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Sample records for brittle crack propagation

  1. Dynamic Initiation and Propagation of Multiple Cracks in Brittle Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaodan Ren

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Brittle materials such as rock and ceramic usually exhibit apparent increases of strength and toughness when subjected to dynamic loading. The reasons for this phenomenon are not yet well understood, although a number of hypotheses have been proposed. Based on dynamic fracture mechanics, the present work offers an alternate insight into the dynamic behaviors of brittle materials. Firstly, a single crack subjected to stress wave excitations is investigated to obtain the dynamic crack-tip stress field and the dynamic stress intensity factor. Second, based on the analysis of dynamic stress intensity factor, the fracture initiation sizes and crack size distribution under different loading rates are obtained, and the power law with the exponent of −2/3 is derived to describe the fracture initiation size. Third, with the help of the energy balance concept, the dynamic increase of material strength is directly derived based on the proposed multiple crack evolving criterion. Finally, the model prediction is compared with the dynamic impact experiments, and the model results agree well with the experimentally measured dynamic increasing factor (DIF.

  2. Experimental Evaluation of Brittle Crack Propagation Velocity - an Improved Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Debel, Christian

    1979-01-01

    A short review of experimental methods currently used in evaluating the velocity of fast crack extension is given. The technique of applying a surface deposited grid gauge has been innovated. This new technique involves a grid produced by a photo-chemical method and an electronic registration cir...... circuit based on integrated transistor-transistor logic. This new method has been applied to experimental studies of brittle crack extension in steel at temperatures between −115 and +22°C.......A short review of experimental methods currently used in evaluating the velocity of fast crack extension is given. The technique of applying a surface deposited grid gauge has been innovated. This new technique involves a grid produced by a photo-chemical method and an electronic registration...

  3. Limiting speed and dynamic instability of crack propagation in a phase-field model of mode III brittle fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karma, Alain; Lobkovsky, Alexander

    2003-03-01

    We present the results of numerical simulations of a continuum phase-field model of mode III brittle fracture that incorporates self-consistently both macroscopic linear elasticity and nonlinear bond-breaking inside a microscopic process zone. This model reproduces basic features of the dynamic instability of fast moving cracks. Simulations in a strip geometry with constant displacement at the edges reveal the existence of three distinct dynamical regimes with increasing load: (i) straight steady-state crack propagation without tip oscillations, (ii) straight propagation with tip oscillations of increasing degree of complexity, and (iii) tip-splitting leading to crack branching. The onset speed of branching is shown to be independent of the characteristic time of energy dissipation inside the process zone in the inertia-dominated regime where this time is comparable or shorter than the time for waves to cross this zone. In contrast, this onset speed depends on the ratio of a microscopic capillary length proportional to the surface energy and the process zone size, with the trend that tougher cracks branch at a larger speed. We test the validity of the standard continuum theory of brittle fracture, which assumes that the stored elastic energy is consumed entirely inside the process zone and that the crack speed is uniquely determined by the macroscopic energy flow rate to the tip.

  4. Fracture mechanical modeling of brittle crack propagation and arrest of steel. 3. Application to duplex-type test; Kozai no zeisei kiretsu denpa teisi no rikigaku model. 3. Konseigata shiken eno tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aihara, S.; Tsuchida, Y. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Machida, S.; Yoshinari, H. [The University of Tokyo, Tokyo (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1996-12-31

    A proposal was made previously on a model of brittle crack propagation and arrest that considers the effect of crack opening suppression by using unbroken ligaments generated on steel plate surface and the effect that cracks precede in the central part of the plate thickness, based on a local limit stress theory for brittleness fracture. This paper discusses applicability of this model to a mixed type test, and elucidates causes for difference in the arrest tenacity of both types in a double tensile test of the standard size. The brittle crack propagation and arrest model based on the local limit stress theory was found applicable to a simulation of the mixed type test. Experimental crack propagation speed history and behavior of the arrest were reproduced nearly completely by using this model. When load stress is increased, the arrests in the mixed type test may be classified into arrests of both inside the steel plate and near the surface, cracks in the former position or arrest in the latter position, and rush of cracks into both positions. Furthermore, at higher stresses, the propagation speed drops once after cracks rushed into the test plate, but turns to a rise, leading to propagation and piercing. 8 refs., 15 figs., 3 tabs.

  5. Crack Path Prediction in Anisotropic Brittle Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Vincent; Karma, Alain

    2005-12-01

    A force balance condition to predict quasistatic crack paths in anisotropic brittle materials is derived from an analysis of diffuse interface continuum models that describe both short-scale failure and macroscopic linear elasticity. The path is uniquely determined by the directional anisotropy of the fracture energy, independent of details of the failure process. The derivation exploits the gradient dynamics and translation symmetry properties of this class of models to define a generalized energy-momentum tensor whose integral around an arbitrary closed path enclosing the crack tip yields all forces acting on this tip, including Eshelby’s configurational forces, cohesive forces, and dissipative forces. Numerical simulations are in very good agreement with analytic predictions.

  6. Unsteady Crack Motion and Branching in a Phase-Field Model of Brittle Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karma, Alain; Lobkovsky, Alexander E.

    2004-06-01

    Crack propagation is studied numerically using a continuum phase-field approach to modeIII brittle fracture. The results shed light on the physics that controls the speed of accelerating cracks and the characteristic branching instability at a fraction of the wave speed.

  7. Crack propagation modeling using Peridynamic theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafezi, M. H.; Alebrahim, R.; Kundu, T.

    2016-04-01

    Crack propagation and branching are modeled using nonlocal peridynamic theory. One major advantage of this nonlocal theory based analysis tool is the unifying approach towards material behavior modeling - irrespective of whether the crack is formed in the material or not. No separate damage law is needed for crack initiation and propagation. This theory overcomes the weaknesses of existing continuum mechanics based numerical tools (e.g. FEM, XFEM etc.) for identifying fracture modes and does not require any simplifying assumptions. Cracks grow autonomously and not necessarily along a prescribed path. However, in some special situations such as in case of ductile fracture, the damage evolution and failure depend on parameters characterizing the local stress state instead of peridynamic damage modeling technique developed for brittle fracture. For brittle fracture modeling the bond is simply broken when the failure criterion is satisfied. This simulation helps us to design more reliable modeling tool for crack propagation and branching in both brittle and ductile materials. Peridynamic analysis has been found to be very demanding computationally, particularly for real-world structures (e.g. vehicles, aircrafts, etc.). It also requires a very expensive visualization process. The goal of this paper is to bring awareness to researchers the impact of this cutting-edge simulation tool for a better understanding of the cracked material response. A computer code has been developed to implement the peridynamic theory based modeling tool for two-dimensional analysis. A good agreement between our predictions and previously published results is observed. Some interesting new results that have not been reported earlier by others are also obtained and presented in this paper. The final objective of this investigation is to increase the mechanics knowledge of self-similar and self-affine cracks.

  8. Scaling properties of crack branching and brittle fragmentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uvarov S.

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The present study is focused on the correlation of scaling properties of crack branching and brittle fragmentation with damage accumulation and a change in the fracture mechanism. The experimental results obtained from the glass fragmentation tests indicate that the size distribution of fragments has a fractal character and is described by a power law.

  9. Nominally brittle cracks in inhomogeneous solids: From microstructural disorder to continuum-level scale

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    Jonathan eBarés

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available We analyze the intermittent dynamics of cracks in heterogeneous brittle materials and the roughness of the resulting fracture surfaces by investigating theoretically and numerically crack propagation in an elastic solid of spatially-distributed toughness. The crack motion split up into discrete jumps, avalanches, displaying scale-free statistical features characterized by universal exponents. Conversely, the ranges of scales are non-universal and the mean avalanche size and duration depend on the loading microstructure and specimen parameters according to scaling laws which are uncovered. The crack surfaces are found to be logarithmically rough. Their selection by the fracture parameters is formulated in term of scaling laws on the structure functions measured on one-dimensional roughness profiles taken parallel and perpendicular to the direction of crack growth.

  10. Crack propagation and arrest of structural steels and pipelines

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    Inoue, Takehiro

    2008-07-01

    Crack arrest of fast running cracks is an important issue for the safety of steel structures. Crack arrest design can prevent fatal damage of large structures by restricting the influence of the incidents. Therefore crack arrest design is important especially for very large structure, where accidents may cause huge economical and social losses. Propagating shear fracture, long running ductile crack propagation in pipelines and brittle crack propagation in heavy thick shipbuilding steels have been investigated. For the propagating shear fracture issue, a new HLP simulation model, applicable to various backfill conditions, including underwater backfill, was developed. The proposed backfill model can be applied to the prediction of the crack arrest of propagating shear fracture under various backfill conditions. The new HLP simulation was successful in estimating full-scale burst tests with various backfill depths. The new HLP simulation for underwater pipelines indicated that propagating shear cracks are easily arrested in offshore pipelines compared to onshore pipeline. The toughness requirement of the line pipe for preventing propagating shear fracture can be significantly smaller in underwater pipelines compared to onshore pipelines. The margin of the underwater pipeline for propagating shear fracture was clarified by the new model developed in this thesis. For brittle crack arrest, an empirical approach for long crack propagation has been conducted. Several large-scale crack arrest tests were carried out in order to investigate the long crack arrestability of heavy-thick shipbuilding steel plates. All plates and their welded joints used in this study satisfied the Charpy toughness requirement for EH-grade shipbuilding steels and welded joints. A brittle crack ran along a welded joint and penetrated through the test plate under a stress exceeding 200MPa, despite the presence of longitudinal stiffeners across the test weld. A brittle crack in a base plate model

  11. Phase field modeling of crack propagation

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    Spatschek, Robert; Brener, Efim; Karma, Alain

    2011-01-01

    Fracture is a fundamental mechanism of materials failure. Propagating cracks can exhibit a rich dynamical behavior controlled by a subtle interplay between microscopic failure processes in the crack tip region and macroscopic elasticity. We review recent approaches to understand crack dynamics using the phase field method. This method, developed originally for phase transformations, has the well-known advantage of avoiding explicit front tracking by making material interfaces spatially diffuse. In a fracture context, this method is able to capture both the short-scale physics of failure and macroscopic linear elasticity within a self-consistent set of equations that can be simulated on experimentally relevant length and time scales. We discuss the relevance of different models, which stem from continuum field descriptions of brittle materials and crystals, to address questions concerning crack path selection and branching instabilities, as well as models that are based on mesoscale concepts for crack tip scale selection. Open questions which may be addressed using phase field models of fracture are summarized.

  12. Fatigue crack propagation and cyclic deformation at a crack tip

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    Kang, T. S.; Liu, H. W.

    1974-01-01

    The fatigue crack propagation relation da/dN = f(R) Delta K squared can be derived with three assumptions: small-scale yielding, material homogeneity, and that crack tip stresses and strains are not strongly affected by plate thickness. The function f(R) is a constant at a given stress ratio, R. The effects of plate thickness and stress ratio on crack tip deformation and fatigue crack growth in 2024-T351 aluminum alloy were studied. High Delta K level in a thin specimen causes crack tip necking. Necking is more pronounced at high stress ratio. Necking causes high maximum strain near a crack tip and fast crack growth rate.

  13. Corrosion fatigue crack propagation in metals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    This review assesses fracture mechanics data and mechanistic models for corrosion fatigue crack propagation in structural alloys exposed to ambient temperature gases and electrolytes. Extensive stress intensity-crack growth rate data exist for ferrous, aluminum and nickel based alloys in a variety of environments. Interactive variables (viz., stress intensity range, mean stress, alloy composition and microstructure, loading frequency, temperature, gas pressure and electrode potential) strongly affect crack growth kinetics and complicate fatigue control. Mechanistic models to predict crack growth rates were formulated by coupling crack tip mechanics with occluded crack chemistry, and from both the hydrogen embrittlement and anodic dissolution/film rupture perspectives. Research is required to better define: (1) environmental effects near threshold and on crack closure; (2) damage tolerant life prediction codes and the validity of similitude; (3) the behavior of microcrack; (4) probes and improved models of crack tip damage; and (5) the cracking performance of advanced alloys and composites.

  14. Modelling of liquid sodium induced crack propagation in T91 martensitic steel: Competition with ductile fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hemery, Samuel [Institut PPRIME, CNRS, Université de Poitiers, ISAE ENSMA, UPR 3346, Téléport 2, 1 Avenue Clément Ader, BP 40109, 86961 Futuroscope Chasseneuil Cedex (France); Berdin, Clotilde, E-mail: clotilde.berdin@u-psud.fr [Univ Paris-Sud, SP2M-ICMMO, CNRS UMR 8182, F-91405 Orsay Cedex (France); Auger, Thierry; Bourhi, Mariem [Ecole Centrale-Supelec, MSSMat CNRS UMR 8579, F-92295 Chatenay Malabry Cedex (France)

    2016-12-01

    Liquid metal embrittlement (LME) of T91 steel is numerically modeled by the finite element method to analyse experimental results in an axisymmetric notched geometry. The behavior of the material is identified from tensile tests then a crack with a constant crack velocity is introduced using the node release technique in order to simulate the brittle crack induced by LME. A good agreement between the simulated and the experimental macroscopic behavior is found: this suggests that the assumption of a constant crack velocity is correct. Mechanical fields during the embrittlement process are then extracted from the results of the finite element model. An analysis of the crack initiation and propagation stages: the ductile fracture probably breaks off the LME induced brittle fracture. - Highlights: • T91 martensitic steel is embrittled by liquid sodium depending on the loading rate at 573 K. • The mechanical behavior is modeled by a von Mises elastic-plastic law. • The LME induced crack propagates at a constant velocity. • The mechanical state at the crack tip does not explain a brittle crack arrest. • The occurrence of the ductile fracture breaks off the brittle fracture.

  15. Quantity effect of radial cracks on the cracking propagation behavior and the crack morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jingjing; Xu, Jun; Liu, Bohan; Yao, Xuefeng; Li, Yibing

    2014-01-01

    In this letter, the quantity effect of radial cracks on the cracking propagation behavior as well as the circular crack generation on the impacted glass plate within the sandwiched glass sheets are experimentally investigated via high-speed photography system. Results show that the radial crack velocity on the backing glass layer decreases with the crack number under the same impact conditions during large quantities of repeated experiments. Thus, the "energy conversion factor" is suggested to elucidate the physical relation between the cracking number and the crack propagation speed. Besides, the number of radial crack also takes the determinative effect in the crack morphology of the impacted glass plate. This study may shed lights on understanding the cracking and propagation mechanism in laminated glass structures and provide useful tool to explore the impact information on the cracking debris.

  16. Molecular dynamics simulation of propagating cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mullins, M.

    1982-01-01

    Steady state crack propagation is investigated numerically using a model consisting of 236 free atoms in two (010) planes of bcc alpha iron. The continuum region is modeled using the finite element method with 175 nodes and 288 elements. The model shows clear (010) plane fracture to the edge of the discrete region at moderate loads. Analysis of the results obtained indicates that models of this type can provide realistic simulation of steady state crack propagation.

  17. Resistance to Crack Propagation of Algerian Wood

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    Abdelhakim DAOUI

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Wood is the most building materials widely used since prehistory for the construction of houses, tools, weapons. Accidents occurring during the use of materials caused by different defaults, as: knots, resin pockets, cracks. These various defaults and others are the starting point of the principle of crack mechanics. Our present work focuses on determining the resistance to crack propagation of three types of Algerians wood, (Aleppo pine, eucalyptus and oak, by calculating the energy release rate G (mode I. The estimation of factor G allows the possibility of fracture propagation.

  18. Crack deflection in brittle media with heterogeneous interfaces and its application in shale fracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Xiaguang; Wei, Yujie

    Driven by the rapid progress in exploiting unconventional energy resources such as shale gas, there is growing interest in hydraulic fracture of brittle yet heterogeneous shales. In particular, how hydraulic cracks interact with natural weak zones in sedimentary rocks to form permeable cracking networks is of significance in engineering practice. Such a process is typically influenced by crack deflection, material anisotropy, crack-surface friction, crustal stresses, and so on. In this work, we extend the He-Hutchinson theory (He and Hutchinson, 1989) to give the closed-form formulae of the strain energy release rate of a hydraulic crack with arbitrary angles with respect to the crustal stress. The critical conditions in which the hydraulic crack deflects into weak interfaces and exhibits a dependence on crack-surface friction and crustal stress anisotropy are given in explicit formulae. We reveal analytically that, with increasing pressure, hydraulic fracture in shales may sequentially undergo friction locking, mode II fracture, and mixed mode fracture. Mode II fracture dominates the hydraulic fracturing process and the impinging angle between the hydraulic crack and the weak interface is the determining factor that accounts for crack deflection; the lower friction coefficient between cracked planes and the greater crustal stress difference favor hydraulic fracturing. In addition to shale fracking, the analytical solution of crack deflection could be used in failure analysis of other brittle media.

  19. Interaction between cracking, delamination and buckling in brittle elastic thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vellinga, W. P.; Van den Bosch, M.; Geers, M. G. D.

    2008-01-01

    A discrete lattice based model for the interaction of cracking, delamination and buckling of brittle elastic coatings is presented. The model is unique in its simultaneous incorporation of the coating and of disorder in the interface and material properties, leading to realistic 3D bending (and

  20. Steady-state propagation of interface corner crack

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veluri, Badrinath; Jensen, Henrik Myhre

    2013-01-01

    Steady-state propagation of interface cracks close to three-dimensional corners has been analyzed. Attention was focused on modeling the shape of the interface crack front and calculating the critical stress for steady-state propagation of the crack. The crack propagation was investigated...... field (crack tip) solutions based on the J-integral. The adopted two-dimensional numerical approach for the calculation of fracture mechanical properties was compared with three-dimensional models for quarter-circular and straight sided crack front shapes. A quantitative approach was formulated based...... for propagation and the angle of intersection of the crack front with the free edge....

  1. Normalizing effect on fatigue crack propagation at the heat-affected zone of AISI 4140 steel shielded metal arc weldings

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    B. Vargas-Arista

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The fractography and mechanical behaviour of fatigue crack propagation in the heat-affected zone (HAZ of AISI 4140 steel welded using the shielded metal arc process was analysed. Different austenitic grain size was obtained by normalizing performed at 1200 °C for 5 and 10 hours after welding. Three point bending fatigue tests on pre-cracked specimens along the HAZ revealed that coarse grains promoted an increase in fatigue crack growth rate, hence causing a reduction in both fracture toughness and critical crack length, and a transgranular brittle final fracture with an area fraction of dimple zones connecting cleavage facets. A fractographic analysis proved that as the normalizing time increased the crack length decreased. The increase in the river patterns on the fatigue crack propagation in zone II was also evidenced and final brittle fracture because of transgranular quasicleavage was observed. Larger grains induced a deterioration of the fatigue resistance of the HAZ.

  2. Transgranular Crack Nucleation in Carrara Marble of Brittle Failure

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    Cheng, Yi; Wong, Louis Ngai Yuen; Maruvanchery, Varun

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the microcrack nucleation is of a fundamental importance in the study of rock fracturing process. Due to variations in texture and mineralogy, different rocks may show different distinctive microcrack nucleation mechanisms. In order to understand the microcrack nucleation mechanisms in Carrara marble comprehensively, localized damage zones are artificially produced by loading specimens containing an array of en-echelon flaws in this study. Then, representative samples were cut from those loaded specimens and prepared for optical observation. Four types of microcrack nucleation mechanisms leading to the formation of transgranular cracks have been identified in Carrara marble. Type I and II mechanisms are favored by the distinctive polygonal shape of the crystal grains in Carrara marble. Local tensile stress concentration in these two mechanisms is attributed to grain sliding and divergent normal contact force, respectively. Type III mechanism is associated with the gliding along twin lamellae. The resultant tensile stress concentration could nucleate microcracks within the grain containing these lamellae or in the grain boundary. No microcracks in the adjoining grains were observed in this study. Our statistical analysis suggests that type III mechanism favors the nucleation of new cracks which are nearly perpendicular to the gently inclined twin lamellae and thus have a small angle with the maximum loading direction (about 15°). Type IV mechanism operates in grains failed mainly due to compressive stress rather than tensile stress concentration. Sets of parallel microcracks of this mechanism seem to be related to the crystallographic planes of calcite. The microcracking results also suggest that most of the grain boundaries in damaged zone have been cracked at the loading about 80 % of the specimen strength, while transgranular cracks begin to occur at that time and flourish after about 90 % loading of the strength.

  3. Radiation efficiency during slow crack propagation: an experimental study.

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    Jestin, Camille; Lengliné, Olivier; Schmittbuhl, Jean

    2017-04-01

    Creeping faults are known to host a significant aseismic deformation. However, the observations of micro-earthquake activity related to creeping faults (e.g. San Andreas Faults, North Anatolian Fault) suggest the presence of strong lateral variabilities of the energy partitioning between radiated and fracture energies. The seismic over aseismic slip ratio is rather difficult to image over time and at depth because of observational limitations (spatial resolution, sufficiently broad band instruments, etc.). In this study, we aim to capture in great details the energy partitioning during the slow propagation of mode I fracture along a heterogeneous interface, where the toughness is strongly varying in space.We lead experiments at laboratory scale on a rock analog model (PMMA) enabling a precise monitoring of fracture pinning and depinning on local asperities in the brittle-creep regime. Indeed, optical imaging through the transparent material allows the high resolution description of the fracture front position and velocity during its propagation. At the same time, acoustic emissions are also measured by accelerometers positioned around the rupture. Combining acoustic records, measurements of the crack front position and the loading curve, we compute the total radiated energy and the fracture energy. We deduce from them the radiation efficiency, ηR, characterizing the proportion of the available energy that is radiated in form of seismic wave. We show an increase of ηR with the crack rupture speed computed for each of our experiments in the sub-critical crack propagation domain. Our experimental estimates of ηR are larger than the theoretical model proposed by Freund, stating that the radiation efficiency of crack propagation in homogeneous media is proportional to the crack velocity. Our results are demonstrated to be in agreement with existing studies which showed that the distribution of crack front velocity in a heterogeneous medium can be well described by a

  4. International Conference on Dynamic Crack Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    1973-01-01

    The planning meeting for a conference on Dynamic Crack Propagation was held at M.LT. in February 1971 and attended by research workers from several industrial, governmental and academic organizations. It was felt that a more specialized meeting would provide a better opportunity for both U.S. and foreign researchers to exchange their ideas and views on dynamic fracture, a subject which is seldom emphasized in national or international fracture conferences. Dynamic crack propagation has been a concern to specialists in many fields: continuum mechanics, metallurgy, geology, polymer chemistry, orthopedics, applied mathematics, as well as structural design and testing. It impinges on a wide variety of problems such as rock breaking and earthquakes, pressure vessels and line pipes, comminution and the per­ formance of armament and ordnance, etc. Advances have been numerous, covering theories and experiments from both the microscopic and macro­ scopic points of view. Hence, the need for comparing the theoretical ...

  5. Brittle crack arrestability of thick steel plate welds in large structure

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Gyu Baek; Park, Joon Sik

    2011-10-01

    Recently, there has been such a critical issue in shipbuilding industry that much larger and stronger ships are required to develop oil and gas in the Arctic region. Attention has been paid to obtaining high strength, good toughness at low temperature, and good weldability. An experimental study was performed to evaluate the brittle crack arrest toughness value (Kca) and brittle crack arrest method of welded joints using EH40 grade steel with a thickness of 80 mm. The test specimens were made by both flux cored arc welding (FCAW) and combined welding (EGW+FCAW) processes. Temperature gradient ESSO test was performed to measure the Kca of the base metal. Also, a constant temperature (-10 °C) ESSO test was performed to establish a brittle crack arrest method using high toughness welding consumable with real structural specimens. The research aims in this study were to investigate the effect of joint design and welding consumable for the crack arrestability of thick steel plates using EH40 grade shipbuilding steel of straight block joint weld line with two kinds of welding processes.

  6. Derivation of a general three-dimensional crack-propagation law: A generalization of the principle of local symmetry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hodgdon, Jennifer A.; Sethna, James P.

    1993-01-01

    We derive a general crack-propagation law for slow brittle cracking, in two and three dimensions, using discrete symmetries, gauge invariance, and gradient expansions. Our derivation provides explicit justification for the ‘‘principle of local symmetry,’’ which has been used extensively to describe...... two-dimensional crack growth, but goes beyond that principle to describe three-dimensional crack phenomena as well. We also find that there are materials properties needed to describe the growth of general cracks in three dimensions, besides the fracture toughness and elastic constants previously used...

  7. Theoretical and numerical studies of crack initiation and propagation in rock masses under freezing pressure and far-field stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongshui Kang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Water-bearing rocks exposed to freezing temperature can be subjected to freeze–thaw cycles leading to crack initiation and propagation, which are the main causes of frost damage to rocks. Based on the Griffith theory of brittle fracture mechanics, the crack initiation criterion, propagation direction, and crack length under freezing pressure and far-field stress are analyzed. Furthermore, a calculation method is proposed for the stress intensity factor (SIF of the crack tip under non-uniformly distributed freezing pressure. The formulae for the crack/fracture propagation direction and length of the wing crack under freezing pressure are obtained, and the mechanism for coalescence of adjacent cracks is investigated. In addition, the necessary conditions for different coalescence modes of cracks are studied. Using the topology theory, a new algorithm for frost crack propagation is proposed, which has the capability to define the crack growth path and identify and update the cracked elements. A model that incorporates multiple cracks is built by ANSYS and then imported into FLAC3D. The SIFs are then calculated using a FISH procedure, and the growth path of the freezing cracks after several calculation steps is demonstrated using the new algorithm. The proposed method can be applied to rocks containing fillings such as detritus and slurry.

  8. The fracture mechanics of fatigue crack propagation in compact bone.

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    Wright, T M; Hayes, W C

    1976-07-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to apply the techniques of fracture mechanics to a study of fatigue crack propagation in compact bone. Small cracks parallel to the long axis of the bone were initiated in standardized specimens of bovine bone. Crack growth was achieved by cyclically loading these specimens. The rate of crack growth was determined from measurements of crack length versus cycles of loading. The stress intensity factor at the tip of the crack was calculated from knowledge of the applied load, the crack length, and the specimen geometry. A strong correlation was found between the experimentally determined crack growth rate and the applied stress intensity. The relationship takes the form of a power law similar to that for other materials. Visual observation and scanning electron microscopy revealed that crack propagation occurred by initiation of subcritical cracks ahead of the main crack.

  9. Dislocation mechanism based model for stage II fatigue crack propagation rate

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    Mazumdar, P. K.

    1986-01-01

    Repeated plastic deformation, which of course depends on dislocation mechanism, at or near the crack tip leads to the fatigue crack propagation. By involving the theory of thermally activated flow and the cumulative plastic strain criterion, an effort is made here to model the stage II fatigue crack propagation rate in terms of the dislocation mechanism. The model, therefore, provides capability to ascertain: (1) the dislocation mechanism (and hence the near crack tip microstructures) assisting the crack growth, (2) the relative resistance of dislocation mechanisms to the crack growth, and (3) the fracture surface characteristics and its interpretation in terms of the dislocation mechanism. The local microstructure predicted for the room temperature crack growth in copper by this model is in good agreement with the experimental results taken from the literature. With regard to the relative stability of such dislocation mechanisms as the cross-slip and the dislocation intersection, the model suggests an enhancement of crack growth rate with an ease of cross-slip which in general promotes dislocation cell formation and is common in material which has high stacking fault energy (produces wavy slips). Cross-slip apparently enhances crack growth rate by promoting slip irreversibility and fracture surface brittleness to a greater degree.

  10. On the micromechanics of brittle fracture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jokl, M.L. (Barnwell Industries, Inc., Fairlawn, NJ (US)); Vitek, V.; McMahon, C.J. Jr. (Pennsylvania Univ., Philadelphia, PA (USA). Dept. of Materials Science and Engineering); Burgers, P. (Hibbitt, Karlsson and Sorensen, Providence, RI (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The response of a deformable solid, in which dislocations are assumed to be highly mobile, to the presence of a loaded crack has been examined, and two cases have been considered. In the first case, that of a crack which pre-exists at zero load, it was confirmed that dislocation emission from the crack tip always precludes brittle crack propagation. In the second case, a microcrack is injected into the loaded deformable solid, for example, due to the cracking of a brittle inclusion. In this case simultaneous dislocation emission and brittle crack propagation can occur, depending on the cohesive energy and the dislocation mobility. Both cases have been studied dynamically, assuming fast moving dislocations, and the effect of the presence of dislocations upon the crack-tip field was fully taken into account. The implications of these results for understanding the brittle-ductile transition and impurity-induced intergranular embrittlement are discussed.

  11. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Crack Propagation in Single-Crystal Aluminum Plate with Central Cracks

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    Jun Ding

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The crack propagation process in single-crystal aluminum plate (SCAP with central cracks under tensile load was simulated by molecular dynamics method. Further, the effects of model size, crack length, temperature, and strain rate on strength of SCAP and crack growth were comprehensively investigated. The results showed that, with the increase of the model size, crack length, and strain rate, the plastic yield point of SCAP occurred in advance, the limit stress of plastic yield decreased, and the plastic deformability of material increased, but the temperature had less effect and sensitivity on the strength and crack propagation of SCAP. The model size affected the plastic deformation and crack growth of the material. Specifically, at small scale, the plastic deformation and crack propagation in SCAP are mainly affected through dislocation multiplication and slip. However, the plastic deformation and crack propagation are obviously affected by dislocation multiplication and twinning in larger scale.

  12. Crack propagation through disordered materials as a depinning transition: A critical test of the theory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponson, Laurent; Pindra, Nadjime

    2017-05-01

    The dynamics of a planar crack propagating within a brittle disordered material is investigated numerically. The fracture front evolution is described as the depinning of an elastic line in a random field of toughness. The relevance of this approach is critically tested through the comparison of the roughness front properties, the statistics of avalanches, and the local crack velocity distribution with experimental results. Our simulations capture the main features of the fracture front evolution as measured experimentally. However, some experimental observations such as the velocity distribution are not consistent with the behavior of an elastic line close to the depinning transition. This discrepancy suggests the presence of another failure mechanism not included in our model of brittle failure.

  13. Crack propagation along polymer/non-polymer interfaces

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vellinga, Willem-Pier; Fedorov, Alexander; De Hosson, Jeff T.

    2007-01-01

    Mechanisms of the propagation of crack fronts along interfaces between a glassy polymer and metal or glass are discussed. Specifically, the systems studied are Poly-Ethylene Terephthalate (PETG) spin-coated on A1, PETG-glass and PETG hot-pressed on Cr-sputtered glass. Cracks studied propagate in an

  14. Crack propagation studies and bond coat properties in thermal ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Ceramic based thermal barrier coatings (TBC) are currently considered as a candidate material for advanced stationary gas turbine components. Crack propagation studies under bending are described that were performed on plasma sprayed ZrO2, bonded by MCrAlY layer to Ni base superalloy. The crack propagation ...

  15. Initiation and propagation of small corner cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellyin, Ferdnand; Kujawski, Daniel; Craig, David F.

    1994-01-01

    The behaviour of small corner cracks, inclined or perpendicular to loading direction, is presented. There are two aspects to this investigation: initiation of small cracks and monitoring their subsequent growth. An initial pre-cracking procedure under cyclic compression is adopted to minimize the residual damage at the tip of the growing and self-arresting crack under cyclic compression. A final fatigue specimen, cut from the larger pre-cracked specimen, has two corner flaws. The opening load of corner flaw is monitored using a novel strain gauge approach. The behaviour of small corner cracks is described in terms of growth rate relative to the size of the crack and its shape.

  16. Small fatigue crack propagation in Y2O3 strengthened steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutař, P.; Kuběna, I.; Ševčík, M.; Šmíd, M.; Kruml, T.; Náhlík, L.

    2014-09-01

    This paper is focused on two type of Y2O3 strengthened steels (Fe-14Cr ODS and ODS-EUROFER). Small fatigue crack propagation was experimentally measured using special small cylindrical specimens (diameter 2 and 2.6 mm) with shallow notch grinded in the gauge length. In the middle of this notch, a pre-crack of length of 50 μm was fabricated using a focused ion beam technique. Fatigue crack growth rate was measured for different applied total strain amplitudes and described using plastic part of the J-integral. Obtained results were compared with published data of EUROFER 97. The effect of the oxide dispersion on small fatigue crack propagation was found rather insignificant. Ferritic Fe-14Cr ODS steel shows more brittle behaviour, i.e. for the same cyclic plasticity, characterised by the plastic part of the J-integral, the small cracks grow faster. A new methodology for residual lifetime prediction of structures containing physically small cracks, based on plastic part of the J-integral, is presented.

  17. Fatigue crack propagation in steels for reactor pressure vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klesnil, M.; Lukas, P.; Kunz, L. (Ceskoslovenska Akademie Ved, Brno. Ustav Fyzikalni Metalurgie); Troshchenko, V.T.; Pokrovskij, V.V.; Yasnij, P.V.; Skorenko, Y.S. (AN Ukrainskoj SSR, Kiev. Inst. Problem Prochnosti)

    1983-01-01

    Fatigue crack propagation data were measured on 15Kh2NMFA steel of Czechoslovak and Soviet makes. The results obtained by two laboratories were compared with other available data regarding materials for pressure vessels of nuclear power plants. Crack propagation curves were measured at temperatures -60, 20 and 350 degC and the corresponding parameters of crack growth equation were found. Threshold values of stress intensity factor amplitude, Ksub(apz), and the influence of stress ratio R in the range of small crack rates were determined experimentally. Fractography revealed either transgranular or mixed transgranular and interaranular fracture modes depending on stress intensity amplitude Ksub(a) and the environment.

  18. Thermomechanical Behavior of Amorphous Polymers During High-Speed Crack Propagation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bjerke, Todd

    2002-01-01

    .... Experiments were performed using two materials, nominally brittle polymethyl methacrylate and nominally ductile polycarbonate to quantify crack tip heating and identify dominant dissipative mechanisms...

  19. Experimental study on stress corrosion crack propagation rate of FV520B in carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Ming; Li, Jianfeng; Chen, Songying; Qu, Yanpeng

    FV520B steel is a kind of precipitation hardening Martensitic stainless steel, it has high-strength, good plasticity and good corrosion resistance. Stress corrosion cracking (SCC) is one of the main corrosion failure mode for FV520B in industrial transportation of natural gas operation. For a better understanding the effect on SCC of FV520B, the improved wedge opening loading (WOL) specimens and constant displacement loading methods were employed in experimental research in carbon dioxide and hydrogen sulfide solution. The test results showed that the crack propagation rate is 1.941 × 10-7-5.748 × 10-7 mm/s, the stress intensity factor KISCC is not more than 36.83 MPa √{ m } . The rate increases with the increasing of the crack opening displacement. Under the condition of different initial loading, KISCC generally shows a decreasing tendency with the increase in H2S concentration, and the crack propagation rate showed an increasing trend substantially. For the enrichment of sulfur ion in the crack tip induced the generation of pitting corrosion, promoting the surrounding metal formed the corrosion micro batteries, the pit defects gradually extended and connected with the adjacent pit to form a small crack, leading to further propagation till cracking happened. Fracture microscopic morphology displayed typical brittle fracture phenomena, accompanying with trans-granular cracking, river shape and sector, many second cracks on the fracture surface.

  20. Phenomena and mechanisms of crack propagation in glass-ceramics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Apel, E; Deubener, J; Bernard, A; Höland, M; Müller, R; Kappert, H; Rheinberger, V; Höland, W

    2008-10-01

    Lithium disilicate, leucite and apatite glass-ceramics have become state-of-the-art framework materials in the fabrication of all-ceramic dental restorative materials. The goal of this study was to examine the crack propagation behaviour of these three known glass-ceramic materials after they have been subjected to Vickers indentation and to characterize their crack opening profiles (delta(meas) vs. (a-r)). For this purpose, various methods of optical examination were employed. Optical microscopy investigations were performed to examine the crack phenomena at a macroscopic level, while high-resolution techniques, such as scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM), were employed to investigate the crack phenomena at a microscopic level. The crack patterns of the three glass-ceramics vary from fairly straightforward to more complex, depending on the amount of residual glass matrix present in the material. The high-strength lithium disilicate crystals feature a high degree of crosslinking, thereby preventing crack propagation. In this material, the crack propagates only through the residual glass phase, which constitutes 30%-40% by volume. Having a high glass content of more than 65% by volume, the leucite and apatite glass-ceramics show far more complex crack patterns. Cracks in the leucite glass-ceramic propagate through both the glass and crystal phase. The apatite glass-ceramic shows a similar crack behaviour as an inorganic-organic composite material containing nanoscale fillers, which are pulled out in the surroundings of the crack tip. The observed crack behaviour and the calculated K(tip) values of the three types of glass-ceramics were compared to the K(IC) values determined according to the SEVNB method.

  1. Crack Propagation in Plane Strain under Variable Amplitude Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ricardo, Luiz Carlos Hernandes

    2010-01-01

    Crack propagation simulation began with developing of finite element method; the analyses were conducted to obtain a basic understanding of the crack growth and closure processes. Today structural and materials engineers develop structures and materials properties using this technique. In this pa...

  2. Stress analysis of fracture of atherosclerotic plaques: crack propagation modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezvani-Sharif, Alireza; Tafazzoli-Shadpour, Mohammad; Kazemi-Saleh, Davood; Sotoudeh-Anvari, Maryam

    2017-08-01

    Traditionally, the degree of luminal obstruction has been used to assess the vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaques. However, recent studies have revealed that other factors such as plaque morphology, material properties of lesion components and blood pressure may contribute to the fracture of atherosclerotic plaques. The aim of this study was to investigate the mechanism of fracture of atherosclerotic plaques based on the mechanical stress distribution and fatigue analysis by means of numerical simulation. Realistic models of type V plaques were reconstructed based on histological images. Finite element method was used to determine mechanical stress distribution within the plaque. Assuming that crack propagation initiated at the sites of stress concentration, crack propagation due to pulsatile blood pressure was modeled. Results showed that crack propagation considerably changed the stress field within the plaque and in some cases led to initiation of secondary cracks. The lipid pool stiffness affected the location of crack formation and the rate and direction of crack propagation. Moreover, increasing the mean or pulse pressure decreased the number of cycles to rupture. It is suggested that crack propagation analysis can lead to a better recognition of factors involved in plaque rupture and more accurate determination of vulnerable plaques.

  3. Suppression of Fatigue Crack Propagation of Duralumin by Cavitation Peening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hitoshi Soyama

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available It was demonstrated in the present paper that cavitation peening which is one of the mechanical surface modification technique can suppress fatigue crack propagation in duralumin. The impacts produced when cavitation bubble collapses can be utilised for the mechanical surface modification technique in the same way as laser peening and shot peening, which is called “cavitation peening”. Cavitation peening employing a cavitating jet in water was used to treat the specimen made of duralumin Japanese Industrial Standards JIS A2017-T3. After introducing a notch, fatigue test was conducted by a load-controlled plate bending fatigue tester, which has been originally developed. The fatigue crack propagation behavior was evaluated and the relationship between the fatigue crack propagation rate versus stress intensity factor range was obtained. From the results, the fatigue crack propagation rate was drastically reduced by cavitation peening and the fatigue life of duralumin plate was extended 4.2 times by cavitation peening. In addition, the fatigue crack propagation can be suppressed by 88% in the stable crack propagation stage by cavitation peening.

  4. Effect of fluid salinity on subcritical crack propagation in calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rostom, Fatma; Røyne, Anja; Dysthe, Dag Kristian; Renard, François

    2013-01-01

    The slow propagation of cracks, also called subcritical crack growth, is a mechanism of fracturing responsible for a ductile deformation of rocks under crustal conditions. In the present study, the double-torsion technique was used to measure the effect of fluid chemistry on the slow propagation of cracks in calcite single crystals at room temperature. Time-lapse images and measurements of force and load-point displacement allowed accurate characterization of crack velocities in a range of 10- 8 to 10- 4 m/s. Velocity curves as a function of energy-release rates were obtained for different fluid compositions, varying NH4Cl and NaCl concentrations. Our results show the presence of a threshold in fluid composition, separating two regimes: weakening conditions where the crack propagation is favored, and strengthening conditions where crack propagation slows down. We suggest that electrostatic surface forces that modify the repulsion forces between the two surfaces of the crack may be responsible for this behavior.

  5. Detection of cracking and damage mechanisms in brittle granites by moment tensor analysis of acoustic emission signals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Shi-da; Li, Yuan-hui; Liu, Jian-po

    2017-05-01

    An acoustic emission (AE) testing of rock cracking was performed under uniaxial loading conditions by precut varisized circular holes in selected brittle granites. Based on AE-source location technique and AE-theory for moment tensor analysis, rules of the temporal-spatial evolution of micro-cracks in different failure mechanisms were explored and types of micro-cracks were analyzed as well. The results revealed that the micro-cracks are uniquely easy to generate in the positions where stress are concentrated. Tensile fractures are easy to form on the roof and floor of a circular hole, while shear fractures are easy to be found on both sides. The locations of initial cracks generated around the holes in the loading process are the direction or vertical direction of maximum principle stress. Macroscopic crack orientation agrees with the direction of maximum principle stress approximately. As the size of circular opening increases and the relative size of pillar decreases, shear cracks are dominant with the percentage more than 45%, tension cracks are fewer, accounted for less than 40% of the total events, and mixed-mode cracks represent a minimum proportion, despite the decrease of percentage of shear cracks. The findings of this work can serve for supporting design of tunnel or roadway to avoid collapse.

  6. A model for high-cycle fatigue crack propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Balbi, Marcela Angela [Rosario National Univ. (Argentina); National Council of Scientific Research and Technology (CONICET) (Argentina)

    2017-02-01

    This paper deals with the prediction of high-cycle fatigue behavior for four different materials (7075-T6 alloy, Ti-6Al-4 V alloy, JIS S10C steel and 0.4 wt.-% C steel) using Chapetti's approach to estimate the fatigue crack propagation curve. In the first part of the paper, a single integral equation for studying the entire propagation process is determined using the recent results of Santus and Taylor, which consider a double regime of propagation (short and long cracks) characterized by the model of El Haddad. The second part of the paper includes a comparison of the crack propagation behavior model proposed by Navarro and de los Rios with the one mentioned in the first half of this work. The results allow us to conclude that the approach presented in this paper is a good and valid estimation of high-cycle fatigue crack propagation using a single equation to describe the entire fatigue crack regime.

  7. Fracture of brittle solids

    CERN Document Server

    Lawn, Brian

    1993-01-01

    This is an advanced text for higher degree materials science students and researchers concerned with the strength of highly brittle covalent-ionic solids, principally ceramics. It is a reconstructed and greatly expanded edition of a book first published in 1975. The book presents a unified continuum, microstructural and atomistic treatment of modern day fracture mechanics from a materials perspective. Particular attention is directed to the basic elements of bonding and microstructure that govern the intrinsic toughness of ceramics. These elements hold the key to the future of ceramics as high-technology materials--to make brittle solids strong, we must first understand what makes them weak. The underlying theme of the book is the fundamental Griffith energy-balance concept of crack propagation. The early chapters develop fracture mechanics from the traditional continuum perspective, with attention to linear and nonlinear crack-tip fields, equilibrium and non-equilibrium crack states. It then describes the at...

  8. Investigation about crack propagation paths in thin rim gears

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Curà

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Crack propagation in gears is a problem related not only to the life of the components, but also to the concept of failsafe design. Fail safe design means to design a component in order that, if a failure occurs, this may cause a “safe failure”. This aspect is very important above all in aerospace industry. As a matter of fact, in aerospace application, the need of reducing weight brings to produce gears with very thick rim and web. Considering thin rim gears, when a crack is nucleated near the tooth root, it may propagate through the tooth (causing the loss of the entire tooth or a portion of it or the propagation may follow a path across the wheel diameter (causing the projection of big parts of the gear that may break the gearbox and may cause serious damage to the aircraft. The first failure mode is define as “failsafe failure” and the second one as “catastrophic failure” and of course has to be avoided. Designers need to have robust design criteria in order to predict crack propagation paths and to avoid catastrophic failures. In literature, few works are present concerning this topic, in particular related to the effect of geometrical parameters that may affect the crack propagation. In this work a numerical analysis about crack propagation in gears with respect to the backup ratio (ratio between tooth height and rim thickness, initial crack position and shape has been done by means of the Extended FEM (XFEM technique, realizing 3D models. XFEM 3D is a relatively new technique consisting in enriching traditional finite elements with more complex shape functions; in this way it is possible to propagate crack also between mesh nodes and to have mesh independent results. Aim of this paper is to highlight the crack propagation path in order to give to designers an high confident design criterion, related to the gear geometry. In particular, the effect of both rim thickness and orientation of the initial crack have been considered

  9. Infrared thermography study of the fatigue crack propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.A. Plekhov

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available The work is devoted to the experimental study of heat dissipation process caused by fatigue crack propagation. To investigate a spatial and time temperature evolution at the crack tip set of experiments was carried out using specimens with pre-grown centered fatigue crack. An original mathematical algorithm for experimental data treatment was developed to obtain a power of heat source caused by plastic deformation at crack tip. The algorithm includes spatial-time filtration and relative motion compensation procedures. Based on the results of mathematical data treatment, we proposed a way to estimate the values of J-integral and stress intensity factor for cracks with pronounced the plastic zone.

  10. Wave propagation in channels and cracks with elastic walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukhinin, S. V.; Yurkovskiy, V. S.; Konstantinov, A. P.; Trilis, A. V.

    2017-10-01

    In this paper wave propagation in the uniform and nonuniform elastic channels filled with fluid or gas is investigated. The weak discontinuities theory approach is proposed to determine the criteria of gradient catastrophe phenomena to occur for the cases of uniform and nonuniform channels. The results of the paper can be applied to studying of the nonlinear wave propagation phenomena in elastic pores, cracks and channels filled with fluid or gas.

  11. Crack propagation of Ti alloy via adiabatic shear bands

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendoza, I., E-mail: ivanmendozabravo@gmail.com [Instituto Tecnológico de Veracruz (Mexico); Villalobos, D. [Instituto Tecnológico de Veracruz (Mexico); Alexandrov, B.T. [The Ohio State University (United States)

    2015-10-01

    This study was focused on the characterization of the origin and mechanism of crack propagation as a result of hot induction bending of Ti alloy. Plates of Ti–6Al–4V alloy with 12.5 mm of thickness were submitted to hot induction bending below the beta transus temperature. Optical and scanning electron microscopy analysis showed crack formation in the tensile zone. Microstructural evidence showed that cracks propagate through the adiabatic shear bands by Dimple-Void mechanism. However, voids formation before shear banding also occurred. In both mechanisms adiabatic shear bands are formed via dynamic recrystallization where the alpha–beta interphase works as stress concentrator promoting the formation of dimples and voids.

  12. Microstructural features of intergranular brittle fracture and cold cracking in high strength aluminum alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalpoor, M.; Eskin, D. G.; ten Brink, Gert; Katgerman, L.

    2010-01-01

    Intergranular brittle fracture has been mainly observed and reported in steel alloys and precipitation hardened At-alloys where intergranular precipitates cover a major fraction of the grain boundary area. 7xxx series aluminum alloys suffer from this problem in the as-cast condition when brittle

  13. Stress Inversion of Coal with a Gas Drilling Borehole and the Law of Crack Propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tianjun Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available For studying the law of crack propagation around a gas drilling borehole, an experimental study about coal with a cavity under uniaxial compression was carried out, with the digital speckle correlation method capturing the images of coal failure. A sequence of coal failure images and the full-field strain of failure were obtained. The strain softening characteristic was shown by the curve. A method of curve dividing—named fitting-damaging—was proposed, combining the least square fitting residual norm and damage fraction. By this method, the five stages and four key points of a stress-strain curve were defined. Then, the full-field stress was inverted by means of the theory of elasticity and the adjacent element weight sharing model. The results show that σci was 30.28–41.71 percent of σf and σcd was 83.08–87.34 percent of σf, calculated by the fitting-damaging method, agreeing with former research. The results of stress inversion showed that under a low stress level (0.15 σf < σ < 0.5 σf, microdamage evolving into plastic failure later was formed around the cavity. Under a high stress level (0.5 σf < σ < 0.85 σf, the region of stress concentration suddenly crazed and formed a brittle crack. When σ ≥ 0.85 σf, the crack was developing, crack lines were connecting with each other, and the coal finally failed. The outcome of the stress inversion was completely concomitant with the images of crack propagation. Additionally, the stress around the cavity was able to be calculated accurately.

  14. Experimental study of heat dissipation at the crack tip during fatigue crack propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Vshivkov

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This work is devoted to the development of an experimental method for studying the energy balance during cyclic deformation and fracture. The studies were conducted on 304 stainless steel AISE and titanium alloy OT4-0 samples. The investigation of the fatigue crack propagation was carried out on flat samples with different geometries and types of stress concentrators. The heat flux sensor was developed based on the Seebeck effect. This sensor was used for measuring the heat dissipation power in the examined samples during the fatigue tests. The measurements showed that the rate of fatigue crack growth depends on the heat flux at the crack tip.

  15. Crack propagation modelling for high strength steel welded structural details

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mecséri, B. J.; Kövesdi, B.

    2017-05-01

    Nowadays the barrier of applying HSS (High Strength Steel) material in bridge structures is their low fatigue strength related to yield strength. This paper focuses on the fatigue behaviour of a structural details (a gusset plate connection) made from NSS and HSS material, which is frequently used in bridges in Hungary. An experimental research program is carried out at the Budapest University of Technology and Economics to investigate the fatigue lifetime of this structural detail type through the same test specimens made from S235 and S420 steel grades. The main aim of the experimental research program is to study the differences in the crack propagation and the fatigue lifetime between normal and high strength steel structures. Based on the observed fatigue crack pattern the main direction and velocity of the crack propagation is determined. In parallel to the tests finite element model (FEM) are also developed, which model can handle the crack propagation. Using the measured strain data in the tests and the calculated values from the FE model, the approximation of the material parameters of the Paris law are calculated step-by-step, and their calculated values are evaluated. The same material properties are determined for NSS and also for HSS specimens as well, and the differences are discussed. In the current paper, the results of the experiments, the calculation method of the material parameters and the calculated values are introduced.

  16. Modeling of crack propagation in strengthened concrete disks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Skodborg; Stang, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    Crack propagation in strengthened concrete disks is a problem that has not yet been addressed properly. To investigate it, a cracked half-infinite disk of concrete is strengthened with a linear elastic material bonded to the surface, and analyzed using two different finite element modeling approa...... instead of 3D calculations to predict the response of a structure and that it opens up for simpler evaluation of strengthened concrete structures using the finite element method....... approaches. The first method is 3D modeling of strengthening, interface and disk, and the second method is modeling of an equivalent disk in 2D, with an effective cohesive crack, equivalent thickness and equivalent stiffness. The 2D modeling approach simplifies modeling of the problem significantly......Crack propagation in strengthened concrete disks is a problem that has not yet been addressed properly. To investigate it, a cracked half-infinite disk of concrete is strengthened with a linear elastic material bonded to the surface, and analyzed using two different finite element modeling...

  17. Low temperature spalling of silicon: A crack propagation study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertoni, Mariana; Uberg Naerland, Tine; Stoddard, Nathan; Guimera Coll, Pablo

    2017-06-08

    Spalling is a promising kerfless method for cutting thin silicon wafers while doubling the yield of a silicon ingot. The main obstacle in this technology is the high total thickness variation of the spalled wafers, often as high as 100% of the wafer thickness. It has been suggested before that a strong correlation exists between low crack velocities and a smooth surface, but this correlation has never been shown during a spalling process in silicon. The reason lies in the challenge associated to measuring such velocities. In this contribution, we present a new approach to assess, in real time, the crack velocity as it propagates during a low temperature spalling process. Understanding the relationship between crack velocity and surface roughness during spalling can pave the way to attain full control on the surface quality of the spalled wafer.

  18. Prediction of crack propagation in layered ceramics with strong interfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Náhlík, Luboš; Šestáková, L.; Hutař, Pavel; Bermejo, R.

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 77, č. 11 (2010), s. 2192-2199 ISSN 0013-7944 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) KJB200410803; GA ČR GA101/09/1821 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20410507 Keywords : Ceramic laminate * Crack propagation direction * Residual stress * Flaw tolerant ceramics * Optimal design Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 1.571, year: 2010

  19. An Investigation of the Sub-Microsecond Features of Dynamic Crack Propagation in PMMA and the Rdx-Based Explosive PBX 9205

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washabaugh, P. D.; Hill, L. G.

    2007-12-01

    A dynamic crack propagating in a brittle material releases enough thermal energy to produce visible light. The dynamic fracture of even macroscopically amorphous materials becomes unsteady as the crack propagation velocity approaches the material wave-speeds. The heat generated at a crack-tip, especially as it jumps, may be a mechanism to initiate a self-sustaining reaction in an energetic material. Experiments were conducted in specimens to simulate an infinite plate for ˜10 μs. The initial specimens were 152 mm square by 6 mm thick acrylic sheets, and were fabricated to study non-steady near-wave-speed crack propagation. A variant of this specimen embedded a 25 mm×3 mm PBX 9205 pellet to explore the influence of dynamic Mode-I cracks in these materials. The crack was initiated by up to 0.24 g of Detasheet placed along a precursor 50 mm long notch, with a shield to contain the reaction products and prevent propagation along the fractured surfaces. The crack was studied by means of a streak camera and a Fourier-filter of the light reflecting off the newly minted surfaces. The sub-microsecond behavior of holes initiating, preceding and coalescing with the main crack were observed in the PMMA samples. The embedding and mechanical loading of explosives by this technique did not initiate a self-sustaining reaction in preliminary testing.

  20. Constrained molecular dynamics for quantifying intrinsic ductility versus brittleness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanguy, D.

    2007-10-01

    Evaluating the critical load levels for intrinsic ductility and brittle propagation is a first, but necessary, step for modeling semibrittle crack propagation. In the most general case, the calculations have to be fully atomistic because the details of the crack tip structure cannot be captured by continuum mechanics. In this paper, we present a method to explore ductile and brittle configurations, within the same force field, giving a quantitative estimate of the proximity of a transition from intrinsic ductility to brittleness. The shear localization is characterized by a centrosymmetry criterion evaluated on each atom in the vicinity of the crack tip. This provides an efficient order parameter to track the nucleation and propagation of dislocations. We show that it can be used as a holonomic constraint within molecular dynamics simulations, giving a precise control over plasticity during crack propagation. The equations of motion are derived and applied to crack propagation in the [112¯] direction of an fcc crystal loaded in mode I along [111]. The critical loads for dislocation emission and for brittle propagation are computed. The key point is that the generalized forces of constraint are not dissipative. Therefore, they do not spoil the critical elastic energy release rates (the Griffith criterion is preserved). As an example of the possibilities of the method, the response of blunted tips is investigated for three configurations: a slab of vacancies, an elliptical hole, and a circular hole. Brittle propagation by an alternative mechanism to cleavage, called “vacancy injection,” is reported.

  1. Modeling of Propagation of Interacting Cracks Under Hydraulic Pressure Gradient

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Hai [Idaho National Laboratory; Mattson, Earl Douglas [Idaho National Laboratory; Podgorney, Robert Karl [Idaho National Laboratory

    2015-04-01

    A robust and reliable numerical model for fracture initiation and propagation, which includes the interactions among propagating fractures and the coupling between deformation, fracturing and fluid flow in fracture apertures and in the permeable rock matrix, would be an important tool for developing a better understanding of fracturing behaviors of crystalline brittle rocks driven by thermal and (or) hydraulic pressure gradients. In this paper, we present a physics-based hydraulic fracturing simulator based on coupling a quasi-static discrete element model (DEM) for deformation and fracturing with conjugate lattice network flow model for fluid flow in both fractures and porous matrix. Fracturing is represented explicitly by removing broken bonds from the network to represent microcracks. Initiation of new microfractures and growth and coalescence of the microcracks leads to the formation of macroscopic fractures when external and/or internal loads are applied. The coupled DEM-network flow model reproduces realistic growth pattern of hydraulic fractures. In particular, simulation results of perforated horizontal wellbore clearly demonstrate that elastic interactions among multiple propagating fractures, fluid viscosity, strong coupling between fluid pressure fluctuations within fractures and fracturing, and lower length scale heterogeneities, collectively lead to complicated fracturing patterns.

  2. Damage Mechanisms and Controlled Crack Propagation in a Hot Pressed Silicon Nitride Ceramic. Ph.D. Thesis - Northwestern Univ., 1993

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calomino, Anthony Martin

    1994-01-01

    The subcritical growth of cracks from pre-existing flaws in ceramics can severely affect the structural reliability of a material. The ability to directly observe subcritical crack growth and rigorously analyze its influence on fracture behavior is important for an accurate assessment of material performance. A Mode I fracture specimen and loading method has been developed which permits the observation of stable, subcritical crack extension in monolithic and toughened ceramics. The test specimen and procedure has demonstrated its ability to generate and stably propagate sharp, through-thickness cracks in brittle high modulus materials. Crack growth for an aluminum oxide ceramic was observed to be continuously stable throughout testing. Conversely, the fracture behavior of a silicon nitride ceramic exhibited crack growth as a series of subcritical extensions which are interrupted by dynamic propagation. Dynamic initiation and arrest fracture resistance measurements for the silicon nitride averaged 67 and 48 J/sq m, respectively. The dynamic initiation event was observed to be sudden and explosive. Increments of subcritical crack growth contributed to a 40 percent increase in fracture resistance before dynamic initiation. Subcritical crack growth visibly marked the fracture surface with an increase in surface roughness. Increments of subcritical crack growth loosen ceramic material near the fracture surface and the fracture debris is easily removed by a replication technique. Fracture debris is viewed as evidence that both crack bridging and subsurface microcracking may be some of the mechanisms contributing to the increase in fracture resistance. A Statistical Fracture Mechanics model specifically developed to address subcritical crack growth and fracture reliability is used together with a damaged zone of material at the crack tip to model experimental results. A Monte Carlo simulation of the actual experiments was used to establish a set of modeling input

  3. Finite element modeling of quasi-brittle cracks in 2D and 3D with enhanced strain accuracy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervera, M.; Barbat, G. B.; Chiumenti, M.

    2017-11-01

    This paper discusses the finite element modeling of cracking in quasi-brittle materials. The problem is addressed via a mixed strain/displacement finite element formulation and an isotropic damage constitutive model. The proposed mixed formulation is fully general and is applied in 2D and 3D. Also, it is independent of the specific finite element discretization considered; it can be equally used with triangles/tetrahedra, quadrilaterals/hexahedra and prisms. The feasibility and accuracy of the method is assessed through extensive comparison with experimental evidence. The correlation with the experimental tests shows the capacity of the mixed formulation to reproduce the experimental crack path and the force-displacement curves with remarkable accuracy. Both 2D and 3D examples produce results consistent with the documented data. Aspects related to the discrete solution, such as convergence regarding mesh resolution and mesh bias, as well as other related to the physical model, like structural size effect and the influence of Poisson's ratio, are also investigated. The enhanced accuracy of the computed strain field leads to accurate results in terms of crack paths, failure mechanisms and force displacement curves. Spurious mesh dependency suffered by both continuous and discontinuous irreducible formulations is avoided by the mixed FE, without the need of auxiliary tracking techniques or other computational schemes that alter the continuum mechanical problem.

  4. Note: A single specimen channel crack growth technique applied to brittle thin films on polymer substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K.; Graham, S.; Pierron, O. N.

    2017-03-01

    We introduce an external-load-assisted thin film channel crack growth technique to measure the subcritical crack growth properties of thin films (i.e., crack velocity, v, versus the strain energy release rate, G), and demonstrate it using 250-nm-thick SiNx films on poly(ethylene terephthalate) substrates. The main particularity of this technique is that it requires a polymer substrate to allow loading to large strains (in order to induce channel cracking) without substrate fracture. Its main advantages are to provide a full v-G curve with a single specimen while relying on a simple specimen preparation and straightforward crack growth characterization. Importantly, the technique can be employed for a much larger range of thin films compared to the residual-stress-driven, thin film channel crack growth tests, including ultrathin films and thin film with residual compressive stresses. The restrictions to a proper use of this technique, related to the (visco)plastic deformation of the substrate, are discussed.

  5. Evaiuation of Cracks Propagation in Retroflllings with Cinalloy Amalgam

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarrabian M

    2000-06-01

    Full Text Available One of the major goals of preradicular surgery is to create a good apical seal. This can be done by sectioning approximately one third of the apex, preparation of a class I cavity, and filling with a biocompatible material. The purpose of this in vitro study was to compare crack propagation in retro filling with two commercially available amalgams. Thirty-four extracted single rooted teeth were divided into two groups. After instrumentation and filling with Gutta percha by lateral condensation method, three millimeter of apex was resected and retro preparations were done by a low speed hand piece and '/> round bur. Then cavities were filled with cinalloy and luxalloy amalgam in-group "one" and "two" respectively. The surface of resected root ends was examined in two stages, after doing retro preparation and retro filling and the presence of any cracks or structural changes was inspected by stereomicroscope 50x. Regard to number and type of cracks, the result of this study showed that there was no significant difference between cinalloy or luxalloy retro fillings. By considering the conditions of this study, cinalloy amalgam can be used as a retro filling material.

  6. Thermomechanical Behavior of Amorphous Polymers During High-Speed Crack Propagation

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Bjerke, Todd

    2002-01-01

    .... Heating in polycarbonate during sheardominated dynamic fracture was from two dissipative processes, the formation of an adiabatic shear band and plastic deformation surrounding the propagating crack...

