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Sample records for brms1 transcriptional repression

  1. Identification of essential sequences for cellular localization in BRMS1 metastasis suppressor.

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    José Rivera

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Breast cancer metastasis suppressor 1 (BRMS1 reduces the number and the size of secondary tumours in a mouse model without affecting the growth of the primary foci upon its re-expression. Knockdown of BRMS1 expression associates with metastasis. The molecular details on BRMS1 mechanism of action include its ability to function as a transcriptional co-repressor and consistently BRMS1 has been described as a predominantly nuclear protein. Since cellular distribution could represent a potential mechanism of regulation, we wanted to characterize BRMS1 sequence motifs that might regulate its cellular distribution. According to its amino acids sequence, BRMS1 contain two putative nuclear localization signals, however none of them has been proved to work so far. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By using well known in vivo assays to detect both nuclear import and export signal, we have characterized, in the present study, one functional nuclear localisation signal as necessary and sufficient to promote nuclear transport. Additionally, the outcome of a directed yeast two-hybrid assay identify importin alpha6 as a specific partner of BRMS1 thus speculating that BRMS1 nuclear import could be specifically mediated by the reported nuclear transporter. Besides, the combination of a computational searching approach along the utilization of a nuclear export assay, identified a functional motif within the BRMS1 sequence responsible for its nuclear export, that resulted not affected by the highly specific CRM1 inhibitor Leptomycin-B. Interspecies heterokaryon assay demonstrate the capability of BRMS1 to shuttle between the nuclear and cytosolic compartments CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show for the first time that BRMS1 contains both nuclear import and export signals enabling its nucleo-cytoplasmic shuttling. These findings contributes new data for the understanding of the BRMS1 functions and allow us to speculate that this phenomenon could

  2. Cytoplasmic BRMS1 expression in malignant melanoma is associated with increased disease-free survival

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    Slipicevic Ana

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background/aims Breast cancer metastasis suppressor 1 (BRMS1 blocks metastasis in melanoma xenografts; however, its usefulness as a biomarker in human melanomas has not been widely studied. The goal was to measure BRMS1 expression in benign nevi, primary and metastatic melanomas and evaluate its impact on disease progression and prognosis. Methods Paraffin-embedded tissue from 155 primary melanomas, 69 metastases and 15 nevi was examined for BRMS1 expression using immunohistochemistry. siRNA mediated BRMS1 down-regulation was used to study impact on invasion and migration in melanoma cell lines. Results A significantly higher percentage of nevi (87%, compared to primary melanomas (20% and metastases (48%, expressed BRMS1 in the nucelus (p Waf1/Cip1 (p = 0.009. Cytoplasmic score index was inversely associated with nuclear p-Akt (p = 0.013 and positively associated with cytoplasmic p-ERK1/2 expression (p = 0.033. Nuclear BRMS1 expression in ≥ 10% of primary melanoma cells was associated with thicker tumors (p = 0.016 and decreased relapse-free period (p = 0.043. Nuclear BRMS1 was associated with expression of fatty acid binding protein 7 (FABP7; p = 0.011, a marker of invasion in melanomas. In line with this, repression of BRMS1 expression reduced the ability of melanoma cells to migrate and invade in vitro. Conclusion Our data suggest that BRMS1 is localized in cytoplasm and nucleus of melanocytic cells and that cellular localization determines its in vivo effect. We hypothesize that cytoplasmic BRMS1 restricts melanoma progression while nuclear BRMS1 possibly promotes melanoma cell invasion. Please see related article: http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7015/10/19

  3. Breast carcinoma metastasis suppressor gene 1 (BRMS1): update on its role as the suppressor of cancer metastases.

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    Kodura, Magdalena Anna; Souchelnytskyi, Serhiy

    2015-12-01

    BRMS1 was discovered over a decade ago as a potential tumor suppressor gene. In this review, we summarize the recent findings about the structure of BRMS1, mechanisms of its action and a role of BRMS1 in the cancer progression. As a suppressor of metastasis, BRMS1 has demonstrated a variety of ways to act on the cell functions, such as cell migration, invasiveness, angiogenesis, cell survival, cytoskeleton rearrangements, cell adhesion, and immune recognition. This variety of effects is a likely reason behind the robustness of anti-metastatic influence of BRMS1. Intracellular signaling mechanisms employed by BRMS1 include regulation of transcription, EGF/HER2 signaling, and expression of NF-kB, fascin, osteopontin, and IL-6. Recently reported clinical studies confirm that BRMS1 can indeed be used as a prognostic marker. Approaches to employ BRMS1 in a development of anti-cancer treatment have also been made. The studies reviewed here with respect to BRMS1 structure, cellular effects, intracellular signaling, and clinical value consolidate the importance of BRMS1 in the development of metastasis.

  4. The great repression: chromatin and cryptic transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennig, Bianca P; Fischer, Tamás

    2013-01-01

    The eukaryotic chromatin structure is essential in correctly defining transcription units. Impairing this structure can activate cryptic promoters, and lead to the accumulation of aberrant RNA transcripts. Here we discuss critical pathways that are responsible for the repression of cryptic transcription and the maintenance of genome integrity.

  5. BEND3 mediates transcriptional repression and heterochromatin organization.

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    Khan, Abid; Prasanth, Supriya G

    2015-01-01

    Transcription repression plays a central role in gene regulation. Transcription repressors utilize diverse strategies to mediate transcriptional repression. We have recently demonstrated that BEND3 (BANP, E5R and Nac1 domain) protein represses rDNA transcription by stabilizing a NoRC component. We discuss the role of BEND3 as a global regulator of gene expression and propose a model whereby BEND3 associates with chromatin remodeling complexes to modulate gene expression and heterochromatin organization.

  6. BRMS1 and Cx43 expression in fine needle aspiration thyroid cancer tissue and their correlation with tumor malignancy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Guo Sheng; Bin Wang; Zong-Ping Diao; Kun-Kun Cao; Sai Zhang; Zheng-Guo Pu

    2016-01-01

    Objective:To study the BRMS1 and Cx43 expression in fine needle aspiration thyroid cancer tissue and their correlation with tumor malignancy.Methods:Patients undergoing thyroid fine needle aspiration biopsy in our hospital from April 2012 to October 2015 were selected for study, 60 patients with thyroid cancer and 60 patients with benign thyroid tumor were screened after pathological diagnosis, biopsy tissue was collected to determine the expression of BRMS1 and Cx43, and serum specimens were collected to determin Gal-3, CEACAM1, MMP2 and MMP9 content.Results: mRNA levels and positive expression rate of BRMS1 andCx43in thyroid cancer tissue were significantly lower than those in benign thyroid tumor tissue; mRNA levels ofBRMS1andCx43in thyroid cancer tissue with different pathological types and tumor diameters were not different, mRNA level ofCx43in thyroid cancer tissue with TNM III-IV stage was significantly lower than that in thyroid cancer tissue with TNM I-II stage, mRNA levels ofBRMS1 in thyroid cancer tissue with different TNM stages were not different, and mRNA levels ofBRMS1andCx43in thyroid carcinoma tissue with lymph node metastasis were significantly lower than those in thyroid carcinoma tissue without lymph node metastasis; serum Gal-3, CEACAM1, MMP2 and MMP9 levels in patients with positive BRMS1 and Cx43 expression in thyroid cancer tissue were significantly lower than those in patients with negative BRMS1 and Cx43 expression in thyroid cancer tissue.Conclusions:Lower expression of BRMS1 and Cx43 in fine needle aspiration thyroid cancer tissue is associated with the distant metastasis and malignant degree of tumor, and lower expression of Cx43 is also associated with the growth of tumor and cancer cell proliferation.

  7. BRMS1基因在前列腺癌组织中的表达及临床意义%Expression of BRMS1 gene in prostate cancer and its clinical significance

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    史本涛; 郑爱萍; 姜妮; 陈泽波; 李贤新; 杨尚琪; 关志忱

    2013-01-01

    目的:研究BRMS1基因在前列腺癌中的表达及临床意义。方法收集我院2008年1月至2011年5月期间行前列腺癌根治术后的石蜡包埋标本80例,良性前列腺增生(BPH)组织石蜡包埋标本35例。应用免疫组化超敏型二步法,检测前列腺癌和BPH组织中BRMS1的表达情况,分析 BRMS1的表达与临床病理参数之间的关系。结果 BRMS1蛋白在前列腺癌和BPH组织中的阳性表达率分别为40.00%(32/80)和74.29%(26/35),差异具有统计学意义(P<0.05)。BRMS1蛋白阳性表达率与前列腺癌的T、M分期和Gleason评分呈负相关,差异有统计学意义(P <0.05);BRMS1蛋白阳性表达率与前列腺癌的年龄、淋巴结转移无相关性,差异没有统计学意义(P>0.05)。结论 BRMS1蛋白在前列腺癌组织中低表达或不表达,可能与前列腺癌的临床分期和病理分级有关。%Objective To study the expressions of the BRMS1 gene in prostate cancer and its clinical significance. Methods Total of 80 samples of prostate cancer and 35 samples of benign prostate hyperplasias were collected from our hospital during January, 2008 to May, 2011. The expression of BRMS1 was detected by immunohistochemistry. Then the correlation between the expression level of BRMS1 and the clinical pathological parameters was analyzed. Results The positive expression rates of BRMS1 were 40.00%(32/80)and 74.29%(26/35) respectively in prostate cancer and benign prostate hyperplasia with a significantly statistical difference(P0.05). Conclusion The abnormal expression of BRMS1 indicates that BRMS1 may be related to the clinical stage and different pathology grade of prostate cancer.

  8. Repressive effects of resveratrol on androgen receptor transcriptional activity.

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    Wen-feng Shi

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The chemopreventive effects of resveratrol (RSV on prostate cancer have been well established; the androgen receptor (AR plays pivotal roles in prostatic tumorigenesis. However, the exact underlying molecular mechanisms about the effects of RSV on AR have not been fully elucidated. A model system is needed to determine whether and how RSV represses AR transcriptional activity. METHODOLOGY: The AR cDNA was first cloned into the retroviral vector pOZ-N and then integrated into the genome of AR-negative HeLa cells to generate the AR(+ cells. The constitutively expressed AR was characterized by monitoring hormone-stimulated nuclear translocation, DNA binding, and transcriptional activation, with the AR(- cells serving as controls. AR(+ cells were treated with RSV, and both AR protein levels and AR transcriptional activity were measured simultaneously. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays were used to detect the effects of RSV on the recruitment of AR to its cognate element (ARE. RESULTS: AR in the AR (+ stable cell line functions in a manner similar to that of endogenously expressed AR. Using this model system we clearly demonstrated that RSV represses AR transcriptional activity independently of any effects on AR protein levels. However, neither the hormone-mediated nucleus translocation nor the AR/ARE interaction was affected by RSV treatment. CONCLUSION: We demonstrated unambiguously that RSV regulates AR target gene expression, at least in part, by repressing AR transcriptional activity. Repressive effects of RSV on AR activity result from mechanisms other than the affects of AR nuclear translocation or DNA binding.

  9. Expression of metastasis suppressor BRMS1 in breast cancer cells results in a marked delay in cellular adhesion to matrix

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    Metastatic dissemination is a multi-step process that depends on cancer cells’ ability to respond to microenvironmental cues by adapting adhesion abilities and undergoing cytoskeletal rearrangement. Breast Cancer Metastasis Suppressor 1 (BRMS1) affects several steps of the metastatic cascade: it dec...

  10. Plant NAC-type transcription factor proteins contain a NARD domain for repression of transcriptional activation.

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    Hao, Yu-Jun; Song, Qing-Xin; Chen, Hao-Wei; Zou, Hong-Feng; Wei, Wei; Kang, Xu-Sheng; Ma, Biao; Zhang, Wan-Ke; Zhang, Jin-Song; Chen, Shou-Yi

    2010-10-01

    Plant-specific transcription factor NAC proteins play essential roles in many biological processes such as development, senescence, morphogenesis, and stress signal transduction pathways. In the NAC family, some members function as transcription activators while others act as repressors. In the present study we found that though the full-length GmNAC20 from soybean did not have transcriptional activation activity, the carboxy-terminal activation domain of GmNAC20 had high transcriptional activation activity in the yeast assay system. Deletion experiments revealed an active repression domain with 35 amino acids, named NARD (NAC Repression Domain), in the d subdomain of NAC DNA-binding domain. NARD can reduce the transcriptional activation ability of diverse transcription factors when fused to either the amino-terminal or the carboxy-terminal of the transcription factors. NARD-like sequences are also present in other NAC family members and they are functional repression domain when fused to VP16 in plant protoplast assay system. Mutation analysis of conserved amino acid residues in NARD showed that the hydrophobic LVFY motif may partially contribute to the repression function. It is hypothesized that the interactions between the repression domain NARD and the carboxy-terminal activation domain may finally determine the ability of NAC family proteins to regulate downstream gene expressions.

  11. BRMS1和 Survivin 在乳腺癌中的表达及临床意义%Expression and clinical significance of BRMS1 and Survivin in breast cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王大勇

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the expression and clinical significance of BRMS1 and Survivin in breast cancer,and to explore the correlation between them and their effects on the pathogenesis ,development,metastasis and prognosis of breast cancer.Methods The expression levels of BRMS1 and Survivin were detected by immunohistochemistry in 160 cases of breast cancer,70 cases of mammary glands benign proliferative lesions and 40 cases of normal tissues adjacent to breast cancer.The data was analyzed together with clinical pathological parameters .Results The positive expression rates of BRMS1in breast cancer, mammary glands benign proliferative lesions and normal tissues adjacent to breast cancer were 34.4%,81.4%,95.0%,respectively,the positive expression rates of BRMS1 in breast cancer were significantly decreased ,as compared with those in mammary glands benign proliferative lesions and normal tissues adjacent to breast cancer ( P <0.05).However the positive expression rates of Survivin in breast cancer ,mammary glands benign proliferative lesions and normal tissues adjacent to breast cancer were 78.8%,17.1%,0,respectively,the positive expression rates of Survivin breast cancer were significantly increased,as compared with those in mammary glands benign proliferative lesions and normal tissues adjacent to breast cancer ( P <0.05).The abnormal expression of BRMS1 and Survivin in breast cancer tissue was correlated to TNM clinical stage and lymph node metastasis .Survivin was also related to histological grade .The abnormal expression of BRMS1 and Survivin in breast cancer tissue was not related to patient's age and tumor's size,but the expression of BRMS1 was negatively correlated with that of Survivin .Conclusion BRMS1 and Survivin play an important role in the carcinogenesis , development,metastasis and prognosis of breast cancer ,which can be used as the markers in diagnosis and prognosis evaluation of breast cancer.%目的:观察BRMS1和Survivin在人乳腺癌组

  12. MarA-mediated transcriptional repression of the rob promoter.

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    Schneiders, Thamarai; Levy, Stuart B

    2006-04-14

    The Escherichia coli transcriptional regulator MarA affects functions that include antibiotic resistance, persistence, and survival. MarA functions as an activator or repressor of transcription utilizing similar degenerate DNA sequences (marboxes) with three different binding site configurations with respect to the RNA polymerase-binding sites. We demonstrate that MarA down-regulates rob transcripts both in vivo and in vitro via a MarA-binding site within the rob promoter that is positioned between the -10 and -35 hexamers. As for the hdeA and purA promoters, which are repressed by MarA, the rob marbox is also in the "backward" orientation. Protein-DNA interactions show that SoxS and Rob, like MarA, bind the same marbox in the rob promoter. Electrophoretic mobility shift analyses with a MarA-specific antibody demonstrate that MarA and RNA polymerase form a ternary complex with the rob promoter DNA. Transcription experiments in vitro and potassium permanganate footprinting analysis show that MarA affects the RNA polymerase-mediated closed to open complex formation at the rob promoter.

  13. Coordinated regulation of transcriptional repression by the RBP2 H3K4 demethylase and Polycomb-Repressive Complex 2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasini, Diego; Hansen, Klaus H; Christensen, Jesper;

    2008-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins regulate important cellular processes such as embryogenesis, cell proliferation, and stem cell self-renewal through the transcriptional repression of genes determining cell fate decisions. The Polycomb-Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) is highly conserved during evolution......, and its intrinsic histone H3 Lys 27 (K27) trimethylation (me3) activity is essential for PcG-mediated transcriptional repression. Here, we show a functional interplay between the PRC2 complex and the H3K4me3 demethylase Rbp2 (Jarid1a) in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. By genome-wide location analysis we...... found that Rbp2 is associated with a large number of PcG target genes in mouse ES cells. We show that the PRC2 complex recruits Rbp2 to its target genes, and that this interaction is required for PRC2-mediated repressive activity during ES cell differentiation. Taken together, these results demonstrate...

  14. ZBTB7A suppresses melanoma metastasis by transcriptionally repressing MCAM

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    Liu, Xue-Song; Genet, Matthew D; Haines, Jenna E; Mehanna, Elie K; Wu, Shaowei; Chen, Hung-I Harry; Chen, Yidong; Qureshi, Abrar A; Han, Jiali; Chen, Xiang; Fisher, David E; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo; Yuan, Zhi-Min

    2015-01-01

    The excessive metastatic propensity of melanoma makes it the most deadly form of skin cancer, yet the underlying mechanism of metastasis remains elusive. Here, mining of cancer genome datasets discovered a frequent loss of chromosome 19p13.3 and associated down-regulation of the zinc finger transcription factor ZBTB7A in metastatic melanoma. Functional assessment of ZBTB7A-regulated genes identified MCAM, which encodes an adhesion protein key to melanoma metastasis. Using an integrated approach, it is demonstrated that ZBTB7A directly binds to the promoter and transcriptionally represses the expression of MCAM, establishing ZBTB7A as a bona fide transcriptional repressor of MCAM. Consistently, down-regulation of ZBTB7A results in marked upregulation of MCAM and enhanced melanoma cell invasion and metastasis. An inverse correlation of ZBTB7A and MCAM expression in association with melanoma metastasis is further validated with data from analysis of human melanoma specimens. Implications Together these results uncover a previously unrecognized role of ZBTB7A in negative regulation of melanoma metastasis and have important clinical implications. PMID:25995384

  15. A core erythroid transcriptional network is repressed by a master regulator of myelo-lymphoid differentiation.

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    Wontakal, Sandeep N; Guo, Xingyi; Smith, Cameron; MacCarthy, Thomas; Bresnick, Emery H; Bergman, Aviv; Snyder, Michael P; Weissman, Sherman M; Zheng, Deyou; Skoultchi, Arthur I

    2012-03-06

    Two mechanisms that play important roles in cell fate decisions are control of a "core transcriptional network" and repression of alternative transcriptional programs by antagonizing transcription factors. Whether these two mechanisms operate together is not known. Here we report that GATA-1, SCL, and Klf1 form an erythroid core transcriptional network by co-occupying >300 genes. Importantly, we find that PU.1, a negative regulator of terminal erythroid differentiation, is a highly integrated component of this network. GATA-1, SCL, and Klf1 act to promote, whereas PU.1 represses expression of many of the core network genes. PU.1 also represses the genes encoding GATA-1, SCL, Klf1, and important GATA-1 cofactors. Conversely, in addition to repressing PU.1 expression, GATA-1 also binds to and represses >100 PU.1 myelo-lymphoid gene targets in erythroid progenitors. Mathematical modeling further supports that this dual mechanism of repressing both the opposing upstream activator and its downstream targets provides a synergistic, robust mechanism for lineage specification. Taken together, these results amalgamate two key developmental principles, namely, regulation of a core transcriptional network and repression of an alternative transcriptional program, thereby enhancing our understanding of the mechanisms that establish cellular identity.

  16. Targeted Transcriptional Repression in Bacteria Using CRISPR Interference (CRISPRi).

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    Hawkins, John S; Wong, Spencer; Peters, Jason M; Almeida, Ricardo; Qi, Lei S

    2015-01-01

    Clustered regularly interspersed short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) interference (CRISPRi) is a powerful technology for sequence-specifically repressing gene expression in bacterial cells. CRISPRi requires only a single protein and a custom-designed guide RNA for specific gene targeting. In Escherichia coli, CRISPRi repression efficiency is high (~300-fold), and there are no observable off-target effects. The method can be scaled up as a general strategy for the repression of many genes simultaneously using multiple designed guide RNAs. Here we provide a protocol for efficient guide RNA design, cloning, and assay of the CRISPRi system in E. coli. In principle, this protocol can be used to construct CRISPRi systems for gene repression in other species of bacteria.

  17. A core erythroid transcriptional network is repressed by a master regulator of myelo-lymphoid differentiation

    OpenAIRE

    Wontakal, Sandeep N.; Guo, Xingyi; Smith, Cameron; MacCarthy, Thomas; Emery H Bresnick; Bergman, Aviv; Snyder, Michael P.; Weissman, Sherman M.; Zheng, Deyou; Skoultchi, Arthur I.

    2012-01-01

    Two mechanisms that play important roles in cell fate decisions are control of a “core transcriptional network” and repression of alternative transcriptional programs by antagonizing transcription factors. Whether these two mechanisms operate together is not known. Here we report that GATA-1, SCL, and Klf1 form an erythroid core transcriptional network by co-occupying >300 genes. Importantly, we find that PU.1, a negative regulator of terminal erythroid differentiation, is a highly integrated...

  18. Mechanisms of transcriptional repression by histone lysine methylation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hublitz, Philip; Albert, Mareike; Peters, Antoine H F M

    2009-01-01

    . In this report, we review the recent literature to deduce mechanisms underlying Polycomb and H3K9 methylation mediated repression, and describe the functional interplay with activating H3K4 methylation. We summarize recent data that indicate a close relationship between GC density of promoter sequences...

  19. Sucrose-induced translational repression of plant bZIP-type transcription factors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiese, A.; Elzinga, N.; Wobbes, B.; Smeekens, S.

    2005-01-01

    Sugars as signalling molecules exert control on the transcription of many plant genes. Sugar signals also alter mRNA and protein stability. Increased sucrose concentrations specifically repress translation of the S-class basic region leucine zipper (bZIP) type transcription factor AtbZIP11/ATB2. Thi

  20. Systematic repression of transcription factors reveals limited patterns of gene expression changes in ES cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Akira; Sharov, Alexei A.; Piao, Yulan; Amano, Misa; Amano, Tomokazu; Hoang, Hien G.; Binder, Bernard Y.; Tapnio, Richard; Bassey, Uwem; Malinou, Justin N.; Correa-Cerro, Lina S.; Yu, Hong; Xin, Li; Meyers, Emily; Zalzman, Michal; Nakatake, Yuhki; Stagg, Carole; Sharova, Lioudmila; Qian, Yong; Dudekula, Dawood; Sheer, Sarah; Cadet, Jean S.; Hirata, Tetsuya; Yang, Hsih-Te; Goldberg, Ilya; Evans, Michele K.; Longo, Dan L.; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S. H.

    2013-01-01

    Networks of transcription factors (TFs) are thought to determine and maintain the identity of cells. Here we systematically repressed each of 100 TFs with shRNA and carried out global gene expression profiling in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Unexpectedly, only the repression of a handful of TFs significantly affected transcriptomes, which changed in two directions/trajectories: one trajectory by the repression of either Pou5f1 or Sox2; the other trajectory by the repression of either Esrrb, Sall4, Nanog, or Tcfap4. The data suggest that the trajectories of gene expression change are already preconfigured by the gene regulatory network and roughly correspond to extraembryonic and embryonic fates of cell differentiation, respectively. These data also indicate the robustness of the pluripotency gene network, as the transient repression of most TFs did not alter the transcriptomes. PMID:23462645

  1. Wild type p53 transcriptionally represses the SALL2 transcription factor under genotoxic stress.

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    Carlos Farkas

    Full Text Available SALL2- a member of the Spalt gene family- is a poorly characterized transcription factor found deregulated in various cancers, which suggests it plays a role in the disease. We previously identified SALL2 as a novel interacting protein of neurotrophin receptors and showed that it plays a role in neuronal function, which does not necessarily explain why or how SALL2 is deregulated in cancer. Previous evidences indicate that SALL2 gene is regulated by the WT1 and AP4 transcription factors. Here, we identified SALL2 as a novel downstream target of the p53 tumor suppressor protein. Bioinformatic analysis of the SALL2 gene revealed several putative p53 half sites along the promoter region. Either overexpression of wild-type p53 or induction of the endogenous p53 by the genotoxic agent doxorubicin repressed SALL2 promoter activity in various cell lines. However R175H, R249S, and R248W p53 mutants, frequently found in the tumors of cancer patients, were unable to repress SALL2 promoter activity, suggesting that p53 specific binding to DNA is important for the regulation of SALL2. Electrophoretic mobility shift assay demonstrated binding of p53 to one of the identified p53 half sites in the Sall2 promoter, and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis confirmed in vivo interaction of p53 with the promoter region of Sall2 containing this half site. Importantly, by using a p53ER (TAM knockin model expressing a variant of p53 that is completely dependent on 4-hydroxy-tamoxifen for its activity, we show that p53 activation diminished SALL2 RNA and protein levels during genotoxic cellular stress in primary mouse embryo fibroblasts (MEFs and radiosensitive tissues in vivo. Thus, our finding indicates that p53 represses SALL2 expression in a context-specific manner, adding knowledge to the understanding of SALL2 gene regulation, and to a potential mechanism for its deregulation in cancer.

  2. Plant stem cell maintenance involves direct transcriptional repression of differentiation program.

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    Yadav, Ram Kishor; Perales, Mariano; Gruel, Jérémy; Ohno, Carolyn; Heisler, Marcus; Girke, Thomas; Jönsson, Henrik; Reddy, G Venugopala

    2013-01-01

    In animal systems, master regulatory transcription factors (TFs) mediate stem cell maintenance through a direct transcriptional repression of differentiation promoting TFs. Whether similar mechanisms operate in plants is not known. In plants, shoot apical meristems serve as reservoirs of stem cells that provide cells for all above ground organs. WUSCHEL, a homeodomain TF produced in cells of the niche, migrates into adjacent cells where it specifies stem cells. Through high-resolution genomic analysis, we show that WUSCHEL represses a large number of genes that are expressed in differentiating cells including a group of differentiation promoting TFs involved in leaf development. We show that WUS directly binds to the regulatory regions of differentiation promoting TFs; KANADI1, KANADI2, ASYMMETRICLEAVES2 and YABBY3 to repress their expression. Predictions from a computational model, supported by live imaging, reveal that WUS-mediated repression prevents premature differentiation of stem cell progenitors, being part of a minimal regulatory network for meristem maintenance. Our work shows that direct transcriptional repression of differentiation promoting TFs is an evolutionarily conserved logic for stem cell regulation.

  3. Targeted transcriptional repression using a chimeric TALE-SRDX repressor protein

    KAUST Repository

    Mahfouz, Magdy M.

    2011-12-14

    Transcriptional activator-like effectors (TALEs) are proteins secreted by Xanthomonas bacteria when they infect plants. TALEs contain a modular DNA binding domain that can be easily engineered to bind any sequence of interest, and have been used to provide user-selected DNA-binding modules to generate chimeric nucleases and transcriptional activators in mammalian cells and plants. Here we report the use of TALEs to generate chimeric sequence-specific transcriptional repressors. The dHax3 TALE was used as a scaffold to provide a DNA-binding module fused to the EAR-repression domain (SRDX) to generate a chimeric repressor that targets the RD29A promoter. The dHax3. SRDX protein efficiently repressed the transcription of the RD29A

  4. Polycomb group protein-mediated repression of transcription

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morey, Lluís; Helin, Kristian

    2010-01-01

    The polycomb group (PcG) proteins are essential for the normal development of multicellular organisms. They form multi-protein complexes that work as transcriptional repressors of several thousand genes controlling differentiation pathways during development. How the PcG proteins work...

  5. The Escherichia coli transcriptional regulator MarA directly represses transcription of purA and hdeA.

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    Schneiders, Thamarai; Barbosa, Teresa M; McMurry, Laura M; Levy, Stuart B

    2004-03-05

    The Escherichia coli MarA protein mediates a response to multiple environmental stresses through the activation or repression in vivo of a large number of chromosomal genes. Transcriptional activation for a number of these genes has been shown to occur via direct interaction of MarA with a 20-bp degenerate asymmetric "marbox" sequence. It was not known whether repression by MarA was also direct. We found that purified MarA was sufficient in vitro to repress transcription of both purA and hdeA. Transcription and electrophoretic mobility shift experiments in vitro using mutant promoters suggested that the marbox involved in the repression overlapped the -35 promoter motif and was in the "backward" orientation. This organization contrasts with that of the class II promoters activated by MarA, in which the marbox also overlaps the -35 motif but is in the "forward" orientation. We conclude that MarA, a member of the AraC/XylS family, can act directly as a repressor or an activator, depending on the position and orientation of the marbox within a promoter.

  6. Transcriptional repression in normal human keratinocytes by wild-type and mutant p53.

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    Alvarez-Salas, L M; Velazquez, A; Lopez-Bayghen, E; Woodworth, C D; Garrido, E; Gariglio, P; DiPaolo, J A

    1995-05-01

    Wild-type p53 is a nuclear phosphoprotein that inhibits cell proliferation and represses transcriptionally most TATA box-containing promoters in transformed or tumor-derived cell lines. This study demonstrates that p53 alters transcription of the long control region (LCR) of human papillomavirus type 18 (HPV-18). Wild-type and mutant p53 143Val to Ala repressed the HPV-18 LCR promoter in normal human keratinocytes, the natural host cell for HPV infections. Repression by wild-type p53 was also observed in C-33A cells and in an HPV-16-immortalized cell line with an inducible wild-type p53. However, when C-33A cells were cotransfected with the HPV-18 LCR and mutant 143Val to Ala, repression did not occur. Mutant p53 135Cys to Ser did not induce repression in either normal human keratinocytes or in the C-33A line; although like 143Val to Ala, it is thought to affect the DNA binding activity of the wild-type protein. The ability of mutant p53 143Val to Ala to inactivate the HPV early promoter in normal cells (by approximately 60% reduction) suggests that this mutant may be able to associate with wild-type p53 and interact with TATA box-binding proteins. Therefore, these results demonstrate that the transcriptional activities of p53 mutants may be dependent upon the cell type assayed and the form of its endogenous p53. Furthermore, normal human keratinocytes represent an alternative model for determining the activities of p53 mutants.

  7. Identification of the minimal repression domain of SUPERMAN shows that the DLELRL hexapeptide is both necessary and sufficient for repression of transcription in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsu, Keiichiro; Mitsuda, Nobutaka; Matsui, Kyoko; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2004-08-13

    We reported previously that the carboxy-terminal 30 amino acids of SUPERMAN (SUPRD) function as a repression domain in Arabidopsis. In this study, we identified the peptide sequences in SUPRD that is both necessary and sufficient for repression of transcription. To our surprise, the hexapeptide DLELRL was sufficient, by itself, to confer the ability to repress transcription on a DNA-binding domain. A database search revealed that there are 32 TFIIIA-type zinc finger proteins in the Arabidopsis genome that contain a hexapeptide sequence similar or identical to that of DLELRL. These peptides acted as repression domains, suggesting that these zinc finger proteins might function as active repressors. Further mutational analysis within DLELRL revealed that an amphiphilic motif composed of six amino acids (XLxLXL) with preferences at the first and fifth positions is necessary and sufficient for strong repression. An assay of positional effects suggested that GAL4DB-DLELRL might function as a short-range repressor. A possible mechanism of the DLELRL-mediated repression is discussed.

  8. Combinatorial activation and repression by seven transcription factors specify Drosophila odorant receptor expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadi Jafari

    Full Text Available The mechanism that specifies olfactory sensory neurons to express only one odorant receptor (OR from a large repertoire is critical for odor discrimination but poorly understood. Here, we describe the first comprehensive analysis of OR expression regulation in Drosophila. A systematic, RNAi-mediated knock down of most of the predicted transcription factors identified an essential function of acj6, E93, Fer1, onecut, sim, xbp1, and zf30c in the regulation of more than 30 ORs. These regulatory factors are differentially expressed in antennal sensory neuron classes and specifically required for the adult expression of ORs. A systematic analysis reveals not only that combinations of these seven factors are necessary for receptor gene expression but also a prominent role for transcriptional repression in preventing ectopic receptor expression. Such regulation is supported by bioinformatics and OR promoter analyses, which uncovered a common promoter structure with distal repressive and proximal activating regions. Thus, our data provide insight into how combinatorial activation and repression can allow a small number of transcription factors to specify a large repertoire of neuron classes in the olfactory system.

  9. Molecular Determinants for PspA-Mediated Repression of the AAA Transcriptional Activator PspF

    OpenAIRE

    Elderkin, Sarah; Bordes, Patricia; Jones, Susan; Rappas, Mathieu; Buck, Martin

    2005-01-01

    The Escherichia coli phage shock protein system (pspABCDE operon and pspG gene) is induced by numerous stresses related to the membrane integrity state. Transcription of the psp genes requires the RNA polymerase containing the σ54 subunit and the AAA transcriptional activator PspF. PspF belongs to an atypical class of σ54 AAA activators in that it lacks an N-terminal regulatory domain and is instead negatively regulated by another regulatory protein, PspA. PspA therefore represses its own exp...

  10. Repression of class I transcription by cadmium is mediated by the protein phosphatase 2A

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lei; Le Roux, Gwenaëlle; Ducrot, Cécile; Chédin, Stéphane; Labarre, Jean; Riva, Michel; Carles, Christophe

    2013-01-01

    Toxic metals are part of our environment, and undue exposure to them leads to a variety of pathologies. In response, most organisms adapt their metabolism and have evolved systems to limit this toxicity and to acquire tolerance. Ribosome biosynthesis being central for protein synthesis, we analyzed in yeast the effects of a moderate concentration of cadmium (Cd2+) on Pol I transcription that represents >60% of the transcriptional activity of the cells. We show that Cd2+ rapidly and drastically shuts down the expression of the 35S rRNA. Repression does not result from a poisoning of any of the components of the class I transcriptional machinery by Cd2+, but rather involves a protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A)-dependent cellular signaling pathway that targets the formation/dissociation of the Pol I–Rrn3 complex. We also show that Pol I transcription is repressed by other toxic metals, such as Ag+ and Hg2+, which likewise perturb the Pol I–Rrn3 complex, but through PP2A-independent mechanisms. Taken together, our results point to a central role for the Pol I–Rrn3 complex as molecular switch for regulating Pol I transcription in response to toxic metals. PMID:23640330

  11. The Transcriptional Repressive Activity of KRAB Zinc Finger Proteins Does Not Correlate with Their Ability to Recruit TRIM28

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Kristin E.; Shylo, Natalia A.; Alexander, Katherine A.; Churchill, Angela J.; Copperman, Cecilia; García-García, María J.

    2016-01-01

    KRAB domain Zinc finger proteins are one of the most abundant families of transcriptional regulators in higher vertebrates. The prevailing view is that KRAB domain proteins function as potent transcriptional repressors by recruiting TRIM28 and promoting heterochromatin spreading. However, the extent to which all KRAB domain proteins are TRIM28-dependent transcriptional repressors is currently unclear. Our studies on mouse ZFP568 revealed that TRIM28 recruitment by KRAB domain proteins is not sufficient to warrant transcriptional repressive activity. By using luciferase reporter assays and yeast two-hybrid experiments, we tested the ability of ZFP568 and other mouse KRAB domain proteins to repress transcription and bind TRIM28. We found that some mouse KRAB domain proteins are poor transcriptional repressors despite their ability to recruit TRIM28, while others showed strong KRAB-dependent transcriptional repression, but no TRIM28 binding. Together, our results show that the transcriptional repressive activity of KRAB-ZNF proteins does not correlate with their ability to recruit TRIM28, and provide evidence that KRAB domains can regulate transcription in a TRIM28-independent fashion. Our findings challenge the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms used by KRAB domain proteins to control gene expression and highlight that a high percentage of KRAB domain proteins in the mouse genome differ from the consensus KRAB sequence at amino acid residues that are critical for TRIM28 binding and/or repressive activity. PMID:27658112

  12. Yeast genetic analysis reveals the involvement of chromatin reassembly factors in repressing HIV-1 basal transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manuela Vanti

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Rebound of HIV viremia after interruption of anti-retroviral therapy is due to the small population of CD4+ T cells that remain latently infected. HIV-1 transcription is the main process controlling post-integration latency. Regulation of HIV-1 transcription takes place at both initiation and elongation levels. Pausing of RNA polymerase II at the 5' end of HIV-1 transcribed region (5'HIV-TR, which is immediately downstream of the transcription start site, plays an important role in the regulation of viral expression. The activation of HIV-1 transcription correlates with the rearrangement of a positioned nucleosome located at this region. These two facts suggest that the 5'HIV-TR contributes to inhibit basal transcription of those HIV-1 proviruses that remain latently inactive. However, little is known about the cell elements mediating the repressive role of the 5'HIV-TR. We performed a genetic analysis of this phenomenon in Saccharomyces cerevisiae after reconstructing a minimal HIV-1 transcriptional system in this yeast. Unexpectedly, we found that the critical role played by the 5'HIV-TR in maintaining low levels of basal transcription in yeast is mediated by FACT, Spt6, and Chd1, proteins so far associated with chromatin assembly and disassembly during ongoing transcription. We confirmed that this group of factors plays a role in HIV-1 postintegration latency in human cells by depleting the corresponding human orthologs with shRNAs, both in HIV latently infected cell populations and in particular single-integration clones, including a latent clone with a provirus integrated in a highly transcribed gene. Our results indicate that chromatin reassembly factors participate in the establishment of the equilibrium between activation and repression of HIV-1 when it integrates into the human genome, and they open the possibility of considering these factors as therapeutic targets of HIV-1 latency.

  13. Polycomb complex 2 is required for E-cadherin repression by the Snail1 transcription factor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herranz, Nicolás; Pasini, Diego; Díaz, Víctor M

    2008-01-01

    The transcriptional factor Snail1 is a repressor of E-cadherin gene (CDH1) expression essential for triggering epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Snail1 represses CDH1 directly binding its promoter and inducing the synthesis of Zeb1 repressor. In this article we show that repression of CDH1...... by Snail1, but not by Zeb1, is dependent on the activity of the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2). ES cells null for Suz12, one of the components of PRC2, show higher levels of Cdh1 mRNA than control ES cells. In tumour cells, interference of PRC2 activity prevents the ability of Snail1 to down......-regulate CDH1 and partially de-represses CDH1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that Snail1 increases the binding of Suz12 to CDH1 promoter and the tri-methylation of lysine 27 in the histone 3. Moreover, Snail1 interacts with Suz12 and Ezh2 as shown by coimmunoprecipitation experiments...

  14. Germ cell nuclear factor directly represses the transcription of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta gene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengqiang He; Naizheng Ding; Jie Kang

    2008-01-01

    Germ cell nuclear factor (GCNF) is a transcription factor that can repress gene transcription and plays an important role during spermatogenesis. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta (PPARδ) is a nuclear hormone receptor belonging to the steroid receptor superfamily.It can activate the expression of many genes,including those involved in lipid metabolism.In this report,we showed that GCNF specifically interacts with PPARδ promoter.Overexpression of GCNF in African green monkey SV40 transformed kidney fibroblast COS7 cells and mouse embryo fibroblast NIH 3T3 cells represses the activity of PPARδ promoter.The mutation of GCNF response element in PPARδ promoter relieves the repression in NIH 3T3 cells and mouse testis.Moreover,we showed that GCNF in nuclear extracts of mouse testis is able to bind to PPARδ promoter directly.We also found that GCNF and PPARδ mRNA were expressed with different patterns in mouse testis by in situ hybridization.These results suggested that GCNF might be a negative regulator of PPARδ gene expression through its direct interaction with PPARδ promoter in mouse testis.

  15. RNAi mediates post-transcriptional repression of gene expression in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smialowska, Agata, E-mail: smialowskaa@gmail.com [Center for Biosciences, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge 141-83 (Sweden); School of Life Sciences, Södertörn Högskola, Huddinge 141-89 (Sweden); Djupedal, Ingela; Wang, Jingwen [Center for Biosciences, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge 141-83 (Sweden); Kylsten, Per [School of Life Sciences, Södertörn Högskola, Huddinge 141-89 (Sweden); Swoboda, Peter [Center for Biosciences, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge 141-83 (Sweden); Ekwall, Karl, E-mail: Karl.Ekwall@ki.se [Center for Biosciences, Department of Biosciences and Nutrition, Karolinska Institute, Huddinge 141-83 (Sweden); School of Life Sciences, Södertörn Högskola, Huddinge 141-89 (Sweden)

    2014-02-07

    Highlights: • Protein coding genes accumulate anti-sense sRNAs in fission yeast S. pombe. • RNAi represses protein-coding genes in S. pombe. • RNAi-mediated gene repression is post-transcriptional. - Abstract: RNA interference (RNAi) is a gene silencing mechanism conserved from fungi to mammals. Small interfering RNAs are products and mediators of the RNAi pathway and act as specificity factors in recruiting effector complexes. The Schizosaccharomyces pombe genome encodes one of each of the core RNAi proteins, Dicer, Argonaute and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (dcr1, ago1, rdp1). Even though the function of RNAi in heterochromatin assembly in S. pombe is established, its role in controlling gene expression is elusive. Here, we report the identification of small RNAs mapped anti-sense to protein coding genes in fission yeast. We demonstrate that these genes are up-regulated at the protein level in RNAi mutants, while their mRNA levels are not significantly changed. We show that the repression by RNAi is not a result of heterochromatin formation. Thus, we conclude that RNAi is involved in post-transcriptional gene silencing in S. pombe.

  16. Citrullination of histone H3 interferes with HP1-mediated transcriptional repression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priyanka Sharma

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Multiple Sclerosis (MS is an autoimmune disease associated with abnormal expression of a subset of cytokines, resulting in inappropriate T-lymphocyte activation and uncontrolled immune response. A key issue in the field is the need to understand why these cytokines are transcriptionally activated in the patients. Here, we have examined several transcription units subject to pathological reactivation in MS, including the TNFα and IL8 cytokine genes and also several Human Endogenous RetroViruses (HERVs. We find that both the immune genes and the HERVs require the heterochromatin protein HP1α for their transcriptional repression. We further show that the Peptidylarginine Deiminase 4 (PADI4, an enzyme with a suspected role in MS, weakens the binding of HP1α to tri-methylated histone H3 lysine 9 by citrullinating histone H3 arginine 8. The resulting de-repression of both cytokines and HERVs can be reversed with the PADI-inhibitor Cl-amidine. Finally, we show that in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from MS patients, the promoters of TNFα, and several HERVs share a deficit in HP1α recruitment and an augmented accumulation of histone H3 with a double citrulline 8 tri-methyl lysine 9 modifications. Thus, our study provides compelling evidence that HP1α and PADI4 are regulators of both immune genes and HERVs, and that multiple events of transcriptional reactivation in MS patients can be explained by the deficiency of a single mechanism of gene silencing.

  17. Mapping the transcription repressive domain in the highly conserved human gene hnulp1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    HNULP1,a new member of the basic helixloop-helix transcription factors,contains a DUF654 domain in its C-terminus and is highly conserved from Drosophilae,yeast,zebrafish to mouse.The function of this motif,however,is currently unknown.In this research,we fused five deletion fragments of the DUF654 domain to the GAL4 DNA-binding domain and then co-transfected with plasmids L8G5-Luc and VP-16.The analysis of the GAL4 luciferase reporter gene indicated that fragments from 228 to 407 amino acids in the DUF654 domain had a strong transcription repression activity.Therefore,this study lays a solid foundation for research on the mechanism of hnulp1 transcriptional regulation and the function of the DUF654 domain.

  18. SUMOylation regulates the transcriptional repression activity of FOG-2 and its association with GATA-4.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    José Perdomo

    Full Text Available Friend of GATA 2 (FOG-2, a co-factor of several GATA transcription factors (GATA-4, -5 and 6, is a critical regulator of coronary vessel formation and heart morphogenesis. Here we demonstrate that FOG-2 is SUMOylated and that this modification modulates its transcriptional activity. FOG-2 SUMOylation occurs at four lysine residues (K324, 471, 915, 955 [corrected]. Three of these residues are part of the characteristic SUMO consensus site (ψKXE, while K955 is found in the less frequent TKXE motif. Absence of SUMOylation did not affect FOG-2's nuclear localization. However, mutation of the FOG-2 SUMOylation sites, or de-SUMOylation, with SENP-1 or SENP-8 resulted in stronger transcriptional repression activity in both heterologous cells and cardiomyocytes. Conversely, increased FOG-2 SUMOylation by overexpression of SUMO-1 or expression of a SUMO-1-FOG-2 fusion protein rendered FOG-2 incapable of repressing GATA-4-mediated activation of the B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP promoter. Moreover, we demonstrate both increased interaction between a FOG-2 SUMO mutant and GATA-4 and enhanced SUMOylation of wild-type FOG-2 by co-expression of GATA-4. These data suggest a new dynamics in which GATA-4 may alter the activity of FOG-2 by influencing its SUMOylation status.

  19. DEWAX-mediated transcriptional repression of cuticular wax biosynthesis in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suh, Mi Chung; Go, Young Sam

    2014-06-06

    The aerial parts of plants are covered with a cuticular wax layer, which is the first barrier between a plant and its environment. Although cuticular wax deposition increases more in the light than in the dark, little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of cuticular wax biosynthesis. Recently DEWAX (Decrease Wax Biosynthesis) encoding an AP2/ERF transcription factor was found to be preferentially expressed in the epidermis and induced by darkness. Wax analysis of the dewax knockout mutant, wild type, and DEWAX overexpression lines (OX) indicates that DEWAX is a negative regulator of cuticular wax biosynthesis. DEWAX represses the expression of wax biosynthetic genes CER1, LACS2, ACLA2, and ECR via direct interaction with their promoters. Cuticular wax biosynthesis is negatively regulated twice a day by the expression of DEWAX; throughout the night and another for stomata closing. Taken together, it is evident that DEWAX-mediated negative regulation of the wax biosynthetic genes plays role in determining the total wax loads produced in Arabidopsis during daily dark and light cycles. In addition, significantly higher levels of DEWAX transcripts in leaves than stems suggest that DEWAX-mediated transcriptional repression might be involved in the organ-specific regulation of total wax amounts on plant surfaces.

  20. A general strategy for cellular reprogramming: the importance of transcription factor cross-repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crespo, Isaac; Del Sol, Antonio

    2013-10-01

    Transcription factor cross-repression is an important concept in cellular differentiation. A bistable toggle switch constitutes a molecular mechanism that determines cellular commitment and provides stability to transcriptional programs of binary cell fate choices. Experiments support that perturbations of these toggle switches can interconvert these binary cell fate choices, suggesting potential reprogramming strategies. However, more complex types of cellular transitions could involve perturbations of combinations of different types of multistable motifs. Here, we introduce a method that generalizes the concept of transcription factor cross-repression to systematically predict sets of genes, whose perturbations induce cellular transitions between any given pair of cell types. Furthermore, to our knowledge, this is the first method that systematically makes these predictions without prior knowledge of potential candidate genes and pathways involved, providing guidance on systems where little is known. Given the increasing interest of cellular reprogramming in medicine and basic research, our method represents a useful computational methodology to assist researchers in the field in designing experimental strategies.

  1. Repression of androgen receptor transcription through the E2F1/DNMT1 axis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conrad David Valdez

    Full Text Available Although androgen receptor (AR function has been extensively studied, regulation of the AR gene itself has been much less characterized. In this study, we observed a dramatic reduction in the expression of androgen receptor mRNA and protein in hyperproliferative prostate epithelium of keratin 5 promoter driven E2F1 transgenic mice. To confirm an inhibitory function for E2F1 on AR transcription, we showed that E2F1 inhibited the transcription of endogenous AR mRNA, subsequent AR protein, and AR promoter activity in both human and mouse epithelial cells. E2F1 also inhibited androgen-stimulated activation of two AR target gene promoters. To elucidate the molecular mechanism of E2F-mediated inhibition of AR, we evaluated the effects of two functional E2F1 mutants on AR promoter activity and found that the transactivation domain appears to mediate E2F1 repression of the AR promoter. Because DNMT1 is a functional intermediate of E2F1 we examined DNMT1 function in AR repression. Repression of endogenous AR in normal human prostate epithelial cells was relieved by DNMT1 shRNA knock down. DNMT1 was shown to be physically associated within the AR minimal promoter located 22 bps from the transcription start site; however, methylation remained unchanged at the promoter regardless of DNMT1 expression. Taken together, our results suggest that DNMT1 operates either as a functional intermediary or in cooperation with E2F1 inhibiting AR gene expression in a methylation independent manner.

  2. Repression of CIITA by the Epstein-Barr virus transcription factor Zta is independent of its dimerization and DNA binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balan, Nicolae; Osborn, Kay; Sinclair, Alison J

    2016-03-01

    Repression of the cellular CIITA gene is part of the immune evasion strategy of the γherpes virus Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) during its lytic replication cycle in B-cells. In part, this is mediated through downregulation of MHC class II gene expression via the targeted repression of CIITA, the cellular master regulator of MHC class II gene expression. This repression is achieved through a reduction in CIITA promoter activity, initiated by the EBV transcription and replication factor, Zta (BZLF1, EB1, ZEBRA). Zta is the earliest gene expressed during the lytic replication cycle. Zta interacts with sequence-specific elements in promoters, enhancers and the replication origin (ZREs), and also modulates gene expression through interaction with cellular transcription factors and co-activators. Here, we explore the requirements for Zta-mediated repression of the CIITA promoter. We find that repression by Zta is specific for the CIITA promoter and can be achieved in the absence of other EBV genes. Surprisingly, we find that the dimerization region of Zta is not required to mediate repression. This contrasts with an obligate requirement of this region to correctly orientate the DNA contact regions of Zta to mediate activation of gene expression through ZREs. Additional support for the model that Zta represses the CIITA promoter without direct DNA binding comes from promoter mapping that shows that repression does not require the presence of a ZRE in the CIITA promoter.

  3. Wnt5a Signals through DVL1 to Repress Ribosomal DNA Transcription by RNA Polymerase I

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dass, Randall A.; Sarshad, Aishe A.; Feenstra, Jennifer M.; Kaur, Amanpreet; Pietras, Kristian; Serra, Rosa; Blanchard, Scott C.; Percipalle, Piergiorgio; Brown, Anthony M. C.; Vincent, C. Theresa

    2016-01-01

    Ribosome biogenesis is essential for cell growth and proliferation and is commonly elevated in cancer. Accordingly, numerous oncogene and tumor suppressor signaling pathways target rRNA synthesis. In breast cancer, non-canonical Wnt signaling by Wnt5a has been reported to antagonize tumor growth. Here, we show that Wnt5a rapidly represses rDNA gene transcription in breast cancer cells and generates a chromatin state with reduced transcription of rDNA by RNA polymerase I (Pol I). These effects were specifically dependent on Dishevelled1 (DVL1), which accumulates in nucleolar organizer regions (NORs) and binds to rDNA regions of the chromosome. Upon DVL1 binding, the Pol I transcription activator and deacetylase Sirtuin 7 (SIRT7) releases from rDNA loci, concomitant with disassembly of Pol I transcription machinery at the rDNA promoter. These findings reveal that Wnt5a signals through DVL1 to suppress rRNA transcription. This provides a novel mechanism for how Wnt5a exerts tumor suppressive effects and why disruption of Wnt5a signaling enhances mammary tumor growth in vivo. PMID:27500936

  4. Dominant Repression by Arabidopsis Transcription Factor MYB44 Causes Oxidative Damage and Hypersensitivity to Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Persak

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In any living species, stress adaptation is closely linked with major changes of the gene expression profile. As a substrate protein of the rapidly stress-induced mitogen-activated protein kinase MPK3, Arabidopsis transcription factor MYB44 likely acts at the front line of stress-induced re-programming. We recently characterized MYB44 as phosphorylation-dependent positive regulator of salt stress signaling. Molecular events downstream of MYB44 are largely unknown. Although MYB44 binds to the MBSII element in vitro, it has no discernible effect on MBSII-driven reporter gene expression in plant co-transfection assays. This may suggest limited abundance of a synergistic co-regulator. MYB44 carries a putative transcriptional repression (Ethylene responsive element binding factor-associated Amphiphilic Repression, EAR motif. We employed a dominant repressor strategy to gain insights into MYB44-conferred stress resistance. Overexpression of a MYB44-REP fusion markedly compromised salt and drought stress tolerance—the opposite was seen in MYB44 overexpression lines. MYB44-mediated resistance likely results from induction of tolerance-enhancing, rather than from repression of tolerance-diminishing factors. Salt stress-induced accumulation of destructive reactive oxygen species is efficiently prevented in transgenic MYB44, but accelerated in MYB44-REP lines. Furthermore, heterologous overexpression of MYB44-REP caused tissue collapse in Nicotiana. A mechanistic model of MAPK-MYB-mediated enhancement in the antioxidative capacity and stress tolerance is proposed. Genetic engineering of MYB44 variants with higher trans-activating capacity may be a means to further raise stress resistance in crops.

  5. Single-cell analysis of Daxx and ATRX-dependent transcriptional repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newhart, Alyshia; Rafalska-Metcalf, Ilona U; Yang, Tian; Negorev, Dmitri G; Janicki, Susan M

    2012-11-15

    Histone H3.3 is a constitutively expressed H3 variant implicated in the epigenetic inheritance of chromatin structures. Recently, the PML-nuclear body (PML-NB)/Nuclear Domain 10 (ND10) proteins, Daxx and ATRX, were found to regulate replication-independent histone H3.3 chromatin assembly at telomeres and pericentric heterochromatin. As it is not completely understood how PML-NBs/ND10s regulate transcription and resistance to viral infection, we have used a CMV-promoter-regulated inducible transgene array, at which Daxx and ATRX are enriched, to delineate the mechanisms through which they regulate transcription. When integrated into HeLa cells, which express both Daxx and ATRX, the array is refractory to activation. However, transcription can be induced when ICP0, the HSV-1 E3 ubiquitin ligase required to reverse latency, is expressed. As ATRX and Daxx are depleted from the activated array in ICP0-expressing HeLa cells, this suggests that they are required to maintain a repressed chromatin environment. As histone H3.3 is strongly recruited to the ICP0-activated array but does not co-localize with the DNA, this also suggests that chromatin assembly is blocked during activation. The conclusion that the Daxx and ATRX pathway is required for transcriptional repression and chromatin assembly at this site is further supported by the finding that an array integrated into the ATRX-negative U2OS cell line can be robustly activated and that histone H3.3 is similarly recruited and unincorporated into the chromatin. Therefore, this study has important implications for understanding gene silencing, viral latency and PML-NB/ND10 function.

  6. EAR motif-mediated transcriptional repression in plants: an underlying mechanism for epigenetic regulation of gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagale, Sateesh; Rozwadowski, Kevin

    2011-02-01

    Ethylene-responsive element binding factor-associated Amphiphilic Repression (EAR) motif-mediated transcriptional repression is emerging as one of the principal mechanisms of plant gene regulation. The EAR motif, defined by the consensus sequence patterns of either LxLxL or DLNxxP, is the most predominant form of transcriptional repression motif so far identified in plants. Additionally, this active repression motif is highly conserved in transcriptional regulators known to function as negative regulators in a broad range of developmental and physiological processes across evolutionarily diverse plant species. Recent discoveries of co-repressors interacting with EAR motifs, such as TOPLESS (TPL) and AtSAP18, have begun to unravel the mechanisms of EAR motif-mediated repression. The demonstration of genetic interaction between mutants of TPL and AtHDA19, co-complex formation between TPL-related 1 (TPR1) and AtHDA19, as well as direct physical interaction between AtSAP18 and AtHDA19 support a model where EAR repressors, via recruitment of chromatin remodeling factors, facilitate epigenetic regulation of gene expression. Here, we discuss the biological significance of EAR-mediated gene regulation in the broader context of plant biology and present literature evidence in support of a model for EAR motif-mediated repression via the recruitment and action of chromatin modifiers. Additionally, we discuss the possible influences of phosphorylation and ubiquitination on the function and turnover of EAR repressors.

  7. Requirement for PBAF in transcriptional repression and repair at DNA breaks in actively transcribed regions of chromatin

    OpenAIRE

    Kakarougkas, Andreas; Ismail, Amani; Chambers, Anna; Riballo, Queti; Herbert, Alex; Kunzel, Julia; Lobrich, Markus; Jeggo, Penny; Downs, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    Summary Actively transcribed regions of the genome are vulnerable to genomic instability. Recently, it was discovered that transcription is repressed in response to neighboring DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). It is not known whether a failure to silence transcription flanking DSBs has any impact on DNA repair efficiency or whether chromatin remodelers contribute to the process. Here, we show that the PBAF remodeling complex is important for DSB-induced transcriptional silencing and promotes ...

  8. STAT4-mediated transcriptional repression of the IL5 gene in human memory Th2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales-van Horn, Sarah R; Estrada, Leonardo D; van Oers, Nicolai S C; Farrar, J David

    2016-06-01

    Type I interferon (IFN-α/β) plays a critical role in suppressing viral replication by driving the transcription of hundreds of interferon-sensitive genes (ISGs). While many ISGs are transcriptionally activated by the ISGF3 complex, the significance of other signaling intermediates in IFN-α/β-mediated gene regulation remains elusive, particularly in rare cases of gene silencing. In human Th2 cells, IFN-α/β signaling suppressed IL5 and IL13 mRNA expression during recall responses to T-cell receptor (TCR) activation. This suppression occurred through a rapid reduction in the rate of nascent transcription, independent of de novo expression of ISGs. Further, IFN-α/β-mediated STAT4 activation was required for repressing the human IL5 gene, and disrupting STAT4 dimerization reversed this effect. This is the first demonstration of STAT4 acting as a transcriptional repressor in response to IFN-α/β signaling and highlights the unique activity of this cytokine to acutely block the expression of an inflammatory cytokine in human T cells.

  9. IscR regulates RNase LS activity by repressing rnlA transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, Yuichi; Miki, Kumiko; Koga, Mitsunori; Katayama, Natsu; Morimoto, Wakako; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Yonesaki, Tetsuro

    2010-07-01

    The Escherichia coli endoribonuclease LS was originally identified as a potential antagonist of bacteriophage T4. When the T4 dmd gene is defective, RNase LS cleaves T4 mRNAs and antagonizes T4 reproduction. This RNase also plays an important role in RNA metabolisms in E. coli. rnlA is an essential gene for RNase LS activity, but the transcriptional regulation of this gene remains to be elucidated. An Fe-S cluster protein, IscR, acts as a transcription factor and controls the expression of genes that are necessary for Fe-S cluster biogenesis. Here, we report that overexpression of IscR suppressed RNase LS activity, causing the loss of antagonist activity against phage T4. This suppressive effect did not require the ligation of Fe-S cluster into IscR. beta-Galactosidase reporter assays showed that transcription from an rnlA promoter increased in iscR-deleted cells compared to wild-type cells, and gel-mobility shift assays revealed specific binding of IscR to the rnlA promoter region. RT-PCR analysis demonstrated that endogenous rnlA mRNA was reduced by overexpression of IscR and increased by deletion of iscR. From these results, we conclude that IscR negatively regulates transcription of rnlA and represses RNase LS activity.

  10. Three WRKY transcription factors additively repress abscisic acid and gibberellin signaling in aleurone cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Liyuan; Gu, Lingkun; Ringler, Patricia; Smith, Stanley; Rushton, Paul J; Shen, Qingxi J

    2015-07-01

    Members of the WRKY transcription factor superfamily are essential for the regulation of many plant pathways. Functional redundancy due to duplications of WRKY transcription factors, however, complicates genetic analysis by allowing single-mutant plants to maintain wild-type phenotypes. Our analyses indicate that three group I WRKY genes, OsWRKY24, -53, and -70, act in a partially redundant manner. All three showed characteristics of typical WRKY transcription factors: each localized to nuclei and yeast one-hybrid assays indicated that they all bind to W-boxes, including those present in their own promoters. Quantitative real time-PCR (qRT-PCR) analyses indicated that the expression levels of the three WRKY genes varied in the different tissues tested. Particle bombardment-mediated transient expression analyses indicated that all three genes repress the GA and ABA signaling in a dosage-dependent manner. Combination of all three WRKY genes showed additive antagonism of ABA and GA signaling. These results suggest that these WRKY proteins function as negative transcriptional regulators of GA and ABA signaling. However, different combinations of these WRKY genes can lead to varied strengths in suppression of their targets.

  11. Cyclin D1 represses gluconeogenesis via inhibition of the transcriptional coactivator PGC1α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Kavita; Liu, Wan-Ju; Thompson, Keyata; Anders, Lars; Devarakonda, Srikripa; Dewi, Ruby; Buckley, Stephanie; Hwang, Bor-Jang; Polster, Brian; Dorsey, Susan G; Sun, Yezhou; Sicinski, Piotr; Girnun, Geoffrey D

    2014-10-01

    Hepatic gluconeogenesis is crucial to maintain normal blood glucose during periods of nutrient deprivation. Gluconeogenesis is controlled at multiple levels by a variety of signal transduction and transcriptional pathways. However, dysregulation of these pathways leads to hyperglycemia and type 2 diabetes. While the effects of various signaling pathways on gluconeogenesis are well established, the downstream signaling events repressing gluconeogenic gene expression are not as well understood. The cell-cycle regulator cyclin D1 is expressed in the liver, despite the liver being a quiescent tissue. The most well-studied function of cyclin D1 is activation of cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4), promoting progression of the cell cycle. We show here a novel role for cyclin D1 as a regulator of gluconeogenic and oxidative phosphorylation (OxPhos) gene expression. In mice, fasting decreases liver cyclin D1 expression, while refeeding induces cyclin D1 expression. Inhibition of CDK4 enhances the gluconeogenic gene expression, whereas cyclin D1-mediated activation of CDK4 represses the gluconeogenic gene-expression program in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, we show that cyclin D1 represses gluconeogenesis and OxPhos in part via inhibition of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC1α) activity in a CDK4-dependent manner. Indeed, we demonstrate that PGC1α is novel cyclin D1/CDK4 substrate. These studies reveal a novel role for cyclin D1 on metabolism via PGC1α and reveal a potential link between cell-cycle regulation and metabolic control of glucose homeostasis.

  12. Repression of Seed Maturation Genes by a Trihelix Transcriptional Repressor in Arabidopsis Seedlings[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Ming-Jun; Lydiate, Derek J.; Li, Xiang; Lui, Helen; Gjetvaj, Branimir; Hegedus, Dwayne D.; Rozwadowski, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    The seed maturation program is repressed during germination and seedling development so that embryonic genes are not expressed in vegetative organs. Here, we describe a regulator that represses the expression of embryonic seed maturation genes in vegetative tissues. ASIL1 (for Arabidopsis 6b-interacting protein 1-like 1) was isolated by its interaction with the Arabidopsis thaliana 2S3 promoter. ASIL1 possesses domains conserved in the plant-specific trihelix family of DNA binding proteins and belongs to a subfamily of 6b-interacting protein 1-like factors. The seedlings of asil1 mutants exhibited a global shift in gene expression to a profile resembling late embryogenesis. LEAFY COTYLEDON1 and 2 were markedly derepressed during early germination, as was a large subset of seed maturation genes, such as those encoding seed storage proteins and oleosins, in seedlings of asil1 mutants. Consistent with this, asil1 seedlings accumulated 2S albumin and oil with a fatty acid composition similar to that of seed-derived lipid. Moreover, ASIL1 specifically recognized a GT element that overlaps the G-box and is in close proximity to the RY repeats of the 2S promoters. We suggest that ASIL1 targets GT-box–containing embryonic genes by competing with the binding of transcriptional activators to this promoter region. PMID:19155348

  13. CLOCKWORK ORANGE Enhances PERIOD Mediated Rhythms in Transcriptional Repression by Antagonizing E-box Binding by CLOCK-CYCLE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Yu, Wangjie; Hardin, Paul E

    2016-11-01

    The Drosophila circadian oscillator controls daily rhythms in physiology, metabolism and behavior via transcriptional feedback loops. CLOCK-CYCLE (CLK-CYC) heterodimers initiate feedback loop function by binding E-box elements to activate per and tim transcription. PER-TIM heterodimers then accumulate, bind CLK-CYC to inhibit transcription, and are ultimately degraded to enable the next round of transcription. The timing of transcriptional events in this feedback loop coincide with, and are controlled by, rhythms in CLK-CYC binding to E-boxes. PER rhythmically binds CLK-CYC to initiate transcriptional repression, and subsequently promotes the removal of CLK-CYC from E-boxes. However, little is known about the mechanism by which CLK-CYC is removed from DNA. Previous studies demonstrated that the transcription repressor CLOCKWORK ORANGE (CWO) contributes to core feedback loop function by repressing per and tim transcription in cultured S2 cells and in flies. Here we show that CWO rhythmically binds E-boxes upstream of core clock genes in a reciprocal manner to CLK, thereby promoting PER-dependent removal of CLK-CYC from E-boxes, and maintaining repression until PER is degraded and CLK-CYC displaces CWO from E-boxes to initiate transcription. These results suggest a model in which CWO co-represses CLK-CYC transcriptional activity in conjunction with PER by competing for E-box binding once CLK-CYC-PER complexes have formed. Given that CWO orthologs DEC1 and DEC2 also target E-boxes bound by CLOCK-BMAL1, a similar mechanism may operate in the mammalian clock.

  14. An X11alpha/FSBP complex represses transcription of the GSK3beta gene promoter.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lau, Kwok-Fai

    2010-08-04

    X11alpha is a neuronal adaptor protein that interacts with the amyloid precursor protein (APP) through a centrally located phosphotyrosine binding domain to inhibit the production of Abeta peptide that is deposited in Alzheimer\\'s disease brains. X11alpha also contains two C-terminal postsynaptic density-95, large discs, zona occludens 1 (PDZ) domains, and we show here that through its PDZ domains, X11alpha interacts with a novel transcription factor, fibrinogen silencer binding protein. Moreover, we show that an X11alpha\\/fibrinogen silencer binding protein complex signals to the nucleus to repress glycogen synthase kinase-3beta promoter activity. Glycogen synthase kinase-3beta is a favoured candidate kinase for phosphorylating tau in Alzheimer\\'s disease. Our findings show a new function for X11alpha that may impact on Alzheimer\\'s disease pathogenesis.

  15. Genetic interactions of MAF1 identify a role for Med20 in transcriptional repression of ribosomal protein genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian M Willis

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Transcriptional repression of ribosomal components and tRNAs is coordinately regulated in response to a wide variety of environmental stresses. Part of this response involves the convergence of different nutritional and stress signaling pathways on Maf1, a protein that is essential for repressing transcription by RNA polymerase (pol III in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here we identify the functions buffering yeast cells that are unable to down-regulate transcription by RNA pol III. MAF1 genetic interactions identified in screens of non-essential gene-deletions and conditionally expressed essential genes reveal a highly interconnected network of 64 genes involved in ribosome biogenesis, RNA pol II transcription, tRNA modification, ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis and other processes. A survey of non-essential MAF1 synthetic sick/lethal (SSL genes identified six gene-deletions that are defective in transcriptional repression of ribosomal protein (RP genes following rapamycin treatment. This subset of MAF1 SSL genes included MED20 which encodes a head module subunit of the RNA pol II Mediator complex. Genetic interactions between MAF1 and subunits in each structural module of Mediator were investigated to examine the functional relationship between these transcriptional regulators. Gene expression profiling identified a prominent and highly selective role for Med20 in the repression of RP gene transcription under multiple conditions. In addition, attenuated repression of RP genes by rapamycin was observed in a strain deleted for the Mediator tail module subunit Med16. The data suggest that Mediator and Maf1 function in parallel pathways to negatively regulate RP mRNA and tRNA synthesis.

  16. Methylation-mediated transcriptional repression of microRNAs during cervical carcinogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilting, Saskia M.; Verlaat, Wina; Jaspers, Annelieke; Makazaji, Nour A.; Agami, Reuven; Meijer, Chris J.L.M.; Snijders, Peter J.F.

    2013-01-01

    Deregulated expression of microRNAs (miRNAs) is common and biologically relevant in cervical carcinogenesis and appears only partly related to chromosomal changes. We recently identified 32 miRNAs showing decreased expression in high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and carcinomas not associated with a chromosomal loss, 6 of which were located within a CpG island. This study aimed to investigate to what extent these miRNAs are subject to DNA methylation-mediated transcriptional repression in cervical carcinogenesis.   Methylation-specific PCR (MSP) analysis on a cell line panel representing different stages of human papillomavirus (HPV) induced transformation revealed an increase in methylation of hsa-miR-149, -203 and -375 with progression to malignancy, whereas expression of these miRNAs was restored upon treatment with a demethylating agent. All three miRNAs showed significantly increased levels of methylation in cervical carcinomas, whereas methylation levels of hsa-miR-203 and -375 were also significantly increased in high-grade CIN. A pilot analysis showed that increased hsa-miR-203 methylation was also detectable in HPV-positive cervical scrapes of women with high-grade CIN compared with controls. Similar to recent findings on hsa-miR-375, ectopic expression of hsa-miR-203 in cervical cancer cells decreased both the proliferation rate and anchorage independent growth. We found evidence for methylation-mediated transcriptional repression of hsa-miR-149, -203 and -375 in cervical cancer. Methylation of the latter two was already apparent in precancerous lesions and represent functionally relevant events in HPV-mediated transformation. Increased hsa-miR-203 methylation was detectable in scrapes of women with high-grade CIN, indicating that methylated miRNAs may provide putative markers to assess the presence of (pre)cancerous lesions. PMID:23324622

  17. Glucose repression of lactose/galactose metabolism in Kluyveromyces lactis is determined by the concentration of the transcriptional activator LAC9 (K1GAL4) [corrected

    OpenAIRE

    Zachariae, W; Kuger, P; Breunig, K D

    1993-01-01

    In the budding yeast Kluyveromyces lactis glucose repression of genes involved in lactose and galactose metabolism is primarily mediated by LAC9 (or K1GAL4) the homologue of the well-known Saccharomyces cerevisiae transcriptional activator GAL4. Phenotypic difference in glucose repression existing between natural strains are due to differences in the LAC9 gene (Breunig, 1989, Mol.Gen.Genet. 261, 422-427). Comparison between the LAC9 alleles of repressible and non-repressible strains revealed ...

  18. Insulators target active genes to transcription factories and polycomb-repressed genes to polycomb bodies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Bing Li

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Polycomb bodies are foci of Polycomb proteins in which different Polycomb target genes are thought to co-localize in the nucleus, looping out from their chromosomal context. We have shown previously that insulators, not Polycomb response elements (PREs, mediate associations among Polycomb Group (PcG targets to form Polycomb bodies. Here we use live imaging and 3C interactions to show that transgenes containing PREs and endogenous PcG-regulated genes are targeted by insulator proteins to different nuclear structures depending on their state of activity. When two genes are repressed, they co-localize in Polycomb bodies. When both are active, they are targeted to transcription factories in a fashion dependent on Trithorax and enhancer specificity as well as the insulator protein CTCF. In the absence of CTCF, assembly of Polycomb bodies is essentially reduced to those representing genomic clusters of Polycomb target genes. The critical role of Trithorax suggests that stable association with a specialized transcription factory underlies the cellular memory of the active state.

  19. ZEB1 limits adenoviral infectability by transcriptionally repressing the Coxsackie virus and Adenovirus Receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lacher Markus D

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously reported that RAS-MEK (Cancer Res. 2003 May 1;63(9:2088-95 and TGF-β (Cancer Res. 2006 Feb 1;66(3:1648-57 signaling negatively regulate coxsackie virus and adenovirus receptor (CAR cell-surface expression and adenovirus uptake. In the case of TGF-β, down-regulation of CAR occurred in context of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT, a process associated with transcriptional repression of E-cadherin by, for instance, the E2 box-binding factors Snail, Slug, SIP1 or ZEB1. While EMT is crucial in embryonic development, it has been proposed to contribute to the formation of invasive and metastatic carcinomas by reducing cell-cell contacts and increasing cell migration. Results Here, we show that ZEB1 represses CAR expression in both PANC-1 (pancreatic and MDA-MB-231 (breast human cancer cells. We demonstrate that ZEB1 physically associates with at least one of two closely spaced and conserved E2 boxes within the minimal CAR promoter here defined as genomic region -291 to -1 relative to the translational start ATG. In agreement with ZEB1's established role as a negative regulator of the epithelial phenotype, silencing its expression in MDA-MB-231 cells induced a partial Mesenchymal-to-Epithelial Transition (MET characterized by increased levels of E-cadherin and CAR, and decreased expression of fibronectin. Conversely, knockdown of ZEB1 in PANC-1 cells antagonized both the TGF-β-induced down-regulation of E-cadherin and CAR and the reduction of adenovirus uptake. Interestingly, even though ZEB1 clearly contributes to the TGF-β-induced mesenchymal phenotype of PANC-1 cells, TGF-β did not seem to affect ZEB1's protein levels or subcellular localization. These findings suggest that TGF-β may inhibit CAR expression by regulating factor(s that cooperate with ZEB1 to repress the CAR promoter, rather than by regulating ZEB1 expression levels. In addition to the negative E2 box-mediated regulation the minimal

  20. Protein inhibitor of activated STAT 4 (PIAS4) regulates pro-inflammatory transcription in hepatocytes by repressing SIRT1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Lina; Fan, Zhiwen; Chen, Junliang; Tian, Wenfang; Li, Min; Xu, Huihui; Wu, Xiaoyan; Fang, Mingming; Xia, Jun; Xu, Yong

    2016-07-12

    Excessive nutrition promotes the pathogenesis of non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH), characterized by the accumulation of pro-inflammation mediators in the liver. In the present study we investigated the regulation of pro-inflammatory transcription in hepatocytes by protein inhibitor of activated STAT 4 (PIAS4) in this process and the underlying mechanisms. We report that expression of the class III deacetylase SIRT1 was down-regulated in the livers of NASH mice accompanied by a simultaneous increase in the expression and binding activity of PIAS4. Exposure to high glucose stimulated the expression PIAS4 in cultured hepatocytes paralleling SIRT1 repression. Estrogen, a known NASH-protective hormone, ameliorated SIRT1 trans-repression by targeting PIAS4. Over-expression of PIAS4 enhanced, while PIAS4 knockdown alleviated, repression of SIRT1 transcription by high glucose. Lentiviral delivery of short hairpin RNA (shRNA) targeting PIAS4 attenuated hepatic inflammation in NASH mice by restoring SIRT1 expression. Mechanistically, PIAS4 promoted NF-κB-mediated pro-inflammatory transcription in a SIRT1 dependent manner. In conclusion, our study indicates that PIAS4 mediated SIRT1 repression in response to nutrient surplus contributes to the pathogenesis of NASH. Therefore, targeting PIAS4 might provide novel therapeutic strategies in the intervention of NASH.

