-of-function mutation, implicating Lyp as an attractive target for the development of effective strategies for the treatment of many autoimmune disorders. Unfortunately, the precise biological functions of Lyp in signaling cascades and cellular physiology are poorly understood. Identification and characterization of Lyp substrates will help define the chain of molecular events coupling Lyp dysfunction to diseases. In the current study, we identified consensus sequence motifs for Lyp substrate recognition using an 'inverse alanine scanning' combinatorial library approach. The intrinsic sequence specificity data led to the discovery and characterization of SKAP-HOM, a cytosolic adaptor protein required for proper activation of the immune system, as a bona fide Lyp substrate. To determine the molecular basis for Lyp substrate recognition, we solved crystal structures of Lyp in complex with the consensus peptide as well as the phosphopeptide derived from SKAP-HOM. Together with the biochemical data, the structures define the molecular determinants for Lyp substrate specificity and provide a solid foundation upon which novel therapeutics targeting Lyp can be developed for multiple autoimmune diseases.

  13. Structural and functional basis for substrate specificity and catalysis of levan fructotransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jinseo; Kim, Myung-Il; Park, Young-Don; Shin, Inchul; Cha, Jaeho; Kim, Chul Ho; Rhee, Sangkee

    2012-09-07

    Levan is β-2,6-linked polymeric fructose and serves as reserve carbohydrate in some plants and microorganisms. Mobilization of fructose is usually mediated by enzymes such as glycoside hydrolase (GH), typically releasing a monosaccharide as a product. The enzyme levan fructotransferase (LFTase) of the GH32 family catalyzes an intramolecular fructosyl transfer reaction and results in production of cyclic difructose dianhydride, thus exhibiting a novel substrate specificity. The mechanism by which LFTase carries out these functions via the structural fold conserved in the GH32 family is unknown. Here, we report the crystal structure of LFTase from Arthrobacter ureafaciens in apo form, as well as in complexes with sucrose and levanbiose, a difructosacchride with a β-2,6-glycosidic linkage. Despite the similarity of its two-domain structure to members of the GH32 family, LFTase contains an active site that accommodates a difructosaccharide using the -1 and -2 subsites. This feature is unique among GH32 proteins and is facilitated by small side chain residues in the loop region of a catalytic β-propeller N-domain, which is conserved in the LFTase family. An additional oligosaccharide-binding site was also characterized in the β-sandwich C-domain, supporting its role in carbohydrate recognition. Together with functional analysis, our data provide a molecular basis for the catalytic mechanism of LFTase and suggest functional variations from other GH32 family proteins, notwithstanding the conserved structural elements.

  14. Substrate-specific gene expression in Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, the chytrid pathogen of amphibians.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erica Bree Rosenblum

    Full Text Available Determining the mechanisms of host-pathogen interaction is critical for understanding and mitigating infectious disease. Mechanisms of fungal pathogenicity are of particular interest given the recent outbreaks of fungal diseases in wildlife populations. Our study focuses on Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd, the chytrid pathogen responsible for amphibian declines around the world. Previous studies have hypothesized a role for several specific families of secreted proteases as pathogenicity factors in Bd, but the expression of these genes has only been evaluated in laboratory growth conditions. Here we conduct a genome-wide study of Bd gene expression under two different nutrient conditions. We compare Bd gene expression profiles in standard laboratory growth media and in pulverized host tissue (i.e., frog skin. A large proportion of genes in the Bd genome show increased expression when grown in host tissue, indicating the importance of studying pathogens on host substrate. A number of gene classes show particularly high levels of expression in host tissue, including three families of secreted proteases (metallo-, serine- and aspartyl-proteases, adhesion genes, lipase-3 encoding genes, and a group of phylogenetically unusual crinkler-like effectors. We discuss the roles of these different genes as putative pathogenicity factors and discuss what they can teach us about Bd's metabolic targets, host invasion, and pathogenesis.

  15. Complexes of Thermotoga maritima S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase provide insights into substrate specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bale, Shridhar; Baba, Kavita; McCloskey, Diane E.; Pegg, Anthony E.; Ealick, Steven E.

    2010-06-25

    The polyamines putrescine, spermidine and spermine are ubiquitous aliphatic cations and are essential for cellular growth and differentiation. S-Adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC) is a critical pyruvoyl-dependent enzyme in the polyamine-biosynthetic pathway. The crystal structures of AdoMetDC from humans and plants and of the AdoMetDC proenzyme from Thermotoga maritima have been obtained previously. Here, the crystal structures of activated T. maritima AdoMetDC (TmAdoMetDC) and of its complexes with S-adenosylmethionine methyl ester and 5{prime}-deoxy-5{prime}-dimethylthioadenosine are reported. The results demonstrate for the first time that TmAdoMetDC autoprocesses without the need for additional factors and that the enzyme contains two complete active sites, both of which use residues from both chains of the homodimer. The complexes provide insights into the substrate specificity and ligand binding of AdoMetDC in prokaryotes. The conservation of the ligand-binding mode and the active-site residues between human and T. maritima AdoMetDC provides insight into the evolution of AdoMetDC.

  16. Kinetic characterization of Vibrio cholerae ApbE: Substrate specificity and regulatory mechanisms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fang, Xuan; Liang, Pingdong; Raba, Daniel Alexander; Rosas-Lemus, Mónica; Chakravarthy, Srinivas; Tuz, Karina; Juárez, Oscar; Permyakov, Eugene A.

    2017-10-24

    ApbE is a member of a novel family of flavin transferases that incorporates flavin mononucleotide (FMN) to subunits of diverse respiratory complexes, which fulfill important homeostatic functions. In this work a detailed characterization of Vibrio cholerae ApbE physiologic activity, substrate specificity and pH dependency was carried out. The data obtained show novel characteristics of the regulation and function of this family. For instance, our experiments indicate that divalent cations are essential for ApbE function, and that the selectivity depends largely on size and the coordination sphere of the cation. Our data also show that ApbE regulation by pH, ADP and potassium is an important mechanism that enhances the adaptation, survival and colonization of V. cholerae in the small intestine. Moreover, studies of the pH-dependency of the activity show that the reaction is favored under alkaline conditions, with a pKa of 8.4. These studies, together with sequence and structure analysis allowed us to identify His257, which is absolutely conserved in the family, as a candidate for the residue whose deprotonation controls the activity. Remarkably, the mutant H257G abolished the flavin transfer activity, strongly indicating that this residue plays an important role in the catalytic mechanism of ApbE.

  17. The fungal cultivar of leaf-cutter ants produces specific enzymes in response to different plant substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Khadempour, Lily [Department of Bacteriology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison WI 53706 USA; Department of Zoology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison WI 53706 USA; Department of Energy Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison WI 53706 USA; Burnum-Johnson, Kristin E. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Baker, Erin S. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Nicora, Carrie D. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Webb-Robertson, Bobbie-Jo M. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; White, Richard A. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Monroe, Matthew E. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Huang, Eric L. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Smith, Richard D. [Biological Sciences Division, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, Richland WA 99352 USA; Currie, Cameron R. [Department of Bacteriology, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison WI 53706 USA; Department of Energy Great Lakes Bioenergy Research Center, University of Wisconsin-Madison, Madison WI 53706 USA

    2016-10-26

    Herbivores use symbiotic microbes to help gain access to energy and nutrients from plant material. Leaf-cutter ants are a paradigmatic example, having tremendous impact on their ecosystems as dominant generalist herbivores through cultivation of a fungus, Leucoagaricus gongylophorous. Here we examine how this mutualism could facilitate the flexible substrate incorporation of the ants by providing leaf-cutter ant subcolonies four substrate types: leaves, flowers, oats, and a mixture of all three. Through metaproteomic analysis of the fungus gardens, we were able to identify and quantify 1766 different fungal proteins, including 161 biomass-degrading enzymes. This analysis revealed that fungal protein profiles were significantly different between subcolonies fed different substrates with the highest abundance of cellulolytic enzymes observed in the leaf and flower treatments. When the fungus garden is provided with leaves and flowers, which contain the majority of their energy in recalcitrant material, it increases its production of proteins that break down cellulose: endoglucanases, exoglucanase and β-glucosidase. Further, the complete metaproteomes for the leaves and flowers treatments were very similar, the mixed treatment closely resembled the treatment with oats alone. This suggests that when provided a mixture of substrates, the fungus garden preferentially produces enzymes necessary for breakdown of simpler, more digestible substrates. This flexible, substrate-specific response of the fungal cultivar allows the leaf-cutter ants to derive energy from a wide range of substrates, which may contribute to their ability to be dominant generalist herbivores.

  18. Sortase A substrate specificity in GBS pilus 2a cell wall anchoring.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Necchi

    Full Text Available Streptococcus agalactiae, also referred to as Group B Streptococcus (GBS, is one of the most common causes of life-threatening bacterial infections in infants. In recent years cell surface pili have been identified in several Gram-positive bacteria, including GBS, as important virulence factors and promising vaccine candidates. In GBS, three structurally distinct types of pili have been discovered (pilus 1, 2a and 2b, whose structural subunits are assembled in high-molecular weight polymers by specific class C sortases. In addition, the highly conserved housekeeping sortase A (SrtA, whose main role is to link surface proteins to bacterial cell wall peptidoglycan by a transpeptidation reaction, is also involved in pili cell wall anchoring in many bacteria. Through in vivo mutagenesis, we demonstrate that the LPXTG sorting signal of the minor ancillary protein (AP2 is essential for pilus 2a anchoring. We successfully produced a highly purified recombinant SrtA (SrtA(ΔN40 able to specifically hydrolyze the sorting signal of pilus 2a minor ancillary protein (AP2-2a and catalyze in vitro the transpeptidation reaction between peptidoglycan analogues and the LPXTG motif, using both synthetic fluorescent peptides and recombinant proteins. By contrast, SrtA(ΔN40 does not catalyze the transpeptidation reaction with substrate-peptides mimicking sorting signals of the other pilus 2a subunits (the backbone protein and the major ancillary protein. Thus, our results add further insight into the proposed model of GBS pilus 2a assembly, in which SrtA is required for pili cell wall covalent attachment, acting exclusively on the minor accessory pilin, representing the terminal subunit located at the base of the pilus.

  19. Structure of putrescine aminotransferase from Escherichia coli provides insights into the substrate specificity among class III aminotransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cha, Hyung Jin; Jeong, Jae-Hee; Rojviriya, Catleya; Kim, Yeon-Gil

    2014-01-01

    YgjG is a putrescine aminotransferase enzyme that transfers amino groups from compounds with terminal primary amines to compounds with an aldehyde group using pyridoxal-5'-phosphate (PLP) as a cofactor. Previous biochemical data show that the enzyme prefers primary diamines, such as putrescine, over ornithine as a substrate. To better understand the enzyme's substrate specificity, crystal structures of YgjG from Escherichia coli were determined at 2.3 and 2.1 Å resolutions for the free and putrescine-bound enzymes, respectively. Sequence and structural analyses revealed that YgjG forms a dimer that adopts a class III PLP-dependent aminotransferase fold. A structural comparison between YgjG and other class III aminotransferases revealed that their structures are similar. However, YgjG has an additional N-terminal helical structure that partially contributes to a dimeric interaction with the other subunit via a helix-helix interaction. Interestingly, the YgjG substrate-binding site entrance size and charge distribution are smaller and more hydrophobic than other class III aminotransferases, which suggest that YgjG has a unique substrate binding site that could accommodate primary aliphatic diamine substrates, including putrescine. The YgjG crystal structures provide structural clues to putrescine aminotransferase substrate specificity and binding.

  20. Substrate specifity and inhibitors of polyphenol oxidase in aspect of darkening of fresh and frozen mushrooms (Agaricus bisporus (Lange Sing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janusz Czapski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Activity of mushroom polyphenol oxidase (PPO toward 6 substrates and inhibitory effect of cysteine, 2-mercaptoethanol, benzoic acid and sodium metabisulphite were determined. The o-diphenols which appeared to be the best substrates were: catechin, DOPA (L-3,4-dihydro-xyphenylalanine and chlorogcnic acid. Affinity of PPO crude preparation substrates to enzyme, expressed as inverse value of Michaelis constant was lower then affinity of catechol. Inhibitory effect depended on specifity of inhibitors and their concentration. Electrophoretic patterns of PPO of mushrooms reveals slow and fast moving 4 isoforms when DOPA was used as a substrate, 2 bands for catechin and chlorogenic acid while only one band showed activity toward tyrosine and p-cresol.

  1. Analysis of a Clonal Lineage of HIV-1 Envelope V2/V3 Conformational Epitope-Specific Broadly Neutralizing Antibodies and Their Inferred Unmutated Common Ancestors ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonsignori, Mattia; Hwang, Kwan-Ki; Chen, Xi; Tsao, Chun-Yen; Morris, Lynn; Gray, Elin; Marshall, Dawn J.; Crump, John A.; Kapiga, Saidi H.; Sam, Noel E.; Sinangil, Faruk; Pancera, Marie; Yongping, Yang; Zhang, Baoshan; Zhu, Jiang; Kwong, Peter D.; O'Dell, Sijy; Mascola, John R.; Wu, Lan; Nabel, Gary J.; Phogat, Sanjay; Seaman, Michael S.; Whitesides, John F.; Moody, M. Anthony; Kelsoe, Garnett; Yang, Xinzhen; Sodroski, Joseph; Shaw, George M.; Montefiori, David C.; Kepler, Thomas B.; Tomaras, Georgia D.; Alam, S. Munir; Liao, Hua-Xin; Haynes, Barton F.

    2011-01-01

    V2/V3 conformational epitope antibodies that broadly neutralize HIV-1 (PG9 and PG16) have been recently described. Since an elicitation of previously known broadly neutralizing antibodies has proven elusive, the induction of antibodies with such specificity is an important goal for HIV-1 vaccine development. A critical question is which immunogens and vaccine formulations might be used to trigger and drive the development of memory B cell precursors with V2/V3 conformational epitope specificity. In this paper we identified a clonal lineage of four V2/V3 conformational epitope broadly neutralizing antibodies (CH01 to CH04) from an African HIV-1-infected broad neutralizer and inferred their common reverted unmutated ancestor (RUA) antibodies. While conformational epitope antibodies rarely bind recombinant Env monomers, a screen of 32 recombinant envelopes for binding to the CH01 to CH04 antibodies showed monoclonal antibody (MAb) binding to the E.A244 gp120 Env and to chronic Env AE.CM243; MAbs CH01 and CH02 also bound to transmitted/founder Env B.9021. CH01 to CH04 neutralized 38% to 49% of a panel of 91 HIV-1 tier 2 pseudoviruses, while the RUAs neutralized only 16% of HIV-1 isolates. Although the reverted unmutated ancestors showed restricted neutralizing activity, they retained the ability to bind to the E.A244 gp120 HIV-1 envelope with an affinity predicted to trigger B cell development. Thus, E.A244, B.9021, and AE.CM243 Envs are three potential immunogen candidates for studies aimed at defining strategies to induce V2/V3 conformational epitope-specific antibodies. PMID:21795340

  2. Specificity and versatility of substrate binding sites in four catalytic domains of human N-terminal acetyltransferases.

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    Cédric Grauffel

    Full Text Available Nt-acetylation is among the most common protein modifications in eukaryotes. Although thought for a long time to protect proteins from degradation, the role of Nt-acetylation is still debated. It is catalyzed by enzymes called N-terminal acetyltransferases (NATs. In eukaryotes, several NATs, composed of at least one catalytic domain, target different substrates based on their N-terminal sequences. In order to better understand the substrate specificity of human NATs, we investigated in silico the enzyme-substrate interactions in four catalytic subunits of human NATs (Naa10p, Naa20p, Naa30p and Naa50p. To date hNaa50p is the only human subunit for which X-ray structures are available. We used the structure of the ternary hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG complex and a structural model of hNaa10p as a starting point for multiple molecular dynamics simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/substrate (substrate=MLG, EEE, MKG, hNaa10p/AcCoA/substrate (substrate=MLG, EEE. Nine alanine point-mutants of the hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG complex were also simulated. Homology models of hNaa20p and hNaa30p were built and compared to hNaa50p and hNaa10p. The simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/MLG reproduce the interactions revealed by the X-ray data. We observed strong hydrogen bonds between MLG and tyrosines 31, 138 and 139. Yet the tyrosines interacting with the substrate's backbone suggest that their role in specificity is limited. This is confirmed by the simulations of hNaa50p/AcCoA/EEE and hNaa10p/AcCoA/MLG, where these hydrogen bonds are still observed. Moreover these tyrosines are all conserved in hNaa20p and hNaa30p. Other amino acids tune the specificity of the S1' sites that is different for hNaa10p (acidic, hNaa20p (hydrophobic/basic, hNaa30p (basic and hNaa50p (hydrophobic. We also observe dynamic correlation between the ligand binding site and helix [Formula: see text] that tightens under substrate binding. Finally, by comparing the four structures we propose maps of the peptide

  3. Structure-guided engineering of the substrate specificity of a fungal β-glucuronidase toward triterpenoid saponins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Bo; Sun, Hanli; Huang, Shen; Feng, Xudong; Jiang, Tao; Li, Chun

    2018-01-12

    Glycoside hydrolases (GHs) have attracted special attention in research aimed at modifying natural products by partial removal of sugar moieties to manipulate their solubility and efficacy. However, these modifications are challenging to control because the low substrate specificity of most GHs often generates undesired by-products. We previously identified a GH2-type fungal β-glucuronidase from Aspergillus oryzae ( P GUS) exhibiting promiscuous substrate specificity in hydrolysis of triterpenoid saponins. Here, we present the P GUS structure, representing the first structure of a fungal β-glucuronidase, and that of an inactive P GUS mutant in complex with the native substrate glycyrrhetic acid 3- O -mono-β-glucuronide (GAMG). P GUS displayed a homotetramer structure with each monomer comprising three distinct domains: a sugar-binding, an immunoglobulin-like β-sandwich, and a TIM barrel domain. Two catalytic residues, Glu 414 and Glu 505 , acted as acid/base and nucleophile, respectively. Structural and mutational analyses indicated that the GAMG glycan moiety is recognized by polar interactions with nine residues (Asp 162 , His 332 , Asp 414 , Tyr 469 , Tyr 473 , Asp 505 , Arg 563 , Asn 567 , and Lys 569 ) and that the aglycone moiety is recognized by aromatic stacking and by a π interaction with the four aromatic residues Tyr 469 , Phe 470 , Trp 472 , and Tyr 473 Finally, structure-guided mutagenesis to precisely manipulate P GUS substrate specificity in the biotransformation of glycyrrhizin into GAMG revealed that two amino acids, Ala 365 and Arg 563 , are critical for substrate specificity. Moreover, we obtained several mutants with dramatically improved GAMG yield (>95%). Structural analysis suggested that modulating the interaction of β-glucuronidase simultaneously toward glycan and aglycone moieties is critical for tuning its substrate specificity toward triterpenoid saponins. © 2018 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  4. Crystal Structure of Inulosucrase from Lactobacillus : Insights into the Substrate Specificity and Product Specificity of GH68 Fructansucrases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pijning, Tjaard; Anwar, Munir A.; Boger, Markus; Dobruchowska, Justyna M.; Leemhuis, Hans; Kralj, Slavko; Dijkhuizen, Lubbert; Dijkstra, Bauke W.

    2011-01-01

    Fructansucrases (FSs) catalyze a transfructosylation reaction with sucrose as substrate to produce fructo-oligosaccharides and fructan polymers that contain either beta-2,1 glycosidic linkages (inulin) or beta-2,6 linkages (levan). Levan-synthesizing FSs (levansucrases) have been most extensively

  5. Expanding the Substrate Specificity of Thermoanaerobacter pseudoethanolicus Secondary Alcohol Dehydrogenase by a Dual Site Mutation

    KAUST Repository

    Musa, Musa M.

    2017-12-14

    Here, we report the asymmetric reduction of selected phenyl-ring-containing ketones by various single and dual site mutants of Thermoanaerobacter pseudoethanolicus secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (TeSADH). Further expanding the size of the substrate binding pocket in the mutant W110A/I86A not only allowed substrates of the single mutants W110A and I86A to be accommodated within the expanded active site, but also expanded the enzyme\\'s substrate range to ketones bearing two sterically demanding groups (bulky-bulky ketones), which are not substrates for TeSADH single mutants. We also report the regio- and enantioselective reduction of diketones using W110A/I86A TeSADH and single TeSADH mutants. The double mutant exhibited dual stereopreference generating the Prelog products most of the time and the anti-Prelog products in a few cases.

  6. Animal deoxyribonucleoside kinases: 'forward' and 'retrograde' evolution of their substrate specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure; Sandrini, Michael; Knecht, Wolfgang

    2004-01-01

    Deoxyribonucleoside kinases, which catalyse the phosphorylation of deoxyribonucleosides, are present in several copies in most multicellular organisms and therefore represent an excellent model to study gene duplication and specialisation of the duplicated copies through partitioning of substrate...

  7. Phospholipase A2 in rat-lung microsomes: Substrate specificity towards endogenous phosphatidylcholines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Longmore, W.J.; Oldenburg, V.; Golde, L.M.G. van

    1979-01-01

    1. 1. Isolated rat lungs were perfused with a variety of radioactive precursors to label the phosphatidylcholines of the microsomal and lamellar body fractions. These endogenously labelled phosphatidylcholines were used as substrates in experiments to identify and characterize phospholipase A

  8. Purification and substrate specificities of a fructanase from Kluyveromyces marxianus isolated from the fermentation process of Mezcal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arrizon, Javier; Morel, Sandrine; Gschaedler, Anne; Monsan, Pierre

    2011-02-01

    A fructanase, produced by a Kluyveromyces marxianus strain isolated during the fermentation step of the elaboration process of "Mezcal de Guerrero" was purified and biochemically characterized. The active protein was a glycosylated dimer with a molecular weight of approximately 250 kDa. The specific enzymatic activity of the protein was determined for different substrates: sucrose, inulin, Agave tequilana fructan, levan and Actilight® and compared with the activity of Fructozyme®. The hydrolysis profile of the different substrates analyzed by HPAEC-PAD showed that the enzyme has different affinities over the substrates tested with a sucrose/inulin enzymatic activity ratio (S/I) of 125. For the hydrolysis of Agave tequilana fructans, the enzyme also showed a higher enzymatic activity and specificity than Fructozyme®, which is important for its potential application in the tequila industry. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. SNOSite: exploiting maximal dependence decomposition to identify cysteine S-nitrosylation with substrate site specificity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tzong-Yi Lee

    Full Text Available S-nitrosylation, the covalent attachment of a nitric oxide to (NO the sulfur atom of cysteine, is a selective and reversible protein post-translational modification (PTM that regulates protein activity, localization, and stability. Despite its implication in the regulation of protein functions and cell signaling, the substrate specificity of cysteine S-nitrosylation remains unknown. Based on a total of 586 experimentally identified S-nitrosylation sites from SNAP/L-cysteine-stimulated mouse endothelial cells, this work presents an informatics investigation on S-nitrosylation sites including structural factors such as the flanking amino acids composition, the accessible surface area (ASA and physicochemical properties, i.e. positive charge and side chain interaction parameter. Due to the difficulty to obtain the conserved motifs by conventional motif analysis, maximal dependence decomposition (MDD has been applied to obtain statistically significant conserved motifs. Support vector machine (SVM is applied to generate predictive model for each MDD-clustered motif. According to five-fold cross-validation, the MDD-clustered SVMs could achieve an accuracy of 0.902, and provides a promising performance in an independent test set. The effectiveness of the model was demonstrated on the correct identification of previously reported S-nitrosylation sites of Bos taurus dimethylarginine dimethylaminohydrolase 1 (DDAH1 and human hemoglobin subunit beta (HBB. Finally, the MDD-clustered model was adopted to construct an effective web-based tool, named SNOSite (http://csb.cse.yzu.edu.tw/SNOSite/, for identifying S-nitrosylation sites on the uncharacterized protein sequences.

  10. Structural and mutational studies on substrate specificity and catalysis of Salmonella typhimurium D-cysteine desulfhydrase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sakshibeedu R Bharath

    Full Text Available Salmonella typhimurium DCyD (StDCyD is a fold type II pyridoxal 5' phosphate (PLP-dependent enzyme that catalyzes the degradation of D-Cys to H(2S and pyruvate. It also efficiently degrades β-chloro-D-alanine (βCDA. D-Ser is a poor substrate while the enzyme is inactive with respect to L-Ser and 1-amino-1-carboxy cyclopropane (ACC. Here, we report the X-ray crystal structures of StDCyD and of crystals obtained in the presence of D-Cys, βCDA, ACC, D-Ser, L-Ser, D-cycloserine (DCS and L-cycloserine (LCS at resolutions ranging from 1.7 to 2.6 Å. The polypeptide fold of StDCyD consisting of a small domain (residues 48-161 and a large domain (residues 1-47 and 162-328 resembles other fold type II PLP dependent enzymes. The structures obtained in the presence of D-Cys and βCDA show the product, pyruvate, bound at a site 4.0-6.0 Å away from the active site. ACC forms an external aldimine complex while D- and L-Ser bind non-covalently suggesting that the reaction with these ligands is arrested at Cα proton abstraction and transimination steps, respectively. In the active site of StDCyD cocrystallized with DCS or LCS, electron density for a pyridoxamine phosphate (PMP was observed. Crystals soaked in cocktail containing these ligands show density for PLP-cycloserine. Spectroscopic observations also suggest formation of PMP by the hydrolysis of cycloserines. Mutational studies suggest that Ser78 and Gln77 are key determinants of enzyme specificity and the phenolate of Tyr287 is responsible for Cα proton abstraction from D-Cys. Based on these studies, a probable mechanism for the degradation of D-Cys by StDCyD is proposed.

  11. Molecular characterization of a glucokinase with broad hexose specificity from Bacillus sphaericus strain C3-41.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bei; Liu, Haizhou; Hu, Xiaomin; Cai, Yajun; Zheng, Dasheng; Yuan, Zhiming

    2007-06-01

    Bacillus sphaericus cannot metabolize sugar since it lacks several of the enzymes necessary for glycolysis. Our results confirmed the presence of a glucokinase-encoding gene, glcK, and a phosphofructokinase-encoding gene, pfk, on the bacterial chromosome and expression of glucokinase during vegetative growth of B. sphaericus strains. However, no phosphoglucose isomerase gene (pgi) or phosphoglucose isomerase enzyme activity was detected in these strains. Furthermore, one glcK open reading frame was cloned from B. sphaericus strain C3-41 and then expressed in Escherichia coli. Biochemical analysis revealed that this gene encoded a protein with a molecular mass of 33 kDa and that the purified recombinant glucokinase had K(m) values of 0.52 and 0.31 mM for ATP and glucose, respectively. It has been proved that this ATP-dependent glucokinase can also phosphorylate fructose and mannose, and sequence alignment of the glcK gene indicated that it belongs to the ROK protein family. It is postulated that the absence of the phosphoglucose isomerase-encoding gene pgi in B. sphaericus might be one of the reasons for the inability of this bacterium to metabolize carbohydrates. Our findings provide additional data that further elucidate the specific metabolic pathway and could be used for genetic improvement of B. sphaericus.

  12. Molecular Characterization of a Glucokinase with Broad Hexose Specificity from Bacillus sphaericus Strain C3-41▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Bei; Liu, Haizhou; Hu, Xiaomin; Cai, Yajun; Zheng, Dasheng; Yuan, Zhiming

    2007-01-01

    Bacillus sphaericus cannot metabolize sugar since it lacks several of the enzymes necessary for glycolysis. Our results confirmed the presence of a glucokinase-encoding gene, glcK, and a phosphofructokinase-encoding gene, pfk, on the bacterial chromosome and expression of glucokinase during vegetative growth of B. sphaericus strains. However, no phosphoglucose isomerase gene (pgi) or phosphoglucose isomerase enzyme activity was detected in these strains. Furthermore, one glcK open reading frame was cloned from B. sphaericus strain C3-41 and then expressed in Escherichia coli. Biochemical analysis revealed that this gene encoded a protein with a molecular mass of 33 kDa and that the purified recombinant glucokinase had Km values of 0.52 and 0.31 mM for ATP and glucose, respectively. It has been proved that this ATP-dependent glucokinase can also phosphorylate fructose and mannose, and sequence alignment of the glcK gene indicated that it belongs to the ROK protein family. It is postulated that the absence of the phosphoglucose isomerase-encoding gene pgi in B. sphaericus might be one of the reasons for the inability of this bacterium to metabolize carbohydrates. Our findings provide additional data that further elucidate the specific metabolic pathway and could be used for genetic improvement of B. sphaericus. PMID:17400775

  13. Evolution of substrate specificity in bacterial AA10 lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Book, Adam J; Yennamalli, Ragothaman M; Takasuka, Taichi E; Currie, Cameron R; Phillips, George N; Fox, Brian G

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the diversity of lignocellulose-degrading enzymes in nature will provide insights for the improvement of cellulolytic enzyme cocktails used in the biofuels industry. Two families of enzymes, fungal AA9 and bacterial AA10, have recently been characterized as crystalline cellulose or chitin-cleaving lytic polysaccharide monooxygenases (LPMOs). Here we analyze the sequences, structures, and evolution of LPMOs to understand the factors that may influence substrate specificity both within and between these enzyme families. Comparative analysis of sequences, solved structures, and homology models from AA9 and AA10 LPMO families demonstrated that, although these two LPMO families are highly conserved, structurally they have minimal sequence similarity outside the active site residues. Phylogenetic analysis of the AA10 family identified clades with putative chitinolytic and cellulolytic activities. Estimation of the rate of synonymous versus non-synonymous substitutions (dN/dS) within two major AA10 subclades showed distinct selective pressures between putative cellulolytic genes (subclade A) and CBP21-like chitinolytic genes (subclade D). Estimation of site-specific selection demonstrated that changes in the active sites were strongly negatively selected in all subclades. Furthermore, all codons in the subclade D had dN/dS values of less than 0.7, whereas codons in the cellulolytic subclade had dN/dS values of greater than 1.5. Positively selected codons were enriched at sites localized on the surface of the protein adjacent to the active site. The structural similarity but absence of significant sequence similarity between AA9 and AA10 families suggests that these enzyme families share an ancient ancestral protein. Combined analysis of amino acid sites under Darwinian selection and structural homology modeling identified a subclade of AA10 with diversifying selection at different surfaces, potentially used for cellulose-binding and protein

  14. Probing the substrate specificity of the catalytically self-sufficient cytochrome P450 RhF from a Rhodococcus sp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Celik, Ayhan; Roberts, Gareth A; White, John H; Chapman, Stephen K; Turner, Nicholas J; Flitsch, Sabine L

    2006-11-21

    Analysis of the substrate specificity of the self-sufficient cytochrome P450 RhF revealed that the enzyme tends to catalyse the dealkylation of substituted alkyl-aryl ethers with shorter alkyl moieties more readily than equivalent compounds with longer alkyl groups.

  15. Substrate specificity analysis of protein kinase complex Dbf2-Mob1 by peptide library and proteome array screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Snyder Michael

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mitotic exit network (MEN is a group of proteins that form a signaling cascade that is essential for cells to exit mitosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The MEN has also been implicated in playing a role in cytokinesis. Two components of this signaling pathway are the protein kinase Dbf2 and its binding partner essential for its kinase activity, Mob1. The components of MEN that act upstream of Dbf2-Mob1 have been characterized, but physiological substrates for Dbf2-Mob1 have yet to be identified. Results Using a combination of peptide library selection, phosphorylation of opitmal peptide variants, and screening of a phosphosite array, we found that Dbf2-Mob1 preferentially phosphorylated serine over threonine and required an arginine three residues upstream of the phosphorylated serine in its substrate. This requirement for arginine in peptide substrates could not be substituted with the similarly charged lysine. This specificity determined for peptide substrates was also evident in many of the proteins phosphorylated by Dbf2-Mob1 in a proteome chip analysis. Conclusion We have determined by peptide library selection and phosphosite array screening that the protein kinase Dbf2-Mob1 preferentially phosphorylated substrates that contain an RXXS motif. A subsequent proteome microarray screen revealed proteins that can be phosphorylated by Dbf2-Mob1 in vitro. These proteins are enriched for RXXS motifs, and may include substrates that mediate the function of Dbf2-Mob1 in mitotic exit and cytokinesis. The relatively low degree of sequence restriction at the site of phosphorylation suggests that Dbf2 achieves specificity by docking its substrates at a site that is distinct from the phosphorylation site

  16. Universal or Specific? A Modeling-Based Comparison of Broad-Spectrum Influenza Vaccines against Conventional, Strain-Matched Vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Subramanian

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Despite the availability of vaccines, influenza remains a major public health challenge. A key reason is the virus capacity for immune escape: ongoing evolution allows the continual circulation of seasonal influenza, while novel influenza viruses invade the human population to cause a pandemic every few decades. Current vaccines have to be updated continually to keep up to date with this antigenic change, but emerging 'universal' vaccines-targeting more conserved components of the influenza virus-offer the potential to act across all influenza A strains and subtypes. Influenza vaccination programmes around the world are steadily increasing in their population coverage. In future, how might intensive, routine immunization with novel vaccines compare against similar mass programmes utilizing conventional vaccines? Specifically, how might novel and conventional vaccines compare, in terms of cumulative incidence and rates of antigenic evolution of seasonal influenza? What are their potential implications for the impact of pandemic emergence? Here we present a new mathematical model, capturing both transmission dynamics and antigenic evolution of influenza in a simple framework, to explore these questions. We find that, even when matched by per-dose efficacy, universal vaccines could dampen population-level transmission over several seasons to a greater extent than conventional vaccines. Moreover, by lowering opportunities for cross-protective immunity in the population, conventional vaccines could allow the increased spread of a novel pandemic strain. Conversely, universal vaccines could mitigate both seasonal and pandemic spread. However, where it is not possible to maintain annual, intensive vaccination coverage, the duration and breadth of immunity raised by universal vaccines are critical determinants of their performance relative to conventional vaccines. In future, conventional and novel vaccines are likely to play complementary roles in

  17. Tissue Restricted Splice Junctions Originate Not Only from Tissue-Specific Gene Loci, but Gene Loci with a Broad Pattern of Expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S Hestand

    Full Text Available Cellular mechanisms that achieve protein diversity in eukaryotes are multifaceted, including transcriptional components such as RNA splicing. Through alternative splicing, a single protein-coding gene can generate multiple mRNA transcripts and protein isoforms, some of which are tissue-specific. We have conducted qualitative and quantitative analyses of the Bodymap 2.0 messenger RNA-sequencing data from 16 human tissue samples and identified 209,363 splice junctions. Of these, 22,231 (10.6% were not previously annotated and 21,650 (10.3% were expressed in a tissue-restricted pattern. Tissue-restricted alternative splicing was found to be widespread, with approximately 65% of expressed multi-exon genes containing at least one tissue-specific splice junction. Interestingly, we observed many tissue-specific splice junctions not only in genes expressed in one or a few tissues, but also from gene loci with a broad pattern of expression.

  18. Chondroitin-4-O-sulfatase from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron: exploration of the substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malleron, Annie; Benjdia, Alhosna; Berteau, Olivier; Le Narvor, Christine

    2012-05-15

    Bacterial sulfatases can be good tools to increase the molecular diversity of glycosaminoglycan synthetic fragments. A chondroitin 4-O-sulfatase from the human commensal bacterium Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron has recently been identified and expressed. In order to use this enzyme for synthetic purposes, the minimal structure required for its activity has been determined. For that, four 4-O-sulfated monosaccharides and one 4-O-sulfated disaccharide have been synthesized and used as substrates with the sulfatase. The minimum structure was shown to be a disaccharide but in contrast to the natural substrate, which must have a 4,5-insaturation, the enzyme accepts as substrate, a disaccharide with a saturated glucuronic acid at the non-reducing end and even a glucopyranosyl moiety without the carboxylic acid functionality. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Structural Comparison, Substrate Specificity, and Inhibitor Binding of AGPase Small Subunit from Monocot and Dicot: Present Insight and Future Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kishore Sarma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase (AGPase is the first rate limiting enzyme of starch biosynthesis pathway and has been exploited as the target for greater starch yield in several plants. The structure-function analysis and substrate binding specificity of AGPase have provided enormous potential for understanding the role of specific amino acid or motifs responsible for allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanisms, which facilitate the engineering of AGPases. We report the three-dimensional structure, substrate, and inhibitor binding specificity of AGPase small subunit from different monocot and dicot crop plants. Both monocot and dicot subunits were found to exploit similar interactions with the substrate and inhibitor molecule as in the case of their closest homologue potato tuber AGPase small subunit. Comparative sequence and structural analysis followed by molecular docking and electrostatic surface potential analysis reveal that rearrangements of secondary structure elements, substrate, and inhibitor binding residues are strongly conserved and follow common folding pattern and orientation within monocot and dicot displaying a similar mode of allosteric regulation and catalytic mechanism. The results from this study along with site-directed mutagenesis complemented by molecular dynamics simulation will shed more light on increasing the starch content of crop plants to ensure the food security worldwide.

  20. Substrate-Specific Development of Thermophilic Bacterial Consortia by Using Chemically Pretreated Switchgrass

    OpenAIRE

    Eichorst, Stephanie A.; Joshua, Chijioke; Sathitsuksanoh, Noppadon; Singh, Seema; Simmons, Blake A.; Singer, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    Microbial communities that deconstruct plant biomass have broad relevance in biofuel production and global carbon cycling. Biomass pretreatments reduce plant biomass recalcitrance for increased efficiency of enzymatic hydrolysis. We exploited these chemical pretreatments to study how thermophilic bacterial consortia adapt to deconstruct switchgrass (SG) biomass of various compositions. Microbial communities were adapted to untreated, ammonium fiber expansion (AFEX)-pretreated, and ionic-liqui...

  1. Structural basis for the activity and substrate specificity of fluoroacetyl-CoA thioesterase FlK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Marcio V B; Huang, Fanglu; Chirgadze, Dimitri Y; Tosin, Manuela; Spiteller, Dieter; Dry, Emily F V; Leadlay, Peter F; Spencer, Jonathan B; Blundell, Tom L

    2010-07-16

    The thioesterase FlK from the fluoroacetate-producing Streptomyces cattleya catalyzes the hydrolysis of fluoroacetyl-coenzyme A. This provides an effective self-defense mechanism, preventing any fluoroacetyl-coenzyme A formed from being further metabolized to 4-hydroxy-trans-aconitate, a lethal inhibitor of the tricarboxylic acid cycle. Remarkably, FlK does not accept acetyl-coenzyme A as a substrate. Crystal structure analysis shows that FlK forms a dimer, in which each subunit adopts a hot dog fold as observed for type II thioesterases. Unlike other type II thioesterases, which invariably utilize either an aspartate or a glutamate as catalytic base, we show by site-directed mutagenesis and crystallography that FlK employs a catalytic triad composed of Thr(42), His(76), and a water molecule, analogous to the Ser/Cys-His-acid triad of type I thioesterases. Structural comparison of FlK complexed with various substrate analogues suggests that the interaction between the fluorine of the substrate and the side chain of Arg(120) located opposite to the catalytic triad is essential for correct coordination of the substrate at the active site and therefore accounts for the substrate specificity.

  2. Altering the substrate specificity and enantioselectivity of phenylacetone monooxygenase by structure-inspired enzyme redesign

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Torres Pazmino, Daniel E.; Snajdrova, Radka; Rial, Daniela V.; Mihovilovic, Marko D.; Fraaije, Marco W.

    Of all presently available Baeyer-Villiger monooxygenases, phenylacetone monooxygenase (PAMO) is the only representative for which a structure has been determined. While it is an attractive biocatalyst because of its thermostability, it is only active with a limited number of substrates. By means of

  3. Structural basis for the changed substrate specificity of Drosophila melanogaster deoxyribonucleoside kinase mutant N64D

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Welin, M.; Skovgaard, T.; Knecht, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    The Drosophila melanogaster deoxyribonucleoside kinase (Dm-dNK) double mutant N45D/N64D was identified during a previous directed evolution study. This mutant enzyme had a decreased activity towards the natural substrates and decreased feedback inhibition with dTTP, whereas the activity with 3...

  4. Insights into Substrate Specificity of NlpC/P60 Cell Wall Hydrolases Containing Bacterial SH3 Domains

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Qingping; Mengin-Lecreulx, Dominique; Liu, Xueqian W.; Patin, Delphine; Farr, Carol L.; Grant, Joanna C.; Chiu, Hsiu-Ju; Jaroszewski, Lukasz; Knuth, Mark W.; Godzik, Adam; Lesley, Scott A.; Elsliger, Marc-André; Deacon, Ashley M.; Wilson, Ian A.

    2015-09-15

    ABSTRACT

    Bacterial SH3 (SH3b) domains are commonly fused with papain-like Nlp/P60 cell wall hydrolase domains. To understand how the modular architecture of SH3b and NlpC/P60 affects the activity of the catalytic domain, three putative NlpC/P60 cell wall hydrolases were biochemically and structurally characterized. These enzymes all have γ-d-Glu-A2pm (A2pm is diaminopimelic acid) cysteine amidase (ordl-endopeptidase) activities but with different substrate specificities. One enzyme is a cell wall lysin that cleaves peptidoglycan (PG), while the other two are cell wall recycling enzymes that only cleave stem peptides with an N-terminall-Ala. Their crystal structures revealed a highly conserved structure consisting of two SH3b domains and a C-terminal NlpC/P60 catalytic domain, despite very low sequence identity. Interestingly, loops from the first SH3b domain dock into the ends of the active site groove of the catalytic domain, remodel the substrate binding site, and modulate substrate specificity. Two amino acid differences at the domain interface alter the substrate binding specificity in favor of stem peptides in recycling enzymes, whereas the SH3b domain may extend the peptidoglycan binding surface in the cell wall lysins. Remarkably, the cell wall lysin can be converted into a recycling enzyme with a single mutation.

    IMPORTANCEPeptidoglycan is a meshlike polymer that envelops the bacterial plasma membrane and bestows structural integrity. Cell wall lysins and recycling enzymes are part of a set of lytic enzymes that target covalent bonds connecting the amino acid and amino sugar building blocks of the PG network. These hydrolases are involved in processes such as cell growth and division, autolysis, invasion, and PG turnover and recycling. To avoid cleavage of unintended substrates, these enzymes have very selective substrate specificities. Our biochemical and structural

  5. Chemical tools for unraveling the substrate specificity of the lysine deacylase enzymes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Andreas Stahl; Olsen, Christian Adam

    have highlighted lysine acetylation as a general post-translational modification (PTM), andagrowing list of non-histone proteins has been identified as substrates for the KDACs, thereby extending their potential impactoncellular function. Furthermore, other acyl groups (e.g., crotonyl, malonyl......, succinyl, glutaryl, myristoyl and 3-phosphoglyceroyl) havebeen identified as lysine PTMs, and both zinc- and NAD+-dependent KDACs have demonstrated capability to remove suchmodifications. These findings suggest that KDACs with impaired deacetylase activity might in fact be functional deacylases...

  6. Species specific substrates and products choices of 4-O-acetyltransferase from Trichoderma brevicompactum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Shikha; Kumari, Indu; Hussain, Razak; Ahmed, Mushtaq; Akhter, Yusuf

    2017-09-01

    Antagonistic species of Trichoderma such as T. harzianum, T. viride, T. virens and T. koningii are well-known biocontrol agents that have been reported to suppress pathogenic soil microbes and enhance the growth of crop plants. Secondary metabolites (SMs) including trichothecenes are responsible for its biocontrol activities. The trichothecenes, trichodermin and harzianum A (HA) are produced in species dependent manner respectively, by Trichoderma brevicompactum (TB) and Trichoderma arundinaceum (TA). The last step in the pathway involves the conversion of trichodermol into trichodermin or HA alternatively, which is catalyzed by 4-O-acetyltransferase (encoded by tri3 gene). Comparative sequence analysis of acetyltransferase enzyme of TB with other chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) family proteins revealed the conserved motif involved in the catalysis. Multiple substrate binding studies were carried out to explore the mechanism behind the two different outcomes. His188 was found to have a role in initial substrate binding. In the case of trichodermin synthesis, represented by ternary complex 1, the trichodermol and acetic anhydride (AAn), the two substrates come very close to each other during molecular simulation analysis so that interactions become possible between them and acetyl group may get transferred from AAn to trichodermol, and Tyr476 residue mediates this phenomenon resulting in the formation of trichodermin. However, in case of the HA biosynthesis using the TB version of enzyme, represented by ternary complex 2, the two substrates, trichodermol and octa-2Z,4E,6E-trienedioic acid (OCTA) did not show any such interactions. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Topolins and Hydroxylated Thidiazuron Derivatives Are Substrates of Cytokinin O-Glucosyltransferase with Position Specificity Related to Receptor Recognition1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Machteld C.; Martin, Ruth C.; Dobrev, Petre I.; Vanková, Radomira; Ho, P. Shing; Yonekura-Sakakibara, Keiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Mok, David W.S.

    2005-01-01

    Glucosides of trans-zeatin occur widely in plant tissues, formed either by O-glucosylation of the hydroxylated side chain or N-glucosylation of the purine ring structure. O-Glucosylation is stereo-specific: the O-glucosyltransferase encoded by the Phaseolus lunatus ZOG1 gene has high affinity for trans-zeatin as the substrate, whereas the enzyme encoded by the maize (Zea mays) cisZOG1 gene prefers cis-zeatin. Here we show that hydroxylated derivatives of benzyladenine (topolins) are also substrates of ZOG1 and cisZOG1. The m-OH and o-OH derivatives are the preferred substrate of ZOG1 and cisZOG1, respectively. Among the hydroxylated derivatives of thidiazuron tested, the only enzyme/substrate combination resulting in conversion was cisZOG1/(o-OH) thidiazuron. The abilities of these cytokinins to serve as substrates to the glucosyltransferases were in a large part correlated with their biological activities in the P. lunatus callus bioassay, indicating that there may be similarities between cytokinin-binding sites on the enzymes and cytokinin receptors. Further support for this interpretation is provided by cytokinin recognition studies involving the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CRE1/WOL/AHK4 and maize ZmHK1 receptors. The AHK4 receptor responded to trans-zeatin and m-topolin, while the ZmHK1 receptor responded also to cis-zeatin and o-topolin. Three-dimensional molecular models of the substrates were applied to explain the results. PMID:15728338

  8. Topolins and hydroxylated thidiazuron derivatives are substrates of cytokinin O-glucosyltransferase with position specificity related to receptor recognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, Machteld C; Martin, Ruth C; Dobrev, Petre I; Vanková, Radomira; Ho, P Shing; Yonekura-Sakakibara, Keiko; Sakakibara, Hitoshi; Mok, David W S

    2005-03-01

    Glucosides of trans-zeatin occur widely in plant tissues, formed either by O-glucosylation of the hydroxylated side chain or N-glucosylation of the purine ring structure. O-Glucosylation is stereo-specific: the O-glucosyltransferase encoded by the Phaseolus lunatus ZOG1 gene has high affinity for trans-zeatin as the substrate, whereas the enzyme encoded by the maize (Zea mays) cisZOG1 gene prefers cis-zeatin. Here we show that hydroxylated derivatives of benzyladenine (topolins) are also substrates of ZOG1 and cisZOG1. The m-OH and o-OH derivatives are the preferred substrate of ZOG1 and cisZOG1, respectively. Among the hydroxylated derivatives of thidiazuron tested, the only enzyme/substrate combination resulting in conversion was cisZOG1/(o-OH) thidiazuron. The abilities of these cytokinins to serve as substrates to the glucosyltransferases were in a large part correlated with their biological activities in the P. lunatus callus bioassay, indicating that there may be similarities between cytokinin-binding sites on the enzymes and cytokinin receptors. Further support for this interpretation is provided by cytokinin recognition studies involving the Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) CRE1/WOL/AHK4 and maize ZmHK1 receptors. The AHK4 receptor responded to trans-zeatin and m-topolin, while the ZmHK1 receptor responded also to cis-zeatin and o-topolin. Three-dimensional molecular models of the substrates were applied to explain the results.