  7. Investigation on Dynamic Propagation Characteristics of In-Plane Cracks in PVB Laminated Glass Plates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoqing Xu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Polyvinyl butyral (PVB laminated glass has been widely used as an important component of mechanical and construction materials. Cracks on PVB laminated glass are rich in impact information, which contribute to its impact resistance design. In this paper, a three-dimensional (3D numerical simulation model describing PVB laminated glass under impact loading is firstly established and validated qualitatively and quantitatively compared with the corresponding experimental results recorded by the high-speed photography system. In the meantime, the extended finite element method (XFEM is introduced to analyze the crack propagation mechanism of laminated glass based on dynamic stress intensity factors (DSIFs and propagations of stress waves. Parametric studies are then carried out to investigate the influence of five critical parameters, that is, plate dimension, crack length, impact energy, glass properties, and PVB properties, on crack propagation characteristics of laminated glass. Results show that the interaction between crack tip and stress waves as well as the propagations of stress waves corresponds to the fluctuations of DSIFs at crack tip. Both the structure and material variables are proven to play a very important role in glass cracking DSIFs and thus govern the crack propagation behavior. Results may provide fundamental explanation to the basic crack propagation mechanism on radial cracks in PVB laminated glass under impact loading conditions, thus to instruct its impact design improvement.

  8. Effect of relative humidity on crack propagation in barrier films for flexible electronics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vellinga, W. P.; De Hosson, J. Th M.; Bouten, P. C. P.

    2012-01-01

    A set of propagating cracks in a SiN barrier film on poly ethylene naphthalate (PEN) were subjected to differing levels of relative humidity. It was observed that the propagation speed of the cracks increased for increasing levels of relative humidity. This was shown using two independent,

  9. Study of the Influences of Transient Crack Propagation in a Pinion on Time-Varying Mesh Stiffness

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youmin Hu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cracks in a cracked gear may further propagate by a tiny length in a very short time for several reasons, such as material fatigue and load fluctuations. In this paper, this dynamic process is defined as transient propagation of cracks. This research aims to calculate the time-varying mesh stiffness of gears when transient propagation of cracks arises, which has not been extensively studied in existing literatures. The transient propagation of cracks is modelled. An improved potential energy method is proposed by incorporating the propagation model into the potential energy method. The improved method can also be utilised to calculate the mesh stiffness of gears when transient propagation of cracks arises. Different transient propagation models are considered to simulate the propagation of cracks in a short amount of time. Different deterioration levels of cracks before transient propagation and different lengths and models of transient propagation are also examined. The variation rules of mesh stiffness caused by the transient propagation of cracks are summarised. The influence of the deterioration level of cracks on mesh stiffness variation when transient propagation arises is obtained. Simulation results show that the proposed method accurately calculates time-varying mesh stiffness when transient propagation of cracks arises. Furthermore, the method improves the monitoring of further propagation of cracks in gears from the perspective of time-varying mesh stiffness.

  10. Impacts of bedding directions of shale gas reservoirs on hydraulically induced crack propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keming Sun

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Shale gas reservoirs are different from conventional ones in terms of their bedding architectures, so their hydraulic fracturing rules are somewhat different. In this paper, shale hydraulic fracturing tests were carried out by using the triaxial hydraulic fracturing test system to identify the effects of natural bedding directions on the crack propagation in the process of hydraulic fracturing. Then, the fracture initiation criterion of hydraulic fracturing was prepared using the extended finite element method. On this basis, a 3D hydraulic fracturing computation model was established for shale gas reservoirs. And finally, a series of studies were performed about the effects of bedding directions on the crack propagation created by hydraulic fracturing in shale reservoirs. It is shown that the propagation rules of hydraulically induced fractures in shale gas reservoirs are jointly controlled by the in-situ stress and the bedding plane architecture and strength, with the bedding direction as the main factor controlling the crack propagation directions. If the normal tensile stress of bedding surface reaches its tensile strength after the fracturing, cracks will propagate along the bedding direction, and otherwise vertical to the minimum in-situ stress direction. With the propagating of cracks along bedding surfaces, the included angle between the bedding normal direction and the minimum in-situ stress direction increases, the fracture initiation and propagation pressures increase and the crack areas decrease. Generally, cracks propagate in the form of non-plane ellipsoids. With the injection of fracturing fluids, crack areas and total formation filtration increase and crack propagation velocity decreases. The test results agree well with the calculated crack propagation rules, which demonstrate the validity of the above-mentioned model.

  11. Fatigue and Creep Crack Propagation behaviour of Alloy 617 in the Annealed and Aged Conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Julian K. Benz; Richard N. Wright

    2013-10-01

    The crack propagation behaviour of Alloy 617 was studied under various conditions. Elevated temperature fatigue and creep-fatigue crack growth experiments were conducted at 650 and 800 degrees C under constant stress intensity (triangle K) conditions and triangular or trapezoidal waveforms at various frequencies on as-received, aged, and carburized material. Environmental conditions included both laboratory air and characteristic VHTR impure helium. As-received Alloy 617 displayed an increase in the crack growth rate (da/dN) as the frequency was decreased in air which indicated a time-dependent contribution component in fatigue crack propagation. Material aged at 650°C did not display any influence on the fatigue crack growth rates nor the increasing trend of crack growth rate with decreasing frequency even though significant microstructural evolution, including y’ (Ni3Al) after short times, occurred during aging. In contrast, carburized Alloy 617 showed an increase in crack growth rates at all frequencies tested compared to the material in the standard annealed condition. Crack growth studies under quasi-constant K (i.e. creep) conditions were also completed at 650 degrees C and a stress intensity of K = 40 MPa9 (square root)m. The results indicate that crack growth is primarily intergranular and increased creep crack growth rates exist in the impure helium environment when compared to the results in laboratory air. Furthermore, the propagation rates (da/dt) continually increased for the duration of the creep crack growth either due to material aging or evolution of a crack tip creep zone. Finally, fatigue crack propagation tests at 800 degrees C on annealed Alloy 617 indicated that crack propagation rates were higher in air than impure helium at the largest frequencies and lowest stress intensities. The rates in helium, however, eventually surpass the rates in air as the frequency is reduced and the stress intensity is decreased which was not observed at 650

  12. Molecular dynamics simulation of effect of hydrogen atoms on crack propagation behavior of α-Fe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, H.Y., E-mail: gsfshy@sohu.com; Zhang, L.; Xiao, M.X.

    2016-12-16

    The effect of the hydrogen concentration and hydrogen distribution on the mechanical properties of α-Fe with a pre-existing unilateral crack under tensile loading is investigated by molecular dynamics simulation. The results reveal that the models present good ductility when the front region of crack tip has high local hydrogen concentration. The peak stress of α-Fe decreases with increasing hydrogen concentration. The studies also indicate that for the samples with hydrogen atoms, the crack propagation behavior is independent of the model size and boundaries. In addition, the crack propagation behavior is significantly influenced by the distribution of hydrogen atoms. - Highlights: • The distribution of hydrogen plays a critical role in the crack propagation. • The peak stress decrease with the hydrogen concentration increasing. • The crack deformation behavior is disclosed and analyzed.

  13. Crack propagation and the material removal mechanism of glass-ceramics by the scratch test.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Zhongjun; Liu, Congcong; Wang, Haorong; Yang, Xue; Fang, Fengzhou; Tang, Junjie

    2016-12-01

    To eliminate the negative effects of surface flaws and subsurface damage of glass-ceramics on clinical effectiveness, crack propagation and the material removal mechanism of glass-ceramics were studied by single and double scratch experiments conducted using an ultra-precision machine. A self-manufactured pyramid shaped single-grit tool with a small tip radius was used as the scratch tool. The surface and subsurface crack propagations and interactions, surface morphology and material removal mechanism were investigated. The experimental results showed that the propagation of lateral cracks to the surface and the interaction between the lateral cracks and radial cracks are the two main types of material peeling, and the increase of the scratch depth increases the propagation angle of the radial cracks and the interaction between the cracks. In the case of a double scratch, the propagation of lateral cracks and radial cracks between paired scratches results in material peeling. The interaction between adjacent scratches depends on the scratch depth and separation distance. There is a critical separation distance where the normalized material removal volume reaches its peak. These findings can help reduce surface flaws and subsurface damage induced by the grinding process and improve the clinical effectiveness of glass-ceramics used as biological substitute and repair materials. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Experimental Study on the Vibration of an Overhung Rotor with a Propagating Transverse Crack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.A. Adewusi

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents an experimental study on the dynamic response of an overhung rotor with a propagating transverse crack. The effects of a propagating transverse crack and side load on the dynamic response of an overhung rotor are investigated in order to identify vibration signatures of a propagating crack in rotating shafts. Startup and steady state vibration signatures were analyzed and presented in the form of Bode plots, Frequency Spectrum Cascades, Frequency Spectrum Waterfalls and orbits. The startup results showed that crack reduces the critical speed and increases the vibration amplitude of the rotor system. It also excites 2X vibration in the startup vibration signatures. The steady state results showed that the propagating crack produces changes in vibration amplitudes of 1X and 2X vibration harmonics and excites 3X harmonic just before fracture. During crack propagation, 1X amplitude may increase or decrease depending on the location of the crack and the direction of vibration measurement while 2X amplitude always increases. The steady state vibration signal of a propagating crack also produces a two-loop orbit.

  15. Corrosion-fatigue crack propagation of aluminum alloys for high-speed trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Lin; Chen, Hui; Che, Xiaoli; Xu, Lidong

    2017-07-01

    A modified single-edge notch tension (SENT) specimen exposed to saline environment was utilized to investigate the corrosion-fatigue crack growth behaviors of 5083, 6005 and 7N01 aluminum alloys. The fatigue crack propagation life, corrosion-fatigue crack rate (da/dN) were tested. The microstructures and fracture surfaces of specimens were examined by optical microscopy and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The results showed that fatigue crack propagation rate of 7N01 in 3.5% NaCl was significantly higher than 6005 and 5083 alloys. The mechanisms of anodic dissolution and hydrogen embrittlement are used to explain the results.

  16. A new approach for the influence of residual stress on fatigue crack propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Lin; Jia, Min-Ping

    Many manufacturing processes can induce residual stresses in produced components. These residual stresses influence the mean stress during cyclic loading. The initial residual stresses induced during manufacturing change during fatigue damage. This paper presents a research on the change of residual stress distribution during fatigue crack propagation; the research predicts crack propagation by considering residual stress. An analysis approach for the change in residual stress distribution is established according to the diffusion theory of cavity, which is also used to investigate cracks with different orientations. Experiments are conducted to verify the prediction results of residual stress. A probability density function based on Weibull distribution is established to evaluate the accuracy of predicted residual stress. The influence of residual stress on fatigue crack propagation is considered the effective stress intensity factor range, which is calculated under the combined stress field of applied stress and residual stress. An analysis model of crack propagation is established. Furthermore, the model of crack propagation is used to estimate the velocity of crack propagation for the cases, same as the cases of residual stress prediction. The case studies show that the results are basically identical with the experimental results, indicating that the proposed approach is acceptable.

  17. Fatigue Crack Propagation Under Variable Amplitude Loading Analyses Based on Plastic Energy Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofiane Maachou

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Plasticity effects at the crack tip had been recognized as “motor” of crack propagation, the growth of cracks is related to the existence of a crack tip plastic zone, whose formation and intensification is accompanied by energy dissipation. In the actual state of knowledge fatigue crack propagation is modeled using crack closure concept. The fatigue crack growth behavior under constant amplitude and variable amplitude loading of the aluminum alloy 2024 T351 are analyzed using in terms energy parameters. In the case of VAL (variable amplitude loading tests, the evolution of the hysteretic energy dissipated per block is shown similar with that observed under constant amplitude loading. A linear relationship between the crack growth rate and the hysteretic energy dissipated per block is obtained at high growth rates. For lower growth rates values, the relationship between crack growth rate and hysteretic energy dissipated per block can represented by a power law. In this paper, an analysis of fatigue crack propagation under variable amplitude loading based on energetic approach is proposed.

  18. A FEM based methodology to simulate multiple crack propagation in friction stir welds

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lepore, Marcello; Carlone, Pierpaolo; Berto, Filippo

    2017-01-01

    In this work a numerical procedure, based on a finite element approach, is proposed to simulate multiple three-dimensional crack propagation in a welded structure. Cracks are introduced in a friction stir welded AA2024-T3 butt joint, affected by a process-induced residual stress scenario....... The residual stress field was inferred by a thermo-mechanical FEM simulation of the process, considering temperature dependent elastic-plastic material properties, material softening and isotropic hardening. Afterwards, cracks introduced in the selected location of FEM computational domain allow stress...... insertion, as well as with respect to crack sizes measured in three different points for each propagation step. This FEM-based approach simulates the fatigue crack propagation by considering accurately the residual stress field generated by plastic deformations imposed on a structural component and has...

  19. Influence of Residual Stress Field on the Fatigue Crack Propagation in Prestressing Steel Wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Toribio

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with the effect of several residual stress profiles on the fatigue crack propagation in prestressing steel wires subjected to tension loading or bending moment. To this end, a computer program was developed to evaluate the crack front evolution on the basis of the Walker law. Results demonstrate that the absence of residual stresses makes the crack propagate towards a preferential crack path. When surface residual stresses are tensile and, correspondingly, core residual stresses are compressive, the fatigue crack fronts rapidly converge towards a quasi-straight shape. When surface residual stresses are compressive, with their corresponding tensile stresses in the core area, a preferential crack path also appears.

  20. Molecular Dynamics Simulation of Crack Propagation in Nanoscale Polycrystal Nickel Based on Different Strain Rates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanqiu Zhang

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Based on the strain rates of 2 × 108 s−1 and 2 × 1010 s−1, molecular dynamics simulation was conducted so as to study mechanisms of crack propagation in nanoscale polycrystal nickel. The strain rate has an important effect on the mechanism of crack propagation in nanoscale polycrystal nickel. In the case of a higher strain rate, local non-3D-crystalline atoms are induced and Lomer-Cottrell locks are formed, which plays a critical role in crack initiation and propagation. Orientation difference between adjacent grains leads to the slipping of dislocations along the different directions, which results in the initiation of a void near the triple junction of grain boundaries and further contributes to accelerating the crack propagation.

  1. Estimation of stepwise crack propagation in ceramic laminates with strong interfaces

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Náhlík, Luboš; Štegnerová, Kateřina; Hutař, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 9, č. 34 (2015), s. 116-124 ISSN 1971-8993. [International Conference on Crack Paths /5./. Ferrara, 16.09.2015-18.09.2015] R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-09347S Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Ceramic laminates * Crack behaviour * Residual stresses * Strain energy density factor * Crack propagation direction Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics http://www.fracturae.com/index.php/fis/article/view/IGF-ESIS.34.12

  2. Identifying and Understanding Environment-Induced Crack propagation Behavior in Ni-based Superalloy INCONEL 617

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma, Longzhou

    2012-11-30

    The nickel-based superalloy INCONEL 617 is a candidate material for heat exchanger applications in the next-generation nuclear plant (NGNP) system. This project will study the crack propagation process of alloy 617 at temperatures of 650°C-950°C in air under static/cyclic loading conditions. The goal is to identify the environmental and mechanical damage components and to understand in-depth the failure mechanism. Researchers will measure the fatigue crack propagation (FCP) rate (da/dn) under cyclic and hold-time fatigue conditions, and sustained crack growth rates (da/dt) at elevated temperatures. The independent FCP process will be identified and the rate-controlled sustained loading crack process will be correlated with the thermal activation equation to estimate the oxygen thermal activation energy. The FCP-dependent model indicates that if the sustained loading crack growth rate, da/dt, can be correlated with the FCP rate, da/dn, at the full time dependent stage, researchers can confirm stress-accelerated grain-boundary oxygen embrittlement (SAGBOE) as a predominate effect. Following the crack propagation tests, the research team will examine the fracture surface of materials in various cracking stages using a scanning electron microscope (SEM) and an optical microscope. In particular, the microstructure of the crack tip region will be analyzed in depth using high resolution transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and electron energy loss spectrum (EELS) mapping techniques to identify oxygen penetration along the grain boundary and to examine the diffused oxygen distribution profile around the crack tip. The cracked sample will be prepared by focused ion beam nanofabrication technology, allowing researchers to accurately fabricate the TEM samples from the crack tip while minimizing artifacts. Researchers will use these microscopic and spectroscopic results to interpret the crack propagation process, as well as distinguish and understand the environment or

  3. Crack propagation direction in a mixed mode geometry estimated via multi-parameter fracture criteria

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Malíková, L.; Veselý, V.; Seitl, Stanislav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 89, AUG (2016), s. 99-107 ISSN 0142-1123. [International Conference on Characterisation of Crack Tip Fields /3./. Urbino, 20.04.2015-22.04.2015] Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Near-crack-tip fields * Mixed mode * Crack propagation direction * Multi-parameter fracture criteria * Finite element analysis Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 2.899, year: 2016

  4. Image-based detection and analysis of crack propagation in cementitious composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, E.B.; Fischer, Gregor; Barros, J.A.O.

    2011-01-01

    after the cracking process has occurred. The alternative nondestructive methods are often either not precise enough or experimentally too demanding. In this study, the use of an image analysis procedure to capture the crack initiation and propagation process is described, which utilizes digital images...

  5. Comparative Study on Prediction Effects of Short Fatigue Crack Propagation Rate by Two Different Calculation Methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Bing; Liao, Zhen; Qin, Yahang; Wu, Yayun; Liang, Sai; Xiao, Shoune; Yang, Guangwu; Zhu, Tao

    2017-05-01

    To describe the complicated nonlinear process of the fatigue short crack evolution behavior, especially the change of the crack propagation rate, two different calculation methods are applied. The dominant effective short fatigue crack propagation rates are calculated based on the replica fatigue short crack test with nine smooth funnel-shaped specimens and the observation of the replica films according to the effective short fatigue cracks principle. Due to the fast decay and the nonlinear approximation ability of wavelet analysis, the self-learning ability of neural network, and the macroscopic searching and global optimization of genetic algorithm, the genetic wavelet neural network can reflect the implicit complex nonlinear relationship when considering multi-influencing factors synthetically. The effective short fatigue cracks and the dominant effective short fatigue crack are simulated and compared by the Genetic Wavelet Neural Network. The simulation results show that Genetic Wavelet Neural Network is a rational and available method for studying the evolution behavior of fatigue short crack propagation rate. Meanwhile, a traditional data fitting method for a short crack growth model is also utilized for fitting the test data. It is reasonable and applicable for predicting the growth rate. Finally, the reason for the difference between the prediction effects by these two methods is interpreted.

  6. Crack Propagation Calculations for Optical Fibers under Static Bending and Tensile Loads Using Continuum Damage Mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yunxia; Cui, Yuxuan; Gong, Wenjun

    2017-01-01

    Static fatigue behavior is the main failure mode of optical fibers applied in sensors. In this paper, a computational framework based on continuum damage mechanics (CDM) is presented to calculate the crack propagation process and failure time of optical fibers subjected to static bending and tensile loads. For this purpose, the static fatigue crack propagation in the glass core of the optical fiber is studied. Combining a finite element method (FEM), we use the continuum damage mechanics for the glass core to calculate the crack propagation path and corresponding failure time. In addition, three factors including bending radius, tensile force and optical fiber diameter are investigated to find their impacts on the crack propagation process and failure time of the optical fiber under concerned situations. Finally, experiments are conducted and the results verify the correctness of the simulation calculation. It is believed that the proposed method could give a straightforward description of the crack propagation path in the inner glass core. Additionally, the predicted crack propagation time of the optical fiber with different factors can provide effective suggestions for improving the long-term usage of optical fibers. PMID:29140284

  7. Lifetime prediction for the subsurface crack propagation using three-dimensional dynamic FEA model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Yuan; Chen, Yun-Xia; Liu, Le

    2017-03-01

    The subsurface crack propagation is one of the major interests for gear system research. The subsurface crack propagation lifetime is the number of cycles remaining for a spall to appear, which can be obtained through either stress intensity factor or accumulated plastic strain analysis. In this paper, the heavy loads are applied to the gear system. When choosing stress intensity factor, the high compressive stress suppresses Mode I stress intensities and severely reduces Mode II stress intensities in the heavily loaded lubricated contacts. Such that, the accumulated plastic strain is selected to calculate the subsurface crack propagation lifetime from the three-dimensional FEA model through ANSYS Workbench transient analysis. The three-dimensional gear FEA dynamic model with the subsurface crack is built through dividing the gears into several small elements. The calculation of the total cycles of the elements is proposed based on the time-varying accumulated plastic strain, which then will be used to calculate the subsurface crack propagation lifetime. During this process, the demonstration from a subsurface crack to a spall can be uncovered. In addition, different sizes of the elements around the subsurface crack are compared in this paper. The influences of the frictional coefficient and external torque on the crack propagation lifetime are also discussed. The results show that the lifetime of crack propagation decreases significantly when the external load T increasing from 100 N m to 150 N m. Given from the distributions of the accumulated plastic strain, the lifetime shares no significant difference when the frictional coefficient f ranging in 0.04-0.06.

  8. Interface fatigue crack propagation in sandwich X-joints – Part I: Experiments

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moslemian, Ramin; Berggreen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    In this study, face/core fatigue crack growth in sandwich X-joints is investigated numerically and experimentally. The work presented here covers Part I of the study which includes an experimental investigation of fatigue crack growth in sandwich X-joints and characterization of the face/core int...... specimens. The measured crack growth rates have been used in Part II of this study to simulate fatigue crack growth in the sandwich tear test specimens.......In this study, face/core fatigue crack growth in sandwich X-joints is investigated numerically and experimentally. The work presented here covers Part I of the study which includes an experimental investigation of fatigue crack growth in sandwich X-joints and characterization of the face...... Correlation technique was used to locate the crack tip and monitor the crack growth. For the specimens with H45 core, unstable crack growth took place initially. Following the unstable propagation, the crack propagated in the core underneath the resin-rich cell layer approaching the interface. However...

  9. Modelling of Debond and Crack Propagation in Sandwich Structures Using Fracture and Damage Mechanics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berggreen, C.; Simonsen, Bo Cerup; Toernqvist, Rikard

    2003-01-01

    Skin-core de-bonding or core crack propagation will often be dominating mechanisms in the collapse modes of sandwich structures. This paper presents two different methods for prediction of crack propagation in a sandwich structure: a fracture mechanics approach, where a new mode-mix method...... is presented, and a local damage mechanics approach. The paper presents a real-life application example, where the superstructure in a vessel pulls the skin off the sandwich deck. The calculations show almost unstable crack growth initially followed by a stabilization, and a nearly linear relation between...

  10. Modeling of crack propagation in weak snowpack layers using the discrete element method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaume, J.; van Herwijnen, A.; Chambon, G.; Birkeland, K. W.; Schweizer, J.

    2015-10-01

    Dry-snow slab avalanches are generally caused by a sequence of fracture processes including (1) failure initiation in a weak snow layer underlying a cohesive slab, (2) crack propagation within the weak layer and (3) tensile fracture through the slab which leads to its detachment. During the past decades, theoretical and experimental work has gradually led to a better understanding of the fracture process in snow involving the collapse of the structure in the weak layer during fracture. This now allows us to better model failure initiation and the onset of crack propagation, i.e., to estimate the critical length required for crack propagation. On the other hand, our understanding of dynamic crack propagation and fracture arrest propensity is still very limited. To shed more light on this issue, we performed numerical propagation saw test (PST) experiments applying the discrete element (DE) method and compared the numerical results with field measurements based on particle tracking. The goal is to investigate the influence of weak layer failure and the mechanical properties of the slab on crack propagation and fracture arrest propensity. Crack propagation speeds and distances before fracture arrest were derived from the DE simulations for different snowpack configurations and mechanical properties. Then, in order to compare the numerical and experimental results, the slab mechanical properties (Young's modulus and strength) which are not measured in the field were derived from density. The simulations nicely reproduced the process of crack propagation observed in field PSTs. Finally, the mechanical processes at play were analyzed in depth which led to suggestions for minimum column length in field PSTs.

  11. Comparative Study on Crack Initiation and Propagation of Glass under Thermal Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Wang

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This paper explores the fracture process based on finite element simulation. Both probabilistic and deterministic methods are employed to model crack initiation, and several commonly used criteria are utilized to predict crack growth. It is concluded that the criteria of maximum tensile stress, maximum normal stress, and maximum Mises stress, as well as the Coulomb-Mohr criterion are able to predict the initiation of the first crack. The mixed-mode criteria based on the stress intensity factor (SIF, energy release rate, and the maximum principal stress, as well as the SIF-based maximum circumferential stress criterion are suitable to predict the crack propagation.

  12. Shear crack formation and propagation in fiber reinforced cementitious composites (FRCC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paegle, Ieva; Fischer, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    Knowledge of the mechanisms controlling crack formation, propagation and failure of FRCC under shear loading is currently limited. This paper presents a study that utilized photogrammetry to monitor the shear deformations of two FRCC materials and ordinary concrete (OC). Multiple shear cracks...... and strain hardening of both FRCC materials was observed under shear loading. The influence of fibers, fiber type, including polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polypropylene (PP) fibers, and shear crack angle were investigated. Based upon photogrammetric results, fundamental descriptions of shear crack opening...

  13. Shear crack formation and propagation in fiber reinforced cementitious composites (FRCC)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paegle, Ieva; Fischer, Gregor

    2012-01-01

    Knowledge of the mechanisms controlling crack formation, propagation and failure of FRCC under shear loading is currently limited. This paper presents a study that utilized photogrammetry to monitor the shear deformations of two FRCC materials and ordinary concrete (OC). Multiple shear cracks...... and strain hardening of both FRCC materials was observed under shear loading. The influence of fibers, fiber type, including polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) and polypropylene (PP) fibers, and shear crack angle were investigated. Based upon photogrammetric results, fundamental descriptions of shear crack opening...

  14. Propagation of a Dugdale crack at the edge of a half plane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferdjani, Hicheme; Abdelmoula, Radhi

    2018-01-01

    This work deals with the propagation of a Dugdale crack at the edge of a half plane. The corresponding singular integral equation is solved semi-analytically. The expressions of the stress intensity factor and of the crack gap are deduced. A propagation criterion deduced from the revisited Griffith theory (Ferdjani and Marigo in Eur J Mech A Solids 53:1-9, 2015) is applied. The length of the process zone is calculated and compared with the literature results. The presented results show the evolution of the applied load with the crack length for different values of the ratio of the critical length of the Dugdale model to the initial crack length. The shape of the crack gap is also presented. Finally, a comparison between the Griffith and Dugdale models is performed.

  15. Analytical Model for Fictitious Crack Propagation in Concrete Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulfkjær, J. P.; Krenk, Steen; Brincker, Rune

    1995-01-01

    An analytical model for load-displacement curves of concrete beams is presented. The load-displacement curve is obtained by combining two simple models. The fracture is modeled by a fictitious crack in an elastic layer around the midsection of the beam. Outside the elastic layer the deformations...... are modeled by beam theory. The state of stress in the elastic layer is assumed to depend bilinearly on local elongation corresponding to a linear softening relation for the fictitious crack. Results from the analytical model are compared with results from a more detailed model based on numerical methods...... for different beam sizes. The analytical model is shown to be in agreement with the numerical results if the thickness of the elastic layer is taken as half the beam depth. It is shown that the point on the load-displacement curve where the fictitious crack starts to develop and the point where the real crack...

  16. A Continuum-Atomistic Analysis of Transgranular Crack Propagation in Aluminum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamakov, V.; Saether, E.; Glaessgen, E.

    2009-01-01

    A concurrent multiscale modeling methodology that embeds a molecular dynamics (MD) region within a finite element (FEM) domain is used to study plastic processes at a crack tip in a single crystal of aluminum. The case of mode I loading is studied. A transition from deformation twinning to full dislocation emission from the crack tip is found when the crack plane is rotated around the [111] crystallographic axis. When the crack plane normal coincides with the [112] twinning direction, the crack propagates through a twinning mechanism. When the crack plane normal coincides with the [011] slip direction, the crack propagates through the emission of full dislocations. In intermediate orientations, a transition from full dislocation emission to twinning is found to occur with an increase in the stress intensity at the crack tip. This finding confirms the suggestion that the very high strain rates, inherently present in MD simulations, which produce higher stress intensities at the crack tip, over-predict the tendency for deformation twinning compared to experiments. The present study, therefore, aims to develop a more realistic and accurate predictive modeling of fracture processes.

  17. Prediction of three-dimensional crack propagation paths taking high cycle fatigue into account

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guido Dhondt

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Engine components are usually subject to complex loading patterns such as mixed-mode Low Cycle Fatigue Loading due to maneuvering. In practice, this LCF Loading has to be superimposed by High Cyclic Fatigue Loading caused by vibrations. The changes brought along by HCF are twofold: first, the vibrational cycles which are superposed on the LCF mission increase the maximum loading of the mission and may alter the principal stress planes. Secondly, the HCF cycles themselves have to be evaluated on their own, assuring that no crack propagation occurs. Indeed, the vibrational frequency is usually so high that propagation leads to immediate failure. In the present paper it is explained how these two effects can be taken care of in a standard LCF crack propagation procedure. The method is illustrated by applying the Finite Element based crack propagation software CRACKTRACER3D on an engine blade.

  18. Analytical Model for Fictitious Crack Propagation in Reinforced Concrete Beams without Debonding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulfkjær, J. P.; Brincker, Rune

    1994-01-01

    The non-linear fracture mechanical problem of combined crack growth and reinforcement action is modelled by adopting a simplified fictitious crack model for concrete and a linear elastic-plastic action for the reinforcement. The softening relation of the concrete is assumed to be linear, however......, the crack growth is further simplified by introducing a continuous layer of springs at the midsection mainly representing a simplified material response around the fracture zone. In the reinforcement the strain condition is assumed to be equal to the strain condition in the concrete. the important question...... of de-bonding between the reinforcement and the concrete is therefore not considered. The model gives closed form solutions for the whole load displacement curve. Further, the model can describe important effects qualitatively correct. For instance the change of behaviour from brittle to ductile when...

  19. Evaluation of variables affecting crack propagation by Delayed Hydride Cracking in Zr-2.5Nb with different heat treatments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mieza, J.I., E-mail: mieza@cnea.gov.ar [CNEA, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Dano por Hidrogeno, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, San Martin (B1650KNA), Bs. As. (Argentina); Instituto Sabato, UNSAM-CNEA, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, San Martin (B1650KNA), Bs. As. (Argentina); Vigna, G.L.; Domizzi, G. [CNEA, Centro Atomico Constituyentes, Dano por Hidrogeno, Av. Gral. Paz 1499, San Martin (B1650KNA), Bs. As. (Argentina)

    2011-04-15

    Delayed Hydride Cracking (DHC) is a failure mechanism that may occur in zirconium alloys used in nuclear reactor core components. The knowledge of the direct effects of the variables affecting the cracking velocity could be used to minimize the risk of crack propagation. In practice, most of these variables - as for example the alloy yield stress and hydrogen diffusion coefficient - are coupled and vary during reactor operation, leading to a complex variable dependence of the cracking mechanism. In order to get an insight into the relative effect of these variables, experimental data and a theoretical approach using a generally accepted DHC model were used in this work. A series of DHC velocity measurements were made in Zr-2.5Nb tube with different heat treatments. The yield stress, the Nb concentration in {beta} phase, and hydrogen solvus of the alloy were measured for different heat treatments. Niobium concentration in {beta} phase gave an indirect indication of {beta}-phase continuity and, with a proper correlation, of the hydrogen diffusion coefficient. The obtained values were used as inputs in a theoretical calculation of cracking velocity. Good agreement between experimental data and predicted values was obtained, showing that hydrogen diffusion coefficient was the most relevant variable affecting DHC velocity cracking. Furthermore, this approach has been demonstrated to be useful in estimating DHC velocity in irradiated materials.

  20. Visualization of non-propagating Lamb wave modes for fatigue crack evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Yun-Kyu; Sohn, Hoon

    2015-03-01

    This article develops a non-propagating Lamb wave mode (NPL) imaging technique for fatigue crack visualization. NPL has a great potential for crack evaluation in that it significantly contributes local mode amplitudes in the vicinity of a crack without spatial propagation. Such unique physical phenomenon is theoretically proven and experimentally measured through laser scanning. Although its measurement is a quite challenging work due to the fact that it is quite localized and coexists with complex propagating Lamb wave modes, a NPL filter proposed in this article overcomes the technical challenge by eliminating all propagating Lamb modes from laser scanned full Lamb wavefields. Through the NPL filtering process, only fatigue crack-induced NPLs can be measured and retained. To verify such physical observation and the corresponding NPL filter, a real micro fatigue crack is created by applying repeated tensile loading, and its detectability is tested using a surface-mounted piezoelectric transducer for generating Lamb waves and a laser Doppler vibrometer for measuring the corresponding responses. The experimental results confirm that even an invisible fatigue crack can be instantaneously visualized and effectively evaluated through the proposed NPL measurement and filtering processes.

  1. Asymptotical analysis and Padé approximation in problems on diffusion-controlled cracks propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alla V. Balueva

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In this work, we consider the diffusion-controlled axisymmetric fracture in an infinite space, and half-space. An important example of diffusion-controlled fracture growth is given by hydrogen induced cracking. In metals, hydrogen is typically dissolved in the proton form. When protons reach the crack surface, they recombine with electrons and form molecular hydrogen in the crack cavity. Then, the fracture can propagate even in the absence of any external loading, that is, only under the excessive pressure of gas hydrogen accumulated inside the crack. Our results show that in the long-time asymptotic approximation (based on the quasi-static solution, the diffusion-controlled delamination propagates with constant velocity. We determine a maximum critical concentration that limits the use of the quasi-static solution. A transient solution, representing a short time asymptotic approximation, is used when the concentration of gas exceeds the critical concentration. We then match these two end-member cases by using the method of Padé approximations and present closed-form solutions for both internal and near-surface diffusion-controlled crack propagation at different time scales. Keywords: diffusion, crack propagation, asymptotic analysis, Padé approximation. Mathematics Subject Classification: 74A45, 74N25, 41A21.

  2. Propagation of cohesive crack in unsaturated porous media by use of XFEM method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mokhtari Alireza

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Various damage models have been presented to model the cracks. These models don’t simulate the discontinuity in displacement field; just see its effect on an upper level on stress field through damage parameter. Damage parameter is used to modify other fields like pressure. This paper tries to model crack itself through fracture mechanics. The opening of the crack is modeled and is connected to stress field by use of cohesive crack model that relates plasticity of crack tip to its opening. When crack opens, there exists discharge of water and gas through crack that are calculated by use of multiscale methods and incorporated in weak form of governing equations.Due to complexity of proposed model, it can’t be solved analytically and extended finite element method (XFEM is used to solve it. Xfem method which is based on partition of unity property of FEM adds some terms to conventional interpolation functions to model discontinuity of fields adjacent to the crack. This method simulates crack in ordinary mesh of FEM and doesn’t need remeshing around the crack when it propagates.

  3. Environment enhanced fatigue crack propagation in metals: Inputs to fracture mechanics life prediction models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangloff, Richard P.; Kim, Sang-Shik

    1993-01-01

    This report is a critical review of both environment-enhanced fatigue crack propagation data and the predictive capabilities of crack growth rate models. This information provides the necessary foundation for incorporating environmental effects in NASA FLAGRO and will better enable predictions of aerospace component fatigue lives. The review presents extensive literature data on 'stress corrosion cracking and corrosion fatigue.' The linear elastic fracture mechanics approach, based on stress intensity range (Delta(K)) similitude with microscopic crack propagation threshold and growth rates, provides a basis for these data. Results are presented showing enhanced growth rates for gases (viz., H2 and H2O) and electrolytes (e.g. NaCl and H2O) in aerospace alloys including: C-Mn and heat treated alloy steels, aluminum alloys, nickel-based superalloys, and titanium alloys. Environment causes purely time-dependent accelerated fatigue crack growth above the monotonic load cracking threshold (KIEAC) and promotes cycle-time dependent cracking below (KIEAC). These phenomenon are discussed in terms of hydrogen embrittlement, dissolution, and film rupture crack tip damage mechanisms.

  4. Effect of defect length on rolling contact fatigue crack propagation in high strength steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Makino

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the present paper is to clarify the effect of defect length in depth direction on rolling contact fatigue (RCF crack propagation in high strength steel. RCF test and synchrotron radiation micro computed tomography (SR micro CT imaging were conducted. In the case of the defect with the 15 m diameter, flaking life decreased with increasing defect length. In a comparison of the CT image and the SEM view, the shapes of defects and the locations of the horizontal cracks were almost the same respectively. The mechanism of RCF crack propagation was discussed by finite element (FE analysis. Defects led to higher tensile residual stress than that without defects in the region where the defect exists. The shear stress range at 0.1 mm in depth on the middle line of the defect and the range of mode II stress intensity factor at the bottom of a vertical crack increased with increasing defect length.

  5. Corrosion initiation and propagation in cracked concrete - a literature review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pacheco, J.; Polder, R.

    2012-01-01

    The major degradation mechanism in civil engineering concrete structures is corrosion of reinforcement due to chloride penetration. Corrosion reduces serviceability and safety due to cracking and spalling of concrete and loss of steel cross section. Recently, service life design has moved from

  6. Shear crack formation and propagation in reinforced Engineered Cementitious Composites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paegle, Ieva; Fischer, Gregor

    2011-01-01

    capacity of beams loaded primarily in shear. The experimental program consists of ECC with short randomly distributed polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) fiber beams with different stirrup arrangements and conventional reinforced concrete (R/C) counterparts for comparison. The shear crack formation mechanism of ECC...

  7. Fatigue Crack Propagation Simulation in Plane Stress Constraint

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ricardo, Luiz Carlos Hernandes; Spinelli, Dirceu

    2010-01-01

    Nowadays, structural and materials engineers develop structures and materials properties using finite element method. This work presents a numerical determination of fatigue crack opening and closure stress intensity factors of a C(T) specimen. Two different standard variable spectrum loadings ar...

  8. Fatigue Crack Propagation from Notched Specimens of 304 SS in elevated Temperature Aqueous Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wire, G. L.; Mills, W. J.

    2002-08-01

    Fatigue crack propagation (FCP) rates for 304 stainless steel (304SS) were determined in 24 degree C and 288 degree C air and 288 degree C water using double-edged notch (DEN) specimens of 304 stainless steel (304 SS). Test performed at matched loading conditions in air and water at 288 degree C with 20-6- cc h[sub]2/kg h[sub]2O provided a direct comparison of the relative crack growth rates in air and water over a wide range of crack growth rates. The DEN crack extension ranged from short cracks (0.03-0.25 mm) to long cracks up to 4.06 mm, which are consistent with conventional deep crack tests. Crack growth rates of 304 SS in water were about 12 times the air rate. This 12X environmental enhancement persisted to crack extensions up to 4.06 mm, far outside the range associated with short crack effects. The large environmental degradation for 304 SS crack growth is consistent with the strong reduction of fatigue life in high hydrogen water. Further, very similar environmental effects w ere reported in fatigue crack growth tests in hydrogen water chemistry (HWC). Most literature data in high hydrogen water show only a mild environmental effect for 304 SS, of order 2.5 times air or less, but the tests were predominantly performed at high cyclic stress intensity or equivalently, high air rates. The environmental effect in low oxygen environments at low stress intensity depends strongly on both the stress ratio, R, and the load rise time, T[sub]r, as recently reported for austenitic stainless steel in BWR water. Fractography was performed for both tests in air and water. At 288 degree C in water, the fracture surfaces were crisply faceted with a crystallographic appearance, and showed striations under high magnification. The cleavage-like facets on the fracture surfaces suggest that hydrogen embrittlement is the primary cause of accelerated cracking.

  9. Nonlocal Peridynamic Modeling and Simulation on Crack Propagation in Concrete Structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Huang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available An extended peridynamic approach for crack propagation analysis in concrete structures was proposed. In the peridynamic constitutive model, concrete material was described as a series of interacting particles, and the short-range repulsive force and anisotropic behavior of concrete were taken into account in the expression of the interactive bonding force, which was given in terms of classical elastic constants and peridynamic horizon. The damage of material was defined locally at the level of pairwise bond, and the critical stretch of material bond was described as a function of fracture strength in the classical concrete failure theory. The efficiency and accuracy of the proposed model and algorithms were validated by simulating the propagation of mode I and I-II mixed mode cracks in concrete slabs. Furthermore, crack propagation in a double-edge notched concrete beam subjected to four-point load was simulated, in which the experimental observations are captured naturally as a consequence of the solution.

  10. Development of fatigue crack propagation models for engineering applications at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomkins, B.

    1975-05-01

    The value of modelling the fatigue crack propagation process is discussed and current models are examined in the light of increasing knowledge of crack tip deformation. Elevated temperature fatigue is examined in detail as an area in which models could contribute significantly to engineering design. A model is developed which examines the role of time-dependent creep cavitation on the failure process in an interactive creep-fatigue situation. (auth)

  11. A phase field model coupling lithium diffusion and stress evolution with crack propagation and application in lithium ion batteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Peng; Zhao, Ya-Pu

    2015-01-07

    Cracking and fracture of electrodes under diffusion during lithiation and delithiation is one of the main factors responsible for short life span of lithium based batteries employing high capacity electrodes. Coupling effects among lithium diffusion, stress evolution and crack propagation have a significant effect on dynamic processes of electrodes during cycling. In this paper, a phase field model coupling lithium diffusion and stress evolution with crack propagation is established. Then the model is applied to a silicon thin film electrode to explore the coupling effects on diffusion and crack propagation paths. During lithiation, simulation results show that lithium accumulates at crack tips and the lithium accumulation further reduces the local hydrostatic stress. Single and multiple crack geometries are considered to elucidate some of the crack patterns in thin film electrodes as a consequence of coupling effects and crack interactions.

  12. The effect of endodontic procedures on apical crack initiation and propagation ex vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adorno, C G; Yoshioka, T; Jindan, P; Kobayashi, C; Suda, H

    2013-08-01

    To evaluate the potential effects of endodontic procedures (instrumentation and filling) on crack initiation and propagation in apical dentine. Forty extracted single-rooted premolars with two canals were selected, 1.5 mm of the apex was ground perpendicular to the long axis of the tooth and the surface polished. The specimens were divided into 4 groups. The buccal canals of groups A, B and C were enlarged to size 40 with manual K-files. Group A was filled with gutta-percha using lateral condensation and vertical compaction without sealer. Group B was filled with the same method as group A except only lateral condensation was used. Group C was left unfilled, while group D was left unprepared and unfilled. Images of the resected surface were taken after resection (baseline), after canal preparation, after filling and after 4-week storage. The images were then inspected for cracks originating from the canal. A significant effect of preparation on crack initiation (P  0.05) or 4-week storage on crack initiation (P > 0.05) was found (logistic regression). Fisher's exact test revealed a significant effect of filling on crack propagation (P  0.05). Root canal procedures can potentially initiate and propagate cracks from within the root canal in the apical region. © 2013 International Endodontic Journal. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. DERIVED EQUATIONS FOR DAMAGE ACCUMULATION IN GEARED WHEELS BASED ON MODIFIED LAWS OF CRACK PROPAGATION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Józef DREWNIAK

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Versatile hypotheses of fatigue damage accumulation are utilized in order to determine the fatigue life of particular mechanical elements. Such an approach to an analysis of fatigue processes is recognized as being phenomenological. In the present paper, modifications to the Paris and Foreman laws of fracture mechanics have been proposed. The goal of these modifications is an explicit formulation of crack propagation velocity as a function of crack length. Additionally, the process of crack growth was simulated according to the Palmgren-Miner and Pugno-Ciavarella-Cornetti-Carpinteri fatigue hypotheses. The results of simulation were verified based upon test stand experiments.

  14. In-situ acousto-ultrasonic monitoring of crack propagation in Al2024 alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanniamparambil, Prashanth A.; Bartoli, Ivan; Hazeli, Kavan; Cuadra, Jefferson; Schwartz, Eric; Saralaya, Raghavendra; Kontsos, Antonios

    2012-04-01

    A data fusion technique implementing the principles of acoustic emission (AE), ultrasonic testing (UT) and digital image correlation (DIC) was employed to in situ monitor crack propagation in an Al 2024 alloy compact tension (CT) specimen. The specimen was designed according to ASTM E647-08 and was pre-cracked under fatigue loading to ensure stable crack growth. Tensile (Mode I) loads were applied according to ASTM E1290-08 while simultaneously recording AE activity, transmitting ultrasonic pulses and measuring full-field surface strains. Realtime 2D source location AE algorithms and visualization provided by the DIC system allowed the full quantification of the crack growth and the cross-validation of the recorded non-destructive testing data. In post mortem, waveform features sensitive to crack propagation were extracted and visible trends as a function of computed crack length were observed. In addition, following a data fusion approach, features from the three independent monitoring systems were combined to define damage sensitive correlations. Furthermore a novelty detector based on the Mahalanobis outlier analysis was implemented to quantify the extent of crack growth and to define a more robust sensing basis for the proposed system.

  15. Analytical Model for Fictitious Crack Propagation in Concrete Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ulfkjær, J. P.; Krenk, S.; Brincker, Rune

    An analytical model for load-displacement curves of unreinforced notched and un-notched concrete beams is presented. The load displacement-curve is obtained by combining two simple models. The fracture is modelled by a fictitious crack in an elastic layer around the mid-section of the beam. Outside...... the elastic layer the deformations are modelled by the Timoshenko beam theory. The state of stress in the elastic layer is assumed to depend bi-lineary on local elongation corresponding to a linear softening relation for the fictitious crack. For different beam size results from the analytical model...... is compared with results from a more accurate model based on numerical methods. The analytical model is shown to be in good agreement with the numerical results if the thickness of the elastic layer is taken as half the beam depth. Several general results are obtained. It is shown that the point on the load...

  16. Corrosion cracking propagation and fatigue strength of complex technical systems

    OpenAIRE

    A.R. Arutyunyan; R.A. Arutyunyan

    2013-01-01

    The reliability problem of complex mechanical systems composed of some number of elements with the crack type defects, which growth rate is essentially governed by the processes of corrosion fatigue, was considered. Among these systems there are different engineering constructions: energetic, transport, chemical and others. Taking into account that the reliability of a system as a whole depends on the reliability of individual elements and the way of their connection, the systems with the...

  17. Analysis of crack propagation in human long bone by using finite element modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salim, Mohammad Shahril; Salleh, Ahmad Faizal; Daud, Ruslizam

    2017-12-01

    The aim of this research is to present a numerical modeling of crack for human long bone specifically on femur shaft bone under mode I loading condition. Two - dimensional model (2D) of long bone was developed based on past research study. The finite element analysis and construction of the model are done using Mechanical APDL (ANSYS) v14.0 software. The research was conducted mainly based on two conditions that were at different crack lengths and different loading forces for male and female. In order to evaluate the stress intensity factor (KI) of the femur shaft of long bone, this research employed finite element method to predict the brittle fracture loading by using three-point bending test. The result of numerical test found that the crack was formed when the crack length reached 0.0022 m where KI values are proportional with the crack's length. Also, various loading forces in range of 400 N to 1000 N were applied in an attempt to study their effect on stress intensity factor and it was found that the female dimension has higher KI values compared to male. It was also observed that K values found by this method have good agreement with theoretical results based on previous research.

  18. Effect of micromorphology of cortical bone tissue on crack propagation under dynamic loading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mayao; Gao, Xing; Abdel-Wahab, Adel; Li, Simin; Zimmermann, Elizabeth A.; Riedel, Christoph; Busse, Björn; Silberschmidt, Vadim V.

    2015-09-01

    Structural integrity of bone tissue plays an important role in daily activities of humans. However, traumatic incidents such as sports injuries, collisions and falls can cause bone fracture, servere pain and mobility loss. In addition, ageing and degenerative bone diseases such as osteoporosis can increase the risk of fracture [1]. As a composite-like material, a cortical bone tissue is capable of tolerating moderate fracture/cracks without complete failure. The key to this is its heterogeneously distributed microstructural constituents providing both intrinsic and extrinsic toughening mechanisms. At micro-scale level, cortical bone can be considered as a four-phase composite material consisting of osteons, Haversian canals, cement lines and interstitial matrix. These microstructural constituents can directly affect local distributions of stresses and strains, and, hence, crack initiation and propagation. Therefore, understanding the effect of micromorphology of cortical bone on crack initiation and propagation, especially under dynamic loading regimes is of great importance for fracture risk evaluation. In this study, random microstructures of a cortical bone tissue were modelled with finite elements for four groups: healthy (control), young age, osteoporosis and bisphosphonate-treated, based on osteonal morphometric parameters measured from microscopic images for these groups. The developed models were loaded under the same dynamic loading conditions, representing a direct impact incident, resulting in progressive crack propagation. An extended finite-element method (X-FEM) was implemented to realize solution-dependent crack propagation within the microstructured cortical bone tissues. The obtained simulation results demonstrate significant differences due to micromorphology of cortical bone, in terms of crack propagation characteristics for different groups, with the young group showing highest fracture resistance and the senior group the lowest.

  19. Effect of micromorphology of cortical bone tissue on crack propagation under dynamic loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Mayao

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Structural integrity of bone tissue plays an important role in daily activities of humans. However, traumatic incidents such as sports injuries, collisions and falls can cause bone fracture, servere pain and mobility loss. In addition, ageing and degenerative bone diseases such as osteoporosis can increase the risk of fracture [1]. As a composite-like material, a cortical bone tissue is capable of tolerating moderate fracture/cracks without complete failure. The key to this is its heterogeneously distributed microstructural constituents providing both intrinsic and extrinsic toughening mechanisms. At micro-scale level, cortical bone can be considered as a four-phase composite material consisting of osteons, Haversian canals, cement lines and interstitial matrix. These microstructural constituents can directly affect local distributions of stresses and strains, and, hence, crack initiation and propagation. Therefore, understanding the effect of micromorphology of cortical bone on crack initiation and propagation, especially under dynamic loading regimes is of great importance for fracture risk evaluation. In this study, random microstructures of a cortical bone tissue were modelled with finite elements for four groups: healthy (control, young age, osteoporosis and bisphosphonate-treated, based on osteonal morphometric parameters measured from microscopic images for these groups. The developed models were loaded under the same dynamic loading conditions, representing a direct impact incident, resulting in progressive crack propagation. An extended finite-element method (X-FEM was implemented to realize solution-dependent crack propagation within the microstructured cortical bone tissues. The obtained simulation results demonstrate significant differences due to micromorphology of cortical bone, in terms of crack propagation characteristics for different groups, with the young group showing highest fracture resistance and the senior group the

  20. ANALYTICAL EVALUATION OF CRACK PROPAGATION FOR BULB HYDRAULIC TURBINES SHAFTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mircea O. POPOVICU

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available The Hydroelectric Power Plants uses the regenerating energy of rivers. The hydraulic Bulb turbines running with low heads are excellent alternative energy sources. The shafts of these units present themselves as massive pieces, with cylindrical shape, manufactured from low-alloyed steels. The paper analyses the fatigue cracks occurring at some turbines in the neighbourhood of the connection zone between the shaft and the turbine runner flange. To obtain the tension state in this zone ANSIS and AFGROW computing programs were used. The number of running hours until the piercing of the shaft wall is established as a useful result.

  1. Laser cutting sandwich structure glass-silicon-glass wafer with laser induced thermal-crack propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cai, Yecheng; Wang, Maolu; Zhang, Hongzhi; Yang, Lijun; Fu, Xihong; Wang, Yang

    2017-08-01

    Silicon-glass devices are widely used in IC industry, MEMS and solar energy system because of their reliability and simplicity of the manufacturing process. With the trend toward the wafer level chip scale package (WLCSP) technology, the suitable dicing method of silicon-glass bonded structure wafer has become necessary. In this paper, a combined experimental and computational approach is undertaken to investigate the feasibility of cutting the sandwich structure glass-silicon-glass (SGS) wafer with laser induced thermal-crack propagation (LITP) method. A 1064 nm semiconductor laser cutting system with double laser beams which could simultaneously irradiate on the top and bottom of the sandwich structure wafer has been designed. A mathematical model for describing the physical process of the interaction between laser and SGS wafer, which consists of two surface heating sources and two volumetric heating sources, has been established. The temperature stress distribution are simulated by using finite element method (FEM) analysis software ABAQUS. The crack propagation process is analyzed by using the J-integral method. In the FEM model, a stationary planar crack is embedded in the wafer and the J-integral values around the crack front edge are determined using the FEM. A verification experiment under typical parameters is conducted and the crack propagation profile on the fracture surface is examined by the optical microscope and explained from the stress distribution and J-integral value.

  2. Influence of the crack propagation rate in the obtaining opening and closing stress intensity factor by finite element method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Carlos H. Ricardo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Crack propagation simulation began with the development of the finite element method; the analyses were conducted to obtain a basic understanding of the crack growth. Today structural and materials engineers develop structures and materials properties using this technique as criterion design. The aim of this paper is to verify the effect of different crack propagation rates in determination of crack opening and closing stress of an ASTM specimen under a standard suspension spectrum loading from FD&E SAE Keyhole Specimen Test Load Histories by finite element analysis. The crack propagation simulation was based on release nodes at the minimum loads to minimize convergence problems. To understand the crack propagation processes under variable amplitude loading, retardation effects are discussed.

  3. Crack Propagation in a Toughened Epoxy Adhesive under Repeated Impacts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian A. Ashcroft

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Adhesives are being increasingly used in structural applications, especially in aerospace, automotive and naval structures, making their structural integrity an important issue. In-service loading histories of such structures usually contain low-energy impacts, repetition of which can significantly affect their performance. This paper deals with the behaviour of the toughened epoxy adhesive FM73 under repeated impacts, known as impact fatigue. Izod impact fatigue tests were performed on FM73 specimens in order to study the evolution of damage and to characterise this via measurable parameters, such as the maximum force and the contact time. A finite element model was developed to simulate the impact tests and this was used to calculate the dynamic strain energy release rate, which was compared with that determined using a simple analytical method. A relationship between the maximum dynamic strain energy release rate and impact fatigue crack growth rate was established that was used as the basis of an impact fatigue crack growth law.

  4. Effect of segregations on mechanical properties and crack propagation in spring steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Žužek

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Considerable efforts have been made over the last decades to improve performance of spring steels, which would increase the service time of springs and also allow vehicles weight reduction. There are different possibilities of improving properties of spring steels, from modifying the chemical composition of steels to optimizing the deformation process and changing the heat treatment parameters. Another way of improving steel properties is through refining the microstructure and reducing amount of inclusions. Therefore, the focus of the current investigation was to determine the effect of more uniform and cleaner microstructure obtained through electro-slag remelting (ESR of steel on the mechanical and dynamic properties of spring steel, with special focus on the resistance to fatigue crack propagation. Effect of the microstructure refinement was evaluated in terms of tensile strength, elongation, fracture and impact toughness, and fatigue resistance under bending and tensile loading. After the mechanical tests the fracture surfaces of samples were analyzed using scanning electron microscope (SEM and the influence of microstructure properties on the crack propagation and crack propagation resistance was studied. Investigation was performed on hot rolled, soft annealed and vacuum heat treated 51CrV4 spring steel produced by conventional continuous casting and compared with steel additional refined through ESR. Results shows that elimination of segregations and microstructure refinement using additional ESR process gives some improvement in terms of better repeatability and reduced scattering, but on the other hand it has negative effect on crack propagation resistance and fatigue properties of the spring steel.

  5. Compressive performance and crack propagation in Al alloy/Ti{sub 2}AlC composites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanaor, D.A.H., E-mail: dorian.hanaor@sydney.edu.au [School of Civil Engineering, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Hu, L. [Ames Laboratory, U.S. Department of Energy, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States); Kan, W.H.; Proust, G. [School of Civil Engineering, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Foley, M. [Australian Centre for Microscopy and Microanalysis, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW 2006 (Australia); Karaman, I.; Radovic, M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Texas A& M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States)

    2016-08-30

    Composite materials comprising a porous Ti{sub 2}AlC matrix and Al 6061 alloy were fabricated by a current-activated pressure assisted melt infiltration process. Coarse, medium and fine meso-structures were prepared with Al alloy filled pores of differing sizes. Materials were subjected to uniaxial compressive loading up to stresses of 668 MPa, leading to the failure of specimens through crack propagation in both phases. As-fabricated and post-failure specimens were analysed by X-ray microscopy and electron microscopy. Quasi-static mechanical testing results revealed that compressive strength was the highest in the fine structured composite materials. While the coarse structured specimens exhibited a compressive strength of 80% relative to this. Reconstructed micro-scale X-ray tomography data revealed different crack propagation mechanisms. Large planar shear cracks propagated throughout the fine structured materials while the coarser specimens exhibited networks of branching cracks propagating preferentially along Al alloy-Ti{sub 2}AlC phase interfaces and through shrinkage pores in the Al alloy phase. Results suggest that control of porosity, compensation for Al alloy shrinkage and enhancement of the Al alloy-Ti{sub 2}AlC phase interfaces are key considerations in the design of high performance metal/Ti{sub 2}AlC phase composites.

  6. ADAPTIVE QUASICONTINUUM SIMULATION OF ELASTIC-BRITTLE DISORDERED LATTICES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karel Mikeš

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available The quasicontinuum (QC method is a computational technique that can efficiently handle atomistic lattices by combining continuum and atomistic approaches. In this work, the QC method is combined with an adaptive algorithm, to obtain correct predictions of crack trajectories in failure simulations. Numerical simulations of crack propagation in elastic-brittle disordered lattices are performed for a two-dimensional example. The obtained results are compared with the fully resolved particle model. It is shown that the adaptive QC simulation provides a significant reduction of the computational demand. At the same time, the macroscopic crack trajectories and the shape of the force-displacement diagram are very well captured.

  7. The surface treatment influence on the fatigue crack propagation of Al 7050-T7451 alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carvalho, A.L.M. [Department of Materials Engineering, State University of Ponta Grossa, Ponta Grossa, PR (Brazil)], E-mail: andrelmc@uepg.br; Voorwald, H.J.C. [Department of Materials and Technology, State University of Sao Paulo UNESP/FEG, Guaratingueta, S.P. (Brazil)

    2009-04-15

    The objective of this research is to evaluate 100 {mu}m thickness hard chromium electroplated coating on the fatigue crack propagation of Al 7050-T7451 alloy. The shot peening process was carried out to create residual stresses using ceramic and glass shots. Reverse bending fatigue tests were performed with base material, base material chromium electroplated and base material shot peened and chromium electroplated. In order to study the influence of residual stresses on fatigue life, the compressive residual stress field was measured by an X-ray diffraction method. Scanning electron microscopy technique was used to analyze fracture surface and identify crack origin sites. Glass shot peening results are better with respect to fatigue crack nucleation and propagation in comparison to ceramic shot peening. An overpeening may have occurred which produced damages on the ceramic shot peened surface.

  8. Mode I Cohesive Law Characterization of Through-Crack Propagation in a Multidirectional Laminate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergan, Andrew C.; Davila, Carlos G.; Leone, Frank A.; Awerbuch, Jonathan; Tan, Tein-Min

    2014-01-01

    A method is proposed and assessed for the experimental characterization of through-the-thickness crack propagation in multidirectional composite laminates with a cohesive law. The fracture toughness and crack opening displacement are measured and used to determine a cohesive law. Two methods of computing fracture toughness are assessed and compared. While previously proposed cohesive characterizations based on the R-curve exhibit size effects, the proposed approach results in a cohesive law that is a material property. The compact tension specimen configuration is used to propagate damage while load and full-field displacements are recorded. These measurements are used to compute the fracture toughness and crack opening displacement from which the cohesive law is characterized. The experimental results show that a steady-state fracture toughness is not reached. However, the proposed method extrapolates to steady-state and is demonstrated capable of predicting the structural behavior of geometrically-scaled specimens.

  9. Nonlinear ultrasound monitoring of single crack propagation in cortical bone

    OpenAIRE

    Haupert, Sylvain; GUERARD, Sandra; Mitton, David; Peyrin, Françoise; Laugier, Pascal

    2012-01-01

    International audience; Accumulation of bone microdamage is suspected to lead to severe impairment of mechanical properties with an increase in skeletal fragility and fracture risk. The objective of the study was to evaluate the sensitivity of nonlinear resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (NRUS) measurements to the propagation in cortical bone of a single microcrack induced by 4-point bending mechanical loading. Twelve human cortical bone specimens were machined as parallelepiped beams (50*2*2mm...

  10. Nonlinear ultrasound monitoring of single crack propagation in cortical bone

    OpenAIRE

    Haupert, Sylvain; GUERARD, Sandra; Mitton, David; Peyrin, Françoise; Laugier, Pascal

    2013-01-01

    Accumulation of bone microdamage is suspected to lead to severe impairment of mechanical properties with an increase in skeletal fragility and fracture risk. The objective of the study was to evaluate the sensitivity of nonlinear resonant ultrasound spectroscopy (NRUS) measurements to the propagation in cortical bone of a single microcrack induced by 4-point bending mechanical loading. Twelve human cortical bone specimens were machined as parallelepiped beams (50*2*2mm) to unambiguously ident...