  1. Mitochondrial calcium uniporter Mcu controls excitotoxicity and is transcriptionally repressed by neuroprotective nuclear calcium signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Jing; Tan, Yan-Wei; Hagenston, Anna M; Martel, Marc-Andre; Kneisel, Niclas; Skehel, Paul A; Wyllie, David J A; Bading, Hilmar; Hardingham, Giles E

    2013-01-01

    The recent identification of the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter gene (Mcu/Ccdc109a) has enabled us to address its role, and that of mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake, in neuronal excitotoxicity. Here we show that exogenously expressed Mcu is mitochondrially localized and increases mitochondrial Ca(2+) levels following NMDA receptor activation, leading to increased mitochondrial membrane depolarization and excitotoxic cell death. Knockdown of endogenous Mcu expression reduces NMDA-induced increases in mitochondrial Ca(2+), resulting in lower levels of mitochondrial depolarization and resistance to excitotoxicity. Mcu is subject to dynamic regulation as part of an activity-dependent adaptive mechanism that limits mitochondrial Ca(2+) overload when cytoplasmic Ca(2+) levels are high. Specifically, synaptic activity transcriptionally represses Mcu, via a mechanism involving the nuclear Ca(2+) and CaM kinase-mediated induction of Npas4, resulting in the inhibition of NMDA receptor-induced mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake and preventing excitotoxic death. This establishes Mcu and the pathways regulating its expression as important determinants of excitotoxicity, which may represent therapeutic targets for excitotoxic disorders.

  2. Ribbon regulates morphogenesis of the Drosophila embryonic salivary gland through transcriptional activation and repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loganathan, Rajprasad; Lee, Joslynn S; Wells, Michael B; Grevengoed, Elizabeth; Slattery, Matthew; Andrew, Deborah J

    2016-01-01

    Transcription factors affect spatiotemporal patterns of gene expression often regulating multiple aspects of tissue morphogenesis, including cell-type specification, cell proliferation, cell death, cell polarity, cell shape, cell arrangement and cell migration. In this work, we describe a distinct role for Ribbon (Rib) in controlling cell shape/volume increases during elongation of the Drosophila salivary gland (SG). Notably, the morphogenetic changes in rib mutants occurred without effects on general SG cell attributes such as specification, proliferation and apoptosis. Moreover, the changes in cell shape/volume in rib mutants occurred without compromising epithelial-specific morphological attributes such as apicobasal polarity and junctional integrity. To identify the genes regulated by Rib, we performed ChIP-seq analysis in embryos driving expression of GFP-tagged Rib specifically in the SGs. To learn if the Rib binding sites identified in the ChIP-seq analysis were linked to changes in gene expression, we performed microarray analysis comparing RNA samples from age-matched wild-type and rib null embryos. From the superposed ChIP-seq and microarray gene expression data, we identified 60 genomic sites bound by Rib likely to regulate SG-specific gene expression. We confirmed several of the identified Rib targets by qRT-pCR and/or in situ hybridization. Our results indicate that Rib regulates cell growth and tissue shape in the Drosophila salivary gland via a diverse array of targets through both transcriptional activation and repression. Furthermore, our results suggest that autoregulation of rib expression may be a key component of the SG morphogenetic gene network.

  3. Transcriptional repression of Hox genes by C. elegans HP1/HPL and H1/HIS-24.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maja Studencka

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Elucidation of the biological role of linker histone (H1 and heterochromatin protein 1 (HP1 in mammals has been difficult owing to the existence of a least 11 distinct H1 and three HP1 subtypes in mice. Caenorhabditis elegans possesses two HP1 homologues (HPL-1 and HPL-2 and eight H1 variants. Remarkably, one of eight H1 variants, HIS-24, is important for C. elegans development. Therefore we decided to analyse in parallel the transcriptional profiles of HIS-24, HPL-1/-2 deficient animals, and their phenotype, since hpl-1, hpl-2, and his-24 deficient nematodes are viable. Global transcriptional analysis of the double and triple mutants revealed that HPL proteins and HIS-24 play gene-specific roles, rather than a general repressive function. We showed that HIS-24 acts synergistically with HPL to allow normal reproduction, somatic gonad development, and vulval cell fate decision. Furthermore, the hpl-2; his-24 double mutant animals displayed abnormal development of the male tail and ectopic expression of C. elegans HOM-C/Hox genes (egl-5 and mab-5, which are involved in the developmental patterning of male mating structures. We found that HPL-2 and the methylated form of HIS-24 specifically interact with the histone H3 K27 region in the trimethylated state, and HIS-24 associates with the egl-5 and mab-5 genes. Our results establish the interplay between HPL-1/-2 and HIS-24 proteins in the regulation of positional identity in C. elegans males.

  4. BRCA1 and c-Myc associate to transcriptionally repress psoriasin, a DNA damage-inducible gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Richard D; Gorski, Julia J; Quinn, Jennifer E; Stewart, Gail E; James, Colin R; Moore, Stephen; Mulligan, Karl; Emberley, Ethan D; Lioe, Tong F; Morrison, Patrick J; Mullan, Paul B; Reid, George; Johnston, Patrick G; Watson, Peter H; Harkin, D Paul

    2005-11-15

    Evidence is accumulating to suggest that some of the diverse functions associated with BRCA1 may relate to its ability to transcriptionally regulate key downstream target genes. Here, we identify S100A7 (psoriasin), S100A8, and S100A9, members of the S100A family of calcium-binding proteins, as novel BRCA1-repressed targets. We show that functional BRCA1 is required for repression of these family members and that a BRCA1 disease-associated mutation abrogates BRCA1-mediated repression of psoriasin. Furthermore, we show that BRCA1 and c-Myc form a complex on the psoriasin promoter and that BRCA1-mediated repression of psoriasin is dependent on functional c-Myc. Finally, we show that psoriasin expression is induced by the topoisomerase IIalpha poison, etoposide, in the absence of functional BRCA1 and increased psoriasin expression enhances cellular sensitivity to this chemotherapeutic agent. Therefore, we identified a novel transcriptional mechanism that is likely to contribute to BRCA1-mediated resistance to etoposide.

  5. Id1 represses osteoclast-dependent transcription and affects bone formation and hematopoiesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    April S Chan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The bone-bone marrow interface is an area of the bone marrow microenvironment in which both bone remodeling cells, osteoblasts and osteoclasts, and hematopoietic cells are anatomically juxtaposed. The close proximity of these cells naturally suggests that they interact with one another, but these interactions are just beginning to be characterized. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An Id1(-/- mouse model was used to assess the role of Id1 in the bone marrow microenvironment. Micro-computed tomography and fracture tests showed that Id1(-/- mice have reduced bone mass and increased bone fragility, consistent with an osteoporotic phenotype. Osteoclastogenesis and pit formation assays revealed that loss of Id1 increased osteoclast differentiation and resorption activity, both in vivo and in vitro, suggesting a cell autonomous role for Id1 as a negative regulator of osteoclast differentiation. Examination by flow cytometry of the hematopoietic compartment of Id1(-/- mice showed an increase in myeloid differentiation. Additionally, we found increased expression of osteoclast genes, TRAP, Oscar, and CTSK in the Id1(-/- bone marrow microenvironment. Lastly, transplantation of wild-type bone marrow into Id1(-/- mice repressed TRAP, Oscar, and CTSK expression and activity and rescued the hematopoietic and bone phenotype in these mice. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: In conclusion, we demonstrate an osteoporotic phenotype in Id1(-/- mice and a mechanism for Id1 transcriptional control of osteoclast-associated genes. Our results identify Id1 as a principal player responsible for the dynamic cross-talk between bone and bone marrow hematopoietic cells.

  6. URI Regulates KAP1 Phosphorylation and Transcriptional Repression via PP2A Phosphatase in Prostate Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mita, Paolo; Savas, Jeffrey N; Briggs, Erica M; Ha, Susan; Gnanakkan, Veena; Yates, John R; Robins, Diane M; David, Gregory; Boeke, Jef D; Garabedian, Michael J; Logan, Susan K

    2016-12-02

    URI (unconventional prefoldin RPB5 interactor protein) is an unconventional prefoldin, RNA polymerase II interactor that functions as a transcriptional repressor and is part of a larger nuclear protein complex. The components of this complex and the mechanism of transcriptional repression have not been characterized. Here we show that KAP1 (KRAB-associated protein 1) and the protein phosphatase PP2A interact with URI. Mechanistically, we show that KAP1 phosphorylation is decreased following recruitment of PP2A by URI. We functionally characterize the novel URI-KAP1-PP2A complex, demonstrating a role of URI in retrotransposon repression, a key function previously demonstrated for the KAP1-SETDB1 complex. Microarray analysis of annotated transposons revealed a selective increase in the transcription of LINE-1 and L1PA2 retroelements upon knockdown of URI. These data unveil a new nuclear function of URI and identify a novel post-transcriptional regulation of KAP1 protein that may have important implications in reactivation of transposable elements in prostate cancer cells.

  7. Transcriptional repression and DNA hypermethylation of a small set of ES cell marker genes in male germline stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanatsu-Shinohara Mito

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We previously identified a set of genes called ECATs (ES cell-associated transcripts that are expressed at high levels in mouse ES cells. Here, we examine the expression and DNA methylation of ECATs in somatic cells and germ cells. Results In all ECATs examined, the promoter region had low methylation levels in ES cells, but higher levels in somatic cells. In contrast, in spite of their lack of pluripotency, male germline stem (GS cells expressed most ECATs and exhibited hypomethylation of ECAT promoter regions. We observed a similar hypomethylation of ECAT loci in adult testis and isolated sperm. Some ECATs were even less methylated in male germ cells than in ES cells. However, a few ECATs were not expressed in GS cells, and most of them targets of Oct3/4 and Sox2. The Octamer/Sox regulatory elements were hypermethylated in these genes. In addition, we found that GS cells express little Sox2 protein and low Oct3/4 protein despite abundant expression of their transcripts. Conclusion Our results suggest that DNA hypermethylation and transcriptional repression of a small set of ECATs, together with post-transcriptional repression of Oct3/4 and Sox2, contribute to the loss of pluripotency in male germ cells.

  8. Diverse mechanisms of post-transcriptional repression by the small RNA regulator of glucose-phosphate stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bobrovskyy, Maksym; Vanderpool, Carin K

    2016-01-01

    The Escherichia coli small RNA SgrS controls a metabolic stress response that occurs upon accumulation of certain glycolytic intermediates. SgrS base pairs with and represses translation of ptsG and manXYZ mRNAs, which encode sugar transporters, and activates translation of yigL mRNA, encoding a sugar phosphatase. This study defines four new genes as direct targets of E. coli SgrS. These new targets, asd, adiY, folE and purR, encode transcription factors or enzymes of diverse metabolic pathways, including aspartate semialdehyde dehydrogenase, arginine decarboxylase gene activator, GTP cyclohydrolase I and a repressor of purine biosynthesis, respectively. SgrS represses translation of each of the four target mRNAs via distinct mechanisms. SgrS binding sites overlapping the Shine-Dalgarno sequences of adiY and folE mRNAs suggest that SgrS pairing with these targets directly occludes ribosome binding and prevents translation initiation. SgrS binding within the purR coding sequence recruits the RNA chaperone Hfq to directly repress purR translation. Two separate SgrS binding sites were found on asd mRNA, and both are required for full translational repression. Ectopic overexpression of asd, adiY and folE is specifically detrimental to cells experiencing glucose-phosphate stress, suggesting that SgrS-dependent repression of the metabolic functions encoded by these targets promotes recovery from glucose-phosphate stress.

  9. The proto-oncoprotein KR-POK represses transcriptional activation of CDKN1A by MIZ-1 through competitive binding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, K M; Choi, W I; Koh, D I; Kim, Y J; Jeon, B N; Yoon, J H; Lee, C E; Kim, S H; Oh, J; Hur, M W

    2012-03-15

    The BTB/POZ family of proteins has been implicated in multiple biological processes, including tumourigenesis, DNA damage responses and cell cycle progression and development. MIZ-1 (Myc-interacting zinc-finger protein 1) is known to activate transcription of CDKN1A. We recently found that a kidney cancer-related POK transcription factor, KR-POK, is highly expressed in kidney, brain and bone marrow cancer tissues and is a potential proto-oncoprotein. Mouse Kr-pok represses transcription of the CDKN1A by acting on the proximal promoter. The BiFC/FRET assay, co-immunoprecipitation and glutathione S-transferase-fusion protein pull-down assay indicate that MIZ-1 and Kr-pok interact via their POZ domains. Oligoucleotide pull-down assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays revealed that MIZ-1 binds to the proximal GC-box#3 (bp, -55 to -63) and the MIZ-1-binding elements, MRE-A (bp, -90 to -64) and MRE-B (bp, -27 to -17). Interestingly, MIZ-1 also binds to the distal p53-binding elements. Kr-pok binds to the proximal GC-box#1 (bp, -95 to -100) and #3 (bp, -55 to -63) relatively strongly. It also shows weak binding to the MREs and the distal p53-binding elements. Kr-pok competes with MIZ-1 in binding to these elements and represses transcription by inhibiting MIZ-1/p300 recruitment, which decreases the acetylation of histones H3 and H4. Our data indicate that Kr-pok stimulates cell proliferation by interfering with the function of MIZ-1 in CDKN1A gene transcription using a mechanism that is radically different from other MIZ-1-interacting proteins, such as B-cell lymphoma 6, c-Myc and Gfi-1.

  10. Disruption of histone modification and CARM1 recruitment by arsenic represses transcription at glucocorticoid receptor-regulated promoters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fiona D Barr

    Full Text Available Chronic exposure to inorganic arsenic (iAs found in the environment is one of the most significant and widespread environmental health risks in the U.S. and throughout the world. It is associated with a broad range of health effects from cancer to diabetes as well as reproductive and developmental anomalies. This diversity of diseases can also result from disruption of metabolic and other cellular processes regulated by steroid hormone receptors via aberrant transcriptional regulation. Significantly, exposure to iAs inhibits steroid hormone-mediated gene activation. iAs exposure is associated with disease, but is also used therapeutically to treat specific cancers complicating an understanding of iAs action. Transcriptional activation by steroid hormone receptors is accompanied by changes in histone and non-histone protein post-translational modification (PTM that result from the enzymatic activity of coactivator and corepressor proteins such as GRIP1 and CARM1. This study addresses how iAs represses steroid receptor-regulated gene transcription. PTMs on histones H3 and H4 at the glucocorticoid receptor (GR-activated mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV promoter were identified by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis following exposure to steroid hormone+/-iAs. Histone H3K18 and H3R17 amino acid residues had significantly different patterns of PTMs after treatment with iAs. Promoter interaction of the coactivator CARM1 was disrupted, but the interaction of GRIP1, a p160 coactivator through which CARM1 interacts with a promoter, was intact. Over-expression of CARM1 was able to fully restore and GRIP1 partially restored iAs-repressed transcription indicating that these coactivators are functionally associated with iAs-mediated transcriptional repression. Both are essential for robust transcription at steroid hormone regulated genes and both are associated with disease when inappropriately expressed. We postulate that iAs effects on CARM1 and GRIP1

  11. Global transcriptional analysis of nitrogen fixation and ammonium repression in root-associated Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501

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    Lu Wei

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biological nitrogen fixation is highly controlled at the transcriptional level by regulatory networks that respond to the availability of fixed nitrogen. In many diazotrophs, addition of excess ammonium in the growth medium results in immediate repression of nif gene transcription. Although the regulatory cascades that control the transcription of the nif genes in proteobacteria have been well investigated, there are limited data on the kinetics of ammonium-dependent repression of nitrogen fixation. Results Here we report a global transcriptional profiling analysis of nitrogen fixation and ammonium repression in Pseudomonas stutzeri A1501, a root-associated and nitrogen-fixing bacterium. A total of 166 genes, including those coding for the global nitrogen regulation (Ntr and Nif-specific regulatory proteins, were upregulated under nitrogen fixation conditions but rapidly downregulated as early as 10 min after ammonium shock. Among these nitrogen fixation-inducible genes, 95 have orthologs in each of Azoarcus sp. BH72 and Azotobacter vinelandii AvoP. In particular, a 49-kb expression island containing nif and other associated genes was markedly downregulated by ammonium shock. Further functional characterization of pnfA, a new NifA-σ54-dependent gene chromosomally linked to nifHDK, is reported. This gene encodes a protein product with an amino acid sequence similar to that of five hypothetical proteins found only in diazotrophic strains. No noticeable differences in the transcription of nifHDK were detected between the wild type strain and pnfA mutant. However, the mutant strain exhibited a significant decrease in nitrogenase activity under microaerobic conditions and lost its ability to use nitrate as a terminal electron acceptor for the support of nitrogen fixation under anaerobic conditions. Conclusions Based on our results, we conclude that transcriptional regulation of nif gene expression in A1501 is mediated by the nif

  12. A transcriptional repressive role for epithelial-specific ETS factor ELF3 on oestrogen receptor alpha in breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gajulapalli, Vijaya Narasihma Reddy; Samanthapudi, Venkata Subramanyam Kumar; Pulaganti, Madhusudana; Khumukcham, Saratchandra Singh; Malisetty, Vijaya Lakhsmi; Guruprasad, Lalitha; Chitta, Suresh Kumar; Manavathi, Bramanandam

    2016-04-15

    Oestrogen receptor-α (ERα) is a ligand-dependent transcription factor that primarily mediates oestrogen (E2)-dependent gene transcription required for mammary gland development. Coregulators critically regulate ERα transcription functions by directly interacting with it. In the present study, we report that ELF3, an epithelial-specific ETS transcription factor, acts as a transcriptional repressor of ERα. Co-immunoprecipitation (Co-IP) analysis demonstrated that ELF3 strongly binds to ERα in the absence of E2, but ELF3 dissociation occurs upon E2 treatment in a dose- and time-dependent manner suggesting that E2 negatively influences such interaction. Domain mapping studies further revealed that the ETS (E-twenty six) domain of ELF3 interacts with the DNA binding domain of ERα. Accordingly, ELF3 inhibited ERα's DNA binding activity by preventing receptor dimerization, partly explaining the mechanism by which ELF3 represses ERα transcriptional activity. Ectopic expression of ELF3 decreases ERα transcriptional activity as demonstrated by oestrogen response elements (ERE)-luciferase reporter assay or by endogenous ERα target genes. Conversely ELF3 knockdown increases ERα transcriptional activity. Consistent with these results, ELF3 ectopic expression decreases E2-dependent MCF7 cell proliferation whereas ELF3 knockdown increases it. We also found that E2 induces ELF3 expression in MCF7 cells suggesting a negative feedback regulation of ERα signalling in breast cancer cells. A small peptide sequence of ELF3 derived through functional interaction between ERα and ELF3 could inhibit DNA binding activity of ERα and breast cancer cell growth. These findings demonstrate that ELF3 is a novel transcriptional repressor of ERα in breast cancer cells. Peptide interaction studies further represent a novel therapeutic option in breast cancer therapy.

  13. CDK11{sup p58} represses vitamin D receptor-mediated transcriptional activation through promoting its ubiquitin-proteasome degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Yayun; Hong, Yi; Zong, Hongliang; Wang, Yanlin; Zou, Weiying; Yang, Junwu; Kong, Xiangfei; Yun, Xiaojing [Gene Research Center, Shanghai Medical College and Institutes of Biomedical, Shanghai 200032 (China); Gu, Jianxin, E-mail: jxgu@shmu.edu.cn [Gene Research Center, Shanghai Medical College and Institutes of Biomedical, Shanghai 200032 (China)

    2009-08-28

    Vitamin D receptor (VDR) is a member of the nuclear receptor superfamily and regulates transcription of target genes. In this study, we identified CDK11{sup p58} as a novel protein involved in the regulation of VDR. CDK11{sup p58}, a member of the large family of p34cdc2-related kinases, is associated with cell cycle progression, tumorigenesis, and apoptotic signaling. Our study demonstrated that CDK11{sup p58} interacted with VDR and repressed VDR-dependent transcriptional activation. Furthermore, overexpression of CDK11{sup p58} decreased the stability of VDR through promoting its ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated degradation. Taken together, these results suggest that CDK11{sup p58} is involved in the negative regulation of VDR.

  14. RepA and RepB exert plasmid incompatibility repressing the transcription of the repABC operon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Oseguera, Angeles; Cevallos, Miguel A

    2013-11-01

    Rhizobium etli CFN42 has a multipartite genome composed of one chromosome and six large plasmids with low copy numbers, all belonging to the repABC plasmid family. All elements essential for replication and segregation of these plasmids are encoded within the repABC operon. RepA and RepB direct plasmid segregation and are involved in the transcriptional regulation of the operon, and RepC is the initiator protein of the plasmid. Here we show that in addition to RepA (repressor) and RepB (corepressor), full transcriptional repression of the operon located in the symbiotic plasmid (pRetCFN42d) of this strain requires parS, the centromere-like sequence, and the operator sequence. However, the co-expression of RepA and RepB is sufficient to induce the displacement of the parental plasmid. RepA is a Walker-type ATPase that self associates in vivo and in vitro and binds specifically to the operator region in its RepA-ADP form. In contrast, RepA-ATP is capable of binding to non-specific DNA. RepA and RepB form high molecular weight DNA-protein complexes in the presence of ATP and ADP. RepA carrying ATP-pocket motif mutations induce full repression of the repABC operon without the participation of RepB and parS. These mutants specifically bind the operator sequence in their ATP or ADP bound forms. In addition, their expression in trans exerts plasmid incompatibility against the parental plasmid. RepA and RepB expressed in trans induce plasmid incompatibility because of their ability to repress the repABC operon and not only by their capacity to distort the plasmid segregation process.

  15. Strong inhibition of fimbrial 3 subunit gene transcription by a novel downstream repressive element in Bordetella pertussis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Qing; Boulanger, Alice; Hinton, Deborah M; Stibitz, Scott

    2014-08-01

    The Bvg-regulated promoters for the fimbrial subunit genes fim2 and fim3 of Bordetella pertussis behave differently from each other both in vivo and in vitro. In vivo Pfim2 is significantly stronger than Pfim3 , even though predictions based on the DNA sequences of BvgA-binding motifs and core promoter elements would indicate the opposite. In vitro Pfim3 demonstrated robust BvgA∼P-dependent transcriptional activation, while none was seen with Pfim2 . This apparent contradiction was investigated further. By swapping sequence elements we created a number of hybrid promoters and assayed their strength in vivo. We found that, while Pfim3 promoter elements upstream of the +1 transcriptional start site do indeed direct Bvg-activated transcription more efficiently than those of Pfim2 , the overall promoter strength of Pfim3  in vivo is reduced due to sequences downstream of +1 that inhibit transcription more than 250-fold. This element, the DRE (downstream repressive element), was mapped to the 15 bp immediately downstream of the Pfim3 +1. Placing the DRE in different promoter contexts indicated that its activity was not specific to fim promoters, or even to Bvg-regulated promoters. However it does appear to be specific to Bordetella species in that it did not function in Escherichia coli.

  16. BEND3 represses rDNA transcription by stabilizing a NoRC component via USP21 deubiquitinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Abid; Giri, Sumanprava; Wang, Yating; Chakraborty, Arindam; Ghosh, Archit K; Anantharaman, Aparna; Aggarwal, Vasudha; Sathyan, Kizhakke M; Ha, Taekjip; Prasanth, Kannanganattu V; Prasanth, Supriya G

    2015-07-01

    Ribosome biogenesis dictates the translational capacity of cells. Several mechanisms establish and maintain transcriptional output from eukaryotic ribosomal DNA (rDNA) loci. rDNA silencing is one such mechanism that ensures the inactivity and hence the maintenance of a silenced state of a subset of rRNA gene copies. Whereas oncogenic agents stimulate rRNA gene transcription, tumor suppressors decrease rRNA gene transcription. We demonstrate in mammalian cells that BANP, E5R, and Nac1 (BEN) domain 3 (BEND3), a quadruple BEN domain-containing protein, localizes in nucleoli and binds to ribosomal RNA gene promoters to help repress rRNA genes. Loss of BEND3 increases histone H3K4 trimethylation and, correspondingly, decreases rDNA promoter DNA methylation, consistent with a role for BEND3 in rDNA silencing. BEND3 associates with the nucleolar-remodeling complex (NoRC), and SUMOylated BEND3 stabilizes NoRC component TTF-1-interacting protein 5 via association with ubiquitin specific protease 21 (USP21) debiquitinase. Our results provide mechanistic insights into how the novel rDNA transcription repressor BEND3 acts together with NoRC to actively coordinate the establishment of rDNA silencing.

  17. miR-200b mediates post-transcriptional repression of ZFHX1B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christoffersen, Nanna Rønbjerg; Silahtaroglu, Asli; Ørom, Ulf Lupo Andersson

    2007-01-01

    MicroRNAs have important functions during animal development and homeostasis through post-transcriptional regulation of their cognate mRNA targets. ZFHX1B is a transcriptional repressor involved in the TGFbeta signaling pathway and in processes of epithelial to mesenchymal transition via regulati...

  18. Interaction of the phospholipid scramblase 1 with HIV-1 Tat results in the repression of Tat-dependent transcription

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusano, Shuichi, E-mail: skusano@m2.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp; Eizuru, Yoshito

    2013-04-19

    Highlights: •PLSCR1 specifically interacted with HIV-1 Tat in vitro and in vivo. •PLSCR1 repressed Tat-dependent transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR. •Suppression of PLSCR1 expression enhanced the levels of HIV-1 transcripts. •PLSCR1 reduced the nuclear localization of Tat. -- Abstract: Human phospholipid scramblase 1 (PLSCR1) is an interferon (IFN)-stimulated gene and possesses an IFN-mediated antiviral function. We show here that PLSCR1 directly interacts with human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) Tat. This interaction occurs both in vitro and in vivo through amino acids 160–250 of PLSCR1. Overexpression of PLSCR1 efficiently represses the Tat-dependent transactivation of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) and reduces the nuclear translocation of Tat. In addition, shRNA-mediated suppression of endogenous PLSCR1 expression enhances the levels of gag mRNA in an HIV-1-infected T-cell line. These findings indicate that PLSCR1 negatively regulates the Tat-dependent transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR during HIV-1 infection.

  19. Transcriptional repression of the yeast CHA1 gene requires the chromatin-remodeling complex RSC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moreira, José Manuel Alfonso; Holmberg, S

    1999-01-01

    In eukaryotes, DNA is packaged into chromatin, a compact structure that must be disrupted when genes are transcribed by RNA polymerase II. For transcription to take place, chromatin is remodeled via nucleosome disruption or displacement, a fundamental transcriptional regulatory mechanism in eukar......In eukaryotes, DNA is packaged into chromatin, a compact structure that must be disrupted when genes are transcribed by RNA polymerase II. For transcription to take place, chromatin is remodeled via nucleosome disruption or displacement, a fundamental transcriptional regulatory mechanism...... in eukaryotic organisms. Here we show that the yeast chromatin-remodeling complex, RSC (remodels the structure of chromatin), isolated on the basis of homology to the SWI/SNF complex, is required for proper transcriptional regulation and nucleosome positioning in the highly inducible CHA1 promoter...... of the CHA1 promoter is disrupted, an architectural change normally only observed during transcriptional induction. In addition, deletion of the gene-specific activator Cha4p did not affect derepression of CHA1 in cells depleted for Swh3p. Thus, CHA1 constitutes a target for the RSC complex, and we propose...

  20. Phosphorylation of the leukemic oncoprotein EVI1 on serine 196 modulates DNA binding, transcriptional repression and transforming ability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J White

    Full Text Available The EVI1 (ecotropic viral integration site 1 gene at 3q26 codes for a transcriptional regulator with an essential role in haematopoiesis. Overexpression of EVI1 in acute myeloid leukaemia (AML is frequently associated with 3q26 rearrangements and confers extremely poor prognosis. EVI1 mediates transcriptional regulation, signalling, and epigenetic modifications by interacting with DNA, proteins and protein complexes. To explore to what extent protein phosphorylation impacts on EVI1 functions, we analysed endogenous EVI1 protein from a high EVI1 expressing Fanconi anaemia (FA derived AML cell line. Mass spectrometric analysis of immunoprecipitated EVI1 revealed phosphorylation at serine 196 (S196 in the sixth zinc finger of the N-terminal zinc finger domain. Mutated EVI1 with an aspartate substitution at serine 196 (S196D, which mimics serine phosphorylation of this site, exhibited reduced DNA-binding and transcriptional repression from a gene promotor selectively targeted by the N-terminal zinc finger domain. Forced expression of the S196D mutant significantly reduced EVI1 mediated transformation of Rat1 fibroblasts. While EVI1-mediated serial replating of murine haematopoietic progenitors was maintained by EVI1-S196D, this was associated with significantly higher Evi1-trancript levels compared with WT-EVI1 or EVI1-S196A, mimicking S196 non-phosphorylated EVI1. These data suggest that EVI1 function is modulated by phosphorylation of the first zinc finger domain.

  1. Genotype-dependent activation or repression of HBV enhancer Ⅱ by transcription factor COUP-TF1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Silke F Fischer; Katja Schmidt; Nicola Fiedler; Dieter Glebe; Christian Schüttler; Jianguang Sun; Wolfram H Gerlich; Reinald Repp; Stephan Schaefer

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To study the expression of HBV enhancer Ⅱ by transcription factor COUP-TF1.METHODS: In order to study the regulation of HBV variants in the vicinity of the NRRE we cloned luciferase constructs containing the HBV enhancer Ⅱ from variants and from HBV genotypes A and D and cotransfected them together with expression vectors for COUP-TF1 into HepG2 cells.RESULTS: Our findings show that enhancer Ⅱ of HBV genotype A is also repressed by COUP-TF1. In contrast,two different enhancer Ⅱ constructs of HBV genotype D were activated by COUP-TF1. The activation was independent of the NRRE because a natural variant with a deletion of nt 1763-1770 was still activated by COUP-TF1.CONCLUSION: Regulation of transcription of the HBV genome seems to differ among HBV genomes derived from different genotypes. These differences in transcriptional control among HBV genotypes may be the molecular basis for differences in the clinical course among HBV genotypes.

  2. Kruppel-like factor-9 (KLF9) inhibits glioblastoma stemness through global transcription repression and integrin α6 inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ying, Mingyao; Tilghman, Jessica; Wei, Yingying; Guerrero-Cazares, Hugo; Quinones-Hinojosa, Alfredo; Ji, Hongkai; Laterra, John

    2014-11-21

    It is increasingly important to understand the molecular basis for the plasticity of neoplastic cells and their capacity to transition between differentiated and stemlike phenotypes. Kruppel-like factor-9 (KLF9), a member of the large KLF transcription factor family, has emerged as a regulator of oncogenesis, cell differentiation, and neural development; however, the molecular basis for the diverse contextual functions of KLF9 remains unclear. This study focused on the functions of KLF9 in human glioblastoma stemlike cells. We established for the first time a genome-wide map of KLF9-regulated targets in human glioblastoma stemlike cells and show that KLF9 functions as a transcriptional repressor and thereby regulates multiple signaling pathways involved in oncogenesis and stem cell regulation. A detailed analysis of one such pathway, integrin signaling, showed that the capacity of KLF9 to inhibit glioblastoma cell stemness and tumorigenicity requires ITGA6 repression. These findings enhance our understanding of the transcriptional networks underlying cancer cell stemness and differentiation and identify KLF9-regulated molecular targets applicable to cancer therapeutics.

  3. The putrescine biosynthesis pathway in Lactococcus lactis is transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolic repression, mediated by CcpA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Daniel M; del Río, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Redruello, Begoña; Martín, María Cruz; Fernández, María; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2013-07-01

    Lactococcus lactis is the lactic acid bacterium most widely used by the dairy industry as a starter for the manufacture of fermented products such as cheese and buttermilk. However, some strains produce putrescine from agmatine via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. The proteins involved in this pathway, including those necessary for agmatine uptake and conversion into putrescine, are encoded by the aguB, aguD, aguA and aguC genes, which together form an operon. This paper reports the mechanism of regulation of putrescine biosynthesis in L. lactis. It is shown that the aguBDAC operon, which contains a cre site at the promoter of aguB (the first gene of the operon), is transcriptionally regulated by carbon catabolic repression (CCR) mediated by the catabolite control protein CcpA.

  4. Forced FOG1 expression in erythroleukemia cells: Induction of erythroid genes and repression of myelo-lymphoid transcription factor PU.1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujiwara, Tohru; Sasaki, Katsuyuki; Saito, Kei; Hatta, Shunsuke; Ichikawa, Satoshi; Kobayashi, Masahiro; Okitsu, Yoko; Fukuhara, Noriko; Onishi, Yasushi; Harigae, Hideo

    2017-02-16

    The transcription factor GATA-1-interacting protein Friend of GATA-1 (FOG1) is essential for proper transcriptional activation and repression of GATA-1 target genes; yet, the mechanisms by which FOG1 exerts its activating and repressing functions remain unknown. Forced FOG1 expression in human K562 erythroleukemia cells induced the expression of erythroid genes (SLC4A1, globins) but repressed that of GATA-2 and PU.1. A quantitative chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis demonstrated increased GATA-1 chromatin occupancy at both FOG1-activated as well as FOG1-repressed gene loci. However, while TAL1 chromatin occupancy was significantly increased at FOG1-activated gene loci, it was significantly decreased at FOG1-repressed gene loci. When FOG1 was overexpressed in TAL1-knocked down K562 cells, FOG1-mediated activation of HBA, HBG, and SLC4A1 was significantly compromised by TAL1 knockdown, suggesting that FOG1 may require TAL1 to activate GATA-1 target genes. Promoter analysis and quantitative ChIP analysis demonstrated that FOG1-mediated transcriptional repression of PU.1 would be mediated through a GATA-binding element located at its promoter, accompanied by significantly decreased H3 acetylation at lysine 4 and 9 (K4 and K9) as well as H3K4 trimethylation. Our results provide important mechanistic insight into the role of FOG1 in the regulation of GATA-1-regulated genes and suggest that FOG1 has an important role in inducing cells to differentiate toward the erythroid lineage rather than the myelo-lymphoid one by repressing the expression of PU.1.

  5. The forkhead transcription factor FOXP1 represses human plasma cell differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Van Keimpema (Martine); L.J. Grüneberg (Leonie J.); M. Mokry (Michal); R. Van Boxtel (Ruben); M.C. van Zelm (Menno); P.J. Coffer (Paul); S. Pals; M. Spaargaren

    2015-01-01

    textabstractExpression of the for khead transcription factor FOXP1 is essential for early B-cell development, whereas down regulation ofFOXP1at the germinal center (GC) stage is required for GC B-cell function. Aberrantly high FOXP1 expression is frequently observed in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma

  6. H-NS mediated repression of CRISPR-based immunity in Escherichia coli K12 can be relieved by the transcription activator LeuO

    OpenAIRE

    Westra, Edze Rients; Pul, Ümit; Heidrich, Nadja; Jore, Matthijs Miklas; Lundgren, Magnus; Stratmann, Thomas; Wurm, Reinhild; Raine, Amanda; Mescher, Melina; van Heereveld, Luc; Mastop, Marieke; Wagner, E. Gerhart H.; Schnetz, Karin; van der Oost, John; Wagner, Rolf

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The recently discovered prokaryotic CRISPR/Cas defense system provides immunity against viral infections and plasmid conjugation. It has been demonstrated that in Escherichia coli transcription of the Cascade genes (casABCDE) and to some extent the CRISPR array, is repressed by heat-stable nucleoid-structuring (H-NS) protein, a global transcriptional repressor. Here we elaborate on the control of the E. coli CRISPR/Cas system, and study the effect on CRISPR-based anti-vira...

  7. Transcriptional repression by glycerol of genes involved in the assimilation of n-alkanes and fatty acids in yeast Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Katsuki; Iwama, Ryo; Kobayashi, Satoshi; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Fukuda, Ryouichi; Ohta, Akinori

    2013-03-01

    The yeast Yarrowia lipolytica assimilates n-alkanes or fatty acids as carbon sources. Transcriptional activation by n-alkanes of ALK1 encoding a cytochrome P450 responsible for the terminal hydroxylation has been well studied so far, but its regulation by other carbon sources is poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the transcriptional regulation of ALK1 by glycerol. Glycerol is a preferable carbon source compared to glucose for Y. lipolytica. The n-decane-induced transcript levels of ALK1 as well as the reporter gene under the control of ALK1 promoter were significantly decreased in the simultaneous presence of glycerol, but not of glucose. Similarly, the expression of PAT1 encoding acetoacetyl-CoA thiolase involved in β-oxidation was induced by n-decane or oleic acid, but its transcript level was decreased when glycerol was supplemented. These results indicate that glycerol represses the transcription of the genes involved in the metabolism of hydrophobic carbon sources in Y. lipolytica. Repression of ALK1 transcription by glycerol was not observed in the deletion mutant of GUT1 encoding glycerol kinase, implying that the phosphorylation of glycerol is required for the glycerol repression.

  8. Repression of glucocorticoid-stimulated angiopoietin-like 4 gene transcription by insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuo, Taiyi; Chen, Tzu-Chieh; Yan, Stephanie; Foo, Fritz; Ching, Cecilia; McQueen, Allison; Wang, Jen-Chywan

    2014-05-01

    Angiopoietin-like 4 (Angptl4) is a glucocorticoid receptor (GR) primary target gene in hepatocytes and adipocytes. It encodes a secreted protein that inhibits extracellular LPL and promotes adipocyte lipolysis. In Angptl4 null mice, glucocorticoid-induced adipocyte lipolysis and hepatic steatosis are compromised. Markedly, insulin suppressed glucocorticoid-induced Angptl4 transcription. To unravel the mechanism, we utilized small molecules to inhibit insulin signaling components and found that phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and Akt were vital for the suppression in H4IIE cells. A forkhead box transcription factor response element (FRE) was found near the 15 bp Angptl4 glucocorticoid response element (GRE). Mutating the Angptl4 FRE significantly reduced glucocorticoid-induced reporter gene expression in cells. Moreover, chromatin immunoprecipitation revealed that GR and FoxO1 were recruited to Angptl4 GRE and FRE in a glucocorticoid-dependent manner, and cotreatment with insulin abolished both recruitments. Furthermore, in 24 h fasted mice, significant occupancy of GR and FoxO1 at the Angptl4 GRE and FRE was found in the liver. In contrast, both occupancies were diminished after 24 h refeeding. Finally, overexpression of dominant negative FoxO1 mutant abolished glucocorticoid-induced Angptl4 expression, mimicking the insulin suppression. Overall, we demonstrate that both GR and FoxO1 are required for Angptl4 transcription activation, and that FoxO1 negatively mediates the suppressive effect of insulin.

  9. A NAC Transcription Factor Represses Putrescine Biosynthesis and Affects Drought Tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hao; Fu, Bing; Sun, Peipei; Xiao, Chang; Liu, Ji-Hong

    2016-11-01

    Arginine decarboxylase (ADC)-mediated putrescine biosynthesis plays an important role in plant stress responses, but the transcriptional regulation of ADC in response to abiotic stress is not well understood. We isolated a NAM, ATAF1/2, and CUC (NAC) domain-containing transcription factor, PtrNAC72, from trifoliate orange (Poncirus trifoliata) by yeast one-hybrid screening. PtrNAC72, localized to the nucleus, binds specifically to the promoter of PtADC and acts as a transcriptional repressor. PtrNAC72 expression was induced by cold, drought, and abscisic acid. ADC messenger RNA abundance and putrescine levels were decreased in transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana nudicaulis) plants overexpressing PtrNAC72 but increased, compared with the wild type, in an Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) transfer DNA insertion mutant, nac72 While transgenic tobacco lines overexpressing PtrNAC72 were more sensitive to drought, plants of the Arabidopsis nac72 mutant exhibited enhanced drought tolerance, consistent with the accumulation of reactive oxygen species in the tested genotypes. In addition, exogenous application of putrescine to the overexpression lines restored drought tolerance, while treatment with d-arginine, an ADC inhibitor, compromised the drought tolerance of nac72 Taken together, these results demonstrate that PtrNAC72 is a repressor of putrescine biosynthesis and may negatively regulate the drought stress response, at least in part, via the modulation of putrescine-associated reactive oxygen species homeostasis.

  10. Prox1 directly interacts with LSD1 and recruits the LSD1/NuRD complex to epigenetically co-repress CYP7A1 transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Huafang; Qin, Yi; Liu, Yanfeng; Xie, Youhua; Liu, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1) catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step in the classical pathway of bile acids synthesis in liver and is crucial for maintaining lipid homeostasis. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α) and α1-fetoprotein transcription factor (FTF) are two major transcription factors driving CYP7A1 promoter activity in hepatocytes. Previous researches have shown that Prospero-related homeobox (Prox1) directly interacts with both HNF4α and FTF and potently co-represses CYP7A1 transcription and bile acid synthesis through unidentified mechanisms. In this work, mechanisms involved in Prox1-mediated co-repression were explored by identifying Prox1-associated proteins using immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry (IP-MS) methodology. Multiple components of the epigenetically repressive lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1)/nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD) complex, most notably LSD1 and histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2), were found to be associated with Prox1 and GST pulldown assay demonstrated that Prox1 directly interacts with LSD1. Sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) assays showed that Prox1 co-localizes with HNF4α, LSD1 and HDAC2 on CYP7A1 promoter in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, by using ChIP assay on HepG2 cells with endogenous Prox1 knocked down by RNA interference, Prox1 was shown to recruit LSD1 and HDAC2 onto CYP7A1 promoter and cause increased H3K4 demethylation. Finally, bile acids treatment of HepG2 cells, which significantly repressed CYP7A1 transcription, resulted in increased Prox1 and LSD1/NuRD complex occupancy on CYP7A1 promoter with a concurrent increase in H3K4 demethylation and H3/H4 deacetylation. These results showed that Prox1 interacts with LSD1 to recruit the repressive LSD1/NuRD complex to CYP7A1 promoter and co-represses transcription through epigenetic mechanisms. In addition, such Prox1-mediated epigenetic repression is involved in the physiologically essential negative feedback

  11. Prox1 directly interacts with LSD1 and recruits the LSD1/NuRD complex to epigenetically co-repress CYP7A1 transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huafang Ouyang

    Full Text Available Cholesterol 7α-hydroxylase (CYP7A1 catalyzes the first and rate-limiting step in the classical pathway of bile acids synthesis in liver and is crucial for maintaining lipid homeostasis. Hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α (HNF4α and α1-fetoprotein transcription factor (FTF are two major transcription factors driving CYP7A1 promoter activity in hepatocytes. Previous researches have shown that Prospero-related homeobox (Prox1 directly interacts with both HNF4α and FTF and potently co-represses CYP7A1 transcription and bile acid synthesis through unidentified mechanisms. In this work, mechanisms involved in Prox1-mediated co-repression were explored by identifying Prox1-associated proteins using immunoprecipitation followed by mass spectrometry (IP-MS methodology. Multiple components of the epigenetically repressive lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1/nucleosome remodeling and histone deacetylase (NuRD complex, most notably LSD1 and histone deacetylase 2 (HDAC2, were found to be associated with Prox1 and GST pulldown assay demonstrated that Prox1 directly interacts with LSD1. Sequential chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP assays showed that Prox1 co-localizes with HNF4α, LSD1 and HDAC2 on CYP7A1 promoter in HepG2 cells. Furthermore, by using ChIP assay on HepG2 cells with endogenous Prox1 knocked down by RNA interference, Prox1 was shown to recruit LSD1 and HDAC2 onto CYP7A1 promoter and cause increased H3K4 demethylation. Finally, bile acids treatment of HepG2 cells, which significantly repressed CYP7A1 transcription, resulted in increased Prox1 and LSD1/NuRD complex occupancy on CYP7A1 promoter with a concurrent increase in H3K4 demethylation and H3/H4 deacetylation. These results showed that Prox1 interacts with LSD1 to recruit the repressive LSD1/NuRD complex to CYP7A1 promoter and co-represses transcription through epigenetic mechanisms. In addition, such Prox1-mediated epigenetic repression is involved in the physiologically essential negative

  12. SIRT1 deacetylates RFX5 and antagonizes repression of collagen type I (COL1A2) transcription in smooth muscle cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xia, Jun [Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University (China); Department of Respiratory Medicine, Jiangsu Provincial Hospital of Chinese Traditional Medicine (China); Wu, Xiaoyan; Yang, Yuyu; Zhao, Yuhao [Atherosclerosis Research Center, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease and Molecular Intervention, Department of Pathophysiology, Nanjing Medical University (China); Fang, Mingming [Jiangsu Jiankang Vocational Institute (China); Xie, Weiping, E-mail: wpxienjmu@gmail.com [Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University (China); Wang, Hong, E-mail: hwangnjmu@gmail.com [Department of Respiratory Medicine, The First Affiliated Hospital of Nanjing Medical University (China); Xu, Yong [Atherosclerosis Research Center, Key Laboratory of Cardiovascular Disease and Molecular Intervention, Department of Pathophysiology, Nanjing Medical University (China)

    2012-11-16

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 interacts with and deacetylates RFX5. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 activation attenuates whereas SIRT1 inhibition enhances collagen repression by RFX5 in vascular smooth muscle cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 promotes cytoplasmic localization and proteasomal degradation of RFX5 and cripples promoter recruitment of RFX5. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer IFN-{gamma} represses SIRT1 expression in vascular smooth muscle cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer SIRT1 agonist alleviates collagen repression by IFN-{gamma} in vascular smooth muscle cells. -- Abstract: Decreased expression of collagen by vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) within the atherosclerotic plaque contributes to the thinning of the fibrous cap and poses a great threat to plaque rupture. Elucidation of the mechanism underlying repressed collagen type I (COL1A2) gene would potentially provide novel solutions that can prevent rupture-induced complications. We have previously shown that regulatory factor for X-box (RFX5) binds to the COL1A2 transcription start site and represses its transcription. Here we report that SIRT1, an NAD-dependent, class III deacetylase, forms a complex with RFX5. Over-expression of SIRT1 or NAMPT, which synthesizes NAD+ to activate SIRT1, or treatment with the SIRT1 agonist resveratrol decreases RFX5 acetylation and disrupts repression of the COL1A2 promoter activity by RFX5. On the contrary, knockdown of SIRT1 or treatment with SIRT1 inhibitors induces RFX5 acetylation and enhances the repression of collagen transcription. SIRT1 antagonizes RFX5 activity by promoting its nuclear expulsion and proteasomal degradation hence dampening its binding to the COL1A2 promoter. The pro-inflammatory cytokine IFN-{gamma} represses COL1A2 transcription by down-regulating SIRT1 expression in SMCs. Therefore, our data have identified as novel pathway whereby SIRT1 maintains collagen synthesis in SMCs by modulating RFX5 activity.

  13. Pharmacologic doses of ascorbic acid repress specificity protein (Sp) transcription factors and Sp-regulated genes in colon cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathi, Satya S; Lei, Ping; Sreevalsan, Sandeep; Chadalapaka, Gayathri; Jutooru, Indira; Safe, Stephen

    2011-01-01

    Ascorbic acid (vitamin C) inhibits cancer cell growth, and there is a controversy regarding the cancer chemoprotective effects of pharmacologic doses of this compound that exhibits prooxidant activity. We hypothesized that the anticancer activity of pharmacologic doses of ascorbic acid (colon cancer cell proliferation and induced apoptosis and necrosis, and this was accompanied by downregulation of Sp1, Sp3, and Sp4 proteins. In addition, ascorbic acid decreased expression of several Sp-regulated genes that are involved in cancer cell proliferation [hepatocyte growth factor receptor (c-Met), epidermal growth factor receptor and cyclin D1], survival (survivin and bcl-2), and angiogenesis [vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its receptors (VEGFR1 and VEGFR2)]. Other prooxidants such as hydrogen peroxide exhibited similar activities in colon cancer cells, and cotreatment with glutathione inhibited these responses. This study demonstrates for the first time that the anticancer activities of ascorbic acid are due, in part, to ROS-dependent repression of Sp transcription factors.

  14. Multiple GCD genes required for repression of GCN4, a transcriptional activator of amino acid biosynthetic genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harashima, S; Hinnebusch, A G

    1986-11-01

    GCN4 encodes a positive regulator of multiple unlinked genes encoding amino acid biosynthetic enzymes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Expression of GCN4 is coupled to amino acid availability by a control mechanism involving GCD1 as a negative effector and GCN1, GCN2, and GCN3 as positive effectors of GCN4 expression. We used reversion of a gcn2 gcn3 double mutation to isolate new alleles of GCD1 and mutations in four additional GCD genes which we designate GCD10, GCD11, GCD12, and GCD13. All of the mutations lead to constitutive derepression of HIS4 transcription in the absence of the GCN2+ and GCN3+ alleles. By contrast, the gcd mutations require the wild-type GCN4 allele for their derepressing effect, suggesting that each acts by influencing the level of GCN4 activity in the cell. Consistent with this interpretation, mutations in each GCD gene lead to constitutive derepression of a GCN4::lacZ gene fusion. Thus, at least five gene products are required to maintain the normal repressed level of GCN4 expression in nonstarvation conditions. Interestingly, the gcd mutations are pleiotropic and also affect growth rate in nonstarvation conditions. In addition, certain alleles lead to a loss of M double-stranded RNA required for the killer phenotype. This pleiotropy suggests that the GCD gene products contribute to an essential cellular function, in addition to, or in conjunction with, their role in GCN4 regulation.

  15. HDAC4 mediates IFN-γ induced disruption of energy expenditure-related gene expression by repressing SIRT1 transcription in skeletal muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fang, Mingming; Fan, Zhiwen; Tian, Wenfang; Zhao, Yuhao; Li, Ping; Xu, Huihui; Zhou, Bisheng; Zhang, Liping; Wu, Xiaoyan; Xu, Yong

    2016-02-01

    Metabolic homeostasis is achieved through balanced energy storage and output. Impairment of energy expenditure is a hallmark event in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes. Previously we have shown that the pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon gamma (IFN-γ) disrupts energy expenditure in skeletal muscle cells via hypermethylated in cancer 1 (HIC1)-class II transactivator (CIITA) dependent repression of SIRT1 transcription. Here we report that repression of SIRT1 transcription by IFN-γ paralleled loss of histone acetylation on the SIRT1 promoter region with simultaneous recruitment of histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4). IFN-γ activated HDAC4 in vitro and in vivo by up-regulating its expression and stimulating its nuclear accumulation. HIC1 and CIITA recruited HDAC4 to the SIRT1 promoter and cooperated with HDAC4 to repress SIRT1 transcription. HDAC4 depletion by small interfering RNA or pharmaceutical inhibition normalized histone acetylation on the SIRT1 promoter and restored SIRT1 expression in the presence of IFN-γ. Over-expression of HDAC4 suppressed the transcription of genes involved in energy expenditure in a SIRT1-dependent manner. In contrast, HDAC4 knockdown/inhibition neutralized the effect of IFN-γ on cellular metabolism by normalizing SIRT1 expression. Therefore, our data reveal a role for HDAC4 in regulating cellular energy output and as such provide insights into rationalized design of novel anti-diabetic therapeutics.

  16. Neuron-restrictive silencer factor (NRSF) represses cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) transcription and antagonizes cAMP-response element-binding protein signaling through a dual NRSE mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jing; Wang, Sihan; Yuan, Lin; Yang, Yinxiang; Zhang, Bowen; Liu, Qingbin; Chen, Lin; Yue, Wen; Li, Yanhua; Pei, Xuetao

    2012-12-14

    Cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) peptide plays a pivotal role in neuroprotection against stroke-related brain injury. However, the regulatory mechanism on CART transcription, especially the repression mechanism, is not fully understood. Here, we show that the transcriptional repressor neuron-restrictive silencer elements (NRSF, also known as REST) represses CART expression through direct binding to two NRSF-binding elements (NRSEs) in the CART promoter and intron 1 (named pNRSE and iNRSE, respectively). EMSA show that NRSF binds to pNRSE and iNRSE directly in vitro. ChIP assays show that NRSF recruits differential co-repressor complexes including CoREST and HDAC1 to these NRSEs. The presence of both NRSEs is required for efficient repression of CART transcription as indicated by reporter gene assays. NRSF overexpression antagonizes forskolin-mediated up-regulation of CART mRNA and protein. Ischemia insult triggered by oxygen-glucose deprivation (OGD) enhances NRSF mRNA levels and then NRSF antagonizes the CREB signaling on CART activation, leading to augmented cell death. Depletion of NRSF in combination with forskolin treatment increases neuronal survival after ischemic insult. These findings reveal a novel dual NRSE mechanism by which NRSF represses CART expression and suggest that NRSF may serve as a therapeutic target for stroke treatment.

  17. mAM facilitates conversion by ESET of dimethyl to trimethyl lysine 9 of histone H3 to cause transcriptional repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hengbin; An, Woojin; Cao, Ru; Xia, Li; Erdjument-Bromage, Hediye; Chatton, Bruno; Tempst, Paul; Roeder, Robert G; Zhang, Yi

    2003-08-01

    Methylation of histone tails plays an important role in chromatin structure and function. Previously, we reported that ESET/SETDB1 is a histone methyltransferase (HMTase). Here, we show that SETDB1 tightly associates with the human homolog of mAM, a murine ATFa-associated factor. Although recombinant ESET can methylate lysine 9 of histone H3 (H3-K9), its activity is severely compromised when compared to that of the ESET/mAM complex. mAM stimulates ESET enzymatic activity by increasing the Vmax and decreasing the Km. Importantly, mAM facilitates the ESET-dependent conversion of dimethyl H3-K9 to the trimethyl state both in vitro and in vivo. Chromatin-based transcription and ChIP analyses demonstrate that mAM enhances ESET-mediated transcriptional repression in a SAM-dependent manner, and this repression correlates with H3-K9 trimethylation at the promoter. Thus, our studies establish that promoter H3-K9 trimethylation is the cause of transcriptional repression and that mAM/hAM facilitates conversion of H3-K9 dimethyl to trimethyl by ESET/SETDB1.

  18. Transcriptional repression of hDaxx enhanced by adenovirus 12 E1B 55-kDa oncoprotein interacting with hDaxx

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    万艳平; 吴移谋; 朱翠明; 尹卫国; 蔡恒玲; 余敏君

    2004-01-01

    Background Daxx has been identified as a nuclear protein that involves in apoptosis and transcriptional repression. Daxx co-localizes with the promyelocytic leukemia (PML) protein and regulates transcription. Human Daxx (hDaxx) is a protein that functions as a transcriptional regulation through its interaction with some DNA-associated proteins. The aim of this study was to explore the transcriptional regulatory effect of hDaxx interacting with adenovirus (Ad) 12 E1B (Ad12E1B) 55-kDa oncoprotein.Methods The co-localization of hDaxx-Ad12E1B or hDaxx-PML protein in the nucleus was observed under a confocal microscope. Interaction of hDaxx and Ad12E1B was analyzed by yeast two-hybrid assay. Direct binding of hDaxx and Ad12E1B was analyzed using coimmunoprecipitation and Western blot in vivo and in vitro. The activity of a luciferase reporter gene, which was regulated by an hDaxx modulated thymidine kinase (TK) promoter, was detected in an automat luminometer.Results Ad12E1B, which co-localized with hDaxx in the nuclei of G401-CC3 cells, disrupted the co-localization of hDaxx and PML in the PML oncogenic domains (PODs). hDaxx bound directly to Ad12E1B in vivo and in vitro. hDaxx interacted with Ad12E1B along its full length. Ad12E1B enhanced transcriptional repression activity of hDaxx.Conclusion Ad12E1B disrupts the co-localization of hDaxx with PML in PODs and enhances transcriptional repression activity of hDaxx.

  19. Retinoid X receptor alpha represses GATA-4-mediated transcription via a retinoid-dependent interaction with the cardiac-enriched repressor FOG-2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clabby, Martha L; Robison, Trevor A; Quigley, Heather F; Wilson, David B; Kelly, Daniel P

    2003-02-21

    Dietary vitamin A and its derivatives, retinoids, regulate cardiac growth and development. To delineate mechanisms involved in retinoid-mediated control of cardiac gene expression, the regulatory effects of the retinoid X receptor alpha (RXR alpha) on atrial naturietic factor (ANF) gene transcription was investigated. The transcriptional activity of an ANF promoter-reporter in rat neonatal ventricular myocytes was repressed by RXR alpha in the presence of 9-cis-RA and by the constitutively active mutant RXR alpha F318A indicating that liganded RXR confers the regulatory effect. The RXR alpha-mediated repression mapped to the proximal 147 bp of the rat ANF promoter, a region lacking a consensus retinoid response element but containing several known cardiogenic cis elements including a well characterized GATA response element. Glutathione S-transferase "pull-down" assays revealed that RXR alpha interacts directly with GATA-4, in a ligand-independent manner, via the DNA binding domain of RXR alpha and the second zinc finger of GATA-4. Liganded RXR alpha repressed the activity of a heterologous promoter-reporter construct containing GATA-response element recognition sites in cardiac myocytes but not in several other cell types, suggesting that additional cardiac-enriched factors participate in the repression complex. Co-transfection of liganded RXR alpha and the known cardiac-enriched GATA-4 repressor, FOG-2, resulted in additive repression of GATA-4 activity in ventricular myocytes. In addition, RXR alpha was found to bind FOG-2, in a 9-cis-RA-dependent manner. These data reveal a novel mechanism by which retinoids regulate cardiogenic gene expression through direct interaction with GATA-4 and its co-repressor, FOG-2.

  20. SIRT1 Represses Estrogen-signaling, Ligand-Independent ERα-mediated Transcription, and Cell Proliferation in Estrogen-Responsive Breast Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, Robert L.; Faller, Douglas V.

    2013-01-01

    In prostate and breast cancer, the androgen and estrogen receptors mediate induction of androgen- and estrogen-responsive genes respectively, and stimulate cell proliferation in response to the binding of their cognate steroid hormones. Sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) is a nicotinamide adenosine dinucleotide (NAD+)-dependent class III histone deacetylase (HDAC) that has been linked to gene silencing, control of the cell cycle, apoptosis and energy homeostasis. In prostate cancer, SIRT1 is required for androgen-antagonist-mediated transcriptional repression and growth suppression of prostate cancer cells. Whether SIRT1 plays a similar role in the actions of estrogen or antagonists had not been determined. We report here that SIRT1 represses the transcriptional and proliferative response of breast cancer cells to estrogens, and this repression is estrogen receptor-alpha (ERα)-dependent. Inhibition of SIRT1 activity results in the phosphorylation of ERα in an AKT-dependent manner, and this activation requires phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) activity. Phosphorylated ERα subsequently accumulates in the nucleus, where ERα binds DNA ER-response elements and activates transcription of estrogen-responsive genes. This ER-dependent transcriptional activation augments estrogen-induced signaling, but also activates ER-signaling in the absence of estrogen, thus defining a novel and unexpected mechanism of ligand-independent ERα-mediated activation and target gene transcription. Like ligand-dependent activation of ERα, SIRT1 inhibition-mediated ERα activation in the absence of estrogen also results in breast cancer cell proliferation. Together, these data demonstrate that SIRT1 regulates the most important cell signaling pathway for the growth of breast cancer cells, both in the presence and the absence of estrogen. PMID:23169992

  1. Metalloregulator CueR biases RNA polymerase's kinetic sampling of dead-end or open complex to repress or activate transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martell, Danya J; Joshi, Chandra P; Gaballa, Ahmed; Santiago, Ace George; Chen, Tai-Yen; Jung, Won; Helmann, John D; Chen, Peng

    2015-11-01

    Metalloregulators respond to metal ions to regulate transcription of metal homeostasis genes. MerR-family metalloregulators act on σ(70)-dependent suboptimal promoters and operate via a unique DNA distortion mechanism in which both the apo and holo forms of the regulators bind tightly to their operator sequence, distorting DNA structure and leading to transcription repression or activation, respectively. It remains unclear how these metalloregulator-DNA interactions are coupled dynamically to RNA polymerase (RNAP) interactions with DNA for transcription regulation. Using single-molecule FRET, we study how the copper efflux regulator (CueR)--a Cu(+)-responsive MerR-family metalloregulator--modulates RNAP interactions with CueR's cognate suboptimal promoter PcopA, and how RNAP affects CueR-PcopA interactions. We find that RNAP can form two noninterconverting complexes at PcopA in the absence of nucleotides: a dead-end complex and an open complex, constituting a branched interaction pathway that is distinct from the linear pathway prevalent for transcription initiation at optimal promoters. Capitalizing on this branched pathway, CueR operates via a "biased sampling" instead of "dynamic equilibrium shifting" mechanism in regulating transcription initiation; it modulates RNAP's binding-unbinding kinetics, without allowing interconversions between the dead-end and open complexes. Instead, the apo-repressor form reinforces the dominance of the dead-end complex to repress transcription, and the holo-activator form shifts the interactions toward the open complex to activate transcription. RNAP, in turn, locks CueR binding at PcopA into its specific binding mode, likely helping amplify the differences between apo- and holo-CueR in imposing DNA structural changes. Therefore, RNAP and CueR work synergistically in regulating transcription.

  2. Hap2-3-5-Gln3 determine transcriptional activation of GDH1 and ASN1 under repressive nitrogen conditions in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández, Hugo; Aranda, Cristina; López, Geovani; Riego, Lina; González, Alicia

    2011-03-01

    The transcriptional activation response relies on a repertoire of transcriptional activators, which decipher regulatory information through their specific binding to cognate sequences, and their capacity to selectively recruit the components that constitute a given transcriptional complex. We have addressed the possibility of achieving novel transcriptional responses by the construction of a new transcriptional regulator--the Hap2-3-5-Gln3 hybrid modulator--harbouring the HAP complex polypeptides that constitute the DNA-binding domain (Hap2-3-5) and the Gln3 activation domain, which usually act in an uncombined fashion. The results presented in this paper show that transcriptional activation of GDH1 and ASN1 under repressive nitrogen conditions is achieved through the action of the novel Hap2-3-5-Gln3 transcriptional regulator. We propose that the combination of the Hap DNA-binding and Gln3 activation domains results in a hybrid modulator that elicits a novel transcriptional response not evoked when these modulators act independently.

  3. Transcriptional repression of Caveolin-1 (CAV1) gene expression by GATA-6 in bladder smooth muscle hypertrophy in mice and human beings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boopathi, Ettickan; Gomes, Cristiano Mendes; Goldfarb, Robert; John, Mary; Srinivasan, Vittala Gopal; Alanzi, Jaber; Malkowicz, S Bruce; Kathuria, Hasmeena; Zderic, Stephen A; Wein, Alan J; Chacko, Samuel

    2011-05-01

    Hypertrophy occurs in urinary bladder wall smooth muscle (BSM) in men with partial bladder outlet obstruction (PBOO) caused by benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and in animal models of PBOO. Hypertrophied BSM from the rabbit model exhibits down-regulation of caveolin-1, a structural and functional protein of caveolae that function as signaling platforms to mediate interaction between receptor proteins and adaptor and effector molecules to regulate signal generation, amplification, and diversification. Caveolin-1 expression is diminished in PBOO-induced BSM hypertrophy in mice and in men with BPH. The proximal promoter of the human and mouse caveolin-1 (CAV1) gene was characterized, and it was observed that the transcription factor GATA-6 binds this promoter, causing reduced expression of caveolin-1. Furthermore, caveolin-1 expression levels inversely correlate with the abundance of GATA-6 in BSM hypertrophy in mice and human beings. Silencing of GATA6 gene expression up-regulates caveolin-1 expression, whereas overexpression of GATA-6 protein sustains the transcriptional repression of caveolin-1 in bladder smooth muscle cells. Together, these data suggest that GATA-6 acts as a transcriptional repressor of CAV1 gene expression in PBOO-induced BSM hypertrophy in men and mice. GATA-6-induced transcriptional repression represents a new regulatory mechanism of CAV1 gene expression in pathologic BSM, and may serve as a target for new therapy for BPH-induced bladder dysfunction in aging men.

  4. Recruitment of HDAC4 by transcription factor YY1 represses HOXB13 to affect cell growth in AR-negative prostate cancers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ren, Guoling; Zhang, Guocui; Dong, Zhixiong;

    2008-01-01

    HOXB13 is a homeodomain protein implicated to play a role in growth arrest in AR (androgen receptor)-negative prostate cancer cells. Expression of HOXB13 is restricted to the AR-expressing prostate cells. In this report, we demonstrate that the HDAC inhibitor NaB (sodium butyrate) was able...... to induce cell growth arrest and to increase HOXB13 expression in AR-negative prostate cancer cells. We also show that both HDAC4 and YY1 participated in the repression of HOXB13 expression through an epigenetic mechanism involving histone acetylation modification. Specifically, co...... essential for the recruitments of YY1 and HDAC4. Data presented in this report suggest that YY1 and HDAC4 affected cell growth by repressing transcriptional regulation of HOXB13 through an epigenetic modification of histones....

  5. The Polycomb Group Protein L3MBTL1 Represses a SMAD5-Mediated Hematopoietic Transcriptional Program in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabiana Perna

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic regulation of key transcriptional programs is a critical mechanism that controls hematopoietic development, and, thus, aberrant expression patterns or mutations in epigenetic regulators occur frequently in hematologic malignancies. We demonstrate that the Polycomb protein L3MBTL1, which is monoallelically deleted in 20q- myeloid malignancies, represses the ability of stem cells to drive hematopoietic-specific transcriptional programs by regulating the expression of SMAD5 and impairing its recruitment to target regulatory regions. Indeed, knockdown of L3MBTL1 promotes the development of hematopoiesis and impairs neural cell fate in human pluripotent stem cells. We also found a role for L3MBTL1 in regulating SMAD5 target gene expression in mature hematopoietic cell populations, thereby affecting erythroid differentiation. Taken together, we have identified epigenetic priming of hematopoietic-specific transcriptional networks, which may assist in the development of therapeutic approaches for patients with anemia.

  6. Chromatin dynamics at the hTERT promoter during transcriptional activation and repression by c-Myc and Mnt in Xenopus leavis oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlström, Therese; Belikov, Sergey; Arsenian Henriksson, Marie

    2013-12-10

    The transcription factors c-Myc and Mnt regulate gene expression through dimerization with Max and binding to E-boxes in target genes. While c-Myc activates gene expression via recruitment of histone modifying complexes, Mnt acts as a transcriptional repressor. Here, we used the Xenopus leavis oocyte system to address the effect of c-Myc and Mnt on transcription and chromatin remodeling over the E-box region in the human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) promoter. As expected we found elevated and decreased levels of hTERT transcription upon exogenously expressed c-Myc/Max and Mnt/Max, respectively. In addition, we confirmed binding of these heterodimers to both E-boxes already enriched with H3K9ac and H4K16ac. These chromatin marks were further enhanced upon c-Myc/Max binding followed by increased DNA accessibility in the E-box region. In contrast, Mnt/Max inhibited Myc-induced transcription and mediated repression through complete chromatin condensation and deacetylation of H3K9 and H4K16 across the E-box region. Importantly, Mnt was able to counteract c-Myc mediated activation even when expressed at low levels, suggesting Mnt to act as a strong repressor by closing the chromatin structure. Collectively our data demonstrate that the balance between c-Myc and Mnt activity determines the transcriptional outcome of the hTERT promoter by modulation of the chromatin architecture.

  7. Optimizing sgRNA position markedly improves the efficiency of CRISPR/dCas9-mediated transcriptional repression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Radzisheuskaya, Aliaksandra; Shlyueva, Daria; Müller, Iris

    2016-01-01

    CRISPR interference (CRISPRi) represents a newly developed tool for targeted gene repression. It has great application potential for studying gene function and mapping gene regulatory elements. However, the optimal parameters for efficient single guide RNA (sgRNA) design for CRISPRi are not fully...

  8. Thermodynamics-based models of transcriptional regulation by enhancers: the roles of synergistic activation, cooperative binding and short-range repression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xin He

    Full Text Available Quantitative models of cis-regulatory activity have the potential to improve our mechanistic understanding of transcriptional regulation. However, the few models available today have been based on simplistic assumptions about the sequences being modeled, or heuristic approximations of the underlying regulatory mechanisms. We have developed a thermodynamics-based model to predict gene expression driven by any DNA sequence, as a function of transcription factor concentrations and their DNA-binding specificities. It uses statistical thermodynamics theory to model not only protein-DNA interaction, but also the effect of DNA-bound activators and repressors on gene expression. In addition, the model incorporates mechanistic features such as synergistic effect of multiple activators, short range repression, and cooperativity in transcription factor-DNA binding, allowing us to systematically evaluate the significance of these features in the context of available expression data. Using this model on segmentation-related enhancers in Drosophila, we find that transcriptional synergy due to simultaneous action of multiple activators helps explain the data beyond what can be explained by cooperative DNA-binding alone. We find clear support for the phenomenon of short-range repression, where repressors do not directly interact with the basal transcriptional machinery. We also find that the binding sites contributing to an enhancer's function may not be conserved during evolution, and a noticeable fraction of these undergo lineage-specific changes. Our implementation of the model, called GEMSTAT, is the first publicly available program for simultaneously modeling the regulatory activities of a given set of sequences.

  9. Synergy between the RE-1 silencer of transcription and NFkappaB in the repression of the neurotransmitter gene TAC1 in human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greco, Steven J; Smirnov, Sergey V; Murthy, Raghav G; Rameshwar, Pranela

    2007-10-12

    The RE-1 silencer of transcription (REST) is a transcriptional regulator that represses neuron-specific genes in non-neuronal tissues by remodeling chromatin structure. We have utilized human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) as a research tool to understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate a neurogenic program of differentiation in non-neuronal tissue. MSCs are mesoderm-derived cells that generate specialized cells such as stroma, fat, bone, and cartilage. We have reported previously the transdifferentiation of MSCs into functional neuronal cells (Cho, K. J., Trzaska, K. A., Greco, S. J., McArdle, J., Wang, F. S., Ye, J.-H., and Rameshwar, P. (2005) Stem Cells 23, 383-391). Expression of the neurotransmitter gene TAC1 was detected only in neuronal cells and thus served as a model to study transcriptional regulation of neuron-specific genes in undifferentiated MSCs. Bone marrow stromal cells are known to transiently express TAC1 following stimulation with the microenvironmental factor interleukin-1alpha. We thus compared the effects of interleukin-1alpha stimulation and neuronal induction of MSCs on TAC1 regulation. Transcription factor mapping of the 5'-flanking region of the TAC1 promoter predicted two REST-binding sites adjacent to one NFkappaB site within exon 1. Chromatin immunoprecipitation, mutagenesis, and loss-of-function studies showed that both transcription factors synergistically mediated repression of TAC1 in the neurogenic and microenvironmental models. Together, the results support the novel finding of synergism between REST and NFkappaB in the suppression of TAC1 in non-neuronal cells.

  10. A novel zinc finger protein Zfp277 mediates transcriptional repression of the Ink4a/arf locus through polycomb repressive complex 1

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Negishi, Masamitsu; Saraya, Atsunori; Mochizuki, Shinobu

    2010-01-01

    . METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined the function of Zinc finger domain-containing protein 277 (Zfp277), a novel zinc finger protein that interacts with the PcG protein Bmi1. Zfp277 binds to the Ink4a/Arf locus in a Bmi1-independent manner and interacts with polycomb repressor complex (PRC) 1 through......BACKGROUND: Polycomb group (PcG) proteins play a crucial role in cellular senescence as key transcriptional regulators of the Ink4a/Arf tumor suppressor gene locus. However, how PcG complexes target and contribute to stable gene silencing of the Ink4a/Arf locus remains little understood...... direct interaction with Bmi1. Loss of Zfp277 in mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) caused dissociation of PcG proteins from the Ink4a/Arf locus, resulting in premature senescence associated with derepressed p16(Ink4a) and p19(Arf) expression. Levels of both Zfp277 and PcG proteins inversely correlated...

  11. The ratio between CcdA and CcdB modulates the transcriptional repression of the ccd poison-antidote system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afif, H; Allali, N; Couturier, M; Van Melderen, L

    2001-07-01

    The ccd operon of the F plasmid encodes CcdB, a toxin targeting the essential gyrase of Escherichia coli, and CcdA, the unstable antidote that interacts with CcdB to neutralize its toxicity. Although work from our group and others has established that CcdA and CcdB are required for transcriptional repression of the operon, the underlying mechanism remains unclear. The results presented here indicate that, although CcdA is the DNA-binding element of the CcdA-CcdB complex, the stoichiometry of the two proteins determines whether or not the complex binds to the ccd operator-promoter region. Using electrophoretic mobility shift assays, we show that a (CcdA)2-(CcdB)2 complex binds DNA. The addition of extra CcdB to that protein-DNA complex completely abolishes DNA retardation. Based on these results, we propose a model in which the ratio between CcdA and CcdB regulates the repression state of the ccd operon. When the level of CcdA is superior or equal to that of CcdB, repression results. In contrast, derepression occurs when CcdB is in excess of CcdA. By ensuring an antidote-toxin ratio greater than one, this mechanism could prevent the harmful effect of CcdB in plasmid-containing bacteria.

  12. Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1 Is required for the transcriptional repression of the telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qingjun Zhu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1, catalysing demethylation of mono- and di-methylated histone H3-K4 or K9, exhibits diverse transcriptional activities by mediating chromatin reconfiguration. The telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT gene, encoding an essential component for telomerase activity that is involved in cellular immortalization and transformation, is silent in most normal human cells while activated in up to 90% of human cancers. It remains to be defined how exactly the transcriptional activation of the hTERT gene occurs during the oncogenic process. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In the present study, we determined the effect of LSD1 on hTERT transcription. In normal human fibroblasts with a tight hTERT repression, a pharmacological inhibition of LSD1 led to a weak hTERT expression, and a robust induction of hTERT mRNA was observed when LSD1 and histone deacetylases (HDACs were both inhibited. Small interference RNA-mediated depletion of both LSD1 and CoREST, a co-repressor in HDAC-containing complexes, synergistically activated hTERT transcription. In cancer cells, inhibition of LSD1 activity or knocking-down of its expression led to significant increases in levels of hTERT mRNA and telomerase activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assay showed that LSD1 occupied the hTERT proximal promoter, and its depletion resulted in elevated di-methylation of histone H3-K4 accompanied by increased H3 acetylation locally in cancer cells. Moreover, during the differentiation of leukemic HL60 cells, the decreased hTERT expression was accompanied by the LSD1 recruitment to the hTERT promoter. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: LSD1 represses hTERT transcription via demethylating H3-K4 in normal and cancerous cells, and together with HDACs, participates in the establishment of a stable repression state of the hTERT gene in normal or differentiated malignant cells. The findings contribute to better understandings of h

  13. Elf5 inhibits the epithelial-mesenchymal transition in mammary gland development and breast cancer metastasis by transcriptionally repressing Snail2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakrabarti, Rumela; Hwang, Julie; Andres Blanco, Mario; Wei, Yong; Lukačišin, Martin; Romano, Rose-Anne; Smalley, Kirsten; Liu, Song; Yang, Qifeng; Ibrahim, Toni; Mercatali, Laura; Amadori, Dino; Haffty, Bruce G; Sinha, Satrajit; Kang, Yibin

    2012-11-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a complex process that occurs during organogenesis and in cancer metastasis. Despite recent progress, the molecular pathways connecting the physiological and pathological functions of EMT need to be better defined. Here we show that the transcription factor Elf5, a key regulator of mammary gland alveologenesis, controls EMT in both mammary gland development and metastasis. We uncovered this role for Elf5 through analyses of Elf5 conditional knockout animals, various in vitro and in vivo models of EMT and metastasis, an MMTV-neu transgenic model of mammary tumour progression and clinical breast cancer samples. Furthermore, we demonstrate that Elf5 suppresses EMT by directly repressing the transcription of Snail2, a master regulator of mammary stem cells and a known inducer of EMT. These findings establish Elf5 not only as a key cell lineage regulator during normal mammary gland development, but also as a suppressor of EMT and metastasis in breast cancer.

