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Sample records for broad bean lentil

  1. [The broad bean's syndrome in ancient Egypt].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippi, D

    1989-01-01

    The problem of broad bean's syndrome and lathyrism in ancient Greece has been deeply studied, with particular referrement to the hypothetic medica and mystical reasons of the Pythagoric order not to eat broad beans. It is impossible to prove Egyptian influence of Phythagora's precept, but we can, however, consider the hypothesis that they had noticed the potential deadly effect of broad beans' use, too, and wonder if their interduction had the same motivations.

  2. “Eat dry beans, split peas, lentils and soya regularly”: A food-based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this paper is to review recent scientific evidence to support the food-based dietary guideline (FBDG): “Eat dry beans, split peas, lentils and soya regularly”. In this review, legumes are synonymous with the term “pulses”, while soy beans are classified as “oilseeds”. The FBDG was originally introduced to ...

  3. [Nutritional evaluation of protein concentrates of beans (Phaseolus vulgaris) and lentils (Lens esculenta)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaba, H; Sanahuja, J C

    1978-06-01

    The composition and nutritive value were determined in navy bean meal (Phaseolus vulgaris) and lentil meal (Lens esculenta), and in their respective protein concentrates obtained through extraction followed by isoelectric precipitation. Sulfur amino acids per gram of nitrogen were lower in the concentrates than in the meals, while there was no difference for lysine and threonine. The white bean protein concentrate had a lower biological value than the meal but better digestibility, although trypsin inhibitor concentration was unchanged. Digestibility greatly improved with heating but it did not increase beyond 81% even after autoclaving. Autoclaved samples supplemented with methionine reached a biological value of 83. The lentil protein concentrate also had a lower biological value than the meal but digestibility was high for both samples (91%) and remained unchanged after heating. Trypsin inhibitors were absent. After supplementing with methionine, a biological value of only 63 was obtained, due to the low level of tryptophan, the second limiting amino acid. In spite of the concentrates' lower biological value, it was proved that they equalled the meals' potential for complementing cereal, as their content in lysine and threonine is high. The concentrates have the additional advantage of allowing effective supplementation without increasing the legume-cereal ratio.

  4. Imazamox Absorption, Translocation and Metabolism in Red Lentil (Lens culinaris Medic.) and Dry Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imazamox is an imidazolinone herbicide used to control many grasses and broadleaf weeds in leguminous crops such as soybeans, alfalfa and dry beans; however, imazamox cannot be used on red lentils because of unacceptable injury. Studies were conducted to compare imazamox absorption, translocation a...

  5. Lentils: the Forgotten Legumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: https://medlineplus.gov/news/fullstory_166192.html Lentils: The Forgotten Legumes Beans' little cousins pack in ... 2, 2017 FRIDAY, June 2, 2017 (HealthDay News) -- Lentils may be the least well known members of ...

  6. Selection of common bean to broad environmental adaptation in Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivars in Haiti need adaptation to a broad range of environments and resistance to the most important diseases such as Bean Golden Yellow Mosaic Virus. The Legume Breeding Program (LBP), a collaborative effort of the AREA project (USAID funded through IFAS/Univ...

  7. Formulation of a complementary food fortified with broad beans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Sixty percent of mothers did not provide bean-based food for their children, with the most frequently reported reason being lack of knowledge of its nutrient value for young children. To a typical complementary food of barley-maize porridge, 10, 20 and 30% of cereal was replaced by processed broad beans (Vicia faba), ...

  8. Differential effects of cooked beans and cooked lentils on protein metabolism in intestine and muscle in growing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pirman, Tatjana; Combe, Etiennette; Ribeyre, Marie Claude; Prugnaud, Jacques; Stekar, Jasna; Patureau Mirand, Philippe

    2006-01-01

    The effect of diets based on cooked beans or lentils on protein metabolism in intestines and muscles was studied in rats. The cooked seeds were used as the unique protein source in balanced diets (containing 229 and 190 g of crude protein per kg dry matter) fed to young growing rats for 20 days. Their effects were compared with those of the control casein diet in pair-fed rats. Protein synthesis rates in small and large intestines and in gastrocnemius and soleus muscles were determined in vivo, in a fed state, by the flooding dose method, using 13C-valine. In the small and large intestine tissues of the legume fed groups, protein, RNA relative masses (mg.100 g BM(-1)) and protein synthesis rates (FSR and ASR) were higher than in the control rats (p lentils in the large intestine and in gastrocnemius muscle. Copyright 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  9. In vitro fermentability and antioxidant capacity of the indigestible fraction of cooked black beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), lentils (Lens culinaris L.) and chickpeas (Cicer arietinum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Salazar, Marcelo; Osorio-Diaz, Perla; Loarca-Piña, Guadalupe; Reynoso-Camacho, Rosalia; Tovar, Juscelino; Bello-Pérez, Luis A

    2010-07-01

    Pulses represent an important source of protein, as well as digestible and indigestible carbohydrates. Little information is available on the indigestible carbohydrates and antioxidant capacity of legume seeds. The cooked seeds of three pulses (black bean, chickpea and lentil) were evaluated for their indigestible fraction (IF), polyphenols content, antioxidant capacity and in vitro fermentability, including short-chain fatty acid production. The insoluble indigestible fraction (IIF) was higher than the soluble counterpart (soluble indigestible fraction, SIF). The SIF value was highest in black beans, while no difference was observed between chickpeas and lentils. Black beans and lentils had higher polyphenols content than chickpeas. The IF of black beans exhibited the lowest and chickpeas the highest associated polyphenols content. Condensed tannins were retained to some extent in the IF that exhibited significant antioxidant capacity. The total IF of the three pulses produced short chain fatty acids (SCFA) after 24 h of in vitro fermentation by human colonic microflora. IF from black bean and lentil were best substrates for the fermentative production of butyric acid. It is concluded that the IF of pulses might be an important source of bioactive compounds.

  10. Nutritional and technological characteristics of new broad bean flaked products.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senesi, E; Duranti, M; Gervasini, M; Bertolo, G; Rizzolo, A

    1988-01-01

    The effects of the technological processes (soaking in water or alkaline solutions, drying, puree preparation) and the supplementation with maize flour on the nutritional value and on the organoleptic characteristics of broad bean (Vicia faba, L. major) flakes have been studied. Protein content was not affected by technological process. The addition of maize flour decreased the protein content of the final product depending on the amount of the maize flour added. Amino acid composition showed a decrease of tryptophan due to technological processing. Supplementation with maize flour improved the amino acid pattern and, except for tryptophan, the amount of essential amino acids in the flakes supplemented with 25% or more maize flour well compared with the provisional pattern by F.A.O. In vitro digestibility trials did not evidence significant changes due to technological processes or to integration of broad beans with maize flour. Broad bean toxic factors (vicine and convicine glycosides) were only slightly affected by the alkaline treatment of the flakes. Glycosides content decreased with the increasing supplementation with maize flour but the relationship was not linear. The organoleptic tests were positive for texture and taste, whereas the appearance of the products should be improved.

  11. Effect of gamma irradiation on antinutritional factors in broad bean

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    Al-Kaisey, Mahdi T.; Alwan, Abdul-Kader H.; Mohammad, Manal H.; Saeed, Amjed H.

    2003-06-01

    The effect of gamma irradiation on the level of antinutritional factors (trypsin inhibitor (TI), phytic acid and oligosaccharides) of broad bean was investigated. The seeds were subjected to gamma irradiation at 0, 2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10 kGy, respectively using cobalt-60 gamma radiation with a dose rate 2.37 kGy/h. TI activity was reduced by 4.5%, 6.7%, 8.5% and 9.2% at 2.5, 5, 7.5 and 10 kGy, respectively. Meanwhile, irradiation at 10.2, 12.3, 15.4 and 18.2 kGy reduced the phytic acid content. The flatulence causing oligosaccharides were decreased as the radiation dose increased. The chemical composition (protein, oil, ash and total carbohydrates) of the tested seeds was determined. Gamma radiation seems to be a good procedure to improve the quality of broad bean from the nutritional point of view.

  12. [Protein screening in wheat and broad bean specimens in Gatersleben].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudolph, A; Hanelt, P; Lehmann, C; Müntz, K; Scholz, F

    1975-01-01

    Actually and in future times plant proteins will constitute the main and primary source of proteins in animal feeding and human alimentation. Therefore, the main efforts to resolve the world nutrition problems are focused on the increase of the protein production and the improvement of the nutritional quality of plant seed proteins. In this regard plant breeding occupies one of the most important strategic positions. With the aim of selecting forms with elevated grain protein content and improved protein quality the systematic screening of collections of wild forms and cultivated cereals and leguminoses constitutes a pre-requisite of successful breeding work in relation to the above-mentioned task. In 1970 the Central Institute of Genetics and Investigation of Cultivated Plants at Gatersleben, GDR, belonging to the Academy of Sciences, started a systematic protein screening with about 10000 wheat, 6500 barley and 450 broad bean specimens, which are parts of the World Collection of Cultivated Plants at this institute. Protein determination was performed by the traditional KJELDAHL-method. Limiting amino acids, essentially lysin from cereal grains, were estimated by automatic ion exchange technique. The annual analytic capacity amounted to 6000 to 8000 samples. First results and problems of wheat- and broad bean-screening are reported in the present publication.

  13. Consumption of dry beans, peas, and lentils could improve diet quality in the US population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Diane C; Lawrence, Frank R; Hartman, Terryl J; Curran, Julianne M

    2009-05-01

    The US Department of Agriculture's MyPyramid guidelines introduced a near doubling of the dietary recommendations for vegetables. These recommendations target specific subgroups of vegetables, including dry beans and peas. Dry beans and peas provide an array of nutrients and phytochemicals that have been shown to have beneficial health effects, yet consumption levels in the United States are quite low. Few studies have examined the influence of legume consumption on nutrient intakes. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to assess nutrient and food group intakes of dry bean and pea consumers compared to nonconsumers. Dietary intake data from the 1999-2002 National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey for adults aged > or =19 years was used. Results show that on any given day only 7.9% of adults are consuming dry beans and peas; Mexican Americans or other Hispanics are more likely to be consumers than nonconsumers. Consuming approximately (1/2) c dry beans or peas resulted in higher intakes of fiber, protein, folate, zinc, iron, and magnesium with lower intakes of saturated fat and total fat. These data support the specific recommendation for dry beans and peas as part of the overall vegetable recommendation. Increased consumption of dry beans and peas-economical and nutrient-rich foods-could improve the diet quality of Americans.

  14. “Eat dry beans, split peas, lentils and soya regularly”: a food-based ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-04-09

    Apr 9, 2013 ... The nutrient and non-nutrient content, results of recent epidemiological and intervention studies on health effects, recommended ... may be exaggerated, and that there is individual variation in response to different bean types. It is recommended ..... and recipe cards may be useful.82 A soy recipe book.

  15. Viruses affecting lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. in Greece; incidence and genetic variability of Bean leafroll virus and Pea enation mosaic virus

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    Elisavet K. CHATZIVASSILIOU

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available In Greece, lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. crops are mainly established with non-certified seeds of local landraces, implying high risks for seed transmitted diseases. During April and May of the 2007–2012 growing seasons, surveys were conducted in eight regions of Greece (Attiki, Evros, Fthiotida, Korinthos, Kozani, Larissa, Lefkada and Viotia to monitor virus incidence in lentil fields. A total of 1216 lentil samples, from plants exhibiting symptoms suggestive of virus infection, were analyzed from 2007 to 2009, using tissue-blot immunoassays (TBIA. Pea seed-borne mosaic virus (PSbMV overall incidence was 4.9%, followed by Alfalfa mosaic virus (AMV (2.4% and Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV (1.0%. When 274 of the samples were tested for the presence of luteoviruses, 38.8% were infected with Bean leafroll virus (BLRV. Since BLRV was not identified in the majority of the samples collected from 2007 to 2009, representative symptomatic plants (360 samples were collected in further surveys performed from 2010 to 2012 and tested by ELISA. Two viruses prevailed in those samples: BLRV (36.1% was associated with stunting, yellowing, and reddening symptoms and Pea enation mosaic virus-1 (PEMV-1 (35.0% was associated with mosaic and mottling symptoms. PSbMV (2.2%, AMV (2.2%, BYMV (3.9% and CMV (2.8% were also detected. When the molecular variability was analyzed for representative isolates, collected from the main Greek lentil production areas, five BLRV isolates showed 95% identity for the coat protein (CP gene and 99% for the 3’ end region. Three Greek PEMV isolates co-clustered with an isolate from Germany when their CP sequence was compared with isolates with no mutation in the aphid transmission gene. Overall, limited genetic variability was detected among Greek isolates of BLRV and PEMV.

  16. Nutritional value of broad bean seeds. Part 1: Starch and fibre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giczewska, Anna; Borowska, Julitta

    2003-04-01

    This paper characterizes starch and dietary fibre in the seeds of fine-size and large-size seed varieties of broad bean and in edible varieties of pea for comparison. The experimental material included seeds at full physiological maturity. The fine-size seed varieties of broad bean, Gobik and Goral, contained slightly less total starch (62.32% and 62.19% of dry matter) than the large-size seed varieties, Windsor Bialy and Bartom (65.32% and 65.26% of dry matter). It was shown that fine-size seed varieties of broad bean are a good source of resistant starch, which is comparable to large-size seed varieties. As far as the content of total starch is concerned, the share of this form of starch in broad bean seeds amounted to 1/3. Digestible starch in broad beans was in the range of 39-42% of dry matter, pea contained approximately one half less starch of this type. Moreover, it was found that the relation of rapidly digestible starch to slowly digestible starch amounted to 1:1 irrespective of broad bean variety. Dietary fibre in broad beans was in the range of 20.36%-26.79% of dry matter while half of it was found to be concentrated in the seed coat. The soluble fraction of the total content of fibre amounted to 11.81% in the Bartom variety and up to 15.89% in the Gobik variety.

  17. Effects of sprouting and postharvest storage under cool temperature conditions on starch content and antioxidant capacity of green pea, lentil and young mung bean sprouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świeca, Michał; Gawlik-Dziki, Urszula

    2015-10-15

    The effects of germination of selected legumes and further storage of sprouts under cool conditions on the phenolics, antioxidant activity and starch content and their potential bioaccessibility were elucidated. In green pea and mung bean sprouts a slight increase of chemically extractable phenolics (including flavonoids) during the first 4 days of sprouting was observed. Digestion in vitro released phenolics; however, flavonoids were poorly bioaccessible. Storage of green pea sprouts decreased reducing power and increased the antiradical ability. Reducing potential of potentially bioaccessible fraction of stored lentil sprouts was elevated of 40%, 31% and 23% in 3-, 4- and 5-day-old sprouts, respectively. Postharvest storage significantly increases the starch digestibility and values of expected glycemic index (eGI)--the highest eGIs were determined for 5-day-old stored sprouts; 75.17-green pea, 83.18-lentil and 89.87-mung bean. Bioactivity and nutritional quality of legumes is affected by sprouting and further storage at low temperatures. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Nutritional value of broad bean seeds. Part 2: Selected biologically active components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowska, Julitta; Giczewska, Anna; Zadernowski, Ryszard

    2003-04-01

    Selected biologically active non-nutrient components (BANS) were determined in broad bean seeds of fine-size and large-size seed varieties and in pea seeds for comparison. Among the analysed biologically active substances the broad bean seeds of fine-size and large-size seed varieties were differentiated mainly by phenolic compounds (including flavanols and proantocyanidines) which appear in twice as large quantities in large-size seed varieties. It was shown that in comparison to pea, broad bean seeds are characterised by a higher content of phenolic compounds, phytates as well as a higher activity of inhibitors of trypsin and amylases. Moreover, it was found that phenolic compounds accumulate mainly in the dark-colored seed coats of large-size broad bean and this fact is related to higher activity inhibiting-amylases of methanol extracts from this fraction of seeds.

  19. Characterization of non-host resistance in broad bean to the wheat stripe rust pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Yulin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Non-host resistance (NHR confers plant species immunity against the majority of microbial pathogens and represents the most robust and durable form of plant resistance in nature. As one of the main genera of rust fungi with economic and biological importance, Puccinia infects almost all cereals but is unable to cause diseases on legumes. Little is known about the mechanism of this kind of effective defense in legumes to these non-host pathogens. Results In this study, the basis of NHR in broad bean (Vicia faba L. against the wheat stripe rust pathogen, Puccinia striiformis f. sp. tritici (Pst, was characterized. No visible symptoms were observed on broad bean leaves inoculated with Pst. Microscopic observations showed that successful location of stomata and haustoria formation were significantly reduced in Pst infection of broad bean. Attempted infection induced the formation of papillae, cell wall thickening, production of reactive oxygen species, callose deposition and accumulation of phenolic compounds in plant cell walls. The few Pst haustoria that did form in broad bean cells were encased in reactive oxygen and callose materials and those cells elicited cell death. Furthermore, a total of seven defense-related genes were identified and found to be up-regulated during the Pst infection. Conclusions The results indicate that NHR in broad bean against Pst results from a continuum of layered defenses, including basic incompatibility, structural and chemical strengthening of cell wall, posthaustorial hypersensitive response and induction of several defense-related genes, demonstrating the multi-layered feature of NHR. This work also provides useful information for further determination of resistance mechanisms in broad bean to rust fungi, especially the adapted important broad bean rust pathogen, Uromyces viciae-fabae, because of strong similarity and association between NHR of plants to unadapted pathogens and basal

  20. Effect of illumination on the content of melatonin, phenolic compounds, and antioxidant activity during germination of lentils (Lens culinaris L.) and kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Yolanda; Liébana, Rosa; Herrera, Teresa; Rebollo-Hernanz, Miguel; Sanchez-Puelles, Carlos; Benítez, Vanesa; Martín-Cabrejas, María A

    2014-11-05

    This study reports the effects of two different illumination conditions during germination (12 h light/12 h dark vs 24 h dark) in lentils (Lens culinaris L.) and kidney beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) on the content of melatonin and phenolic compounds, as well as the antioxidant activity. Germination led to relative increase in melatonin content and significant antioxidant activity, while the content of phenolic compounds decreased. The highest melatonin content was obtained after 6 days of germination under 24 h dark for both legumes. These germinated legume seeds with improved levels of melatonin might play a protective role against free radicals. Thus, considering the potent antioxidant activity of melatonin, these sprouts can be consumed as direct foods and be offered as preventive food strategies in combating chronic diseases through the diet.

  1. Glycemic index of split peas, rice (Binam, kidney beans, green peas, "Lavash" bread and broad bean kernels in NIDDM subjects

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    Darabi A

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available Equal amounts of carbohydrates from various foodstuffs do not increase blood glucose to the same extent. This study was carried out, therefore, in 1996 at the National Nutrition and Food Technology Research institute in Tehran to determine the glycemic index of split pease, rice (Binam, kidney beans, green peas, “Lavash” bread and broad bean kernels. Diabetic subjects were studied in a clinical trial. The exact amount of cabohydrate in foodstuffs was determined using AOAC. Methods. White bread was used as the reference food. After a 12-hour overnight fast on seven separate days each subject was given the test food in an amount to provide 25 g of carbohydrate. Blood glucose was determined after 0, 60, 120 minutes using orthotouidine method. Glycemi response in each individual was calculated as the area under the 2- hour glucose individual was calculated as the area under the test food glucose curve as a percentage of the mean area under the whith bread glucose curve. Glycemic indices of the test foods were 31± 8.5 for split peas, 42.9±3 for rice, 44±9 for kidney beans, 57±7 for green peas, 69±8.5 for “Lavash” bread, and 96±14 for broad bean kernels .Legumes and rice (Binam can be used efficiently in meal planning for the diabetic subjects.

  2. Use of sourdough fermentation and mixture of wheat, chickpea, lentil and bean flours for enhancing the nutritional, texture and sensory characteristics of white bread.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizzello, Carlo Giuseppe; Calasso, Maria; Campanella, Daniela; De Angelis, Maria; Gobbetti, Marco

    2014-06-16

    This study aimed at investigating the addition of legume (chickpea, lentil and bean) flours to wheat flour bread. Type I sourdough containing legumes or wheat-legume flours were prepared and propagated (back slopped) in laboratory, according to traditional protocols that are routinely used for making typical Italian breads. Based on kinetic of acidification and culture-dependent data, the wheat-legume sourdough was further characterized and selected for bread making. As determined by RAPD-PCR and partial sequencing of 16S rDNA gene analyses, lactic acid bacteria in wheat-legume sourdough included Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus sanfranciscensis, Leuconostoc mesenteroides, Lactobacillus fermentum, Weissella cibaria, Lactobacillus pentosus, Lactobacillus coryneformis, Lactobacillus rossiae, Lactobacillus brevis, Lactobacillus parabuchneri and Lactobacillus paraplantarum. Two breads containing 15% (w/w) of legume (chickpea, lentil and bean) flours were produced using selected wheat-legume sourdough (WLSB) and traditional wheat sourdough (WSB). Compared to wheat yeasted bread (WYB), the level of total free amino acids (FAA) was higher in WSB and WLSB. Phytase and antioxidant activities were the highest in WLSB. Compared to bread WYB, the addition of legume flours decreased the in vitro protein digestibility (IVPD) (WYB versus WSB). However, the dough fermentation with WSLB favored an increase of IVPD. According to the levels of carbohydrates, dietary fibers and resistant starch, WSB and WLSB showed lower values of hydrolysis index (HI) compared to WYB. As showed by texture and image analyses and sensory evaluation of breads, a good acceptability was found for WSB and, especially, WLSB breads. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Comparative study of the sensitivities of onion and broad bean root ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemicals which cause chromosomal aberration (CA) in plant cells frequently produce identical CA in cultured animal cells. Plant species however, differ in sensitivities. Onion and broad bean (BB) root meristem cells were compared for sensitivity to chlorpyrifos (CPF), mercury chloride (HgCl2), ethyl methanesulphonate ...

  4. Performance of Amblyseius herbicolus on broad mites and on castor bean and sunnhemp pollen.

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    Rodríguez-Cruz, Fredy Alexander; Venzon, Madelaine; Pinto, Cleide Maria Ferreira

    2013-08-01

    Amblyseius herbicolus (Banks) is found associated with broad mites Polyphagotarsonemus latus in crops such as chili pepper in Brazil. The species has a potential for controlling P. latus, but little is known about its development and reproduction on this pest as well as on other food sources. We studied biological, reproductive and life table parameters of A. herbicolus on three different diets: broad mites, castor bean pollen (Ricinus communis) and sunnhemp pollen (Crotalaria juncea). The predator was able to develop and reproduce on all diets. However, its intrinsic growth rate was higher on the diet of broad mites or on castor bean pollen than on sunnhemp pollen. Differences among pollen species may be due to their nutritional content. Feeding on alternative food such as pollen can facilitate the predator's mass rearing and maintain its population on crops when prey is absent or scarce. Other strategies of using pollen to sustain predator population and reduce pest damage are discussed.

  5. Efficiency of some technological processes on reducing the residues of malathion and pirimiphos methyl in mature broad bean seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamil, M E; Abou-Zahw, M M; Hegazy, N A

    1996-10-01

    Residue study was performed on several insecticides which could contaminate local Egyptian beans. The effect of storage periods and various processing steps on lowering the residues of malathion and pirimiphos methyl in treated seeds and their processed products were investigated. The data indicated that malathion and pirimiphos methyl persisted for more than 90 days on and in stored mature dry broad beans after postharvest treatment. However, stored broad beans could be safely used for human consumption after 90 days when the insecticide residues reached safe levels. Washing removed 69 and 75% of malathion and pirimiphos methyl residues of treated broad beans, respectively. Malathion residue was not detected in various processed products. More than 89 and 99% of malathion residues were absent in dehulled and heated dehulled broad beans. In addition, pirimiphos methyl residues were reduced to 92, 97, 87, 99, 99, and 95% from the initial levels in treated beans following dehulling, cooking of dehulled beans, germination, cooking of germinated beans and cooking of the beans by the common method and under pressure, respectively.

  6. Oxidative stress and DNA damage in broad bean (Vicia faba L.) seedlings induced by thallium.

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    Radić, Sandra; Cvjetko, Petra; Glavas, Katarina; Roje, Vibor; Pevalek-Kozlina, Branka; Pavlica, Mirjana

    2009-01-01

    Thallium (Tl) is a metal of great toxicological concern because it is highly toxic to all living organisms through mechanisms that are yet poorly understood. Since Tl is accumulated by important crops, the present study aimed to analyze the biological effects induced by bioaccumulation of Tl in broad bean (Vicia faba L.) as well as the plant's antioxidative defense mechanisms usually activated by heavy metals. Thallium toxicity was related to production of reactive oxygen species in leaves and roots of broad bean seedlings following short-term (72 h) exposure to thallium (I) acetate (0, 0.5, 1, 5, and 10 mg/L) by evaluating DNA damage and oxidative stress parameters as well as antioxidative response. The possible antagonistic effect of potassium (K) was tested by combined treatment with 5 mg/L of Tl (Tl+) and 10 mg/L of potassium (K+) acetate. Accumulation of Tl+ in roots was 50 to 250 times higher than in broad bean shoots and was accompanied by increase in dry weight and proline. Despite responsive antioxidative defense (increased activities of superoxide dismutase, ascorbate peroxidase, and pyrogallol peroxidase), Tl+ caused oxidative damage to lipids and proteins as evaluated by malondialdehyde and carbonyl group levels, and induced DNA strand breaks. Combined treatment caused no oxidative alternations to lipids and proteins though it induced DNA damage. The difference in Tl-induced genotoxicity following both acellular and cellular exposure implies indirect DNA damage. Results obtained indicate that oxidative stress is involved in the mechanism of Tl toxicity and that the tolerance of broad bean to Tl is achieved, at least in part, through the increased activity of antioxidant enzymes.

  7. EVALUATION OF LENTIL GERMPLASM FOR DISEASE RESISTANCE TO FUSARIUM WILT (FUSARIUM OXYSPORUM F.SP. LENTIS)

    OpenAIRE

    Tzvetelina Stoilova; Peter Chavdarov

    2006-01-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medic.) is one of the oldest known protein-rich food legumes. Lentil is the second pulse crop after dry bean in Bulgaria. Diseases such as Ascochyta blight and Lentil wilt play a major role in reducing lentil yield. Thirty two lentil genotypes with different geographical origin were screened for reaction to Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lentis during 2003-2004 from the Institute for Plant Genetic Resourses, Sadovo under greenhouse conditions. Three of the studied accessions ...

  8. Impact of legume protein type and location on lipid oxidation in fish oil-in-water emulsions: Lentil, pea, and faba bean proteins.

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    Gumus, Cansu Ekin; Decker, Eric Andrew; McClements, David Julian

    2017-10-01

    Emulsion-based delivery systems are being developed to incorporate ω-3 fatty acids into functional foods and beverages. There is interest in formulating these delivery systems from more sustainable and label-friendly ingredients. The aim of this study was therefore to examine the impact of plant-protein emulsifiers on the oxidative stability of 1wt% fish oil-in-water emulsions. Fish oil emulsions stabilized by three types of legume protein (lentil, pea, and faba bean) were produced using a high-pressure microfluidizer. The formation of primary (peroxides) and secondary (TBARS) lipid oxidation products was measured when the emulsions were stored at 37°C under accelerated (+100μM iron sulfate) or non-accelerated (no added iron) conditions for 21 or 33days, respectively. The particle size, charge and microstructure of the emulsions were monitored during storage using light scattering and microscopy to detect changes in physical stability. Emulsions stabilized by whey protein isolate, a commonly used animal-based protein, were utilized as a control. The emulsions formed using whey protein had smaller initial particle sizes, better physical stability, and slightly better stability to lipid oxidation than the ones formed using plant-based proteins. The impact of protein location (adsorbed versus non-adsorbed) on the oxidative stability of the emulsions was also investigated. The presence of non-adsorbed proteins inhibited lipid oxidation, presumably by binding transition metals and reducing their ability to interact with ω-3 fatty acids in the lipid droplets. Overall, these results have important implications for fabricating emulsion-based delivery systems for bioactive lipids, e.g., they indicate that including high levels of non-adsorbed proteins could improve oxidative stability. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  9. The Effect of Humic Acid on Nutrient Composition in Broad Bean (Vicia faba L. Roots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sener AKINCI

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Humic acids promote the conversion of mineral nutrients into forms available to plants. It also stimulates seed germination and viability, and its main effect usually being more prominent in the roots. The objective of this study was to determine of the influence of humic acid on broad bean (Vicia faba L. cultivar �Eresen 87� on root growth and development as well as nutrient uptake, during investigation in a pot experiment. Treatment with leonardite, as humic acid source positively affected both germination and harvesting, enhancing root length and biomass. Humic acid (HA caused significant increase of fresh (RFW and dry (RDW weights by 30.1% and 56.6% of broad bean roots, respectively. Flame photometer and atomic absorption spectrophotometry analyses revealed that K content was major nutrient among the tested elements. Humic acid increased the contents of Na and K significantly. The content of Ca and Fe was not significantly increased whereas Cu, Mn and Zn content decreased under HA treatment.

  10. Occurrence of broad bean (Vicia faba L. diseases in Olsztyn-Elbąg and Bydgoszcz Provinces

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    Stanisław Sadowski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available During the years 1981-1985, there were conducted studies of the healthiness of broad bean,'Nadwiślański' variety, cultivated in different soil and climate conditions of the two regions: i.e. Bydgoszcz - comparatively warmer and drier, and Olsztyn-Elbląg - colder and moister. It was found that the main reason for a premature broad bean leaves dry in up in the Olsztyn-Elbląg Region was caused by the fungi Cercospora and Botrytis, and in the Bydgoszcz Region - the root rot which occurs here to a greater extent. Root gangrene was greater intensity in drier and lighter soils. Rotting broad bean roots were most frequently occupied by the fungi of the Fusarium family (ca. 70%. The prevailing species were Fusarium oxysporum, next F. solani and more rarely F. culmorum and F. avenaceum. Climate conditions and soil species affected considerably the species composition of the root fungi.

  11. Broad bean and pea by-products as sources of fibre-rich ingredients: potential antioxidant activity measured in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mateos-Aparicio, Inmaculada; Redondo-Cuenca, Araceli; Villanueva-Suárez, María-José

    2012-02-01

    By-products generated during the processing of plant food can be considered a promising source of dietary fibre as a functional compound. The dietary fibre composition, soluble sugars and antioxidant activity of the extractable polyphenols of pea and broad bean by-products have been analysed in this study. Total dietary fibre using AOAC methods plus hydrolysis (broad bean pod: 337.3 g kg⁻¹; pea pod: 472.6 g kg⁻¹) is higher (P pod: 309.7 g kg⁻¹; pea pod: 434.6 g kg⁻¹). The main monomers are uronic acids, glucose, arabinose and galactose in broad bean pods. However, pea pods are very rich in glucose and xylose. The soluble sugars analysed by high-performance liquid chromatography in both by-products have glucose as the most important component, followed by sucrose and fructose. The ferric reducing antioxidant power (broad bean pod: 406.4 µmol Trolox equivalents g⁻¹; pea pod: 25.9 µmol Trolox equivalents g⁻¹) and scavenging effect on 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl radical (EC₅₀ of broad bean pod: 0.4 mg mL⁻¹; EC₅₀ of pea pod: 16.0 mg mL⁻¹) were also measured. Broad bean and pea by-products are very rich in dietary fibre, particularly insoluble dietary fibre and their extractable polyphenols demonstrate antioxidant activity. Therefore they might be regarded as functional ingredients. Copyright © 2011 Society of Chemical Industry.

  12. Apple Latent Spherical Virus Vector as Vaccine for the Prevention and Treatment of Mosaic Diseases in Pea, Broad Bean, and Eustoma Plants by Bean Yellow Mosaic Virus

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    Nozomi Satoh

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the protective effects of a viral vector based on an Apple latent spherical virus (ALSV harboring a segment of the Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV genome against mosaic diseases in pea, broad bean, and eustoma plants caused by BYMV infection. In pea plants pre-inoculated with the ALSV vaccine and challenge inoculated with BYMV expressing green fluorescence protein, BYMV multiplication occurred in inoculated leaves, but was markedly inhibited in the upper leaves. No mosaic symptoms due to BYMV infection were observed in the challenged plants pre-inoculated with the ALSV vaccine. Simultaneous inoculation with the ALSV vaccine and BYMV also prevented mosaic symptoms in broad bean and eustoma plants, and BYMV accumulation was strongly inhibited in the upper leaves of plants treated with the ALSV vaccine. Pea and eustoma plants were pre-inoculated with BYMV followed by inoculation with the ALSV vaccine to investigate the curative effects of the ALSV vaccine. In both plant species, recovery from mosaic symptoms was observed in upper leaves and BYMV accumulation was inhibited in leaves developing post-ALSV vaccination. These results show that ALSV vaccination not only prevents mosaic diseases in pea, broad bean, and eustoma, but that it is also effective in curing these diseases.

  13. Batch-batch stable microbial community in the traditional fermentation process of huyumei broad bean pastes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Linjiang; Fan, Zihao; Kuai, Hui; Li, Qi

    2017-09-01

    During natural fermentation processes, a characteristic microbial community structure (MCS) is naturally formed, and it is interesting to know about its batch-batch stability. This issue was explored in a traditional semi-solid-state fermentation process of huyumei, a Chinese broad bean paste product. The results showed that this MCS mainly contained four aerobic Bacillus species (8 log CFU per g), including B. subtilis, B. amyloliquefaciens, B. methylotrophicus, and B. tequilensis, and the facultative anaerobe B. cereus with a low concentration (4 log CFU per g), besides a very small amount of the yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii (2 log CFU per g). The dynamic change of the MCS in the brine fermentation process showed that the abundance of dominant species varied within a small range, and in the beginning of process the growth of lactic acid bacteria was inhibited and Staphylococcus spp. lost its viability. Also, the MCS and its dynamic change were proved to be highly reproducible among seven batches of fermentation. Therefore, the MCS naturally and stably forms between different batches of the traditional semi-solid-state fermentation of huyumei. Revealing microbial community structure and its batch-batch stability is helpful for understanding the mechanisms of community formation and flavour production in a traditional fermentation. This issue in a traditional semi-solid-state fermentation of huyumei broad bean paste was firstly explored. This fermentation process was revealed to be dominated by a high concentration of four aerobic species of Bacillus, a low concentration of B. cereus and a small amount of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii. Lactic acid bacteria and Staphylococcus spp. lost its viability at the beginning of fermentation. Such the community structure was proved to be highly reproducible among seven batches. © 2017 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  14. Impact of three different fungicides on fungal epi- and endophytic communities of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) and broad bean (Vicia faba).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prior, René; Mittelbach, Moritz; Begerow, Dominik

    2017-06-03

    In this study, the impacts of three different fungicides to fungal phyllosphere communities on broad bean (Vicia faba, Fabaceae) and common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, Fabaceae) were analyzed. The fungicides included copper, sulfur, and azoxystrobin. The plants were sowed, grown, and treated under conditions occurring in conventional and organic farming. A culture-based approach was used to identify changes in the phyllosphere fungal community after the treatment. Different effects on species richness and growth index of the epiphytic and endophytic communities for common bean and broad bean could be shown. Treatments with sulfur showed the weakest effect, followed by those based on copper and the systemic azoxystrobin, which showed the strongest effect especially on endophytic communities. The epiphytic fungal community took five weeks to recover after treatment with azoxystrobin. However, the effect of azoxystrobin on the endophytic community lasted more than five weeks. Finally, the data suggest that the surface structure of the host leaves have a huge impact on the mode of action that the fungicides exert.

  15. Development of PCR-based assays for detecting and differentiating three species of botrytis infecting broad bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botrytis cinerea, B. fabae and B. fabiopsis are known to cause chocolate spot on broad bean. This study was conducted to develop PCR-based assays to detect and differentiate this three species. Two sets of primers, Bc-f/Bc-r for B. cinerea and Bfab-f/Bfab-r for B. fabiopsis, were designed based on t...

  16. Nutritional value of broad bean seeds. Part 3: Changes of dietary fibre and starch in the production of commercial flours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giczewska, Anna; Borowska, Julitta

    2004-04-01

    We report on the impact of flour production from small- and large-seed varieties of broad bean on the quantitative and qualitative distribution of dietary fibre and starch. The experimental material consisted of the seeds of small-seed varieties of broad bean: Gobik and Goral, large-seed varieties of broad bean: Windsor Bialy and Bartom, and pea seeds of Albatros, Karat and Miko varieties (for comparison). The seeds were at full physiological maturity. Soaking and hydrothermal processing were shown to cause multidirectional, statistically significant changes in dietary fibre and starch, depending on both parameters of the process and type of the seeds. The flours of both small-seed broad bean varieties contained 20.15%-28.31%, flours of the large-seed broad bean 23.10%-27.50%, and those from pea seeds 20.13%-22.81% total dietary fibre. Attention should be paid to the considerable, approximately 2-fold increase in the soluble dietary fibre (SDF) content, compared to the raw material. The processing of seeds caused significant changes also with reference to starch. The most considerable changes were observed when the variant with the longest times of soaking (18 h) and heating (45 min) was applied. In the broad bean flours, the content of analytically available starch decreased by 22.94-30.60% and its digestibility was observed to decrease up to 30.25%. The pea flours, however, were characterised by an increased concentration of both forms of starch, especially significant for the digestible starch. The calculated content of resistant starch (RS) differentiated, to a high extent, the flours obtained. Under the same processing conditions, the flours of small-seed Gobik and Goral varieties of broad bean were characterised by a significantly higher RS content than those obtained from the large-seed varieties. A decrease in the starch digestibility rate index (SDRI) values, especially high for the small-seed varieties, should also be emphasised. The results obtained

  17. Evaluation for fresh consumption of new broad bean genotypes with a determinate growth habit in central Chile

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    Cecilia Baginsky

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Broad bean (Vicia faba L. [unranked] major (Harz Beck is usually consumed dry. In Chile, however, broad bean is grown as a vegetable crop with indeterminate genotypes. The new 'Alarga', 'Retaca' and 'Verde Bonita' broad bean genotypes, which have a determinate growth habit, were evaluated in six irrigated environments in central Chile at three locations (Rancagua, Talca, and Talagante and on two planting dates (F1 and F2; 1-mo apart. The aim was to characterize their yield and select the best-yielding genotypes in terms of pod yield (PY and fresh grain yield (GY. The best location(s to produce fresh pods and fresh grain were also identified and described. Fresh grain yield and components were measured and the genotype x environment interaction (GxE was analyzed. Pod yield differed among genotypes; 'Verde Bonita' and 'Retaca' had the highest PY (15 500 kg ha-1, 8% higher than 'Alarga'. There was a GxE interaction for GY and 'Retaca' had its highest yield in Talca on the two planting dates and in Rancagua when planted late (F2. Mean GY of 'Retaca' was 3900 kg ha-1 with the highest number of grains per 1 m² (NG. The best GY was related to a higher seasonal photothermal quotient (ranging from 1.15 to 1.82 MJ m-2 d-1 °C-1, r = 0.90, P d" 0.001. The lowest GY was in Talagante on F1. Genotypes differed in yield composition; 'Retaca' had many small pods giving many seeds per unit area and 'Verde Bonita' had large pods yielding fewer grains per unit area. The 'Retaca' genotype is preferred by the frozen broad bean industry, whereas 'Verde Bonita' is preferred by the fresh broad bean market.

  18. N-(jasmonoyl)tyrosine-derived compounds from flowers of broad beans (Vicia faba).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramell, Robert; Schmidt, Jürgen; Herrmann, Gabriele; Schliemann, Willibald

    2005-09-01

    Two new amide-linked conjugates of jasmonic acid, N-[(3R,7R)-(-)-jasmonoyl]-(S)-dopa (3) and N-[(3R,7R)-(-)-jasmonoyl]-dopamine (5), were isolated in addition to the known compound N-[(3R,7R)-(-)-jasmonoyl]-(S)-tyrosine (2) from the methanolic extract of flowers of broad bean (Vicia faba). Their structures were proposed on the basis of spectroscopic data (LC-MS/MS) and chromatographic properties on reversed and chiral phases and confirmed by partial syntheses. Furthermore, tyrosine conjugates of two cucurbic acid isomers (7, 8) were detected and characterized by LC-MS. Crude enzyme preparations from flowers of V. faba hydroxylated both (+/-)-2 and N-[(3R,7R/3S,7S)-(-)-jasmonoyl]tyramine [(+/-)-4] to (+/-)-3 and (+/-)-5, respectively, suggesting a possible biosynthetic relationship. In addition, a commercial tyrosinase (mushroom) and a tyrosinase-containing extract from hairy roots of red beet exhibited the same catalytic properties, but with different substrate specificities. The conjugates (+/-)-2, (+/-)-3, (+/-)-4, and (+/-)-5 exhibited in a bioassay low activity to elicit alkaloid formation in comparison to free (+/-)-jasmonic acid [(+/-)-1].

  19. Genetic Compositions of Broad bean wilt virus 2 Infecting Red Pepper in Korea

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    Hae-Ryun Kwak

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available The incidence of Broad bean wilt virus 2 (BBWV2 on red pepper was investigated using the samples obtained from 24 areas of 8 provinces in Korea. Two hundred and five samples (79% out of 260 collected samples were found to be infected with BBWV2. While the single infection rate of BBWV2 was 21.5%, the co-infection rate of BBWV2 with Cucumber mosaic virus, Pepper mottle virus, Pepper mild mottle virus and/or Potato virus Y was 78.5%. To characterize the genetic diversity of BBWV2 Korean isolates, 7 isolates were fully sequenced and analyzed. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that BBWV2 isolates could be divided largely into two groups as Group I and Group II. Based on the partial sequence analyses, 153 selected BBWV2 isolates were subgrouped into GS-I (21.6%, GS-II (3.9% and GS-III (56.9%. BBWV2 GS-III, which was predominant in Korea, appears to be a new combination between Group I RNA-1 and Group II RNA-2. Viral disease incidence of BBWV2 on red pepper was under 2% before 2004. However, the incidence was increased abruptly to 41.3% in 2005, 58.2% in 2006 and 79% in 2007. These rapid increases might be related with the emergence of new combinations between BBWV2 groups.

  20. An enhancing effect of visible light and UV radiation on phenolic compounds and various antioxidants in broad bean seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasaneen, Mohammed Naguib Abdel-Ghany; Abdel-Aziz, Heba Mahmoud Mohammed

    2010-01-01

    Exposure of dark- or ambient visible light-grown broad bean seedlings to low (LL) and high (HL) visible light intensities, UV-A or UV-C, either alone or in combination, induced significant increases in total phenolic compounds as well as in anthocyanins content, throughout the germination period, as compared with the respective levels in control seedlings. In general, as compared with control levels, exposure of both dark- or light-grown broad bean seedlings to LL, HL, UV-A or UV-C, induced significant increases in the contents of non-enzymatic antioxidants (total ascorbate; ASA-DASA and total glutathione; GSSG-GSH) and enzymatic antioxidant activities (superoxide dismutase; SOD, catalase; CAT, ascorbate peroxidase; APO and glutathione reductase; GR). The obtained results are discussed in relation to induced mechanisms of protection and repair from the inevitable exposure to damaging visible light and UV radiation. PMID:20505357

  1. EVALUATION OF LENTIL GERMPLASM FOR DISEASE RESISTANCE TO FUSARIUM WILT (FUSARIUM OXYSPORUM F.SP. LENTIS

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    Tzvetelina Stoilova

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Lentil (Lens culinaris Medic. is one of the oldest known protein-rich food legumes. Lentil is the second pulse crop after dry bean in Bulgaria. Diseases such as Ascochyta blight and Lentil wilt play a major role in reducing lentil yield. Thirty two lentil genotypes with different geographical origin were screened for reaction to Fusarium oxysporum f.sp. lentis during 2003-2004 from the Institute for Plant Genetic Resourses, Sadovo under greenhouse conditions. Three of the studied accessions (91-001, 91-028 and 98-001 were susceptible with 45 and 50 % of total wilted plant.

  2. Nutritional improvement of corn pasta-like product with broad bean (Vicia faba) and quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez, M A; Drago, S R; Bassett, M N; Lobo, M O; Sammán, N C

    2016-05-15

    In this study, the nutritional quality of pasta-like product (spaghetti-type), made with corn (Zea mays) flour enriched with 30% broad bean (Vicia faba) flour and 20% of quinoa (Chenopodium quinoa) flour, was determined. Proximate chemical composition and iron, zinc and dietary fiber were determined. A biological assay was performed to assess the protein value using net protein utilization (NPU), true digestibility (TD) and protein digestibility-corrected amino acid score (PDCAAS). Iron and zinc availability were estimated by measuring dialyzable mineral fraction (%Da) resulting from in vitro gastrointestinal digestion. Nutritionally improved, gluten-free spaghetti (NIS) showed significantly increased NPU and decreased TD compared with a non-enriched control sample. One NIS-portion supplied 10-20% of recommended fiber daily intake. Addition of quinoa flour had a positive effect on the FeDa% as did broad bean flour on ZnDa%. EDTA increased Fe- and ZnDa% in all NIS-products, but it also impaired sensorial quality. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Effect of petroleum-derived substances on life history traits of black bean aphid (Aphis fabae Scop.) and on the growth and chemical composition of broad bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rusin, Milena; Gospodarek, Janina; Nadgórska-Socha, Aleksandra; Barczyk, Gabriela

    2017-04-01

    The aim of the study was to determine the effects of various petroleum-derived substances, namely petrol, diesel fuel and spent engine oil, on life history traits and population dynamics of the black bean aphid Aphis fabae Scop. and on growth and chemical composition of its host plant Vicia faba L. Each substance was tested separately, using two concentrations (9 g kg-1 and 18 g kg-1). The experiment was conducted in four replications (four pots with five plants in each pot per treatment). Plants were cultivated in both control and contaminated soils. After six weeks from soil contamination and five weeks from sowing the seeds, observations of the effect of petroleum-derived substances on traits of three successive generations of aphids were conducted. Aphids were inoculated separately on leaves using cylindrical cages hermetically closed on both sides. Contamination of aphid occurred through its host plant. Results showed that all tested substances adversely affected A. fabae life history traits and population dynamics: extension of the prereproductive period, reduction of fecundity and life span, reduction of the population intrinsic growth rate. In broad bean, leaf, roots, and shoot growth was also impaired in most conditions, whereas nutrient and heavy metal content varied according to substances, their concentration, as well as plant part analysed. Results indicate that soil contamination with petroleum-derived substances entails far-reaching changes not only in organisms directly exposed to these pollutants (plants), but also indirectly in herbivores (aphids) and consequently provides information about potential negative effects on further links of the food chain, i.e., for predators and parasitoids.

  4. Targeting gene combinations for broad spectrum rust resistance in heat tolerant snap beans developed for tropical environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Common bean rust disease, caused by Uromyces appendiculatus, and heat stress, caused by high ambient temperature, constrain snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production in many areas in tropical and temperate zones. Bean rust and heat stress often occur within the same production regions, such ...

  5. Amino acid composition and biological effects of supplementing broad bean and corn proteins with Nigella sativa (black cumin) cake protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    al-Gaby, A M

    1998-10-01

    The biological effects of supplementing broad bean (Vicia faba) or corn (Zea maize) meal protein with black cumin (Nigella sativa) cake protein as well as their amino acid composition were investigated. The percentage of total protein content of Nigella cake was 22.7%. Lysine is existent in abundant amounts in faba meal protein, while leucine is the most abundant in corn meal protein (chemical score = 156) and valine is higher in Nagella cake protein. compared with rats fed sole corn or faba meal protein, substitution of 25% of corn or faba meal protein with Nigella cake protein in the diet remarkably raised the growth rate of rats and resulted in significant higher levels of rat total serum lipids and triglycerides. Also, the supplemented diet caused significant increases in serum total protein and its two fractions albumin and globulin and insignificantly increase the activity of serum phosphatases and transaminases within normal ranges. The supplementation did not have any adverse nutritional effects in the levels of lipid fractions in the serum.

  6. IDENTIFIKASI MOLEKULER BROAD BEAN WILT VIRUS 2 (BBWV2 DAN CYMBIDIUM MOSAIC VIRUS (CYMMV ASAL TANAMAN NILAM (POGOSTEMON CABLIN BENTH.

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    Miftakhurohmah .

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Molecular identification Broad Bean Wilt Virus 2 (BBWV2 and Cymbidium Mosaic Virus (CymMV from patchouli plant (Pogostemon cablin Benth.. Several viruses have been reported to be associated with mosaic disease on patchouli plant in Indonesia. This study aims to identify the two viruses in patchouli cultivation in West Java by studying the molecular characterization. Mosaic symptomatic leaf samples taken from patchouli cultivation in Manoko (Bandung Barat District, West Java Province. RNA extraction was performed using Xprep Plant RNA mini kit. RNA amplification with RT-PCR technique using primers for the cp gene region of BBWV2 and CymMV. The PCR product was sent to PT. Science Genetics Indonesia to do sequencing, then analyzed nucleotide sequences. Results of RT-PCR were performed successfully obtained DNA bands with size accordance with the predictions of the primer design for BBWV2 and CymMV cp region. Further, based on nucleotide and amino acid sequence analyses, the two virus isolates were confirmed as BBWV2 and CymMV respectively. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that BBWV2 Manoko clustered with BBWV2 from Singapore (original host of Brazilian red-cloak, China (pepper and South Korea (chili. Whereas, CymMV Manoko become one cluster with CymMV from India (Phaius sp., Indonesia (Dendrobium, China (vanilla, Thailand (Oncidium, Hawai (Dendrobium and South Korea Cymbidium.

  7. In vitro fermentation of lupin seeds (Lupinus albus) and broad beans (Vicia faba): dynamic modulation of the intestinal microbiota and metabolomic output.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gullón, Patricia; Gullón, Beatriz; Tavaria, Freni; Vasconcelos, Marta; Gomes, Ana Maria

    2015-10-01

    Broad beans (Vicia faba) and lupin seeds (Lupinus albus) are legumes rich in a wide range of compounds, which may represent a useful dietary approach for modulating the human gut microbiome. In this work, after in vitro digestion, legume samples were used as carbon sources in anaerobic batch cultures to evaluate their impact on the intestinal microbiota composition and on their metabolic products. The fermentations were monitored by a decrease in pH, generation of short chain fatty acids (SCFA) and lactate and the changes in the dynamic bacterial populations by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). The total SCFA at the end of fermentation was 81.52 mM for lupin seeds and 78.41 mM for broad beans accompanied by a decrease of the pH for both legumes. The microbial groups that increased significantly (P < 0.05) were Bifidobacterium spp., Lactobacillus-Enterococcus, Atopobium, Bacteroides-Pretovella, Clostridium coccoides-Eubacterium rectale, Faecalibacterium prausnitzii and Roseburia intestinalis. This impact on the intestinal microbiota suggests that lupin seeds and broad beans may be used in the development of novel functional foods, which can be included in dietary strategies for human health promotion.

  8. Registration of "Essex" lentil

    Science.gov (United States)

    ‘Essex’ lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) was released by the USDA-ARS in August 2009. Essex, selection LC01602307E, originated as an F5 selection from the cross of Richlea/PI 297754. Essex was released based on its superior yield performance relative to the variety Eston. Essex was tested in replicate...

  9. Nutrition education and introduction of broad bean-based complementary food improves knowledge and dietary practices of caregivers and nutritional status of their young children in Hula, Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Negash, Canaan; Belachew, Tefera; Henry, Carol J; Kebebu, Afework; Abegaz, Kebede; Whiting, Susan J

    2014-12-01

    Nutritious complementary foods are needed in countries where undernutrition and stunting are major problems, but mothers may be reluctant to change from traditional gruels. To test whether a recipe-based complementary feeding education intervention would improve knowledge and practice of mothers with young children in Hula, Ethiopia. A baseline survey of 200 eligible, randomly selected mother-child pairs gathered data on sociodemographic characteristics, food security status, knowledge and practices concerning complementary feeding, food group intakes of children aged 6 to 23 months by 24-hour recalls, and children's anthropometric measurements. Twice a month for 6 months, women in the intervention group received an education session consisting of eight specific messages using Alive and Thrive posters and a demonstration and tasting of a local barley and maize porridge recipe containing 30% broad beans. The control group lived in a different area and had no intervention. At 6 months, knowledge and practice scores regarding complementary feeding were significantly improved (p nutrition education over 6 months that included demonstration of a local porridge recipe with broad beans added improved the complementary feeding practices of caregivers and the nutritional status of their young children.

  10. Preparation of mayonnaise from extracted plant protein isolates of chickpea, broad bean and lupin flour: chemical, physiochemical, nutritional and therapeutic properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alu'datt, Muhammad H; Rababah, Taha; Alhamad, Mohammad N; Ereifej, Khalil; Gammoh, Sana; Kubow, Stan; Tawalbeh, Deia

    2017-05-01

    This investigation was aimed to study the molecular, physico-chemical, and biofunctional health properties of mayonnaise prepared using proteins isolated from broad bean, lupin and chickpea flour. Proteins were isolated from chickpea (CPPI), broad bean (BBPI) and lupin (LPPI) flour and assessed for molecular, physico-chemical, biofunctional, and protein yield. The highest water holding capacity, foaming stability, emulsion stability as well as protein yield and protein content of 44.0, 70.8, 37.5, 81.2, and 36.4, respectively were observed for BBPI. Mayonnaise prepared from the isolated plant proteins was evaluated for chemical composition, molecular properties of the protein subunits, and potential nutraceutical properties. Preparation of mayonnaise using BBPI or a mixture of either BBPI and CPPI or BBPI and LPPI showed superior values for lightness and lowered values for redness. Mayonnaise prepared from either BBPI or the BBPI and CPPI mixture showed the best antioxidant, antihypertensive and antidiabetic properties. The present study results indicated that the use of the BBPI and CPPI mixture can be a novel technological approach for the development of a mayonnaise with improved health promoting properties.

  11. Lentil genetic and genomic resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentil (Lens culinaris spp. culinaris) has a long history associated with the early civilizations 11,000 BP in southwestern Asia. The progenitor taxon is Lens culinaris spp. orientalis. The primary source of germplasm for lentil crop improvement is from the International Center for Agricultural Rese...

  12. Lentil (Lens culinaris) Lipid Transfer Protein Len c 3: A Novel Legume Allergen

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Akkerdaas, J.; Finkina, E. I.; Balandin, S. V.; Santos Magadán, S.; Knulst, A.; Fernandez-Rivas, M.; Asero, R.; van Ree, R.; Ovchinnikova, T. V.

    2012-01-01

    Background: Lentils are increasingly consumed in many parts of the world. Two allergens, Len c 1 and 2, have been reported previously. Recently, peanut and green bean lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) have been identified as the first two members of an important group of allergens that might be

  13. Effect of Cd stress on the bioavailability of Cd and other mineral nutrition elements in broad bean grown in a loess subsoil amended with municipal sludge compost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Cheng; Nan, Zhongren; Wang, Houcheng; Li, Xiaolin; Zhou, Jian; Yao, Xun; Jin, Pen

    2017-12-26

    Municipal sludge compost (MSC) is commonly used as fertilizer or an amendment in barren soils. However, MSC-borne Cd is of great concern in food safety because of its toxicity. Loess subsoil (LS) is barren and lacks nutrients, but it has a strong ability to absorb and stabilize heavy metals. Hence, LS may be amended with MSC and may reduce the bioavailability of Cd. To simulate the dose effect of the accumulated MSC-borne Cd in amended LS, pot experiments were conducted to study the bioavailability of Cd and other mineral nutrition elements in broad bean (Vicia faba L.) under Cd stress. Plant height and dry biomass remarkably increased as the physicochemical properties of LS were significantly improved; however, they were not significantly influenced by the added Cd. The Cd in the plants grown in MSC amended-LS (P2) mainly accumulated in roots (32.12 mg kg-1) and then in stems and leaves (6.00 mg kg-1). Less Cd (0.74 mg kg-1) accumulated in the edible parts, where the Cd concentration was 53% lower than that in the edible parts of plants grown in LS (P1). The decreased Cd concentrations in the P2 beans may be due to the biomass dilution effect. Notably, the Cd concentrations in the beans exceeded the national safety limit value (0.2 mg kg-1) when the Cd treatment levels exceeded 2 mg kg-1 in LS and 6 mg kg-1 in amended LS. The MgCl2 extraction procedures can be used to assess Cd bioavailability in amended soil-plant systems. The potential antagonism of Zn and Cu against Cd toxicity in the soil-plant system may explain why this plant can tolerate higher Cd concentrations after MSC application.

  14. Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akcay, Ufuk Celikkol; Yücel, Meral; Oktem, Hüseyin Avni

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes an efficient Agrobacterium-mediated genetic transformation of lentil by use of cotyledonary node explants, an optimized wounding method, and vacuum infiltration. Transformation protocol was followed by direct regeneration of transgenic shoots and micrografting of the shoots on root stocks to obtain whole-plant regeneration. The most efficient transgene expression on the axil region was obtained when the Agrobacterium KYRT1 strain was used. Gradually increasing selection pressure and repeated removal of regenerated shoots between selection steps increased the number of transgene-expressing shoots greatly. This protocol allowed 2.3 % transformation efficiency and stable transgene expression and transmission which were tracked through three generations.

  15. STABILITY PARAMETERS IN LENTIL

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    B TUBA BİÇER

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Fourteen lentil genotypes were tested for grain yield in Southeastern Anatolia ecological conditions, over our consecutive years to classify these cultivars for yield stability. Seed yield ranged from 1.903 t/ha to 1.367 t/ha. RM76, RM601 and RM152 showed regression coeffi cient above 1.00, but RM76 among these lines was consistently produced the highest yields. The unstable cultivars, RM601 and RM152 had the highest S2 values and high C.V. for grain yield.

  16. Determining radio frequency heating uniformity of mixed beans during disinfestation treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Since chickpeas and lentils are difficulty to artificially infest with live insects for radio frequency (RF) treatment validation, black-eyed peas and mung beans were selected to infest with insects before mixing with chickpeas and lentils. Temperature difference between black-eyed pea and chickpea ...

  17. Lentils (Lens culinaris Medikus Subspecies culinaris): a whole food for increased iron and zinc intake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavarajah, Dil; Thavarajah, Pushparajah; Sarker, Ashutosh; Vandenberg, Albert

    2009-06-24

    Micronutrient malnutrition, the hidden hunger, affects more than 40% of the world's population, and a majority of them are in South and South East Asia and Africa. This study was carried out to determine the potential for iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) biofortification of lentils ( Lens culinaris Medikus subsp. culinaris ) to improve human nutrition. Lentils are a common and quick-cooking nutritious staple pulse in many developing countries. We analyzed the total Fe and Zn concentrations of 19 lentil genotypes grown at eight locations for 2 years in Saskatchewan, Canada. It was observed that some genetic variation exists for Fe and Zn concentrations among the lentil lines tested. The total Fe and Zn concentrations ranged from 73 to 90 mg of Fe kg(-1) and from 44 to 54 mg of Zn kg(-1). The calculated percentages of the recommended daily allowance (RDA) for Fe and Zn were within the RDA ranges from a 100 g serving of dry lentils. Broad-sense heritability estimates for Fe and Zn concentrations in lentil seed were 64 and 68%, respectively. It was concluded that lentils have great potential as a whole food source of Fe and Zn for people affected by these nutrient deficiencies. This is the first report on the genetic basis for Fe and Zn micronutrient content in lentils. These results provide some understanding of the genetic basis of Fe and Zn concentrations and will allow for the development of potential strategies for genetic biofortification.

  18. Pea and Broad Bean Pods as a Natural Source of Dietary Fiber: The Impact on Texture and Sensory Properties of Cake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belghith-Fendri, Lilia; Chaari, Fatma; Kallel, Fatma; Zouari-Ellouzi, Soumaya; Ghorbel, Raoudha; Besbes, Souhail; Ellouz-Chaabouni, Semia; Ghribi-Aydi, Dhouha

    2016-10-01

    Attention has focused on bakery products such as cake which is one of the most common bakery products consumed by people in the world. Legume by-products, pea pods (PPs) (Pisum sativum L.) and broad bean pods (BBPs) (Vicia faba L.) mediterranean (Tunisian), has been studied for its high dietary fiber content (PP: 43.87 g/100 g; BBP: 53.01 g/100 g). Protein content was also a considerable component for both by-products. We investigated the effect of substituted of 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%, and 30% of PP and BBP flours on the sensory and technological properties in cake. Cakes hardness increased whereas L* and a* color values decreased. The overall acceptability rate showed that a maximum of 15% of PP and BBP flours can be added to prepare acceptable quality cakes. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®.

  19. Infestation of Broad Bean (Vicia faba) by the Green Stink Bug (Nezara viridula) Decreases Shoot Abscisic Acid Contents under Well-Watered and Drought Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ederli, Luisa; Brunetti, Cecilia; Centritto, Mauro; Colazza, Stefano; Frati, Francesca; Loreto, Francesco; Marino, Giovanni; Salerno, Gianandrea; Pasqualini, Stefania

    2017-01-01

    The response of broad bean (Vicia faba) plants to water stress alone and in combination with green stink bug (Nezara viridula) infestation was investigated through measurement of: (1) leaf gas exchange; (2) plant hormone titres of abscisic acid (ABA) and its metabolites, and of salicylic acid (SA); and (3) hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) content. Furthermore, we evaluated the effects of experimentally water-stressed broad-bean plants on N. viridula performance in terms of adult host-plant preference, and nymph growth and survival. Water stress significantly reduced both photosynthesis (A) and stomatal conductance (gs ), while infestation by the green stink bug had no effects on photosynthesis but significantly altered partitioning of ABA between roots and shoots. Leaf ABA was decreased and root ABA increased as a result of herbivore attack, under both well-watered and water-deprived conditions. Water stress significantly impacted on SA content in leaves, but not on H2O2. However, infestation of N. viridula greatly increased both SA and H2O2 contents in leaves and roots, which suggests that endogenous SA and H2O2 have roles in plant responses to herbivore infestation. No significant differences were seen for green stink bug choice between well-watered and water-stressed plants. However, for green stink bug nymphs, plant water stress promoted significantly lower weight increases and significantly higher mortality, which indicates that highly water-stressed host plants are less suitable for N. viridula infestation. In conclusion two important findings emerged: (i) association of water stress with herbivore infestation largely changes plant response in terms of phytohormone contents; but (ii) water stress does not affect the preference of the infesting insects, although their performance was impaired.