  11. A micromechanical analysis of damage propagation in fluid-saturated cracked media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dormieux, Luc; Kondo, Djimedo; Ulm, Franz-Josef

    2006-07-01

    We first revisit the well known framework of Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics (LEFM) in the case of a fluid-saturated crack. We next consider a r.e.v. of cracked medium comprising a family of cracks characterized by the corresponding crack density parameter ɛ. Generalizing the classical energy approach of LEFM, the proposed damage criterion is written on the thermodynamic force associated with ɛ, which is estimated by means of standard homogenization schemes. This criterion proves to involve a macroscopic effective strain tensor, or alternatively the Terzaghi effective stress tensor. The stability of damage propagation is discussed for various homogenization schemes. A comparison with experimental results is presented in the case of a uniaxial tensile test on concrete. To cite this article: L. Dormieux et al., C. R. Mecanique 334 (2006).

  12. Effects of pre-cracks on both initiation and propagation of re-bar corrosion in pure carbon dioxide

    OpenAIRE

    L’Hostis Valérie; Hiep Dang Vu; François Raoul

    2013-01-01

    This paper deals with effects of pre-cracks on both initiation and propagation of reinforcement steel corrosion due to carbonation. The ring shaped mortar samples with 8 mm steel bar inside were cracked with different crack widths ranging from 12 micrometers to 600 micrometers and then subjected to carbon dioxide environment for different terms to assess the carbonation profile in cracks and along the interface between steel and concrete, damaged by the internal pressure applied to the ring s...

  13. Numerical analysis of the influence of liquid on propagation of a rolling contact fatigue crack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Olzak

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Numerical investigations of the propagation of rolling contact fatigue crack filled by the liquid have been conducted. Two models of fluid crack interaction have been considered. In the first model called 䖓hydrostatic� the assumption of incompressible, inviscid and weightless liquid was accepted. It was also assumed that due to the wheel load the trapped liquid could not get outside the crack and its volume remained constant until the rising pressure would open up the crack mouth again. On this assumption the analysis has a steady-state character. In the second model it has been assumed that the crack is filled by the viscous, incompressible fluid and the fluid motion as well as the resulting pressure distribution can be represented by one-dimensional form of the Reynolds equation. The method for solving the problem of the coupled motion of liquid and crack faces has been developed and series of calculation were made. The method has been employed for the predicting of crack deformation in the course of wheel rolling

  14. Cracks in high-manganese cast steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Chojecki

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available The reasons which account for the formation of in service cracks in castings made from Hadfield steel were discussed. To explain the source of existence of the nuclei of brittle fractures, the properties of cast steel were examined within the range of solidification temperatures, remembering that feeding of this material is specially difficult, causing microporosity in hot spots. This creates conditions promoting the formation of microcracks which tend to propagate during service conditions involving high dynamic stresses, and explains why the cracks are mainly characterized by a brittle nature. The reason for crack formation in service are micro-porosities formed during casting solidification.

  15. Fracture mechanics of shear crack propagation and dissection in the healthy bovine descending aortic media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haslach, Henry W; Siddiqui, Ahmed; Weerasooriya, Amanda; Nguyen, Ryan; Roshgadol, Jacob; Monforte, Noel; McMahon, Eileen

    2018-03-01

    This experimental study adopts a fracture mechanics strategy to investigate the mechanical cause of aortic dissection. Inflation of excised healthy bovine aortic rings with a cut longitudinal notch that extends into the media from the intima suggests that an intimal tear may propagate a nearly circumferential-longitudinal rupture surface that is similar to the delamination that occurs in aortic dissection. Radial and 45°-from-radial cut notch orientations, as seen in the thickness surface, produce similar circumferential crack propagation morphologies. Partial cut notches, whose longitudinal length is half the width of the ring, measure the influence of longitudinal material on crack propagation. Such specimens also produce circumferential cracks from the notch root that are visible in the thickness circumferential-radial plane, and often propagate a secondary crack from the base of the notch, visible in the intimal circumferential-longitudinal plane. Inflation of rings with pairs of cut notches demonstrates that a second notch modifies the propagation created in a specimen with a single notch. The circumferential crack propagation is likely a consequence of the laminar medial structure. These fracture surfaces are probably due to non-uniform circumferential shear deformation in the heterogeneous media as the aortic wall expands. The qualitative deformation morphology around the root of the cut notch during inflation is evidence for such shear deformation. The shear apparently results from relative slip in the circumferential direction of collagen fibers. The slip may produce shear in the longitudinal-circumferential plane between medial layers or in the radial-circumferential plane within a medial lamina in an idealized model. Circumferential crack propagation in the media is then a shear mechanical process that might be facilitated by disease of the tissue. An intimal tear of an apparently healthy aortic wall near the aortic arch is life-threatening because it

  16. Environmental influence on the near-threshold fatigue crack propagation behaviour of a high-strength steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Henaff, G.; Petit, J.; Bouchet, B.

    1992-07-01

    The near-threshold fatigue crack propagation behavior of a high-strength low-alloy steel has been investigated in ambient air and in vacuum so as to determine the role of the environment precisely. The analysis of the results is conducted by taking crack closure effects into account. It is concluded that fatigue crack growth rates measured in ambient air depend upon three processes: intrinsic fatigue crack propagation as observed in vacuum, adsorption of water vapor molecules on freshly created rupture surfaces, which enhances crack propagation, and a subsequent step of hydrogen-assisted cracking. The appearance of intergranular ruptures and oxide layers on rupture surfaces in ambient air is also discussed.

  17. Evaluation method for ductile crack propagation in pre-strained plates; Yohizumizai no ensei kiretsu denpa hyokaho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ueda, Y.; Murakawa, H. [Osaka Univ., Osaka (Japan). Welding Research Inst.; Tanigawa, M. [Hitachi Zosen Corp., Osaka (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    In order to investigate an effect of the plastic deformation, which was generated on ship side outer platings subjected to collision load before crack initiation, on the crack propagation behavior, crack propagation experiments using pre-strained specimens and simulation analysis by means of FEM method were carried out, to discuss about the practical simulation analysis method. As a result of the crack propagation experiments using pre-strained center notched plate specimens, a phenomenon where the crack is apt to propagate due to the pre-strains was confirmed, and measured data of crack tip opening angles were obtained. A method was proposed, in which the critical crack tip opening angle values are corrected by considering the difference between the crack shapes obtained from the FEM analysis model and actually measured, and its effectiveness was confirmed. The finite element size effect was also examined. A method using an equivalent plastic strain as the crack propagation condition was shown to determine the relationship between the element size and the critical value of equivalent plastic strain. 5 refs., 21 figs., 4 tabs.

  18. Sample geometry and the brittle-ductile behavior of edge cracks in 3D atomistic simulations by molecular dynamics

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pelikán, Vladimír; Hora, Petr; Machová, Anna; Kolman, Radek; Uhnáková, Alena

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 258 (2017), s. 45-48, č. článku 188189. ISSN 1662-9779 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA15-20666S Institutional support: RVO:61388998 Keywords : BCC iron * crack growth * dislocation emission * twins Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism https://www.scientific.net/SSP.258.45

  19. Simplified Qualitative Discrete Numerical Model to Determine Cracking Pattern in Brittle Materials by Means of Finite Element Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Ochoa-Avendaño

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the formulation, implementation, and validation of a simplified qualitative model to determine the crack path of solids considering static loads, infinitesimal strain, and plane stress condition. This model is based on finite element method with a special meshing technique, where nonlinear link elements are included between the faces of the linear triangular elements. The stiffness loss of some link elements represents the crack opening. Three experimental tests of bending beams are simulated, where the cracking pattern calculated with the proposed numerical model is similar to experimental result. The advantages of the proposed model compared to discrete crack approaches with interface elements can be the implementation simplicity, the numerical stability, and the very low computational cost. The simulation with greater values of the initial stiffness of the link elements does not affect the discontinuity path and the stability of the numerical solution. The exploded mesh procedure presented in this model avoids a complex nonlinear analysis and regenerative or adaptive meshes.

  20. Fluid-driven fractures in brittle hydrogels

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Keeffe, Niall; Linden, Paul

    2016-11-01

    Hydraulic fracturing is a process in which fluid is injected deep underground at high pressures that can overcome the strength of the surrounding matrix. This results in an increase of surface area connected to the well bore and thus allows extraction of natural gas previously trapped in a rock formation. We experimentally study the physical mechanisms of these fluid-driven fractures in low permeability reservoirs where the leak-off of fracturing fluid is considered negligible. This is done through the use of small scale experiments on transparent and brittle, heavily cross-linked hydrogels. The propagation of these fractures can be split into two distinct regimes depending on whether the dominant energy dissipation mechanism is viscous flow or material toughness. We will analyse crack growth rates, crack thickness and tip shape in both regimes. Moreover, PIV techniques allow us to explore the flow dynamics within the fracture, which is crucial in predicting transport of proppants designed to prevent localisation of cracks.

  1. Experimental Characterization and Simulation of Slip Transfer at Grain Boundaries and Microstructurally-Sensitive Crack Propagation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Vipul; Hochhalter, Jacob; Yamakov, Vesselin; Scott, Willard; Spear, Ashley; Smith, Stephen; Glaessgen, Edward

    2013-01-01

    A systematic study of crack tip interaction with grain boundaries is critical for improvement of multiscale modeling of microstructurally-sensitive fatigue crack propagation and for the computationally-assisted design of more durable materials. In this study, single, bi- and large-grain multi-crystal specimens of an aluminum-copper alloy are fabricated, characterized using electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD), and deformed under tensile loading and nano-indentation. 2D image correlation (IC) in an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) is used to measure displacements near crack tips, grain boundaries and within grain interiors. The role of grain boundaries on slip transfer is examined using nano-indentation in combination with high-resolution EBSD. The use of detailed IC and EBSD-based experiments are discussed as they relate to crystal-plasticity finite element (CPFE) model calibration and validation.

  2. Recent developments in analysis of crack propagation and fracture of practical materials. [stress analysis in aircraft structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardrath, H. F.; Newman, J. C., Jr.; Elber, W.; Poe, C. C., Jr.

    1978-01-01

    The limitations of linear elastic fracture mechanics in aircraft design and in the study of fatigue crack propagation in aircraft structures are discussed. NASA-Langley research to extend the capabilities of fracture mechanics to predict the maximum load that can be carried by a cracked part and to deal with aircraft design problems are reported. Achievements include: (1) improved stress intensity solutions for laboratory specimens; (2) fracture criterion for practical materials; (3) crack propagation predictions that account for mean stress and high maximum stress effects; (4) crack propagation predictions for variable amplitude loading; and (5) the prediction of crack growth and residual stress in built-up structural assemblies. These capabilities are incorporated into a first generation computerized analysis that allows for damage tolerance and tradeoffs with other disciplines to produce efficient designs that meet current airworthiness requirements.

  3. Mechanical behavior of limestone undergoing brittle-ductile transition: experiments and model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, Aurélien; Fortin, Jérôme; Verberne, Berend; Regnet, Jean-Baptiste; Plümper, Oliver; Dimanov, Alexandre; Spiers, Christopher; Guéguen, Yves

    2017-04-01

    With increasing confining pressure, carbonate rocks can undergo the brittle-ductile transition at room temperature. In order to examine the brittle-ductile transition, we performed constant strain rate triaxial deformation and stress-stepping creep experiments on Tavel limestone (porosity 14.7%) under various conditions. The evolution of elastic wave velocities were recorded during each experiment and inverted to crack densities. The constant strain rate triaxial experiments were performed for varying confining pressure from 5 to 90 MPa. For Pc≤55 MPa our results show that the behavior is brittle. The latter is characterized by dilatancy due to crack propagation, leading to a stress drop at failure. For Pc≥70 MPa, the behavior is semi-brittle with elastic compaction followed by inelastic compaction, then leading to dilatancy and eventual failure. The semi-brittle behavior is characterized by diffuse deformation. Inelastic compaction is due to intra-crystalline plasticity (dislocation motions and twinning) and micro-cracking. Constant strain rates experiments were modelled taking into account (1) crack propagation from pre-existing flaws, (2) plastic pore collapse and (3) crack nucleation from dislocation pile-ups. The obtained model predictions are in good agreement with our experimental data. Stress stepping (creep) experiments were performed in a range of confining pressures crossing the brittle-ductile transition (from 20 to 85 MPa). In the brittle regime, the time-dependent axial deformation is coupled with dilatancy and a decrease of elastic wave velocities, which is characteristic of crack nucleation and/or propagation. In the semi-brittle regime, the first steps are inelastic compactant due to plastic pore collapse. All following stress steps are dilatant as a result of crack nucleation and/or propagation. In general, our results show that the axial strain rate is always controlled by plastic phenomena, until the last step, during which the axial strain

  4. Normalizing effect on fatigue crack propagation at the heat-affected zone of AISI 4140 steel shielded metal arc weldings

    OpenAIRE

    B. Vargas-Arista; J. Teran-Guillen; Solis, J.; García-Cerecero,G.; Martínez-Madrid,M.

    2013-01-01

    The fractography and mechanical behaviour of fatigue crack propagation in the heat-affected zone (HAZ) of AISI 4140 steel welded using the shielded metal arc process was analysed. Different austenitic grain size was obtained by normalizing performed at 1200 °C for 5 and 10 hours after welding. Three point bending fatigue tests on pre-cracked specimens along the HAZ revealed that coarse grains promoted an increase in fatigue crack growth rate, hence causing a reduction in both fracture toughne...

  5. The smoothing of crack propagation curves. A comparative assessment of various methods. Glaettung von Rissfortschrittskurven. Eine vergleichende Untersuchung verschiedener Verfahren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makris, P. (Technical Univ., Athens (Greece)); Stein, K. (Pro Minent Dosiertechnik GmbH, Heidelberg (Germany)); Stathopoulos, D.

    1992-01-01

    The determination of crack propagation behaviour can be simplified and the prediciton of remaining life times improved by arithmetically smoothing out curves of experimental crack propagation data. The article describes four different arithmetic methods: Least squares procedure, Belfit, curve fit, and smoothing by spline functions. Belfit is the most suitable procedure for smoothing da/dN-curves, because it gives the smallest deviation of calculated curves from experimental data. (orig.).

  6. Mitigation of sub-surface crack propagation in railroad rails by laser surface modification

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DiMelfi, R.J.; Sanders, P.G.; Hunter, B.; Eastman, J.A.; Leong, K.; Kramer, J.M. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Sawley, K.J. [Association of American Railroads, Pueblo, CO (United States). Research and Test Dept.

    1997-10-01

    The authors address the mitigation of sub-surface crack propagation in railroad rails via laser surface modification. The goal is to reduce the shear forces from rail-wheel friction, which contribute significantly to the nucleation and propagation of cracks in the sub-surface region at rail gage corners. Microhardness scans and tensile tests were performed on samples from cross-sections of unused and heavily used rail heads. The results of these tests indicate that the severe cyclic plastic deformation that occurs at the gage corners, during service, significantly hardens the sub-surface region there, which leads to cracking. Laser glazing, the rapid melting and rapid solidification of a thin surface layer, was used to reduce the friction coefficient of rail steel. The advantages of this process are that specific regions of the rail surface can be targeted; the treatment does not wash away as the currently used liquid lubricants do; it is more environmentally sound than liquid lubricants; and it can be applied in service, during re-work or during rail fabrication. A number of laser treatments were conducted on AISI 1080 steel plates, similar to rail steel, from which friction samples were extracted. Static block-on-ring friction experiments performed on a variety of laser treated surfaces showed reductions in the friction coefficient by about 25% relative to untreated surfaces at loads corresponding to prototypic rail service loads. The authors laser-glazed two areas on the top surface of a 6-ft length of rail with multiple pass treatments, one with adjacent passes overlapping, and one with adjacent passes separated by 1 mm. Friction measurements were made after they were subjected to 20,000 run-in cycles. The laser treatments remained intact after these cycles. Reductions of friction coefficient of ca. 40%, relative to untreated surfaces, were observed, corresponding to a reduction in the calculated mixed mode crack propagation rate by ca. 79%.

  7. Investigation of the fatigue crack propagation behaviour in the Al alloy/Hybrid MMC Bi-layer material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iqbal, AKM Asif; Arai, Yoshio

    2017-09-01

    In this study, the fatigue crack propagation behaviour in the Al alloy-hybrid MMC bi-material system has been investigated. Three-point bending fatigue test is carried out on the Shimadzu servopulser machine. The plastic replica technique is used to observe the crack growth during cyclic loading. The crack growth rate is analyzed at different stress intensity factor range, ΔK. The experimental results showed that the crack growth decelerates in the MMC layer side and maximum crack retardation occurs on the boundary of the bi-material system. Near the boundary of the bi-material, the crack tip becomes curved, which reduces the crack growth rate in the vicinity of the boundary of the bi-material even at higher ΔK. The particle-matrix interfacial debonding, as well as particle fracture, is observed in the hybrid MMC layer during fatigue loading.

  8. A Property of Crack Propagation at the Specimen of CFRP with Layer Angle

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hwang, Gue Wan; Cho, Jae Ung [Kongju Univ., Kongju (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Chong Du [Inha Univ., Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    CFRP is the composite material manufactured by the hybrid resin on the basis of carbon fiber. As this material has the high specific strength and the light weight, it has been widely used at various fields. Particularly, the unidirectional carbon fiber can be applied with the layer angle. CFRP made with layer angle has the strength higher than with no layer angle. In this paper, the property of crack growth due to each layer angle was investigated on the crack propagation and fracture behavior of the CFRP compact tension specimen due to the change of layer angle. The value of maximum stress is shown to be decreased and the crack propagation is slowed down as the layer angle is increased. But the limit according to the layer angle is shown as the stress is increased again from the base point of the layer angle of 60°.This study result is thought to be utilized with the data which verify the probability of fatigue fracture when the defect inside the structure at using CFRP of mechanical structure happens.

  9. The effect of thickness on fatigue crack propagation in 7475-T731 aluminum alloy sheet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daiuto, R. A.; Hillberry, B. M.

    1984-01-01

    Tests were conducted on three thicknesses of 7475-T731 aluminum alloy sheet to investigate the effect of thickness on fatigue crack propagation under constant amplitude loading conditions and on retardation following a single peak overload. Constant amplitude loading tests were performed at stress ratios of 0.05 and 0.75 to obtain data for conditions with crack closure and without crack closure, respectively. At both stress ratios a thickness effect was clearly evident, with thicker specimens exhibiting higher growth rates in the transition from plane strain to plane stress region. The effect of thickness for a stress ratio of 0.05 corresponded well with the fracturing mode transitions observed on the specimens. A model based on the strain energy release rate which accounted for the fracture mode transition was found to correlate the thickness effects well. The specimens tested at the stress ratio of 0.75 did not make the transition from tensile mode to shear mode, indicating that another mechanism besides crack closure or fracture mode transition was active.

  10. Metal magnetic memory technique used to predict the fatigue crack propagation behavior of 0.45%C steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chongchong, Li [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300130 (China); National Key Lab for Remanufacturing, Academy of Armored Forces Engineering, Beijing 100072 (China); Lihong, Dong, E-mail: lihong.dong@126.com [National Key Lab for Remanufacturing, Academy of Armored Forces Engineering, Beijing 100072 (China); Haidou, Wang [National Key Lab for Remanufacturing, Academy of Armored Forces Engineering, Beijing 100072 (China); Guolu, Li [School of Materials Science and Engineering, Hebei University of Technology, Tianjin 300130 (China); Binshi, Xu [National Key Lab for Remanufacturing, Academy of Armored Forces Engineering, Beijing 100072 (China)

    2016-05-01

    Monitoring fatigue crack propagation behavior of ferromagnetic components is very important. In this paper, the tension–tension fatigue tests of center cracked tension (CCT) specimens were carried out; the variation regularity of both tangential and normal components of magnetic signals during fatigue process were investigated. The results showed that the initial abnormal signals which appeared at the notch were reversed after cyclic loading. The abnormal magnetic signals became more significant with the increase of fatigue cycles and reversed again after failure. The characteristic parameters, i.e., the peak value of tangential component, B{sub tp}, and maximum gradient value of normal component, K{sub m}, showed similar variation trends during the fatigue process, which can be divided into three different stages. An approximate linear relationship was found between the characteristic parameters and fatigue crack length 2a. The feasibility of predicting the fatigue crack propagation using the abnormal magnetic signals was discussed. What's more, the variation and distribution of the magnetic signals were also analyzed based on the theory of magnetic charge. - Highlights: • A novel and passive NDT method, i.e. MMMT method, is proposed. • Both tangential and normal components of magnetic signals were investigated. • The prediction of crack propagation by abnormal magnetic signals was discussed. • A linear relationship was found between the parameters and fatigue crack length 2a. • The parameters can be potentially used to evaluate the crack propagation state.

  11. Effect of strain wave shape on low-cycle fatigue crack propagation of SUS 304 stainless steel at elevated temperatures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okazaki, M.; Hattori, I.; Koizwmi, T.; Shiraiwa, F.

    1983-08-01

    Effect of strain wave shape on strain-controlled low-cycle fatigue crack propagation of SUS 304 stainless steel was investigated at 600 and 700/sup 0/C. It was found that the rate of crack propagation in a cycle-dependent region was successfully correlated with the range of cyclic J-integral, ..delta..J /SUB f/, regardless of the strain wave shape, frequency, and test temperature. It was also shown that the rate of crack propagation gradually increased from cycle-dependent curve to time-dependent one with decreasing frequency and slow-fast strain wave shape, and that one of the factors governing the rate of crack propagation in such a region was the ratio of the range of creep J-integral to that of total J-integral, ..delta..J /SUB c/ /..delta..J /SUB T/. Based on the results thus obtained, an interaction damage rule proposed semi-empirically was interpreted, with regard to crack propagation. Furthermore, fatigue crack initiation mechanism in slow-fast strain wave shape was studied, and it was shown that grain boundary sliding took an important role in it.

  12. On the Theory and Numerical Simulation of Cohesive Crack Propagation with Application to Fiber-Reinforced Composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rudraraju, Siva Shankar; Garikipati, Krishna; Waas, Anthony M.; Bednarcyk, Brett A.

    2013-01-01

    The phenomenon of crack propagation is among the predominant modes of failure in many natural and engineering structures, often leading to severe loss of structural integrity and catastrophic failure. Thus, the ability to understand and a priori simulate the evolution of this failure mode has been one of the cornerstones of applied mechanics and structural engineering and is broadly referred to as "fracture mechanics." The work reported herein focuses on extending this understanding, in the context of through-thickness crack propagation in cohesive materials, through the development of a continuum-level multiscale numerical framework, which represents cracks as displacement discontinuities across a surface of zero measure. This report presents the relevant theory, mathematical framework, numerical modeling, and experimental investigations of through-thickness crack propagation in fiber-reinforced composites using the Variational Multiscale Cohesive Method (VMCM) developed by the authors.

  13. Crack initiation and propagation close to the interface in a ferrite-austenite joint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besson, J. [Ecole des Mines de Paris, Centre des Materiaux, UMR CNRS 7633, BP 87, 91003 Evry Cedex (France)]. E-mail: jacques.besson@ensmp.fr; Madi, Y. [Ecole des Mines de Paris, Centre des Materiaux, UMR CNRS 7633, BP 87, 91003 Evry Cedex (France); Motarjemi, A. [Institute of Materials Research, GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht 21502 (Germany); Structural Integrity Group, TWI, Granta Park, Great Abington, Cambridge CB1 6AL (United Kingdom); Kocak, M. [Institute of Materials Research, GKSS Research Center, Geesthacht 21502 (Germany); Martin, G. [EdF les Renardieres, Route de Sens - Ecuelles, 77250 Moret-sur-Loing (France); Hornet, P. [EdF les Renardieres, Route de Sens - Ecuelles, 77250 Moret-sur-Loing (France)

    2005-04-25

    The safety assessment of welded structures and joints still remains an important industrial problem. In this study, a simple diffusion bonded bi-material joint has been made in order to analyze the plastic mismatch effect. It consists of an assembly of ferritic and austenitic steels which are representative of nuclear pressure vessel components. Tests were performed on various specimens including smooth and notched tensile bars, Charpy V-notch specimens and single-edge notch bend specimens. Homogeneous and bimaterial specimens were tested. On deeply notched specimens, the effect of the distance between the notch root and the interface on fracture initiation and crack propagation direction was studied. Tests were modeled using elasto-plastic finite element simulations. These simulations were post-processed in order to determine crack initiation based on the Rice and Tracey criterion according to the 'local approach of fracture' procedure.

  14. Experimental and numerical modelling of ductile crack propagation in large-scale shell structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Bo Cerup; Törnquist, R.

    2004-01-01

    This paper presents a combined experimental-numerical procedure for development and calibration of macroscopic crack propagation criteria in large-scale shell structures. A novel experimental set-up is described in which a mode-I crack can be driven 400 mm through a 20(+) mm thick plate under fully....... The applicability of the often-used equivalent strain criterion is discussed versus a more rationally based criterion which takes into account the stress tri-axiality. A large-scale grounding experiment is also simulated showing very good agreement with measurements. The performance of the proposed model...... is in general good and it is believed that the presented results and experimental-numerical calibration procedure can be of use in practical finite-element simulations of collision and grounding events with the use of shell elements. As discussed, the paper provides a clean framework for further development...

  15. Effects of porcelain thickness on the flexural strength and crack propagation in a bilayered zirconia system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Viviane Maria Gonçalves de Figueiredo

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: This study evaluated the influence of porcelain (VM9, VITA Zahnfabrik, Germany thickness on the flexural strength and crack propagation in bilayered zirconia systems (YZ, VITA Zahnfabrik, Germany. Material and Methods: Thirty zirconia bars (20.0x4.0x1.0 mm and six zirconia blocks (12.0x7.5x1.2 mm were prepared and veneered with porcelain with different thickness: 1 mm, 2 mm, or 3 mm. The bars of each experimental group (n=10 were subjected to four-point flexural strength testing. In each ceramic block, a Vickers indentation was created under a load of 10 kgf for 10 seconds, for the propagation of cracks. Results: The results of flexural strength were evaluated by One-way ANOVA and Tukey's test, with a significance level of 5%. The factor “thickness of the porcelain” was statistically significant (p=0.001 and the l-mm group presented the highest values of flexural strength. The cracks were predominant among the bending specimens with 1 and 2 mm of porcelain, and catastrophic failures were found in 50% of 3-mm-thick porcelain. After the indentation of blocks, the most severe defects were observed in blocks with 3-mm-thick porcelain. Conclusion: The smallest (1 mm thickness of porcelain on the zirconia infrastructure presented higher values of flexural strength. Better resistance to defect propagation was observed near the porcelain/ zirconia interface for all groups. Higher flexural strength was found for a thinner porcelain layer in a bilayered zirconia system. The damage caused by a Vickers indentation near and far the interface with the zirconia shows that the stress profiles are different.

  16. Effects of porcelain thickness on the flexural strength and crack propagation in a bilayered zirconia system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Figueiredo, Viviane Maria Gonçalves de; Pereira, Sarina Maciel Braga; Bressiani, Eduardo; Valera, Márcia Carneiro; Bottino, Marco Antônio; Zhang, Yu; Melo, Renata Marques de

    2017-01-01

    This study evaluated the influence of porcelain (VM9, VITA Zahnfabrik, Germany) thickness on the flexural strength and crack propagation in bilayered zirconia systems (YZ, VITA Zahnfabrik, Germany). Thirty zirconia bars (20.0x4.0x1.0 mm) and six zirconia blocks (12.0x7.5x1.2 mm) were prepared and veneered with porcelain with different thickness: 1 mm, 2 mm, or 3 mm. The bars of each experimental group (n=10) were subjected to four-point flexural strength testing. In each ceramic block, a Vickers indentation was created under a load of 10 kgf for 10 seconds, for the propagation of cracks. The results of flexural strength were evaluated by One-way ANOVA and Tukey's test, with a significance level of 5%. The factor "thickness of the porcelain" was statistically significant (p=0.001) and the l-mm group presented the highest values of flexural strength. The cracks were predominant among the bending specimens with 1 and 2 mm of porcelain, and catastrophic failures were found in 50% of 3-mm-thick porcelain. After the indentation of blocks, the most severe defects were observed in blocks with 3-mm-thick porcelain. The smallest (1 mm) thickness of porcelain on the zirconia infrastructure presented higher values of flexural strength. Better resistance to defect propagation was observed near the porcelain/ zirconia interface for all groups. Higher flexural strength was found for a thinner porcelain layer in a bilayered zirconia system. The damage caused by a Vickers indentation near and far the interface with the zirconia shows that the stress profiles are different.

  17. Delayed crack propagation in barium titanate single crystals in humid air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Bing; Bai, Yang; Cao, Jiang-Li; Su, Yanjing; Shi, San-Qiang; Chu, Wuyang; Qiao, Lijie

    2008-06-01

    Domain witching of ferroelectrics under mechanical or electric load in vacuum or dry air has been intensively studied. However, the effects of environments on the domain switching in ferroelectrics have not been well understood. Here, we demonstrate that domain configurations in BaTiO3 single crystal under sustained load can be significantly affected by the humidity due to the decrease in surface energy and electrostatic energy upon adsorption of polar water molecules. Consequently, the crack propagation behaviors of the ferroelectrics under sustained load can be remarkably altered.

  18. Effects of pre-cracks on both initiation and propagation of re-bar corrosion in pure carbon dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hiep Dang, Vu; François, Raoul; L'Hostis, Valérie

    2013-07-01

    This paper deals with effects of pre-cracks on both initiation and propagation of reinforcement steel corrosion due to carbonation. The ring shaped mortar samples with 8 mm steel bar inside were cracked with different crack widths ranging from 12 micrometers to 600 micrometers and then subjected to carbon dioxide environment for different terms to assess the carbonation profile in cracks and along the interface between steel and concrete, damaged by the internal pressure applied to the ring samples. After carbonation of interface, ring samples were submitted to wetting-drying cycles to study the propagation of corrosion and the effect of corrosion products on healing and then repassivation of steel bar or corrosion cracks development. Results show that irrespective of width of cracks, the carbon dioxide reaches the interface between steel and mortar and propagates along this interface. The samples then subjected to wetting-drying cycles exhibit corrosion development all along the interface,the appearance of oxides does not lead to create corrosion cracks for the duration of the experiments.

  19. Effects of pre-cracks on both initiation and propagation of re-bar corrosion in pure carbon dioxide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L’Hostis Valérie

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with effects of pre-cracks on both initiation and propagation of reinforcement steel corrosion due to carbonation. The ring shaped mortar samples with 8 mm steel bar inside were cracked with different crack widths ranging from 12 micrometers to 600 micrometers and then subjected to carbon dioxide environment for different terms to assess the carbonation profile in cracks and along the interface between steel and concrete, damaged by the internal pressure applied to the ring samples. After carbonation of interface, ring samples were submitted to wetting-drying cycles to study the propagation of corrosion and the effect of corrosion products on healing and then repassivation of steel bar or corrosion cracks development. Results show that irrespective of width of cracks, the carbon dioxide reaches the interface between steel and mortar and propagates along this interface. The samples then subjected to wetting-drying cycles exhibit corrosion development all along the interface,the appearance of oxides does not lead to create corrosion cracks for the duration of the experiments.

  20. Mechanisms of crack propagation in nanoscale single crystal, bicrystal and tricrystal nickels based on molecular dynamics simulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanqiu Zhang

    Full Text Available Molecular dynamics simulation was performed in order to investigate mechanisms of crack propagation in nanoscale single crystal, bicrystal and tricrystal nickels, respectively. The grain boundary plays a significant role in the initiation and propagation of crack. As for tricrystal, in particular, a void occurs at the triple junction of grain boundaries and contributes to accelerating the crack propagation. The existence of the grain boundary contributes to the increase of Shockley partial dislocations along with stacking faults. The orientation difference among the grains causes the dislocations to move along different directions in the different slip systems, which lays the foundation for the formation of the crossed or closed Lomer-Cottrell locks. The Lomer-Cottrell locks are able to impede the movement of dislocations and cause the pile-up of dislocations. Amorphous atoms are induced in the region near the Lomer-Cottrell lock. The deformation energy is relaxed when the amorphous atoms are separated one another, which consequently leads to the initiation and propagation of crack. Keywords: Metal material, Crack propagation, Dislocation, Molecular dynamics simulation

  1. AE analysis of delamination crack propagation in carbon fiber-reinforced polymer materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Sang Jae; Arakawa, Kazuo [Kyushu University, kasuga (Japan); Chen, Dingding [National University of Defense Technology, Changsha (China); Han, Seung Wook; Choi, Nak Sam [Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-01-15

    Delamination fracture behavior was investigated using acoustic emission (AE) analysis on carbon fiber-reinforced polymer (CFRP) samples manufactured using vacuum-assisted resin transfer molding (VARTM). CFRP plate was fabricated using unidirectional carbon fiber fabric with a lay-up of six plies [+30/-30]6 , and a Teflon film was inserted as a starter crack. Test pieces were sectioned from the inlet and vent of the mold, and packed between two rectangular epoxy plates to load using a universal testing machine. The AE signals were monitored during tensile loading using two sensors. The average tensile load of the inlet specimens was slightly larger than that of the vent specimens; however, the data exhibited significant scattering due to non-uniform resin distribution, and there was no statistically significant different between the strength of the samples sectioned from the inlet or outlet of the mold. Each of the specimens exhibited similar AE characteristics, regardless of whether they were from the inlet or vent of the mold. Four kinds of damage mechanism were observed: micro-cracking, fiber-resin matrix debonding, fiber pull-out, and fiber failure; and three stages of the crack propagation process were identified.

  2. Crack initiation and propagation on the polymeric material ABS (Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene, under ultrasonic fatigue testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. M. Domínguez Almaraz

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Crack initiation and propagation have been investigated on the polymeric material ABS (Acrylonitrile Butadiene Styrene, under ultrasonic fatigue testing. Three controlled actions were implemented in order to carry out fatigue tests at very high frequency on this material of low thermal conductivity, they are: a The applying load was low to limit heat dissipation at the specimen neck section, b The dimensions of testing specimen were small (but fitting the resonance condition, in order to restraint the temperature gradient at the specimen narrow section, c Temperature at the specimen neck section was restrained by immersion in water or oil during ultrasonic fatigue testing. Experimental results are discussed on the basis of thermo-mechanical behaviour: the tail phenomenon at the initial stage of fatigue, initial shear yielding deformation, crazed development on the later stage, plastic strain on the fracture surface and the transition from low to high crack growth rate. In addition, a numerical analysis is developed to evaluate the J integral of energy dissipation and the stress intensity factor K, with the crack length

  3. Statistical analysis of fatigue crack propagation data of materials from ancient portuguese metallic bridges

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J A F O. Correia

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In Portugal there is a number of old metallic riveted railway and highway bridges that were erected by the end of the 19th century and beginning of the 20th century, and are still in operation, requiring inspections and remediation measures to overcome fatigue damage. Residual fatigue life predictions should be based on actual fatigue data from bridge materials which is scarce due to the material specificities. Fatigue crack propagation data of materials from representative Portuguese riveted bridges, namely the Pinh�o and Luiz I road bridges, the Viana road/railway bridge, the F�o road bridge and the Trez�i railway bridge were considered in this study. The fatigue crack growth rates were correlated using the Pariss law. Also, a statistical analysis of the pure mode I fatigue crack growth (FCG data available for the materials from the ancient riveted metallic bridges is presented. Based on this analysis, design FCG curves are proposed and compared with BS7910 standard proposal, for the Paris region, which is one important fatigue regime concerning the application of the Fracture Mechanics approaches, to predict the remnant fatigue life of structural details

  4. Alternating brittle and ductile response of coherent twin boundaries in nanotwinned metals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinha, Tanushree; Kulkarni, Yashashree, E-mail: ykulkarni@uh.edu [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Houston, Houston, Texas 77204 (United States)

    2014-11-14

    Nanotwinned metals have opened exciting avenues for the design of high strength and high ductility materials. In this work, we investigate crack propagation along coherent twin boundaries in nanotwinned metals using molecular dynamics. Our simulations reveal that alternating twin boundaries exhibit intrinsic brittleness and ductility owing to the opposite crystallographic orientations of the adjoining twins. This is a startling consequence of the directional anisotropy of an atomically sharp crack along a twin boundary that favors cleavage in one direction and dislocation emission from the crack tip in the opposite direction. We further find that a blunt crack exhibits ductility in all cases albeit with very distinct deformation mechanisms and yield strength associated with intrinsically brittle and ductile coherent twin boundaries.

  5. On catastrophic fracture of steel structures at temperatures lower than cold brittleness threshold

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kornev, V. M.

    2017-10-01

    The paper considers crack propagation in elements of homogeneous steel structures and those with welded joints. For analysis of failure of the structures, diagrams of quasi-brittle fracture have been plotted. When constructing quasi-brittle fracture diagrams, the model of elastic-plastic material having an ultimate strain was used. The data report for quasi-brittle fracture diagrams of common elements of structures has been given. Analysis of parameters used in the proposed model was carried out for temperatures near or lower the brittleness threshold. Parameters of the model are selected from two laboratory experiments (critical stress intensity factor and classical stress-strain diagram) performed at appropriate temperatures. It has been established that weld structures with cracks in the vicinity of a welded joint exhibit decreased crack toughness. The effect of structure break under monotonic loading conditions is clearly visible inasmuch as ultimate loads essentially decrease with increasing a crack length. The attention is given to the parameter characterizing plastic material deformation and exhaustion of plasticity resource under preliminary plastic material deformation. After the plasticity resource is exhausted, the temperature of brittleness threshold approaches a room temperature.

  6. Two dimensional modeling of elastic wave propagation in solids containing cracks with rough surfaces and friction - Part II: Numerical implementation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delrue, Steven; Aleshin, Vladislav; Truyaert, Kevin; Bou Matar, Olivier; Van Den Abeele, Koen

    2018-01-01

    Our study aims at the creation of a numerical toolbox that describes wave propagation in samples containing internal contacts (e.g. cracks, delaminations, debondings, imperfect intergranular joints) of known geometry with postulated contact interaction laws including friction. The code consists of two entities: the contact model and the solid mechanics module. Part I of the paper concerns an in-depth description of a constitutive model for realistic contacts or cracks that takes into account the roughness of the contact faces and the associated effects of friction and hysteresis. In the crack model, three different contact states can be recognized: contact loss, total sliding and partial slip. Normal (clapping) interactions between the crack faces are implemented using a quadratic stress-displacement relation, whereas tangential (friction) interactions were introduced using the Coulomb friction law for the total sliding case, and the Method of Memory Diagrams (MMD) in case of partial slip. In the present part of the paper, we integrate the developed crack model into finite element software in order to simulate elastic wave propagation in a solid material containing internal contacts or cracks. We therefore implemented the comprehensive crack model in MATLAB® and introduced it in the Structural Mechanics Module of COMSOL Multiphysics®. The potential of the approach for ultrasound based inspection of solids with cracks showing acoustic nonlinearity is demonstrated by means of an example of shear wave propagation in an aluminum sample containing a single crack with rough surfaces and friction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Carbon Nanotube-Doped Adhesive Films for Detecting Crack Propagation on Bonded Joints: A Deeper Understanding of Anomalous Behaviors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández Sánchez-Romate, Xoan Xosé; Molinero, Javier; Jiménez-Suárez, Alberto; Sánchez, María; Güemes, Alfredo; Ureña, Alejandro

    2017-12-13

    A novel nanoreinforced adhesive film has been developed to detect adhesive deformation and crack propagation along the bonding line by means of the electrical response of the material. Adhesive films were doped by spraying an aqueous dispersion of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) over the surface. To determine the sensitivity of bonded joints, single lap shear (SLS) and mode-I fracture energy tests have been carried out while their electrical response has been measured. It has been found that CNT-doped adhesive films are able to detect adhesive deformation and final failure for SLS specimens and crack initiation and propagation along the bonding line for mode-I specimens with a high sensitivity. Sudden increases on electrical resistance are correlated to a rapid growing of the crack length due to instability on crack propagation in a tick-slip case, whereas specimens with a more uniform crack propagation are linked to a steadier increase on electrical resistance, and both of them are properly correlated to the mechanical response. By analyzing more in detail the electrical response and comparing with theoretical approaches, the stick-slip behavior is associated with the presence of porosity and lack of adhesives because of possible manufacturing issues such as adhesive overflowing. These statements are also validated by microstructural analysis. Therefore, the potential and applicability of the proposed adhesive films for evaluating the structural integrity has been demonstrated.

  8. 3D Mapping Of Density And Crack Propagation Through Sintering Of Catalysis Tablets By X-Ray Tomography

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Hjalte Sylvest; Puig-Molina, A.; Dalskov, N.

    2016-01-01

    For hydrogen production, by steam reforming, porous ceramics are broadly used as catalyst support, due to their stability and ease in shaping. Catalyst supports in the form of tablets are conventionally produced by powder pressing and subsequent sintering. However, if the process is not done...... properly, cracks may arise and propagate during the sintering of the tablets. This can lead to weak sintered tablets that get rejected in the quality control. For this work, crack-containing samples of rejected tabletized support were provided. The formation, growth and closure of internal cracks during...... sintering of the rejected tabletized support material are studied by 3D X-ray tomography. This is a powerful technique, which due to its nondestructive nature is suitable to study the development of internal cracks in the tablets during sintering. Cracks could be identified in the green tablet (before...

  9. Comparison of Crack Initiation, Propagation and Coalescence Behavior of Concrete and Rock Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zengin, Enes; Abiddin Erguler, Zeynal

    2017-04-01

    There are many previously studies carried out to identify crack initiation, propagation and coalescence behavior of different type of rocks. Most of these studies aimed to understand and predict the probable instabilities on different engineering structures such as mining galleries or tunnels. For this purpose, in these studies relatively smaller natural rock and synthetic rock-like models were prepared and then the required laboratory tests were performed to obtain their strength parameters. By using results provided from these models, researchers predicted the rock mass behavior under different conditions. However, in the most of these studies, rock materials and models were considered as contains none or very few discontinuities and structural flaws. It is well known that rock masses naturally are extremely complex with respect to their discontinuities conditions and thus it is sometimes very difficult to understand and model their physical and mechanical behavior. In addition, some vuggy rock materials such as basalts and limestones also contain voids and gaps having various geometric properties. Providing that the failure behavior of these type of rocks controlled by the crack initiation, propagation and coalescence formed from their natural voids and gaps, the effect of these voids and gaps over failure behavior of rocks should be investigated. Intact rocks are generally preferred due to relatively easy side of their homogeneous characteristics in numerical modelling phases. However, it is very hard to extract intact samples from vuggy rocks because of their complex pore sizes and distributions. In this study, the feasibility of concrete samples to model and mimic the failure behavior vuggy rocks was investigated. For this purpose, concrete samples were prepared at a mixture of %65 cement dust and %35 water and their physical and mechanical properties were determined by laboratory experiments. The obtained physical and mechanical properties were used to

  10. Evaluation of Fatigue Crack Propagation of Gears Considering Uncertainties in Loading and Material Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haileyesus B. Endeshaw

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Failure prediction of wind turbine gearboxes (WTGs is especially important since the maintenance of these components is not only costly but also causes the longest downtime. One of the most common causes of the premature fault of WTGs is attributed to the fatigue fracture of gear teeth due to fluctuating and cyclic torque, resulting from stochastic wind loading, transmitted to the gearbox. Moreover, the fluctuation of the torque, as well as the inherent uncertainties of the material properties, results in uncertain life prediction for WTGs. It is therefore essential to quantify these uncertainties in the life estimation of gears. In this paper, a framework, constituted by a dynamic model of a one-stage gearbox, a finite element method, and a degradation model for the estimation of fatigue crack propagation in gear, is presented. Torque time history data of a wind turbine rotor was scaled and used to simulate the stochastic characteristic of the loading and uncertainties in the material constants of the degradation model were also quantified. It was demonstrated that uncertainty quantification of load and material constants provides a reasonable estimation of the distribution of the crack length in the gear tooth at any time step.

  11. Flexural edge waves generated by steady-state propagation of a loaded rectilinear crack in an elastically supported thin plate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobili, Andrea; Radi, Enrico; Lanzoni, Luca

    2017-08-01

    The problem of a rectilinear crack propagating at constant speed in an elastically supported thin plate and acted upon by an equally moving load is considered. The full-field solution is obtained and the spotlight is set on flexural edge wave generation. Below the critical speed for the appearance of travelling waves, a threshold speed is met which marks the transformation of decaying edge waves into edge waves propagating along the crack and dying away from it. Yet, besides these, and for any propagation speed, a pair of localized edge waves, which rapidly decay behind the crack tip, is also shown to exist. These waves are characterized by a novel dispersion relation and fade off from the crack line in an oscillatory manner, whence they play an important role in the far field behaviour. Dynamic stress intensity factors are obtained and, for speed close to the critical speed, they show a resonant behaviour which expresses the most efficient way to channel external work into the crack. Indeed, this behaviour is justified through energy considerations regarding the work of the applied load and the energy release rate. Results might be useful in a wide array of applications, ranging from fracturing and machining to acoustic emission and defect detection.

  12. Flexural edge waves generated by steady-state propagation of a loaded rectilinear crack in an elastically supported thin plate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nobili, Andrea; Radi, Enrico; Lanzoni, Luca

    2017-08-01

    The problem of a rectilinear crack propagating at constant speed in an elastically supported thin plate and acted upon by an equally moving load is considered. The full-field solution is obtained and the spotlight is set on flexural edge wave generation. Below the critical speed for the appearance of travelling waves, a threshold speed is met which marks the transformation of decaying edge waves into edge waves propagating along the crack and dying away from it. Yet, besides these, and for any propagation speed, a pair of localized edge waves, which rapidly decay behind the crack tip, is also shown to exist. These waves are characterized by a novel dispersion relation and fade off from the crack line in an oscillatory manner, whence they play an important role in the far field behaviour. Dynamic stress intensity factors are obtained and, for speed close to the critical speed, they show a resonant behaviour which expresses the most efficient way to channel external work into the crack. Indeed, this behaviour is justified through energy considerations regarding the work of the applied load and the energy release rate. Results might be useful in a wide array of applications, ranging from fracturing and machining to acoustic emission and defect detection.

  13. The effects of degree of crosslinking on the fatigue crack initiation and propagation resistance of orthopedic-grade polyethylene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, D A; Bellare, A; Pruitt, L

    2003-07-01

    Crosslinked ultrahigh molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) has been recently approved by the Food and Drug Administration for use in orthopedic implants. The majority of commercially available UHMWPE orthopedic components are crosslinked using e-beam or gamma radiation. The level of crosslinking is controlled with radiation dose and free radicals are eliminated through heat treatments to prevent long-term degradation associated with chain scission or oxidation mechanisms. Laboratory studies have demonstrated a substantial improvement in the wear resistance of crosslinked UHMWPE. However, a concern about the resistance to fatigue damage remains in the clinical community, especially for tibial components that sustain high cyclic contact stresses. The objective of this study was to investigate both the initiation and propagation aspects of fatigue cracks in radiation crosslinked medical-grade UHMWPE. This work evaluated three levels of radiation, which induced three crosslink densities, on the fatigue crack propagation and total fatigue life behavior. Both as-received UHMWPE, as well as those that underwent an identical thermal history as the crosslinked UHMWPE were used as controls. Fractured crack propagation specimens were examined using scanning electron microscopy to elucidate fatigue fracture mechanisms. The results of this work indicated that a low crosslink density may optimize the fatigue resistance from both a crack initiation and propagation standpoint. Copyright 2003 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Mechanisms of crack propagation in nanoscale single crystal, bicrystal and tricrystal nickels based on molecular dynamics simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yanqiu; Jiang, Shuyong; Zhu, Xiaoming; Zhao, Yanan

    Molecular dynamics simulation was performed in order to investigate mechanisms of crack propagation in nanoscale single crystal, bicrystal and tricrystal nickels, respectively. The grain boundary plays a significant role in the initiation and propagation of crack. As for tricrystal, in particular, a void occurs at the triple junction of grain boundaries and contributes to accelerating the crack propagation. The existence of the grain boundary contributes to the increase of Shockley partial dislocations along with stacking faults. The orientation difference among the grains causes the dislocations to move along different directions in the different slip systems, which lays the foundation for the formation of the crossed or closed Lomer-Cottrell locks. The Lomer-Cottrell locks are able to impede the movement of dislocations and cause the pile-up of dislocations. Amorphous atoms are induced in the region near the Lomer-Cottrell lock. The deformation energy is relaxed when the amorphous atoms are separated one another, which consequently leads to the initiation and propagation of crack.

  15. Fatigue crack detection and identification by the elastic wave propagation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stawiarski, Adam; Barski, Marek; Pająk, Piotr

    2017-05-01

    In this paper the elastic wave propagation phenomenon was used to detect the initiation of the fatigue damage in isotropic plate with a circular hole. The safety and reliability of structures mostly depend on the effectiveness of the monitoring methods. The Structural Health Monitoring (SHM) system based on the active pitch-catch measurement technique was proposed. The piezoelectric (PZT) elements was used as an actuators and sensors in the multipoint measuring system. The comparison of the intact and defected structures has been used by damage detection algorithm. One part of the SHM system has been responsible for detection of the fatigue crack initiation. The second part observed the evolution of the damage growth and assess the size of the defect. The numerical results of the wave propagation phenomenon has been used to present the effectiveness and accuracy of the proposed method. The preliminary experimental analysis has been carried out during the tension test of the aluminum plate with a circular hole to determine the efficiency of the measurement technique.

  16. Crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... make people edgy and irritable. They may have panic attacks and full-blown psychosis where they hear ... die. It's extremely hard to kick a crack addiction. Even after people have been off the drug ...

  17. Experimental – Numerical Analysis of Stress State in Front of the Crack Tip of Modified and Unmodified G17CrMo5-5 Cast Steel by Rare Earth Metals in a Brittle-Ductile Transition Region

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dzioba I.

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available In the paper presented experimental data and numerical analysis of stress distribution in front of the crack of two melts of low-alloy G17CrMo5-5 cast steel-modified (M by rare earth metals and original, unmodified (UM in the temperature range, according to the brittle-ductile transition region. Experimental tests include determination of the tensile properties and fracture toughness characteristics for the UM and M cast steel. Numerical analysis includes determination of stress distribution in front of the crack at the initial moment of the crack extension. In the numerical computations, experimentally tested specimens SEN(B were modeled. The true stress-strain curves for the UM and M cast steel were used in the calculation. It was shown that the maximum of the opening stresses at the initial moment of the crack extension occurs in the axis of the specimens and reaches similar level of about 3.5σ0 for both UM and M cast steel. However, the length of the critical distance, measured for stress level equal 3σ0, is great for the M in comparison to the UM cast steel. Also was shown that the UM cast steel increased the level of the stress state triaxiality parameters that resulted in a decrease of fracture toughness.

  18. Integrated FEM-DBEM simulation of crack propagation in AA2024-T3 FSW butt joints considering manufacturing effects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sonne, Mads Rostgaard; Carlone, P.; Citarella, R.

    2015-01-01

    This paper deals with a numerical and experimental investigation on the influence of residual stresses on fatigue crack growth in AA2024-T3 friction stir welded butt joints. An integrated FEM-DBEM procedure for the simulation of crack propagation is proposed and discussed. A numerical FEM model...... of the welding process of precipitation hardenable AA2024-T3 aluminum alloy is employed to infer the process induced residual stress field. The reliability of the FEM simulations with respect to the induced residual stresses is assessed comparing numerical outcomes with experimental data obtained by means...

  19. Coupled Finite Volume Methods and Extended Finite Element Methods for the Dynamic Crack Propagation Modelling with the Pressurized Crack Surfaces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shouyan Jiang

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available We model the fluid flow within the crack as one-dimensional flow and assume that the flow is laminar; the fluid is incompressible and accounts for the time-dependent rate of crack opening. Here, we discretise the flow equation by finite volume methods. The extended finite element methods are used for solving solid medium with crack under dynamic loads. Having constructed the approximation of dynamic extended finite element methods, the derivation of governing equation for dynamic extended finite element methods is presented. The implicit time algorithm is elaborated for the time descritisation of dominant equation. In addition, the interaction integral method is given for evaluating stress intensity factors. Then, the coupling model for modelling hydraulic fracture can be established by the extended finite element methods and the finite volume methods. We compare our present numerical results with our experimental results for verifying the proposed model. Finally, we investigate the water pressure distribution along crack surface and the effect of water pressure distribution on the fracture property.

  20. On-line prognosis of fatigue crack propagation based on Gaussian weight-mixture proposal particle filter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Yuan, Shenfang; Qiu, Lei; Wang, Hui; Yang, Weibo

    2018-01-01

    Accurate on-line prognosis of fatigue crack propagation is of great meaning for prognostics and health management (PHM) technologies to ensure structural integrity, which is a challenging task because of uncertainties which arise from sources such as intrinsic material properties, loading, and environmental factors. The particle filter algorithm has been proved to be a powerful tool to deal with prognostic problems those are affected by uncertainties. However, most studies adopted the basic particle filter algorithm, which uses the transition probability density function as the importance density and may suffer from serious particle degeneracy problem. This paper proposes an on-line fatigue crack propagation prognosis method based on a novel Gaussian weight-mixture proposal particle filter and the active guided wave based on-line crack monitoring. Based on the on-line crack measurement, the mixture of the measurement probability density function and the transition probability density function is proposed to be the importance density. In addition, an on-line dynamic update procedure is proposed to adjust the parameter of the state equation. The proposed method is verified on the fatigue test of attachment lugs which are a kind of important joint components in aircraft structures. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Fatigue crack propagation behavior and debris formation in Ti-6Al-4V alloys with different grain size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, H. J.; Nakahigashi, J.; Ebara, R.; Endo, M.

    2017-05-01

    Titanium alloy is widely used in applications where high specific strength as well as good heat and corrosion resistance is required. Consequently, there are a number of studies on the fatigue characteristics of titanium alloys. In recent years, grain refinement for metallic materials processed by several methods, such as severe plastic deformation, has been studied to improve the mechanical properties. Grain refinement of titanium alloy by the protium treatment is a new technology, and the fatigue properties of this material have yet to be sufficiently studied. Therefore in this study, tension-compression fatigue tests were conducted for a protium treated Ti-6Al-4V alloy with ultra-fine grains of 0.5 μm in average size as well as for an untreated alloy with conventional grains of 6 μm. Specimens had shallow, sharp notches with the depth of 50 μm and the root radius of 10 μm, which enabled successive observation of the initiation and early propagation behaviors of small fatigue cracks. Substantial amount of oxide debris was formed along the crack during crack propagation. The role of debris was discussed in association with propagation resistance.

  2. Fatigue propagation behaviour of short cracks (1-2 mm) in steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-12-01

    ESDU 93033 presents data that compare the behavior of long and short cracks which are longer than the typical microstructural dimension but are not substantially larger than the radius of the plastic zone at the crack tip. Experimental data extracted from the literature for crack growth rate under constant amplitude loading are presented graphically against stress intensity factor range for both long and short cracks at various stress ratios in air for AISI 4340, HY 130, AISI 1045, SAE 0030 (UNS J 03010), and AISI 1020. In addition, there are data obtained in vacuum for E460, and in salt solution and sea water for HY 130. Data in air for E460, A508, QIN, and 304 are for only one stress ratio (but include the effect of sea water for QIN). Data for AISI 316 are for short cracks only in air at two stress ratios and for EN5 are for short and long cracks in sea water and one stress ratio only. No consistent relationship between yield strength and either short or long crack growth behavior was found, but where a short crack effect was evident the threshold value of stress intensity factor range was lower than for long cracks, and the crack growth rate at low values of stress intensity factor range was greater.

  3. Crack initiation and propagation paths in small diameter FSW 6082-T6 aluminium tubes under fatigue loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Tovo

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports results of fatigue tests of friction stir welded (FSW aluminium tubes. Relatively small 38 mm diameter tubes were used and hence an automated FSW process using a retracting tool was designed for this project, as the wall thickness of the aluminium tube was similar to the diameter of the FSW tool. This is a more complex joint geometry to weld than the more usual larger diameter tube reported in the literature. S-N fatigue testing was performed using load ratios of R = 0.1 and R = -1. Crack path analysis was performed using both low magnification stereo microscopy and scanning electron microscopy, in order to identify crack initiation sites and to determine the direction of crack propagation. Work is still in progress to follow the crack path through the various microstructural zones associated with the weld. A simple statistical analysis was used to characterize the most typical crack initiation site. This work forms part of a wider project directed at determining multiaxial fatigue design rules for small diameter 6082-T6 aluminium tubes that could be of use in the ground vehicle industry.

  4. Fatigue Analysis of the Piston Rod in a Kaplan Turbine Based on Crack Propagation under Unsteady Hydraulic Loads

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, X.; Y Luo, Y.; Wang, Z. W.

    2014-03-01

    As an important component of the blade-control system in Kaplan turbines, piston rods are subjected to fluctuating forces transferred by the turbines blades from hydraulic pressure oscillations. Damage due to unsteady hydraulic loads might generate unexpected down time and high repair cost. In one running hydropower plant, the fracture failure of the piston rod was found twice at the same location. With the transient dynamic analysis, the retainer ring structure of the piston rod existed a relative high stress concentration. This predicted position of the stress concentration agreed well with the actual fracture position in the plant. However, the local strain approach was not able to explain why this position broke frequently. Since traditional structural fatigue analyses use a local stress strain approach to assess structural integrity, do not consider the effect of flaws which can significantly degrade structural life. Using linear elastic fracture mechanism (LEFM) approaches that include the effect of flaws is becoming common practice in many industries. In this research, a case involving a small semi-ellipse crack was taken into account at the stress concentration area, crack growth progress was calculated by FEM. The relationship between crack length and remaining life was obtained. The crack propagation path approximately agreed with the actual fracture section. The results showed that presence of the crack had significantly changed the local stress and strain distributions of the piston rod compared with non-flaw assumption.

  5. Effect of porosity and environment on the mechanical behavior of acrylic bone cement modified with acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene particles: part II. Fatigue crack propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vila, M M; Ginebra, M P; Gil, F J; Planell, J A

    1999-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of adding an elastomeric second phase, acrylonitrile-butadiene-styrene, on the fatigue crack propagation behavior of poly(methyl methacrylate) bone cement. Moreover, the influence of porosity and environmental conditions was studied. When comparing the plain cement to the modified cement, a decrease in the crack propagation rate was observed at between 1 and 2 orders of magnitude. The storage in a physiological environment (saline solution at 37 degrees C) also caused a decrease in the crack propagation rate of about 2 orders of magnitude for the plain and modified cement prepared in air or under a vacuum. Porosity did not have any noticeable effect on the fatigue crack propagation behavior of the cement.

  6. Study of the initiation and the propagation of cracks under 3D thermal cyclic loading; Etude de l'amorcage et de la propagation des fissures sous chargement thermique cyclique 3D

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ancelet, O

    2005-07-01

    The incident which has occurred on the Civaux power plant has shown the noxiousness of thermal loading and the difficulty to take it into account at design level. The objective of this report is to study the initiation and the propagation of crack under thermal loading. In this aim the CEA has developed a new experiment named FAT3D. The various experiments carried out showed the harmfulness of a thermal loading, which makes it possible to rapidly initiate a network of cracks and to propagate one (or some) cracks through the totally thickness of the component under certain conditions. These experimental results associated with a mechanical analysis put at fault the usual criteria of damage based on the variations of the equivalent strain. In addition, the study of the propagation stage shows the importance of the plasticity which, in the case of a thermal loading, slows down the propagation of the crack. (author)

  7. Effect of Microstructure on Fatigue Crack Propagation and S-N Fatigue Behaviors of TMCP Steels with Yield Strengths of Approximately 450 MPa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Youngju; Kwon, Jaeki; Lee, Hyunjung; Jang, Wookil; Choi, Jongkyo; Kim, Sangshik

    2011-04-01

    In the present study, stress (S) - number of cycles to failure (N) (S-N) fatigue and fatigue crack propagation behaviors of three thermomechanical control process steels with different microstructures but similar yield strengths of approximately 450 MPa were investigated. The P + F steel was predominately pearlite plus ferrite, whereas B1 and B2 steels were both bainitic steels with martensite-austenite and pearlitic islands. Despite the significant difference in microstructural features, the resulting fatigue crack propagation rates and near-threshold Δ K values were comparable with each other. The hard phases, such as pearlite colonies in the P + F specimen, tended to affect fatigue crack propagation behavior in a similar manner, and severe crack branching was observed in intermediate and high Δ K regimes. Despite similar fatigue crack propagation rates and near-threshold Δ K values, the resistance to S-N fatigue was substantially different for each steel specimen. Depending on fatigue crack initiators, such as the ferrite/pearlite phase boundaries for the P + F specimens and the cracked martensite-austenite and/or small pearlitic islands for the bainitic specimens, the cycles for crack initiation varied greatly.

  8. Crack initiation and growth in welded structures; Amorcage et propagation de la fissuration dans les jonctions soudees

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Assire, A

    2000-10-13

    results. Concerning local approach, intergranular creep damage model of the Ecole des Mines de Paris is used for crack initiation and growth under creep and creep fatigue loading. Crack propagations are simulated with an adaptive re-meshing technique and are compared with experimental results for crack located in weld and base metal. A sensibility analysis shows that crack propagation strongly depend on the characteristic distance, which is needed to simulate crack growth with local approach, for the weld metal parameters. (author)

  9. Crack Propagation on ESE(T) Specimens Strengthened with CFRP Sheets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Christian Skodborg; Jensen, Peter Holmstrøm; Dyrelund, Jens

    2009-01-01

    In this paper fatigue tests on side notched steel test specimens strengthened with adhesive bonded fibre reinforced polymer (FRP) sheets are presented. The specimens are subject to crack growth both in the steel and bond line. Influence of the load ratio and initial crack length on the overall en...