  14. Enhanced Cardiac Akt/Protein Kinase B Signaling Contributes to Pathological Cardiac Hypertrophy in Part by Impairing Mitochondrial Function via Transcriptional Repression of Mitochondrion-Targeted Nuclear Genes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wende, Adam R.; O'Neill, Brian T.; Bugger, Heiko; Riehle, Christian; Tuinei, Joseph; Buchanan, Jonathan; Tsushima, Kensuke; Wang, Li; Caro, Pilar; Guo, Aili; Sloan, Crystal; Kim, Bum Jun; Wang, Xiaohui; Pereira, Renata O.; McCrory, Mark A.; Nye, Brenna G.; Benavides, Gloria A.; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.; Shioi, Tetsuo; Weimer, Bart C.

    2014-01-01

    Sustained Akt activation induces cardiac hypertrophy (LVH), which may lead to heart failure. This study tested the hypothesis that Akt activation contributes to mitochondrial dysfunction in pathological LVH. Akt activation induced LVH and progressive repression of mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation (FAO) pathways. Preventing LVH by inhibiting mTOR failed to prevent the decline in mitochondrial function, but glucose utilization was maintained. Akt activation represses expression of mitochondrial regulatory, FAO, and oxidative phosphorylation genes in vivo that correlate with the duration of Akt activation in part by reducing FOXO-mediated transcriptional activation of mitochondrion-targeted nuclear genes in concert with reduced signaling via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα)/PGC-1α and other transcriptional regulators. In cultured myocytes, Akt activation disrupted mitochondrial bioenergetics, which could be partially reversed by maintaining nuclear FOXO but not by increasing PGC-1α. Thus, although short-term Akt activation may be cardioprotective during ischemia by reducing mitochondrial metabolism and increasing glycolysis, long-term Akt activation in the adult heart contributes to pathological LVH in part by reducing mitochondrial oxidative capacity. PMID:25535334

  15. HosA, a MarR Family Transcriptional Regulator, Represses Nonoxidative Hydroxyarylic Acid Decarboxylase Operon and Is Modulated by 4-Hydroxybenzoic Acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Ajit; Ranjan, Akash

    2016-02-23

    Members of the Multiple antibiotic resistance Regulator (MarR) family of DNA binding proteins regulate transcription of a wide array of genes required for virulence and pathogenicity of bacteria. The present study reports the molecular characterization of HosA (Homologue of SlyA), a MarR protein, with respect to its target gene, DNA recognition motif, and nature of its ligand. Through a comparative genomics approach, we demonstrate that hosA is in synteny with nonoxidative hydroxyarylic acid decarboxylase (HAD) operon and is present exclusively within the mutS-rpoS polymorphic region in nine different genera of Enterobacteriaceae family. Using molecular biology and biochemical approach, we demonstrate that HosA binds to a palindromic sequence downstream to the transcription start site of divergently transcribed nonoxidative HAD operon and represses its expression. Furthermore, in silico analysis showed that the recognition motif for HosA is highly conserved in the upstream region of divergently transcribed operon in different genera of Enterobacteriaceae family. A systematic chemical search for the physiological ligand revealed that 4-hydroxybenzoic acid (4-HBA) interacts with HosA and derepresses HosA mediated repression of the nonoxidative HAD operon. Based on our study, we propose a model for molecular mechanism underlying the regulation of nonoxidative HAD operon by HosA in Enterobacteriaceae family.

  16. KR-POK interacts with p53 and represses its ability to activate transcription of p21WAF1/CDKN1A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Bu-Nam; Kim, Min-Kyeong; Choi, Won-Il; Koh, Dong-In; Hong, Sung-Yi; Kim, Kyung-Sup; Kim, Minjung; Yun, Chae-Ok; Yoon, Juyong; Choi, Kang-Yell; Lee, Kyung-Ryul; Nephew, Kenneth P; Hur, Man-Wook

    2012-03-01

    Transcriptional regulation by p53 is thought to play a role in its ability to suppress tumorigenesis. However, there remain gaps in understanding about how p53 regulates transcription and how disrupting this function may promote cancer. Here we report a role in these processes for the kidney cancer-related gene KR-POK (ZBTB7C), a POZ domain and Krüppel-like zinc finger transcription factor that we found to physically interact with p53. Murine embryonic fibroblasts isolated from genetically deficient mice (Kr-pok(-/-) MEFs) exhibited a proliferative defect relative to wild-type mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEF). The zinc finger domain of Kr-pok interacted directly with the DNA binding and oligomerization domains of p53. This interaction was essential for Kr-pok to bind the distal promoter region of the CDKN1A gene, an important p53 target gene encoding the cell-cycle regulator p21WAF1, and to inhibit p53-mediated transcriptional activation of CDKN1A. Kr-pok also interacted with the transcriptional corepressors NCoR and BCoR, acting to repress histone H3 and H4 deacetylation at the proximal promoter region of the CDKN1A gene. Importantly, Kr-pok(-/-) MEFs displayed an enhancement in CDKN1A transactivation by p53 during the DNA damage response, without any parallel changes in transcription of either the p53 or Kr-pok genes themselves. Furthermore, Kr-pok promoted cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, and its expression was increased in more than 50% of the malignant human kidney cancer cases analyzed. Together, our findings define KR-POK as a transcriptional repressor with a pro-oncogenic role that relies upon binding to p53 and inhibition of its transactivation function.

  17. Repression of Human T-lymphotropic virus type 1 Long Terminal Repeat sense transcription by Sp1 recruitment to novel Sp1 binding sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fauquenoy, Sylvain; Robette, Gwenaëlle; Kula, Anna; Vanhulle, Caroline; Bouchat, Sophie; Delacourt, Nadège; Rodari, Anthony; Marban, Céline; Schwartz, Christian; Burny, Arsène; Rohr, Olivier; Van Driessche, Benoit; Van Lint, Carine

    2017-01-01

    Human T-lymphotropic Virus type 1 (HTLV-1) infection is characterized by viral latency in the majority of infected cells and by the absence of viremia. These features are thought to be due to the repression of viral sense transcription in vivo. Here, our in silico analysis of the HTLV-1 Long Terminal Repeat (LTR) promoter nucleotide sequence revealed, in addition to the four Sp1 binding sites previously identified, the presence of two additional potential Sp1 sites within the R region. We demonstrated that the Sp1 and Sp3 transcription factors bound in vitro to these two sites and compared the binding affinity for Sp1 of all six different HTLV-1 Sp1 sites. By chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments, we showed Sp1 recruitment in vivo to the newly identified Sp1 sites. We demonstrated in the nucleosomal context of an episomal reporter vector that the Sp1 sites interfered with both the sense and antisense LTR promoter activities. Interestingly, the Sp1 sites exhibited together a repressor effect on the LTR sense transcriptional activity but had no effect on the LTR antisense activity. Thus, our results demonstrate the presence of two new functional Sp1 binding sites in the HTLV-1 LTR, which act as negative cis-regulatory elements of sense viral transcription. PMID:28256531

  18. Repression of MHC class I transcription by HPV16E7 through interaction with a putative RXR{beta} motif and NF-{kappa}B cytoplasmic sequestration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hui; Zhan, TaiLan; Li, Chang [Key Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics of the Ministry of Education, College of Life Science and Technology and Center for Human Genome Research, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Liu, Mugen, E-mail: lium@mail.hust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics of the Ministry of Education, College of Life Science and Technology and Center for Human Genome Research, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Wang, Qing K., E-mail: qkwang@mail.hust.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Molecular Biophysics of the Ministry of Education, College of Life Science and Technology and Center for Human Genome Research, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Center for Cardiovascular Genetics, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States)

    2009-10-16

    Down-regulation of transcription of the MHC class I genes in HPV16 tumorigenic cells is partly due to HPV16E7 associated with the MHC class I promoter and repressed chromatin activation. In this study, we further demonstrated that HPV16E7 is physically associated with a putative RXR{beta} binding motif (GGTCA) of the proximal promoter of the MHC class I genes by using reporter transcriptional assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Our data also provide evidence that HPV16E7 inhibits TNF-{alpha}-induced up-regulation of MHC class I transcription by impaired nuclear translocation of NF-{kappa}B. More importantly, CaSki tumor cells treated with TSA and transfected with the constitutively active mutant form of IKK-{alpha} (which can activate NF-{kappa}B directly) showed a maximal level of up-regulation of MHC-I expression. Taken together, our results suggest that HPV16E7 may employ two independent mechanisms to ensure that either the constitutive or inducible transcription of MHC class I genes is down-regulated.

  19. NF-κB-repressing factor phosphorylation regulates transcription elongation via its interactions with 5'→3' exoribonuclease 2 and negative elongation factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rother, Sascha; Bartels, Myriam; Schweda, Aike Torben; Resch, Klaus; Pallua, Norbert; Nourbakhsh, Mahtab

    2016-01-01

    NF-κB-repressing factor (NKRF) inhibits transcription elongation by binding to specific sequences in target promoters. Stimuli such as IL-1 have been shown to overcome this inhibitory action and enable the resumption of transcription elongation machinery by an unknown mechanism. Using mass spectrometry and in vitro phosphorylation analyses, we demonstrate that NKRF is phosphorylated within 3 different domains in unstimulated HeLa cells. Phosphoamino acid mapping and mutation analysis of NKRF further suggest that only Ser phosphorylation within aa 421-429 is regulated by IL-1 stimulation. In copurification studies, aa 421-429 is required for interactions between NKRF, 5'→3' exoribonuclease 2 (XRN2) and the negative elongation factor (NELF)-E in HeLa cells. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments further show that IL-1 stimulation leads to decrease in NKRF aa 421-429 phosphorylation and dissociation of NELF-E and XRN2 by concomitant resumption of transcription elongation of a synthetic reporter or the endogenous NKRF target gene, IL-8. Together, NKRF phosphorylation modulates promoter-proximal transcription elongation of NF-κB/NKRF-regulated genes via direct interactions with elongation complex in response to specific stimuli.

  20. Two-component signal transduction system CBO0787/CBO0786 represses transcription from botulinum neurotoxin promoters in Clostridium botulinum ATCC 3502.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen Zhang

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Blocking neurotransmission, botulinum neurotoxin is the most poisonous biological substance known to mankind. Despite its infamy as the scourge of the food industry, the neurotoxin is increasingly used as a pharmaceutical to treat an expanding range of muscle disorders. Whilst neurotoxin expression by the spore-forming bacterium Clostridium botulinum appears tightly regulated, to date only positive regulatory elements, such as the alternative sigma factor BotR, have been implicated in this control. The identification of negative regulators has proven to be elusive. Here, we show that the two-component signal transduction system CBO0787/CBO0786 negatively regulates botulinum neurotoxin expression. Single insertional inactivation of cbo0787 encoding a sensor histidine kinase, or of cbo0786 encoding a response regulator, resulted in significantly elevated neurotoxin gene expression levels and increased neurotoxin production. Recombinant CBO0786 regulator was shown to bind to the conserved -10 site of the core promoters of the ha and ntnh-botA operons, which encode the toxin structural and accessory proteins. Increasing concentration of CBO0786 inhibited BotR-directed transcription from the ha and ntnh-botA promoters, demonstrating direct transcriptional repression of the ha and ntnh-botA operons by CBO0786. Thus, we propose that CBO0786 represses neurotoxin gene expression by blocking BotR-directed transcription from the neurotoxin promoters. This is the first evidence of a negative regulator controlling botulinum neurotoxin production. Understanding the neurotoxin regulatory mechanisms is a major target of the food and pharmaceutical industries alike.

  1. Cell-Autonomous Repression of Shh by Transcription Factor Pax6 Regulates Diencephalic Patterning by Controlling the Central Diencephalic Organizer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabel Martín Caballero

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available During development, region-specific patterns of regulatory gene expression are controlled by signaling centers that release morphogens providing positional information to surrounding cells. Regulation of signaling centers themselves is therefore critical. The size and the influence of a Shh-producing forebrain organizer, the zona limitans intrathalamica (ZLI, are limited by Pax6. By studying mouse chimeras, we find that Pax6 acts cell autonomously to block Shh expression in cells around the ZLI. Immunoprecipitation and luciferase assays indicate that Pax6 can bind the Shh promoter and repress its function. An analysis of chimeras suggests that many of the regional gene expression pattern defects that occur in Pax6−/− diencephalic cells result from a non-cell-autonomous position-dependent defect of local intercellular signaling. Blocking Shh signaling in Pax6−/− mutants reverses major diencephalic patterning defects. We conclude that Pax6’s cell-autonomous repression of Shh expression around the ZLI is critical for many aspects of normal diencephalic patterning.

  2. Cell-autonomous repression of Shh by transcription factor Pax6 regulates diencephalic patterning by controlling the central diencephalic organizer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, Isabel Martín; Manuel, Martine N; Molinek, Michael; Quintana-Urzainqui, Idoia; Mi, Da; Shimogori, Tomomi; Price, David J

    2014-09-11

    During development, region-specific patterns of regulatory gene expression are controlled by signaling centers that release morphogens providing positional information to surrounding cells. Regulation of signaling centers themselves is therefore critical. The size and the influence of a Shh-producing forebrain organizer, the zona limitans intrathalamica (ZLI), are limited by Pax6. By studying mouse chimeras, we find that Pax6 acts cell autonomously to block Shh expression in cells around the ZLI. Immunoprecipitation and luciferase assays indicate that Pax6 can bind the Shh promoter and repress its function. An analysis of chimeras suggests that many of the regional gene expression pattern defects that occur in Pax6(-/-) diencephalic cells result from a non-cell-autonomous position-dependent defect of local intercellular signaling. Blocking Shh signaling in Pax6(-/-) mutants reverses major diencephalic patterning defects. We conclude that Pax6's cell-autonomous repression of Shh expression around the ZLI is critical for many aspects of normal diencephalic patterning.

  3. Bovine Herpesvirus 1 Protein bICP0 Represses the Transcription of bISG15 in Fetal Bovine Lung Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang Liu; Xiao-hong Kong; Wen-tao Qiao; Yun-qi Geng

    2011-01-01

    The ubiquitin-like modifier bISG15 is an antiviral protein found in fetal bovine lung (FBL) cells.Bovine Herpesvirus 1(BHV-1),which is a viral pathogen of cattle,can infect FBL cells and induce cytopathic effects.Real-time PCR assays showed that BHV- 1 's infection could repress the basal or inducible transcription of bISG15 in FBL cells.It demonstrates that this repression effect depends on BHV-1 viral infection and new protein synthesis.Our previous work showed that bIRF-3 was the key factor in the stimulation of bISG 15 in FBL cells,so the effect of BHV-1 viral protein on bIRF-3 activating the promoter of bISG15 was confirmed.The luciferase assay showed the BHV-1 viral protein bICP0 inhibited the activation of bISG15 promoter stimulated by bIRF-3.Taken together,our work suggested that BHV-I had some molecular mechanism to resist the cellular bISG15'santiviral functions.

  4. A tobacco calcium-dependent protein kinase, CDPK1, regulates the transcription factor REPRESSION OF SHOOT GROWTH in response to gibberellins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishida, Sarahmi; Yuasa, Takashi; Nakata, Masaru; Takahashi, Yohsuke

    2008-12-01

    The homeostasis of gibberellins (GAs) is maintained by negative feedback in plants. REPRESSION OF SHOOT GROWTH (RSG) is a tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) transcriptional activator that has been suggested to play a role in GA feedback by the regulation of GA biosynthetic enzymes. The 14-3-3 signaling proteins negatively regulate RSG by sequestering it in the cytoplasm in response to GAs. The phosphorylation on Ser-114 of RSG is essential for 14-3-3 binding of RSG. Here, we identified tobacco Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase (CDPK1) as an RSG kinase that promotes 14-3-3 binding to RSG by phosphorylation of Ser-114 of RSG. CDPK1 interacts with RSG in a Ca(2+)-dependent manner in vivo and in vitro and specifically phosphorylates Ser-114 of RSG. Inhibition of CDPK repressed the GA-induced phosphorylation of Ser-114 of RSG and the GA-induced nuclear export of RSG. Overexpression of CDPK1 inhibited the feedback regulation of a GA 20-oxidase gene and resulted in sensitization to the GA biosynthetic inhibitor. Our results suggest that CDPK1 decodes the Ca(2+) signal produced by GAs and regulates the intracellular localization of RSG.

  5. Repression of transcription mediated at a thyroid hormone response element by the v-erb-A oncogene product

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sap, J; Muñoz, A; Schmitt, J

    1989-01-01

    Several recent observations, such as the identification of the cellular homologue of the v-erb-A oncogene as a thyroid-hormone receptor, have strongly implicated nuclear oncogenes in transcriptional control mechanisms. The v-erb-A oncogene blocks the differentiation of erythroid cells, and change......-erb-A protein negatively interferes with normal transcriptional-control mechanisms, and that amino-acid substitutions have altered its DNA-binding properties....

  6. Deacetylase inhibitors repress STAT5-mediated transcription by interfering with bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) protein function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pinz, Sophia; Unser, Samy; Buob, Dominik; Fischer, Philipp; Jobst, Belinda; Rascle, Anne

    2015-04-20

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription STAT5 is essential for the regulation of proliferation and survival genes. Its activity is tightly regulated through cytokine signaling and is often upregulated in cancer. We showed previously that the deacetylase inhibitor trichostatin A (TSA) inhibits STAT5-mediated transcription by preventing recruitment of the transcriptional machinery at a step following STAT5 binding to DNA. The mechanism and factors involved in this inhibition remain unknown. We now show that deacetylase inhibitors do not target STAT5 acetylation, as we initially hypothesized. Instead, they induce a rapid increase in global histone acetylation apparently resulting in the delocalization of the bromodomain and extra-terminal (BET) protein Brd2 and of the Brd2-associated factor TBP to hyperacetylated chromatin. Treatment with the BET inhibitor (+)-JQ1 inhibited expression of STAT5 target genes, supporting a role of BET proteins in the regulation of STAT5 activity. Accordingly, chromatin immunoprecipitation demonstrated that Brd2 is associated with the transcriptionally active STAT5 target gene Cis and is displaced upon TSA treatment. Our data therefore indicate that Brd2 is required for the proper recruitment of the transcriptional machinery at STAT5 target genes and that deacetylase inhibitors suppress STAT5-mediated transcription by interfering with Brd2 function.

  7. RBP-J kappa repression activity is mediated by a co-repressor and antagonized by the Epstein-Barr virus transcription factor EBNA2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waltzer, L; Bourillot, P Y; Sergeant, A; Manet, E

    1995-01-01

    The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) protein EBNA2 is a transcriptional activator that can be targeted to its DNA responsive elements by direct interaction with the cellular protein RBP-J kappa. RBP-J kappa is a ubiquitous factor, highly conserved between man, mouse and Drosophila, whose function in mammalian cells is largely unknown. Here we provide evidence that RBP-J kappa is a transcriptional repressor and, more importantly, that RBP-J kappa repression is mediated by a co-repressor. The function of the co-repressor could be counterbalanced by making a fusion protein (RBP-VP16) between RBP-J kappa and the VP16 activation domain. This RBP-VP16-mediated activation could be strongly increased by an EBNA2 protein deprived of its activation domain, but not by an EBNA2 protein incapable of making physical contact with RBP-J kappa. Our results suggest that EBNA2 activates transcription by both interfering with the function of a co-repressor recruited by RBP-J kappa and providing an activation domain. Images PMID:8559649

  8. Repression of the transcription factor Bach2 contributes to predisposition of IgG1 memory B cells toward plasma cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kometani, Kohei; Nakagawa, Rinako; Shinnakasu, Ryo; Kaji, Tomohiro; Rybouchkin, Andrei; Moriyama, Saya; Furukawa, Koji; Koseki, Haruhiko; Takemori, Toshitada; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2013-07-25

    Memory B cells are essential for generating rapid and robust secondary antibody responses. It has been thought that the unique cytoplasmic domain of IgG causes the prompt activation of antigen-experienced IgG memory B cells. To assess this model, we have generated a mouse containing IgG1 B cells that have never encountered antigen. We found that, upon challenge, antigen-experienced IgG1 memory B cells rapidly differentiated into plasma cells, whereas nonexperienced IgG1 B cells did not, suggesting the importance of the stimulation history. In addition, our results suggest that repression of the Bach2 transcription factor, which results from antigen experience, contributes to predisposition of IgG1 memory B cells to differentiate into plasma cells.

  9. PSD-95 is post-transcriptionally repressed during early neural development by PTBP1 and PTBP2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zheng, Sika; Gray, Erin E; Chawla, Geetanjali

    2012-01-01

    Postsynaptic density protein 95 (PSD-95) is essential for synaptic maturation and plasticity. Although its synaptic regulation has been widely studied, the control of PSD-95 cellular expression is not understood. We found that Psd-95 was controlled post-transcriptionally during neural development...

  10. The nickel-responsive regulator NikR controls activation and repression of gene transcription in Helicobacter pylori.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.D.J. Ernst (Florian); E.J. Kuipers (Ernst); A. Heijens (Angela); R. Sarwari (Roya); J. Stoof (Jeroen); C.W. Penn (Charles); J.G. Kusters (Johannes); A.H.M. van Vliet (Arnoud)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractThe NikR protein is a nickel-dependent regulatory protein which is a member of the ribbon-helix-helix family of transcriptional regulators. The gastric pathogen Helicobacter pylori expresses a NikR ortholog, which was previously shown to mediate regulation of metal metabolism and urease

  11. ZCT1 and ZCT2 transcription factors repress the activity of a gene promoter from the methyl erythritol phosphate pathway in Madagascar periwinkle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chebbi, Mouadh; Ginis, Olivia; Courdavault, Vincent; Glévarec, Gaëlle; Lanoue, Arnaud; Clastre, Marc; Papon, Nicolas; Gaillard, Cécile; Atanassova, Rossitza; St-Pierre, Benoit; Giglioli-Guivarc'h, Nathalie; Courtois, Martine; Oudin, Audrey

    2014-10-15

    In Catharanthus roseus, accumulating data highlighted the existence of a coordinated transcriptional regulation of structural genes that takes place within the secoiridoid biosynthetic branch, including the methyl erythritol phosphate (MEP) pathway and the following steps leading to secologanin. To identify transcription factors acting in these pathways, we performed a yeast one-hybrid screening using as bait a promoter region of the hydroxymethylbutenyl 4-diphosphate synthase (HDS) gene involved in the responsiveness of C. roseus cells to hormonal signals inducing monoterpene indole alkaloid (MIA) production. We identified that ZCT2, one of the three members of the zinc finger Catharanthus protein (ZCT) family, can bind to a HDS promoter region involved in hormonal responsiveness. By trans-activation assays, we demonstrated that ZCT1 and ZCT2 but not ZCT3 repress the HDS promoter activity. Gene expression analyses in C. roseus cells exposed to methyljasmonate revealed a persistence of induction of ZCT2 gene expression suggesting the existence of feed-back regulatory events acting on HDS gene expression in correlation with the MIA production.

  12. The HSV-1 Latency-Associated Transcript Functions to Repress Latent Phase Lytic Gene Expression and Suppress Virus Reactivation from Latently Infected Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicoll, Michael P; Hann, William; Shivkumar, Maitreyi; Harman, Laura E R; Connor, Viv; Coleman, Heather M; Proença, João T; Efstathiou, Stacey

    2016-04-01

    Herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) establishes life-long latent infection within sensory neurons, during which viral lytic gene expression is silenced. The only highly expressed viral gene product during latent infection is the latency-associated transcript (LAT), a non-protein coding RNA that has been strongly implicated in the epigenetic regulation of HSV-1 gene expression. We have investigated LAT-mediated control of latent gene expression using chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses and LAT-negative viruses engineered to express firefly luciferase or β-galactosidase from a heterologous lytic promoter. Whilst we were unable to determine a significant effect of LAT expression upon heterochromatin enrichment on latent HSV-1 genomes, we show that reporter gene expression from latent HSV-1 genomes occurs at a greater frequency in the absence of LAT. Furthermore, using luciferase reporter viruses we have observed that HSV-1 gene expression decreases during long-term latent infection, with a most marked effect during LAT-negative virus infection. Finally, using a fluorescent mouse model of infection to isolate and culture single latently infected neurons, we also show that reactivation occurs at a greater frequency from cultures harbouring LAT-negative HSV-1. Together, our data suggest that the HSV-1 LAT RNA represses HSV-1 gene expression in small populations of neurons within the mouse TG, a phenomenon that directly impacts upon the frequency of reactivation and the maintenance of the transcriptionally active latent reservoir.

  13. Characterization of OxyR as a negative transcriptional regulator that represses catalase production in Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju-Sim Kim

    Full Text Available Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Corynebacterium glutamicum each have one gene (cat encoding catalase. In-frame Δcat mutants of C. diphtheriae and C. glutamicum were hyper-sensitive to growth inhibition and killing by H(2O(2. In C. diphtheriae C7(β, both catalase activity and cat transcription decreased ~2-fold during transition from exponential growth to early stationary phase. Prototypic OxyR in Escherichia coli senses oxidative stress and it activates katG transcription and catalase production in response to H(2O(2. In contrast, exposure of C. diphtheriae C7(β to H(2O(2 did not stimulate transcription of cat. OxyR from C. diphtheriae and C. glutamicum have 52% similarity with E. coli OxyR and contain homologs of the two cysteine residues involved in H(2O(2 sensing by E. coli OxyR. In-frame ΔoxyR deletion mutants of C. diphtheriae C7(β, C. diphtheriae NCTC13129, and C. glutamicum were much more resistant than their parental wild type strains to growth inhibition by H(2O(2. In the C. diphtheriae C7(β ΔoxyR mutant, cat transcripts were about 8-fold more abundant and catalase activity was about 20-fold greater than in the C7(β wild type strain. The oxyR gene from C. diphtheriae or C. glutamicum, but not from E. coli, complemented the defect in ΔoxyR mutants of C. diphtheriae and C. glutamicum and decreased their H(2O(2 resistance to the level of their parental strains. Gel-mobility shift, DNaseI footprint, and primer extension assays showed that purified OxyR from C. diphtheriae C7(β bound, in the presence or absence of DTT, to a sequence in the cat promoter region that extends from nucleotide position -55 to -10 with respect to the +1 nucleotide in the cat ORF. These results demonstrate that OxyR from C. diphtheriae or C. glutamicum functions as a transcriptional repressor of the cat gene by a mechanism that is independent of oxidative stress induced by H(2O(2.

  14. Characterization of OxyR as a negative transcriptional regulator that represses catalase production in Corynebacterium diphtheriae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ju-Sim; Holmes, Randall K

    2012-01-01

    Corynebacterium diphtheriae and Corynebacterium glutamicum each have one gene (cat) encoding catalase. In-frame Δcat mutants of C. diphtheriae and C. glutamicum were hyper-sensitive to growth inhibition and killing by H(2)O(2). In C. diphtheriae C7(β), both catalase activity and cat transcription decreased ~2-fold during transition from exponential growth to early stationary phase. Prototypic OxyR in Escherichia coli senses oxidative stress and it activates katG transcription and catalase production in response to H(2)O(2). In contrast, exposure of C. diphtheriae C7(β) to H(2)O(2) did not stimulate transcription of cat. OxyR from C. diphtheriae and C. glutamicum have 52% similarity with E. coli OxyR and contain homologs of the two cysteine residues involved in H(2)O(2) sensing by E. coli OxyR. In-frame ΔoxyR deletion mutants of C. diphtheriae C7(β), C. diphtheriae NCTC13129, and C. glutamicum were much more resistant than their parental wild type strains to growth inhibition by H(2)O(2). In the C. diphtheriae C7(β) ΔoxyR mutant, cat transcripts were about 8-fold more abundant and catalase activity was about 20-fold greater than in the C7(β) wild type strain. The oxyR gene from C. diphtheriae or C. glutamicum, but not from E. coli, complemented the defect in ΔoxyR mutants of C. diphtheriae and C. glutamicum and decreased their H(2)O(2) resistance to the level of their parental strains. Gel-mobility shift, DNaseI footprint, and primer extension assays showed that purified OxyR from C. diphtheriae C7(β) bound, in the presence or absence of DTT, to a sequence in the cat promoter region that extends from nucleotide position -55 to -10 with respect to the +1 nucleotide in the cat ORF. These results demonstrate that OxyR from C. diphtheriae or C. glutamicum functions as a transcriptional repressor of the cat gene by a mechanism that is independent of oxidative stress induced by H(2)O(2).

  15. Oncovirus Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) represses tumor suppressor PDLIM2 to persistently activate nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and STAT3 transcription factors for tumorigenesis and tumor maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Fan; Xiao, Yadong; Qu, Zhaoxia

    2015-03-20

    Kaposi sarcoma herpesvirus (KSHV) is the most common cause of malignancies among AIDS patients. However, how KSHV induces tumorigenesis remains largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that one important mechanism underlying the tumorigenesis of KSHV is through transcriptional repression of the tumor suppressor gene PDZ-LIM domain-containing protein 2 (PDLIM2). PDLIM2 expression is repressed in KSHV-transformed human umbilical vascular endothelial cells as well as in KSHV-associated cancer cell lines and primary tumors. Importantly, PDLIM2 repression is essential for KSHV-induced persistent activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) and subsequent tumorigenesis and tumor maintenance. Our mechanistic studies indicate that PDLIM2 repression by KSHV involves DNA methylation. Notably, the epigenetic repression of PDLIM2 can be reversed by 5-aza-2-deoxycytidine and vitamin D to suppress KSHV-associated cancer cell growth. These studies not only improve our understanding of KSHV pathogenesis but also provide immediate therapeutic strategies for KSHV-mediated cancers, particularly those associated with AIDS.

  16. Transcriptional repression of the Dspp gene leads to dentinogenesis imperfecta phenotype in Col1a1-Trps1 transgenic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napierala, Dobrawa; Sun, Yao; Maciejewska, Izabela; Bertin, Terry K; Dawson, Brian; D'Souza, Rena; Qin, Chunlin; Lee, Brendan

    2012-08-01

    Dentinogenesis imperfecta (DGI) is a hereditary defect of dentin, a calcified tissue that is the most abundant component of teeth. Most commonly, DGI is manifested as a part of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI) or the phenotype is restricted to dental findings only. In the latter case, DGI is caused by mutations in the DSPP gene, which codes for dentin sialoprotein (DSP) and dentin phosphoprotein (DPP). Although these two proteins together constitute the majority of noncollagenous proteins of the dentin, little is known about their transcriptional regulation. Here we demonstrate that mice overexpressing the Trps1 transcription factor (Col1a1-Trps1 mice) in dentin-producing cells, odontoblasts, present with severe defects of dentin formation that resemble DGI. Combined micro-computed tomography (µCT) and histological analyses revealed tooth fragility due to severe hypomineralization of dentin and a diminished dentin layer with irregular mineralization in Col1a1-Trps1 mice. Biochemical analyses of noncollagenous dentin matrix proteins demonstrated decreased levels of both DSP and DPP proteins in Col1a1-Trps1 mice. On the molecular level, we demonstrated that sustained high levels of Trps1 in odontoblasts lead to dramatic decrease of Dspp expression as a result of direct inhibition of the Dspp promoter by Trps1. During tooth development Trps1 is highly expressed in preodontoblasts, but in mature odontoblasts secreting matrix its expression significantly decreases, which suggests a Trps1 role in odontoblast development. In these studies we identified Trps1 as a potent inhibitor of Dspp expression and the subsequent mineralization of dentin. Thus, we provide novel insights into mechanisms of transcriptional dysregulation that leads to DGI.

  17. CtBP/BARS: a dual-function protein involved in transcription co-repression and Golgi membrane fission

    OpenAIRE

    Nardini, Marco; Spanò, Stefania; Cericola, Claudia; Pesce, Alessandra; Massaro, Anna; Millo, Enrico; Luini, Alberto; Corda, Daniela; Bolognesi, Martino

    2003-01-01

    C-terminal-binding protein/brefeldin A-ADP ribosylated substrate (CtBP/BARS) plays key roles in development and oncogenesis as a transcription co-repressor, and in intracellular traffic as a promoter of Golgi membrane fission. Co-repressor activity is regulated by NAD(H) binding to CtBP/BARS, while membrane fission is associated with its acyl-CoA-dependent acyltransferase activity. Here, we report the crystal structures of rat CtBP/BARS in a binary complex with NAD(H), and in a ternary comple...

  18. Transcription of lncRNA prt, clustered prt RNA sites for Mmi1 binding, and RNA polymerase II CTD phospho-sites govern the repression of pho1 gene expression under phosphate-replete conditions in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Debashree; Sanchez, Ana M; Goldgur, Yehuda; Shuman, Stewart; Schwer, Beate

    2016-07-01

    Expression of fission yeast Pho1 acid phosphatase is repressed during growth in phosphate-rich medium. Repression is mediated by transcription of the prt locus upstream of pho1 to produce a long noncoding (lnc) prt RNA. Repression is also governed by RNA polymerase II CTD phosphorylation status, whereby inability to place a Ser7-PO4 mark (as in S7A) derepresses Pho1 expression, and inability to place a Thr4-PO4 mark (as in T4A) hyper-represses Pho1 in phosphate replete cells. Here we find that basal pho1 expression from the prt-pho1 locus is inversely correlated with the activity of the prt promoter, which resides in a 110-nucleotide DNA segment preceding the prt transcription start site. CTD mutations S7A and T4A had no effect on the activity of the prt promoter or the pho1 promoter, suggesting that S7A and T4A affect post-initiation events in prt lncRNA synthesis that make it less and more repressive of pho1, respectively. prt lncRNA contains clusters of DSR (determinant of selective removal) sequences recognized by the YTH-domain-containing protein Mmi1. Altering the nucleobase sequence of two DSR clusters in the prt lncRNA caused hyper-repression of pho1 in phosphate replete cells, concomitant with increased levels of the prt transcript. The isolated Mmi1 YTH domain binds to RNAs with single or tandem DSR elements, to the latter in a noncooperative fashion. We report the 1.75 Å crystal structure of the Mmi1 YTH domain and provide evidence that Mmi1 recognizes DSR RNA via a binding mode distinct from that of structurally homologous YTH proteins that recognize m(6)A-modified RNA.

  19. Conserved sequence-specific lincRNA-steroid receptor interactions drive transcriptional repression and direct cell fate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hudson, William H.; Pickard, Mark R.; de Vera, Ian Mitchelle S.; Kuiper, Emily G.; Mourtada-Maarabouni, Mirna; Conn, Graeme L.; Kojetin, Douglas J.; Williams, Gwyn T.; Ortlund, Eric A. [Emory-MED; (Keele); (Scripps)

    2014-12-23

    The majority of the eukaryotic genome is transcribed, generating a significant number of long intergenic noncoding RNAs (lincRNAs). Although lincRNAs represent the most poorly understood product of transcription, recent work has shown lincRNAs fulfill important cellular functions. In addition to low sequence conservation, poor understanding of structural mechanisms driving lincRNA biology hinders systematic prediction of their function. Here we report the molecular requirements for the recognition of steroid receptors (SRs) by the lincRNA growth arrest-specific 5 (Gas5), which regulates steroid-mediated transcriptional regulation, growth arrest and apoptosis. We identify the functional Gas5-SR interface and generate point mutations that ablate the SR-Gas5 lincRNA interaction, altering Gas5-driven apoptosis in cancer cell lines. Further, we find that the Gas5 SR-recognition sequence is conserved among haplorhines, with its evolutionary origin as a splice acceptor site. This study demonstrates that lincRNAs can recognize protein targets in a conserved, sequence-specific manner in order to affect critical cell functions.

  20. lncRNA-Induced Nucleosome Repositioning Reinforces Transcriptional Repression of rRNA Genes upon Hypotonic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongliang Zhao

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The activity of rRNA genes (rDNA is regulated by pathways that target the transcription machinery or alter the epigenetic state of rDNA. Previous work has established that downregulation of rRNA synthesis in quiescent cells is accompanied by upregulation of PAPAS, a long noncoding RNA (lncRNA that recruits the histone methyltransferase Suv4-20h2 to rDNA, thus triggering trimethylation of H4K20 (H4K20me3 and chromatin compaction. Here, we show that upregulation of PAPAS in response to hypoosmotic stress does not increase H4K20me3 because of Nedd4-dependent ubiquitinylation and proteasomal degradation of Suv4-20h2. Loss of Suv4-20h2 enables PAPAS to interact with CHD4, a subunit of the chromatin remodeling complex NuRD, which shifts the promoter-bound nucleosome into the transcriptional “off” position. Thus, PAPAS exerts a “stress-tailored” dual function in rDNA silencing, facilitating either Suv4-20h2-dependent chromatin compaction or NuRD-dependent changes in nucleosome positioning.

  1. Stress-and Pathogen-Induced Arabidopsis WRKY48 is a Transcriptional Activator that Represses Plant Basal Defense

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Deng-Hui Xing; Zi-Bing Lai; Zu-Yu Zheng; K. M. Vinod; Bao-Fang Fan; Zhi-Xiang Chen

    2008-01-01

    Plant WRKY transcription factors can function as either positive or negative regulators of plant basal disease resistance. Arabidopsis WRKY48 is induced by mechanical and/or osmotic stress due to infiltration and pathogen infection and, therefore, may play a role in plant defense responses. WRKY48 is localized to the nucleus, recognizes the TrGACC Wbox sequence with a high affinity in vitro and functions in plant cells as a strong transcriptional activator. To determine the biological functions directly, we have isolated loss-of-function T-DNA insertion mutants and generated gain-of-function transgenic overexpression plants for WRKY48 in Arabidopsis. Growth of a virulent strain of the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae was decreased in the wrky48T-DNA insertion mutants. The enhanced resistance of the loss-of-function mutants was associated with increased induction of salicylic acid-regulated PR1 by the bacterial pathogen. By contrast, transgenic WRKY48-0verexpressing plants support enhanced growth of P syringae and the enhanced susceptibility was associated with reduced expression of defense-related PR genes. These results suggest that WRKY48 is a negative regulator of PR gene expression and basal resistance to the bacterial pathogen P syringae.

  2. Transcriptional repression of Bmp2 by p21(Waf1/Cip1) links quiescence to neural stem cell maintenance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porlan, Eva; Morante-Redolat, José Manuel; Marqués-Torrejón, María Ángeles; Andreu-Agulló, Celia; Carneiro, Carmen; Gómez-Ibarlucea, Esther; Soto, Atenea; Vidal, Anxo; Ferrón, Sacri R; Fariñas, Isabel

    2013-11-01

    Relative quiescence and self renewal are defining features of adult stem cells, but their potential coordination remains unclear. Subependymal neural stem cells (NSCs) lacking cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) inhibitor (CKI) 1a (p21) exhibit rapid expansion that is followed by their permanent loss later in life. Here we demonstrate that transcription of the gene encoding bone morphogenetic protein 2 (Bmp2) in NSCs is under the direct negative control of p21 through actions that are independent of CDK. Loss of p21 in NSCs results in increased levels of secreted BMP2, which induce premature terminal differentiation of multipotent NSCs into mature non-neurogenic astrocytes in an autocrine and/or paracrine manner. We also show that the cell-nonautonomous p21-null phenotype is modulated by the Noggin-rich environment of the subependymal niche. The dual function that we describe here provides a physiological example of combined cell-autonomous and cell-nonautonomous functions of p21 with implications in self renewal, linking the relative quiescence of adult stem cells to their longevity and potentiality.

  3. CtBP/BARS: a dual-function protein involved in transcription co-repression and Golgi membrane fission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nardini, Marco; Spanò, Stefania; Cericola, Claudia; Pesce, Alessandra; Massaro, Anna; Millo, Enrico; Luini, Alberto; Corda, Daniela; Bolognesi, Martino

    2003-06-16

    C-terminal-binding protein/brefeldin A-ADP ribosylated substrate (CtBP/BARS) plays key roles in development and oncogenesis as a transcription co-repressor, and in intracellular traffic as a promoter of Golgi membrane fission. Co-repressor activity is regulated by NAD(H) binding to CtBP/BARS, while membrane fission is associated with its acyl-CoA-dependent acyltransferase activity. Here, we report the crystal structures of rat CtBP/BARS in a binary complex with NAD(H), and in a ternary complex with a PIDLSKK peptide mimicking the consensus motif (PXDLS) recognized in CtBP/BARS cellular partners. The structural data show CtBP/BARS in a NAD(H)-bound dimeric form; the peptide binding maps the recognition site for DNA-binding proteins and histone deacetylases to an N-terminal region of the protein. The crystal structure together with the site-directed mutagenesis data and binding experiments suggest a rationale for the molecular mechanisms underlying the two fundamental co-existing, but diverse, activities supported by CtBP/BARS in the nucleus and in Golgi membranes.

  4. microRNA-155, induced by interleukin-1ß, represses the expression of microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF-M in melanoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathalie Arts

    Full Text Available Loss of expression of surface antigens represents a significant problem for cancer immunotherapy. Microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF-M regulates melanocyte fate by driving expression of many differentiation genes, whose protein products can be recognized by cytolytic T lymphocytes. We previously reported that interleukin-1ß (IL-1ß can downregulate MITF-M levels. Here we show that downregulation of MITF-M expression by IL-1ß was paralleled by an upregulation of miR-155 expression in four melanoma lines. We confirmed that miR-155 was able to target endogenous MITF-M in melanoma cells and demonstrated a role for miR-155 in the IL-1ß-induced repression of MITF-M by using an antagomiR. Notably, we also observed a strong negative correlation between MITF-M and miR-155 levels in a mouse model of melanoma. Taken together, our results indicate that MITF-M downregulation by inflammatory stimuli might be partly due to miR-155 upregulation. This could represent a novel mechanism of melanoma immune escape in an inflammatory microenvironment.

  5. Repressive Tolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Morten Jarlbæk

    2016-01-01

    to an administrative culture of repressive tolerance of organised interests: authorities listen but only reacts in a very limited sense. This bears in it the risk of jeopardising the knowledge transfer from societal actors to administrative ditto thus harming the consultation institutions’ potential for strengthening...

  6. Anti-Inflammatory Cytokine Interleukin-4 Inhibits Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase Gene Expression in the Mouse Macrophage Cell Line RAW264.7 through the Repression of Octamer-Dependent Transcription

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miki Hiroi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS is a signature molecule involved in the classical activation of M1 macrophages and is induced by the Nos2 gene upon stimulation with Th1-cell derived interferon-gamma (IFNγ and bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS. Although the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4 is known to inhibit Nos2 gene expression, the molecular mechanism involved in the negative regulation of Nos2 by IL-4 remains to be fully elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of IL-4-mediated Nos2 transcriptional repression in the mouse macrophage-like cell line RAW264.7. Signal transducer and activator of transcription 6 (Stat6 knockdown by siRNA abolished the IL-4-mediated inhibition of Nos2 induced by IFNγ/LPS. Transient transfection of a luciferase reporter gene containing the 5′-flanking region of the Nos2 gene demonstrated that an octamer transcription factor (OCT binding site in the promoter region is required for both positive regulation by IFNγ/LPS and negative regulation by IL-4. Although IL-4 had no inhibitory effect on the DNA-binding activity of constitutively expressed Oct-1, IL-4-induced Nos2-reporter transcriptional repression was partially attenuated by overexpression of the coactivator CREB-binding protein (CBP. These results suggest that a coactivator/cofactor that functionally interacts with Oct-1 is a molecular target for the IL-4-mediated inhibition of Nos2 and that IL-4-activated Stat6 represses Oct-1-dependent transcription by competing with this coactivator/cofactor.

  7. E2F-Rb complexes assemble and inhibit cdc25A transcription in cervical carcinoma cells following repression of human papillomavirus oncogene expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wu, L; Goodwin, E C; Naeger, L K;

    2000-01-01

    Expression of the bovine papillomavirus E2 protein in cervical carcinoma cells represses expression of integrated human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogenes, followed by repression of the cdc25A gene and other cellular genes required for cell cycle progression, resulting in dramatic growth arrest....... To explore the mechanism of repression of cell cycle genes in cervical carcinoma cells following E6/E7 repression, we analyzed regulation of the cdc25A promoter, which contains two consensus E2F binding sites and a consensus E2 binding site. The wild-type E2 protein inhibited expression of a luciferase gene...... linked to the cdc25A promoter in HT-3 cervical carcinoma cells. Mutation of the distal E2F binding site in the cdc25A promoter abolished E2-induced repression, whereas mutation of the proximal E2F site or the E2 site had no effect. None of these mutations affected the activity of the promoter...

  8. Expression of the Adenovirus Early Gene 1A Transcription-Repression Domain Alone Downregulates HER2 and Results in the Death of Human Breast Cancer Cells Upregulated for the HER2 Proto-Oncogene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenstein, Paul M; Green, Maurice

    2011-07-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) early gene 1A 243 residue protein (E1A 243R) possesses a potent transcription-repression function within the N-terminal 80 amino acids (E1A 1-80). We examined the ability of E1A 243R and E1A 1-80 to repress transcription of both an exogenous and the endogenous HER2 promoter in a human breast cancer cell line upregulated for the HER2 proto-oncogene (SK-BR-3). Both moieties repressed HER2 expression by over 90%. When E1A 1-80 was expressed from a nonreplicative Ad vector, levels of expression were lower than anticipated. Addition of nonspecific sequences to the E1A 1-80 C-terminus (E1A 1-80 C+) enhanced its expression 10- to 20-fold. Because "oncogene addiction" suggests that repression of HER2 could kill HER2 upregulated cells, we examined the ability of full-length E1A 243R and E1A 1-80 C+ delivered by an Ad vector to kill HER2 upregulated SK-BR-3 cells. Expression of both E1A 243R and E1A 1-80 C+ killed SK-BR-3 cells but not normal breast cells. E1A 1-80 C+ is a particularly effective killer of SK-BR-3 cells. At 144 h post infection, over 85% of SK-BR-3 cells were killed by a 100 moi of the Ad vector expressing E1A 1-80 C+. As controls, Ad vectors expressing E1A 243R with deletion of all known functional domains or expressing unrelated β-galactosidase had no effect. Three additional human breast cancer cells lines reported to be upregulated for HER2 or another EGF family member (EGFR) were found to be efficiently killed by expression of E1A 1-80 C+, whereas three additional "normal" cell lines (two derived from breast and one from foreskin) were not. The ability of the E1A transcription-repression domain alone to kill HER2 upregulated breast cancer cells has potential for development of therapies for treatment of aggressive human breast cancers and potentially other human cancers that overexpress HER2.

  9. Glucose repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kayikci, Omur; Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration and gluc......Glucose is the primary source of energy for the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Although yeast cells can utilize a wide range of carbon sources, presence of glucose suppresses molecular activities involved in the use of alternate carbon sources as well as it represses respiration...... and gluconeogenesis. This dominant effect of glucose on yeast carbon metabolism is coordinated by several signaling and metabolic interactions that mainly regulate transcriptional activity but are also effective at post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. This review describes effects of glucose repression...

  10. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway represses the transcription of the β-amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme (BACE1) via binding of T-cell factor-4 to BACE1 promoter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parr, Callum; Mirzaei, Nazanin; Christian, Mark; Sastre, Magdalena

    2015-02-01

    Alterations in the Wnt signaling pathway have been implicated in Alzheimer's disease; however, its role in the processing of the amyloid precursor protein remains unknown. In this study, activation of the Wnt pathway by overexpression of the agonist Wnt3a or β-catenin or by inhibition of glycogen kinase synthase-3 in N2a cells resulted in a reduction in Aβ levels and in the activity and expression of BACE1 (β-APP cleaving enzyme). Conversely, inhibition of the pathway by transfection of the antagonists secreted frizzled receptor protein-1 or dickkopf-1 produced the opposite effects. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis demonstrated that β-catenin binds specifically to regions within the promoter of BACE1 containing putative T-cell factor/lymphoid enhancer binding factor-1 (TCF/LEF) motifs, consistent with canonical Wnt target regulation. Furthermore, cells transfected with β-catenin mutants incapable of binding to TCF/LEF increased BACE1 gene promoter activity. Interestingly, TCF4 knockdown reversed the effects of Wnt3a activation on BACE1 transcription. We found that TCF4 binds to the same region on BACE1 promoter following Wnt3a stimulation, indicating that TCF4 functions as a transcriptional repressor of BACE1 gene. In conclusion, Wnt/β-catenin stimulation may repress BACE1 transcription via binding of TCF4 to BACE1 gene, and therefore, activation of the Wnt pathway may hold the key to new treatments of Alzheimer disease.-Parr, C., Mirzaei, N., Christian, M., and Sastre, M. Activation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway represses the transcription of the β-amyloid precursor protein cleaving enzyme (BACE1) via binding of T-cell factor-4 to BACE1 promoter.

  11. Oct-2 forms a complex with Oct-1 on the iNOS promoter and represses transcription by interfering with recruitment of RNA PolII by Oct-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentrari, Fatima; Chantôme, Aurelie; Knights, Andrew; Jeannin, Jean-François; Pance, Alena

    2015-11-16

    Oct-1 (POU2f1) and Oct-2 (POU2f2) are members of the POU family of transcription factors. They recognize the same DNA sequence but fulfil distinct functions: Oct-1 is ubiquitous and regulates a variety of genes while Oct-2 is restricted to B-cells and neurones. Here we examine the interplay and regulatory mechanisms of these factors to control the inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS, NOS2). Using two breast cancer cell lines as a comparative model, we found that MCF-7 express iNOS upon cytokine stimulation while MDA-MB-231 do not. Oct-1 is present in both cell lines but MDA-MB-231 also express high levels of Oct-2. Manipulation of Oct-2 expression in these cell lines demonstrates that it is directly responsible for the repression of iNOS in MDA-MB-231. In MCF-7 cells Oct-1 binds the iNOS promoter, recruits RNA PolII and triggers initiation of transcription. In MDA-MB-231 cells, both Oct-1 and Oct-2 bind the iNOS promoter, forming a higher-order complex which fails to recruit RNA PolII, and as a consequence iNOS transcription does not proceed. Unravelling the mechanisms of transcription factor activity is paramount to the understanding of gene expression patterns that determine cell behaviour.

  12. The two-component system CpxR/A represses the expression of Salmonella virulence genes by affecting the stability of the transcriptional regulator HilD

    Science.gov (United States)

    De la Cruz, Miguel A.; Pérez-Morales, Deyanira; Palacios, Irene J.; Fernández-Mora, Marcos; Calva, Edmundo; Bustamante, Víctor H.

    2015-01-01

    Salmonella enterica can cause intestinal or systemic infections in humans and animals mainly by the presence of pathogenicity islands SPI-1 and SPI-2, containing 39 and 44 genes, respectively. The AraC-like regulator HilD positively controls the expression of the SPI-1 genes, as well as many other Salmonella virulence genes including those located in SPI-2. A previous report indicates that the two-component system CpxR/A regulates the SPI-1 genes: the absence of the sensor kinase CpxA, but not the absence of its cognate response regulator CpxR, reduces their expression. The presence and absence of cell envelope stress activates kinase and phosphatase activities of CpxA, respectively, which in turn controls the level of phosphorylated CpxR (CpxR-P). In this work, we further define the mechanism for the CpxR/A-mediated regulation of SPI-1 genes. The negative effect exerted by the absence of CpxA on the expression of SPI-1 genes was counteracted by the absence of CpxR or by the absence of the two enzymes, AckA and Pta, which render acetyl-phosphate that phosphorylates CpxR. Furthermore, overexpression of the lipoprotein NlpE, which activates CpxA kinase activity on CpxR, or overexpression of CpxR, repressed the expression of SPI-1 genes. Thus, our results provide several lines of evidence strongly supporting that the absence of CpxA leads to the phosphorylation of CpxR via the AckA/Pta enzymes, which represses both the SPI-1 and SPI-2 genes. Additionally, we show that in the absence of the Lon protease, which degrades HilD, the CpxR-P-mediated repression of the SPI-1 genes is mostly lost; moreover, we demonstrate that CpxR-P negatively affects the stability of HilD and thus decreases the expression of HilD-target genes, such as hilD itself and hilA, located in SPI-1. Our data further expand the insight on the different regulatory pathways for gene expression involving CpxR/A and on the complex regulatory network governing virulence in Salmonella. PMID:26300871

  13. Identification of the subunit of cAMP receptor protein (CRP) that functionally interacts with CytR in CRP-CytR-mediated transcriptional repression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meibom, K L; Kallipolitis, B H; Ebright, R H

    2000-01-01

    At promoters of the Escherichia coli CytR regulon, the cAMP receptor protein (CRP) interacts with the repressor CytR to form transcriptionally inactive CRP-CytR-promoter or (CRP)(2)-CytR-promoter complexes. Here, using "oriented heterodimer" analysis, we show that only one subunit of the CRP dimer...

  14. The transcriptional regulator Rok binds A+T-rich DNA and is involved in repression of a mobile genetic element in Bacillus subtilis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wiep Klaas Smits

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The rok gene of Bacillus subtilis was identified as a negative regulator of competence development. It also controls expression of several genes not related to competence. We found that Rok binds to extended regions of the B. subtilis genome. These regions are characterized by a high A+T content and are known or believed to have been acquired by horizontal gene transfer. Some of the Rok binding regions are in known mobile genetic elements. A deletion of rok resulted in higher excision of one such element, ICEBs1, a conjugative transposon found integrated in the B. subtilis genome. When expressed in the Gram negative E. coli, Rok also associated with A+T-rich DNA and a conserved C-terminal region of Rok contributed to this association. Together with previous work, our findings indicate that Rok is a nucleoid associated protein that serves to help repress expression of A+T-rich genes, many of which appear to have been acquired by horizontal gene transfer. In these ways, Rok appears to be functionally analogous to H-NS, a nucleoid associated protein found in Gram negative bacteria and Lsr2 of high G+C Mycobacteria.

  15. Mechanism of action of the Escherichia coli phage shock protein PspA in repression of the AAA family transcription factor PspF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elderkin, Sarah; Jones, Susan; Schumacher, Jörg; Studholme, David; Buck, Martin

    2002-06-28

    The PspA protein, a negative regulator of the Escherichia coli phage shock psp operon, is produced when virulence factors are exported through secretins in many Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria and its homologue in plants, VIPP1, plays a critical role in thylakoid biogenesis, essential for photosynthesis. Activation of transcription by the enhancer-dependent bacterial sigma(54) containing RNA polymerase occurs through ATP hydrolysis-driven protein conformational changes enabled by activator proteins that belong to the large AAA(+) mechanochemical protein family. We show that PspA directly and specifically acts upon and binds to the AAA(+) domain of the PspF transcription activator. Interactions involving PspF and nucleotide are changed by the action of PspA. These changes and the complexes that form between PspF and PspA can explain how PspA exerts its negative effects upon transcription activated by PspF, and are of significance when considering how activities of other AAA(+) proteins might be controlled.

  16. TALENs-directed knockout of the full-length transcription factor Nrf1α that represses malignant behaviour of human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Yonggang; Qiu, Lu; Lü, Fenglin; Ru, Xufang; Li, Shaojun; Xiang, Yuancai; Yu, Siwang; Zhang, Yiguo

    2016-04-11

    The full-length Nrf1α is processed into distinct isoforms, which together regulate genes essential for maintaining cellular homeostasis and organ integrity, and liver-specific loss of Nrf1 in mice results in spontaneous hepatoma. Herein, we report that the human constitutive Nrf1α, rather than smaller Nrf1β/γ, expression is attenuated or abolished in the case of low-differentiated high-metastatic hepatocellular carcinomas. Therefore, Nrf1α is of importance in the physio-pathological origin and development, but its specific pathobiological function(s) remains elusive. To address this, TALENs-directed knockout of Nrf1α, but not Nrf1β/γ, is created in the human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells. The resulting Nrf1α(-/-) cells are elongated, with slender spindle-shapes and enlarged gaps between cells observed under scanning electron microscope. When compared with wild-type controls, the invasive and migratory abilities of Nrf1α(-/-) cells are increased significantly, along with the cell-cycle G2-M arrest and S-phase reduction, as accompanied by suppressed apoptosis. Despite a modest increase in the soft-agar colony formation of Nrf1α(-/-) cells, its loss-of-function markedly promotes malgrowth of the subcutaneous carcinoma xenograft in nude mice with hepatic metastasis. Together with molecular expression results, we thus suppose requirement of Nrf1α (and major derivates) for gene regulatory mechanisms repressing cancer cell process (e.g. EMT) and malignant behaviour (e.g. migration).

  17. Phytoplasma-induced floral abnormalities in Catharanthus roseus are associated with phytoplasma accumulation and transcript repression of floral organ identity genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Yi-Ting; Chen, Jen-Chih; Lin, Chan-Pin

    2011-12-01

    Floral symptoms caused by phytoplasma largely resemble floral reversion in other plants. Periwinkle leaf yellowing (PLY) phytoplasma and peanut witches'-broom (PnWB) phytoplasma caused different degrees of floral abnormalities on infected periwinkle plants. The PLY phytoplasma-infected plants exhibited floral discoloration, virescence, small flowers, and only occasionally full floral reversion. In contrast, PnWB phytoplasma frequently induced complete floral reversion and resulted in a witches'-broom symptom from the floral reversion. Although different degrees of floral symptoms were induced by these two phytoplasmas, the morphological disorders were similar to those of other plants carrying SEPALLATA mutations or gene silencing. Here, we compared expression levels of organ-identity-related genes and pigmentation genes during floral symptom development. Accumulation of phytoplasmas in malformed flowers and their closely surrounding leaves was also compared. In infected plants, transcript abundance of all examined organ identity genes and pigmentation genes was suppressed. Indeed, CrSEP3, a SEPALLALA3 ortholog, showed the greatest suppression among genes examined. Of the pigmentation genes, transcript reduction of chalcone synthase was most highly correlated with the loss in floral pigmentation. Floral symptom severities were associated with the accumulation of either phytoplasmas. Interestingly, both phytoplasmas accumulated to higher levels in malformed flowers than in their surrounding leaves. Many plant pathogens manipulate host plant development to their advantage. It is intriguing to see whether phytoplasmas alter floral development to increase their population.

  18. DAF-16/FOXO regulates transcription of cki-1/Cip/Kip and repression of lin-4 during C. elegans L1 arrest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baugh, L Ryan; Sternberg, Paul W

    2006-04-18

    Development is typically studied as a continuous process under laboratory conditions, but wild animals often develop in variable and stressful environments. C. elegans larvae hatch in a developmentally arrested state (L1 arrest) and initiate post-embryonic development only in the presence of food (E. coli in lab). In contrast to the well-studied dauer arrest, L1 arrest occurs without morphological modification, although larvae in L1 arrest are more resistant to environmental stress than developing larvae . Consistent with its role in dauer formation and aging, we show that insulin/insulin-like growth factor (IGF) signaling regulates L1 arrest. daf-2 insulin/IGF receptor mutants have a constitutive-L1-arrest phenotype when fed and extended survival of L1 arrest when starved. Conversely, daf-16/FOXO mutants have a defective-arrest phenotype, failing to arrest development and dying rapidly when starved. We show that DAF-16 is required for transcription of the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor cki-1 in stem cells in response to starvation, accounting for the failure of daf-16/FOXO mutants to arrest cell division during L1 arrest. Other developmental events such as cell migration, cell fusion, and expression of the microRNA lin-4, a temporal regulator of post-embryonic development, are also observed in starved daf-16/FOXO mutants. These results suggest that DAF-16/FOXO promotes developmental arrest via transcriptional regulation of numerous target genes that control various aspects of development.

  19. NFkappaB p50-CCAAT/enhancer-binding protein beta (C/EBPbeta)-mediated transcriptional repression of microRNA let-7i following microbial infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Hara, Steven P; Splinter, Patrick L; Gajdos, Gabriella B; Trussoni, Christy E; Fernandez-Zapico, Martin E; Chen, Xian-Ming; LaRusso, Nicholas F

    2010-01-01

    MicroRNAs, central players of numerous cellular processes, regulate mRNA stability or translational efficiency. Although these molecular events are established, the mechanisms regulating microRNA function and expression remain largely unknown. The microRNA let-7i regulates Toll-like receptor 4 expression. Here, we identify a novel transcriptional mechanism induced by the protozoan parasite Cryptosporidium parvum and Gram(-) bacteria-derived lipopolysaccharide (LPS) mediating let-7i promoter silencing in human biliary epithelial cells (cholangiocytes). Using cultured cholangiocytes, we show that microbial stimulus decreased let-7i expression, and promoter activity. Analysis of the mechanism revealed that microbial infection promotes the formation of a NFkappaB p50-C/EBPbeta silencer complex in the regulatory sequence. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays (ChIP) demonstrated that the repressor complex binds to the let-7i promoter following microbial stimulus and promotes histone-H3 deacetylation. Our results provide a novel mechanism of transcriptional regulation of cholangiocyte let-7i expression following microbial insult, a process with potential implications for epithelial innate immune responses in general.

  20. Interaction of the Chlamydia trachomatis histone H1-like protein (Hc1) with DNA and RNA causes repression of transcription and translation in vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Lotte Bang; Birkelund, S; Christiansen, G

    1994-01-01

    The 18 kDa histone H1-like protein from Chlamydia trachomatis (Hc1) is a DNA-binding protein thought to be involved in condensation of the chlamydial chromosome during late stages in the chlamydial life cycle. Expression of Hc1 in Escherichia coli results in an overall relaxation of DNA and sever......The 18 kDa histone H1-like protein from Chlamydia trachomatis (Hc1) is a DNA-binding protein thought to be involved in condensation of the chlamydial chromosome during late stages in the chlamydial life cycle. Expression of Hc1 in Escherichia coli results in an overall relaxation of DNA...... and severely affects DNA, RNA and protein synthesis. We have analysed the interaction of Hc1 with single-stranded DNA and RNA by Southwestern and Northwestern blotting. Furthermore, we show that purified, recombinant Hc1 dramatically affects transcription and translation in vitro at physiologically relevant...

  1. SOX6 attenuates glucose-stimulated insulin secretion by repressing PDX1 transcriptional activity and is down-regulated in hyperinsulinemic obese mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iguchi, Haruhisa; Ikeda, Yukio; Okamura, Masashi; Tanaka, Toshiya; Urashima, Yasuyo; Ohguchi, Hiroto; Takayasu, Shinobu; Kojima, Noriaki; Iwasaki, Satoshi; Ohashi, Riuko; Jiang, Shuying; Hasegawa, Go; Ioka, Ryoichi X; Magoori, Kenta; Sumi, Koichi; Maejima, Takashi; Uchida, Aoi; Naito, Makoto; Osborne, Timothy F; Yanagisawa, Masashi; Yamamoto, Tokuo T; Kodama, Tatsuhiko; Sakai, Juro

    2005-11-11

    In obesity-related insulin resistance, pancreatic islets compensate for insulin resistance by increasing secretory capacity. Here, we report the identification of sex-determining region Y-box 6 (SOX6), a member of the high mobility group box superfamily of transcription factors, as a co-repressor for pancreatic-duodenal homeobox factor-1 (PDX1). SOX6 mRNA levels were profoundly reduced by both a long term high fat feeding protocol in normal mice and in genetically obese ob/ob mice on a normal chow diet. Interestingly, we show that SOX6 is expressed in adult pancreatic insulin-producing beta-cells and that overexpression of SOX6 decreased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion, which was accompanied by decreased ATP/ADP ratio, Ca(2+) mobilization, proinsulin content, and insulin gene expression. In a complementary fashion, depletion of SOX6 by small interfering RNAs augmented glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in insulinoma mouse MIN6 and rat INS-1E cells. These effects can be explained by our mechanistic studies that show SOX6 acts to suppress PDX1 stimulation of the insulin II promoter through a direct protein/protein interaction. Furthermore, SOX6 retroviral expression decreased acetylation of histones H3 and H4 in chromatin from the promoter for the insulin II gene, suggesting that SOX6 may decrease PDX1 stimulation through changes in chromatin structure at specific promoters. These results suggest that perturbations in transcriptional regulation that are coordinated through SOX6 and PDX1 in beta-cells may contribute to the beta-cell adaptation in obesity-related insulin resistance.

  2. Transcriptional regulation of the human IL5 gene by ionizing radiation in Jurkat T cells: evidence for repression by an NF-AT-like element.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu-Hesselmann, J; Messer, G; van Beuningen, D; Kind, P; Peter, R U

    1997-12-01

    Eosinophilia is often observed in patients with parasitic infections and atopic diseases like allergic asthma and atopic dermatitis. Additionally, it is a typical feature of the inflammatory reaction after therapeutic and accidental exposure to ionizing radiation. This uniquely specific phenomenon regulated by the cytokine interleukin 5 (IL-5) suggests specific control for IL5 gene expression. In this study, we generated promoter-CAT constructs containing different human IL-5 promoter regions spanning from positions -507 to +43. Transfection experiments in Jurkat T cells revealed that the promoter sequence from -57 to +43 was required for constitutive and inducible IL-5 promoter activity. Low baseline CAT activity could be enhanced by treatment with phenylmercuric acetate (PMA) or the combination of PMA and calcium ionophore. The promoter region between positions -97 and +43 showed responsiveness to low-dose X rays. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays demonstrated that the region from -117 to -97 was responsive to irradiation. Transcription factors specifically bound to this sequence showed a dose-dependent response to single doses of X rays between 1 and 8 Gy. Competition analysis indicated that the protein-DNA complexes at this region were related to the nuclear factor of activated T cells (NF-AT). Further confirmation was obtained by the addition of specific antibodies into protein-DNA reactions. For the first time, we have demonstrated that specific DNA binding of NF-ATp at the promoter region from -117 to -97 is involved in transcriptional regulation of the human IL5 gene in response to ionizing radiation.

  3. Arabidopsis STO/BBX24 negatively regulates UV-B signaling by interacting with COP1 and repressing HY5 transcriptional activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lei Jiang; Yan Wang; Qian-Feng Li; Lars Olof Bj(o)rn; Jun-Xian He; Shao-Shan Li

    2012-01-01

    UV-B (280-315 nm) is an integral part of solar radiation and can act either as a stress inducer or as a developmental signal.In recent years,increasing attention has been paid to the Iow-fluence UV-B-induced photomorphogenic response and several key players in this response have been identified,which include UVR8 (a UV-B-specific photoreceptor),COPI (a WD40-repeat-containing RING finger protein),HY5 (a basic zipper transcription factor),and RUP1/2 (two UVR8-interacting proteins).Here we report that Arabidopsis SALT TOLERANCE (STO/BBX24),a known regulator for light signaling in plants,defines a new signaling component in UV-B-mediated photomorphogenesis.The bbx24 mutant is hypersensitive to UV-B radiation and becomes extremely dwarfed under UV-B treatment.By contrast,BBX24 overexpression transgenic lines respond much more weakly to UV-B than the bbx24 and wild-type plants.BBX24 expression is UV-B-inducible and its accumulation under UV-B requires COP1.Co-immunoprecipitation experiments indicate that BBX24 interacts with COP1 in planta upon UV-B illumination.Moreover,BBX24 interacts with HY5 and acts antagonistically with HY5 in UV-B-induced inhibition of hypocotyl elongation.Furthermore,BBX24 attenuates UV-B-induced HY5 accumulation and suppresses its transcription-activation activity.Taken together,our results reveal a previously uncharacterized function of the light-regulated BBX24 in UV-B responses and demonstrate that BBX24 functions as a negative regulator of photomorphogenic UV-B responses by interacting with both COP1 and HY5.The UV-B-inducible expression pattern and its suppression of HY5 activity suggest that BBX24 could be a new component of the feedback regulatory module of UV-B signaling in plants.

  4. Phosphorylation of p65(RelA on Ser(547 by ATM represses NF-κB-dependent transcription of specific genes after genotoxic stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hélène Sabatel

    Full Text Available The NF-κB pathway is involved in immune and inflammation responses, proliferation, differentiation and cell death or survival. It is activated by many external stimuli including genotoxic stress. DNA double-strand breaks activate NF-κB in an ATM-dependent manner. In this manuscript, a direct interaction between p65(RelA and the N-terminal extremity of ATM is reported. We also report that only one of the five potential ATM-(S/TQ target sites present in p65, namely Ser(547, is specifically phosphorylated by ATM in vitro. A comparative transcriptomic analysis performed in HEK-293 cells expressing either wild-type HA-p65 or a non-phosphorylatable mutant HA-p65(S547A identified several differentially transcribed genes after an etoposide treatment (e.g. IL8, A20, SELE. The transcription of these genes is increased in cells expressing the mutant. Substitution of Ser(547 to alanine does not affect p65 binding abilities on the κB site of the IL8 promoter but reduces p65 interaction with HDAC1. Cells expressing p65(S547A have a higher level of histone H3 acetylated on Lys(9 at the IL8 promoter, which is in agreement with the higher gene induction observed. These results indicate that ATM regulates a sub-set of NF-κB dependent genes after a genotoxic stress by direct phosphorylation of p65.

  5. Identification of genes involved in Ca2+ ionophore A23187-mediated apoptosis and demonstration of a high susceptibility for transcriptional repression of cell cycle genes in B lymphoblasts from a patient with Scott syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meyer Dominique

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In contrast to other agents able to induce apoptosis of cultured cells, Ca2+ ionophore A23187 was shown to elicit direct activation of intracellular signal(s. The phenotype of the cells derived from patients having the hemorrhagic disease Scott syndrome, is associated with an abnormally high proportion of apoptotic cells, both in basal culture medium and upon addition of low ionophore concentrations in long-term cultures. These features are presumably related to the mutation also responsible for the defective procoagulant plasma membrane remodeling. We analyzed the specific transcriptional re-programming induced by A23187 to get insights into the effect of this agent on gene expression and a defective gene regulation in Scott cells. Results The changes in gene expression upon 48 hours treatment with 200 nM A23187 were measured in Scott B lymphoblasts compared to B lymphoblasts derived from the patient's daughter or unrelated individuals using Affymetrix microarrays. In a similar manner in all of the B cell lines, results showed up-regulation of 55 genes, out of 12,000 represented sequences, involved in various pathways of the cell metabolism. In contrast, a group of 54 down-regulated genes, coding for histones and proteins involved in the cell cycle progression, was more significantly repressed in Scott B lymphoblasts than in the other cell lines. These data correlated with the alterations of the cell cycle phases in treated cells and suggested that the potent effect of A23187 in Scott B lymphoblasts may be the consequence of the underlying molecular defect. Conclusion The data illustrate that the ionophore A23187 exerts its pro-apoptotic effect by promoting a complex pattern of genetic changes. These results also suggest that a subset of genes participating in various steps of the cell cycle progress can be transcriptionally regulated in a coordinated fashion. Furthermore, this research brings a new insight into the defect

  6. JAZF1 promotes proliferation of C2C12 cells, but retards their myogenic differentiation through transcriptional repression of MEF2C and MRF4—Implications for the role of Jazf1 variants in oncogenesis and type 2 diabetes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yuasa, Katsutoshi; Aoki, Natsumi; Hijikata, Takao, E-mail: hijikata@musashino-u.ac.jp

    2015-08-15

    Single-nucleotide polymorphisms associated with type 2 diabetes (T2D) have been identified in Jazf1, which is also involved in the oncogenesis of endometrial stromal tumors. To understand how Jazf1 variants confer a risk of tumorigenesis and T2D, we explored the functional roles of JAZF1 and searched for JAZF1 target genes in myogenic C2C12 cells. Consistent with an increase of Jazf1 transcripts during myoblast proliferation and their decrease during myogenic differentiation in regenerating skeletal muscle, JAZF1 overexpression promoted cell proliferation, whereas it retarded myogenic differentiation. Examination of myogenic genes revealed that JAZF1 overexpression transcriptionally repressed MEF2C and MRF4 and their downstream genes. AMP deaminase1 (AMPD1) was identified as a candidate for JAZF1 target by gene array analysis. However, promoter assays of Ampd1 demonstrated that mutation of the putative binding site for the TR4/JAZF1 complex did not alleviate the repressive effects of JAZF1 on promoter activity. Instead, JAZF1-mediated repression of Ampd1 occurred through the MEF2-binding site and E-box within the Ampd1 proximal regulatory elements. Consistently, MEF2C and MRF4 expression enhanced Ampd1 promoter activity. AMPD1 overexpression and JAZF1 downregulation impaired AMPK phosphorylation, while JAZF1 overexpression also reduced it. Collectively, these results suggest that aberrant JAZF1 expression contributes to the oncogenesis and T2D pathogenesis. - Highlights: • JAZF1 promotes cell cycle progression and proliferation of myoblasts. • JAZF1 retards myogenic differentiation and hypertrophy of myotubes. • JAZF1 transcriptionally represses Mef2C and Mrf4 expression. • JAZF1 has an impact on the phosphorylation of AMPK.

  7. Kinetically-defined component actions in gene repression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carson C Chow

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Gene repression by transcription factors, and glucocorticoid receptors (GR in particular, is a critical, but poorly understood, physiological response. Among the many unresolved questions is the difference between GR regulated induction and repression, and whether transcription cofactor action is the same in both. Because activity classifications based on changes in gene product level are mechanistically uninformative, we present a theory for gene repression in which the mechanisms of factor action are defined kinetically and are consistent for both gene repression and induction. The theory is generally applicable and amenable to predictions if the dose-response curve for gene repression is non-cooperative with a unit Hill coefficient, which is observed for GR-regulated repression of AP1LUC reporter induction by phorbol myristate acetate. The theory predicts the mechanism of GR and cofactors, and where they act with respect to each other, based on how each cofactor alters the plots of various kinetic parameters vs. cofactor. We show that the kinetically-defined mechanism of action of each of four factors (reporter gene, p160 coactivator TIF2, and two pharmaceuticals [NU6027 and phenanthroline] is the same in GR-regulated repression and induction. What differs is the position of GR action. This insight should simplify clinical efforts to differentially modulate factor actions in gene induction vs. gene repression.

  8. SAGA complex components and acetate repression in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgakopoulos, Paraskevi; Lockington, Robin A; Kelly, Joan M

    2012-11-01

    Alongside the well-established carbon catabolite repression by glucose and other sugars, acetate causes repression in Aspergillus nidulans. Mutations in creA, encoding the transcriptional repressor involved in glucose repression, also affect acetate repression, but mutations in creB or creC, encoding components of a deubiquitination system, do not. To understand the effects of acetate, we used a mutational screen that was similar to screens that uncovered mutations in creA, creB, and creC, except that glucose was replaced by acetate to identify mutations that were affected for repression by acetate but not by glucose. We uncovered mutations in acdX, homologous to the yeast SAGA component gene SPT8, which in growth tests showed derepression for acetate repression but not for glucose repression. We also made mutations in sptC, homologous to the yeast SAGA component gene SPT3, which showed a similar phenotype. We found that acetate repression is complex, and analysis of facA mutations (lacking acetyl CoA synthetase) indicates that acetate metabolism is required for repression of some systems (proline metabolism) but not for others (acetamide metabolism). Although plate tests indicated that acdX- and sptC-null mutations led to derepressed alcohol dehydrogenase activity, reverse-transcription quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction showed no derepression of alcA or aldA but rather elevated induced levels. Our results indicate that acetate repression is due to repression via CreA together with metabolic changes rather than due to an independent regulatory control mechanism.