  20. Lentil (Lens culinaris) lipid transfer protein Len c 3: a novel legume allergen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akkerdaas, J; Finkina, E I; Balandin, S V; Santos Magadán, S; Knulst, A; Fernandez-Rivas, M; Asero, R; van Ree, R; Ovchinnikova, T V

    2012-01-01

    Lentils are increasingly consumed in many parts of the world.Two allergens, Len c 1 and 2, have been reported previously. Recently, peanut and green bean lipid transfer proteins (LTPs) have been identified as the first two members of an important group of allergens that might be associated with severe food allergies. To investigate lentil LTP as a potential new allergen. Efficacy of LTP extraction was monitored at different acidic pH values, using immunoblotting with cross-reactive anti-peach LTP antiserum. Natural LTP was purified from lentil extract and expressed as recombinant allergen in Escherichia coli. Sera from 10 lentil-allergic and/or -sensitized patients (Spain: 6, Italy: 1 and the Netherlands: 3) were used to further characterize lentil LTP. Natural lentil LTP, purified from the homogenized germinated seeds and optimally extracted at pH 3, was identified and designated as allergen Len c 3. By CAP, 9/10 sera showed specific IgE to Len c 3. Recombinant (r) Len c 3 was successfully purified. The natural (n) Len c 3 CAP was completely inhibited by rLen c 3/rPru p 3. IgE binding to lentil pH 3 extract blot was completely inhibited by rLen c 3. The availability of immunochemically active nLen/rLen c 3 as a novel legume allergen facilitates further development and implementation of a third (next to peanut and green bean) legume LTP in component-resolved diagnosis strategies and contributes to evaluate the clinical importance of legume LTPs. Preferential extraction of Len c 3 (pH 3) will affect the production of sensitive extract-based diagnostic tests. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Source-sink manipulations suggest an N-feedback mechanism for the drop in N2 fixation during pod-filling in pea and broad bean.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schulze, Joachim

    2003-05-01

    Various legume species show a marked decline in N2 fixation during pod-filling. The objective of this study was to clarify whether this is a result of impaired nodule assimilate supply or whether re-moblised N from senescing lower leaves initiates the phenomenon through an N-feedback impact. In model experiments on pea and broad bean plants during vegetative and reproductive growth, 30 or 60% of green leaves were either excised or individually darkened, thus removing the same photosynthetic capacity yet allowing N to be re-mobilised from darkened leaves. Results are consistent with an N-feedback down-regulation of nitrogenase in that 1. leaf darkening reduced N2 fixation to a greater extent then excision, 2. darkened leaves quickly senesced and N from these leaves was re-mobilised in substantial amounts, 3. N and amino acids (AA) accumulated and C/N ratios decreased in nodules of plants with darkened leaves versus excision or untreated controls. These findings further support various indirect evidence that nitrogenase is regulated by an N-feedback mechanism that is not yet fully understood.

  2. Low phytic acid lentils (Lens culinaris L.): a potential solution for increased micronutrient bioavailability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavarajah, Pushparajah; Thavarajah, Dil; Vandenberg, Albert

    2009-10-14

    Phytic acid is an antinutrient present mainly in seeds of grain crops such as legumes and cereals. It has the potential to bind mineral micronutrients in food and reduce their bioavailability. This study analyzed the phytic acid concentration in seeds of 19 lentil ( Lens culinaris L.) genotypes grown at two locations for two years in Saskatchewan, Canada. The objectives of this study were to determine (1) the levels of phytic acid in commercial lentil genotypes and (2) the impact of postharvest processing and (3) the effect of boiling on the stability of phytic aid in selected lentil genotypes. The phytic acid was analyzed by high-performance anion exchange separation followed by conductivity detection. The Saskatchewan-grown lentils were naturally low in phytic acid (phytic acid = 2.5-4.4 mg g(-1); phytic acid phosphorus = 0.7-1.2 mg g(-1)), with concentrations lower than those reported for low phytic acid mutants of corn, wheat, common bean, and soybean. Decortication prior to cooking further reduced total phytic acid by >50%. As lowering phytic acid intake can lead to increased mineral bioavailability, dietary inclusion of Canadian lentils may have significant benefits in regions with widespread micronutrient malnutrition.

  3. Current Knowledge on Genetic Biofortification in Lentil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Jitendra; Gupta, Debjyoti Sen; Kumar, Shiv; Gupta, Sanjeev; Singh, Narendra Pratap

    2016-08-24

    Micronutrient deficiency in the human body, popularly known as "hidden hunger", causes many health problems. It presently affects >2 billion people worldwide, especially in South Asia and sub-Saharan Africa. Biofortification of food crop varieties is one way to combat the problem of hidden hunger using conventional plant breeding and transgenic methods. Lentils are rich sources of protein, micronutrients, and vitamins including iron, zinc, selenium, folates, and carotenoids. Lentil genetic resources including germplasm and wild species showed genetic variability for these traits. Studies revealed that a single serving of lentils could provide a significant amount of the recommended daily allowance of micronutrients and vitamins for adults. Therefore, lentils have been identified as a food legume for biofortification, which could provide a whole food solution to the global micronutrient malnutrition. The present review discusses the current ongoing efforts toward genetic biofortification in lentils using classical breeding and molecular marker-assisted approaches.

  4. Genetic characterization and cotyledon color in lentil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cahit Erdoğan

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Genetic characterization of lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. cultivars is important for lentil breeding. Therefore, random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE analysis were carried out to evaluate genetic diversity in 13 Turkish lentil cultivars. A total of eight RAPD primers were used in this study; 61 bands were produced and 55 of them were polymorphic (89.78%. The RAPD primers OPA-10, OPB-11, and OPI-13 had the highest polymorphism ratio (100%. As a result of SDS-PAGE analysis, variations in the seed protein pattern were observed among the lentil cultivars being studied. The SDS-PAGE similarity matrices indicated higher genetic similarity estimates among the lentil cultivars than RAPD. In addition, principal components analysis (PCA was performed for both SDS-PAGE and RAPD where the first three components accounted for 75.760% and 68.121% of the total variation for SDS-PAGE and RAPD analysis, respectively. It was noted that the lentil cultivars with factor loadings greater than 0.5 for each principal component (PC were also grouped together in the SDS-PAGE and RAPD dendrogram. In addition to genetic diversity, cotyledon color (an important market criterion values were measured for lightness (L*, redness (a*, and yellowness (b*. As for cotyledon color, values for brightness, redness, and yellowness varied significantly among lentil cultivars. Among the red lentil cultivars, 'Cagil' and 'Yerli Kirmizi' had the highest cotyledon L* values of 70.83 and 70.74, respectively. The results of both genetic diversity analyses and cotyledon color of lentil cultivars would help in planning future breeding programs to improve high yielding marketable lentil cultivars.

  5. Rhizobium paranaense sp. nov., an effective N2-fixing symbiont of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) with broad geographical distribution in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dall'Agnol, Rebeca Fuzinatto; Ribeiro, Renan Augusto; Delamuta, Jakeline Renata Marçon; Ormeño-Orrillo, Ernesto; Rogel, Marco Antonio; Andrade, Diva Souza; Martínez-Romero, Esperanza; Hungria, Mariangela

    2014-09-01

    Nitrogen (N), the nutrient most required for plant growth, is key for good yield of agriculturally important crops. Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) can benefit from bacteria collectively called rhizobia, which are capable of fixing atmospheric nitrogen (N2) in root nodules and supplying it to the plant. Common bean is amongst the most promiscuous legume hosts; several described species, in addition to putative novel ones have been reported as able to nodulate this legume, although not always effectively in terms of fixing N2. In this study, we present data indicating that Brazilian strains PRF 35(T), PRF 54, CPAO 1135 and H 52, currently classified as Rhizobium tropici, represent a novel species symbiont of common bean. Morphological, physiological and biochemical properties differentiate these strains from other species of the genus Rhizobium, as do BOX-PCR profiles (less than 60 % similarity), multilocus sequence analysis with recA, gyrB and rpoA (less than 96.4 % sequence similarity), DNA-DNA hybridization (less than 50 % DNA-DNA relatedness), and average nucleotide identity of whole genomes (less than 92.8.%). The novel species is effective in nodulating and fixing N2 with P. vulgaris, Leucaena leucocephala and Leucaena esculenta. We propose the name Rhizobium paranaense sp. nov. for this novel taxon, with strain PRF 35(T) ( = CNPSo 120(T) = LMG 27577(T) = IPR-Pv 1249(T)) as the type strain. © 2014 IUMS.

  6. Analysis of genetic structure and interrelationships in lentil species using morphological and SSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koul, Priyanka Mohan; Sharma, Vikas; Rana, Maneet; Chahota, Rakesh K; Kumar, Shiv; Sharma, Tilak R

    2017-05-01

    Genetic structure and relationships of 130 lentil accessions belonging to six taxa were analysed. For this purpose, seven morphological traits and 31 polymorphic simple sequence repeat (SSR) primers were used for this purpose. Morphological traits grouped lentil accessions into five main clusters. SSR primers collectively amplified 139 polymorphic alleles in a range of 2-10 with an average of 4.48 alleles. The size of amplified alleles varied from 50 to 650 bp. Polymorphism information content (PIC) ranged from 0.02 to 0.85 with an average of 0.46. Neighbour-joining tree grouped accessions broadly according to their taxonomic ranks, except L. culinaris ssp. odemensis. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed that a major portion (82.0%) of genetic variance resided within species, while only 18% resided among species. Bayesian model-based STRUCTURE analysis assigned all accessions into five clusters and showed some admixture within individuals. Cluster analysis showed that cultivated Lens accessions of Ethiopian origin clustered separately, from other cultivated accessions indicating its distinct lineage. Among the analysed lentil species, L. culinaris ssp. odemensis seemed to have conserved genetic background and needs revision of its taxonomic status. Results of present study provide important information on genetic diversity and relationships among different wild and cultivated taxa of lentil. Thus, these results can be useful in designing breeding strategies for future improvement and taxonomic implications in lentil.

  7. Selecting Lentil Accessions for Global Selenium Biofortification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavarajah, Dil; Abare, Alex; Mapa, Indika; Coyne, Clarice J.; Thavarajah, Pushparajah; Kumar, Shiv

    2017-01-01

    The biofortification of lentil (Lens culinaris Medikus.) has the potential to provide adequate daily selenium (Se) to human diets. The objectives of this study were to (1) determine how low-dose Se fertilizer application at germination affects seedling biomass, antioxidant activity, and Se uptake of 26 cultivated lentil genotypes; and (2) quantify the seed Se concentration of 191 lentil wild accessions grown in Terbol, Lebanon. A germination study was conducted with two Se treatments [0 (control) and 30 kg of Se/ha] with three replicates. A separate field study was conducted in Lebanon for wild accessions without Se fertilizer. Among cultivated lentil accessions, PI533690 and PI533693 showed >100% biomass increase vs. controls. Se addition significantly increased seedling Se uptake, with the greatest uptake (6.2 µg g−1) by PI320937 and the least uptake (1.1 µg g−1) by W627780. Seed Se concentrations of wild accessions ranged from 0 to 2.5 µg g−1; accessions originating from Syria (0–2.5 µg g−1) and Turkey (0–2.4 µg g−1) had the highest seed Se. Frequency distribution analysis revealed that seed Se for 63% of accessions was between 0.25 and 0.75 µg g−1, and thus a single 50 g serving of lentil has the potential to provide adequate dietary Se (20–60% of daily recommended daily allowance). As such, Se application during plant growth for certain lentil genotypes grown in low Se soils may be a sustainable Se biofortification solution to increase seed Se concentration. Incorporating a diverse panel of lentil wild germplasm into Se biofortification programs will increase genetic diversity for effective genetic mapping for increased lentil seed Se nutrition and plant productivity. PMID:28846602

  8. Selecting Lentil Accessions for Global Selenium Biofortification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dil Thavarajah

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The biofortification of lentil (Lens culinaris Medikus. has the potential to provide adequate daily selenium (Se to human diets. The objectives of this study were to (1 determine how low-dose Se fertilizer application at germination affects seedling biomass, antioxidant activity, and Se uptake of 26 cultivated lentil genotypes; and (2 quantify the seed Se concentration of 191 lentil wild accessions grown in Terbol, Lebanon. A germination study was conducted with two Se treatments [0 (control and 30 kg of Se/ha] with three replicates. A separate field study was conducted in Lebanon for wild accessions without Se fertilizer. Among cultivated lentil accessions, PI533690 and PI533693 showed >100% biomass increase vs. controls. Se addition significantly increased seedling Se uptake, with the greatest uptake (6.2 µg g−1 by PI320937 and the least uptake (1.1 µg g−1 by W627780. Seed Se concentrations of wild accessions ranged from 0 to 2.5 µg g−1; accessions originating from Syria (0–2.5 µg g−1 and Turkey (0–2.4 µg g−1 had the highest seed Se. Frequency distribution analysis revealed that seed Se for 63% of accessions was between 0.25 and 0.75 µg g−1, and thus a single 50 g serving of lentil has the potential to provide adequate dietary Se (20–60% of daily recommended daily allowance. As such, Se application during plant growth for certain lentil genotypes grown in low Se soils may be a sustainable Se biofortification solution to increase seed Se concentration. Incorporating a diverse panel of lentil wild germplasm into Se biofortification programs will increase genetic diversity for effective genetic mapping for increased lentil seed Se nutrition and plant productivity.

  9. Effects of enzymatic hydrolysis on lentil allergenicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabanillas, Beatriz; Pedrosa, Mercedes M; Rodríguez, Julia; González, Angela; Muzquiz, Mercedes; Cuadrado, Carmen; Crespo, Jesús F; Burbano, Carmen

    2010-09-01

    Enzymatic hydrolysis and further processing are commonly used to produce hypoallergenic dietary products derived from different protein sources, such as cow's milk. Lentils and chickpeas seem to be an important cause of IgE-mediated hypersensitivity in the Mediterranean area and India. Some studies have investigated the effects of enzymatic treatments on the in vitro immunological reactivity of members of the Leguminosae family, such as soybean, chickpea, lentil, and lupine. Nevertheless, there are only a few studies carried out to evaluate the effect on IgE reactivity of these food-hydrolysis products with sera from patients with well-documented allergy to these foods. In this study, lentil protein extract was hydrolyzed by sequential action of an endoprotease (Alcalase) and an exoprotease (Flavourzyme). Immunoreactivity to raw and hydrolyzed lentil extract was evaluated by means of IgE immunoblotting and ELISA using sera from five patients with clinical allergy to lentil. The results indicated that sequential hydrolysis of lentil results in an important proteolytic destruction of IgE-binding epitopes shown by in vitro experiments. However, some allergenic proteins were still detected by sera from four out of five patients in the last step of sequential hydrolyzation.

  10. Lentils (Lens culinaris L.) as a source of dietary selenium

    Science.gov (United States)

    The chapter discusses the nutritional value of lentils, with a focus on factors affecting lentils as a source of dietary selenium. It addresses the chemical nature of lentil-selenium, pointing out that more than 90% is present in organic compounds which are generally well absorbed by humans. The se...

  11. The value of enhancing nutrient bioavailability of lentils: The Sri ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Although all red lentils are imported, they are the most widely consumed pulse among Sri Lankans. Red lentil consumption levels are significantly greater in the estate sector where the prevalence of under nutrition is high. Thus, this review was undertaken to understand the potential role of lentils in the Sri Lankan diet and ...

  12. Evaluation of Wild Lentil Species as Genetic Resources to Improve Drought Tolerance in Cultivated Lentil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorim, Linda Y.; Vandenberg, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Increasingly unpredictable annual rainfall amounts and distribution patterns have far reaching implications for pulse crop biology. Seedling and whole plant survival will be affected given that water is a key factor in plant photosynthesis and also influences the evolving disease spectrum that affects crops. The wild relatives of cultivated lentil are native to drought prone areas, making them good candidates for the evaluation of drought tolerance traits. We evaluated root and shoot traits of genotypes of cultivated lentil and five wild species grown under two water deficit regimes as well as fully watered conditions over a 13 week period indoors. Plants were grown in sectioned polyvinyl chloride (PVC) tubes containing field soil from the A, B, and C horizons. We found that root distribution into different soil horizons varied among wild lentil genotypes. Secondly, wild lentil genotypes employed diverse strategies such as delayed flowering, reduced transpiration rates, reduced plant height, and deep root systems to either escape, evade or tolerate drought conditions. In some cases, more than one drought strategy was observed within the same genotype. Sequence based classification of wild and cultivated genotypes did not explain patterns of drought response. The environmental conditions at their centers of origin may explain the patterns of drought strategies observed in wild lentils. The production of numerous small seeds by wild lentil genotypes may have implications for yield improvement in lentil breeding programs. PMID:28706524

  13. Evaluation of Wild Lentil Species as Genetic Resources to Improve Drought Tolerance in Cultivated Lentil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Y. Gorim

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Increasingly unpredictable annual rainfall amounts and distribution patterns have far reaching implications for pulse crop biology. Seedling and whole plant survival will be affected given that water is a key factor in plant photosynthesis and also influences the evolving disease spectrum that affects crops. The wild relatives of cultivated lentil are native to drought prone areas, making them good candidates for the evaluation of drought tolerance traits. We evaluated root and shoot traits of genotypes of cultivated lentil and five wild species grown under two water deficit regimes as well as fully watered conditions over a 13 week period indoors. Plants were grown in sectioned polyvinyl chloride (PVC tubes containing field soil from the A, B, and C horizons. We found that root distribution into different soil horizons varied among wild lentil genotypes. Secondly, wild lentil genotypes employed diverse strategies such as delayed flowering, reduced transpiration rates, reduced plant height, and deep root systems to either escape, evade or tolerate drought conditions. In some cases, more than one drought strategy was observed within the same genotype. Sequence based classification of wild and cultivated genotypes did not explain patterns of drought response. The environmental conditions at their centers of origin may explain the patterns of drought strategies observed in wild lentils. The production of numerous small seeds by wild lentil genotypes may have implications for yield improvement in lentil breeding programs.

  14. Effect of meteorological factors on the development of lentil stemphylium blight at different sowing dates in rampur, chitwan, Nepal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subash Subedi

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Stemphylium species are pathogenic to a number of crops under broad geography and diverse environments. Stemphylium blight of lentil (Lens culinaris Medik caused by Stemphylium botryosum Walr is becoming a serious emerging threat to lentil cultivation and become widespread throughout major legume growing areas in Nepal. Lentil was sown in different dates to observed incidence and severity of stemphylium blight in Rampur, Chitwan during two consecutive years 2012-2014. Lentil seeds sown up to middle of November escaped the disease severity and also resulted higher yield compared to other dates. Disease severity increased with the advancement of sowing date from November 1 to December 21 with decreased yields. The trends of disease development were similar in both years. The maximum and minimum temperatures, total rainfall and sunshine hour ranging from 22.42-24.23°C (mean 23.32°C, 4.12-13.00°C(mean 8.56°C, 9.6-30.5mm (mean 24.85mm and 200.05-309.85 hour (mean 254.95 hour respectively were favorable for disease development. A multiple linear regression model with temperature, rainfall and sunshine hours was developed to predict stemphylium blight disease severity on lentil plants.

  15. Genomic basis of broad host range and environmental adaptability of Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 and Rhizobium sp. PRF 81 which are used in inoculants for common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ormeño-Orrillo Ernesto

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 and Rhizobium sp. PRF 81 are α-Proteobacteria that establish nitrogen-fixing symbioses with a range of legume hosts. These strains are broadly used in commercial inoculants for application to common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris in South America and Africa. Both strains display intrinsic resistance to several abiotic stressful conditions such as low soil pH and high temperatures, which are common in tropical environments, and to several antimicrobials, including pesticides. The genetic determinants of these interesting characteristics remain largely unknown. Results Genome sequencing revealed that CIAT 899 and PRF 81 share a highly-conserved symbiotic plasmid (pSym that is present also in Rhizobium leucaenae CFN 299, a rhizobium displaying a similar host range. This pSym seems to have arisen by a co-integration event between two replicons. Remarkably, three distinct nodA genes were found in the pSym, a characteristic that may contribute to the broad host range of these rhizobia. Genes for biosynthesis and modulation of plant-hormone levels were also identified in the pSym. Analysis of genes involved in stress response showed that CIAT 899 and PRF 81 are well equipped to cope with low pH, high temperatures and also with oxidative and osmotic stresses. Interestingly, the genomes of CIAT 899 and PRF 81 had large numbers of genes encoding drug-efflux systems, which may explain their high resistance to antimicrobials. Genome analysis also revealed a wide array of traits that may allow these strains to be successful rhizosphere colonizers, including surface polysaccharides, uptake transporters and catabolic enzymes for nutrients, diverse iron-acquisition systems, cell wall-degrading enzymes, type I and IV pili, and novel T1SS and T5SS secreted adhesins. Conclusions Availability of the complete genome sequences of CIAT 899 and PRF 81 may be exploited in further efforts to understand the interaction of tropical

  16. Genomic basis of broad host range and environmental adaptability of Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 and Rhizobium sp. PRF 81 which are used in inoculants for common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Rhizobium tropici CIAT 899 and Rhizobium sp. PRF 81 are α-Proteobacteria that establish nitrogen-fixing symbioses with a range of legume hosts. These strains are broadly used in commercial inoculants for application to common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) in South America and Africa. Both strains display intrinsic resistance to several abiotic stressful conditions such as low soil pH and high temperatures, which are common in tropical environments, and to several antimicrobials, including pesticides. The genetic determinants of these interesting characteristics remain largely unknown. Results Genome sequencing revealed that CIAT 899 and PRF 81 share a highly-conserved symbiotic plasmid (pSym) that is present also in Rhizobium leucaenae CFN 299, a rhizobium displaying a similar host range. This pSym seems to have arisen by a co-integration event between two replicons. Remarkably, three distinct nodA genes were found in the pSym, a characteristic that may contribute to the broad host range of these rhizobia. Genes for biosynthesis and modulation of plant-hormone levels were also identified in the pSym. Analysis of genes involved in stress response showed that CIAT 899 and PRF 81 are well equipped to cope with low pH, high temperatures and also with oxidative and osmotic stresses. Interestingly, the genomes of CIAT 899 and PRF 81 had large numbers of genes encoding drug-efflux systems, which may explain their high resistance to antimicrobials. Genome analysis also revealed a wide array of traits that may allow these strains to be successful rhizosphere colonizers, including surface polysaccharides, uptake transporters and catabolic enzymes for nutrients, diverse iron-acquisition systems, cell wall-degrading enzymes, type I and IV pili, and novel T1SS and T5SS secreted adhesins. Conclusions Availability of the complete genome sequences of CIAT 899 and PRF 81 may be exploited in further efforts to understand the interaction of tropical rhizobia with common bean

  17. Lentils in Alaska: Potential and Prospects

    Science.gov (United States)

    The Western Regional Plant Introduction Station at Pullman, Washington holds the USDA collection of cool-season pulses. The USDA lentil collection consists of over 2800 accessions, including an established core collection of 280 accessions. This core collection was collaboratively grown out at the S...

  18. Selecting Lentil Accessions for Global Selenium Biofortification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biofortification of lentil (Lens culinaris Medikus.) has the potential to provide adequate daily selenium (Se) to human diets. The objectives of this study were to (1) determine how low dose Se fertilizer application at germination affects seedling biomass, antioxidant activity, and Se uptake of 26 ...

  19. Mechanical damage to green and red lentil seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahbazi, Feizollah; Valizade, Saman; Dowlatshah, Ali

    2017-07-01

    In this research, the breakage susceptibility of two classes of lentil (green and red) was evaluated as affected by impact energy and seed moisture content. The experiments were conducted at impact energies of 0.1, 0.2 and 0.3 J, and moisture contents of 10, 12.5, 15, 17.5, 20 and 25% (wet basis). Results showed that red lentil seeds had more breakage than green seeds and the difference in breakage percentage between green and red lentil seeds was significant at 0.01% level according to analysis of variance (p red lentil seeds increased as the energy of impact increased. With increasing the seed moisture content of the both green and red lentils, the breakage percentage of seeds decreased. The average values of seeds breakage green and red lentil seeds varied from 100 to 67.7% and from 100 to 93.1%, respectively, as the seeds moisture content increased from 10 to 25%. The optimum seed moisture at which minimum damage was observed was 17.5% for green lentil and 15% for red lentil. Mathematical relationships composed of lentil seeds moisture content and energy of impact were developed for accurate description of the breakage percentage of green and red lentil seeds under impact loading.

  20. Polyphenol-Rich Lentils and Their Health Promoting Effects

    OpenAIRE

    Kumar Ganesan; Baojun Xu

    2017-01-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris; Family: Fabaceae) is a potential functional dietary ingredient which has polyphenol-rich content. Several studies have demonstrated that the consumption of lentil is immensely connected to the reduction in the incidence of diseases such as diabetes, obesity, cancers and cardiovascular diseases due to its bioactive compounds. There has been increasing scientific interest in the study area of lentils as the functional food due to its high nutritive value, polyphenols, an...

  1. Valle Agricola lentil, an unknown lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) seed from Southern Italy as a novel antioxidant and prebiotic source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, Nicola; Pacifico, Severina; Piccolella, Simona; Di Giuseppe, Antonella M A; Mezzacapo, Maria C; Ragucci, Sara; Iannuzzi, Federica; Zarrelli, Armando; Di Maro, Antimo

    2015-09-01

    In order to promote 'Valle Agricola' lentil, an autochthonous lentil of the Campania Region, a thorough investigation of its biochemical and nutritional properties has been carried out. The macronutrient content (proteins, carbohydrates and lipids), free and total amino acids, and unsaturated fatty acids were determined. The antioxidant capability of raw 'Valle Agricola' lentils, as well as of boiled ones, was estimated in terms of their total phenol content (TPC), ORAC value, and free radical scavenging capacities using DPPH and ABTS assays. The data obtained evidenced that the boiling process slightly decreased Valle Agricola lentil's antioxidant power. Furthermore, when trypsin and chymotrypsin inhibitory activities were measured, a large decrease of the levels of anti-nutritional factors was estimated. In order to have a phytochemical overview of this autochthonous lentil seed, LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis was applied to raw and boiled lentil extracts. Flavonol glycosides and free flavanols, as well as typical seed prebiotic saccharides, were the most representative constituents.

  2. High potential for selenium biofortification of lentils ( Lens culinaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavarajah, Dil; Ruszkowski, Jamie; Vandenberg, Albert

    2008-11-26

    Beneficial forms of selenium (Se) and their impact on human health are a global topic of interest in public health. We are studying the genetic potential for Se biofortification of pulse crops to improve human nutrition. Lentils ( Lens culinaris L.) are an important protein and carbohydrate food and are a valuable source of essential dietary components and trace elements. We analyzed the total Se concentration of 19 lentil genotypes grown at eight locations for two years in Saskatchewan, Canada. We observed significant genotypic and environmental variation in total Se concentration in lentils and that total Se concentration in lentils ranged between 425 and 673 microg kg(-1), providing 77-122% of the recommended daily intake in 100 g of dry lentils. Over 70% of the Se was present as selenomethionine (SeMet) with a smaller fraction (lentils were grown were rich in Se (37-301 microg kg(-1)) and that lentils grown in Saskatchewan have the potential to provide an excellent natural source of this essential element. Our analyses gave us a preliminary understanding of the genetic basis of Se uptake in lentil and indicated that any potential strategy for micronutrient biofortification in lentil will require choice of field locations that minimize the spatial variability of soil Se content.

  3. Transcriptome sequencing of lentil based on second-generation technology permits large-scale unigene assembly and SSR marker discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Sukhjiwan; Cogan, Noel O I; Pembleton, Luke W; Shinozuka, Maiko; Savin, Keith W; Materne, Michael; Forster, John W

    2011-05-25

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is a cool-season grain legume which provides a rich source of protein for human consumption. In terms of genomic resources, lentil is relatively underdeveloped, in comparison to other Fabaceae species, with limited available data. There is hence a significant need to enhance such resources in order to identify novel genes and alleles for molecular breeding to increase crop productivity and quality. Tissue-specific cDNA samples from six distinct lentil genotypes were sequenced using Roche 454 GS-FLX Titanium technology, generating c. 1.38 × 106 expressed sequence tags (ESTs). De novo assembly generated a total of 15,354 contigs and 68,715 singletons. The complete unigene set was sequence-analysed against genome drafts of the model legume species Medicago truncatula and Arabidopsis thaliana to identify 12,639, and 7,476 unique matches, respectively. When compared to the genome of Glycine max, a total of 20,419 unique hits were observed corresponding to c. 31% of the known gene space. A total of 25,592 lentil unigenes were subsequently annoated from GenBank. Simple sequence repeat (SSR)-containing ESTs were identified from consensus sequences and a total of 2,393 primer pairs were designed. A subset of 192 EST-SSR markers was screened for validation across a panel 12 cultivated lentil genotypes and one wild relative species. A total of 166 primer pairs obtained successful amplification, of which 47.5% detected genetic polymorphism. A substantial collection of ESTs has been developed from sequence analysis of lentil genotypes using second-generation technology, permitting unigene definition across a broad range of functional categories. As well as providing resources for functional genomics studies, the unigene set has permitted significant enhancement of the number of publicly-available molecular genetic markers as tools for improvement of this species.

  4. Transcriptome sequencing of lentil based on second-generation technology permits large-scale unigene assembly and SSR marker discovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Materne Michael

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. is a cool-season grain legume which provides a rich source of protein for human consumption. In terms of genomic resources, lentil is relatively underdeveloped, in comparison to other Fabaceae species, with limited available data. There is hence a significant need to enhance such resources in order to identify novel genes and alleles for molecular breeding to increase crop productivity and quality. Results Tissue-specific cDNA samples from six distinct lentil genotypes were sequenced using Roche 454 GS-FLX Titanium technology, generating c. 1.38 × 106 expressed sequence tags (ESTs. De novo assembly generated a total of 15,354 contigs and 68,715 singletons. The complete unigene set was sequence-analysed against genome drafts of the model legume species Medicago truncatula and Arabidopsis thaliana to identify 12,639, and 7,476 unique matches, respectively. When compared to the genome of Glycine max, a total of 20,419 unique hits were observed corresponding to c. 31% of the known gene space. A total of 25,592 lentil unigenes were subsequently annoated from GenBank. Simple sequence repeat (SSR-containing ESTs were identified from consensus sequences and a total of 2,393 primer pairs were designed. A subset of 192 EST-SSR markers was screened for validation across a panel 12 cultivated lentil genotypes and one wild relative species. A total of 166 primer pairs obtained successful amplification, of which 47.5% detected genetic polymorphism. Conclusions A substantial collection of ESTs has been developed from sequence analysis of lentil genotypes using second-generation technology, permitting unigene definition across a broad range of functional categories. As well as providing resources for functional genomics studies, the unigene set has permitted significant enhancement of the number of publicly-available molecular genetic markers as tools for improvement of this species.

  5. Preparation of bean curds from protein fractions of six legumes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, R; Klamczynska, B; Baik, B K

    2001-06-01

    Chickpeas, lentils, smooth peas, mung beans, and faba beans were milled into flours and fractionated to protein and starch fractions. Compositions of the seeds, cotyledons, and flours were compared for each legume and the weight and protein recovery of each fraction analyzed. Bean curds were prepared from the protein fractions through heat denaturation of protein milk, followed by coagulation with calcium sulfate or magnesium sulfate. The effect of chickpea protein concentration and coagulant dosage on the texture of bean curds was evaluated using a texture analyzer. Textural analysis indicated that curd prepared at 2.3-3.0% protein concentration and 1.5% CaSO(4) dosage had better yield and better texture than curds prepared under other conditions. Bean curds prepared from chickpeas and faba beans exhibited the second highest springiness and cohesiveness after those from soybeans. Curds of mung beans and smooth peas, on the other hand, had the highest yields and the highest moisture contents. The protein yield of the first and second soluble extracts used for curd preparation accounted for approximately 90% of the total protein of the seeds.

  6. Lentil-based diets attenuate hypertension and large-artery remodelling in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Matthew G; Zahradka, Peter; Taylor, Carla G

    2014-02-01

    Hypertension is a major risk factor for CVD, the leading cause of mortality worldwide. The prevalence of hypertension is expected to continue increasing, and current pharmacological treatments cannot alleviate all the associated problems. Pulse crops have been touted as a general health food and are now being studied for their possible effects on several disease states including hypertension, obesity and diabetes. In the present study, 15-week-old spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) were fed diets containing 30% w/w beans, peas, lentils, chickpeas, or mixed pulses or a pulse-free control diet for 4 weeks. Normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats were placed on a control diet. Pulse wave velocity (PWV) was measured weekly, while blood pressure (BP) was measured at baseline and week 4. Fasting serum obtained in week 4 of the study was analysed for circulating lipids. A histological analysis was carried out on aortic sections to determine vascular geometry. Of all the pulse varieties studied, lentils were found to be able to attenuate the rise in BP in the SHR model (PLentils were able to decrease the media:lumen ratio and media width of the aorta. The total cholesterol (TC), LDL-cholesterol (LDL-C) and HDL-cholesterol levels of rats fed the pulse-based diets were found to be lower when compared with those of the WKY rat and SHR controls (Plentils significantly reduced the rise in BP and large-artery remodelling in the SHR, but had no effect on PWV. These results indicate that the effects of lentils on arterial remodelling and BP in the SHR are independent of circulating LDL-C levels.

  7. Radiosensitivity of lentil beam (Lens culinaris L.) to gamma-irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Min Kyu; Ryu, Jaihyunk; Jeong, Sang Wook; Kim, Jin Baek; Kang, Si Young; Kwon, Soon Jae [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-02-15

    We examined damages from gamma-irradiation and determined the optimal gamma ray dose for mutation breeding in lentil (Lens culinaris L.) bean. Four individual lines (L-C, L-2, L-8 and L-9), that have remarkable adaptability in South Korea were gamma-irradiated at doses of 50, 70, 100, 200, 300, 400, and 500 Gy. The germination rate of seed decreased as the dose increased over 50 Gy in all lines. However, LD{sub 50} and RD{sub 50} were different among lines. The median lethal doses (LD50) were approximately 127 (L-C), 74 (L-2), 95 (L-8), and 144 (L-9) Gy. The median reduction doses (RD{sub 50}) for plant height, number of leaves, root length, and flash weight were 156, 176, 150, and 180 Gy for L-C, 253, 198, 127, and 142 Gy for L-2, 188, 175, 200, and 190 Gy for L-8, and 162, 210, 224, and 184 for L-9, respectively. The growth characteristics of the M1 generation decreased as the dose increased over 70 Gy. The optimal doses of gamma irradiation for mutation breeding of lentil were determined to be 70 Gy (L-2, L-8) and 100 Gy (L-C, L-9). We performed the comet assay to observe nuclear DNA damage induced by gamma-irradiation. In comet assay, a clear difference was identified over 100 Gy treatments. With increasing doses of gamma-ray in the range of 50 to 500 Gy, the rate of head DNA was decreased significantly from 97.5% to 81.6%. Tail length was consecutively increased from 1.9 μm to 17.4 μm. Our result provides basic information for construction of mutant pools in lentils.

  8. Lentils (Lens culinaris L.), a rich source of folates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen Gupta, Debjyoti; Thavarajah, Dil; Knutson, Phil; Thavarajah, Pushparajah; McGee, Rebecca J; Coyne, Clarice J; Kumar, Shiv

    2013-08-14

    The potential for genetic biofortification of U.S.-grown lentils ( Lens culinaris L.) with bioavailable folate has not been widely studied. The objectives of this study were (1) to determine the folate concentration of 10 commercial lentil cultivars grown in Minot and McLean counties, North Dakota, USA, in 2010 and 2011, (2) to determine the genotype (G) × environmental (E) interactions for folate concentration in lentil cultivars, and (3) to compare the folate concentration of other pulses [field peas ( Pisum sativum L.) and chickpea ( Cicer arietinum L.)] grown in the United States. Folate concentration in lentil cultivars ranged from 216 to 290 μg/100 g with a mean of 255 μg/100 g. In addition, lentil showed higher folate concentration compared to chickpea (42-125 μg/100 g), yellow field pea (41-55 μg/100 g), and green field pea (50-202 μg/100 g). A 100 g serving of lentils could provide a significant amount of the recommended daily allowance of dietary folates (54-73%) for adults. A significant year × location interaction on lentil folate concentration was observed; this indicates that possible location sourcing may be required for future lentil folate research.

  9. Nutritional and health-beneficial quality of lentils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is an ancient, domesticated legume that has been nourishing humans for millennia. As with most pulse seeds, lentil can provide several dietary nutrients; these include amino acids (in the form of protein), energy (primarily in the form of starch), most essential miner...

  10. Genetic studies on morpho-phenological traits in lentil (Lens ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2014-08-12

    Aug 12, 2014 ... dominant over erect growth habit in lentil wide crosses. Flower colour: Flower colour in lentil has been observed to be a variable character viz; violet, white, pink, blue and purple. The cultivated genotypes viz; L830 and ILL8006 have purple flower colour, while ILL10829 and Precoz have white flower colour.

  11. Agro-morphological characterization of the Turkish lentil landraces

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-09-01

    Sep 1, 2009 ... Hawtin G (eds) Lentils. CAB, Slough, UK, pp. 15-38. Duvick DN (1984). Genetic diversity in major farm crops on the farm and in reverse. Eco. Bot. 38: 151-178. Erskine W, Witcombe JR (1984). Lentil gemplazm catalog, Aleppo,. Syria: International Center for Agricultural Research in the Dry Areas. (ICARDA).

  12. Genetics of early growth vigour in lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    to identify major and minor gene(s), for making genetic improvement in lentil by the use of marker assisted selection. Lentil is an important cool season food legume crop of rainfed agriculture and it is one of important pulse crops for diversifying cereal-based cropping systems worldwide. Presently, it occupies 3.74 million ha ...

  13. Polyphenol-Rich Lentils and Their Health Promoting Effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-01-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris; Family: Fabaceae) is a potential functional dietary ingredient which has polyphenol-rich content. Several studies have demonstrated that the consumption of lentil is immensely connected to the reduction in the incidence of diseases such as diabetes, obesity, cancers and cardiovascular diseases due to its bioactive compounds. There has been increasing scientific interest in the study area of lentils as the functional food due to its high nutritive value, polyphenols, and other bioactive compounds. These polyphenols and the bioactive compounds found in lentil play an important role in the prevention of those degenerative diseases in humans. Besides that, it has health-promoting effects. Based on the in vitro, in-vivo and clinical studies, the present review focuses to provide more information on the nutritional compositions, bioactive compounds including polyphenols and health-promoting effects of lentils. Health-promoting information was gathered and orchestrated at a suitable place in the review. PMID:29125587

  14. Polyphenol-Rich Lentils and Their Health Promoting Effects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumar Ganesan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Lentil (Lens culinaris; Family: Fabaceae is a potential functional dietary ingredient which has polyphenol-rich content. Several studies have demonstrated that the consumption of lentil is immensely connected to the reduction in the incidence of diseases such as diabetes, obesity, cancers and cardiovascular diseases due to its bioactive compounds. There has been increasing scientific interest in the study area of lentils as the functional food due to its high nutritive value, polyphenols, and other bioactive compounds. These polyphenols and the bioactive compounds found in lentil play an important role in the prevention of those degenerative diseases in humans. Besides that, it has health-promoting effects. Based on the in vitro, in-vivo and clinical studies, the present review focuses to provide more information on the nutritional compositions, bioactive compounds including polyphenols and health-promoting effects of lentils. Health-promoting information was gathered and orchestrated at a suitable place in the review.

  15. Treating chronic arsenic toxicity with high selenium lentil diets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sah, Shweta [Department of Ecosystem and Public Health, Faculty of Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6 (Canada); Vandenberg, Albert [Department of Plant Sciences, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, SK S7N 5A8 (Canada); Smits, Judit, E-mail: judit.smits@ucalgary.ca [Department of Ecosystem and Public Health, Faculty of Veterinary Medicine, University of Calgary, Calgary, AB T2N 4Z6 (Canada)

    2013-10-01

    Arsenic (As) toxicity causes serious health problems in humans, especially in the Indo-Gangetic plains and mountainous areas of China. Selenium (Se), an essential micronutrient is a potential mitigator of As toxicity due to its antioxidant and antagonistic properties. Selenium is seriously deficient in soils world-wide but is present at high, yet non-toxic levels in the great plains of North America. We evaluate the potential of dietary Se in counteracting chronic As toxicity in rats through serum biochemistry, blood glutathione levels, immunotoxicity (antibody response), liver peroxidative stress, thyroid response and As levels in tissues and excreta. To achieve this, we compare diets based on high-Se Saskatchewan (SK) lentils versus low-Se lentils from United States. Rats drank control (0 ppm As) or As (40 ppm As) water while consuming SK lentils (0.3 ppm Se) or northwestern USA lentils (< 0.01 ppm Se) diets for 14 weeks. Rats on high Se diets had higher glutathione levels regardless of As exposure, recovered antibody responses in As-exposed group, higher fecal and urinary As excretion and lower renal As residues. Selenium deficiency caused greater hepatic peroxidative damage in the As exposed animals. Thyroid hormones, triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4), were not different. After 14 weeks of As exposure, health indicators in rats improved in response to the high Se lentil diets. Our results indicate that high Se lentils have a potential to mitigate As toxicity in laboratory mammals, which we hope will translate into benefits for As exposed humans. - Highlights: • We reduce chronic arsenic toxicity in rats with a whole food solution. • High selenium lentils decrease liver damage and increase blood glutathione levels. • High selenium lentil diets increase urinary and fecal arsenic excretion. • High selenium lentil diets decrease arsenic levels in kidney, the storage organ. • High selenium lentil diets reverse arsenic suppression of the B cell

  16. Dielectric properties of cowpea weevil, black eyed peas and mung beans with respect to the development of radio frequency heat treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    In developing radio frequency (RF) and microwave (MW) disinfestation treatments for chickpeas and lentils, large amounts of product infested with cowpea weevil must be treated to validate treatment efficacy. To accomplish this, black-eyed peas and mung beans are being considered for use as surrogate...

  17. Words denoting faba bean (Vicia faba in European languages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mikić Aleksandar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Faba bean (Vicia faba L took part in the 'agricultural revolution' of post-glacial Europe along with other grain legumes and cereals. In order to assess the diversity and the origin of the words denoting faba bean in the languages of Europe, a lexicological study was carried out with emphasis upon etymological dictionaries. The words in almost all modern Indo-European languages in Europe owe their origin to the Proto-Indo-European root *bhabh bhabhā, also denoting faba bean. The Proto-Altaic root *bŭkrV, denoting pea nut and cone, through the Proto-Turkic *burčak, denoting both pea and bean is responsible for the words in several modern Altaic languages of Europe while the others are borrowings from Arabic. The origin of the words in modern Caucasian languages is the Proto-Caucasian root *howł[ā], meaning both bean and lentil. The words in Uralic languages are either borrowings, mostly from Slavic, or derived from their own words denoting pea.

  18. Effects of feeding Ascochyta-infected and normal lentils to rats (short-term study).

    OpenAIRE

    Tarwid, J N; Morrall, R A; Mills, J H

    1985-01-01

    Weanling, female, Sprague-Dawley rats were fed diets containing either rat chow with no lentils, 80% normal lentils or 80% diseased lentils heavily infected with the fungus Ascochyta lentis. Body weight, feed consumption and clinical appearance were monitored over 90 days and blood samples were collected at the termination of the experiment. Weight gain and feed consumption were similar in the control group and the group fed diseased lentils. Weight gain was slightly depressed in the group fe...

  19. Lentil consumption reduces resistance artery remodeling and restores arterial compliance in the spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, Matthew G; Taylor, Carla G; Wu, Yinghong; Anderson, Hope D; Zahradka, Peter

    2016-11-01

    We previously established that lentils were able to significantly attenuate the development of hypertension in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHRs), but the mechanism was not investigated. The current study was therefore designed to examine the effect of lentils on arterial function in relation to arterial stiffness, lipid biochemistry and activation of select aortic proteins. Seventeen-week-old male SHRs were randomly assigned to groups (n=10/group) fed (a) 30% w/w green lentils, (b) 30% red lentils, (c) 30% mixed lentils (red and green) or (d) no lentils for 8 weeks. Normotensive Wistar Kyoto (WKY) groups (n=10/group) received either the mixed lentil or no lentil diet. Blood pressure, pulse wave velocity and serum lipids were measured at baseline and 8 weeks, while pressure myography, arterial morphology and aortic proteins were measured after termination. There were no dietary-related changes in pulse wave velocity or blood pressure for any SHR or WKY group. Low-density lipoprotein cholesterol and high-density lipoprotein cholesterol were significantly lower in only SHR red lentil and WKY mixed lentil groups compared to their controls. The lentil diets reduced the media:lumen ratio of SHRs relative to control-fed SHRs but had no effect on WKYs. Both red and green lentils reduced arterial stiffness of SHRs but not WKYs. SHR lentil groups showed lower aortic p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (p38MAPK) phosphorylation, thus implying that p38MAPK activation is suppressed with lentil feeding. Lentil-based diets suppress pathological vascular remodeling in SHRs, while green lentils maintain the vascular function of SHRs similar to normotensive WKYs despite the presence of high blood pressure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. 78 FR 63160 - United States Standards for Feed Peas, Split Peas, and Lentils

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-23

    ... Peas, and Lentils AGENCY: Grain Inspection, Packers and Stockyards Administration, USDA ACTION: Notice... Peas, and Lentils under the Agriculture Marketing Act (AMA) of 1946. To ensure that the standards and... current U.S. Standards for Feed Peas, Split Peas, and Lentils are meeting the needs in today's marketing...

  1. Satiety Effects of Lentils in a Calorie Matched Fruit Smoothie.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Jennifer; Slavin, Joanne

    2016-09-20

    The food environment is changing, with consumers being more health conscious and concerned about the wholesomeness of their food than ever before. Consumers are looking for nutritious whole food alternatives to fill their plates and stomachs. Pulse grains, rich in both protein and fiber, may be the ideal candidate to promote satiety at meals. In a crossover feeding study, participants consumed calorie-matched fruit smoothies prepared with either an ice cream base or pureed red lentils. Self-reported satiety, blood glucose response, and ad libitum food intake at a secondary meal were all measured along with breath hydrogen and methane and gastrointestinal tolerance. While there was no significant difference in satiety response or energy intake at the secondary meal, the nutrient profile of the lentil smoothie was improved with increased protein and fiber and dramatically lower fat content. Blood glucose response was not statistically different between the 2 treatments. Both smoothies were generally well tolerated; however, there was a slightly elevated AUC for perceived gastrointestinal tolerance over 24 h in the lentil smoothie. No difference in breath hydrogen or methane response was seen between treatments. The substitution of lentils into a meal is not likely to improve satiety; however lentils are a good source of fiber and protein and can greatly improve nutritional content of the meal. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  2. Response of vetch, lentil, chickpea and red pea to pre- or post-emergence applied herbicides

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. Vasilakoglou

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Broad-leaved weeds constitute a serious problem in the production of winter legumes, but few selective herbicides controlling these weeds have been registered in Europe. Four field experiments were conducted in 2009/10 and repeated in 2010/11 in Greece to study the response of common vetch (Vicia sativa L., lentil (Lens culinaris Medik., chickpea (Cicer arietinum L. and red pea (Lathyrus cicera L. to several rates of the herbicides pendimethalin, S-metolachlor, S-metolachlor plus terbuthylazine and flumioxazin applied pre-emergence, as well as imazamox applied post-emergence. Phytotoxicity, crop height, total weight and seed yield were evaluated during the experiments. The results of this study suggest that common vetch, lentil, chickpea and red pea differed in their responses to the herbicides tested. Pendimethalin at 1.30 kg ha-1, S-metolachlor at 0.96 kg ha-1 and flumioxazine at 0.11 kg ha-1 used as pre-emergence applied herbicides provided the least phytotoxicity to legumes. Pendimethalin at 1.98 kg ha-1 and both rates of S-metolachlor plus terbuthylazine provided the greatest common lambsquarters (Chenopodium album L. control. Imazamox at 0.03 to 0.04 kg ha-1 could also be used as early post-emergence applied herbicide in common vetch and red pea without any significant detrimental effect.

  3. Perceived Benefits and Barriers Surrounding Lentil Consumption in Families with Young Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, Theodosia; Zello, Gordon A; Chilibeck, Phil D; Vandenberg, Albert

    2015-03-01

    Plant-based diets are advocated for prevention of chronic diseases. Lentils are an inexpensive plant-based meat alternative. This study determined perceived benefits and barriers to lentil consumption and how they relate to the demographics and nutritional knowledge of caregivers and consumption habits in families with children 3-11 years of age. A self-administered questionnaire measuring nutritional knowledge and perceived benefits and barriers to the consumption of lentils was completed by 401 caregivers in a school setting in Saskatoon, Saskatchewan. The majority of respondents were 26-45 years of age (83%) and female (76%). Respondents associated lentils with health benefits (91%). The most frequently reported barrier associated with consumption pertained to family acceptance: "if my child liked lentils I would make them more" (76% agreement). More than half (58%) of respondents stated they "never or rarely" consumed lentils (low-consumers). Of low-consumers, top barriers included lack of knowledge on how to cook lentils and a belief that family members would not accept lentils. Future promotion strategies should address the top barriers to lentil consumption. An understanding of the perceived benefits and barriers surrounding lentil consumption will help formulate approaches to increase consumption of lentils as well as pulses.

  4. Construction of intersubspecific molecular genetic map of lentil ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Lentil (Lens culinaris ssp. culinaris), is a self-pollinating diploid ( 2 n = 2 x = 14 ), cool-season legume crop and is consumed worldwide as a rich source of protein (∼24.0%), largely in vegetarian diets. Here we report development of a genetic linkage map of Lens using 114 F2 plants derived from the intersubspecific cross ...

  5. Polyphenol-Rich Lentils and Their Health Promoting Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganesan, Kumar; Xu, Baojun

    2017-11-10

    Polyphenols are a group of plant metabolites with potent antioxidant properties, which protect against various chronic diseases induced by oxidative stress. Evidence showed that dietary polyphenols have emerged as one of the prominent scientific interests due to their role in the prevention of degenerative diseases in humans. Possible health beneficial effects of polyphenols are measured based on the human consumption and their bioavailability. Lentil (Lens culinaris; Family: Fabaceae) is a great source of polyphenol compounds with various health-promoting properties. Polyphenol-rich lentils have a potential effect on human health, possessing properties such as antioxidant, antidiabetic, anti-obesity, anti-hyperlipidemic, anti-inflammatory and anticancer. Based on the explorative study, the current comprehensive review aims to give up-to-date information on nutritive compositions, bioactive compounds and the health-promoting effect of polyphenol-rich lentils, which explores their therapeutic values for future clinical studies. All data of in vitro, in vivo and clinical studies of lentils and their impact on human health were collected from a library database and electronic search (Science Direct, PubMed and Google Scholar). Health-promoting information was gathered and orchestrated in the suitable place in the review.

  6. Erysiphe trifolii causing powdery mildew of lentil (Lens culinaris)

    Science.gov (United States)

    The taxonomy of the powdery mildew fungus infecting lentil in the Pacific Northwest (PNW) of the USA was investigated on the basis of morphology and rDNA ITS sequences. Anamorphic characters were in close agreement with descriptions of E. trifolii. However, teleomorphs formed chasmothecial appenda...

  7. Genetics of early growth vigour in lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.)

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics; Volume 92; Issue 2. Genetics of early growth vigour in lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) Jitendra Kumar Ekata Srivastva Mratunjay Singh. Research Note Volume 92 Issue 2 August 2013 pp 323-326. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link:

  8. Antioxidant responses of lentil and barley plants to boron toxicity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    marine algal flagellates, while bacteria, fungi, green algae and animals apparently do not require boron. ... + or urea on the growth, photosynthetic pigment content and MDA, H2O2 and proline content of lentil and .... 0.053 mM NTB, 10 mM methionine, 0.0053 mM riboflavin and an appropriate aliquot of enzyme extract.

  9. Lentil production in Germany : testing different mixed cropping systems, sowing dates and weed controls

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Lina

    2012-01-01

    As a kind of legume crop, lentils (Lens culinaris Medik.) with their high nutritional value are grown mainly for human consumption in many regions of the world. The crop has benefits in crop rotation due to its symbiotic N-fixation, which is important especially in organic farming, and it can also increase crop biodiversity in arable land. In Europe, lentils are considered one of the popular leguminous food crops. However, the cultivation and scientific research on lentils were neglected in G...

  10. Integrating straw yield and quality into multi-dimensional improvement of lentil (Lens culinaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhtib, Ashraf; Wamatu, Jane; Ejeta, T Tolemariam; Rischkowsky, Barbara

    2017-09-01

    Lentil straw is an important source of fodder for livestock in Africa, South Asia and the Middle East. However, improvement programmes of lentil do not pay attention to straw traits, neither are straw traits considered in release criteria of new varieties. This study aimed to determine whether straw traits can be integrated into multi-trait improvement of lentil. Wide genotypic variation (P 0.05) was found between grain yield. The possibility to simultaneously improve grain yield and nutritive traits of lentil straw. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  11. Competitive Ability of Lentil (Lens culinaris L.) Cultivars to Weed Interference under Rain-fed Conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Javad Hamzei; Mohsen Seyedi; Majid Babaei

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The lentil or masoor (Lens culinaris L.) is a brushy annual plant of the legume family, grown for its lens-shaped seeds. Lentil has been one of the first crops domesticated in the Near East. With 26% protein, lentil is the vegetable with the highest level of protein other than soybeans, and it is an important part of people’s diet in many parts of the world. It is reported that the average yield of lentil is considerably low compared to its potential yield of 1500-2000 kg ha-...

  12. Multi-environment selection of small sieve snap beans reduces production constraints in East Africa and subtropical regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Common bean rust caused by Uromyces appendiculatus, and heat stress lower the yield and quality of snap beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in East Africa. Four snap bean breeding lines previously selected for broad-spectrum rust resistance (involving Ur-4 and Ur-11 rust genes) and heat tolerance followin...

  13. Chemical composition, carbohydrate digestibility, and antioxidant capacity of cooked black bean, chickpea, and lentil Mexican varieties

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Silva-Cristobal, L; Osorio-Díaz, P; Tovar, J; Bello-Pérez, L. A

    2010-01-01

    ... (high protein, digestible and indigestible carbohydrates, and polyphenols content). However, limited information is available on the indigestible carbohydrates and the antioxidant capacity of legumes growing in Mexico...

  14. Integration of sunflower (Helianthus annuus residues with a pre-plant herbicide enhances weed suppression in broad bean (Vicia faba Integração de resíduos de girassol (Helianthus annuus com herbicida pré-emergente na supressão de plantas daninhas na cultura da fava (Vicia faba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.S Alsaadawi

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Field trial was conducted with the aim of utilizing allelopathic crop residues to reduce the use of synthetic herbicides in broad bean (Vicia faba fields. Sunflower residue at 600 and 1,400 g m-2 and Treflan (trifluralin at 50, 75 and 100% of recommended dose were incorporated into the soil alone or in combination with each other. Untreated plots were maintained as a control. Herbicide application in plots amended with sunflower residue had the least total weed count and biomass, which was even better than herbicide used alone. Integration of recommended dose of Treflan with sunflower residue at 1,400 g m-² produced maximum (987.5 g m-2 aboveground biomass of broad bean, which was 74 and 36% higher than control and recommended herbicide dose applied alone, respectively. Combination of herbicide and sunflower residue appeared to better enhance pod number and yield per unit area than herbicide alone. Application of 50% dose of Treflan in plots amended with sunflower residue resulted in similar yield advantage as was noticed with 100% herbicide dose. Chromatographic analysis of residue-infested field soil indicated the presence of several phytotoxic compounds of phenolic nature. Periodic data revealed that maximum suppression in weed density and dry weight synchronized with peak values of phytotoxins observed 4 weeks after incorporation of sunflower residues. Integration of sunflower residues with lower herbicide rates can produce effective weed suppression without compromising yield as a feasible and environmentally sound approach in broad bean fields.O experimento foi realizado com o objetivo de utilizar resíduos agrícolas com potencial alelopático para reduzir o uso de herbicidas sintéticos em fava (Vicia faba. Resíduos de girassol (600 e 1,400 g m-2 e Treflan (50, 75 e 100% da dose recomendada foram incorporados ao solo isoladamente ou em combinação uns com os outros. Parcelas não tratadas foram mantidas como controle. A aplicação de

  15. Effect of meteorological factors on the development of lentil stemphylium blight at different sowing dates in rampur, chitwan, Nepal

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Subash Subedi; Sundarman Shrestha; Gopal Bahadur KC; Resham Bahadur Thapa; Surya Kanta Ghimire; Sarswati Neupane

    2016-01-01

    .... Stemphylium blight of lentil (Lens culinaris Medik) caused by Stemphylium botryosum Walr is becoming a serious emerging threat to lentil cultivation and become widespread throughout major legume growing areas in Nepal...

  16. Antioxidant responses of lentil and barley plants to boron toxicity ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    After ten-day germination, the lentil (native) and barley (Tokak157/37) were incubated 16 h light and 8 h dark per day for 7-day growth cycle under the conditions of boron stress via different nitrogen sources (10 mM nitrogen in NH4 Cl, KNO3 and urea). As a result of the changes in the nitrogen sources of the plants, there ...

  17. Genetics and Biochemistry of Zero-Tannin Lentils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirali, Mahla; Purves, Randy W; Stonehouse, Rob; Song, Rui; Bett, Kirstin; Vandenberg, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The zero-tannin trait in lentil is controlled by a single recessive gene (tan) that results in a phenotype characterized by green stems, white flowers, and thin, transparent, or translucent seed coats. Genes that result in zero-tannin characteristics are useful for studies of seed coat pigmentation and biochemical characters because they have altered pigmentation. In this study, one of the major groups of plant pigments, phenolic compounds, was compared among zero-tannin and normal phenotypes and genotypes of lentil. Biochemical data were obtained by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Genomic sequencing was used to identify a candidate gene for the tan locus. Phenolic compound profiling revealed that myricetin, dihydromyricetin, flavan-3-ols, and proanthocyanidins are only detected in normal lentil phenotypes and not in zero-tannin types. The molecular analysis showed that the tan gene encodes a bHLH transcription factor, homologous to the A gene in pea. The results of this study suggest that tan as a bHLH transcription factor interacts with the regulatory genes in the biochemical pathway of phenolic compounds starting from flavonoid-3',5'-hydroxylase (F3'5'H) and dihydroflavonol reductase (DFR).

  18. Construction of a comparative genetic map in faba bean (Vicia faba L.); conservation of genome structure with Lens culinaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellwood, Simon R; Phan, Huyen T T; Jordan, Megan; Hane, James; Torres, Anna M; Avila, Carmen M; Cruz-Izquierdo, Serafín; Oliver, Richard P

    2008-08-09

    The development of genetic markers is complex and costly in species with little pre-existing genomic information. Faba bean possesses one of the largest and least studied genomes among cultivated crop plants and no gene-based genetic maps exist. Gene-based orthologous markers allow chromosomal regions and levels of synteny to be characterised between species, reveal phylogenetic relationships and chromosomal evolution, and enable targeted identification of markers for crop breeding. In this study orthologous codominant cross-species markers have been deployed to produce the first exclusively gene-based genetic linkage map of faba bean (Vicia faba), using an F6 population developed from a cross between the lines Vf6 (equina type) and Vf27 (paucijuga type). Of 796 intron-targeted amplified polymorphic (ITAP) markers screened, 151 markers could be used to construct a comparative genetic map. Linkage analysis revealed seven major and five small linkage groups (LGs), one pair and 12 unlinked markers. Each LG was comprised of three to 30 markers and varied in length from 23.6 cM to 324.8 cM. The map spanned a total length of 1685.8 cM. A simple and direct macrosyntenic relationship between faba bean and Medicago truncatula was evident, while faba bean and lentil shared a common rearrangement relative to M. truncatula. One hundred and four of the 127 mapped markers in the 12 LGs, which were previously assigned to M. truncatula genetic and physical maps, were found in regions syntenic between the faba bean and M. truncatula genomes. However chromosomal rearrangements were observed that could explain the difference in chromosome numbers between these three legume species. These rearrangements suggested high conservation of M. truncatula chromosomes 1, 5 and 8; moderate conservation of chromosomes 2, 3, 4 and 7 and no conservation with M. truncatula chromosome 6. Multiple PCR amplicons and comparative mapping were suggestive of small-scale duplication events in faba bean

  19. Construction of a comparative genetic map in faba bean (Vicia faba L.; conservation of genome structure with Lens culinaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avila Carmen M

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The development of genetic markers is complex and costly in species with little pre-existing genomic information. Faba bean possesses one of the largest and least studied genomes among cultivated crop plants and no gene-based genetic maps exist. Gene-based orthologous markers allow chromosomal regions and levels of synteny to be characterised between species, reveal phylogenetic relationships and chromosomal evolution, and enable targeted identification of markers for crop breeding. In this study orthologous codominant cross-species markers have been deployed to produce the first exclusively gene-based genetic linkage map of faba bean (Vicia faba, using an F6 population developed from a cross between the lines Vf6 (equina type and Vf27 (paucijuga type. Results Of 796 intron-targeted amplified polymorphic (ITAP markers screened, 151 markers could be used to construct a comparative genetic map. Linkage analysis revealed seven major and five small linkage groups (LGs, one pair and 12 unlinked markers. Each LG was comprised of three to 30 markers and varied in length from 23.6 cM to 324.8 cM. The map spanned a total length of 1685.8 cM. A simple and direct macrosyntenic relationship between faba bean and Medicago truncatula was evident, while faba bean and lentil shared a common rearrangement relative to M. truncatula. One hundred and four of the 127 mapped markers in the 12 LGs, which were previously assigned to M. truncatula genetic and physical maps, were found in regions syntenic between the faba bean and M. truncatula genomes. However chromosomal rearrangements were observed that could explain the difference in chromosome numbers between these three legume species. These rearrangements suggested high conservation of M. truncatula chromosomes 1, 5 and 8; moderate conservation of chromosomes 2, 3, 4 and 7 and no conservation with M. truncatula chromosome 6. Multiple PCR amplicons and comparative mapping were suggestive of

  20. Common Beans and Their Non-Digestible Fraction: Cancer Inhibitory Activity—An Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rocio Campos-Vega

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The US Department of Agriculture’s MyPyramid guidelines introduced a near doubling of the dietary recommendations for vegetables including dry beans—an important food staple in many traditional diets that can improve public health and nutrition. Populations with high legume (peas, beans, lentils consumption have a low risk of cancer and chronic degenerative diseases. Common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. are known as a rich, reliable source of non-digested compounds like fiber, phenolics, peptides and phytochemicals that are associated with health benefits. Emerging evidence indicates that common bean consumption is associated with reduced cancer risk in human populations, inhibiting carcinogenesis in animal models and inducing cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in cell cultures. Fiber may reduce the risk of premature death from all causes, whereas the whole non-digestible fraction from common beans exhibits anti-proliferative activity and induces apoptosis in vitro and in vivo colon cancer. The mechanisms responsible for this apparently protective role may include gene-nutrient interactions and modulation of proteins’ expression. This review investigates the potential health benefits and bioactivity of beans on tumor inhibition, highlighting studies involving functional compounds, mainly non-digestible fractions that modulate genes and proteins, thereby, unraveling their preventive role against the development of cancer.