  9. Electrostatic interactions guide the active site face of a structure-specific ribonuclease to its RNA substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plantinga, Matthew J; Korennykh, Alexei V; Piccirilli, Joseph A; Correll, Carl C

    2008-08-26

    Restrictocin, a member of the alpha-sarcin family of site-specific endoribonucleases, uses electrostatic interactions to bind to the ribosome and to RNA oligonucleotides, including the minimal specific substrate, the sarcin/ricin loop (SRL) of 23S-28S rRNA. Restrictocin binds to the SRL by forming a ground-state E:S complex that is stabilized predominantly by Coulomb interactions and depends on neither the sequence nor structure of the RNA, suggesting a nonspecific complex. The 22 cationic residues of restrictocin are dispersed throughout this protein surface, complicating a priori identification of a Coulomb interacting surface. Structural studies have identified an enzyme-substrate interface, which is expected to overlap with the electrostatic E:S interface. Here, we identified restrictocin residues that contribute to binding in the E:S complex by determining the salt dependence [partial differential log(k 2/ K 1/2)/ partial differential log[KCl

  10. Chemical mechanism and substrate specificity of RhlI, an acylhomoserine lactone synthase from Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raychaudhuri, Aniruddha; Jerga, Agoston; Tipton, Peter A

    2005-03-01

    The enzyme RhlI catalyzes the formation of N-butyrylhomoserine lactone from S-adenosylmethionine and N-butyrylacyl carrier protein. N-Butyrylhomoserine lactone serves as a quorum-sensing signal molecule in Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and is implicated in the regulation of many processes involved in bacterial virulence and infectivity. The P. aeruginosa genome contains three genes encoding acyl carrier proteins. We have cloned all three genes, expressed the acyl carrier proteins, and characterized each as a substrate for RhlI. A continuous, spectrophotometric assay was developed to facilitate kinetic and mechanistic studies of RhlI. Acp1, which has not been characterized previously, was a good substrate for RhlI, with a K(m) of 7 microM; the reaction proceeded with a k(cat) value of 0.35 s(-1). AcpP, which supports fatty acid biosynthesis, was also a good substrate in the RhlI reaction, where k(cat) was 0.46 s(-1), and the K(m) for AcpP was 6 microM. The third acyl carrier protein, Acp3, was a poor substrate for RhlI, with a K(m) of 280 microM; k(cat) was 0.03 s(-1). Taken together with microarray data from the literature which show that expression of the gene encoding Acp1 is under the control of the quorum-sensing system, our data suggest that Acp1 is likely to be the substrate for RhlI in vivo. Isotope labeling studies were conducted to investigate the chemical mechanism of the RhlI-catalyzed lactonization reaction. Solvent deuterons were not incorporated into product, which implicates a direct attack mechanism in which the carboxylate oxygen of the presumptive N-butyryl-SAM intermediate attacks the methylene carbon adjacent to the sulfonium ion. Alternative mechanisms, in which N-butyrylvinylglycine is formed via elimination of methylthioadenosine, were ruled out on the basis of the observation that RhlI failed to convert authentic N-butyrylvinylglycine to N-butyryl-L-homoserine lactone.

  11. Short-term in-vitro expansion improves monitoring and allows affordable generation of virus-specific T-cells against several viruses for a broad clinical application.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    René Geyeregger

    Full Text Available Adenoviral infections are a major cause of morbidity and mortality after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT in pediatric patients. Adoptive transfer of donor-derived human adenovirus (HAdV-specific T-cells represents a promising treatment option. However, the difficulty in identifying and selecting rare HAdV-specific T-cells, and the short time span between patients at high risk for invasive infection and viremia are major limitations. We therefore developed an IL-15-driven 6 to 12 day short-term protocol for in vitro detection of HAdV-specific T cells, as revealed by known MHC class I multimers and a newly identified adenoviral CD8 T-cell epitope derived from the E1A protein for the frequent HLA-type A*02∶01 and IFN-γ. Using this novel and improved diagnostic approach we observed a correlation between adenoviral load and reconstitution of CD8(+ and CD4(+ HAdV-specific T-cells including central memory cells in HSCT-patients. Adaption of the 12-day protocol to good manufacturing practice conditions resulted in a 2.6-log (mean expansion of HAdV-specific T-cells displaying high cytolytic activity (4-fold compared to controls and low or absent alloreactivity. Similar protocols successfully identified and rapidly expanded CMV-, EBV-, and BKV-specific T-cells. Our approach provides a powerful clinical-grade convertible tool for rapid and cost-effective detection and enrichment of multiple virus-specific T-cells that may facilitate broad clinical application.

  12. Design of Peptide Substrate for Sensitively and Specifically Detecting Two Aβ-Degrading Enzymes: Neprilysin and Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Po-Ting Chen

    Full Text Available Upregulation of neprilysin (NEP to reduce Aβ accumulation in the brain is a promising strategy for the prevention of Alzheimer's disease (AD. This report describes the design and synthesis of a quenched fluorogenic peptide substrate qf-Aβ(12-16AAC (with the sequence VHHQKAAC, which has a fluorophore, Alexa-350, linked to the side-chain of its C-terminal cysteine and a quencher, Dabcyl, linked to its N-terminus. This peptide emitted strong fluorescence upon cleavage. Our results showed that qf-Aβ(12-16AAC is more sensitive to NEP than the previously reported peptide substrates, so that concentrations of NEP as low as 0.03 nM could be detected at peptide concentration of 2 μM. Moreover, qf-Aβ(12-16AAC had superior enzymatic specificity for both NEP and angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE, but was inert with other Aβ-degrading enzymes. This peptide, used in conjunction with a previously reported peptide substrate qf-Aβ(1-7C [which is sensitive to NEP and insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE], could be used for high-throughput screening of compounds that only upregulate NEP. The experimental results of cell-based activity assays using both qf-Aβ(1-7C and qf-Aβ(12-16AAC as the substrates confirm that somatostatin treatment most likely upregulates IDE, but not NEP, in neuroblastoma cells.

  13. The Structure of Allophanate Hydrolase from Granulibacter bethesdensis Provides Insights into Substrate Specificity in the Amidase Signature Family

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Yi [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States); Maurice, Martin [Marquette Univ., Milwaukee, WI (United States)

    2013-01-02

    Allophanate hydrolase (AH) catalyzes the hydrolysis of allophanate, an intermediate in atrazine degradation and urea catabolism pathways, to NH3 and CO2. AH belongs to the amidase signature family, which is characterized by a conserved block of 130 amino acids rich in Gly and Ser and a Ser-cis-Ser-Lys catalytic triad. In this study, the first structures of AH fromGranulibacter bethesdensis were determined, with and without the substrate analogue malonate, to 2.2 and 2.8 Å, respectively. The structures confirm the identity of the catalytic triad residues and reveal an altered dimerization interface that is not conserved in the amidase signature family. The structures also provide insights into previously unrecognized substrate specificity determinants in AH. Two residues, Tyr299 and Arg307, are within hydrogen bonding distance of a carboxylate moiety of malonate. Both Tyr299 and Arg307 were mutated, and the resulting modified enzymes revealed >3 order of magnitude reductions in both catalytic efficiency and substrate stringency. It is proposed that Tyr299 and Arg307 serve to anchor and orient the substrate for attack by the catalytic nucleophile, Ser172. The structure further suggests the presence of a unique C-terminal domain in AH. While this domain is conserved, it does not contribute to catalysis or to the structural integrity of the core domain, suggesting that it may play a role in mediating transient and specific interactions with the urea carboxylase component of urea amidolyase. Analysis of the AH active site architecture offers new insights into common determinants of catalysis and specificity among divergent members of the amidase signature family.

  14. Substrate specificity and transglycosylation catalyzed by a thermostable beta-glucosidase from marine hyperthermophile Thermotoga neapolitana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Tak-Hyun; Choi, Ki-Won; Park, Cheon-Seok; Lee, Soo-Bok; Kang, Ho-Young; Shon, Kwang-Jae; Park, Jang-Su; Cha, Jaeho

    2005-12-01

    The gene encoding beta-glucosidase of the marine hyperthermophilic eubacterium Thermotoga neapolitana (bglA) was subcloned and expressed in Escherichia coli. The recombinant BglA (rBglA) was efficiently purified by heat treatment at 75 degrees C, and a Ni-NTA affinity chromatography and its molecular mass were determined to be 56.2 kDa by mass spectrometry (MS). At 100 degrees C, the enzyme showed more than 94% of its optimal activity. The half-life of the enzyme was 3.6 h and 12 min at 100 and 105 degrees C, respectively. rBglA was active toward artificial (p-nitrophenyl beta-D: -glucoside) and natural substrates (cellobiose and lactose). The enzyme also exhibited activity with positional isomers of cellobiose: sophorose, laminaribiose, and gentiobiose. Kinetic studies of the enzyme revealed that the enzyme showed biphasic behavior with p-nitrophenyl beta-D: -glucoside as the substrate. Whereas metal ions did not show any significant effect on its activity, dithiothreitol and beta-mercaptoethanol markedly increased enzymatic activity. When arbutin and cellobiose were used as an acceptor and a donor, respectively, three distinct intermolecular transfer products were found by thin-layer chromatography and recycling preparative high-performance liquid chromatography. Structural analysis of three arbutin transfer products by MS and nuclear magnetic resonance indicated that glucose from cellobiose was transferred to the C-3, C-4, and C-6 in the glucose unit of acceptor, respectively.

  15. Engineering the substrate specificity of a thermophilic penicillin acylase from thermus thermophilus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres, Leticia L; Cantero, Angel; del Valle, Mercedes; Marina, Anabel; López-Gallego, Fernando; Guisán, José M; Berenguer, José; Hidalgo, Aurelio

    2013-03-01

    A homologue of the Escherichia coli penicillin acylase is encoded in the genomes of several thermophiles, including in different Thermus thermophilus strains. Although the natural substrate of this enzyme is not known, this acylase shows a marked preference for penicillin K over penicillin G. Three-dimensional models were created in which the catalytic residues and the substrate binding pocket were identified. Through rational redesign, residues were replaced to mimic the aromatic binding site of the E. coli penicillin G acylase. A set of enzyme variants containing between one and four amino acid replacements was generated, with altered catalytic properties in the hydrolyses of penicillins K and G. The introduction of a single phenylalanine residue in position α188, α189, or β24 improved the K(m) for penicillin G between 9- and 12-fold, and the catalytic efficiency of these variants for penicillin G was improved up to 6.6-fold. Structural models, as well as docking analyses, can predict the positioning of penicillins G and K for catalysis and can demonstrate how binding in a productive pose is compromised when more than one bulky phenylalanine residue is introduced into the active site.

  16. Synthesis and physical characterization of a P1 arginine combinatorial library, and its application to the determination of the substrate specificity of serine peptidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furlong, Stephen T; Mauger, Russell C; Strimpler, Anne M; Liu, Yi-Ping; Morris, Frank X; Edwards, Philip D

    2002-11-01

    Serine peptidases are a large, well-studied, and medically important class of peptidases. Despite the attention these enzymes have received, details concerning the substrate specificity of even some of the best known enzymes in this class are lacking. One approach to rapidly characterizing substrate specificity for peptidases is the use of positional scanning combinatorial substrate libraries. We recently synthesized such a library for enzymes with a preference for arginine at P1 and demonstrated the use of this library with thrombin (Edwards et al. Bioorg. Med. Chem. Lett. 2000, 10, 2291). In the present work, we extend these studies by demonstrating good agreement between the theroretical and measured content of portions of this library and by showing that the library permits rapid characterization of the substrate specificity of additional SA clan serine peptidases including factor Xa, tryptase, and trypsin. These results were consistent both with cleavage sites in natural substrates and cleavage of commercially available synthetic substrates. We also demonstrate that pH or salt concentration have a quantitative effect on the rate of cleavage of the pooled library substrates but that correct prediction of optimal substrates for the enzymes studied appeared to be independent of these parameters. These studies provide new substrate specificity data on an important class of peptidases and are the first to provide physical characterization of a peptidase substrate library.

  17. Global, broad, or specific cognitive differences? Using a MIMIC model to examine differences in CHC abilities in children with learning disabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niileksela, Christopher R; Reynolds, Matthew R

    2014-01-01

    This study was designed to better understand the relations between learning disabilities and different levels of latent cognitive abilities, including general intelligence (g), broad cognitive abilities, and specific abilities based on the Cattell-Horn-Carroll theory of intelligence (CHC theory). Data from the Differential Ability Scales-Second Edition (DAS-II) were used to create a multiple-indicator multiple cause model to examine the latent mean differences in cognitive abilities between children with and without learning disabilities in reading (LD reading), math (LD math), and reading and writing(LD reading and writing). Statistically significant differences were found in the g factor between the norm group and the LD groups. After controlling for differences in g, the LD reading and LD reading and writing groups showed relatively lower latent processing speed, and the LD math group showed relatively higher latent comprehension-knowledge. There were also some differences in some specific cognitive abilities, including lower scores in spatial relations and numerical facility for the LD math group, and lower scores in visual memory for the LD reading and writing group. These specific mean differences were above and beyond any differences in the latent cognitive factor means.

  18. Substrate and reaction specificity of Mycobacterium tuberculosis cytochrome P450 CYP121: insights from biochemical studies and crystal structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonvielle, Matthieu; Le Du, Marie-Hélène; Lequin, Olivier; Lecoq, Alain; Jacquet, Mickaël; Thai, Robert; Dubois, Steven; Grach, Guillaume; Gondry, Muriel; Belin, Pascal

    2013-06-14

    Cytochrome P450 CYP121 is essential for the viability of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Studies in vitro show that it can use the cyclodipeptide cyclo(l-Tyr-l-Tyr) (cYY) as a substrate. We report an investigation of the substrate and reaction specificities of CYP121 involving analysis of the interaction between CYP121 and 14 cYY analogues with various modifications of the side chains or the diketopiperazine (DKP) ring. Spectral titration experiments show that CYP121 significantly bound only cyclodipeptides with a conserved DKP ring carrying two aryl side chains in l-configuration. CYP121 did not efficiently or selectively transform any of the cYY analogues tested, indicating a high specificity for cYY. The molecular determinants of this specificity were inferred from both crystal structures of CYP121-analog complexes solved at high resolution and solution NMR spectroscopy of the analogues. Bound cYY or its analogues all displayed a similar set of contacts with CYP121 residues Asn(85), Phe(168), and Trp(182). The propensity of the cYY tyrosyl to point toward Arg(386) was dependent on the presence of the DKP ring that limits the conformational freedom of the ligand. The correct positioning of the hydroxyl of this tyrosyl was essential for conversion of cYY. Thus, the specificity of CYP121 results from both a restricted binding specificity and a fine-tuned P450 substrate relationship. These results document the catalytic mechanism of CYP121 and improve our understanding of its function in vivo. This work contributes to progress toward the design of inhibitors of this essential protein of M. tuberculosis that could be used for antituberculosis therapy.

  19. Structural Analysis of the Catalytic Mechanism and Substrate Specificity of Anabaena Alkaline Invertase InvA Reveals a Novel Glucosidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jin; Cai, Kun; Hu, Hai-Xi; Jiang, Yong-Liang; Yang, Feng; Hu, Peng-Fei; Cao, Dong-Dong; Li, Wei-Fang; Chen, Yuxing; Zhou, Cong-Zhao

    2016-12-02

    Invertases catalyze the hydrolysis of sucrose to glucose and fructose, thereby playing a key role in primary metabolism and plant development. According to the optimum pH, invertases are classified into acid invertases (Ac-Invs) and alkaline/neutral invertases (A/N-Invs), which share no sequence homology. Compared with Ac-Invs that have been extensively studied, the structure and catalytic mechanism of A/N-Invs remain unknown. Here we report the crystal structures of Anabaena alkaline invertase InvA, which was proposed to be the ancestor of modern plant A/N-Invs. These structures are the first in the GH100 family. InvA exists as a hexamer in both crystal and solution. Each subunit consists of an (α/α)6 barrel core structure in addition to an insertion of three helices. A couple of structures in complex with the substrate or products enabled us to assign the subsites -1 and +1 specifically binding glucose and fructose, respectively. Structural comparison combined with enzymatic assays indicated that Asp-188 and Glu-414 are putative catalytic residues. Further analysis of the substrate binding pocket demonstrated that InvA possesses a stringent substrate specificity toward the α1,2-glycosidic bond of sucrose. Together, we suggest that InvA and homologs represent a novel family of glucosidases. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  20. High substrate specificity of ipsdienol dehydrogenase (IDOLDH), a short-chain dehydrogenase from Ips pini bark beetles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Teran, Rubi; Pak, Heidi; Blomquist, Gary J.; Tittiger, Claus

    2016-01-01

    Ips spp. bark beetles use ipsdienol, ipsenol, ipsdienone and ipsenone as aggregation pheromone components and pheromone precursors. For Ips pini, the short-chain oxidoreductase ipsdienol dehydrogenase (IDOLDH) converts (−)-ipsdienol to ipsdienone, and thus likely plays a role in determining pheromone composition. In order to further understand the role of IDOLDH in pheromone biosynthesis, we compared IDOLDH to its nearest functionally characterized ortholog with a solved structure: human L-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase type II/ amyloid-β binding alcohol dehydrogenase (hHADH II/ABAD), and conducted functional assays of recombinant IDOLDH to determine substrate and product ranges and structural characteristics. Although IDOLDH and hHADH II/ABAD had only 35% sequence identity, their predicted tertiary structures had high identity. We found IDOLDH is a functional homo-tetramer. In addition to oxidizing (−)-ipsdienol, IDOLDH readily converted racemic ipsenol to ipsenone, and stereo-specifically reduced both ketones to their corresponding (−)-alcohols. The (+)-enantiomers were never observed as products. Assays with various substrate analogs showed IDOLDH had high substrate specificity for (−)-ipsdienol, ipsenol, ipsenone and ipsdienone, supporting that IDOLDH functions as a pheromone-biosynthetic enzyme. These results suggest that different IDOLDH orthologs and or activity levels contribute to differences in Ips spp. pheromone composition. PMID:26953347

  1. High substrate specificity of ipsdienol dehydrogenase (IDOLDH), a short-chain dehydrogenase from Ips pini bark beetles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueroa-Teran, Rubi; Pak, Heidi; Blomquist, Gary J; Tittiger, Claus

    2016-09-01

    Ips spp. bark beetles use ipsdienol, ipsenol, ipsdienone and ipsenone as aggregation pheromone components and pheromone precursors. For Ips pini, the short-chain oxidoreductase ipsdienol dehydrogenase (IDOLDH) converts (-)-ipsdienol to ipsdienone, and thus likely plays a role in determining pheromone composition. In order to further understand the role of IDOLDH in pheromone biosynthesis, we compared IDOLDH to its nearest functionally characterized ortholog with a solved structure: human L-3-hydroxyacyl-CoA dehydrogenase type II/ amyloid-β binding alcohol dehydrogenase (hHADH II/ABAD), and conducted functional assays of recombinant IDOLDH to determine substrate and product ranges and structural characteristics. Although IDOLDH and hHADH II/ABAD had only 35% sequence identity, their predicted tertiary structures had high identity. We found IDOLDH is a functional homo-tetramer. In addition to oxidizing (-)-ipsdienol, IDOLDH readily converted racemic ipsenol to ipsenone, and stereo-specifically reduced both ketones to their corresponding (-)-alcohols. The (+)-enantiomers were never observed as products. Assays with various substrate analogs showed IDOLDH had high substrate specificity for (-)-ipsdienol, ipsenol, ipsenone and ipsdienone, supporting that IDOLDH functions as a pheromone-biosynthetic enzyme. These results suggest that different IDOLDH orthologs and or activity levels contribute to differences in Ips spp. pheromone composition. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Japanese Biochemical Society. All rights reserved.

  2. Substrate specific stimulation of NEIL1 by WRN but not the other human RecQ helicases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Popuri, Venkateswarlu; Croteau, Deborah L; Bohr, Vilhelm A

    2010-01-01

    NEIL1, the mammalian homolog of Escherichia coli endonuclease VIII, is a DNA glycosylase that repairs ring-fragmented purines, saturated pyrimidines and several oxidative lesions like 5-hydroxyuracil, 5-hydroxycytosine, etc. Previous studies from our laboratory have shown that Werner Syndrome...... protein (WRN), one of the five human RecQ helicases, stimulates NEIL1 DNA glycosylase activity on oxidative DNA lesions. The goal of this study was to extend this observation and analyze the interaction between NEIL1 and all five human RecQ helicases. The DNA substrate specificity of the interaction...... between WRN and NEIL1 was also analyzed. The results indicate that WRN is the only human RecQ helicase that stimulates NEIL1 DNA glycosylase activity, and that this stimulation requires a double-stranded DNA substrate....

  3. General and Specific Effects on Cattell-Horn-Carroll Broad Ability Composites: Analysis of the Woodcock-Johnson III Normative Update Cattell-Horn-Carroll Factor Clusters across Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Floyd, Randy G.; McGrew, Kevin S.; Barry, Amberly; Rafael, Fawziya; Rogers, Joshua

    2009-01-01

    Many school psychologists focus their interpretation on composite scores from intelligence test batteries designed to measure the broad abilities from the Cattell-Horn-Carroll theory. The purpose of this study was to investigate the general factor loadings and specificity of the broad ability composite scores from one such intelligence test…

  4. Cloning, protein sequence clarification, and substrate specificity of a leucine dehydrogenase from Bacillus sphaericus ATCC4525.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hongmei; Zhu, Dunming; Hyatt, Brooke A; Malik, Fahad M; Biehl, Edward R; Hua, Ling

    2009-08-01

    Although an X-ray model sequence of a leucine dehydrogenase from Bacillus sphaericus ATCC4525 was reported, the amino acid sequence of this enzyme has not been confirmed. In the current study, this leucine dehydrogenase gene was cloned, sequenced, and over-expressed in Escherichia coli, and the protein sequence has been clarified. This leucine dehydrogenase is not identical with that of B. sphaericus IFO3525 because there are 16 different amino acid residues between these two proteins. Since the information on the catalytic properties of leucine dehydrogenase from B. sphaericus ATCC4525 has been limited, the recombinant enzyme was purified as His-tagged protein and further studied. This enzyme showed activity toward aliphatic substrates for both oxidative deamination and reductive amination and is an effective catalyst for the asymmetric synthesis of alpha-amino acids from the corresponding alpha-ketoacids.

  5. A chlorogenic acid esterase with a unique substrate specificity from Ustilago maydis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieter, Annabel; Haase-Aschoff, Paul; Kelle, Sebastian; Linke, Diana; Krings, Ulrich; Popper, Lutz; Berger, Ralf G

    2015-03-01

    An extracellular chlorogenic acid esterase from Ustilago maydis (UmChlE) was purified to homogeneity by using three separation steps, including anion-exchange chromatography on a Q Sepharose FF column, preparative isoelectric focusing (IEF), and, finally, a combination of affinity chromatography and hydrophobic interaction chromatography on polyamide. SDS-PAGE analysis suggested a monomeric protein of ∼71 kDa. The purified enzyme showed maximal activity at pH 7.5 and at 37°C and was active over a wide pH range (3.5 to 9.5). Previously described chlorogenic acid esterases exhibited a comparable affinity for chlorogenic acid, but the enzyme from Ustilago was also active on typical feruloyl esterase substrates. Kinetic constants for chlorogenic acid, methyl p-coumarate, methyl caffeate, and methyl ferulate were as follows: Km values of 19.6 μM, 64.1 μM, 72.5 μM, and 101.8 μM, respectively, and kcat/Km values of 25.83 mM(-1) s(-1), 7.63 mM(-1) s(-1), 3.83 mM(-1) s(-1) and 3.75 mM(-1) s(-1), respectively. UmChlE released ferulic, p-coumaric, and caffeic acids from natural substrates such as destarched wheat bran (DSWB) and coffee pulp (CP), confirming activity on complex plant biomass. The full-length gene encoding UmChlE consisted of 1,758 bp, corresponding to a protein of 585 amino acids, and was functionally produced in Pichia pastoris GS115. Sequence alignments with annotated chlorogenic acid and feruloyl esterases underlined the uniqueness of this enzyme. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Expansion of substrate specificity and catalytic mechanism of azoreductase by X-ray crystallography and site-directed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Kosuke; Nakanishi, Masayuki; Lee, Woo-Cheol; Zhi, Yuehua; Sasaki, Hiroshi; Zenno, Shuhei; Saigo, Kaoru; Kitade, Yukio; Tanokura, Masaru

    2008-05-16

    AzoR is an FMN-dependent NADH-azoreductase isolated from Escherichia coli as a protein responsible for the degradation of azo compounds. We previously reported the crystal structure of the enzyme in the oxidized form. In the present study, different structures of AzoR were determined under several conditions to obtain clues to the reaction mechanism of the enzyme. AzoR in its reduced form revealed a twisted butterfly bend of the isoalloxazine ring of the FMN cofactor and a rearrangement of solvent molecules. The crystal structure of oxidized AzoR in a different space group and the structure of the enzyme in complex with the inhibitor dicoumarol were also determined. These structures indicate that the formation of a hydrophobic part around the isoalloxazine ring is important for substrate binding and an electrostatic interaction between Arg-59 and the carboxyl group of the azo compound causes a substrate preference for methyl red over p-methyl red. The substitution of Arg-59 with Ala enhanced the Vmax value for p-methyl red 27-fold with a 3.8-fold increase of the Km value. This result indicates that Arg-59 decides the substrate specificity of AzoR. The Vmax value for the p-methyl red reduction of the R59A mutant is comparable with that for the methyl red reduction of the wild-type enzyme, whereas the activity toward methyl red was retained. These findings indicate the expansion of AzoR substrate specificity by a single amino acid substitution. Furthermore, we built an authentic model of the AzoR-methyl red complex based on the results of the study.

  7. Computational insights into active site shaping for substrate specificity and reaction regioselectivity in the EXTL2 retaining glycosyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Fernanda; Lluch, José M; Masgrau, Laura

    2017-11-07

    Glycosyltransferases are enzymes that catalyze a monosaccharide transfer reaction from a donor to an acceptor substrate with the synthesis of a new glycosidic bond. They are highly substrate specific and regioselective, even though the acceptor substrate often presents multiple reactive groups. Currently, many efforts are dedicated to the development of biocatalysts for glycan synthesis and, therefore, a better understanding of how natural enzymes achieve this goal can be of valuable help. To gain a deeper insight into the catalytic strategies used by retaining glycosyltransferases, the wild type EXTL2 (CAZy family GT64) and four mutant forms (at positions 293 and 246) were studied using QM(DFT)/MM calculations and molecular dynamics simulations. Existing hypotheses on the roles of Arg293, an enigmatic residue in the CAZy family GT64 that seemed to contradict a mechanism through an oxocarbenium intermediate, and of Asp246 have been tested. We also provide a molecular interpretation for the results of site-directed mutagenesis experiments. Moreover, we have investigated why an Asp, and not a Glu like in the family GT6, is found on the β-face of the transferred GlcNAc. It is predicted that an Asp246Glu mutant of EXTL2 would be unable to catalyze the α-1,4 transfer. The results herein presented clarify the roles that Arg293, Asp246 and Leu213 have at different stages of the catalytic process (for binding but also for efficient chemical reaction). Altogether, we provide a molecular view that connects the identity and conformation of these residues to the substrate specificity and regioselectivity of the enzyme, illustrating a delicate interplay between all these aspects.

  8. Insect chymotrypsins: chloromethyl ketone inactivation and substrate specificity relative to possible coevolutional adaptation of insects and plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Adriana R; Sato, Paloma M; Terra, Walter R

    2009-03-01

    Insect digestive chymotrypsins are present in a large variety of insect orders but their substrate specificity still remains unclear. Four insect chymotrypsins from 3 different insect orders (Dictyoptera, Coleoptera, and two Lepidoptera) were isolated using affinity chromatography. Enzymes presented molecular masses in the range of 20 to 31 kDa and pH optima in the range of 7.5 to 10.0. Kinetic characterization using different colorimetric and fluorescent substrates indicated that insect chymotrypsins differ from bovine chymotrypsin in their primary specificity toward small substrates (like N-benzoyl-L-Tyr p-nitroanilide) rather than on their preference for large substrates (exemplified by Succynil-Ala-Ala-Pro-Phe p-nitroanilide). Chloromethyl ketones (TPCK, N- alpha-tosyl-L-Phe chloromethyl ketone and Z-GGF-CK, N- carbobenzoxy-Gly-Gly-Phe-CK) inactivated all chymotrypsins tested. Inactivation rates follow apparent first-order kinetics with variable second order rates (TPCK, 42 to 130 M(-1) s(-1); Z-GGF-CK, 150 to 450 M(-1) s(-1)) that may be remarkably low for S. frugiperda chymotrypsin (TPCK, 6 M(-1) s(-1); Z-GGF-CK, 6.1 M(-1) s(-1)). Homology modelling and sequence alignment showed that in lepidopteran chymotrypsins, differences in the amino acid residues in the neighborhood of the catalytic His 57 may affect its pKa value. This is proposed as the cause of the decrease in His 57 reactivity toward chloromethyl ketones. Such amino acid replacement in the active site is proposed to be an adaptation to the presence of dietary ketones. (c) 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Structural And Biochemical Studies of Botulinum Neurotoxin Serotype C1 Light Chain Protease: Implications for Dual Substrate Specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jin, R.; Sikorra, S.; Stegmann, C.M.; Pich, A.; Binz, T.; Brunger, A.T.

    2009-06-01

    Clostridial neurotoxins are the causative agents of the neuroparalytic disease botulism and tetanus. They block neurotransmitter release through specific proteolysis of one of the three soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive-factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs) SNAP-25, syntaxin, and synaptobrevin, which constitute part of the synaptic vesicle fusion machinery. The catalytic component of the clostridial neurotoxins is their light chain (LC), a Zn2+ endopeptidase. There are seven structurally and functionally related botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs), termed serotype A to G, and tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT). Each of them exhibits unique specificity for their target SNAREs and peptide bond(s) they cleave. The mechanisms of action for substrate recognition and target cleavage are largely unknown. Here, we report structural and biochemical studies of BoNT/C1-LC, which is unique among BoNTs in that it exhibits dual specificity toward both syntaxin and SNAP-25. A distinct pocket (S1') near the active site likely achieves the correct register for the cleavage site by only allowing Ala as the P1' residue for both SNAP-25 and syntaxin. Mutations of this SNAP-25 residue dramatically reduce enzymatic activity. The remote a-exosite that was previously identified in the complex of BoNT/A-LC and SNAP-25 is structurally conserved in BoNT/C1. However, mutagenesis experiments show that the a-exosite of BoNT/C1 plays a less stringent role in substrate discrimination in comparison to that of BoNT/A, which could account for its dual substrate specificity.

  10. Cationic Oligo(thiophene ethynylene) with Broad-Spectrum and High Antibacterial Efficiency under White Light and Specific Biocidal Activity against S. aureus in Dark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Qi; Li, Junting; Zhang, Xiaoqian; Li, Zhengping; Tang, Yanli

    2016-01-13

    We designed and synthesized a novel oligo(thiophene ethynylene) (OTE) to investigate the antibacterial activities against Gram-positive (Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis) and Gram-negative (Ralstonia solanacearum and Escherichia coli) bacteria in vitro by photodynamic therapy (PDT). Notably, OTE presents broad-spectrum and greatly high antibacterial activities after white light irradiation at nanogram per milliliter concentrations. The half inhibitory concentrations (IC50) values obtained for S. aureus, S. epidermidis, E. coli, and R. solanacearum are 8, 13, 24, and 52 ng/mL after illumination for 30 min, respectively, which are lower than that of other PDT agents. Interestingly, OTE shows the specific and very strong dark killing capability against S. aureus at the concentration of 180 ng/mL for 30 min, which is the highest efficiency biocide against S. aureus without the need of irradiation to date. The antibacterial mechanism investigated demonstrated that reactive oxygen species or singlet-oxygen generated by OTE kills bacteria irreversibly upon white light irradiation, and OTE as a v-type oligomer exerts its toxicity directly on destroying bacterial cytoplasmic membrane in the dark. Importantly, the OTE shows no cell cytotoxicity and excellent biocompatibility. The results indicate that it is potential to provide versatile applications in the efficient control of pathogenic organisms and specific application for killing S. aureus.

  11. Control of substrate specificity by a single active site residue of the KsgA methyltransferase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Farrell, Heather C; Musayev, Faik N; Scarsdale, J Neel; Rife, Jason P

    2012-01-10

    The KsgA methyltransferase is universally conserved and plays a key role in regulating ribosome biogenesis. KsgA has a complex reaction mechanism, transferring a total of four methyl groups onto two separate adenosine residues, A1518 and A1519, in the small subunit rRNA. This means that the active site pocket must accept both adenosine and N(6)-methyladenosine as substrates to catalyze formation of the final product N(6),N(6)-dimethyladenosine. KsgA is related to DNA adenosine methyltransferases, which transfer only a single methyl group to their target adenosine residue. We demonstrate that part of the discrimination between mono- and dimethyltransferase activity lies in a single residue in the active site, L114; this residue is part of a conserved motif, known as motif IV, which is common to a large group of S-adenosyl-L-methionine-dependent methyltransferases. Mutation of the leucine to a proline mimics the sequence found in DNA methyltransferases. The L114P mutant of KsgA shows diminished overall activity, and its ability to methylate the N(6)-methyladenosine intermediate to produce N(6),N(6)-dimethyladenosine is impaired; this is in contrast to a second active site mutation, N113A, which diminishes activity to a level comparable to L114P without affecting the methylation of N(6)-methyladenosine. We discuss the implications of this work for understanding the mechanism of KsgA's multiple catalytic steps.

  12. The human DNA-activated protein kinase, DNA-PK: Substrate specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, C.W.; Connelly, M.A.; Zhang, H.; Sipley, J.A. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States). Biology Dept.; Lees-Miller, S.P.; Lintott, L.G. [Univ. of Calgary, Alberta (Canada). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu; Appella, E. [National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD (United States). Lab. of Cell Biology

    1994-11-05

    Although much has been learned about the structure and function of p53 and the probable sequence of subsequent events that lead to cell cycle arrest, little is known about how DNA damage is detected and the nature of the signal that is generated by DNA damage. Circumstantial evidence suggests that protein kinases may be involved. In vitro, human DNA-PK phosphorylates a variety of nuclear DNA-binding, regulatory proteins including the tumor suppressor protein p53, the single-stranded DNA binding protein RPA, the heat shock protein hsp90, the large tumor antigen (TAg) of simian virus 40, a variety of transcription factors including Fos, Jun, serum response factor (SRF), Myc, Sp1, Oct-1, TFIID, E2F, the estrogen receptor, and the large subunit of RNA polymerase II (reviewed in Anderson, 1993; Jackson et al., 1993). However, for most of these proteins, the sites that are phosphorylated by DNA-PK are not known. To determine if the sites that were phosphorylated in vitro also were phosphorylated in vivo and if DNA-PK recognized a preferred protein sequence, the authors identified the sites phosphorylated by DNA-PK in several substrates by direct protein sequence analysis. Each phosphorylated serine or threonine is followed immediately by glutamine in the polypeptide chain; at no other positions are the amino acid residues obviously constrained.

  13. Unraveling the substrate recognition mechanism and specificity of the unusual glycosyl hydrolase family 29 BT2192 from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guillotin, Laure; Lafite, Pierre; Daniellou, Richard

    2014-03-11

    Glycosyl hydrolase (GH) family 29 (CAZy database) consists of retaining α-l-fucosidases. We have identified BT2192, a protein from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron, as the first GH29 representative exhibiting both weak α-l-fucosidase and β-d-galactosidase activities. Determination and analysis of X-ray structures of BT2192 in complex with β-d-galactoside competitive inhibitors showed a new binding mode different from that of known GH29 enzymes. Three point mutations, specific to BT2192, prevent the canonical GH29 substrate α-l-fucose from binding efficiently to the fucosidase-like active site relative to other GH29 enzymes. β-d-Galactoside analogues bind and interact in a second pocket, which is not visible in other reported GH29 structures. Molecular simulations helped in the assessment of the flexibility of both substrates in their respective pocket. Hydrolysis of the fucosyl moiety from the putative natural substrates like 3-fucosyllactose or Lewis(X) antigen would be mainly due to the efficient interactions with the galactosyl moiety, in the second binding site, located more than 6-7 Å apart.

  14. Expression and characterization of a glucose-tolerant β-1,4-glucosidase with wide substrate specificity from Cytophaga hutchinsonii.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Cong; Wang, Xifeng; Zhang, Weican; Zhao, Yue; Lu, Xuemei

    2017-03-01

    Cytophaga hutchinsonii is a gram-negative bacterium that can efficiently degrade crystalline cellulose by a novel strategy without cell-free cellulases or cellulosomes. Genomic analysis implied that C. hutchinsonii had endoglucanases and β-glucosidases but no exoglucanases which could processively digest cellulose and produce cellobiose. In this study, BglA was functionally expressed in Escherichia coli and found to be a β-glucosidase with wide substrate specificity. It can hydrolyze pNPG, pNPC, cellobiose, and cellodextrins. Moreover, unlike most β-glucosidases whose activity greatly decreases with increasing length of the substrate chains, BglA has similar activity on cellobiose and larger cellodextrins. The K m values of BglA on cellobiose, cellotriose, and cellotetraose were calculated to be 4.8 × 10-2, 5.6 × 10-2, and 5.3 × 10-2 mol/l, respectively. These properties give BglA a great advantage to cooperate with endoglucanases in C. hutchinsonii in cellulose degradation. We proposed that C. hutchinsonii could utilize a simple cellulase system which consists of endoglucanases and β-glucosidases to completely digest amorphous cellulose into glucose. Moreover, BglA was also found to be highly tolerant to glucose as it retained 40 % activity when the concentration of glucose was 100 times higher than that of the substrate, showing potential application in the bioenergy industry.

  15. Construction of a multifunctional coating consisting of phospholipids and endothelial progenitor cell-specific peptides on titanium substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Huiqing; Li, Xiaojing [Key Lab. of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Zhao, Yuancong, E-mail: zhaoyc7320@163.com [Key Lab. of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Li, Jingan; Chen, Jiang [Key Lab. of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Yang, Ping, E-mail: yangping8@263.net [Key Lab. of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Maitz, Manfred F. [Key Lab. of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China); Max Bergmann Center of Biomaterials Dresden, Leibniz of Polymer Research Dresden, 01069 Dresden (Germany); Huang, Nan [Key Lab. of Advanced Technology for Materials of Education Ministry, School of Materials Science and Engineering, Southwest Jiaotong University, Chengdu 610031 (China)

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: The phospholipid groups of PMMDP can inhibit platele adhesion, and the EPCs-specific peptide of the PMMDP showed special recognition and capture for EPCs. The catechol groups of PMMDP play a critical role as molecular anchor for balancing the binding between the coating and the substrate. - Highlights: • The uniform coating of PMMDP can be constructed on titanium surface successfully through the catechol groups. • The phospholipid groups of PMMDP can inhibit platele adhesion, fibrinogen denaturation and improve the hydrophilicity of substrate. • The EPCs-specific peptide of the PMMDP showed special recognition and capture for EPCs. - Abstract: A phospholipid/peptide polymer (PMMDP) with phosphorylcholine groups, endothelial progenitor cell (EPC)-specific peptides and catechol groups was anchored onto a titanium (Ti) surface to fabricate a biomimetic multifunctional surface. The PMMDP coating was characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), water contact angle measurements and atomic force microscopy (AFM), respectively. The amount of PMMDP coating on the Ti surface was quantified by using the quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation (QCM-D). Interactions between blood components and the coated and bare Ti substrates were evaluated by platelet adhesion and activation assays and fibrinogen denaturation test using platelet rich plasma (PRP). The results revealed that the PMMDP-modified surface inhibited fibrinogen denaturation and reduced platelet adhesion and activation. EPC cell culture on the PMMDP-modified surface showed increased adhesion and proliferation of EPCs when compared to the cells cultured on untreated Ti surface. The inhibition of fibrinogen denaturation and platelet adhesion and support of EPCs attachment and proliferation indicated that this coating might be beneficial for future applications in blood-contacting implants, such as vascular stents.

  16. Mutagenesis of Met-151 and Thr-153 to alanine in Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus secondary alcohol dehydrogenase changes substrate specificity for acetophenones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nealon, Christopher M; Kim, Chang Sup; Dwamena, Amos K; Phillips, Robert S

    2017-10-01

    Secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (SADH) from Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus reduces ketones to chiral alcohols, and generally obeys Prelog's Rule, with binding pockets for large and small alkyl substituents, giving (S)-alcohols. We have previously shown that mutations in both the large and small pockets can alter both substrate specificity and stereoselectivity. In the present work, Met-151 and Thr-153, residues located in the small pocket, were mutated to alanine. The M151A mutant SADH shows significantly lower activity and lower stereoselectivity for reduction of aliphatic ketones than wild-type SADH. Furthermore, M151A showed non-linear kinetics for reduction of acetone. T153A SADH shows lower activity but similar stereoselectivity for ketone reduction compared to wild-type SADH. The I86A/M151A/C295A and I86A/T153A/C295A triple mutant SADH show altered specificity for reduction of substituted acetophenones. These results confirm that these mutations are useful to combine with I86A/C295A SADH to expand the small pocket of SADH and broaden the substrate specificity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. The First Archaeal ATP-Dependent Glucokinase, from the Hyperthermophilic Crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix, Represents a Monomeric, Extremely Thermophilic ROK Glucokinase with Broad Hexose Specificity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Thomas; Reichstein, Bianca; Schmid, Roland; Schönheit, Peter

    2002-01-01

    An ATP-dependent glucokinase of the hyperthermophilic aerobic crenarchaeon Aeropyrum pernix was purified 230-fold to homogeneity. The enzyme is a monomeric protein with an apparent molecular mass of about 36 kDa. The apparent Km values for ATP and glucose (at 90°C and pH 6.2) were 0.42 and 0.044 mM, respectively; the apparent Vmax was about 35 U/mg. The enzyme was specific for ATP as a phosphoryl donor, but showed a broad spectrum for phosphoryl acceptors: in addition to glucose, which showed the highest catalytic efficiency (kcat/Km), the enzyme also phosphorylates glucosamin, fructose, mannose, and 2-deoxyglucose. Divalent cations were required for maximal activity: Mg2+, which was most effective, could partially be replaced with Co2+, Mn2+, and Ni2+. The enzyme had a temperature optimum of at least 100°C and showed significant thermostability up to 100°C. The coding function of open reading frame (ORF) APE2091 (Y. Kawarabayasi, Y. Hino, H. Horikawa, S. Yamazaki, Y. Haikawa, K. Jin-no, M. Takahashi, M. Sekine, S. Baba, A. Ankai, H. Kosugi, A. Hosoyama, S. Fukui, Y. Nagai, K. Nishijima, H. Nakazawa, M. Takamiya, S. Masuda, T. Funahashi, T. Tanaka, Y. Kudoh, J. Yamazaki, N. Kushida, A. Oguchi, and H. Kikuchi, DNA Res. 6:83-101, 145-152, 1999), previously annotated as gene glk, coding for ATP-glucokinase of A. pernix, was proved by functional expression in Escherichia coli. The purified recombinant ATP-dependent glucokinase showed a 5-kDa higher molecular mass on sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, but almost identical kinetic and thermostability properties in comparison to the native enzyme purified from A. pernix. N-terminal amino acid sequence of the native enzyme revealed that the translation start codon is a GTG 171 bp downstream of the annotated start codon of ORF APE2091. The amino acid sequence deduced from the truncated ORF APE2091 revealed sequence similarity to members of the ROK family, which comprise bacterial sugar kinases and

  18. Identification of ElpA, a Coxiella burnetii pathotype-specific Dot/Icm type IV secretion system substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graham, Joseph G; Winchell, Caylin G; Sharma, Uma M; Voth, Daniel E

    2015-03-01

    Coxiella burnetii causes human Q fever, a zoonotic disease that presents with acute flu-like symptoms and can result in chronic life-threatening endocarditis. In human alveolar macrophages, C. burnetii uses a Dot/Icm type IV secretion system (T4SS) to generate a phagolysosome-like parasitophorous vacuole (PV) in which to replicate. The T4SS translocates effector proteins, or substrates, into the host cytosol, where they mediate critical cellular events, including interaction with autophagosomes, PV formation, and prevention of apoptosis. Over 100 C. burnetii Dot/Icm substrates have been identified, but the function of most remains undefined. Here, we identified a novel Dot/Icm substrate-encoding open reading frame (CbuD1884) present in all C. burnetii isolates except the Nine Mile reference isolate, where the gene is disrupted by a frameshift mutation, resulting in a pseudogene. The CbuD1884 protein contains two transmembrane helices (TMHs) and a coiled-coil domain predicted to mediate protein-protein interactions. The C-terminal region of the protein contains a predicted Dot/Icm translocation signal and was secreted by the T4SS, while the N-terminal portion of the protein was not secreted. When ectopically expressed in eukaryotic cells, the TMH-containing N-terminal region of the CbuD1884 protein trafficked to the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), with the C terminus dispersed nonspecifically in the host cytoplasm. This new Dot/Icm substrate is now termed ElpA (ER-localizing protein A). Full-length ElpA triggered substantial disruption of ER structure and host cell secretory transport. These results suggest that ElpA is a pathotype-specific T4SS effector that influences ER function during C. burnetii infection. Copyright © 2015, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  19. Dual substrate feedback control of specific growth-rate in vaccine production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Neeleman, R.; Beuvery, E.C.; Vries, D.; Straten, van G.; Boxtel, van A.J.B.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract: Unexpectedly, primary concern of bio-pharmaceutical industry is not optimisation of product yield or cost reduction, but consistency in production and product quality. This paper describes the methodology and experimental results of specific growth-rate control for vaccine production. The

  20. BTI1, an Azoreductase with pH-Dependent Substrate Specificity ▿ †

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Hans E.; Johansson, Mary K.; Wong, Albert C.; Armstrong, Eliana S.; Peterson, Erik J.; Grant, Richard E.; Roy, Margaret A.; Reddington, Mark V.; Cook, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    The group II azoreductase BTI1 utilizes NADPH to directly cleave azo bonds in water-soluble azo dyes, including quenchers of fluorescence. Unexpectedly, optimal reduction was dye specific, ranging from a pH of 8.3 for flame orange. PMID:21531830

  1. BTI1, an Azoreductase with pH-Dependent Substrate Specificity ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Johansson, Hans E.; Johansson, Mary K.; Wong, Albert C.; Armstrong, Eliana S.; Peterson, Erik J.; Grant, Richard E.; Roy, Margaret A.; Reddington, Mark V.; Cook, Ronald M.

    2011-01-01

    The group II azoreductase BTI1 utilizes NADPH to directly cleave azo bonds in water-soluble azo dyes, including quenchers of fluorescence. Unexpectedly, optimal reduction was dye specific, ranging from a pH of 8.3 for flame orange.

  2. BTI1, an azoreductase with pH-dependent substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Hans E; Johansson, Mary K; Wong, Albert C; Armstrong, Eliana S; Peterson, Erik J; Grant, Richard E; Roy, Margaret A; Reddington, Mark V; Cook, Ronald M

    2011-06-01

    The group II azoreductase BTI1 utilizes NADPH to directly cleave azo bonds in water-soluble azo dyes, including quenchers of fluorescence. Unexpectedly, optimal reduction was dye specific, ranging from a pH of 8.3 for flame orange.