  10. Fracture toughness and fatigue crack propagation rate of short fiber reinforced epoxy composites for analogue cortical bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chong, Alexander C M; Miller, Forrest; Buxton, McKee; Friis, Elizabeth A

    2007-08-01

    Third-generation mechanical analogue bone models and synthetic analogue cortical bone materials manufactured by Pacific Research Laboratories, Inc. (PRL) are popular tools for use in mechanical testing of various orthopedic implants and biomaterials. A major issue with these models is that the current third-generation epoxy-short fiberglass based composite used as the cortical bone substitute is prone to crack formation and failure in fatigue or repeated quasistatic loading of the model. The purpose of the present study was to compare the tensile and fracture mechanics properties of the current baseline (established PRL "third-generation" E-glass-fiber-epoxy) composite analogue for cortical bone to a new composite material formulation proposed for use as an enhanced fourth-generation cortical bone analogue material. Standard tensile, plane strain fracture toughness, and fatigue crack propagation rate tests were performed on both the third- and fourth-generation composite material formulations using standard ASTM test techniques. Injection molding techniques were used to create random fiber orientation in all test specimens. Standard dog-bone style tensile specimens were tested to obtain ultimate tensile strength and stiffness. Compact tension fracture toughness specimens were utilized to determine plane strain fracture toughness values. Reduced thickness compact tension specimens were also used to determine fatigue crack propagation rate behavior for the two material groups. Literature values for the same parameters for human cortical bone were compared to results from the third- and fourth-generation cortical analogue bone materials. Tensile properties of the fourth-generation material were closer to that of average human cortical bone than the third-generation material. Fracture toughness was significantly increased by 48% in the fourth-generation composite as compared to the third-generation analogue bone. The threshold stress intensity to propagate the crack

  11. A boundary integral method for a dynamic, transient mode I crack problem with viscoelastic cohesive zone

    KAUST Repository

    Leise, Tanya L.

    2009-08-19

    We consider the problem of the dynamic, transient propagation of a semi-infinite, mode I crack in an infinite elastic body with a nonlinear, viscoelastic cohesize zone. Our problem formulation includes boundary conditions that preclude crack face interpenetration, in contrast to the usual mode I boundary conditions that assume all unloaded crack faces are stress-free. The nonlinear viscoelastic cohesive zone behavior is motivated by dynamic fracture in brittle polymers in which crack propagation is preceeded by significant crazing in a thin region surrounding the crack tip. We present a combined analytical/numerical solution method that involves reducing the problem to a Dirichlet-to-Neumann map along the crack face plane, resulting in a differo-integral equation relating the displacement and stress along the crack faces and within the cohesive zone. © 2009 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  12. Subcritical crack propagation due to chemical rock weakening: macroscale chemo-plasticity and chemo-elasticity modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hueckel, T.; Hu, M.

    2015-12-01

    Crack propagation in a subcritically stressed rock subject to chemically aggressive environment is analyzed and numerically simulated. Chemically induced weakening is often encountered in hydraulic fracturing of low-permeability oil/gas reservoirs and heat reservoirs, during storage of CO2 and nuclear waste corroding canisters, and other circumstances when rock matrix acidizing is involved. Upon acidizing, mineral mass dissolution is substantially enhanced weakening the rock and causing crack propagation and eventually permeability changes in the medium. The crack process zone is modeled mathematically via a chemo-plastic coupling and chemo-elastic coupling model. In plasticity a two-way coupling is postulated between mineral dissolution and a yield limit of rock matrix. The rate of dissolution is described by a rate law, but the mineral mass removal per unit volume is also a function of a variable internal specific surface area, which is in turn affected by the micro-cracking (treated as a plastic strain). The behavior of the rock matrix is modeled as rigid-plastic adding a chemical softening capacity to Cam-Clay model. Adopting the Extended Johnson's approximation of processes around the crack tip, the evolution of the stress field and deformation as a function of the chemically enhanced rock damage is modeled in a simplified way. In addition, chemical reactive transport is made dependent on plastic strain representing micro-cracking. Depending on mechanical and chemical boundary conditions, the area of enhanced chemical softening is near or somewhat away from the crack tip.In elasticity, chemo-mechanical effect is postulated via a chemical volumetric shrinkage strain proportional to mass removal variable, conceived analogously to thermal expansion. Two versions are considered: of constant coefficient of shrinkage and a variable one, coupled to deviatoric strain. Airy Potential approach used for linear elasticity is extended considering an extra term, which is

  13. The Crack Initiation and Propagation in threshold regime and S-N curves of High Strength Spring Steels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gubeljak, N.; Predan, J.; Senčič, B.; Chapetti, M. D.

    2016-03-01

    An integrated fracture mechanics approach is proposed to account for the estimation of the fatigue resistance of component. Applications, estimations and results showed very good agreements with experimental results. The model is simple to apply, accounts for the main geometrical, mechanical and material parameters that define the fatigue resistance, and allows accurate predictions. It offers a change in design philosophy: It could be used for design, while simultaneously dealing with crack propagation thresholds. Furthermore, it allows quantification of the material defect sensitivity. In the case of the set of fatigue tests carried out by rotational bending of specimens without residual stresses, the estimated results showed good agreement and that an initial crack length of 0.5 mm can conservatively explain experimental data. In the case of fatigue tests carried out on the springs at their final condition with bending at R = 0.1 our data shows the influence of compressive residual stresses on fatigue strength. Results also showed that the procedures allow us to analyze the different combinations of initial crack length and residual stress levels, and how much the fatigue resistance can change by changing that configuration. For this set of tests, the fatigue resistance estimated for an initial crack length equal to 0.35 mm, can explain all testing data observed for the springs.

  14. Fatigue crack propagation resistance of cemented carbides; Resistencia a la propagacion de fisuras por fatiga en carburos cementados

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, Y.; Rodriguez, S.; Llanes, L.; Anglada, M.

    2001-07-01

    It is studied the fatigue crack growth behavior of two grades of WC-Co cemented carbides, both with a 10%{sub w}t of Co but with different carbide grain size, 0,8 and 2,5 {mu}m. Crack growth kinetics, measured under different load ratios, is described using an alternative form to the Paris equation. hence, it is used a model that takes into account both maximum and range of the applied stress intensity factor, k{sub m}ax and {delta}K respectively, within an equation of the form da/dN=f(K{sub m}ax, {delta}K). It is observed a significant dependence with respect to K{sub m}ax, yielding evidence of the prominence of static modes of rupture. Under these considerations, the fatigue crack growth sensitivity of the materials studied is evaluated. Finally, the damage mechanisms associated with stable and unstable fatigue crack propagation are analyzed. (Author) 11 refs.

  15. Damage, crack growth and fracture characteristics of nuclear grade graphite using the Double Torsion technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Becker, T.H., E-mail: thorsten.becker@uct.ac.za [University of Cape Town, The University of Manchester, Materials Performance Centre, School of Materials, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Marrow, T.J., E-mail: james.marrow@materials.ox.ac.uk [Department of Materials, University of Oxford (United Kingdom); Tait, R.B., E-mail: robert.tait@uct.ac.za [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of Cape Town, Cape Town (South Africa)

    2011-07-01

    The crack initiation and propagation characteristics of two medium grained polygranular graphites, nuclear block graphite (NBG10) and Gilsocarbon (GCMB grade) graphite, have been studied using the Double Torsion (DT) technique. The DT technique allows stable crack propagation and easy crack tip observation of such brittle materials. The linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM) methodology of the DT technique was adapted for elastic-plastic fracture mechanics (EPFM) in conjunction with a methodology for directly calculating the J-integral from in-plane displacement fields (JMAN) to account for the non-linearity of graphite deformation. The full field surface displacement measurement techniques of electronic speckle pattern interferometry (ESPI) and digital image correlation (DIC) were used to observe and measure crack initiation and propagation. Significant micro-cracking in the fracture process zone (FPZ) was observed as well as crack bridging in the wake of the crack tip. The R-curve behaviour was measured to determine the critical J-integral for crack propagation in both materials. Micro-cracks tended to nucleate at pores, causing deflection of the crack path. Rising R-curve behaviour was observed, which is attributed to the formation of the FPZ, while crack bridging and distributed micro-cracks are responsible for the increase in fracture resistance. Each contributes around 50% of the irreversible energy dissipation in both graphites.

  16. The release of trapped gases from amorphous solid water films. I. "Top-down" crystallization-induced crack propagation probed using the molecular volcano.

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, R Alan; Smith, R Scott; Kay, Bruce D

    2013-03-14

    In this (Paper I) and the companion paper (Paper II; R. May, R. Smith, and B. Kay, J. Chem. Phys. 138, 104502 (2013)), we investigate the mechanisms for the release of trapped gases from underneath amorphous solid water (ASW) films. In prior work, we reported the episodic release of trapped gases in concert with the crystallization of ASW, a phenomenon that we termed the "molecular volcano." The observed abrupt desorption is due to the formation of cracks that span the film to form a connected pathway for release. In this paper, we utilize the "molecular volcano" desorption peak to characterize the formation of crystallization-induced cracks. We find that the crack length distribution is independent of the trapped gas (Ar, Kr, Xe, CH4, N2, O2, or CO). Selective placement of the inert gas layer is used to show that cracks form near the top of the film and propagate downward into the film. Isothermal experiments reveal that, after some induction time, cracks propagate linearly in time with an Arrhenius dependent velocity corresponding to an activation energy of 54 kJ∕mol. This value is consistent with the crystallization growth rates reported by others and establishes a direct connection between crystallization growth rate and the crack propagation rate. A two-step model in which nucleation and crystallization occurs in an induction zone near the top of the film followed by the propagation of a crystallization∕crack front into the film is in good agreement with the temperature programmed desorption results.

  17. The use of XFEM to assess the influence of intra-cortical porosity on crack propagation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Florez, Naiara; Carriero, Alessandra; Shefelbine, Sandra J

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed at using eXtended finite element method (XFEM) to characterize crack growth through bone's intra-cortical pores. Two techniques were compared using Abaqus: (1) void material properties were assigned to pores; (2) multiple enrichment regions with independent crack-growth possibilities were employed. Both were applied to 2D models of transverse images of mouse bone with differing porous structures. Results revealed that assigning multiple enrichment regions allows for multiple cracks to be initiated progressively, which cannot be captured when the voids are filled. Therefore, filling pores with one enrichment region in the model will not create realistic fracture patterns in Abaqus-XFEM.

  18. Influence of the residual stresses on crack initiation in brittle materials and structures; Prise en compte des contraintes residuelles dans un critere d'amorcage en rupture fragile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henninger, C

    2007-11-15

    Many material assemblies subjected to thermo-mechanical loadings develop thermal residual stresses which modify crack onset conditions. Besides if one of the components has a plastic behaviour, plastic residual deformations may also have a contribution. One of the issues in brittle fracture mechanics is to predict crack onset without any pre-existing defect. Leguillon proposed an onset criterion based on both a Griffth-like energetic condition and a maximum stress criterion. The analysis uses matched asymptotics and the theory of singularity. The good fit between the model and experimental measurements led on homogeneous isotropic materials under pure mechanical loading incited us to take into account residual stresses in the criterion. The comparison between the modified criterion and the experimental measurements carried out on an aluminum/epoxy assembly proves to be satisfying concerning the prediction of failure of the interface between the two components. Besides, it allows, through inversion, identifying the fracture properties of this interface. The modified criterion is also applied to the delamination of the tile/structure interface in the plasma facing components of the Tore Supra tokamak. Indeed thermal and plastic residual stresses appear in the metallic part of these coating tiles. (author)

  19. Steady State Crack Propagation in Layered Material Systems Displaying Visco-plastic Behaviour

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau

    2012-01-01

    The steady state fracture toughness of elastic visco-plastic materials is studied numerically, using both a conventional and a higher order model. Focus is on the combined effect of strain hardening, strain gradient hardening and strain rate hardening on cracking in layered material systems......, and predictions for the crack tip shielding ratio is brought forward. Included is a novel procedure for extracting information on the rate-independent toughness without approaching this numerically cumbersome limit....

  20. Fatigue crack propagation in UFG Ti grade 4 processed by severe plastic deformation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Fintová, Stanislava; Arzaghi, M.; Kuběna, Ivo; Kunz, Ludvík; Sarrazin-Baudoux, C.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 98, MAY (2017), s. 187-194 ISSN 0142-1123 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LQ1601; GA MŠk LM2015069 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Titanium * Fatigue * Crack growth * Crack closure * Equal channel angular processing Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics OBOR OECD: Audio engineering, reliability analysis Impact factor: 2.899, year: 2016 http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S014211231730035X

  1. Microstructural changes induced near crack tip during corrosion fatigue tests in austenitic-ferritic steel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gołebiowski, B; Swiatnicki, W A; Gaspérini, M

    2010-03-01

    Microstructural changes occurring during fatigue tests of austenitic-ferritic duplex stainless steel (DSS) in air and in hydrogen-generating environment have been investigated. Hydrogen charging of steel samples during fatigue crack growth (FCG) tests was performed by cathodic polarization of specimens in 0.1M H(2)SO(4) aqueous solution. Microstructural investigations of specimens after FCG tests were carried out using transmission electron microscopy to reveal the density and arrangement of dislocations formed near crack tip. To determine the way of crack propagation in the microstructure, electron backscatter diffraction investigations were performed on fatigue-tested samples in both kinds of environment. To reveal hydrogen-induced phase transformations the atomic force microscopy was used. The above investigations allowed us to define the character of fatigue crack propagation and microstructural changes near the crack tip. It was found that crack propagation after fatigue tests in air is accompanied with plastic deformation; a high density of dislocations is observed at large distance from the crack. After fatigue tests performed during hydrogen charging the deformed zone containing high density of dislocations is narrow compared to that after fatigue tests in air. It means that hydrogenation leads to brittle character of fatigue crack propagation. In air, fatigue cracks propagate mostly transgranularly, whereas in hydrogen-generating environment the cracks have mixed transgranular/interfacial character.

  2. Incidence of apical crack formation and propagation during removal of root canal filling materials with different engine driven nickel-titanium instruments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taha Özyürek

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Objectives To determine the incidence of crack formation and propagation in apical root dentin after retreatment procedures performed using ProTaper Universal Retreatment (PTR, Mtwo-R, ProTaper Next (PTN, and Twisted File Adaptive (TFA systems. Materials and Methods The study consisted of 120 extracted mandibular premolars. One millimeter from the apex of each tooth was ground perpendicular to the long axis of the tooth, and the apical surface was polished. Twenty teeth served as the negative control group. One hundred teeth were prepared, obturated, and then divided into 5 retreatment groups. The retreatment procedures were performed using the following files: PTR, Mtwo-R, PTN, TFA, and hand files. After filling material removal, apical enlargement was done using apical size 0.50 mm ProTaper Universal (PTU, Mtwo, PTN, TFA, and hand files. Digital images of the apical root surfaces were recorded before preparation, after preparation, after obturation, after filling removal, and after apical enlargement using a stereomicroscope. The images were then inspected for the presence of new apical cracks and crack propagation. Data were analyzed with χ2 tests using SPSS 21.0 software. Results New cracks and crack propagation occurred in all the experimental groups during the retreatment process. Nickel-titanium rotary file systems caused significantly more apical crack formation and propagation than the hand files. The PTU system caused significantly more apical cracks than the other groups after the apical enlargement stage. Conclusions This study showed that retreatment procedures and apical enlargement after the use of retreatment files can cause crack formation and propagation in apical dentin.

  3. Fracture Profile and Crack Propagation of Ultra-High Strength Hot-Stamped Boron Steel During Mechanical Trimming Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Xianhong; Yang, Kun; Chen, Sisi; Chen, Jun

    2015-10-01

    Mechanical trimming process for ultra-high strength boron steel after hot stamping was carried out in this study. Shear and tensile tests were designed to analyze the influences of stress state on the fracture mode; trimmed fracture surface and profile were observed and compared to other commonly used steels such as DP980 and Q235 etc.; the crack propagation during trimming process was studied through step-by-step tests. The observation and analysis reveal that the fracture mode of hot-stamped boron steel is highly related to the stress state, it belongs to cleavage fracture on low stress triaxiality but dimple fracture on high stress triaxiality. Such phenomenon is reflected in the trimming process, during which the stress state changes from shear-dominated state to tensile-dominated state. In addition, the burnish zone of trimmed boron steel is much smaller than other high strength steels, and the profile of cutting surface shows an `S'-like shape which is destructive to the trimming tool. Moreover, during the trimming process, most martensite laths near the cutting edge are stretched and rotated markedly to the direction of the shear band, and the main crack expands along those grain boundaries, which may penetrate through a few martensite laths and form small crack branches.

  4. Analysis of crack initiation in the vicinity of an interface in brittle materials. Applications to ceramic matrix composites and nuclear fuels; Analyse de la fissuration au voisinage d'une interface dans les materiaux fragiles. Applications aux composites a matrice ceramique et aux combustibles nucleaires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poitou, B

    2007-11-15

    In this study, criterions are proposed to describe crack initiation in the vicinity of an interface in brittle bi-materials. The purpose is to provide a guide for the elaboration of ceramic multi-layer structures being able to develop damage tolerance by promoting crack deflection along interfaces. Several cracking mechanisms are analyzed, like the competition between the deflection of a primary crack along the interface or its penetration in the second layer. This work is first completed in a general case and is then used to describe the crack deviation at the interface in ceramic matrix composites and nuclear fuels. In this last part, experimental tests are carried out to determine the material fracture properties needed to the deflection criteria. An optimization of the fuel coating can be proposed in order to increase its toughness. (author)

  5. Crack propagation analysis using acoustic emission sensors for structural health monitoring systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kral, Zachary; Horn, Walter; Steck, James

    2013-01-01

    Aerospace systems are expected to remain in service well beyond their designed life. Consequently, maintenance is an important issue. A novel method of implementing artificial neural networks and acoustic emission sensors to form a structural health monitoring (SHM) system for aerospace inspection routines was the focus of this research. Simple structural elements, consisting of flat aluminum plates of AL 2024-T3, were subjected to increasing static tensile loading. As the loading increased, designed cracks extended in length, releasing strain waves in the process. Strain wave signals, measured by acoustic emission sensors, were further analyzed in post-processing by artificial neural networks (ANN). Several experiments were performed to determine the severity and location of the crack extensions in the structure. ANNs were trained on a portion of the data acquired by the sensors and the ANNs were then validated with the remaining data. The combination of a system of acoustic emission sensors, and an ANN could determine crack extension accurately. The difference between predicted and actual crack extensions was determined to be between 0.004 in. and 0.015 in. with 95% confidence. These ANNs, coupled with acoustic emission sensors, showed promise for the creation of an SHM system for aerospace systems.

  6. Wave propagation analysis of edge cracked circular beams under impact force.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şeref Doğuşcan Akbaş

    Full Text Available This paper presents responses of an edge circular cantilever beam under the effect of an impact force. The beam is excited by a transverse triangular force impulse modulated by a harmonic motion. The Kelvin-Voigt model for the material of the beam is used. The cracked beam is modelled as an assembly of two sub-beams connected through a massless elastic rotational spring. The considered problem is investigated within the Bernoulli-Euler beam theory by using energy based finite element method. The system of equations of motion is derived by using Lagrange's equations. The obtained system of linear differential equations is reduced to a linear algebraic equation system and solved in the time domain by using Newmark average acceleration method. In the study, the effects of the location of crack, the depth of the crack, on the characteristics of the reflected waves are investigated in detail. Also, the positions of the cracks are calculated by using reflected waves.

  7. Effect of oxidation on the fatigue crack propagation behavior of Z3CN20.09M dyplex stainless steel in high temperature water

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Huan Chun; Yang, Bin [State Key Laboratory for Advanced Metals and Materials, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing (China); Chen, Yue Feng; Chen, Xu Dong [Collaborative Innovation Center of Steel Technology, Beijing (China)

    2017-06-15

    The fatigue crack propagation behaviors of Z3CN20.09M duplex stainless steel (DSS) were investigated by studying oxide films of specimens tested in 290°C water and air. The results indicate that a full oxide film that consisted of oxides and hydroxides was formed in 290°C water. By contrast, only a half-baked oxide film consisting of oxides was formed in 290°C air. Both environments are able to deteriorate the elastic modulus and hardness of the oxide films, especially the 290°C water. The fatigue lives of the specimens tested in 290°C air were about twice of those tested in 290°C water at all strain amplitudes. Moreover, the crack propagation rates of the specimen tested in 290°C water were confirmed to be faster than those tested in 290°C air, which was thought to be due to the deteriorative strength of the oxide films induced by the mutual promotion of oxidation and crack propagation at the crack tip. It is noteworthy that the crack propagation can be postponed by the ferrite phase in the DSS, especially when the specimens were tested in 290°C water.

  8. Comparison of Damage Formation and Crack Propagation Behavior of Selected Nuclear Graphite for HTGR

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chi, Se-Hwan; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Kim, Eung-Seon; Kim, Min-Hwan [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-05-15

    Undoubtedly, these changes are attributed to the irradiation-induced changes in the microstructure of graphite components and finally result in an increase in the probability of fracture of graphite core components menacing the safety of reactor. Due to the nature of HTGR whose core components are made of quasi-brittle graphite, the graphite core components operating for 40-60 years without failure require knowledge and understanding on the characteristics of graphite fracture. In this study, two results on the fracture of nuclear graphite, i.e., fracture under cyclic compressive loading unloading and fracture under static loading, were reevaluated to understand the fracture characteristics of selected nuclear graphite grade for HTGR. Present observation may need to be considered in the graphite selection as well as in the design and safety evaluation of the graphite core components in HTGR.

  9. Application of Interfacial Propagation and Kinking Crack Concept to ECC/Concrete Overlay Repair System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yaw ChiaHwan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Research on the application of ultraductile engineered cementitious composite (ECC as overlay in the repair of deteriorated concrete structures is performed in this paper. Also, interfacial crack kinking and trapping mechanism experimentally observed in ECC/concrete overlay repair system are described by comparison of toughness and energy release rate. The mechanism involves cycles of extension, kinking, and arrest of interfacial crack into the overlay. Experimental testing of overlay repair system reveals significant improvements in load carrying capacity and ductility over conventional concrete overlay. The commonly observed overlay system failure mode of delamination or spalling is eliminated when ECC is applied. These failure modes are suppressed when ECC is used as an ideal and durable candidate overlay repair material.

  10. Behavior of Plastic Deformation and Crack Propagation on Fully Lamellar GAMMA-TiAl Alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ming; Mao, Guangjie; Ma, Yue; Gong, Shengkai

    Practical residual strain field around the microcrack tip of fully lamellar γ-TiAl alloy was estimate the by digital image correlation (DIC) technology with in-situ SEM observation. And the macro plastic deformation before fracture of such low ductility alloys was observed. The results showed that the size of plastic zone around microcrack tip was 2 ~ 10µm which was much more smaller than the calculated value by fracture mechanics. During the magnified observation on the plastic deformation region, a series of microcracks were observed in the specimen without macro cracking. Furthermore, the size of distribution region of the microcracks were in the same order of magnitude with the calculated plastic zone near primary crack tip which just reflected the comprehensive effect of microcracks and the plastic deformation on the tips of them.

  11. Quantitative characterization of initiation and propagation in stress corrosion cracking. An approach of a phenomenological model; Caracterisation quantitative de l`amorcage et de la propagation en corrosion sous contrainte. Approche d`une modelisation phenomenologique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raquet, O.

    1994-11-25

    A purely phenomenological study of stress corrosion cracking was performed using the couple Z2CN 18.10 (304L) austenitic stainless steel/boiling MgCl{sub 2} aqueous solution. The exploitation of the morphological information (shape of the cracks and size distribution) available after constant elongation rate tests led to the proposal of an analytical expression of the crack initiation and growth rates. This representation allowed to quantitatively characterize the influence of the applied strain rate as well as the effect of corrosion inhibitors on the crack initiation and propagation phases. It can be used in the search for the stress corrosion cracking mechanisms as a `riddle` for the determination of the rate controlling steps. As a matter of fact, no mechanistic hypothesis has been used for its development. (author).

  12. On crack propagation in the welded polyolefin pipes with and without the presence of weld beads

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mikula, Jakub; Hutař, Pavel; Nezbedová, E.; Lach, R.; Arbeiter, F.; Ševčík, Martin; Pinter, G.; Grellmann, W.; Náhlík, Luboš

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 87, DEC (2015), s. 95-104 ISSN 0264-1275 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GAP108/12/1560; GA MŠk(CZ) EE2.3.30.0063; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0068 Institutional support: RVO:68081723 Keywords : Slow crack growth * Butt weld * Lifetime estimation * Polyolefin pipes * Weld bead Subject RIV: JL - Materials Fatigue, Friction Mechanics Impact factor: 3.997, year: 2015

  13. An Improved Approach to Fracture Toughness Assessment of Brittle Coating on Ductile Substrate Systems under Indentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demidova, Natalia V.

    Fracture toughness is an important material property that determines the structural integrity of a component with pre-existing or service-generated flaws. In the present research, an indentation-based method and the associated fracture mechanics model are proposed for fracture toughness assessment of brittle coating/ductile substrate systems. The proposed models consider well-developed radial/median cracks generated under sharp indentation, despite that the crack formation process may have gone through crack initiation and propagation phases. For generality, the geometry of a well-developed crack is assumed to be semi-elliptical in shape. The driving force of the crack is considered to stem from the residual plastic zone expansion under the indenter, as well as the far-field Boussinesq (elastic) stress. Three well-defined configurations are studied. For the first configuration, a crack with a depth of less than 7% of the coating thickness is considered. In this case, the problem is treated as the one for the monolithic material with the coating material properties. For the second configuration, a crack that runs deeper than 7% of the coating thickness but is still within the coating layer is analyzed. In this case, the composite hardness is introduced into the analysis to account for the influence of the substrate material properties; and furthermore, an interface correction factor is proposed to take into account the presence of the coating/substrate interface and its influence on the stress intensity factor of the well-developed elliptical cracks. For the third configuration, a crack penetrating into the substrate is considered. In this case, based on the condition of deformation compatibility across the coating/substrate interface, the bulk modulus for the coating/substrate system is introduced into the analysis. A series of indentation tests are conducted on a WC/10Co/4Cr coating/1080 low carbon steel substrate specimen, which is a brittle coating on a ductile

  14. Brittle fracture of an Au/Ag alloy induced by a surface film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, R. G.; Frost, A. J.; Shahrabi, T.; Newman, R. C.

    1991-02-01

    The film-induced cleavage model of stress-corrosion cracking (SCC) has been tested using an Ag-20 at. pct Au alloy in 1 M HClO4 solution. Brittle cracks, both intergranular (IG) and transgranular (TG) in nature, were formed by high-speed loading of a thin foil covered with a dealloyed (nanoporous gold) layer. These cracks were found to propagate through the dealloyed layer and into the uncorroded bulk face-centered cubic (fcc) material for a distance of many microns. Hydrogen embrittlement (HE) can be excluded on thermodynamic grounds; thus, only film-induced cleavage can explain the observed decoupling of stress and corrosion in the fracture process.

  15. High temperature cracking of steels: effect of geometry on creep crack growth laws; Fissuration des aciers a haute temperature: effet de la geometrie sur la transferabilite des lois de propagation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kabiri, M.R

    2003-12-01

    This study was performed at Centre des Materiaux de l'Ecole des Mines de Paris. It deals with identification and transferability of high temperature creep cracking laws of steels. A global approach, based on C{sup *} and J non-linear fracture mechanics parameters has been used to characterize creep crack initiation and propagation. The studied materials are: the ferritic steels 1Cr-1Mo-1/4V (hot and cold parts working at 540 and 250 C) used in the thermal power stations and the austenitic stainless steel 316 L(N) used in the nuclear power stations. During this thesis a data base was setting up, it regroups several tests of fatigue, creep, creep-fatigue, and relaxation. Its particularity is to contain several creep tests (27 tests), achieved at various temperatures (550 to 650 C) and using three different geometries. The relevance of the C{sup *} parameter to describe the creep crack propagation was analysed by a means of systematic study of elasto-viscoplastic stress singularities under several conditions (different stress triaxiality). It has been shown that, besides the C{sup *} parameter, a second non singular term, denoted here as Q{sup *}, is necessary to describe the local variables in the vicinity of the crack tip. Values of this constraint parameter are always negative. Consequently, application of typical creep crack growth laws linking the creep crack growth rate to the C{sup *} parameter (da/dt - C{sup *}), will be conservative for industrial applications. Furthermore, we showed that for ferritic steels, crack incubation period is important, therefore a correlation of Ti - C{sup *} type has been kept to predict crack initiation time Ti. For the austenitic stainless steel, the relevant stage is the one of the crack propagation, so that a master curve (da/dt - C{sup *}), using a new data analysis method, was established. Finally, the propagation of cracks has been simulated numerically using the node release technique, allowing to validate analytical

  16. The influence of surface stress on dislocation emission from sharp and blunt cracks in f.c.c. metals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schiøtz, Jakob

    2000-01-01

    is a consequence of the many-body nature of the interatomic interactions. The enhanced dislocation emission can cause an order-of-magnitude increase in the fracture toughness of certain materials, in which a sharp crack would propagate by cleavage. Collisions with already existing dislocations will blunt the crack......We use computer simulations to study the behaviour of atomically sharp and blunted cracks in various fee metals. The simulations use effective medium potentials which contain many-body interactions. We find that when using potentials representing platinum and gold a sharp crack is stable...... with respect to the emission of a dislocation from the crack tip, whereas for all other metals studied the sharp crack is unstable. This result cannot be explained by existing criteria for the intrinsic ductile/brittle behaviour of crack tips, but is probably caused by surface stresses. When the crack...

  17. Combined lock-in thermography and heat flow measurements for analysing heat dissipation during fatigue crack propagation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Bär

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available During fatigue crack propagation experiments with constant force as well as constant stress intensity lock in thermography and heat flow measurements with a new developed peltier sensor have been performed. With lock in thermography space resolved measurements are possible and the evaluation allows to distinguish between elastic and dissipated energies. The specimens have to be coated with black paint to enhance the emissivity. The thickness of the coating influences the results and therefore quantitative measurements are problematic. The heat flow measurements are easy to perform and provide quantitative results but only integral in an area given by the used peltier element. To get comparable results the values measured with thermography were summarized in an area equivalent to that of the peltier element. The experiments with constant force show a good agreement between the thermography and the heat flow measurements. In case of the experiments with a constant stress intensity some differences become visible. Whereas the thermography measurements show a linear decrease of the signal with rising crack length, the heat flow measurements show a clearly nonlinear dependency. Obviously the measured energies in thermography and peltier based heat flow measurement are not comparable

  18. Inhibition of Crack Propagation of High Strength Steels through Single and Multifunctional Inhibitors

    Science.gov (United States)

    1976-08-01

    1964. 38. W.M. Latimer; Oxidation Potentials, Prentice-Hall, Inc, Englewood Cliffs, NJ (1952). 39. M. Pourbaix; Atlas of Electrochemical Equilibria ...conditions were virtually independent of the bulk pH and potential. In all cases, the electrochemical conditions at the crack tip were such that hydrogen...University of Florida, 1970. 27. B.F. Brown, C.T. Fuji and E.P. Dahlberg, J. Electrochem . Soc., 116, 218 (1969). 28. J.A. Smith, M.H. Peterson and B.F

  19. Interface fatigue crack propagation in sandwich X-joints – Part II: Finite element modeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Moslemian, Ramin; Berggreen, Christian

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the second and final part of this study is to simulate fatigue crack growth in the tested Sandwich Tear Test specimens, described in Part I, using the finite element method. To accelerate the simulation, a cycle jump method is utilized and implemented in the finite element routine....... The proposed method is based on conducting finite element analysis for a set of cycles to establish a trend line, extrapolating the trend line spanning many cycles, and use the extrapolated state as initial state for additional finite element simulations. The measured da/dN relations of the face/core interface...

  20. Experimental and Numerical Study of Interface Crack Propagation in Foam Cored Sandwich Beams

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berggreen, Carl Christian; Simonsen, Bo Cerup; Borum, Kaj Kvisgård

    2007-01-01

    This article deals with the prediction of debonding between core and face sheet in foam-cored sandwich structures. It describes the development, validation, and application of a FEM-based numerical model for the prediction of the propagation of debond damage. The structural mechanics is considered...

  1. Fatigue crack initiation and propagation in steels exposed to inert and corrosive environments. Final report, May 1, 1977--December 31, 1977

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Youseffi, K.; Finnie, I.

    1978-02-01

    The fatigue crack initiation life of AISI 1018 steel was investigated using compact tension specimens having sharp notch root radii. The data were analyzed using two methods for predicting initiation in strain cycling experiments. Also, another approach in which initiation is related to the stress intensity factor was developed. The next phase, that of propagation, was studied using AISI 1018 steel and a new high strength steel HY-180. The crack propagation data obtained for both steels tested in air can be described accurately by the power law first suggested by Paris, da/dN = C(..delta..K)/sup n/, where a is the crack length, N the number of cycles, and C and n are material constants. However, the exponent n was found to be two times larger for AISI 1018 steel than HY-180 steel.

  2. Fully Noncontact Wave Propagation Imaging in an Immersed Metallic Plate with a Crack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung-Ryul Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This study presents a noncontact sensing technique with ultrasonic wave propagation imaging algorithm, for damage visualization of liquid-immersed structures. An aluminum plate specimen (400 mm × 400 mm × 3 mm with a 12 mm slit was immersed in water and in glycerin. A 532 nm Q-switched continuous wave laser is used at an energy level of 1.2 mJ to scan an area of 100 mm × 100 mm. A laser Doppler vibrometer is used as a noncontact ultrasonic sensor, which measures guided wave displacement at a fixed point. The tests are performed with two different cases of specimen: without water and filled with water and with glycerin. Lamb wave dispersion curves for the respective cases are calculated, to investigate the velocity-frequency relationship of each wave mode. Experimental propagation velocities of Lamb waves for different cases are compared with the theoretical dispersion curves. This study shows that the dispersion and attenuation of the Lamb wave is affected by the surrounding liquid, and the comparative experimental results are presented to verify it. In addition, it is demonstrated that the developed fully noncontact ultrasonic propagation imaging system is capable of damage sizing in submerged structures.

  3. The Role of Local Microstructure on Small Fatigue Crack Propagation in an α + β Titanium Alloy, Ti-6Al-2Sn-4Zr-6Mo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczepanski, C. J.; Jha, S. K.; Larsen, J. M.; Jones, J. W.

    2012-11-01

    Microstructural origins of the variability in fatigue lifetime observed in the high- and very-high-cycle fatigue regimes in titanium alloys were explored by examining the role of microstructural heterogeneity (neighborhoods of grains with similar crystallographic orientations or microtexture) on the initiation and early growth of fatigue cracks in Ti-6246. Ultrasonic fatigue of focused ion beam (FIB) micronotched samples was used to investigate long lifetime (107 to 109) behavior for two microstructural conditions: one with microtexture and one without microtexture. For specimens containing notches of nominally 20 μm in length, fatigue crack initiation in the microtextured material was most likely to occur from notches placed in neighborhoods with a microtexture favorably oriented for easy basal slip. Initiation lifetimes in the untextured material with similar sized notches were, on average, slightly greater than those for the microtextured condition. In both materials, the crack-initiation lifetime from micronotches of length 2c > 20 μm was a very small fraction (fatigue lifetime for unnotched specimens. Furthermore, in the microtextured condition, small fatigue crack propagation rates did not correlate with the microtextured regions and did not statistically differ from average small crack growth rates in the untextured material. As the micronotch size was reduced below 20 μm, fatigue crack initiation was controlled by microstructure rather than by FIB-machined defects. Finally, predictions of the fraction of life consumed in small and long fatigue crack growth from preexisting cracks nominally equivalent in size to the micronotches was compared with the measured fatigue life of unnotched specimens. The predicted range of lifetimes when factoring in the experimentally observed variability in small fatigue crack growth, only accounted for 0.1 pct of the observed fatigue lifetime variability. These findings indicate that in the high-and very-high-cycle fatigue

  4. An Effective Modal Approach to the Dynamic Evaluation of Fracture Toughness of Quasi-Brittle Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, L. E. T.; Vareda, L. V.; Hanai, J. B.; Sousa, J. L. A. O.; Silva, A. I.

    2017-05-01

    A modal dynamic analysis is used as the tool to evaluate the fracture toughness of concrete from the results of notched-through beam tests. The dimensionless functions describing the relation between the frequencies and specimen geometry used for identifying the variation in the natural frequency as a function of crack depth is first determined for a 150 × 150 × 500-mm notched-through specimen. The frequency decrease resulting from the propagating crack is modeled through a modal/fracture mechanics approach, leading to determination of an effective crack length. This length, obtained numerically, is used to evaluate the fracture toughness of concrete, the critical crack mouth opening displacements, and the brittleness index proposed. The methodology is applied to tests performed on high-strength concrete specimens. The frequency response for each specimen is evaluated before and after each crack propagation step. The methodology is then validated by comparison with results from the application of other methodologies described in the literature and suggested by RILEM.

  5. The mechanics and physics of fracturing: application to thermal aspects of crack propagation and to fracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherepanov, Genady P

    2015-03-28

    By way of introduction, the general invariant integral (GI) based on the energy conservation law is presented, with mention of cosmic, gravitational, mass, elastic, thermal and electromagnetic energy of matter application to demonstrate the approach, including Coulomb's Law generalized for moving electric charges, Newton's Law generalized for coupled gravitational/cosmic field, the new Archimedes' Law accounting for gravitational and surface energy, and others. Then using this approach the temperature track behind a moving crack is found, and the coupling of elastic and thermal energies is set up in fracturing. For porous materials saturated with a fluid or gas, the notion of binary continuum is used to introduce the corresponding GIs. As applied to the horizontal drilling and fracturing of boreholes, the field of pressure and flow rate as well as the fluid output from both a horizontal borehole and a fracture are derived in the fluid extraction regime. The theory of fracking in shale gas reservoirs is suggested for three basic regimes of the drill mud permeation, with calculating the shape and volume of the local region of the multiply fractured rock in terms of the pressures of rock, drill mud and shale gas. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  6. Moving mesh finite element simulation for phase-field modeling of brittle fracture and convergence of Newton's iteration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fei; Huang, Weizhang; Li, Xianping; Zhang, Shicheng

    2018-03-01

    A moving mesh finite element method is studied for the numerical solution of a phase-field model for brittle fracture. The moving mesh partial differential equation approach is employed to dynamically track crack propagation. Meanwhile, the decomposition of the strain tensor into tensile and compressive components is essential for the success of the phase-field modeling of brittle fracture but results in a non-smooth elastic energy and stronger nonlinearity in the governing equation. This makes the governing equation much more difficult to solve and, in particular, Newton's iteration often fails to converge. Three regularization methods are proposed to smooth out the decomposition of the strain tensor. Numerical examples of fracture propagation under quasi-static load demonstrate that all of the methods can effectively improve the convergence of Newton's iteration for relatively small values of the regularization parameter but without compromising the accuracy of the numerical solution. They also show that the moving mesh finite element method is able to adaptively concentrate the mesh elements around propagating cracks and handle multiple and complex crack systems.

  7. Use of electrochemical potential noise to detect initiation and propagation of stress corrosion cracks in a 17-4 PH steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzalez-Rodriguez, J.G. [UAEM, Cuernavaca (Mexico); Salinas-Bravo, V.M.; Garcia-Ochoa, E. [Inst. de Investigaciones Electricas, Temixco (Mexico). Dept. de Fisicoquimica Aplicada; Diaz-Sanchez, A. [Inst. Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares, Toluca (Mexico). Dept. de Materiales

    1997-09-01

    Corrosion potential transients were associated with nucleation and propagation of stress corrosion cracks in a 17-4 precipitation-hardenable (PH) martensitic stainless steel (SS) during slow strain rate tests (SSRT) at 90 C in deaerated sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions, Test solutions included 20 wt% NaCl at pH 3 and 7, similar to normal and faulted steam turbine environments, respectively. Time series were analyzed using the fast Fourier transform method. At the beginning of straining, the consistent noise behavior was perturbed with small potential transients, probably associated with rupture of the surface oxide layer. After yielding, these transients increased in intensity. At maximum load, the transients were still higher in intensity and frequency. These potential transients were related to crack nucleation and propagation. When the steel did not fail by stress corrosion cracking (SCC), such transients were found only at the beginning of the test. The power spectra showed some differences in all cases in roll-off slope and voltage magnitude, but these were not reliable tools to monitor the initiation and propagation of stress corrosion cracks.

  8. The Deformation Mechanisms in Process of Crack Propagation for Alpha Titanium with Compounding Microdefects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The multiscale analysis method based on traction-separation law (TSL and cohesive zone law was used to describe the cross-scale defective process of alpha titanium (α-Ti material with compounding microdefects in this paper. First, the properties of T-S curve and the reasonable range of T-S area relative to the length of defects were discussed. Next, based on the conclusions above, the molecule dynamics analysis of three models of α-Ti with compounding microdefects was conducted and cross-scaly simulated. The phenomenon, principles, and mechanisms of different compound microscale defects propagation of α-Ti were observed and explained at atomic scale, and the effects of different microdefects on macrofracture parameters of materials were studied.

  9. Crack growth in an austenitic stainless steel at high temperature; Propagation de fissure a haute temperature dans un acier inoxydable austenitique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polvora, J.P

    1998-12-31

    This study deals with crack propagation at 650 deg C on an austenitic stainless steel referenced by Z2 CND 17-12 (316L(NN)). It is based on an experimental work concerning two different cracked specimens: CT specimens tested at 650 deg C in fatigue, creep and creep-fatigue with load controlled conditions (27 tests), tube specimens containing an internal circumferential crack tested in four points bending with displacement controlled conditions (10 tests). Using the fracture mechanics tools (K, J and C* parameters), the purpose here is to construct a methodology of calculation in order to predict the evolution of a crack with time for each loading condition using a fracture mechanics global approach. For both specimen types, crack growth is monitored by using a specific potential drop technique. In continuous fatigue, a material Paris law at 650 deg C is used to correlate crack growth rate with the stress intensity factor range corrected with a factor U(R) in order to take into account the effects of crack closure and loading ratio R. In pure creep on CT specimens, crack growth rate is correlated to the evolution of the C* parameter (evaluated experimentally) which can be estimated numerically with FEM calculations and analytically by using a simplified method based on a reference stress approach. A modeling of creep fatigue growth rate is obtained from a simple summation of the fatigue contribution and the creep contribution to the total crack growth. Good results are obtained when C* parameter is evaluated from the simplified expression C*{sub s}. Concerning the tube specimens tested in 4 point bending conditions, a simulation based on the actual A 16 French guide procedure proposed at CEA. (authors) 104 refs.

  10. Study on influence of three kinds of stress on crack propagation in butt welds of spiral coil waterwall for ultra supercritical boiler

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Zhenrong; Si, Jun

    2017-09-01

    The spiral coil waterwall is the main pressure parts and the core functional components of Ultra Supercritical Boiler. In the process of operation, the spiral coil waterwall is under the combined action of welding residual stress, installation defects stress and working fluid stress, Cracks and crack propagation are easy to occur in butt welds with defects. In view of the early cracks in the butt welds of more T23 water cooled walls, in this paper, the influence of various stresses on the crack propagation in the butt welds of spiral coil waterwall was studied by numerical simulation. Firstly, the welding process of T23 water cooled wall tube was simulated, and the welding residual stress field was obtained. Then,on the basis, put the working medium load on the spiral coil waterwall, the supercoated stress distribution of the welding residual stress and the stress of the working medium is obtained. Considering the bending moment formed by stagger joint which is the most common installation defects, the stress field distribution of butt welds in T23 water-cooled wall tubes was obtained by applying bending moment on the basis of the stress field of the welding residual stress and the working medium stress. The results show that, the welding residual stress is small, the effect of T23 heat treatment after welding to improve the weld quality is not obvious; The working medium load plays a great role in the hoop stress of the water cooled wall tube, and promotes the cracks in the butt welds; The axial stress on the water cooled wall tube produced by the installation defect stress is obvious, the stagger joint, and other installation defects are the main reason of crack propagation of spiral coil waterwall. It is recommended that the control the bending moment resulting from the stagger joint not exceed 756.5 NM.

  11. Finite element modelling of fibre-reinforced brittle materials

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kullaa, J.

    1997-01-01

    The tensile constitutive behaviour of fibre-reinforced brittle materials can be extended to two or three dimensions by using the finite element method with crack models. The three approaches in this study include the smeared and discrete crack concepts and a multi-surface plasticity model. The

  12. Role of Different Kinds of Boundaries Against Cleavage Crack Propagation in Low-Temperature Embrittlement of Low-Carbon Martensitic Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuboi, Mizuki; Shibata, Akinobu; Terada, Daisuke; Tsuji, Nobuhiro

    2017-07-01

    The present paper investigated the relationship between low-temperature embrittlement and microstructure of lath martensite in a low-carbon steel from both microstructural and crystallographic points of view. The fracture surface of the specimen after the miniaturized Charpy impact test at 98 K (-175 °C) mainly consisted of cleavage fracture facets parallel to crystallographic {001} planes of martensite. Through the crystallographic orientation analysis of micro-crack propagation, we found that the boundaries which separated different martensite variants having large misorientation angles of {001} cleavage planes could inhibit crack propagation. It was then concluded that the size of the aggregations of martensite variants belonging to the same Bain deformation group could control the low-temperature embrittlement of martensitic steels.

  13. Full-Scale Fatigue Testing of a Wind Turbine Blade in Flapwise Direction and Examining the Effect of Crack Propagation on the Blade Performance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Othman Al-Khudairi

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, the sensitivity of the structural integrity of wind turbine blades to debonding of the shear web from the spar cap was investigated. In this regard, modal analysis, static and fatigue testing were performed on a 45.7 m blade for three states of the blade: (i as received blade (ii when a crack of 200 mm was introduced between the web and the spar cap and (iii when the crack was extended to 1000 mm. Calibration pull-tests for all three states of the blade were performed to obtain the strain-bending moment relationship of the blade according to the estimated target bending moment (BM which the blade is expected to experience in its service life. The resultant data was used to apply appropriate load in the fatigue tests. The blade natural frequencies in flapwise and edgewise directions over a range of frequency domain were found by modal testing for all three states of the blade. The blade first natural frequency for each state was used for the flapwise fatigue tests. These were performed in accordance with technical specification IEC TS 61400-23. The fatigue results showed that, for a 200 mm crack between the web and spar cap at 9 m from the blade root, the crack did not propagate at 50% of the target BM up to 62,110 cycles. However, when the load was increased to 70% of target BM, some damages were detected on the pressure side of the blade. When the 200 mm crack was extended to 1000 mm, the crack began to propagate when the applied load exceeded 100% of target BM and the blade experienced delaminations, adhesive joint failure, compression failure and sandwich core failure.

  14. Full-Scale Fatigue Testing of a Wind Turbine Blade in Flapwise Direction and Examining the Effect of Crack Propagation on the Blade Performance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al-Khudairi, Othman; Hadavinia, Homayoun; Little, Christian; Gillmore, Gavin; Greaves, Peter; Dyer, Kirsten

    2017-10-03

    In this paper, the sensitivity of the structural integrity of wind turbine blades to debonding of the shear web from the spar cap was investigated. In this regard, modal analysis, static and fatigue testing were performed on a 45.7 m blade for three states of the blade: (i) as received blade (ii) when a crack of 200 mm was introduced between the web and the spar cap and (iii) when the crack was extended to 1000 mm. Calibration pull-tests for all three states of the blade were performed to obtain the strain-bending moment relationship of the blade according to the estimated target bending moment (BM) which the blade is expected to experience in its service life. The resultant data was used to apply appropriate load in the fatigue tests. The blade natural frequencies in flapwise and edgewise directions over a range of frequency domain were found by modal testing for all three states of the blade. The blade first natural frequency for each state was used for the flapwise fatigue tests. These were performed in accordance with technical specification IEC TS 61400-23. The fatigue results showed that, for a 200 mm crack between the web and spar cap at 9 m from the blade root, the crack did not propagate at 50% of the target BM up to 62,110 cycles. However, when the load was increased to 70% of target BM, some damages were detected on the pressure side of the blade. When the 200 mm crack was extended to 1000 mm, the crack began to propagate when the applied load exceeded 100% of target BM and the blade experienced delaminations, adhesive joint failure, compression failure and sandwich core failure.

  15. On the role of sulfur on the dissolution of pressure vessel steels at the tip of a propagating crack in PWR environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Combrade, P.; Foucault, M. (UNIREC 42- Firminy (FR)); Marcus, P. (Ecole Nationale Superieure de Chimie 75 - Paris (FR)); Slama, G. (Societe Franco-Americaine de Constructions Atomiques (Framatome), 92 - Courbevoie (FR))

    1990-03-01

    Different aspects of the effect of sulfur on the dissolution and film repair on pressure vessel steel exposed to PWR environment at 300{sup 0}C were examined. A monolayer of sulfur adsorbed on a bare surface was shown to inhibit the nucleation of a magnetite film. The comparison of this result with dissolution measurements performed by using CERT under controlled potential lead to the assumption that mechanical rupture steps are involved in the environmental effect on the crack propagation rate. 27 refs.

  16. Propagation of cracks by stress corrosion in conditions of BWR type reactor; Propagacion de grietas por corrosion bajo esfuerzo en condiciones de reactor de agua en ebullicion (BWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merino C, F.J. [ININ, 52045 Estado de Mexico (Mexico); Fuentes C, P. [ITT, Metepec, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)]. E-mail: fjmc@nuclear.inin.mx

    2004-07-01

    In this work, the obtained results when applying the Hydrogen Chemistry to a test tube type Compact Tension (CT), built in austenitic stainless steel 304l, simulating the conditions to those that it operates a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), temperature 288 C and pressure of 8 MPa are presented. With the application of this water chemistry, seeks to be proven the diminution of the crack propagation speed. (Author)

  17. Explicit dynamics for numerical simulation of crack propagation by the extended finite element method; Dynamique explicite pour la simulation numerique de propagation de fissure par la methode des elements finis etendus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Menouillard, T

    2007-09-15

    Computerized simulation is nowadays an integrating part of design and validation processes of mechanical structures. Simulation tools are more and more performing allowing a very acute description of the phenomena. Moreover, these tools are not limited to linear mechanics but are developed to describe more difficult behaviours as for instance structures damage which interests the safety domain. A dynamic or static load can thus lead to a damage, a crack and then a rupture of the structure. The fast dynamics allows to simulate 'fast' phenomena such as explosions, shocks and impacts on structure. The application domain is various. It concerns for instance the study of the lifetime and the accidents scenario of the nuclear reactor vessel. It is then very interesting, for fast dynamics codes, to be able to anticipate in a robust and stable way such phenomena: the assessment of damage in the structure and the simulation of crack propagation form an essential stake. The extended finite element method has the advantage to break away from mesh generation and from fields projection during the crack propagation. Effectively, crack is described kinematically by an appropriate strategy of enrichment of supplementary freedom degrees. Difficulties connecting the spatial discretization of this method with the temporal discretization of an explicit calculation scheme has then been revealed; these difficulties are the diagonal writing of the mass matrix and the associated stability time step. Here are presented two methods of mass matrix diagonalization based on the kinetic energy conservation, and studies of critical time steps for various enriched finite elements. The interest revealed here is that the time step is not more penalizing than those of the standard finite elements problem. Comparisons with numerical simulations on another code allow to validate the theoretical works. A crack propagation test in mixed mode has been exploited in order to verify the simulation

  18. Mathematical and computational analyses of cracking formation fracture morphology and its evolution in engineering materials and structures

    CERN Document Server

    Sumi, Yoichi

    2014-01-01

    This book is about the pattern formation and the evolution of crack propagation in engineering materials and structures, bridging mathematical analyses of cracks based on singular integral equations, to computational simulation of engineering design. The first two parts of this book focus on elasticity and fracture and provide the basis for discussions on fracture morphology and its numerical simulation, which may lead to a simulation-based fracture control in engineering structures. Several design concepts are discussed for the prevention of fatigue and fracture in engineering structures, including safe-life design, fail-safe design, damage tolerant design. After starting with basic elasticity and fracture theories in parts one and two, this book focuses on the fracture morphology that develops due to the propagation of brittle cracks or fatigue cracks.   In part three, the mathematical analysis of a curved crack is precisely described, based on the perturbation method. The stability theory of interactive ...

  19. Creep-fatigue propagation of semi-elliptical crack at 650 deg. C in 316L(N) stainless steel plates with or without welded joints; Propagation de fissures semi-elliptiques en fatigue-fluage a 650 deg. C dans des plaques d'acier 316L(N) avec ou sans joints soudes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtit, F

    2000-07-01

    This study realised in LISN Laboratory of CEA Saclay, deals with the creep fatigue propagation of semi elliptical crack at the temperature of 650 deg C in 316L(N) stainless steel plates with or without welded joints. A vast majority of the studies on creep fatigue propagation models are based on specimen (CT) especially designed for crack propagation study. The PLAQFLU program performed in LISN laboratory deals with the application and adaptation of these models to complex crack shape, which are more representative of the cracks observed in industrial components. In this scope, we use propagation tests realised at the temperature of 650 deg C with wide plates containing semi elliptical defects. For some of them, the initial defect is machined in the middle of a welded joint, which constitute a privileged site for the crack initiation. The approach used in this study is based on global parameters of fracture mechanics. At first, tests on CT specimen are used in order to determine the propagation laws correlating the crack growth rate to the global parameters K or C{sup *}. These laws are then supposed to be intrinsic to our materials and are used to analysed the semi elliptical crack propagation. The analysis of the comportment of the crack during the hold time demonstrates the possibility to establish a correlation between the crack propagation both in the deepest and the surface point and the local value of C{sup *}. These correlations are coherent in the different points of the crack front for the different applied hold times, and they present a reasonably good agreement with the creep propagation law identified on CT specimen. The simulation of test performed on based metal specimen with a model of summation of both creep and pure fatigue crack growth gives acceptable results when the calculus of the simplified expression of C{sup *}{sub s} considers a continuous evolution of creep deformations rate during the all test. (author)

  20. Helical crack-front instability in mixed-mode fracture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pons, Antonio J; Karma, Alain

    2010-03-04

    Planar crack propagation under pure tension loading (mode I) is generally stable. However, it becomes universally unstable with the superposition of a shear stress parallel to the crack front (mode III). Under this mixed-mode (I + III) loading configuration, an initially flat parent crack segments into an array of daughter cracks that rotate towards a direction of maximum tensile stress. This segmentation produces stepped fracture surfaces with characteristic 'lance-shaped' markings observed in a wide range of engineering and geological materials. The origin of this instability remains poorly understood and a theory with which to predict the surface roughness scale is lacking. Here we perform large-scale simulations of mixed-mode I + III brittle fracture using a continuum phase-field method that describes the complete three-dimensional crack-front evolution. The simulations reveal that planar crack propagation is linearly unstable against helical deformations of the crack front, which evolve nonlinearly into a segmented array of finger-shaped daughter cracks. Furthermore, during their evolution, facets gradually coarsen owing to the growth competition of daughter cracks in striking analogy with the coarsening of finger patterns observed in nonequilibrium growth phenomena. We show that the dynamically preferred unstable wavelength is governed by the balance of the destabilizing effect of far-field stresses and the stabilizing effect of cohesive forces on the process zone scale, and we derive a theoretical estimate for this scale using a new propagation law for curved cracks in three dimensions. The rotation angles of coarsened facets are also compared to theoretical predictions and available experimental data.

  1. Fatigue Crack Propagation in Mirage IIIO Wing Main Spar Specimens and the Effects of Spectrum Truncation on Life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1984-07-01

    Science Division, Library Trans-Australia Airlines, Library Qantas Airways Limited SEC of Vic., Herman Research Laboratory, Library Ansett Airlines of...consideration was given to imposing flight loading limits for particular aircraft to reduce the risk of in-flight structural failure-in effect, to...potential interactions of cracks developing on the other side of the hole, the analysis of crack growth rates was limited to a maximum crack depth of about

  2. Role of Brittle Behaviour of Soft Calcarenites Under Low Confinement: Laboratory Observations and Numerical Investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lollino, Piernicola; Andriani, Gioacchino Francesco

    2017-07-01

    The strength decay that occurs in the post-peak stage, under low confinement stress, represents a key factor of the stress-strain behaviour of rocks. However, for soft rocks this issue is generally underestimated or even neglected in the solution of boundary value problems, as for example those concerning the stability of underground cavities or rocky cliffs. In these cases, the constitutive models frequently used in limit equilibrium analyses or more sophisticated numerical calculations are, respectively, rigid-plastic or elastic-perfectly plastic. In particular, most of commercial continuum-based numerical codes propose a variety of constitutive models, including elasticity, elasto-plasticity, strain-softening and elasto-viscoplasticity, which are not exhaustive in simulating the progressive failure mechanisms affecting brittle rock materials, these being characterized by material detachment and crack opening and propagation. As a consequence, a numerical coupling with mechanical joint propagation is needed to cope with fracture mechanics. Therefore, continuum-based applications that treat the simulation of the failure processes of intact rock masses at low stress levels may need the adoption of numerical techniques capable of implementing fracture mechanics and rock brittleness concepts, as it is shown in this paper. This work is aimed at highlighting, for some applications of rock mechanics, the essential role of post-peak brittleness of soft rocks by means of the application of a hybrid finite-discrete element method. This method allows for a proper simulation of the brittle rock behaviour and the related mechanism of fracture propagation. In particular, the paper presents two ideal problems, represented by a shallow underground cave and a vertical cliff, for which the evolution of the stability conditions is investigated by comparing the solutions obtained implementing different brittle material responses with those resulting from the assumption of perfectly

  3. Brittle fracture in casing pipes; Sproeda brott i mantelroer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nilsson, Stefan; Thoernblom, Kristian; Saellberg, Sven-Erik; Bergstroem, Gunnar [Swedish National Testing and Research Inst., Goeteborg (Sweden)

    2005-05-01

    Rapid Crack Propagation (RCP) has been observed in the casing pipe of large diameter district heating pipes on several occasions. An RCP crack is driven by hoop stresses in the casing pipe wall. It is a problem during installation work in cold weather. The casing pipe material is more brittle in low temperatures, and a temperature decrease will cause a hoop stress build-up since the thermal contraction of the casing pipe is constrained by the steel pipe and the PUR foam. RCP fracture has been documented at temperatures around -18 deg C but has likely, at some instances, occurred already at few degrees below 0 deg C. Three different polyethylene materials were evaluated with respect to the risk for brittle fracture of the casing pipe. One unimodal material of PE80 quality which have been used in casing to a large extent previously, one modern unimodal PE80 material which is used today and, finally, a bimodal PE80 material of a quality which currently is the dominant choice among pipe producers. Modern materials are in general much more resistant to brittle fracture, since it is an important design property for the raw material producers. Tests were done on casing of both large (up to 630 mm in diameter) and small (160 mm) dimension. A handling test was made where the pipes were cooled down and worked on with power tools in a manner similar to actual field work. An RCP fracture occurred at -25 deg C during cutting with angle grinder on a pipe with a diameter of 500 mm on the modern unimodal PE80 material. The same material also fractured during impact testing according to EN 253 at -20 deg C on both small and large diameter pipes. The bimodal PE80 resin passed both tests without fracture. A series of impact tests were done on pipes with diameter 160 mm with the purpose of determining critical temperatures and temperature stress levels with respect to brittle fracture. The results show that the bimodal material is so resistant that there is no real risk for RCP in

  4. Cracks propagation by stress corrosion cracking in conditions of Boiling Water Reactor (BWR); Propagacion de grietas por corrosion bajo esfuerzo en condiciones de reactor de agua hirviente (BWR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuentes C, P

    2003-07-01

    This work presents the results of the assays carried out in the Laboratory of Hot Cells of the National Institute of Nuclear Research (ININ) to a type test tube Compact Tension (CT), built in steel austenitic stainless type 304L, simulating those conditions those that it operates a Boiling Water Reactor (BWR), at temperature 288 C and pressure of 8 MPa, to determine the speed to which the cracks spread in this material that is of the one that different components of a reactor are made, among those that it highlights the reactor core vessel. The application of the Hydrogen Chemistry of the Water is presented (HWC) that is one alternative to diminish the corrosion effect low stress in the component, this is gets controlling the quantity of oxygen and of hydrogen as well as the conductivity of the water. The rehearsal is made following the principles of the Mechanics of Elastic Lineal Fracture (LEFM) that considers a crack of defined size with little plastic deformation in the tip of this; the measurement of crack advance is continued with the technique of potential drop of direct current of alternating signal, this is contained inside the standard Astm E-647 (Method of Test Standard for the Measurement of Speed of Growth of Crack by fatigue) that is the one that indicates us as carrying out this test. The specifications that should complete the test tubes that are rehearsed as for their dimensions, it forms, finish and determination of mechanical properties (tenacity to the fracture mainly) they are contained inside the norm Astm E-399, the one which it is also based on the principles of the fracture mechanics. The obtained results were part of a database to be compared with those of other rehearsals under different conditions, Normal Chemistry of the Water (NWC) and it dilutes with high content of O{sub 2}; to determine the conditions that slow more the phenomena of stress corrosion cracking, as well as the effectiveness of the used chemistry and of the method of

  5. Effect of substrate roughness on the contact damage of thin brittle films on brittle substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weidner, Mirko [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales NSW 2052, Sydney (Australia); Institute for Materials Science, Technische Universitaet Darmstadt, Petersenstrasse 23, 64287 Darmstadt (Germany); Borrero-Lopez, Oscar [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales NSW 2052, Sydney (Australia); Departamento de Ingenieria Mecanica, Energetica y de los Materiales, Universidad de Extremadura, 06071, Badajoz (Spain); Hoffman, Mark, E-mail: mark.hoffman@unsw.edu.a [School of Materials Science and Engineering, University of New South Wales NSW 2052, Sydney (Australia); Bendavid, Avi; Martin, Phil J. [CSIRO Materials Science and Engineering, P.O. Box 218, Lindfield NSW 2070 (Australia)

    2010-07-01

    The effect of substrate and surface roughness on the contact fracture of diamond-like carbon coatings on brittle soda-lime glass substrates has been investigated. The average surface roughness (R{sub a}) of the examined samples ranged from 15 nm to 571 nm. Contact damage was simulated by means of spherical nanoindentation, and fracture was subsequently assessed by focused ion beam microscopy. It was found that, in the absence of sub-surface damage in the substrate, fracture occurs in the coating in the form of radial, and ring/cone cracks during loading, and lateral cracks during unloading. Increasing the surface roughness results in a decrease in the critical load for crack initiation during loading, and in the suppression of fracture modes during unloading from high loads. When sub-surface damage (lateral cracks) is present in the substrate, severe spalling takes place during loading, causing a large discontinuity in the load-displacement curve. The results have implications concerning the design of damage-tolerant coated systems consisting of a brittle film on a brittle substrate.