  9. Racism and Surplus Repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Howard

    1983-01-01

    Explores the relationship between Herbert Marcuse's theory of "surplus repression" and Freud's theory of the "unconscious" with respect to latent, hidden, covert, or subliminal aspects of racism in the United States. Argues that unconscious racism, manifested in evasion/avoidance, acting out/projection, and attempted justification, perpetuates…

  10. Nuclear AXIN2 represses MYC gene expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennoll, Sherri A.; Konsavage, Wesley M.; Yochum, Gregory S., E-mail: gsy3@psu.edu

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •AXIN2 localizes to cytoplasmic and nuclear compartments in colorectal cancer cells. •Nuclear AXIN2 represses the activity of Wnt-responsive luciferase reporters. •β-Catenin bridges AXIN2 to TCF transcription factors. •AXIN2 binds the MYC promoter and represses MYC gene expression. -- Abstract: The β-catenin transcriptional coactivator is the key mediator of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway. In the absence of Wnt, β-catenin associates with a cytosolic and multi-protein destruction complex where it is phosphorylated and targeted for proteasomal degradation. In the presence of Wnt, the destruction complex is inactivated and β-catenin translocates into the nucleus. In the nucleus, β-catenin binds T-cell factor (TCF) transcription factors to activate expression of c-MYC (MYC) and Axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2). AXIN2 is a member of the destruction complex and, thus, serves in a negative feedback loop to control Wnt/β-catenin signaling. AXIN2 is also present in the nucleus, but its function within this compartment is unknown. Here, we demonstrate that AXIN2 localizes to the nuclei of epithelial cells within normal and colonic tumor tissues as well as colorectal cancer cell lines. In the nucleus, AXIN2 represses expression of Wnt/β-catenin-responsive luciferase reporters and forms a complex with β-catenin and TCF. We demonstrate that AXIN2 co-occupies β-catenin/TCF complexes at the MYC promoter region. When constitutively localized to the nucleus, AXIN2 alters the chromatin structure at the MYC promoter and directly represses MYC gene expression. These findings suggest that nuclear AXIN2 functions as a rheostat to control MYC expression in response to Wnt/β-catenin signaling.

  11. Financial Liberalization Or Repression?

    OpenAIRE

    Ang, James

    2009-01-01

    While financial liberalization has always been advocated in developing countries, experiences with it do not always produce desirable outcomes. In order to evaluate the costs and benefits associated with financial liberalization and repression, this study highlights that the overall effectiveness of the reform programs depends on the relative strength of each financial sector policy implemented. Using India as a case study, the results indicate that interest rate controls, statutory liquidity...

  12. Repression of insulin gene expression by adenovirus type 5 E1a proteins.

    OpenAIRE

    1987-01-01

    Insulin gene transcription relies on enhancer and promoter elements which are active in pancreatic beta cells. We showed that adenovirus type 5 infection of HIT T-15 cells, a transformed hamster beta cell line, represses insulin gene transcription and mRNA levels. Using expression plasmids transiently introduced into HIT T-15 cells, we showed that adenovirus type 5 E1a transcription regulatory proteins repress insulin enhancer-promoter element activity as assayed with a surrogate xanthine-gua...

  13. CRISPR Technology for Genome Activation and Repression in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Dan; Qi, Lei S

    2016-01-04

    Targeted modulation of transcription is necessary for understanding complex gene networks and has great potential for medical and industrial applications. CRISPR is emerging as a powerful system for targeted genome activation and repression, in addition to its use in genome editing. This protocol describes how to design, construct, and experimentally validate the function of sequence-specific single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) for sequence-specific repression (CRISPRi) or activation (CRISPRa) of transcription in mammalian cells. In this technology, the CRISPR-associated protein Cas9 is catalytically deactivated (dCas9) to provide a general platform for RNA-guided DNA targeting of any locus in the genome. Fusion of dCas9 to effector domains with distinct regulatory functions enables stable and efficient transcriptional repression or activation in mammalian cells. Delivery of multiple sgRNAs further enables activation or repression of multiple genes. By using scaffold RNAs (scRNAs), different effectors can be recruited to different genes for simultaneous activation of some and repression of others. The CRISPRi and CRISPRa methods provide powerful tools for sequence-specific control of gene expression on a genome-wide scale to aid understanding gene functions and for engineering genetic regulatory systems.

  14. JARID2 regulates binding of the Polycomb repressive complex 2 to target genes in ES cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pasini, Diego; Cloos, Paul A C; Walfridsson, Julian

    2010-01-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) proteins have an important role in controlling the expression of genes essential for development, differentiation and maintenance of cell fates. The Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) is believed to regulate transcriptional repression by catalysing the di- and tri-methy...

  15. Financial repression and fiscal policy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gupta, KL; Lensink, R

    1997-01-01

    This paper develops a simulation model to assess the consequences of government's trying to raise revenues through financial repression in developing countries. The measures of financial repression studied are (1) government borrowing from the banking sector to finance its budget deficit (2) governm

  16. Pachytene asynapsis drives meiotic sex chromosome inactivation and leads to substantial postmeiotic repression in spermatids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, James M A; Mahadevaiah, Shantha K; Ellis, Peter J I; Mitchell, Michael J; Burgoyne, Paul S

    2006-04-01

    Transcriptional silencing of the sex chromosomes during male meiosis (MSCI) is conserved among organisms with limited sex chromosome synapsis, including mammals. Since the 1990s the prevailing view has been that MSCI in mammals is transient, with sex chromosome reactivation occurring as cells exit meiosis. Recently, we found that any chromosome region unsynapsed during pachytene of male and female mouse meiosis is subject to transcriptional silencing (MSUC), and we hypothesized that MSCI is an inevitable consequence of this more general meiotic silencing mechanism. Here, we provide direct evidence that asynapsis does indeed drive MSCI. We also show that a substantial degree of transcriptional repression of the sex chromosomes is retained postmeiotically, and we provide evidence that this postmeiotic repression is a downstream consequence of MSCI/MSUC. While this postmeiotic repression occurs after the loss of MSUC-related proteins at the end of prophase, other histone modifications associated with transcriptional repression have by then become established.

  17. Tandem DNA-bound cAMP-CRP complexes are required for transcriptional repression of the deoP2 promoter by the CytR repressor in Escherichia coli

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søgaard-Andersen, Lotte; Møllegaard, N E; Douthwaite, S R;

    1990-01-01

    region, and is sufficient for activation; the second site, CRP-2, centred around -93, is indispensable for repression. Here we demonstrate, by means of in vivo titration, that CytR interaction with deoP2 depends not only on CRP-2, but also on CRP-1 and the length and possibly the sequence separating...... these two sites. Also, point mutations in either CRP site reduce or abolish CytR titration; however, no co-operativity is observed in the interaction of CytR with the two CRP binding sites. Furthermore, the reduction in CytR titration parallels the reduction in binding of cAMP-CRP to the mutated CRP sites...

  18. miRNA-dependent translational repression in the Drosophila ovary.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Reich

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Drosophila ovary is a tissue rich in post-transcriptional regulation of gene expression. Many of the regulatory factors are proteins identified via genetic screens. The more recent discovery of microRNAs, which in other animals and tissues appear to regulate translation of a large fraction of all mRNAs, raised the possibility that they too might act during oogenesis. However, there has been no direct demonstration of microRNA-dependent translational repression in the ovary. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, quantitative analyses of transcript and protein levels of transgenes with or without synthetic miR-312 binding sites show that the binding sites do confer translational repression. This effect is dependent on the ability of the cells to produce microRNAs. By comparison with microRNA-dependent translational repression in other cell types, the regulated mRNAs and the protein factors that mediate repression were expected to be enriched in sponge bodies, subcellular structures with extensive similarities to the P bodies found in other cells. However, no such enrichment was observed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results reveal the variety of post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms that operate in the Drosophila ovary, and have implications for the mechanisms of miRNA-dependent translational control used in the ovary.

  19. Chromatin Repressive Complexes in Stem Cells, Development, and Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Laugesen, Anne; Helin, Kristian

    2014-01-01

    of the polycomb repressive complexes, PRC1 and PRC2, and the HDAC1- and HDAC2-containing complexes, NuRD, Sin3, and CoREST, in stem cells, development, and cancer, as well as the ongoing efforts to develop therapies targeting these complexes in human cancer. Furthermore, we discuss the role of repressive......The chromatin environment is essential for the correct specification and preservation of cell identity through modulation and maintenance of transcription patterns. Many chromatin regulators are required for development, stem cell maintenance, and differentiation. Here, we review the roles...... complexes in modulating thresholds for gene activation and their importance for specification and maintenance of cell fate....

  20. Transcriptional elongation factor ENL phosphorylated by ATM recruits polycomb and switches off transcription for DSB repair.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ui, Ayako; Nagaura, Yuko; Yasui, Akira

    2015-05-07

    Transcription is repressed if a DNA double-strand break (DSB) is introduced in close proximity to a transcriptional activation site at least in part by H2A-ubiquitination. While ATM signaling is involved, how it controls H2A-ubiquitination remains unclear. Here, we identify that, in response to DSBs, a transcriptional elongation factor, ENL (MLLT1), is phosphorylated by ATM at conserved SQ sites. This phosphorylation increases the interaction between ENL and the E3-ubiquitin-ligase complex of Polycomb Repressive Complex 1 (PRC1) via BMI1. This interaction promotes enrichment of PRC1 at transcription elongation sites near DSBs to ubiquitinate H2A leading to transcriptional repression. ENL SQ sites and BMI1 are necessary for KU70 accumulation at DSBs near active transcription sites and cellular resistance to DSBs. Our data suggest that ATM-dependent phosphorylation of ENL functions as switch from elongation to Polycomb-mediated repression to preserve genome integrity.

  1. Evidence that regulatory protein MarA of Escherichia coli represses rob by steric hindrance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McMurry, Laura M; Levy, Stuart B

    2010-08-01

    The MarA protein of Escherichia coli can both activate and repress the initiation of transcription, depending on the position and orientation of its degenerate 20-bp binding site ("marbox") at the promoter. For all three known repressed genes, the marbox overlaps the promoter. It has been reported that MarA represses the rob promoter via an RNA polymerase (RNAP)-DNA-MarA ternary complex. Under similar conditions, we found a ternary complex for the repressed purA promoter also. These findings, together with the backwards orientation of repressed marboxes, suggested a unique interaction of MarA with RNAP in repression. However, no repression-specific residues of MarA could be found among 38 single-alanine replacement mutations previously shown to retain activation function or among mutants from random mutagenesis. Mutations Thr12Ala, Arg36Ala, Thr95Ile, and Pro106Ala were more damaging for activation than for repression, some up to 10-fold, so these residues may play a specific role in activation. We found that nonspecific binding of RNAP to promoterless regions of DNA was presumably responsible for the ternary complexes seen previously. When RNAP binding was promoter specific, MarA reduced RNAP access to the rob promoter; there was little or no ternary complex. These findings strongly implicate steric hindrance as the mechanism of repression of rob by MarA.

  2. Repression of RNA polymerase by the archaeo-viral regulator ORF145/RIP

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sheppard, Carol; Blombach, Fabian; Belsom, Adam

    2016-01-01

    initiation, as well as elongation. Both host and viral promoters are subjected to ORF145 repression. Thus, ORF145 has the properties of a global transcription repressor and its overexpression is toxic for Sulfolobus. On the basis of its properties, we have re-named ORF145 RNAP Inhibitory Protein (RIP).......Little is known about how archaeal viruses perturb the transcription machinery of their hosts. Here we provide the first example of an archaeo-viral transcription factor that directly targets the host RNA polymerase (RNAP) and efficiently represses its activity. ORF145 from the temperate Acidianus...

  3. The unified theory of repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erdelyi, Matthew Hugh

    2006-10-01

    Repression has become an empirical fact that is at once obvious and problematic. Fragmented clinical and laboratory traditions and disputed terminology have resulted in a Babel of misunderstandings in which false distinctions are imposed (e.g., between repression and suppression) and necessary distinctions not drawn (e.g., between the mechanism and the use to which it is put, defense being just one). "Repression" was introduced by Herbart to designate the (nondefensive) inhibition of ideas by other ideas in their struggle for consciousness. Freud adapted repression to the defensive inhibition of "unbearable" mental contents. Substantial experimental literatures on attentional biases, thought avoidance, interference, and intentional forgetting exist, the oldest prototype being the work of Ebbinghaus, who showed that intentional avoidance of memories results in their progressive forgetting over time. It has now become clear, as clinicians had claimed, that the inaccessible materials are often available and emerge indirectly (e.g., procedurally, implicitly). It is also now established that the Ebbinghaus retention function can be partly reversed, with resulting increases of conscious memory over time (hypermnesia). Freud's clinical experience revealed early on that exclusion from consciousness was effected not just by simple repression (inhibition) but also by a variety of distorting techniques, some deployed to degrade latent contents (denial), all eventually subsumed under the rubric of defense mechanisms ("repression in the widest sense"). Freudian and Bartlettian distortions are essentially the same, even in name, except for motive (cognitive vs. emotional), and experimentally induced false memories and other "memory illusions" are laboratory analogs of self-induced distortions.

  4. Basic Pentacysteine Proteins Repress Abscisic Acid Insensitive4 Expression via Direct Recruitment of the Polycomb-Repressive Complex 2 in Arabidopsis Root Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mu, Ying; Zou, Meijuan; Sun, Xuwu; He, Baoye; Xu, Xiumei; Liu, Yini; Zhang, Lixin; Chi, Wei

    2017-01-30

    Plant transcription factors generally act in complex regulatory networks that function at multiple levels to govern plant developmental programs. Dissection of the interconnections among different classes of transcription factors can elucidate these regulatory networks and thus improve our understanding of plant development. Here, we investigated the molecular and functional relationships of the transcription factors ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE 4 (ABI4) and members of the BASIC PENTACYSTEINE (BPC) family in lateral root (LR) development of Arabidopsis thaliana Genetic analysis showed that BPCs promote LR development by repressing ABI4 expression. Molecular analysis showed that BPCs bind to the ABI4 promoter and repress ABI4 transcription in roots. BPCs directly recruit the Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2) to the ABI4 locus and epigenetically repress ABI4 expression by catalyzing the trimethylation of histone H3 at lysine 27. In addition, BPCs and ABI4 coordinate their activities to fine-tune the levels of PIN-FORMED1, a component of the auxin signaling pathway, and thus modulate LR formation. These results establish a functional relationship between two universal and multiple-role transcription factors and provide insight into the mechanisms of the transcriptional regulatory networks that affect Arabidopsis organogenesis.

  5. TALE-mediated modulation of transcriptional enhancers in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, Justin; Stern, David L

    2013-08-01

    We tested whether transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) could mediate repression and activation of endogenous enhancers in the Drosophila genome. TALE repressors (TALERs) targeting each of the five even-skipped (eve) stripe enhancers generated repression specifically of the focal stripes. TALE activators (TALEAs) targeting the eve promoter or enhancers caused increased expression primarily in cells normally activated by the promoter or targeted enhancer, respectively. This effect supports the view that repression acts in a dominant fashion on transcriptional activators and that the activity state of an enhancer influences TALE binding or the ability of the VP16 domain to enhance transcription. In these assays, the Hairy repression domain did not exhibit previously described long-range transcriptional repression activity. The phenotypic effects of TALER and TALEA expression in larvae and adults are consistent with the observed modulations of eve expression. TALEs thus provide a novel tool for detection and functional modulation of transcriptional enhancers in their native genomic context.

  6. Evaluation of sgRNA target sites for CRISPR-mediated repression of TP53.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid E B Lawhorn

    Full Text Available The CRISPR (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats platform has been developed as a general method to direct proteins of interest to gene targets. While the native CRISPR system delivers a nuclease that cleaves and potentially mutates target genes, researchers have recently employed catalytically inactive CRISPR-associated 9 nuclease (dCas9 in order to target and repress genes without DNA cleavage or mutagenesis. With the intent of improving repression efficiency in mammalian cells, researchers have also fused dCas9 with a KRAB repressor domain. Here, we evaluated different genomic sgRNA targeting sites for repression of TP53. The sites spanned a 200-kb distance, which included the promoter, transcript sequence, and regions flanking the endogenous human TP53 gene. We showed that repression up to 86% can be achieved with dCas9 alone (i.e., without use of the KRAB domain by targeting the complex to sites near the TP53 transcriptional start site. This work demonstrates that efficient transcriptional repression of endogenous human genes can be achieved by the targeted delivery of dCas9. Yet, the efficiency of repression strongly depends on the choice of the sgRNA target site.

  7. Gene Repression in Haloarchaea Using the CRISPR (Clustered Regularly Interspaced Short Palindromic Repeats)-Cas I-B System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stachler, Aris-Edda; Marchfelder, Anita

    2016-07-15

    The clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-Cas system is used by bacteria and archaea to fend off foreign genetic elements. Since its discovery it has been developed into numerous applications like genome editing and regulation of transcription in eukaryotes and bacteria. For archaea currently no tools for transcriptional repression exist. Because molecular biology analyses in archaea become more and more widespread such a tool is vital for investigating the biological function of essential genes in archaea. Here we use the model archaeon Haloferax volcanii to demonstrate that its endogenous CRISPR-Cas system I-B can be harnessed to repress gene expression in archaea. Deletion of cas3 and cas6b genes results in efficient repression of transcription. crRNAs targeting the promoter region reduced transcript levels down to 8%. crRNAs targeting the reading frame have only slight impact on transcription. crRNAs that target the coding strand repress expression only down to 88%, whereas crRNAs targeting the template strand repress expression down to 8%. Repression of an essential gene results in reduction of transcription levels down to 22%. Targeting efficiencies can be enhanced by expressing a catalytically inactive Cas3 mutant. Genes can be targeted on plasmids or on the chromosome, they can be monocistronic or part of a polycistronic operon.

  8. An Introduction to CRISPR Technology for Genome Activation and Repression in Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Dan; Qi, Lei S

    2016-01-04

    CRISPR interference/activation (CRISPRi/a) technology provides a simple and efficient approach for targeted repression or activation of gene expression in the mammalian genome. It is highly flexible and programmable, using an RNA-guided nuclease-deficient Cas9 (dCas9) protein fused with transcriptional regulators for targeting specific genes to effect their regulation. Multiple studies have shown how this method is an effective way to achieve efficient and specific transcriptional repression or activation of single or multiple genes. Sustained transcriptional modulation can be obtained by stable expression of CRISPR components, which enables directed reprogramming of cell fate. Here, we introduce the basics of CRISPRi/a technology for genome repression or activation.

  9. Ubiquitous Brms1 expression is critical for mammary carcinoma metastasis suppression via promotion of apoptosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morbidity and mortality of breast cancer patients are drastically increased when primary tumor cells are able to spread to distant sites and proliferate to become secondary lesions. Effective treatment of metastatic disease has been limited; therefore, an increased molecular understanding to identif...

  10. Wnt-mediated repression via bipartite DNA recognition by TCF in the Drosophila hematopoietic system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chen U; Blauwkamp, Timothy A; Burby, Peter E; Cadigan, Ken M

    2014-08-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays many important roles in animal development, tissue homeostasis and human disease. Transcription factors of the TCF family mediate many Wnt transcriptional responses, promoting signal-dependent activation or repression of target gene expression. The mechanism of this specificity is poorly understood. Previously, we demonstrated that for activated targets in Drosophila, TCF/Pangolin (the fly TCF) recognizes regulatory DNA through two DNA binding domains, with the High Mobility Group (HMG) domain binding HMG sites and the adjacent C-clamp domain binding Helper sites. Here, we report that TCF/Pangolin utilizes a similar bipartite mechanism to recognize and regulate several Wnt-repressed targets, but through HMG and Helper sites whose sequences are distinct from those found in activated targets. The type of HMG and Helper sites is sufficient to direct activation or repression of Wnt regulated cis-regulatory modules, and protease digestion studies suggest that TCF/Pangolin adopts distinct conformations when bound to either HMG-Helper site pair. This repressive mechanism occurs in the fly lymph gland, the larval hematopoietic organ, where Wnt/β-catenin signaling controls prohemocytic differentiation. Our study provides a paradigm for direct repression of target gene expression by Wnt/β-catenin signaling and allosteric regulation of a transcription factor by DNA.

  11. Musashi mediates translational repression of the Drosophila hypoxia inducible factor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertolin, Agustina P.; Katz, Maximiliano J.; Yano, Masato; Pozzi, Berta; Acevedo, Julieta M.; Blanco-Obregón, Dalmiro; Gándara, Lautaro; Sorianello, Eleonora; Kanda, Hiroshi; Okano, Hideyuki; Srebrow, Anabella; Wappner, Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation to hypoxia depends on a conserved α/β heterodimeric transcription factor called Hypoxia Inducible Factor (HIF), whose α-subunit is regulated by oxygen through different concurrent mechanisms. In this study, we have identified the RNA binding protein dMusashi, as a negative regulator of the fly HIF homologue Sima. Genetic interaction assays suggested that dMusashi participates of the HIF pathway, and molecular studies carried out in Drosophila cell cultures showed that dMusashi recognizes a Musashi Binding Element in the 3′ UTR of the HIFα transcript, thereby mediating its translational repression in normoxia. In hypoxic conditions dMusashi is downregulated, lifting HIFα repression and contributing to trigger HIF-dependent gene expression. Analysis performed in mouse brains revealed that murine Msi1 protein physically interacts with HIF-1α transcript, suggesting that the regulation of HIF by Msi might be conserved in mammalian systems. Thus, Musashi is a novel regulator of HIF that inhibits responses to hypoxia specifically when oxygen is available. PMID:27141964

  12. Regulating transcription traffic around DSBs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plosky, Brian S

    2015-05-07

    If a double-strand break (DSB) occurs and either a DNA polymerase or RNA polymerase is coming along, how do we save the train? In this issue of Molecular Cell, Ui et al. (2015) describe a connection between an elongation factor and a repressive complex to prevent transcription in proximity to a DSB.

  13. The HTLV-1 Tax Oncoprotein Represses Ku80 Gene Expression

    OpenAIRE

    Ducu, Razvan I.; Dayaram, Tajhal; Marriott, Susan J

    2011-01-01

    The HTLV-I oncoprotein Tax interferes with DNA double strand break repair. Since non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) is a major pathway used to repair DNA double strand breaks we examined the effect of Tax on this pathway, with particular interest in the expression and function of Ku80, a critical component of the NHEJ pathway. Tax expression decreased Ku80 mRNA and protein levels, and repressed transcription from the Ku80 promoter. Conversely, Ku80 mRNA increased following siRNA knockdown of T...

  14. Snai1 represses Nanog to promote embryonic stem cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Galvagni

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cell (ESC self-renewal and pluripotency is maintained by an external signaling pathways and intrinsic regulatory networks involving ESC-specific transcriptional complexes (mainly formed by OCT3/4, Sox2 and Nanog proteins, the Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2 and DNA methylation [1–8]. Among these, Nanog represents the more ESC specific factor and its repression correlates with the loss of pluripotency and ESC differentiation [9–11]. During ESC early differentiation, many development-associated genes become upregulated and although, in general, much is known about the pluripotency self-renewal circuitry, the molecular events that lead ESCs to exit from pluripotency and begin differentiation are largely unknown. Snai1 is one the most early induced genes during ESC differentiation in vitro and in vivo [12,13]. Here we show that Snai1 is able to directly repress several stemness-associated genes including Nanog. We use a ESC stable-line expressing a inducible Snai1 protein. We here show microarray analysis of embryonic stem cells (ESC expressing Snail-ER at various time points of induction with 4-OH. Data were deposited in Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO datasets under reference GSE57854 and here: http://epigenetics.hugef-research.org/data.php.

  15. Nitric oxide participates in plant flowering repression by ascorbate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Senthil Kumar, Rajendran; Shen, Chin-Hui; Wu, Pei-Yin; Suresh Kumar, Subbiah; Hua, Moda Sang; Yeh, Kai-Wun

    2016-01-01

    In Oncidium, redox homeostasis involved in flowering is mainly due to ascorbic acid (AsA). Here, we discovered that Oncidium floral repression is caused by an increase in AsA-mediated NO levels, which is directed by the enzymatic activities of nitrate reductase (NaR) and nitrite reducatase (NiR). Through Solexa transcriptomic analysis of two libraries, ‘pseudobulb with inflorescent bud’ (PIB) and ‘pseudobulb with axillary bud’ (PAB), we identified differentially expressed genes related to NO metabolism. Subsequently, we showed a significant reduction of NaR enzymatic activities and NO levels during bolting and blooming stage, suggesting that NO controlled the phase transition and flowering process. Applying AsA to Oncidium PLB (protocorm-like bodies) significantly elevated the NO content and enzyme activities. Application of sodium nitroprusside (-NO donor) on Arabidopsis vtc1 mutant caused late flowering and expression level of flowering-associated genes (CO, FT and LFY) were reduced, suggesting NO signaling is vital for flowering repression. Conversely, the flowering time of noa1, an Arabidopsis NO-deficient mutant, was not altered after treatment with L-galacturonate, a precursor of AsA, suggesting AsA is required for NO-biosynthesis involved in the NO-mediated flowering-repression pathway. Altogether, Oncidium bolting is tightly regulated by AsA-mediated NO level and downregulation of transcriptional levels of NO metabolism genes. PMID:27731387

  16. The tumor suppressor, parafibromin, mediates histone H3 K9 methylation for cyclin D1 repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yong-Jin; Han, Jeung-Whan; Youn, Hong-Duk; Cho, Eun-Jung

    2010-01-01

    Parafibromin, a component of the RNA polymerase II-associated PAF1 complex, is a tumor suppressor linked to hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome and sporadic parathyroid carcinoma. Parafibromin induces cell cycle arrest by repressing cyclin D1 via an unknown mechanism. Here, we show that parafibromin interacts with the histone methyltransferase, SUV39H1, and functions as a transcriptional repressor. The central region (128-227 amino acids) of parafibromin is important for both the interaction with SUV39H1 and transcriptional repression. Parafibromin associated with the promoter and coding regions of cyclin D1 and was required for the recruitment of SUV39H1 and the induction of H3 K9 methylation but not H3 K4 methylation. RNA interference analysis showed that SUV39H1 was critical for cyclin D1 repression. These data suggest that parafibromin plays an unexpected role as a repressor in addition to its widely known activity associated with transcriptional activation. Parafibromin as a part of the PAF1 complex might downregulate cyclin D1 expression by integrating repressive H3 K9 methylation during transcription.

  17. Pluripotency factors and Polycomb Group proteins repress aryl hydrocarbon receptor expression in murine embryonic stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chia-I Ko

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR is a transcription factor and environmental sensor that regulates expression of genes involved in drug-metabolism and cell cycle regulation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses, Ahr ablation in mice and studies with orthologous genes in invertebrates suggest that AHR may also play a significant role in embryonic development. To address this hypothesis, we studied the regulation of Ahr expression in mouse embryonic stem cells and their differentiated progeny. In ES cells, interactions between OCT3/4, NANOG, SOX2 and Polycomb Group proteins at the Ahr promoter repress AHR expression, which can also be repressed by ectopic expression of reprogramming factors in hepatoma cells. In ES cells, unproductive RNA polymerase II binds at the Ahr transcription start site and drives the synthesis of short abortive transcripts. Activation of Ahr expression during differentiation follows from reversal of repressive marks in Ahr promoter chromatin, release of pluripotency factors and PcG proteins, binding of Sp factors, establishment of histone marks of open chromatin, and engagement of active RNAPII to drive full-length RNA transcript elongation. Our results suggest that reversible Ahr repression in ES cells holds the gene poised for expression and allows for a quick switch to activation during embryonic development.

  18. Pluripotency factors and Polycomb Group proteins repress aryl hydrocarbon receptor expression in murine embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Chia-I; Wang, Qin; Fan, Yunxia; Xia, Ying; Puga, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) is a transcription factor and environmental sensor that regulates expression of genes involved in drug-metabolism and cell cycle regulation. Chromatin immunoprecipitation analyses, Ahr ablation in mice and studies with orthologous genes in invertebrates suggest that AHR may also play a significant role in embryonic development. To address this hypothesis, we studied the regulation of Ahr expression in mouse embryonic stem cells and their differentiated progeny. In ES cells, interactions between OCT3/4, NANOG, SOX2 and Polycomb Group proteins at the Ahr promoter repress AHR expression, which can also be repressed by ectopic expression of reprogramming factors in hepatoma cells. In ES cells, unproductive RNA polymerase II binds at the Ahr transcription start site and drives the synthesis of short abortive transcripts. Activation of Ahr expression during differentiation follows from reversal of repressive marks in Ahr promoter chromatin, release of pluripotency factors and PcG proteins, binding of Sp factors, establishment of histone marks of open chromatin, and engagement of active RNAPII to drive full-length RNA transcript elongation. Our results suggest that reversible Ahr repression in ES cells holds the gene poised for expression and allows for a quick switch to activation during embryonic development.

  19. The role of Hansenula polymorpha MIG1 homologues in catabolite repression and pexophagy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stasyk, Olena G.; Van Zutphen, Tim; Kang, Huyn Ah; Stasyk, Oleh V.; Veenhuis, Marten; Sibirny, Andriy A.

    2007-01-01

    In the methanol-utilizing yeast Hansenula polymorpha, glucose and ethanol trigger the repression of peroxisomal enzymes at the transcriptional level, and rapid and selective degradation of methanol-induced peroxisomes by means of a process termed pexophagy. In this report we demonstrate that deficie

  20. Gene Silencing Triggers Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 Recruitment to CpG Islands Genome Wide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riising, Eva Madi; Vacher-Comet, Itys; Leblanc, Benjamin Olivier;

    2014-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are required for normal differentiation and development and are frequently deregulated in cancer. PcG proteins are involved in gene silencing; however, their role in initiation and maintenance of transcriptional repression is not well defined. Here, we show that knoc...

  1. Decitabine represses osteoclastogenesis through inhibition of RANK and NF-κB.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Hanfeng; Mi, Baoguo; Li, Yong; Wu, Wei; Tan, Peng; Fang, Zhong; Li, Jing; Zhang, Yong; Li, Feng

    2015-05-01

    DNA methylation is essential for maintenance of stable repression of gene transcription during differentiation and tumorigenesis. Demethylating reagents including decitabine could release the repression, leading to perturbed transcription program. Recently others and we showed that, in B cell lymphomas, decitabine repressed B cell specific gene transcription and activated NF-κB signaling, causing decreased expression of translocated oncogenes including MYC and attenuated tumor cell proliferation. During osteoclastogenesis, changes in DNA methylation occurred in numerous genes, implicating important roles for DNA methylation in osteoclastogenesis. In the present study, we found that decitabine inhibited osteoclastogenesis. The inhibitory effect could be at least partially attributed to reduced expression of multiple osteoclast specific genes including RANK by decitabine. Moreover, decitabine inhibited activity of NF-κB, AP-1 and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), but not PI3K/Akt pathway. In vivo, using ovariectomized mouse as a model, we observed that decitabine reduced the osteoclast activity and bone loss. In conclusion, our findings demonstrated that decitabine was an inhibitor of osteoclastogenesis by repression of osteoclast specific transcription program including the RANK, NF-κB and AP-1 pathways. DNA methylation might be indispensable for osteoclastogenesis. The use of decitabine could represent a novel strategy in treatment of diseases associated with increased osteoclast activity.

  2. Friedreich's ataxia--a case of aberrant transcription termination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Jill Sergesketter; Napierala, Marek

    2015-01-01

    Reduced expression of the mitochondrial protein Frataxin (FXN) is the underlying cause of Friedreich's ataxia. We propose a model of premature termination of FXN transcription induced by pathogenic expanded GAA repeats that links R-loop structures, antisense transcription, and heterochromatin formation as a novel mechanism of transcriptional repression in Friedreich's ataxia.

  3. ATF3 represses PPARγ expression and inhibits adipocyte differentiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Min-Kyung; Jung, Myeong Ho, E-mail: jung0603@pusan.ac.kr

    2014-11-07

    Highlights: • ATF3 decrease the expression of PPARγ and its target gene in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. • ATF3 represses the promoter activity of PPARγ2 gene. • ATF/CRE (−1537/−1530) is critical for ATF3-mediated downregulation of PPARγ. • ATF3 binds to the promoter region containing the ATF/CRE. • ER stress inhibits adipocyte differentiation through downregulation of PPARγ by ATF3. - Abstract: Activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) is a stress-adaptive transcription factor that mediates cellular stress response signaling. We previously reported that ATF3 represses CCAAT/enhancer binding protein α (C/EBPα) expression and inhibits 3T3-L1 adipocyte differentiation. In this study, we explored potential role of ATF3 in negatively regulating peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPARγ). ATF3 decreased the expression of PPARγ and its target gene in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. ATF3 also repressed the activity of −2.6 Kb promoter of mouse PPARγ2. Overexpression of PPARγ significantly prevented the ATF3-mediated inhibition of 3T3-L1 differentiation. Transfection studies with 5′ deleted-reporters showed that ATF3 repressed the activity of −2037 bp promoter, whereas it did not affect the activity of −1458 bp promoter, suggesting that ATF3 responsive element is located between the −2037 and −1458. An electrophoretic mobility shift assay and chromatin immunoprecipitation assay demonstrated that ATF3 binds to ATF/CRE site (5′-TGACGTTT-3′) between −1537 and −1530. Mutation of the ATF/CRE site abrogated ATF3-mediated transrepression of the PPARγ2 promoter. Treatment with thapsigargin, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducer, increased ATF3 expression, whereas it decreased PPARγ expression. ATF3 knockdown significantly blocked the thapsigargin-mediated downregulation of PPARγ expression. Furthermore, overexpression of PPARγ prevented inhibition of 3T3-L1 differentiation by thapsigargin. Collectively, these results suggest that ATF3-mediated

  4. Structure and regulatory function of plant transcription factors

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    The expression of inducible genes in plants is regulated byspecific transcription factors at the transcriptional level. A typical transcription factor usually contains a DNA-binding domain, a transcription regulation domain, a dimerization site and a nuclear localization domain. These functional domains define the characteristic, localization and regulatory role of a transcription factor. Transcription factors recognize and bind to specific cis-acting elements or interact with other proteins, and then activate or repress the transcription of target genes by their functional domains. In recent years, elucidation on the structure and function of transcription factors has become an important subject in plant molecular biology.

  5. Nuclear receptors in inflammation control: repression by GR and beyond.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chinenov, Yurii; Gupte, Rebecca; Rogatsky, Inez

    2013-11-05

    Inflammation is a protective response of organisms to pathogens, irritation or injury. Primary inflammatory sensors activate an array of signaling pathways that ultimately converge upon a few transcription factors such as AP1, NFκB and STATs that in turn stimulate expression of inflammatory genes to ultimately eradicate infection and repair the damage. A disturbed balance between activation and inhibition of inflammatory pathways can set the stage for chronic inflammation which is increasingly recognized as a key pathogenic component of autoimmune, metabolic, cardiovascular and neurodegenerative disorders. Nuclear receptors (NRs) are a large family of transcription factors many of which are known for their potent anti-inflammatory actions. Activated by small lipophilic ligands, NRs interact with a wide range of transcription factors, cofactors and chromatin-modifying enzymes, assembling numerous cell- and tissue-specific DNA-protein transcriptional regulatory complexes with diverse activities. Here we discuss established and emerging roles and mechanisms by which NRs and, in particular, the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) repress genes encoding cytokines, chemokines and other pro-inflammatory mediators.

  6. Translational repression by PUF proteins in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chritton, Jacqueline J; Wickens, Marvin

    2010-06-01

    PUF (Pumilio and FBF) proteins provide a paradigm for mRNA regulatory proteins. They interact with specific sequences in the 3' untranslated regions (UTRs) of target mRNAs and cause changes in RNA stability or translational activity. Here we describe an in vitro translation assay that reconstitutes the translational repression activity of canonical PUF proteins. In this system, recombinant PUF proteins were added to yeast cell lysates to repress reporter mRNAs bearing the 3'UTRs of specific target mRNAs. PUF proteins from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Caenorhabditis elegans were active in the assay and were specific by multiple criteria. Puf5p, a yeast PUF protein, repressed translation of four target RNAs. Repression mediated by the HO 3'UTR was particularly efficient, due to a specific sequence in that 3'UTR. The sequence lies downstream from the PUF binding site and does not affect PUF protein binding. PUF-mediated repression was sensitive to the distance between the ORF and the regulatory elements in the 3'UTR: excessive distance decreased repression activity. Our data demonstrate that PUF proteins function in vitro across species, that different mRNA targets are regulated differentially, and that specific ancillary sequences distinguish one yeast mRNA target from another. We suggest a model in which PUF proteins can control translation termination or elongation.

  7. Derangement of a factor upstream of RARalpha triggers the repression of a pleiotropic epigenetic network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Corlazzoli

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chromatin adapts and responds to extrinsic and intrinsic cues. We hypothesize that inheritable aberrant chromatin states in cancer and aging are caused by genetic/environmental factors. In previous studies we demonstrated that either genetic mutations, or loss, of retinoic acid receptor alpha (RARalpha, can impair the integration of the retinoic acid (RA signal at the chromatin of RA-responsive genes downstream of RARalpha, and can lead to aberrant repressive chromatin states marked by epigenetic modifications. In this study we tested whether the mere interference with the availability of RA signal at RARalpha, in cells with an otherwise functional RARalpha, can also induce epigenetic repression at RA-responsive genes downstream of RARalpha. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To hamper the availability of RA at RARalpha in untransformed human mammary epithelial cells, we targeted the cellular RA-binding protein 2 (CRABP2, which transports RA from the cytoplasm onto the nuclear RARs. Stable ectopic expression of a CRABP2 mutant unable to enter the nucleus, as well as stable knock down of endogenous CRABP2, led to the coordinated transcriptional repression of a few RA-responsive genes downstream of RARalpha. The chromatin at these genes acquired an exacerbated repressed state, or state "of no return". This aberrant state is unresponsive to RA, and therefore differs from the physiologically repressed, yet "poised" state, which is responsive to RA. Consistent with development of homozygosis for epigenetically repressed loci, a significant proportion of cells with a defective CRABP2-mediated RA transport developed heritable phenotypes indicative of loss of function. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Derangement/lack of a critical factor necessary for RARalpha function induces epigenetic repression of a RA-regulated gene network downstream of RARalpha, with major pleiotropic biological outcomes.

  8. Lactose-mediated carbon catabolite repression of putrescine production in dairy Lactococcus lactis is strain dependent.

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Rio, Beatriz; Ladero, Victor; Redruello, Begoña; Linares, Daniel M; Fernández, Maria; Martín, Maria Cruz; Alvarez, Miguel A

    2015-06-01

    Lactococcus lactis is the lactic acid bacterial (LAB) species most widely used as a primary starter in the dairy industry. However, several strains of L. lactis produce the biogenic amine putrescine via the agmatine deiminase (AGDI) pathway. We previously reported the putrescine biosynthesis pathway in L. lactis subsp. cremoris GE2-14 to be regulated by carbon catabolic repression (CCR) via glucose but not lactose (Linares et al., 2013). The present study shows that both these sugars repress putrescine biosynthesis in L. lactis subsp. lactis T3/33, a strain isolated from a Spanish artisanal cheese. Furthermore, we demonstrated that both glucose and lactose repressed the transcriptional activity of the aguBDAC catabolic genes of the AGDI route. Finally, a screening performed in putrescine-producing dairy L. lactis strains determined that putrescine biosynthesis was repressed by lactose in all the L. lactis subsp. lactis strains tested, but in only one L. lactis subsp. cremoris strain. Given the obvious importance of the lactose-repression in cheese putrescine accumulation, it is advisable to consider the diversity of L. lactis in this sense and characterize consequently the starter cultures to select the safest strains.

  9. Targeted repression of AXIN2 and MYC gene expression using designer TALEs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rennoll, Sherri A.; Scott, Samantha A.; Yochum, Gregory S., E-mail: gsy3@psu.edu

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • We designed TALE–SID fusion proteins to target AXIN2 and MYC. • TALE–SIDs bound the chromosomal AXIN2 and MYC genes and repressed their expression. • TALE–SIDs repress β-catenin{sup S45F}-dependent AXIN2 and MYC transcription. - Abstract: Designer TALEs (dTALEs) are chimeric transcription factors that can be engineered to regulate gene expression in mammalian cells. Whether dTALEs can block gene transcription downstream of signal transduction cascades, however, has yet to be fully explored. Here we tested whether dTALEs can be used to target genes whose expression is controlled by Wnt/β-catenin signaling. TALE DNA binding domains were engineered to recognize sequences adjacent to Wnt responsive enhancer elements (WREs) that control expression of axis inhibition protein 2 (AXIN2) and c-MYC (MYC). These custom DNA binding domains were linked to the mSin3A interaction domain (SID) to generate TALE–SID chimeric repressors. The TALE–SIDs repressed luciferase reporter activity, bound their genomic target sites, and repressed AXIN2 and MYC expression in HEK293 cells. We generated a novel HEK293 cell line to determine whether the TALE–SIDs could function downstream of oncogenic Wnt/β-catenin signaling. Treating these cells with doxycycline and tamoxifen stimulates nuclear accumulation of a stabilized form of β-catenin found in a subset of colorectal cancers. The TALE–SIDs repressed AXIN2 and MYC expression in these cells, which suggests that dTALEs could offer an effective therapeutic strategy for the treatment of colorectal cancer.

  10. Regional repression of a Drosophila POU box gene in the endoderm involves inductive interactions between germ layers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Affolter, M; Walldorf, U; Kloter, U; Schier, A F; Gehring, W J

    1993-04-01

    An induction process occurring between the mesodermal and the endodermal germ layers has recently been described in the regulation of the Drosophila homeotic gene labial (lab). We report here that proper spatial regulation of the Drosophila POU box gene pdm-1 products also involves interaction between these two germ layers. pdm-1 transcripts are initially present in both the anterior and the posterior endodermal midgut primordia. Upon fusion of the two primordia, transcripts disappear from two regions in the endoderm, a central domain and an anterior domain. The anterior repression domain of pdm-1 is independent of the expression of known homeotic genes and genes encoding secreted signalling molecules in the visceral mesoderm, both for its positioning and its repression. Repression in the central domain requires both the homeotic gene Ultrabithorax (Ubx) and the decapentaplegic (dpp) gene, which encodes a secreted protein. Both of these genes are also required for lab induction. However, the analysis of pdm-1 expression in various mutant backgrounds indicates that the regulation of lab and pdm-1 across germ layers is controlled by different genetic cascades. Our study indicates that dpp is not the signal that dictates central pdm-1 repression across germ layers and suggests that in the same midgut region, different signalling pathways result in the differential activation or repression of potential transcription factors.

  11. Repression of mesodermal fate by foxa, a key endoderm regulator of the sea urchin embryo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveri, Paola; Walton, Katherine D; Davidson, Eric H; McClay, David R

    2006-11-01

    The foxa gene is an integral component of the endoderm specification subcircuit of the endomesoderm gene regulatory network in the Strongylocentrotus purpuratus embryo. Its transcripts become confined to veg2, then veg1 endodermal territories, and, following gastrulation, throughout the gut. It is also expressed in the stomodeal ectoderm. gatae and otx genes provide input into the pregastrular regulatory system of foxa, and Foxa represses its own transcription, resulting in an oscillatory temporal expression profile. Here, we report three separate essential functions of the foxa gene: it represses mesodermal fate in the veg2 endomesoderm; it is required in postgastrular development for the expression of gut-specific genes; and it is necessary for stomodaeum formation. If its expression is reduced by a morpholino, more endomesoderm cells become pigment and other mesenchymal cell types, less gut is specified, and the larva has no mouth. Experiments in which blastomere transplantation is combined with foxa MASO treatment demonstrate that, in the normal endoderm, a crucial role of Foxa is to repress gcm expression in response to a Notch signal, and hence to repress mesodermal fate. Chimeric recombination experiments in which veg2, veg1 or ectoderm cells contained foxa MASO show which region of foxa expression controls each of the three functions. These experiments show that the foxa gene is a component of three distinct embryonic gene regulatory networks.

  12. I-mfa domain proteins specifically interact with SERTA domain proteins and repress their transactivating functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusano, Shuichi; Shiimura, Yuki; Eizuru, Yoshito

    2011-09-01

    The I-mfa domain proteins I-mfa and HIC are considered to be candidate tumor suppressor genes and have been shown to be involved in transcriptional regulation. We show here that I-mfa and HIC specifically interact with SEI-1 through their C-terminal I-mfa domains in vivo. This interaction affects the intracellular localization of I-mfa and requires the region of SEI-1 between 30 and 90 amino acids, which includes its SERTA domain, and results in repression of its intrinsic transcriptional activity. I-mfa also decreases the levels of the SEI-1·DP-1 complex and endogenous Fbxw7 mRNA, the expression of which is coregulated by E2F·DP-1 and SEI-1 in an interaction-dependent manner in vitro. In addition, I-mfa also specifically interacts with other SERTA domain-containing proteins, including SEI-2, SEI-3, SERTAD3 and SERTAD4, through its I-mfa domain in vivo. This interaction also affects the intracellular localization of I-mfa and represses the intrinsic transcriptional activities of SEI-2 and SERTAD3, which are also involved in the E2F-dependent transcription. These data reveal for the first time that I-mfa domain proteins interact with SERTA domain proteins and negatively regulate their transcriptional activity. Because SEI-1, SEI-2 and SERTAD3, whose intrinsic transcriptional activities are repressed by I-mfa, are suggested to be oncogenes, I-mfa domain proteins may be involved in their oncogenic functions by negatively regulating their transcriptional activities.

  13. DELLA proteins interact with FLC to repress flowering transition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongwei Guo

    2016-01-01

    Flowering is a highly orchestrated and extremely critical process in a plant’s life cycle. Previous study has demonstrated that SUPPRESSOR OF OVEREXPRESSION OF CONSTANS 1 (SOC1) and FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) integrate the gibberellic acid (GA) signaling pathway and vernalization pathway in regulating flowering time, but detailed molecular mechanisms remain largely unclear. In GA signaling pathway, DELLA proteins are a group of master transcriptional regulators, while in vernalization pathway FLOWERING LOCUS C (FLC) is a core transcriptional repressor that down-regulates the expression of SOC1 and FT. Here, we report that DELLA proteins interact with FLC in vitro and in vivo, and the LHRI domains of DELLAs and the C-terminus of MADS domain of FLC are required for these interactions. Phenotypic and gene expression analysis showed that mutation of FLC reduces while over-expression of FLC enhances the GA response in the flowering process. Further, DELLA-FLC interactions promote the repression ability of FLC on its target genes. In summary, these findings report that the interaction between MADS box transcription factor FLC and GRAS domain regulator DELLAs may integrate various signaling inputs in flowering time control, and shed new light on the regulatory mechanism both for FLC and DELLAs in regulating gene expression.

  14. REST represses a subset of the pancreatic endocrine differentiation program

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin, David; Kim, Yung-Hae; Sever, Dror

    2015-01-01

    To contribute to devise successful beta-cell differentiation strategies for the cure of Type 1 diabetes we sought to uncover barriers that restrict endocrine fate acquisition by studying the role of the transcriptional repressor REST in the developing pancreas. Rest expression is prevented...... in neurons and in endocrine cells, which is necessary for their normal function. During development, REST represses a subset of genes in the neuronal differentiation program and Rest is down-regulated as neurons differentiate. Here, we investigate the role of REST in the differentiation of pancreatic...... endocrine cells, which are molecularly close to neurons. We show that Rest is widely expressed in pancreas progenitors and that it is down-regulated in differentiated endocrine cells. Sustained expression of REST in Pdx1(+) progenitors impairs the differentiation of endocrine-committed Neurog3...

  15. SIRT6 represses LINE1 retrotransposons by ribosylating KAP1 but this repression fails with stress and age

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Meter, Michael; Kashyap, Mehr; Rezazadeh, Sarallah; Geneva, Anthony J.; Morello, Timothy D.; Seluanov, Andrei; Gorbunova, Vera

    2014-01-01

    L1 retrotransposons are an abundant class of transposable elements which pose a threat to genome stability and may play a role in age-related pathologies such as cancer. Recent evidence indicates that L1s become more active in somatic tissues during the course of aging; the mechanisms underlying this phenomenon remain unknown, however. Here we report that the longevity regulating protein, SIRT6, is a powerful repressor of L1 activity. Specifically, SIRT6 binds to the 5′UTR of L1 loci, where it mono-ADP ribosylates the nuclear corepressor protein, KAP1, and facilitates KAP1 interaction with the heterochromatin factor, HP1α, thereby contributing to the packaging of L1 elements into transcriptionally repressive heterochromatin. During the course of aging, and also in response to DNA damage, however, we find that SIRT6 is depleted from L1 loci, allowing for the activation of these previously silenced retroelements. PMID:25247314

  16. MAF2 Is Regulated by Temperature-Dependent Splicing and Represses Flowering at Low Temperatures in Parallel with FLM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara A Airoldi

    Full Text Available Plants enter their reproductive phase when the environmental conditions are favourable for the successful production of progeny. The transition from vegetative to reproductive phase is influenced by several environmental factors including ambient temperature. In the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, SHORT VEGETATIVE PHASE (SVP is critical for this pathway; svp mutants cannot modify their flowering time in response to ambient temperature. SVP encodes a MADS-box transcription factor that directly represses genes that promote flowering. SVP binds DNA in complexes with other MADS-box transcription factors, including FLOWERING LOCUS M (FLM, which acts with SVP to repress the floral transition at low temperatures. Small temperature changes post-transcriptionally regulate FLM through temperature-dependent alternative splicing (TD-AS. As ambient temperature increases, the predominant FLM splice isoform shifts to encode a protein incapable of exerting a repressive effect on flowering. Here we characterize a closely related MADS-box transcription factor, MADS AFFECTING FLOWERING2 (MAF2, which has independently evolved TD-AS. At low temperatures the most abundant MAF2 splice variant encodes a protein that interacts with SVP to repress flowering. At increased temperature the relative abundance of splice isoforms shifts in favour of an intron-retaining variant that introduces a premature termination codon. We show that this isoform encodes a protein that cannot interact with SVP or repress flowering. At lower temperatures MAF2 and SVP repress flowering in parallel with FLM and SVP, providing an additional input to sense ambient temperature for the control of flowering.

  17. Genetic and epigenetic control of RKIP transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Datar, Ila; Tegegne, Hanna; Qin, Kevin; Al-Mulla, Fahd; Bitar, Milad S; Trumbly, Robert J; Yeung, Kam C

    2014-01-01

    Raf kinase inhibitory protein (RKIP) is known to modulate key signaling cascades and regulate normal physiological processes such as cellular proliferation, differentiation, and apoptosis. The expression of RKIP is found to be downregulated in several cancer metastases and the repressed RKIP expression can be reactivated on treatment with chemotherapeutic agents. RKIP is a proven tumor metastasis suppressor gene and investigating the mechanisms of transcriptional regulation of RKIP is therefore of immense clinical importance. In this review, we discuss the basal expression of RKIP in various tissues and the genetic aspects of the RKIP chromosomal locus including the structure of the RKIP promoter as well as gene regulatory elements such as enhancers. We also review the genetic and epigenetic modulation of RKIP transcription through EZH2, a component of the polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) and sequence specific transcription factors (TFs) BACH1 and Snail. Emerging experimental evidence supports a unifying model in which both these TFs repress RKIP transcription in cancers by recruiting the EZH2 containing repressive complex to the proximal RKIP promoter. Finally, we review the known mechanisms employed by different types of chemotherapeutic agents to activate RKIP expression in cancer cells.

  18. GATA4 mediates gene repression in the mature mouse small intestine through interactions with friend of GATA (FOG) cofactors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Beuling (Eva); T. Bosse (Tjalling); D.J. Kerk (Daniel); C.M. Piaseckyj (Christina); Y. Fujiwara (Yuko); S.G. Katz (Samuel); S.H. Orkin (Stuart); R.J. Grand (Richard); S.D. Krasinski (Stephen)

    2008-01-01

    textabstractGATA4, a transcription factor expressed in the proximal small intestine but not in the distal ileum, maintains proximal-distal distinctions by multiple processes involving gene repression, gene activation, and cell fate determination. Friend of GATA (FOG) is an evolutionarily conserved f

  19. SUMO modification of Stra13 is required for repression of cyclin D1 expression and cellular growth arrest.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaju Wang

    Full Text Available Stra13, a basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH transcription factor is involved in myriad biological functions including cellular growth arrest, differentiation and senescence. However, the mechanisms by which its transcriptional activity and function are regulated remain unclear. In this study, we provide evidence that post-translational modification of Stra13 by Small Ubiquitin-like Modifier (SUMO dramatically potentiates its ability to transcriptionally repress cyclin D1 and mediate G(1 cell cycle arrest in fibroblast cells. Mutation of SUMO acceptor lysines 159 and 279 located in the C-terminal repression domain has no impact on nuclear localization; however, it abrogates association with the co-repressor histone deacetylase 1 (HDAC1, attenuates repression of cyclin D1, and prevents Stra13-mediated growth suppression. HDAC1, which promotes cellular proliferation and cell cycle progression, antagonizes Stra13 sumoylation-dependent growth arrest. Our results uncover an unidentified regulatory axis between Stra13 and HDAC1 in progression through the G(1/S phase of the cell cycle, and provide new mechanistic insights into regulation of Stra13-mediated transcriptional repression by sumoylation.

  20. Repression of the pyr operon in Lactobacillus plantarum prevents its ability to grow at low carbon dioxide levels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nicoloff, Hervé; Elagöz, Aram; Arsène-Ploetze, Florence

    2005-01-01

    (encoding CPS-A) responds to arginine availability, whereas pyrAaAb (encoding CPS-P) is part of the pyrR1BCAaAbDFE operon coding for the de novo pyrimidine pathway repressed by exogenous uracil. The pyr operon is regulated by transcription attenuation mediated by a trans-acting repressor that binds...

  1. Repression of hla by rot is dependent on sae in Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dongmei; Cheung, Ambrose

    2008-03-01

    The regulatory locus sae is a two-component system in Staphylococcus aureus that regulates many important virulence factors, including alpha-toxin (encoded by hla) at the transcriptional level. The SarA homologs Rot and SarT were previously shown to be repressors of hla in selected S. aureus backgrounds. To delineate the interaction of rot and sae and the contribution of sarT to hla expression, an assortment of rot and sae isogenic single mutants, a rot sae double mutant, and a rot sae sarT markerless triple mutant were constructed from wild-type strain COL. Using Northern blot analysis and transcriptional reporter gene green fluorescent protein, fusion, and phenotypic assays, we found that the repression of hla by rot is dependent on sae. A rot sae sarT triple mutant was not able to rescue the hla defect of the rot sae double mutant. Among the three sae promoters, the distal sae P3 promoter is the strongest in vitro. Interestingly, the sae P3 promoter activities correlate with hla expression in rot, rot sae, and rot sae sarT mutants of COL. Transcriptional study has also shown that rot repressed sae, especially at the sae P3 promoter. Collectively, our data implicated the importance of sae in the rot-mediated repression of hla in S. aureus.

  2. Different levels of catabolite repression optimize growth in stable and variable environments.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron M New

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Organisms respond to environmental changes by adapting the expression of key genes. However, such transcriptional reprogramming requires time and energy, and may also leave the organism ill-adapted when the original environment returns. Here, we study the dynamics of transcriptional reprogramming and fitness in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae in response to changing carbon environments. Population and single-cell analyses reveal that some wild yeast strains rapidly and uniformly adapt gene expression and growth to changing carbon sources, whereas other strains respond more slowly, resulting in long periods of slow growth (the so-called "lag phase" and large differences between individual cells within the population. We exploit this natural heterogeneity to evolve a set of mutants that demonstrate how the frequency and duration of changes in carbon source can favor different carbon catabolite repression strategies. At one end of this spectrum are "specialist" strategies that display high rates of growth in stable environments, with more stringent catabolite repression and slower transcriptional reprogramming. The other mutants display less stringent catabolite repression, resulting in leaky expression of genes that are not required for growth in glucose. This "generalist" strategy reduces fitness in glucose, but allows faster transcriptional reprogramming and shorter lag phases when the cells need to shift to alternative carbon sources. Whole-genome sequencing of these mutants reveals that mutations in key regulatory genes such as HXK2 and STD1 adjust the regulation and transcriptional noise of metabolic genes, with some mutations leading to alternative gene regulatory strategies that allow "stochastic sensing" of the environment. Together, our study unmasks how variable and stable environments favor distinct strategies of transcriptional reprogramming and growth.

  3. Repression-Sensitization and Health Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayton, William F.; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Examined relationship between repression-sensitization (R-S) and visits to prison infirmary for males during a one-year period. Main effect for R-S dimension was significant for total number of visits, number of medically justified visits, and number of medically unjustified visits. Sensitizers had significantly more visits than repressors.…

  4. Political Repression in U.S. History

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Minnen, C.A.

    2009-01-01

    The authors of the essays in this book amass considerable historical evidence illustrating various forms of political repression and its relationship with democracy in the United States, from the late-eighteenth century to the present. They discuss efforts, made mostly but not only by government age

  5. Nitrogen Catabolite Repression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hofman-Bang, H Jacob Peider

    1999-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae the expression of all known nitrogen catabolite pathways are regulated by four regulators known as Gln3, Gat1, Da180, and Deh1. This is known as nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR). They bind to motifs in the promoter region to the consensus sequence S' GATAA 3'. Gln3...

  6. ArgR-dependent repression of arginine and histidine transport genes in Escherichia coli K-12.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caldara, Marina; Minh, Phu Nguyen Le; Bostoen, Sophie; Massant, Jan; Charlier, Daniel

    2007-10-19

    In Escherichia coli L-arginine is taken up by three periplasmic binding protein-dependent transport systems that are encoded by two genetic loci: the artPIQM-artJ and argT-hisJQMP gene clusters. The transcription of the artJ, artPIQM and hisJQMP genes and operons is repressed by liganded ArgR, whereas argT, encoding the LAO (lysine, arginine, ornithine) periplasmic binding protein, is insensitive to the repressor. Here we characterize the repressible Esigma70 P artJ, P artP and P hisJ promoters and demonstrate that the cognate operators consist of two 18 bp ARG boxes separated by 3 bp. Determination of the energy landscape of the ArgR-operator contacts by missing contact probing and mutant studies indicated that each box of a pair contributes to complex formation in vitro and to the repressibility in vivo, but to a different extent. The organization of the ARG boxes and promoter elements in the control regions of the uptake genes is distinct from that of the arginine biosynthetic genes. The hisJQMP operon is the first member of the E. coli ArgR regulon, directly repressed by liganded ArgR, where none of the core promoter elements overlaps the ARG boxes. Single round in vitro transcription assays and DNase I footprinting experiments indicate that liganded ArgR inhibits P artJ and P artP promoter activity by steric exclusion of the RNA polymerase. In contrast, ArgR-mediated repression of P hisJ by inhibition of RNA polymerase binding appears to occur through topological changes of the promoter region.

  7. Foxk proteins repress the initiation of starvation-induced atrophy and autophagy programs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bowman, Christopher John; Ayer, Donald E; Dynlacht, Brian David

    2014-12-01

    Autophagy is the primary catabolic process triggered in response to starvation. Although autophagic regulation within the cytosolic compartment is well established, it is becoming clear that nuclear events also regulate the induction or repression of autophagy. Nevertheless, a thorough understanding of the mechanisms by which sequence-specific transcription factors modulate expression of genes required for autophagy is lacking. Here, we identify Foxk proteins (Foxk1 and Foxk2) as transcriptional repressors of autophagy in muscle cells and fibroblasts. Interestingly, Foxk1/2 serve to counter-balance another forkhead transcription factor, Foxo3, which induces an overlapping set of autophagic and atrophic targets in muscle. Foxk1/2 specifically recruits Sin3A-HDAC complexes to restrict acetylation of histone H4 and expression of critical autophagy genes. Remarkably, mTOR promotes the transcriptional activity of Foxk1 by facilitating nuclear entry to specifically limit basal levels of autophagy in nutrient-rich conditions. Our study highlights an ancient, conserved mechanism whereby nutritional status is interpreted by mTOR to restrict autophagy by repressing essential autophagy genes through Foxk-Sin3-mediated transcriptional control.

  8. Repression of cardiac hypertrophy by KLF15: underlying mechanisms and therapeutic implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost J Leenders

    Full Text Available The Kruppel-like factor (KLF family of transcription factors regulates diverse cell biological processes including proliferation, differentiation, survival and growth. Previous studies have shown that KLF15 inhibits cardiac hypertrophy by repressing the activity of pivotal cardiac transcription factors such as GATA4, MEF2 and myocardin. We set out this study to characterize the interaction of KLF15 with putative other transcription factors. We first show that KLF15 interacts with myocardin-related transcription factors (MRTFs and strongly represses the transcriptional activity of MRTF-A and MRTF-B. Second, we identified a region within the C-terminal zinc fingers of KLF15 that contains the nuclear localization signal. Third, we investigated whether overexpression of KLF15 in the heart would have therapeutic potential. Using recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAV we have overexpressed KLF15 specifically in the mouse heart and provide the first evidence that elevation of cardiac KLF15 levels prevents the development of cardiac hypertrophy in a model of Angiotensin II induced hypertrophy.

  9. MYC acts via the PTEN tumor suppressor to elicit autoregulation and genome-wide gene repression by activation of the Ezh2 methyltransferase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaur, Mandeep; Cole, Michael D.

    2012-01-01

    The control of normal cell growth is a balance between stimulatory and inhibitory signals. MYC is a pleiotropic transcription factor that both activates and represses a broad range of target genes and is indispensable for cell growth. While much is known about gene activation by MYC, there is no established mechanism for the majority of MYC repressed genes. We report that MYC transcriptionally activates the PTEN tumor suppressor in normal cells to inactivate the PI3K pathway, thus suppressing AKT activation. Suppression of AKT enhances the activity of the EZH2 histone methyltransferase, a subunit of the epigenetic repressor Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 (PRC2), while simultaneously stabilizing the protein. MYC mediated enhancement in EZH2 protein level and activity results in local and genome-wide elevation in the repressive H3K27me3 histone modification, leading to widespread gene repression including feedback autoregulation of the MYC gene itself. Depletion of either PTEN or EZH2 and inhibition of the PI3K/AKT pathway leads to gene derepression. Importantly, expression of a phospho-defective EZH2 mutant is sufficient to recapitulate nearly half of all MYC-mediated gene repression. We present a novel epigenetic model for MYC-mediated gene repression and propose that PTEN and MYC exist in homeostatic balance to control normal growth which is disrupted in cancer cells. PMID:23135913

  10. The SUPERMAN protein is an active repressor whose carboxy-terminal repression domain is required for the development of normal flowers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiratsu, Keiichiro; Ohta, Masaru; Matsui, Kyoko; Ohme-Takagi, Masaru

    2002-03-13

    SUPERMAN was identified as a putative regulator of transcription that acts in floral development, but its function remains to be clarified. We demonstrate here that SUPERMAN is an active repressor whose repression domain is located in the carboxy-terminal region. Ectopic expression of SUPERMAN that lacked the repression domain resulted in a phenotype similar to that of superman mutants, demonstrating that the repression activity of SUPERMAN is essential for the development of normal flowers. Constitutive expression of SUPERMAN resulted in a severe dwarfism but did not affect cell size, indicating that SUPERMAN might regulate genes that are involved in cell division.

  11. The B-type lamin is required for somatic repression of testis-specific gene clusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shevelyov, Y. Y.; Lavrov, S. A.; Mikhaylova, L. M.; Nurminsky, I. D.; Kulathinal, R. J.; Egorova, K. S.; Rozovsky, Y. M.; Nurminsky, D. I.

    2009-01-01

    Large clusters of coexpressed tissue-specific genes are abundant on chromosomes of diverse species. The genes coordinately misexpressed in diverse diseases are also found in similar clusters, suggesting that evolutionarily conserved mechanisms regulate expression of large multigenic regions both in normal development and in its pathological disruptions. Studies on individual loci suggest that silent clusters of coregulated genes are embedded in repressed chromatin domains, often localized to the nuclear periphery. To test this model at the genome-wide scale, we studied transcriptional regulation of large testis-specific gene clusters in somatic tissues of Drosophila. These gene clusters showed a drastic paucity of known expressed transgene insertions, indicating that they indeed are embedded in repressed chromatin. Bioinformatics analysis suggested the major role for the B-type lamin, LamDmo, in repression of large testis-specific gene clusters, showing that in somatic cells as many as three-quarters of these clusters interact with LamDmo. Ablation of LamDmo by using mutants and RNAi led to detachment of testis-specific clusters from nuclear envelope and to their selective transcriptional up-regulation in somatic cells, thus providing the first direct evidence for involvement of the B-type lamin in tissue-specific gene repression. Finally, we found that transcriptional activation of the lamina-bound testis-specific gene cluster in male germ line is coupled with its translocation away from the nuclear envelope. Our studies, which directly link nuclear architecture with coordinated regulation of tissue-specific genes, advance understanding of the mechanisms underlying both normal cell differentiation and developmental disorders caused by lesions in the B-type lamins and interacting proteins. PMID:19218438

  12. I-mfa domain proteins specifically interact with HTLV-1 Tax and repress its transactivating functions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kusano, Shuichi, E-mail: skusano@m2.kufm.kagoshima-u.ac.jp [Division of Persistent and Oncogenic Viruses, Center for Chronic Viral Diseases, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Yoshimitsu, Makoto; Hachiman, Miho [Division of Hematology and Immunology, Center for Chronic Viral Diseases, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan); Ikeda, Masanori [Division of Persistent and Oncogenic Viruses, Center for Chronic Viral Diseases, Graduate School of Medical and Dental Sciences, Kagoshima University, 8-35-1 Sakuragaoka, Kagoshima 890-8544 (Japan)

    2015-12-15

    The I-mfa domain proteins HIC (also known as MDFIC) and I-mfa (also known as MDFI) are candidate tumor suppressor genes that are involved in cellular and viral transcriptional regulation. Here, we show that HIC and I-mfa directly interact with human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) Tax protein in vitro. In addition, HIC and I-mfa repress Tax-dependent transactivation of an HTLV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) reporter construct in COS-1, Jurkat and high-Tax-producing HTLV-1-infected T cells. HIC also interacts with Tax through its I-mfa domain in vivo and represses Tax-dependent transactivation of HTLV-1 LTR and NF-κB reporter constructs in an interaction-dependent manner. Furthermore, we show that HIC decreases the nuclear distribution and stimulates the proteasomal degradation of Tax. These data reveal that HIC specifically interacts with HTLV-1 Tax and negatively regulates Tax transactivational activity by altering its subcellular distribution and stability. - Highlights: • I-mfa domain proteins, HIC and I-mfa, specifically interact with HTLV-1 Tax. • HIC and I-mfa repress the Tax-dependent transactivation of HTLV-1 LTR. • HIC represses the Tax-dependent transactivation of NF-κΒ. • HIC decreases the nuclear distribution of Tax. • HIC stimulates the proteasomal degradation of Tax.

  13. Interplay of Dynamic Transcription and Chromatin Remodeling: Lessons from Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Klopf

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Regulation of transcription involves dynamic rearrangements of chromatin structure. The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has a variety of highly conserved factors necessary for these reconstructions. Chromatin remodelers, histone modifiers and histone chaperones directly associate to promoters and open reading frames of exposed genes and facilitate activation and repression of transcription. We compare two distinct patterns of induced transcription: Sustained transcribed genes switch to an activated state where they remain as long as the induction signal is present. In contrast, single pulsed transcribed genes show a quick and strong induction pulse resulting in high transcript levels followed by adaptation and repression to basal levels. We discuss intensively studied promoters and coding regions from both groups for their co-factor requirements during transcription. Interplay between chromatin restructuring factors and dynamic transcription is highly variable and locus dependent.

  14. De-repression of RaRF-mediated RAR repression by adenovirus E1A in the nucleolus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Um, Soo-Jong; Youn, Hye Sook; Kim, Eun-Joo

    2014-02-21

    Transcriptional activity of the retinoic acid receptor (RAR) is regulated by diverse binding partners, including classical corepressors and coactivators, in response to its ligand retinoic acid (RA). Recently, we identified a novel corepressor of RAR called the retinoic acid resistance factor (RaRF) (manuscript submitted). Here, we report how adenovirus E1A stimulates RAR activity by associating with RaRF. Based on immunoprecipitation (IP) assays, E1A interacts with RaRF through the conserved region 2 (CR2), which is also responsible for pRb binding. The first coiled-coil domain of RaRF was sufficient for this interaction. An in vitro glutathione-S-transferase (GST) pull-down assay was used to confirm the direct interaction between E1A and RaRF. Further fluorescence microscopy indicated that E1A and RaRF were located in the nucleoplasm and nucleolus, respectively. However, RaRF overexpression promoted nucleolar translocation of E1A from the nucleoplasm. Both the RA-dependent interaction of RAR with RaRF and RAR translocation to the nucleolus were disrupted by E1A. RaRF-mediated RAR repression was impaired by wild-type E1A, but not by the RaRF binding-defective E1A mutant. Taken together, our data suggest that E1A is sequestered to the nucleolus by RaRF through a specific interaction, thereby leaving RAR in the nucleoplasm for transcriptional activation.

  15. MYCN repression of Lifeguard/FAIM2 enhances neuroblastoma aggressiveness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planells-Ferrer, L; Urresti, J; Soriano, A; Reix, S; Murphy, D M; Ferreres, J C; Borràs, F; Gallego, S; Stallings, R L; Moubarak, R S; Segura, M F; Comella, J X

    2014-01-01

    Neuroblastoma (NBL) is the most common solid tumor in infants and accounts for 15% of all pediatric cancer deaths. Several risk factors predict NBL outcome: age at the time of diagnosis, stage, chromosome alterations and MYCN (V-Myc Avian Myelocytomatosis Viral Oncogene Neuroblastoma-Derived Homolog) amplification, which characterizes the subset of the most aggressive NBLs with an overall survival below 30%. MYCN-amplified tumors develop exceptional chemoresistance and metastatic capacity. These properties have been linked to defects in the apoptotic machinery, either by silencing components of the extrinsic apoptotic pathway (e.g. caspase-8) or by overexpression of antiapoptotic regulators (e.g. Bcl-2, Mcl-1 or FLIP). Very little is known on the implication of death receptors and their antagonists in NBL. In this work, the expression levels of several death receptor antagonists were analyzed in multiple human NBL data sets. We report that Lifeguard (LFG/FAIM2 (Fas apoptosis inhibitory molecule 2)/NMP35) is downregulated in the most aggressive and undifferentiated tumors. Intringuingly, although LFG has been initially characterized as an antiapoptotic protein, we have found a new association with NBL differentiation. Moreover, LFG repression resulted in reduced cell adhesion, increased sphere growth and enhanced migration, thus conferring a higher metastatic capacity to NBL cells. Furthermore, LFG expression was found to be directly repressed by MYCN at the transcriptional level. Our data, which support a new functional role for a hitherto undiscovered MYCN target, provide a new link between MYCN overexpression and increased NBL metastatic properties. PMID:25188511

  16. RNAi and heterochromatin repress centromeric meiotic recombination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellermeier, Chad; Higuchi, Emily C; Phadnis, Naina

    2010-01-01

    During meiosis, the formation of viable haploid gametes from diploid precursors requires that each homologous chromosome pair be properly segregated to produce an exact haploid set of chromosomes. Genetic recombination, which provides a physical connection between homologous chromosomes, is essen......During meiosis, the formation of viable haploid gametes from diploid precursors requires that each homologous chromosome pair be properly segregated to produce an exact haploid set of chromosomes. Genetic recombination, which provides a physical connection between homologous chromosomes....... Surprisingly, one mutant derepressed for recombination in the heterochromatic mating-type region during meiosis and several mutants derepressed for centromeric gene expression during mitotic growth are not derepressed for centromeric recombination during meiosis. These results reveal a complex relation between...... types of repression by heterochromatin. Our results also reveal a previously undemonstrated role for RNAi and heterochromatin in the repression of meiotic centromeric recombination and, potentially, in the prevention of birth defects by maintenance of proper chromosome segregation during meiosis....

  17. Transthyretin represses neovascularization in diabetic retinopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Jun

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The apoptosis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells has been reportedly induced by the protein transthyretin (TTR). In human ocular tissue, TTR is generally considered to be secreted mainly by retinal pigment epithelial cells (hRPECs); however, whether TTR affects the development of neovascularization in diabetic retinopathy (DR) remains unclear. Methods Natural and simulated DR media were used to culture human retinal microvascular endothelial cells (hRECs). Hyperglycemia was simulated by increasing the glucose concentration from 5.5 mM up to 25 mM, while hypoxia was induced with 200 µM CoCl2. To understand the effects of TTR on hRECs, cell proliferation was investigated under natural and DR conditions. Overexpression of TTR, an in vitro wound-healing assay, and a tube formation assay were employed to study the repression of TTR on hRECs. Real-time fluorescence quantitative PCR (qRT-PCR) was used to study the mRNA levels of DR-related genes, such as Tie2, VEGFR1, VEGFR2, Angpt1, and Angpt2. Results The proliferation of hRECs was significantly decreased in the simulated hyperglycemic and hypoxic DR environments. The cells were further repressed by added exogenous or endogenous TTR only under hyperglycemic conditions. The in vitro migration and tube formation processes of the hRECs were inhibited with TTR; furthermore, in the hyperglycemia and hyperglycemia/hypoxia environments, the levels of Tie2 and Angpt1 mRNA were enhanced with exogenous TTR, while those of VEGFR1, VEGFR2, and Angpt1 were repressed. Conclusions In hyperglycemia, the proliferation, migration, and neovascularization of hRECs were significantly inhibited by TTR. The key genes for DR neovascularization, including Tie2, VEGFR1, VEGFR2, Angpt1, and Angpt2, were regulated by TTR. Under DR conditions, TTR significantly represses neovascularization by inhibiting the proliferation, migration and tube formation of hRECs. PMID:27746673

  18. Polycomb repressive complex 1 controls uterine decidualization

    OpenAIRE

    Fenghua Bian; Fei Gao; Kartashov, Andrey V.; Jegga, Anil G; Artem Barski; Das, Sanjoy K.

    2016-01-01

    Uterine stromal cell decidualization is an essential part of the reproductive process. Decidual tissue development requires a highly regulated control of the extracellular tissue remodeling; however the mechanism of this regulation remains unknown. Through systematic expression studies, we detected that Cbx4/2, Rybp, and Ring1B [components of polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1)] are predominantly utilized in antimesometrial decidualization with polyploidy. Immunofluorescence analyses reveale...

  19. DNA Topoisomerases Maintain Promoters in a State Competent for Transcriptional Activation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Jakob Madsen; Fredsøe, Jacob Christian; Rødgaard, Morten Terpager;

    2012-01-01

    To investigate the role of DNA topoisomerases in transcription, we have studied global gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells deficient for topoisomerases I and II and performed single-gene analyses to support our findings. The genome-wide studies show a general transcriptional down-re...... transcriptional activation of genes with a repressible/inducible mode of regulation....

  20. Transcriptional activation by the thyroid hormone receptor through ligand-dependent receptor recruitment and chromatin remodelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grøntved, Lars; Waterfall, Joshua J; Kim, Dong Wook;

    2015-01-01

    A bimodal switch model is widely used to describe transcriptional regulation by the thyroid hormone receptor (TR). In this model, the unliganded TR forms stable, chromatin-bound complexes with transcriptional co-repressors to repress transcription. Binding of hormone dissociates co-repressors and...