  3. Biochemical and Computational Analysis of the Substrate Specificities of Cfr and RlmN Methyltransferases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ntokou, Eleni; Hansen, Lykke Haastrup; Kongsted, Jacob

    2015-01-01

    interchangeability between Cfr and RlmN we constructed various combinations of their genes. The function of the mixed genes was investigated by RNA primer extension analysis to reveal methylation at 23S rRNA position A2503 and by MIC analysis to reveal antibiotic resistance. The catalytic site is expected...... to be responsible for the C2/C8 specificity and most of the combinations involve interchanging segments at this site. Almost all replacements showed no function in the primer extension assay, apart from a few that had a weak effect. Thus Cfr and RlmN appear to be much less similar than expected from their sequence......-ray structure of RlmN. We used a trinucleotide as target sequence and assessed its positioning at the active site for methylation. The calculations are in accordance with different poses of the trinucleotide in the two enzymes indicating major evolutionary changes to shift the C2/C8 specificities. To explore...

  4. Modification of calcite crystal morphology by designed phosphopeptides and primary structures and substrate specifities of the cysteine proteases mexicain and chymomexicain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Zhirui

    the same substrate specificity, having a rather broad specificity, but with some preference for Val, Thr, Phe, Tyr and Leu at the P2 position. However, they do not appear to cleave peptide bonds where P2 is Lys, Arg or Ile. Their computated 3-dimensional structures were found to be nearly identical to papain and related proteins by homology modeling.

  5. Mosquito has a single multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase characterized by unique substrate specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knecht, Wolfgang; Petersen, G.E.; Sandrini, Michael

    2003-01-01

    In mammals four deoxyribonucleoside kinases, with a relatively restricted specificity, catalyze the phosphorylation of the four natural deoxyribonucleosides. When cultured mosquito cells, originating from the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae, were examined for deoxyribonucleoside kinase activities......, only a single enzyme was isolated. Subsequently, the corresponding gene was cloned and over-expressed. While the mosquito kinase (Ag-dNK) phosphorylated all four natural deoxyribonucleosides, it displayed an unexpectedly higher relative efficiency for the phosphorylation of purine versus pyrimidine...

  6. Air proteins control differential TRAMP substrate specificity for nuclear RNA surveillance

    OpenAIRE

    Schmidt, Karyn; Xu, Zhenjiang; Mathews, David H.; Butler, J. Scott

    2012-01-01

    In the nucleus of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, TRAMP complexes recognize and polyadenylate RNAs, which enhances RNA degradation by the exosome and may contribute to its specificity. TRAMPs contain either of two putative RNA-binding factors called Air proteins. Previous studies suggested that these proteins function interchangeably in targeting the poly(A)-polymerase activity of TRAMPs to RNAs. Experiments reported here show that the Air proteins govern separable functions. Phenotypic analysis an...

  7. Stereoselectivity and substrate specificity in the kinetic resolution of methyl-substituted 1-oxaspiro[2.5]octanes by Rhodotorula glutinis epoxide hydrolase

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Weijers, C.A.G.M.; Meeuwse, P.; Herpers, R.L.J.M.; Franssen, M.C.R.; Sudhölter, E.J.R.

    2005-01-01

    [GRAPHICS] The kinetic resolution of a range of methyl-substituted 1-oxaspiro[2.5]octanes by yeast epoxide hydrolase (YEH) from Rhodotorula glutinis has been investigated. The structural determinants of substrate specificity and stereoselectivity of YEH toward these substrates appeared to be the

  8. In vitro substrate specificities of 3'-5' polymerases correlate with biological outcomes of tRNA 5'-editing reactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yicheng; Jackman, Jane E

    2015-07-22

    Protozoan mitochondrial tRNAs (mt-tRNAs) are repaired by a process known as 5'-editing. Mt-tRNA sequencing revealed organism-specific patterns of editing G-U base pairs, wherein some species remove G-U base pairs during 5'-editing, while others retain G-U pairs in the edited tRNA. We tested whether 3'-5' polymerases that catalyze the repair step of 5'-editing exhibit organism-specific preferences that explain the treatment of G-U base pairs. Biochemical and kinetic approaches revealed that a 3'-5' polymerase from Acanthamoeba castellanii tolerates G-U wobble pairs in editing substrates much more readily than several other enzymes, consistent with its biological pattern of editing. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Characterisation of the broad substrate specificity 2-keto acid decarboxylase Aro10p of Saccharomyces kudriavzevii and its implication in aroma development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stribny, Jiri; Romagnoli, G.; Perez Torrado, R.; Daran, J.G.; Querol, Amparo

    2016-01-01

    Background: The yeast amino acid catabolism plays an important role in flavour generation since higher alcohols and acetate esters, amino acid catabolism end products, are key components of overall flavour and aroma in fermented products. Comparative studies have shown that other Saccharomyces

  10. Characterisation of the broad substrate specificity 2-keto acid decarboxylase Aro10p of Saccharomyces kudriavzevii and its implication in aroma development

    OpenAIRE

    Stribny, Jiri; Romagnoli, Grabiele; Pérez Torrado, Roberto; Daran, Jean-Marc; Querol, Amparo

    2016-01-01

    Background: The yeast amino acid catabolism plays an important role in flavour generation since higher alcohols and acetate esters, amino acid catabolism end products, are key components of overall flavour and aroma in fermented products. Comparative studies have shown that other Saccharomyces species, such as S. kudriavzevii, differ during the production of aroma-active higher alcohols and their esters compared to S. cerevisiae.Results: In this study, we performed a comparative analysis of t...

  11. Mass-production of human ACAT-1 and ACAT-2 to screen isoform-specific inhibitor: a different substrate specificity and inhibitory regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyung-Hyun; An, Sojin; Lee, Woo-Song; Paik, Young-Ki; Kim, Young-Kook; Jeong, Tae-Sook

    2003-10-03

    Recently, acyl-CoA:cholesterol acyltransferase was found to be present as two isoforms, ACAT-1 and ACAT-2, in mammalian tissues with different metabolic functions and tissue-specific locations. In this study, the isoforms were mass-produced individually from insect cells to establish a more sensitive and reliable screening method for specific inhibitors against each isoform. The expressed hACAT-1 and hACAT-2 appeared as a 50 kDa- and a 46 kDa-band on SDS-PAGE, respectively, from Hi5 cells and they preferred to exist in oligomeric form, from dimer to tetramer, during the purification process. They also exhibited an approximate 3.4 to 3.7-fold increase in activities when compared to rat liver microsomal fractions at the same protein concentration. Known ACAT inhibitors, pyripyropene A, oleic acid anilide, and diethyl pyrocarbonate, were tested to evaluate the inhibitory specificity and sensitivity of the expressed enzymes. Interestingly, pyripyropene A inhibited only the hACAT-2 fraction with IC(50)=0.64 microM but not the hACAT-1 fraction; whereas the fatty acid anilide did not show a significant difference in inhibitory activity with either hACAT-1 or hACAT-2. Furthermore, cholesterol was more rapidly utilized by hACAT-1, but hACAT-2 esterified other cholic acid derivatives more efficiently. These results suggest that the specificity of each substrate and inhibitor was highly different, depending on each isoform from the viewpoint of the regulatory site and the substrate binding site location.

  12. Mosquito has a single multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase characterized by unique substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knecht, Wolfgang; Petersen, Gitte Ebert; Sandrini, Michael Paolo Bastner; Søndergaard, Leif; Munch-Petersen, Birgitte; Piskur, Jure

    2003-03-15

    In mammals four deoxyribonucleoside kinases, with a relatively restricted specificity, catalyze the phosphorylation of the four natural deoxyribonucleosides. When cultured mosquito cells, originating from the malaria vector Anopheles gambiae, were examined for deoxyribonucleoside kinase activities, only a single enzyme was isolated. Subsequently, the corresponding gene was cloned and over-expressed. While the mosquito kinase (Ag-dNK) phosphorylated all four natural deoxyribonucleosides, it displayed an unexpectedly higher relative efficiency for the phosphorylation of purine versus pyrimidine deoxyribonucleosides than the fruit fly multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinase (EC 2.7.1.145). In addition, Ag-dNK could also phosphorylate some medically interesting nucleoside analogs, like stavudine (D4T), 2-chloro-deoxyadenosine (CdA) and 5-bromo-vinyl-deoxyuridine (BVDU). Although the biological significance of multisubstrate deoxyribonucleoside kinases and their diversity among insects remains unclear, the observed variation provides a whole range of applications, as species specific and highly selective targets for insecticides, they have a potential to be used in the enzymatic production of various (di-)(deoxy-)ribonucleoside monophosphates, and as suicide genes in gene therapy.

  13. Localisation and substrate specificities of transglycanases in charophyte algae relate to development and morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herburger, Klaus; Ryan, Louise M; Popper, Zoë A; Holzinger, Andreas

    2017-08-21

    Cell wall-modifying enzymes were previously investigated in charophyte green algae (CGA) from cultures of uniform age, giving limited insight into their roles. Therefore, we investigated the in situ localisation and specificity of enzymes acting on hemicelluloses in CGA genera of different morphologies and developmental stages. In vivo transglycosylation between xyloglucan and an endogenous donor in filamentous Klebsormidium and Zygnema showed action in longitudinal cell walls of young (1 month) but not old cells (1 year), suggesting involvement in cell growth. Contrastingly, in parenchymatous Chara, transglycanase action occurred in all cell planes. In Klebsormidium and Zygnema, enzyme action predominately co-localised with xyloglucans and mannans, to a lesser extent mixed-linkage β-glucan (MLG), indicating predominantly xyloglucan:xyloglucan endotransglucosylase (XET). Novel transglycosylation activities between xyloglucan and xylan, and xyloglucan and galactomannan were identified in vitro, in both genera. Our results show that several cell wall-modifying enzymes are present in CGA and that differences in morphology and cell age are related to enzyme localisation and specificity. This indicates an evolutionary significance of cell wall modifications, as similar changes are known from their immediate descendants, the land plants. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  14. Characterization of Non-Nitrocatechol Pan and Isoform Specific Catechol-O-methyltransferase Inhibitors and Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Reduced dopamine neurotransmission in the prefrontal cortex has been implicated as causal for the negative symptoms and cognitive deficit associated with schizophrenia; thus, a compound which selectively enhances dopamine neurotransmission in the prefrontal cortex may have therapeutic potential. Inhibition of catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT, EC 2.1.1.6) offers a unique advantage, since this enzyme is the primary mechanism for the elimination of dopamine in cortical areas. Since membrane bound COMT (MB-COMT) is the predominant isoform in human brain, a high throughput screen (HTS) to identify novel MB-COMT specific inhibitors was completed. Subsequent optimization led to the identification of novel, non-nitrocatechol COMT inhibitors, some of which interact specifically with MB-COMT. Compounds were characterized for in vitro efficacy versus human and rat MB and soluble (S)-COMT. Select compounds were administered to male Wistar rats, and ex vivo COMT activity, compound levels in plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), and CSF dopamine metabolite levels were determined as measures of preclinical efficacy. Finally, novel non-nitrocatechol COMT inhibitors displayed less potent uncoupling of the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) compared to tolcapone as well as nonhepatotoxic entacapone, thus mitigating the risk of hepatotoxicity. PMID:22860182

  15. Catalytic domain of restriction endonuclease BmrI as a cleavage module for engineering endonucleases with novel substrate specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Siu-hong; Bao, Yongming; Ciszak, Ewa; Laget, Sophie; Xu, Shuang-yong

    2007-01-01

    Creating endonucleases with novel sequence specificities provides more possibilities to manipulate DNA. We have created a chimeric endonuclease (CH-endonuclease) consisting of the DNA cleavage domain of BmrI restriction endonuclease and C.BclI, a controller protein of the BclI restriction-modification system. The purified chimeric endonuclease, BmrI198-C.BclI, cleaves DNA at specific sites in the vicinity of the recognition sequence of C.BclI. Double-strand (ds) breaks were observed at two sites: 8 bp upstream and 18 bp within the C-box sequence. Using DNA substrates with deletions of C-box sequence, we show that the chimeric endonuclease requires the 5' half of the C box only for specific cleavage. A schematic model is proposed for the mode of protein-DNA binding and DNA cleavage. The present study demonstrates that the BmrI cleavage domain can be used to create combinatorial endonucleases that cleave DNA at specific sequences dictated by the DNA-binding partner. The resulting endonucleases will be useful in vitro and in vivo to create ds breaks at specific sites and generate deletions.

  16. Excimer laser texturing of natural composite polymer surfaces for studying cell-to-substrate specific response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dinca, V.; Alloncle, P.; Delaporte, P.; Ion, V.; Rusen, L.; Filipescu, M.; Mustaciosu, C.; Luculescu, C.; Dinescu, M.

    2015-10-01

    Surface modifications of biocompatible materials are among the main factors used for enhancing and promoting specific cellular activities (e.g. spreading, adhesion, migration, and differentiation) for various types of medical applications such as implants, microfluidic devices, or tissue engineering scaffolds. In this work an excimer laser at 193 nm was used to fabricate chitosan-collagen roughness gradients. The roughness gradients were obtained in one step by applying single laser pulses and sample tilting. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements, atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and spectro-ellipsometry (SE) were used for sample characterization. The goal is to determine the optimal morpho-chemical characteristics of these structures for in vitro tailoring of protein adsorption and cell behavior. The response induced by the roughness gradient onto various cell lines (i.e. L 929 fibroblasts, HEP G2 hepatocytes, OLN 93 oligodendrocytes, M63 osteoblasts) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein absorption was investigated.

  17. Development and Validation of Broad-Range Qualitative and Clade-Specific Quantitative Molecular Probes for Assessing Mercury Methylation in the Environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christensen, Geoff A; Wymore, Ann M; King, Andrew J; Podar, Mircea; Hurt, Richard A; Santillan, Eugenio U; Soren, Ally; Brandt, Craig C; Brown, Steven D; Palumbo, Anthony V; Wall, Judy D; Gilmour, Cynthia C; Elias, Dwayne A

    2016-10-01

    Two genes, hgcA and hgcB, are essential for microbial mercury (Hg) methylation. Detection and estimation of their abundance, in conjunction with Hg concentration, bioavailability, and biogeochemistry, are critical in determining potential hot spots of methylmercury (MeHg) generation in at-risk environments. We developed broad-range degenerate PCR primers spanning known hgcAB genes to determine the presence of both genes in diverse environments. These primers were tested against an extensive set of pure cultures with published genomes, including 13 Deltaproteobacteria, nine Firmicutes, and nine methanogenic Archaea genomes. A distinct PCR product at the expected size was confirmed for all hgcAB(+) strains tested via Sanger sequencing. Additionally, we developed clade-specific degenerate quantitative PCR (qPCR) primers that targeted hgcA for each of the three dominant Hg-methylating clades. The clade-specific qPCR primers amplified hgcA from 64%, 88%, and 86% of tested pure cultures of Deltaproteobacteria, Firmicutes, and Archaea, respectively, and were highly specific for each clade. Amplification efficiencies and detection limits were quantified for each organism. Primer sensitivity varied among species based on sequence conservation. Finally, to begin to evaluate the utility of our primer sets in nature, we tested hgcA and hgcAB recovery from pure cultures spiked into sand and soil. These novel quantitative molecular tools designed in this study will allow for more accurate identification and quantification of the individual Hg-methylating groups of microorganisms in the environment. The resulting data will be essential in developing accurate and robust predictive models of Hg methylation potential, ideally integrating the geochemistry of Hg methylation to the microbiology and genetics of hgcAB IMPORTANCE: The neurotoxin methylmercury (MeHg) poses a serious risk to human health. MeHg production in nature is associated with anaerobic microorganisms. The recent

  18. Correction: Dynamic properties of dipeptidyl peptidase III from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and the structural basis for its substrate specificity - a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomin, M; Tomić, S

    2017-11-21

    Correction for 'Dynamic properties of dipeptidyl peptidase III from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and the structural basis for its substrate specificity - a computational study' by M. Tomin et al., Mol. BioSyst., 2017, 13, 2407-2417.

  19. Substrate specificity of flavin-dependent vanillyl-alcohol oxidase from Penicillium simplicissimum.Evidence for the production of 4-hydroxycinnamyl alcohols from 4-allylphenols

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fraaije, Marco W.; Veeger, Cees; Berkel, Willem J.H. van

    1995-01-01

    The substrate specificity of the flavoprotein vanillyl-alcohol oxidase from Penicillium simplicissimum was investigated. Vanillyl-alcohol oxidase catalyzes besides the oxidation of 4-hydroxybenzyl alcohols, the oxidative deamination of 4-hydroxybenzylamines and the oxidative demethylation of

  20. Structural and mutational analysis of Escherichia coli AlkB provides insight into substrate specificity and DNA damage searching.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul J Holland

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In Escherichia coli, cytotoxic DNA methyl lesions on the N1 position of purines and N3 position of pyrimidines are primarily repaired by the 2-oxoglutarate (2-OG iron(II dependent dioxygenase, AlkB. AlkB repairs 1-methyladenine (1-meA and 3-methylcytosine (3-meC lesions, but it also repairs 1-methylguanine (1-meG and 3-methylthymine (3-meT at a much less efficient rate. How the AlkB enzyme is able to locate and identify methylated bases in ssDNA has remained an open question. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We determined the crystal structures of the E. coli AlkB protein holoenzyme and the AlkB-ssDNA complex containing a 1-meG lesion. We coupled this to site-directed mutagenesis of amino acids in and around the active site, and tested the effects of these mutations on the ability of the protein to bind both damaged and undamaged DNA, as well as catalyze repair of a methylated substrate. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: A comparison of our substrate-bound AlkB-ssDNA complex with our unliganded holoenzyme reveals conformational changes of residues within the active site that are important for binding damaged bases. Site-directed mutagenesis of these residues reveals novel insight into their roles in DNA damage recognition and repair. Our data support a model that the AlkB protein utilizes at least two distinct conformations in searching and binding methylated bases within DNA: a "searching" mode and "repair" mode. Moreover, we are able to functionally separate these modes through mutagenesis of residues that affect one or the other binding state. Finally, our mutagenesis experiments show that amino acid D135 of AlkB participates in both substrate specificity and catalysis.

  1. Substrate-independent luminescent phage-based biosensor to specifically detect enteric bacteria such as E. coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franche, Nathalie; Vinay, Manon; Ansaldi, Mireille

    2017-01-01

    Water quality is a major safety consideration in environments that are impacted by human activity. The key challenge of the COMBITOX project is to develop a unique instrument that can accommodate several biodetector systems (see the accompanying COMBITOX papers) able to detect different pollutants such as bacteria, toxins, and heavy metals. The output signal chosen by our consortium is based on luminescence detection. Our group recently developed phage-based biosensors using gfp as a reporter gene to detect enteric bacteria in complex environments such as sea water, and the main challenge we faced was to adapt our biodetector to a luminescent signal that could fit the COMBITOX project requirements. Another key point was to use a substrate-independent reporter system in order to avoid substrate addition in the detection prototype. This paper describes the development of a phage-based biodetector using a luminescent and substrate-independent output to detect some enteric bacteria, such as Escherichia coli, in water samples. We have successfully engineered various prototypes using the HK620 and HK97 bacteriophages that use different packaging systems, and both proved functional for the integration of the full luxCDABE operon controlled by two different bacterial promoters. We show that the luxCDABE operon controlled by the PrplU bacterial promoter is the most efficient in terms of signal emission. The emission of luminescence is specific and allows the detection of 10(4) bacteria per milliliter in 1.5 h post-infection with neither a concentration nor enrichment step.

  2. Membrane topology and identification of key residues of EaDAcT, a plant MBOAT with unusual substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Tam N T; Shelton, Jennifer; Brown, Susan; Durrett, Timothy P

    2017-10-01

    Euonymus alatus diacylglycerol acetyltransferase (EaDAcT) catalyzes the transfer of an acetyl group from acetyl-CoA to the sn-3 position of diacylglycerol to form 3-acetyl-1,2-diacyl-sn-glycerol (acetyl-TAG). EaDAcT belongs to a small, plant-specific subfamily of the membrane bound O-acyltransferases (MBOAT) that acylate different lipid substrates. Sucrose gradient density centrifugation revealed that EaDAcT colocalizes to the same fractions as an endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-specific marker. By mapping the membrane topology of EaDAcT, we obtained an experimentally determined topology model for a plant MBOAT. The EaDAcT model contains four transmembrane domains (TMDs), with both the N- and C-termini orientated toward the lumen of the ER. In addition, there is a large cytoplasmic loop between the first and second TMDs, with the MBOAT signature region of the protein embedded in the third TMD close to the interface between the membrane and the cytoplasm. During topology mapping, we discovered two cysteine residues (C187 and C293) located on opposite sides of the membrane that are important for enzyme activity. In order to identify additional amino acid residues important for acetyltransferase activity, we isolated and characterized acetyltransferases from other acetyl-TAG-producing plants. Among them, the acetyltransferase from Euonymus fortunei possessed the highest activity in vivo and in vitro. Mutagenesis of conserved amino acids revealed that S253, H257, D258 and V263 are essential for EaDAcT activity. Alteration of residues unique to the acetyltransferases did not alter the unique acyl donor specificity of EaDAcT, suggesting that multiple amino acids are important for substrate recognition. © 2017 The Authors The Plant Journal © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Excimer laser texturing of natural composite polymer surfaces for studying cell-to-substrate specific response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dinca, V., E-mail: dincavalentina@yahoo.com [NILPRP, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Alloncle, P.; Delaporte, P. [Aix-Marseille University, CNRS, LP3 Laboratory, Campus de Luminy, 13288 Marseille (France); Ion, V. [NILPRP, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Faculty of Physics, University of Bucharest, 077125 Magurele (Romania); Rusen, L.; Filipescu, M. [NILPRP, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Mustaciosu, C. [Horia Hulubei National Institute of Physics and Nuclear Engineering – IFIN HH, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania); Luculescu, C.; Dinescu, M. [NILPRP, National Institute for Lasers, Plasma and Radiation Physics, Magurele, Bucharest (Romania)

    2015-10-15

    Highlights: • Roughness gradients are obtained in one step by applying single laser pulses and sample tilting. • BSA protein and cell dependence behavior onto gradient characteristics was studied. • The degradation of the samples by lysozyme was correlated to its ability to access the textured area. - Abstract: Surface modifications of biocompatible materials are among the main factors used for enhancing and promoting specific cellular activities (e.g. spreading, adhesion, migration, and differentiation) for various types of medical applications such as implants, microfluidic devices, or tissue engineering scaffolds. In this work an excimer laser at 193 nm was used to fabricate chitosan–collagen roughness gradients. The roughness gradients were obtained in one step by applying single laser pulses and sample tilting. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy measurements, atomic force microscopy (AFM), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and spectro-ellipsometry (SE) were used for sample characterization. The goal is to determine the optimal morpho-chemical characteristics of these structures for in vitro tailoring of protein adsorption and cell behavior. The response induced by the roughness gradient onto various cell lines (i.e. L 929 fibroblasts, HEP G2 hepatocytes, OLN 93 oligodendrocytes, M63 osteoblasts) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) protein absorption was investigated.

  4. Neural substrates of defensive reactivity in two subtypes of specific phobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueken, Ulrike; Hilbert, Kevin; Stolyar, Veronika; Maslowski, Nina I; Beesdo-Baum, Katja; Wittchen, Hans-Ulrich

    2014-11-01

    Depending on threat proximity, different defensive behaviours are mediated by a descending neural network involving forebrain (distal threat) vs midbrain areas (proximal threat). Compared to healthy subjects, it can be assumed that phobics are characterized by shortened defensive distances on a behavioural and neural level. This study aimed at characterizing defensive reactivity in two subtypes of specific phobia [snake (SP) and dental phobics (DP)]. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), n = 39 subjects (13 healthy controls, HC; 13 SP; 13 DP) underwent an event-related fMRI task employing an anticipation (5-10 s) and immediate perception phase (phobic pictures and matched neutral stimuli; 1250 ms) to modulate defensive distance. Although no differential brain activity in any comparisons was observed in DP, areas associated with defensive behaviours (e.g. amygdala, hippocampus, midbrain) were activated in SP. Decreasing defensive distance in SP was characterized by a shift to midbrain activity. Present findings substantiate differences between phobia types in their physiological and neural organization that can be expanded to early stages of defensive behaviours. Findings may contribute to a better understanding of the dynamic organization of defensive reactivity in different types of phobic fear. © The Author (2013). Published by Oxford University Press. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  5. Differences in the substrate specificities and active-site structures of two α-L-fucosidases (glycoside hydrolase family 29) from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakurama, Haruko; Tsutsumi, Erika; Ashida, Hisashi; Katayama, Takane; Yamamoto, Kenji; Kumagai, Hidehiko

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that α-L-fucosidases of glycoside hydrolase family 29 can be divided into two subfamilies based on substrate specificity and phylogenetic clustering. To explore the validity of this classification, we enzymatically characterized two structure-solved α-L-fucosidases representing the respective subfamilies. Differences in substrate specificities are discussed in relation to differences in active-site structures between the two enzymes.

  6. Imaging a cognitive model of apraxia: the neural substrate of gesture-specific cognitive processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peigneux, Philippe; Van der Linden, Martial; Garraux, Gaetan; Laureys, Steven; Degueldre, Christian; Aerts, Joel; Del Fiore, Guy; Moonen, Gustave; Luxen, Andre; Salmon, Eric

    2004-03-01

    The present study aimed to ascertain the neuroanatomical basis of an influential neuropsychological model for upper limb apraxia [Rothi LJ, et al. The Neuropsychology of Action. 1997. Hove, UK: Psychology Press]. Regional cerebral blood flow was measured in healthy volunteers using H2 15O PET during performance of four tasks commonly used for testing upper limb apraxia, i.e., pantomime of familiar gestures on verbal command, imitation of familiar gestures, imitation of novel gestures, and an action-semantic task that consisted in matching objects for functional use. We also re-analysed data from a previous PET study in which we investigated the neural basis of the visual analysis of gestures. First, we found that two sets of discrete brain areas are predominantly engaged in the imitation of familiar and novel gestures, respectively. Segregated brain activation for novel gesture imitation concur with neuropsychological reports to support the hypothesis that knowledge about the organization of the human body mediates the transition from visual perception to motor execution when imitating novel gestures [Goldenberg Neuropsychologia 1995;33:63-72]. Second, conjunction analyses revealed distinctive neural bases for most of the gesture-specific cognitive processes proposed in this cognitive model of upper limb apraxia. However, a functional analysis of brain imaging data suggested that one single memory store may be used for "to-be-perceived" and "to-be-produced" gestural representations, departing from Rothi et al.'s proposal. Based on the above considerations, we suggest and discuss a revised model for upper limb apraxia that might best account for both brain imaging findings and neuropsychological dissociations reported in the apraxia literature. Copyright 2004 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  7. Galectin-3 Is a Substrate for Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA) in Human Seminal Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saraswati, Sarika; Block, Ashley S.; Davidson, Mari. K.; Rank, Roger. G.; Mahadevan, Maha; Diekman, Alan B.

    2012-01-01

    Background Galectin-3 is a multivalent carbohydrate-binding protein involved in cell adhesion, cell cycle control, immunomodulation, and cancer progression, including prostate cancer. Galectin-3 function is regulated by proteolytic cleavage that destroys galectin-3 multivalency while preserving carbohydrate-binding activity. In human semen, galectin-3 is present in seminal plasma and is also associated with prostasomes, exosome-like vesicles secreted by the prostate. In the current study, we characterized the proteolytic activity that cleaves galectin-3 in human seminal plasma. Methods An in vitro assay was developed to investigate galectin-3 cleavage in seminal plasma. The effect of protease inhibitors, divalent ion chelators, and Zn2+ on the cleavage activity was determined. Proteases enriched from seminal plasma were tested for their ability to cleave galectin-3. Affinity purification and microsequence analysis were used to identify the cleavage site in galectin-3. Results Galectin-3 was identified in human seminal plasma in an intact and truncated form. Gelatinases enriched from seminal plasma did not cleave galectin-3. Inhibitor studies indicated that the galectin-3 cleavage activity in seminal plasma is a Zn2+ sensitive, serine protease. Prostate specific antigen (PSA) was demonstrated to cleave galectin-3 between tyrosine107-glycine108 and produce a functionally-active, monovalent lectin. Conclusions PSA is a chymotrypsin-like serine protease secreted by the prostatic epithelium and normally functions in liquefaction of semen following ejaculation. Furthermore, PSA is implicated in the promotion of localized prostate tumors and bone metastases by its roles in immunomodulation, invasion, and apoptosis. Our results indicate that PSA regulates galectin-3 in human semen and may regulate galectin-3 function during prostate cancer progression. PMID:20672323

  8. Milk secretion of nitrofurantoin, as a specific BCRP/ABCG2 substrate, in assaf sheep: modulation by isoflavones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez, M; Real, R; Mendoza, G; Merino, G; Prieto, J G; Alvarez, A I

    2009-10-01

    Studies on residues in milk used for human consumption have increased due to health concerns and priority interest in the control of potentially risky drugs. The protein BCRP/ABCG2, present in the mammary epithelia, actively extrudes drugs into milk and can be modulated by isoflavones. Nitrofurantoin is a specific BCRP substrate which is actively excreted into milk by this transporter. In this research, we studied nitrofurantoin transport into milk in four experimental groups: G1-calves fed forage with isoflavones; G2-calves fed forage with isoflavones and administered exogenous genistein and daidzein; G3-calves fed forage without isoflavones; G4-calves fed forage without isoflavones and administered exogenous genistein and daidzein. Results show increased levels of nitrofurantoin in milk from calves without isoflavones (G3) and decreased nitrofurantoin residues in milk when isoflavones were present, either by forage (G1 and G2) or by exogenous administration (G4). The values of C(max) in milk were significantly lower in those groups with isoflavones in forage (G1, G2). Plasma levels were low and unmodified among the groups. Inter-individual variation was high. All these results seem to point to a feasible control of drug secretion into milk through isoflavones in the diet when the drug is a good BCRP/ABCG2 substrate.

  9. A vanadium-dependent bromoperoxidase in the marine red alga Kappaphycus alvarezii (Doty) Doty displays clear substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenarska, Zornitsa; Taniguchi, Tomokazu; Ohsawa, Noboru; Hiraoka, Masanori; Itoh, Nobuya

    2007-05-01

    Bromoperoxidase activity was initially detected in marine macroalgae belonging to the Solieriaceae family (Gigartinales, Rhodophyta), including Solieria robusta (Greville) Kylin, Eucheuma serra J. Agardh and Kappaphycus alvarezii (Doty) Doty, which are important industrial sources of the polysaccharide carrageenan. Notably, the purification of bromoperoxidase was difficult because due to the coexistence of viscoid polysaccharides. The activity of the partially purified enzyme was dependent on the vanadate ion, and displayed a distinct substrate spectrum from that of previously reported vanadium-dependent bromoperoxidases of marine macroalgae. The enzyme was specific for Br- and I- ions and inactive toward F- and Cl-. The K(m) values for Br- and H2O2 were 2.5x10(-3) M and 8.5x10(-5) M, respectively. The halogenated product, dibromoacetaldehyde, that accumulated in K. alvarezii was additionally determined.

  10. Biochemical characterization and substrate specificity of jojoba fatty acyl-CoA reductase and jojoba wax synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miklaszewska, Magdalena; Banaś, Antoni

    2016-08-01

    Wax esters are used in industry for production of lubricants, pharmaceuticals and cosmetics. The only natural source of wax esters is jojoba oil. A much wider variety of industrial wax esters-containing oils can be generated through genetic engineering. Biotechnological production of tailor-made wax esters requires, however, a detailed substrate specificity of fatty acyl-CoA reductases (FAR) and wax synthases (WS), the two enzymes involved in wax esters synthesis. In this study we have successfully characterized the substrate specificity of jojoba FAR and jojoba WS. The genes encoding both enzymes were expressed heterologously in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and the activity of tested enzymes was confirmed by in vivo studies and in vitro assays using microsomal preparations from transgenic yeast. Jojoba FAR exhibited the highest in vitro activity toward 18:0-CoA followed by 20:1-CoA and 22:1-CoA. The activity toward other 11 tested acyl-CoAs was low or undetectable as with 18:2-CoA and 18:3-CoA. In assays characterizing jojoba WS combinations of 17 fatty alcohols with 14 acyl-CoAs were tested. The enzyme displayed the highest activity toward 14:0-CoA and 16:0-CoA in combination with C16-C20 alcohols as well as toward C18 acyl-CoAs in combination with C12-C16 alcohols. 20:1-CoA was efficiently utilized in combination with most of the tested alcohols. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Dynamic properties of dipeptidyl peptidase III from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron and the structural basis for its substrate specificity - a computational study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomin, M; Tomić, S

    2017-10-24

    Dipeptidyl peptidase III (DPP III) from the human gut symbiont Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (Bt) is the first identified prokaryotic DPP III orthologue. It has low sequence similarity to the thoroughly studied human DPP III, and differently from eukaryotic orthologues it has a cysteine (Cys450) residue in the zinc-binding motif HEXXGH (HECLGH). The recently determined crystal structure of BtDPP III showed that its 3D structure, similar to the structure of the human DPP III, consists of two domains with a wide cleft in between. Although such a striking similarity of the 3D structures of orthologues with low sequence similarity is not surprising, it is no guarantee for similarity of their dynamic properties and the catalytic performance. Here, we report the results of the molecular modelling study of BtDPP III, wild type and its C450S mutant, as well as their complexes with characteristic DPP III substrates Arg-Arg-2-naphthylamide (RRNA) and Lys-Ala-2-naphtylamide (KANA). During several hundred nanoseconds of all-atom MD simulations of the wild type protein, the long range conformational changes, which can be described as protein 'closing', have been traced. We have determined a similar conformational change for the human orthologue as well. However, the amplitude of the change is lower for BtDPP III than for the human DPP III. The MD simulations have been performed using ff03, ff12SB and ff14SB force fields wherein the results of the last two better fit to the experimental results. The hydrogen bond analysis indicates reasons for higher substrate specificity of BtDPP III towards RRNA than KANA as well as for the decrease of the RRNA hydrolysis rate induced by the Cys450 to Ser mutation. The obtained results are in line with the experimental data.

  12. Residue Asn277 Affects the Stability and Substrate Specificity of the SMG1 Lipase from Malassezia globosa

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dongming Lan

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermostability and substrate specificity are important characteristics of enzymes for industrial application, which can be improved by protein engineering. SMG1 lipase from Malassezia globosa is a mono- and diacylglycerol lipase (MDL that shows activity toward mono- and diacylglycerols, but no activity toward triacylglycerols. SMG1 lipase is considered a potential biocatalyst applied in oil/fat modification and its crystal structure revealed that an interesting residue-Asn277 may contribute to stabilize loop 273–278 and the 3104 helix which are important to enzyme characterization. In this study, to explore its role in affecting the stability and catalytic activity, mutagenesis of N277 with Asp (D, Val (V, Leu (L and Phe (F was conducted. Circular dichroism (CD spectral analysis and half-life measurement showed that the N277D mutant has better thermostability. The melting temperature and half-life of the N277D mutant were 56.6 °C and 187 min, respectively, while that was 54.6 °C and 121 min for SMG1 wild type (WT. Biochemical characterization of SMG1 mutants were carried out to test whether catalytic properties were affected by mutagenesis. N277D had similar enzymatic properties as SMG1 WT, but N277F showed a different substrate selectivity profile as compared to other SMG1 mutants. Analysis of the SMG1 3D model suggested that N277D formed a salt bridge via its negative charged carboxyl group with a positively charged guanidino group of R227, which might contribute to confer N277D higher temperature stability. These findings not only provide some clues to understand the molecular basis of the lipase structure/function relationship but also lay the framework for engineering suitable MDL lipases for industrial applications.

  13. The zebrafish genome encodes the largest vertebrate repertoire of functional aquaporins with dual paralogy and substrate specificities similar to mammals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chauvigné François

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Aquaporins are integral membrane proteins that facilitate the transport of water and small solutes across cell membranes. These proteins are vital for maintaining water homeostasis in living organisms. In mammals, thirteen aquaporins (AQP0-12 have been characterized, but in lower vertebrates, such as fish, the diversity, structure and substrate specificity of these membrane channel proteins are largely unknown. Results The screening and isolation of transcripts from the zebrafish (Danio rerio genome revealed eighteen sequences structurally related to the four subfamilies of tetrapod aquaporins, i.e., aquaporins (AQP0, -1 and -4, water and glycerol transporters or aquaglyceroporins (Glps; AQP3 and AQP7-10, a water and urea transporter (AQP8, and two unorthodox aquaporins (AQP11 and -12. Phylogenetic analyses of nucleotide and deduced amino acid sequences demonstrated dual paralogy between teleost and human aquaporins. Three of the duplicated zebrafish isoforms have unlinked loci, two have linked loci, while DrAqp8 was found in triplicate across two chromosomes. Genomic sequencing, structural analysis, and maximum likelihood reconstruction, further revealed the presence of a putative pseudogene that displays hybrid exons similar to tetrapod AQP5 and -1. Ectopic expression of the cloned transcripts in Xenopus laevis oocytes demonstrated that zebrafish aquaporins and Glps transport water or water, glycerol and urea, respectively, whereas DrAqp11b and -12 were not functional in oocytes. Contrary to humans and some rodents, intrachromosomal duplicates of zebrafish AQP8 were water and urea permeable, while the genomic duplicate only transported water. All aquaporin transcripts were expressed in adult tissues and found to have divergent expression patterns. In some tissues, however, redundant expression of transcripts encoding two duplicated paralogs seems to occur. Conclusion The zebrafish genome encodes the largest repertoire of

  14. Pre-steady-state Kinetics Reveal the Substrate Specificity and Mechanism of Halide Oxidation of Truncated Human Peroxidasin 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paumann-Page, Martina; Katz, Romy-Sophie; Bellei, Marzia; Schwartz, Irene; Edenhofer, Eva; Sevcnikar, Benjamin; Soudi, Monika; Hofbauer, Stefan; Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Furtmüller, Paul G; Obinger, Christian

    2017-03-17

    Human peroxidasin 1 is a homotrimeric multidomain peroxidase that is secreted to the extracellular matrix. The heme enzyme was shown to release hypobromous acid that mediates the formation of specific covalent sulfilimine bonds to reinforce collagen IV in basement membranes. Maturation by proteolytic cleavage is known to activate the enzyme. Here, we present the first multimixing stopped-flow study on a fully functional truncated variant of human peroxidasin 1 comprising four immunoglobulin-like domains and the catalytically active peroxidase domain. The kinetic data unravel the so far unknown substrate specificity and mechanism of halide oxidation of human peroxidasin 1. The heme enzyme is shown to follow the halogenation cycle that is induced by the rapid H 2 O 2 -mediated oxidation of the ferric enzyme to the redox intermediate compound I. We demonstrate that chloride cannot act as a two-electron donor of compound I, whereas thiocyanate, iodide, and bromide efficiently restore the ferric resting state. We present all relevant apparent bimolecular rate constants, the spectral signatures of the redox intermediates, and the standard reduction potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple, and we demonstrate that the prosthetic heme group is post-translationally modified and cross-linked with the protein. These structural features provide the basis of human peroxidasin 1 to act as an effective generator of hypobromous acid, which mediates the formation of covalent cross-links in collagen IV. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  15. Pre-steady-state Kinetics Reveal the Substrate Specificity and Mechanism of Halide Oxidation of Truncated Human Peroxidasin 1*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paumann-Page, Martina; Katz, Romy-Sophie; Bellei, Marzia; Schwartz, Irene; Edenhofer, Eva; Sevcnikar, Benjamin; Soudi, Monika

    2017-01-01

    Human peroxidasin 1 is a homotrimeric multidomain peroxidase that is secreted to the extracellular matrix. The heme enzyme was shown to release hypobromous acid that mediates the formation of specific covalent sulfilimine bonds to reinforce collagen IV in basement membranes. Maturation by proteolytic cleavage is known to activate the enzyme. Here, we present the first multimixing stopped-flow study on a fully functional truncated variant of human peroxidasin 1 comprising four immunoglobulin-like domains and the catalytically active peroxidase domain. The kinetic data unravel the so far unknown substrate specificity and mechanism of halide oxidation of human peroxidasin 1. The heme enzyme is shown to follow the halogenation cycle that is induced by the rapid H2O2-mediated oxidation of the ferric enzyme to the redox intermediate compound I. We demonstrate that chloride cannot act as a two-electron donor of compound I, whereas thiocyanate, iodide, and bromide efficiently restore the ferric resting state. We present all relevant apparent bimolecular rate constants, the spectral signatures of the redox intermediates, and the standard reduction potential of the Fe(III)/Fe(II) couple, and we demonstrate that the prosthetic heme group is post-translationally modified and cross-linked with the protein. These structural features provide the basis of human peroxidasin 1 to act as an effective generator of hypobromous acid, which mediates the formation of covalent cross-links in collagen IV. PMID:28154175

  16. Substrate Specificity of the Bacillus subtilis BY-Kinase PtkA Is Controlled by Alternative Activators: TkmA and SalA

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Derouiche, Abderahmane; Shi, Lei; Kalantari, Aida

    2016-01-01

    Bacterial protein-tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases) are known to regulate different aspects of bacterial physiology, by phosphorylating cellular protein substrates. Physiological cues that trigger BY-kinases activity are largely unexplored. In Proteobacteria, BY-kinases contain a cytosol-exposed cata......IA and TkmA with PtkA favor phosphorylation of different protein substrates in vivo and in vitro. This observation may contribute to explaining how specificity is established in the seemingly promiscuous interactions of BY-kinases with their cellular substrates....

  17. Activation of c-Src and Fyn kinases by protein tyrosine phosphatase RPTPalpha is substrate-specific and compatible with lipid raft localization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vacaresse, Nathalie; Møller, Bente; Danielsen, Erik Michael

    2008-01-01

    Tyrosine kinases of the Src family (SFKs) function in multiple signaling pathways, raising the question of how appropriate regulation and substrate choice are achieved. SFK activity is modulated by several protein tyrosine phosphatases (PTPs), among which RPTPa and SHP2 are the best established. We...... studied how RPTPa affects substrate specificity and regulation of c-Src and Fyn in response to EGF and PDGF. We find that RPTPa, in a growth factor-specific manner, directs the specificity of these kinases towards a specific subset of SFK substrates, particularly the focal adhesion protein Paxillin...... and the lipid raft scaffolding protein Cbp/PAG. A significant fraction of RPTPa is present in lipid rafts, where its targets Fyn and Cbp/PAG reside, and growth factor-mediated SFK activation within this compartment is strictly dependent on RPTPa. Forced concentration of RPTPa into lipid rafts is compatible...

  18. Structural basis for non-genuine phenolic acceptor substrate specificity of Streptomyces roseochromogenes prenyltransferase CloQ from the ABBA/PT-barrel superfamily.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla Araya-Cloutier

    Full Text Available Acceptor substrate specificity of Streptomyces roseochromogenes prenyltransferase SrCloQ was investigated using different non-genuine phenolic compounds. RP-UHPLC-UV-MSn was used for the tentative annotation and quantification of the prenylated products. Flavonoids, isoflavonoids and stilbenoids with different types of substitution were prenylated by SrCloQ, although with less efficiency than the genuine substrate 4-hydroxyphenylpyruvate. The isoflavan equol, followed by the flavone 7,4'-dihydroxyflavone, were the best non-genuine acceptor substrates. B-ring C-prenylation was in general preferred over A-ring C-prenylation (ratio 5:1. Docking studies of non-genuine acceptor substrates with the B-ring oriented towards the donor substrate dimethylallyl pyrophosphate, showed that the carbonyl group of the C-ring was able to make stabilizing interactions with the residue Arg160, which might determine the preference observed for B-ring prenylation. No reaction products were formed when the acceptor substrate had no phenolic hydroxyl groups. This preference can be explained by the essential hydrogen bond needed between a phenolic hydroxyl group and the residue Glu281. Acceptor substrates with an additional hydroxyl group at the C3' position (B-ring, were mainly O3'-prenylated (> 80% of the reaction products. This can be explained by the proximity of the C3' hydroxyl group to the donor substrate at the catalytic site. Flavones were preferred over isoflavones by SrCloQ. Docking studies suggested that the orientation of the B-ring and of the phenolic hydroxyl group at position C7 (A-ring of flavones towards the residue Tyr233 plays an important role in this observed preference. Finally, the insights obtained on acceptor substrate specificity and regioselectivity for SrCloQ were extended to other prenyltransferases from the CloQ/NhpB family.

  19. Functional and structural characterization of a novel mannosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthase from Rubrobacter xylanophilus reveals its dual substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Empadinhas, Nuno; Pereira, Pedro José Barbosa; Albuquerque, Luciana; Costa, Joana; Sá-Moura, Bebiana; Marques, Alexandra T; Macedo-Ribeiro, Sandra; da Costa, Milton S

    2011-01-01

    Rubrobacter xylanophilus is the only actinobacterium known to accumulate the organic solute mannosylglycerate (MG); moreover, the accumulation of MG is constitutive. The key enzyme for MG synthesis, catalysing the conversion of GDP-mannose (GDP-Man) and D-3-phosphoglycerate (3-PGA) into the phosphorylated intermediate mannosyl-3-phosphoglycerate and GDP, was purified from R. xylanophilus cell extracts and the corresponding gene was expressed in E. coli. Despite the related solute glucosylglycerate (GG) having never been detected in R. xylanophilus, the cell extracts and the pure recombinant mannosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthase (MpgS) could also synthesize glucosyl-3-phosphoglycerate (GPG), the precursor of GG, in agreement with the higher homology of the novel MpgS towards GPG-synthesizing mycobacterial glucosyl-3-phosphoglycerate synthases (GpgS) than towards MpgSs from hyper/thermophiles, known to accumulate MG under salt or thermal stress. To understand the specificity and substrate ambiguity of this novel enzyme, we determined the crystal structure of the unliganded MpgS and of its complexes with the nucleotide and sugar donors, at 2.2, 2.8 and 2.5 Å resolution respectively. The first three-dimensional structures of a protein from this extremely gamma-radiation-resistant thermophile here reported show that MpgS (GT81 family) contains a GT-A like fold and clearly explain its nucleotide and sugar-donor specificity. In the GDP-Man complex, a flexible loop ((254) RQNRHQ(259) ), located close to the active site moves towards the incoming sugar moiety, providing the ligands for both magnesium ion co-ordination and sugar binding. A triple mutant of R. xylanophilus MpgS, mimicking the (206) PLAGE(210) loop stabilizing hydrogen bond network observed for mycobacterial GpgSs, reduces significantly the affinity to GDP-Man, implicating this loop in the sugar-donor discrimination. © 2010 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Binding specificity of R-10G and TRA-1-60/81, and substrate specificity of keratanase II studied with chemically synthesized oligosaccharides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Hiromi; Nagai, Yuko; Kojima, Aya; Toyoda, Hidenao; Kawasaki, Nobuko; Kawasaki, Toshisuke

    2017-03-14

    Recently, we established a mouse monoclonal antibody specific to hiPS/ hES cells, R-10G, which recognizes a type of keratan sulfate. Keratan sulfates (KS) comprise a family of glycosaminoglycans consisting of the repeating unit of [Gal-GlcNAc(6S)]. However, there is a diversity in the degree of sulfation at Gal and GlcNAc residues, and also in the mode of linkage, Galβ1 - 3GlcNAc (type 1) or Galβ1 - 4GlcNAc (type 2). To gain more insight into the binding specificity of R-10G, we carried out an ELISA test on avidin-coated plates using polyethylene glycol (PEG)3-biotinylated derivatives of a series of N-acetyllactosamine tetrasaccharides (keratan sulfates (KSs)). The results suggested that the minimum epitope structure is Galβ1 - 4GlcNAc(6S)β1 - 3Galβ1 - 4GlcNAc(6S)β1 (type 2- type 2 keratan sulfate). Removal of sulfate from GlcNAc(6S) or addition of sulfate to Gal abolished the binding activity almost completely. We also examined the binding specificity of TRA-1-60/81 in the same assay system. The minimum epitope structure was shown to be Galβ1 - 3GlcNAcβ1 - 3Galβ1 - 4GlcNAcβ1 in agreement with the previous study involving glycan arrays (Natunen et al., Glycobiology, 21, 1125-1130 (2011)). Interestingly, however, TRA-1-60/81 was shown to bind to Galβ1 - 3GlcNAc(6S)β1 - 3Galβ1 - 4GlcNAc(6S)β1 (type 1- type 2 keratan sulfate) dose-dependently, being more than one-third the binding activity toward Galβ1 - 3GlcNAcβ1 - 3Galβ1 - 4GlcNAcβ1 than in the case of TRA-1-60. In addition, a substrate specificity study on keratanase II revealed that keratanase II degraded not only "type 2-type 2 keratan sulfate" but also "type 1-type 2 keratan sulfate", significantly.