  6. Investigation on the Crack Behaviour in Kevlar 49 Based Composite Materials using Extended Finite Element Method for Aerospace Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Handa, Danish; Sekhar Dondapati, Raja; Kumar, Abhinav

    2017-08-01

    Ductile to brittle transition (DTBT) is extensively observed in materials under cryogenic temperatures, thereby observing brittle failure due to the non-resistance of crack propagation. Owing to its outstanding mechanical and thermal properties, Kevlar 49 composites are widely used in aerospace applications under cryogenic temperatures. Therefore, in this paper, involving the assumption of linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM), mechanical characterization of Kevlar 49 composite is done using Extended Finite Element Method (X-FEM) technique in Abaqus/CAE software. Further, the failure of Kevlar 49 composites due to the propagation of crack at room temperature and the cryogenic temperature is investigated. Stress, strain and strain energy density as a function of the width of the Kevlar specimen is predicted, indicates that Kevlar 49 composites are suitable for use under cryogenic temperatures.

  7. Cracks in Polymer Spherulites: Phenomenological Mechanisms in Correlation with Ring Bands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eamor M. Woo

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews possible mechanisms of various crack forms and their likely correlations with interior crystal lamellae and discontinuous interfaces in spherulites. Complex yet periodically repetitive patterns of cracks in spherulites are beyond attributions via differences in thermal expansion coefficients, which would cause random and irregular cracks in the contract direction only. Cracks in brittle polymers such as poly(l-lactic acid (PLLA, or poly(4-hydroxyl butyrate (PHB, or more ductile polymers such as poly(trimethylene terephthalate (PTT are examined and illustrated, although for focus and demonstration, more discussions are spent on PLLA. The cracks can take many shapes that bear extremely striking similarity to the ring-band or lamellar patterns in the same spherulites. Crack patterns may differ significantly between the ring-banded and ringless spherulites, suggesting that the cracks may be partially shaped and governed by interfaces of lamellae and how the lamellar crystals assemble themselves in spherulites. Similarly, with some exceptions, most of the cracks patterns in PHB or PTT are also highly guided by the lamellar assembly in either ring-banded spherulites or ringless spherulites. Some exceptions of cracks in spherulites deviating from the apparent crystal birefringence patterns do exist; nevertheless, discontinuous interfaces in the initial lamellae neat the nuclei center might be hidden by top crystal over-layers of the spherulites, which might govern crack propagation.

  8. Understanding the edge crack phenomenon in ceramic laminates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Ševeček

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Layered ceramic materials (also referred to as “ceramic laminates” are becoming one of the most promising areas of materials technology aiming to improve the brittle behavior of bulk ceramics. The utilization of tailored compressive residual stresses acting as physical barriers to crack propagation has already succeeded in many ceramic systems. Relatively thick compressive layers located below the surface have proven very effective to enhance the fracture resistance and provide a minimum strength for the material. However, internal compressive stresses result in out-of plane stresses at the free surfaces, what can cause cracking of the compressive layer, forming the so-called edge cracks. Experimental observations have shown that edge cracking may be associated with the magnitude of the compressive stresses and with the thickness of the compressive layer. However, an understanding of the parameters related to the onset and extension of such edge cracks in the compressive layers is still lacking. In this work, a 2D parametric finite element model has been developed to predict the onset and propagation of an edge crack in ceramic laminates using a coupled stress-energy criterion. This approach states that a crack is originated when both stress and energy criteria are fulfilled simultaneously. Several designs with different residual stresses and a given thickness in the compressive layers have been computed. The results predict the existence of a lower bound, below no edge crack will be observed, and an upper bound, beyond which the onset of an edge crack would lead to the complete fracture of the layer

  9. Numerical evaluation of the phase-field model for brittle fracture with emphasis on the length scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xue; Vignes, Chet; Sloan, Scott W.; Sheng, Daichao

    2017-05-01

    The phase-field model has been attracting considerable attention due to its capability of capturing complex crack propagations without mesh dependence. However, its validation studies have primarily focused on the ability to predict reasonable, sharply defined crack paths. Very limited works have so far been contributed to estimate its accuracy in predicting force responses, which is majorly attributed to the difficulty in the determination of the length scale. Indeed, accurate crack path simulation can be achieved by setting the length scale to be sufficiently small, whereas a very small length scale may lead to unrealistic force-displacement responses and overestimate critical structural loads. This paper aims to provide a critical numerical investigation of the accuracy of phase-field modelling of brittle fracture with special emphasis on a possible formula for the length scale estimation. Phase-field simulations of a number of classical fracture experiments for brittle fracture in concretes are performed with simulated results compared with experimental data qualitatively and quantitatively to achieve this goal. Furthermore, discussions are conducted with the aim to provide guidelines for the application of the phase-field model.

  10. [Cosmetology and brittle nails].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abimelec, P

    2000-12-15

    The knowledge of manicure techniques and nail cosmetics compositions are a prerequisite to the understanding of their potential side effects. The brittle nail syndrome is a common problem that roughly affect 20% of women. We will review the etiologic hypothesis, describe the various presentations, and suggest a treatment for this perplexing problem.

  11. Damage tolerant design and condition monitoring of composite material and bondlines in wind turbine blades: Failure and crack propagation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pereira, Gilmar Ferreira; Mikkelsen, Lars Pilgaard; McGugan, Malcolm

    2015-01-01

    . A Structure-Material-Sensor Finite Element Method (FEM) model was developed to simulate the Fibre Bragg Grating sensor output response, when embedded in a host material (Composite material, polymer or adhesive), during a crack growing/damage event. This Structure-Material-Sensor model provides a tool......This research presents a novel method to asses a crack growing/damage event in composite material, in polymer, or in structural adhesive using Fibre Bragg Grating (FBG) sensors embedded in the host material, and its application in to a composite material structure: Wind Turbine Trailing Edge...

  12. Aspects of brittle failure assessment for RPV

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zecha, H.; Hermann, T.; Hienstorfer, W. [TUeV SUeD Energietechnik GmbH Baden-Wuerttemberg, Filderstadt (Germany); Schuler, X. [Materialpruefungsanstalt, Univ. Stuttgart (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    This paper describes the process of pressurized thermal shock analysis (PTS) and brittle failure assessment for the reactor pressure vessel (RPV) of the nuclear power plants NECKAR I/II. The thermo-hydraulic part of the assessment provides the boundary conditions for the fracture mechanics analysis. In addition to the one dimensional thermo-hydraulic simulations CFD, analyses were carried out for selected transients. An extensive evaluation of material properties is necessary to provide the input data for a reliable fracture mechanics assessment. For the core weld and the flange weld it has shown that brittle crack initiation can be precluded for all considered load cases. For the cold and hot leg nozzle detailed linear-elastic and elasticplastic Finite Element Analyses (FEA) are performed to verify the integrity of the RPV. (orig.)

  13. Hydrogen induced stress corrosion cracks initiation to propagation process of titanium alloys under the deep underground environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakayama, Gen.; Fukaya, Yuuichi; Akashi, Masatsune [Research Laboratory, Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries, Co., Ltd. 1, Shin-Nakahara-Cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8501 (Japan); Sawa, Shunsuke; Awano, Toshihiko; Hirano, Takashi; Kanno, Takeshi [Nuclear Division, Ishikawajima-Harima Heavy Industries, Co., Ltd. 1, Shin-Nakahara-Cho, Isogo-ku, Yokohama 235-8501 (Japan); Owada, Hitoshi; Kawahara, Ken-ichi; Asano, Hidekazu [Radioactive Waste Management Funding and Research Center, 4th floor, Mori Building No. 15, 2-8-10, Toranomon, Minato-ku, Tokyo (Japan)

    2004-07-01

    Overpacks for high-level trans-uranium (TRU) radioactive waste must be reliable for geological disposal for as long as 60,000 years. The composite overpacks composed of a corrosion resistant Ti-Pd alloy outer layer and a carbon steel inner layer should never be subject to crevice corrosion when stored in a deep underground environment. The presumed upper limit environment of TRU waste disposal was the groundwater originated from sea water, and 80 deg. C based on the radiation resolution. Ti-0.01Pd was chosen based on the empirical crevice corrosion temperature - chloride concentration map. The critical temperature of crevice corrosion was 92 deg. C at 0.6 mol/L [NaCl] solution based on E{sub R,CREV} measurements. The corrosion resistance of weld joint was equal to that of base material. From cathodic reaction on the titanium surface for maintaining the passivity, hydrogen might be generated. Hydrogen induced stress corrosion cracks have been shown to occur. The mean titanium-hydride thickness, H{sub d} and greatest crack depth for cross section, C{sub d} were measured after constant-current uni-axle constant load tensile test in 0.6 mol/L [NaCl] solution at 80 deg. C. Effects of electric charge density, Q, current density, i, temperature, T, pH were examined as parameter dependence. The electric current density, which copes with hydrogen occurrence speed decreased, the H{sub d} increased. Also H{sub d} is clearly seen to increase with Q when Q > 1 MC/m{sup 2}. No crack could be detected below Q{sub c} = 3.5 MC/m{sup 2}, and above the Q{sub c}, C{sub d} was initially increased with increases in Q. The equation C{sub d}({mu}m) = 7 x (Q(MC/m{sup 2}) - 3.5){sup 0.5} holds. Based on the details heat analysis of the radiation resolution during disposal, the temperature transition was computed. From the temperature dependence of electric current density for maintaining the passivity, the amount of electric charge density of 7.5 MC/m{sup 2} for 60,000 years was calculated

  14. Magnetic flux gradient observation during fatigue crack propagation: A case study of SAE 1045 carbon steel used for automotive transmission parts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad S.R.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The objective of this study is to evaluate the application of the metal magnetic memory (MMM technique for investigations on fatigue crack propagation in a ferromagnetic material. Fatigue failure caused by stress concentration is serious in practical engineering. However, early fatigue damages cannot be detected by using traditional nondestructive testing (NDT methods. Therefore this paper study about NDT method called metal magnetic memory (MMM that has potentials for evaluating the fatigue damage at the early damage and critical fracture stages. While its capacity to evaluate the distribution of self-magnetic leakage field signals on the component’s surface is well-established, there remains a need to scrutinize the physical mechanism and quantitative analysis aspects of this method. To begin with, a fatigue test involving a loading of 7kN was conducted on a SAE 1045 carbon steel specimen. This material is frequently used in the manufacturing of automotive transmission components that include the axle and spline shaft. MMM signals were measured along a scanning distance of 100 mm and analysed during the propagation stage. Other than revealing that the value of the magnetic flux gradient signals dH(y/dx increased in tandem with the crack length, the results also led to the detection of the crack growth location. It was anticipated that the dH(y/dx value will also exhibit an upward trend with a rise in the fatigue growth rate of da/dN. A modified Paris equation was utilized to correlate dH(y/dx with da/dn through the replacement of the stress intensity factor range ΔK. This resulted in the log-log plot of da/dN versus dH(y/dx portraying an inclination similar to the log-log plot of da/dN versus ΔK. A linear relationship was established between dH(y/dx and ΔK with the R2 value as 0.96. Players in the automotive industry can benefit from the disclosure that dH(y/dx can effectively replace ΔK for the monitoring of fatigue crack growth

  15. Effect of proof testing on the flaw growth characteristics of 304 stainless steel. [crack propagation in welded joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finger, R. W.

    1974-01-01

    The effects of proof overload frequency and magnitude on the cyclic crack growth rates of 304 stainless steel weldments were investigated. The welding procedure employed was typical of those used on over-the-road cryogenic vessels. Tests were conducted at room temperature with an overload ratio of 1.50 to determine the effect of overload frequency. Effect of overload magnitude was determined from tests where a room temperature overload was applied between blocks of 1000 cycles applied at 78 K (-320 F). The cyclic stress level used in all tests was typical of the nominal membrane stress generally encountered in full scale vessels. Test results indicate that judicious selection of proof overload frequency and magnitude can reduce crack growth rates for cyclic stress levels.

  16. Fatigue crack propagation of acrylic bone cements. Influence of the radio-opaque agents; Propagacion de grietas por fatiga de cementos oseos acrilicos. Influencia de los agentes radiopacos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ginebra, M. P.; Albuixech, L.; Fernandez-Barragan, E.; Gil, F. J.; Planell, J. A.; San Roman, J.; Vazquez, B.

    2001-07-01

    In this work the 2,5-diiodo-8-quinolyl methacrylate (IHQM), is proposed as a new radiopaque agent. The addition of the iodine containing methacrylate provided a statistically significant increase in the tensile strength, fracture toughness and ductility, with respect to the barium sulphate containing cement. This effect was attributed to the fact that the use of a radiopaque monomer eliminated the porosity associated to the barium sulphate particles. However, since fatigue resistance is one of the main properties required to ensure a good long-term performance of permanent pros these, as is the case of acrylic bone cements, it is important to compare the fatigue properties of this new bone cement formulation with the radiolucent and the BaSO{sub 4} containing bone cements. The results show that the absence of inorganic particles with no matrix adhesion plays a negative role when the fatigue crack propagation is considered. (Author) 26 refs.

  17. 3D random Voronoi grain-based models for simulation of brittle rock damage and fabric-guided micro-fracturing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. Ghazvinian

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available A grain-based distinct element model featuring three-dimensional (3D Voronoi tessellations (random poly-crystals is proposed for simulation of crack damage development in brittle rocks. The grain boundaries in poly-crystal structure produced by Voronoi tessellations can represent flaws in intact rock and allow for numerical replication of crack damage progression through initiation and propagation of micro-fractures along grain boundaries. The Voronoi modelling scheme has been used widely in the past for brittle fracture simulation of rock materials. However the difficulty of generating 3D Voronoi models has limited its application to two-dimensional (2D codes. The proposed approach is implemented in Neper, an open-source engine for generation of 3D Voronoi grains, to generate block geometry files that can be read directly into 3DEC. A series of Unconfined Compressive Strength (UCS tests are simulated in 3DEC to verify the proposed methodology for 3D simulation of brittle fractures and to investigate the relationship between each micro-parameter and the model's macro-response. The possibility of numerical replication of the classical U-shape strength curve for anisotropic rocks is also investigated in numerical UCS tests by using complex-shaped (elongated grains that are cemented to one another along their adjoining sides. A micro-parameter calibration procedure is established for 3D Voronoi models for accurate replication of the mechanical behaviour of isotropic and anisotropic (containing a fabric rocks.

  18. Unstable brittle crack-arrest toughness of newly developed steel plate with surface layers having ultra fine grain microstructure. Part 2. Crack-arrest toughness of the plate after plastic damage and its application to prevent crack expansion after a collision; Hyoso chosairyuko no zeisei kiretsu denpa teishi seino. 2. Sosei sonsho go no tokusei oyobi shototsugo no kiretsu kakudai boshi eno tekiyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ishikawa, T.; Hagiwara, Y.; Inoue, T.; Oshita, S. [Nippon Steel Corp., Tokyo (Japan); Kuroiwa, T.; Hashimoto, T. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Tokyo (Japan); Tada, M. [Mitsubishi Heavy Industries Ltd., Nagasaki (Japan). Nagasaki Technical Inst.; Yajima, H. [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). Faculty of Engineering

    1995-12-01

    Use of ships with high safety and reliability that can suppress the casualties and ocean pollution accidents caused by ships failure to a minimum, are in demand. Therefore, in order to study the improvement of safety when steel plates with surface layers having ultra fine grain microstructure and having extremely improved arrest characteristic are used for ship structures, fracture simulation of collision and comparative evaluation of the arrest properties with the conventional steel plate were carried out. Firstly, fracture simulation of the ship bodycaused by the collision of very large crude oil carries (VLCC) was carried out and the plastic strain caused during the collision was quantified. After that, as for steel plate with surface layers having ultrafine grain microstructure and normal KE 36 steel plate, comparative study of arrestability of steel plate under 10% plastic strain was made. As a result, it was revealed that sufficient arrest efficiency was secured by using steel plate with surface layers having ultra fine grain structure even for the case where arrestability for long big crack is not secured in case of normal KE 36 steel plate due to the plastic strain effect on VLCC caused by collision. 11 refs., 18 figs., 5 tabs.

  19. Dynamical observations on the crack tip zone and stress corrosion of two-dimensional MoS2

    KAUST Repository

    Ly, Thuc Hue

    2017-01-18

    Whether and how fracture mechanics needs to be modified for small length scales and in systems of reduced dimensionality remains an open debate. Here, employing in situ transmission electron microscopy, atomic structures and dislocation dynamics in the crack tip zone of a propagating crack in two-dimensional (2D) monolayer MoS2 membrane are observed, and atom-to-atom displacement mapping is obtained. The electron beam is used to initiate the crack; during in situ observation of crack propagation the electron beam effect is minimized. The observed high-frequency emission of dislocations is beyond previous understanding of the fracture of brittle MoS2. Strain analysis reveals dislocation emission to be closely associated with the crack propagation path in nanoscale. The critical crack tip plastic zone size of nearly perfect 2D MoS2 is between 2 and 5 nm, although it can grow to 10 nm under corrosive conditions such as ultraviolet light exposure, showing enhanced dislocation activity via defect generation.

  20. Dynamical observations on the crack tip zone and stress corrosion of two-dimensional MoS2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ly, Thuc Hue; Zhao, Jiong; Cichocka, Magdalena Ola; Li, Lain-Jong; Lee, Young Hee

    2017-01-01

    Whether and how fracture mechanics needs to be modified for small length scales and in systems of reduced dimensionality remains an open debate. Here, employing in situ transmission electron microscopy, atomic structures and dislocation dynamics in the crack tip zone of a propagating crack in two-dimensional (2D) monolayer MoS2 membrane are observed, and atom-to-atom displacement mapping is obtained. The electron beam is used to initiate the crack; during in situ observation of crack propagation the electron beam effect is minimized. The observed high-frequency emission of dislocations is beyond previous understanding of the fracture of brittle MoS2. Strain analysis reveals dislocation emission to be closely associated with the crack propagation path in nanoscale. The critical crack tip plastic zone size of nearly perfect 2D MoS2 is between 2 and 5 nm, although it can grow to 10 nm under corrosive conditions such as ultraviolet light exposure, showing enhanced dislocation activity via defect generation.

  1. Crack propagation in stainless steel AISI 304L in Hydrogen Chemistry conditions (HWC); Propagacion de Grietas en Acero Inoxidable AISI 304L en Condiciones de Quimica de Hidrogeno (HWC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diaz S, A.; Fuentes C, P.; Merino C, F. [ININ, Carretera Mexico -Toluca s/n, La Marquesa, Ocoyoacac, Mexico (Mexico); Castano M, V. [Instituto de Fisica Aplicada, UNAM, Km 15.5 Carretera Queretaro-San Luis Potosi, Juriquilla, Queretaro (Mexico)]. e-mail: ads@nuclear.inin.mx

    2006-07-01

    Velocities of crack growth in samples type CT pre cracking of stainless steel AISI 304l solder and sensitized thermally its were obtained by the Rising Displacement method or of growing displacement. It was used a recirculation circuit that simulates the operation conditions of a BWR type reactor (temperature of 280 C and a pressure of 8 MPa) with the chemistry modified by the addition of hydrogen with and without the addition of impurities of a powerful oxidizer like the Cu{sup +} ion. In each essay stayed a displacement velocity was constant of 1x10{sup -9} m/s, making a continuous pursuit of the advance of the crack by the electric potential drop technique. Contrary to the idea of mitigation of the crack propagation velocity by effect of the addition of the hydrogen in the system, the values of the growth velocities obtained by this methodology went similar to the opposing ones under normal operation conditions. To the finish of the rehearsal one carries out the fractographic analysis of the propagation surfaces, which showed cracks growth in trans and intergranular way, evidencing the complexity of the regulator mechanisms of the IGSCC like in mitigation conditions as the alternative Hydrogen Chemistry. (Author)

  2. Mechanics of quasi-static crack growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rice, J R

    1978-10-01

    Results on the mechanics of quasi-static crack growth are reviewed. These include recent studies on the geometry and stability of crack paths in elastic-brittle solids, and on the thermodynamics of Griffith cracking, including environmental effects. The relation of crack growth criteria to non-elastic rheological models is considered and paradoxes with energy balance approaches, based on singular crack models, are discussed for visco-elastic, diffuso-elastic, and elastic-plastic materials. Also, recent approaches to prediction of stable crack growth in ductile, elastic-plastic solids are discussed.

  3. Crack tip strain evolution and crack closure during overload of a growing fatigue crack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    De-Qiang Wang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available It is generally accepted that fatigue crack growth is retarded after an overload, which has been explained either by plasticity-induced crack closure or near-tip residual stress. However, any interpretation of overload effect is insufficient if strain evolution in front of crack tip is not properly considered. The current understanding of overload-induced retardation lacks the clarification of the relationship between crack closure at crack wake and strain evolution at crack tip. In this work, a material with low work hardening coefficient was used to study the effect of overload on crack tip strain evolution and crack closure by in-situ SEM observation and digital image correlation technique. Crack opening displacement (COD and crack tip strain were measured before and after the overload. It was observed that the evolution of crack tip strain follows the crack opening behaviour behind the crack tip, indicating a smaller influence of overload on micro-mechanical behaviour of fatigue crack growth. After the overload, plastic strain accumulation was responsible for crack growth. The strain at a certain distance to crack tip was mapped, and it was found that the crack tip plastic zone size correlated well with crack growth rate during post-overload fatigue crack propagation.

  4. Laws of crack motion and phase-field models of fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hakim, Vincent; Karma, Alain

    2009-02-01

    Recently proposed phase-field models offer self-consistent descriptions of brittle fracture. Here, we analyze these theories in the quasistatic regime of crack propagation. We show how to derive the laws of crack motion either by using solvability conditions in a perturbative treatment for slight departure from the Griffith threshold or by generalizing the Eshelby tensor to phase-field models. The analysis provides a simple physical interpretation of the second component of the classic Eshelby integral in the limit of vanishing crack propagation velocity: it gives the elastic torque on the crack tip that is needed to balance the Herring torque arising from the anisotropic surface energy. This force-balance condition can be interpreted physically based on energetic considerations in the traditional framework of continuum fracture mechanics, in support of its general validity for real systems beyond the scope of phase-field models. The obtained law of crack motion reduces in the quasistatic limit to the principle of local symmetry in isotropic media and to the principle of maximum energy-release-rate for smooth curvilinear cracks in anisotropic media. Analytical predictions of crack paths in anisotropic media are validated by numerical simulations. Interestingly, for kinked cracks in anisotropic media, force-balance gives significantly different predictions from the principle of maximum energy-release-rate and the difference between the two criteria can be numerically tested. Simulations also show that predictions obtained from force-balance hold even if the phase-field dynamics is modified to make the failure process irreversible. Finally, the role of dissipative forces on the process zone scale as well as the extension of the results to motion of planar cracks under pure antiplane shear are discussed.

  5. Brittle Rock Modeling Approach and its Validation Using Excavation-Induced Micro-Seismicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chun-Chi; Li, Tian-Bin; Xing, Hui-Lin; Zhang, Hang; Wang, Min-Jie; Liu, Tian-Yi; Chen, Guo-Qing; Chen, Zi-Quan

    2016-08-01

    With improvements to the bonded-particle model, a custom indicator of crack intensity is introduced to grade rock fractures accurately. Brittle fracturing of rock mass is studied using the bonded-particle model; here, "brittle" refers to the process where more energy is released towards making particles collide and disperse, and hence results in the quick emergence of "chain cracks". Certain principles concerning how to construct brittle rock are then proposed. Furthermore, a modeling approach for brittle rocks based on the adaptive continuum/discontinuum (AC/DC) method is proposed to aid the construction of large-scale models of tunnel excavations. To connect with actual tunneling conditions, fundamental mechanical properties, the mechanism for brittle fracturing, the joint distribution, and the initial stress field are considered in the modeling approach. Results from micro-seismic monitoring of a tunnel excavation confirmed the suitability of this modeling approach to simulate crack behavior, and results show that simulated cracking exhibit similar trends (evolution, location, and intensity) with micro-seismic cracking.

  6. Fracture assessment of laser welde joints using numerical crack propagation simulation with a cohesive zone model; Bruchmechanische Bewertung von Laserschweissverbindungen durch numerische Rissfortschrittsimulation mit dem Kohaesivzonenmodell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scheider, I.

    2001-07-01

    This thesis introduces a concept for fracture mechanical assessment of structures with heterogenuous material properties like weldments. It is based on the cohesive zone model for numerical crack propagation analysis. With that model the failure of examined structures due to fracture can be determined. One part of the thesis contains the extension of the capabilities of the cohesive zone model regarding modelling threedimensional problems, shear fracture and unloading. In a second part new methods are developed for determination of elastic-plastic and fracture mechanical material properties, resp., which are based on optical determination of the specimen deformation. The whole concept has been used successfully for the numerical simulation of small laser welded specimens. (orig.) [German] In der vorliegenden Arbeit wird ein Konzept vorgestellt, mit dem es moeglich ist, Bauteile mit heterogenen Materialeigenschaften, wie z.B. Schweissverbindungen, bruchmechanisch zu bewerten. Es basiert auf einem Modell zur numerischen Rissfortschrittsimulation, dem Kohaesivzonenmodell, um das Versagen des zu untersuchenden Bauteils infolge von Bruch zu bestimmen. Ein Teil der Arbeit umfasst die Weiterentwicklung des Kohaesivzonenmodells zur Vorhersage des Bauteilversagens in Bezug auf die Behandlung dreidimensionaler Probleme, Scherbuch und Entlastung. In einem zweiten Teil werden Methoden zur Bestimmung sowohl der elastischplastischen als auch der bruchmechanischen Materialparameter entwickelt, die zum grossen Teil auf optischen Auswertungsmethoden der Deformationen beruhen. Das geschlossene Konzept wird erfolgreich auf lasergeschweisste Kleinproben angewendet. (orig.)

  7. Crack propagation during fatigue in cast duplex stainless steels: influence of the microstructure, of the aging and of the test temperature; Propagation de fissure par fatigue dans les aciers austeno-ferritiques moules: influence de la microstructure, du vieillissement et de la temperature d'essai

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Calonne, V

    2001-07-15

    Duplex stainless steels are used as cast components in nuclear power plants. At the service temperature of about 320 C, the ferrite phase is thermally aged and embrittled. This induces a significant decrease in fracture properties of these materials. The aim of this work consists in studying Fatigue Crack Growth Rates (FCGR) and Fatigue Crack Growth Mechanisms (FCGM) as a function of thermal ageing and test temperature (20 C/320 C). Two cast duplex stainless steels (30% ferrite) are tested. In order to better understand the influence of the crystallographic orientation of the phases on the FCGM, the solidification structure of the material is studied by Electron Back-Scatter Diffraction (EBSD) and by Unidirectional Solidification Quenching. Fatigue crack growth tests are also performed in equiaxed and basaltic structures. Microstructure, fatigue crack growth mechanical properties and mechanisms are thus studied in relation to each other. In the studied range of delta K, the crack propagates without any preferential path by successive ruptures of phase laths. The macroscopic crack propagation plane, as determined by EBSD, depends on the crystallographic orientation of the ferrite grain. So, according to the solidification structure, secondary cracks can appear, which in turn influences the FCGR. Fatigue crack closure, which has to be determined to estimate the intrinsic FCGR, decreases with increasing ageing. This can be explained by a decrease in the kinematic cyclic hardening. The Paris exponent as determined from intrinsic FCGR increases with ageing. Intrinsic FCGR can then be separated in two ranges: one with lower FCGR in aged materials than in un-aged and one with the reversed tendency. (author)

  8. Fracture Energy-Based Brittleness Index Development and Brittleness Quantification by Pre-peak Strength Parameters in Rock Uniaxial Compression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munoz, H.; Taheri, A.; Chanda, E. K.

    2016-12-01

    Brittleness is a fundamental mechanical rock property critical to many civil engineering works, mining development projects and mineral exploration operations. However, rock brittleness is a concept yet to be investigated as there is not any unique criterion available, widely accepted by rock engineering community able to describe rock brittleness quantitatively. In this study, new brittleness indices were developed based on fracture strain energy quantities obtained from the complete stress-strain characteristics of rocks. In doing so, different rocks having unconfined compressive strength values ranging from 7 to 215 MPa were examined in a series of quasi-static uniaxial compression tests after properly implementing lateral-strain control in a closed-loop system to apply axial load to rock specimen. This testing method was essential to capture post-peak regime of the rocks since a combination of class I-II or class II behaviour featured post-peak stress-strain behaviour. Further analysis on the post-peak strain localisation, stress-strain characteristics and the fracture pattern causing class I-II and class II behaviour were undertaken by analysing the development of field of strains in the rocks via three-dimensional digital image correlation. Analysis of the results demonstrated that pre-peak stress-strain brittleness indices proposed solely based on pre-peak stress-strain behaviour do not show any correlation with any of pre-peak rock mechanical parameters. On the other hand, the proposed brittleness indices based on pre-peak and post-peak stress-strain relations were found to competently describe an unambiguous brittleness scale against rock deformation and strength parameters such as the elastic modulus, the crack damage stress and the peak stress relevant to represent failure process.

  9. Effect of different microstructural parameters on hydrogen induced cracking in an API X70 pipeline steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohtadi-Bonab, M. A.; Eskandari, M.; Karimdadashi, R.; Szpunar, J. A.

    2017-07-01

    In this study, the surface and cross section of an as-received API X70 pipeline steel was studied by SEM and EDS techniques in order to categorize the shape and morphology of inclusions. Then, an electrochemical hydrogen charging using a mixed solution of 0.2 M sulfuric acid and 3 g/l ammonium thiocyanate has been utilized to create hydrogen cracks in X70 steel. After hydrogen charging experiments, the cross section of this steel has been accurately checked by SEM in order to find out hydrogen cracks. The region of hydrogen cracks was investigated by SEM and EBSD techniques to predict the role of different microstructural parameters involving hydrogen induced cracking (HIC) phenomenon. The results showed that inclusions were randomly distributed in the cross section of tested specimens. Moreover, different types of inclusions in as-received X70 steel were found. However, only inclusions which were hard, brittle and incoherent with the metal matrix, such as manganese sulfide and carbonitride precipitates, were recognized to be harmful to HIC phenomenon. Moreover, HIC cracks propagate dominantly in transgraular manner through differently oriented grains with no clear preferential trend. Moreover, a different type of HIC crack with about 15-20 degrees of deviation from the rolling direction was found and studied by EBSD technique and role of micro-texture parameters on HIC was discussed.

  10. Mitigation strategies for reflective cracking in pavements : [research project capsule].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    Refl ection cracks are caused by discontinuities (cracks or joints) in underlying layers, : which propagate through hot-mix asphalt (HMA) overlay due to continuous movement : at the crack prompted by thermal expansion and traffi c loading. If the new...

  11. Application of a criterion for cold cracking to casting high strength aluminum alloys

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lalpoor, M.; Eskin, D.G.; Fjaer, H.G.; Ten Cate, A.; Ontijt, N.; Katgerman, L.

    2010-01-01

    Direct chill (DC) casting of high strength 7xxx series aluminium alloys is difficult mainly due to solidification cracking (hot cracks) and solid state cracking (cold cracks). Poor thermal properties along with extreme brittleness in the as-cast condition make DC-casting of such alloys a challenging

  12. Effect of plasticity on cleavage crack growth resistance at an interface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    1999-01-01

    on the metal side of the interface. But even though the crack growth mechanism is brittle, the interface shows crack growth resistance due to plastic flow at some distance from the crack tip. It is assumed that the crack tip does not emit dislocations. Therefore, the numerical technique employed makes use...

  13. Effect of Water Vapor Pressure on the Fatigue Crack Propagation of Aerospace Aluminum Alloys 7075-T651 and 2199-T86

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-16

    ed. Chemistry and electrochemistry of corrosion and stress corrosion cracking: A symposium honoring the contributions of RW Staehle. TMS-AIME...893. 36. Turnbull A, Ferriss DH (1987) Mathematical-Modeling of the Electrochemistry in Corrosion Fatigue Cracks in Steel Corroding in Marine... Corrosion Conference. - Previous clearance information: USAFA-DF-PA-248 (Abstract) - Recommended distribution statement: Distribution A, Approved for

  14. The propagation of short fatigue crack effect in 304L stainless steel: closure and plasticity effect; Propagation par fatigue des fissures physiquement courtes dans un acier inoxydable de type 304L: role de la fermeture et de la plasticite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesur, N

    2005-12-15

    The behaviour of 2D physically short cracks has been studied for an austenitic stainless steel type A304L. Experimental fatigue tests have shown an increase of the threshold fatigue range when the crack length is increasing from 0.1 to 0.8 mm. This effect is explained in term of crack closure variation. The numerical simulation by mean of finite elements supports such an effect of crack closure when computing is performed in plane stress at R=0.1 and R=0.7. Such behaviour is typical for a material characterized by an isotropic and cinematic constitutive cyclic hardening law. The local plasticity effect is shown to control the crack growth rate and has been related to an effective plastic intensity factor range. (author)

  15. TIG Dressing Effects on Weld Pores and Pore Cracking of Titanium Weldments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui-Jun Yi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Weld pores redistribution, the effectiveness of using tungsten inert gas (TIG dressing to remove weld pores, and changes in the mechanical properties due to the TIG dressing of Ti-3Al-2.5V weldments were studied. Moreover, weld cracks due to pores were investigated. The results show that weld pores less than 300 μm in size are redistributed or removed via remelting due to TIG dressing. Regardless of the temperature condition, TIG dressing welding showed ductility, and there was a loss of 7% tensile strength of the weldments. Additionally, it was considered that porosity redistribution by TIG dressing was due to fluid flow during the remelting of the weld pool. Weld cracks in titanium weldment create branch cracks around pores that propagate via the intragranular fracture, and oxygen is dispersed around the pores. It is suggested that the pore locations around the LBZ (local brittle zone and stress concentration due to the pores have significant effects on crack initiation and propagation.

  16. Time-resolved study of femtosecond laser induced micro-modifications inside transparent brittle materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hendricks, F.; Matylitsky, V. V.; Domke, M.; Huber, Heinz P.

    2016-03-01

    Laser processing of optically transparent or semi-transparent, brittle materials is finding wide use in various manufacturing sectors. For example, in consumer electronic devices such as smartphones or tablets, cover glass needs to be cut precisely in various shapes. The unique advantage of material processing with femtosecond lasers is efficient, fast and localized energy deposition in nearly all types of solid materials. When an ultra-short laser pulse is focused inside glass, only the localized region in the neighborhood of the focal volume absorbs laser energy by nonlinear optical absorption. Therefore, the processing volume is strongly defined, while the rest of the target stays unaffected. Thus ultra-short pulse lasers allow cutting of the chemically strengthened glasses such as Corning Gorilla glass without cracking. Non-ablative cutting of transparent, brittle materials, using the newly developed femtosecond process ClearShapeTM from Spectra-Physics, is based on producing a micron-sized material modification track with well-defined geometry inside. The key point for development of the process is to understand the induced modification by a single femtosecond laser shot. In this paper, pump-probe microscopy techniques have been applied to study the defect formation inside of transparent materials, namely soda-lime glass samples, on a time scale between one nanosecond to several tens of microseconds. The observed effects include acoustic wave propagation as well as mechanical stress formation in the bulk of the glass. Besides better understanding of underlying physical mechanisms, our experimental observations have enabled us to find optimal process parameters for the glass cutting application and lead to better quality and speed for the ClearShapeTM process.

  17. Initiation and growth of thermal fatigue crack networks in an AISI 304 L type austenitic stainless steel (X2 CrNi18-09); Amorcage et propagation de reseaux de fissures de fatigue thermique dans un acier inoxydable austenitique de type X2 CrNi18-09 (AISI 304 L)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maillot, V

    2004-07-01

    We studied the behaviour of a 304 L type austenitic stainless steel submitted to thermal fatigue. Using the SPLASH equipment of CEA/SRMA we tested parallelepipedal specimens on two sides: the specimens are continuously heated by Joule effect, while two opposites faces are cyclically. cooled by a mixed spray of distilled water and compressed air. This device allows the reproduction and the study of crack networks similar to those observed in nuclear power plants, on the inner side of circuits fatigued by mixed pressurized water flows at different temperatures. The crack initiation and the network constitution at the surface were observed under different thermal conditions (Tmax = 320 deg C, {delta}T between 125 and 200 deg C). The experiment produced a stress gradient in the specimen, and due to this gradient, the in-depth growth of the cracks finally stopped. The obtained crack networks were studied quantitatively by image analysis, and different parameters were studied: at the surface during the cycling, and post mortem by step-by-step layer removal by grinding. The maximal depth obtained experimentally, 2.5 mm, is relatively coherent with the finite element modelling of the SPLASH test, in which compressive stresses appear at a depth of 2 mm. Some of the crack networks obtained by thermal fatigue were also tested in isothermal fatigue crack growth under 4-point bending, at imposed load. The mechanisms of the crack selection, and the appearance of the dominating crack are described. Compared to the propagation of a single crack, the crack networks delay the propagation, depending on the severity of the crack competition for domination. The dominating crack can be at the network periphery, in that case it is not as shielded by its neighbours as a crack located in the center of the network. It can also be a straight crack surrounded by more sinuous neighbours. Indeed, on sinuous cracks, the loading is not the same all along the crack path, leading to some

  18. Brittle fracture phase-field modeling of a short-rod specimen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Escobar, Ivana [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Tupek, Michael R. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Bishop, Joseph E. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Predictive simulation capabilities for modeling fracture evolution provide further insight into quantities of interest in comparison to experimental testing. Based on the variational approach to fracture, the advent of phase-field modeling achieves the goal to robustly model fracture for brittle materials and captures complex crack topologies in three dimensions.

  19. Ductile crack growth simulation and effects of crack growth on single-edge notched bend specimens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimada, Keito; Komiya, Shinji; Iwashita, Tsutomu

    2017-10-01

    This paper describes the testing of single-edge notched bend (SENB) specimens, which are used for fracture toughness tests, and the ductile crack initiation from the notch tip of the specimens. All of the specimens exhibited brittle fracture with relatively large ductile crack growth (from 1.0 to 4.8 mm). The paper also shows the ductile crack growth simulation using a damage model (Bonora model) for finite element analysis (FEA). FEA reproduced ductile crack growth observed in the SENB tests and the analysis results showed the effects of the ductile crack growth rate on stress distribution around the crack tips. In addition, the value of the Weibull stress was calculated in the paper, and the Weibull stress slightly decreased if the model had a higher ductile crack growth rate as compared with the model that had a lower ductile crack growth rate.

  20. Applications of lattice method in the simulation of crack path in heterogeneous materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. E. Kosteski

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The simulation of critical and subcritical crack propagation in heterogeneous materials is not a simple problem in computational mechanics. These topics can be studied with different theoretical tools. In the crack propagation problem it is necessary to lead on the interface between the continuum and the discontinuity, and this region has different characteristics when we change the scale level point of view. In this context, this work applies a version of the lattice discrete element method (LDEM in the study of such matters. This approach lets us to discretize the continuum with a regular tridimensional truss where the elements have an equivalent stiffness consistent with the material one wishes to model. The masses are lumped in the nodes and an uni-axial bilinear relation, inspired in the Hilleborg constitutive law, is assumed for the elements. The random characteristics of the material are introduced in the model considering the material toughness as a random field with defined statistical properties. It is important to highlight that the energy balance consistence is maintained during all the process. The spatial discretization lets us arrive to a motion equation that can be solved using an explicit scheme of integration on time. Two examples are shown in the present paper; one of them illustrates the possibilities of this method in simulating critical crack propagation in a solid mechanics problem: a simple geometry of grade material. In the second example, a simulation of subcritical crack growth is presented, when a pre-fissured quasi-brittle body is submitted to cyclic loading. In this second example, a strategy to measure crack advance in the model is proposed. Finally, obtained results and the performance of the model are discussed.

  1. A preliminary study of crack initiation and growth at stress concentration sites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawicke, D. S.; Gallagher, J. P.; Hartman, G. A.; Rajendran, A. M.

    1982-01-01

    Crack initiation and propagation models for notches are examined. The Dowling crack initiation model and the E1 Haddad et al. crack propagation model were chosen for additional study. Existing data was used to make a preliminary evaluation of the crack propagation model. The results indicate that for the crack sizes in the test, the elastic parameter K gave good correlation for the crack growth rate data. Additional testing, directed specifically toward the problem of small cracks initiating and propagating from notches is necessary to make a full evaluation of these initiation and propagation models.

  2. Quasi-Brittle Fracture Modeling of Preflawed Bitumen Using a Diffuse Interface Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Hou

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Fundamental understandings on the bitumen fracture mechanism are vital to improve the mixture design of asphalt concrete. In this paper, a diffuse interface model, namely, phase-field method is used for modeling the quasi-brittle fracture in bitumen. This method describes the microstructure using a phase-field variable which assumes one in the intact solid and negative one in the crack region. Only the elastic energy will directly contribute to cracking. To account for the growth of cracks, a nonconserved Allen-Cahn equation is adopted to evolve the phase-field variable. Numerical simulations of fracture are performed in bituminous materials with the consideration of quasi-brittle properties. It is found that the simulation results agree well with classic fracture mechanics.

  3. Corrosion Fatigue Crack Propagation Rate Characteristics for Weldable Ship and Offshore Steels with Regard to the Influence of Loading Frequency and Saltwater Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakubowski Marek

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available After Vosikovsky (1975, the corrosion fatigue crack growth rate (CFCGR characteristics have been divided into three regions. The region-III rates are very close to mechanical fatigue crack growth rates. CFCGR formulae, including the long-crack length effect (in region I only, the loading frequency effect (in region II only, and the saltwater temperature effect, have been proposed. It has been assumed that CFCGR is proportional to f-k, where f is the loading frequency and k is a constant. The averaged k-value for all steels of yield stress (YS below 500 MPa, usually with ferrite-pearlite microstructures, is higher than that for YS > 500 MPa, usually with quenched and tempered microstructures. The temperature effect does not appear in region I below room temperature. In the remaining cases, that is, in region I for elevated temperatures and in region II for both low and elevated temperatures, the CFCGR increases with increasing temperature. Under a potential of -0.8 V, a long-crack-length effect, qualitatively similar to analogous effect for free corrosion conditions, appears.

  4. The Reflective Cracking in Flexible Pavements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pais Jorge

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Reflective cracking is a major concern for engineers facing the problem of road maintenance and rehabilitation. The problem appears due to the presence of cracks in the old pavement layers that propagate into the pavement overlay layer when traffic load passes over the cracks and due to the temperature variation. The stress concentration in the overlay just above the existing cracks is responsible for the appearance and crack propagation throughout the overlay. The analysis of the reflective cracking phenomenon is usually made by numerical modeling simulating the presence of cracks in the existing pavement and the stress concentration in the crack tip is assessed to predict either the cracking propagation rate or the expected fatigue life of the overlay. Numerical modeling to study reflective cracking is made by simulating one crack in the existing pavement and the loading is usually applied considering the shear mode of crack opening. Sometimes the simulation considers the mode I of crack opening, mainly when temperature effects are predominant.

  5. Mapping the ductile-brittle transition of magma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, J. E.; Lavallee, Y.; Dingwell, D. B.

    2010-12-01

    groundmass, whereas fractures initiate sporadically in phenocrysts. At high strain rates continuous fracture initiate in the phenocrysts and propagate through the groundmass. AE analysis suggests the ductile-brittle transition to approximate two orders of magnitude of strain rate and that it is temperature dependent. Within the transition, the different ratio of ductile to brittle deformation processes controls the strain to failure. This study shows that the presence of crystals widens the range of strain rates of the ductile-brittle transition and the failure of magma becomes dependent on total strain. Our findings will be discussed in the context of different eruptive scenarios.

  6. Modified 9% Cr steel (grade P9. 1): Low cycle fatigue and crack propagation rate of base material and welds at room and high temperature

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vanderschaeghe, A.; Gabrel-Cousaert, C.; Lecoq, J.

    1992-01-01

    The low-cycle fatigue properties of weldment have been studied at 550deg C. The base material behaves the best, the main difference between in three zones of the weldment lies in the behaviour in the plastic range. The authors have studied the threshold values and crack growth rates for weldment at 20deg C and 550deg C for R = 0,1. The results show an increase of the crack growth rate of a factor 3 between room temperature and 550deg C. Moreover at 550deg C the influence of the ratio R has been studied only for base material in the range of 0,05 to 0,7. For values of R up to 0,4 the threshold values are related to oxide induced closure theory. (orig.).

  7. Environmental Stress Crazing and Cracking of Transparent Polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-02-01

    MTL TR 89-12 AD ENVIRONMENTAL STRESS CRAZING AND CRACKING OF TRANSPARENT POLYMERS k -A205 624 ALEX J. HSIEH and JANICE J. VANSELOW POLYMER RESEARCH...SubwLe) 5. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED Final Report ENVIRONMENTAL STRESS CRAZING AND CRACKING OF TRANSPARENT POLYMERS S. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT...behavior is called environmental stress crazing or cracking (ESC). Aggressive surface active agents can cause ductile materials to fracture brittlely

  8. Brittle materials at high-loading rates: an open area of research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forquin, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Brittle materials are extensively used in many civil and military applications involving high-strain-rate loadings such as: blasting or percussive drilling of rocks, ballistic impact against ceramic armour or transparent windshields, plastic explosives used to damage or destroy concrete structures, soft or hard impacts against concrete structures and so on. With all of these applications, brittle materials are subjected to intense loadings characterized by medium to extremely high strain rates (few tens to several tens of thousands per second) leading to extreme and/or specific damage modes such as multiple fragmentation, dynamic cracking, pore collapse, shearing, mode II fracturing and/or microplasticity mechanisms in the material. Additionally, brittle materials exhibit complex features such as a strong strain-rate sensitivity and confining pressure sensitivity that justify expending greater research efforts to understand these complex features. Currently, the most popular dynamic testing techniques used for this are based on the use of split Hopkinson pressure bar methodologies and/or plate-impact testing methods. However, these methods do have some critical limitations and drawbacks when used to investigate the behaviour of brittle materials at high loading rates. The present theme issue of Philosophical Transactions A provides an overview of the latest experimental methods and numerical tools that are currently being developed to investigate the behaviour of brittle materials at high loading rates. This article is part of the themed issue 'Experimental testing and modelling of brittle materials at high strain rates'.

  9. Experimental analysis of crack evolution in concrete by the acoustic emission technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Saliba

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The fracture process zone (FPZ was investigated on unnotched and notched beams with different notch depths. Three point bending tests were realized on plain concrete under crack mouth opening displacement (CMOD control. Crack growth was monitored by applying the acoustic emission (AE technique. In order to improve our understanding of the FPZ, the width and length of the FPZ were followed based on the AE source locations maps and several AE parameters were studied during the entire loading process. The bvalue analysis, defined as the log-linear slope of the frequency-magnitude distribution of acoustic emissions, was also carried out to describe quantitatively the influence of the relative notch depth on the fracture process. The results show that the number of AE hits increased with the decrease of the relative notch depth and an important AE energy dissipation was observed at the crack initiation in unnotched beams. In addition, the relative notch depth influenced the AE characteristics, the process of crack propagation, and the brittleness of concrete.

  10. Experimental investigation of interfacial crack arrest in sandwich beams subjected to fatigue loading using a novel crack arresting device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martakos, G.; Andreasen, J.H.; Berggreen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    A recently proposed face-sheet–core interface crack arresting device is implemented in sandwich beams and tested using the Sandwich Tear Test configuration. Fatigue loading conditions are applied to propagate the crack and determine the effect of the crack stopper on the fatigue growth rate...... and arrest of the crack. Digital image correlation is used through the duration of the fatigue experiment to track the strain evolution as the crack tip advances. The measured strains are related to crack tip propagation, arrest, and re-initiation of the crack. A finite element model is used to calculate...... the energy release rate, mode mixity and to simulate crack propagation and arrest of the crack. Finally, the effectiveness of the crack arresting device is demonstrated on composite sandwich beams subjected to fatigue loading conditions....

  11. Interference of wedge-shaped protrusions on the faces of a Griffith crack in biaxial stress. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boulet, J.A.M. [Tennessee Univ., Knoxville, TN (United States)

    1992-04-01

    An initial investigation of the influence of protrusion interference on the fracture toughness required to prevent unstable propagation of a Griffith crack in a brittle material is described. The interference is caused by relative shear displacement of the crack faces when subjected to remote biaxial stress with neither principal stress parallel to the crack. It is shown that for room temperature cracks smaller than about one centimeter in silicon carbide, or about one millimeter in silicon nitride, the presence of interference changes the fracture stress. A mathematical model based on linear elasticity solutions and including multiple interference sites at arbitrarily specified positions on the crack is presented. Computations of the change in required fracture toughness and its dependence on wedge geometry (size and vertex angle), applied stresses (orientation and magnitude), and location of the interference site are discussed. Results indicate that a single interference site has only a slight effect on required toughness. However, the influence of interference increases monotonically with the number of interference sites. The two-dimensional model described herein is not accurate when the interference sites are closely spaced.

  12. Knuckle Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... people realize that cracking knuckles produces a funny noise and may repeat cracking just to produce the ... main areas of exercise are aerobic exercise and resistance News Categories Ankylosing Spondylitis News Fibromyalgia News Gout ...

  13. Introduction of sub-lithospheric component into melted lithospheric base by propagating crack: Case study of migrated Quaternary volcanoes in Wudalianchi, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chuvashova, Irina; Sun, Yi-min

    2016-04-01

    mantle beneath the northern Songliao basin and that admixture of the common sub-lithospheric component was locally introduced into the melted region by mechanism of propagating crack. This study is based on analytical data obtained for volcanic rocks in the Chinese-Russian Wudalianchi-Baikal Research Center on recent volcanism and environment. Major oxides were determined by "wet chemistry" at the Institute of the Earth's Crust SB RAS, Irkutsk. Trace-elements were measured by ICP-MS technique using mass-spectrometer Agilent 7500ce of the Center for collective use "Microanalysis" (Limnological Institute of SB RAS, Irkutsk) and Nd, Pb, and Sr isotopes by TIMS technique using mass-spectrometer Finnigan MAT 262 of the Center for collective use "Geodynamics and geochronology" (Institute of the Earth's Crust SB RAS). The work was supported by the RFBR grant № 16-05-00774. References Chuvashova, I.S., Rasskazov, S.V., Liu, J., Meng, F., Yasnygina, T.A., Fefelov, N.N., Saranina, E.V., 2009. Isotopically-enriched components in evolution of Late Cenozoic potassic magmatism in Heilongjiang province, northeast China, Proceedings of the Irkutsk State University. Series of Earth Sciences, 2 (2), pp. 181-198. Guide book for field mission to Wudalianchi National Park, China, 2010. Prepared by Wudalianchi National Park and Nature Management Committee Heilongjiang province, 50 p. Foulger, G.R., 2010. Plates vs. plumes: a geological controversy. Wiley-Blackwell, 328 p. Rasskazov, S.V., Yasnygina, T.A., Chuvashova, I.S. Mantle sources of the Cenozoic volcanic rocks of East Asia: Derivatives of slabs, the sub-lithospheric convection, and the lithosphere. Russian Journal of Pacific Geology. 2014. V. 8 (5), 355-371. Wang, Y., Chen, H., 2005. Tectonic controls on the Pleistocene-Holocene Wudalianchi volcanic field (northeastern China), Journal of Asian Earth Sciences, 24, pp. 419-431.

  14. On the application of cohesive crack modeling in cementitious materials

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stang, Henrik; Olesen, John Forbes; Poulsen, Peter Noe

    2007-01-01

    for a centrally cracked sheet is established applying semi-analytical, bridged and fictitious crack modeling. The semi-analytical crack model is compared with a FEM analysis and it is demonstrated, that the standard fictitious crack implementation in FEM packages (in this case DIANA) provides a good approximation......Cohesive crack models-in particular the Fictitious Crack Model - are applied routinely in the analysis of crack propagation in concrete and mortar. Bridged crack models-where cohesive stresses are assumed to exist together with a stress singularity at the crack tip-on the other hand, are used...... typically for multi scale problems such as crack propagation in fiber reinforced composites. Mortar and concrete, however, are multi-scale materials and the question naturally arises, if bridged crack models in fact are more suitable for concrete and mortar as well? In trying to answer this question a model...

  15. Phase-Field Model of Dynamic Crack Instability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karma, Alain

    2002-03-01

    Steady-state propagation of brittle cracks is known to end abruptly when the tip speed exceeds a fraction of the Rayleigh wave speed, at which point crack branching is typically observed in both real experiments and molecular dynamic simulations. There have been several theoretical attempts to understand the origin of this dynamic instability over the last decades, but no clear picture has yet emerged. We have recently introduced a phenomenological continuum model of dynamic fracture [Karma et al., Phys. Rev. Lett., Vol 87, 045501 (2001)] that is based on the phase-field methodology used extensively to model interfacial pattern formation. This model couples a scalar field, which distinguishes between ``broken'' and ``unbroken'' states of the system, to the displacement field in a way that consistently includes both macroscopic elasticity and a simple rotationally invariant short scale description of breaking. This talk will report the results of a numerical simulation study of this model done in collaboration with Alex Lobkovsky that sheds new light on the origin of this elusive instability.

  16. Snow fracture: From micro-cracking to global failure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capelli, Achille; Reiweger, Ingrid; Schweizer, Jürg

    2017-04-01

    Slab avalanches are caused by a crack forming and propagating in a weak layer within the snow cover, which eventually causes the detachment of the overlying cohesive slab. The gradual damage process leading to the nucleation of the initial failure is still not entirely understood. Therefore, we studied the damage process preceding snow failure by analyzing the acoustic emissions (AE) generated by bond failure or micro-cracking. The AE allow studying the ongoing progressive failure in a non-destructive way. We performed fully load-controlled failure experiments on snow samples presenting a weak layer and recorded the generated AE. The size and frequency of the generated AE increased before failure revealing an acceleration of the damage process with increased size and frequency of damage and/or microscopic cracks. The AE energy was power-law distributed and the exponent (b-value) decreased approaching failure. The waiting time followed an exponential distribution with increasing exponential coefficient λ before failure. The decrease of the b-value and the increase of λ correspond to a change in the event distribution statistics indicating a transition from homogeneously distributed uncorrelated damage producing mostly small AE to localized damage, which cause larger correlated events which leads to brittle failure. We observed brittle failure for the fast experiment and a more ductile behavior for the slow experiments. This rate dependence was reflected also in the AE signature. In the slow experiments the b value and λ were almost constant, and the energy rate increase was moderate indicating that the damage process was in a stable state - suggesting the damage and healing processes to be balanced. On a shorter time scale, however, the AE parameters varied indicating that the damage process was not steady but consisted of a sum of small bursts. We assume that the bursts may have been generated by cascades of correlated micro-cracks caused by localization of

  17. Complete Tangent Stiffness for eXtended Finite Element Method by including crack growth parameters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mougaard, J.F.; Poulsen, P.N.; Nielsen, L.O.

    2013-01-01

    The eXtended Finite Element Method (XFEM) is a useful tool for modeling the growth of discrete cracks in structures made of concrete and other quasi‐brittle and brittle materials. However, in a standard application of XFEM, the tangent stiffness is not complete. This is a result of not including...... within the same standard nonlinear iterations. This new solution strategy is believed to provide the modeling capabilities to deal with simultaneous growth of several cracks. A cohesive crack modeling is used. The method is applied to a partly cracked XFEM element of linear strain triangle type...... the crack geometry parameters, such as the crack length and the crack direction directly in the virtual work formulation. For efficiency, it is essential to obtain a complete tangent stiffness. A new method in this work is presented to include an incremental form the crack growth parameters on equal terms...

  18. Cracks in Sheets Draped on Curved Surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Noah P.; Koning, Vinzenz; Vitelli, Vincenzo; Irvine, William T. M.

    Conforming materials to surfaces with Gaussian curvature has proven a versatile tool to guide the behavior of mechanical defects such as folds, blisters, scars, and pleats. In this talk, we show how curvature can likewise be used to control material failure. In our experiments, thin elastic sheets are confined on curved geometries that stimulate or suppress the growth of cracks, and steer or arrest their propagation. By redistributing stresses in a sheet, curvature provides a geometric tool for protecting certain regions and guiding crack patterns. A simple model captures crack behavior at the onset of propagation, while a 2D phase-field model successfully captures the crack's full phenomenology.

  19. Nonadiabatic study of dynamic electronic effects during brittle fracture of silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theofanis, Patrick L; Jaramillo-Botero, Andres; Goddard, William A; Xiao, Hai

    2012-01-27

    It has long been observed that brittle fracture of materials can lead to emission of high energy electrons and UV photons, but an atomistic description of the origin of such processes has lacked. We report here on simulations using a first-principles-based electron force field methodology with effective core potentials to describe the nonadiabatic quantum dynamics during brittle fracture in silicon crystal. Our simulations replicate the correct response of the crack tip velocity to the threshold critical energy release rate, a feat that is inaccessible to quantum mechanics methods or conventional force-field-based molecular dynamics. We also describe the crack induced voltages, current bursts, and charge carrier production observed experimentally during fracture but not previously captured in simulations. We find that strain-induced surface rearrangements and local heating cause ionization of electrons at the fracture surfaces.

  20. Numerical simulation of acoustic emission in brittle rocks by two-dimensional finite-discrete element analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisjak, A.; Liu, Q.; Zhao, Q.; Mahabadi, O. K.; Grasselli, G.

    2013-10-01

    Stress waves, known as acoustic emissions (AEs), are released by localized inelastic deformation events during the progressive failure of brittle rocks. Although several numerical models have been developed to simulate the deformation and damage processes of rocks, such as non-linear stress-strain behaviour and localization of failure, only a limited number have been capable of providing quantitative information regarding the associated seismicity. Moreover, the majority of these studies have adopted a pseudo-static approach based on elastic strain energy dissipation that completely disregards elastodynamic effects. This paper describes a new AE modelling technique based on the combined finite-discrete element method (FEM/DEM), a numerical tool that simulates material failure by explicitly considering fracture nucleation and propagation in the modelling domain. Given the explicit time integration scheme of the solver, stress wave propagation and the effect of radiated seismic energy can be directly captured. Quasi-dynamic seismic information is extracted from a FEM/DEM model with a newly developed algorithm based on the monitoring of internal variables (e.g. relative displacements and kinetic energy) in proximity to propagating cracks. The AE of a wing crack propagation model based on this algorithm are cross-analysed by traveltime inversion and energy estimation from seismic recordings. Results indicate a good correlation of AE initiation times and locations, and scaling of energies, independently calculated with the two methods. Finally, the modelling technique is validated by simulating a laboratory compression test on a granite sample. The micromechanical parameters of the heterogeneous model are first calibrated to reproduce the macroscopic stress-strain response measured during standard laboratory tests. Subsequently, AE frequency-magnitude statistics, spatial clustering of source locations and the evolution of AE rate are investigated. The distribution of

  1. Study of Hot Salt Stress Corrosion Crack Initiation of Alloy IMI 834 by using DC Potential Drop Method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pustode, Mangesh D. [Bharat Forge Ltd., Pune (India); Dewangan, Bhupendra [Tata Steel, Jamshedpur (India); Raja, V. S. [Indian Institute of Technology Bombay, Mumbai (India); Paulose, Neeta; Babu, Narendra [Gas Turbine Research Establishment (GTRE), Bangalore (India)

    2016-10-15

    DC potential drop technique was employed during the slow strain rate tests to study the hot salt stress corrosion crack (HSSCC) initiation at 300 and 400 ℃. Threshold stresses for HSSCC initiation were found to about 88 % of the yield strength at both temperatures, but the time from crack initiation to final failure (Δtscc) decreased significantly with temperature, which reflects larger tendency for brittle fracture and secondary cracking. The brittle fracture features consisted of transgranular cracking through the primary α grain and discontinuous faceted cracking through the transformed β grains.