  1. Impact of Elicitation on Antioxidant and Potential Antihypertensive Properties of Lentil Sprouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peñas, Elena; Limón, Rocío I; Martínez-Villaluenga, Cristina; Restani, Patrizia; Pihlanto, Anne; Frias, Juana

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the application of elicitors (500 μM ascorbic acid, 50 μM folic acid, 5 mM glutamic acid and 50 ppm chitosan in 5 mM glutamic acid) during lentil germination up to 8 days as a strategy to increase germination rate and to enhance the accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and phenolic compounds. The effect of elicitation on the protein profile and antioxidant and angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory activities of sprouted lentils was also evaluated. The application of elicitors did not negatively affect the germination yield of lentils and no significant changes on the protein pattern of lentils germinated in the presence of elicitors were observed. Chitosan/glutamic acid increased by 1.6-fold the GABA content in lentil sprouts, whilst ascorbic and folic acids as well as chitosan/glutamic acid were highly effective to enhance the total content of phenolic compounds and the antioxidant activity of sprouted lentils. All elicited lentil sprouts showed ability to inhibit ACE activity (IC50: 9.5-11.9 μg peptides/mL). Therefore, elicitation can be considered a promising approach to improve the content of compounds with antioxidant and potential antihypertensive activities in lentil sprouts.

  2. The use of ESR technique for assessment of heating temperatures of archaeological lentil samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydaş, Canan; Engin, Birol; Dönmez, Emel Oybak; Belli, Oktay

    2010-01-01

    Heat-induced paramagnetic centers in modern and archaeological lentils ( Lens culinaris, Medik.) were studied by X-band (9.3 GHz) electron spin resonance (ESR) technique. The modern red lentil samples were heated in an electrical furnace at increasing temperatures in the range 70-500 °C. The ESR spectral parameters (the intensity, g-value and peak-to-peak line width) of the heat-induced organic radicals were investigated for modern red lentil ( Lens culinaris, Medik.) samples. The obtained ESR spectra indicate that the relative number of heat-induced paramagnetic species and peak-to-peak line widths depends on the temperature and heating time of the modern lentil. The g-values also depend on the heating temperature but not heating time. Heated modern red lentils produced a range of organic radicals with g-values from g = 2.0062 to 2.0035. ESR signals of carbonised archaeological lentil samples from two archaeological deposits of the Van province in Turkey were studied and g-values, peak-to-peak line widths, intensities and elemental compositions were compared with those obtained for modern samples in order to assess at which temperature these archaeological lentils were heated in prehistoric sites. The maximum temperatures of the previous heating of carbonised UA5 and Y11 lentil seeds are as follows about 500 °C and above 500 °C, respectively.

  3. SNP-based genotyping in lentil: linking sequence information with phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentil (Lens culinaris) has been late to enter the world of high throughput molecular analysis due to a general lack of genomic resources. Using a 454 sequencing-based approach, SNPs have been identified in genes across the lentil genome. Several hundred have been turned into single SNP KASP assay...

  4. A validated source panel of SSR markers for effective discrimination of lentil species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medic) is an important cool season food legume grown extensively in the world. This crop species has 14 chromosomes (2n=14), is a diploid and has a genome size of more than 4000 Mbp. Development of highly polymorphic molecular markers is a lentil research priority. In this stu...

  5. Genome wide association study using the ICARDA Lentil Reference set and agronomic data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is the world’s fifth most important pulse crop. It is self-pollinated diploid (2n=14) and has a relatively large genome size of approximately 4Gb. Next generation sequencing (NGS) technology was used to genotype the ICARDA Lentil Reference set using the two-enzyme (Pst...

  6. Processing, cooking, and cooling affect prebiotic concentrations in lentil (Lens culinaris Medikus)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentil is an important staple food crop in many regions world-wide and is a good source of protein (20-30%) and various micronutrients. Lentil contains raffinose-family oligosaccharides (RFO), resistant starch (RS), and other prebiotic compounds essential for maintenance of healthy gastrointestinal ...

  7. Molecular characterization of genetic variation to pea enation mosaic virus resistance in lentil (Lenz culinaris Medik.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Identification of genetically diverse lentil germplasm with resistance to pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) through combined of molecular marker analysis and phenotyping could prove useful in breeding programs. A total of 44 lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) accessions, were screened for resistance to PE...

  8. A global survey of low-molecular weight carbohydrates in lentils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentils contain a range of low-molecular weight carbohydrates (LMWC); however, those have not been well characterized. The objectives of this study were to (1) determine the concentrations of LMWC in lentils grown in six locations, and (2) identify any genetic and environmental effects on those LMWC...

  9. Chemical form of selenium in naturally selenium-rich lentils (Lens culinaris L.) from Saskatchewan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavarajah, Dil; Vandenberg, Albert; George, Graham N; Pickering, Ingrid J

    2007-09-05

    Lentils (Lens culinaris L.) are a source of many essential dietary components and trace elements for human health. In this study we show that lentils grown in the Canadian prairies are additionally enriched in selenium, an essential micronutrient needed for general well-being, including a healthy immune system and protection against cancer. Selenium K near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the selenium biochemistry of two lentil cultivars grown in various locations in Saskatchewan, Canada. We observe significant variations in total selenium concentration with geographic location and cultivar; however, almost all the selenium (86-95%) in these field-grown lentils is present as organic selenium modeled as selenomethionine with a small component (5-14%) as selenate. As the toxicities of certain forms of arsenic and selenium are antagonistic, selenium-rich lentils may have a pivotal role to play in alleviating the chronic arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh.

  10. Chemical Form of Selenium in Naturally Selenium-Rich Lentils (Lens Culinaris L.) From Saskatchewan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thavarajah, D.; Vandenberg, A.; George, G.N.; Pickering, I.J.

    2009-06-04

    Lentils (Lens culinaris L.) are a source of many essential dietary components and trace elements for human health. In this study we show that lentils grown in the Canadian prairies are additionally enriched in selenium, an essential micronutrient needed for general well-being, including a healthy immune system and protection against cancer. Selenium K near-edge X-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) has been used to examine the selenium biochemistry of two lentil cultivars grown in various locations in Saskatchewan, Canada. We observe significant variations in total selenium concentration with geographic location and cultivar; however, almost all the selenium (86--95%) in these field-grown lentils is present as organic selenium modeled as selenomethionine with a small component (5--14%) as selenate. As the toxicities of certain forms of arsenic and selenium are antagonistic, selenium-rich lentils may have a pivotal role to play in alleviating the chronic arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh.

  11. Antioxidant activity of phenolic compounds in lentil seeds (Lens culinaris L.

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    Dragišić-Maksimović Jelena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The antioxidant activities of methanol extracts of lentil seeds (Lens culinaris L. have been investigated in this work. Scarce reference data describe lentil seeds as rich in polyphenols, which are reported to exhibit bioactive properties due to their capability to reduce or quench reactive oxygen species. The content and composition of phenolics is highly dependent of the cultivars, environments/growth conditions and method of analysis. Therefore, this study is an effort in investigation of phenolics content and composition in lentil seeds trying to prove the contribution of identified phenolics to antioxidant capacity. HPLC measurements revealed that lentil seeds contain gallic acid, epicatechin, catechin, protocatechuic acid, rutin, p-coumaric acid and umbeliferone. Their DPPH radical scavenging activity was in descending order from gallic acid to umbeliferone. The presented results contribute to knowledge of the implications in dietary intake of phenolic compounds from lentil seeds.

  12. THE EFFECT OF SOWING TIME, TILLAGE SYSTEM AND HERBICIDES ON WEED SPECIES DENSITY, WEED BIOMASS AND YIELD OF LENTIL WITHIN A LENTIL-WHEAT SEQUENCE

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Songül Gürsoy; Cumali Özaslan; Murat Urgun; Betül Kolay; Murat Koç

    2014-01-01

    ... growing season to evaluate the effect of various forms of tillage and herbicides, and the timing of such operations on weed density and lentil (Lens culinaris, L) yield after wheat (Triticum aestivum L...

  13. Effects of Dietary Inclusion of Lentil Byproduct on Performance and Oxidative Stability of Eggs in Laying Quail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Çabuk, Metin; Eratak, Serdar; Basmacioğlu Malayoğlu, Hatice

    2014-01-01

    One hundred and sixty-eight 11-week-old laying quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica) were fed one of the following three diets: (1) control: basal diet with no lentil (Lens culinaris L.) byproduct; (2) inclusion of 10% lentil byproduct; (3) inclusion of 20% lentil byproduct. In the recent years, colour sorting machines are used in order to separate red lentils according to their colours. The goal is to select the items which are discoloured, not as ripe as required, or still with hull even after dehulling of lentil seed. During the sorting, a new byproduct called “sorting byproduct” leftover is obtained. The byproduct is cleaner and is of a higher quality than other lentil byproducts. This experiment was conducted to study the effects of the inclusion of different levels of lentil byproduct on laying quail performance. The experimental treatment included 10% or 20% lentil byproduct in the diet, and this was fed to quails aged between 11 and 22 weeks. The inclusion of 10% and 20% levels of lentil byproduct in the diet significantly increased egg production, but feed intake and feed conversion ratio were not significantly affected. Egg weight decreased significantly following the inclusion of 20% lentil byproduct. The inclusion of lentil byproduct in the diet increased the deposition of yellow yolk pigments and decreased malonaldehyde formation in the yolk. PMID:25180206

  14. Effects of Dietary Inclusion of Lentil Byproduct on Performance and Oxidative Stability of Eggs in Laying Quail

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Metin Çabuk

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available One hundred and sixty-eight 11-week-old laying quails (Coturnix coturnix japonica were fed one of the following three diets: (1 control: basal diet with no lentil (Lens culinaris L. byproduct; (2 inclusion of 10% lentil byproduct; (3 inclusion of 20% lentil byproduct. In the recent years, colour sorting machines are used in order to separate red lentils according to their colours. The goal is to select the items which are discoloured, not as ripe as required, or still with hull even after dehulling of lentil seed. During the sorting, a new byproduct called “sorting byproduct” leftover is obtained. The byproduct is cleaner and is of a higher quality than other lentil byproducts. This experiment was conducted to study the effects of the inclusion of different levels of lentil byproduct on laying quail performance. The experimental treatment included 10% or 20% lentil byproduct in the diet, and this was fed to quails aged between 11 and 22 weeks. The inclusion of 10% and 20% levels of lentil byproduct in the diet significantly increased egg production, but feed intake and feed conversion ratio were not significantly affected. Egg weight decreased significantly following the inclusion of 20% lentil byproduct. The inclusion of lentil byproduct in the diet increased the deposition of yellow yolk pigments and decreased malonaldehyde formation in the yolk.

  15. Rhizobium leguminosarum is the symbiont of lentils in the Middle East and Europe but not in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harun-or Rashid, M; Gonzalez, Javier; Young, J Peter W; Wink, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Lentil is the oldest of the crops that have been domesticated in the Fertile Crescent and spread to other regions during the Bronze Age, making it an ideal model to study the evolution of rhizobia associated with crop legumes. Housekeeping and nodulation genes of lentil-nodulating rhizobia from the region where lentil originated (Turkey and Syria) and regions to which lentil was introduced later (Germany and Bangladesh) were analyzed to determine their genetic diversity, population structure, and taxonomic position. There are four different lineages of rhizobia associated with lentil nodulation, of which three are new and endemic to Bangladesh, while Mediterranean and Central European lentil symbionts belong to the Rhizobium leguminosarum lineage. The endemic lentil grex pilosae may have played a significant role in the origin of these new lineages in Bangladesh. The presence of R. leguminosarum with lentil at the center of origin and in countries where lentil was introduced later suggests that R. leguminosarum is the original symbiont of lentil. Lentil seeds may have played a significant role in the initial dispersal of this Rhizobium species within the Middle East and on to other countries. Nodulation gene sequences revealed a high similarity to those of symbiovar viciae. © 2013 Federation of European Microbiological Societies. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Preliminary Assessment of the Nutritional Quality of two Types of Lentils (Lens Culinaris by Near Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy Technology (Nirs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovidiu Moldovan

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the nutritive value of two varieties of lentils (Lens culinaris, namely green and red varieties. For this purpose the chemical components: crude protein, starch, ash, sugars (monosaccharides and oligosaccharides, crude fat, total fibers and dry matter of two lentils varieties (green and red were determined by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy technology (NIRS. Results show that green lentils had higher contents in ash (minerals, crude protein and total fibers, while the red lentils had higher contents in crude fat and total carbohydrates. The metabolizable energy (MJ/kg of the red lentils was slightly higher than green lentils. In conclusion both type of lentils (green and red revealed good nutritional quality with slight differences.

  17. A study of the desorption isotherms of lentils

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    M.A.S. Barrozo

    2000-03-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this work was to analyze the main equilibrium equations used for grains to find the best way to represent the equilibrium conditions between lentil and air. The experimental study was based on the static method using saturated salt solutions. We developed criteria for distinguish between some existing equations used for grains. To distinguishing between these equations we explored some nonlinearity measures. The results obtained showed that the Halsey modified equation was the best model in terms of nonsignificance for bias and nonlinearity measures.

  18. HERITABILITY AND PATH ANALYSIS OF SOME ECONOMICAL CHARACTERISTICS IN LENTIL

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    B BIÇER

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Twenty-nine lentil (Lens culinaris Medik genotypes were grown from 1997/98 to 1998/2001 at Dicle University, Faculty of Agriculture in Diyarbakir The heritability for days to fl owering and maturity, plant height, height of lowest pod, number of pod per plant, 1000 seed weight and seed yield were estimated as 0.94, 0.78, 0.52, 0.72, 0.37, 0.87 and 0.53, respectively. The path analysis indicated that total biological yield and number of clusters and pods per plant had very high positive direct effect on seed yield.

  19. Diversity of Macro- and Micronutrients in the Seeds of Lentil Landraces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolga Karaköy

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Increasing the amount of bioavailable mineral elements in plant foods would help to improve the nutritional status of populations in developing countries. Legume seeds have the potential to provide many essential nutrients. It is important to have information on genetic variations among different lentil populations so that plant breeding programs can use new varieties in cross-breeding programs. The main objective of this study was to characterize the micro- and macronutrient concentrations of lentil landraces seeds collected from South-Eastern Turkey. We found impressive variation in the micro- and macroelement concentrations in 39 lentil landraces and 7 cultivars. We investigated the relationships of traits by correlation analysis and principal component analysis (PCA. The concentrations of several minerals, particularly Zn, were positively correlated with other minerals, suggesting that similar pathways or transporters control the uptake and transport of these minerals. Some genotypes had high mineral and protein content and potential to improve the nutritional value of cultivated lentil. Cross-breeding of numerous lentil landraces from Turkey with currently cultivated varieties could improve the levels of micro- and macronutrients of lentil and may contribute to the worldwide lentil quality breeding program.

  20. Diversity of macro- and micronutrients in the seeds of lentil landraces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaköy, Tolga; Erdem, Halil; Baloch, Faheem S; Toklu, Faruk; Eker, Selim; Kilian, Benjamin; Özkan, Hakan

    2012-01-01

    Increasing the amount of bioavailable mineral elements in plant foods would help to improve the nutritional status of populations in developing countries. Legume seeds have the potential to provide many essential nutrients. It is important to have information on genetic variations among different lentil populations so that plant breeding programs can use new varieties in cross-breeding programs. The main objective of this study was to characterize the micro- and macronutrient concentrations of lentil landraces seeds collected from South-Eastern Turkey. We found impressive variation in the micro- and macroelement concentrations in 39 lentil landraces and 7 cultivars. We investigated the relationships of traits by correlation analysis and principal component analysis (PCA). The concentrations of several minerals, particularly Zn, were positively correlated with other minerals, suggesting that similar pathways or transporters control the uptake and transport of these minerals. Some genotypes had high mineral and protein content and potential to improve the nutritional value of cultivated lentil. Cross-breeding of numerous lentil landraces from Turkey with currently cultivated varieties could improve the levels of micro- and macronutrients of lentil and may contribute to the worldwide lentil quality breeding program.

  1. Searching chromosomal landmarks in Indian lentils through EMA-based Giemsa staining method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Timir Baran; Halder, Mihir

    2016-09-01

    Lentil is one of the oldest protein-rich food crop with only one cultivated and six wild species. India is one important cultivator, producer and consumer of lentils and possesses a large number of germplasms. All species of lentil show 2n = 14 chromosomes. The primary objective of the present paper is to search chromosomal landmarks through enzymatic maceration and air drying (EMA)-based Giemsa staining method in five Indian lentil species not reported elsewhere at a time. Additionally, gametic chromosome analysis, tendril formation and seed morphology have been studied to ascertain interspecific relationships in lentils. Chromosome analysis in Lens culinaris, Lens orientalis and Lens odemensis revealed that they contain intercalary sat chromosome and similar karyotypic formula, while Lens nigricans and Lens lamottei showed presence of terminal sat chromosomes not reported earlier. This distinct morphological feature in L. nigricans and L. lamottei may be considered as chromosomal landmark. Meiotic analysis showed n = 7 bivalents in L. culinaris, L. nigricans and L. lamottei. No tendril formation was observed in L. culinaris, L. orientalis and L. odemensis while L. nigricans and L. lamottei developed very prominent tendrils. Based on chromosomal analysis, tendril formation and seed morphology, the five lentil species can be separated into two distinct groups. The outcome of this research may enrich conventional and biotechnological breeding programmes in lentil and may facilitate an easy and alternative method for identification of interspecific hybrids.

  2. Diversity of Macro- and Micronutrients in the Seeds of Lentil Landraces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karaköy, Tolga; Erdem, Halil; Baloch, Faheem S.; Toklu, Faruk; Eker, Selim; Kilian, Benjamin; Özkan, Hakan

    2012-01-01

    Increasing the amount of bioavailable mineral elements in plant foods would help to improve the nutritional status of populations in developing countries. Legume seeds have the potential to provide many essential nutrients. It is important to have information on genetic variations among different lentil populations so that plant breeding programs can use new varieties in cross-breeding programs. The main objective of this study was to characterize the micro- and macronutrient concentrations of lentil landraces seeds collected from South-Eastern Turkey. We found impressive variation in the micro- and macroelement concentrations in 39 lentil landraces and 7 cultivars. We investigated the relationships of traits by correlation analysis and principal component analysis (PCA). The concentrations of several minerals, particularly Zn, were positively correlated with other minerals, suggesting that similar pathways or transporters control the uptake and transport of these minerals. Some genotypes had high mineral and protein content and potential to improve the nutritional value of cultivated lentil. Cross-breeding of numerous lentil landraces from Turkey with currently cultivated varieties could improve the levels of micro- and macronutrients of lentil and may contribute to the worldwide lentil quality breeding program. PMID:22997502

  3. Identification QTLs Controlling Genes for Se Uptake in Lentil Seeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Duygu; Sever, Tugce; Aldemir, Secil; Yagmur, Bulent; Temel, Hulya Yilmaz; Kaya, Hilal Betul; Alsaleh, Ahmad; Kahraman, Abdullah; Ozkan, Hakan; Vandenberg, Albert; Tanyolac, Bahattin

    2016-01-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is an excellent source of protein and carbohydrates and is also rich in essential trace elements for the human diet. Selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient for human health and nutrition, providing protection against several diseases and regulating important biological systems. Dietary intake of 55 μg of Se per day is recommended for adults, with inadequate Se intake causing significant health problems. The objective of this study was to identify and map quantitative trait loci (QTL) of genes controlling Se accumulation in lentil seeds using a population of 96 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) developed from the cross “PI 320937” × “Eston” grown in three different environments for two years (2012 and 2013). Se concentration in seed varied between 119 and 883 μg/kg. A linkage map consisting of 1,784 markers (4 SSRs, and 1,780 SNPs) was developed. The map spanned a total length of 4,060.6 cM, consisting of 7 linkage groups (LGs) with an average distance of 2.3 cM between adjacent markers. Four QTL regions and 36 putative QTL markers, with LOD scores ranging from 3.00 to 4.97, distributed across two linkage groups (LG2 and LG5) were associated with seed Se concentration, explaining 6.3–16.9% of the phenotypic variation. PMID:26978666

  4. Identification QTLs Controlling Genes for Se Uptake in Lentil Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ates, Duygu; Sever, Tugce; Aldemir, Secil; Yagmur, Bulent; Temel, Hulya Yilmaz; Kaya, Hilal Betul; Alsaleh, Ahmad; Kahraman, Abdullah; Ozkan, Hakan; Vandenberg, Albert; Tanyolac, Bahattin

    2016-01-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is an excellent source of protein and carbohydrates and is also rich in essential trace elements for the human diet. Selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient for human health and nutrition, providing protection against several diseases and regulating important biological systems. Dietary intake of 55 μg of Se per day is recommended for adults, with inadequate Se intake causing significant health problems. The objective of this study was to identify and map quantitative trait loci (QTL) of genes controlling Se accumulation in lentil seeds using a population of 96 recombinant inbred lines (RILs) developed from the cross "PI 320937" × "Eston" grown in three different environments for two years (2012 and 2013). Se concentration in seed varied between 119 and 883 μg/kg. A linkage map consisting of 1,784 markers (4 SSRs, and 1,780 SNPs) was developed. The map spanned a total length of 4,060.6 cM, consisting of 7 linkage groups (LGs) with an average distance of 2.3 cM between adjacent markers. Four QTL regions and 36 putative QTL markers, with LOD scores ranging from 3.00 to 4.97, distributed across two linkage groups (LG2 and LG5) were associated with seed Se concentration, explaining 6.3-16.9% of the phenotypic variation.

  5. Identification QTLs Controlling Genes for Se Uptake in Lentil Seeds.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duygu Ates

    Full Text Available Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. is an excellent source of protein and carbohydrates and is also rich in essential trace elements for the human diet. Selenium (Se is an essential micronutrient for human health and nutrition, providing protection against several diseases and regulating important biological systems. Dietary intake of 55 μg of Se per day is recommended for adults, with inadequate Se intake causing significant health problems. The objective of this study was to identify and map quantitative trait loci (QTL of genes controlling Se accumulation in lentil seeds using a population of 96 recombinant inbred lines (RILs developed from the cross "PI 320937" × "Eston" grown in three different environments for two years (2012 and 2013. Se concentration in seed varied between 119 and 883 μg/kg. A linkage map consisting of 1,784 markers (4 SSRs, and 1,780 SNPs was developed. The map spanned a total length of 4,060.6 cM, consisting of 7 linkage groups (LGs with an average distance of 2.3 cM between adjacent markers. Four QTL regions and 36 putative QTL markers, with LOD scores ranging from 3.00 to 4.97, distributed across two linkage groups (LG2 and LG5 were associated with seed Se concentration, explaining 6.3-16.9% of the phenotypic variation.

  6. Direct in vitro regeneration of lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omran, V G; Bagheri, A; Moshtaghi, N

    2008-09-15

    This study surveyed a rapid, efficient and reproducible protocol for in vitro shoot regeneration and rooting by different explants and different concentration of BAP. Due to optimization of shoot regeneration, two media including of MS and modified MS (MS salts with double concentration of CaC21, and B5 vitamins), different explants such as decapitated embryo axes, epicotyls and cotyledonary nodes and different concentrations of BAP hormone (1, 1.5, 2, 2.5, 3 and 4 mg L(-1)) in two genotypes (Gachsaran and Flip. 92-12 L) were used. The results showed that modified MS is a suitable medium for in vitro shoot regeneration of lentil. High levels of BAP caused increasing of shoot regeneration in lentil genotypes. Three milligram per liter of BAP induced the highest level of shoot regeneration. In addition, decapitated embryo explants were the best explants for highest shoot regeneration (5.8) (p rooting, the in vitro-in vivo method of rooting was better than only in vitro method. The shoots regenerated in 2 mg L(-1) BAP had higher rooting percentage than the shoots were regenerated in 3 and 4 mg L(-1) BAP. These results indicate on the inhibitory effect of high concentration of BAP on root induction. But the genotype didn't have any significant effect on rooting percentage and length of roots.

  7. 'Beans' or 'Sizzlin' Beans:' Words Get People Eating Healthier

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... energy-boosting green beans and shallots" or "smart-choice vitamin C citrus carrots." Indulgent. For example, phrases like "dynamite chili and tangy lime-seasoned beets," "sweet sizzlin' green beans and crispy shallots" or "twisted ...

  8. Effects of Defatted Jack Bean Flour and Jack Bean Protein ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study evaluated the effects of substituting wheat flour with defatted Jack bean flour and Jack bean protein concentrate on bread quality. Jack bean flour milled from the seed nibs was defatted with n-hexane and part of the defatted flour (DJF) extracted in acid medium (pH; 4.5) for protein concentrate (JPC). Both the DJF ...

  9. Trials on the Timing of Chemical Control of Lentil weevil, Bruchus lentis Frӧlich (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae in Lentil Field in Gachsaran Region (Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Saeidi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The lentil weevil, Bruchus lentis Frӧlich, (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae: Bruchinae is the most serious pest of lentil in Iran. Economic losses due to this pest reach up to 40% of the lentil crop. Over a two-year study (2012 and 2013 in Agricultural Research Station of Gachsaran Region, best timing of chemical control of B. lentis was determined. A field experiment with cultivation of lentil Sina variety Lens culinaris Medik was conducted in a randomized complete block design with five treatments and three replications. The treatments consisted of spraying four times (respectively, during the early flowering, 10 days after the first spraying, 10 days after the second spraying; 10 days after the third spraying and control (without spraying. For the spraying from Endosulfan insecticide EC50% at ratio one liter per hectare was used. Three samples were taken from the pods and totally 150 pods from each replicate for contaminations of seeds were investigated. After the determination of the percent of seeds contamination, results were statistically analysed. Based on the results obtained, first spray treatment, with the mean contamination of 15.45% and second spray treatment with the mean contamination of 12.25% had the highest impact on reducing contamination lentil seeds to B. lentis and between them there was no statistically significant difference and were in one group. Therefore, spraying one time during the early flowering until 15 days after it was the best time to control of B. lentis.

  10. Investigation of the extruded products based on lupins, lentils and sublimated meat hydrophilic properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. N. Ostrikov

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Using the calorimetric method have been studied the swelling kinetics of developed vegetable-meat mixture on the basis of lentils, lupine and sublimated meat to create extruded functionality products.

  11. Lentil root protoplasts: a transient expression system suitable for coelectroporation of monoclonal antibodies and plasmid molecules

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Maccarrone, M.; Veldink, G.A.; Finazzi Agrò, A.

    1995-01-01

    Protoplasts were isolated from lentil (Lens culinaris) roots and their suitability as a transient expression system was investigated. After transfecting the protoplasts with the -glucuronidase (GUS) gene by either electroporation or polyethylene glycol (PEG), the specific activity of the reporter

  12. Diversity of Macro- and Micronutrients in the Seeds of Lentil Landraces

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Karaköy, Tolga; Erdem, Halil; Baloch, Faheem S; Toklu, Faruk; Eker, Selim; Kilian, Benjamin; Özkan, Hakan

    2012-01-01

    .... Legume seeds have the potential to provide many essential nutrients. It is important to have information on genetic variations among different lentil populations so that plant breeding programs can use new varieties in cross-breeding programs...

  13. Nutritional Profile and Carbohydrate Characterization of Spray-Dried Lentil, Pea and Chickpea Ingredients

    OpenAIRE

    Tosh, Susan M.; Farnworth, Edward R; Yolanda Brummer; Duncan, Alison M.; Wright, Amanda J; Boye, Joyce I; Michèle Marcotte; Marzouk Benali

    2013-01-01

    Although many consumers know that pulses are nutritious, long preparation times are frequently a barrier to consumption of lentils, dried peas and chickpeas. Therefore, a product has been developed which can be used as an ingredient in a wide variety of dishes without presoaking or precooking. Dried green peas, chickpeas or lentils were soaked, cooked, homogenized and spray-dried. Proximate analyses were conducted on the pulse powders and compared to an instant mashed potato product. Because ...

  14. Effect of Supplemental Irrigation on Lentil Yield and Growth in Semi-Arid Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Kahraman, Abdullah; Khan, Mohd Kamran; Pandey, Anamika; Ergun DOGAN

    2016-01-01

    Lentil is one of the most promising legume crops providing nutritional and food assurance to human beings. Due to extensive production of lentil crop in rain-fed agriculture system, its growth and yield are mainly determined by the levels of precipitation. Consequently, it usually faces drought stress during the generative stage resulting in low yield. In such scenario, controlled supplemental irrigation (SI) can improve and stabilize the productivity. Therefore, the present study was conduct...

  15. Salinity Tolerance During Germination and Seedling Growth of Some Lentil (Lens culinaris Medic.) Cultivars

    OpenAIRE

    Ceyhan, Ercan; Uzun Kayıs, Saniye

    2015-01-01

    Present research was conducted to determine effects of salt concentrations on emergence and seedling development of lentil varieties. Trials were made during the year of 2013 on the laboratory and greenhouse of Selcuk University, Agricultural Faculty. Emergency trial was set up according to “Randomized Plots Design” by two factors and four replications; greenhouse trial was also set up according to “Randomized Plots Design” by two factors and three replications. The lentil varieties; Altın To...

  16. Marker-Trait Association Analysis of Iron and Zinc Concentration in Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) Seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaei, Hamid; Podder, Rajib; Caron, Carolyn T; Kundu, Shudhangshu S; Diapari, Marwan; Vandenberg, Albert; Bett, Kirstin E

    2017-07-01

    Lentil ( Medik.) seeds are relatively rich in iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn), making lentil a potential crop to aid in the global battle against human micronutrient deficiency. Understanding the genetic basis for uptake of seed Fe and Zn is required to increase sustainable concentrations of these minerals in seeds. The objectives of this study were to characterize genetic variation in seed Fe and Zn concentration and to identify molecular markers associated with these traits across diverse lentil accessions. A set of 138 cultivated lentil accessions from 34 countries were evaluated in four environments (2 sites × 2 yr) in Saskatchewan, Canada. The collection was genotyped using 1150 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers that are distributed across the lentil genome. The germplasm tested exhibited a wide range of variation for seed Fe and Zn concentration. The marker-trait association analysis detected two SNP markers tightly linked to seed Fe and one linked to seed Zn concentration (-log10 ≥ 4.36). Additional markers were detected at -log10 ≥ 3.06. A number of putative candidate genes underlying detected loci encode Fe- and Zn-related functions. This study provides insight into the genetics of seed Fe and Zn concentration of lentil and opportunities for marker-assisted selection to improve micronutrient concentration as part of micronutrient biofortification programs. Copyright © 2017 Crop Science Society of America.

  17. Nutritional evaluation of ethanol-extracted lentil flours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz, M A; Blázquez, I; Sierra, I; Medrano, M A; Frias, J; Vidal-Valverde, C; Hernández, A

    2001-04-01

    Lentil flours were extracted with 80% ethanol at 25 and 50 degrees C for 1, 2, or 3 h. The various nitrogen fractions, soluble carbohydrates, three amino acids (Lys, His, and Tyr), available lysine, protein digestibility, and vitamins B(1) and B(2) were analyzed to evaluate the effect of extraction. Extraction resulted in an increase in the total nitrogen content of the extracted flours, with extraction temperature affecting the nature of the nitrogen (protein or nonprotein) content. There was also a large reduction in the oligosaccharides of the raffinose family, although the effect of temperature was appreciable only in the case of stachyose. There was hardly any effect on the concentrations of the amino acids analyzed or on protein digestibility; however, a positive correlation between protein digestibility and the available lysine was recorded in the samples. The vitamin B(1) and B(2) contents underwent variable decreases depending on extraction temperature.

  18. Preliminary Assessment of the Nutritional Quality of two Types of Lentils (Lens Culinaris) by Near Infrared Reflectance Spectroscopy Technology (Nirs)

    OpenAIRE

    Ovidiu Moldovan; Adriana Păucean; Romina Vlaic; Maria Doiniţa Borş; Sevastiţa Muste

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate and compare the nutritive value of two varieties of lentils (Lens culinaris), namely green and red varieties. For this purpose the chemical components: crude protein, starch, ash, sugars (monosaccharides and oligosaccharides), crude fat, total fibers and dry matter of two lentils varieties (green and red) were determined by near infrared reflectance spectroscopy technology (NIRS). Results show that green lentils had higher contents in ash (minerals), crud...

  19. Effects of Marketing Loans on U.S. Dry Peas and Lentils: Supply Response and World Trade

    OpenAIRE

    Lin, William W.; Lucier, Gary

    2008-01-01

    The 2002 Farm Act required USDA to implement marketing loans for the 2002-07 crops of dry peas, lentils, and small chickpeas. This provision led to expanded acreage for dry peas and lentils, crops analyzed in this study. The analysis found that marketing loans played a role in expansion for dry peas in 2003-05 and for lentils in 2003. For dry peas and lentils, marketing loans contributed to acreage expansion in North Dakota and Montana. Simulation model results suggest that marketing loans ha...

  20. acid on growth and yield components of common beans

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    pods perplant, 100-seed mass and harvest index. The highest seed yields were equi valient to 1854 kg ha1 in 1997 ... In pigeon pea (Cajanus cajan L.) (Singh et ah, 1978), and broad beans (Diethelm et al, 1986) ...... growth, chemical composition, flowering, pod yield and chemical composition of green seeds of pea plant ...

  1. Castor bean organelle genome sequencing and worldwide genetic diversity analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maximo Rivarola

    Full Text Available Castor bean is an important oil-producing plant in the Euphorbiaceae family. Its high-quality oil contains up to 90% of the unusual fatty acid ricinoleate, which has many industrial and medical applications. Castor bean seeds also contain ricin, a highly toxic Type 2 ribosome-inactivating protein, which has gained relevance in recent years due to biosafety concerns. In order to gain knowledge on global genetic diversity in castor bean and to ultimately help the development of breeding and forensic tools, we carried out an extensive chloroplast sequence diversity analysis. Taking advantage of the recently published genome sequence of castor bean, we assembled the chloroplast and mitochondrion genomes extracting selected reads from the available whole genome shotgun reads. Using the chloroplast reference genome we used the methylation filtration technique to readily obtain draft genome sequences of 7 geographically and genetically diverse castor bean accessions. These sequence data were used to identify single nucleotide polymorphism markers and phylogenetic analysis resulted in the identification of two major clades that were not apparent in previous population genetic studies using genetic markers derived from nuclear DNA. Two distinct sub-clades could be defined within each major clade and large-scale genotyping of castor bean populations worldwide confirmed previously observed low levels of genetic diversity and showed a broad geographic distribution of each sub-clade.

  2. Watershed responses to Amazon soya bean cropland expansion and intensification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neill, Christopher; Coe, Michael T; Riskin, Shelby H; Krusche, Alex V; Elsenbeer, Helmut; Macedo, Marcia N; McHorney, Richard; Lefebvre, Paul; Davidson, Eric A; Scheffler, Raphael; Figueira, Adelaine Michela e Silva; Porder, Stephen; Deegan, Linda A

    2013-06-05

    The expansion and intensification of soya bean agriculture in southeastern Amazonia can alter watershed hydrology and biogeochemistry by changing the land cover, water balance and nutrient inputs. Several new insights on the responses of watershed hydrology and biogeochemistry to deforestation in Mato Grosso have emerged from recent intensive field campaigns in this region. Because of reduced evapotranspiration, total water export increases threefold to fourfold in soya bean watersheds compared with forest. However, the deep and highly permeable soils on the broad plateaus on which much of the soya bean cultivation has expanded buffer small soya bean watersheds against increased stormflows. Concentrations of nitrate and phosphate do not differ between forest or soya bean watersheds because fixation of phosphorus fertilizer by iron and aluminium oxides and anion exchange of nitrate in deep soils restrict nutrient movement. Despite resistance to biogeochemical change, streams in soya bean watersheds have higher temperatures caused by impoundments and reduction of bordering riparian forest. In larger rivers, increased water flow, current velocities and sediment flux following deforestation can reshape stream morphology, suggesting that cumulative impacts of deforestation in small watersheds will occur at larger scales.

  3. Full of Beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mason, David H.

    1982-01-01

    Describes a genetics activity illustrating genetic variation, mutation, and influence of environmental factors on genotypic expression. Irridiated bean seeds are planted and observed (x-rayed by dentist's x-ray machine at different exposures and for different times). Questions to extend the activity are discussed. (Author/JN)

  4. Evaluation, Bean Dehuller

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The hopper unit is shown in Fig. 2. It is the de- vice through which the machine is fed or charged with bean seeds. It has a square base on which an inverted hollow pyramidal frustrum is attached. It is constructed from 1.5mm thick galvanised metal sheet and the square base is constructed with mild steel angle bar of 3mm.

  5. Sharing Beans with Friends

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell, Clare V.

    2013-01-01

    Teachers and researchers have known for decades that the use of storybooks can have a positive impact on students' experiences with mathematics. This article describes how first graders in an urban public school actively engage with mathematics by using the story "Bean Thirteen" as a context for developing number sense. This…

  6. Iron Fortification of Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) to Address Iron Deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, Rajib; Tar’an, Bunyamin; Tyler, Robert T.; Henry, Carol J.; Vandenberg, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a major human health concern in areas of the world in which diets are often Fe deficient. In the current study, we aimed to identify appropriate methods and optimal dosage for Fe fortification of lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) dal with FeSO4·7H2O (ferrous sulphate hepta-hydrate), NaFeEDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid iron (III) sodium salt) and FeSO4·H2O (ferrous sulphate mono-hydrate). We used a colorimetric method to determine the appearance of the dal fortified with fortificants at different Fe concentrations and under different storage conditions. Relative Fe bioavailability was assessed using an in vitro cell culture bioassay. We found that NaFeEDTA was the most suitable fortificant for red lentil dal, and at 1600 ppm, NaFeEDTA provides 13–14 mg of additional Fe per 100 g of dal. Lentil dal sprayed with fortificant solutions, followed by shaking and drying at 75 °C, performed best with respect to drying time and color change. Total Fe and phytic acid concentrations differed significantly between cooked unfortified and fortified lentil, ranging from 68.7 to 238.5 ppm and 7.2 to 8.0 mg g−1, respectively. The relative Fe bioavailability of cooked fortified lentil was increased by 32.2–36.6% compared to unfortified cooked lentil. We conclude that fortification of lentil dal is effective and could provide significant health benefits to dal-consuming populations vulnerable to Fe deficiency. PMID:28800117

  7. Iron Fortification of Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) to Address Iron Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podder, Rajib; Tar'an, Bunyamin; Tyler, Robert T; Henry, Carol J; DellaValle, Diane M; Vandenberg, Albert

    2017-08-11

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is a major human health concern in areas of the world in which diets are often Fe deficient. In the current study, we aimed to identify appropriate methods and optimal dosage for Fe fortification of lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) dal with FeSO₄·7H₂O (ferrous sulphate hepta-hydrate), NaFeEDTA (ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid iron (III) sodium salt) and FeSO₄·H₂O (ferrous sulphate mono-hydrate). We used a colorimetric method to determine the appearance of the dal fortified with fortificants at different Fe concentrations and under different storage conditions. Relative Fe bioavailability was assessed using an in vitro cell culture bioassay. We found that NaFeEDTA was the most suitable fortificant for red lentil dal, and at 1600 ppm, NaFeEDTA provides 13-14 mg of additional Fe per 100 g of dal. Lentil dal sprayed with fortificant solutions, followed by shaking and drying at 75 °C, performed best with respect to drying time and color change. Total Fe and phytic acid concentrations differed significantly between cooked unfortified and fortified lentil, ranging from 68.7 to 238.5 ppm and 7.2 to 8.0 mg g-1, respectively. The relative Fe bioavailability of cooked fortified lentil was increased by 32.2-36.6% compared to unfortified cooked lentil. We conclude that fortification of lentil dal is effective and could provide significant health benefits to dal-consuming populations vulnerable to Fe deficiency.

  8. Current Knowledge in lentil genomics and its application for crop improvement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiv eKumar

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Most of the lentil growing countries face a certain set of abiotic and biotic stresses causing substantial reduction in crop growth, yield, and production. Until-to date, lentil breeders have used conventional plant breeding techniques of selection-recombination-selection cycle to develop improved cultivars. These techniques have been successful in mainstreaming some of the easy-to-manage monogenic traits. However in case of complex quantitative traits, these conventional techniques are less precise. As most of the economic traits are complex, quantitative and often influenced by environments and genotype-environment (GE interaction, the genetic improvement of these traits becomes difficult. Genomics assisted breeding is relatively powerful and fast approach to develop high yielding varieties more suitable to adverse environmental conditions. New tools such as molecular markers and bioinformatics are expected to generate new knowledge and improve our understanding on the genetics of complex traits. In the past, the limited availability of genomic resources in lentil could not allow breeders to employ these tools in mainstream breeding program. The recent application of the Next Generation Sequencing (NGS and Genotyping by sequencing (GBS technologies has facilitated to speed up the lentil genome sequencing project and large discovery of genome-wide SNP markers. Recently, several linkage maps have been developed in lentil through the use of Expressed Sequenced Tag (EST-derived Simple Sequence Repeat (SSR and Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP markers. These maps have emerged as useful genomic resources to identify QTL imparting tolerance to biotic and abiotic stresses in lentil. In this review, the current knowledge on available genomic resources and its application in lentil breeding program are discussed.

  9. Identification of IgE sequential epitopes of lentil (Len c 1) by peptide microarray immunoassay

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vereda, Andrea; Andreae, Doerthe A.; Lin, Jing; Shreffler, Wayne G.; Ibañez, Maria Dolores; Cuesta-Herranz, Javier; Bardina, Luda; Sampson, Hugh A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Lentils are oftentimes responsible for allergic reactions to legumes in Mediterranean children. Though the primary sequence of the major allergen, Len c 1 is known, the location of the IgE binding epitopes remains undefined. Objective We sought to identify IgE-binding epitopes of Len c 1 and relate epitope binding to clinical characteristics. Methods 135 peptides corresponding to the primary sequence of Len c 1 were probed with sera from 33 lentil-allergic individuals and 15 non-atopic controls by means of microarray immunoassay. Lentil-specific IgE, Skin Prick Tests and clinical reactions to lentil were determined. Epitopes were defined as overlapping signal above inter- and intra-slide cut-offs and confirmed by inhibition assays using a peptide from the respective region. Hierarchical clustering of microarray data was used to correlate binding patterns with clinical findings. Results The lentil-allergic patients specifically recognized IgE-binding epitopes located in the C-terminal region, between peptide 107 and 135. Inhibition experiments confirmed the specificity of IgE binding in this region, identifying different epitopes. Linkage of cluster results with clinical data and lentil specific IgE levels displayed a positive correlation between lentil-specific IgE levels, epitope recognition and respiratory symptoms. Modeling based on the three-dimensional structure of a homologous soy vicilin suggests that the Len c 1 epitopes identified are exposed on the surface of the molecule. Conclusion Several IgE-binding sequential epitopes of Len c 1 have been identified. Epitopes are located in the C-terminal region, and are predicted to be exposed on the surface of the protein. Epitope diversity is positively correlated with IgE levels, pointing to a more polyclonal IgE response. PMID:20816193

  10. Evaluation of different intercropping patterns of cumin (Cuminum cyminum L. and lentil (Lens culinaris L. in double crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Rezaei- chiyaneh

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available In order to evaluate the comparison of different intercropping patterns of cumin (Cuminum cyminum L. with lentil (Lens culinaris L. in double crop, a field experiment was conducted based on a randomized complete block design with three replications and eight treatment at the farm located in West Azerbaijan province - city Nagadeh, Iran during growing reason of 2011-2012. Treatments included intra- row intercropping (50% cumin + 50% lentil, row intercropping (one row of lentil + one row of cumin and strip intercropping (two rows of lentil + one rows of cumin, three rows of lentil + one rows of cumin, four rows of lentil + four two of cumin, six rows of lentil + two rows of cumin and pure lentil and cumin. Intercropping patterns had significant effect on all of mentioned traits. Results showed that the highest and the lowest economic yield of lentil were achieved in monoculture with 600 and 1600 kg.ha-1and six rows of lentil + two rows of cumin with 273 and 676 kg.ha-1, respectively. Grain yield and biological yield were no significant differences at monoculture with row intercropping and intra- row intercropping. But with increasing strip widths of grain yield and biological yield decreased by 50 and 54 %, respectively. The essential oil percentage of all treatments was higher than monoculture. The highest essential oil yield was obtained of intra- row intercropping (20 kg.ha-1. Results indicated that maximum (1.8 and minimum (0.94 LER values were obtained of row intercropping and strip intercropping (six rows of lentil + two rows of cumin, respectively. By changing row intercropping patterns to strip intercropping, LER was decreased due to complementary and facilitative effects in intercropping.

  11. Effect of cooking methods on selected physicochemical and nutritional properties of barlotto bean, chickpea, faba bean, and white kidney bean

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Güzel, Demet; Sayar, Sedat

    2012-01-01

    The effects of atmospheric pressure cooking (APC) and high-pressure cooking (HPC) on the physicochemical and nutritional properties of barlotto bean, chickpea, faba bean, and white kidney bean were investigated...

  12. Proanthocyanidin composition in the seed coat of lentils (Lens culinaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dueñas, M; Sun, Baoshan; Hernández, Teresa; Estrella, Isabel; Spranger, M Isabel

    2003-12-31

    Lentils (Lens culinaris L.) are a popular food in many countries. However, little is known about their phenolic composition. Because polyphenols in lentils are located essentially in their seed coat, the objective of this work was to study the composition of proanthocyanidins, the major group of polyphenols, in this part of the tissue. The use of C(18) Sep-Pak cartridges permitted the fractionation of lentil seed coat extract into monomer, oligomer, and polymer proanthocyanidin fractions. Subsequent thiolysis of oligomer and polymer fractions followed by HPLC analysis allowed the mean degree of polymerization (mDP) and the structural composition of proanthocyanidins to be determined. A fractionation of lentil seed coat extracts on a polyamide column followed by HPLC and HPLC-DAD-MS analyses was used to identify the individual proanthocyanidins. The results showed that the major monomeric flavan-3-ol was (+) catechin-3-glucose, with lesser amounts of (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin. In the oligomer fraction, various dimer, trimer, and tetramer proanthocyanidins constituted of catechin, gallocatechin, and catechin gallate units were identified, and several procyanidins and prodelphinidins from pentamers to nonamers constitute the polymer fraction. The most abundant proanthocyanidins in the seed coat of lentils are the polymers (65-75%), with a mDP of 7-9, followed by the oligomers (20-30%), with a mDP of 4-5.

  13. Microencapsulation of canola oil by lentil protein isolate-based wall materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, C; Varankovich, N; Nickerson, M T

    2016-12-01

    The overall goal was to encapsulate canola oil using a mixture of lentil protein isolate and maltodextrin with/without lecithin and/or sodium alginate by spray drying. Initially, emulsion and microcapsule properties as a function of oil (20%-30%), protein (2%-8%) and maltodextrin concentration (9.5%-18%) were characterized by emulsion stability, droplet size, viscosity, surface oil and entrapment efficiency. Microcapsules with 20% oil, 2% protein and 18% maltodextrin were shown to have the highest entrapment efficiency, and selected for further re-design using different preparation conditions and wall ingredients (lentil protein isolate, maltodextrin, lecithin and/or sodium alginate). The combination of the lentil protein, maltodextrin and sodium alginate represented the best wall material to produce microcapsules with the highest entrapment efficiency (∼88%). The lentil protein-maltodextrin-alginate microcapsules showed better oxidative stability and had a stronger wall structure than the lentil protein-maltodextrin microcapsules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Influence of metribuzin on the Rhizobium leguminosarum--lentil (Lens culinaris) symbiosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprout, S L; Nelson, L M; Germida, J J

    1992-04-01

    The effects of the triazine herbicide metribuzin (Sencor) on the lentil (Lens culinaris Medic.) - Rhizobium leguminosarum biovar viciae symbiosis were studied in Leonard jars and growth pouches. Lentils inoculated with Rhizobium leguminosarum strain 128C54 or 128C84, and noninoculated lentils grown in plant nutrient solution supplemented with 5 mM KNO3, had metribuzin applied to the plants at either 8 or 13 days after planting. When sprayed at 8 days, metribuzin had a significant (p less than or equal to 0.05) negative effect on plant weight, number of nodules, taproot growth, and acetylene reduction activity. Five to 10 days after spraying, the plants began to recover from the inhibitory effects. When spraying was delayed to 13 days after planting, metribuzin had little effect on plant growth. The R. leguminosarum strain used as inoculant affected the degree of inhibition of lentil growth and the rate of plant recovery. Less than 0.2% of foliarly applied metribuzin was translocated to the root. Thus the detrimental effects of metribuzin application to lentils were mainly due to direct effects on the plant, which resulted in indirect effects on nodulation and nitrogen fixation.

  15. Urticaria and anaphylaxis in a child after inhalation of lentil vapours: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitaliti, Giovanna; Morselli, Ignazio; Di Stefano, Valeria; Lanzafame, Angela; La Rosa, Mario; Leonardi, Salvatore

    2012-12-13

    Among legumes, lentils seem to be the most common legume implicated in pediatric allergic reactions in the Mediterranean area and India, and usually they start early in life, below 4 years of age. A 22 -month-old child was admitted to our Pediatric Department for anaphylaxis and urticaria. At the age of 9 months she presented a first episode of angioedema and laryngeal obstruction, due to a second assumption of lentils in her diet. At admission we performed routine analyses that were all in the normal range, except for the dosage of specific IgE, that revealed a positive result for lentils. Prick tests too were positive for lentils, while they were all negative for other main food allergens. The child also performed a prick by prick that gave the same positive result (with a wheal of 8 mm of diameter). The child had not previously eaten lentils and other legumes, but her pathological anamnesis highlighted that the allergic reaction appeared soon after the inhalation of cooking lentil vapours when the child entered the kitchen Therefore a diagnosis of lentils vapours allergy was made. Our case shows the peculiarity of a very early onset. In literature there are no data on episodes of anaphylaxis in so young children, considering that our child was already on lentils exclusion diet. Therefore a diet of exclusion does not absolutely preserve patients from allergic reactions, that can develop also after their cooking steams inhalation.

  16. Urticaria and anaphilaxis in a child after inhalation of lentils vapours: a case report and literature review

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    Background Among legumes, lentils seem to be the most common legume implicated in pediatric allergic reactions in the Mediterranean area and India, and usually they start early in life, below 4 years of age. Case report A 22 -month-old child was admitted to our Pediatric Department for anaphylaxis and urticaria. At the age of 9 months she presented a first episode of angioedema and laryngeal obstruction, due to a second assumption of lentils in her diet. At admission we performed routine analyses that were all in the normal range, except for the dosage of specific IgE, that revealed a positive result for lentils. Prick tests too were positive for lentils, while they were all negative for other main food allergens. The child also performed a prick by prick that gave the same positive result (with a wheal of 8 mm of diameter). The child had not previously eaten lentils and other legumes, but her pathological anamnesis highlighted that the allergic reaction appeared soon after the inhalation of cooking lentil vapours when the child entered the kitchen Therefore a diagnosis of lentils vapours allergy was made. Conclusions Our case shows the peculiarity of a very early onset. In literature there are no data on episodes of anaphylaxis in so young children, considering that our child was already on lentils exclusion diet. Therefore a diet of exclusion does not absolutely preserve patients from allergic reactions, that can develop also after their cooking steams inhalation. PMID:23237421

  17. Urticaria and anaphilaxis in a child after inhalation of lentils vapours: a case report and literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vitaliti Giovanna

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Among legumes, lentils seem to be the most common legume implicated in pediatric allergic reactions in the Mediterranean area and India, and usually they start early in life, below 4 years of age. Case report A 22 -month-old child was admitted to our Pediatric Department for anaphylaxis and urticaria. At the age of 9 months she presented a first episode of angioedema and laryngeal obstruction, due to a second assumption of lentils in her diet. At admission we performed routine analyses that were all in the normal range, except for the dosage of specific IgE, that revealed a positive result for lentils. Prick tests too were positive for lentils, while they were all negative for other main food allergens. The child also performed a prick by prick that gave the same positive result (with a wheal of 8 mm of diameter. The child had not previously eaten lentils and other legumes, but her pathological anamnesis highlighted that the allergic reaction appeared soon after the inhalation of cooking lentil vapours when the child entered the kitchen Therefore a diagnosis of lentils vapours allergy was made. Conclusions Our case shows the peculiarity of a very early onset. In literature there are no data on episodes of anaphylaxis in so young children, considering that our child was already on lentils exclusion diet. Therefore a diet of exclusion does not absolutely preserve patients from allergic reactions, that can develop also after their cooking steams inhalation.

  18. Lentil (Lens culinaris L) as a candidate crop for iron biofortification: Is there a genetic potential for iron bioavailability?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iron (Fe) deficiency is the most prevalent nutrient deficiency worldwide. Biofortification of staple food crops, such as the lentil (Lens culinaris L.), may be an effective solution. We analyzed the iron (Fe) concentration, Fe bioavailability, and phytic acid (PA) concentration of 23 lentil genotype...

  19. Molecular characterization of genetic variation related to pea enation mosaic virus resistance in lentil (Lens culinaris Medik)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Identification of genetically diverse lentil germplasm with resistance to pea enation mosaic virus (PEMV) through combined approach of molecular marker analysis and phenotyping could prove useful in breeding programs. A total of 44 lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) accessions, were screened for resista...

  20. Nutritional Impacts of Saskatchewan Grown Lentils (Lens culinaris L) Feeding on Samples of Healthy and Clinical Children in Sri Lanka

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canadian grown Lentil is a rich source of micronutrients. It has high levels of selenium (Se), iron (Fe), zinc (Zn), folic acid and carotenes (Thavarajah, et al., 2007; 2008, 2009, Wilmot et al., 2009). In addition, our latest finding shows that Canadian lentil has naturally low levels of antinutri...

  1. Effect of domestic cooking on carotenoids, tocopherols, fatty acids, phenolics, and antioxidant activities of lentils (Lens culinaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing; Deng, Zeyuan; Tang, Yao; Chen, Peter X; Liu, Ronghua; Ramdath, D Dan; Liu, Qiang; Hernandez, Marta; Tsao, Rong

    2014-12-31

    The phytochemicals and antioxidant activity in lipophilic and hydrophilic (extractable and bound) fractions of lentils before and after domestic cooking were investigated. The hydrophilic fractions in lentils contributed much more to the antioxidant activity than the lipophilic fraction. The phenolic content of lentils was mainly composed of extractable compounds. Significant changes (P lentils before and after cooking. More specifically, cooking was found to favor the release of carotenoids and tocopherols and flavonols (kaempferol glycosides), but led to losses of flavanols (monomeric and condensed tannin). Whereas reduced flavanols and other phenolic compounds may have negatively affected the antioxidant activity, other components, especially the lipophilic antioxidants, were increased. The present study suggests that incorporation of cooked lentils into the diet will not cause significant loss to the phytochemical antioxidants and thus will retain the potential health benefits.

  2. Profiling the Phenolic Compounds of the Four Major Seed Coat Types and Their Relation to Color Genes in Lentil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirali, Mahla; Purves, Randy W; Vandenberg, Albert

    2017-05-26

    Phenolic compounds can provide antioxidant health benefits for humans, and foods such as lentils can be valuable dietary sources of different subclasses of these secondary metabolites. This study used LC-MS analyses to compare the phenolic profiles of lentil genotypes with four seed coat background colors (green, gray, tan, and brown) and two cotyledon colors (red and yellow) grown at two locations. The mean area ratio per mg sample (MARS) values of various phenolic compounds in lentil seeds varied with the different seed coat colors conferred by specific genotypes. Seed coats of lentil genotypes with the homozygous recessive tgc allele (green and gray seed coats) had higher MARS values of flavan-3-ols, proanthocyanidins, and some flavonols. This suggests lentils featuring green and gray seed coats might be more promising as health-promoting foods.

  3. Detecting DNA polymorphism and genetic diversity in Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) germplasm: comparison of ISSR and DAMD marker.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seyedimoradi, Hiva; Talebi, Reza

    2014-10-01

    Genetic diversity and interrelationships among 31 lentil genotypes were evaluated using 10 Inter-Simple Sequence Repeat (ISSR) and 10 directed amplification of minisatellite DNA region (DAMD) primers. A total of 43 and 48 polymorphic bands were amplified by ISSR and DAMD markers, respectively. Average polymorphism information content (PIC) for ISSR and DAMD markers were 0.37 and 0.41, respectively. All 31 lentil genotypes could be distinguished by ISSR markers into three groups and by DAMD markers into two groups. Various molecular markers show a different efficiency for evaluating DNA polymorphism in lentil and indicate that the patterns of variation are clearly influenced by the genetic marker used. Comparatively, the genetic diversity of examined lentil genotypes by two different marker techniques (ISSR and DAMD) was high and indicated that ISSR and DAMD are effective and promising marker systems for fingerprinting in lentil and give useful information on its genetic relationships.

  4. Bean [alpha]-Amylase Inhibitor Confers Resistance to the Pea Weevil (Bruchus pisorum) in Transgenic Peas (Pisum sativum L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, H. E.; Gollasch, S.; Moore, A.; Tabe, L. M.; Craig, S.; Hardie, D. C.; Chrispeels, M. J.; Spencer, D.; Higgins, TJV.

    1995-04-01

    Bruchid larvae cause major losses of grain legume crops through-out the world. Some bruchid species, such as the cowpea weevil and the azuki bean weevil, are pests that damage stored seeds. Others, such as the pea weevil (Bruchus pisorum), attack the crop growing in the field. We transferred the cDNA encoding the [alpha]-amylase inhibitor ([alpha]-AI) found in the seeds of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) into pea (Pisum sativum) using Agrobacterium-mediated transformation. Expression was driven by the promoter of phytohemagglutinin, another bean seed protein. The [alpha]-amylase inhibitor gene was stably expressed in the transgenic pea seeds at least to the T5 seed generation, and [alpha]-AI accumulated in the seeds up to 3% of soluble protein. This level is somewhat higher than that normally found in beans, which contain 1 to 2% [alpha]-AI. In the T5 seed generation the development of pea weevil larvae was blocked at an early stage. Seed damage was minimal and seed yield was not significantly reduced in the transgenic plants. These results confirm the feasibility of protecting other grain legumes such as lentils, mungbean, groundnuts, and chickpeas against a variety of bruchids using the same approach. Although [alpha]-AI also inhibits human [alpha]-amylase, cooked peas should not have a negative impact on human energy metabolism.

  5. Antioxidant Activity of a Red Lentil Extract and Its Fractions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ronald B. Pegg

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Phenolic compounds were extracted from red lentil seeds using 80% (v/v aqueous acetone. The crude extract was applied to a Sephadex LH-20 column. Fraction 1, consisting of sugars and low-molecular-weight phenolics, was eluted from the column by ethanol. Fraction 2, consisting of tannins, was obtained using acetone-water (1:1; v/v as the mobile phase. Phenolic compounds present in the crude extract and its fractions demonstrated antioxidant and antiradical activities as revealed from studies using a β-carotene-linoleate model system, the total antioxidant activity (TAA method, the DPPH radical-scavenging activity assay, and a reducing power evaluation. Results of these assays showed the highest values when tannins (fraction 2 were tested. For instance, the TAA of the tannin fraction was 5.85 μmol Trolox® eq./mg, whereas the crude extract and fraction 1 showed 0.68 and 0.33 μmol Trolox® eq./mg, respectively. The content of total phenolics in fraction 2 was the highest (290 mg/g; the tannin content, determined using the vanillin method and expressed as absorbance units at 500 nm per 1 g, was 129. There were 24 compounds identified in the crude extract using an HPLC-ESI-MS method: quercetin diglycoside, catechin, digallate procyanidin, and p-hydroxybenzoic were the dominant phenolics in the extract.

  6. Antioxidant Activity of a Red Lentil Extract and Its Fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amarowicz, Ryszard; Estrella, Isabell; Hernández, Teresa; Dueñas, Montserrat; Troszyńska, Agnieszka; Agnieszka, Kosińska; Pegg, Ronald B.

    2009-01-01

    Phenolic compounds were extracted from red lentil seeds using 80% (v/v) aqueous acetone. The crude extract was applied to a Sephadex LH-20 column. Fraction 1, consisting of sugars and low-molecular-weight phenolics, was eluted from the column by ethanol. Fraction 2, consisting of tannins, was obtained using acetone-water (1:1; v/v) as the mobile phase. Phenolic compounds present in the crude extract and its fractions demonstrated antioxidant and antiradical activities as revealed from studies using a β-carotene-linoleate model system, the total antioxidant activity (TAA) method, the DPPH radical-scavenging activity assay, and a reducing power evaluation. Results of these assays showed the highest values when tannins (fraction 2) were tested. For instance, the TAA of the tannin fraction was 5.85 μmol Trolox® eq./mg, whereas the crude extract and fraction 1 showed 0.68 and 0.33 μmol Trolox® eq./mg, respectively. The content of total phenolics in fraction 2 was the highest (290 mg/g); the tannin content, determined using the vanillin method and expressed as absorbance units at 500 nm per 1 g, was 129. There were 24 compounds identified in the crude extract using an HPLC-ESI-MS method: quercetin diglycoside, catechin, digallate procyanidin, and p-hydroxybenzoic were the dominant phenolics in the extract. PMID:20054484

  7. Assessment of Freezing Tolerance in Lentil Genotypes (Lens culinaris by Electrolyte Leakage Index

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A Nezami

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Lentil (Lens culinaris. Medik is one of the major cool season pulse crops which could suffer damage under severe cold. Some physiological parameters such as electrolyte leakage (EL have been used to assess the response of crops to cold conditions. in order to evaluate the possibility of using the EL index for assessing the freezing tolerance of lentil genotypes, a factorial experiment carried out with seven lentil genotypes (MLC7, MLC60, MLC185, MLC225, MLC357, Ghazvin and Robat and nine freezing temperatures (0, -3, -6, -9, -12, -15, -18, -21 and -24oC on the base of completely randomized design with three replications on the fall 2008. Results showed that, in all genotypes, EL was increased with decreasing the temperature, and there was significantly difference (P

  8. Does overhead irrigation with salt affect growth, yield, and phenolic content of lentil plants?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giannakoula Anastasia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Overhead irrigation of lentil plants with salt (100 mM NaCl did not have any significant impact on plant growth, while chlorophyll content and chlorophyll fluorescence parameter Fv/Fm were affected. Under such poor irrigation water quality, the malondialdehyde content in leaves was increased due to the lipid peroxidation of membranes. In seeds, the total phenolic content (TPC was correlated to their total antioxidant capacity (TAC. High performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS detection showed that flavonoids (catechin, epicatechin, rutin, p-coumaric acid, quercetin, kaempferol, gallic acid and resveratrol appear to be the compounds with the greatest influence on the TAC values. Catechin is the most abundant phenolic compound in lentil seeds. Overhead irrigation with salt reduced the concentration of almost all phenolic compounds analyzed from lentil seed extracts.