  1. The crystal structure of a xyloglucan-specific endo-beta-1,4-glucanase from Geotrichum sp. M128 xyloglucanase reveals a key amino acid residue for substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaoi, Katsuro; Kondo, Hidemasa; Hiyoshi, Ayako; Noro, Natsuko; Sugimoto, Hiroshi; Tsuda, Sakae; Miyazaki, Kentaro

    2009-09-01

    Geotrichum sp. M128 possesses two xyloglucan-specific glycoside hydrolases belonging to family 74, xyloglucan-specific endo-beta-1,4-glucanase (XEG) and oligoxyloglucan reducing-end-specific cellobiohydrolase (OXG-RCBH). Despite their similar amino acid sequences (48% identity), their modes of action and substrate specificities are distinct. XEG catalyzes the hydrolysis of xyloglucan polysaccharides in endo mode, while OXG-RCBH acts on xyloglucan oligosaccharides at the reducing end in exo mode. Here, we determined the crystal structure of XEG at 2.5 A resolution, and compared it to a previously determined structure of OXG-RCBH. For the most part, the amino acid residues that interact with substrate are conserved between the two enzymes. However, there are notable differences at subsite positions -1 and +2. OXG-RCBH has a loop around the +2 site that blocks one end of the active site cleft, which accounts for its exo mode of action. In contrast, XEG lacks a corresponding loop at this site, thereby allowing binding to the middle of the main chain of the substrate. At the -1 site in OXG-RCBH, Asn488 interacts with the xylose side chain of the substrate, whereas the -1 site is occupied by Tyr457 in XEG. To confirm the contribution of this residue to substrate specificity, Tyr457 was substituted by Gly in XEG. The wild-type XEG cleaved the oligoxyloglucan at a specific site; the Y457G variant cleaved the same substrate, but at various sites. Together, the absence of a loop in the cleft and the presence of bulky Tyr457 determine the substrate specificity of XEG.

  2. Novel α-L-arabinofuranosidase from Cellulomonas fimi ATCC 484 and its substrate-specificity analysis with the aid of computer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ying; Zhang, Lujia; Guo, Mingrong; Sun, Jiaqi; Matsukawa, Shingo; Xie, Jingli; Wei, Dongzhi

    2015-04-15

    In the process of gene mining for novel α-L-arabinofuranosidases (AFs), the gene Celf_3321 from Cellulomonas fimi ATCC 484 encodes an AF, termed as AbfCelf, with potent activity, 19.4 U/mg under the optimum condition, pH 6.0 and 40 °C. AbfCelf can hydrolyze α-1,5-linked oligosaccharides, sugar beet arabinan, linear 1,5-α-arabinan, and wheat flour arabinoxylan, which is partly different from some previously well-characterized GH 51 AFs. The traditional substrate-specificity analysis for AFs is labor-consuming and money costing, because the substrates include over 30 kinds of various 4-nitrophenol (PNP)-glycosides, oligosaccharides, and polysaccharides. Hence, a preliminary structure and mechanism based method was applied for substrate-specificity analysis. The binding energy (ΔG, kcal/mol) obtained by docking suggested the reaction possibility and coincided with the experimental results. AbfA crystal 1QW9 was used to test the rationality of docking method in simulating the interaction between enzyme and substrate, as well the credibility of the substrate-specificity analysis method in silico.

  3. Substrate specificity of glucose dehydrogenase and carbon source utilization pattern of pantoea dispersa strain P2 and its radiation induced mutants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Keun; Murugesan, Senthilkumar [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-06-15

    Mineral phosphate solubilizing pantoea dispersa strain P2 produced 5.5 mM and 42.6 mM of gluconic acid on 24 h and 72 h incubation, respectively. Strain P2 exhibited glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) specific activity of 0.32 IU mg{sup -1} protein. We have studied the substrate specificity of GDH as well as carbon source utilization pattern of strain P2. GDH of strain P2 did not use ribose as substrate. Utilization of lactose with specific activity of 0.65 IU mg{sup -1} protein indicated that the enzyme belongs to GDH type B isozyme. Arabinose, galactose, ribose, sucrose and xylose did not induce the synthesis of GDH enzyme while mannose induced the synthesis of GDH with highest specific activity of 0.58 IU mg{sup -1} protein. Through radiation mutagenesis, the substrate specificity of GDH was modified in order to utilize side range of sugars available in root exudates. Ribose, originally not a substrate for GDH of strain P2 was utilized as substrate by mutants P2-M5 with specific activity of 0.44 and 0.57 IU mg{sup -1} protein, respectively. Specific activity of GDH on the media containing lactose and galactose was also improved to 1.2 and 0.52 IU mg{sup -1} protein in P2-M5 and P2-M6 respectively. Based on the carbon source availability in root exudate, the mutants can be selected and utilized as efficient biofertilizer under P-deficient soil conditions.

  4. Substrate Specificity and Stereoselectivity of Two Sulfolobus 2-Keto-3-deoxygluconate Aldolases towards Azido-Substituted Aldehydes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schurink, M.; Wolterink-van Loo, S.; Oost, van der J.; Sonke, Th.; Franssen, M.C.R.

    2014-01-01

    The 2-keto-3-deoxygluconate aldolases (KDGAs) isolated from Sulfolobus species convert pyruvate and glyceraldehyde reversibly into 2-keto-3-deoxygluconate and -galactonate. As a result of their high thermostability and activity on nonphosphorylated substrates, KDGA enzymes have potential as

  5. Understanding Russell's viper venom factor V activator's substrate specificity by surface plasmon resonance and in-silico studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yadav, Pradeep K; Antonyraj, Christian B; Basheer Ahamed, Syed Ibrahim; Srinivas, Sistla

    2017-01-01

    Blood coagulation factor V (FV) is activated either by Factor X or thrombin, cleaving at three different sites viz., Site I (Arg709-Ser710), site II (Arg1018-Thr1019), and site III (Arg1545-Ser1546). Russell's viper venom factor V activator (RVV-V) is a thrombin-like serine proteinase that activates FV with selective, single cleavage at site III. A long lasting effort is being pending in understanding the 'selective' binding specificity of the RVV-V towards site III. Here, we present the binding kinetic study of RVV-V with two designed peptides corresponding to the regions from site I (Gln699-Asn713) and site II (1008Lys-Pro1022), respectively, that include 15 amino acids. Our investigation for justifying the binding efficacy and kinetics of peptides includes SPR method, protein-peptide docking, molecular dynamics simulation, and principal component analysis (PCA). Surprisingly, the SPR experiment disclosed that the Peptide II showed a lower binding affinity with KD of 2.775 mM while the Peptide I showed none. Docking and simulation of both the peptides with RVV-V engaged either rooted or shallow binding for Peptide II and Peptide I respectively. The peptide binding resulted in global conformational changes in the native fold of RVV-V, whereas the similar studies for thrombin failed to make major changes in the native fold. In support, the PCA analysis for RVV-V showed the dislocation of catalytic triad upon binding both the peptides. Hence, RVV-V, a serine protease, is incompetent in cleaving these two sites. This study suggests a transition in RVV-V from the native rigid to the distorted flexible structure and paves a way to design a new peptide substrate/inhibitor.

  6. SUMO modification of Akt regulates global SUMOylation and substrate SUMOylation specificity through Akt phosphorylation of Ubc9 and SUMO1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, C H; Liu, S Y; Lee, E H Y

    2016-02-04

    SUMOylation is an important post-translational modification, and Akt SUMOylation was found to regulate cell proliferation, tumorigenesis and cell cycle, but the molecular mechanism of Akt SUMOylation is less well known. Here, we show both endogenous and ectopic Akt SUMOylation and Lys276 is the major SUMO acceptor on Akt. Further, Akt SUMOylation is Akt phosphorylation dependent and Akt SUMOylation increases Akt kinase activity without affecting the phosphorylation level of Akt. Moreover, endogenous Akt SUMOylation is enhanced by insulin treatment and this is Akt activity dependent. Heat-shock stimulus also increases Akt SUMOylation and it is also Akt activity dependent. Endogenous Akt SUMOylation is also found in the rat brain and it is enhanced by insulin-like growth factor-1 stimulation. In addition, Akt directly phosphorylates Ubc9 at Thr35 and phosphorylates SUMO1 at Thr76. Ubc9 phosphorylation at Thr35 promotes Ubc9 thioester bond formation and SUMO1 phosphorylation at Thr76 stabilizes the SUMO1 protein. Through these distinct mechanisms, Akt SUMOylation regulates global SUMOylation, including Akt and Ubc9 SUMOylation, and substrate SUMOylation specificity, including STAT1 and CREB SUMOylation, in different manners. Akt SUMOylation also enhances phosphatase and tensin homolog (PTEN) SUMOylation through Akt phosphorylation of Ubc9 and SUMO1, which serves as an endogenous mechanism to stop the positive feedback loop resulted from Akt activation. Further, Akt SUMOylation increases cyclin D1 expression and cell proliferation, and these effects are also mediated through Ubc9 phosphorylation at Thr35 and SUMO1 phosphorylation at Thr76. Here, we have identified a novel mechanism for SUMOylation regulation. Because of the important role Akt plays in tumorigenesis, this mechanism may also be involved in Akt-regulated tumorigenesis.

  7. Structural basis for non-genuine phenolic acceptor substrate specificity of Streptomyces roseochromogenes prenyltransferase CloQ from the ABBA/PT-barrel superfamily

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Araya-Cloutier, C.; Martens, B.; Schaftenaar, G.; Leipoldt, F.; Gruppen, H.; Vincken, J.P.

    2017-01-01

    Acceptor substrate specificity of Streptomyces roseochromogenes prenyltransferase SrCloQ was investigated using different non-genuine phenolic compounds. RP-UHPLC-UV-MSn was used for the tentative annotation and quantification of the prenylated products. Flavonoids, isoflavonoids and stilbenoids

  8. Structural basis for non-genuine phenolic Acceptor substrate specificity of Streptomyces roseochromogenes prenyltransferase CloQ from the ABBA/PT-barrel superfamily

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Araya-Cloutier, Carla; Martens, Bianca; Schaftenaar, Gijs; Leipoldt, Franziska; Gruppen, Harry; Vincken, Jean Paul

    2017-01-01

    Acceptor substrate specificity of Streptomyces roseochromogenes prenyltransferase SrCloQ was investigated using different non-genuine phenolic compounds. RP-UHPLC-UV-MSn was used for the tentative annotation and quantification of the prenylated products. Flavonoids, isoflavonoids and stilbenoids

  9. New insights into the substrate specificities of proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters from E. coli by a pH sensitive assay

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prabhala, Bala Krishna; Aduri, Nanda Gowtham; Jensen, Johanne Mørch

    2014-01-01

    Proton-coupled oligopeptide transporters (POTs) are secondary active transporters that facilitate di- and tripeptide uptake by coupling it to an inward directed proton electrochemical gradient. Here the substrate specificities of E. coli POTs YdgR, YhiP and YjdL were investigated by means of a la...

  10. Substrate Specificity, Inhibitor Selectivity and Structure-Function Relationships of Aldo-Keto Reductase 1B15: A Novel Human Retinaldehyde Reductase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joan Giménez-Dejoz

    Full Text Available Human aldo-keto reductase 1B15 (AKR1B15 is a newly discovered enzyme which shares 92% amino acid sequence identity with AKR1B10. While AKR1B10 is a well characterized enzyme with high retinaldehyde reductase activity, involved in the development of several cancer types, the enzymatic activity and physiological role of AKR1B15 are still poorly known. Here, the purified recombinant enzyme has been subjected to substrate specificity characterization, kinetic analysis and inhibitor screening, combined with structural modeling. AKR1B15 is active towards a variety of carbonyl substrates, including retinoids, with lower kcat and Km values than AKR1B10. In contrast to AKR1B10, which strongly prefers all-trans-retinaldehyde, AKR1B15 exhibits superior catalytic efficiency with 9-cis-retinaldehyde, the best substrate found for this enzyme. With ketone and dicarbonyl substrates, AKR1B15 also shows higher catalytic activity than AKR1B10. Several typical AKR inhibitors do not significantly affect AKR1B15 activity. Amino acid substitutions clustered in loops A and C result in a smaller, more hydrophobic and more rigid active site in AKR1B15 compared with the AKR1B10 pocket, consistent with distinct substrate specificity and narrower inhibitor selectivity for AKR1B15.

  11. I86A/C295A mutant secondary alcohol dehydrogenase from Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus has broadened substrate specificity for aryl ketones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nealon, Christopher M; Welsh, Travis P; Kim, Chang Sup; Phillips, Robert S

    2016-09-15

    Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus secondary alcohol dehydrogenase (SADH) reduces aliphatic ketones according to Prelog's Rule, with binding pockets for small and large substituents. It was shown previously that the I86A mutant SADH reduces acetophenone, which is not a substrate of wild-type SADH, to give the anti-Prelog R-product (Musa, M. M.; Lott, N.; Laivenieks, M.; Watanabe, L.; Vieille, C.; Phillips, R. S. ChemCatChem2009, 1, 89-93.). However, I86A SADH did not reduce aryl ketones with substituents larger than fluorine. We have now expanded the small pocket of the active site of I86A SADH by mutation of Cys-295 to alanine to allow reaction of substituted acetophenones. As predicted, the double mutant I86A/C295A SADH has broadened substrate specificity for meta-substituted, but not para-substituted, acetophenones. However, the increase of the substrate specificity of I86A/C295A SADH is accompanied by a decrease in the kcat/Km values of acetophenones, possibly due to the substrates fitting loosely inside the more open active site. Nevertheless, I86A/C295A SADH gives high conversions and very high enantiomeric excess of the anti-Prelog R-alcohols from the tested substrates. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. SVSVGMKPSPRP: a broad range adhesion peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Estephan, Elias; Dao, Jérôme; Saab, Marie-Belle; Panayotov, Ivan; Martin, Marta; Larroque, Christian; Gergely, Csilla; Cuisinier, Frédéric J G; Levallois, Bernard

    2012-12-01

    A combinatorial phage display approach was previously used to evolve a 12-mer peptide (SVSVGMKPSPRP) with the highest affinity for different semiconductor surfaces. The discovery of the multiple occurrences of the SVSVGMKPSPRP sequence in an all-against-all basic local alignment search tool search of PepBank sequences was unexpected, and a Google search using the peptide sequence recovered 58 results concerning 12 patents and 16 scientific publications. The number of patent and articles indicates that the peptide is perhaps a broad range adhesion peptide. To evaluate peptide properties, we conducted a study to investigate peptide adhesion on different inorganic substrates by mass spectrometry and atomic force microscopy for gold, carbon nanotubes, cobalt, chrome alloy, titanium, and titanium alloy substrates. Our results showed that the peptide has a great potential as a linker to functionalize metallic surfaces if specificity is not a key factor. This peptide is not specific to a particular metal surface, but it is a good linker for the functionalization of a wide range of metallic materials. The fact that this peptide has the potential to adsorb on a large set of inorganic surfaces suggests novel promising directions for further investigation. Affinity determination of SVSVGMKPSPRP peptide would be an important issue for eventual commercial uses.

  13. Uracil DNa-glycosylase from HeLa cells: general properties, substrate specificity and effect of uracil analogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krokan, H; Wittwer, C U

    1981-06-11

    Uracil-DNA glycosylase was partially purified from HeLa cells. Various substrates containing [3H]dUMP residues were prepared by nick-translation of calf thymus DNA. The standard substrate was double-stranded DNA with [3H]dUMP located internally in the chain. Compared to the release of uracil from this substrate, a 3-fold increase in the rate was seen with single-stranded DNA, and a 20-fold reduction in the rate was observed when the [3H]dUMP-residue was located at the 3'end. The rate of [3H]uracil release decreased progressively when one, two or three of the dNMP residues were replaced by the corresponding rNMP; in the extreme case when the substrate contained [3H]dUMP in addition to rCMP, rGMP, and rAMP, the rate of [3H]uracil release was less than 3% of that of the control. The enzyme was inhibited to the same extent by uracil and the uracil analogs 6-aminouracil and 5-azauracil, but very weakly, or not at all, by 5 other analogs. Our results suggest strongly that uracil-DNA glycosylase has a high degree of selectivity for uracil in dUMP residues located internally in DNA chains and that the recognition of the correct substrate also depends on the residues flanking dUMP being deoxyribonucleotides.

  14. Broadly neutralizing influenza hemagglutinin stem-specific antibody CR8020 targets residues that are prone to escape due to host selection pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tharakaraman, Kannan; Subramanian, Vidya; Cain, David; Sasisekharan, Viswanathan; Sasisekharan, Ram

    2014-05-14

    Broadly neutralizing antibodies (bNAb) that target a conserved region of a viral antigen hold significant therapeutic promise. CR8020 is a bNAb that targets the stem region of influenza A virus (IAV) hemagglutinin (HA). CR8020 is currently being evaluated for prophylactic use against group 2 IAVs in phase II studies. Structural and computational analyses reported here indicate that CR8020 targets HA residues that are prone to antigenic drift and host selection pressure. Critically, CR8020 escape mutation is seen in certain H7N9 viruses from recent outbreaks. Furthermore, the ability of the bNAb Fc region to effectively engage activating Fcγ receptors (FCγR) is essential for antibody efficacy. In this regard, our data indicate that the membrane could sterically hinder the formation of HA-CR8020-FcγRIIa/HA-IgG-FcγRIIIa ternary complexes. Altogether, our analyses suggest that epitope mutability and accessibility to immune complex assembly are important attributes to consider when evaluating bNAb candidates for clinical development. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Kinetic Analysis of Autotaxin Reveals Substrate-specific Catalytic Pathways and a Mechanism for Lysophosphatidic Acid Distribution*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saunders, Lauren P.; Cao, Wenxiang; Chang, William C.; Albright, Ronald A.; Braddock, Demetrios T.; De La Cruz, Enrique M.

    2011-01-01

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a secreted lysophospholipase D that hydrolyzes lysophosphatidylcholine (LPC) into lysophosphatidic acid (LPA), initiating signaling cascades leading to cancer metastasis, wound healing, and angiogenesis. Knowledge of the pathway and kinetics of LPA synthesis by ATX is critical for developing quantitative physiological models of LPA signaling. We measured the individual rate constants and pathway of the LPA synthase cycle of ATX using the fluorescent lipid substrates FS-3 and 12-(N-methyl-N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl))-LPC. FS-3 binds rapidly (k1 ≥500 μm−1 s−1) and is hydrolyzed slowly (k2 = 0.024 s−1). Release of the first hydrolysis product is random and rapid (≥1 s−1), whereas release of the second is slow and rate-limiting (0.005–0.007 s−1). Substrate binding and hydrolysis are slow and rate-limiting with LPC. Product release is sequential with choline preceding LPA. The catalytic pathway and kinetics depend strongly on the substrate, suggesting that ATX kinetics could vary for the various in vivo substrates. Slow catalysis with LPC reveals the potential for LPA signaling to spread to cells distal to the site of LPC substrate binding by ATX. An ATX mutant in which catalytic threonine at position 210 is replaced with alanine binds substrate weakly, favoring a role for Thr-210 in binding as well as catalysis. FTY720P, the bioactive form of a drug currently used to treat multiple sclerosis, inhibits ATX in an uncompetitive manner and slows the hydrolysis reaction, suggesting that ATX inhibition plays a significant role in lymphocyte immobilization in FTY720P-based therapeutics. PMID:21719699

  16. Broad and persistent Gag-specific CD8+ T-cell responses are associated with viral control but rarely drive viral escape during primary HIV-1 infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radebe, Mopo; Gounder, Kamini; Mokgoro, Mammekwa; Ndhlovu, Zaza M.; Mncube, Zenele; Mkhize, Lungile; van der Stok, Mary; Jaggernath, Manjeetha; Walker, Bruce D.; Ndung’u, Thumbi

    2015-01-01

    Objective We characterized protein-specific CD8+ T-cell immunodominance patterns during the first year of HIV-1 infection, and their impact on viral evolution and immune control. Methods We analyzed CD8+ T-cell responses to the full HIV-1 proteome during the first year of infection in eighteen antiretroviral-naïve individuals with acute HIV-1 subtype C infection, all identified prior to seroconversion. Ex vivo and cultured IFN-γ ELISPOT assays were performed and viruses from plasma were sequenced within defined CTL Gag epitopes. Results Nef-specific CD8+ T-cell responses were dominant during the first 4 weeks post infection and made up 40% of total responses at this time, yet by 1 year responses against this region had declined and Gag responses made up to 47% of all T-cell responses measured. An inverse correlation between the breadth of Gag-specific responses and viral load set point was evident at 26 weeks post infection (p=0.0081; r= −0.60) and beyond. An inverse correlation between the number of persistent responses targeting Gag and viral set point was also identified (p=0.01; r=−0.58). Gag-specific responses detectable by the cultured ELISPOT assay correlated negatively with viral load set point (p=0.0013; r=−0.91). Sequence evolution in targeted and non-targeted Gag epitopes in this cohort was infrequent. Conclusions These data underscore the importance of HIV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses, particularly to the Gag protein, in the maintenance of low viral load levels during primary infection and show that these responses are initially poorly elicited by natural infection. These data have implications for vaccine design strategies. PMID:25387316

  17. Broad-range detection of arboviruses belonging to Simbu serogroup lineage 1 and specific detection of Akabane, Aino and Peaton viruses by newly developed multiple TaqMan assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirafuji, Hiroaki; Yazaki, Ryu; Shuto, Yozo; Yanase, Tohru; Kato, Tomoko; Ishikura, Youji; Sakaguchi, Zenjiro; Suzuki, Moemi; Yamakawa, Makoto

    2015-12-01

    TaqMan assays were developed for the broad-range detection of arboviruses belonging to Simbu serogroup lineage 1 in the genus Orthobunyavirus and also for the specific detection of three viruses in the lineage, Akabane, Aino and Peaton viruses (AKAV, AINOV and PEAV, respectively). A primer and probe set was designed for the broad-range detection of Simbu serogroup lineage 1 (Pan-Simbu1 set) mainly targeting AKAV, AINOV, PEAV, Sathuperi and Shamonda viruses (SATV and SHAV), and the forward and reverse primers of the Pan-Simbu1 set were also used for the specific detection of AKAV with another probe (AKAV-specific set). In addition, two more primer and probe sets were designed for AINOV- and PEAV-specific detection, respectively (AINOV- and PEAV-specific sets). All of the four primer and probe sets successfully detected targeted viruses, and thus broad-range and specific detection of all the targeted viruses can be achieved by using two multiplex assays and a single assay in a dual (two-color) assay format when another primer and probe set for a bovine β-actin control is also used. The assays had an analytical sensitivity of 10 copies/tube for AKAV, at least 100 copies/tube for AINOV, 100 copies/tube for PEAV, one copy/tube for SATV and at least 10 copies/tube for SHAV, respectively. Diagnostic sensitivity of the assays was tested with field-collected bovine samples, and the results suggested that the sensitivity was higher than that of a conventional RT-PCR. These data indicate that the newly developed TaqMan assays will be useful tools for the diagnosis and screening of field-collected samples for infections of AKAV and several other arboviruses belonging to the Simbu serogroup lineage 1. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. HIV-specific CD4-induced Antibodies Mediate Broad and Potent Antibody-dependent Cellular Cytotoxicity Activity and are Commonly Detected in Plasma from HIV-infected Humans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine L. Williams

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available HIV-specific antibodies (Abs can reduce viral burden by blocking new rounds of infection or by destroying infected cells via activation of effector cells through Fc–FcR interaction. This latter process, referred to as antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC, has been associated with viral control and improved clinical outcome following both HIV and SIV infections. Here we describe an HIV viral-like particle (VLP-based sorting strategy that led to identification of HIV-specific memory B cells encoding Abs that mediate ADCC from a subtype A-infected Kenyan woman at 914 days post-infection. Using this strategy, 12 HIV-envelope-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs were isolated and three mediated potent ADCC activity when compared to well-characterized ADCC mAbs. The ADCC-mediating Abs also mediated antibody-dependent cell-mediated virus inhibition (ADCVI, which provides a net measure of Fc receptor-triggered effects against replicating virus. Two of the three ADCC-mediating Abs targeted a CD4-induced (CD4i epitope also bound by the mAb C11; the third antibody targeted the N-terminus of V3. Both CD4i Abs identified here demonstrated strong cross-clade breadth with activity against 10 of 11 envelopes tested, including those from clades A, B, C, A/D and C/D, whereas the V3-specific antibody showed more limited breadth. Variants of these CD4i, C11-like mAbs engineered to interrupt binding to FcγRs inhibited a measurable percentage of the donor's ADCC activity starting as early as 189 days post-infection. C11-like antibodies also accounted for between 18–78% of ADCC activity in 9 chronically infected individuals from the same cohort study. Further, the two CD4i Abs originated from unique B cells, suggesting that antibodies targeting this epitope can be commonly produced. Taken together, these data provide strong evidence that CD4i, C11-like antibodies develop within the first 6 months of infection and they can arise from unique B

  19. Initial-rate kinetics of human NMN-adenylyltransferases: substrate and metal ion specificity, inhibition by products and multisubstrate analogues, and isozyme contributions to NAD+ biosynthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorci, Leonardo; Cimadamore, Flavio; Scotti, Stefania; Petrelli, Riccardo; Cappellacci, Loredana; Franchetti, Palmarisa; Orsomando, Giuseppe; Magni, Giulio

    2007-04-24

    Initial-rate and product inhibition studies revealed distinctive ordered ternary complex kinetic mechanisms, substrate specificities, and metal ion preferences for the three isozymes of human nicotinamide mononucleotide adenylyl-transferase (NMNAT, EC 2.7.7.1). ATP binds before NMN with nuclear isozyme NMNAT1 and Golgi apparatus NMNAT2, but the opposite order is observed with the mitochondrial isozyme NMNAT3. Only the latter utilizes ITP efficiently in place of ATP, and while NMNH conversion to NADH by NMNAT1 and NMNAT3 occurs at similar rates, conversion by NMNAT2 is much slower. These isozymes can also be discriminated by their action on tiazofurin monophosphate (TrMP), a metabolite of the antineoplastic prodrug tiazofurin. Our finding that TrMP is only a substrate with NMNAT1 and NMNAT3 reveals for the first time an organelle selectivity in the metabolism of this important drug. In search of additional ways to discriminate these isozymes, we synthesized and tested the P1-(nicotinamide/nicotinate-riboside-5')-Pn-(adenosine-5') dinucleotides Np3AD, Np4AD, and Nap4AD. In addition to being highly effective inhibitors, these multisubstrate geometric inhibitors gave inhibition patterns that are consistent with the aforementioned isozyme differences in substrate binding order. Distinctive differences in their substrate specificity and metal ion selectivity also permitted us to quantify individual isozyme contributions to NAD+ formation in human cell extracts.

  20. Structural Basis for Substrate Specificity in Phosphate Binding (beta/alpha)8-Barrels: D-Allulose 6-Phosphate 3-Epimerase from Escherichia coli K-12

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chan,K.; Fedorov, A.; Almo, S.; Gerlt, J.

    2008-01-01

    Enzymes that share the ({beta}/{alpha})8-barrel fold catalyze a diverse range of reactions. Many utilize phosphorylated substrates and share a conserved C-terminal ({beta}/a)2-quarter barrel subdomain that provides a binding motif for the dianionic phosphate group. We recently reported functional and structural studies of d-ribulose 5-phosphate 3-epimerase (RPE) from Streptococcus pyogenes that catalyzes the equilibration of the pentulose 5-phosphates d-ribulose 5-phosphate and d-xylulose 5-phosphate in the pentose phosphate pathway [J. Akana, A. A. Fedorov, E. Fedorov, W. R. P. Novack, P. C. Babbitt, S. C. Almo, and J. A. Gerlt (2006) Biochemistry 45, 2493-2503]. We now report functional and structural studies of d-allulose 6-phosphate 3-epimerase (ALSE) from Escherichia coli K-12 that catalyzes the equilibration of the hexulose 6-phosphates d-allulose 6-phosphate and d-fructose 6-phosphate in a catabolic pathway for d-allose. ALSE and RPE prefer their physiological substrates but are promiscuous for each other's substrate. The active sites (RPE complexed with d-xylitol 5-phosphate and ALSE complexed with d-glucitol 6-phosphate) are superimposable (as expected from their 39% sequence identity), with the exception of the phosphate binding motif. The loop following the eighth {beta}-strand in ALSE is one residue longer than the homologous loop in RPE, so the binding site for the hexulose 6-phosphate substrate/product in ALSE is elongated relative to that for the pentulose 5-phosphate substrate/product in RPE. We constructed three single-residue deletion mutants of the loop in ALSE, ?T196, ?S197 and ?G198, to investigate the structural bases for the differing substrate specificities; for each, the promiscuity is altered so that d-ribulose 5-phosphate is the preferred substrate. The changes in kcat/Km are dominated by changes in kcat, suggesting that substrate discrimination results from differential transition state stabilization. In both ALSE and RPE, the

  1. X-ray structures of uridine phosphorylase from Vibrio cholerae in complexes with uridine, thymidine, uracil, thymine, and phosphate anion: Substrate specificity of bacterial uridine phosphorylases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prokofev, I. I.; Lashkov, A. A., E-mail: alashkov83@gmail.com; Gabdulkhakov, A. G.; Balaev, V. V.; Seregina, T. A. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography of Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” (Russian Federation); Mironov, A. S. [State Research Institute of Genetics and Selection of Industrial Microorganisms (Russian Federation); Betzel, C. [University of Hamburg (Germany); Mikhailov, A. M. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography of Federal Scientific Research Centre “Crystallography and Photonics” (Russian Federation)

    2016-11-15

    In many types of human tumor cells and infectious agents, the demand for pyrimidine nitrogen bases increases during the development of the disease, thus increasing the role of the enzyme uridine phosphorylase in metabolic processes. The rational use of uridine phosphorylase and its ligands in pharmaceutical and biotechnology industries requires knowledge of the structural basis for the substrate specificity of the target enzyme. This paper summarizes the results of the systematic study of the three-dimensional structure of uridine phosphorylase from the pathogenic bacterium Vibrio cholerae in complexes with substrates of enzymatic reactions—uridine, phosphate anion, thymidine, uracil, and thymine. These data, supplemented with the results of molecular modeling, were used to consider in detail the structural basis for the substrate specificity of uridine phosphorylases. It was shown for the first time that the formation of a hydrogen-bond network between the 2′-hydroxy group of uridine and atoms of the active-site residues of uridine phosphorylase leads to conformational changes of the ribose moiety of uridine, resulting in an increase in the reactivity of uridine compared to thymidine. Since the binding of thymidine to residues of uridine phosphorylase causes a smaller local strain of the β-N1-glycosidic bond in this the substrate compared to the uridine molecule, the β-N1-glycosidic bond in thymidine is more stable and less reactive than that in uridine. It was shown for the first time that the phosphate anion, which is the second substrate bound at the active site, interacts simultaneously with the residues of the β5-strand and the β1-strand through hydrogen bonding, thus securing the gate loop in a conformation.

  2. Crystal structure and identification of a key amino acid for glucose tolerance, substrate specificity, and transglycosylation activity of metagenomic β-glucosidase Td2F2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzawa, Tomohiko; Jo, Toshinori; Uchiyama, Taku; Manninen, Jenny A; Arakawa, Takatoshi; Miyazaki, Kentaro; Fushinobu, Shinya; Yaoi, Katsuro

    2016-06-01

    β-Glucosidase Td2F2 isolated from a compost metagenome has high glucose tolerance and transglycosylation activity. In this study, we determined the high-resolution crystal structure of Td2F2. It has a unique structure at the -1 subsite that is important for substrate specificity but not for glucose tolerance. To elucidate the mechanism(s) of glucose tolerance, we isolated a glucose-sensitive Td2F2 mutant using random mutagenesis. In this mutant, Asn223 residue located between subsites +1 and +2 was mutated. The Asn223 mutation resulted in reduced glucose tolerance and transglycosylation activity, and drastically changed substrate specificity. These results indicate that the structure between subsites +1 and +2 is critical for the glucose tolerance and substrate specificity of Td2F2. Our findings shed light on the glucose tolerance and transglycosylation activity mechanisms of glycoside hydrolase family 1 β-glucosidases. The atomic coordinates and structure factors (codes 3WH5, 3WH6, 3WH8, 3WH7, 5AYB, and 5AYI) have been deposited in the Protein Data Bank (http://wwpdb.org/). © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  3. Influence of different ECM mimetic peptide sequences embedded in a nonfouling environment on the specific adhesion of human-skin keratinocytes and fibroblasts on deformable substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salber, Jochen; Gräter, Stefan; Harwardt, Marc; Hofmann, Matthias; Klee, Doris; Dujic, Jadranka; Jinghuan, Huang; Ding, Jiandong; Kippenberger, Stefan; Bernd, August; Groll, Jürgen; Spatz, Joachim P; Möller, Martin

    2007-06-01

    Mechanical stress is a decisive factor for the differentiation, proliferation, and general behavior of cells. However, the specific signaling of mechanotransduction is not fully understood. One basic problem is the clear distinction between the different extracellular matrix (ECM) constituents that participate in cellular adhesion and their corresponding signaling pathways. Here, a system is proposed that enables mechanical stimulation of human-skin-derived keratinocytes and human dermal fibroblasts that specifically interact with peptide sequences immobilized on a non-interacting but deformable substrate. The peptide sequences mimic fibronectin, laminin, and collagen type IV, three major components of the ECM. To achieve this, PDMS is activated using ammonia plasma and coated with star-shaped isocyanate-terminated poly(ethylene glycol)-based prepolymers, which results in a functional coating that prevents unspecific cell adhesion. Specific cell adhesion is achieved by functionalization of the layers with the peptide sequences in different combinations. Moreover, a method that enables the decoration of deformable substrates with cell-adhesion peptides in extremely defined nanostructures is presented. The distance and clustering of cell adhesion molecules below 100 nm has been demonstrated to be of utmost importance for cell adhesion. Thus we present a new toolbox that allows for the detailed analysis of the adhesion of human-skin-derived cells on structurally and biochemically decorated deformable substrates.

  4. Protein-protein interfaces are vdW dominant with selective H-bonds and (or) electrostatics towards broad functional specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nilofer, Christina; Sukhwal, Anshul; Mohanapriya, Arumugam; Kangueane, Pandjassarame

    2017-01-01

    Several catalysis, cellular regulation, immune function, cell wall assembly, transport, signaling and inhibition occur through Protein- Protein Interactions (PPI). This is possible with the formation of specific yet stable protein-protein interfaces. Therefore, it is of interest to understand its molecular principles using structural data in relation to known function. Several interface features have been documented using known X-ray structures of protein complexes since 1975. This has improved our understanding of the interface using structural features such as interface area, binding energy, hydrophobicity, relative hydrophobicity, salt bridges and hydrogen bonds. The strength of binding between two proteins is dependent on interface size (number of residues at the interface) and thus its corresponding interface area. It is known that large interfaces have high binding energy (sum of (van der Waals) vdW, H-bonds, electrostatics). However, the selective role played by each of these energy components and more especially that of vdW is not explicitly known. Therefore, it is important to document their individual role in known protein-protein structural complexes. It is of interest to relate interface size with vdW, H-bonds and electrostatic interactions at the interfaces of protein structural complexes with known function using statistical and multiple linear regression analysis methods to identify the prominent force. We used the manually curated non-redundant dataset of 278 hetero-dimeric protein structural complexes grouped using known functions by Sowmya et al. (2015) to gain additional insight to this phenomenon using a robust inter-atomic non-covalent interaction analyzing tool PPCheck (Anshul and Sowdhamini, 2015). This dataset consists of obligatory (enzymes, regulator, biological assembly), immune and nonobligatory (enzyme and regulator inhibitors) complexes. Results show that the total binding energy is more for large interfaces. However, this is not true

  5. Active site studies of cytochrome P=450CAM. I. Specific cysteine labeling with the affinity reagent isobornyl bromoacetate as a model for substrate binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, R I; Gunsalus, I C; Dus, K M

    1982-11-10

    A model is presented suggesting a function of specific cysteine residue of cytochrome P-450CAM in binding the substrate camphor, via a thiohemiketal bond, for its correct orientation to the heme iron and for the subsequent transfer of nascent product to facilitate its release. This model was developed to explain the results of affinity labeling with isobornyl bromoacetate. This reagent couples to the proteins via a thioether bond to cysteine, eliciting a type I transition in the difference spectrum. Formation of this covalent complex, which is strongly inhibited by the substrate, can be monitored by quantitation of S-carboxymethylcysteine in acid hydrolyzates. While addition of one equivalent of label yields 0.3 equivalents of the cysteine derivative after 5 min, increasing to 0.8 equivalents after 24 h, the spectral shift decays with time. Kinetic analysis of the spectral decay and of covalent coupling strongly suggests that thioether bond formation occurs at the substrate binding-site, in a reaction step prior to, and distinct from, the step associated with the spectral decay. The P-450CAM derivative, when titrated with camphor, produced again a type I spectrum virtually identical with the spectrum of the native P-450CAM-substrate complex. While the model presented here is not the only possible interpretation of the results, it is fully consistent with them and provides an excellent framework for further study of the catalytic mechanism of P-450CAM.

  6. Characterization of thimet- and neurolysin-like activities in Escherichia coli M 3 A peptidases and description of a specific substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschoalin, Thaysa; Carmona, Adriana K; Oliveira, Vitor; Juliano, Luiz; Travassos, Luiz R

    2005-09-01

    M 3 A oligopeptidases from Escherichia coli, with hydrolytic properties similar to Zn-dependent mammalian thimet oligopeptidase (EP 24.15) and neurolysin (EP 24.16), were studied aiming at identification of comparative enzyme and substrate specificity, hydrolytic products, and susceptibility to inhibitors. Fluorescent peptides, neurotensin (NT) and bradykinin (BK), were used as substrates for bacterial lysates. Bacterial enzymes were totally inhibited by o-phenanthrolin, JA-2 and partially by Pro-Ile, but not by leupeptin, PMSF, E-64, and Z-Pro-Prolinal, using internally quenched Abz-GFSPFRQ-EDDnp as substrate. The molecular mass of the bacterial oligopeptidase activity (77--78 kDa) was determined by gel filtration, and the effect of inhibitors, including captopril, suggested that it results from a combination of oligopeptidase A (OpdA) and peptidyl dipeptidase Dcp (77.1 and 77.5 kDa, respectively). Recombinant OpdA cloned from the same E. coli strain entirely reproduced the primary cleavage of fluorescent peptides, NT and BK, by the bacterial lysate. Genes encoding these M 3 A enzymes were those recognized in E. coli genome, bearing identity at the amino acid level (25--31%) with mammalian Zn-dependent oligopeptidases. We also describe a substrate, Abz-GFSPFRQ-EDDnp, that differentiates bacterial and mammalian oligopeptidases.

  7. Crystal Structure of the LasA Virulence Factor from Pseudomonas aeruginosa: Substrate Specificity and Mechanism of M23 Metallopeptidases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Spencer, James; Murphy, Loretta M.; Conners, Rebecca; Sessions, Richard B.; Gamblin, Steven J. (Wales); (Bristol Med Sci); (NIMR)

    2010-09-21

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is an opportunist Gram-negative bacterial pathogen responsible for a wide range of infections in immunocompromized individuals and is a leading cause of mortality in cystic fibrosis patients. A number of secreted virulence factors, including various proteolytic enzymes, contribute to the establishment and maintenance of Pseudomonas infection. One such is LasA, an M23 metallopeptidase related to autolytic glycylglycine endopeptidases such as Staphylococcus aureus lysostaphin and LytM, and to DD-endopeptidases involved in entry of bacteriophage to host bacteria. LasA is implicated in a range of processes related to Pseudomonas virulence, including stimulating ectodomain shedding of the cell surface heparan sulphate proteoglycan syndecan-1 and elastin degradation in connective tissue. Here we present crystal structures of active LasA as a complex with tartrate and in the uncomplexed form. While the overall fold resembles that of the other M23 family members, the LasA active site is less constricted and utilizes a different set of metal ligands. The active site of uncomplexed LasA contains a five-coordinate zinc ion with trigonal bipyramidal geometry and two metal-bound water molecules. Using these structures as a starting point, we propose a model for substrate binding by LasA that explains its activity against a wider range of substrates than those used by related lytic enzymes, and offer a catalytic mechanism for M23 metallopeptidases consistent with available structural and mutagenesis data. Our results highlight how LasA is a structurally distinct member of this endopeptidase family, consistent with its activity against a wider range of substrates and with its multiple roles in Pseudomonas virulence.

  8. Substrate and Inhibitor-Specific Conformational Changes in the Human Serotonin Transporter Revealed by Voltage-Clamp Fluorometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Söderhielm, Pella C; Andersen, Jacob; Munro, Lachlan

    2015-01-01

    of TM6, Ala419 in the interface between TM8 and extracellular loop (EL) 4, and Leu481 in EL5. The reporter positions were used for time-resolved measurement of conformational changes during 5-HT transport and binding of cocaine and the selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors fluoxetine and escitalopram....... At all reporter positions, fluorescence changes observed upon substrate application were distinctly different from those observed upon inhibitor application, with respect to relative amplitude or direction. Furthermore, escitalopram, fluoxetine, and cocaine induced a very similar pattern of fluorescent...

  9. The 2010 Broad Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2011

    2011-01-01

    A new data analysis, based on data collected as part of The Broad Prize process, provides insights into which large urban school districts in the United States are doing the best job of educating traditionally disadvantaged groups: African-American, Hispanics, and low-income students. Since 2002, The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation has awarded The…

  10. Broad ligament ectopic pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Rama C; Lepakshi G; Raju SN

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy in the broad ligament is a rare form of ectopic pregnancy with a high risk of maternal mortality. Ultrasonography may help in the early diagnosis but mostly the diagnosis is established during surgery. We report the case of a patient with broad ligament ectopic pregnancy diagnosed intraoperatively. The patient had uneventful postoperative recovery.

  11. Using Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry to Define the Specific Interactions of the Phospholipase A2 Superfamily with Lipid Substrates, Inhibitors, and Membranes*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Jian; Burke, John E.; Dennis, Edward A.

    2013-01-01

    The phospholipase A2 (PLA2) superfamily consists of 16 groups and many subgroups and constitutes a diverse set of enzymes that have a common catalytic activity due to convergent evolution. However, different PLA2 types have unique three-dimensional structures and catalytic residues as well as specific tissue localization and distinct biological functions. Understanding how the different PLA2 enzymes associate with phospholipid membranes, specific phospholipid substrate molecules, and inhibitors on a molecular basis has advanced in recent years due to the introduction of hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry. Its theory, practical considerations, and application to understanding PLA2/membrane interactions are addressed. PMID:23209293

  12. Epidermal growth factor (EGF) ligand release by substrate-specific a disintegrin and metalloproteases (ADAMs) involves different protein kinase C (PKC) isoenzymes depending on the stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Michelle; Dubbin, Karen; D'Aiello, Antonio; Hartmann, Monika; Lodish, Harvey; Herrlich, Andreas

    2011-05-20

    The dysregulation of EGF family ligand cleavage has severe consequences for the developing as well as the adult organism. Therefore, their production is highly regulated. The limiting step is the ectodomain cleavage of membrane-bound precursors by one of several a disintegrin and metalloprotease (ADAM) metalloproteases, and understanding the regulation of cleavage is an important goal of current research. We have previously reported that in mouse lung epithelial cells, the pro-EGF ligands TGFα, neuregulin 1β (NRG), and heparin-binding EGF are differentially cleaved depending on the cleavage stimulus (Herrlich, A., Klinman, E., Fu, J., Sadegh, C., and Lodish, H. (2008) FASEB J.). In this study in mouse embryonic fibroblasts that lack different ADAMs, we show that induced cleavage of EGF ligands can involve the same substrate-specific metalloprotease but does require different stimulus-dependent signaling pathways. Cleavage was stimulated by phorbol ester (12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA), a mimic of diacylglycerol and PKC activator), hypertonic stress, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA)-induced G protein-coupled receptor activation, or by ionomycin-induced intracellular calcium release. Although ADAMs showed substrate preference (ADAM17, TGFα and heparin-binding EGF; and ADAM9, NRG), substrate cleavage differed substantially with the stimulus, and cleavage of the same substrate depended on the presence of different, sometimes multiple, PKC isoforms. For instance, classical PKC was required for TPA-induced but not hypertonic stress-induced cleavage of all EGF family ligands. Inhibition of PKCζ enhanced NRG release upon TPA stimulation, but it blocked NRG release in response to hypertonic stress. Our results suggest a model in which substantial regulation of ectodomain cleavage occurs not only on the metalloprotease level but also on the level of the substrate or of a third protein. © 2011 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  13. The zinc form of carnosine dipeptidase 2 (CN2) has dipeptidase activity but its substrate specificity is different from that of the manganese form.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumura, Nobuaki; Takao, Toshifumi

    2017-12-16

    Carnosine dipeptidase II (CN2), a metallopeptidase present in the cytosol of various vertebrate tissues, catalyzes the hydrolysis of carnosine and several other dipeptides in the presence of Mn 2+ . Although the metal-binding center of mouse CN2 is also able to associate with Zn 2+ in vitro, it was not known whether the zinc form of CN2 has any enzymatic activity. In the present study, we show that Zn 2+ has a higher affinity for binding to CN2 than Mn 2+ , as evidenced by native mass spectrometry. The issue of whether the zinc form of CN2 has enzymatic activity was also examined using various dipeptides as substrates. The findings indicate that the zinc form of CN2 catalyzes the hydrolysis of several different dipeptides including Leu-His, Met-His and Ala-His at a reaction rate comparable to that for its manganese form. On the other hand, the zinc form of CN2 did not catalyze the hydrolysis of carnosine and several other dipeptides that are hydrolyzed by the manganese form of CN2. Substrate specificity was also examined in HEK293T cells expressing CN2, and the findings indicate that Leu-His, Met-His, but not carnosine, were hydrolyzed in the cell culture. These results suggest that the zinc form of CN2 is an active enzyme, but with a different substrate specificity from that of the manganese form. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Stereoselectivity and substrate specificity in the kinetic resolution of methyl-substituted 1-oxaspiro[2.5]octanes by Rhodotorula glutinis epoxide hydrolase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weijers, Carel A G M; Meeuwse, Petra; Herpers, Robert L J M; Franssen, Maurice C R; Sudhölter, Ernst J R

    2005-08-19

    The kinetic resolution of a range of methyl-substituted 1-oxaspiro[2.5]octanes by yeast epoxide hydrolase (YEH) from Rhodotorula glutinis has been investigated. The structural determinants of substrate specificity and stereoselectivity of YEH toward these substrates appeared to be the configuration of the epoxide ring and the substitution pattern of the cyclohexane ring. For all compounds tested, O-axial epoxides were hydrolyzed faster than the corresponding O-equatorial compounds. In concern of the ring substituents, YEH preferred methyl groups on the Re side of the ring. Placement of substituents close to the spiroepoxide carbon decreased the reaction rate but increased enantioselectivity. YEH-catalyzed kinetic resolutions of 4-methyl 1-oxaspiro[2.5]octane epimers were most enantioselective (E > 100).