  1. Photoperiodic control of the floral transition through a distinct polycomb repressive complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yizhong; Gu, Xiaofeng; Yuan, Wenya; Schmitz, Robert J; He, Yuehui

    2014-03-31

    Polycomb group (PcG) complexes such as PRC1 mediate transcriptional repression. Here, we show that the plant-specific EMBRYONIC FLOWER1 (EMF1), LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1, and a histone H3 lysine-4 demethylase form a distinct PcG complex, termed EMF1c, that plays PRC1-like roles and is crucial for regulation of the florigen gene FLOWERING LOCUS T (FT) in Arabidopsis. Long-day photoperiods promote FT expression activation in leaf veins specifically at dusk through the photoperiod pathway to induce Arabidopsis flowering. We found that before dusk and at night, a vascular EMF1c directly represses FT expression to prevent photoperiod-independent flowering, whereas at dusk EMF1 binding to FT chromatin is disrupted by the photoperiod pathway, leading to proper FT activation. Furthermore, a MADS-domain transcription factor and potent floral repressor binds EMF1 to repress FT expression. Our study reveals that the vascular EMF1c integrates inputs from several flowering-regulatory pathways to synchronize flowering time to environmental cues.

  2. EVEN-SKIPPED HOMEOBOX 1 controls human ES cell differentiation by directly repressing GOOSECOID expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kalisz, Mark; Winzi, Maria Karin; Bisgaard, Hanne Cathrine;

    2012-01-01

    TGFß signaling patterns the primitive streak, yet little is known about transcriptional effectors that mediate the cell fate choices during streak-like development in mammalian embryos and in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Here we demonstrate that cross-antagonistic actions of EVEN-SKIPPED HOMEOBOX 1...... (EVX1) and GOOSECOID (GSC) regulate cell fate decisions in streak-like progenitors derived from human ES cells exposed to BMP4 and/or activin. We found that EVX1 repressed GSC expression and promoted formation of posterior streak-like progeny in response to BMP4, and conversely that GSC repressed EVX1...... expression and was required for development of anterior streak-like progeny in response to activin. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that EVX1 bound to the GSC 5'-flanking region in BMP4 treated human ES cells, and band shift assays identified two EVX1 binding sites in the GSC 5'-region...

  3. Multi-Faceted Characterization of a Novel LuxR-Repressible Promoter Library for Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susanna Zucca

    Full Text Available The genetic elements regulating the natural quorum sensing (QS networks of several microorganisms are widely used in synthetic biology to control the behaviour of single cells and engineered bacterial populations via ad-hoc constructed synthetic circuits. A number of novel engineering-inspired biological functions have been implemented and model systems have also been constructed to improve the knowledge on natural QS systems. Synthetic QS-based parts, such as promoters, have been reported in literature, to provide biological components with functions that are not present in nature, like modified induction logic or activation/repression by additional molecules. In this work, a library of promoters that can be repressed by the LuxR protein in presence of the QS autoinducer N-3-oxohexanoyl-L-homoserine lactone (AHL was reported for Escherichia coli, to expand the toolkit of genetic parts that can be used to engineer novel synthetic QS-based systems. The library was constructed via polymerase chain reaction with highly constrained degenerate oligonucleotides, designed according to the consensus -35 and -10 sequences of a previously reported constitutive promoter library of graded strength, to maximize the probability of obtaining functional clones. All the promoters have a lux box between the -35 and -10 regions, to implement a LuxR-repressible behaviour. Twelve unique library members of graded strength (about 100-fold activity range were selected to form the final library and they were characterized in several genetic contexts, such as in different plasmids, via different reporter genes, in presence of a LuxR expression cassette in different positions and in response to different AHL concentrations. The new obtained regulatory parts and corresponding data can be exploited by synthetic biologists to implement an artificial AHL-dependent repression of transcription in genetic circuits. The target transcriptional activity can be selected among the

  4. Repression of Smad3 by Stat3 and c-Ski/SnoN induces gefitinib resistance in lung adenocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makino, Yojiro; Yoon, Jeong-Hwan; Bae, Eunjin; Kato, Mitsuyasu; Miyazawa, Keiji; Ohira, Tatsuo; Ikeda, Norihiko; Kuroda, Masahiko; Mamura, Mizuko

    2017-03-04

    Cancer-associated inflammation develops resistance to the epidermal growth-factor receptor (EGFR) tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) in non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLCs) harboring oncogenic EGFR mutations. Stat3-mediated interleukin (IL)-6 signaling and Smad-mediated transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) signaling pathways play crucial regulatory roles in cancer-associated inflammation. However, mechanisms how these pathways regulate sensitivity and resistance to EGFR-TKI in NSCLCs remain largely undetermined. Here we show that signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat)3 represses Smad3 in synergy with the potent negative regulators of TGF-β signaling, c-Ski and SnoN, whereby renders gefitinib-sensitive HCC827 cells resistant. We found that IL-6 signaling via phosphorylated Stat3 induced gefitinib resistance as repressing transcription of Smad3, whereas TGF-β enhanced gefitinib sensitivity as activating transcription of Smad3 in HCC827 cells with gefitinib-sensitizing EGFR mutation. Promoter analyses showed that Stat3 synergized with c-Ski/SnoN to repress Smad2/3/4-induced transcription of the Smad3 gene. Smad3 was found to be an apoptosis inducer, which upregulated pro-apoptotic genes such as caspase-3 and downregulated anti-apoptotic genes such as Bcl-2. Our results suggest that derepression of Smad3 can be a therapeutic strategy to prevent gefitinib-resistance in NSCLCs with gefitinib-sensitizing EGFR mutation.

  5. Bile Acids Function Synergistically To Repress Invasion Gene Expression in Salmonella by Destabilizing the Invasion Regulator HilD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eade, Colleen R; Hung, Chien-Che; Bullard, Brian; Gonzalez-Escobedo, Geoffrey; Gunn, John S; Altier, Craig

    2016-08-01

    Salmonella spp. are carried by and can acutely infect agricultural animals and humans. After ingestion, salmonellae traverse the upper digestive tract and initiate tissue invasion of the distal ileum, a virulence process carried out by the type III secretion system encoded within Salmonella pathogenicity island 1 (SPI-1). Salmonellae coordinate SPI-1 expression with anatomical location via environmental cues, one of which is bile, a complex digestive fluid that causes potent repression of SPI-1 genes. The individual components of bile responsible for SPI-1 repression have not been previously characterized, nor have the bacterial signaling processes that modulate their effects been determined. Here, we characterize the mechanism by which bile represses SPI-1 expression. Individual bile acids exhibit repressive activity on SPI-1-regulated genes that requires neither passive diffusion nor OmpF-mediated entry. By using genetic methods, the effects of bile and bile acids were shown to require the invasion gene transcriptional activator hilD and to function independently of known upstream signaling pathways. Protein analysis techniques showed that SPI-1 repression by bile acids is mediated by posttranslational destabilization of HilD. Finally, we found that bile acids function synergistically to achieve the overall repressive activity of bile. These studies demonstrate a common mechanism by which diverse environmental cues (e.g., certain short-chain fatty acids and bile acids) inhibit SPI-1 expression. These data provide information relevant to Salmonella pathogenesis during acute infection in the intestine and during chronic infection of the gallbladder and inform the basis for development of therapeutics to inhibit invasion as a means of repressing Salmonella pathogenicity.

  6. A jumonji (Jarid2) protein complex represses cyclin D1 expression by methylation of histone H3-K9.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shirato, Haruki; Ogawa, Satoko; Nakajima, Kuniko; Inagawa, Masayo; Kojima, Mizuyo; Tachibana, Makoto; Shinkai, Yoichi; Takeuchi, Takashi

    2009-01-09

    Covalent modifications of histone tails have critical roles in regulating gene expression. Previously, we identified the jumonji (jmj, Jarid2) gene, the jmjC domain, and a Jmj family. Recently, many Jmj family proteins have been shown to be histone demethylases, and jmjC is the catalytic domain. However, Jmj does not have histone demethylase activity because the jmjC domain lacks conserved residues for binding to cofactors. Independently of these studies, we previously showed that Jmj binds to the cyclin D1 promoter and represses the transcription of cyclin D1. Here, we show the mechanisms by which Jmj represses the transcription of cyclin D1. We found that a protein complex of Jmj had histone methyltransferase activity toward histone H3 lysine 9 (H3-K9). We also found that Jmj bound to the H3-K9 methyltransferases G9a and GLP. Expression of Jmj recruited G9a and GLP to the cyclin D1 promoter and increased H3-K9 methylation. Inactivation of both G9a and GLP, but not of only G9a, inhibited the methylation of H3-K9 in the cyclin D1 promoter and repression of cyclin D1 expression by Jmj. These results suggest that Jmj methylates H3-K9 and represses cyclin D1 expression through G9a and GLP, and that Jmj family proteins can regulate gene expression by not only histone demethylation but also other histone modification.

  7. Collaboration of MLLT1/ENL, Polycomb and ATM for transcription and genome integrity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ui, Ayako; Yasui, Akira

    2016-04-25

    Polycomb group (PcG) repress, whereas Trithorax group (TrxG) activate transcription for tissue development and cellular proliferation, and misregulation of these factors is often associated with cancer. ENL (MLLT1) and AF9 (MLLT3) are fusion partners of Mixed Lineage Leukemia (MLL), TrxG proteins, and are factors in Super Elongation Complex (SEC). SEC controls transcriptional elongation to release RNA polymerase II, paused around transcription start site. In MLL rearranged leukemia, several components of SEC have been found as MLL-fusion partners and the control of transcriptional elongation is misregulated leading to tumorigenesis in MLL-SEC fused Leukemia. It has been suggested that unexpected collaboration of ENL/AF9-MLL and PcG are involved in tumorigenesis in leukemia. Recently, we found that the collaboration of ENL/AF9 and PcG led to a novel mechanism of transcriptional switch from elongation to repression under ATM-signaling for genome integrity. Activated ATM phosphorylates ENL/AF9 in SEC, and the phosphorylated ENL/AF9 binds BMI1 and RING1B, a heterodimeric E3-ubiquitin-ligase complex in Polycomb Repressive complex 1 (PRC1), and recruits PRC1 at transcriptional elongation sites to rapidly repress transcription. The ENL/AF9 in SEC- and PcG-mediated transcriptional repression promotes DSB repair near transcription sites. The implication of this is that the collaboration of ENL/AF9 in SEC and PcG ensures a rapid response of transcriptional switching from elongation to repression to neighboring genotoxic stresses for DSB repair. Therefore, these results suggested that the collaboration of ENL/AF9 and PcG in transcriptional control is required to maintain genome integrity and may be link to the MLL-ENL/AF9 leukemia.

  8. Pax6 represses androgen receptor-mediated transactivation by inhibiting recruitment of the coactivator SPBP.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julianne Elvenes

    Full Text Available The androgen receptor (AR has a central role in development and maintenance of the male reproductive system and in the etiology of prostate cancer. The transcription factor Pax6 has recently been reported to act as a repressor of AR and to be hypermethylated in prostate cancer cells. SPBP is a transcriptional regulator that previously has been shown to enhance the activity of Pax6. In this study we have identified SPBP to act as a transcriptional coactivator of AR. We also show that Pax6 inhibits SPBP-mediated enhancement of AR activity on the AR target gene probasin promoter, a repression that was partly reversed by increased expression of SPBP. Enhanced expression of Pax6 reduced the amount of SPBP associated with the probasin promoter when assayed by ChIP in HeLa cells. We mapped the interaction between both AR and SPBP, and AR and Pax6 to the DNA-binding domains of the involved proteins. Further binding studies revealed that Pax6 and SPBP compete for binding to AR. These results suggest that Pax6 represses AR activity by displacing and/or inhibiting recruitment of coactivators to AR target promoters. Understanding the mechanism for inhibition of AR coactivators can give rise to molecular targeted drugs for treatment of prostate cancer.

  9. Translational repression determines a neuronal potential in Drosophila asymmetric cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okabe, M; Imai, T; Kurusu, M; Hiromi, Y; Okano, H

    2001-05-01

    Asymmetric cell division is a fundamental strategy for generating cellular diversity during animal development. Daughter cells manifest asymmetry in their differential gene expression. Transcriptional regulation of this process has been the focus of many studies, whereas cell-type-specific 'translational' regulation has been considered to have a more minor role. During sensory organ development in Drosophila, Notch signalling directs the asymmetry between neuronal and non-neuronal lineages, and a zinc-finger transcriptional repressor Tramtrack69 (TTK69) acts downstream of Notch as a determinant of non-neuronal identity. Here we show that repression of TTK69 protein expression in the neuronal lineage occurs translationally rather than transcriptionally. This translational repression is achieved by a direct interaction between cis-acting sequences in the 3' untranslated region of ttk69 messenger RNA and its trans-acting repressor, the RNA-binding protein Musashi (MSI). Although msi can act downstream of Notch, Notch signalling does not affect MSI expression. Thus, Notch signalling is likely to regulate MSI activity rather than its expression. Our results define cell-type-specific translational control of ttk69 by MSI as a downstream event of Notch signalling in asymmetric cell division.

  10. Mechanism of catabolite repression of tryptophanase synthesis in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaacs, H; Chao, D; Yanofsky, C; Saier, M H

    1994-08-01

    Repression of tryptophanase (tryptophan indole-lyase) by glucose and its non-metabolizable analogue methyl alpha-glucoside has been studied employing a series of isogenic strains of Escherichia coli lacking cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase and altered for two of the proteins of the phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system (PTS), Enzyme I and Enzyme IIAGlc. Basal activity of tryptophanase was depressed mildly by inclusion of glucose in the growth medium, but inducible tryptophanase synthesis was subject to strong glucose repression in the parental strain, which exhibited normal PTS enzyme activities. Methyl alpha-glucoside was without effect in this strain. Loss of Enzyme I decreased sensitivity to repression by glucose but enhanced sensitivity to repression by methyl alpha-glucoside. Loss of Enzyme IIAGlc activity largely abolished repression by methyl alpha-glucoside but had a less severe effect on glucose repression. The repressive effects of both sugars were fully reversed by inclusion of cyclic AMP in the growth medium. Tryptophan uptake under the same conditions was inhibited weakly by glucose and more strongly by methyl alpha-glucoside in the parental strain. Inhibition by both sugars was alleviated by partial loss of Enzyme I. Inhibition by methyl alpha-glucoside appeared to be largely due to energy competition and was not responsible for repression of tryptophanase synthesis. Measurement of net production of cyclic AMP as well as intracellular concentrations of cyclic AMP revealed a good correlation with intensity of repression. The results suggest that while basal tryptophanase synthesis is relatively insensitive to catabolite repression, inducible synthesis is subject to strong repression by two distinct mechanisms, one dependent on enzyme IIAGlc of the PTS and the other independent of this protein. Both mechanisms are attributable to depressed rates of cyclic AMP synthesis. No evidence for a cyclic-AMP-independent mechanism of catabolite

  11. Transcriptional Regulation of Plant Secondary Metabolism

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chang-Qing Yang; Xin Fang; Xiu-Ming Wu; Ying-Bo Mao; Ling-Jian Wang; Xiao-Ya Chen

    2012-01-01

    Plant secondary metabolites play critical roles in plant-environment interactions.They are synthesized in different organs or tissues at particular developmental stages,and in response to various environmental stimuli,both biotic and abiotic.Accordingly,corresponding genes are regulated at the transcriptional level by multiple transcription factors.Several families of transcription factors have been identified to participate in controlling the biosynthesis and accumulation of secondary metabolites.These regulators integrate internal (often developmental) and external signals,bind to corresponding cis-elements — which are often in the promoter regions — to activate or repress the expression of enzyme-coding genes,and some of them interact with other transcription factors to form a complex.In this review,we summarize recent research in these areas,with an emphasis on newly-identified transcription factors and their functions in metabolism regulation.

  12. ATRX represses alternative lengthening of telomeres.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napier, Christine E; Huschtscha, Lily I; Harvey, Adam; Bower, Kylie; Noble, Jane R; Hendrickson, Eric A; Reddel, Roger R

    2015-06-30

    The unlimited proliferation of cancer cells requires a mechanism to prevent telomere shortening. Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres (ALT) is an homologous recombination-mediated mechanism of telomere elongation used in tumors, including osteosarcomas, soft tissue sarcoma subtypes, and glial brain tumors. Mutations in the ATRX/DAXX chromatin remodeling complex have been reported in tumors and cell lines that use the ALT mechanism, suggesting that ATRX may be an ALT repressor. We show here that knockout or knockdown of ATRX in mortal cells or immortal telomerase-positive cells is insufficient to activate ALT. Notably, however, in SV40-transformed mortal fibroblasts ATRX loss results in either a significant increase in the proportion of cell lines activating ALT (instead of telomerase) or in a significant decrease in the time prior to ALT activation. These data indicate that loss of ATRX function cooperates with one or more as-yet unidentified genetic or epigenetic alterations to activate ALT. Moreover, transient ATRX expression in ALT-positive/ATRX-negative cells represses ALT activity. These data provide the first direct, functional evidence that ATRX represses ALT.

  13. Expression of the Type VI Secretion System 1 Component Hcp1 Is Indirectly Repressed by OpaR in Vibrio parahaemolyticus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lizhi Ma

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The type VI secretion system (T6SS is bacterial protein injection machinery with roles in virulence, symbiosis, interbacterial interaction, antipathogenesis, and environmental stress responses. There are two T6SS loci, T6SS1 and T6SS2, in the two chromosomes of Vibrio parahaemolyticus, respectively. This work disclosed that the master quorum sensing (QS regulator OpaR repressed the transcription of hcp1 encoding the structural component Hcp1 of T6SS1 in V. parahaemolyticus, indicating that QS had a negative regulatory action on T6SS1. A single σ54-dependent promoter was transcribed for hcp1 in V. parahaemolyticus, and its activity was repressed by the OpaR regulator. Since the OpaR protein could not bind to the upstream region of hcp1, OpaR would repress the transcription of hcp1 in an indirect manner.

  14. Requirement for sex comb on midleg protein interactions in Drosophila polycomb group repression.

    OpenAIRE

    Aidan J Peterson; Mallin, Daniel R.; Francis, Nicole J.; Ketel, Carrie S.; Stamm, Joyce; Voeller, Rochus K.; Kingston, Robert E.; Jeffrey A Simon

    2004-01-01

    The Drosophila Sex Comb on Midleg (SCM) protein is a transcriptional repressor of the Polycomb group (PcG). Although genetic studies establish SCM as a crucial PcG member, its molecular role is not known. To investigate how SCM might link to PcG complexes, we analyzed the in vivo role of a conserved protein interaction module, the SPM domain. This domain is found in SCM and in another PcG protein, Polyhomeotic (PH), which is a core component of Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1). SCM-PH int...

  15. Kaiso is a key regulator of spleen germinal center formation by repressing Bcl6 expression in splenocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koh, Dong-In; Yoon, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Min-Kyeong; An, Haemin; Kim, Min-Young; Hur, Man-Wook, E-mail: mwhur2@yuhs.ac

    2013-12-13

    Highlights: •Knockout of Kaiso results in concordant high expression of Bcl6 and c-Myc in spleen. •Kaiso binds the Bcl6 promoter and represses Bcl6 transcription by recruiting NCoR. •Upregulated Bcl6 increases splenocyte proliferation and causes large diffused GC. •Cell cycle-inhibition genes such as Cdkn1b and Cdkn1a are repressed by Bcl6. -- Abstract: Kaiso was previously described as a methylated DNA-binding protein and a transcription repressor interacting with the corepressor protein complex NCoR. In the current study, we show that generation-3 Kaiso knockout mice show a phenotype of splenomegaly and large diffused germinal centers (GC). In the spleens of Kaiso knockout mice, Bcl6 (a transcriptional repressor that plays a critical role in GC development in spleen) and c-Myc were highly expressed, while the cell cycle arrest genes p27 (CDKN1B), p21 (CDKN1A) and Gadd45a were downregulated. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and transcription assays suggested that Kaiso represses Bcl6 expression, and in Kaiso knockout mice, derepressed Bcl6 increased cell proliferation by suppressing p27 (CDKN1B), p21 (CDKN1A) and Gadd45a, while upregulating the oncogene c-Myc. Further evidence for Kaiso regulation of splenomegaly was provided by B lymphocyte Ramos cells, in which ectopic KAISO repressed BCL6 and c-MYC expression, while concomitantly increasing the expression of the cell cycle arrestors p21, p27 and Gadd45a. In summary, derepressed Bcl6 expression may be responsible for increases in GC cell proliferation and splenomegaly of Kaiso knockout mice.

  16. ChREBP Mediates Glucose Repression of Peroxisome Proliferator-activated Receptor {alpha} Expression in Pancreatic {beta}-Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boergesen, Michael; Poulsen, Lars la Cour; Schmidt, Søren Fisker;

    2011-01-01

    Chronic exposure to elevated levels of glucose and fatty acids leads to dysfunction of pancreatic β-cells by mechanisms that are only partly understood. The transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) is an important regulator of genes involved in fatty acid metaboli...... of glucose repression of PPARα gene expression in pancreatic β-cells, suggesting that ChREBP may be important for glucose suppression of the fatty acid oxidation capacity of β-cells....

  17. Reconstruction and logical modeling of glucose repression signaling pathways in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Ana

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the presence of high levels of glucose leads to an array of down-regulatory effects known as glucose repression. This process is complex due to the presence of feedback loops and crosstalk between different pathways, complicating the use of intuitive approaches to analyze the system. Results We established a logical model of yeast glucose repression, formalized as a hypergraph. The model was constructed based on verified regulatory interactions and it includes 50 gene transcripts, 22 proteins, 5 metabolites and 118 hyperedges. We computed the logical steady states of all nodes in the network in order to simulate wildtype and deletion mutant responses to different sugar availabilities. Evaluation of the model predictive power was achieved by comparing changes in the logical state of gene nodes with transcriptome data. Overall, we observed 71% true predictions, and analyzed sources of errors and discrepancies for the remaining. Conclusion Though the binary nature of logical (Boolean models entails inherent limitations, our model constitutes a primary tool for storing regulatory knowledge, searching for incoherencies in hypotheses and evaluating the effect of deleting regulatory elements involved in glucose repression.

  18. Expression of bvg-repressed genes in Bordetella pertussis is controlled by RisA through a novel c-di-GMP signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    The BvgAS two component system of Bordetella pertussis controls virulence factor expression. In addition, BvgAS controls expression of the bvg-repressed genes through the action of the repressor, BvgR. The transcription factor RisA is inhibited by BvgR, and when BvgR is not expressed RisA induces th...

  19. Repression of sulfate assimilation is an adaptive response of yeast to the oxidative stress of zinc deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chang-Yi; Roje, Sanja; Sandoval, Francisco J; Bird, Amanda J; Winge, Dennis R; Eide, David J

    2009-10-02

    The Zap1 transcription factor is a central player in the response of yeast to changes in zinc status. Previous studies identified over 80 genes activated by Zap1 in zinc-limited cells. In this report, we identified 36 genes repressed in a zinc- and Zap1-responsive manner. As a result, we have identified a new mechanism of Zap1-mediated gene repression whereby transcription of the MET3, MET14, and MET16 genes is repressed in zinc-limited cells. These genes encode the first three enzymes of the sulfate assimilation pathway. We found that MET30, encoding a component of the SCF(Met30) ubiquitin ligase, is a direct Zap1 target gene. MET30 expression is increased in zinc-limited cells, and this leads to degradation of Met4, a transcription factor responsible for MET3, MET14, and MET16 expression. Thus, Zap1 is responsible for a decrease in sulfate assimilation in zinc-limited cells. We further show that cells that are unable to down-regulate sulfate assimilation under zinc deficiency experience increased oxidative stress. This increased oxidative stress is associated with an increase in the NADP(+)/NADPH ratio and may result from a decrease in NADPH-dependent antioxidant activities. These studies have led to new insights into how cells adapt to nutrient-limiting growth conditions.

  20. The retinoblastoma protein as a transcriptional repressor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Helin, K; Ed, H

    1993-01-01

    The retinoblastoma protein (pRB) is one of the best-studied tumour suppressor gene products. Its loss during the genesis of many human tumours, its inactivation by several DNA tumour virus oncoproteins, and its ability to inhibit cell growth when introduced into dividing cells all suggest that pRB...... negatively regulates some aspect of normal cell growth. The discovery that pRB associates with transcription factors such as E2F has provided the first model for pRB function. In this review, we discuss how pRB may regulate cell growth by repressing transcription of genes essential for cell proliferation....

  1. Hypoxic repression of CYP7A1 through a HIF-1α- and SHP-independent mechanism

    OpenAIRE

    Moon, Yunwon; Park, Bongju; Park, Hyunsung

    2016-01-01

    Liver cells experience hypoxic stress when drug-metabolizing enzymes excessively consume O2 for hydroxylation. Hypoxic stress changes the transcription of several genes by activating a heterodimeric transcription factor called hypoxia-inducible factor-1α/β (HIF-1α/β). We found that hypoxic stress (0.1% O2) decreased the expression of cytochrome P450 7A1 (CYP7A1), a rate-limiting enzyme involved in bile acid biosynthesis. Chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), a major component of bile acids, represses...

  2. Active repression by RARγ signaling is required for vertebrate axial elongation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janesick, Amanda; Nguyen, Tuyen T L; Aisaki, Ken-ichi; Igarashi, Katsuhide; Kitajima, Satoshi; Chandraratna, Roshantha A S; Kanno, Jun; Blumberg, Bruce

    2014-06-01

    Retinoic acid receptor gamma 2 (RARγ2) is the major RAR isoform expressed throughout the caudal axial progenitor domain in vertebrates. During a microarray screen to identify RAR targets, we identified a subset of genes that pattern caudal structures or promote axial elongation and are upregulated by increased RAR-mediated repression. Previous studies have suggested that RAR is present in the caudal domain, but is quiescent until its activation in late stage embryos terminates axial elongation. By contrast, we show here that RARγ2 is engaged in all stages of axial elongation, not solely as a terminator of axial growth. In the absence of RA, RARγ2 represses transcriptional activity in vivo and maintains the pool of caudal progenitor cells and presomitic mesoderm. In the presence of RA, RARγ2 serves as an activator, facilitating somite differentiation. Treatment with an RARγ-selective inverse agonist (NRX205099) or overexpression of dominant-negative RARγ increases the expression of posterior Hox genes and that of marker genes for presomitic mesoderm and the chordoneural hinge. Conversely, when RAR-mediated repression is reduced by overexpressing a dominant-negative co-repressor (c-SMRT), a constitutively active RAR (VP16-RARγ2), or by treatment with an RARγ-selective agonist (NRX204647), expression of caudal genes is diminished and extension of the body axis is prematurely terminated. Hence, gene repression mediated by the unliganded RARγ2-co-repressor complex constitutes a novel mechanism to regulate and facilitate the correct expression levels and spatial restriction of key genes that maintain the caudal progenitor pool during axial elongation in Xenopus embryos.

  3. Transforming growth factor-β1 signaling represses testicular steroidogenesis through cross-talk with orphan nuclear receptor Nur77.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Eunsook; Song, Chin-Hee; Park, Jae-Il; Ahn, Ryun-Sup; Choi, Hueng-Sik; Ko, CheMyong; Lee, Keesook

    2014-01-01

    Transforming growth factor- β1 (TGF-β1) has been reported to inhibit luteinizing hormone (LH) mediated-steroidogenesis in testicular Leydig cells. However, the mechanism by which TGF-β1 controls the steroidogenesis in Leydig cells is not well understood. Here, we investigated the possibility that TGF-β1 represses steroidogenesis through cross-talk with the orphan nuclear receptor Nur77. Nur77, which is induced by LH/cAMP signaling, is one of major transcription factors that regulate the expression of steroidogenic genes in Leydig cells. TGF-β1 signaling inhibited cAMP-induced testosterone production and the expression of steroidogenic genes such as P450c17, StAR and 3β-HSD in mouse Leydig cells. Further, TGF-β1/ALK5 signaling repressed cAMP-induced and Nur77-activated promoter activity of steroidogenic genes. In addition, TGF-β1/ALK5-activated Smad3 repressed Nur77 transactivation of steroidogenic gene promoters by interfering with Nur77 binding to DNA. In primary Leydig cells isolated from Tgfbr2flox/flox Cyp17iCre mice, TGF-β1-mediated repression of cAMP-induced steroidogenic gene expression was significantly less than that in primary Leydig cells from Tgfbr2flox/flox mice. Taken together, these results suggest that TGF-β1/ALK5/Smad3 signaling represses the expression of steroidogenic genes via the suppression of Nur77 transactivation in testicular Leydig cells. These findings may provide a molecular mechanism involved in the TGF-β1-mediated repression of testicular steroidogenesis.

  4. Polycomb mediates Myc autorepression and its transcriptional control of many loci in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodliffe, Julie M.; Wieschaus, Eric; Cole, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    Aberrant accumulation of the Myc oncoprotein propels proliferation and induces carcinogenesis. In normal cells, however, an abundance of Myc protein represses transcription at the c-myc locus. Cancer cells often lose this autorepression. We examined the control of myc in Drosophila and show here that the Drosophila ortholog, dmyc, also undergoes autorepression. We find that the developmental repressor Polycomb (Pc) is required for dmyc autorepression, and that this Pc-dMyc-mediated repression spreads across an 875-kb region encompassing the dmyc gene. To further investigate the relationship between Myc and Polycomb, we used microarrays to identify genes regulated by each, and identify a striking relationship between the two: A large set of dMyc activation targets is normally repressed by Pc, and 73% of dMyc repression targets require Pc for this repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation confirmed that many dMyc-Pc-repressed loci have an epigenetic mark recognized by Pc. Our results suggest a novel relationship between Myc and Polycomb, wherein Myc enhances Polycomb repression in order to repress targets, and Myc suppresses Polycomb repression in order to activate targets. PMID:16357214

  5. Genome editing in butterflies reveals that spalt promotes and Distal-less represses eyespot colour patterns.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Linlin; Reed, Robert D

    2016-06-15

    Butterfly eyespot colour patterns are a key example of how a novel trait can appear in association with the co-option of developmental patterning genes. Little is known, however, about how, or even whether, co-opted genes function in eyespot development. Here we use CRISPR/Cas9 genome editing to determine the roles of two co-opted transcription factors that are expressed during early eyespot determination. We found that deletions in a single gene, spalt, are sufficient to reduce or completely delete eyespot colour patterns, thus demonstrating a positive regulatory role for this gene in eyespot determination. Conversely, and contrary to previous predictions, deletions in Distal-less (Dll) result in an increase in the size and number of eyespots, illustrating a repressive role for this gene in eyespot development. Altogether our results show that the presence, absence and shape of butterfly eyespots can be controlled by the activity of two co-opted transcription factors.

  6. Ikaros mediates gene silencing in T cells through Polycomb repressive complex 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oravecz, Attila; Apostolov, Apostol; Polak, Katarzyna; Jost, Bernard; Le Gras, Stéphanie; Chan, Susan; Kastner, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    T-cell development is accompanied by epigenetic changes that ensure the silencing of stem cell-related genes and the activation of lymphocyte-specific programmes. How transcription factors influence these changes remains unclear. We show that the Ikaros transcription factor forms a complex with Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) in CD4−CD8− thymocytes and allows its binding to more than 500 developmentally regulated loci, including those normally activated in haematopoietic stem cells and others induced by the Notch pathway. Loss of Ikaros in CD4−CD8− cells leads to reduced histone H3 lysine 27 trimethylation and ectopic gene expression. Furthermore, Ikaros binding triggers PRC2 recruitment and Ikaros interacts with PRC2 independently of the nucleosome remodelling and deacetylation complex. Our results identify Ikaros as a fundamental regulator of PRC2 function in developing T cells. PMID:26549758

  7. Role of ND10 nuclear bodies in the chromatin repression of HSV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Haidong; Zheng, Yi

    2016-04-05

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a neurotropic virus that establishes lifelong latent infection in human ganglion sensory neurons. This unique life cycle necessitates an intimate relation between the host defenses and virus counteractions over the long course of infection. Two important aspects of host anti-viral defense, nuclear substructure restriction and epigenetic chromatin regulation, have been intensively studied in the recent years. Upon viral DNA entering the nucleus, components of discrete nuclear bodies termed nuclear domain 10 (ND10), converge at viral DNA and place restrictions on viral gene expression. Meanwhile the infected cell mobilizes its histones and histone-associated repressors to force the viral DNA into nucleosome-like structures and also represses viral transcription. Both anti-viral strategies are negated by various HSV countermeasures. One HSV gene transactivator, infected cell protein 0 (ICP0), is a key player in antagonizing both the ND10 restriction and chromatin repression. On one hand, ICP0 uses its E3 ubiquitin ligase activity to target major ND10 components for proteasome-dependent degradation and thereafter disrupts the ND10 nuclear bodies. On the other hand, ICP0 participates in de-repressing the HSV chromatin by changing histone composition or modification and therefore activates viral transcription. Involvement of a single viral protein in two seemingly different pathways suggests that there is coordination in host anti-viral defense mechanisms and also cooperation in viral counteraction strategies. In this review, we summarize recent advances in understanding the role of chromatin regulation and ND10 dynamics in both lytic and latent HSV infection. We focus on the new observations showing that ND10 nuclear bodies play a critical role in cellular chromatin regulation. We intend to find the connections between the two major anti-viral defense pathways, chromatin remodeling and ND10 structure, in order to achieve a better

  8. Interactions of transcription factors with chromatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bakel, Harm

    2011-01-01

    Sequence-specific transcription factors (TFs) play a central role in regulating transcription initiation by directing the recruitment and activity of the general transcription machinery and accessory factors. It is now well established that many of the effects exerted by TFs in eukaryotes are mediated through interactions with a host of coregulators that modify the chromatin state, resulting in a more open (in case of activation) or closed conformation (in case of repression). The relationship between TFs and chromatin is a two-way street, however, as chromatin can in turn influence the recognition and binding of target sequences by TFs. The aim of this chapter is to highlight how this dynamic interplay between TF-directed remodelling of chromatin and chromatin-adjusted targeting of TF binding determines where and how transcription is initiated, and to what degree it is productive.

  9. Yeast nitrogen catabolite repression is sustained by signals distinct from glutamine and glutamate reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fayyad-Kazan, Mohammad; Feller, A; Bodo, E; Boeckstaens, M; Marini, A M; Dubois, E; Georis, I

    2016-01-01

    Nitrogen catabolite repression (NCR) is a wide transcriptional regulation program enabling baker's yeast to downregulate genes involved in the utilization of poor nitrogen sources when preferred ones are available. Nowadays, glutamine and glutamate, the major nitrogen donors for biosyntheses, are assumed to be key metabolic signals regulating NCR. NCR is controlled by the conserved TORC1 complex, which integrates nitrogen signals among others to regulate cell growth. However, accumulating evidence indicate that the TORC1-mediated control of NCR is only partial, arguing for the existence of supplementary regulatory processes to be discovered. In this work, we developed a genetic screen to search for new players involved in NCR signaling. Our data reveal that the NADP-glutamate dehydrogenase activity of Gdh1 negatively regulates NCR-sensitive gene transcription. By determining the total, cytoplasmic and vacuolar pools of amino acids, we show that there is no positive correlation between glutamine/glutamate reservoirs and the extent of NCR. While our data indicate that glutamine could serve as initial trigger of NCR, they show that it is not a sufficient signal to sustain repression and point to the existence of yet unknown signals. Providing additional evidence uncoupling TORC1 activity and NCR, our work revisits the dogmas underlying NCR regulation.

  10. Functional Analysis of the Nitrogen Metabolite Repression Regulator Gene nmrA in Aspergillus flavus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyun Han

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available In Aspergillus nidulans, the nitrogen metabolite repression regulator NmrA plays a major role in regulating the activity of the GATA transcription factor AreA during nitrogen metabolism. However, the function of nmrA in Aspergillus flavus has notbeen previously studied. Here, we report the identification and functional analysis of nmrA in A. flavus. Our work showed that the amino acid sequences of NmrA are highly conserved among Aspergillus species and that A. flavus NmrA protein contains a canonical Rossmann fold motif. Deletion of nmrA slowed the growth of A. flavus but significantly increased conidiation and sclerotia production. Moreover, seed infection experiments indicated that nmrA is required for the invasive virulence of A. flavus. In addition, the ΔnmrA mutant showed increased sensitivity to rapamycin and methyl methanesulfonate, suggesting that nmrA could be responsive to target of rapamycin signaling and DNA damage. Furthermore, quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analysis suggested that nmrA might interact with other nitrogen regulatory and catabolic genes. Our study provides a better understanding of nitrogen metabolite repression and the nitrogen metabolism network in fungi.

  11. Acute Genome-wide effects of Rosiglitazone on PPARγ transcriptional networks in Adipocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haakonsson, Anders Kristian; Madsen, Maria Stahl; Nielsen, Ronni

    2013-01-01

    on the transcriptional network of PPARγ in adipocytes. Treatment with rosiglitazone for 1 hour leads to acute transcriptional activation as well as repression of a number of genes as determined by genome-wide RNA polymerase II occupancy. Unlike what has been shown for many other nuclear receptors, agonist treatment does...

  12. Integrative analysis of histone ChIP-seq and transcription data using Bayesian mixture models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klein, Hans-Ulrich; Schäfer, Martin; Porse, Bo T;

    2014-01-01

    Histone modifications are a key epigenetic mechanism to activate or repress the transcription of genes. Datasets of matched transcription data and histone modification data obtained by ChIP-seq exist, but methods for integrative analysis of both data types are still rare. Here, we present a novel...

  13. Characterization of an Nmr homolog that modulates GATA factor-mediated nitrogen metabolite repression in Cryptococcus neoformans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I Russel Lee

    Full Text Available Nitrogen source utilization plays a critical role in fungal development, secondary metabolite production and pathogenesis. In both the Ascomycota and Basidiomycota, GATA transcription factors globally activate the expression of catabolic enzyme-encoding genes required to degrade complex nitrogenous compounds. However, in the presence of preferred nitrogen sources such as ammonium, GATA factor activity is inhibited in some species through interaction with co-repressor Nmr proteins. This regulatory phenomenon, nitrogen metabolite repression, enables preferential utilization of readily assimilated nitrogen sources. In the basidiomycete pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans, the GATA factor Gat1/Are1 has been co-opted into regulating multiple key virulence traits in addition to nitrogen catabolism. Here, we further characterize Gat1/Are1 function and investigate the regulatory role of the predicted Nmr homolog Tar1. While GAT1/ARE1 expression is induced during nitrogen limitation, TAR1 transcription is unaffected by nitrogen availability. Deletion of TAR1 leads to inappropriate derepression of non-preferred nitrogen catabolic pathways in the simultaneous presence of favoured sources. In addition to exhibiting its evolutionary conserved role of inhibiting GATA factor activity under repressing conditions, Tar1 also positively regulates GAT1/ARE1 transcription under non-repressing conditions. The molecular mechanism by which Tar1 modulates nitrogen metabolite repression, however, remains open to speculation. Interaction between Tar1 and Gat1/Are1 was undetectable in a yeast two-hybrid assay, consistent with Tar1 and Gat1/Are1 each lacking the conserved C-terminus regions present in ascomycete Nmr proteins and GATA factors that are known to interact with each other. Importantly, both Tar1 and Gat1/Are1 are suppressors of C. neoformans virulence, reiterating and highlighting the paradigm of nitrogen regulation of pathogenesis.

  14. Antagonism between MES-4 and Polycomb Repressive Complex 2 Promotes Appropriate Gene Expression in C. elegans Germ Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura J. Gaydos

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The Caenorhabditis elegans MES proteins are key chromatin regulators of the germline. MES-2, MES-3, and MES-6 form the C. elegans Polycomb repressive complex 2 and generate repressive H3K27me3. MES-4 generates H3K36me3 on germline-expressed genes. Transcript profiling of dissected mutant germlines revealed that MES-2/3/6 and MES-4 cooperate to promote the expression of germline genes and repress the X chromosomes and somatic genes. Results from genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation showed that H3K27me3 and H3K36me3 occupy mutually exclusive domains on the autosomes and that H3K27me3 is enriched on the X. Loss of MES-4 from germline genes causes H3K27me3 to spread to germline genes, resulting in reduced H3K27me3 elsewhere on the autosomes and especially on the X. Our findings support a model in which H3K36me3 repels H3K27me3 from germline genes and concentrates it on other regions of the genome. This antagonism ensures proper patterns of gene expression for germ cells, which includes repression of somatic genes and the X chromosomes.

  15. Repression of nitrogen catabolic genes by ammonia and glutamine in nitrogen-limited continuous cultures of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ter Schure, E G; Silljé, H H; Vermeulen, E E; Kalhorn, J W; Verkleij, A J; Boonstra, J; Verrips, C T

    1998-05-01

    Growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae on ammonia and glutamine decreases the expression of many nitrogen catabolic genes to low levels. To discriminate between ammonia- and glutamine-driven repression of GAP1, PUT4, GDH1 and GLN1, a gln1-37 mutant was used. This mutant is not able to convert ammonia into glutamine. Glutamine-limited continuous cultures were used to completely derepress the expression of GAP1, PUT4, GDH1 and GLN1. Following an ammonia pulse, the expression of GAP1, PUT4 and GDH1 decreased while the intracellular glutamine concentration remained constant, both in the cytoplasm and in the vacuole. Therefore, it was concluded that ammonia causes gene repression independent of the intracellular glutamine concentration. The expression of GLN1 was not decreased by an ammonia pulse but solely by a glutamine pulse. Analysis of the mRNA levels of ILV5 and HIS4 showed that the response of the two biosynthetic genes, GDH1 and GLN1, to ammonia and glutamine in the wild-type and gln1-37 was not due to changes in general transcription of biosynthetic genes. Ure2p has been shown to be an essential element for nitrogen-regulated gene expression. Deletion of URE2 in the gln1-37 background prevented repression of gene expression by ammonia, showing that the ammonia-induced repression is not caused by a general stress response but represents a specific signal for nitrogen catabolite regulation.

  16. Circuitry Linking the Catabolite Repression and Csr Global Regulatory Systems of Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannuri, Archana; Vakulskas, Christopher A; Zere, Tesfalem; McGibbon, Louise C; Edwards, Adrianne N; Georgellis, Dimitris; Babitzke, Paul; Romeo, Tony

    2016-11-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP) and the cAMP receptor protein (cAMP-CRP) and CsrA are the principal regulators of the catabolite repression and carbon storage global regulatory systems, respectively. cAMP-CRP controls the transcription of genes for carbohydrate metabolism and other processes in response to carbon nutritional status, while CsrA binds to diverse mRNAs and regulates translation, RNA stability, and/or transcription elongation. CsrA also binds to the regulatory small RNAs (sRNAs) CsrB and CsrC, which antagonize its activity. The BarA-UvrY two-component signal transduction system (TCS) directly activates csrB and csrC (csrB/C) transcription, while CsrA does so indirectly. We show that cAMP-CRP inhibits csrB/C transcription without negatively regulating phosphorylated UvrY (P-UvrY) or CsrA levels. A crp deletion caused an elevation in CsrB/C levels in the stationary phase of growth and increased the expression of csrB-lacZ and csrC-lacZ transcriptional fusions, although modest stimulation of CsrB/C turnover by the crp deletion partially masked the former effects. DNase I footprinting and other studies demonstrated that cAMP-CRP bound specifically to three sites located upstream from the csrC promoter, two of which overlapped the P-UvrY binding site. These two proteins competed for binding at the overlapping sites. In vitro transcription-translation experiments confirmed direct repression of csrC-lacZ expression by cAMP-CRP. In contrast, cAMP-CRP effects on csrB transcription may be mediated indirectly, as it bound nonspecifically to csrB DNA. In the reciprocal direction, CsrA bound to crp mRNA with high affinity and specificity and yet exhibited only modest, conditional effects on expression. Our findings are incorporated into an emerging model for the response of Csr circuitry to carbon nutritional status.

  17. Base J represses genes at the end of polycistronic gene clusters in Leishmania major by promoting RNAP II termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reynolds, David L; Hofmeister, Brigitte T; Cliffe, Laura; Siegel, T Nicolai; Anderson, Britta A; Beverley, Stephen M; Schmitz, Robert J; Sabatini, Robert

    2016-08-01

    The genomes of kinetoplastids are organized into polycistronic gene clusters that are flanked by the modified DNA base J. Previous work has established a role of base J in promoting RNA polymerase II termination in Leishmania spp. where the loss of J leads to termination defects and transcription into adjacent gene clusters. It remains unclear whether these termination defects affect gene expression and whether read through transcription is detrimental to cell growth, thus explaining the essential nature of J. We now demonstrate that reduction of base J at specific sites within polycistronic gene clusters in L. major leads to read through transcription and increased expression of downstream genes in the cluster. Interestingly, subsequent transcription into the opposing polycistronic gene cluster does not lead to downregulation of sense mRNAs. These findings indicate a conserved role for J regulating transcription termination and expression of genes within polycistronic gene clusters in trypanosomatids. In contrast to the expectations often attributed to opposing transcription, the essential nature of J in Leishmania spp. is related to its role in gene repression rather than preventing transcriptional interference resulting from read through and dual strand transcription.

  18. Maltose and maltodextrin utilization by Listeria monocytogenes depend on an inducible ABC transporter which is repressed by glucose.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shubha Gopal

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the environment as well as in the vertebrate intestine, Listeriae have access to complex carbohydrates like maltodextrins. Bacterial exploitation of such compounds requires specific uptake and utilization systems. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We could show that Listeria monocytogenes and other Listeria species contain genes/gene products with high homology to the maltodextrin ABC transporter and utilization system of B. subtilis. Mutant construction and growth tests revealed that the L. monocytogenes gene cluster was required for the efficient utilization of maltodextrins as well as maltose. The gene for the ATP binding protein of the transporter was located distant from the cluster. Transcription analyses demonstrated that the system was induced by maltose/maltodextrins and repressed by glucose. Its induction was dependent on a LacI type transcriptional regulator. Repression by glucose was independent of the catabolite control protein CcpA, but was relieved in a mutant defective for Hpr kinase/phosphorylase. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The data obtained show that in L. monocytogenes the uptake of maltodextrin and, in contrast to B. subtilis, also maltose is exclusively mediated by an ABC transporter. Furthermore, the results suggest that glucose repression of the uptake system possibly is by inducer exclusion, a mechanism not described so far in this organism.

  19. Copper stress induces a global stress response in Staphylococcus aureus and represses sae and agr expression and biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Jonathan; Sitthisak, Sutthirat; Sengupta, Mrittika; Johnson, Miranda; Jayaswal, R K; Morrissey, Julie A

    2010-01-01

    Copper is an important cofactor for many enzymes; however, high levels of copper are toxic. Therefore, bacteria must ensure there is sufficient copper for use as a cofactor but, more importantly, must limit free intracellular levels to prevent toxicity. In this study, we have used DNA microarray to identify Staphylococcus aureus copper-responsive genes. Transcriptional profiling of S. aureus SH1000 grown in excess copper identified a number of genes which fall into four groups, suggesting that S. aureus has four main mechanisms for adapting to high levels of environmental copper, as follows: (i) induction of direct copper homeostasis mechanisms; (ii) increased oxidative stress resistance; (iii) expression of the misfolded protein response; and (iv) repression of a number of transporters and global regulators such as Agr and Sae. Our experimental data confirm that resistance to oxidative stress and particularly to H2O2 scavenging is an important S. aureus copper resistance mechanism. Our previous studies have demonstrated that Eap and Emp proteins, which are positively regulated by Agr and Sae, are required for biofilm formation under low-iron growth conditions. Our transcriptional analysis has confirmed that sae, agr, and eap are repressed under high-copper conditions and that biofilm formation is indeed repressed under high-copper conditions. Therefore, our results may provide an explanation for how copper films can prevent biofilm formation on catheters.

  20. Hypoxic repression of CYP7A1 through a HIF-1α- and SHP-independent mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Yunwon; Park, Bongju; Park, Hyunsung

    2016-03-01

    Liver cells experience hypoxic stress when drug-metabolizing enzymes excessively consume O2 for hydroxylation. Hypoxic stress changes the transcription of several genes by activating a heterodimeric transcription factor called hypoxia-inducible factor- 1α/β (HIF-1α/β). We found that hypoxic stress (0.1% O2) decreased the expression of cytochrome P450 7A1 (CYP7A1), a rate-limiting enzyme involved in bile acid biosynthesis. Chenodeoxycholic acid (CDCA), a major component of bile acids, represses CYP7A1 by activating a transcriptional repressor named small heterodimer partner (SHP). We observed that hypoxia decreased the levels of both CDCA and SHP, suggesting that hypoxia repressed CYP7A1 without inducing SHP. The finding that overexpression of HIF-1α increased the activity of the CYP7A1 promoter suggested that hypoxia decreased the expression of CYP7A1 in a HIF-1-independent manner. Thus, the results of this study suggested that hypoxia decreased the activity of CYP7A1 by limiting its substrate O2, and by decreasing the transcription of CYP7A1. [BMB Reports 2016; 49(3): 173-178].

  1. Epigenetic involvement of Alien/ESET complex in thyroid hormone-mediated repression of E2F1 gene expression and cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Wei, E-mail: hongwei@tijmu.edu.cn [Department of Immunology, Tianjin Medical University, 300070 Tianjin (China); College of Basic Medicine, Tianjin Medical University, 300070 Tianjin (China); Li, Jinru; Wang, Bo [College of Basic Medicine, Tianjin Medical University, 300070 Tianjin (China); Chen, Linfeng [Department of Medical Oncology, Harvard Medical School, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Boston, 02115 MA (United States); Niu, Wenyan; Yao, Zhi [Department of Immunology, Tianjin Medical University, 300070 Tianjin (China); Baniahmad, Aria, E-mail: aban@mti.uni-jena.de [Institute for Human Genetics, Jena University Hospital, 07740 Jena (Germany)

    2011-12-02

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Corepressor Alien interacts with histone methyltransferase ESET in vivo. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Alien/ESET complex is recruited to nTRE of T3-responsive gene by liganded TR{beta}1. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ESET-mediated H3K9 methylation is required for liganded TR{beta}1-repressed transcription. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ESET is involved in T3-repressed G1/S phase transition and proliferation. -- Abstract: The ligand-bound thyroid hormone receptor (TR) is known to repress via a negative TRE (nTRE) the expression of E2F1, a key transcription factor that controls the G1/S phase transition. Alien has been identified as a novel interacting factor of E2F1 and acts as a corepressor of E2F1. The detailed molecular mechanism by which Alien inhibits E2F1 gene expression remains unclear. Here, we report that the histone H3 lysine 9 (H3K9) methyltransferase (HMT) ESET is an integral component of the corepressor Alien complex and the Alien/ESET complex is recruited to both sites, the E2F1 and the nTRE site of the E2F1 gene while the recruitment to the negative thyroid hormone response element (nTRE) is induced by the ligand-bound TR{beta}1 within the E2F1 gene promoter. We show that, overexpression of ESET promotes, whereas knockdown of ESET releases, the inhibition of TR{beta}1-regulated gene transcription upon T3 stimulation; and H3K9 methylation is required for TR{beta}1-repressed transcription. Furthermore, depletion of ESET impairs thyroid hormone-repressed proliferation as well as the G1/S transition of the cell cycle. Taken together, our data indicate that ESET is involved in TR{beta}1-mediated transcription repression and provide a molecular basis of thyroid hormone-induced repression of proliferation.

  2. 花发育中的转录共抑制子%Transcription Co-repressors in Flower Development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘重持

    2003-01-01

    Transcription co-repressors are negative regulators of gene expression. Since they do not possess a DNA-binding motif, their ability to repress gene expression depends on their association with other DNA-binding transcription factors. One well characterized transcription co-repressor is the yeast Tup1. Although unable to bind DNA by itself, the Tup1 co-repressor is recruited by different DNA-binding transcription factors to repress pathway-specific gene expression. Recent isolations of two Arabidopsis genes, LEUNIG (LUG) and SEUSS (SEU), suggest that similar types of co-repressors are involved in the transcription repression of floral homeotic genes during flower development. This review will summarize these findings, speculate on mechanisms, and discuss future directions.

  3. H2A.Z-mediated localization of genes at the nuclear periphery confers epigenetic memory of previous transcriptional state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donna Garvey Brickner

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Many genes are recruited to the nuclear periphery upon transcriptional activation. The mechanism and functional significance of this recruitment is unclear. We find that recruitment of the yeast INO1 and GAL1 genes to the nuclear periphery is rapid and independent of transcription. Surprisingly, these genes remain at the periphery for generations after they are repressed. Localization at the nuclear periphery serves as a form of memory of recent transcriptional activation, promoting reactivation. Previously expressed GAL1 at the nuclear periphery is activated much more rapidly than long-term repressed GAL1 in the nucleoplasm, even after six generations of repression. Localization of INO1 at the nuclear periphery is necessary and sufficient to promote more rapid activation. This form of transcriptional memory is chromatin based; the histone variant H2A.Z is incorporated into nucleosomes within the recently repressed INO1 promoter and is specifically required for rapid reactivation of both INO1 and GAL1. Furthermore, H2A.Z is required to retain INO1 at the nuclear periphery after repression. Therefore, H2A.Z-mediated localization of recently repressed genes at the nuclear periphery represents an epigenetic state that confers memory of transcriptional activation and promotes reactivation.

  4. The Stat3/GR interaction code: predictive value of direct/indirect DNA recruitment for transcription outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langlais, David; Couture, Catherine; Balsalobre, Aurélio; Drouin, Jacques

    2012-07-13

    Transcription factor recruitment to genomic sites of action is primarily due to direct protein:DNA interactions. The subsequent recruitment of coregulatory complexes leads to either transcriptional activation or repression. In contrast to this canonical scheme, some transcription factors, such as the glucocorticoid receptor (GR), behave as transcriptional repressors when recruited to target genes through protein tethering. We have investigated the genome-wide prevalence of tethering between GR and Stat3 and found nonreciprocal interactions, namely that GR tethering to DNA-bound Stat3 results in transcriptional repression, whereas Stat3 tethering to GR results in synergism. Further, other schemes of GR and Stat3 corecruitment to regulatory modules result in transcriptional synergism, including neighboring and composite binding sites. The results indicate extensive transcriptional interactions between Stat3 and GR; further, they provide a genome-wide assessment of transcriptional regulation by tethering and a molecular basis for integration of signals mediated by GR and Stats in health and disease.

  5. Network of mutually repressive metastasis regulators can promote cell heterogeneity and metastatic transitions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balazsi, Gabor; Kim, Eun-Jin; Rosner, Marsha

    2014-03-01

    The sources and consequences of nongenetic variability in metastatic progression are largely unknown. To address these questions, we characterize the transcriptional regulatory network around the metastasis suppressor Raf Kinase Inhibitory Protein (RKIP). It was previously shown that RKIP negatively regulates the transcription factor BACH1, which promotes breast cancer metastasis. Here we demonstrate that BACH1 acts in a double negative (overall positive) feedback loop to inhibit RKIP transcription in breast cancer cells. BACH1 also negatively regulates its own transcription. Analysis of the RKIP-BACH1 network reveals the existence of an inverse relationship between BACH1 and RKIP involving both monostable and bistable transitions between ``low BACH1, high RKIP'' and ``high BACH1, low RKIP'' cellular states that can potentially give rise to nongenetic variability. Single cell analysis confirmed the antagonistic relationship between RKIP and BACH1, and showed cell line-dependent signatures consistent with bistable behavior. Together, our results suggest that the mutually repressive relationship between metastatic regulators such as RKIP and BACH1 can play a key role in determining metastatic progression in cancer. This work was supported by NIH/NIGMS grant R01GM106027.

  6. Repressive coping and alexithymia in idiopathic environmental intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Sine; Zachariae, Robert; Rasmussen, Alice;

    2010-01-01

    To examine if the non-expression of negative emotions (i.e., repressive coping) and differences in the ability to process and regulate emotions (i.e., alexithymia) is associated with idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI).......To examine if the non-expression of negative emotions (i.e., repressive coping) and differences in the ability to process and regulate emotions (i.e., alexithymia) is associated with idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI)....

  7. Effects of cytosine methylation on transcription factor binding sites

    KAUST Repository

    Medvedeva, Yulia A

    2014-03-26

    Background: DNA methylation in promoters is closely linked to downstream gene repression. However, whether DNA methylation is a cause or a consequence of gene repression remains an open question. If it is a cause, then DNA methylation may affect the affinity of transcription factors (TFs) for their binding sites (TFBSs). If it is a consequence, then gene repression caused by chromatin modification may be stabilized by DNA methylation. Until now, these two possibilities have been supported only by non-systematic evidence and they have not been tested on a wide range of TFs. An average promoter methylation is usually used in studies, whereas recent results suggested that methylation of individual cytosines can also be important.Results: We found that the methylation profiles of 16.6% of cytosines and the expression profiles of neighboring transcriptional start sites (TSSs) were significantly negatively correlated. We called the CpGs corresponding to such cytosines " traffic lights" We observed a strong selection against CpG " traffic lights" within TFBSs. The negative selection was stronger for transcriptional repressors as compared with transcriptional activators or multifunctional TFs as well as for core TFBS positions as compared with flanking TFBS positions.Conclusions: Our results indicate that direct and selective methylation of certain TFBS that prevents TF binding is restricted to special cases and cannot be considered as a general regulatory mechanism of transcription. 2013 Medvedeva et al.; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.

  8. Antisense transcription as a tool to tune gene expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, Jennifer A N; Voigt, Christopher A

    2016-01-14

    A surprise that has emerged from transcriptomics is the prevalence of genomic antisense transcription, which occurs counter to gene orientation. While frequent, the roles of antisense transcription in regulation are poorly understood. We built a synthetic system in Escherichia coli to study how antisense transcription can change the expression of a gene and tune the response characteristics of a regulatory circuit. We developed a new genetic part that consists of a unidirectional terminator followed by a constitutive antisense promoter and demonstrate that this part represses gene expression proportionally to the antisense promoter strength. Chip-based oligo synthesis was applied to build a large library of 5,668 terminator-promoter combinations that was used to control the expression of three repressors (PhlF, SrpR, and TarA) in a simple genetic circuit (NOT gate). Using the library, we demonstrate that antisense promoters can be used to tune the threshold of a regulatory circuit without impacting other properties of its response function. Finally, we determined the relative contributions of antisense RNA and transcriptional interference to repressing gene expression and introduce a biophysical model to capture the impact of RNA polymerase collisions on gene repression. This work quantifies the role of antisense transcription in regulatory networks and introduces a new mode to control gene expression that has been previously overlooked in genetic engineering.

  9. Churchill regulates cell movement and mesoderm specification by repressing Nodal signaling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mentzer Laura

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell movements are essential to the determination of cell fates during development. The zinc-finger transcription factor, Churchill (ChCh has been proposed to regulate cell fate by regulating cell movements during gastrulation in the chick. However, the mechanism of action of ChCh is not understood. Results We demonstrate that ChCh acts to repress the response to Nodal-related signals in zebrafish. When ChCh function is abrogated the expression of mesodermal markers is enhanced while ectodermal markers are expressed at decreased levels. In cell transplant assays, we observed that ChCh-deficient cells are more motile than wild-type cells. When placed in wild-type hosts, ChCh-deficient cells often leave the epiblast, migrate to the germ ring and are later found in mesodermal structures. We demonstrate that both movement of ChCh-compromised cells to the germ ring and acquisition of mesodermal character depend on the ability of the donor cells to respond to Nodal signals. Blocking Nodal signaling in the donor cells at the levels of Oep, Alk receptors or Fast1 inhibited migration to the germ ring and mesodermal fate change in the donor cells. We also detect additional unusual movements of transplanted ChCh-deficient cells which suggests that movement and acquisition of mesodermal character can be uncoupled. Finally, we demonstrate that ChCh is required to limit the transcriptional response to Nodal. Conclusion These data establish a broad role for ChCh in regulating both cell movement and Nodal signaling during early zebrafish development. We show that chch is required to limit mesodermal gene expression, inhibit Nodal-dependant movement of presumptive ectodermal cells and repress the transcriptional response to Nodal signaling. These findings reveal a dynamic role for chch in regulating cell movement and fate during early development.

  10. Transcription dynamics of inducible genes modulated by negative regulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yanyan; Tang, Moxun; Yu, Jianshe

    2015-06-01

    Gene transcription is a stochastic process in single cells, in which genes transit randomly between active and inactive states. Transcription of many inducible genes is also tightly regulated: It is often stimulated by extracellular signals, activated through signal transduction pathways and later repressed by negative regulations. In this work, we study the nonlinear dynamics of the mean transcription level of inducible genes modulated by the interplay of the intrinsic transcriptional randomness and the repression by negative regulations. In our model, we integrate negative regulations into gene activation process, and make the conventional assumption on the production and degradation of transcripts. We show that, whether or not the basal transcription is temporarily terminated when cells are stimulated, the mean transcription level grows in the typical up and down pattern commonly observed in immune response genes. With the help of numerical simulations, we clarify the delicate impact of the system parameters on the transcription dynamics, and demonstrate how our model generates the distinct temporal gene-induction patterns in mouse fibroblasts discerned in recent experiments.

  11. Organic acid mediated repression of sugar utilization in rhizobia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Bhagya; Rajput, Mahendrapal Singh; Jog, Rahul; Joshi, Ekta; Bharwad, Krishna; Rajkumar, Shalini

    2016-11-01

    Rhizobia are a class of symbiotic diazotrophic bacteria which utilize C4 acids in preference to sugars and the sugar utilization is repressed as long as C4 acids are present. This can be manifested as a diauxie when rhizobia are grown in the presence of a sugar and a C4 acid together. Succinate, a C4 acid is known to repress utilization of sugars, sugar alcohols, hydrocarbons, etc by a mechanism termed as Succinate Mediated Catabolite Repression (SMCR). Mechanism of catabolite repression determines the hierarchy of carbon source utilization in bacteria. Though the mechanism of catabolite repression has been well studied in model organisms like E. coli, B. subtilis and Pseudomonas sp., mechanism of SMCR in rhizobia has not been well elucidated. C4 acid uptake is important for effective symbioses while mutation in the sugar transport and utilization genes does not affect symbioses. Deletion of hpr and sma0113 resulted in the partial relief of SMCR of utilization of galactosides like lactose, raffinose and maltose in the presence of succinate. However, no such regulators governing SMCR of glucoside utilization have been identified till date. Though rhizobia can utilize multitude of sugars, high affinity transporters for many sugars are yet to be identified. Identifying high affinity sugar transporters and studying the mechanism of catabolite repression in rhizobia is important to understand the level of regulation of SMCR and the key regulators involved in SMCR.

  12. [Repression of the enzyme inducible syntheses in Escherichia coli K12 mutant with a deleted ptsH gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gershanovich, V N; Il'ina, T S; Rusina, O Iu; Iurovitskaia, N V; Bol'shakova, T N

    1977-01-01

    The genome of lambda phage with thermosensitive repressor was integrated into the pts region of the E. coli chromosome. Such a lysogenic culture behaves as a pts mutant at 30 degrees. Heating of cells of this strain leads to the induction of lambda prophage and formation of deletions in the pts region. A mutant with a deletion covering ptsH gene was isolated after prophage induction. The deletion nature of pts mutation was confirmed in genetic and biochemical experiments. It was shown that the deletion is small and does not involve ptsI and lig genes. The isolated deltaptsH mutant possesses all characteristics of pts mutants: pleiotropic impairment of transport and utilization of a number of carbohydrates, repression of the enzyme inducible synthesis and resistance to catabolite repression with glucose. These data (together with earlier ones) allow us to conclude that the phosphorylated form of HPr is involved (in direct of indirect manner/ in activation of DNA transcription.

  13. PPARγ partial agonist GQ-16 strongly represses a subset of genes in 3T3-L1 adipocytes

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    Milton, Flora Aparecida [Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde, Laboratório de Farmacologia Molecular, Universidade de Brasília (Brazil); Genomic Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX (United States); Cvoro, Aleksandra [Genomic Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX (United States); Amato, Angelica A. [Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde, Laboratório de Farmacologia Molecular, Universidade de Brasília (Brazil); Sieglaff, Douglas H.; Filgueira, Carly S.; Arumanayagam, Anithachristy Sigamani [Genomic Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX (United States); Caro Alves de Lima, Maria do; Rocha Pitta, Ivan [Laboratório de Planejamento e Síntese de Fármacos – LPSF, Universidade Federal de Pernambuco (Brazil); Assis Rocha Neves, Francisco de [Faculdade de Ciências da Saúde, Laboratório de Farmacologia Molecular, Universidade de Brasília (Brazil); Webb, Paul, E-mail: pwebb@HoustonMethodist.org [Genomic Medicine, Houston Methodist Research Institute, Houston, TX (United States)

    2015-08-28

    Thiazolidinediones (TZDs) are peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) agonists that improve insulin resistance but trigger side effects such as weight gain, edema, congestive heart failure and bone loss. GQ-16 is a PPARγ partial agonist that improves glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity in mouse models of obesity and diabetes without inducing weight gain or edema. It is not clear whether GQ-16 acts as a partial agonist at all PPARγ target genes, or whether it displays gene-selective actions. To determine how GQ-16 influences PPARγ activity on a gene by gene basis, we compared effects of rosiglitazone (Rosi) and GQ-16 in mature 3T3-L1 adipocytes using microarray and qRT-PCR. Rosi changed expression of 1156 genes in 3T3-L1, but GQ-16 only changed 89 genes. GQ-16 generally showed weak effects upon Rosi induced genes, consistent with partial agonist actions, but a subset of modestly Rosi induced and strongly repressed genes displayed disproportionately strong GQ-16 responses. PPARγ partial agonists MLR24 and SR1664 also exhibit disproportionately strong effects on transcriptional repression. We conclude that GQ-16 displays a continuum of weak partial agonist effects but efficiently represses some negatively regulated PPARγ responsive genes. Strong repressive effects could contribute to physiologic actions of GQ-16. - Highlights: • GQ-16 is an insulin sensitizing PPARγ ligand with reduced harmful side effects. • GQ-16 displays a continuum of weak partial agonist activities at PPARγ-induced genes. • GQ-16 exerts strong repressive effects at a subset of genes. • These inhibitor actions should be evaluated in models of adipose tissue inflammation.

  14. BCL11B is a general transcriptional repressor of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat in T lymphocytes through recruitment of the NuRD complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cismasiu, Valeriu B; Paskaleva, Elena; Suman Daya, Sneha; Canki, Mario; Duus, Karen; Avram, Dorina

    2008-10-25

    In this study we provide evidence that the transcription factor BCL11B represses expression from the HIV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) in T lymphocytes through direct association with the HIV-1 LTR. We also demonstrate that the NuRD corepressor complex mediates BCL11B transcriptional repression of the HIV-1 LTR. In addition, BCL11B and the NuRD complex repressed TAT-mediated transactivation of the HIV-1 LTR in T lymphocytes, pointing to a potential role in initiation of silencing. In support of all the above results, we demonstrate that BCL11B affects HIV-1 replication and virus production, most likely by blocking LTR transcriptional activity. BCL11B showed specific repression for the HIV-1 LTR sequences isolated from seven different HIV-1 subtypes, demonstrating that it is a general transcriptional repressor for all LTRs.

  15. pH-Dependent DNA Distortion and Repression of Gene Expression by Pectobacterium atrosepticum PecS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deochand, Dinesh K; Meariman, Jacob K; Grove, Anne

    2016-07-15

    Transcriptional activity is exquisitely sensitive to changes in promoter DNA topology. Transcription factors may therefore control gene activity by modulating the relative positioning of -10 and -35 promoter elements. The plant pathogen Pectobacterium atrosepticum, which causes soft rot in potatoes, must alter gene expression patterns to ensure growth in planta. In the related soft-rot enterobacterium Dickeya dadantii, PecS functions as a master regulator of virulence gene expression. Here, we report that P. atrosepticum PecS controls gene activity by altering promoter DNA topology in response to pH. While PecS binds the pecS promoter with high affinity regardless of pH, it induces significant DNA distortion only at neutral pH, the pH at which the pecS promoter is repressed in vivo. At pH ∼8, DNA distortions are attenuated, and PecS no longer represses the pecS promoter. A specific histidine (H142) located in a crevice between the dimerization- and DNA-binding regions is required for pH-dependent changes in DNA distortion and repression of gene activity, and mutation of this histidine renders the mutant protein incapable of repressing the pecS promoter. We propose that protonated PecS induces a DNA conformation at neutral pH in which -10 and -35 promoter elements are suboptimally positioned for RNA polymerase binding; on deprotonation of PecS, binding is no longer associated with significant changes in DNA conformation, allowing gene expression. We suggest that this mode of gene regulation leads to differential expression of the PecS regulon in response to alkalinization of the plant apoplast.

  16. CTCF and CohesinSA-1 Mark Active Promoters and Boundaries of Repressive Chromatin Domains in Primary Human Erythroid Cells.

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    Laurie A Steiner

    Full Text Available CTCF and cohesinSA-1 are regulatory proteins involved in a number of critical cellular processes including transcription, maintenance of chromatin domain architecture, and insulator function. To assess changes in the CTCF and cohesinSA-1 interactomes during erythropoiesis, chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled with high throughput sequencing and mRNA transcriptome analyses via RNA-seq were performed in primary human hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC and primary human erythroid cells from single donors.Sites of CTCF and cohesinSA-1 co-occupancy were enriched in gene promoters in HSPC and erythroid cells compared to single CTCF or cohesin sites. Cell type-specific CTCF sites in erythroid cells were linked to highly expressed genes, with the opposite pattern observed in HSPCs. Chromatin domains were identified by ChIP-seq with antibodies against trimethylated lysine 27 histone H3, a modification associated with repressive chromatin. Repressive chromatin domains increased in both number and size during hematopoiesis, with many more repressive domains in erythroid cells than HSPCs. CTCF and cohesinSA-1 marked the boundaries of these repressive chromatin domains in a cell-type specific manner.These genome wide data, changes in sites of protein occupancy, chromatin architecture, and related gene expression, support the hypothesis that CTCF and cohesinSA-1 have multiple roles in the regulation of gene expression during erythropoiesis including transcriptional regulation at gene promoters and maintenance of chromatin architecture. These data from primary human erythroid cells provide a resource for studies of normal and perturbed erythropoiesis.

  17. Transcriptional Regulation of Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase (TERT) by MYC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattar, Ekta; Tergaonkar, Vinay

    2017-01-01

    Telomerase elongates telomeres and is crucial for maintaining genomic stability. While stem cells and cancer cells display high telomerase activity, normal somatic cells lack telomerase activity primarily due to transcriptional repression of telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), the catalytic component of telomerase. Transcription factor binding, chromatin status as well as epigenetic modifications at the TERT promoter regulates TERT transcription. Myc is an important transcriptional regulator of TERT that directly controls its expression by promoter binding and associating with other transcription factors. In this review, we discuss the current understanding of the molecular mechanisms behind regulation of TERT transcription by Myc. We also discuss future perspectives in investigating the regulation of Myc at TERT promoter during cancer development.

  18. Transcription factor CTCF and mammalian genome organization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kotova E. S.

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The CTCF transcription factor is thought to be one of the main participants in various gene regulatory networks including transcription activation and repression, formation of independently functioning chromatin domains, regulation of imprinting etc. Sequencing of human and other genomes opened up a possibility to ascertain the genomic distribution of CTCF binding sites and to identify CTCF-dependent cis-regulatory elements, including insulators. In the review, we summarized recent data on CTCF functioning within a framework of the chromatin loop domain hypothesis of large-scale regulation of the genome activity. Its fundamental properties allow CTCF to serve as a transcription factor, an insulator protein and a dispersed genome-wide demarcation tool able to recruit various factors that emerge in response to diverse external and internal signals, and thus to exert its signal-specific function(s.

  19. Repressed ethylene production in the gynoecium of long-lasting flowers of the carnation 'White Candle': role of the gynoecium in carnation flower senescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nukui, Hideki; Kudo, Sakiko; Yamashita, Atsushi; Satoh, Shigeru

    2004-03-01

    Ethylene production and expression of ethylene biosynthetic genes was investigated in senescing flowers of carnation (Dianthus caryophyllus L.) cultivars 'White Candle (WC)' and 'Light Pink Barbara (LPB)', with long and short vase-lives, respectively. Ethylene production from the gynoecium and petals of senescing 'WC' flowers was below the limit of detection, in agreement with the repressed ethylene production from the whole flowers. However, exogenous ethylene treatment caused the accumulation of transcripts for DC-ACS1 and DC-ACO1 genes in both the gynoecium and petals, resulting in ethylene production from the flowers. Moreover, application of ABA or IAA, which are known to exhibit their action through the induction of ethylene synthesis in the gynoecium, to 'WC' flowers from their cut stem-end induced ethylene production and wilting in the flowers. These findings suggested that, in 'WC' flowers the mechanism of ethylene biosynthesis, i.e. the induction of expression of genes for ethylene biosynthesis and the action of resulting enzymes, was not defective, but that its function was repressed during natural senescence. Transcripts of DC-ACO1, DC-ACS3, and DC-ACS1 were present in the gynoecium of senescing 'LPB' flowers. In the gynoecium of senescing 'WC' flowers, however, the DC-ACO1 transcript was present, but the DC-ACS1 transcript was absent and the DC-ACS3 transcript was detected only in a small amount; the latter two were associated with the low rate of ethylene production in the gynoecium of 'WC' flowers. These findings indicated that the repressed ethylene production in 'WC' flowers during natural senescence is caused by the repressed ethylene production in the gynoecium, giving further support for the role of the gynoecium in regulating petal senescence in carnation flowers.

  20. A transcription activator-like effector (TALE) induction system mediated by proteolysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Copeland, Matthew F; Politz, Mark C; Johnson, Charles B; Markley, Andrew L; Pfleger, Brian F

    2016-04-01

    Simple and predictable trans-acting regulatory tools are needed in the fields of synthetic biology and metabolic engineering to build complex genetic circuits and optimize the levels of native and heterologous gene products. Transcription activator-like effectors (TALEs) are bacterial virulence factors that have recently gained traction in biotechnology applications owing to their customizable DNA-binding specificity. In this work we expanded the versatility of these transcription factors to create an inducible TALE system by inserting tobacco-etch virus (TEV) protease recognition sites into the TALE backbone. The resulting engineered TALEs maintain transcriptional repression of their target genes in Escherichia coli, but are degraded after induction of the TEV protease, thereby promoting expression of the previously repressed target gene of interest. This TALE-TEV technology enables both repression and induction of plasmid or chromosomal target genes in a manner analogous to traditional repressor proteins but with the added flexibility of being operator-agnostic.