  9. Influence of thermal processing on IgE reactivity to lentil and chickpea proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrado, Carmen; Cabanillas, Beatriz; Pedrosa, Mercedes M; Varela, Alejandro; Guillamón, Eva; Muzquiz, Mercedes; Crespo, Jesús F; Rodriguez, Julia; Burbano, Carmen

    2009-11-01

    In the last years, legume proteins are gaining importance as food ingredients because of their nutraceutical properties. However, legumes are also considered relevant in the development of food allergies through ingestion. Peanuts and soybeans are important food allergens in Western countries, while lentil and chickpea allergy are more relevant in the Mediterranean area. Information about the effects of thermal-processing procedures at various temperatures and conditions is scarce; therefore, the effect of these procedures on legume allergenic properties is not defined so far. The SDS-PAGE and IgE-immunoblotting patterns of chickpeas and lentils were analyzed before and after boiling (up to 60 min) and autoclaving (1.2 and 2.6 atm, up to 30 min). The results indicated that some of these treatments reduce IgE binding to lentil and chickpea, the most important being harsh autoclaving. However, several extremely resistant immunoreactive proteins still remained in these legumes even after this extreme treatment.

  10. Effect of maize density, bean cultivar and bean spatial arrangement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    On-farm trials to determine the optimum combination of maize (Zea mays L.) density, bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivar and bean spatial arrangement to produce high yields of the intercrop combination were conducted in Chinyika Resettlement Area (CRA) and at Domboshava Training Centre (DTC) during the 1996/97 ...

  11. Will selenium increase lentil (Lens culinaris Medik) yield and seed quality?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavarajah, Dil; Thavarajah, Pushparajah; Vial, Eric; Gebhardt, Mary; Lacher, Craig; Kumar, Shiv; Combs, Gerald F

    2015-01-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik), a nutritious traditional pulse crop, has been experiencing a declining area of production in South East Asia, due to lower yields, and marginal soils. The objective of this study was to determine whether selenium (Se) fertilization can increase lentil yield, productivity, and seed quality (both seed Se concentration and speciation). Selenium was provided to five lentil accessions as selenate or selenite by foliar or soil application at rates of 0, 10, 20, or 30 kg Se/ha and the resulting lentil biomass, grain yield, seed Se concentration, and Se speciation was determined. Seed Se concentration was measured using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES) after acid digestion. Seed Se speciation was measured using ICP-mass spectrometry with a high performance liquid chromatography (ICP-MS-LC) system. Foliar application of Se significantly increased lentil biomass (5586 vs. 7361 kg/ha), grain yield (1732 vs. 2468 kg /ha), and seed Se concentrations (0.8 vs. 2.4 μg/g) compared to soil application. In general, both application methods and both forms of Se increased concentrations of organic Se forms (selenocysteine and selenomethionine) in lentil seeds. Not surprisingly, the high yielding CDC Redberry had the highest levels of biomass and grain yield of all varieties evaluated. Eston, ILL505, and CDC Robin had the greatest responses to Se fertilization with respect to both grain yield, seed Se concentration and speciation; thus, use of these varieties in areas with low-Se soils might require Se fertilization to reach yield potentials.

  12. Integrated management of foot rot of lentil using biocontrol agents under field condition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, M A; Hasan, M M; Hossain, I; Rahman, S M E; Ismail, Alhazmi Mohammed; Oh, Deog-Hwan

    2012-07-01

    The efficacy of cowdung, Bangladesh Institute of Nuclear Agriculture (BINA)-biofertilizer, and Bangladesh Agricultural University (BAU)-biofungicide, alone or in combination, was evaluated for controlling foot rot disease of lentil. The results exhibited that BINA-biofertilizer and BAUbiofungicide (peat soil-based Rhizobium leguminosarum and black gram bran-based Trichoderma harzianum) are compatible and have combined effects in controlling the pathogenic fungi Fusarium oxysporum and Sclerotium rolfsii, which cause the root rot of lentil. Cowdung mixing with soil (at 5 t/ha) during final land preparation and seed coating with BINA-biofertilizer and BAU-biofungicide (at 2.5% of seed weight) before sowing recorded 81.50% field emergence of lentil, which showed up to 19.85% higher field emergence over the control. Post-emergence deaths of plants due to foot rot disease were significantly reduced after combined seed treatment with BINA-biofertilizer and BAU-biofungicide. Among the treatments used, only BAU-biofungicide as the seed treating agent resulted in higher plant stand (84.82%). Use of BINA-biofertilizer and BAU-biofungicide as seed treating biocontrol agents and application of cowdung in the soil as an organic source of nutrient resulted in higher shoot and root lengths, and dry shoot and root weights of lentil. BINA-biofertilizer significantly increased the number of nodules per plant and nodules weight of lentil. Seeds treating with BAUbiofungicide and BINA-biofertilizer and soil amendment with cowdung increased the biomass production of lentil up to 75.56% over the control.

  13. Will selenium increase lentil (Lens culinaris Medik yield and seed quality?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dil eThavarajah

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik, a nutritious traditional pulse crop, has been experiencing a declining area of production in South East Asia, due to lower yields and marginal soils. The objective of this study was to determine whether selenium (Se fertilization can increase lentil yield, productivity, and seed quality (both seed Se concentration and speciation. Selenium was provided to five lentil accessions as selenate or selenite by foliar or soil application at rates of 0, 10, 20, or 30 kg Se/ha and the resulting lentil biomass, grain yield, seed Se concentration, and Se speciation was determined. Seed Se concentration was measured using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry (ICP-OES after acid digestion. Seed Se speciation was measured using ICP-mass spectrometry with a high performance liquid chromatography (ICP-MS-LC system. Foliar application of Se significantly increased lentil biomass (5586 vs. 7361 kg/ha, grain yield (1732 vs. 2468 kg /ha, and seed Se concentrations (0.8 vs. 2.4 µg/g compared to soil application. In general, both application methods and both forms of Se increased concentrations of organic Se forms (selenocysteine and selenomethionine in lentil seeds. Not surprisingly, the high yielding CDC Redberry had the highest levels of biomass and grain yield of all varieties evaluated. Eston, ILL505, and CDC Robin had the greatest responses to Se fertilization with respect to both grain yield, seed Se concentration and speciation; thus, use of these varieties in areas with low-Se soils might require Se fertilization to reach yield potentials.

  14. Combined application of Artificial Neural Networks and life cycle assessment in lentil farming in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behzad Elhami

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an Artificial Neural Network (ANN was applied to model yield and environmental emissions from lentil cultivation in Esfahan province of Iran. Data was gathered from lentil farmers using face to face questionnaire method during 2014–2015 cropping season. Life cycle assessment (LCA was applied to investigate the environmental impact categories associated with lentil production. Based on the results, total energy input, energy output to input ratio and energy productivity were determined to be 32,970.10 MJ ha−1, 0.902 and 0.06 kg MJ−1, respectively. The greatest amount of energy consumption was attributed to chemical fertilizer (42.76%. Environmental analysis indicated that the acidification potential was higher than other environmental impact categories in lentil production system. Also results showed that the production of agricultural machinery was the main hotspot in abiotic depletion, eutrophication, global warming, human toxicity, fresh water aquatic ecotoxicity, marine aquatic ecotoxicity and terrestrial ecotoxicity impact categories, while direct emissions associated with lentil cultivation was the main hotspot in acidification potential and photochemical oxidation potential. In addition, diesel fuel was the main hotspot only in ozone layer depletion. The ANN model with 9-10-6-11 structure was identified as the most appropriate network for predicting yield and related environmental impact categories of lentil cultivation. Overall, the results of sensitivity analysis revealed that farmyard manure had the greatest effect on the most of the environmental impacts, while machinery was the most affecting parameter on the yield of the crop.

  15. Considering the Physicochemical and Sensorial Properties of Momtaze Hamburgers Containing Lentil and Chickpea Seed Flour

    OpenAIRE

    Amir Motamedi; Marzieh Vahdani; Homa Baghaei; Monire Alsadat Borghei

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives: The food product known as the ‘hamburger’ plays a crucial role in people’s nutrition and the diversity of the food they consume. The reasons for our study include the area under cultivation, the remarkable amount of protein in chickpeas and lentils, as well as the public interest in tending to meat products, especially hamburgers. Materials and Methods: In this study, beef burgers were combined with chickpea flour and lentil flour at 4%, 8% and 12% levels. We eva...

  16. Effect of Indole-3-Butyric Acid on in vitro Root Development in Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.)

    OpenAIRE

    Khawar, Khalid Mahmood; ÖZCAN, Sebahattin

    2002-01-01

    Lentil is an important crop of the family Leguminosae and is notoriously recalcitrant to rooting in vitro. Shoots of cultivar \\"Ali Dayı\\" of lentil obtained after culturing seeds for 10 days on MS medium were isolated and rooted on MS medium containing indole-3-butyric acid (IBA) at concentrations of 0.25, 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0 mg/l. The primary response was obtained after 4 weeks; 0.25 mg/l IBA gave the best results, with a rooting percentage of 25%, mean number of 7.87 roots...

  17. Faba bean in cropping systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Steen Jensen, Erik; Peoples, Mark B.; Hauggaard-Nielsen, Henrik

    2010-01-01

    The grain legume (pulse) faba bean (Vicia faba L.) is grown world-wide as a protein source for food and feed. At the same time faba bean offers ecosystem services such as renewable inputs of nitrogen (N) into crops and soil via biological N2 fixation, and a diversification of cropping systems. Even...... though the global average grain yield has almost doubled during the past 50 years the total area sown to faba beans has declined by 56% over the same period. The season-to-season fluctuations in grain yield of faba bean and the progressive replacement of traditional farming systems, which utilized...... legumes to provide N to maintain soil N fertility, with industrialized, largely cereal-based systems that are heavily reliant upon fossil fuels (=N fertilizers, heavy mechanization) are some of the explanations for this decline in importance. Past studies of faba bean in cropping systems have tended...

  18. Effect of processing on the in vitro and in vivo protein quality of red and green lentils (Lens culinaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nosworthy, Matthew G; Medina, Gerardo; Franczyk, Adam J; Neufeld, Jason; Appah, Paulyn; Utioh, Alphonsus; Frohlich, Peter; House, James D

    2018-02-01

    In order to determine the effect of extrusion, baking and cooking on the protein quality of red and green lentils, a rodent bioassay was conducted and compared to an in vitro method of protein quality determination. On average, the Protein Digestibility-Corrected Amino Acid Score of red lentils (55.0) was higher than that of green lentils (50.8). Extruded lentil flour had higher scores (63.01 red, 57.09 green) than either cooked (57.40 red, 52.92 green) or baked (53.84 red, 47.14 green) flours. The average Digestible Indispensable Amino Acid Score of red lentils (0.54) was higher than green lentils (0.49). The Protein Efficiency Ratio of the extruded lentil flours (1.30 red, 1.34 green) was higher than that of the baked flour (0.98 red, 1.09 green). A correlation was found between in vivo and in vitro methods of determining protein digestibility (R2=0.8934). This work could influence selection of processing method during product development. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Effect of germination time on proximate analysis, bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity of lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) sprouts

    OpenAIRE

    A. Ahmed Fouad; Ali Rehab, F. M.

    2015-01-01

    Background. The lentil plant, Lens culinaris L., is a member of the Leguminoceae family and constitutes one of the most important traditional dietary components. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effects of sprouting for 3, 4, 5 and 6 days on proximate, bioactive compounds and antioxidative characteristics of lentil (Lens culinaris) sprouts. Material and methods. Lentil seeds were soaked in distilled water (1:10, w/v) for 12 h at room temperature (~25°C), then ke...

  20. Nutritional Profile and Carbohydrate Characterization of Spray-Dried Lentil, Pea and Chickpea Ingredients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosh, Susan M; Farnworth, Edward R; Brummer, Yolanda; Duncan, Alison M; Wright, Amanda J; Boye, Joyce I; Marcotte, Michèle; Benali, Marzouk

    2013-07-25

    Although many consumers know that pulses are nutritious, long preparation times are frequently a barrier to consumption of lentils, dried peas and chickpeas. Therefore, a product has been developed which can be used as an ingredient in a wide variety of dishes without presoaking or precooking. Dried green peas, chickpeas or lentils were soaked, cooked, homogenized and spray-dried. Proximate analyses were conducted on the pulse powders and compared to an instant mashed potato product. Because the health benefits of pulses may be due in part to their carbohydrate content, a detailed carbohydrate analysis was carried out on the pulse powders. Pulse powders were higher in protein and total dietary fibre and lower in starch than potato flakes. After processing, the pulse powders maintained appreciable amounts of resistant starch (4.4%-5.2%). Total dietary fibre was higher in chickpeas and peas (26.2% and 27.1% respectively) than lentils (21.9%), whereas lentils had the highest protein content (22.7%). Pulse carbohydrates were rich in glucose, arabinose, galactose and uronic acids. Stachyose, a fermentable fibre, was the most abundant oligosaccharide, making up 1.5%-2.4% of the dried pulse powders. Spray-drying of cooked, homogenized pulses produces an easy to use ingredient with strong nutritional profile.

  1. Transcriptome analyses of Sclerotinia sclerotiorum infecting chickpea and lentil using RNA sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclerotinia sclerotiorum causes white mold of many important crops. To elucidate its pathogenic mechanisms, transcriptome analyses were used to study its interactions with chickpea and lentil. Five mRNA libraries were constructed from S. sclertiorum (strain WM-A1), healthy chickpea (cv. Spansih Whit...

  2. Assessment of genetic diversity in lentils (Lens culinaris Medik.) based on SNPs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basheer-Salimia, R; Camilli, B; Scacchi, S; Noli, E; Awad, M

    2015-06-01

    This study is the first attempt to establish an SNP database for the purpose of estimating the genetic diversity and relatedness of Palestinian lentil genotypes. A total of 14 lentil accessions (11 local, two supplied by ICARDA, and one introduced from Italy) were investigated. By sequencing two genes, lectin and lipid transfer protein 5 (LTP5), four SNPs were detected (three in the first and one in latter gene) with average frequencies of one SNP every 228 and 578 bp, respectively. In addition, in LTP5 two single-nucleotide indels were observed in the non-coding part of the gene. Four haplotypes were identified in the lectin gene, three in LTP5. One lectin haplotype coincided with that present in GenBank belonging to two cultivated varieties, two were rather similar to this, whereas the last one turned out closer to the sequence of one wild lentil accession, indicating the existence of diversity in the Palestinian germplasm. These results, enhancing the available knowledge of lentil genetic resources in Palestine, may contribute to their conservation and utilization in breeding projects.

  3. The proteome of lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) seeds: discriminating between landraces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scippa, Gabriella Stefania; Rocco, Mariapina; Ialicicco, Manuela; Trupiano, Dalila; Viscosi, Vincenzo; Di Michele, Michela; Arena, Simona; Chiatante, Donato; Scaloni, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is one of the most ancient crops of the Mediterranean region used for human nutrition; an extensive differentiation of L. culinaris over millennia has resulted in a number of different landraces. As a consequence of environmental and socio-economic issues, the disappearance of many of them occurred in more recent times. To investigate the potential of proteomics as a tool in phylogenetic studies, testing the possibility to identify specific markers of different plant landraces, 2-D gel electrophoretic maps of mature seeds were obtained from seven lentil populations belonging to a local ecotype (Capracotta) and five commercial varieties (Turca Rossa, Canadese, Castelluccio di Norcia, Rascino and Colfiorito). 2-DE analysis resolved hundreds of protein species in each lentil sample, among which only 122 were further identified by MALDI-TOF PMF and/or nanoLC-ESI-LIT-MS/MS, probably as a result of the poor information available on L. culinaris genome. A comparison of these maps revealed that 103 protein spots were differentially expressed within and between populations. The multivariate statistical analyses carried out on these variably expressed spots showed that 24 protein species were essential for population discrimination, thus determining their proposition as landrace markers. Besides providing the first reference map of mature lentil seeds, our data confirm previous studies based on morphological/genetic observations and further support the valuable use of proteomic techniques as phylogenetic tool in plant studies.

  4. The development of meat pate with increased the food and biological values with germinated grains lentils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. V. Antipova

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the important technological trends in food production, balanced on the chemical and amino acid composition is the development of methods for enrichment product protein, vitamins and minerals. The solution to this problem has long been used a method of enrichment of vegetable raw materials to create a nutrient and healthy products available to different social groups. In theory justified the choice of research object – lentils, which have a number of advantages in food systems. Analyzed method of increasing the biological value of the object in the process of germination grains and marked improvement the balance of amino acid composition. Designed meat pate with using germination grains and investigated its main functional-technological (FTC, organoleptic properties and digestibility. In determining, the functional-technological characteristics revealed an increase in FTC-indicators, such as water binding, water holding, fat holding, and emulsifying ability when you add germination lentils. According to the results of organoleptic evaluation revealed improvement in the consistency of meat pate, when replacing 50% of raw meat, germination lentils, and in appearance, color, smell and taste, control and test products are almost identical. The digestibility of the paste was 97%. Proposed different options of using germination grains of lentils to create a products for public and preventive nutrition.

  5. Novel flavonol glycosides from the aerial parts of lentil (Lens culinaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Żuchowski, Jerzy; Pecio, Łukasz; Stochmal, Anna

    2014-11-06

    While the phytochemical composition of lentil (Lens culinaris) seeds is well described in scientific literature, there is very little available data about secondary metabolites from lentil leaves and stems. Our research reveals that the aerial parts of lentil are a rich source of flavonoids. Six kaempferol and twelve quercetin glycosides were isolated, their structures were elucidated using NMR spectroscopy and chemical methods. This group includes 16 compounds which have not been previously described in the scientific literature: quercetin 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl(1→2)-β-D-galactopyranoside-7-O-β-D-glucuropyranoside (1), kaempferol 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl(1→2)-β-D-galacto-pyranoside-7-O-β-D-glucuropyranoside (3), their derivatives 4-10,12-15,17,18 acylated with caffeic, p-coumaric, ferulic, or 3,4,5-trihydroxycinnamic acid and kaempferol 3-O-{[(6-O-E-p-coumaroyl)-β-D-glucopyranosyl(1→2)]-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl(1→6)}-β-D-galactopyranoside-7-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside (11). Their DPPH scavenging activity was also evaluated. This is probably the first detailed description of flavonoids from the aerial parts of lentil.

  6. Lentil and Kale: Complementary Nutrient-Rich Whole Food Sources to Combat Micronutrient and Calorie Malnutrition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliozzi, Megan; Thavarajah, Dil; Thavarajah, Pushparajah; Smith, Powell

    2015-01-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is a nutritious food and a staple for millions of people. Not only are lentils a good source of energy, they also contain a range of micronutrients and prebiotic carbohydrates. Kale (Brassica oleracea v. acephala) has been considered as a health food, but its full range of benefits and composition has not been extensively studied. Recent studies suggest that foods are enrich in prebiotic carbohydrates and dietary fiber that can potentially reduce risks of non-communicable diseases, including obesity, cancer, heart disease, and diabetes. Lentil and kale added to a cereal-based diet would enhance intakes of essential minerals and vitamins to combat micronutrient malnutrition. This review provides an overview of lentil and kale as a complementary nutrient-rich whole food source to combat global malnutrition and calorie issues. In addition, prebiotic carbohydrate profiles and the genetic potential of these crops for further micronutrient enrichment are briefly discussed with respect to developing sustainable and nutritious food systems. PMID:26569296

  7. Selenium fertilization on lentil (Lens culinaris Medikus) grain yield, seed selenium concentration, and antioxidant activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenium (Se) is an essential element for mammals but has not been considered as an essential element for higher plants. Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is a cool season food legume rich in protein and a range of micronutrients including minerals (iron and zinc), folates, and carotenoids. The objecti...

  8. Variation for seed minerals and protein concentrations in diverse germplasm of lentil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentil (Lens culinaris) is an important food legume that can provide significant amounts of dietary minerals and other essential nutrients to humans. To understand the nutritional diversity that exists within this species, we measured seed mineral and protein concentrations in 350 diverse accessions...

  9. First report of root rot of lentil caused by Aphanomyces euteiches in Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    In June 2008, apparently diseased lentil plants (Lens culinaris L. cv. Crimson) were observed in a production field in Kendrick, ID. Symptoms included stunting, leaf chlorosis, reddening of abaxial leaf surfaces, browning of entire root systems and root necrosis. Roots of symptomatic plants were sur...

  10. Evaluation of the hypocholesterolemic effect and prebiotic activity of a lentil (Lens culinaris Medik) extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micioni Di Bonaventura, Maria Vittoria; Cecchini, Cinzia; Vila-Donat, Pilar; Caprioli, Giovanni; Cifani, Carlo; Coman, Maria Magdalena; Cresci, Alberto; Fiorini, Dennis; Ricciutelli, Massimo; Silvi, Stefania; Vittori, Sauro; Sagratini, Gianni

    2017-11-01

    The aim of our work was to produce a hydroalcoholic extract of lentils and to examine (a) the hypocholesterolemic action in an animal model, by studying the plasma cholesterol level and the concentration of bile acids in the feces; (b) the potential prebiotic effect, by conducting an in vitro culture fermentation experiment and assessing the level of SCFAs in the feces of rats. Lentil extract (LE) was obtained by extracting lentils with a solution of H2 0/EtOH (70/30 v/v) for 3 h, and the content of main nutrients was determined. After 71 days of diet-induced hypercholesterolemia in rats, LE reduced the cholesterol level of rats of 16.8% (p < 0.05) and increased the level of bile acids in the feces of rats (p < 0.01). LE revealed the same prebiotic activity of inulin and good bifidogenic activity, inasmuch as it enhanced the growth of Bifidobacterium spp. by 3 log (p < 0.05). The concentration of SCFAs in the feces of rats fed with LE increased during the time of the study. This new hydroalcoholic extract obtained from lentils was shown to possess hypocholesterolemic and prebiotic properties, and could have interesting applications in the field of nutraceuticals. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  11. Inheritance and linkage map positions of genes conferring resistance to stemphylium blight in lentil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stemphylium blight (caused by Stemphylium botryosum Wallr.) is one of the major diseases of lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) in South Asia and North America. The objective of the study was to identify linkage map position of the genes conferring resistance to stemphylium blight and the markers linked ...

  12. Generation and Characterisation of a Reference Transcriptome for Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudheesh, Shimna; Verma, Preeti; Forster, John W; Cogan, Noel O I; Kaur, Sukhjiwan

    2016-11-12

    RNA-Seq using second-generation sequencing technologies permits generation of a reference unigene set for a given species, in the absence of a well-annotated genome sequence, supporting functional genomics studies, gene characterisation and detailed expression analysis for specific morphophysiological or environmental stress response traits. A reference unigene set for lentil has been developed, consisting of 58,986 contigs and scaffolds with an N50 length of 1719 bp. Comparison to gene complements from related species, reference protein databases, previously published lentil transcriptomes and a draft genome sequence validated the current dataset in terms of degree of completeness and utility. A large proportion (98%) of unigenes were expressed in more than one tissue, at varying levels. Candidate genes associated with mechanisms of tolerance to both boron toxicity and time of flowering were identified, which can eventually be used for the development of gene-based markers. This study has provided a comprehensive, assembled and annotated reference gene set for lentil that can be used for multiple applications, permitting identification of genes for pathway-specific expression analysis, genetic modification approaches, development of resources for genotypic analysis, and assistance in the annotation of a future lentil genome sequence.

  13. Iron bioavailability of rats fed liver, lentil, spinach and their mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rewashdeh, Abdullah Y; El-Qudah, Jafar M; Al-Dmoor, Hanee; Al-Qudah, Maisa M; Mamkagh, Amer M; Tarawneh, Khaled A; Hawari, Azmi D; Dababneh, Basem F; Al-Bakheit, Alaa A; Haddad, Moawya A

    2009-02-15

    To study the effects of dietary iron source (basal diet-FeSO4 x 7H2O, liver, lentil, spinach, liver + lentil, liver+spinach and lentil+spinach) on iron bioavailability, fifty-six Albino Sprague Dawley derived male 21 days old rats were fed on iron-deficient diet (7.8 mg Fe kg(-1) diet) and the mentioned seven iron containing diets (40 mg Fe kg(-1) diet) for 10 days. Rats fed liver diet showed higher iron apparent absorption (52.1%), hemoglobin (Hb) gain (0.94 g/100 mL), Hb-iron gain (1.2 mg), Hb-regeneration efficiency (HRE%) (50.8%), relative efficiency of HRE% (106.5%), packed cell volume gain (2.22%) and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration (0.64 g dL(-1)). Liver resulted in an increase in these parameters when mixed with lentil and spinach diets. However, rats fed iron free diet showed the higher dry matter absorption.

  14. Lentil and Kale: Complementary Nutrient-Rich Whole Food Sources to Combat Micronutrient and Calorie Malnutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migliozzi, Megan; Thavarajah, Dil; Thavarajah, Pushparajah; Smith, Powell

    2015-11-11

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is a nutritious food and a staple for millions of people. Not only are lentils a good source of energy, they also contain a range of micronutrients and prebiotic carbohydrates. Kale (Brassica oleracea v. acephala) has been considered as a health food, but its full range of benefits and composition has not been extensively studied. Recent studies suggest that foods are enrich in prebiotic carbohydrates and dietary fiber that can potentially reduce risks of non-communicable diseases, including obesity, cancer, heart disease, and diabetes. Lentil and kale added to a cereal-based diet would enhance intakes of essential minerals and vitamins to combat micronutrient malnutrition. This review provides an overview of lentil and kale as a complementary nutrient-rich whole food source to combat global malnutrition and calorie issues. In addition, prebiotic carbohydrate profiles and the genetic potential of these crops for further micronutrient enrichment are briefly discussed with respect to developing sustainable and nutritious food systems.

  15. Generation and Characterisation of a Reference Transcriptome for Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shimna Sudheesh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available RNA-Seq using second-generation sequencing technologies permits generation of a reference unigene set for a given species, in the absence of a well-annotated genome sequence, supporting functional genomics studies, gene characterisation and detailed expression analysis for specific morphophysiological or environmental stress response traits. A reference unigene set for lentil has been developed, consisting of 58,986 contigs and scaffolds with an N50 length of 1719 bp. Comparison to gene complements from related species, reference protein databases, previously published lentil transcriptomes and a draft genome sequence validated the current dataset in terms of degree of completeness and utility. A large proportion (98% of unigenes were expressed in more than one tissue, at varying levels. Candidate genes associated with mechanisms of tolerance to both boron toxicity and time of flowering were identified, which can eventually be used for the development of gene-based markers. This study has provided a comprehensive, assembled and annotated reference gene set for lentil that can be used for multiple applications, permitting identification of genes for pathway-specific expression analysis, genetic modification approaches, development of resources for genotypic analysis, and assistance in the annotation of a future lentil genome sequence.

  16. Novel Flavonol Glycosides from the Aerial Parts of Lentil (Lens culinaris

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerzy Żuchowski

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available While the phytochemical composition of lentil (Lens culinaris seeds is well described in scientific literature, there is very little available data about secondary metabolites from lentil leaves and stems. Our research reveals that the aerial parts of lentil are a rich source of flavonoids. Six kaempferol and twelve quercetin glycosides were isolated, their structures were elucidated using NMR spectroscopy and chemical methods. This group includes 16 compounds which have not been previously described in the scientific literature: quercetin 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl(1→2-β-D-galactopyranoside-7-O-β-D-glucuropyranoside (1, kaempferol 3-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl(1→2-β-D-galacto-pyranoside-7-O-β-D-glucuropyranoside (3, their derivatives 4–10,12–15,17,18 acylated with caffeic, p-coumaric, ferulic, or 3,4,5-trihydroxycinnamic acid and kaempferol 3-O-{[(6-O-E-p-coumaroyl-β-D-glucopyranosyl(1→2]-α-L-rhamnopyranosyl(1→6}-β-D-galactopyranoside-7-O-α-L-rhamnopyranoside (11. Their DPPH scavenging activity was also evaluated. This is probably the first detailed description of flavonoids from the aerial parts of lentil.

  17. Ozone stress modulates amine oxidase and lipoxygenase expression in lentil (Lens culinaris) seedlings

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Maccarrone, M.; Veldink, G.A.; Finazzi Agrò, A.

    1997-01-01

    The effect of ozone stress on polyamine metabolism and membrane lipid peroxidation in lentil seedlings through the amine oxidase and lipoxygenase activity and expression has been investigated. Ozone is shown to control the expression of these enzymes at the transcriptional level, down-regulating the

  18. Nutritional Profile and Carbohydrate Characterization of Spray-Dried Lentil, Pea and Chickpea Ingredients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susan M. Tosh

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Although many consumers know that pulses are nutritious, long preparation times are frequently a barrier to consumption of lentils, dried peas and chickpeas. Therefore, a product has been developed which can be used as an ingredient in a wide variety of dishes without presoaking or precooking. Dried green peas, chickpeas or lentils were soaked, cooked, homogenized and spray-dried. Proximate analyses were conducted on the pulse powders and compared to an instant mashed potato product. Because the health benefits of pulses may be due in part to their carbohydrate content, a detailed carbohydrate analysis was carried out on the pulse powders. Pulse powders were higher in protein and total dietary fibre and lower in starch than potato flakes. After processing, the pulse powders maintained appreciable amounts of resistant starch (4.4%–5.2%. Total dietary fibre was higher in chickpeas and peas (26.2% and 27.1% respectively than lentils (21.9%, whereas lentils had the highest protein content (22.7%. Pulse carbohydrates were rich in glucose, arabinose, galactose and uronic acids. Stachyose, a fermentable fibre, was the most abundant oligosaccharide, making up 1.5%–2.4% of the dried pulse powders. Spray-drying of cooked, homogenized pulses produces an easy to use ingredient with strong nutritional profile.

  19. Lentil and Kale: Complementary Nutrient-Rich Whole Food Sources to Combat Micronutrient and Calorie Malnutrition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Megan Migliozzi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. is a nutritious food and a staple for millions of people. Not only are lentils a good source of energy, they also contain a range of micronutrients and prebiotic carbohydrates. Kale (Brassica oleracea v. acephala has been considered as a health food, but its full range of benefits and composition has not been extensively studied. Recent studies suggest that foods are enrich in prebiotic carbohydrates and dietary fiber that can potentially reduce risks of non-communicable diseases, including obesity, cancer, heart disease, and diabetes. Lentil and kale added to a cereal-based diet would enhance intakes of essential minerals and vitamins to combat micronutrient malnutrition. This review provides an overview of lentil and kale as a complementary nutrient-rich whole food source to combat global malnutrition and calorie issues. In addition, prebiotic carbohydrate profiles and the genetic potential of these crops for further micronutrient enrichment are briefly discussed with respect to developing sustainable and nutritious food systems.

  20. 9 CFR 319.310 - Lima beans with ham in sauce, beans with ham in sauce, beans with bacon in sauce, and similar...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Lima beans with ham in sauce, beans with ham in sauce, beans with bacon in sauce, and similar products. 319.310 Section 319.310 Animals and....310 Lima beans with ham in sauce, beans with ham in sauce, beans with bacon in sauce, and similar...

  1. Molecular Breeding for Ascochyta Blight Resistance in Lentil: Current Progress and Future Directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew S. Rodda

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. is a diploid (2n = 2x = 14, self-pollinating, cool-season, grain legume that is cultivated worldwide and is highly valuable due to its high protein content. However, lentil production is constrained by many factors including biotic stresses, majority of which are fungal diseases such as ascochyta blight (AB, fusarium wilt, rust, stemphylium blight, anthracnose, and botrytis gray mold. Among various diseases, AB is a major -problem in many lentil-producing countries and can significantly reduce crop production. Breeding for AB resistance has been a priority for breeding programs across the globe and consequently, a number of resistance sources have been identified and extensively exploited. In order to increase the efficiency of combining genes from different genetic backgrounds, molecular genetic tools can be integrated with conventional breeding methods. A range of genetic linkage maps have been generated based on DNA-based markers, and quantitative trait loci (QTLs for AB resistance have been identified. Molecular markers linked to these QTLs may potentially be used for efficient pyramiding of the AB disease resistance genes. Significant genomic resources have been established to identify and characterize resistance genes, including an integrated genetic map, expressed sequence tag libraries, gene based markers, and draft genome sequences. These resources are already being utilized for lentil crop improvement, to more effectively select for disease resistance, as a case study of the Australian breeding program will show. The combination of genomic resources, effective molecular genetic tools and high resolution phenotyping tools will improve the efficiency of selection for ascochyta blight resistance and accelerate varietal development of global lentil breeding programs.

  2. Molecular Breeding for Ascochyta Blight Resistance in Lentil: Current Progress and Future Directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodda, Matthew S; Davidson, Jennifer; Javid, Muhammad; Sudheesh, Shimna; Blake, Sara; Forster, John W; Kaur, Sukhjiwan

    2017-01-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is a diploid (2n = 2x = 14), self-pollinating, cool-season, grain legume that is cultivated worldwide and is highly valuable due to its high protein content. However, lentil production is constrained by many factors including biotic stresses, majority of which are fungal diseases such as ascochyta blight (AB), fusarium wilt, rust, stemphylium blight, anthracnose, and botrytis gray mold. Among various diseases, AB is a major -problem in many lentil-producing countries and can significantly reduce crop production. Breeding for AB resistance has been a priority for breeding programs across the globe and consequently, a number of resistance sources have been identified and extensively exploited. In order to increase the efficiency of combining genes from different genetic backgrounds, molecular genetic tools can be integrated with conventional breeding methods. A range of genetic linkage maps have been generated based on DNA-based markers, and quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for AB resistance have been identified. Molecular markers linked to these QTLs may potentially be used for efficient pyramiding of the AB disease resistance genes. Significant genomic resources have been established to identify and characterize resistance genes, including an integrated genetic map, expressed sequence tag libraries, gene based markers, and draft genome sequences. These resources are already being utilized for lentil crop improvement, to more effectively select for disease resistance, as a case study of the Australian breeding program will show. The combination of genomic resources, effective molecular genetic tools and high resolution phenotyping tools will improve the efficiency of selection for ascochyta blight resistance and accelerate varietal development of global lentil breeding programs.

  3. IN BEANS TO COMMON BLIGHT

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    1993-05-12

    , Beebe, S.E. and Correa,. F.J. 1981. Comparing two inoculation techniques for evaluating resistance in beans to Xanthomonas campestris pv. phaseoli. Proceedings 5th International conference of. Plant Pathogenic Bacteria.

  4. Genetic diversity of cultivated lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) and its relation to the world’s agro-ecological zones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assessment of genetic diversity and population structure of germplasm collections plays a critical role in supporting conservation and crop genetic enhancement strategies. We used a cultivated lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) collection consisting of 352 accessions originating from 54 diverse countrie...

  5. Detecting DNA polymorphism and genetic diversity in Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) germplasm: comparison of ISSR and DAMD marker

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Seyedimoradi, Hiva; Talebi, Reza

    2014-01-01

    .... Average polymorphism information content (PIC) for ISSR and DAMD markers were 0.37 and 0.41, respectively. All 31 lentil genotypes could be distinguished by ISSR markers into three groups and by DAMD markers into two groups...

  6. Symbiotic Efficiency of Native and Exotic Rhizobium Strains Nodulating Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) in Soils of Southern Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Wondwosen Tena; Endalkachew Wolde-Meskel; Fran Walley

    2016-01-01

    Lentil plays a major role in the food and nutritional security of low income Ethiopian families because of the high protein content of their seed; however, their productivity typically is low largely due to soil fertility limitations. Field and pot experiments were conducted during the 2011 cropping season to determine the effectiveness of Rhizobium strains on two cultivars of lentil in Southern Ethiopia. Six rhizobial inoculant treatments (four indigenous and two commercial inoculants), a ni...

  7. Effect of germination time on proximate analysis, bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity of lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) sprouts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fouad, A Ahmed; Rehab, F M Ali

    2015-01-01

    The lentil plant, Lens culinaris L., is a member of the Leguminoceae family and constitutes one of the most important traditional dietary components. The purpose of the current study was to investigate the effects of sprouting for 3, 4, 5 and 6 days on proximate, bioactive compounds and antioxidative characteristics of lentil (Lens culinaris) sprouts. Lentil seeds were soaked in distilled water (1:10, w/v) for 12 h at room temperature (~25°C), then kept between thick layers of cotton cloth and allowed to germinate in the dark for 3, 4, 5 and 6 days. The nutritional composition, protein solubility, free amino acids, antinutritional factors, bioactive compounds and antioxidant activity of raw and germinated samples were determined using standard official procedures. Sprouting process caused significant (P ≤ 0.05) increases in moisture, protein, ash, crude fiber, protein solubility, free amino acids, total, reducing and nonreducing sugars. However, oil content, antinutritional factors (tannins and phytic acid) significantly (P ≤ 0.05) decreased. Results indicated that total essential amino acids of lentil seeds protein formed 38.10% of the total amino acid content. Sulfur-containing amino acids were the first limiting amino acid, while threonine was the second limiting amino acid in raw and germinated lentil seeds. Sprouting process has a positive effect on the essential amino acid contents and protein efficiency ratio (PER) of lentil sprouts. Phenolics content increased from 1341.13 mg/100 g DW in raw lentil seeds to 1411.50, 1463.00, 1630.20 and 1510.10 in those samples germinated for 3, 4, 5 and 6 days, respectively. Sprouted seeds had higher DPPH radical scavenging and reducing power activities. Based on these results, sprouting process is recommended to increase nutritive value, and antioxidant activity of lentil seeds.

  8. A consensus linkage map of lentil based on DArT markers from three RIL mapping populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duygu Ates

    Full Text Available Lentil (Lens culinaris ssp. culinaris Medikus is a diploid (2n = 2x = 14, self-pollinating grain legume with a haploid genome size of about 4 Gbp and is grown throughout the world with current annual production of 4.9 million tonnes.A consensus map of lentil (Lens culinaris ssp. culinaris Medikus was constructed using three different lentils recombinant inbred line (RIL populations, including "CDC Redberry" x "ILL7502" (LR8, "ILL8006" x "CDC Milestone" (LR11 and "PI320937" x "Eston" (LR39.The lentil consensus map was composed of 9,793 DArT markers, covered a total of 977.47 cM with an average distance of 0.10 cM between adjacent markers and constructed 7 linkage groups representing 7 chromosomes of the lentil genome. The consensus map had no gap larger than 12.67 cM and only 5 gaps were found to be between 12.67 cM and 6.0 cM (on LG3 and LG4. The localization of the SNP markers on the lentil consensus map were in general consistent with their localization on the three individual genetic linkage maps and the lentil consensus map has longer map length, higher marker density and shorter average distance between the adjacent markers compared to the component linkage maps.This high-density consensus map could provide insight into the lentil genome. The consensus map could also help to construct a physical map using a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome library and map based cloning studies. Sequence information of DArT may help localization of orientation scaffolds from Next Generation Sequencing data.

  9. Effects of organic fertilizers on the growth and yield of bush bean, winged bean and yard long bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Aminul Islam

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT VC (20%, TC (20% and N:P:K fertilizer (farmer's practice were used to determine the growth and yield attributes of bush bean (Phaseolus vulgaris, winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus and yard long bean (Vigna unguiculata. Plants grown with VC (20% produced the highest fresh biomass for bush bean (527.55 g m-2, winged bean (1168.61 g m-2 and yard long bean (409.84 g m-2. In all the tested legumes the highest pod weight, pod number, pod dry weight and pod length were found in the VC (20% treatment. Photosynthetic rates in the three legumes peaked at pod formation stage in all treatments, with the highest photosynthetic rate observed in winged bean (56.17 µmol m-2s-1 grown with VC (20%. The highest yield for bush bean (2.98 ton ha-1, winged bean (7.28 ton ha-1 and yard long bean (2.22 ton ha-1 were also found in VC (20% treatment. Furthermore, protein content was highest in bush bean (26.50 g/100g, followed by yard long bean (24.74 g/100g and winged bean (22.04 g/100g, under VC (20% treatment. It can be concluded that legumes grown with VC (20% produced the highest yield and yield attributes.

  10. Detection of common vetch (Vicia sativa L.) in Lentil (Lens culinaris L.) using unique chemical fingerprint markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thavarajah, Pushparajah; Thavarajah, Dil; Premakumara, G A S; Vandenberg, Albert

    2012-12-15

    Detection of adulteration of split red lentil (Lens culinaris L.) seeds with low level addition of split common vetch (Vicia sativa L.) is hampered by a lack of reliable detection methods. An analytical method was developed using high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) based on two unique chemical markers found in common vetch: ß-cyanoalanine (BCA) and γ-glutamyl-ß-cyanoalanine (GCA). These two markers were present in samples of common vetch seed grown in Canada and Serbia. Authentic lentil samples grown in Canada, Australia, USA, Turkey, Syria, and Morocco had no detectable levels of these chemical markers. Commercial lentil samples for export from lentil processing plants in Saskatchewan, Canada, also had no detectable levels of GCA and BCA. The presence of vetch in intentionally adulterated lentil samples could be determined via chemical markers with a detection limit of 5% (w/w). The proposed method is a simple sample extraction and rapid HPLC analysis that could be widely used to detect intentional adulteration of lentils with common vetch. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Optimization of microwave vacuum drying parameters for germinated lentils based on starch digestibility, antioxidant activity and total phenolic content

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robbarts Nongmaithem

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to optimize the processing parameters of pulse mode microwave-vacuum drying of germinated green and red lentils (CDC Greenland and CDC Maxim and investigate the changes in their total phenolic content (TPC, total antioxidant activity (TAA and in-vitro starch digestibility (SD. The lentils were germinated for 5 days and dried by a pulse mode microwave-vacuum method, using 2 s to 8 s out of 10 s pulsed mode at 2000W microwave power and varying the vacuum pressure level between 15 and 45 kPa. In-vitro starch digestibility increased significantly with increased microwave power level. The TPC and TAA appeared to vary distinctively in the two varieties of selected lentils. Vacuum pressure levels did not significantly (p>0.05 affect any responses. Green lentils could be dried at 8 s microwave power and 45 kPa vacuum pressure and red lentils could be dried at 5.5 s microwave power and 42.19 kPa vacuum pressure. The microwave-vacuum drying showed great potential for the drying of germinated lentils.

  12. Identification and assessment of symbiotic effectiveness of phage-typed Rhizobium leguminosarum strains on lentil (Lens culinaris Medik) cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaiswal, Sanjay Kumar; Dhar, Banshi

    2011-05-01

    Symbiotic effectiveness of 19 indigenous and two exotic (USDA 2426 and USDA 2431) strains of lentil Rhizobium belonging to different phage-sensitive and phage-resistant groups was compared under axenic condition. Four strains (USDA 2431, BHULR 104, BHULR 113, and BHULR 115) sensitive to different phages were found significantly superior over others in terms of nodule number, acetylene reduction activity, and total dry weight per plant. Inoculation response of these strains was then evaluated on six lentil cultivars under field condition. A significant symbiotic interaction between rhizobial strains and lentil cultivars was observed. Grain yield enhancement was noticed by the compatible interaction of lentil cultivars HUL-57, L-4147, K-75, and PL-4/DPL-15/DPL-62 with rhizobial strains USDA 2431, BHULR 104, BHULR 113, and BHULR 115, respectively. The authentication of rhizobial strains was accomplished through 16S rDNA sequence analysis. All rhizobial strains had close matching with R. leguminosarum bv. viciae strains. The results have shown that phages can trustfully help selecting out the symbiotically efficient most rhizobial strains for advantageous use with lentil cultivars, in order to strengthen the BNF-based future lentil breeding programs.

  13. Phenolic substance characterization and chemical and cell-based antioxidant activities of 11 lentils grown in the northern United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Baojun; Chang, Sam K C

    2010-02-10

    Chemical and cellular antioxidant activities and phenolic profiles of 11 lentil cultivars grown in the cool northern parts of the United States were investigated. Individual phenolic compounds, including phenolic acids, flavan-3-ols, flavones, and anthocyanins, were further quantitatively investigated by HPLC. Cellular antioxidant activities (CAA) and peroxyl radical scavenging capacity (PRSC) were evaluated by fluorescence microplate reader. Cultivar Morton exhibited the highest individual flavan-3-ols (catechin and epicatechin) and total flavonoids, as well as the highest antioxidant properties (PRSC and CAA) among all lentils tested. Five phenolic acids of the benzoic types and their derivates (gallic, protocatechuic, 2,3,4-trihydroxybenzoic, p-hydroxybenzoic acid, and protocatechualdehyde) and four phenolic acids of the cinnamic type (chlorogenic, p-coumaric, m-coumaric, and sinapic acid) were detected in all lentil cultivars. Two flavan-3-ols [(+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin] and one flavone (luteolin) were detected in all lentil cultivars. Among all phenolic compounds detected, sinapic acid was the predominant phenolic acid, and (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin were the predominant flavonoids. These results showed that different phenotype lentils possessed considerable variations in their individual phenolic compounds, as well as chemical and cellular antioxidant activities. Caffeic acid, catechin, epicatechin, and total flavonoids significantly (p lentils for use as functional foods.

  14. Agronomic Evaluation and Genetic Characterization of Different Accessions in Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monica Bacchi

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Lentil is an important winter-sown legume for semi-arid and temperate areas, food consumption of seed is considerable in several countries of Mediterranean Basin. In Central and Southern Italy different lentil landraces are cultivated within specific marginal areas and commercialized with a recognizable geographical indication of origin. Considering the extensive germplasm and the economic importance of lentil in several rural areas, detailed knowledge of existing genetic variation from different regions is the first important step both for conservation and exploitation of genetic resources, allowing to develop breeding programs. In field experiments over three cropping seasons (2002-2005, 25 lentil accessions from Plant Genetic Institute of National Research Council (Bari, representing part of a large germplasm collection from different areas, were carried out at the University of Reggio Calabria in order to characterize the agronomic performances in a semi-arid environment and to study genetic variability. For this purpose, 10 AFLP primer combinations and 6 SSR markers were used. The agronomic results highlighted the influence of different climatic conditions on phenological, biometrical and yielding traits. A considerable production level of lentil (2,55 t ha-1 and a low yield variability in the three years was observed, showing the high adaptability of the germplasm tested to semi-arid environment. The earliness and the plant height appeared as the most important traits negatively correlated to grain yield; in particular the earliness was confirmed as suitable mechanism of escape from abiotic stress. Genetic characterization showed that a few number of microsatellites and primer combinations are able to provide significant insights on genetic diversity combining the 25 accessions in 3 large clusters that mainly mirror their geographic origin. Principal Component Analysis that consider genetic as well as morphological and agronomic data

  15. Breeding Beans with Bruchid and Multiple Virus Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) and bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV) are worldwide threats to dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production. Beans planted in the lowlands of Central America and the Caribbean also need resistance to Bean golden yellow mosaic virus (BGYMV). The common bean weev...

  16. Competitive Ability of Lentil (Lens culinaris L. Cultivars to Weed Interference under Rain-fed Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Javad Hamzei

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The lentil or masoor (Lens culinaris L. is a brushy annual plant of the legume family, grown for its lens-shaped seeds. Lentil has been one of the first crops domesticated in the Near East. With 26% protein, lentil is the vegetable with the highest level of protein other than soybeans, and it is an important part of people’s diet in many parts of the world. It is reported that the average yield of lentil is considerably low compared to its potential yield of 1500-2000 kg ha-1, obtained in the research field. Such lower yield may be attributed to the poor management of the crop among which poor weed management is an important one. Lentil crop is not very competitive against weeds due to small and weak canopy. Weed reduces yield through competition with crop plants for space, moisture, light and plant nutrients. Generally 20 to 30% losses of grain yield are quite usual and may increase even 50%, if the crop management practices are not properly followed (Deihimfard et al., 2007. The modern lentil varieties give good yield if the land remains weed free for the first one month. However, most of the farmers are reluctant to control weeds in lentil field timely and finally, loses yield. Inadequate weed control was found to reduce the yield 40-66% in lentil (Erman et al., 2008; McDonald et al., 2007. A major component of integrated weed management is the use of more competitive crops, although the selection of better crop competitiveness is a difficult task. The use of competitive plants for weed control could be considered cost-effective and less labour-intensive, and thus reduces the amount of herbicides required. Therefore, the aim of this research was to evaluate lentil competitive ability and to compare the effects of cultivar selection. Materials and methods An experiment was carried out as a factorial based on a randomized complete block design (RCBD with 10 treatments and three replications. Experimental treatments included hand

  17. Analysis of variation for white mold resistance in the BeanCAP snap bean panel

    Science.gov (United States)

    White mold disease caused by Sclerotinia sclerotiorum Lib. de Bary, is one of the most devastated diseases that infect snap and dry beans (Miklas et al. 2013). The USDA-NIFA supported Bean Coordinated Agricultural Project (CAP) has assembled and genotyped dry and a snap bean panels. The snap bean pa...

  18. The 2010 Broad Prize

    Science.gov (United States)

    Education Digest: Essential Readings Condensed for Quick Review, 2011

    2011-01-01

    A new data analysis, based on data collected as part of The Broad Prize process, provides insights into which large urban school districts in the United States are doing the best job of educating traditionally disadvantaged groups: African-American, Hispanics, and low-income students. Since 2002, The Eli and Edythe Broad Foundation has awarded The…

  19. Broad ligament ectopic pregnancy

    OpenAIRE

    Rama C; Lepakshi G; Raju SN

    2015-01-01

    Pregnancy in the broad ligament is a rare form of ectopic pregnancy with a high risk of maternal mortality. Ultrasonography may help in the early diagnosis but mostly the diagnosis is established during surgery. We report the case of a patient with broad ligament ectopic pregnancy diagnosed intraoperatively. The patient had uneventful postoperative recovery.

  20. Nutritional parameters and yield evaluation of newly developed genotypes of lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solanki, I S; Kapoor, A C; Singh, U

    1999-01-01

    Among the commonly consumed food legumes, lentils occupy an important place in human nutrition in the Indian subcontinent. Twenty-one lentil genotypes were evaluated for such nutrition related parameters as moisture, protein, crude fiber, fat, ash (total mineral matter), carbohydrates, total energy and metabolizable energy. These genotypes were also analyzed for 100-seed weight and seed yield/plant. Protein content ranged between 22.1 and 27.4% with significant differences among genotypes. Considerable variations were observed among the genotypes for calcium, phosphorus, iron and tannin contents. Large variations existed in yield and 100-seed weight of these genotypes. Seed yield/plant was not significantly correlated with any of the principal seed constituents analyzed in the present study. The genotypes, LH 97 and LH 37 were found to be better and hence could be explored for further development and selection of desirable characteristics.

  1. An unusual cause of small bowel obstruction in children: lentil soup bezoar

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plataras, Christos; Sardianos, Nektarios; Vlatakis, Stephanos; Nikas, Konstantinos

    2014-01-01

    Bezoars are an unusual cause of acute intestinal obstruction in children. Most cases are trichobezoars in adolescent girls who swallow their hair. Lactobezoars are another unusual but occasionally reported cause of intestinal obstruction in neonates. Phytobezoars and food bolus bezoars are the least common types of intestinal obstruction that have been reported in children. Of the few paediatric cases that have been described, the majority involve persimmons. Moreover, all of these cases involve the ingestion of raw fibres or fruit that have not been cooked. We report a case of a girl who presented with acute ileal obstruction because of lentil soup bezoar. Given the wide use of this otherwise nutritional foodstuff, we highlight the danger from its inappropriate preparation to the health of children. This is the first reported case of intestinal obstruction caused by lentils in children and we hope to raise concern among paediatricians regarding this matter. PMID:24692381

  2. Candidate effectors contribute to race differentiation and virulence of the lentil anthracnose pathogen Colletotrichum lentis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhadauria, Vijai; MacLachlan, Ron; Pozniak, Curtis; Banniza, Sabine

    2015-08-22

    The hemibiotroph Colletotrichum lentis, causative agent of anthracnose on Lens culinaris (lentil) was recently described as a new species. During its interaction with the host plant, C. lentis likely secretes numerous effector proteins, including toxins to alter the plant's innate immunity, thereby gaining access to the host tissues for nutrition and reproduction. In silico analysis of 2000 ESTs generated from C. lentis-infected lentil leaf tissues identified 15 candidate effectors. In planta infection stage-specific gene expression waves among candidate effectors were revealed for the appressorial penetration phase, biotrophic phase and necrotrophic phase. No sign of positive selection pressure [ω (dN/dS) Colletotrichum. ClToxB is further characterized as a host-specific toxin that is likely to contribute to quantitative differences in virulence between the races 0 and 1.

  3. Effect of Salinity and Seed Size on Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik Germination and Seedling Growth Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Y Alizadeh

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Both soil and water salinity is one of the main reasons in decreasing germination, seedling growth and establishment in many arid and semiarid parts of world especially in our country. For this reason in order to evaluate the effect of lentil seed size on germination and seedling growth properties that was under effect of salinity stress, a completely randomized design with factorial arrangement and 3 replications conducted using two lentils genotypes (Robatt and Gachsaran, two small and large seed sizes (34.8 and 59 mg in Robatt and 41.5 and 69 mg in Gachsaran per seed, respectively and five drought levels (0, 0.5, 0.8, 1.2 and 1.7 percent of NaCl in 2008s. Results showed that Robatt genotype had higher germination rate and salinity tolerance than Gachsaran. In addition seed size had significant different (P

  4. The effect of seed priming in germination of lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. genotypes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    hoseyn hoseyni

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Optimal germination and plant establishment is an important problem for agricultural productivity in arid and semi-arid areas. Priming is an approach for increasing plant establishment in undesirable conditions. This research was conducted in a laboratory at the College of Agriculture, Ferdowsi University of Mashhad. Two lentil genotypes (MLC198, MLC4, two osmoticum as priming agents (PEG, NaCl and three osmotic potential for each osmoticom (-4, -8 and -12 bars were used in this study. Germination test was conducted in two conditions (water stress and non water stress. The result showed that PEG was more effective than NaCl for lentil seed priming. Within the applied osmotic potentials, -8 bar of PEG and -4 bar of NaCl were the best in promoting seed germination. MLC4 showed better response to priming compared with MLC198 genotype. Under non water stress conditions, different parameters of germination were in state of affairs.

  5. Diversity of Macro- and Micronutrients in the Seeds of Lentil Landraces

    OpenAIRE

    Tolga Karaköy; Halil Erdem; Faheem S. Baloch; Faruk Toklu; Selim Eker; Benjamin Kilian; Hakan Özkan

    2012-01-01

    Increasing the amount of bioavailable mineral elements in plant foods would help to improve the nutritional status of populations in developing countries. Legume seeds have the potential to provide many essential nutrients. It is important to have information on genetic variations among different lentil populations so that plant breeding programs can use new varieties in cross-breeding programs. The main objective of this study was to characterize the micro- and macronutrient concentrations o...

  6. Pre-breeding of lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) for herbicide resistance through seed mutagenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rizwan, Muhammad; Aslam, Muhammad; Asghar, Muhammad Jawad; Abbas, Ghulam; Shah, Tariq Mahmud; Shimelis, Hussein

    2017-01-01

    Lentil is a poor competitor of weeds and its sensitivity to herbicides is a major hurdle for large scale production. The present study was conducted to select herbicide resistant lentil genotypes through seed mutagenesis. Seeds of three advanced lentil genotypes (LPP 11001, LPP 11100 and LPP 11116) were treated with two different concentrations of ethyl methanesulfonate (EMS; 0.1 and 0.2%), hydrazine hydrate (HH; 0.02 and 0.03%) and sodium azide (SA; 0.01 and 0.02%) to develop M1 seed. The M2 was screened against two herbicides including Ally Max 28.6% SG (X = 34.58 g/ha and 1.5X = 51.87 g/ha) and Atlantis 3.6% WG (X = 395.2 g/ha and 1.5X = 592.8 g/ha) using the following three screening methods: post plant emergence (PPE), pre-plant incorporation (PPI) and seed priming (SP). Data were recorded on survival index and survival percentage from each experimental unit of every population. Plants in all populations were categorized following their reaction to herbicides. The newly developed populations showed greater variation for herbicide resistance when compared to their progenitors. Phenotypic traits were significantly reduced in all the screening environments. Overall, 671 herbicide resistant mutants were selected from all testing environments. The seeds from selected plants were re-mutagenized at 150 Gy of gamma radiation and evaluated against higher dose of herbicides. This allowed selection of 134 herbicide resistant mutants. The selected mutants are useful germplasm for herbicide resistance breeding of lentil.

  7. Diversification of indigenous gene- pool by using exotic germplasm in lentil (Lens culinaris Medikus subsp. culinaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Jitendra; Srivastva, Ekta; Singh, Mritunjay; Kumar, Shiv; Nadarajan, N; Sarker, Ashutosh

    2014-01-01

    Genetic diversity was studied among 21 accessions of lentil using SSR markers and morphological traits in order to assess the diversification of Indian gene-pool of lentil through introgression of exotic genes and introduction of germplasm. Among these , 16 genotypes either had 'Precoz' gene, an Argentine line in their pedigree or genes from introduced lines from ICARDA. Sixty five SSR markers and eight phenotypic traits were used to analyse the level of genetic diversity in these genotypes. Forty three SSR markers (66 %) were polymorphic and generated a total of 177 alleles with an average of 4.1 alleles per SSR marker. Alleles per marker ranged from 2 to 6. The polymorphic information content ranged 0.33 to 0.80 with an average of 0.57, suggesting that SSR markers are highly polymorphic among the studied genotypes. Genetic dissimilarity based a dendrogram grouped these accessions into two main clusters (cluster I and cluster II) and it ranged 33 % to 71 %, suggesting high level of genetic diversity among the genotypes. First three components of PCA based morphological traits explained higher variance (95.6 %) compared to PCA components based on SSR markers (42.7 %) of total genetic variance. Thus, more diversity was observed for morphological traits and genotypes in each cluster and sub-cluster showed a range of variability for seed size, earliness, pods/plant and plant height. Molecular and phenotypic diversity analysis thus suggested that use of germplasm of exotic lines have diversified the genetic base of lentil germplasm in India. This diversified gene-pool will be very useful in the development of improved varieties of lentil in order to address the effect of climate change, to adapt in new cropping systems niches such as mixed cropping, relay cropping, etc. and to meet consumers' preference.

  8. Comparative morpho-physiological and biochemical responses of lentil and grass pea genotypes under water stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talukdar, Dibyendu

    2013-01-01

    Background: Both lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) and grass pea (Lathyrus sativus L.) in the family Fabaceae are two important cool-season food legumes, often experiencing water stress conditions during growth and maturity. Objective: The present study was undertaken to ascertain the response of these two crops under different water stress regimes. Materials and Methods: Different morpho-physiological and biochemical parameters were studied in a pot experiment under controlled environmental conditions. Along with control (proper irrigation, 0 stress), three sets of plants were subjected to mild (6 d), moderate (13 d) and severe (20 d) water stress by withholding irrigation at the appropriate time. Results: Compared with control, plant growth traits and seed yield components reduced significantly in both crops with increasing period of water stress, resulting in lowering of dry mass with more severe effect on lentil compared with grass pea. Foliar Relative Water Content (RWC) (%), K+/Na+ ratio, chlorophyll (chl) a, chl a/b ratio, stomatal conductance and net photosynthetic rate declined considerably in both crops under water stress. Leaf-free proline level increased significantly in both crops, but it decreased markedly in nodules of lentil and remained unchanged in grass pea. Nodulation was also affected due to water stress. The impairment in growth traits and physio-biochemical parameters under water stress was manifested in reduction of drought tolerance efficiency of both crops. Conclusion: Impact of water stress was more severe on lentil compared with grass pea, and modulation of growth traits signified necessity of a detailed strategy in breeding of food legumes under water stress. PMID:24082740

  9. Ancient orphan crop joins modern era: gene-based SNP discovery and mapping in lentil

    OpenAIRE

    Sharpe, Andrew G.; Ramsay, Larissa; Sanderson, Lacey-Anne; Fedoruk, Michael J; Clarke, Wayne E.; Li, Rong; Kagale, Sateesh; Vijayan, Perumal; Vandenberg, Albert; Bett, Kirstin E.

    2013-01-01

    Background The genus Lens comprises a range of closely related species within the galegoid clade of the Papilionoideae family. The clade includes other important crops (e.g. chickpea and pea) as well as a sequenced model legume (Medicago truncatula). Lentil is a global food crop increasing in importance in the Indian sub-continent and elsewhere due to its nutritional value and quick cooking time. Despite this importance there has been a dearth of genetic and genomic resources for the crop and...

  10. Generation and Characterisation of a Reference Transcriptome for Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.)

    OpenAIRE

    Shimna Sudheesh; Preeti Verma; Forster, John W; Noel O. I. Cogan; Sukhjiwan Kaur

    2016-01-01

    RNA-Seq using second-generation sequencing technologies permits generation of a reference unigene set for a given species, in the absence of a well-annotated genome sequence, supporting functional genomics studies, gene characterisation and detailed expression analysis for specific morphophysiological or environmental stress response traits. A reference unigene set for lentil has been developed, consisting of 58,986 contigs and scaffolds with an N50 length of 1719 bp. Comparison to gene compl...

  11. In Vitro Optimization of Rooting in Two Genotype of Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.)

    OpenAIRE

    V. Ghasemi omra; Bagheri, A.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Establishing of an efficient and repeatable regeneration protocol is one of the basic prerequirements for gene transformation and plant breeding. Lentil, because of rooting problems, is a recalcitrant legume in respect of whole regeneration. For this, we examined two methods in vitro and in vivo flowing in vitro method to induce root on regenerated shoots. In vitro-in vivo method was better than in vitro for rooting of regenerated shoots. The shoots regenerated from medium contain...