  15. Substrate Specificity and Allosteric Regulation of a D-Lactate Dehydrogenase from a Unicellular Cyanobacterium are Altered by an Amino Acid Substitution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shoki; Takeya, Masahiro; Osanai, Takashi

    2017-11-08

    Lactate/lactic acid is an important chemical compound for the manufacturing of bioplastics. The unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 can produce lactate from carbon dioxide and possesses D-lactate dehydrogenase (Ddh). Here, we performed a biochemical analysis of the Ddh from this cyanobacterium (SyDdh) using recombinant proteins. SyDdh was classified into a cyanobacterial clade similar to those from Gram-negative bacteria, although it was distinct from them. SyDdh can use both pyruvate and oxaloacetate as a substrate and is activated by fructose-1,6-bisphosphate and repressed by divalent cations. An amino acid substitution based on multiple sequence alignment data revealed that the glutamine at position 14 and serine at position 234 are important for the allosteric regulation by Mg 2+ and substrate specificity of SyDdh, respectively. These results reveal the characteristic biochemical properties of Ddh in a unicellular cyanobacterium, which are different from those of other bacterial Ddhs.

  16. Optimization of the fermentation conditions and substrate specifity of mycelium-bound ester hydrolases of Aspergillus oryzae Cs007

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Hong Yan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In order to improve mycelium-bound ester hydrolases activities of Aspergillus oryzae Cs007, the main production conditions were investigated. The ester hydrolases activities were simultaneously determined by titration assay and spectrophotometric assay methods, using olive oil and p-nitrophenyl esters as substrates, respectively. The optimum carbon source and nitrogen source were olive oil and peptone, with the concentrations of 1% and 2.2%, respectively. The effects of carbon source, nitrogen source and their concentrations on the production of enzymes were identical when the enzymes activities were assayed by the two methods. The mycelium-bound enzymes showed hydrolytic activity toward all the tested p-nitrophenyl esters, triglycerides and fatty acid ethyl esters. But it showed greater preference for long-chain triglycerides and short-chain p-nitrophenyl esters.

  17. Conformational flexibility of PL12 family heparinases: structure and substrate specificity of heparinase III from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (BT4657).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ulaganathan, ThirumalaiSelvi; Shi, Rong; Yao, Deqiang; Gu, Ruo-Xu; Garron, Marie-Line; Cherney, Maia; Tieleman, D Peter; Sterner, Eric; Li, Guoyun; Li, Lingyun; Linhardt, Robert J; Cygler, Miroslaw

    2017-01-01

    Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are linear polysaccharides comprised of disaccharide repeat units, a hexuronic acid, glucuronic acid or iduronic acid, linked to a hexosamine, N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) or N-acetylgalactosamine. GAGs undergo further modification such as epimerization and sulfation. These polysaccharides are abundant in the extracellular matrix and connective tissues. GAGs function in stabilization of the fibrillar extracellular matrix, control of hydration, regulation of tissue, organism development by controlling cell cycle, cell behavior and differentiation. Niche adapted bacteria express enzymes called polysaccharide lyases (PL), which degrade GAGs for their nutrient content. PL have been classified into 24 sequence-related families. Comparison of 3D structures of the prototypic members of these families allowed identification of distant evolutionary relationships between lyases that were unrecognized at the sequence level, and identified occurrences of convergent evolution. We have characterized structurally and enzymatically heparinase III from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron (BtHepIII; gene BT4657), which is classified within the PL12 family. BtHepIII is a 72.5 kDa protein. We present the X-ray structures of two crystal forms of BtHepIII at resolution 1.8 and 2.4 Å. BtHepIII contains two domains, the N-terminal α-helical domain forming a toroid and the C-terminal β-sheet domain. Comparison with recently determined structures of two other heparinases from the same PL12 family allowed us to identify structural flexibility in the arrangement of the domains indicating open-close movement. Based on comparison with other GAG lyases, we identified Tyr301 as the main catalytic residue and confirmed this by site-directed mutagenesis. We have characterized substrate preference of BtHepIII toward sulfate-poor heparan sulfate substrate. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  18. Metabolic erosion primarily through mutation accumulation, and not tradeoffs, drives limited evolution of substrate specificity in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Leiby

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Evolutionary adaptation to a constant environment is often accompanied by specialization and a reduction of fitness in other environments. We assayed the ability of the Lenski Escherichia coli populations to grow on a range of carbon sources after 50,000 generations of adaptation on glucose. Using direct measurements of growth rates, we demonstrated that declines in performance were much less widespread than suggested by previous results from Biolog assays of cellular respiration. Surprisingly, there were many performance increases on a variety of substrates. In addition to the now famous example of citrate, we observed several other novel gains of function for organic acids that the ancestral strain only marginally utilized. Quantitative growth data also showed that strains with a higher mutation rate exhibited significantly more declines, suggesting that most metabolic erosion was driven by mutation accumulation and not by physiological tradeoffs. These reductions in growth by mutator strains were ameliorated by growth at lower temperature, consistent with the hypothesis that this metabolic erosion is largely caused by destabilizing mutations to the associated enzymes. We further hypothesized that reductions in growth rate would be greatest for substrates used most differently from glucose, and we used flux balance analysis to formulate this question quantitatively. To our surprise, we found no significant relationship between decreases in growth and dissimilarity to glucose metabolism. Taken as a whole, these data suggest that in a single resource environment, specialization does not mainly result as an inevitable consequence of adaptive tradeoffs, but rather due to the gradual accumulation of disabling mutations in unused portions of the genome.

  19. Metabolic erosion primarily through mutation accumulation, and not tradeoffs, drives limited evolution of substrate specificity in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leiby, Nicholas; Marx, Christopher J

    2014-02-01

    Evolutionary adaptation to a constant environment is often accompanied by specialization and a reduction of fitness in other environments. We assayed the ability of the Lenski Escherichia coli populations to grow on a range of carbon sources after 50,000 generations of adaptation on glucose. Using direct measurements of growth rates, we demonstrated that declines in performance were much less widespread than suggested by previous results from Biolog assays of cellular respiration. Surprisingly, there were many performance increases on a variety of substrates. In addition to the now famous example of citrate, we observed several other novel gains of function for organic acids that the ancestral strain only marginally utilized. Quantitative growth data also showed that strains with a higher mutation rate exhibited significantly more declines, suggesting that most metabolic erosion was driven by mutation accumulation and not by physiological tradeoffs. These reductions in growth by mutator strains were ameliorated by growth at lower temperature, consistent with the hypothesis that this metabolic erosion is largely caused by destabilizing mutations to the associated enzymes. We further hypothesized that reductions in growth rate would be greatest for substrates used most differently from glucose, and we used flux balance analysis to formulate this question quantitatively. To our surprise, we found no significant relationship between decreases in growth and dissimilarity to glucose metabolism. Taken as a whole, these data suggest that in a single resource environment, specialization does not mainly result as an inevitable consequence of adaptive tradeoffs, but rather due to the gradual accumulation of disabling mutations in unused portions of the genome.

  20. Investigation of an Immunoassay with Broad Specificity to Quinolone Drugs by Genetic Algorithm with Linear Assignment of Hypermolecular Alignment of Data Sets and Advanced Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiahong; Lu, Ning; Shen, Xing; Tang, Qiushi; Zhang, Chijian; Xu, Jun; Sun, Yuanming; Huang, Xin-An; Xu, Zhenlin; Lei, Hongtao

    2016-04-06

    A polyclonal antibody against the quinolone drug pazufloxacin (PAZ) but with surprisingly broad specificity was raised to simultaneously detect 24 quinolones (QNs). The developed competitive indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ciELISA) exhibited limits of detection (LODs) for the 24 QNs ranging from 0.45 to 15.16 ng/mL, below the maximum residue levels (MRLs). To better understand the obtained broad specificity, a genetic algorithm with linear assignment of hypermolecular alignment of data sets (GALAHAD) was used to generate the desired pharmacophore model and superimpose the QNs, and then advanced comparative molecular field analysis (CoMFA) and advanced comparative molecular similarity indices analysis (CoMSIA) models were employed to study the three-dimensional quantitative structure-activity relationship (3D QSAR) between QNs and the antibody. It was found that the QNs could interact with the antibody with different binding poses, and cross-reactivity was mainly positively correlated with the bulky substructure containing electronegative atom at the 7-position, while it was negatively associated with the large bulky substructure at the 1-position of QNs.

  1. Extension of Drosophila lifespan by cinnamon through a sex-specific dependence on the insulin receptor substrate chico.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schriner, Samuel E; Kuramada, Steven; Lopez, Terry E; Truong, Stephanie; Pham, Andrew; Jafari, Mahtab

    2014-12-01

    Cinnamon is a spice commonly used worldwide to flavor desserts, fruits, cereals, breads, and meats. Numerous health benefits have been attributed to its consumption, including the recent suggestion that it may decrease blood glucose levels in people with diabetes. Insulin signaling is an integral pathway regulating the lifespan of laboratory organisms, such as worms, flies, and mice. We posited that if cinnamon truly improved the clinical signs of diabetes in people that it would also act on insulin signaling in laboratory organisms and increase lifespan. We found that cinnamon did extend lifespan in the fruit fly, Drosophila melanogaster. However, it had no effect on the expression levels of the 3 aging-related Drosophila insulin-like peptides nor did it alter sugar, fat, or soluble protein levels, as would be predicted. In addition, cinnamon exhibited no protective effects in males against oxidative challenges. However, in females it did confer a protective effect against paraquat, but sensitized them to iron. Cinnamon provided no protective effect against desiccation and starvation in females, but sensitized males to both. Interestingly, cinnamon protected both sexes against cold, sensitized both to heat, and elevated HSP70 expression levels. We also found that cinnamon required the insulin receptor substrate to extend lifespan in males, but not females. We conclude that cinnamon does not extend lifespan by improving stress tolerance in general, though it does act, at least in part, through insulin signaling. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. α--AMYLASES OF Aspergillus flavus var. oryzae AND Bacillus subtilis: THE SUBSTRATE SPECIFICITY AND RESISTANCE TO A NUMBER OF CHEMICALLY ACTIVE SUBSTANCES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. V. Avdiyuk

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The ability of Aspergillus flavus var. oryzae 80428 and Bacillus subtilis 147 α-amylases to split different carbohydrate-containing substrates, such as maltose, sucrose, trehalose, dextrin, α- and β-cyclodextrin, amylose, amylopectin, glycogen, pullulan, soluble starch, insoluble starch, corn starch, wheat starch, dextran 500 has been studied. It was shown that investigated enzymes differ by substrate specificity. α-Amylase of A. flavus var. oryzae 80428 rapidly hydrolysed soluble potato and wheat starch, while the α-amylase of B. subtilis 147 — only wheat starch. Both enzymes don’t cleave maltose, α-cyclodextrin and dextran 500. A. flavus var. oryzae 80428 α-amylase display very small ability to hydrolyze pullulan, while α-amylase of B. subtilis 147 it does not act in general. The lowest values of Michaelis constant for both enzymes at splitting of glycogen have been obtained, indicating that enzymes have the greatest affinity to this substrate. The studies of influence of chemically active substances on activity of A. flavus var. oryzae 80428 and B. subtilis 147 ?-amylases show there are resistant to urea, deoxycholic acid, Tween-80, Triton X-100 and hydrogen peroxide. It’s indicate the enzymes tested may be competitive in compare with earlier described in literature enzymes. The obtained results give a possibility to propose in future usage these enzymes in different fields of industry, foremost in detergent industry.

  3. Influence of substrate concentration and moisture content on the specific methanogenic activity of dry mesophilic municipal solid waste digestate spiked with propionate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le Hyaric, Ronan; Chardin, Caroline; Benbelkacem, Hassen; Bollon, Julien; Bayard, Rémy; Escudié, Renaud; Buffière, Pierre

    2011-01-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of substrate concentration and moisture content on the specific methanogenic activity (SMA) of a fresh dry mesophilic digestate from a municipal solid waste digester plant. For this purpose, SMA tests were performed under mesophilic conditions into glass bottles of 500 mL volume used as batch reactors, during a period of 20-25 days. Propionate was used as substrate at concentrations ranging from 1 to 10 gCOD/kg. Four moisture contents were studied: 65%, 75%, 80% and 82%. Experimental results showed that propionate concentration and moisture content strongly influenced the SMA. The highest SMA was observed at a substrate concentration of 10 gCOD/kg (11.3 mgCOD gVS(-1) d(-1) for the second dose of propionate) and at a moisture content of 82% (7.8 mgCOD gVS(-1) d(-1) for the second dose of propionate, at a concentration of 5 gCOD/kg). SMA was found to decrease linearly when decreasing the moisture content. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Proton transfer in methylmalonyl-CoA epimerase from Propionibacterium shermanii. Studies with specifically tritiated (2R)-methylmalonyl-CoA as substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leadlay, P F; Fuller, J Q

    1983-01-01

    (2R)-Methyl[2-3H]malonyl-CoA was used as the substrate for methylmalonyl-CoA epimerase from Propionibacterium shermanii, under conditions where the (2S)-methylmalonyl-CoA product was removed enzymically as fast as it was formed, and the fate of the label was monitored at different extents of reaction. Very little, if any, tritium is found attached to the C-2 position in the (2S)-epimer product (isolated as propionyl-CoA). Evidently, the hydrogen atom of the new C-H bond in the product is essentially solvent-derived. The rate of tritium release into the solvent is lower than the rate of product formation, and shows a primary kinetic tritium-isotope effect on kcat./Km of 2.3 +/- 0.1. The specific radioactivity of the remaining substrate rises slowly during the epimerase-catalysed reaction, and this provides an independent estimate of the primary kinetic tritium-isotope effect on kcat./Km of 1.6 +/- 0.5. These results, taken together, indicate that the mechanistic pathway of the epimerase-catalysed reaction resembles that established for proline racemase [Cardinale & Abeles, (1968) Biochemistry 7, 3970-3978], in which two enzyme bases are involved in catalysis. One base removes the proton from the substrate, the second provides the new proton, and there is no fast isotopic exchange between enzyme-bound intermediates and solvent protons. PMID:6311169

  5. Structures of trans-2-enoyl-CoA reductases from Clostridium acetobutylicum and Treponema denticola: insights into the substrate specificity and the catalytic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Kuan; Zhao, Meng; Zhang, Tianlong; Zha, Manwu; Zhong, Chen; Jiang, Yu; Ding, Jianping

    2013-01-01

    TERs (trans-2-enoyl-CoA reductases; EC 1.3.1.44), which specifically catalyse the reduction of crotonyl-CoA to butyryl-CoA using NADH as cofactor, have recently been applied in the design of robust synthetic pathways to produce butan-1-ol as a biofuel. We report in the present paper the characterization of a CaTER (a TER homologue in Clostridium acetobutylicum), the structures of CaTER in apo form and in complexes with NADH and NAD+, and the structure of TdTER (Treponema denticola TER) in complex with NAD+. Structural and sequence comparisons show that CaTER and TdTER share approximately 45% overall sequence identity and high structural similarities with the FabV class enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductases in the bacterial fatty acid synthesis pathway, suggesting that both types of enzymes belong to the same family. CaTER and TdTER function as monomers and consist of a cofactor-binding domain and a substrate-binding domain with the catalytic active site located at the interface of the two domains. Structural analyses of CaTER together with mutagenesis and biochemical data indicate that the conserved Glu75 determines the cofactor specificity, and the conserved Tyr225, Tyr235 and Lys244 play critical roles in catalysis. Upon cofactor binding, the substrate-binding loop changes from an open conformation to a closed conformation, narrowing a hydrophobic channel to the catalytic site. A modelling study shows that the hydrophobic channel is optimal in both width and length for the binding of crotonyl-CoA. These results provide molecular bases for the high substrate specificity and the catalytic mechanism of TERs.

  6. Arylamine N-acetyltransferases: characterization of the substrate specificities and molecular interactions of environmental arylamines with human NAT1 and NAT2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Von Vett, Annette; Zhang, Naixia; Walters, Kylie J; Wagner, Carston R; Hanna, Patrick E

    2007-09-01

    Arylamine N-acetyltransferases (NATs) are phase II xenobiotic metabolism enzymes that catalyze the detoxification of arylamines by N-acetylation and the bioactivation of N-arylhydroxylamines by O-acetylation. Endogenous and recombinant mammalian NATs with high specific activities are difficult to obtain in substantial quantities and in a state of homogeneity. This paper describes the overexpression of human wild-type NAT2 as a dihydrofolate reductase fusion protein containing a TEV protease-sensitive linker. Treatment of the partially purified fusion protein with TEV protease, followed by chromatographic purification, afforded 2.8 mg of homogeneous NAT2 from 2 L of cell culture. The kinetic specificity constants ( k cat/ K m) for N-acetylation of arylamine environmental contaminants, some of which are associated with bladder cancer risk, were determined with NAT2 and NAT1. The NAT1/NAT2 ratio of the specificity constants varied almost 1000-fold for monosubstituted and disubstituted alkylanilines containing methyl and ethyl ring substituents. 2-Alkyl substituents depressed N-acetylation rates but were more detrimental to catalysis by NAT1 than by NAT2. 3-Alkyl groups caused substrates to be preferentially N-acetylated by NAT2, and both 4-methyl- and 4-ethylaniline were better substrates for NAT1 than NAT2. NMR-based models were used to analyze the NAT binding site interactions of the alkylanilines. The selectivity of NAT1 for acetylation of 4-alkylanilines appears to be due to binding of the substituents to V216, which is replaced by S216 in NAT2. The contribution of 3-alkyl substituents to NAT2 substrate selectivity is attributed to multiple bonding interactions with F93, whereas a single bonding interaction occurs with V93 in NAT1. Unfavorable steric clashes between 2-methyl substituents and F125 of NAT1 may account for the selective NAT2-mediated N-acetylation of 2-alkylanilines; F125 is replaced by S125 in NAT2. These results provide insight into the structural

  7. Short-term starvation is a strategy to unravel the cellular capacity of oxidizing specific exogenous/endogenous substrates in mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeidler, Julianna D; Fernandes-Siqueira, Lorena O; Carvalho, Ana S; Cararo-Lopes, Eduardo; Dias, Matheus H; Ketzer, Luisa A; Galina, Antonio; Da Poian, Andrea T

    2017-08-25

    Mitochondrial oxidation of nutrients is tightly regulated in response to the cellular environment and changes in energy demands. In vitro studies evaluating the mitochondrial capacity of oxidizing different substrates are important for understanding metabolic shifts in physiological adaptations and pathological conditions, but may be influenced by the nutrients present in the culture medium or by the utilization of endogenous stores. One such influence is exemplified by the Crabtree effect (the glucose-mediated inhibition of mitochondrial respiration) as most in vitro experiments are performed in glucose-containing media. Here, using high-resolution respirometry, we evaluated the oxidation of endogenous or exogenous substrates by cell lines harboring different metabolic profiles. We found that a 1-h deprivation of the main energetic nutrients is an appropriate strategy to abolish interference of endogenous or undesirable exogenous substrates with the cellular capacity of oxidizing specific substrates, namely glutamine, pyruvate, glucose, or palmitate, in mitochondria. This approach primed mitochondria to immediately increase their oxygen consumption after the addition of the exogenous nutrients. All starved cells could oxidize exogenous glutamine, whereas the capacity for oxidizing palmitate was limited to human hepatocarcinoma Huh7 cells and to C2C12 mouse myoblasts that differentiated into myotubes. In the presence of exogenous glucose, starvation decreased the Crabtree effect in Huh7 and C2C12 cells and abrogated it in mouse neuroblastoma N2A cells. Interestingly, the fact that the Crabtree effect was observed only for mitochondrial basal respiration but not for the maximum respiratory capacity suggests it is not caused by a direct effect on the electron transport system. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Improving qPCR methodology for detection of foaming bacteria by analysis of broad-spectrum primers and a highly specific probe for quantification of Nocardia spp. in activated sludge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asvapathanagul, P; Olson, B H

    2017-01-01

    To develop qPCR broad-spectrum primers combined with a Nocardia genus-specific probe for the identification of a broad spectrum of Nocardia spp. and to analyse the effects of using this developed primer and probe set on the ability to quantify Nocardia spp. in mixed DNA. The consequences of using a degenerative primer set and species-specific probe for the genus Nocardia on qPCR assays were examined using DNA extracts of pure cultures and activated sludge. The mixed DNA extracts where the target organism Nocardia flavorosea concentration ranged from 5 × 10(2) to 5 × 10(6) copies per reaction, while the background organism's DNA (Mycobacterium bovis) concentration was held at 5 × 10(6) copies per reaction, only produced comparable cycle threshold florescence levels when N. flavorosea concentration was greater than or equal to the background organism concentration. When concentrations of N. flavorosea were lowered in increments of 1 log, while holding M. bovis concentrations constant at 5 × 10(6) copies per reaction, all assays demonstrated delayed cycle threshold values with a maximum 34·6-fold decrease in cycle threshold at a ratio of 10(6) M. bovis: 10(2) N. flavorosea copies per reaction. The data presented in this study indicated that increasing the ability of a primer set to capture a broad group of organisms can affect the accuracy of quantification even when a highly specific probe is used. This study examined several applications of molecular tools in complex communities such as evaluating the effect of mispriming vs interference. It also elucidates the importance of understanding the community genetic make-up on primer design. Degenerative primers are very useful in amplifying bacterial DNA across genera, but reduce the efficiency of qPCR reactions. Therefore, standards that address closely related background species must be used to obtain accurate qPCR results. © 2016 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  9. Characterization of the Ruler Protein Interaction Interface on the Substrate Specificity Switch Protein in the Yersinia Type III Secretion System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Oanh; Rogne, Per; Edgren, Tomas; Wolf-Watz, Hans; Login, Frédéric H; Wolf-Watz, Magnus

    2017-02-24

    Many pathogenic Gram-negative bacteria use the type III secretion system (T3SS) to deliver effector proteins into eukaryotic host cells. In Yersinia, the switch to secretion of effector proteins is induced first after intimate contact between the bacterium and its eukaryotic target cell has been established, and the T3SS proteins YscP and YscU play a central role in this process. Here we identify the molecular details of the YscP binding site on YscU by means of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. The binding interface is centered on the C-terminal domain of YscU. Disrupting the YscU-YscP interaction by introducing point mutations at the interaction interface significantly reduced the secretion of effector proteins and HeLa cell cytotoxicity. Interestingly, the binding of YscP to the slowly self-cleaving YscU variant P264A conferred significant protection against autoproteolysis. The YscP-mediated inhibition of YscU autoproteolysis suggests that the cleavage event may act as a timing switch in the regulation of early versus late T3SS substrates. We also show that YscUC binds to the inner rod protein YscI with a dissociation constant (Kd ) of 3.8 μm and with 1:1 stoichiometry. The significant similarity among different members of the YscU, YscP, and YscI families suggests that the protein-protein interactions discussed in this study are also relevant for other T3SS-containing Gram-negative bacteria. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  10. Archease from Pyrococcus abyssi improves substrate specificity and solubility of a tRNA m5C methyltransferase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Auxilien, Sylvie; El Khadali, Fatima; Rasmussen, Anette

    2007-01-01

    reading frame (PAB1947), which is shown here to encode a tRNA m(5)C methyltransferase. In vitro, the purified recombinant methyltransferase catalyzes m(5)C formation at several cytosines within tRNAs with preference for C49. The specificity of the methyltransferase is increased by the archease...

  11. Functional roles and substrate specificities of twelve cytochromes P450 belonging to CYP52 family in n-alkane assimilating yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwama, Ryo; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Ishimaru, Chiaki; Ohta, Akinori; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Ryouichi

    2016-06-01

    Yarrowia lipolytica possesses twelve ALK genes, which encode cytochromes P450 in the CYP52 family. In this study, using a Y. lipolytica strain from which all twelve ALK genes had been deleted, strains individually expressing each of the ALK genes were constructed and their roles and substrate specificities were determined by observing their growth on n-alkanes and analyzing fatty acid metabolism. The results suggested that the twelve Alk proteins can be categorized into four groups based on their substrate specificity: Alk1p, Alk2p, Alk9p, and Alk10p, which have significant activities to hydroxylate n-alkanes; Alk4p, Alk5p, and Alk7p, which have significant activities to hydroxylate the ω-terminal end of dodecanoic acid; Alk3p and Alk6p, which have significant activities to hydroxylate both n-alkanes and dodecanoic acid; and Alk8p, Alk11p, and Alk12p, which showed faint or no activities to oxidize these substrates. The involvement of Alk proteins in the oxidation of fatty alcohols and fatty aldehydes was also analyzed by measuring viability of the mutant deleted for twelve ALK genes in medium containing dodecanol and by observing growth on dodecanal of a mutant strain, in which twelve ALK genes were deleted along with four fatty aldehyde dehydrogenase genes. It was suggested that ALK gene(s) is/are involved in the detoxification of dodecanol and the assimilation of dodecanal. These results imply that genes encoding CYP52-family P450s have undergone multiplication and diversification in Y. lipolytica for assimilation of various hydrophobic compounds. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Determinants of dual substrate specificity revealed by the crystal structure of homoisocitrate dehydrogenase from Thermus thermophilus in complex with homoisocitrate·Mg(2+)·NADH.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kento; Tomita, Takeo; Kuzuyama, Tomohisa; Nishiyama, Makoto

    2016-09-30

    HICDH (Homoisocitrate dehydrogenase) is a member of the β-decarboxylating dehydrogenase family that catalyzes the conversion of homoisocitrate to α-ketoadipate using NAD(+) as a coenzyme, which is the fourth reaction involved in lysine biosynthesis through the α-aminoadipate pathway. Although typical HICDHs from fungi and yeast exhibit strict substrate specificities toward homoisocitrate (HIC), HICDH from a thermophilic bacterium Thermus thermophilus (TtHICDH) catalyzes the reactions using both HIC and isocitrate (IC) as substrates at similar efficiencies. We herein determined the crystal structure of the quaternary complex of TtHICDH with HIC, NADH, and Mg(2+) ion at a resolution of 2.5 Å. The structure revealed that the distal carboxyl group of HIC was recognized by the side chains of Ser72 and Arg85 from one subunit, and Asn173 from another subunit of a dimer unit. Model structures were constructed for TtHICDH in complex with IC and also for HICDH from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ScHICDH) in complex with HIC. TtHICDH recognized the distal carboxyl group of IC by Arg85 in the model. In ScHICDH, the distal carboxyl group of HIC was recognized by the side chains of Ser98 and Ser108 from one subunit and Asn208 from another subunit of a dimer unit. By contrast, in ScHICDH, which lacks an Arg residue at the position corresponding to Arg85 in TtHICDH, these residues may not interact with the distal carboxyl group of shorter IC. These results provide a molecular basis for the differences in substrate specificities between TtHICDH and ScHICDH. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. FS laser processing of bio-polymer thin films for studying cell-to-substrate specific response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daskalova, A., E-mail: a_daskalova@code.bg [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 72, Tsarigradsko Chaussee Blvd., 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Nathala, Chandra S.R. [Institute of General Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Wiedner Hauptstr. 8-10/134, A-1040 Wien (Austria); Spectra-Physics Vienna, Fernkorngasse 10, 1100 Wien (Austria); Kavatzikidou, P.; Ranella, A. [Institute for Electronic Structure and Lasers-FORTH, P.O. Box 1385, Vassilika Vouton, 711 10 Heraklion, Crete (Greece); Szoszkiewicz, R. [Faculty of Materials Science and Engineering, Warsaw University of Technology, 141 Woloska Str., 02-507 Warsaw, Poland (Poland); Husinsky, W. [Institute of General Physics, Vienna University of Technology, Wiedner Hauptstr. 8-10/134, A-1040 Wien (Austria); Fotakis, C. [Institute for Electronic Structure and Lasers-FORTH, P.O. Box 1385, Vassilika Vouton, 711 10 Heraklion, Crete (Greece)

    2016-09-30

    Highlights: • Systematic research in the field of fs laser interaction with biopolymers for application in tissue engineering. • Utilizing a new biopolymer blend of collagen/elastin material for studying the interaction process in the fs domain. • Obtaining of improved, circularly shaped, interconnected nanopores, with high reproducibility from collagen/elastin layer. • Observation of randomly arranged pattern outside modification zone due to formation of an impact wave over biofilm surface. • NIH/3T3 cell-interface interaction reveal a preferable cell migration on fs laser-modified surface array. - Abstract: The use of ultra-short pulses for nanoengineering of biomaterials opens up possibilities for biological, medical and tissue engineering applications. Structuring the surface of a biomaterial into arrays with micro- and nanoscale features and architectures, defines new roadmaps to innovative engineering of materials. Thin films of novel collagen/elastin composite and gelatin were irradiated by Ti:sapphire fs laser in air at central wavelength 800 nm, with pulse durations in the range of 30 fs. The size and shape as well as morphological forms occurring in the resulted areas of interaction were analyzed as a function of irradiation fluence and number of pulses by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The fs interaction regime allows generation of well defined micro porous surface arrays. In this study we examined a novel composite consisting of collagen and elastin in order to create a biodegradable matrix to serve as a biomimetic surface for cell attachment. Confocal microscopy images of modified zones reveal formation of surface fringe patterns with orientation direction alongside the area of interaction. Outside the crater rim a wave-like topography pattern is observed. Structured, on a nanometer scale, surface array is employed for cell-culture experiments for testing cell’s responses to substrate morphology. Mice fibroblasts migration was monitored

  14. Pre-steady-state Kinetics Reveal the Substrate Specificity and Mechanism of Halide Oxidation of Truncated Human Peroxidasin 1*

    OpenAIRE

    Paumann-Page, Martina; Katz, Romy-Sophie; Bellei, Marzia; Schwartz, Irene; Edenhofer, Eva; Sevcnikar, Benjamin; Soudi, Monika; Hofbauer, Stefan; Battistuzzi, Gianantonio; Furtm?ller, Paul G.; Obinger, Christian

    2017-01-01

    Human peroxidasin 1 is a homotrimeric multidomain peroxidase that is secreted to the extracellular matrix. The heme enzyme was shown to release hypobromous acid that mediates the formation of specific covalent sulfilimine bonds to reinforce collagen IV in basement membranes. Maturation by proteolytic cleavage is known to activate the enzyme. Here, we present the first multimixing stopped-flow study on a fully functional truncated variant of human peroxidasin 1 comprising four immunoglobulin-l...

  15. Combining substrate specificity analysis with support vector classifiers reveals feruloyl esterase as a phylogenetically informative protein group

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olivares Hernandez, Roberto; Sunner, Hampus; Frisvad, Jens Christian

    2010-01-01

    Background Our understanding of how fungi evolved to develop a variety of ecological niches, is limited but of fundamental biological importance. Specifically, the evolution of enzymes affects how well species can adapt to new environmental conditions. Feruloyl esterases (FAEs) are enzymes able...... defined via our phylogenetic analysis not only suggests that FAEs are phylogenetically informative proteins but it is also a considerable step towards improved FAEs functional prediction....

  16. Antibody-targeted NY-ESO-1 to mannose receptor or DEC-205 in vitro elicits dual human CD8+ and CD4+ T cell responses with broad antigen specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuji, Takemasa; Matsuzaki, Junko; Kelly, Marcus P; Ramakrishna, Venky; Vitale, Laura; He, Li-Zhen; Keler, Tibor; Odunsi, Kunle; Old, Lloyd J; Ritter, Gerd; Gnjatic, Sacha

    2011-01-15

    Immunization of cancer patients with vaccines containing full-length tumor Ags aims to elicit specific Abs and both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. Vaccination with protein Ags, however, often elicits only CD4(+) T cell responses without inducing Ag-specific CD8(+) T cells, as exogenous protein is primarily presented to CD4(+) T cells. Recent data revealed that Ab-mediated targeting of protein Ags to cell surface receptors on dendritic cells could enhance the induction of both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. We investigated in this study if these observations were applicable to NY-ESO-1, a cancer-testis Ag widely used in clinical cancer vaccine trials. We generated two novel targeting proteins consisting of the full-length NY-ESO-1 fused to the C terminus of two human mAbs against the human mannose receptor and DEC-205, both internalizing molecules expressed on APC. These targeting proteins were evaluated for their ability to activate NY-ESO-1-specific human CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells in vitro. Both targeted NY-ESO-1 proteins rapidly bound to their respective targets on APC. Whereas nontargeted and Ab-targeted NY-ESO-1 proteins similarly activated CD4(+) T cells, cross-presentation to CD8(+) T cells was only efficiently induced by targeted NY-ESO-1. In addition, both mannose receptor and DEC-205 targeting elicited specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells from PBLs of cancer patients. Receptor-specific delivery of NY-ESO-1 to APC appears to be a promising vaccination strategy to efficiently generate integrated and broad Ag-specific immune responses against NY-ESO-1 in cancer patients.

  17. Crystal Structure of the Homo sapiens Kynureninase-3-Hydroxyhippuric Acid Inhibitor Complex: Insights into the Molecular Basis Of Kynureninase Substrate Specificity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lima,Santiago; Kumar,Sunil; Gawandi,Vijay; Momany,Cory; Phillips,Robert S.; (Georgia)

    2009-02-23

    Homo sapiens kynureninase is a pyridoxal-5'-phosphate dependent enzyme that catalyzes the hydrolytic cleavage of 3-hydroxykynurenine to yield 3-hydroxyanthranilate and L-alanine as part of the tryptophan catabolic pathway leading to the de novo biosynthesis of NAD{sup +}. This pathway results in quinolinate, an excitotoxin that is an NMDA receptor agonist. High levels of quinolinate have been correlated with the etiology of neurodegenerative disorders such as AIDS-related dementia and Alzheimer's disease. We have synthesized a novel kynureninase inhibitor, 3-hydroxyhippurate, cocrystallized it with human kynureninase, and solved the atomic structure. On the basis of an analysis of the complex, we designed a series of His-102, Ser-332, and Asn-333 mutants. The H102W/N333T and H102W/S332G/N333T mutants showed complete reversal of substrate specificity between 3-hydroxykynurenine and L-kynurenine, thus defining the primary residues contributing to substrate specificity in kynureninases.

  18. SOD1 overexpression in vivo blocks hyperglycemia-induced specific PKC isoforms: substrate activation and consequent lipid peroxidation in diabetic embryopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xuezheng; Weng, Hongbo; Reece, E Albert; Yang, Peixin

    2011-07-01

    Oxidative stress plays a causative role in diabetic embryopathy. We tested whether mitigating oxidative stress, using superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) transgenic (Tg) mice, would block hyperglycemia-induced specific protein kinase C (PKC) isoform activation and its downstream cascade. Day 8.5 embryos from nondiabetic wild-type control (NC), diabetic mellitus wild-type (DM), and diabetic SOD1-Tg mice (DM-SOD1-Tg) were used for detection of phosphorylated (p-) PKCα/βII and p-PKCδ, and levels of 2 prominent PKC substrates, phosphorylated myristoylated alanine-rich protein kinase C substrate (MARCKS) and receptor for activated C kinase 1 (RACK1), and lipid peroxidation markers, 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) and malondialdehyde (MDA). Levels of p-PKCα/βII, p-PKCδ, p-MARCKS, 4-HNE, and MDA were significantly elevated in the DM group compared with those in the NC group and the DM-SOD1-Tg group. The NC and DM-SOD1-Tg groups had comparable levels of these protein and lipid peroxidation markers. RACK1 levels did not differ among the 3 groups. Mitigating oxidative stress by SOD1 overexpression blocks maternal hyperglycemia-induced activation of specific PKC isoforms and downstream cascades. Copyright © 2011 Mosby, Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. An eleven amino acid residue deletion expands the substrate specificity of acetyl xylan esterase II (AXE II) from Penicillium purpurogenum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colombres, Marcela; Garate, José A.; Lagos, Carlos F.; Araya-Secchi, Raúl; Norambuena, Patricia; Quiroz, Soledad; Larrondo, Luis; Pérez-Acle, Tomas; Eyzaguirre, Jaime

    2008-01-01

    The soft-rot fungus Penicillium purpurogenum secretes to the culture medium a variety of enzymes related to xylan biodegradation, among them three acetyl xylan esterases (AXE I, II and III). AXE II has 207 amino acids; it belongs to family 5 of the carbohydrate esterases and its structure has been determined by X-ray crystallography at 0.9 Å resolution (PDB 1G66). The enzyme possesses the α/β hydrolase fold and the catalytic triad typical of serine esterases (Ser90, His187 and Asp175). AXE II can hydrolyze esters of a large variety of alcohols, but it is restricted to short chain fatty acids. An analysis of its three-dimensional structure shows that a loop that covers the active site may be responsible for this strict specificity. Cutinase, an enzyme that hydrolyzes esters of long chain fatty acids and shows a structure similar to AXE II, lacks this loop. In order to generate an AXE II with this broader specificity, the preparation of a mutant lacking residues involving this loop (Gly104 to Ala114) was proposed. A set of molecular simulation experiments based on a comparative model of the mutant enzyme predicted a stable structure. Using site-directed mutagenesis, the loop's residues have been eliminated from the AXE II cDNA. The mutant protein has been expressed in Aspergillus nidulans A722 and Pichia pastoris, and it is active towards a range of fatty acid esters of up to at least 14 carbons. The availability of an esterase with broader specificity may have biotechnological applications for the synthesis of sugar esters.

  20. Regulation of AKT phosphorylation at Ser473 and Thr308 by endoplasmic reticulum stress modulates substrate specificity in a severity dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Wa Yung

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress is a common factor in the pathophysiology of diverse human diseases that are characterised by contrasting cellular behaviours, from proliferation in cancer to apoptosis in neurodegenerative disorders. Coincidently, dysregulation of AKT/PKB activity, which is the central regulator of cell growth, proliferation and survival, is often associated with the same diseases. Here, we demonstrate that ER stress modulates AKT substrate specificity in a severity-dependent manner, as shown by phospho-specific antibodies against known AKT targets. ER stress also reduces both total and phosphorylated AKT in a severity-dependent manner, without affecting activity of the upstream kinase PDK1. Normalisation to total AKT revealed that under ER stress phosphorylation of Thr308 is suppressed while that of Ser473 is increased. ER stress induces GRP78, and siRNA-mediated knock-down of GRP78 enhances phosphorylation at Ser473 by 3.6 fold, but not at Thr308. Substrate specificity is again altered. An in-situ proximity ligation assay revealed a physical interaction between GRP78 and AKT at the plasma membrane of cells following induction of ER stress. Staining was weak in cells with normal nuclear morphology but stronger in those displaying rounded, condensed nuclei. Co-immunoprecipitation of GRP78 and P-AKT(Ser473 confirmed the immuno-complex consists of non-phosphorylated AKT (Ser473 and Thr308. The interaction is likely specific as AKT did not bind to all molecular chaperones, and GRP78 did not bind to p70 S6 kinase. These findings provide one mechanistic explanation for how ER stress contributes to human pathologies demonstrating contrasting cell fates via modulation of AKT signalling.

  1. Distinct substrate specificities of three glycoside hydrolase family 42 β-galactosidases from Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis ATCC 15697

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Viborg, Alexander Holm; Katayama, Takane; Abou Hachem, Maher

    2014-01-01

    Glycoside hydrolase family 42 (GH42) includes β-galactosidases catalyzing the release of galactose (Gal) from the non-reducing end of different β-d-galactosides. Health-promoting probiotic bifidobacteria, which are important members of the human gastrointestinal tract microbiota, produce GH42...... signatures of the three GH42 enzymes correlate to unique sequence motifs denoting specific clades in a GH42 phylogenetic tree providing novel insight into GH42 subspecificities. Overall, the data illustrate the metabolic adaptation of bifidobacteria to the β-galactoside-rich gut niche and emphasize...

  2. Structural basis for drug and substrate specificity exhibited by FIV encoding a chimeric FIV/HIV protease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ying Chuan; Perryman, Alexander L; Olson, Arthur J; Torbett, Bruce E; Elder, John H; Stout, C David

    2011-06-01

    A chimeric feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) protease (PR) has been engineered that supports infectivity but confers sensitivity to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) PR inhibitors darunavir (DRV) and lopinavir (LPV). The 6s-98S PR has five replacements mimicking homologous residues in HIV PR and a sixth which mutated from Pro to Ser during selection. Crystal structures of the 6s-98S FIV PR chimera with DRV and LPV bound have been determined at 1.7 and 1.8 Å resolution, respectively. The structures reveal the role of a flexible 90s loop and residue 98 in supporting Gag processing and infectivity and the roles of residue 37 in the active site and residues 55, 57 and 59 in the flap in conferring the ability to specifically recognize HIV PR drugs. Specifically, Ile37Val preserves tertiary structure but prevents steric clashes with DRV and LPV. Asn55Met and Val59Ile induce a distinct kink in the flap and a new hydrogen bond to DRV. Ile98Pro→Ser and Pro100Asn increase 90s loop flexibility, Gln99Val contributes hydrophobic contacts to DRV and LPV, and Pro100Asn forms compensatory hydrogen bonds. The chimeric PR exhibits a comparable number of hydrogen bonds, electrostatic interactions and hydrophobic contacts with DRV and LPV as in the corresponding HIV PR complexes, consistent with IC(50) values in the nanomolar range. © 2011 International Union of Crystallography

  3. 3-Hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase kinase and sucrose-phosphate synthase kinase activities in cauliflower florets: Ca2+ dependence and substrate specificities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toroser, D; Huber, S C

    1998-07-15

    Plant 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase(HMGR; EC 1.1.1.34) and sucrose-phosphate synthase (SPS; EC 2.4.1.14) and synthetic peptides designed from the known phosphorylation sites of plant HMGR (SAMS*: KSHMKYNRSTKDVK), rat acetyl-CoA carboxylase (SAMS: HMRSAMSGLHLVKRR), spinach SPS (SP2: GRRJRRISSVEJJDKK), and spinach NADH:nitrate reductase (NR6: GPTLKRTASTPFJNTTSK) were used to characterize kinase activities from cauliflower (Brassica oleracea L. ) inflorescences. The three major peaks of protein kinase activity resolved by anion-exchange FPLC are homologs of those observed previously in spinach leaves and thus are designated PKI, PKIV, and PKIII, listed in order of elution. PKIV was the most active in terms of phosphorylation and inactivation of recombinant Nicotiana HMGR and was also strictly Ca2+ dependent. The novel aspects are that PKIII has not been detected in previous cauliflower studies, that SAMS* is a more specific peptide substrate to identify potential HMGR kinases, and that the major HMGR kinase in cauliflower is Ca2+ dependent. Of the three major kinases that phosphorylated the SP2 peptide only PKI (partially Ca2+ sensitive) and PKIII (Ca2+ insensitive) inactivated native spinach leaf SPS. Cauliflower extracts contained endogenous SPS that was inactivated by endogenous kinase(s) in an ATP-dependent manner and this may be one of the substrate target proteins for PKI and/or PKIII. The substrate specificity of the three kinase peaks was studied using synthetic peptide variants of the SP2 sequence. All three kinases had a strong preference for peptides with a basic residue at P-6 (as in SP2 and SAMS*; SAMS has a free amino terminus at this position) or a Pro at P-7 (as in NR6). This requirement for certain residues at P-6 or P-7 was not recognized in earlier studies but appears to be a general requirement. In plant HMGR, a conserved His residue at P-6 is involved directly in catalysis and this may explain why substrates reduced HMGR phosphorylation

  4. Structural basis for drug and substrate specificity exhibited by FIV encoding a chimeric FIV/HIV protease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Ying-Chuan; Perryman, Alexander L.; Olson, Arthur J.; Torbett, Bruce E.; Elder, John H.; Stout, C. David, E-mail: dave@scripps.edu [The Scripps Research Institute, 10550 North Torrey Pines Road, La Jolla, CA 92037 (United States)

    2011-06-01

    Crystal structures of the 6s-98S FIV protease chimera with darunavir and lopinavir bound have been determined at 1.7 and 1.8 Å resolution, respectively. A chimeric feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) protease (PR) has been engineered that supports infectivity but confers sensitivity to the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) PR inhibitors darunavir (DRV) and lopinavir (LPV). The 6s-98S PR has five replacements mimicking homologous residues in HIV PR and a sixth which mutated from Pro to Ser during selection. Crystal structures of the 6s-98S FIV PR chimera with DRV and LPV bound have been determined at 1.7 and 1.8 Å resolution, respectively. The structures reveal the role of a flexible 90s loop and residue 98 in supporting Gag processing and infectivity and the roles of residue 37 in the active site and residues 55, 57 and 59 in the flap in conferring the ability to specifically recognize HIV PR drugs. Specifically, Ile37Val preserves tertiary structure but prevents steric clashes with DRV and LPV. Asn55Met and Val59Ile induce a distinct kink in the flap and a new hydrogen bond to DRV. Ile98Pro→Ser and Pro100Asn increase 90s loop flexibility, Gln99Val contributes hydrophobic contacts to DRV and LPV, and Pro100Asn forms compensatory hydrogen bonds. The chimeric PR exhibits a comparable number of hydrogen bonds, electrostatic interactions and hydrophobic contacts with DRV and LPV as in the corresponding HIV PR complexes, consistent with IC{sub 50} values in the nanomolar range.

  5. Ascorbate uptake by ROS 17/2.8 osteoblast-like cells: substrate specificity and sensitivity to transport inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, S J; Kulaga, A; Jaworski, E M; Wilson, J X

    1991-06-01

    Ascorbate (reduced vitamin C) is required for bone formation. We have shown previously that both the osteoblast-like cell line ROS 17/2.8 and primary cultures of rat calvarial cells possess a saturable, Na(+)-dependent uptake system for L-ascorbate (J Membr Biol 111:83-91, 1989). The purpose of the present study was to investigate the specificity of this transport system for organic anions and its sensitivity to transport inhibitors. Initial rates of ascorbate uptake were measured by incubating ROS 17/2.8 cells with [L-14C]ascorbate at 37 degrees C. Uptake of [L-14C]ascorbate (5 microM) was inhibited 98 +/- 1% by coincubation with unlabeled L-ascorbate (3 mM) and 48 +/- 4% by salicylate (3 mM), but it was not affected by 3 mM formate, lactate, pyruvate, gluconate, oxalate, malonate, or succinate. Uptake of the radiolabeled vitamin also was not affected by acute (1 minute) exposure of the cells to the Na+ transport inhibitors amiloride and ouabain or the glucose transport inhibitor cytochalasin B. In contrast, anion transport inhibitors rapidly (less than 1 minute) and reversibly blocked [L-14C]ascorbate uptake. In order of potency, these drugs were 4,4'-diisothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS) approximately equal to sulfinpyrazone greater than furosemide approximately equal to 4-acetamido-4'-isothiocyanostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (SITS). These findings indicate that the ascorbate transporter is relatively specific for the ascorbate anion, since other organic anions (with the exception of salicylate) did not compete with ascorbate for uptake. Rapid and reversible inhibition by the impermeant antagonists DIDS and SITS suggests that they interact directly with the ascorbate transporter, consistent with location of the transport system in the plasma membrane.