  2. Size-dependent plastic deformation and failure mechanisms of nanotwinned Ni{sub 3}Al: Insights from an atomistic cracking model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Yun-Jiang, E-mail: yjwang@imech.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Tsuchiya, Koichi [Research Center for Strategic Materials, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Dai, L.H., E-mail: lhdai@lnm.imech.ac.cn [State Key Laboratory of Nonlinear Mechanics, Institute of Mechanics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2016-01-01

    The polycrystalline Ni{sub 3}Al is brittle since the notorious intergranular fracture mode hinders its applications. Here we perform molecular dynamics to highlight the unique role of nanotwin boundary in the plastic deformation and failure mechanisms of Ni{sub 3}Al via an atomistic cracking model. Surprisingly, the strength, ductility and fracture toughness of the nanotwinned Ni{sub 3}Al are revealed to increase simultaneously with reducing twin size, possibly evading a traditional tradeoff between ductility/toughness and strength. A possible quasi-brittle fracture mode in single crystalline Ni{sub 3}Al is recognized as nucleating twinning partials from crack tip. However, the pre-existing twin boundaries can suppress the emission and propagation of successive twinning dislocations. Instead, dislocation avalanches happen and serve as a crack blunting mechanism which leads to the ductile fracture pattern of the nanotwinned Ni{sub 3}Al. A size-dependent transition of fracture mode from dislocation nucleation to shear localization is observed as twin becomes very small. A physical model combined with energetics analysis is provided to rationalize the transition. Our atomistic insights are in qualitative agreement with recent observations of improved strength and ductility of Ni{sub 3}Al with disordered nanotwinned structure after severe plastic deformation.

  3. PREDICTION OF CHARACTERISTIC LENGTH AND FRACTURE TOUGHNESS IN DUCTILE-BRITTLE TRANSITION

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lam, P

    2008-04-15

    Finite element method was used to analyze the three-point bend experimental data of A533B-1 pressure vessel steel obtained by Sherry, Lidbury, and Beardsmore [1] from -160 to -45 C within the ductile-brittle transition regime. As many researchers have shown, the failure stress ({sigma}{sub f}) of the material could be approximated as a constant. The characteristic length, or the critical distance (r{sub c}) from the crack tip, at which {sigma}{sub f} is reached, is shown to be temperature dependent based on the crack tip stress field calculated by the finite element method. With the J-A{sub 2} two-parameter constraint theory in fracture mechanics, the fracture toughness (J{sub C} or K{sub JC}) can be expressed as a function of the constraint level (A{sub 2}) and the critical distance r{sub c}. This relationship is used to predict the fracture toughness of A533B-1 in the ductile-brittle transition regime with a constant {sigma}{sub f} and a set of temperature-dependent r{sub c}. It can be shown that the prediction agrees well with the test data for wide range of constraint levels from shallow cracks (a/W= 0.075) to deep cracks (a/W= 0.5), where a is the crack length and W is the specimen width.

  4. Brittle type 1 diabetes mellitus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertuzzi, Federico; Verzaro, Roberto; Provenzano, Vincenzo; Ricordi, Camillo

    2007-01-01

    A small group of patients affected by type 1 diabetes mellitus is characterized by a severe instability of glycemic values with frequent and unpredictable hypoglycemic and/or ketoacidosis episodes which cannot be explained by errors of patients or diabetologists. The quality of life of these patients is dramatically compromised in particular because of the frequency of acute events, hospital recoveries and precocious appearance of chronic complications. This clinical condition has been defined as "brittle diabetes". A precise quantification of these patients is difficult because diagnostic criteria are still not well defined and it is often difficult to verify errors of patients in terms of inappropriate conduct with the pathology. Even more than the other kinds of diabetes, therapy is based on education, glycemic control, intensive therapy and strict interaction between physicians and patients. The introduction of insulin analogous, with either ultra-fast and ultra-slow action and the use of subcutaneous insulin pumps have significantly increased the possibility of treating the most of these cases. However, there is a minority of patients resistant to the therapy. In similar cases, pancreas or islet transplantation represents an effective therapeutic option entailing good expected outcomes. The main limiting factor of beta cell function replacement by transplantation is so far represented by the potentially severe side effects of the immunosuppression therapy necessary to avoid graft rejection and recurrence of autoimmunity.

  5. On Failure in Polycrystalline and Amorphous Brittle Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourne, N. K.

    2009-12-01

    The performance of behaviour of brittle materials depends upon discrete deformation mechanisms operating during the loading process. The critical mechanisms determining the behaviour of armour ceramics have not been isolated using traditional ballistics. It has recently become possible to measure strength histories in materials under shock. The data gained for the failed strength of the armour are shown to relate directly to the penetration measured into tiles. Further the material can be loaded and recovered for post-mortem examination. Failure is by micro-fracture that is a function of the defects and then cracking activated by plasticity mechanisms within the grains and failure at grain boundaries in the amorphous intergranular phase. Thus it is the shock-induced plastic yielding of grains at the impact face that determines the later time penetration through the tile.

  6. Numerical model of thermo-mechanical coupling for the tensile failure process of brittle materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yu; Wang, Zhe; Ren, Fengyu; Wang, Daguo

    2017-10-01

    A numerical model of thermal cracking with a thermo-mechanical coupling effect was established. The theory of tensile failure and heat conduction is used to study the tensile failure process of brittle materials, such as rock and concrete under high temperature environment. The validity of the model is verified by thick-wall cylinders with analytical solutions. The failure modes of brittle materials under thermal stresses caused by temperature gradient and different thermal expansion coefficient were studied by using a thick-wall cylinder model and an embedded particle model, respectively. In the thick-wall cylinder model, different forms of cracks induced by temperature gradient were obtained under different temperature boundary conditions. In the embedded particle model, radial cracks were produced in the medium part with lower tensile strength when temperature increased because of the different thermal expansion coefficient. Model results are in good agreement with the experimental results, thereby providing a new finite element method for analyzing the thermal damage process and mechanism of brittle materials.

  7. Numerical model of thermo-mechanical coupling for the tensile failure process of brittle materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Fu

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available A numerical model of thermal cracking with a thermo-mechanical coupling effect was established. The theory of tensile failure and heat conduction is used to study the tensile failure process of brittle materials, such as rock and concrete under high temperature environment. The validity of the model is verified by thick-wall cylinders with analytical solutions. The failure modes of brittle materials under thermal stresses caused by temperature gradient and different thermal expansion coefficient were studied by using a thick-wall cylinder model and an embedded particle model, respectively. In the thick-wall cylinder model, different forms of cracks induced by temperature gradient were obtained under different temperature boundary conditions. In the embedded particle model, radial cracks were produced in the medium part with lower tensile strength when temperature increased because of the different thermal expansion coefficient. Model results are in good agreement with the experimental results, thereby providing a new finite element method for analyzing the thermal damage process and mechanism of brittle materials.

  8. Unraveling the Brittle History of Cratonic Areas Reveals the Profound Mechanical Instability of "Stable" Shields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viola, G.; Mattila, J.

    2014-12-01

    can propagate over large distances and lead to similar deformational histories, with the local geology only playing a second-order role on the final brittle strain pattern recorded by the rock.

  9. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of a high strength Mg-7%Gd-5%Y-1%Nd-0.5%Zr alloy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S.D. Wang

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Through performing the tensile tests with different strain rates in 3.5 wt.% NaCl solution, the stress corrosion cracking (SCC behavior and the effect of strain rate on the SCC susceptibility of an extruded Mg-7%Gd-5%Y-1%Nd-0.5%Zr (EW75 alloy have been investigated. Results demonstrate that the alloy is susceptible to SCC when the strain rate is lower than 5 × 10−6 s−1. At the strain rate of 1 × 10−6 s−1, the SCC susceptibility index (ISCC is 0.96 and the elongation-to-failure (εf is only 0.11%. Fractography indicates that the brittle quasi-cleavage feature is very obvious and become more pronounced with decreasing the strain rate. Further analysis confirms that the cracking mode is predominantly transgranular, but the partial intergranular cracking at some localized area can also occur. Meanwhile, it seems that the crack propagation path is unrelated to the existing phase particles.

  10. Effects of temperature and pressure on stress corrosion cracking behavior of 310S stainless steel in chloride solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Yunpan; Zhou, Cheng; Chen, Songying; Wang, Ruiyan

    2017-01-01

    310S is an austenitic stainless steel for high temperature applications, having strong resistance of oxidation, hydrogen embrittlement and corrosion. Stress corrosion cracking(SCC) is the main corrosion failure mode for 310S stainless steel. Past researched about SCC of 310S primarily focus on the corrosion mechanism and influence of temperature and corrosive media, but few studies concern the combined influence of temperature, pressure and chloride. For a better understanding of temperature and pressure's effects on SCC of 310S stainless steel, prepared samples are investigated via slow strain rate tensile test(SSRT) in different temperature and pressure in NACE A solution. The result shows that the SCC sensibility indexes of 310S stainless steel increase with the rise of temperature and reach maximum at 10MPa and 160°C, increasing by 22.3% compared with that at 10 MPa and 80 °C. Instead, the sensibility decreases with the pressure up. Besides, the fractures begin to transform from the ductile fracture to the brittle fracture with the increase of temperature. 310S stainless steel has an obvious tendency of stress corrosion at 10MPa and 160°C and the fracture surface exists cleavage steps, river patterns and some local secondary cracks, having obvious brittle fracture characteristics. The SCC cracks initiate from inclusions and tiny pits in the matrix and propagate into the matrix along the cross section gradually until rupture. In particular, the oxygen and chloride play an important role on the SCC of 310S stainless steel in NACE A solution. The chloride damages passivating film, causing pitting corrosion, concentrating in the cracks and accelerated SSC ultimately. The research reveals the combined influence of temperature, pressure and chloride on the SCC of 310S, which can be a guide to the application of 310S stainless steel in super-heater tube.

  11. Fan-head shear rupture mechanism as a source of off-fault tensile cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarasov, Boris

    2016-04-01

    This presentation discusses the role of a recently identified fan-head shear rupture mechanism [1] in the creation of off-fault tensile cracks observed in earthquake laboratory experiments conducted on brittle photoelastic specimens [2,3]. According to the fan-mechanism the shear rupture propagation is associated with consecutive creation of small slabs in the fracture tip which, due to rotation caused by shear displacement of the fracture interfaces, form a fan-structure representing the fracture head. The fan-head combines such unique features as: extremely low shear resistance (below the frictional strength) and self-sustaining tensile stress intensification along one side of the interface. The variation of tensile stress within the fan-head zone is like this: it increases with distance from the fracture tip up to a maximum value and then decreases. For the initial formation of the fan-head high local stresses corresponding to the fracture strength should be applied in a small area, however after completions of the fan-head it can propagate dynamically through the material at low shear stresses (even below the frictional strength). The fan-mechanism allows explaining all unique features associated with the off-fault cracking process observed in photoelastic experiments [2,3]. In these experiments spontaneous shear ruptures were nucleated in a bonded, precut, inclined and pre-stressed interface by producing a local pressure pulse in a small area. Isochromatic fringe patterns around a shear rupture propagating along bonded interface indicate the following features of the off-fault tensile crack development: tensile cracks nucleate and grow periodically along one side of the interface at a roughly constant angle (about 80 degrees) relative to the shear rupture interface; the tensile crack nucleation takes place some distance behind the rupture tip; with distance from the point of nucleation tensile cracks grow up to a certain length within the rupture head zone

  12. Creep, Fatigue and Environmental Interactions and Their Effect on Crack Growth in Superalloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telesman, J.; Gabb, T. P.; Ghosn, L. J.; Smith, T.

    2017-01-01

    Complex interactions of creep/fatigue/environment control dwell fatigue crack growth (DFCG) in superalloys. Crack tip stress relaxation during dwells significantly changes the crack driving force and influence DFCG. Linear Elastic Fracture Mechanics, Kmax, parameter unsuitable for correlating DFCG behavior due to extensive visco-plastic deformation. Magnitude of remaining crack tip axial stresses controls DFCG resistance due to the brittle-intergranular nature of the crack growth process. Proposed a new empirical parameter, Ksrf, which incorporates visco-plastic evolution of the magnitude of remaining crack tip stresses. Previous work performed at 704C, extend the work to 760C.

  13. Brittle Creep of Tournemire Shale: Orientation, Temperature and Pressure Dependences

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Zhi; Bonnelye, Audrey; Dick, Pierre; David, Christian; Chen, Mian; Schubnel, Alexandre

    2017-04-01

    Time and temperature dependent rock deformation has both scientific and socio-economic implications for natural hazards, the oil and gas industry and nuclear waste disposal. During the past decades, most studies on brittle creep have focused on igneous rocks and porous sedimentary rocks. To our knowledge, only few studies have been carried out on the brittle creep behavior of shale. Here, we conducted a series of creep experiments on shale specimens coming from the French Institute for Nuclear Safety (IRSN) underground research laboratory located in Tournemire, France. Conventional tri-axial experiments were carried under two different temperatures (26˚ C, 75˚ C) and confining pressures (10 MPa, 80 MPa), for three orientations (σ1 along, perpendicular and 45˚ to bedding). Following the methodology developed by Heap et al. [2008], differential stress was first increased to ˜ 60% of the short term peak strength (10-7/s, Bonnelye et al. 2016), and then in steps of 5 to 10 MPa every 24 hours until brittle failure was achieved. In these long-term experiments (approximately 10 days), stress and strains were recorded continuously, while ultrasonic acoustic velocities were recorded every 1˜15 minutes, enabling us to monitor the evolution of elastic wave speed anisotropy. Temporal evolution of anisotropy was illustrated by inverting acoustic velocities to Thomsen parameters. Finally, samples were investigated post-mortem using scanning electron microscopy. Our results seem to contradict our traditional understanding of loading rate dependent brittle failure. Indeed, the brittle creep failure stress of our Tournemire shale samples was systematically observed ˜50% higher than its short-term peak strength, with larger final axial strain accumulated. At higher temperatures, the creep failure strength of our samples was slightly reduced and deformation was characterized with faster 'steady-state' creep axial strain rates at each steps, and larger final axial strain

  14. Fracture Mechanical Markov Chain Crack Growth Model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gansted, L.; Brincker, Rune; Hansen, Lars Pilegaard

    1991-01-01

    On the basis of the B-model developed in [J. L. Bogdanoff and F. Kozin, Probabilistic Models of Cumulative Damage. John Wiley, New York (1985)] a new numerical model incorporating the physical knowledge of fatigue crack propagation is developed. The model is based on the assumption that the crack...

  15. Investigation on cracking mechanism of austenite stainless steel during in situ tension in transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Peng; Hu Hongyan; Liu Yuanyuan [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Zhang Yue [College of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Fang, Yuan [Advanced Technology Institute, Technology Center of Baoshan Iron and Steel company, Shanghai 201900 (China); Ren Xuejun [School of Engineering, Liverpool John Moores University, Liverpool L3 3AF (United Kingdom); Liao Bo [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China); Yang Qingxiang, E-mail: qxyang@ysu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Metastable Materials Science and Technology, Yanshan University, Qinhuangdao 066004 (China)

    2011-01-25

    Research highlights: {yields} During the initial stage of loading process, at the crack tip, the dislocations slip from center to around zone and the density of dislocation is increased at local zone. With the increase of load, around center, an oval-shaped dislocation free zone (DFZ) forms. When the displacement keeps constant, the dislocations continue moving. The DFZ become thinner and the nano-cracks initiate gradually, then, propagate abruptly along the direction vertical to the tensile force. {yields} The cracks may propagate in continuous propagation way. The micro-cracks initiate ahead of the main crack firstly, then propagate, grow and connect with the main crack finally, which results in that the main crack propagates too. The initiation direction of micro-crack has a certain angle with the tensile force direction. However, the direction of the main crack propagation is always along the direction vertical to the tensile force. {yields} The cracks may propagate in discontinuous way too. The dislocations pile up inversely in front of the crack tip. The propagation process of crack is that the crack tip is blunt at first. Then, with the increase of load, the new crack tip forms in the blunt crack firstly, then propagates and is blunt again. So back and forth, the cracks propagate forward continuously. - Abstract: Twin-roll strip casting technology is a new one to produce austenite stainless steel strip directly. However, during this process, the cracking occurs usually on the surface of the steel strip. The technique of in situ tension in transmission electron microscope was used to observe and analyze the crack initiation and propagation in austenite stainless steel produced by twin-roll strip casting technology in this work. The results show that the crack initiates in dislocation free-zone firstly and then propagates along the direction vertical to the tensile force. The crack may propagate in continuous propagation way and discontinuous one respectively

  16. Junction formation during desiccation cracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toga, K B; Alaca, B Erdem

    2006-08-01

    In order to provide a sound physical basis for the understanding of the formation of desiccation crack networks, an experimental study is presented addressing junction formation. Focusing on junctions, basic features of the network determining the final pattern, provides an elemental approach and imparts conceptual clarity to the rather complicated problem of the evolution of crack patterns. Using coffee-water mixtures a clear distinction between junction formation during nucleation and propagation is achieved. It is shown that for the same drying suspension, one can switch from the well-known symmetric triple junctions that are unique to the nucleation phase to propagation junctions that are purely dictated by the variations of the stress state. In the latter case, one can even manipulate the path of a propagating crack in a deterministic fashion by changing the stress state within the suspension. Clear microscopic evidence is provided for the formation of propagation junctions, and material inhomogeneity is observed to be reflected by a broad distribution of angles, in stark contrast to shrinkage cracks in homogeneous solid films.

  17. A rate-dependent multi-scale crack model for concrete

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karamnejad, A.; Nguyen, V.P.; Sluys, L.J.

    2013-01-01

    A multi-scale numerical approach for modeling cracking in heterogeneous quasi-brittle materials under dynamic loading is presented. In the model, a discontinuous crack model is used at macro-scale to simulate fracture and a gradient-enhanced damage model has been used at meso-scale to simulate

  18. Cohesive stress heterogeneities and the transition from intrinsic ductility to brittleness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanguy, D.

    2017-11-01

    The influence of nanoscale cavities on the fracture of the Σ 33 {554 }[110 ] symmetrical tilt grain boundary is studied by atomistic simulations. The crack crystallography is chosen such that dislocation emission is easy. A transition from a ductile behavior of the tip to a brittle one is obtained for a dense (coverage beyond 15% and intercavity spacing smaller than 4 nm) distribution of small cavities (sizes in-between 1 and 2 nm). The results are in good agreement with recent experiments from the literature. Even at the highest coverage, the character of the crack is highly sensitive to the initial position of the tip and a mixture of ductile and brittle responses is found. This complexity is beyond the usual criterion based on the drop of the work of separation with the amount of damage in the structure. It is shown that a heterogeneous cohesive zone model, with parameters extracted from the simulations and enriched with a criterion for plasticity, can explain the simulations and reproduce the transition. Additional simulations show that outside this range of small sizes and dense packing, which gives essentially a two-dimensional response (either crack opening or infinite straight dislocation emission), dislocation half-loops appear for intercavity spacing starting at about 4 nm. They constitute, together with regions of low coverage/small cavities, efficient obstacles to brittle cracking. These results could be guidelines to designing interfaces more resistant to solute embrittlement, in general. The cohesive zone model is generic. Furthermore, the {554} single crystal was used to determine to which extent the results depend on the details of the core structure versus the cavity distribution. These elements show that the conclusions reached have a generic character.

  19. Mechanisms of Subcritical Cracking in Calcite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Royne, A.; Dysthe, D. K.; Bisschop, J.

    2008-12-01

    Brittle materials are characterized by a critical stress intensity factor above which they will fail catastrophically by dynamic cracking. However, it has been observed that materials can also fail at much lower stresses, through slow crack growth, often referred to as subcritical cracking. This phenomenon can take place even in vacuum, but is greatly enhanced by water and other reactive species in the environment. For a given material and environmental condition there is a systematic relationship between the crack tip velocity and the stress intensity factor. The presence of a lower stress limit to subcritical cracking has been predicted from thermodynamics but has not been firmly demonstrated experimentally. This parameter would control the long- term strength of geological materials. Subcritical cracking must necessarily be important in controlling the rock strength in near-surface processes where water and other active species are present and the displacements and stresses are low. Weathering is one example of such a process. Modelling has shown that fracture networks generated by a high degree of subcritical cracking will percolate at much lower fracture densities than purely stochastical fracture networks. This has important implications for how water can move through the crust. Understanding the mechanisms for subcritical crack growth in geological materials is also important in assessing the stability and long term performance of sequestration reservoirs for CO2 or nuclear waste. The mechanism for stress corrosion is well known for glasses and quartz. For carbonate minerals, the mechanism for subcritical crack growth has not been identified, and the only experimental studies on calcitic materials have been on polycrystalline rocks such as marble. Suggested mechanisms include stress corrosion (weakening reactions at the crack tip), preferential dissolution at the crack tip with rapid removal of dissolved species, and environmentally controlled

  20. Interfacial Crack Arrest in Sandwich Panels with Embedded Crack Stoppers Subjected to Fatigue Loading

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martakos, G.; Andreasen, J. H.; Berggreen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    of the embedded crack arresters was evaluated in terms of the achieved enhancement of the damage tolerance of the tested sandwich panels. A finite element (FE) model of the experimental setup was used for predicting propagation rates and direction of the crack growth. The FE simulation was based on the adoption......A novel crack arresting device has been implemented in sandwich panels and tested using a special rig to apply out-of-plane loading on the sandwich panel face-sheets. Fatigue crack propagation was induced in the face-core interface of the sandwich panels which met the crack arrester. The effect...... of linear fracture mechanics and a fatigue propagation law (i.e. Paris law) to predict the residual fatigue life-time and behaviour of the test specimens. Finally, a comparison between the experimental results and the numerical simulations was made to validate the numerical predictions as well...

  1. Control of relaxation cracking in austenitic high temperature components

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wortel, J.C. van

    2007-01-01

    The degradation mechanism "relaxation cracking" is acting in austenitic components operating between 550°C (1020°F) and 750°C (1380°F). The brittle failures are always located in cold formed areas or in welded joints and are mostly addressed within 1 year service. More than 10 different names can be

  2. Statistical model of stress corrosion cracking based on extended ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The mechanism of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been discussed for decades. Here I propose a model of SCC reflecting the feature of fracture in brittle manner based on the variational principle under approximately supposed thermal equilibrium. In that model the functionals are expressed with extended forms of ...

  3. Statistical model of stress corrosion cracking based on extended ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2013-12-01

    Dec 1, 2013 ... Abstract. The mechanism of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) has been discussed for decades. Here I propose a model of SCC reflecting the feature of fracture in brittle manner based on the vari- ational principle under approximately supposed thermal equilibrium. In that model the functionals are expressed ...

  4. Some Aspects of Formation of Cracks in FRC with Main Reinforcement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Simonsen, J.; Hansen, W.

    In this paper the response of fibre reinforced concrete with main reinforcement in pure tension is considered. Test results are presented showing three distinct regimes: a regime of linear elasticity, a regime of yielding at approximately constant stress, and finally, a regime of strain hardening....... A simple model of the response of a tension member with main reinforcement and a partially opened crack is presented, and the influence of different shapes of the crack opening relation is studied. The case of a parabolic crack opening relation defines a brittleness number that describes the transition...... from discrete cracking to multiple cracking. It is shown, that if the crack opening relation is assumed to consist of a brittle contribution from the cement paste, and a more ductile contribution from the pull-out of the fibres, a plastic regime will be present in the tensile response. The fracture...

  5. Relationship Between Slugging Pressure and Brittle Fracture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The hardness of the slugs was determined and taken as measure of the hardness of the resulting granules. The following tableting parameters were measured for the final tablets - tensile strength (T), packing fraction (Pf) and the brittle fracture index (BFI). Results - A high slugging load was associated with the formation of ...

  6. Thermal fatigue cracking of die-casting dies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thermal fatigue cracking of die-casting dies

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Die-casting dies are exposed to high thermal and mechanical loads. Thermal fatigue cracking of dies due to thermal cycling may importantly shorten the life-time of the die. Cracks degrade the surface quality of dies and consequently the surface of castings. In this study, thermal fatigue cracking of dies was analyzed during the process of die casting aluminium alloys. During the process cracks were observed and measured and their location and size were determined. Thermal and mechanical loads cause high local stresses and consequently surface cracks. First cracks occur as early as after 2000 cycles and propagate progressively with cycles.

  7. Terahertz non-destructive imaging of cracks and cracking in structures of cement-based materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shujie; Li, Tongchun; Zhou, Jun; Liu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Xiaoming; Qi, Huijun; Mu, Zhiyong

    2017-11-01

    Cracks and crack propagation in cement-based materials are key factors leading to failure of structures, affecting safety in construction engineering. This work investigated the application of terahertz (THz) non-destructive imaging to inspections on structures of cement-based materials, so as to explore the potential of THz imaging in crack detection. Two kinds of disk specimens made of plain cement mortar and UHMWPE fiber concrete were prepared respectively. A mechanical expansion load device was deployed to generate cracks and control the whole process of cracking. Experimental tests were carried out on cracked specimens by using a commercial THz time domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) during loading. The results show that crack opening and propagation could be examined by THz clearly and the material factors influence the ability of crack resistance significantly. It was found that the THz imaging of crack initiation and propagation agrees with the practical phenomenon and supplies more information about damage of samples. It is demonstrated that the damage behavior of structures of cement-based materials can be successfully detected by THz imaging.

  8. Morphology, crystallography, and crack paths of tempered lath martensite in a medium-carbon low-alloy steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Chengduo [School of Material Science and Engineering, Zhengzhou University, 100 Science Avenue, Zhengzhou, Henan 450001 (China); Qiu, Hai; Kimura, Yuuji; Inoue, Tadanobu [Research Center for Strategic Materials, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba 305-0047 (Japan)

    2016-07-04

    The tempered lath martensite and its crack propagation have significant influence on the ductility and toughness of the warm tempformed medium-carbon steel. The martensitic microstructures of these medium-carbon steels are transformed from twinned austenite and the orientation relationship of lath martensite (α′) with prior austenite (γ) is distinctive. In the present paper we investigate the microstructure and fracture mode of a quenched and tempered 0.4%C-2%Si-1%Cr-1%Mo steel using electron backscatter diffraction technique. The results showed that the orientation relationship between γ and α′ is Greninger-Troiano (G-T) relationship. A single γ grain was divided into 4 packets and each packet was subdivided into 3 blocks. The misorientation angles between adjacent blocks were ~54.3° or ~60.0° in a packet. Most γ grains were twins sharing a {111}{sub γ} plane. There were 7 packets in a twinned γ grain and the twin boundaries were in a special packet. Besides the common packet, there were three packets in each twin. Being different from the cleavage fracture along the {001} planes in conventional martensitic steels, both cleavage and intergranular cracks were present in our medium-carbon steel. The former was in the larger blocks and it propagated along the {001}, {011}, and {112} planes. The latter propagated along the block, packet, or prior austenite boundaries. The intergranular cracks were generally in the fine block region. These results suggested that the block size is the key factor in controlling the brittle fracture mode of lath martensitic steel.

  9. Online Bridge Crack Monitoring with Smart Film

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benniu Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Smart film crack monitoring method, which can be used for detecting initiation, length, width, shape, location, and propagation of cracks on real bridges, is proposed. Firstly, the fabrication of the smart film is developed. Then the feasibility of the method is analyzed and verified by the mechanical sensing character of the smart film under the two conditions of normal strain and crack initiation. Meanwhile, the coupling interference between parallel enameled wires of the smart film is discussed, and then low-frequency detecting signal and the custom communication protocol are used to decrease interference. On this basis, crack monitoring system with smart film is designed, where the collected crack data is sent to the remote monitoring center and the cracks are simulated and recurred. Finally, the monitoring system is applied to six bridges, and the effects are discussed.

  10. A micromechanical model of tension-softening and bridging toughening of short random fiber reinforced brittle matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Victor C.; Wang, Youjiang; Backer, Stanley

    A MICROMECHANICAL model has been formulated for the post-cracking behavior of a brittle matrix composite reinforced with randomly distributed short fibers. This model incorporates the mechanics of pull-out of fibers which are inclined at an angle to the matrix crack plane and which undergo slip-weakening or slip-hardening during the pull-out process. In addition, the random location and orientation of fibers are accounted for. Comparisons of model predictions of post-cracking tension-softening behavior with experimental data appear to support the validity of the model. The model is used to examine the effects of fiber length, snubbing friction coefficient and interfacial bond behavior on composite post-cracking tensile properties. The scaling of the bridging fracture toughening with material parameters is discussed.

  11. Assessment of Mudrock Brittleness with Micro-scratch Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Uribe, Luis Alberto; Aman, Michael; Espinoza, D. Nicolas

    2017-11-01

    Mechanical properties are essential for understanding natural and induced deformational behavior of geological formations. Brittleness characterizes energy dissipation rate and strain localization at failure. Brittleness has been investigated in hydrocarbon-bearing mudrocks in order to quantify the impact of hydraulic fracturing on the creation of complex fracture networks and surface area for reservoir drainage. Typical well logging correlations associate brittleness with carbonate content or dynamic elastic properties. However, an index of rock brittleness should involve actual rock failure and have a consistent method to quantify it. Here, we present a systematic method to quantify mudrock brittleness based on micro-mechanical measurements from the scratch test. Brittleness is formulated as the ratio of energy associated with brittle failure to the total energy required to perform a scratch. Soda lime glass and polycarbonate are used for comparison to identify failure in brittle and ductile mode and validate the developed method. Scratch testing results on mudrocks indicate that it is possible to use the recorded transverse force to estimate brittleness. Results show that tested samples rank as follows in increasing degree of brittleness: Woodford, Eagle Ford, Marcellus, Mancos, and Vaca Muerta. Eagle Ford samples show mixed ductile/brittle failure characteristics. There appears to be no definite correlation between micro-scratch brittleness and quartz or total carbonate content. Dolomite content shows a stronger correlation with brittleness than any other major mineral group. The scratch brittleness index correlates positively with increasing Young's modulus and decreasing Poisson's ratio, but shows deviations in rocks with distinct porosity and with stress-sensitive brittle/ductile behavior (Eagle Ford). The results of our study demonstrate that the micro-scratch test method can be used to investigate mudrock brittleness. The method is particularly useful for

  12. Crack Propagation in Compressor Rotor Blade

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-01

    following equation, see Reshetov and Levina (1965)  (28) where c = 0.0014 for ground/ground steel surfaces and m = 0.5 for most metallic...D. N and Levina Z. M., Machine Design for Contact Stiffness, Machines and Tooling, vol. 36, 1965, p. 15 Rao, J. S., Fracture Mechanics Analysis of

  13. Water content and other aspects of brittle versus normal fingernails

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stern, Dana Kazlow; Diamantis, Stephanie; Smith, Elizabeth; Wei, Huachen; Gordon, Marsha; Muigai, Wangui; Moshier, Erin; Lebwohl, Mark; Spuls, Phyllis

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Previous authors have claimed that dehydration of the nail plate causes brittle nails. Some experts claim that normal nails contain 18% water, and brittle nails contain less than 16%. OBJECTIVE: We sought to test the hypothesis that brittle nails contain 2% less water than normal nails.

  14. Johanna and Tommy: Two Preschoolers in Sweden with Brittle Bones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millde, Kristina; Brodin, Jane

    Information is presented for caregivers of Swedish children with osteogenesis imperfecta (brittle bones) and their families. Approximately five children with brittle bones are born in Sweden annually. Two main types of brittle bone disease have been identified: congenita and tarda. Typical symptoms include numerous and unexpected fractures, bluish…

  15. Micro-scale observations of semi-brittle failure in Carrara marble

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tal, Y.; Evans, J. B.

    2014-12-01

    We studied the generation and extension of micro cracks during semi-brittle failure of rectangular prisms (12 mm x 6 mm x 6 mm) of Carrara marble under uniaxial compression (i.e., with no confining pressure) at temperatures ranging from 25 to 184 °C and compared these observations to existing damage models. Using a long distance microscope, we generated a series of sequential images of micro-scale grid made of square markers with sides about 7.5 mm long and spacing of 12.6 mm. The grid covered a region of 1 mm x 0.8 mm near the center of one free surface. By measuring the relative displacements of the grid markers, we generated 2 - D finite strain distribution maps at each stage of the experiment. Deformation was concentrated along cracks. To study and quantify their evolution additional filtering stage was applied. At 105 °C and 184 °C, the number and length of micro cracks increased with increasing load, and near the peak stress, they intersected and coalesced. By measuring the number and vertical dimension of the cracks intersecting the surface, we calculated a damage parameter as defined by Ashby and Sammis [1990]. In the two experiments mentioned above, the damage sustained by the samples near the peak stress was much larger than that calculated from the model. In a third experiment at room temperature, failure was very abrupt and no micro cracks were observed within the region analyzed.

  16. Swedish Work on Brittle-Fracture Problems in Nuclear Reactor Pressure Vessels

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grounes, M.

    1966-03-15

    After a short review of the part of the Swedish nuclear energy program that is of interest in this context the Swedish reactor pressure vessels and the reasoning behind the choice of materials are surveyed. Problems and desirable aims for future reactors are discussed. Much work is now being done on new types of pressure vessel steels with high strength, low transition temperature and good corrosion resistance. These steels are of the martensitic austenitic type Bofors 2RMO (13 % Cr, 6 % Ni, 1. 5 % Mo) and of the ferritic martensitic austenitic type Avesta 248 SV (16 % Cr, 5 % Ni, 1 % Mo). An applied philosophy for estimating the brittle-fracture tendency of pressure vessels is described. As a criterion of this tendency we use the crack-propagation transition temperature, e. g. as measured by the Robertson isothermal crack-arrest test. An estimate of this transition temperature at the end of the reactor' s lifetime must take increases due to fabrication, welding, geometry, ageing and irradiation into account. The transition temperature vs. stress curve moves towards higher temperatures during the reactor' s lifetime. As long as this curve does not cross the reactor vessel stress vs. temperature curve the vessel is considered safe. The magnitude of the different factors influencing the final transition temperature are discussed and data for the Marviken reactor's pressure vessel are presented. At the end of the reactor's lifetime the estimated transition temperature is 115 deg C, which is below the maximum permissible value. A program for the study of strain ageing has been initiated owing to the uncertainty as to the extent of strain ageing at low strains. A study of a simple crack-arrest test, developed in Sweden, is in progress. An extensive irradiation-effects program on several steels is in progress. Results from tests on the Swedish carbon-manganese steels 2103/R3, SIS 142103 and SIS 142102, the low-alloy steels Degerfors DE-631A, Bofors NO

  17. Elastic Anisotropy Reversal During Brittle Creep in Shale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Geng, Zhi; Bonnelye, Audrey; Chen, Mian; Jin, Yan; Dick, Pierre; David, Christian; Fang, Xin; Schubnel, Alexandre

    2017-11-01

    We conducted two brittle creep experiments on shale samples under upper crustal conditions (confining pressure of 80 MPa at 26°C and 75°C). We deformed the samples to failure, with bedding oriented perpendicular to the maximum compressive stress direction, using the stress-stepping methodology. In both experiments, the failure stress was 64% higher than the short-term peak strength. Throughout each differential stress step, ultrasonic wave velocities initially decreased and then gradually increased with deformation/time. The magnitude of these variations depends both on the direction of measurement with respect to the bedding and the temperature, and it is largest for velocities measured parallel to the bedding and at high temperature. Elastic wave anisotropy was completely reversed at 75°C, following a limited amount of axial strain ( 0.6%). Scanning electron microscope investigation confirmed evidence of a time-dependent pressure solution, localized compaction, crack sealing/healing, and mineral rotation. Our observations reveal that elastic anisotropy can evolve rapidly in both time and space, which has implications on the stress state and its rotation near fault zones.

  18. Computer-aided analysis of cutting processes for brittle materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogorodnikov, A. I.; Tikhonov, I. N.

    2017-12-01

    This paper is focused on 3D computer simulation of cutting processes for brittle materials and silicon wafers. Computer-aided analysis of wafer scribing and dicing is carried out with the use of the ANSYS CAE (computer-aided engineering) software, and a parametric model of the processes is created by means of the internal ANSYS APDL programming language. Different types of tool tip geometry are analyzed to obtain internal stresses, such as a four-sided pyramid with an included angle of 120° and a tool inclination angle to the normal axis of 15°. The quality of the workpieces after cutting is studied by optical microscopy to verify the FE (finite-element) model. The disruption of the material structure during scribing occurs near the scratch and propagates into the wafer or over its surface at a short range. The deformation area along the scratch looks like a ragged band, but the stress width is rather low. The theory of cutting brittle semiconductor and optical materials is developed on the basis of the advanced theory of metal turning. The fall of stress intensity along the normal on the way from the tip point to the scribe line can be predicted using the developed theory and with the verified FE model. The crystal quality and dimensions of defects are determined by the mechanics of scratching, which depends on the shape of the diamond tip, the scratching direction, the velocity of the cutting tool and applied force loads. The disunity is a rate-sensitive process, and it depends on the cutting thickness. The application of numerical techniques, such as FE analysis, to cutting problems enhances understanding and promotes the further development of existing machining technologies.

  19. Fabrication of brittle materials -- current status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Scattergood, R.O.

    1988-12-01

    The research initiatives in the area of precision fabrication will be continued in the upcoming year. Three students, T. Bifano (PhD), P. Blake (PhD) and E. Smith (MS), finished their research programs in the last year. Sections 13 and 14 will summarize the essential results from the work of the Materials Engineering students Blake and Smith. Further details will be presented in forthcoming publications that are now in preparation. The results from Bifano`s thesis have been published in adequate detail and need not be summarized further. Three new students, S. Blackley (MS), H. Paul (PhD), and S. Smith (PhD) have joined the program and will continue the research efforts in precision fabrication. The programs for these students will be outlined in Sections 15 and 16. Because of the success of the earlier work in establishing new process models and experimental techniques for the study of diamond turning and diamond grinding, the new programs will, in part, build upon the earlier work. This is especially true for investigations concerned with brittle materials. The basic understanding of material response of nominally brittle materials during machining or grinding operations remains as a challenge. The precision fabrication of brittle materials will continue as an area of emphasis for the Precision Engineering Center.

  20. Brittle onset of monodispersed magmatic suspensions: from spheres to spheroid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordonnier, B.; Kaus, B.; Manga, M.; Caricchi, L.; Pistone, M.; Castro, J.; Hess, K.-U.; Gottschaller, S.; Dingwell, D. B.; Burlini, L.

    2012-04-01

    post-processing are all performed under MATLAB. For the largest meshes, the computation has been performed with the help of the BRUTUS cluster at ETH Zurich. For solving the system of equation we used the MILAMIN solver and extended it from 2-D to 3-D by the use of Crouzeix-Raviart type elements. MILAMIN is a native MATLAB implementation, which takes advantage of Tim Davi's SuiteSparse package. Here we solve the incompressible Stokes equations. We tested random to structured configurations (Simple Cubic, Body Centered Cubic and Face Centered Cubic) for different particle orientations from random to aligned. These numerical simulations allow us to estimate the stress concentration in magmas due to the presence of the crystals. Our results first confirm the hydrodynamics effects on the flow of elongated particles. The calculated apparent viscosity of the material versus the crystal fraction confirms an early increase for the suspensions viscosity with elongated particles. More importantly, the stress localization due to the particles suggests that the melt will start cracking for a relatively lower bulk stress. Finally, the experimental trend is supported by the numerical simulations, which highlight the importance of the critical packing fraction in addition to the maximum packing fraction. The combination of experimental results and numerical modeling allow us to characterize the physical processes responsible for the failure of particle bearing suspensions and characterize the effect of fraction and shape on the brittle-ductile transition.

  1. Seeding Cracks Using a Fatigue Tester for Accelerated Gear Tooth Breaking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nenadic, Nenad G.; Wodenscheck, Joseph A.; Thurston, Michael G.; Lewicki, David G.

    2011-01-01

    This report describes fatigue-induced seeded cracks in spur gears and compares them to cracks created using a more traditional seeding method, notching. Finite element analysis (FEA) compares the effective compliance of a cracked tooth to the effective compliance of a notched tooth where the crack and the notch are of the same depth. In this analysis, cracks are propagated to the desired depth using FRANC2D and effective compliances are computed in ANSYS. A compliance-based feature for detecting cracks on the fatigue tester is described. The initiated cracks are examined using both nondestructive and destructive methods. The destructive examination reveals variability in the shape of crack surfaces.

  2. On short cracks that depart from elastoplastic notch tips

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verônica Miquelin Machado

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of short cracks that depart from elastoplastic notch tips is modeled to estimate the stresses required to initiate and to propagate cracks in notched structural components, and to evaluate the size of tolerable crack-like defects under general loading conditions. This analysis can model both fatigue and environmentally assisted cracking problems; can evaluate notch sensitivity in both cases; and can as well be used to establish design or acceptance criteria for tolerable non-propagating crack-like defects in such cases. The growth of short cracks is assumed driven by the applied stresses and by the stress gradient ahead the notch tip, and supported by the material resistances to crack initiation and to long crack propagation by fatigue or EAC. In the elastoplastic case, the stress gradient ahead of the notch tip is quantified by a J-field to consider the short crack behavior. The tolerable short crack predictions made by this model are evaluated by suitable fatigue and EAC tests of notched specimens specially designed to start nonpropagating cracks from the notch tips, both under elastic and elastoplastic conditions.

  3. Effect of thermal aging on grain structural characteristic and Ductile-to-Brittle transition temperature of CLAM steel at 550 °C

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Wei [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Chen, Jianwei [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China); Xu, Gang, E-mail: gang.xu@fds.org.cn [Key Laboratory of Neutronics and Radiation Safety, Institute of Nuclear Energy Safety Technology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei, Anhui, 230031 (China)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • The grain boundary length per unit area decreased with the increasing aging time. • The fraction of LABs increased obviously after thermal aging. • Prior austenitic grain refinement is more important to improve low temperature toughness. - Abstract: In this work, electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) was used to investigate the grain structure evolution of China low activation martensitic (CLAM) steel samples which were aged at 550 °C for 0 h, 2000 h, 4000 h and 10,000 h. The results showed that the prior austenitic grain size increased with the aging time, which led to the decrease of grain boundary length. The fraction of misorientation angle in a range from about 4 to 10° increased obviously after thermal aging for 10,000 h, and it indicated that the fine subgrains formed in the CLAM steel during the long-term thermal exposure. Furthermore, Charpy impact experiments were carried out to analyze the toughness of the CLAM steel before and after aging, particularly the Ductile-to-Brittle Transition Temperature (DBTT). Though amounts of fine subgrians formed in matrix, a substantial increase in DBTT (∼40.1 °C) had been noticed after aging for 10,000 h. The results showed that the high angle boundaries such as prior austenitic grain boundaries are more effective in retarding the propagation of cleavage crack than subgrain boundaries.

  4. A dimensional analysis approach to fatigue in quasi-brittle materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marco Paggi

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available In this study, a generalized Barenblatt and Botvina dimensional analysis approach to fatigue crack growth is proposed in order to highlight and explain the deviations from the classical power-law equations used to characterize the fatigue behaviour of quasi-brittle materials. According to this theoretical approach, the microstructural-size (related to the volumetric content of fibres in fibre-reinforced concrete, the crack-size, and the size-scale effects on the Paris’ law and the Wöhler equation are presented within a unified mathematical framework. Relevant experimental results taken from the literature are used to confirm the theoretical trends and to determine the values of the incomplete self-similarity exponents. All these information are expected to be useful for the design of experiments, since the role of the different dimensionless numbers governing the phenomenon of fatigue is herein elucidated.

  5. Internal shear cracking in bulk metal forming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christiansen, Peter; Nielsen, Chris Valentin; Bay, Niels Oluf

    2017-01-01

    This paper presents an uncoupled ductile damage criterion for modelling the opening and propagation of internal shear cracks in bulk metal forming. The criterion is built upon the original work on the motion of a hole subjected to shear with superimposed tensile stress triaxiality and its overall...... performance is evaluated by means of side-pressing formability tests in Aluminium AA2007-T6 subjected to different levels of pre-strain. Results show that the new proposed criterionis able to combine simplicity with efficiency for predicting the onset of fracture and the crack propagation path for the entire...... cracking to internal cracks formed undert hree-dimensional states of stress that are typical of bulk metal forming....

  6. Fretting Fatigue with Cylindrical-On-Flat Contact: Crack Nucleation, Crack Path and Fatigue Life

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noraphaiphipaksa, Nitikorn; Manonukul, Anchalee; Kanchanomai, Chaosuan

    2017-01-01

    Fretting fatigue experiments and finite element analysis were carried out to investigate the influence of cylindrical-on-flat contact on crack nucleation, crack path and fatigue life of medium-carbon steel. The location of crack nucleation was predicted using the maximum shear stress range criterion and the maximum relative slip amplitude criterion. The prediction using the maximum relative slip amplitude criterion gave the better agreement with the experimental result, and should be used for the prediction of the location of crack nucleation. Crack openings under compressive bulk stresses were found in the fretting fatigues with flat-on-flat contact and cylindrical-on-flat contacts, i.e., fretting-contact-induced crack openings. The crack opening stress of specimen with flat-on-flat contact was lower than those of specimens with cylindrical-on-flat contacts, while that of specimen with 60-mm radius contact pad was lower than that of specimen with 15-mm radius contact pad. The fretting fatigue lives were estimated by integrating the fatigue crack growth curve from an initial propagating crack length to a critical crack length. The predictions of fretting fatigue life with consideration of crack opening were in good agreement with the experimental results. PMID:28772522

  7. Methodologies for Crack Initiation in Welded Joints Applied to Inspection Planning

    OpenAIRE

    Zou, Guang; Banisoleiman, Kian; González, Arturo

    2016-01-01

    Crack initiation and propagation threatens structural integrity of welded joints and normally inspections are assigned based on crack propagation models. However, the approach based on crack propagation models may not be applicable for some high-quality welded joints, because the initial flaws in them may be so small that it may take long time for the flaws to develop into a detectable size. This raises a concern regarding the inspection planning of high-quality welded joins, as there is no g...

  8. Experimental study on the physical and chemical properties of the deep hard brittle shale

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Xiong

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In the hard brittle shale formation, rock composition, physical and chemical properties, mechanics property before and after interacting with fluid have direct relation with borehole problems, such as borehole wall collapse, mud loss, hole shrinkage. To achieve hard brittle shale micro-structure, physical–chemical properties and mechanics property, energy-dispersive X-ray diffraction (XRD, cation exchange capacity experiment and hardness test are conducted. The result of laboratory experiments indicates that, clay mineral and quartz is dominated in mineral composition. In clay mineral, illite and illite/semectite mixed layers are abundant and there is no sign of montmorillonite. Value of cation exchange capacity (CEC ranges from 102.5–330 mmol/kg and average value is 199.56 mmol/kg. High value of CEC and content of clay mineral means hard brittle shale has strong ability of hydration. The image of XRD shows well developed micro-cracks and pores, which make rock failure easily, especially when fluid invades rock inside. Shale sample soaked with anti-high temperature KCL drilling fluid on shorter immersing time has stronger strength, whereas shale sample soaked with plugging and film forming KCL drilling fluid on longer immersing time has stronger strength.

  9. Damage initiation in brittle and ductile materials as revealed from a fractoluminescence study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexandre Chmel

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available A set of heterogeneous and homogeneous materials differing in their brittle and ductile characteristics (granite, marble, silica ceramics, silicon carbide, organic glass were subjected to impact damaging by a falling weight. Multiple chemical bond ruptures produced by elastic waves propagating from a damaged zone were accompanied by the photon emission generated throughout the sample (tribo- or fractoluminescence, FL. The statistical analysis of the FL time series detected with high resolution (10 ns showed that the energy release distributions in brittle solids follow the power law typical for the correlated nucleation of primary defects. At the same time, the formation of damaged sites in ductile materials (marble and organic glass was found to be fully random.

  10. A comprehensive method for the fracability evaluation of shale combined with brittleness and stress sensitivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoqiong; Ge, Hongkui; Wang, Daobing; Wang, Jianbo; Chen, Hao

    2017-12-01

    An effective fracability evaluation on the fracture network is key to the whole process of shale gas exploitation. At present, neither a standard criteria nor a generally accepted evaluation method exist. Well log and laboratory results have shown that the commonly used brittleness index calculated from the mineralogy composition is not entirely consistent with that obtained from the elastic modulus of the rock, and is sometimes even contradictory. The brittle mineral reflects the brittleness of the rock matrix, and the stress sensitivity of the wave velocity reflects the development degree of the natural fracture system. They are both key factors in controlling the propagating fracture morphology. Thus, in this study, a novel fracability evaluation method of shale was developed combining brittleness and stress sensitivity. Based on this method, the fracability of three shale gas plays were evaluated. The cored cylindrical samples were loaded under uniaxial stress up to 30 MPa and the compressional wave velocities were obtained along the axis stress direction at each MPa stress. From the stress velocity evolution, the stress sensitivity coefficients could be obtained. Our results showed that the fracability of Niutitang shale is better than that of Lujiaping shale, and the fracability of Lujiaping shale is better than Longmaxi shale. This result is in good agreement with acoustic emission activity measurements. The new fracability evaluation method enables a comprehensive reflection of the characteristics of rock matrix brittleness and the natural fracture system. This work is valuable for the evaluation of hydraulic fracturing effects in unconventional oil and gas reservoirs in the future.

  11. Strain rate effects in stress corrosion cracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parkins, R.N. (Newcastle upon Tyne Univ. (UK). Dept. of Metallurgy and Engineering Materials)

    1990-03-01

    Slow strain rate testing (SSRT) was initially developed as a rapid, ad hoc laboratory method for assessing the propensity for metals an environments to promote stress corrosion cracking. It is now clear, however, that there are good theoretical reasons why strain rate, as opposed to stress per se, will often be the controlling parameter in determining whether or not cracks are nucleated and, if so, are propagated. The synergistic effects of the time dependence of corrosion-related reactions and microplastic strain provide the basis for mechanistic understanding of stress corrosion cracking in high-pressure pipelines and other structures. However, while this may be readily comprehended in the context of laboratory slow strain tests, its extension to service situations may be less apparent. Laboratory work involving realistic stressing conditions, including low-frequency cyclic loading, shows that strain or creep rates give good correlation with thresholds for cracking and with crack growth kinetics.

  12. Small crack test program for helicopter materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annigeri, Bal; Schneider, George

    1994-01-01

    Crack propagation tests were conducted to determine crack growth behavior in five helicopter materials for surface cracks between 0.005 to 0.020 inches in depth. Constant amplitude tests were conducted at stress ratios R equals 0.1 and 0.5, and emphasis was placed on near threshold data (i.e., 10-8 to 10-6 inches/cycle). Spectrum tests were conducted using a helicopter spectrum. The test specimen was an unnotched tension specimen, and cracks were initiated from a small EDM notch. An optical/video system was used to monitor crack growth. The material for the test specimens was obtained from helicopter part forgings. Testing was conducted at stresses below yield to reflect actual stresses in helicopter parts.

  13. Fatigue crack Behaviour in a High Strength Tool Steel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højerslev, Christian; Carstensen, Jesper V.; Brøndsted, Povl

    2002-01-01

    The influence of microstructure on fatigue crack initiation and crack growth of a hardened and tempered high speed steel was investigated. The evolution of fatigue cracks was followed in four point bending at room temperature. It was found that a carbide damage zone exists above a threshold load...... value of maximally 80% of the yield strength of the steel. The size of this carbide damage zone increases with increasing load amplitude, and the zone is apparently associated with crack nucleation. On fatigue crack propagation plastic deformation of the matrix occurs in a radius of approximately 4...

  14. Tunneling cracks in full scale wind turbine blade joints

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Jeppe Bjørn; Sørensen, Bent F.; Kildegaard, C.

    2017-01-01

    A novel approach is presented and used in a generic tunneling crack tool for the prediction of crack growth rates for tunneling cracks propagating across a bond-line in a wind turbine blade under high cyclic loadings. In order to test and demonstrate the applicability of the tool, model predictions...... are compared with measured crack growth rates from a full scale blade fatigue test. The crack growth rates, measured for a several metre long section along the blade trailing-edge joint during the fatigue test, are found to be in-between the upper- and lower-bound predictions....

  15. Asymmetric crack bifurcation under stress wave loading in antiplane strain

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dempsey, J.P. [Clarkson Univ., Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Potsdam, New York (United States); Kuo, M.-K. [Northwestern Univ., Dept. of Civil Engineering, Evanston, Illinois (United States); Bentley, D.L. [Clarkson Univ., Dept. of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Potsdam, New York (United States)

    1985-07-01

    In this paper the transient diffraction of an elastic wave by an extending but branching crack is considered. The incident wave is a plane horizontally-polarized wave. It is assumed that crack division is generated at the instant that the tip of a stationary crack is struck. The original length of the crack is therefore immaterial for small times, and the analytical work can be simplified by considering a semi-infinite crack. Size effects become important for later times. The two new cracks tips are are assumed to propagate at different but constant velocities under different arbitrary angles with the original crack plane. The dependence of the elasto-dynamic stress intensity factors on the crack tip velocities and the angles of branching is examined.

  16. Mechanical Behavior of Low Porosity Carbonate Rock: From Brittle Creep to Ductile Creep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicolas, A.; Fortin, J.; Gueguen, Y.

    2014-12-01

    Mechanical compaction and associated porosity reduction play an important role in the diagenesis of porous rocks. They may also affect reservoir rocks during hydrocarbon production, as the pore pressure field is modified. This inelastic compaction can lead to subsidence, cause casing failure, trigger earthquake, or change the fluid transport properties. In addition, inelastic deformation can be time - dependent. In particular, brittle creep phenomena have been deeply investigated since the 90s, especially in sandstones. However knowledge of carbonates behavior is still insufficient. In this study, we focus on the mechanical behavior of a 14.7% porosity white Tavel (France) carbonate rock (>98% calcite). The samples were deformed in a triaxial cell at effective confining pressures ranging from 0 MPa to 85 MPa at room temperature and 70°C. Experiments were carried under dry and water saturated conditions in order to explore the role played by the pore fluids. Two types of experiments have been carried out: (1) a first series in order to investigate the rupture envelopes, and (2) a second series with creep experiments. During the experiments, elastic wave velocities (P and S) were measured to infer crack density evolution. Permeability was also measured during creep experiments. Our results show two different mechanical behaviors: (1) brittle behavior is observed at low confining pressures, whereas (2) ductile behavior is observed at higher confining pressures. During creep experiments, these two behaviors have a different signature in term of elastic wave velocities and permeability changes, due to two different mechanisms: development of micro-cracks at low confining pressures and competition between cracks and microplasticity at high confining pressure. The attached figure is a summary of 20 triaxial experiments performed on Tavel limestone under different conditions. Stress states C',C* and C*' and brittle strength are shown in the P-Q space: (a) 20°C and dry

  17. Fracture spacing in tensile brittle layers adhering to a rigid substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lazarus, Véronique

    2017-01-01

    A natural question arising when observing crack networks in brittle layers such as, e.g., paints, muds, skins, pottery glazes, coatings, ceramics, is what determines the distance between cracks. This apparently simple question received a wealth of more or less complex and appropriate answers, but no consensus has emerged. Here, we show that the cracks interact mutually as soon as the spacing between them is smaller than ten times the thickness of the layer. Then, a simple Griffith-type balance between the elastic deformation energy and the fracture bulk and debonding costs captures a broad number of observations, going from the square-root or linear increase of the spacing with the thickness, to its decrease with loading until saturation. The adhesion strength is identified as playing a key role in these behaviour changes. As illustration, we show how the model can be applied to study the influence of the layer thickness on crack patterns. We believe that the versatility of the approach should permit wide applicability, from geosciences to engineering.

  18. Crack branching in cross-ply composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    La Saponara, Valeria

    2001-10-01

    The purpose of this research work is to examine the behavior of an interface crack in a cross-ply laminate which is subject to static and fatigue loading. The failure mechanism analyzed here is crack branching (or crack kinking or intra-layer crack): the delamination located between two different plies starts growing as an interface crack and then may branch into the less tough ply. The specimens were manufactured from different types of Glass/Epoxy and Graphite/Epoxy, by hand lay-up, vacuum bagging and cure in autoclave. Each specimen had a delamination starter. Static mixed mode tests and compressive fatigue tests were performed. Experiments showed the scale of the problem, one ply thickness, and some significant features, like contact in the branched crack. The amount of scatter in the experiments required use of statistics. Exploratory Data Analysis and a factorial design of experiments based on a 8 x 8 Hadamard matrix were used. Experiments and statistics show that there is a critical branching angle above which crack growth is greatly accelerated. This angle seems: (1) not to be affected by the specimens' life; (2) not to depend on the specimen geometry and loading conditions; (3) to strongly depend on the amount of contact in the branched crack. Numerical analysis was conducted to predict crack propagation based on the actual displacement/load curves for static tests. This method allows us to predict the total crack propagation in 2D conditions, while neglecting branching. Finally, the existence of a solution based on analytic continuation is discussed.

  19. Crack Tip Flipping Under Mode I/III Tearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felter, Christian Lotz; Specht Jensen, Lasse; Nielsen, Kim Lau

    Crack tip flipping, where the fracture surface alternates from side to side in 45° shear bands, seems to be an overlooked propagation mode in Mode I sheet tearing often disregarded as  “transitional” or tied to randomness in the material. In fact, such observations rarely make it to the literature....... However, crack tip flipping is a true propagation mode, but unlike those already established: i) it never settles in a steady-state as the near tip stress/strain field continuously change, and ii) the mechanism governing failure evolves behind the leading crack tip. Recent research has revealed new...... insight into this intriguing behavior of a crack propagating by the void nucleation and growth mechanism, and the work presented compiles both published and unpublished experimental and numerical findings. E.g. in a recent attempt to gain control of the flipping crack a slight Mode III was imposed...

  20. Effect of microstructure and environment on the crack growth behaviour on Inconel 718 alloy at 650/sup 0/C under fatigue, creep and combined loading

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedron, J.P.; Pineau, A.

    1982-11-01

    The crack growth properties of various microstructures developed in one heat of Inconel 718 alloy were investigated at 650/sup 0/C under air and vacuum environments. The microstructures included fine-grained material (ASTM grain sizes 6-8), coarse-grained material (ASTM grain sizes 3-4) and material of a necklace structure (ASTM grain sizes 3-4 and 8-10). The effect of grain boundary ..beta.. (Ni/sub 3/Nb) phase precipitation was also studied. Continuous fatigue, creep and creep-fatigue conditions were examined. For continuous fatigue the influence of frequency was investigated over the range between 5x10/sup -2/ and 20 Hz. For creep-fatigue conditions, hold times of 10 and 300 s were superimposed on a 5x10/sup -2/ Hz triangular wave shape signal. It was shown that the grain boundary microstructure had a very strong effect when the fatigue crack propagation behaviour was essentially time dependent. This effect is associated with the occurrence of brittle intergranular fracture and dramatic increases in crack growth rate. The microstructure had no effect under vacuum testing.

  1. Interlaminar crack growth in fiber reinforced composites during fatigue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. S.; Wang, H. T.

    1979-01-01

    This paper presents an investigation of interlaminar crack growth behavior in fiber-reinforced composites subjected to fatigue loading. In the experimental phase of the study, interlaminar crack propagation rates and mechanisms were determined for the cases of various geometries, laminate parameters and cyclic stress levels. An advanced singular hybrid-stress finite element method was used in conjunction with the experimental results to examine the local crack-tip behavior and to characterize the crack propagation during fatigue. Results elucidate the basic nature of the cyclic delamination damage and relate the interlaminar crack growth rate to the range of mixed-mode crack-tip stress intensity factors. The study provides fundamental insight into the problem, reveals several important features of the interlaminar fatigue failure, and should be of practical importance in selection, testing and design of composite materials.

  2. Simulation of Interfacial Corner Cracks in Bimaterial Systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veluri, Badrinath; Jensen, Henrik Myhre

    2012-01-01

    . In the semiconductor and microelectronics industry, characterizing interconnect reliability is through either component or system-level accelerated tests. A phenomenological model focused on modeling the shape of such interface cracks and calculating the critical stress for steady-state propagation has been developed....... The crack propagation is investigated by estimating the fracture mechanics parameters that include the strain energy release rate, crack front profiles and the three-dimensional mode-mixity along the crack front. A numerical approach is then applied for coupling the far field solutions utilizing...... the capability of the Finite Element Method to the near field (crack tip) solutions based on the J-integral. The developed two-dimensional numerical approach for the calculation of fracture mechanical properties has been validated with three-dimensional models for varying crack front shapes. In this study...