  12. Accounting, Creativity and Charity in Hospitality Enterprises: the Case of “Lentil as Anything”

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria-Gabriella Baldarelli

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper aims at analysing the case of “Lentil as Anything”, that is a very interesting combination of creativity and charity in the field of hospitality enterprises. It represents the implementation of a new typology of restoration in which guests can eat and then they will pay as they “feel”. The research case is a charity (social enterprise and it is an example of civil enterprise with some stimulating implications about accounting and accountability tools.

  13. NetBeans IDE 8 cookbook

    CERN Document Server

    Salter, David

    2014-01-01

    If you're a Java developer of any level using NetBeans and want to learn how to get the most out of NetBeans, then this book is for you. Learning how to utilize NetBeans will provide a firm foundation for your Java application development.

  14. Chlorotic mottle of bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jayasinghe, W.U.

    1982-01-01

    For the past years there have been outbreaks of a disease of bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in Colombia called bean chlorotic mottle. The etiology of bean chlorotic mottle was not known, but the disease was generally believed to be incited by the same whitefly-transmitted virus

  15. Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) nodulates with genotypically and phenotypically diverse rhizobia in Ethiopian soils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tena, Wondwosen; Wolde-Meskel, Endalkachew; Degefu, Tulu; Walley, Fran

    2017-01-01

    Forty-eight lentil-nodulating rhizobia were isolated from soil samples collected from diverse agro-ecological locations in Ethiopia, and characterized based on 76 phenotypic traits. Furthermore, 26 representative strains were selected and characterized using multilocus sequence analyses (MLSA) of core (16S rRNA, recA, atpD, glnII and gyrB) and symbiotic (nodA and nifH) genes. Numerical analysis of phenotypic characteristics showed that the 48 test strains fell into three major distinct clusters. The phylogenetic trees based on 16S rRNA genes showed that they belong to the Rhizobium genus. Our phylogenetic reconstruction based on combined gene trees (recA, atpD and glnII) supported three distinct sub-lineages (Clades I-III). While genospecies I and II could be classified with Rhizobium etli and Rhizobium leguminosarum, respectively, genospecies III, might be an unnamed genospecies within the genus Rhizobium. Phylogenetic reconstruction based on the symbiosis-related genes supported a single cluster, indicating differences in the evolutionary histories between chromosomal and symbiotic genes. Overall, these results confirmed the presence of a great diversity of lentil-nodulating Rhizobium species in Ethiopia, inviting further exploration. Moreover, the differences in symbiotic effectiveness of the test strains indicated the potential for selecting and using them as inoculants to improve the productivity of lentil in the country. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  16. Ancient orphan crop joins modern era: gene-based SNP discovery and mapping in lentil

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background The genus Lens comprises a range of closely related species within the galegoid clade of the Papilionoideae family. The clade includes other important crops (e.g. chickpea and pea) as well as a sequenced model legume (Medicago truncatula). Lentil is a global food crop increasing in importance in the Indian sub-continent and elsewhere due to its nutritional value and quick cooking time. Despite this importance there has been a dearth of genetic and genomic resources for the crop and this has limited the application of marker-assisted selection strategies in breeding. Results We describe here the development of a deep and diverse transcriptome resource for lentil using next generation sequencing technology. The generation of data in multiple cultivated (L. culinaris) and wild (L. ervoides) genotypes together with the utilization of a bioinformatics workflow enabled the identification of a large collection of SNPs and the subsequent development of a genotyping platform that was used to establish the first comprehensive genetic map of the L. culinaris genome. Extensive collinearity with M. truncatula was evident on the basis of sequence homology between mapped markers and the model genome and large translocations and inversions relative to M. truncatula were identified. An estimate for the time divergence of L. culinaris from L. ervoides and of both from M. truncatula was also calculated. Conclusions The availability of the genomic and derived molecular marker resources presented here will help change lentil breeding strategies and lead to increased genetic gain in the future. PMID:23506258

  17. Literary Invention and Critical Fashion: Missing the Boat in the Sea of Lentils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elzbieta Sklodowska

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available In pursuing the relation of Sea of Lentils (1979 to the Spanish American literary canon, I argue that while Benítez-Rojo's novel did not fall into the category of the already canonized—and therefore was spared a parricidal gesture of the Post-Boom writers—neither did it belong amidst the previously marginalized texts. I suggest that Sea of Lentils concentrates its internal critique of language and representation around the process of remembering in a manner that is radically at odds not only with the "traditional" historical novel, but with the official voice of the ascendant testimonio as well. Moreover, the notion of memory as unpredictable "turbulent flow" and the breaking down of a globalizing grand récit into "fractal" petites histoires lead us toward chaos theory and Postmodernism. I conclude that while Sea of Lentils prefigured a variety of concerns that were to become dominant in the 1980s, it essentially failed to satisfy the more immediate expectations of invention on the part of "technocratic" critics, on one hand, and, on the other, of "culturalists" longing for a genuinely Latin American and "authentic" discourse.

  18. Comparison and Classification of Lentil (Lens culinaris Landraces under Drought Stress Conditions after Flowering

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    V. Rashidi

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to compare and classify of 15Iranian lentil landraces under drought stress conditions after flowering, an experiment was carried out in split plot lay out based on randomized complete block design with four replications. It was performed at the Agricultural Research Station of Islamic Azad University, Tabriz Branch, during the cropping year of 2011. The primary factor consisted of drought stress treatments at 2 levels (non stress and stress after flowering and secondary factor of 15 lentil landraces. Analysis of variance indicated remarkable diversities among the landraces under study and significant differences for interaction of genotype by drought stress levels were obtained for most of the traits measured. Grain yield and number of grains per plant were highly influenced by drought stress. Mean comparisons also showed significant variations among the landraces for number of pods per plant, number of grains per plant, 100- grain weight, hecto liter weight, biological yield, grain yield and harvest index. Drought stress also reduced of plant height, number of pods per plant, number of seeds per plant, 100- seeds weight, hectoliter weight, biological yield, grain yield and harvest index of the lentil landraces under study. Correlation coefficients revealed that, number of seeds per plant and harvest index had significant and positive effect on seed yield under drought stress. Cluster analysis, based on the traits studied, divided the landraces into three groups. In this classification, the landraces of Kaleybar, Garadagh, Kharvana, Horand Danehriz and Shomale Varzegan were distinguished as superior landraces under drought conditions.

  19. Molecular characterization of a first begomovirus associated with lentil (Lens culinaris) from India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naimuddin, K; Akram, M; Agnihotri, A K

    A disease of lentil with symptoms of distortion, mottling and chlorosis in the leaves, shortening of internodes and excessive branching was noticed in lentil at Kanpur, India, during 2012-2014. Results of polymerase chain reaction and reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction employed to detect suspected RNA and DNA viruses indicated involvement of a geminivirus, which was further characterized by sequencing of full genome amplified by rolling circle amplification. Analysis of full length DNA-A revealed 96.4-96.7% nucleotide similarity with bitter gourd yellow vein virus (BGYVV) isolates and tomato leaf curl New Delhi virus (ToLCNDV) isolate. As per the recent revision of begomovirus species demarcation criteria, if a new virus isolate shares ≥91% nt sequence identity with any other isolate of an existing species, it should be treated as an isolate of that species, even if it is Len:14]. This is the first report of a begomovirus found associated with a disease in lentil from India.

  20. Identification of High-Temperature Tolerant Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) Genotypes through Leaf and Pollen Traits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sita, Kumari; Sehgal, Akanksha; Kumar, Jitendra; Kumar, Shiv; Singh, Sarvjeet; Siddique, Kadambot H M; Nayyar, Harsh

    2017-01-01

    Rising temperatures are proving detrimental for various agricultural crops. Cool-season legumes such as lentil (Lens culunaris Medik.) are sensitive to even small increases in temperature during the reproductive stage, hence the need to explore the available germplasm for heat tolerance as well as its underlying mechanisms. In the present study, a set of 38 core lentil accessions were screened for heat stress tolerance by sowing 2 months later (first week of January; max/min temperature >32/20°C during the reproductive stage) than the recommended date of sowing (first week of November; max/min temperature 35/25°C were highly detrimental for growth and yield in lentil. While HT genotypes tolerated temperatures up to 40/30°C by producing fewer pods, the HS genotypes failed to do so even at 38/28°C. The findings attributed heat tolerance to superior pollen function and higher expression of leaf antioxidants.

  1. Ancient orphan crop joins modern era: gene-based SNP discovery and mapping in lentil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Andrew G; Ramsay, Larissa; Sanderson, Lacey-Anne; Fedoruk, Michael J; Clarke, Wayne E; Li, Rong; Kagale, Sateesh; Vijayan, Perumal; Vandenberg, Albert; Bett, Kirstin E

    2013-03-18

    The genus Lens comprises a range of closely related species within the galegoid clade of the Papilionoideae family. The clade includes other important crops (e.g. chickpea and pea) as well as a sequenced model legume (Medicago truncatula). Lentil is a global food crop increasing in importance in the Indian sub-continent and elsewhere due to its nutritional value and quick cooking time. Despite this importance there has been a dearth of genetic and genomic resources for the crop and this has limited the application of marker-assisted selection strategies in breeding. We describe here the development of a deep and diverse transcriptome resource for lentil using next generation sequencing technology. The generation of data in multiple cultivated (L. culinaris) and wild (L. ervoides) genotypes together with the utilization of a bioinformatics workflow enabled the identification of a large collection of SNPs and the subsequent development of a genotyping platform that was used to establish the first comprehensive genetic map of the L. culinaris genome. Extensive collinearity with M. truncatula was evident on the basis of sequence homology between mapped markers and the model genome and large translocations and inversions relative to M. truncatula were identified. An estimate for the time divergence of L. culinaris from L. ervoides and of both from M. truncatula was also calculated. The availability of the genomic and derived molecular marker resources presented here will help change lentil breeding strategies and lead to increased genetic gain in the future.

  2. Evaluation of Drought Tolerance in Cold Hardy Lentils (Lens culinaris medik. at Germination Stage

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    A. Nezami

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Germination and emergence of cold tolerant lentil genotypes sometimes experiences low temperatures and variable rainfalls in the fall planting. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of drought stress on germination stage of lentil genotypes. Experiment was carried out with 18 lentil genotypes under five levels of water potential (0 , -0.4 , -0.8 , -1.2 , -1.6 MPa using PEG solutions with a 5×18 factorial experiment based on a compeletly randomaized design with three replications of 25 seeds at 13˚C. Germination and normal seedling percentage, germination rate, radicle and plumule length were measured. Germination averaged over genotypes was 88% at 0 MPa whereas it was 18% at -1.6 MPa. MLC20, with 79%, MLC138 and MLC25 with 74% showed the highest germination, whereas MLC245 and MLC7 with 45% and 47% percent had the lowest germination percentage, respectively. The effects of water potentials × genotypes on all traits were significantly different (p

  3. Morphological characterization and genetic diversity in lentil (Lens culinaris medikus ssp. Culinaris germplasm

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    K.U. Ahamed

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetic divergence of 110 lentil germplasm with checks was assessed based on morphological traits using multivariate analysis. Mahalanobis generalized distance (D2 analysis was used to group the lentil genotypes. Significant variations among lentil genotypes were observed in respect of days to 1st flowering, days to 50% flowering, days to maturity, plant height, and number of pods per peduncle, number of pods per plant, number of seeds per plant, 100 seed weight and yield per plant. Considering the mean values, the germplasm were grouped into ten clusters. The highest number of genotypes (17 was in cluster X and lowest (5 both in cluster II and IV. Cluster IV had the highest cluster mean for number of pods per plant (297.08, number of seeds per plant (594.16, 100 seed weight (1.44 g and yield per plant (8.53 g. Among them, the highest inter-cluster distance was obtained between the cluster IV and I (24.61 followed by IV and III (22.33, while the lowest was between IX and II (1.63. The maximum value of inter-cluster distance indicated that genotypes belonging to cluster IV were far diverged from those of cluster I. The first female flower initiation was earlier in BD-3812 (49 days in cluster I and cluster IV had highest grain yield per plant (8.53. BD-3807 produced significant maximum number of pods per plant (298.40 in cluster IV.

  4. Indirect Estimations of Lentil Leaf and Plant N by SPAD Chlorophyll Meter

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    Hossein Zakeri

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available A Soil Plant Analysis Development (SPAD chlorophyll meter can be used to screen for leaf nitrogen (N concentration in breeding programs. Lentil (Lens culinaris L. cultivars were grown under varied N regimes, SPAD chlorophyll meter readings (SCMR were recorded from the cultivars leaves, and leaf N concentration was measured by combustion. Linear regression and the nonlinear Radial Basis Functions (RBF neural networks models were employed to estimate leaf N concentration (LNC based on the SCMR values. The closest estimates of LNC were obtained from the multivariate models in which the combination of plant age, leaf thickness, and SCMR was employed as the independent variable. In comparison, SCMR as the single independent variable in both models estimated less than 50% of LNC variations. The results showed significant effects of soil moisture and plant age on the association of LNC –SCMR as well as the relationship of LNC with plant N, grain yield, and days to maturity. However, the effect of cultivar on the measured variables was negligible. Although lentil N can be diagnosed by comparing SCMR values of the crop with those from a well-fertilized (N fixing plot, the results did not support using SPAD chlorophyll meter for screening lentil LNC.

  5. Winter sowing of adapted lines as a potential yield increase strategy in lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.

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    Abel Barrios

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. subsp. culinaris is a traditional crop in Spain although current grain yield in Spain is relatively low and unstable. The effect of an early sowing date (winter sowing on yield in the Spanish Central Plateau (meseta was analyzed comparing it to the traditional spring sowing. Yield from eleven cultivars currently available for sowing in Spain and two F6:7  populations of recombinant inbred lines (RIL, ´Precoz´ × ´WA8649041´ (89 lines and ´BGE016365´ × ´ILL1918´ (118 lines, was evaluated in winter and spring sowing dates for three seasons (2005/06, 2006/07 and 2007/08 and two localities. Yield and stability were assessed by the method of consistency of performance with some modifications. When comparing with the best currently available cultivars sown in the traditional spring sowing date, (with an estimated average yield of 43.9 g/m in our experimental conditions, winter sowing using adapted breeding lines proved to be a suitable strategy for increasing lentil yield and yield stability in the Spanish meseta, with an average yield increase of 111% (reaching an estimated yield of 92.8 g/m. Results point to that lentil production can greatly increase in the Spanish meseta if adequate plant materials, such as some of the lines analyzed, are sown at late fall.

  6. Graphic analysis of yield stability in new improved lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. genotypes using nonparametric statistics

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    Naser SABAGHNIA

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Yield stability is an interesting feature of today’s lentil breeding programs, due to the high annual variation in mean yield, particularly in the arid and semi-arid areas. The genetic effects including genetic main and genotype × environment (GE interaction effects for grain yield of eighteen lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. genotypes were studied with fourteen nonparametric stability statistics. Results of five distinct nonparametric tests of GE interaction and combined ANOVA showed there were both additive and crossover interaction types and genotypes varied significantly for grain yield. According to most of the nonparametric stability statistics, genotypes G5, G6, G8 and G18 were the most stable genotypes. Considering mean yield versus stability values via their plotting, indicates that genotypes G2, G11 and G14 following to G5, G16 and G18 were the most favorable genotypes. None of the nonparametric stability statistics were correlated with mean yield and so had static concept of stability. Our results confirmed that rankings of genotypes within environments and using mean yield information permit ease of interpretation of nonparametric results. Finally genotypes G2 (FLIP 92-12L, G11 (Gachsaran and G14 (ILL 6206 were found to be the most stable and high mean yielding genotype and thus recommended for commercial release. Such an outcome could be used to delineate predictive, more rigorous recommendation strategies as well as to help define stability concepts for lentil and other crops.

  7. A farmer friendly and economic IPM strategy to combat root-knot nematodes infesting lentil

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    Rose Rizvi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available An experiment was conducted to assess the effect of Rhizobium sp., waste tea leaves, eggshell powder, and composted cow dung manure on the root-knot nematode, Meloidogyne incognita, on lentil in Botany department AMU, Aligarh, India. When used alone, composted cow dung was better in reducing galling and nematode multiplication and improving lentil growth followed by eggshell powder, Rhizobium sp., and waste tea leaves. Significant result in the integrated management of M. incognita was obtained when Rhizobium sp. was used in combination with cow dung and eggshell powder (with or without waste tea leaves. Combined application of root nodule bacterium and organic wastes like waste tea leaves, eggshell, and cow dung may be suggested to the farmers/growers or related persons who are having great enthusiasm to establish a lentil production business. Application of these organic materials along with the root nodule bacteria may be helpful to foster soil ecosystem which has been a hot topic in the present scenario.

  8. Winter sowing of adapted lines as a potential yield increase strategy in lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrios, A.; Aparicio, T.; Rodríguez, M.J.; Pérez de la Vega, M.; Caminero, C.

    2016-11-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. subsp. culinaris) is a traditional crop in Spain although current grain yield in Spain is relatively low and unstable. The effect of an early sowing date (winter sowing) on yield in the Spanish Central Plateau (meseta) was analyzed comparing it to the traditional spring sowing. Yield from eleven cultivars currently available for sowing in Spain and two F6:7 populations of recombinant inbred lines (RIL), ´Precoz´ × ´WA8649041´ (89 lines) and ´BGE016365´ × ´ILL1918´ (118 lines), was evaluated in winter and spring sowing dates for three seasons (2005/06, 2006/07 and 2007/08) and two localities. Yield and stability were assessed by the method of consistency of performance with some modifications. When comparing with the best currently available cultivars sown in the traditional spring sowing date, (with an estimated average yield of 43.9 g/m in our experimental conditions), winter sowing using adapted breeding lines proved to be a suitable strategy for increasing lentil yield and yield stability in the Spanish meseta, with an average yield increase of 111% (reaching an estimated yield of 92.8 g/m). Results point to that lentil production can greatly increase in the Spanish meseta if adequate plant materials, such as some of the lines analyzed, are sown at late fall. (Author)

  9. Conformational lock and dissociative thermal inactivation of lentil seedling amine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi-Nejad, S Zahra; Moosavi-Movahedi, Ali-Akbar; Rezaei-Tavirani, Mostafa; Floris, Giovanni; Medda, Rosaria

    2003-03-31

    The kinetics of thermal inactivation of copper-containing amine oxidase from lentil seedlings were studied in a 100 mM potassium phosphate buffer, pH 7, using putrescine as the substrate. The temperature range was between 47-60 degrees C. The thermal inactivation curves were not linear at 52 and 57 degrees C; three linear phases were shown. The first phase gave some information about the number of dimeric forms of the enzyme that were induced by the higher temperatures using the "conformational lock" pertaining theory to oligomeric enzyme. The "conformational lock" caused two additional dimeric forms of the enzyme when the temperature increased to 57 degrees C. The second and third phases were interpreted according to a dissociative thermal inactivation model. These phases showed that lentil amine oxidase was reversibly-dissociated before the irreversible thermal inactivation. Although lentil amine oxidase is not a thermostable enzyme, its dimeric structure can form "conformational lock," conferring a structural tolerance to the enzyme against heat stress.

  10. Fusaria and other fungi taxa associated with rhizosphere and rhizoplane of lentil and sesame at different growth stages

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    Sobhy I. Abdel-Hafez

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Density and diversity of Fusarium species and other fungi associated with rhizosphere and rhizoplane of lentil and sesame plants at three different growth stages were investigated. Sixteen species of Fusarium were isolated from rhizosphere (13 species and rhizoplane (11 of both plants studied. In lentil, 11 species were recorded from its rhizosphere (9 species and rhizoplane (8. Fusarium species associated with lentil rhizoplane gave highest number of propagules at the first stage of plant growth while the ones of Fusarium associated with the rhizosphere produced the highest number at the second stage of growth. F. solani was the most common in the three growth stages. In addition, of two growth stages, F. culmorum and F. tricinctum were isolated from the rhizosphere while F. nygamai and F. verticillioides from the rhizoplane. The other species were recorded from only one growth stage of lentil plant. In sesame plants, rhizosphere yielded nine Fusarium species while rhizoplane gave only six from the three stages investigated. Stage I of sesame rhizosphere possessed the highest colony forming units of Fusarium. As the case for lentil, F. solani was the most common species in sesame rhizospere and rhizoplane. F. verticillioides and F. nygamai (in three different growth stages followed by F. oxysporum and F. tricinctum (in two growth stages were recorded using the dilution-plate and/or soil-plate methods from sesame rhizosphere soils. Rhizoplane Fusarium species of sesame plants were isolated at the three different growth stages with almost equal number of colony forming units. F. poae came after F. solani in its frequency since it was recovered from two growth stages. Several of the isolated species are well-known as pathogens to many cultivated plants. To the best of our knowledge, three species are recorded here for the first time in Egypt from the rhizosphere (F. acutatum, rhizoplane of sesame plants (F. longipes and from rhizosphere of both

  11. EST-SNP discovery and dense genetic mapping in lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) enable candidate gene selection for boron tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Sukhjiwan; Cogan, Noel O I; Stephens, Amber; Noy, Dianne; Butsch, Mirella; Forster, John W; Materne, Michael

    2014-03-01

    Large-scale SNP discovery and dense genetic mapping in a lentil intraspecific cross permitted identification of a single chromosomal region controlling tolerance to boron toxicity, an important breeding objective. Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is a highly nutritious food legume crop that is cultivated world-wide. Until recently, lentil has been considered a genomic 'orphan' crop, limiting the feasibility of marker-assisted selection strategies in breeding programs. The present study reports on the identification of single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from transcriptome sequencing data, utilisation of expressed sequence tag (EST)-derived simple sequence repeat (SSR) and SNP markers for construction of a gene-based genetic linkage map, and identification of markers in close linkage to major QTLs for tolerance to boron (B) toxicity. A total of 2,956 high-quality SNP markers were identified from a lentil EST database. Sub-sets of 546 SSRs and 768 SNPs were further used for genetic mapping of an intraspecific mapping population (Cassab × ILL2024) that exhibits segregation for B tolerance. Comparative analysis of the lentil linkage map with the sequenced genomes of Medicago truncatula Gaertn., soybean (Glycine max [L.] Merr.) and Lotus japonicus L. indicated blocks of conserved macrosynteny, as well as a number of rearrangements. A single genomic region was found to be associated with variation for B tolerance in lentil, based on evaluation performed over 2 years. Comparison of flanking markers to genome sequences of model species (M. truncatula, soybean and Arabidopsis thaliana) identified candidate genes that are functionally associated with B tolerance, and could potentially be used for diagnostic marker development in lentil.

  12. SNP-Based Linkage Mapping for Validation of QTLs for Resistance to Ascochyta Blight in Lentil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudheesh, Shimna; Rodda, Matthew S; Davidson, Jenny; Javid, Muhammad; Stephens, Amber; Slater, Anthony T; Cogan, Noel O I; Forster, John W; Kaur, Sukhjiwan

    2016-01-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is a self-pollinating, diploid, annual, cool-season, food legume crop that is cultivated throughout the world. Ascochyta blight (AB), caused by Ascochyta lentis Vassilievsky, is an economically important and widespread disease of lentil. Development of cultivars with high levels of durable resistance provides an environmentally acceptable and economically feasible method for AB control. A detailed understanding of the genetic basis of AB resistance is hence highly desirable, in order to obtain insight into the number and influence of resistance genes. Genetic linkage maps based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) and simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers have been developed from three recombinant inbred line (RIL) populations. The IH × NF map contained 460 loci across 1461.6 cM, while the IH × DIG map contained 329 loci across 1302.5 cM and the third map, NF × DIG contained 330 loci across 1914.1 cM. Data from these maps were combined with a map from a previously published study through use of bridging markers to generate a consensus linkage map containing 689 loci distributed across seven linkage groups (LGs), with a cumulative length of 2429.61 cM at an average density of one marker per 3.5 cM. Trait dissection of AB resistance was performed for the RIL populations, identifying totals of two and three quantitative trait loci (QTLs) explaining 52 and 69% of phenotypic variation for resistance to infection in the IH × DIG and IH × NF populations, respectively. Presence of common markers in the vicinity of the AB_IH1- and AB_IH2.1/AB_IH2.2-containing regions on both maps supports the inference that a common genomic region is responsible for conferring resistance and is associated with the resistant parent, Indianhead. The third QTL was derived from Northfield. Evaluation of markers associated with AB resistance across a diverse lentil germplasm panel revealed that the identity of alleles associated with AB_IH1 predicted the

  13. SNP-based linkage mapping for validation of QTLs for resistance to ascochyta blight in lentil

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    Shimna Sudheesh

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. is a self-pollinating, diploid, annual, cool-season, food legume crop that is cultivated throughout the world. Ascochyta blight (AB, caused by Ascochyta lentis Vassilievsky, is an economically important and widespread disease of lentil. Development of cultivars with high levels of durable resistance provides an environmentally acceptable and economically feasible method for AB control. A detailed understanding of the genetic basis of AB resistance is hence highly desirable, in order to obtain insight into the number and influence of resistance genes. Genetic linkage maps based on single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP and simple sequence repeat (SSR markers have been developed from three recombinant inbred line (RIL populations. The IH x NF map contained 460 loci across 1461.6 cM, while the IH x DIG map contained 329 loci across 1302.5 cM and the third map, NF x DIG contained 330 loci across 1914.1 cM. Data from these maps were combined with a map from a previously published study through use of bridging markers to generate a consensus linkage map containing 689 loci distributed across 7 linkage groups (LGs, with a cumulative length of 2429.61 cM at an average density of one marker per 3.5 cM. Trait dissection of AB resistance was performed for the RIL populations, identifying totals of two and three quantitative trait loci (QTLs explaining 52% and 69% of phenotypic variation for resistance to infection in the IH x DIG and IH x NF populations, respectively. Presence of common markers in the vicinity of the AB_IH1- and AB_IH2.1/AB_IH2.2-containing regions on both maps supports the inference that a common genomic region is responsible for conferring resistance and is associated with the resistant parent, Indianhead. The third QTL was derived from Northfield. Evaluation of markers associated with AB resistance across a diverse lentil germplasm panel revealed that the identity of alleles associated with AB_IH1 predicted

  14. Antioxidant activity and polyphenolic compound stability of lentil-orange peel powder blend in an extrusion process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rathod, Rahul P; Annapure, Uday S

    2017-03-01

    Lentil contains substantial amount of protein, carbohydrate, fibre and other nutrients and orange peels powder rich in carbohydrate and fiber content The present study was aimed to investigate the effects of extrusion processing parameter on the level of total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), total tannin content and antioxidant activity of lentil-orange peel powder blend, also to investigate the possibility of blend as a candidate for production of protein rich extruded product by using response surface methodology. It was observed that, the physicochemical properties and sensory characteristics of lentil-orange peel based extrudate were highly dependent on process variables. The blend of lentil and orange peel powder has a huge potential for extrusion to produce ready-to-eat extruded with good acceptance. The overall best quality product was optimized and obtained at 16% moisture, 150 °C die temperature and 200 rpm screw speed. Extrusion process increased nutritional value of extruded product with TPC and TFC of 70.4 and 67.62% respectively and antioxidant activity of 60.6%. It showed higher stability at 150 °C with intermediate feed moisture content and despite the use of high temperatures in the extrusion-cooking is possible to minimize the loss of bioactive compounds to achieve products. Thus, results indicated that blend of lentil and orange peel may be used as raw material for the production of extruded snacks with great nutritional value.

  15. Exploring genetic variability within lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) and across related legumes using a newly developed set of microsatellite markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Priyanka; Sharma, Tilak R; Srivastava, Prem S; Abdin, M Z; Bhatia, Sabhyata

    2014-09-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is an economically important grain legume, yet the genetic and genomic resources remain largely uncharacterized and unexploited in this crop. Microsatellites have become markers of choice for crop improvement applications. Hence, simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers were developed for lentil through the construction of genomic library enriched for GA/CT motifs. As a result 122 functional SSR primer pairs were developed from 151 microsatellite loci and validated in L. culinaris cv. Precoz. Thirty three SSR markers were utilized for the analysis of genetic relationships between cultivated and wild species of Lens and related legumes. A total of 123 alleles were amplified at 33 loci ranging from 2-5 alleles with an average of 3.73 alleles per locus. Polymorphic information content (PIC) for all the loci ranged from 0.13 to 0.99 with an average of 0.66 per locus. Varied levels of cross genera transferability were obtained ranging from 69.70 % across Pisum sativum to 12.12 % across Vigna radiata. The UPGMA based dendrogram was able to establish the uniqueness of each genotype and grouped them into two major clusters clearly resolving the genetic relationships within lentil and related species. The new set of SSR markers reported here were efficient and highly polymorphic and would add to the existing repertoire of lentil SSR markers to be utilized in molecular breeding. Moreover, the improved knowledge about intra- and inter-specific genetic relationships would facilitate germplasm utilization for lentil improvement.

  16. Fatty acid, carotenoid and tocopherol compositions of 20 Canadian lentil cultivars and synergistic contribution to antioxidant activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Bing; Deng, Zeyuan; Tang, Yao; Chen, Peter; Liu, Ronghua; Ramdath, D Dan; Liu, Qiang; Hernandez, Marta; Tsao, Rong

    2014-10-15

    Understanding the profile of lipophilic phytochemicals in lentils is necessary to better understand the health benefits of lentils. The fatty acid, carotenoid and tocopherol compositions and antioxidant activities of the lipophilic extracts of 20 lentil cultivars (10 red and 10 green) were therefore examined. Lentils contained 1.52-2.95% lipids, of which 77.5-81.7% were unsaturated essential fatty acids. Total tocopherols ranged from 37 to 64μg/g DW, predominantly γ-tocopherol (96-98% of the tocopherol content), followed by δ- and α-tocopherol. trans-Lutein was the primary and major carotenoid (64-78%) followed by trans-zeaxanthin (5-13%). Carotenoids and tocopherols showed weak correlation with 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) activity (r=0.4893 and 0.3259, respectively), but good correlation when combined (r=0.6688), suggesting they may act synergistically. Carotenoids were found to contribute the most to the strong antioxidant activity measured by photochemiluminescence (PCL) assay. Results from this study contribute to the development of lentil cultivars and related functional foods with increased health benefits. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Symbiotic Efficiency of Native and Exotic Rhizobium Strains Nodulating Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. in Soils of Southern Ethiopia

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    Wondwosen Tena

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Lentil plays a major role in the food and nutritional security of low income Ethiopian families because of the high protein content of their seed; however, their productivity typically is low largely due to soil fertility limitations. Field and pot experiments were conducted during the 2011 cropping season to determine the effectiveness of Rhizobium strains on two cultivars of lentil in Southern Ethiopia. Six rhizobial inoculant treatments (four indigenous and two commercial inoculants, a nitrogen (N fertilizer treatment (50 kg·urea·ha−1 and an absolute control (non-inoculated non-fertilized were used. Inoculated plants produced significantly higher nodule number, nodule dry weight, grain yield and yield components than non-inoculated non-fertilized plants. Inoculation of field grown lentil with rhizobia strain Lt29 and Lt5 enhanced seed yield by 59% and 44%, respectively. Whereas urea fertilization enhanced yields by 40%. Similarly, grain yields were increased during the pot experiment by 92% and 67% over the control treatments by inoculation with Lt29 and Lt5, respectively. The highest levels of N fixation were achieved in plants inoculated with Lt29 (65.7% Ndfa. Both field and pot investigations indicate that inoculation of lentil with native rhizobial strains replace the need for inorganic N fertilization to optimize lentil yields.

  18. Leveraging genomic resources of model species for the assessment of diversity and phylogeny in wild and domesticated lentil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alo, Fida; Furman, Bonnie J; Akhunov, Eduard; Dvorak, Jan; Gepts, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Advances in comparative genomics have provided significant opportunities for analysis of genetic diversity in species with limited genomic resources, such as the genus Lens. Medicago truncatula expressed sequence tags (ESTs) were aligned with the Arabidopsis thaliana genome sequence to identify conserved exon sequences and splice sites in the ESTs. Conserved primers (CPs) based on M. truncatula EST sequences flanking one or more introns were then designed. A total of 22% of the CPs produced polymerase chain reaction amplicons in lentil and were used to sequence amplicons in 175 wild and 133 domesticated lentil accessions. Analysis of the sequences confirmed that L. nigricans and L. ervoides are well-defined species at the DNA sequence level. Lens culinaris subsp. odemensis, L. culinaris subsp. tomentosus, and L. lamottei may constitute a single taxon pending verification with crossability experiments. Lens culinaris subsp. orientalis is the progenitor of domesticated lentil, L. culinaris subsp. culinaris (as proposed before), but a more specific area of origin can be suggested in southern Turkey. We were also able to detect the divergence, following domestication, of the domesticated gene pool into overlapping large-seeded (megasperma) and small-seeded (microsperma) groups. Lentil domestication led to a loss of genetic diversity of approximately 40%. The approach followed in this research has allowed us to rapidly exploit sequence information from model plant species for the study of genetic diversity of a crop such as lentil with limited genomic resources.

  19. Stability of expression of reference genes among different lentil (Lens culinaris) genotypes subjected to cold stress, white mold disease, and Aphanomyces root rot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentils have served as an important plant source of dietary protein for over 8000 years. The development of improved lentil varieties is accelerated by a better understanding of the genetic basis of desirable traits, which can be gained by examining patterns of gene expression among phenotypically d...

  20. Identification of quantitative trait loci controlling root and shoot traits associated to drought tolerance in a lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) recombinant inbred line population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drought is one of the major abiotic stresses limiting lentil productivity in rainfed production systems. Specific rooting patterns can be associated with drought avoidance mechanisms that can be used in lentil breeding. In all, 252 co-dominant and dominant markers were used for genetic linkage map c...

  1. Seed coat removal improves Fe bioavailability in cooked lentils: studies using an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell culture model

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study examined the range of Fe concentration and relative Fe bioavailability of 24 varieties of cooked lentils, as well as the impact of seed coat removal on lentil Fe nutritional quality. Relative Fe bioavailability was assessed by the in vitro/Caco-2 cell culture method. While Fe concentrat...

  2. Use of Wild Relatives and Closely Related Species to Adapt Common Bean to Climate Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James D. Kelly

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. is an important legume crop worldwide. However, abiotic and biotic stress limits bean yields to <600 kg ha−1 in low-income countries. Current low yields result in food insecurity, while demands for increased yields to match the rate of population growth combined with the threat of climate change are significant. Novel and significant advances in genetic improvement using untapped genetic diversity available in crop wild relatives and closely related species must be further explored. A meeting was organized by the Global Crop Diversity Trust to consider strategies for common bean improvement. This review resulted from that meeting and considers our current understanding of the genetic resources available for common bean improvement and the progress that has been achieved thus far through introgression of genetic diversity from wild relatives of common bean, and from closely related species, including: P. acutifolius, P. coccineus, P. costaricensis and P. dumosus. Newly developed genomic tools and their potential applications are presented. A broad outline of research for use of these genetic resources for common bean improvement in a ten-year multi-disciplinary effort is presented.

  3. Soybean rust resistance sources and inheritance in the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Souza, T L P O; Dessaune, S N; Moreira, M A; Barros, E G

    2014-07-25

    Soybean rust (SBR), caused by the fungus Phakopsora pachyrhizi, has been reported in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivars and elite lines that were infected under controlled and natural field conditions in South Africa, the United States, Argentina, and Brazil. Although SBR is currently not a top priority problem for the common bean crop, many bean breeders are concerned about this disease because of the high severity and virulence diversity of P. pachyrhizi and its broad host range. In this study, a set of 44 P. vulgaris genotypes were tested for resistance to P. pachyrhizi; these genotypes included resistance sources to several fungal common bean diseases, carioca-, black- and red-seeded Brazilian cultivars, and elite lines that were developed by the main common bean breeding programs in Brazil. Twenty-four SBR resistance sources were identified. They presented the reddish-brown (RB) lesion type, characterizing resistance reactions. In addition to the RB lesion type, the PI181996 line presented the lowest disease severity mean score, considering its associated standard error value. For this reason, it was crossed with susceptible lines to study the inheritance of resistance. The results support the hypothesis that resistance to SBR in PI181996 is monogenic and dominant. We propose that this SBR resistance gene, the first to be identified and characterized in common bean, might be designated as Pkp-1.

  4. In vitro protein digestibility and physico-chemical properties of flours and protein concentrates from two varieties of lentil (Lens culinaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbana, Chockry; Boye, Joyce Irene

    2013-02-01

    The chemical composition of whole lentil flours and lentil protein concentrates prepared by alkaline extraction and iso-electric precipitation from Blaze and Laird varieties of lentil were studied. The protein composition of the flours and concentrates, determined by sodium dodecyl sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and size-exclusion high-performance liquid chromatography (SE-HPLC) showed that the extracted proteins were composed mainly of globulins and albumins. Trypsin inhibitor activity ranged between 0.94 and 1.94 trypsin inhibitor units (TIU) mg(-1) for the flours, but was markedly lower in the protein concentrates ranging between 0.17 and 0.66 TIU mg(-1). In vitro protein digestibility ranged between 75.90 and 77.05% for the flours, whereas significantly (P lentil protein concentrates is higher than that of the flours, however, both lentil flours and protein concentrates contain useful proteins that could serve as value-added ingredients in food formulations.

  5. Genetic Diversity of Cultivated Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) and Its Relation to the World's Agro-ecological Zones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khazaei, Hamid; Caron, Carolyn T; Fedoruk, Michael; Diapari, Marwan; Vandenberg, Albert; Coyne, Clarice J; McGee, Rebecca; Bett, Kirstin E

    2016-01-01

    Assessment of genetic diversity and population structure of germplasm collections plays a critical role in supporting conservation and crop genetic enhancement strategies. We used a cultivated lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) collection consisting of 352 accessions originating from 54 diverse countries to estimate genetic diversity and genetic structure using 1194 polymorphic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers which span the lentil genome. Using principal coordinate analysis, population structure analysis and UPGMA cluster analysis, the accessions were categorized into three major groups that prominently reflected geographical origin (world's agro-ecological zones). The three clusters complemented the origins, pedigrees, and breeding histories of the germplasm. The three groups were (a) South Asia (sub-tropical savannah), (b) Mediterranean, and (c) northern temperate. Based on the results from this study, it is also clear that breeding programs still have considerable genetic diversity to mine within the cultivated lentil, as surveyed South Asian and Canadian germplasm revealed narrow genetic diversity.

  6. Protein Quality of Irradiated Brazilian Beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delincée, Henry; Villavicencio, Anna-Lucia C. H.; Mancini-Filho, Jorge

    1998-06-01

    Beans are a major source of dietary protein in Brazil. However, high losses due to insect infestation occur after each harvest. To combat these losses, radiation processing of beans offers promise as an alternative to chemical treatment, provided the nutritional quality of beans is not impaired by the radiation treatment. Conflicting results have been published about the effect of radiation on the biological value of legume proteins. Therefore, two varieties of Brazilian beans were studied: 1) Phaseolus vulgaris L., var. carioca and 2) Vigna unguiculata (L.) Walp, var. macaçar. The beans were irradiated with doses of 0, 0.5, 1.0, 2.5, 5.0 and 10 kGy. Since irradiated beans will be consumed after appropriate storage, the beans under study were stored for 6 months at ambient temperature. Protein quality was measured by a biological assay employing the nitrogen balance approach in weanling rats. The animals were fed with optimally cooked beans, which were the only source of protein (˜10%). Nitrogen contents of legumes, diets, animal urine and faeces were determined by Kjeldahl analysis. The indices for apparent protein quality: net protein utilisation, digestibility and biological value were not influenced by irradiation. Thus, radiation treatment of Brazilian beans offers considerable promise as an effective insect disinfection process, without impairing the biological quality of the valuable bean protein.

  7. Identification and analysis of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) transcriptomes by massively parallel pyrosequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-01

    Background Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) is the most important food legume in the world. Although this crop is very important to both the developed and developing world as a means of dietary protein supply, resources available in common bean are limited. Global transcriptome analysis is important to better understand gene expression, genetic variation, and gene structure annotation in addition to other important features. However, the number and description of common bean sequences are very limited, which greatly inhibits genome and transcriptome research. Here we used 454 pyrosequencing to obtain a substantial transcriptome dataset for common bean. Results We obtained 1,692,972 reads with an average read length of 207 nucleotides (nt). These reads were assembled into 59,295 unigenes including 39,572 contigs and 19,723 singletons, in addition to 35,328 singletons less than 100 bp. Comparing the unigenes to common bean ESTs deposited in GenBank, we found that 53.40% or 31,664 of these unigenes had no matches to this dataset and can be considered as new common bean transcripts. Functional annotation of the unigenes carried out by Gene Ontology assignments from hits to Arabidopsis and soybean indicated coverage of a broad range of GO categories. The common bean unigenes were also compared to the bean bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) end sequences, and a total of 21% of the unigenes (12,724) including 9,199 contigs and 3,256 singletons match to the 8,823 BAC-end sequences. In addition, a large number of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and transcription factors were also identified in this study. Conclusions This work provides the first large scale identification of the common bean transcriptome derived by 454 pyrosequencing. This research has resulted in a 150% increase in the number of Phaseolus vulgaris ESTs. The dataset obtained through this analysis will provide a platform for functional genomics in common bean and related legumes and will aid in the

  8. Identification and analysis of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) transcriptomes by massively parallel pyrosequencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalavacharla, Venu; Liu, Zhanji; Meyers, Blake C; Thimmapuram, Jyothi; Melmaiee, Kalpalatha

    2011-10-11

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) is the most important food legume in the world. Although this crop is very important to both the developed and developing world as a means of dietary protein supply, resources available in common bean are limited. Global transcriptome analysis is important to better understand gene expression, genetic variation, and gene structure annotation in addition to other important features. However, the number and description of common bean sequences are very limited, which greatly inhibits genome and transcriptome research. Here we used 454 pyrosequencing to obtain a substantial transcriptome dataset for common bean. We obtained 1,692,972 reads with an average read length of 207 nucleotides (nt). These reads were assembled into 59,295 unigenes including 39,572 contigs and 19,723 singletons, in addition to 35,328 singletons less than 100 bp. Comparing the unigenes to common bean ESTs deposited in GenBank, we found that 53.40% or 31,664 of these unigenes had no matches to this dataset and can be considered as new common bean transcripts. Functional annotation of the unigenes carried out by Gene Ontology assignments from hits to Arabidopsis and soybean indicated coverage of a broad range of GO categories. The common bean unigenes were also compared to the bean bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) end sequences, and a total of 21% of the unigenes (12,724) including 9,199 contigs and 3,256 singletons match to the 8,823 BAC-end sequences. In addition, a large number of simple sequence repeats (SSRs) and transcription factors were also identified in this study. This work provides the first large scale identification of the common bean transcriptome derived by 454 pyrosequencing. This research has resulted in a 150% increase in the number of Phaseolus vulgaris ESTs. The dataset obtained through this analysis will provide a platform for functional genomics in common bean and related legumes and will aid in the development of molecular markers that

  9. Identification and analysis of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. transcriptomes by massively parallel pyrosequencing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thimmapuram Jyothi

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris is the most important food legume in the world. Although this crop is very important to both the developed and developing world as a means of dietary protein supply, resources available in common bean are limited. Global transcriptome analysis is important to better understand gene expression, genetic variation, and gene structure annotation in addition to other important features. However, the number and description of common bean sequences are very limited, which greatly inhibits genome and transcriptome research. Here we used 454 pyrosequencing to obtain a substantial transcriptome dataset for common bean. Results We obtained 1,692,972 reads with an average read length of 207 nucleotides (nt. These reads were assembled into 59,295 unigenes including 39,572 contigs and 19,723 singletons, in addition to 35,328 singletons less than 100 bp. Comparing the unigenes to common bean ESTs deposited in GenBank, we found that 53.40% or 31,664 of these unigenes had no matches to this dataset and can be considered as new common bean transcripts. Functional annotation of the unigenes carried out by Gene Ontology assignments from hits to Arabidopsis and soybean indicated coverage of a broad range of GO categories. The common bean unigenes were also compared to the bean bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC end sequences, and a total of 21% of the unigenes (12,724 including 9,199 contigs and 3,256 singletons match to the 8,823 BAC-end sequences. In addition, a large number of simple sequence repeats (SSRs and transcription factors were also identified in this study. Conclusions This work provides the first large scale identification of the common bean transcriptome derived by 454 pyrosequencing. This research has resulted in a 150% increase in the number of Phaseolus vulgaris ESTs. The dataset obtained through this analysis will provide a platform for functional genomics in common bean and related legumes and

  10. Optimization of microwave vacuum drying parameters for germinated lentils based on starch digestibility, antioxidant activity and total phenolic content

    OpenAIRE

    Robbarts Nongmaithem; Venkatesh Meda

    2017-01-01

    The aim of this study was to optimize the processing parameters of pulse mode microwave-vacuum drying of germinated green and red lentils (CDC Greenland and CDC Maxim) and investigate the changes in their total phenolic content (TPC), total antioxidant activity (TAA) and in-vitro starch digestibility (SD). The lentils were germinated for 5 days and dried by a pulse mode microwave-vacuum method, using 2 s to 8 s out of 10 s pulsed mode at 2000W microwave power and varying the vacuum pressure l...

  11. Geographical differentiation of dried lentil seed (Lens culinaris) samples using diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and discriminant analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kouvoutsakis, G; Mitsi, C; Tarantilis, P A; Polissiou, M G; Pappas, C S

    2014-02-15

    Diffuse reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (DRIFTS) and discriminant analysis were used for the geographical differentiation of dried lentil seed (Lens culinaris) samples. Specifically, 18 Greek samples and nine samples imported from other countries were distinguished using the 2250-1720 and 1275-955 cm⁻¹ spectral regions. The differentiation is complete. The combination of DRIFTS and discriminant analysis enables simple, rapid, cheap and accurate differentiation of commercial lentil seeds in terms of geographical origin. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Construction of intersubspecific molecular genetic map of lentil based on ISSR, RAPD and SSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Mamta; Verma, Bhawna; Kumar, Naresh; Chahota, Rakesh K; Rathour, Rajeev; Sharma, Shyam K; Bhatia, Sabhyata; Sharma, Tilak R

    2012-01-01

    Lentil (Lens culinaris ssp. culinaris), is a self-pollinating diploid (2n = 2x = 14), cool-season legume crop and is consumed worldwide as a rich source of protein (~24.0%), largely in vegetarian diets. Here we report development of a genetic linkage map of Lens using 114 F(2) plants derived from the intersubspecific cross between L 830 and ILWL 77. RAPD (random amplified polymorphic DNA) primers revealed more polymorphism than ISSR (intersimple sequence repeat) and SSR (simple sequence repeat) markers. The highest proportion (30.72%) of segregation distortion was observed in RAPD markers. Of the 235 markers (34 SSR, 9 ISSR and 192 RAPD) used in the mapping study, 199 (28 SSRs, 9 ISSRs and 162 RAPDs) were mapped into 11 linkage groups (LGs), varying between 17.3 and 433.8 cM and covering 3843.4 cM, with an average marker spacing of 19.3 cM. Linkage analysis revealed nine major groups with 15 or more markers each and two small LGs with two markers each, and 36 unlinked markers. The study reported assigning of 11 new SSRs on the linkage map. Of the 66 markers with aberrant segregation, 14 were unlinked and the remaining 52 were mapped. ISSR and RAPD markers were found to be useful in map construction and saturation. The current map represents maximum coverage of lentil genome and could be used for identification of QTL regions linked to agronomic traits, and for marker-assisted selection in lentil.

  13. Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi colonization and phosphorus nutrition in organic field pea and lentil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baird, Julia M; Walley, Fran L; Shirtliffe, Steven J

    2010-11-01

    Phosphorus (P) can be low in soil under low input organic management; however, beneficial crop plant associations with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are known to promote crop nutrition and increase phosphorus uptake. Thus, management strategies that promote AMF associations are particularly desirable for low-input cropping systems. The objectives of this study were to determine the impact of seeding rate on AMF colonization and the impact of AMF colonization on P concentration and uptake by organically grown field pea and lentil. Field experiments examined the impact of three seeding rates of field pea and lentil on P uptake and crop yield. Phosphorus accumulation was examined further in a controlled growth chamber experiment, in which field pea was sown at rates corresponding to those used in the field and harvested at 10-day intervals until 50 days after emergence. In the field, the level of AMF colonization of roots remained at 80% for field pea, while colonization of lentil increased with increasing seeding rates from 77% to 88%. The level of AMF colonization of field pea achieved in the growth chamber after 50 days was 80% for the two highest seeding rates and 60% for the low seeding rate. The rate at which AMF colonization occurred did not vary between treatments. Ultimately, AMF colonization level did not affect P accumulation. In contrast to several previous studies, both field and growth chamber experiments revealed that AMF colonization was not reduced at higher seeding rates. These results suggest that organic farmers may increase seeding rates without adversely affecting P nutrition.

  14. Lentil and chickpea protein-stabilized emulsions: optimization of emulsion formulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Can Karaca, Asli; Nickerson, Michael T; Low, Nicholas H

    2011-12-28

    Chickpea and lentil protein-stabilized emulsions were optimized with regard to pH (3.0-8.0), protein concentration (1.1-4.1% w/w), and oil content (20-40%) for their ability to form and stabilize oil-in-water emulsions using response surface methodology. Specifically, creaming stability, droplet size, and droplet charge were assessed. Optimum conditions for minimal creaming (no serum separation after 24 h), small droplet size ( 40 mV) were identified as 4.1% protein, 40% oil, and pH 3.0 or 8.0, regardless of the plant protein used for emulsion preparation.

  15. Transcriptome analysis of lentil (Lens culinaris Medikus) in response to seedling drought stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Dharmendra; Singh, Chandan Kumar; Taunk, Jyoti; Tomar, Ram Sewak Singh; Chaturvedi, Ashish Kumar; Gaikwad, Kishor; Pal, Madan

    2017-02-27

    Drought stress is one of the most harmful abiotic stresses in crop plants. As a moderately drought tolerant crop, lentil is a major crop in rainfed areas and a suitable candidate for drought stress tolerance research work. Screening for drought tolerance stress under hydroponic conditions at seedling stage with air exposure is an efficient technique to select genotypes with contrasting traits. Transcriptome analysis provides valuable resources, especially for lentil, as here the information on complete genome sequence is not available. Hence, the present studies were carried out. This study was undertaken to understand the biochemical mechanisms and transcriptome changes involved in imparting adaptation to drought stress at seedling stage in drought-tolerant (PDL-2) and drought-sensitive (JL-3) cultivars. Among different physiological and biochemical parameters, a significant increase was recorded in proline, glycine betaine contents and activities of SOD, APX and GPX in PDL-2 compared to JL-3while chlorophyll, RWC and catalase activity decreased significantly in JL-3. Transcriptome changes between the PDL-2 and JL-3 under drought stress were evaluated using Illumina HiSeq 2500 platform. Total number of bases ranged from 5.1 to 6.7 Gb. Sequence analysis of control and drought treated cDNA libraries of PDL-2 and JL-3 produced 74032, 75500, 78328 and 81523 contigs, respectively with respective N50 value of 2011, 2008, 2000 and 1991. Differential gene expression of drought treated genotypes along with their controls revealed a total of 11,435 upregulated and 6,934 downregulated transcripts. For functional classification of DEGs, KEGG pathway annotation analysis extracted a total of 413 GO annotation terms where 176 were within molecular process, 128 in cellular and 109 in biological process groups. The transcriptional profiles provide a foundation for deciphering the underlying mechanism for drought tolerance in lentil. Transcriptional regulation, signal transduction

  16. Deep Super-SAGE transcriptomic analysis of cold acclimation in lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrios, Abel; Caminero, Constantino; García, Pedro; Krezdorn, Nicolas; Hoffmeier, Klaus; Winter, Peter; Pérez de la Vega, Marcelino

    2017-06-30

    Frost is one of the main abiotic stresses limiting plant distribution and crop production. To cope with the stress, plants evolved adaptations known as cold acclimation or chilling tolerance to maximize frost tolerance. Cold acclimation is a progressive acquisition of freezing tolerance by plants subjected to low non-freezing temperatures which subsequently allows them to survive exposure to frost. Lentil is a cool season grain legume that is challenged by winter frost in some areas of its cultivation. To better understand the genetic base of frost tolerance differential gene expression in response to cold acclimation was investigated. Recombinant inbred lines (RILs) from the cross Precoz x WA8649041 were first classified as cold tolerant or cold susceptible according to their response to temperatures between -3 to -15 °C. Then, RILs from both extremes of the response curve were cold acclimated and the leaf transcriptomes of two bulks each of eight frost tolerant and seven cold susceptible RILs were investigated by Deep Super-SAGE transcriptome profiling. Thus, four RNA bulks were analysed: the acclimated susceptible, the acclimated tolerant and the respective controls (non-acclimated susceptible and non-acclimated tolerant). Approximately 16.5 million 26 nucleotide long Super-SAGE tags were sequenced in the four sets (between ~3 and 5.4 millions). In total, 133,077 different unitags, each representing a particular transcript isoform, were identified in these four sets. Tags which showed a significantly different abundance in any of the bulks (fold change ≥4.0 and a significant p-value <0.001) were selected and used to identify the corresponding lentil gene sequence. Three hundred of such lentil sequences were identified. Most of their known homologs coded for glycine-rich, cold and drought-regulated proteins, dormancy-associated proteins, proline-rich proteins (PRPs) and other membrane proteins. These were generally but not exclusively over-expressed in the

  17. Field evaluation of cutter and feeder mechanism of chickpea harvester for lentil harvesting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S Kamgar

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Introduction The main producers of lentil are Canada, India, Nepal and China, respectively and Iran is the ninth producer in the world. The hand pulling is the usual method of lentil harvesting. Use of conventional combine because of short leg varieties, wide combine head in dry land and grain losses by cutter bar vibrations is impossible. So a mechanism should be designed to harvest the lentil plants with minimum damage. This mechanism should be evaluated under different tests of crop and machines such as forward speed (FS, grain moisture content (GMC, different varieties and other parameters. Some researchers studied the effects of GMC (Andrews and et al., 1993; Huitink, 2005; Adisa, 2009; Abdi and Jalali, 2013 and FS on grain losses (Geng et al., 1984; Swapan et al., 2001; Mostafavand and Kamgar, 2014; Hunt, 1995. Field tests were conducted at three levels of FS 1.5, 3 and 4.5 km.h-1; three levels of cutting height (CH 4, 8 and 13 cm and two levels of GMC, 8 and 14% on two varieties of lentils including Flip and Shiraz with three replications. Materials and Methods The feeder and cutter mechanism for chickpea harvesting that was the base design of device which is notched wheel and counter shear, was used. The other components of device were dividers, slat and chain feeders, belt and pulleys, chassis, elevator conveyor and storage. Two split plot design based on a randomized complete design was used to determine the effects of above treatments on lentil losses. Results and Discussion The ANOVA results indicated that the all studied factors; FS of feeder and cutter mechanism, CH and GMC had significant effect on losses of Shiraz variety (P0.05. The ranges of losses of Flip variety at 8% GMC were 8.6 to 10% for FS of 1.5 km.h-1, 9.1 to 10.4% for FS of 3 km.h-1and 10.4 to 11.4% for FS of 4.5 km h-1. These ranges at 14% GMC were 7.9 to 8.9% for FS of 1.5 km.h-1, 8.4 to 9.2% for FS of 3 km.h-1and 8.5 to 10% for FS of 4.5 km h-1. The ranges of

  18. Genome-wide survey and expression profiles of the AP2/ERF family in castor bean (Ricinus communis L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Wei; Li, Fei; Ling, Lizhen; Liu, Aizhong

    2013-11-13

    The AP2/ERF transcription factor, one of the largest gene families in plants, plays a crucial role in the regulation of growth and development, metabolism, and responses to biotic and abiotic stresses. Castor bean (Ricinus communis L., Euphobiaceae) is one of most important non-edible oilseed crops and its seed oil is broadly used for industrial applications. The available genome provides a great chance to identify and characterize the global information on AP2/ERF transcription factors in castor bean, which might provide insights in understanding the molecular basis of the AP2/ERF family in castor bean. A total of 114 AP2/ERF transcription factors were identified based on the genome in castor bean. According to the number of the AP2/ERF domain, the conserved amino acid residues within AP2/ERF domain, the conserved motifs and gene organization in structure, and phylogenetical analysis, the identified 114 AP2/ERF transcription factors were characterized. Global expression profiles among different tissues using high-throughput sequencing of digital gene expression profiles (DGEs) displayed diverse expression patterns that may provide basic information in understanding the function of the AP2/ERF gene family in castor bean. The current study is the first report on identification and characterization of the AP2/ERF transcription factors based on the genome of castor bean in the family Euphobiaceae. Results obtained from this study provide valuable information in understanding the molecular basis of the AP2/ERF family in castor bean.

  19. Weed Azuki Bean, an Overlooked Representative

    OpenAIRE

    YAMAGUCHI, Hirofumi

    1989-01-01

    Two forms of prostrated and slightly branching Azuki bean (Phaseolus angularis W.F. Wight) grow naturally in the ruderal and cultivated fields in central Japan. These have larger leaves and thick stem, like the cultigen, and have easily dehiscent black pods similar to the wild Azuki bean (P. angularis var. nipponensis Ohwi). Two forms have seeds intermediate in size between the cultigen and wild Azuki beans. The black-seed form shows relatively larger plant stature and is seen in ruderal site...

  20. Kinetics model development of cocoa bean fermentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kresnowati, M. T. A. P.; Gunawan, Agus Yodi; Muliyadini, Winny

    2015-12-01

    Although Indonesia is one of the biggest cocoa beans producers in the world, Indonesian cocoa beans are oftenly of low quality and thereby frequently priced low in the world market. In order to improve the quality, adequate post-harvest cocoa processing techniques are required. Fermentation is the vital stage in series of cocoa beans post harvest processing which could improve the quality of cocoa beans, in particular taste, aroma, and colours. During the fermentation process, combination of microbes grow producing metabolites that serve as the precursors for cocoa beans flavour. Microbial composition and thereby their activities will affect the fermentation performance and influence the properties of cocoa beans. The correlation could be reviewed using a kinetic model that includes unstructured microbial growth, substrate utilization and metabolic product formation. The developed kinetic model could be further used to design cocoa bean fermentation process to meet the expected quality. Further the development of kinetic model of cocoa bean fermentation also serve as a good case study of mixed culture solid state fermentation, that has rarely been studied. This paper presents the development of a kinetic model for solid-state cocoa beans fermentation using an empirical approach. Series of lab scale cocoa bean fermentations, either natural fermentations without starter addition or fermentations with mixed yeast and lactic acid bacteria starter addition, were used for model parameters estimation. The results showed that cocoa beans fermentation can be modelled mathematically and the best model included substrate utilization, microbial growth, metabolites production and its transport. Although the developed model still can not explain the dynamics in microbial population, this model can sufficiently explained the observed changes in sugar concentration as well as metabolic products in the cocoa bean pulp.

  1. Successful introgression of abiotic stress tolerance from wild tepary bean to common bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production is severely limited due to abiotic stresses, including drought and sub-zero temperatures. Tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius Gray), a relative of common bean, has demonstrated tolerance to these stresses. Preliminary studies screening tepary accessions ...

  2. Integrating and Processing XML Documents with JavaBeans Components

    OpenAIRE

    Yin-Wah Chiou

    2003-01-01

    The eXtensible Markup Language (XML) and JavaBeans component model have gained wide popularity in the Object Web computing. This paper explores how JavaBeans components can be used to integrate and process the XML documents. It covers Bean Markup Language (BML), XML BeanMaker, XML Bean Suite, and Xbeans. The most powerful JavaBeans connection language is BML, which represents an integration of XML and JavaBeans components to provide a mechanism for implementing active content. XML BeanMaker i...

  3. Chemopreventive effect of raw and cooked lentils (Lens culinaris L) and soybeans (Glycine max) against azoxymethane-induced aberrant crypt foci.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faris, Mo'ez Al-Islam E; Takruri, Hamed R; Shomaf, Maha S; Bustanji, Yasser K

    2009-05-01

    Although lentils (Lens culinaris L) contain several bioactive compounds that have been linked to the prevention of cancer, the in vivo chemopreventive ability of lentils against chemically induced colorectal cancer has not been examined. Our present study examined the hypothesis that lentils could suppress the early carcinogenesis in vivo by virtue of their bioactive micro- and macroconstituents and that culinary thermal treatment could affect their chemopreventive potential. To accomplish this goal, we used raw whole lentils (RWL), raw split lentils (RSL), cooked whole lentils (CWL), and cooked split lentils (CSL). Raw soybeans (RSB; Glycine max) were used for the purpose of comparison with a well-studied chemopreventive agent. Sixty weanling Fischer 344 male rats, 4 to 5 weeks of age, were randomly assigned to 6 groups (10 rats/group): the control group (C) received AIN-93G diet, and treatment leguminous groups of RWL, CWL, RSL, CSL, and RSB received the treatment diets containing AIN-93G+5% of the above-mentioned legumes. After acclimatization for 1 week (at 5th to 6th week of age), all animals were put on the control and treatment diets separately for 5 weeks (from 6th to 11th week of age). At the end of the 5th week of feeding (end of 11th week of age), all rats received 2 subcutaneous injections of azoxymethane carcinogen at 15 mg/kg rat body weight per dose once a week for 2 consecutive weeks. After 17 weeks of the last azoxymethane injection (from 12th to 29th week of age), all rats were euthanized. Chemopreventive ability was assessed using colonic aberrant crypt foci and activity of hepatic glutathione-S-transferases. Significant reductions (P lentils might be protective against colon carcinogenesis and that hydrothermal treatment resulted in an improvement in the chemopreventive potential for the whole lentils.