  6. An in silico analysis of T-box regulated genes and T-box evolution in prokaryotes, with emphasis on prediction of substrate specificity of transporters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kleerebezem Michiel

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background T-box anti-termination is an elegant and sensitive mechanism by which many bacteria maintain constant levels of amino acid-charged tRNAs. The amino acid specificity of the regulatory element is related to a so-called specifier codon and can in principle be used to guide the functional annotation of the genes controlled via the T-box anti-termination mechanism. Results Hidden Markov Models were defined to search the T-box regulatory element and were applied to all completed prokaryotic genomes. The vast majority of the genes found downstream of the retrieved elements encoded functionalities related to transport and synthesis of amino acids and the charging of tRNA. This is completely in line with findings reported in literature and with the proposed biological role of the regulatory element. For several species, the functional annotation of a large number of genes encoding proteins involved in amino acid transport could be improved significantly on basis of the amino acid specificity of the identified T-boxes. In addition, these annotations could be extrapolated to a larger number of orthologous systems in other species. Analysis of T-box distribution confirmed that the element is restricted predominantly to species of the phylum Firmicutes. Furthermore, it appeared that the distribution was highly species specific and that in the case of amino acid transport some boxes seemed to "pop-up" only recently. Conclusion We have demonstrated that the identification of the molecular specificity of a regulatory element can be of great help in solving notoriously difficult annotation issues, e.g. by defining the substrate specificity of genes encoding amino acid transporters on basis of the amino acid specificity of the regulatory T-box. Furthermore, our analysis of the species-dependency of the occurrence of specific T-boxes indicated that these regulatory elements propagate in a semi-independent way from the genes that they control.

  7. Communities of anamorphic fungi on green leaves and leaf litter of native forests of Scutia buxifolia and Celtis tala: Composition, diversity, seasonality and substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allegrucci, Natalia; Bucsinszky, Ana María; Arturi, Marcelo; Cabello, Marta Noemí

    2015-01-01

    Xeric forests dominated by two tree species, Scutia buxifolia (Rhamnaceae) and Celtis tala (Ulmacea), are temperate, semi-deciduous wooded communities that represent the most abundant woodlands on the eastern plains of Buenos Aires Province, Argentina. The district of Magdalena has one of the most well-preserved native-forest areas, with an environmental heterogeneity that gives rise to the wide variability in the vegetation present. The aim of this study was to analyze the species composition, diversity, seasonal variations, and substrate specificity of anamorphic fungi (Ascomycota) on the green leaves and in the leaf litter of native forests dominated by Scutia buxifolia and Celtis tala from Magdalena, Buenos Aires, Argentina. In order to obtain the mycobiota of decomposition, seasonal samples of green leaves and leaf litter from both types of trees were collected over a two-year period. In the laboratory, the leaves were placed in a moist chamber and incubated at room temperature. A total of 100 species of anamorphic Ascomycota were identified in both forests. No significant variations were observed in the richness, diversity, or evenness of the fungal communities of the green leaves and leaf litter of both forests between seasons. The species that characterized the fungal communities in the leaves of each of the trees were found to be different. The type of substrate had a stronger influence in determining the composition of the fungal community in both types of forests. Copyright © 2013 Revista Iberoamericana de Micología. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  8. Phylogenetic relationships of the silver saxifrages (Saxifraga, sect. Ligulatae haworth): implications for the evolution of substrate specificity, life histories, and biogeography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conti, E; Soltis, D E; Hardig, T M; Schneider, J

    1999-12-01

    The silver saxifrages (Saxifraga sect. Ligulatae Haworth; Saxifragaceae) exhibit remarkable variation of substrate specialization, with strictly calcicole to calcifuge species, as well as life histories which range from semelparity to iteroparity. They occur almost exclusively in the European mountain ranges and display high levels of endemism. Sequences from chloroplast and nuclear ribosomal DNA were obtained to resolve phylogenetic relationships among the silver saxifrages and related taxa and to gain insight into the evolution of substrate specificity, life history, and biogeography. The resulting phylogenies suggested that (1) Saxifraga sect. Ligulatae, as traditionally defined, does not constitute a monophyletic group; (2) lime-secreting hydathodes in calcifuge species apparently represent a secondary nonaptation; (3) semelparity evolved independently two or three times in the silver saxifrages and allied sections, possibly in response to climatic changes that occured during the Pleistocene; and (4) narrow endemics, for example S. cochlearis, likely evolved from the fragmentation of the widespread S. paniculata into refugial populations that became isolated during the glacial maxima of the Pleistocene. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  9. Novel IgG-Degrading Enzymes of the IgdE Protease Family Link Substrate Specificity to Host Tropism of Streptococcus Species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spoerry, Christian; Hessle, Pontus; Lewis, Melanie J; Paton, Lois; Woof, Jenny M; von Pawel-Rammingen, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Recently we have discovered an IgG degrading enzyme of the endemic pig pathogen S. suis designated IgdE that is highly specific for porcine IgG. This protease is the founding member of a novel cysteine protease family assigned C113 in the MEROPS peptidase database. Bioinformatical analyses revealed putative members of the IgdE protease family in eight other Streptococcus species. The genes of the putative IgdE family proteases of S. agalactiae, S. porcinus, S. pseudoporcinus and S. equi subsp. zooepidemicus were cloned for production of recombinant protein into expression vectors. Recombinant proteins of all four IgdE family proteases were proteolytically active against IgG of the respective Streptococcus species hosts, but not against IgG from other tested species or other classes of immunoglobulins, thereby linking the substrate specificity to the known host tropism. The novel IgdE family proteases of S. agalactiae, S. pseudoporcinus and S. equi showed IgG subtype specificity, i.e. IgdE from S. agalactiae and S. pseudoporcinus cleaved human IgG1, while IgdE from S. equi was subtype specific for equine IgG7. Porcine IgG subtype specificities of the IgdE family proteases of S. porcinus and S. pseudoporcinus remain to be determined. Cleavage of porcine IgG by IgdE of S. pseudoporcinus is suggested to be an evolutionary remaining activity reflecting ancestry of the human pathogen to the porcine pathogen S. porcinus. The IgG subtype specificity of bacterial proteases indicates the special importance of these IgG subtypes in counteracting infection or colonization and opportunistic streptococci neutralize such antibodies through expression of IgdE family proteases as putative immune evasion factors. We suggest that IgdE family proteases might be valid vaccine targets against streptococci of both human and veterinary medical concerns and could also be of therapeutic as well as biotechnological use.

  10. Structure of the N-glycosidase MilB in complex with hydroxymethyl CMP reveals its Arg23 specifically recognizes the substrate and controls its entry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Gong; Wu, Geng; Zhang, Yan; Liu, Guang; Han, Tiesheng; Deng, Zixin; He, Xinyi

    2014-07-01

    5-Hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) is present in T-even phage and mammalian DNA as well as some nucleoside antibiotics, including mildiomycin and bacimethrin, during whose synthesis 5hmC is produced by the hydrolysis of 5-hydroxymethyl cytidine 5'-monophosphate (hmCMP) by an N-glycosidase MilB. Recently, the MilB-CMP complex structure revealed its substrate specificity for CMP over dCMP. However, hmCMP instead of CMP is the preferred substrate for MilB as supported by that its KM for CMP is ∼27-fold higher than that for hmCMP. Here, we determined the crystal structures of MilB and its catalytically inactive E103A mutant in complex with hmCMP. In the structure of the complex, Phe22 and Arg23 are positioned in a cage-like active site resembling the binding pocket for the flipped 5-methylcytosine (5mC) in eukaryotic 5mC-binding proteins. Van der Waals interaction between the benzene ring of Phe22 and the pyrimidine ring of hmCMP stabilizes its binding. Remarkably, upon hmCMP binding, the guanidinium group of Arg23 was bent ∼65° toward hmCMP to recognize its 5-hydroxymethyl group, inducing semi-closure of the cage-like pocket. Mutagenesis studies of Arg23 and bioinformatics analysis demonstrate that the positively charged Arg/Lys at this site is critical for the specific recognition of the 5-hydroxymethyl group of hmCMP. © The Author(s) 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  11. PI-273, a Substrate-Competitive, Specific Small-Molecule Inhibitor of PI4KIIα, Inhibits the Growth of Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Jiangmei; Gao, Zhen; Zhao, Dan; Zhang, Lunfeng; Qiao, Xinhua; Zhao, Yingying; Ding, Hong; Zhang, Panpan; Lu, Junyan; Liu, Jia; Jiang, Hualiang; Luo, Cheng; Chen, Chang

    2017-11-15

    While phosphatidylinositol 4-kinase (PI4KIIα) has been identified as a potential target for antitumor therapy, the clinical applications of PI4KIIα are limited by a lack of specific inhibitors. Here we report the first small-molecule inhibitor (SMI) of human PI4KIIα. Docking-based and ligand-based virtual screening strategies were first employed to identify promising hits, followed by two rounds of kinase activity inhibition validation. 2-(3-(4-Chlorobenzoyl)thioureido)-4-ethyl-5-methylthiophene-3-carboxamide (PI-273) exhibited the greatest inhibitory effect on PI4KIIα kinase activity (IC50 = 0.47 μmol/L) and suppressed cell proliferation. Surface plasmon resonance and thermal shift assays indicated that PI-273 interacted directly with PI4KIIα. Kinetic analysis identified PI-273 as a reversible competitive inhibitor with respect to the substrate phosphatidylinositol (PI), which contrasted with most other PI kinase inhibitors that bind the ATP binding site. PI-273 reduced PI4P content, cell viability, and AKT signaling in wild-type MCF-7 cells, but not in PI4KIIα knockout MCF-7 cells, indicating that PI-273 is highly selective for PI4KIIα. Mutant analysis revealed a role of palmitoylation insertion in the selectivity of PI-273 for PI4KIIα. In addition, PI-273 treatment retarded cell proliferation by blocking cells in G2-M, inducing cell apoptosis and suppressing colony-forming ability. Importantly, PI-273 significantly inhibited MCF-7 cell-induced breast tumor growth without toxicity. PI-273 is the first substrate-competitive, subtype-specific inhibitor of PI4KIIα, the use of which will facilitate evaluations of PI4KIIα as a cancer therapeutic target. Cancer Res; 77(22); 6253-66. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. Fermentation of mixed glucose-xylose substrates by engineered strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae: role of the coenzyme specificity of xylose reductase, and effect of glucose on xylose utilization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klimacek Mario

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In spite of the substantial metabolic engineering effort previously devoted to the development of Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains capable of fermenting both the hexose and pentose sugars present in lignocellulose hydrolysates, the productivity of reported strains for conversion of the naturally most abundant pentose, xylose, is still a major issue of process efficiency. Protein engineering for targeted alteration of the nicotinamide cofactor specificity of enzymes catalyzing the first steps in the metabolic pathway for xylose was a successful approach of reducing xylitol by-product formation and improving ethanol yield from xylose. The previously reported yeast strain BP10001, which expresses heterologous xylose reductase from Candida tenuis in mutated (NADH-preferring form, stands for a series of other yeast strains designed with similar rational. Using 20 g/L xylose as sole source of carbon, BP10001 displayed a low specific uptake rate qxylose (g xylose/g dry cell weight/h of 0.08. The study presented herein was performed with the aim of analysing (external factors that limit qxylose of BP10001 under xylose-only and mixed glucose-xylose substrate conditions. We also carried out a comprehensive investigation on the currently unclear role of coenzyme utilization, NADPH compared to NADH, for xylose reduction during co-fermentation of glucose and xylose. Results BP10001 and BP000, expressing C. tenuis xylose reductase in NADPH-preferring wild-type form, were used. Glucose and xylose (each at 10 g/L were converted sequentially, the corresponding qsubstrate values being similar for each strain (glucose: 3.0; xylose: 0.05. The distribution of fermentation products from glucose was identical for both strains whereas when using xylose, BP10001 showed enhanced ethanol yield (BP10001 0.30 g/g; BP000 0.23 g/g and decreased yields of xylitol (BP10001 0.26 g/g; BP000 0.36 g/g and glycerol (BP10001 0.023 g/g; BP000 0.072 g/g as compared

  13. Structural insights into the substrate specificity of a 6-phospho-β-glucosidase BglA-2 from Streptococcus pneumoniae TIGR4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei-Li; Jiang, Yong-Liang; Pikis, Andreas; Cheng, Wang; Bai, Xiao-Hui; Ren, Yan-Min; Thompson, John; Zhou, Cong-Zhao; Chen, Yuxing

    2013-05-24

    The 6-phospho-β-glucosidase BglA-2 (EC 3.2.1.86) from glycoside hydrolase family 1 (GH-1) catalyzes the hydrolysis of β-1,4-linked cellobiose 6-phosphate (cellobiose-6'P) to yield glucose and glucose 6-phosphate. Both reaction products are further metabolized by the energy-generating glycolytic pathway. Here, we present the first crystal structures of the apo and complex forms of BglA-2 with thiocellobiose-6'P (a non-metabolizable analog of cellobiose-6'P) at 2.0 and 2.4 Å resolution, respectively. Similar to other GH-1 enzymes, the overall structure of BglA-2 from Streptococcus pneumoniae adopts a typical (β/α)8 TIM-barrel, with the active site located at the center of the convex surface of the β-barrel. Structural analyses, in combination with enzymatic data obtained from site-directed mutant proteins, suggest that three aromatic residues, Tyr(126), Tyr(303), and Trp(338), at subsite +1 of BglA-2 determine substrate specificity with respect to 1,4-linked 6-phospho-β-glucosides. Moreover, three additional residues, Ser(424), Lys(430), and Tyr(432) of BglA-2, were found to play important roles in the hydrolytic selectivity toward phosphorylated rather than non-phosphorylated compounds. Comparative structural analysis suggests that a tryptophan versus a methionine/alanine residue at subsite -1 may contribute to the catalytic and substrate selectivity with respect to structurally similar 6-phospho-β-galactosidases and 6-phospho-β-glucosidases assigned to the GH-1 family.

  14. Structural Insights into the Substrate Specificity of a 6-Phospho-β-glucosidase BglA-2 from Streptococcus pneumoniae TIGR4*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Wei-Li; Jiang, Yong-Liang; Pikis, Andreas; Cheng, Wang; Bai, Xiao-Hui; Ren, Yan-Min; Thompson, John; Zhou, Cong-Zhao; Chen, Yuxing

    2013-01-01

    The 6-phospho-β-glucosidase BglA-2 (EC 3.2.1.86) from glycoside hydrolase family 1 (GH-1) catalyzes the hydrolysis of β-1,4-linked cellobiose 6-phosphate (cellobiose-6′P) to yield glucose and glucose 6-phosphate. Both reaction products are further metabolized by the energy-generating glycolytic pathway. Here, we present the first crystal structures of the apo and complex forms of BglA-2 with thiocellobiose-6′P (a non-metabolizable analog of cellobiose-6′P) at 2.0 and 2.4 Å resolution, respectively. Similar to other GH-1 enzymes, the overall structure of BglA-2 from Streptococcus pneumoniae adopts a typical (β/α)8 TIM-barrel, with the active site located at the center of the convex surface of the β-barrel. Structural analyses, in combination with enzymatic data obtained from site-directed mutant proteins, suggest that three aromatic residues, Tyr126, Tyr303, and Trp338, at subsite +1 of BglA-2 determine substrate specificity with respect to 1,4-linked 6-phospho-β-glucosides. Moreover, three additional residues, Ser424, Lys430, and Tyr432 of BglA-2, were found to play important roles in the hydrolytic selectivity toward phosphorylated rather than non-phosphorylated compounds. Comparative structural analysis suggests that a tryptophan versus a methionine/alanine residue at subsite −1 may contribute to the catalytic and substrate selectivity with respect to structurally similar 6-phospho-β-galactosidases and 6-phospho-β-glucosidases assigned to the GH-1 family. PMID:23580646

  15. Mutations in the substrate binding site of human heat-shock protein 70 indicate specific interaction with HLA-DR outside the peptide binding groove.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrer, Karin M; Haug, Markus; Schwörer, Daniela; Kalbacher, Hubert; Holzer, Ursula

    2014-06-01

    Heat-shock protein 70 (Hsp70)-peptide complexes are involved in MHC class I- and II-restricted antigen presentation, enabling enhanced activation of T cells. As shown previously, mammalian cytosolic Hsp70 (Hsc70) molecules interact specifically with HLA-DR molecules. This interaction might be of significance as Hsp70 molecules could transfer bound antigenic peptides in a ternary complex into the binding groove of HLA-DR molecules. The present study provides new insights into the distinct interaction of Hsp70 with HLA-DR molecules. Using a quantitative binding assay, it could be demonstrated that a point mutation of amino acids alanine 406 and valine 438 in the substrate binding pocket led to reduced peptide binding compared with the wild-type Hsp70 whereas HLA-DR binding remains unaffected. The removal of the C-terminal lid neither altered the substrate binding capacity nor the Hsp70 binding characteristics to HLA-DR. A truncated variant lacking the nucleotide binding domain showed no binding interactions with HLA-DR. Furthermore, the truncated ATPase subunit of constitutively expressed Hsc70 revealed similar binding affinities to HLA-DR compared with the complete Hsc70. Hence, it can be assumed that the Hsp70-HLA-DR interaction takes place outside the peptide binding groove and is attributed to the ATPase domain of HSP70 molecules. The Hsp70-chaperoned peptides might thereby be directly transferred into the binding groove of HLA-DR, so enabling enhanced presentation of the peptide on antigen-presenting cells and leading to an improved proliferation of responding T cells as shown previously. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. RNA-Seq approach for genetic improvement of meat quality in pig and evolutionary insight into the substrate specificity of animal carbonyl reductases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Won Yong; Kwon, Seul Gi; Son, Minky; Cho, Eun Seok; Lee, Yuno; Kim, Jae Hwan; Kim, Byeong-Woo; Park, Da Hye; Hwang, Jung Hye; Kim, Tae Wan; Park, Hwa Choon; Park, Beom Young; Choi, Jong-Soon; Cho, Kwang Keun; Chung, Ki Hwa; Song, Young Min; Kim, Il Suk; Jin, Sang Keun; Kim, Doo Hwan; Lee, Seung-Won; Lee, Keun Woo; Bang, Woo Young; Kim, Chul Wook

    2012-01-01

    Changes in meat quality traits are strongly associated with alterations in postmortem metabolism which depend on genetic variations, especially nonsynonymous single nucleotide variations (nsSNVs) having critical effects on protein structure and function. To selectively identify metabolism-related nsSNVs, next-generation transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) was carried out using RNAs from porcine liver, which contains a diverse range of metabolic enzymes. The multiplex SNV genotyping analysis showed that various metabolism-related genes had different nsSNV alleles. Moreover, many nsSNVs were significantly associated with multiple meat quality traits. Particularly, ch7:g.22112616A>G SNV was identified to create a single amino acid change (Thr/Ala) at the 145th residue of H1.3-like protein, very close to the putative 147th threonine phosphorylation site, suggesting that the nsSNV may affect multiple meat quality traits by affecting the epigenetic regulation of postmortem metabolism-related gene expression. Besides, one nonsynonymous variation, probably generated by gene duplication, led to a stop signal in porcine testicular carbonyl reductase (PTCR), resulting in a C-terminal (E281-A288) deletion. Molecular docking and energy minimization calculations indicated that the binding affinity of wild-type PTCR to 5α-DHT, a C(21)-steroid, was superior to that of C-terminal-deleted PTCR or human carbonyl reductase, which was very consistent with experimental data, reported previously. Furthermore, P284 was identified as an important residue mediating the specific interaction between PTCR and 5α-DHT, and phylogenetic analysis showed that P284 is an evolutionarily conserved residue among animal carbonyl reductases, which suggests that the C-terminal tails of these reductases may have evolved under evolutionary pressure to increase the substrate specificity for C(21)-steroids and facilitate metabolic adaptation. Altogether, our RNA-Seq revealed that selective nsSNVs were

  17. Integrated Broadband Bowtie Antenna on Transparent Silica Substrate

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, Xingyu; Wang, Shiyi; Subbaraman, Harish; Pan, Zeyu; Zhan, Qiwen; Chen, Ray T

    2016-01-01

    The bowtie antenna is a topic of growing interest in recent years. In this paper, we design, fabricate, and characterize a modified gold bowtie antenna integrated on a transparent silica substrate. The bowtie antenna is designed with broad RF bandwidth to cover the X-band in the electromagnetic spectrum. We numerically investigate the antenna characteristics, specifically its resonant frequency and enhancement factor. Our designed bowtie antenna provides a strong broadband electric field enhancement in its feed gap. Taking advantage of the low-k silica substrate, high enhancement factor can be achieved without the unwanted reflection and scattering from the backside silicon handle which is the issue of using an SOI substrate. We simulate the dependence of resonance frequency on bowtie geometry, and verify the simulation results through experimental investigation, by fabricating different sets of bowtie antennas on silica substrates and then measuring their resonance frequencies. In addition, the far-field rad...

  18. Moving college students to a better understanding of substrate specificity of enzymes through utilizing multimedia pre-training and an interactive enzyme model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saleh, Mounir R.

    Scientists' progress in understanding enzyme specificity uncovered a complex natural phenomenon. However, not all of the currently available biology textbooks seem to be up to date on this progress. Students' understanding of how enzymes work is a core requirement in biochemistry and biology tertiary education. Nevertheless, current pre-college science education does not provide students with enough biochemical background to enable them to understand complex material such as this. To bridge this gap, a multimedia pre-training presentation was prepared to fuel the learner's prior knowledge with discrete facts necessary to understand the presented concept. This treatment is also known to manage intrinsic cognitive load during the learning process. An interactive instructional enzyme model was also built to motivate students to learn about substrate specificity of enzymes. Upon testing the effect of this combined treatment on 111 college students, desirable learning outcomes were found in terms of cognitive load, motivation, and achievement. The multimedia pre-training group reported significantly less intrinsic cognitive load, higher motivation, and demonstrated higher transfer performance than the control and post-training groups. In this study, a statistical mediation model is also proposed to explain how cognitive load and motivation work in concert to foster learning from multimedia pre-training. This type of research goes beyond simple forms of "what works" to a deeper understanding of "how it works", thus enabling informed decisions for multimedia instructional design. Multimedia learning plays multiple roles in science education. Therefore, science learners would be some of the first to benefit from improving multimedia instructional design. Accordingly, complex scientific phenomena can be introduced to college students in a motivating, informative, and cognitively efficient learning environment.

  19. Premating isolation is determined by larval rearing substrates in cactophilic Drosophila mojavensis. X. Age-specific dynamics of adult epicuticular hydrocarbon expression in response to different host plants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etges, William J; de Oliveira, Cassia C

    2014-01-01

    Analysis of sexual selection and sexual isolation in Drosophila mojavensis and its relatives has revealed a pervasive role of rearing substrates on adult courtship behavior when flies were reared on fermenting cactus in preadult stages. Here, we assessed expression of contact pheromones comprised of epicuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) from eclosion to 28 days of age in adults from two populations reared on fermenting tissues of two host cacti over the entire life cycle. Flies were never exposed to laboratory food and showed significant reductions in average CHC amounts consistent with CHCs of wild-caught flies. Overall, total hydrocarbon amounts increased from eclosion to 14–18 days, well past age at sexual maturity, and then declined in older flies. Most flies did not survive past 4 weeks. Baja California and mainland populations showed significantly different age-specific CHC profiles where Baja adults showed far less age-specific changes in CHC expression. Adults from populations reared on the host cactus typically used in nature expressed more CHCs than on the alternate host. MANCOVA with age as the covariate for the first six CHC principal components showed extensive differences in CHC composition due to age, population, cactus, sex, and age × population, age × sex, and age × cactus interactions. Thus, understanding variation in CHC composition as adult D. mojavensis age requires information about population and host plant differences, with potential influences on patterns of mate choice, sexual selection, and sexual isolation, and ultimately how these pheromones are expressed in natural populations. Studies of drosophilid aging in the wild are badly needed. PMID:25360246

  20. Tyrosine 105 and threonine 212 at outermost substrate binding subsites -6 and +4 control substrate specificity, oligosaccharide cleavage patterns, and multiple binding modes of barley alpha-amylase 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak-Jensen, K.S.; André, G.; Gottschalk, T.E.

    2004-01-01

    and oligosaccharides, respectively. Bond cleavage analysis of oligosaccharide degradation by wild-type and mutant AMY1 supports that Tyr105 is critical for binding at subsite -6. Substrate binding is improved by T212(Y/W) introduced at subsite +4 and the [Y105A/ T212(Y/W)] AMY1 double mutants synergistically enhanced......The role in activity of outer regions in the substrate binding cleft in alpha-amylases is illustrated by mutational analysis of Tyr(105) and Thr(212) localized at subsites - 6 and +4 ( substrate cleavage occurs between subsites -1 and +1) in barley alpha-amylase 1 (AMY1). Tyr(105) is conserved......% activity, respectively. Thus engineering of aromatic stacking interactions at the ends of the 10-subsite long binding cleft affects activity very differently, dependent on the substrate. Y105A dominates in dual subsite -6/+4 [Y105A/T212(Y/W)] AMY1 mutants having almost retained and low activity on starch...

  1. Structural basis of regulation and substrate specificity of protein kinase CK2 deduced from the modeling of protein-protein interactions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Srinivasan N

    2003-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Protein Kinase Casein Kinase 2 (PKCK2 is an ubiquitous Ser/Thr kinase expressed in all eukaryotes. It phosphorylates a number of proteins involved in various cellular processes. PKCK2 holoenzyme is catalytically active tetramer, composed of two homologous or identical and constitutively active catalytic (α and two identical regulatory (β subunits. The tetramer cannot phosphorylate some substrates that can be phosphorylated by PKCK2α in isolation. The present work explores the structural basis of this feature using computational analysis and modeling. Results We have initially built a model of PKCK2α bound to a substrate peptide with a conformation identical to that of the substrates in the available crystal structures of other kinases complexed with the substrates/ pseudosubstrates. In this model however, the fourth acidic residue in the consensus pattern of the substrate, S/T-X-X-D/E where S/T is the phosphorylation site, did not result in interaction with the active form of PKCK2α and is highly solvent exposed. Interaction of the acidic residue is observed if the substrate peptide adopts conformations as seen in β turn, α helix, or 310 helices. This type of conformation is observed and accommodated well by PKCK2α in calmodulin where the phosphorylation site is at the central helix. PP2A carries sequence patterns for PKCK2α phosphorylation. While the possibility of PP2A being phosphorylated by PKCK2 has been raised in the literature we use the model of PP2A to generate a model of PP2A-PKCK2α complex. PKCK2β undergoes phosphorylation by holoenzyme at the N-terminal region, and is accommodated very well in the limited space available at the substrate-binding site of the holoenzyme while the space is insufficient to accommodate the binding of PP2A or calmodulin in the holoenzyme. Conclusion Charge and shape complimentarity seems to play a role in substrate recognition and binding to PKCK2α, along with the consensus

  2. Medically Relevant Acinetobacter Species Require a Type II Secretion System and Specific Membrane-Associated Chaperones for the Export of Multiple Substrates and Full Virulence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, Christian M; Kinsella, Rachel L; Palmer, Lauren D; Skaar, Eric P; Feldman, Mario F

    2016-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii, A. nosocomialis, and A. pittii have recently emerged as opportunistic human pathogens capable of causing severe human disease; however, the molecular mechanisms employed by Acinetobacter to cause disease remain poorly understood. Many pathogenic members of the genus Acinetobacter contain genes predicted to encode proteins required for the biogenesis of a type II secretion system (T2SS), which have been shown to mediate virulence in many Gram-negative organisms. Here we demonstrate that Acinetobacter nosocomialis strain M2 produces a functional T2SS, which is required for full virulence in both the Galleria mellonella and murine pulmonary infection models. Importantly, this is the first bona fide secretion system shown to be required for virulence in Acinetobacter. Using bioinformatics, proteomics, and mutational analyses, we show that Acinetobacter employs its T2SS to export multiple substrates, including the lipases LipA and LipH as well as the protease CpaA. Furthermore, the Acinetobacter T2SS, which is found scattered amongst five distinct loci, does not contain a dedicated pseudopilin peptidase, but instead relies on the type IV prepilin peptidase, reinforcing the common ancestry of these two systems. Lastly, two of the three secreted proteins characterized in this study require specific chaperones for secretion. These chaperones contain an N-terminal transmembrane domain, are encoded adjacently to their cognate effector, and their disruption abolishes type II secretion of their cognate effector. Bioinformatic analysis identified putative chaperones located adjacent to multiple previously known type II effectors from several Gram-negative bacteria, which suggests that T2SS chaperones constitute a separate class of membrane-associated chaperones mediating type II secretion.

  3. Gene Expression Analysis of Zobellia galactanivorans during the Degradation of Algal Polysaccharides Reveals both Substrate-Specific and Shared Transcriptome-Wide Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    François Thomas

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Flavobacteriia are recognized as key players in the marine carbon cycle, due to their ability to efficiently degrade algal polysaccharides both in the open ocean and in coastal regions. The chemical complexity of algal polysaccharides, their differences between algal groups and variations through time and space, imply that marine flavobacteria have evolved dedicated degradation mechanisms and regulation of their metabolism during interactions with algae. In the present study, we report the first transcriptome-wide gene expression analysis for an alga-associated flavobacterium during polysaccharide degradation. Zobellia galactanivorans DsijT, originally isolated from a red alga, was grown in minimal medium with either glucose (used as a reference monosaccharide or one selected algal polysaccharide from brown (alginate, laminarin or red algae (agar, porphyran, ι- or κ-carrageenan as sole carbon source. Expression profiles were determined using whole-genome microarrays. Integration of genomic knowledge with the automatic building of a co-expression network allowed the experimental validation of operon-like transcription units. Differential expression analysis revealed large transcriptomic shifts depending on the carbon source. Unexpectedly, transcriptomes shared common signatures when growing on chemically divergent polysaccharides from the same algal phylum. Together with the induction of numerous transcription factors, this hints at complex regulation events that fine-tune the cell behavior during interactions with algal biomass in the marine environment. The results further highlight genes and loci that may participate in polysaccharide utilization, notably encoding Carbohydrate Active enZymes (CAZymes and glycan binding proteins together with a number of proteins of unknown function. This constitutes a set of candidate genes potentially representing new substrate specificities. By providing an unprecedented view of global transcriptomic

  4. Catalytic-site conformational equilibrium in nerve-agent adducts of acetylcholinesterase: possible implications for the HI-6 antidote substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artursson, Elisabet; Andersson, Per Ola; Akfur, Christine; Linusson, Anna; Börjegren, Susanne; Ekström, Fredrik

    2013-05-01

    Nerve agents such as tabun, cyclosarin and Russian VX inhibit the essential enzyme acetylcholinesterase (AChE) by organophosphorylating the catalytic serine residue. Nucleophiles, such as oximes, are used as antidotes as they can reactivate and restore the function of the inhibited enzyme. The oxime HI-6 shows a notably low activity on tabun adducts but can effectively reactivate adducts of cyclosarin and Russian VX. To examine the structural basis for the pronounced substrate specificity of HI-6, we determined the binary crystal structures of Mus musculus AChE (mAChE) conjugated by cyclosarin and Russian VX and found a conformational mobility of the side chains of Phe338 and His447. The interaction between HI-6 and tabun-adducts of AChE were subsequently investigated using a combination of time resolved fluorescence spectroscopy and X-ray crystallography. Our findings show that HI-6 binds to tabun inhibited Homo sapiens AChE (hAChE) with an IC50 value of 300μM and suggest that the reactive nucleophilic moiety of HI-6 is excluded from the phosphorus atom of tabun. We propose that a conformational mobility of the side-chains of Phe338 and His447 is a common feature in nerve-agent adducts of AChE. We also suggest that the conformational mobility allow HI-6 to reactivate conjugates of cyclosarin and Russian VX while a reduced mobility in tabun conjugated AChE results in steric hindrance that prevents efficient reactivation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Asp218 participates with Asp213 to bind a Ca2+ atom into the S1 subsite of aminopeptidase A: a key element for substrate specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claperon, Cédric; Rozenfeld, Raphael; Iturrioz, Xavier; Inguimbert, Nicolas; Okada, Mayumi; Roques, Bernard; Maigret, Bernard; Llorens-Cortes, Catherine

    2008-11-15

    APA (aminopeptidase A; EC 3.4.11.7) is a membrane-bound zinc metallopeptidase, also activated by Ca(2+), involved in the formation of brain angiotensin III, which exerts a tonic stimulatory action on the central control of blood pressure in hypertensive animals. In the present study, in the three-dimensional model of the ectodomain of mouse APA, we docked the specific APA inhibitor glutamate phosphonate, in the presence of Ca(2+). The model showed the presence of one Ca(2+) atom in an hydrophilic pocket corresponding to the S1 subsite in which the lateral chain of the inhibitor is pointing. In this pocket, the Ca(2+) atom was hexaco-ordinated with the acidic side chains of Asp(213) and Asp(218), the carbonyl group of Glu(215) and three water molecules, one of them being engaged in a hydrogen bond with the negatively charged carboxylate side chain of the inhibitor. Mutagenic replacement of Asp(213) and Asp(218) with a conservative residue maintained the ability of mutated APAs to be activated by Ca(2+). However, the replacement by a non-conservative residue abolished this property, demonstrating the crucial role of these residues in Ca(2+) binding. We also showed the involvement of these residues in the strict specificity of APA in the presence of Ca(2+) for N-terminal acidic residues from substrates or inhibitors, since mutagenic replacement of Asp(213) and Asp(218) induced a decrease of the inhibitory potencies of inhibitors homologous with acidic residues. Finally, this led to the rational design of a new potent APA inhibitor, NI926 (K(i)=70 nM), which allowed us to precisely localize Asp(213) at the entrance and Asp(218) at the bottom of the S1 subsite. Taken together, these data provide new insight into the organization and functional role of the APA S1 subsite and will allow the design of pharmacophore of the inhibitor, helpful for the development of a new generation of APA inhibitors as central-acting antihypertensive agents.

  6. Offshore Substrate

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — This shapefile displays the distribution of substrate types from Pt. Arena to Pt. Sal in central/northern California. Originally this data consisted of seven paper...

  7. Germacrene A Synthase in Yarrow (Achillea millefolium Is an Enzyme with Mixed Substrate Specificity: Gene Cloning, Functional Characterization and Expression Analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leila ePazouki

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Terpenoid synthases constitute a highly diverse gene family producing a wide range of cyclic and acyclic molecules consisting of isoprene (C5 residues. Often a single terpene synthase produces a spectrum of molecules of given chain length, but some terpene synthases can use multiple substrates, producing products of different chain length. Only a few such enzymes has been characterized, but the capacity for multiple-substrate use can be more widespread than previously thought. Here we focused on germacrene A synthase (GAS that is a key cytosolic enzyme in the sesquiterpene lactone biosynthesis pathway in the important medicinal plant Achillea millefolium (AmGAS. The full length encoding gene was heterologously expressed in Escherichia coli BL21 (DE3, functionally characterized, and its in vivo expression was analyzed. The recombinant protein catalyzed formation of germacrene A with the C15 substrate farnesyl diphosphate (FDP, while acyclic monoterpenes were formed with the C10 substrate geranyl diphosphate (GDP and cyclic monoterpenes with the C10 substrate neryl diphosphate (NDP. Although monoterpene synthesis has been assumed to be confined exclusively to plastids, AmGAS can potentially synthesize monoterpenes in cytosol when GDP or NDP become available. AmGAS enzyme had high homology with GAS sequences from other Asteraceae species, suggesting that multi-substrate use can be more widespread among germacrene A synthases than previously thought. Expression studies indicated that AmGAS was expressed in both autotrophic and heterotrophic plant compartments with the highest expression levels in leaves and flowers. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the cloning and characterization of germacrene A synthase coding gene in A. millefolium, and multi-substrate use of GAS enzymes.

  8. The lectin domains of polypeptide GalNAc-transferases exhibit carbohydrate-binding specificity for GalNAc: lectin binding to GalNAc-glycopeptide substrates is required for high density GalNAc-O-glycosylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandall, Hans H; Irazoqui, Fernando; Tarp, Mads Agervig

    2007-01-01

    Initiation of mucin-type O-glycosylation is controlled by a large family of UDP GalNAc:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (GalNAc-transferases). Most GalNAc-transferases contain a ricin-like lectin domain in the C-terminal end, which may confer GalNAc-glycopeptide substrate specificity...... to the enzyme. We have previously shown that the lectin domain of GalNAc-T4 modulates its substrate specificity to enable unique GalNAc-glycopeptide specificities and that this effect is selectively inhibitable by GalNAc; however, direct evidence of carbohydrate binding of GalNAc-transferase lectins has...... not been previously presented. Here, we report the direct carbohydrate binding of two GalNAc-transferase lectin domains, GalNAc-T4 and GalNAc-T2, representing isoforms reported to have distinct glycopeptide activity (GalNAc-T4) and isoforms without apparent distinct GalNAc-glycopeptide specificity (Gal...

  9. The 1.6 Å crystal structure of pyranose dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris rationalizes substrate specificity and reveals a flavin intermediate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tien Chye Tan

    Full Text Available Pyranose dehydrogenases (PDHs are extracellular flavin-dependent oxidoreductases secreted by litter-decomposing fungi with a role in natural recycling of plant matter. All major monosaccharides in lignocellulose are oxidized by PDH at comparable yields and efficiencies. Oxidation takes place as single-oxidation or sequential double-oxidation reactions of the carbohydrates, resulting in sugar derivatives oxidized primarily at C2, C3 or C2/3 with the concomitant reduction of the flavin. A suitable electron acceptor then reoxidizes the reduced flavin. Whereas oxygen is a poor electron acceptor for PDH, several alternative acceptors, e.g., quinone compounds, naturally present during lignocellulose degradation, can be used. We have determined the 1.6-Å crystal structure of PDH from Agaricus meleagris. Interestingly, the flavin ring in PDH is modified by a covalent mono- or di-atomic species at the C(4a position. Under normal conditions, PDH is not oxidized by oxygen; however, the related enzyme pyranose 2-oxidase (P2O activates oxygen by a mechanism that proceeds via a covalent flavin C(4a-hydroperoxide intermediate. Although the flavin C(4a adduct is common in monooxygenases, it is unusual for flavoprotein oxidases, and it has been proposed that formation of the intermediate would be unfavorable in these oxidases. Thus, the flavin adduct in PDH not only shows that the adduct can be favorably accommodated in the active site, but also provides important details regarding the structural, spatial and physicochemical requirements for formation of this flavin intermediate in related oxidases. Extensive in silico modeling of carbohydrates in the PDH active site allowed us to rationalize the previously reported patterns of substrate specificity and regioselectivity. To evaluate the regioselectivity of D-glucose oxidation, reduction experiments were performed using fluorinated glucose. PDH was rapidly reduced by 3-fluorinated glucose, which has the C2

  10. Specific features of sputtered atoms transport during Ta sub 2 O sub 5 film deposition on substrates of complicated spatial configuration

    CERN Document Server

    Bystrov, Y A; Volpyas, V A; Govako, E A; Timofeev, D E; Troshkov, V V

    2002-01-01

    The possibility of providing for uniform properties of the Ta sub 2 O sub 5 films on the surface of substrates, having complex form, is considered. The attempt is made to consider the sputtered atoms transport in the space of the target-substrate drift through the determination of the thermalization zone geometrical sizes and the subsequent transition of the sputtered particles into the diffusion mode. Various calculational models and static modeling methods are used for describing the process of the sputtered particles transport

  11. Structure and substrate specificity of the pyrococcal coenzyme A disulfide reductases/polysulfide reductases (CoADR/Psr): implications for S(0)-based respiration and a sulfur-dependent antioxidant system in Pyrococcus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herwald, Sanna; Liu, Albert Y; Zhu, Brian E; Sea, Kevin W; Lopez, Karlo M; Sazinsky, Matthew H; Crane, Edward J

    2013-04-23

    FAD and NAD(P)H-dependent coenzyme A disulfide reductases/polysulfide reductases (CoADR/Psr) have been proposed to be important for the reduction of sulfur and disulfides in the sulfur-reducing anaerobic hyperthermophiles Pyrococcus horikoshii and Pyrococcus furiosus; however, the form(s) of sulfur that the enzyme actually reduces are not clear. Here we determined the structure for the FAD- and coenzyme A-containing holoenzyme from P. horikoshii to 2.7 Å resolution and characterized its substrate specificity. The enzyme is relatively promiscuous and reduces a range of disulfide, persulfide, and polysulfide compounds. These results indicate that the likely in vivo substrates are NAD(P)H and di-, poly-, and persulfide derivatives of coenzyme A, although polysulfide itself is also efficiently reduced. The role of the enzyme in the reduction of elemental sulfur (S(8)) in situ is not, however, ruled out by these results, and the possible roles of this substrate are discussed. During aerobic persulfide reduction, rapid recycling of the persulfide substrate was observed, which is proposed to occur via sulfide oxidation by O(2) and/or H(2)O(2). As expected, this reaction disappears under anaerobic conditions and may explain observations by others that CoADR is not essential for S(0) respiration in Pyrococcus or Thermococcus but appears to participate in oxidative defense in the presence of S(0). When compared to the homologous Npsr enzyme from Shewanella loihica PV-4 and homologous enzymes known to reduce CoA disulfide, the phCoADR structure shows a relatively restricted substrate channel leading into the sulfur-reducing side of the FAD isoalloxazine ring, suggesting how this enzyme class may select for specific disulfide substrates.

  12. Mutation in the FMN Domain Modulates MCD Spectra of the iNOS Ferric Cyano Complex in a Substrate-Specific Manner

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sempombe, Joseph; Galinato, Mary Grace I.; Elmore, Bradley O.; Fan, Weihong; Guillemette, J. Guy; Lehnert, Nicolai; Kirk, Martin L.; Feng, Changjian

    2011-01-01

    We have obtained low temperature MCD spectra for ferric cyano complexes of the wild type and E546N mutant of a human iNOS oxygenase/FMN construct. The mutation at the FMN domain has previously been shown to modulate the MCD spectra of the L-arginine-bound ferric iNOS heme [Sempombe et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2009, 131, 6940–6941]. Addition of L-arginine to the wild type protein causes notable changes in the CN−-adduct MCD spectrum, while the E546N mutant spectrum is not perturbed. Moreover, the MCD spectral perturbation observed with L-arginine is absent in the CN− complexes incubated with N-hydroxy-L-arginine, which is the substrate for the second step of NOS catalysis. EPR spectroscopy also reveals a substrate dependency of the spectra. These results indicate that the interdomain FMN–heme interactions exert a long-range effect on key heme axial ligand-substrate interactions that determine substrate oxidation pathways of NOS. PMID:21718007

  13. Multiple alternative substrate kinetics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Vernon E

    2015-11-01

    The specificity of enzymes for their respective substrates has been a focal point of enzyme kinetics since the initial characterization of metabolic chemistry. Various processes to quantify an enzyme's specificity using kinetics have been utilized over the decades. Fersht's definition of the ratio kcat/Km for two different substrates as the "specificity constant" (ref [7]), based on the premise that the important specificity existed when the substrates were competing in the same reaction, has become a consensus standard for enzymes obeying Michaelis-Menten kinetics. The expansion of the theory for the determination of the relative specificity constants for a very large number of competing substrates, e.g. those present in a combinatorial library, in a single reaction mixture has been developed in this contribution. The ratio of kcat/Km for isotopologs has also become a standard in mechanistic enzymology where kinetic isotope effects have been measured by the development of internal competition experiments with extreme precision. This contribution extends the theory of kinetic isotope effects to internal competition between three isotopologs present at non-tracer concentrations in the same reaction mix. This article is part of a special issue titled: Enzyme Transition States from Theory and Experiment. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. Structure-function relationship of a plant NCS1 member - Homology modeling and mutagenesis identified residues critical for substrate specificity of PLUTO, a nucleobase transporter from arabidopsis

    KAUST Repository

    Witz, Sandra

    2014-03-12

    Plastidic uracil salvage is essential for plant growth and development. So far, PLUTO, the plastidic nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis thaliana is the only known uracil importer at the inner plastidic membrane which represents the permeability barrier of this organelle. We present the first homology model of PLUTO, the sole plant NCS1 member from Arabidopsis based on the crystal structure of the benzyl hydantoin transporter MHP1 from Microbacterium liquefaciens and validated by molecular dynamics simulations. Polar side chains of residues Glu-227 and backbones of Val-145, Gly-147 and Thr-425 are proposed to form the binding site for the three PLUTO substrates uracil, adenine and guanine. Mutational analysis and competition studies identified Glu-227 as an important residue for uracil and to a lesser extent for guanine transport. A differential response in substrate transport was apparent with PLUTO double mutants E227Q G147Q and E227Q T425A, both of which most strongly affected adenine transport, and in V145A G147Q, which markedly affected guanine transport. These differences could be explained by docking studies, showing that uracil and guanine exhibit a similar binding mode whereas adenine binds deep into the catalytic pocket of PLUTO. Furthermore, competition studies confirmed these results. The present study defines the molecular determinants for PLUTO substrate binding and demonstrates key differences in structure-function relations between PLUTO and other NCS1 family members. 2014 Witz et al.

  15. Structure-function relationship of a plant NCS1 member--homology modeling and mutagenesis identified residues critical for substrate specificity of PLUTO, a nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandra Witz

    Full Text Available Plastidic uracil salvage is essential for plant growth and development. So far, PLUTO, the plastidic nucleobase transporter from Arabidopsis thaliana is the only known uracil importer at the inner plastidic membrane which represents the permeability barrier of this organelle. We present the first homology model of PLUTO, the sole plant NCS1 member from Arabidopsis based on the crystal structure of the benzyl hydantoin transporter MHP1 from Microbacterium liquefaciens and validated by molecular dynamics simulations. Polar side chains of residues Glu-227 and backbones of Val-145, Gly-147 and Thr-425 are proposed to form the binding site for the three PLUTO substrates uracil, adenine and guanine. Mutational analysis and competition studies identified Glu-227 as an important residue for uracil and to a lesser extent for guanine transport. A differential response in substrate transport was apparent with PLUTO double mutants E227Q G147Q and E227Q T425A, both of which most strongly affected adenine transport, and in V145A G147Q, which markedly affected guanine transport. These differences could be explained by docking studies, showing that uracil and guanine exhibit a similar binding mode whereas adenine binds deep into the catalytic pocket of PLUTO. Furthermore, competition studies confirmed these results. The present study defines the molecular determinants for PLUTO substrate binding and demonstrates key differences in structure-function relations between PLUTO and other NCS1 family members.