  3. Controlled mud-crack patterning and self-organized cracking of polydimethylsiloxane elastomer surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seghir, Rian; Arscott, Steve

    2015-01-01

    Exploiting pattern formation – such as that observed in nature – in the context of micro/nanotechnology could have great benefits if coupled with the traditional top-down lithographic approach. Here, we demonstrate an original and simple method to produce unique, localized and controllable self-organised patterns on elastomeric films. A thin, brittle silica-like crust is formed on the surface of polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) using oxygen plasma. This crust is subsequently cracked via the deposition of a thin metal film – having residual tensile stress. The density of the mud-crack patterns depends on the plasma dose and on the metal thickness. The mud-crack patterning can be controlled depending on the thickness and shape of the metallization – ultimately leading to regularly spaced cracks and/or metal mesa structures. Such patterning of the cracks indicates a level of self-organization in the structuring and layout of the features – arrived at simply by imposing metallization boundaries in proximity to each other, separated by a distance of the order of the critical dimension of the pattern size apparent in the large surface mud-crack patterns. PMID:26437880

  4. Deformation, Fracture, and Fragmentation in Brittle Geologic Solids

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    Deformation, Fracture, and Fragmentation in Brittle Geologic Solids by J. D. Clayton ARL-RP-299 September 2010 A...Proving Ground, MD 21005-5066 ARL-RP-299 September 2010 Deformation, Fracture, and Fragmentation in Brittle Geologic Solids J. D. Clayton...2010 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Deformation, Fracture, and Fragmentation in Brittle Geologic Solids 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM

  5. Effects of grain size and aging conditions of fatigue crack propagation behavior in beta Ti-22V-4Al alloy; {beta} gata Ti-22V-4Al gokin no hiro kiretsu shinten kyodo ni oyobosu kessho ryukei to jiko joken no eikyo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokaji, K. [Gifu University, Gifu (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Oya, K. [Daido Steel Co. Ltd., Nagoya (Japan); Kariya, H. [Aisan Industry Co. Ltd., Aichi (Japan)

    2000-11-01

    This paper presents the effect of microstructural modification on fatigue crack propagation (FCP) in a beta Ti-22V-4Al alloy. FCP experiments have been conducted using eight materials with different microstructures: two as solution treated materials (ST), three single aged materials (STA), and three two-step aged materials (STDA). Particular attention has been paid to the effect of grain size and aging condition. The results showed that in ST materials the coarse grained material exhibited higher FCP resistance than the fine grained material, but this grain size dependence was eliminated by aging, and two-step aging condition had very little influence on FCP behaviour. After allowing for crack closure, the effect of grain size was largely diminished and FCP behaviour was not affected by solution treatment temperature and aging condition. ST materials indicated the highest apparent and intrinsic FCP resistance and then STDA materials. STA materials in the decreasing order. Taking into account the difference in the modulus of elasticity in addition to crack closure, the difference in FCP resistance between STDA and STA materials was eliminated, but ST materials still showed higher FCP resistance. (author)

  6. Critical fatigue behaviour in brittle glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    load exceeds the Griffith strength of these extended cracks and the solid fails. Obviously, while for loads just above the static Griffith strength of the solid, the failure occurs almost instantaneously (τ = 0 for σ > σ 0 c ), the time-to-failure τ in the fatigue process is nonvanishing and increases significantly as the external load ...

  7. Critical fatigue behaviour in brittle glasses

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    threshold loading conditions are analysed here employing an anomalous diffusion model. Critical dynamical behaviour in the time-to-fracture and the growth of the micro-crack sizes, similar to that observed in such materials in the case of ...

  8. Twisting cracks in Bouligand structures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suksangpanya, Nobphadon; Yaraghi, Nicholas A; Kisailus, David; Zavattieri, Pablo

    2017-12-01

    The Bouligand structure, which is found in many biological materials, is a hierarchical architecture that features uniaxial fiber layers assembled periodically into a helicoidal pattern. Many studies have highlighted the high damage-resistant performance of natural and biomimetic Bouligand structures. One particular species that utilizes the Bouligand structure to achieve outstanding mechanical performance is the smashing Mantis Shrimp, Odontodactylus Scyllarus (or stomatopod). The mantis shrimp generates high speed, high acceleration blows using its raptorial appendage to defeat highly armored preys. The load-bearing part of this appendage, the dactyl club, contains an interior region [16] that consists of a Bouligand structure. This region is capable of developing a significant amount of nested twisting microcracks without exhibiting catastrophic failure. The development and propagation of these microcracks are a source of energy dissipation and stress relaxation that ultimately contributes to the remarkable damage tolerance properties of the dactyl club. We develop a theoretical model to provide additional insights into the local stress intensity factors at the crack front of twisting cracks formed within the Bouligand structure. Our results reveal that changes in the local fracture mode at the crack front leads to a reduction of the local strain energy release rate, hence, increasing the necessary applied energy release rate to propagate the crack, which is quantified by the local toughening factor. Ancillary 3D simulations of the asymptotic crack front field were carried out using a J-integral to validate the theoretical values of the energy release rate and the local stress intensity factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Surface wave propagation effects on buried segmented pipelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peixin Shi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper deals with surface wave propagation (WP effects on buried segmented pipelines. Both simplified analytical model and finite element (FE model are developed for estimating the axial joint pullout movement of jointed concrete cylinder pipelines (JCCPs of which the joints have a brittle tensile failure mode under the surface WP effects. The models account for the effects of peak ground velocity (PGV, WP velocity, predominant period of seismic excitation, shear transfer between soil and pipelines, axial stiffness of pipelines, joint characteristics, and cracking strain of concrete mortar. FE simulation of the JCCP interaction with surface waves recorded during the 1985 Michoacan earthquake results in joint pullout movement, which is consistent with the field observations. The models are expanded to estimate the joint axial pullout movement of cast iron (CI pipelines of which the joints have a ductile tensile failure mode. Simplified analytical equation and FE model are developed for estimating the joint pullout movement of CI pipelines. The joint pullout movement of the CI pipelines is mainly affected by the variability of the joint tensile capacity and accumulates at local weak joints in the pipeline.

  10. Effects of External Hydrogen on Hydrogen Transportation and Distribution Around the Fatigue Crack Tip in Type 304 Stainless Steel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xingyang; Zhou, Chengshuang; Cai, Xiao; Zheng, Jinyang; Zhang, Lin

    2017-10-01

    The effects of external hydrogen on hydrogen transportation and distribution around the fatigue crack tip in type 304 stainless steel were investigated by using hydrogen microprint technique (HMT) and thermal desorption spectrometry. HMT results show that some silver particles induced by hydrogen release are located near the fatigue crack and more silver particles are concentrated around the crack tip, which indicates that hydrogen accumulates in the vicinity of the crack tip during the crack growth in hydrogen gas environment. Along with the crack propagation, strain-induced α' martensite forms around the crack tip and promotes hydrogen invasion into the matrix, which will cause the crack initiation and propagation at the austenite/ α' martensite interface. In addition, the hydrogen content in the vicinity of the crack tip is higher than that at the crack edge far away from the crack tip, which is related to the stress state and strain-induced α' martensite.

  11. Constraints on structural evolution from correlations between hydraulic properties and P-wave velocities during brittle faulting of rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahrens, Benedikt; Duda, Mandy; Renner, Jörg

    2017-04-01

    One of the key challenges in geophysics concerns the derivation of structure and state of rocks and rock formations from constraints on the spatial distribution of their physical properties, as gained from laboratory experiments, borehole logging, and surveys at the surface covering scales from centimeters to kilometers. The use of information from the propagation of elastic waves constitutes the most common approach to derive the structure and state of rocks, if direct information on in-situ properties is limited (e.g., through boreholes) or inaccessible. Furthermore, the determination of hydraulic rock properties serves the dual purpose of constraining structure and providing the basis for predictions of the behavior of a system of interest during continued fluid injection or production, as associated with, e.g., exploitation of hydrocarbon reservoirs, operation of subsurface liquid-waste repositories, or geothermal energy provision. In-situ, wave observations potentially provide better coverage of rock volumes (in space and time) than hydraulic investigations and thus constraints on correlations between elastic and hydraulic properties bear the potential to improve subsurface characterization. In our laboratory study, we continuously monitored hydraulic properties and elastic wave velocities of porous Wilkeson sandstone samples during conventional triaxial deformation. Confining pressures applied in the tests cover the range from below to above the critical pressure for crack closure to control the state of pre-existing cracks. Hydraulic properties were determined using the oscillatory pore-pressure method owing to its benefits regarding continuous and highly resolved monitoring of permeability and specific storage capacity during deformation and even imminent localized failure. The magnitude of the deformation-associated variations in the monitored physical properties strongly depends on initial microstructure and degree of hydrostatically induced crack closure

  12. Impacts of weld residual stresses and fatigue crack growth threshold on crack arrest under high-cycle thermal fluctuations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taheri, Said, E-mail: Said.taheri@edf.fr [EDF-LAB, IMSIA, 7 Boulevard Gaspard Monge, 91120 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Julan, Emricka [EDF-LAB, AMA, 7 Boulevard Gaspard Monge, 91120 Palaiseau Cedex (France); Tran, Xuan-Van [EDF Energy R& D UK Centre/School of Mechanical, Aerospace and Civil Engineering, The University of Manchester, Manchester M13 9PL (United Kingdom); Robert, Nicolas [EDF-DPN, UNIE, Strategic Center, Saint Denis (France)

    2017-01-15

    Highlights: • For crack growth analysis, weld residual stress field must be considered through its SIF in presence of a crack. • Presence of cracks of same depth proves their arrest, where equal depth is because mean stress acts only on crack opening. • Not considering amplitudes under a fatigue crack growth threshold (FCGT) does not compensate the lack of FGCT in Paris law. • Propagation rates are close for axisymmetric and circumferential semi-elliptical cracks. - Abstract: High cycle thermal crazing has been observed in some residual heat removal (RHR) systems made of 304 stainless steel in PWR nuclear plants. This paper deals with two types of analyses including logical argumentation and simulation. Crack arrest in networks is demonstrated due to the presence of two cracks of the same depth in the network. This identical depth may be proved assuming that mean stress acts only on crack opening and that cracks are fully open during the load cycle before arrest. Weld residual stresses (WRS) are obtained by an axisymmetric simulation of welding on a tube with a chamfer. Axisymmetric and 3D parametric studies of crack growth on: representative sequences for variable amplitude thermal loading, fatigue crack growth threshold (FCGT), permanent mean stress, cyclic counting methods and WRS, are performed with Code-Aster software using XFEM methodology. The following results are obtained on crack depth versus time: the effect of WRS on crack growth cannot be determined by the initial WRS field in absence of crack, but by the associated stress intensity factor. Moreover the relation between crack arrest depth and WRS is analyzed. In the absence of FCGT Paris’s law may give a significant over-estimation of crack depth even if amplitudes of loading smaller than FCGT have not been considered. Appropriate depth versus time may be obtained using different values of FCGT, but axisymmetric simulations do not really show a possibility of arrest for shallow cracks in

  13. Forecasting the brittle failure of heterogeneous, porous geomaterials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasseur, Jérémie; Wadsworth, Fabian; Heap, Michael; Main, Ian; Lavallée, Yan; Dingwell, Donald

    2017-04-01

    Heterogeneity develops in magmas during ascent and is dominated by the development of crystal and importantly, bubble populations or pore-network clusters which grow, interact, localize, coalesce, outgas and resorb. Pore-scale heterogeneity is also ubiquitous in sedimentary basin fill during diagenesis. As a first step, we construct numerical simulations in 3D in which randomly generated heterogeneous and polydisperse spheres are placed in volumes and which are permitted to overlap with one another, designed to represent the random growth and interaction of bubbles in a liquid volume. We use these simulated geometries to show that statistical predictions of the inter-bubble lengthscales and evolving bubble surface area or cluster densities can be made based on fundamental percolation theory. As a second step, we take a range of well constrained random heterogeneous rock samples including sandstones, andesites, synthetic partially sintered glass bead samples, and intact glass samples and subject them to a variety of stress loading conditions at a range of temperatures until failure. We record in real time the evolution of the number of acoustic events that precede failure and show that in all scenarios, the acoustic event rate accelerates toward failure, consistent with previous findings. Applying tools designed to forecast the failure time based on these precursory signals, we constrain the absolute error on the forecast time. We find that for all sample types, the error associated with an accurate forecast of failure scales non-linearly with the lengthscale between the pore clusters in the material. Moreover, using a simple micromechanical model for the deformation of porous elastic bodies, we show that the ratio between the equilibrium sub-critical crack length emanating from the pore clusters relative to the inter-pore lengthscale, provides a scaling for the error on forecast accuracy. Thus for the first time we provide a potential quantitative correction for

  14. Cracking cone fracture after cold compaction of argillaceous particles

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In this work an experimental investigation has been focused on the `cracking cone' fracture in powder compacts. This includes studies of crack propagation and determination of operating conditions to avoid the green body fracture. The numerical modelling is implemented using a finite element method based on the Von ...

  15. Crack Nucleation in Thin Films on Disordered Substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heierli, Joachim; Zaiser, Michael

    2009-09-01

    We investigate the delamination of thin films from disordered substrates by studying the conditions for the nucleation of a supercritical crack under mixed mode I/II loading. The stress in the film is described using Euler theory, while the interface between film and substrate is modeled as a brittle interface with randomly varying fracture energy. System strength is evaluated in terms of the elastic and geometrical properties of the film, and the statistical properties of the distribution of interface fracture energies.

  16. Brittle fracture of polymer transient networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, S.; Shabbir, A.; Hassager, O.; Ligoure, C.; Ramos, L.

    2017-11-01

    We study the fracture of reversible double transient networks, constituted of water suspensions of entangled surfactant wormlike micelles reversibly linked by various amounts of telechelic polymers. We provide a state diagram that delineates the regime of fracture without necking of the filament from the regime where no fracture or break-up has been observed. We show that filaments fracture when stretched at a rate larger than the inverse of the slowest relaxation time of the networks. We quantitatively demonstrate that dissipation processes are not relevant in our experimental conditions and that, depending on the density of nodes in the networks, fracture occurs in the linear viscoelastic regime or in a non-linear regime. In addition, analysis of the crack opening profiles indicates deviations from a parabolic shape close to the crack tip for weakly connected networks. We demonstrate a direct correlation between the amplitude of the deviation from the parabolic shape and the amount of non linear viscoelasticity.

  17. [A microstructural approach to fatigue crack processes in poly crystalline BCC materials]. Progress report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerberich, W.W.

    1992-12-31

    Objective was to study fatigue where a combination of low temperature and cyclic loading produced cyclic cleavage in bcc Fe-base systems. Both dislocation dynamics and quasi-statics of crack growth were probed. This document reviews progress over the past 6 years: hydrogen embrittlement and cleavage, computations (stress near crack tip), dislocation emission from grain boundaries, fracture process zones, and understanding brittle fracture at the atomistic/dislocation scales and at the microscopic/macroscopic scale.

  18. [A microstructural approach to fatigue crack processes in poly crystalline BCC materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gerberich, W.W.

    1992-01-01

    Objective was to study fatigue where a combination of low temperature and cyclic loading produced cyclic cleavage in bcc Fe-base systems. Both dislocation dynamics and quasi-statics of crack growth were probed. This document reviews progress over the past 6 years: hydrogen embrittlement and cleavage, computations (stress near crack tip), dislocation emission from grain boundaries, fracture process zones, and understanding brittle fracture at the atomistic/dislocation scales and at the microscopic/macroscopic scale.

  19. Comparing the floquet stability of open and breathing fatigue cracks in an overhung rotordynamic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varney, Philip; Green, Itzhak

    2017-11-01

    Rotor cracks represent an uncommon but serious threat to rotating machines and must be detected early to avoid catastrophic machine failure. An important aspect of analyzing rotor cracks is understanding their influence on the rotor stability. It is well-known that the extent of rotor instability versus shaft speed is exacerbated by deeper cracks. Consequently, crack propagation can eventually result in an unstable response even if the shaft speed remains constant. Most previous investigations of crack-induced rotor instability concern simple Jeffcott rotors. This work advances the state-of-the-art by (a) providing a novel inertial-frame model of an overhung rotor, and (b) assessing the stability of the cracked overhung rotor using Floquet stability analysis. The rotor Floquet stability analysis is performed for both an open crack and a breathing crack, and conclusions are drawn regarding the importance of appropriately selecting the crack model. The rotor stability is analyzed versus crack depth, external viscous damping ratio, and rotor inertia. In general, this work concludes that the onset of instability occurs at lower shaft speeds for thick rotors, lower viscous damping ratios, and deeper cracks. In addition, when comparing commensurate cracks, the breathing crack is shown to induce more regions of instability than the open crack, though the open crack generally predicts an unstable response for shallower cracks than the breathing crack. Keywords: rotordynamics, stability, rotor cracks.

  20. Cracking of Composite Modified Alloy 825 Primary Air Port Tubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kish, Joseph R. [Paprican; Keiser, James R [ORNL; Singbeil, Douglas [Paprican; Willoughby, Adam W [ORNL; Longmire, Hu Foster [ORNL

    2007-04-01

    Twenty primary air ports fabricated from modified Alloy 825-based composite tubes underwent a metallurgical examination to document the mode and extent of cracking on the external fireside surface of a kraft recovery boiler. Collectively, the crack features found are most consistent with thermal fatigue, but corrosion fatigue cannot be ruled out. Regardless of the true cracking mechanism, temperature cycling is implicated as a critical factor for crack propagation. on the basis of the relative crack lengths observed, membrane welds and tube weld repairs, and their adjacent heat-affected zones, appear to be more susceptible to cracking than the cladding itself. This work suggests that mills should avoid boiler operating conditions that promote large temperature fluctuations, which can cause Alloy 825-based composite tubes to crack.

  1. Theoretical and numerical studies on morphological transitions in crack growth

    CERN Document Server

    Mühle, V

    1999-01-01

    This paper investigates the formation of crack patterns in stationary and transient temperature fields analytically with linear elastic fracture mechanics and numerically with the finite elements method (FEM). In particular, we consider the experimental situation of a narrow thin strip of hot glass slowly lowered into cold water, with temperature difference and velocity as variable parameters. The parameter regions of no crack, one straight crack and one oscillating crack are determined. The type of phase transition related to the borderline between straight and oscillating crack is characterized. The theoretical results are compared with those of other Similar investigations and comparisons are done for the propagation of multiple cracks. Quenching of a wide thin strip leads to a hierarchy of cracks whose scaling properties are analyzed. Without any fitting, theory and experiment agree surprisingly well.

  2. Damage law identification of a quasi brittle ceramic from a b ending test using digital image correlation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meille S.

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The quasi brittle ceramics show a non linear mechanical behaviour resulting most of the time in a dissymetry between their tensile and compressive stress-strain laws. The characterization of their fracture strengths might be biased if elastic linear formulae are used to analyze classical tests like bending tests. Based on Digital Image Correlation (DIC, a methodology is proposed to characterize materials with dissymmetric behaviours. Applying specific DIC decomposition functions for bending, compressive and tensile tests, a stress-strain model and its damage law are identified for aluminium titanate, a damageable micro cracked ceramic. This identification method using DIC can obviously be applied to other quasi brittle materials.

  3. Effect of T-stress on the cleavage crack growth resistance resulting from plastic flow

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tvergaard, Viggo

    1998-01-01

    , the materials show crack growth resistance. It is shown here that the resistance is strongly dependent on the value of the non-singular T-stress, acting parallel to the crack plane. The numerical technique employed makes use of a thin dislocation-free strip of elastic material inside which the crack propagates...

  4. Three-dimensional growth characteristics of a plane crack subjected to concentrated forces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartranft, R. J.; Sih, G. C.

    1974-01-01

    A combination of longitudinal shear and normal forces acting on a half-plane crack is shown to lead to predictions of crack growth qualitatively similar to those obtained by Knauss (1970) for crack propagation in antiplane shear. The presented results, based on the strain-energy-density fracture criterion, predict the direction of growth and the load which initiates it.

  5. Creep crack growth analysis using C{sub t}-parameter for internal circumferential and external axial surface cracks in a pressurized cylinder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tun, Nwe Ni; Yang, Hee Seung; Yu, Jong Min; Yoon, Kee Bong [Dept. of Mechanical Engineering, Chung Ang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-12-15

    Creep crack growth at elevated temperatures is a critical consideration in estimating the remaining life of high temperature structural components and in deciding their inspection interval. In this study, creep crack growth analyses for external radial-axial and internal radial-circumferential surface cracks in a pressurized cylinder were conducted by an analytical method. The effect of crack depth and crack length on the variations in Ct and remaining life predictions were investigated for surface cracks with various initial aspect ratios. It was observed that the remaining life of an internal radial-circumferential surface crack was approximately 53 times longer than that of an external radial-axial surface crack for the same crack size and loading conditions with 316 stainless steel material. It was also observed that the variations in remaining life, crack propagations, and the Ct values were considerably sensitive to the crack location and crack depth. Convergence of crack aspect ratio was not observed when the crack depth ratio was increased. Since the method is independent of material properties and location of the crack geometries, it can be extended to various material properties and various locations of the surface crack geometries.

  6. Topological defects govern crack front motion and facet formation on broken surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kolvin, Itamar; Cohen, Gil; Fineberg, Jay

    2018-02-01

    Cracks develop intricate patterns on the surfaces that they create. As faceted fracture surfaces are commonly formed by slow tensile cracks in both crystalline and amorphous materials, facet formation and structure cannot reflect microscopic order. Although fracture mechanics predict that slow crack fronts should be straight and form mirror-like surfaces, facet-forming fronts propagate simultaneously within different planes separated by steps. Here we show that these steps are topological defects of crack fronts and that crack front separation into disconnected overlapping segments provides the condition for step stability. Real-time imaging of propagating crack fronts combined with surface measurements shows that crack dynamics are governed by localized steps that drift at a constant angle to the local front propagation direction while their increased dissipation couples to long-ranged elasticity to determine front shapes. We study how three-dimensional topology couples to two-dimensional fracture dynamics to provide a fundamental picture of how patterned surfaces are generated.

  7. Fatigue crack sizing in rail steel using crack closure-induced acoustic emission waves

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Dan; Kuang, Kevin Sze Chiang; Ghee Koh, Chan

    2017-06-01

    The acoustic emission (AE) technique is a promising approach for detecting and locating fatigue cracks in metallic structures such as rail tracks. However, it is still a challenge to quantify the crack size accurately using this technique. AE waves can be generated by either crack propagation (CP) or crack closure (CC) processes and classification of these two types of AE waves is necessary to obtain more reliable crack sizing results. As the pre-processing step, an index based on wavelet power (WP) of AE signal is initially established in this paper in order to distinguish between the CC-induced AE waves and their CP-induced counterparts. Here, information embedded within the AE signal was used to perform the AE wave classification, which is preferred to the use of real-time load information, typically adopted in other studies. With the proposed approach, it renders the AE technique more amenable to practical implementation. Following the AE wave classification, a novel method to quantify the fatigue crack length was developed by taking advantage of the CC-induced AE waves, the count rate of which was observed to be positively correlated with the crack length. The crack length was subsequently determined using an empirical model derived from the AE data acquired during the fatigue tests of the rail steel specimens. The performance of the proposed method was validated by experimental data and compared with that of the traditional crack sizing method, which is based on CP-induced AE waves. As a significant advantage over other AE crack sizing methods, the proposed novel method is able to estimate the crack length without prior knowledge of the initial crack length, integration of AE data or real-time load amplitude. It is thus applicable to the health monitoring of both new and existing structures.

  8. Mechanisms of dwell fatigue crack growth in an advanced nickel disc alloy RR1000

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu S.Y.

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available RR1000 is one of an advanced class of nickel-based superalloys developed for disc applications. Under one hour dwell fatigue loading, complex crack growth behaviour has been observed especially in a coarse grained version of this alloy. At a temperature of 700 ∘C in air an increase of nearly two orders of magnitude in crack growth rates compared to baseline fatigue crack growth rates may be seen. However for certain microstructural conditions, cracks can also demonstrate retardation following initial acceleration. When using a direct current potential difference (d.c.p.d technique for monitoring crack growth, a damage zone of a few hundred microns is often measured ahead of a fast growing crack. Advanced characterisation techniques including SEM, ECCI and X-ray tomography have been adopted in the current study to understand the observed damage zone and retardation phenomenon. It is found that damage zones measured by d.c.p.d reflect brittle and non-uniform advance of the crack resulting from continuous dynamic or quasi-dynamic fracture of an oxide intrusion ahead of the crack tip during the dwell period. In contrast, cracking of the oxide intrusion is less frequent or even prevented during dwell periods associated with a retarded and slow growing crack. Crack tip stress relaxation plays an important role in dictating whether or not dynamic cracking of the oxide intrusion can be avoided.

  9. An empirical stress-intensity factor equation for the surface crack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Raju, I. S.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents an empirical stress-intensity factor equation for a surface crack as a function of parametric angle, crack depth, crack length, plate thickness and plate width for tension and bending loads. The stress-intensity factors used to develop the equation were obtained from a previous three-dimensional, finite-element analysis of semielliptical surface cracks in finite elastic plates subjected to tension or bending loads. A wide range of configuration parameters was included in the equation. The ratios of crack length to plate thickness and the ratios of crack depth to crack length ranged from 0 to 1.0. The effects of plate width on stress-intensity variations along the crack front were also included. The equation was used to predict patterns of surface-crack growth under tension or bending fatigue loads. The equation was also used to correlate surface-crack fracture data for a brittle epoxy material within + or - 10 percent for a wide range of crack shapes and crack sizes.

  10. Magnetic fabric of brittle fault rocks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pomella, Hannah

    2014-05-01

    The anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) has been recognized as a highly sensitive indicator of rock fabric and is widely employed in the field of structural geology. Brittle faults are often characterized by fault breccia and gouge, fault rocks with clast-in-matrix textures. A noteworthy property of both gouge and breccia is the often observed presence of a fabric that is defined by the preferred orientation of clasts and grains in the matrix. In the very fine-grained gouge and in the matrix of the breccia the fabric is not visible in the field or in thin sections but can probably be detected by AMS analyses. For the present study different kinds of brittle fault rocks have been sampled on two faults with known tectonic settings, in order to allow for a structural interpretation of the measured AMS signal. The measurements were carried out with an AGICO MFK1-FA Kappabridge and a CS4 furnace apparatus at the Institute of Geology, University of Innsbruck. Fault gouge was sampled on the Naif fault located in the Southern Alps, E of Meran, South Tyrol, Italy. Along this fault the Permian Granodiorite overthrusts the Southalpine basement and its Permomesozoic cover. The Neoalpine thrust fault is characterised by a wide cataclastic zone and an up to 1 m thick fault gouge. The gouge was sampled using paleomagnetic sample boxes. Heating experiments indicate that the magnetic fabric is dominated by paramagnetic minerals (>95%). The samples provide a magnetic susceptibility in the range of +10*E-5 [SI]. The K-min axis of the magnetic ellipsoid corresponds approximately to the pol of the fault plane measured in the field. However the whole magnetic ellipsoid shows a variation in the inclination compared to the structural data. Fine-grained ultracataclasites were sampled on the Assergi fault, located in the Abruzzi Apennines, NE of L'Aquila, Italy. This normal fault was active in historical time and crosscuts limestones as well as talus deposits. An up to 20 cm thick

  11. An embedded crack in a constant strain triangle utilizing extended finite element concepts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, J.F.; Poulsen, P.N.

    2013-01-01

    This paper revisits the formulation of the CST element with an embedded discrete crack taking advantage of the direct formulations developed within the framework of the extended finite element method, XFEM. The result is a simple element for modeling cohesive fracture processes in quasi-brittle m...

  12. Deformation relief in the area of ​​fatigue crack

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    М.В. Карускевич

    2007-02-01

    Full Text Available  Results of observation of the alclad aluminium alloy surface state near fatigue crack are presented. It is shown, that deformation relief near stress concentrator expresses fatigue damage of the material not only at the initial stage of fatigue, but at the fatigue crack propagation stage as well. The damage parameter D, that  determines the intensity of the surface micro plastic deformation features can be considered as quantitative parameter of fatigue crack propagation rate.

  13. Shot Peening Effect on Fatigue Crack Repaired Weldments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Efrain Rodriguez-Sanchez

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Fracture mechanics calculations are required to validate the safety level defined in design codes to prevent a fatigue failure. The periodic inspection-assessment cycle can lead to the implementation of a fatigue crack repair by crack removal. To improve the fatigue performance of the crack repair, residual compressive stresses induced by peening can be considered. This paper is in relation to the peening effect estimation on stress intensity factors in fatigue crack repaired weldments, since the stress intensity factor is a key parameter in fracture mechanics calculations. A set of T-butt specimens were experimentally fatigue tested and crack propagation data was gathered for the calculation of stress intensity factors. The experiments were designed to estimate the residual compressive stress depth layer and its effect on crack propagation inhibition. Experimental estimation of the peening effect on stress intensity factors in fatigue crack repaired weldments was validated by comparison against an analytical weight function solution. Experimental stress intensity factors determined from a set of fatigue tested T-butt specimens allowed estimating preliminarily that peening has a limited effect on fatigue crack propagation inhibition for edge repaired T-butt weldments subjected to bending loading.

  14. Three-dimensional characterization of stress corrosion cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lozano-Perez, S.; Rodrigo, P.; Gontard, Lionel Cervera

    2011-01-01

    Understanding crack propagation and initiation is fundamental if stress corrosion cracking (SCC) mechanisms are to be understood. However, cracking is a three-dimensional (3D) phenomenon and most characterization techniques are restricted to two-dimensional (2D) observations. In order to overcome...... the best spatial resolution. To illustrate the power of these techniques, different parts of dominant stress corrosion cracks in Ni-alloys and stainless steels have been reconstructed in 3D. All relevant microstructural features can now be studied in detail and its relative orientation respect...

  15. Microstructural investigation of the interaction and interdependence of cataclastic and plastic mechanisms in Feldspar crystals deformed in the semi-brittle field

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, A. C.; Pryer, L. L.

    2001-06-01

    Plagioclase feldspar (An 50) single crystals from the Hogarth Range, NSW, Australia, have been deformed in the brittle-to-semi-brittle regime at 500-800 °C, 90-300 MPa effective pressure, and strain rate between 10 -5 and 10 -6. This gem quality feldspar is both macroscopically and microscopically devoid of any microstructure other than very rare growth twins, so all microstructures produced by experimental deformation can be easily identified. The specimens were deformed to failure, which occurred at strains of groups of twins also accommodate lattice misorientations of several degrees, typical of those seen in subgrains that have been produced by dislocation climb. These observations suggest that the deformation progressed by an alternation of twinning and microfracturing, each process initiating the other in turn. Tangled and isolated dislocations were also observed in and near partially healed cracks. Since, in other materials, dislocation tangles have been observed to nucleate cracks, our observations suggest that in general, deformation to higher strains in the semi-brittle regime is probably controlled, not by the simple superposition of brittle and plastic processes operating independently, but by their interaction and interdependence.

  16. On post-weld heat treatment cracking in tig welded superalloy ATI 718Plus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Asala

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The susceptibility of heat affected zone (HAZ to cracking in Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG welded Allvac 718Plus superalloy during post-weld heat treatment (PWHT was studied. Contrary to the previously reported case of low heat input electron beam welded Allvac 718Plus, where HAZ cracking occurred during PWHT, the TIG welded alloy is crack-free after PWHT, notwithstanding the presence of similar micro-constituents that caused cracking in the low input weld. Accordingly, the formation of brittle HAZ intergranular micro-constituents may not be a sufficient factor to determine cracking propensity, the extent of heat input during welding may be another major factor that influences HAZ cracking during PWHT of the aerospace superalloy Allvac 718Plus.

  17. On post-weld heat treatment cracking in tig welded superalloy ATI 718Plus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asala, G.; Ojo, O. A.

    The susceptibility of heat affected zone (HAZ) to cracking in Tungsten Inert Gas (TIG) welded Allvac 718Plus superalloy during post-weld heat treatment (PWHT) was studied. Contrary to the previously reported case of low heat input electron beam welded Allvac 718Plus, where HAZ cracking occurred during PWHT, the TIG welded alloy is crack-free after PWHT, notwithstanding the presence of similar micro-constituents that caused cracking in the low input weld. Accordingly, the formation of brittle HAZ intergranular micro-constituents may not be a sufficient factor to determine cracking propensity, the extent of heat input during welding may be another major factor that influences HAZ cracking during PWHT of the aerospace superalloy Allvac 718Plus.

  18. Fracture Resistance Measurement Method for in situ Observation of Crack Mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Bent F.; Horsewell, A.; Jørgensen, O.

    1998-01-01

    observation and acoustic emission, As an example, crack growth in a cubic-phase yttria-stabilized zirconia is detected easily by in situ observation of the crack-tip region, Many fracture toughness measurements are obtained for each specimen, giving high confidence in the measured fracture toughness value......, In situ observation is useful for the study of toughening mechanisms and subcritical crack-growth behavior and to sort out erroneous measurements (e.g., due to crack branching).......A special test fixture has been developed for fracture mechanical testing of brittle materials inside an environmental scanning electron microscope. The fixture loads a double cantilever beam specimen with pure bending moments and provides stable crack growth. Crack growth is detected by in situ...

  19. Modified Dugdale cracks and Fictitious cracks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lauge Fuglsang

    1998-01-01

    A number of theories are presented in the literature on crack mechanics by which the strength of damaged materials can be predicted. Among these are theories based on the well-known Dugdale model of a crack prevented from spreading by self-created constant cohesive flow stressed acting in local...... areas, so-called fictitious cracks, in front of the crack.The Modified Dugdale theory presented in this paper is also based on the concept of Dugdale cracks. Any cohesive stress distribution, however, can be considered in front of the crack. Formally the strength of a material weakened by a modified...... Dugdale crack is the same as if it has been weakened by the well-known Griffith crack, namely sigma_CR = (EG_CR/phi)^1/2 where E and 1 are Young's modulus and crack half-length respectively, and G_CR is the so-called critical energy release rate. The physical significance of G_CR, however, is different...

  20. Unified risk analysis of fatigue failure in ductile alloy components during all three stages of fatigue crack evolution process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patankar, Ravindra

    2003-10-01

    Statistical fatigue life of a ductile alloy specimen is traditionally divided into three stages, namely, crack nucleation, small crack growth, and large crack growth. Crack nucleation and small crack growth show a wide variation and hence a big spread on cycles versus crack length graph. Relatively, large crack growth shows a lesser variation. Therefore, different models are fitted to the different stages of the fatigue evolution process, thus treating different stages as different phenomena. With these independent models, it is impossible to predict one phenomenon based on the information available about the other phenomenon. Experimentally, it is easier to carry out crack length measurements of large cracks compared to nucleating cracks and small cracks. Thus, it is easier to collect statistical data for large crack growth compared to the painstaking effort it would take to collect statistical data for crack nucleation and small crack growth. This article presents a fracture mechanics-based stochastic model of fatigue crack growth in ductile alloys that are commonly encountered in mechanical structures and machine components. The model has been validated by Ray (1998) for crack propagation by various statistical fatigue data. Based on the model, this article proposes a technique to predict statistical information of fatigue crack nucleation and small crack growth properties that uses the statistical properties of large crack growth under constant amplitude stress excitation. The statistical properties of large crack growth under constant amplitude stress excitation can be obtained via experiments.

  1. Theory of friction based on brittle fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byerlee, J.D.

    1967-01-01

    A theory of friction is presented that may be more applicable to geologic materials than the classic Bowden and Tabor theory. In the model, surfaces touch at the peaks of asperities and sliding occurs when the asperities fail by brittle fracture. The coefficient of friction, ??, was calculated from the strength of asperities of certain ideal shapes; for cone-shaped asperities, ?? is about 0.1 and for wedge-shaped asperities, ?? is about 0.15. For actual situations which seem close to the ideal model, observed ?? was found to be very close to 0.1, even for materials such as quartz and calcite with widely differing strengths. If surface forces are present, the theory predicts that ?? should decrease with load and that it should be higher in a vacuum than in air. In the presence of a fluid film between sliding surfaces, ?? should depend on the area of the surfaces in contact. Both effects are observed. The character of wear particles produced during sliding and the way in which ?? depends on normal load, roughness, and environment lend further support to the model of friction presented here. ?? 1967 The American Institute of Physics.

  2. Process of cracking in reinforced concrete beams (simulation and experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. N. Shardakov

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents the results of experimental and theoretical investigations of the mechanisms of crack formation in reinforced concrete beams subjected to quasi-static bending. The boundary-value problem has been formulated in the framework of brittle fracture mechanics and solved using the finite-element method. Numerical simulation of the vibrations of an uncracked beam and a beam with cracks of different size serves to determine the pattern of changes in the spectrum of eigenfrequencies observed during crack evolution. A series of sequential quasi-static 4-point bend tests leading to the formation of cracks in a reinforced concrete beam were performed. At each loading step, the beam was subjected to an impulse load to induce vibrations. Two stages of cracking were detected. During the first stage the nonconservative process of deformation begins to develope, but has not visible signs. The second stage is an active cracking, which is marked by a sharp change in eingenfrequencies. The boundary of a transition from one stage to another is well registered. The vibration behavior was examined for the ordinary concrete beams and the beams strengthened with a carbon-fiber polymer. The obtained results show that the vibrodiagnostic approach is an effective tool for monitoring crack formation and assessing the quality of measures aimed at strengthening concrete structures

  3. ON THE BRITTLENESS OF ENAMEL AND SELECTED DENTAL MATERIALS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, S.; Quinn, J. B; Romberg, E.; Arola, D.

    2008-01-01

    Although brittle material behavior is often considered undesirable, a quantitative measure of “brittleness” is currently not used in assessing the clinical merits of dental materials. Objective To quantify and compare the brittleness of human enamel and common dental restorative materials used for crown replacement. Methods Specimens of human enamel were prepared from the 3rd molars of “young” (18≤age≤25) and “old” (50≤age) patients. The hardness, elastic modulus and apparent fracture toughness were characterized as a function of distance from the DEJ using indentation approaches. These properties were then used in estimating the brittleness according to a model that accounts for the competing dissipative processes of deformation and fracture. The brittleness of selected porcelain, ceramic and Micaceous Glass Ceramic (MGC) dental materials was estimated and compared with that of the enamel. Results The average brittleness of the young and old enamel increased with distance from the DEJ. For the old enamel the average brittleness increased from approximately 300 µm−1 at the DEJ to nearly 900 µm−1 at the occlusal surface. While there was no significant difference between the two age groups at the DEJ, the brittleness of the old enamel was significantly greater (and up to 4 times higher) than that of the young enamel near the occlusal surface. The brittleness numbers for the restorative materials were up to 90% lower than that of young occlusal enamel. Significance The brittleness index could serve as a useful scale in the design of materials used for crown replacement, as well as a quantitative tool for characterizing degradation in the mechanical behavior of enamel. PMID:18436299

  4. Ductile-brittle behavior at blunted cavities in 3D iron crystals uncovered and covered by copper atoms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pelikán V.

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to studies of the mechanical response of an atomically blunted cavity uncovered and covered by copper atoms by means 3D molecular dynamic (MD simulations. The cavity is loaded uni-axially in tension mode I. Our question is how the copper atoms influence the ductile-brittle behavior at the crack front of the blunted cavity in comparison with the blunted cavity in pure bcc iron. We show that the dislocation emission is easier in the Fe–Cu system in comparison with pure bcc iron. However, stability of the blunted cavities seems to be weaker in copper region than in pure bcc iron.

  5. Concrete Cracking Prediction Including the Filling Proportion of Strand Corrosion Products

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lei; Dai, Lizhao; Zhang, Xuhui; Zhang, Jianren

    2016-01-01

    The filling of strand corrosion products during concrete crack propagation is investigated experimentally in the present paper. The effects of stirrups on the filling of corrosion products and concrete cracking are clarified. A prediction model of crack width is developed incorporating the filling proportion of corrosion products and the twisting shape of the strand. Experimental data on cracking angle, crack width, and corrosion loss obtained from accelerated corrosion tests of concrete beams are presented. The proposed model is verified by experimental data. Results show that the filling extent of corrosion products varies with crack propagation. The rust filling extent increases with the propagating crack until a critical width. Beyond the critical width, the rust-filling extent remains stable. Using stirrups can decrease the critical crack width. Stirrups can restrict crack propagation and reduce the rust filling. The tangent of the cracking angle increases with increasing corrosion loss. The prediction of corrosion-induced crack is sensitive to the rust-filling extent. PMID:28772367

  6. Applications of elastic-viscoplastic constitutive models in dynamic analyses of crack run-arrest events

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bass, B. R.; Pugh, C. E.; Swindeman, R. W.

    1988-01-01

    Applications of nonlinear techniques to the first series of six HSST wide-plate crack-arrest tests that were performed are described. The experiments include crack initiations at low temperatures and relatively long (20 cm) cleavage propagation phases which are terminated by arrest in high temperature regions. Crack arrest are then followed by ductile tearing events. Consequently, the crack front regions are exposed to wide ranges of strain rates and temperatures.

  7. The Pore Collapse “Hot-Spots” Model Coupled with Brittle Damage for Solid Explosives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. R. Cheng

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper is devoted to the building of a numerical pore collapse model with “hot-spots” formation for the impacted damage explosives. According to damage mechanical evolution of brittle material, the one-dimensional elastic-viscoplastic collapse model was improved to incorporate the impact damage during the dynamic collapse of pores. The damage of explosives was studied using the statistical crack mechanics (SCRAM. The effects of the heat conduction and the chemical reaction were taken into account in the formation of “hot-spots.” To verify the improved model, numerical simulations were carried out for different pressure states and used to model a multiple-impact experiment. The results show that repeated weak impacts can lead to the collapse of pores and the “hot-spots” may occur due to the accumulation of internal defects accompanied by the softening of explosives.

  8. Thermal fatigue of a 304L austenitic stainless steel: simulation of the initiation and of the propagation of the short cracks in isothermal and aniso-thermal fatigue; Fatigue thermique d'un acier inoxydable austenitique 304L: simulation de l'amorcage et de la croissance des fissures courtes en fatigue isotherme et anisotherme

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haddar, N

    2003-04-01

    The elbow pipes of thermal plants cooling systems are submitted to thermal variations of short range and of variable frequency. These variations bound to temperature changes of the fluids present a risk of cracks and leakages. In order to solve this problem, EDF has started the 'CRECO RNE 808' plan: 'thermal fatigue of 304L austenitic stainless steels' to study experimentally on a volume part, the initiation and the beginning of the propagation of cracks in thermal fatigue on austenitic stainless steels. The aim of this study is more particularly to compare the behaviour and the damage of the material in mechanic-thermal fatigue (cycling in temperature and cycling in deformation) and in isothermal fatigue (the utmost conditions have been determined by EDF for the metal: Tmax = 165 degrees C and Tmin = 90 degrees C; the frequency of the thermal variations can reach a Hertz). A lot of experimental results are given. A model of lifetime is introduced and validated. (O.M.)

  9. Modeling and analysis of ductility of brittle materials using indentation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Guoyan; Lu, Zhe; Bai, Jianming; Yu, Fangsu

    2014-08-01

    Nowadays, many optical elements are fabricated by means of glass molding using hard and brittle inserts such as Silicon Carbide (SiC) and Silicon Nitride (Si3N4). However, for those hard-to-machine materials, the most feasible solution is still with ultra-precision grinding and following polishing. Hence, it is necessary and meaningful to study their plastic properties for the development of optical fabrication and ultra-precision manufacturing process. However, the conventional methods including compression test and indentation fracture mechanics are not sufficient to obtain the accurate parameters and still lack of reliable supporting of the machining process. To solve this problem, this paper presents a novel way to correlate the plastic properties to the indentation data using dimensional analysis for the two sorts of hard and brittle materials of SiC and Si3N4. Through integrating the data obtained by the indentation tests and the modeling method presented in this paper, stress-strain behavior, yield stress σy, yield strain epsilony and strain hardening exponent n could be determined. The processing performance of these two materials reflected by the above parameters are consistent with the conclusions drawing from the indentation crack development under varying loads during the indentation test, which verifies the effectiveness and feasibility of the presented modeling method.

  10. Forecasting volcanic eruptions: the control of elastic-brittle deformation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kilburn, Christopher; Robertson, Robert; Wall, Richard; Steele, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    At volcanoes reawakening after long repose, patterns of unrest normally reflect the elastic-brittle deformation of crust above a magma reservoir. Local fault movements, detected as volcano-tectonic (VT) earthquakes, increase in number with surface deformation, at first approximately exponentially and then linearly. The trends describe how crustal behaviour evolves from quasi-elastic deformation under an increasing stress to inelastic deformation under a constant stress. They have been quantified and verified against experiments for deformation in compression [1]. We have extended the analysis to extensional deformation. The results agree well with field data for crust being stretched by a pressurizing magmatic system [2]. They also provide new criteria for enhancing the definitions of alert levels and preferred times to eruption. The VT-deformation sequence is a field proxy for changes in deformation with applied stress. The transition from quasi-elastic to inelastic behaviour is characterised in extension by the ratio of differential failure stress SF to tensile strength σT. Unrest data from at least basaltic to andesitic stratovolcanoes, as well as large calderas, yield preferred values for SF/σT ≤ 4, coinciding with the range for tensile failure expected from established theoretical constraints (from Mohr-Coulomb-Griffiths failure). We thus associate the transition with the approach to tensile rupture at the wall of a pressurized magma reservoir. In particular, values of about 2 are consistent with the rupture of a cylindrical reservoir, such as a closed conduit within a volcanic edifice, whereas values of about 3 suggest an approximately spherical reservoir, such as may exist at deeper levels. The onset of inelastic behaviour reflects the emergence of self-accelerating crack growth under a constant stress. Applied to forecasting eruptions, it provides a new and objective criterion for raising alert levels during an emergency; it yields the classic linear

  11. Investigating Reaction-Driven Cracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelemen, P. B.; Hirth, G.; Savage, H. M.

    2013-12-01

    Many metamorphic reactions lead to large volume changes, and potentially to reaction-driven cracking [1,2]. Large-scale hydration of mantle peridotite to produce serpentine or talc is invoked to explain the rheology of plate boundaries, the nature of earthquakes, and the seismic properties of slow-spread ocean crust and the 'mantle wedge' above subduction zones. Carbonation of peridotite may be an important sink in the global carbon cycle. Zones of 100% magnesite + quartz replacing peridotite, up to 200 m thick, formed where oceanic mantle was thrust over carbonate-bearing metasediments in Oman. Talc + carbonate is an important component of the matrix in subduction mélanges at Santa Catalina Island , California, and the Sanbagawa metamorphic belt, Japan. Engineered systems to emulate natural mineral carbonation could provide relatively inexpensive CO2 capture and storage [3]. More generally, engineered reaction-driven cracking could supplement or replace hydraulic fracture in geothermal systems, solution mining, and extraction of tight oil and gas. The controls on reaction-driven cracking are poorly understood. Hydration and carbonation reactions can be self-limiting, since they potentially reduce permeability and armor reactive surfaces [4]. Also, in some cases, hydration or carbonation may take place at constant volume. Small changes in volume due to precipitation of solid products increases stress, destabilizing solid reactants, until precipitation and dissolution rates become equal at a steady state stress [5]. In a third case, volume change due to precipitation of solid products causes brittle failure. This has been invoked on qualitative grounds to explain, e.g., complete serpentinization of mantle peridotite [6]. Below ~ 300°C, the available potential energy for hydration and carbonation of olivine could produce stresses of 100's of MPa [2], sufficient to fracture rocks to 10 km depth or more, causing brittle failure below the steady state stress required

  12. Macroscopic crack formation and extension in pristine and artificially aged PBX 9501

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Cheng [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Thompson, Darla G [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2010-01-01

    A technique has been developed to quantitatively describe macroscopic cracks, both their location and extent, in heterogeneous high explosive and mock materials. By combining such a technique with the deformation field measurement using digital image correlation (DIC), we conduct observation and measurement of the initiation, extension, and coalescence of internal cracks in the compression of Brazilian disk made of pristine and artificially aged PBX 9501 hjgh explosives. Our results conclude quantitatively that aged PBX 9501 is not only weaker but also much more brittle than the pristine one, thus is more susceptible to macroscopic cracking.

  13. Experimental and numerical investigation of cracking behavior of cortical bone in cutting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alam, K

    2014-01-01

    Bone cutting is a well-known surgical procedure in orthopaedics and dentistry for fracture treatment and reconstruction. Common complications associated with the process are mechanical damage linked with excessive levels of penetration force. Larger forces may produce minor cracks in bone which may seriously affect strength of fixation and may delay the healing process. This paper investigates cracking behavior in the microstructure of cortical bone in cutting using experimental and numerical techniques. Experiments were performed on cortical bone to study the mechanics of crack propagation and evaluate the extent of crack with the drilling force and amount of penetration. Finite element (FE) simulations were performed to visualize the extension and arrest of the cracks in bone microstructure. The length of crack was found to be strongly influenced by the drilling force and amount of drill penetration. Osteon were seen to deflect the cracks at their boundaries. Crack propagation in bone microstructure was observed to depend on anatomical direction. Numerical simulations predicted the direction of crack propagation and found osteon boundaries to act as barrier to the cracks. Lower drilling force may be used in cutting the bone to avoid cracks in the bone tissue. A detailed FE model based on fracture data of cortical bone is to be produced to simulate cracking of bone microstructure.

  14. Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... That People Abuse » Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Cocaine (Coke, Crack) Facts Listen Cocaine is a white ... Version Download "My life was built around getting cocaine and getting high." ©istock.com/ Marjot Stacey is ...

  15. Crack sealer fill characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-06-01

    Laboratory testing was conducted to determine the extent of crack fill for crack sealers composed of methyl methacrylate, : epoxy, urethane, and high molecular weight methacrylate. The test specimens consisted of eight-inch long concrete : cylinders ...

  16. Crack patterns in layers: effect of the thickness and mechanical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauchard, L.; Sibrant, A.

    2015-12-01

    The surface of planets is host to many regions displaying cracks patterns that have been identified as potential dessication cracks. Crack patterns can be observed at multi-scales from millimeters in rocks to several kilometers on planetary surface. The mechanisms of cracking usually result from differential shrinkage stress (due to a drying process or temperature change). A large variety of crack morphologies is involved depending on both the microstructure and the thickness of the layer : crack can form isolated junctions or interact each other. In last case cracks can divide the plane hierarchically leading to broken or connected network of cracks, or grow in-depth resulting in the well ordered basalt columns. In particular, crack patterns strongly depend on both the mechanical properties and the thickness of the layer. To understand the physical process involved, the geometrical characteristics of the crack pattern (crack spacing, crack aperture or crack depth) are analyzed by laboratory testing procedures. In this way, crack patterns can be modeled by the drying layers of aqueous suspensions of nanoparticles (silica particles). During the drying process, advection towards the evaporation surface accumulates particles and leads to a porous structure filled of water. The mechanical properties of the layer are related to the structure of the layer and are measured using indentation testing. Depending on the accumulation rate, solid layers exhibit non-homogeneous mechanical properties in depth. This affect the crack formation and stability of crack propagation.

  17. Scattering mechanical performances for brittle bulk metallic glasses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. W. Qiao

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Scattering mechanical performances of brittle La- and Mg-based BMGs are found in the present study. Upon dynamic loading, there exist largely scattered fracture strengths even if the strain rates are under the same order, and the BMG systems are the same. The negative strain rate dependence for La- and Mg-based BMGs is obtained, i.e., a decreased fracture strength is dominating from quasi-static to dynamic compression. At cryogenic temperatures, distinguishingly low fracture strengths are available for these two brittle BMGs, and decreased tolerance to accommodate strains makes BMGs more and more brittle. It is concluded that the scattering mechanical performances of brittle BMGs should be carefully evaluated before actual applications.

  18. Towards an integrated numerical simulator for crack-seal vein microstructure: Coupling phase-field with the Discrete Element Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Virgo, Simon; Ankit, Kumar; Nestler, Britta; Urai, Janos L.

    2016-04-01

    Crack-seal veins form in a complex interplay of coupled thermal, hydraulic, mechanical and chemical processes. Their formation and cyclic growth involves brittle fracturing and dilatancy, phases of increased fluid flow and the growth of crystals that fill the voids and reestablish the mechanical strength. Existing numerical models of vein formation focus on selected aspects of the coupled process. Until today, no model exists that is able to use a realistic representation of the fracturing AND sealing processes, simultaneously. To address this challenge, we propose the bidirectional coupling of two numerical methods that have proven themselves as very powerful to model the fundamental processes acting in crack-seal systems: Phase-field and the Discrete Element Method (DEM). The phase-field Method was recently successfully extended to model the precipitation of quartz crystals from an aqueous solution and applied to model the sealing of a vein over multiple opening events (Ankit et al., 2013; Ankit et al., 2015a; Ankit et al., 2015b). The advantage over former, purely kinematic approaches is that in phase-field, the crystal growth is modeled based on thermodynamic and kinetic principles. Different driving forces for microstructure evolution, such as chemical bulk free energy, interfacial energy, elastic strain energy and different transport processes, such as mass diffusion and advection, can be coupled and the effect on the evolution process can be studied in 3D. The Discrete Element Method was already used in several studies to model the fracturing of rocks and the incremental growth of veins by repeated fracturing (Virgo et al., 2013; Virgo et al., 2014). Materials in DEM are represented by volumes of packed spherical particles and the response to the material to stress is modeled by interaction of the particles with their nearest neighbours. For rocks, in 3D, the method provides a realistic brittle failure behaviour. Exchange Routines are being developed that

  19. Capsules with evolving brittleness to resist the preparation of self-healing concrete

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gruyaert, E.

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Capsules for self-healing concrete have to possess multifunctional properties and it would be an enormous advantage in the valorization process when they could also be mixed in. Therefore, we aimed to develop capsules with evolving brittleness. Capsules with high initial flexibility were prepared by adding a plasticizer to an ethyl cellulose matrix. During hardening of the concrete, the plasticizing agent should leach out to the moist environment yielding more brittle capsules which break upon crack appearance. The tested capsules could easily be mixed in during concrete production. However, incompatibility issues between the capsule wall and the inner polymeric healing agent appeared. Moreover, the capsules became insufficiently brittle and the bond strength to the cementitious matrix was too weak. Consequently, multilayer capsules were tested. These capsules had a high impact resistance to endure concrete mixing and were able to break upon crack formation.Las cápsulas para la auto-reparación del hormigón tienen que poseer propiedades multifuncionales. Una enorme ventaja en el proceso para su valorización se obtendría si aquellas pudieran resistir con éxito el mezclado. Por lo tanto, nos propusimos desarrollar cápsulas cuya fragilidad evoluciona. Cápsulas con una alta flexibilidad inicial se prepararon mediante la adición de un plastificante a una matriz de etil celulosa. Durante el endurecimiento del hormigón, el agente plastificante debe filtrarse hacia el medio ambiente húmedo produciendo cápsulas más frágiles que se rompen con el surgimiento de fisuras. Las cápsulas pudieron ser fácilmente mezcladas durante la producción de hormigón. Sin embargo, aparecieron problemas de incompatibilidad entre la pared de la cápsula y el agente de curación polimérico interior. Por otra parte, las cápsulas se comportaron insuficientemente frágiles y con una baja adherencia hacia la matriz cementicia. En consecuencia, se probaron las c

  20. Creep and crack growth of zircon and mullite base materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbonneau, X.; Olagnon, C.; Fantozzi, G. [INSA, Villeurbanne (France). GEMPPM

    1999-03-01

    The creep and crack propagation properties of mullite and zircon ceramics were compared. In the investigated temperature range, mullite presents a simple crack propagation of a unique macrocracks, although a change of mechanism is observed at 1200 C. The zircon material present a rather more complex crack propagation, with multicracking and branching, due to a significant crack healing. The creep behaviours also appeared as different for both materials. The mullite creep curves present only two stages, even when fracture occurs, while a tertiary regime is observed in the case of zircon. The results show that grain boundary sliding is the main deformation mechanism for the two different materials. In fact, they exhibit similar overall real behaviours with a different characteristic temperature. At low stress, the minimum creep rate can be considered as a stationary creep, but at a higher stress, generalised or localised damage interfere, leading to a higher apparent stationary creep exponent. Sub-critical crack growth and deformation act as parallel mechanisms for mullite, while the interaction is more complex in zircon where crack healing induce multi-cracking. (orig.) 9 refs.

  1. Crack Front Segmentation and Facet Coarsening in Mixed-Mode Fracture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chih-Hung; Cambonie, Tristan; Lazarus, Veronique; Nicoli, Matteo; Pons, Antonio J.; Karma, Alain

    2015-12-01

    A planar crack generically segments into an array of "daughter cracks" shaped as tilted facets when loaded with both a tensile stress normal to the crack plane (mode I) and a shear stress parallel to the crack front (mode III). We investigate facet propagation and coarsening using in situ microscopy observations of fracture surfaces at different stages of quasistatic mixed-mode crack propagation and phase-field simulations. The results demonstrate that the bifurcation from propagating a planar to segmented crack front is strongly subcritical, reconciling previous theoretical predictions of linear stability analysis with experimental observations. They further show that facet coarsening is a self-similar process driven by a spatial period-doubling instability of facet arrays.

  2. Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    G. De

    2003-02-24

    One potential failure mechanism for titanium and its alloys under repository conditions is via the absorption of atomic hydrogen in the metal crystal lattice. The resulting decreased ductility and fracture toughness may lead to brittle mechanical fracture called hydrogen-induced cracking (HIC) or hydrogen embrittlement. For the current design of the engineered barrier without backfill, HIC may be a problem since the titanium drip shield can be galvanically coupled to rock bolts (or wire mesh), which may fall onto the drip shield, thereby creating conditions for hydrogen production by electrochemical reaction. The purpose of this scientific analysis and modeling activity is to evaluate whether the drip shield will fail by HIC or not under repository conditions within 10,000 years of emplacement. This Analysis and Model Report (AMR) addresses features, events, and processes related to hydrogen induced cracking of the drip shield. REV 00 of this AMR served as a feed to ''Waste Package Degradation Process Model Report'' and was developed in accordance with the activity section ''Hydrogen Induced Cracking of Drip Shield'' of the development plan entitled ''Analysis and Model Reports to Support Waste Package PMR'' (CRWMS M&O 1999a). This AMR, prepared according to ''Technical Work Plan for: Waste Package Materials Data Analyses and Modeling'' (BSC 2002), is to feed the License Application.

  3. Evolution of crack paths and compliance in round bars under cyclic tension and bending

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Toribio

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this paper is to calculate how the surface crack front and the dimensionless compliance evolve in cracked cylindrical bars subjected to cyclic tension or bending with different initial crack geometries (crack depths and aspect ratios. To this end, a computer application (in the Java programming language that calculates the crack front’s geometric evolution and the dimensionless compliance was made by discretizing the crack front (characterized with elliptical shape and assuming that every point advances perpendicularly to the crack front according to the Paris law, and using a three-parameter stress intensity factor (SIF. The results show that in fatigue crack propagation, relative crack depth influences more on dimensionless compliance than the aspect ratio, because the crack front tends to converge when the crack propagates from different initial geometries, showing greater values for tension than for bending. Furthermore, during fatigue crack growth, materials with higher values of the exponent of the Paris law produce slightly greater dimensionless compliance and a better convergence between the results for straight-fronted and circular initial cracks.

  4. Automatic Pavement Crack Recognition Based on BP Neural Network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Li

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A feasible pavement crack detection system plays an important role in evaluating the road condition and providing the necessary road maintenance. In this paper, a back propagation neural network (BPNN is used to recognize pavement cracks from images. To improve the recognition accuracy of the BPNN, a complete framework of image processing is proposed including image preprocessing and crack information extraction. In this framework, the redundant image information is reduced as much as possible and two sets of feature parameters are constructed to classify the crack images. Then a BPNN is adopted to distinguish pavement images between linear and alligator cracks to acquire high recognition accuracy. Besides, the linear cracks can be further classified into transversal and longitudinal cracks according to the direction angle. Finally, the proposed method is evaluated on the data of 400 pavement images obtained by the Automatic Road Analyzer (ARAN in Northern China and the results show that the proposed method seems to be a powerful tool for pavement crack recognition. The rates of correct classification for alligator, transversal and longitudinal cracks are 97.5%, 100% and 88.0%, respectively. Compared to some previous studies, the method proposed in this paper is effective for all three kinds of cracks and the results are also acceptable for engineering application.

  5. Crack path and fracture surface modifications in cement composites

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sajjad Ahmad

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available There is a tremendous increase in the use of high strength and high performance self-consolidating cementitious composites due to their superior workability and mechanical strengths. Cement composites are quasi-brittle in nature and possess extremely low tensile strength as compared to their compressive strength. Due to the low tensile strength capacity, cracks develop in cementitious composites due to the drying shrinkage, plastic settlements and/or stress concentrations (due to external restrains and/or applied stresses etc. These cracks developed at the nanoscale may grow rapidly due to the applied stresses and join together to form micro and macro cracks. The growth of cracks from nanoscale to micro and macro scale is very rapid and may lead to sudden failure of the cement composites. The present paper reports the modifications in the crack growth pattern of the high performance cement composites to achieve enhanced ductility and toughness. The objective was accomplished by the incorporation of the micro sized inert particulates in the cement composite matrix. The results indicate that the incorporation of micro sized inert particles acted as the obstacles in the growth of the cracks thus improving the ductility and the energy absorption capacity of the self-consolidating cementitious composites.