  1. The interplay of StyR and IHF regulates substrate-dependent induction and carbon catabolite repression of styrene catabolism genes in Pseudomonas fluorescens ST

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leoni Livia

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Pseudomonas fluorescens ST, the promoter of the styrene catabolic operon, PstyA, is induced by styrene and is subject to catabolite repression. PstyA regulation relies on the StyS/StyR two-component system and on the IHF global regulator. The phosphorylated response regulator StyR (StyR-P activates PstyA in inducing conditions when it binds to the high-affinity site STY2, located about -40 bp from the transcription start point. A cis-acting element upstream of STY2, named URE, contains a low-affinity StyR-P binding site (STY1, overlapping the IHF binding site. Deletion of the URE led to a decrease of promoter activity in inducing conditions and to a partial release of catabolite repression. This study was undertaken to assess the relative role played by IHF and StyR-P on the URE, and to clarify if PstyA catabolite repression could rely on the interplay of these regulators. Results StyR-P and IHF compete for binding to the URE region. PstyA full activity in inducing conditions is achieved when StyR-P and IHF bind to site STY2 and to the URE, respectively. Under catabolite repression conditions, StyR-P binds the STY1 site, replacing IHF at the URE region. StyR-P bound to both STY1 and STY2 sites oligomerizes, likely promoting the formation of a DNA loop that closes the promoter in a repressed conformation. We found that StyR and IHF protein levels did not change in catabolite repression conditions, implying that PstyA repression is achieved through an increase in the StyR-P/StyR ratio. Conclusion We propose a model according to which the activity of the PstyA promoter is determined by conformational changes. An open conformation is operative in inducing conditions when StyR-P is bound to STY2 site and IHF to the URE. Under catabolite repression conditions StyR-P cellular levels would increase, displacing IHF from the URE and closing the promoter in a repressed conformation. The balance between the open and the closed

  2. Manipulating the sensitivity of signal-induced repression: quantification and consequences of altered brinker gradients.

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    Lucia Gafner

    Full Text Available Traditionally, the analysis of gene regulatory regions suffered from the caveat that it was restricted to artificial contexts (e.g. reporter constructs of limited size. With the advent of the BAC recombineering technique, genomic constructs can now be generated to test regulatory elements in their endogenous environment. The expression of the transcriptional repressor brinker (brk is negatively regulated by Dpp signaling. Repression is mediated by small sequence motifs, the silencer elements (SEs, that are present in multiple copies in the regulatory region of brk. In this work, we manipulated the SEs in the brk locus. We precisely quantified the effects of the individual SEs on the Brk gradient in the wing disc by employing a 1D data extraction method, followed by the quantification of the data with reference to an internal control. We found that mutating the SEs results in an expansion of the brk expression domain. However, even after mutating all predicted SEs, repression could still be observed in regions of maximal Dpp levels. Thus, our data point to the presence of additional, low affinity binding sites in the brk locus.

  3. Gene induction and repression during terminal erythropoiesis are mediated by distinct epigenetic changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Piu; Hattangadi, Shilpa M; Cheng, Albert W; Frampton, Garrett M; Young, Richard A; Lodish, Harvey F

    2011-10-20

    It is unclear how epigenetic changes regulate the induction of erythroid-specific genes during terminal erythropoiesis. Here we use global mRNA sequencing (mRNA-seq) and chromatin immunoprecipitation coupled to high-throughput sequencing (CHIP-seq) to investigate the changes that occur in mRNA levels, RNA polymerase II (Pol II) occupancy, and multiple posttranslational histone modifications when erythroid progenitors differentiate into late erythroblasts. Among genes induced during this developmental transition, there was an increase in the occupancy of Pol II, the activation marks H3K4me2, H3K4me3, H3K9Ac, and H4K16Ac, and the elongation methylation mark H3K79me2. In contrast, genes that were repressed during differentiation showed relative decreases in H3K79me2 levels yet had levels of Pol II binding and active histone marks similar to those in erythroid progenitors. We also found that relative changes in histone modification levels, in particular, H3K79me2 and H4K16ac, were most predictive of gene expression patterns. Our results suggest that in terminal erythropoiesis both promoter and elongation-associated marks contribute to the induction of erythroid genes, whereas gene repression is marked by changes in histone modifications mediating Pol II elongation. Our data map the epigenetic landscape of terminal erythropoiesis and suggest that control of transcription elongation regulates gene expression during terminal erythroid differentiation.

  4. I-mfa domain proteins specifically interact with HTLV-1 Tax and repress its transactivating functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusano, Shuichi; Yoshimitsu, Makoto; Hachiman, Miho; Ikeda, Masanori

    2015-12-01

    The I-mfa domain proteins HIC (also known as MDFIC) and I-mfa (also known as MDFI) are candidate tumor suppressor genes that are involved in cellular and viral transcriptional regulation. Here, we show that HIC and I-mfa directly interact with human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1) Tax protein in vitro. In addition, HIC and I-mfa repress Tax-dependent transactivation of an HTLV-1 long terminal repeat (LTR) reporter construct in COS-1, Jurkat and high-Tax-producing HTLV-1-infected T cells. HIC also interacts with Tax through its I-mfa domain in vivo and represses Tax-dependent transactivation of HTLV-1 LTR and NF-κB reporter constructs in an interaction-dependent manner. Furthermore, we show that HIC decreases the nuclear distribution and stimulates the proteasomal degradation of Tax. These data reveal that HIC specifically interacts with HTLV-1 Tax and negatively regulates Tax transactivational activity by altering its subcellular distribution and stability.

  5. IMP2, a gene involved in the expression of glucose-repressible genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lodi, T; Goffrini, P; Ferrero, I; Donnini, C

    1995-09-01

    Two mutants carrying different deletions of the IMP2 coding sequence of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, delta T1, which encodes a protein lacking the last 26 C-terminal amino acids, and delta T2, which completely lacks the coding region, were analysed for derepression of glucose-repressible maltose, galactose, raffinose and ethanol utilization pathways in response to glucose limitation. The role of the IMP2 gene product in the regulation of carbon catabolite repressible enzymes maltase, invertase, alcohol dehydrogenase, NAD-dependent glutamate dehydrogenase (NAD-GDH) and L-lactate:ferricytochrome-c oxidoreductase (L-LCR) was also analysed. The IMP2 gene product is required for the rapid glucose derepression of all above-mentioned carbon source utilization pathways and of all the enzymes except for L-LCR. NAD-GDH is regulated by IMP2 in the opposite way and, in fact, this enzyme was released at higher levels in both imp2 mutants than in the wild-type strain. Therefore, the product of IMP2 appears to be involved in positive and negative regulation. Both deletions result in growth and catalytic defects; in some cases partial modification of the gene product yielded more dramatic effects than its complete absence. Moreover, evidence is provided that the IMP2 gene product regulates galactose- and maltose-inducible genes at the transcriptional level and is a positive regulator of maltase, maltose permease and galactose permease gene expression.

  6. Cell type-specific translational repression of Cyclin B during meiosis in males.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Catherine Craig; Gim, Byung Soo; Fuller, Margaret T

    2015-10-01

    The unique cell cycle dynamics of meiosis are controlled by layers of regulation imposed on core mitotic cell cycle machinery components by the program of germ cell development. Although the mechanisms that regulate Cdk1/Cyclin B activity in meiosis in oocytes have been well studied, little is known about the trans-acting factors responsible for developmental control of these factors in male gametogenesis. During meiotic prophase in Drosophila males, transcript for the core cell cycle protein Cyclin B1 (CycB) is expressed in spermatocytes, but the protein does not accumulate in spermatocytes until just before the meiotic divisions. Here, we show that two interacting proteins, Rbp4 and Fest, expressed at the onset of spermatocyte differentiation under control of the developmental program of male gametogenesis, function to direct cell type- and stage-specific repression of translation of the core G2/M cell cycle component cycB during the specialized cell cycle of male meiosis. Binding of Fest to Rbp4 requires a 31-amino acid region within Rbp4. Rbp4 and Fest are required for translational repression of cycB in immature spermatocytes, with Rbp4 binding sequences in a cell type-specific shortened form of the cycB 3' UTR. Finally, we show that Fest is required for proper execution of meiosis I.

  7. Puf mediates translation repression of transmission-blocking vaccine candidates in malaria parasites.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Miao

    Full Text Available Translational control of gene expression plays an essential role in development. In malaria parasites, translational regulation is critical during the development of specialized transition stages between the vertebrate host and mosquito vector. Here we show that a Pumilio/FBF (Puf family RNA-binding protein, PfPuf2, is required for the translation repression of a number of transcripts in gametocytes including two genes encoding the transmission-blocking vaccine candidates Pfs25 and Pfs28. Whereas studies to date support a paradigm of Puf-mediated translation regulation through 3' untranslated regions (UTRs of target mRNAs, this study, for the first time, identifies a functional Puf-binding element (PBE in the 5'UTR of pfs25. We provide both in vitro and in vivo evidence to demonstrate that PfPuf2 binds to the PBEs in pfs25 and pfs28 to mediate translation repression. This finding provides a renewed view of Pufs as versatile translation regulators and sheds light on their functions in the development of lower branches of eukaryotes.

  8. Specific binding sites in the alcR and alcA promoters of the ethanol regulon for the CREA repressor mediating carbon catabolite repression in Aspergillus nidulans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulmburg, P; Mathieu, M; Dowzer, C; Kelly, J; Felenbok, B

    1993-03-01

    The CREA repressor responsible for carbon catabolite repression in Aspergillus nidulans represses the transcription of the ethanol regulon. The N-terminal part of the CREA protein encompassing the two zinc fingers (C2H2 class family) and an alanine-rich region was expressed in Escherichia coli as a fusion protein with glutathione-S-transferase. Our results show that CREA is a DNA-binding protein able to bind to the promoters of both the specific trans-acting gene, alcR, and of the structural gene, alcA, encoding the alcohol dehydrogenase I. DNase I protection footprinting experiments revealed several specific binding sites in the alcR and in the alcA promoters having the consensus sequence 5'-G/CPyGGGG-3'. The disruption of one of these CREA-binding sites in the alcR promoter overlapping the induction target for the trans-activator ALCR results in a partially derepressed alc phenotype and derepressed alcR transcription, showing that this binding site is functional in vivo. Our data suggest that CREA represses the ethanol regulon by a double lock mechanism repressing both the trans-acting gene, alcR, and the structural gene, alcA.

  9. Arabidopsis Flower and Embryo Developmental Genes are Repressed in Seedlings by Different Combinations of Polycomb Group Proteins in Association with Distinct Sets of Cis-regulatory Elements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hua; Liu, Chunmei; Cheng, Jingfei; Liu, Jian; Zhang, Lei; He, Chongsheng; Shen, Wen-Hui; Jin, Hong; Xu, Lin; Zhang, Yijing

    2016-01-01

    Polycomb repressive complexes (PRCs) play crucial roles in transcriptional repression and developmental regulation in both plants and animals. In plants, depletion of different members of PRCs causes both overlapping and unique phenotypic defects. However, the underlying molecular mechanism determining the target specificity and functional diversity is not sufficiently characterized. Here, we quantitatively compared changes of tri-methylation at H3K27 in Arabidopsis mutants deprived of various key PRC components. We show that CURLY LEAF (CLF), a major catalytic subunit of PRC2, coordinates with different members of PRC1 in suppression of distinct plant developmental programs. We found that expression of flower development genes is repressed in seedlings preferentially via non-redundant role of CLF, which specifically associated with LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (LHP1). In contrast, expression of embryo development genes is repressed by PRC1-catalytic core subunits AtBMI1 and AtRING1 in common with PRC2-catalytic enzymes CLF or SWINGER (SWN). This context-dependent role of CLF corresponds well with the change in H3K27me3 profiles, and is remarkably associated with differential co-occupancy of binding motifs of transcription factors (TFs), including MADS box and ABA-related factors. We propose that different combinations of PRC members distinctively regulate different developmental programs, and their target specificity is modulated by specific TFs.

  10. Arabidopsis Flower and Embryo Developmental Genes are Repressed in Seedlings by Different Combinations of Polycomb Group Proteins in Association with Distinct Sets of Cis-regulatory Elements.

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    Hua Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polycomb repressive complexes (PRCs play crucial roles in transcriptional repression and developmental regulation in both plants and animals. In plants, depletion of different members of PRCs causes both overlapping and unique phenotypic defects. However, the underlying molecular mechanism determining the target specificity and functional diversity is not sufficiently characterized. Here, we quantitatively compared changes of tri-methylation at H3K27 in Arabidopsis mutants deprived of various key PRC components. We show that CURLY LEAF (CLF, a major catalytic subunit of PRC2, coordinates with different members of PRC1 in suppression of distinct plant developmental programs. We found that expression of flower development genes is repressed in seedlings preferentially via non-redundant role of CLF, which specifically associated with LIKE HETEROCHROMATIN PROTEIN1 (LHP1. In contrast, expression of embryo development genes is repressed by PRC1-catalytic core subunits AtBMI1 and AtRING1 in common with PRC2-catalytic enzymes CLF or SWINGER (SWN. This context-dependent role of CLF corresponds well with the change in H3K27me3 profiles, and is remarkably associated with differential co-occupancy of binding motifs of transcription factors (TFs, including MADS box and ABA-related factors. We propose that different combinations of PRC members distinctively regulate different developmental programs, and their target specificity is modulated by specific TFs.

  11. Epigenetic silencing of Bim transcription by Spi-1/PU.1 promotes apoptosis resistance in leukaemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ridinger-Saison, M; Evanno, E; Gallais, I; Rimmelé, P; Selimoglu-Buet, D; Sapharikas, E; Moreau-Gachelin, F; Guillouf, C

    2013-09-01

    Deregulation of transcriptional networks contributes to haematopoietic malignancies. The transcription factor Spi-1/PU.1 is a master regulator of haematopoiesis and its alteration leads to leukaemia. Spi-1 overexpression inhibits differentiation and promotes resistance to apoptosis in erythroleukaemia. Here, we show that Spi-1 inhibits mitochondrial apoptosis in vitro and in vivo through the transcriptional repression of Bim, a proapoptotic factor. BIM interacts with MCL-1 that behaves as a major player in the survival of the preleukaemic cells. The repression of BIM expression reduces the amount of BIM-MCL-1 complexes, thus increasing the fraction of potentially active antiapoptotic MCL-1. We then demonstrate that Spi-1 represses Bim transcription by binding to the Bim promoter and by promoting the trimethylation of histone 3 on lysine 27 (H3K27me3, a repressive histone mark) on the Bim promoter. The PRC2 repressive complex of Polycomb is directly responsible for the deposit of H3K27me3 mark at the Bim promoter. SUZ12 and the histone methyltransferase EZH2, two PRC2 subunits bind to the Bim promoter at the same location than H3K27me3, distinct of the Spi-1 DNA binding site. As Spi-1 interacts with SUZ12 and EZH2, these results indicate that Spi-1 modulates the activity of PRC2 without directly recruiting the complex to the site of its activity on the chromatin. Our results identify a new mechanism whereby Spi-1 represses transcription and provide mechanistic insights on the antiapoptotic function of a transcription factor mediated by the epigenetic control of gene expression.

  12. Transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase in the control of ketogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hegardt, F G

    1998-10-01

    Mitochondrial and cytosolic HMG-CoA synthases are encoded by two different genes. Control of ketogenesis is exerted by transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase. Fasting, cAMP, and fatty acids increase its transcriptional rate, while refeeding and insulin repress it. Fatty acids increase transcription through peroxisomal proliferator regulatory element (PPRE), to which peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR) can bind. Other transcription factors such as chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter transcription factor (COUP-TF) and hepatocyte nuclear factor 4 (HNF-4) compete for the PPRE site, modulating the response of PPAR.

  13. Percept-genetic signs of repression in histrionic personality disorder.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubino, I A; Saya, A; Pezzarossa, B

    1992-04-01

    Several types of perceptual distortions of two anxiety-arousing visual stimuli are coded as repression in the Defense Mechanism Test, a tachistoscopic, percept-genetic technique. Given the well-established correspondence between hysteria and repression, the study included a clinical validation of these variants of repression against the diagnosis of histrionic personality disorder. 41 subjects with evidence of this disorder on the Millon Clinical Multiaxial Inventory-II were compared with 41 nonhistrionic controls. Significantly more histrionics were coded for the type of repression in which the threatening figure is transformed into a harmless object (code 1:42), while animal- and statue-repressions, when combined (codes 1:1 and 1:2), were significantly more characteristic of the nonhistrionic group. As an unpredicted finding, significantly more histrionic subjects employed defensive strategies, currently coded as reaction formations (code 4:). Histrionic subjects without concomitant compulsive features were coded more frequently for introaggression (code 6:) compared both with nonhistrionic controls and with histrionic-compulsive subjects. The findings are discussed within the context of the available percept-genetic literature. It is suggested that the Defense Mechanism Test may be further employed to objectify and investigate the defense mechanisms of the DSM-III-R disorders.

  14. Ethical issues in the search for repressed memories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merskey, H

    1996-01-01

    Currently, concepts of repression and dissociation are in flux. It has been pointed out that there is no scientific evidence for the occurrence of repression and that the whole notion is anecdotal. Dissociation, which is offered as an alternative to repression, cannot logically be held to operate without a motive force, as Freud argued, or a weakness of the organism, as Janet proposed. The concepts have been applied particularly to the idea that early childhood experience could be repressed but recovered many years later. This claim is at variance with established knowledge concerning human memory. Practices of subtle and overt suggestion, employed in recovered-memory treatments, give rise to a false-memory syndrome in which individuals, who have undergone various levels of suggestion, accuse their parents and others of childhood sexual abuse. The common phenomenon of childhood sexual abuse is contaminated by many cases that may be regarded on strong grounds as being false and have been retracted in more than 1,000 instances. Repressed-memory (RM) treatment is also at variance with traditional psychotherapy, which does not encourage confrontation on the basis of uncorroborated information; moreover, many cases of RM therapy seem to result in deterioration. Unlike traditional psychotherapy, some RM practitioners strongly encourage patients to hate individuals in their family circle. The consequences of these developments, the need for informed consent, and the development of legislative initiatives to challenge RM therapy are noted. The impact of these therapies and proposed legislation upon regular psychotherapy and psychiatry is outlined.

  15. Kaiso is a key regulator of spleen germinal center formation by repressing Bcl6 expression in splenocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koh, Dong-In; Yoon, Jae-Hyeon; Kim, Min-Kyeong; An, Haemin; Kim, Min-Young; Hur, Man-Wook

    2013-12-13

    Kaiso was previously described as a methylated DNA-binding protein and a transcription repressor interacting with the corepressor protein complex NCoR. In the current study, we show that generation-3 Kaiso knockout mice show a phenotype of splenomegaly and large diffused germinal centers (GC). In the spleens of Kaiso knockout mice, Bcl6 (a transcriptional repressor that plays a critical role in GC development in spleen) and c-Myc were highly expressed, while the cell cycle arrest genes p27 (CDKN1B), p21 (CDKN1A) and Gadd45a were downregulated. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) and transcription assays suggested that Kaiso represses Bcl6 expression, and in Kaiso knockout mice, derepressed Bcl6 increased cell proliferation by suppressing p27 (CDKN1B), p21 (CDKN1A) and Gadd45a, while upregulating the oncogene c-Myc. Further evidence for Kaiso regulation of splenomegaly was provided by B lymphocyte Ramos cells, in which ectopic KAISO repressed BCL6 and c-MYC expression, while concomitantly increasing the expression of the cell cycle arrestors p21, p27 and Gadd45a. In summary, derepressed Bcl6 expression may be responsible for increases in GC cell proliferation and splenomegaly of Kaiso knockout mice.

  16. The Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Responsive miR-125a Represses Mesenchymal Morphology in Ovarian Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen D. Cowden Dahl

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available The epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT that occurs during embryonic development is recapitulated during tumor metastasis. Important regulators of this process include growth factors, transcription factors, and adhesion molecules. New evidence suggests that microRNA (miRNA activity contributes to metastatic progression and EMT; however, the mechanisms leading to altered miRNA expression during cancer progression remain poorly understood. Importantly, overexpression of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR in ovarian cancer correlates with poor disease outcome and induces EMT in ovarian cancer cells. We report that EGFR signaling leads to transcriptional repression of the miRNA miR-125a through the ETS family transcription factor PEA3. Overexpression of miR-125a induces conversion of highly invasive ovarian cancer cells from a mesenchymal to an epithelial morphology, suggesting miR-125a is a negative regulator of EMT. We identify AT-rich interactive domain 3B (ARID3B as a target of miR-125a and demonstrate that ARID3B is overexpressed in human ovarian cancer. Repression of miR-125a through growth factor signaling represents a novel mechanism for regulating ovarian cancer invasive behavior.

  17. Selective de-repression of germ cell-specific genes in mouse embryonic fibroblasts in a permissive epigenetic environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekinaka, Tamotsu; Hayashi, Yohei; Noce, Toshiaki; Niwa, Hitoshi; Matsui, Yasuhisa

    2016-09-09

    Epigenetic modifications play crucial roles on establishment of tissue-specific transcription profiles and cellular characteristics. Direct conversions of fibroblasts into differentiated tissue cells by over-expression of critical transcription factors have been reported, but the epigenetic mechanisms underlying these conversions are still not fully understood. In addition, conversion of somatic cells into germ cells has not yet been achieved. To understand epigenetic mechanisms that underlie germ cell characteristics, we attempted to use defined epigenetic factors to directly convert mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) into germ cells. Here, we successfully induced germ cell-specific genes by inhibiting repressive epigenetic modifications via RNAi or small-molecule compounds. Under these conditions, some tissue-specific genes and stimulus-inducible genes were also induced. Meanwhile, the treatments did not result in genome-wide transcriptional activation. These results suggested that a permissive epigenetic environment resulted in selective de-repression of stimulus- and differentiation-inducible genes including germ cell-specific genes in MEFs.

  18. Selective de-repression of germ cell-specific genes in mouse embryonic fibroblasts in a permissive epigenetic environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekinaka, Tamotsu; Hayashi, Yohei; Noce, Toshiaki; Niwa, Hitoshi; Matsui, Yasuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic modifications play crucial roles on establishment of tissue-specific transcription profiles and cellular characteristics. Direct conversions of fibroblasts into differentiated tissue cells by over-expression of critical transcription factors have been reported, but the epigenetic mechanisms underlying these conversions are still not fully understood. In addition, conversion of somatic cells into germ cells has not yet been achieved. To understand epigenetic mechanisms that underlie germ cell characteristics, we attempted to use defined epigenetic factors to directly convert mouse embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs) into germ cells. Here, we successfully induced germ cell-specific genes by inhibiting repressive epigenetic modifications via RNAi or small-molecule compounds. Under these conditions, some tissue-specific genes and stimulus-inducible genes were also induced. Meanwhile, the treatments did not result in genome-wide transcriptional activation. These results suggested that a permissive epigenetic environment resulted in selective de-repression of stimulus- and differentiation-inducible genes including germ cell-specific genes in MEFs. PMID:27608931

  19. Stepwise assembly of functional C-terminal REST/NRSF transcriptional repressor complexes as a drug target

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Inui, Ken; Zhao, Zongpei; Yuan, Juan

    2017-01-01

    In human cells, thousands of predominantly neuronal genes are regulated by the repressor element 1 (RE1)-silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencer factor (REST/NRSF). REST/NRSF represses transcription of these genes in stem cells and non-neuronal cells by tethering corepressor co...

  20. AP-2{alpha} suppresses skeletal myoblast proliferation and represses fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 promoter activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitchell, Darrion L. [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, 3333 Green Bay Road, North Chicago, IL 60064 (United States); DiMario, Joseph X., E-mail: joseph.dimario@rosalindfranklin.edu [Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy, Chicago Medical School, Rosalind Franklin University of Medicine and Science, 3333 Green Bay Road, North Chicago, IL 60064 (United States)

    2010-01-15

    Skeletal muscle development is partly characterized by myoblast proliferation and subsequent differentiation into postmitotic muscle fibers. Developmental regulation of expression of the fibroblast growth factor receptor 1 (FGFR1) gene is required for normal myoblast proliferation and muscle formation. As a result, FGFR1 promoter activity is controlled by multiple transcriptional regulatory proteins during both proliferation and differentiation of myogenic cells. The transcription factor AP-2{alpha} is present in nuclei of skeletal muscle cells and suppresses myoblast proliferation in vitro. Since FGFR1 gene expression is tightly linked to myoblast proliferation versus differentiation, the FGFR1 promoter was examined for candidate AP-2{alpha} binding sites. Mutagenesis studies indicated that a candidate binding site located at - 1035 bp functioned as a repressor cis-regulatory element. Furthermore, mutation of this site alleviated AP-2{alpha}-mediated repression of FGFR1 promoter activity. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies demonstrated that AP-2{alpha} interacted with the FGFR1 promoter in both proliferating myoblasts and differentiated myotubes. In total, these results indicate that AP-2{alpha} is a transcriptional repressor of FGFR1 gene expression during skeletal myogenesis.

  1. PADI4 acts as a coactivator of Tal1 by counteracting repressive histone arginine methylation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolodziej, Stephan; Kuvardina, Olga N.; Oellerich, Thomas; Herglotz, Julia; Backert, Ingo; Kohrs, Nicole; Buscató, Estel. La; Wittmann, Sandra K.; Salinas-Riester, Gabriela; Bonig, Halvard; Karas, Michael; Serve, Hubert; Proschak, Ewgenij; Lausen, Jörn

    2014-05-01

    The transcription factor Tal1 is a critical activator or repressor of gene expression in hematopoiesis and leukaemia. The mechanism by which Tal1 differentially influences transcription of distinct genes is not fully understood. Here we show that Tal1 interacts with the peptidylarginine deiminase IV (PADI4). We demonstrate that PADI4 can act as an epigenetic coactivator through influencing H3R2me2a. At the Tal1/PADI4 target gene IL6ST the repressive H3R2me2a mark triggered by PRMT6 is counteracted by PADI4, which augments the active H3K4me3 mark and thus increases IL6ST expression. In contrast, at the CTCF promoter PADI4 acts as a repressor. We propose that the influence of PADI4 on IL6ST transcription plays a role in the control of IL6ST expression during lineage differentiation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. These results open the possibility to pharmacologically influence Tal1 in leukaemia.

  2. A systems biology approach to study glucose repression in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, Steen Lund; Soberano de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Bro, Christoffer

    2007-01-01

    in repression of a wide range of genes involved to utilization of alternative carbon sources. In this work, we applied a systems biology approach to study the interaction between these two pathways. Through genome-wide transcription analysis of strains with disruption of HXK2, GRR1, MIG1, the combination of MIG......1 and MIG2, and the parentel strain, we identified 393 genes to have significantly changed expression levels. To identify co-regulation patterns in the different strains we applied principal component analysis. Disruption of either GRR1 or HXK2 were both found to have profound effects...... reporter metabolites, and found that there is a high degree of consistency between the identified reporter metabolites and the physiological effects observed in the different mutants . Our systems biology approach points to close interaction between the two pathways, and our metabolism driven analysis...

  3. The EDLL motif: a potent plant transcriptional activation domain from AP2/ERF transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiwari, Shiv B; Belachew, Alemu; Ma, Siu Fong; Young, Melinda; Ade, Jules; Shen, Yu; Marion, Colleen M; Holtan, Hans E; Bailey, Adina; Stone, Jeffrey K; Edwards, Leslie; Wallace, Andreah D; Canales, Roger D; Adam, Luc; Ratcliffe, Oliver J; Repetti, Peter P

    2012-06-01

    In plants, the ERF/EREBP family of transcriptional regulators plays a key role in adaptation to various biotic and abiotic stresses. These proteins contain a conserved AP2 DNA-binding domain and several uncharacterized motifs. Here, we describe a short motif, termed 'EDLL', that is present in AtERF98/TDR1 and other clade members from the same AP2 sub-family. We show that the EDLL motif, which has a unique arrangement of acidic amino acids and hydrophobic leucines, functions as a strong activation domain. The motif is transferable to other proteins, and is active at both proximal and distal positions of target promoters. As such, the EDLL motif is able to partly overcome the repression conferred by the AtHB2 transcription factor, which contains an ERF-associated amphiphilic repression (EAR) motif. We further examined the activation potential of EDLL by analysis of the regulation of flowering time by NF-Y (nuclear factor Y) proteins. Genetic evidence indicates that NF-Y protein complexes potentiate the action of CONSTANS in regulation of flowering in Arabidopsis; we show that the transcriptional activation function of CONSTANS can be substituted by direct fusion of the EDLL activation motif to NF-YB subunits. The EDLL motif represents a potent plant activation domain that can be used as a tool to confer transcriptional activation potential to heterologous DNA-binding proteins.

  4. The conserved HDAC Rpd3 drives transcriptional quiescence in S. cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey N. McKnight

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Quiescence is a ubiquitous cell cycle stage conserved from microbes through humans and is essential to normal cellular function and response to changing environmental conditions. We recently reported a massive repressive event associated with quiescence in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where Rpd3 establishes repressive chromatin structure that drives transcriptional shutoff [6]. Here, we describe in detail the experimental procedures, data collection, and data analysis related to our characterization of transcriptional quiescence in budding yeast (GEO: GSE67151. Our results provide a bona fide molecular event driven by widespread changes in chromatin structure through action of Rpd3 that distinguishes quiescence as a unique cell cycle stage in S. cerevisiae.

  5. Transcriptional regulation by Polycomb group proteins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Di Croce, Luciano; Helin, Kristian

    2013-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are epigenetic regulators of transcription that have key roles in stem-cell identity, differentiation and disease. Mechanistically, they function within multiprotein complexes, called Polycomb repressive complexes (PRCs), which modify histones (and other proteins......) and silence target genes. The dynamics of PRC1 and PRC2 components has been the focus of recent research. Here we discuss our current knowledge of the PRC complexes, how they are targeted to chromatin and how the high diversity of the PcG proteins allows these complexes to influence cell identity....

  6. The glycosyltransferase LARGE2 is repressed by Snail and ZEB1 in prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Qin; Miller, Michael R; Schappet, James; Henry, Michael D

    2015-01-01

    Reductions in both expression of the dystroglycan core protein and functional glycosylation of the α-dystroglycan (αDG) subunit have been reported in a number of cancers and may contribute to disease progression. In the case of prostate cancer, one mechanism that contributes to αDG hypoglycosylation is transcriptional down-regulation of LARGE2 (GYLTY1B), a glycosyltransferase that produces the functional (laminin-binding) glycan on αDG, but the mechanism(s) underlying reduction of LARGE2 mRNA remain unclear. Here, we show that αDG hypoglycosylation is associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT)-like status. We examined immunoreactivity for both functionally-glycosylated αDG and E-cadherin by flow cytometry and the relative expression of ZEB1 mRNA and the αDG glycosyltransferase LARGE2 mRNA in prostate and other cancer cell lines by quantitative RT-PCR. To study the role of ZEB1 and other transcription factors in the regulation of LARGE2, we employed overexpression and knockdown approaches. Snail- or ZEB1-driven EMT caused αDG hypoglycosylation by repressing expression of the LARGE2 mRNA, with both ZEB1-dependent and -independent mechanisms contributing to Snail-mediated LARGE2 repression. To examine the direct regulation of LARGE2 by Snail and ZEB1 we employed luciferase reporter and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays. Snail and ZEB1 were found to bind directly to the LARGE2 promoter, specifically to E/Z-box clusters. Furthermore, analysis of gene expression profiles of clinical samples in The Cancer Genome Atlas reveals negative correlation of LARGE2 and ZEB1 expression in various cancers. Collectively, our results suggest that LARGE2 is negatively regulated by Snail and/or ZEB1, revealing a mechanistic basis for αDG hypoglycosylation during prostate cancer progression and metastasis.

  7. Repression of interferon-γexpression in T cells by prosperorelated Homeobox protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Linfang Wang; Jianmei Zhu; Shifang Shan; Yi Qin; Yuying Kong; Jing Liu; Yuan Wang; Youhua Xie

    2008-01-01

    Interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) is a major proinflammatory effector and regulatory cytokine produced by activated T cells and NK cells. IFN-γ has been shown to play pivotal roles in fundamental immunological processes such as inflammatory reactions,cell-mediated immunity and autoimmunity. A variety of human disorders have now been linked to irregular IFN-γ expression. In order to achieve proper IFN-γ-mediated immunological effects,IFN-γ expression in T cells is subject to both positive and negative regulation. In this study,we report for the first time the negative regulation of IFN-γ expression by Prospero-related Homeobox (Prox1). In Jurkat T cells and primary human CD4+ T cells,Proxl expression decreases quickly upon T cell activation,concurrent with a dramatic increase in IFN-γ expression.Reporter analysis and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) revealed that Proxl associates with and inhibits the transcription activity of IFN-γ promoter in activated Jurkat T cells. Co-immunoprecipitation and GST pull-down assay demonstrated a direct binding between Proxl and the nuclear receptor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ),which is also an IFN-γ repressor in T cells. By introducing deletions and mutations into Proxl,we show that the repression of IFN-γ promoter by Prox1 is largely dependent upon the physical interaction between Prox1 and PPARγ. Furthermore,PPARγ antagonist treatment removes Prox1 from IFN-γ promoter and attenuates repression of IFN-γ expression by Prox1. These findings establish Prox1 as a new negative regulator of IFN-γ expression in T cells and will aid in the understanding of IFN-γ transcription regulation mechanisms.

  8. Suppression and repression: A theoretical discussion illustrated by a movie

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Lucia de Souza Campos Paiva

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The first translations of Freud's work into Portuguese have presented problems because they were not translated from the German language. More than a hundred years after the beginning of Psychoanalysis, there are still many discussions on Freud's metapsychology and a considerable difficulty in obtaining a consensus on the translation of some concepts. This paper refers back to Freud's concepts of primal repression, repression and suppression. In order to discuss such concepts, we have made use of a film, co-produced by Germans and Argentineans, which is named "The Song in me" (Das Lied in mir, released to the public in 2011 and directed by Florian Micoud Cossen. Through this motion picture, the following of Freud's concepts are analyzed, and the differentiation between them is discussed: suppression and repression, as well as the importance of their precise translation.

  9. Timing of transcriptional quiescence during gametogenesis is controlled by global histone H3K4 demethylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Mengshu; Soloveychik, Maria; Ranger, Mathieu; Schertzberg, Michael; Shah, Zarna; Raisner, Ryan; Venkatasubrahmanyan, Shivkumar; Tsui, Kyle; Gebbia, Marinella; Hughes, Tim; van Bakel, Harm; Nislow, Corey; Madhani, Hiten D; Meneghini, Marc D

    2012-11-13

    Gametes are among the most highly specialized cells produced during development. Although gametogenesis culminates in transcriptional quiescence in plants and animals, regulatory mechanisms controlling this are unknown. Here, we confirm that gamete differentiation in the single-celled yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is accompanied by global transcriptional shutoff following the completion of meiosis. We show that Jhd2, a highly conserved JARID1-family histone H3K4 demethylase, activates protein-coding gene transcription in opposition to this programmed transcriptional shutoff, sustaining the period of productive transcription during spore differentiation. Moreover, using genome-wide nucleosome, H3K4me, and transcript mapping experiments, we demonstrate that JHD2 globally represses intergenic noncoding transcription during this period. The widespread transcriptional defects of JHD2 mutants are associated with precocious differentiation and the production of stress-sensitive spores, demonstrating that Jhd2 regulation of the global postmeiotic transcriptional program is critical for the production of healthy meiotic progeny.

  10. Transcriptional repression of the Neurofibromatosis-1 tumor suppressor by the t(8;21) fusion protein.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Yang, G.; Khalaf, W.; Locht, L.; Jansen, J.H.; Gao, M.; Thompson, M.A.; Reijden, B.A. van der; Gutmann, D.H.; Delwel, R.; Clapp, D.W.; Hiebert, S.W.

    2005-01-01

    Von Recklinghausen's disease is a relatively common familial genetic disorder characterized by inactivating mutations of the Neurofibromatosis-1 (NF1) gene that predisposes these patients to malignancies, including an increased risk for juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia. However, NF1 mutations are no

  11. Mono-allelic retrotransposon insertion addresses epigenetic transcriptional repression in human genome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byun Hyang-Min

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Retrotransposons have been extensively studied in plants and animals and have been shown to have an impact on human genome dynamics and evolution. Their ability to move within genomes gives retrotransposons to affect genome instability. Methods we examined the polymorphic inserted AluYa5, evolutionary young Alu, in the progesterone receptor gene to determine the effects of Alu insertion on molecular environment. We used mono-allelic inserted cell lines which carry both Alu-present and Alu-absent alleles. To determine the epigenetic change and gene expression, we performed restriction enzyme digestion, Pyrosequencing, and Chromatin Immunoprecipitation. Results We observed that the polymorphic insertion of evolutionally young Alu causes increasing levels of DNA methylation in the surrounding genomic area and generates inactive histone tail modifications. Consequently the Alu insertion deleteriously inactivates the neighboring gene expression. Conclusion The mono-allelic Alu insertion cell line clearly showed that polymorphic inserted repetitive elements cause the inactivation of neighboring gene expression, bringing aberrant epigenetic changes.

  12. Transcriptional responses of Arabidopsis thaliana plants to As (V stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Joshua S

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Arsenic is toxic to plants and a common environmental pollutant. There is a strong chemical similarity between arsenate [As (V] and phosphate (Pi. Whole genome oligonucleotide microarrays were employed to investigate the transcriptional responses of Arabidopsis thaliana plants to As (V stress. Results Antioxidant-related genes (i.e. coding for superoxide dismutases and peroxidases play prominent roles in response to arsenate. The microarray experiment revealed induction of chloroplast Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD (at2g28190, Cu/Zn SOD (at1g08830, as well as an SOD copper chaperone (at1g12520. On the other hand, Fe SODs were strongly repressed in response to As (V stress. Non-parametric rank product statistics were used to detect differentially expressed genes. Arsenate stress resulted in the repression of numerous genes known to be induced by phosphate starvation. These observations were confirmed with qRT-PCR and SOD activity assays. Conclusion Microarray data suggest that As (V induces genes involved in response to oxidative stress and represses transcription of genes induced by phosphate starvation. This study implicates As (V as a phosphate mimic in the cell by repressing genes normally induced when available phosphate is scarce. Most importantly, these data reveal that arsenate stress affects the expression of several genes with little or unknown biological functions, thereby providing new putative gene targets for future research.

  13. GR SUMOylation and formation of an SUMO-SMRT/NCoR1-HDAC3 repressing complex is mandatory for GC-induced IR nGRE-mediated transrepression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Guoqiang; Paulen, Laetitia; Chambon, Pierre

    2016-01-01

    Unique among the nuclear receptor superfamily, the glucocorticoid (GC) receptor (GR) can exert three distinct transcriptional regulatory functions on binding of a single natural (cortisol in human and corticosterone in mice) and synthetic [e.g., dexamethasone (Dex)] hormone. The molecular mechanisms underlying GC-induced positive GC response element [(+)GRE]-mediated activation of transcription are partially understood. In contrast, these mechanisms remain elusive for GC-induced evolutionary conserved inverted repeated negative GC response element (IR nGRE)-mediated direct transrepression and for tethered indirect transrepression that is mediated by DNA-bound NF-κB/activator protein 1 (AP1)/STAT3 activators and instrumental in GC-induced anti-inflammatory activity. We demonstrate here that SUMOylation of lysine K293 (mouse K310) located within an evolutionary conserved sequence in the human GR N-terminal domain allows the formation of a GR-small ubiquitin-related modifiers (SUMOs)-NCoR1/SMRT-HDAC3 repressing complex mandatory for GC-induced IR nGRE-mediated direct repression in vitro, but does not affect transactivation. Importantly, these results were validated in vivo: in K310R mutant mice and in mice ablated selectively for nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCoR1)/silencing mediator for retinoid or thyroid-hormone receptors (SMRT) corepressors in skin keratinocytes, Dex-induced direct repression and the formation of repressing complexes on IR nGREs were impaired, whereas transactivation was unaffected. In mice selectively ablated for histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) in skin keratinocytes, GC-induced direct repression, but not bindings of GR and of corepressors NCoR1/SMRT, was abolished, indicating that HDAC3 is instrumental in IR nGRE-mediated repression. Moreover, we demonstrate that the binding of HDAC3 to IR nGREs in vivo is mediated through interaction with SMRT/NCoR1. We also show that the GR ligand binding domain (LBD) is not required for SMRT

  14. GR SUMOylation and formation of an SUMO-SMRT/NCoR1-HDAC3 repressing complex is mandatory for GC-induced IR nGRE-mediated transrepression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Guoqiang; Paulen, Laetitia; Chambon, Pierre

    2016-02-02

    Unique among the nuclear receptor superfamily, the glucocorticoid (GC) receptor (GR) can exert three distinct transcriptional regulatory functions on binding of a single natural (cortisol in human and corticosterone in mice) and synthetic [e.g., dexamethasone (Dex)] hormone. The molecular mechanisms underlying GC-induced positive GC response element [(+)GRE]-mediated activation of transcription are partially understood. In contrast, these mechanisms remain elusive for GC-induced evolutionary conserved inverted repeated negative GC response element (IR nGRE)-mediated direct transrepression and for tethered indirect transrepression that is mediated by DNA-bound NF-κB/activator protein 1 (AP1)/STAT3 activators and instrumental in GC-induced anti-inflammatory activity. We demonstrate here that SUMOylation of lysine K293 (mouse K310) located within an evolutionary conserved sequence in the human GR N-terminal domain allows the formation of a GR-small ubiquitin-related modifiers (SUMOs)-NCoR1/SMRT-HDAC3 repressing complex mandatory for GC-induced IR nGRE-mediated direct repression in vitro, but does not affect transactivation. Importantly, these results were validated in vivo: in K310R mutant mice and in mice ablated selectively for nuclear receptor corepressor 1 (NCoR1)/silencing mediator for retinoid or thyroid-hormone receptors (SMRT) corepressors in skin keratinocytes, Dex-induced direct repression and the formation of repressing complexes on IR nGREs were impaired, whereas transactivation was unaffected. In mice selectively ablated for histone deacetylase 3 (HDAC3) in skin keratinocytes, GC-induced direct repression, but not bindings of GR and of corepressors NCoR1/SMRT, was abolished, indicating that HDAC3 is instrumental in IR nGRE-mediated repression. Moreover, we demonstrate that the binding of HDAC3 to IR nGREs in vivo is mediated through interaction with SMRT/NCoR1. We also show that the GR ligand binding domain (LBD) is not required for SMRT

  15. The repression domain of the E1B 55-kilodalton protein participates in countering interferon-induced inhibition of adenovirus replication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahal, Jasdave S; Gallagher, Courtney; DeHart, Caroline J; Flint, S J

    2013-04-01

    To begin to investigate the mechanism by which the human adenovirus type 5 E1B 55-kDa protein protects against the antiviral effects of type 1 interferon (IFN) (J. S. Chahal, J. Qi, and S. J. Flint, PLoS Pathog. 8:e1002853, 2012 [doi:10.1371/journal.ppat.1002853]), we examined the effects of precise amino acid substitution in this protein on resistance of viral replication to the cytokine. Only substitution of residues 443 to 448 of E1B for alanine (E1B Sub19) specifically impaired production of progeny virus and resulted in a large defect in viral DNA synthesis in IFN-treated normal human fibroblasts. Untreated or IFN-treated cells infected by this mutant virus (AdEasyE1Sub19) contained much higher steady-state concentrations of IFN-inducible GBP1 and IFIT2 mRNAs than did wild-type-infected cells and of the corresponding newly transcribed pre-mRNAs, isolated exploiting 5'-ethynyluridine labeling and click chemistry. These results indicated that the mutations created by substitution of residues 443 to 448 for alanine (Sub19) impair repression of transcription of IFN-inducible genes, by the E1B, 55-kDa protein, consistent with their location in a segment required for repression of p53-dependent transcription. However, when synthesized alone, the E1B 55-kDa protein inhibited expression of the p53-regulated genes BAX and MDM2 but had no impact whatsoever on induction of IFIT2 and GBP1 expression by IFN. These observations correlate repression of transcription of IFN-inducible genes by the E1B 55-kDa protein with protection against inhibition of viral genome replication and indicate that the E1B 55-kDa protein is not sufficient to establish such transcriptional repression.

  16. Nitrogen catabolite repression of asparaginase II in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Dunlop, P C; Meyer, G M; Roon, R J

    1980-01-01

    The biosynthesis of asparaginase II in Saccharomyces cerevisiae is subject to strong catabolite repression by a variety of nitrogen compounds. In the present study, asparaginase II synthesis was examined in a wild-type yeast strain and in strains carrying gdhA, gdhCR, or gdhCS mutations. The following effects were observed: (i) In the wild-type strain, the biosynthesis of asparaginase II was strongly repressed when either 10 mM ammonium sulfate or various amino acids (10 mM) served as the sou...

  17. Political Repressions in USSR (Against Speculations, Perversion and Mystifications)

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    In the article the great numbers of political repressions, which were exaggerated by authors: R.A. Medvedev, A.I. Solzhenitsyn, O.G. Shatunovskoy, A.V. Antonov-Ovseenko in 80-90s are criticized. The author characterizes figures given in tens and even in hundreds of millions of victims as a statistical charlatanism.After checking up the KGB archives, and documents of division responsible for NKVD-MVD special settlements, the author spills the light on real numbers of political repressions in U...

  18. Repressive coping and alexithymia in ideopathic environmental intolerance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skovbjerg, Sine; Zachariae, Robert; Rasmussen, Alice;

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine if the non-expression of negative emotions (i.e., repressive coping) and differences in the ability to process and regulate emotions (i.e., alexithymia) is associated with idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI). Methods The study included participants who had previously...... participated in a general population-based study and reported symptoms of environmental intolerance (n = 787) and patients with IEI (n = 237). The participants completed questionnaires assessing IEI, namely, a measure of repressive coping combining scores on the Marlowe–Crowne Social Desirability Scale (MCSDS...

  19. piRNA-mediated nuclear accumulation of retrotransposon transcripts in the Drosophila female germline.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chambeyron, Séverine; Popkova, Anna; Payen-Groschêne, Geneviève; Brun, Christine; Laouini, Dorsaf; Pelisson, Alain; Bucheton, Alain

    2008-09-30

    Germline silencing of transposable elements is essential for the maintenance of genome integrity. Recent results indicate that this repression is largely achieved through a RNA silencing pathway that involves Piwi-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). However the repressive mechanisms are not well understood. To address this question, we used the possibility to disrupt the repression of the Drosophila I element retrotransposon by hybrid dysgenesis. We show here that the repression of the functional I elements that are located in euchromatin requires proteins of the piRNA pathway, and that the amount of ovarian I element piRNAs correlates with the strength of the repression in the female germline. Antisense RNAs, which are likely used to produce antisense piRNAs, are transcribed by heterochromatic defective I elements, but efficient production of these antisense small RNAs requires the presence in the genome of euchromatic functional I elements. Finally, we demonstrate that the piRNA-induced silencing of the functional I elements is at least partially posttranscriptional. In a repressive background, these elements are still transcribed, but some of their sense transcripts are kept in nurse cell nuclear foci together with those of the Doc retrotransposon. In the absence of I element piRNAs, either in dysgenic females or in mutants of the piRNA silencing pathway, sense I element transcripts are transported toward the oocyte where retrotransposition occurs. Our results indicate that piRNAs are involved in a posttranscriptional gene-silencing mechanism resulting in RNA nuclear accumulation.

  20. The doublesex splicing enhancer components Tra2 and Rbp1 also repress splicing through an intronic silencer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qi, Junlin; Su, Shihuang; Mattox, William

    2007-01-01

    The activation of sex-specific alternative splice sites in the Drosophila melanogaster doublesex and fruitless pre-mRNAs has been well studied and depends on the serine-arginine-rich (SR) splicing factors Tra, Tra2, and Rbp1. Little is known, however, about how SR factors negatively regulate splice sites in other RNAs. Here we examine how Tra2 blocks splicing of the M1 intron from its own transcript. We identify an intronic splicing silencer (ISS) adjacent to the M1 branch point that is sufficient to confer Tra2-dependent repression on another RNA. The ISS was found to function independently of its position within the intron, arguing against the idea that bound repressors function by simply interfering with branch point accessibility to general splicing factors. Conserved subelements of the silencer include five short repeated sequences that are required for Tra2 binding but differ from repeated binding sites found in Tra2-dependent splicing enhancers. The ISS also contains a consensus binding site for Rbp1, and this protein was found to facilitate repression of M1 splicing both in vitro and in Drosophila larvae. In contrast to the cooperative binding of SR proteins observed on the doublesex splicing enhancer, we found that Rbp1 and Tra2 bind to the ISS independently through distinct sequences. Our results suggest that functionally synergistic interactions of these SR factors can cause either splicing activation or repression.

  1. SRSF3 represses the expression of PDCD4 protein by coordinated regulation of alternative splicing, export and translation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Seung Kuk; Jeong, Sunjoo

    2016-02-05

    Gene expression is regulated at multiple steps, such as transcription, splicing, export, degradation and translation. Considering diverse roles of SR proteins, we determined whether the tumor-related splicing factor SRSF3 regulates the expression of the tumor-suppressor protein, PDCD4, at multiple steps. As we have reported previously, knockdown of SRSF3 increased the PDCD4 protein level in SW480 colon cancer cells. More interestingly, here we showed that the alternative splicing and the nuclear export of minor isoforms of pdcd4 mRNA were repressed by SRSF3, but the translation step was unaffected. In contrast, only the translation step of the major isoform of pdcd4 mRNA was repressed by SRSF3. Therefore, overexpression of SRSF3 might be relevant to the repression of all isoforms of PDCD4 protein levels in most types of cancer cell. We propose that SRSF3 could act as a coordinator of the expression of PDCD4 protein via two mechanisms on two alternatively spliced mRNA isoforms.

  2. GATA3 induces human T-cell commitment by restraining Notch activity and repressing NK-cell fate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van de Walle, Inge; Dolens, Anne-Catherine; Durinck, Kaat; De Mulder, Katrien; Van Loocke, Wouter; Damle, Sagar; Waegemans, Els; De Medts, Jelle; Velghe, Imke; De Smedt, Magda; Vandekerckhove, Bart; Kerre, Tessa; Plum, Jean; Leclercq, Georges; Rothenberg, Ellen V.; Van Vlierberghe, Pieter; Speleman, Frank; Taghon, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The gradual reprogramming of haematopoietic precursors into the T-cell fate is characterized by at least two sequential developmental stages. Following Notch1-dependent T-cell lineage specification during which the first T-cell lineage genes are expressed and myeloid and dendritic cell potential is lost, T-cell specific transcription factors subsequently induce T-cell commitment by repressing residual natural killer (NK)-cell potential. How these processes are regulated in human is poorly understood, especially since efficient T-cell lineage commitment requires a reduction in Notch signalling activity following T-cell specification. Here, we show that GATA3, in contrast to TCF1, controls human T-cell lineage commitment through direct regulation of three distinct processes: repression of NK-cell fate, upregulation of T-cell lineage genes to promote further differentiation and restraint of Notch activity. Repression of the Notch1 target gene DTX1 hereby is essential to prevent NK-cell differentiation. Thus, GATA3-mediated positive and negative feedback mechanisms control human T-cell lineage commitment. PMID:27048872

  3. Transcriptional Regulation of the p16 Tumor Suppressor Gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotake, Yojiro; Naemura, Madoka; Murasaki, Chihiro; Inoue, Yasutoshi; Okamoto, Haruna

    2015-08-01

    The p16 tumor suppressor gene encodes a specific inhibitor of cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4 and 6 and is found altered in a wide range of human cancers. p16 plays a pivotal role in tumor suppressor networks through inducing cellular senescence that acts as a barrier to cellular transformation by oncogenic signals. p16 protein is relatively stable and its expression is primary regulated by transcriptional control. Polycomb group (PcG) proteins associate with the p16 locus in a long non-coding RNA, ANRIL-dependent manner, leading to repression of p16 transcription. YB1, a transcription factor, also represses the p16 transcription through direct association with its promoter region. Conversely, the transcription factors Ets1/2 and histone H3K4 methyltransferase MLL1 directly bind to the p16 locus and mediate p16 induction during replicative and premature senescence. In the present review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms by which these factors regulate p16 transcription.

  4. ICP0 antagonizes Stat 1-dependent repression of herpes simplex virus: implications for the regulation of viral latency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balliet John W

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1 ICP0 protein is an E3 ubiquitin ligase, which is encoded within the HSV-1 latency-associated locus. When ICP0 is not synthesized, the HSV-1 genome is acutely susceptible to cellular repression. Reciprocally, when ICP0 is synthesized, viral replication is efficiently initiated from virions or latent HSV-1 genomes. The current study was initiated to determine if ICP0's putative role as a viral interferon (IFN antagonist may be relevant to the process by which ICP0 influences the balance between productive replication versus cellular repression of HSV-1. Results Wild-type (ICP0+ strains of HSV-1 produced lethal infections in scid or rag2-/- mice. The replication of ICP0- null viruses was rapidly repressed by the innate host response of scid or rag2-/- mice, and the infected animals remained healthy for months. In contrast, rag2-/- mice that lacked the IFN-α/β receptor (rag2-/- ifnar-/- or Stat 1 (rag2-/- stat1-/- failed to repress ICP0- viral replication, resulting in uncontrolled viral spread and death. Thus, the replication of ICP0- viruses is potently repressed in vivo by an innate immune response that is dependent on the IFN-α/β receptor and the downstream transcription factor, Stat 1. Conclusion ICP0's function as a viral IFN antagonist is necessary in vivo to prevent an innate, Stat 1-dependent host response from rapidly repressing productive HSV-1 replication. This antagonistic relationship between ICP0 and the host IFN response may be relevant in regulating whether the HSV-1 genome is expressed, or silenced, in virus-infected cells in vivo. These results may also be clinically relevant. IFN-sensitive ICP0- viruses are avirulent, establish long-term latent infections, and induce an adaptive immune response that is highly protective against lethal challenge with HSV-1. Therefore, ICP0- viruses appear to possess the desired safety and efficacy profile of a live vaccine against

  5. The phylogeny of C/S1 bZIP transcription factors reveals a shared algal ancestry and the pre-angiosperm translational regulation of S1 transcripts

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Peviani, Alessia; Lastdrager, Jeroen; Hanson, Johannes; Snel, Berend

    2016-01-01

    Basic leucine zippers (bZIPs) form a large plant transcription factor family. C and S1 bZIP groups can heterodimerize, fulfilling crucial roles in seed development and stress response. S1 sequences also harbor a unique regulatory mechanism, termed Sucrose-Induced Repression of Translation (SIRT). Th

  6. Amino acid 1-209 is essential for PDX-1-mediated repression of human CMV IE promoter activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing CHEN; Lei CHEN; Ge LI; Lu CHENG; Yin HUANG; Jia-xin ZHANG; Wei-wei FAN; Da-ru LU

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To explore the different roles of pancreatic duodenal homeobox factors-1 (PDX-1) domains in PDX-1 mediated repression of human cytomegalovirus immediately early (CMV IE) promoter. Methods: A series of truncated PDX-1 mutants were constructed. The binding of PDX-1 and CMV IE promoter was identified by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). The dual-reporter assay was applied to examine the repression activities of PDX-1 mutants on CMV IE promoter. In addition, RNAi technology was used to specifically knock down the endogenous PDX-1 expression. Results: The reporter assay indicated that compared to the mock controls (pEGFP-N2), overexpression of PDX-1 resulted in a 41% decrease of CMV IE promoter activity in the 293 cells (P<0.05) and 43% decrease in HeLa cells (P<0.05), and the repression levels of various truncated mutants played on CMV IE promoter were different. Specific knock down of the endogenous PDX-1 expression significantly restored the activity of CMV IE promoter. EMS A demonstrated that domain 3 is necessary for nuclear localization and DNA binding activity of PDX-1. However, binding of PDX-1 alone to CMV IE promoter was not sufficient to inhibit its transcriptional activity, and other domains of PDX-1 presented were also required. Conclusion: Our data suggested that the DNA binding activity of PDX-1 domain 3 and the cooperative binding of PDX-1 domain 1/2 with other proteins were required for PDX-1 mediated repression of CMV IE promoter.

  7. CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC 10 (COP10 Contributes to Floral Repression under Non-Inductive Short Days in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Young Kang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In Arabidopsis, CONSTITUTIVE PHOTOMORPHOGENIC/DE-ETIOLATED/FUSCA (COP/DET/FUS genes act in repression of photomorphogenesis in darkness, and recent reports revealed that some of these genes, such as COP1 and DET1, also have important roles in controlling flowering time and circadian rhythm. The COP/DET/FUS protein COP10 interacts with DET1 and DNA DAMAGE-BINDING PROTEIN 1 (DDB1 to form a CDD complex and represses photomorphogenesis in darkness. The cop10-4 mutants flower normally in inductive long days (LD but early in non-inductive short days (SD compared with wild type (WT; however, the role of COP10 remains unknown. Here, we investigate the role of COP10 in SD-dependent floral repression. Reverse transcription-quantitative PCR revealed that in SD, expression of the LD-dependent floral inducers GI, FKF1, and FT significantly increased in cop10-4 mutants, compared with WT. This suggests that COP10 mainly regulates FT expression in a CO-independent manner. We also show that COP10 interacts with GI in vitro and in vivo, suggesting that COP10 could also affect GI function at the posttranslational level. Moreover, FLC expression was repressed drastically in cop10-4 mutants and COP10 interacts with MULTICOPY SUPPRESSOR OF IRA1 4 (MSI4/FVE (MSI4/FVE, which epigenetically inhibits FLC expression. These data suggest that COP10 contributes to delaying flowering in the photoperiod and autonomous pathways by downregulating FT expression under SD.

  8. Intellectual Performance as a Function of Repression and Menstrual Cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Englander-Golden, Paula; And Others

    Performance on complex (Space Relations and Verbal Reasoning) and simple (Digit Symbol) tests was investigated as a function of Byrne's Repression-Sensitization (RS) dimension, phase of menstrual cycle and premenstrual-menstrual (PM) symptomatology in a group of females not taking oral contraceptives. Two control groups, consisting of males and…

  9. Onset of carbon catabolite repression in Aspergillus nidulans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Flipphi, M.; Vondervoort, van de P.J.I.; Ruijter, G.J.G.; Visser, J.; Arst Jr., H.N.; Felenbok, B.

    2003-01-01

    The role of hexose phosphorylating enzymes in the signaling of carbon catabolite repression was investigated in the filamentous fungus Aspergillus nidulans. A D-fructose non-utilizing, hexokinase-deficient (hxkA1, formerly designated frA1) strain was utilized to obtain new mutants lacking either glu

  10. Financial repression, money growth, and seignorage: The Polish experience

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Aarle, B. van; Budina, N.

    1997-01-01

    Financial Repression, Money Growth and Seignorage: The Polish Experience. — A small analytical framework is developed to analyze the relation between reserve requirements, base money growth and seignorage revenues. From the analysis, the authors can derive of steady-state seignorage revenues as a fu

  11. PICKLE acts during germination to repress expression of embryonic traits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui-Chun; Chuang, King; Henderson, James T.; Rider, Stanley Dean; Bai, Yinglin; Zhang, Heng; Fountain, Matthew; Gerber, Jacob; Ogas, Joe

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY PICKLE (PKL) codes for a CHD3 chromatin remodeling factor that plays multiple roles in Arabidopsis growth and development. Previous analysis of the expression of genes that exhibit PKL-dependent regulation suggested that PKL acts during germination to repress expression of embryonic traits. In this study, we examined the expression of PKL protein to investigate when and where PKL acts to regulate development. A PKL:eGFP translational fusion is preferentially localized in the nucleus of cells, consistent with the proposed role for PKL as a chromatin remodeling factor. A steroid-inducible version of PKL - a fusion of PKL to the glucocorticoid receptor (PKL:GR) - was used to examine when PKL acts to repress expression of embryonic traits. We found that activation of PKL:GR during germination was sufficient to repress expression of embryonic traits in the primary roots of pkl seedlings whereas activation of PKL:GR after germination had little effect. In contrast, we observed that PKL is required continuously after germination to repress expression of PHERES1, a type I MADS box gene that is normally expressed during early embryogenesis in wild-type plants. Thus PKL acts at multiple points during development to regulate patterns of gene expression in Arabidopsis. PMID:16359393

  12. Functional analysis of transcriptional regulation of herpes simplex virus type 1 tegument protein VP22

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Xian; LI WeiZhong; LIU LongDing; CHE YanChun; CUN Wei; WU Wen Juan; HE ChunYan; SHAO CongWen; LI QiHan

    2008-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) tegument proteins have important functions in the viral repli-cation process. In order to investigate the role of the HSV-1 tegument protein VP22 in viral replication, its transcriptional regulation of viral promoters was investigated using the chloramphenicol acetyl-transferase (CAT) assay. The results indicate that VP22 exerts a dose-dependent transcriptional in-hibitory effect on the HSV-1 α4, TK, and gC gene promoters. VP22 had the capacity to repress tran-scriptional activation of promoters via different viral transcription regulatory factors such as VP16 and ICP0, as evidenced by the specific repression of the TK and gC gene promoters by ICP0. In addition, VP22 was capable of inhibiting the promotion of ICP0 transcriptional activation in the presence of HAT PCAF, which is even more remarkable than the VP22 repression of ICP0 transcriptional activation. Fi-nally, the transcriptional inhibitory effect of VP22 on other viral promoters was demonstrated by the analysis of β-galactosidase activities in internal controls.

  13. MiR-10 represses HoxB1a and HoxB3a in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joost M Woltering

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The Hox genes are involved in patterning the anterior-posterior axis. In addition to the protein coding Hox genes, the miR-10, miR-196 and miR-615 families of microRNA genes are conserved within the vertebrate Hox clusters. The members of the miR-10 family are located at positions associated with Hox-4 paralogues. No function is yet known for this microRNA family but the genomic positions of its members suggest a role in anterior-posterior patterning. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using sensor constructs, overexpression and morpholino knockdown, we show in Zebrafish that miR-10 targets HoxB1a and HoxB3a and synergizes with HoxB4 in the repression of these target genes. Overexpression of miR-10 also induces specific phenotypes related to the loss of function of these targets. HoxB1a and HoxB3a have a dominant hindbrain expression domain anterior to that of miR-10 but overlap in a weaker expression domain in the spinal cord. In this latter domain, miR-10 knockdown results in upregulation of the target genes. In the case of a HoxB3a splice variant that includes miR-10c within its primary transcript, we show that the microRNA acts in an autoregulatory fashion. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We find that miR-10 acts to repress HoxB1a and HoxB3a within the spinal cord and show that this repression works cooperatively with HoxB4. As with the previously described interactions between miR-196 and HoxA7 and Hox-8 paralogues, the target genes are located in close proximity to the microRNA. We present a model in which we postulate a link between the clustering of Hox genes and post-transcriptional gene regulation. We speculate that the high density of transcription units and enhancers within the Hox clusters places constraints on the precision of the transcriptional control that can be achieved within these clusters and requires the involvement of post-transcriptional gene silencing to define functional domains of genes appropriately.

  14. The defense-responsive genes showing enhanced and repressed expression after pathogen infection in rice (Oryza sativa L.)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周斌; 彭开蔓; 储昭晖; 王石平; 张启发

    2002-01-01

    Despite large numbers of studies about defense response, processes involved in the resistance of plants to incompatible pathogens are still largely uncharacterized. The objective of this study was to identify genes involved in defense response by cDNA array analysis and to gain knowledge about the functions of the genes involved in defense response. Approximately 20000 rice cDNA clones were arrayed on nylon filters. RNA samples isolated from different rice lines after infection with incompatible strains or isolates of Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae or Pyricularia grisea, respectively, were used to synthesize cDNA as probes for screening the cDNA arrays. A total of 100 differentially expressed unique sequences were identified from 5 pathogen-host combinations. Fifty-three sequences were detected as showing enhanced expression and 47 sequences were detected as showing repressed expression after pathogen infection. Sequence analysis revealed that most of the 100 sequences had various degrees of homology with genes in databases which encode or putatively encode transcription regulating proteins, translation regulating proteins, transport proteins, kinases, metabolic enzymes, and proteins involved in other functions. Most of the genes have not been previously reported as being involved in the disease resistance response in rice. The results from cDNA arrays, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and RNA gel blot analysis suggest that activation or repression of most of these genes might occur commonly in the defense response.

  15. Roles of histones and nucleosomes in gene transcription

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    This article reviews the latest research developments in the field of eukaryotic gene regulation by the structural alterations of chromatin and nucleosomes. The following issues are briefly addressed: (ⅰ) nucleosome and histone modifications by both the ATP-dependent remodel- ing com-plexes and the histone acetyltransferases and their roles in gene activation; (ⅱ) competitive binding of histones and transcription factors on gene promoters, and transcription repression by nucleosomes; and (ⅲ) influences of linker histone H1 on gene regulation. Meanwhile, the significance and impact of these new research progresses, as well as issues worthwhile for further study are commented.

  16. RA-RAR-β counteracts myelin-dependent inhibition of neurite outgrowth via Lingo-1 repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Puttagunta, Radhika; Schmandke, André; Floriddia, Elisa; Gaub, Perrine; Fomin, Natalie; Ghyselinck, Norbert B; Di Giovanni, Simone

    2011-06-27

    After an acute central nervous system injury, axonal regeneration is limited as the result of a lack of neuronal intrinsic competence and the presence of extrinsic inhibitory signals. The injury fragments the myelin neuronal insulating layer, releasing extrinsic inhibitory molecules to signal through the neuronal membrane-bound Nogo receptor (NgR) complex. In this paper, we show that a neuronal transcriptional pathway can interfere with extrinsic inhibitory myelin-dependent signaling, thereby promoting neurite outgrowth. Specifically, retinoic acid (RA), acting through the RA receptor β (RAR-β), inhibited myelin-activated NgR signaling through the transcriptional repression of the NgR complex member Lingo-1. We show that suppression of Lingo-1 was required for RA-RAR-β to counteract extrinsic inhibition of neurite outgrowth. Furthermore, we confirm in vivo that RA treatment after a dorsal column overhemisection injury inhibited Lingo-1 expression, specifically through RAR-β. Our findings identify a novel link between RA-RAR-β-dependent proaxonal outgrowth and inhibitory NgR complex-dependent signaling, potentially allowing for the development of molecular strategies to enhance axonal regeneration after a central nervous system injury.

  17. p53 Represses the Oncogenic Sno-MiR-28 Derived from a SnoRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Yu

    Full Text Available p53 is a master tumour repressor that participates in vast regulatory networks, including feedback loops involving microRNAs (miRNAs that regulate p53 and that themselves are direct p53 transcriptional targets. We show here that a group of polycistronic miRNA-like non-coding RNAs derived from small nucleolar RNAs (sno-miRNAs are transcriptionally repressed by p53 through their host gene, SNHG1. The most abundant of these, sno-miR-28, directly targets the p53-stabilizing gene, TAF9B. Collectively, p53, SNHG1, sno-miR-28 and TAF9B form a regulatory loop which affects p53 stability and downstream p53-regulated pathways. In addition, SNHG1, SNORD28 and sno-miR-28 are all significantly upregulated in breast tumours and the overexpression of sno-miR-28 promotes breast epithelial cell proliferation. This research has broadened our knowledge of the crosstalk between small non-coding RNA pathways and roles of sno-miRNAs in p53 regulation.

  18. Disruption of DNA methylation-dependent long gene repression in Rett syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabel, Harrison W.; Kinde, Benyam Z.; Stroud, Hume; Gilbert, Caitlin S.; Harmin, David A.; Kastan, Nathaniel R.; Hemberg, Martin; Ebert, Daniel H.; Greenberg, Michael E.

    2015-01-01

    Disruption of the MECP2 gene leads to Rett syndrome (RTT), a severe neurological disorder with features of autism1. MECP2 encodes a methyl-DNA-binding protein2 that has been proposed to function as a transcriptional repressor, but despite numerous studies examining neuronal gene expression in Mecp2 mutants, no clear model has emerged for how MeCP2 regulates transcription3–9. Here we identify a genome-wide length-dependent increase in gene expression in MeCP2 mutant mouse models and human RTT brains. We present evidence that MeCP2 represses gene expression by binding to methylated CA sites within long genes, and that in neurons lacking MeCP2, decreasing the expression of long genes attenuates RTT-associated cellular deficits. In addition, we find that long genes as a population are enriched for neuronal functions and selectively expressed in the brain. These findings suggest that mutations in MeCP2 may cause neurological dysfunction by specifically disrupting long gene expression in the brain. PMID:25762136

  19. SIRT7 represses Myc activity to suppress ER stress and prevent fatty liver disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Jiyung; He, Ming; Liu, Yufei; Paredes, Silvana; Villanova, Lidia; Brown, Katharine; Qiu, Xiaolei; Nabavi, Noushin; Mohrin, Mary; Wojnoonski, Kathleen; Li, Patrick; Cheng, Hwei-Ling; Murphy, Andrew J; Valenzuela, David M; Luo, Hanzhi; Kapahi, Pankaj; Krauss, Ronald; Mostoslavsky, Raul; Yancopoulos, George D; Alt, Frederick W; Chua, Katrin F; Chen, Danica

    2013-11-14

    Nonalcoholic fatty liver disease is the most common chronic liver disorder in developed countries. Its pathogenesis is poorly understood, and therapeutic options are limited. Here, we show that SIRT7, an NAD(+)-dependent H3K18Ac deacetylase, functions at chromatin to suppress ER stress and prevent the development of fatty liver disease. SIRT7 is induced upon ER stress and is stabilized at the promoters of ribosomal proteins through its interaction with the transcription factor Myc to silence gene expression and to relieve ER stress. SIRT7-deficient mice develop chronic hepatosteatosis resembling human fatty liver disease. Myc inactivation or pharmacological suppression of ER stress alleviates fatty liver caused by SIRT7 deficiency. Importantly, SIRT7 suppresses ER stress and reverts the fatty liver disease in diet-induced obese mice. Our study identifies SIRT7 as a cofactor of Myc for transcriptional repression and delineates a druggable regulatory branch of the ER stress response that prevents and reverts fatty liver disease.

  20. Position-dependent interactions of Y-box protein 2 (YBX2) with mRNA enable mRNA storage in round spermatids by repressing mRNA translation and blocking translation-dependent mRNA decay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleene, Kenneth C

    2016-03-01

    Many mRNAs encoding proteins needed for the construction of the specialized organelles of spermatozoa are stored as translationally repressed, free messenger ribonucleoproteins in round spermatids, to be actively translated in elongating and elongated spermatids. The factors that repress translation in round spermatids, however, have been elusive. Two lines of evidence implicate the highly abundant and well-known translational repressor, Y-box protein 2 (YBX2), as a critical factor: First, protamine 1 (Prm1) and sperm-mitochondria cysteine-rich protein (Smcp) mRNAs are prematurely recruited onto polysomes in Ybx2-knockout mouse round spermatids. Second, mutations in 3' untranslated region (3'UTR) cis-elements that abrogate YBX2 binding activate translation of Prm1 and Smcp mRNAs in round spermatids of transgenic mice. The abundance of YBX2 and its affinity for variable sequences, however, raise questions of how YBX2 targets specific mRNAs for repression. Mutations to the Prm1 and Smcp mRNAs in transgenic mice reveal that strong repression in round spermatids requires YBX2 binding sites located near the 3' ends of their 3'UTRs as locating the same sites in upstream positions produce negligible repression. This location-dependence implies that the assembly of repressive complexes is nucleated by adjacent cis-elements that enable cooperative interactions of YBX2 with co-factors. The available data suggest that, in vertebrates, YBX2 has the important role of coordinating the storage of translationally repressed mRNAs in round spermatids by inhibiting translational activity and the degradation of transcripts via translation-dependent deadenylation. These insights should facilitiate future experiments designed to unravel how YBX2 targets mRNAs for repression in round spermatids and how mutations in the YBX2 gene cause infertility in humans. Mol. Reprod. Dev. 83: 190-207, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. CRTR-1, a developmentally regulated transcriptional repressor related to the CP2 family of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodda, S; Sharma, S; Scherer, M; Chapman, G; Rathjen, P

    2001-02-02

    CP2-related proteins comprise a family of DNA-binding transcription factors that are generally activators of transcription and expressed ubiquitously. We reported a differential display polymerase chain reaction fragment, Psc2, which was expressed in a regulated fashion in mouse pluripotent cells in vitro and in vivo. Here, we report further characterization of the Psc2 cDNA and function. The Psc2 cDNA contained an open reading frame homologous to CP2 family proteins. Regions implicated in DNA binding and oligomeric complex formation, but not transcription activation, were conserved. Psc2 expression in vivo during embryogenesis and in the adult mouse demonstrated tight spatial and temporal regulation, with the highest levels of expression in the epithelial lining of distal convoluted tubules in embryonic and adult kidneys. Functional analysis demonstrated that PSC2 repressed transcription 2.5-15-fold when bound to a heterologous promoter in ES, 293T, and COS-1 cells. The N-terminal 52 amino acids of PSC2 were shown to be necessary and sufficient for this activity and did not share obvious homology with reported repressor motifs. These results represent the first report of a CP2 family member that is expressed in a developmentally regulated fashion in vivo and that acts as a direct repressor of transcription. Accordingly, the protein has been named CP2-Related Transcriptional Repressor-1 (CRTR-1).

  2. Identification of a Transcriptional Repressor Involved in Benzoate Metabolism in Geobacter bemidjiensis ▿

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Subsurface environments contaminated with aromatic compounds can be remediated in situ by Geobacter species. A transcription factor that represses expression of bamA, a benzoate-inducible gene, in Geobacter bemidjiensis during growth with acetate was identified. It is likely that this repressor also regulates other genes involved in aromatic compound metabolism.

  3. The origin recognition complex links replication, sister chromatid cohesion and transcriptional silencing in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suter, Bernhard; Tong, Amy; Chang, Michael; Yu, Lisa; Brown, Grant W; Boone, Charles; Rine, Jasper

    2004-01-01

    Mutations in genes encoding the origin recognition complex (ORC) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae affect initiation of DNA replication and transcriptional repression at the silent mating-type loci. To explore the function of ORC in more detail, a screen for genetic interactions was undertaken using large

  4. DDX3 Represses Stemness by Epigenetically Modulating Tumor-suppressive miRNAs in Hepatocellular Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hao-Kang; Mai, Ru-Tsun; Huang, Hsien-Da; Chou, Chih-Hung; Chang, Yi-An; Chang, Yao-Wen; You, Li-Ru; Chen, Chun-Ming; Lee, Yan-Hwa Wu

    2016-06-27

    Studies indicate that the presence of cancer stem cells (CSCs) is responsible for poor prognosis of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients. In this study, the functional role of DDX3 in regulation of hepatic CSCs was investigated. Our results demonstrated that reduced DDX3 expression was not only inversely associated with tumor grade, but also predicted poor prognosis of HCC patients. Knockdown of DDX3 in HCC cell line HepG2 induced stemness gene signature followed by occurrence of self-renewal, chemoreisistance, EMT, migration as well as CSC expansion, and most importantly, DDX3 knockdown promotes tumorigenesis. Moreover, we found positive correlations between DDX3 level and expressions of tumor-suppressive miR-200b, miR-200c, miR-122 and miR-145, but not miR-10b and miR-519a, implying their involvement in DDX3 knockdown-induced CSC phenotypes. In addition, DDX3 reduction promoted up-regulation of DNA methyltransferase 3A (DNMT3A), while neither DNMT3B nor DNMT1 expression was affected. Enriched DNMT3A binding along with hypermethylation on promoters of these tumor-suppressive miRNAs reflected their transcriptional repressions in DDX3-knockdown cells. Furthermore, individual restoration of these tumor-suppressive miRNAs represses DDX3 knockdown-induced CSC phenotypes. In conclusion, our study suggested that DDX3 prevents generation of CSCs through epigenetically regulating a subset of tumor-suppressive miRNAs expressions, which strengthens tumor suppressor role of DDX3 in HCC.