  16. The All-Alpha Domains of Coupling Proteins from the Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirB/VirD4 and Enterococcus faecalis pCF10-Encoded Type IV Secretion Systems Confer Specificity to Binding of Cognate DNA Substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitaker, Neal; Chen, Yuqing; Jakubowski, Simon J; Sarkar, Mayukh K; Li, Feng; Christie, Peter J

    2015-07-01

    Bacterial type IV coupling proteins (T4CPs) bind and mediate the delivery of DNA substrates through associated type IV secretion systems (T4SSs). T4CPs consist of a transmembrane domain, a conserved nucleotide-binding domain (NBD), and a sequence-variable helical bundle called the all-alpha domain (AAD). In the T4CP structural prototype, plasmid R388-encoded TrwB, the NBD assembles as a homohexamer resembling RecA and DNA ring helicases, and the AAD, which sits at the channel entrance of the homohexamer, is structurally similar to N-terminal domain 1 of recombinase XerD. Here, we defined the contributions of AADs from the Agrobacterium tumefaciens VirD4 and Enterococcus faecalis PcfC T4CPs to DNA substrate binding. AAD deletions abolished DNA transfer, whereas production of the AAD in otherwise wild-type donor strains diminished the transfer of cognate but not heterologous substrates. Reciprocal swaps of AADs between PcfC and VirD4 abolished the transfer of cognate DNA substrates, although strikingly, the VirD4-AADPcfC chimera (VirD4 with the PcfC AAD) supported the transfer of a mobilizable plasmid. Purified AADs from both T4CPs bound DNA substrates without sequence preference but specifically bound cognate processing proteins required for cleavage at origin-of-transfer sequences. The soluble domains of VirD4 and PcfC lacking their AADs neither exerted negative dominance in vivo nor specifically bound cognate processing proteins in vitro. Our findings support a model in which the T4CP AADs contribute to DNA substrate selection through binding of associated processing proteins. Furthermore, MOBQ plasmids have evolved a docking mechanism that bypasses the AAD substrate discrimination checkpoint, which might account for their capacity to promiscuously transfer through many different T4SSs. For conjugative transfer of mobile DNA elements, members of the VirD4/TraG/TrwB receptor superfamily bind cognate DNA substrates through mechanisms that are largely undefined. Here

  17. Substrate Handbook for Biogas Production; Substrathandbok foer biogasproduktion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlsson, My; Uldal, Martina (AnoxKaldnes AB, Lund (Sweden))

    2009-02-15

    Today, co-digestion plants in Sweden treat a broad range of different substrates, of which some have not previously been used for anaerobic digestion. The major part of this organic waste derives from households, restaurants, food industries and farms. When evaluating a new substrate as feed for anaerobic digestion, several different aspects need to be taken into consideration, such as anaerobic degradability, TS/VS content, nutrient composition and risk for mechanical problems. Consequently, there is a need for practical guidelines on how to evaluate new substrates as raw materials for biogas production, including not only gas yield but also what practical and microbiological problems that may arise when the specific substrate is treated together with other substrates in the plant. The aim with this handbook is to provide a basis on how to evaluate new substrates as feed for anaerobic digestion. The intention is that this material will save time and effort for the personnel at the plant when they come in contact with new types of waste. Also, the aim is to facilitate the process of identifying new substrates within the ABP-regulation (1774/2002) and what requirements are then demanded on handling. The work with the handbook has been divided in three different parts; (1) an extensive literature study and a compilation of the achieved results, (2) interviews with personnel at most of the Swedish co-digestion plants to identify substrates and problems of interest, and (3) lab tests of selected substrates. The lab tests included Bio Methane Potential (BMP) tests as well as a simple characterization of each substrate based on fat/protein/carbohydrate content. All data origins from anaerobic digestion within the mesophilic temperature range, but the results and discussion are applicable also for thermophilic anaerobic digestion. The result of this work is a written report together with an Excel file which are to be directly used by the biogas plants as a basis in the

  18. Characterization of the outer membrane receptor ShuA from the heme uptake system of Shigella dysenteriae. Substrate specificity and identification of the heme protein ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkhard, Kimberly A; Wilks, Angela

    2007-05-18

    Shigella dysenteriae, like many bacterial pathogens, has evolved outer membrane receptor-mediated pathways for the uptake and utilization of heme as an iron source. As a first step toward understanding the mechanism of heme uptake we have undertaken a site-directed mutagenesis, spectroscopic, and kinetic analysis of the outer membrane receptor ShuA of S. dysenteriae. Purification of the outer membrane receptor gave a single band of molecular mass 73 kDa on SDS-PAGE. Initial spectroscopic analysis of the protein in either detergent micelles or lipid bicelles revealed residual heme bound to the receptor, with a Soret maximum at 413 nm. Titration of the protein with exogenous heme gave a Soret peak at 437 nm in detergent micelles, and 402 nm in lipid bicelles. However, transfer of heme from hemoglobin yields a Soret maximum at 413 nm identical to that of the isolated protein. Further spectroscopic and kinetic analysis revealed that hemoglobin in the oxidized state is the most likely physiological substrate for ShuA. In addition, mutation of the conserved histidines, H86A or H420A, resulted in a loss of the ability of the receptor to efficiently extract heme from hemoglobin. In contrast the double mutant H86A/H420A was unable to extract heme from hemoglobin. These findings taken together confirm that both His-86 and His-420 are essential for substrate recognition, heme coordination, and transfer. Furthermore, the full-length TonB was shown to form a 1:1 complex with either apo-ShuA H86A/H420A or the wild-type ShuA. These observations provide a basis for future studies on the coordination and transport of heme by the TonB-dependent outer membrane receptors.

  19. The Broad Superintendents Academy, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broad Foundation, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Broad Superintendents Academy is an executive training program that identifies and prepares prominent leaders--executives with experience successfully leading large organizations and a passion for public service--then places them in urban school districts to dramatically improve the quality of education for America's students. This brochure…

  20. NleB/SseK effectors from Citrobacter rodentium, Escherichia coli, and Salmonella enterica display distinct differences in host substrate specificity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    El Qaidi, Samir; Chen, Kangming; Halim, Adnan

    2017-01-01

    proteins with N-acetyl-D-glucosamine to inhibit antibacterial and inflammatory host responses. NleB is conserved among the attaching/effacing pathogens enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC), enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC), and Citrobacter rodentium. Moreover, Salmonella enterica strains encode up to three Nle...... of these effectors. SseK1, SseK3, EHEC NleB1, EPEC NleB1, and C. rodentium NleB blocked TNF-mediated NF-κB pathway activation, whereas SseK2 and NleB2 did not. C. rodentium NleB, EHEC NleB1, and SseK1 glycosylated host glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH). C. rodentium NleB, EHEC NleB1, EPEC NleB1......, and SseK2 glycosylated the Fas-associated death domain protein (FADD). SseK3 and NleB2 were not active against either substrate. We also found that EHEC NleB1 glycosylated two GAPDH arginine residues, R197 and R200 and that these two residues were essential for GAPDH-mediated activation of tumor necrosis...

  1. Influence of the RNase H domain of retroviral reverse transcriptases on the metal specificity and substrate selection of their polymerase domains

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pandey Virendra N

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Reverse transcriptases from HIV-1 and MuLV respectively prefer Mg2+ and Mn2+ for their polymerase activity, with variable fidelity, on both RNA and DNA templates. The function of the RNase H domain with respect to these parameters is not yet understood. To evaluate this function, two chimeric enzymes were constructed by swapping the RNase H domains between HIV-1 RT and MuLV RT. Chimeric HIV-1 RT, having the RNase H domain of MuLV RT, inherited the divalent cation preference characteristic of MuLV RT on the DNA template with no significant change on the RNA template. Chimeric MuLV RT, likewise partially inherited the metal ion preference of HIV-1 RT. Unlike the wild-type MuLV RT, chimeric MuLV RT is able to use both Mn.dNTP and Mg.dNTP on the RNA template with similar efficiency, while a 30-fold higher preference for Mn.dNTP was seen on the DNA template. The metal preferences for the RNase H activity of chimeric HIV-1 RT and chimeric MuLV RT were, respectively, Mn2+ and Mg2+, a property acquired through their swapped RNase H domains. Chimeric HIV-1 RT displayed higher fidelity and discrimination against rNTPs than against dNTPs substrates, a property inherited from MuLV RT. The overall fidelity of the chimeric MuLV RT was decreased in comparison to the parental MuLV RT, suggesting that the RNase H domain profoundly influences the function of the polymerase domain.

  2. Site-saturation engineering of lysine 47 in cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase from Paenibacillus macerans to enhance substrate specificity towards maltodextrin for enzymatic synthesis of 2-O-D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid (AA-2G).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Ruizhi; Liu, Long; Shin, Hyun-dong; Chen, Rachel R; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2013-07-01

    In this work, the site-saturation engineering of lysine 47 in cyclodextrin glycosyltransferase (CGTase) from Paenibacillus macerans was conducted to improve the specificity of CGTase towards maltodextrin, which can be used as a cheap and easily soluble glycosyl donor for the enzymatic synthesis of 2-O-D-glucopyranosyl-L-ascorbic acid (AA-2G) by CGTase. When using maltodextrin as glycosyl donor, four mutants K47F (lysine→ phenylalanine), K47L (lysine→ leucine), K47V (lysine→ valine) and K47W (lysine→ tryptophan) showed higher AA-2G yield as compared with that produced by the wild-type CGTase. The transformation conditions (temperature, pH and the mass ratio of L-ascorbic acid to maltodextrin) were optimized and the highest titer of AA-2G produced by the mutant K47L could reach 1.97 g/l, which was 64.2% higher than that (1.20 g/l) produced by the wild-type CGTase. The reaction kinetics analysis confirmed the enhanced maltodextrin specificity, and it was also found that compared with the wild-type CGTase, the four mutants had relatively lower cyclization activities and higher disproportionation activities, which was favorable for AA-2G synthesis. The mechanism responsible for the enhanced substrate specificity was further explored by structure modeling and it was indicated that the enhancement of maltodextrin specificity may be due to the short residue chain and the removal of hydrogen bonding interactions between the side chain of residue 47 and the sugar at -3 subsite. Here the obtained mutant CGTases, especially the K47L, has a great potential in the production of AA-2G with maltodextrin as a cheap and easily soluble substrate.

  3. Protease activity of PprI facilitates DNA damage response: Mn2+-dependence and substrate sequence-specificity of the proteolytic reaction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yunguang Wang

    Full Text Available The extremophilic bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans exhibits an extraordinary resistance to ionizing radiation. Previous studies established that a protein named PprI, which exists only in the Deinococcus-Thermus family, acts as a general switch to orchestrate the expression of a number of DNA damage response (DDR proteins involved in cellular radio-resistance. Here we show that the regulatory mechanism of PprI depends on its Mn(2+-dependent protease activity toward DdrO, a transcription factor that suppresses DDR genes' expression. Recognition sequence-specificity around the PprI cleavage site is essential for DNA damage repair in vivo. PprI and DdrO mediate a novel DNA damage response pathway differing from the classic LexA-mediated SOS response system found in radiation-sensitive bacterium Escherichia coli. This PprI-mediated pathway in D. radiodurans is indispensable for its extreme radio-resistance and therefore its elucidation significantly advances our understanding of the DNA damage repair mechanism in this amazing organism.

  4. Premating isolation is determined by larval rearing substrates in cactophilic Drosophila mojavensis. IX. Host plant and population specific epicuticular hydrocarbon expression influences mate choice and sexual selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havens, J A; Etges, W J

    2013-03-01

    Sexual signals in cactophilic Drosophila mojavensis include cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs), contact pheromones that mediate female discrimination of males during courtship. CHCs, along with male courtship songs, cause premating isolation between diverged populations, and are influenced by genotype × environment interactions caused by different host cacti. CHC profiles of mated and unmated adult flies from a Baja California and a mainland Mexico population of D. mojavensis reared on two host cacti were assayed to test the hypothesis that male CHCs mediate within-population female discrimination of males. In multiple choice courtship trials, mated and unmated males differed in CHC profiles, indicating that females prefer males with particular blends of CHCs. Mated and unmated females significantly differed in CHC profiles as well. Adults in the choice trials had CHC profiles that were significantly different from those in pair-mated adults from no-choice trials revealing an influence of sexual selection. Females preferred different male CHC blends in each population, but the influence of host cactus on CHC variation was significant only in the mainland population indicating population-specific plasticity in CHCs. Different groups of CHCs mediated female choice-based sexual selection in each population suggesting that geographical and ecological divergence has the potential to promote divergence in mate communication systems. © 2012 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2012 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  5. The Histone-H3K4-Specific Demethylase KDM5B Binds to Its Substrate and Product through Distinct PHD Fingers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianna J. Klein

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The histone lysine demethylase KDM5B regulates gene transcription and cell differentiation and is implicated in carcinogenesis. It contains multiple conserved chromatin-associated domains, including three PHD fingers of unknown function. Here, we show that the first and third, but not the second, PHD fingers of KDM5B possess histone binding activities. The PHD1 finger is highly specific for unmodified histone H3 (H3K4me0, whereas the PHD3 finger shows preference for the trimethylated histone mark H3K4me3. RNA-seq analysis indicates that KDM5B functions as a transcriptional repressor for genes involved in inflammatory responses, cell proliferation, adhesion, and migration. Biochemical analysis reveals that KDM5B associates with components of the nucleosome remodeling and deacetylase (NuRD complex and may cooperate with the histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1 in gene repression. KDM5B is downregulated in triple-negative breast cancer relative to estrogen-receptor-positive breast cancer. Overexpression of KDM5B in the MDA-MB 231 breast cancer cells suppresses cell migration and invasion, and the PHD1-H3K4me0 interaction is essential for inhibiting migration. These findings highlight tumor-suppressive functions of KDM5B in triple-negative breast cancer cells and suggest a multivalent mechanism for KDM5B-mediated transcriptional regulation.

  6. Structural insights into the substrate specificity and function of Escherichia coli K12 YgjK, a glucosidase belonging to the glycoside hydrolase family 63.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurakata, Yuma; Uechi, Akiko; Yoshida, Hiromi; Kamitori, Shigehiro; Sakano, Yoshiyuki; Nishikawa, Atsushi; Tonozuka, Takashi

    2008-08-01

    Proteins belonging to the glycoside hydrolase family 63 (GH63) are found in bacteria, archaea, and eukaryotes. Eukaryotic GH63 proteins are processing *-glucosidase I enzymes that hydrolyze an oligosaccharide precursor of eukaryotic N-linked glycoproteins. In contrast, the functions of the bacterial and archaeal GH63 proteins are unclear. Here we determined the crystal structure of a bacterial GH63 enzyme, Escherichia coli K12 YgjK, at 1.78 A resolution and investigated some properties of the enzyme. YgjK consists of the N-domain and the A-domain, joined by a linker region. The N-domain is composed of 18 antiparallel beta-strands and is classified as a super-beta-sandwich. The A-domain contains 16 *-helices, 12 of which form an (*/*)(6)-barrel; the remaining 4 *-helices are found in an extra structural unit that we designated as the A'-region. YgjK, a member of the glycoside hydrolase clan GH-G, shares structural similarity with glucoamylase (GH15) and chitobiose phosphorylase (GH94) [corrected] both of which belong to clan GH-L or GH-L-like [corrected] In crystal structures of YgjK in complex with glucose, mannose, and galactose, all of the glucose, mannose, and galactose units were located in the catalytic cleft. YgjK showed the highest activity for the *-1,3-glucosidic linkage of nigerose, but also hydrolyzed trehalose, kojibiose, and maltooligosaccharides from maltose to maltoheptaose, although the activities were low. These findings suggest that YgjK is a glucosidase with relaxed specificity for sugars.

  7. Power electronics substrate for direct substrate cooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Khiet [Mission Viejo, CA; Ward, Terence G [Redondo Beach, CA; Mann, Brooks S [Redondo Beach, CA; Yankoski, Edward P [Corona, CA; Smith, Gregory S [Woodland Hills, CA

    2012-05-01

    Systems and apparatus are provided for power electronics substrates adapted for direct substrate cooling. A power electronics substrate comprises a first surface configured to have electrical circuitry disposed thereon, a second surface, and a plurality of physical features on the second surface. The physical features are configured to promote a turbulent boundary layer in a coolant impinged upon the second surface.

  8. Study of Carbon Nanotube-Substrate Interaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaqueline S. Soares

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Environmental effects are very important in nanoscience and nanotechnology. This work reviews the importance of the substrate in single-wall carbon nanotube properties. Contact with a substrate can modify the nanotube properties, and such interactions have been broadly studied as either a negative aspect or a solution for developing carbon nanotube-based nanotechnologies. This paper discusses both theoretical and experimental studies where the interaction between the carbon nanotubes and the substrate affects the structural, electronic, and vibrational properties of the tubes.

  9. Prebiotics: preferential substrates for specific germs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberfroid, M B

    2001-02-01

    A prebiotic is "a non-digestible food ingredient that beneficially affects the host by selectively stimulating the growth and/or the activity of one or a limited number of bacteria in the colon." The premise is based on the hypothesis that the large gut in humans contains bacteria that are beneficial or detrimental to health. Although this generalization probably gives too simplistic a view of gut microbiology, it is a feasible working concept. Currently, food components that seem to exert the best prebiotic effects are inulin-type fructans. In pure culture, most species of bifidobacteria are adapted to the utilization of these nondigestible oligosaccharides but many other bacteria are also capable of metabolizing them. Clearly, these studies of pure bacteria are of limited use unless their results are supported by the results of studies using mixed cultures. Indeed, as many components of the gut microbiota as possible should be measured to indicate a true prebiotic effect. Simple stimulation of bifidobacteria is insufficient to demonstrate an effect; the effects on other gut microorganisms in vivo with human volunteers is necessary. Adjustment of the composition and activities of the colonic microflora so that health-promoting activities are optimized remains key in functional food development. New methods are being applied extensively to human gut microbiology and promise the degree of reliability required to detect subtle changes in colonic microflora composition and to correlate such changes with health benefits. This is a review of the present state of knowledge concerning prebiotics, with emphasis on the criteria used for classification, mechanisms of selective growth stimulation, and physiologic effects.

  10. Direct transfer of graphene onto flexible substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Luiz G P; Song, Yi; Zeng, Tingying; Dresselhaus, Mildred S; Kong, Jing; Araujo, Paulo T

    2013-10-29

    In this paper we explore the direct transfer via lamination of chemical vapor deposition graphene onto different flexible substrates. The transfer method investigated here is fast, simple, and does not require an intermediate transfer membrane, such as polymethylmethacrylate, which needs to be removed afterward. Various substrates of general interest in research and industry were studied in this work, including polytetrafluoroethylene filter membranes, PVC, cellulose nitrate/cellulose acetate filter membranes, polycarbonate, paraffin, polyethylene terephthalate, paper, and cloth. By comparing the properties of these substrates, two critical factors to ensure a successful transfer on bare substrates were identified: the substrate's hydrophobicity and good contact between the substrate and graphene. For substrates that do not satisfy those requirements, polymethylmethacrylate can be used as a surface modifier or glue to ensure successful transfer. Our results can be applied to facilitate current processes and open up directions for applications of chemical vapor deposition graphene on flexible substrates. A broad range of applications can be envisioned, including fabrication of graphene devices for opto/organic electronics, graphene membranes for gas/liquid separation, and ubiquitous electronics with graphene.

  11. THz metal mesh filters on electrically thick fused silica substrates

    OpenAIRE

    Otter, WJ; F. Hu; Hazell, JF; Lucyszyn, S

    2014-01-01

    ? 2014 IEEE.This paper shows simulated and measured results of ultra-low cost metal mesh filters on electrically thick substrates for millimeter-wave and THz bands. It provides a broad overview of metal mesh filters currently available and suggest why it is worth moving to an electrically thick substrate for ultra-low cost applications. We demonstrate scalable traditional metal mesh filters on 525 ?m thick fused silica substrates. In addition, trapped-mode excitation is exploited to improve o...

  12. [The broad bean's syndrome in ancient Egypt].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, D

    1989-01-01

    The problem of broad bean's syndrome and lathyrism in ancient Greece has been deeply studied, with particular referrement to the hypothetic medica and mystical reasons of the Pythagoric order not to eat broad beans. It is impossible to prove Egyptian influence of Phythagora's precept, but we can, however, consider the hypothesis that they had noticed the potential deadly effect of broad beans' use, too, and wonder if their interduction had the same motivations.

  13. The anomalous tides near Broad Sound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Middleton, Jason H.; Buchwald, V. T.; Huthnance, John M.

    Observations of tidal current and height, in conjunction with theoretical mathematical models are used to investigate the propagation of the tide near Broad Sound, a narrowing estuary situated on a wide section of continental shelf toward the southern end of the Great Barrier Reef. The observations indicate that the dense offshore reefs severely inhibit tidal flow, with the result that tides flood toward Broad Sound from the north and from the south, along the main lagoon. There is a local magnification of the semi-diurnal tides within Broad Sound itself. Models of flow across reefs confirm the effectiveness of dense, shallow, and broad reefs in acting as a barrier to the tide. The diffraction of tides through large gaps in the reef is modelled using conformal mapping techniques and with the inclusion of energy leakage, the diffraction model predicts magnification of the semi-diurnal tidal heights by a factor of about 4 and a phase lag of 3 h on the shelf near Broad Sound, these values being consistent with observation. The observed convergence of the tide close to, and within Broad Sound itself is consistent with the proximity of the semi-diurnal tidal period to the natural period for flow in Broad Sound, considered as a narrowing estuary. This results in further amplification, by an additional factor of about 1.5, so that the tides in Broad Sound are increased by a factor of between 5 and 6, altogether, compared with those elsewhere on the east Australian coast.

  14. Broad Prize: Do the Successes Spread?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    When the Broad Prize for Urban Education was created in 2002, billionaire philanthropist Eli Broad said he hoped the awards, in addition to rewarding high-performing school districts, would foster healthy competition; boost the prestige of urban education, long viewed as dysfunctional; and showcase best practices. Over the 10 years the prize has…

  15. Broad Academy's Growing Reach Draws Scrutiny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samuels, Christina A.

    2011-01-01

    Billionaire businessman Eli Broad, one of the country's most active philanthropists, founded the "Broad Superintendents Academy" in 2002 with an extraordinarily optimistic goal: Find leaders from both inside and outside education, train them, and have them occupying the superintendencies in a third of the 75 largest school districts--all in just…

  16. Metabolic Value Chemoattractants Are Preferentially Recognized at Broad Ligand Range Chemoreceptor of Pseudomonas putida KT2440

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matilde Fernández

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria have evolved a wide range of chemoreceptors with different ligand specificities. Typically, chemoreceptors bind ligands with elevated specificity and ligands serve as growth substrates. However, there is a chemoreceptor family that has a broad ligand specificity including many compounds that are not of metabolic value. To advance the understanding of this family, we have used the PcaY_PP (PP2643 chemoreceptor of Pseudomonas putida KT2440 as a model. Using Isothermal Titration Calorimetry we showed here that the recombinant ligand binding domain (LBD of PcaY_PP recognizes 17 different C6-ring containing carboxylic acids with KD values between 3.7 and 138 μM and chemoeffector affinity correlated with the magnitude of the chemotactic response. Mutation of the pcaY_PP gene abolished chemotaxis to these compounds; phenotype that was restored following gene complementation. Growth experiments using PcaY_PP ligands as sole C-sources revealed functional relationships between their metabolic potential and affinity for the chemoreceptor. Thus, only 7 PcaY_PP ligands supported growth and their KD values correlated with the length of the bacterial lag phase. Furthermore, PcaY_PP ligands that did not support growth had significantly higher KD values than those that did. The receptor has thus binds preferentially compounds that serve as C-sources and amongst them those that rapidly promote growth. Tightest binding compounds were quinate, shikimate, 3-dehydroshikimate and protocatechuate, which are at the interception of the biosynthetic shikimate and catabolic quinate pathways. Analytical ultracentrifugation studies showed that ligand free PcaY_PP-LBD is present in a monomer-dimer equilibrium (KD = 57.5 μM. Ligand binding caused a complete shift to the dimeric state, which appears to be a general feature of four-helix bundle LBDs. This study indicates that the metabolic potential of compounds is an important parameter in the molecular recognition

  17. Multisite Promiscuity in the Processing of Endogenous Substrates By Human Carboxylesterase 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bencharit, S.; Edwards, C.C.; Morton, C.L.; Howard-Williams, E.L.; Kuhn, P.; Potter, P.M.; Redinbo, M.R.; /North Carolina U. /St. Jude Children' s Hosp., Memphis /SLAC,

    2007-01-16

    Human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1) is a drug and endobiotic-processing serine hydrolase that exhibits relatively broad substrate specificity. It has been implicated in a variety of endogenous cholesterol metabolism pathways including the following apparently disparate reactions: cholesterol ester hydrolysis (CEH), fatty acyl Coenzyme A hydrolysis (FACoAH), acyl-Coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransfer (ACAT), and fatty acyl ethyl ester synthesis (FAEES). The structural basis for the ability of hCE1 to perform these catalytic actions involving large substrates and products has remained unclear. Here we present four crystal structures of the hCE1 glycoprotein in complexes with the following endogenous substrates or substrate analogues: Coenzyme A, the fatty acid palmitate, and the bile acids cholate and taurocholate. While the active site of hCE1 was known to be promiscuous and capable of interacting with a variety of chemically distinct ligands, these structures reveal that the enzyme contains two additional ligand-binding sites and that each site also exhibits relatively non-specific ligand-binding properties. Using this multisite promiscuity, hCE1 appears structurally capable of assembling several catalytic events depending, apparently, on the physiological state of the cellular environment. These results expand our understanding of enzyme promiscuity and indicate that, in the case of hCE1, multiple non-specific sites are employed to perform distinct catalytic actions.

  18. Measuring Prevention More Broadly, An Empirical...

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Measuring Prevention More Broadly, An Empirical Assessment of CHIPRA Core Measures Differences in CHIP design and structure, across states and over time, may limit...

  19. Prospects for broadly protective influenza vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treanor, John Jay

    2015-11-27

    The development of vaccines that could provide broad protection against antigenically variant influenza viruses has long been the ultimate prize in influenza research. Recent developments have pushed us closer to this goal, and such vaccines may now be within reach. This brief review outlines the current approaches to broadly protective vaccines, and the probable hurdles and roadblocks to achieving this goal. Copyright © 2015 American Journal of Preventive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  20. Personal glucose meters for detection and quantification of a broad range of analytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yi; Xiang, Yu

    2015-02-03

    A general methodology for the development of highly sensitive and selective sensors that can achieve portable, low-cost and quantitative detection of a broad range of targets using only a personal glucose meter (PGM) is disclosed. The method uses recognition molecules that are specific for a target agent, enzymes that can convert an enzyme substrate into glucose, and PGM. Also provided are sensors, which can include a solid support to which is attached a recognition molecule that permits detection of a target agent, wherein the recognition molecule specifically binds to the target agent in the presence of the target agent but not significantly to other agents as well as an enzyme that can catalyze the conversion of a substance into glucose, wherein the enzyme is attached directly or indirectly to the recognition molecule, and wherein in the presence of the target agent the enzyme can convert the substance into glucose. The disclosed sensors can be part of a lateral flow device. Methods of using such sensors for detecting target agents are also provided.

  1. Prediction and characterization of P-glycoprotein substrates potentially bound to different sites by emerging chemical pattern and hierarchical cluster analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Xianchao; Mei, Hu; Qu, Sujun; Huang, Shuheng; Sun, Jiaying; Yang, Li; Chen, Hua

    2016-04-11

    P-glycoprotein (P-gp), an ATP-binding cassette (ABC) multidrug transporter, can actively transport a broad spectrum of chemically diverse substrates out of cells and is heavily involved in multidrug resistance (MDR) in tumors. So far, the multiple specific binding sites remain a major obstacle in developing an efficient prediction method for P-gp substrates. Herein, emerging chemical pattern (ECP) combined by hierarchical cluster analysis was utilized to predict P-gp substrates as well as their potential binding sites. An optimal ECP model using only 3 descriptors was established with prediction accuracies of 0.80, 0.81 and 0.74 for 803 training samples, 120 test samples, and 179 independent validation samples, respectively. Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) of the ECPs of P-gp substrates derived 2 distinct ECP groups (ECPGs). Interestingly, HCA of the P-gp substrates based on ECP similarities also showed 2 distinct classes, which happened to be dominated by the 2 ECPGs, respectively. In the light of available experimental proofs and molecular docking results, the 2 distinct ECPGs were proved to be closely related to the binding profiles of R- and H-site substrates, respectively. The present study demonstrates, for the first time, a successful ECP model, which can not only accurately predict P-gp substrates, but also identify their potential substrate-binding sites. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Fluorogenic substrate [Ala-Pro](2)-cresyl violet but not Ala-Pro-rhodamine 110 is cleaved specifically by DPPIV activity: A study in living Jurkat cells and CD26/DPPIV-transfected Jurkat cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boonacker, Emil; Elferink, Sjoerd; Bardai, Abdennasser; Fleischer, Bernard; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.

    2003-01-01

    Fluorogenic substrates [Ala-Pro](2)-cresyl violet and Ala-Pro-rhodamine 110 have been tested for microscopic detection of protease activity of dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV) in living cells. DPPIV activity is one of the many functions of the multifunctional or moonlighting protein CD26/DPPIV. As a

  3. Applications of fibrous substrates containing insolubilized phase change polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigo, Tyrone L.; Bruno, Joseph S.

    1993-01-01

    Incorporation of polyethylene glycols into fibrous substrates produces several improved functional properties when they are insolubilized by crosslinking with a methylolamide resin or by polyacetal formation by their reaction with glyoxal. The range of molecular weights of polyols that may be insolubilized is broad as are the curing conditions (0.25-10 min at 80-200C). Most representative fiber types and blends (natural and synthetic) and all types of fabric constructions (woven, nonwoven and knit) have been modified by incorporation of the bound polyols. The most novel property is the thermal adaptability of the modified substrates to many climatic conditions. This adaptability is due to the high latent heat of the crosslinked polyols that function as phase change materials, the hydrophilic nature of the crosslinked polymer and its enhanced thermal conductivity. Other enhanced properties imparted to fabrics include flex and flat abrasion, antimicrobial activity, reduced static charge, resistance to oily soils, resiliency, wind resistance and reduced lint loss. Applications commercialized in the U.S. and Japan include sportswear and skiwear. Several examples of electric sets of properties useful for specific end uses are given. In addition, other uses are biomedical horticultural, aerospace, indoor insulation, automotive interiors and components and packaging material.

  4. Teaching the Broad, Interdisciplinary Impact of Evolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benson, David; Atlas, Pierre; Haberski, Raymond; Higgs, Jamie; Kiley, Patrick; Maxwell, Michael, Jr.; Mirola, William; Norton, Jamey

    2009-01-01

    As perhaps the most encompassing idea in biology, evolution has impacted not only science, but other academic disciplines as well. The broad, interdisciplinary impact of evolution was the theme of a course taught at Marian College, Indianapolis, Indiana in 2002, 2004, and 2006. Using a strategy that could be readily adopted at other institutions,…

  5. Giant Broad Line Regions in Dwarf Seyferts

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    High angular resolution spectroscopy obtained with the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) has revealed a remarkable population of galaxies hosting dwarf Seyfert nuclei with an unusually large broad-line region (BLR). These objects are remarkable for two reasons. Firstly, the size of the BLR can, in some cases, rival those ...

  6. A semisynthetic epitope for kinase substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Jasmina J; Li, Manqing; Brinkworth, Craig S; Paulson, Jennifer L; Wang, Dan; Hübner, Anette; Chou, Wen-Hai; Davis, Roger J; Burlingame, Alma L; Messing, Robert O; Katayama, Carol D; Hedrick, Stephen M; Shokat, Kevan M

    2007-06-01

    The ubiquitous nature of protein phosphorylation makes it challenging to map kinase-substrate relationships, which is a necessary step toward defining signaling network architecture. To trace the activity of individual kinases, we developed a semisynthetic reaction scheme, which results in the affinity tagging of substrates of the kinase in question. First, a kinase, engineered to use a bio-orthogonal ATPgammaS analog, catalyzes thiophosphorylation of its direct substrates. Second, alkylation of thiophosphorylated serine, threonine or tyrosine residues creates an epitope for thiophosphate ester-specific antibodies. We demonstrated the generality of semisynthetic epitope construction with 13 diverse kinases: JNK1, p38alpha MAPK, Erk1, Erk2, Akt1, PKCdelta, PKCepsilon, Cdk1/cyclinB, CK1, Cdc5, GSK3beta, Src and Abl. Application of this approach, in cells isolated from a mouse that expressed endogenous levels of an analog-specific (AS) kinase (Erk2), allowed purification of a direct Erk2 substrate.

  7. N-(jasmonoyl)tyrosine-derived compounds from flowers of broad beans (Vicia faba).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramell, Robert; Schmidt, Jürgen; Herrmann, Gabriele; Schliemann, Willibald

    2005-09-01

    Two new amide-linked conjugates of jasmonic acid, N-[(3R,7R)-(-)-jasmonoyl]-(S)-dopa (3) and N-[(3R,7R)-(-)-jasmonoyl]-dopamine (5), were isolated in addition to the known compound N-[(3R,7R)-(-)-jasmonoyl]-(S)-tyrosine (2) from the methanolic extract of flowers of broad bean (Vicia faba). Their structures were proposed on the basis of spectroscopic data (LC-MS/MS) and chromatographic properties on reversed and chiral phases and confirmed by partial syntheses. Furthermore, tyrosine conjugates of two cucurbic acid isomers (7, 8) were detected and characterized by LC-MS. Crude enzyme preparations from flowers of V. faba hydroxylated both (+/-)-2 and N-[(3R,7R/3S,7S)-(-)-jasmonoyl]tyramine [(+/-)-4] to (+/-)-3 and (+/-)-5, respectively, suggesting a possible biosynthetic relationship. In addition, a commercial tyrosinase (mushroom) and a tyrosinase-containing extract from hairy roots of red beet exhibited the same catalytic properties, but with different substrate specificities. The conjugates (+/-)-2, (+/-)-3, (+/-)-4, and (+/-)-5 exhibited in a bioassay low activity to elicit alkaloid formation in comparison to free (+/-)-jasmonic acid [(+/-)-1].

  8. Parallel evaluation of broad virus detection methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modrof, Jens; Berting, Andreas; Kreil, Thomas R

    2014-01-01

    The testing for adventitious viruses is of critical importance during development and production of biological products. The recent emergence and ongoing development of broad virus detection methods calls for an evaluation of whether these methods can appropriately be implemented into current adventitious agent testing procedures. To assess the suitability of several broad virus detection methods, a comparative experimental study was conducted: four virus preparations, which were spiked at two different concentrations each into two different cell culture media, were sent to four investigators in a blinded fashion for analysis with broad virus detection methods such as polymerase chain reaction-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR-ESI/MS), microarray, and two approaches utilizing massively parallel sequencing. The results that were reported by the investigators revealed that all methods were able to identify the majority of samples correctly (mean 83%), with a surprisingly narrow range among the methods, that is, between 72% (PCR-ESI/MS) and 95% (microarray). In addition to the correct results, a variety of unexpected assignments were reported for a minority of samples, again with little variation regarding the methods used (range 20-45%), while false negatives were reported for 0-25% of the samples. Regarding assay sensitivity, the viruses were detected by all methods included in this study at concentrations of about 4-5 log10 quantitative PCR copies/mL, and probably with higher sensitivity in some cases. In summary, the broad virus detection methods investigated were shown to be suitable even for detection of relatively low virus concentrations. However, there is also some potential for the production of false-positive as well as false-negative assignments, which indicates the requirement for further improvements before these methods can be considered for routine use. © PDA, Inc. 2014.

  9. Amino acid residues important for CMP-sialic acid recognition by the CMP-sialic acid transporter: analysis of the substrate specificity of UDP-galactose/CMP-sialic acid transporter chimeras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeshima-Futagami, Taro; Sakaguchi, Masayoshi; Uehara, Eriko; Aoki, Kazuhisa; Ishida, Nobuhiro; Sanai, Yutaka; Sugahara, Yasusato; Kawakita, Masao

    2012-12-01

    In our previous studies, we demonstrated that chimeric molecules of the CMP-sialic acid (CMP-Sia) transporter (CST) and the UDP-galactose (Gal) transporter (UGT) in which the seventh transmembrane helix-containing segment was derived from the CST could transport both CMP-Sia and UDP-Gal and that the CST-derived seventh transmembrane helix segment was sufficient for the chimera to recognize CMP-Sia in the otherwise UGT context. In this study, we continued to more precisely define the submolecular region that is necessary for CMP-Sia recognition, and we demonstrated that the N-terminal half of the seventh transmembrane helix of CST is essential for the CMP-Sia transport mediated by the chimeric transporters. We further showed that Tyr214Gly and Ser216Phe mutations of a chimeric transporter that was capable of transporting both CMP-Sia and UDP-Gal led to the selective loss of CMP-Sia transport activity without affecting UDP-Gal transport activity. Conversely, when a residue in a chimeric transporter that was active for UDP-Gal transport but not CMP-Sia transport was replaced by Tyr, so that Tyr occupied the same position as in the CMP-Sia transporter, the resulting mutant chimera acquired the ability to transport CMP-Sia. These results demonstrated that Tyr214 and Ser216, located in the seventh transmembrane helix of the human CST, are critically important for the recognition of CMP-Sia as a transport substrate. Identification of determinants critical for the discrimination between relevant and irrelevant substrates will advance our understanding of the mechanisms of substrate recognition by nucleotide sugar transporters.

  10. Azo-sulforhodamine dyes: a novel class of broad spectrum dark quenchers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chevalier, Arnaud; Renard, Pierre-Yves; Romieu, Anthony

    2014-08-01

    A rapid access to a novel class of water-soluble dark quencher dyes was achieved using an azo-coupling reaction between a fluorescent primary arylamine derived from a sulforhodamine 101 scaffold and a tertiary aniline equipped with different bioconjugatable groups. The thus obtained nonfluorescent azo-sulforhodamine hybrids display a broad quenching range spanning the visible to NIR regions. This was demonstrated through the preparation and enzymatic activation of FRET-based fluorogenic substrates of urokinase.

  11. PREFACE: Cell-substrate interactions Cell-substrate interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardel, Margaret; Schwarz, Ulrich

    2010-05-01

    not on the amount of ligand for adhesion receptors, but on its spatial distribution [1]. New protocols for the preparation of soft elastic substrates were essential to show that adhesion structures and cytoskeleton of adherent cells strongly adapt to substrate stiffness [2], with dramatic effects for cellular decision making. For example, it has been shown recently that differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells is strongly influenced by substrate stiffness [3]. Thus, physical factors appear to be equally important as biochemical ones in determining the cellular response to its substrate [4]. The introduction of novel physical techniques not only opened up completely new perspectives regarding biological function, it also introduced a new quantitative element into this field. For example, the availability of soft elastic substrates with controlled stiffness allows us to reconstruct cellular traction forces and to correlate them with other cellular features. This development enables modeling approaches to work in close contact with experimental data, thus opening up the perspective that the field of cell-substrate interactions will become a quantitative and predictive science in the future. Because physical research into cell-substrate interactions has become one of the fastest growing research areas in cellular biophysics and materials science, we believe that it is very timely that this special issue gathers some of the on-going research effort in this field. In contrast to the non-living world, cellular systems usually interact with their environment through specific adhesion, mainly based on adhesion receptors from the integrin family. During recent years, force spectroscopy has emerged as one of the main methods to study the physics of specific adhesion. In this special issue, single cell force spectroscopy is used by Boettiger and Wehrle-Haller to characterize the strength of cell-matrix adhesion and how it is modulated by the glycocalyx [5], while Chirasatitsin

  12. Characterization of coumarin-specific prenyltransferase activities in Citrus limon peel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munakata, Ryosuke; Inoue, Tsuyoshi; Koeduka, Takao; Sasaki, Kanako; Tsurumaru, Yusuke; Sugiyama, Akifumi; Uto, Yoshihiro; Hori, Hitoshi; Azuma, Jun-Ichi; Yazaki, Kazufumi

    2012-01-01

    Coumarins, a large group of polyphenols, play important roles in the defense mechanisms of plants, and they also exhibit various biological activities beneficial to human health, often enhanced by prenylation. Despite the high abundance of prenylated coumarins in citrus fruits, there has been no report on coumarin-specific prenyltransferase activity in citrus. In this study, we detected both O- and C-prenyltransferase activities of coumarin substrates in a microsome fraction prepared from lemon (Citrus limon) peel, where large amounts of prenylated coumarins accumulate. Bergaptol was the most preferred substrate out of various coumarin derivatives tested, and geranyl diphosphate (GPP) was accepted exclusively as prenyl donor substrate. Further enzymatic characterization of bergaptol 5-O-geranyltransferase activity revealed its unique properties: apparent K(m) values for GPP (9 µM) and bergaptol (140 µM) and a broad divalent cation requirement. These findings provide information towards the discovery of a yet unidentified coumarin-specific prenyltransferase gene.

  13. EBG Size Reduction for Low Permittivity Substrates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gonzalo Expósito-Domínguez

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Double layer and edge-location via techniques are combined for electromagnetic band gap (EBG size reduction. The study of the required number of elements and their dimensions is carried out in order to suppress the surface wave propagation modes and consequently to reduce the mutual coupling between radiating elements in low-permittivity substrates. By applying these techniques, the size of the EBG mushroom is reduced by 30%; however, the bandwidth operation maintains its value, and these structures can be integrated between radiating elements in broad bandwidth antennas.

  14. Broad-band semiconductor optical amplifiers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding Ying [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)]. E-mail: yingding@red.semi.ac.cn; Kan Qiang [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Wang Junling [Institute of Optoelectronic Technology, Beijing Jiaotong University, Beijing 100044 (China); Pan Jiaoqing [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Zhou Fan [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China); Chen Weixi [School of Physics, Peking University, Beijing 100871 (China); Wang Wei [Institute of Semiconductors, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100083 (China)

    2007-01-15

    Broad-band semiconductor optical amplifiers (SOAs) with different thicknesses and thin bulk tensile-strained active layers were fabricated and studied. Amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) spectra and gain spectra of SOAs were measured and analyzed at different CW biases. A maximal 3 dB ASE bandwidth of 136 nm ranging from 1480 to 1616 nm, and a 3 dB optical amplifier gain bandwidth of about 90 nm ranging from 1510 to 1600 nm, were obtained for the very thin bulk active SOA. Other SOAs characteristics such as saturation output power and polarization sensitivity were measured and compared.

  15. Broad spectrum antibiotic compounds and use thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koglin, Alexander; Strieker, Matthias

    2016-07-05

    The discovery of a non-ribosomal peptide synthetase (NRPS) gene cluster in the genome of Clostridium thermocellum that produces a secondary metabolite that is assembled outside of the host membrane is described. Also described is the identification of homologous NRPS gene clusters from several additional microorganisms. The secondary metabolites produced by the NRPS gene clusters exhibit broad spectrum antibiotic activity. Thus, antibiotic compounds produced by the NRPS gene clusters, and analogs thereof, their use for inhibiting bacterial growth, and methods of making the antibiotic compounds are described.

  16. Crx broadly modulates the pineal transcriptome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rovsing, Louise; Clokie, Samuel; Bustos, Diego M

    2011-01-01

    Cone-rod homeobox (Crx) encodes Crx, a transcription factor expressed selectively in retinal photoreceptors and pinealocytes, the major cell type of the pineal gland. In this study, the influence of Crx on the mammalian pineal gland was studied by light and electron microscopy and by use...... of microarray and qRTPCR technology, thereby extending previous studies on selected genes (Furukawa et al. 1999). Deletion of Crx was not found to alter pineal morphology, but was found to broadly modulate the mouse pineal transcriptome, characterized by a > 2-fold down-regulation of 543 genes and a > 2-fold up......-regulation of 745 genes (p pineal glands of wild...

  17. Distinct DNA-binding surfaces in the ATPase and linker domains of MutLγ determine its substrate specificities and exert separable functions in meiotic recombination and mismatch repair.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corentin Claeys Bouuaert

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Mlh1-Mlh3 (MutLγ is a mismatch repair factor with a central role in formation of meiotic crossovers, presumably through resolution of double Holliday junctions. MutLγ has DNA-binding, nuclease, and ATPase activities, but how these relate to one another and to in vivo functions are unclear. Here, we combine biochemical and genetic analyses to characterize Saccharomyces cerevisiae MutLγ. Limited proteolysis and atomic force microscopy showed that purified recombinant MutLγ undergoes ATP-driven conformational changes. In vitro, MutLγ displayed separable DNA-binding activities toward Holliday junctions (HJ and, surprisingly, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA, which was not predicted from current models. MutLγ bound DNA cooperatively, could bind multiple substrates simultaneously, and formed higher-order complexes. FeBABE hydroxyl radical footprinting indicated that the DNA-binding interfaces of MutLγ for ssDNA and HJ substrates only partially overlap. Most contacts with HJ substrates were located in the linker regions of MutLγ, whereas ssDNA contacts mapped within linker regions as well as the N-terminal ATPase domains. Using yeast genetic assays for mismatch repair and meiotic recombination, we found that mutations within different DNA-binding surfaces exert separable effects in vivo. For example, mutations within the Mlh1 linker conferred little or no meiotic phenotype but led to mismatch repair deficiency. Interestingly, mutations in the N-terminal domain of Mlh1 caused a stronger meiotic defect than mlh1Δ, suggesting that the mutant proteins retain an activity that interferes with alternative recombination pathways. Furthermore, mlh3Δ caused more chromosome missegregation than mlh1Δ, whereas mlh1Δ but not mlh3Δ partially alleviated meiotic defects of msh5Δ mutants. These findings illustrate functional differences between Mlh1 and Mlh3 during meiosis and suggest that their absence impinges on chromosome segregation not only via reduced

  18. Distinct DNA-binding surfaces in the ATPase and linker domains of MutLγ determine its substrate specificities and exert separable functions in meiotic recombination and mismatch repair

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Mlh1-Mlh3 (MutLγ) is a mismatch repair factor with a central role in formation of meiotic crossovers, presumably through resolution of double Holliday junctions. MutLγ has DNA-binding, nuclease, and ATPase activities, but how these relate to one another and to in vivo functions are unclear. Here, we combine biochemical and genetic analyses to characterize Saccharomyces cerevisiae MutLγ. Limited proteolysis and atomic force microscopy showed that purified recombinant MutLγ undergoes ATP-driven conformational changes. In vitro, MutLγ displayed separable DNA-binding activities toward Holliday junctions (HJ) and, surprisingly, single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), which was not predicted from current models. MutLγ bound DNA cooperatively, could bind multiple substrates simultaneously, and formed higher-order complexes. FeBABE hydroxyl radical footprinting indicated that the DNA-binding interfaces of MutLγ for ssDNA and HJ substrates only partially overlap. Most contacts with HJ substrates were located in the linker regions of MutLγ, whereas ssDNA contacts mapped within linker regions as well as the N-terminal ATPase domains. Using yeast genetic assays for mismatch repair and meiotic recombination, we found that mutations within different DNA-binding surfaces exert separable effects in vivo. For example, mutations within the Mlh1 linker conferred little or no meiotic phenotype but led to mismatch repair deficiency. Interestingly, mutations in the N-terminal domain of Mlh1 caused a stronger meiotic defect than mlh1Δ, suggesting that the mutant proteins retain an activity that interferes with alternative recombination pathways. Furthermore, mlh3Δ caused more chromosome missegregation than mlh1Δ, whereas mlh1Δ but not mlh3Δ partially alleviated meiotic defects of msh5Δ mutants. These findings illustrate functional differences between Mlh1 and Mlh3 during meiosis and suggest that their absence impinges on chromosome segregation not only via reduced formation of

  19. Crx broadly modulates the pineal transcriptome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rovsing, Louise; Clokie, Samuel; Bustos, Diego M.; Rohde, Kristian; Coon, Steven L.; Litman, Thomas; Rath, Martin F.; Møller, Morten; Klein, David C.

    2011-01-01

    Cone-rod homeobox (Crx) encodes Crx, a transcription factor expressed selectively in retinal photoreceptors and pinealocytes, the major cell type of the pineal gland. Here, the influence of Crx on the mammalian pineal gland was studied by light and electron microscopy and by use of microarray and qRTPCR technology, thereby extending previous studies on selected genes (Furukawa et al. 1999). Deletion of Crx was not found to alter pineal morphology, but was found to broadly modulate the mouse pineal transcriptome, characterized by a >2-fold downregulation of 543 genes and a >2-fold upregulation of 745 genes (p pineal glands of wild-type animals; only eight of these were also day/night expressed in the Crx−/− pineal gland. However, in the Crx−/− pineal gland 41 genes exhibit differential night/day expression that is not seen in wild-type animals. These findings indicate that Crx broadly modulates the pineal transcriptome and also influences differential night/day gene expression in this tissue. Some effects of Crx deletion on the pineal transcriptome might be mediated by Hoxc4 upregulation. PMID:21797868

  20. Robust plasmonic substrates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kostiučenko, Oksana; Fiutowski, Jacek; Tamulevicius, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Robustness is a key issue for the applications of plasmonic substrates such as tip-enhanced Raman spectroscopy, surface-enhanced spectroscopies, enhanced optical biosensing, optical and optoelectronic plasmonic nanosensors and others. A novel approach for the fabrication of robust plasmonic...