  4. INFLUENCE OF ADDITION OF OAT AND LENTIL ON THE CONTENT OF THE DETECTED COMPONENTS IN BREAD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Frančáková

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the results obtained by bread products analysis made with the addition of oats and lentils, which increased its nutrition value are presented. Breads were prepared with addition of 10 %, 20 %, 30 %, 40 % and 50 % which were analyzed for Fe, Mn, Zn, Cu, Co, Ni, Cr, Pb and Cd content. Prepared products were evaluated also from viewpoint of their technological and nutritional value. Use of oat in bread increased with the addition of a quantity of 50 % content of nutritionally significant elements such as Fe (3.2 times, Mn (3.13 times, Zn (2.23 times, Cu (2.01 times and Cr (1.2 times. The addition of lentils increased particularly Cu content (3.55 times, Zn (2.96 times and Mn (1.29 times. None of the samples showed exceeded maximum limit (1.0 mg.kg-1 for lead. Based on the analysis results it was confirmed, that the most problematic element in our soils and subsequently in the foodstuffs is cadmium. Exceeded values (-1 were detected in 8 samples from 11, in finished products the values were within the limits ranging from 0.090 mg.kg-1 Cd to 0.180 mg.kg-1 Cd.doi:10.5219/42

  5. Antioxidant activity and phenolic compositions of lentil (Lens culinaris var. Morton) extract and its fractions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yanping; Chang, Sam K.C.; Gu, Yan; Qian, Steven Y.

    2011-01-01

    Phenolic compounds were extracted from Morton lentils using acidified aqueous acetone. The crude Morton extract (CME) was applied onto a macroresin column and desorbed by aqueous methanol to obtain a semi-purified Morton extract (SPME). The SPME was further fractionated over Sephadex LH-20 column into five main fractions (Fr I – Fr V). The phytochemical contents such as total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), and condensed tannin content (CTC) of the CME, SPME, and its fractions were examined by colorimetric methods. Antioxidant activity of extracts and fractions were screened by DPPH scavenging activity, trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), ferric reduced antioxidant power (FRAP), and oxygen radical absorbing capacity (ORAC) methods. In addition, the compositions of active fractions were determined by HPLC-DAD and HPLC-MS methods. Results showed that fraction enriched in condensed tannins (Fr V) exhibited significantly higher value of TPC, CTC and higher antioxidant activity as compared to the crude extract, SPME and low-molecular-weight fractions (Fr I – IV). Eighteen compounds existed in those fractions, and seventeen were tentatively identified by UV and MS spectra. HPLC-MS analysis revealed Fr II contained mainly kaempferol glycoside, Fr III and Fr IV mainly contained flavonoid glycosides, and Fr V was composed of condensed tannins. The results suggested that extract of Morton lentils is a promising source of antioxidant phenolics, and may be used as a dietary supplement for health promotion. PMID:21332205

  6. Antioxidant activity and phenolic compositions of lentil (Lens culinaris var. Morton) extract and its fractions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yanping; Chang, Sam K C; Gu, Yan; Qian, Steven Y

    2011-03-23

    Phenolic compounds were extracted from Morton lentils using acidified aqueous acetone. The crude Morton extract (CME) was applied onto a macroresin column and desorbed by aqueous methanol to obtain a semipurified Morton extract (SPME). The SPME was further fractionated over a Sephadex LH-20 column into five main fractions (I-V). The phytochemical contents such as total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), and condensed tannin content (CTC) of the CME, SPME, and its fractions were examined by colorimetric methods. Antioxidant activity of extracts and fractions were screened by DPPH scavenging activity, Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (TEAC), ferric reduced antioxidant power (FRAP), and oxygen radical absorbing capacity (ORAC) methods. In addition, the compositions of active fractions were determined by HPLC-DAD and HPLC-MS methods. Results showed that the fraction enriched in condensed tannins (fraction V) exhibited significantly higher values of TPC, CTC, and antioxidant activity as compared to the crude extract, SPME, and low molecular weight fractions (I-IV). Eighteen compounds existed in those fractions, and 17 were tentatively identified by UV and MS spectra. HPLC-MS analysis revealed fraction II contained mainly kaempferol glycoside, fractions III and IV mainly contained flavonoid glycosides, and fraction V was composed of condensed tannins. The results suggested that the extract of Morton lentils is a promising source of antioxidant phenolics and may be used as a dietary supplement for health promotion.

  7. Antioxidant and antihypertensive properties of liquid and solid state fermented lentils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torino, Maria Inés; Limón, Rocío I; Martínez-Villaluenga, Cristina; Mäkinen, Sari; Pihlanto, Anne; Vidal-Valverde, Concepción; Frias, Juana

    2013-01-15

    The effect of liquid (LSF) and solid state fermentation (SSF) of lentils for production of water-soluble fractions with antioxidant and antihypertensive properties was studied. LSF was performed either spontaneously (NF) or by Lactobacillus plantarum (LP) while SSF was performed by Bacillus subtilis (BS). Native lactic flora in NF adapted better than L. plantarum to fermentative broth and BS counts increased 4.0 logCFU/g up to 48 h of SSF. LSF water-soluble fractions had higher (P ≤ 0.05) free amino groups, GABA content, antioxidant and angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitory (ACEI) activities than SSF. In addition, GABA and ACEI activity of LSF increased in a time-dependent manner. Proteolysis by BS was limited, with slight changes in free amino groups, while GABA, total phenolic compounds and antioxidant capacity increased throughout fermentation. Higher antihypertensive potential was observed in NF (96 h) characterised by the highest GABA content (10.42 mg/g extract), ACE-inhibitory potency (expressed as IC(50)) of 0.18 mg protein/ml and antioxidant capacity of 0.26 mmol Trolox equivalents/g extract. Therefore, water-soluble fermented lentil extracts obtained by LSF are particularly promising as functional ingredients in preventing hypertension. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Chemical profiling of lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) Cultivars and isolation of compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsopmo, Apollinaire; Muir, Alister D

    2010-08-11

    A high-performance liquid chromatography method was developed to obtain fingerprints of secondary metabolites of 12 lentil cultivars grown under the same environmental condition. Extracts (100% methanol and methanol-water (1:1)) were analyzed by RP-HPLC. Full photodiode array (191-360 nm) data were collected and used for cluster analysis. Methanol and methanol-water extracts showed slightly different clustering patterns. In the dendogram of methanol extracts, CDC Richlea appeared as an isolated group, whereas Indianhead was the isolated group in methanol-water extracts. The cultivar CDC Milestone was selected for further evaluation because of the presence of three peaks (8.9, 16.7, and 32.7 min) that were absent in other cultivars or present in very small amounts. Chromatographic separations of the methanol extract afforded several compounds including the novel 4-chloro-1H-indole-3-N-methylacetamide (13) as well as itaconic acid (3), arbutin (5), gentisic acid 5-O-[beta-d-apiofuranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-d-xylopyranoside] (9), and (6S,7Z,9R)-9-hydroxymegastigma-4,7-dien-3-one-9-O-beta-d-apiofuranosyl-(1-->2)-beta-d-glucopyranoside (14), which are described for the first time from lentils. Structures were determined by high-resolution NMR experiments.

  9. Global wild annual Lens collection: a potential resource for lentil genetic base broadening and yield enhancement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Mohar; Bisht, Ishwari Singh; Kumar, Sandeep; Dutta, Manoranjan; Bansal, Kailash Chander; Karale, Moreshwar; Sarker, Ashutosh; Amri, Ahmad; Kumar, Shiv; Datta, Swapan Kumar

    2014-01-01

    Crop wild relatives (CWRs) are invaluable gene sources for various traits of interest, yet these potential resources are themselves increasingly threatened by the impact of climate change as well as other anthropogenic and socio-economic factors. The prime goal of our research was to cover all aspects of wild Lens genetic resource management like species characterization, agro-morphological evaluation, diversity assessment, and development of representative sets for its enhanced utilization in lentil base broadening and yield improvement initiatives. We characterized and evaluated extensively, the global wild annual Lens taxa, originating from twenty seven counties under two agro-climatic conditions of India consecutively for three cropping seasons. Results on various qualitative and quantitative characters including two foliar diseases showed wide variations for almost all yield attributing traits including multiple disease resistance in the wild species, L. nigricans and L. ervoides accessions. The core set developed from the entire Lens taxa had maximum representation from Turkey and Syria, indicating rich diversity in accessions originating from these regions. Diversity analysis also indicated wide geographical variations across genepool as was reflected in the core set. Potential use of core set, as an initial starting material, for genetic base broadening of cultivated lentil was also suggested.

  10. Morphology of seedling lentil (Lens culinaris Medic., Fabaceae) as influenced by light intensity and heredity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nozzolillo, C

    1986-01-01

    Lentil seedlings (Lens culinaris Medic.) were grown out-of-doors, in a shaded greenhouse or in a controlled environment chamber (15 degrees C, 14 hr day under a bank of incandescent and fluorescent lights). Bright light promoted branching of seedlings and inhibited internode elongation. Internodes formed after transfer of plants from high to low or from low to high light intensity were like those grown in continuous high or low light intensity. Branching was enhanced following transfer from high to low light intensity. Transfer from low to high light intensity resulted in stimulation of lateral bud development only if irradiance was very high (full sun). Third generation lines from single seed selections exhibited segregation of internode lengths. F4 hybrids of a cross between a "tall" and a "short" plant showed a similar segregation. Number of leaflets per leaf increased from two at nodes 3 and 4 to four at node 7 in the species of lentils examined (L. culinaris, L. orientalis, L. ervoides, L. nigricans) regardless of light intensity.

  11. In Vitro Optimization of Rooting in Two Genotype of Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Ghasemi omra

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Establishing of an efficient and repeatable regeneration protocol is one of the basic prerequirements for gene transformation and plant breeding. Lentil, because of rooting problems, is a recalcitrant legume in respect of whole regeneration. For this, we examined two methods in vitro and in vivo flowing in vitro method to induce root on regenerated shoots. In vitro-in vivo method was better than in vitro for rooting of regenerated shoots. The shoots regenerated from medium containing 2 mg/lit BAP produced higher frequency of rooting (70% than medium containing 3, 4 mg/lit BAP that represents the inhibitory effect of cytokenins on root induction. IBA (10 mg /lit as a overnight pretreatment, induced higher frequency of rooting than 3 days pretreatment while, NAA hormone with similar concentration as a 3 days pretreatment produced highest frequency of rooting (80%. Genotypes had no effect on percent, number and length of produced roots. Keywords: Lentil, Rooting, Auxin, explant, in vitro

  12. Hydropriming Increases Germination of Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. under Water Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sevil SAĞLAM

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Fresh seeds of lentil cultivars ‘Pul 11’, ‘Sultan 1’ and ‘Meyveci 2001’ were subjected to hydropriming with an objective to improve germination and seedling vigor under water stress induced by PEG-6000 at the water potentials of 0.0 (distilled water, -0.3 and-0.6 MPa. Results revealed that germination delayed in increasing water stress with variable germination among cultivars. Root, shoot length and germination were higher but mean germination time were lower in the primed seeds. Seeds were able to germinate at all concentrations of PEG but higher germination and improved seedling growth was observed in primed seeds. Cultivars showed variable response to water stress and cv. ‘Pul 11’ with the lightest seed weight gave better performance. Whereas, cv. ‘Sultan 1’ enhanced germination percentage with hydropriming under increased water stress. It was concluded that inhibition of germination due to water stress should be overcome by using primed lentil seeds.

  13. Effect Of Chitosan Application On The Performance Of Lentil Genotypes Under Rainfed Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janmohammadi Mohsen

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available In the current study, influences of chitosan solutions on morphological characteristics, growth and yield components of lentil (Lens culinaris Med. under rainfed conditions have been investigated. A field experiment was conducted in the Northwest of Iran using a split-plot experiment based on a completely randomized design with three replications. The response of twelve genotypes with different origins to chitosan application at the sowing (seed soaking, vegetative and reproductive stage (spraying chitosan onto leaves was evaluated. Results revealed that chitosan application could significantly improve the number of pods per plant, 100-seed weight, grain yield per plant and harvest index in comparison to control plants. The comparison of yield components between chitosan treatments showed that spraying chitosan during the reproductive stage was more efficient than in other stages. However, the responses of the number of pods per plants and grain yield per plants to chitosan treatments were significantly different among the genotypes. Although the highest grain yield was recorded in the 78S 26013 genotype (from Jordan, its response to chitosan treatments was different from the other genotypes and showed the best performance in plants obtained from seed soaked in chitosan solutions. We suggest that the application of chitosan as an agronomic management strategy be further investigated for an efficient technique to induce resistance in lentil plants against biotic and drought stress in semi-arid regions.

  14. Incidence of seed-borne fungi and aflatoxins in Sudanese lentil seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    el-Nagerabi, S A; Elshafie, A E

    2001-01-01

    Thirteen seed samples of lentil (Lens esculenta) were incubated on agar plate and moist filter papers (Moist Chambers) at 28 +/- 2 degrees C for determination of the incidence of seed-borne fungi. Aflatoxins content of the seeds was measured using the bright greenish- yellow fluorescence test (BGYF) and thin-layer chromatography (TLC). Sixty-nine species and seven varieties, which belong to 24 genera of fungi, were isolated from this crop. Of these fungi, 51 species and two varieties are considered new for this crop, whereas seven genera and 13 species are new to the mycoflora of the Sudan. The genus Aspergillus (13 species and 6 varieties) which comprising 44% of the total colony count was the most prevalent genus followed by Rhizopus (2 species, 19%), Penicillium (6 species) and Fusarium (8 species) (12%), Chaetomium (3 species) and Cladosporium (5 species) (6%), where the 18 genera (1-4 species) showed very low level of incidence (19%). Of the possible pathogens of lentil plants, F. oxysporum the main cause of vascular wilt was recovered from seeds of this crop. Thin layer chromatographic analysis of chloroform extracts of 13 seed samples showed that only one samples was naturally contaminated with aflatoxins B1, B2, G1 and G2 (14.3 micrograms/kg).

  15. A simple and reliable method to detect gamma irradiated lentil ( Lens culinaris Medik.) seeds by germination efficiency and seedling growth test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhuri, Sadhan K.

    2002-05-01

    Germination efficiency and root/shoot length of germinated seedling is proposed to identify irradiated lentil seeds. Germination percentage was reduced above 0.2 kGy and lentil seeds were unable to germinate above 1.0 kGy dose. The critical dose that prevented the root elongation varied from 0.1 to 0.5 kGy. The sensitivity of lentil seeds to gamma irradiation was inversely proportional to moisture content of the seeds. Radiation effects could be detected in seeds even 12 months storage after gamma irradiation.

  16. A simple and reliable method to detect gamma irradiated lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) seeds by germination efficiency and seedling growth test

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaudhuri, Sadhan K. E-mail: sadhankumar_c@yahoo.com

    2002-05-01

    Germination efficiency and root/shoot length of germinated seedling is proposed to identify irradiated lentil seeds. Germination percentage was reduced above 0.2 kGy and lentil seeds were unable to germinate above 1.0 kGy dose. The critical dose that prevented the root elongation varied from 0.1 to 0.5 kGy. The sensitivity of lentil seeds to gamma irradiation was inversely proportional to moisture content of the seeds. Radiation effects could be detected in seeds even 12 months storage after gamma irradiation.

  17. Early activation of lipoxygenase in lentil (Lens culinaris) root protoplasts by oxidative stress induces programmed cell death

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vliegenthart, J.F.G.; Maccarrone, M.; Zadelhoff, G. van; Veldink, G.A.; Finazzi Agrò, A.

    2000-01-01

    Oxidative stress caused by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) triggers the hypersensitive response of plants to pathogens. Here, short pulses of H2O2 are shown to cause death of lentil (Lens culinaris) root protoplasts. Dead cells showed DNA fragmentation and ladder formation, typical hallmarks of apoptosis

  18. Integrating and Processing XML Documents with JavaBeans Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yin-Wah Chiou

    2003-02-01

    Full Text Available The eXtensible Markup Language (XML and JavaBeans component model have gained wide popularity in the Object Web computing. This paper explores how JavaBeans components can be used to integrate and process the XML documents. It covers Bean Markup Language (BML, XML BeanMaker, XML Bean Suite, and Xbeans. The most powerful JavaBeans connection language is BML, which represents an integration of XML and JavaBeans components to provide a mechanism for implementing active content. XML BeanMaker is used to generate JavaBeans from XML DTD files. XML Bean Suite is a toolkit of JavaBeans components to provide a comprehensive set of functionality to manipulate XML content. The Xbean is a powerful paradigm to process XML-based distributed applications.

  19. Tagging and mapping of SSR marker for rust resistance gene in lentil (Lens culinaris Medikus subsp. culinaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikshit, H K; Singh, Akanksha; Singh, D; Aski, M; Jain, Neelu; Hegde, V S; Basandrai, A K; Basandrai, D; Sharma, T R

    2016-06-01

    Lentil, as an economical source of protein, minerals and vitamins, plays important role in nutritional security of the common man. Grown mainly in West Asia, North Africa (WANA) region and South Asia, it suffers from several biotic stresses such as wilt, rust, blight and broomrape. Lentil rust caused by autoecious fungus Uromyces viciae fabae (Pers.) Schroet is a serious lentil disease in Algeria, Bangladesh, Ethiopia, India, Italy, Morocco, Pakistan and Nepal. The disease symptoms are observed during flowering and early podding stages. Rust causes severe yield losses in lentil. It can only be effectively controlled by identifying the resistant source, understanding its inheritance and breeding for host resistance. The obligate parasitic nature of pathogen makes it difficult to maintain the pathogen in culture and to apply it to screen segregating progenies under controlled growth conditions. Hence, the use of molecular markers will compliment in identification of resistant types in different breeding programs. Here, we studied the inheritance of resistance to rust in lentil using F₁, F₂ and F₂:₃ from cross PL 8 (susceptible) x L 4149 (resistant) varieties. The phenotyping of lentil population was carried out at Sirmour, India. The result of genetic analysis revealed that a single dominant gene controls rust resistance in lentil genotype L 4149. The F2 population from this cross was used to tag and map the rust resistance gene using SSR and SRAP markers. Markers such as 270 SRAP and 162 SSR were studied for polymorphism and 101 SRAP and 33 SSRs were found to be polymorphic between the parents. Two SRAP and two SSR markers differentiated the resistant and susceptible bulks. SSR marker Gllc 527 was estimated to be linked to rust resistant locus at a distance of 5.9 cM. The Gllc 527 marker can be used for marker assisted selection for rust resistance; however, additional markers closer to rust resistant locus are required. The markers linked to the rust

  20. Registration of ‘Samurai’ Otebo Bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    ‘Samurai’ otebo bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) (Reg. no. CV- , PI ), developed by Michigan State University AgBioResearch was released in 2015 as an upright, full-season cultivar with virus [caused by Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV)] resistance and high-yield potential. Samurai was developed using ped...

  1. PROCESSING AND UTILIZATION OF AFRICAN LOCUST BEAN ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    User

    ABSTRACT. The study examined the processing, utilization and challenges of African locust bean. (Parkia biglobosa) in Arigidi Akoko in Akoko Northwest Local Government Area of Ondo. State. A total of 3,446 locust bean sellers were identified and 5% of the sellers were sampled given the total of 172 respondents: 80 at ...

  2. Nutritional and health benefits of dried beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Messina, Virginia

    2014-07-01

    Dried beans (often referred to as grain legumes) may contribute to some of the health benefits associated with plant-based diets. Beans are rich in a number of important micronutrients, including potassium, magnesium, folate, iron, and zinc, and are important sources of protein in vegetarian diets. In particular, they are among the only plant foods that provide significant amounts of the indispensable amino acid lysine. Commonly consumed dried beans are also rich in total and soluble fiber as well as in resistant starch, all of which contribute to the low glycemic index of these foods. They also provide ample amounts of polyphenols, many of which are potent antioxidants. Intervention and prospective research suggests that diets that include beans reduce low-density lipoprotein cholesterol, favorably affect risk factors for metabolic syndrome, and reduce risk of ischemic heart disease and diabetes. The relatively low bean intakes of North Americans and northern Europeans can be attributed to a negative culinary image as well as to intestinal discomfort attributable to the oligosaccharide content of beans. Cooking practices such as sprouting beans, soaking and discarding soaking water before cooking, and cooking in water with a more alkaline pH can reduce oligosaccharide content. Promotional efforts are needed to increase bean intake. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  3. EFFECT OF AFRICAN OIL BEAN SEED ( PENTACLETHRA ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The plasma cholesterol level of rats fed with diets composed with Fu, F1, F2, F3 and F4 increased initially and decreased with the time of fermentation. Degree of fermentation of the African oil bean seed therefore affected the plasma cholesterol. KEYWORDS. Cholesterol, African bean seed, Pentaclethra macrophyllia, ...

  4. Mung Bean: Technological and Nutritional Potential

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dahiya, P.K.; Linnemann, A.R.; Boekel, van M.A.J.S.; Khetarpaul, N.; Grewal, R.B.; Nout, M.J.R.

    2015-01-01

    Mung bean (Vigna radiata (L.) R.Wilczek) has been intensively researched; scattered data are available on various properties. Data on physical, chemical, food processing, and nutritional properties were collected for whole mung bean grains and reviewed to assess the crop’s potential as food and to

  5. beans grown in an intercropping system

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2005-02-10

    Feb 10, 2005 ... Sole crops were planted at the recommended PPD of 44 444 and 11 1 1 11 plants ha'l for maize and climbing beans, respectively. Maize in ...... Cali, Colombia. 54pp. Davis, J.H.C. and Garcia, S. 1983. Competitive ability and growth ofindetcrminate beans and maize for intercropping. CIAT Abstract on.

  6. the pan- africa bean research alliance (pabra)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    the forefront of efforts to accelerate the transition of beans from a subsistence crop to a modern commodity in. Sub-Saharan .... the versatility of the bean crop and its contribution to a ..... Shared breeding responsibilities under PABRA: involving 1) CIAT Headquarter breeding program in Colombia and the re gional breeding ...

  7. Weed management strategies for castor bean crops

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augusto Guerreiro Fontoura Costa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Castor bean crops are agriculturally relevant due to the quality and versatility of their oil, both for the chemical industry and for biodiesel production. Proper weed management is important for both the cultivation and the yield of castor bean crops; therefore, the intention of the present work is to review pertinent information regarding weed management, including the studies regarding weed interference periods, chemical controls for use in different crop production systems and herbicide selectivity, for castor bean crops. Weed science research for castor bean crops is scarce. One of the main weed management challenges for castor bean crops is the absence of herbicides registered with the Ministry of Agriculture, Livestock and Food Supply (MALFS. Research for viable herbicides for weed control in castor bean crops should be directed by research and/or rural extension institutions, associations and farmers cooperatives, as well as by manufactures, for the registration of these selective herbicides, which would be primarily used to control eudicotyledons in castor bean crops. New studies involving the integration of weed control methods in castor bean also may increase the efficiency of weed management, for both small farmers using traditional crop methods in the Brazilian Northeast region, as well as for areas with the potential for large scale production, using conservation tillage systems, such as the no-tillage crop production system.

  8. Proteome Characterization of Leaves in Common Bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faith M. Robison

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Dry edible bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. is a globally relevant food crop. The bean genome was recently sequenced and annotated allowing for proteomics investigations aimed at characterization of leaf phenotypes important to agriculture. The objective of this study was to utilize a shotgun proteomics approach to characterize the leaf proteome and to identify protein abundance differences between two bean lines with known variation in their physiological resistance to biotic stresses. Overall, 640 proteins were confidently identified. Among these are proteins known to be involved in a variety of molecular functions including oxidoreductase activity, binding peroxidase activity, and hydrolase activity. Twenty nine proteins were found to significantly vary in abundance (p-value < 0.05 between the two bean lines, including proteins associated with biotic stress. To our knowledge, this work represents the first large scale shotgun proteomic analysis of beans and our results lay the groundwork for future studies designed to investigate the molecular mechanisms involved in pathogen resistance.

  9. Using of dimensional analysis to determine the parameters of gravity separator table device to minimize impurities in bulk lentils

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H Bagheri

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Lentil (Lens culinaris medic is an important and highly nutritious crop belonging to the family of legumes. Lentil is cultivated worldwide but competition with weeds is a problem affecting production and can reduce yield by more than 80%. The study on the separation of impurities in bulk lentils (Euphorbia helioscopia weed, Wild oat weed and etc. by a gravity separator has an extreme importance. Since no study has been done to date, in this study, the effects of different parameters of a gravity separator (longitudinal and latitudinal slopes, oscillation frequency and amplitude on the separation of foreign matters in lentil seeds were evaluated. A dimensionless number (v/aω which shows ration of air current velocity blown to lentil to the maximum velocity of table oscillation, was considered in ratio of separation. Materials and Methods In this research, lentil samples were taken from farms in Ardebil Province (Bileh-Savar cultivar. A gravity separator apparatus was also used for separating impurities from lentil seeds. A Laboratory Gravity Separator Type LA-K (Westrup A/S Denmark was used to separate impurities from bulk lentils. In this machine, table settings were as follows; longitudinal slope parameters (1°,1.5°, 1.75°, 2° and 2.5°, latitudinal slope (0.5°, 1°, and 1.5°, frequency of oscillation (380, 400, 420 and 450 cycles min-1, and amplitude of oscillation (5 and 7 mm, these settings were all adjustable. Similarly, the instrument had 5 boxes whereby, through proper adjustment, the heavier material was transferred toward the right side of the table and lighter material moved toward the left side. Through proper adjustment of the main parameters of the instrument, the impurities were separated from bulk lentils. Then using an electronic seed counter, five groups of seed which each group containing 100 seeds were counted and selected. Results and Discussion The results of variance analysis of the factorial design with

  10. Faba bean in microspore culture

    OpenAIRE

    Hautsalo, Juho

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to develop functional method for producing doupled-haploid plants for faba bean. Microspore culture is an advanced method to produce doubled-haploids and it is based on the totipotent nature of plant cells, since even a microspore, which is an immature pollen cell with haploid genome, can develop into a plant. This plant is either haploid or doupled haploid depending on whether there has been chromosome doubling or not and because the chromosomes either do not ...

  11. Enterprise JavaBeans 31

    CERN Document Server

    Rubinger, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Learn how to code, package, deploy, and test functional Enterprise JavaBeans with the latest edition of this bestselling guide. Written by the developers of JBoss EJB 3.1, this book not only brings you up to speed on each component type and container service in this implementation, it also provides a workbook with several hands-on examples to help you gain immediate experience with these components. With version 3.1, EJB's server-side component model for building distributed business applications is simpler than ever. But it's still a complex technology that requires study and lots of practi

  12. Table 5 Mineral content of ashed bean samples

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dr Mamiro

    2012-08-05

    Aug 5, 2012 ... All analyses were done in the Food Science and Technology laboratory in collaboration with the Department of Soil Science. Mineral analysis was performed on bean leaves and fresh bean grains after dry ashing [16]. Iron and zinc determination. About 100g of bean leaves and fresh bean grains for each ...

  13. factors influencing smallholder farmers' bean production and supply

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    In order to meet this growing demand, adoption of better production technologies focusing on improving production and marketing of beans is necessary. In an effort to improve bean production in. Burundi, the bean improvement programme by. Pan-African Bean Research Alliance (PABRA) in collaboration with Institut des ...

  14. Clustering common bean mutants based on heterotic groupings ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study was to cluster bean mutants from a bean mutation breeding programme, based on heterotic groupings. This was achieved by genotyping 16 bean genotypes, using 21 Simple Sequence Repeats (SSR) bean markers. From the results, three different clusters A, B and C, were obtained suggesting ...

  15. Epiphytic bacteria from various bean genotypes and their potential ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bean plants treated with bacterial antagonists had smaller disease lesions than the phosphate buffer, treated controls. These results suggest that phylloplane microflora from beans influence the development of common bacterial blight on the bean crop. These antagonists are promising potential biocontrol agents for bean ...

  16. Breeding black beans for Haiti with multiple virus resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Black bean production in the lowlands of Central America and the Caribbean is threatened by Bean golden yellow mosaic virus (BGYMV) and Bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV). Therefore, the objective of this research was to develop, test and release tropically-adapted black bean lines with resis...

  17. Development, release and dissemination of "Sankara" black bean in Haiti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) production in the Caribbean is threatened by Bean Golden Yellow Mosaic Virus (BGYMV), Bean Common Mosaic Virus (BCMV) and Bean Common Mosaic Necrosis Virus (BCMNV). The University of Puerto Rico, the University of Nebraska, the USDA-ARS, Zamorano and the National ...

  18. Key odorants in cured Madagascar vanilla beans (Vanilla planiforia) of differing bean quality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Makoto; Inai, Yoko; Miyazawa, Norio; Kurobayashi, Yoshiko; Fujita, Akira

    2013-01-01

    The odor-active volatiles in Madagascar vanilla beans (Vanilla planiforia) of two grades, red whole beans as standard quality and cuts beans as substandard quality, were characterized by instrumental and sensory analyses. The higher contents of vanillin and β-damascenone in red whole beans than in cuts beans respectively contributed to significant differences in the sweet and dried fruit-like notes, while the higher contents of guaiacol and 3-phenylpropanoic acid in cuts beans than in red whole beans respectively contributed to significant differences in the phenolic and metallic notes. A sensory evaluation to compare red whole beans and their reconstituted aroma characterized both samples as being similar, while in respect of the phenolic note, the reconstituted aroma significantly differed from the reconstituted aroma with guaiacol added at the concentration ratio of vanillin and guaiacol in cuts beans. It is suggested from these results that the concentration ratio of vanillin and guaiacol could be used as an index for the quality of Madagascar vanilla beans.

  19. Identification of High-Temperature Tolerant Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) Genotypes through Leaf and Pollen Traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sita, Kumari; Sehgal, Akanksha; Kumar, Jitendra; Kumar, Shiv; Singh, Sarvjeet; Siddique, Kadambot H. M.; Nayyar, Harsh

    2017-01-01

    Rising temperatures are proving detrimental for various agricultural crops. Cool-season legumes such as lentil (Lens culunaris Medik.) are sensitive to even small increases in temperature during the reproductive stage, hence the need to explore the available germplasm for heat tolerance as well as its underlying mechanisms. In the present study, a set of 38 core lentil accessions were screened for heat stress tolerance by sowing 2 months later (first week of January; max/min temperature >32/20°C during the reproductive stage) than the recommended date of sowing (first week of November; max/min temperature stress. Nodulation was remarkably higher (1.8–22-fold) in HT genotypes. Moreover, HT genotypes produced more sucrose in their leaves (65–73%) and anthers (35–78%) that HS genotypes, which was associated with superior reproductive function and nodulation. Exogenous supplementation of sucrose to in vitro-grown pollen grains, collected from heat-stressed plants, enhanced their germination ability. Assessment of the leaves of HT genotypes suggested significantly less damage to membranes (1.3–1.4-fold), photosynthetic function (1.14–1.17-fold) and cellular oxidizing ability (1.1–1.5-fold) than HS genotypes, which was linked to higher relative leaf water content (RLWC) and stomatal conductance (gS). Consequently, HT genotypes had less oxidative damage (measured as malondialdehyde and hydrogen peroxide concentration), coupled with a higher expression of antioxidants, especially those of the ascorbate–glutathione pathway. Controlled environment studies on contrasting genotypes further supported the impact of heat stress and differentiated the response of HT and HS genotypes to varying temperatures. Our studies indicated that temperatures >35/25°C were highly detrimental for growth and yield in lentil. While HT genotypes tolerated temperatures up to 40/30°C by producing fewer pods, the HS genotypes failed to do so even at 38/28°C. The findings attributed

  20. Agronomic Management under Organic Farming May Affect the Bioactive Compounds of Lentil (Lens culinaris L. and Grass Pea (Lathyrus communis L.?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valeria Menga

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A two year field experiment was carried out to evaluate the effects of three row and eight row seeding on the total phenolic compound (TPC, total flavonoid content (TFC, hydrolyzed (HTC and condensed tannin (CTC, antioxidant activity (ABTS assay, protein content and soluble dietary fiber (SDF and insoluble dietary fiber (IDF in the extracts of lentil (Lens culinaris L. and grass pea (Lathyrus communis L. cultivated under organic farming. The aim of this study was to determine whether row spacing used for seeding in organic farming systems for lentil and grass pea is a suitable method to increase the accumulation of antioxidant compounds in these crops. Grass pea showed the highest mean SDF and protein while lentil varieties showed the greatest and significant content of all of the antioxidant compounds. In lentil, there were increases in TPC (52%, HTC (73%, TFC (85% and CTC (41%, passing from three rows to eight rows, while in grass pea, the increases were lower, and only significant for TFC and CTC (37%, 13% respectively. In both lentils and grass pea, the highest correlation coefficient was between TPC and HTC, which indicates that the HTC includes the predominant phenolic compounds in lentil as well as in grass pea (r = 0.98, 0.71 p < 0.001, respectively. Regardless of legume species, TPC, HTC, TFC and CTC showed significant (p < 0.001 and linear correlations with the ABTS assay. These data confirm the key role of row spacing for the improvement of the antioxidant properties of lentil in organic farming; moreover, they hint at the major responsiveness and adaptation of lentil to environmental stimulus with respect to grass pea.

  1. Root Traits, Nodulation and Root Distribution in Soil for Five Wild Lentil Species and Lens culinaris (Medik.) Grown under Well-Watered Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorim, Linda Y.; Vandenberg, Albert

    2017-01-01

    The efficient use of resources such as water and nutrients by plants is increasingly important as the world population food demand continues to grow. With the increased production of lentil in the temperate zones of North America, improvement in yield needs to be maintained. The use of wild lentil genotypes as sources of genetic diversity for introgression into cultivated lentil is an important breeding strategy, but little is known about their root systems. We evaluated the root systems of five wild lentil species and Lens culinaris under fully watered conditions. Plants were grown in 60 cm tubes containing equal volumes of soil collected from the reconstructed A, B, and C horizons. Significant differences were observed for root traits and fine root distribution between and within species and the proportion of root biomass partitioned into each soil layer was unique for each genotype. We also observed variability in nodule number and nodule shape within and between genotypes. Some genotypes more efficiently used water for either biomass or seed production. The allocation of resources to seed production also varied between genotypes. These observations could have impact on the design of future lentil breeding in the context of strategies for managing changes in rainfall amount and distribution for lentil production ecosystems. PMID:28993782

  2. Effect of heat treatment and mineral and vitamin supplementation on the nutritive use of protein and calcium from lentils (Lens culinaris M.) in growing rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porres, Jesús M; López-Jurado, María; Aranda, Pilar; Urbano, Gloria

    2003-05-01

    The effects of heat treatment, supplementation of a mineral and vitamin premix, and 4% olive oil on the bioavailability of protein and calcium from Lens culinaris M., var vulgaris, cultivar. magda-20 were studied in growing rats. Nutrition assessment was based on chemical analysis of lentil protein, energy, total and available starch, lipid and calcium composition, and the digestive and metabolic use of nitrogen and calcium by rats. Lentils used for the present study had crude protein and calcium contents of 25.5% and 0.07%, respectively. Heating lentils to 120 degrees C at 1 atm for 30 min decreased trypsin inhibitor activity, phytate, and tannin content by 76%, 8%, and 12%, respectively, but did not improve dietary intake or digestive use of protein compared with untreated raw control lentils. Mineral, vitamin, and olive oil supplementation of raw or autoclaved lentils significantly improved daily food intake and nutritive use of nitrogen and calcium. The best results were obtained for the rats fed with a diet of raw lentils supplemented with a premix of minerals and vitamins. There was a direct correlation between calcium balance and weight gain in animals (r = 0.89) and between the calcium balance and nitrogen balance (r = 0.86).

  3. Bioavailability of phytic acid-phosphorus and magnesium from lentils (Lens culinaris m.) in growing rats: influence of thermal treatment and vitamin-mineral supplementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porres, Jesús M; López-Jurado, María; Aranda, Pilar; Urbano, Gloria

    2004-09-01

    We sought to improve the nutritive utilization of Lens culinaris M. variety vulgaris cultivar Magda-20 in growing rats by autoclaving the lentil seeds at 120 degrees C for 30 min at an internal pressure of 1 atm and by supplementing the rats with a vitamin-mineral premix. Nutritional assessment was based on chemical analysis of total phosphorus, free phosphorus, phytate, magnesium, neutral detergent fiber, and acid detergent fiber contents of the lentils and the digestive and metabolic use of phosphorus and magnesium by the growing rats. The net absorption of phosphorus was greater than the amount of non-phytate phosphorus ingested by the animals fed diets of raw and autoclaved lentil flours. Vitamin-mineral supplementation of raw and autoclaved lentil flour resulted in a significant increase in dietary intake and net absorption of phosphorus and magnesium. For all of the experimental diets tested, there was a direct correlation between phosphorus or magnesium balance and weight gain (r = 0.91 and 0.80, respectively) and between phosphorus or magnesium balance and nitrogen balance (r = 0.91 and 0.87, respectively). Part of the phytate-phosphorus from raw and autoclaved lentil flour was available during digestion, and hardly any phytate was detected in the feces. Supplementation of raw lentil flour with a vitamin-mineral premix was the most effective treatment for increasing daily food intake, body weight gain, and nutritive use of phosphorus and magnesium.

  4. Root Traits, Nodulation and Root Distribution in Soil for Five Wild Lentil Species and Lens culinaris (Medik.) Grown under Well-Watered Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorim, Linda Y; Vandenberg, Albert

    2017-01-01

    The efficient use of resources such as water and nutrients by plants is increasingly important as the world population food demand continues to grow. With the increased production of lentil in the temperate zones of North America, improvement in yield needs to be maintained. The use of wild lentil genotypes as sources of genetic diversity for introgression into cultivated lentil is an important breeding strategy, but little is known about their root systems. We evaluated the root systems of five wild lentil species and Lens culinaris under fully watered conditions. Plants were grown in 60 cm tubes containing equal volumes of soil collected from the reconstructed A, B, and C horizons. Significant differences were observed for root traits and fine root distribution between and within species and the proportion of root biomass partitioned into each soil layer was unique for each genotype. We also observed variability in nodule number and nodule shape within and between genotypes. Some genotypes more efficiently used water for either biomass or seed production. The allocation of resources to seed production also varied between genotypes. These observations could have impact on the design of future lentil breeding in the context of strategies for managing changes in rainfall amount and distribution for lentil production ecosystems.

  5. Assessment of genetic response and character association for yield and yield components in Lentil (Lens culinaris L. population developed through chemical mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruhul Amin

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Genetic variation is imperative to any plant improvement program. Therefore, this study was primarily based on this aspect of inducing desirable genetic variation for enhancement of the available lentil genetic diversity. The lentil seeds were treated with methyl methanesulfonate (MMS alone and in combination with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO for inducing polygenic variation as well as determining the impact of DMSO on mutagenecity of MMS. Comparative observations were recorded for bio-physiological damages, morphological variation, and quantitative traits to assess the genetic response of the lentil cultivar L 4076 toward the different concentrations of chemicals. Significant statistics suggested that the DMSO interfere with the extent of mutagenecity of MMS in lentil which could be attributed to either synergistic action of both or variation in MMS uptake. The outcome of mutagenesis on the character association study revealed that mutagenic treatments can modify significantly the manner of association between any two traits in lentil. The moderate doses of MMS in combination with 2% DMSO showed notable diminution in the biological damages while accelerating the rate of desirable high-yielding mutants had proved to be economical. The segregate of the selected mutants in future generations will definitely contribute to the improvement of Lentil genotype.

  6. Transient kinetics of copper-containing lentil (Lens culinaris) seedling amine oxidase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bellelli, A; Brunori, M; Finazzi-Agró, A; Floris, G; Giartosi, A; Rinaldi, A

    1985-01-01

    The reaction between lentil (Lens culinaris) seedling amine oxidase and its chromogenic substrate, p-dimethylaminomethylbenzylamine, has been studied by the stopped-flow technique. Upon being mixed with substrate in the absence of oxygen, the enzyme is bleached in a complex kinetic process. A yellow intermediate absorbing at 464 nm and the first product (aldehyde) are formed in subsequent steps. When oxygenated buffer is mixed with substrate-reduced amine oxidase, the 496 nm absorption of the oxidized enzyme is very rapidly restored in a second-order process (k = 2.5 X 10(7) M-1 X S-1). This reaction is appreciable even at very low oxygen concentration, in keeping with the fairly low Km for O2 measured by steady-state kinetics. PMID:4091830

  7. Effect of Extrusion Variables on the Hardness of Lentil Semolina Extrudates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrova, Todorka; Ruskova, Milena; Tzonev, Panayot; Zsivanovits, Gabor; Penov, Nikolay

    2010-01-01

    Lentil semolina was extruded in a laboratory single screw extruder (Brabender 20 DN, Germany) with screw diameter 19 mm and die diameter 5 mm. Effects of moisture content, barrel temperature, metering zone temperature, screw speed, and screw compression ratio on hardness of the extruded products were studied. Response surface methodology with combinations of moisture content (18, 22, 25, 28, 32%), metering zone temperature (136, 150, 160, 170, 184° C), barrel temperature (136, 150, 160, 170, 184° C), screw speed (132, 160, 180, 200, 228 rpm), and screw compression ratio (1:1, 2:1, 3:1, 4:1, 5:1) was applied. Feed screw speed was fixed at 70 rpm. Feed zone temperature was kept constant at 150° C. The hardness of the extrudates was measured with a TA.XT Plus Texture Analyser, Stable Micro Systems. The textural profiles of the extrudates showed that feed moisture had the highest effect on the hardness.

  8. Management of faba bean gall in faba bean producing area of Eastern Amhara, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogale Nigir Hailemariam

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Faba bean new disease (faba bean gall (Olpidium viciae (Kusano is the most destructive disease of faba bean ((Vicia faba L. in Ethiopia, particularly in Amhara, Tigray and some part of Oromia region. This problem needs immediate sound management strategy to maximize faba bean productivity. A field study was carried out in Geregera and Jama during the 2013 and 2014 main crop season and Maybar watershed in 2014 to verify the fungicide to faba bean gall. The objective of this study was evaluating effective fungicides for the management of faba bean new disease. The treatments were baylaton in the form of seed dressing and foliar spray; mancozeb, redomil, chlorotalonin and cruzet in the form of foliar spray and apron star and theram used as a foliar spray and also untreated check used as a comparison. The result showed that significantly differ between treatments (p

  9. Yeasts are essential for cocoa bean fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Van Thi Thuy; Zhao, Jian; Fleet, Graham

    2014-03-17

    Cocoa beans (Theobroma cacao) are the major raw material for chocolate production and fermentation of the beans is essential for the development of chocolate flavor precursors. In this study, a novel approach was used to determine the role of yeasts in cocoa fermentation and their contribution to chocolate quality. Cocoa bean fermentations were conducted with the addition of 200ppm Natamycin to inhibit the growth of yeasts, and the resultant microbial ecology and metabolism, bean chemistry and chocolate quality were compared with those of normal (control) fermentations. The yeasts Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia kudriavzevii and Kluyveromyces marxianus, the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus fermentum and the acetic acid bacteria Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconobacter frateurii were the major species found in the control fermentation. In fermentations with the presence of Natamycin, the same bacterial species grew but yeast growth was inhibited. Physical and chemical analyses showed that beans fermented without yeasts had increased shell content, lower production of ethanol, higher alcohols and esters throughout fermentation and lesser presence of pyrazines in the roasted product. Quality tests revealed that beans fermented without yeasts were purplish-violet in color and not fully brown, and chocolate prepared from these beans tasted more acid and lacked characteristic chocolate flavor. Beans fermented with yeast growth were fully brown in color and gave chocolate with typical characters which were clearly preferred by sensory panels. Our findings demonstrate that yeast growth and activity were essential for cocoa bean fermentation and the development of chocolate characteristics. Crown Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. A high-selenium lentil dietary intervention in Bangladesh to counteract arsenic toxicity: study protocol for a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krohn, Regina M; Raqib, Rubhana; Akhtar, Evana; Vandenberg, Albert; Smits, Judit E G

    2016-04-27

    Millions of people worldwide are exposed to dangerous levels of arsenic (above the WHO water standard of 10 ppb) in drinking water and food. Lack of nutritious foods exacerbates the adverse health effects of arsenic poisoning. The micronutrient selenium is a known antagonist to arsenic, promoting the excretion of arsenic from the body. Studies are in progress examining the potential of using selenium supplement pills to counteract arsenic toxicity. We are planning a clinical trial to test whether high-selenium lentils, as a whole food solution, can improve the health of arsenic-exposed Bangladeshi villagers. A total of 400 participants (about 80 families) will be divided into two groups via computer-generated block randomization. Eligibility criteria are age (≥14) years) and arsenic concentration in the household tube well (≥100 ppb). In this double-blind study, one group will eat high-selenium lentils grown in western Canada; the other will consume low-selenium lentils grown in Idaho, USA. Each participant will consume 65 g of lentils each day for 6 months. At the onset, midterm, and end of the trial, blood, urine and stool, plus hair (day 1 and at 6 months only) samples will be collected and a health examination conducted including assessment of acute lung inflammation, body mass and height, and blood pressure. The major outcome will be arsenic excretion in urine and feces, as well as arsenic deposition in hair and morbidity outcomes as assessed by a biweekly questionnaire. Secondary outcomes include antioxidant status, lipid profile, lung inflammation status, and blood pressure. Selenium pills as a treatment for arsenic exposure are costly and inconvenient, whereas a whole food approach to lower the toxic burden of arsenic may be a practical remedy for Bangladeshi people while efforts to provide safe drinking water are continuing. If high-selenium lentils prove to be effective in counteracting arsenic toxicity, agronomic partnerships between Canada and

  11. Heterologous expression and solution structure of defensin from lentil Lens culinaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shenkarev, Zakhar O. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya Str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Gizatullina, Albina K. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya Str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Department of Physicochemical Biology and Biotechnology, Institutskii per., 9, 141700 Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Finkina, Ekaterina I.; Alekseeva, Ekaterina A.; Balandin, Sergey V.; Mineev, Konstantin S. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya Str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Arseniev, Alexander S. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya Str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Department of Physicochemical Biology and Biotechnology, Institutskii per., 9, 141700 Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V., E-mail: ovch@ibch.ru [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya Str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Department of Physicochemical Biology and Biotechnology, Institutskii per., 9, 141700 Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2014-08-22

    Highlights: • Lentil defensin Lc-def and its {sup 15}N-labeled analog were overexpressed in E. coli. • Lc-def is active against fungi, but does not inhibit growth of G+ and G− bacteria. • Lc-def spatial structure involves triple-stranded β-sheet and α-helix (CSαβ motif). • Lc-def is able to bind to anionic lipid vesicles under low-salt conditions. • NMR data revealed significant μs–ms mobility in the loops 1 and 3 of Lc-def. - Abstract: A new defensin Lc-def, isolated from germinated seeds of the lentil Lens culinaris, has molecular mass 5440.4 Da and consists of 47 amino acid residues. Lc-def and its {sup 15}N-labeled analog were overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Antimicrobial activity of the recombinant protein was examined, and its spatial structure, dynamics, and interaction with lipid vesicles were studied by NMR spectroscopy. It was shown that Lc-def is active against fungi, but does not inhibit the growth of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The peptide is monomeric in aqueous solution and contains one α-helix and triple-stranded β-sheet, which form cysteine-stabilized αβ motif (CSαβ) previously found in other plant defensins. The sterically neighboring loop1 and loop3 protrude from the defensin core and demonstrate significant mobility on the μs–ms timescale. Lc-def does not bind to the zwitterionic lipid (POPC) vesicles but interacts with the partially anionic (POPC/DOPG, 7:3) membranes under low-salt conditions. The Lc-def antifungal activity might be mediated through electrostatic interaction with anionic lipid components of fungal membranes.

  12. Selection of Superior Lentil (Lens esculenta M.) Genotypes by Assessing Character Association and Genetic Diversity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, U. K.; Rani, Santona; Paul, M. R.; Alam, M. N.; Horneburg, B.

    2014-01-01

    Lentil is one of the most important pulse crops in the world as well as in Bangladesh. It is now considered a main component for training and body building practising in first world countries. Yield varies tremendously from year to year and location to location. Therefore, it is very important to find genotypes that perform consistently well even in ecological farming systems without any intercultural operations. Twenty lentil genotypes were tested during the period from November 2010 to March 2011 and from December 2011 to March 2012 with three replicates in each season to determine genetic variability, diversity, characters association, and selection indices for better grain yield. The experiment was conducted at the breeding field of the Department of Genetics and Plant Breeding, Bangladesh Agricultural University, Mymensingh. This study revealed that all the genotypes possess a high amount of genetic diversity. Plant height and 100-grain weight showed significant positive correlation with grain yield plant−1 that was also confirmed by path analysis as the highest direct effect on grain yield. The genotypes BM-513 and BM-941 were found to be the best performer in both the seasons and were considered as consistent genotype. The genotypes were grouped into four clusters based on Euclidean distance following Ward's method and RAPD analysis. However, discriminant function analysis revealed a progressive increase in the efficiency of selection and BM-70 ranked as the best followed by the genotypes BM-739, BM-680, BM-185, and BM-513. These genotypes might be recommended for farmers' cultivation in ecological farming in Bangladesh. PMID:25580457

  13. Recombinant production and solution structure of lipid transfer protein from lentil Lens culinaris

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gizatullina, Albina K. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Department of Physicochemical Biology and Biotechnology, Institutskii per., 9, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Finkina, Ekaterina I.; Mineev, Konstantin S.; Melnikova, Daria N.; Bogdanov, Ivan V. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Telezhinskaya, Irina N.; Balandin, Sergey V. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Department of Physicochemical Biology and Biotechnology, Institutskii per., 9, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Shenkarev, Zakhar O. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Arseniev, Alexander S. [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Department of Physicochemical Biology and Biotechnology, Institutskii per., 9, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation); Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V., E-mail: ovch@ibch.ru [Shemyakin and Ovchinnikov Institute of Bioorganic Chemistry, Russian Academy of Sciences, Miklukho-Maklaya str., 16/10, 117997 Moscow (Russian Federation); Moscow Institute of Physics and Technology (State University), Department of Physicochemical Biology and Biotechnology, Institutskii per., 9, 141700, Dolgoprudny, Moscow Region (Russian Federation)

    2013-10-04

    Highlights: •Lipid transfer protein from lentil seeds (Lc-LTP2) was overexpressed in E. coli. •Antimicrobial activity and spatial structure of the recombinant Lc-LTP2 were examined. •Internal tunnel-like lipid-binding cavity occupies ∼7% of the total Lc-LTP2 volume. •Binding of DMPG lipid induces moderate rearrangements in the Lc-LTP2 structure. •Lc-LTP2/DMPG complex has limited lifetime and dissociates within tens of hours. -- Abstract: Lipid transfer protein, designated as Lc-LTP2, was isolated from seeds of the lentil Lens culinaris. The protein has molecular mass 9282.7 Da, consists of 93 amino acid residues including 8 cysteines forming 4 disulfide bonds. Lc-LTP2 and its stable isotope labeled analogues were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Antimicrobial activity of the recombinant protein was examined, and its spatial structure was studied by NMR spectroscopy. The polypeptide chain of Lc-LTP2 forms four α-helices (Cys4-Leu18, Pro26-Ala37, Thr42-Ala56, Thr64-Lys73) and a long C-terminal tail without regular secondary structure. Side chains of the hydrophobic residues form a relatively large internal tunnel-like lipid-binding cavity (van der Waals volume comes up to ∼600 Å{sup 3}). The side-chains of Arg45, Pro79, and Tyr80 are located near an assumed mouth of the cavity. Titration with dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) revealed formation of the Lc-LTP2/lipid non-covalent complex accompanied by rearrangements in the protein spatial structure and expansion of the internal cavity. The resultant Lc-LTP2/DMPG complex demonstrates limited lifetime and dissociates within tens of hours.

  14. Effect of Shading on some Important Physiological Traits in Lentil Crop

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Darabi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Light is one of the growth-reducing factors in mixed cropping and agroforestry systems. Therefore, an experimental field was conducted to justiffy the effect of light intensity on two lentil cultivars. It was performed in a factorial experiment based on randomized complete block design with three replications at Agricultural Research Station of Ilam University during 2012-2013 cropping season. The factors under study consisted of shading in four levels (0 shading, 25, 50, 75 and 100% of shadings and two cultivars lentil (Lens culinaris Medic (Ziba and ILL4400. Results showed that physiologic traits were significantly affected by cultivar × shading intraction. Ziba cultivar had the highest chlorophyll a and b content in 100% shading. Carotenoid content, relative water content and leaf area index also increased with increasing in shading. The highest and lowest carotenoid and relative water contents were observed in 100% shading × ILL4400 cultivar and control treatment × Ziba cultiva, respectively. The highest leaf specific weight observed in control treatment × Ziba cultivar and decreased with increasing shading. Grain yield decreased with increasing shading. The highest and lowest mean grain yield, 2522 kg.ha-1 and 1137 kg.ha-1, were observed in control treatment × Ziba cultivar and 100% shading and ILL4400 cultivar, respectively. Based on the results of this study, Ziba cultivar had the highest leaf area index, relative water content and chlorophyll a in higher shading treatments; hence, it can perform better than ILL4400 in mixed cropping and agroforestry systems where the light is limited factor.

  15. Feeding toasted field beans to dairy cows

    OpenAIRE

    Jørgensen, K.F.; Kjeldsen, A.M.; Askegaard, M.

    2013-01-01

    Toasting field beans can improve the protein quality of field beans markedly. In the feed demonstrations carried out in Project EcoProtein testing a new method of toasting with a drum dryer, showed, however, only reduced effect on the protein quality due to a lower than optimal temperature. The toasted field beans were fed in two organic dairy herds, replacing a part of the concentrates in the ration in a cross-over design. Preliminary results showed no milk yield difference in herd 1, but a ...

  16. Reflective Polyethylene Mulch Reduces Mexican Bean Beetle (Coleoptera: Coccinellidae) Densities and Damage in Snap Beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nottingham, L B; Kuhar, T P

    2016-08-01

    Mexican bean beetle, Epilachna varivestis Mulsant, is a serious pest of snap beans, Phaseolus vulgaris L., in the eastern United States. These beetles are intolerant to direct sunlight, explaining why individuals are typically found on the undersides of leaves and in the lower portion of the plant canopy. We hypothesized that snap beans grown on reflective, agricultural polyethylene (plastic mulch) would have fewer Mexican bean beetles and less injury than those grown on black plastic or bare soil. In 2014 and 2015, beans were seeded into beds of metallized, white, and black plastic, and bare soil, in field plots near Blacksburg, VA. Mexican bean beetle density, feeding injury, predatory arthropods, and snap bean yield were sampled. Reflected light intensity, temperature, and humidity were monitored using data loggers. Pyranometer readings showed that reflected light intensity was highest over metallized plastic and second highest over white plastic; black plastic and bare soil were similarly low. Temperature and humidity were unaffected by treatments. Significant reductions in Mexican bean beetle densities and feeding injury were observed in both metallized and white plastic plots compared to black plastic and bare soil, with metallized plastic having the fewest Mexican bean beetle life stages and injury. Predatory arthropod densities were not reduced by reflective plastic. Metallized plots produced the highest yields, followed by white. The results of this study suggest that growing snap beans on reflective plastic mulch can suppress the incidence and damage of Mexican bean beetle, and increase yield in snap beans. © The Authors 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Entomological Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  17. Phenotyping common beans for adaptation to drought

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Stephen E.; Rao, Idupulapati M.; Blair, Matthew W.; Acosta-Gallegos, Jorge A.

    2013-01-01

    Common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) originated in the New World and are the grain legume of greatest production for direct human consumption. Common bean production is subject to frequent droughts in highland Mexico, in the Pacific coast of Central America, in northeast Brazil, and in eastern and southern Africa from Ethiopia to South Africa. This article reviews efforts to improve common bean for drought tolerance, referring to genetic diversity for drought response, the physiology of drought tolerance mechanisms, and breeding strategies. Different races of common bean respond differently to drought, with race Durango of highland Mexico being a major source of genes. Sister species of P. vulgaris likewise have unique traits, especially P. acutifolius which is well adapted to dryland conditions. Diverse sources of tolerance may have different mechanisms of plant response, implying the need for different methods of phenotyping to recognize the relevant traits. Practical considerations of field management are discussed including: trial planning; water management; and field preparation. PMID:23507928

  18. Phenotyping common beans for adaptation to drought.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beebe, Stephen E; Rao, Idupulapati M; Blair, Matthew W; Acosta-Gallegos, Jorge A

    2013-01-01

    Common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) originated in the New World and are the grain legume of greatest production for direct human consumption. Common bean production is subject to frequent droughts in highland Mexico, in the Pacific coast of Central America, in northeast Brazil, and in eastern and southern Africa from Ethiopia to South Africa. This article reviews efforts to improve common bean for drought tolerance, referring to genetic diversity for drought response, the physiology of drought tolerance mechanisms, and breeding strategies. Different races of common bean respond differently to drought, with race Durango of highland Mexico being a major source of genes. Sister species of P. vulgaris likewise have unique traits, especially P. acutifolius which is well adapted to dryland conditions. Diverse sources of tolerance may have different mechanisms of plant response, implying the need for different methods of phenotyping to recognize the relevant traits. Practical considerations of field management are discussed including: trial planning; water management; and field preparation.

  19. Healthy food trends -- beans and legumes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000726.htm Healthy food trends -- beans and legumes To use the sharing ... Nutrition Browse the Encyclopedia A.D.A.M., Inc. is accredited by URAC, also known as the ...

  20. Resistance to Fusarium wilt in common bean

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renata Oliveira Batista

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available In breeding programs, understanding the potential of parents should be a way to spend significantly less time and costs to obtain new cultivars. For this, the objective of this study was to estimate the general and specific combining ability of parents aiming common bean breeding for resistance to Fusarium wilt (FW based on disease severity and reduction in plant growth. Eight common bean genotypes were crossed in a 3 x 5 partial diallel mating scheme to obtain F1 hybrids. The parents and their 15 F1 hybrids were evaluated for severity of Fusarium wilt, area under the disease progress curve, percentage of plant height reduction and plant shoot fresh weight reduction and grain yield. The resistance of common bean to FW is controlled by a few dominant genes. The reduction in plant growth is controlled by a different set of genes that can increase the selection efficiency of parents for common bean breeding.

  1. Resistance to Fusarium wilt in common bean

    OpenAIRE

    Renata Oliveira Batista; Oliveira, Ana Maria Cruz e; Johnn Lennon Oliveira Silva; Alessandro Nicoli; Pedro Crescêncio Sousa Carneiro; José Eustáquio de Sousa Carneiro; Trazilbo José de Paula Júnior; Marisa Vieira de Queiroz

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In breeding programs, understanding the potential of parents should be a way to spend significantly less time and costs to obtain new cultivars. For this, the objective of this study was to estimate the general and specific combining ability of parents aiming common bean breeding for resistance to Fusarium wilt (FW) based on disease severity and reduction in plant growth. Eight common bean genotypes were crossed in a 3 x 5 partial diallel mating scheme to obtain F1 hybrids. The paren...

  2. Phenological, nutritional and molecular diversity assessment among 35 introduced lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) genotypes grown in Saudi Arabia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Salem S; Khan, Altaf M; Ammar, Megahed H; El-Harty, Ehab H; Migdadi, Hussein M; El-Khalik, Samah M Abd; Al-Shameri, Aref M; Javed, Muhammad M; Al-Faifi, Sulieman A

    2013-12-27

    Morphological, nutritional and molecular analyses were carried out to assess genetic diversity among 35 introduced lentil genotypes (Lens culinaris Medik.). The genotypes exhibited significant differences for their field parameters and some of them showed noticeable superiority. The nutritional and proximate analysis showed that some genotypes were excellent sources of proteins, essential amino acids, minerals, anti-oxidants, total phenolic contents (TPC) and total flavonoid contents (TFC) and hence, highlights lentil nutritional and medicinal potential. Sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP) and amplified fragments length polymorphism (AFLP) markers were used to estimate the genetic variability at the molecular level. The existence of a considerable amount of genetic diversity among the tested lentil genotypes was also proven at the molecular level. A total of 2894 polymorphic SRAP and 1625 AFLP loci were successfully amplified using six SRAP and four AFLP primer pair combinations. Polymorphism information content (PIC) values for SRAP and AFLP markers were higher than 0.8, indicating the power and higher resolution of those marker systems in detecting molecular diversity. UPGMA (unweighted pair group method with arithmetic average) cluster analysis based on molecular data revealed large number of sub clusters among genotypes, indicating high diversity levels. The data presented here showed that FLIP2009-64L and FLIP2009-69L could be used as a significant source of yield, total protein, essential amino acids, and antioxidant properties. The results suggest potential lentil cultivation in the central region of Saudi Arabia for its nutritional and medicinal properties, as well as sustainable soil fertility crop.

  3. Phenological, Nutritional and Molecular Diversity Assessment among 35 Introduced Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) Genotypes Grown in Saudi Arabia

    OpenAIRE

    Salem S. Alghamdi; Altaf M. Khan; Ammar, Megahed H.; Ehab H. EL-Harty; Hussein M. Migdadi; Abd El-Khalik, Samah M.; Al-Shameri, Aref M.; Javed, Muhammad M.; Al-Faifi, Sulieman A.

    2013-01-01

    Morphological, nutritional and molecular analyses were carried out to assess genetic diversity among 35 introduced lentil genotypes (Lens culinaris Medik.). The genotypes exhibited significant differences for their field parameters and some of them showed noticeable superiority. The nutritional and proximate analysis showed that some genotypes were excellent sources of proteins, essential amino acids, minerals, anti-oxidants, total phenolic contents (TPC) and total flavonoid contents (TFC...

  4. Phenological, Nutritional and Molecular Diversity Assessment among 35 Introduced Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. Genotypes Grown in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salem S. Alghamdi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Morphological, nutritional and molecular analyses were carried out to assess genetic diversity among 35 introduced lentil genotypes (Lens culinaris Medik.. The genotypes exhibited significant differences for their field parameters and some of them showed noticeable superiority. The nutritional and proximate analysis showed that some genotypes were excellent sources of proteins, essential amino acids, minerals, anti-oxidants, total phenolic contents (TPC and total flavonoid contents (TFC and hence, highlights lentil nutritional and medicinal potential. Sequence-related amplified polymorphism (SRAP and amplified fragments length polymorphism (AFLP markers were used to estimate the genetic variability at the molecular level. The existence of a considerable amount of genetic diversity among the tested lentil genotypes was also proven at the molecular level. A total of 2894 polymorphic SRAP and 1625 AFLP loci were successfully amplified using six SRAP and four AFLP primer pair combinations. Polymorphism information content (PIC values for SRAP and AFLP markers were higher than 0.8, indicating the power and higher resolution of those marker systems in detecting molecular diversity. UPGMA (unweighted pair group method with arithmetic average cluster analysis based on molecular data revealed large number of sub clusters among genotypes, indicating high diversity levels. The data presented here showed that FLIP2009-64L and FLIP2009-69L could be used as a significant source of yield, total protein, essential amino acids, and antioxidant properties. The results suggest potential lentil cultivation in the central region of Saudi Arabia for its nutritional and medicinal properties, as well as sustainable soil fertility crop.