  5. Amino Acid Catabolism in Staphylococcus aureus and the Function of Carbon Catabolite Repression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halsey, Cortney R.; Lei, Shulei; Wax, Jacqueline K.; Lehman, Mckenzie K.; Nuxoll, Austin S.; Steinke, Laurey; Sadykov, Marat

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Staphylococcus aureus must rapidly adapt to a variety of carbon and nitrogen sources during invasion of a host. Within a staphylococcal abscess, preferred carbon sources such as glucose are limiting, suggesting that S. aureus survives through the catabolism of secondary carbon sources. S. aureus encodes pathways to catabolize multiple amino acids, including those that generate pyruvate, 2-oxoglutarate, and oxaloacetate. To assess amino acid catabolism, S. aureus JE2 and mutants were grown in complete defined medium containing 18 amino acids but lacking glucose (CDM). A mutation in the gudB gene, coding for glutamate dehydrogenase, which generates 2-oxoglutarate from glutamate, significantly reduced growth in CDM, suggesting that glutamate and those amino acids generating glutamate, particularly proline, serve as the major carbon source in this medium. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) studies confirmed this supposition. Furthermore, a mutation in the ackA gene, coding for acetate kinase, also abrogated growth of JE2 in CDM, suggesting that ATP production from pyruvate-producing amino acids is also critical for growth. In addition, although a functional respiratory chain was absolutely required for growth, the oxygen consumption rate and intracellular ATP concentration were significantly lower during growth in CDM than during growth in glucose-containing media. Finally, transcriptional analyses demonstrated that expression levels of genes coding for the enzymes that synthesize glutamate from proline, arginine, and histidine are repressed by CcpA and carbon catabolite repression. These data show that pathways important for glutamate catabolism or ATP generation via Pta/AckA are important for growth in niches where glucose is not abundant, such as abscesses within skin and soft tissue infections. PMID:28196956

  6. A compendium of nucleosome and transcript profiles reveals determinants of chromatin architecture and transcription.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harm van Bakel

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Nucleosomes in all eukaryotes examined to date adopt a characteristic architecture within genes and play fundamental roles in regulating transcription, yet the identity and precise roles of many of the trans-acting factors responsible for the establishment and maintenance of this organization remain to be identified. We profiled a compendium of 50 yeast strains carrying conditional alleles or complete deletions of genes involved in transcriptional regulation, histone biology, and chromatin remodeling, as well as compounds that target transcription and histone deacetylases, to assess their respective roles in nucleosome positioning and transcription. We find that nucleosome patterning in genes is affected by many factors, including the CAF-1 complex, Spt10, and Spt21, in addition to previously reported remodeler ATPases and histone chaperones. Disruption of these factors or reductions in histone levels led genic nucleosomes to assume positions more consistent with their intrinsic sequence preferences, with pronounced and specific shifts of the +1 nucleosome relative to the transcription start site. These shifts of +1 nucleosomes appear to have functional consequences, as several affected genes in Ino80 mutants exhibited altered expression responses. Our parallel expression profiling compendium revealed extensive transcription changes in intergenic and antisense regions, most of which occur in regions with altered nucleosome occupancy and positioning. We show that the nucleosome-excluding transcription factors Reb1, Abf1, Tbf1, and Rsc3 suppress cryptic transcripts at their target promoters, while a combined analysis of nucleosome and expression profiles identified 36 novel transcripts that are normally repressed by Tup1/Cyc8. Our data confirm and extend the roles of chromatin remodelers and chaperones as major determinants of genic nucleosome positioning, and these data provide a valuable resource for future studies.

  7. A compendium of nucleosome and transcript profiles reveals determinants of chromatin architecture and transcription.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Bakel, Harm; Tsui, Kyle; Gebbia, Marinella; Mnaimneh, Sanie; Hughes, Timothy R; Nislow, Corey

    2013-05-01

    Nucleosomes in all eukaryotes examined to date adopt a characteristic architecture within genes and play fundamental roles in regulating transcription, yet the identity and precise roles of many of the trans-acting factors responsible for the establishment and maintenance of this organization remain to be identified. We profiled a compendium of 50 yeast strains carrying conditional alleles or complete deletions of genes involved in transcriptional regulation, histone biology, and chromatin remodeling, as well as compounds that target transcription and histone deacetylases, to assess their respective roles in nucleosome positioning and transcription. We find that nucleosome patterning in genes is affected by many factors, including the CAF-1 complex, Spt10, and Spt21, in addition to previously reported remodeler ATPases and histone chaperones. Disruption of these factors or reductions in histone levels led genic nucleosomes to assume positions more consistent with their intrinsic sequence preferences, with pronounced and specific shifts of the +1 nucleosome relative to the transcription start site. These shifts of +1 nucleosomes appear to have functional consequences, as several affected genes in Ino80 mutants exhibited altered expression responses. Our parallel expression profiling compendium revealed extensive transcription changes in intergenic and antisense regions, most of which occur in regions with altered nucleosome occupancy and positioning. We show that the nucleosome-excluding transcription factors Reb1, Abf1, Tbf1, and Rsc3 suppress cryptic transcripts at their target promoters, while a combined analysis of nucleosome and expression profiles identified 36 novel transcripts that are normally repressed by Tup1/Cyc8. Our data confirm and extend the roles of chromatin remodelers and chaperones as major determinants of genic nucleosome positioning, and these data provide a valuable resource for future studies.

  8. An overview on transcriptional regulators in Streptomyces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romero-Rodríguez, Alba; Robledo-Casados, Ivonne; Sánchez, Sergio

    2015-08-01

    Streptomyces are Gram-positive microorganisms able to adapt and respond to different environmental conditions. It is the largest genus of Actinobacteria comprising over 900 species. During their lifetime, these microorganisms are able to differentiate, produce aerial mycelia and secondary metabolites. All of these processes are controlled by subtle and precise regulatory systems. Regulation at the transcriptional initiation level is probably the most common for metabolic adaptation in bacteria. In this mechanism, the major players are proteins named transcription factors (TFs), capable of binding DNA in order to repress or activate the transcription of specific genes. Some of the TFs exert their action just like activators or repressors, whereas others can function in both manners, depending on the target promoter. Generally, TFs achieve their effects by using one- or two-component systems, linking a specific type of environmental stimulus to a transcriptional response. After DNA sequencing, many streptomycetes have been found to have chromosomes ranging between 6 and 12Mb in size, with high GC content (around 70%). They encode for approximately 7000 to 10,000 genes, 50 to 100 pseudogenes and a large set (around 12% of the total chromosome) of regulatory genes, organized in networks, controlling gene expression in these bacteria. Among the sequenced streptomycetes reported up to now, the number of transcription factors ranges from 471 to 1101. Among these, 315 to 691 correspond to transcriptional regulators and 31 to 76 are sigma factors. The aim of this work is to give a state of the art overview on transcription factors in the genus Streptomyces.

  9. Political Repressions in USSR (Against Speculations, Perversion and Mystifications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viktor N. Zemskov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In the article the great numbers of political repressions, which were exaggerated by authors: R.A. Medvedev, A.I. Solzhenitsyn, O.G. Shatunovskoy, A.V. Antonov-Ovseenko in 80-90s are criticized. The author characterizes figures given in tens and even in hundreds of millions of victims as a statistical charlatanism.After checking up the KGB archives, and documents of division responsible for NKVD-MVD special settlements, the author spills the light on real numbers of political repressions in USSR. In his view, the total number of political victims does not exceed 2, 6 million people. This number implies over 800 thousand of death sentenced for political reasons, around 600 thousand political prisoners who died in labor camps, and about 1, 2 million people died in exile (including ‘Kulak Exile’ and during transportation (deported ethnic groups and others.

  10. An Updated GA Signaling 'Relief of Repression' Regulatory Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiu-Hua Gao; Sen-Lin Xiao; Qin-Fang Yao; Yu-Juan Wang; Xiang-Dong Fu

    2011-01-01

    Gibberellic acid (GA)regulates many aspects of plant growth and development. The DELLA proteins act to restrain plant growth, and GA relieves this repression by promoting their degradation via the 26S proteasome pathway.The elucidation of the crystalline structure of the GA soluble receptor GID1 protein represents an important breakthrough for understanding the way in which GA is perceived and how it induces the destabilization of the DELLA proteins. Recent advances have revealed that the DELLA proteins are involved in protein-protein interactions within various environmental and hormone signaling pathways. In this review, we highlight our current understanding of the 'relief of repression" model that aims to explain the role of GA and the function of the DELLA proteins, incorporating the many aspects of cross-talk shown to exist in the control of plant development and the response to stress.

  11. Functional analysis of transcriptional regulation of herpes simplex virus type 1 tegument protein VP22

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) tegument proteins have important functions in the viral repli- cation process. In order to investigate the role of the HSV-1 tegument protein VP22 in viral replication, its transcriptional regulation of viral promoters was investigated using the chloramphenicol acetyl- transferase (CAT) assay. The results indicate that VP22 exerts a dose-dependent transcriptional in- hibitory effect on the HSV-1 α4, TK, and gC gene promoters. VP22 had the capacity to repress tran- scriptional activation of promoters via different viral transcription regulatory factors such as VP16 and ICP0, as evidenced by the specific repression of the TK and gC gene promoters by ICP0. In addition, VP22 was capable of inhibiting the promotion of ICP0 transcriptional activation in the presence of HAT PCAF, which is even more remarkable than the VP22 repression of ICP0 transcriptional activation. Fi- nally, the transcriptional inhibitory effect of VP22 on other viral promoters was demonstrated by the analysis of β-galactosidase activities in internal controls.

  12. Repressive coping and alexithymia in idiopathic environmental intolerance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariae, Robert; Rasmussen, Alice; Johansen, Jeanne Duus; Elberling, Jesper

    2010-01-01

    Objective To examine if the non-expression of negative emotions (i.e., repressive coping) and differences in the ability to process and regulate emotions (i.e., alexithymia) is associated with idiopathic environmental intolerance (IEI). Methods The study included participants who had previously participated in a general population-based study and reported symptoms of environmental intolerance (n = 787) and patients with IEI (n = 237). The participants completed questionnaires assessing IEI, namely, a measure of repressive coping combining scores on the Marlowe–Crowne Social Desirability Scale (MCSDS) and the Taylor Manifest Anxiety Scale (TMAS), the Toronto Alexithymia Scale (TAS-20), and a negative affectivity scale (NAS). Multiple, hierarchical linear regression analyses were conducted using IEI variables as the dependent variables. Results The TMAS and MCSDS scores were independently associated with the IEI variables, but there was no evidence of a role of the repressive coping construct. While the total alexithymia score was unrelated to IEI, the TAS-20 subscale of difficulties identifying feelings (DIF) was independently associated with symptoms attributed to IEI. Negative affectivity was a strong independent predictor of the IEI variables and a mediator of the association between DIF and IEI. Conclusion Our results provide no evidence for a role of repressive coping in IEI, and our hypothesis of an association with alexithymia was only partly supported. In contrast, strong associations between IEI and negative emotional reactions, defensiveness and difficulties identifying feelings were found, suggesting a need for exploring the influence of these emotional reactions in IEI. PMID:21432559

  13. The rnc Gene Promotes Exopolysaccharide Synthesis and Represses the vicRKX Gene Expressions via MicroRNA-Size Small RNAs in Streptococcus mutans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Meng-Ying; Yang, Ying-Ming; Li, Ke-Zeng; Lei, Lei; Li, Meng; Yang, Yan; Tao, Xiang; Yin, Jia-Xin; Zhang, Ru; Ma, Xin-Rong; Hu, Tao

    2016-01-01

    Dental caries is a biofilm-dependent disease that largely relies on the ability of Streptococcus mutans to synthesize exopolysaccharides. Although the rnc gene is suggested to be involved in virulence mechanisms in many other bacteria, the information regarding it in S. mutans is very limited. Here, using deletion or overexpression mutant assay, we demonstrated that rnc in S. mutans significantly positively regulated exopolysaccharide synthesis and further altered biofilm formation. Meanwhile, the cariogenecity of S. mutans was decreased by deletion of rnc in a specific pathogen-free (SPF) rat model. Interestingly, analyzing the expression at mRNA level, we found the downstream vic locus was repressed by rnc in S. mutans. Using deep sequencing and bioinformatics analysis, for the first time, three putative microRNA-size small RNAs (msRNAs) targeting vicRKX were predicted in S. mutans. The expression levels of these msRNAs were negatively correlated with vicRKX but positively correlated with rnc, indicating rnc probably repressed vicRKX expression through msRNAs at the post-transcriptional level. In all, the results present that rnc has a potential role in the regulation of exopolysaccharide synthesis and can affect vicRKX expressions via post-transcriptional repression in S. mutans. This study provides an alternative avenue for further research aimed at preventing caries.

  14. Revisiting the Master-Signifier, or, Mandela and Repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Derek; Vanheule, Stijn

    2015-01-01

    The concept of the master-signifier has been subject to a variety of applications in Lacanian forms of political discourse theory and ideology critique. While there is much to be commended in literature of this sort, it often neglects salient issues pertaining to the role of master signifiers in the clinical domain of (individual) psychical economy. The popularity of the concept of the master (or "empty") signifier in political discourse analysis has thus proved a double-edged sword. On the one hand it demonstrates how crucial psychical processes are performed via the operations of the signifier, extending thus the Lacanian thesis that identification is the outcome of linguistic and symbolic as opposed to merely psychological processes. On the other, the use of the master signifier concept within the political realm to track discursive formations tends to distance the term from the dynamics of the unconscious and operation of repression. Accordingly, this paper revisits the master signifier concept, and does so within the socio-political domain, yet while paying particular attention to the functioning of unconscious processes of fantasy and repression. More specifically, it investigates how Nelson Mandela operates as a master signifier in contemporary South Africa, as a vital means of knitting together diverse elements of post-apartheid society, enabling the fantasy of the post-apartheid nation, and holding at bay a whole series of repressed and negated undercurrents.

  15. Trans-inactivation: Repression in a wrong place.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shatskikh, Aleksei S; Abramov, Yuriy A; Lavrov, Sergey A

    2016-08-19

    Trans-inactivation is the repression of genes on a normal chromosome under the influence of a rearranged homologous chromosome demonstrating the position effect variegation (PEV). This phenomenon was studied in detail on the example of brown(Dominant) allele causing the repression of wild-type brown gene on the opposite chromosome. We have investigated another trans-inactivation-inducing chromosome rearrangement, In(2)A4 inversion. In both cases, brown(Dominant) and In(2)A4, the repression seems to be the result of dragging of the euchromatic region of the normal chromosome into the heterochromatic environment. It was found that cis-inactivation (classical PEV) and trans-inactivation show different patterns of distribution along the chromosome and respond differently to PEV modifying genes. It appears that the causative mechanism of trans-inactivation is de novo heterochromatin assembly on euchromatic sequences dragged into the heterochromatic nuclear compartment. Trans-inactivation turns out to be the result of a combination of heterochromatin-induced position effect and the somatic interphase chromosome pairing that is widespread in Diptera.

  16. Revisiting the Master-Signifier, or, Mandela and Repression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, Derek; Vanheule, Stijn

    2016-01-01

    The concept of the master-signifier has been subject to a variety of applications in Lacanian forms of political discourse theory and ideology critique. While there is much to be commended in literature of this sort, it often neglects salient issues pertaining to the role of master signifiers in the clinical domain of (individual) psychical economy. The popularity of the concept of the master (or “empty”) signifier in political discourse analysis has thus proved a double-edged sword. On the one hand it demonstrates how crucial psychical processes are performed via the operations of the signifier, extending thus the Lacanian thesis that identification is the outcome of linguistic and symbolic as opposed to merely psychological processes. On the other, the use of the master signifier concept within the political realm to track discursive formations tends to distance the term from the dynamics of the unconscious and operation of repression. Accordingly, this paper revisits the master signifier concept, and does so within the socio-political domain, yet while paying particular attention to the functioning of unconscious processes of fantasy and repression. More specifically, it investigates how Nelson Mandela operates as a master signifier in contemporary South Africa, as a vital means of knitting together diverse elements of post-apartheid society, enabling the fantasy of the post-apartheid nation, and holding at bay a whole series of repressed and negated undercurrents. PMID:26834664

  17. Repression and activation by multiprotein complexes that alter chromatin structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kingston, R E; Bunker, C A; Imbalzano, A N

    1996-04-15

    Recent studies have provided strong evidence that macromolecular complexes are used in the cell to remodel chromatin structure during activation and to create an inaccessible structure during repression, Although there is not yet any rigorous demonstration that modification of chromatin structure plays a direct, causal role in either activation or repression, there is sufficient smoke to indicate the presence of a blazing inferno nearby. It is clear that complexes that remodel chromatin are tractable in vitro; hopefully this will allow the establishment of systems that provide a direct analysis of the role that remodeling might play in activation. These studies indicate that establishment of functional systems to corroborate the elegant genetic studies on repression might also be tractable. As the mechanistic effects of these complexes are sorted out, it will become important to understand how the complexes are regulated. In many of the instances discussed above, the genes whose products make up these complexes were identified in genetic screens for effects on developmental processes. This implies a regulation of the activity of these complexes in response to developmental cues and further implies that the work to fully understand these complexes will occupy a generation of scientists.

  18. Nuc-ErbB3 regulates H3K27me3 levels and HMT activity to establish epigenetic repression during peripheral myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ness, Jennifer K; Skiles, Amanda A; Yap, Eng-Hui; Fajardo, Eduardo J; Fiser, Andras; Tapinos, Nikos

    2016-06-01

    Nuc-ErbB3 an alternative transcript from the ErbB3 locus binds to a specific DNA motif and associates with Schwann cell chromatin. Here we generated a nuc-ErbB3 knockin mouse that lacks nuc-ErbB3 expression in the nucleus without affecting the neuregulin-ErbB3 receptor signaling. Nuc-ErbB3 knockin mice exhibit hypermyelination and aberrant myelination at the paranodal region. This phenotype is attributed to de-repression of myelination associated gene transcription following loss of nuc-ErbB3 and histone H3K27me3 promoter occupancy. Nuc-ErbB3 knockin mice exhibit reduced association of H3K27me3 with myelination-associated gene promoters and increased RNA Pol-II rate of transcription of these genes. In addition, nuc-ErbB3 directly regulates levels of H3K27me3 in Schwann cells. Nuc-ErbB3 knockin mice exhibit significant decrease of histone H3K27me3 methyltransferase (HMT) activity and reduced levels of H3K27me3. Collectively, nuc-ErbB3 is a master transcriptional repressor, which regulates HMT activity to establish a repressive chromatin landscape on promoters of genes during peripheral myelination.

  19. Gene activation by UV light, fungal elicitor or fungal infection in Petroselinum crispum is correlated with repression of cell cycle-related genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Logemann, E; Wu, S C; Schröder, J; Schmelzer, E; Somssich, I E; Hahlbrock, K

    1995-12-01

    The effects of UV light or fungal elicitors on plant cells have so far been studied mostly with respect to defense-related gene activation. Here, an inverse correlation of these stimulatory effects with the activities of several cell cycle-related genes is demonstrated. Concomitant with the induction of flavonoid biosynthetic enzymes in UV-irradiated cell suspension cultures of parsley (Petroselinum crispum), total histone synthesis declined to about half the initial rate. A subclass of the histone H3 gene family was selected to demonstrate the close correlation of its expression with cell division, both in intact plants and cultured cells. Using RNA-blot and run-on transcription assays, it was shown that one arbitrarily selected subclass of each of the histone H2A, H2B, H3 and H4 gene families and of the genes encoding a p34cdc2 protein kinase and a mitotic cyclin were transcriptionally repressed in UV-irradiated as well as fungal elicitor-treated parsley cells. The timing and extent of repression differed between the two stimuli; the response to light was more transient and smaller in magnitude. These differential responses to light and elicitor were inversely correlated with the induction of phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, a key enzyme of phenylpropanoid metabolism. Essentially the same result was obtained with a defined oligopeptide elicitor, indicating that the same signaling pathway is responsible for defense-related gene activation and cell cycle-related gene repression. A temporary (UV light) or long-lasting (fungal elicitor) cessation of cell culture growth is most likely due to an arrest of cell division which may be a prerequisite for full commitment of the cells to transcriptional activation of full commitment of the cells to transcriptional activation of pathways involved in UV protection or pathogen defense. This conclusion is corroborated by the observation that the histone H3 mRNA level greatly declined around fungal infection sites in young parsley

  20. Lateral gene expression in Drosophila early embryos is supported by Grainyhead-mediated activation and tiers of dorsally-localized repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, Mayra; Stathopoulos, Angelike

    2011-01-01

    The general consensus in the field is that limiting amounts of the transcription factor Dorsal establish dorsal boundaries of genes expressed along the dorsal-ventral (DV) axis of early Drosophila embryos, while repressors establish ventral boundaries. Yet recent studies have provided evidence that repressors act to specify the dorsal boundary of intermediate neuroblasts defective (ind), a gene expressed in a stripe along the DV axis in lateral regions of the embryo. Here we show that a short 12 base pair sequence ("the A-box") present twice within the ind CRM is both necessary and sufficient to support transcriptional repression in dorsal regions of embryos. To identify binding factors, we conducted affinity chromatography using the A-box element and found a number of DNA-binding proteins and chromatin-associated factors using mass spectroscopy. Only Grainyhead (Grh), a CP2 transcription factor with a unique DNA-binding domain, was found to bind the A-box sequence. Our results suggest that Grh acts as an activator to support expression of ind, which was surprising as we identified this factor using an element that mediates dorsally-localized repression. Grh and Dorsal both contribute to ind transcriptional activation. However, another recent study found that the repressor Capicua (Cic) also binds to the A-box sequence. While Cic was not identified through our A-box affinity chromatography, utilization of the same site, the A-box, by both factors Grh (activator) and Cic (repressor) may also support a "switch-like" response that helps to sharpen the ind dorsal boundary. Furthermore, our results also demonstrate that TGF-β signaling acts to refine ind CRM expression in an A-box independent manner in dorsal-most regions, suggesting that tiers of repression act in dorsal regions of the embryo.

  1. Lateral gene expression in Drosophila early embryos is supported by Grainyhead-mediated activation and tiers of dorsally-localized repression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mayra Garcia

    Full Text Available The general consensus in the field is that limiting amounts of the transcription factor Dorsal establish dorsal boundaries of genes expressed along the dorsal-ventral (DV axis of early Drosophila embryos, while repressors establish ventral boundaries. Yet recent studies have provided evidence that repressors act to specify the dorsal boundary of intermediate neuroblasts defective (ind, a gene expressed in a stripe along the DV axis in lateral regions of the embryo. Here we show that a short 12 base pair sequence ("the A-box" present twice within the ind CRM is both necessary and sufficient to support transcriptional repression in dorsal regions of embryos. To identify binding factors, we conducted affinity chromatography using the A-box element and found a number of DNA-binding proteins and chromatin-associated factors using mass spectroscopy. Only Grainyhead (Grh, a CP2 transcription factor with a unique DNA-binding domain, was found to bind the A-box sequence. Our results suggest that Grh acts as an activator to support expression of ind, which was surprising as we identified this factor using an element that mediates dorsally-localized repression. Grh and Dorsal both contribute to ind transcriptional activation. However, another recent study found that the repressor Capicua (Cic also binds to the A-box sequence. While Cic was not identified through our A-box affinity chromatography, utilization of the same site, the A-box, by both factors Grh (activator and Cic (repressor may also support a "switch-like" response that helps to sharpen the ind dorsal boundary. Furthermore, our results also demonstrate that TGF-β signaling acts to refine ind CRM expression in an A-box independent manner in dorsal-most regions, suggesting that tiers of repression act in dorsal regions of the embryo.

  2. Nascent transcription affected by RNA polymerase IV in Zea mays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhard, Karl F; Talbot, Joy-El R B; Deans, Natalie C; McClish, Allison E; Hollick, Jay B

    2015-04-01

    All eukaryotes use three DNA-dependent RNA polymerases (RNAPs) to create cellular RNAs from DNA templates. Plants have additional RNAPs related to Pol II, but their evolutionary role(s) remain largely unknown. Zea mays (maize) RNA polymerase D1 (RPD1), the largest subunit of RNA polymerase IV (Pol IV), is required for normal plant development, paramutation, transcriptional repression of certain transposable elements (TEs), and transcriptional regulation of specific alleles. Here, we define the nascent transcriptomes of rpd1 mutant and wild-type (WT) seedlings using global run-on sequencing (GRO-seq) to identify the broader targets of RPD1-based regulation. Comparisons of WT and rpd1 mutant GRO-seq profiles indicate that Pol IV globally affects transcription at both transcriptional start sites and immediately downstream of polyadenylation addition sites. We found no evidence of divergent transcription from gene promoters as seen in mammalian GRO-seq profiles. Statistical comparisons identify genes and TEs whose transcription is affected by RPD1. Most examples of significant increases in genic antisense transcription appear to be initiated by 3'-proximal long terminal repeat retrotransposons. These results indicate that maize Pol IV specifies Pol II-based transcriptional regulation for specific regions of the maize genome including genes having developmental significance.

  3. Cohesin modulates transcription of estrogen-responsive genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Antony, Jisha; Dasgupta, Tanushree; Rhodes, Jenny M; McEwan, Miranda V; Print, Cristin G; O'Sullivan, Justin M; Horsfield, Julia A

    2015-03-01

    The cohesin complex has essential roles in cell division, DNA damage repair and gene transcription. The transcriptional function of cohesin is thought to derive from its ability to connect distant regulatory elements with gene promoters. Genome-wide binding of cohesin in breast cancer cells frequently coincides with estrogen receptor alpha (ER), leading to the hypothesis that cohesin facilitates estrogen-dependent gene transcription. We found that cohesin modulates the expression of only a subset of genes in the ER transcription program, either activating or repressing transcription depending on the gene target. Estrogen-responsive genes most significantly influenced by cohesin were enriched in pathways associated with breast cancer progression such as PI3K and ErbB1. In MCF7 breast cancer cells, cohesin depletion enhanced transcription of TFF1 and TFF2, and was associated with increased ER binding and increased interaction between TFF1 and its distal enhancer situated within TMPRSS3. In contrast, cohesin depletion reduced c-MYC mRNA and was accompanied by reduced interaction between a distal enhancer of c-MYC and its promoters. Our data indicates that cohesin is not a universal facilitator of ER-induced transcription and can even restrict enhancer-promoter communication. We propose that cohesin modulates transcription of estrogen-dependent genes to achieve appropriate directionality and amplitude of expression.

  4. RNA-guided transcriptional regulation in planta via synthetic dCas9-based transcription factors

    KAUST Repository

    Piatek, Agnieszka Anna

    2014-11-14

    Targeted genomic regulation is a powerful approach to accelerate trait discovery and development in agricultural biotechnology. Bacteria and archaea use clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPRs) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) regulatory systems for adaptive molecular immunity against foreign nucleic acids introduced by invading phages and conjugative plasmids. The type II CRISPR/Cas system has been adapted for genome editing in many cell types and organisms. A recent study used the catalytically inactive Cas9 (dCas9) protein combined with guide-RNAs (gRNAs) as a DNA-targeting platform to modulate gene expression in bacterial, yeast, and human cells. Here, we modified this DNA-targeting platform for targeted transcriptional regulation in planta by developing chimeric dCas9-based transcriptional activators and repressors. To generate transcriptional activators, we fused the dCas9 C-terminus with the activation domains of EDLL and TAL effectors. To generate a transcriptional repressor, we fused the dCas9 C-terminus with the SRDX repression domain. Our data demonstrate that dCas9 fusion with the EDLL activation domain (dCas9:EDLL) and the TAL activation domain (dCas9:TAD), guided by gRNAs complementary to selected promoter elements, induce strong transcriptional activation on Bs3

  5. Elucidating MicroRNA Regulatory Networks Using Transcriptional, Post-transcriptional, and Histone Modification Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sara J.C. Gosline

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available MicroRNAs (miRNAs regulate diverse biological processes by repressing mRNAs, but their modest effects on direct targets, together with their participation in larger regulatory networks, make it challenging to delineate miRNA-mediated effects. Here, we describe an approach to characterizing miRNA-regulatory networks by systematically profiling transcriptional, post-transcriptional and epigenetic activity in a pair of isogenic murine fibroblast cell lines with and without Dicer expression. By RNA sequencing (RNA-seq and CLIP (crosslinking followed by immunoprecipitation sequencing (CLIP-seq, we found that most of the changes induced by global miRNA loss occur at the level of transcription. We then introduced a network modeling approach that integrated these data with epigenetic data to identify specific miRNA-regulated transcription factors that explain the impact of miRNA perturbation on gene expression. In total, we demonstrate that combining multiple genome-wide datasets spanning diverse regulatory modes enables accurate delineation of the downstream miRNA-regulated transcriptional network and establishes a model for studying similar networks in other systems.

  6. Elucidating MicroRNA Regulatory Networks Using Transcriptional, Post-transcriptional, and Histone Modification Measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gosline, Sara J C; Gurtan, Allan M; JnBaptiste, Courtney K; Bosson, Andrew; Milani, Pamela; Dalin, Simona; Matthews, Bryan J; Yap, Yoon S; Sharp, Phillip A; Fraenkel, Ernest

    2016-01-12

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) regulate diverse biological processes by repressing mRNAs, but their modest effects on direct targets, together with their participation in larger regulatory networks, make it challenging to delineate miRNA-mediated effects. Here, we describe an approach to characterizing miRNA-regulatory networks by systematically profiling transcriptional, post-transcriptional and epigenetic activity in a pair of isogenic murine fibroblast cell lines with and without Dicer expression. By RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) and CLIP (crosslinking followed by immunoprecipitation) sequencing (CLIP-seq), we found that most of the changes induced by global miRNA loss occur at the level of transcription. We then introduced a network modeling approach that integrated these data with epigenetic data to identify specific miRNA-regulated transcription factors that explain the impact of miRNA perturbation on gene expression. In total, we demonstrate that combining multiple genome-wide datasets spanning diverse regulatory modes enables accurate delineation of the downstream miRNA-regulated transcriptional network and establishes a model for studying similar networks in other systems.

  7. The Involvement of Mig1 from Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous in Catabolic Repression: An Active Mechanism Contributing to the Regulation of Carotenoid Production

    Science.gov (United States)

    Córdova, Pamela; Marcoleta, Andrés E.; Contreras, Gabriela; Barahona, Salvador; Sepúlveda, Dionisia; Fernández-Lobato, María; Baeza, Marcelo; Cifuentes, Víctor

    2016-01-01

    The red yeast X. dendrorhous is one of the few natural sources of astaxanthin, a carotenoid used in aquaculture for salmonid fish pigmentation and in the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries for its antioxidant properties. Genetic control of carotenogenesis is well characterized in this yeast; however, little is known about the regulation of the carotenogenesis process. Several lines of evidence have suggested that carotenogenesis is regulated by catabolic repression, and the aim of this work was to identify and functionally characterize the X. dendrorhous MIG1 gene encoding the catabolic repressor Mig1, which mediates transcriptional glucose-dependent repression in other yeasts and fungi. The identified gene encodes a protein of 863 amino acids that demonstrates the characteristic conserved features of Mig1 proteins, and binds in vitro to DNA fragments containing Mig1 boxes. Gene functionality was demonstrated by heterologous complementation in a S. cerevisiae mig1- strain; several aspects of catabolic repression were restored by the X. dendrorhous MIG1 gene. Additionally, a X. dendrorhous mig1- mutant was constructed and demonstrated a higher carotenoid content than the wild-type strain. Most important, the mig1- mutation alleviated the glucose-mediated repression of carotenogenesis in X. dendrorhous: the addition of glucose to mig1- and wild-type cultures promoted the growth of both strains, but carotenoid synthesis was observed only in the mutant strain. Transcriptomic and RT-qPCR analyses revealed that several genes were differentially expressed between X. dendrorhous mig1- and the wild-type strain when cultured with glucose as the sole carbon source. The results obtained in this study demonstrate that catabolic repression in X. dendrorhous is an active process in which the identified MIG1 gene product plays a central role in the regulation of several biological processes, including carotenogenesis. PMID:27622474

  8. The Involvement of Mig1 from Xanthophyllomyces dendrorhous in Catabolic Repression: An Active Mechanism Contributing to the Regulation of Carotenoid Production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alcaíno, Jennifer; Bravo, Natalia; Córdova, Pamela; Marcoleta, Andrés E; Contreras, Gabriela; Barahona, Salvador; Sepúlveda, Dionisia; Fernández-Lobato, María; Baeza, Marcelo; Cifuentes, Víctor

    2016-01-01

    The red yeast X. dendrorhous is one of the few natural sources of astaxanthin, a carotenoid used in aquaculture for salmonid fish pigmentation and in the cosmetic and pharmaceutical industries for its antioxidant properties. Genetic control of carotenogenesis is well characterized in this yeast; however, little is known about the regulation of the carotenogenesis process. Several lines of evidence have suggested that carotenogenesis is regulated by catabolic repression, and the aim of this work was to identify and functionally characterize the X. dendrorhous MIG1 gene encoding the catabolic repressor Mig1, which mediates transcriptional glucose-dependent repression in other yeasts and fungi. The identified gene encodes a protein of 863 amino acids that demonstrates the characteristic conserved features of Mig1 proteins, and binds in vitro to DNA fragments containing Mig1 boxes. Gene functionality was demonstrated by heterologous complementation in a S. cerevisiae mig1- strain; several aspects of catabolic repression were restored by the X. dendrorhous MIG1 gene. Additionally, a X. dendrorhous mig1- mutant was constructed and demonstrated a higher carotenoid content than the wild-type strain. Most important, the mig1- mutation alleviated the glucose-mediated repression of carotenogenesis in X. dendrorhous: the addition of glucose to mig1- and wild-type cultures promoted the growth of both strains, but carotenoid synthesis was observed only in the mutant strain. Transcriptomic and RT-qPCR analyses revealed that several genes were differentially expressed between X. dendrorhous mig1- and the wild-type strain when cultured with glucose as the sole carbon source. The results obtained in this study demonstrate that catabolic repression in X. dendrorhous is an active process in which the identified MIG1 gene product plays a central role in the regulation of several biological processes, including carotenogenesis.

  9. Identification of the Human Zinc Transcriptional Regulatory Element (ZTRE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coneyworth, Lisa J.; Jackson, Kelly A.; Tyson, John; Bosomworth, Helen J.; van der Hagen, Eline; Hann, Georgia M.; Ogo, Ogo A.; Swann, Daniel C.; Mathers, John C.; Valentine, Ruth A.; Ford, Dianne

    2012-01-01

    Many genes with crucial roles in zinc homeostasis in mammals respond to fluctuating zinc supply through unknown mechanisms, and uncovering these mechanisms is essential to understanding the process at cellular and systemic levels. We detected zinc-dependent binding of a zinc-induced protein to a specific sequence, the zinc transcriptional regulatory element (ZTRE), in the SLC30A5 (zinc transporter ZnT5) promoter and showed that substitution of the ZTRE abrogated the repression of a reporter gene in response to zinc. We identified the ZTRE in other genes, including (through an unbiased search) the CBWD genes and (through targeted analysis) in multiple members of the SLC30 family, including SLC30A10, which is repressed by zinc. The function of the CBWD genes is currently unknown, but roles for homologs in metal homeostasis are being uncovered in bacteria. We demonstrated that CBWD genes are repressed by zinc and that substitution of the ZTRE in SLC30A10 and CBWD promoter-reporter constructs abrogates this response. Other metals did not affect expression of the transcriptional regulator, binding to the ZTRE or promoter-driven reporter gene expression. These findings provide the basis for elucidating how regulation of a network of genes through this novel mechanism contributes to zinc homeostasis and how the cell orchestrates this response. PMID:22902622

  10. Negative transcriptional regulation of mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) by nuclear TFAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Eun Jin; Kang, Young Cheol; Park, Wook-Ha; Jeong, Jae Hoon; Pak, Youngmi Kim, E-mail: ykpak@khu.ac.kr

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • TFAM localizes in nuclei and mitochondria of neuronal cells. • Nuclear TFAM does not bind the Tfam promoter. • Nuclear TFAM reduced the Tfam promoter activity via suppressing NRF-1 activity. • A novel self-negative feedback regulation of Tfam gene expression is explored. • FAM may play different roles depending on its subcellular localizations. - Abstract: The nuclear DNA-encoded mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) is synthesized in cytoplasm and transported into mitochondria. TFAM enhances both transcription and replication of mitochondrial DNA. It is unclear, however, whether TFAM plays a role in regulating nuclear gene expression. Here, we demonstrated that TFAM was localized to the nucleus and mitochondria by immunostaining, subcellular fractionation, and TFAM-green fluorescent protein hybrid protein studies. In HT22 hippocampal neuronal cells, human TFAM (hTFAM) overexpression suppressed human Tfam promoter-mediated luciferase activity in a dose-dependent manner. The mitochondria targeting sequence-deficient hTFAM also repressed Tfam promoter activity to the same degree as hTFAM. It indicated that nuclear hTFAM suppressed Tfam expression without modulating mitochondrial activity. The repression required for nuclear respiratory factor-1 (NRF-1), but hTFAM did not bind to the NRF-1 binding site of its promoter. TFAM was co-immunoprecipitated with NRF-1. Taken together, we suggest that nuclear TFAM down-regulate its own gene expression as a NRF-1 repressor, showing that TFAM may play different roles depending on its subcellular localizations.

  11. Stochastic model for gene transcription on Drosophila melanogaster embryos

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prata, Guilherme N.; Hornos, José Eduardo M.; Ramos, Alexandre F.

    2016-02-01

    We examine immunostaining experimental data for the formation of stripe 2 of even-skipped (eve) transcripts on D. melanogaster embryos. An estimate of the factor converting immunofluorescence intensity units into molecular numbers is given. The analysis of the eve dynamics at the region of stripe 2 suggests that the promoter site of the gene has two distinct regimes: an earlier phase when it is predominantly activated until a critical time when it becomes mainly repressed. That suggests proposing a stochastic binary model for gene transcription on D. melanogaster embryos. Our model has two random variables: the transcripts number and the state of the source of mRNAs given as active or repressed. We are able to reproduce available experimental data for the average number of transcripts. An analysis of the random fluctuations on the number of eves and their consequences on the spatial precision of stripe 2 is presented. We show that the position of the anterior or posterior borders fluctuate around their average position by ˜1 % of the embryo length, which is similar to what is found experimentally. The fitting of data by such a simple model suggests that it can be useful to understand the functions of randomness during developmental processes.

  12. Dimethylated H3K27 Is a Repressive Epigenetic Histone Mark in the Protist Entamoeba histolytica and Is Significantly Enriched in Genes Silenced via the RNAi Pathway*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Bardees M.; Singh, Upinder

    2015-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a fundamental biological process that plays a crucial role in regulation of gene expression in many organisms. Transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) is one of the important nuclear roles of RNAi. Our previous data show that Entamoeba histolytica has a robust RNAi pathway that links to TGS via Argonaute 2-2 (Ago2-2) associated 27-nucleotide small RNAs with 5′-polyphosphate termini. Here, we report the first repressive histone mark to be identified in E. histolytica, dimethylation of H3K27 (H3K27Me2), and demonstrate that it is enriched at genes that are silenced by RNAi-mediated TGS. An RNAi-silencing trigger can induce H3K27Me2 deposits at both episomal and chromosomal loci, mediating gene silencing. Our data support two phases of RNAi-mediated TGS: an active silencing phase where the RNAi trigger is present and both H3K27Me2 and Ago2-2 concurrently enrich at chromosomal loci; and an established silencing phase in which the RNAi trigger is removed, but gene silencing with H3K27Me2 enrichment persist independently of Ago2-2 deposition. Importantly, some genes display resistance to chromosomal silencing despite induction of functional small RNAs. In those situations, the RNAi-triggering plasmid that is maintained episomally gets partially silenced and has H3K27Me2 enrichment, but the chromosomal copy displays no repressive histone enrichment. Our data are consistent with a model in which H3K27Me2 is a repressive histone modification, which is strongly associated with transcriptional repression. This is the first example of an epigenetic histone modification that functions to mediate RNAi-mediated TGS in the deep-branching eukaryote E. histolytica. PMID:26149683

  13. Dimethylated H3K27 Is a Repressive Epigenetic Histone Mark in the Protist Entamoeba histolytica and Is Significantly Enriched in Genes Silenced via the RNAi Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foda, Bardees M; Singh, Upinder

    2015-08-21

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a fundamental biological process that plays a crucial role in regulation of gene expression in many organisms. Transcriptional gene silencing (TGS) is one of the important nuclear roles of RNAi. Our previous data show that Entamoeba histolytica has a robust RNAi pathway that links to TGS via Argonaute 2-2 (Ago2-2) associated 27-nucleotide small RNAs with 5'-polyphosphate termini. Here, we report the first repressive histone mark to be identified in E. histolytica, dimethylation of H3K27 (H3K27Me2), and demonstrate that it is enriched at genes that are silenced by RNAi-mediated TGS. An RNAi-silencing trigger can induce H3K27Me2 deposits at both episomal and chromosomal loci, mediating gene silencing. Our data support two phases of RNAi-mediated TGS: an active silencing phase where the RNAi trigger is present and both H3K27Me2 and Ago2-2 concurrently enrich at chromosomal loci; and an established silencing phase in which the RNAi trigger is removed, but gene silencing with H3K27Me2 enrichment persist independently of Ago2-2 deposition. Importantly, some genes display resistance to chromosomal silencing despite induction of functional small RNAs. In those situations, the RNAi-triggering plasmid that is maintained episomally gets partially silenced and has H3K27Me2 enrichment, but the chromosomal copy displays no repressive histone enrichment. Our data are consistent with a model in which H3K27Me2 is a repressive histone modification, which is strongly associated with transcriptional repression. This is the first example of an epigenetic histone modification that functions to mediate RNAi-mediated TGS in the deep-branching eukaryote E. histolytica.

  14. Role of the BAHD1 Chromatin-Repressive Complex in Placental Development and Regulation of Steroid Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakisic, Goran; Wendling, Olivia; Libertini, Emanuele; Radford, Elizabeth J.; Le Guillou, Morwenna; Champy, Marie-France; Wattenhofer-Donzé, Marie; Soubigou, Guillaume; Ait-Si-Ali, Slimane; Feunteun, Jean; Sorg, Tania; Coppée, Jean-Yves; Ferguson-Smith, Anne C.; Cossart, Pascale; Bierne, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    BAHD1 is a vertebrate protein that promotes heterochromatin formation and gene repression in association with several epigenetic regulators. However, its physiological roles remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that ablation of the Bahd1 gene results in hypocholesterolemia, hypoglycemia and decreased body fat in mice. It also causes placental growth restriction with a drop of trophoblast glycogen cells, a reduction of fetal weight and a high neonatal mortality rate. By intersecting transcriptome data from murine Bahd1 knockout (KO) placentas at stages E16.5 and E18.5 of gestation, Bahd1-KO embryonic fibroblasts, and human cells stably expressing BAHD1, we also show that changes in BAHD1 levels alter expression of steroid/lipid metabolism genes. Biochemical analysis of the BAHD1-associated multiprotein complex identifies MIER proteins as novel partners of BAHD1 and suggests that BAHD1-MIER interaction forms a hub for histone deacetylases and methyltransferases, chromatin readers and transcription factors. We further show that overexpression of BAHD1 leads to an increase of MIER1 enrichment on the inactive X chromosome (Xi). In addition, BAHD1 and MIER1/3 repress expression of the steroid hormone receptor genes ESR1 and PGR, both playing important roles in placental development and energy metabolism. Moreover, modulation of BAHD1 expression in HEK293 cells triggers epigenetic changes at the ESR1 locus. Together, these results identify BAHD1 as a core component of a chromatin-repressive complex regulating placental morphogenesis and body fat storage and suggest that its dysfunction may contribute to several human diseases. PMID:26938916

  15. Sex comb on midleg (Scm) is a functional link between PcG-repressive complexes in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Hyuckjoon; McElroy, Kyle A; Jung, Youngsook Lucy; Alekseyenko, Artyom A; Zee, Barry M; Park, Peter J; Kuroda, Mitzi I

    2015-06-01

    The Polycomb group (PcG) proteins are key regulators of development in Drosophila and are strongly implicated in human health and disease. How PcG complexes form repressive chromatin domains remains unclear. Using cross-linked affinity purifications of BioTAP-Polycomb (Pc) or BioTAP-Enhancer of zeste [E(z)], we captured all PcG-repressive complex 1 (PRC1) or PRC2 core components and Sex comb on midleg (Scm) as the only protein strongly enriched with both complexes. Although previously not linked to PRC2, we confirmed direct binding of Scm and PRC2 using recombinant protein expression and colocalization of Scm with PRC1, PRC2, and H3K27me3 in embryos and cultured cells using ChIP-seq (chromatin immunoprecipitation [ChIP] combined with deep sequencing). Furthermore, we found that RNAi knockdown of Scm and overexpression of the dominant-negative Scm-SAM (sterile α motif) domain both affected the binding pattern of E(z) on polytene chromosomes. Aberrant localization of the Scm-SAM domain in long contiguous regions on polytene chromosomes revealed its independent ability to spread on chromatin, consistent with its previously described ability to oligomerize in vitro. Pull-downs of BioTAP-Scm captured PRC1 and PRC2 and additional repressive complexes, including PhoRC, LINT, and CtBP. We propose that Scm is a key mediator connecting PRC1, PRC2, and transcriptional silencing. Combined with previous structural and genetic analyses, our results strongly suggest that Scm coordinates PcG complexes and polymerizes to produce broad domains of PcG silencing.

  16. Tcf3 represses Wnt-β-catenin signaling and maintains neural stem cell population during neocortical development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atsushi Kuwahara

    Full Text Available During mouse neocortical development, the Wnt-β-catenin signaling pathway plays essential roles in various phenomena including neuronal differentiation and proliferation of neural precursor cells (NPCs. Production of the appropriate number of neurons without depletion of the NPC population requires precise regulation of the balance between differentiation and maintenance of NPCs. However, the mechanism that suppresses Wnt signaling to prevent premature neuronal differentiation of NPCs is poorly understood. We now show that the HMG box transcription factor Tcf3 (also known as Tcf7l1 contributes to this mechanism. Tcf3 is highly expressed in undifferentiated NPCs in the mouse neocortex, and its expression is reduced in intermediate neuronal progenitors (INPs committed to the neuronal fate. We found Tcf3 to be a repressor of Wnt signaling in neocortical NPCs in a reporter gene assay. Tcf3 bound to the promoter of the proneural bHLH gene Neurogenin1 (Neurog1 and repressed its expression. Consistent with this, Tcf3 repressed neuronal differentiation and increased the self-renewal activity of NPCs. We also found that Wnt signal stimulation reduces the level of Tcf3, and increases those of Tcf1 (also known as Tcf7 and Lef1, positive mediators of Wnt signaling, in NPCs. Together, these results suggest that Tcf3 antagonizes Wnt signaling in NPCs, thereby maintaining their undifferentiated state in the neocortex and that Wnt signaling promotes the transition from Tcf3-mediated repression to Tcf1/Lef1-mediated enhancement of Wnt signaling, constituting a positive feedback loop that facilitates neuronal differentiation.

  17. The effect of negative feedback on noise propagation in transcriptional gene networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooshangi, Sara; Weiss, Ron

    2006-06-01

    This paper analyzes how the delay and repression strength of negative feedback in single-gene and multigene transcriptional networks influences intrinsic noise propagation and oscillatory behavior. We simulate a variety of transcriptional networks using a stochastic model and report two main findings. First, intrinsic noise is not attenuated by the addition of negative or positive feedback to transcriptional cascades. Second, for multigene negative feedback networks, synchrony in oscillations among a cell population can be improved by increasing network depth and tightening the regulation at one of the repression stages. Our long term goal is to understand how the noise characteristics of complex networks can be derived from the properties of modules that are used to compose these networks.

  18. Non-Canonical EZH2 Transcriptionally Activates RelB in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawrence, Cortney L.; Baldwin, Albert S.

    2016-01-01

    Enhancer of zeste homology 2 (EZH2) is the methyltransferase component of the polycomb repressive complex (PRC2) which represses gene transcription via histone H3 trimethylation at lysine 23 (H3K27me3). EZH2 activity has been linked with oncogenesis where it is thought to block expression of certain tumor suppressors. Relative to a role in cancer, EZH2 functions to promote self-renewal and has been shown to be important for the tumor-initiating cell (TIC) phenotype in breast cancer. Recently a non-canonical role for EZH2 has been identified where it promotes transcriptional activation of certain genes. Here we show that EZH2, through a methyltransferase-independent mechanism, promotes the transcriptional activation of the non-canonical NF-κB subunit RelB to drive self-renewal and the TIC phenotype of triple-negative breast cancer cells. PMID:27764181

  19. Repression of death consciousness and the psychedelic trip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varsha Dutta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Death is our most repressed consciousness, it inheres our condition as the primordial fear. Perhaps it was necessary that this angst be repressed in man or he would be hurled against the dark forces of nature. Modern ethos was built on this edifice, where the ′denial of death′ while ′embracing one′s symbolic immortality′ would be worshipped, so this ideology simply overturned and repressed looking into the morass of the inevitable when it finally announced itself. Once this slowly pieced its way into all of life, ′death′ would soon become a terminology in medicine too and assert its position, by giving a push to those directly dealing with the dying to shy away from its emotional and spiritual affliction. The need to put off death and prolong one′s life would become ever more urgent. Research using psychedelics on the terminally ill which had begun in the 1950s and 1960s would coerce into another realm and alter the face of medicine; but the aggression with which it forced itself in the 1960s would soon be politically maimed, and what remained would be sporadic outpours that trickled its way from European labs and underground boot camps. Now, with the curtain rising, the question has etched itself again, about the use of psychedelic drugs in medicine, particularly psychedelic psychotherapy with the terminally ill. This study is an attempt to philosophically explore death anxiety from its existential context and how something that is innate in our condition cannot be therapeutically cured. Psychedelic use was immutably linked with ancient cultures and only recently has it seen its scientific revival, from which a scientific culture grew around psychedelic therapy. How much of what was threaded in the ritual and spiritual mores can be extricated and be interpreted in our own mechanized language of medicine is the question that nudges many.

  20. Regulation of heterochromatin transcription by Snail1/LOXL2 during epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millanes-Romero, Alba; Herranz, Nicolás; Perrera, Valentina; Iturbide, Ane; Loubat-Casanovas, Jordina; Gil, Jesús; Jenuwein, Thomas; García de Herreros, Antonio; Peiró, Sandra

    2013-12-12

    Although heterochromatin is enriched with repressive traits, it is also actively transcribed, giving rise to large amounts of noncoding RNAs. Although these RNAs are responsible for the formation and maintenance of heterochromatin, little is known about how their transcription is regulated. Here, we show that the Snail1 transcription factor represses mouse pericentromeric transcription, acting through the H3K4 deaminase LOXL2. Since Snail1 plays a key role in the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), we analyzed the regulation of heterochromatin transcription in this process. At the onset of EMT, one of the major structural heterochromatin proteins, HP1α, is transiently released from heterochromatin foci in a Snail1/LOXL2-dependent manner, concomitantly with a downregulation of major satellite transcription. Moreover, preventing the downregulation of major satellite transcripts compromised the migratory and invasive behavior of mesenchymal cells. We propose that Snail1 regulates heterochromatin transcription through LOXL2, thus creating the favorable transcriptional state necessary for completing EMT.

  1. Sense and antisense transcription are associated with distinct chromatin architectures across genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murray, Struan C; Haenni, Simon; Howe, Françoise S; Fischl, Harry; Chocian, Karolina; Nair, Anitha; Mellor, Jane

    2015-09-18

    Genes from yeast to mammals are frequently subject to non-coding transcription of their antisense strand; however the genome-wide role for antisense transcription remains elusive. As transcription influences chromatin structure, we took a genome-wide approach to assess which chromatin features are associated with nascent antisense transcription, and contrast these with features associated with nascent sense transcription. We describe a distinct chromatin architecture at the promoter and gene body specifically associated with antisense transcription, marked by reduced H2B ubiquitination, H3K36 and H3K79 trimethylation and increased levels of H3 acetylation, chromatin remodelling enzymes, histone chaperones and histone turnover. The difference in sense transcription between genes with high or low levels of antisense transcription is slight; thus the antisense transcription-associated chromatin state is not simply analogous to a repressed state. Using mutants in which the level of antisense transcription is reduced at GAL1, or altered genome-wide, we show that non-coding transcription is associated with high H3 acetylation and H3 levels across the gene, while reducing H3K36me3. Set1 is required for these antisense transcription-associated chromatin changes in the gene body. We propose that nascent antisense and sense transcription have fundamentally distinct relationships with chromatin, and that both should be considered canonical features of eukaryotic genes.

  2. Blood-Brain Glucose Transfer: Repression in Chronic Hyperglycemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gjedde, Albert; Crone, Christian

    1981-10-01

    Diabetic patients with increased plasma glucose concentrations may develop cerebral symptoms of hypoglycemia when their plasma glucose is rapidly lowered to normal concentrations. The symptoms may indicate insufficient transport of glucose from blood to brain. In rats with chronic hyperglycemia the maximum glucose transport capacity of the blood-brain barrier decreased from 400 to 290 micromoles per 100 grams per minute. When plasma glucose was lowered to normal values, the glucose transport rate into brain was 20 percent below normal. This suggests that repressive changes of the glucose transport mechanism occur in brain endothelial cells in response to increased plasma glucose.

  3. Boosting transcription by transcription: enhancer-associated transcripts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrow, Emily M; Chadwick, Brian P

    2013-12-01

    Enhancers are traditionally viewed as DNA sequences located some distance from a promoter that act in cis and in an orientation-independent fashion to increase utilization of specific promoters and thereby regulate gene expression. Much progress has been made over the last decade toward understanding how these distant elements interact with target promoters, but how transcription is enhanced remains an object of active inquiry. Recent reports convey the prevalence and diversity of enhancer transcription and transcripts and support both as key factors with mechanistically distinct, but not mutually exclusive roles in enhancer function. Decoupling the causes and effects of transcription on the local chromatin landscape and understanding the role of enhancer transcripts in the context of long-range interactions are challenges that require additional attention. In this review, we focus on the possible functions of enhancer transcription by highlighting several recent enhancer RNA papers and, within the context of other enhancer studies, speculate on the role of enhancer transcription in regulating differential gene expression.

  4. p21 as a transcriptional co-repressor of S-phase and mitotic control genes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nuria Ferrándiz

    Full Text Available It has been previously described that p21 functions not only as a CDK inhibitor but also as a transcriptional co-repressor in some systems. To investigate the roles of p21 in transcriptional control, we studied the gene expression changes in two human cell systems. Using a human leukemia cell line (K562 with inducible p21 expression and human primary keratinocytes with adenoviral-mediated p21 expression, we carried out microarray-based gene expression profiling. We found that p21 rapidly and strongly repressed the mRNA levels of a number of genes involved in cell cycle and mitosis. One of the most strongly down-regulated genes was CCNE2 (cyclin E2 gene. Mutational analysis in K562 cells showed that the N-terminal region of p21 is required for repression of gene expression of CCNE2 and other genes. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays indicated that p21 was bound to human CCNE2 and other p21-repressed genes gene in the vicinity of the transcription start site. Moreover, p21 repressed human CCNE2 promoter-luciferase constructs in K562 cells. Bioinformatic analysis revealed that the CDE motif is present in most of the promoters of the p21-regulated genes. Altogether, the results suggest that p21 exerts a repressive effect on a relevant number of genes controlling S phase and mitosis. Thus, p21 activity as inhibitor of cell cycle progression would be mediated not only by the inhibition of CDKs but also by the transcriptional down-regulation of key genes.

  5. Acute genome-wide effects of rosiglitazone on PPARγ transcriptional networks in adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haakonsson, Anders Kristian; Stahl Madsen, Maria; Nielsen, Ronni; Sandelin, Albin; Mandrup, Susanne

    2013-09-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) is a master regulator of adipocyte differentiation, and genome-wide studies indicate that it is involved in the induction of most adipocyte genes. Here we report, for the first time, the acute effects of the synthetic PPARγ agonist rosiglitazone on the transcriptional network of PPARγ in adipocytes. Treatment with rosiglitazone for 1 hour leads to acute transcriptional activation as well as repression of a number of genes as determined by genome-wide RNA polymerase II occupancy. Unlike what has been shown for many other nuclear receptors, agonist treatment does not lead to major changes in the occurrence of PPARγ binding sites. However, rosiglitazone promotes PPARγ occupancy at many preexisting sites, and this is paralleled by increased occupancy of the mediator subunit MED1. The increase in PPARγ and MED1 binding is correlated with an increase in transcription of nearby genes, indicating that rosiglitazone, in addition to activating the receptor, also promotes its association with DNA, and that this is causally linked to recruitment of mediator and activation of genes. Notably, both rosiglitazone-activated and -repressed genes are induced during adipogenesis. However, rosiglitazone-activated genes are markedly more associated with PPARγ than repressed genes and are highly dependent on PPARγ for expression in adipocytes. By contrast, repressed genes are associated with the other key adipocyte transcription factor CCAAT-enhancer binding proteinα (C/EBPα), and their expression is more dependent on C/EBPα. This suggests that the relative occupancies of PPARγ and C/EBPα are critical for whether genes will be induced or repressed by PPARγ agonist.

  6. Ectomycorrhiza-mediated repression of the high-affinity ammonium importer gene AmAMT2 in Amanita muscaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willmann, Anita; Weiss, Michael; Nehls, Uwe

    2007-02-01

    A main function of ectomycorrhizas, a symbiosis between certain soil fungi and fine roots of woody plants, is the exchange of plant-derived carbohydrates for fungus-derived nutrients. As it is required in large amounts, nitrogen is of special interest. A gene (AmAMT2) coding for a putative fungal ammonium importer was identified in an EST project of functional Amanita muscaria/poplar ectomycorrhizas. Heterologous expression of the entire AmAMT2 coding region in yeast revealed the corresponding protein to be a high-affinity ammonium importer. In axenically grown Amanita hyphae AmAMT2 expression was strongly repressed by nitrogen, independent of whether the offered nitrogen source was transported by AmAMT2 or not. In functional ectomycorrhizas the AmAMT2 transcript level was further decreased in both hyphal networks (sheath and Hartig net), while extraradical hyphae revealed strong gene expression. Together our data suggest that (1) AmAMT2 expression is regulated by the endogenous nitrogen content of hyphae and (2) fungal hyphae in ectomycorrhizas are well supported with nitrogen even when the extraradical mycelium is nitrogen limited. As a consequence of AmAMT2 repression in mycorrhizas, ammonium can be suggested as a potential nitrogen source delivered by fungal hyphae in symbiosis.

  7. HIV-1 Tat RNA silencing suppressor activity is conserved across kingdoms and counteracts translational repression of HIV-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Shuiming; Zhong, Xuehua; Yu, Lianbo; Ding, Biao; de Haan, Peter; Boris-Lawrie, Kathleen

    2009-01-13

    The RNA silencing pathway is an intracellular innate response to virus infections and retro-transposons. Many plant viruses counter this host restriction by RNA silencing suppressor (RSS) activity of a double-stranded RNA-binding protein, e.g., tomato bushy stunt virus P19. Here, we demonstrate P19 and HIV-1 Tat function across the plant and animal kingdoms and suppress a common step in RNA silencing that is downstream of small RNA maturation. Our experiments reveal that RNA silencing in HIV-1 infected human cells severely attenuates the translational output of the unspliced HIV-1 gag mRNA, and possibly all HIV-1 transcripts. The attenuation in gag mRNA translation is exacerbated by K51A substitution in the Tat double-stranded RNA-binding domain. Tat, plant virus RSS, or Dicer downregulation rescues robust gag translation and bolsters HIV-1 virion production. The reversal of HIV-1 translation repression by plant RSS supports the recent finding in Arabidopsis that plant miRNAs operate by translational inhibition. Our results identify common features between RNA silencing suppression of plant and animal viruses. We suggest that RNA silencing-mediated translation repression plays a strategic role in determining the viral set-point in a newly HIV-1-infected patient.

  8. A network of PUF proteins and Ras signaling promote mRNA repression and oogenesis in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubstenberger, Arnaud; Cameron, Cristiana; Shtofman, Rebecca; Gutman, Shiri; Evans, Thomas C

    2012-06-15

    Cell differentiation requires integration of gene expression controls with dynamic changes in cell morphology, function, and control. Post-transcriptional mRNA regulation and signaling systems are important to this process but their mechanisms and connections are unclear. During C. elegans oogenesis, we find that two groups of PUF RNA binding proteins (RNABPs), PUF-3/11 and PUF-5/6/7, control different specific aspects of oocyte formation. PUF-3/11 limits oocyte growth, while PUF-5/6/7 promotes oocyte organization and formation. These two PUF groups repress mRNA translation through overlapping but distinct sets of 3' untranslated regions (3'UTRs). Several PUF-dependent mRNAs encode other mRNA regulators suggesting both PUF groups control developmental patterning of mRNA regulation circuits. Furthermore, we find that the Ras-MapKinase/ERK pathway functions with PUF-5/6/7 to repress specific mRNAs and control oocyte organization and growth. These results suggest that diversification of PUF proteins and their integration with Ras-MAPK signaling modulates oocyte differentiation. Together with other studies, these findings suggest positive and negative interactions between the Ras-MAPK system and PUF RNA-binding proteins likely occur at multiple levels. Changes in these interactions over time can influence spatiotemporal patterning of tissue development.

  9. Regulation of transcription functions of the p53 tumor suppressor by the mdm-2 oncogene.

    OpenAIRE

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Mdm-2, a zinc finger protein, negatively regulates the p53 tumor suppressor gene product by binding to it and preventing transcriptional activation (16). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Assays for p53 mediated transcription, repression and activation by mutant and wild-type p53 proteins were used to measure the ability of mdm-2 to block each activity. RESULTS: Mdm-2 was able to inhibit all three functions of the wild-type and mutant p53 activities; transcriptional activation by the wild-ty...

  10. Tbx2 regulates anterior neural specification by repressing FGF signaling pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Gun-Sik; Park, Dong-Seok; Choi, Sun-Cheol; Han, Jin-Kwan

    2017-01-15

    During early embryogenesis, FGF signals regulate the antero-posterior (AP) patterning of the neural plate by promoting posterior cell fates. In particular, BMP signal-mediated attenuation of FGF pathway plays a critical role in the determination of the anterior neural region. Here we show that Tbx2, a T-box transcriptional repressor regulates anterior neural specification by suppressing FGF8 signaling pathway in Xenopus embryo. Tbx2 is expressed in the anterior edge of the neural plate in early neurulae. Overexpression and knockdown of Tbx2 induce expansion and reduction in the expression of anterior neural markers, respectively. It also suppresses FGF8-induced ERK phosphorylation and neural caudalization. Tbx2, which is a target gene of BMP signal, down-regulates FGF8 signaling by inhibiting the expression of Flrt3, a positive regulator of this pathway. We found that Tbx2 binds directly to the T-box element located in the promoter region of Flrt3 gene, thereby interfering with the activity of the promoter. Consistently, Tbx2 augmentation of anterior neural formation is inhibited by co-expression of Flrt3. Furthermore, disruption of the anterior-most structures such as eyes in Tbx2-depleted embryos can be rescued by inhibition of Flrt3 function or FGF signaling. Taken together, our results suggest that Tbx2 mediates BMP signal to down-regulate FGF signaling pathway by repressing Flrt3 expression for anterior tissue formation.

  11. Autism gene Ube3a and seizures impair sociability by repressing VTA Cbln1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Vaishnav; Stoppel, David C; Nong, Yi; Johnson, Mark A; Nadler, Monica J S; Ozkaynak, Ekim; Teng, Brian L; Nagakura, Ikue; Mohammad, Fahim; Silva, Michael A; Peterson, Sally; Cruz, Tristan J; Kasper, Ekkehard M; Arnaout, Ramy; Anderson, Matthew P

    2017-03-15

    Maternally inherited 15q11-13 chromosomal triplications cause a frequent and highly penetrant type of autism linked to increased gene dosages of UBE3A, which encodes a ubiquitin ligase with transcriptional co-regulatory functions. Here, using in vivo mouse genetics, we show that increasing UBE3A in the nucleus downregulates the glutamatergic synapse organizer Cbln1, which is needed for sociability in mice. Epileptic seizures also repress Cbln1 and are found to expose sociability impairments in mice with asymptomatic increases in UBE3A. This Ube3a-seizure synergy maps to glutamate neurons of the midbrain ventral tegmental area (VTA), where Cbln1 deletions impair sociability and weaken glutamatergic transmission. We provide preclinical evidence that viral-vector-based chemogenetic activation of, or restoration of Cbln1 in, VTA glutamatergic neurons reverses the sociability deficits induced by Ube3a and/or seizures. Our results suggest that gene and seizure interactions in VTA glutamatergic neurons impair sociability by downregulating Cbln1, a key node in the expanding protein interaction network of autism genes.

  12. PfSETvs methylation of histone H3K36 represses virulence genes in Plasmodium falciparum

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jiang, Lubin; Mu, Jianbing; Zhang, Qingfeng;

    2013-01-01

    The variant antigen Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1), which is expressed on the surface of P. falciparum-infected red blood cells, is a critical virulence factor for malaria. Each parasite has 60 antigenically distinct var genes that each code for a different PfEMP1 p...... orthologues of PfSETvs repress gene expression in other eukaryotes. PfSETvs knockout parasites expressing all PfEMP1 proteins may also be applied to the development of a malaria vaccine....... protein. During infection the clonal parasite population expresses only one gene at a time before switching to the expression of a new variant antigen as an immune-evasion mechanism to avoid the host antibody response. The mechanism by which 59 of the 60 var genes are silenced remains largely unknown...... genes and the intronic promoter, expression of var genes coincides with transcription of their corresponding antisense long noncoding RNA. These results uncover a previously unknown role of PfSETvs-dependent H3K36me3 in silencing var genes in P. falciparum that might provide a general mechanism by which...

  13. Selective translational repression of truncated proteins from frameshift mutation-derived mRNAs in tumors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwon Tae You

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Frameshift and nonsense mutations are common in tumors with microsatellite instability, and mRNAs from these mutated genes have premature termination codons (PTCs. Abnormal mRNAs containing PTCs are normally degraded by the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD system. However, PTCs located within 50-55 nucleotides of the last exon-exon junction are not recognized by NMD (NMD-irrelevant, and some PTC-containing mRNAs can escape from the NMD system (NMD-escape. We investigated protein expression from NMD-irrelevant and NMD-escape PTC-containing mRNAs by Western blotting and transfection assays. We demonstrated that transfection of NMD-irrelevant PTC-containing genomic DNA of MARCKS generates truncated protein. In contrast, NMD-escape PTC-containing versions of hMSH3 and TGFBR2 generate normal levels of mRNA, but do not generate detectable levels of protein. Transfection of NMD-escape mutant TGFBR2 genomic DNA failed to generate expression of truncated proteins, whereas transfection of wild-type TGFBR2 genomic DNA or mutant PTC-containing TGFBR2 cDNA generated expression of wild-type protein and truncated protein, respectively. Our findings suggest a novel mechanism of gene expression regulation for PTC-containing mRNAs in which the deleterious transcripts are regulated either by NMD or translational repression.

  14. Requirement for sex comb on midleg protein interactions in Drosophila polycomb group repression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peterson, Aidan J; Mallin, Daniel R; Francis, Nicole J; Ketel, Carrie S; Stamm, Joyce; Voeller, Rochus K; Kingston, Robert E; Simon, Jeffrey A

    2004-07-01

    The Drosophila Sex Comb on Midleg (SCM) protein is a transcriptional repressor of the Polycomb group (PcG). Although genetic studies establish SCM as a crucial PcG member, its molecular role is not known. To investigate how SCM might link to PcG complexes, we analyzed the in vivo role of a conserved protein interaction module, the SPM domain. This domain is found in SCM and in another PcG protein, Polyhomeotic (PH), which is a core component of Polycomb repressive complex 1 (PRC1). SCM-PH interactions in vitro are mediated by their respective SPM domains. Yeast two-hybrid and in vitro binding assays were used to isolate and characterize >30 missense mutations in the SPM domain of SCM. Genetic rescue assays showed that SCM repressor function in vivo is disrupted by mutations that impair SPM domain interactions in vitro. Furthermore, overexpression of an isolated, wild-type SPM domain produced PcG loss-of-function phenotypes in flies. Coassembly of SCM with a reconstituted PRC1 core complex shows that SCM can partner with PRC1. However, gel filtration chromatography showed that the bulk of SCM is biochemically separable from PH in embryo nuclear extracts. These results suggest that SCM, although not a core component of PRC1, interacts and functions with PRC1 in gene silencing.

  15. Age-associated repression of type 1 inositol 1, 4, 5-triphosphate receptor impairs muscle regeneration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bora; Lee, Seung-Min; Bahn, Young Jae; Lee, Kwang-Pyo; Kang, Moonkyung; Kim, Yeon-Soo; Woo, Sun-Hee; Lim, Jae-Young; Kim, Eunhee; Kwon, Ki-Sun

    2016-01-01

    Skeletal muscle mass and power decrease with age, leading to impairment of mobility and metabolism in the elderly. Ca2+ signaling is crucial for myoblast differentiation as well as muscle contraction through activation of transcription factors and Ca2+-dependent kinases and phosphatases. Ca2+ channels, such as dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR), two-pore channel (TPC) and inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (ITPR), function to maintain Ca2+ homeostasis in myoblasts. Here, we observed a significant decrease in expression of type 1 IP3 receptor (ITPR1), but not types 2 and 3, in aged mice skeletal muscle and isolated myoblasts, compared with those of young mice. ITPR1 knockdown using shRNA-expressing viruses in C2C12 myoblasts and tibialis anterior muscle of mice inhibited myotube formation and muscle regeneration after injury, respectively, a typical phenotype of aged muscle. This aging phenotype was associated with repression of muscle-specific genes and activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR)-Ras-extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway. ERK inhibition by U0126 not only induced recovery of myotube formation in old myoblasts but also facilitated muscle regeneration after injury in aged muscle. The conserved decline in ITPR1 expression in aged human skeletal muscle suggests utility as a potential therapeutic target for sarcopenia, which can be treated using ERK inhibition strategies. PMID:27658230

  16. Repression of estrogen receptor {beta} function by putative tumor suppressor DBC1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koyama, Satoshi [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Wada-Hiraike, Osamu, E-mail: osamuwh-tky@umin.ac.jp [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Nakagawa, Shunsuke; Tanikawa, Michihiro; Hiraike, Haruko; Miyamoto, Yuichiro; Sone, Kenbun; Oda, Katsutoshi [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Fukuhara, Hiroshi [Department of Urology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Nakagawa, Keiichi [Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan); Kato, Shigeaki [SORST, Japan Science and Technology, Honcho 4-1-8, Kawaguchi, Saitama 332-0012 (Japan); Institute of Molecular and Cellular Biosciences, The University of Tokyo, Yayoi 1-1-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-0034 (Japan); Yano, Tetsu; Taketani, Yuji [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Graduate School of Medicine, The University of Tokyo, Hongo 7-3-1 Bunkyo-ku, Tokyo 113-8655 (Japan)

    2010-02-12

    It has been well established that estrogen is involved in the pathophysiology of breast cancer. Estrogen receptor (ER) {alpha} appears to promote the proliferation of cancer tissues, while ER{beta} can protect against the mitogenic effect of estrogen in breast tissue. The expression status of ER{alpha} and ER{beta} may greatly influence on the development, treatment, and prognosis of breast cancer. Previous studies have indicated that the deleted in breast cancer 1 (DBC1/KIAA1967) gene product has roles in regulating functions of nuclear receptors. The gene encoding DBC1 is a candidate for tumor suppressor identified by genetic search for breast cancer. Caspase-dependent processing of DBC1 promotes apoptosis, and depletion of the endogenous DBC1 negatively regulates p53-dependent apoptosis through its specific inhibition of SIRT1. In addition, DBC1 modulates ER{alpha} expression and promotes breast cancer cell survival by binding to ER{alpha}. Here we report an ER{beta}-specific repressive function of DBC1. Immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence studies show that ER{beta} and DBC1 interact in a ligand-independent manner similar to ER{alpha}. In vitro pull-down assays revealed a direct interaction between DBC1 amino-terminus and activation function-1/2 domain of ER{beta}. Although DBC1 shows no influence on the ligand-dependent transcriptional activation function of ER{alpha}, the expression of DBC1 negatively regulates the ligand-dependent transcriptional activation function of ER{beta}in vivo, and RNA interference-mediated depletion of DBC1 stimulates the transactivation function of ER{beta}. These results implicate the principal role of DBC1 in regulating ER{beta}-dependent gene expressions.

  17. Riboswitch control of Rho-dependent transcription termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hollands, Kerry; Proshkin, Sergey; Sklyarova, Svetlana; Epshtein, Vitaly; Mironov, Alexander; Nudler, Evgeny; Groisman, Eduardo A

    2012-04-03

    Riboswitches are RNA sensors that regulate gene expression upon binding specific metabolites or ions. Bacterial riboswitches control gene expression primarily by promoting intrinsic transcription termination or by inhibiting translation initiation. We now report a third general mechanism of riboswitch action: governing the ability of the RNA-dependent helicase Rho to terminate transcription. We establish that Rho promotes transcription termination in the Mg(2+)-sensing mgtA riboswitch from Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium and the flavin mononucleotide-sensing ribB riboswitch from Escherichia coli when the corresponding riboswitch ligands are present. The Rho-specific inhibitor bicyclomycin enabled transcription of the coding regions at these two loci in bacteria experiencing repressing concentrations of the riboswitch ligands in vivo. A mutation in the mgtA leader that favors the "high Mg(2+)" conformation of the riboswitch promoted Rho-dependent transcription termination in vivo and in vitro and enhanced the ability of the RNA to stimulate Rho's ATPase activity in vitro. These effects were overcome by mutations in a C-rich region of the mRNA that is alternately folded at high and low Mg(2+), suggesting a role for this region in regulating the activity of Rho. Our results reveal a potentially widespread mode of gene regulation whereby riboswitches dictate whether a protein effector can interact with the transcription machinery to prematurely terminate transcription.

  18. Multiple defects in the respiratory chain lead to the repression of genes encoding components of the respiratory chain and TCA cycle enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourges, Ingrid; Mucchielli, Marie-Helene; Herbert, Christopher J; Guiard, Bernard; Dujardin, Geneviève; Meunier, Brigitte

    2009-04-17

    Respiratory complexes III, IV and V are formed by components of both nuclear and mitochondrial origin and are embedded in the inner mitochondrial membrane. Their assembly requires the auxiliary factor Oxa1, and the absence of this protein has severe consequences on these three major respiratory chain enzymes. We have studied, in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the effect of the loss of Oxa1 function and of other respiratory defects on the expression of nuclear genes encoding components of the respiratory complexes and tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes. We observed that the concomitant decrease in the level of two respiratory enzymes, complexes III and IV, led to their repression. These genes are known targets of the transcriptional activator complex Hap2/3/4/5 that plays a central role in the reprogramming of yeast metabolism when cells switch from a fermenting, glucose-repressed state to a respiring, derepressed state. We found that the Hap4 protein, the regulatory subunit of the transcriptional complex, was present at a lower level in the oxa1 mutants whereas no change in HAP4 transcript level was observed, suggesting a posttranscriptional modulation. In addition, an altered mitochondrial morphology was observed in mutants with decreased expression of Hap2/3/4/5 target genes. We suggest that the aberrant mitochondrial morphology, presumably caused by the severely decreased level of at least two respiratory enzymes, might be part of the signalling pathway linking the mitochondrial defect and Hap2/3/4/5.