  1. Broad spectrum microarray for fingerprint-based bacterial species identification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frey Jürg E

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microarrays are powerful tools for DNA-based molecular diagnostics and identification of pathogens. Most target a limited range of organisms and are based on only one or a very few genes for specific identification. Such microarrays are limited to organisms for which specific probes are available, and often have difficulty discriminating closely related taxa. We have developed an alternative broad-spectrum microarray that employs hybridisation fingerprints generated by high-density anonymous markers distributed over the entire genome for identification based on comparison to a reference database. Results A high-density microarray carrying 95,000 unique 13-mer probes was designed. Optimized methods were developed to deliver reproducible hybridisation patterns that enabled confident discrimination of bacteria at the species, subspecies, and strain levels. High correlation coefficients were achieved between replicates. A sub-selection of 12,071 probes, determined by ANOVA and class prediction analysis, enabled the discrimination of all samples in our panel. Mismatch probe hybridisation was observed but was found to have no effect on the discriminatory capacity of our system. Conclusions These results indicate the potential of our genome chip for reliable identification of a wide range of bacterial taxa at the subspecies level without laborious prior sequencing and probe design. With its high resolution capacity, our proof-of-principle chip demonstrates great potential as a tool for molecular diagnostics of broad taxonomic groups.

  2. Broad ion beam serial section tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Winiarski, B., E-mail: b.winiarski@manchester.ac.uk [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Materials Division, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Gholinia, A. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Mingard, K.; Gee, M. [Materials Division, National Physical Laboratory, Teddington TW11 0LW (United Kingdom); Thompson, G.E.; Withers, P.J. [School of Materials, University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom)

    2017-01-15

    Here we examine the potential of serial Broad Ion Beam (BIB) Ar{sup +} ion polishing as an advanced serial section tomography (SST) technique for destructive 3D material characterisation for collecting data from volumes with lateral dimensions significantly greater than 100 µm and potentially over millimetre sized areas. Further, the associated low level of damage introduced makes BIB milling very well suited to 3D EBSD acquisition with very high indexing rates. Block face serial sectioning data registration schemes usually assume that the data comprises a series of parallel, planar slices. We quantify the variations in slice thickness and parallelity which can arise when using BIB systems comparing Gatan PECS and Ilion BIB systems for large volume serial sectioning and 3D-EBSD data acquisition. As a test case we obtain 3D morphologies and grain orientations for both phases of a WC-11%wt. Co hardmetal. In our case we have carried out the data acquisition through the manual transfer of the sample between SEM and BIB which is a very slow process (1–2 slice per day), however forthcoming automated procedures will markedly speed up the process. We show that irrespective of the sectioning method raw large area 2D-EBSD maps are affected by distortions and artefacts which affect 3D-EBSD such that quantitative analyses and visualisation can give misleading and erroneous results. Addressing and correcting these issues will offer real benefits when large area (millimetre sized) automated serial section BIBS is developed. - Highlights: • In this work we examine how microstructures can be reconstructed in three-dimensions (3D) by serial argon broad ion beam (BIB) milling, enabling much larger volumes (>250×250×100µm{sup 3}) to be acquired than by serial section focused ion beam-scanning electron microscopy (FIB-SEM). • The associated low level of damage introduced makes BIB milling very well suited to 3D-EBSD acquisition with very high indexing rates. • We explore

  3. Against a Broad Definition of "Empathy"

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Songhorian

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In this paper I will try to provide some arguments against a broad definition of “empathy”. Firstly, I will deal with attempts to define empathy as an umbrella concept. Then, I will try to point out the four main elements which contribute to the confusion that researchers in both the social and political as well as the scientific and philosophical domains face when dealing with empathy. In order to resolve this confusion, I suggest applying David Marr’s distinction to the field of empathy. Instead of providing an umbrella definition for empathy, which tries to account for all the data coming from different disciplines, I believe understanding that there are different levels of explanations and that different disciplines can contribute to each of them will provide a more detailed and less confused definition of empathy.

  4. Substrate mediated enzyme prodrug therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Betina Fejerskov

    Full Text Available In this report, we detail Substrate Mediated Enzyme Prodrug Therapy (SMEPT as a novel approach in drug delivery which relies on enzyme-functionalized cell culture substrates to achieve a localized conversion of benign prodrug(s into active therapeutics with subsequent delivery to adhering cells or adjacent tissues. For proof-of-concept SMEPT, we use surface adhered micro-structured physical hydrogels based on poly(vinyl alcohol, β-glucuronidase enzyme and glucuronide prodrugs. We demonstrate enzymatic activity mediated by the assembled hydrogel samples and illustrate arms of control over rate of release of model fluorescent cargo. SMEPT was not impaired by adhering cells and afforded facile time - and dose - dependent uptake of the in situ generated fluorescent cargo by hepatic cells, HepG2. With the use of a glucuronide derivative of an anticancer drug, SN-38, SMEPT afforded a decrease in cell viability to a level similar to that achieved using parent drug. Finally, dose response was achieved using SMEPT and administration of judiciously chosen concentration of SN-38 glucuronide prodrug thus revealing external control over drug delivery using drug eluting surface. We believe that this highly adaptable concept will find use in diverse biomedical applications, specifically surface mediated drug delivery and tissue engineering.

  5. Species specific inhibition of viral replication using dicer substrate siRNAs (DsiRNAs) targeting the viral nucleoprotein of the fish pathogenic rhabdovirus viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bohle, Harry; Lorenzen, Niels; Schyth, Brian Dall

    2011-01-01

    Gene knock down by the use of small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) is widely used as a method for reducing the expression of specific genes in eukaryotic cells via the RNA interference pathway. But, the effectivity of siRNA induced gene knock down in cells from fish has in several studies been...... for dicer for the generation of siRNAs targeting the nucleoprotein N gene of viral hemorrhagic septicemia virus (VHSV). This rhabdovirus infects salmonid fish and is responsible for large yearly losses in aquaculture production. Specificity of the DsiRNA is assured in two ways: first, by using...

  6. Cortical substrates for the perception of face actions: an fMRI study of the specificity of activation for seen speech and for meaningless lower-face acts (gurning).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, R; MacSweeney, M; Surguladze, S; Calvert, G; McGuire, P; Suckling, J; Brammer, M J; David, A S

    2001-10-01

    Can the cortical substrates for the perception of face actions be distinguished when the superficial visual qualities of these actions are very similar? Two fMRI experiments are reported. Compared with watching the face at rest, observing silent speech was associated with bilateral activation in a number of temporal cortical regions, including the superior temporal sulcus (STS). Watching face movements of similar extent and duration, but which could not be construed as speech (gurning; Experiment 1b) was not associated with activation of superior temporal cortex to the same extent, especially in the left hemisphere. Instead, the peak focus of the largest cluster of activation was in the posterior part of the inferior temporal gyrus (right, BA 37). Observing silent speech, but not gurning faces, was also associated with bilateral activation of inferior frontal cortex (BA 44 and 45). In a second study, speechreading and observing gurning faces were compared within a single experiment, using stimuli which comprised the speaker's face and torso (and hence a much smaller image of the speaker's face and facial actions). There was again differential engagement of superior temporal cortex which followed the pattern of Experiment 1. These findings suggest that superior temporal gyrus and neighbouring regions are activated bilaterally when subjects view face actions--at different scales--that can be interpreted as speech. This circuitry is not accessed to the same extent by visually similar, but linguistically meaningless actions. However, some temporal regions, such as the posterior part of the right superior temporal sulcus, appear to be common processing sites for processing both seen speech and gurns.

  7. Substrate specificities of three members of the human UDP-N-acetyl-alpha-D-galactosamine:Polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferase family, GalNAc-T1, -T2, and -T3

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wandall, H H; Hassan, H; Mirgorodskaya, E

    1997-01-01

    Mucin-type O-glycosylation is initiated by UDP-N-acetylgalactosamine:polypeptide N-acetylgalactosaminyltransferases (GalNAc-transferases). The role each GalNAc-transferase plays in O-glycosylation is unclear. In this report we characterized the specificity and kinetic properties of three purified...

  8. Broad-Band Activatable White-Opsin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subrata Batabyal

    Full Text Available Currently, the use of optogenetic sensitization of retinal cells combined with activation/inhibition has the potential to be an alternative to retinal implants that would require electrodes inside every single neuron for high visual resolution. However, clinical translation of optogenetic activation for restoration of vision suffers from the drawback that the narrow spectral sensitivity of an opsin requires active stimulation by a blue laser or a light emitting diode with much higher intensities than ambient light. In order to allow an ambient light-based stimulation paradigm, we report the development of a 'white-opsin' that has broad spectral excitability in the visible spectrum. The cells sensitized with white-opsin showed excitability at an order of magnitude higher with white light compared to using only narrow-band light components. Further, cells sensitized with white-opsin produced a photocurrent that was five times higher than Channelrhodopsin-2 under similar photo-excitation conditions. The use of fast white-opsin may allow opsin-sensitized neurons in a degenerated retina to exhibit a higher sensitivity to ambient white light. This property, therefore, significantly lowers the activation threshold in contrast to conventional approaches that use intense narrow-band opsins and light to activate cellular stimulation.

  9. Multivalent dendritic molecules as broad spectrum bacteria agglutination agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shuzhang; Abu-Esba, Lica; Turkyilmaz, Serhan; White, Alexander G; Smith, Bradley D

    2013-01-01

    This study reports the first set of synthetic molecules that act as broad spectrum agglutination agents and thus are complementary to the specific targeting of antibodies. The molecules have dendritic architecture and contain multiple copies of zinc(II)-dipicolylamine (ZnDPA) units that have selective affinity for the bacterial cell envelope. A series of molecular structures were evaluated, with the number of appended ZnDPA units ranging from four to thirty-two. Agglutination assays showed that the multivalent probes rapidly cross-linked ten different strains of bacteria, regardless of Gram-type and cell morphology. Fluorescence microscopy studies using probes with four ZnDPA units indicated a high selectivity for bacteria agglutination in the presence of mammalian cells and no measurable effect on the health of the cells. The high bacterial selectivity was confirmed by conducting in vivo optical imaging studies of a mouse leg infection model. The results suggest that multivalent ZnDPA molecular probes with dendritic structures have great promise as selective, broad spectrum bacterial agglutination agents for infection imaging and theranostic applications.

  10. Nitrification in a zeoponic substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGilloway, R. L.; Weaver, R. W.; Ming, D. W.; Gruener, J. E.

    2003-01-01

    Clinoptilolite is a zeolite mineral with high cation exchange capacity used in zeoponic substrates that have been proposed as a solid medium for growing plants or as a fertilizer material. The kinetics of nitrification has not been measured for NH4+ saturated zeoponic substrate. Experiments were conducted to evaluate the production of NO2- and NO3-, and nitrifier populations in zeoponic substrates. Small columns were filled with zeoponic substrate inoculated with a commercial inoculum or soil enrichment culture of nitrifying bacteria. In addition to column studies, a growth chamber study was conducted to evaluate the kinetics of nitrification in zeoponic substrates used to grow radishes (Raphanus sativus L.). The zeoponic substrate provided a readily available source of NH4+, and nitrifying bacteria were active in the substrate. Ammonium oxidation rates in column studies ranged from 5 to 10 micrograms N g-1 substrate h-1, and NO2- oxidation rates were 2 to 9.5 micrograms N g-1 substrate h-1. Rates determined from the growth chamber study were approximately 1.2 micrograms N g-1 substrate h-1. Quantities of NH4+ oxidized to NO2- and NO3- in inoculated zeoponic substrate were in excess of plant up-take. Acidification as a result of NH4+ oxidation resulted in a pH decline, and the zeoponic substrate showed limited buffering capacity.

  11. Arctic Change Information for a Broad Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soreide, N. N.; Overland, J. E.; Calder, J.

    2002-12-01

    Demonstrable environmental changes have occurred in the Arctic over the past three decades. NOAA's Arctic Theme Page is a rich resource web site focused on high latitude studies and the Arctic, with links to widely distributed data and information focused on the Arctic. Included is a collection of essays on relevant topics by experts in Arctic research. The website has proven useful to a wide audience, including scientists, students, teachers, decision makers and the general public, as indicated through recognition by USA Today, Science magazine, etc. (http://www.arctic.noaa.gov) Working jointly with NSF and the University of Washington's Polar Science Center as part of the Study of Environmental Arctic Change (SEARCH) program, NOAA has developed a website for access to pan-Arctic time series spanning diverse data types including climate indices, atmospheric, oceanic, sea ice, terrestrial, biological and fisheries. Modest analysis functions and more detailed analysis results are provided. (http://www.unaami.noaa.gov/). This paper will describe development of an Artic Change Detection status website to provide a direct and comprehensive view of previous and ongoing change in the Arctic for a broad climate community. For example, composite metrics are developed using principal component analysis based on 86 multivariate pan-Arctic time series for seven data types. Two of these metrics can be interpreted as a regime change/trend component and an interdecadal component. Changes can also be visually observed through tracking of 28 separate biophysical indicators. Results will be presented in the form of a web site with relevant, easily understood, value-added knowledge backed by peer review from Arctic scientists and scientific journals.

  12. Feedback from Broad Absorption Line Quasars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartas, George; Saez, C.

    2008-03-01

    The fraction of the total bolometric energy released over an AGN's lifetime into the ISM and IGM in the form kinetic energy injection scales as the outflow velocity to the third power so we expect that powerful broad absorption line (BAL) quasars may have mass outflow rates that are large enough to influence significantly the formation of the host galaxy and to regulate the growth of the central black hole. One of the most promising radio quiet quasars for studying the properties of the outflow is the lensed BAL quasar APM 08279+5255. The large flux magnification by a factor of about 100 provided by the gravitational lens effect combined with the large redshift (z = 3.91) of the quasar have provided the highest S/N X-ray spectra of a quasar containing X-ray BALs. We present results from recent monitoring observations of APM 08279+5255. performed with the Suzaku, XMM-Newton and Chandra observatories. Significant variability of the X-ray BALs is detected on timescales as short as 4 days (proper time) implying launching radii of about 6 times the Schwarzschild radius. The fitted width of the X-ray absorption troughs imply a large gradient in the outflow velocity of the X-ray absorbers with projected outflow velocities of up to 0.5c. The notch-like shape of the detected X-ray BALs are similar to those produced in recent numerical simulations (i.e. Schurch & Done 2007) that include radiative transfer calculations through highly ionized X-ray absorbers outflowing at near relativistic velocities. We provide preliminary constraints of the outflows properties.

  13. Broadly protective influenza vaccines: Redirecting the antibody response through adjuvation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cox, F.

    2016-01-01

    Influenza virus infections are responsible for significant morbidity worldwide and current vaccines have limited coverage, therefore it remains a high priority to develop broadly protective vaccines. With the discovery of broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) against influenza these vaccines

  14. WHO Study Group on cell substrates for production of biologicals, Geneva, Switzerland, 11-12 June 2007.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knezevic, I; Stacey, G; Petricciani, J

    2008-05-01

    For many years, the World Health Organization (WHO) has provided global leadership in defining technical specifications for quality assurance and safety of biological medicines produced in cell substrates. Current WHO requirements for the use of animal cells as substrates for production of vaccines and other biologicals were adopted by the WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization in 1996 (WHO TRS 878). Since then, significant progress especially in the development of vaccines in novel continuous cell lines of mammalian origin as well as in insect cells has been made and consequently there is an increasing need for the re-evaluation of existing criteria for the acceptability of such cell lines. In addition there is also a need to consider new issues in cell substrate safety arising from these new cell types and developments in technology and scientific knowledge. In response to these demands, the WHO Study Group on Cell Substrates was formed in 2006 to initiate revision of WHO requirements and to address the need for further research in this area. At its second meeting on 11-12 June 2007, the Study Group reviewed scientific data that would form the basis for new recommendations and made a number of proposals for further investigations. The Study Group is working on the preparation of a revised WHO document, and a broad consultation with regulators, manufacturers, and other relevant parties is planned for 2008.

  15. Modeling of optical wireless scattering communication channels over broad spectra.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weihao; Zou, Difan; Xu, Zhengyuan

    2015-03-01

    The air molecules and suspended aerosols help to build non-line-of-sight (NLOS) optical scattering communication links using carriers from near infrared to visible light and ultraviolet bands. This paper proposes channel models over such broad spectra. Wavelength dependent Rayleigh and Mie scattering and absorption coefficients of particles are analytically obtained first. They are applied to the ray tracing based Monte Carlo method, which models the photon scattering angle from the scatterer and propagation distance between two consecutive scatterers. Communication link path loss is studied under different operation conditions, including visibility, particle density, wavelength, and communication range. It is observed that optimum communication performances exist across the wavelength under specific atmospheric conditions. Infrared, visible light and ultraviolet bands show their respective features as conditions vary.

  16. Substrate recognition by ribonucleoprotein ribonuclease MRP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esakova, Olga; Perederina, Anna; Quan, Chao; Berezin, Igor; Krasilnikov, Andrey S

    2011-02-01

    The ribonucleoprotein complex ribonuclease (RNase) MRP is a site-specific endoribonuclease essential for the survival of the eukaryotic cell. RNase MRP closely resembles RNase P (a universal endoribonuclease responsible for the maturation of the 5' ends of tRNA) but recognizes distinct substrates including pre-rRNA and mRNA. Here we report the results of an in vitro selection of Saccharomyces cerevisiae RNase MRP substrates starting from a pool of random sequences. The results indicate that RNase MRP cleaves single-stranded RNA and is sensitive to sequences in the immediate vicinity of the cleavage site requiring a cytosine at the position +4 relative to the cleavage site. Structural implications of the differences in substrate recognition by RNases P and MRP are discussed.

  17. Identification of secreted proteins of Aspergillus oryzae associated with growth on solid cereal substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Biesebeke, te R.; Boussier, A.; Biezen, de N.; Hondel, van den C.; Punt, P.J.

    2006-01-01

    Filamentous growth of Aspergillus oryzae on solid cereal substrates involves secretion of substrate converting enzymes and a solid substrate specific polarised hyphal growth phenotype. To identify proteins produced under these specific conditions, the extracts of A. oryzae grown on wheat-based media

  18. MICROLENSING OF QUASAR BROAD EMISSION LINES: CONSTRAINTS ON BROAD LINE REGION SIZE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guerras, E.; Mediavilla, E. [Instituto de Astrofisica de Canarias, Via Lactea S/N, La Laguna E-38200, Tenerife (Spain); Jimenez-Vicente, J. [Departamento de Fisica Teorica y del Cosmos, Universidad de Granada, Campus de Fuentenueva, E-18071 Granada (Spain); Kochanek, C. S. [Department of Astronomy and the Center for Cosmology and Astroparticle Physics, The Ohio State University, 4055 McPherson Lab, 140 West 18th Avenue, Columbus, OH 43221 (United States); Munoz, J. A. [Departamento de Astronomia y Astrofisica, Universidad de Valencia, E-46100 Burjassot, Valencia (Spain); Falco, E. [Center for Astrophysics, 60 Garden Street, Cambridge, MA 02138 (United States); Motta, V. [Departamento de Fisica y Astronomia, Universidad de Valparaiso, Avda. Gran Bretana 1111, Valparaiso (Chile)

    2013-02-20

    We measure the differential microlensing of the broad emission lines between 18 quasar image pairs in 16 gravitational lenses. We find that the broad emission lines are in general weakly microlensed. The results show, at a modest level of confidence (1.8{sigma}), that high ionization lines such as C IV are more strongly microlensed than low ionization lines such as H{beta}, indicating that the high ionization line emission regions are more compact. If we statistically model the distribution of microlensing magnifications, we obtain estimates for the broad line region size of r{sub s} = 24{sup +22} {sub -15} and r{sub s} = 55{sup +150} {sub -35} lt-day (90% confidence) for the high and low ionization lines, respectively. When the samples are divided into higher and lower luminosity quasars, we find that the line emission regions of more luminous quasars are larger, with a slope consistent with the expected scaling from photoionization models. Our estimates also agree well with the results from local reveberation mapping studies.

  19. Solid substrate fermentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tengerdy, R.P.

    1985-04-01

    Solid Substrate Fermentation (SSF) describes the microbiological tranformation of biological materials in their natural state, in contrast with liquid or submerged fermentations which are carried out in dilute solutions or slurries. The most important industrial microorganisms used in SSF are filamentous fungi and the critical factors in their growth are the control of the moisture level and the temperature. Traditionally, most SSFs are conducted in shallow trays (so that heat build up is avoided) and stacked in a moist chamber, however, the modern SSF should be able to mix large amounts of substrate for a uniform fermentation, maximum automization scale-up of the process, continuous operation and fermentation control and a promising new design is the Helical screw fermenter. At the present time SSF is used in the production of foods (e.g. mushrooms and oriental foods) in municipal, agricultural and industrial solid waste disposal and in the production of enzymes and speciality chemicals but it does not seem likely that it will replace prevalent liquid fermentation technologies. 29 references.

  20. Multistructural biomimetic substrates for controlled cellular differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orza, Anamaria I.; Mihu, Carmen; Soritau, Olga; Diudea, Mircea; Florea, Adrian; Matei, Horea; Balici, Stefana; Mudalige, Thilak; Kanarpardy, Ganesh K.; Biris, Alexandru S.

    2014-02-01

    Multidimensional scaffolds are considered to be ideal candidates for regenerative medicine and tissue engineering based on their potential to provide an excellent microenvironment and direct the fate of the cultured cells. More recently, the use of stem cells in medicine has opened a new technological opportunity for controlled tissue formation. However, the mechanism through which the substrate directs the differentiation of stem cells is still rather unclear. Data concerning its specific surface chemistry, topology, and its signaling ability need to be further understood and analyzed. In our study, atomic force microscopy was used to study the stiffness, roughness, and topology of the collagen (Coll) and metallized collagen (MC) substrates, proposed as an excellent substrate for regenerative medicine. The importance of signaling molecules was studied by constructing a new hybrid signaling substrate that contains both collagen and laminin extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. The cellular response—such as attachment capability, proliferation and cardiac and neuronal phenotype expression on the metallized and non-metallized hybrid substrates (collagen + laminin)—was studied using MTT viability assay and immunohistochemistry studies. Our findings indicate that such hybrid materials could play an important role in the regeneration of complex tissues.

  1. Donor substrate promiscuity of bacterial β1-3-N-acetylglucosaminyltransferases and acceptor substrate flexibility of β1-4-galactosyltransferases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanhong; Xue, Mengyang; Sheng, Xue; Yu, Hai; Zeng, Jie; Thon, Vireak; Chen, Yi; Muthana, Musleh M; Wang, Peng G; Chen, Xi

    2016-04-15

    β1-3-N-Acetylglucosaminyltransferases (β3GlcNAcTs) and β1-4-galactosyltransferases (β4GalTs) have been broadly used in enzymatic synthesis of N-acetyllactosamine (LacNAc)-containing oligosaccharides and glycoconjugates including poly-LacNAc, and lacto-N-neotetraose (LNnT) found in the milk of human and other mammals. In order to explore oligosaccharides and derivatives that can be synthesized by the combination of β3GlcNAcTs and β4GalTs, donor substrate specificity studies of two bacterial β3GlcNAcTs from Helicobacter pylori (Hpβ3GlcNAcT) and Neisseria meningitidis (NmLgtA), respectively, using a library of 39 sugar nucleotides were carried out. The two β3GlcNAcTs have complementary donor substrate promiscuity and 13 different trisaccharides were produced. They were used to investigate the acceptor substrate specificities of three β4GalTs from Neisseria meningitidis (NmLgtB), Helicobacter pylori (Hpβ4GalT), and bovine (Bβ4GalT), respectively. Ten of the 13 trisaccharides were shown to be tolerable acceptors for at least one of these β4GalTs. The application of NmLgtA in one-pot multienzyme (OPME) synthesis of two trisaccharides including GalNAcβ1-3Galβ1-4GlcβProN3 and Galβ1-3Galβ1-4Glc was demonstrated. The study provides important information for using these glycosyltransferases as powerful catalysts in enzymatic and chemoenzymatic syntheses of oligosaccharides and derivatives which can be useful probes and reagents. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Multifunctional epitaxial systems on silicon substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singamaneni, Srinivasa Rao, E-mail: ssingam@ncsu.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Materials Science Division, Army Research Office, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States); Department of Physics, The University of Texas at El Paso, El Paso, Texas 79968 (United States); Prater, John Thomas [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States); Materials Science Division, Army Research Office, Research Triangle Park, North Carolina 27709 (United States); Narayan, Jagdish [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, North Carolina State University, Raleigh, North Carolina 27695 (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Multifunctional heterostructures can exhibit a wide range of functional properties, including colossal magneto-resistance, magnetocaloric, and multiferroic behavior, and can display interesting physical phenomena including spin and charge ordering and strong spin-orbit coupling. However, putting this functionality to work remains a challenge. To date, most of the work reported in the literature has dealt with heterostructures deposited onto closely lattice matched insulating substrates such as DyScO{sub 3}, SrTiO{sub 3} (STO), or STO buffered Si(100) using concepts of lattice matching epitaxy (LME). However, strain in heterostructures grown by LME is typically not fully relaxed and the layers contain detrimental defects such as threading dislocations that can significantly degrade the physical properties of the films and adversely affect the device characteristics. In addition, most of the substrates are incompatible with existing CMOS-based technology, where Si (100) substrates dominate. This review discusses recent advances in the integration of multifunctional oxide and non-oxide materials onto silicon substrates. An alternative thin film growth approach, called “domain matching epitaxy,” is presented which identifies approaches for minimizing lattice strain and unwanted defects in large misfit systems (7%–25% and higher). This approach broadly allows for the integration of multifunctional materials onto silicon substrates, such that sensing, computation, and response functions can be combined to produce next generation “smart” devices. In general, pulsed laser deposition has been used to epitaxially grow these materials, although the concepts developed here can be extended to other deposition techniques, as well. It will be shown that TiN and yttria-stabilized zirconia template layers provide promising platforms for the integration of new functionality into silicon-based computer chips. This review paper reports on a number of thin

  3. Broad spectrum infrared thermal desorption of wipe-based explosive and narcotic samples for trace mass spectrometric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forbes, Thomas P; Staymates, Matthew; Sisco, Edward

    2017-08-07

    Wipe collected analytes were thermally desorbed using broad spectrum near infrared heating for mass spectrometric detection. Employing a twin tube filament-based infrared emitter, rapid and efficiently powered thermal desorption and detection of nanogram levels of explosives and narcotics was demonstrated. The infrared thermal desorption (IRTD) platform developed here used multi-mode heating (direct radiation and secondary conduction from substrate and subsequent convection from air) and a temperature ramp to efficiently desorb analytes with vapor pressures across eight orders of magnitude. The wipe substrate experienced heating rates up to (85 ± 2) °C s(-1) with a time constant of (3.9 ± 0.2) s for 100% power emission. The detection of trace analytes was also demonstrated from complex mixtures, including plastic-bonded explosives and exogenous narcotics, explosives, and metabolites from collected artificial latent fingerprints. Manipulation of the emission power and duration directly controlled the heating rate and maximum temperature, enabling differential thermal desorption and a level of upstream separation for enhanced specificity. Transitioning from 100% power and 5 s emission duration to 25% power and 30 s emission enabled an order of magnitude increase in the temporal separation (single seconds to tens of seconds) of the desorption of volatile and semi-volatile species within a collected fingerprint. This mode of operation reduced local gas-phase concentrations, reducing matrix effects experienced with high concentration mixtures. IRTD provides a unique platform for the desorption of trace analytes from wipe collections, an area of importance to the security sector, transportation agencies, and customs and border protection.

  4. Unmasking tandem site interaction in human acetylcholinesterase. Substrate activation with a cationic acetanilide substrate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Joseph L; Cusack, Bernadette; Davies, Matthew P; Fauq, Abdul; Rosenberry, Terrone L

    2003-05-13

    Acetylcholinesterase (AChE) contains a narrow and deep active site gorge with two sites of ligand binding, an acylation site (or A-site) at the base of the gorge, and a peripheral site (or P-site) near the gorge entrance. The P-site contributes to catalytic efficiency by transiently binding substrates on their way to the acylation site, where a short-lived acyl enzyme intermediate is produced. A conformational interaction between the A- and P-sites has recently been found to modulate ligand affinities. We now demonstrate that this interaction is of functional importance by showing that the acetylation rate constant of a substrate bound to the A-site is increased by a factor a when a second molecule of substrate binds to the P-site. This demonstration became feasible through the introduction of a new acetanilide substrate analogue of acetylcholine, 3-(acetamido)-N,N,N-trimethylanilinium (ATMA), for which a = 4. This substrate has a low acetylation rate constant and equilibrates with the catalytic site, allowing a tractable algebraic solution to the rate equation for substrate hydrolysis. ATMA affinities for the A- and P-sites deduced from the kinetic analysis were confirmed by fluorescence titration with thioflavin T as a reporter ligand. Values of a >1 give rise to a hydrolysis profile called substrate activation, and the AChE site-specific mutant W86F, and to a lesser extent wild-type human AChE itself, showed substrate activation with acetylthiocholine as the substrate. Substrate activation was incorporated into a previous catalytic scheme for AChE in which a bound P-site ligand can also block product dissociation from the A-site, and two additional features of the AChE catalytic pathway were revealed. First, the ability of a bound P-site ligand to increase the substrate acetylation rate constant varied with the structure of the ligand: thioflavin T accelerated ATMA acetylation by a factor a(2) of 1.3, while propidium failed to accelerate. Second, catalytic rate

  5. A substrate specificity-determining unit of three Lin12-Notch repeat modules is formed in trans within the pappalysin-1 dimer and requires a sequence stretch C-terminal to the third module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weyer, Kathrin; Boldt, Henning Bünsow; Poulsen, Christine Bruun

    2007-01-01

    Members of the pappalysin family of metzincin metalloproteinases, pregnancy-associated plasma protein-A (PAPP-A, pappalysin-1) and PAPP-A2 (pappalysin-2), regulate the bioavailability of insulin-like growth factors (IGFs) by specific proteolytic inactivation of IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs). PAPP-A...... cleaves IGFBP-4 and IGFBP-5, whereas PAPP-A2 cleaves only IGFBP-5. The pappalysins contain three Lin12-Notch repeat (LNR1-3) modules, previously considered unique to the Notch receptor family in which they function to regulate receptor cleavage. In contrast to the Notch receptor where three LNR modules...... are tandemly arranged, LNR3 is separated by more than 1000 residues from LNR1-2 in the pappalysin sequence. Each of the three LNR modules of PAPP-A is required for proteolysis of IGFBP-4, but not IGFBP-5. However, we here find that a C-terminal truncated variant of PAPP-A, which lacks LNR3 and therefore...

  6. Delivery of P-glycoprotein substrates using chemosensitizers and nanotechnology for selective and efficient therapeutic outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto Montesinos, Rita; Béduneau, Arnaud; Pellequer, Yann; Lamprecht, Alf

    2012-07-10

    As a result of its broad substrate specificity and critical localization in excretory and barrier function tissues, P-glycoprotein (P-gp) plays major roles in the pharmacokinetics, safety and efficacy profiles of numerous drugs. P-gp is often responsible for the failure of many chemical treatments against cancer, immunosuppressive, infectious and neurodegenerative diseases. Among the therapeutic approaches to circumvent P-gp function, advances in the design of new chemical P-gp modulators to interact specifically with P-gp have yielded few clinical successful reports. Members of a class of components that were initially developed as surface active agents showed promising results with regard to the modulation of P-gp. These components include surfactants and amphiphilic co-polymers. Alternatively, colloidal systems were developed to facilitate drug uptake in resistant cells. This approach is based on the encapsulation of drugs, which masks them from the biological environment and prevents their transport by P-gp using the surfactants released from the nanocarrier. Likewise, a novel and synergistic strategy is currently being explored and involves nanocarrier-mediated transport and controlled release of both P-gp substrates and P-gp modulators. In this review, we discuss recent results obtained by direct modulation with chemosensitizers and the available nanotechnology to modulate P-gp function. In this manuscript, we also discuss unexplored pathways for future therapies. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. In vitro metabolism of specific CYP2D and CYP3A opioid substrates using rat liver S9 fractions and mass spectrometry reveal a severe metabolic impairment with increasing age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmin, Sabrin Fuad; Giroux, Marie-Chantal; Vachon, Pascal; Beaudry, Francis

    2017-02-01

    Codeine and oxycodone are opioids used to alleviate pain. The outcome of the treatment is ultimately related to their metabolism by Cytochromes P450 (CYPs). Depending on the drugs used, alterations in the metabolism of drugs by CYPs can lead to severe consequences including alterations in their efficacy, safety and toxicity. The objectives of this study were to develop a novel HPLC-MS/MS method capable of quantifying codeine and oxycodone along with specific metabolites using an isotopic dilution strategy and study the rate of formation of morphine (CYP2D), norcodeine (CYP3A), oxymorphone (CYP2D) and noroxycodone (CYP3A). The chromatographic separation was achieved using a Biobasic C18 100 × 1 mm column combined with an isocratic mobile phase composed of methanol and 10 mm ammonium acetate (40:60) at a flow rate of 75 μL/min. The mass spectrometer was operating in scan mode MS/MS and the analytical range was set at 10-10 000 nm. The precision (RSD) and accuracy (RE) observed were 4.4-11.5 and -9.1-6.1% respectively. Liver S9 fractions from 3-, 6-, 12- and 18-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were prepared and Michaelis-Menten parameters were determined. The derived maximum enzyme velocity suggested a rapid saturation of the CYP2D and CYP3A active sites in the liver S9 fractions of 18-month-old rats. Moreover, metabolic stabilities of codeine and oxycodone in rat liver S9 fractions were significantly greater for the 18-month-old rats. This study suggests that there is an impairment of CYP2D and CYP3A metabolism in aging rats. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Tailored surfaces of perovskite oxide substrates for conducted growth of thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez, Florencio; Ocal, Carmen; Fontcuberta, Josep

    2014-04-07

    Oxide electronics relies on the availability of epitaxial oxide thin films. The extreme flexibility of the chemical composition of ABO3 perovskites and the broad spectrum of properties they cover, inspire the creativity of scientists and place perovskites in the lead of functional materials for advanced technologies. Moreover, emerging properties are being discovered at interfaces between distinct perovskites that could not be anticipated on the basis of those of the adjacent epitaxial layers. All dreamed new prospects require the use of suitable substrates for epitaxial growth. Perovskite single crystals are the workhorses of this activity and understanding and controlling their surface properties have become critical. In this tutorial review we will chiefly focus on the impact of the morphology and composition of the surface of ABO3 perovskite substrates on the growth mechanisms and properties of thin films epitaxially grown on them. As SrTiO3 is the most popular substrate, we will mostly concentrate on describing the current understanding and achievements for it. Illustrative examples of other perovskite substrates (LaAlO3, LSAT and DyScO3) will be also included. We will show that distinct chemical terminations can exist on the surfaces used for growth and we will review methods employed either to select the most appropriate one for specific growth to allow, for instance, tailoring the ultimate outmost epilayer, or to induce self-ordering to engineer long-range nanoscale patterns of chemical terminations. We will demonstrate the capacity of this knowledge by the growth of low-dimensional organic and inorganic structures.

  9. The X-ray Crystallographic Structure and Specificity profile of HAD Superfamily Phosphohydrolase BT1666: Comparison of Paralogous Functions in B. thetaiotaomicron†

    OpenAIRE

    Lu, Zhibing; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra; Karen N Allen

    2011-01-01

    Analysis of the haloalkanoate dehalogenase superfamily (HADSF) has uncovered homologues occurring within the same organism that are found to possess broad, overlapping substrate specificities and low catalytic efficiencies. Here we compare the HADSF phosphatase BT1666 from Bacteroides thetaiotaomicron VPI-5482 to a homologue with high sequence identity (40%) from the same organism BT4131, a known hexose-phosphate phosphatase. The goal is to find if these enzymes represent duplicated versus pa...

  10. Using New Media to Reach Broad Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, P. L.

    2008-06-01

    The International Year of Astronomy New Media Working Group (IYA NMWG) has a singular mission: To flood the Internet with ways to learn about astronomy, interact with astronomers and astronomy content, and socially network with astronomy. Within each of these areas, we seek to build lasting programs and partnerships that will continue beyond 2009. Our weapon of choice is New Media. It is often easiest to define New Media by what it is not. Television, radio, print and their online redistribution of content are not New Media. Many forms of New Media start as user provided content and content infrastructures that answer that individual's creative whim in a way that is adopted by a broader audience. Classic examples include Blogs and Podcasts. This media is typically distributed through content specific websites and RSS feeds, which allow syndication. RSS aggregators (iTunes has audio and video aggregation abilities) allow subscribers to have content delivered to their computers automatically when they connect to the Internet. RSS technology is also being used in such creative ways as allowing automatically updating Google-maps that show the location of someone with an intelligent GPS system, and in sharing 100 word microblogs from anyone (Twitters) through a single feed. In this poster, we outline how the IYA NMWG plans to use New Media to reach target primary audiences of astronomy enthusiasts, image lovers, and amateur astronomers, as well as secondary audiences, including: science fiction fans, online gamers, and skeptics.

  11. SERS substrate and a method of providing a SERS substrate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2011-01-01

    Source: US2011116089A A substrate primarily for SERS determination, the substrate has a number of elongate elements with a density of at least 1x108 elongate elements per cm2 and having metal coated tips. When the elements may be made to lean toward each other, such as by providing a drop...

  12. [Biogas production from cellulose-containing substrates: a review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsavkelova, E A; Netrusov, A I

    2012-01-01

    Anaerobic microbial conversion of organic substrates to various biofuels is one of the alternative energy sources attracting the greatest attention of scientists. The advantages of biogas production over other technologies are the ability of methanogenic communities to degrade a broad range of substrates and concomitant benefits: neutralization of organic waste, reduction of greenhouse gas emission, and fertilizer production. Cellulose-containing materials are a good substrate, but their full-scale utilization encounters a number of problems, including improvement of the quality and amount ofbiogas produced and maintenance of the stability and high efficiency of microbial communities. We review data on microorganisms that form methanogenic cellulolytic communities, enzyme complexes of anaerobes essential for cellulose fiber degradation, and feedstock pretreatment, as biodegradation is hindered in the presence of lignin. Methods for improving biogas production by optimization of microbial growth conditions are considered on the examples of biogas formation from various types of plant and paper materials: writing paper and cardboard.

  13. Friction and Shear Strength at the Nanowire–Substrate Interfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gu Yi

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The friction and shear strength of nanowire (NW–substrate interfaces critically influences the electrical/mechanical performance and life time of NW-based nanodevices. Yet, very few reports on this subject are available in the literature because of the experimental challenges involved and, more specifically no studies have been reported to investigate the configuration of individual NW tip in contact with a substrate. In this letter, using a new experimental method, we report the friction measurement between a NW tip and a substrate for the first time. The measurement was based on NW buckling in situ inside a scanning electron microscope. The coefficients of friction between silver NW and gold substrate and between ZnO NW and gold substrate were found to be 0.09–0.12 and 0.10–0.15, respectively. The adhesion between a NW and the substrate modified the true contact area, which affected the interfacial shear strength. Continuum mechanics calculation found that interfacial shear strengths between silver NW and gold substrate and between ZnO NW and gold substrate were 134–139 MPa and 78.9–95.3 MPa, respectively. This method can be applied to measure friction parameters of other NW–substrate systems. Our results on interfacial friction and shear strength could have implication on the AFM three-point bending tests used for nanomechanical characterisation.

  14. Reactive Oxygen Species and the Aging Eye: Specific Role of Metabolically Active Mitochondria in Maintaining Lens Function and in the Initiation of the Oxidation-Induced Maturity Onset Cataract--A Novel Platform of Mitochondria-Targeted Antioxidants With Broad Therapeutic Potential for Redox Regulation and Detoxification of Oxidants in Eye Diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Yegorov, Yegor E

    2016-01-01

    -targeted rechargeable antioxidant (either MitoVit E, Mito Q, or SkQs) as a potent medicine to treat ocular diseases. Such specificity is explained by the fact that developed compositions might be used to effectively prevent ROS-induced oxidation of lipids and proteins in the inner mitochondrial membrane in vivo and outside mitochondria in the cellular and tissue structures of the lens and eye compartments. Mitochondrial targeting of compounds with universal types of antioxidant activity represents a promising approach for treating a number of ROS-related ocular diseases of the aging eye and can be implicated in the management of cataracts.

  15. A Low Cost High Specific Stiffness Mirror Substrate Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The primary purpose of this proposal is to develop and demonstrate a new technology for manufacturing an ultra-low-cost precision optical telescope mirror which can...

  16. Social Cognition, Social Skill, and the Broad Autism Phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasson, Noah J.; Nowlin, Rachel B.; Pinkham, Amy E.

    2013-01-01

    Social-cognitive deficits differentiate parents with the "broad autism phenotype" from non-broad autism phenotype parents more robustly than other neuropsychological features of autism, suggesting that this domain may be particularly informative for identifying genetic and brain processes associated with the phenotype. The current study…

  17. A Cointegration And Error Correction Approach To Broad Money ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study considered the stability of broad money demand function in Nigeria using data for 1970 to 2004. The study applied the Cointegration and error correction approach The Johansen Cointegration test shows that long run equilibrium relationship exists between broad money demand and its determinants. While the ...

  18. Broad-scale consequences of land management: Columbia basin example.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard W. Haynes; Thomas M. Quigley

    2001-01-01

    Integrating management actions to consistently achieve broad ecological and socioeconomic goals is a challenge largely unmet. The presumed or real conflict between these goals establishes a forum for debate. Broad measures are needed to describe tradeoffs, trends in conditions under varying management scenarios, and a transparent science underpinning. The Interior...

  19. Boot Camp for Education CEOs: The Broad Foundation Superintendents Academy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jehlen, Alain

    2012-01-01

    The Broad Foundation Superintendents Academy is the most prominent and most controversial training institute for school chiefs. The Academy is the flagship program of the Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation, the smallest of a triumvirate of corporate foundations that are at the heart of the billionaire campaign to remake public education in the image…

  20. Substrate chemistry regulates the surface phase separation of polyurethane films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Juan; Pan, Xianchao; Wang, Jinfeng; Luo, Yanfeng

    The effect of substrate chemistry on surface phase separation of polyurethane films were investigated by using self-assembled monolayer (SAM) with chemically different modifications, i.e. hydroxy (-OH) and methyl (-CH3) end groups. Results showed that hydrophilic (-OH) and hydrophobic end groups (-CH3) could respectively promote the aggregation of hard and soft segments at polyurethane-substrate interface, which further regulates the phase separation of polyurethane surface that contacts the substrate. The aggregation of hard segments tended to enhance the surface smoothness of polyurethane films, especially on hydrophilic substrates with hydroxy modification. Further analysis of tensile testing revealed that the regulation of surface phase separation had no effect on the shape memory effect of polyurethane films. These findings suggest that the chemical properties of the substrates could regulate the phase separation and may provide some guidance on the design of specific polyurethane with desired morphology and properties.

  1. Biochemistry Students' Ideas about How an Enzyme Interacts with a Substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linenberger, Kimberly J.; Bretz, Stacey Lowery

    2015-01-01

    Enzyme-substrate interactions are a fundamental concept of biochemistry that is built upon throughout multiple biochemistry courses. Central to understanding enzyme-substrate interactions is specific knowledge of exactly how an enzyme and substrate interact. Within this narrower topic, students must understand the various binding sites on an…

  2. Convergence of broad-scale migration strategies in terrestrial birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Sorte, Frank A; Fink, Daniel; Hochachka, Wesley M; Kelling, Steve

    2016-01-27

    Migration is a common strategy used by birds that breed in seasonal environments. Selection for greater migration efficiency is likely to be stronger for terrestrial species whose migration strategies require non-stop transoceanic crossings. If multiple species use the same transoceanic flyway, then we expect the migration strategies of these species to converge geographically towards the most optimal solution. We test this by examining population-level migration trajectories within the Western Hemisphere for 118 migratory species using occurrence information from eBird. Geographical convergence of migration strategies was evident within specific terrestrial regions where geomorphological features such as mountains or isthmuses constrained overland migration. Convergence was also evident for transoceanic migrants that crossed the Gulf of Mexico or Atlantic Ocean. Here, annual population-level movements were characterized by clockwise looped trajectories, which resulted in faster but more circuitous journeys in the spring and more direct journeys in the autumn. These findings suggest that the unique constraints and requirements associated with transoceanic migration have promoted the spatial convergence of migration strategies. The combination of seasonal atmospheric and environmental conditions that has facilitated the use of similar broad-scale migration strategies may be especially prone to disruption under climate and land-use change. © 2016 The Author(s).

  3. Improved PCR Amplification of Broad Spectrum GC DNA Templates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guido, Nicholas; Starostina, Elena; Leake, Devin; Saaem, Ishtiaq

    2016-01-01

    Many applications in molecular biology can benefit from improved PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a wide range of GC content. Conventional PCR amplification of DNA sequences with regions of GC less than 30%, or higher than 70%, is complex due to secondary structures that block the DNA polymerase as well as mispriming and mis-annealing of the DNA. This complexity will often generate incomplete or nonspecific products that hamper downstream applications. In this study, we address multiplexed PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a wide range of GC content. In order to mitigate amplification complications due to high or low GC regions, we tested a combination of different PCR cycling conditions and chemical additives. To assess the fate of specific oligonucleotide (oligo) species with varying GC content in a multiplexed PCR, we developed a novel method of sequence analysis. Here we show that subcycling during the amplification process significantly improved amplification of short template pools (~200 bp), particularly when the template contained a low percent of GC. Furthermore, the combination of subcycling and 7-deaza-dGTP achieved efficient amplification of short templates ranging from 10-90% GC composition. Moreover, we found that 7-deaza-dGTP improved the amplification of longer products (~1000 bp). These methods provide an updated approach for PCR amplification of DNA segments containing a broad range of GC content.

  4. IYA: Using New Media to Reach Broad Audiences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gay, Pamela L.; IYA New Media Working Group

    2007-12-01

    The International Year of Astronomy New Media Working Group (IYA NMWG) seeks to flood the Internet with ways to learn about astronomy and increase interaction among professionals, amateurs, and laypeople. Our primary audiences are amateur astronomers, astronomy and space enthusiasts, and image lovers, but secondary audiences include science fiction fans, online gamers, and skeptics. We aim to build lasting programs and partnerships that will continue beyond 2009. Our weapon of choice is New Media. New Media differ from traditional media (such as television, radio, and print) in their informality. Many forms of New Media start as user-provided content. New Media content-building infrastructures answer the content provider's creative whims, and New-Media content can be commented upon, shared, borrowed, adopted, edited, and re-posted by a broad audience. Classic examples of New Media include blogs and podcasts. This media is typically distributed through content-specific websites and RSS feeds, which allow individual Internet users to select preferred streams of media (including text, audio, and video) to be delivered to them automatically.

  5. HAMLET - A protein-lipid complex with broad tumoricidal activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, James C S; Nadeem, Aftab; Svanborg, Catharina

    2017-01-15

    HAMLET (Human Alpha-lactalbumin Made LEthal to Tumor cells) is a tumoricidal protein-lipid complex with broad effects against cancer cells of different origin. The therapeutic potential is emphasized by a high degree of specificity for tumor tissue. Here we review early studies of HAMLET, in collaboration with the Orrenius laboratory, and some key features of the subsequent development of the HAMLET project. The early studies focused on the apoptotic response that accompanies death in HAMLET treated tumor cells and the role of mitochondria in this process. In subsequent studies, we have identified a sequence of interactions that starts with the membrane integration of HAMLET and the activation of ion fluxes followed by HAMLET internalization, progressive inhibition of MAPK kinases and GTPases and sorting of HAMLET to different cellular compartments, including the nuclei. Therapeutic efficacy of HAMLET has been demonstrated in animal models of glioblastoma, bladder cancer and intestinal cancer. In clinical studies, HAMLET has been shown to target skin papillomas and bladder cancers. The findings identify HAMLET as a new drug candidate with promising selectivity for cancer cells and a strong therapeutic potential. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Biological substrates of addiction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joffe, Max E; Grueter, Carrie A; Grueter, Brad A

    2014-03-01

    This review is an introduction to addiction, the reward circuitry, and laboratory addiction models. Addiction is a chronic disea