  5. Influence of Harvest Aid Herbicides on Seed Germination, Seedling Vigor and Milling Quality Traits of Red Lentil (Lens culinaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subedi, Maya; Willenborg, Christian J; Vandenberg, Albert

    2017-01-01

    Most red lentil produced worldwide is consumed in dehulled form, and post-harvest milling and splitting qualities are major concerns in the secondary processing industry. Lentil producers in northern temperate regions usually apply pre-harvest desiccants as harvest aids to accelerate the lentil crop drying process and facilitate harvesting operations. This paper reports on field studies conducted at Scott and Saskatoon, Saskatchewan, Canada in the 2012 and 2013 cropping seasons to evaluate whether herbicides applied as harvest aids alone or tank mixed with glyphosate affect seed germination, seedling vigor, milling, and splitting qualities. The site-year by desiccant treatment interaction for seed germination, vigor, and milling recovery yields was significant. Glyphosate applied alone or as tank mix with other herbicides (except diquat) reduced seed germination and seedling vigor at Saskatoon and Scott in 2012 only. Pyraflufen-ethyl (20 g ai ha-1) applied with glyphosate as well as saflufenacil (36 g ai ha-1) decreased dehulling efficiency, while saflufenacil and/or glufosinate with glyphosate reduced milling recovery and football recovery, although these effects were inconsistent. Application of diquat alone or in combination with glyphosate exhibited more consistent dehulling efficiency gains and increases in milling recovery yield. Significant but negative associations were observed between glyphosate residue in seeds and seed germination (r = -0.84, p < 0.001), seed vigor (r = -0.62, p < 0.001), dehulling efficiency (r = -0.55, p < 0.001), and milling recovery (r = -0.62, p < 0.001). These results indicate application of diquat alone or in combination with glyphosate may be a preferred option for lentil growers to improve milling recovery yield.

  6. Effect of instant controlled pressure drop on IgE antibody reactivity to peanut, lentil, chickpea and soybean proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuadrado, Carmen; Cabanillas, Beatriz; Pedrosa, Mercedes M; Muzquiz, Mercedes; Haddad, Joseph; Allaf, Karim; Rodriguez, Julia; Crespo, Jesus F; Burbano, Carmen

    2011-01-01

    The use of legume seeds is being expanded in the food industry due to their excellent nutritional and technological properties. However, legumes have been considered causative agents of allergic reactions through ingestion. Previous studies indicated that processing methods combining heat and steam pressure, such as instant controlled pressure drop (DIC®), could decrease allergenicity. The aim of this study was to investigate the impact of DIC treatment on peanut, lentil, chickpea and soybean IgE antibody reactivity. Peanut, lentil, chickpea and soybean seeds were subjected to DIC treatment at different pressure and time conditions (3 and 6 bar for 1 and 3 min). Control (raw) and DIC-treated extracts were analyzed by SDS-PAGE and immunoblotting using a serum pool from sensitized patients. DIC treatment did not affect the total protein content of legume seeds. Nevertheless, modifications of protein profiles after DIC showed a general decrease in IgE binding to legume proteins that was correlated to a higher steam pressure and longer treatment. The immunoreactivity of soybean proteins was almost abolished with treatment at 6 bar for 3 min. The results demonstrated that DIC treatment produces a reduction in the overall in vitro IgE binding of peanut, lentil and chickpea and a drastic reduction in soybean immunoreactivity. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  7. Development of Molecular Markers for Iron Metabolism Related Genes in Lentil and Their Expression Analysis under Excess Iron Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen Gupta, Debjyoti; McPhee, Kevin; Kumar, Shiv

    2017-01-01

    Multiple genes and transcription factors are involved in the uptake and translocation of iron in plants from soil. The sequence information about iron uptake and translocation related genes is largely unknown in lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.). This study was designed to develop iron metabolism related molecular markers for Ferritin-1, BHLH-1 (Basic helix loop helix), or FER-like transcription factor protein and IRT-1 (Iron related transporter) genes using genome synteny with barrel medic (Medicago truncatula). The second objective of this study was to analyze differential gene expression under excess iron over time (2 h, 8 h, 24 h). Specific molecular markers were developed for iron metabolism related genes (Ferritin-1, BHLH-1, IRT-1) and validated in lentil. Gene specific markers for Ferritin-1 and IRT-1 were used for quantitative PCR (qPCR) studies based on their amplification efficiency. Significant differential expression of Ferritin-1 and IRT-1 was observed under excess iron conditions through qPCR based gene expression analysis. Regulation of iron uptake and translocation in lentil needs further characterization. Greater emphasis should be given to development of conditions simulating field conditions under external iron supply and considering adult plant physiology.

  8. Association mapping unveils favorable alleles for grain iron and zinc concentrations in lentil (Lens culinaris subsp. culinaris).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Akanksha; Sharma, Vinay; Dikshit, Harsh Kumar; Aski, Muraleedhar; Kumar, Harish; Thirunavukkarasu, Nepolean; Patil, Basavanagouda S; Kumar, Shiv; Sarker, Ashutosh

    2017-01-01

    Lentil is a major cool-season grain legume grown in South Asia, West Asia, and North Africa. Populations in developing countries of these regions have micronutrient deficiencies; therefore, breeding programs should focus more on improving the micronutrient content of food. In the present study, a set of 96 diverse germplasm lines were evaluated at three different locations in India to examine the variation in iron (Fe) and zinc (Zn) concentration and identify simple sequence repeat (SSR) markers that associate with the genetic variation. The genetic variation among genotypes of the association mapping (AM) panel was characterized using a genetic distance-based and a general model-based clustering method. The model-based analysis identified six subpopulations, which satisfactorily explained the genetic structure of the AM panel. AM analysis identified three SSRs (PBALC 13, PBALC 206, and GLLC 563) associated with grain Fe concentration explaining 9% to 11% of phenotypic variation and four SSRs (PBALC 353, SSR 317-1, PLC 62, and PBALC 217) were associated with grain Zn concentration explaining 14%, to 21% of phenotypic variation. These identified SSRs exhibited consistent performance across locations. These candidate SSRs can be used in marker-assisted genetic improvement for developing Fe and Zn fortified lentil varieties. Favorable alleles and promising genotypes identified in this study can be utilized for lentil biofortification.

  9. Resistant starch type V formation in brown lentil (Lens culinaris Medikus) starch with different lipids/fatty acids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okumus, Bahar Nur; Tacer-Caba, Zeynep; Kahraman, Kevser; Nilufer-Erdil, Dilara

    2018-02-01

    This study aimed to characterize the brown lentil (Lens culinaris Medikus) starch and investigate the formation of amylose-lipid complexes (Resistant Starch Type V) by the addition of different lipids/fatty acids (10%, w/w) to both raw and cooked starch samples. Resistant starch content (measured by the official method of AACCI (Method 32-40), using the resistant starch assay kit) of raw brown lentil starch (BLS) increased significantly by the additions of lipids/fatty acids, starch sample complexed with HSO (hydrogenated sunflower oil) (14.1±0.4%) being the highest. For the cooked starch/lipid complexes, more profound effect was evident (22.2-67.7%). Peak, breakdown and trough viscosity values of the amylose-lipid complexed starches were significantly lower than that of BLS (p<0.05), while significant decreases in the setback and final viscosities were only detected in oil samples, but not in fatty acids. Each lipid in concern exerted different effects on the digestibility of starch and amylose-lipid complex formation while having no substantial differential effects on the thermal properties of starch depicted by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). Amylose-lipid complex formation with suitable fatty acids/lipids seems a promising way of increasing resistant starch content of food formulations. Although the applications being quite uncommon yet, brown lentil seems to have potential both as a starch and also as a resistant starch source. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Effects of seed size and aging on field performance of lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. under different irrigation treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazem GHASSEMI-GOLEZANI

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available A sub-sample of lentil (Lens culinaris ‘Kimia’ seeds was kept as bulk (S1 and another sample was separated to large (S2 and small (S3 seeds. A sub-sample of each size was kept as control or high vigor seed lot (A1 and the two other sub-samples were artificially aged for 2 and 4 days (A2 and A3, respectively. Field performance of these seeds was evaluated during 2011 and 2012. Yield components and grain yield of lentil decreased with decreasing water availability. The highest yield components (except 1000 grain weight and grain yield per unit area were obtained by plants from large seeds. The superiority of plants from large seeds in grain yield was more evident under limited irrigations than under well watering. Seed aging resulted in poor stand establishment and consequently low grain yield per unit area. Plants from aged large seeds showed the lowest reduction in grain yield per unit area, compared with those from aged small and bulk seeds. It seems that cultivation of large seeds somehow can reduce the deleterious effects of drought stress and seed aging on grain yield per unit area of lentil.

  11. Silicon improves seed germination and alleviates drought stress in lentil crops by regulating osmolytes, hydrolytic enzymes and antioxidant defense system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biju, Sajitha; Fuentes, Sigfredo; Gupta, Dorin

    2017-10-01

    Silicon (Si) has been widely reported to have beneficial effect on mitigating drought stress in plants. However, the effect of Si on seed germination under drought conditions is still poorly understood. This research was carried out to ascertain the role of Si to abate polyethylene glycol-6000 mediated drought stress on seed germination and seedling growth of lentil. Results showed that drought stress significantly decreased the seed germination traits and increased the concentration of osmolytes (proline, glycine betaine and soluble sugars), reactive oxygen species (hydrogen peroxide and superoxide anion) and lipid peroxides in lentil seedlings. The activities of hydrolytic enzymes and antioxidant enzymes increased significantly under osmotic stress. The application of Si significantly enhanced the plants ability to withstand drought stress conditions through increased Si content, improved antioxidants, hydrolytic enzymes activity, decreased concentration of osmolytes and reactive oxygen species. Multivariate data analysis showed statistically significant correlations among the drought-tolerance traits, whereas cluster analysis categorised the genotypes into distinct groups based on their drought-tolerance levels and improvements in expression of traits due to Si application. Thus, these results showed that Si supplementation of lentil was effective in alleviating the detrimental effects of drought stress on seed germination and increased seedling vigour. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  12. A rooting procedure for lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) and other hypogeous legumes (pea, chickpea and Lathyrus) based on explant polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fratini, R; Ruiz, M L

    2003-04-01

    The present study assessed the rooting response of lentil nodal segments in relation to explant polarity, hormone, salt and carbohydrate concentrations of the medium. Nodal segments of lentil with an axillary bud cultured in an inverted orientation (apical end in medium) showed higher rooting frequencies than explants cultured in a normal orientation (basal end in medium). The highest rooting percentage (95.35%) and average number of shoots regenerated per explant (2.4) were obtained from explants placed in an inverted orientation on Murashige and Skoog (MS) medium salts with 3% sucrose, supplemented with 5 microM indole acetic acid (IAA) and 1 microM kinetin (KN). Reducing or increasing phytohormone concentration did not alter significantly root regeneration of inverted explants. Sucrose at 3% allowed higher root regeneration frequencies compared to 1.5% sucrose. MS full concentration permitted regeneration of longer shoots with more nodes per regenerated shoot, compared to MS half-strength, which regenerated more shoots of shorter length and with less nodes. Inverted nodal segments of other hypogeous legumes (pea, chickpea and Lathyrus) also exhibited higher rooting frequencies than explants cultured in a normal orientation on MS medium with 3% sucrose and supplemented with 5 microM IAA and 1 microM KN. The most novel application of this study is the culture of nodal segments of hypogeous legumes in an inverted orientation. This procedure is a considerable improvement over other published procedures concerning in vitro rooting of lentil, pea, chickpea and Lathyrus.

  13. Assessment on induced genetic variability and divergence in the mutagenized lentil populations of microsperma and macrosperma cultivars developed using physical and chemical mutagenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafiul Amin Laskar

    Full Text Available Induced mutagenesis was employed to create genetic variation in the lentil cultivars for yield improvement. The assessments were made on genetic variability, character association, and genetic divergence among the twelve mutagenized populations and one parent population of each of the two lentil cultivars, developed by single and combination treatments with gamma rays and hydrazine hydrates. Analysis of variance revealed significant inter-population differences for the observed quantitative phenotypic traits. The sample mean of six treatment populations in each of the cultivar exhibited highly superior quantitative phenotypic traits compared to their parent cultivars. The higher values of heritability and genetic advance with a high genotypic coefficient of variation for most of the yield attributing traits confirmed the possibilities of lentil yield improvement through phenotypic selection. The number of pods and seeds per plant appeared to be priority traits in selection for higher yield due to their strong direct association with yield. The cluster analysis divided the total populations into three divergent groups in each lentil cultivar with parent genotypes in an independent group showing the high efficacy of the mutagens. Considering the highest contribution of yield trait to the genetic divergence among the clustered population, it was confirmed that the mutagenic treatments created a wide heritable variation for the trait in the mutant populations. The selection of high yielding mutants from the mutant populations of DPL 62 (100 Gy and Pant L 406 (100Gy + 0.1% HZ in the subsequent generation is expected to give elite lentil cultivars. Also, hybridization between members of the divergent group would produce diverse segregants for crop improvement. Apart from this, the induced mutations at loci controlling economically important traits in the selected high yielding mutants have successfully contributed in diversifying the accessible lentil

  14. Sporoderm infrastructural and cytochemical modifications in cytoplasmic male sterile broad-bean (Vicia faba L.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Claude Audran

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A comparative study of mature sporoderms of sterile and fertile pollen grains was performed using electron microscopic techniques. In sterile pollen grains, intine is lacking; ectexine sculpture is reduced and tectum is overlaid by membranous systems. Infratectal texture is compact and a sporopollenin granulous mass is obturing the aperture central region. Endexine reacts with proteins and acidic carbohydrates tests.

  15. Comparative study of the sensitivities of onion and broad bean root ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ONOS

    2010-07-05

    Jul 5, 2010 ... Cytotoxicity was inferred when the mitotic index (MI) of treated cells was 三 ½ of control. All chemicals were toxic to onion cells but only EMS and HgCl2 were toxic to BB. Genotoxicity was determined by analyzing 100 anaphase and telophase cells for chromosome fragments, bridges, vagrant chromosome, ...

  16. Dynamic transcriptome profiling of Bean Common Mosaic Virus (BCMV) infection in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) is widespread, with Phaseolus species as the primary host plants. Numerous BCMV strains have been identified on the basis of a panel of bean varieties that distinguish the pathogenicity types with respect to the viral strains. Here, we report the transcriptional respo...

  17. ARTICLE - Inbreeding depression in castor bean (Ricinus communis L. progenies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milton Krieger

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to investigate inbreeding depression (DE in castor bean. From a population derived from the Guarani cultivar, 60 mother plants were sampled. Three types of progenies were obtained from each one: from self-pollination (AU, from crosses (CR and from open pollination (PL. Grain yield of the progenies was evaluated in two locations. There was a strong interaction of progenies x locations, which led to obtaining estimates within each location. Broad variation was observed in inbreeding depression, with mean values of 6.7% and 13.4%, comparing AU progenies with PL progenies. It was observed that the population has high potential for selecting promising inbred lines. The frequency of mother plants generating progenies with simultaneous high general combination capacity and low inbreeding depression was low. Recurrent selection will increase the occurrence of parent plants associating these two properties, which is necessary for obtaining superior synthetic varieties.

  18. Genetics of common bean resistance to white mold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Flávia Fernandes Carneiro

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the research was to investigate the nature and magnitude of the genetic factors involved in theresistance of the common bean to white mold. The lines G122 (resistant and M20 (susceptible were crossed to yield F1 and F2generations and F2:3 progenies. The experiment was set up using the random block design with two replications, each of which wasevaluated twice with fungal inoculations being performed on 28 and 38 day-old plants using the straw test method. Six to eight daysafter inoculation evaluations were conducted on individual plants and at the level of means of progenies using a diagrammatic scaleranging from 1 to 9. The additive-dominance model adopted was efficient, and the genetic control of resistance was predominantlydue additive effects. Estimates of broad-sense heritability indicated that selection would be more efficient when based on the meansof progenies and when successive inoculations are employed.

  19. Dietary arsenic exposure in Brazil: The contribution of rice and beans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciminelli, Virginia S T; Gasparon, Massimo; Ng, Jack C; Silva, Gabriela C; Caldeira, Claudia L

    2017-02-01

    The human health risk associated with arsenic in food in Southeast Brazil was quantified. Based on the most commonly consumed food types in the Brazilian diet, the maximum inorganic As (iAs) daily intake from food (0.255 μg kg(-1) body weight per day) is approximately 9% of the Benchmark Dose Lower Limit (BMDL0.5) of 3 μg kg(-1) body weight per day set by the World Health Organization (WHO) and Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) Joint Expert Committee in Food Additives (JECFA). When water is included, the contribution of food to the total intake varies from 96.9% to 39.7%. Rice and beans, the main Brazilian staple food, contribute between 67 and 90% of the total As intake from food (46-79% from rice and 11-23% from beans). The substantial contribution of beans to total As food intake is reported for the first time. The broad range of As concentrations in rice and beans highlights the variable and potentially large contribution of both to As food intake in places where diet consists largely of these two food categories. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Assessment of genetic variation within a global collection of lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) cultivars and landraces using SNP markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardi, Maria; Materne, Michael; Cogan, Noel O I; Rodda, Matthew; Daetwyler, Hans D; Slater, Anthony T; Forster, John W; Kaur, Sukhjiwan

    2014-12-24

    Lentil is a self-pollinated annual diploid (2n = 2× = 14) crop with a restricted history of genetic improvement through breeding, particularly when compared to cereal crops. This limited breeding has probably contributed to the narrow genetic base of local cultivars, and a corresponding potential to continue yield increases and stability. Therefore, knowledge of genetic variation and relationships between populations is important for understanding of available genetic variability and its potential for use in breeding programs. Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers provide a method for rapid automated genotyping and subsequent data analysis over large numbers of samples, allowing assessment of genetic relationships between genotypes. In order to investigate levels of genetic diversity within lentil germplasm, 505 cultivars and landraces were genotyped with 384 genome-wide distributed SNP markers, of which 266 (69.2%) obtained successful amplification and detected polymorphisms. Gene diversity and PIC values varied between 0.108-0.5 and 0.102-0.375, with averages of 0.419 and 0.328, respectively. On the basis of clarity and interest to lentil breeders, the genetic structure of the germplasm collection was analysed separately for cultivars and landraces. A neighbour-joining (NJ) dendrogram was constructed for commercial cultivars, in which lentil cultivars were sorted into three major groups (G-I, G-II and G-III). These results were further supported by principal coordinate analysis (PCoA) and STRUCTURE, from which three clear clusters were defined based on differences in geographical location. In the case of landraces, a weak correlation between geographical origin and genetic relationships was observed. The landraces from the Mediterranean region, predominantly Greece and Turkey, revealed very high levels of genetic diversity. Lentil cultivars revealed clear clustering based on geographical origin, but much more limited correlation between geographic origin

  1. Identification of High-Temperature Tolerant Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. Genotypes through Leaf and Pollen Traits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kumari Sita

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Rising temperatures are proving detrimental for various agricultural crops. Cool-season legumes such as lentil (Lens culunaris Medik. are sensitive to even small increases in temperature during the reproductive stage, hence the need to explore the available germplasm for heat tolerance as well as its underlying mechanisms. In the present study, a set of 38 core lentil accessions were screened for heat stress tolerance by sowing 2 months later (first week of January; max/min temperature >32/20°C during the reproductive stage than the recommended date of sowing (first week of November; max/min temperature <32/20°C during the reproductive stage. Screening revealed some promising heat-tolerant genotypes (IG2507, IG3263, IG3297, IG3312, IG3327, IG3546, IG3330, IG3745, IG4258, and FLIP2009 which can be used in a breeding program. Five heat-tolerant (HT genotypes (IG2507, IG3263, IG3745, IG4258, and FLIP2009 and five heat-sensitive (HS genotypes (IG2821, IG2849, IG4242, IG3973, IG3964 were selected from the screened germplasm and subjected to further analysis by growing them the following year under similar conditions to probe the mechanisms associated with heat tolerance. Comparative studies on reproductive function revealed significantly higher pollen germination, pollen viability, stigmatic function, ovular viability, pollen tube growth through the style, and pod set in HT genotypes under heat stress. Nodulation was remarkably higher (1.8–22-fold in HT genotypes. Moreover, HT genotypes produced more sucrose in their leaves (65–73% and anthers (35–78% that HS genotypes, which was associated with superior reproductive function and nodulation. Exogenous supplementation of sucrose to in vitro-grown pollen grains, collected from heat-stressed plants, enhanced their germination ability. Assessment of the leaves of HT genotypes suggested significantly less damage to membranes (1.3–1.4-fold, photosynthetic function (1.14–1.17-fold and cellular

  2. Lectin from green speckled lentil seeds (Lens culinaris) triggered apoptosis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Yau Sang; Yu, Huimin; Xia, Lixin; Ng, Tzi Bun

    2015-01-01

    The green speckled lentil seed (Lens culinaris) lectin (GSLL) exhibits hemagglutinating activity, and possesses some properties distinct from those of other lentil lectins (e.g., molecular size, biological activities) that deserve further investigation. This study aims to investigate the basic properties (e.g., molecular size, amino acid sequence, sugar specificity) and biological activities (e.g., antiproliferative activity) of GSLL. GSLL was purified by successive fractionation on SP-Sepharose, Affi-gel blue gel, Mono Q, and Superdex 75. The biochemical properties of GSLL were investigated by SDS-PAGE, mass spectrometry, N-terminal amino acid sequencing, and sugar inhibition tests. For the biological activities, purified lyophilized GSLL was sterilized, adjusted to concentrations from 1 to 0 mg/mL (by twofold serial dilution) in Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium with fetal bovine serum, and examined by using the MTT assay, flow cytometry, and western blotting after treatment of nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE1 and CNE2 cell lines with the lectin. GSLL appeared as a 21-kDa band in non-reducing SDS-PAGE. It was composed of two subunits with molecular sizes of 17 and ~4 kDa. It exhibited specificity in binding to glucose and mannose, as well as glucosides and mannosides. Mass spectrometry and N-terminal amino acid sequencing revealed similarity of GSLL to L. culinaris lectin (LcL), especially higher coverage of the β-chain of LcL. A 48-h treatment with GSLL exerted antiproliferative effects on nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE1 and CNE2 cell lines with significant inhibition at 0.125 mg/mL (P < 0.001) and 1 mg/mL (P = 0.004), respectively, and these effects were attenuated in the presence of glucose and mannose. GSLL induced apoptosis in nasopharyngeal carcinoma CNE1 cells, with detectable phosphatidylserine externalization, mitochondrial depolarization, and cell cycle arrest. Western blot analysis suggested that GSLL triggered the extrinsic apoptotic pathway

  3. Phytogeographical origin of Madeiran common beans based on phaseolin patterns

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Emanuel Marques da Silva; Anísia Soraia Abreu Correia; Nuno Alexandre Amaral Lopes; Humberto Gil Moreira Nóbrega; José Filipe Teixeira Ganança; Ana Maria Domingues; Manhaz Khadem; Jan Jacek Slaski; Miguel Ângelo Almeida Pinheiro de Carvalho

    2010-01-01

    ... electrophoresis system, based on lab-on-a-chip technology. Five common bean standard varieties with typical phaseolin patterns were used to determine the phytogeographical origin of the Madeiran common bean accessions...

  4. Effects of Kidney Bean, Phaseolus vulgaris Meal on the Growth ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    , Oreochromis niloticus (mean weight 1.36 + 0.05 g) fed diets containing varying levels of the kidney bean, Phaseolus vulgaris were investigated under laboratory conditions. The kidney bean was incorporated at separate levels of 60, 40, ...

  5. Natural incidence of bean viruses in the northwest of Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mina Rastgou

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Bean is considered as one of the most important legumes around the world. Viral diseases are a major yield reducing factor in bean production. Bean samples with virus-like symptoms like severe or mild mosaic, vein banding, leaf curling, blistering and necrosis were collected from different bean fields in Urmia (Northwest of Iran during the growing seasons of 2013 and 2014. Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV, Bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV, Bean yellow mosaic virus (BYMV, Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV, Tomato spotted wilt virus (TSWV, Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV and Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV were detected by double antibody sandwich enzyme-linked-immunosorbent assay. Mixed infection of BCMV and BCMNV were found. BCMNV was the most frequent virus in this region whereas BYMV and TYLCV were each detected just in one sample. This is the first report of BCMNV, BCMV, BYMV, TSWV, TMV and TYLCV incidence on bean in Urmia, Iran.

  6. Performance of climber common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) lines ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    STORAGESEVER

    2009-06-03

    pathogen co-adaptation in Malawi. Proceed- ings of Bean/Cowpea CRSP Eastern African Regionalisation. Workshop, Lilongwe, p. 7. Mloza Banda HR, Ferguson AE, Mkandawire ABC (2003). The common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris ...

  7. Java EE 7 development with NetBeans 8

    CERN Document Server

    Heffelfinger, David R

    2015-01-01

    The book is aimed at Java developers who wish to develop Java EE applications while taking advantage of NetBeans functionality to automate repetitive tasks. Familiarity with NetBeans or Java EE is not assumed.

  8. Genome-Wide Linkage and Association Mapping of Halo Blight Resistance in Common Bean to Race 6 of the Globally Important Bacterial Pathogen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J. Tock

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola (Psph Race 6 is a globally prevalent and broadly virulent bacterial pathogen with devastating impact causing halo blight of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.. Common bean lines PI 150414 and CAL 143 are known sources of resistance against this pathogen. We constructed high-resolution linkage maps for three recombinant inbred populations to map resistance to Psph Race 6 derived from the two common bean lines. This was complemented with a genome-wide association study (GWAS of Race 6 resistance in an Andean Diversity Panel of common bean. Race 6 resistance from PI 150414 maps to a single major-effect quantitative trait locus (QTL; HB4.2 on chromosome Pv04 and confers broad-spectrum resistance to eight other races of the pathogen. Resistance segregating in a Rojo × CAL 143 population maps to five chromosome arms and includes HB4.2. GWAS detected one QTL (HB5.1 on chromosome Pv05 for resistance to Race 6 with significant influence on seed yield. The same HB5.1 QTL, found in both Canadian Wonder × PI 150414 and Rojo × CAL 143 populations, was effective against Race 6 but lacks broad resistance. This study provides evidence for marker-assisted breeding for more durable halo blight control in common bean by combining alleles of race-nonspecific resistance (HB4.2 from PI 150414 and race-specific resistance (HB5.1 from cv. Rojo.

  9. Registration of AO-1012-29-3-3A red kidney bean germplasm line with bean weevil, BCMV and BCMNV resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) and bean common mosaic necrosis virus (BCMNV) are important seed-borne diseases of dry bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) in the Americas and Africa. The bean weevil (Acanthoscelides obtectus Say) is an aggressive post-harvest pest of the common bean. The development of bea...

  10. Relationship between geographical origin, seed size and genetic diversity in faba bean (Vicia faba L.) as revealed by SSR markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Göl, Şurhan; Doğanlar, Sami; Frary, Anne

    2017-05-11

    Faba bean (Vicia faba L.) is an important legume species because of its high protein and starch content. Broad bean can be grown in different climatic conditions and is an ideal rotation crop because of the nitrogen fixing bacteria in its roots. In this work, 255 faba bean germplasm accessions were characterized using 32 SSR primers which yielded 302 polymorphic fragments. According to the results, faba bean individuals were divided into two main groups based on the neighbor-joining algorithm (r = 0.91) with some clustering based on geographical origin as well as seed size. Population structure was also determined and agreed with the dendrogram analysis in splitting the accessions into two subpopulations. Analysis of molecular variance (AMOVA) revealed high levels of within population genetic variation. Genetic similarity and geographical proximity were related with separation of European accessions from African and Asian ones. Interestingly, there was no significant difference between landrace (38%) and cultivar (40%) diversity indicating that genetic variability has not yet been lost due to breeding. A total of 44 genetically well-characterized faba bean individuals were selected for a core collection to be further examined for yield and nutritional traits.

  11. Nutritional and Antioxidant Potential of Lentil Sprouts Affected by Elicitation with Temperature Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Świeca, Michał; Baraniak, Barbara

    2014-04-09

    The influences of temperature stress on antioxidant potential and nutritional quality of lentil sprouts were studied. Temperature treatments (TC, 1 h at 4 °C; TH, 1 h at 40 °C) significantly improved the nutraceutical potential without any negative effect on nutritional quality. In comparison to control, elicited sprouts were characterized by elevated content of condensed tannins, flavonoids, and total phenolics. The highest content of total phenolics and flavonoids was determined for 6-day-old TH sprouts -23.7 ± 0.87 and 2.50 ± 0.07 mg/(g of dry weight (DW)), respectively. The general trend of antiradical, lipid preventing, and reducing properties in elicited sprouts indicates a significantly improvement of these activities. The highest reducing power was determined for 6-day-old sprouts induced at TH (0.43 ± 0.02 mmol of Trolox/(g of DW)), while the lowest for 3-day-old sprouts elicited at TC (0.29 ± 0.02 mmol of Trolox/(g of DW)). Both modifications effectively elevated the ability to prevent lipids against oxidation (in 3-day-old sprouts a 3.3- and 4-fold increase for TC and TH, respectively).

  12. Heterologous expression and solution structure of defensin from lentil Lens culinaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Gizatullina, Albina K; Finkina, Ekaterina I; Alekseeva, Ekaterina A; Balandin, Sergey V; Mineev, Konstantin S; Arseniev, Alexander S; Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V

    2014-08-22

    A new defensin Lc-def, isolated from germinated seeds of the lentil Lens culinaris, has molecular mass 5440.4Da and consists of 47 amino acid residues. Lc-def and its (15)N-labeled analog were overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Antimicrobial activity of the recombinant protein was examined, and its spatial structure, dynamics, and interaction with lipid vesicles were studied by NMR spectroscopy. It was shown that Lc-def is active against fungi, but does not inhibit the growth of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. The peptide is monomeric in aqueous solution and contains one α-helix and triple-stranded β-sheet, which form cysteine-stabilized αβ motif (CSαβ) previously found in other plant defensins. The sterically neighboring loop1 and loop3 protrude from the defensin core and demonstrate significant mobility on the μs-ms timescale. Lc-def does not bind to the zwitterionic lipid (POPC) vesicles but interacts with the partially anionic (POPC/DOPG, 7:3) membranes under low-salt conditions. The Lc-def antifungal activity might be mediated through electrostatic interaction with anionic lipid components of fungal membranes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Ethyl methane sulphonate induced genetic variability and heritability in macrosperma and microsperma lentils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rana, Aman; Solanki, I S

    2015-09-01

    Dry and healthy seeds of two lentil cultivars, LH90-54 (macrosperma) and LH89-48 (microsperma) were treated with three doses of ethyl methane sulphonate (0.1, 0.2 and 0.4 %). In both the cultivars, all the M, plants with sufficient seed from each treatment and control were taken to raise independent M2 plant progenies. Wider range of means in both positive and negative directions along with overall positive shift in mean for all the polygenic traits, except pod-initiation height and 100-seed weight, were observed in different treatments in M2 generation. In both the cultivars, medium dose induced highest amount of variation. The estimates of variance, GCV and PCV for different polygenic traits increased significantly over control values in all the treatments of both the cultivars. Higher estimates of heritability and genetic advance in M2 population indicated tremendous scope for the improvement of seed yield and its component traits through selection in the mutagenized material.

  14. Recombinant production and solution structure of lipid transfer protein from lentil Lens culinaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gizatullina, Albina K; Finkina, Ekaterina I; Mineev, Konstantin S; Melnikova, Daria N; Bogdanov, Ivan V; Telezhinskaya, Irina N; Balandin, Sergey V; Shenkarev, Zakhar O; Arseniev, Alexander S; Ovchinnikova, Tatiana V

    2013-10-04

    Lipid transfer protein, designated as Lc-LTP2, was isolated from seeds of the lentil Lens culinaris. The protein has molecular mass 9282.7Da, consists of 93 amino acid residues including 8 cysteines forming 4 disulfide bonds. Lc-LTP2 and its stable isotope labeled analogues were overexpressed in Escherichia coli and purified. Antimicrobial activity of the recombinant protein was examined, and its spatial structure was studied by NMR spectroscopy. The polypeptide chain of Lc-LTP2 forms four α-helices (Cys4-Leu18, Pro26-Ala37, Thr42-Ala56, Thr64-Lys73) and a long C-terminal tail without regular secondary structure. Side chains of the hydrophobic residues form a relatively large internal tunnel-like lipid-binding cavity (van der Waals volume comes up to ∼600Å(3)). The side-chains of Arg45, Pro79, and Tyr80 are located near an assumed mouth of the cavity. Titration with dimyristoyl phosphatidylglycerol (DMPG) revealed formation of the Lc-LTP2/lipid non-covalent complex accompanied by rearrangements in the protein spatial structure and expansion of the internal cavity. The resultant Lc-LTP2/DMPG complex demonstrates limited lifetime and dissociates within tens of hours. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Kinetics of Adaptation to Osmotic Stress in Lentil (Lens culinaris Med.) Roots 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuzmanoff, Konrad M.; Evans, Michael L.

    1981-01-01

    When intact roots of lentil (Lens culinaris Med.) are subjected to severe osmotic stress by treatment with a solution of low water potential, they immediately begin to shrink. Within 10 to 15 minutes, shrinkage ceases, and within 20 minutes, the roots resume growth. The time lag between application of osmoticum and resumption of growth varies from about 10 to 30 minutes over the range of external water potentials of −2 to −12.4 bars. For external water potentials as low as −8.7 bars the new steady rate of growth in the presence of osmoticum is approximately equal to that prevailing before application of osmoticum. For external water potentials between −8.7 and −13 bars growth resumes, but the new rate is less than that prior to addition of osmoticum. Measurements of changes in the internal solute content during adaptation show that the solute content of the root increases but that the magnitude of the increase is, by itself, insufficient to account for the resumption of rapid growth. PMID:16661878

  16. Outbreaks of Chrysodeixis includens (Walker (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae in common bean and castor bean in São Paulo State, Brazil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edson Luiz Lopes Baldin

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Since 2009, increasing populations of Chrysodeixis includens (Walker (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae have been observed in cultivated common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L. and castor bean (Ricinus communis L. at the Lageado Experimental Farm, belonging to the FCA/UNESP, Botucatu, São Paulo State, Brazil. Defoliations around 80% and 50% were observed in the common bean cv. Pérola and castor bean cv. IAC-2028, respectively. Samples of individuals (caterpillars and pupae were collected in the field, and kept in laboratory until adult emergence aiming to confirm the species. These are new observations for common bean in São Paulo State and, in the case of castor bean, unpublished in Brazil. It suggests that C. includens has adapted to attack other agricultural crops, demanding attention of common bean and castor bean producers.

  17. A review of the Hispanic paradox: time to spill the beans?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert P. Young

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Past epidemiological observations and recent molecular studies suggest that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD and lung cancer are closely related diseases, resulting from overlapping genetic susceptibility and exposure to aero pollutants, primarily cigarette smoke. Statistics from the American Lung Association and American Cancer Society reveal that mortality from COPD and lung cancer are lowest in Hispanic subjects and generally highest in African American subjects, with mortality in non-Hispanic white subjects and Asian subjects in between. This observation, described as the ‘‘Hispanic paradox’’, persists after adjusting for confounding variables, notably smoking exposure and sociodemographic factors. While differences in genetic predisposition might underlie this observation, differences in diet remain a possible explanation. Such a hypothesis is supported by the observation that a diet high in fruit and vegetables has been shown to confer a protective effect on both COPD and lung cancer. In this article, we hypothesise that a diet rich in legumes may explain, in part, the Hispanic paradox, given the traditionally high consumption of legumes (beans and lentils by Hispanic subjects. Legumes are very high in fibre and have recently been shown to attenuate systemic inflammation significantly, which has previously been linked to susceptibility to COPD and lung cancer in large prospective studies. A similar protective effect could be attributed to the consumption of soy products (from soybeans in Asian subjects, for whom a lower incidence of COPD and lung cancer has also been reported. This hypothesis requires confirmation in cohort studies and randomised control trials, where the effects of diet on outcomes can be carefully examined in a prospective study design.

  18. Potency of Traditional Insecticide Materials against Stored Bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The bean weevil, Acanthoscelides obtectus is a major insect pest of stored common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris an important source of plant protein in many parts of the world, Tanzania inclusive. In rural Tanzania, most smallholder farmers apply traditional insecticide materials in the protection of bean from insect pests.

  19. Performance Evaluation of a Dryer for Processed Locust Bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Drying of fresh fermented locust beans condiments is highly important in marketing strategy. Performance test of the dryer for processed locust beans condiments (Iru) was carried out using an instrumented dryer designed and developed, this was used to dry two varieties of fermented locust beans (Iru Woro of initial ...

  20. Registration of Gabisa Common Bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L.) Variety

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Gabisa is a common name for common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) variety with pedigree name of VAX-2. It is a bush food bean variety selected out of common bean lines introduced to Ethiopia through CIAT program and released in 2007 by the Bako Agricultural Research Center for production in western Ethiopia and ...

  1. Effects of fermented soya bean on digestion, absorption and diarrhoea

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kiers, J.L.

    2001-01-01

    For many centuries Asian people have consumed soya beans in various forms of traditional fermented soya bean foods. Major desirable aspects of fermented soya bean foods are their attractive flavour and texture, certain nutritional properties, and possible health promoting effects. This

  2. Bacteriological Contamination of Soya Bean Flour Sold in Makurdi ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Soya bean (Glycine max) is a leguminous crop that is used as a staple food worldwide. The raw harvest is processed into various food forms like soya bean flour and processing methods increase the chances of bacterial contamination. This research work assessed the bacteria contamination of soya bean flour sold in and ...

  3. susceptibility to bruchids among common beans in uganda abstract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Internaciaonal de Agricultura Tropical, Cali,. Colombia. 40pp. Shade, R.E., Pratt, R.C. and Pomeroy, M.A. 1987. Development and mortality of the bean weevil,. Acanthoscelides obtectus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae) on mature seeds of tepary beans,. Phaseolus acutifolius and common beans,. Phaseolus vulgaris. Environmental.

  4. Effect of hydrocolloids on functional properties of navy bean starch

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of hydrocolloid replacement on the pasting properties of navy bean starch and on the properties of navy bean starch gels were studied. Navy bean starch was isolated, and blends were prepared with beta-glucan, guar gum, pectin and xanthan gum solutions. The total solids concentration was ...

  5. Inheritance of halo blight resistance in common bean | Chataika ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Halo blight caused by (Pseudomonas syringe pv. phaseolicola (Burkh) (Psp)) is an important disease of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) world-wide. Several races of the Psp exist and likewise some sources of resistance in common bean have been identified. CAL 143, is a CIAT-bred common bean line, which was ...

  6. Comparative evaluation of raw and urea/toasted velvet bean ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Feeding trials lasting 28 days were conducted to investigate the nutritive value of raw and urea treated/toasted mucuna bean for broiler chicks. Raw mucuna bean contains 30.33% crude protein, 7.20% crude fibre, 6.9% ether extract and 5.0% ash. Mucuna bean seeds were divided into two batches. One batch was ground ...

  7. Development and use of microsatellite markers in Marama bean

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Prof. Adipala Ekwamu

    the main focus for potential to be used in Marama bean genetic diversity studies. Microsatellite loci were isolated from the Marama bean germplasm using a modified FIASCO enrichment technique. Nine Marama bean microsatellite libraries, enriched for (AAG)7, (GTT)7, (AGG)7, (GAG)7, (CA)10, (CT)10, (TCC)7, (CA)15 and.

  8. High-pressure improves enzymatic proteolysis and the release of peptides with angiotensin I converting enzyme inhibitory and antioxidant activities from lentil proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Mora, P; Peñas, E; Frias, J; Gomez, R; Martinez-Villaluenga, C

    2015-03-15

    Angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and antioxidant peptides are receiving attention due to their beneficial effects in the prevention/treatment of hypertension. The objective was to explore the effect of high hydrostatic pressure (HP) on proteolysis by different proteases and the release of bioactive peptides from lentil proteins. Pressurisation (100-300 MPa) enhanced the hydrolytic efficiency of Protamex, Savinase and Corolase 7089 compared to Alcalase. Proteolysis at 300 MPa led to a complete degradation of lentil proteins and increased peptide (antioxidant activities that were retained upon in vitro gastrointestinal digestion. The peptides responsible for the multifunctional properties of S300 hydrolysate were identified as different fragments from storage proteins and the allergen Len c 1. These results support the potential of HP as a technology for the cost-effective production of bioactive peptides from lentil proteins during enzymatic proteolysis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Determining radio frequency heating uniformity in mixed beans for disinfestations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our laboratory collaborates with USDA-ARS in Parlier, CA in developing thermal treatments based on radio frequency (RF) energy for insect control in legumes to meet postharvest phytosanitary regulations for international market. Our current study focuses on lentils and chickpeas that are two importa...

  10. Evaluation of the reaction oof interspecific hybrids of common bean and tepary bean to Bradyrhizobium y Rhizobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Interspecific hybrids between common bean, Phaseolus vulgaris L., and tepary bean, Phaseolus acutifolius A. Gray, have the potential to increase bean production in regions where rainfall is limited. In 2014, an experiment was initiated using a split-plot design. The treatments included inoculation, ...

  11. Sensory and Physicochemical Studies of Thermally Micronized Chickpea (Cicer arietinum) and Green Lentil (Lens culinaris) Flours as Binders in Low-Fat Beef Burgers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shariati-Ievari, Shiva; Ryland, Donna; Edel, Andrea; Nicholson, Tiffany; Suh, Miyoung; Aliani, Michel

    2016-05-01

    Pulses are known to be nutritious foods but are susceptible to oxidation due to the reaction of lipoxygenase (LOX) with linolenic and linoleic acids which can lead to off flavors caused by the formation of volatile organic compounds (VOCs). Infrared micronization at 130 and 150 °C was investigated as a heat treatment to determine its effect on LOX activity and VOCs of chickpea and green lentil flour. The pulse flours were added to low-fat beef burgers at 6% and measured for consumer acceptability and physicochemical properties. Micronization at 130 °C significantly decreased LOX activity for both flours. The lentil flour micronized at 150 °C showed a further significant decrease in LOX activity similar to that of the chickpea flour at 150 °C. The lowering of VOCs was accomplished more successfully with micronization at 130 °C for chickpea flour while micronization at 150 °C for the green lentil flour was more effective. Micronization minimally affected the characteristic fatty acid content in each flour but significantly increased omega-3 and n-6 fatty acids at 150 °C in burgers with lentil and chickpea flours, respectively. Burgers with green lentil flour micronized at 130 and 150 °C, and chickpea flour micronized at 150 °C were positively associated with acceptability. Micronization did not affect the shear force and cooking losses of the burgers made with both flours. Formulation of low-fat beef burgers containing 6% micronized gluten-free binder made from lentil and chickpea flour is possible based on favorable results for physicochemical properties and consumer acceptability. © 2016 Institute of Food Technologists®

  12. The use of whole faba beans in emulsion gel

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    The faba bean (Vicia faba L.) is an economical protein source used in food and feed worldwide. It has high protein content and well-balanced amino acid composition. Since the starch fraction of faba beans causes problems in protein gelation, it hinders the use of whole faba beans for tofu production. Due to economical, ecological and nutritional reasons, it is worthwhile to develop a new way for producing whole faba bean tofu without discarding any part of faba beans. The aim of this thesis w...

  13. Mapping snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) pod and color traits, in a dry bean x snap bean recombinant inbred population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snap bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) breeding programs are tasked with developing varieties that meet the standards of the vegetable processing industry and ultimately that of the consumer; all the while matching or exceeding the field performance of existing varieties. While traditional breeding methods ...

  14. Effect of Intercropping Patterns of Fennel (Foeniculum vulgarMill, Sesame (Sesamum indicum and Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L on Growth, Qualitative and Quantitative Characters and Yield Components

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    fatemeh ranjbar

    2017-02-01

    end of each row and 8 m2 area was harvested. All harvested crops were dried under free condition and shadow, then was weighted and after that seeds were separated from crops. To measure yield components five samples were selected. For fennel: umbel number per plant, umbellate number per plant, seed number per umbellate, 1000 seed weight, for sesame: capsule number per plant, seed number per capsule and 1000 seed weight and for bean: pod number per plant, seed number per pod and 1000 seed weight were measured. Results and discussion: Results indicated that the yield and yield components of intercropped and pure fennel treatments significantly affect grain and biological yield, harvest index, the number of umbels per plant, the number of fertile umbellates per plant, and vegetative essential oil. In addition, these treatments in sesame showed significant effect on biological yield, grain yield, harvest index, plant height and seed weight per capsule. The results for bean revealed significant effects on biological yield, grain yield and the number of seeds per pod. Moreover, the highest percentage of essential oil in fennel was obtained in fennel-sesame treatment. The highest percentage of oil in sesame was obtained in sole crop of fennel. Furthermore, the results showed that the highest LER (1.22 was observed in sesame-fennel treatment. Considering this ratio, this treatment was selected as a superior treatment among the other treatments. An experiment on mixed cultivation of Zea maize and bean showed higher amount of biological yield, in intercropping treatments (RezvanBeydokhti et al., 2005. Another experiment on mixed cropping of cumin (Cuminum cyminum L. and lentil (Lens culinaris M.showed higher amount of seed yield in intercropping treatments and biological yield in sole cropping .

  15. Development of a panel of unigene-derived polymorphic EST–SSR markers in lentil using public database information

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Debjyoti Sen Gupta

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik., a diploid (2n = 14 with a genome size greater than 4000 Mbp, is an important cool season food legume grown worldwide. The availability of genomic resources is limited in this crop species. The objective of this study was to develop polymorphic markers in lentil using publicly available curated expressed sequence tag information (ESTs. In this study, 9513 ESTs were downloaded from the National Center for Biotechnology Information (NCBI database to develop unigene-based simple sequence repeat (SSR markers. The ESTs were assembled into 4053 unigenes and then analyzed to identify 374 SSRs using the MISA microsatellite identification tool. Among the 374 SSRs, 26 compound SSRs were observed. Primer pairs for these SSRs were designed using Primer3 version 1.14. To classify the functional annotation of ESTs and EST–SSRs, BLASTx searches (using E-value 1 × 10−5 against the public UniProt (http://www.uniprot.org/ and NCBI (http://www.ncbi.nlh.nih.gov/ databases were performed. Further functional annotation was performed using PLAZA (version 3.0 comparative genomics and GO annotation was summarized using the Plant GO slim category. Among the synthesized 312 primers, 219 successfully amplified Lens DNA. A diverse panel of 24 Lens genotypes was used to identify polymorphic markers. A polymorphic set of 57 markers successfully discriminated the test genotypes. This set of polymorphic markers with functional annotation data could be used as molecular tools in lentil breeding.

  16. Effect of germination, cooking, canning and storage on the nutrient composition of four varieties of lentils (Lens esculenta Moench).

    OpenAIRE

    Madhi, Yahia Saeed

    1985-01-01

    Various parameters (physical and biochemical) of the dry seeds of four varieties of lentils (Lens esculenta Moench): two Syrians, one Jordanian, and one American were studied as were those of seedlings grown for up to 5 days in the dark (25°C and 35°C) and in the light (25°C). The nutrients studied were: carbohydrates, lipids, crude fibre, proteins, and the vitamins: vitamin C, thiamine, and riboflavin. On the whole, there were no wide differences in nutritional values between the...

  17. Nitrogen mineralization in soils amended with sunnhemp, velvet bean and common bean residues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ambrosano, Edmilson Jose [Estacao Experimental de Agronomia de Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Centro de Acao Regional; Trivelin, Paulo Cesar Ocheuze; Muraoka, Takashi [Centro de Energia Nuclear na Agricultura (CENA), Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Lab. de Isotopos Estaveis; Cantarella, Heitor [Instituto Agronomico de Campinas (IAC), SP (Brazil). Centro de Solos e Recursos Agroambientais; Ambrosano, Glaucia Maria Bovi [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Piracicaba, SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Odontologia. Dept. de Odontologia Social e Bioestatistica

    2003-03-01

    Nitrogen ({sup 15}N) released from sunnhemp (Crotalaria juncea), velvet bean (Mucuna aterrima) and from Phaseolus bean residues was evaluated after incubation of the plant material in an Eutrudox and a Paleudalf, in a greenhouse experiment with pots containing 6 kg of air dried soil. Dry matter equivalent to 13 Mg ha{sup -1} of Phaseolus bean residues and the same amount of above ground arts of the leguminous species, associated to 2.7 and 2.2 Mg ha{sup -1} of roots of sunnhemp and velvet bean respectively, were incorporated into the soil. A completely randomized experimental design was adopted, with treatments arranged in a 2 x 3 + 1 factorial, replicated three times. The treatments were the following: two soils (Eutrudox and Paleudalf) and three plant materials: two green-manures (sunnhemp or velvet bean), and Phaseolus bean residues, besides one control without plant incorporation into the soil. For the green-manure treatments there were two sub-treatments for each legume species, with {sup 15}N labeling of either shoots or roots. Soil moisture was maintained relatively constant during the experimental period and the treatments were sampled weekly during 49 days. Total mineral nitrogen in the soil, as well as that derived from the legume plants were determined by isotope dilution. Nitrogen from the velvet bean accounted for a greater proportion of the soil inorganic N; shoots were responsible for most of N accumulated. Dry bean residues caused immobilization of inorganic N. The leguminous species added were intensively and promptly mineralized preserving the soil native nitrogen. Mineralization of the legume plant N was greater in the Paleudalf soil than in the Eutrudox. (author)

  18. Nitrogen mineralization in soils amended with sunnhemp, velvet bean and common bean residues

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ambrosano Edmilson José

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Nitrogen (15N released from sunnhemp (Crotalaria juncea, velvet bean (Mucuna aterrima and from Phaseolus bean residues was evaluated after incubation of the plant material in an Eutrudox and a Paleudalf, in a greenhouse experiment with pots containing 6 kg of air dried soil. Dry matter equivalent to 13 Mg ha-1 of Phaseolus bean residues and the same amount of above ground parts of the leguminous species, associated to 2.7 and 2.2 Mg ha-1 of roots of sunnhemp and velvet bean respectively, were incorporated into the soil. A completely randomized experimental design was adopted, with treatments arranged in a 2 3 + 1 factorial, replicated three times. The treatments were the following: two soils (Eutrudox and Paleudalf and three plant materials: two green-manures (sunnhemp or velvet bean, and Phaseolus bean residues, besides one control without plant incorporation into the soil. For the green-manure treatments there were two sub-treatments for each legume species, with 15N labeling of either shoots or roots. Soil moisture was maintained relatively constant during the experiment al period and the treatments were sampled weekly during 49 days. Total mineral nitrogen in the soil, as well as that derived from the legume plants were determined by isotope dilution. Nitrogen from the velvet bean accounted for a greater proportion of the soil inorganic N; shoots were responsible for most of N accumulated. Dry bean residues caused immobilization of inorganic N. The leguminous species added were intensively and promptly mineralized preserving the soil native nitrogen. Mineralization of the legume plant N was greater in the Paleudalf soil than in the Eutrudox.

  19. 1 CHEMICAL EVALUATION OF WINGED BEANS ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ROP30

    useful information on the possible uses of these under exploited food items for human consumption, food industry and other technological uses. The objectives of this study, therefore, are to determine the proximate, mineral and sugar composition of winged beans, pitanga cherries and orchid fruit, and the physico- chemical ...

  20. Forage potential of American potato bean

    Science.gov (United States)

    American potato bean (Apios americana Medikus) is a nitrogen-fixing perennial leguminous vine that is native to the eastern half of the United States. In the wild, the plant prefers moist soils near bodies of water and full sunlight for at least part of the day. It grows well in waterlogged, acidi...

  1. Genetic divergence of common bean cultivars.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Veloso, J S; Silva, W; Pinheiro, L R; Dos Santos, J B; Fonseca, N S; Euzebio, M P

    2015-09-22

    The aim of this study was to evaluate genetic divergence in the 'Carioca' (beige with brown stripes) common bean cultivar used by different institutions and in 16 other common bean cultivars used in the Rede Cooperativa de Pesquisa de Feijão (Cooperative Network of Common Bean Research), by using simple sequence repeats associated with agronomic traits that are highly distributed in the common bean genome. We evaluated 22 polymorphic loci using bulks containing DNA from 30 plants. There was genetic divergence among the Carioca cultivar provided by the institutions. Nevertheless, there was lower divergence among them than among the other cultivars. The cultivar used by Instituto Agronômico do Paraná was the most divergent in relation to the Carioca samples. The least divergence was observed among the samples used by Universidade Federal de Lavras and by Embrapa Arroz e Feijão. Of all the cultivars, 'CNFP 10104' and 'BRSMG Realce' showed the greatest dissimilarity. The cultivars were separated in two groups of greatest similarity using the Structure software. Genetic variation among cultivars was greater than the variation within or between the groups formed. This fact, together with the high estimate of heterozygosity observed and the genetic divergence of the samples of the Carioca cultivar in relation to the original provided by Instituto Agronômico de Campinas, indicates a mixture of cultivars. The high divergence among cultivars provides potential for the utilization of this genetic variability in plant breeding.

  2. CHEMICAL COMPOSITION OF BEAN WEEVIL (Acanthoscelides ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Administrator

    and 13.1mg of iron respectively; indication that insects are rich sources of Fe. Like other insects weevils are good sources of calcium, occasioned by their possession of exoskeleton which is composed of calcium (Ebong, 1993). (d). Table III reports the level of toxicants in bean weevil. The milligram per 100g dry matter of the.

  3. Release of "Bella" white bean cultivar

    Science.gov (United States)

    "Bella" Reg. No. GP-___, PI ______) is a multiple disease resistant white bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) cultivar, adapted to the humid tropics that was developed and released cooperatively by the University of Puerto Rico Agricultural Experiment Station and the USDA-ARS. The breeding objective was to...

  4. Nutraceutical perspectives and utilization of common beans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Common beans contain a variety of phytochemicals such as polyphenolic compounds, alkaloids, fibre, saponins, steroids, lectins and terpenoids among others. These phytochemicals are believed to offer protective functions and physiological effects in the body. The nutraceutical properties that have been described for ...

  5. Phenotyping common beans for adaptation to drought

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephen eBeebe

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. originated in the New World and are the grain legume of greatest production for direct human consumption. Common bean production is subject to frequent droughts in highland Mexico, in the Pacific coast of Central America, in northeast Brazil, and in eastern and southern Africa from Ethiopia to South Africa. This article reviews efforts to improve common bean for drought tolerance, referring to genetic diversity for drought response, the physiology of of drought tolerance mechanisms, and breeding strategies. Different races of common bean respond differently to drought, with race Durango of highland Mexico being a major source of genes. Sister species of P. vulgaris likewise have unique traits, especially P. acutifolius which is well adapted to dryland conditions. Diverse sources of tolerance may have different mechanisms of plant response, implying the need for different methods of phenotyping to recognize the relevant traits. Practical considerations of field management are discussed including: trial planning; water management; and field preparation.

  6. morphological diversity of tropical common bean germplasm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    Plant samples and study location. The materials used in this study were 284 bean accessions, including 15 lines from Colombia, one line from. Rwanda and 268 landraces, currently maintained at the National Crops Resources Research. Institute (NaCRRI) at Namulonge, Uganda (data not shown). Seven of the accessions ...

  7. biological nitrogen fixation by inoculated soya beans

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Biological Nitrogen Fixation (BNF) by soya beans (Glycine max) was estimated using the acetylene reduction assay (ARA) for varieties Davis, Kudu, Impala, Hardee, Geduld, and an unidentified variety, grown in pure and mixed cultures with maize (Zea mays) over two seasons. All varieties had higher levels of BNF when ...

  8. FUNGI OF AFRICAN YAM BEAN. SPHENOSTYLIS STENOCARPA

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    blotter, ragdoll and agar plate methods in detecting seed-borne fungi of African yam bean,. Sphenoxtylis stenocaapa (Hochst ex. ... Murropluunina pliaseolina and Penicillin/n spp. were recorded more in the agar plate method than in the other fungi .... transferred to the deep-freezer (-20°C) for "24 hours“ only and incubated ...

  9. Breeding for bean anthracnose resistance: Matching breeding ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A total of 365 new bean lines were generated and 54 of these were introduced to 10 farming communities in four different ecological zones for evaluation using the participatory variety selection approach. Farmers were able to select eight promising lines, which were earmarked for new variety release. Out of the eight lines, ...

  10. Mung bean: technological and nutritional potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dahiya, P K; Linnemann, A R; Van Boekel, M A J S; Khetarpaul, N; Grewal, R B; Nout, M J R

    2015-01-01

    Mung bean (Vigna radiata (L.) R. Wilczek) has been intensively researched; scattered data are available on various properties. Data on physical, chemical, food processing, and nutritional properties were collected for whole mung bean grains and reviewed to assess the crop's potential as food and to set research priorities. Results show that mung bean is a rich source of protein (14.6-33.0 g/100 g) and iron (5.9-7.6 mg/100 g). Grain color is correlated with compounds like polyphenols and carotenoids, while grain hardness is associated with fiber content. Physical properties like grain dimensions, sphericity, porosity, bulk, and true density are related to moisture content. Anti-nutrients are phytic acid, tannins, hemagglutinins, and polyphenols. Reported nutrient contents vary greatly, the causes of which are not well understood. Grain size and color have been associated with different regions and were used by plant breeders for selection purposes. Analytical methods require more accuracy and precision to distinguish biological variation from analytical variation. Research on nutrient digestibility, food processing properties, and bioavailability is needed. Furthermore, the effects of storage and processing on nutrients and food processing properties are required to enable optimization of processing steps, for better mung bean food quality and process efficiency.

  11. Common bean and cowpea improvement in Angola

    Science.gov (United States)

    During 2014 and 2015, the Instituto de Investigação Agronómica (IIA) evaluated the performance of common bean (Phaselolus vulgaris L.) breeding lines and improved cowpea (Vigna unguiculata L. Walp.) varieties. The field experiments were planted in the lowlands at Mazozo and in the highlands at Chian...

  12. Castor bean response to zinc fertilization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chaves, Lucia Helena Garofalo; Cunha, Tassio Henrique Cavalcanti da Silva; Lima, Vinicius Mota; Cabral, Paulo Cesar Pinto; Barros Junior, Genival; Lacerda, Rogerio Dantas de [Universidade Federal de Campina Grande (UAEAg/UFCG), PB (Brazil). Unidade Academica de Engenharia Agricola

    2008-07-01

    Zinc is a trace element and it is absolutely essential for the normal healthy growth of plants. This element plays a part of several enzyme systems and other metabolic functions in the plants. Castor beans (Ricinus communis L.) crop is raising attention as an alternative crop for oil and biodiesel production. Despite the mineral fertilization is an important factor for increasing castor beans yield, few researches has been made on this issue, mainly on the use of zinc. In order to evaluate the effects of zinc on growth of this plant an experiment was carried out in a greenhouse, in Campina Grande, Paraiba State, Brazil, from July to December 2007. The substrate for the pot plants was a 6 mm-sieved surface soil (Neossolo Quartzarenico). The experimental design was a completely randomized with three replications. The treatments were composed of five levels of Zn (0; 2; 4; 6 and 8 mg dm{sup -3}), which were applied at the time of planting. One plant of castor bean, cultivar BRS 188 - Paraguacu, was grown per pot after thinning and was irrigated whenever necessary. Data on plant height, number and length of leaves and stem diameter were measured at 21, 34, 77 and 103 days after planting. Under conditions that the experiment was carried out the results showed that the Zn levels used, did not affect the castor bean plants growth. (author)

  13. chitwood on African yam bean, Sphenostylis stenocarpa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Yomi

    2012-01-24

    Jan 24, 2012 ... The experiments were laid out in a completely randomized design ... cloning with the aim of imparting pest resistance to plants. (Omitogun, et al. ..... The effects of M. incognita infection on growth parameters of 12 African yam bean accessions, S. stenocarpa, in a screen house experiment. Accession. Health.

  14. Phenotypic and metabolic responses to drought and salinity of four contrasting lentil accessions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muscolo, A.; Junker, A.; Klukas, C.; Weigelt-Fischer, K.; Riewe, D.; Altmann, T.

    2015-01-01

    Drought and salinity are among the major abiotic stresses which, often inter-relatedly, adversely affect plant growth and productivity. Plant stress responses depend on the type of stress, on its intensity, on the species, and also on the genotype. Different accessions of a species may have evolved different mechanisms to cope with stress and to complete their life cycles. This study is focused on lentil, an important Mediterranean legume with high quality protein for the human diet. The effects of salinity and drought on germination and early growth of Castelluccio di Norcia (CAST), Pantelleria (PAN), Ustica (UST), and Eston (EST) accessions were evaluated to identify metabolic and phenotypic traits related to drought and/or salinity stress tolerance. The results showed a relationship between imposed stresses and performance of the cultivars. According to germination frequencies, the accession ranking was as follows: NaCl resistant > susceptible, PAN > UST > CAST > EST; polyethylene glycol (PEG) resistant > susceptible, CAST > UST > EST > PAN. Seedling tolerance rankings were: NaCl resistant > susceptible, CAST ≈ UST > PAN ≈ EST; PEG resistant > susceptible, CAST > EST ≈ UST > PAN. Changes in the metabolite profiles, mainly quantitative rather than qualitative, were observed in the same cultivar in respect to the treatments, and among the cultivars under the same treatment. Metabolic differences in the stress tolerance of the different genotypes were related to a reduction in the levels of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle intermediates. The relevant differences, between the most NaCl-tolerant genotype (PAN) and the most sensitive one (EST) were related to the decrease in the threonic acid level. Stress-specific metabolite indicators were also identified: ornithine and asparagine as markers of drought stress and alanine and homoserine as markers of salinity stress. PMID:25969553

  15. 7 CFR 868.101 - General information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... for Beans, Whole Dry Peas, Split Peas, and Lentils, which provide a uniform language for describing..., suspending, or terminating the U.S. standards for Beans, Whole Dry Peas, Split Peas, and Lentils...

  16. Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... yogurt legumes, such as beans, split peas, and lentils Zinc Zinc helps your immune system, which is ... peanuts legumes, such as beans, split peas, and lentils When people don't get enough of these ...