  19. TET1 and hydroxymethylcytosine in transcription and DNA methylation fidelity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Williams, Kristine; Christensen, Jesper; Pedersen, Marianne Terndrup;

    2011-01-01

    throughout the genome of embryonic stem cells, with the majority of binding sites located at transcription start sites (TSSs) of CpG-rich promoters and within genes. The hmC modification is found in gene bodies and in contrast to mC is also enriched at CpG-rich TSSs. We provide evidence further that TET1 has...... a role in transcriptional repression. TET1 binds a significant proportion of Polycomb group target genes. Furthermore, TET1 associates and colocalizes with the SIN3A co-repressor complex. We propose that TET1 fine-tunes transcription, opposes aberrant DNA methylation at CpG-rich sequences and thereby...... contributes to the regulation of DNA methylation fidelity....

  20. The transcriptional repressor domain of Gli3 is intrinsically disordered.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Tsanev

    Full Text Available The transcription factor Gli3 is acting mainly as a transcriptional repressor in the Sonic hedgehog signal transduction pathway. Gli3 contains a repressor domain in its N-terminus from residue G106 to E236. In this study we have characterized the intracellular structure of the Gli3 repressor domain using a combined bioinformatics and experimental approach. According to our findings the Gli3 repressor domain while being intrinsically disordered contains predicted anchor sites for partner interactions. The obvious interaction partners to test were Ski and DNA; however, with both of these the structure of Gli3 repressor domain remained disordered. To locate residues important for the repressor function we mutated several residues within the Gli3 repressor domain. Two of these, H141A and H157N, targeting predicted helical regions, significantly decreased transcriptional repression and thus identify important functional parts of the domain.

  1. Dopamine signaling leads to loss of Polycomb repression and aberrant gene activation in experimental parkinsonism

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Södersten, Erik; Feyder, Michael; Lerdrup, Mads

    2014-01-01

    Polycomb group (PcG) proteins bind to and repress genes in embryonic stem cells through lineage commitment to the terminal differentiated state. PcG repressed genes are commonly characterized by the presence of the epigenetic histone mark H3K27me3, catalyzed by the Polycomb repressive complex 2. ...... and thereby contribute to long-term maladaptive responses including the motor complications, or dyskinesia, caused by prolonged administration of L-DOPA in Parkinson's disease....

  2. The Notch/Hes1 pathway sustains NF-κB activation through CYLD repression in T cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa, Lluis; Cathelin, Severine; D'Altri, Teresa; Trimarchi, Thomas; Statnikov, Alexander; Guiu, Jordi; Rodilla, Veronica; Inglés-Esteve, Julia; Nomdedeu, Josep; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Besses, Carles; Abdel-Wahab, Omar; Kucine, Nicole; Sun, Shao-Cong; Song, Guangchan; Mullighan, Charles C; Levine, Ross L; Rajewsky, Klaus; Aifantis, Iannis; Bigas, Anna

    2010-09-14

    It was previously shown that the NF-κB pathway is downstream of oncogenic Notch1 in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Here, we visualize Notch-induced NF-κB activation using both human T-ALL cell lines and animal models. We demonstrate that Hes1, a canonical Notch target and transcriptional repressor, is responsible for sustaining IKK activation in T-ALL. Hes1 exerts its effects by repressing the deubiquitinase CYLD, a negative IKK complex regulator. CYLD expression was found to be significantly suppressed in primary T-ALL. Finally, we demonstrate that IKK inhibition is a promising option for the targeted therapy of T-ALL as specific suppression of IKK expression and function affected both the survival of human T-ALL cells and the maintenance of the disease in vivo.

  3. Symbiotic plasmid is required for NolR to fully repress nodulation genes in Rhizobium leguminosarum A34

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Fengqing Li; Bihe Hou; Guofan Hong

    2008-01-01

    NolR is a reguiator of noduiation genes present in Rhizobium and Sinorhizobium. However, the mechanism by which NolR participates in the inducible transcription ofnoduiation genes remains unclear. To investigate whether there are other factors regulating the function of NoIR, an insertion mutant of NolR in Rhizobium leguminosarum strain 8401, which lacks the symbiotic plasmid, was constructed by homologous recombination. We investigated the effects of NolR inactivation on the expression of nodulation genes. Three inducible nodulation genes (nodA, nodF and nodM) were expressed constitutively in NoiR-mutant, MRl14. Our results suggested that the symbiotic plasmid is required for NolR to fully repress nodulation genes in Rhizobium ieguminosarum A34. In addition, MRl14 has provided a useful tool for further study of molecular interactions between NolR and other factors.

  4. Repression of a potassium channel by nuclear hormone receptor and TGF-β signaling modulates insulin signaling in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donha Park

    Full Text Available Transforming growth factor β (TGF-β signaling acts through Smad proteins to play fundamental roles in cell proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, and metabolism. The Receptor associated Smads (R-Smads interact with DNA and other nuclear proteins to regulate target gene transcription. Here, we demonstrate that the Caenorhabditis elegans R-Smad DAF-8 partners with the nuclear hormone receptor NHR-69, a C. elegans ortholog of mammalian hepatocyte nuclear factor 4α HNF4α, to repress the exp-2 potassium channel gene and increase insulin secretion. We find that NHR-69 associates with DAF-8 both in vivo and in vitro. Functionally, daf-8 nhr-69 double mutants show defects in neuropeptide secretion and phenotypes consistent with reduced insulin signaling such as increased expression of the sod-3 and gst-10 genes and a longer life span. Expression of the exp-2 gene, encoding a voltage-gated potassium channel, is synergistically increased in daf-8 nhr-69 mutants compared to single mutants and wild-type worms. In turn, exp-2 acts selectively in the ASI neurons to repress the secretion of the insulin-like peptide DAF-28. Importantly, exp-2 mutation shortens the long life span of daf-8 nhr-69 double mutants, demonstrating that exp-2 is required downstream of DAF-8 and NHR-69. Finally, animals over-expressing NHR-69 specifically in DAF-28-secreting ASI neurons exhibit a lethargic, hypoglycemic phenotype that is rescued by exogenous glucose. We propose a model whereby DAF-8/R-Smad and NHR-69 negatively regulate the transcription of exp-2 to promote neuronal DAF-28 secretion, thus demonstrating a physiological crosstalk between TGF-β and HNF4α-like signaling in C. elegans. NHR-69 and DAF-8 dependent regulation of exp-2 and DAF-28 also provides a novel molecular mechanism that contributes to the previously recognized link between insulin and TGF-β signaling in C. elegans.

  5. Polycomb-Mediated Repression and Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Interact to Regulate Merkel Cell Specification during Skin Development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carolina N Perdigoto

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available An increasing amount of evidence indicates that developmental programs are tightly regulated by the complex interplay between signaling pathways, as well as transcriptional and epigenetic processes. Here, we have uncovered coordination between transcriptional and morphogen cues to specify Merkel cells, poorly understood skin cells that mediate light touch sensations. In murine dorsal skin, Merkel cells are part of touch domes, which are skin structures consisting of specialized keratinocytes, Merkel cells, and afferent neurons, and are located exclusively around primary hair follicles. We show that the developing primary hair follicle functions as a niche required for Merkel cell specification. We find that intraepidermal Sonic hedgehog (Shh signaling, initiated by the production of Shh ligand in the developing hair follicles, is required for Merkel cell specification. The importance of Shh for Merkel cell formation is further reinforced by the fact that Shh overexpression in embryonic epidermal progenitors leads to ectopic Merkel cells. Interestingly, Shh signaling is common to primary, secondary, and tertiary hair follicles, raising the possibility that there are restrictive mechanisms that regulate Merkel cell specification exclusively around primary hair follicles. Indeed, we find that loss of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2 in the epidermis results in the formation of ectopic Merkel cells that are associated with all hair types. We show that PRC2 loss expands the field of epidermal cells competent to differentiate into Merkel cells through the upregulation of key Merkel-differentiation genes, which are known PRC2 targets. Importantly, PRC2-mediated repression of the Merkel cell differentiation program requires inductive Shh signaling to form mature Merkel cells. Our study exemplifies how the interplay between epigenetic and morphogen cues regulates the complex patterning and formation of the mammalian skin structures.

  6. Polycomb-Mediated Repression and Sonic Hedgehog Signaling Interact to Regulate Merkel Cell Specification during Skin Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bar, Carmit; Tsai, Pai-Chi; Valdes, Victor J.; Cohen, Idan; Santoriello, Francis J.; Zhao, Dejian; Hsu, Ya-Chieh; Ezhkova, Elena

    2016-01-01

    An increasing amount of evidence indicates that developmental programs are tightly regulated by the complex interplay between signaling pathways, as well as transcriptional and epigenetic processes. Here, we have uncovered coordination between transcriptional and morphogen cues to specify Merkel cells, poorly understood skin cells that mediate light touch sensations. In murine dorsal skin, Merkel cells are part of touch domes, which are skin structures consisting of specialized keratinocytes, Merkel cells, and afferent neurons, and are located exclusively around primary hair follicles. We show that the developing primary hair follicle functions as a niche required for Merkel cell specification. We find that intraepidermal Sonic hedgehog (Shh) signaling, initiated by the production of Shh ligand in the developing hair follicles, is required for Merkel cell specification. The importance of Shh for Merkel cell formation is further reinforced by the fact that Shh overexpression in embryonic epidermal progenitors leads to ectopic Merkel cells. Interestingly, Shh signaling is common to primary, secondary, and tertiary hair follicles, raising the possibility that there are restrictive mechanisms that regulate Merkel cell specification exclusively around primary hair follicles. Indeed, we find that loss of Polycomb repressive complex 2 (PRC2) in the epidermis results in the formation of ectopic Merkel cells that are associated with all hair types. We show that PRC2 loss expands the field of epidermal cells competent to differentiate into Merkel cells through the upregulation of key Merkel-differentiation genes, which are known PRC2 targets. Importantly, PRC2-mediated repression of the Merkel cell differentiation program requires inductive Shh signaling to form mature Merkel cells. Our study exemplifies how the interplay between epigenetic and morphogen cues regulates the complex patterning and formation of the mammalian skin structures. PMID:27414999

  7. A negative regulator encoded by a rice WRKY gene represses both abscisic acid and gibberellins signaling in aleurone cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhong-Lin; Shin, Margaret; Zou, Xiaolu; Huang, Jianzhi; Ho, Tun-hua David; Shen, Qingxi J

    2009-05-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) and gibberellins (GAs) control several developmental processes including seed maturation, dormancy, and germination. The antagonism of these two hormones is well-documented. However, recent data from transcription profiling studies indicate that they can function as agonists in regulating the expression of many genes although the underlying mechanism is unclear. Here we report a rice WRKY gene, OsWRKY24, which encodes a protein that functions as a negative regulator of both GA and ABA signaling. Overexpression of OsWRKY24 via particle bombardment-mediated transient expression in aleurone cells represses the expression of two reporter constructs: the beta-glucuronidase gene driven by the GA-inducible Amy32b alpha-amylase promoter (Amy32b-GUS) and the ABA-inducible HVA22 promoter (HVA22-GUS). OsWRKY24 is unlikely a general repressor because it has little effect on the expression of the luciferase reporter gene driven by a constitutive ubiquitin promoter (UBI-Luciferase). As to the GA signaling, OsWRKY24 differs from OsWRKY51 and -71, two negative regulators specifically function in the GA signaling pathway, in several ways. First, OsWRKY24 contains two WRKY domains while OsWRKY51 and -71 have only one; both WRKY domains are essential for the full repressing activity of OsWRKY24. Second, binding of OsWRKY24 to the Amy32b promoter appears to involve sequences in addition to the TGAC cores of the W-boxes. Third, unlike OsWRKY71, OsWRKY24 is stable upon GA treatment. Together, these data demonstrate that OsWRKY24 is a novel type of transcriptional repressor that inhibits both GA and ABA signaling.

  8. Pronephric tubule morphogenesis in zebrafish depends on Mnx mediated repression of irx1b within the intermediate mesoderm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Elisabeth; Wendik, Björn; Srivastava, Monika; Pacho, Frederic; Töchterle, Sonja; Salvenmoser, Willi; Meyer, Dirk

    2016-03-01

    Mutations in the homeobox transcription factor MNX1 are the major cause of dominantly inherited sacral agenesis. Studies in model organisms revealed conserved mnx gene requirements in neuronal and pancreatic development while Mnx activities that could explain the caudal mesoderm specific agenesis phenotype remain elusive. Here we use the zebrafish pronephros as a simple yet genetically conserved model for kidney formation to uncover a novel role of Mnx factors in nephron morphogenesis. Pronephros formation can formally be divided in four stages, the specification of nephric mesoderm from the intermediate mesoderm (IM), growth and epithelialisation, segmentation and formation of the glomerular capillary tuft. Two of the three mnx genes in zebrafish are dynamically transcribed in caudal IM in a time window that proceeds segmentation. We show that expression of one mnx gene, mnx2b, is restricted to the pronephric lineage and that mnx2b knock-down causes proximal pronephric tubule dilation and impaired pronephric excretion. Using expression profiling of embryos transgenic for conditional activation and repression of Mnx regulated genes, we further identified irx1b as a direct target of Mnx factors. Consistent with a repression of irx1b by Mnx factors, the transcripts of irx1b and mnx genes are found in mutual exclusive regions in the IM, and blocking of Mnx functions results in a caudal expansion of the IM-specific irx1b expression. Finally, we find that knock-down of irx1b is sufficient to rescue proximal pronephric tubule dilation and impaired nephron function in mnx-morpholino injected embryos. Our data revealed a first caudal mesoderm specific requirement of Mnx factors in a non-human system and they demonstrate that Mnx-dependent restriction of IM-specific irx1b activation is required for the morphogenesis and function of the zebrafish pronephros.

  9. Epoxide-mediated CifR repression of cif gene expression utilizes two binding sites in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballok, Alicia E; Bahl, Christopher D; Dolben, Emily L; Lindsay, Allia K; St Laurent, Jessica D; Hogan, Deborah A; Madden, Dean R; O'Toole, George A

    2012-10-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa secretes an epoxide hydrolase virulence factor that reduces the apical membrane expression of ABC transporters such as the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR). This virulence factor, named CFTR inhibitory factor (Cif), is regulated by a TetR-family, epoxide-responsive repressor known as CifR via direct binding and repression. We identified two sites of CifR binding in the intergenic space between cifR and morB, the first gene in the operon containing the cif gene. We have mapped these binding sites and found they are 27 bp in length, and they overlap the -10 and +1 sites of both the cifR and morB regulatory region and the start of transcription, respectively. In addition, we found that CifR binds to each repression site with differing affinity. Mutagenesis of these binding sites resulted in a loss of DNA binding in vitro, and mutation of one of these sites in vivo resulted in an increase in transcription of both the cif and cifR genes. We characterized cif and cifR gene expression in sputum and found that, whereas cif gene expression varied relative to an in vitro coculture control, cifR gene expression was consistently higher. Analysis of a longitudinal sample of CF isolates from nine patients revealed that Cif protein was expressed over time, although variably, and these changes could not be linked to mutations in the cifR gene or the promoters of these genes. Finally, we tested CifR responsiveness to other epoxides and showed that CifR can respond to multiple epoxides to various degrees.

  10. A mutation in the Zn-finger of the GAL4 homolog LAC9 results in glucose repression of its target genes.

    OpenAIRE

    Kuger, P; Gödecke, A; Breunig, K D

    1990-01-01

    The transcriptional activator LAC9, a GAL4 homolog of Kluyveromyces lactis which mediates lactose and galactose-dependent activation of genes involved in the utilization of these sugars can also confer glucose repression to those genes. Here we report on the isolation and characterization of LAC9-2, an allele which encodes a glucose-sensitive activator in contrast to the one previously cloned. A single amino acid exchange of leu-104 to tryptophan is responsible for the glucose-insensitive phe...

  11. PRC2 regulates RNA polymerase III transcribed non-translated RNA gene transcription through EZH2 and SUZ12 interaction with TFIIIC complex

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Chang; Li Shuai; Dai Xiaoyan; Ma Ji; Wan Junhu; Jiang Hao; Wang Peng; Liu Zhaoli; Zhang Hongquan

    2015-01-01

    Polycomb repression complex 2 ( PRC2 ) component EZH2 tri-methylates H3 K27 and exerts ep-igenetic repression on target gene expression. EZH2-mediated epigenetic control of RNA polymerase II(Pol II) transcribed coding gene transcription has been well established. However, little is known about EZH2-mediated epigenetic regulation of RNA polymerase III( Pol III) transcription. Here we present a paradigm that EZH2 is in-volved in the repression of Pol III transcription via interaction with transcriptional factor complex IIIC ( TFIIIC ) . EZH2 and H3K27 me3 cooccupy the promoter of tRNATyr, 5S rRNA and 7SL RNA genes. Depletion of EZH2 or inhibition of EZH2 methyl transferase activity led to upregulation of Pol III target gene transcription. EZH2-media-ted repression of Pol III transcribed gene expression requires presence of SUZ12 . SUZ12 was able to interact with TFIIIC complex and knockdown of SUZ12 decreased occupancy of EZH2 and H3 K27 me3 at the promoter of Pol III target genes. Our findings pointed out a previously unidentified role of PRC2 complex in suppressing transcription of Pol III transcribed non-translated RNA genes, putting Pol III on a new layer of epigenetic regulation.

  12. Noncytotoxic Suppression of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Transcription by Exosomes Secreted from CD8+ T Cells▿

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    CD8+ T cells display a noncytotoxic activity that suppresses transcription of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) in an antigen-independent and major histocompatibility complex-unrestricted manner. To date, the precise cellular and molecular factors mediating this CD8+ T-cell effector function remain unsolved. Despite evidence indicating the dependence of the activity on cell-cell contact, the possibility of a membrane-mediated activity that represses transcription from the viral prom...

  13. Sulforaphane causes epigenetic repression of hTERT expression in human breast cancer cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed M Meeran

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sulforaphane (SFN, an isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables, is a common dietary component that has histone deacetylase inhibition activity and exciting potential in cancer prevention. The mechanisms by which SFN imparts its chemopreventive properties are of considerable interest and little is known of its preventive potential for breast cancer. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We found that SFN significantly inhibits the viability and proliferation of breast cancer cells in vitro while it has negligible effects on normal breast cells. Inhibition of telomerase has received considerable attention because of its high expression in cancer cells and extremely low level of expression in normal cells. SFN treatment dose- and time-dependently inhibited human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT, the catalytic regulatory subunit of telomerase, in both MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 human breast cancer cells. DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs, especially DNMT1 and DNMT3a, were also decreased in SFN-treated breast cancer cells suggesting that SFN may repress hTERT by impacting epigenetic pathways. Down-regulation of DNMTs in response to SFN induced site-specific CpG demethylation occurring primarily in the first exon of the hTERT gene thereby facilitating CTCF binding associated with hTERT repression. Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP analysis of the hTERT promoter revealed that SFN increased the level of active chromatin markers acetyl-H3, acetyl-H3K9 and acetyl-H4, whereas the trimethyl-H3K9 and trimethyl-H3K27 inactive chromatin markers were decreased in a dose-dependent manner. SFN-induced hyperacetylation facilitated the binding of many hTERT repressor proteins such as MAD1 and CTCF to the hTERT regulatory region. Depletion of CTCF using siRNA reduced the SFN-induced down-regulation of hTERT mRNA transcription in these breast cancer cells. In addition, down-regulation of hTERT expression facilitated the induction of cellular apoptosis in human breast

  14. Inorganic arsenic represses interleukin-17A expression in human activated Th17 lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morzadec, Claudie; Macoch, Mélinda; Robineau, Marc; Sparfel, Lydie [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France); Fardel, Olivier [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France); Pôle Biologie, Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU) Rennes, 2 rue Henri Le Guilloux, 35033 Rennes (France); Vernhet, Laurent, E-mail: laurent.vernhet@univ-rennes1.fr [UMR INSERM U1085, Institut de Recherche sur la Santé, l' Environnement et le Travail (IRSET), Université de Rennes 1, 2 avenue du Professeur Léon Bernard, 35043 Rennes (France)

    2012-08-01

    Trivalent inorganic arsenic [As(III)] is an efficient anticancer agent used to treat patients suffering from acute promyelocytic leukemia. Recently, experimental studies have clearly demonstrated that this metalloid can also cure lymphoproliferative and/or pro-inflammatory syndromes in different murine models of chronic immune-mediated diseases. T helper (Th) 1 and Th17 lymphocytes play a central role in development of these diseases, in mice and humans, especially by secreting the potent pro-inflammatory cytokine interferon-γ and IL-17A, respectively. As(III) impairs basic functions of human T cells but its ability to modulate secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by differentiated Th lymphocytes is unknown. In the present study, we demonstrate that As(III), used at concentrations clinically achievable in plasma of patients, has no effect on the secretion of interferon-γ from Th1 cells but almost totally blocks the expression and the release of IL-17A from human Th17 lymphocytes co-stimulated for five days with anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies, in the presence of differentiating cytokines. In addition, As(III) specifically reduces mRNA levels of the retinoic-related orphan receptor (ROR)C gene which encodes RORγt, a key transcription factor controlling optimal IL-17 expression in fully differentiated Th17 cells. The metalloid also blocks initial expression of IL-17 gene induced by the co-stimulation, probably in part by impairing activation of the JNK/c-Jun pathway. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that As(III) represses expression of the major pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-17A produced by human Th17 lymphocytes, thus strengthening the idea that As(III) may be useful to treat inflammatory immune-mediated diseases in humans. -- Highlights: ► Arsenic inhibits secretion of IL-17A from human naïve and memory Th17 lymphocytes. ► Arsenic represses early expression of IL-17A gene in human activated T lymphocytes. ► Arsenic interferes with activation of

  15. Germ Cell Nuclear Factor (GCNF) Represses Oct4 Expression and Globally Modulates Gene Expression in Human Embryonic Stem (hES) Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongran; Wang, Xiaohong; Xu, Xueping; Kyba, Michael; Cooney, Austin J

    2016-04-15

    Oct4 is considered a key transcription factor for pluripotent stem cell self-renewal. It binds to specific regions within target genes to regulate their expression and is downregulated upon induction of differentiation of pluripotent stem cells; however, the mechanisms that regulate the levels of human Oct4 expression remain poorly understood. Here we show that expression of human Oct4 is directly repressed by germ cell nuclear factor (GCNF), an orphan nuclear receptor, in hES cells. Knockdown of GCNF by siRNA resulted in maintenance of Oct4 expression during RA-induced hES cell differentiation. While overexpression of GCNF promoted repression of Oct4 expression in both undifferentiated and differentiated hES cells. The level of Oct4 repression was dependent on the level of GCNF expression in a dose-dependent manner. mRNA microarray analysis demonstrated that overexpression of GCNF globally regulates gene expression in undifferentiated and differentiated hES cells. Within the group of altered genes, GCNF down-regulated 36% of the genes, and up-regulated 64% in undifferentiated hES cells. In addition, GCNF also showed a regulatory gene pattern that is different from RA treatment during hES cell differentiation. These findings increase our understanding of the mechanisms that maintain hES cell pluripotency and regulate gene expression during the differentiation process.

  16. Mutations in the GW-repeat protein SUO reveal a developmental function for microRNA-mediated translational repression in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Li; Wu, Gang; Poethig, R Scott

    2012-01-03

    Plant microRNAs (miRNAs) typically mediate RNA cleavage, but examples of miRNA-mediated translational repression have also been reported. However, the functional significance of this latter process is unknown. We identified SUO in a screen for Arabidopsis mutations that increase the accumulation of the miR156-regulated gene SPL3. suo has a loss-of-function phenotype characteristic of plants with reduced Argonaute (AGO)1 activity. An analysis of RNA and protein levels in suo mutants demonstrated that this phenotype is a consequence of a defect in miRNA-mediated translational repression; the effect of suo on vegetative phase change is attributable to a reduction in miR156/miR157 activity. SUO encodes a large protein with N-terminal bromo-adjacent homology (BAH) and transcription elongation factor S-II (TFS2N) domains and two C-terminal GW (glycine and tryptophan) repeats. SUO is present in the nucleus, and colocalizes with the processing-body component DCP1 in the cytoplasm. Our results reveal that SOU is a component of the miRNA pathway in Arabidopsis and demonstrate that translational repression is a functionally important aspect of miRNA activity in plants.

  17. Chromosome segregation proteins of Vibrio cholerae as transcription regulators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Jong Hwan; Rajagopala, Seesandra V; Chattoraj, Dhruba K

    2014-05-06

    ABSTRACT Bacterial ParA and ParB proteins are best known for their contribution to plasmid and chromosome segregation, but they may also contribute to other cell functions. In segregation, ParA interacts with ParB, which binds to parS centromere-analogous sites. In transcription, plasmid Par proteins can serve as repressors by specifically binding to their own promoters and, additionally, in the case of ParB, by spreading from a parS site to nearby promoters. Here, we have asked whether chromosomal Par proteins can likewise control transcription. Analysis of genome-wide ParB1 binding in Vibrio cholerae revealed preferential binding to the three known parS1 sites and limited spreading of ParB1 beyond the parS1 sites. Comparison of wild-type transcriptomes with those of ΔparA1, ΔparB1, and ΔparAB1 mutants revealed that two out of 20 genes (VC0067 and VC0069) covered by ParB1 spreading are repressed by both ParB1 and ParA1. A third gene (VC0076) at the outskirts of the spreading area and a few genes further away were also repressed, particularly the gene for an outer membrane protein, ompU (VC0633). Since ParA1 or ParB1 binding was not evident near VC0076 and ompU genes, the repression may require participation of additional factors. Indeed, both ParA1 and ParB1 proteins were found to interact with several V. cholerae proteins in bacterial and yeast two-hybrid screens. These studies demonstrate that chromosomal Par proteins can repress genes unlinked to parS and can do so without direct binding to the cognate promoter DNA. IMPORTANCE Directed segregation of chromosomes is essential for their maintenance in dividing cells. Many bacteria have genes (par) that were thought to be dedicated to segregation based on analogy to their roles in plasmid maintenance. It is becoming clear that chromosomal par genes are pleiotropic and that they contribute to diverse processes such as DNA replication, cell division, cell growth, and motility. One way to explain the pleiotropy

  18. HP1a, Su(var)3-9, SETDB1 and POF stimulate or repress gene expression depending on genomic position, gene length and expression pattern in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, Lina E; Stenberg, Per; Larsson, Jan

    2013-04-01

    Heterochromatin protein 1a (HP1a) is a chromatin-associated protein important for the formation and maintenance of heterochromatin. In Drosophila, the two histone methyltransferases SETDB1 and Su(var)3-9 mediate H3K9 methylation marks that initiates the establishment and spreading of HP1a-enriched chromatin. Although HP1a is generally regarded as a factor that represses gene transcription, several reports have linked HP1a binding to active genes, and in some cases, it has been shown to stimulate transcriptional activity. To clarify the function of HP1a in transcription regulation and its association with Su(var)3-9, SETDB1 and the chromosome 4-specific protein POF, we conducted genome-wide expression studies and combined the results with available binding data in Drosophila melanogaster. The results suggest that HP1a, SETDB1 and Su(var)3-9 repress genes on chromosome 4, where non-ubiquitously expressed genes are preferentially targeted, and stimulate genes in pericentromeric regions. Further, we showed that on chromosome 4, Su(var)3-9, SETDB1 and HP1a target the same genes. In addition, we found that transposons are repressed by HP1a and Su(var)3-9 and that the binding level and expression effects of HP1a are affected by gene length. Our results indicate that genes have adapted to be properly expressed in their local chromatin environment.

  19. Variable coordination of cotranscribed genes in Escherichia coli following antisense repression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kulyté Agne

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A majority of bacterial genes belong to tight clusters and operons, which complicates gene functional studies using conventional knock-out methods. Antisense agents can down-regulate the expression of genes without disrupting the genome because they bind mRNA and block its expression. However, it is unclear how antisense inhibition affects expression from genes that are cotranscribed with the target. Results To examine the effects of antisense inhibition on cotranscribed genes, we constructed a plasmid expressing the two reporter genes gfp and DsRed as one transcriptional unit. Incubation with antisense peptide nucleic acid (PNA targeted to the mRNA start codon region of either the upstream gfp or the downstream DsRed gene resulted in a complete expression discoordination from this artificial construct. The same approach was applied to the three cotranscribed genes in the endogenously expressed lac-operon (lacZ, Y and A and partial downstream expression coordination was seen when the lacZ start codon was targeted with antisense PNA. Targeting the lacY mRNA start codon region showed no effect on the upstream lacZ gene expression whereas expression from the downstream lacA gene was affected as strongly as the lacY gene. Determination of lacZ and lacY mRNA levels revealed a pattern of reduction that was similar to the Lac-proteins, indicating a relation between translation inhibition and mRNA degradation as a response to antisense PNA treatment. Conclusion The results show that antisense mediated repression of genes within operons affect cotranscribed genes to a variable degree. Target transcript stability appears to be closely related to inhibition of translation and presumably depends on translating ribosomes protecting the mRNA from intrinsic decay mechanisms. Therefore, for genes within operons and clusters it is likely that the nature of the target transcript will determine the inhibitory effects on cotranscribed genes

  20. Differential signal transduction via TrmB, a sugar sensing transcriptional repressor of Pyrococcus furiosus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sung-Jae; Surma, Melanie; Seitz, Sabine; Hausner, Winfried; Thomm, Michael; Boos, Winfried

    2007-06-01

    TrmB is a transcriptional repressor of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus serving at least two operons. TrmB represses genes encoding an ABC transporter for trehalose and maltose (the TM system) with trehalose and maltose as inducers. TrmB also represses genes encoding another ABC transporter for maltodextrins (the MD system) with maltotriose and sucrose as inducers. Here we report that glucose which was also bound by TrmB acted as a corepressor (causing stronger repression) for both the TM and the MD system. Binding of glucose by TrmB was increased in the presence of TM promoter DNA. Maltose which acted as inducer for the TM system acted as a corepressor for the MD system intensifying repression. We propose that the differential conformational changes of TrmB in response to binding the different sugars governs the ability of TrmB to interact with the promoter region and represents a simple mechanism for selecting the usage of one carbon source over the other, reminiscent of catabolite repression in bacteria.

  1. Serum repressing efflux pump CDR1 in Candida albicans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fan Jen-Chung

    2006-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In the past decades, the prevalence of candidemia has increased significantly and drug resistance has also become a pressing problem. Overexpression of CDR1, an efflux pump, has been proposed as a major mechanism contributing to the drug resistance in Candida albicans. It has been demonstrated that biological fluids such as human serum can have profound effects on antifungal pharmacodynamics. The aim of this study is to understand the effects of serum in drug susceptibility via monitoring the activity of CDR1 promoter of C. albicans. Results The wild-type C. albicans cells (SC5314 but not the cdr1/cdr1 mutant cells became more susceptible to the antifungal drug when the medium contained serum. To understand the regulation of CDR1 in the presence of serum, we have constructed CDR1 promoter-Renilla luciferase (CDR1p-RLUC reporter to monitor the activity of the CDR1 promoter in C. albicans. As expected, the expression of CDR1p-RLUC was induced by miconazole. Surprisingly, it was repressed by serum. Consistently, the level of CDR1 mRNA was also reduced in the presence of serum but not N-acetyl-D-glucosamine, a known inducer for germ tube formation. Conclusion Our finding that the expression of CDR1 is repressed by serum raises the question as to how does CDR1 contribute to the drug resistance in C. albicans causing candidemia. This also suggests that it is important to re-assess the prediction of in vivo therapeutic outcome of candidemia based on the results of standard in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing, conducted in the absence of serum.

  2. Transcriptional regulation of nitrogen fixation by molybdenum in Azotobacter vinelandii.

    OpenAIRE

    Jacobson, M.R.; Premakumar, R; Bishop, P E

    1986-01-01

    Multiple genomic regions homologous to nifH were found in the diazotroph Azotobacter vinelandii. The nifHDK gene cluster, located on a 12.8-kilobase (kb) XhoI fragment and two additional XhoI fragments (7.4 and 8.4 kb) hybridized to a nifH-specific DNA template but the 7.4- and 8.4-kb fragments did not hybridize to nifD- or nifK-specific DNA probes. In vivo transcription of the nifHDK gene cluster was ammonia-repressible and required the presence of at least 50 nM molybdenum in the derepressi...

  3. Transcript analysis of 250 novel yeast genes from chromosome XIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Planta, R J; Brown, A J; Cadahia, J L; Cerdan, M E; de Jonge, M; Gent, M E; Hayes, A; Kolen, C P; Lombardia, L J; Sefton, M; Oliver, S G; Thevelein, J; Tournu, H; van Delft, Y J; Verbart, D J; Winderickx, J

    1999-03-15

    The European Functional Analysis Network (EUROFAN) is systematically analysing the function of novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes revealed by genome sequencing. As part of this effort our consortium has performed a detailed transcript analysis for 250 novel ORFs on chromosome XIV. All transcripts were quantified by Northern analysis under three quasi-steady-state conditions (exponential growth on rich fermentative, rich non-fermentative, and minimal fermentative media) and eight transient conditions (glucose derepression, glucose upshift, stationary phase, nitrogen starvation, osmo-stress, heat-shock, and two control conditions). Transcripts were detected for 82% of the 250 ORFs, and only one ORF did not yield a transcript of the expected length (YNL285w). Transcripts ranged from low (62%), moderate (16%) to high abundance (2%) relative to the ACT1 mRNA. The levels of 73% of the 206 chromosome XIV transcripts detected fluctuated in response to the transient states tested. However, only a small number responded strongly to the transients: eight ORFs were induced upon glucose upshift; five were repressed by glucose; six were induced in response to nitrogen starvation; three were induced in stationary phase; five were induced by osmo-stress; four were induced by heat-shock. These data provide useful clues about the general function of these ORFs and add to our understanding of gene regulation on a genome-wide basis.

  4. Modular construction of mammalian gene circuits using TALE transcriptional repressors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yinqing; Jiang, Yun; Chen, He; Liao, Weixi; Li, Zhihua; Weiss, Ron; Xie, Zhen

    2015-03-01

    An important goal of synthetic biology is the rational design and predictable implementation of synthetic gene circuits using standardized and interchangeable parts. However, engineering of complex circuits in mammalian cells is currently limited by the availability of well-characterized and orthogonal transcriptional repressors. Here, we introduce a library of 26 reversible transcription activator-like effector repressors (TALERs) that bind newly designed hybrid promoters and exert transcriptional repression through steric hindrance of key transcriptional initiation elements. We demonstrate that using the input-output transfer curves of our TALERs enables accurate prediction of the behavior of modularly assembled TALER cascade and switch circuits. We also show that TALER switches using feedback regulation exhibit improved accuracy for microRNA-based HeLa cancer cell classification versus HEK293 cells. Our TALER library is a valuable toolkit for modular engineering of synthetic circuits, enabling programmable manipulation of mammalian cells and helping elucidate design principles of coupled transcriptional and microRNA-mediated post-transcriptional regulation.

  5. Long noncoding RNAs as a novel component of the Myc transcriptional network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winkle, Melanie; van den Berg, Anke; Tayari, Masoumeh; Sietzema, Jantine; Terpstra, Martijn; Kortman, Gertrud; de Jong, Debora; Visser, Lydia; Diepstra, Arjan; Kok, Klaas; Kluiver, Joost

    2015-06-01

    Myc is a well-known transcription factor with important roles in cell cycle, apoptosis, and cellular transformation. Long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) have recently emerged as an important class of regulatory RNAs. Here, we show that lncRNAs are a main component of the Myc-regulated transcriptional program using the P493-6 tetracycline-repressible myc model. We demonstrate that both Myc-induced mRNAs and lncRNAs are significantly enriched for Myc binding sites. In contrast to Myc-repressed mRNAs, Myc-repressed lncRNAs are significantly enriched for Myc binding sites. Subcellular localization analysis revealed that compared to mRNAs, lncRNAs more often have a specific subcellular localization with a markedly higher percentage of nuclear enrichment within the Myc-repressed lncRNA set. Parallel analysis of differentially expressed lncRNAs and mRNAs identified 105 juxtaposed lncRNA-mRNA pairs, indicative for regulation in cis. To support the potential relevance of the Myc-regulated lncRNAs in cellular transformation, we analyzed their expression in primary Myc-high and Myc-low B-cell lymphomas. In total, 54% of the lncRNAs differentially expressed between the lymphoma subsets were identified as Myc-regulated in P493-6 cells. This study is the first to show that lncRNAs are an important factor within the Myc-regulated transcriptional program and indicates a marked difference between Myc-repressed lncRNAs and mRNAs.

  6. Repressive Coping, Emotional Adjustment, and Cognition in People Who Have Lost Loved Ones to Suicide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parker, Holly A.; McNally, Richard J.

    2008-01-01

    Research indicates that a repressive coping style is psychologically protective against the stress of trauma, yet it is unclear whether this finding generalizes to suicide bereavement. Thus, we assessed cognitive ability and mental health among individuals who lost a loved one to suicide. The results indicate that repressive coping may be…

  7. Regulation of pqs quorum sensing via catabolite repression control in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhang, Lianbo; Gao, Qingguo; Chen, Wanying;

    2013-01-01

    that the Pseudomonas aeruginosa catabolite repression control protein regulates the Pseudomonas quinolone signal quorum sensing, which further controls synthesis of virulence factor pyocyanin, biofilm formation and survival during infection models. Our study suggests that deregulation of the catabolite repression by P...

  8. Chromatin Properties of Regulatory DNA Probed by Manipulation of Transcription Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharov, Alexei A.; Nishiyama, Akira; Qian, Yong; Dudekula, Dawood B.; Longo, Dan L.; Schlessinger, David

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Transcription factors (TFs) bind to DNA and regulate the transcription of nearby genes. However, only a small fraction of TF binding sites have such regulatory effects. Here we search for the predictors of functional binding sites by carrying out a systematic computational screening of a variety of contextual factors (histone modifications, nuclear lamin-bindings, and cofactor bindings). We used regression analysis to test if contextual factors are associated with upregulation or downregulation of neighboring genes following the induction or knockdown of the 9 TFs in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Functional TF binding sites appeared to be either active (i.e., bound by P300, CHD7, mediator, cohesin, and SWI/SNF) or repressed (i.e., with H3K27me3 histone marks and bound by Polycomb factors). Active binding sites mediated the downregulation of nearby genes upon knocking down the activating TFs or inducing repressors. Repressed TF binding sites mediated the upregulation of nearby genes (e.g., poised developmental regulators) upon inducing TFs. In addition, repressed binding sites mediated repressive effects of TFs, identified by the downregulation of target genes after the induction of TFs or by the upregulation of target genes after the knockdown of TFs. The contextual factors associated with functions of DNA-bound TFs were used to improve the identification of candidate target genes regulated by TFs. PMID:24918633

  9. Chromatin properties of regulatory DNA probed by manipulation of transcription factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharov, Alexei A; Nishiyama, Akira; Qian, Yong; Dudekula, Dawood B; Longo, Dan L; Schlessinger, David; Ko, Minoru S H

    2014-08-01

    Transcription factors (TFs) bind to DNA and regulate the transcription of nearby genes. However, only a small fraction of TF binding sites have such regulatory effects. Here we search for the predictors of functional binding sites by carrying out a systematic computational screening of a variety of contextual factors (histone modifications, nuclear lamin-bindings, and cofactor bindings). We used regression analysis to test if contextual factors are associated with upregulation or downregulation of neighboring genes following the induction or knockdown of the 9 TFs in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. Functional TF binding sites appeared to be either active (i.e., bound by P300, CHD7, mediator, cohesin, and SWI/SNF) or repressed (i.e., with H3K27me3 histone marks and bound by Polycomb factors). Active binding sites mediated the downregulation of nearby genes upon knocking down the activating TFs or inducing repressors. Repressed TF binding sites mediated the upregulation of nearby genes (e.g., poised developmental regulators) upon inducing TFs. In addition, repressed binding sites mediated repressive effects of TFs, identified by the downregulation of target genes after the induction of TFs or by the upregulation of target genes after the knockdown of TFs. The contextual factors associated with functions of DNA-bound TFs were used to improve the identification of candidate target genes regulated by TFs.

  10. Epstein-barr virus latency in B cells leads to epigenetic repression and CpG methylation of the tumour suppressor gene Bim.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kostas Paschos

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In human B cells infected with Epstein-Barr virus (EBV, latency-associated virus gene products inhibit expression of the pro-apoptotic Bcl-2-family member Bim and enhance cell survival. This involves the activities of the EBV nuclear proteins EBNA3A and EBNA3C and appears to be predominantly directed at regulating Bim mRNA synthesis, although post-transcriptional regulation of Bim has been reported. Here we show that protein and RNA stability make little or no contribution to the EBV-associated repression of Bim in latently infected B cells. However, treatment of cells with inhibitors of histone deacetylase (HDAC and DNA methyltransferase (DNMT enzymes indicated that epigenetic mechanisms are involved in the down-regulation of Bim. This was initially confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis of histone acetylation levels on the Bim promoter. Consistent with this, methylation-specific PCR (MSP and bisulphite sequencing of regions within the large CpG island located at the 5' end of Bim revealed significant methylation of CpG dinucleotides in all EBV-positive, but not EBV-negative B cells examined. Genomic DNA samples exhibiting methylation of the Bim promoter included extracts from a series of explanted EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphoma (BL biopsies. Subsequent analyses of the histone modification H3K27-Me3 (trimethylation of histone H3 lysine 27 and CpG methylation at loci throughout the Bim promoter suggest that in EBV-positive B cells repression of Bim is initially associated with this repressive epigenetic histone mark gradually followed by DNA methylation at CpG dinucleotides. We conclude that latent EBV initiates a chain of events that leads to epigenetic repression of the tumour suppressor gene Bim in infected B cells and their progeny. This reprogramming of B cells could have important implications for our understanding of EBV persistence and the pathogenesis of EBV-associated disease, in particular BL.

  11. Ligand-dependent regulation of the activity of the orphan nuclear receptor, small heterodimer partner (SHP), in the repression of bile acid biosynthetic CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Ji; Choi, Sung-E; Seok, Sun Mi; Yang, Linda; Zuercher, William J; Xu, Yong; Willson, Timothy M; Xu, H Eric; Kemper, Jongsook Kim

    2011-07-01

    Small heterodimer partner (SHP) plays important roles in diverse biological processes by directly interacting with transcription factors and inhibiting their activities. SHP has been designated an orphan nuclear receptor, but whether its activity can be modulated by ligands has been a long-standing question. Recently, retinoid-related molecules, including 4-[3-(1-adamantyl)-4-hydroxyphenyl]-3-chlorocinnamic acid (3Cl-AHPC), were shown to bind to SHP and enhance apoptosis. We have examined whether 3Cl-AHPC acts as an agonist and increases SHP activity in the repression of bile acid biosynthetic CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 genes and delineated the underlying mechanisms. Contrary to this expectation, micromolar concentrations of 3Cl-AHPC increased CYP7A1 expression but indirectly via p38 kinase signaling. Nanomolar concentrations, however, repressed CYP7A1 expression and decreased bile acid levels in HepG2 cells, and little repression was observed when SHP was down-regulated by small hairpin RNA. Mechanistic studies revealed that 3Cl-AHPC bound to SHP, increased the interaction of SHP with liver receptor homologue (LRH)-1, a hepatic activator for CYP7A1 and CYP8B1 genes, and with repressive cofactors, Brahma, mammalian Sin3a, and histone deacetylase-1, and, subsequently, increased the occupancy of SHP and these cofactors at the promoters. Mutation of Leu-100, predicted to contact 3Cl-AHPC within the SHP ligand binding pocket by molecular modeling, severely impaired the increased interaction with LRH-1, and repression of LRH-1 activity mediated by 3Cl-AHPC. 3Cl-AHPC repressed SHP metabolic target genes in a gene-specific manner in human primary hepatocytes and HepG2 cells. These data suggest that SHP may act as a ligand-regulated receptor in metabolic pathways. Modulation of SHP activity by synthetic ligands may be a useful therapeutic strategy.

  12. PlnTFDB: an integrative plant transcription factor database

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruzicic Slobodan

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Transcription factors (TFs are key regulatory proteins that enhance or repress the transcriptional rate of their target genes by binding to specific promoter regions (i.e. cis-acting elements upon activation or de-activation of upstream signaling cascades. TFs thus constitute master control elements of dynamic transcriptional networks. TFs have fundamental roles in almost all biological processes (development, growth and response to environmental factors and it is assumed that they play immensely important functions in the evolution of species. In plants, TFs have been employed to manipulate various types of metabolic, developmental and stress response pathways. Cross-species comparison and identification of regulatory modules and hence TFs is thought to become increasingly important for the rational design of new plant biomass. Up to now, however, no computational repository is available that provides access to the largely complete sets of transcription factors of sequenced plant genomes. Description PlnTFDB is an integrative plant transcription factor database that provides a web interface to access large (close to complete sets of transcription factors of several plant species, currently encompassing Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress, Populus trichocarpa (poplar, Oryza sativa (rice, Chlamydomonas reinhardtii and Ostreococcus tauri. It also provides an access point to its daughter databases of a species-centered representation of transcription factors (OstreoTFDB, ChlamyTFDB, ArabTFDB, PoplarTFDB and RiceTFDB. Information including protein sequences, coding regions, genomic sequences, expressed sequence tags (ESTs, domain architecture and scientific literature is provided for each family. Conclusion We have created lists of putatively complete sets of transcription factors and other transcriptional regulators for five plant genomes. They are publicly available through http://plntfdb.bio.uni-potsdam.de. Further data will be

  13. The structural gene for a phosphorus-repressible phosphate permease in Neurospora crassa can complement a mutation in positive regulatory gene nuc-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, B J; Akins, R A; Lambowitz, A M; Metzenberg, R L

    1988-03-01

    van+, a gene encoding a phosphorus-repressible phosphate permease, was isolated by its ability to complement nuc-1, a positive regulatory locus that normally regulates van+ expression. This was unexpected because the nuc-1 host already contained a resident van+ gene. Plasmids carrying van+ complemented a nuc-2 mutation as well. Probing of RNA from untransformed wild-type (nuc-1+) and constitutive (nuc-1c) strains by van+ probes indicated that levels of the van+ transcript were subject to control by nuc-1+. Probing of the same RNAs with a cosmid clone, containing approximately 15 kilobases of upstream and downstream DNA, revealed no other detectable phosphorus-regulated transcripts within this 40-kilobase region of the chromosome.

  14. KAYAK-α modulates circadian transcriptional feedback loops in Drosophila pacemaker neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ling, Jinli; Dubruille, Raphaëlle; Emery, Patrick

    2012-11-21

    Circadian rhythms are generated by well-conserved interlocked transcriptional feedback loops in animals. In Drosophila, the dimeric transcription factor CLOCK/CYCLE (CLK/CYC) promotes period (per), timeless (tim), vrille (vri), and PAR-domain protein 1 (Pdp1) transcription. PER and TIM negatively feed back on CLK/CYC transcriptional activity, whereas VRI and PDP1 negatively and positively regulate Clk transcription, respectively. Here, we show that the α isoform of the Drosophila FOS homolog KAYAK (KAY) is required for normal circadian behavior. KAY-α downregulation in circadian pacemaker neurons increases period length by 1.5 h. This behavioral phenotype is correlated with decreased expression of several circadian proteins. The strongest effects are on CLK and the neuropeptide PIGMENT DISPERSING FACTOR, which are both under VRI and PDP1 control. Consistently, KAY-α can bind to VRI and inhibit its interaction with the Clk promoter. Interestingly, KAY-α can also repress CLK activity. Hence, in flies with low KAY-α levels, CLK derepression would partially compensate for increased VRI repression, thus attenuating the consequences of KAY-α downregulation on CLK targets. We propose that the double role of KAY-α in the two transcriptional loops controlling Drosophila circadian behavior brings precision and stability to their oscillations.

  15. Transcriptional Networks Controlled by NKX2-1 in the Development of Forebrain GABAergic Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandberg, Magnus; Flandin, Pierre; Silberberg, Shanni; Su-Feher, Linda; Price, James D; Hu, Jia Sheng; Kim, Carol; Visel, Axel; Nord, Alex S; Rubenstein, John L R

    2016-09-21

    The embryonic basal ganglia generates multiple projection neurons and interneuron subtypes from distinct progenitor domains. Combinatorial interactions of transcription factors and chromatin are thought to regulate gene expression. In the medial ganglionic eminence, the NKX2-1 transcription factor controls regional identity and, with LHX6, is necessary to specify pallidal projection neurons and forebrain interneurons. Here, we dissected the molecular functions of NKX2-1 by defining its chromosomal binding, regulation of gene expression, and epigenetic state. NKX2-1 binding at distal regulatory elements led to a repressed epigenetic state and transcriptional repression in the ventricular zone. Conversely, NKX2-1 is required to establish a permissive chromatin state and transcriptional activation in the sub-ventricular and mantle zones. Moreover, combinatorial binding of NKX2-1 and LHX6 promotes transcriptionally permissive chromatin and activates genes expressed in cortical migrating interneurons. Our integrated approach provides a foundation for elucidating transcriptional networks guiding the development of the MGE and its descendants.

  16. DNA Topoisomerases maintain promoters in a state competent for transcriptional activation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

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    Jakob Madsen Pedersen

    Full Text Available To investigate the role of DNA topoisomerases in transcription, we have studied global gene expression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells deficient for topoisomerases I and II and performed single-gene analyses to support our findings. The genome-wide studies show a general transcriptional down-regulation upon lack of the enzymes, which correlates with gene activity but not gene length. Furthermore, our data reveal a distinct subclass of genes with a strong requirement for topoisomerases. These genes are characterized by high transcriptional plasticity, chromatin regulation, TATA box presence, and enrichment of a nucleosome at a critical position in the promoter region, in line with a repressible/inducible mode of regulation. Single-gene studies with a range of genes belonging to this group demonstrate that topoisomerases play an important role during activation of these genes. Subsequent in-depth analysis of the inducible PHO5 gene reveals that topoisomerases are essential for binding of the Pho4p transcription factor to the PHO5 promoter, which is required for promoter nucleosome removal during activation. In contrast, topoisomerases are dispensable for constitutive transcription initiation and elongation of PHO5, as well as the nuclear entrance of Pho4p. Finally, we provide evidence that topoisomerases are required to maintain the PHO5 promoter in a superhelical state, which is competent for proper activation. In conclusion, our results reveal a hitherto unknown function of topoisomerases during transcriptional activation of genes with a repressible/inducible mode of regulation.

  17. The role of promoter cis-element, mRNA capping, and ROS in the repression and salt-inducible expression of AtSOT12 in Arabidopsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinhua eChen

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Inducible gene expression is a gene regulatory mechanism central to plant response to environmental cues. The inducible genes are often repressed under normal growth conditions while their expression levels are significantly elevated by conditions such as abiotic stresses. Induction of gene expression requires both cis-acting DNA elements and trans-acting proteins that are modulated through signal transduction pathways. Here we report several molecular events that affect salt induced expression of the Arabidopsis AtSOT12 gene. Promoter deletion analysis revealed that DNA elements residing in the 5’ UTR are required for the salt induced expression of AtSOT12. Cytosine methylation in the promoter was low and salt stress slightly increased the DNA methylation level, suggesting that DNA methylation may not contribute to AtSOT12 gene repression. Co-transcriptional processing of AtSOT12 mRNA including capping and polyadenylation site selection was also affected by salt stress. The percentage of capped mRNA increased by salt treatment, and the polyadenylation sites were significantly different before and after exposure to salt stress. The expression level of AtSOT12 under normal growth conditions was markedly higher in the oxi1 mutant defective of ROS signaling than in the wild type. Moreover, AtSOT12 transcript level was elevated by treatments with DPI and DMTU, two chemicals preventing reactive oxygen species (ROS accumulation. These results suggest that repression of AtSOT12 expression may require physiological level of ROS and ROS signaling.

  18. Strong Suppression of Systemic Acquired Resistance in Arabidopsis by NRR is Dependent on its Ability to Interact with NPR1and its Putative Repression Domain

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mawsheng Chern; Patrick E. Canlas; Pamela C. Ronald

    2008-01-01

    Systemic Acquired Resistance (SAR) in plants confers lasting broad-spectrum resistance to pathogens and requires the phytohormone salicylic acid (SA). Arabidopsis NPR1/NIM1 is a key regulator of the SAR response. Studies attempting to reveal the function of NPR1 and how it mediates SA signaling have led to isolation of two classes of proteins that interact with NPRI: the first class includes rice NRR, Arabidopsis NIMIN1, NIMIN2, and NIMIN3, and tobacco NIMIN2-1ike proteins; the second class belongs to TGA transcription factors. We have previously shown that overexpression of NRR in rice suppresses both basal and Xa21-mediated resistance. In order to test whether NRR affects SA-induced, NPRl-mediated SAR, we have transformed Arabidopsis with the rice NRR gene and tested its effects on the defense response. Expression of NRR in Arabidopsis results in suppression of PR gene induction by SAR inducer and resistance to pathogens. These phenotypes are even more severe than those of the nprl- 1 mutant. The ability of NRR to suppress PR gene induction and disease resistance is correlated with its ability to bind to NPR1 because two point mutations in NRR, which reduce NPR1 binding, fail to suppress NPR1. In contrast, wild-type and a mutant NRR, which still binds to NPR1 strongly, retain the ability to suppress the SAR response. Replacing the C-terminal 79 amino acids of NRR with the VP16 activation domain turns the fusion protein into a transcriptional co-activator. These results indicate that NRR binds to NPR1 in vivo in a protein complex to inhibit transcriptional activation of PR genes and that NRR contains a transcription repression domain for active repression.

  19. Transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational regulations of gene expression during leaf polarity formation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lin Xu; Li Yang; Hai Huang

    2007-01-01

    Leaf morphogenesis requires the establishment of adaxial-abaxial polarity after primordium initiation from the shoot apical meristem (SAM). Several families of transcription factors are known to play critical roles in promoting adaxial or abaxial leaf fate. Recently, post-transcriptional gene silencing pathways have been shown to regulate the establishment of leaf polarity, providing novel and exciting insights into leaf development. For example, microRNAs (miR165/166)and a trans-acting siRNA (TAS3-derived tasiR-ARF) have been shown to repress the expression of several key transcription factor genes. In addition, yet another level of regulation, post-translational regulation, has been revealed recently by studies on the role of the 26S proteasome in leaf polarity. Although our understanding regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying establishment of adaxial-abaxial polarity has greatly improved, there is still much that remains elusive.This review aims to discuss recent progress, as well as the remaining questions, regarding the molecular mechanisms underlying leaf polarity formation.

  20. Extremadura: Behind the material traces of Franco’s repression

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    Muñoz Encinar, Laura

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available After the failed coup d’état of July 17th, 1936 and after the start of the Spanish Civil War that followed it, rebels carried out a repressive strategy based on the execution of thousands of people as a key tool of social control. The socialization of fear and terror through humiliation, killing and disappearance would become the main strategy employed throughout the war and the post-war period. In this context, perpetrators would exercise repressive practices on victims and their bodies. As a result, countless mass graves were opened in order to hide the bodies of victims. In the region of Extremadura, these mass graves have been investigated through the application of archeology and physical anthropology as disciplines of research and historical knowledge production. The exhumations, have given us a diachronic point of view of the repressive strategies developed, associated with different contexts between 1936 and 1946. Analyses of mass executions linked to rebels’ occupation of territories in this region, systematic rearguard killings in occupied areas, elimination procedures carried out in concentration camps and prisons and the fight against the armed guerrilla during the dictatorship, are the main contributions of this article.Tras el fracaso del golpe de Estado del 17 de julio de 1936 y el inicio de la Guerra Civil en España, se llevó a cabo, por parte de los sublevados, una estrategia represiva basada en la ejecución de miles de personas como principal herramienta de control social. La socialización del miedo y el terror a través de las vejaciones, ejecuciones y desapariciones será la principal estrategia utilizada, donde el uso de las víctimas y los cuerpos formará también parte de las prácticas represivas ideadas por los perpetradores. Como consecuencia, se abrieron incontables fosas comunes con el objetivo de ocultar los cadáveres de los represaliados. Estas fosas han sido investigadas en la Comunidad Autónoma de

  1. QapR (PA5506) represses an operon that negatively affects the Pseudomonas quinolone signal in Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tipton, Kyle A; Coleman, James P; Pesci, Everett C

    2013-08-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa is a Gram-negative, opportunistic pathogen that can cause disease in varied sites within the human body and is a significant source of morbidity and mortality in those afflicted with cystic fibrosis. P. aeruginosa is able to coordinate group behaviors, such as virulence factor production, through the process of cell-to-cell signaling. There are three intercellular signaling systems employed by P. aeruginosa, and one of these systems utilizes the small molecule 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (Pseudomonas quinolone signal [PQS]). PQS is required for virulence in multiple infection models and has been found in the lungs of cystic fibrosis patients colonized by P. aeruginosa. In this study, we have identified an RpiR family transcriptional regulator, QapR, which is an autoregulatory repressor. We found that mutation of qapR caused overexpression of the qapR operon. We characterized the qapR operon to show that it contains genes qapR, PA5507, PA5508, and PA5509 and that QapR directly controls the transcription of these genes in a negative manner. We also show that derepression of this operon greatly reduces PQS concentration in P. aeruginosa. Our results suggest that qapR affects PQS concentration by repressing an enzymatic pathway that acts on PQS or a PQS precursor to lower the PQS concentration. We believe that this operon comprises a novel mechanism to regulate PQS concentration in P. aeruginosa.

  2. AATF/Che-1 acts as a phosphorylation-dependent molecular modulator to repress p53-driven apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Höpker, Katja; Hagmann, Henning; Khurshid, Safiya; Chen, Shuhua; Hasskamp, Pia; Seeger-Nukpezah, Tamina; Schilberg, Katharina; Heukamp, Lukas; Lamkemeyer, Tobias; Sos, Martin L; Thomas, Roman K; Lowery, Drew; Roels, Frederik; Fischer, Matthias; Liebau, Max C; Resch, Ulrike; Kisner, Tülay; Röther, Fabian; Bartram, Malte P; Müller, Roman Ulrich; Fabretti, Francesca; Kurschat, Peter; Schumacher, Björn; Gaestel, Matthias; Medema, René H; Yaffe, Michael B; Schermer, Bernhard; Reinhardt, H Christian; Benzing, Thomas

    2012-10-17

    Following genotoxic stress, cells activate a complex signalling network to arrest the cell cycle and initiate DNA repair or apoptosis. The tumour suppressor p53 lies at the heart of this DNA damage response. However, it remains incompletely understood, which signalling molecules dictate the choice between these different cellular outcomes. Here, we identify the transcriptional regulator apoptosis-antagonizing transcription factor (AATF)/Che-1 as a critical regulator of the cellular outcome of the p53 response. Upon genotoxic stress, AATF is phosphorylated by the checkpoint kinase MK2. Phosphorylation results in the release of AATF from cytoplasmic MRLC3 and subsequent nuclear translocation where AATF binds to the PUMA, BAX and BAK promoter regions to repress p53-driven expression of these pro-apoptotic genes. In xenograft experiments, mice exhibit a dramatically enhanced response of AATF-depleted tumours following genotoxic chemotherapy with adriamycin. The exogenous expression of a phospho-mimicking AATF point mutant results in marked adriamycin resistance in vivo. Nuclear AATF enrichment appears to be selected for in p53-proficient endometrial cancers. Furthermore, focal copy number gains at the AATF locus in neuroblastoma, which is known to be almost exclusively p53-proficient, correlate with an adverse prognosis and reduced overall survival. These data identify the p38/MK2/AATF signalling module as a critical repressor of p53-driven apoptosis and commend this pathway as a target for DNA damage-sensitizing therapeutic regimens.

  3. The MogR Transcriptional Repressor Regulates Nonhierarchal Expression of Flagellar Motility Genes and Virulence in Listeria monocytogenes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Flagella are surface structures critical for motility and virulence of many bacterial species. In Listeria monocytogenes, MogR tightly represses expression of flagellin (FlaA during extracellular growth at 37 degrees C and during intracellular infection. MogR is also required for full virulence in a murine model of infection. Using in vitro and in vivo infection models, we determined that the severe virulence defect of MogR-negative bacteria is due to overexpression of FlaA. Specifically, overproduction of FlaA in MogR-negative bacteria caused pleiotropic defects in bacterial division (chaining phenotype, intracellular spread, and virulence in mice. DNA binding and microarray analyses revealed that MogR represses transcription of all known flagellar motility genes by binding directly to a minimum of two TTTT-N(5-AAAA recognition sites positioned within promoter regions such that RNA polymerase binding is occluded. Analysis of MogR protein levels demonstrated that modulation of MogR repression activity confers the temperature-specificity to flagellar motility gene expression. Epistasis analysis revealed that MogR repression of transcription is antagonized in a temperature-dependent manner by the DegU response regulator and that DegU further regulates FlaA levels through a posttranscriptional mechanism. These studies provide the first known example to our knowledge of a transcriptional repressor functioning as a master regulator controlling nonhierarchal expression of flagellar motility genes.

  4. Regulatory Interactions of Csr Components: the RNA Binding Protein CsrA Activates csrB Transcription in Escherichia coli

    OpenAIRE

    Gudapaty, Seshagirirao; Suzuki, Kazushi; Wang, Xin; Babitzke, Paul; Romeo, Tony

    2002-01-01

    The global regulator CsrA (carbon storage regulator) of Escherichia coli is a small RNA binding protein that represses various metabolic pathways and processes that are induced in the stationary phase of growth, while it activates certain exponential phase functions. Both repression and activation by CsrA involve posttranscriptional mechanisms, in which CsrA binding to mRNA leads to decreased or increased transcript stability, respectively. CsrA also binds to a small untranslated RNA, CsrB, f...

  5. Mapping Yeast Transcriptional Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Timothy R; de Boer, Carl G.

    2013-01-01

    The term “transcriptional network” refers to the mechanism(s) that underlies coordinated expression of genes, typically involving transcription factors (TFs) binding to the promoters of multiple genes, and individual genes controlled by multiple TFs. A multitude of studies in the last two decades have aimed to map and characterize transcriptional networks in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We review the methodologies and accomplishments of these studies, as well as challenges we now face....

  6. Long non-coding RNA-mediated transcriptional interference of a permease gene confers drug tolerance in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ard, Ryan; Tong, Pin; Allshire, Robin C

    2014-11-27

    Most long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) encoded by eukaryotic genomes remain uncharacterized. Here we focus on a set of intergenic lncRNAs in fission yeast. Deleting one of these lncRNAs exhibited a clear phenotype: drug sensitivity. Detailed analyses of the affected locus revealed that transcription of the nc-tgp1 lncRNA regulates drug tolerance by repressing the adjacent phosphate-responsive permease gene transporter for glycerophosphodiester 1 (tgp1(+)). We demonstrate that the act of transcribing nc-tgp1 over the tgp1(+) promoter increases nucleosome density, prevents transcription factor access and thus represses tgp1(+) without the need for RNA interference or heterochromatin components. We therefore conclude that tgp1(+) is regulated by transcriptional interference. Accordingly, decreased nc-tgp1 transcription permits tgp1(+) expression upon phosphate starvation. Furthermore, nc-tgp1 loss induces tgp1(+) even in repressive conditions. Notably, drug sensitivity results directly from tgp1(+) expression in the absence of the nc-tgp1 RNA. Thus, transcription of an lncRNA governs drug tolerance in fission yeast.

  7. HCV core protein represses the apoptosis and improves the autophagy of human hepatocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Changhong; Qu, Aihua; Han, Xiaochun; Wang, Yiguo

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aims to investigate the influence on human hepatocytes apoptosis and autophagy by the hepatitis C virus (HCV) core protein. Methods: QSG-7701, a human-derived non-neoplastic liver cell line, was transfected with PIRES-core vector that was a eukaryotic vector to express HCV core protein. Fluorescence microscope was used to observe the changes of nuclei in apoptosis cells by Annex in V-FITC/PI double staining. Flow cytometry was applied to detect the rate of cell apoptosis. Western blotting was used to detect the expression of HCV core protein, transcription factor nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB), autophagic biomarker microtubule associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3), and Beclin-1. Results: The apoptosis rate was significantly lower (P < 0.05) in QSG7701/core group (transfected with PIRES-core vector, (1.34±0.07)%) than in QSG7701 group (no transfection, (2.35±0.11)%) and in QSG7701 QSG7701/pcDNA3.1 group (transfected with pcDNA3.1 vector, (2.58±0.1)%). NF-κB expression was up-expressed in QSG7701/core group than in QSG7701/pcDNA3.1 group and QSG7701 group (P < 0.05). LC3-II expression and Beclin-1 expression was significant higher in QSG7701/core group than in the QSG7701/pcDNA3.1 group and QSG7701 group (P < 0.05). Conclusion: HCV core protein can repress the apoptosis and improve the autophagy of QSG7701 through up-regulating NF-κB and Beclin-1 expression. PMID:26629077

  8. Stochastic de-repression of Rhodopsins in single photoreceptors of the fly retina.

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    Pranidhi Sood

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The photoreceptors of the Drosophila compound eye are a classical model for studying cell fate specification. Photoreceptors (PRs are organized in bundles of eight cells with two major types - inner PRs involved in color vision and outer PRs involved in motion detection. In wild type flies, most PRs express a single type of Rhodopsin (Rh: inner PRs express either Rh3, Rh4, Rh5 or Rh6 and outer PRs express Rh1. In outer PRs, the K(50 homeodomain protein Dve is a key repressor that acts to ensure exclusive Rh expression. Loss of Dve results in de-repression of Rhodopsins in outer PRs, and leads to a wide distribution of expression levels. To quantify these effects, we introduce an automated image analysis method to measure Rhodopsin levels at the single cell level in 3D confocal stacks. Our sensitive methodology reveals cell-specific differences in Rhodopsin distributions among the outer PRs, observed over a developmental time course. We show that Rhodopsin distributions are consistent with a two-state model of gene expression, in which cells can be in either high or basal states of Rhodopsin production. Our model identifies a significant role of post-transcriptional regulation in establishing the two distinct states. The timescale for interconversion between basal and high states is shown to be on the order of days. Our results indicate that even in the absence of Dve, the Rhodopsin regulatory network can maintain highly stable states. We propose that the role of Dve in outer PRs is to buffer against rare fluctuations in this network.

  9. Repression of the Auxin Response Pathway Increases Arabidopsis Susceptibility to Necrotrophic Fungi

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Francisco Llorente; Paul Muskett; Andrea Sánchez-Vallet; Gemma López; Brisa Ramos; Clara Sánchez-Rodríguez; Lucia Jordá; Jane Parker; Antonio Molina

    2008-01-01

    In plants, resistance to necrotrophic pathogens depends on the interplay between different hormone systems, such as those regulated by salicylic acid (SA), jasmonic acid (JA), ethylene, and abscisic acid. Repression of auxin signaling by the SA pathway was recently shown to contribute to antibacterial resistance. Here, we demonstrate that Arabidopsis auxin signaling mutants axrl, axr2, and axr6 that have defects in the auxin-stimulated SCF (Skpl-Cullin-F-box) ubiquitination pathway exhibit increased susceptibility to the necrotrophic fungi Plectosphaerella cucumerina and Botrytis cinerea. Also, stabilization of the auxin transcriptional repressor AXR3 that is normally targeted for removal by the SCF-ubiquitin/proteasome machinery occurs upon P. cucumerina infection. Pharmacological inhibition of auxin transport or proteasome function each compromise necrotroph resistance of wild-type plants to a similar extent as in non-treated auxin response mutants. These results suggest that auxin signaling is important for resistance to the necrotrophic fungi P. cucumerina and B. cinerea. SGTlb (one of two Arabidopsis SGT1 genes encoding HSP90/HSC70 co-chaperones) promotes the functions of SCF E3-ubiquitin ligase complexes in auxin and JA responses and resistance conditioned by certain Resistance (R) genes to biotrophic pathogens. We find that sgtlb mutants are as resistant to P. cucumerina as wild-type plants. Conversely, auxin/SCF signaling mutants are uncompromised in RPP4-triggered resistance to the obligate biotrophic oomycete, Hyaloperonospora parasitica. Thus, the predominant action of SGTlb in R gene-conditioned resistance to oomycetes appears to be at a site other than assisting SCF E3-ubiquitin ligases. However, genetic additivity of sgtlb axr1 double mutants in susceptibility to H. parasitica suggests that SCF-mediated ubiquitination contributes to limiting biotrophic pathogen colonization once plant-pathogen compatibility is established.

  10. Efficient Gene Induction and Endogenous Gene Repression Systems for the Filamentous Cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Higo, Akiyoshi; Isu, Atsuko; Fukaya, Yuki; Hisabori, Toru

    2016-02-01

    In the last decade, many studies have been conducted to employ genetically engineered cyanobacteria in the production of various metabolites. However, the lack of a strict gene regulation system in cyanobacteria has hampered these attempts. The filamentous cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. PCC 7120 performs both nitrogen and carbon fixation and is, therefore, a good candidate organism for such production. To employ Anabaena cells for this purpose, we intended to develop artificial gene regulation systems to alter the cell metabolic pathways efficiently. We introduced into Anabaena a transcriptional repressor TetR, widely used in diverse organisms, and green fluorescent protein (GFP) as a reporter. We found that anhydrotetracycline (aTc) substantially induced GFP fluorescence in a concentration-dependent manner. By expressing tetR under the nitrate-specific promoter nirA, we successfully reduced the concentration of aTc required for the induction of gfp under nitrogen fixation conditions (to 10% of the concentration needed under nitrate-replete conditions). Further, we succeeded in the overexpression of GFP by depletion of nitrate without the inducer by means of promoter engineering of the nirA promoter. Moreover, we applied these gene regulation systems to a metabolic enzyme in Anabaena and successfully repressed glnA, the gene encoding glutamine synthetase that is essential for nitrogen assimilation in cyanobacteria, by expressing the small antisense RNA for glnA. Consequently, the ammonium production of an ammonium-excreting Anabaena mutant was significantly enhanced. We therefore conclude that the gene regulation systems developed in this study are useful tools for the regulation of metabolic enzymes and will help to increase the production of desired substances in Anabaena.

  11. Post-transcriptional regulation of gene PA5507 controls PQS concentration in Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    OpenAIRE

    Tipton, Kyle A.; Coleman, James P.; Pesci, Everett C.

    2015-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa can sense and respond to a myriad of environmental signals and utilizes a system of small molecules to communicate through intercellular signaling. The small molecule 2-heptyl-3-hydroxy-4-quinolone (Pseudomonas Quinolone Signal [PQS]) is one of these signals and its synthesis is important for virulence. Previously, we identified an RpiR-type transcriptional regulator, QapR, that positively affects PQS production by repressing the qapR operon. An in-frame deletion of thi...

  12. Massively Systematic Transcript End Readout (MASTER): Transcription Start Site Selection, Transcriptional Slippage, and Transcript Yields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vvedenskaya, Irina O.; Zhang, Yuanchao; Goldman, Seth R.; Valenti, Anna; Visone, Valeria; Taylor, Deanne M.; Ebright, Richard H.; Nickels, Bryce E.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY We report the development of a next-generation sequencing-based technology that entails construction of a DNA library comprising up to at least 47 (~16,000) bar-coded sequences, production of RNA transcripts, and analysis of transcript ends and transcript yields ("massively systematic transcript end readout," MASTER). Using MASTER, we define full inventories of transcription start sites ("TSSomes") of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase for initiation at a consensus core promoter in vitro and in vivo, we define the TSS-region DNA-sequence determinants for TSS selection, reiterative initiation ("slippage synthesis"), and transcript yield, and we define effects of DNA topology and NTP concentration. The results reveal that slippage synthesis occurs from the majority of TSS-region DNA sequences and that TSS-region DNA sequences have profound, up to 100-fold, effects on transcript yield. The results further reveal that TSSomes depend on DNA topology, consistent with the proposal that TSS selection involves transcription-bubble expansion ("scrunching") and transcription-bubble contraction ("anti-scrunching"). PMID:26626484

  13. Massively Systematic Transcript End Readout, "MASTER": Transcription Start Site Selection, Transcriptional Slippage, and Transcript Yields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vvedenskaya, Irina O; Zhang, Yuanchao; Goldman, Seth R; Valenti, Anna; Visone, Valeria; Taylor, Deanne M; Ebright, Richard H; Nickels, Bryce E

    2015-12-17

    We report the development of a next-generation sequencing-based technology that entails construction of a DNA library comprising up to at least 4(7) (∼ 16,000) barcoded sequences, production of RNA transcripts, and analysis of transcript ends and transcript yields (massively systematic transcript end readout, "MASTER"). Using MASTER, we define full inventories of transcription start sites ("TSSomes") of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase for initiation at a consensus core promoter in vitro and in vivo; we define the TSS-region DNA sequence determinants for TSS selection, reiterative initiation ("slippage synthesis"), and transcript yield; and we define effects of DNA topology and NTP concentration. The results reveal that slippage synthesis occurs from the majority of TSS-region DNA sequences and that TSS-region DNA sequences have profound, up to 100-fold, effects on transcript yield. The results further reveal that TSSomes depend on DNA topology, consistent with the proposal that TSS selection involves transcription-bubble expansion ("scrunching") and transcription-bubble contraction ("anti-scrunching").

  14. A Nonnatural Transcriptional Coactivator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyanguile, Origene; Uesugi, Motonari; Austin, David J.; Verdine, Gregory L.

    1997-12-01

    In eukaryotes, sequence-specific DNA-binding proteins activate gene expression by recruiting the transcriptional apparatus and chromatin remodeling proteins to the promoter through protein-protein contacts. In many instances, the connection between DNA-binding proteins and the transcriptional apparatus is established through the intermediacy of adapter proteins known as coactivators. Here we describe synthetic molecules with low molecular weight that act as transcriptional coactivators. We demonstrate that a completely nonnatural activation domain in one such molecule is capable of stimulating transcription in vitro and in vivo. The present strategy provides a means of gaining external control over gene activation through intervention using small molecules.

  15. Repressed synthesis of ribosomal proteins generates protein-specific cell cycle and morphological phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thapa, Mamata; Bommakanti, Ananth; Shamsuzzaman, Md; Gregory, Brian; Samsel, Leigh; Zengel, Janice M; Lindahl, Lasse

    2013-12-01

    The biogenesis of ribosomes is coordinated with cell growth and proliferation. Distortion of the coordinated synthesis of ribosomal components affects not only ribosome formation, but also cell fate. However, the connection between ribosome biogenesis and cell fate is not well understood. To establish a model system for inquirie