  6. Near-IR imaging of cracks in teeth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fried, William A.; Simon, Jacob C.; Lucas, Seth; Chan, Kenneth H.; Darling, Cynthia L.; Staninec, Michal; Fried, Daniel

    2014-02-01

    Dental enamel is highly transparent at near-IR wavelengths and several studies have shown that these wavelengths are well suited for optical transillumination for the detection and imaging of tooth decay. We hypothesize that these wavelengths are also well suited for imaging cracks in teeth. Extracted teeth with suspected cracks were imaged at several wavelengths in the near-IR from 1300-1700-nm. Extracted teeth were also examined with optical coherence tomography to confirm the existence of suspected cracks. Several teeth of volunteers were also imaged in vivo at 1300-nm to demonstrate clinical potential. In addition we induced cracks in teeth using a carbon dioxide laser and imaged crack formation and propagation in real time using near-IR transillumination. Cracks were clearly visible using near-IR imaging at 1300-nm in both in vitro and in vivo images. Cracks and fractures also interfered with light propagation in the tooth aiding in crack identification and assessment of depth and severity.

  7. Interlaminar crack growth in fiber reinforced composites during fatigue, part 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, S. S.; Wang, H. T.

    1981-01-01

    Interlaminar crack growth behavior in fiber-reinforced composites subjected to fatigue loading was investigated experimentally and theoretically. In the experimental phase, inter-laminar crack propagation rates and mechanisms were determined for the cases of various geometries, laminate parameters and cyclic stress levels. A singular hybrid-stress finite element method was used in conjuction with the experimental results to examine the local crack-tip behavior and to characterize the crack propagation during fatigue. Results elucidate the basic nature of the cyclic delamination damage, and relate the interlaminar crack growth rate to the range of mixed-mode crack-tip stress intensity factors. The results show that crack growth rates are directly related to the range of the mixed-mode cyclic stress intensity factors by a power law relationship.

  8. Effect of fiber orientation on the fracture toughness of brittle matrix composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, L. K.; Wetherhold, R. C.

    1992-01-01

    The effective fracture toughness of brittle matrix materials can be increased through the addition of short, poorly bonded fibers which bridge the growing crack. The orientation distribution of the fibers is likely to be biased, and not in an ideal random or aligned state. A micromechanical model is formulated for the postcracking behavior using the force-displacement relation for an arbitrary fiber bridging a crack, the fiber orientation density function, and the fiber location density function. This model is then used to determine an effective traction law for the bridging fibers, as well as the steady state bridging toughness increment. In most cases, the results may be placed in the form of a product of the aligned fiber results times a modifying integrated orientation factor. The frictional shear stress on fiber pull-out is allowed to vary during pull-out, modeling the effects of matrix breakdown, fiber surface smoothing or wear debris accumulation. Results are presented for a variety of representative planar and three-dimensional fiber orientation states.

  9. Optimization Of Laboratory Hot Rolling Of Brittle Fe-40at.%Al-Zr-B Aluminide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schindler I.

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Use of the protective steel capsules enabled to manage the laboratory hot flat rolling of the extremely brittle as-cast aluminide Fe-40at.%Al-Zr-B with the total height reduction of almost 70 %. The hot rolling parameters were optimized to obtain the best combination of deformation temperature (from 1160°C up to 1240°C and rolling speed (from 0.14 m·s−1 to 0.53 m·s−1. The resistance against cracking and refinement of the highly heterogeneous cast microstructure were the main criteria. Both experiments and mathematical simulations based on FEM demonstrated that it is not possible to exploit enhanced plasticity of the investigated alloy at low strain rates in the hot rolling process. The heat flux from the sample to the working rolls is so intensive at low rolling speed that even the protective capsule does not prevent massive appearance of the surface transverse cracking. The homogeneity and size of product’s grain was influenced significantly by temperature of deformation, whereas the effect of rolling speed was relatively negligible. The optimal forming parameters were found as rolling temperature 1200°C and the rolling speed 0.35 m·s−1. The effective technology of the iron aluminide Fe-40at.% Al-Zr-B preparation by simple processes of melting, casting and hot rolling was thus established and optimized.

  10. Process Optimization for Suppressing Cracks in Laser Engineered Net Shaping of Al2O3 Ceramics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niu, F. Y.; Wu, D. J.; Yan, S.; Ma, G. Y.; Zhang, B.

    2017-03-01

    Direct additive manufacturing of ceramics (DAMC) without binders is a promising technique for rapidly fabricating high-purity components with good performance. Nevertheless, cracks are easily generated during fabrication as a result of the high intrinsic brittleness of ceramics and the great temperature gradients. Therefore, optimizing the DAMC process is a challenge. In this study, direct fabrication of Al2O3 single-bead wall structures are conducted with a laser engineered net shaping (LENS) system. A new process optimization method for suppressing cracks is proposed based on analytical models, and then the influence of process parameters on crack number is discussed experimentally. The results indicate that the crack number decreases obviously with the increase of scanning speed. Single-bead wall specimens without cracks are successfully fabricated by the optimized process.

  11. A Modified Strip-Yield-Saturation-Induction Model Solution for Cracked Piezoelectromagnetic Plate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. Bhargava

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A strip-yield-saturation-induction model is proposed for an impermeable crack embedded in piezoelectromagnetic plate. The developed slide-yield, saturation, and induction zones are arrested by distributing, respectively, mechanical, electrical, and magnetic loads over their rims. Two cases are considered: when saturation zone exceeds induction zone and vice-versa. It is assumed that developed slide-yield zone is the smallest because of the brittle nature of piezoelectromagnetic material. Fourier integral transform technique is employed to obtain the solution. Closed form analytic expressions are derived for developed zones lengths, crack sliding displacement, crack opening potential drop, crack opening induction drop, and energy release rate. Case study presented for BaTiO3–CoFe2O4 shows that crack arrest is possible under small-scale mechanical, electrical, and magnetic yielding.

  12. Measurement of shrinkage and cracking in lyophilized amorphous cakes. Part I: final-product assessment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ullrich, Sabine; Seyferth, Stefan; Lee, Geoffrey

    2015-01-01

    An experimental technique is presented to determine independently shrinkage and cracking in lyophilized amorphous cakes based on photographic imaging of their top surface. An inverse correlation between cake shrinkage and cracking during freeze-drying is seen. Shrinkage relaxes the drying tension and gives little cracking, whereas if shrinkage is restrained then more cracking occurs. A lower shrinkage and greater cracking with higher disaccharide concentration correlates with change in cake hardness and brittleness. Adhesion of the cake to the inside vial wall could not be identified as a determining factor for shrinkage. Shrinkage is non-uniform across the cake's surface and is manifested largely in the peripheral region. A correlation between shrinkage and w(g)' for different disaccharides suggests that drying tension develops as non-frozen water is lost from the porous solid after sublimation of the ice phase has exposed the solid/gas interface. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. and the American Pharmacists Association.

  13. Stress corrosion cracking of titanium alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    May, R. C.; Beck, F. H.; Fontana, M. G.

    1971-01-01

    Experiments were conducted to study (1) the basic electrochemical behavior of titanium in acid chloride solutions and (2) the response of the metal to dynamic straining in the same evironment. The aim of this group of experiments was to simulate, as nearly as possible, the actual conditions which exist at the tip of a crack. One of the foremost theories proposed to explain the propagation of stress corrosion cracks is a hydrogen embrittlement theory involving the precipitation of embrittling titanium hydrides inside the metal near the crack tip. An initial survey of the basic electrochemical literature indicated that surface hydrides play a critical role in the electrochemistry of titanium in acid solutions. A comprehensive analysis of the effect of surface films, particularly hydrides, on the electrochemical behavior of titanium in these solution is presented.

  14. Numerical modelling of desiccation cracking of clayey soil

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vo Thi Dong

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The formation and propagation of desiccation cracks in soil is an extremely complex phenomenon because of the coupling between hydraulic and mechanical behaviour of soil, which are constituted here by the presence of capillary forces and discontinuities. The formation of a cracks network strongly influences the mechanical and hydraulic properties of soil. The main objective of this research is to study the evolution of suction and strain fields, the initiation and propagation of cracks under the effect of drying, using the finite element method. A simulation of a soil sample with four cohesive joints shows the results similar to experimental data. In addition, a simulation of multijoints shows that cracks does not open in all potentials positions and it gives similar spacing.

  15. Small-crack effects in high-strength aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, J. C., Jr.; Wu, X. R.; Venneri, S. L.; Li, C. G.

    1994-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration and the Chinese Aeronautical Establishment participated in a Fatigue and Fracture Mechanics Cooperative Program. The program objectives were to identify and characterize crack initiation and growth of small cracks (10 microns to 2 mm long) in commonly used US and PRC aluminum alloys, to improve fracture mechanics analyses of surface- and corner-crack configurations, and to develop improved life-prediction methods. Fatigue and small-crack tests were performed on single-edgenotch tension (SENT) specimens and large-crack tests were conducted on center-crack tension specimens for constant-amplitude (stress ratios of -1, 0, and 0.5) and Mini-TWIST spectrum loading. The plastic replica method was used to monitor the initiation and growth of small fatigue cracks at the semicircular notch. Crack growth results from each laboratory on 7075-T6 bare and LC9cs clad aluminum alloys agreed well and showed that fatigue life was mostly crack propagation from a material defect (inclusion particles or void) or from the cladding layer. Finite-element and weight-function methods were used to determine stress intensity factors for surface and corner cracks in the SENT specimens. Equations were then developed and used in a crack growth and crack-closure model to correlate small- and large-crack data and to make life predictions for various load histories. The cooperative program produced useful experimental data and efficient analysis methods for improving life predictions. The results should ultimately improve aircraft structural reliability and safety.

  16. Elevated temperature crack growth in aluminum alloys: Tensile deformation of 2618 and FVS0812 aluminum alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Yang; Gangloff, Richard P.

    1990-01-01

    Understanding the damage tolerance of aluminum alloys at elevated temperatures is essential for safe applications of advanced materials. The objective of this project is to investigate the time dependent subcritical cracking behavior of powder metallurgy FVS0812 and ingot metallurgy 2618 aluminum alloys at elevated temperatures. The fracture mechanics approach was applied. Sidegrooved compact tension specimens were tested at 175, 250, and 316 C under constant load. Subcritical crack growth occurred in each alloy at applied stress intensity levels (K) of between about 14 and 25 MPa/m, well below K (sub IC). Measured load, crack opening displacement and displacement rate, and crack length and growth rate (da/dt) were analyzed with several continuum fracture parameters including, the C-integral, C (sub t), and K. Elevated temperature growth rate data suggest that K is a controlling parameter during time dependent cracking. For FVS0812, da/dt is highest at 175 C when rates are expressed as a function of K. While crack growth rate is not controlled by C (sub t) at 175 C, da/dt appears to better correlate with C (sub t) at higher temperatures. Creep brittle cracking at intermediate temperatures, and perhaps related to strain aging, is augmented by time dependent transient creep plasticity at higher temperatures. The C (sub t) analysis is, however, complicated by the necessity to measure small differences in the elastic crack growth and creep contributions to the crack opening displacement rate. A microstructural study indicates that 2618 and FVS0812 are likely to be creep brittle materials, consistent with the results obtained from the fracture mechanics study. Time dependent crack growth of 2618 at 175 C is characterized by mixed transgranular and intergranular fracture. Delamination along the ribbon powder particle boundaries occurs in FVS0812 at all temperatures. The fracture mode of FVS0812 changes with temperature. At 175 C, it is characterized as dimpled rupture

  17. Hydraulic machine tests for compression of a quasi-brittle material at medium strain rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quirion, Y.; Lesaffre, A. S.

    2006-08-01

    This paper describes an experimental device used to determine the dynamic compressive behaviour of quasi-brittle material at medium strain rates (1 to 100 s - 1). The tool combines a servo-hydraulic machine with a high-speed photography. Tests consist in compressing a sample between a dynamic jack and an instrumented anvil according to the direct impact method. The main difficulty of brittle material testing is to achieve dynamic equilibrium in the sample before failure because of their low failure strains. Furthermore, oscillations phenomena disturb load measurement. In this paper, we present adequate methods in order to carry out homogeneous testing and to simplify data interpretation. Two experimental configurations are developed. We use firstly the anvil as a load cell for low impact velocity and secondly the wave propagation in the anvil for medium impact velocity. Finally, in order to investigate experimentally the strain uniformity, axial strain measurements are quantified by image processing. Results are compared with experimental ones obtained on a crossbow system.

  18. Brittle fracture in structural steels: perspectives at different size-scales.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knott, John

    2015-03-28

    This paper describes characteristics of transgranular cleavage fracture in structural steel, viewed at different size-scales. Initially, consideration is given to structures and the service duty to which they are exposed at the macroscale, highlighting failure by plastic collapse and failure by brittle fracture. This is followed by sections describing the use of fracture mechanics and materials testing in carrying-out assessments of structural integrity. Attention then focuses on the microscale, explaining how values of the local fracture stress in notched bars or of fracture toughness in pre-cracked test-pieces are related to features of the microstructure: carbide thicknesses in wrought material; the sizes of oxide/silicate inclusions in weld metals. Effects of a microstructure that is 'heterogeneous' at the mesoscale are treated briefly, with respect to the extraction of test-pieces from thick sections and to extrapolations of data to low failure probabilities. The values of local fracture stress may be used to infer a local 'work-of-fracture' that is found experimentally to be a few times greater than that of two free surfaces. Reasons for this are discussed in the conclusion section on nano-scale events. It is suggested that, ahead of a sharp crack, it is necessary to increase the compliance by a cooperative movement of atoms (involving extra work) to allow the crack-tip bond to displace sufficiently for the energy of attraction between the atoms to reduce to zero. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  19. How Tough is Human Cortical Bone? In-Situ Measurements on Realistically Short Cracks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ritchie, Robert O; Koester, K. J.; Ager III, J. W.; Ritchie, R.O.

    2008-05-10

    Bone is more difficult to break than to split. Although this is well known, and many studies exist on the behavior of long cracks in bone, there is a need for data on the orientation-dependent crack-growth resistance behavior of human cortical bone which accurately assesses its toughness at appropriate size-scales. Here we use in-situ mechanical testing in the scanning electron microscope and x-ray computed tomography to examine how physiologically-pertinent short (<600 mu m) cracks propagate in both the transverse and longitudinal orientations in cortical bone, using both crack-deflection/twist mechanics and nonlinear-elastic fracture mechanics to determine crack-resistance curves. We find that after only 500 mu m of cracking, the driving force for crack propagation was more than five times higher in the transverse (breaking) direction than in the longitudinal (splitting) direction due to major crack deflections/twists principally at cement sheathes. Indeed, our results show that the true transverse toughness of cortical bone is far higher than previously reported. However, the toughness in the longitudinal orientation, where cracks tend to follow the cement lines, is quite low at these small crack sizes; it is only when cracks become several millimeters in length that bridging mechanisms can develop leading to the (larger-crack) toughnesses generally quoted for bone.

  20. Eliminating cracking during drying.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Qiu; Tan, Peng; Schofield, Andrew B; Xu, Lei

    2013-03-01

    When colloidal suspensions dry, stresses build up and cracks often occur -a phenomenon undesirable for important industries such as paint and ceramics. We demonstrate an effective method which can completely eliminate cracking during drying: by adding emulsion droplets into colloidal suspensions, we can systematically decrease the amount of cracking, and eliminate it completely above a critical droplet concentration. Since the emulsion droplets eventually also evaporate, our technique achieves an effective function while making little changes to the component of final product, and may therefore serve as a promising approach for cracking elimination. Furthermore, adding droplets also varies the speed of air invasion and provides a powerful method to adjust drying rate. With the effective control over cracking and drying rate, our study may find important applications in many drying- and cracking-related industrial processes.

  1. The nature of temper brittleness of high-chromium ferrite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarrak, V.I.; Suvorova, S.O.; Golovin, I.S.; Mishin, V.M.; Kislyuk, I.V. [Central Scientific-Research Institute for Ferrous Metallurgy, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    1995-03-01

    The reasons for development of {open_quotes}475{degrees}C brittleness{close_quotes} of high-chromium ferritic steels are considered from the standpoint of fracture mechanics. It is shown that the general rise in the curve of temperature-dependent local flow stress has the decisive influence on the position of the ductile-to-brittle transformation temperature and the increase in it as the result of a hold at temperatures of development of brittleness. The established effect is related to the change in the parameters determining dislocation mobility, that is, the activation energy of dislocation movement in high-chromium ferrite and the resistance to microplastic deformation, both caused by processes of separation into layers of high-chromium ferrite and decomposition of the interstitial solid solution.

  2. Brittle and ductile friction and the physics of tectonic tremor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daub, Eric G.; Shelly, David R.; Guyer, Robert A.; Johnson, P.A.

    2011-01-01

    Observations of nonvolcanic tremor provide a unique window into the mechanisms of deformation and failure in the lower crust. At increasing depths, rock deformation gradually transitions from brittle, where earthquakes occur, to ductile, with tremor occurring in the transitional region. The physics of deformation in the transition region remain poorly constrained, limiting our basic understanding of tremor and its relation to earthquakes. We combine field and laboratory observations with a physical friction model comprised of brittle and ductile components, and use the model to provide constraints on the friction and stress state in the lower crust. A phase diagram is constructed that characterizes under what conditions all faulting behaviors occur, including earthquakes, tremor, silent transient slip, and steady sliding. Our results show that tremor occurs over a range of ductile and brittle frictional strengths, and advances our understanding of the physical conditions at which tremor and earthquakes take place.

  3. Analytical Solutions for Corrosion-Induced Cohesive Concrete Cracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hua-Peng Chen

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a new analytical model to study the evolution of radial cracking around a corroding steel reinforcement bar embedded in concrete. The concrete cover for the corroding rebar is modelled as a thick-walled cylinder subject to axisymmetrical displacement constraint at the internal boundary generated by expansive corrosion products. A bilinear softening curve reflecting realistic concrete property, together with the crack band theory for concrete fracture, is applied to model the residual tensile stress in the cracked concrete. A governing equation for directly solving the crack width in cover concrete is established for the proposed analytical model. Closed-form solutions for crack width are then obtained at various stages during the evolution of cracking in cover concrete. The propagation of crack front with corrosion progress is studied, and the time to cracking on concrete cover surface is predicted. Mechanical parameters of the model including residual tensile strength, reduced tensile stiffness, and radial pressure at the bond interface are investigated during the evolution of cover concrete cracking. Finally, the analytical predictions are examined by comparing with the published experimental data, and mechanical parameters are analysed with the progress of reinforcement corrosion and through the concrete cover.

  4. Flexural Cracking Behavior Of Steel Fiber Reinforced Concrete Beams

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashraf Abdalkader

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Steel fibers are added to concrete due to its ability to improve the tensile strength and control propagation of cracks in reinforced concrete members. Steel fiber reinforced concrete is made of cement fine water and coarse aggregate in addition to steel fibers. In this experimental work flexural cracking behavior of reinforced concrete beams contains different percentage of hooked-end steel fibers with length of 50 mm and equivalent diameter of 0.5 mm was studied. The beams were tested under third-point loading test at 28 days. First cracking load maximum crack width cracks number and load-deflection relations were investigated to evaluate the flexural cracking behavior of concrete beams with 34 MPa target mean strength. Workability wet density compressive and splitting tensile strength were also investigated. The results showed that the flexural crack width is significantly reduced with the addition of steel fibers. Fiber contents of 1.0 resulted in 81 reduction in maximum crack width compared to control concrete without fiber. The results also showed that the first cracking load and maximum load are increased with the addition of steel fibers.

  5. Analysis of Fatigue Crack Growth in Ship Structural Details

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leheta Heba W.

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Fatigue failure avoidance is a goal that can be achieved only if the fatigue design is an integral part of the original design program. The purpose of fatigue design is to ensure that the structure has adequate fatigue life. Calculated fatigue life can form the basis for meaningful and efficient inspection programs during fabrication and throughout the life of the ship. The main objective of this paper is to develop an add-on program for the analysis of fatigue crack growth in ship structural details. The developed program will be an add-on script in a pre-existing package. A crack propagation in a tanker side connection is analyzed by using the developed program based on linear elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM and finite element method (FEM. The basic idea of the developed application is that a finite element model of this side connection will be first analyzed by using ABAQUS and from the results of this analysis the location of the highest stresses will be revealed. At this location, an initial crack will be introduced to the finite element model and from the results of the new crack model the direction of the crack propagation and the values of the stress intensity factors, will be known. By using the calculated direction of propagation a new segment will be added to the crack and then the model is analyzed again. The last step will be repeated until the calculated stress intensity factors reach the critical value.

  6. Cuttability Assessment of Selected Rocks Through Different Brittleness Values

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dursun, Arif Emre; Gokay, M. Kemal

    2016-04-01

    Prediction of cuttability is a critical issue for successful execution of tunnel or mining excavation projects. Rock cuttability is also used to determine specific energy, which is defined as the work done by the cutting force to excavate a unit volume of yield. Specific energy is a meaningful inverse measure of cutting efficiency, since it simply states how much energy must be expended to excavate a unit volume of rock. Brittleness is a fundamental rock property and applied in drilling and rock excavation. Brittleness is one of the most crucial rock features for rock excavation. For this reason, determination of relations between cuttability and brittleness will help rock engineers. This study aims to estimate the specific energy from different brittleness values of rocks by means of simple and multiple regression analyses. In this study, rock cutting, rock property, and brittleness index tests were carried out on 24 different rock samples with different strength values, including marble, travertine, and tuff, collected from sites around Konya Province, Turkey. Four previously used brittleness concepts were evaluated in this study, denoted as B 1 (ratio of compressive to tensile strength), B 2 (ratio of the difference between compressive and tensile strength to the sum of compressive and tensile strength), B 3 (area under the stress-strain line in relation to compressive and tensile strength), and B 9 = S 20, the percentage of fines (Brazilian tensile, and point load strengths of rocks using multiple regression analysis). The results suggest that the proposed simple regression-based prediction models including B 3, B 9, and B 9p outperform the other models including B 1 and B 2 and can be used for more accurate and reliable estimation of specific energy.

  7. Application of the cracked pipe element to creep crack growth prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brochard, J.; Charras, T. [C.E.A.-C.E.-Saclay DRN/DMT, Gif Sur Yvette (France); Ghoudi, M. [C.E.A.-C.E.-Saclay, Gif Sur Yvette (France)

    1997-04-01

    Modifications to a computer code for ductile fracture assessment of piping systems with postulated circumferential through-wall cracks under static or dynamic loading are very briefly described. The modifications extend the capabilities of the CASTEM2000 code to the determination of fracture parameters under creep conditions. The main advantage of the approach is that thermal loads can be evaluated as secondary stresses. The code is applicable to piping systems for which crack propagation predictions differ significantly depending on whether thermal stresses are considered as primary or secondary stresses.

  8. Analysis of Fatigue Crack Paths in Cold Drawn Pearlitic Steel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesús Toribio

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a fracto-metallographic analysis was performed on the cracked specimens of cold drawn pearlitic steel subjected to fatigue tests. Fatigue cracks are transcollonial and exhibit a preference for fracturing pearlitic lamellae, with non-uniform crack opening displacement values, micro-discontinuities, branchings, bifurcations and frequent local deflections that create microstructural roughness. At the micro-level, the cold drawn pearlitic steel exhibits higher micro-roughness than the hot rolled bar (this is a consequence of the manufacturing process by cold drawing, so that the actual fractured surface in the cold drawn wire is greater than that in the hot rolled bar, due to the fact that the crack deflection events are more frequent and with higher angle in the former (the heavily drawn prestressing steel wire. These findings show the relevant role on the manufacturing process by cold drawing in the fatigue crack propagation in pearlitic steel.

  9. Monitoring fatigue crack growth using nonlinear ultrasonic phased array imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jingwei; Potter, Jack N.; Croxford, Anthony J.; Drinkwater, Bruce W.

    2017-05-01

    Nonlinear imaging techniques have recently emerged which have the potential to detect material degradation and challenging defects, such as closed cracks. This paper describes an investigation into the performance of nonlinear ultrasonic imaging (NUI) for the monitoring of the early stages of fatigue crack growth. This technique, in conjunction with conventional array imaging, is applied to the periodic monitoring of steel compact tension specimens subjected to high cycle fatigue loading. The detection limits of these techniques are investigated. Their abilities to localise and detect small cracks are further quantified with the aid of micrography. The results suggest that NUI is more sensitive than conventional ultrasonic imaging to the microscale changes occurring at the early stages of failure, i.e. detectability starts c. 15% of fatigue life. In addition to early detection, the potential for NUI to deliver accurate sizing of fatigue cracks and monitor crack propagation is also presented.

  10. Assisted crack tip flipping under Mode I thin sheet tearing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Felter, Christian Lotz; Nielsen, Kim Lau

    2017-01-01

    Crack tip flipping, where the fracture surface alternates from side to side in roughly 45° shear bands, seems to be an overlooked propagation mode in Mode I thin sheet tearing. In fact, observations of crack tip flipping is rarely found in the literature. Unlike the already established modes...... such as slanting, cup-cone (rooftop), or cup-cup (bathtub) the flipping crack never settles in a steady-state as the near tip stress/strain field continuously change when the flip successively initiates and develops shear-lips. A recent experimental investigation has revealed new insight by exploiting 3D X......-ray tomography scanning of a developing crack tip flip. But, it remains to be understood what makes the crack flip systematically, what sets the flipping frequency, and under which material conditions this mode occurs. The present study aims at investigating the idea that a slight out-of-plane action (Mode III...

  11. Study of cavities in a creep crack growth test specimen

    OpenAIRE

    Jazaeri, H; Bouchard, P. J.; Hutchings, M. T.; Mamun, A. A.; Heenan, R K

    2016-01-01

    Small Angle Neutron Scattering (SANS) and Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) have been used to determine the degree of cavitation damage, of length scale 5-300 nm, associated with a creep crack grown in a compact tension specimen cut from a Type 316H stainless steel weldment. The specimen was supplied by EDF Energy as part of an extensive study of creep crack growth in the heat affected zone of reactor components. The creep crack propagates along a line 1.5 mm away from, and parallel to, the ...

  12. Numerical Determination of Crack Opening and Closure Stress Intensity Factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ricardo, Luiz Carlos Hernandes

    2009-01-01

    The present work shows the numerical determination of fatigue crack opening and closure stress intensity factors of a C(T) specimen under variable amplitude loading using a finite element method. A half compact tension C(T) specimen, assuming plane stress constraint was used by finite element...... method covering the effects in two-dimensional (2D) small scale yielding models of fatigue crack growth under modified wind turbine standard spectrum loading WISPER. The crack propagation of the finite element model was based on release nodes in the minimum loads to minimize convergence problems...

  13. Investigation of welding crack in micro laser welded NiTiNb shape memory alloy and Ti6Al4V alloy dissimilar metals joints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuhua, Chen; Yuqing, Mao; Weiwei, Lu; Peng, He

    2017-06-01

    Dissimilar metals of NiTiNb shape memory alloy and Ti6Al4V alloy with a same thickness of 0.2 mm were joined by micro laser welding. The effect of laser power on crack sensitivity of the weld was investigated. The results show that full penetrated welds are obtained when the laser power of 7.2 W is used, many cracks are observed in the weld. With increasing the laser power to 12 W, the number of all cracks and cracking width first increase and then decrease. By XRD analysis, three different kinds of Ti2Ni, NbNi3 and AlNbTi2 intermetallic compounds are found in the weld. According to the formation enthalpy and binary phase diagram, brittle Ti2Ni phase with more contents is existed in the weld due to final solidification, and which is the main reason of crack formation along with large stress concentration. Moreover, the welding cracks like the weld center longitudinal solidification cracks, weld metal toe transversal liquid cracks, heat-affected-zone hot cracks and crater cracks are classified in the laser welded joints. A brittle cleavage fracture with cleavage planes and river patterns in the joints is presented from the fracture surface.

  14. Fault Feature Analysis of a Cracked Gear Coupled Rotor System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Ma

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering the misalignment of gear root circle and base circle and accurate transition curve, an improved mesh stiffness model for healthy gear is proposed, and it is validated by comparison with the finite element method. On the basis of the improved method, a mesh stiffness model for a cracked gear pair is built. Then a finite element model of a cracked gear coupled rotor system in a one-stage reduction gear box is established. The effects of crack depth, width, initial position, and crack propagation direction on gear mesh stiffness, fault features in time domain and frequency domain, and statistical indicators are investigated. Moreover, fault features are also validated by experiment. The results show that the improved mesh stiffness model is more accurate than the traditional mesh stiffness model. When the tooth root crack appears, distinct impulses are found in time domain vibration responses, and sidebands appear in frequency domain. Amplitudes of all the statistical indicators ascend gradually with the growth of crack depth and width, decrease with the increasing crack initial position angle, and firstly increase and then decrease with the growth of propagation direction angle.

  15. Standard test method for measurement of creep crack growth times in metals

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2007-01-01

    1.1 This test method covers the determination of creep crack growth (CCG) in metals at elevated temperatures using pre-cracked specimens subjected to static or quasi-static loading conditions. The time (CCI), t0.2 to an initial crack extension δai = 0.2 mm from the onset of first applied force and creep crack growth rate, ˙a or da/dt is expressed in terms of the magnitude of creep crack growth relating parameters, C* or K. With C* defined as the steady state determination of the crack tip stresses derived in principal from C*(t) and Ct (1-14). The crack growth derived in this manner is identified as a material property which can be used in modeling and life assessment methods (15-25). 1.1.1 The choice of the crack growth correlating parameter C*, C*(t), Ct, or K depends on the material creep properties, geometry and size of the specimen. Two types of material behavior are generally observed during creep crack growth tests; creep-ductile (1-14) and creep-brittle (26-37). In creep ductile materials, where cr...

  16. Short review: Potential impact of delamination cracks on fracture toughness of structural materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    X.C. Arnoult

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The current energy policy envisages extended lifetime for the current nuclear power plants (GEN II NPP. This policy imposes a large research effort to understand the ageing of power plant components. In this goal, it is necessary to improve knowledge about safety, reliability and components’ integrity for more than forty years of operation. In Central and Eastern Europe, the majority of NPPs are VVER types, where some of the components are produced from austenitic steel 08Ch18N10T. Irradiated 08Ch18N10T may exhibit brittle behavior, namely delamination cracks are found in some cases on the fracture surface of irradiated 08Ch18N10T with elongated δ-ferrite. Delamination cracks have also been observed on the fracture surface of high-strength steels or aluminum-lithium alloys. This article presents a state-of-the art review to provide a detailed analysis of the influence of delamination cracks on the toughness of metal alloys. In general, the delamination cracks are present in metal alloys having a high texture and microstructure anisotropy. Three types of delamination cracks have been observed and are classified as crack arrester delamination, crack divider delamination and crack splitting delamination. The microscopy characterization, 3D fracture theories and computational studies explaining possible causes and effects of delamination cracks on the mechanical properties of metal alloys are presented.

  17. Interfacial crack arrest in sandwich beams subjected to fatigue loading using a novel crack arresting device – Numerical modelling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martakos, G.; Andreasen, J.H.; Berggreen, Christian

    2017-01-01

    fatigue test study. Based on a linear elastic fracture mechanics approach, the developed FE model is utilised to simulate crack propagation and arrest in foam-cored sandwich beam specimens subjected to fatigue loading conditions. The effect of the crack arresters on the fatigue life is analysed......A novel crack arresting device is implemented in foam-cored composite sandwich beams and tested using the Sandwich Tear Test (STT) configuration. A finite element model of the setup is developed, and the predictions are correlated with observations and results from a recently conducted experimental......, and the predictive results are subsequently compared with the observations from the previously conducted fatigue tests. The FE model predicts the energy release rate and the mode mixity based on the derived crack surface displacements, utilising algorithms for the prediction of accelerated fatigue crack growth...

  18. Relaxation cracking in the process industry, an underestimated problem

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wortel, J.C. van [TNO Institute of Industrial Technology, Apeldoorn (Netherlands)

    1998-12-31

    Austenitic components, operating between 500 and 750 deg C, can fail within 1 year service while the ordinary mechanical properties after failure are still within the code requirements. The intergranular brittle failures are situated in the welded or cold deformed areas. This type of cracking has many names, showing the uncertainty concerning the mechanism for the (catastrophical) failures. A just finished investigation showed that it is a relaxation crack problem, introduced by manufacturing processes, especially welding and cold rolling. Cracking/failures can be expected after only 0.1- 0.2 % relaxation strain. These low strain values can already be generated during relaxation of the welding stresses. Especially coarse grained `age hardening` materials are susceptible. Stabilising and Postweld Heat Treatments are very effective to avoid relaxation crack problems during operation. After these heat treatments the components can withstand more than 2 % relaxation strain. At temperatures between 500 and 750 deg C relaxation cracking is the predominant factor for the safety and lifetime of welded austenitic components. (orig.) 12 refs.

  19. Effective Thermal Conductivity of Graphite Materials with Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pestchaanyi, S. E.; Landman, I. S.

    The dependence of effective thermal diffusivity on temperature caused by volumetric cracks is modelled for macroscopic graphite samples using the three-dimensional thermomechanics code Pegasus-3D. At high off-normal heat loads typical of the divertor armour, thermostress due to the anisotropy of graphite grains is much larger than that due to the temperature gradient. Numerical simulation demonstrated that the volumetric crack density both in fine grain graphites and in the CFC matrix depends mainly on the local sample temperature, not on the temperature gradient. This allows to define an effective thermal diffusivity for graphite with cracks. The results obtained are used to explain intense cracking and particle release from carbon based materials under electron beam heat load. Decrease of graphite thermal diffusivity with increase of the crack density explains particle release mechanism in the experiments with CFC where a clear energy threshold for the onset of particle release has been observed in J. Linke et al. Fusion Eng. Design, in press, Bazyler et al., these proceedings. Surface temperature measurement is necessary to calibrate the Pegasus-3D code for simulation of ITER divertor armour brittle destruction.

  20. Prediction of non-brittle fracture in the welded joint of C-Mn steel in the brittle-ductile transition domain; Prediction de la non-rupture fragile dans un joint soude en acier C-Mn dans le domaine de la transition fragile/ductile

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen, Thai Ha

    2009-11-15

    This work concerns the nuclear safety, specifically the secondary circuit integrity of pressurized water reactors (PWR). The problem is that of the fracture of a thin tubular structure in ferritic steel with many welded joints. The ferritic steel and weld present a brittle/ductile tenacity transition. Moreover, the welds present geometry propitious to the appearance of fatigue cracks, due to vibrations and expansions. These cracks may cause the complete fracture of the structure. The objectives of this work are to establish a criterion of non-fracture by cleavage of thin welded structures in ferritic steel, applicable to actual structures. Therefore, the present study focuses on the fracture behaviour of welded thin structures in brittle/ductile transition. It aims at developing the threshold stress model initially proposed by Chapuliot, to predict the non-brittle-fracture of this welded structure. The model is identified for the welded joint in C-Mn steel for nuclear construction, specifically in the upper part of the transition. A threshold stress, below which the cleavage cannot take place, is identified using tensile tests at low temperature on axis-symmetrical notched specimens taken in welded joint. This threshold stress is used to define the threshold volume where the maximum principal stress exceeds the threshold stress during the test. The analysis by SEM of specimen fracture surfaces shows that the gross solidification molten zone in the weld is the most likely to cleave. The relation between the brittle fracture probability and the threshold volume in the gross solidification molten zone is established via a sensitivity function, using multi-materials simulations. The model thus identified is tested for the prediction of non-brittle-fracture of SENT specimens taken in the welded joint and tested in tension. The results obtained are encouraging with regards to the transferability of the model to the actual structure. (author)

  1. FASTRAN II - FATIGUE CRACK GROWTH STRUCTURAL ANALYSIS (UNIX VERSION)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Newman, J. C.

    1994-01-01

    Predictions of fatigue crack growth behavior can be made with the Fatigue Crack Growth Structural Analysis (FASTRAN II) computer program. As cyclic loads are applied to a selected crack configuration with an initial crack size, FASTRAN II predicts crack growth as a function of cyclic load history until either a desired crack size is reached or failure occurs. FASTRAN II is based on plasticity-induced crack-closure behavior of cracks in metallic materials and accounts for load-interaction effects, such as retardation and acceleration, under variable-amplitude loading. The closure model is based on the Dugdale model with modifications to allow plastically deformed material to be left along the crack surfaces as the crack grows. Plane stress and plane strain conditions, as well as conditions between these two, can be simulated in FASTRAN II by using a constraint factor on tensile yielding at the crack front to approximately account for three-dimensional stress states. FASTRAN II contains seventeen predefined crack configurations (standard laboratory fatigue crack growth rate specimens and many common crack configurations found in structures); and the user can define one additional crack configuration. The baseline crack growth rate properties (effective stress-intensity factor against crack growth rate) may be given in either equation or tabular form. For three-dimensional crack configurations, such as surface cracks or corner cracks at holes or notches, the fatigue crack growth rate properties may be different in the crack depth and crack length directions. Final failure of the cracked structure can be modelled with fracture toughness properties using either linear-elastic fracture mechanics (brittle materials), a two-parameter fracture criterion (brittle to ductile materials), or plastic collapse (extremely ductile materials). The crack configurations in FASTRAN II can be subjected to either constant-amplitude, variable-amplitude or spectrum loading. The applied

  2. Anisotropic Cracking of Nanocrystal Superlattices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diroll, Benjamin T; Ma, Xuedan; Wu, Yaoting; Murray, Christopher B

    2017-10-11

    The synthesis colloidal nanocrystals in nonpolar organic solvents has led to exceptional size- and shape-control, enabling the formation of nanocrystal superlattices isostructural to atomic lattices built with nanocrystals rather than atoms. The long aliphatic ligands (e.g., oleic acid) used to achieve this control separate nanocrystals too far in the solid state for most charge-transporting devices. Solid-state ligand exchange, which brings particles closer together and enhances conductivity, necessitates large changes in the total volume of the solid (compressive stress), which leads to film cracking. In this work, truncate octahedral lead selenide nanocrystals are shown to self-assemble into body-centered cubic superlattices in which the atomic axes of the individual nanocrystals are coaligned with the crystal axes of the superlattice. Due to this coalignment, upon ligand exchange of the superlattices, cracking is preferentially observed on ⟨011⟩ superlattice directions. This observation is related to differences in the ligand binding to exposed {100} and {111} planes of the PbSe nanocrystal surfaces. This result has implications for binary and more complex structures in which differential reactivity of the constituent elements can lead to disruption of the desired structure. In addition, cracks in PbSe superlattices occur in a semiregular spacings inversely related to the superlattice domain size and strongly influenced by the presence of twin boundaries, which serve as both emission centers and propagation barriers for fractures. This work shows that defects, similar to behavior in nanotwinned metals, could be used to engineer enhanced mechanical strength and electrical conductivity in nanocrystal superlattices.

  3. Crack and Kids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Besharov, Douglas J.

    1990-01-01

    Reviews problems of crack-addicted babies. Suggests the following areas for grant support: (1) results of fetal exposure; (2) medical treatment and foster care for newborns; (3) research on behavioral changes resulting from crack use; (4) public awareness materials; (5) education for addicted mothers who keep their babies; and (6) removing babies…

  4. Updating a cracked database

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S. Idreos (Stratos); M.L. Kersten (Martin); S. Manegold (Stefan)

    2007-01-01

    textabstractA cracked database is a datastore continuously reorganized based on operations being executed. For each query, the data of interest is physically reclustered to speed-up future access to the same, overlapping or even disjoint data. This way, a cracking DBMS self-organizes and adapts

  5. Models for Ductile and Brittle Fracture for Two-Dimensional Wave Propagation Calculations

    Science.gov (United States)

    1975-02-01

    o r —* M M recce c ♦ ♦ ♦ ♦ >UJ UJU UJ IT— * r- * a i»- * ♦ — c * •> ^ « «V M M —fM - « fv. m *v o c e c C C c cc ♦ • • ♦ ♦ J...n ■* tr * «»c ir ir V U.’ U.’U. lu IT d* at UJU ’ Ui ki «*■ c « 9 « C - ^ c -• r* r — c — — fw (V (\\. rv 7CCCCCCCC c» ♦♦♦♦••♦ VUtU

  6. Steady-state, elastic-plastic growth of slanted cracks in symmetrically loaded plates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Kim Lau; Hutchinson, J. W.

    2017-01-01

    Elastic and elastic-plastic results are obtained for a semi-infinite slanted through-crack propagating in a symmetrically loaded plate strip with the aim of providing theoretical background to commonly observed plate tearing behavior. Were it is not for the slant of the crack through the thickness...... of the plate, the problem would be mode I, but due to the slant the local conditions along the crack front are a combination of mode I and mode III. A three-dimensional formulation for steady-state crack propagation is employed to generate distributions of effective stress, stress triaxiality and Lode...... parameter through the plate in the plastic zone at the crack tip. The distribution of the mode I and mode III stress intensity factors along the crack front are obtained for the elastic problem. The out-of-plane bending constraint imposed on the plate significantly influences the mixed mode behavior along...

  7. Fracture mechanics applied to the machining of brittle materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiatt, G.D.; Strenkowski, J.S.

    1988-12-01

    Research has begun on incorporating fracture mechanics into a model of the orthogonal cutting of brittle materials. Residual stresses are calculated for the machined material by a combination of Eulerian and Lagrangian finite element models and then used in the calculation of stress intensity factors by the Green`s Function Method.

  8. Continuous intraperitoneal insulin infusion in patients with 'brittle' diabetes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    DeVries, J H; Eskes, S A; Snoek, Frank J

    2002-01-01

    AIMS: To evaluate the effects of continuous intraperitoneal insulin infusion (CIPII) using implantable pumps on glycaemic control and duration of hospital stay in poorly controlled 'brittle' Dutch diabetes patients, and to assess their current quality of life. METHODS: Thirty-three patients were...

  9. Analytical model of micromachining of brittle materials with sharp particles

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moktadir, Z.; Wensink, H.; Kraft, M.

    2005-01-01

    We present an analytical model for the powder blasting of brittle materials with sharp particles. We developed a continuum equation, which describes the surface evolution during the powder blasting, into which we introduced surface energetics as the major relaxation mechanism. The experimental and

  10. Brittle deformational features of Michika Area, Hawal Basement ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Brittle deformational features of Michika Area, Hawal Basement complex, NE Nigeria. N E Bassey. Abstract. No Abstract. Global Journal of Geological Sciences Vol. 5 (1&2) 2007: pp. 51-54. http://dx.doi.org/10.4314/gjgs.v5i1.18741 · AJOL African Journals Online. HOW TO USE AJOL... for Researchers · for Librarians ...

  11. Quantitative acoustic emission monitoring of fatigue cracks in fracture critical steel bridges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this research is to evaluate the feasibility to employ quantitative acoustic : emission (AE) techniques for monitoring of fatigue crack initiation and propagation in steel : bridge members. Three A36 compact tension steel specimens w...

  12. Correlation Between Pin Misalignment and Crack Length in THT Solder Joints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Molnar A.

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available In this manuscript, correlations were searched for between pin misalignments relative to PCB bores and crack propagation after cyclic thermal shock tests in THT solder joints produced from lead-free solder alloys. In total, 7 compositions were examined including SAC solders with varying Ag, Cu and Ni contents. The crack propagation was initiated by cyclic thermal shock tests with 40°C / +125°C temperature profiles. Pin misalignments relative to the bores were characterized with three attributes obtained from one section of the examined solder joints. Cracks typically originated at the solder/pin or solder/bore interfaces and propagated within the solder. It was shown that pin misalignments did not have an effect on crack propagation, thus, the solder joints’ lifetime.

  13. Stress Corrosion Cracking of Zircaloy-4 in Halide Solutions: Effect of Temperature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farina S.B.

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Zircaloy-4 was found to be susceptible to stress corrosion cracking in 1 M NaCl, 1 M KBr and 1 M KI aqueous solutions at potentials above the pitting potential. In all the solutions tested crack propagation was initially intergranular and then changed to transgranular. The effect of strain rate and temperature on the SCC propagation was investigated. An increase in the strain rate was found to lead to an increase in the crack propagation rate. The crack propagation rate increases in the three solutions tested as the temperatures increases between 20 and 90 °C. The Surface-Mobility SCC mechanism accounts for the observation made in the present work, and the activation energy predicted in iodide solutions is similar to that found in the literature.

  14. Acoustic determination of cracks in welded joints. [by resonant structural vibration measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baltanoiu, M.; Criciotoiu, E.

    1974-01-01

    The acoustic analysis method permits detection of any cracks that might take place and their manner of propagation. The study deals with the cracks produced in experiments to determine the welding technology for a welded gray cast iron workpiece by using piezoelectric transducers to determine vibration acceleration.

  15. Assessment of the Efficiency of HWCon IASCC Crack Growth Rate for High Fluence BWRMaterials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teysseyre, Sebastien Paul [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This report describes the experimental study performed to assess the efficiency of hydrogen water chemistry on the propagation rate of cracks generated by irradiation assisted stress corrosion cracking in high fluence material. The selection of the material and the test procedures followed for this study are presented. The test results obtained with 8.6 dpa specimen are discussed.

  16. Effects of crack-dilatancy on Rayleigh waves in fluid-saturated ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    However, aspect (thickness to radius) ratio of (circular) cracks may not have much effect on the velocity of Rayleigh waves. The opening of surface pores may be an important reason for a faster propagation of Rayleigh waves in any realistic elastic medium. Finally, the dilatancy due to the growth of cracks up to their ...

  17. Effect of stress ratio and frequency on fatigue crack growth rate of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. Effect of stress ratio and frequency on the fatigue crack propagation of 2618 aluminium alloy– silicon carbide composite were investigated at ambient temperature. With the first set of specimens, the fatigue crack growth rates were studied at three frequencies of 1 Hz, 5 Hz and 10 Hz at a stress ratio of 0⋅1 whereas.

  18. Development of in-situ fatigue crack observing system for rotating bending fatigue testing machine

    OpenAIRE

    Lian, B.; Ueno, A; Iwashita, T

    2016-01-01

    To substitute for a traditional replication technique, an in-situ fatigue crack observing system for rotating bending testing machine has been newly developed. For verifying performance of this observing system, fatigue tests were carried out by using fatigue specimen having a small artificial defect. It is proved that this system can be detect a small fatigue crack and its propagation behavior.

  19. Fatigue Crack Growth Behavior of Stainless Steel Coated with TiN Film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukui, Satoshi; Yonekura, Daisuke; Murakami, Ri-Ichi

    In our previous study, we examined the influence of the fatigue properties of the stainless steel coated with TiN film and clarified the influence of TiN coating and the surface roughness on the fatigue property. In this study, the four point bending fatigue crack growth tests were carried out for martensitic stainless steel coated with TiN film deposited by arc ion plating method in order to investigate the effect of surface finishing on the fatigue crack behavior for film coated material. The fatigue crack growth behavior was evaluated using the replica method. As a result, the crack propagation rate of mirror polished specimens were lower than that of rough surface specimens. The crack propagation rate was especially decreased for TiN coatings deposited on the mirror polished substrate. The surface roughness near the crack initiation site increased after fatigue test. It concludes that the surface roughness of substrate influences crack propagation rate and the deposition of TiN film affected influenced crack propagation rate and fatigue strength when the surface roughness of substrate is small enough.

  20. Development of in-situ fatigue crack observing system for rotating bending fatigue testing machine

    OpenAIRE

    Lian, B.; Ueno, A; Iwashita, T

    2015-01-01

    To substitute for a traditional replication technique, an in-situ fatigue crack observing system for rotating bending testing machine has been newly developed. For verifying performance of this observing system, fatigue tests were carried out by using fatigue specimen having a small artificial defect. It is proved that this system can be detect a small fatigue crack and its propagation behavior.

  1. Destructive Examinations on Divider Plates from Decommissioned Steam Generators Affected by Superficial Stress Corrosion Cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miloudi, Salem; Firmin, Erwan; Deforge, Damien; Vaillant, François; Lemaire, Emmanuel

    Stress Corrosion Cracking of nickel alloys has been a major concern for all the Nuclear Power Plants over the last forty years. Since 2002, some cases of Stress Corrosion Cracking (SCC) have been reported on Steam Generator (SG) Divider Plates. However, evidence of propagation following the first detection has never been observed (based on nearly one hundred in-service inspections).

  2. Effect of stress ratio and frequency on fatigue crack growth rate of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Effect of stress ratio and frequency on the fatigue crack propagation of 2618 aluminium alloy–silicon carbide composite were investigated at ambient temperature. With the first set of specimens, the fatigue crack growth rates were studied at three frequencies of 1 Hz, 5 Hz and 10 Hz at a stress ratio of 0.1 whereas the effects ...

  3. Evolution Procedure of Multiple Rock Cracks under Seepage Pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taoying Liu

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available In practical geotechnical engineering, most of rock masses with multiple cracks exist in water environment. Under such circumstance, these adjacent cracks could interact with each other. Moreover, the seepage pressure, produced by the high water pressure, can change cracks’ status and have an impact on the stress state of fragile rocks. According to the theory of fracture mechanics, this paper discusses the law of crack initiation and the evolution law of stress intensity factor at the tip of a wing crack caused by compression-shear stress and seepage pressure. Subsequently, considering the interaction of the wing cracks and the additional stress caused by rock bridge damage, this paper proposes the intensity factor evolution equation under the combined action of compression-shear stress and seepage pressure. In addition, this paper analyzes the propagation of cracks under different seepage pressure which reveals that the existence of seepage pressure facilitates the wing crack’s growth. The result indicates that the high seepage pressure converts wing crack growth from stable form to unstable form. Meanwhile, based on the criterion and mechanism for crack initiation and propagation, this paper puts forward the mechanical model for different fracture transfixion failure modes of the crag bridge under the combined action of seepage pressure and compression-shear stress. At the last part, this paper, through investigating the flexibility tensor of the rock mass’s initial damage and its damage evolution in terms of jointed rock mass's damage mechanics, deduces the damage evolution equation for the rock mass with multiple cracks under the combined action of compression-shear stress and seepage pressure. The achievement of this investigation provides a reliable theoretical principle for quantitative research of the fractured rock mass failure under seepage pressure.

  4. Edge cracks in nickel and aluminium single crystals: A molecular dynamics study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, Sagar, E-mail: sagarc@barc.gov.in; Chavan, V. M.; Patel, R. J. [Refueling Technology Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India); Samal, M. K. [Reactor Safety Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Mumbai-400085 (India)

    2016-05-23

    A molecular dynamics study of edge cracks in Ni and Al single crystals under mode-I loading conditions is presented. Simulations are performed using embedded-atom method potentials for Ni and Al at a temperature of 0.5 K. The results reveal that Ni and Al show different fracture mechanisms. Overall failure behavior of Ni is brittle, while fracture in Al proceeds through void nucleation and coalescence with a zig-zag pattern of crack growth. The qualitative nature of results is discussed in the context of vacancy-formation energies and surface energies of the two FCC metals.

  5. Minimum shear stress range: a criterion for crack path determination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, K.; Abdel Wahab, M.

    2017-05-01

    For problems under proportional mixed-mode conditions, various criteria are used to predict fatigue crack growth directions, most achieving reasonable accuracy. The crack propagation angle is often obtained by maximizing a quantity (for instance, energy or stresses) as function of the stress intensity factors KI and KII. This maximization is generally performed at the instant of maximum fatigue loading and a stress analysis at this instant is sufficient to predict the crack propagation angle and thus the fatigue crack growth direction. However, under non-proportional loading, the maximum values of KI and KII may occur at different instants of the fatigue cycle and so a simple analysis at the maximum loading instant is not appropriate; it is necessary to consider the entire loading cycle history. One possible criterion to treat problems under these circumstances is the minimum shear stress range criterion (MSSR). This paper presents a brief discussion of the most common criteria used for determination of crack propagation direction, focusing on an implementation of MSSR. Its performance is assessed in different conditions and the results are compared to literature data.

  6. Wave Propagation

    CERN Document Server

    Ferrarese, Giorgio

    2011-01-01

    Lectures: A. Jeffrey: Lectures on nonlinear wave propagation.- Y. Choquet-Bruhat: Ondes asymptotiques.- G. Boillat: Urti.- Seminars: D. Graffi: Sulla teoria dell'ottica non-lineare.- G. Grioli: Sulla propagazione del calore nei mezzi continui.- T. Manacorda: Onde nei solidi con vincoli interni.- T. Ruggeri: "Entropy principle" and main field for a non linear covariant system.- B. Straughan: Singular surfaces in dipolar materials and possible consequences for continuum mechanics

  7. An analysis of crack evolution of a 12Cr13 stainless steel during forging process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-min Guo

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The analysis of an abnormal crack of a forging plate is presented in this work. The crack was found after forging process. Macro-analysis, SEM, composition inspection, metallographic analysis, inclusion analysis, EPMA and EDS were implemented. SEM shows that cleavage fracture is the main feature of the fracture surface, according to which it can be decided that the fracture is brittle fracture. XRF and carbon and sulphur analyzer indicate regular composition condition of the plate. EPMA and EDS suggest phosphorus segregation spread a lot around the crack. The results indicate that: brittleness caused by phosphorus segregation around crack zone is the main reason that cracks generate in the 12Cr13 steel during forging. As all we know, phosphorus has deleterious effect on toughness of steel because of its enrichment on grain boundaries, which can weaken the bond strength of grain boundary. Its existence should be avoided and microstructure of the steel should be homogeneous when good plasticity and toughness are wanted.

  8. Thermal–stress analysis on the crack formation of tungsten during fusion relevant transient heat loads

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changjun Li

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available In the future fusion devices, ELMs-induced transient heat flux may lead to the surface cracking of tungsten (W based plasma-facing materials (PFMs. In theory, the cracking is related to the material fracture toughness and the thermal stress-strain caused by transient heat flux. In this paper, a finite element model was successfully built to realize a theoretical semi infinite space. The temperature and stress-strain distribution as well as evolution of W during a single heating-cooling cycle of transient heat flux were simulated and analyzed. It showed that the generation of plastic deformation during the brittle temperature range between room temperature and DBTT (ductile to brittle transition temperature, ∼400 °C caused the cracking of W during the cooling phase. The cracking threshold for W under transient heat flux was successfully obtained by finite element analysis, to some extent, in consistent with the similar experimental results. Both the heat flux factors (FHF = P·t0.5 and the maximum surface temperatures at cracking thresholds were almost invariant for the transient heat fluxes with different pulse widths and temporal distributions. This method not only identified the theoretical conclusion but also obtained the detail values for W with actual temperature-dependent properties.

  9. The contribution of activated processes to Q. [stress corrosion cracking in seismic wave attenuation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spetzler, H. A.; Getting, I. C.; Swanson, P. L.

    1980-01-01

    The possible role of activated processes in seismic attenuation is investigated. In this study, a solid is modeled by a parallel and series configuration of dashpots and springs. The contribution of stress and temperature activated processes to the long term dissipative behavior of this system is analyzed. Data from brittle rock deformation experiments suggest that one such process, stress corrosion cracking, may make a significant contribution to the attenuation factor, Q, especially for long period oscillations under significant tectonic stress.

  10. Static and dynamic crack toughness of brazed joints of Inconel 718 nickel-base alloy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weiss, B.Z. (Technion-Israel Inst. of Tech., Haifa); Steffens, H.D.; Englehart, A.H.; Wielage, B.

    1979-10-01

    The crack toughness of brazed joints of Inconel 718 nickel-base alloy was investigated at different strain rates. The brazing filler metal used was BNi5. The results were compared with those obtained on specimens made of the base material. The brazed joints were heat-treated after the brazing process in order to achieve a desirable distribution of the brittle phases in the joint.

  11. Analysis of acoustic emission waveforms from fatigue cracks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhuiyan, Md. Yeasin; Bao, Jingjing; Poddar, Banibrata; Giurgiutiu, Victor

    2017-04-01

    Acoustic emission (AE) monitoring technique is a well-known approach in the field of NDE/SHM. AE monitoring from the defect formation and failure in the materials were well studied by the researchers. However, conventional AE monitoring techniques are predominantly based on statistical analysis. In this study we focus on understanding the AE waveforms from the fatigue crack growth using physics based approach. The growth of the fatigue crack causes the acoustic emission in the material that propagates in the structure. One of the main challenges of this approach is to develop the physics based understanding of the AE source itself. The acoustic emission happens not only from the crack growth but also from the interaction of the crack lips during fatigue loading of the materials. As the waveforms are generated from the AE event, they propagate and create local vibration modes along the crack faces. Fatigue experiments were performed to generate the fatigue cracks. Several test specimens were used in the fatigue experiments and corresponding AE waveforms were captured. The AE waveforms were analyzed and distinguished into different groups based on the similar nature on both time domain and frequency domain. The experimental results are explained based on the physical observation of the specimen.

  12. Brittle nail syndrome: a pathogenesis-based approach with a proposed grading system.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kerkhof, P.C.M. van de; Pasch, M.C.; Scher, R.K.; Kerscher, M.; Gieler, U.; Haneke, E.; Fleckman, P.

    2005-01-01

    Brittle nail syndrome is a heterogeneous abnormality, characterized by increased fragility of the nail plate. Brittle nails affect about 20% of the population and women are affected twice as frequently as men. The vast majority of patients experience brittle nails as a significant cosmetic problem

  13. The influence of a brittle Cr interlayer on the deformation behavior of thin Cu films on flexible substrates: Experiment and model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Vera M; Toth, Florian; Wiesinger, Andreas; Berger, Julia; Kirchlechner, Christoph; Cordill, Megan J; Fischer, Franz D; Rammerstorfer, Franz G; Dehm, Gerhard

    2015-05-01

    Thin metal films deposited on polymer substrates are used in flexible electronic devices such as flexible displays or printed memories. They are often fabricated as complicated multilayer structures. Understanding the mechanical behavior of the interface between the metal film and the substrate as well as the process of crack formation under global tension is important for producing reliable devices. In the present work, the deformation behavior of copper films (50-200 nm thick), bonded to polyimide directly or via a 10 nm chromium interlayer, is investigated by experimental analysis and computational simulations. The influence of the various copper film thicknesses and the usage of a brittle interlayer on the crack density as well as on the stress magnitude in the copper after saturation of the cracking process are studied with in situ tensile tests in a synchrotron and under an atomic force microscope. From the computational point of view, the evolution of the crack pattern is modeled as a stochastic process via finite element based cohesive zone simulations. Both, experiments and simulations show that the chromium interlayer dominates the deformation behavior. The interlayer forms cracks that induce a stress concentration in the overlying copper film. This behavior is more pronounced in the 50 nm than in the 200 nm copper films.

  14. Statistical model of stress corrosion cracking based on extended ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2016-09-07

    Sep 7, 2016 ... Abstract. In the previous paper (Pramana – J. Phys. 81(6), 1009 (2013)), the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) based on non-quadratic form of Dirichlet energy was proposed and its statistical features were discussed. Following those results, we discuss here how SCC propagates on pipe wall ...

  15. Statistical model of stress corrosion cracking based on extended ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the previous paper ({\\it Pramana – J. Phys.} 81(6), 1009 (2013)), the mechanism of stress corrosion cracking (SCC) based on non-quadratic form of Dirichlet energy was proposed and its statistical features were discussed. Following those results, we discuss here how SCC propagates on pipe wall statistically. It reveals ...

  16. Stereological characterization of crack path transitions in ceramic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Unknown

    Abstract. All ceramic composites involve a mismatch in physical properties the extent of which differs from one composite to another. Mismatch in thermal expansion (∆α) and elastic modulus (∆Ε) is known to produce stresses that influence the path of a propagating crack. Thus, the relative effect of thermal and elastic mis-.

  17. A grain boundary sliding model for cavitation, crack growth and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A model is presented for cavity growth, crack propagation and fracture resulting from grain boundary sliding (GBS) during high temperature creep deformation. The theory of cavity growth by GBS was based on energy balance criteria on the assumption that the matrix is sufficiently plastic to accommodate misfit strains ...

  18. Stereological characterization of crack path transitions in ceramic ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    In the present work several model composites with different combinations of thermal and elastic mismatch have been considered. Cracks propagating at different sub-critical stress intensities (velocities) were generated by a novel indentation technique. Each indentation was performed at a constant displacement rate and a ...

  19. Reinforced Concrete Finite Element Modeling based on the Discrete Crack Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sri Tudjono

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The behavior of reinforced concrete elements is complex due to the nature of the concrete that is weak in tension. Among these complex issues are the initial cracking and crack propagation of concrete, and the bond-slip phenomenon between the concrete and reinforcing steel. Laboratory tested specimens are not only costly, but are limited in number. Therefore a finite element analysis is favored in combination to experimental data. The finite element technique involving the cracks inserting is one of the approaches to study the behavior of reinforced concrete structures through numerical simulation. In finite element modeling, the cracks can be represented by either smeared or discrete crack. The discrete crack method has its potential to include strain discontinuity within the structure. A finite element model (FEM including the concrete cracking and the bond-slip was developed to simulate the nonlinear response of reinforced concrete structures.

  20. Photogrammetric Assessment of Flexure Induced Cracking of Reinforced Concrete Beams under Service Loads

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pease, Bradley Justin; Geiker, Mette Rica; Stang, Henrik

    2006-01-01

    Reinforced concrete structures are known to crack due to restrained shrinkage, temperature gradients, application of load, and expansive reactions. Cracks provide paths for rapid ingress of moisture, chlorides, and other aggressive substances, which may affect the long-term durability...... of the structure. For example, concrete cracks located at the reinforcing steel may contribute to a rapid corrosion initiation and propagation. Previous research has shown that cracked reinforced concrete under static flexural loading may have an increased ingress of chloride ions along the reinforcement....../concrete interface. The aim of this paper is to provide a detailed description of the development of cracks in reinforced concrete under flexural load. Cracking at both realistic service load levels (1.0-1.8 times estimated cracking load) and unrealistically high service load levels (> 0.5 times beam capacity) has...