  17. The Broad Superintendents Academy, 2007

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broad Foundation, 2007

    2007-01-01

    The Broad Superintendents Academy is an executive training program that identifies and prepares prominent leaders--executives with experience successfully leading large organizations and a passion for public service--then places them in urban school districts to dramatically improve the quality of education for America's students. This brochure…

  18. Beneficial effect of protracted sterilization of lentils on phytase production by Aspergillus ficuum in solid state fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Patrick; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2012-01-01

    Water addition to the solid substrate preceding autoclaving increased substrate porosity and phytase production in solid state fermentation. In comparison with dry sterilization, the phytase activity increased 6-, 8.5-, and 10-fold when the autoclaving time was 20, 40, and 60 min, respectively. Autoclaving increased the void space of sterilized lentils, and the increase was 16% higher when water was supplemented to the lentils before sterilization. Image analysis of SEM pictures of the solid substrate showed that water supplementation presterilization portended greater micro-fissure surface area, which also increased with increasing the sterilization time. SEM pictures of the fermentation product showed that fungal growth into the center of the solid substrate was ubiquitous when water was supplemented before sterilization but was absent when water was supplemented post sterilization. Similarly, spore formation on the substrate surface for the presterilization water supplementation samples far exceeded spore formation for samples that received supplementation poststerilization. This evidence suggests that improved mass transfer into the solid substrate resulting from additional pore volume and the formation of micro-fissures on the substrate surface is responsible for the observed gains in phytase productivity in solid state fermentation. Copyright © 2012 American Institute of Chemical Engineers (AIChE).

  19. An integrated approach to the characterization of two autochthonous lentil (Lens culinaris) landraces of Molise (south-central Italy).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scippa, G S; Trupiano, D; Rocco, M; Viscosi, V; Di Michele, M; D'Andrea, A; Chiatante, D

    2008-08-01

    Plant biodiversity must be safeguarded because it constitutes a resource of genes that may be used, for instance, in breeding programs. Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.) is one of the most ancient crops of the Mediterranean region. Extensive differentiation of L. culinaris over millennia has resulted in a myriad of different landraces. However, in more recent times many landraces have disappeared consequent to environmental and socioeconomic changes. To promote the survival of endangered lentil landraces, we have investigated the genetic relationship between two ancient landrace cultivated in Capracotta and Conca Casale (Molise, south-central Italy) and widely spread commercial varieties using an integrated approach consisting of studies at morphological, DNA and protein level. Seeds of these two landraces were collected from local farmers and conserved in the Molise germoplasm bank. The two local landraces were well differentiated from each other, and the Conca Casale landrace was separated from the commercial varieties at morphological, protein and DNA level. The Capracotta landrace, was well separated from the commercial varieties, except Castelluccio di Norcia, at DNA level showing a more complex and heterogeneous segregation at morphological and biochemical level. The correlation between morphological, DNA and protein data, illustrates that proteomics is a powerful tool with which to complement the analysis of biodiversity in ecotypes of a single plant species and to identify physiological and/or environmental markers.

  20. Geographical origin discrimination of lentils (Lens culinaris Medik.) using 1H NMR fingerprinting and multivariate statistical analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longobardi, Francesco; Innamorato, Valentina; Di Gioia, Annalisa; Ventrella, Andrea; Lippolis, Vincenzo; Logrieco, Antonio F; Catucci, Lucia; Agostiano, Angela

    2017-12-15

    Lentil samples coming from two different countries, i.e. Italy and Canada, were analysed using untargeted 1H NMR fingerprinting in combination with chemometrics in order to build models able to classify them according to their geographical origin. For such aim, Soft Independent Modelling of Class Analogy (SIMCA), k-Nearest Neighbor (k-NN), Principal Component Analysis followed by Linear Discriminant Analysis (PCA-LDA) and Partial Least Squares-Discriminant Analysis (PLS-DA) were applied to the NMR data and the results were compared. The best combination of average recognition (100%) and cross-validation prediction abilities (96.7%) was obtained for the PCA-LDA. All the statistical models were validated both by using a test set and by carrying out a Monte Carlo Cross Validation: the obtained performances were found to be satisfying for all the models, with prediction abilities higher than 95% demonstrating the suitability of the developed methods. Finally, the metabolites that mostly contributed to the lentil discrimination were indicated. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Study of Lentil (Lens culinaris Medik. Seed Size on Germination and Seedling Properties in Drought Stress Condition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Moradi

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Poor establishment of seedling due to both drought and lack of water is one of the most important problems in arid and semiarid regions such as Iran. So, in order to evaluate the effect of lentil seed size on germination and seedling growth properties affected by drought stress, a completely randomized design with factorial arrangement and 3 replications conducted using two lentils genotypes (Robatt and Gachsaran, two small and large seed sizes (34.8 and 59 mg in Robatt and 41.5 and 69 mg in Gachsaran per seed, respectively and five drought levels (0, -2, -6, -12 and -18 bar in 1387. Results showed that all of studied traits (R/H ratio except were affected by seed size, genotype and drought, significantly. Small seeds sizes had highest percent and rate germination, radicle and hypocotyle length and weight. But radicle/hypocotyle ratio of large seed was higher. Robatt was performance for total trait significantly. With increasing in drought intensity, trait values had significant decreases. Also double and triple interactions between factors were significant. Overall it seems that small seed size show more tolerance to drought and genotype with small seed size are performance in this condition.

  2. Discrimination of geographical origin of lentils (Lens culinaris Medik.) using isotope ratio mass spectrometry combined with chemometrics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Longobardi, F; Casiello, G; Cortese, M; Perini, M; Camin, F; Catucci, L; Agostiano, A

    2015-12-01

    The aim of this study was to predict the geographic origin of lentils by using isotope ratio mass spectrometry (IRMS) in combination with chemometrics. Lentil samples from two origins, i.e. Italy and Canada, were analysed obtaining the stable isotope ratios of δ(13)C, δ(15)N, δ(2)H, δ(18)O, and δ(34)S. A comparison between median values (U-test) highlighted statistically significant differences (plentils produced in these two different geographic areas, except for δ(15)N. Applying principal component analysis, grouping of samples was observed on the basis of origin but with overlapping zones; consequently, two supervised discriminant techniques, i.e. partial least squares discriminant analysis and k-nearest neighbours algorithm were used. Both models showed good performances with external prediction abilities of about 93% demonstrating the suitability of the methods developed. Subsequently, isotopic determinations were also performed on the protein and starch fractions and the relevant results are reported. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Savinase, the most suitable enzyme for releasing peptides from lentil (Lens culinaris var. Castellana) protein concentrates with multifunctional properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Mora, Patricia; Peñas, Elena; Frias, Juana; Martínez-Villaluenga, Cristina

    2014-05-07

    The aim of this study was to produce multifunctional hydrolysates from lentil protein concentrates. Four different proteases (Alcalase, Savinase, Protamex, and Corolase 7089) and different hydrolysis times were evaluated for their degree and pattern of proteolysis and their angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitory and antioxidant activities. Alcalase and Savinase showed the highest proteolytic effectiveness (P ≤ 0.05), which resulted in higher yield of peptides. The hydrolysate produced by Savinase after 2 h of hydrolysis (S2) displayed the highest ACE-inhibitory (IC50 = 0.18 mg/mL) and antioxidant activity (1.22 μmol of Trolox equiv/mg of protein). Subsequent reverse-phase HPLC-tandem mass spectrometric analysis of 3 kDa permeates of S2 showed 32 peptides, mainly derived from convicilin, vicilin, and legumin containing bioactive amino acid sequences, which makes them potential contributors to ACE-inhibitory and antioxidant activities detected. The ACE-inhibitory and antioxidant activities of S2 were significantly improved after in vitro gastrointestinal digestion (P ≤ 0.05). Multifunctional hydrolysates could encourage value-added utilization of lentil proteins for the formulation of functional foods and nutraceuticals.

  4. Critical evaluation of changes in the ratio of insoluble bound to soluble phenolics on antioxidant activity of lentils during germination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeo, JuDong; Shahidi, Fereidoon

    2015-01-21

    A new indicator, the ratio of insoluble bound phenolics (IBPs) to soluble phenolics (SPs), is suggested as an effective means to monitor changes in the antioxidant activity of lentils during germination. This indicator may be used to monitor other process-induced changes in antioxidant potential of food phenolics in other foods. The antioxidant activity of SPs, IBPs, and total value, the sum of both free and esterified phenolics, of germinated CDC Richlea lentil variety was evaluated for 4 days. Total phenolic content (TPC), total flavonoid content (TFC), 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) radical, and 2,2'-azinobis(3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) (ABTS) radical cation scavenging ability were employed to record antioxidant activities. An incremental increase in IBPs was found in TPC, TFC, DPPH, and ABTS radical cation scavenging ability, whereas SPs showed a declining trend in TFC, DPPH, and ABTS, except TPC during 4 days of germination. The ratio of IBPs to SPs increased using most methods, and this may be possibly due to the changes of phenolic compound formation from soluble into insoluble bound form during germination process. The ratio can be used as a novel method for monitoring process-induced changes in the antioxidant activity of foods.

  5. Zinc supplementation, production and quality of coffee beans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Herminia Emilia Prieto Martinez

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Besides its importance in the coffee tree nutrition, there is almost no information relating zinc nutrition and bean quality. This work evaluated the effect of zinc on the coffee yield and bean quality. The experiment was conducted with Coffea arabica L. in "Zona da Mata" region, Minas Gerais, Brazil. Twelve plots were established at random with 4 competitive plants each. Treatments included plants supplemented with zinc (eight plots and control without zinc supplementation (four plots. Plants were subjected to two treatments: zinc supplementation and control. Yield, number of defective beans, beans attacked by berry borers, bean size, cup quality, beans zinc concentration, potassium leaching, electrical conductivity, color index, total tritable acidity, pH, chlorogenic acids contents and ferric-reducing antioxidant activity of beans were evaluated. Zinc positively affected quality of coffee beans, which presented lower percentage of medium and small beans, lower berry borer incidence, lower potassium leaching and electrical conductivity, higher contents of zinc and chlorogenic acids and higher antioxidant activity in comparison with control beans.

  6. Volatile compounds as potential defective coffee beans' markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toci, Aline T; Farah, Adriana

    2008-06-01

    Although Brazil is the largest raw coffee producer and exporter in the world, a large amount of its Arabica coffee production is considered inappropriate for exportation. This by-product of coffee industry is called PVA due to the presence of black (P), green (V) and sour (A) defective beans, which are known to contribute considerably for cup quality decrease. Data on the volatile composition of Brazilian defective coffee beans are scarce. In this study, we evaluated the volatile composition of defective coffee beans (two lots) compared to good quality beans from the respective lots. Potential defective beans' markers were identified. In the raw samples, 2-methylpyrazine and 2-furylmethanol acetate were identified only in black-immature beans and butyrolactone only in sour beans, while benzaldehyde and 2,3,5,6-tetramethylpyrazine showed to be potential markers of defective beans in general. In the roasted PVA beans, pyrazine, 2,3-butanediol meso, 2-methyl-5-(1-propenyl)pyrazine, hexanoic acid, 4-ethyl-guayacol and isopropyl p-cresol sulfide also showed to be potential defective coffee beans' markers. Copyright © 2007 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. A global survey of effects of genotype and environment on selenium concentration in lentils (Lens culinaris L.): Implications for nutritional fortification strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lentils (Lens culinaris L.) are an important protein and carbohydrate food, rich in essential dietary components and trace elements. Selenium (Se) is an essential micronutrient for human health. For adults, 55 µg of daily Se intake is recommended for better health and cancer prevention. Millions of ...

  8. Seed coat removal improves iron bioavailability in cooked lentils: studies using an in vitro digestion/Caco-2 cell culture model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DellaValle, Diane M; Vandenberg, Albert; Glahn, Raymond P

    2013-08-28

    In this study we examined the range of Fe concentration and relative Fe bioavailability of 24 varieties of cooked lentils, as well as the impact of seed coat removal on Fe nutritional as well as antinutrient properties. Relative Fe bioavailability was assessed by the in vitro/Caco-2 cell culture method. While the Fe concentration of the whole lentil was moderately high (72.8 ± 10.8 μg/g, n = 24), the relative Fe bioavailability was moderate (2.4 ± 1.0 ng of ferritin/mg of protein). Although removing the seed coat reduced the Fe concentration by an average of 16.4 ± 9.4 μg/g, the bioavailability was significantly improved (+5.3 ± 2.2 ng of ferritin/mg of protein; p lentil seed coat contains a range of polyphenols known to inhibit Fe bioavailability. Thus, along with breeding for high Fe concentration and bioavailability (i.e., biofortification), seed coat removal appears to be a practical way to improve Fe bioavailability of the lentil.

  9. First Report of Pratylenchus neglectus, Pratylenchus thornei and Paratylenchus hametus nematodes causing yield reduction to dry land peas and lentils in Idaho

    Science.gov (United States)

    In June 2006, stunted, chlorotic, plants in large patches were observed in two 100-acre fields of dry land peas (Pisum sativum) in Latah County Idaho which resulted in 90% and 75% crop loss. In the same region a 300 acre field of dry land lentils (Lens culinaris) also had plants showing poor growth,...

  10. Effect of dual modification of sonication and γ-irradiation on physicochemical and functional properties of lentil (Lens culinaris L.) starch.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeed, Toiba; Wani, Idrees Ahmed; Hussain, Peerzada Rashid

    2017-08-01

    Starch isolated from lentil was subjected to two treatments namely sonication and, a dual treatment of sonication and irradiation at a dose of 5kGy. Lentil yielded 26.12±1.56g starch/100g of lentil. Chemical composition of native starch revealed 7.83±0.28% moisture, 0.23±0.30% protein, 0.35±0.05% fat and 0.10±0.00% ash. The results revealed that pasting properties of lentil starch were not affected upon sonication. However, these decreased significantly (p≤0.05) upon dual treatments. Amylose content of native starch was 31.16±1.80g/100g which showed a decrease upon sonication and dual treatments. Sonication and dual treatments (sonication and irradiation) decreased hunter 'L' value while 'a' and 'b' values showed an increase. Syneresis decreased more or less insignificantly upon sonication. However, a significant decrease in syneresis was observed after 120h storage following dual treatments. Sonication did not decrease the functional properties significantly while as dual treatment induced a significant decrease in functional properties. FT-IR analysis revealed a decrease in the intensities of OH, CH and OC stretches and CH2 bending upon sonication and dual treatments. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Studies on glucose-metabolizing enzymes in cytosolic and bacteroidal fractions of mungbean (Vigna radiata L.) and lentil (Lens culinaris L.) nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munjral, N; Gupta, A K; Kaur, N

    2007-06-01

    Nitrogen is exported in the form of ureides or amides from the nodules in pulse crops. In order to understand the carbon metabolism in ureide and amide exporting nodules, activities of enzymes involved in glucose metabolism were compared in cytosolic and bacteroidal fractions of mungbean (ureide exporter) and lentil (amide exporter) nodules during development. Activities of hexokinase, fructokinase, phosphoglucomutase, fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase, phosphohexose isomerase and UDP-glucose pyrophosphorylase were detected in cytosolic fraction of nodules of both the crops during development. Out of these enzymes, specific activity of phosphohexose isomerase was the highest in nodules of both the crops, in comparison with other enzymes. In comparison with mungbean, activities of various enzymes were less in cytosolic fraction of lentil. Activities of hexokinase, fructokinase, phosphoglucomutase were present only in cytosolic fraction of mungbean (Vigna radiata L.), however, low activity of these enzymes was also observed in lentil (Lens culinaris L.) bacteroids. Activities of phosphohexose isomerase and fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase were higher in bacteroids of lentil, as compared to mungbean during early nodule development, but this pattern was reversed with progress of crop development. Higher activities of phosphoglucomutase and fructose-1,6-phosphatase in mungbean cytosolic fraction could lead to increased flow of carbon towards pentose phosphate pathway.

  12. Quantification of soyasaponins I and betag in Italian lentil seeds by solid-phase extraction (SPE) and high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagratini, Gianni; Zuo, Yanting; Caprioli, Giovanni; Cristalli, Gloria; Giardinà, Dario; Maggi, Filippo; Molin, Laura; Ricciutelli, Massimo; Traldi, Piero; Vittori, Sauro

    2009-12-09

    Lentil saponins are triterpene glycosides, mainly soyasaponins I and betag (also known as VIota), with multiple health-promoting properties. This paper reports the isolation of soyasaponins I and betag from soybeans as analytical standards and the development of a new analytical procedure for quantification of their content in various cultivars of Italian lentils, by SPE-HPLC-MS. Soyasaponins I and betag were isolated from soybeans at a purity of >90% and characterized by MS/MS (ion trap) experiments. The determination of soyasaponins in lentils was performed by extraction, SPE purification, and HPLC-MS (single quadrupole) analysis; results were confirmed by MALDI-TOF experiments. Calibration curves for soyasaponin I and betag showed correlation coefficients of 0.998 and 0.997, respectively. LOD and LOQ values were 0.02 and 0.2 mg kg(-1) for soyasaponins I and 0.1 and 1 mg kg(-1) for soyasaponin betag. Recoveries calculated at a 100 mg kg(-1) fortification level ranged from 85 to 97%, with n = 10 and RSDs of <12%. In the 32 lentil samples, contents of soyasaponin I ranged from 28 to 407 mg kg(-1), whereas that of soyasaponin betag ranged from 110 to 1242 mg kg(-1).

  13. Methylxanthine and catechin content of fresh and fermented cocoa beans, dried cocoa beans, and cocoa liquor

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    Pedro P. Peláez

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The theobromine and catechin content can affect the quality of cocoa liquor and is influenced by cacao variety, production area (PA, and fermentation, as well as the method of drying beans (FDB and cocoa liquor production (CLP. This study examined variationsin methylxanthine and catechin levels in fresh and fermented cocoa beans, dried cocoa grains, and in cocoa liquor from Trinitario, Criollo, and Forastero cacao varieties. A total of 123 cocoa bean samples from three Peruvian PAs at different altitudes, Tingo María (TM, San Alejandro (SA, and Curimana (CU, were evaluated. The theobromine (Tb and caffeine (Cf contents in fresh cocoa beans were affected by both cocoa type and PA. The caffeine content was higher in Trinitario cacao than in Criollo and Forastero varieties (p ≤ 0.05. The Tb and CF contents decreased in dry cocoa grain and was affected by FDB (p ≤ 0.05 (1.449 ± 0.004 to 1.140 ± 0.010 and 0.410 ± 0.03 to 0.165 ± 0.02 g Tb and C, respectively, per 100 g dry weight. Cocoa beans from Tingo María, which has thehighest altitude, had higher Tb and CF contents than those from other PAs. The catechin (C and epicatechin (EC contents were affected by the FDB and CLP, and were highestin fresh cocoa beans from the Tingo María area (range: 0.065 ± 0.01 to 0.020 ± 0.00 g C/100 g. The C and EC contents decreased during FDB and CLP (0.001 g C/100 g of cocoa liquor. Taken together, these results show that higher concentrations of Tb, Cf, C,and EC are present in fresh cocoa beans. Moreover, the cocoa variety influenced cocoa liquor quality. Overall, cocoa from the Tingo María PA had the most desirable chemical composition.

  14. Effect of field peas, chickpeas, and lentils on rumen fermentation, digestion, microbial protein synthesis, and feedlot performance in receiving diets for beef cattle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbery, T C; Lardy, G P; Soto-Navarro, S A; Bauer, M L; Anderson, V L

    2007-11-01

    Two experiments were conducted to evaluate the use of pulse grains in receiving diets for cattle. In Exp. 1, 8 Holstein (615 +/- 97 kg of initial BW) and 8 Angus-crossbred steers (403 +/- 73 kg of initial BW) fitted with ruminal and duodenal cannulas were blocked by breed and used in a randomized complete block design to assess the effects of pulse grain inclusion in receiving diets on intake, ruminal fermentation, and site of digestion. Experiment 2 was a 39-d feedlot receiving trial in which 176 mixed-breed steers (254 +/- 19 kg of initial BW) were used in a randomized complete block design to determine the effects of pulse grains on DMI, ADG, and G:F in newly received feedlot cattle. In both studies, pulse grains (field peas, lentils, or chickpea) replaced corn and canola meal as the grain component in diets fed as a total mixed ration. Treatments included 1) corn and canola meal (control); 2) field pea; 3) lentil; and 4) chickpea. Preplanned orthogonal contrasts were conducted between control vs. chickpea, control vs. field pea, and control vs. lentil. In Exp. 1, there were no differences among treatments for DMI (11.63 kg/d, 2.32% of BW daily, P = 0.63) or OM intake (P = 0.63). No treatment effects for apparent ruminal (P = 0.10) and total tract OM digestibilities (P = 0.40) were detected when pulse grains replaced corn and canola meal. Crude protein intake (P = 0.78), microbial CP flow (P = 0.46), total tract CP digestibility (P = 0.45), and microbial efficiency (P = 0.18) were also not influenced by treatment. Total-tract ADF (P = 0.004) and NDF (P = 0.04) digestibilities were greater with field pea vs. control. Total VFA concentrations were lower for field pea (P = 0.009) and lentil (P lentil had lower (P lentil had greater overall DMI (7.59 vs. 6.98 kg/d; P lentil had greater ADG (1.90 vs. 1.71 kg/d; P < or = 0.04) than control. Gain efficiency (P = 0.18) did not differ among treatments. Steers fed pulse grains had similar CP and OM digestibilities

  15. Obtaining retrotransposon sequences, analysis of their genomic distribution and use of retrotransposon-derived genetic markers in lentil (Lens culinaris Medik.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rey-Baños, Rita; Sáenz de Miera, Luis E; García, Pedro; Pérez de la Vega, Marcelino

    2017-01-01

    Retrotransposons with long terminal repeats (LTR-RTs) are widespread mobile elements in eukaryotic genomes. We obtained a total of 81 partial LTR-RT sequences from lentil corresponding to internal retrotransposon components and LTRs. Sequences were obtained by PCR from genomic DNA. Approximately 37% of the LTR-RT internal sequences presented premature stop codons, pointing out that these elements must be non-autonomous. LTR sequences were obtained using the iPBS technique which amplifies sequences between LTR-RTs. A total of 193 retrotransposon-derived genetic markers, mainly iPBS, were used to obtain a genetic linkage map from 94 F7 inbred recombinant lines derived from the cross between the cultivar Lupa and the wild ancestor L. culinaris subsp. orientalis. The genetic map included 136 markers located in eight linkage groups. Clusters of tightly linked retrotransposon-derived markers were detected in linkage groups LG1, LG2, and LG6, hence denoting a non-random genomic distribution. Phylogenetic analyses identified the LTR-RT families in which internal and LTR sequences are included. Ty3-gypsy elements were more frequent than Ty1-copia, mainly due to the high Ogre element frequency in lentil, as also occurs in other species of the tribe Vicieae. LTR and internal sequences were used to analyze in silico their distribution among the contigs of the lentil draft genome. Up to 8.8% of the lentil contigs evidenced the presence of at least one LTR-RT similar sequence. A statistical analysis suggested a non-random distribution of these elements within of the lentil genome. In most cases (between 97% and 72%, depending on the LTR-RT type) none of the internal sequences flanked by the LTR sequence pair was detected, suggesting that defective and non-autonomous LTR-RTs are very frequent in lentil. Results support that LTR-RTs are abundant and widespread throughout of the lentil genome and that they are a suitable source of genetic markers useful to carry out further genetic

  16. Obtaining retrotransposon sequences, analysis of their genomic distribution and use of retrotransposon-derived genetic markers in lentil (Lens culinaris Medik..

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Rey-Baños

    Full Text Available Retrotransposons with long terminal repeats (LTR-RTs are widespread mobile elements in eukaryotic genomes. We obtained a total of 81 partial LTR-RT sequences from lentil corresponding to internal retrotransposon components and LTRs. Sequences were obtained by PCR from genomic DNA. Approximately 37% of the LTR-RT internal sequences presented premature stop codons, pointing out that these elements must be non-autonomous. LTR sequences were obtained using the iPBS technique which amplifies sequences between LTR-RTs. A total of 193 retrotransposon-derived genetic markers, mainly iPBS, were used to obtain a genetic linkage map from 94 F7 inbred recombinant lines derived from the cross between the cultivar Lupa and the wild ancestor L. culinaris subsp. orientalis. The genetic map included 136 markers located in eight linkage groups. Clusters of tightly linked retrotransposon-derived markers were detected in linkage groups LG1, LG2, and LG6, hence denoting a non-random genomic distribution. Phylogenetic analyses identified the LTR-RT families in which internal and LTR sequences are included. Ty3-gypsy elements were more frequent than Ty1-copia, mainly due to the high Ogre element frequency in lentil, as also occurs in other species of the tribe Vicieae. LTR and internal sequences were used to analyze in silico their distribution among the contigs of the lentil draft genome. Up to 8.8% of the lentil contigs evidenced the presence of at least one LTR-RT similar sequence. A statistical analysis suggested a non-random distribution of these elements within of the lentil genome. In most cases (between 97% and 72%, depending on the LTR-RT type none of the internal sequences flanked by the LTR sequence pair was detected, suggesting that defective and non-autonomous LTR-RTs are very frequent in lentil. Results support that LTR-RTs are abundant and widespread throughout of the lentil genome and that they are a suitable source of genetic markers useful to carry

  17. THE EFFECT OF WATER EXTRACTS FROM WINTER SAVORY ON BLACK BEAN APHID MORTALITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milena Rusin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the effect of water extracts prepared from fresh and dry matter of winter savory (Satureja montana L. on mortality of wingless females and larvae of black bean aphid (Aphis fabae Scop.. The experiment was conducted in the laboratory, in six replicates. Dry extracts were prepared at concentration of 2%, 5% and 10%, while the fresh plant at concentration of 10%, 20% and 30%. Stomach poisoning of extracts was determined by soaking broad bean leaves in the respective solutions, and then determining mortality of wingless female and larvae feeding on leaves thus prepared at 12 hour intervals. The results of the experiment showed that the extract prepared from dry matter at the highest concentration (10%, as well as the extracts from fresh matter at concentration of 20% and 30% contributed to an increase in mortality of wingless female of black bean aphid. Meanwhile, extracts prepared from both dry and fresh matter at two highest concentrations caused an increase in mortality of larvae of this pest. Furthermore, with increasing concentrations of analysed extracts prepared from both fresh and dry matter of winter savory, their negative effect on wingless females and larvae usually increase.

  18. Análise físico-química, microbiológica e sensorial de brotos de lentilha da variedade PRECOZ = Physicochemical, microbiological and sensory analysis of lentil sprouts, Precoz variety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neoraldo Thadeu Pacheco Loures

    2009-10-01

    percentage. Eight days after sowing, weights were put on sprouts to create a physiological stress as well as to increase ethylene synthesis and improve the quality of produced sprouts. They were also submitted to microbiological tests, whose values were superior to 1.1 x 104 NMP g-1 for fecal coliforms, with acidity of 2.64% and a pH of 5.48, with low acidity. There was no growth of Salmonella or Escherichia coli, once the levels were lower than 10 UFC g-1. The physiochemical analyses, in 100 grams of sprouts, presented 54.34 g of carbohydrates; 6.24 g of crude fiber and 25.56 g of protein. Non-trained taster persons were submitted to sensory tests in order to compare, according to palatability, which was more acceptable – sprouts of alfalfa or beans. The acceptability of lentils was 73.3%, with only 13.3% of rejection and 13.3% of indifference; these results were inferior to beans, which had 96.7% of acceptability and 3.3% ofrejection, as well as alfalfa, which had 83.3% of acceptability and 10.00% of rejection. According to the low rejection and indifference, it is possible to suggest that the studied variety of lentil canbe used in the production of sprouts, as a nutritional nourishing complement.

  19. A Blended- Rather Than Whole-Lentil Meal with or without α-Galactosidase Mildly Increases Healthy Adults’ Appetite but Not Their Glycemic Response123

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguah, Katherene O-B; Wonnell, Brittany S; Campbell, Wayne W; McCabe, George P; McCrory, Megan A

    2014-01-01

    Background: Disrupting the physical structure of pulses by blending them or by using a digestive supplement (α-galactosidase) to reduce intestinal discomfort could potentially negate the previously observed beneficial effects of whole pulses of lowering appetitive and glycemic responses because of more rapid digestion. Objective: We hypothesized that blended lentils, α-galactosidase, or both increase postprandial appetite and blood glucose responses vs. whole lentils. Methods: Men and women [n = 12; means ± SDs body mass index (kg/m2): 23.3 ± 3.1; aged 28 ± 10 y] consumed breakfast meals containing whole (W), blended (B), or no lentils [control (C)], each with 3 α-galactosidase or placebo capsules in a randomized, crossover, double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Between each test day there was a 3- to 5-d washout period. Results: Mixed-model ANOVA showed effects of meal on postprandial appetite and glucose (P = 0.0001–0.031). The B meal resulted in higher postprandial appetite ratings than did the W meal but not the C meal for hunger, desire to eat, and prospective consumption (Δ = 0.4–0.5 points; P = 0.002–0.044). Postprandial glucose concentration was 4.5 mg/dL lower for the B meal than for the C meal (P lentils increased appetite (∼6%), but not glycemic response, compared with whole lentils, whereas α-galactosidase did not. Both B and W meals may be consumed (with or without an α-galactosidase supplement) with little impact on appetite, without increasing glycemic response. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02110511. PMID:25411033

  20. Flowering and Growth Responses of Cultivated Lentil and Wild Lens Germplasm toward the Differences in Red to Far-Red Ratio and Photosynthetically Active Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hai Y.; Saha, Shyamali; Vandenberg, Albert; Bett, Kirstin E.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding environmental responses of pulse crop species and their wild relatives will play an important role in developing genetic strategies for crop improvement in response to changes in climate. This study examined how cultivated lentil and wild Lens germplasm responded to different light environments, specifically differences in red/far-red ratio (R/FR) and photosynthetically active radiation (PAR). Three genotypes of each the seven Lens species were grown in environmentally controlled growth chambers equipped to provide light treatments consisting of different R/FR ratios and PAR values. Our results showed that overall, days to flower of Lens genotypes were mainly influenced by the R/FR induced light quality change but not by the PAR related light intensity change. The cultivated lentil (L. culinaris) showed consistent, accelerated flowering in response to the low R/FR light environment together with three wild lentil genotypes (L. orientalis IG 72611, L. tomentosus IG 72830, and L. ervoides IG 72815) while most wild lentil genotypes had reduced responses and flowering time was not significantly affected. The longest shoot length, longest internode length, and largest leaflet area were observed under the low R/FR low PAR environment for both cultivated and wild lentils. The distinctly different responses between flowering time and elongation under low R/FR conditions among wild Lens genotypes suggests discrete pathways controlling flowering and elongation, which are both components of shade avoidance responses. The yield and above-ground biomass of Lens genotypes were the highest under high R/FR high PAR conditions, intermediate under low R/FR low PAR conditions, and lowest under high R/FR low PAR light conditions. Three L. lamottei genotypes (IG 110809, IG 110810, and IG 110813) and one L. ervoides genotype (IG 72646) were less sensitive in their time to flower responses while maintaining similar yield, biomass, and harvest index across all three light

  1. A blended- rather than whole-lentil meal with or without α-galactosidase mildly increases healthy adults' appetite but not their glycemic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anguah, Katherene O-B; Wonnell, Brittany S; Campbell, Wayne W; McCabe, George P; McCrory, Megan A

    2014-12-01

    Disrupting the physical structure of pulses by blending them or by using a digestive supplement (α-galactosidase) to reduce intestinal discomfort could potentially negate the previously observed beneficial effects of whole pulses of lowering appetitive and glycemic responses because of more rapid digestion. We hypothesized that blended lentils, α-galactosidase, or both increase postprandial appetite and blood glucose responses vs. whole lentils. Men and women [n = 12; means ± SDs body mass index (kg/m(2)): 23.3 ± 3.1; aged 28 ± 10 y] consumed breakfast meals containing whole (W), blended (B), or no lentils [control (C)], each with 3 α-galactosidase or placebo capsules in a randomized, crossover, double-blind placebo-controlled trial. Between each test day there was a 3- to 5-d washout period. Mixed-model ANOVA showed effects of meal on postprandial appetite and glucose (P = 0.0001-0.031). The B meal resulted in higher postprandial appetite ratings than did the W meal but not the C meal for hunger, desire to eat, and prospective consumption (Δ = 0.4-0.5 points; P = 0.002-0.044). Postprandial glucose concentration was 4.5 mg/dL lower for the B meal than for the C meal (P lentils increased appetite (∼6%), but not glycemic response, compared with whole lentils, whereas α-galactosidase did not. Both B and W meals may be consumed (with or without an α-galactosidase supplement) with little impact on appetite, without increasing glycemic response. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT02110511. © 2014 American Society for Nutrition.

  2. Dynamic transcriptome profiling of Bean Common Mosaic Virus (BCMV) infection in Common Bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Kathleen; Singh, Jugpreet; Hill, John H; Whitham, Steven A; Cannon, Steven B

    2016-08-11

    Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) is widespread, with Phaseolus species as the primary host plants. Numerous BCMV strains have been identified on the basis of a panel of bean varieties that distinguish the pathogenicity types with respect to the viral strains. The molecular responses in Phaseolus to BCMV infection have not yet been well characterized. We report the transcriptional responses of a widely susceptible variety of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L., cultivar 'Stringless green refugee') to two BCMV strains, in a time-course experiment. We also report the genome sequence of a previously unreported BCMV strain. The interaction with the known strain NL1-Iowa causes moderate symptoms and large transcriptional responses, and the newly identified strain (Strain 2 or S2) causes severe symptoms and moderate transcriptional responses. The transcriptional profiles of host plants infected with the two isolates are distinct, and involve numerous differences in splice forms in particular genes, and pathway specific expression patterns. We identified differential host transcriptome response after infection of two different strains of Bean common mosaic virus (BCMV) in common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Virus infection initiated a suite of changes in gene expression level and patterns in the host plants. Pathways related to defense, gene regulation, metabolic processes, photosynthesis were specifically altered after virus infection. Results presented in this study can increase the understanding of host-pathogen interactions and provide resources for further investigations of the biological mechanisms in BCMV infection and defense.

  3. Safety assessment of the biogenic amines in fermented soya beans and fermented bean curd.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Juan; Ding, Xiaowen; Qin, Yingrui; Zeng, Yitao

    2014-08-06

    To evaluate the safety of biogenic amines, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) was used to evaluate the levels of biogenic amines in fermented soya beans and fermented bean curd. In fermented soya beans, the total biogenic amines content was in a relatively safe range in many samples, although the concentration of histamine, tyramine, and β-phenethylamine was high enough in some samples to cause a possible safety threat, and 8 of the 30 samples were deemed unsafe. In fermented bean curd, the total biogenic amines content was more than 900 mg/kg in 19 white sufu amples, a level that has been determined to pose a safety hazard; putrescine was the only one detected in all samples and also had the highest concentration, which made samples a safety hazard; the content of tryptamine, β-phenethylamine, tyramine, and histamine had reached the level of threat to human health in some white and green sufu samples, and that may imply another potential safety risk; and 25 of the 33 samples were unsafe. In conclusion, the content of biogenic amines in all fermented soya bean products should be studied and appropriate limits determined to ensure the safety of eating these foods.

  4. Dynamics of Cocoa Bean Pulp Degradation during Cocoa Bean Fermentation: Effects of Yeast Starter Culture Addition

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    Laras Cempaka

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Fermentation is a crucial step in the post-harvest processing of cocoa beans. This process comprises mixed culture microbial activities on the cocoa bean pulp, producing metabolites that act as important precursors for cocoa flavour development. Variations in the microbial population dynamics during the fermentation process may induce changes in the overall process. Thus, the introduction of a specific microbial starter culture may improve the quality of the fermentation. This article discusses the effects ofthe addition of Saccharomyces cerevisae var. Chevalieri starter culture on cocoa bean fermentation. The dynamics in the yeast concentration, sugary pulp compounds and metabolic products were measured during fermentation. The alterations in the dynamic metabolite profile were significant, although only a slight difference was observed in the yeast population. A higher fermentation index was measured for the cocoa bean fermentation with yeast starter culture, 1.13 compared to 0.84. In conclusion, this method can potentially be applied to shorten the cocoa bean fermentation time.

  5. Ion beam analysis of ground coffee and roasted coffee beans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Debastiani, R.; dos Santos, C. E. I.; Yoneama, M. L.; Amaral, L.; Dias, J. F.

    2014-01-01

    The way that coffee is prepared (using roasted ground coffee or roasted coffee beans) may influence the quality of beverage. Therefore, the aim of this work is to use ion beam techniques to perform a full elemental analysis of packed roasted ground coffee and packed roasted coffee beans, as well as green coffee beans. The samples were analyzed by PIXE (particle-induced X-ray emission). Light elements were measured through RBS (Rutherford backscattering spectrometry) experiments. Micro-PIXE experiments were carried out in order to check the elemental distribution in the roasted and green coffee beans. In general, the elements found in ground coffee were Mg, P, S, Cl, K, Ca, Ti, Mn, Fe, Cu, Zn, Rb and Sr. A comparison between ground coffee and grinded roasted beans shows significant differences for several elements. Elemental maps reveal that P and K are correlated and practically homogeneously distributed over the beans.

  6. Puffing, a novel coffee bean processing technique for the enhancement of extract yield and antioxidant capacity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Wooki; Kim, Sang-Youn; Kim, Dae-Ok; Kim, Byung-Yong; Baik, Moo-Yeol

    2018-02-01

    Puffing of coffee beans, which induces heat- and pressure-derived physicochemical changes, was applied as an alternative to roasting. Roasted or puffed coffee beans with equivalent lightness values were compared. The moisture content was higher while the crude fat and protein compositions were lower in puffed beans than in roasted beans. The pH was lower and the acid content was higher in puffed beans than in roasted beans. The roasted beans exhibited greater specific volumes, while the puffed beans displayed greater extraction yields. The trigonelline and total phenolic contents were greater in puffed beans than in roasted beans resulting in an enhanced antioxidant capacity. Sensory evaluation of roasted and puffed coffee bean brews revealed that puffing did not affect the flavor or overall acceptance. The current study provides evidence that puffing is an alternative to roasting coffee beans with various benefits. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Bean grain hysteresis with induced mechanical damage

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    Renata C. Campos

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This study aimed to evaluate the effect of mechanical damage on the hysteresis of beans with induced mechanical damage under different conditions of temperature and relative humidity. Beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. harvested manually with 35% water content (w.b. were used. Part of this product was subjected to induced mechanical damage by Stein Breakage Tester and controlled drying (damaged and control sample, for sorption processes. The sorption isotherms of water were analyzed for different temperature conditions: 20, 30, 40 and 50 oC; and relative humidity: 0.3; 0.4; 0.5; 0.7 and 0.9 (decimal. Equilibrium moisture content data were correlated with six mathematical models, and the Modified Oswin model was the one that best fitted to the experimental data. According to the above mentioned isotherms, it was possible to observe the phenomenon of hysteresis of damaged and control samples, and this phenomenon was more pronounced in control ones.

  8. Chemical and Sensorial Evaluation of a Newly Developed Bean Jam

    OpenAIRE

    Guiné, Raquel; Figueiredo, Ana; Correia, Paula; Gonçalves, Fernando

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of the present work was to develop an innovative food product with nutritional properties as well as appealing organoleptic qualities. The product, a jam, was prepared with the beans’ cooking water combined with fresh apple or carrot, without the addition of any conservatives. Three different jams were produced: bean and carrot, bean and apple and bean, apple and cinnamon. The developed products underwent a sensorial...

  9. Subunit heterogeneity in the lima bean lectin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, D D; Etzler, M E; Goldstein, I J

    1982-08-10

    Three forms of lectin (components I, II, and III) from lima beans (Phaseolus lunatus) have been purified on an affinity support containing the synthetic type A blood group trisaccharide alpha-D-GalNAc-(1 leads to 3)-[alpha-L-Fuc-(1 leads to 2)]-beta-D-Gal-(1 leads to). Conversion of components I and II to component III has been achieved by reduction in 10(-2) M dithiothreitol. Isoelectric focusing of lima bean lectin in the presence of 8 M urea and beta-mercaptoethanol revealed charge heterogeneity of the lectin subunits. Three major subunit classes of apparent pI 7.05, 6.65, and 6.45, designated alpha, beta, and alpha', respectively, were identified; they occur in a relative abundance of 2:5:3. Green lima beans harvested before maturity lacked the alpha' subunit (pI 6.45) which appears to accumulate during seed maturation. The three subunits are glycoproteins of identical size and immunochemical reactivity. Identical NH2-terminal sequences were found for the three subunits. Amino acid analysis and tryptic peptide mapping indicated that the observed charge heterogeneity is probably due to differences in the primary structure of the subunits. Studies of subunit composition of charge isolectins provided evidence of nonrandom subunit assembly. A model is proposed involving pairing of a pI 6.65 subunit with either a pI 7.06 or 6.45 subunit to form dimeric units. Possible roles for subunit heterogeneity and ordered subunit assembly in determining the metal and sugar binding properties of lima bean lectin are discussed.

  10. Tolerance of dry bean cultivars to saflufenacil

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    Francielli Diesel

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The herbicide saflufenacil is a Protox inhibitor, with differential translocation mode in comparison to other herbicides with the same mechanism of action. Selectivity, efficacy and safety to the environment are important characteristics for practical application of a herbicide in agriculture. The aim of this study was to determine the tolerance of ten dry bean cultivars to saflufenacil, applied on preemergence. The experiment was conducted in split plot randomized blocks design with ten dry bean cultivars (IAPAR 81; IPR Tiziu, IPR Corujinha; BRS Estilo; BRS Talismã; BRS Esplendor; BRS Campeiro; BRS Radiante, BRS Vereda and Jalo Precoce allocated in plots and saflufenacil concentrations (0, 14.7 and 29.4 g ha- 1 in subplots. Evaluations were performed at 21 and 28 days after application (DAA and plant height at 28 and 35 DAA. At physiological maturity were evaluated plant height, first pod height , number of pods per plant, 400 grains weight and dry beans grain yield. The cultivar Talismã showed low sensitivity to the herbicide and the cultivar Jalo Precoce high sensitivity to the herbicide, considering all variables analyzed.

  11. Pb-210 in beans grown in normal background environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mingote, Raquel M.; Nogueira, Regina A., E-mail: mingote@cnen.gov.br, E-mail: rnogueira@cnen.gov.br [Centro Regional de Ciencias Nucleares do Centro-Oeste (CRCN-CO/CNEN-GO), Abadia de Goias, GO (Brazil)

    2013-07-01

    A survey was carried out on the activity concentration of {sup 210}Pb in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) grown in normal background environments in Brazil. The Carioca beans and the black type were analyzed, which contribute with 90% of the Brazilian market share of the common beans. To this study 18 bean samples sowing in the Middle-Western and Southern regions of Brazil during the years 2010-2011 were analyzed. The proportion per bean type was similar to the national production: most of the Carioca beans (n=13; 72%) and black beans (n=5; 28%). Other 17 values of {sup 210}Pb activity concentration in beans grown in Southeastern region available in the GEORAD, a dataset of radioactivity in Brazil, were added to the statistic analysis of the data. Considering the information contained in censored observations (60%), representative value of {sup 210}Pb activity concentration in beans was estimated by using robust ROS, a censored data analysis method. The value 0.047 Bq kg{sup -1} fresh wt. obtained here is according to {sup 210}Pb activity concentration in grains reported by UNSCEAR 0.05 Bq kg{sup -1}. (author)

  12. The Effective Design of Bean Bag as a Vibroimpact Damper

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.Q. Liu

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available The technique of a bean bag damper has been effectively applied in many engineering fields to control the vibroimpact of a structural system. In this study, the basic parameters responsible for the design of an effective bean bag: the size of beans, the mass ratio of the bean bag to the structure to which it is attached, the clearance distance and the position of the bag, are studied by both theoretical and experimental analyses. These will provide a better understanding of the performance of the bean bag for optimisation of damper design. It was found that reducing the size of beans would increase the exchange of momentum in the system due to the increase in the effective contact areas. Within the range of mass ratios studied, the damping performance of the damper was found to improve with higher mass ratios. There was an optimum clearance for any specific damper whereby the maximum attenuation could be achieved. The position of the bag with respect to nodes and antipodes of the primary structure determined the magnitude of attenuation attainable. Furthermore, the limitations of bean bags have been identified and a general criteria for the design of a bean bag damper has been formulated based on the study undertaken. It was shown that an appropriately configured bean bag damper was capable of reducing the amplitude of vibration by 80% to 90%.

  13. Export and Competitiveness of Indonesian Coffee Bean in International Market: Strategic Implication for the Development of Organic Coffee Bean

    OpenAIRE

    Bambang Drajat; Adang Agustian; Ade Supriatna

    2007-01-01

    The performance of Indonesian coffee bean export from 1995 to 2004was not satisfactory. This implied that there were problems of the competitiveness of Indonesian coffee bean export. This study was expected to come up withsome views related with the problem. This study was aimed to analyze the competitiveness of Indonesian coffee bean export in international markets. Somepolicy implication would be derived following the conclusions. In addition,this study was aimed to deliver some arguments r...

  14. Export and Competitiveness of Indonesian Coffee Bean in International Market: Strategic Implication for the Development of Organic Coffee Bean

    OpenAIRE

    Drajat, Bambang; Agustian, Adang; Supriatna, Ade

    2007-01-01

    The performance of Indonesian coffee bean export from 1995 to 2004was not satisfactory. This implied that there were problems of the competitiveness of Indonesian coffee bean export. This study was expected to come up withsome views related with the problem. This study was aimed to analyze the competitiveness of Indonesian coffee bean export in International markets. Somepolicy implication would be derived following the conclusions. In addition,this study was aimed to deliver some arguments r...

  15. The effect of lactic acid bacteria on cocoa bean fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Van Thi Thuy; Zhao, Jian; Fleet, Graham

    2015-07-16

    Cocoa beans (Theobroma cacao L.) are the raw material for chocolate production. Fermentation of cocoa pulp by microorganisms is crucial for developing chocolate flavor precursors. Yeasts conduct an alcoholic fermentation within the bean pulp that is essential for the production of good quality beans, giving typical chocolate characters. However, the roles of bacteria such as lactic acid bacteria and acetic acid bacteria in contributing to the quality of cocoa bean and chocolate are not fully understood. Using controlled laboratory fermentations, this study investigated the contribution of lactic acid bacteria to cocoa bean fermentation. Cocoa beans were fermented under conditions where the growth of lactic acid bacteria was restricted by the use of nisin and lysozyme. The resultant microbial ecology, chemistry and chocolate quality of beans from these fermentations were compared with those of indigenous (control) fermentations. The yeasts Hanseniaspora guilliermondii, Pichia kudriavzevii, Kluyveromyces marxianus and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the lactic acid bacteria Lactobacillus plantarum, Lactobacillus pentosus and Lactobacillus fermentum and the acetic acid bacteria Acetobacter pasteurianus and Gluconobacter frateurii were the major species found in control fermentations. In fermentations with the presence of nisin and lysozyme, the same species of yeasts and acetic acid bacteria grew but the growth of lactic acid bacteria was prevented or restricted. These beans underwent characteristic alcoholic fermentation where the utilization of sugars and the production of ethanol, organic acids and volatile compounds in the bean pulp and nibs were similar for beans fermented in the presence of lactic acid bacteria. Lactic acid was produced during both fermentations but more so when lactic acid bacteria grew. Beans fermented in the presence or absence of lactic acid bacteria were fully fermented, had similar shell weights and gave acceptable chocolates with no differences

  16. Phytochrome-Mediated Control of Diamine Oxidase Level in the Epicotyl of Etiolated Lentil (Lens culinaris Medicus) Seedlings 1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelini, Riccardo; Federico, Rodolfo; Mancinelli, Alberto

    1988-01-01

    Diamine oxidase (DAO; EC 1.4.3.6) levels are strongly reduced in epicotyls of 3-day-old etiolated lentil (Lens culinaris Medicus) seedlings upon exposure to continuous red and blue light, as compared to etiolated controls. Far-red light inhibits DAO activity to a lesser extent. A less marked effect can also be obtained by short (5-10 min) daily exposures. Phytochrome involvement in this light-mediated response has been demonstrated by red/far-red reversibility experiments. These findings provide the first evidence that mechanisms underlying the photoregulation of DAO level in the Leguminosae are related to photomorphogenesis and are essentially unrelated to the photosynthetic capacity of the seedling. PMID:16666444

  17. Genetics of resistance to anthracnose and identification of AFLP and RAPD markers linked to the resistance gene in PI 320937 germplasm of lentil (Lens culinaris Medikus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tullu, A; Buchwaldt, L; Warkentin, T; Taran, B; Vandenberg, A

    2003-02-01

    Anthracnose, caused by Colletotrichum truncatum, is a major disease problem and production constraint of lentil in North America. The research was conducted to examine the resistance to anthracnose in PI 320937 lentil and to identify molecular markers linked to the resistance gene in a recombinant inbred line (RIL) population developed from a cross of Eston lentil, the susceptible parent, and PI 320937, the resistant parent. A total of 147 F(5:6) RILs were evaluated for resistance to anthracnose in the greenhouse using isolate 95B36 of C. truncatum. Bulked segregant analysis (BSA) strategy was employed and two contrasting DNA bulks were constructed based on greenhouse inoculation of F(5)-derived F(6) RILs. DNA from the parents and bulks were screened with 700 RAPD primers and seven AFLP primer combinations. Analysis of segregation data indicated that a major dominant gene was responsible for resistance to anthracnose while variations in the resistance level among RILs could be the influences of minor genes. We designate the major gene as LCt-2. MapMaker analysis produced two flanking RAPD markers OPEO6(1250) and UBC-704(700) linked to LCt-2 locus in repulsion (6.4 cM) and in coupling (10.5 cM), respectively. Also, three AFLP markers, EMCTTACA(350) and EMCTTAGG(375) in coupling, and EMCTAAAG(175) in repulsion, were linked to the LCt-2 locus. These markers could be used to tag the LCt-2 locus and facilitate marker-assisted selection for resistance to anthracnose in segregating populations of lentil in which PI 320937 was used as the source of resistance. Also, a broader application of the linked RAPD markers was also demonstrated in Indianhead lentil, widely used as a source of resistance to anthracnose in the breeding program at the Crop Development Centre, University of Saskatchewan. Further selection within the few F(5:6) lines should be effective in pyramiding one or several of the minor genes into the working germplasm of lentil, resulting in a more durable and

  18. Comparison of kinetic properties of amine oxidases from sainfoin and lentil and immunochemical characterization of copper/quinoprotein amine oxidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zajoncová, L; Frébort, I; Luhová, L; Sebela, M; Galuszka, P; Pec, P

    1999-01-01

    Kinetic properties of novel amine oxidase isolated from sainfoin (Onobrychis viciifolia) were compared to those of typical plant amine oxidase (EC 1.4.3.6) from lentil (Lens culinaris). The amine oxidase from sainfoin was active toward substrates, such as 1,5-diaminopentane (cadaverine) with K(m) of 0.09 mM and 1,4-diaminobutane (putrescine) with K(m) of 0.24 mM. The maximum rate of oxidation for cadaverine at saturating concentration was 2.7 fold higher than that of putrescine. The amine oxidase from lentil had the maximum rate for putrescine comparable to the rate of sainfoin amine oxidase with the same substrate. Both amine oxidases, like other plant Cu-amine oxidases, were inhibited by substrate analogs (1,5-diamino-3-pentanone, 1,4-diamino-2-butanone and aminoguanidine), Cu2+ chelating agents (diethyltriamine, 1,10-phenanthroline, 8-hydroxyquinoline, 2,2'-bipyridyl, imidazole, sodium cyanide and sodium azide), some alkaloids (L-lobeline and cinchonine), some lathyrogens (beta-aminopropionitrile and aminoacetonitrile) and other inhibitors (benzamide oxime, acetone oxime, hydroxylamine and pargyline). Tested by Ouchterlony's double diffusion in agarose gel, polyclonal antibodies against the amine oxidase from sainfoin, pea and grass pea cross-reacted with amine oxidases from several other Fabaceae and from barley (Hordeum vulgare) of Poaceae, while amine oxidase from the filamentous fungus Aspergillus niger did not cross-react at all. However, using Western blotting after SDS-PAGE with rabbit polyclonal antibodies against the amine oxidase from Aspergillus niger, some degree of similarity of plant amine oxidases from sainfoin, pea, field pea, grass pea, fenugreek, common melilot, white sweetclover and Vicia panonica with the A. niger amine oxidase was confirmed.

  19. The geometry and lithology of the Cima Sandstone Lentil: a paleoseep-bearing interbed in the Moreno Formation, central California

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheatley, P. V.; Schwartz, H.

    2007-12-01

    The Cima Sandstone Lentil outcrops over a relatively small area on the western side of the San Joaquin Valley in central California. Here this unit can be found in the Panoche Hills in the northern portion of the field area and the Tumey Hills in the southern portion of the field area. The Cima Sandstone resides within the 800m Moreno Formation that spans the Maastrichtian to the Danian. The Moreno Formation comprises four members, which are the Dosados Member, the Tierra Loma Member, the Marca Shale Member, and the Dos Palos Shale Member (of which the Cima Sandstone is an interbed). The Cima Sandstone contains numerous large carbonate mounds, concretions, and pavements, indicating paleoseep activity. The Cima Sandstone has never been studied in detail, but recent interest in sandstone injectites as well as interest in paleoseeps has prompted us to examine this interbed more carefully. The Cima is an immature sandstone composed primarily of quartz along with small amounts of micas and feldspars as well as varying amounts of glauconite. These minerals are generally cemented by carbonate but, occasionally, iron oxide cement is present locally. Much variation exists within the Cima Sandstone Lentil and we seek to characterize and understand this variation. One of the most obvious sources of variability is the thickness of the unit itself. The thickness ranges from near 60m in the northern Panoche Hills to only 9m in the Tumey Hills. Induration also varies noticeably, from well cemented in the north, to unconsolidated in the south. Similarly, the sandstone is grain-supported and houses some depositional structures in the northern outcrops but becomes largely matrix-supported and lacking bedding in the southern outcrops. Preliminary data suggests that proximity to carbonate concretions, fluid conduits, and underlying injectites may have some influence over grain size and sorting.

  20. Salt tolerance analysis of chickpea, faba bean and durum wheat varieties. I. Chickpea and faba bean

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Katerji, N.; Hoorn, van J.W.; Hamdy, A.; Mastrorilli, M.; Oweis, T.

    2005-01-01

    Two varieties of chickpea (Cicer arietinum L.) and faba bean (Vicia faba), differing in drought tolerance according to the classification of the International Center for Agronomic Research in Dry Areas (ICARDA), were irrigated with waters of three different salinity levels in a lysimeter experiment

  1. Potato Bean: Potential Forage/Dietary Supplement for Small Ruminants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Potato bean (Apios americana Medikus) is a nitrogen-fixing, perennial, leguminous vine indigenous to the eastern half of the United States. This vine climbs on plants and objects making its foliage accessible to browsing animals. We have observed deer eating potato bean foliage. Both deer and goa...

  2. 21 CFR 184.1343 - Locust (carob) bean gum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ...) bean gum is primarily the macerated endosperm of the seed of the locust (carob) bean tree, Ceratonia siliqua (Linne), a leguminous evergreen tree, with lesser quantities of seed coat and germ. (b) The...(o)(28) of this chapter. Beverages and beverage bases, nonalcoholic, § 170.3(n)(3) of this chapter...

  3. agronomic qualities of genetic pyramids of common bean developed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ACSS

    2017-11-07

    Nov 7, 2017 ... (BCMNV); and Pythium ultimum (P.ult) root rots were combined into the same genotype at CIAT, a process referred to as pyramiding. Common bean genetic pyramids could, therefore, offer long-term strategies for managing major common bean diseases. However, in the process of developing pyramids ...

  4. Feeding value of processed horse eye bean ( Mucuna urens ) meal ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study was designed to evaluate the performance of pullet chicks fed graded levels of processed horse eye bean meal (HEBM) as partial replacement for soybean meal. The cracked beans were subjected to three processing methods viz: soaking in plain water for 48 hours, cooking for 90 minutes, and toasting on open ...

  5. Incentives for cocoa bean production in Ghana: Does quality matter?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Quarmine, W.; Haagsma, R.; Sakyi-Dawson, O.; Asante, F.; Huis, van A.; Obeng-Ofori, D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper investigates the institutional factors that constrain farmers’ incentives to enhance the quality of cocoa beans in Ghana. Data were collected at three levels of aggregation in the cocoa bean value chain: village, district, and national level. Multi-stage cluster sampling was employed to

  6. Root rots of common and tepary beans in Puerto Rico

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root rots are a disease complex affecting common bean and can be severe in bean growing areas in the tropics and subtropics. The presence of several pathogens makes it difficult to breed for resistance because of the synergistic effect of the pathogens in the host and the interaction of soil factors...

  7. Antioxidant activity of black bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.) protein hydrolysates

    Science.gov (United States)

    The objective of this work was to study the effect of enzymatic hydrolysis of black bean protein concentrate using different enzymes. Bean proteins were extracted and hydrolyzed over a period of 120 min using the enzymes pepsin or alcalase. The protein hydrolysates’ molecular weight was assayed by e...

  8. Evaluation of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris) response to charcoal rot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Charcoal rot in common beans (Phaseolus vulgaris L.), caused by Macrophomina phaseolina (Tassi) Gold. (Mph), is an endemic disease in the prevailing hot and dry conditions in southern Puerto Rico. This study evaluated the 120 bean genotypes that compose the BASE 120 panel under screenhouse conditio...

  9. Economics of oil bean ( Pentaclethra macrophylla ), seed marketing ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The study assessed the economics of oil bean marketing in Owerri agricultural zone of Imo state. Forty- five marketers oil bean marketers were randomly selected from three markets of the study area. Primary data were collected using structural questionnaire. Data collected were analysed using statistical tools such as ...

  10. Variability within the common bean phaseolus vulgaris germ plasm

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bean production in Uganda is characterized by ... characterization of the available germ plasm form the discussion basis of this paper. ... was geographical origin, local variety name, seed colour the diversity noted within the present bean collection is a and size. By 1984 a total of204 landraces were collected, reflection of ...

  11. Effects of Fermented Soya Bean Supplements on Serum Insulin and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of Fermented Soya Bean Supplements on Serum Insulin and Leptin Levels of High Fat Diet-induced Type 2 ... Fermented Soya Bean and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Rabbits. J. Afr. Ass. Physiol. Sci. 5 (2): December, 2017 .... Effect of soy and milk whey protein isolates and their hydrolysates on weight reduction in.

  12. Advances in the improvement of tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Climate change, high temperature and drought are increasingly critical factors affecting agriculture and specifically the production of common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris L.). Tepary bean (Phaseolus acutifolius A. Gray), native to the Sonora desert located in the northern part of Mexico and southwest o...

  13. Canning Quality Evaluation of Common Bean ( Phaseolus vulgaris L ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The results revealed the optimum hydration coefficient value of 1.8 for all common bean varieties. Visual appearances, splits, degree of clumping, starchiness, flavor and taste and seed size were also determined through a visual rating procedure as canning quality traits. Awash Melka and Awash-1 bean varieties revealed a ...

  14. Effect of soya bean diet preparations on some haematological and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Effects of Soya bean diet preparations on the hematocrit, hemoglobin concentration, total plasma protein, plasma albumin, sodium, potassium and chloride concentrations were studied in male albino rats. The animals were fed diets containing 75%, 50% and 25% Soya bean in groups II, III and IV respectively. Group I rats ...

  15. Determination of ochratoxin A levels in ivorian cocoa beans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The objective of this study is to monitor levels of ochratoxin A (OTA) in terms of the marketability of Ivorian cocoa beans stored at the ports of Abidjan and San Pedro. Thus, 270 samples of cocoa beans were analyzed. Merchantability and OTA levels were determined respectively according to the Ivorian Coffee and Cocoa ...

  16. Epicatechin content and antioxidant capacity of cocoa beans from ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Natural antioxidant has received more attention to be part of daily diet. Cocoa beans is one of the main sources of polyphenols especially epicatechin. This study was conducted to investigate the relationship between antioxidant potential and epicatechin content of raw cocoa beans from different countries, namely Malaysia, ...

  17. Susceptibility of South African dry bean cultivars to bacterial diseases

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Dry beans are an important crop in South Africa with the annual bean consumption being approximately 120 000 t. The crop is annually subjected to a number of biotic constraints such as bacterial diseases that can cause serious yield losses especially when the climate is conducive to diseases. The use of resistant ...

  18. The composition of wax and oil in green coffee beans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folstar, P.

    1976-01-01

    Methods for the isolation of wax and oil from green coffee beans were studied and a method for the quantitative extraction of coffee oil from the beans was introduced. Coffee wax, coffee oil and wax-free coffee oil as well as the unsaponifiable matter prepared from each were fractionated by column

  19. Behavior of pesticides in coffee beans during the roasting process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakamoto, Katsushi; Nishizawa, Hideo; Manabe, Noboru

    2012-01-01

    In Japan, maximum residue limits for pesticides (MRL) in coffee are set on green coffee beans, but not roasted coffee beans, although roasted beans are actually used to prepare coffee for drinking. Little is known about the behavior of pesticides during the roasting process. In the present study, we examined the changes in the concentration of pesticide (organochlorine: γ-BHC, chlordane and heptachlor) residues in coffee beans during the roasting process. We prepared green coffee beans spiked with these pesticides (0.2 and 1.0 μg/g), and the residue levels in the beans were measured before and after the roasting process. We determined the residual rate after the roasting process. γ-BHC was not detectable at all, and more than 90% of chlordane was lost after the roasting (3.1 and 5.1% of chlordane remained in the beans spiked with 0.2 and 1.0 μg/g of chlordane, respectively). A low level of heptachlor (0.72%) was left in the coffee beans spiked with 1 μg/g of heptachlor. Disappearance of γ-BHC during the roasting process may be due to the high vapor pressure of γ-BHC, while chlordane has a lower vapor pressure. We also examined the behavior of piperonyl butoxide and atrazine during the roasting process. Piperonyl butoxide behaved similarly to chlordane, but atrazine disappeared after the roasting process, because it is unstable to heat.

  20. Detection of metabolites in Flor de Mayo common beans ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    It was followed by tryptamine (TAM), TRP and IAA. The results of Trichoderma harzianum inoculation in greenhouse tests showed variability in Flor de Mayo beans seedlings in response to physiological level and production parameters. The effect of Trichoderma in Flor de Mayo common bean showed that strain 802 had a ...